WorldWideScience

Sample records for platinum carbon catalyst

  1. Platinum catalyst formed on carbon nanotube by the in-liquid plasma method for fuel cell

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Show, Yoshiyuki; Hirai, Akira; Almowarai, Anas; Ueno, Yutaro

    2015-12-01

    In-liquid plasma was generated in the carbon nanotube (CNT) dispersion fluid using platinum electrodes. The generated plasma spattered the surface of the platinum electrodes and dispersed platinum particles into the CNT dispersion. Therefore, the platinum nanoparticles were successfully formed on the CNT surface in the dispersion. The platinum nanoparticles were applied to the proton exchange membrane fuel cell (PEMFC) as a catalyst. The electrical power of 108 mW/cm{sup 2} was observed from the fuel cell which was assembled with the platinum catalyst formed on the CNT by the in-liquid plasma method. - Highlights: • The platinum catalyst was successfully formed on the CNT surface in the dispersion by the in-liquid plasma method. • The electrical power of 108 mW/cm{sup 2} was observed from the fuel cell which was assembled with the platinum catalyst formed on the CNT by the in-liquid plasma method.

  2. Structure-activity relationships of carbon-supported platinum-bismuth and platinum-antimony oxidation catalysts

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Maphoru, MV

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Compositional and morphological studies on supported platinum are important for the improvement and expanded use of catalysts for oxidative coupling reactions. Nanocomposites consisting of 5% Pt supported on activated carbon and promoted with 5% Bi...

  3. Nano carbon supported platinum catalyst interaction behavior with perfluorosulfonic acid ionomer and their interface structures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Shuang Ma

    2016-01-01

    behavior of Nafion ionomer on platinized carbon nano fibers (CNFs), carbon nano tubes (CNTs) and amorphous carbon (Vulcan). The interaction is affected by the catalyst surface oxygen groups as well as porosity. Comparisons between the carbon supports and platinized equivalents are carried out. It reveals......The interaction between perfluorosulfonic acid ionomer and supported platinum catalyst is essential. It directly influences platinum accessibility, stability of carbon support and platinum, proton conductivity and electron conductivity in an electrode. In this study, we compare the adsorption...... that the platinization step modifies the surface nature of the carbon supports in terms of specific surface area, crystallinity and especially porosity; therefore, ionomer adsorption over carbon is not always representative for the ionomer adsorption over carbon supported catalyst, though indicative. Moreover...

  4. Low platinum catalyst and method of preparation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, Di-Jia; Chong, Lina

    2017-11-21

    A low platinum catalyst and method for making same. The catalyst comprises platinum-transition metal bimetallic alloy microcrystallites over a transition metal-nitrogen-carbon composite. A method of making a catalyst comprises preparation of transition metal organic frameworks, infusion of platinum, thermal treatment, and reduction to form the microcrystallites and composite.

  5. Oxygen reduction on carbon supported platinum catalysts in high temperature polymer electrolytes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Qingfeng, Li; Bergqvist, R. S.; Hjuler, H. A.

    1999-01-01

    Oxygen reduction on carbon supported platinum catalysts has been investigated in H3PO4, H3PO4-doped Nafion and PBI polymer electrolytes in a temperature range from 80 to 190°C. Compared with pure H3PO4, using the H3PO4 doped Nafion and PBI polymer electrolytes can significantly improve the oxygen...

  6. Oxygen reduction on carbon supported platinum catalysts in high temperature polymer electrolytes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Qingfeng, Li; Hjuler, Hans Aage; Bjerrum, Niels

    2000-01-01

    Oxygen reduction on carbon supported platinum catalysts has been investigated in H3PO4, H3PO4-doped Nafion and polybenzimidazole (PBI) polymer electrolytes in a temperature range up to 190 degrees C. Compared with pure H3PO4, the combination of H3PO4 and polymer electrolytes can significantly...... membrane fuel cell based on H3PO4-doped PBI for operation at temperatures between 150 and 200 degrees C. (C) 2000 Elsevier Science Ltd. All rights reserved....

  7. Preparation of Carbon-Platinum-Ceria and Carbon-Platinum-Cerium catalysts and its application in Polymer Electrolyte Fuel Cell: Hydrogen, Methanol, and Ethanol

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guzman Blas, Rolando Pedro

    This thesis is focused on fuel cells using hydrogen, methanol and ethanol as fuel. Also, in the method of preparation of catalytic material for the anode: Supercritical Fluid Deposition (SFD) and impregnation method using ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid (EDTA) as a chelating agent. The first part of the thesis describes the general knowledge about Hydrogen Polymer Exchange Membrane Fuel Cell (HPEMFC),Direct Methanol Fuel Cell (DMFC) and Direct Ethanol Fuel Cell (DEFC), as well as the properties of Cerium and CeO2 (Ceria). The second part of the thesis describes the preparation of catalytic material by Supercritical Fluid Deposition (SFD). SFD was utilized to deposit Pt and ceria simultaneously onto gas diffusion layers. The Pt-ceria catalyst deposited by SFD exhibited higher methanol oxidation activity compared to the platinum catalyst alone. The linear sweep traces of the cathode made for the methanol cross over study indicate that Pt-Ceria/C as the anode catalyst, due to its better activity for methanol, improves the fuel utilization, minimizing the methanol permeation from anode to cathode compartment. The third and fourth parts of the thesis describe the preparation of material catalytic material Carbon-Platinum-Cerium by a simple and cheap impregnation method using EDTA as a chelating agent to form a complex with cerium (III). This preparation method allows the mass production of the material catalysts without additional significant cost. Fuel cell polarization and power curves experiments showed that the Carbon-Platinum-Cerium anode materials exhibited better catalytic activity than the only Vulcan-Pt catalysts for DMFC, DEFC and HPEMFC. In the case of Vulcan-20%Pt-5%w Cerium, this material exhibits better catalytic activity than the Vulcan-20%Pt in DMFC. In the case of Vulcan-40% Pt-doped Cerium, this material exhibits better catalytic activity than the Vulcan-40% Pt in DMFC, DEFC and HPEMFC. Finally, I propose a theory that explains the reason why the

  8. A phenyl-sulfonic acid anchored carbon-supported platinum catalyst for polymer electrolyte fuel cell electrodes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Selvarani, G.; Sahu, A.K.; Choudhury, N.A.; Sridhar, P.; Pitchumani, S.; Shukla, A.K.

    2007-01-01

    A method, to anchor phenyl-sulfonic acid functional groups with the platinum catalyst supported onto a high surface-area carbon substrate, is reported. The use of the catalyst in the electrodes of a polymer electrolyte fuel cell (PEFC) helps enhancing its performance. Characterization of the catalyst by Fourier transform infra red (FTIR) spectroscopy, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and point-of-zero-charge (PZC) studies suggests that the improvement in performance of the PEFC is facilitated not only by enlarging the three-phase boundary in the catalyst layer but also by providing ionic-conduction paths as well as by imparting negative charge to platinum sites with concomitant oxidation of sulfur present in the carbon support. It is argued that the negatively charged platinum sites help repel water facilitating oxygen to access the catalyst sites. The PEFC with modified carbon-supported platinum catalyst electrodes exhibits 40% enhancement in its power density as compared to the one with unmodified carbon-supported platinum catalyst electrodes

  9. Formation of Platinum Catalyst on Carbon Black Using an In‐Liquid Plasma Method for Fuel Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yoshiyuki Show

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Platinum (Pt catalyst was formed on the surface of carbon black using an in‐liquid plasma method. The formed Pt catalyst showed the average particle size of 4.1 nm. This Pt catalyst was applied to a polymer electrolyte membrane fuel cell (PEMFC. The PEMFC showed an open voltage of 0.85 V and a maximum output power density of 216 mW/cm2.

  10. The Reduction Reaction of Dissolved Oxygen in Water by Hydrazine over Platinum Catalyst Supported on Activated Carbon Fiber

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, K.K.; Moon, J.S. [Korea Electric Power Research Institute, Taejon (Korea)

    1999-07-01

    The reduction reaction of dissolved oxygen (DO) by hydrazine was investigated on activated carbon fiber (ACF) and Pt/ACF catalysts using a batch reactor with an external circulating loop. The ACF itself showed catalytic activity and this was further improved by supporting platinum on ACF. The catalytic role platinum is ascribed to its acceleration of hydrazine decomposition, based on electric potential and current measurements as well as the kinetic study. (author). 15 refs., 13 figs.

  11. Electrooxidation of ethanol on novel multi-walled carbon nanotube supported platinum-antimony tin oxide nanoparticle catalysts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guo, Dao-Jun [School of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, The Key Laboratory of Life-Organic Analysis, Qufu Normal University, Qufu, Shandong 273165 (China)

    2011-01-15

    We synthesize the new Pt based catalyst for direct ethanol fuel cells using novel multi-walled carbon nanotubes supported platinum-antimony tin oxide (Pt-ATO/MWCNT) nanoparticle as new catalyst support for the first time. The structure of Pt-ATO/MWCNT catalyst is characterized by transmission electron micrograph (TEM) and X-ray diffraction (XRD). The electrocatalytic properties of Pt-ATO/MWCNT catalyst for ethanol electrooxidation reactions are investigated by cyclic voltammetry (CV) and chronoamperometric experiments in acidic medium. The electrocatalytic activity for ethanol electrooxidation reaction shows that high carbon monoxide tolerance and good stability of Pt-ATO/MWCNT catalyst compared with Pt-SnO{sub 2}/MWCNT and commercial Pt/C are observed. These results imply that Pt-ATO/MWCNT catalyst has promising potential applications in direct alcohol fuel cells. (author)

  12. Mesostructured platinum-free anode and carbon-free cathode catalysts for durable proton exchange membrane fuel cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cui, Xiangzhi; Shi, Jianlin; Wang, Yongxia; Chen, Yu; Zhang, Lingxia; Hua, Zile

    2014-01-01

    As one of the most important clean energy sources, proton exchange membrane fuel cells (PEMFCs) have been a topic of extensive research focus for decades. Unfortunately, several critical technique obstacles, such as the high cost of platinum electrode catalysts, performance degradation due to the CO poisoning of the platinum anode, and carbon corrosion by oxygen in the cathode, have greatly impeded its commercial development. A prototype of a single PEMFC catalyzed by a mesostructured platinum-free WO3/C anode and a mesostructured carbon-free Pt/WC cathode catalysts is reported herein. The prototype cell exhibited 93% power output of a standard PEMFC using commercial Pt/C catalysts at 50 and 70 °C, and more importantly, CO poisoning-free and carbon corrosion-resistant characters of the anode and cathode, respectively. Consequently, the prototype cell demonstrated considerably enhanced cell operation durability. The mesostructured electrode catalysts are therefore highly promising in the future development and application of PEMFCs. Copyright © 2014 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  13. Oxidative dehydrogenation of aqueous ethanol on a carbon supported platinum catalyst

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tillaart, van den J.A.A.; Kuster, B.F.M.; Marin, G.B.M.M.

    1994-01-01

    The kinetics of the selective oxidative dehydrogenation of ethanol to ethanal over a platinum on graphite catalyst with oxygen in water was investigated in a three-phase continuous stirred tank reactor by variation of temp., pH and reactant concns. No effect of the pH on the disappearance rate of

  14. Effect of glassy carbon properties on the electrochemical deposition of platinum nano-catalyst and its activity for methanol oxidation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    SANJA TERZIC

    2007-02-01

    Full Text Available The effects of the properties of glassy carbon on the deposition of platinum particles and the electrocatalytic activity of platinum supported on glassy carbon (GC/Pt for methanol oxidation in alkaline and acidic solutions were studied. Platinum was potentiostatically deposited on two glassy carbon samples, thermally treated at different temperatures, which were either polished or anodicaly polarised in acid (GCOX-AC/Pt and in alkali (GCOX-AL/Pt. Anodic polarisation of glassy carbon, either in alkaline or acidic solution, enhances the activity of both types of GC/Pt electrodes for methanol oxidation. The activity of the catalysts follows the change in the properties of the glassy carbon support upon anodic treatment. The specific activity of the GCOX-AL/Pt electrode for this reaction in alkali is increased only a few times in comparison with the activity of the GC/Pt one. On the other hand, the specific activity of the GCOX-AC/Pt electrode for methanol oxidation in acid is about one order of magnitude higher than that of the GC/Pt electrode. The role of the substrate on the properties of catalyst is discussed in detail.

  15. High utilization platinum deposition on single-walled carbon nanotubes as catalysts for direct methanol fuel cell

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, J.J.; Yin, G.P.; Zhang, J.; Wang, Z.B.; Gao, Y.Z.

    2007-01-01

    This research aims to enhance the activity of Pt catalysts, thus to lower the loading of Pt metal in fuel cell. Highly dispersed platinum supported on single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) as catalyst was prepared by ion exchange method. The homemade Pt/SWNTs underwent a repetition of ion exchange and reduction process in order to achieve an increase of the metal loading. For comparison, the similar loading of Pt catalyst supported on carbon nanotubes was prepared by borohydride reduction method. The catalysts were characterized by using energy dispersive analysis of X-ray (EDAX), transmission electron micrograph (TEM), X-ray diffraction (XRD), and X-ray photoelectron spectrum (XPS). Compared with the Pt/SWNTs catalyst prepared by borohydride method, higher Pt utilization was achieved on the SWNTs by ion exchange method. Furthermore, in comparison to the E-TEK 20 wt.% Pt/C catalyst with the support of carbon black, the results from electrochemical measurement indicated that the Pt/SWNTs prepared by ion exchange method displayed a higher catalytic activity for methanol oxidation and higher Pt utilization, while no significant increasing in the catalytic activity of the Pt/SWNTs catalyst obtained by borohydride method

  16. Platinum/ceria/alumina catalysts on microstructures for carbon monoxide conversion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Germani, G.; Schuurman, Y.; Mirodatos, C. [Institut de Recherches sur la Catalyse, CNRS, 2 Avenue Albert Einstein, 69626 Villeurbanne (France); Alphonse, P.; Courty, M. [CIRIMAT, UMR-CNRS 5085, Universite Paul Sabatier, 118 route de Narbonne, 31062 Toulouse Cedex 04 (France)

    2005-12-15

    Platinum/ceria/alumina catalysts have been prepared by a sol-gel method and coated in the microchannels of stainless steel platelets. These catalysts are very active for the water-gas shift reaction between 300 and 400{sup o}C. Moreover, they are non-pyrophoric and thus well suited for the purification of hydrogen for PEM fuel cells. The obtained coatings show good adherence and catalytic activity. The influence of the amount of platinum and ceria as well as the effect of a binder on the catalytic performance has been investigated. The samples have been characterized before reaction by XRD, SEM and by N{sub 2} adsorption measurements. The kinetics, free from internal diffusion limitations, over these thin films have been described by a power law rate equation. An activation energy of 86kJ/mol has been found and at 260{sup o}C the TOF corresponds to 0.6+/-0.1s{sup -1} for all investigated samples. The superior activity of the platelets compared to the powder samples is attributed to the diffusion limitations inside the powder pellets. Thus catalysts deposited on microstructured platelets lead to a better platinum utilization.

  17. Novel non-platinum metal catalyst material

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2014-01-01

    The present invention relates to a novel non-platinum metal catalyst material for use in low temperature fuel cells and electrolysers and to fuel cells and electrolysers comprising the novel non-platinum metal catalyst material. The present invention also relates to a novel method for synthesizing...... the novel non-platinum metal catalyst material....

  18. Revealing the Dynamics of Platinum Nanoparticle Catalysts on Carbon in Oxygen and Water Using Environmental TEM

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Luo, Langli [Environmental; Engelhard, Mark H. [Environmental; Shao, Yuyan [Environmental; Wang, Chongmin [Environmental

    2017-10-02

    Deactivation of supported metal nanoparticle catalysts, especially in relevant gas condition, is a critical challenge for many technological applications, including heterogeneous catalysis, electrocatalysis, fuel cells, biomedical imaging and drug delivery. It has been far more commonly realized that deactivation of catalysts stems from surface area loss due to particle coarsening, however, for which the mechanism remains largely unclear. Herein, we use aberration corrected environmental transmission electron microscopy, at atomic level, to in-situ observe the dynamics of Pt catalyst in fuel cell relevant gas conditions. Particles migration and coalescence is observed to be the dominant coarsening process. As compared with the case of H2O, O2 promotes Pt nanoparticle migration on carbon surface. Surprisingly, coating Pt/carbon with a nanofilm of electrolyte (Nafion ionomer) leads to a faster migration of Pt in H2O than in O2, a consequence of Nafion-carbon interface water “lubrication” effect. Atomically, the particles coalescence is featured by re-orientation of particles towards lattice matching, a process driven by orientation dependent van der Waals force. These results provide direct observations of dynamics of metal nanoparticles at critical surface/interface under relevant conditions and yield significant insights into the multi-phase interaction in related technological processes.

  19. Performance of Platinum Nanoparticles / Multiwalled Carbon Nanotubes / Bacterial Cellulose Composite as Anode Catalyst for Proton Exchange Membrane Fuel Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Henry Fonda Aritonang

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Highly dispersed platinum (Pt nanoparticles / multiwalled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs on bacterial cellulose (BC as anode catalysts for proton exchange membrane fuel cells (PEMFC were prepared with various precursors and their electro-catalytic activities towards hydrogen oxidation at 70 oC under non-humidified conditions. The composite was prepared by deposition of Pt nanoparticles and MWCNTs on BC gel by impregnation method using a water solution of metal precursors and MWCNTs followed by reducing reaction using a hydrogen gas. The composite was characterized by using TEM (transmission electron microscopy, EDS (energy dispersive spectroscopy, and XRD (X-ray diffractometry techniques. TEM images and XRD patterns both lead to the observation of spherical metallic Pt nanoparticles with mean diameter of 3-11 nm well impregnated into the BC fibrils. Preliminary tests on a single cell indicate that renewable BC is a good prospect to be explored as a membrane in fuel cell field. Copyright © 2017 BCREC Group. All rights reserved Received: 21st November 2016; Revised: 26th February 2017; Accepted: 27th February 2017 How to Cite: Aritonang, H.F., Kamu, V.S., Ciptati, C., Onggo, D., Radiman, C.L. (2017. Performance of Platinum Nanoparticles / Multiwalled Carbon Nanotubes / Bacterial Cellulose Composite as Anode Catalyst for Proton Exchange Membrane Fuel Cells. Bulletin of Chemical Reaction Engineering & Catalysis, 12 (2: 287-292 (doi:10.9767/bcrec.12.2.803.287-292 Permalink/DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.9767/bcrec.12.2.803.287-292

  20. In situ XAFS studies of the oxygen reduction reaction on carbon supported platinum and platinum nickel nano-scale alloys as cathode catalysts in fuel cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jia, Qingying

    Platinum based bimetallic alloys have been investigated by conducting Pt L3 and Ni K edge in situ XAFS measurements on carbon supported Pt and PtNi(1:1) nanoscale catalysts under a wide range of operating potentials. We observed that (1) the Pt-Pt bond distance in PtNi alloys is shorter than that of Pt, and the bond distance between Pt and oxygen adsorbate is longer for PtNi. (2) Pt has a tendency to stay on the surface while Ni is mostly underneath the surface. (3) While a change in oxidation of pure Pt was clearly observed at different potentials, the Pt in the PtNi alloy remained nearly oxygen-free at all potentials, but an accompanying oxidation change of Ni was observed instead. (4) PtNi has higher open circuit voltage than Pt/C. These results indicate that the chemisorption energy between Pt and oxygen adsorbate is reduced in PtNi alloys, which prevents the poison of oxygen adsorbate and hence improves the reactivity. In addition, the strain and ligand effects in PtNi nanoparticle alloys were studied by FEW calculations using experimental data as a guide to understand the factors causing the reduction of chemisorptions energy of Pt. Our calculation indicates that Pt d-band is broader and lower in energy when the bond distance between Pt is shorter, resulting in weaker chemisorption energy between Pt and absorbed oxygen atom on top, and vice verse. Meanwhile, the investigation of ligand effect shows two trends in modifying Pt's properties within alloyed transition metals. The strain effect dominates in PtNi bimetallic system, corresponding to weaker chemisorptions energy and lower white intensity of Pt L3 edge, which is in consistent with our experimental results. The implications of these results afford a good guideline in understanding the reactivity enhancement mechanism and in the context of alloy catalysts design.

  1. Controllable deposition of platinum nanoparticles on single-wall carbon nanohorns as catalyst for direct methanol fuel cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niu, Ben; Xu, Wei; Guo, Zhengduo; Zhou, Nengzhi; Liu, Yang; Shi, Zujin; Lian, Yongfu

    2012-09-01

    Uniform and well dispersed platinum nanoparticles were successfully deposited on single-walled carbon nanohorns with the assistance of 4,4-dipydine and ion liquids, respectively. In particular, the size of platinum nanoparticles could be controlled in a very narrow range (2.2 to 2.5 nm) when ion liquids were applied. The crystalline nature of these platinum nanoparticles was confirmed by high resolution transmission electron microscopy observation and X-ray power diffraction analysis, and two species of platinum Pt(0) and Pt(II) were detected by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. Electrochemical studies revealed that thus obtained nanocomposites had much better electrocatalytic activity for the methanol oxidation than those prepared with carbon nanotubes as supporter.

  2. Electrochemical performance for the electro-oxidation of ethylene glycol on a carbon-supported platinum catalyst at intermediate temperature

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kosaka, Fumihiko; Oshima, Yoshito; Otomo, Junichiro

    2011-01-01

    Highlights: → High oxidation current in ethylene glycol electro-oxidation at intermediate temperature. → High C-C bond dissociation ratio of ethylene glycol at intermediate temperature. → Low selectivity for CH 4 in ethylene glycol electro-oxidation. → High selectivity for CO 2 according to an increase in steam to carbon ratios. - Abstract: To determine the kinetic performance of the electro-oxidation of a polyalcohol operating at relatively high temperatures, direct electrochemical oxidation of ethylene glycol on a carbon supported platinum catalyst (Pt/C) was investigated at intermediate temperatures (235-255 o C) using a single cell fabricated with a proton-conducting solid electrolyte, CsH 2 PO 4 , which has high proton conductivity (>10 -2 S cm -1 ) in the intermediate temperature region. A high oxidation current density was observed, comparable to that for methanol electro-oxidation and also higher than that for ethanol electro-oxidation. The main products of ethylene glycol electro-oxidation were H 2 , CO 2 , CO and a small amount of CH 4 formation was also observed. On the other hand, the amounts of C 2 products such as acetaldehyde, acetic acid and glycolaldehyde were quite small and were lower by about two orders of magnitude than the gaseous reaction products. This clearly shows that C-C bond dissociation proceeds almost to completion at intermediate temperatures and the dissociation ratio reached a value above 95%. The present observations and kinetic analysis suggest the effective application of direct alcohol fuel cells operating at intermediate temperatures and indicate the possibility of total oxidation of alcohol fuels.

  3. Electrochemical performance for the electro-oxidation of ethylene glycol on a carbon-supported platinum catalyst at intermediate temperature

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kosaka, Fumihiko; Oshima, Yoshito [Department of Environment Systems, Graduate School of Frontier Sciences, University of Tokyo, 5-1-5 Kashiwanoha, Kashiwa, Chiba 277-8563 (Japan); Otomo, Junichiro, E-mail: otomo@k.u-tokyo.ac.jp [Department of Environment Systems, Graduate School of Frontier Sciences, University of Tokyo, 5-1-5 Kashiwanoha, Kashiwa, Chiba 277-8563 (Japan)

    2011-11-30

    Highlights: > High oxidation current in ethylene glycol electro-oxidation at intermediate temperature. > High C-C bond dissociation ratio of ethylene glycol at intermediate temperature. > Low selectivity for CH{sub 4} in ethylene glycol electro-oxidation. > High selectivity for CO{sub 2} according to an increase in steam to carbon ratios. - Abstract: To determine the kinetic performance of the electro-oxidation of a polyalcohol operating at relatively high temperatures, direct electrochemical oxidation of ethylene glycol on a carbon supported platinum catalyst (Pt/C) was investigated at intermediate temperatures (235-255 {sup o}C) using a single cell fabricated with a proton-conducting solid electrolyte, CsH{sub 2}PO{sub 4}, which has high proton conductivity (>10{sup -2} S cm{sup -1}) in the intermediate temperature region. A high oxidation current density was observed, comparable to that for methanol electro-oxidation and also higher than that for ethanol electro-oxidation. The main products of ethylene glycol electro-oxidation were H{sub 2}, CO{sub 2}, CO and a small amount of CH{sub 4} formation was also observed. On the other hand, the amounts of C{sub 2} products such as acetaldehyde, acetic acid and glycolaldehyde were quite small and were lower by about two orders of magnitude than the gaseous reaction products. This clearly shows that C-C bond dissociation proceeds almost to completion at intermediate temperatures and the dissociation ratio reached a value above 95%. The present observations and kinetic analysis suggest the effective application of direct alcohol fuel cells operating at intermediate temperatures and indicate the possibility of total oxidation of alcohol fuels.

  4. Beneficial effects of rhodium and tin oxide on carbon supported platinum catalysts for ethanol electrooxidation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soares, Layciane A.; Morais, Claudia; Napporn, Teko W.; Kokoh, K. Boniface; Olivi, Paulo

    2016-05-01

    This work investigates ethanol electrooxidation on Pt/C, PtxRhy/C, Pt-SnO2/C, and PtxRhy-SnO2/C catalysts synthesized by the Pechini and microwave-assisted polyol methods. The catalysts are characterized by energy dispersive X-ray analysis (EDX), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), and X-ray diffraction (XRD) techniques. The electrochemical properties of these electrode materials are examined by cyclic voltammetry and chronoamperometry experiments in acid medium. The products obtained during ethanol electrolysis are identified by high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC). The adsorbed intermediates are evaluated by an in situ reflectance Infrared Spectroscopy technique combined with cyclic voltammetry. Catalysts performance in a direct ethanol fuel cell (DEFC) is also assessed. The electrical performance of the electrocatalysts in a single DEFC at 80 °C decreases in the following order Pt70Rh30SnO2 > Pt80Rh20SnO2 > Pt60Rh40SnO2 ∼ PtSnO2 > PtxRhy ∼ Pt, showing that the presence of SnO2 enhances the ability of Pt to catalyze ethanol electrooxidation.

  5. Effect of Nitrogen Post-Doping on a Commercial Platinum-Ruthenium/Carbon Anode Catalyst

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-02-15

    published by Elsevier. The attached copy is furnished to the author for internal non-commercial research and education use, including for instruction at...3 mg cm2 for each anode. During MEA assembly into the fuel cell hardware, 5 cm2 carbon paper with a microporous layer (SGL GDL 25BC) was placed on...7 (2005) 373. [4] A.K. Shukla, J. Electrochem. Soc. 141 (1994) 1517. [5] Z. Lei, et al., Microporous Mesoporous Mater. 119 (2009) 30e38. [6] X. Li, S

  6. Poisoning by carbon monoxide in the hydrogen exchange reaction between deuterium gas and water preadsorbed on a platinum--alumina catalyst

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Iida, I.; Tamaru, K.

    1979-01-01

    Poisoning by carbon monoxide in the exchange reaction between deuterium and the water preadsorbed on a platinum--alumina catalyst was studied, by measuring not only the rate of reaction but also its kinetic behavior and the adsorption of reactants on the catalyst surface. The shape of the poisoning curve is closely associated with the kinetic behavior and exhibited an abrupt change on freezing the adsorbed water below 273 0 K. When the rate is proportional to deuterium pressure and independent of the amount of water adsorbed, the exchange rate dropped sharply by carbon monoxide adsorbed of a few percent coverage without any marked changes in the amount and the rate of hydrogen adsorption on the platinum surface. However, at temperatures lower than 273 0 K and at higher deuterium pressures, the rate depends not on the deuterium pressure but on the amount of water adsorbed. The migration of hydrogen in or through the adsorbed water is seemingly sufficiently suppressed by freezing to control the overall reaction rate. In this case, a small amount of adsorption of carbon monoxide did not show any toxicity, but then a steep poisoning started accompanying a change in the kinetic behavior. It was accordingly demonstrated that the mechanism of the reaction may be better understood by studying poisoning and measuring adsorption, overall rate, and kinetic behavior

  7. Hydrodeoxygenation of phenols as lignin models under acid-free conditions with carbon-supported platinum catalysts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohta, Hidetoshi; Kobayashi, Hirokazu; Hara, Kenji; Fukuoka, Atsushi

    2011-11-28

    Carbon-supported Pt catalysts are highly active and reusable for the aqueous-phase hydrodeoxygenation of phenols as lignin models without adding any acids. It is suggested that Pt/carbon facilitates the hydrogenation of phenols and the hydrogenolysis of the resulting cyclohexanols.

  8. Activity of platinum/carbon and palladium/carbon catalysts promoted by Ni2 P in direct ethanol fuel cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Guoqiang; Feng, Ligang; Chang, Jinfa; Wickman, Björn; Grönbeck, Henrik; Liu, Changpeng; Xing, Wei

    2014-12-01

    Ethanol is an alternative fuel for direct alcohol fuel cells, in which the electrode materials are commonly based on Pt or Pd. Owing to the excellent promotion effect of Ni2 P that was found in methanol oxidation, we extended the catalyst system of Pt or Pd modified by Ni2 P in direct ethanol fuel cells. The Ni2 P-promoted catalysts were compared to commercial catalysts as well as to reference catalysts promoted with only Ni or only P. Among the studied catalysts, Pt/C and Pd/C modified by Ni2 P (30 wt %) showed both the highest activity and stability. Upon integration into the anode of a homemade direct ethanol fuel cell, the Pt-Ni2 P/C-30 % catalyst showed a maximum power density of 21 mW cm(-2) , which is approximately two times higher than that of a commercial Pt/C catalyst. The Pd-Ni2 P/C-30 % catalyst exhibited a maximum power density of 90 mW cm(-2) . This is approximately 1.5 times higher than that of a commercial Pd/C catalyst. The discharge stability on both two catalysts was also greatly improved over a 12 h discharge operation. © 2014 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  9. Tungsten carbide/porous carbon composite as superior support for platinum catalyst toward methanol electro-oxidation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jiang, Liming; Fu, Honggang; Wang, Lei; Mu, Guang; Jiang, Baojiang; Zhou, Wei; Wang, Ruihong

    2014-01-01

    Graphical abstract: The WC nanoparticles are well dispersed in the carbon matrix. The size of WC nanoparticles is about 30 nm. It can be concluded that tungsten carbide and carbon composite was successfully prepared by the present synthesis conditions. - Highlights: • The WC/PC composite with high specific surface area was prepared by a simple way. • The Pt/WC/PC catalyst has superior performance toward methanol electro-oxidation. • The current density for methanol electro-oxidation is as high as 595.93 A g −1 Pt. • The Pt/WC/PC catalyst shows better durability and stronger CO electro-oxidation. • The performance of Pt/WC/PC is superior to the commercial Pt/C (JM) catalyst. - Abstract: Tungsten carbide/porous carbon (WC/PC) composites have been successfully synthesized through a surfactant assisted evaporation-induced-assembly method, followed by a thermal treatment process. In particular, WC/PC-35-1000 composite with tungsten content of 35% synthesized at the carbonized temperature of 1000 °C, exhibited a specific surface area (S BET ) of 457.92 m 2 g −1 . After loading Pt nanoparticles (NPs), the obtained Pt/WC/PC-35-1000 catalyst exhibits the highest unit mass electroactivity (595.93 A g −1 Pt) toward methanol electro-oxidation, which is about 2.6 times as that of the commercial Pt/C (JM) catalyst. Furthermore, the Pt/WC/PC-35-1000 catalyst displays much stronger resistance to CO poisoning and better durability toward methanol electrooxidation compared with the commercial Pt/C (JM) catalyst. The high electrocatalytic activity, strong poison-resistivity and good stability of Pt/WC/PC-35-1000 catalyst are attributed to the porous structures and high specific surface area of WC/PC support could facilitate the rapid mass transportation. Moreover, synergistic effect between WC and Pt NPs is favorable to the higher catalytic performance

  10. Tungsten carbide/porous carbon composite as superior support for platinum catalyst toward methanol electro-oxidation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jiang, Liming [School of Chemical Engineering and Technology, Harbin Institute of Technology, Harbin 150001 (China); Fu, Honggang, E-mail: fuhg@vip.sina.com [School of Chemical Engineering and Technology, Harbin Institute of Technology, Harbin 150001 (China); Key Laboratory of Functional Inorganic Material Chemistry, Heilongjiang University, Harbin 150080 (China); Wang, Lei; Mu, Guang; Jiang, Baojiang; Zhou, Wei; Wang, Ruihong [Key Laboratory of Functional Inorganic Material Chemistry, Heilongjiang University, Harbin 150080 (China)

    2014-01-01

    Graphical abstract: The WC nanoparticles are well dispersed in the carbon matrix. The size of WC nanoparticles is about 30 nm. It can be concluded that tungsten carbide and carbon composite was successfully prepared by the present synthesis conditions. - Highlights: • The WC/PC composite with high specific surface area was prepared by a simple way. • The Pt/WC/PC catalyst has superior performance toward methanol electro-oxidation. • The current density for methanol electro-oxidation is as high as 595.93 A g{sup −1} Pt. • The Pt/WC/PC catalyst shows better durability and stronger CO electro-oxidation. • The performance of Pt/WC/PC is superior to the commercial Pt/C (JM) catalyst. - Abstract: Tungsten carbide/porous carbon (WC/PC) composites have been successfully synthesized through a surfactant assisted evaporation-induced-assembly method, followed by a thermal treatment process. In particular, WC/PC-35-1000 composite with tungsten content of 35% synthesized at the carbonized temperature of 1000 °C, exhibited a specific surface area (S{sub BET}) of 457.92 m{sup 2} g{sup −1}. After loading Pt nanoparticles (NPs), the obtained Pt/WC/PC-35-1000 catalyst exhibits the highest unit mass electroactivity (595.93 A g{sup −1} Pt) toward methanol electro-oxidation, which is about 2.6 times as that of the commercial Pt/C (JM) catalyst. Furthermore, the Pt/WC/PC-35-1000 catalyst displays much stronger resistance to CO poisoning and better durability toward methanol electrooxidation compared with the commercial Pt/C (JM) catalyst. The high electrocatalytic activity, strong poison-resistivity and good stability of Pt/WC/PC-35-1000 catalyst are attributed to the porous structures and high specific surface area of WC/PC support could facilitate the rapid mass transportation. Moreover, synergistic effect between WC and Pt NPs is favorable to the higher catalytic performance.

  11. Carbon-supported co-pyridine as non-platinum cathode catalyst for alkaline membrane fuel cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Qiao, Jinli; Xu, Li; Liu, Yuyu; Xu, Pan; Shi, Jingjing; Liu, Shiyao; Tian, Binglun

    2013-01-01

    Development of high-performance cost-effective electrocatalyts that can replace Pt catalyst have been a central theme in polymer electrolyte membrane fuel cells (PEMFCs) including direct methanol fuel cells (DMFCs). Here we show that carbon-supported pyridine–cobalt nanoparticles (CoPy/C) can generate a high catalytic activity toward the oxygen reduction reaction (ORR). The catalysts are synthesized using cobalt sulfate heptahydrate (CoSO 4 ·7H 2 O) and pyridine (Py) as the Co and N precursors via a solid state reaction by heat-treatment in an inert atmosphere at 800 °C. In particular, the ORR kinetics on these catalyst materials are evaluated using rotating disk electrode (RDE) technique in electrolytes of various KOH concentrations, ranging from 0.05 to 12 M. The Koutecky–Levich equation analyses indicate that the transferred electron number, n, per oxygen molecule on CoPy/C electrode depend on the low negative ovevrpotentials in low KOH concentrations, whereas in high KOH concentrations the values of n for oxygen reduction depend on the high negative overpotentials, and varies between 3.5 and 4.0. These catalysts exhibit the superior methanol tolerance to commercial 40%Pt/C catalyst, and the negative effect of high KOH concentration is much less for CoPy/C than for Pt/C, suggesting the promising utilization of CoPy/C as electrocatalysts for alkaline polymer electrolyte membrane fuel cells

  12. Non-carbon titanium cobalt nitride nanotubes supported platinum catalyst with high activity and durability for methanol oxidation reaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Xiaoxiang; Li, Wuyi; Pan, Zhanchang; Xu, Yanbin; Liu, Gen; Hu, Guanghui; Wu, Shoukun; Li, Jinghong; Chen, Chun; Lin, Yingsheng

    2018-05-01

    Titanium cobalt nitride nanotubes (Ti0.95Co0.05N NTs) hybrid support, a novel robust non-carbon support material prepared by solvothermal and post-nitriding processes, is further decorated with Pt nanoparticles for the electrooxidation of methanol. The catalyst is characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD), nitrogen adsorption/desorption, transmission electron microscopy (TEM), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and electrochemical measurements. The morphology, structure and composition of the synthesized Ti0.95Co0.05N NTs suggest that the nanotube wall is porous and consists of homogeneous cohesively attached nitrides nanocube particles. Notable, Ti0.95Co0.05N NTs supported Pt catalyst exhibits significantly improved catalytic activity and durability for methanol electrooxidation compared with the conventional JM Pt/C catalyst. The experimental data indicate that enhanced catalytic activity and stability of Pt/Ti0.95Co0.05N NTs towards methanol electrooxidation might be mainly attributed to the tubular nanostructures and synergistic effect introduced by the Co doping. Both of them are playing an important role in improving the activity and durability of the Ti0.95Co0.05N NTs catalyst.

  13. Platinum-Bismuth Bimetallic Catalysts: Synthesis, Characterization and Applications

    OpenAIRE

    Saucedo, Jose A, Jr; Xiao, Yang; Varma, Arvind

    2015-01-01

    Bimetallic catalysts have been explored and shown to exhibit unique characteristics which are not present in monometallic catalysts. Platinum is well known as an effective catalyst for oxidation and reduction reactions, and it can be made more effective when bismuth is introduced as a promotor. Thus, the effectiveness of the Pt-Bi catalyst was demonstrated in prior work. What is not clear, however, is the mechanism behind the catalyst function; why addition of bismuth to platinum decreases de...

  14. Silica Supported Platinum Catalysts for Total Oxidation of the Polyaromatic Hydrocarbon Naphthalene: An Investigation of Metal Loading and Calcination Temperature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David R. Sellick

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available A range of catalysts comprising of platinum supported on silica, prepared by an impregnation method, have been studied for the total oxidation of naphthalene, which is a representative Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbon. The influence of platinum loading and calcination temperature on oxidation activity was evaluated. Increasing the platinum loading up to 2.5 wt.% increased the catalyst activity, whilst a 5.0 wt.% catalyst was slightly less active. The catalyst containing the optimum 2.5 wt.% loading was most active after calcination in air at 550 °C. Characterisation by carbon monoxide chemisorption and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy showed that low platinum dispersion to form large platinum particles, in combination with platinum in metallic and oxidised states was important for high catalyst activity. Catalyst performance improved after initial use in repeat cycles, whilst there was slight deactivation after prolonged time-on-stream.

  15. Graphite-supported platinum catalysts: Effects of gas and aqueous phase treatments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vleeming, J.H.; Kuster, B.F.M.; Marin, G.B. [Eindhoven Univ. of Technology (Netherlands)] [and others

    1997-03-01

    The effects on the platinum particle diameter and the available platinum surface area of a graphite-supported platinum catalyst resulting from pretreatments and from performing a selective oxidation reaction are investigated. In the gas phase considerable catalyst sintering occurs only in the presence of oxygen at 773 K due to extensive carbon burn-off, whereas in an aqueous phase platinum particle growth is limited upon oxidative treatment. A hydrogen treatment in aqueous phase at 363 K causes platinum particle growth, aggregate formation, and covering of metal sites. These phenomena become more important with increasing pH. Platinum particle growth and aggregate formation are attributed to platinum particle rather than platinum adatom mobility and is caused by the destruction of the oxygen-containing surface groups on the graphite support, which serve as anchorage sites for the platinum particles. Site covering is caused by products originating from the graphite support, which are formed as a result of the reductive treatments. When performing the aqueous phase oxidation of methyl {alpha}-D-glucopyranoside at 323 K and a pH of 9, catalyst modifications are small under oxidative conditions. Exposure of the catalyst for several hours to methyl {alpha}-D-glucopyranoside under the same conditions but in the absence of oxygen causes site covering. 50 refs., 9 figs., 1 tab.

  16. Development of radioactive platinum group metal catalysts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chung, H.S.; Kim, Y.S.; Kim, Y.E.

    1999-03-01

    The fission product nuclides generated during the irradiation of reactor fuel include many useful elements, among them platinum group metals such as ruthenium, rhodium and palladium which are of great industrial importance, occur rarely in nature and are highly valuable. In this research, the authors reviewed various PGM recovery methods. Recovery of palladium from seven-component simulated waste solutions was conducted by selective precipitation method. The recovery yield was more than 99.5% and the purity of the product was more than 99%. Wet-proof catalyst was prepared with the recovered palladium. The specific surface area of the catalyst support was more than 400m 2 /g. The content of palladium impregnated on the support was 1 to 10 wt. %. Hydrogen isotope exchange efficiency of more than 93% to equilibrium with small amount of the catalyst was obtained. It was turned out possible to consider using such palladium or other very low active PGM materials in applications where its activity is unimportant as in nuclear industries. (author). 86 refs., 44 tabs., 88 figs

  17. Development of radioactive platinum group metal catalysts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chung, H.S.; Kim, Y.S.; Kim, Y.E. [and others

    1999-03-01

    The fission product nuclides generated during the irradiation of reactor fuel include many useful elements, among them platinum group metals such as ruthenium, rhodium and palladium which are of great industrial importance, occur rarely in nature and are highly valuable. In this research, the authors reviewed various PGM recovery methods. Recovery of palladium from seven-component simulated waste solutions was conducted by selective precipitation method. The recovery yield was more than 99.5% and the purity of the product was more than 99%. Wet-proof catalyst was prepared with the recovered palladium. The specific surface area of the catalyst support was more than 400m{sup 2}/g.The content of palladium impregnated on the support was 1 to 10 wt. %. Hydrogen isotope exchange efficiency of more than 93% to equilibrium with small amount of the catalyst was obtained. It was turned out possible to consider using such palladium or other very low active PGM materials in applications where its activity is unimportant as in nuclear industries. (author). 86 refs., 44 tabs., 88 figs.

  18. Ruthenium-platinum bimetallic catalysts supported on silica: characterization and study of benzene hydrogenation and CO methanation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chakrabarty, D.K.; Rao, K.M.; Sundararaman, N.; Chandavar, K.

    1986-12-15

    Ru-Pt/SiO/sub 2/ bimetallic catalysts with varying Ru:Pt ratio have been prepared and studied with the aim to establish if they contain coclusters or isolated ruthenium and platinum particles. X-ray diffraction studies show that individual crystallites of ruthenium and platinum are present and no coclusters are formed. Metal dispersion has been determined by hydrogen chemisorption and surface composition of the catalysts has been obtained from XPS. It was found that preoxidation of the catalysts prior to reduction is essential for good platinum dispersion. The experimental turnover number (TN) for benzene hydrogenation on the bimetallic catalysts agrees very well with that of the weighted average on the individual metal catalysts and this may be taken as a kinetic evidence for the absence of coclusters. Carbon monoxide methanation activity of the bimetallic catalysts is quite similar to that of the supported platinum catalyst. 6 refs., 6 figs., 2 tabs.

  19. Recycling of platinum group metals from the automotive catalysts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Benevit, Mariana; Petter, Patricia Melo Halmenschlager; Veit, Hugo Marcelo

    2014-01-01

    Currently it is very important to use alternative sources of raw material for obtaining metals, avoiding the traditional mining. This work aims to characterize and evaluate the recoverability of platinum group metals present in automotive catalysts. Thus, the catalysts were divided into two groups: the first was catalysts used in 1.0 cars and the second was catalyst used in 2.0 cars. DRX and FRX techniques and chemical analysis performed by ICP/OES was used to characterized these materials. The results showed that there is a significant amount of platinum group elements in catalyst waste, which can be separated and reused. In the next step, hydro and pyrometallurgical routes, for metals extraction from catalyst waste, will be studied. (author)

  20. Redeposition of electrochemically dissolved platinum as nanoparticles on carbon

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Norgaard, C. F.; Stamatin, S. N.; Skou, E. M.

    2014-01-01

    communication reports a simple chemical method for reprecipitating platinum as nanoparticles of reasonable particle size on a carbon substrate without intermediary separation and handling of solid platinum salt. After electrochemical dissolution, platinum was reprecipitated using a polyol based method. Platinum...

  1. Methanol oxidation at platinum electrodes in acid solution: comparison between model and real catalysts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. V. TRIPKOVIC

    2006-12-01

    Full Text Available Methanol oxidation in acid solution was studied at platinum single crystals, Pt(hkl, as the model catalyst, and at nanostructural platinum supported on high surface area carbon, Pt/C, as the real catalyst. The linear extrapolation method was used to determine the beginning of hydroxyl anion adsorption. Structural sensitivity of the adsorption was proved and a correlation with the onset of the methanol oxidation current was established at all catalysts. Bisulfate and chloride anions were found to decrease the methanol oxidation rate, but probably did not influence the reaction parth. The specific activity for the reaction increased in the sequence Pt(110 < Pt/C < Pt(111, suggesting that the activity of the supported Pt catalyst can be correlated with the activities of the dominating crystal planes on its surface.

  2. Adsorption and temperature-programmed desorption of hydrogen with dispersed platinum and platinum-gold catalysts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anderson, J.R.; Foger, K.; Breakspere, R.J.

    1979-05-01

    Adsorption and temperature-programmed desorption of hydrogen with dispersed platinum and platinum-gold catalysts was studied with 0.9-3Vertical Bar3< platinum on silica gel, aerosil, sodium and lanthanum Y zeolites, and ..gamma..-alumina, and on aerosil-supported gold-platinum alloys containing 2, 10, 24, 33, and 85Vertical Bar3< gold. Surface enrichment with gold in the alloy systems, as derived from hydrogen adsorption data and predicted from surface enrichment theory and electron microscopic measurements of particle size, were in good agreement, which indicated that equilibrium was achieved by the thermal treatment (oxygen at 573/sup 0/K, hydrogen at 620/sup 0/K, repeated cycles) used. Hydrogen spillover to gold was observed at the higher hydrogen pressures tested on the alloys with high gold content, and to the zeolite supports. The temperature-programed desorption profiles were independent of gold content, which indicated that gold acts only as diluent, and that isolated surface platinum atoms become populated with hydrogen atoms either by hydrogen atom spillover from platinum ensembles to gold and from the gold to the isolated platinum, and/or by adsorption of a molecule directly on the isolated platinum and chemisorption of one H atom at an adjacent gold atom. The distribution of surface platinum ensembles was evaluated by a computer simulation method.

  3. Electrostatic layer-by-layer a of platinum-loaded multiwall carbon nanotube multilayer: A tunable catalyst film for anodic methanol oxidation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yuan Junhua; Wang Zhijuan; Zhang Yuanjian; Shen Yanfei; Han Dongxue; Zhang Qixian; Xu Xiaoyu; Niu Li

    2008-01-01

    A simple layer-by-layer (LBL) electrostatic adsorption technique was developed for deposition of films composed of alternating layers of positively charged poly(diallyldimethylammonium chloride) (PDDA) and negatively charged multiwall carbon nanotubes bearing platinum nanoparticles (Pt-CNTs). PDDA/Pt-CNT film structure and morphology up to six layers were characterized by scanning electron microscopy and ultraviolet-visible spectroscopy, showing the Pt-CNT layers to be porous and uniformly deposited within the multilayer films. Electrochemical properties of the PDDA/Pt-CNT films, as well as electrocatalytic activity toward methanol oxidation, were investigated with cyclic voltammetry. Significant activity toward anodic methanol oxidation was observed and is readily tunable through changing film thickness and/or platinum-nanoparticle loading. Overall, the observed properties of these PDDA/Pt-CNT multilayer films indicated unique potential for application in direct methanol fuel cell

  4. Methanol-Tolerant Platinum-Palladium Catalyst Supported on Nitrogen-Doped Carbon Nanofiber for High Concentration Direct Methanol Fuel Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Jiyoung; Jang, Jin-Sung; Peck, Dong-Hyun; Lee, Byungrok; Yoon, Seong-Ho; Jung, Doo-Hwan

    2016-08-15

    Pt-Pd catalyst supported on nitrogen-doped carbon nanofiber (N-CNF) was prepared and evaluated as a cathode electrode of the direct methanol fuel cell (DMFC). The N-CNF, which was directly synthesized by the catalytic chemical vapor deposition from acetonitrile at 640 °C, was verified as having a change of electrochemical surface properties such as oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) activities and the electrochemical double layer compared with common carbon black (CB). To attain the competitive oxygen reduction reaction activity with methanol tolerance, the Pt and Pd metals were supported on the CB or the N-CNF. The physical and electrochemical characteristics of the N-CNF-supported Pt-Pd catalyst were examined and compared with catalyst supported on the CB. In addition, DMFC single cells using these catalysts as the cathode electrode were applied to obtain I-V polarization curves and constant current operating performances with high-concentration methanol as the fuel. Pt-Pd catalysts had obvious ORR activity even in the presence of methanol. The higher power density was obtained at all the methanol concentrations when it applied to the membrane electrode assembly (MEA) of the DMFC. When the N-CNF is used as the catalyst support material, a better performance with high-concentration methanol is expected.

  5. Methanol-Tolerant Platinum-Palladium Catalyst Supported on Nitrogen-Doped Carbon Nanofiber for High Concentration Direct Methanol Fuel Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jiyoung Kim

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Pt-Pd catalyst supported on nitrogen-doped carbon nanofiber (N-CNF was prepared and evaluated as a cathode electrode of the direct methanol fuel cell (DMFC. The N-CNF, which was directly synthesized by the catalytic chemical vapor deposition from acetonitrile at 640 °C, was verified as having a change of electrochemical surface properties such as oxygen reduction reaction (ORR activities and the electrochemical double layer compared with common carbon black (CB. To attain the competitive oxygen reduction reaction activity with methanol tolerance, the Pt and Pd metals were supported on the CB or the N-CNF. The physical and electrochemical characteristics of the N-CNF–supported Pt-Pd catalyst were examined and compared with catalyst supported on the CB. In addition, DMFC single cells using these catalysts as the cathode electrode were applied to obtain I-V polarization curves and constant current operating performances with high-concentration methanol as the fuel. Pt-Pd catalysts had obvious ORR activity even in the presence of methanol. The higher power density was obtained at all the methanol concentrations when it applied to the membrane electrode assembly (MEA of the DMFC. When the N-CNF is used as the catalyst support material, a better performance with high-concentration methanol is expected.

  6. Oxidation of 4-methoxy-1-naphthol on promoted platinum catalysts

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Maphoru, MV

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available , July 2017, Volume 58, Issue 4, pp 441–447 Oxidation of 4-methoxy-1-naphthol on promoted platinum catalysts M. V. Maphoru J. Heveling S. Kesavan Pillai Abstract Oxidative coupling of naphthols is a useful method for the formation of new...

  7. Sulfur tolerant zeolite supported platinum catalysts for aromatics hydrogenation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bergem, Haakon

    1997-12-31

    The increased demand for transportation fuels at the expence of heavier fuel oil has forced the refinery industry to expand their conversion capacity with hydrotreating as one of the key processes. A shift towards more diesel powered vehicles along with tightening fuel regulations demanding cleaner fuels has lead to increasing interest in catalytic processes for the manufacturing of such environmentally acceptable fuels. This provides the motivation for this thesis. Its main objective was to study possible catalysts active for desulfurization, hydrogenation, and ring-opening of aromatics all in the presence of sulfur. A close examination of the physical properties and kinetical behaviour of the chosen catalysts has been performed. A high pressure reactor setup was designed and built for activity measurements. Zeolite supported platinum catalysts were prepared and both the metal and acid functions were characterized utilizing various experimental techniques. Hydrogenation of toluene was used as a model reaction and the effect of sulfur adsorption on the activity and kinetic behaviour of the catalysts was investigated. The catalyst samples showed hydrogenation activities comparable to a commercial Pt/Al2O3 catalyst. There were no clear differences in the effect of the various sulfur compounds studied. Platinum supported on zeolite Y gave considerably more sulfur tolerant catalysts compared to Al2O3 as support. 155 refs., 58 figs., 36 tabs.

  8. Dynamic environmental transmission electron microscopy observation of platinum electrode catalyst deactivation in a proton-exchange-membrane fuel cell.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoshida, Kenta; Xudong, Zhang; Bright, Alexander N; Saitoh, Koh; Tanaka, Nobuo

    2013-02-15

    Spherical-aberration-corrected environmental transmission electron microscopy (AC-ETEM) was applied to study the catalytic activity of platinum/amorphous carbon electrode catalysts in proton-exchange-membrane fuel cells (PEMFCs). These electrode catalysts were characterized in different atmospheres, such as hydrogen and air, and a conventional high vacuum of 10(-5) Pa. A high-speed charge coupled device camera was used to capture real-time movies to dynamically study the diffusion and reconstruction of nanoparticles with an information transfer down to 0.1 nm, a time resolution below 0.2 s and an acceleration voltage of 300 kV. With such high spatial and time resolution, AC-ETEM permits the visualization of surface-atom behaviour that dominates the coalescence and surface-reconstruction processes of the nanoparticles. To contribute to the development of robust PEMFC platinum/amorphous carbon electrode catalysts, the change in the specific surface area of platinum particles was evaluated in hydrogen and air atmospheres. The deactivation of such catalysts during cycle operation is a serious problem that must be resolved for the practical use of PEMFCs in real vehicles. In this paper, the mechanism for the deactivation of platinum/amorphous carbon electrode catalysts is discussed using the decay rate of the specific surface area of platinum particles, measured first in a vacuum and then in hydrogen and air atmospheres for comparison.

  9. Reactions of neopentane and neohexane on platinum/Y-zeolite and platinum/silica catalysts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Foger, K.; Anderson, J.R.

    1978-10-13

    The hydrocracking/hydroisomerization reaction of 20:1 hydrogen/neopentane at 455-625/sup 0/K was studied on platinum-exchanged sodium, calcium, and lanthanum Y zeolites and Aerosil-supported platinum of 1-20 nm average platinum particle size, by analysis of the product distribution, ESCA, and temperature-programed desorption. The results suggested that the reaction occurs only on platinum and that it proceeds by two parallel pathways which have different activation energies and whose relative proportion depends on the particle size. One pathway is the conventionally accepted one on low-index crystallite facets; the other proceeds on single-surface platinum atoms of low coordination (corner or edge atoms) which become more abundant at lower crystallite size. In both cases, the adsorbed intermediate may undergo either isomerization or hydrogenolysis; the selectivity depends on the hydrogen partial pressure and the relative strength of adsorption of hydrogen and neopentane. Neohexane isomerization selectivity on the same catalysts is consistent with a carbonium ion mechanism on a dual-function catalyst.

  10. Methanol Steam Reforming Promoted by Molten Salt-Modified Platinum on Alumina Catalysts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kusche, Matthias; Agel, Friederike; Ní Bhriain, Nollaig; Kaftan, Andre; Laurin, Mathias; Libuda, Jörg; Wasserscheid, Peter

    2014-01-01

    We herein describe a straight forward procedure to increase the performance of platinum-on-alumina catalysts in methanol steam reforming by applying an alkali hydroxide coating according to the “solid catalyst with ionic liquid layer” (SCILL) approach. We demonstrate by diffuse reflectance infrared Fourier transform spectroscopy (DRIFTS) and temperature-programmed desorption (TPD) studies that potassium doping plays an important role in the catalyst activation. Moreover, the hygroscopic nature and the basicity of the salt modification contribute to the considerable enhancement in catalytic performance. During reaction, a partly liquid film of alkali hydroxides/carbonates forms on the catalyst/alumina surface, thus significantly enhancing the availability of water at the catalytically active sites. Too high catalyst pore fillings with salt introduce a considerable mass transfer barrier into the system as indicated by kinetic studies. Thus, the optimum interplay between beneficial catalyst modification and detrimental mass transfer effects had to be identified and was found on the applied platinum-on-alumina catalyst at KOH loadings around 7.5 mass %. PMID:25124120

  11. Phase-field model for deposition process of platinum nanoparticles on carbon substrate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamakawa, S; Hyodo, S; Okazaki-Maeda, K; Kohyama, M

    2008-01-01

    Platinum supported on a carbon carrier is widely used as a catalyst for polymer electrolyte membrane fuel cells. The catalytic activity is significantly affected by the size distribution and morphologies of the platinum particles. The objective of this study is to extend the phase-field approach to describe the formation process of platinum particles onto the substrate. The microstructural evolution of a nanoparticle was represented by the temporal evolution of the field variables related to the platinum concentration, long-range crystallographic ordering and phase transition. First-principles calculations were performed in order to estimate the interaction energies between several different types of platinum clusters and a graphene sheet. The platinum density profile concentrated over the substrate surface led to the formation of three-dimensional islands in accordance with the Volmer-Weber mode of growth. The size distributions of the platinum particles were sensitive to the heterogeneity of the substrate surface and to the competitive nucleation and growth processes

  12. Pretreatment of Platinum/Tin Oxide-Catalyst

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hess, Robert V.; Paulin, Patricia A.; Miller, Irvin M.; Schryer, David R.; Sidney, Barry D.; Wood, George M.; Upchurch, Billy T.; Brown, Kenneth G.

    1987-01-01

    Addition of CO to He pretreatment doubles catalytic activity. In sealed, high-energy, pulsed CO2 laser, CO and O2 form as decomposition products of CO2 in laser discharge zone. Products must be recombined, because oxygen concentration of more than few tenths of percent causes rapid deterioration of power, ending in unstable operation. Promising low-temperature catalyst for combining CO and O2 is platinum on tin oxide. New development increases activity of catalyst so less needed for recombination process.

  13. Formic acid oxidation at platinum-bismuth catalysts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Popović Ksenija Đ.

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The field of heterogeneous catalysis, specifically catalysis on bimetallic surfaces, has seen many advances over the past few decades. Bimetallic catalysts, which often show electronic and chemical properties that are distinct from those of their parent metals, offer the opportunity to obtain new catalysts with enhanced selectivity, activity, and stability. The oxidation of formic acid is of permanent interest as a model reaction for the mechanistic understanding of the electrooxidation of small organic molecules and because of its technical relevance for fuel cell applications. Platinum is one of the most commonly used catalysts for this reaction, despite the fact that it shows a few significant disadvantages: high cost and extreme susceptibility to poisoning by CO. To solve this problem, several approaches have been used, but generally, they all consist in the modification of platinum with a second element. Especially, bismuth has received significant attention as Pt modifier. According to the results presented in this survey dealing with the effects influencing the formic acid oxidation it was found that two types of Pt-Bi bimetallic catalysts (bulk and low loading deposits on GC showed superior catalytic activity in terms of the lower onset potential and oxidation current density, as well as exceptional stability compared to Pt. The findings in this report are important for the understanding of mechanism of formic acid electrooxidation on a bulk alloy and decorated surface, for the development of advanced anode catalysts for direct formic acid fuel cells, as well as for the synthesis of novel low-loading bimetallic catalysts. The use of bimetallic compounds as the anode catalysts is an effective solution to overcoming the problems of the formic acid oxidation current stability for long term applications. In the future, the tolerance of both CO poisoning and electrochemical leaching should be considered as the key factors in the development

  14. Platinum-modified cobalt nanosheets supported on three-dimensional carbon sponge as a high-performance catalyst for hydrogen peroxide electroreduction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ye, Ke; Zhang, Dongming; Zhang, Hongyu; Cheng, Kui; Wang, Guiling; Cao, Dianxue

    2015-01-01

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • The Pt-Co NS@carbon sponge electrode shows unique nanosheet structure on the three-dimensional (3D) porous network skeleton with a large surface area. • The Pt-Co NS@carbon sponge electrode achieves a reduction current density of −1.38 A cm"−"2 mg"−"1 in 3.0 mol L"−"1 KOH and 1.5 mol L"−"1 H_2O_2 at −0.50 V (vs. Ag/AgCl) • The Pt-Co NS@carbon sponge electrode exhibits a desirable stability for the H_2O_2 electroreduction. - Abstract: Pt-modified Co nanosheet@carbon sponge (Pt-Co NS@carbon sponge) electrode is synthesized via a facile sponge carbonization method coupled with a direct Co electrodeposition and Pt chemical-deposition. The obtained electrodes are characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDX) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). The catalytic performances of H_2O_2 electroreduction in alkaline medium are investigated by cyclic voltammetry (CV), chronoamperometry (CA) and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS). The Pt-Co NS@carbon sponge electrode exhibits unique nanosheet structure on the three-dimensional (3D) porous network skeleton with a large surface area and displays excellent catalytic performance. The Pt-Co NS@carbon sponge electrode achieves a reduction current density of −1.38 A cm"−"2 mg"−"1 in 3.0 mol L"−"1 KOH and 1.5 mol L"−"1 H_2O_2 at −0.50 V (vs. Ag/AgCl) accompanied with a desirable stability, which is significantly higher than the catalytic activity of H_2O_2 electroreduction achieved previously with precious metals as catalysts. The impressive electrocatalytic performance is largely attributed to the superior 3D open structure and high electronic conductivity, which ensures the full utilization of Pt surfaces and makes the electrode have higher electrochemical activity. Original Pt-Co NS@carbon sponge electordes have a great potential for the

  15. Rapid and Efficient Collection of Platinum from Karstedt's Catalyst Solution via Ligands-Exchange-Induced Assembly.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Gonghua; Wei, Yanlong; Huang, Zhenzhu; Hu, Jiwen; Liu, Guojun; Ou, Ming; Lin, Shudong; Tu, Yuanyuan

    2018-02-21

    Reported herein is a novel strategy for the rapid and efficient collection of platinum from Karstedt's catalyst solution. By taking advantage of a ligand-exchange reaction between alkynols and the 1,3-divinyltetramethyldisiloxane ligand (M Vi M Vi ) that coordinated with platinum (Pt(0)), the Karstedt's catalyst particles with a size of approximately 2.5 ± 0.7 nm could be reconstructed and assembled into larger particles with a size of 150 ± 35 nm due to the hydrogen bonding between the hydroxyl groups of the alkynol. In addition, because the silicone-soluble M Vi M Vi ligand of the Karstedt's catalyst was replaced by water-soluble alkynol ligands, the resultant large particles were readily dispersed in water, resulting in rapid, efficient, and complete collection of platinum from the Karstedt's catalyst solutions with platinum concentrations in the range from ∼20 000 to 0.05 ppm. Our current strategy not only was used for the rapid and efficient collection of platinum from the Karstedt's catalyst solutions, but it also enabled the precise evaluation of the platinum content in the Karstedt's catalysts, even if this platinum content was extremely low (i.e., 0.05 ppm). Moreover, these platinum specimens that were efficiently collected from the Karstedt's catalyst solutions could be directly used for the evaluation of platinum without the need for pretreatment processes, such as calcination and digestion with hydrofluoric acid, that were traditionally used prior to testing via inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry in conventional methods.

  16. Single-Atom Catalyst of Platinum Supported on Titanium Nitride for Selective Electrochemical Reactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Sungeun; Kim, Jiwhan; Tak, Young Joo; Soon, Aloysius; Lee, Hyunjoo

    2016-02-05

    As a catalyst, single-atom platinum may provide an ideal structure for platinum minimization. Herein, a single-atom catalyst of platinum supported on titanium nitride nanoparticles were successfully prepared with the aid of chlorine ligands. Unlike platinum nanoparticles, the single-atom active sites predominantly produced hydrogen peroxide in the electrochemical oxygen reduction with the highest mass activity reported so far. The electrocatalytic oxidation of small organic molecules, such as formic acid and methanol, also exhibited unique selectivity on the single-atom platinum catalyst. A lack of platinum ensemble sites changed the reaction pathway for the oxygen-reduction reaction toward a two-electron pathway and formic acid oxidation toward direct dehydrogenation, and also induced no activity for the methanol oxidation. This work demonstrates that single-atom platinum can be an efficient electrocatalyst with high mass activity and unique selectivity. © 2016 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  17. Monodisperse Platinum and Rhodium Nanoparticles as Model Heterogeneous Catalysts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grass, Michael Edward [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States)

    2008-09-01

    Model heterogeneous catalysts have been synthesized and studied to better understand how the surface structure of noble metal nanoparticles affects catalytic performance. In this project, monodisperse rhodium and platinum nanoparticles of controlled size and shape have been synthesized by solution phase polyol reduction, stabilized by polyvinylpyrrolidone (PVP). Model catalysts have been developed using these nanoparticles by two methods: synthesis of mesoporous silica (SBA-15) in the presence of nanoparticles (nanoparticle encapsulation, NE) to form a composite of metal nanoparticles supported on SBA-15 and by deposition of the particles onto a silicon wafer using Langmuir-Blodgett (LB) monolayer deposition. The particle shapes were analyzed by transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and high resolution TEM (HRTEM) and the sizes were determined by TEM, X-ray diffraction (XRD), and in the case of NE samples, room temperature H2 and CO adsorption isotherms. Catalytic studies were carried out in homebuilt gas-phase reactors. For the nanoparticles supported on SBA-15, the catalysts are in powder form and were studied using the homebuilt systems as plug-flow reactors. In the case of nanoparticles deposited on silicon wafers, the same systems were operated as batch reactors. This dissertation has focused on the synthesis, characterization, and reaction studies of model noble metal heterogeneous catalysts. Careful control of particle size and shape has been accomplished though solution phase synthesis of Pt and Rh nanoparticles in order to elucidate further structure-reactivity relationships in noble metal catalysis.

  18. Carbons and carbon supported catalysts in hydroprocessing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Furimsky, Edward

    2009-07-01

    This book is a comprehensive summary of recent research in the field and covers all areas of carbons and carbon materials. The potential application of carbon supports, particularly those of carbon black (CB) and activated carbon (AC) in hydroprocessing catalysis are covered. Novel carbon materials such as carbon fibers and carbon nano tubes (CNT) are also covered, including the more recent developments in the use of fullerenes in hydroprocessing applications. Although the primary focus of this book is on carbons and carbon supported catalysts, it also identifies the difference in the effect of carbon supports compared with the oxidic supports, particularly that of the Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}. The difference in catalyst activity and stability was estimated using both model compounds and real feeds under variable conditions. The conditions applied during the preparation of carbon supported catalysts are also comprehensively covered and include various methods of pretreatment of carbon supports to enhance catalyst performance. The model compounds results consistently show higher hydrodesulfurization and hydrodeoxygenation activities of carbon supported catalysts than that of the Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} supported catalysts. Also, the deactivation of the former catalysts by coke deposition was much less evident. Chapter 6.3.1.3 is on carbon-supported catalysts: coal-derived liquids.

  19. Platinum group metal recovery and catalyst manufacturing process

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chung, H. S.; Kim, Y. S.; Yoo, J. H.; Lee, H. S.; Ahn, D. H.; Kim, K. R.; Lee, S. H.; Paek, S. W.; Kang, H. S.

    1998-03-01

    The fission product nuclides generated during the irradiation of reactor fuel include many useful elements, among them platinum group metal such as ruthenium, rhodium and palladium which are of great industrial importance, occur rarely in nature and are highly valuable. In this research, the authors reviewed various PGM recovery methods. Recovery of palladium from seven-component simulated waste solution was conducted by selective precipitation method. The recovery yield was more than 99.5% and the purity of the product was more than 99%. Wet-proof catalyst was prepared with the recovered palladium. The specific surface area of the catalyst support was more than 400 m{sup 2}/g. The content of palladium impregnated on the support was 10 wt.%. Hydrogen isotope exchange efficiency of 93 % to equilibrium with small amount of the catalyst was obtained. It was turned out possible to consider using such palladium or other very low active PGM materials in applications where its actively is unimportant as in nuclear industries. (author). 63 refs., 38 tabs., 36 figs.

  20. Determination of surface coverage of catalysts : temperature programmed experiments on platinum and iridium sponge catalysts after low temperature ammonia oxidation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van den Broek, A.C.M.; Grondelle, van J.; Santen, van R.A.

    1999-01-01

    The activity of iridium and platinum sponge catalysts was studied in the low temperature gas phase oxidation of ammonia with oxygen. Under the reaction conditions used, iridium was found to be more active and more selective to nitrogen than platinum. Furthermore it was established from activity

  1. Power generation in microbial fuel cells using platinum group metal-free cathode catalyst: Effect of the catalyst loading on performance and costs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santoro, Carlo; Kodali, Mounika; Herrera, Sergio; Serov, Alexey; Ieropoulos, Ioannis; Atanassov, Plamen

    2018-02-28

    Platinum group metal-free (PGM-free) catalyst with different loadings was investigated in air breathing electrodes microbial fuel cells (MFCs). Firstly, the electrocatalytic activity towards oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) of the catalyst was investigated by rotating ring disk electrode (RRDE) setup with different catalyst loadings. The results showed that higher loading led to an increased in the half wave potential and the limiting current and to a further decrease in the peroxide production. The electrons transferred also slightly increased with the catalyst loading up to the value of ≈3.75. This variation probably indicates that the catalyst investigated follow a 2x2e - transfer mechanism. The catalyst was integrated within activated carbon pellet-like air-breathing cathode in eight different loadings varying between 0.1 mgcm -2 and 10 mgcm -2 . Performance were enhanced gradually with the increase in catalyst content. Power densities varied between 90 ± 9 μWcm -2 and 262 ± 4 μWcm -2 with catalyst loading of 0.1 mgcm -2 and 10 mgcm -2 respectively. Cost assessments related to the catalyst performance are presented. An increase in catalyst utilization led to an increase in power generated with a substantial increase in the whole costs. Also a decrease in performance due to cathode/catalyst deterioration over time led to a further increase in the costs.

  2. Development of Ultra-Low Platinum Alloy Cathode Catalysts for PEM Fuel Cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Popov, Branko N. [Univ. of South Carolina, Columbia, SC (United States). Dept. of Chemical Engineering; Weidner, John [Univ. of South Carolina, Columbia, SC (United States)

    2016-01-07

    The goal of this project is to synthesize a low cost PEM fuel cell cathode catalyst and support with optimized average mass activity, stability of mass activity, initial high current density performance under H2/air (power density), and catalyst and support stability able to meet 2017 DOE targets for electrocatalysts for transportation applications. Pt*/ACCS-2 catalyst was synthesized according to a novel methodology developed at USC through: (i) surface modification, (ii) metal catalyzed pyrolysis and (iii) chemical leaching to remove excess meal used to dope the support. Pt* stands for suppressed platinum catalyst synthesized with Co doped platinum. The procedure results in increasing carbon graphitization, inclusion of cobalt in the bulk and formation of non-metallic active sites on the carbon surface. Catalytic activity of the support shows an onset potential of 0.86 V for the oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) with well-defined kinetic and mass transfer regions and 2.5% H2O2 production. Pt*/ACCS-2 catalyst durability under 0.6-1.0 V potential cycling and support stability under 1.0-1.5 V potential cycling was evaluated. The results indicated excellent catalyst and support performance under simulated start-up/shut down operating conditions (1.0 – 1.5 V, 5000 cycles) which satisfy DOE 2017 catalyst and support durability and activity. The 30% Pt*/ACCS-2 catalyst showed high initial mass activity of 0.34 A/mgPGM at 0.9 ViR-free and loss of mass activity of 45% after 30,000 cycles (0.6-1.0 V). The catalyst performance under H2-air fuel cell operating conditions showed only 24 mV (iR-free) loss at 0.8 A/cm2 with an ECSA loss of 42% after 30,000 cycles (0.6-1.0 V). The support stability under 1.0-1.5 V potential cycling showed mass activity loss of 50% and potential loss of 8 mV (iR-free) at 1.5 A/cm2. The ECSA loss was 22% after 5,000 cycles. Furthermore, the Pt*/ACCS-2 catalyst showed an

  3. Development of Water Detritiation Process Using the Hydrophobic Platinum Catalyst

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ahn, D.H.; Paek, S.; Choi, H.J.; Kim, K.R.; Chung, H.; Yim, S.P.; Lee, M.S.

