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Sample records for platinum stepped surfaces

  1. Surface characterization of platinum electrodes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Solla-Gullón, José; Rodríguez, Paramaconi; Herrero, Enrique; Aldaz, Antonio; Feliu, Juan M

    2008-03-14

    The quantitative analysis of the different surface sites on platinum samples is attempted from pure voltammetric data. This analysis requires independent knowledge of the fraction of two-dimensional (111) and (100) domains. Specific site-probe reactions are employed to achieve this goal. Irreversibly-adsorbed bismuth and tellurium have been revealed to be sensitive to the presence of (111) terrace domains of different width whereas almost all sites involved in (100) ordered domains have been characterized through germanium adatoms. The experimental protocol follows that used with well-defined single-crystal electrodes and, therefore, requires careful control of the surface cleanliness. Platinum basal planes and their vicinal stepped surfaces have been employed to obtain calibration plots between the charge density measured under the adatom redox peak, specific for the type of surface site, and the corresponding terrace size. The evaluation of the (100) bidimensional domains can also be achieved using the voltammetric profiles, once the fraction of (111) ordered domains present in the polyoriented platinum has been determined and their featureless contribution has been subtracted from the whole voltammetric response. Using that curve, it is possible to perform a deconvolution of the adsorption states of the polycrystalline sample different from those related to (111) domains. The fraction of (100)-related states in the deconvoluted voltammogram can then be compared to that expected from the independent estimation coming from the charge involved in the redox process undergone by the irreversibly-adsorbed germanium and thus check the result of the deconvolution. The information about the surface-site distribution can also be applied to analyze the voltammetric profile of nanocrystalline platinum electrodes.

  2. Heterogeneous platinum-catalyzed hydrogenation of dialkyl(diolefin)platinum(II) complexes: A new route to platinum surface alkyls

    OpenAIRE

    McCarthy, Thomas J.; Shih, Yen-Shiang; Whitesides, George M.

    1981-01-01

    Platinum metal catalyzes the reduction of dialkyl(diolefin)platinum(II) complexes by dihydrogen to alkanes and platinum(0). The reaction involves adsorption of the platinum(II) complex on the platinum(0) catalyst surface with conversion of the alkyl moieties to platinum surface alkyls; these appear as alkane products. The platinum atom originally present in the soluble organoplatinum species becomes part of the platinum(0) surface.

  3. Influence of beryllium cations on the electrochemical oxidation of methanol on stepped platinum surfaces in alkaline solution

    Science.gov (United States)

    García, Gonzalo; Stoffelsma, Chantal; Rodriguez, Paramaconi; Koper, Marc T. M.

    2015-01-01

    The role of beryllium on the oxidation of methanol on Pt stepped surfaces (Pt[(n-1) (111)x(110)]) orientation-Pt(553) with n = 5, Pt(554) n = 10, Pt(151514) n = 30), Pt(111) and Pt(110) single crystals in alkaline media was studied by cyclic voltammetry and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIRS). The results suggest that under the conditions of the experiment, the methanol oxidation reaction follows a direct pathway with formaldehyde and formate as reaction intermediates. The combination of OHads and beryllium blocks the adsorption and oxidation of methanol on Pt(111), but appears to promote the complete oxidation of methanol to carbon dioxide/carbonate on Pt(110).

  4. Dynamics of hydrogen dissociation on stepped platinum

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Groot, I. M. N.; Schouten, K. J. P.; Kleyn, A. W.; Juurlink, L. B. F.

    2008-01-01

    We have studied the reactivity of hydrogen on the Pt(211) stepped surface using supersonic molecular beam techniques. We observe an energy dependence that is indicative of indirect adsorption below 9 kJ mol(-1) and direct adsorption between 0 and 37 kJ mol(-1). Comparison of our results to

  5. Characterization of electrochemically modified polycrystalline platinum surfaces

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Krebs, L.C.; Ishida, Takanobu.

    1991-12-01

    The characterization of electrochemically modified polycrystalline platinum surfaces has been accomplished through the use of four major electrochemical techniques. These were chronoamperometry, chronopotentiommetry, cyclic voltammetry, and linear sweep voltammetry. A systematic study on the under-potential deposition of several transition metals has been performed. The most interesting of these were: Ag, Cu, Cd, and Pb. It was determined, by subjecting the platinum electrode surface to a single potential scan between {minus}0.24 and +1.25 V{sub SCE} while stirring the solution, that the electrocatalytic activity would be regenerated. As a consequence of this study, a much simpler method for producing ultra high purity water from acidic permanganate has been developed. This method results in water that surpasses the water produced by pyrocatalytic distillation. It has also been seen that the wettability of polycrystalline platinum surfaces is greatly dependent on the quantity of oxide present. Oxide-free platinum is hydrophobic and gives a contact angle in the range of 55 to 62 degrees. We have also modified polycrystalline platinum surface with the electrically conducting polymer poly-{rho}-phenylene. This polymer is very stable in dilute sulfuric acid solutions, even under applied oxidative potentials. It is also highly resistant to electrochemical hydrogenation. The wettability of the polymer modified platinum surface is severely dependent on the choice of supporting electrolyte chosen for the electrochemical polymerization. Tetraethylammonium tetrafluoroborate produces a film that is as hydrophobic as Teflon, whereas tetraethylammonium perchlorate produces a film that is more hydrophilic than oxide-free platinum.

  6. Platinum in Earth surface environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reith, F.; Campbell, S. G.; Ball, A. S.; Pring, A.; Southam, G.

    2014-04-01

    Platinum (Pt) is a rare precious metal that is a strategic commodity for industries in many countries. The demand for Pt has more than doubled in the last 30 years due to its role in the catalytic conversion of CO, hydrocarbons and NOx in modern automobiles. To explore for new Pt deposits, process ores and deal with ecotoxicological effects of Pt mining and usage, the fundamental processes and pathways of Pt dispersion and re-concentration in surface environments need to be understood. Hence, the aim of this review is to develop a synergistic model for the cycling of Pt in Earth surface environments. This is achieved by integrating the geological/(biogeo)chemical literature, which focuses on naturally occurring Pt mobility around ore deposits, with the environmental/ecotoxicological literature dealing with anthropogenic Pt dispersion. In Pt deposits, Pt occurs as sulfide-, telluride- and arsenide, native metal and alloyed to other PGEs and iron (Fe). Increased mining and utilization of Pt combined with the burning of fossil fuels have led to the dispersion of Pt-containing nano- and micro-particles. Hence, soils and sediments in industrialized areas, urban environments and along major roads are now commonly Pt enriched. Platinum minerals, nuggets and anthropogenic particles are transformed by physical and (bio)geochemical processes. Complexation of Pt ions with chloride, thiosulfate, ammonium, cyanide, low- and high molecular weight organic acids (LMWOAs and HMWOAs) and siderophores can facilitate Pt mobilization. Iron-oxides, clays, organic matter and (micro)biota are known to sequester Pt-complexes and -particles. Microbes and plants are capable of bioaccumulating and reductively precipitating mobile Pt complexes. Bioaccumulation can lead to toxic effects on plants and animals, including humans. (Bio)mineralization in organic matter-rich sediments can lead to the formation of secondary Pt particles and -grains. Ultimately, Pt is enriched in oceanic sediments

  7. Surface decorated platinum carbonyl clusters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ciabatti, Iacopo; Femoni, Cristina; Iapalucci, Maria Carmela; Longoni, Giuliano; Zacchini, Stefano; Zarra, Salvatore

    2012-06-01

    Four molecular Pt-carbonyl clusters decorated by Cd-Br fragments, i.e., [Pt13(CO)12{Cd5(μ-Br)5Br2(dmf)3}2]2- (1), [Pt19(CO)17{Cd5(μ-Br)5Br3(Me2CO)2}{Cd5(μ-Br)5Br(Me2CO)4}]2- (2), [H2Pt26(CO)20(CdBr)12]8- (3) and [H4Pt26(CO)20(CdBr)12(PtBr)x]6- (4) (x = 0-2), have been obtained from the reactions between [Pt3n(CO)6n]2- (n = 2-6) and CdBr2.H2O in dmf at 120 °C. The structures of these molecular clusters with diameters of 1.5-2 nm have been determined by X-ray crystallography. Both 1 and 2 are composed of icosahedral or bis-icosahedral Pt-CO cores decorated on the surface by Cd-Br motifs, whereas 3 and 4 display a cubic close packed Pt26Cd12 metal frame decorated by CO and Br ligands. An oversimplified and unifying approach to interpret the electron count of these surface decorated platinum carbonyl clusters is suggested, and extended to other low-valent organometallic clusters and Au-thiolate nanoclusters.Four molecular Pt-carbonyl clusters decorated by Cd-Br fragments, i.e., [Pt13(CO)12{Cd5(μ-Br)5Br2(dmf)3}2]2- (1), [Pt19(CO)17{Cd5(μ-Br)5Br3(Me2CO)2}{Cd5(μ-Br)5Br(Me2CO)4}]2- (2), [H2Pt26(CO)20(CdBr)12]8- (3) and [H4Pt26(CO)20(CdBr)12(PtBr)x]6- (4) (x = 0-2), have been obtained from the reactions between [Pt3n(CO)6n]2- (n = 2-6) and CdBr2.H2O in dmf at 120 °C. The structures of these molecular clusters with diameters of 1.5-2 nm have been determined by X-ray crystallography. Both 1 and 2 are composed of icosahedral or bis-icosahedral Pt-CO cores decorated on the surface by Cd-Br motifs, whereas 3 and 4 display a cubic close packed Pt26Cd12 metal frame decorated by CO and Br ligands. An oversimplified and unifying approach to interpret the electron count of these surface decorated platinum carbonyl clusters is suggested, and extended to other low-valent organometallic clusters and Au-thiolate nanoclusters. CCDC 867747 and 867748. For crystallographic data in CIF or other electronic format see DOI: 10.1039/c2nr30400g

  8. Examining the surfaces in used platinum catalysts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Trumić B.

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available For the purpose of finding more advanced platinum catalyst manufacturing technologies and achieving a higher degree of ammonia oxidation, metallographic characterization has been done on the surface of catalyst gauzes and catalyst gripper gauzes made from platinum and palladium alloys. For the examined samples of gauzes as well as the cross section of the wires, a chemical analysis was provided. The purpose of this paper is the metallographic characterization of examined alloys carried out by way of electronic microscopic scanning, X-rays as well as chemical assays which contributed greatly to a better understanding of the surface deactivation, in other words a better consideration of structural changes occurring on the wire surface.

  9. Surface Analysis of 4-Aminothiophenol Adsorption at Polycrystalline Platinum Electrodes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosario-Castro, Belinda I.; Fachini, Estevao R.; Contes, Enid J.; Perez-Davis, Marla E.; Cabrera, Carlos R.

    2008-01-01

    Formation of self-assembled monolayer (SAM) of 4-aminothiophenol (4-ATP) on polycrystalline platinum electrodes has been studied by surface analysis and electrochemistry techniques. The 4-ATP monolayer was characterized by cyclic voltammetry (CV), Raman spectroscopy, reflection absorption infrared (RAIR) spectroscopy, and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). Cyclic voltammetry (CV) experiments give an idea about the packing quality of the monolayer. RAIR and Raman spectra for 4-ATP modified platinum electrodes showed the characteristic adsorption bands for neat 4-ATP indicating the adsorption of 4-ATP molecules on platinum surface. The adsorption on platinum was also evidenced by the presence of sulfur and nitrogen peaks by XPS survey spectra of the modified platinum electrodes. High resolution XPS studies and RAIR spectrum for platinum electrodes modified with 4-ATP indicate that molecules are sulfur-bonded to the platinum surface. The formation of S-Pt bond suggests that ATP adsorption gives up an amino terminated SAM. Thickness of the monolayer was evaluated via angle-resolved XPS (AR-XPS) analyses. Derivatization of 4-ATP SAM was performed using 16-Br hexadecanoic acid.

  10. Friction of atomically stepped surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dikken, R. J.; Thijsse, B. J.; Nicola, L.

    2017-03-01

    The friction behavior of atomically stepped metal surfaces under contact loading is studied using molecular dynamics simulations. While real rough metal surfaces involve roughness at multiple length scales, the focus of this paper is on understanding friction of the smallest scale of roughness: atomic steps. To this end, periodic stepped Al surfaces with different step geometry are brought into contact and sheared at room temperature. Contact stress that continuously tries to build up during loading, is released with fluctuating stress drops during sliding, according to the typical stick-slip behavior. Stress release occurs not only through local slip, but also by means of step motion. The steps move along the contact, concurrently resulting in normal migration of the contact. The direction of migration depends on the sign of the step, i.e., its orientation with respect to the shearing direction. If the steps are of equal sign, there is a net migration of the entire contact accompanied by significant vacancy generation at room temperature. The stick-slip behavior of the stepped contacts is found to have all the characteristic of a self-organized critical state, with statistics dictated by step density. For the studied step geometries, frictional sliding is found to involve significant atomic rearrangement through which the contact roughness is drastically changed. This leads for certain step configurations to a marked transition from jerky sliding motion to smooth sliding, making the final friction stress approximately similar to that of a flat contact.

  11. Responses of fibroblasts and glial cells to nanostructured platinum surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pennisi, C. P.; Sevcencu, C.; Dolatshahi-Pirouz, A.; Foss, M.; Lundsgaard Hansen, J.; Nylandsted Larsen, A.; Zachar, V.; Besenbacher, F.; Yoshida, K.

    2009-09-01

    The chronic performance of implantable neural prostheses is affected by the growth of encapsulation tissue onto the stimulation electrodes. Encapsulation is associated with activation of connective tissue cells at the electrode's metallic contacts, usually made of platinum. Since surface nanotopography can modulate the cellular responses to materials, the aim of the present work was to evaluate the 'in vitro' responses of connective tissue cells to platinum strictly by modulating its surface nanoroughness. Using molecular beam epitaxy combined with sputtering, we produced platinum nanostructured substrates consisting of irregularly distributed nanopyramids and investigated their effect on the proliferation, cytoskeletal organization and cellular morphology of primary fibroblasts and transformed glial cells. Cells were cultured on these substrates and their responses to surface roughness were studied. After one day in culture, the fibroblasts were more elongated and their cytoskeleton less mature when cultured on rough substrates. This effect increased as the roughness of the surface increased and was associated with reduced cell proliferation throughout the observation period (4 days). Morphological changes also occurred in glial cells, but they were triggered by a different roughness scale and did not affect cellular proliferation. In conclusion, surface nanotopography modulates the responses of fibroblasts and glial cells to platinum, which may be an important factor in optimizing the tissue response to implanted neural electrodes.

  12. Modification of platinum surfaces by spontaneous deposition: Methanol oxidation electrocatalysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    MacDonald, J.P.; Gualtieri, B.; Runga, N.; Teliz, E.; Zinola, C.F. [Fundamental Electrochemistry Laboratory, School of Sciences, Universidad de la Republica, Igua Street No. 4225, CP 11400, Montevideo (Uruguay)

    2008-12-15

    The presence of a second metal on platinum surfaces affects the performance of methanol oxidation. However, most of the electrocatalytic reactions are studied by using electrochemically deposited platinum alloys, but in the case of spontaneous deposition the situation is not so clear since the surface distribution, stability and morphology are usually not well documented. The formation of surface decorated samples on mono- and poly-crystalline platinum is followed by electrochemical and spectroscopic techniques and analysis of their performance towards methanol adsorption and oxidation compared with that on pure platinum. Pt/Sn and Pt/Ru are of special interest because of their well-known performance in methanol fuel cells. Methanol oxidation on Pt(111)/Ru, Pt(111)/Sn and Pt(111) shows that ruthenium is the only one able to promote the reaction since the simultaneous dissolution of tin occurs and competes with the process of interest. The in situ infrared spectroscopy is used to compare methanol oxidation on Pt(111)/Ru and Pt(111) in acid media using p-polarized light. The formation of bridge bound carbon monoxide is inhibited in the presence of ruthenium ad-species, whereas on Pt(111) the three adsorption configurations are observed. Linear sweep polarization curves and Tafel slopes (calculated from steady state potentiostatic plots) for methanol oxidation are compared on polycrystalline surfaces modified by tin or ruthenium at different coverages. There is almost no change in the Tafel slopes due to the presence of the foreign metal except for Pt/Ru, where a 0.09 V decade{sup -1} slope was calculated below 0.55 V due to hydroxyl adsorbates on ruthenium islands. The anodic stripping of methanol residues on the three surfaces indicates a lower amount of carbon monoxide-type adsorbates on Pt/Ru, and the simultaneous tin dissolution process leading to residues oxidation on Pt/Sn electrodes. (author)

  13. CO-Induced Restructuring on Stepped Pt Surfaces: A Molecular Dynamics Study

    CERN Document Server

    Michalka, Joseph R; Gezelter, J Daniel

    2016-01-01

    The effects of plateau width and step edge kinking on carbon monoxide (CO)-induced restructuring of platinum surfaces were explored using molecular dynamics (MD) simulations. Platinum crystals displaying four different vicinal surfaces [(321), (765), (112), and (557)] were constructed and exposed to partial coverages of carbon monoxide. Platinum-CO interactions were fit to recent experimental data and density functional theory (DFT) calculations, providing a classical interaction model that captures the atop binding preference on Pt. The differences in Pt-Pt binding strength between edge atoms on the various facets were found to play a significant role in step edge wandering and reconstruction events. Because the mechanism for step doubling relies on a stochastic meeting of two wandering edges, the widths of the plateaus on the original surfaces was also found to play a role in these reconstructions. On the Pt(321) surfaces, the CO adsorbate was found to assist in reordering the kinked step edges into straigh...

  14. Surface segregations in platinum-based alloy nanoparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamakawa, Shunsuke; Asahi, Ryoji; Koyama, Toshiyuki

    2014-04-01

    A phase-field model that describes the radial distributions of the ordered-disordered phase and surface segregation in a single-alloy nanoparticle is introduced to clarify the overall behavior of surface segregation of various Pt-based alloy nanoparticles. One of the obstacles to apply a platinum-transition metal alloy as a cathode electro-catalyst of a polymer electrolyte fuel cell is the need to ensure the retention of the designed surface composition in an alloy nanoparticle against the alloy combinations, a particle size, and heat treatment. From the results of calculations for CrPt, FePt, CoPt, NiPt, CuPt, PdPt, IrPt, and AuPt binary nanoparticles with diameters below 10 nm at 973.15 K, the compositional variation within a single particle was found to depend on the balance between the atomic interaction within particles and the surface free energy. In addition, the obtained specific steady-state composition of the surface varied significantly with alloy combination and particle diameter. Based on the general tendencies of a binary system to exhibit segregation, attempts to control the amount of platinum segregation on the surface using a ternary-alloy system were examined.

  15. Platinum overlayers on Co(0001) and Ni(111): numerical simulation of surface alloying

    Science.gov (United States)

    Légaré, P.; Cabeza, G. F.; Castellani, N. J.

    1999-11-01

    The surface alloying of one and two monolayers (ML) of platinum deposited on Ni(111) and Co(0001) were studied by means of the ECT-BFS method. The 1 ML deposit appears to be very stable on both substrates. Platinum can diffuse at high temperature only, the large activation barrier being represented by the first substrate layer. On the contrary, the stability of the 2 ML deposit is poor so that alloying is easily obtained. In both cases, the platinum diffusion produces metastable states. The lowest-energy states exhibit a propensity for platinum dilution in a limited region below the surface. The initial platinum thickness determines not only the features of the alloyed region, but also the surface concentration. The surface alloys have features qualitatively similar to those reported for the (111) surface of bulk Pt-Ni and Pt-Co alloys: a platinum-rich surface and oscillating concentration profiles.

  16. Structural sensitivity studies of ethylene hydrogenation on platinum and rhodium surfaces

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Quinlan, M.A. [California Univ., Berkeley, CA (United States). Dept. of Chemistry]|[Lawrence Berkeley National Lab., CA (United States)

    1996-01-01

    The catalytic hydrogenation of ethylene and hydrogen on the well characterized surfaces of the noble metals platinum and rhodium has been studied for the purposes of determining the relative activity of these two substrates as well as the degree of structure sensitivity. The Pt(111) and the Rh(755) single crystal surfaces,as well as Pt and Rh foils, were employed as substrates to study the effect of surface step structure on reactivity. In addition, vibrational spectroscopy studies were performed for ethylene adsorption on the stepped Rh(755) surface. The catalytic reaction were obtained using a combined ultrahigh vacuum chamber coupled with an atmospheric pressure reaction chamber that functioned as a batch reactor. Samples could be prepared using standard surface science techniques and characterized for surface composition and geometry using Auger Electron Spectroscopy and Low Energy Electron Diffraction. A comparison of the reactivity of Rh(111) with the results from this study on Rh(755) allows a direct determination of the effect of step structure on ethylene hydrogenation activity. Structure sensitivity is expected to exhibit orders of magnitude differences in rate as surface orientation is varied. In this case, no significant differences were found, confirming the structure insensitivity of this reaction over this metal. The turnover frequency of the Rh(111) surface, 5 {times} 10{sup 1} s{sup {minus}1}, is in relatively good agreement with the turnover frequency of 9 {times} 10{sup 1} s{sup {minus}1} measured for the Rh(755) surface. Rate measurements made on the Pt(111) surface and the Pt foil are in excellent agreement, both measuring 3 {times} 10{sup 2} s{sup minus}1. Likewise, it is concluded that no strong structure sensitivity for the platinum surfaces exists. High Resolution Electron Energy Loss Spectroscopy studies of adsorbed ethylene on the Rh(755) surface compare favorably with the ethylidyne spectra obtained on the Rh(111) and Rh(100) surfaces.

  17. Influence of Surface Structure of Platinum Electrodes on Electrooxidation of CO

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    XIA Xing-hua; ZHANG Dai; SONG Yan-yan

    2003-01-01

    The oxidation of CO on platinum electrodes in an acid solution was studied with the conventional electrochemical methods and the on-line electrochemical mass spectroscopy. It was found that this reaction is strongly determined by the surface morphology of platinum. The pretreatment of platinum electrodes can change the surface properties dramatically, in consequence it can improve the electrocatalytic activity towards the electrooxidation of CO. The existence of surface active sites on the roughened platinum electrodes can be used to explain its high electrocatalysis towards the oxidation of CO.

  18. Platinum recycling going green via induced surface potential alteration enabling fast and efficient dissolution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hodnik, Nejc; Baldizzone, Claudio; Polymeros, George; Geiger, Simon; Grote, Jan-Philipp; Cherevko, Serhiy; Mingers, Andrea; Zeradjanin, Aleksandar; Mayrhofer, Karl J. J.

    2016-01-01

    The recycling of precious metals, for example, platinum, is an essential aspect of sustainability for the modern industry and energy sectors. However, due to its resistance to corrosion, platinum-leaching techniques rely on high reagent consumption and hazardous processes, for example, boiling aqua regia; a mixture of concentrated nitric and hydrochloric acid. Here we demonstrate that complete dissolution of metallic platinum can be achieved by induced surface potential alteration, an ‘electrode-less' process utilizing alternatively oxidative and reductive gases. This concept for platinum recycling exploits the so-called transient dissolution mechanism, triggered by a repetitive change in platinum surface oxidation state, without using any external electric current or electrodes. The effective performance in non-toxic low-concentrated acid and at room temperature is a strong benefit of this approach, potentially rendering recycling of industrial catalysts, including but not limited to platinum-based systems, more sustainable. PMID:27767178

  19. Platinum recycling going green via induced surface potential alteration enabling fast and efficient dissolution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hodnik, Nejc; Baldizzone, Claudio; Polymeros, George; Geiger, Simon; Grote, Jan-Philipp; Cherevko, Serhiy; Mingers, Andrea; Zeradjanin, Aleksandar; Mayrhofer, Karl J. J.

    2016-10-01

    The recycling of precious metals, for example, platinum, is an essential aspect of sustainability for the modern industry and energy sectors. However, due to its resistance to corrosion, platinum-leaching techniques rely on high reagent consumption and hazardous processes, for example, boiling aqua regia; a mixture of concentrated nitric and hydrochloric acid. Here we demonstrate that complete dissolution of metallic platinum can be achieved by induced surface potential alteration, an `electrode-less' process utilizing alternatively oxidative and reductive gases. This concept for platinum recycling exploits the so-called transient dissolution mechanism, triggered by a repetitive change in platinum surface oxidation state, without using any external electric current or electrodes. The effective performance in non-toxic low-concentrated acid and at room temperature is a strong benefit of this approach, potentially rendering recycling of industrial catalysts, including but not limited to platinum-based systems, more sustainable.

  20. Study of gold-platinum and platinum-gold surface modification and its influence on hydrogen evolution and oxygen reduction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    BRANIMIR N. GRGUR

    2005-02-01

    Full Text Available Surface modification of the electrodes was conducted from sulfuric acid solutions containing the corresponding metal–chloride complexes using cyclic voltammetry. Comparing the charges of the hydrogen underpotential deposition region, and the corresponding oxide reduction regions, it is concluded that a platinum overlayer on gold forms 3D islands, while gold on platinum forms 2D islands. Foreign metals present in an amount of up to one monolayer exert an influence on the change in reaction rate with respect to both hydrogen evolution (HER and oxygen reduction (ORR reactions. Aplatinum overlayer on a gold substrate increases the activity forHER and for ORR, compared with pure gold. These results can be understood in terms of a simple model, in which the change in the H and OH binding energies are directly proportional to the shift of the d-bond center of the overlayer. On the contrary, a gold layer on platinum slightly decreases the activity for both reactions compared with pure platinum.

  1. Surface oxide growth on platinum electrode in aqueous trifluoromethanesulfonic acid

    Science.gov (United States)

    Furuya, Yoshihisa; Mashio, Tetsuya; Ohma, Atsushi; Dale, Nilesh; Oshihara, Kenzo; Jerkiewicz, Gregory

    2014-10-01

    Platinum in the form of nanoparticles is the key and most expensive component of polymer electrolyte membrane fuel cells, while trifluoromethanesulfonic acid (CF3SO3H) is the smallest fluorinated sulfonic acid. Nafion, which acts as both electrolyte and separator in fuel cells, contains -CF2SO3H groups. Consequently, research on the electrochemical behaviour of Pt in aqueous CF3SO3H solutions creates important background knowledge that can benefit fuel cell development. In this contribution, Pt electro-oxidation is studied in 0.1 M aqueous CF3SO3H as a function of the polarization potential (Ep, 1.10 ≤ Ep ≤ 1.50 V), polarization time (tp, 100 ≤ tp ≤ 104 s), and temperature (T, 278 ≤ T ≤ 333 K). The critical thicknesses (X1), which determines the applicability of oxide growth theories, is determined and related to the oxide thickness (dox). Because X1 > dox for the entire range of Ep, tp, and T values, the formation of Pt surface oxide follows the interfacial place-exchange or the metal cation escape mechanism. The mechanism of Pt electro-oxidation is revised and expanded by taking into account possible interactions of cations, anions, and water molecules with Pt. A modified kinetic equation for the interfacial place exchange is proposed. The application of the interfacial place-exchange and metal cation escape mechanisms leads to an estimation of the Ptδ+-Oδ- surface dipole (μPtO), and the potential drop (Vox) and electric field (Eox) within the oxide. The Pt-anion interactions affect the oxidation kinetics by indirectly influencing the electric field within the double layer and the surface oxide.