    2006-01-01

    Radioactive emissions and occupational doses by tritium are mainly caused by tritiated water escaping from equipment in the nuclear industry. Improving the leak-tightness of equipment is effective in reducing emissions and internal dose but is not a long-term solution. Water detritiation was consider to be the most effective tritium control option since tritium is removed right from the source. The WTRF (Wolsong Tritium Removal Facility) is under construction now with the completion date of June, 2006 in Korea. It is designed to remove tritium from tritiated heavy water in each of the existing four Candu units at Wolsong site. We developed a hydrophobic platinum catalyst (Pt/SDBC catalyst) that would be used at the LPCE (Liquid Phase Catalytic Exchange) column in the WTRF. The catalytic rate constants of the newly developed catalyst for the deuterium exchange reaction between water vapor and hydrogen gas were measured in a recycle reactor. The catalytic rate constants of the Pt/SDBC catalyst decreased with reaction time and were much greater than that required, 2.0 x 10 -4 mol (D 2 )/s/g(pellet) in the design of the WTRF. Tritium removal efficiency of the WTRF, which is important for a safe and reliable operation of the facility, depends on the design and operating variables. A theoretical model based on the design and operating variables of the LPCE process was set up, and the equations between the parameters were derived. Numerical calculation result from a computer program shows steep increase of the detritiation factor of the LPCE process with respect to temperature increase and mild increase with respect to pressure decrease. The other parametric study shows that the calculated detritiation factors increase as the catalyst efficiency, number of theoretical stages of hydrophilic packing, the detritiation factor of cryogenic distillation system and the total number of sections increase. We also proceeded with the experiments for the hydrogen isotopic exchange

  4. Synthesis and characterization of platinum supported on alumina doped with cerium catalyst

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yusof Abdullah; Abd Fatah Awang Mat; Mohd Ali Sufi; Sarimah Mahat; Razali Kassim; Nurhaslinda Abdullah.

    1996-03-01

    The synthesis and characterization of gamma-alumina doped with cerium as platinum support for the automobile exhaust catalyst are described. Platinum/alumina/ceria catalyst were prepared by impregnation of hexachloroplatinic acid and sintered at 500 degree Celsius to obtain metal dispersions of 1.0 wt%. Catalyst distribution inside the powder and the effects of the addition of cerium to alumina were analyzed by the scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and x-ray fluorescence spectroscopy (XRF). The results showed that the alumina - supported catalysts contained well dispersion of the noble metal

  5. Separation of deuterium by H2/H2O reaction with hydrophobic platinum catalyst

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kitamoto, A.; Takashima, Y.; Shimizu, M.

    The separation performance of a trickle bed exchange column packed with a hydrophobic or waterproof catalyst is related to operating conditions such as hydrogen surface velocity, water flow rate, and temperature. The optimum carrier type and catalyst platinum content were determined. The continuous injection of roughly 10 3 ppm O 2 regenerates the catalyst effectively. The ratio of hydrophobic catalyst to hydrophilic packing is an important factor in increasing the exchange rate in deuterium extraction

  6. Hydrogen Temperature-Programmed Desorption (H2 TPD) of Supported Platinum Catalysts.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Koningsberger, D.C.; Miller, J.T.; Meyers, B.L.; Modica, F.S.; Lane, G.S.; Vaarkamp, M.

    1993-01-01

    Hydrogen temperature-programmed desorption (TPD) of supported platinum catalysts, Pt/KLTL, Pt/H-LTL, Pt/K-MAZ, Pt/H-MAZ, Pt/-Al2O3, and Pt/SiO2, was performed after hydrogen reduction at 300, 450, or 650°C. For all catalysts, reversible desorption of chemisorbed hydrogen occurred at approximately

  7. The role of support and promoter on the oxidation of sulfur dioxide using platinum based catalysts

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Koutsopoulos, Sotiris; Rasmussen, Søren Birk; Eriksen, Kim Michael

    2006-01-01

    The catalytic oxidation of SO2 to SO3 was studied over platinum based catalysts in the absence and the presence of dopants. The active metal was supported on silica gel or titania (anatase) by impregnation. The activities of the silica supported catalysts were found to follow the order PtRh/SiO2 ...

  8. Highly active carbon supported Pd cathode catalysts for direct formic acid fuel cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mikolajczuk-Zychora, A.; Borodzinski, A.; Kedzierzawski, P.; Mierzwa, B.; Mazurkiewicz-Pawlicka, M.; Stobinski, L.; Ciecierska, E.; Zimoch, A.; Opałło, M.

    2016-12-01

    One of the drawbacks of low-temperature fuel cells is high price of platinum-based catalysts used for the electroreduction of oxygen at the cathode of the fuel cell. The aim of this work is to develop the palladium catalyst that will replace commonly used platinum cathode catalysts. A series of palladium catalysts for oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) were prepared and tested on the cathode of Direct Formic Acid Fuel Cell (DFAFC). Palladium nanoparticles were deposited on the carbon black (Vulcan) and on multiwall carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) surface by reduction of palladium(II) acetate dissolved in ethanol. Hydrazine was used as a reducing agent. The effect of functionalization of the carbon supports on the catalysts physicochemical properties and the ORR catalytic activity on the cathode of DFAFC was studied. The supports were functionalized by treatment in nitric acid for 4 h at 80 °C. The structure of the prepared catalysts has been characterized by thermogravimetric analysis (TGA), X-ray diffraction (XRD), transmission electron microscope (TEM) and cyclic voltammetry (CV). Hydrophilicity of the catalytic layers was determined by measuring contact angles of water droplets. The performance of the prepared catalysts has been compared with that of the commercial 20 wt.% Pt/C (Premetek) catalyst. The maximum power density obtained for the best palladium catalyst, deposited on the surface of functionalized carbon black, is the same as that for the commercial Pt/C (Premetek). Palladium is cheaper than platinum, therefore the developed cathode catalyst is promising for future applications.

  9. Highly active carbon supported Pd cathode catalysts for direct formic acid fuel cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mikolajczuk-Zychora, A., E-mail: amikolajczuk@ichf.edu.pl [Institute of Physical Chemistry, Polish Academy of Sciences, Kasprzaka 44/52, 01-224 Warsaw (Poland); Borodzinski, A.; Kedzierzawski, P.; Mierzwa, B. [Institute of Physical Chemistry, Polish Academy of Sciences, Kasprzaka 44/52, 01-224 Warsaw (Poland); Mazurkiewicz-Pawlicka, M. [Faculty of Materials Science and Engineering, Warsaw University of Technology, Wołoska 141, 02-507 Warsaw (Poland); Faculty of Chemical and Process Engineering, Warsaw University of Technology, Warynskiego 1, Warsaw (Poland); Stobinski, L. [Institute of Physical Chemistry, Polish Academy of Sciences, Kasprzaka 44/52, 01-224 Warsaw (Poland); Faculty of Chemical and Process Engineering, Warsaw University of Technology, Warynskiego 1, Warsaw (Poland); Ciecierska, E. [Faculty of Materials Science and Engineering, Warsaw University of Technology, Wołoska 141, 02-507 Warsaw (Poland); Zimoch, A.; Opałło, M. [Institute of Physical Chemistry, Polish Academy of Sciences, Kasprzaka 44/52, 01-224 Warsaw (Poland)

    2016-12-01

    Highlights: • Palladium catalyst used on the cathode DFAFC is comparable to commercial platinum catalyst. • The treatment of carbon supports in nitric acid(V) increases the electrochemically available metal surface area and the catalytic activity in oxygen reduction reaction of catalysts. - Abstract: One of the drawbacks of low-temperature fuel cells is high price of platinum-based catalysts used for the electroreduction of oxygen at the cathode of the fuel cell. The aim of this work is to develop the palladium catalyst that will replace commonly used platinum cathode catalysts. A series of palladium catalysts for oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) were prepared and tested on the cathode of Direct Formic Acid Fuel Cell (DFAFC). Palladium nanoparticles were deposited on the carbon black (Vulcan) and on multiwall carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) surface by reduction of palladium(II) acetate dissolved in ethanol. Hydrazine was used as a reducing agent. The effect of functionalization of the carbon supports on the catalysts physicochemical properties and the ORR catalytic activity on the cathode of DFAFC was studied. The supports were functionalized by treatment in nitric acid for 4 h at 80 °C. The structure of the prepared catalysts has been characterized by thermogravimetric analysis (TGA), X-ray diffraction (XRD), transmission electron microscope (TEM) and cyclic voltammetry (CV). Hydrophilicity of the catalytic layers was determined by measuring contact angles of water droplets. The performance of the prepared catalysts has been compared with that of the commercial 20 wt.% Pt/C (Premetek) catalyst. The maximum power density obtained for the best palladium catalyst, deposited on the surface of functionalized carbon black, is the same as that for the commercial Pt/C (Premetek). Palladium is cheaper than platinum, therefore the developed cathode catalyst is promising for future applications.

  10. Platinum-gold nanoclusters as catalyst for direct methanol fuel cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giorgi, L; Giorgi, R; Gagliardi, S; Serra, E; Alvisi, M; Signore, M A; Piscopiello, E

    2011-10-01

    Nanosized platinum-gold alloys clusters have been deposited on gas diffusion electrode by sputter deposition. The deposits were characterized by FE-SEM, TEM and XPS in order to verify the formation of alloy nanoparticles and to study the influence of deposition technique on the nanomorphology. The deposition by sputtering process allowed a uniform distribution of metal particles on porous surface of carbon supports. Typical island growth mode was observed with the formation of a dispersed metal nanoclusters (mean size about 5 nm). Cyclic voltammetry was used to determine the electrochemical active surface and the electrocatalytic performance of the PtAu electrocatalysts for methanol oxidation reaction. The data were re-calculated in the form of mass specific activity (MSA). The sputter-catalyzed electrodes showed higher performance and stability compared to commercial catalysts.

  11. Investigation of altenative carbon materials for fuel-cell catalyst support

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Mikkel Juul

    In order to ensure high utilization of the catalyst material in a polymer electrolyte membrane fuel cell (PEMFC) it is usually fixed in the form of nanoparticles on a supporting material. The catalyst is platinum or a platinum alloy, and the commonly used support is carbon black (CB). Although...... structured carbon forms such as graphitized CBs, carbon nanotubes (CNTs), and carbon nanofibres (CNFs). This thesis concerns the investigation of an array of different materials which may prospec-tively replace the conventional materials used in the catalyst. The study comprised 13 carbon samples which...... nanotubes (GMWCNTs), and graphitized carbon nanofibre (CNF), while the Pt/C samples were platinized samples of some of the CNTs and CNFs (Pt/FWCNT, Pt/GMWCNT, and Pt/CNF, respectively) as well as two commercial Pt/CB reference catalysts. Comparative analyses have been performed in order to be able to assess...

  12. Gaseous exchange reaction of deuterium between hydrogen and water on hydrophobic catalyst supporting platinum

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Izawa, Hirozumi; Isomura, Shohei; Nakane, Ryohei.

    1979-01-01

    The deuterium exchange reaction between hydrogen and water in the gas phase where the fed hydrogen gas is saturated with water vapor is studied experimentally by use of the proper hydrophobic catalysts supporting platinum. It is found that the activities of those catalysts for this reaction system are very high compared with the other known ones for the systems in which gas and liquid should coexist on catalyst surfaces, and that the apparent catalytic activity becomes larger as the amount of platinum supported on a catalyst particle increases. By analyses of the data the following informations are obtained. The exchange reaction can be expressed by a first order reversible reaction kinetics. The pore diffusion in the catalyst particles has significant effect on the overall reaction mechanisms. (author)

  13. Catalyst for Carbon Monoxide Oxidation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davis, Patricia; Brown, Kenneth; VanNorman, John; Brown, David; Upchurch, Billy; Schryer, David; Miller, Irvin

    2010-01-01

    In many applications, it is highly desirable to operate a CO2 laser in a sealed condition, for in an open system the laser requires a continuous flow of laser gas to remove the dissociation products that occur in the discharge zone of the laser, in order to maintain a stable power output. This adds to the operating cost of the laser, and in airborne or space applications, it also adds to the weight penalty of the laser. In a sealed CO2 laser, a small amount of CO2 gas is decomposed in the electrical discharge zone into corresponding quantities of CO and O2. As the laser continues to operate, the concentration of CO2 decreases, while the concentrations of CO and O2 correspondingly increase. The increasing concentration of O2 reduces laser power, because O2 scavenges electrons in the electrical discharge, thereby causing arcing in the electric discharge and a loss of the energetic electrons required to boost CO2 molecules to lasing energy levels. As a result, laser power decreases rapidly. The primary object of this invention is to provide a catalyst that, by composition of matter alone, contains chemisorbed water within and upon its structure. Such bound moisture renders the catalyst highly active and very long-lived, such that only a small quantity of it needs to be used with a CO2 laser under ambient operating conditions. This object is achieved by a catalyst that consists essentially of about 1 to 40 percent by weight of one or more platinum group metals (Pt, Pd, Rh, Ir, Ru, Os, Pt being preferred); about 1 to 90 percent by weight of one or more oxides of reducible metals having multiple valence states (such as Sn, Ti, Mn, Cu, and Ce, with SnO2 being preferred); and about 1 to 90 percent by weight of a compound that can bind water to its structure (such as silica gel, calcium chloride, magnesium sulfate, hydrated alumina, and magnesium perchlorate, with silica gel being preferred). Especially beneficial results are obtained when platinum is present in the

  14. Catalytic transformation of carbon dioxide and methane into syngas over ruthenium and platinum supported hydroxyapatites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rêgo De Vasconcelos, Bruna; Zhao, Lulu; Sharrock, Patrick; Nzihou, Ange; Pham Minh, Doan, E-mail: doan.phamminh@mines-albi.fr

    2016-12-30

    Highlights: • Formation of nanoparticles of Pt and Ru on hydroxyapatite surface support (HAP). • Pt catalyst more active and stable than Ru catalyst in dry reforming of methane (DRM). • Low carbon deposition on the surface of Pt catalyst after reaction. • Quantification of water as by-product of the reaction for the first time. • Good mass balance of the reaction. - Abstract: This work focused on the catalytic transformation of methane (CH{sub 4}) and carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) into syngas (mixture of CO and H{sub 2}). Ruthenium- and platinum-based catalysts were prepared using hydroxyapatite (HAP) as catalyst support. Different methods for metal deposition were used including incipient wetness impregnation (IWI), excess liquid phase impregnation (LIM), and cationic exchange (CEX). Metal particle size varied in large range from less than 1 nm to dozens nm. All catalysts were active at 400–700 °C but only Pt catalyst prepared by IWI method (Pt/HAP IWI) was found stable. The catalytic performance of Pt/HAP IWI could be comparable with the literature data on noble metal-based catalysts, prepared on metal oxide supports. For the first time, water was experimentally quantified as a by-product of the reaction. This helped to correctly buckle the mass balance of the process.

  15. Catalytic transformation of carbon dioxide and methane into syngas over ruthenium and platinum supported hydroxyapatites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rêgo De Vasconcelos, Bruna; Zhao, Lulu; Sharrock, Patrick; Nzihou, Ange; Pham Minh, Doan

    2016-01-01

    Highlights: • Formation of nanoparticles of Pt and Ru on hydroxyapatite surface support (HAP). • Pt catalyst more active and stable than Ru catalyst in dry reforming of methane (DRM). • Low carbon deposition on the surface of Pt catalyst after reaction. • Quantification of water as by-product of the reaction for the first time. • Good mass balance of the reaction. - Abstract: This work focused on the catalytic transformation of methane (CH 4 ) and carbon dioxide (CO 2 ) into syngas (mixture of CO and H 2 ). Ruthenium- and platinum-based catalysts were prepared using hydroxyapatite (HAP) as catalyst support. Different methods for metal deposition were used including incipient wetness impregnation (IWI), excess liquid phase impregnation (LIM), and cationic exchange (CEX). Metal particle size varied in large range from less than 1 nm to dozens nm. All catalysts were active at 400–700 °C but only Pt catalyst prepared by IWI method (Pt/HAP IWI) was found stable. The catalytic performance of Pt/HAP IWI could be comparable with the literature data on noble metal-based catalysts, prepared on metal oxide supports. For the first time, water was experimentally quantified as a by-product of the reaction. This helped to correctly buckle the mass balance of the process.

  16. Dearomatization of jet fuel on irradiated platinum-supported catalyst

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mucka, V.; Ostrihonova, A.; Kopernicky, I.; Mikula, O.

    1983-01-01

    The effect of ionizing radiation ( 60 Co #betta#-rays) on Pt-supported catalyst used for the dearomatization of jet fuel with distillation in the range 395 to 534 K has been studied. Pre-irradiation of the catalyst with doses in the range 10 2 to 5 x 10 4 Gy leads to the partial catalyst activation. Irradiation of the catalyst enhances its resistance to catalyst poisons, particularly to sulphur-compounds, and this is probably the reason for its catalytic activity being approx. 60 to 100% greater than that of un-irradiated catalyst. Optimum conditions for dearomatization on the irradiated catalyst were found and, by means of a rotary three-factorial experiment, it was shown that these lie at lower temperatures and lower pressures than those for un-irradiated catalyst. (author)

  17. Platinum-nickel alloy nanoparticles supported on carbon for 3-pentanone hydrogenation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhu, Lihua, E-mail: lihuazhu@stu.xmu.edu.cn [School of Metallurgy and Chemical Engineering, Jiangxi University of Science and Technology, Ganzhou 341000, Jiang Xi (China); Department of Chemical and Biochemical Engineering, National Engineering Laboratory for Green Productions of Alcohols-Ethers-Esters, College of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Xiamen University, Xiamen 361005 (China); Zheng, Tuo; Yu, Changlin [School of Metallurgy and Chemical Engineering, Jiangxi University of Science and Technology, Ganzhou 341000, Jiang Xi (China); Zheng, Jinbao [Department of Chemical and Biochemical Engineering, National Engineering Laboratory for Green Productions of Alcohols-Ethers-Esters, College of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Xiamen University, Xiamen 361005 (China); Tang, Zhenbiao [School of Metallurgy and Chemical Engineering, Jiangxi University of Science and Technology, Ganzhou 341000, Jiang Xi (China); Zhang, Nuowei [Department of Chemical and Biochemical Engineering, National Engineering Laboratory for Green Productions of Alcohols-Ethers-Esters, College of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Xiamen University, Xiamen 361005 (China); Shu, Qing [School of Metallurgy and Chemical Engineering, Jiangxi University of Science and Technology, Ganzhou 341000, Jiang Xi (China); Chen, Bing H., E-mail: chenbh@xmu.edu.cn [Department of Chemical and Biochemical Engineering, National Engineering Laboratory for Green Productions of Alcohols-Ethers-Esters, College of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Xiamen University, Xiamen 361005 (China)

    2017-07-01

    Highlights: • The PtNi/Ni(OH){sub 2}/C catalyst was successfully synthesized at room temperature. • PtNi alloy/C was obtained after PtNi/Ni(OH){sub 2}/C reduced in hydrogen at 300 °C. • Nanostructures of the PtNi catalysts were characterized by numerous techniques. • PtNi alloy/C exhibited high catalytic activity for 3-pentanone hydrogenation. - Abstract: In this work, we prepared the Ni/Ni(OH){sub 2}/C sample at room temperature by hydrazine hydrate reducing method. The galvanic replacement reaction method was applied to deposit platinum on the Ni/Ni(OH){sub 2} nanoparticles, to prepare the PtNi/Ni(OH){sub 2}/C catalyst. The catalyst of platinum-nickel alloy nanoparticles supported on carbon (signed as PtNi/C) was obtained by the thermal treatment of PtNi/Ni(OH){sub 2}/C in flowing hydrogen at 300 °C for 2 h. The size, nanostructure, surface properties, Pt and Ni chemical states of the PtNi/C catalyst were analyzed using powder X-ray diffraction (XRD), transmission electron microscope (TEM) and high resolution transmission electron microscope (HRTEM), high-angle annular dark-field scanning TEM (HAADF-STEM) and elemental energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDS) line scanning, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and high-sensitivity low-energy ion scattering spectroscopy (HS-LEIS) techniques. The as-synthesized PtNi/C catalyst showed enhanced catalytic performance relative to the Ni/Ni(OH){sub 2}/C, Ni/C, Pt/C and PtNi/Ni(OH){sub 2}/C catalysts for 3-pentanone hydrogenation due to electron synergistic effect between Pt and Ni species in the PtNi/C catalyst. The PtNi/C catalyst also had exceling stability, with industrial application value.

  18. Homogeneous deuterium exchange using rhenium and platinum chloride catalysts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fawdry, R.M.

    1979-01-01

    Previous studies of homogeneous hydrogen isotope exchange are mostly confined to one catalyst, the tetrachloroplatinite salt. Recent reports have indicated that chloride salts of iridium and rhodium may also be homogeneous exchange catalysts similar to the tetrachloroplatinite, but with much lower activities. Exchange by these homogeneous catalysts is frequently accompanied by metal precipitation with the termination of homogeneous exchange, particularly in the case of alkane exchange. The studies presented in this thesis describe two different approaches to overcome this limitation of homogeneous hydrogen isotope exchange catalysts. The first approach was to improve the stability of an existing homogeneous catalyst and the second was to develop a new homogeneous exchange catalyst which is free of the instability limitation

  19. Electrochemical titration of hydrogen adsorbed on supported platinum catalysts

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Paseka, Ivo

    2007-01-01

    Roč. 329, - (2007), s. 161-163 ISSN 0926-860X R&D Projects: GA ČR GA104/03/0409 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z40320502 Keywords : platinum * hydrogen adsorption * specific surface area Subject RIV: CA - Inorganic Chemistry Impact factor: 3.166, year: 2007

  20. Electrochemical DNA biosensors based on platinum nanoparticles combined carbon nanotubes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhu Ningning; Chang Zhu; He Pingang; Fang Yuzhi

    2005-01-01

    Platinum nanoparticles were used in combination with multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) for fabricating sensitivity-enhanced electrochemical DNA biosensor. Multi-walled carbon nanotubes and platinum nanoparticles were dispersed in Nafion, which were used to fabricate the modification of the glassy carbon electrode (GCE) surface. Oligonucleotides with amino groups at the 5' end were covalently linked onto carboxylic groups of MWCNTs on the electrode. The hybridization events were monitored by differential pulse voltammetry (DPV) measurement of the intercalated daunomycin. Due to the ability of carbon nanotubes to promote electron-transfer reactions, the high catalytic activities of platinum nanoparticles for chemical reactions, the sensitivity of presented electrochemical DNA biosensors was remarkably improved. The detection limit of the method for target DNA was 1.0 x 10 -11 mol l -1

  1. Structure, activity, and stability of platinum alloys as catalysts for the oxygen reduction reaction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vej-Hansen, Ulrik Grønbjerg

    In this thesis I present our work on theoretical modelling of platinum alloys as catalysts for the Oxygen Reduction Reaction (ORR). The losses associated with the kinetics of the ORR is the main bottleneck in low-temperature fuel cells for transport applications, and more active catalysts...... are essential for wide-spread use of this technology. platinum alloys have shown great promise as more active catalysts, which are still stable under reaction conditions. We have investigated these systems on multiple scales, using either Density Functional Theory (DFT) or Effective Medium Theory (EMT......), depending on the length and time scales involved. Using DFT, we show how diffusion barriers in transition metal alloys in the L12 structure depend on the alloying energy, supporting the assumption that an intrinsically more stable alloy is also more stable towards diffusion-related degradation...

  2. Characteristics improvement of hydrophobic polytetrafluoroethylene-platinum catalysts for tritium separation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Popescu, I.; Ionita, Gh.; Dobrinescu, D.; Varlam, C.; Stefanescu, I.

    2006-01-01

    Full text: Based on the long experience of the authors in the preparation, testing and evaluation of the performances of hydrophobic catalysts and based on the reviewed references, this paper presents up-to-date R and D activities on the preparation methods and applications of the hydrophobic catalysts in tritium separation. The objectives of the paper are: how to improve the characteristics and performance of platinum hydrophobic catalysts; to assess and find a new procedure for the preparation of a new improved hydrophobic catalyst. From reviewed references one can conclude that platinum is the most active and efficient catalytic metal while the polytetrafluoroethylene is the best wet-proofing agent. A new improved hydrophobic Pt-catalyst has been proposed and its testing is now underway. The main steps and experimental conditions of preparation are thoroughly discussed. A new wet-proofing agent and new binders (titanium dioxide, cerium dioxide, zirconium dioxide) with a catalytic role are proposed and tested. The physico-structural parameters of the improved catalyst have been determined and are discussed in detail. The new proposal is a promising idea to improve the performance of conventional hydrophobic Pt-catalysts. (authors)

  3. Highly Durable Platinum Single-Atom Alloy Catalyst for Electrochemical Reactions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kim, Jiwhan; Roh, Chi-Woo; Sahoo, Suman Kalyan

    2018-01-01

    Single atomic Pt catalyst can offer efficient utilization of the expensive platinum and provide unique selectivity because it lacks ensemble sites. However, designing such a catalyst with high Pt loading and good durability is very challenging. Here, single atomic Pt catalyst supported on antimony...... functional theory calculations show that replacing Sb sites with Pt atoms in the bulk phase or at the surface of SbSn or ATO is energetically favorable. The Pt1/ATO shows superior activity and durability for formic acid oxidation reaction, compared to a commercial Pt/C catalyst. The single atomic Pt...... structure is retained even after a harsh durability test, which is performed by repeating cyclic voltammetry in the range of 0.05–1.4 V for 1800 cycles. A full cell is fabricated for direct formic acid fuel cell using the Pt1/ATO as an anode catalyst, and an order of magnitude higher cell power is obtained...

  4. Nanolithographic Fabrication and Heterogeneous Reaction Studies ofTwo-Dimensional Platinum Model Catalyst Systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Contreras, Anthony Marshall [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States)

    2006-05-20

    In order to better understand the fundamental components that govern catalytic activity, two-dimensional model platinum nanocatalyst arrays have been designed and fabricated. These catalysts arrays are meant to model the interplay of the metal and support important to industrial heterogeneous catalytic reactions. Photolithography and sub-lithographic techniques such as electron beam lithography, size reduction lithography and nanoimprint lithography have been employed to create these platinum nanoarrays. Both in-situ and ex-situ surface science techniques and catalytic reaction measurements were used to correlate the structural parameters of the system to catalytic activity.

  5. Electrochemical behavior of platinum nanoparticles on a carbon xerogel support modified with a [(trifluoromethyl)-benzenesulfonyl]imide electrolyte.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Bing; Mei, Hua; DesMarteau, Darryl; Creager, Stephen E

    2014-12-11

    A monoprotic [(trifluoromethyl)benzenesulfonyl]imide (SI) superacid electrolyte was used to covalently modify a mesoporous carbon xerogel (CX) support via reaction of the corresponding trifluoromethyl aryl sulfonimide diazonium zwitterion with the carbon surface. Electrolyte attachment was demonstrated by elemental analysis, acid-base titration, and thermogravimetric analysis. The ion-exchange capacity of the fluoroalkyl-aryl-sulfonimide-grafted carbon xerogel (SI-CX) was ∼0.18 mequiv g(-1), as indicated by acid-base titration. Platinum nanoparticles were deposited onto the SI-grafted carbon xerogel samples by the impregnation and reduction method, and these materials were employed to fabricate polyelectrolyte membrane fuel-cell (PEMFC) electrodes by the decal transfer method. The SI-grafted carbon-xerogel-supported platinum (Pt/SI-CX) was characterized by X-ray diffraction and transmission electron microscopy to determine platinum nanoparticle size and distribution, and the findings are compared with CX-supported platinum catalyst without the grafted SI electrolyte (Pt/CX). Platinum nanoparticle sizes are consistently larger on Pt/SI-CX than on Pt/CX. The electrochemically active surface area (ESA) of platinum catalyst on the Pt/SI-CX and Pt/CX samples was measured with ex situ cyclic voltammetry (CV) using both hydrogen adsorption/desorption and carbon monoxide stripping methods and by in situ CV within membrane electrode assemblies (MEAs). The ESA values for Pt/SI-CX are consistently lower than those for Pt/CX. Some possible reasons for the behavior of samples with and without grafted SI layers and implications for the possible use of SI-grafted carbon layers in PEMFC devices are discussed.

  6. Carbon a support for sulfide catalysts

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vissers, J.P.R.; Lensing, T.J.; Mercx, F.P.M.; Beer, de V.H.J.; Prins, R.

    1983-01-01

    Two types of carbon materials, carbon black composite and carbon covered alumina, were studied for-their use as support for sulfide catalysts. The following parameters were varied: type of carbon black, carbon coverage of the alumina and carbon pretreatment. Pore size distributions were determined

  7. Electrocatalytic activity of atomic layer deposited Pt-Ru catalysts onto N-doped carbon nanotubes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Johansson, A.-C.; Larsen, J.V.; Verheijen, M.A.; Haugshøj, K.B.; Clausen, H.; Kessels, W.M.M.; Christensen, L.H.; Thomsen, E.V.

    2014-01-01

    Pt-Ru catalysts of various compositions, between 0 and 100 at.% of Ru, were deposited onto N-doped multi-walled carbon nanotubes (N-CNTs) by atomic layer deposition (ALD) at 250 C. The Pt and Ru precursors were trimethyl(methylcyclopentadienyl)platinum (MeCpPtMe3) and

  8. Platinum nanocube catalysts for methanol and ethanol electrooxidation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Han, Sang-Beom; Song, You-Jung; Lee, Jong-Min; Kim, Jy-Yeon; Park, Kyung-Won [Department of Chemical and Environmental Engineering, Soongsil University, Seoul 156-743 (Korea)

    2008-07-15

    We prepared Pt nanocube catalyst with about 3.6 nm in size by a polyol process in the presence of PVP as a stabilizer and Fe ion as a kinetic controller. The crystal structure of Pt nanocube with {l_brace}1 0 0{r_brace} faces was confirmed by field-emission transmission electron microscopy. In a cyclic voltammogram, we found that the Pt nanocube catalyst showed relatively high ratio of the forward anodic peak current to the reverse anodic peak current resulting in less accumulation of residues on the catalyst. The Pt nanocube catalyst with the edge of stepped {l_brace}1 0 0{r_brace} faces was preferable to breakage of CH{sub 3}OH and CH{sub 3}CH{sub 2}OH compared to polycrystalline Pt nanocatalyst. In an electrochemical measurement for methanol and ethanol electrooxidation, the Pt nanocube catalyst showed an excellent catalytic activity, i.e., lower onset potential and higher current density, compared to the polycrystalline Pt nanocatalyst. (author)

  9. Tin-Platinum catalysts interactions on titania and silica

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nava, N.; Del Angel, P.; Salmones, J.; Baggio-Saitovitch, E.; Santiago, P.

    2007-01-01

    Pt-Sn was supported on titania and silica, and the resulting interactions between the components in prepared samples and the resulting interactions between the components before and after treatment with hydrogen were characterized by Moessbauer spectroscopy, X-ray diffraction, Rietveld refinement, high-resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM) and catalytic tests data. Results show the presence of Pt and SnO 2 after calcinations, and Pt 3 Sn, PtSn and PtSn 3 after reduction. Rietveld analysis shows that some Ti 4+ are replaced by Sn 4+ atoms in the titania structure. Finally, HRTEM and the practically absence of activity observed confirms that metallic platinum is encapsulated

  10. Graphene-supported platinum catalysts for fuel cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Seselj, Nedjeljko; Engelbrekt, Christian; Zhang, Jingdong

    2015-01-01

    Increasing concerns with non-renewable energy sources drive research and development of sustainable energy technology. Fuel cells have become a central part in solving challenges associated with energy conversion. This review summarizes recent development of catalysts used for fuel cells over the...

  11. Ionic Liquids as Solvents for Rhodium and Platinum Catalysts Used in Hydrosilylation Reaction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Witold Zielinski

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available A group of imidazolium and pyridinium based ionic liquids has been synthetized, and their ability to dissolve and activate the catalysts used in hydrosilylation reaction of 1-octane and 1,1,1,3,5,5,5-heptamethyltrisiloxane was investigated. An organometallic catalyst as well as inorganic complexes of platinum and rhodium dissolved in ionic liquids were used, forming liquid solutions not miscible with the substrates or with the products of the reaction. The results show that application of such a simple biphasic catalytic system enables reuse of ionic liquid phase with catalysts in multiple reaction cycles reducing the costs and decreasing the amount of catalyst needed per mole of product.

  12. A Robust Fiber Bragg Grating Hydrogen Gas Sensor Using Platinum-Supported Silica Catalyst Film

    OpenAIRE

    Marina Kurohiji; Seiji Ichiriyama; Naoki Yamasaku; Shinji Okazaki; Naoya Kasai; Yusuke Maru; Tadahito Mizutani

    2018-01-01

    A robust fiber Bragg grating (FBG) hydrogen gas sensor for reliable multipoint-leakage monitoring has been developed. The sensing mechanism is based on shifts of center wavelength of the reflection spectra due to temperature change caused by catalytic combustion heat. The sensitive film which consists of platinum-supported silica (Pt/SiO2) catalyst film was obtained using sol-gel method. The precursor solution was composed of hexachloroplatinic acid and commercially available silica precursor...

  13. Electrochemical and microstructural characterization of platinum supported on glassy carbon

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Terzić Sanja

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available The effect of the electrochemical oxidation of glassy carbon on the deposition of platinum particles and the electrocatalytic activity of platinum supported on oxidized glassy carbon were studied for methanol oxidation in H2SO4 solution. Platinum was potentiostatically deposited from H2SO4 + 6mM H2PtCl6 solution. Glassy carbon was anodically polarized in 1 M NaOH at 1.41 V (SCE for 35 and 95 s and in 0.5 M H2SO4 at 2V (SCE for 35; 95 s and 2.25 V for 35 and 95 s. Electrochemical treatment of the GC support leads to a better distribution of platinum on the substrate and has remarkable effect on the activity. The activity of the Pt/GCox electrode for methanol oxidation is larger than that of polycrystalline Pt and by more than one order of magnitude larger than that of a Pt/GC electrode. This increase in activity indicates the pronounced role of the organic residues of the GC support on the properties of Pt particles deposited on glassy carbon.

  14. Tin-Platinum catalysts interactions on titania and silica

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nava, N. [Instituto Mexicano del Petroleo Lazaro Cardenas 152, 07730 Mexico, D.F. (Mexico)], E-mail: tnava@imp.mx; Del Angel, P. [Instituto Mexicano del Petroleo Lazaro Cardenas 152, 07730 Mexico, D.F. (Mexico); Salmones, J. [Instituto Politecnico Nacional-ESIQIE UPALM, 07738 Mexico, D.F. (Mexico); Baggio-Saitovitch, E. [Centro Brasileiro de Pesquisas Fisicas, Rua Dr. Xavier Sigaud 150, 22290-180 Rio de Janeiro, Brasil (Brazil); Santiago, P. [Instituto de Fisica, UNAM, Mexico, D. F., 04510 Mexico (Mexico)

    2007-09-30

    Pt-Sn was supported on titania and silica, and the resulting interactions between the components in prepared samples and the resulting interactions between the components before and after treatment with hydrogen were characterized by Moessbauer spectroscopy, X-ray diffraction, Rietveld refinement, high-resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM) and catalytic tests data. Results show the presence of Pt and SnO{sub 2} after calcinations, and Pt{sub 3}Sn, PtSn and PtSn{sub 3} after reduction. Rietveld analysis shows that some Ti{sup 4+} are replaced by Sn{sup 4+} atoms in the titania structure. Finally, HRTEM and the practically absence of activity observed confirms that metallic platinum is encapsulated.

  15. Structural consideration with respect to the thermal stability of a new platinum supported lanthanum-alumina catalyst

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oudet, F.; Bordes, E.; Courtine, P.; Maxant, G.; Lambert, C.; Guerlet, J.P.

    1987-01-01

    The influence of lanthanum aluminate, LaAlO 3 , on the thermal stability of both alumina and platinum supported alumina catalysts is investigated. In the case of alumina, the stabilization is interpreted in terms of structural coherence between δ-Al 2 O 3 and a three-fold superstructure of LaAlO 3 . The addition of LaAlO 3 , is shown to increase both the dispersion and the resistance to sintering of the platinum supported alumina catalyst. Moreover, lanthanum hexa-aluminate (La-β-Al 2 O 3 ) is present in the platinum catalyst fired at 1150 0 C. These observations are assumed to result for the epitaxial relations between platinum and the lanthanum-alumina support. 23 refs.; 8 figs.; 2 tabs

  16. Electrocatalytic properties of graphite nanofibers-supported platinum catalysts for direct methanol fuel cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Soo-Jin; Park, Jeong-Min; Seo, Min-Kang

    2009-09-01

    Graphite nanofibers (GNFs) treated at various temperatures were used as carbon supports to improve the efficiency of PtRu catalysts. The electrochemical properties of the PtRu/GNFs catalysts were then investigated to evaluate their potential for application in DMFCs. The results indicated that the particle size and dispersibility of PtRu in the catalysts were changed by heat treatment, and the electrochemical activity of the catalysts was improved. Consequently, it was found that heat treatments could have an influence on the surface and structural properties of GNFs, resulting in enhancing an electrocatalytic activity of the catalysts for DMFCs.

  17. A Simple Synthesis of an N-Doped Carbon ORR Catalyst: Hierarchical Micro/Meso/Macro Porosity and Graphitic Shells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Eisenberg, D.; Stroek, W.; Geels, N.J.; Sandu, C.S.; Heller, A.; Yan, N.; Rothenberg, G.

    2016-01-01

    Replacing platinum as an oxygen reduction catalyst is an important scientific and technological challenge. Herein we report a simple synthesis of a complex carbon with very good oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) activity at pH 13. Pyrolysis of magnesium nitrilotriacetate yields a carbon with

  18. Recycling of platinum group metals from the automotive catalysts; Reciclagem de metais do grupo da platina proveniente de catalisadores automotivos

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Benevit, Mariana; Petter, Patricia Melo Halmenschlager; Veit, Hugo Marcelo, E-mail: patymhp@yahoo.com.br [Universidade Federal do Rio Grande do Sul (UFRGS), Porto Alegre, RS (Brazil). Faculdade de Engenharia. Departamento de Materiais

    2014-07-01

    Currently it is very important to use alternative sources of raw material for obtaining metals, avoiding the traditional mining. This work aims to characterize and evaluate the recoverability of platinum group metals present in automotive catalysts. Thus, the catalysts were divided into two groups: the first was catalysts used in 1.0 cars and the second was catalyst used in 2.0 cars. DRX and FRX techniques and chemical analysis performed by ICP/OES was used to characterized these materials. The results showed that there is a significant amount of platinum group elements in catalyst waste, which can be separated and reused. In the next step, hydro and pyrometallurgical routes, for metals extraction from catalyst waste, will be studied. (author)

  19. Platinum Catalysts Supported on Ce, Zr, Pr - Oxides in Catalytic Wet Air Oxidation of Acetic Acid

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Mikulová, Jana; Rossignol, S.; Barbier Jr., J.; Duprez, D.; Kappenstein, C.

    2007-01-01

    Roč. 146, č. 3 (2007), s. 1248-1253 ISSN 0304-3894 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z40720504 Keywords : platinum * cerium oxide * carbonate species Subject RIV: CF - Physical ; Theoretical Chemistry Impact factor: 2.337, year: 2007

  20. Hydrogenation of o-cresol on platinum catalyst: Catalytic experiments and first-principles calculations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Yaping [Department of Physics and Engineering Physics, The University of Tulsa, Tulsa, OK 74104 (United States); Liu, Zhimin [School of Chemical, Biological and Materials Engineering, University of Oklahoma, Norman, OK 73019 (United States); Xue, Wenhua [Department of Physics and Engineering Physics, The University of Tulsa, Tulsa, OK 74104 (United States); Crossley, Steven P.; Jentoft, Friederike C. [School of Chemical, Biological and Materials Engineering, University of Oklahoma, Norman, OK 73019 (United States); Wang, Sanwu, E-mail: sanwu-wang@utulsa.edu [Department of Physics and Engineering Physics, The University of Tulsa, Tulsa, OK 74104 (United States)

    2017-01-30

    Highlights: • Hydrogenation of o-cresol over Pt results in formation of two products. • Dissociation of hydrogen from the −OH group involves a low activation energy. • Following hydrogenation of the aromatic ring forms 2-methyl-cyclohexanone. • Further hydrogenation produces the final product, 2-methyl-cyclohexanol. - Abstract: Catalytic experiments were performed for the hydrogenation of o-cresol in n-dodecane over a platinum catalyst. Batch reactions analyzed with an in-situ ATR IR probe suggest that the hydrogenation results in the formation of the final product, 2-methyl-cyclohexanol, with 2-methyl-cyclohexanone as the intermediate product. Ab initio density-functional theory was employed to investigate the atomic-scale mechanism of o-cresol hydrogenation on the Pt(111) surface. The formation of 2-methyl-cyclohexanone was found to involve two steps. The first step is a hydrogen abstraction, that is, the H atom in the hydroxyl group migrates to the Pt surface. The second step is hydrogenation, that is, the pre-existing H atoms on Pt react with the carbon atoms in the aromatic ring. On the other hand, 2-methyl-cyclohexanonol may be produced through two paths, with activation energies slightly greater than that for the formation of 2-methyl-cyclohexanone. One path involves direct hydrogenation of the aromatic ring. Another path involves three steps, with the partial hydrogenation of the ring as the first step, hydrogen abstraction of the −OH group as the second, and hydrogenation of remaining C atoms and the O atom the last.

  1. Reaction selectivity studies on nanolithographically-fabricated platinum model catalyst arrays

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grunes, Jeffrey Benjamin [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States)

    2004-05-01

    In an effort to understand the molecular ingredients of catalytic activity and selectivity toward the end of tuning a catalyst for 100% selectivity, advanced nanolithography techniques were developed and utilized to fabricate well-ordered two-dimensional model catalyst arrays of metal nanostructures on an oxide support for the investigation of reaction selectivity. In-situ and ex-situ surface science techniques were coupled with catalytic reaction data to characterize the molecular structure of the catalyst systems and gain insight into hydrocarbon conversion in heterogeneous catalysis. Through systematic variation of catalyst parameters (size, spacing, structure, and oxide support) and catalytic reaction conditions (hydrocarbon chain length, temperature, pressures, and gas composition), the data presented in this dissertation demonstrate the ability to direct a reaction by rationally adjusting, through precise control, the design of the catalyst system. Electron beam lithography (EBL) was employed to create platinum nanoparticles on an alumina (Al2O3) support. The Pt nanoparticle spacing (100-150-nm interparticle distance) was varied in these samples, and they were characterized using x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), and atomic force microscopy (AFM), both before and after reactions. The TEM studies showed the 28-nm Pt nanoparticles with 100 and 150-nm interparticle spacing on alumina to be polycrystalline in nature, with crystalline sizes of 3-5 nm. The nanoparticle crystallites increased significantly after heat treatment. The nanoparticles were still mostly polycrystalline in nature, with 2-3 domains. The 28-nm Pt nanoparticles deposited on alumina were removed by the AFM tip in contact mode with a normal force of approximately 30 nN. After heat treatment at 500 C in vacuum for 3 hours, the AFM tip, even at 4000 nN, could not remove the platinum

  2. Active carbon catalyst for heavy oil upgrading

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fukuyama, Hidetsugu; Terai, Satoshi [Technology Research Center, Toyo Engineering Corporation, 1818 Azafujimi, Togo, Mobara-shi, Chiba 297-00017 (Japan); Uchida, Masayuki [Business Planning and Exploring Department, Overseas Business Development and Marketing Division, Toyo Engineering Corporation, 2-8-1 Akanehama, Narashino-shi, Chiba 275-0024 (Japan); Cano, Jose L.; Ancheyta, Jorge [Maya Crude Treatment Project, Instituto Mexicano del Petroleo, Eje Central Lazaro Cardenas No. 152, Col. San Bartolo Atepehuacan, Mexico D.F. 07730 (Mexico)

    2004-11-24

    The active carbon (AC) catalyst was studied by hydrocracking of Middle Eastern vacuum residue (VR) for heavy oil upgrading. It was observed that the active carbon has the affinity to heavy hydrocarbon compounds and adsorption selectivity to asphaltenes, and exhibits better ability to restrict the coke formation during the hydrocracking reaction of VR. The mesopore of active carbon was thought to play an important role for effective conversion of heavy hydrocarbon compounds into lighter fractions restricting carbon formation. The performance of the AC catalyst was examined by continuous hydrocracking by CSTR for the removal of such impurities as sulfur and heavy metals (nickel and vanadium), which are mostly concentrated in the asphaltenes. The AC catalyst was confirmed to be very effective for the removal of heavy metals from Middle Eastern VR, Maya/Istmo VR and Maya VR. The extruded AC catalysts were produced by industrial manufacturing method. The application test of the extruded AC catalyst for ebullating-bed reactor as one of the commercially applicable reactors was carried out at the ebullating-bed pilot plant for 500h. The ebullition of the extruded AC catalyst was successfully traced and confirmed by existing {gamma}-ray density meter. The extruded AC catalyst showed stable performance with less sediment formation at an equivalent conversion by conventional alumina catalyst at commercial ebullating-bed unit. The degradation of the AC catalyst at the aging test was observed to be less than that of the conventional alumina catalyst. Thus, the AC catalyst was confirmed to be effective and suitable for upgrading of heavy oil, especially such heavy oils as Maya, which contains much heavy metals.

  3. Non-platinum nanocatalyst on porous nitrogen-doped carbon fabricated by cathodic vacuum arc plasma technique

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sirirak, Reungruthai [Material Science Research Center, Faculty of Science, Chiang Mai University, Chiang Mai 50200 (Thailand); Department of Chemistry and Center of Excellence for Innovation in Chemistry (PERCH-CIC), Faculty of Science, Chiang Mai University, Chiang Mai 50200 (Thailand); Sarakonsri, Thapanee, E-mail: tsarakonsri@gmail.com [Material Science Research Center, Faculty of Science, Chiang Mai University, Chiang Mai 50200 (Thailand); Department of Chemistry and Center of Excellence for Innovation in Chemistry (PERCH-CIC), Faculty of Science, Chiang Mai University, Chiang Mai 50200 (Thailand); Medhesuwakul, Min [Plasma & Beam Physics Research Facility, Department of Physics and Materials Science, Faculty of Science, Chiang Mai University, Chiang Mai 50200 (Thailand)

    2015-11-30

    Highlights: • High surface area porous coral-like nitrogen-doped carbon (NC) and non-platinum nanocatalysts were fabricated on proton exchange membrane using the cathodic vacuum arc plasma (CVAP) technique. • It is a one-step catalysts preparation directly on nafion proton exchange membrane. This CVAP technique is the first new method that was applied in a polymer electrolyte membrane fuel cells (PEMFCs) catalysts preparation. • Due to these excellent characteristics of nitrogen-doped carbon, it is expected to exhibit a good catalyst supporter for PEMFC. • In addition, the Fe–NC catalysts fabricated via this CVAP technique are sphere-like nanoparticle and well disperse on coral-like NC film, which particularity exhibits that these prepared catalysts ought to be a good oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) catalyst for PEMFC. • This approach can be extended to the synthesis of other non-platinum ORR catalyst for broad range applications in energy conversion. - Abstract: Polymer electrolyte membrane fuel cells (PEMFCs) convert chemical energy directly into electrical energy where catalysts composing of non-noble transition metals, nitrogen, and carbon compounds are the most promising materials to replace the expensive platinum catalysts for oxygen reduction reaction (ORR). In this research, cathodic vacuum arc plasma (CVAP) technique was used to fabricate porous nitrogen doped carbon (NC) and non-platinum catalyst on porous NC (Fe–NC) directly on ion exchange membrane for being used as an ORR catalyst at the cathode. The porous NC layer was fabricated on silicon wafer at 0.05 mTorr, 0.1 mTorr, 0.5 mTorr, 1 mTorr, and 5 mTorr of nitrogen gas inlet. The AFM, and SEM images are observed to be regularly big with quite high hillocks and thin NC layers; these results indicate that the optimum process pressure of nitrogen gas inlet is 5 mTorr for porous NC fabrication. The SEM–EDS detects Fe, N, and C elements in the prepared catalysts, and the XRD pattern reviews

  4. Non-platinum nanocatalyst on porous nitrogen-doped carbon fabricated by cathodic vacuum arc plasma technique

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sirirak, Reungruthai; Sarakonsri, Thapanee; Medhesuwakul, Min

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • High surface area porous coral-like nitrogen-doped carbon (NC) and non-platinum nanocatalysts were fabricated on proton exchange membrane using the cathodic vacuum arc plasma (CVAP) technique. • It is a one-step catalysts preparation directly on nafion proton exchange membrane. This CVAP technique is the first new method that was applied in a polymer electrolyte membrane fuel cells (PEMFCs) catalysts preparation. • Due to these excellent characteristics of nitrogen-doped carbon, it is expected to exhibit a good catalyst supporter for PEMFC. • In addition, the Fe–NC catalysts fabricated via this CVAP technique are sphere-like nanoparticle and well disperse on coral-like NC film, which particularity exhibits that these prepared catalysts ought to be a good oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) catalyst for PEMFC. • This approach can be extended to the synthesis of other non-platinum ORR catalyst for broad range applications in energy conversion. - Abstract: Polymer electrolyte membrane fuel cells (PEMFCs) convert chemical energy directly into electrical energy where catalysts composing of non-noble transition metals, nitrogen, and carbon compounds are the most promising materials to replace the expensive platinum catalysts for oxygen reduction reaction (ORR). In this research, cathodic vacuum arc plasma (CVAP) technique was used to fabricate porous nitrogen doped carbon (NC) and non-platinum catalyst on porous NC (Fe–NC) directly on ion exchange membrane for being used as an ORR catalyst at the cathode. The porous NC layer was fabricated on silicon wafer at 0.05 mTorr, 0.1 mTorr, 0.5 mTorr, 1 mTorr, and 5 mTorr of nitrogen gas inlet. The AFM, and SEM images are observed to be regularly big with quite high hillocks and thin NC layers; these results indicate that the optimum process pressure of nitrogen gas inlet is 5 mTorr for porous NC fabrication. The SEM–EDS detects Fe, N, and C elements in the prepared catalysts, and the XRD pattern reviews

  5. Recovery of Platinum Group Metals from Spent Catalysts Using Iron Chloride Vapor Treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taninouchi, Yu-ki; Okabe, Toru H.

    2018-05-01

    The recovery of platinum group metals (PGMs) from spent automobile catalysts is a difficult process because of their relatively low contents in the scrap. In this study, to improve the efficiency of the existing recycling techniques, a novel physical concentration method involving treatment with FeCl2 vapor has been examined. The reactions occurring between typical catalyst components and FeCl2 vapor are discussed from the thermodynamic point of view, and the validity of the proposed technique was experimentally verified. The obtained results indicate that the vapor treatment at around 1200 K (927 °C) can effectively alloy PGMs (Pt, Pd, and Rh) with Fe, resulting in the formation of a ferromagnetic alloy. It was also confirmed that cordierite and alumina (the major catalyst components) remained unreacted after the vapor treatment, while ceria species were converted into oxychlorides. The samples simulating the automobile catalyst were also subjected to magnetic separation after the treatment with FeCl2 vapor; as a result, PGMs were successfully extracted and concentrated in the form of a magnetic powder. Thus, the FeCl2 vapor treatment followed by magnetic separation can be utilized for recovering PGMs directly from spent catalysts as an effective pretreatment for the currently used recycling methods.

  6. Durability of Carbon Nanofiber (CNF) & Carbon Nanotube (CNT) as Catalyst Support for Proton Exchange Membrane Fuel Cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Shuang Ma; Borghei, Maryam; Lund, Peter

    2013-01-01

    a standard polyol method were prepared and fabricated as cathodes of Membrane Electrode Assemblies (MEA) for PEMFC. Both the catalysts as such and the MEAs made out of them were evaluated regarding to thermal and electrochemical stability using traditional carbon black (Vulcan XC72) as a reference. Thermal...... gravimetric analysis (TGA), cyclic voltammetry (CV), polarization curve and impedance spectroscopy were applied on the samples under accelerated stress conditions. The carbon nano-materials demonstrated better stability as support for nano-sized platinum catalyst under PEMFC related operating conditions. Due...

  7. Ruthenium–Platinum Catalysts and Direct Methanol Fuel Cells (DMFC: A Review of Theoretical and Experimental Breakthroughs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana S. Moura

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available The increasing miniaturization of devices creates the need for adequate power sources and direct methanol fuel cells (DMFC are a strong option in the various possibilities under current development. DMFC catalysts are mostly based on platinum, for its outperformance in three key areas (activity, selectivity and stability within methanol oxidation framework. However, platinum poisoning with products of methanol oxidation led to the use of alloys. Ruthenium–platinum alloys are preferred catalysts active phases for methanol oxidation from an industrial point of view and, indeed, ruthenium itself is a viable catalyst for this reaction. In addition, the route of methanol decomposition is crucial in the goal of producing H2 from water reaction with methanol. However, the reaction pathway remains elusive and new approaches, namely in computational methods, have been ensued to determine it. This article reviews the various recent theoretical approaches for determining the pathway of methanol decomposition, and systematizes their validation with experimental data, within methodological context.

  8. Modeling chemisorption kinetics of carbon monoxide on polycrystalline platinum

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Donnelly, R.G.; Modell, M.; Baddour, R.F.

    1978-04-01

    Seven distinct desorption surface states of carbon monoxide on polycrystalline platinum were detected by deconvoluting temperature-programed desorption spectra of 4-100% carbon monoxide monolayer coverage. The adstates had fixed activation energies of desorption (22.5-32.6 kcal/mole) over the entire coverage range. Rates of formation and populations were derived. The chemisorption was modeled by a Hinshelwood-type expression which allowed for site creation and suggested that adsorbed molecules are sufficiently mobile during desorption heating to fill ordered states of minimum energy and that chemisorption into these states is noncompetitive and determined by the surface. Spectra, diagrams, graphs, tables, and 49 references.

  9. Characterizing the structural degradation in a PEMFC cathode catalyst layer : carbon corrosion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Young, A.; Stumper, J. [Ballard Power Systems, Burnaby, BC (Canada); Gyenge, E. [British Columbia Univ., Vancouver, BC (Canada). Dept. of Chemical and Biological Engineering

    2009-07-01

    The structural degradation resulting from carbon corrosion of a cathode catalyst layer in a polymer electrolyte membrane fuel cell (PEMFC) was investigated in this study. In order to oxidize the catalyst carbon support, the PEMFC catalyst layer was subjected to a 30 hour accelerated stress test that cycled the cathode potential from 0.1 to 1.5 VRHE at 30 and 150 second intervals. The rate and amount of carbon loss was determined by measuring the carbon dioxide in the exhaust gas. The structural degradation of the catalyst layer was characterized and correlated to the PEMFC performance using cyclic voltammetry (CV), electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS), scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and polarization analyses. This analysis revealed a clear thinning of the cathode catalyst layer and gas diffusion layer carbon sub-layer, and a reduction in the effective platinum surface area due to the carbon support oxidation. The thinned cathode catalyst layer changed the water management, and increased the voltage loss associated with the oxygen mass transport and catalyst layer ohmic resistance. In order to further develop and verify this methodology for other degradation mechanisms, emphasis was placed on EIS measurements.

  10. A Study of Iron-Nitrogen-Carbon Fuel Cell Catalysts: Chemistry - Nanostructure - Performance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Workman, Michael J., Jr.

    focused ion beam tomography is modified and optimized for platinum-group metal free catalyst layers, facilitating direct observation of catalyst integration into catalyst layers. I present evidence supporting the hypothesis that atomically dispersed iron coordinated with nitrogen are the dominant active sites in these catalysts. Further, that the concentration of surface oxides in the carbon structure, which can be directly influenced by synthesis parameters, correlates with both the concentration of active sites in the material and with fuel cell performance. Catalyst performance is hindered by the addition of carbon nanotubes and by the presence of metallic iron. Evidence consistent with the catalytic active sites residing in the graphitic plane is also presented.

  11. Recovery of platinum-group metals (PGMS from spent automotive catalysts: Part II: Automotive catalysts: Structures and principle of operation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dimitrijević Mile D.

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Catalytic converters are incorporated into motor vehicle emission systems (passenger cars, trucks and other motor vehicles, as well as civil and agricultural machines, as of lately to reduce air pollution as well as to meet the emission standards. Their purpose is to convert toxic emissions generated by combustion of liquid fossil fuels into less harmful products. In catalytic converters, rhodium is used for the reduction of gasses, whereas platinum and palladium are used for the oxidation of gasses. This paper presents the structure and operating principle of automotive catalysts in view of the fact that cars are the most prevalent motor vehicles worldwide and due to the fact that the production of cars with gasoline and diesel engines will dominate until at least 2020.

  12. Influence of the Synthesis Method for Pt Catalysts Supported on Highly Mesoporous Carbon Xerogel and Vulcan Carbon Black on the Electro-Oxidation of Methanol

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cinthia Alegre

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Platinum catalysts supported on carbon xerogel and carbon black (Vulcan were synthesized with the aim of investigating the influence of the characteristics of the support on the electrochemical performance of the catalysts. Three synthesis methods were compared: an impregnation method with two different reducing agents, sodium borohydride and formic acid, and a microemulsion method, in order to study the effect of the synthesis method on the physico-chemical properties of the catalysts. X-ray diffraction and transmission electron microscopy were applied. Cyclic voltammetry and chronoamperometry were used for studying carbon monoxide and methanol oxidation. Catalysts supported on carbon xerogel presented higher catalytic activities towards CO and CH3OH oxidation than catalysts supported on Vulcan. The higher mesoporosity of carbon xerogel was responsible for the favored diffusion of reagents towards catalytic centers.

  13. Isotopic exchange between deuterium and neohexane on supported platinum and palladium catalysts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eskinazi, V.

    1979-01-01

    The isotopic exchange reaction between neohexane and deuterium on supported Pt/SiO 2 and Pd/SiO 2 catalysts has been investigated in the temperature range 86.5 to 110 0 C. Rates of exchange were studied as functions of percentage of metal atoms exposed, the conditions of catalyst pretreatment, and the reaction temperature. The rates of exchange were not strongly dependent upon percentage exposed; however, the relative yields of d 1 through d 5 in the ethyl moiety or neohexane were dependent on the percentage metal atoms exposed. The Pt/SiO 2 catalysts were found to be more active for exchange than the Pd/SiO 2 catalysts by an order of magnitude. Both the turnover frequencies and the exchange pattern were observed to be influenced by the pretreatment of the catalyst. Maxima in the exchange pattern occurred at d 3 and d 5 in the case of Pt/SiO 2 and at d 5 only in the case of the Pd/SiO 2 catalysts. In order to account for the d 3 maximum observed for Pt catalysts, some extension of the Horiuti-Polanyi mechanism is required. Mechanisms by which the d 3 species might be formed are proposed and discussed. On Pd/SiO 2 catalysts exchange occurs preferentially in the ethyl substituent of the quaternary carbon atom rather than on the three methyl substituents of the quaternary carbon atom. Such preference is not observed on Pt/SiO 2 catalysts; in fact, in some cases, this preference is reversed. Whenever exchange occurs in the three methyl substituents, mostly the d 1 product is obtained. For Pt/SiO 2 catalysts, the exchange pattern appears to be influenced by steric effects, but the data suggest that factors other than steric effects are important on Pd

  14. Enhancement of micropore filling of water on carbon black by platinum loading

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Miyajima, Naoya, E-mail: miyajima@yamanashi.ac.jp [Interdisciplinary Graduate School of Medicine and Engineering, 4-3-11 Takeda, Kofu, Yamanashi 400-8511 (Japan); Hatori, Hiroaki [Institute of Advanced Industrial Science and Technology (AIST), 16-1 Onogawa, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-8569 (Japan); Radovic, Ljubisa R. [Department of Energy and Geo-Environmental Engineering, The Pennsylvania State University, University Park, PA 16802 (United States); Yamada, Yoshio [Institute of Advanced Industrial Science and Technology (AIST), 16-1 Onogawa, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-8569 (Japan)

    2010-10-15

    Two kinds of typical carbons, carbon black and activated carbon fibers, were modified with platinum nanoparticles without changing their original pore structures. The surface properties of the modified carbons were investigated by measuring of water adsorption isotherms. Micropore filling of water was facilitated by the presence of platinum nanoparticles on the surface of the carbon black. On the other hand, such a filling effect was not observed in the case of the activated carbon fibers. A critical content and/or size of platinum nanoparticles could be required to promote efficiently the water adsorption.

  15. A phototactic micromotor based on platinum nanoparticle decorated carbon nitride.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ye, Zhenrong; Sun, Yunyu; Zhang, Hui; Song, Bo; Dong, Bin

    2017-11-30

    In this paper, we report a unique phototactic (both positive and negative) micromotor based on platinum nanoparticle decorated carbon nitride. The phototaxis relies on the self-diffusiophoretic mechanism and different surface modifications. The micromotor reported in the current study does not require the addition of any external fuels and shows versatile motion behaviour, i.e. start, stop, directional and programmable motion, which is controlled by light. In addition, since the actuation of the precipitated micromotors at the bottom of a solution using light results in the opacity changes from transparent to translucent, we anticipate that the current micromotor may have potential application in the field of smart windows.

  16. Activity targets for nanostructured platinum-group-metal-free catalysts in hydroxide exchange membrane fuel cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Setzler, Brian P.; Zhuang, Zhongbin; Wittkopf, Jarrid A.; Yan, Yushan

    2016-12-01

    Fuel cells are the zero-emission automotive power source that best preserves the advantages of gasoline automobiles: low upfront cost, long driving range and fast refuelling. To make fuel-cell cars a reality, the US Department of Energy has set a fuel cell system cost target of US$30 kW-1 in the long-term, which equates to US$2,400 per vehicle, excluding several major powertrain components (in comparison, a basic, but complete, internal combustion engine system costs approximately US$3,000). To date, most research for automotive applications has focused on proton exchange membrane fuel cells (PEMFCs), because these systems have demonstrated the highest power density. Recently, however, an alternative technology, hydroxide exchange membrane fuel cells (HEMFCs), has gained significant attention, because of the possibility to use stable platinum-group-metal-free catalysts, with inherent, long-term cost advantages. In this Perspective, we discuss the cost profile of PEMFCs and the advantages offered by HEMFCs. In particular, we discuss catalyst development needs for HEMFCs and set catalyst activity targets to achieve performance parity with state-of-the-art automotive PEMFCs. Meeting these targets requires careful optimization of nanostructures to pack high surface areas into a small volume, while maintaining high area-specific activity and favourable pore-transport properties.

  17. Platinum Group Metal-free Catalysts for Hydrogen Evolution Reaction in Microbial Electrolysis Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuan, Heyang; He, Zhen

    2017-07-01

    Hydrogen gas is a green energy carrier with great environmental benefits. Microbial electrolysis cells (MECs) can convert low-grade organic matter to hydrogen gas with low energy consumption and have gained a growing interest in the past decade. Cathode catalysts for the hydrogen evolution reaction (HER) present a major challenge for the development and future applications of MECs. An ideal cathode catalyst should be catalytically active, simple to synthesize, durable in a complex environment, and cost-effective. A variety of noble-metal free catalysts have been developed and investigated for HER in MECs, including Nickel and its alloys, MoS 2 , carbon-based catalysts and biocatalysts. MECs in turn can serve as a research platform to study the durability of the HER catalysts. This personal account has reviewed, analyzed, and discussed those catalysts with an emphasis on synthesis and modification, system performance and potential for practical applications. It is expected to provide insights into the development of HER catalysts towards MEC applications. © 2017 The Chemical Society of Japan & Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  18. Influence of surface morphology on methanol oxidation at a glassy carbon-supported Pt catalyst

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. STEVANOVIC

    2008-08-01

    Full Text Available Platinum supported on glassy carbon (GC was used as a model system for studying the influence of the surface morphology of a Pt catalyst on methanol oxidation in alkaline and acidic solutions. Platinum was deposited by the potential step method on GC samples from H2SO4 + H2PtCl6 solution under the same conditions with loadings from 10 to 80 mg cm-2. AFM and STM images of the GC/Pt electrodes showed that the Pt was deposited in the form of 3D agglomerates composed of spherical particles. Longer deposition times resulted in increased growth of Pt forms and a decrease in the specific area of the Pt. The real surface area of Pt increased with loading but the changes were almost negligible at higher loadings. Nevertheless, both the specific and mass activity of platinum supported on glassy carbon for methanol oxidation in acidic and in alkaline solutions exhibit a volcanic dependence with respect to the platinum loading. The increase in the activity can be explained by the increasing the particle size with the loading and thus an increase in the contiguous Pt sites available for adsorption and decomposition of methanol. However, the decrease in the activity of the catalyst with further increase of loading and particle size after reaching the maximum is related to the decrease of active sites available for methanol adsorption and their accessibility as a result of more close proximity and pronounced coalescence of the Pt particles.

  19. Outstanding low temperature HC-SCR of NOx over platinum-group catalysts supported on mesoporous materials expecting diesel-auto emission regulation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Komatsu, Tamikuni; Tomokuni, Keizou; Yamada, Issaku

    2006-01-01

    Outstanding low temperature HC-SCR of NOx over platinum-group catalysts supported on mesoporous materials, which does not rely on the conventional NOx-absorption-reduction-catalysts, is presented for the purpose of de-NOx of diesel-auto emissions. The established catalysts basically consist of mesoporous silica or metal-substituted mesoporous silicates for supports and platinum for active species, which is operated under lean- and rich-conditions. The new catalysts are very active at 150-200 o C and free from difficult problems of SOx-deactivation and hydrothermal ageing of the NOx-absorption-reduction catalyst. (author)

  20. Effect of titania on the characteristics of a Tin-Platinum catalyst

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Morales-Gil, P., E-mail: moralesp@imp.mx; Nava, N. [Instituto Mexicano del Petróleo (Mexico); Baggio-Saitovitch, E. [Centro Brasileiro de Pesquisas Físicas (Brazil)

    2015-06-15

    Pt-Sn bimetallic catalysts dispersed on alumina are commonly used for reforming and dehydrogenation reactions. In this research work, Pt and Sn were supported on titania. The resulting interactions between the components in the prepared samples, before and after treatment with hydrogen, were studied by Mössbauer spectroscopy, X-ray diffraction and Rietveld refinement. The results show the presence of Pt and SnO{sub 2} after calcinations. After the reduction process, metallic Pt, PtSn, and Pt{sub 3}Sn alloys were identified. The Rietveld refinement analysis shows that some Ti{sup 4+} atoms were replaced by Sn{sup 4+} atoms in the titania structure. Finally, the Mössbauer spectroscopy and X-ray diffraction results indicate that metallic platinum and SnO{sub 2} are encapsulated by a TiOx layer.

  1. Temperature-programmed reduction and cyclic voltammetry of Pt/carbon-fibre paper catalysts for methanol electrooxidation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Attwood, P.A.; McNicol, B.D.; Short, R.T.

    1981-01-01

    Temperature-programmed reduction (TPR) and cyclic voltammetry (CV) studies of platinum catalysts supported on pyrographite-coated carbon-fibre paper, and prepared by either ion exchange or impregnation, clearly demonstrate the nature of the interactions between the platinum species and the support. After drying the above catalysts at 120 0 C, the ion-exchanged preparation exhibits the stronger interaction with the carbon support, as might be expected since a chemical interaction with carbon surface groups is known to occur in such catalysts. The presence of a fraction of bulk Pt(NH 3 ) 4 (OH) 2 impregnating salt in the impregnated catalyst has been detected using TPR. After air activation at 300 0 C, subambient reduction peaks were observed and the strength of binding of Pt in the ion-exchanged catalyst was reflected by its increased difficulty of reduction in comparison with that of the impregnated catalyst. The stoichiometry of reduction in ion-exchanged catalysts corresponds to Pt 2+ → Pt 0 in both dried and activated catalysts, with a small amount of Pt 4+ present in the latter. Upon activation the impregnated catalyst showed the presence of some Pt metal, which was thought to arise from the decomposition of the fraction of bulk Pt(NH 3 ) 4 (OH) 2 in the dried catalyst. Activation of ion-exchanged catalysts at temperatures higher than 300 0 C led to a progressive weakening of the Pt-support interaction and consequent smaller Pt surface areas. Activation at 500 0 C in air produced Pt metal exclusively and very low Pt surface areas. The strong interaction between Pt and the carbon support upon activation of the ion-exchanged catalyst at 300 0 C is thought to be the origin of the large metal surface area and the high catalytic activity for methanol electrooxidation found upon reduction

  2. Role of bonding mechanisms during transfer hydrogenation reaction on heterogeneous catalysts of platinum nanoparticles supported on zinc oxide nanorods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Alawi, Reem A.; Laxman, Karthik; Dastgir, Sarim; Dutta, Joydeep

    2016-07-01

    For supported heterogeneous catalysis, the interface between a metal nanoparticle and the support plays an important role. In this work the dependency of the catalytic efficiency on the bonding chemistry of platinum nanoparticles supported on zinc oxide (ZnO) nanorods is studied. Platinum nanoparticles were deposited on ZnO nanorods (ZnO NR) using thermal and photochemical processes and the effects on the size, distribution, density and chemical state of the metal nanoparticles upon the catalytic activities are presented. The obtained results indicate that the bonding at Pt-ZnO interface depends on the deposition scheme which can be utilized to modulate the surface chemistry and thus the activity of the supported catalysts. Additionally, uniform distribution of metal on the catalyst support was observed to be more important than the loading density. It is also found that oxidized platinum Pt(IV) (platinum hydroxide) provided a more suitable surface for enhancing the transfer hydrogenation reaction of cyclohexanone with isopropanol compared to zero valent platinum. Photochemically synthesized ZnO supported nanocatalysts were efficient and potentially viable for upscaling to industrial applications.

  3. Bimetallic Catalysts and Platinum Surfaces Studied by X-ray Absorption Spectroscopy and Scanning Tunnelling Microscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Roenning, Magnus

    2000-07-01

    Bimetallic catalyst systems used in Fischer-Tropsch synthesis (Co-Re/Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}) and in the naphtha reforming process (Pt-Re/Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}) have been studied in situ using X-ray absorption spectroscopy (EXAFS). Additionally, the adsorption of ethene on platinum single crystal surfaces has been investigated using scanning tunnelling microscopy. In situ EXAFS at the cobalt K absorption edge have been carried out at 450{sup o}C on the hydrogen reduction of a rhenium-promoted Co{sub 3}O{sub 4}/Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} catalyst. Reductions carried out using 100% hydrogen and 5% hydrogen in helium gave different results. Whereas the reduction using dilute hydrogen leads to bulk-like metallic cobalt particles (hcp or fcc), reaction with pure hydrogen yields a more dispersed system with smaller cobalt metal particles (< 40 A). The results are rationalised in terms of different degrees of reoxidation of cobalt by the higher and lower concentrations of water generated during the reduction of cobalt oxide by 100% and 5% hydrogen, respectively. Additionally, in both reduction protocols a small fraction (3 -4 wt%) of the cobalt content is randomly dispersed over the tetrahedral vacancies of the alumina support. This dispersion occurs during reduction and not calcination. The cobalt in these sites cannot be reduced at 450 {sup o}C. The local environments about the rhenium atoms in Co-Re/{gamma}-A1{sub 2}O{sub 3} catalyst after different reduction periods have been studied by X-ray absorption spectroscopy. A bimetallic catalyst containing 4.6 wt% cobalt and 2 wt% rhenium has been compared with a corresponding monometallic sample with 2 wt% rhenium on the same support. The rhenium L{sub III} EXAFS analysis shows that bimetallic particles are formed after reduction at 450{sup o}C with the average particle size being 10-15 A. Rhenium is shown to be reduced at a later stage than cobalt. The fraction of cobalt atoms entering the support obstructs the access to the support for the

  4. A Platinum Monolayer Core-Shell Catalyst with a Ternary Alloy Nanoparticle Core and Enhanced Stability for the Oxygen Reduction Reaction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Haoxiong Nan

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available We synthesize a platinum monolayer core-shell catalyst with a ternary alloy nanoparticle core of Pd, Ir, and Ni. A Pt monolayer is deposited on carbon-supported PdIrNi nanoparticles using an underpotential deposition method, in which a copper monolayer is applied to the ternary nanoparticles; this is followed by the galvanic displacement of Cu with Pt to generate a Pt monolayer on the surface of the core. The core-shell Pd1Ir1Ni2@Pt/C catalyst exhibits excellent oxygen reduction reaction activity, yielding a mass activity significantly higher than that of Pt monolayer catalysts containing PdIr or PdNi nanoparticles as cores and four times higher than that of a commercial Pt/C electrocatalyst. In 0.1 M HClO4, the half-wave potential reaches 0.91 V, about 30 mV higher than that of Pt/C. We verify the structure and composition of the carbon-supported PdIrNi nanoparticles using X-ray powder diffraction, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, thermogravimetry, transmission electron microscopy, and energy dispersive X-ray spectrometry, and we perform a stability test that confirms the excellent stability of our core-shell catalyst. We suggest that the porous structure resulting from the dissolution of Ni in the alloy nanoparticles may be the main reason for the catalyst’s enhanced performance.

  5. Electrochemical reduction of oxygen on small platinum particles supported on carbon in concentrated phosphoric acid. 2. Effects of teflon content in the catalyst layer and baking temperature of the electrode

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maoka, T.

    1988-03-01

    A relation between hydrophobicity (or wettability) of a porous gas diffusion electrode for use in a phosphoric acid fuel cell and its cathode performance (activity toward electrochemical oxygen reduction) was examined. The hydrophobicity of the gas diffusion electrode was regulated by changing either the amount of Teflon (PTFE) content in the catalyst layer or baking temperature of the electrode. The Tafel slope or electrochemical oxygen reduction became twice as high as that of the ordinary electrode when the wettability of electrode toward phosphoric acid was high. This fact supports a flooded agglomerate model as the mode of this type of porous gas diffusion electrode.

  6. pH-dependent release of trace elements including platinum group elements (PGEs) from gasoline and diesel catalysts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sucha, Veronika; Mihaljevic, Martin; Ettler, Vojtech; Strnad, Ladislav

    2014-05-01

    The release of trace metals and platinum group elements (PGEs) from automobile exhaust catalysts represents a remarkable source of higly dispersed environmental contamination. Especially, PGEs have shown increasing research interest due to their possible bioaccessibility. In our research, we focused on leaching behaviour of trace metals from gasoline and diesel automobile catalysts. While catalysts for gasoline engines contain a mixture of Pt-Pd-Rh or Pd-Rh, catalysts for diesel engines are composed only of Pt. We used dust from two crushed gasoline and two crushed diesel catalysts (new and aged). The dust of gasoline catalysts contains significant concentrations of Pt (700 mg.kg-1), Pd (11 000 mg.kg-1) and Rh (700 mg.kg-1). And the dust of diesel catalysts are composed of Pt (3 900 mg.kg-1) and they contains negligible amounts of Pd dan Rh (leaching of trace metals from dust we used pH-stat leaching test according to the European standard CEN/TS 14997. The concentrations of cations: PGEs (Pt, Pd a Rh), K, Na, Ca, Mg, Al, Ti, Cr, Mn, Fe, Co, Ni, Cu, Zn, Cd, Pb, La and Ce were determined by inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS) and atomic absorption spectrometry (AAS), and anions: F-, Cl-, SO42- and NO3- by high-performance liquid chromatography. Although the dusts from catalysts were relatively stable to acid/base influence, the leaching of trace metals from catalysts showed a dependence on pH. Generally, the highest concentrations were released under acidic conditions. The leaching of PGEs was higher for Pt in diesel catalysts and for Pd and Rh in gasoline catalysts. The highest concentrations of Zn and Pb were observed in old catalysts. The rare earth metals were released more from gasoline catalysts. Catalysts particles represent health risk especially with respect to their PGEs contents.

  7. Analysis of proton exchange membrane fuel cell catalyst layers for reduction of platinum loading at Nissan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ohma, Atsushi; Mashio, Tetsuya; Sato, Kazuyuki; Iden, Hiroshi; Ono, Yoshitaka; Sakai, Kei; Akizuki, Ken; Takaichi, Satoshi; Shinohara, Kazuhiko

    2011-01-01

    The biggest issue that must be addressed in promoting widespread use of fuel cell vehicles (FCVs) is to reduce the cost of the fuel cell system. Especially, it is of vital importance to reduce platinum (Pt) loading of catalyst layers (CLs) in the membrane electrode assembly (MEA) of a proton exchange membrane fuel cell (PEMFC). In order to lower the Pt loading of the MEA, mass transport of reactants related to the performance in high current density should be enhanced significantly as well as kinetics of the catalyst, which can result in the better Pt utilization and effectiveness. In this study, we summarized our analytical approach and methods for reduction of Pt loading in CLs. Microstructure, mass transport properties of the reactants, and their relation in CLs were elucidated by applying experimental analyses and computational methods. A simple CL model for I–V performance prediction was then established, where experimentally elucidated parameters of the microstructure and the properties in CLs were taken into account. Finally, we revealed the impact of lowering the Pt loading on the transport properties, polarization, and the I–V performance.

  8. Reduction of Furfural to Furfuryl Alcohol in Liquid Phase over a Biochar-Supported Platinum Catalyst

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ariadna Fuente-Hernández

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available In this work, the liquid phase hydrogenation of furfural has been studied using a biochar-supported platinum catalyst in a batch reactor. Reactions were performed between 170 °C and 320 °C, using 3 wt % and 5 wt % of Pt supported on a maple-based biochar under hydrogen pressure varying from 500 psi to 1500 psi for reaction times between 1 h and 6 h in various solvents. Under all reactive conditions, furfural conversion was significant, whilst under specific conditions furfuryl alcohol (FA was obtained in most cases as the main product showing a selectivity around 80%. Other products as methylfuran (MF, furan, and trace of tetrahydrofuran (THF were detected. Results showed that the most efficient reaction conditions involved a 3% Pt load on biochar and operations for 2 h at 210 °C and 1500 psi using toluene as solvent. When used repetitively, the catalyst showed deactivation although only a slight variation in selectivity toward FA at the optimal experimental conditions was observed.

  9. Influence of platinum group metal-free catalyst synthesis on microbial fuel cell performance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santoro, Carlo; Rojas-Carbonell, Santiago; Awais, Roxanne; Gokhale, Rohan; Kodali, Mounika; Serov, Alexey; Artyushkova, Kateryna; Atanassov, Plamen

    2018-01-01

    Platinum group metal-free (PGM-free) ORR catalysts from the Fe-N-C family were synthesized using sacrificial support method (SSM) technique. Six experimental steps were used during the synthesis: 1) mixing the precursor, the metal salt, and the silica template; 2) first pyrolysis in hydrogen rich atmosphere; 3) ball milling; 4) etching the silica template using harsh acids environment; 5) the second pyrolysis in ammonia rich atmosphere; 6) final ball milling. Three independent batches were fabricated following the same procedure. The effect of each synthetic parameters on the surface chemistry and the electrocatalytic performance in neutral media was studied. Rotating ring disk electrode (RRDE) experiment showed an increase in half wave potential and limiting current after the pyrolysis steps. The additional improvement was observed after etching and performing the second pyrolysis. A similar trend was seen in microbial fuel cells (MFCs), in which the power output increased from 167 ± 2 μW cm-2 to 214 ± 5 μW cm-2. X-ray Photoelectron Spectroscopy (XPS) was used to evaluate surface chemistry of catalysts obtained after each synthetic step. The changes in chemical composition were directly correlated with the improvements in performance. We report outstanding reproducibility in both composition and performance among the three different batches.

  10. Dye sensitized solar cell based on platinum decorated multiwall carbon nanotubes as catalytic layer on the counter electrode

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mathew, Ambily; Rao, G. Mohan; Munichandraiah, N.

    2011-01-01

    Graphical abstract: I-V characteristics of the DSSCs with Pt CE and Pt/MWCNT CE measured at 100 mW/cm 2 . It shows relatively better performance with Pt/MWCNT counter electrodes. Highlights: → Synthesis of multiwalled carbon nanotubes by pyrolysis. → Synthesis of Pt/MWCNT composite by chemical reduction. → Fabrication DSSC using Pt/MWCNT as catalytic layer on the counter electrode. → Study of catalytic activity by Electrochemical Impedance Spectroscopy. -- Abstract: In this study we have employed multiwall carbon nanotubes (MWCNT), decorated with platinum as catalytic layer for the reduction of tri-iodide ions in dye sensitized solar cell (DSSC). MWCNTs have been prepared by a simple one step pyrolysis method using ferrocene as the catalyst and xylene as the carbon source. Platinum decorated MWCNTs have been prepared by chemical reduction method. The as prepared MWCNTs and Pt/MWCNTs have been characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD), scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). In combination with a dye adsorbed TiO 2 photoanode and an organic liquid electrolyte, Pt/MWCNT composite showed an enhanced short circuit current density of 16.12 mA/cm 2 leading to a cell efficiency of 6.50% which is comparable to that of Platinum.

  11. Dye sensitized solar cell based on platinum decorated multiwall carbon nanotubes as catalytic layer on the counter electrode

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mathew, Ambily [Department of Instrumentation and Applied Physics, Indian Institute of Science, Bangalore 560012 India (India); Rao, G. Mohan, E-mail: gmrao@isu.iisc.ernet.in [Department of Instrumentation and Applied Physics, Indian Institute of Science, Bangalore 560012 India (India); Munichandraiah, N. [Department of Inorgonic and Physical Chemistry, Indian Institute of Science, Bangalore 560012 India (India)

    2011-11-15

    Graphical abstract: I-V characteristics of the DSSCs with Pt CE and Pt/MWCNT CE measured at 100 mW/cm{sup 2}. It shows relatively better performance with Pt/MWCNT counter electrodes. Highlights: {yields} Synthesis of multiwalled carbon nanotubes by pyrolysis. {yields} Synthesis of Pt/MWCNT composite by chemical reduction. {yields} Fabrication DSSC using Pt/MWCNT as catalytic layer on the counter electrode. {yields} Study of catalytic activity by Electrochemical Impedance Spectroscopy. -- Abstract: In this study we have employed multiwall carbon nanotubes (MWCNT), decorated with platinum as catalytic layer for the reduction of tri-iodide ions in dye sensitized solar cell (DSSC). MWCNTs have been prepared by a simple one step pyrolysis method using ferrocene as the catalyst and xylene as the carbon source. Platinum decorated MWCNTs have been prepared by chemical reduction method. The as prepared MWCNTs and Pt/MWCNTs have been characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD), scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). In combination with a dye adsorbed TiO{sub 2} photoanode and an organic liquid electrolyte, Pt/MWCNT composite showed an enhanced short circuit current density of 16.12 mA/cm{sup 2} leading to a cell efficiency of 6.50% which is comparable to that of Platinum.

  12. Catalysts for Efficient Production of Carbon Nanotubes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Ted X.; Dong, Yi

    2009-01-01

    Several metal alloys have shown promise as improved catalysts for catalytic thermal decomposition of hydrocarbon gases to produce carbon nanotubes (CNTs). Heretofore almost every experiment on the production of carbon nanotubes by this method has involved the use of iron, nickel, or cobalt as the catalyst. However, the catalytic-conversion efficiencies of these metals have been observed to be limited. The identification of better catalysts is part of a continuing program to develop means of mass production of high-quality carbon nanotubes at costs lower than those achieved thus far (as much as $100/g for purified multi-wall CNTs or $1,000/g for single-wall CNTs in year 2002). The main effort thus far in this program has been the design and implementation of a process tailored specifically for high-throughput screening of alloys for catalyzing the growth of CNTs. The process includes an integral combination of (1) formulation of libraries of catalysts, (2) synthesis of CNTs from decomposition of ethylene on powders of the alloys in a pyrolytic chemical-vapor-decomposition reactor, and (3) scanning- electron-microscope screening of the CNTs thus synthesized to evaluate the catalytic efficiencies of the alloys. Information gained in this process is put into a database and analyzed to identify promising alloy compositions, which are to be subjected to further evaluation in a subsequent round of testing. Some of these alloys have been found to catalyze the formation of carbon nano tubes from ethylene at temperatures as low as 350 to 400 C. In contrast, the temperatures typically required for prior catalysts range from 550 to 750 C.

  13. Investigating the effects of proton exchange membrane fuel cell conditions on carbon supported platinum electrocatalyst composition and performance

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Patel, Anant; Artyushkova, Kateryna; Atanassov, Plamen; Colbow, Vesna; Dutta, Monica; Harvey, Davie; Wessel, Silvia

    2011-12-01

    Changes that carbon-supported platinum electrocatalysts undergo in a proton exchange membrane fuel cell environment were simulated by ex situ heat treatment of catalyst powder samples at 150 C and 100% relative humidity. In order to study modifications that are introduced to chemistry, morphology, and performance of electrocatalysts, XPS, HREELS and three-electrode rotating disk electrode experiments were performed. Before heat treatment, graphitic content varied by 20% among samples with different types of carbon supports, with distinct differences between bulk and surface compositions within each sample. Following the aging protocol, the bulk and surface chemistry of the samples were similar, with graphite content increasing or remaining constant and Pt-carbide decreasing for all samples. From the correlation of changes in chemical composition and losses in performance of the electrocatalysts, we conclude that relative distribution of Pt particles on graphitic and amorphous carbon is as important for electrocatalytic activity as the absolute amount of graphitic carbon present

  14. Investigating the effects of proton exchange membrane fuel cell conditions on carbon supported platinum electrocatalyst composition and performance

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    A. Patel; K. Artyushkova; P. Atanassov; V. Colbow; M. Dutta; D. Harvey; S. Wessel

    2012-04-30

    Changes that carbon-supported platinum electrocatalysts undergo in a proton exchange membrane fuel cell environment were simulated by ex situ heat treatment of catalyst powder samples at 150 C and 100% relative humidity. In order to study modifications that are introduced to chemistry, morphology, and performance of electrocatalysts, XPS, HREELS and three-electrode rotating disk electrode experiments were performed. Before heat treatment, graphitic content varied by 20% among samples with different types of carbon supports, with distinct differences between bulk and surface compositions within each sample. Following the aging protocol, the bulk and surface chemistry of the samples were similar, with graphite content increasing or remaining constant and Pt-carbide decreasing for all samples. From the correlation of changes in chemical composition and losses in performance of the electrocatalysts, we conclude that relative distribution of Pt particles on graphitic and amorphous carbon is as important for electrocatalytic activity as the absolute amount of graphitic carbon present

  15. Biogenic platinum and palladium nanoparticles as new catalysts for the removal of pharmaceutical compounds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martins, Mónica; Mourato, Cláudia; Sanches, Sandra; Noronha, João Paulo; Crespo, M T Barreto; Pereira, Inês A C

    2017-01-01

    Pharmaceutical products (PhP) are one of the most alarming emergent pollutants in the environment. Therefore, it is of extreme importance to investigate efficient PhP removal processes. Biologic synthesis of platinum nanoparticles (Bio-Pt) has been reported, but their catalytic activity was never investigated. In this work, we explored the potential of cell-supported platinum (Bio-Pt) and palladium (Bio-Pd) nanoparticles synthesized with Desulfovibrio vulgaris as biocatalysts for removal of four PhP: ciprofloxacin, sulfamethoxazole, ibuprofen and 17β-estradiol. The catalytic activity of the biological nanoparticles was compared with the PhP removal efficiency of D. vulgaris whole-cells. In contrast with Bio-Pd, Bio-Pt has a high catalytic activity in PhP removal, with 94, 85 and 70% removal of 17β-estradiol, sulfamethoxazole and ciprofloxacin, respectively. In addition, the estrogenic activity of 17β-estradiol was strongly reduced after the reaction with Bio-Pt, showing that this biocatalyst produces less toxic effluents. Bio-Pt or Bio-Pd did not act on ibuprofen, but this could be completely removed by D. vulgaris whole-cells, demonstrating that sulfate-reducing bacteria are among the microorganisms capable of biotransformation of ibuprofen in anaerobic environments. This study demonstrates for the first time that Bio-Pt has a high catalytic activity, and is a promising catalyst to be used in water treatment processes for the removal of antibiotics and endocrine disrupting compounds, the most problematic PhP. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Catalytic wet oxidation of ammonia solution: Activity of the nanoscale platinum-palladium-rhodium composite oxide catalyst

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hung, C.-M.

    2009-01-01

    Aqueous solutions of 400-1000 mg/L of ammonia were oxidized in a trickle-bed reactor (TBR) in this study of nanoscale platinum-palladium-rhodium composite oxide catalysts, which were prepared by the co-precipitation of H 2 PtCl 6 , Pd(NO 3 ) 3 and Rh(NO 3 ) 3 . Hardly any of the dissolved ammonia was removed by wet oxidation in the absence of any catalyst, whereas about 99% of the ammonia was reduced during wet oxidation over nanoscale platinum-palladium-rhodium composite oxide catalysts at 503 K in an oxygen partial pressure of 2.0 MPa. A synergistic effect exists in the nanoscale platinum-palladium-rhodium composite structure, which is the material with the highest ammonia reduction activity. The nanometer-sized particles were characterized by TEM, XRD and FTIR. The effect of the initial concentration and reaction temperature on the removal of ammonia from the effluent streams was also studied at a liquid hourly space velocity of under 9 h -1 in the wet catalytic processes

  17. Catalytic wet oxidation of ammonia solution: Activity of the nanoscale platinum-palladium-rhodium composite oxide catalyst

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hung, C.-M. [Department of Industry Engineering and Management, Yung-Ta Institute of Technology and Commerce, 316 Chung-shan Road, Linlo, Pingtung 909, Taiwan (China)], E-mail: hungcm1031@gmail.com

    2009-04-15

    Aqueous solutions of 400-1000 mg/L of ammonia were oxidized in a trickle-bed reactor (TBR) in this study of nanoscale platinum-palladium-rhodium composite oxide catalysts, which were prepared by the co-precipitation of H{sub 2}PtCl{sub 6}, Pd(NO{sub 3}){sub 3} and Rh(NO{sub 3}){sub 3}. Hardly any of the dissolved ammonia was removed by wet oxidation in the absence of any catalyst, whereas about 99% of the ammonia was reduced during wet oxidation over nanoscale platinum-palladium-rhodium composite oxide catalysts at 503 K in an oxygen partial pressure of 2.0 MPa. A synergistic effect exists in the nanoscale platinum-palladium-rhodium composite structure, which is the material with the highest ammonia reduction activity. The nanometer-sized particles were characterized by TEM, XRD and FTIR. The effect of the initial concentration and reaction temperature on the removal of ammonia from the effluent streams was also studied at a liquid hourly space velocity of under 9 h{sup -1} in the wet catalytic processes.

  18. Catalytic wet oxidation of ammonia solution: activity of the nanoscale platinum-palladium-rhodium composite oxide catalyst.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hung, Chang-Mao

    2009-04-15

    Aqueous solutions of 400-1000 mg/L of ammonia were oxidized in a trickle-bed reactor (TBR) in this study of nanoscale platinum-palladium-rhodium composite oxide catalysts, which were prepared by the co-precipitation of H(2)PtCl(6), Pd(NO(3))(3) and Rh(NO(3))(3). Hardly any of the dissolved ammonia was removed by wet oxidation in the absence of any catalyst, whereas about 99% of the ammonia was reduced during wet oxidation over nanoscale platinum-palladium-rhodium composite oxide catalysts at 503 K in an oxygen partial pressure of 2.0 MPa. A synergistic effect exists in the nanoscale platinum-palladium-rhodium composite structure, which is the material with the highest ammonia reduction activity. The nanometer-sized particles were characterized by TEM, XRD and FTIR. The effect of the initial concentration and reaction temperature on the removal of ammonia from the effluent streams was also studied at a liquid hourly space velocity of under 9 h(-1) in the wet catalytic processes.

  19. On the mobility of carbon-supported platinum nanoparticles towards unveiling cathode degradation in water electrolysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paciok, Paul; Schalenbach, Maximilian; Carmo, Marcelo; Stolten, Detlef

    2017-10-01

    This study investigates the influence of the hydrogen evolution reaction (HER) overpotential on the mobility of carbon-supported platinum particles. The migration of the platinum over the carbon support was analyzed by means of identical location transmission electron microscopy (IL-TEM). While at potentials of 0.1 and 0 V vs. reversible hydrogen electrode (RHE), no changes to the Pt/C material were observed. With a decrease of the overpotential to -0.1 V vs. RHE, an increase in the quantity of migrating platinum particles took place. At -0.2 V vs. RHE, a further rise in the particle migration was observed. The effect of the overpotential on the migration was explained by a higher hydrogen generation rate, the formation of a hydrogen monolayer on the platinum and the resulting changes of the platinum support distance. The mechanisms revealed in this study could describe a relevant source of degradation of PEM water electrolyzers.

  20. Tin-oxide-coated single-walled carbon nanotube bundles supporting platinum electrocatalysts for direct ethanol fuel cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hsu, Ryan S; Higgins, Drew; Chen Zhongwei

    2010-01-01

    Novel tin-oxide (SnO 2 )-coated single-walled carbon nanotube (SWNT) bundles supporting platinum (Pt) electrocatalysts for ethanol oxidation were developed for direct ethanol fuel cells. SnO 2 -coated SWNT (SnO 2 -SWNT) bundles were synthesized by a simple chemical-solution route. SnO 2 -SWNT bundles supporting Pt (Pt/SnO 2 -SWNTs) electrocatalysts and SWNT-supported Pt (Pt/SWNT) electrocatalysts were prepared by an ethylene glycol reduction method. The catalysts were physically characterized using TGA, XRD and TEM and electrochemically evaluated through cyclic voltammetry experiments. The Pt/SnO 2 -SWNTs showed greatly enhanced electrocatalytic activity for ethanol oxidation in acid medium, compared to the Pt/SWNT. The optimal SnO 2 loading of Pt/SnO 2 -SWNT catalysts with respect to specific catalytic activity for ethanol oxidation was also investigated.

  1. Tin-oxide-coated single-walled carbon nanotube bundles supporting platinum electrocatalysts for direct ethanol fuel cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsu, Ryan S; Higgins, Drew; Chen, Zhongwei

    2010-04-23

    Novel tin-oxide (SnO(2))-coated single-walled carbon nanotube (SWNT) bundles supporting platinum (Pt) electrocatalysts for ethanol oxidation were developed for direct ethanol fuel cells. SnO(2)-coated SWNT (SnO(2)-SWNT) bundles were synthesized by a simple chemical-solution route. SnO(2)-SWNT bundles supporting Pt (Pt/SnO(2)-SWNTs) electrocatalysts and SWNT-supported Pt (Pt/SWNT) electrocatalysts were prepared by an ethylene glycol reduction method. The catalysts were physically characterized using TGA, XRD and TEM and electrochemically evaluated through cyclic voltammetry experiments. The Pt/SnO(2)-SWNTs showed greatly enhanced electrocatalytic activity for ethanol oxidation in acid medium, compared to the Pt/SWNT. The optimal SnO(2) loading of Pt/SnO(2)-SWNT catalysts with respect to specific catalytic activity for ethanol oxidation was also investigated.

  2. Carbon nanotubes and other nanostructures as support material for nanoparticulate noble-metal catalysts in fuel cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Veltzé, Sune; Larsen, Mikkel Juul; Elina, Yli-Rantala

    or platinum-alloy catalysts in the electrodes are required. To maximize the utilization of the noble metal it is frequently deposited as nanoparticles (1–5 nm) on a stabilizing support of carbon black. Carbon black provides good anchoring of the catalyst particles, but is prone to severe destructive oxidation...... at high electrical potentials encountered occasionally in fuel cells. Other nanostructures of carbon are being investigated as alternatives to carbon black as they have several beneficial properties. Multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MW-CNT) are an example of one type of these promising materials. Like...... of the fuel-cell electrodes. However, the low concentration of structural defects also poses challenges with regard to anchoring of the catalyst particles on the CNT surface. Thus, activation treatments introducing surface functional groups may be necessary. Also, the surface properties are responsible...

  3. Thief carbon catalyst for oxidation of mercury in effluent stream

    Science.gov (United States)

    Granite, Evan J [Wexford, PA; Pennline, Henry W [Bethel Park, PA

    2011-12-06

    A catalyst for the oxidation of heavy metal contaminants, especially mercury (Hg), in an effluent stream is presented. The catalyst facilitates removal of mercury through the oxidation of elemental Hg into mercury (II) moieties. The active component of the catalyst is partially combusted coal, or "Thief" carbon, which can be pre-treated with a halogen. An untreated Thief carbon catalyst can be self-promoting in the presence of an effluent gas streams entrained with a halogen.

  4. Tethered catalysts for the hydration of carbon dioxide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valdez, Carlos A; Satcher, Jr., Joe H; Aines, Roger D; Wong, Sergio E; Baker, Sarah E; Lightstone, Felice C; Stolaroff, Joshuah K

    2014-11-04

    A system is provided that substantially increases the efficiency of CO.sub.2 capture and removal by positioning a catalyst within an optimal distance from the air-liquid interface. The catalyst is positioned within the layer determined to be the highest concentration of carbon dioxide. A hydrophobic tether is attached to the catalyst and the hydrophobic tether modulates the position of the catalyst within the liquid layer containing the highest concentration of carbon dioxide.

  5. Single-wall carbon nanotube chemical attachment at platinum electrodes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rosario-Castro, Belinda I.; Contes-de-Jesus, Enid J.; Lebron-Colon, Marisabel; Meador, Michael A.; Scibioh, M. Aulice; Cabrera, Carlos R.

    2010-01-01

    Self-assembled monolayer (SAM) techniques were used to adsorb 4-aminothiophenol (4-ATP) on platinum electrodes in order to obtain an amino-terminated SAM as the base for the chemical attachment of single-wall carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs). A physico-chemical, morphological and electrochemical characterizations of SWCNTs attached onto the modified Pt electrodes was done by using reflection-absorption infrared spectroscopy (RAIR), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), Raman spectroscopy, scanning electron microscopy (SEM), atomic force microscopy (AFM), and cyclic voltammetry (CV) techniques. The SWNTs/4-ATP/Pt surface had regions of small, medium, and large thickness of carbon nanotubes with heights of 100-200 nm, 700 nm to 1.5 μm, and 1.0-3.0 μm, respectively. Cyclic voltammetries (CVs) in sulfuric acid demonstrated that attachment of SWNTs on 4-ATP/Pt is markedly stable, even after 30 potential cycles. CV in ruthenium hexamine was similar to bare Pt electrodes, suggesting that SWNTs assembly is similar to a closely packed microelectrode array.

  6. Carbon nanostructures as catalyst support for polymer electrolyte membrane fuel cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Natarajan, S.K.; Hamelin, J. [Quebec Univ., Trois Rivieres, PQ (Canada). Inst. de recherche sur l' hydrogene

    2008-07-01

    This paper reported on a study that investigated potential alternatives to Vulcan XC-72 as a catalyst supports for polymer electrolyte membrane fuel cells (PEMFCs). These included carbon nanostructures (CNS) prepared by high energy ball milling of graphite and transition metal catalysts, followed by heat treatment. Among the key factors discussed were the graphitic content, high surface area, microporous structure, good electrical conductivity and the ability of the material to attach functional groups. Some graphic results supporting the usage of CNS as catalyst support for PEMFCs were presented. Upon chemical oxidation, surface functional groups such as carbonyl, carboxyl, and hydroxyl were populated on the surface of CNS. Nanosized platinum particles with particle size distribution between 3 nm and 5 nm were reduced on the functionalized sites of CNS in a colloidal medium. The paper also presented cyclic voltammograms, XPS, HRTEM and PSD results. 3 refs.

  7. Catalysts for the production of hydrocarbons from carbon monoxide and water

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sapienza, R.S.; Slegeir, W.A.; Goldberg, R.I.

    1985-11-06

    A method of converting low H/sub 2//CO ratio syngas to carbonaceous products comprising reacting the syngas with water or steam at 200 to 350/sup 0/C in the presence of a metal catalyst supported on zinc oxide. Hydrocarbons are produced with a catalyst selected from cobalt, nickel or ruthenium and alcohols are produced with a catalyst selected from palladium, platinum, ruthenium or copper on the zinc oxide support. The ratio of the reactants are such that for alcohols and saturated hydrocarbons: (2n + 1) greater than or equal to x greater than or equal to O and for olefinic hydrocarbons: 2n greater than or equal to x greater than or equal to O where n is the number of carbon atoms in the product and x is the molar amount of water in the reaction mixture.

  8. A Robust Fiber Bragg Grating Hydrogen Gas Sensor Using Platinum-Supported Silica Catalyst Film

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marina Kurohiji

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available A robust fiber Bragg grating (FBG hydrogen gas sensor for reliable multipoint-leakage monitoring has been developed. The sensing mechanism is based on shifts of center wavelength of the reflection spectra due to temperature change caused by catalytic combustion heat. The sensitive film which consists of platinum-supported silica (Pt/SiO2 catalyst film was obtained using sol-gel method. The precursor solution was composed of hexachloroplatinic acid and commercially available silica precursor solution. The atom ratio of Si : Pt was fixed at 13 : 1. A small amount of this solution was dropped on the substrate and dried at room temperature. After that, the film was calcined at 500°C in air. These procedures were repeated and therefore thick hydrogen-sensitive films were obtained. The catalytic film obtained by 20-time coating on quartz glass substrate showed a temperature change 75 K upon exposure to 3 vol.% H2. For realizing robust sensor device, this catalytic film was deposited and FBG portion was directly fixed on titanium substrate. The sensor device showed good performances enough to detect hydrogen gas in the concentration range below lower explosion limit at room temperature. The enhancement of the sensitivity was attributed to not only catalytic combustion heat but also related thermal strain.

  9. Sinter-Resistant Platinum Catalyst Supported by Metal-Organic Framework.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, In Soo; Li, Zhanyong; Zheng, Jian; Platero-Prats, Ana E; Mavrandonakis, Andreas; Pellizzeri, Steven; Ferrandon, Magali; Vjunov, Aleksei; Gallington, Leighanne C; Webber, Thomas E; Vermeulen, Nicolaas A; Penn, R Lee; Getman, Rachel B; Cramer, Christopher J; Chapman, Karena W; Camaioni, Donald M; Fulton, John L; Lercher, Johannes A; Farha, Omar K; Hupp, Joseph T; Martinson, Alex B F

    2018-01-22

    Single atoms and few-atom clusters of platinum are uniformly installed on the zirconia nodes of a metal-organic framework (MOF) NU-1000 via targeted vapor-phase synthesis. The catalytic Pt clusters, site-isolated by organic linkers, are shown to exhibit high catalytic activity for ethylene hydrogenation while exhibiting resistance to sintering up to 200 °C. In situ IR spectroscopy reveals the presence of both single atoms and few-atom clusters that depend upon synthesis conditions. Operando X-ray absorption spectroscopy and X-ray pair distribution analyses reveal unique changes in chemical bonding environment and cluster size stability while on stream. Density functional theory calculations elucidate a favorable reaction pathway for ethylene hydrogenation with the novel catalyst. These results provide evidence that atomic layer deposition (ALD) in MOFs is a versatile approach to the rational synthesis of size-selected clusters, including noble metals, on a high surface area support. © 2018 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  10. Conical nano-structure arrays of Platinum cathode catalyst for enhanced cell performance in PEMFC (proton exchange membrane fuel cell)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khan, Aziz; Nath, Bhabesh Kumar; Chutia, Joyanti

    2015-01-01

    Conical nanostructure arrays of Pt (Platinum) as cathode catalyst are developed using a novel integrated plasma sputtering technique. The integration method involves successive deposition of Pt catalyst arrays one upon another maintaining a uniform time gap. Deposition by integrated approach results in the formation of dense arrays of Pt nanostructure as compared to continuous deposition. These high number density integrated arrays with low Pt loading of 0.10 mg cm −2 at the cathode provide enhanced performance compared to non-integrated cathode catalyst prepared by continuous deposition and standard commercial electrodes with Pt loadings of 1 mg cm −2 . The performance is compared on the basis of polarization curve measurements and the calculated power density values. PEM fuel cell with dual integrated cathode showed an improved power density of 0.90 W cm −2 , which is higher than continuously deposited cathode catalyst with maximum power density of 0.67 W cm −2 for the same Pt loading of 0.10 mg cm −2 . - Highlights: • Conical nanostructures with high number density are prepared by a novel integrated deposition technique. • Electrode with such catalyst shows maximum performance of 0.9 W cm −2 . • Integrated catalyst performs better than continuously prepared nanostructure catalyst.

  11. Magnetic properties of carbon nanotubes with and without catalyst

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lipert, Kamil; Ritschel, Manfred; Leonhardt, Albrecht; Krupskaya, Yulia; Buechner, Bernd; Klingeler, Ruediger, E-mail: k.lipert@ifw-dresden.d [Leibniz Institute for Solid State and Materials Research (IFW) Dresden (Germany)

    2010-01-01

    In this paper we report on the magnetic properties of single- and multiwalled carbon nanotubes synthesized using different chemical vapour deposition methods and with variety of catalyst materials (ferromagnetic Fe, FeCo and diamagnetic Re). Different methods yield carbon nanotubes with different morphologies and different quantity of residual catalyst material. Catalyst particles are usually encapsulated in the nanotubes and influence the magnetic respond of the samples. Varying ferromagnetic properties depending on the shape, size and type of catalyst are discussed in detail. The data are compared with M(H) characteristics of carbon nanotubes without catalysts and with nonmagnetic rhenium, as a reference.

  12. Selective hydrogenation of halogenated arenes using porous manganese oxide (OMS-2) and platinum supported OMS-2 catalysts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McManus, Iain J; Daly, Helen; Manyar, Haresh G; Taylor, S F Rebecca; Thompson, Jillian M; Hardacre, Christopher

    2016-07-04

    Porous manganese oxide (OMS-2) and platinum supported on OMS-2 catalysts have been shown to facilitate the hydrogenation of the nitro group in chloronitrobenzene to give chloroaniline with no dehalogenation. Complete conversion was obtained within 2 h at 25 °C and, although the rate of reaction increased with increasing temperature up to 100 °C, the selectivity to chloroaniline remained at 99.0%. Use of Pd/OMS-2 or Pt/Al2O3 resulted in significant dechlorination even at 25 °C and 2 bar hydrogen pressure giving a selectivity to chloroaniline of 34.5% and 77.8%, respectively, at complete conversion. This demonstrates the potential of using platinum group metal free catalysts for the selective hydrogenation of halogenated aromatics. Two pathways were observed for the analogous nitrobenzene hydrogenation depending on the catalyst used. The hydrogenation of nitrobenzene was found to follow a direct pathway to aniline and nitrosobenzene over Pd/OMS-2 in contrast to the OMS and Pt/OMS-2 catalysts which resulted in formation of nitrosobenzene, azoxybenzene and azobenzene/hydrazobenzene intermediates before complete conversion to aniline. These results indicate that for Pt/OMS-2 the hydrogenation proceeds predominantly over the support with the metal acting to dissociate hydrogen. In the case of Pd/OMS-2 both the hydrogenation and hydrogen adsorption occur on the metal sites.

  13. Electrochemical Deposition of Platinum and Palladium on Gold Nanoparticles Loaded Carbon Nanotube Support for Oxidation Reactions in Fuel Cell

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Surin Saipanya

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Pt and Pd sequentially electrodeposited Au nanoparticles loaded carbon nanotube (Au-CNT was prepared for the electrocatalytic study of methanol, ethanol, and formic acid oxidations. All electrochemical measurements were carried out in a three-electrode cell. A platinum wire and Ag/AgCl were used as auxiliary and reference electrodes, respectively. Suspension of the Au-CNT, phosphate buffer, isopropanol, and Nafion was mixed and dropped on glassy carbon as a working electrode. By sequential deposition method, PdPtPt/Au-CNT, PtPdPd/Au-CNT, and PtPdPt/Au-CNT catalysts were prepared. Cyclic voltammograms (CVs of those catalysts in 1 M H2SO4 solution showed hydrogen adsorption and hydrogen desorption reactions. CV responses for those three catalysts in methanol, ethanol, and formic acid electrooxidations studied in 2 M CH3OH, CH3CH2OH, and HCOOH in 1 M H2SO4 show characteristic oxidation peaks. The oxidation peaks at anodic scan contribute to those organic substance oxidations while the peaks at cathodic scan are related with the reoxidation of the adsorbed carbonaceous species. Comparing all those three catalysts, it can be found that the PdPtPt/Au-CNT catalyst is good at methanol oxidation; the PtPdPt/Au-CNT effectively enhances ethanol oxidation while the PtPdPd/Au-CNT exceptionally catalyzes formic acid oxidation. Therefore, a different stoichiometry affects the electrochemical active surface area of the catalysts to achieve the catalytic oxidation reactions.

  14. Gasification of carbon deposits on catalysts and metal surfaces

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Figueiredo, J L

    1986-10-01

    'Coke' deposited on catalysts and reactor surfaces includes a variety of carbons of different structures and origins, their reactivities being conveniently assessed by Temperature Programmed Reaction (TPR). The gasification of carbon deposits obtained in the laboratory under well controlled conditions, and the regeneration of coked catalysts from petroleum refining processes are reviewed and discussed. Filamentary carbon deposits, containing dispersed metal particles, behave as supported metal catalysts during gasification, and show high reactivities. Pyrolytic and acid catalysis carbons are less reactive on their own, as the gasification is not catalysed; however, metal components of the catalyst or metal impurities deposited on the surface may enhance gasification. 26 refs., 8 figs., 2 tabs.

  15. Platinum decorated carbon nanotubes for highly sensitive amperometric glucose sensing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xie Jining; Wang Shouyan; Aryasomayajula, L; Varadan, V K

    2007-01-01

    Fine platinum nanoparticles (1-5 nm in diameter) were deposited on functionalized multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWNTs) through a decoration technique. A novel type of enzymatic Pt/MWNTs paste-based mediated glucose sensor was fabricated. Electrochemical measurements revealed a significantly improved sensitivity (around 52.7 μA mM -1 cm -2 ) for glucose sensing without using any picoampere booster or Faraday cage. In addition, the calibration curve exhibited a good linearity in the range of 1-28 mM of glucose concentration. Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) were performed to investigate the nanoscale structure and the chemical bonding information of the Pt/MWNTs paste-based sensing material, respectively. The improved sensitivity of this novel glucose sensor could be ascribed to its higher electroactive surface area, enhanced electron transfer, efficient enzyme immobilization, unique interaction in nanoscale and a synergistic effect on the current signal from possible multi-redox reactions

  16. Characterizing Carbon Nanotube Supported Platinum Catalyst by Electrochemistry

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Veltzé, Sune; Andersen, Shuang Ma; Skou, Eivind Morten

    Den metode for hvorved forskellige platinbærende katalysatormaterialebærende kulstofunderlag vil blive testet elektrokemisk beskrives, hvor Elektrokemisk Masse Spektrometri nævnes som en mulighed sammen med mikroskopi....

  17. Carbon monoxide tolerant anodes for proton exchange membrane (PEM) fuel cells. 1. Catalyst development approach

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Holleck, G L; Pasquariello, D M; Clauson, S L

    1998-07-01

    PEM fuel cells are highly attractive for distributed power and cogeneration systems. They are efficient and function virtually without noise or pollution. To be competitive PEM fuel cells must operate on fuel mixtures obtained by reforming of widely available natural gas or liquid hydrocarbons. Reformed fuel gas mixtures invariably contain CO, a strong poison for Pt. Therefore CO tolerant anode catalysts are essential for wide spread PEMFC introduction. It is the objective to develop effective CO tolerant fuel cell catalysts based on multi-component platinum-transition metal alloys. Towards this goal the authors have developed a novel approach for the synthesis and performance evaluation of multifunctional ternary alloy fuel cell catalysts. The alloys are prepared as well-defined thin films on standard TFE-bonded carbon substrates via a dc magnetron sputtering technique. The anodes are laminated to Nafion membranes and the electrochemical performance is measured in a representative fuel cell configuration with H{sub 2} and H{sub 2}/CO gas mixtures. The multi-target sputtering technique permits one to reproducibly synthesize true alloy films of controlled composition. The deposit morphology and electrode structure are determined by the standardized TFE bonded carbon substrate. The thin catalyst layer is concentrated at the electrode ionomer interface where it can be fully utilized in a representative fuel cell configuration. Thus, a true comparative fuel cell catalyst evaluation is possible. The effectiveness of this approach will be demonstrated with Pt, Pt-Ru and Pt-Ru-X catalyzed anodes.

  18. Catalyst design for carbon nanotube growth using atomistic modeling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pint, Cary L; Bozzolo, Guillermo; Hauge, Robert

    2008-01-01

    The formation and stability of bimetallic catalyst particles, in the framework of carbon nanotube growth, is studied using the Bozzolo-Ferrante-Smith (BFS) method for alloys. Monte Carlo-Metropolis simulations with the BFS method are utilized in order to predict and study equilibrium configurations for nanoscale catalyst particles which are directly relevant to the catalyst state prior to growth of carbon nanotubes. At the forefront of possible catalyst combinations is the popular Fe-Mo bimetallic catalyst, which we have recently studied experimentally. We explain our experimental results, which indicate that the growth observed is dependent on the order of co-catalyst deposition, in the straightforward interpretation of BFS strain and chemical energy contributions toward the formation of Fe-Mo catalyst prior to growth. We find that the competition between the formation of metastable inner Mo cores and clusters of surface-segregated Mo atoms in Fe-Mo catalyst particles influences catalyst formation, and we investigate the role of Mo concentration and catalyst particle size in this process. Finally, we apply the same modeling approach to other prominent bimetallic catalysts and suggest that this technique can be a powerful tool to understand and manipulate catalyst design for highly efficient carbon nanotube growth

  19. Pt/Al/sub 2/O/sub 3/- carbon nanocomposite as a catalyst for fuel cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Naeem, R.; Ahmed, R.; Ansari, M.S.

    2013-01-01

    Catalysts comprising platinum nanoparticles (Pt NPs) on carbon support are used in fuel cells for the hydrogen and electricity production by electrochemical oxidation of methanol. However, the catalyst is not the best in terms of its performance. Considering role of the support as significant towards efficiency and durability of the catalyst, there is need for introducing novel support materials to replace carbon alone. Deposition of various metallic NPs on ceramic-carbon (hybrid) supports has been reported to improve thermal, mechanical, electrical and chemical properties of different types of catalyst. In search of better performing catalysts for proton exchange membrane fuel cells (PEMFCs), hybrid supports having different ceramic materials should be synthesized. In this regard Pt/Al/sub 2/O/sub 3/-Carbon (nanocomposites) have been synthesized and applied as promising catalysts in the PEMFCs; results obtained for the nanocomposites were compared with Pt/carbon and Pt/Al/sub 2/O/sub 3/. Vulcan carbon was purified and functionalized prior to use; presence of oxygen containing functional groups on carbon was established from the FTIR spectrum, Hybrid support (1:8 by weight ratio of ceramic and carbon) were already prepared in aqueous 2-propanol employing sonication method on to which Pt NPs (10% by weight in all the cases) were deposited by simple chemical reduction of PtCl/sub 4/ by NaBH/sub 4/ under controlled conditions. The catalysts were subjected to various characterization techniques like TGA (for thermal stability), EDX (for chemical composition), SEM (for surface morphology) and XRD (for cell-shape and -volume, material density and average crystalline size). Catalysts efficiencies for the methanol oxidation were investigated through cyclic voltammetery (CV) by comparing electrochemical surface area, peak current, exchange current density and rate constant in the acidic and basic media. Pt/Al/sub 2/O/sub 3/-carbon exhibited better catalytic efficiencies

  20. Catalyst retention in continuous flow with supercritical carbon dioxide

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Stouten, S.C.; Noel, T.; Wang, Q.; Hessel, V.

    2014-01-01

    This review discusses the retention of organometallic catalysts in continuous flow processes utilizing supercritical carbon dioxide. Due to its innovative properties, supercritical carbon dioxide offers interesting possibilities for process intensification. As a result of safety and cost

  1. Growth of vertically aligned single-walled carbon nanotubes with metallic chirality through faceted FePt-Au catalysts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohashi, Toshiyuki; Iwama, Hiroki; Shima, Toshiyuki

    2016-02-01

    Direct synthesis of vertically aligned metallic single-walled carbon nanotubes (m-SWCNT forests) is a difficult challenge. We have successfully synthesized m-SWCNT forests using faceted iron platinum-gold catalysts epitaxially grown on a single crystalline magnesium oxide substrate. The metallic content of the forests estimated by Raman spectroscopy reaches 90%. From the standpoint of growth rate of the forests, the growth mechanism is probably based on the catalyst of solid state. It is suggested that preferential growth of m-SWCNTs is achieved when both factors are satisfied, namely, {111} dominant octahedral facet and ideal size (fine particles) of FePt particles.

  2. Oxygen reduction at platinum nanoparticles supported on carbon cryogel in alkaline solution

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. R. ELEZOVIC

    2007-07-01

    Full Text Available The oxygen reduction reaction was investigated in 0.1 M NaOH solution, on a porous coated electrode formed of Pt particles supported on carbon cryogel. The Pt/C catalyst was characterized by the X-ray diffraction (XRD, transmission electron microscopy (TEM and cyclic voltammetry techniques. The results demonstrated a successful reduction of Pt to metallic form and homogenous Pt particle size distribution with a mean particle size of about 2.7 nm. The ORR kinetics was investigated by linear sweep polarization at a rotating disc electrode. The results showed the existence of two E – log j regions, usually referred to polycrystalline Pt in acid and alkaline solution. At low current densities (lcd, the Tafel slope was found to be close to –2.3RT/F, while at high current densities (hcd it was found to be close to –2×2.3RT/F. It is proposed that the main path in the ORR mechanism on Pt particles was the direct four-electron process, with the transfer of the first electron as the rate determining step. If the activities are expressed through the specific current densities, a small enhancement of the catalytic activity for Pt/C was observed compared to that of polycrystalline Pt. The effect of the Pt particle size on the electrocatalysis of oxygen reduction was ascribed to the predominant (111 facets of the platinum crystallites.

  3. KOH-activated multi-walled carbon nanotubes as platinum supports for oxygen reduction reaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Chaoxiong; Song, Shuqin; Liu, Jinchao; Maragou, Vasiliki; Tsiakaras, Panagiotis

    In the present investigation, multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) thermally treated by KOH were adopted as the platinum supporting material for the oxygen reduction reaction electrocatalysts. FTIR and Raman spectra were used to investigate the surface state of MWCNTs treated by KOH at different temperatures (700, 800, and 900 °C) and showed MWCNTs can be successfully functionalized. The structural properties of KOH-activated MWCNTs supported Pt were determined by X-ray diffraction (XRD) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM), and their electrochemical performance was evaluated by the aid of cyclic voltammetry (CV) and rotating disk electrode (RDE) voltammetry. According to the experimental findings of the present work, the surrface of MWCNTs can be successfully functionalized with oxygen-containing groups after activation by KOH, favoring the good dispersion of Pt nanoparticles with narrow size distribution. The as-prepared Pt catalysts supported on KOH treated MWCNTs at higher temperature, possess higher electrochemical surface area and exhibit desirable activity towards oxygen reduction reaction (ORR). More precisely, it has been found that the electrochemical active area of Pt/MWCNTs-900 is approximately two times higher than that of Pt/MWCNTs. It can be concluded that KOH activation is an effective way to decorate MWCNTs' surface with oxygen-containing groups and bigger surface area, which makes them more suitable as electrocatalyst support materials.

  4. Carbon nanotube/platinum nanoparticle nanocomposites: preparation, characterization and application in electro oxidation of alcohols

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kalinke, Adir H.; Zarbin, Aldo J. G.

    2014-01-01

    The synthesis and characterization of different platinum nanoparticle/ carbon nanotube nanocomposite samples are described along with the application of these nanocomposites as electrocatalysts for alcohol oxidation. Samples were prepared by a biphasic system in which platinum nanoparticles (Pt-NPs) are synthesized in situ in contact with a carbon nanotube (CNT) dispersion. Variables including platinum precursor/CNT ratio, previous chemical treatment of carbon nanotubes, and presence or absence of a capping agent were evaluated and correlated with the characteristic of the synthesized materials. Samples were characterized by Raman spectroscopy, X-ray diffraction, thermogravimetric analysis and transmission electron microscopy. Glassy carbon electrodes were modified by the nanocomposite samples and evaluated as electrocatalysts for alcohol oxidation. Current densities of 56.1 and 79.8/104.7 mA cm -2 were determined for the oxidation of methanol and ethanol, respectively. (author)

  5. Platinum catalysts recovery of the proton exchange membrane fuel cell; Recuperacao de catalisadores de platina da celula a combustibel de membrana polimerica trocadora de protons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fukurozaki, S.H.; Seo, E.S.M. [Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleares (IPEN/CNEN-SP), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil). Centro de Ciencia e Tecnologia de Materiais. Lab. de Processamento de Residuos

    2006-07-01

    Currently, platinum is the most feasible catalyst for the Proton Exchange Membrane Fuel Cells - PEMFC. Along with platinum's significant importance in this energy system are the high cost of this noble metal and its detrimental effects on the environment. Therefore, recycling this material seems as an alternative to decrease its impacts on the environment and, at the same time, to provide a reduction of the system's costs. A search was conducted for literature and studies about platinum recycling methods. However, only two techniques of platinum recovery, which are still in development, were found. In face of this situation, a recovery method of platinum from deactivated Membrane Electrode Assembly - MEA's was developed, with attention to aspects related to the environment and the necessary requirements for its primary recycling. The results found showed a high recovery ratio and a possibility to reintroduce this metal into the production cycle. (author)

  6. Controlled synthesis of the tricontinuous mesoporous material IBN-9 and its carbon and platinum derivatives

    KAUST Repository

    Zhao, Yunfeng; Zhang, Daliang; Zhao, Lan; Wang, Guangchao; Zhu, Yihan; Cairns, Amy; Sun, Junliang; Zou, Xiaodong; Han, Yu

    2011-01-01

    materials (e.g., carbon and platinum) via a "hard- templating" synthesis route. The obtained carbon material possesses large surface area (∼1900 m2/g), high pore volume (1.56 cm 3/g), and remarkable gas adsorption capability at both cryogenic temperatures

  7. Direct Olefination of Alcohols with Sulfones by Using Heterogeneous Platinum Catalysts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siddiki, S M A Hakim; Touchy, Abeda Sultana; Kon, Kenichi; Shimizu, Ken-Ichi

    2016-04-18

    Carbon-supported Pt nanoparticles (Pt/C) were found to be effective heterogeneous catalysts for the direct Julia olefination of alcohols in the presence of sulfones and KOtBu under oxidant-free conditions. Primary alcohols, including aryl, aliphatic, allyl, and heterocyclic alcohols, underwent olefination with dimethyl sulfone and aryl alkyl sulfones to give terminal and internal olefins, respectively. Secondary alcohols underwent methylenation with dimethyl sulfone. Under 2.5 bar H2, the same reaction system was effective for the transformation of alcohol OH groups to alkyl groups. Structural and mechanistic studies of the terminal olefination system suggested that Pt(0) sites on the Pt metal particles are responsible for the rate-limiting dehydrogenation of alcohols and that KOtBu may deprotonate the sulfone reagent. The Pt/C catalyst was reusable after the olefination, and this method showed a higher turnover number (TON) and a wider substrate scope than previously reported methods, which demonstrates the high catalytic efficiency of the present method. © 2016 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  8. Evaluation of the isotope separation rate of deuterium exchange reaction between H2 and H2O with platinum catalyst

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kitamoto, Asashi; Takashima, Yoichi; Shimizu, Masami.

    1983-01-01

    The high performance catalysts of hydrophobic carrier with fully dispersed platinum were used to measure the isotope separation performance of hydrogen by the chemical exchange method. The continuous injection of oxygen on the order of 10 3 ppm was effective in regenerating catalyst activity and in maintaining high performance for a long time. The separation performance in a trickle bed column should be evaluated by using two parameters, ksub(g) and ksub(l). These two parameters were unified to the overall transfer coefficient ksub(fg), which may be sufficient in the estimation of overall performance or the design of a separation plant by the chemical exchange method. When one wants to increase the transfer rate in a chemical exchange column, the improvement of ksub(l) rather than ksub(g) may be more effective in increasing the overall transfer rate (its coefficient is expressed by ksub(fg) in this paper). (author)

  9. Metal Nanoparticle Catalysts for Carbon Nanotube Growth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pierce, Benjamin F.

    2003-01-01

    Work this summer involved and new and unique process for producing the metal nanoparticle catalysts needed for carbon nanotube (CNT) growth. There are many applications attributed to CNT's, and their properties have deemed them to be a hot spot in research today. Many groups have demonstrated the versatility in CNT's by exploring a wide spectrum of roles that these nanotubes are able to fill. A short list of such promising applications are: nanoscaled electronic circuitry, storage media, chemical sensors, microscope enhancement, and coating reinforcement. Different methods have been used to grow these CNT's. Some examples are laser ablation, flame synthesis, or furnace synthesis. Every single approach requires the presence of a metal catalyst (Fe, Co, and Ni are among the best) that is small enough to produce a CNT. Herein lies the uniqueness of this work. Microemulsions (containing inverse micelles) were used to generate these metal particles for subsequent CNT growth. The goal of this summer work was basically to accomplish as much preliminary work as possible. I strived to pinpoint which variable (experimental process, metal product, substrate, method of application, CVD conditions, etc.) was the determining factor in the results. The resulting SEM images were sufficient for the appropriate comparisons to be made. The future work of this project consists of the optimization of the more promising experimental procedures and further exploration onto what exactly dictated the results.

  10. Platinum-TM (TM = Fe, Co) alloy nanoparticles dispersed nitrogen doped (reduced graphene oxide-multiwalled carbon nanotube) hybrid structure cathode electrocatalysts for high performance PEMFC applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vinayan, B P; Ramaprabhu, S

    2013-06-07

    The efforts to push proton exchange membrane fuel cells (PEMFC) for commercial applications are being undertaken globally. In PEMFC, the sluggish kinetics of oxygen reduction reactions (ORR) at the cathode can be improved by the alloying of platinum with 3d-transition metals (TM = Fe, Co, etc.) and with nitrogen doping, and in the present work we have combined both of these aspects. We describe a facile method for the synthesis of a nitrogen doped (reduced graphene oxide (rGO)-multiwalled carbon nanotubes (MWNTs)) hybrid structure (N-(G-MWNTs)) by the uniform coating of a nitrogen containing polymer over the surface of the hybrid structure (positively surface charged rGO-negatively surface charged MWNTs) followed by the pyrolysis of these (rGO-MWNTs) hybrid structure-polymer composites. The N-(G-MWNTs) hybrid structure is used as a catalyst support for the dispersion of platinum (Pt), platinum-iron (Pt3Fe) and platinum-cobalt (Pt3Co) alloy nanoparticles. The PEMFC performances of Pt-TM alloy nanoparticle dispersed N-(G-MWNTs) hybrid structure electrocatalysts are 5.0 times higher than that of commercial Pt-C electrocatalysts along with very good stability under acidic environment conditions. This work demonstrates a considerable improvement in performance compared to existing cathode electrocatalysts being used in PEMFC and can be extended to the synthesis of metal, metal oxides or metal alloy nanoparticle decorated nitrogen doped carbon nanostructures for various electrochemical energy applications.

  11. A Pd/C-CeO2 Anode Catalyst for High-Performance Platinum-Free Anion Exchange Membrane Fuel Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Hamish A; Lavacchi, Alessandro; Vizza, Francesco; Marelli, Marcello; Di Benedetto, Francesco; D'Acapito, Francesco; Paska, Yair; Page, Miles; Dekel, Dario R

    2016-05-10

    One of the biggest obstacles to the dissemination of fuel cells is their cost, a large part of which is due to platinum (Pt) electrocatalysts. Complete removal of Pt is a difficult if not impossible task for proton exchange membrane fuel cells (PEM-FCs). The anion exchange membrane fuel cell (AEM-FC) has long been proposed as a solution as non-Pt metals may be employed. Despite this, few examples of Pt-free AEM-FCs have been demonstrated with modest power output. The main obstacle preventing the realization of a high power density Pt-free AEM-FC is sluggish hydrogen oxidation (HOR) kinetics of the anode catalyst. Here we describe a Pt-free AEM-FC that employs a mixed carbon-CeO2 supported palladium (Pd) anode catalyst that exhibits enhanced kinetics for the HOR. AEM-FC tests run on dry H2 and pure air show peak power densities of more than 500 mW cm(-2) . © 2016 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  12. Tailoring the properties of Platinum supported catalysts by irreversible adsorbed adatoms toward ethanol oxidation for direct ethanol fuel cells

    OpenAIRE

    Costa Figueiredo, Marta; Santasalo-Aarnio, A.; Vidal-Iglesias, F.J.; Solla-Gullón, J.; Feliu, J.M.; Kontturi, K.; Kallio, T.

    2013-01-01

    In this work ethanol oxidation on carbon supported Pt catalysts modified with irreversibly adsorbed adatoms is reported. This study concerns understanding of the effect of a second metal on real catalysts in conditions as close as possible to those applied in fuel cells systems. The results were acquired using cyclic voltammetry, chronoamperometry and in situ infra-red techniques always taking into account the future application of the electrocatalyst materials in fuel cells. Foreign adatoms,...

  13. Cyclic voltammetric investigations of microstructured and platinum-covered glassy carbon electrodes in contact with a polymer electrolyte membrane

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Scherer, G G; Veziridis, Z; Staub, M [Paul Scherrer Inst. (PSI), Villigen (Switzerland); Freimuth, H [Inst. fuer Mikrotechnik Mainz IMM, Mainz (Germany)

    1997-06-01

    Model gas diffusion electrodes were prepared by microstructuring glassy carbon surfaces with high aspect ratios and subsequent deposition of platinum. These electrodes were characterized by hydrogen under-potential deposition (H-upd) in contact with a polymer electrolyte membrane employing cyclic voltametry. H-upd was found on platinum areas not in direct contact to the solid electrolyte, as long as a continuous platinum-path existed. A carbon surface between platinum acts as barrier for H-upd. (author) 4 figs., 5 refs.

  14. Hydrogenation of carbon monoxide over supported palladium catalysts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fujimoto, K.; Hashimoto, H.; Kunugi, T.

    1978-03-01

    An alumina-supported 2% palladium catalyst had higher activity for carbon monoxide hydrogenation than a silica-supported 2% palladium catalyst, at 250/sup 0/-400/sup 0/C and 1 atm. The addition of lanthanum oxide or thorium oxide, but not of potassium oxide, to the silica-supported catalyst increased the conversion at 350/sup 0/C from 1.1% to 81.0% with a selectivity of 56.1% for methane, 1.4% for C/sub 2/ compounds, 0.1% for C/sub 3/ compounds, and 42.5% for carbon dioxide. Temperature-programed desorption of carbon monoxide in a hydrogen stream showed that of two desorption peaks observed for carbon monoxide, the one at higher temperature corresponded to the carbon monoxide species which hydrogenates to methane and that the area of this peak increased with increasing thorium content of the catalyst. Graphs, tables, and 12 references.

  15. Current status for applications of hydrophobic platinum catalysts in tritium removal from nuclear effluents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vagner, Irina; Ionita, Gheorghe; Varlam, Carmen

    2008-01-01

    Full text: Based on the long experience of the authors, in the preparation, testing and evaluation of the performances of hydrophobic catalysts, and based on the reviewed references, this paper presents up-to-date R and D results on the preparation methods and applications of the hydrophobic catalysts, in deuterium and tritium separation. The objectives of the paper are: 1. to provide a database for selection of the most appropriate catalyst and catalytic packing for above mentioned processes; 2. to evaluate the potentiality of hydrophobic Pt-catalysts in the deuterium and tritium separation; 3. to assess and find a new procedure for preparation of a new improved hydrophobic catalyst. The merits of the hydrophobic catalysts are shown in comparison to hydrophilic catalysts. As results of the review some general conclusions about the applications of hydrophobic catalysts in environmental field are as follow: 1. the hydrophobic Pt-catalysts packed in the trickle bed reactors showed a high catalytic activity and long stability; 2. the utilization of the hydrophobic Pt-catalysts for tritium removal from liquid and gaseous effluent in nuclear field was entirely confirmed on industrial scale; 3. the extension of the utilization of the hydrophobic Pt-catalysts to other new processes, which take place in presence of liquid water or high humidity, like VOCs oxidation from wastewater or H 2 -O 2 catalytic recombination, are subject to testing

  16. Co-deposition of Pt and ceria anode catalyst in supercritical carbon dioxide for direct methanol fuel cell applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    You, Eunyoung; Guzmán-Blas, Rolando; Nicolau, Eduardo; Aulice Scibioh, M.; Karanikas, Christos F.; Watkins, James J.; Cabrera, Carlos R.

    2012-01-01

    Pt and mixed Pt-ceria catalysts were deposited onto gas diffusion layers using supercritical fluid deposition (SFD) to fabricate thin layer electrodes for direct methanol fuel cells. Dimethyl (1,5-cyclooctadiene) platinum (II) (CODPtMe 2 ) and tetrakis (2,2,6,6-tetramethyl 3,5-heptanedionato) cerium (IV) (Ce(tmhd) 4 ) were used as precursors. Hydrogen-assisted Pt deposition was performed in compressed carbon dioxide at 60 °C and 17.2 MPa to yield high purity Pt on carbon-black based gas diffusion layers. During the preparation of the mixed Pt-ceria catalyst, hydrogen reduction of CODPtMe 2 to yield Pt catalyzed the deposition of ceria from Ce(tmhd) 4 enabling co-deposition at 150 °C. The catalyst layers were characterized using X-ray diffraction (XRD), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and scanning electron microscope-energy dispersive spectral (SEM-EDS) analyses. Their electrochemical performance toward methanol oxidation was examined in half cell mode using a three electrode assembly as well as in fuel cell mode. The thin layer electrodes formed via SFD exhibited higher performance in fuel cell operations compared to those prepared by the conventional brush-paint method. Furthermore, the Pt-ceria catalyst with an optimized composition exhibited greater methanol oxidation activity than pure platinum.

  17. Application of aromatization catalyst in synthesis of carbon nanotubes

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    In a typical chemical vapour deposition (CVD) process for synthesizing carbon nanotubes (CNTs), it was found that the aromatization catalysts could promote effectively the formation of CNT. The essence of this phenomenon was attributed to the fact that the aromatization catalyst can accelerate the ...

  18. Nickel catalysts for internal reforming in molten carbonate fuel cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Berger, R.J.; Berger, R.J.; Doesburg, E.B.M.; Doesburg, E.B.M.; van Ommen, J.G.; Ross, J.R.H.; Ross, J.R.H.

    1996-01-01

    Natural gas may be used instead of hydrogen as fuel for the molten carbonate fuel cell (MCFC) by steam reforming the natural gas inside the MCFC, using a nickel catalyst (internal reforming). The severe conditions inside the MCFC, however, require that the catalyst has a very high stability. In

  19. Sulfidation of carbon-supported iron oxide catalysts

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ramselaar, W.L.T.M.; Hadders, R.H.; Gerkema, E.; Beer, de V.H.J.; Oers, van E.M.; Kraan, van der A.M.

    1989-01-01

    The sulfidation of carbon-supported iron oxide catalysts was studied by means of in-situ Mössbauer spectroscopy at temperatures down to 4.2 K. The catalysts were dried in two different ways and then sulfided in a flow of 10% H2S in H2 at temperatures between 293 and 773 K. Thiophene

  20. Fine platinum nanoparticles supported on a porous ceramic membrane as efficient catalysts for the removal of benzene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Hui; Li, Chengyin; Ren, Xiaoyong; Liu, Kaiqi; Yang, Jun

    2017-11-29

    It would be desirable to remove volatile organic compounds (VOCs) while we eliminate the dusts using silicon carbide (SiC)-based porous ceramics from the hot gases. Aiming at functionalizing SiC-based porous ceramics with catalytic capability, we herein report a facile strategy to integrate high efficient catalysts into the porous SiC substrates for the VOC removal. We demonstrate an aqueous salt method for uniformly distributing fine platinum (Pt) particles on the alumina (Al 2 O 3 ) layers, which are pre-coated on the SiC substrates as supports for VOC catalysts. We confirm that at a Pt mass loading as low as 0.176% and a weight hourly space velocity of 6000 mL g -1 h -1 , the as-prepared Pt/SiC@Al 2 O 3 catalysts can convert 90% benzene at a temperature of ca. 215 °C. The results suggest a promising way to design ceramics-based bi-functional materials for simultaneously eliminating dusts and harmful VOCs from various hot gases.

  1. Influence of plasma treatment of carbon blacks on electrochemical activity of Pt/carbon blacks catalysts for DMFCs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Seok; Cho, Mi-Hwa; Lee, Jae-Rock; Park, Soo-Jin

    In this work, in order to improve the dispersion of platinum catalysts deposited on carbon materials, the effects of surface plasma treatment of carbon blacks (CBs) were investigated. The surface characteristics of the CBs were determined by fourier transformed-infrared (FT-IR), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), and Boehm's titration method. The electrochemical properties of the plasma-treated CBs-supported Pt (Pt/CBs) catalysts were analyzed by linear sweep voltammetry (LSV) experiments. From the results of FT-IR and acid-base values, N 2-plasma treatment of the CBs at 300 W intensity led to a formation of a free radical on the CBs. The peak intensity increased with increase of the treatment time, due to the formation of new basic functional groups (such as C-N, C dbnd N, -NH 3 +, -NH, and dbnd NH) by the free radical on the CBs. Accordingly, the basic values were enhanced by the basic functional groups. However, after a specific reaction time, N 2-plasma treatment could hardly influence on change of the surface functional groups of CBs, due to the disappearance of free radical. Consequently, it was found that optimal treatment time was 30 s for the best electro activity of Pt/CBs catalysts and the N 2-plasma treated Pt/CBs possessed the better electrochemical properties than the pristine Pt/CBs.

  2. Total Oxidation of Ethanol and Toluene over Ceria-Zirconia Supported Platinum Catalysts.

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Topka, Pavel; Kaluža, Luděk; Gaálová, Jana

    2016-01-01

    Roč. 70, č. 7 (2016), s. 898-906 ISSN 0366-6352 R&D Projects: GA ČR GP13-24186P Institutional support: RVO:67985858 Keywords : oxidation * volatile organic compounds * platinum Subject RIV: CI - Industrial Chemistry, Chemical Engineering Impact factor: 1.258, year: 2016

  3. Growth mechanism of graphene on platinum: Surface catalysis and carbon segregation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sun, Jie; Lindvall, Niclas; Yurgens, August; Nam, Youngwoo; Cole, Matthew T.; Teo, Kenneth B. K.; Woo Park, Yung

    2014-01-01

    A model of the graphene growth mechanism of chemical vapor deposition on platinum is proposed and verified by experiments. Surface catalysis and carbon segregation occur, respectively, at high and low temperatures in the process, representing the so-called balance and segregation regimes. Catalysis leads to self-limiting formation of large area monolayer graphene, whereas segregation results in multilayers, which evidently “grow from below.” By controlling kinetic factors, dominantly monolayer graphene whose high quality has been confirmed by quantum Hall measurement can be deposited on platinum with hydrogen-rich environment, quench cooling, tiny but continuous methane flow and about 1000 °C growth temperature

  4. Controlled surface segregation leads to efficient coke-resistant nickel/platinum bimetallic catalysts for the dry reforming of methane

    KAUST Repository

    Li, Lidong; Zhou, Lu; Ould-Chikh, Samy; Anjum, Dalaver; Kanoun, Mohammed; Scaranto, Jessica; Hedhili, Mohamed Nejib; Khalid, Syed; Laveille, Paco; D'Souza, Lawrence; Clo, Alain M.; Basset, Jean-Marie

    2015-01-01

    Surface composition and structure are of vital importance for heterogeneous catalysts, especially for bimetallic catalysts, which often vary as a function of reaction conditions (known as surface segregation). The preparation of bimetallic catalysts with controlled metal surface composition and structure is very challenging. In this study, we synthesize a series of Ni/Pt bimetallic catalysts with controlled metal surface composition and structure using a method derived from surface organometallic chemistry. The evolution of the surface composition and structure of the obtained bimetallic catalysts under simulated reaction conditions is investigated by various techniques, which include CO-probe IR spectroscopy, high-angle annular dark-field scanning transmission electron microscopy, energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy, extended X-ray absorption fine structure analysis, X-ray absorption near-edge structure analysis, XRD, and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. It is demonstrated that the structure of the bimetallic catalyst is evolved from Pt monolayer island-modified Ni nanoparticles to core-shell bimetallic nanoparticles composed of a Ni-rich core and a Ni/Pt alloy shell upon thermal treatment. These catalysts are active for the dry reforming of methane, and their catalytic activities, stabilities, and carbon formation vary with their surface composition and structure. The reform of reforming: A series of alumina-supported Ni/Pt bimetallic nanoparticles (NPs) with controlled surface composition and structure are prepared. Remarkable surface segregation for these bimetallic NPs is observed upon thermal treatment. These bimetallic NPs are active catalysts for CO2 reforming of CH4, and their catalytic activities, stabilities, and carbon formation vary with their surface composition and structure.

  5. Controlled surface segregation leads to efficient coke-resistant nickel/platinum bimetallic catalysts for the dry reforming of methane

    KAUST Repository

    Li, Lidong

    2015-02-03

    Surface composition and structure are of vital importance for heterogeneous catalysts, especially for bimetallic catalysts, which often vary as a function of reaction conditions (known as surface segregation). The preparation of bimetallic catalysts with controlled metal surface composition and structure is very challenging. In this study, we synthesize a series of Ni/Pt bimetallic catalysts with controlled metal surface composition and structure using a method derived from surface organometallic chemistry. The evolution of the surface composition and structure of the obtained bimetallic catalysts under simulated reaction conditions is investigated by various techniques, which include CO-probe IR spectroscopy, high-angle annular dark-field scanning transmission electron microscopy, energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy, extended X-ray absorption fine structure analysis, X-ray absorption near-edge structure analysis, XRD, and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. It is demonstrated that the structure of the bimetallic catalyst is evolved from Pt monolayer island-modified Ni nanoparticles to core-shell bimetallic nanoparticles composed of a Ni-rich core and a Ni/Pt alloy shell upon thermal treatment. These catalysts are active for the dry reforming of methane, and their catalytic activities, stabilities, and carbon formation vary with their surface composition and structure. The reform of reforming: A series of alumina-supported Ni/Pt bimetallic nanoparticles (NPs) with controlled surface composition and structure are prepared. Remarkable surface segregation for these bimetallic NPs is observed upon thermal treatment. These bimetallic NPs are active catalysts for CO2 reforming of CH4, and their catalytic activities, stabilities, and carbon formation vary with their surface composition and structure.