  2. DME Dissociation Reaction on Platinum Electrode Surface : A Quantitative Kinetic Analysis by In Situ IR Spectroscopy

    OpenAIRE

    Zhang, Yi; Tong, Yujin; Lu, Leilei; Osawa, Masatoshi; Ye, Shen

    2010-01-01

    The kinetics of electrocatalytic dissociation reaction of dimethyl ether (DME) on a platinum (Pt) polycrystalline electrode in an acidic solution yielding carbon monoxide (CO) has been quantitatively analyzed by in situ IR spectroscopy in the potential region between 100 and 500 mV (vs reversible hydrogen electrode). A two-step consecutive reaction model, an initial dehydrogenation step followed by a CO formation step, is proposed for the dissociation process of the DME molecule. The mechanis...

  3. Bimetallic Catalysts and Platinum Surfaces Studied by X-ray Absorption Spectroscopy and Scanning Tunnelling Microscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Roenning, Magnus

    2000-07-01

    anisotropic, and tend to grow in the [N 1] direction of the hexagonal reconstruction. The diffusion barrier associated with step edges parallel to the [N 1] direction is shown to be an important factor for the anisotropic behaviour of the adsorption process. The Pt(111) and the Pt(100)-hex-R0.7{sup o} surfaces were both saturated with ethene at room temperature followed by heating to 900 K. LEED patterns and STM images of the platinum surfaces after heating consistently show that graphite formation is more pronounced on Pt(111) than on Pt(100). The adsorbate formed on the Pt(100) surface during ethene exposure appears to desorb completely, leaving a clean hexagonally reconstructed surface when heated in UHV to temperatures above 900 K.

  4. Surface engineering of hierarchical platinum-cobalt nanowires for efficient electrocatalysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bu, Lingzheng; Guo, Shaojun; Zhang, Xu; Shen, Xuan; Su, Dong; Lu, Gang; Zhu, Xing; Yao, Jianlin; Guo, Jun; Huang, Xiaoqing

    2016-06-01

    Despite intense research in past decades, the lack of high-performance catalysts for fuel cell reactions remains a challenge in realizing fuel cell technologies for transportation applications. Here we report a facile strategy for synthesizing hierarchical platinum-cobalt nanowires with high-index, platinum-rich facets and ordered intermetallic structure. These structural features enable unprecedented performance for the oxygen reduction and alcohol oxidation reactions. The specific/mass activities of the platinum-cobalt nanowires for oxygen reduction reaction are 39.6/33.7 times higher than commercial Pt/C catalyst, respectively. Density functional theory simulations reveal that the active threefold hollow sites on the platinum-rich high-index facets provide an additional factor in enhancing oxygen reduction reaction activities. The nanowires are stable in the electrochemical conditions and also thermally stable. This work may represent a key step towards scalable production of high-performance platinum-based nanowires for applications in catalysis and energy conversion.

  5. Determination of platinum surface contamination in veterinary and human oncology centres using inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Janssens, T.; Brouwers, E. E M; de Vos, J. P.; de Vries, N.; Schellens, J. H M; Beijnen, J. H.

    2015-01-01

    The objective of this study was to determine the surface contamination with platinum-containing antineoplastic drugs in veterinary and human oncology centres. Inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry was used to measure platinum levels in surface samples. In veterinary and human oncology

  6. Potential Dependent Structural Changes of Underpotentially Deposited Copper on an Iodine Treated Platinum Surface Determined In Situ by Surface EXAFS and Its Polarization Dependence

    Science.gov (United States)

    1993-08-25

    of Underpotentially Deposited Copper on an Iodine Treated Platinum Surface Determined In Situ by Surface EXAFS and Its Polarization Dependence G.M...fiCAtson) Potential Dependent Structural Changes of Underpotentially Deposited Copper on an Irodine Treated Platinum Surface Determined In Situ by...necessary and identify by block number) An in situ structural investigation of the underpotential deposition of copper on an iodine covered platinum

  7. Surface and Step Conductivities on Si(111) Surfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Just, Sven; Blab, Marcus; Korte, Stefan; Cherepanov, Vasily; Soltner, Helmut; Voigtländer, Bert

    2015-08-07

    Four-point measurements using a multitip scanning tunneling microscope are carried out in order to determine surface and step conductivities on Si(111) surfaces. In a first step, distance-dependent four-point measurements in the linear configuration are used in combination with an analytical three-layer model for charge transport to disentangle the 2D surface conductivity from nonsurface contributions. A termination of the Si(111) surface with either Bi or H results in the two limiting cases of a pure 2D or 3D conductance, respectively. In order to further disentangle the surface conductivity of the step-free surface from the contribution due to atomic steps, a square four-probe configuration is applied as a function of the rotation angle. In total, this combined approach leads to an atomic step conductivity of σ(step)=(29±9)  Ω(-1) m(-1) and to a step-free surface conductivity of σ(surf)=(9±2)×10(-6)  Ω(-1)/□ for the Si(111)-(7×7) surface.

  8. Nanocrystal and surface alloy properties of bimetallic Gold-Platinum nanoparticles

    OpenAIRE

    Mott Derrick; Luo Jin; Smith Andrew; Njoki Peter; Wang Lingyan; Zhong Chuan-Jian

    2006-01-01

    AbstractWe report on the correlation between the nanocrystal and surface alloy properties with the bimetallic composition of gold-platinum(AuPt) nanoparticles. The fundamental understanding of whether the AuPt nanocrystal core is alloyed or phase-segregated and how the surface binding properties are correlated with the nanoscale bimetallic properties is important not only for the exploitation of catalytic activity of the nanoscale bimetallic catalysts, but also to the general exploration of t...

  9. The Electrochemical Development of Pt(111 Stepped Surfaces and Its Influence on Methanol Electrooxidation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. Teliz

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The progress in the preparation of new electrode surfaces by electrochemical treatments exhibiting high faradaic efficiencies towards industrial electrocatalytic processes has gained more attention in today's scientific community. Most of the papers report new catalysts dispersed on different substrates, but some fundamental studies required for electrochemical and physical characterizations are sometimes forgotten. In this paper, we make a full staging of two electrochemical treatments that can be conducted to enhance the electrocatalytic activity of platinum surfaces, such as, electrofacetting through square wave potential programs and constant cathodic polarizations in the net hydrogen evolution region. The cathodic treatment applied at −2 V clearly develops (111 stepped planes similarly to the electrofacetting performed after applying the square wave program between 1.40 V and 0.70 V at 2.5 kHz. The X-ray diffraction patterns of both surfaces as well as on other electrofacetted platinum electrodes are obtained for comparison purposes. Moreover, the electrocatalytic activity towards methanol electrooxidation also exhibits equivalent coulombic efficiencies and 200% higher than on polycrystalline platinum as demonstrated by linear sweep voltammetry and potentiostatic current decays.

  10. Metal surfaces: Surface, step and kink formation energies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kollár, J.; Vitos, Levente; Johansson, B.;

    2000-01-01

    We review the surface, step, and kink energies in monoatomic metallic systems. A systematic comparison is given between the theoretical results based on density functional theory and available experimental data. Our calculated values are used to predict the equilibrium shapes of small metal...

  11. Preparation of Dispersed Platinum Nanoparticles on a Carbon Nanostructured Surface Using Supercritical Fluid Chemical Deposition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mineo Hiramatsu

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available We have developed a method of forming platinum (Pt nanoparticles using a metal organic chemical fluid deposition (MOCFD process employing a supercritical fluid (SCF, and have demonstrated the synthesis of dispersed Pt nanoparticles on the surfaces of carbon nanowalls (CNWs, two-dimensional carbon nanostructures, and carbon nanotubes (CNTs. By using SCF-MOCFD with supercritical carbon dioxide as a solvent of metal-organic compounds, highly dispersed Pt nanoparticles of 2 nm diameter were deposited on the entire surface of CNWs and CNTs. The SCF-MOCFD process proved to be effective for the synthesis of Pt nanoparticles on the entire surface of intricate carbon nanostructures with narrow interspaces.

  12. Surface features and catalytic performance of platinum/alumina catalysts in slurry-phase hydrogenation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gutierrez-Ortiz, M.A.; Gonzalez-Marcos, M.P.; Arnaiz-Aguilar, S.; Gonzalez-Marcos, J.A.; Gonzalez-Velasco, J.R. (Univ. del Pais Vasco/Euskal Hirrika Unibertsitatea, Bilbao (Spain). Dept. de Ingenierlla Quimica)

    1993-11-01

    Several platinum catalysts supported on three commercial [gamma]-aluminas were prepared by impregnation and anionic exchange using aqueous solutions of H[sub 2]PtCl[sub 6]. A number of methods were used to characterize the precursors as well as the final catalysts, including TGA, TPR, and hydrogen chemisorption at 298 K. TPR measurements showed two reduction peaks for the catalysts: the first one corresponding to reduction of the metal precursor to platinum and the second one associated to formation of a surface complex, Pt-Al[sub 2]O[sub 3[minus]x], With partial reduction of the support. The activity of the different catalysts was tested in the slurry-phase hydrogenation of benzene. The results obtained in the activity measurements have been correlated to the characteristics of the catalysts.

  13. Albumin (BSA) adsorption onto graphite stepped surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rubio-Pereda, Pamela; Vilhena, J. G.; Takeuchi, Noboru; Serena, Pedro A.; Pérez, Rubén

    2017-06-01

    Nanomaterials are good candidates for the design of novel components with biomedical applications. For example, nano-patterned substrates may be used to immobilize protein molecules in order to integrate them in biosensing units. Here, we perform long MD simulations (up to 200 ns) using an explicit solvent and physiological ion concentrations to characterize the adsorption of bovine serum albumin (BSA) onto a nano-patterned graphite substrate. We have studied the effect of the orientation and step size on the protein adsorption and final conformation. Our results show that the protein is stable, with small changes in the protein secondary structure that are confined to the contact area and reveal the influence of nano-structuring on the spontaneous adsorption, protein-surface binding energies, and protein mobility. Although van der Waals (vdW) interactions play a dominant role, our simulations reveal the important role played by the hydrophobic lipid-binding sites of the BSA molecule in the adsorption process. The complex structure of these sites, that incorporate residues with different hydrophobic character, and their flexibility are crucial to understand the influence of the ion concentration and protein orientation in the different steps of the adsorption process. Our study provides useful information for the molecular engineering of components that require the immobilization of biomolecules and the preservation of their biological activity.

  14. Covalent Attachment of 1-Alkenes to Oxidized Platinum Surfaces

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Alonso Carnicero, J.M.; Fabre, B.; Trilling, A.K.; Scheres, L.M.W.; Franssen, M.C.R.; Zuilhof, H.

    2015-01-01

    We report the formation of covalently bound alkyl layers onto oxidized Pt (PtOx) substrates by reaction with 1-alkenes as a novel way to bind organic molecules to metal surfaces. The organic layers were characterized by static contact angle, infrared reflection absorption spectroscopy (IRRAS), X-ray

  15. Resolving the Structure of Active Sites on Platinum Catalytic Nanoparticles

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chang, Lan Yun; Barnard, Amanda S.; Gontard, Lionel Cervera

    2010-01-01

    Accurate understanding of the structure of active sites is fundamentally important in predicting catalytic properties of heterogeneous nanocatalysts. We present an accurate determination of both experimental and theoretical atomic structures of surface monatomic steps on industrial platinum nanop...

  16. Covalent attachment of 1-alkenes to oxidized platinum surfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alonso, Jose Maria; Fabre, Bruno; Trilling, Anke K; Scheres, Luc; Franssen, Maurice C R; Zuilhof, Han

    2015-03-10

    We report the formation of covalently bound alkyl layers onto oxidized Pt (PtOx) substrates by reaction with 1-alkenes as a novel way to bind organic molecules to metal surfaces. The organic layers were characterized by static contact angle, infrared reflection absorption spectroscopy (IRRAS), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), and atomic force microscopy (AFM). The grafted alkyl layers display a hydrolytic stability that is comparable to that of alkyl thiols on Au. PtOx-alkene attachment is compatible with terminal ester moieties enabling further anchoring of functional groups, such as redox-active ferrocene, and thus has great potential to extend monolayer chemistry on noble metals.

  17. Mechanical polishing as an improved surface treatment for platinum screen-printed electrodes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Junqiao Lee

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available The viability of mechanical polishing as a surface pre-treatment method for commercially available platinum screen-printed electrodes (SPEs was investigated and compared to a range of other pre-treatment methods (UV-Ozone treatment, soaking in N,N-dimethylformamide, soaking and anodizing in aqueous NaOH solution, and ultrasonication in tetrahydrofuran. Conventional electrochemical activation of platinum SPEs in 0.5 M H2SO4 solution was ineffective for the removal of contaminants found to be passivating the screen-printed surfaces. However, mechanical polishing showed a significant improvement in hydrogen adsorption and in electrochemically active surface areas (probed by two different redox couples due to the effective removal of surface contaminants. Results are also presented that suggest that SPEs are highly susceptible to degradation by strong acidic or caustic solutions, and could potentially lead to instability in long-term applications due to continual etching of the binding materials. The ability of SPEs to be polished effectively extends the reusability of these traditionally “single-use” devices.

  18. Canard explosion and internal signal stochastic bi-resonance in the CO oxidation on platinum surface

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2006-01-01

    Canard explosion is a kind of complex temporal behavior and is ubiquitous in excitable systems. It is associated with an abrupt change of amplitude and period of an oscillatory trajectory in a very narrow interval of a control parameter. We have analyzed in the present paper the behavior of canard explosion that is near a supercritical Hopf bifurcation and its response to white noise in a temporal model of CO oxidation on platinum surface. We have found that the presence of canard explosion gives rise to internal signal stochastic bi-resonance, thus demonstrating a novel functional feature of noise: selective amplifying signals with different periods.

  19. Scaling behavior of the surface roughness of platinum films grown by oblique angle deposition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dolatshahi-Pirouz, A.; Hovgaard, M. B.; Rechendorff, K.; Chevallier, J.; Foss, M.; Besenbacher, F.

    2008-03-01

    Thin platinum films with well-controlled rough surface morphologies are grown by e-gun evaporation at an oblique angle of incidence between the deposition flux and the substrate normal. Atomic force microscopy is used to determine the root-mean-square value w of the surface roughness on the respective surfaces. From the scaling behavior of w , we find that while the roughness exponent α remains nearly unchanged at about 0.90, the growth exponent β changes from 0.49±0.04 to 0.26±0.01 as the deposition angle approaches grazing incidence. The values of the growth exponent β indicate that the film growth is influenced by both surface diffusion and shadowing effects, while the observed change from 0.49 to 0.26 can be attributed to differences in the relative importance of diffusion and shadowing with the deposition angle.

  20. Photodeposition of Gold, Platinum, or Silver onto Titanium Dioxide Nanoparticles at Steps of Highly Oriented Pyrolytic Graphite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taing, James

    The photodeposition of gold, platinum, or silver nanoparticles selectively onto isolated titanium dioxide (TiO2) nanoparticles created metal/TiO2 photocatalysts and heterogeneous catalysts, and validated the photocatalytic property of the semiconductor. The isolated and ordered TiO2 nanoparticles permitted clear observations of the stability, and changes in morphology, of the particles in various experimental conditions. The fabrication of TiO2 nanoparticles at the steps of highly oriented pyrolytic graphite (HOPG), utilizing physical vapor deposition, required heating the graphite substrate to a minimum of 800 °C. The production of a photocurrent, and plating of gold nanoparticles, confirmed the photocatalytic property of the TiO2 nanoparticles on HOPG when utilized as a photoelectrode in a two half-cell setup. Employing sodium chloride (1.0 M) as an electrolyte resulted in an increase/decrease of the photocurrent with the addition of gold cations to the half-cell without/with the TiO2 nanoparticles. A poor distribution of gold nanoparticles, roughly 40-45 nm wide, deposited around few of the TiO2 nanoparticles. A lower concentration of sodium chloride (0.1 M) resulted in a coalescence of Au nanoparticles, roughly 10 nm, around many TiO2 nanoparticles. Using sodium nitrate as an electrolyte resulted in a rapid decay in the photocurrent and a growth of an unidentified material on the TiO2 nanoparticles. The unidentified material hindered the reduction of gold cations introduced midway through the experiment. With gold cations present at the onset of the experiment, disperse gold nanoparticles (˜5-10 nm) deposited around the TiO2 nanoparticles. In the absence of additional electrolyte, many disperse gold nanoparticles less than 5 nm deposited onto the TiO2 nanoparticles. More platinum than gold selectively deposited onto the TiO2 nanoparticles. On the contrary, less silver selectively deposited onto the TiO2 nanoparticles. Scanning electron microscopy and atomic

  1. Femtosecond laser-induced periodic surface nanostructuring of sputtered platinum thin films

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rodríguez, Ainara, E-mail: airodriguez@ceit.es [CIC microGUNE, Goiru Kalea 9 Polo Innovación Garaia, 20500 Arrasate-Mondragón (Spain); CEIT-IK4 & Tecnun (University of Navarra), Paseo Manuel Lardizábal 15, 20018 San Sebastián (Spain); Morant-Miñana, Maria Carmen; Dias-Ponte, Antonio; Martínez-Calderón, Miguel; Gómez-Aranzadi, Mikel; Olaizola, Santiago M. [CIC microGUNE, Goiru Kalea 9 Polo Innovación Garaia, 20500 Arrasate-Mondragón (Spain); CEIT-IK4 & Tecnun (University of Navarra), Paseo Manuel Lardizábal 15, 20018 San Sebastián (Spain)

    2015-10-01

    Highlights: • Femtosecond laser-induced surface nanostructures on sputtered platinum thin films. • Three types of structures obtained: random nanostructures, LSFL and HSFL. • Two different modification regimes have been established based on laser fluence. - Abstract: In this work, submicro and nanostructures self-formed on the surface of Platinum thin films under femtosecond laser-pulse irradiation are investigated. A Ti:Sapphire laser system was used to linearly scan 15 mm lines with 100 fs pulses at a central wavelength of 800 nm with a 1 kHz repetition rate. The resulting structures were characterized by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and 2D-Fast Fourier Transform (2D-FFT) analysis. This analysis of images revealed different types of structures depending on the laser irradiation parameters: random nanostructures, low spatial frequency LIPSS (LSFL) with a periodicity from about 450 to 600 nm, and high spatial frequency LIPSS (HSFL) with a periodicity from about 80 to 200 nm. Two different modifications regimes have been established for the formation of nanostructures: (a) a high-fluence regime in which random nanostructures and LSFL are obtained and (b) a low-fluence regime in which HSFL and LSFL are obtained.

  2. 4-step 4-h carboplatin desensitization protocol for patients with gynecological malignancies showing platinum hypersensitivity: a retrospective study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takase, Naoto; Matsumoto, Koji; Onoe, Takuma; Kitao, Akihito; Tanioka, Maki; Kikukawa, Yoshitaka; Yamaguchi, Satoshi; Fujiwara, Kiyoshi; Negoro, Shunichi

    2015-06-01

    Platinum agents are essential for treating gynecological malignancies, particularly ovarian cancer. However, multiple carboplatin doses may cause hypersensitivity reactions (HSRs). Carboplatin desensitization prevents life-threatening HSRs and promotes the successful completion of planned chemotherapy. Since January 2010, carboplatin desensitization was performed at our institution. Solutions with 1/1000, 1/100, and 1/10 dilutions of carboplatin and an undiluted solution were prepared in 250 mL of 5% glucose. Each solution was administered as a 1-h intravenous infusion (4-step 4-h protocol). This retrospective analysis was approved by the institutional review board. From January 2010 to December 2013, 20 patients with gynecological malignancies (median age 62 years, range 43-74 years) received desensitization treatment. The International Federation of Gynecology and Obstetrics stages at presentation were I, II, III, and IV in 1, 1, 15, 13 patients, respectively. During first-line and second-line treatments, 3 and 17 patients, respectively, experienced carboplatin-induced HSRs. The median carboplatin cycle number was 11 (range 2-16). In the first desensitization cycle, 17 (85%) patients completed treatment without adverse events, 2 experienced Grade 1 HSRs but completed treatment, and 1 experienced Grade 3 HSR and discontinued treatment. The first desensitization cycle completion rate was 95%. Of 83 desensitization cycles administered, 79 (95.2%) were completed. No treatment-related deaths occurred. Most patients completed the planned chemotherapy. Our protocol could be conducted safely with shorter duration and simpler procedures than previous protocols. Carboplatin desensitization seems beneficial for patients with a history of carboplatin-induced HSRs; however, the risk of HSR recurrence still remains. Desensitization should therefore be performed only by well-trained staff.

  3. Electrochemical characterization of gelatinized starch dispersions: voltammetry and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy on platinum surface.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hernandez-Jaimes, C; Lobato-Calleros, C; Sosa, E; Bello-Pérez, L A; Vernon-Carter, E J; Alvarez-Ramirez, J

    2015-06-25

    The electrochemical properties of gelatinized starch dispersions (GSD; 5% w/w) from different botanical sources were studied using cyclic voltammetry (CV) and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) tests over a platinum surface. The phenomenological modelling of EIS data using equivalent circuits indicated that after gelatinization the electrical resistance was determined mainly by the resistance of insoluble material (i.e., ghosts). Sonication of the GSD disrupted the ghost microstructure, and produced an increase in electrical conductivity by reducing the resistance of the insoluble material. The CV data showed three oxidation peaks at potentials where glucose solutions displayed oxidation waves. It is postulated that hydrolysis at the bulk and electrocatalyzed oxidation on the Pt-surface are reactions involved in the starch transformation. Starches peak intensity increased with the amylose content, suggesting that the amylose-rich matrix played an important role in the charge transfer in the electrolytic system. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Nanocrystal and surface alloy properties of bimetallic Gold-Platinum nanoparticles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mott Derrick

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available AbstractWe report on the correlation between the nanocrystal and surface alloy properties with the bimetallic composition of gold-platinum(AuPt nanoparticles. The fundamental understanding of whether the AuPt nanocrystal core is alloyed or phase-segregated and how the surface binding properties are correlated with the nanoscale bimetallic properties is important not only for the exploitation of catalytic activity of the nanoscale bimetallic catalysts, but also to the general exploration of the surface or interfacial reactivities of bimetallic or multimetallic nanoparticles. The AuPt nanoparticles are shown to exhibit not only single-phase alloy character in the nanocrystal, but also bimetallic alloy property on the surface. The nanocrystal and surface alloy properties are directly correlated with the bimetallic composition. The FTIR probing of CO adsorption on the bimetallic nanoparticles supported on silica reveals that the surface binding sites are dependent on the bimetallic composition. The analysis of this dependence further led to the conclusion that the relative Au-atop and Pt-atop sites for the linear CO adsorption on the nanoparticle surface are not only correlated with the bimetallic composition, but also with the electronic effect as a result of the d-band shift of Pt in the bimetallic nanocrystals, which is the first demonstration of the nanoscale core-surface property correlation for the bimetallic nanoparticles over a wide range of bimetallic composition.

  5. Nanocrystal and surface alloy properties of bimetallic Gold-Platinum nanoparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mott, Derrick; Luo, Jin; Smith, Andrew; Njoki, Peter N; Wang, Lingyan

    2007-01-01

    We report on the correlation between the nanocrystal and surface alloy properties with the bimetallic composition of gold-platinum(AuPt) nanoparticles. The fundamental understanding of whether the AuPt nanocrystal core is alloyed or phase-segregated and how the surface binding properties are correlated with the nanoscale bimetallic properties is important not only for the exploitation of catalytic activity of the nanoscale bimetallic catalysts, but also to the general exploration of the surface or interfacial reactivities of bimetallic or multimetallic nanoparticles. The AuPt nanoparticles are shown to exhibit not only single-phase alloy character in the nanocrystal, but also bimetallic alloy property on the surface. The nanocrystal and surface alloy properties are directly correlated with the bimetallic composition. The FTIR probing of CO adsorption on the bimetallic nanoparticles supported on silica reveals that the surface binding sites are dependent on the bimetallic composition. The analysis of this dependence further led to the conclusion that the relative Au-atop and Pt-atop sites for the linear CO adsorption on the nanoparticle surface are not only correlated with the bimetallic composition, but also with the electronic effect as a result of the d-band shift of Pt in the bimetallic nanocrystals, which is the first demonstration of the nanoscale core-surface property correlation for the bimetallic nanoparticles over a wide range of bimetallic composition.

  6. Sonochemical deposition of platinum nanoparticles on polymer beads and their transfer on the pore surface of a silica matrix.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chave, Tony; Grunenwald, Anthony; Ayral, André; Lacroix-Desmazes, Patrick; Nikitenko, Sergey I

    2013-04-01

    This study reported the sonochemical deposition of platinum on the surface of polystyrene beads (PSBs) and the transfer of obtained Pt nanoparticles into a porous silica matrix using the PSB as a sacrificial template. Platinum nanoparticle deposition was ensured by the sonochemical reduction of Pt(IV) at room temperature in latex solutions containing polystyrene beads in the presence of formic acid under Ar or under Ar/CO atmosphere without any additives. After ultrasonic treatments for few hours, well dispersed Pt nanoparticles within the range of 3-5 nm deposited on PSB were obtained in both studied conditions. Samples were then mixed with TEOS, dried, and heated at 450°C to ensure the PSB removal from the silica matrix. TEM and SEM results clearly show that final silica pore size is within the same order of magnitude than initial PSB. Finally, platinum decorated silica matrix with chosen pore sizes was successfully prepared.

  7. Direct NO decomposition over stepped transition-metal surfaces

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Falsig, Hanne; Bligaard, Thomas; Christensen, Claus H.

    2007-01-01

    We establish the full potential energy diagram for the direct NO decomposition reaction over stepped transition-metal surfaces by combining a database of adsorption energies on stepped metal surfaces with known Bronsted-Evans-Polanyi (BEP) relations for the activation barriers of dissociation...