  6. UV-induced polymerization of size-controlled platinum/poly[styrene-divinylbenzene-tri(propylene glycol) diacrylate] hydrophobic catalyst beads in microfluidics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wi, Jun; Li, Xiang; Song, Tong; Song, Zi Fan; Chang, Zhen Qi; Meng, Da Qiao

    2015-01-01

    The catalytic exchange of hydrogen isotopes between hydrogen and water has been known to be a very useful process for the separation of tritium from tritiated water. For the process, a highly active hydrophobic catalyst is needed. This study provides an effective fabrication method of size-controlled platinum/poly[styrene-divinylbenzene-tri(propylene glycol) diacrylate] [Pt/poly(SDB-TPGDA)] hydrophobic catalyst beads with a narrow size distribution. Platinum nanoparticles were prepared by γ-ray-induced reduction in the aqueous phase first, and then uniformly dispersed in SDB-TPGDA comonomer after the hydrophobization of platinum nanoparticles with alkylamine stabilizers. The porous Pt/poly(SDB-TPGDA) hydrophobic catalyst beads were synthesized by the UV-initiated polymerization of the mixture droplets prepared in a capillary-based microfluidic system. The size of as-prepared catalyst beads can be controlled in the range of 200-1,000 μm by adjusting the flow rate of dispersed and continuous phases, as well as the viscosity of the continuous phase. Sorbitan monooleate and cyclohexanol were used as coporogens to control the porosities of the catalyst beads

  7. UV-induced polymerization of size-controlled platinum/poly[styrene-divinylbenzene-tri(propylene glycol) diacrylate] hydrophobic catalyst beads in microfluidics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wi, Jun; Li, Xiang; Song, Tong; Song, Zi Fan; Chang, Zhen Qi [School of Nuclear Science and Technology, University of Science and Technology of China, Hefei (China); Meng, Da Qiao [Si Chuan Institute of Materials and Technology, Jiang You (China)

    2015-10-15

    The catalytic exchange of hydrogen isotopes between hydrogen and water has been known to be a very useful process for the separation of tritium from tritiated water. For the process, a highly active hydrophobic catalyst is needed. This study provides an effective fabrication method of size-controlled platinum/poly[styrene-divinylbenzene-tri(propylene glycol) diacrylate] [Pt/poly(SDB-TPGDA)] hydrophobic catalyst beads with a narrow size distribution. Platinum nanoparticles were prepared by γ-ray-induced reduction in the aqueous phase first, and then uniformly dispersed in SDB-TPGDA comonomer after the hydrophobization of platinum nanoparticles with alkylamine stabilizers. The porous Pt/poly(SDB-TPGDA) hydrophobic catalyst beads were synthesized by the UV-initiated polymerization of the mixture droplets prepared in a capillary-based microfluidic system. The size of as-prepared catalyst beads can be controlled in the range of 200-1,000 μm by adjusting the flow rate of dispersed and continuous phases, as well as the viscosity of the continuous phase. Sorbitan monooleate and cyclohexanol were used as coporogens to control the porosities of the catalyst beads.

  8. Nitrogen-doped carbon nanotubes as a metal catalyst support

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Mabena, LF

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available ., which are among the most commonly used heterogeneous catalyst supports (Mart??nez-Me?ndez et al. 2006). Catalyst activity depends on the particle size and appropriate dis- tance between each particle. These catalysts deposited on a support... supported Pt electrodes. Appl Catal B Environ 80:286?295 Maldonado S, Morin S, Stevenson KJ (2006) Structure, composition, and chemical reactivity of carbon nanotubes by selective nitrogen doping. Carbon 44:1429?1437 Mart??nez-Me?ndez S, Henr??quez Y...

  9. Synthesis of carbon nanotubes and nanotube forests on copper catalyst

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kruszka, Bartosz; Terzyk, Artur P; Wiśniewski, Marek; Gauden, Piotr A; Szybowicz, Mirosław

    2014-01-01

    The growth of carbon nanotubes on bulk copper is studied. We show for the first time, that super growth chemical vapor deposition method can be successfully applied for preparation of nanotubes on copper catalyst, and the presence of hydrogen is necessary. Next, different methods of copper surface activation are studied, to improve catalyst efficiency. Among them, applied for the first time for copper catalyst in nanotubes synthesis, sulfuric acid activation is the most promising. Among tested samples the surface modified for 10 min is the most active, causing the growth of vertically aligned carbon nanotube forests. Obtained results have potential importance in application of nanotubes and copper in electronic chips and nanodevices. (paper)

  10. The platinum catalyst layer in polymer-electrolyte fuel cells[Dissertation 17127]; Die Platinkatalysatorschicht in Polymerelektrolyt-Brennstoffzellen. Beitraege zum Verstaendnis und zur Optimierung

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reiner, A.

    2007-07-01

    This illustrated, comprehensive dissertation by Dr. Andreas Reiner presents an in-depth analysis of polymer electrolyte fuel cells (PEFC) and in particular, their platinum catalyst layer. First of all, the thermodynamics and kinetics involved are reviewed, along with components, their efficiencies and the catalyst layer. The methods used, including scanning electron microscope, x-ray and Rutherford spectroscopy are discussed. The structure and composition of co-sputtered catalyst layers and their production are described. Electro-chemical activation and the electro-chemical properties of the layers are discussed. The second part of the dissertation deals with the principle of hydrogen under-potential deposition. This method provides information about the electrochemically active platinum surface fraction. The results of investigations made are presented and discussed.

  11. Durable platinum/graphene catalysts assisted with polydiallyldimethylammonium for proton-exchange membrane fuel cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lei, M.; Liang, C.; Wang, Y.J.; Huang, K.; Ye, C.X.; Liu, G.; Wang, W.J.; Jin, S.F.; Zhang, R.; Fan, D.Y.; Yang, H.J.; Wang, Y.G.

    2013-01-01

    High performance and electrochemically stable Pt/graphene catalysts assisted with polydiallyldimethylammonium (PDDA) have been synthesized for PEM fuel cells. The preparation procedure and properties of the catalysts are investigated in detail. With the introduction of PDDA molecules, Pt nanoparticles can be well-dispersed on graphene support, resulting in improved electrochemical surface area and enhanced electrocatalytic activity. The corresponding electrochemical surface areas (ECSA) of catalyst layers calculated from the hydrogen desorption peak on cyclic voltammogram curves are 78.3, 72.5 and 73.6 cm 2 g −1 for catalyst layers with Pt/graphene, Pt-PDDA/graphene, and Pt/graphene-PDDA catalysts, respectively. Both PDDA modified Pt nanoparticles and PDDA modified graphene supports also exhibit high durability toward electrochemical oxidation cycles compared with the conventional produced Pt/graphene catalyst at the same conditions. After 3000 cycles, only 23.52% of the initial ECSA remains for Pt/graphene electrocatalyst whereas 43.04% and 37.7% of the initial ECSA for the Pt/graphene-PDDA and Pt-PDDA/graphene catalysts remain, respectively

  12. Design of Polymer-Coated Multi-Walled Carbon Nanotube/Carbon Black-based Fuel Cell Catalysts with High Durability and Performance Under Non-humidified Condition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yang, Zehui; Berber, Mohamed R.; Nakashima, Naotoshi

    2015-01-01

    To realize a high catalyst utilization, better fuel cell performance and durability as well as low production cost, an efficient design strategy of the catalyst layer that can improve both the oxygen accessibility and structure stability is highly required. Here, we describe the preparation of fuel cell electrocatalysts with an efficient fuel cell performance and better stability based on hybrids of multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWNTs) and carbon black (CB) which were wrapped by a proton conducting polymer, poly[2,2′-(2,6-pyridine)-5,5′-bibenzimidazole], before deposition of the platinum (Pt) metal catalyst. The catalyst mass activity after feeding only 10%-MWNTs to CB increased by 1.5 and 2 times than those of the MWNTs-based- and CB-based catalysts, respectively. The results also demonstrated that 90 wt% of the MWNTs in the catalyst layer allows it to be replaced by CB without any significant change in its durability and performance under 120 °C and non-humidified condition

  13. Metal Oxide-Supported Platinum Overlayers as Proton-Exchange Membrane Fuel Cell Cathodes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tripkovic, Vladimir; Abild-Pedersen, Frank; Studt, Felix

    2012-01-01

    We investigated the activity and stability of n=(1, 2, 3) platinum layers supported on a number of rutile metal oxides (MO2; M=Ti, Sn, Ta, Nb, Hf and Zr). A suitable oxide support can alleviate the problem of carbon corrosion and platinum dissolution in Pt/C catalysts. Moreover, it can increase t...

  14. Hall Measurements on Carbon Nanotube Paper Modified With Electroless Deposited Platinum

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Iwuoha Emmanuel

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Carbon nanotube paper, sometimes referred to as bucky paper, is a random arrangement of carbon nanotubes meshed into a single robust structure, which can be manipulated with relative ease. Multi-walled carbon nanotubes were used to make the nanotube paper, and were subsequently modified with platinum using an electroless deposition method based on substrate enhanced electroless deposition. This involves the use of a sacrificial metal substrate that undergoes electro-dissolution while the platinum metal deposits out of solution onto the nanotube paper via a galvanic displacement reaction. The samples were characterized using SEM/EDS, and Hall-effect measurements. The SEM/EDS analysis clearly revealed deposits of platinum (Pt distributed over the nanotube paper surface, and the qualitative elemental analysis revealed co-deposition of other elements from the metal substrates used. When stainless steel was used as sacrificial metal a large degree of Pt contamination with various other metals was observed. Whereas when pure sacrificial metals were used bimetallic Pt clusters resulted. The co-deposition of a bimetallic system upon carbon nanotubes was a function of the metal type and the time of exposure. Hall-effect measurements revealed some interesting fluctuations in sheet carrier density and the dominant carrier switched from N- to P-type when Pt was deposited onto the nanotube paper. Perspectives on the use of the nanotube paper as a replacement to traditional carbon cloth in water electrolysis systems are also discussed.

  15. Sum Frequency Generation Vibrational Spectroscopy of Colloidal Platinum Nanoparticle Catalysts: Disordering versus Removal of Organic Capping

    KAUST Repository

    Krier, James M.; Michalak, William D.; Baker, L. Robert; An, Kwangjin; Komvopoulos, Kyriakos; Somorjai, Gabor A.

    2012-01-01

    Recent work with nanoparticle catalysts shows that size and shape control on the nanometer scale influences reaction rate and selectivity. Sum frequency generation (SFG) vibrational spectroscopy is a powerful tool for studying heterogeneous

  16. Tuning the structure of platinum particles on ceria in situ for enhancing the catalytic performance of exhaust gas catalysts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gaenzler, Andreas M.; Casapu, Maria; Grunwaldt, Jan-Dierk; Vernoux, Philippe; Loridant, Stephane; Cadete Santos Aires, Francisco J.; Epicier, Thierry; Betz, Benjamin; Hoyer, Ruediger

    2017-01-01

    A dynamic structural behavior of Pt nanoparticles on the ceria surface under reducing/oxidizing conditions was found at moderate temperatures (<500 C) and exploited to enhance the catalytic activity of Pt/CeO 2 -based exhaust gas catalysts. Redispersion of platinum in an oxidizing atmosphere already occurred at 400 C. A protocol with reducing pulses at 250-400 C was applied in a subsequent step for controlled Pt-particle formation. Operando X-ray absorption spectroscopy unraveled the different extent of reduction and sintering of Pt particles: The choice of the reductant allowed the tuning of the reduction degree/particle size and thus the catalytic activity (CO>H 2 >C 3 H 6 ). This dynamic nature of Pt on ceria at such low temperatures (250-500 C) was additionally confirmed by in situ environmental transmission electron microscopy. A general concept is proposed to adjust the noble metal dispersion (size, structure), for example, during operation of an exhaust gas catalyst. (copyright 2017 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim)

  17. Tuning the structure of platinum particles on ceria in situ for enhancing the catalytic performance of exhaust gas catalysts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gaenzler, Andreas M.; Casapu, Maria; Grunwaldt, Jan-Dierk [Institute for Chemical Technology and Polymer Chemistry (ITCP), Karlsruhe Institute of Technology (KIT), Karlsruhe (Germany); Vernoux, Philippe; Loridant, Stephane; Cadete Santos Aires, Francisco J. [Institut de Recherches sur la Catalyse et l' Environnement de Lyon, UMR 5256, CNRS, Universite Claude Bernard Lyon 1, Universite de Lyon, Villeurbanne (France); Epicier, Thierry [Materiaux, Ingenierie et Science, UMR 5510, CNRS, INSA de Lyon, Universite de Lyon, Villeurbanne (France); Betz, Benjamin [Umicore AG and Co. KG, Hanau (Germany); Ernst-Berl Institut, Technische Universitaet Darmstadt (Germany); Hoyer, Ruediger [Umicore AG and Co. KG, Hanau (Germany)

    2017-10-09

    A dynamic structural behavior of Pt nanoparticles on the ceria surface under reducing/oxidizing conditions was found at moderate temperatures (<500 C) and exploited to enhance the catalytic activity of Pt/CeO{sub 2}-based exhaust gas catalysts. Redispersion of platinum in an oxidizing atmosphere already occurred at 400 C. A protocol with reducing pulses at 250-400 C was applied in a subsequent step for controlled Pt-particle formation. Operando X-ray absorption spectroscopy unraveled the different extent of reduction and sintering of Pt particles: The choice of the reductant allowed the tuning of the reduction degree/particle size and thus the catalytic activity (CO>H{sub 2}>C{sub 3}H{sub 6}). This dynamic nature of Pt on ceria at such low temperatures (250-500 C) was additionally confirmed by in situ environmental transmission electron microscopy. A general concept is proposed to adjust the noble metal dispersion (size, structure), for example, during operation of an exhaust gas catalyst. (copyright 2017 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim)

  18. Carbon Nanofibers as Catalyst Support for Noble Metals

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Toebes, M.L.

    2004-01-01

    In the quest for new and well-defined support materials for heterogeneous catalysts we explored the potential of carbon nanofibers (CNF). CNF belongs to the by now extensive family of synthetic graphite-like carbon materials with advantageous and tunable physico-chemical properties. Aim of the work

  19. Catalyst deposition for the preparation of carbon nanotubes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2013-01-01

    patterned surface is configured to ensure that no more than a single island of catalyst is formed on each plateau, so that a sub sequent growth of carbon nanotubes from the deposited islands result in that no more than a single carbon nanotube is grown from each plateau....

  20. bis-Nitrile and bis-Dialkylcyanamide Platinum(II) Complexes as Efficient Catalysts for Hydrosilylation Cross-Linking of Siloxane Polymers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Islamova, Regina M; Dobrynin, Mikhail V; Ivanov, Daniil M; Vlasov, Andrey V; Kaganova, Elena V; Grigoryan, Galina V; Kukushkin, Vadim Yu

    2016-03-05

    cis- and trans-Isomers of the platinum(II) nitrile complexes [PtCl2(NCR)2] (R = NMe2, N(C₅H10), Ph, CH2Ph) were examined as catalysts for hydrosilylation cross-linking of vinyl-terminated polydimethylsiloxane and trimethylsilyl-terminated poly(dimethylsiloxane-co-ethylhydrosiloxane) producing high quality silicone rubbers. Among the tested platinum species the cis-complexes are much more active catalysts than their trans-congeners and for all studied platinum complexes cis-[PtCl2(NCCH2Ph)2] exhibits the best catalytic activity (room temperature, c = 1.0 × 10(-4) mol/L, τpot-life 60 min, τcuring 6 h). Although cis-[PtCl₂(NCCH2Ph)2] is less active than the widely used Karstedt's catalyst, its application for the cross-linking can be performed not only at room temperature (c = 1.0 × 10(-4) mol/L), but also, more efficiently, at 80 °C (c = 1.0 × 10(-4)-1.0 × 10(-5) mol/L) and it prevents adherence of the formed silicone rubbers to equipment. The usage of the cis- and trans-[PtCl2(NCR)2] complexes as the hydrosilylation catalysts do not require any inhibitors and, moreover, the complexes and their mixtures with vinyl- and trimethylsilyl terminated polysiloxanes are shelf-stable in air. Tested catalysts do not form colloid platinum particles after the cross-linking.

  1. Electroreduction of oxygen on carbon-supported gold catalysts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Erikson, Heiki; Juermann, Gea; Sarapuu, Ave; Potter, Robert J.; Tammeveski, Kaido

    2009-01-01

    The electrochemical reduction of oxygen was studied on Au/C catalysts (20 and 30 wt%) in 0.5 M H 2 SO 4 and 0.1 M KOH solutions using the rotating disk electrode (RDE) method. The thickness of the Au/C-Nafion layers was varied between 1.5 and 10 μm. The specific activity of Au was independent of catalyst loading in both solutions, indicating that the transport of reactants through the catalyst layer does not limit the process of oxygen reduction under these conditions. The mass activity of 20 wt% Au/C catalysts was higher due to smaller particle size. The number of electrons involved in the reaction and the Tafel slopes were found; the values of these parameters are similar to that of bulk polycrystalline gold and indicate that the mechanism of O 2 reduction is not affected by carbon support or the catalyst configuration.

  2. Nitrogen controlled iron catalyst phase during carbon nanotube growth

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bayer, Bernhard C., E-mail: bernhard.bayer@univie.ac.at [Department of Engineering, University of Cambridge, Cambridge CB3 0FA (United Kingdom); Faculty of Physics, University of Vienna, A-1090 Vienna (Austria); Baehtz, Carsten [Institute of Ion Beam Physics and Materials Research, Helmholtz-Zentrum Dresden-Rossendorf, D-01314 Dresden (Germany); Kidambi, Piran R.; Weatherup, Robert S.; Caneva, Sabina; Cabrero-Vilatela, Andrea; Hofmann, Stephan [Department of Engineering, University of Cambridge, Cambridge CB3 0FA (United Kingdom); Mangler, Clemens; Kotakoski, Jani; Meyer, Jannik C. [Faculty of Physics, University of Vienna, A-1090 Vienna (Austria); Goddard, Caroline J. L. [Department of Materials Science and Metallurgy, University of Cambridge, Cambridge CB3 0FS (United Kingdom)

    2014-10-06

    Close control over the active catalyst phase and hence carbon nanotube structure remains challenging in catalytic chemical vapor deposition since multiple competing active catalyst phases typically co-exist under realistic synthesis conditions. Here, using in-situ X-ray diffractometry, we show that the phase of supported iron catalyst particles can be reliably controlled via the addition of NH{sub 3} during nanotube synthesis. Unlike polydisperse catalyst phase mixtures during H{sub 2} diluted nanotube growth, nitrogen addition controllably leads to phase-pure γ-Fe during pre-treatment and to phase-pure Fe{sub 3}C during growth. We rationalize these findings in the context of ternary Fe-C-N phase diagram calculations and, thus, highlight the use of pre-treatment- and add-gases as a key parameter towards controlled carbon nanotube growth.

  3. Determination of platinum group metal catalyst residues in active pharmaceutical ingredients by means of total reflection X-ray spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marguí, Eva; Queralt, Ignasi; Hidalgo, Manuela

    2013-01-01

    The control of metal catalyst residues (i.e., platinum group metals (PGMs)) in different stages of the manufacturing processes of the active pharmaceutical ingredients (APIs) and, especially, in the final product is crucial. For API specimens, there are strict guidelines to limit the levels of metal residues based on their individual levels of safety concern. For PGMs the concentration limit has been established at 10 mg/kg in the API. Therefore great effort is currently being devoted to the development of new and simple procedures to control metals in pharmaceuticals. In the present work, an analytical methodology based on benchtop total reflection X-ray fluorescence spectrometry (TXRF) has been developed for the rapid and simple determination of some PGM catalyst impurities (Rh, Pd, Ir and Pt) in different types of API samples. An evaluation of different sample treatments (dissolution and digestion of the solid pharmaceutical samples) has been carried out and the developed methodologies have been validated according to the analytical parameters to be considered and acceptance criteria for PGM determination according to the United States Pharmacopeia (USP). Limits of quantification obtained for PGM metals were in the range of 2–4 mg/kg which are satisfactory according to current legislation. From the obtained results it is shown that the developed TXRF method can be implemented in the pharmaceutical industries to increase productivity of the laboratory; offering an interesting and complementary analytical tool to other atomic spectroscopic methods. - Highlights: • A TXRF method for PGM catalyst residue determination in API samples is presented. • Analysis can be performed using 10 μL of the internal standardized dissolved API. • The method is rapid, simple and suitable according to the USP requirements

  4. Enhanced activity and durability of platinum anode catalyst by the modification of cobalt phosphide for direct methanol fuel cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li, Xiang; Wang, Hongjuan; Yu, Hao; Liu, Ziwu; Wang, Haihui; Peng, Feng

    2015-01-01

    Graphical abstract: A novel Pt/CoP/CNTs electrocatalyst with has been designed and prepared, which exhibits high activity and stability for methanol oxidation reaction. - Highlights: • Pt-cobalt phosphide catalyst supported on carbon nanotubes (Pt/CoP/CNTs) is designed. • Pt/CoP/CNTs exhibit high activity and stability for methanol oxidation reaction(MOR). • The effect of CoP content on electrocatalytic performances for MOR is studied. • CoP decreases the Pt particle size and increases the electrochemical surface areas. • The interaction between Pt and CoP is evidenced by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. - Abstract: In this study, carbon nanotubes (CNTs) supported Pt-cobalt phosphide (CoP) electrocatalyst (Pt/CoP/CNTs) is designed and prepared for methanol oxidation (MOR) for the first time. The modification of CoP decreases the Pt particle size significantly and increases the electrochemical surface areas due to the interaction between Pt and CoP, which is evidenced by transmission electron microscopy, X-ray diffraction and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. Among all these catalysts, Pt/4%CoP/CNTs catalyst exhibits the best MOR activity of 1600 mA mg −1 Pt , which is six times that of Pt/CNTs. Moreover, this catalyst also exhibits the higher onset current density and steady current density than the other Pt-based catalysts. The work provides a promising method to develop the highly active and stable Pt-based catalyst for direct methanol fuel cells.

  5. Electro catalyst of platinum prepared by CVD for the oxygen reduction reaction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Garcia C, M.A.; Fernandez V, S.M.; Vargas G, J.R.

    2004-01-01

    In this work it is reported the preparation and characterization of platinum films obtained by the technique of chemical vapor deposition at low pressure, better well-known as LPCVD for their initials in English (Low Pressure Chemical Vapor Deposition). The technique has several industrial applications and in this work it is explored their possible use to prepare applicable electrocatalysts in fuel cells. The films were characterized by XRD, SEM, EDS and they were proven for to determine their acting in the Oxygen reduction reaction (Orr) in sulfuric acid 0.5 M, the results show that the material presents good activity for the reaction in study. (Author)

  6. Influence of solvent on the infared spectrum of carbon monoxide adsorbed on platinum electrodes

    OpenAIRE

    Feltovich, Susanne D.

    1993-01-01

    The behavior of adsorbed carbon monoxide on platinum was studied using potential difference infrared spectroscopy. Three solvents and three electrolytes were chosen, and data gathered at both high and low adsorbate coverages. The rate of change of IR peak position with applied potential, the Stark tuning rate, was used as an indicator of the local electric field strength at the interface. It was determined that neither solvated cation size nor bulk dielectric constant accoun...

  7. LDRD final report on synthesis of shape-and size-controlled platinum and platinum alloy nanostructures on carbon with improved durability.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shelnutt, John Allen; Garcia, Robert M.; Song, Yujiang; Moreno, Andres M.; Stanis, Ronald J.

    2008-10-01

    This project is aimed to gain added durability by supporting ripening-resistant dendritic platinum and/or platinum-based alloy nanostructures on carbon. We have developed a new synthetic approach suitable for directly supporting dendritic nanostructures on VXC-72 carbon black (CB), single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs), and multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs). The key of the synthesis is to creating a unique supporting/confining reaction environment by incorporating carbon within lipid bilayer relying on a hydrophobic-hydrophobic interaction. In order to realize size uniformity control over the supported dendritic nanostructures, a fast photocatalytic seeding method based on tin(IV) porphyrins (SnP) developed at Sandia was applied to the synthesis by using SnP-containing liposomes under tungsten light irradiation. For concept approval, one created dendritic platinum nanostructure supported on CB was fabricated into membrane electrode assemblies (MEAs) for durability examination via potential cycling. It appears that carbon supporting is essentially beneficial to an enhanced durability according to our preliminary results.

  8. Pulsed laser dewetting of nickel catalyst for carbon nanofiber growth

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guan, Y F; Pearce, R C; Simpson, M L; Rack, P D; Melechko, A V; Hensley, D K

    2008-01-01

    We present a pulsed laser dewetting technique that produces single nickel catalyst particles from lithographically patterned disks for subsequent carbon nanofiber growth through plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition. Unlike the case for standard heat treated Ni catalyst disks, for which multiple nickel particles and consequently multiple carbon nanofibers (CNFs) are observed, single vertically aligned CNFs could be obtained from the laser dewetted catalyst. Different laser dewetting parameters were tested in this study, such as the laser energy density and the laser processing time measured by the total number of laser pulses. Various nickel disk radii and thicknesses were attempted and the resultant number of carbon nanofibers was found to be a function of the initial disk dimension and the number of laser pulses

  9. Carbon catalysts for electrochemical hydrogen peroxide production in acidic media

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Čolić, Viktor; Yang, Sungeun; Révay, Zsolt

    2018-01-01

    Hydrogen peroxide is a commodity chemical, as it is an environmentally friendly oxidant. The electrochemical production of H2O2 from oxygen and water by the reduction of oxygen is of great interest, as it would allow the decentralized, on-site, production of pure H2O2. The ability to run...... the reaction in an acidic electrolyte with high performance is particularly important, as it would allow the use of polymer solid electrolytes and the production of pH-neutral hydrogen peroxide. Carbon catalysts, which are cheap, abundant, durable and can be highly selective show promise as potential catalysts...... for such systems. In this work, we examine the electrocatalytic performance and properties of seven commercially available carbon materials for H2O2 production by oxygen electroreduction. We show that the faradaic efficiencies for the reaction lie in a wide range of 18-82% for different carbon catalysts. In order...

  10. Interfacial charge distributions in carbon-supported palladium catalysts

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rao, Radhika G.; Blume, Raoul; Hansen, Thomas Willum

    2017-01-01

    Controlling the charge transfer between a semiconducting catalyst carrier and the supported transition metal active phase represents an elite strategy for fine turning the electronic structure of the catalytic centers, hence their activity and selectivity. These phenomena have been theoretically...... and experimentally elucidated for oxide supports but remain poorly understood for carbons due to their complex nanoscale structure. Here, we combine advanced spectroscopy and microscopy on model Pd/C samples to decouple the electronic and surface chemistry effects on catalytic performance. Our investigations reveal...... treatments can be used to tune the interfacial charge distribution, hereby providing a strategy to rationally design carbon-supported catalysts.Control over charge transfer in carbon-supported metal nanoparticles is essential for designing new catalysts. Here, the authors show that thermal treatments...

  11. Synergistic effect and mechanism of platinum catalyst and nitrogen-containing silane on the thermal stability of silicone rubber

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen, Wanjuan; Zeng, Xingrong; Lai, Xuejun; Li, Hongqiang; Fang, Weizhen; Liu, Tian

    2016-01-01

    Highlights: • Platinum (Pt) and nitrogen-containing silane (NS) were introduced into silicone rubber. • The thermal stability was improved by Pt/NS both under nitrogen and air atmosphere. • The TG-FTIR of evolved gases during degradation was performed. • The synergistic effect and mechanism of Pt and NS were proposed. - Abstract: Platinum (Pt) catalyst and nitrogen-containing silane (NS) were introduced to improve the thermal stability of silicone rubber. The effects of Pt and NS on thermal stability and degradation mechanism of silicone rubber were investigated by thermogravimetry (TG), thermogravimetry-Fourier transform infrared spectrometry (TG-FTIR), scanning electron microscope-energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (SEM-EDXS) and Fourier transform infrared spectrometry (FTIR). A significant synergism was found between Pt and NS for improving the thermal stability of silicone rubber. When 6.67 ppm of Pt and 1.4 phr of NS were introduced, the temperature of 10% and 20% weight loss under nitrogen atmosphere were respectively increased by 36 °C and 119 °C. Meanwhile, the residue weight at 900 °C was doubled to 68% in the presence of Pt/NS. The synergistic mechanism might be that the nitrogen atom coordinated with Pt and improved the catalytic efficiency of Pt. Additionally, NS preserved the catalytic activity of Pt under air atmosphere. Hence, Pt/NS efficiently catalyzed thermal crosslinking and suppressed degradation of silicone chains. Moreover, it revealed that the presence of Pt/NS protected silicone chains from oxidation. Thus, the unzipping depolymerization by silanol groups was reduced significantly.

  12. Synergistic effect and mechanism of platinum catalyst and nitrogen-containing silane on the thermal stability of silicone rubber

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, Wanjuan; Zeng, Xingrong, E-mail: psxrzeng@gmail.com; Lai, Xuejun; Li, Hongqiang; Fang, Weizhen; Liu, Tian

    2016-05-20

    Highlights: • Platinum (Pt) and nitrogen-containing silane (NS) were introduced into silicone rubber. • The thermal stability was improved by Pt/NS both under nitrogen and air atmosphere. • The TG-FTIR of evolved gases during degradation was performed. • The synergistic effect and mechanism of Pt and NS were proposed. - Abstract: Platinum (Pt) catalyst and nitrogen-containing silane (NS) were introduced to improve the thermal stability of silicone rubber. The effects of Pt and NS on thermal stability and degradation mechanism of silicone rubber were investigated by thermogravimetry (TG), thermogravimetry-Fourier transform infrared spectrometry (TG-FTIR), scanning electron microscope-energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (SEM-EDXS) and Fourier transform infrared spectrometry (FTIR). A significant synergism was found between Pt and NS for improving the thermal stability of silicone rubber. When 6.67 ppm of Pt and 1.4 phr of NS were introduced, the temperature of 10% and 20% weight loss under nitrogen atmosphere were respectively increased by 36 °C and 119 °C. Meanwhile, the residue weight at 900 °C was doubled to 68% in the presence of Pt/NS. The synergistic mechanism might be that the nitrogen atom coordinated with Pt and improved the catalytic efficiency of Pt. Additionally, NS preserved the catalytic activity of Pt under air atmosphere. Hence, Pt/NS efficiently catalyzed thermal crosslinking and suppressed degradation of silicone chains. Moreover, it revealed that the presence of Pt/NS protected silicone chains from oxidation. Thus, the unzipping depolymerization by silanol groups was reduced significantly.

  13. Mechanooptic Regulation of Photoconduction in Functionalized Carbon Nanotubes Decorated with Platinum

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. Mercado-Zúñiga

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The observation of photoconduction and nonlinear optical absorption on functionalized multiwall carbon nanotubes decorated with platinum is reported. The samples were prepared by a chemical vapor deposition method. The electrical conductivity of the carbon nanotubes seems to be decreased by the functionalization process; but this property is strongly enhanced after the incorporation of platinum particles. Nonresonant photoconductive experiments at 532 nm and 445 nm wavelengths allow us to detect a selective participation of the platinum to the photoelectrical response. A mechanooptic effect based on Fresnel reflection was obtained through a photoconductive modulation induced by the rotation of a silica substrate where the samples were deposited as a thin film. A two-photon absorption process was identified as the main physical mechanism responsible for the nonlinear optical absorption. We consider that important changes in the nonlinear photon interactions with carbon nanotubes can be related to the population losses derived from phonons and the detuning of the frequency originated by functionalization.

  14. New efficient catalyst for ammonia synthesis: barium-promoted cobalt on carbon

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hagen, Stefan; Barfod, Rasmus; Fehrmann, Rasmus

    2002-01-01

    Barium-promoted cobalt catalysts supported on carbon exhibit higher ammonia activities at synthesis temperatures than the commercial, multipromoted iron catalyst and also a lower ammonia......Barium-promoted cobalt catalysts supported on carbon exhibit higher ammonia activities at synthesis temperatures than the commercial, multipromoted iron catalyst and also a lower ammonia...

  15. Catalyst Deactivation Simulation Through Carbon Deposition in Carbon Dioxide Reforming over Ni/CaO-Al2O3 Catalyst

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Istadi Istadi

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Major problem in CO2 reforming of methane (CORM process is coke formation which is a carbonaceous residue that can physically cover active sites of a catalyst surface and leads to catalyst deactivation. A key to develop a more coke-resistant catalyst lies in a better understanding of the methane reforming mechanism at a molecular level. Therefore, this paper is aimed to simulate a micro-kinetic approach in order to calculate coking rate in CORM reaction. Rates of encapsulating and filamentous carbon formation are also included. The simulation results show that the studied catalyst has a high activity, and the rate of carbon formation is relatively low. This micro-kinetic modeling approach can be used as a tool to better understand the catalyst deactivation phenomena in reaction via carbon deposition. Copyright © 2011 BCREC UNDIP. All rights reserved.(Received: 10th May 2011; Revised: 16th August 2011; Accepted: 27th August 2011[How to Cite: I. Istadi, D.D. Anggoro, N.A.S. Amin, and D.H.W. Ling. (2011. Catalyst Deactivation Simulation Through Carbon Deposition in Carbon Dioxide Reforming over Ni/CaO-Al2O3 Catalyst. Bulletin of Chemical Reaction Engineering & Catalysis, 6 (2: 129-136. doi:10.9767/bcrec.6.2.1213.129-136][How to Link / DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.9767/bcrec.6.2.1213.129-136 || or local:  http://ejournal.undip.ac.id/index.php/bcrec/article/view/1213 ] | View in  |  

  16. Treatment of ammonia by catalytic wet oxidation process over platinum-rhodium bimetallic catalyst in a trickle-bed reactor: effect of pH.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hung, Chang-Mao; Lin, Wei-Bang; Ho, Ching-Lin; Shen, Yun-Hwei; Hsia, Shao-Yi

    2010-08-01

    This work adopted aqueous solutions of ammonia for use in catalytic liquid-phase reduction in a trickle-bed reactor with a platinum-rhodium bimetallic catalyst, prepared by the co-precipitation of chloroplatinic acid (H2PtCl6) and rhodium nitrate [Rh(NO3)3]. The experimental results demonstrated that a minimal amount of ammonia was removed from the solution by wet oxidation in the absence of any catalyst, while approximately 97.0% of the ammonia was removed by wet oxidation over the platinum-rhodium bimetallic catalyst at 230 degrees C with an oxygen partial pressure of 2.0 MPa. The oxidation of ammonia has been studied as a function of pH, and the main reaction products were determined. A synergistic effect is manifest in the platinum-rhodium bimetallic structure, in which the material has the greatest capacity to reduce ammonia. The reaction pathway linked the oxidizing ammonia to nitric oxide, nitrogen, and water.

  17. Carbon formation on nickel and nickel-copper alloy catalysts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alstrup, I.; Soerensen, O.; Rostrup-Nielsen, J.R. [Haldor Topsoe Research Labs., Lyngby (Denmark); Tavares, M.T.; Bernardo, C.A.

    1998-05-01

    Equilibrium, kinetic and morphological studies of carbon formation in CH{sub 4} + H{sub 2}, CO, and CO + H{sub 2} gases on silica supported nickel and nickel-copper catalysts are reviewed. The equilibrium deviates in all cases from graphite equilibrium and more so in CO + CO{sub 2} than in CH{sub 4} + H{sub 2}. A kinetic model based on information from surface science results with chemisorption of CH{sub 4} and possibly also the first dehydrogenation step as rate controlling describes carbon formation on nickel catalyst in CH{sub 4} + H{sub 2} well. The kinetics of carbon formation in CO and CO + H{sub 2} gases are in agreement with CO disproportionation as rate determining step. The presence of hydrogen influences strongly the chemisorption of CO. Carbon filaments are formed when hydrogen is present in the gas while encapsulating carbon dominates in pure CO. Small amounts of Cu alloying promotes while larger amounts (Cu : Ni {>=} 0.1) inhibits carbon formation and changes the morphology of the filaments (``octopus`` carbon formation). Adsorption induced nickel segregation changes the kinetics of the alloy catalysts at high carbon activities. Modifications suggested in some very recent papers on the basis of new results are also briefly discussed. (orig.) 31 refs.

  18. Modeling Low-Platinum-Loading Effects in Fuel-Cell Catalyst Layers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yoon, Wonseok; Weber, Adam Z.

    2011-01-01

    The cathode catalyst layer within a proton-exchange-membrane fuel cell is the most complex and critical, yet least understood, layer within the cell. The exact method and equations for modeling this layer are still being revised and will be discussed in this paper, including a 0.8 reaction order, existence of Pt oxides, possible non-isopotential agglomerates, and the impact of a film resistance towards oxygen transport. While the former assumptions are relatively straightforward to understand and implement, the latter film resistance is shown to be critically important in explaining increased mass-transport limitations with low Pt-loading catalyst layers. Model results demonstrate agreement with experimental data that the increased oxygen flux and/or diffusion pathway through the film can substantially decrease performance. Also, some scale-up concepts from the agglomerate scale to the more macroscopic porous-electrode scale are discussed and the resulting optimization scenarios investigated.

  19. Preparation of Monodispersed Fe-Mo Nanoparticles as the Catalyst for CVD Synthesis of Carbon Nanotubes

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Li, Yan; Liu, Jie; Wang, Yongqian; Wang, Zhong L

    2001-01-01

    ...particles were systematically studied. The prepared nanoparticles were used as catalysts for single-walled carbon nanotube growth and the results indicate that there is an upper limit for the size of the catalyst particles to nucleate singlewalled carbon nanotubes.

  20. Magnetic Carbon Supported Palladium Nanoparticles: An Efficient and Sustainable Catalyst for Hydrogenation Reactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Magnetic carbon supported Pd catalyst has been synthesized via in situ generation of nanoferrites and incorporation of carbon from renewable cellulose via calcination; the catalyst can be used for the hydrogenation of alkenes and reduction of aryl nitro compounds.

  1. High sintering resistance of size-selected platinum cluster catalysts by suppressed ostwald ripening

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wettergren, Kristina; Schweinberger, Florian F.; Deiana, Davide

    2014-01-01

    on different supports exhibit remarkable intrinsic sintering resistance even under reaction conditions. The observed stability is related to suppression of Ostwald ripening by elimination of its main driving force via size-selection. This study thus constitutes a general blueprint for the rational design...... of sintering resistant catalyst systems and for efficient experimental strategies to determine sintering mechanisms. Moreover, this is the first systematic experimental investigation of sintering processes in nanoparticle systems with an initially perfectly monomodal size distribution under ambient conditions....

  2. Activated Carbon, Carbon Nanofiber and Carbon Nanotube Supported Molybdenum Carbide Catalysts for the Hydrodeoxygenation of Guaiacol

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eduardo Santillan-Jimenez

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Molybdenum carbide was supported on three types of carbon support—activated carbon; multi-walled carbon nanotubes; and carbon nanofibers—using ammonium molybdate and molybdic acid as Mo precursors. The use of activated carbon as support afforded an X-ray amorphous Mo phase, whereas crystalline molybdenum carbide phases were obtained on carbon nanofibers and, in some cases, on carbon nanotubes. When the resulting catalysts were tested in the hydrodeoxygenation (HDO of guaiacol in dodecane, catechol and phenol were obtained as the main products, although in some instances significant amounts of cyclohexane were produced. The observation of catechol in all reaction mixtures suggests that guaiacol was converted into phenol via sequential demethylation and HDO, although the simultaneous occurrence of a direct demethoxylation pathway cannot be discounted. Catalysts based on carbon nanofibers generally afforded the highest yields of phenol; notably, the only crystalline phase detected in these samples was Mo2C or Mo2C-ζ, suggesting that crystalline Mo2C is particularly selective to phenol. At 350 °C, carbon nanofiber supported Mo2C afforded near quantitative guaiacol conversion, the selectivity to phenol approaching 50%. When guaiacol HDO was performed in the presence of acetic acid and furfural, guaiacol conversion decreased, although the selectivity to both catechol and phenol was increased.

  3. EFFECT OF IMPREGNATION PROCEDURE OF Pt/γ-Al2O3 CATALYSTS UPON CATALYTIC OXIDATION OF CO

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Triyono Triyono

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available The oxidation of carbon monoxide by oxygen using two catalysts prepared by two different methods has been investigated. In the first method, catalyst prepared by immersing γ-Al2O3 into the hexa-chloroplatinic acid solution at 80oC for 4 h, resulted Pt/γ-Al2O3 catalyst having platinum highly dispersed on the support. While that of immersing γ-Al2O3 in the hexa-chloroplatinic acid solution at room temperature for 12 h, produced Pt/ γ-Al2O3 catalyst where platinum dispersion was much lower. Catalytic activity test showed that platinum well dispersed on the support enhanced the activity of oxidation of carbon monoxide. The platinum impregnated at room temperature resulted in the poor activity.   Keyword: Catalyst, CO Oxidation, Platinum.

  4. Platinum and palladium on carbon nanotubes : Experimental and theoretical studies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Adjizian, J. J.; De Marco, P.; Suarez-Martinez, I.; El Mel, A. A.; Snyders, R.; Gengler, R. Y. N.; Rudolf, P.; Ke, X.; Van Tendeloo, G.; Bittencourt, C.; Ewels, C. P.

    2013-01-01

    Pristine and oxygen plasma functionalised carbon nanotubes (CNTs) were studied after the evaporation of Pt and Pd atoms. High resolution transmission electron microscopy shows the formation of metal nanoparticles at the CNT surface. Oxygen functional groups grafted by the plasma functionalization

  5. Atomic layer deposited highly dispersed platinum nanoparticles supported on non-functionalized multiwalled carbon nanotubes for the hydrogenation of xylose to xylitol

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, Xinhua; Jiang, Chengjun

    2013-09-01

    Highly dispersed platinum nanoparticles were deposited on gram quantities of non-functionalized multiwalled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) by atomic layer deposition (ALD) in a fluidized bed reactor at 300 °C. (Methylcyclopentadienyl) trimethylplatinum and oxygen were used as precursors. The results of TEM analysis showed that 1.3 nm Pt nanoparticles were highly dispersed on non-functionalized MWCNTs. The porous structures of MWCNTs did not change with the deposition of Pt nanoparticles. For comparison, the commercial 3 wt% Pt/C catalyst was also characterized. The ALD-prepared Pt/MWCNT was used for the hydrogenation of xylose to xylitol. The ALD-prepared Pt/MWCNT showed the best catalytic performance with 100 % conversion of xylose and 99.3 % selectivity to xylitol, compared to commercially available Pt/C, Ru/C, and Raney Ni catalysts. The stability of ALD produced Pt/MWCNT catalyst was higher than that of the commercial Pt/C, due to the presence of surface defects on the MWCNTs and the strong metal-support interaction for the ALD-prepared Pt/MWCNT catalyst.

  6. Atomic layer deposited highly dispersed platinum nanoparticles supported on non-functionalized multiwalled carbon nanotubes for the hydrogenation of xylose to xylitol

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liang, Xinhua, E-mail: liangxin@mst.edu [Missouri University of Science and Technology, Department of Chemical and Biochemical Engineering (United States); Jiang, Chengjun [Zhejiang University of Science and Technology, Department of Chemical and Biological Engineering (China)

    2013-09-15

    Highly dispersed platinum nanoparticles were deposited on gram quantities of non-functionalized multiwalled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) by atomic layer deposition (ALD) in a fluidized bed reactor at 300 Degree-Sign C. (Methylcyclopentadienyl) trimethylplatinum and oxygen were used as precursors. The results of TEM analysis showed that {approx}1.3 nm Pt nanoparticles were highly dispersed on non-functionalized MWCNTs. The porous structures of MWCNTs did not change with the deposition of Pt nanoparticles. For comparison, the commercial 3 wt% Pt/C catalyst was also characterized. The ALD-prepared Pt/MWCNT was used for the hydrogenation of xylose to xylitol. The ALD-prepared Pt/MWCNT showed the best catalytic performance with 100 % conversion of xylose and 99.3 % selectivity to xylitol, compared to commercially available Pt/C, Ru/C, and Raney Ni catalysts. The stability of ALD produced Pt/MWCNT catalyst was higher than that of the commercial Pt/C, due to the presence of surface defects on the MWCNTs and the strong metal-support interaction for the ALD-prepared Pt/MWCNT catalyst.

  7. Carbon nanotube forests growth using catalysts from atomic layer deposition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, Bingan; Zhang, Can; Esconjauregui, Santiago; Xie, Rongsi; Zhong, Guofang; Robertson, John [Department of Engineering, University of Cambridge, Cambridge CB3 0FA (United Kingdom); Bhardwaj, Sunil [Istituto Officina dei Materiali-CNR Laboratorio TASC, s.s. 14, km 163.4, I-34012 Trieste (Italy); Sincrotone Trieste S.C.p.A., s.s. 14, km 163.4, I-34149 Trieste (Italy); Cepek, Cinzia [Istituto Officina dei Materiali-CNR Laboratorio TASC, s.s. 14, km 163.4, I-34012 Trieste (Italy)

    2014-04-14

    We have grown carbon nanotubes using Fe and Ni catalyst films deposited by atomic layer deposition. Both metals lead to catalytically active nanoparticles for growing vertically aligned nanotube forests or carbon fibres, depending on the growth conditions and whether the substrate is alumina or silica. The resulting nanotubes have narrow diameter and wall number distributions that are as narrow as those grown from sputtered catalysts. The state of the catalyst is studied by in-situ and ex-situ X-ray photoemission spectroscopy. We demonstrate multi-directional nanotube growth on a porous alumina foam coated with Fe prepared by atomic layer deposition. This deposition technique can be useful for nanotube applications in microelectronics, filter technology, and energy storage.

  8. Formation of carbonato and hydroxo complexes in the reaction of platinum anticancer drugs with carbonate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Di Pasqua, Anthony J; Centerwall, Corey R; Kerwood, Deborah J; Dabrowiak, James C

    2009-02-02

    The second-generation Pt(II) anticancer drug carboplatin is here shown to react with carbonate, which is present in blood, interstitial fluid, cytosol, and culture medium, to produce platinum-carbonato and -hydroxo complexes. Using [(1)H-(15)N] HSQC NMR and (15)N-labeled carboplatin, we observe that cis-[Pt(CBDCA-O)(OH)(NH(3))(2)](-), cis-[Pt(OH)(2)(NH(3))(2)], cis-[Pt(CO(3))(OH)(NH(3))(2)](-), and what may be cis-[Pt(CO(3))(NH(3))(2)] are produced when 1 is allowed to react in 23.8 mM carbonate buffer. When (15)N-labeled carboplatin is allowed to react in 0.5 M carbonate buffer, these platinum species, as well as other hydroxo and carbonato species, some of which may be dinuclear complexes, are produced. Furthermore, we show that the carbonato species cis-[Pt(CO(3))(OH)(NH(3))(2)](-) is also produced when cisplatin is allowed to react in carbonate buffer. The study outlines the conditions under which carboplatin and cisplatin form carbonato and aqua/hydroxo species in carbonate media.

  9. Preparation And Characterization Of Cr/Activated Carbon Catalyst From Palm Empty Fruit Bunch

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zainal Fanani

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Preparation and characterization of Cr/activated carbon catalyst from palm empty fruit bunch had been done. The research were to determine the effect of carbonization temperature towards adsorption of ammonia, iodine number, metilen blue number, and porosity of activated carbon and Cr/activated carbon catalyst. The determination of porosity include surface area, micropore volume and total pore volume. The results showed the best carbonization temperature activated carbon and Cr/activated carbon catalyst at 700°C. The adsorption ammonia of activated carbon and Cr/activated carbon catalyst as 6.379 mmol/g and 8.1624 mmol/g. The iodine number of activated carbon and Cr/activated carbon catalyst as 1520.16 mg/g and 1535.67 mg/g. The metilen blue number of activated carbon and Cr/activated carbon catalyst as 281.71 mg/g and 319.18 mg/g. The surface area of activated carbon and Cr/activated carbon catalyst as 1527.80 m2/g and 1652.58 m2/g. The micropore volume of activated carbon and Cr/activated carbon catalyst as 0.7460 cm3/g and 0.8670 cm3/g. The total pore volume of activated carbon and Cr/activated carbon catalyst as 0.8243 cm3/g and 0.8970 cm3/g.

  10. Electro-oxidation of Ethanol on Carbon Supported PtSn and PtSnNi Catalysts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nur Hidayati

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Even though platinum is known as an active electro-catalyst for ethanol oxidation at low temperatures (< 100 oC, choosing the electrode material for ethanol electro-oxidation is a crucial issue. It is due to its property which easily poisoned by a strong adsorbed species such as CO. PtSn-based electro-catalysts have been identified as better catalysts for ethanol electro-oxidation. The third material is supposed to improved binary catalysts performance. This work presents a study of the ethanol electro-oxidation on carbon supported Pt-Sn and Pt-Sn-Ni catalysts. These catalysts were prepared by alcohol reduction. Nano-particles with diameters between 2.5-5.0 nm were obtained. The peak of (220 crystalline face centred cubic (fcc Pt phase for PtSn and PtSnNi alloys was repositioned due to the presence of Sn and/or Ni in the alloy. Furthermore, the modification of Pt with Sn and SnNi improved ethanol and CO electro-oxidation. Copyright © 2016 BCREC GROUP. All rights reserved Received: 10th November 2015; Revised: 1st February 2016; Accepted: 1st February 2016 How to Cite: Hidayati, N., Scott, K. (2016. Electro-oxidation of Ethanol on Carbon Supported PtSn and PtSnNi Catalysts. Bulletin of Chemical Reaction Engineering & Catalysis, 11 (1: 10-20. (doi:10.9767/bcrec.11.1.394.10-20 Permalink/DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.9767/bcrec.11.1.394.10-20

  11. A micro alkaline direct ethanol fuel cell with platinum-free catalysts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verjulio, R. W.; Alcaide, F.; Álvarez, G.; Sabaté, N.; Torres-Herrero, N.; Esquivel, J. P.; Santander, J.

    2013-11-01

    This paper presents the fabrication and characterization of a micro alkaline direct ethanol fuel cell. The device has been conceived as a feasibility demonstrator, using microtechnologies for the fabrication of the current collectors and traditional techniques for the membrane electrode assembly production. The fuel cell works in passive mode, as expected for the simplicity required for micro power systems. Non-noble catalysts have been used in order to implement the main advantage of alkaline systems, showing the feasibility of such a device as a potential very-low-cost power device at mini- and micro scales.

  12. Synthesis, characterization and optimization of platinum-alloy nanoparticle catalysts in proton exchange membrane fuel cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Srivastava, Ratndeep

    Renewable hydrogen-fuelled proton exchange membrane (PEMFC) fuel cells have consistently demonstrated great promise as a future source of energy due to their high conversion efficiency, lower temperature of operation and lack of greenhouse emissions. One of the major impediments in the commercialization of polymer electrolyte membrane fuel cells is the insufficient catalytic reactivity and higher cost of Pt electrocatalysts which are utilized for the electroreduction of oxygen from air. This dissertation focuses primarily on a family of Pt alloy fuel cell electrocatalysts referred to as de-alloyed core-shell electrocatalysts. These materials are bimetallic or multimetallic nanoparticles, mostly supported on conductive supports which were first described in a dissertation by Dr. S. Koh earlier in 2009.1 De-alloyed Pt nanoparticle electrocatalysts are formed from base metal rich binary Pt-M and ternary Pt-M1-M 2 (M, M1, M2 = Cu, Co, Ni, Fe and Cr) alloy nanoparticle precursors. The precursors are transformed and activated by electrochemical selective dissolution of the less noble metal component of the precursors (de-alloying). They have shown exceptional activity for oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) in idealized electrochemical half cell measurements, in particular rotating disk electrode experiments. However, these materials were never tested or implemented in realistic Membrane Electrode Assemblies (MEA) and single PEM fuel cells. The objective of this work was to implement de-alloyed Pt particle catalysts in realistic fuel cell electrode layers as well as a detailed characterization of their behavior and stability. The major challenges of MEA implementation consists of the behavior of the new nanostructured electrocatalysts inside the complex three-phase interface of polymer membrane ionomer, liquid water, metal catalyst, support, and reactant gas. Activity measurements were followed by medium and long-term durability analysis by potential cycling of the membrane

  13. A micro alkaline direct ethanol fuel cell with platinum-free catalysts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Verjulio, R W; Sabaté, N; Torres-Herrero, N; Esquivel, J P; Santander, J; Alcaide, F; Álvarez, G

    2013-01-01

    This paper presents the fabrication and characterization of a micro alkaline direct ethanol fuel cell. The device has been conceived as a feasibility demonstrator, using microtechnologies for the fabrication of the current collectors and traditional techniques for the membrane electrode assembly production. The fuel cell works in passive mode, as expected for the simplicity required for micro power systems. Non-noble catalysts have been used in order to implement the main advantage of alkaline systems, showing the feasibility of such a device as a potential very-low-cost power device at mini- and micro scales. (paper)

  14. Platinum(0-1,3-divinyl-1,1,3,3-tetramethyldisiloxane Complex as a Pt Source for Pt/SnO2 Catalyst

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Agnieszka Martyla

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents new preparation method of Pt/SnO2, an important catalytic system. Besides of its application as a heterogenic industrial catalyst, it is also used as a catalyst in electrochemical processes, especially in fuel cells. Platinum is commonly used as an anode catalyst in low temperature fuel cells, fuelled with alcohols of low molecular weight such as methanol. Platinum(0-1,3-divinyl-1,1,3,3-tetramethyldisiloxane complex was used as a precursor of metallic phase. The aim of the research was to obtain a highly active in electrochemical system Pt/SnO2 catalyst with low metal load. Considering small size of Pt crystallites, it should result in high activity of Pt/SnO2 system. The presented method of SnO2 synthesis allows for obtaining support consisting of nanoparticles. The effect of the thermal treatment on activity of Pt/SnO2 gel was demonstrated. The system properties were investigated using TEM, FTIR (ATR, and XRD techniques to describe its thermal structural evolution. The results showed two electrocatalytical activity peaks for drying at a temperature of 430 K and above 650 K.

  15. Nanotemplated platinum fuel cell catalysts and copper-tin lithium battery anode materials for microenergy devices

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rohan, J.F., E-mail: james.rohan@tyndall.ie [Tyndall National Institute, University College Cork, Lee Maltings, Cork (Ireland); Hasan, M.; Holubowitch, N. [Tyndall National Institute, University College Cork, Lee Maltings, Cork (Ireland)

    2011-11-01

    Highlights: > Anodic Aluminum oxide formation on Si substrate. > High density nanotemplated Pt catalyst on Si for integrated energy and electronics. > CuSn alloy deposition from a single, high efficiency methanesulfonate plating bath. > Nanotemplated CuSn Li anode electrodes with high capacity retention. - Abstract: Nanotemplated materials have significant potential for applications in energy conversion and storage devices due to their unique physical properties. Nanostructured materials provide additional electrode surface area beneficial for energy conversion or storage applications with short path lengths for electronic and ionic transport and thus the possibility of higher reaction rates. We report on the use of controlled growth of metal and alloy electrodeposited templated nanostructures for energy applications. Anodic aluminium oxide templates fabricated on Si for energy materials integration with electronic devices and their use for fuel cell and battery materials deposition is discussed. Nanostructured Pt anode catalysts for methanol fuel cells are shown. Templated CuSn alloy anodes that possess high capacity retention with cycling for lithium microbattery integration are also presented.

  16. Stabilization of supported platinum nanoparticles on γ-alumina catalysts by addition of tungsten

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Contreras, Jose L.; Fuentes, Gustavo A.; Zeifert, Beatriz; Salmones, Jose

    2009-01-01

    The thermal stabilization of Al 2 O 3 using W 6+ ions has been found useful to the synthesis of Pt/Al 2 O 3 catalysts. The simultaneous and sequential methods were used to study the effect of W 6+ upon Pt/γ-Al 2 O 3 reducibility, Pt dispersion, and benzene hydrogenation. The W/Pt atomic ratios were from 0.49 to 12.4. In the first method we found that the W 6+ ions delayed reduction of a fraction of Pt 4+ atoms beyond 773 K. At the same time, W 6+ inhibited sintering of the metallic crystallites once they were formed on the surface. For the sequential sample with a W/Pt atomic ratio of 3.28 W 6+ did not inhibit the H 2 reduction of Pt oxides even below of 773 K, the Pt oxides were reduced completely. After reduction at 1073 K, sequential samples impregnating Pt on WO x -γ-Al 2 O 3 were more active and stable during benzene hydrogenation. TOF of the reaction did not change when the W/Pt atomic ratio, preparation technique and reduction temperature changed and its value was of 1.1 s -1 . W 6+ ions promoted high thermal stability of Pt crystallites when sequential catalysts were reduced at 1073 K and decreased their Lewis acidity.

  17. Electrocatalytic activity of carbon-supported catalysts for direct ethanol fuel cell applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rodriguez Varela, F.J. [CINVESTAV-Unidad Saltillo, Coahuila, (Mexico). Grupo de Investigacion en Energia; Savadogo, O. [Ecole Polytechnique de Montreal, Montreal, PQ (Canada). Laboratoire de nouveaux materiaux pour l' energie et l' electrochimie

    2008-07-01

    Proton exchange membrane fuel cells (PEMFCs) can be fueled with hydrogen, alcohols, hydrocarbons and acetals. Ethanol is an important fuel candidate because it can be electro-oxidized to carbon dioxide on platinum (Pt)-based electrocatalysts in a direct ethanol fuel cell (DEFC) at relatively low temperatures. This study investigated the electrocatalytic activity of some carbon-supported electrocatalysts towards the ethanol oxidation (EOR) and the oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) in the presence of ethanol. Compared to other anode catalysts such as Pt, PtRu and Pt oxide, anodes based on PtSn alloys have a higher catalytic activity for the EOR. When tested in a DEFC, the current density at 0.4V and 90 degrees C based on a PtSn/C anode and a Pt/C cathode was 2 times higher than that of a cell based on a PtRu/C-Pt/C membrane electrode assembly (MEA) configuration. In addition, cathode catalysts based on Ru/C had good catalytic activity for the ORR and exhibited high selectivity for this reaction in the presence of ethanol. The results showed that in the presence of 0.125, 0.25 or 0.5 M ethanol concentrations, a decrease in onset potential of about 60, 62 and 68 mV emerged, respectively. These values were about 10 times lower than those measured for some Pt-based cathode catalysts tested in this study in the presence of 0.125 M EtOH. 20 refs., 5 figs.

  18. Observation of ionomer in catalyst ink of polymer electrolyte fuel cell using cryogenic transmission electron microscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takahashi, Shinichi; Shimanuki, Junichi; Mashio, Tetsuya; Ohma, Atsushi; Tohma, Hajime; Ishihara, Ayumi; Ito, Yoshiko; Nishino, Yuri; Miyazawa, Atsuo

    2017-01-01

    Optimizing the catalyst layer structure is one of the key issues for improving performance despite lower platinum loading. The catalyst ink, consisting of platinum-loaded carbon particles and ionomer dispersed in an aqueous solvent, is a key factor for controlling the structure of the catalyst layer because the catalyst layer is prepared in a wet coating process. For that purpose, we visualized the nanostructure of the ionomer in the catalyst ink by cryogenic electron microscopy, especially cryogenic transmission electron microscopy (cryo-TEM). By cryo-TEM, it was revealed that ionomer molecules formed rod-like aggregates macro-homogeneously in the solvent, and a similar morphology was observed in a carbon-particle-containing solvent. In contrast, ionomer aggregates in the catalyst ink containing platinum nanoparticles loaded on carbon particles were denser in the vicinity of the platinum-loaded carbon particles. That can be attributed to strong interaction between platinum nanoparticles and sulfonic acid groups in the ionomer. It also implies that a good understanding of ionomer morphology in the catalyst ink can play an important role in controlling the catalyst layer microstructure for reducing platinum loading.

  19. Nanostructured platinum-free electrocatalysts in alkaline direct alcohol fuel cells: catalyst design, principles and applications

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Ozoemena, Kenneth I

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available in nanoparticles and semi-innite surfaces. Table 1Table 1 Typical calculated segregation energies (eV) for binary alloy nanoparticles Core Shell Ag Pd Ni Ir Co Fe Ag 0 �0.82 �2.29 �3.54 �2.15 �5.20 Pd 0.70 0 �1.09 �1.71 �1.29 �3.26 Ni 0.67 0.46 0 �0.67 �0.20 �2... compares the Wigner–Seitz radii and electron densities of somemetallic elements that are useful for making alloy catalysts for AFC systems. Table 2 clearly indicates that Pd, for example, has a stronger tendency to surface-segregate in Ni, Fe, or Fe...

  20. Sinter-Resistant Platinum Catalyst Supported by Metal-Organic Framework

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, In Soo [Materials Science Division, Argonne National Lab, 9700 S Cass Ave. Argonne IL 60439 USA; Nanophotonics Center, Korea Institute of Science and Technology, Seoul 02792 South Korea; Li, Zhanyong [Department of Chemistry, Northwestern University, 2145 Sheridan Rd. Evanston IL 60208 USA; Zheng, Jian [Institute for Integrated Catalysis, Pacific Northwest National Lab, P.O. Box 999 Richland WA 99352 USA; Platero-Prats, Ana E. [X-ray Science Division, Argonne National Lab, 9700 S Cass Ave. Argonne IL 60439 USA; Mavrandonakis, Andreas [Department of Chemistry, University of Minnesota, 207 Pleasant St. SE Minneapolis MN 55455 USA; Pellizzeri, Steven [Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering, Clemson University, 205 Earle Hall Clemson SC 29634 USA; Ferrandon, Magali [Chemical Sciences and Engineering Division, Argonne National Lab, 9700 S. Cass Ave. Argonne IL 60439 USA; Vjunov, Aleksei [Institute for Integrated Catalysis, Pacific Northwest National Lab, P.O. Box 999 Richland WA 99352 USA; Gallington, Leighanne C. [X-ray Science Division, Argonne National Lab, 9700 S Cass Ave. Argonne IL 60439 USA; Webber, Thomas E. [Department of Chemistry, University of Minnesota, 207 Pleasant St. SE Minneapolis MN 55455 USA; Vermeulen, Nicolaas A. [Department of Chemistry, Northwestern University, 2145 Sheridan Rd. Evanston IL 60208 USA; Penn, R. Lee [Department of Chemistry, University of Minnesota, 207 Pleasant St. SE Minneapolis MN 55455 USA; Getman, Rachel B. [Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering, Clemson University, 205 Earle Hall Clemson SC 29634 USA; Cramer, Christopher J. [Department of Chemistry, University of Minnesota, 207 Pleasant St. SE Minneapolis MN 55455 USA; Chapman, Karena W. [X-ray Science Division, Argonne National Lab, 9700 S Cass Ave. Argonne IL 60439 USA; Camaioni, Donald M. [Institute for Integrated Catalysis, Pacific Northwest National Lab, P.O. Box 999 Richland WA 99352 USA; Fulton, John L. [Institute for Integrated Catalysis, Pacific Northwest National Lab, P.O. Box 999 Richland WA 99352 USA; Lercher, Johannes A. [Institute for Integrated Catalysis, Pacific Northwest National Lab, P.O. Box 999 Richland WA 99352 USA; Department of Chemistry and Catalysis Research Institute, Technische Universität München, Lichtenbergstrasse 4 85748 Garching Germany; Farha, Omar K. [Department of Chemistry, Northwestern University, 2145 Sheridan Rd. Evanston IL 60208 USA; Hupp, Joseph T. [Materials Science Division, Argonne National Lab, 9700 S Cass Ave. Argonne IL 60439 USA; Department of Chemistry, Northwestern University, 2145 Sheridan Rd. Evanston IL 60208 USA; Martinson, Alex B. F. [Materials Science Division, Argonne National Lab, 9700 S Cass Ave. Argonne IL 60439 USA

    2018-01-02

    Installed on the zirconia nodes of a metal-organic framework (MOF) NU-1000 via targeted vapor-phase synthesis. The catalytic Pt clusters, site-isolated by organic linkers, are shown to exhibit high catalytic activity for ethylene hydrogenation while exhibiting resistance to sintering up to 200 degrees C. In situ IR spectroscopy reveals the presence of both single atoms and few-atom clusters that depend upon synthesis conditions. Operando X-ray absorption spectroscopy and Xray pair distribution analyses reveal unique changes in chemical bonding environment and cluster size stability while on stream. Density functional theory calculations elucidate a favorable reaction pathway for ethylene hydrogenation with the novel catalyst. These results provide evidence that atomic layer deposition (ALD) in MOFs is a versatile approach to the rational synthesis of size-selected clusters, including noble metals, on a high surface area support.

  1. Stabilization of supported platinum nanoparticles on gamma-alumina catalysts by addition of tungsten

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Contreras, Jose L., E-mail: jlcl@correo.azc.uam.m [Universidad Autonoma Metropolitana-Azcapotzalco. Energia, CBI, Av. Sn. Pablo 180, Col. Reynosa, 02200, Mexico, D.F. (Mexico); Universidad Autonoma Metropolitana-Iztapalapa Depto. Ingenieria de Procesos e Hidraulica, A.P. 55-534, 09340 Mexico, D.F. (Mexico); Fuentes, Gustavo A. [Universidad Autonoma Metropolitana-Iztapalapa Depto. Ingenieria de Procesos e Hidraulica, A.P. 55-534, 09340 Mexico, D.F. (Mexico); Zeifert, Beatriz; Salmones, Jose [Instituto Politecnico Nacional, ESIQIE, Av. IPN s/n Edif. 8, UPALM, Mexico, D.F. 07738 (Mexico)

    2009-08-26

    The thermal stabilization of Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} using W{sup 6+} ions has been found useful to the synthesis of Pt/Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} catalysts. The simultaneous and sequential methods were used to study the effect of W{sup 6+} upon Pt/gamma-Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} reducibility, Pt dispersion, and benzene hydrogenation. The W/Pt atomic ratios were from 0.49 to 12.4. In the first method we found that the W{sup 6+} ions delayed reduction of a fraction of Pt{sup 4+} atoms beyond 773 K. At the same time, W{sup 6+}inhibited sintering of the metallic crystallites once they were formed on the surface. For the sequential sample with a W/Pt atomic ratio of 3.28 W{sup 6+} did not inhibit the H{sub 2} reduction of Pt oxides even below of 773 K, the Pt oxides were reduced completely. After reduction at 1073 K, sequential samples impregnating Pt on WO{sub x}-gamma-Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} were more active and stable during benzene hydrogenation. TOF of the reaction did not change when the W/Pt atomic ratio, preparation technique and reduction temperature changed and its value was of 1.1 s{sup -1}. W{sup 6+} ions promoted high thermal stability of Pt crystallites when sequential catalysts were reduced at 1073 K and decreased their Lewis acidity.

  2. Mass-produced multi-walled carbon nanotubes as catalyst supports for direct methanol fuel cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jang, In Young; Park, Ki Chul; Jung, Yong Chae; Lee, Sun Hyung; Song, Sung Moo; Muramatsu, Hiroyuki; Kim, Yong Jung; Endo, Morinobu

    2011-01-01

    Commercially mass-produced multi-walled carbon nanotubes, i.e., VGNF (Showa Denko Co.), were applied to support materials for platinum-ruthenium (PtRu) nanoparticles as anode catalysts for direct methanol fuel cells. The original VGNFs are composed of high-crystalline graphitic shells, which hinder the favorable surface deposition of the PtRu nanoparticles that are formed via borohydride reduction. The chemical treatment of VGNFs with potassium hydroxide (KOH), however, enables highly dispersed and dense deposition of PtRu nanoparticles on the VGNF surface. This capability becomes more remarkable depending on the KOH amount. The electrochemical evaluation of the PtRu-deposited VGNF catalysts showed enhanced active surface areas and methanol oxidation, due to the high dispersion and dense deposition of the PtRu nanoparticles. The improvement of the surface deposition states of the PtRu nanoparticles was significantly due to the high surface area and mesorporous surface structure of the KOH-activated VGNFs.

  3. Electronic states of carbon alloy catalysts and nitrogen substituent effects on catalytic activity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hata, Tomoyuki; Ushiyama, Hiroshi; Yamashita, Koichi

    2013-03-01

    In recent years, Carbon Alloy Catalysts (CACs) are attracting attention as a candidate for non-platinum-based cathode catalysts in fuel cells. Oxygen reduction reactions at the cathode are divided into two elementary processes, electron transfer and oxygen adsorption. The electron transfer reaction is the rate-determining, and by comparison of energy levels, catalytic activity can be evaluated quantitatively. On the other hand, to begin with, adsorption mechanism is obscure. The purpose of this study is to understand the effect of nitrogen substitution and oxygen adsorption mechanism, by first-principle electronic structure calculations for nitrogen substituted models. To reproduce the elementary processes of oxygen adsorption, we assumed that the initial structures are formed based on the Pauling model, a CACs model and nitrogen substituted CACs models in which various points are replaced with nitrogen. When we try to focus only on the DOS peaks of oxygen, in some substituted model that has high adsorption activity, a characteristic partial occupancy state was found. We conclude that this state will affect the adsorption activity, and discuss on why partially occupied states appear with simplification by using an orbital correlation diagram.

  4. Platinum assisted by carbon quantum dots for methanol electro-oxidation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pan, Dan; Li, Xingwei; Zhang, Aofeng

    2018-01-01

    Various types of fuel cells as clean and portable power sources show a great attraction, especially direct methanol fuel cell (DMFC) having high energy density, low operating temperature and convenient fuel storage. However, the preparation of low-cost Pt-based catalysts with satisfactory catalytic performance still faces many challenges for its commercialization on large scale. Here, Pt catalysts assisted by carbon quantum dots (CQDs) are reported. The synergistic effect of carbon quantum dots and Pt metals is similar to a bi-component catalyst, such as PtRu. First, carbon quantum dots derived from Vulcan XC-72 carbon black are synthesized by mixed acid etching. Then, carbon black (Vulcan XC-72) is soaked in carbon quantum dots solution for several days to obtain carbon black modified by carbon quantum dots (XC-72-CQDs). Finally, Pt catalysts are supported on XC-72-CQDs (Pt/XC-72-CQDs) through a simple chemical reduction method. For methanol electro-oxidation reaction, the catalytic performance of Pt/XC-72-CQDs is compared with commercial PtRu/C (30% Pt + 15% Ru). Results show that a typical product (Pt/XC-72-CQDs5) exhibits a better catalytic activity than PtRu/C. In cyclic voltammetry test, the specific activity of Pt/XC-72-CQDs5 is 1.06 mA cm-2 Pt and 477.6 mA mg-1 Pt, while that of PtRu/C is 0.77 mA cm-2 Pt and 280.6 mA mg-1 Pt.

  5. Control of carbon nanotube growth using cobalt nanoparticles as catalyst

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huh, Yoon; Green, Malcolm L.H.; Kim, Young Heon; Lee, Jeong Yong; Lee, Cheol Jin

    2005-01-01

    We have controllably grown carbon nanotubes using uniformly distributed cobalt nanoparticles as catalyst. Cobalt nanoparticles with a uniform size were synthesized by chemical reaction and colloidal solutions including the cobalt nanoparticles were prepared. The cobalt nanoparticles were uniformly distributed on silicon substrates by a spin-coating method. Carbon nanotubes with a uniform diameter were synthesized on the cobalt nanoparticles by thermal chemical vapor deposition of acetylene gas. The density and vertical alignment of carbon nanotubes could be controlled by adjusting the density of cobalt (Co) nanoparticles

  6. The Mossbauer spectra of carbon nanotubes synthesize using ferrite catalyst

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang Haiyan; Lin Jiapeng; Peng Zuxiong; Zeng Guoxun; Pang Jinshan; Chen Yiming

    2009-01-01

    The ferrite powder with honeycombed structure obtained by chemical combustion was used as catalyst to synthesize multi-walled carbon nanotubes by chemical vapor deposition. The magnetic components and characters of the the carbon nanotubes synthesized were investigated by X-ray diffraction (XRD), Mossbauer spectra and vibrating-sample magnetometer (VSM). The ferric components of the carbon nanotubes samples can be identified by Mossbauer spectra. The Mossbauer spectra of carbon nanotubes sample after purification contains two ferromagnetic sextet components corresponding to α-Fe species and Fe 3 C (cementite) species. While the Mossbauer spectra of the carbon nanotubes sample before purification contains three ferromagnetic sextet components corresponding to α-Fe species, Fe 3 C species and γ-Fe 2 O 3 . The saturation magnetization intensity Ms of carbon nanotubes sample after purification is decreased from 46.61 to 2.94 emu/g, but the coercive force increasd and reached 328Oe.

  7. CORRELATION BETWEEN PREEXPONENTIAL FACTOR AND ACTIVATION ENERGY OF ISOAMYLALCOHOL HYDROGENOLYSIS ON PLATINUM CATALYSTS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Triyono Triyono

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Arrhenius equation stated that reaction will proceed faster at higher temperature and with lower activation energy (Ea. Many literatures reported that preexponential factor (A is constant for certain reaction and there is no relation between A and Ea. Experiment on the reaction of isoamylalcohol hydrogenolysis showed that logarithm of A increased linearly with Ea. The result of this investigation suggests that the rate of a process is affected by the number of active centers on the surface of a catalysts, which influences the value of the pre-exponential term in the expression for the rate constant of a reaction. An increase in the number of active centers corresponds to a higher value of A, the active centers would be less effective and is attended by a growth in the value of Ea. Therefore, reaction with lower activation energy will not always has higher reaction rate due to decreasing of Ea.   Keywords: isoamylalcohol hydrogenolysis, preexponential factor, activation  energy.

  8. Sum Frequency Generation Vibrational Spectroscopy of Colloidal Platinum Nanoparticle Catalysts: Disordering versus Removal of Organic Capping

    KAUST Repository

    Krier, James M.

    2012-08-23

    Recent work with nanoparticle catalysts shows that size and shape control on the nanometer scale influences reaction rate and selectivity. Sum frequency generation (SFG) vibrational spectroscopy is a powerful tool for studying heterogeneous catalysis because it enables the observation of surface intermediates during catalytic reactions. To control the size and shape of catalytic nanoparticles, an organic ligand was used as a capping agent to stabilize nanoparticles during synthesis. However, the presence of an organic capping agent presents two major challenges in SFG and catalytic reaction studies: it blocks a significant fraction of active surface sites and produces a strong signal that prevents the detection of reaction intermediates with SFG. Two methods for cleaning Pt nanoparticles capped with poly (vinylpyrrolidone) (PVP) are examined in this study: solvent cleaning and UV cleaning. Solvent cleaning leaves more PVP intact and relies on disordering with hydrogen gas to reduce the SFG signal of PVP. In contrast, UV cleaning depends on nearly complete removal of PVP to reduce SFG signal. Both UV and solvent cleaning enable the detection of reaction intermediates by SFG. However, solvent cleaning also yields nanoparticles that are stable under reaction conditions, whereas UV cleaning results in aggregation during reaction. The results of this study indicate that solvent cleaning is more advantageous for studying the effects of nanoparticle size and shape on catalytic selectivity by SFG vibrational spectroscopy. © 2012 American Chemical Society.

  9. Electrochemical promotion of oxidative coupling of methane on platinum/polybenzimidazole catalyst

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Petrushina, Irina; Bandur, Viktor; Bjerrum, Niels

    2002-01-01

    The electrochemical promotion of catalytic methane oxidation was studied using a (CH4,O-2,Ar), Pt\\polybenzimidazole (PBI)-H3PO4\\Pt,(H-2,Ar) fuel cell at 135degreesC. It has been found that C2H2, CO2, and water are the main oxidation products. Without polarization the yield of C2H2 was 0......, meaning that there was a maximum promotion effect at a polarization of -0.15 V, or 0.45 V catalyst potential vs. a hydrogen electrode (3.8% C2H2 yield). The catalytic rate enhancement ratio, r(C-2)/r(o)(C-2), at this maximum was 4.2. There was no C2H2 production at polarization greater than or equal to0.......9% and the yield of CO2 was 7.3%. This means that C-2 open-circuit selectivity was approximately 11%. Open-circuit voltage was around 0.6 V. It has been shown that the CH4 --> C2H2 catalytic reaction can be electrochemically promoted at negative polarization and exhibits a clear "volcano-type'' promotion behavior...

  10. High-performance Platinum-free oxygen reduction reaction and hydrogen oxidation reaction catalyst in polymer electrolyte membrane fuel cell.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chandran, Priji; Ghosh, Arpita; Ramaprabhu, Sundara

    2018-02-26

    The integration of polymer electrolyte membrane fuel cell (PEMFC) stack into vehicles necessitates the replacement of high-priced platinum (Pt)-based electrocatalyst, which contributes to about 45% of the cost of the stack. The implementation of high-performance and durable Pt metal-free catalyst for both oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) and hydrogen oxidation reaction (HOR) could significantly enable large-scale commercialization of fuel cell-powered vehicles. Towards this goal, a simple, scalable, single-step synthesis method was adopted to develop palladium-cobalt alloy supported on nitrogen-doped reduced graphene oxide (Pd 3 Co/NG) nanocomposite. Rotating ring-disk electrode (RRDE) studies for the electrochemical activity towards ORR indicates that ORR proceeds via nearly four-electron mechanism. Besides, the mass activity of Pd 3 Co/NG shows an enhancement of 1.6 times compared to that of Pd/NG. The full fuel cell measurements were carried out using Pd 3 Co/NG at the anode, cathode in conjunction with Pt/C and simultaneously at both anode and cathode. A maximum power density of 68 mW/cm 2 is accomplished from the simultaneous use of Pd 3 Co/NG as both anode and cathode electrocatalyst with individual loading of 0.5 mg/cm 2 at 60 °C without any backpressure. To the best of our knowledge, the present study is the first of its kind of a fully non-Pt based PEM full cell.

  11. Deactivation by carbon of iron catalysts for indirect liquefaction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bartholomew, C.H.

    1990-10-11

    This report describes recent progress in a fundamental, three-year investigation of carbon formation and its effects on the activity and selectivity of promoted iron catalysts for Fischer-Tropsch (FT) synthesis, the objectives of which are: determine rates and mechanisms of carbon deactivation of unsupported Fe and Fe/K catalysts during CO hydrogenation over a range of CO concentrations, CO:H{sub 2} ratios, and temperatures; model the rates of deactivation of the same catalysts in fixed-bed reactors. During the thirteenth quarter design of software for a computer-automated reactor system to be used in the kinetic and deactivation studies was continued. Further progress was made toward the completion of the control language, control routines, and software for operating this system. Progress was also made on the testing of the system hardware and software. H{sub 2} chemisorption capacities and activity selectivity data were also measured for three iron catalysts promoted with 1% alumina. 47 refs., 8 figs., 1 tab.

  12. Characterization of a surface modified carbon cryogel and a carbon supported Pt catalyst

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    BILJANA M. BABIĆ

    2007-08-01

    Full Text Available A carbon cryogel, synthesized by carbonization of a resorcinol/formaldehyde cryogel and oxidized in nitric acid, was used as catalyst support for Pt nano-particles. The Pt/C catalyst was prepared by a modified polyol synthesis method in an ethylene glycol (EG solution. Characterization by nitrogen adsorption showed that the carbon cryogel support and the Pt/C catalyst were mesoporous materials with high specific surface areas (SBET > 400 m2 g-1 and large mesoporous volumes. X-Ray diffraction of the catalyst demonstrated the successful reduction of the Pt precursor to metallic form. TEM Images of the Pt/C catalyst and Pt particle size distribution showed that the mean Pt particle size was about 3.3 nm. Cyclic voltammetry (CV experiments at various scan rates (from 2 to 200 mV s-1 were performed in 0.5 mol dm-3 HClO4 solution. The large capacitance of the oxidized carbon cryogel electrode, which arises from a combination of the double-layer capacitance and pseudocapacitance, associated with the participation of surface redox-type reactions was demonstrated. For the oxidized carbon cryogel, the total specific capacitance determined by 1/C vs. ν0.5 extrapolation method was found to be 386 F g-1. The hydrogen oxidation reaction at the investigated Pt/C catalyst proceeded as an electrochemically reversible, two-electron direct discharge reaction.

  13. The kinetics of steam-carbon dioxide conversion, rational ways and production catalysts of process gas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khamroev, F.B.

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of the present work is to study the kinetics of steam-carbon dioxide conversion, rational ways and production catalysts of process gas. The experimental equation of steam-carbon methane conversion, heat stability increasing and catalyst efficiency, decreasing of hydrodynamical resistance of catalyst layer were determined.

  14. Composite catalyst for carbon monoxide and hydrocarbon oxidation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Wei; Flytzani-Stephanopoulos, Maria

    1996-01-01

    A method and composition for the complete oxidation of carbon monoxide and/or hydrocarbon compounds. The method involves reacting the carbon monoxide and/or hydrocarbons with an oxidizing agent in the presence of a metal oxide composite catalyst. The catalyst is prepared by combining fluorite-type oxygen ion conductors with active transition metals. The fluorite oxide, selected from the group consisting of cerium oxide, zirconium oxide, thorium oxide, hafnium oxide, and uranium oxide, and may be doped by alkaline earth and rare earth oxides. The transition metals, selected from the group consisting of molybdnum, copper, cobalt, maganese, nickel, and silver, are used as additives. The atomic ratio of transition metal to fluorite oxide is less than one.

  15. Infinite dilution partial molar volumes of platinum(II) 2,4-pentanedionate in supercritical carbon dioxide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kong, Chang Yi; Siratori, Tomoya; Funazukuri, Toshitaka; Wang, Guosheng

    2014-10-03

    The effects of temperature and density on retention of platinum(II) 2,4-pentanedionate in supercritical fluid chromatography were investigated at temperatures of 308.15-343.15K and pressure range from 8 to 40MPa by the chromatographic impulse response method with curve fitting. The retention factors were utilized to derive the infinite dilution partial molar volumes of platinum(II) 2,4-pentanedionate in supercritical carbon dioxide. The determined partial molar volumes were small and positive at high pressures but exhibited very large and negative values in the highly compressible near critical region of carbon dioxide. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Carbon in palladium catalysts: A metastable carbide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Seriani, Nicola; Mittendorfer, Florian; Kresse, Georg

    2010-01-01

    The catalytic activity of palladium towards selective hydrogenation of hydrocarbons depends on the partial pressure of hydrogen. It has been suggested that the reaction proceeds selectively towards partial hydrogenation only when a carbon-rich film is present at the metal surface. On the basis of first-principles simulations, we show that carbon can dissolve into the metal because graphite formation is delayed by the large critical nucleus necessary for graphite nucleation. A bulk carbide Pd 6 C with a hexagonal 6-layer fcc-like supercell forms. The structure is characterized by core level shifts of 0.66-0.70 eV in the core states of Pd, in agreement with experimental x-ray photoemission spectra. Moreover, this phase traps bulk-dissolved hydrogen, suppressing the total hydrogenation reaction channel and fostering partial hydrogenation. (author)

  17. A new catalyst for heavy water production and its prospect

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sato, Toshio; Ohkoshi, Sumio; Takahashi, Tomiki

    1978-01-01

    The heavy water production process utilizing isotope exchange reaction between liquid water and hydrogen is the most promising method. Study was made for developing highly active and long life catalyst practically applied for this process. As platinum is used as this catalyst, catalytic activities using varieties of Polapacs and Shodexes instead of active carbon as the carriers of platinum catalyst were investigated. It became clear that the catalytic activity using Pt/Shodex 104 (3 wt %) was 1000 times as high as the activity using Pt/active carbon (1 wt %). This method is considered to be reasonable enough economically. There are many problems which must be solved hereafter for its practical use, and the further studies are required regarding the following points; forming of catalyst, life of catalyst, mass production of catalyst, most appropriate counter flow reacting device of hydrophobic catalyst, pressure and temperature effects on reaction. (Kobatake, H.)

  18. Magnetism for understanding catalyst analysis of purified carbon nanotubes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bellouard, Christine; Mercier, Guillaume; Cahen, Sébastien; Ghanbaja, Jaafar; Medjahdi, Ghouti [Institut Jean Lamour, CNRS-Université de Lorraine, BP 70239, 54506 Vandoeuvre-lès-Nancy (France); Gleize, Jérôme [Laboratoire de Chimie Physique-Approche Multi-échelle de Milieux Complexes-Université de Lorraine, 1 Bd Arago, 57078 Metz (France); Lamura, Gianrico [CNR-SPIN – Dipartimento di Fisica, via Dodecaneso 33, 16146 Genova (Italy); Hérold, Claire [Institut Jean Lamour, CNRS-Université de Lorraine, BP 70239, 54506 Vandoeuvre-lès-Nancy (France); Vigolo, Brigitte, E-mail: Brigitte.Vigolo@univ-lorraine.fr [Institut Jean Lamour, CNRS-Université de Lorraine, BP 70239, 54506 Vandoeuvre-lès-Nancy (France)

    2016-08-01

    The precise quantification of catalyst residues in purified carbon nanotubes is often a major issue in view of any fundamental and/or applicative studies. More importantly, since the best CNTs are successfully grown with magnetic catalysts, their quantification becomes strictly necessary to better understand intrinsic properties of CNT. For these reasons, we have deeply analyzed the catalyst content remained in nickel–yttrium arc-discharge single walled carbon nanotubes purified by both a chlorine-gas phase and a standard acid-based treatment. The study focuses on Ni analysis which has been investigated by transmission electron microscopy, X-ray diffraction, thermogravimetry analysis, and magnetic measurements. In the case of the acid-based treatment, all quantifications result in a decrease of the nanocrystallized Ni by a factor of two. In the case of the halogen gas treatment, analysis and quantification of Ni content is less straightforward: a huge difference appears between X-ray diffraction and thermogravimetry results. Thanks to magnetic measurements, this disagreement is explained by the presence of Ni{sup 2+} ions, belonging to NiCl{sub 2} formed during the Cl-based purification process. In particular, NiCl{sub 2} compound appears under different magnetic/crystalline phases: paramagnetic or diamagnetic, or well intercalated in between carbon sheets with an ordered magnetic phase at low temperature. - Highlights: • Cl-gas treatment of Ni catalyst of carbon nanotubes leads to NiCl{sub 2} residue. • Magnetic measurements show the transformation of Ni{sup 0} in Ni{sup 2+}through a purification process. • High temperature Cl treatment removes 75% of metallic impurities. • Cl-purification yields to an amount of metal of 1.5% in arc-discharge CNT samples.

  19. Controlled synthesis of the tricontinuous mesoporous material IBN-9 and its carbon and platinum derivatives

    KAUST Repository

    Zhao, Yunfeng

    2011-08-23

    Controlled synthesis of mesoporous materials with ultracomplicated pore configurations is of great importance for both fundamental research of nanostructures and the development of novel applications. IBN-9, which is the only tricontinuous mesoporous silica with three sets of interpenetrating three-dimensional channel systems, appears to be an excellent model mesophase for such study. The extensive study of synthesis space diagrams proves mesophase transition among the cylindrical MCM-41, tricontinuous IBN-9 and bicontinuous MCM-48, and also allows a more precise control of phase-pure synthesis. On the other hand, rational design of structure-directing agents offers a possibility to extend the synthesis conditions of IBN-9, as well as tailor its pore size. Moreover, an unprecedented helical structure consisting of twisted 3-fold interwoven mesoporous channels is reported here for the first time. The unique tricontinuous mesostructure of IBN-9 has been well-replicated by other functional materials (e.g., carbon and platinum) via a "hard- templating" synthesis route. The obtained carbon material possesses large surface area (∼1900 m2/g), high pore volume (1.56 cm 3/g), and remarkable gas adsorption capability at both cryogenic temperatures and room temperature. The platinum material has an ordered mesostructure composed of highly oriented nanocrystals. © 2011 American Chemical Society.

  20. Behavior of oxidized platinum nanoparticles on an aligned carbon nanotube forest

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Matsuda, Keita, E-mail: matsuda.keita@c.mbox.nagoya-u.ac.jp; Norimatsu, Wataru [Department of Applied Chemistry, Nagoya University, Nagoya 464-8603 (Japan); Arai, Shigeo; Kusunoki, Michiko [Institute of Materials and Systems for Sustainability, Nagoya University, Nagoya 464-8603 (Japan)

    2016-10-14

    We observed and analyzed the behavior of platinum nanoparticles (PtNPs) supported on aligned-carbon nanotubes (CNTs) at high temperatures by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and high-resolution transmission electron microscope observations. We found that the PtNPs moved toward the inner-side along each CNT on which they were deposited. The mechanism of this behavior is related to the redox reaction of Pt with the carbon atoms in the CNT. We also performed in-situ observation of this process at a high temperature using an environmental transmission electron microscope under an oxygen atmosphere. We found that the PtNPs penetrated down into a high-density aligned CNT forest along the tube axis and that the PtNPs changed their shape to fit the structure of the CNTs during their movement.

  1. Electro-catalytic oxidation of ethanol on platinum-iridium mixtures supported on glassy carbon

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rodriguez, Henry; Hoyos Bibian

    2004-01-01

    Electro-catalytic oxidation of ethanol on platinum-iridium mixtures supported on glassy carbon was studied, in acid media at different temperatures and concentrations. During the maturation time of deposited iridium, the surface is covered by an irreversible oxide formation, which affects the behavior of the catalytic mixture. The Pt 7 0 Ir 3 0 and Pt 9 0 Ir 1 0 mixtures seem to be a little more active than the Pt/C electrode at potentials below 800 mV (vs. HRE). In all electrodes appears two reactions: partial ethanol oxidation to produce acetaldehyde (main path of reaction at low temperatures and high electrode coverage with ethanol adsorption residues) and the total oxidation to carbon dioxide which is considerable at potential above 800 mV and it is increased with increasing temperature

  2. Development of Sulfur and Carbon Tolerant Reforming Alloy Catalysts Aided Fundamental Atomistic Insights

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Suljo Linic

    2008-12-31

    Current hydrocarbon reforming catalysts suffer from rapid carbon and sulfur poisoning. Even though there is a tremendous incentive to develop more efficient catalysts, these materials are currently formulated using inefficient trial and error experimental approaches. We have utilized a hybrid experimental/theoretical approach, combining quantum Density Functional Theory (DFT) calculations and various state-of-the-art experimental tools, to formulate carbon tolerant reforming catalysts. We have employed DFT calculations to develop molecular insights into the elementary chemical transformations that lead to carbon poisoning of Ni catalysts. Based on the obtained molecular insights, we have identified, using DFT quantum calculation, various Ni alloy catalysts as potential carbon tolerant reforming catalysts. The alloy catalysts were synthesized and tested in steam reforming and partial oxidation of methane, propane, and isooctane. We demonstrated that the alloy catalysts are much more carbon-tolerant than monometallic Ni catalysts under nearly stoichiometric steam-to-carbon ratios. Under these conditions, monometallic Ni is rapidly poisoned by sp2 carbon deposits. The research approach is distinguished by two characteristics: (a) knowledge-based, bottomup approach, compared to the traditional trial and error approach, allows for a more efficient and systematic discovery of improved catalysts. (b) the focus is on exploring alloy materials which have been largely unexplored as potential reforming catalysts.

  3. Synthesis and properties of platinum on multiwall carbon nanotube modified by chitosan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fikriyyah, A. K.; Chaldun, E. R.; Indriyati

    2018-03-01

    Platinum nanoparticles on multiwall carbon nanotubes (Pt/MWCNT) play an important role in fuel cell to convert the chemical energy from a fuel into electricity. In this study, Pt/MWCNT electrocatalysts were prepared by chemical reduction of the metal salts in chitosan as the support. Firstly, commercial MWCNTs were functionalized by oxidative process using a mixture of nitric acid and sulfuric acid. Then, functionalized MWCNTs were mixed with chitosan-acetic acid solution to conduct grafting reaction with NH2 groups in chitosan by solution polymerization method. Platinum nanoparticles were loaded onto the surface of the MWCNTs after hexachloroplatinic acid was reduced by sodium hydroxide solution. The result showed that Pt was attached on MWCNT based on analysis from EDS, XRD, and UV Vis Spectroscopy. UV Vis analysis indicates the plasmon absorbance band of Pt nanoparticles in Pt/MWCNT, while XRD analysis confirmed the size of Pt particle in nanometer. This elucidates the potential procedure to synthesize Pt/MWCNT using chitosan.

  4. Starch saccharification by carbon-based solid acid catalyst

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamaguchi, Daizo; Hara, Michikazu

    2010-06-01

    The hydrolysis of cornstarch using a highly active solid acid catalyst, a carbon material bearing SO 3H, COOH and OH groups, was investigated at 353-393 K through an analysis of variance (ANOVA) and an artificial neural network (ANN). ANOVA revealed that reaction temperature and time are significant parameters for the catalytic hydrolysis of starch. The ANN model indicated that the reaction efficiency reaches a maximum at an optimal condition (water, 0.8-1.0 mL; starch, 0.3-0.4 g; catalyst, 0.3 g; reaction temperature, 373 K; reaction time, 3 h). The relationship between the reaction and these parameters is discussed on the basis of the reaction mechanism.

  5. De-oxygenation of CO2 by using Hydrogen, Carbon and Methane over Alumina-Supported Catalysts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R.Y. Raskar

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available The de-oxygenation of CO2 was explored by using hydrogen, methane, carbon etc., over alumina supported catalysts. The alumina-supported ruthenium, rhodium, platinum, molybdenum, vanadium and magnesium catalysts were first reduced in hydrogen atmosphere and then used for the de-oxygenation of CO2. Furthermore, experimental variables for the de-oxygenation of CO2 were temperature (range 50 to 650 oC, H2/CO2 mole ratios (1.0 to 5, and catalyst loading (0.5 to 10 wt %. During the de-oxygenation of CO2 with H2 or CH4 or carbon, conversion of CO2, selectivity to CO and CH4 were estimated. Moreover, 25.4 % conversion of CO2 by hydrogen was observed over 1 wt% Pt/Al2O3 catalyst at 650 oC with 33.8 % selectivity to CH4. However, 8.1 to 13.9 % conversion of CO2 was observed over 1 wt% Pt/Al2O3 catalyst at 550 oC in the presence of both H2 and CH4. Moreover, 42.8 to 79.4 % CH4 was converted with 9 to 23.1 % selectivity to CO. It was observed that the de-oxygenation of CO2 by hydrogen, carbon and methane produced carbon, CO and CH4. © 2012 BCREC UNDIP. All rights reservedReceived: 6th February 2012; Revised: 23rd April 2012; Accepted: 24th April 2012[How to Cite: R. Y. Raskar, K. B. Kale, A. G. Gaikwad. (2011. De-oxygenation of CO2 by using Hydrogen, Carbon and Methane over Alumina-Supported Catalysts. Bulletin of Chemical Reaction Engineering & Catalysis, 7 (1: 59-69.  doi:10.9767/bcrec.7.1.1631.59-69][How to Link / DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.9767/bcrec.7.1.1631.59-69 ] | View in 

  6. Growth of carbon nanocone arrays on a metal catalyst: The effect of carbon flux ionization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Levchenko, I.; Khachan, J.; Vladimirov, S. V.; Ostrikov, K.

    2008-01-01

    The growth of carbon nanocone arrays on metal catalyst particles by deposition from a low-temperature plasma is studied by multiscale Monte Carlo/surface diffusion numerical simulation. It is demonstrated that the variation in the degree of ionization of the carbon flux provides an effective control of the growth kinetics of the carbon nanocones, and leads to the formation of more uniform arrays of nanostructures. In the case of zero degree of ionization (neutral gas process), a width of the distribution of nanocone heights reaches 360 nm with the nanocone mean height of 150 nm. When the carbon flux of 75% ionization is used, the width of the distribution of nanocone heights decreases to 100 nm, i.e., by a factor of 3.6. A higher degree of ionization leads to a better uniformity of the metal catalyst saturation and the nanocone growth, thus contributing to the formation of more height-uniform arrays of carbon nanostructures.

  7. A comparative study on the influence of the platinum catalyst in poly(dimethylsiloxane) based networks synthesis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bejenariu, Anca Gabriela; Poulsen, Julie Øblom; Skov, Anne Ladegaard

    2009-01-01

    The aim of the project is to find the best of three Pt catalysts and their appropriate quantity in order to obtain soft networks in one hour at room temperature. How the choice of catalyst influences the final elastomeric properties is also evaluated. The differences between the catalysts...

  8. Determination of serotonin on platinum electrode modified with carbon nanotubes/polypyrrole/silver nanoparticles nanohybrid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cesarino, Ivana; Galesco, Heloisa V; Machado, Sergio A S

    2014-07-01

    A new sensor has been developed by a simple electrodeposition of multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNT), polypyrrole (PPy) and colloidal silver nanoparticles on the platinum (Pt) electrode surface. The Pt/MWCNT/PPy/AgNPs electrode was applied to the detection of serotonin in plasmatic serum samples using differential pulse voltammetry (DPV). The synergistic effect of MWCNT/PPy/AgNPs nanohybrid formed yielded a LOD of 0.15 μmol L(-1) (26.4 μg L(-1)). Reproducibility and repeatability values of 2.2% and 1.7%, respectively, were obtained compared to the conventional procedure. The proposed electrode can be an effective material to be used in biological analysis. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. Voltammetric Determination of Salbutamol Based on Electrochemical Oxidation at Platinum and Glassy Carbon Electrodes

    OpenAIRE

    YILMAZ, Niyazi; ÖZKAN, Sibel A.; USLU, Bengi

    2014-01-01

    The oxidative behavior of salbutamol was studied as a function of pH at platinum and activated glassy carbon electrodes. Between pH 1.9 and 12.0, the drug was characterized by a single oxidation step at both electrodes. The process was found to be dependent on the nature and the pH of the supporting elctrolyte. The procedure yielded a linear concentration range of 1 \\times 10-4 to 1 \\times 10-3 M and 2 \\times 10-5 to 1 \\times 10-3 M in 0.2 M sulphuric acid and a phosphate buffer of pH 6, at p...

  10. Platinum containing amorphous hydrogenated carbon (a-C:H/Pt) thin films as selective solar absorbers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lan, Yung-Hsiang; Brahma, Sanjaya; Tzeng, Y.H.; Ting, Jyh-Ming

    2014-01-01

    We have investigated a double-cermet structured thin film in which an a-C:H thin film was used as an anti-reflective (AR) layer and two platinum-containing amorphous hydrogenated carbon (a-C:H/Pt) thin films were used as the double cermet layers. A reactive co-sputter deposition method was used to prepare both the anti-reflective and cermet layers. Effects of the target power and heat treatment were studied. The obtained films were characterized using X-ray diffraction, scanning electron microscopy, high-resolution transmission electron microscopy. The optical absorptance and emittance of the as deposited and annealed films were determined using UV–vis-NIR spectroscopy. We show that the optical absorptance of the resulting double-cermet structured thin film is as high as 96% and remains to be 91% after heat treatment at 400 °C, indicating the thermal stability of the film

  11. Monolayer-by-monolayer growth of platinum films on complex carbon fiber paper structure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pang, Liuqing; Zhang, Yunxia [Key Laboratory of Applied Surface and Colloid Chemistry, National Ministry of Education, Shaanxi Key Laboratory for Advanced Energy Devices, Shaanxi Engineering Lab for Advanced Energy Technology, School of Materials Science and Engineering, Shaanxi Normal University, Xi’an 710119 (China); Liu, Shengzhong, E-mail: szliu@dicp.ac.cn [Key Laboratory of Applied Surface and Colloid Chemistry, National Ministry of Education, Shaanxi Key Laboratory for Advanced Energy Devices, Shaanxi Engineering Lab for Advanced Energy Technology, School of Materials Science and Engineering, Shaanxi Normal University, Xi’an 710119 (China); Dalian National Laboratory for Clean Energy, iChEM, Dalian Institute of Chemical Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Dalian 116023 (China)

    2017-06-15

    Graphical abstract: A controlled monolayer-by-monolayer deposition process has been developed to fabricate Pt coating on carbon fiber paper with complex network structures using a dual buffer strategy. This development may pave a way to fabricate superior Pt catalysts with the minimal Pt usage. In fact, the present Pt group metal loading is 25 times lower than the U.S. DOE 2017 target value. - Highlights: • Developed a controlled monolayer-by-monolayer Pt deposition using a dual buffer strategy. • The present Pt group metal loading is 25 times lower than the U.S. DOE 2017 target value. • This development may pave a way to fabricate superior Pt catalysts with the minimal Pt usage. - Abstract: A controlled monolayer-by-monolayer deposition process has been developed to fabricate Pt coating on carbon fiber paper with complex network structures using a dual buffer (Au/Ni) strategy. The X-ray diffraction, electrochemical quartz crystal microbalance, current density analyses, and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy results conclude that the monolayer deposition process accomplishes full coverage on the substrate and that the thickness of the deposition layer can be controlled on a single atom scale. This development may pave a way to fabricate superior Pt catalysts with the minimal Pt usage. In fact, the present Pt group metal loading is 25 times lower than the U.S. DOE 2017 target value.

  12. Platinum-Niobium(V Oxide/Carbon Nanocomposites Prepared By Microwave Synthesis For Ethanol Oxidation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Virginija KEPENIENĖ

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available In the present work, Pt nanoparticles were deposited by means of microwave synthesis on the primary carbon supported Nb2O5 composite which was prepared in two different ways: (A by dispersion of Nb2O5 and carbon with the mass ratio equal to 1:1 in a 2-propanol solution by ultrasonication for 30 min. with further desiccation of the mixture and (B by heating the Nb2O5/C composite obtained according to the procedure (A at 500 °C for 2 h. The transmission electron microscopy was used to determine the shape and the size of catalyst particles. X-ray diffraction and inductively coupled plasma optical emission spectroscopy were employed to characterize the structure and composition of the synthesized catalysts. The electrocatalytic activity of the synthesized catalysts towards the oxidation of ethanol in an alkaline medium was investigated by means of cyclic voltammetry.DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.5755/j01.ms.22.2.8609

  13. Advantages of electrodes with dendrimer-protected platinum nanoparticles and carbon nanotubes for electrochemical methanol oxidation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siriviriyanun, Ampornphan; Imae, Toyoko

    2013-04-14

    Electrochemical sensors consisting of electrodes loaded with carbon nanotubes and Pt nanoparticles (PtNPs) protected by dendrimers have been developed using a facile method to fabricate them on two types of disposable electrochemical printed chips with a screen-printed circular gold or a screen-printed circular glassy carbon working electrode. The electrochemical performance of these sensors in the oxidation of methanol was investigated by cyclic voltammetry. It was revealed that such sensors possess stable durability and high electrocatalytic activity: the potential and the current density of an anodic peak in the oxidation of methanol increased with increasing content of PtNPs on the electrodes, indicating the promotion of electrocatalytic activity in relation to the amount of catalyst. The low anodic potential suggests the easy electrochemical reaction, and the high catalyst tolerance supports the almost complete oxidation of methanol to carbon dioxide. The significant performance of these sensors in the detection of methanol oxidation comes from the high electrocatalytic ability of PtNPs, excellent energy transfer of carbon nanotubes and the remarkable ability of dendrimers to act as binders. Thus these systems are effective for a wide range of applications as chemical, biomedical, energy and environmental sensors and as units of direct methanol fuel cells.

  14. Removal of dye by immobilised photo catalyst loaded activated carbon

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zulkarnain Zainal; Chan, Sook Keng; Abdul Halim Abdullah

    2008-01-01

    The ability of activated carbon to adsorb and titanium dioxide to photo degrade organic impurities from water bodies is well accepted. Combination of the two is expected to enhance the removal efficiency due to the synergistic effect. This has enabled activated carbon to adsorb more and at the same time the lifespan of activated carbon is prolonged as the workload of removing organic pollutants is shared between activated carbon and titanium dioxide. Immobilisation is selected to avoid unnecessary filtering of adsorbent and photo catalyst. In this study, mixture of activated carbon and titanium dioxide was immobilised on glass slides. Photodegradation and adsorption studies of Methylene Blue solution were conducted in the absence and presence of UV light. The removal efficiency of immobilised TiO 2 / AC was found to be two times better than the removal by immobilised AC or immobilised TiO 2 alone. In 4 hours and with the concentration of 10 ppm, TiO 2 loaded activated carbon prepared from 1.5 g/ 15.0 mL suspension produced 99.50 % dye removal. (author)

  15. Novel catalysts for isotopic exchange between hydrogen and liquid water

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Butler, J.P.; Rolston, J.H.; Stevens, W.H.

    1978-01-01

    Catalytic isotopic exchange between hydrogen and liquid water offers many inherent potential advantages for the separation of hydrogen isotopes which is of great importance in the Canadian nuclear program. Active catalysts for isotopic exchange between hydrogen and water vapor have long been available, but these catalysts are essentially inactive in the presence of liquid water. New, water-repellent platinum catalysts have been prepared by: (1) treating supported catalysts with silicone, (2) depositing platinum on inherently hydrophobic polymeric supports, and (3) treating platinized carbon with Teflon and bonding to a carrier. The activity of these catalysts for isotopic exchange between countercurrent streams of liquid water and hydrogen saturated with water vapor has been measured in a packed trickle bed integral reactor. The performance of these hydrophobic catalysts is compared with nonwetproofed catalysts. The mechanism of the overall exchange reaction is briefly discussed. 6 figures

  16. Renewable hydrogen: carbon formation on Ni and Ru catalysts during ethanol steam-reforming

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rass-Hansen, Jeppe; Christensen, Christina Hviid; Sehested, J.

    2007-01-01

    for the production of hydrogen is investigated, along with quantitative and qualitative determinations of carbon formation on the catalysts by TPO and TEM experiments. A Ru/ MgAl2O4 catalyst, a Ni/MgAl2O4 catalyst as well as Ag-and K-promoted Ni/ MgAl2O4 catalysts were studied. The operating temperature was between...... addition was a rapid deactivation of the catalyst due to an enhanced gum carbon formation on the Ni crystals. Contrary to this, the effect of K addition was a prolonged resistance against carbon formation and therefore against deactivation. The Ru catalyst operates better than all the Ni catalysts...

  17. Synthesis of carbon nanotubes by CCVD of natural gas using hydrotreating catalysts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahmed E. Awadallah

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Carbon nanotubes have been successfully synthesized using the catalytic chemical vapor deposition (CCVD technique over typical refining hydrotreating catalysts (hydrodesulfurization and hydrodenitrogenation containing Ni–Mo and Co–Mo supported on Al2O3 catalysts at 700°C in a fixed bed horizontal reactor using natural gas as a carbon source. The catalysts and the as-grown CNTs were characterized by transmission electron microscopy, HRTEM, X-ray diffraction patterns, EDX and TGA–DTG. The obtained data clarified that the Ni–Mo catalyst gives higher yield, higher purity and selectivity for CNTs compared to Co–Mo catalyst. XRD, TEM and TGA reveal also that the Ni–Mo catalyst produces mostly CNTs with different diameters whereas the Co–Mo catalyst produces largely amorphous carbon.

  18. Bio-inspired routes for synthesizing efficient nanoscale platinum electrocatalysts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cha, Jennifer N. [Univ. of California, San Diego, CA (United States); Wang, Joseph [Univ. of California, San Diego, CA (United States)

    2014-08-31

    The overall objective of the proposed research is to use fundamental advances in bionanotechnology to design powerful platinum nanocrystal electrocatalysts for fuel cell applications. The new economically-viable, environmentally-friendly, bottom-up biochemical synthetic strategy will produce platinum nanocrystals with tailored size, shape and crystal orientation, hence leading to a maximum electrochemical reactivity. There are five specific aims to the proposed bio-inspired strategy for synthesizing efficient electrocatalytic platinum nanocrystals: (1) isolate peptides that both selectively bind particular crystal faces of platinum and promote the nucleation and growth of particular nanocrystal morphologies, (2) pattern nanoscale 2-dimensional arrays of platinum nucleating peptides from DNA scaffolds, (3) investigate the combined use of substrate patterned peptides and soluble peptides on nanocrystal morphology and growth (4) synthesize platinum crystals on planar and large-area carbon electrode supports, and (5) perform detailed characterization of the electrocatalytic behavior as a function of catalyst size, shape and morphology. Project Description and Impact: This bio-inspired collaborative research effort will address key challenges in designing powerful electrocatalysts for fuel cell applications by employing nucleic acid scaffolds in combination with peptides to perform specific, environmentally-friendly, simultaneous bottom-up biochemical synthesis and patterned assembly of highly uniform and efficient platinum nanocrystal catalysts. Bulk synthesis of nanoparticles usually produces a range of sizes, accessible catalytic sites, crystal morphologies, and orientations, all of which lead to inconsistent catalytic activities. In contrast, biological systems routinely demonstrate exquisite control over inorganic syntheses at neutral pH and ambient temperature and pressures. Because the orientation and arrangement of the templating biomolecules can be precisely

  19. Catalysts for oxidation of mercury in flue gas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Granite, Evan J [Wexford, PA; Pennline, Henry W [Bethel Park, PA

    2010-08-17

    Two new classes of catalysts for the removal of heavy metal contaminants, especially mercury (Hg) from effluent gases. Both of these classes of catalysts are excellent absorbers of HCl and Cl.sub.2 present in effluent gases. This adsorption of oxidizing agents aids in the oxidation of heavy metal contaminants. The catalysts remove mercury by oxidizing the Hg into mercury (II) moieties. For one class of catalysts, the active component is selected from the group consisting of iridium (Ir) and iridum-platinum (Ir/Pt) alloys. The Ir and Ir/Pt alloy catalysts are especially corrosion resistant. For the other class of catalyst, the active component is partially combusted coal or "Thief" carbon impregnated with Cl.sub.2. Untreated Thief carbon catalyst can be self-activating in the presence of effluent gas streams. The Thief carbon catalyst is disposable by means of capture from the effluent gas stream in a particulate collection device (PCD).

  20. TiO2-anatase modified by carbon as the photo catalyst under visible light

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Morawski, A.W.; Janus, M.; Tryba, B.; Kalucki, K.; Tryba, B.; Inagaki, M.

    2006-01-01

    The photo-catalytic oxidation of phenol in water under a visible light over anatase-type titanium dioxide (Tytanpol A11, Poland), modified by carbon deposited via n-hexane carbonization, was investigated. The catalysts, which had small (0-0.2 mass%) and high (0.69-0.85 mass%) contents of carbon showed a little lower catalytic photo-activity than pristine TiO 2 . However, the catalyst with high content of carbon (0.85 mass%) gave almost 14-times lower turbidity in the phenol solution after the photo-catalyst sedimentation. These two factors depend on the carbon content and have an influence on the 'practical efficiency' of the catalysts. The 'practical efficiency' of the catalyst under visible light, calculated from these two factors, was therefore 14-times higher for the catalyst containing 0.85 mass% carbon (whereas for UV radiation, it was found to be lower - 0.2 mass% -; this is the result of a previous work). The surface modification of the catalyst with 0.85% carbon seemed to be stable under visible light. The deposition of carbon on TiO 2 by carbonization of n-hexane was supposed to lead to obtain the catalyst, which could be easily used in a water-treatment system under visible light. (authors)

  1. Carbonized tantalum catalysts for catalytic chemical vapor deposition of silicon films

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cheng Shimin [State Key Laboratory of Catalysis, Dalian Institute of Chemical Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Dalian 116023 (China); Dalian National Laboratory for Clean Energy, Dalian 116023 (China); Graduate University of Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100049 (China); Gao Huiping; Ren Tong; Ying Pinliang [State Key Laboratory of Catalysis, Dalian Institute of Chemical Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Dalian 116023 (China); Dalian National Laboratory for Clean Energy, Dalian 116023 (China); Li Can, E-mail: canli@dicp.ac.cn [State Key Laboratory of Catalysis, Dalian Institute of Chemical Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Dalian 116023 (China); Dalian National Laboratory for Clean Energy, Dalian 116023 (China)

    2012-06-01

    Catalytic chemical vapor deposition (Cat-CVD) has been demonstrated as a promising way to prepare device-quality silicon films. However, catalyst ageing due to Si contamination is an urgency to be solved for the practical application of the technique. In this study, the effect of carbonization of tantalum catalyst on its structure and performance was investigated. The carbonized Ta catalyst has a TaC surface layer which is preserved over the temperature range between 1450 and 1750 Degree-Sign C and no Si contamination occurs on the catalyst after long-term use. Si film prepared using the carbonized Ta catalyst has a similar crystal structure to that prepared by uncarbonized Ta catalyst. Formation of the TaC surface layer can alleviate the ageing problem of the catalyst, which shows great potential as a stable catalyst for Cat-CVD of Si films. - Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Si films prepared by catalytic chemical vapor deposition. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Carbonized Ta with a TaC surface layer used as catalyst. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer TaC surface structure preserved after long-term use in a wide temperature range. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Help to solve the ageing problem of metal catalysts. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Si film obtained has a similar crystal structure to that prepared by Ta catalyst.

  2. Physicochemical investigations of carbon nanofiber supported Cu/ZrO2 catalyst

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Din, Israf Ud; Shaharun, Maizatul S.; Subbarao, Duvvuri; Naeem, A.

    2014-01-01

    Zirconia-promoted copper/carbon nanofiber catalysts (Cu‐ZrO 2 /CNF) were prepared by the sequential deposition precipitation method. The Herringbone type of carbon nanofiber GNF-100 (Graphite nanofiber) was used as a catalyst support. Carbon nanofiber was oxidized to (CNF-O) with 5% and 65 % concentration of nitric acid (HNO 3 ). The CNF activated with 5% HNO 3 produced higher surface area which is 155 m 2 /g. The catalyst was characterized by X-ray Diffraction (XRD), Fourier Transform Infra-Red (FTIR) and N 2 adsorption-desorption. The results showed that increase of HNO 3 concentration reduced the surface area and porosity of the catalyst

  3. Coatings of Different Carbon Nanotubes on Platinum Electrodes for Neuronal Devices: Preparation, Cytocompatibility and Interaction with Spiral Ganglion Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burblies, Niklas; Schulze, Jennifer; Schwarz, Hans-Christoph; Kranz, Katharina; Motz, Damian; Vogt, Carla; Lenarz, Thomas; Warnecke, Athanasia; Behrens, Peter

    2016-01-01

    Cochlear and deep brain implants are prominent examples for neuronal prostheses with clinical relevance. Current research focuses on the improvement of the long-term functionality and the size reduction of neural interface electrodes. A promising approach is the application of carbon nanotubes (CNTs), either as pure electrodes but especially as coating material for electrodes. The interaction of CNTs with neuronal cells has shown promising results in various studies, but these appear to depend on the specific type of neurons as well as on the kind of nanotubes. To evaluate a potential application of carbon nanotube coatings for cochlear electrodes, it is necessary to investigate the cytocompatibility of carbon nanotube coatings on platinum for the specific type of neuron in the inner ear, namely spiral ganglion neurons. In this study we have combined the chemical processing of as-delivered CNTs, the fabrication of coatings on platinum, and the characterization of the electrical properties of the coatings as well as a general cytocompatibility testing and the first cell culture investigations of CNTs with spiral ganglion neurons. By applying a modification process to three different as-received CNTs via a reflux treatment with nitric acid, long-term stable aqueous CNT dispersions free of dispersing agents were obtained. These were used to coat platinum substrates by an automated spray-coating process. These coatings enhance the electrical properties of platinum electrodes, decreasing the impedance values and raising the capacitances. Cell culture investigations of the different CNT coatings on platinum with NIH3T3 fibroblasts attest an overall good cytocompatibility of these coatings. For spiral ganglion neurons, this can also be observed but a desired positive effect of the CNTs on the neurons is absent. Furthermore, we found that the well-established DAPI staining assay does not function on the coatings prepared from single-wall nanotubes.

  4. Phosphorus poisoning of molybdenum sulfide hydrodesulfurization catalysts supported on carbon and alumina

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bouwens, S.M.A.M.; Vissers, J.P.R.; Beer, de V.H.J.; Prins, R.

    1988-01-01

    Phosphorus-containing Mo sulfide catalysts supported on ¿-Al2O3 and activated carbon were evaluated for their thiophene HDS activities. Phosphorus was added as phosphoric acid to the carrier material prior to the molybdenum component. The thiophene HDS activity of the carbon-supported catalysts was

  5. Elaboration, physical and electrochemical characterizations of CO tolerant PEMFC anode materials. Study of platinum-molybdenum and platinum-tungsten alloys and composites; Elaborations et caracterisations electrochimiques et physiques de materiaux d'anode de PEMFC peu sensibles a l'empoisonnement par CO: etude d'alliages et de composites a base de platine-molybdene et de platine-tungstene

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Peyrelade, E.

    2005-06-15

    PEMFC development is hindered by the CO poisoning ability of the anode platinum catalyst. It has been previously shown that the oxidation potential of carbon monoxide adsorbed on the platinum atoms can be lowered using specific Pt based catalysts, either metallic alloys or composites. The objective is then to realize a catalyst for which the CO oxidation is compatible with the working potential of a PEMFC anode. In our approach, to enhance the CO tolerance of platinum based catalyst supported on carbon, we studied platinum-tungsten and platinum-molybdenum alloys and platinum-metal oxide materials (Pt-WO{sub x} and Pt-MoO{sub x}). The platinum based alloys demonstrate a small effect of the second metal towards the oxidation of carbon monoxide. The platinum composites show a better tolerance to carbon monoxide. Electrochemical studies on both Pt-MoO{sub x} and Pt-WO{sub x} demonstrate the ability of the metal-oxides to promote the ability of Pt to oxidize CO at low potentials. However, chrono-amperometric tests reveal a bigger influence of the tungsten oxide. Complex chemistry reactions on the molybdenum oxide surface make it more difficult to observe. (author)

  6. Total Oxidation of Dichloromethane and Ethanol over Ceria-Zirconia Mixed Oxide Supported Platinum and Gold Catalysts

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Matějová, Lenka; Topka, Pavel; Kaluža, Luděk; Pitkäaho, S.; Ojala, S.; Gaálová, Jana; Keiski, R.L.

    142-143, OCT-NOV (2013), s. 54-64 ISSN 0926-3373 R&D Projects: GA ČR GP13-24186P Institutional support: RVO:67985858 Keywords : gold * platinum * ceria Subject RIV: CF - Physical ; Theoretical Chemistry Impact factor: 6.007, year: 2013

  7. Application of sodium carbonate prevents sulphur poisoning of catalysts in automated total mercury analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    McLagan, David S.; Huang, Haiyong; Lei, Ying D.; Wania, Frank; Mitchell, Carl P. J.

    2017-07-01

    Analysis of high sulphur-containing samples for total mercury content using automated thermal decomposition, amalgamation, and atomic absorption spectroscopy instruments (USEPA Method 7473) leads to rapid and costly SO2 poisoning of catalysts. In an effort to overcome this issue, we tested whether the addition of powdered sodium carbonate (Na2CO3) to the catalyst and/or directly on top of sample material increases throughput of sulphur-impregnated (8-15 wt%) activated carbon samples per catalyst tube. Adding 5 g of Na2CO3 to the catalyst alone only marginally increases the functional lifetime of the catalyst (31 ± 4 g of activated carbon analyzed per catalyst tube) in relation to unaltered catalyst of the AMA254 total mercury analyzer (17 ± 4 g of activated carbon). Adding ≈ 0.2 g of Na2CO3 to samples substantially increases (81 ± 17 g of activated carbon) catalyst life over the unaltered catalyst. The greatest improvement is achieved by adding Na2CO3 to both catalyst and samples (200 ± 70 g of activated carbon), which significantly increases catalyst performance over all other treatments and enables an order of magnitude greater sample throughput than the unaltered samples and catalyst. It is likely that Na2CO3 efficiently sequesters SO2, even at high furnace temperatures to produce Na2SO4 and CO2, largely negating the poisonous impact of SO2 on the catalyst material. Increased corrosion of nickel sampling boats resulting from this methodological variation is easily resolved by substituting quartz boats. Overall, this variation enables an efficient and significantly more affordable means of employing automated atomic absorption spectrometry instruments for total mercury analysis of high-sulphur matrices.

  8. Aligned carbon nanotube array functionalization for enhanced atomic layer deposition of platinum electrocatalysts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dameron, Arrelaine A., E-mail: arrelaine.dameron@nrel.gov [National Renewable Energy Laboratory, 1617 Cole Blvd Golden, Golden, CO 80401 (United States); Pylypenko, Svitlana; Bult, Justin B.; Neyerlin, K.C.; Engtrakul, Chaiwat; Bochert, Christopher; Leong, G. Jeremy; Frisco, Sarah L.; Simpson, Lin; Dinh, Huyen N.; Pivovar, Bryan [National Renewable Energy Laboratory, 1617 Cole Blvd Golden, Golden, CO 80401 (United States)

    2012-04-15

    Uniform metal deposition onto high surface area supports is a key challenge of developing successful efficient catalyst materials. Atomic layer deposition (ALD) circumvents permeation difficulties, but relies on gas-surface reactions to initiate growth. Our work demonstrates that modified surfaces within vertically aligned carbon nanotube (CNT) arrays, from plasma and molecular precursor treatments, can lead to improved catalyst deposition. Gas phase functionalization influences the number of ALD nucleation sites and the onset of ALD growth and, in turn, affects the uniformity of the coating along the length of the CNTs within the aligned arrays. The induced chemical changes for each functionalization route are identified by X-ray photoelectron and Raman spectroscopies. The most effective functionalization routes increase the prevalence of oxygen moieties at defect sites on the carbon surfaces. The striking effects of the functionalization are demonstrated with ALD Pt growth as a function of surface treatment and ALD cycles examined by electron microscopy of the arrays and the individual CNTs. Finally, we demonstrate applicability of these materials as fuel cell electrocatalysts and show that surface functionalization affects their performance towards oxygen reduction reaction.

  9. Development of Sulfur and Carbon Tolerant Reforming Alloy Catalysts Aided by Fundamental Atomistics Insights

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Suljo Linic

    2006-08-31

    Current hydrocarbon reforming catalysts suffer from rapid carbon and sulfur poisoning. Even though there is a tremendous incentive to develop more efficient catalysts, these materials are currently formulated using inefficient trial and error experimental approaches. We have utilized a novel hybrid experimental/theoretical approach, combining quantum Density Functional Theory (DFT) calculations and various state-of-the-art experimental tools, to formulate carbon tolerant reforming catalysts. We have employed DFT calculations to develop molecular insights into the elementary chemical transformations that lead to carbon poisoning of Ni catalysts. Based on the obtained molecular insights, we have identified, using DFT quantum calculation, Sn/Ni alloy as a potential carbon tolerant reforming catalyst. Sn/Ni alloy was synthesized and tested in steam reforming of methane, propane, and isooctane. We demonstrated that the alloy catalyst is carbon-tolerant under nearly stoichiometric steam-to-carbon ratios. Under these conditions, monometallic Ni is rapidly poisoned by sp2 carbon deposits. The research approach is distinguished by a few characteristics: (a) Knowledge-based, bottom-up approach, compared to the traditional trial and error approach, allows for a more efficient and systematic discovery of improved catalysts. (b) The focus is on exploring alloy materials which have been largely unexplored as potential reforming catalysts.

  10. Fuel cell testing of Pt–Ru catalysts supported on differently prepared and pretreated carbon nanotubes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tokarz, Wojciech; Lota, Grzegorz; Frackowiak, Elzbieta; Czerwiński, Andrzej; Piela, Piotr

    2013-01-01

    Proton-exchange membrane fuel cell (PEMFC) testing of Pt–Ru catalysts supported on differently prepared multiwall carbon nanotube (MCNT) supports was performed to elucidate the influence of the different supports on the operating characteristics of the catalysts under real direct methanol fuel cell (DMFC) anode and H 2 -PEMFC anode conditions. The MCNTs were either thin, entangled or thick, disentangled. Pretreatment of the MCNTs was also done and it was either high-temperature KOH etching or annealing (graphitization). The performance of the catalysts was compared against the performance of a commercial Pt–Ru catalyst supported on a high-surface-area carbon black. Among the different MCNT supports, the graphitized, entangled support offered the best performance in all tests, which was equal to the performance of the commercial catalyst, despite the MCNT catalyst layer was ca. 2.2 times thicker than the carbon black catalyst layer. Even for an MCNT catalyst layer, which was almost 7 times thicker than the carbon black catalyst layer, the transport limitations were not prohibitive. This confirmed the expected potential of nanotube supports for providing superior reactant transport properties of the PEMFC catalyst layers

  11. An investigation into carbon nanostructured materials as catalyst support in proton exchange membrane fuel cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Veltzé, Sune

    acid treatment on the Vapour Grown Carbon Fibers™ manufactured by Showa Denko K. K. From these fibres, twelve platinised samples were investigated, of which one was platinised by a platinum phtalocyanine impregnation method, two were platinised by the polyol method and the remaining by the Bönnemann......Polymer electrolyte fuel cells (PEFCs) are among the key research areas concerning clean cost-effective energy. Carbon nano fibres (CNF), single walled carbon nano tubes (SWCNT), multi walled carbon nano tubes (MWCNT) and other related materials are among the possible successors to standard carbon...... black support materials for low platinum containing electrocatalyst. This is partly due to their high electronic conductivity. Partly due to their high surface area needed for the dispersion of nanoparticulate metal-clusters. In addition carbon nano-structures (CNF, SWCNT, MWCNT etc.) are more durable...

  12. High performance platinum single atom electrocatalyst for oxygen reduction reaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Jing; Jiao, Menggai; Lu, Lanlu; Barkholtz, Heather M.; Li, Yuping; Wang, Ying; Jiang, Luhua; Wu, Zhijian; Liu, Di-Jia; Zhuang, Lin; Ma, Chao; Zeng, Jie; Zhang, Bingsen; Su, Dangsheng; Song, Ping; Xing, Wei; Xu, Weilin; Wang, Ying; Jiang, Zheng; Sun, Gongquan

    2017-07-01

    For the large-scale sustainable implementation of polymer electrolyte membrane fuel cells in vehicles, high-performance electrocatalysts with low platinum consumption are desirable for use as cathode material during the oxygen reduction reaction in fuel cells. Here we report a carbon black-supported cost-effective, efficient and durable platinum single-atom electrocatalyst with carbon monoxide/methanol tolerance for the cathodic oxygen reduction reaction. The acidic single-cell with such a catalyst as cathode delivers high performance, with power density up to 680 mW cm-2 at 80 °C with a low platinum loading of 0.09 mgPt cm-2, corresponding to a platinum utilization of 0.13 gPt kW-1 in the fuel cell. Good fuel cell durability is also observed. Theoretical calculations reveal that the main effective sites on such platinum single-atom electrocatalysts are single-pyridinic-nitrogen-atom-anchored single-platinum-atom centres, which are tolerant to carbon monoxide/methanol, but highly active for the oxygen reduction reaction.

  13. Allotropic Carbon Nanoforms as Advanced Metal-Free Catalysts or as Supports

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hermenegildo Garcia

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available This perspective paper summarizes the use of three nanostructured carbon allotropes as metal-free catalysts (“carbocatalysts” or as supports of metal nanoparticles. After an introductory section commenting the interest of developing metal-free catalysts and main features of carbon nanoforms, the main body of this paper is focused on exemplifying the opportunities that carbon nanotubes, graphene, and diamond nanoparticles offer to develop advanced catalysts having active sites based on carbon in the absence of transition metals or as large area supports with special morphology and unique properties. The final section provides my personal view on future developments in this field.

  14. Surface treated carbon catalysts produced from waste tires for fatty acids to biofuel conversion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hood, Zachary D.; Adhikari, Shiba P.; Wright, Marcus W.; Lachgar, Abdessadek; Li, Yunchao; Naskar, Amit K.; Paranthaman, Mariappan Parans

    2018-02-06

    A method of making solid acid catalysts includes the step of sulfonating waste tire pieces in a first sulfonation step. The sulfonated waste tire pieces are pyrolyzed to produce carbon composite pieces having a pore size less than 10 nm. The carbon composite pieces are then ground to produce carbon composite powders having a size less than 50 .mu.m. The carbon composite particles are sulfonated in a second sulfonation step to produce sulfonated solid acid catalysts. A method of making biofuels and solid acid catalysts are also disclosed.

  15. Carbon coated (carbonous) catalyst in ebullated bed reactor for production of oxygenated chemicals from syngas/CO2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Peizheng Zhou

    2002-01-01

    This report summarizes the work completed under DOE's Support of Advanced Fuel Research program, Contract No. DE-FG26-99FT40681. The contract period was October 2000 through September 2002. This R and D program investigated the modification of the mechanical strength of catalyst extrudates using Hydrocarbon Technologies, Inc. (HTI) carbon-coated catalyst technology so that the ebullated bed technology can be utilized to produce valuable oxygenated chemicals from syngas/CO 2 efficiently and economically. Exothermic chemical reactions benefit from the temperature control and freedom from catalyst fouling provided by the ebullated bed reactor technology. The carbon-coated extrudates prepared using these procedures had sufficient attrition resistance and surface area for use in ebullated bed operation. The low cost of carbon coating makes the carbon-coated catalysts highly competitive in the market of catalyst extrudates

  16. Iridium-decorated palladium-platinum core-shell catalysts for oxygen reduction reaction in proton exchange membrane fuel cell.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Chen-Hao; Hsu, Hsin-Cheng; Wang, Kai-Ching

    2014-08-01

    Carbon-supported Pt, Pd, Pd-Pt core-shell (Pt(shell)-Pd(core)/C) and Ir-decorated Pd-Pt core-shell (Ir-decorated Pt(shell)-Pd(core)/C) catalysts were synthesized, and their physical properties, electrochemical behaviors, oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) characteristics and proton exchange membrane fuel cell (PEMFC) performances were investigated herein. From the XRD patterns and TEM images, Ir-decorated Pt(shell)-Pd(core)/C has been confirmed that Pt was deposited on the Pd nanoparticle which had the core-shell structure. Ir-decorated Pt(shell)-Pd(core)/C has more positive OH reduction peak than Pt/C, which is beneficial to weaken the binding energy of Pt-OH during the ORR. Thus, Ir-decorated Pt(shell)-Pd(core)/C has higher ORR activity than Pt/C. The maximum power density of H2-O2 PEMFC using Ir-decorated Pt(shell)-Pd(core)/C is 792.2 mW cm(-2) at 70°C, which is 24% higher than that using Pt/C. The single-cell accelerated degradation test of PEMFC using Ir-decorated Pt(shell)-Pd(core)/C shows good durability by the potential cycling of 40,000 cycles. This study concludes that Ir-decorated Pt(shell)-Pd(core)/C has the low Pt content, but it can facilitate the low-cost and high-efficient PEMFC. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Nitrogen-doped hierarchical lamellar porous carbon synthesized from the fish scale as support material for platinum nanoparticle electrocatalyst toward the oxygen reduction reaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Haijing; Cao, Yinliang; Wang, Feng; Huang, Yaqin

    2014-01-22

    Novel hierarchical lamellar porous carbon (HLPC) with high BET specific surface area of 2730 m(2) g(-1) and doped by nitrogen atoms has been synthesized from the fish scale without any post-synthesis treatment, and applied to support the platinum (Pt) nanoparticle (NP) catalysts (Pt/HLPC). The Pt NPs could be highly dispersed on the porous surface of HLPC with a narrow size distribution centered at ca. 2.0 nm. The results of the electrochemical analysis reveal that the electrochemical active surface area (ECSA) of Pt/HLPC is larger than the Pt NP electrocatalyst supported on the carbon black (Pt/Vulcan XC-72). Compared with the Pt/Vulcan XC-72, the Pt/HLPC exhibits larger current density, lower overpotential, and enhanced catalytic activity toward the oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) through the direct four-electron pathway. The improved catalytic activity is mainly attributed to the high BET specific surface area, hierarchical porous structures and the nitrogen-doped surface property of HLPC, indicating the superiority of HLPC as a promising support material for the ORR electrocatalysts.

  18. Synthesis and Characterization of Carbon nanofibers on Co and Cu Catalysts by Chemical Vapor Deposition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Park, Eunsil; Kim, Jongwon; Lee, Changseop

    2014-01-01

    This study reports on the synthesis of carbon nanofibers via chemical vapor deposition using Co and Cu as catalysts. In order to investigate the suitability of their catalytic activity for the growth of nanofibers, we prepared catalysts for the synthesis of carbon nanofibers with Cobalt nitrate and Copper nitrate, and found the optimum concentration of each respective catalyst. Then we made them react with Aluminum nitrate and Ammonium Molybdate to form precipitates. The precipitates were dried at a temperature of 110 .deg. C in order to be prepared into catalyst powder. The catalyst was sparsely and thinly spread on a quartz tube boat to grow carbon nanofibers via thermal chemical vapor deposition. The characteristics of the synthesized carbon nanofibers were analyzed through SEM, EDS, XRD, Raman, XPS, and TG/DTA, and the specific surface area was measured via BET. Consequently, the characteristics of the synthesized carbon nanofibers were greatly influenced by the concentration ratio of metal catalysts. In particular, uniform carbon nanofibers of 27 nm in diameter grew when the concentration ratio of Co and Cu was 6:4 at 700 .deg. C of calcination temperature; carbon nanofibers synthesized under such conditions showed the best crystallizability, compared to carbon nanofibers synthesized with metal catalysts under different concentration ratios, and revealed 1.26 high amorphicity as well as 292 m 2 g -1 high specific surface area

  19. Characterization of platinum catalysts supported on substoichiometric oxides of Zr, Ti and Ce by the electric impedance spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eder, D.

    2003-09-01

    Noble metal catalysts show enhanced catalytic activities towards hydrocarbon C-O bond reactions, when they are supported on reducible oxides (titania or ceria) compared to silica or alumina. Active sites on the surface of such species are probably electronic or structural defects which lower the bonding strength of adsorbed molecules and favor subsequent reactions at the triple phase boundary between the metal, the oxide and the atmosphere. On the other hand, a pre-treatment of these catalysts in hydrogen at higher temperatures leads to a reversed effect. Noble metal catalysts supported on reducible oxides suffer from the so called SMSI-effect ('strong metal support interaction'), when they are reduced at temperatures above 400 o C. The adsorption capacity for hydrogen and for carbon monoxide and the catalytic activity for hydrocarbon skeletal reactions are decreased, the reason for this is mostly agreed to be the reduction of the support. Aim of this work was to characterize the electronic structure of two reducible oxides (TiO 2 and CeO 2 ) as a support for noble metal catalysts and compare them to the non-reducible ZrO 2 . The formation of oxygen vacancies during a typical catalytic pre-treatment in hydrogen was studied quantitatively by the volumetric oxygen titration and by temperature controlled oxidation/Desorption (TPO, TPD), as well as qualitatively by Electron Paramagnetic Resonance (EPR) and Fourier Transformation Infrared Spectroscopy (FTIR). The materials used in this work were of polycrystalline type, their specific surface area was controlled by calcinations at different temperatures. The reduction was performed in flowing dry hydrogen with varied flow rates at different temperatures. In some experiments, a water vapour pressure of 6.1 mbar was added to the gas stream to study the influence of humidity on the formation of oxygen vacancies. The treatment in hydrogen at low temperatures leads to the formation of oxygen vacancies located at the surface

  20. Novel type of carbon-supported catalysts. I.Preparation and characterization

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Doorn, J.; Staugaard, P.; Moulijn, J.A.; Beer, de V.H.J.

    1989-01-01

    The exposure of CoO/Al2O3 catalysts to carbon monoxide leads, after reduction to cobalt metal, to the formation of filamentary carbon in addition to a less reactive form of deposited carbon. The filament diameters were determined by scanning electron microscopy. The carbon content was determined by

  1. CATALYSTS NHI Thermochemical Systems FY 2009 Year-End Report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ginosar, Daniel M.

    2009-01-01

    Fiscal Year 2009 work in the Catalysts project focused on advanced catalysts for the decomposition of sulfuric acid, a reaction common to both the Sulfur-Iodine (S-I) cycle and the Hybrid Sulfur cycle. Prior years effort in this project has found that although platinum supported on titanium oxide will be an acceptable catalyst for sulfuric acid decomposition in the integrated laboratory scale (ILS) project, the material has short comings, including significant cost and high deactivation rates due to sintering and platinum evaporation. For pilot and larger scale systems, the catalyst stability needs to be improved significantly. In Fiscal Year 2008 it was found that at atmospheric pressure, deactivation rates of a 1 wt% platinum catalyst could be reduced by 300% by adding either 0.3 wt% iridium (Ir) or 0.3 wt% ruthenium (Ru) to the catalyst. In Fiscal Year 2009, work focused on examining the platinum group metal catalysts activity and stability at elevated pressures. In addition, simple and complex metal oxides are known to catalyze the sulfuric acid decomposition reaction. These metal oxides could offer activities comparable to platinum but at significantly reduced cost. Thus a second focus for Fiscal Year 2009 was to explore metal oxide catalysts for the sulfuric acid decomposition reaction. In Fiscal Year 2007 several commercial activated carbons had been identified for the HI decomposition reaction; a reaction specific to the S-I cycle. Those materials should be acceptable for the pilot scale project. The activated carbon catalysts have some disadvantages including low activity at the lower range of reactor operating temperature (350 to 400 C) and a propensity to generate carbon monoxide in the presence of water that could contaminate the hydrogen product, but due to limited funding, this area had low priority in Fiscal Year 2009. Fiscal Year 2009 catalyst work included five tasks: development, and testing of stabilized platinum based H2SO4 catalysts

  2. Dissolved oxygen removal in a column packed with catalyst

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Han Soo; Chung, Hong Suk; Cho, Young Hyun; Ahn, Do Hee; Kim, Eun Kee

    1996-01-01

    The dissolved oxygen removed by H 2 -O 2 reaction in column packed with various catalysts was examined. The catalysts employed were the prepared polymeric catalyst, platinum on activated carbon, and Lewatit OC-1045 which is available commercially. The column experiments with the prepared polymeric catalyst showed the dissolved oxygen reduced to 35 ppb which is below the limit in feel water of power plants. This implies the likely application of the prepared catalyst for practical use. The activated carbon required the pre-treatment for the removed of dissolved oxygen, since the surface of activated carbon contains much oxygen adsorbed initially. The Lewatit catalyst exposed the best performance, however, the aged one showed the gradual loss of catalytic activity due to degradation of resin catalyst. 14 refs., 6 figs., 2 tabs. (author)

  3. Platinum and palladium nano-structured catalysts for polymer electrolyte fuel cells and direct methanol fuel cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Long, Nguyen Viet; Thi, Cao Minh; Yong, Yang; Nogami, Masayuki; Ohtaki, Michitaka

    2013-07-01

    In this review, we present the synthesis and characterization of Pt, Pd, Pt based bimetallic and multi-metallic nanoparticles with mixture, alloy and core-shell structure for nano-catalysis, energy conversion, and fuel cells. Here, Pt and Pd nanoparticles with modified nanostructures can be controllably synthesized via chemistry and physics for their uses as electro-catalysts. The cheap base metal catalysts can be studied in the relationship of crystal structure, size, morphology, shape, and composition for new catalysts with low cost. Thus, Pt based alloy and core-shell catalysts can be prepared with the thin Pt and Pt-Pd shell, which are proposed in low and high temperature proton exchange membrane fuel cells (PEMFCs), and direct methanol fuel cells (DMFCs). We also present the survey of the preparation of Pt and Pd based catalysts for the better catalytic activity, high durability, and stability. The structural transformations, quantum-size effects, and characterization of Pt and Pd based catalysts in the size ranges of 30 nm (1-30 nm) are presented in electro-catalysis. In the size range of 10 nm (1-10 nm), the pure Pt catalyst shows very large surface area for electro-catalysis. To achieve homogeneous size distribution, the shaped synthesis of the polyhedral Pt nanoparticles is presented. The new concept of shaping specific shapes and morphologies in the entire nano-scale from nano to micro, such as polyhedral, cube, octahedra, tetrahedra, bar, rod, and others of the nanoparticles is proposed, especially for noble and cheap metals. The uniform Pt based nanosystems of surface structure, internal structure, shape, and morphology in the nanosized ranges are very crucial to next fuel cells. Finally, the modifications of Pt and Pd based catalysts of alloy, core-shell, and mixture structures lead to find high catalytic activity, durability, and stability for nano-catalysis, energy conversion, fuel cells, especially the next large-scale commercialization of next

  4. Electrocatalytic activity mapping of model fuel cell catalyst films using scanning electrochemical microscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nicholson, P.G.; Zhou, S.; Hinds, G.; Wain, A.J.; Turnbull, A.

    2009-01-01

    Scanning electrochemical microscopy has been employed to spatially map the electrocatalytic activity of model proton exchange membrane fuel cell (PEMFC) catalyst films towards the hydrogen oxidation reaction (the PEMFC anode reaction). The catalyst films were composed of platinum-loaded carbon nanoparticles, similar to those typically used in PEMFCs. The electrochemical characterisation was correlated with a detailed physical characterisation using dynamic light scattering, transmission electron microscopy and field-emission scanning electron microscopy. The nanoparticles were found to be reasonably mono-dispersed, with a tendency to agglomerate into porous bead-type structures when spun-cast. The number of carbon nanoparticles with little or no platinum was surprisingly higher than would be expected based on the platinum-carbon mass ratio. Furthermore, the platinum-rich carbon particles tended to agglomerate and the clusters formed were non-uniformly distributed. This morphology was reflected in a high degree of heterogeneity in the film activity towards the hydrogen oxidation reaction.

  5. Hydrogen storage behaviors of platinum-supported multi-walled carbon nanotubes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, Soo-Jin; Lee, Seul-Yi [Department of Chemistry, Inha University, 253 Nam-gu, Incheon 402-751 (Korea, Republic of)

    2010-12-15

    In this work, the hydrogen storage behaviors of multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWNTs) loaded by crystalline platinum (Pt) particles were studied. The microstructure of the Pt/MWNTs was characterized by X-ray diffraction and transmission electron microscopy. The pore structure and total pore volumes of the Pt/MWNTs were analyzed by N{sub 2}/77 K adsorption isotherms. The hydrogen storage capacity of the Pt/MWNTs was evaluated at 298 K and 100 bar. From the experimental results, it was found that Pt particles were homogeneously distributed on the MWNT surfaces. The amount of hydrogen storage capacity increased in proportion to the Pt content, with Pt-5/MWNTs exhibiting the largest hydrogen storage capacity. The superior amount of hydrogen storage was linked to an increase in the number of active sites and the optimum-controlled micropore volume for hydrogen adsorption due to the well-dispersed Pt particles. Therefore, it can be concluded that Pt particles play an important role in hydrogen storage characteristics due to the hydrogen spillover effect. (author)

  6. Platinum nano-cluster thin film formed on glassy carbon and the application for methanol oxidation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chang, Gang; Oyama, Munetaka; Hirao, Kazuyuki

    2007-01-01

    As an interesting platinum nanostructured material, a Pt nano-cluster film (PtNCF) attached on glassy carbon (GC) is reported. Through the reduction of PtCl 4 2- by ascorbic acid in the presence of GC substrate, a Pt thin continuous film composed of small nano-clusters which had a further agglomerated nanostructure of small grains could be attached on the GC surface. It was found that the electrocatalytic ability of PtNCF for the methanol oxidation was apparently higher than those of the Pt nano-clusters dispersedly attached on GC or indium in oxides. In addition, the electrocatalytic performance of PtNCF per Pt amount was superior to that of Pt black on GC. These results indicate that, in spite of the continuous nanostructures, nano-grains of PtNCF worked effectively for the catalytic electrolysis. The present PtNCF can be regarded as an interesting thin film material, which can be easily prepared by one-step chemical reduction

  7. Process for the separation and recovery of palladium and platinum from spent automobile catalyst leach liquor using LIX 84I and Alamine 336.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reddy, B Ramachandra; Raju, B; Lee, Jin Young; Park, Hyung Kyu

    2010-08-15

    Spent catalysts from automobile industry contain environmentally critical and economically valuable metals such as Pt, Pd, Fe, Ni, Mn, and Cr. In this paper, we present a process for the selective separation and complete recovery of palladium (Pd) and platinum (Pt) from hydrochloric acid leach liquors of spent automobile catalyst employing solvent extraction method. Typical composition of leach liquor used for the present study contains (mg/L): Pd-150, Pt-550, Mn-500, Ni-1000, Fe-1500, Cr-100 and 3 M HCl. Selective separation of Pd from the leach liquor is achieved with 0.5 vol.% LIX 84I (2-hydroxy-5-nonylacetophenone oxime in a mixture with a high flash point hydrocarbon diluent) in kerosene at an aqueous to organic (A/O) ratio of 3 in 2 stages, with an enrichment factor of three. Quantitative stripping of Pd from loaded organic is achieved with 0.5 M thiourea and 1 M HCl. Co-extraction of Fe and Pt with 5 vol.% Alamine 336 (tertiary amine of mixed tri-octyl/decyl amine) in kerosene followed by selective scrubbing of Fe with dilute HCl and complete stripping of Pt from loaded organic was proposed with 0.5 M thiourea and 0.1 M HCl. Purity of Pd and Pt strip solutions are 99.7%. Finally, the present process can solve environmental related issues and at the same time recover valuable metals in pure form. Copyright 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. Facile synthesis of a platinum-lead oxide nanocomposite catalyst with high activity and durability for ethanol electrooxidation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Wei-Hua; Wang, Hong-Hui; Chen, De-Hao; Zhou, Zhi-You; Sun, Shi-Gang

    2012-12-21

    Aimed at searching for highly active and stable nano-scale Pt-based catalysts that can improve significantly the energy conversion efficiency of direct ethanol fuel cells (DEFCs), a novel Pt-PbO(x) nanocomposite (Pt-PbO(x) NC) catalyst with a mean size of 3.23 nm was synthesized through a simple wet chemistry method without using a surfactant, organometallic precursors and high temperature. Electrocatalytic tests demonstrated that the as-prepared Pt-PbO(x) NC catalyst possesses a much higher catalytic activity and a longer durability than Pt nanoparticles (nm-Pt) and commercial Pt black catalysts for ethanol electrooxidation. For instance, Pt-PbO(x) NC showed an onset potential that was 30 mV and 44 mV less positive, together with a peak current density 1.7 and 2.6 times higher than those observed for nm-Pt and Pt black catalysts in the cyclic voltammogram tests. The ratio of current densities per unit Pt mass on Pt-PbO(x) NC, nm-Pt and Pt black catalysts is 27.3 : 3.4 : 1 for the long-term (2 hours) chronoamperometric experiments measured at -0.4 V (vs. SCE). In situ FTIR spectroscopic studies revealed that the activity of breaking C-C bonds of ethanol of the Pt-PbO(x) NC is as high as 5.17 times that of the nm-Pt, which illustrates a high efficiency of ethanol oxidation to CO(2) on the as-prepared Pt-PbO(x) NC catalyst.