  8. An Examination of the Surface and Sub-Surface of Modern and Historical Platinum Photographic Prints Using Low Vacuum High-Resolution Scanning Electron Microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ravines, Patrick; Erdman, Natasha; McElroy, Rob

    2016-08-01

    Photographic prints of platinum metal on paper supports are some of the most exquisite and expressive in the world of fine art photography. Platinum prints were produced from about 1890 to 1920 in the USA and Europe. The chemical and material nature of these valuable prints is of great interest to many who are interested in their long-term preservation, in the intersection of science and art, and in the scientific and technical study of cultural heritage. This paper presents the results of a characterization study using newer electron microscopy techniques. In this study, a low vacuum high-resolution scanning electron microscope was used to study the surface and sub-surface of historic and modern platinum and/or palladium print samples. Using environmental SEM pressures allowed us to investigate the actual top surface and sub-surface with cross-sections without any preparation; no coatings of carbon or other material. Cross-sections were prepared using an argon plasma cross-polishing system. This study shows that the photographic image of platinum prints is composed of platinum nanoparticles embedded in the upper layers of the paper's cellulosic fibers.

  9. Analysis of the inter- and extracellular formation of platinum nanoparticles by Fusarium oxysporum f. sp. lycopersici using response surface methodology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Riddin, T L [Department of Biochemistry, Microbiology and Biotechnology, Rhodes University, PO Box 94, Grahamstown (South Africa); Gericke, M [MINTEK, Private Bag X3015, Randburg 2125 (South Africa); Whiteley, C G [Department of Biochemistry, Microbiology and Biotechnology, Rhodes University, PO Box 94, Grahamstown (South Africa)

    2006-07-28

    Fusarium oxysporum fungal strain was screened and found to be successful for the inter- and extracellular production of platinum nanoparticles. Nanoparticle formation was visually observed, over time, by the colour of the extracellular solution and/or the fungal biomass turning from yellow to dark brown, and their concentration was determined from the amount of residual hexachloroplatinic acid measured from a standard curve at 456 nm. The extracellular nanoparticles were characterized by transmission electron microscopy. Nanoparticles of varying size (10-100 nm) and shape (hexagons, pentagons, circles, squares, rectangles) were produced at both extracellular and intercellular levels by the Fusarium oxysporum. The particles precipitate out of solution and bioaccumulate by nucleation either intercellularly, on the cell wall/membrane, or extracellularly in the surrounding medium. The importance of pH, temperature and hexachloroplatinic acid (H{sub 2}PtCl{sub 6}) concentration in nanoparticle formation was examined through the use of a statistical response surface methodology. Only the extracellular production of nanoparticles proved to be statistically significant, with a concentration yield of 4.85 mg l{sup -1} estimated by a first-order regression model. From a second-order polynomial regression, the predicted yield of nanoparticles increased to 5.66 mg l{sup -1} and, after a backward step, regression gave a final model with a yield of 6.59 mg l{sup -1}.

  10. Analysis of the inter- and extracellular formation of platinum nanoparticles by Fusarium oxysporum f. sp. lycopersici using response surface methodology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riddin, T. L.; Gericke, M.; Whiteley, C. G.

    2006-07-01

    Fusarium oxysporum fungal strain was screened and found to be successful for the inter- and extracellular production of platinum nanoparticles. Nanoparticle formation was visually observed, over time, by the colour of the extracellular solution and/or the fungal biomass turning from yellow to dark brown, and their concentration was determined from the amount of residual hexachloroplatinic acid measured from a standard curve at 456 nm. The extracellular nanoparticles were characterized by transmission electron microscopy. Nanoparticles of varying size (10-100 nm) and shape (hexagons, pentagons, circles, squares, rectangles) were produced at both extracellular and intercellular levels by the Fusarium oxysporum. The particles precipitate out of solution and bioaccumulate by nucleation either intercellularly, on the cell wall/membrane, or extracellularly in the surrounding medium. The importance of pH, temperature and hexachloroplatinic acid (H2PtCl6) concentration in nanoparticle formation was examined through the use of a statistical response surface methodology. Only the extracellular production of nanoparticles proved to be statistically significant, with a concentration yield of 4.85 mg l-1 estimated by a first-order regression model. From a second-order polynomial regression, the predicted yield of nanoparticles increased to 5.66 mg l-1 and, after a backward step, regression gave a final model with a yield of 6.59 mg l-1.

  11. Coating Carbon Fibers With Platinum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Effinger, Michael R.; Duncan, Peter; Coupland, Duncan; Rigali, Mark J.

    2007-01-01

    A process for coating carbon fibers with platinum has been developed. The process may also be adaptable to coating carbon fibers with other noble and refractory metals, including rhenium and iridium. The coated carbon fibers would be used as ingredients of matrix/fiber composite materials that would resist oxidation at high temperatures. The metal coats would contribute to oxidation resistance by keeping atmospheric oxygen away from fibers when cracks form in the matrices. Other processes that have been used to coat carbon fibers with metals have significant disadvantages: Metal-vapor deposition processes yield coats that are nonuniform along both the lengths and the circumferences of the fibers. The electrical resistivities of carbon fibers are too high to be compatible with electrolytic processes. Metal/organic vapor deposition entails the use of expensive starting materials, it may be necessary to use a furnace, and the starting materials and/or materials generated in the process may be hazardous. The present process does not have these disadvantages. It yields uniform, nonporous coats and is relatively inexpensive. The process can be summarized as one of pretreatment followed by electroless deposition. The process consists of the following steps: The surfaces of the fiber are activated by deposition of palladium crystallites from a solution. The surface-activated fibers are immersed in a solution that contains platinum. A reducing agent is used to supply electrons to effect a chemical reduction in situ. The chemical reduction displaces the platinum from the solution. The displaced platinum becomes deposited on the fibers. Each platinum atom that has been deposited acts as a catalytic site for the deposition of another platinum atom. Hence, the deposition process can also be characterized as autocatalytic. The thickness of the deposited metal can be tailored via the duration of immersion and the chemical activity of the solution.

  12. Photoinduced triplet-state electron transfer of platinum porphyrin: a one-step direct method for sensing iodide with an unprecedented detection limit

    KAUST Repository

    Masih, Dilshad

    2015-02-05

    Here, we report for the first time a one-step direct method for sensing halides in aqueous solution using phosphorescence quenching of platinum-cationic porphyrin. This method offers an easy, rapid, environmentally friendly, ultra-sensitive (with a previously unattained detection limit of 1 × 10−12 M) and economical method for the determination of iodide. To fully understand the reaction mechanism responsible for the phosphorescence quenching process, we have employed cutting-edge time-resolved laser spectroscopy with broadband capabilities.

  13. Photoinduced triplet-state electron transfer of platinum porphyrin: A one-step direct method for sensing iodide with an unprecedented detection limit

    KAUST Repository

    Masih, Dilshad

    2014-02-05

    Here, we report for the first time a one-step direct method for sensing halides in aqueous solution using phosphorescence quenching of platinum-cationic porphyrin. This method offers an easy, rapid, environmentally friendly, ultra-sensitive (with a previously unattained detection limit of 1 × 10-12 M) and economical method for the determination of iodide. To fully understand the reaction mechanism responsible for the phosphorescence quenching process, we have employed cutting-edge time-resolved laser spectroscopy with broadband capabilities. This journal is © The Royal Society of Chemistry 2015.

  14. Step bunching on the vicinal GaN(0001) surface

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ramana Murty, M. V.; Fini, P.; Stephenson, G. B.; Thompson, Carol; Eastman, J. A.; Munkholm, A.; Auciello, O.; Jothilingam, R.; DenBaars, S. P.; Speck, J. S.

    2000-10-15

    Nominally 2{sup o} vicinal GaN(0001) surfaces exhibit monolayer-height steps at 990{sup o}C in the metal-organic chemical vapor deposition environment. Real-time x-ray scattering observations at 715--990{sup o}C indicate that there is a tendency for step bunching during growth. Below 850{sup o}C, step bunches nucleated during growth remain and coarsen after growth, while above 850{sup o}C, the surface reverts to monolayer-height steps after growth. Surfaces vicinal toward the {l_brace}1{bar 1}00{r_brace} and the {l_brace}11{bar 2}0{r_brace} planes exhibit similar behavior. We suggest a simple equilibrium surface orientational phase diagram for vicinal GaN(0001) that is consistent with these observations.

  15. Bimetallic Catalysts and Platinum Surfaces Studied by X-ray Absorption Spectroscopy and Scanning Tunnelling Microscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Roenning, Magnus

    2000-07-01

    Bimetallic catalyst systems used in Fischer-Tropsch synthesis (Co-Re/Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}) and in the naphtha reforming process (Pt-Re/Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}) have been studied in situ using X-ray absorption spectroscopy (EXAFS). Additionally, the adsorption of ethene on platinum single crystal surfaces has been investigated using scanning tunnelling microscopy. In situ EXAFS at the cobalt K absorption edge have been carried out at 450{sup o}C on the hydrogen reduction of a rhenium-promoted Co{sub 3}O{sub 4}/Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} catalyst. Reductions carried out using 100% hydrogen and 5% hydrogen in helium gave different results. Whereas the reduction using dilute hydrogen leads to bulk-like metallic cobalt particles (hcp or fcc), reaction with pure hydrogen yields a more dispersed system with smaller cobalt metal particles (< 40 A). The results are rationalised in terms of different degrees of reoxidation of cobalt by the higher and lower concentrations of water generated during the reduction of cobalt oxide by 100% and 5% hydrogen, respectively. Additionally, in both reduction protocols a small fraction (3 -4 wt%) of the cobalt content is randomly dispersed over the tetrahedral vacancies of the alumina support. This dispersion occurs during reduction and not calcination. The cobalt in these sites cannot be reduced at 450 {sup o}C. The local environments about the rhenium atoms in Co-Re/{gamma}-A1{sub 2}O{sub 3} catalyst after different reduction periods have been studied by X-ray absorption spectroscopy. A bimetallic catalyst containing 4.6 wt% cobalt and 2 wt% rhenium has been compared with a corresponding monometallic sample with 2 wt% rhenium on the same support. The rhenium L{sub III} EXAFS analysis shows that bimetallic particles are formed after reduction at 450{sup o}C with the average particle size being 10-15 A. Rhenium is shown to be reduced at a later stage than cobalt. The fraction of cobalt atoms entering the support obstructs the access to the support for the

  16. Computational study of platinum nanoparticle deposition on the surfaces of crevices

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gu, H.F., E-mail: guhaifeng@hrbeu.edu.cn [Laboratory for Thermal-Hydraulics, Nuclear Energy and Safety Research Department, Paul Scherrer Institut, CH-5232 Villigen PSI (Switzerland); College of Nuclear Science and Technology, Harbin Engineering University, 150001 Harbin (China); Niceno, B. [Laboratory for Thermal-Hydraulics, Nuclear Energy and Safety Research Department, Paul Scherrer Institut, CH-5232 Villigen PSI (Switzerland); Grundler, P.V. [Laboratory for Nuclear Materials, Nuclear Energy and Safety Research Department, Paul Scherrer Institut, CH-5232 Villigen PSI (Switzerland); Sharabi, M. [Laboratory for Thermal-Hydraulics, Nuclear Energy and Safety Research Department, Paul Scherrer Institut, CH-5232 Villigen PSI (Switzerland); Mechanical Power Engineering Department, Mansoura University, 35516 Mansoura (Egypt); Veleva, L. [Laboratory for Nuclear Materials, Nuclear Energy and Safety Research Department, Paul Scherrer Institut, CH-5232 Villigen PSI (Switzerland); Hot Laboratory Division, Nuclear Energy and Safety Research Department, Paul Scherrer Institut, CH-5232 Villigen PSI (Switzerland); Ritter, S. [Laboratory for Nuclear Materials, Nuclear Energy and Safety Research Department, Paul Scherrer Institut, CH-5232 Villigen PSI (Switzerland)

    2016-08-01

    Highlights: • Nano-particle deposition on the surface of crevices is studied using RANS simulation. • Model results are validated by comparing with experimental data. • Behaviours and mechanisms of particle deposition in different crevices are analyzed. • RANS models with Lagrangian particle tracking method are evaluated and discussed. - Abstract: A well-known issue in boiling water reactors (BWR), which can threaten their structural integrity, is stress corrosion cracking (SCC) of reactor internals and recirculation pipes due to the accumulation of oxidizing radiolysis products of water. Currently, many operators of BWRs use combined platinum particle and hydrogen injection into the reactor water to mitigate SCC by lowering the electrochemical corrosion potential. It is essential for efficient mitigation that Pt particles reach all water-wetted surfaces, including crevices and cracks, which are also reached by the oxidizing species. In this study, a set of crevices with different widths and orientations with respect to the fluid flow are investigated using numerical simulation tools and compared against experimental findings. The Reynolds-Averaged Navier–Stokes models are used to compute the mean turbulent flow quantities in three-dimensional crevices, and the discrete random walk model is used to evaluate the effect of velocity fluctuations on particle movement. The Lagrangian particle tracking analysis is performed and the average concentration of deposited particles on the surface of crevices is evaluated and compared with experimental results. The results show that Reynolds stress model combined with enhanced wall treatment provides a more accurate prediction of particle concentration and distribution on the surface of crevices than SST k–ω turbulence model, which was expected, owing to the anisotropic nature of the Reynolds stress model. Furthermore, analyses on the particle deposition shows that three different mechanisms play important roles in

  17. Surface structured platinum electrodes for the electrochemical reduction of carbon dioxide in imidazolium based ionic liquids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanc-Scherer, Florin A; Montiel, Miguel A; Montiel, Vicente; Herrero, Enrique; Sánchez-Sánchez, Carlos M

    2015-10-01

    The direct CO2 electrochemical reduction on model platinum single crystal electrodes Pt(hkl) is studied in [C2mim(+)][NTf2(-)], a suitable room temperature ionic liquid (RTIL) medium due to its moderate viscosity, high CO2 solubility and conductivity. Single crystal electrodes represent the most convenient type of surface structured electrodes for studying the impact of RTIL ion adsorption on relevant electrocatalytic reactions, such as surface sensitive electrochemical CO2 reduction. We propose here based on cyclic voltammetry and in situ electrolysis measurements, for the first time, the formation of a stable adduct [C2mimH-CO2(-)] by a radical-radical coupling after the simultaneous reduction of CO2 and [C2mim(+)]. It means between the CO2 radical anion and the radical formed from the reduction of the cation [C2mim(+)] before forming the corresponding electrogenerated carbene. This is confirmed by the voltammetric study of a model imidazolium-2-carboxylate compound formed following the carbene pathway. The formation of that stable adduct [C2mimH-CO2(-)] blocks CO2 reduction after a single electron transfer and inhibits CO2 and imidazolium dimerization reactions. However, the electrochemical reduction of CO2 under those conditions provokes the electrochemical cathodic degradation of the imidazolium based RTIL. This important limitation in CO2 recycling by direct electrochemical reduction is overcome by adding a strong acid, [H(+)][NTf2(-)], into solution. Then, protons become preferentially adsorbed on the electrode surface by displacing the imidazolium cations and inhibiting their electrochemical reduction. This fact allows the surface sensitive electro-synthesis of HCOOH from CO2 reduction in [C2mim(+)][NTf2(-)], with Pt(110) being the most active electrode studied.

  18. Platinum nanoparticles on gallium nitride surfaces: effect of semiconductor doping on nanoparticle reactivity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schäfer, Susanne; Wyrzgol, Sonja A; Caterino, Roberta; Jentys, Andreas; Schoell, Sebastian J; Hävecker, Michael; Knop-Gericke, Axel; Lercher, Johannes A; Sharp, Ian D; Stutzmann, Martin

    2012-08-01

    Platinum nanoparticles supported on n- and p-type gallium nitride (GaN) are investigated as novel hybrid systems for the electronic control of catalytic activity via electronic interactions with the semiconductor support. In situ oxidation and reduction were studied with high pressure photoemission spectroscopy. The experiments revealed that the underlying wide-band-gap semiconductor has a large influence on the chemical composition and oxygen affinity of supported nanoparticles under X-ray irradiation. For as-deposited Pt cuboctahedra supported on n-type GaN, a higher fraction of oxidized surface atoms was observed compared to cuboctahedral particles supported on p-type GaN. Under an oxygen atmosphere, immediate oxidation was recorded for nanoparticles on n-type GaN, whereas little oxidation was observed for nanoparticles on p-type GaN. Together, these results indicate that changes in the Pt chemical state under X-ray irradiation depend on the type of GaN doping. The strong interaction between the nanoparticles and the support is consistent with charge transfer of X-ray photogenerated free carriers at the semiconductor-nanoparticle interface and suggests that GaN is a promising wide-band-gap support material for photocatalysis and electronic control of catalysis.

  19. Electrical characterization of gold and platinum thin film electrodes with polyaniline modified surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aggas, John Richard

    Recent studies into soft organic electronics have burgeoned as a result of discoveries of conducting polymers such as polyaniline, polythiophene, and polypyrrole. However, in order to make these conducting polymers suitable for in vivo soft organic electronics, they must be developed so that they can be biocompatible and provide accurate sensing. Chitosan, a naturally occurring polymer structure found in exoskeletons of crustaceans, has been studied for its biocompatible properties. Composites of polyaniline (PAn), an intrinsically conductive polymer (ICP) and chitosan (Chi), a biopolymer, were developed and applied to gold and platinum Thin Film Electrode (TFE) devices. Electropolymerization and drop cast deposition were utilized to modify TFEs with a thin film of PAn or PAn-Chi composite. The impedance response over a spectrum of frequencies was studied for blank control TFEs, platinized TFEs, and platinized TFEs with various polyaniline coatings. Impedance measurements were taken in dry environments, DI Water, and in buffers such as PBS, and HEPES. Current-Voltage (I-V) characterization was used to study the current response and SEM imaging was used to study the surface topography. Resistance was measured for PAn modified unplatinized gold TFEs with varying amounts of incorporated chitosan. Impedance measurements of control and platinized TFEs yielded results similar to a low pass filter. Due to the conductive nature of polyaniline, the impedance of TFEs decreased substantially after poylaniline deposition. Measured resistance values for polyaniline and chitosan composites on TFEs revealed a window of concentrations of incorporated chitosan to lower resistance.

  20. Attachment of Single-wall Carbon Nanotubes (SWNTs) on Platinum Surfaces by Self-Assembling Techniques

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosario-Castro, Belinda I.; Cabrera, Carlos R.; Perez-Davis, Maria; Lebron, Marisabel; Meador, Michael

    2003-01-01

    Single-wall carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) are very interesting materials because of their morphology, electronic and mechanical properties. Its morphology (high length-to-diameter ratio) and electronic properties suggest potential application of SWNTs as anode material for lithium ion secondary batteries. The introduction of SWNTs on these types of sources systems will improve their performance, efficiency, and capacity to store energy. A purification method has been applied for the removal of iron and amorphous carbon from the nanotubes. Unpurified and purified SWNTs were characterized by transmission electron microscopy (TEM), and thermogravimetric analysis (TGA). In order to attach carbon nanotubes on platinum electrode surfaces, a self-assembled monolayer (SAM) of 4-aminothiophenol (4-ATP) was deposited over the electrodes. The amino-terminated SAM obtained was characterized by cyclic voltammetry, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), and Fourier-transforms infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy. Carbon nanotubes were deposited over the amino-terminated SAM by an amide bond formed between SAM amino groups and carboxylic acid groups at the open ends of the carbon nanotubes.This deposition was characterized using Raman spectroscopy and Scanning Electron microscopy (SEM).

  1. Investigation of nanostructured platinum-nickel supported on the titanium surface as electrocatalysts for alkaline fuel cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tamašauskaitė-Tamašiūnaitė, L.; Balčiūnaitė, A.; Vaiciukevičienė, A.; Selskis, A.; Pakštas, V.

    2012-06-01

    This study involves the formation of nanostructured platinum-nickel supported on the titanium surface catalysts using the galvanic displacement technique and investigation of their electrocatalytic activity toward the oxidation of borohydride, methanol and ethanol in an alkaline media by cyclic voltammetry and chronoamperometry. Scanning electron microscopy, Energy Dispersive X-ray Spectroscopy and X-ray diffraction were used to characterize the surface structure, composition and morphology. The nanoPt(Ni)/Ti and nanoPt/Ti catalysts exhibited a higher catalytic efficiency to the oxidation of borohydride, ethanol and methanol as compared with that of pure Pt.

  2. In Situ Structural Studies of the Underpotential Deposition of Copper onto an Iodine Covered Platinum Surface Using X-Ray Standing Waves

    Science.gov (United States)

    1991-01-01

    ABSTRAc C We present initial results of an in situ structural investigation of the underpotential deposition of copper on an iodine covered platinum...compare the result of surface coverage isotherms derived from both electrochemical and x-ray measurements. 1. INTRODUCIION The underpotential deposition ...the underpotential deposition of copper on an iodine covered platinum/carbon layered synthetic microstructure. 2 THEORETICAL BACKGROUND X-ray standing

  3. Oxygen reduction reaction catalyzed by platinum nanonetwork prepared by template free one step synthesis for polymer electrolyte membrane fuel cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Narayanamoorthy, B. [Department of Chemistry, Faculty of Science, Sri Chandrasekharendra Saraswathi Viswa Mahavidyalaya (SCSVMV University), Enathur, Kanchipuram 631 561 (India); Kumar, B.V.V.S. Pavan; Eswaramoorthy, M. [Nanomaterials and Catalysis Lab, Chemistry and Physics of Materials Unit, Jawaharlal Nehru Centre for Advanced Scientific Research (JNCASR), Bangalore 560 064 (India); Balaji, S., E-mail: prof.balaji13@gmail.com [Department of Chemistry, Faculty of Science, Sri Chandrasekharendra Saraswathi Viswa Mahavidyalaya (SCSVMV University), Enathur, Kanchipuram 631 561 (India)

    2014-07-01

    Highlights: • Supportless Pt nanonetwork (Pt NN) synthesized by novel template free one step method as per our earlier reported procedure. • Electrocatalytic activity of Pt NN studied taking oxygen reduction reaction in acid medium. • Kinetic and thermodynamic parameters were deduced under hydrodynamic conditions. • ORR mechanistic pathway was proposed based on kinetic rate constants. • ADT analysis found enhanced stability (5000 cycles) for Pt NN than Pt NN/VC and reported Pt/C. - Abstract: The reduction reaction of molecular oxygen (ORR) was investigated using supportless Pt nanonetwork (Pt NN) electrocatalyst in sulfuric acid medium. Pt NN was prepared by template free borohydride reduction. The transmission electron microscope images revealed a network like nano-architecture having an average cluster size of 30 nm. The electrochemical characterization of supportless and Vulcan carbon supported Pt NN (Pt NN/VC) was carried out using rotating disc and ring disc electrodes at various temperatures. Kinetic and thermodynamic parameters were estimated under hydrodynamic conditions and compared with Pt NN/VC and reported Pt/C catalysts. The accelerated durability test revealed that supportless Pt NN is quite stable for 5000 potential cycles with 22% reduction in electrochemical surface area (ECSA). While the initial limiting current density has in fact increased by 11.6%, whereas Pt NN/VC suffered nearly 55% loss in ECSA and 13% loss in limiting current density confirming an enhanced stability of supportless Pt NN morphology for ORR compared to conventional Pt/C ORR catalysts in acid medium.

  4. Response Surface Methodology's Steepest Ascent and Step Size Revisited

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kleijnen, J.P.C.; den Hertog, D.; Angun, M.E.

    2002-01-01

    Response Surface Methodology (RSM) searches for the input combination maximizing the output of a real system or its simulation.RSM is a heuristic that locally fits first-order polynomials, and estimates the corresponding steepest ascent (SA) paths.However, SA is scale-dependent; and its step size is

  5. Formation of {open_quotes}metal wool{close_quotes} structures and dynamics of catalytic etching of platinum surfaces during ammonia oxidation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lyubovsky, M.R.; Barelko, V.V. [Institute of Chemical Physics in Chernogolovka, Moscow (Russian Federation)

    1994-09-01

    Reconstruction of a clean surface of a platinum catalyst and a platinum surface covered with gold during ammonia oxidation was studied by SEM observations. It was found that the process of catalytic etching had two sequential stages in which different crystal structures with different rates of growth formed on the surface. The first stage was the formation of parallel facets, and the second stage was the formation of individual microcrystals with perfect crystal faces. It was also found that the second state had a threshold character, beginning after some delay from the start of the reaction. A structure resembling metal wool and consisting of interlaced platinum filaments was found to form on the surface of gold-covered platinum catalysts. Characteristic features of this structure`s development are reported. The growth of filaments is attributed to the vapor-liquid-solid mechanism of whisker growth. On the basis of the observed platinum whisker formation and behavior during ammonia oxidation, a mechanism of catalyst surface reconstruction that explains observed characteristic features of the process of catalytic etching is proposed. 25 refs., 8 figs.

  6. Adaptive time steps in trajectory surface hopping simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spörkel, Lasse; Thiel, Walter

    2016-05-01

    Trajectory surface hopping (TSH) simulations are often performed in combination with active-space multi-reference configuration interaction (MRCI) treatments. Technical problems may arise in such simulations if active and inactive orbitals strongly mix and switch in some particular regions. We propose to use adaptive time steps when such regions are encountered in TSH simulations. For this purpose, we present a computational protocol that is easy to implement and increases the computational effort only in the critical regions. We test this procedure through TSH simulations of a GFP chromophore model (OHBI) and a light-driven rotary molecular motor (F-NAIBP) on semiempirical MRCI potential energy surfaces, by comparing the results from simulations with adaptive time steps to analogous ones with constant time steps. For both test molecules, the number of successful trajectories without technical failures rises significantly, from 53% to 95% for OHBI and from 25% to 96% for F-NAIBP. The computed excited-state lifetime remains essentially the same for OHBI and increases somewhat for F-NAIBP, and there is almost no change in the computed quantum efficiency for internal rotation in F-NAIBP. We recommend the general use of adaptive time steps in TSH simulations with active-space CI methods because this will help to avoid technical problems, increase the overall efficiency and robustness of the simulations, and allow for a more complete sampling.