  9. Enhanced life of proton exchange membrane fuel cell catalysts using perfluorosulfonic acid stabilized carbon support

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cheng Niancai; Mu Shichun; Chen Xiaojing; Lv Haifeng; Pan Mu; Edwards, Peter P.

    2011-01-01

    We report a new and simple solution to increase life of Pt/C catalysts using the proton-conducting polymer (perfluorosulfonic acid, PFSA) stabilized carbon support (denoted these catalysts as Pt/NFC catalysts) as compared to conventional Pt/C catalysts commonly used in PEM fuel cells. A high catalytic activity of the catalyst is observed by both CV (cyclic voltammetry) and ORR (oxygen reduction reaction) measurements. Especially, our own catalysts have a 60% better life as compared to Pt/C under electrochemically accelerated durability test conditions. The loss rate of electrochemical active area (ECA) for Pt/NFC catalysts is only 0.007 m 2 g -1 cycle -1 , compared to a value of 0.011 m 2 g -1 cycle -1 for Pt/C.

  10. Enhanced life of proton exchange membrane fuel cell catalysts using perfluorosulfonic acid stabilized carbon support

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cheng Niancai [State Key Laboratory of Advanced Technology for Materials Synthesis and Processing, Wuhan University of Technology, 430070 (China); Mu Shichun, E-mail: msc@whut.edu.c [State Key Laboratory of Advanced Technology for Materials Synthesis and Processing, Wuhan University of Technology, 430070 (China); Department of Chemistry, Inorganic Chemistry Laboratory, University of Oxford, South Parks Road, OX1 3QR (United Kingdom); Chen Xiaojing; Lv Haifeng; Pan Mu [State Key Laboratory of Advanced Technology for Materials Synthesis and Processing, Wuhan University of Technology, 430070 (China); Edwards, Peter P. [Department of Chemistry, Inorganic Chemistry Laboratory, University of Oxford, South Parks Road, OX1 3QR (United Kingdom)

    2011-02-01

    We report a new and simple solution to increase life of Pt/C catalysts using the proton-conducting polymer (perfluorosulfonic acid, PFSA) stabilized carbon support (denoted these catalysts as Pt/NFC catalysts) as compared to conventional Pt/C catalysts commonly used in PEM fuel cells. A high catalytic activity of the catalyst is observed by both CV (cyclic voltammetry) and ORR (oxygen reduction reaction) measurements. Especially, our own catalysts have a 60% better life as compared to Pt/C under electrochemically accelerated durability test conditions. The loss rate of electrochemical active area (ECA) for Pt/NFC catalysts is only 0.007 m{sup 2} g{sup -1} cycle{sup -1}, compared to a value of 0.011 m{sup 2} g{sup -1} cycle{sup -1} for Pt/C.

  11. Ferromagnetic resonance of cobalt nanoparticles used as a catalyst for the carbon nanotubes synthesis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Duraia, El-Shazly M. [Suez Canal University, Faculty of Science, Physics Department, Ismailia (Egypt); Al-Farabi Kazakh National University, Almaty (Kazakhstan); Institute of Physics and Technology, Almaty (Kazakhstan)], E-mail: duraia_physics@yahoo.com; Abdullin, Kh.A. [Institute of Physics and Technology, Almaty (Kazakhstan)

    2009-12-15

    Catalyst is considered to be the most crucial parameter for the growth of carbon nanotubes. In this work we study the ferromagnetic resonance (FMR) spectra of the catalyst nanoclusters. Moreover we report for the first time the angle FMR studies of catalyst particles with and without CNT layer. The dependencies of the FMR spectra, X-ray diffraction (XRD) patterns, Raman spectra and morphology of the CNT layers on the growth conditions are discussed.

  12. Platinum-group elements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zientek, Michael L.; Loferski, Patricia J.; Parks, Heather L.; Schulte, Ruth F.; Seal, Robert R.; Schulz, Klaus J.; DeYoung,, John H.; Seal, Robert R.; Bradley, Dwight C.

    2017-12-19

    The platinum-group elements (PGEs)—platinum, palladium, rhodium, ruthenium, iridium, and osmium—are metals that have similar physical and chemical properties and tend to occur together in nature. PGEs are indispensable to many industrial applications but are mined in only a few places. The availability and accessibility of PGEs could be disrupted by economic, environmental, political, and social events. The United States net import reliance as a percentage of apparent consumption is about 90 percent.PGEs have many industrial applications. They are used in catalytic converters to reduce carbon monoxide, hydrocarbon, and nitrous oxide emissions in automobile exhaust. The chemical industry requires platinum or platinum-rhodium alloys to manufacture nitric oxide, which is the raw material used to manufacture explosives, fertilizers, and nitric acid. In the petrochemical industry, platinum-supported catalysts are needed to refine crude oil and to produce aromatic compounds and high-octane gasoline. Alloys of PGEs are exceptionally hard and durable, making them the best known coating for industrial crucibles used in the manufacture of chemicals and synthetic materials. PGEs are used by the glass manufacturing industry in the production of fiberglass and flat-panel and liquid crystal displays. In the electronics industry, PGEs are used in computer hard disks, hybridized integrated circuits, and multilayer ceramic capacitors.Aside from their industrial applications, PGEs are used in such other fields as health, consumer goods, and finance. Platinum, for example, is used in medical implants, such as pacemakers, and PGEs are used in cancer-fighting drugs. Platinum alloys are an ideal choice for jewelry because of their white color, strength, and resistance to tarnish. Platinum, palladium, and rhodium in the form of coins and bars are also used as investment commodities, and various financial instruments based on the value of these PGEs are traded on major exchanges

  13. The effect of alkaline doped catalysts on the CVD synthesis of carbon nanotubes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nemeth, Krisztian; Nemeth, Zoltan; Fejes, Dora

    2011-01-01

    The aim of this work was to develop new doped catalysts for chemical vapour deposition (CVD) synthesis in order to increase the quantity and quality of carbon nanotubes (CNTs). Doping compounds such as CsBr, CsCl, KBr and KCl were used to reach higher carbon deposit and carbon yield. The amount o...... of the dopant alkali compounds varied from 1 to 5%. As prepared CNTs were characterized by transmission electron microscopy (TEM), X‐ray diffraction (XRD) and Raman microscopy. Results revealed that both carbon yield and deposit could be increased over doped catalysts.......The aim of this work was to develop new doped catalysts for chemical vapour deposition (CVD) synthesis in order to increase the quantity and quality of carbon nanotubes (CNTs). Doping compounds such as CsBr, CsCl, KBr and KCl were used to reach higher carbon deposit and carbon yield. The amount...

  14. Fabrication of Fischer-Tropsch Catalysts by Deposition of Iron Nanocrystals on Carbon Nanotubes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Casavola, Marianna; Hermannsdoerfer, Justus; de Jonge, Niels; Dugulan, A. Iulian; de Jong, Krijn P.

    2015-01-01

    The fabrication of supported catalysts consisting of colloidal iron oxide nanocrystals with tunable size, geometry, and loadinghomogeneously dispersed on carbon nanotube (CNT) supportsis described herein. The catalyst synthesis is performed in a two-step approach. First, colloidal iron and iron

  15. The role of Ni in sulfided carbon-supported Ni-Mo hydrodesulfurization catalysts

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bouwens, S.M.A.M.; Barthe-Zahir, N.; Beer, de V.H.J.; Prins, R.

    1991-01-01

    The thiophene hydrodesulfurization activities of Ni and Ni---Mo sulfide catalysts supported on activated carbon were measured at atmospheric pressure and the catalyst structures were studied by means of X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, dynamic oxygen chemisorption, and chemical sulfur analysis. The

  16. Exposure of metallic copper surface on Cu-Al2O3-carbon catalysts

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Menon, P.G.; Prasad, J.

    1970-01-01

    The bifunctional nature of Cu---Al2O3-on-carbon catalysts, used in the direct catalytic conversion of ethanol to ethyl acetate, prompted an examination of the dispersion of Cu on the composite catalyst. For this, the N2O-method of Osinga et al. for estimation of bare metallic copper surface on

  17. Carbon Nanofiber Supported Transition-Metal Carbide Catalysts for the Hydrodeoxygenation of Guaiacol

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jongerius, A.; Gosselink, R.W.; Dijkstra, J.; Bitter, J.H.; Bruijnincx, P.C.A.; Weckhuysen, B.M.

    2013-01-01

    Hydrodeoxygenation (HDO) studies over carbon nanofiber-supported (CNF) W2C and Mo2C catalysts were performed on guaiacol, a prototypical substrate to evaluate the potential of a catalyst for valorization of depolymerized lignin streams. Typical reactions were executed at 55 bar hydrogen pressure

  18. Catalyst functionalized buffer sorbent pebbles for rapid separation of carbon dioxide from gas mixtures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aines, Roger D

    2015-03-31

    A method for separating CO.sub.2 from gas mixtures uses a slurried media impregnated with buffer compounds and coating the solid media with a catalyst or enzyme that promotes the transformation of CO.sub.2 to carbonic acid. Buffer sorbent pebbles with a catalyst or enzyme coating are provided for rapid separation of CO.sub.2 from gas mixtures.

  19. Influence of the catalyst type on the growth of carbon nanotubes via methane chemical vapor deposition

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jodin, Lucie; Dupuis, Anne-Claire; Rouvière, Emmanuelle; Reiss, Peter

    2006-01-01

    The preparation of the catalyst is one of the key parameters which governs the quality of carbon nanotubes (CNTs) grown by catalyzed chemical vapor deposition (CVD). We investigated the influence of three different procedures of catalyst preparation on the type and diameter of CNTs formed under

  20. Catalyst functionalized buffer sorbent pebbles for rapid separation of carbon dioxide from gas mixtures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aines, Roger D.

    2013-03-12

    A method for separating CO.sub.2 from gas mixtures uses a slurried media impregnated with buffer compounds and coating the solid media with a catalyst or enzyme that promotes the transformation of CO.sub.2 to carbonic acid. Buffer sorbent pebbles with a catalyst or enzyme coating are provided for rapid separation of CO.sub.2 from gas mixtures.

  1. Platinum metals in the environment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zereini, Fathi [Frankfurt Univ. (Germany). Dept. of Environmental Analytical Chemistry; Wiseman, Clare L.S. (ed.) [Toronto Univ. (Canada). School of the Environment

    2015-03-01

    This book contains the five chapters with the following topics: 1. SOURCES OF PGE EMISSIONS ELEMENTS: Sources of Platinum Group Elements (PGE) in the Environment; Impact of Platinum Group Element Emissions from Mining and Production Activities. 2. ANALYTICAL METHODS FOR THE DETERMINATION OF PGE IN BIOLOGICAL AND ENVIRONMENTAL MATRICES: Appraisal of Biosorption for Recovery, Separation and Determination of Platinum, Palladium and Rhodium in Environmental Samples; On the Underestimated Factors Influencing the Accuracy of Determination of Pt and Pd by Electrothermal Atomic Absorption Spectrometry in Road Dust Samples; Application of Solid Sorbents for Enrichment and Separation of Platinum Metal Ions; Voltammetric Analysis of Platinum in Environmental Matrices; Speciation Analysis of Chloroplatinates; Analysis of Platinum Group Elements in Environmental Samples: A Review. 3. OCCURRENCE, CHEMICAL BEHAVIOR AND FATE OF PGE IN THE ENVIRONMENT: Brazilian PGE Research Data Survey on Urban and Roadside Soils; Platinum, Palladium and Rhodium in a Bavarian Roadside Soil; Increase of Platinum Group Element Concentrations in Soils and Airborne Dust During the Period of Vehicular Exhaust Catalysts Introduction; Platinum-Group Elements in Urban Fluvial Bed Sediments-Hawaii; Long-Term Monitoring of Palladium and Platinum Contents in Road Dust of the City of Munich, Germany; Characterization of PGEs and Other Elements in Road Dusts and Airborne Particles in Houston, Texas; Accumulation and Distribution of Pt and Pd in Roadside Dust, Soil and Vegetation in Bulgaria; Increase of the Environmental Pt Concentration in the Metropolitan Area of Mexico City Associated to the Use of Automobile Catalytic Converters; Solubility of Emitted Platinum Group Elements (Pt, Pd and Rh) in Airborne Particulate Matter (PM10) in the Presence of Organic Complexing Agents; The Influence of Anionic Species (Cl{sup -}, NO{sub 3}{sup -}, SO{sub 4}{sup 2-}) on the Transformation and Solubility of Platinum in

  2. Electrochemical deposition and characterization of platinum on carbon paper and Ni foam

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Louw, E

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available There are various methods used to prepare fuel cell (FC) catalysts. The electrochemical deposition method is well known for the fabrication of nanostructured catalysts for energy materials. Electrochemical atomic layer deposition (ECALD) method...

  3. Hydrogen Temperature-Programmed Desorption in Platinum Catalysts: Decomposition and Isotopic Exchange by Spillover Hydrogen of Chemisorbed Ammonia.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Koningsberger, D.C.; Miller, J.T.; Meyers, B.L.; Barr, M.K.; Modica, F.S.

    1996-01-01

    H{2}-TPD of Pt/alumina catalysts display multiple hydrogendesorptions. In addition to chemisorbed hydrogen (Peak I) atapproximately 175}o{C, there is a small hydrogen desorption (PeakII) at about 250}o{C and a large, irreversible hydrogen desorption(Peak III) at 450}o{C. The quantity of hydrogen

  4. Oxidation catalyst

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ceyer, Sylvia T.; Lahr, David L.

    2010-11-09

    The present invention generally relates to catalyst systems and methods for oxidation of carbon monoxide. The invention involves catalyst compositions which may be advantageously altered by, for example, modification of the catalyst surface to enhance catalyst performance. Catalyst systems of the present invention may be capable of performing the oxidation of carbon monoxide at relatively lower temperatures (e.g., 200 K and below) and at relatively higher reaction rates than known catalysts. Additionally, catalyst systems disclosed herein may be substantially lower in cost than current commercial catalysts. Such catalyst systems may be useful in, for example, catalytic converters, fuel cells, sensors, and the like.

  5. Atomic platinum layer coated titanium copper nitride supported on carbon nanotubes for the methanol oxidation reaction

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Zheng, Y

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available measurements. The results confirm the core-shell structure of the prepared TiN@Pt/CNTs catalyst. More importantly, the catalyst exhibits superb mass activity and durability for the methanol oxidation reaction (MOR) than that of the commercial JM Pt/C catalyst...

  6. Pt -based anode catalysts for direct ethanol fuel cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hoyos, Bibian; Sanchez, Carlos; Gonzalez, Javier

    2007-01-01

    In this work it is studied the electro-catalytic behavior of pure platinum and platinum-based alloys with Ru, Sn, Ir, and Os supported on carbon to the ethanol electro-oxidation in aims to develop anodic catalysts for direct ethanol fuel cells, additionally, porous electrodes and membrane electrode assemblies were built for proton exchange membrane fuel cells in which the electrodes were tested. Catalysts characterization was made by cyclic voltammetry whereas the fuel cells behavior tests were made by current-potential polarization curves. in general, all alloys show a lower on-set reaction potential and a higher catalytic activity than pure platinum. However, in the high over potential zone, pure platinum has higher catalytic activity than the alloys. In agreement with these results, the alloys studied here could be useful in fuel cells operating on moderated and low current

  7. Nitrogen-Doped Carbon Encapsulated Nickel/Cobalt Nanoparticle Catalysts for Olefin Migration of Allylarenes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kramer, Søren; Mielby, Jerrik Jørgen; Buss, Kasper Spanggård

    2017-01-01

    Olefin migration of allylarenes is typically performed with precious metal-based homogeneous catalysts. In contrast, very limited progress has been made using cheap, earth-abundant base metals as heterogeneous catalysts for these transformations - in spite of the obvious economic and environmental...... advantages. Herein, we report on the use of an easily prepared heterogeneous catalyst material for the migration of olefins, in particular allylarenes. The catalyst material consists of nickel/cobalt alloy nanoparticles encapsulated in nitrogen-doped carbon shells. The encapsulated nanoparticles are stable...

  8. Platinum nanoparticles decorated dendrite-like gold nanostructure on glassy carbon electrodes for enhancing electrocatalysis performance to glucose oxidation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jia, Hongmei [Hubei Collaborative Innovation Center for Advanced Organic Chemical Materials, Ministry-of-Education Key Laboratory for the Green Preparation and Application of Functional Materials, School of Materials Science and Engineering, Hubei University, No. 368 Youyi Avenue, Wuchang, Wuhan 430062 (China); Chang, Gang, E-mail: changgang@hubu.edu.cn [Hubei Collaborative Innovation Center for Advanced Organic Chemical Materials, Ministry-of-Education Key Laboratory for the Green Preparation and Application of Functional Materials, School of Materials Science and Engineering, Hubei University, No. 368 Youyi Avenue, Wuchang, Wuhan 430062 (China); Lei, Ming [State Key Laboratory of Information Photonics and Optical Communications, Beijing University of Posts and Telecommunications, Beijing 100876 (China); He, Hanping [College of Chemistry and Chemical Engineer, Hubei University, Youyi Road 368, Wuchang, Wuhan, Hubei 430062 (China); Liu, Xiong; Shu, Honghui; Xia, Tiantian; Su, Jie [Hubei Collaborative Innovation Center for Advanced Organic Chemical Materials, Ministry-of-Education Key Laboratory for the Green Preparation and Application of Functional Materials, School of Materials Science and Engineering, Hubei University, No. 368 Youyi Avenue, Wuchang, Wuhan 430062 (China); He, Yunbin, E-mail: ybhe@hubu.edu.cn [Hubei Collaborative Innovation Center for Advanced Organic Chemical Materials, Ministry-of-Education Key Laboratory for the Green Preparation and Application of Functional Materials, School of Materials Science and Engineering, Hubei University, No. 368 Youyi Avenue, Wuchang, Wuhan 430062 (China)

    2016-10-30

    Highlights: • Pt/DGNs/GC composites were obtained via a clean and facile method without any templates, surfactants, or stabilizers. • Controlling chemical reduction deposition time, the amount of platinum nanoparticles on Au surface could be regulated, which further tuned electrocatalytic properties toward glucose oxidation. • The obtained Pt/DGNs/GC composites with high electrochemical active surface area (ECSA) show superior electrocatalytic activity to glucose. • The sensor based on Pt/DGNs/GC exhibited excellent sensitivity, selectivity and stability for nonenzymatic glucose detection. - Abstract: Platinum nanoparticles decorated dendrite-like gold nanostructure, bimetal composite materials on glassy carbon electrode (Pt/DGNs/GC) for enhancing electrocatalysis to glucose oxidation was designed and successfully fabricated by a facile two-step deposition method without any templates, surfactants, or stabilizers. Dendrite-like gold nanostructure was firstly deposited on the GC electrode via the potentiostatic method, and then platinum nanoparticles were decorated on the surface of gold substrate through chemical reduction deposition. X-ray diffraction (XRD), field-emission scanning electron microscope (FE-SEM), energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDS) were applied to characterize the evolution of morphology and structure of the as-prepared Pt/DGNs/GC. Based on electrochemical measurements such as cyclic voltammetry, linear voltammetry and chronoamperometry, Pt/DGNs/GC exhibited significantly enhanced electrocatalytic performance to glucose oxidation compared those of pure dendrite-like Au nanoparticles in our previous report. Controlling chemical reduction deposition time, the amount of platinum nanoparticles on Au surface could be regulated, which further tuned electrocatalytic properties toward glucose oxidation. The dendrite-like gold surface partially covered by platinum nanoparticles dramatically enhanced the electrocatalytic performance for the

  9. Mild in situ growth of platinum nanoparticles on multiwalled carbon nanotube-poly (vinyl alcohol) hydrogel electrode for glucose electrochemical oxidation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, Shumin; Zheng, Yudong, E-mail: zhengyudong@mater.ustb.edu.cn; Qiao, Kun [University of Science and Technology Beijing, School of Material Science and Engineering (China); Su, Lei [University of Science and Technology Beijing, School of Chemistry and Biological Engineering (China); Sanghera, Amendeep; Song, Wenhui [University College London, UCL Centre for Nanotechnology & Regenerative Medicine, Division of Surgery and Interventional Science (United Kingdom); Yue, Lina; Sun, Yi [University of Science and Technology Beijing, School of Material Science and Engineering (China)

    2015-12-15

    This investigation describes an effective strategy to fabricate an electrochemically active hybrid hydrogel made from platinum nanoparticles that are highly dense, uniformly dispersed, and tightly embedded throughout the conducting hydrogel network for the electrochemical oxidation of glucose. A suspension of multiwalled carbon nanotubes and polyvinyl alcohol aqueous was coated on glassy carbon electrode by electrophoretic deposition and then physically crosslinked to form a three-dimensional porous conductive hydrogel network by a process of freezing and thawing. The network offered 3D interconnected mass-transport channels (around 200 nm) and confined nanotemplates for in situ growth of uniform platinum nanoparticles via the moderate reduction agent, ascorbic acid. The resulting hybrid hydrogel electrode membrane demonstrates an effective method for loading platinum nanoparticles on multiwalled carbon nanotubes by the electrostatic adsorption between multiwalled carbon nanotubes and platinum ions within porous hydrogel network. The average diameter of platinum nanoparticles is 37 ± 14 nm, which is less than the particle size by only using the moderate reduction agent. The hybrid hydrogel electrode membrane-coated glassy carbon electrode showed excellent electrocatalytic activity and good long-term stability toward glucose electrochemical oxidation. The glucose oxidation current exhibited a linear relationship with the concentration of glucose in the presence of chloride ions, promising for potential applications of implantable biofuel cells, biosensors, and electronic devices.

  10. Fabrication and Characterization of New Composite Tio2 Carbon Nanofiber Anodic Catalyst Support for Direct Methanol Fuel Cell via Electrospinning Method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdullah, N.; Kamarudin, S. K.; Shyuan, L. K.; Karim, N. A.

    2017-12-01

    Platinum (Pt) is the common catalyst used in a direct methanol fuel cell (DMFC). However, Pt can lead towards catalyst poisoning by carbonaceous species, thus reduces the performance of DMFC. Thus, this study focuses on the fabrication of a new composite TiO2 carbon nanofiber anodic catalyst support for direct methanol fuel cells (DMFCs) via electrospinning technique. The distance between the tip and the collector (DTC) and the flow rate were examined as influencing parameters in the electrospinning technique. To ensure that the best catalytic material is fabricated, the nanofiber underwent several characterizations and electrochemical tests, including FTIR, XRD, FESEM, TEM, and cyclic voltammetry. The results show that D18, fabricated with a flow rate of 0.1 mLhr-1 and DTC of 18 cm, is an ultrafine nanofiber with the smallest average diameter, 136.73 ± 39.56 nm. It presented the highest catalyst activity and electrochemical active surface area value as 274.72 mAmg-1 and 226.75m2 g-1 PtRu, respectively, compared with the other samples.

  11. Process intensification by combination of activated carbon supported catalysts and alternative energy sources

    OpenAIRE

    Calvino Casilda, Vanesa; Pérez-Mayoral, E.

    2014-01-01

    [EN] Activated carbons are well known for their catalytic properties and for being used as a catalyst support in heterogeneous catalysis. Activated carbons possess most of the desired properties of a catalyst support; inertness towards unwanted reactions, stability under regeneration and reaction conditions, suitable mechanical properties, tunable surface area, porosity, and the possibility of being manufactured in different size and shape. On the other hand, the in...

  12. Studies on PEM fuel cell noble metal catalyst dissolution

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, S. M.; Grahl-Madsen, L.; Skou, E. M.

    2011-01-01

    A combination of electrochemical, spectroscopic and gravimetric methods was carried out on Proton Exchange Membrane (PEM) fuel cell electrodes with the focus on platinum and ruthenium catalysts dissolution, and the membrane degradation. In cyclic voltammetry (CV) experiments, the noble metals were...... found to dissolve in 1 M sulfuric acid solution and the dissolution increased exponentially with the upper potential limit (UPL) between 0.6 and 1.6 vs. RHE. 2-20% of the Pt (depending on the catalyst type) was found to be dissolved during the experiments. Under the same conditions, 30-100% of the Ru...... (depending on the catalyst type) was found to be dissolved. The faster dissolution of ruthenium compared to platinum in the alloy type catalysts was also confirmed by X-ray diffraction measurements. The dissolution of the carbon supported catalyst was found one order of magnitude higher than the unsupported...

  13. Selective deposition of catalyst nanoparticles using the gravitational force for carbon nanotubes interconnect

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Do-Yoon; Lee, Hyun-Chul; Lee, Jong-Hak; Park, Jae-Hong; Alegaonkar, Prashant S. [Center for Nanotubes and Nanostructured Composites, Sungkyunkwan University, 300 Chunchun-dong, Jangan-Gu, Suwon, 440-746 (Korea, Republic of); Yoo, Ji-Beom [Center for Nanotubes and Nanostructured Composites, Sungkyunkwan University, 300 Chunchun-dong, Jangan-Gu, Suwon, 440-746 (Korea, Republic of)], E-mail: jbyoo@skku.ac.kr; Han, In-Taek; Kim, Ha-Jin; Jin, Yong-Wan; Kim, Jong-Min [Samsung Advanced Institute of Technology, Mt. 14-1, Nongseo-dong, Giheung-gu, Younggin-si Gyunggi-do, 449-712 (Korea, Republic of); Kwon, Kee-Won [Department of Semiconducting System, Sungkyunkwan University (Korea, Republic of)

    2008-04-01

    The photolithography process has generally been used for the making of catalyst layers used for the synthesis of CNTs due to its comparative ease. However, this method results in the formation of undesirable catalyst particles, which deteriorate the quality of the devices. Therefore, we tried to form a catalyst layer without using any lift-off or wet etching process, especially for the formation of carbon nanotube interconnects. After spin coating the samples, which were previously fabricated with several vias, with an iron-acetate solution, the catalyst layer was pulled down into the bottom of the holes through the force of gravity. We were able to remove the catalyst layer which was coated over undesirable areas, by TMAH (tetramethylammonium hydroxide, N(CH{sub 3}){sub 4}OH) treatment. After the catalyst deposition process, we synthesized CNTs and observed them by scanning electron microscopy (SEM)

  14. Design of Highly Selective Platinum Nanoparticle Catalysts for the Aerobic Oxidation of KA-Oil using Continuous-Flow Chemistry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gill, Arran M; Hinde, Christopher S; Leary, Rowan K; Potter, Matthew E; Jouve, Andrea; Wells, Peter P; Midgley, Paul A; Thomas, John M; Raja, Robert

    2016-03-08

    Highly active and selective aerobic oxidation of KA-oil to cyclohexanone (precursor for adipic acid and ɛ-caprolactam) has been achieved in high yields using continuous-flow chemistry by utilizing uncapped noble-metal (Au, Pt & Pd) nanoparticle catalysts. These are prepared using a one-step in situ methodology, within three-dimensional porous molecular architectures, to afford robust heterogeneous catalysts. Detailed spectroscopic characterization of the nature of the active sites at the molecular level, coupled with aberration-corrected scanning transmission electron microscopy, reveals that the synthetic methodology and associated activation procedures play a vital role in regulating the morphology, shape and size of the metal nanoparticles. These active centers have a profound influence on the activation of molecular oxygen for selective catalytic oxidations. © 2016 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  15. Platinum Iron Intermetallic Nanoparticles Supported on Carbon Formed In Situ by High-Pressure Pyrolysis for Efficient Oxygen Reduction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hu, Yang; Jensen, Jens Oluf; Zhang, Wei

    2016-01-01

    Carbon-supported PtFe alloy catalysts are synthesized by the one-step, high-temperature pyrolysis of Pt, Fe, and C precursors. As a result of the high temperature, the formed PtFe nanoparticles possess highly ordered, face-centered tetragonal, intermetallic structures with a mean size of ≈11.8 nm....... At 0.9 V versus the reversible hydrogen electrode, the PtFe nanoparticles show a 6.8 times higher specific activity than the reference Pt/C catalyst towards the oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) as well as excellent stability, most likely because of the durable intermetallic structure and the preleaching...... treatment of the catalyst. During these preliminary syntheses, we found that a portion of the PtFe nanoparticles is buried in the in situ formed carbon phase, which limits Pt utilization in the catalyst and results in a mass-specific activity equivalent to the commercial Pt/C catalyst. Moreover...

  16. Physicochemical investigations of carbon nanofiber supported Cu/ZrO{sub 2} catalyst

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Din, Israf Ud, E-mail: drisraf@yahoo.com, E-mail: maizats@petronas.com.my; Shaharun, Maizatul S., E-mail: drisraf@yahoo.com, E-mail: maizats@petronas.com.my [Department of Fundamental and Applied Sciences, Universiti Teknologi PETRONAS (Malaysia); Subbarao, Duvvuri, E-mail: duvvuri-subbarao@petronas.com.my [Department of Chemical Engineering, Universiti Teknologi PETRONAS (Malaysia); Naeem, A., E-mail: naeeem64@yahoo.com [National Centre of Excellence in Physical Chemistry, University of Peshawar (Pakistan)

    2014-10-24

    Zirconia-promoted copper/carbon nanofiber catalysts (Cu‐ZrO{sub 2}/CNF) were prepared by the sequential deposition precipitation method. The Herringbone type of carbon nanofiber GNF-100 (Graphite nanofiber) was used as a catalyst support. Carbon nanofiber was oxidized to (CNF-O) with 5% and 65 % concentration of nitric acid (HNO{sub 3}). The CNF activated with 5% HNO{sub 3} produced higher surface area which is 155 m{sup 2}/g. The catalyst was characterized by X-ray Diffraction (XRD), Fourier Transform Infra-Red (FTIR) and N{sub 2} adsorption-desorption. The results showed that increase of HNO{sub 3} concentration reduced the surface area and porosity of the catalyst.

  17. Nitrogen-doped carbon-supported cobalt-iron oxygen reduction catalyst

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zelenay, Piotr; Wu, Gang

    2014-04-29

    A Fe--Co hybrid catalyst for oxygen reaction reduction was prepared by a two part process. The first part involves reacting an ethyleneamine with a cobalt-containing precursor to form a cobalt-containing complex, combining the cobalt-containing complex with an electroconductive carbon supporting material, heating the cobalt-containing complex and carbon supporting material under conditions suitable to convert the cobalt-containing complex and carbon supporting material into a cobalt-containing catalyst support. The second part of the process involves polymerizing an aniline in the presence of said cobalt-containing catalyst support and an iron-containing compound under conditions suitable to form a supported, cobalt-containing, iron-bound polyaniline species, and subjecting said supported, cobalt-containing, iron bound polyaniline species to conditions suitable for producing a Fe--Co hybrid catalyst.

  18. Ganoderma-Like MoS2 /NiS2 with Single Platinum Atoms Doping as an Efficient and Stable Hydrogen Evolution Reaction Catalyst.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guan, Yongxin; Feng, Yangyang; Wan, Jing; Yang, Xiaohui; Fang, Ling; Gu, Xiao; Liu, Ruirui; Huang, Zhengyong; Li, Jian; Luo, Jun; Li, Changming; Wang, Yu

    2018-05-27

    Herein, a unique ganoderma-like MoS 2 /NiS 2 hetero-nanostructure with isolated Pt atoms anchored is reported. This novel ganoderma-like heterostructure can not only efficiently disperse and confine the few-layer MoS 2 nanosheets to fully expose the edge sites of MoS 2 , and provide more opportunity to capture the Pt atoms, but also tune the electronic structure to modify the catalytic activity. Because of the favorable dispersibility and exposed large specific surface area, single Pt atoms can be easily anchored on MoS 2 nanosheets with ultrahigh loading of 1.8 at% (the highest is 1.3 at% to date). Owing to the ganoderma-like structure and platinum atoms doping, this catalyst shows Pt-like catalytic activity for the hydrogen evolution reaction with an ultralow overpotential of 34 mV and excellent durability of only 2% increase in overpotential for 72 h under the constant current density of 10 mA cm -2 . © 2018 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  19. Engineering catalytic activity via ion beam bombardment of catalyst supports for vertically aligned carbon nanotube growth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Islam, A. E.; Nikolaev, P.; Amama, P. B.; Zakharov, D.; Sargent, G.; Saber, S.; Huffman, D.; Erford, M.; Semiatin, S. L.; Stach, E. A.; Maruyama, B.

    2015-09-01

    Carbon nanotube growth depends on the catalytic activity of metal nanoparticles on alumina or silica supports. The control on catalytic activity is generally achieved by variations in water concentration, carbon feed, and sample placement on a few types of alumina or silica catalyst supports obtained via thin film deposition. We have recently expanded the choice of catalyst supports by engineering inactive substrates like c-cut sapphire via ion beam bombardment. The deterministic control on the structure and chemistry of catalyst supports obtained by tuning the degree of beam-induced damage have enabled better regulation of the activity of Fe catalysts only in the ion beam bombarded areas and hence enabled controllable super growth of carbon nanotubes. A wide range of surface characterization techniques were used to monitor the catalytically active surface engineered via ion beam bombardment. The proposed method offers a versatile way to control carbon nanotube growth in patterned areas and also enhances the current understanding of the growth process. With the right choice of water concentration, carbon feed and sample placement, engineered catalyst supports may extend the carbon nanotube growth yield to a level that is even higher than the ones reported here, and thus offers promising applications of carbon nanotubes in electronics, heat exchanger, and energy storage.

  20. Functionalized Natural Carbon-Supported Nanoparticles as Excellent Catalysts for Hydrocarbon Production.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Jian; Guo, Lisheng; Ma, Qingxiang; Gao, Xinhua; Yamane, Noriyuki; Xu, Hengyong; Tsubaki, Noritatsu

    2017-02-01

    We report a one-pot and eco-friendly synthesis of carbon-supported cobalt nanoparticles, achieved by carbonization of waste biomass (rice bran) with a cobalt source. The functionalized biomass provides carbon microspheres as excellent catalyst support, forming a unique interface between hydrophobic and hydrophilic groups. The latter, involving hydroxyl and amino groups, can catch much more active cobalt nanoparticles on surface for Fischer-Tropsch synthesis than chemical carbon. The loading amount of cobalt on the final catalyst is much higher than that prepared with a chemical carbon source, such as glucose. The proposed concept of using a functionalized natural carbon source shows great potential compared with conventional carbon sources, and will be meaningful for other fields concerning carbon support, such as heterogeneous catalysis or electrochemical fields. © 2017 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  1. Flame synthesis of carbon nano onions using liquefied petroleum gas without catalyst

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dhand, Vivek; Prasad, J. Sarada; Rao, M. Venkateswara; Bharadwaj, S.; Anjaneyulu, Y.; Jain, Pawan Kumar

    2013-01-01

    Densely agglomerated, high specific surface area carbon nano onions with diameter of 30–40 nm have been synthesized. Liquefied petroleum gas and air mixtures produced carbon nano onions in diffusion flames without catalyst. The optimized oxidant to fuel ratio which produces carbon nano onions has been found to be 0.1 slpm/slpm. The experiment yielded 70% pure carbon nano onions with a rate of 5 g/h. X-ray diffraction, high-resolution electron microscopy and Raman spectrum reveal the densely packed sp 2 hybridized carbon with (002) semi-crystalline hexagonal graphite reflection. The carbon nano onions are thermally stable up to 600 °C. - Highlights: ►Flame synthesized carbon nano onions with 30–40 nm diameters. ►LPG/air, diffusion type flame used in absence of catalyst to produce nano onions. ►Carbon nano onion production rate is 5 g/hr and with 70% purity.

  2. Highly sensitive hydrogen peroxide sensor based on a glassy carbon electrode modified with platinum nanoparticles on carbon nanofiber heterostructures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yang, Yang; Fu, Renzhong; Yuan, Jianjun; Wu, Shiyuan; Zhang, Jialiang; Wang, Haiying

    2015-01-01

    We are presenting a sensor for hydrogen peroxide (H 2 O 2 ) that is based on the use of a heterostructure composed of Pt nanoparticles (NPs) and carbon nanofibers (CNFs). High-density Pt NPs were homogeneously loaded onto a three-dimensional nanostructured CNF matrix and then deposited in a glassy carbon electrode (GCE). The resulting sensor synergizes the advantages of the conducting CNFs and the nanoparticle catalyst. The porous structure of the CNFs also favor the high-density immobilization of the NPs and the diffusion of water-soluble molecules, and thus assists the rapid catalytic oxidation of H 2 O 2 . If operated at a working voltage of −0.2 V (vs. Ag/AgCl), the modified GCE exhibits a linear response to H 2 O 2 in the 5 μM to 15 mM concentration range (total analytical range: 5 μM to 100 mM), with a detection limit of 1.7 μM (at a signal-to-noise ratio of 3). The modified GCE is not interfered by species such as uric acid and glucose. Its good stability, high selectivity and good reproducibility make this electrode a valuable tool for inexpensive amperometric sensing of H 2 O 2 . (author)

  3. Toward Small-Diameter Carbon Nanotubes Synthesized from Captured Carbon Dioxide: Critical Role of Catalyst Coarsening.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Douglas, Anna; Carter, Rachel; Li, Mengya; Pint, Cary L

    2018-05-23

    Small-diameter carbon nanotubes (CNTs) often require increased sophistication and control in synthesis processes, but exhibit improved physical properties and greater economic value over their larger-diameter counterparts. Here, we study mechanisms controlling the electrochemical synthesis of CNTs from the capture and conversion of ambient CO 2 in molten salts and leverage this understanding to achieve the smallest-diameter CNTs ever reported in the literature from sustainable electrochemical synthesis routes, including some few-walled CNTs. Here, Fe catalyst layers are deposited at different thicknesses onto stainless steel to produce cathodes, and atomic layer deposition of Al 2 O 3 is performed on Ni to produce a corrosion-resistant anode. Our findings indicate a correlation between the CNT diameter and Fe metal layer thickness following electrochemical catalyst reduction at the cathode-molten salt interface. Further, catalyst coarsening during long duration synthesis experiments leads to a 2× increase in average diameters from 3 to 60 min durations, with CNTs produced after 3 min exhibiting a tight diameter distribution centered near ∼10 nm. Energy consumption analysis for the conversion of CO 2 into CNTs demonstrates energy input costs much lower than the value of CNTs-a concept that strictly requires and motivates small-diameter CNTs-and is more favorable compared to other costly CO 2 conversion techniques that produce lower-value materials and products.

  4. Graphitized Carbon: A Promising Stable Cathode Catalyst Support Material for Long Term PEMFC Applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohanta, Paritosh Kumar; Regnet, Fabian; Jörissen, Ludwig

    2018-05-28

    Stability of cathode catalyst support material is one of the big challenges of polymer electrolyte membrane fuel cells (PEMFC) for long term applications. Traditional carbon black (CB) supports are not stable enough to prevent oxidation to CO₂ under fuel cell operating conditions. The feasibility of a graphitized carbon (GC) as a cathode catalyst support for low temperature PEMFC is investigated herein. GC and CB supported Pt electrocatalysts were prepared via an already developed polyol process. The physical characterization of the prepared catalysts was performed using transmission electron microscope (TEM), X-ray Powder Diffraction (XRD) and inductively coupled plasma optical emission spectrometry (ICP-OES) analysis, and their electrochemical characterizations were conducted via cyclic voltammetry(CV), rotating disk electrode (RDE) and potential cycling, and eventually, the catalysts were processed using membrane electrode assemblies (MEA) for single cell performance tests. Electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) and scanning electrochemical microscopy (SEM) have been used as MEA diagonostic tools. GC showed superior stability over CB in acid electrolyte under potential conditions. Single cell MEA performance of the GC-supported catalyst is comparable with the CB-supported catalyst. A correlation of MEA performance of the supported catalysts of different Brunauer⁻Emmett⁻Teller (BET) surface areas with the ionomer content was also established. GC was identified as a promising candidate for catalyst support in terms of both of the stability and the performance of fuel cell.

  5. Copolymers Based on Indole-6-Carboxylic Acid and 3,4-Ethylenedioxythiophene as Platinum Catalyst Support for Methanol Oxidation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tzi-Yi Wu

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Indole-6-carboxylic acid (ICA and 3,4-ethylenedioxythiophene (EDOT are copolymerized electrochemically on a stainless steel (SS electrode to obtain poly(indole-6-carboxylic acid-co-3,4-ethylenedioxythiophenes (P(ICA-co-EDOTs. The morphology of P(ICA-co-EDOTs is checked using scanning electron microscopy (SEM, and the SEM images reveal that these films are composed of highly porous fibers when the feed molar ratio of ICA/EDOT is greater than 3/2. Platinum particles can be electrochemically deposited into the P(ICA-co-EDOTs and PICA films to obtain P(ICA-co-EDOTs-Pt and PICA-Pt composite electrodes, respectively. These composite electrodes are further characterized using X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS, SEM, X-ray diffraction analysis (XRD, and cyclic voltammetry (CV. The SEM result indicates that Pt particles disperse more uniformly into the highly porous P(ICA3-co-EDOT2 fibers (feed molar ratio of ICA/EDOT = 3/2. The P(ICA3-co-EDOT2-Pt nanocomposite electrode exhibited excellent catalytic activity for the electrooxidation of methanol in these electrodes, which reveals that P(ICA3-co-EDOT2-Pt nanocomposite electrodes are more promising for application in an electrocatalyst as a support material.

  6. Activated carbon from orange peels as supercapacitor electrode and catalyst support for oxygen reduction reaction in proton exchange membrane fuel cell

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Dhelipan

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Activated carbon is synthesized using orange peel as precursor through chemical activation using H3PO4 and its ability as electrocatalyst support for ORR reaction is examined. The prepared material was subjected to various structural, compositional, morphological and electrochemical studies. For ORR activity, the platinum loaded on activated carbon (Pt/OP-AC was investigated by cyclic voltammograms (CVs recorded in N2 and O2 saturated 0.1 M aqueous HClO4. For supercapacitor performance, three electrode systems was tested in aqueous H2SO4 for feasibility determination and showed electrochemical double layer capacitance (EDLC behaviour which is expected for activated carbon like materials. Electrochemical surface area (ECSA of the activated carbon from orange peel is measured using CV. The physical properties of the prepared carbon are studied using SEM (scanning electron microscope, XRD (X-ray diffraction, Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR spectroscopy and Raman spectroscopy. The AC derived from orange peels delivered a high specific capacitance of 275 F g−1 at 10 mV s-1 scan rate. Hence, this study suggested that orange peels may be considered not only as a potential alternative source for synthesizing carbon supported catalyst for fuel cell application but also highlight the production of low-cost carbon for further applications like supercapacitors.

  7. Design criteria for stable Pt/C fuel cell catalysts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Josef C. Meier

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Platinum and Pt alloy nanoparticles supported on carbon are the state of the art electrocatalysts in proton exchange membrane fuel cells. To develop a better understanding on how material design can influence the degradation processes on the nanoscale, three specific Pt/C catalysts with different structural characteristics were investigated in depth: a conventional Pt/Vulcan catalyst with a particle size of 3–4 nm and two Pt@HGS catalysts with different particle size, 1–2 nm and 3–4 nm. Specifically, Pt@HGS corresponds to platinum nanoparticles incorporated and confined within the pore structure of the nanostructured carbon support, i.e., hollow graphitic spheres (HGS. All three materials are characterized by the same platinum loading, so that the differences in their performance can be correlated to the structural characteristics of each material. The comparison of the activity and stability behavior of the three catalysts, as obtained from thin film rotating disk electrode measurements and identical location electron microscopy, is also extended to commercial materials and used as a basis for a discussion of general fuel cell catalyst design principles. Namely, the effects of particle size, inter-particle distance, certain support characteristics and thermal treatment on the catalyst performance and in particular the catalyst stability are evaluated. Based on our results, a set of design criteria for more stable and active Pt/C and Pt-alloy/C materials is suggested.

  8. Development of industrial hydrogenating catalyst on rhenium base

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chistyakova, G.A.; Bat', I.I.; Rebrova, V.V.

    1975-01-01

    Processes for forming rhenium catalysts on carbon carrier and their catalytic properties in nitrobenzene (NB) reduction were studied. Application of an ammonia preparation to the carbon surface produced impregnated carbon saturated at room temperature with a water solution of the ammonia preparation, taken in a volume equal to the volumetric capacity of the carbon. With one impregnation, 2% rhenium was taken up. Catalysts containing more than 5% rhenium were obtained by impregnating the carbon with heating and use of more concentrated solutions. Catalysts made in this way and dried at 100 0 C had the composition Re 2 OH/carbon/. The most active catalysts were those reduced at 200-250 0 C; higher temperatures, up to 300-500 0 C, decreased the activity. Study of the catalytic properties of the rhenium catalysts in a liquid phase reduction of NB showed that the specific activity of rhenium depends only slightly on the content of the active component in the catalyst and is close to the specific activity of palladium and considerably exceeds that of nickel. Study of the effect of the NB concentration and hydrogen pressure on the activity and stability of the 5% rhenium catalyst indicated that with NB concentrations from 50 to 10% the process takes place at an essentially constant rate; the order of the reaction was close to zero with an apparent activation energy of about 7000 cal/mole. At pressures of 15-200 atm the yield with the 5% catalyst was proportional to the hydrogen pressure. A big advantage of the rhenium catalysts in the reduction of NB is their high selectivity. With a higher activity than palladium and nickel catalysts, 5% rhenium catalyst produces a high operating capacity in a wide range of contact charges, which has considerable significance for industrial use in contact apparatus of the column type. Comparison of the costs of rhenium catalysts and granular carbon carrier with those of nickel, platinum, and palladium showed that 5% rhenium catalyst can

  9. Novel RuCoSe as non-platinum catalysts for oxygen reduction reaction in microbial fuel cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rozenfeld, Shmuel; Schechter, Michal; Teller, Hanan; Cahan, Rivka; Schechter, Alex

    2017-09-01

    Microbial electrochemical cells (MECs) are explored for the conversion of acetate directly to electrical energy. This device utilizes a Geobacter sulfurreducens anode and a novel RuCoSe air cathode. RuCoSe synthesized in selected compositions by a borohydride reduction method produces amorphous structures of powdered agglomerates. Oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) was measured in a phosphate buffer solution pH 7 using a rotating disc electrode (RDE), from which the kinetic current (ik) was measured as a function of potential and composition. The results show that ik of RuxCoySe catalysts increases in the range of XRu = 0.25 > x > 0.7 and y < 0.15 for all tested potentials. A poisoning study of RuCoSe and Pt catalysts in a high concentration acetate solution shows improved tolerance of RuCoSe to this fuel at acetate concentration ≥500 mM. MEC discharge plots under physiological conditions show that ∼ RuCo2Se (sample S3) has a peak power density of 750 mW cm-2 which is comparable with Pt 900 mW cm-2.

  10. Dimethyl carbonate synthesis via transesterification of propylene carbonate with methanol by ceria-zinc catalysts: Role of catalyst support and reaction parameters

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kumar, Praveen; Srivastava, Vimal Chandra; Mishra, Indra Mani [Indian Institute of Technology Roorkee, Roorkee 247667, Uttarakhand (India)

    2015-09-15

    Ceria and zinc oxide catalyst were impregnated onto various oxide supports, namely Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}, TiO{sub 2} and SiO{sub 2}, individually by deposition-coprecipitation method. The synthesized catalysts (CZA, CZS and CZT having supports Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}, TiO{sub 2} and SiO{sub 2}, respectively) were characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD), NH{sub 3}- and CO{sub 2}-temperature programmed desorption (TPD) and N2 adsorption. These catalysts were used for synthesis of dimethyl carbonate (DMC) from methanol and propylene carbonate in a batch reactor. CZS was found to have larger average grain size as compared to CZA and CZT. Composite oxides (catalysts) were found to contain individual phases of ZnO, CeO{sub 2} and some spinel forms of Zn, Ce along with their supports. CZS having highest basicity and surface area showed better catalytic activity as compared to CZA and CZT. Effect of reaction temperature and methanol/PC molar ratio on DMC yield was studied and a reaction mechanism has been discussed. Maximum DMC yield of 77% was observed with CZS catalyst at 170 .deg. C with methanol/PC molar ratio of 10.

  11. Synthesis of 2D Nitrogen-Doped Mesoporous Carbon Catalyst for Oxygen Reduction Reaction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhipeng Yu

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available 2D nitrogen-doped mesoporous carbon (NMC is synthesized by using a mesoporous silica film as hard template, which is then investigated as a non-precious metal catalyst for the oxygen reduction reaction (ORR. The effect of the synthesis conditions on the silica template and carbon is extensively investigated. In this work, we employ dual templates—viz. graphene oxide and triblock copolymer F127—to control the textural features of a 2D silica film. The silica is then used as a template to direct the synthesis of a 2D nitrogen-doped mesoporous carbon. The resultant nitrogen-doped mesoporous carbon is characterized by transmission electron microscopy (TEM, nitrogen ad/desorption isotherms, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS, cyclic voltammetry (CV, and rotating disk electrode measurements (RDE. The electrochemical test reveals that the obtained 2D-film carbon catalyst yields a highly electrochemically active surface area and superior electrocatalytic activity for the ORR compared to the 3D-particle. The superior activity can be firstly attributed to the difference in the specific surface area of the two catalysts. More importantly, the 2D-film morphology makes more active sites accessible to the reactive species, resulting in a much higher utilization efficiency and consequently better activity. Finally, it is noted that all the carbon catalysts exhibit a higher ORR activity than a commercial Pt catalyst, and are promising for use in fuel cells.

  12. A review of catalysts for the electroreduction of carbon dioxide to produce low-carbon fuels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qiao, Jinli; Liu, Yuyu; Hong, Feng; Zhang, Jiujun

    2014-01-21

    This paper reviews recent progress made in identifying electrocatalysts for carbon dioxide (CO2) reduction to produce low-carbon fuels, including CO, HCOOH/HCOO(-), CH2O, CH4, H2C2O4/HC2O4(-), C2H4, CH3OH, CH3CH2OH and others. The electrocatalysts are classified into several categories, including metals, metal alloys, metal oxides, metal complexes, polymers/clusters, enzymes and organic molecules. The catalyts' activity, product selectivity, Faradaic efficiency, catalytic stability and reduction mechanisms during CO2 electroreduction have received detailed treatment. In particular, we review the effects of electrode potential, solution-electrolyte type and composition, temperature, pressure, and other conditions on these catalyst properties. The challenges in achieving highly active and stable CO2 reduction electrocatalysts are analyzed, and several research directions for practical applications are proposed, with the aim of mitigating performance degradation, overcoming additional challenges, and facilitating research and development in this area.

  13. Immobilization of platinum nanoparticles on 3,4-diaminobenzoyl-functionalized multi-walled carbon nanotube and its electrocatalytic activity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Choi, Hyun-Jung; Kang, Ji-Ye; Jeon, In-Yup; Eo, Soo-Mi; Tan, Loon-Seng; Baek, Jong-Beom

    2012-01-01

    Multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) are functionalized at the sp 2 C–H defect sites with 3,4-diaminobenzoic acid by a “direct” Friedel–Crafts acylation reaction in a mild polyphosphoric acid/phosphorous pentoxide medium. Owing to enhanced surface polarity, the resulting 3,4-diaminobenzoyl-functionalized MWCNTs (DAB-MWCNT) are highly dispersible in polar solvents, such as ethanol, N-methyl-2-pyrrolidone, and methanesulfonic acid. The absorption and emission properties of DAB-MWCNT in solution state are qualitatively shown to be sensitive to the pH in the environment. The DAB-MWCNT is used as a stable platform on which to deposit platinum nanoparticles (PNP). The PNP/DAB-MWCNT hybrid displays high electrocatalytic activity with good electrochemical stability for an oxygen reduction reaction under an alkaline condition.Graphical AbstractMulti-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) were functionalized with 3,4-diaminobenzoic acid to produce 3,4-diaminobenzoyl-functionalized MWCNT (DAB-MWCNT). Platinum nanoparticles (PNP) were deposited to DAB-MWCNT. The resulting PNP/DAB-MWCNT hybrid displayed high electrocatalytic activity.

  14. Electrochemical removal of hexavalent chromium from wastewater using Platinum-Iron/Iron-carbon nanotubes and bipolar Electrodes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hoshyar Hossini

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: In recent decades, electrocoagulation (EC has engrossed much attention as an environmental-friendly and effectiveness process. In addition, the EC process is a potential suitable way for treatment of wastewater with concern to costs and environment. The object of this study was electrochemical evaluation of chromium removal from industrial wastewater using Platinum and carbon nanotubes electrodes. Materials and Methods: The effect of key variables including pH (3–9, hexavalent chromium concentration (50–300 mg/l, supporting electrolyte (NaCl, KCl, Na2CO3 and KNO3 and its dosage, Oxidation-Reduction variations, sludge generation rate and current density (2–20 mA/cm2 was determined. Results: Based on experimental data, optimum conditions were determined in 20, 120 min, pH 3, NaCl 0.5% and 100 mg/L initial concentration of chromium. Conclusions: Removal of hexavalent chromium from the wastewater could be successfully performanced using Platinum-Iron/Iron-carbon nanotubes and bipolar Electrodes.

  15. Optimization of fuel cell membrane electrode assemblies for transition metal ion-chelating ordered mesoporous carbon cathode catalysts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Johanna K. Dombrovskis

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Transition metal ion-chelating ordered mesoporous carbon (TM-OMC materials were recently shown to be efficient polymer electrolyte membrane fuel cell (PEMFC catalysts. The structure and properties of these catalysts are largely different from conventional catalyst materials, thus rendering membrane electrode assembly (MEA preparation parameters developed for conventional catalysts not useful for applications of TM-OMC catalysts. This necessitates development of a methodology to incorporate TM-OMC catalysts in the MEA. Here, an efficient method for MEA preparation using TM-OMC catalyst materials for PEMFC is developed including effects of catalyst/ionomer loading and catalyst/ionomer-mixing and application procedures. An optimized protocol for MEA preparation using TM-OMC catalysts is described.

  16. Application in industry and energy production of active carbon/cobalt catalyst for nitrogen oxide neutralization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mekhandzhiev, D.; Nikolov, R.; Lyutskanov, L.; Dushanov, D.; Lakov, L.

    1997-01-01

    A new material for neutralization of nitrogen oxides is presented. Two or three metals containing catalysts with a good activity and selectivity towards NO x have been obtained. Preparation of carbon catalysts by deposition of the active phase precursor on the initial carbon material prior to activation is considered as the most promising method. An active carbon-based catalyst (AC/Co) has been synthesized Apricot shells preliminary impregnated with a water-alcohol solution of Co nitrate have been used as initial carbon material. after drying they have been subjected to one-phase steam pyrolysis using a fix-bed reactor. The catalyst thus obtained has a specific surface area (BET) of 53 m 2 g -1 , a favorable mesopore volume/total volume ratio (about 0.85) determined by nitrogen adsorption, a suitable mesopore distribution, about 70% of the mesopores being characterized by r p larger than 25 A and a high dispersion of the Co oxide phase. In addition the catalyst possesses the necessary mechanical resistance. The catalyst has exhibited a high activity with respect to NO x reduction with CO at low temperatures (at 150-250 o C which are the temperatures of industrial flue gases, nO conversion up to 60-95% occurs) and a high selectivity. No presence of H 2 O has been established over the whole temperature range (100-300 o C). An additional advantage of the catalyst is the fact that the amount of CO above 150 o C is lower than the stoichiometric which indicates parallel participation in the process of both the active phase and the support (active carbon) It is also important that the presented catalyst has a low price due to the use of waste products from agriculture and the elimination of special thermal treatment of the supported Co nitrate. There are possibilities of using of other organic wastes from agriculture as well as wastes obtained during flotation of coal. (author)

  17. Microstructure, elastic, and inelastic properties of biomorphic carbons carbonized using a Fe-containing catalyst

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orlova, T. S.; Kardashev, B. K.; Smirnov, B. I.; Gutierrez-Pardo, A.; Ramirez-Rico, J.

    2016-12-01

    The microstructure and amplitude dependences of the Young's modulus E and internal friction (logarithmic decrement δ), and microplastic properties of biocarbon matrices BE-C(Fe) obtained by beech tree carbonization at temperatures T carb = 850-1600°C in the presence of an iron-containing catalyst are studied. By X-ray diffraction analysis and transmission electron microscopy, it is shown that the use of Fe-catalyst during carbonization with T carb ≥ 1000°C leads to the appearance of a bulk graphite phase in the form of nanoscale bulk graphite inclusions in a quasi-amorphous matrix, whose volume fraction and size increase with T carb. The correlation of the obtained dependences E( T carb) and δ( T carb) with microstructure evolution with increasing T carb is revealed. It is found that E is mainly defined by a crystalline phase fraction in the amorphous matrix, i.e., a nanocrystalline phase at T carb 1300°C. Maximum values E = 10-12 GPa are achieved for samples with T carb ≈ 1150 and 1600°C. It is shown that the microplasticity manifest itself only in biocarbons with T carb ≥ 1300°C (upon reaching a significant volume of the graphite phase); in this case, the conditional microyield stress decreases with increasing total volume of introduced mesoporosity (free surface area).

  18. Efficient Cycloaddition Reaction of Carbon Dioxide with Epoxide by Rhodamine Based Catalyst Under 1 atm Pressure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gong, Qing; Luo, Huadong; Cao, Di; Zhang, Haibo; Wang, Wenjing; Zhou, Xiaohai [Wuhan University, Wuhan (China)

    2012-06-15

    Rhodamine B (RhB) and rhodamine 6G (Rh6G) were employed as catalysts for the synthesis of cyclic carbonate from carbon dioxide and epoxide. It turned out that the catalytic activity of Rh6G was nearly 29 times higher than that of RhB at 1 atm pressure, 90 .deg. C. Furthermore, the catalytic efficiency of RhB and Rh6G was greatly enhanced with triethylamine as co-catalyst. Under the optimized conditions, the best isolated yield (93%) of cyclic carbonate was achieved without organic solvent and metal component

  19. Patterned forests of vertically-aligned multiwalled carbon nanotubes using metal salt catalyst solutions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garrett, David J; Flavel, Benjamin S; Baronian, Keith H R; Downard, Alison J

    2013-01-01

    A simple method for producing patterned forests of multiwalled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) is described. An aqueous metal salt solution is spin-coated onto a substrate patterned with photoresist by standard methods. The photoresist is removed by acetone washing leaving the acetone-insoluble catalyst pattern on the substrate. Dense forests of vertically aligned (VA) MWCNTs are grown on the patterned catalyst layers by chemical vapour deposition. The procedures have been demonstrated by growing MWCNT forests on two substrates: silicon and conducting graphitic carbon films. The forests adhere strongly to the substrates and when grown directly on carbon film, offer a simple method of preparing MWCNT electrodes.

  20. In-situ observations of catalyst dynamics during surface-bound carbon nanotube nucleation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hofmann, S; Sharma, R; Du, G

    2007-01-01

    nanoparticles on SiOx support show crystalline lattice fringe contrast and high deformability before and during nanotube formation. A single-walled carbon nanotube nucleates by lift-off of a carbon cap. Cap stabilization and nanotube growth involve the dynamic reshaping of the catalyst nanocrystal itself...

  1. Polymeric carbon nitride nanomesh as an efficient and durable metal-free catalyst for oxidative desulfurization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Lijuan; Lei, Ganchang; Fang, Yuanxing; Cao, Yanning; Wang, Xinchen; Jiang, Lilong

    2018-03-06

    We report the first use of polymeric carbon nitride (CN) for the catalytic selective oxidation of H 2 S. The as-prepared CN with unique ultrathin "nanomeshes" structure exhibits excellent H 2 S conversion and high S selectivity. In particular, the CN nanomesh also displays better durability in the desulfurization reaction than traditional catalysts, such as carbon- and iron-based materials.

  2. Solar-Driven Hydrogen Peroxide Production Using Polymer-Supported Carbon Dots as Heterogeneous Catalyst

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gogoi, Satyabrat; Karak, Niranjan

    2017-10-01

    Safe, sustainable, and green production of hydrogen peroxide is an exciting proposition due to the role of hydrogen peroxide as a green oxidant and energy carrier for fuel cells. The current work reports the development of carbon dot-impregnated waterborne hyperbranched polyurethane as a heterogeneous photo-catalyst for solar-driven production of hydrogen peroxide. The results reveal that the carbon dots possess a suitable band-gap of 2.98 eV, which facilitates effective splitting of both water and ethanol under solar irradiation. Inclusion of the carbon dots within the eco-friendly polymeric material ensures their catalytic activity and also provides a facile route for easy catalyst separation, especially from a solubilizing medium. The overall process was performed in accordance with the principles of green chemistry using bio-based precursors and aqueous medium. This work highlights the potential of carbon dots as an effective photo-catalyst.

  3. A Comparative Study of Carbon Nanotubes Synthesized from Co/Zn/Al and Fe/Ni/Al Catalyst

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ezekiel Dixon Dikio

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The catalyst systems Fe/Ni/Al and Co/Zn/Al were synthesized and used in the synthesis of carbon nanotubes. The carbon nanotubes produced were characterized by Field Emission Scanning Electron Microscope (FE-SEM, Energy Dispersive x-ray Spectroscopy (EDS, Raman spectroscopy, Thermogravimetric Analysis (TGA and Transmission Electron Microscope (TEM. A comparison of the morphological profile of the carbon nanotubes produced from these catalysts indicates the catalyst system Fe/Ni/Al to have produced higher quality carbon nanotubes than the catalyst system Co/Zn/Al.

  4. Radiation hardness of silicon detectors manufactured on epitaxial material and FZ bulk enriched with oxygen, carbon, tin and platinum

    CERN Document Server

    Ruzin, A; Glaser, M; Lemeilleur, F; Talamonti, R; Watts, S; Zanet, A

    1999-01-01

    Recent results on the radiation hardness of silicon detectors fabricated on epitaxial and float zone bulk silicon enriched by various impurities, such as carbon, oxygen, tin and platinum are reported. A new methodology of measurements of electrical properties of the devices has been utilized in the experiment. It has been shown that in the case of irradiation by protons, oxygen enriched silicon has better radiation hardness than standard float zone silicon. The carbon enriched silicon detectors, on the other hand, exhibited significantly inferior radiation hardness compared to standard detectors. This study shows for the first time, a violation of the widely used normalization technique of the various particle irradiations by NIEL coefficients. The study has been carried out in the framework of the RD48 (ROSE) collaboration, which studies the radiation hardening of silicon detectors. (5 refs).

  5. Carbon nanocages: a new support material for Pt catalyst with remarkably high durability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xiao Xia; Tan, Zhe Hua; Zeng, Min; Wang, Jian Nong

    2014-03-24

    Low durability is the major challenge hindering the large-scale implementation of proton exchange membrane fuel cell (PEMFC) technology, and corrosion of carbon support materials of current catalysts is the main cause. Here, we describe the finding of remarkably high durability with the use of a novel support material. This material is based on hollow carbon nanocages developed with a high degree of graphitization and concurrent nitrogen doping for oxidation resistance enhancement, uniform deposition of fine Pt particles, and strong Pt-support interaction. Accelerated degradation testing shows that such designed catalyst possesses a superior electrochemical activity and long-term stability for both hydrogen oxidation and oxygen reduction relative to industry benchmarks of current catalysts. Further testing under conditions of practical fuel cell operation reveals almost no degradation over long-term cycling. Such a catalyst of high activity, particularly, high durability, opens the door for the next-generation PEMFC for "real world" application.

  6. Graphitic Carbon Nitride as a Catalyst Support in Fuel Cells and Electrolyzers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mansor, Noramalina; Miller, Thomas S.; Dedigama, Ishanka; Jorge, Ana Belen; Jia, Jingjing; Brázdová, Veronika; Mattevi, Cecilia; Gibbs, Chris; Hodgson, David; Shearing, Paul R.; Howard, Christopher A.; Corà, Furio; Shaffer, Milo; Brett, Daniel J.L.

    2016-01-01

    Highlights: • Graphitic carbon nitride (gCN) describes many materials with different structures. • gCNs can exhibit excellent mechanical, chemical and thermal resistance. • A major obstacle for pure gCN catalyst supports is limited electronic conductivity. • Composite/Hybrid gCN structures show excellent performance as catalyst supports. • gCNs have great potential for use in fuel calls and water electrolyzers. - Abstract: Electrochemical power sources, such as polymer electrolyte membrane fuel cells (PEMFCs), require the use of precious metal catalysts which are deposited as nanoparticles onto supports in order to minimize their mass loading and therefore cost. State-of-the-art/commercial supports are based on forms of carbon black. However, carbon supports present disadvantages including corrosion in the operating fuel cell environment and loss of catalyst activity. Here we review recent work examining the potential of different varieties of graphitic carbon nitride (gCN) as catalyst supports, highlighting their likely benefits, as well as the challenges associated with their implementation. The performance of gCN and hybrid gCN-carbon materials as PEMFC electrodes is discussed, as well as their potential for use in alkaline systems and water electrolyzers. We illustrate the discussion with examples taken from our own recent studies.

  7. Novel Catalyst for the Chirality Selective Synthesis of Single Walled Carbon Nanotubes

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-05-12

    Final 3. DATES COVERED (From - To) 03-April-2013 to 02-April-2015 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Novel Catalyst for the Chirality Selective...Distribution is unlimited. 13. SUPPLEMENTARY NOTES 14. ABSTRACT Chiral single walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) are known to possess unique... chirality control in SWCNT synthesis. A model catalyst based on CoSO4/SiO2 was developed that showed good selectivity to (9,8) nanotubes. Remote plasma

  8. Two Iron Complexes as Homogeneous and Heterogeneous Catalysts for the Chemical Fixation of Carbon Dioxide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karan, Chandan Kumar; Bhattacharjee, Manish

    2018-04-16

    Two new bimetallic iron-alkali metal complexes of amino acid (serine)-based reduced Schiff base ligand were synthesized and structurally characterized. Their efficacy as catalysts for the chemical fixation of carbon dioxide was explored. The heterogeneous version of the catalytic reaction was developed by the immobilization of these homogeneous bimetallic iron-alkali metal complexes in an anion-exchange resin. The resin-bound complexes can be used as recyclable catalysts up to six cycles.

  9. Dehydrogenation of propane in the presence of carbon dioxide over chromium and gallium oxides catalysts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lapidus, A.L.; Agafonov, Yu.A.; Gaidai, N.A.; Nekrasov, N.V.; Menshova, M.V.; Kunusova, R.M. [Russian Academy of Sciences, Moscow (Russian Federation). N.D. Zelinsky Inst. of Organic Chemistry

    2011-07-01

    Effective chromium and gallium oxides supported catalysts were prepared and tested in longduration experiments for propane dehydrogenation in the presence of CO{sub 2}. The optimal concentrations of active metals were found. It was shown that the activity, selectivity and stability of chromium oxides catalysts were higher than these parameters for gallium ones. Mechanism of propane oxidative dehydrogenation was studied over both catalysts using unstationary and spectroscopic methods. The employment of these methods allowed to establish the differences in process mechanism. It was shown that surface hydroxides took participation in propene formation over Cr-catalysts and hydrides - over Ga-ones. Propane and carbon dioxide participated in the reaction from the adsorbed state over both catalysts but they were differed by the adsorption capacity of the reaction components: CO2 was tied more firmly than C{sub 3}H{sub 6} over both catalysts, CO{sub 2} and C{sub 3}H{sub 6} were tied more strongly with Cr-catalysts than with Ga-ones. It was shown that CO{sub 2} took active participation in reverse watergas shift reaction and in oxidation of catalyst surface over chromium oxides catalysts. The main role of CO{sub 2} in propane dehydrogenation over gallium catalysts consisted in a decrease of coke formation. Step-schemes of propene and cracking products formation were proposed on the basis of literature and obtained data: via the redox mechanism over Cr-catalysts and through a heterolytic dissociation reaction pathway over Ga-ones. (orig.)

  10. thesis of high-purity carbon nanotubes over alumina and silica supported bimetallic catalysts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sanja Ratković

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available Carbon nanotubes (CNTs were synthesized by a catalytic chemical vapor deposition method (CCVD of ethylene over alumina and silica supported bimetallic catalysts based on Fe, Co and Ni. The catalysts were prepared by a precipitation method, calcined at 600 °C and in situ reduced in hydrogen flow at 700 °C. The CNTs growth was carried out by a flow the mixture of C2H4 and nitrogen over the catalyst powder in a horizontal oven. The structure and morphology of as-synthesized CNTs were characterized using SEM. The as-synthesized nanotubes were purified by acid and basic treatments in order to remove impurities such as amorphous carbon, graphite nanoparticles and metal catalysts. XRD and DTA/TG analyses showed that the amounts of by-products in the purified CNTs samples were reduced significantly. According to the observed results, ethylene is an active carbon source for growing high-density CNTs with high yield but more on alumina-supported catalysts than on their silica- supported counterparts. The last might be explained by SMSI formed in the case of alumina-supported catalysts, resulting in higher active phase dispersion.

  11. Trickle bed reactor for the oxidation of phenol over active carbon catalyst

    OpenAIRE

    Gabbiye, Nigus; Font Capafons, Josep; Fortuny Sanromá, Agustín; Bengoa, Christophe José; Fabregat Llangotera, Azael; Stüber, Frank Erich

    2009-01-01

    The catalytic wet air oxidation of phenol using activated carbon has been performed in a laboratory trickle bed reactor over a wide range of operating variables (PO2, T, FL and Cph,o) and hydrodynamic conditions. The influence of different start-up procedures (saturation of activated carbon) has also been tested. Further improvement of activity and stability has been checked for by using dynamic TBR operation concept or impregnated Fe/carbon catalyst. The results obtained confi...