  7. Platinum-group elements. Quantification in collected exhaust fumes and studies of catalyst surfaces

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Palacios, M.A.; Gomez, M.M.; Moldovan, M. [Departamento de Quimica Analitica, Facultad de CC Quimicas, Universidad Complutense de Madrid, 28040- Madrid (Spain); Morrison, G.; Rauch, S. [Chalmers University of Technology, Gothenburg (Sweden); McLeod, C.; Ma, R. [University of Sheffield, Sheffield (United Kingdom); Laserna, J.; Lucena, P. [University of Malaga, Malaga (Spain); Caroli, S.; Alimonti, A.; Petrucci, F.; Bocca, B. [Istituto Superiore di Sanita, Rome (Italy); Schramel, P.; Lustig, S.; Zischka, M. [GSF-Forschung, Neuherberg (Germany); Wass, U.; Stenbom, B. [Volvo, Gothenberg (Sweden); Luna, M. [Ford, Madrid (Spain); Saenz, J.C. [Instituto Nacional de Tecnica Aeroespacial, INTA, Madrid (Spain); Santamaria, J.; Torrens, J.M. [Seat, Barcelona (Spain)

    2000-07-20

    Automotive catalytic converters, in which Pt, Pd and Rh (platinum-group elements; PGEs) are the active components for eliminating several noxious components from exhaust fumes, have become the main source of environmental urban pollution by PGEs. This work reports on the catalyst morphology through changes in catalyst surface by scanning electron microscopy/energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (SEM/EDX) and laser-induced breakdown spectrometry (LIBS) from fresh to aged catalytic converters. The distribution of these elements in the fresh catalysts analysed (Pt-Pd-Rh gasoline catalyst) is not uniform and occurs mainly in a longitudinal direction. This heterogeneity seems to be greater for Pt and Pd. PGEs released by the catalysts, fresh and aged 30000 km, were studied in parallel. Whole raw exhaust fumes from four catalysts of three different types were also examined. Two of these were gasoline catalysts (Pt-Pd-Rh and Pd-Rh) and the other two were diesel catalysts (Pt). Samples were collected following the 91441 EUDC driving cycle for light-duty vehicle testing. The results show that at 0 km the samples collected first have the highest content of particulate PGEs and although the general tendency is for the release to decrease with increasing number of samples taken, exceptions are frequent. At 30000 km the released PGEs in gasoline and diesel catalysts decreased significantly. For fresh gasoline catalysts the mean of the total amount released was approximately 100, 250 and 50 ng km{sup -1} for Pt, Pd and Rh, respectively. In diesel catalysts the Pt release varied in the range 400-800 ng km{sup -1}. After ageing the catalysts up to 30000 km, the gasoline catalysts released amounts of Pt between 6 and 8 ng km{sup -1}, Pd between 12 and 16 ng km{sup -1} and Rh between 3 and 12 ng km{sup -1}. In diesel catalysts the Pt release varied in the range 108-150 ng km{sup -1}. The soluble portion of PGEs in the HNO{sub 3} collector solution represented less than 5% of the

  8. Temporal step fluctuations on a conductor surface: electromigration force, surface resistivity and low-frequency noise

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, E. D.; Bondarchuk, O.; Tao, C. G.; Yan, W.; Cullen, W. G.; Rous, P. J.; Bole, T.

    2007-10-01

    Scattering of charge carriers from surface structures will become an increasing factor in the resistivity as the structure decreases in size to the nanoscale. The effects of scattering at the most basic surface defect, a kink in a step edge, are here analyzed using the continuum step model. Using a Langevin analysis, it has been shown that the electromigration force on the atoms at the step edge causes changes in the temporal evolution of the step-edge. For an electromigration force acting perpendicular to the average step edge and mass-transport dominated by step-edge diffusion, significant deviations from the usual t1/4 scaling of the displacement correlation function occur dependent on a critical time τ and the direction of the force relative to the step edge (i.e. uphill or downhill). Experimental observations of step fluctuations on Ag(111) show the predicted changes among step fluctuations without current, and with current in the up- and down-hill directions for a current density of order 105 A cm-2. The results yield the magnitude of the electromigration force acting on kinked sites at the step-edge. This in turn yields the contribution of the fluctuating steps to the surface resistivity, which exceeds 1% of the bulk resistivity as wire diameters decrease below 10s of nanometres. The temporal fluctuations of kink density can thus also be related to resistivity noise. Relating the known fluctuation spectrum of the step displacements to fluctuations in their lengths, the corresponding resistivity noise is predicted to show spectral signatures of ~f-1/2 for step fluctuations governed by random attachment/detachment, and ~f-3/4 for step fluctuations governed by step-edge diffusion.

  9. One-step electrodeposition process to fabricate cathodic superhydrophobic surface

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen Zhi, E-mail: c2002z@nwpu.edu.cn [Department of Applied Physics, Northwestern Polytechnical University, Xi' an 710129 (China); Li Feng [Department of Applied Physics, Northwestern Polytechnical University, Xi' an 710129 (China); Hao Limei [Department of Applied Physics, Xi' an University of Science and Technology, Xi' an 710054 (China); Chen Anqi; Kong Youchao [Department of Applied Physics, Northwestern Polytechnical University, Xi' an 710129 (China)

    2011-12-01

    In this work, a rapid one-step process is developed to fabricate superhydrophobic cathodic surface by electrodepositing copper plate in an electrolyte solution containing manganese chloride (MnCl{sub 2}{center_dot}4H{sub 2}O), myristic acid (CH{sub 3}(CH{sub 2}){sub 12}COOH) and ethanol. The superhydrophobic surfaces were characterized by means of scanning electron microscopy (SEM), and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) and X-ray diffraction (XRD). The shortest electrolysis time for fabricating a superhydrophobic surface is about 1 min, the measured maximum contact angle is 163 Degree-Sign and rolling angle is less than 3 Degree-Sign . Furthermore, this method can be easily extended to other conductive materials. The approach is time-saving and cheap, and it is supposed to have a promising future in industrial fields.

  10. One-step electrodeposition process to fabricate cathodic superhydrophobic surface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Zhi; Li, Feng; Hao, Limei; Chen, Anqi; Kong, Youchao

    2011-12-01

    In this work, a rapid one-step process is developed to fabricate superhydrophobic cathodic surface by electrodepositing copper plate in an electrolyte solution containing manganese chloride (MnCl2·4H2O), myristic acid (CH3(CH2)12COOH) and ethanol. The superhydrophobic surfaces were characterized by means of scanning electron microscopy (SEM), and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) and X-ray diffraction (XRD). The shortest electrolysis time for fabricating a superhydrophobic surface is about 1 min, the measured maximum contact angle is 163° and rolling angle is less than 3°. Furthermore, this method can be easily extended to other conductive materials. The approach is time-saving and cheap, and it is supposed to have a promising future in industrial fields.

  11. Kinetically controlled growth of gallium on stepped Si (553) surface

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kumar, Mukesh; Pasha, Syed Khalid; Govind,, E-mail: govind@nplindia.org

    2013-10-15

    Kinetically controlled growth of gallium (Ga) metal has been reported on high index stepped Si (553) surface and its thermal stability with various novel superstructural phases has been analyzed. Auger electron spectroscopy studies revealed that the adsorption of Ga at room temperature (RT) follows Frank–van der Merwe (FM) growth mode while for higher substrate temperature, Ga adsorption remains within the submonolayer range. Thermal desorption and low energy electron diffraction studies investigated the formation of thermally stable Ga-islands and the various Ga induced superstructural phase on Si (553). During room temperature adsorption, (1 1 1)7 × 7 facet of Si (553) reconstructed into (1 1 1)6 × 6 facet while during desorption process, stable (1 1 1)6 × 6 and (1 1 1)√3 × √3-R30° surface reconstructions has been observed.

  12. Kinetically controlled growth of gallium on stepped Si (553) surface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Mukesh; Pasha, Syed Khalid; Govind

    2013-10-01

    Kinetically controlled growth of gallium (Ga) metal has been reported on high index stepped Si (553) surface and its thermal stability with various novel superstructural phases has been analyzed. Auger electron spectroscopy studies revealed that the adsorption of Ga at room temperature (RT) follows Frank-van der Merwe (FM) growth mode while for higher substrate temperature, Ga adsorption remains within the submonolayer range. Thermal desorption and low energy electron diffraction studies investigated the formation of thermally stable Ga-islands and the various Ga induced superstructural phase on Si (553). During room temperature adsorption, (1 1 1)7 × 7 facet of Si (553) reconstructed into (1 1 1)6 × 6 facet while during desorption process, stable (1 1 1)6 × 6 and (1 1 1)√3 × √3-R30° surface reconstructions has been observed.

  13. 1-Step Versus 2-Step Immobilization of Alkaline Phosphatase and Bone Morphogenetic Protein-2 onto Implant Surfaces Using Polydopamine

    OpenAIRE

    Nijhuis, Arnold W.G.; van den Beucken, Jeroen J.J.P.; Boerman, Otto C.; Jansen, John A.; Leeuwenburgh, Sander C.G.

    2013-01-01

    Immobilization of biomolecules onto implant surfaces is highly relevant in many areas of biomaterial research. Recently, a 2-step immobilization procedure was developed for the facile conjugation of biomolecules onto various surfaces using self-polymerization of dopamine into polydopamine. In the current study, a 1-step polydopamine-based approach was applied for alkaline phosphatase (ALP) and bone morphogenetic protein-2 (BMP-2) immobilization, and compared to the conventional 2-step polydop...

  14. In-induced stable ordering of stepped Si(553) surface

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chauhan, Amit Kumar Singh [Physics of Energy Harvesting, (CSIR-NPL) , Dr. K.S. KrishnanRoad, New Delhi -110012 (India); Department of Physics, JMI, New Delhi 110025 (India); Niazi, Asad; Nair, Lekha [Department of Physics, JMI, New Delhi 110025 (India); Gupta, Govind, E-mail: govind@nplindia.org [Physics of Energy Harvesting, (CSIR-NPL) , Dr. K.S. KrishnanRoad, New Delhi -110012 (India)

    2015-05-15

    Highlights: • Control growth of In on step Si(553) & thermal stability of novel superstructure. • Influence of temperature on growth modes (SK,VB) under different growth conditions. • In-induced superstructure: (8 × 2), (8 × 4), mixed (553)-7 × 1 + (111)√3 × √3R30° phases. - Abstract: The growth mechanism and adsorbate-induced surface morphology of metal atoms on semiconducting surfaces crucially determines the electronic and physicochemical properties of these metal/semiconductor systems. In this study, we investigate the kinetically controlled growth of indium (In) atoms on the high index stepped Si(553)-7 × 7 surface and the thermal stability of various novel In-induced superstructural phases formed during adsorption/desorption process. Auger electron spectroscopy analysis reveals that In adsorption at room temperature (RT) and at 350 °C, with a controlled incident flux of 0.0016 ML/s, proceeds in the Stranski–Krastanov growth mode where two dimensional (2D)/three dimensional (3D) islands are formed on top of two complete monolayers. At higher substrate temperature up to 450 °C, the growth of In atoms occurs in the form of islands on the bare Si(553) surface, and In coverage is limited to the sub-monolayer regime. During the thermal desorption of the RT grown In/Si(553) system, the In clusters rearrange themselves and an unusual “cluster to layer” transformation occurs on top of the stable monolayer. In situ low energy electron diffraction analysis during adsorption and desorption shows the development of various coverage and temperature dependent In-induced superstructural phases on Si(553) surface, such as: (8 × 2) after annealing at 520 °C with coverage 0.5 ML, (8 × 4) after annealing at 580 °C (∼1 ML coverage) and (553)-7 × 1 + (111)-√3 × √3-R30° at 0.3 ML (630 °C). These adsorbate-induced superstructural phases could potentially be utilized as templates for pattern assisted growth of various exotic 1D/2D structures for

  15. Surface channelling in grazing-incidence ion bombardment of a stepped surface

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rosandi, Yudi [Fachbereich Physik, Universitaet Kaiserslautern, Erwin-Schroedinger-Strasse, D-67663 Kaiserslautern (Germany); Urbassek, Herbert M. [Fachbereich Physik, Universitaet Kaiserslautern, Erwin-Schroedinger-Strasse, D-67663 Kaiserslautern (Germany)]. E-mail: urbassek@rhrk.uni-kl.de

    2007-03-15

    Using molecular-dynamics simulation, the impact of a 5keV Ar atom at 83 deg. incidence angle towards the surface normal onto a stepped Pt(111) surface is investigated. The projectile impinges with a [11-bar2] azimuth on a B step. The channelling of trajectories below the upper terrace is characterized in terms of the distribution of channelling lengths and the energy loss of channelled projectiles. The influence of target temperature is studied by simulating targets at 0K and at 550K.

  16. 1-step versus 2-step immobilization of alkaline phosphatase and bone morphogenetic protein-2 onto implant surfaces using polydopamine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nijhuis, Arnold W G; van den Beucken, Jeroen J J P; Boerman, Otto C; Jansen, John A; Leeuwenburgh, Sander C G

    2013-08-01

    Immobilization of biomolecules onto implant surfaces is highly relevant in many areas of biomaterial research. Recently, a 2-step immobilization procedure was developed for the facile conjugation of biomolecules onto various surfaces using self-polymerization of dopamine into polydopamine. In the current study, a 1-step polydopamine-based approach was applied for alkaline phosphatase (ALP) and bone morphogenetic protein-2 (BMP-2) immobilization, and compared to the conventional 2-step polydopamine-based immobilization and plain adsorption. To this end, ALP and BMP-2 were immobilized onto titanium and polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE) substrates. The absolute quantity and biological activity of immobilized ALP were assessed quantitatively to compare the three types of immobilization. Plain adsorption of both ALP and BMP-2 was inferior to both polydopamine-based immobilization approaches. ALP was successfully immobilized onto titanium and PTFE surfaces via the 1-step approach, and the immobilized ALP retained its enzymatic activity. Using the 1-step approach, the amount of immobilized ALP was increased twofold to threefold compared to the conventional 2-step immobilization process. In contrast, more BMP-2 was immobilized using the conventional 2-step immobilization approach. Retention of ALP and BMP-2 was measured over a period of 4 weeks and was found to be similar for the 1-step and 2-step methods and far superior to the retention of adsorbed biomolecules due to the formation of covalent linkages between catechol moieties and immobilized proteins. The biological behavior of ALP and BMP-2 coatings immobilized using polydopamine (1- and 2-step) as well as adsorption was assessed by culturing rat bone marrow cells, which revealed that the cell responses to the various experimental groups were not statistically different. In conclusion, the 1-step polydopamine-based immobilization method was shown to be more efficient for immobilization of ALP, whereas the conventional 2

  17. In situ surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopic study of formic acid electrooxidation on spontaneously deposited platinum on gold.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muralidharan, Ranjani; McIntosh, Michael; Li, Xiao

    2013-06-28

    Present formic acid fuel cell efficiency is limited by low kinetics at the anode, indicating the need for effective catalysts to improve the formic acid oxidation. As a prerequisite, the nature of adsorbed species and specifically the reaction intermediates formed in this process needs to be examined. This work focuses on the electrooxidation of formic acid and the nature of the intermediates at a platinum-modified gold surface prepared through spontaneous deposition using a combination of electrochemistry and in situ surface enhanced Raman spectroscopy (SERS). This Pt-modified gold electrode surface assists in oxidizing formic acid at potentials as low as 0.0 V vs. Ag/AgCl which is 0.15 V more negative than a bare Pt surface. The oxidation current obtained on the Pt-modified gold electrode is 72 times higher than on a bare Au surface and 5 times higher than on a bare Pt surface at the same potential. In situ SERS has revealed the involvement of formate at a low frequency as the primary intermediate in this electrooxidation process. While previous studies mainly focused on the formate mode at ca. 1322 cm(-1), it is the first time that a formate peak at ca. 300 cm(-1) was observed on a Pt or Pt-associated surface. A unique relationship has been observed between the formic acid oxidation currents and the SERS intensity of this formate adsorbate. Furthermore, the characteristic Stark effect of the formate proves the strong interaction between the adsorbate and the catalyst. Both electrochemical and spectroscopic results suggest that the formic acid electrooxidation takes place by the dehydrogenation pathway involving a low frequency formate intermediate on the Pt-modified gold electrode catalyst.

  18. Platinum nanoparticle-facilitated reflective surfaces for non-contact temperature control in microfluidic devices for PCR amplification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leslie, Daniel C; Seker, Erkin; Bazydlo, Lindsay A L; Strachan, Briony C; Landers, James P

    2012-01-07

    The polymerase chain reaction (PCR) is critical for amplification of target sequences of DNA or RNA that have clinical, biological or forensic relevance. While extrinsic Fabry-Perot interferometry (EFPI) has been shown to be adequate for non-contact temperature sensing, the difficulty in defining a reflective surface that is semi-reflective, non-reactive for PCR compatibility and adherent for thermal bonding has limited its exploitation. Through the incorporation of a reflective surface fabricated using a thermally driven self-assembly of a platinum nanoparticle monolayer on the surface of the microfluidic chamber, an enhanced EFPI signal results, allowing for non-contact microfluidic temperature control instrumentation that uses infrared-mediated heating, convective forced-air cooling, and interferometic temperature sensing. The interferometer is originally calibrated with a miniature copper-constantan thermocouple in the PCR chamber resulting in temperature sensitivities of -22.0 to -32.8 nm·°C(-1), depending on the chamber depth. This universal calibration enables accurate temperature control in any device with arbitrary dimensions, thereby allowing versatility in various applications. Uniquely, this non-contact temperature control for PCR thermocycling is applied to the amplification of STR loci for human genetic profiling, where nine STR loci are successfully amplified for human identification using the EFPI-based non-contact thermocycling.

  19. Platinum Migration at the Pt/YSZ Interface

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Jimmi; Jacobsen, Torben

    2006-01-01

    by potential sweep, step and impedance techniques. As expected, inductive behaviour and activation during step polarization is confirmed, but furthermore, a very accentuated noise pattern is seen during cathodic step polarization. Investigation of the YSZ and Pt surfaces afterwards reveals the growth......Electrode activation, inductive hysteresis and non-linearity are well known phenomena on Pt-YSZ electrodes, and recently also regular fluctuation patterns have been reported. The oxygen electrode on YSZ surfaces is studied at Pt micro-electrodes prepared by electrochemical etching of platinum wire...... of dendrite like Pt structures from the TPB. The formation of these may explain the observed noise and contribute to the explanation of the activation mechanism taking place at the platinum-YSZ interface....

  20. 1-Step Versus 2-Step Immobilization of Alkaline Phosphatase and Bone Morphogenetic Protein-2 onto Implant Surfaces Using Polydopamine

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nijhuis, A.W.G.; Beucken, J.J.J.P van den; Boerman, O.C.; Jansen, Jan; Leeuwenburgh, S.C.G.

    2013-01-01

    Immobilization of biomolecules onto implant surfaces is highly relevant in many areas of biomaterial research. Recently, a 2-step immobilization procedure was developed for the facile conjugation of biomolecules onto various surfaces using self-polymerization of dopamine into polydopamine. In the cu

  1. 1-Step Versus 2-Step Immobilization of Alkaline Phosphatase and Bone Morphogenetic Protein-2 onto Implant Surfaces Using Polydopamine

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nijhuis, A.W.G.; Beucken, J.J.J.P van den; Boerman, O.C.; Jansen, Jan; Leeuwenburgh, S.C.G.

    2013-01-01

    Immobilization of biomolecules onto implant surfaces is highly relevant in many areas of biomaterial research. Recently, a 2-step immobilization procedure was developed for the facile conjugation of biomolecules onto various surfaces using self-polymerization of dopamine into polydopamine. In the

  2. Effect of {gamma}-irradiation on the temperature coefficient of surface resistivity of two-dimensional island platinum films

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bishay, A.G. [Engineering Mathematics and Physics Department, Faculty of Engineering, Ain Shams University, Cairo (Egypt); El-Gamal, S., E-mail: samyelgamal@gmail.co [Physics Department, Faculty of Education, Ain Shams University, Cairo (Egypt)

    2011-05-15

    Three sets (A, B and C) of two-dimensional island platinum films (2D-I(Pt)Fs) were prepared via the thermal evaporation technique, where the substrates are corning 7059 glass slides. The mass thickness (d{sub m}) of the films of different sets is 5, 10 and 20 A, respectively. The Pt films were exposed to {gamma}-rays from {sup 137}Cs (0.662 MeV) radiation source of dose rate 0.5 Gy/min. and the different doses are 100, 200, 300, 500 and 700 Gy. The dependence of the surface resistivity ({rho}) on temperature over the range of 100-300 K was undertaken at different d{sub m} and doses then the temperature coefficient of surface resistivity ({alpha}) was deduced. It was found that; (i) for particular d{sub m} and T, the absolute value of {alpha} decreases as the dose increases (ii) for particular dose and T, the absolute value of {alpha} decreases as d{sub m} increases (iii) for particular dose and d{sub m}, the absolute value of {alpha} decreases as T increases. Qualitative interpretation for the results was offered on the ground that the electrons transfer among islands takes place by the activated tunneling mechanism and the {gamma}-irradiation has changed the shape of islands from spherical to prolate spheroid.

  3. Adsorption and diffusion of Si adatom near single-layer steps on Si surface

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhu Xiao-Yan; Huang Yan

    2005-01-01

    By use of the empirical tight-binding (ETB) method, the adsorption and diffusion behaviours of single silicon adatom on the reconstructed Si(100) surface with single-layer steps are simulated. The adsorption energies around the SA step, nonrebonded SB step, rebonded SB step, and rough SB step with a kink structure are specially mapped out in this paper, from which the favourable binding sites and several possible diffusion paths are achieved. Because of the rebonded and kink structures, the SB step is more suitable for the attachment of Si adatom than the SA step or defective surface.

  4. Local field distribution and configuration of CO molecules adsorbed on the nanostructure platinum surface

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Huang Xiao-Jing; He Su-Zhen; Wu Chen-Xu

    2006-01-01

    This paper shows that the local electric field distribution near the nanostructure metallic surface is obtained by solving the Laplace equation, and furthermore, the configuration of CO molecules adsorbed on a Pt nanoparticle surface is obtained by using Monte Carlo simulation. It is found that the uneven local electric field distribution induced by the nanostructure surface can influence the configuration of carbon monoxide (CO) molecules by a force, which drags the adsorbates to the poles of the nanoparticles. This result, together with our results obtained before, may explain the experimental results that the nanostructure metallic surface can lead to abnormal phenomena such as anti-absorption infrared effects.

  5. Adsorbates on cobalt and platinum single crystal surfaces studied by STM

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Venvik, Hilde Johnsen

    1998-12-31

    This thesis on surface physics may contribute to the understanding of catalysts and so be of interest to companies working on oil and natural gas refining. The thesis deals with room temperature experimental investigations of adsorbates of CO and C{sub 2}H{sub 4} gases on Co and Pt single crystal surfaces. 252 refs., 51 figs., 1 table

  6. Oxygen Atom Adsorption and Diffusion on Pd Low-index Surfaces and (311) Stepped Surface

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG, Ze-Xin(王泽新); JIA, Xiang-Feng(贾祥凤); TIAN, Feng-Hui(田凤惠); CHEN, Shou-Gang(陈守刚)

    2004-01-01

    The 5-parameter Morse potential (5-MP for short) of the interaction system between an oxygen atom and palladium surface clusters was constructed. The adsorption and diffusion of an oxygen atom on low index surfaces Pd (100), Pd (111), Pd (110) and Pd (311) stepped surface were investigated in detail with 5-MP. It is found that fcc and hcp sites on the (111) surface and (111) microfacets are equivalent. The calculation results show that O atom adsorbs in the three-fold hollow site, and the long-bridge site is a stable site both in regular Pd (110) surface and in the (1×2) missing-row reconstruction structure. Moreover, in the study of O-Pd (311) surface system, We conclude that there are two stable adsorption states (four-fold site: H4, three-fold site: Hh) on O-Pd (311) surface and the three-fold site (Hf) is the metastable adsorption. At low coverage oxygen atom favors the four-fold hollow site (H4).

  7. Monte Carlo Simulation of the (100 Surface of the fcc Lattice of Platinum and Gold

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. A. Parsafar

    1997-04-01

    Full Text Available   In this work, the (100 surface of Au and Pts face centered cubic lattice, has been simulated in Monte-Carlo method, using a 486-DX2 computer. The potential equation that was used for the interaction among atoms in the metal surfaces is called Sutton and Chen potential. This potential is introduced for the interaction of floating nuclei in the electron sea, and attractive term is a many body potential.   Surface atoms are allowed to move to their adjacent unoccupied sites. These movements occur when temperature increases by which surface configuration, coordination number and the solid surface will be changed. In primary movements, we have large flactuations for the energy, but when the number of movements become large enough (order of hunders of thouands, we may ignore the small energy flactuation and therefore stable configuration can obtained.   In this calculation, we have taken into account the interaction between any particle with its first and second neighbouring atoms. Probability of acceptance of any movement is equal to the Boltzman factor. Finally, an equation, that is temperature dependency of surface magnitude, was abtained.