  12. Removal of free fatty acid in Palm Fatty Acid Distillate using sulfonated carbon catalyst derived from biomass wastefor biodiesel production

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hidayat, Arif; Rochmadi; Wijaya, Karna; Budiman, Arief

    2016-01-01

    In this research, the esterification of PFAD using the sulfonatedcoconut shell biochar catalyst was studied. Carbon solid catalysts were prepared by a sulfonation of carbonized coconut shells. The performances of the catalysts were evaluated in terms of the reaction temperatures, the molar ratios of methanol to PFAD, the catalyst loading and the reaction times. The reusability of the solid acid carbon catalysts was also studied in this work. The results indicated that the FFA conversion was significantly increased with increasing catalyst loading and reaction times. It can be concluded that the optimal conditions were an PFAD to methanol molar ratio of 1:12, the amount of catalyst of 10%w, and reaction temperature of 60oC.At this optimum condition, the conversion to biodieselreached 88%.

  13. Optimization of the Pd-Fe-Mo Catalysts for Oxygen Reduction Reaction in Proton-Exchange Membrane Fuel Cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Yeayeon; Jang, Jeongseok; Lee, Jin Goo; Jeon, Ok Sung; Kim, Hyeong Su; Hwang, Ho Jung; Shul, Yong Gun

    2016-01-01

    Highlights: • Pd-Mo-Fe catalysts show high catalytic activity and stability for oxygen-reduction reactions in acid media. • The optimum compositions were 7.5:1.5:1.0 for Pd-Fe-Mo, and the optimum temperatures were 500 °C. • The Pd-Fe-Mo catalysts were successfully applied to the PEMFC cathode, showing ∼500 mA cm −1 at 0.6 V. • The lattice constant was strongly related to the activity and stability of the catalysts for oxygen-reduction reactions. - Abstract: Highly active and durable non-platinum catalysts for oxygen-reduction reaction (ORR) have been developed for energy conversion devices such as proton-exchange membrane fuel cells (PEMFCs). In this study, Pd-Fe-Mo catalyst is reported as a non-platinum catalyst for ORR. The atomic ratio and annealing temperatures are controlled on the catalysts to understand interplay between their physical and chemical properties and electrochemical activities. The Pd-Fe-Mo catalyst optimized with 7.5:1.5:1.0 of the atomic ratio and 500 °C of the annealing temperature shows 32.18 mA mg −1 PGM (PGM: platinum group metal) of the kinetic current density at 0.9 V for ORR, which is comparable to that of commercial Pt/C catalyst. The current density is degraded to 6.20 mA mg −1 PGM after 3000 cycling of cyclic voltammetry, but it is greatly enhanced value compared to other non-platinum catalysts. In actual application to PEMFCs, the 20% Pd-Fe-Mo catalyst supported on carbons exhibits a high performance of 506 mA cm −2 at 0.6 V. The results suggest that the Pd-Fe-Mo catalyst can be a good candidate for non-platinum ORR catalysts.

  14. Biodiesel production from Silybum marianum L. seed oil with high FFA content using sulfonated carbon catalyst for esterification and base catalyst for transesterification

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fadhil, Abdelrahman B.; Aziz, Akram M.; Al-Tamer, Marwa H.

    2016-01-01

    Highlights: • PET was converted to activated carbon and then sulfonated to prepare carbon acid catalyst. • Carbon acid catalyst was used for esterification of high acid value Silybum marianum L. seed oil. • Biodiesel was obtained with 96.98% efficiency. - Abstract: In this research work, waste of polyethylene terephthalate (PET) was converted into activated carbon and the latter was used in the preparation of a carbon acid catalyst. Waste of PET was converted into activated carbon via carbonization and steam activation, then the activated carbon was sulfonated using fuming sulfuric acid in order to produce the carbon acid catalyst. The prepared carbon acid catalyst was tested for esterification of high acid value non-edible oil, Silybum marianum L. seed oil (SMSO) via optimized protocol. Amount of the carbon acid catalyst, methanol to oil molar ratio, temperature and time were the experimental variables optimized. Esterification of SMSO with methanol using the prepared carbon acid catalyst reduced its parent acid value (20.0 mg KOH/g) to the acceptable limits for base-catalyzed transesterification (<2.0 mg KOH/g) using 6.0% w/w of the catalyst, 15:1 methanol to oil molar ratio, 68 °C reaction temperature and 180 min of reaction. The performance of the catalyst was reduced gradually during its recycling and reached to 60.0% at the 5th cycle. Kinetics of esterification of SMSO using the prepared carbon acid catalyst followed pseudo first order kinetics, and the activation energy was found to be 70.98 kJ/mol. The esterified oil was converted to biodiesel through optimized base-catalyzed transesterification with methanol. Biodiesel with (96.98% yield and purity of 96.69% w/w) yield was obtained using 0.80% KOH w/w, 6:1 methanol to oil molar ratio, 60 °C reaction temperature, 75 min of reaction and 600 rpm rate of stirring. The biodiesel properties were within the recommended biodiesel standards as prescribed by ASTM D 6751 and EN 14214. Transesterification of

  15. RuP{sub 2}-based catalysts with platinum-like activity and higher durability for the hydrogen evolution reaction at all pH values

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pu, Zonghua; Amiinu, Ibrahim Saana; Kou, Zongkui; Li, Wenqiang; Mu, Shichun [State Key Laboratory of Advanced Technology for Materials Synthesis and Processing, Wuhan University of Technology (China)

    2017-09-11

    Highly active, stable, and cheap Pt-free catalysts for the hydrogen evolution reaction (HER) are under increasing demand for future energy conversion systems. However, developing HER electrocatalysts with Pt-like activity that can function at all pH values still remains as a great challenge. Herein, based on our theoretical predictions, we design and synthesize a novel N,P dual-doped carbon-encapsulated ruthenium diphosphide (RuP{sub 2} rate at NPC) nanoparticle electrocatalyst for HER. Electrochemical tests reveal that, compared with the Pt/C catalyst, RuP{sub 2} rate at NPC not only has Pt-like HER activity with small overpotentials at 10 mA cm{sup -2} (38 mV in 0.5 m H{sub 2}SO{sub 4}, 57 mV in 1.0 m PBS and 52 mV in 1.0 m KOH), but demonstrates superior stability at all pH values, as well as 100 % Faradaic yields. Therefore, this work adds to the growing family of transition-metal phosphides/heteroatom-doped carbon heterostructures with advanced performance in HER. (copyright 2017 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim)

  16. On the nature of oxygen-containing surface groups on carbon nanofibers and their role for platinum deposition—an xps and titration study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Plomp, A.J.; Su, D.S.; de Jong, K.P.; Bitter, J.H.

    2009-01-01

    XPS and acid−base titrations were used to investigate the nature and stability of oxygen-containing surface groups on carbon nanofibers (CNF) and platinum-containing CNF. During heat treatments in inert atmosphere at 973 K all acidic (carboxylic) oxygen surface groups were removed for CNF.

  17. Recent progress in solution plasma-synthesized-carbon-supported catalysts for energy conversion systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lun Li, Oi; Lee, Hoonseung; Ishizaki, Takahiro

    2018-01-01

    Carbon-based materials have been widely utilized as the electrode materials in energy conversion and storage technologies, such as fuel cells and metal-air batteries. In these systems, the oxygen reduction reaction is an important step that determines the overall performance. A novel synthesis route, named the solution plasma process, has been recently utilized to synthesize various types of metal-based and heteroatom-doped carbon catalysts. In this review, we summarize cutting-edge technologies involving the synthesis and modeling of carbon-supported catalysts synthesized via solution plasma process, followed by current progress on the electrocatalytic performance of these catalysts. This review provides the fundamental and state-of-the-art performance of solution-plasma-synthesized electrode materials, as well as the remaining scientific and technological challenges for this process.

  18. Sustainable production of acetaldehyde from lactic acid over the carbon catalysts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tang, Congming; Peng, Jiansheng; Li, Xinli; Zhai, Zhanjie; Gao, Hejun; Liao, Yunwen [China West Normal University, Nanchong (China); Bai, Wei; Jiang, Ning [Chengdu Institute of Organic Chemistry, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Chengdu (China)

    2016-01-15

    The synthesis of acetaldehyde from lactic acid over the carbon material catalysts was investigated. The carbon materials were characterized by scanning electron microscopy for morphologic features, by X-ray diffraction for crystal phases, by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy for functional group structures, by N2 sorption for specific surface area and by ammonia temperature-programed desorption for acidity, respectively. Among the tested carbon catalysts, mesoporous carbon displayed the most excellent catalytic performance. By acidity analysis, the medium acidity is a crucial factor for catalytic performance: more medium acidity favored the formation of acetaldehyde from lactic acid. To verify, we compared the catalytic performance of fresh activated carbon with that of the activated carbon treated by nitric acid. Similarly, the modified activated carbon also displayed better activity due to a drastic increase of medium acidity amount. However, in contrast to fresh carbon nanotube, the treated sample displayed worse activity due to decrease of medium acidity amount. The effect of reaction temperature and time on stream on the catalytic performance was also investigated. Under the optimal reaction conditions, 100% lactic acid conversion and 91.6% acetaldehyde selectivity were achieved over the mesoporous carbon catalyst.

  19. Anti-bacteria activity of carbon nanotubes grown on trimetallic catalyst

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ibrahim, S. O.; Abdulkareem, A. S.; Isah, K. U.; Ahmadu, U.; Bankole, M. T.; Kariim, I.

    2018-06-01

    Trimetallic catalyst was prepared using wet impregnation method to produce carbon nanotubes (CNTs) through the method of catalytic chemical vapor deposition (CCVD). Characterization of the developed catalyst and CNTs were carried out using thermogravimetric analysis (TGA), x-ray diffraction (XRD), specific surface area Brunauer-Emmett-Teller (BET), Fourier-transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), high-resolution scanning electron microscopy (HRSEM)/energy dispersive x-ray spectroscopy (EDS) and high-resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM)/selected area electron diffraction (SAED). The BET and TGA analysis indicated that the catalyst has a high surface area and is thermally stable. The FTIR of the developed catalyst shows notable functional group with presence of unbound water. The HRSEM of the catalyst revealed agglomerated, homogeneous and porous particles while the HRSEM/HRTEM of the produced CNTs gave the formation of long strand of multiwalled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs), and homogeneous crystalline fringe like structure with irregular diameter. EDS revealed the dominance of carbon in the elemental composition. XRD/SAED patterns of the catalyst suggest high dispersion of the metallic particles in the catalyst mixture while that of the CNTs confirmed that the produced MWCNTs were highly graphitized and crystalline in nature with little structural defects. The anti-bacteria activity of the produced MWCNTs on Klebsiella pneumoneae, Escherichia coli, and Pseudomonas aeruginosa was also carried out. It was observed that the produced MWCNTs have an inhibitory property on bacteria; Escherichia coli and Klebsiella pneumoneae from zero day ( and ) through to twelfth day (Nil count) respectively. It has no effect on Pseudomonas aeruginosa with too numerous to count at zero-sixth day, but a breakdown in its growth at ninth-twelfth day (). This study implied that MWCNTs with varying diameter and well-ordered nano-structure can be produced from catalyst via CCVD

  20. Catalytic wet air oxidation of 2-chlorophenol over sewage sludge-derived carbon-based catalysts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tu, Yuting [Institut de recherches sur la catalyse et l’environnement de Lyon (IRCELYON), CNRS – Université Claude Bernard Lyon 1, 2 Avenue Albert Einstein, 69626 Villeurbanne Cedex (France); School of Environmental Science and Engineering, Sun Yat-Sen University, Guangzhou 510275 (China); Xiong, Ya; Tian, Shuanghong [School of Environmental Science and Engineering, Sun Yat-Sen University, Guangzhou 510275 (China); Guangdong Provincial Key Laboratory of Environmental Pollution Control and Remediation Technology, Guangzhou 510275 (China); Kong, Lingjun [School of Environmental Science and Engineering, Sun Yat-Sen University, Guangzhou 510275 (China); Descorme, Claude, E-mail: claude.descorme@ircelyon.univ-lyon1.fr [Institut de recherches sur la catalyse et l’environnement de Lyon (IRCELYON), CNRS – Université Claude Bernard Lyon 1, 2 Avenue Albert Einstein, 69626 Villeurbanne Cedex (France)

    2014-07-15

    Highlights: • A sewage sludge derived carbon-supported iron oxide catalyst (FeSC) was prepared. • FeSC exhibited high catalytic activity in the wet air oxidation of 2-chlorophenol. • A strong correlation was observed between the 2-CP conversion, the iron leaching and the pH. • Using an acetate buffer, the iron leaching was suppressed while keeping some catalytic activity. • A simplified reaction pathway was proposed for the CWAO of 2-CP over the FeSC catalyst. - Abstract: A sewage sludge derived carbon-supported iron oxide catalyst (FeSC) was prepared and used in the Catalytic Wet Air Oxidation (CWAO) of 2-chlorophenol (2-CP). The catalysts were characterized in terms of elemental composition, surface area, pH{sub PZC}, XRD and SEM. The performances of the FeSC catalyst in the CWAO of 2-CP was assessed in a batch reactor operated at 120 °C under 0.9 MPa oxygen partial pressure. Complete decomposition of 2-CP was achieved within 5 h and 90% Total Organic Carbon (TOC) was removed after 24 h of reaction. Quite a straight correlation was observed between the 2-CP conversion, the amount of iron leached in solution and the pH of the reaction mixture at a given reaction time, indicating a strong predominance of the homogeneous catalysis contribution. The iron leaching could be efficiently prevented when the pH of the solution was maintained at values higher than 4.5, while the catalytic activity was only slightly reduced. Upon four successive batch CWAO experiments, using the same FeSC catalyst recovered by filtration after pH adjustment, only a very minor catalyst deactivation was observed. Finally, based on all the identified intermediates, a simplified reaction pathway was proposed for the CWAO of 2-CP over the FeSC catalyst.

  1. Pyrolysis-catalysis of waste plastic using a nickel-stainless-steel mesh catalyst for high-value carbon products.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yeshui; Nahil, Mohamad A; Wu, Chunfei; Williams, Paul T

    2017-11-01

    A stainless-steel mesh loaded with nickel catalyst was produced and used for the pyrolysis-catalysis of waste high-density polyethylene with the aim of producing high-value carbon products, including carbon nanotubes (CNTs). The catalysis temperature and plastic-to-catalyst ratio were investigated to determine the influence on the formation of different types of carbon deposited on the nickel-stainless-steel mesh catalyst. Increasing temperature from 700 to 900°C resulted in an increase in the carbon deposited on the nickel-loaded stainless-steel mesh catalyst from 32.5 to 38.0 wt%. The increase in sample-to-catalyst ratio reduced the amount of carbon deposited on the mesh catalyst in terms of g carbon g -1 plastic. The carbons were found to be largely composed of filamentous carbons, with negligible disordered (amorphous) carbons. Transmission electron microscopy analysis of the filamentous carbons revealed them to be composed of a large proportion (estimated at ∼40%) multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs). The optimum process conditions for CNT production, in terms of yield and graphitic nature, determined by Raman spectroscopy, was catalysis temperature of 800°C and plastic-to-catalyst ratio of 1:2, where a mass of 334 mg of filamentous/MWCNTs g -1 plastic was produced.

  2. Carbon and Mo transformations during the synthesis of mesoporous Mo2C/carbon catalysts by carbothermal hydrogen reduction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Haiyan; Liu, Shida; Liu, Bing; Montes, Vicente; Hill, Josephine M.; Smith, Kevin J.

    2018-02-01

    The synthesis of mesoporous Mo2C/carbon catalysts by carbothermal hydrogen reduction is reported. Petroleum coke (petcoke) was activated with KOH at 800 °C to obtain high surface area microporous activated petcoke (APC; 2000 m2/g). The APC was wet impregnated with ammonium heptamolybdate (AHM: 10 wt% Mo), dried and reduced in H2 at temperatures from 400 to 800 °C, to yield Mo2C/APC catalysts. Increased reduction temperature increased the Mo2C yield and the mesoporous volume of the Mo2C/APC. At a reduction temperature of 750 °C the mesopore volume of the catalyst doubled compared to the APC support and accounted for 37% of the total pore volume. Maintaining the final CHR temperature for 90 min further increased the Mo2C yield and mesoporosity of the catalyst. The role of Mo2C in the catalytic hydrogenation of the APC and mesopore generation is demonstrated. The activity of the Mo2C/carbon catalysts in the hydrodeoxygenation of 4-methyl phenol increased with increased CHR temperature and catalyst mesoporosity.

  3. Valorization of waste Date pits biomass for biodiesel production in presence of green carbon catalyst

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abu-Jrai, Ahmad M.; Jamil, Farrukh; Al-Muhtaseb, Ala'a H.; Baawain, Mahad; Al-Haj, Lamya; Al-Hinai, Mohab; Al-Abri, Mohammed; Rafiq, Sikander

    2017-01-01

    Highlights: • Waste Date pits were utilized to produce green catalyst for biodiesel production. • The optimized yield of biodiesel was 91.6% at 65 °C and 9:1 methanol to oil ratio. • Catalyst activity decreases very less upon reusing it up to three runs. • Produced biodiesel possess competent fuel properties as per ASTM and EN standards. - Abstract: In this study, an efficient utilization of waste Date pits biomass for synthesizing green carbon catalyst as well as production of biodiesel were investigated. The green carbon catalyst was modified by KOH and characterized by XRD, SEM, EDX, TEM and BET. Taguchi method in Response Surface Methodology (RSM) was applied to study the effect of several process parameters such as reaction temperature, time, catalysts type and methanol to oil ratio, on the yield of the produced biodiesel. The optimized yield obtained was 91.6% when the process temperature was 65 °C, with catalyst type C3 (6 wt% KOH on carbon) within 1 h and with 9:1 methanol to oil ratio. The produced biodiesel was completely characterized in order to verify its quality, compared with the international standards. Fuel properties of the produced biodiesel were found to be a cetane number 60.31, density 881 kg/m"3, viscosity 4.24 mm"2/s, cloud point 3.9 °C, cold filter plugging point −0.62 °C, pour point −1.4 °C and flash point 141 °C, which lies within the limits specified by the international standards of ASTM and EN. Waste Date pits biomass can be a promising platform for the production of green carbon catalysts as well as biodiesel production.

  4. Synthesis of Carbon Nano tubes Using Anadara Granosa Shells as Catalyst Support

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mohd Zobir Hussein; Mohd Zobir Hussein; Salwani Asyikin Zakarya; Siti Halimah Sarijo

    2011-01-01

    The synthesis of carbon nano tubes (CNTs) by chemical vapor deposition (CVD) method using natural calcite prepared from Anadara granosa shells (CS), as metal catalyst support was studied. Hexane and iron were used as carbon precursor and catalyst, respectively. The as synthesised CNTs was characterized using XRD, TEM and FESEM. From the XRD patterns the CNTs peak can be seen more incisive after purification process and from the FESEM micrographs the CNTs can be seen as a bunch of rope-like structures. (author)

  5. The Origin of Sulfur Tolerance in Supported Platinum Catalysts: The Relationship between Structural and Catalytic Properties in Acidic and Alkaline Pt/LTL.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Koningsberger, D.C.; Miller, J.T.

    1996-01-01

    The reactivity, structure, and sulfur tolerance is compared for platinum supported on acidic and alkaline LTL zeolite. In the absence of sulfur, EXAFS spectroscopy indicates that small metallic platinum particles of approximately 6 to 14 atoms/cluster are present. The TOF for neopentane

  6. Graphitised Carbon Nanofibres as Catalyst Support for PEMFC

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Yli-Rantala, E.; Pasanen, A.; Kauranen, P.

    2011-01-01

    (PANI) precursor. The modified surfaces were studied by FTIR and XPS and the electrochemical characterization, including long-term Pt stability tests, was performed using a low-temperature PEMFC single cell. The performance and stability of the G-CNF supported catalysts were compared with a CB supported...

  7. Carbon-supported iron and iron-molybdenum sulfide catalysts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ramselaar, W.L.T.M.

    1988-01-01

    The main objective was to describe the relations between the characteristics (composition and dispersion) of the actual sulfide phase and the catalytic activity. Attention was also paid to the influence of preparational aspects on these characteristics. The catalysts were characterized using in-situ Moessbauer spectroscopy down to 2.0 K. 254 refs.; 47 figs.; 22 tabs

  8. Sea urchin-like mesoporous carbon material grown with carbon nanotubes as a cathode catalyst support for fuel cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kuo, Ping-Lin; Hsu, Chun-Han; Li, Wan-Ting; Jhan, Jing-Yi; Chen, Wei-Fu [Department of Chemical Engineering, National Cheng Kung University, Tainan 70101 (China)

    2010-12-15

    A sea urchin-like carbon (UC) material with high surface area (416 m{sup 2} g{sup -1}), adequate electrical conductivity (59.6 S cm{sup -1}) and good chemical stability was prepared by growing carbon nanotubes onto mesoporous carbon hollow spheres. A uniform dispersion of Pt nanoparticles was then anchored on the UC, where the Pt nanoparticles were prepared using benzylamine as the stabilizer. For this Pt loaded carbon, cyclic voltammogram measurements showed an exceptionally high electrochemically active surface area (EAS) (114.8 m{sup 2} g{sup -1}) compared to the commonly used commercial E-TEK catalyst (65.2 m{sup 2} g{sup -1}). The durability test demonstrates that the carbon used as a support exhibited minor loss in EAS of Pt. Compared to the E-TEK (20 wt%) cathode catalyst, this Pt loaded UC catalyst has greatly enhanced catalytic activity toward the oxygen reduction reaction, less cathode flooding and considerably improved performance, resulting in an enhancement of ca. 37% in power density compared with that of E-TEK. Based on the results obtained, the UC is an excellent support for Pt nanoparticles used as cathode catalysts in proton exchange membrane fuel cells. (author)

  9. CO Adsorption and Oxidation at the Catalyst-Water Interface: An Investigation by Attenuated Total Reflection Infrared Spectroscopy.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ebbesen, S.D.; Mojet, Barbara; Lefferts, Leonardus

    2006-01-01

    Adsorption of carbon monoxide and oxidation of preadsorbed carbon monoxide from gas and aqueous phases were studied on a platinum catalyst deposited on a ZnSe internal reflection element (IRE) using attenuated total reflection infrared (ATR-IR) spectroscopy. The results of this study convincingly

  10. Carbon/H-ZSM-5 composites as supports for bi-functional Fischer-Tropsch synthesis catalysts

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Valero-Romero, M.J.; Sartipi, S.; Sun, X.; Rodríguez-Mirasol, J.; Cordero, T.; Kapteijn, F.; Gascon, J.

    2016-01-01

    Mesoporous H-ZSM-5–carbon composites, prepared via tetrapropylammonium hydroxide (TPAOH) post treatment of H-ZSM-5 followed by deposition of pyrolytic carbon, have been used as the support for the preparation of Co-based Fischer–Tropsch catalysts. The resulting catalysts display an improved

  11. Enhanced Activity and Selectivity of Carbon Nanofiber Supported Pd Catalysts for Nitrite Reduction

    KAUST Repository

    Shuai, Danmeng; Choe, Jong Kwon; Shapley, John R.; Werth, Charles J.

    2012-01-01

    Pd-based catalyst treatment represents an emerging technology that shows promise to remove nitrate and nitrite from drinking water. In this work we use vapor-grown carbon nanofiber (CNF) supports in order to explore the effects of Pd nanoparticle size and interior versus exterior loading on nitrite reduction activity and selectivity (i.e., dinitrogen over ammonia production). Results show that nitrite reduction activity increases by 3.1-fold and selectivity decreases by 8.0-fold, with decreasing Pd nanoparticle size from 1.4 to 9.6 nm. Both activity and selectivity are not significantly influenced by Pd interior versus exterior CNF loading. Consequently, turnover frequencies (TOFs) among all CNF catalysts are similar, suggesting nitrite reduction is not sensitive to Pd location on CNFs nor Pd structure. CNF-based catalysts compare favorably to conventional Pd catalysts (i.e., Pd on activated carbon or alumina) with respect to nitrite reduction activity and selectivity, and they maintain activity over multiple reduction cycles. Hence, our results suggest new insights that an optimum Pd nanoparticle size on CNFs balances faster kinetics with lower ammonia production, that catalysts can be tailored at the nanoscale to improve catalytic performance for nitrite, and that CNFs hold promise as highly effective catalyst supports in drinking water treatment. © 2012 American Chemical Society.

  12. Controlling thin film structure for the dewetting of catalyst nanoparticle arrays for subsequent carbon nanofiber growth

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Randolph, S J; Fowlkes, J D; Melechko, A V; Klein, K L; III, H M Meyer; Simpson, M L; Rack, P D

    2007-01-01

    Vertically aligned carbon nanofiber (CNF) growth is a catalytic chemical vapor deposition process in which structure and functionality is controlled by the plasma conditions and the properties of the catalyst nanoparticles that template the fiber growth. We have found that the resultant catalyst nanoparticle network that forms by the dewetting of a continuous catalyst thin film is dependent on the initial properties of the thin film. Here we report the ability to tailor the crystallographic texture and composition of the nickel catalyst film and subsequently the nanoparticle template by varying the rf magnetron sputter deposition conditions. After sputtering the Ni catalyst thin films, the films are heated and exposed to an ammonia dc plasma, to chemically reduce the native oxide on the films and induce dewetting of the film to form nanoparticles. Subsequent nanoparticle treatment in an acetylene plasma at high substrate temperature results in CNF growth. Evidence is presented that the texture and composition of the nickel thin film has a significant impact on the structure and composition of the formed nanoparticle, as well as the resultant CNF morphology. Nickel films with a preferred (111) or (100) texture were produced and conditions favoring interfacial silicidation reactions were identified and investigated. Both compositional and structural analysis of the films and nanoparticles indicate that the properties of the as-deposited Ni catalyst film influences the subsequent nanoparticle formation and ultimately the catalytic growth of the carbon nanofibers

  13. Enhanced Activity and Selectivity of Carbon Nanofiber Supported Pd Catalysts for Nitrite Reduction

    KAUST Repository

    Shuai, Danmeng

    2012-03-06

    Pd-based catalyst treatment represents an emerging technology that shows promise to remove nitrate and nitrite from drinking water. In this work we use vapor-grown carbon nanofiber (CNF) supports in order to explore the effects of Pd nanoparticle size and interior versus exterior loading on nitrite reduction activity and selectivity (i.e., dinitrogen over ammonia production). Results show that nitrite reduction activity increases by 3.1-fold and selectivity decreases by 8.0-fold, with decreasing Pd nanoparticle size from 1.4 to 9.6 nm. Both activity and selectivity are not significantly influenced by Pd interior versus exterior CNF loading. Consequently, turnover frequencies (TOFs) among all CNF catalysts are similar, suggesting nitrite reduction is not sensitive to Pd location on CNFs nor Pd structure. CNF-based catalysts compare favorably to conventional Pd catalysts (i.e., Pd on activated carbon or alumina) with respect to nitrite reduction activity and selectivity, and they maintain activity over multiple reduction cycles. Hence, our results suggest new insights that an optimum Pd nanoparticle size on CNFs balances faster kinetics with lower ammonia production, that catalysts can be tailored at the nanoscale to improve catalytic performance for nitrite, and that CNFs hold promise as highly effective catalyst supports in drinking water treatment. © 2012 American Chemical Society.

  14. High Performance Fe- and N- Doped Carbon Catalyst with Graphene Structure for Oxygen Reduction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peng, Hongliang; Mo, Zaiyong; Liao, Shijun; Liang, Huagen; Yang, Lijun; Luo, Fan; Song, Huiyu; Zhong, Yiliang; Zhang, Bingqing

    2013-05-01

    Proton exchange membrane fuel cells are promising candidates for a clean and efficient energy conversion in the future, the development of carbon based inexpensive non-precious metal ORR catalyst has becoming one of the most attractive topics in fuel cell field. Herein we report a Fe- and N- doped carbon catalyst Fe-PANI/C-Mela with graphene structure and the surface area up to 702 m2 g-1. In 0.1 M HClO4 electrolyte, the ORR onset potential for the catalyst is high up to 0.98 V, and the half-wave potential is only 60 mV less than that of the Pt/C catalyst (Loadings: 51 μg Pt cm-2). The catalyst shows high stability after 10,000 cyclic voltammetry cycles. A membrane electrode assembly made with the catalyst as a cathode is tested in a H2-air single cell, the maximum power density reached ~0.33 W cm2 at 0.47 V.

  15. Catalytic performance of activated carbon supported cobalt catalyst for CO2 reforming of CH4.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Guojie; Su, Aiting; Du, Yannian; Qu, Jiangwen; Xu, Ying

    2014-11-01

    Syngas production by CO2 reforming of CH4 in a fixed bed reactor was investigated over a series of activated carbon (AC) supported Co catalysts as a function of Co loading (between 15 and 30wt.%) and calcination temperature (Tc=300, 400 or 500°C). The catalytic performance was assessed through CH4 and CO2 conversions and long-term stability. XRD and SEM were used to characterize the catalysts. It was found that the stability of Co/AC catalysts was strongly dependent on the Co loading and calcination temperature. For the loadings (25wt.% for Tc=300°C), stable activities have been achieved. The loading of excess Co (>wt.% 25) causes negative effects not only on the performance of the catalysts but also on the support surface properties. In addition, the experiment showed that ultrasound can enhance and promote dispersion of the active metal on the carrier, thus improving the catalytic performance of the catalyst. The catalyst activity can be long-term stably maintained, and no obvious deactivation has been observed in the first 2700min. After analyzing the characteristics, a reaction mechanism for CO2 reforming of CH4 over Co/AC catalyst was proposed. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Activity of Cu-activated carbon fiber catalyst in wet oxidation of ammonia solution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hung, Chang-Mao

    2009-07-30

    Aqueous solutions of 200-1000 mg/L of ammonia were oxidized in a trickle-bed reactor using Cu-activated carbon fiber (ACF) catalysts, which were prepared by incipient wet impregnation with aqueous solutions of copper nitrate that was deposited on ACF substrates. The results reveal that the conversion of ammonia by wet oxidation in the presence of Cu-ACF catalysts was a function of the metal loading weight ratio of the catalyst. The total conversion efficiency of ammonia was 95% during wet oxidation over the catalyst at 463 K at an oxygen partial pressure of 3.0 MPa. Moreover, the effect of the initial concentration of ammonia and the reaction temperature on the removal of ammonia from the effluent streams was also studied at a liquid space velocity of less than 3.0 h(-1).

  17. Activity of Cu-activated carbon fiber catalyst in wet oxidation of ammonia solution

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hung, Chang-Mao, E-mail: hungcm1031@gmail.com [Department of Industry Engineering and Management, Yung-Ta Institute of Technology and Commerce, 316 Chung-shan Road, Linlo, Pingtung 909, Taiwan (China)

    2009-07-30

    Aqueous solutions of 200-1000 mg/L of ammonia were oxidized in a trickle-bed reactor using Cu-activated carbon fiber (ACF) catalysts, which were prepared by incipient wet impregnation with aqueous solutions of copper nitrate that was deposited on ACF substrates. The results reveal that the conversion of ammonia by wet oxidation in the presence of Cu-ACF catalysts was a function of the metal loading weight ratio of the catalyst. The total conversion efficiency of ammonia was 95% during wet oxidation over the catalyst at 463 K at an oxygen partial pressure of 3.0 MPa. Moreover, the effect of the initial concentration of ammonia and the reaction temperature on the removal of ammonia from the effluent streams was also studied at a liquid space velocity of less than 3.0 h{sup -1}.

  18. Activity of Cu-activated carbon fiber catalyst in wet oxidation of ammonia solution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hung, Chang-Mao

    2009-01-01

    Aqueous solutions of 200-1000 mg/L of ammonia were oxidized in a trickle-bed reactor using Cu-activated carbon fiber (ACF) catalysts, which were prepared by incipient wet impregnation with aqueous solutions of copper nitrate that was deposited on ACF substrates. The results reveal that the conversion of ammonia by wet oxidation in the presence of Cu-ACF catalysts was a function of the metal loading weight ratio of the catalyst. The total conversion efficiency of ammonia was 95% during wet oxidation over the catalyst at 463 K at an oxygen partial pressure of 3.0 MPa. Moreover, the effect of the initial concentration of ammonia and the reaction temperature on the removal of ammonia from the effluent streams was also studied at a liquid space velocity of less than 3.0 h -1 .

  19. Effect of iron catalyst thickness on vertically aligned carbon nanotube forest straightness for CNT-MEMS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moulton, Kellen; Jensen, Brian D; Morrill, Nicholas B; Konneker, Adam M; Vanfleet, Richard R; Allred, David D; Davis, Robert C

    2012-01-01

    This paper examines the effect of iron catalyst thickness on the straightness of growth of carbon nanotubes (CNTs) for microelectromechanical systems fabricated using the CNT-templated-microfabrication (CNT-M) process. SEM images of samples grown using various iron catalyst thicknesses show that both straight sidewalls and good edge definition are achieved using an iron thickness between 7 and 8 nm. Below this thickness, individual CNTs are well aligned, but the sidewalls of CNT forests formed into posts and long walls are not always straight. Above this thickness, the CNT forest sidewalls are relatively straight, but edge definition is poor, with significantly increased sidewall roughness. The proximity of a device or feature to other regions of iron catalyst also affects CNT growth. By using an iron catalyst thickness appropriate for straight growth, and by adding borders of iron around features or devices, a designer can greatly improve straightness of growth for CNT-MEMS. (paper)

  20. Pt/glassy carbon model catalysts prepared from PS-b-P2VP micellar templates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gu, Yunlong; St-Pierre, Jean; Ploehn, Harry J

    2008-11-04

    Poly(styrene)-block-poly(2-vinylpyridine) (PS-b-P2VP) diblock copolymer was used as a micellar template to fabricate arrays of Pt nanoparticles on mica and glassy carbon (GC) supports. Polymer micellar deposition yields Pt nanoparticles with tunable particle size and surface number density on both mica and GC. After deposition of precursor-loaded micelles onto GC, oxygen plasma etching removes the polymer shell, followed by thermal treatment with H2 gas to reduce the Pt. Etching conditions were optimized to maximize removal of the polymer while minimizing damage to the GC. Arrays of Pt nanoparticles with controlled size and surface number density can be prepared on mica (for particle size characterization) and GC to make Pt/GC model catalysts. These model catalysts were characterized by tapping mode atomic force microscopy, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, and cyclic voltammetry to measure activity for oxidation of carbon monoxide or methanol. Cyclic voltammetry results demonstrate the existence of a correlation between Pt particle size and electrocatalytic properties including onset potential, tolerance of carbonaceous adsorbates, and intrinsic activity (based on active Pt area from CO stripping voltammetry). Results obtained with Pt/GC model catalysts duplicate prior results obtained with Pt/porous carbon catalysts therefore validating the synthesis approach and offering a new, tunable platform to study catalyst structure and other effects such as aging on proton exchange membrane fuel cell (PEMFC) reactions.

  1. Cobalt doped CuMnOx catalysts for the preferential oxidation of carbon monoxide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dey, Subhashish; Dhal, Ganesh Chandra; Mohan, Devendra; Prasad, Ram; Gupta, Rajeev Nayan

    2018-05-01

    Carbon monoxide (CO) is a poisonous gas, recognized as a silent killer for the 21st century. It is produced from the partial oxidation of carbon containing compounds. The catalytic oxidation of CO receives a huge attention due to its applications in different fields. In the present work, hopcalite (CuMnOx) catalysts were synthesized using a co-precipitation method for CO oxidation purposes. Also, it was doped with the cobalt by varying concentration from 1 to 5wt%. It was observed that the addition of cobalt into the CuMnOx catalyst (by the deposition-precipitation method) improved the catalytic performance for the low-temperature CO oxidation. CuMnOx catalyst doped with 3wt% of cobalt exhibited most active performance and showed the highest activity than other cobalt concentrations. Different analytical tools (i.e. XRD, FTIR, BET, XPS and SEM-EDX) were used to characterize the as-synthesized catalysts. It was expected that the introduction of cobalt will introduce new active sites into the CuMnOx catalyst that are associated with the cobalt nano-particles. The order of calcination strategies based on the activity for cobalt doped CuMnOx catalysts was observed as: Reactive calcinations (RC) > flowing air > stagnant air. Therefore, RC (4.5% CO in air) route can be recommended for the synthesis of highly active catalysts. The catalytic activity of doped CuMnOx catalysts toward CO oxidation shows a correlation among average oxidation number of Mn and the position and the nature of the doped cobalt cation.

  2. Preparation of Pt–Ru bimetallic catalyst supported on carbon ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Unknown

    of carbon nanotube (Iijima 1991) was first based on the carbon-arc method, though the carbon nanotube prepared by this method are more graphitic, the low yield and rela- tively small length (< 1 m) make the production cost very high. The template synthesis method (Martin 1994) and catalytic production methods (Jose et ...

  3. Novel synthesis of highly durable and active Pt catalyst encapsulated in nitrogen containing carbon for polymer electrolyte membrane fuel cell

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Hyunjoon; Sung, Yung-Eun; Choi, Insoo; Lim, Taeho; Kwon, Oh Joong

    2017-09-01

    Novel synthesis of a Pt catalyst encapsulated in a N-containing carbon layer for use in a polymer electrolyte membrane fuel cell is described in this study. A Pt-aniline complex, formed by mixing Pt precursor and aniline monomer, was used as the source of Pt, C, and N. Heat treatment of the Pt-aniline complex with carbon black yielded 5 nm Pt nanoparticles encapsulated by a N-containing carbon layer originating from aniline carbonization. The synthesized Pt catalyst exhibited higher mass specific activity to oxygen reduction reaction than that shown by conventional Pt/C catalyst because pyridinic N with graphitic carbon in the carbon layer provided active sites for oxygen reduction reaction in addition to those provided by Pt. In single cell testing, initial performance of the synthesized catalyst was limited because the thick catalyst layer increased resistance related to mass transfer. However, it was observed that the carbon layer successfully prevented Pt nanoparticles from growing via agglomeration and Ostwald ripening under fuel cell operation, thereby improving durability. Furthermore, a mass specific performance of the synthesized catalyst higher than that of a conventional Pt/C catalyst was achieved by modifying the synthesized catalyst's layer thickness.

  4. Turbostratic carbon supported palladium as an efficient catalyst for reductive purification of water from trichloroethylene

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emil Kowalewski

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available This work investigates the catalytic properties of turbostratic carbon supported Pd catalyst in hydrodechlorination of trichloroethylene (TCE HDC in aqueous phase. 1.57 wt% Pd/C was thoroughly characterized by BET, TPHD, CO chemisorption, PXRD, STEM, XPS and used as the catalyst in removal of trichloroethylene from drinking water in batch and continuous-flow reactors. The studies showed that catalytic performance of Pd/C depended on the hydrophobicity and textural properties of carbon support, which influenced noble metal dispersion and increased catalyst tolerance against deactivation by chlorination. Palladium in the form of uniformly dispersed small (~3.5 nm nanoparticles was found to be very active and stable in purification of water from TCE both in batch and continuous-flow operation.

  5. Atomic layer deposition of ruthenium surface-coating on porous platinum catalysts for high-performance direct ethanol solid oxide fuel cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeong, Heon Jae; Kim, Jun Woo; Jang, Dong Young; Shim, Joon Hyung

    2015-09-01

    Pt-Ru bi-metallic catalysts are synthesized by atomic layer deposition (ALD) of Ru surface-coating on sputtered Pt mesh. The catalysts are evaluated in direct ethanol solid oxide fuel cells (DESOFCs) in the temperature range of 300-500 °C. Island-growth of the ALD Ru coating is confirmed by transmission electron microscopy and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) analyses. The performance of the DESOFCs is evaluated based on the current-voltage output and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy. Genuine reduction of the polarization impedance, and enhanced power output with improved surface kinetics are achieved with the optimized ALD Ru surface-coating compared to bare Pt. The chemical composition of the Pt/ALD Ru electrode surface after fuel cell operation is analyzed via XPS. Enhanced cell performance is clearly achieved, attributed to the effective Pt/ALD Ru bi-metallic catalysis, including oxidation of Cdbnd O by Ru, and de-protonation of ethanol and cleavage of C-C bonds by Pt, as supported by surface morphology analysis which confirms formation of a large amount of carbon on bare Pt after the ethanol-fuel-cell test.

  6. Selective adsorption of refractory sulfur species on active carbons and carbon based CoMo catalyst.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farag, Hamdy

    2007-03-01

    Adsorption technique could be a reliable alternative in removing to a certain remarkable extent the sulfur species from the feedstock of petroleum oil. The performance of various carbons on adsorption of model sulfur compounds in a simulated feed solution and the sulfur containing compounds in the real gas oil was evaluated. The adsorption experiments have been carried out in a batch scale at ambient temperature and under the atmospheric pressure. In general, the most refractory sulfur compounds in the hydrotreatment reactions were selectively removed and adsorbed. It was found that the adsorbents affinities to dibenzothiophene and 4,6-dimethyldibenzothiophene were much more favored and pronounced than the aromatic matrices like fluorene, 1-methylnaphthalene and 9-methylanthracene. Among the sulfur species, 4,6-dimethyldibenzothiophene was the highest to be removed in terms of both selectivity and capacity over all the present adsorbents. The studied adsorbents showed significant capacities for the polyaromatic thiophenes. The electronic characteristics seem to play a certain role in such behavior. Regeneration of the used adsorbent was successfully attained either by washing it with toluene or by the release of the adsorbates through heat treatment. A suggested adsorptive removal process of sulfur compounds from petroleum distillate over carbon supported CoMo catalyst was discussed.

  7. Dehydrogenation of Ethylbenzene with Carbon Dioxide as Soft Oxidant over Supported Vanadium-Antimony Oxide Catalyst

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hong, Do Young; Vislovskiy, Vladislav P.; Yoo, Jin S.; Chang, Jong San [Korea Research Institute of Chemical Technology, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of); Park, Sang Eon [Inha University, Incheon (Korea, Republic of); Park, Min Seok [Mongolia International University, Ulaanbaatar (Mongolia)

    2005-11-15

    This work presents that carbon dioxide, which is a main contributor to the global warming effect, could be utilized as a selective oxidant in the oxidative dehydrogenation of ethylbenzene. The dehydrogenation of ethylbenzene over alumina-supported vanadium-antimony oxide catalyst has been studied under different atmospheres such as inert nitrogen, steam, oxygen or carbon dioxide as diluent or oxidant. Among them, the addition of carbon dioxide gave the highest styrene yield (up to 82%) and styrene selectivity (up to 97%) along with stable activity. Carbon dioxide could play a beneficial role of a selective oxidant in the improvement of the catalytic behavior through the oxidative pathway.

  8. Efficient strategy to Cu/Si catalyst into vertically aligned carbon ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Abstract. Bamboo-shaped vertically aligned carbon nanotubes (bs-VACNTs) were fabricated on Cu/Si catalyst by ... on Si wafer material when compared to the other commer- ..... [3] Li H, Zhao N, He C, Shi C, Du X, Li J and Cui Q 2008 Mater.

  9. Selective formation of diamond-like carbon coating by surface catalyst patterning

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Palnichenko, A.V.; Mátéfi-Tempfli, M.; Mátéfi-Tempfli, Stefan

    2004-01-01

    The selective formation of diamond-like carbon coating by surface catalyst patterning was studied. DLC films was deposited using plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition, filtered vacuum arc deposition, laser ablation, magnetron sputtering and ion-beam lithography methods. The DLC coatings were...

  10. Effect of catalyst preparation on the yield of carbon nanotube growth

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Escobar, Mariano; Rubiolo, Gerardo; Candal, Roberto; Goyanes, Silvia

    2009-01-01

    Multi-wall carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) were synthesized by catalytic chemical vapor deposition (CVD) on catalytic iron nanoparticles dispersed in a silica matrix, prepared by sol gel method. In this contribution, variation of gelation condition on catalyst structure and its influence on the yield of carbon nanotubes growth was studied. The precursor utilized were tetraethyl-orthosilicate and iron nitrate. The sols were dried at two different temperatures in air (25 or 80 deg. C) and then treated at 450 deg. C for 10 h. The xerogels were introduced into the chamber and reduced in a hydrogen/nitrogen (10%v/v) atmosphere at 600 deg. C. MWCNTs were formed by deposition of carbon atoms from decomposition of acetylene at 700 deg. C. The system gelled at RT shows a yield of 100% respect to initial catalyst mass whereas the yield of that gelled at 80 deg. C was lower than 10%. Different crystalline phases are observed for both catalysts in each step of the process. Moreover, TPR analysis shows that iron oxide can be efficiently reduced to metallic iron only in the system gelled at room temperature. Carbon nanotubes display a diameter of about 25-40 nm and several micron lengths. The growth mechanism of MWCNTs is base growth mode for both catalysts.

  11. Effect of catalyst preparation on the yield of carbon nanotube growth

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Escobar, Mariano, E-mail: mescobar@df.uba.a [Dep. Quimica Inorganica, Analitica y Quimica Fisica, FCEyN, UBA, Ciudad Universitaria (1428), Bs As (Argentina); LP and MC, Dep. Fisica, FCEyN, UBA (Argentina); Rubiolo, Gerardo [Unidad de Actividad Materiales, CNEA, Av Gral Paz 1499, San Martin (1650), Bs As (Argentina); Consejo Nacional de Investigaciones Cientificas y Tecnicas (CONICET) (Argentina); Candal, Roberto [Consejo Nacional de Investigaciones Cientificas y Tecnicas (CONICET) (Argentina); Instituto de Fisico-quimica de Materiales, Ambiente y Energia (INQUIMAE), CONICET - UBA (Argentina); Goyanes, Silvia [LP and MC, Dep. Fisica, FCEyN, UBA (Argentina); Consejo Nacional de Investigaciones Cientificas y Tecnicas (CONICET) (Argentina)

    2009-10-01

    Multi-wall carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) were synthesized by catalytic chemical vapor deposition (CVD) on catalytic iron nanoparticles dispersed in a silica matrix, prepared by sol gel method. In this contribution, variation of gelation condition on catalyst structure and its influence on the yield of carbon nanotubes growth was studied. The precursor utilized were tetraethyl-orthosilicate and iron nitrate. The sols were dried at two different temperatures in air (25 or 80 deg. C) and then treated at 450 deg. C for 10 h. The xerogels were introduced into the chamber and reduced in a hydrogen/nitrogen (10%v/v) atmosphere at 600 deg. C. MWCNTs were formed by deposition of carbon atoms from decomposition of acetylene at 700 deg. C. The system gelled at RT shows a yield of 100% respect to initial catalyst mass whereas the yield of that gelled at 80 deg. C was lower than 10%. Different crystalline phases are observed for both catalysts in each step of the process. Moreover, TPR analysis shows that iron oxide can be efficiently reduced to metallic iron only in the system gelled at room temperature. Carbon nanotubes display a diameter of about 25-40 nm and several micron lengths. The growth mechanism of MWCNTs is base growth mode for both catalysts.

  12. Phosphorylated mesoporous carbon as effective catalyst for the selective fructose dehydration to HMF

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Villa, Alberto [Universita di Milano, Italy; Schiavoni, Marco [University of Milan and INFN, Milano, Italy; Fulvio, Pasquale F [ORNL; Mahurin, Shannon Mark [ORNL; Dai, Sheng [ORNL; Mayes, Richard T [ORNL; Veith, Gabriel M [ORNL; Prati, Laura [Universita di Milano, Italy

    2013-01-01

    Phosphorylated mesoporous carbons (PMCs) have been synthesized using an already reported one pot methodology. These materials have been applied as acidic catalysts in the dehydration of fructose to hydroxymethylfurfural (HMF). PMCs showed better selectivity to HMF compared to sulfonated carbon catalyst (SC) despite lower activity. The concentration of P-O groups correlates to the activity/selectivity of the catalysts; the higher the P-O concentration the higher the activity. However, the higher the P-O content the lower the selectivity to HMF. Indeed a lower concentration of the P-O groups (and even the acidic groups) minimized the degradation of HMF to levulinic acid and the formation of by-products, such as humines. Stability tests showed that these systems deactivate due to the formation of humines, water insoluble by-products derived from the dehydration of fructose, blocking the active site of the catalyst. Increasing the amount of P-O groups, higher amount of humines are formed; therefore carbons containing lower amount of phosphorylated groups, such as P/N-0.25, are less prone to deactivation. Keywords: Phosphorylated mesoporous carbons; fructose dehydration; HMF

  13. Structure and Reactivity of Zeolite- and Carbon-Supported Catalysts for the Oxidative Carbonylation of Alcohols

    OpenAIRE

    Briggs, Daniel Neal

    2010-01-01

    AbstractStructure and Reactivity of Zeolite- and Carbon-Supported Catalysts for the Oxidative Carbonylation of AlcoholsbyDaniel Neal BriggsDoctor of Philosophy in Chemical EngineeringUniversity of California, BerkeleyProfessor Alexis T. Bell, Chair The oxidative carbonylation of alcohols to produce dialkyl carbonates is a process that takes place commercially in a slurry of cuprous chloride in the appropriate alcohol. While this process is chemically efficient, it incurs costs in terms of ene...

  14. Immersion Calorimetry for the Characterization of PD Catalysts Supported on Activated Carbon

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liliana Giraldo

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Activated carbons obtained from coconut peel were oxidized using hydrogen peroxide. Superficial characteristics of these carbons were determined through N2 and CO2 isotherms and functional groups were characterized by TPD. Finally, the microcalorimetry technique was used in order to obtain the immersion enthalpies in diverse liquids and established the relation between them and the results obtained by the other characterization techniques. The results suggested that the immersion calorimetry allow establishing the difference between the supports and the catalysts.

  15. High yield growth of patterned vertically aligned carbon nanotubes using inkjet-printed catalyst.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beard, James D; Stringer, Jonathan; Ghita, Oana R; Smith, Patrick J

    2013-10-09

    This study reports on the fabrication of vertically aligned carbon nanotubes localized at specific sites on a growth substrate by deposition of a nanoparticle suspension using inkjet printing. Carbon nanotubes were grown with high yield as vertically aligned forests to a length of approximately 400 μm. The use of inkjet printing for catalyst fabrication considerably improves the production rate of vertically aligned patterned nanotube forests compared with conventional patterning techniques, for example, electron beam lithography or photolithography.

  16. Synthesis of gold nano-catalysts supported on carbon nanotubes by using electroless plating technique

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ma Xicheng; Li Xia; Lun Ning; Wen Shulin

    2006-01-01

    Gold nanoparticles supported on carbon nanotubes were prepared by using electroless plating technique. High-resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM) has shown that spherical gold nanoparticles were homogeneously dispersed on the surfaces of the carbon nanotubes with a distribution of particle sizes sharply at around 3-4 nm in diameter. The results presented in this work will probably provide new catalysts with better performances

  17. Platinum recycling in the United States in 1998

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hilliard, Henry E.

    2001-01-01

    In the United States, catalytic converters are the major source of secondary platinum for recycling. Other sources of platinum scrap include reforming and chemical process catalysts. The glass industry is a small but significant source of platinum scrap. In North America, it has been estimated that in 1998 more than 20,000 kilograms per year of platinum-group metals from automobile catalysts were available for recycling. In 1998, an estimated 7,690 kilograms of platinum were recycled in the United States. U.S. recycling efficiency was calculated to have been 76 percent in 1998; the recycling rate was estimated at 16 percent.

  18. Carbon-supported cubic CoSe2 catalysts for oxygen reduction reaction in alkaline medium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Feng Yongjun; Alonso-Vante, Nicolas

    2012-01-01

    Highlights: ► Cubic CoSe 2 a non-precious metal electrocatalyst for oxygen reduction in KOH. ► The catalyst shows four-electron transfer pathway in overall reaction. ► Catalyst has higher methanol tolerance than commercial Pt/C catalyst. - Abstract: A Carbon-supported CoSe 2 nanocatalyst has been developed as an alternative non-precious metal electrocatalyst for oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) in alkaline medium. The catalyst was prepared via a surfactant-free route and its electrocatalytic activity for the ORR has been investigated in detail in 0.1 M KOH electrolyte at 25 °C using rotating disk electrode (RDE) and rotating ring-disk electrode (RRDE) techniques. The prepared catalyst showed promising catalytic activity towards ORR in a four-electron transfer pathway and higher tolerance to methanol compared to commercial Pt/C catalyst in 0.1 M KOH. To some extent, the increase of CoSe 2 loading on the electrode favors a faster reduction of H 2 O 2 intermediate to H 2 O.

  19. Functionalized carbon nanofibers as solid acid catalysts for transesterification

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Stellwagen, D.R.; van der Klis, Frits; van Es, D.S.; de Jong, K.P.; Bitter, J.H.

    2013-01-01

    Carbon nanofibers (CNFs) were functionalized with aryl sulfonic acid groups using in situ diazonium coupling. The use of diazonium coupling yielded an acidic carbon material, in which the introduced acidic groups are readily accessible to the triglyceride substrate. The material is an efficient

  20. Functionalized carbon nanofibers as solid-acid catalysts for transesterification

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Stellwagen, D.R.; Klis, van der F.; Es, van D.S.; Jong, de K.P.; Bitter, J.H.

    2013-01-01

    Carbon nanofibers (CNFs) were functionalized with aryl sulfonic acid groups using in situ diazonium coupling. The use of diazonium coupling yielded an acidic carbon material, in which the introduced acidic groups are readily accessible to the triglyceride substrate. The material is an efficient

  1. Preparation of Pt–Ru bimetallic catalyst supported on carbon

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    The template carbonization of polyphenyl acetylene yields hollow, uniform cylindrical carbon nanotubes with outer diameter almost equal to pore diameter of the template used. High resolution transmission electron microscopic investigation reveals that Pt–Ru nanoparticles are highly dispersed inside the tube with an ...

  2. Study of different nanostructured carbon supports for fuel cell catalysts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mirabile Gattia, Daniele; Antisari, Marco Vittori; Giorgi, Leonardo; Marazzi, Renzo; Piscopiello, Emanuela; Montone, Amelia; Bellitto, Serafina; Licoccia, Silvia; Traversa, Enrico

    Pt clusters were deposited by an impregnation process on three carbon supports: multi-wall carbon nanotubes (MWNT), single-wall carbon nanohorns (SWNH), and Vulcan XC-72 carbon black to investigate the effect of the carbon support structure on the possibility of reducing Pt loading on electrodes for direct methanol (DMFC) fuel cells without impairing performance. MWNT and SWNH were in-house synthesised by a DC and an AC arc discharge process between pure graphite electrodes, respectively. UV-vis spectrophotometry, scanning and transmission electron microscopy, X-ray diffraction, and cyclic voltammetry measurements were used to characterize the Pt particles deposited on the three carbon supports. A differential yield for Pt deposition, not strictly related to the surface area of the carbon support, was observed. SWNH showed the highest surface chemical activity toward Pt deposition. Pt deposited in different forms depending on the carbon support. Electrochemical characterizations showed that the Pt nanostructures deposited on MWNT are particularly efficient in the methanol oxidation reaction.

  3. Facile preparation of hierarchically porous carbon using diatomite as both template and catalyst and methylene blue adsorption of carbon products.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Dong; Yuan, Peng; Tan, Daoyong; Liu, Hongmei; Wang, Tong; Fan, Mingde; Zhu, Jianxi; He, Hongping

    2012-12-15

    Hierarchically porous carbons were prepared using a facile preparation method in which diatomite was utilized as both template and catalyst. The porous structures of the carbon products and their formation mechanisms were investigated. The macroporosity and microporosity of the diatomite-templated carbons were derived from replication of diatom shell and structure-reconfiguration of the carbon film, respectively. The macroporosity of carbons was strongly dependent on the original morphology of the diatomite template. The macroporous structure composed of carbon plates connected by the pillar- and tube-like macropores resulted from the replication of the central and edge pores of the diatom shells with disk-shaped morphology, respectively. And another macroporous carbon tubes were also replicated from canoe-shaped diatom shells. The acidity of diatomite dramatically affected the porosity of the carbons, more acid sites of diatomite template resulted in higher surface area and pore volume of the carbon products. The diatomite-templated carbons exhibited higher adsorption capacity for methylene blue than the commercial activated carbon (CAC), although the specific surface area was much smaller than that of CAC, due to the hierarchical porosity of diatomite-templated carbons. And the carbons were readily reclaimed and regenerated. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Electrodeposition of gold-platinum alloy nanoparticles on carbon nanotubes as electrochemical sensing interface for sensitive detection of tumor marker

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li Ya [Key Laboratory on Luminescence and Real-Time Analysis, Ministry of Education, College of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Southwest University, Chongqing 400715 (China); Yuan Ruo, E-mail: yuanruo@swu.edu.cn [Key Laboratory on Luminescence and Real-Time Analysis, Ministry of Education, College of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Southwest University, Chongqing 400715 (China); Chai Yaqin; Song Zhongju [Key Laboratory on Luminescence and Real-Time Analysis, Ministry of Education, College of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Southwest University, Chongqing 400715 (China)

    2011-07-30

    Graphical abstract: Electrodeposition of gold-platinum alloy (Au-PtNPs) on carbon nanotubes as electrochemical sensing interface and HRP as blocking agent for the fabrication of high sensitive immunosensor. Display Omitted Highlights: > In this work, we proposed a novel electrochemical sensing surface. > The sensing surface possessed larger electro-active areas and higher conductivity due to the introduction of MWCNTs. > The signal could be amplified effectively by synergetic catalysis effect of Au-PtNPs and HRP towards the reduction of H{sub 2}O{sub 2}. > Biomolecules could be immobilized on the surface of Au-PtNPs tightly with the bioactivity kept well. > The simple fabrication method provided a new potential for the future development of practical devices for clinical diagnosis application. - Abstract: A novel electrochemical sensing interface, electrodeposition of gold-platinum alloy nanoparticles (Au-PtNPs) on carbon nanotubes, was proposed and used to fabricate a label-free amperometric immunosensor. On the one hand, the multiwalled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) could increase active area of the electrode and enhance the electron transfer ability between the electrode and redox probe; on the other hand, the Au-PtNPs not only could be used to assemble biomolecules with bioactivity kept well, but also could further facilitate the shuttle of electrons. In the meanwhile, horseradish peroxidase (HRP) instead of bovine serum albumin (BSA) was employed to block the possible remaining active sites and avoid the nonspecific adsorption. With the synergetic catalysis effect of Au-PtNPs and HRP towards the reduction of hydrogen peroxide (H{sub 2}O{sub 2}), the signal could be amplified and the sensitivity could be enhanced. Using alpha-fetoprotein (AFP) as model analyte, the fabricated immunosensor exhibited two wide linear ranges in the concentration ranges of 0.5-20 ng mL{sup -1} and 20-200 ng mL{sup -1} with a detection limit of 0.17 ng mL{sup -1} at a signal-to-noise of

  5. Determination of the potentiostatic stability of PEMFC electro catalysts at elevated temperatures

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dam, V.A.T.; Jayasayee, K.; Bruijn, de F.A.

    2009-01-01

    The electrochemical stability of platinum on carbon catalyst (Hispec TM 4000, Johnson Matthey) has been investigated predominantly at constant potentials ranging from 0.95 to 1.25 V at elevated temperatures. By combining a quartz crystal microbalance (QCM) with electrochemical techniques, dynamic

  6. Effects of Activated Carbon Surface Property on Structure and Activity of Ru/AC Catalysts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, S. K.; Li, L. M.; Guo, N. N.

    2018-05-01

    The activated carbon (AC) was modified by supercritical (SC) methanol, HNO3 oxidation, or HNO3 oxidation plus SC methanol, respectively. Then, the original and the modified AC were used as supports for Ru/AC catalysts prepared via the impregnation method. The results showed that the SC methanol modification decreased the content of surface acidic groups of AC. While HNO3 oxidation displayed the opposite behavior. Furthermore, the dispersion of ruthenium and the activity of catalysts were highly dependent on the content of surface acidic groups, and the SC methanol modified sample exhibited the highest activity for hydrogenation of glucose.

  7. Synthesis of Dimethyl Glutarate from Cyclobutanone and Dimethyl Carbonate over Solid Base Catalysts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhi, Chen; Dudu, Wu

    2012-01-01

    A facile route for the synthesis of dimethyl glutarate (DMG) from cyclobutanone and dimethyl carbonate (DMC) in the presence of solid base catalysts has been developed. It was found that the intermediate carbomethoxycyclobutanone (CMCB) was produced from cyclobutanone with DMC in the first step, and then CMCB was further converted to DMG by reacting with a methoxide group. The role of the basic catalysts can be mainly ascribed to the activation of cyclobutanone via the abstraction of a proton in the α-position by base sites, and solid bases with moderate strength, such as MgO, favor the formation of DMG

  8. Synthesis of Dimethyl Glutarate from Cyclobutanone and Dimethyl Carbonate over Solid Base Catalysts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhi, Chen; Dudu, Wu [Guangdong Medical College, Dongguan (China)

    2012-06-15

    A facile route for the synthesis of dimethyl glutarate (DMG) from cyclobutanone and dimethyl carbonate (DMC) in the presence of solid base catalysts has been developed. It was found that the intermediate carbomethoxycyclobutanone (CMCB) was produced from cyclobutanone with DMC in the first step, and then CMCB was further converted to DMG by reacting with a methoxide group. The role of the basic catalysts can be mainly ascribed to the activation of cyclobutanone via the abstraction of a proton in the {alpha}-position by base sites, and solid bases with moderate strength, such as MgO, favor the formation of DMG

  9. Fe catalysts for methane decomposition to produce hydrogen and carbon nano materials

    KAUST Repository

    Zhou, Lu; Enakonda, Linga Reddy; Harb, Moussab; Saih, Youssef; Aguilar Tapia, Antonio; Ould-Chikh, Samy; Hazemann, Jean-louis; Li, Jun; Wei, Nini; Gary, Daniel; Del-Gallo, Pascal; Basset, Jean-Marie

    2017-01-01

    Conducting catalytic methane decomposition over Fe catalysts is a green and economic route to produce H2 without CO/CO2 contamination. Fused 65wt% and impregnated 20wt% Fe catalysts were synthesized with different additives to investigate their activity, whereas showing Fe-Al2O3 combination as the best catalyst. Al2O3 is speculated to expose more Fe00 for the selective deposition of carbon nano tubes (CNTs). A fused Fe (65wt%)-Al2O3 sample was further investigated by means of H2-TPR, in-situ XRD, HRTEM and XAS to conclude 750°C is the optimized temperature for H2 pre-reduction and reaction to obtain a high activity. Based on density functional theory (DFT) study, a reaction mechanism over Fe catalysts was proposed to explain the formation of graphite from unstable supersaturated iron carbides decomposition. A carbon deposition model was further proposed which explains the formation of different carbon nano materials.

  10. Fe catalysts for methane decomposition to produce hydrogen and carbon nano materials

    KAUST Repository

    Zhou, Lu

    2017-02-21

    Conducting catalytic methane decomposition over Fe catalysts is a green and economic route to produce H2 without CO/CO2 contamination. Fused 65wt% and impregnated 20wt% Fe catalysts were synthesized with different additives to investigate their activity, whereas showing Fe-Al2O3 combination as the best catalyst. Al2O3 is speculated to expose more Fe00 for the selective deposition of carbon nano tubes (CNTs). A fused Fe (65wt%)-Al2O3 sample was further investigated by means of H2-TPR, in-situ XRD, HRTEM and XAS to conclude 750°C is the optimized temperature for H2 pre-reduction and reaction to obtain a high activity. Based on density functional theory (DFT) study, a reaction mechanism over Fe catalysts was proposed to explain the formation of graphite from unstable supersaturated iron carbides decomposition. A carbon deposition model was further proposed which explains the formation of different carbon nano materials.

  11. Electrocatalysis of chemically synthesized noble metal nanoparticles on carbon electrodes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhang, Ling; Ulstrup, Jens; Zhang, Jingdong

    Noble metal nanoparticles (NPs), such as platinum (Pt) and palladium (Pd) NPs are promising catalysts for dioxygen reduction and oxidation of molecules such as formic acid and ethanol in fuel cells. Carbon nanomaterials are ideal supporting materials for electrochemical catalysts due to their good...... by electrochemical SPM. This study offers promise for development of new high-efficiency catalyst types with low-cost for fuel cell technology...

  12. USE OF CARBON CATALYSTS FOR OXIDATIVE DESTRUCTION OF WASTEWATERS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Svetlana S. Stavitskaya

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available The paper considers a possibility of using the catalytic action of the carbonaceous adsorbents modified by different ways for the purification of various solutions, natural and wastewaters. It has been found that the oxidative destruction of organic (phenols, dyes, pesticides, etc. and inorganic (H2S contaminants in water solutions is considerably intensified in the presence of both ordinary activated carbons and especially, carbons with specially introduced catalytic additives. It is shown that the sewage treatment level is strongly affected by the amount and nature of a modifying agent introduced on the carbon surface.

  13. Flame synthesis of carbon nano onions using liquefied petroleum gas without catalyst

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dhand, Vivek, E-mail: vivekdhand2012@gmail.com [Centre for Knowledge Management of Nanoscience and Technology, 12-5-32/8, Vijayapuri Colony, Tarnaka, Secunderabad-500 017, A.P (India); Prasad, J. Sarada; Rao, M. Venkateswara [Centre for Environment, Institute of Science and Technology, Jawaharlal Nehru Technological University, Kukatpally, Hyderabad 500 085 (India); Bharadwaj, S. [Department of Physics, CVR College of Engineering and Osmania University, Hyderabad 501510, A.P (India); Anjaneyulu, Y. [TLGVRC, Jackson State University, JSU Box 18739, Jackson, MS 39217-0939 (United States); Jain, Pawan Kumar [International Advanced Research Centre for Powder Metallurgy and New Materials (ARCI), Balapur PO, Hyderabad 500005, Andhra Pradesh (India)

    2013-03-01

    Densely agglomerated, high specific surface area carbon nano onions with diameter of 30-40 nm have been synthesized. Liquefied petroleum gas and air mixtures produced carbon nano onions in diffusion flames without catalyst. The optimized oxidant to fuel ratio which produces carbon nano onions has been found to be 0.1 slpm/slpm. The experiment yielded 70% pure carbon nano onions with a rate of 5 g/h. X-ray diffraction, high-resolution electron microscopy and Raman spectrum reveal the densely packed sp{sup 2} hybridized carbon with (002) semi-crystalline hexagonal graphite reflection. The carbon nano onions are thermally stable up to 600 Degree-Sign C. - Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Flame synthesized carbon nano onions with 30-40 nm diameters. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer LPG/air, diffusion type flame used in absence of catalyst to produce nano onions. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Carbon nano onion production rate is 5 g/hr and with 70% purity.

  14. Application of hydrophobic Pt catalysts in hydrogen isotopes separation from nuclear effluents

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ionita, G.; Popescu, I.; Stefanescu, I.; Retegan, T. [National Institute of Cryogenics and Isotopic Separation (Romania)

    2003-09-01

    According to reviewed references and to tests effected by authors the platinum/carbon/teflon is the most active and the most stable catalyst for removal of tritium from nuclear effluents by isotopic exchange between hydrogen and liquid water. To improve the performances of process it is recommended to use the catalyst as ordered or random mixed catalytic packing in a trickle bed reactor. (O.M.)

  15. SEM method for direct visual tracking of nanoscale morphological changes of platinum based electrocatalysts on fixed locations upon electrochemical or thermal treatments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zorko, Milena [National Institute of Chemistry, Hajdrihova 19, Ljubljana (Slovenia); Centre of Excellence for Low-Carbon Technologies, Hajdrihova 19, Ljubljana (Slovenia); Jozinović, Barbara [Centre of Excellence for Low-Carbon Technologies, Hajdrihova 19, Ljubljana (Slovenia); Bele, Marjan [National Institute of Chemistry, Hajdrihova 19, Ljubljana (Slovenia); Centre of Excellence for Low-Carbon Technologies, Hajdrihova 19, Ljubljana (Slovenia); Hodnik, Nejc, E-mail: nejc.hodnik@ki.si [National Institute of Chemistry, Hajdrihova 19, Ljubljana (Slovenia); Gaberšček, Miran [National Institute of Chemistry, Hajdrihova 19, Ljubljana (Slovenia); Centre of Excellence for Low-Carbon Technologies, Hajdrihova 19, Ljubljana (Slovenia)

    2014-05-01

    A general method for tracking morphological surface changes on a nanometer scale with scanning electron microscopy (SEM) is introduced. We exemplify the usefulness of the method by showing consecutive SEM images of an identical location before and after the electrochemical and thermal treatments of platinum-based nanoparticles deposited on a high surface area carbon. Observations reveal an insight into platinum based catalyst degradation occurring during potential cycling treatment. The presence of chloride clearly increases the rate of degradation. At these conditions the dominant degradation mechanism seems to be the platinum dissolution with some subsequent redeposition on the top of the catalyst film. By contrast, at the temperature of 60 °C, under potentiostatic conditions some carbon corrosion and particle aggregation was observed. Temperature treatment simulating the annealing step of the synthesis reveals sintering of small platinum based composite aggregates into uniform spherical particles. The method provides a direct proof of induced surface phenomena occurring on a chosen location without the usual statistical uncertainty in usual, random SEM observations across relatively large surface areas. - Highlights: • A new SEM method for observations of identical locations. • Nanoscale morphological consecutive changes on identical locations. • Electrochemical and thermal treatments on platinum based nanoparticles. • Potential cycling induces platinum dissolution with redeposition on top of the film. • At 1.4 V vs. RHE and 60 °C carbon corrosion and particle aggregation is observed.

  16. Catalytic transformations of fatty acids derivatives for food, oleochemicals and fuels over carbon supported platinum group metals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Simakova, I.

    2010-07-01

    The main focus of the research is in the development of an alternative harmless Pd-based hydrogenation technology compared to the traditional one based on Ni. Pd counterparts could be recycled, is more active and resistant to acids and form less trans isomers. In order to be economically viable and competitive this technology has to be based on the best catalyst that means an optimized combination of high activity, high life-time and high selectivity. Therefore, the engineering aspects were closely taken into account and much effort was directed into the design of Pd on a mesoporous carbon support as well as in establishing the correlation between catalyst characteristics and its activity in the C=C hydrogenation and isomerization. Detailed characterization (TEM, XRD, XPS, TPR, CO TPD, physisorption and CO chemisorption) of the tested catalysts was carried out. In addition, the influence of temperature, hydrogen pressure, catalytic concentration on the fatty-acid and isomeric composition of hydrogenated oils were determined in the absence of mass transfer limitations. Deoxygenation by full decarboxylation of -COOH function of fatty acid is the best way to make green diesel because paraffins are produced and utilization of expensive hydrogen is not required. Deoxygenation was systematically investigated over Pd/C (Sibunit) using saturated fatty acids C16 - C20 and C22, as feeds, producing one less carbon containing, diesel-like hydrocarbons. The same decarboxylation rates were obtained for pure saturated fatty acids. Comparison of deoxygenation rate for stearic, oleic or linoleic acids as a feedstock at 300 deg C under 1 vol% hydrogen over mesoporous Pd/C (Sibunit) catalyst revealed that catalyst activity and selectivity increased with less unsaturated feedstock. The main products in the case of stearic acid were desired C17 hydrocarbons, whereas the amounts of C17 aromatic compounds increased in case of oleic and linoleic acids. Catalyst deactivation was relatively

  17. A combined in situ XAS-XRPD-Raman study of Fischer-Tropsch synthesis over a carbon supported Co catalyst

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tsakoumis, Nikolaos E.; Dehghan, Roya; Johnsen, Rune

    2013-01-01

    A cobalt based Fischer-Tropsch synthesis (FTS) catalyst, supported on a carbon nanofibers/carbon felt composite (Co/CNF/CF) was studied in situ at realistic conditions. The catalyst was monitored by Xray absorption spectroscopy (XAS), high-resolution X-ray powder diffraction (HR-XRPD) and Raman...... spectroscopy, while changes in the gas phase were observed by mass spectrometry (MS). Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) was also applied to characterise the catalyst. The catalyst has a bimodal particle size distribution and exhibits a high deactivation rate. During the in situ study the catalyst appears...... to reduce further at the induction period of FTS, while crystallite growth is been detected in the same period. At steady state FTS the amount of metallic Co is constant. A change in the volumetric flow towards higher conversions did not affect the degree of reduction or the crystallite size of the catalyst...