  8. Platinum vapor deposition surface-assisted laser desorption/ionization for imaging mass spectrometry of small molecules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawasaki, Hideya; Ozawa, Tomoyuki; Hisatomi, Hirotaka; Arakawa, Ryuichi

    2012-08-30

    Matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization (MALDI) imaging mass spectrometry (IMS) allows for the simultaneous detection and imaging of several molecules in a sample. However, when using an organic matrix in the MALDI-IMS of small molecules, inhomogeneous matrix crystallization may yield poorly reproducible peaks in the mass spectra. We describe a solvent-free approach that employs a homogeneously deposited metal nanoparticle layer (or film) for small-molecule detection. Platinum vapor deposition surface-assisted laser desorption/ionization imaging mass spectrometry (Pt vapor deposition SALDI-IMS) of small molecules was performed as a solvent-free and organic-matrix-free method. A commercially available magnetron sputtering device was used for Pt deposition. Vapor deposition of Pt produced a homogenous layer of nanoparticles over the surface of the target imaging sample. The effectiveness of Pt vapor deposition SALDI-IMS was demonstrated for the direct detection of small analytes of inkjet ink on printed paper as well as for various other analytes (saccharides, pigments, and drugs) separated by thin-layer chromatography (TLC), without the need for extraction or concentration processes. The advantage of choosing Pt instead of Au in SALDI-IMS was also shown. A solvent-free approach involving the direct deposition of Pt on samples (SALDI-IMS) is effective for the analysis of inkjet-printed papers and various analytes separated by TLC. This method would be useful in imaging analyses of various insulating materials such as polymers and biological materials. Copyright © 2012 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  9. Platinum-based anticancer drugs in waste waters of a major UK hospital and predicted concentrations in recipient surface waters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vyas, Nitin; Turner, Andrew; Sewell, Graham

    2014-09-15

    Concentrations of the cytotoxic platinum-based anticancer drugs, as total Pt, have been measured over a three week period in one of the main drains and in the effluent of the oncology ward of a major UK hospital (Derriford, Plymouth). Concentrations of Pt were highly variable in both discharges, and ranged from about 0.02 to 140 μg L(-1) in the oncology effluent and from about 0.03 to 100 μg L(-1) in the main drain. A comparison of drug administration figures over the study period with an estimate of the quantity of Pt discharged through the drains suggests that about 22% of total Pt is emitted to the environment from the hospital with the remainder being discharged by treated patients in the wider community. Administration figures for the three Pt-based drugs used in the hospital (cisplatin, carboplatin and oxaliplatin) coupled with published measurements on the removal of the drugs by conventional sewage treatment allowed the concentrations of Pt arising from each drug to be predicted in recipient surface waters as a function of water flow rate. For conditions representative of the region under study, concentrations of total Pt between a few tens and in excess of 100 pg L(-1) are predicted, with the principal form of the metal occurring as carboplatin and its metabolites. Although predicted concentrations are below EMEA guidelines warranting further risk assessment, the presence of substances in surface waters that are potentially carcinogenic, mutagenic and teratogenic and yet whose environmental effects are not understood is cause for concern. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Platinum adsorption on ceria: A comparative theoretical study of different surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Dongwei; Li, Tingxian; Wang, Qinggao; Yang, Gui; He, Chaozheng; He, Bingling; Lu, Zhansheng; Yang, Zongxian

    2017-02-01

    A comparative study, based on the density functional theory, on the adsorption of single Pt atoms on the CeO2(111), (110), and (100) surfaces has been performed. According to the calculated adsorption energies, it is suggested that the deposited Pt atoms on the CeO2(111) surface are easy to aggregate and form nanoparticles compared with those on the CeO2(110) and (100) surfaces. Further, the interaction strength between Pt and the three CeO2 surfaces follows the order of (100) > (110) > (111). It is also found that there is a correlation between the formal oxidation state of the adsorbed Pt and its coordination number with respect to O. The Pt atom coordinated by one O atom on the CeO2 surfaces is only slightly charged and almost neutral, and that coordinately by four O atoms exclusively has the formal oxidation state of Pt2+. The possible reasons for these findings have been discussed. And the present theoretical results have been compared with the available experimental reports. It is expected that our studies will give useful insights into the shape-dependent interaction between Pt with CeO2 nanocrystals and the shape-dependent oxidation state of the deposited Pt.

  11. Design of a High Speed Planing Hull with a Cambered Step and Surface Piercing Hydrofoils

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-06-01

    Design of a High Speed Planing Hull with a Cambered Step and Surface Piercing Hydrofoils by Leon Alexander Faison Bachelor of Science in...Speed Planing Hull with a Cambered Step and Surface Piercing Hydrofoils 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER 5b. GRANT NUMBER 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER 6. AUTHOR(S...cambered step and stern, surface piercing hydrofoils , commonly known as a Dynaplane hull. This configuration combines the drag reduction benefits of a

  12. Characterization and reactivity of organic monolayers on gold and platinum surfaces

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wu, Chien-Ching [Iowa State Univ., Ames, IA (United States)

    1995-12-06

    Purpose is to understand how the mobilization, dielectric, orientation, composition, coverage, and structure of self-assembled organic monolayers on metal surfaces affects the surface reactivities and properties of these films in order to facilitate the construction of desired films. Two model systems were used: tiols at Au and aromatic acids at Pt. Surface analysis methods, including contact angle, electrochemistry, ellipsometry, infrared reflection absorption spectroscopy (IRRAS), and x-ray photospectroscopy, were used to study the self-assembled organic monolayers on Au and Pt. IRRAS, contact angle, and electrochemistry were used to determine the surface pKa of phenylcarboxylic acids and pyridylcarboxylic acids monolayers on Pt. These techniques were also used to determine the orientation of polymethylene chain axis and the carboxylic follow the structural evolution of the chains and end group of the thiolate monolayers during formation. IRRAS was also used to assess the carboxylic acid group in terms of its possible existence as the non-hydrogen-bonded species, the hydrogen-bonded dimeric group, and the hydrogen-bonded polymeric group. These different forms of the end group were also followed vs coverage, as well as the reactivity vs solution pH. IRRAS and contact angle were used to calculate the rate constant of the esterification of carboxylic acid-terminated monolayers on Au.

  13. Kinetics of gas phase formic acid decomposition on platinum single crystal and polycrystalline surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Detwiler, Michael D.; Milligan, Cory A.; Zemlyanov, Dmitry Y.; Delgass, W. Nicholas; Ribeiro, Fabio H.

    2016-06-01

    Formic acid dehydrogenation turnover rates (TORs) were measured on Pt(111), Pt(100), and polycrystalline Pt foil surfaces at a total pressure of 800 Torr between 413 and 513 K in a batch reactor connected to an ultra-high vacuum (UHV) system. The TORs, apparent activation energies, and reaction orders are not sensitive to the structure of the Pt surface, within the precision of the measurements. CO introduced into the batch reactor depressed the formic acid dehydrogenation TOR and increased the reaction's apparent activation energies on Pt(111) and Pt(100), consistent with behavior predicted by the Temkin equation. Two reaction mechanisms were explored which explain the formic acid decomposition mechanism on Pt, both of which include dissociative adsorption of formic acid, rate limiting formate decomposition, and quasi-equilibrated hydrogen recombination and CO adsorption. No evidence was found that catalytic supports used in previous studies altered the reaction kinetics or mechanism.

  14. The effect of one-step and multi-step polishing systems on surface texture of two different resin composites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bashetty Kusum

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: The purpose of this in-vitro study was to evaluate the surface roughness of two direct resin composites polished with one-step and multi-step polishing systems. Materials and Methods: The resin composites examined in this study include minifill-hybrid composite Esthet-X (DENTSPLY/Caulk, Milford, DE, USA and packable composite Solitaire II (Heraeus Kulzer, Inc., Southbend. A total of 42 discs (10 3 2 mm, 21 specimens of each restorative material were fabricated. Seven specimens per composite group received no polishing treatment and served as control. For each composite group, the specimens were randomly divided into two polishing systems: One-step PoGo (Dentsply/Caulk, Milford, DE, USA and multi-step Super Snap (Shofu, Inc. Kyoto, Japan. Polishing systems were applied according to the manufacturer′s instructions after being ground wet with 1200 grit silicon carbide paper. The surface roughness values were determined using a profilometer. Results: Data was subjected to student′s t test at a significance level of 0.05. The smoothest surfaces were achieved under Mylar strips in both the composite groups. Mean Ra values ranged from 0.09 to 0.3 mm for Esthet-X group and from 0.18 to 0.3 mm for Solitaire II with different polishing systems. The ranking of the order of surface roughness on the basis of the type of composite was as follows: Esthet-X , Solitaire II for PoGo system and Esthet-X 5 Solitaire II for Super Snap; and the ranking for the polishing system was: PoGo , Super Snap (P # 0.05. Conclusion: The one-step polishing system (PoGo produced better surface quality in terms of roughness than the multi-step system (Super Snap for minifill-hybrid composite (Esthet-X, and it was equivalent to Super Snap for packable composites (Solitaire II. Minifill-hybrid presented a better surface finish than Solitaire II when PoGo polishing system was used. No significant difference was present in surface roughness between both

  15. A novel immunosensor based on immobilization of hepatitis B surface antibody on platinum electrode modified colloidal gold and polyvinyl butyral as matrices via electrochemical impedance spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Dianping; Yuan, Ruo; Chai, Yaqin; Dai, Jianyuan; Zhong, Xia; Liu, Yan

    2004-12-01

    Hepatitis B surface antibody (HBsAb) was immobilized to the surface of platinum electrode modified with colloidal gold and polyvinyl butyral (PVB) as matrices to detect hepatitis B surface antigen (HBsAg) via electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS). The electrochemical measurements of cyclic voltammetry and impedance spectroscopy showed that K(4)[Fe(CN)(6)]/K(3)[Fe(CN)(6)] reactions on the platinum electrode surface were blocked due to the procedures of self-assembly of HBsAb-Au-PVB. The binding of a specific HBsAb to HBsAg recognition layer could be detected by measurements of the impedance change. A new strategy was introduced for improving the sensitivity of impedance measurements via the large specific surface area and high surface free energy of Au nanoparticles and the encapsulated effect of polyvinyl butyral. The results showed that this strategy caused dramatic improvement of the detection sensitivity of HBsAg and had good linear response to detect HBsAg in the range of 20-160 ng.ml(-1) with a detection limit of 7.8 ng.ml(-1). Moreover, the studied immunosensor exhibited high sensitivity and long-term stability.

  16. Step density waves on growing vicinal crystal surfaces - Theory and experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ranguelov, Bogdan; Müller, Pierre; Metois, Jean-Jacques; Stoyanov, Stoyan

    2017-01-01

    The Burton, Cabrera and Frank (BCF) theory plays a key conceptual role in understanding and modeling the crystal growth of vicinal surfaces. In BCF theory the adatom concentration on a vicinal surface obeys to a diffusion equation, generally solved within quasi-static approximation where the adatom concentration at a given distance x from a step has a steady state value n (x) . Recently, we show that going beyond this approximation (Ranguelov and Stoyanov, 2007) [6], for fast surface diffusion and slow attachment/detachment kinetics of adatoms at the steps, a train of fast-moving steps is unstable against the formation of steps density waves. More precisely, the step density waves are generated if the step velocity exceeds a critical value related to the strength of the step-step repulsion. This theoretical treatment corresponds to the case when the time to reach a steady state concentration of adatoms on a given terrace is comparable to the time for a non-negligible change of the step configuration leading to a terrace adatom concentration n (x , t) that depends not only on the terrace width, but also on its "past width". This formation of step density waves originates from the high velocity of step motion and has nothing to do with usual kinetic instabilities of step bunching induced by Ehrlich-Schwoebel effect, surface electromigration and/or the impact of impurities on the step rate. The so-predicted formation of step density waves is illustrated by numerical integration of the equations for step motion. In order to complete our previous theoretical treatment of the non-stationary BCF problem, we perform an in-situ reflection electron microscopy experiment at specific temperature interval and direction of the heating current, in which, for the first time, the step density waves instability is evidenced on Si(111) surface during highest possible Si adatoms deposition rates.

  17. Kinetic study of CO oxidation on step decorated Pt(1 1 1) vicinal single crystal electrodes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen Qingsong [Institute of Electrochemistry, University of Alicante, Apartado 99, E-03080 Alicante (Spain); State Key Laboratory of Physical Chemistry of Solid Surfaces, Department of Chemistry, College of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Xiamen University, Xiamen 361005 (China); Feliu, Juan M., E-mail: juan.feliu@ua.es [Institute of Electrochemistry, University of Alicante, Apartado 99, E-03080 Alicante (Spain); Berna, Antonio; Climent, Victor [Institute of Electrochemistry, University of Alicante, Apartado 99, E-03080 Alicante (Spain); Sun Shigang, E-mail: sgsun@xmu.edu.cn [State Key Laboratory of Physical Chemistry of Solid Surfaces, Department of Chemistry, College of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Xiamen University, Xiamen 361005 (China)

    2011-07-01

    Highlights: > Chronoamperometry has been used to study CO oxidation on Pt stepped surfaces. > Adatoms step decoration allows determination of the role of steps on CO oxidation. > Rate constant decreases after step decoration with adatoms. > Tafel slopes are around 60-90 mV/dec, suggesting a Langmuir-Hinshelwood mechanism. - Abstract: In this work, surface modification at atomic level was applied to study the reactivity of step sites on platinum single crystal surfaces. Stepped platinum single crystal electrodes with (1 1 1) terraces separated by monoatomic step sites with different symmetry were decorated with irreversibly adsorbed adatoms, without blocking the terrace sites, and characterized in 0.1 M HClO{sub 4} solution. The kinetics of CO oxidation on the different platinum single crystal planes as well as on the step decorated surfaces has been studied using chronoamperometry. The apparent rate constants, which were determined by fitting the experimental data to a mean-field model, decrease after the steps of platinum single crystal electrodes have been blocked by the adatoms. This behavior indicates that steps are active sites for CO oxidation. Tafel slopes measured from the potential dependence of the apparent rate constants of CO oxidation were similar in all cases. This result demonstrates that the electrochemical oxidation of the CO adlayer on all the surfaces follows the same Langmuir-Hinshelwood model, irrespectively of step modification.

  18. A single-step route for large-scale synthesis of core-shell palladium@platinum dendritic nanocrystals/reduced graphene oxide with enhanced electrocatalytic properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Qi; Xu, Yan-Ru; Wang, Ai-Jun; Feng, Jiu-Ju

    2016-01-01

    In this report, a facile, seed-less and single-step method is developed for large-scale synthesis of core-shell Pd@Pt dendritic nanocrystals anchored on reduced graphene oxide (Pd@Pt DNC/rGO) under mild conditions. Poly(ethylene oxide) is employed as a structure-directing and stabilizing agent. Compared with commercial Pt/C (20 wt%) and Pd/C (20 wt%) catalysts, the as-obtained nanocomposite has large electrochemically active surface area (114.15 m2gmetal-1), and shows superior catalytic activity and stability with the mass activities of 1210.0 and 1128.5 mAmgmetal-1 for methanol and ethanol oxidation, respectively. The improved catalytic activity is mainly the consequence of the synergistic effects between Pd and Pt of the dendritic structures, as well as rGO as a support.

  19. Electrocatalysis of formic acid on palladium and platinum surfaces: from fundamental mechanisms to fuel cell applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Kun; Zhang, Han-Xuan; Zou, Shouzhong; Cai, Wen-Bin

    2014-10-14

    Formic acid as a natural biomass and a CO2 reduction product has attracted considerable interest in renewable energy exploitation, serving as both a promising candidate for chemical hydrogen storage material and a direct fuel for low temperature liquid fed fuel cells. In addition to its chemical dehydrogenation, formic acid oxidation (FAO) is a model reaction in the study of electrocatalysis of C1 molecules and the anode reaction in direct formic acid fuel cells (DFAFCs). Thanks to a deeper mechanistic understanding of FAO on Pt and Pd surfaces brought about by recent advances in the fundamental investigations, the "synthesis-by-design" concept has become a mainstream idea to attain high-performance Pt- and Pd-based nanocatalysts. As a result, a large number of efficient nanocatalysts have been obtained through different synthesis strategies by tailoring geometric and electronic structures of the two primary catalytic metals. In this paper, we provide a brief overview of recent progress in the mechanistic studies of FAO, the synthesis of novel Pd- and Pt-based nanocatalysts as well as their practical applications in DFAFCs with a focus on discussing studies significantly contributing to these areas in the past five years.

  20. Trends in CO Oxidation Rates for Metal Nanoparticles and Close-Packed, Stepped, and Kinked Surfaces

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jiang, Tao; Mowbray, Duncan; Dobrin, Sergey;

    2009-01-01

    Using density functional theory calculations, we study trends in the CO oxidation activity for different metals and surfaces. Specifically, we show how the activity of (111) close-packed surfaces, (211) stepped surfaces, (532) kinked surfaces, 55 atom cuboctahedral clusters, and 12 atom cluster...

  1. Platinum impact assessment

    OpenAIRE

    Yip, Joyce Pui Yan

    2007-01-01

    This paper presents a comprehensive strategic analysis of Company X's strategies to mitigate its risks from volatile platinum prices, since Platinum is a critical component of fuel cells. It is recommended that Company X consider leasing platinum to lower cash flow requirements to meet its platinum demand over the next 5 years. A shorter platinum leasing period will reduce Company X's platinum market risk. OEMs can set up metal accounts with catalyst suppliers to eliminate Company X from plat...

  2. Probing Interaction Between Platinum Group Metal (PGM) and Non-PGM Support Through Surface Characterization and Device Performance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saha, Shibely

    High cost and limited abundance of Platinum (Pt) have hindered effective commercialization of Proton Exchange Membrane Fuel Cell and Electrolyzer. Efforts have been undertaken to reduce precious group metal (PGM) requirement for these devices without compromising the activity of the catalyst by using transition metal carbides (TMC) as non-PGM support thanks to their similar electronic and geometric structures as Pt. In this work Mo2C was selected as non-PGM support and Pt was used as the PGM of interest. We hypothesize that the hollow nanotube morphology of Mo2C support combined with Pt nano particles deposited on it via atomic layer deposition (ALD) technique would allow increased interaction between them which may increase the activity of Pt and Mo2C as well as maximize the Pt active surface area. Specifically, a rotary ALD equipment was used to grow Pt particles from atomic level to 2--3 nanometers by simply adjusting number of ALD cycles in order to probe the interaction between the deposited Pt nanoparticles and Mo2C nanotube support. Interaction between the Pt and Mo2 C was analyzed via surface characterization and electrochemical characterization. Interaction between Pt and Mo2C arises due to the lattice mismatch between Pt and Mo2C as well as electron migration between them. Lattice spacing analysis using high resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM) images, combined with Pt binding energy shift in XPS results, clearly showed strong bonding between Pt nanoparticles and the Mo2C nanotube support in all the resultant Pt/Mo2C samples. We postulate that this strong interaction is responsible for the significantly enhanced durability observed in our constant potential electrolysis (CPE) and accelerated degradation testing (ADT). Of the three samples from different ALD cycles (15, 50 and 100), Mo2C nanotubes modified by 50 (1.07 wt% Pt loading) and 100 cycles (4.4 wt% Pt) of Pt deposition, showed higher HER and HOR activity per Pt mass than commercial

  3. Electronic structure for a topological insulator with a smoothly varying step on surface

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhou, Ma; Liu, Yiman; Shao, Huaihua; Zhou, Xiaoying; Zhou, Guanghui, E-mail: ghzhou@hunnu.edu.cn

    2014-12-01

    We study the penetration depth (PD) of surface state into the bulk, the local density of states (LDOS) and the spin-polarized STM tip tunneling conductance (TG) for a smoothly varying step described by an asymptotic model, on the surface of a three-dimensional (3D) topological insulator (TI). Using curvilinear coordinates for calculation, we find that the PD shows two peaks near step edges with maximum surface curvature and a dip value of flat surface at step middle with zero curvature. In contrast, the LDOS exhibits a double valley (dip) pattern, in which it rapidly declines from the highest value for flat surface to the dip value near step edges, and then shows a small peak at step middle. This interesting small peak is in good agreement with experimentally observed LDOS peak within a step of definite span on a 3D TI surface. Moreover, the calculated surface spin-polarized STM tip TG also confirms the LDOS qualitatively. The findings here may provide a further understanding of 3D TI surface with step line defects.

  4. Step driven competitive epitaxial and self-limited growth of graphene on copper surface

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lili Fan

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available The existence of surface steps was found to have significant function and influence on the growth of graphene on copper via chemical vapor deposition. The two typical growth modes involved were found to be influenced by the step morphologies on copper surface, which led to our proposed step driven competitive growth mechanism. We also discovered a protective role of graphene in preserving steps on copper surface. Our results showed that wide and high steps promoted epitaxial growth and yielded multilayer graphene domains with regular shape, while dense and low steps favored self-limited growth and led to large-area monolayer graphene films. We have demonstrated that controllable growth of graphene domains of specific shape and large-area continuous graphene films are feasible.

  5. A step towards Mobile Arsenic measurement for surface waters

    OpenAIRE

    2015-01-01

    This is the author accepted manuscript. The final version is available via RSC at http://pubs.rsc.org/en/Content/ArticleLanding/2015/AN/c4an02368d#!divAbstract. Surface modified quantum dots (QDs) are studied using a bio-inspired cysteine rich ligand (glutathione, GSH) and their quenching response and selectivity to arsenic examined. As predicted from As3+ binding with highly crosslinked phytochelatin-(PCn)-like molecules, better arsenic selectivity is obtained for a thicker more 3-dimensi...

  6. Buckling of reconstruction elements of the edges of triple steps on vicinal Si(111) surfaces

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhachuk, R. A., E-mail: zhachuk@gmail.com [Russian Academy of Sciences, Rzhanov Institute of Semiconductor Physics, Siberian Branch (Russian Federation); Coutinho, J. [University of Aveiro, Campus Santiago, I3N, Department of Physics (Portugal); Rayson, M. J. [University of Surrey, Department of Chemistry (United Kingdom); Briddon, P. R. [Newcastle University, School of Electrical, Electronic and Computer Engineering (United Kingdom)

    2015-04-15

    The structure of steps with a height of three (111) interplanar distances on vicinal Si(111) surfaces has been analyzed through density functional theory calculations. It has been shown that several stable atomic configurations are possible depending on the buckling of the reconstruction elements of edges of the steps on the surface. It has been found that the direction of the buckling of reconstruction elements in the ground state of the surface is determined by the Coulomb interaction with their nearest atomic environment.

  7. Surface and step dynamics of a semi-infinite insulating antiferromagnet system

    CERN Document Server

    Tamine, M

    2003-01-01

    We have carried out a theoretical study of the localized spin-wave modes near the surface step of the insulating Heisenberg antiferromagnet. In this work, we study the full magnetic problem arising from the absence of translational symmetry due to the presence of a magnetic surface and step. The calculation concerns in particular the spin fluctuation dynamics and employs the matching procedure in the random-phase approximation. Only the nearest neighbours exchange interactions are considered between the spins in the model. The analytical formalism presented here determines the bulk and evanescent spin fluctuation fields in the two-dimensional plane normal to the surface and step regions. The results are used to calculate the localized modes of magnons associated with the step and surface terraces. The present model may be generalized to treat the spin fluctuations dynamics of other extended surface imperfections or nanostructures, provided they preserve the translation symmetry of the ordered spins along a di...

  8. Low loss two-step ion-exchanged waveguides with high surface refractive index

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hassanzadeh, Abdollah; Mittler, Silvia

    2011-07-01

    Two-step ion-exchanged waveguides with high surface refractive indices are fabricated under a variety of conditions. By modifying the conventional two-step ion exchange, the losses and the effective diffusion depth can be decreased without a significant effect on the surface refractive index. The influence of the first step, K+-Na+ ion exchange, performed time dependably on the surface refractive index change is investigated. Energy-dispersive x-ray spectroscopy is performed to establish the diffusion profiles of various ions.

  9. The formation energy for steps and kinks on cubic transition metal surfaces

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vitos, Levente; Skriver, Hans Lomholt; Kollàr, Janos

    1999-01-01

    We have used our first-principles database of surface energies for metals in conjunction with the concept of vicinal surfaces to derive the energies of formation of monoatomic steps and corresponding kinks on close-packed surface facets of bcc and fee transition metals. The entries in the database...... allow for a direct calculation of the energies of a number of important steps. For the remaining steps and for all the kinks the energies of formation have been estimated from pair potential expansions of the entries in the database. (C) 1999 Elsevier Science B.V. All rights reserved....

  10. Deposition of the platinum crystals on the carbon nanotubes

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2000-01-01

    A new technique and the affecting factors for depositing platinum on the carbon nanotubes were investigated. The results show that the deposited platinum crystals in the atmosphere of hydrogen or nitrogen have a small size and a homogeneous distribution on the surface of the carbon nanotubes. The pretreatment would decrease the platinum particles on the carbon nanotubes significantly.

  11. Direct Imaging Mass Spectrometry of Plant Leaves Using Surface-assisted Laser Desorption/Ionization with Sputter-deposited Platinum Film.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ozawa, Tomoyuki; Osaka, Issey; Hamada, Satoshi; Murakami, Tatsuya; Miyazato, Akio; Kawasaki, Hideya; Arakawa, Ryuichi

    2016-01-01

    Plant leaves administered with systemic insecticides as agricultural chemicals were analyzed using imaging mass spectrometry (IMS). Matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization (MALDI) is inadequate for the detection of insecticides on leaves because of the charge-up effect that occurs on the non-conductive surface of the leaves. In this study, surface-assisted laser desorption/ionization with a sputter-deposited platinum film (Pt-SALDI) was used for direct analysis of chemicals in plant leaves. Sputter-deposited platinum (Pt) films were prepared on leaves administered with the insecticides. A sputter-deposited Pt film with porous structure was used as the matrix for Pt-SALDI. Acephate and acetamiprid contained in the insecticides on the leaves could be detected using Pt-SALDI-MS, but these chemical components could not be adequately detected using MALDI-MS because of the charge-up effect. Enhancement of ion yields for the insecticides was achieved using Pt-SALDI, accompanied by prevention of the charge-up effect by the conductive Pt film. The movement of systemic insecticides in plants could be observed clearly using Pt-SALDI-IMS. The distribution and movement of components of systemic insecticides on leaves could be analyzed directly using Pt-SALDI-IMS. Additionally, changes in the properties of the chemicals with time, as an indicator of the permeability of the insecticides, could be evaluated.

  12. Scanning Tunneling Spectroscopy Study of Single Layer Step Edges on Si (100) Surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xiqiao; Namboodiri, Pradeep; Li, Kai; Deng, Xiao; Silver, Richard

    Advanced Hydrogen lithography enables the fabrication of atomically precise donor-based quantum devices on Si(100) surfaces. Understanding the defect and step edge interaction with local electronic and geometric structures is needed to properly interpret device measurement results. Low temperature Si epitaxy, used to encapsulate devices, introduces island growth and step edges near/above buried donor nanostructures, presenting a real challenge in relocating and characterizing buried donor devices using Scanning Tunneling Microscopy/Spectroscopy (STM/STS). We present spatially resolved STS results across single layer steps on Si(100) surfaces. While the electronic properties across SA steps were found to be very similar to that on flat terraces, we observed an edge induced gap state on rebonded SB step edges, which was assigned to the unpaired dangling bond state at the lower edge atom of the rebonded SB steps. In addition, we used computational simulation within Bardeen's formalism to probe the influence of subsurface doping density profiles on the observed STS features over step edges and other defects. This study will help to elucidate the role played by surface step edges and subsurface doping densities in characterizing surface and subsurface nanostructures using STS/STM.

  13. Step-height measurements on sand surfaces: A comparison between optical scanner and coordinate measuring machine

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mohaghegh, Kamran; Yazdanbakhsh, Seyed Alireza; Tiedje, Niels Skat

    2016-01-01

    the same routine to touch the different positions on the polygonised mesh. Each measurement was repeated 5 times. The results of step height measurements on sand surfaces showed a maximum error of ± 12 µm for CMM, while scanner shows only ± 4 µm. Generally speaking, optical step height values were measured...

  14. Electrochemical Fabrication and Electrocatalytic Properties of Nanostructured Mesoporous Platinum Microelectrodes

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Mengyan NIE; Joanne M. Elliott

    2005-01-01

    Electrodeposition from a lyotropic liquid crystal template medium was used to produce nanostructured platinum microelectrodes with high specific surface area and high mass transport efficiency. Compared to polished and conventional platinized microelectrodes, well-ordered nanostructured platinum microelectrodes exhibited enhanced electrocatalytic properties for oxygen and ascorbic acid, whilst well-ordered nanostructured platinum microelectrodes offered improved electrocatalytic properties for oxygen reduction compared to disordered nanostructured platinum microelectrodes.