  18. A New Energy-Saving Catalytic System: Carbon Dioxide Activation by a Metal/Carbon Catalyst.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yun, Danim; Park, Dae Sung; Lee, Kyung Rok; Yun, Yang Sik; Kim, Tae Yong; Park, Hongseok; Lee, Hyunjoo; Yi, Jongheop

    2017-09-22

    The conversion of CO 2 into useful chemicals is an attractive method to reduce greenhouse gas emissions and to produce sustainable chemicals. However, the thermodynamic stability of CO 2 means that a lot of energy is required for its conversion into chemicals. Here, we suggest a new catalytic system with an alternative heating system that allows minimal energy consumption during CO 2 conversion. In this system, electrical energy is transferred as heat energy to the carbon-supported metal catalyst. Fast ramping rates allow high operating temperatures (T app =250 °C) to be reached within 5 min, which leads to an 80-fold decrease of energy consumption in methane reforming using CO 2 (DRM). In addition, the consumed energy normalized by time during the DRM reaction in this current-assisted catalysis is sixfold lower (11.0 kJ min -1 ) than that in conventional heating systems (68.4 kJ min -1 ). © 2017 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  19. Controllable pt nanoparticle deposition on carbon nanotubes as an anode catalyst for direct methanol fuel cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mu, Yongyan; Liang, Hanpu; Hu, Jinsong; Jiang, Li; Wan, Lijun

    2005-12-01

    We report a novel process to prepare well-dispersed Pt nanoparticles on CNTs. Pt nanoparticles, which were modified by the organic molecule triphenylphosphine, were deposited on multiwalled carbon nanotubes by the organic molecule, which acts as a cross linker. By manipulating the relative ratio of Pt nanoparticles and multiwalled carbon nanotubes in solution, Pt/CNT composites with different Pt content were achieved. The so-prepared Pt/CNT composite materials show higher electrocatalytic activity and better tolerance to poisoning species in methanol oxidation than the commercial E-TEK catalyst, which can be ascribed to the high dispersion of Pt nanoparticles on the multiwalled carbon nanotube surface.

  20. Oxygen Reduction Reaction Activity of Platinum Thin Films with Different Densities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ergul, Busra; Begum, Mahbuba; Kariuki, Nancy; Myers, Deborah J.; Karabacak, Tansel

    2017-08-24

    Platinum thin films with different densities were grown on glassy carbon electrodes by high pressure sputtering deposition and evaluated as oxygen reduction reaction catalysts for polymer electrolyte fuel cells using cyclic voltammetry and rotating disk electrode techniques in aqueous perchloric acid electrolyte. The electrochemically active surface area, ORR mass activity (MA) and specific activity (SA) of the thin film electrodes were obtained. MA and SA were found to be higher for low-density films than for high-density film.

  1. Wet catalyst-support films for production of vertically aligned carbon nanotubes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alvarez, Noe T; Hamilton, Christopher E; Pint, Cary L; Orbaek, Alvin; Yao, Jun; Frosinini, Aldo L; Barron, Andrew R; Tour, James M; Hauge, Robert H

    2010-07-01

    A procedure for vertically aligned carbon nanotube (VA-CNT) production has been developed through liquid-phase deposition of alumoxanes (aluminum oxide hydroxides, boehmite) as a catalyst support. Through a simple spin-coating of alumoxane nanoparticles, uniform centimer-square thin film surfaces were coated and used as supports for subsequent deposition of metal catalyst. Uniform VA-CNTs are observed to grow from this film following deposition of both conventional evaporated Fe catalyst, as well as premade Fe nanoparticles drop-dried from the liquid phase. The quality and uniformity of the VA-CNTs are comparable to growth from conventional evaporated layers of Al(2)O(3). The combined use of alumoxane and Fe nanoparticles to coat surfaces represents an inexpensive and scalable approach to large-scale VA-CNT production that makes chemical vapor deposition significantly more competitive when compared to other CNT production techniques.

  2. Catalyst effects of fabrication of carbon nanotubes synthesized by chemical vapor deposition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tian, F.; Li, H.P.; Zhao, N.Q.; He, C.N.

    2009-01-01

    Catalytic effects of the fabrication of carbon nanotubes (CNTs) by chemical vapor deposition of methane were investigated by thermogravimetric analysis. More specifically, the total yield and thermal stability characteristics of the product were examined with respect to physicochemical characteristics of the catalyst. Three kinds of Ni/Al catalysts with 5 wt%, 10 wt% and 15 wt% Ni, respectively were employed to synthesize CNTs. It was determined that an optimal Ni content of the catalyst resulted in maximum yield and most stable product. With increasing the Ni content, the CNT yield increased but they became less stable during heat treatment in air. According to transmission electron microscopy observations, the defect sites along the walls and at the ends of the raw CNTs facilitated the thermal oxidative destruction of the CNTs.

  3. Growth of uniform thin-walled carbon nanotubes with spin-coated Fe catalyst and the correlation between the pre-growth catalyst size and the nanotube diameter

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Seah, Choon-Ming; Chai, Siang-Piao; Ichikawa, Satoshi; Mohamed, Abdul Rahman

    2013-01-01

    Single-walled carbon nanotubes (CNTs) and double-walled CNTs with a selectivity of 93 % were obtained by means of the novel homemade iron catalysts which were spin coated on silicon wafer. The average diameters of the iron particles prepared from the colloidal solutions containing 30, 40, 50, 60, and 70 mmol/L of iron nitrate were 8.2, 5.1, 20.8, 32.2, and 34.7 nm, respectively, and growing thin-walled CNTs with the average diameters of 4.1, 2.2, 9.2, 11.1, and 18.1 nm, respectively. The diameters of the CNTs were correlated with the geometric sizes of the pre-growth catalyst particles. Thin-walled CNTs were found to have a catalyst mean diameter-to-CNT average diameter ratio of 2.31. Iron carbide was formed after the growth of CNTs, and it is believed that during the growth of CNTs, carbon source decomposed and deposited on the surface of catalyst, followed by the diffusion of surface carbon into the iron catalyst particles, resulting in carbon supersaturation state before the growth of CNTs.

  4. Efficient selective catalytic reduction of NO by novel carbon-doped metal catalysts made from electroplating sludge.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Jia; Zhang, Jingyi; Xu, Yunfeng; Su, Huimin; Li, Xiaoman; Zhou, Ji Zhi; Qian, Guangren; Li, Li; Xu, Zhi Ping

    2014-10-07

    Electroplating sludges, once regarded as industrial wastes, are precious resources of various transition metals. This research has thus investigated the recycling of an electroplating sludge as a novel carbon-doped metal (Fe, Ni, Mg, Cu, and Zn) catalyst, which was different from a traditional carbon-supported metal catalyst, for effective NO selective catalytic reduction (SCR). This catalyst removed >99.7% NO at a temperature as low as 300 °C. It also removed NO steadily (>99%) with a maximum specific accumulative reduced amount (MSARA) of 3.4 mmol/g. Gas species analyses showed that NO removal was accompanied by evolving N2 and CO2. Moreover, in a wide temperature window, the sludge catalyst showed a higher CO2 selectivity (>99%) than an activated carbon-supported metal catalyst. Structure characterizations revealed that carbon-doped metal was transformed to metal oxide in the sludge catalyst after the catalytic test, with most carbon (2.33 wt %) being consumed. These observations suggest that NO removal over the sludge catalyst is a typical SCR where metals/metal oxides act as the catalytic center and carbon as the reducing reagent. Therefore, our report probably provides an opportunity for high value-added utilizations of heavy-metal wastes in mitigating atmospheric pollutions.

  5. Facile fabrication of novel silver-polypyrrole-multiwall carbon nanotubes nanocomposite for replacement of platinum in dye-sensitized solar cell

    OpenAIRE

    Shaista Rafique; Rehana Sharif; Imran Rashid; Sheeba Ghani

    2016-01-01

    This paper demonstrates the facile synthesis of high performance silver-polypyrrole-multiwall carbon nanotubes (Ag-PPy-FMWCNTS) nanocomposites via electrodeposition method on stainless steel substrate and its application as a low cost counter electrode (CE) for the precious platinum (Pt) free DSSC. The nanocomposites were characterized by variety of techniques such as Fourier transforms infrared (FTIR), X-ray diffraction, Scanning electron microscope (SEM), cyclic voltammetry (CV) and Four pr...

  6. Chelating agent-assisted heat treatment of a carbon-supported iron oxide nanoparticle catalyst for PEMFC.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Shyh-Jiun; Huang, Chia-Hung; Huang, Chun-Kai; Hwang, Weng-Sing

    2009-08-28

    Iron complexes were supported on commercial carbon black and heat treated to create FeO(x)/C catalysts that showed a larger normalized current density and normalized power density than commercial Pt/C catalysts; the coordination number of the iron complexes used affected the formation of the active site for oxygen reduction in PEMFC.

  7. Continuous synthesis of methanol: heterogeneous hydrogenation of ethylene carbonate over Cu/HMS catalysts in a fixed bed reactor system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Xi; Cui, Yuanyuan; Wen, Chao; Wang, Bin; Dai, Wei-Lin

    2015-09-18

    Continuous fixed-bed catalytic hydrogenation of ethylene carbonate (EC) to methanol and ethylene glycol (EG), an emerging synthetic process of methanol via indirect conversion of CO2, was successfully performed over Cu/HMS catalysts prepared by the ammonia evaporation (AE) method. The catalysts possessed superb performance with a conversion of 100% and a selectivity to methanol of 74%.

  8. Multi-Directional Growth of Aligned Carbon Nanotubes Over Catalyst Film Prepared by Atomic Layer Deposition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhou Kai

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The structure of vertically aligned carbon nanotubes (CNTs severely depends on the properties of pre-prepared catalyst films. Aiming for the preparation of precisely controlled catalyst film, atomic layer deposition (ALD was employed to deposit uniform Fe2O3 film for the growth of CNT arrays on planar substrate surfaces as well as the curved ones. Iron acetylacetonate and ozone were introduced into the reactor alternately as precursors to realize the formation of catalyst films. By varying the deposition cycles, uniform and smooth Fe2O3 catalyst films with different thicknesses were obtained on Si/SiO2 substrate, which supported the growth of highly oriented few-walled CNT arrays. Utilizing the advantage of ALD process in coating non-planar surfaces, uniform catalyst films can also be successfully deposited onto quartz fibers. Aligned few-walled CNTs can be grafted on the quartz fibers, and they self-organized into a leaf-shaped structure due to the curved surface morphology. The growth of aligned CNTs on non-planar surfaces holds promise in constructing hierarchical CNT architectures in future.

  9. Towards Green Cyclic Carbonate Synthesis : Heterogeneous and Homogeneous Catalyst Development

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Stewart, J.A.

    2015-01-01

    This PhD research serves to implement both known and novel catalytic systems for the purpose of cyclic carbonate synthesis from biomass-derived substrates. Such products have been earmarked as potential monomers for non-isocyanate polyurethanes (NIPUs), amongst other uses. Particular attention has

  10. Highly Loaded Carbon Black Supported Pt Catalysts for Fuel Cells

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Kaluža, Luděk; Larsen, M.J.; Zdražil, Miroslav; Gulková, Daniela; Vít, Zdeněk; Šolcová, Olga; Soukup, Karel; Koštejn, Martin; Bonde, J.L.; Maixnerová, Lucie; Odgaard, M.

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 256, NOV 1 (2015), s. 375-383 ISSN 0920-5861 R&D Projects: GA MŠk(CZ) 7HX13003 EU Projects: European Commission(XE) 303466 - IMMEDIATE Institutional support: RVO:67985858 Keywords : carbon black * fuell cell * electrocatalyst Subject RIV: CI - Industrial Chemistry , Chemical Engineering Impact factor: 4.312, year: 2015

  11. Hydrogenation of carbon monoxide on WO/sub 3/-Supported ruthenium catalysts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yoshinari, Tomohiro; Suganuma, Fujio; Sera, Chikara

    1988-01-01

    In this study, a WO/sub 3/-supported catalyst was prepared to conduct hydrogenation of CO for examining the product distribution and composition of hydrocarbons, using a gamma-alumina-supported catalyst for comparison. These catalysts were used under pressure to conduct a distributive reaction and the desorbing behavior of CO or H/sub 2/ at elevated temperature was measured to examine the influence of the type of carrier or the method of preparation on the activity and the distribution of products formed. The WO/sub 3/-supported catalyst gave a carbon chain length distribution that did not comply with the rule of Schulz-Flory, giving a composition richer in the isomers. Carbon number distribution is affected by Ru-dispersion, and the selectivity of isomers depends on the acidity of the carrier. Formed products distribution of the WO/sub 3/-supported reaction is attributable to the secondary reaction, which relates to the acidic point of the carrier, of the primary product formed on the metal. (7 figs, 4 tabs, 18 refs)

  12. Surface science approach to Pt/carbon model catalysts: XPS, STM and microreactor studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Motin, Abdul Md.; Haunold, Thomas; Bukhtiyarov, Andrey V.; Bera, Abhijit; Rameshan, Christoph; Rupprechter, Günther

    2018-05-01

    Pt nanoparticles supported on carbon are an important technological catalyst. A corresponding model catalyst was prepared by physical vapor deposition (PVD) of Pt on sputtered HOPG (highly oriented pyrolytic graphite). The carbon substrate before and after sputtering as well as the Pt/HOPG system before and after Pt deposition and annealing were examined by XPS and STM. This yielded information on the surface density of defects, which serve as nucleation centres for Pt, and on the size distribution (mean size/height) of the Pt nanoparticles. Two different model catalysts were prepared with mean sizes of 2.0 and 3.6 nm, both turned out to be stable upon UHV-annealing to 300 °C. After transfer into a UHV-compatible flow microreactor and subsequent cleaning in UHV and under mbar pressure, the catalytic activity of the Pt/HOPG model system for ethylene hydrogenation was examined under atmospheric pressure flow conditions. This enabled to determine temperature-dependent conversion rates, turnover frequencies (TOFs) and activation energies. The catalytic results obtained are in line with the characteristics of technological Pt/C, demonstrating the validity of the current surface science based model catalyst approach.

  13. Surface structured platinum electrodes for the electrochemical reduction of carbon dioxide in imidazolium based ionic liquids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanc-Scherer, Florin A; Montiel, Miguel A; Montiel, Vicente; Herrero, Enrique; Sánchez-Sánchez, Carlos M

    2015-10-07

    The direct CO2 electrochemical reduction on model platinum single crystal electrodes Pt(hkl) is studied in [C2mim(+)][NTf2(-)], a suitable room temperature ionic liquid (RTIL) medium due to its moderate viscosity, high CO2 solubility and conductivity. Single crystal electrodes represent the most convenient type of surface structured electrodes for studying the impact of RTIL ion adsorption on relevant electrocatalytic reactions, such as surface sensitive electrochemical CO2 reduction. We propose here based on cyclic voltammetry and in situ electrolysis measurements, for the first time, the formation of a stable adduct [C2mimH-CO2(-)] by a radical-radical coupling after the simultaneous reduction of CO2 and [C2mim(+)]. It means between the CO2 radical anion and the radical formed from the reduction of the cation [C2mim(+)] before forming the corresponding electrogenerated carbene. This is confirmed by the voltammetric study of a model imidazolium-2-carboxylate compound formed following the carbene pathway. The formation of that stable adduct [C2mimH-CO2(-)] blocks CO2 reduction after a single electron transfer and inhibits CO2 and imidazolium dimerization reactions. However, the electrochemical reduction of CO2 under those conditions provokes the electrochemical cathodic degradation of the imidazolium based RTIL. This important limitation in CO2 recycling by direct electrochemical reduction is overcome by adding a strong acid, [H(+)][NTf2(-)], into solution. Then, protons become preferentially adsorbed on the electrode surface by displacing the imidazolium cations and inhibiting their electrochemical reduction. This fact allows the surface sensitive electro-synthesis of HCOOH from CO2 reduction in [C2mim(+)][NTf2(-)], with Pt(110) being the most active electrode studied.

  14. Iron catalyst for preparation of polymethylene from synthesis gas and method for producing the catalyst

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sapienza, R.S.; Slegeir, W.A.

    1990-05-15

    This invention relates to a process for synthesizing hydrocarbons; more particularly, the invention relates to a process for synthesizing long-chain hydrocarbons known as polymethylene from carbon monoxide and hydrogen or from carbon monoxide and water or mixtures thereof in the presence of a catalyst comprising iron and platinum or palladium or mixtures thereof which may be supported on a solid material, preferably an inorganic refractory oxide. This process may be used to convert a carbon monoxide containing gas to a product which could substitute for high density polyethylene.

  15. Fabrication of aligned carbon nanotubes on Cu catalyst by dc plasma-enhanced catalytic decomposition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang Zhejuan [Department of Physics, Engineering Research Center for Nanophotonics and Advanced Instrument, East China Normal University, North Zhongshan Road 3663, 200062 Shanghai (China); Shakerzadeh, Maziar; Tay, Beng Kang; Li Xiaocheng; Tan Chongwei [School of Electrical and Electronic Engineering, Nanyang Technological University, Nanyang Avenue 50, 639798 Singapore (Singapore); Lin Lifeng; Guo Pingsheng; Feng Tao [Department of Physics, Engineering Research Center for Nanophotonics and Advanced Instrument, East China Normal University, North Zhongshan Road 3663, 200062 Shanghai (China); Sun Zhuo, E-mail: zsun@phy.ecnu.edu.cn [Department of Physics, Engineering Research Center for Nanophotonics and Advanced Instrument, East China Normal University, North Zhongshan Road 3663, 200062 Shanghai (China)

    2009-04-01

    Aligned multi-walled carbon nanotubes (ACNTs) are deposited using copper (Cu) catalyst on Chromium (Cr)-coated substrate by plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition at temperature of 700 deg. C. Acetylene gas has been used as the carbon source while ammonia is used for diluting and etching. The thicknesses of Cu films on Cr-coated Si (100) substrates are controlled by deposition time of magnetron sputtering. The growth behaviors and quality of ACNTs are investigated by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and transmission electron microscopy. The different performance of ACNTs on various Cu films is explained by referring to the graphitic order as detected by Raman spectroscopy. The results indicate that the ACNTs are formed in tip-growth model where Cu is used as a novel catalyst, and the thickness of Cu films is responsible to the diameter and quality of synthesized CNTs.

  16. Heterogeneous electrochemical CO2 reduction using nonmetallic carbon-based catalysts: current status and future challenges

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Tao; Fan, Qun; Tao, Hengcong; Han, Zishan; Jia, Mingwen; Gao, Yunnan; Ma, Wangjing; Sun, Zhenyu

    2017-11-01

    Electrochemical CO2 reduction (ECR) offers an important pathway for renewable energy storage and fuels production. It still remains a challenge in designing highly selective, energy-efficient, robust, and cost-effective electrocatalysts to facilitate this kinetically slow process. Metal-free carbon-based materials have features of low cost, good electrical conductivity, renewability, diverse structure, and tunability in surface chemistry. In particular, surface functionalization of carbon materials, for example by doping with heteroatoms, enables access to unique active site architectures for CO2 adsorption and activation, leading to interesting catalytic performances in ECR. We aim to provide a comprehensive review of this category of metal-free catalysts for ECR, providing discussions and/or comparisons among different nonmetallic catalysts, and also possible origin of catalytic activity. Fundamentals and some future challenges are also described.

  17. Highly n-Type Titanium Oxide as an Electronically Active Support for Platinum in the Catalytic Oxidation of Carbon Monoxide

    KAUST Repository

    Baker, L. Robert

    2011-08-18

    The role of the oxide-metal interface in determining the activity and selectivity of chemical reactions catalyzed by metal particles on an oxide support is an important topic in science and industry. A proposed mechanism for this strong metal-support interaction is electronic activation of surface adsorbates by charge carriers. Motivated by the goal of using electronic activation to drive nonthermal chemistry, we investigated the ability of the oxide support to mediate charge transfer. We report an approximately 2-fold increase in the turnover rate of catalytic carbon monoxide oxidation on platinum nanoparticles supported on stoichiometric titanium dioxide (TiO2) when the TiO2 is made highly n-type by fluorine (F) doping. However, for nonstoichiometric titanium oxide (TiOX<2) the effect of F on the turnover rate is negligible. Studies of the titanium oxide electronic structure show that the energy of free electrons in the oxide determines the rate of reaction. These results suggest that highly n-type TiO2 electronically activates adsorbed oxygen (O) by electron spillover to form an active O- intermediate. © 2011 American Chemical Society.

  18. Plain to point network reduced graphene oxide - activated carbon composites decorated with platinum nanoparticles for urine glucose detection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hossain, Mohammad Faruk; Park, Jae Y.

    2016-02-01

    In this study, a hydrothermal technique was applied to synthesize glucose-treated reduced graphene oxide-activated carbon (GRGO/AC) composites. Platinum nanoparticles (PtNP) were electrochemically deposited on the modified GRGO/AC surface, and chitosan-glucose oxidase (Chit-GOx) composites and nafion were integrated onto the modified surface of the working electrode to prepare a highly sensitive glucose sensor. The fabricated biosensor exhibited a good amperometric response to glucose in the detection range from 0.002 mM to 10 mM, with a sensitivity of 61.06 μA/mMcm2, a short response time (4 s) and a low detection limit of 2 μM (signal to noise ratio is 3). The glucose sensor exhibited a negligible response to interference and good stability. In addition, the glucose levels in human urine were tested in order to conduct a practical assessment of the proposed sensor, and the results indicate that the sensor had superior urine glucose recognition. These results thus demonstrate that the noble nano-structured electrode with a high surface area and electrocatalytic activity offers great promise for use in urine glucose sensing applications.

  19. Palladium on Nitrogen-Doped Mesoporous Carbon: A Bifunctional Catalyst for Formate-Based, Carbon-Neutral Hydrogen Storage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Fanan; Xu, Jinming; Shao, Xianzhao; Su, Xiong; Huang, Yanqiang; Zhang, Tao

    2016-02-08

    The lack of safe, efficient, and economical hydrogen storage technologies is a hindrance to the realization of the hydrogen economy. Reported herein is a reversible formate-based carbon-neutral hydrogen storage system that is established over a novel catalyst comprising palladium nanoparticles supported on nitrogen-doped mesoporous carbon. The support was fabricated by a hard template method and nitridated under a flow of ammonia. Detailed analyses demonstrate that this bicarbonate/formate redox equilibrium is promoted by the cooperative role of the doped nitrogen functionalities and the well-dispersed, electron-enriched palladium nanoparticles. © 2016 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  20. Growth Mechanism of Single-Walled Carbon Nanotubes on Iron–Copper Catalyst and Chirality Studies by Electron Diffraction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    He, Maoshuai; Liu, Bilu; Chernov, Alexander I.

    2012-01-01

    Chiralities of single-walled carbon nanotubes grown on an atomic layer deposition prepared bimetallic FeCu/MgO catalyst were evaluated quantitatively using nanobeam electron diffraction. The results reveal that the growth yields nearly 90% semiconducting tubes, 45% of which are of the (6,5) type...... by impregnation, showing similar catalytic performance as the atomic layer deposition-prepared catalyst, yielding single-walled carbon nanotubes with a similar narrow chirality distribution....

  1. Synthesis of carbonate esters by carboxymethylation using NaAlO2 as a highly active heterogeneous catalyst

    OpenAIRE

    Ramesh, Sreerangappa; Indukuri, Kiran; Riant, Olivier; Debecker, Damien

    2018-01-01

    Sodium aluminate is presented as a highly active heterogeneous catalyst able to convert a range of alcohols into the corresponding mixed carbonate esters, in high yield and under green conditions. The reaction is carried out using dimethyl carbonate both as a reactant and solvent, at 90°C. Allylic, aliphatic and aromatic alcohols are converted in good yields. The solid catalyst is shown to be truly heterogeneous, resistant to leaching, and recyclable.

  2. Improved hydrogen generation from alkaline NaBH{sub 4} solution using cobalt catalysts supported on modified activated carbon

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xu, Dongyan; Guo, Qingjie; Yue, Xuehai [College of Chemical Engineering, Qingdao University of Science and Technology, Qingdao 266042 (China); Dai, Ping [College of Electromechanical Engineering, Qingdao University of Science and Technology, Qingdao 266061 (China)

    2008-12-15

    Hydrogen production from alkaline sodium borohydride (NaBH{sub 4}) solution via hydrolysis process over activated carbon supported cobalt catalysts is studied. Activated carbons are used in their original form and after liquid phase oxidation with HNO{sub 3}. The changes in surface functional groups of the activated carbon are detected by FTIR spectroscopy. The effects of HNO{sub 3} oxidation on the properties of the activated carbon and the resulting catalyst performance are investigated. FTIR analysis reveals that the oxidative treatment leads to the formation of various functional groups on the surface of the activated carbon. Cobalt catalysts supported on the modified activated carbon are found to exhibit higher activity and stability. (author)

  3. Strength and microplasticity of biocarbons prepared by carbonization in the presence of a catalyst

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shpeizman, V. V.; Orlova, T. S.; Smirnov, B. I.; Gutierrez-Pardo, A.; Ramirez-Rico, J.

    2016-04-01

    The microdeformation has been investigated under uniaxial compression of beech-derived biocarbons partially graphitized during carbonization in the presence of a Ni- or Fe-containing catalyst. The strength and ultimate fracture strain have been determined at different temperatures of carbonization of the samples in the absence or in the presence of a catalyst. It has been shown using high-precision interferometry that the deformation of biocarbon samples under uniaxial loading occurs through jumps (in magnitude and rate of deformation) with axial displacements in the nanometer and micrometer ranges. The use of a catalyst leads to a decrease in the size of nanometer-scale jumps and in the number of micrometer-scale jumps. The standard deviations of the strain rate on loading steps from the smooth average dependence of the strain rate on the displacement have been calculated for micrometer-scale jumps. A similar characteristic for nanometer- scale jumps has been determined from the distortion of the shape of beats in the primary interferogram. It has been shown that the variation in the standard deviation of the strain rate with a change in the carbonization temperature is similar to the corresponding dependence of the ultimate fracture strain.

  4. A facile approach towards increasing the nitrogen-content in nitrogen-doped carbon nanotubes via halogenated catalysts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ombaka, L.M.; Ndungu, P.G.; Omondi, B.; McGettrick, J.D.; Davies, M.L.; Nyamori, V.O.

    2016-01-01

    Nitrogen-doped carbon nanotubes (N-CNTs) have been synthesized at 850 °C via a CVD deposition technique by use of three ferrocenyl derivative catalysts, i.e. para-CN, -CF_3 and -Cl substituted-phenyl rings. The synthesized catalysts have been characterized by NMR, IR, HR-MS and XRD. The XRD analysis of the para-CF_3 catalyst indicates that steric factors influence the X-ray structure of 1,1′-ferrocenylphenyldiacrylonitriles. Acetonitrile or pyridine was used as carbon and nitrogen sources to yield mixtures of N-CNTs and carbon spheres (CS). The N-CNTs obtained from the para-CF_3 catalysts, in pyridine, have the highest nitrogen-doping level, show a helical morphology and are less thermally stable compared with those synthesized by use of the para-CN and -Cl as catalyst. This suggests that fluorine heteroatoms enhance nitrogen-doping in N-CNTs and formation of helical-N-CNTs (H-N-CNTs). The para-CF_3 and para-Cl catalysts in acetonitrile yielded iron-filled N-CNTs, indicating that halogens promote encapsulation of iron into the cavity of N-CNT. The use of acetonitrile, as carbon and nitrogen source, with the para-CN and -Cl as catalysts also yielded a mixture of N-CNTs and carbon nanofibres (CNFs), with less abundance of CNFs in the products obtained using para-Cl catalysts. However, para-CF_3 catalyst in acetonitrile gave N-CNTs as the only shaped carbon nanomaterials. - Graphical abstract: Graphical abstract showing the synthesis of N-CNTs using halogenated-ferrocenyl derivatives as catalyst with pyridine or acetonitrile as nitrogen and carbon sources via the chemical vapour deposition technique. - Highlights: • N-CNTs were synthesized from halogenated ferrocenyl catalysts. • Halogenated catalysts promote nitrogen-doping and pyridinic nitrogen in N-CNTs. • Halogenated catalysts facilitate iron filling of N-CNTs.

  5. Hydrogen production by dry reforming of methane with carbon dioxide in one-dimensional nickel-based catalysts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lopez U, A. C.

    2016-01-01

    The main objective of this thesis is development of nickel catalysts supported over 1D matrix of cerium oxide, to be used in dry reforming methane reaction with carbon dioxide for hydrogen production. The catalysts were characterized by: Temperature Programmed Reduction (TPR), Scanning Electronic Microscopy (Sem), Surface Area (Bet method) an X Ray Diffraction (XRD). The TPR technique allowed to define reduction temperature of the active phase in the catalyst, Sem technique showed that the CeO_2 matrix had a nano rod morphology. XRD allowed to identify the crystalline phases of the catalysts. Finally, the catalysts were tested in the dry reforming methane reaction, high catalytic activity and hydrogen production were performed at 700 degrees Celsius and the catalyst with 30 wt.% of nickel. (Author)

  6. Two Catalysts for Selective Oxidation of Contaminant Gases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wright, John D.

    2011-01-01

    Two catalysts for the selective oxidation of trace amounts of contaminant gases in air have been developed for use aboard the International Space Station. These catalysts might also be useful for reducing concentrations of fumes in terrestrial industrial facilities especially facilities that use halocarbons as solvents, refrigerant liquids, and foaming agents, as well as facilities that generate or utilize ammonia. The first catalyst is of the supported-precious-metal type. This catalyst is highly active for the oxidation of halocarbons, hydrocarbons, and oxygenates at low concentrations in air. This catalyst is more active for the oxidation of hydrocarbons and halocarbons than are competing catalysts developed in recent years. This catalyst completely converts these airborne contaminant gases to carbon dioxide, water, and mineral acids that can be easily removed from the air, and does not make any chlorine gas in the process. The catalyst is thermally stable and is not poisoned by chlorine or fluorine atoms produced on its surface during the destruction of a halocarbon. In addition, the catalyst can selectively oxidize ammonia to nitrogen at a temperature between 200 and 260 C, without making nitrogen oxides, which are toxic. The temperature of 260 C is higher than the operational temperature of any other precious-metal catalyst that can selectively oxidize ammonia. The purpose of the platinum in this catalyst is to oxidize hydrocarbons and to ensure that the oxidation of halocarbons goes to completion. However, the platinum exhibits little or no activity for initiating the destruction of halocarbons. Instead, the attack on the halocarbons is initiated by the support. The support also provides a high surface area for exposure of the platinum. Moreover, the support resists deactivation or destruction by halogens released during the destruction of halocarbons. The second catalyst is of the supported- metal-oxide type. This catalyst can selectively oxidize ammonia to

  7. Ionic liquids as transesterification catalysts: applications for the synthesis of linear and cyclic organic carbonates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maurizio Selva

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available The use of ionic liquids (ILs as organocatalysts is reviewed for transesterification reactions, specifically for the conversion of nontoxic compounds such as dialkyl carbonates to both linear mono-transesterification products or alkylene carbonates. An introductory survey compares pros and cons of classic catalysts based on both acidic and basic systems, to ionic liquids. Then, innovative green syntheses of task-specific ILs and their representative applications are introduced to detail the efficiency and highly selective outcome of ILs-catalyzed transesterification reactions. A mechanistic hypothesis is discussed by the concept of cooperative catalysis based on the dual (electrophilic/nucleophilic activation of reactants.

  8. Low-temperature catalyst activator: mechanism of dense carbon nanotube forest growth studied using synchrotron radiation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Akito Takashima

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available The mechanism of the one-order-of-magnitude increase in the density of vertically aligned carbon nanotubes (CNTs achieved by a recently developed thermal chemical vapor deposition process was studied using synchrotron radiation spectroscopic techniques. In the developed process, a Ti film is used as the underlayer for an Fe catalyst film. A characteristic point of this process is that C2H2 feeding for the catalyst starts at a low temperature of 450°C, whereas conventional feeding temperatures are ∼800°C. Photoemission spectroscopy using soft and hard X-rays revealed that the Ti underlayer reduced the initially oxidized Fe layer at 450°C. A photoemission intensity analysis also suggested that the oxidized Ti layer at 450°C behaved as a support for nanoparticle formation of the reduced Fe, which is required for dense CNT growth. In fact, a CNT growth experiment, where the catalyst chemical state was monitored in situ by X-ray absorption spectroscopy, showed that the reduced Fe yielded a CNT forest at 450°C. Contrarily, an Fe layer without the Ti underlayer did not yield such a CNT forest at 450°C. Photoemission electron microscopy showed that catalyst annealing at the conventional feeding temperature of 800°C caused excess catalyst agglomeration, which should lead to sparse CNTs. In conclusion, in the developed growth process, the low-temperature catalyst activation by the Ti underlayer before the excess Fe agglomeration realised the CNT densification.

  9. Revisiting the electrochemical oxidation of ammonia on carbon-supported metal nanoparticle catalysts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li, Zhe-Fei; Wang, Yuxuan; Botte, Gerardine G.

    2017-01-01

    Highlights: • A procedure to pretreat electrocatalysts to study the ammonia oxidation is provided. • N ads and O/OH ads were identified as the major deactivation species that prevent ammonia oxidatoin. • The electrocatalytic activity, thermodynamics, and possible deactivation mechanisms for ammonia oxidation were elucidated. • The onset potential for ammonia oxidation is related to the hydrogen binding energy of the catalyst. • Ammonia electro-oxidation involves a complex decoupled electron and proton transfer process. - Abstract: The ammonia electro-oxidation reaction (AOR) has been studied due to its promising applications in ammonia electrolysis, wastewater remediation, direct ammonia fuel cells, and sensors. However, it is difficult to compare and analyze the reported electrocatalytic activity of AOR reliably, likely due to the variation in catalyst synthesis, electrode composition, electrode morphology, and testing protocol. In this paper, the electro-oxidation of ammonia on different carbon-supported precious metal nanoparticle catalysts was revisited. The effect of experimental conditions, electrochemical test parameters, electrocatalytic activity, thermodynamics, and possible deactivation mechanism of the catalysts were investigated. Pt/C catalyst possesses the highest electrocatalytic activity, while Ir/C and Rh/C show lower overpotential. The onset potential of the AOR is related to the hydrogen binding energy of the catalyst. N ads is one major cause of deactivation accompanied with the formation of surface O/OH ads at high potentials. The coulombic efficiency of N ads formation on Pt is about 1% initially and gradually decreases with reaction time. Increase in ammonia concentration leads to increase in current density, while increase in hydroxyl ions concentration can enhance the current density and reduce the overpotential simultaneously. The slopes of AOR onset potential and hydrogen adsorption/desorption potential of Pt/C as a function of p

  10. Determination of platinum group metals by ICP-AES in environmental samples after preconcentration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vlasankova, R.; Sommer, L.

    1999-01-01

    Platinum group metal (PGM) may have toxic properties and their presence in the environment represent danger for human health. With the introduction of automobile catalytic converters containing PGM, the emission of these noble metals into atmosphere has increased. Platinum, palladium and rhodium are used in this catalytic converters to decrease toxic emissions of carbon monoxide, unburnt hydrocarbons and nitrogen oxides in vehicles exhaust gases. These catalysts are mobile sources of PGM into the environment. Thus, increased platinum concentrations have been found in various objects of environment because of the massive introduction of such catalytic converters are present. The preconcentration and separation of PGM and their determination by ICP-AES in environmental samples are described

  11. Graphene Carbon Nanotube Carpets Grown Using Binary Catalysts for High-Performance Lithium-Ion Capacitors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salvatierra, Rodrigo Villegas; Zakhidov, Dante; Sha, Junwei; Kim, Nam Dong; Lee, Seoung-Ki; Raji, Abdul-Rahman O; Zhao, Naiqin; Tour, James M

    2017-03-28

    Here we show that a versatile binary catalyst solution of Fe 3 O 4 /AlO x nanoparticles enables homogeneous growth of single to few-walled carbon nanotube (CNT) carpets from three-dimensional carbon-based substrates, moving past existing two-dimensional limited growth methods. The binary catalyst is composed of amorphous AlO x nanoclusters over Fe 3 O 4 crystalline nanoparticles, facilitating the creation of seamless junctions between the CNTs and the underlying carbon platform. The resulting graphene-CNT (GCNT) structure is a high-density CNT carpet ohmically connected to the carbon substrate, an important feature for advanced carbon electronics. As a demonstration of the utility of this approach, we use GCNTs as anodes and cathodes in binder-free lithium-ion capacitors, producing stable devices with high-energy densities (∼120 Wh kg -1 ), high-power density capabilities (∼20,500 W kg -1 at 29 Wh kg -1 ), and a large operating voltage window (4.3 to 0.01 V).

  12. Large-scale synthesis of coiled-like shaped carbon nanotubes using bi-metal catalyst

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krishna, Vemula Mohana; Somanathan, T.; Manikandan, E.; Umar, Ahmad; Maaza, M.

    2018-02-01

    Carbon nanomaterials (CNMs), especially carbon nanotubes (CNTs) with coiled structure exhibit scientifically fascinating. They may be projected as an innovative preference to future technological materials. Coiled carbon nanotubes (c-CNTs) on a large-scale were successfully synthesized with the help of bi-metal substituted α-alumina nanoparticles catalyst via chemical vapor deposition (CVD) technique. Highly spring-like carbon nanostructures were observed by field emission scanning electron microscope (FESEM) examination. Furthermore, the obtained material has high purity, which correlates the X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDX) analysis. Raman spectroscopy reveals that the carbon multi layers are well graphitized and crystalline, even if they have defects in its structure due to coiled morphology. High-resolution transmission electron microscope (HRTEM) describes internal structure and dia of the product. Ultimately, results support the activity of bi-metal impregnated α-alumina nanoparticles catalyst to determine the high yield, graphitization and internal structure of the material. We have also studied the purified c-CNTs magnetic properties at room temperature and will be an added advantage in several applications.

  13. Carbon Nitride Materials as Efficient Catalyst Supports for Proton Exchange Membrane Water Electrolyzers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana Belen Jorge

    2018-06-01

    Full Text Available Carbon nitride materials with graphitic to polymeric structures (gCNH were investigated as catalyst supports for the proton exchange membrane (PEM water electrolyzers using IrO2 nanoparticles as oxygen evolution electrocatalyst. Here, the performance of IrO2 nanoparticles formed and deposited in situ onto carbon nitride support for PEM water electrolysis was explored based on previous preliminary studies conducted in related systems. The results revealed that this preparation route catalyzed the decomposition of the carbon nitride to form a material with much lower N content. This resulted in a significant enhancement of the performance of the gCNH-IrO2 (or N-doped C-IrO2 electrocatalyst that was likely attributed to higher electrical conductivity of the N-doped carbon support.

  14. Immobilised carbon nanotubes as carrier for Co-Fischer-Tropsch synthesis catalysts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thiessen, J.; Rose, A.; Kiendl, I.; Jess, A. [Bayreuth Univ. (Germany). Dept. of Chemical Engineering; Curulla-Ferre, D. [Total S.A., Gas and Power, Paris La Defense (France)

    2011-07-01

    A possibility to immobilise carbon nanotubes (CNT) to make them applicable in a technical scale fixed bed reactor is studied. The approach to fabricate millimetre scale composites containing CNT presented in this work is to confine the nano-carbon in macro porous ceramic particles. Thus CNT were grown on the inner surface of silica and alumina pellets and spheres, respectively. Cobalt nano particles were successfully deposited on the carbon surface inside the two types of ceramic carriers and the systems were tested in Fischer - Tropsch synthesis (FTS). The cobalt mass related activity of these novel catalysts is similar to a conventional system. The selectivities of the Co/CNT/ceramic composites were compared with non supported CNT and carbon nanofibres (CNF). (orig.)

  15. Catalyst for hydrocarbon conversion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Duhaut, P.; Miquel, J.

    1975-01-01

    A description is given for a catalyst and process for hydrocarbon conversions, e.g., reforming. The catalyst contains an alumina carrier, platinum, iridium, at least one metal selected from uranium, vanadium, and gallium, and optionally halogen in the form of metal halide of one of the aforesaid components. (U.S.)

  16. Flexible, highly graphitized carbon aerogels based on bacterial cellulose/lignin: Catalyst-free synthesis and its application in energy storage devices

    KAUST Repository

    Xu, Xuezhu; Zhou, Jian; Nagaraju, Doddahalli H.; Jiang, Long; Marinov, Val R.; Lubineau, Gilles; Alshareef, Husam N.; Oh, Myungkeun

    2015-01-01

    Currently, most carbon aerogels are based on carbon nanotubes (CNTs) or graphene, which are produced through a catalyst-assisted chemical vapor deposition method. Biomass based organic aerogels and carbon aerogels, featuring low cost, high

  17. Anodic Stripping Voltammetric Detection of Arsenic(III) at Platinum-Iron(III) Nanoparticle Modified Carbon Nanotube on Glassy Carbon Electrode

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shin, Seung Hyun; Hong, Hun Gi

    2010-01-01

    The electrochemical detection of As(III) was investigated on a platinum-iron(III) nanoparticles modified multiwalled carbon nanotube on glassy carbon electrode(nanoPt-Fe(III)/MWCNT/GCE) in 0.1 M H 2 SO 4 . The nanoPt-Fe(III)/ MWCNT/GCE was prepared via continuous potential cycling in the range from .0.8 to 0.7 V (vs. Ag/AgCl), in 0.1 M KCl solution containing 0.9 mM K 2 PtCl 6 and 0.6 mM FeCl 3 . The Pt nanoparticles and iron oxide were co-electrodeposited into the MWCNT-Nafion composite film on GCE. The resulting electrode was examined by cyclic voltammetry (CV), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), and anodic stripping voltammetry (ASV). For the detection of As(III), the nanoPt-Fe(III)/MWCNT/GCE showed low detection limit of 10 nM (0.75 ppb) and high sensitivity of 4.76 μAμM -1 , while the World Health Organization's guideline value of arsenic for drinking water is 10 ppb. It is worth to note that the electrode presents no interference from copper ion, which is the most serious interfering species in arsenic detection

  18. Carbon-supported cobalt catalyst for hydrogen generation from alkaline sodium borohydride solution

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xu, Dongyan; Liu, Xinmin; Cao, Changqing; Guo, Qingjie [College of Chemical Engineering, Qingdao University of Science and Technology, Qingdao 266042 (China); Dai, Ping [College of Electromechanical Engineering, Qingdao University of Science and Technology, Qingdao 266061 (China)

    2008-08-01

    Low cost transition metal catalysts with high performance are attractive for the development of on-board hydrogen generation systems by catalytic hydrolysis of sodium borohydride (NaBH{sub 4}) in fuel cell fields. In this study, hydrogen production from alkaline NaBH{sub 4} via hydrolysis process over carbon-supported cobalt catalysts was studied. The catalytic activity of the supported cobalt catalyst was found to be highly dependent on the calcination temperatures. The hydrogen generation rate increases with calcination temperatures in the range of 200-400 C, but a high calcination temperature above 500 C led to markedly decreased activity. X-ray diffraction patterns reveal that the catalysts experience phase transition from amorphous Co-B to crystalline cobalt hydroxide with increase in calcination temperatures. The reaction performance is also dependent on the concentration of NaBH{sub 4}, and the hydrogen generation rate increases for lower NaBH{sub 4} concentrations and decreases after reaching a maximum at 10 wt.% of NaBH{sub 4}. (author)

  19. Single Pot Selective Hydrogenation of Furfural to 2-Methylfuran Over Carbon Supported Iridium Catalysts

    KAUST Repository

    Date, Nandan S; Hengne, Amol Mahalingappa; Huang, Kuo-Wei; Chikate, Rajeev C.; Rode, C. V.

    2018-01-01

    Various iridium supported carbon catalysts were prepared and screened for direct hydrogenation of furfural (FFR) to 2-methyl furan (2-MF). Amongest these, 5% Ir/C showed excellent results with complete FFR conversion and highest selectivity of 95% to 2-MF at very low H2 pressure of 100 psig. Metallic (Iro) and oxide ( IrO2) phases of Ir catalyzed first step hydrogenation involving FFR to FAL and subsequent hydrogenation to 2-MF,respecively. This was confirmed by XPS analysis and some controlled experiments. At low temperature of 140 oC, almost equal selectivities of FAL (42%) and 2-MF (43%) were observed, while higher temperature (220oC) favored selective hydrodeoxygenation. At optimized temperature, 2-MF formed selectively while higher pressure and higher catalyst loading favored ring hydrogenation of furfural rather than side chain hydrogenation. With combination of several control experimental results and detailed catalyst characterization, a plausible reaction pathway has been proposed for selective formation of 2-MF. The selectivity to various other products in FFR hydrogenation can be manipulated by tailoring the reaction conditions over the same catalyst.

  20. Surface heterogeneity and ionization of Cs promoter in carbon-based ruthenium catalyst for ammonia synthesis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kotarba, Andrzej; Dmytrzyk, Jaromir; Rarog-Pilecka, Wioletta; Kowalczyk, Zbigniew

    2003-01-01

    Second-generation ammonia synthesis cesium-doped ruthenium catalyst supported on turbostratic carbon was investigated by the species resolved thermal alkali desorption method (SR-TAD). Energetic barriers for cesium ions (2.86 eV), ground state (1.96 eV) and electronically excited atoms (5.76 eV) desorbing from the Cs-Ru/C catalyst were determined. In the case of ruthenium-free Cs/C system, cesium desorbs as ground state atoms only, with an energy barrier of 2.87 eV. The work functions determined by the thermionic emission of electrons from Cs/C and Cs-Ru/C were of the same value (2.9 eV). It was concluded that ruthenium induces heterogeneous distribution of cesium on the catalyst surface. The promoter stability is reduced on low work function areas and its surface ionization on high work function areas opens the ionic desorption channel. The Cs desorption from the catalyst is discussed in terms of the literature data for the cesium/graphite system

  1. Single Pot Selective Hydrogenation of Furfural to 2-Methylfuran Over Carbon Supported Iridium Catalysts

    KAUST Repository

    Date, Nandan S

    2018-03-20

    Various iridium supported carbon catalysts were prepared and screened for direct hydrogenation of furfural (FFR) to 2-methyl furan (2-MF). Amongest these, 5% Ir/C showed excellent results with complete FFR conversion and highest selectivity of 95% to 2-MF at very low H2 pressure of 100 psig. Metallic (Iro) and oxide ( IrO2) phases of Ir catalyzed first step hydrogenation involving FFR to FAL and subsequent hydrogenation to 2-MF,respecively. This was confirmed by XPS analysis and some controlled experiments. At low temperature of 140 oC, almost equal selectivities of FAL (42%) and 2-MF (43%) were observed, while higher temperature (220oC) favored selective hydrodeoxygenation. At optimized temperature, 2-MF formed selectively while higher pressure and higher catalyst loading favored ring hydrogenation of furfural rather than side chain hydrogenation. With combination of several control experimental results and detailed catalyst characterization, a plausible reaction pathway has been proposed for selective formation of 2-MF. The selectivity to various other products in FFR hydrogenation can be manipulated by tailoring the reaction conditions over the same catalyst.

  2. Local structure of Iridium organometallic catalysts covalently bonded to carbon nanotubes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blasco, J.; Cuartero, V.; Subías, G.; Jiménez, M. V.; Pérez-Torrente, J. J.; Oro, L. A.; Blanco, M.; Álvarez, P.; Blanco, C.; Menéndez, R.

    2016-05-01

    Hybrid catalysts based on Iridium N-heterocyclic carbenes anchored to carbon nanotubes (CNT) have been studied by XAFS spectroscopy. Oxidation of CNT yields a large amount of functional groups, mainly hydroxyl groups at the walls and carboxylic groups at the tips, defects and edges. Different kinds of esterification reactions were performed to functionalize oxidized CNT with imidazolium salts. Then, the resulting products were reacted with an Ir organometallic compound to form hybrid catalysts efficient in hydrogen transfer processes. XANES spectroscopy agree with the presence of Ir(I) in these catalysts and the EXAFS spectra detected differences in the local structure of Ir atoms between the initial Ir organometallic compound and the Ir complexes anchored to the CNT. Our results confirm that the halide atom, present in the Ir precursor, was replaced by oxygen from -OH groups at the CNT wall in the first coordination shell of Ir. The lability of this group accounts for the good recyclability and the good efficiency shown by these hybrid catalysts.

  3. Preparation of a Carbon-Based Solid Acid Catalyst by Sulfonating Activated Carbon in a Chemical Reduction Process

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiao-Yan Liu

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Sulfonated (SO3H-bearing activated carbon (AC-SO3H was synthesized by an aryl diazonium salt reduction process. The obtained material had a SO3H density of 0.64 mmol·g-1 and a specific surface area of 602 m2·g-1. The catalytic properties of AC-SO3H were compared with that of two commercial solid acid catalysts, Nafion NR50 and Amberlyst-15. In a 10-h esterification reaction of acetic acid with ethanol, the acid conversion with AC-SO3H (78% was lower than that of Amberlyst-15 (86%, which could be attributed to the fact that the SO3H density of the sulfonated carbon was lower than that of Amberlyst-15 (4.60 mmol·g-1. However, AC-SO3H exhibited comparable and even much higher catalytic activities than the commercial catalysts in the esterification of aliphatic acids with longer carbon chains such as hexanoic acid and decanoic acid, which may be due to the large specific surface area and mesoporous structures of the activated carbon. The disadvantage of AC-SO3H is the leaching of SO3H group during the reactions.

  4. The thermal properties of controllable diameter carbon nanotubes synthesized by using AB5 alloy of micrometer magnitude as catalyst

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang Haiyan; Chen Yiming; Zeng Guoxun; Huang Huiping; Xie Zhiwei; Jie Xiaohua

    2007-01-01

    We have synthesized multi-wall carbon nanotubes by catalytic chemical vapour deposition (CCVD) method using an AB 5 hydrogen storage alloy with diameter ranging from 38 to 150 μm as a catalyst. The H 2 uptake capacity of the carbon nanotubes prepared using an AB 5 alloy as a catalyst is about 4 wt.% through to the pressure of 8 MPa at room temperature. Differential thermal analysis-thermogravimetric analysis (DTA-TGA) technique has been applied to investigate the effect of the diameters of the AB 5 alloy catalyst of micrometer magnitude and the technique conditions in the CCVD process on the thermal properties of carbon nanotubes. As the catalyst diameter increases from 38 to 150 μm, the average diameter of the prepared carbon nanotubes increases and the diameter distribution also enlarges. Electron microscope, Raman spectrum and thermal analysis all indicated that the catalyst sizes affect the diameter and the thermal properties of the carbon nanotubes. When the catalyst diameter increases, the initial weight loss temperature and the differential thermal peak temperature of the carbon nanotubes increases, which shows that the lager the diameter of the carbon nanotubes is, the higher the oxidation temperature, and the better the anti-oxidizablity. However, if the diameter of the catalyst is larger than 100 μm, the anti-oxidizablity does not rise anymore but tend to be invariableness. In the CCVD preparation process, the anti-oxidizability of the carbon nanotubes increases, when raising the ratio of the hydrogen gas in the reaction gas in our experimental range (4:1, 3:1, and 2:1, respectively)

  5. Hydrogenation of hexene over platinum on alumina vs. platinum in a Na-Y zeolite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miner, R.S. Jr.; Ione, K.G.; Namba, S.; Turkevich, J.

    1978-01-01

    In order to study the efficacy of zeolites as supports, several platinum H--Y zeolites were prepared by ion exchanging an H--Y zeolite with Pt(NH 3 ) 4 Cl 2 and reducing these products with hydrazine hydrate (A, B, C). Another preparation was made by adsorbing 32-A platinum sol on the zeolite crystallites (D). These catalysts were studied for hydrogenation and isomerization of hexene-1, ethylene hydrogenation, hydrogen chemisorption, and poison titration. They were compared with monodisperse Pt (32 A diameter) on alumina. A marked difference was found between the behavior of hexene-1 with the platinum-in-zeolite and with the platinum-on-alumina

  6. Heterogeneous Catalysts for VOC Oxidation from Red Mud and Bagasse Ash Carbon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pande, Gaurav

    A range of VOC oxidation catalysts have been prepared in this study from agricultural and industrial waste as the starting point. The aim is to prepare catalysts with non-noble metal oxides as the active catalytic component (iron in red mud). The same active component was also supported on activated carbon obtained from unburned carbon in bagasse ash. Red mud which is an aluminum industry waste and rich in different phases of iron as oxide and hydroxide is used as the source for the catalytically active species. It is our aim to enhance the catalytic performance of red mud which though high in iron concentration has a low surface area and may not have the properties of an ideal catalyst by itself. In one of the attempts to enhance the catalytic performance, we have tried to leach red mud for which we have explored a range of leaching acids for effecting the leaching most efficiently and then precipitated the iron from the leachate as its hydroxide by precipitating with alkali solution followed by drying and calcination to give high surface area metal oxide material. Extensive surface characterization and VOC oxidation catalytic testing were performed for these solids. In a step to further enhance the catalytic activity towards oxidation, copper was introduced by taking another industrial waste from the copper tubing industry viz. the pickling acid. Copper has a more favourable redox potential making it catalytically more effective than iron. To make the mixed metal oxide, red mud leachate was mixed with the pickling acid in a pre-decided ratio before precipitating with alkali solution followed by drying and calcination as was done with the red mud leachate. The results from these experiments are encouraging. The temperature programmed reduction (TPR) of the solids show that the precipitate of red mud leachates show hydrogen uptake peak at a lower temperature than for just the calcined red mud. This could be due to the greatly enhanced surface area of the prepared

  7. Activated carbon derived from chitosan as air cathode catalyst for high performance in microbial fuel cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yi; Zhao, Yong; Li, Kexun; Wang, Zhong; Tian, Pei; Liu, Di; Yang, Tingting; Wang, Junjie

    2018-02-01

    Chitosan with rich of nitrogen is used as carbon precursor to synthesis activated carbon through directly heating method in this study. The obtained carbon is activated by different amount of KOH at different temperatures, and then prepared as air cathodes for microbial fuel cells. Carbon sample treated with double amount of KOH at 850 °C exhibits maximum power density (1435 ± 46 mW m-2), 1.01 times improved, which ascribes to the highest total surface area, moderate micropore and mesoporous structure and the introduction of nitrogen. The electrochemical impedance spectroscopy and powder resistivity state that carbon treated with double amount of KOH at 850 °C possesses lower resistance. The other electrochemical measurements demonstrate that the best kinetic activity make the above treated sample to show the best oxygen reduction reaction activity. Besides, the degree of graphitization of samples increases with the activated temperature increasing, which is tested by Raman. According to elemental analysis and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, all chitosan samples are nitrogen-doped carbon, and high content nitrogen (pyridinic-N) improves the electrochemical activity of carbon treated with KOH at 850 °C. Thus, carbon materials derived from chitosan would be an optimized catalyst for oxygen reduction reaction in microbial fuel cell.

  8. Synthesis of carbon-supported copper catalyst and its catalytic performance in methanol dehydrogenation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shelepova, Ekaterina V. [Boreskov Institute of Catalysis SB RAS, pr. Ac. Lavrentieva, 5, Novosibirsk, 630090 (Russian Federation); National Research Tomsk Polytechnic University, Lenin av., 30, Tomsk, 634050 (Russian Federation); Vedyagin, Aleksey A., E-mail: vedyagin@catalysis.ru [Boreskov Institute of Catalysis SB RAS, pr. Ac. Lavrentieva, 5, Novosibirsk, 630090 (Russian Federation); National Research Tomsk Polytechnic University, Lenin av., 30, Tomsk, 634050 (Russian Federation); Ilina, Ludmila Yu.; Nizovskii, Alexander I. [Boreskov Institute of Catalysis SB RAS, pr. Ac. Lavrentieva, 5, Novosibirsk, 630090 (Russian Federation); Tsyrulnikov, Pavel G. [Institute of Hydrocarbon Processing SB RAS, Neftezavodskaya st., 54, Omsk, 644040 (Russian Federation)

    2017-07-01

    Highlights: • Carbon-supported copper catalyst was studied in dehydrogenation of methanol. • Reduction temperature affected size of Cu particles and Cu{sup 0}/Cu{sup 2+} ratio. • Reduction at 400 °C was required to obtain high methyl formate yield. - Abstract: Carbon-supported copper catalyst was prepared by incipient wetness impregnation of Sibunit with an aqueous solution of copper nitrate. Copper loading was 5 wt.%. Temperature of reductive pretreatment was varied within a range of 200–400 °C. The samples were characterized by transmission electron microscopy, X-ray diffraction analysis, X-ray photoelectron and X-ray absorption spectroscopies. Catalytic activity of the samples was studied in a reaction of methanol dehydrogenation. Silica-based catalyst with similar copper loading was used as a reference. It was found that copper is distributed over the surface of support in the form of metallic and partially oxidized particles of about 12–17 nm in size. Diminished interaction of copper with support was supposed to be responsible for high catalytic activity.

  9. Iron ore catalysts for methane decomposition to make CO x free hydrogen and carbon nano material

    KAUST Repository

    Zhou, Lu

    2018-03-27

    In this work, for the first time, iron ores with 91.7%–96.2% FeO, 1.3%–2.3% AlO, 1.2%–4.5% SiO, 1.3%–3.9% NaO, were studied directly as bulk catalysts for methane decomposition. By hydrogen pre-reduction at 850 °C, FeO species on iron ores were gradually reduced into FeO, FeO and then finally into Fe species. After reduction of 1.6 g of iron ore catalysts of 50 µm particle size with 100 mL/min pure H for 3.5 h at 850 °C, CMD life testing was conducted at 850 °C and GHSV of 3.75 L/g h and the catalyst showed a stable methane conversion for 5 h. When methane decomposition proceeded on Fe sites, FeC species would be formed to deposit graphite around themselves to finally form carbon nano onions. This carbon nano onions material showed excellent application for wastewater purification. All samples were fully characterized with XRF, XRD, H-TPR, TEM and Raman.

  10. Catalytic oxidation of albendazole using molybdenum supported on carbon nanotubes as catalyst

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sun-Kou, Maria del Rosario; Vega Carrasco, Edgar R.; Picasso Escobar, Gino I.

    2013-01-01

    The catalytic oxidation reaction of the thioether group (-S-) in the structure to the drug albendazole (C 12 H 15 N 3 O 2 S) was studied in order to obtain a pharmacologically active molecule known as albendazole sulfoxide. With this purpose, three heterogeneous catalysts were prepared using molybdenum (Mo) as active phase and carbon nanotubes as a multiple-layer catalyst support. The incorporation of the active phase was performed by wet impregnation, with subsequent calcination for 4 hours at 400 o C. For the catalytic oxidation reaction was employed hydrogen peroxide-urea (H 2 NCONH 2 ·H 2 O 2 ) as oxidizing agent and methanol (CH 3 OH) as reaction medium. The textural and morphology characterization of carbon nanoparticles and catalysts was carried out by adsorption-desorption of N 2 (BET) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). The identification and quantification of the reaction products were followed by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) and high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC), respectively. With the yield, selectivity and conversion higher than 90% after 60 minutes of reaction, albendazole sulphoxide was obtained as major product of oxidation reaction. (author)

  11. Synthesis of carbon-supported nickel catalysts for the dry reforming of CH{sub 4}

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fidalgo, B.; Zubizarreta, L.; Bermudez, J.M.; Arenillas, A.; Menendez, J.A. [Instituto Nacional del Carbon, CSIC, Apartado 73, 33080 Oviedo (Spain)

    2010-07-15

    A series of carbon-based nickel (Ni) catalysts was prepared in order to investigate the effect of the preparation method on the dispersion of Ni and its final catalytic activity in the dry reforming of methane, i.e. CH{sub 4} + CO{sub 2} 2H{sub 2} + 2CO. Three parameters were studied: (i) the influence of the surface chemistry of the carbon used as support; (ii) the method of drying (conventional vs. microwave drying); and, (iii) the temperature of the reduction stage. In order to study the role of the surface chemistry of the commercial activated carbon used as support, the active carbon was tested as received and oxidized. Although a better Ni dispersion was achieved over the oxidized support, the conversions were much lower. It was also found that microwave drying offers various advantages over conventional drying, the main one being that less time is required to prepare the catalyst. Two reduction temperatures were used (300 and 500 C), being found that it is necessary to adjust this parameter to prevent the Ni particles from sintering. (author)

  12. Less sensitive electrocatalysts towards carbon monoxide for PEMFC fed by hydrogen produced from reforming gas; Recherche de catalyseurs peu sensibles a la presence de monoxyde de carbone pour piles a combustible PEMFC alimentees en gaz de reformage

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boucher, A.C.

    2002-11-15

    The aim of this work was to prepare bimetallic catalysts based on platinum to elaborate anodes for fuel cells fed by hydrogen produced from reforming gas and containing thus some ppm of carbon monoxide. In order to avoid platinum poisoning, another metal, such as tin, was added. This leads to a more tolerant material to CO. A Pt-Sn catalyst supported on Vulcan XC-72 carbon was prepared by a chemical route, using a platinum carbonyl complex. This material was characterized by physical and chemical methods which indicate that it is formed by nano-structured Pt{sub 3}Sn particles. These particles have a narrow size distribution with a mean diameter of approximately 2 nm. Its activity towards CO, particularly under fuel cell conditions, was compared with a similar commercial E-TEK catalyst. This study shows that the catalyst prepared from the carbonyl precursor is less sensitive to CO than the commercial one. (author)

  13. Upgrading of glycerol from biodiesel synthesis with dimethyl carbonate on reusable Sr–Al mixed oxide catalysts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Algoufi, Y.T.; Akpan, U.G.; Kabir, G.; Asif, M.; Hameed, B.H.

    2017-01-01

    Highlights: • Catalytic transesterification with dimethyl carbonate (DMC) converts glycerol into glycerol carbonate (GLC). • DMC and Sr_x–Al catalysts affect the reaction mechanisms that convert glycerol into GLC. • The morphology and textural structure of Sr_x–Al catalysts perpetuate catalytic activity. • The atomic ratio of Sr/Al has a unique effect on Sr–Al catalytic activity. • Sr_0_._5–Al catalyst exhibits limited leaching after five reaction cycles. - Abstract: The high demand for renewable energy has led to the upsurge of methanol-assisted biodiesel synthesis. Therefore, glycerol as a byproduct entered the waste stream given the oversupply of biodiesel to the market. The dimethyl carbonate (DMC)-assisted transesterification of glycerol on a catalyst has been a popular approach for converting glycerol into valuable glycerol carbonate (GLC). The synthesis of GLC from the DMC-assisted transesterification of glycerol on mixed oxide catalysts (Sr_x–Al) with different Sr/Al ratios was examined in this study. A glycerol conversion of 99.4% and a GLC yield of 100% were achieved in a catalyst with Sr/Al = 0.5 (Sr_0_._5–Al). Both values are higher than those in catalysts synthesized with Sr/Al = 0.25 and 0.75. The Sr_0_._5–Al catalyst withstood five transesterification reaction cycles without a serious deactivation induced by the leaching of active SrO. Therefore, the Sr_0_._5–Al catalyst is suitable for consecutive uses in the DMC-assisted transesterification of glycerol with DMC into GLC.

  14. Platinum-based electrocatalysts synthesized by depositing contiguous adlayers on carbon nanostructures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adzic, Radoslav; Harris, Alexander

    2013-03-26

    High-surface-area carbon nanostructures coated with a smooth and conformal submonolayer-to-multilayer thin metal films and their method of manufacture are described. The preferred manufacturing process involves the initial oxidation of the carbon nanostructures followed by immersion in a solution with the desired pH to create negative surface dipoles. The nanostructures are subsequently immersed in an alkaline solution containing non-noble metal ions which adsorb at surface reaction sites. The metal ions are then reduced via chemical or electrical means and the nanostructures are exposed to a solution containing a salt of one or more noble metals which replace adsorbed non-noble surface metal atoms by galvanic displacement. Subsequent film growth may be performed via the initial quasi-underpotential deposition of a non-noble metal followed by immersion in a solution comprising a more noble metal. The resulting coated nanostructures may be used, for example, as high-performance electrodes in supercapacitors, batteries, or other electric storage devices.

  15. Patterned growth of carbon nanotubes on Si substrates without predeposition of metal catalysts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Y.; Yu, J.

    2005-07-01

    Aligned carbon nanotubes (CNTs) can be readily synthesized on quartz or silicon-oxide-coated Si substrates using a chemical vapor deposition method, but it is difficult to grow them on pure Si substrates without predeposition of metal catalysts. We report that aligned CNTs were grown by pyrolysis of iron phthalocyanine at 1000°C on the templates created on Si substrates with simple mechanical scratching. Scanning electron microscopy and x-ray energy spectroscopy analysis revealed that the trenches and patterns created on the surface of Si substrates were preferred nucleation sites for nanotube growth due to a high surface energy, metastable surface structure, and possible capillarity effect. A two-step pyrolysis process maintained Fe as an active catalyst.

  16. Mesoporous nitrogen-rich carbon materials as cathode catalysts in microbial fuel cells

    KAUST Repository

    Ahn, Yongtae

    2014-12-01

    The high cost of the catalyst material used for the oxygen reduction reaction in microbial fuel cell (MFC) cathodes is one of the factors limiting practical applications of this technology. Mesoporous nitrogen-rich carbon (MNC), prepared at different temperatures, was examined as an oxygen reduction catalyst, and compared in performance to Pt in MFCs and electrochemical cells. MNC calcined at 800 °C produced a maximum power density of 979 ± 131 mW m-2 in MFCs, which was 37% higher than that produced using MNC calined at 600 °C (715 ± 152 mW m-2), and only 14% lower than that obtained with Pt (1143 ± 54 mW m-2). The extent of COD removal and coulombic efficiencies were the same for all cathode materials. These results show that MNC could be used as an alternative to Pt in MFCs. © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. Pt Nanostructures/N-Doped Carbon hybrid, an Efficient Catalyst for Hydrogen Evolution/Oxidation Reactions: Enhancing its Base Media Activity through Bifunctionality of the Catalyst.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barman, Sudip; Kundu, Manas; Bhowmik, Tanmay; Mishra, Ranjit

    2018-06-04

    Design and synthesis of active catalyst for HER/HOR are important for the development of hydrogen based renewable technologies. We report synthesis of Pt nanostructures-N-doped carbon hybrid (Pt-(PtO2)-NSs/C) for HER/HOR applications. The HER activity of this Pt-(PtOx)-NSs/C catalyst is 4 and 6.5 times better than commercial Pt/C in acid and base. The catalyst exhibits a current density of 10 mA/cm2 at overpotentials of 5 and 51 mV with tafel slopes of 29 and 64mV/dec in in 0.5 M H2SO4 and 0.5 M KOH. This catalyst also showed superior HOR activity at all pH values. The HER/HOR activity of Pt-(PtOx)-NSs/C and PtOx-free Pt-Nanostructures/C (PtNSs/C) catalysts are comparable in acid. The presence of PtOx in Pt-(PtOx)-NSs/C makes this Pt-catalyst more HER/HOR active in base media. The activity of Pt-(PtOx)NSs/C catalyst is 5 fold higher than that of PtNSs/C catalyst in basic medium although their activity is comparable in acid. Hydrogen binding energy and oxophilicity are the two equivalent descriptors for HER/HOR in basic media. We propose a bi-functional mechanism for the enhanced alkaline HER/HOR activity of Pt(PtOx)-NSs/C catalyst. In bi-functional Pt-(PtOx)-NSs/C catalyst, PtOx provide an active site for OH- adsorption to form OHads which reacts with hydrogen intermediate (Hads), present at neighbouring Pt sites to form H2O leading to enhancement of HOR activity in basic medium This work may provide opportunity to develop catalysts for various renewable energy technologies. © 2018 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  18. Synthesis of vertical MnO_2 wire arrays on hemp-derived carbon for efficient and robust green catalysts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yang, MinHo; Kim, Dong Seok; Sim, Jae-Wook; Jeong, Jae-Min; Kim, Do Hyun; Choi, Jae Hyung; Kim, Jinsoo; Kim, Seung-Soo; Choi, Bong Gill

    2017-01-01

    Highlights: • The three-dimensional nanocomposites based on vertical MnO_2 array on hemp-derived carbon (HDC) were prepared by hydrothermal method. • The 3D v-MnO_2/HDC nanocomposites showed well-defined porous nature with a high specific surface area of 382.3 m"2 g"−"1. • PET glycolysis was performed using the 3D v-MnO_2/HDC nanocomposites as a catalyst, leading to efficient catalytic performance. - Abstract: Three-dimensional (3D) carbon materials derived from waste biomass have been attracted increasing attention in catalysis and materials science because of their great potential of catalyst supports with respect to multi-functionality, unique structures, high surface area, and low cost. Here, we present a facile and efficient way for preparing 3D heterogeneous catalysts based on vertical MnO_2 wires deposited on hemp-derived 3D porous carbon. The 3D porous carbon materials are fabricated by carbonization and activation processes using hemp (Cannabis Sttiva L.). These 3D porous carbon materials are employed as catalyst supports for direct deposition of vertical MnO_2 wires using a one-step hydrothermal method. The XRD and XPS results reveal the crystalline structure of α-MnO_2 wires. The resultant composites are further employed as a catalyst for glycolysis of poly(ethylene terephthalate) (PET) with high conversion yield of 98%, which is expected to be expressly profitable for plastics recycling industry.

  19. The effect of promoters on the electronic structure of ruthenium catalysts supported on carbon

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guraya, Monica; Sprenger, Susanne; Rarog-Pilecka, Wioletta; Szmigiel, Dariusz; Kowalczyk, Zbigniew; Muhler, Martin

    2004-01-01

    Alkali- and earth-alkali-promoted ruthenium catalysts supported on graphitized carbon were investigated by means of X-ray and ultraviolet photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS and UPS) in order to study the effect of promoters on the electronic structure of this metal-support system. Samples were measured as prepared and after thorough reduction in hydrogen. The C 1s spectra of reduced alkali-promoted catalysts showed a shift towards higher binding energies and an asymmetric broadening. Neither non-promoted nor Ba-promoted Ru/C samples exhibited such a behaviour after similar treatments. The most important feature in the UP spectra of the reduced alkali-promoted catalysts was the appearance of a well defined Fermi edge absent in the semimetal-like electronic structure of graphite. No significant effects appeared in the case of non-promoted or Ba-promoted catalysts. The increase in the density of occupied states at the Fermi energy indicates a shift of this level into the conduction band, due to a charge transfer from the promoter to the support. This interpretation also provides an explanation for the observed higher C 1s binding energy and asymmetric broadening, due to the off-set introduced in the binding energy scale and the increasing probability of inelastic excitations near the Fermi level. In addition to photoelectron spectroscopy, low energy ion scattering (ISS) was used to obtain information about the localisation of the promoters. Based on the mild sputtering effect during prolonged series of spectra, it was possible to conclude that potassium covers both the carbon support and the Ru metal particles

  20. The Role of Non-Conventional Supports for Single-Atom Platinum-Based Catalysts in Fuel-Cell Technology: A Theoretical Surface Science Approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-02-05

    could be a promising catalyst for PEM fuel cells. Introduction: Proton exchange membrane fuel cells ( PEMFCs ) have found wide potential...Unfortunately, due to their high cost and low lifespan, wide-scale commercialization of PEMFCs has been greatly impeded and much effort has been made to...lower its cost as well as to improve its durability over time. In an attempt to alleviate the high-cost associated with conventional PEMFC catalysts