  15. Static and dynamic buckling of reconstructions at triple steps on Si(111) surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhachuk, R.; Teys, S.; Coutinho, J.; Rayson, M. J.; Briddon, P. R.

    2014-10-01

    Triple steps on Si(111) surfaces are popular building blocks for bottom-up nanostructure assembly, conferring size uniformity and precise positioning of growing nanostructures. In this work, we employ the Si(7 7 10) regular stepped surface as model system to study the triple steps by scanning tunneling microscopy (STM) and large-scale first-principles calculations. We find a surprising cohabitation of reconstruction elements at the step edge that either buckles statically or dynamically at room temperature. The driving force for the observed sequence of buckling patterns is traced back to Coulomb interactions involving charged adatoms and rest-atoms lying on a mini-terrace. These results reconcile the Si(111) triple step model with the experimental STM data.

  16. Static and dynamic buckling of reconstructions at triple steps on Si(111) surfaces

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhachuk, R., E-mail: zhachuk@gmail.com; Teys, S. [Institute of Semiconductor Physics, pr. Lavrentyeva 13, Novosibirsk 630090 (Russian Federation); Coutinho, J. [Department of Physics and I3N, University of Aveiro, Campus Santiago, 3810-193 Aveiro (Portugal); Rayson, M. J. [Department of Chemistry, University of Surrey, Guildford GU2 7XH (United Kingdom); Briddon, P. R. [School of Electrical, Electronic and Computer Engineering, Newcastle University, Newcastle Upon Tyne NE1 7RU (United Kingdom)

    2014-10-27

    Triple steps on Si(111) surfaces are popular building blocks for bottom-up nanostructure assembly, conferring size uniformity and precise positioning of growing nanostructures. In this work, we employ the Si(7 7 10) regular stepped surface as model system to study the triple steps by scanning tunneling microscopy (STM) and large-scale first-principles calculations. We find a surprising cohabitation of reconstruction elements at the step edge that either buckles statically or dynamically at room temperature. The driving force for the observed sequence of buckling patterns is traced back to Coulomb interactions involving charged adatoms and rest-atoms lying on a mini-terrace. These results reconcile the Si(111) triple step model with the experimental STM data.

  17. SURFACE SITES AND MOBILITIES OF IN ATOMS ON A STEPPED CU(100) SURFACE STUDIED AT LOW COVERAGE

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    BREEMAN, M; DORENBOS, G; BOERMA, DO

    1992-01-01

    The various surface sites of In atoms deposited to a coverage of 0.013 monolayer (ML) onto a stepped Cu(100) surface were determined with low-energy ion scattering (LEIS) as a function of deposition temperature. From the fractions of In atoms occupying different sites, observed in the temperature ra

  18. SURFACE SITES AND MOBILITIES OF IN ATOMS ON A STEPPED CU(100) SURFACE STUDIED AT LOW COVERAGE

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    BREEMAN, M; DORENBOS, G; BOERMA, DO

    1992-01-01

    The various surface sites of In atoms deposited to a coverage of 0.013 monolayer (ML) onto a stepped Cu(100) surface were determined with low-energy ion scattering (LEIS) as a function of deposition temperature. From the fractions of In atoms occupying different sites, observed in the temperature ra

  19. Platinum-based anticancer drugs in waste waters of a major UK hospital and predicted concentrations in recipient surface waters.

    OpenAIRE

    Vyas, N; Turner, A; Sewell, G.

    2014-01-01

    Concentrations of the cytotoxic platinum-based anticancer drugs, as total Pt, have been measured over a three week period in one of the main drains and in the effluent of the oncology ward of a major UK hospital (Derriford, Plymouth). Concentrations of Pt were highly variable in both discharges, and ranged from about 0.02 to 140 μg L(-1) in the oncology effluent and from about 0.03 to 100 μg L(-1) in the main drain. A comparison of drug administration figures over the study period with an est...

  20. Stabilizing platinum in phosphoric acid fuel cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Remick, R. J.

    1982-01-01

    Platinum sintering on phosphoric acid fuel cell cathodes is discussed. The cathode of the phosphoric acid fuel cell uses a high surface area platinum catalyst dispersed on a conductive carbon support to minimize both cathode polarization and fabrication costs. During operation, however, the active surface area of these electrodes decreases, which in turn leads to decreased cell performance. This loss of active surface area is a major factor in the degradation of fuel cell performance over time.

  1. Influence of step faceting on the enantiospecific decomposition of aspartic acid on chiral Cu surfaces vicinal to Cu{111}.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reinicker, A D; Therrien, A J; Lawton, T J; Ali, R; Sykes, E C H; Gellman, A J

    2016-09-13

    On surfaces vicinal to Cu{111}, l-aspartic acid (l-Asp) adsorption causes steps to facet enantiospecifically into {310}(R) and {320}(S) steps. l-Asp has its highest heat of adsortion on surfaces that naturally expose the {310}(R) or {320}(S) steps but decomposes preferentially on the {310}(R) steps.

  2. Investigation of equilibration and growth of stepped surfaces by Kinetic Monte Carlo in one dimension

    Science.gov (United States)

    Türkan, A.; Esen, M.; Tüzemen, A. Türker; Özdemir, M.

    2017-02-01

    In this study, the equilibration and in the case of a particle flux to the surface, the growth of a one dimensional semi-conductor surface of "V" initial shape is investigated by kinetic Monte Carlo method. The initial surface is assumed to consist of atomic height steps separated by terraces. In Monte Carlo simulations, the following processes are considered: the diffusion of free particles on the surface, the attachment/detachment of particles to/from step edges from/to a terrace in front of a step or to a terrace above the step. In the simulations the Ehrlich-Schwoebel barrier is also taken into account. The equilibration of "V" initial shape at various temperatures is investigated. Moreover, the effect of particle bonding energy on the surface profile and on the evolution of the surface is also investigated. In the case of a particle flux to the surface, the surface profile and its growth kinetics are investigated at various temperatures and flux values.

  3. Ion-step method for surface potential sensing of silicon nanowires

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Chen, Songyue; Nieuwkasteele, van Jan W.; Berg, van den Albert; Eijkel, Jan C.T.

    2016-01-01

    This paper presents a novel stimulus-response method for surface potential sensing of silicon nanowire (Si NW) field-effect transistors. When an "ion-step" from low to high ionic strength is given as a stimulus to the gate oxide surface, an increase of double layer capacitance is therefore expected.

  4. Highly charged ions impinging on a stepped metal surface under grazing incidence

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Robin, A; Niemann, D; Stolterfoht, N; Heiland, W

    2003-01-01

    We report on energy loss measurements and charge state distributions for 60 keV N6+ and 75 keV N5+ ions scattered off a Pt(110)(1x2) single crystal surface. In particular, the influence of surface steps on the energy loss and the outgoing charge states is discussed. The scattering angle and the angl

  5. Highly charged ions impinging on a stepped metal surface under grazing incidence

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Robin, A; Niemann, D; Stolterfoht, N; Heiland, W

    We report on energy loss measurements and charge state distributions for 60 keV N6+ and 75 keV N5+ ions scattered off a Pt(110)(1x2) single crystal surface. In particular, the influence of surface steps on the energy loss and the outgoing charge states is discussed. The scattering angle and the

  6. Methods for growth of relatively large step-free SiC crystal surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neudeck, Philip G. (Inventor); Powell, J. Anthony (Inventor)

    2002-01-01

    A method for growing arrays of large-area device-size films of step-free (i.e., atomically flat) SiC surfaces for semiconductor electronic device applications is disclosed. This method utilizes a lateral growth process that better overcomes the effect of extended defects in the seed crystal substrate that limited the obtainable step-free area achievable by prior art processes. The step-free SiC surface is particularly suited for the heteroepitaxial growth of 3C (cubic) SiC, AlN, and GaN films used for the fabrication of both surface-sensitive devices (i.e., surface channel field effect transistors such as HEMT's and MOSFET's) as well as high-electric field devices (pn diodes and other solid-state power switching devices) that are sensitive to extended crystal defects.

  7. Optical characterization of gold chains and steps on the vicinal Si(557) surface: Theory and experiment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hogan, Conor [Consiglio Nazionale delle Ricerche, Istituto di Struttura della Materia, via Fosso del Cavaliere 100, 00133 Rome (Italy); Department of Physics and European Theoretical Spectroscopy Facility (ETSF), University of Rome ' ' Tor Vergata' ' , Via della Ricerca Scientifica 1, 00133 Rome (Italy); McAlinden, Niall; McGilp, John F. [School of Physics, Trinity College Dublin, Dublin 2 (Ireland)

    2012-06-15

    We present a joint experimental-theoretical study of the reflectance anisotropy of clean and gold-covered Si(557), a vicinal surface of Si(111) upon which gold forms quasi-one-dimensional (1D) chains parallel to the steps. By means of first-principles calculations, we analyse the close relationship between the various surface structural motifs and the optical properties. Good agreement is found between experimental and computed spectra of single-step models of both clean and Au-adsorbed surfaces. Spectral fingerprints of monoatomic gold chains and silicon step edges are identified. The role of spin-orbit coupling (SOC) on the surface optical properties is examined, and found to have little effect. (Copyright copyright 2012 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim)

  8. Spatially resolved scanning tunneling spectroscopy of single-layer steps on Si(100) surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xiqiao; Namboodiri, Pradeep; Li, Kai; Deng, Xiao; Silver, Richard

    2016-09-01

    Single-layer steps at Si(100) surfaces/interfaces present significant challenges to the quantitative characterization of buried dopant devices as well as the accurate imaging and relocation of fabricated quantum structures. We demonstrate the detailed spatially resolved scanning tunneling spectroscopy study across monolayer step edges on Si(100) surfaces and quantitative determination of the local density of state distributions and behavior of the band gap at step edges. The influence on the local electrostatic environment due to step edge states has been quantified while accounting for the effects of scanning tunneling measurement conditions. The dangling bond states on Si(100) surfaces are utilized as a fingerprint to quantify the local band bending landscape and to make corrections to the experimentally observed surface state energy levels and band gap values at the step edge regions. We observe a significant band gap narrowing behavior along a rebonded single-layer type B step edge on a degenerately boron-doped p -type Si substrate.

  9. Sum frequency generation spectroscopy study of hydrogenated stepped Si(111) surfaces made by molecular hydrogen exposure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hien, K. T. T.; Sattar, M. A.; Miyauchi, Y.; Mizutani, G.; Rutt, H. N.

    2017-09-01

    Hydrogen adsorption on stepped Si(111) surfaces 9.5° miscut in the [ 1 ̅ 1 ̅ 2 ] direction has been investigated in situ in a UHV chamber with a base pressure of 10-8 Pa. The H-Si(111)1×1 surface was prepared by exposing the wafer to ultra-pure hydrogen gas at a pressure of 470 Pa. Termination of hydrogen on terraces and steps was observed by sum frequency generation (SFG) with several polarization combinations such as ppp, ssp, pps, spp, psp, sps, pss and sss. Here the 1st, 2nd and 3rd symbols indicate SFG, visible and IR polarizations, respectively. ppp and ssp-SFG clearly showed only two modes: the Si-H stretching vibration terrace mode at 2082 cm-1 (A) and the vertical step dihydride vibration mode at 2094 cm-1 (C1). Interesting points are the appearance of the C1 mode in contrast to the previous SFG spectrum of the H-Si(111)1×1 surface with the same miscut surface angle prepared by wet chemical etching. We suggest that the formation of step dihydride and its orientation on the Si(111) stepped surfaces depend strongly on the preparation method.

  10. Amplitude and phase of surface plasmon polaritons excited at a step edge

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Klick, Alwin; de la Cruz, Sergio; Lemke, Christoph

    2016-01-01

    A combined experimental and theoretical study on the laser-induced excitation of surface plasmon polaritons (SPP) at well-defined step edges of a gold–vacuum interface is presented. As a relevant parameter determining the coupling efficiency between laser field and SPP, we identify the ratio...... between step height h and excitation wavelength λ. For specific values of h/λ, an almost complete suppression of SPP excitation is observed, which corresponds to a condition of constructive interference between the waves reflected at the top and bottom of the step. Experiment and theory show, furthermore...

  11. Step-Flow Growth on Vicinal GaAs Surfaces by Migration-Enhanced Epitaxy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamaguchi, Hiroshi; Horikoshi, Yoshiji

    1989-08-01

    The mechanism of step-flow growth on vicinal GaAs substrates during migration-enhanced epitaxy are studied using the reflection high-energy electron diffraction technique. Results show that the low As pressure during migration-enhanced epitaxy growth accelerates step-flow growth. In addition, it is also shown that monolayer terraces composed of surface Ga atoms are formed from step edges during the Ga deposition process. A GaAs/AlAs tilted superlattice is established using this growth technique. X-ray diffraction measurement and transmission electron microscopy observations show that the fabricated structure has periodic composition modulation along the axis tilted from the substrate azimuth.

  12. Ehrlich-Schwöbel barriers and adsorption of Au, Cu and Ag stepped (100) surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benlattar, M.; Elkoraychy, E.; Sbiaai, K.; Mazroui, M.; Boughaleb, Y.

    2017-02-01

    We use a combination of quenched molecular dynamics and embedded atom method to calculate the activation energy barriers for the hopping and exchange mechanisms of Au, Ag or Cu on Au(100), Ag(100) or Cu(100) stepped surfaces. Our findings show that the Ehrlich-Schwöbel (ES) barriers for an adatom to undergo jump or exchange at a step edge are found to be dependent of the nature of substrate stepped surfaces. We also find that the ES barriers for the hopping processes are too high, except for Cu/Au(100). While for exchange process the Ehrlich-Schwöbel barriers are found to be very low and even negative. These ES barriers can explain the difference in the growth modes for the different systems. On the other hand, we calculated the adsorption energies at the most stable adsorption sites near step edges. In particular, we wish to clarify the relation between the adatom diffusion energy barriers and the adatom adsorption energies. These results may serve as some guiding rules for studying stepped surface morphologies, which are of importance to surface nanoengineering.

  13. Ethylene adsorption on regularly stepped copper surface: C 2H 4 on Cu(210)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamazaki, Daichi; Okada, Michio; Franco, Francisco C., Jr.; Kasai, Toshio

    2011-05-01

    Ethylene adsorption on regularly stepped Cu(210) surface was investigated with infrared reflection-adsorption spectroscopy and temperature programmed desorption. At 90 K, π-bonded ethylene was adsorbed on Cu(210) molecularly and all species were desorbed below 160 K. There were three types of π-bonded ethylene on the surface. Recent experimental studies have suggested that ethylene is dehydrogenated on Cu(410) due to the regular step [Kravchuk et al ., J. Phys. Chem. C, 113 (2009) 20881]. However, neither the formation of di-σ-bonded ethylene nor dehydrogenation occurred on Cu(210).

  14. PLATINUM AND FUEL CELLS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Platinum requirements for fuel cell vehicles (FCVS) have been identified as a concern and possible problem with FCV market penetration. Platinum is a necessary component of the electrodes of fuel cell engines that power the vehicles. The platinum is deposited on porous electrodes...

  15. Adsorption of hydrogen atoms on Pd (211),(311) and (511) stepped defective surfaces

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    HOU Lu-bing; DENG Hui-qiu; HU Wang-yu

    2006-01-01

    Using embedded-atom-method potential for Pd and MORSE potential for the interaction between H and Pd atoms,the adsorption properties of H atoms on Pd (211),(311) and (511) stepped defective surfaces were calculated systematically. For Pd (311) surface,it is found that the four-fold hollow sites H4 are the preferable sites for H atoms being adsorbed on these Pd defective surfaces. The sites H4 are the most stable adsorbed sites and the three-fold hollow sites Hf and Hh are metastable ones. The calculated results are in reasonable agreement with the HREELS experiment results. For the (211) and (511) stepped defective surfaces of Pd,our calculation shows that the most stable adsorption sites are H5 and H2 respectively,both of them are four fold hollow sites.

  16. Implementation of variable time step stochastic dynamics for electronically inelastic gas-surface collisions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garrett, Bruce C.; Swaminathan, P. K.; Murthy, C. S.; Redmon, Michael J.

    1987-01-01

    A variable time step algorithm has been implemented for solving the stochastic equations of motion for gas-surface collisions. It has been tested for a simple model of electronically inelastic collisions with an insulator surface in which the phonon manifold acts as a heat bath and electronic states are localized. In addition to reproducing the accurate nuclear dynamics of the surface atoms, numerical calculations have shown the algorithm to yield accurate ensemble averages of physical observables such as electronic transition probabilities and total energy loss of the gas atom to the surface. This new algorithm offers a gain in efficieny of up to an order of magnitude compared to fixed time step integration.

  17. Adsorption of CO molecules on Rh low index and (331) stepped surfaces

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Zexin; PANG Xuehui; WANG Rui

    2004-01-01

    The 5-parameter Morse potential (for short 5-MP) of the interaction between C, O atom and Rh surface and the extended LEPS potential have been constructed, and the adsorption and diffusion of CO molecules on Rh low index surfaces and open rough Rh(331) stepped surface are investigated. This work puts forward the concept of vibration dactylogram property for molecular adsorption states. The calculation results and the analysis of vibration dactylogram show that there exists the commonness in the adsorption on Rh low index surfaces and Rh(331) stepped surface : with the increasing coverage, the top, bridge sites are adsorbed in perpendicularly in sequence, and the top sites are the steady adsorption sites and the bridge sites are the next. On (100) surface, CO molecules obtain the eigenvibration of 2009, 1946 cm-1 on the top and bridge sites respectively and the difference between the binding energy of above two sites is 0.09 eV; on (110) surface, CO molecules obtain the eigenvibration of 2019, 1961 cm-1 respectively; on (111) surface, CO molecules on the top、bridge and hollow sites produce the eigenvibration of 2000, 1912, 1894 cm-1 respectively, the binding energies of the three sites decrease in turn and the discrepancy between the top and bridge sites is 0.03 eV; on (331) surface, top and bridge sites between two equivalent top sites are adsorbed in, and then obtain the eigenvibration of 2018, 1987 cm-1; 1969, 1927 cm-1 respectively.

  18. Growth of Ceria Nano-Islands on a Stepped Au(788 Surface

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Teng Ma

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available The growth morphology and structure of ceria nano-islands on a stepped Au(788 surface has been investigated by scanning tunneling microscopy (STM and low-energy electron diffraction (LEED. Within the concept of physical vapor deposition, different kinetic routes have been employed to design ceria-Au inverse model catalysts with different ceria nanoparticle shapes and arrangements. A two-dimensional superlattice of ceria nano-islands with a relatively narrow size distribution (5 ± 2 nm2 has been generated on the Au(788 surface by the postoxidation method. This reflects the periodic anisotropy of the template surface and has been ascribed to the pinning of ceria clusters and thus nucleation on the fcc domains of the herringbone reconstruction on the Au terraces. In contrast, the reactive evaporation method yields ceria islands elongated in [01-1] direction, i.e., parallel to the step edges, with high aspect ratios (~6. Diffusion along the Au step edges of ceria clusters and their limited step crossing in conjunction with a growth front perpendicular to the step edges is tentatively proposed to control the ceria growth under reactive evaporation conditions. Both deposition recipes generate two-dimensional islands of CeO2(111-type O–Ce–O single and double trilayer structures for submonolayer coverages.

  19. Development of superhydrophobic surface on glass substrate by multi-step atmospheric pressure plasma treatment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Han, Duksun [Department of Applied Plasma Engineering, Chonbuk National University, 567 Baekje-daero, Deokjin-gu, Jeonju, Jeollabuk-do 561-756 (Korea, Republic of); Moon, Se Youn, E-mail: symoon@jbnu.ac.kr [Department of Applied Plasma Engineering, Chonbuk National University, 567 Baekje-daero, Deokjin-gu, Jeonju, Jeollabuk-do 561-756 (Korea, Republic of); Department of Quantum system Engineering, Chonbuk National University, 567 Baekje-daero, Deokjin-gu, Jeonju, Jeollabuk-do 561-756 (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-07-31

    Superhydrophobic surface was prepared on a glass by helium based CH{sub 4} and C{sub 4}F{sub 8} atmospheric pressure plasmas, and its water wettability was investigated by a water droplet contact angle method. The water droplet spread over on the untreated glasses that showed the initial hydrophilic property of the glass surface. Then, the static contact angles became about 85° and 98° after a single step CH{sub 4} plasma treatment and a single step C{sub 4}F{sub 8} plasma treatment, respectively. The contact angle was remarkably increased to 152°, indicating a superhydrophobic property, after a sequential multi-step CH{sub 4} and C{sub 4}F{sub 8} plasma treatment. From the X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and the field emission scanning electron microscope measurements, it was found that the physical morphologies and the chemical compositions were depending on the substrate materials, which were important factors for the superhydrophobicity. - Highlights: • Development of rapid and simple method for superhydrophobic surface • Effects of atmospheric pressure plasma for superhydrophobic surface preparation • Observation of chemical and physical surface modification by atmospheric pressure plasma • Effects of substrate properties for plasma–surface interaction.

  20. Surface structure of anatase TiO{sub 2}(001): Reconstruction, atomic steps, and domains

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liang, Yong; Gan, Shupan; Chambers, Scott A.; Altman, Eric I.

    2001-06-15

    The surface structure of anatase TiO{sub 2}(001) was investigated using scanning tunneling microscopy (STM), x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), reflection high-energy electron diffraction (RHEED), and low-energy electron diffraction (LEED). A two-domain (1{times}4)/(4{times}1) reconstruction, similar to those previously reported in LEED and ion scattering studies, was observed by STM and RHEED. This reconstruction was found to be stable not only from room temperature to 850{degree}C in ultrahigh vacuum and oxygen-rich environments, but also during the anatase film growth. High-resolution STM images obtained at positive sample biases revealed two types of atomic row within each surface unit cell, indicating different Ti-derived states at the surface. At the same time, XPS of the reconstructed surfaces showed no evidence of Ti{sup 3+}. Based on the STM, XPS, RHEED, and LEED results, an {open_quotes}added{close_quotes}-and-{open_quotes}missing{close_quotes}-row model is proposed to account for the (1{times}4) reconstruction. Atomic steps and their relationship to the population of (1{times}4) and (4{times}1) domains were also investigated. The results showed that for vicinal surfaces the domain population depended strongly on the overall surface step orientation. While populations of the (1{times}4) and the (4{times}1) domains were nearly equal on flat (001) surfaces, they became significantly lopsided on a surface with its normal 2{degree} away from the (001) direction, demonstrating a strong correlation between surface steps and domain population on vicinal surfaces.

  1. Surface Structure of Anatase TiO{sub 2}(001): Reconstruction, Atomic Steps, and Domains

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liang, Yong; Gan, Shupan; Chambers, Scott A.; Altman, Eric I.

    2001-06-15

    The surface structure of anatase TiO{sub 2}(001) was investigated using scanning tunneling microscopy (STM), x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), reflection high energy electron diffraction (RHEED), and low energy electron diffraction (LEED). A two-domain (1 x 4)/(4 x 1) reconstruction, similar to those previously reported in LEED and ion scattering studies, was observed by STM and RHEED. This reconstruction was found to be stable not only from room temperature to 850 C in ultra-high vacuum and oxygen rich environments, but also during the anatase film growth. High-resolution STM images obtained at positive sample biases revealed two types of atomic rows within each surface unit cell, indicating different Ti-derived states at the surface. At the same time, XPS of the reconstructed surfaces showed no evidence of Ti{sup 3+}. Based on the STM, XPS, RHEED, and LEED results, an ''added''-and-''missing''-row model is proposed to account for the (1 x 4) reconstruction. Atomic steps and their relationship to the population of (1 x 4) and (4 x 1) domains were also investigated. Results showed that for vicinal surfaces, the domain population depended strongly on the overall surface step orientation. While populations of the (1 x 4) and the (4 x 1) domains were nearly equal on the flat (001) surfaces, they became significantly lopsided on the surface with its normal 2{sup o} away from the (001) direction, demonstrating a strong correlation between surface steps and domain population on vicinal surfaces.

  2. Harmonically-Interacting Step Approach to the Relaxation Process of Vicinal Surface. II. The Relaxation Process Induced by the Step-Edge Diffusion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamamoto, Takao

    1999-09-01

    The relaxation processes of vicinal surface induced by the diffusion of adatoms along the step edge are analyzed by the Ginzburg-Landau-Langevin equation based on the harmonically-interacting step (HIS) picture.By the equation, the time evolutions of the step deformation width and the step fluctuation width are analyzed.For the relaxation process induced by the infinite-length step-edge diffusion, these quantities show the “universal” scaling behaviors.However, both of the universality and the scaling behavior disappear for the finite-length diffusion.To verify the results quantitatively, we performed the Monte-Carlo calculations for the solid-on-solid step terrace-step-kink model.The results from the Monte-Carlo calculations agree with the analytic results from the HIS picture very well.

  3. Methanol decomposition on low index and stepped CeO2 surfaces from GGA+U

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reimers, Walter G.; Branda, María M.

    2017-02-01

    GGA + U calculations have been carried out to study the complete methanol decomposition on the more stable Ceria surfaces, i.e. (111), (221), (331) and (110). These results have shown that the methanol adsorption is exothermic on oxidized as well as on the partially reduced surfaces though the adsorption energy is greater for the latest. The first dehydrogenation step of methanol is highly probable for all the studied sites with activation barriers smaller than 0.2 eV. The first dehydrogenation reaction could also occur by breaking the Csbnd H methyl bond, but we found that this reaction is very unlikely. Reaction and activation energies for the second dehydrogenation - from methoxy to formaldehyde, are very similar for perfect (111) and stepped surfaces but these activation barriers are not negligible, almost ten times as many the first step barriers. Next, the formaldehyde decomposition to formyl and CO species on perfect CeO2(111) have an important energetic cost, therefore these reactions could occur only on stepped surfaces.

  4. One-step polymer surface modification for minimizing drug, protein, and DNA adsorption in microanalytical systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Esben Kjær Unmack; Larsen, Niels Bent

    2013-01-01

    The non-specific adsorption of dissolved analytes strongly reduces the sensitivity and reliability in polymer microanalytical systems. Here, a one-step aqueous phase procedure modifies polymer material surfaces to strongly reduce their non-specific adsorption of a broad range of organic analytes ...... systems, including polystyrene (PS), cyclic olefin copolymer (COC), liquid crystalline polymer (LCP), and polyimide (PI)....

  5. Molecular N-2 chemisorption-specific adsorption on step defect sites on Pt surfaces

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tripa, C. Emil; Zubkov, T.S.; Yates, John T.

    1999-01-01

    Infrared reflection-absorption spectroscopy and density functional theory, within the generalized gradient approximation, were used to investigate both experimentally and theoretically N-2 chemisorption on stepped and smooth Pt surfaces. N-2 chemisorption was observed to occur only on the edge...

  6. Single-step spatial rotation error separation technique for the ultraprecision measurement of surface profiles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hou, Maosheng; Qiu, Lirong; Zhao, Weiqian; Wang, Fan; Liu, Entao; Ji, Lin

    2014-01-20

    To improve the measurement accuracy of the profilometer for large optical surfaces, a new single-step spatial rotation error separation technique (SSEST) is proposed to separate the surface profile error and spindle spatial rotation error, and a novel SSEST-based system for surface profile measurement is developed. In the process of separation, two sets of measured results at the ith measurement circle are obtained before and after the rotation of error separation table, the surface profile error and spatial rotation error of spindle can be determined using discrete Fourier-transform and harmonic analysis. Theoretical analyses and experimental results indicate that SSEST can accurately separate spatial rotation error of spindle from the measured surface profile results within the range of 1-100 upr and improve the accuracy of surface profile measurements.

  7. Stabilizing platinum in phosphoric acid fuel cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Remick, R. J.

    1981-10-01

    A carbon substrate for use in fabricating phosphoric acid fuel cell cathodes was modified by catalytic oxidation to stabilize the platinum catalyst by retarding the sintering of small platinum crystallites. Results of 100-hour operational tests confirmed that the rate of platinum surface area loss observed on catalytically oxidized supports was less than that observed with unmodified supports of the same starting material. Fuel cell electrodes fabricated from Vulcan XC-72R, which was modified by catalytic in a nitric oxide atmosphere, produced low platium sintering rates and high activity for the reduction of oxygen in the phosphoric acid environment.

  8. Infrared studies of gold nanochains on the Si(557) stepped surface

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vu Hoang, Chung; Klevenz, Markus; Lovrincic, Robert; Skibbe, Olaf; Neubrech, Frank; Pucci, Annemarie [Kirchhoff-Institut fuer Physik der Universitaet Heidelberg (Germany)

    2008-07-01

    Gold nanochains on Si(557) will be fabricated under ultra high vacuum conditions. The terraces of the stepped surface serve as one-dimensional diffusion channels, which leads to the formation of parallel monoatomic chains. Due to the appearance of metallic chains an anisotropic change of the conductivity of the substrate surface can be expected. The chain growth process and conductivity dependence versus gold composition will be investigated in-situ by using transmittance infrared spectroscopy (IRS) with light polarized parallel and perpendicular to the chains, respectively. IRS is a well-established method to observe conductivity changes on surfaces. The temperature dependent behaviour of gold chains will be studied as well.

  9. Local surface sampling step estimation for extracting boundaries of planar point clouds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brie, David; Bombardier, Vincent; Baeteman, Grégory; Bennis, Abdelhamid

    2016-09-01

    This paper presents a new approach to estimate the surface sampling step of planar point clouds acquired by Terrestrial Laser Scanner (TLS) which is varying with the distance to the surface and the angular positions. The local surface sampling step is obtained by doing a first order Taylor expansion of planar point coordinates. Then, it is shown how to use it in Delaunay-based boundary point extraction. The resulting approach, which is implemented in the ModiBuilding software, is applied to two facade point clouds of a building. The first is acquired with a single station and the second with two stations. In both cases, the proposed approach performs very accurately and appears to be robust to the variations of the point cloud density.

  10. BEP-relations for N2 dissociation over stepped transition metal and alloy surfaces

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fronczek-Munter, Ture Rønved; Bligaard, Thomas; Christensen, Claus H.

    2008-01-01

    We present density functional theory (DFT) calculations for N(2) dissociation on stepped face-centred cubic (211) surface slabs. By using the same crystal structure, the same adsorption site for atomic nitrogen, and the same transition-state bond length of N(2) over a range of pure metal surfaces...... is a general electronic structure effect, and that geometric effects are responsible for the scatter which is normally observed around the BEP line. The BEP relation is also shown to be valid for both surface and bulk alloys. The scatter is, however, larger than for the pure elements. This can be understood...... as a larger geometrical variance. To analyze the accuracy of the DFT calculations a detailed convergence study is performed for several adsorbates on stepped hexagonal close-packed and face-centred cubic Ru slabs....

  11. Nanometer-resolved mechanical properties around GaN crystal surface steps

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jörg Buchwald

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available The mechanical properties of surfaces and nanostructures deviate from their bulk counterparts due to surface stress and reduced dimensionality. Experimental indentation-based techniques present the challenge of measuring these effects, while avoiding artifacts caused by the measurement technique itself. We performed a molecular dynamics study to investigate the mechanical properties of a GaN step of only a few lattice constants step height and scrutinized its applicability to indentation experiments using a finite element approach (FEM. We show that the breakdown of half-space symmetry leads to an “artificial” reduction of the elastic properties of comparable lateral dimensions which overlays the effect of surface stress. Contact resonance atomic force microscopy (CR-AFM was used to compare the simulation results with experiments.

  12. Competition of terrace and step-edge sputtering under oblique-incidence ion impact on a stepped Pt(1 1 1) surface

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rosandi, Yudi [Fachbereich Physik, Technische Universitaet, 67663 Kaiserslautern (Germany); Redinger, Alex; Michely, Thomas [II. Physikalisches Institut, Universitaet zu Koeln, 50937 Koeln (Germany); Urbassek, Herbert M. [Fachbereich Physik, Technische Universitaet, 67663 Kaiserslautern (Germany)], E-mail: urbassek@rhrk.uni-kl.de

    2009-08-15

    Using molecular-dynamics simulation, we study the sputtering of a Pt(1 1 1) surface under oblique and glancing incidence 5 keV Ar ions. For incidence angles larger than a critical angle {theta}{sub c}, the projectile is reflected off the surface and the sputter yield is zero. We discuss the azimuth dependence of the critical angle {theta}{sub c} with the help of the surface corrugation felt by the impinging ion. If a step exists on the surface, sputtering occurs also for glancing incidence {theta}>{theta}{sub c}. We demonstrate that for realistic step densities, the total sputtering of a stepped surface may be sizable even at glancing incidence.

  13. One-step fabrication of near superhydrophobic aluminum surface by nanosecond laser ablation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jagdheesh, R.; García-Ballesteros, J. J.; Ocaña, J. L.

    2016-06-01

    Inspired by the micro and nano structures of biological surface such as lotus leaf, rice leaves, etc. a functional near superhydrophobic surface of pure aluminum has been fabricated using one-step nanosecond laser processing. Thin aluminum sheets are micro-patterned with ultraviolet laser pulses to create near superhydrophobic surface in one-step direct laser writing technique. The impact of number of pulses/microhole with respect to the geometry and static contact angle measurements has been investigated. The microstructure shows the formation of blind microholes along with the micro-wall by laser processing, which improves the composite interface between the three phases such as water, air and solid, thus enhance the wetting property of the surface. The geometrical changes are supported by the chemical changes induced on the surface for improving the degree of hydrophobicity. Laser processed microholes exhibited near superhydrophobic surface with SCA measurement of 148 ± 3°. The static contact angle values are very consistent for repeated measurement at same area and across the laser patterned surface.

  14. Atomic step-and-terrace surface of polyimide sheet for advanced polymer substrate engineering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, G.; Shimada, K.; Nozawa, Y.; Kaneko, S.; Urakami, T.; Koyama, K.; Komura, M.; Matsuda, A.; Yoshimoto, M.

    2016-07-01

    Typical thermostable and flexible polyimide polymers exhibit many excellent properties such as strong mechanical and chemical resistance. However, in contrast to single-crystal substrates like silicon or sapphire, polymers mostly display disordered and rough surfaces, which may result in instability and degradation of the interfaces between thin films and polymer substrates. As a step toward the development of next-generation polymer substrates, we here report single-atom-layer imprinting onto the polyimide sheets, resulting in an ultrasmooth 0.3 nm high atomic step-and-terrace surface on the polyimides. The ultrasmooth polymer substrates are expected to be applied to the fabrication of nanostructures such as superlattices, nanowires, or quantum dots in nanoscale-controlled electronic devices. We fabricate smooth and atomically stepped indium tin oxide transparent conducting oxide thin films on the imprinted polyimide sheets for future use in organic-based optoelectronic devices processed with nanoscale precision. Furthermore, toward 2D polymer substrate nanoengineering, we demonstrate nanoscale letter writing on the atomic step-and-terrace polyimide surface via atomic force microscopy probe scratching.

  15. 2-Methoxycycloocta-1,5-dienyl platinum complexes as precursors for platinum nanoparticles

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Ninad Ghavale; Sandip Dey; Vimal K Jain; R Tewari

    2009-02-01

    Thermolysis of [Pt2 (-OR)2 (C8H12OMe)2] (R = Me or Ac) in hexadecylamine (HDA) at 210°C under argon atmosphere gave platinum nanoparticles which were characterized by XRD, EDAX and TEM analysis. Both spherical (∼ 10 nm) and rod-like (∼ 19 nm length with aspect ratio of 2.3) face centred cubic (fcc) platinum metal nanoparticles could be isolated. The thermogravimetric analyses of these complexes revealed that they undergo a single step decomposition leading to the formation of platinum metal powder.

  16. Atomistic simulations of calcium uranyl(VI) carbonate adsorption on calcite and stepped-calcite surfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doudou, Slimane; Vaughan, David J; Livens, Francis R; Burton, Neil A

    2012-07-17

    Adsorption of actinyl ions onto mineral surfaces is one of the main mechanisms that control the migration of these ions in environmental systems. Here, we present computational classical molecular dynamics (MD) simulations to investigate the behavior of U(VI) in contact with different calcite surfaces. The calcium-uranyl-carbonate [Ca(2)UO(2)(CO(3))(3)] species is shown to display both inner- and outer-sphere adsorption to the flat {101̅4} and the stepped {314̅8} and {31̅2̅16} planes of calcite. Free energy calculations, using the umbrella sampling method, are employed to simulate adsorption paths of the same uranyl species on the different calcite surfaces under aqueous condition. Outer-sphere adsorption is found to dominate over inner-sphere adsorption because of the high free energy barrier of removing a uranyl-carbonate interaction and replacing it with a new uranyl-surface interaction. An important binding mode is proposed involving a single vicinal water monolayer between the surface and the sorbed complex. From the free energy profiles of the different calcite surfaces, the uranyl complex was also found to adsorb preferentially on the acute-stepped {314̅8} face of calcite, in agreement with experiment.

  17. Synthesis of nanosized platinum based catalyst using sol-gel process

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ingale, S. V.; Wagh, P. B.; Bandyopadhyay, D.; Singh, I. K.; Tewari, R.; Gupta, S. C.

    2015-02-01

    The nano-sized platinum based catalysts using high surface area silica support have been prepared by sol-gel method. Tetramethoxysilane (TMOS) diluted in methanol was hydrolyzed to form a porous silica gel. Platinum (2%) was loaded at sol state using platinum chloride solution. After gelation, the solvent from the gel pores was extracted at ambient temperature which resulted in porous silica matrix incorporated with nanosized platinum. X-ray diffraction studies indicated the presence of elemental platinum in the silica-platinum composites. Transmission electron microscopy of the platinum -silica composites revealed that nanosized platinum particles of about 5-10 nm are homogeneously dispersed in silica matrix. Chemisorptions studies showed high dispersion (more than 50%) of platinum on silica support with specific surface area of 400 m2/g which puts them as promising candidates as catalyst in heterogeneous reactions.

  18. Nearly Perfect Durable Superhydrophobic Surfaces Fabricated by a Simple One-Step Plasma Treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ryu, Jeongeun; Kim, Kiwoong; Park, JooYoung; Hwang, Bae Geun; Ko, YoungChul; Kim, HyunJoo; Han, JeongSu; Seo, EungRyeol; Park, YongJong; Lee, Sang Joon

    2017-05-16

    Fabrication of superhydrophobic surfaces is an area of great interest because it can be applicable to various engineering fields. A simple, safe and inexpensive fabrication process is required to fabricate applicable superhydrophobic surfaces. In this study, we developed a facile fabrication method of nearly perfect superhydrophobic surfaces through plasma treatment with argon and oxygen gases. A polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE) sheet was selected as a substrate material. We optimized the fabrication parameters to produce superhydrophobic surfaces of superior performance using the Taguchi method. The contact angle of the pristine PTFE surface is approximately 111.0° ± 2.4°, with a sliding angle of 12.3° ± 6.4°. After the plasma treatment, nano-sized spherical tips, which looked like crown-structures, were created. This PTFE sheet exhibits the maximum contact angle of 178.9°, with a sliding angle less than 1°. As a result, this superhydrophobic surface requires a small external force to detach water droplets dripped on the surface. The contact angle of the fabricated superhydrophobic surface is almost retained, even after performing an air-aging test for 80 days and a droplet impacting test for 6 h. This fabrication method can provide superb superhydrophobic surface using simple one-step plasma etching.

  19. One-step synthesis of silver nanoparticles, nanorods, and nanowires on the surface of DNA network.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Gang; Zhou, Hualan; Liu, Zhiguo; Song, Yonghai; Wang, Li; Sun, Lanlan; Li, Zhuang

    2005-05-12

    Here, we describe a one-step synthesis of silver nanoparticles, nanorods, and nanowires on DNA network surface in the absence of surfactant. Silver ions were first adsorbed onto the DNA network and then reduced in sodium borohydride solution. Silver nanoparticles, nanorods, and nanowires were formed by controlling the size of pores of the DNA network. The diameter of the silver nanoparticles and the aspect ratio of the silver nanorods and nanowires can be controlled by adjusting the DNA concentration and reduction time.

  20. Polarization dependent formation of femtosecond laser-induced periodic surface structures near stepped features

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murphy, Ryan D.; Torralva, Ben; Adams, David P.; Yalisove, Steven M.

    2014-06-01

    Laser-induced periodic surface structures (LIPSS) are formed near 110 nm-tall Au microstructured edges on Si substrates after single-pulse femtosecond irradiation with a 150 fs pulse centered near a 780 nm wavelength. We investigate the contributions of Fresnel diffraction from step-edges and surface plasmon polariton (SPP) excitation to LIPSS formation on Au and Si surfaces. For certain laser polarization vector orientations, LIPSS formation is dominated by SPP excitation; however, when SPP excitation is minimized, Fresnel diffraction dominates. The LIPSS orientation and period distributions are shown to depend on which mechanism is activated. These results support previous observations of the laser polarization vector influencing LIPSS formation on bulk surfaces.

  1. Polarization dependent formation of femtosecond laser-induced periodic surface structures near stepped features

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Murphy, Ryan D. [Applied Physics Program, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan 48109 (United States); Torralva, Ben [Department of Atmospheric, Oceanic and Space Sciences, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan 48109 (United States); Adams, David P. [Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque, New Mexico 87123 (United States); Yalisove, Steven M. [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan 48109 (United States)

    2014-06-09

    Laser-induced periodic surface structures (LIPSS) are formed near 110 nm-tall Au microstructured edges on Si substrates after single-pulse femtosecond irradiation with a 150 fs pulse centered near a 780 nm wavelength. We investigate the contributions of Fresnel diffraction from step-edges and surface plasmon polariton (SPP) excitation to LIPSS formation on Au and Si surfaces. For certain laser polarization vector orientations, LIPSS formation is dominated by SPP excitation; however, when SPP excitation is minimized, Fresnel diffraction dominates. The LIPSS orientation and period distributions are shown to depend on which mechanism is activated. These results support previous observations of the laser polarization vector influencing LIPSS formation on bulk surfaces.

  2. One-step Fabrication of Nanoporous Black Silicon Surfaces for Solar Cells using Modified Etching Solution

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ye-hua Tang; Chun-lan Zhou; Su Zhou; Yan Zhao; Wen-jing Wang; Jian-ming Fei; Hong-bin Cao

    2013-01-01

    Currently,a conventional two-step method has been used to generate black silicon (BS)surfaces on silicon substrates for solar cell manufacturing.However,the performances of the solar cell made with such surface generation method are poor,because of the high surface recombination caused by deep etching in the conventional surface generation method for BS.In this work,a modified wet chemical etching solution with additives was developed.A zhomogeneous BS layer with random porous structure was obtained from the modified solution in only one step at room temperature.The BS layer had low reflectivity and shallow etching depth.The additive in the etch solution performs the function of pH-modulation.After 16-min etching,the etching depth in the samples was approximately 200 nm,and the spectrum-weighted-reflectivity in the range from 300 nm to 1200 nm was below 5%,BS solar cells were fabricated in the production line.The decreased etching depth can improve the electrical performance of solar cells because of the decrease in surface recombination.An efficiency of 15,63% for the modified etching BS solar cells was achieved on a large area,ptype single crystalline silicon substrate with a 624.32-mV open circuit voltage and a 77.88%fill factor.

  3. One-step process for superhydrophobic metallic surfaces by wire electrical discharge machining.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bae, Won Gyu; Song, Ki Young; Rahmawan, Yudi; Chu, Chong Nam; Kim, Dookon; Chung, Do Kwan; Suh, Kahp Y

    2012-07-25

    We present a direct one-step method to fabricate dual-scale superhydrophobic metallic surfaces using wire electrical discharge machining (WEDM). A dual-scale structure was spontaneously formed by the nature of exfoliation characteristic of Al 7075 alloy surface during WEDM process. A primary microscale sinusoidal pattern was formed via a programmed WEDM process, with the wavelength in the range of 200 to 500 μm. Notably, a secondary roughness in the form of microcraters (average roughness, Ra: 4.16 to 0.41 μm) was generated during the exfoliation process without additional chemical treatment. The low surface energy of Al 7075 alloy (γ = 30.65 mJ/m(2)) together with the presence of dual-scale structures appears to contribute to the observed superhydrophobicity with a static contact angle of 156° and a hysteresis less than 3°. To explain the wetting characteristics on dual-scale structures, we used a simple theoretical model. It was found that Cassie state is likely to present on the secondary roughness in all fabricated surfaces. On the other hand, either Wenzel or Cassie state can present on the primary roughness depending on the characteristic length of sinusoidal pattern. In an optimal condition of the serial cutting steps with applied powers of ∼30 and ∼8 kW, respectively, a stable, superhydrophobic metallic surface was created with a sinusoidal pattern of 500 μm wavelength.

  4. Transparent, superhydrophobic surfaces from one-step spin coating of hydrophobic nanoparticles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Lebo; Karunakaran, Raghuraman G; Guo, Jia; Yang, Shu

    2012-02-01

    We study the nonwettability and transparency from the assembly of fluorosilane modified silica nanoparticles (F-SiO(2) NPs) via one-step spin-coating and dip-coating without any surface postpassivation steps. When spin-coating the hydrophobic NPs (100 nm in diameter) at a concentration ≥ 0.8 wt % in a fluorinated solvent, the surface exhibited superhydrophobicity with an advancing water contact angle greater than 150° and a water droplet (5 μL) roll-off angle less than 5°. In comparison, superhydrophobicity was not achieved by dip-coating the same hydrophobic NPs. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and atomic force microscopy (AFM) images revealed that NPs formed a nearly close-packed assembly in the superhydrophobic films, which effectively minimized the exposure of the underlying substrate while offering sufficiently trapped air pockets. In the dip-coated films, however, the surface coverage was rather random and incomplete. Therefore, the underlying substrate was exposed and water was able to impregnate between the NPs, leading to smaller water contact angle and larger water contact angle hysteresis. The spin-coated superhydrophobic film was also highly transparent with greater than 95% transmittance in the visible region. Further, we demonstrated that the one-step coating strategy could be extended to different polymeric substrates, including poly(methyl methacrylate) and polyester fabrics, to achieve superhydrophobicity.

  5. A rapid one-step electrodeposition process for fabrication of superhydrobic surfaces on anode and cathode

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    郝丽梅; 闫小乐; 解忧; 张涛; 陈志

    2016-01-01

    This work presents a method to solve the weak solubility of zinc chloride (ZnCl2) in the ethanol by adding some reasonable water into an ethanol electrolyte containing ZnCl2and myristic acid (CH3(CH2)12COOH). A rapid one-step electrodeposition process was developed to fabricate anodic (2.5 min) and cathodic (40 s) superhydrophobic surfaces of copper substrate (contact angle more than 150°) in an aqueous ethanol electrolyte. Morphology, composition, chemical structure and superhydrophobicity of these superhydrophobic surfaces were investigated by SEM, FTIR, XRD, and contact angle measurement, respectively. The results indicate that water ratio of the electrolyte can reduce the required deposition time, superhydrophobic surface needs over 30 min with anhydrous electrolyte, while it needs only 2.5 min with electrolyte including 10 mL water, and the maximum contact angle of anodic surface is 166° and that of the cathodic surface is 168°. Two copper electrode surfaces have different reactions in the process of electrodeposition time, and the anodic copper surface covers copper myristate (Cu[CH3(CH2)12COO]2) and cupric chloride (CuCl); while, zinc myristate (Zn[CH3(CH2)12COO]2) and pure zinc (Zn) appear on the cathodic surface.

  6. One-step electrodeposition process to fabricate corrosion-resistant superhydrophobic surface on magnesium alloy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Qin; Chen, Dexin; Kang, Zhixin

    2015-01-28

    A simple, one-step method has been developed to construct a superhydrophobic surface by electrodepositing Mg-Mn-Ce magnesium plate in an ethanol solution containing cerium nitrate hexahydrate and myristic acid. Scanning electron microscopy, energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy were employed to characterize the surfaces. The shortest electrodeposition time to obtain a superhydrophobic surface was about 1 min, and the as-prepared superhydrophobic surfaces had a maximum contact angle of 159.8° and a sliding angle of less than 2°. Potentiodynamic polarization and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy measurements demonstrated that the superhydrophobic surface greatly improved the corrosion properties of magnesium alloy in 3.5 wt % aqueous solutions of NaCl, Na2SO4, NaClO3, and NaNO3. Besides, the chemical stability and mechanical durability of the as-prepared superhydrophobic surface were also examined. The presented method is rapid, low-cost, and environmentally friendly and thus should be of significant value for the industrial fabrication of anticorrosive superhydrophobic surfaces and should have a promising future in expanding the applications of magnesium alloys.

  7. Behaviour of palladium(II), platinum(IV), and rhodium(III) in artificial and natural waters: influence of reactor surface and geochemistry on metal recovery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cobelo-Garcia, Antonio; Turner, Andrew; Millward, Geoffrey E; Couceiro, Fay

    2007-03-07

    The recovery of dissolved platinum group elements (PGE: Pd(II), Pt(IV) and Rh(III)) added to Milli-Q water, artificial freshwater and seawater and filtered natural waters has been studied, as a function of pH and PGE concentration, in containers of varying synthetic composition. The least adsorptive and/or precipitative loss was obtained for borosilicate glass under most of the conditions employed, whereas the greatest loss was obtained for low-density polyethylene. Of the polymeric materials tested, the adsorptive and/or precipitative loss of PGE was lowest for fluorinated ethylene propylene (Teflon). The loss of Pd(II) in freshwater was significant due to its affinity for surface adsorption and its relatively low solubility. The presence of natural dissolved organic matter increases the recovery of Pd(II) but enhances the loss of Pt(IV). The loss of Rh(III) in seawater was significant and was mainly due to precipitation, whereas Pd(II) recovery was enhanced, compared to freshwater, because of its complexation with chloride. The results have important implications regarding protocols employed for sample preservation and controlled laboratory experiments used in the study of the speciation and biogeochemical behaviour of PGE.

  8. The structure and reactivity of adsorbates on stepped Rh and Pt surfaces investigated by LEED, HREELS, TPD, XPS and STM

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Batteas, J.D. [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States). Dept. of Chemistry]|[Lawrence Berkeley Lab., CA (United States). Materials Science Div.

    1995-06-01

    Defects on surfaces such as steps play an important role in surface chemistry. In order to obtain an understanding of the influence of steps in surface chemical reactions, the structure and reactivity of small molecules (O{sub 2}, CO, H{sub 2}S, and C{sub 2}H{sub 4}) on atomically stepped surfaces of RH and Pt have been investigated. The detailed structures of CO and oxygen bonded to the Rh(110) surface were determined. The CO molecules bond near the short bridge sites with the CO molecular axis tilted approximately 24{degree} from the surface normal. Oxygen atoms are bound asymmetrically in the 3-fold fcc hollow-sites to the (111) facets of the steps. The interactions of CO and oxygen on the Rh(311) surface were examined. The reaction of CO with the ordered phases of O shows two distinct reaction channels, a low temperature reaction limited channel (200 K) and a high temperature diffusion limited channel (350 K). Models of the reaction geometry and dynamics are proposed. The thermal decomposition of ethylene was examined on the Rh(311) surface. The stable decomposition species (C{sub 2}H, CH and C{sub 2}) are formed near 300 K, approximately 100 K lower on the stepped Rh(311) than on the flatter Rh(111) surface. The formation of these species at lower temperatures is attributed to the stepped nature of the surface. Finally, in situ STM was used to examine surface structural changes of a stepped Pt(111) crystal under coadsorption of sulfur and CO. This is the first direct evidence for a new mechanism by which a surface covered with an unreactive, strongly chemisorbed overlayer can form new sites, for bonding and reactions to occur, by massive surface restructuring at the step edges. This new surface phenomenon answers some of the puzzles of metal surface catalysis and its implications are described. 278 refs.

  9. Controlled surface segregation leads to efficient coke-resistant nickel/platinum bimetallic catalysts for the dry reforming of methane

    KAUST Repository

    Li, Lidong

    2015-02-03

    Surface composition and structure are of vital importance for heterogeneous catalysts, especially for bimetallic catalysts, which often vary as a function of reaction conditions (known as surface segregation). The preparation of bimetallic catalysts with controlled metal surface composition and structure is very challenging. In this study, we synthesize a series of Ni/Pt bimetallic catalysts with controlled metal surface composition and structure using a method derived from surface organometallic chemistry. The evolution of the surface composition and structure of the obtained bimetallic catalysts under simulated reaction conditions is investigated by various techniques, which include CO-probe IR spectroscopy, high-angle annular dark-field scanning transmission electron microscopy, energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy, extended X-ray absorption fine structure analysis, X-ray absorption near-edge structure analysis, XRD, and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. It is demonstrated that the structure of the bimetallic catalyst is evolved from Pt monolayer island-modified Ni nanoparticles to core-shell bimetallic nanoparticles composed of a Ni-rich core and a Ni/Pt alloy shell upon thermal treatment. These catalysts are active for the dry reforming of methane, and their catalytic activities, stabilities, and carbon formation vary with their surface composition and structure. The reform of reforming: A series of alumina-supported Ni/Pt bimetallic nanoparticles (NPs) with controlled surface composition and structure are prepared. Remarkable surface segregation for these bimetallic NPs is observed upon thermal treatment. These bimetallic NPs are active catalysts for CO2 reforming of CH4, and their catalytic activities, stabilities, and carbon formation vary with their surface composition and structure.

  10. Creeping Ray Tracing Algorithm for Arbitrary NURBS Surfaces Based on Adaptive Variable Step Euler Method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Song Fu

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Although the uniform theory of diffraction (UTD could be theoretically applied to arbitrarilyshaped convex objects modeled by nonuniform rational B-splines (NURBS, one of the great challenges in calculation of the UTD surface diffracted fields is the difficulty in determining the geodesic paths along which the creeping waves propagate on arbitrarilyshaped NURBS surfaces. In differential geometry, geodesic paths satisfy geodesic differential equation (GDE. Hence, in this paper, a general and efficient adaptive variable step Euler method is introduced for solving the GDE on arbitrarilyshaped NURBS surfaces. In contrast with conventional Euler method, the proposed method employs a shape factor (SF ξ to efficiently enhance the accuracy of tracing and extends the application of UTD for practical engineering. The validity and usefulness of the algorithm can be verified by the numerical results.

  11. Controlled Surface Segregation Leads to Efficient Coke-Resistant Nickel/Platinum Bimetallic Catalysts for the Dry Reforming of Methane

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Lidong [King Abdullah Univ. of Science and Technology, Thuwal (Saudi Arabia); Zhou, Lu [King Abdullah Univ. of Science and Technology, Thuwal (Saudi Arabia); Ould-Chikh, Samy [King Abdullah Univ. of Science and Technology, Thuwal (Saudi Arabia); Anjum, Dalaver H. [King Abdullah Univ. of Science and Technology, Thuwal (Saudi Arabia); Kanoun, Mohammed B. [King Abdullah Univ. of Science and Technology, Thuwal (Saudi Arabia); Scaranto, Jessica [SABIC Corporate Research and Innovation Center, Thuwal (Saudi Arabia); Hedhili, Mohamed N. [King Abdullah Univ. of Science and Technology, Thuwal (Saudi Arabia); Khalid, Syed [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Laveille, Paco V. [King Abdullah Univ. of Science and Technology, Thuwal (Saudi Arabia); D' Souza, Lawrence [SABIC Corporate Research and Innovation Center, Thuwal (Saudi Arabia); Clo, Alain [King Abdullah Univ. of Science and Technology, Thuwal (Saudi Arabia); Basset, Jean-Marie [King Abdullah Univ. of Science and Technology, Thuwal (Saudi Arabia)

    2015-02-03

    The surface composition and structure are of vital importance for heterogeneous catalysts, especially for bimetallic catalysts, which often vary as a function of reaction conditions (known as surface segregation). The preparation of bimetallic catalysts with controlled metal surface composition and structure is very challenging. In this study, we synthesize a series of Ni/Pt bimetallic catalysts with controlled metal surface composition and structure using a method derived from surface organometallic chemistry. Moreover, the evolution of the surface composition and structure of the obtained bimetallic catalysts under simulated reaction conditions is investigated by various techniques, which include CO-probe IR spectroscopy, high-angle annular dark-field scanning transmission electron microscopy, energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy, extended X-ray absorption fine structure analysis, X-ray absorption near-edge structure analysis, XRD, and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. It is demonstrated that the structure of the bimetallic catalyst is evolved from Pt monolayer island-modified Ni nanoparticles to core–shell bimetallic nanoparticles composed of a Ni-rich core and a Ni/Pt alloy shell upon thermal treatment. The catalysts are active for the dry reforming of methane, and their catalytic activities, stabilities, and carbon formation vary with their surface composition and structure.

  12. Two-Step Process To Create "Roll-Off" Superamphiphobic Paper Surfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Lu; Tang, Zhenguan; Clinton, Rahmat M; Breedveld, Victor; Hess, Dennis W

    2017-03-15

    Surface modification of cellulose-based paper, which displays roll-off properties for water and oils (surface tension ≥23.8 mN·m(-1)) and good repellency toward n-heptane (20.1 mN·m(-1)), is reported. Droplets of water, diiodomethane, motor oil, hexadecane, and decane all "bead up", i.e., exhibit high contact angles, and roll off the treated surface under the influence of gravity. Unlike widely used approaches that rely on the deposition of nanoparticles or electrospun nanofibers to create superamphiphobic surfaces, our method generates a hierarchical structure as an inherent property of the substrate and displays good adhesion between the film and substrate. The two-step combination of plasma etching and vapor deposition used in this study enables fine-tuning of the nanoscale roughness and thereby facilitates enhanced fundamental understanding of the effect of micro- and nanoscale roughness on the paper wetting properties. The surfaces maintain their "roll-off" properties after dynamic impact tests, demonstrating their mechanical robustness. Furthermore, the superamphiphobic paper has high gas permeability due to pore-volume enhancement by plasma etching but maintains the mechanical flexibility and strength of untreated paper, despite the presence of nanostructures. The unique combination of the chemical and physical properties of the resulting superamphiphobic paper is of practical interest for a range of applications such as breathable and disposable medical apparel, antifouling biomedical devices, antifingerprint paper, liquid packaging, microfluidic devices, and medical testing strips through a simple surface etching plus coating process.

  13. The surface temperatures of the earth: steps towards integrated understanding of variability and change

    Science.gov (United States)

    Merchant, C. J.; Matthiesen, S.; Rayner, N. A.; Remedios, J. J.; Jones, P. D.; Olesen, F.; Trewin, B.; Thorne, P. W.; Auchmann, R.; Corlett, G. K.; Guillevic, P. C.; Hulley, G. C.

    2013-06-01

    Surface temperature is a key aspect of weather and climate, but the term may refer to different quantities that play interconnected roles and are observed by different means. In a community-based activity in June 2012, the EarthTemp Network brought together 55 researchers from five continents to improve the interaction between scientific communities who focus on surface temperature in particular domains, to exploit the strengths of different observing systems and to better meet the needs of different communities. The workshop identified key needs for progress towards meeting scientific and societal requirements for surface temperature understanding and information which are presented in this community paper. A "whole-Earth" perspective is required with more integrated, collaborative approaches to observing and understanding Earth's various surface temperatures. It is necessary to build understanding of the relationships between different surface temperatures, where presently inadequate, and undertake large-scale systematic intercomparisons. Datasets need to be easier to obtain and exploit for a wide constituency of users, with the differences and complementarities communicated in readily understood terms, and realistic and consistent uncertainty information provided. Steps were also recommended to curate and make available data that are presently inaccessible, develop new observing systems and build capacities to accelerate progress in the accuracy and usability of surface temperature datasets.

  14. The surface temperatures of Earth: steps towards integrated understanding of variability and change

    Science.gov (United States)

    Merchant, C. J.; Matthiesen, S.; Rayner, N. A.; Remedios, J. J.; Jones, P. D.; Olesen, F.; Trewin, B.; Thorne, P. W.; Auchmann, R.; Corlett, G. K.; Guillevic, P. C.; Hulley, G. C.

    2013-12-01

    Surface temperature is a key aspect of weather and climate, but the term may refer to different quantities that play interconnected roles and are observed by different means. In a community-based activity in June 2012, the EarthTemp Network brought together 55 researchers from five continents to improve the interaction between scientific communities who focus on surface temperature in particular domains, to exploit the strengths of different observing systems and to better meet the needs of different communities. The workshop identified key needs for progress towards meeting scientific and societal requirements for surface temperature understanding and information, which are presented in this community paper. A "whole-Earth" perspective is required with more integrated, collaborative approaches to observing and understanding Earth's various surface temperatures. It is necessary to build understanding of the relationships between different surface temperatures, where presently inadequate, and undertake large-scale systematic intercomparisons. Datasets need to be easier to obtain and exploit for a wide constituency of users, with the differences and complementarities communicated in readily understood terms, and realistic and consistent uncertainty information provided. Steps were also recommended to curate and make available data that are presently inaccessible, develop new observing systems and build capacities to accelerate progress in the accuracy and usability of surface temperature datasets.

  15. Detonation nanodiamonds biofunctionalization and immobilization to titanium alloy surfaces as first steps towards medical application.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonçalves, Juliana P L; Shaikh, Afnan Q; Reitzig, Manuela; Kovalenko, Daria A; Michael, Jan; Beutner, René; Cuniberti, Gianaurelio; Scharnweber, Dieter; Opitz, Jörg

    2014-01-01

    Due to their outstanding properties nanodiamonds are a promising nanoscale material in various applications such as microelectronics, polishing, optical monitoring, medicine and biotechnology. Beyond the typical diamond characteristics like extreme hardness or high thermal conductivity, they have additional benefits as intrinsic fluorescence due to lattice defects without photobleaching, obtained during the high pressure high temperature process. Further the carbon surface and its various functional groups in consequence of the synthesis, facilitate additional chemical and biological modification. In this work we present our recent results on chemical modification of the nanodiamond surface with phosphate groups and their electrochemically assisted immobilization on titanium-based materials to increase adhesion at biomaterial surfaces. The starting material is detonation nanodiamond, which exhibits a heterogeneous surface due to the functional groups resulting from the nitrogen-rich explosives and the subsequent purification steps after detonation synthesis. Nanodiamond surfaces are chemically homogenized before proceeding with further functionalization. Suspensions of resulting surface-modified nanodiamonds are applied to the titanium alloy surfaces and the nanodiamonds subsequently fixed by electrochemical immobilization. Titanium and its alloys have been widely used in bone and dental implants for being a metal that is biocompatible with body tissues and able to bind with adjacent bone during healing. In order to improve titanium material properties towards biomedical applications the authors aim to increase adhesion to bone material by incorporating nanodiamonds into the implant surface, namely the anodically grown titanium dioxide layer. Differently functionalized nanodiamonds are characterized by infrared spectroscopy and the modified titanium alloys surfaces by scanning and transmission electron microscopy. The process described shows an adsorption and

  16. Detonation nanodiamonds biofunctionalization and immobilization to titanium alloy surfaces as first steps towards medical application

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juliana P. L. Gonçalves

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Due to their outstanding properties nanodiamonds are a promising nanoscale material in various applications such as microelectronics, polishing, optical monitoring, medicine and biotechnology. Beyond the typical diamond characteristics like extreme hardness or high thermal conductivity, they have additional benefits as intrinsic fluorescence due to lattice defects without photobleaching, obtained during the high pressure high temperature process. Further the carbon surface and its various functional groups in consequence of the synthesis, facilitate additional chemical and biological modification. In this work we present our recent results on chemical modification of the nanodiamond surface with phosphate groups and their electrochemically assisted immobilization on titanium-based materials to increase adhesion at biomaterial surfaces. The starting material is detonation nanodiamond, which exhibits a heterogeneous surface due to the functional groups resulting from the nitrogen-rich explosives and the subsequent purification steps after detonation synthesis. Nanodiamond surfaces are chemically homogenized before proceeding with further functionalization. Suspensions of resulting surface-modified nanodiamonds are applied to the titanium alloy surfaces and the nanodiamonds subsequently fixed by electrochemical immobilization. Titanium and its alloys have been widely used in bone and dental implants for being a metal that is biocompatible with body tissues and able to bind with adjacent bone during healing. In order to improve titanium material properties towards biomedical applications the authors aim to increase adhesion to bone material by incorporating nanodiamonds into the implant surface, namely the anodically grown titanium dioxide layer. Differently functionalized nanodiamonds are characterized by infrared spectroscopy and the modified titanium alloys surfaces by scanning and transmission electron microscopy. The process described shows an

  17. Theoretical insights into the effect of terrace width and step edge coverage on CO adsorption and dissociation over stepped Ni surfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Kuiwei; Zhang, Minhua; Yu, Yingzhe

    2017-07-21

    Vicinal surfaces of Ni are model catalysts of general interest and great importance in computational catalysis. Here we report a comprehensive study conducted with density functional theory on Ni[n(111) × (100)] (n = 2, 3 and 4) surfaces to explore the effect of terrace width and step edge coverage on CO adsorption and dissociation, a probe reaction relevant to many industrial processes. The coordination numbers (CN), the generalized coordination numbers and the d band partial density of states (d-PDOS) of Ni are identified as descriptors to faithfully reflect the difference of the step edge region for Ni[n(111) × (100)]. Based on analysis of the energy diagrams for CO activation and dissociation as well as the structural features of the Ni(311), Ni(211) and Ni(533) surfaces, Ni(211) (n = 3) is proposed as a model of adequate representativeness for Ni[n(111) × (100)] (n≥ 3) surface groups in investigating small molecule activation over such stepped structures. Further, a series of Ni(211) surfaces with the step edge coverage ranging from 1/4 to 1 monolayer (ML) were utilized to assess their effect on CO activation. The results show that CO adsorption is not sensitive to the step edge coverage, which could readily approach 1 ML under a CO-rich atmosphere. In contrast, CO dissociation manifests strong coverage dependence when the coverage exceeds 1/2 ML, indicating that significant adsorbate-adsorbate interactions emerge. These results are conducive to theoretical studies of metal-catalyzed surface processes where the defects play a vital role.

  18. Nucleation on a stepped surface with an Ehrlich-Schwöbel barrier

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chromcova, Z.; Tringides, M. C.; Chvoj, Z.

    2013-07-01

    During deposition on a stepped surface the growth mode depends on the conditions such as temperature T, deposition rate F and width of the terraces w. In this work we studied the influence of all the above mentioned characteristics using the kinetic Monte Carlo (kMC) technique. We concentrated on the conditions on the terrace at the moment of the first nucleation. The critical density of monomers for nucleation ηm decreases with the width of the terrace and the nucleation starts at surprisingly low densities of monomers. We tested several definitions of the critical width for nucleation wc used in various articles in the past and we compared our results with results of the analytical steady-state mean-field model (Ranguelov and Altman 2007 Phys. Rev. B 75 245419). To check how the simplified assumption about the steady-state regime during deposition influences the resulting dependence of wc ≃ (D/F)κ, we set and also solved a time-dependent analytical model. This analytical model as well as kMC predict that wc ≃ (D/F)1/5. kMC simulation also shows that the Ehrlich-Schwöbel barrier has only limited influence on the nucleation on the stepped surface at conditions close to the nucleation regime. For all widths of terraces there is a critical value of the Ehrlich-Schwöbel barrier \\Delta {E}_{{ES}}^{{c}}/{k}_{{B}}T\\sim 7.3 (\\Delta {E}_{{ES}}^{{c}}\\sim 0.1 1 eV at T = 175 K), and only below this critical value does the Ehrlich-Schwöbel barrier affect the final value of the density of nuclei. The results of the kMC are summarized in a semi-empirical analytical formula which describes the dependence of the step-flow growth and nucleation on the terrace width w, diffusion coefficient D and deposition rate F. In our simulations we tested two models of the stepped surface with different thicknesses of the step, both with an Ehrlich-Schwöbel barrier on the edge of the terrace.

  19. Behind platinum's sparkle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yam, Vivian W W

    2010-09-01

    As a rare and precious metal that is also resistant to wear and tarnish, platinum is known to be particularly well-suited to jewellery. Vivian Yam reflects on how, beyond its prestigious image, platinum has also found its way into a variety of fields ranging from the petrochemical to the pharmaceutical industry.

  20. Advacancy-mediated atomic steps kinetics and two-dimensional negative island nucleation on ultra-flat Si(111) surface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sitnikov, S. V.; Latyshev, A. V.; Kosolobov, S. S.

    2017-01-01

    We have investigated Si(111) surface morphology transformations during high-temperature sublimation and oxygen treatments by means of in situ ultrahigh vacuum reflection electron microscopy. By analyzing atomic steps kinetics and two-dimensional negative (vacancy) islands nucleation on ultra-flat Si(111) surface with extremely wide (up to 120 μm in size) terraces we have estimated the activation energy associated with the surface-bulk vacancy exchange processes. We show that atomic steps motion and negative islands nucleation kinetics at temperatures above 1180 °C can be described by the step-flow model of Burton, Cabrera and Frank taking into account advacancies formation. By comparing experimental results with predictions of model we conclude that the surface mass transport at temperatures above 1180 °C is governed by surface vacancies nucleation and interaction with atomic steps rather than via adatoms surface diffusion.

  1. Effect of surface steps on the microstructure of lateral composition modulation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    FOLLSTAEDT,DAVID M.; NORMAN,A.G.; RENO,JOHN L.; JONES,ERIC D.; TWESTEN,R.D.; LEE,STEPHEN R.; MOUTINHO,H.; MASCARENHAS,A.

    2000-03-23

    Growth of InAs/AlAs short-period superlattices on appropriately miscut (001) InP substrates is shown to alter the microstructure of composition modulation from a 2D organization of short compositionally enriched wires to a single dominant modulation direction and wire lengths up to {approximately}1 {micro}m. The effects of miscut are interpreted in terms of surface step orientation and character. The material is strongly modulated and exhibits intense optical emission. The 1D modulations appear potentially useful for new devices that take advantage of the preferred direction formed in the growth plane.

  2. The Surface Temperatures of the Earth: Steps towards Integrated Understanding of Variability and Change

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matthiesen, Stephan; Merchant, Chris; Rayner, Nick; Remedios, John; Høyer, Jacob L.; Jones, Phil; Olesen, Folke; Roquet, Hervé; Sobrino, José; Thorne, Peter

    2013-04-01

    Surface temperature is a key aspect of weather and climate, relevant to human health, agriculture and leisure, ecosystem services, infrastructure development and economic activity. In a community-based activity, the EarthTemp Network brought together 55 researchers from 5 continents to improve the interaction between scientific communities who focus on particular domains, to exploit the strengths of different observing systems and to better meet the needs of different communities. The Network idenitified key needs for progress towards meeting societal needs for surface temperature understanding and information, which will be reviewed and discussed in this contribution. A "whole-Earth" perspective is required with more integrated, collaborative approaches to observing and understanding Earth's various surface temperatures. It is necessary to build understanding of the relationships of different surface temperatures, where presently inadequate, and undertake large-scale systematic intercomparisons. Datasets need to be easier to obtain and exploit for a wide constituency of users, with the differences and complementarities communicated in readily understood terms, and realistic and consistent uncertainty information. Steps are also recommended to curate and make available data that are presently inaccessible, develop new observing systems and build capacities to accelerate progress in the accuracy and usability of surface temperature datasets.

  3. One-Step Synthesis of PEGylated Gold Nanoparticles with Tunable Surface Charge

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rares Stiufiuc

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The present work reports a rapid, simple and efficient one-step synthesis and detailed characterisation of stable aqueous colloids of gold nanoparticles (AuNPs coated with unmodified poly(ethyleneglycol (PEG molecules of different molecular weights and surface charges. By mixing and heating aqueous solutions of PEG with variable molecular chain and gold(III chloride hydrate (HAuCl4 in the presence of NaOH, we have successfully produced uniform colloidal 5 nm PEG coated AuNPs of spherical shape with tunable surface charge and an average diameter of 30 nm within a few minutes. It has been found out that PEGylated AuNPs provide optical enhancement of the characteristic vibrational bands of PEG molecules attached to the gold surface when they are excited with both visible (532 nm and NIR (785 nm laser lines. The surface enhanced Raman scattering (SERS signal does not depend on the length of the PEG molecular chain enveloping the AuNPs, and the stability of the colloid is not affected by the addition of concentrated salt solution (0.1 M NaCl, thus suggesting their potential use for in vitro and in vivo applications. Moreover, by gradually changing the chain length of the biopolymer, we were able to control nanoparticles’ surface charge from −28 to −2 mV, without any modification of the Raman enhancement properties and of the colloidal stability.

  4. A two-step process for controlling the surface smoothness of polyelectrolyte-based microcapsules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lacík, I; Anilkumar, A V; Wang, T G

    2001-01-01

    Biocompatibility is one of the crucial requirements to be fulfilled when designing devices for immunoisolation of transplanted cells. The quality of the capsule surface (smoothness/roughness) influences the nature of cell overgrowth on it by immunocytes, which eventually may lead to the transplant failure. A microcapsule has been developed based on the polyelectrolyte complexation of the polyanions sodium alginate and cellulose sulphate with the polycation poly(methylene-co-guanidine), which was successfully tested in rodent animal models. Recently, the principles for controlling the surface smoothness of these capsules has been identified. This paper reports on a two-step process used for production of stable capsules with improved surface properties. The methodology involves separating the process of drop shape recovery and precursor capsule formation from the process of membrane formation by applying a two-reactor design. The multi-loop reactors are connected in series, and the process separation is given by the different composition of cation solutions flowing in each reactor. This process enables one to prepare the microcapsule immunoisolation device, which can differ in the extent of surface roughness and, thus, is suitable for studying the effect of surface morphology of the immunoisolation device on cell overgrowth. The effect of this process on the capsule permeability has also been evaluated.

  5. Synthesis and Characteristics of Mesoporous Silica Aerogels with One-step Solvent Exchange/Surface Modification

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Lijiu; ZHAO Shanyu

    2009-01-01

    The synthesis procedures and physical properties of the ambient dried hydrophobic silica aerogels by using different contents of ethanol(EtOH)/trimethylchlorosilane(TMCS)/n-Hexane as surface modification agent were investigated.One-step solvent exchange and surface modification were simultaneously progressed by immersing silica hydrogels in EtOH/TMCS/n-Hexane solution.It is found that microstructures as well as properties of silica aerogels like porosity,specific density and specific surface area are affected by the contents of surface modification agent in the sol from the re-sults of SEM,TEM morphology,FT-IR chemical structure,BET surface area and BJH pore size analyses.The volume of TMCS is of 10%and 20%of hydrogels,and the final product is hydrophilic xerogels.When TMCS's percent(v/v)is elevated to 75%-100%,hydrophobic silica aerogels with good performance are synthesized,the porosities of aerogels are in the range of 93.5%-95.8%and the av-erage pore size diameter is less than 20 nm.

  6. Effect of Processing Steps on the Mechanical Properties and Surface Appearance of 6063 Aluminium Extruded Products

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juan Asensio-Lozano

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available 6063 aluminum anodized extrusions may exhibit a common surface defect known as streaking, characterized by the formation of narrow bands with a surface gloss different from the surrounding material. The origin of this banding lies in the differential surface topography produced after etching during the anodizing stage, shown to be connected to certain microstructural characteristics. The present study has attempted to determine the origin of these defects and measure the mechanical properties in these zones, properties which were either barely acceptable or did not meet the specification’s requirements. Quantitative metallography and mechanical testing, both tensile and microhardness, were used for materials assessment at the different steps of the process of manufacturing 6063 anodized extrusions. The results of this research show that nonequilibrium solidification rates during billet casting could lead to the formation of coarse eutectic Mg2Si particles which have a deleterious effect on both mechanical properties and surface appearance in the anodized condition. However, differences in the size and density of the coarse Mg2Si particles have been found to exist in the streak profile compared to the surrounding zones. The study revealed the importance of these particles in explaining the origin of the marginal or sub-marginal properties and anodizing surface defects found.

  7. Self-assembled monolayers of 1-alkenes on oxidized platinum surfaces as platforms for immobilized enzymes for biosensing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alonso, Jose Maria; Bielen, Abraham A. M.; Olthuis, Wouter; Kengen, Servé W. M.; Zuilhof, Han; Franssen, Maurice C. R.

    2016-10-01

    Alkene-based self-assembled monolayers grafted on oxidized Pt surfaces were used as a scaffold to covalently immobilize oxidase enzymes, with the aim to develop an amperometric biosensor platform. NH2-terminated organic layers were functionalized with either aldehyde (CHO) or N-hydroxysuccinimide (NHS) ester-derived groups, to provide anchoring points for enzyme immobilization. The functionalized Pt surfaces were characterized by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), static water contact angle (CA), infrared reflection absorption spectroscopy (IRRAS) and atomic force microscopy (AFM). Glucose oxidase (GOX) was covalently attached to the functionalized Pt electrodes, either with or without additional glutaraldehyde crosslinking. The responses of the acquired sensors to glucose concentrations ranging from 0.5 to 100 mM were monitored by chronoamperometry. Furthermore, lactate oxidase (LOX) and human hydroxyacid oxidase (HAOX) were successfully immobilized onto the PtOx surface platform. The performance of the resulting lactate sensors was investigated for lactate concentrations ranging from 0.05 to 20 mM. The successful attachment of active enzymes (GOX, LOX and HAOX) on Pt electrodes demonstrates that covalently functionalized PtOx surfaces provide a universal platform for the development of oxidase enzyme-based sensors.

  8. A facile reflux procedure to increase active surface sites form highly active and durable supported palladium@platinum bimetallic nanodendrites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Qin; Li, Yingjun; Liu, Baocang; Xu, Guangran; Zhang, Geng; Zhao, Qi; Zhang, Jun

    2015-11-01

    A series of well-dispersed bimetallic Pd@Pt nanodendrites uniformly supported on XC-72 carbon black are fabricated by using different capping agents. These capping agents are essential for the branched morphology control. However, the surfactant adsorbed on the nanodendrites surface blocks the access of reactant molecules to the active surface sites, and the catalytic activities of these bimetallic nanodendrites are significantly restricted. Herein, a facile reflux procedure to effectively remove the capping agent molecules without significantly affecting their sizes is reported for activating supported nanocatalysts. More significantly, the structure and morphology of the nanodendrites can also be retained, enhancing the numbers of active surface sites, catalytic activity and stability toward methanol and ethanol electro-oxidation reactions. The as-obtained hot water reflux-treated Pd@Pt/C catalyst manifests superior catalytic activity and stability both in terms of surface and mass specific activities, as compared to the untreated catalysts and the commercial Pt/C and Pd/C catalysts. We anticipate that this effective and facile removal method has more general applicability to highly active nanocatalysts prepared with various surfactants, and should lead to improvements in environmental protection and energy production.

  9. Ab initio study of Al(III) adsorption on stepped {100} surfaces of KDP crystals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Salter, E A; Wierzbicki, A; Land, T A

    2004-04-01

    Crystals of potassium dihydrogen phosphate (KH{sub 2}PO{sub 4}, KDP) are grown in large scale for use as nonlinear material in laser components. Traces of trivalent metal impurities are often added to the supernatant to achieve habit control during crystal growth, selectively inhibiting the growth of the {l_brace}100{r_brace} face. Model systems representing AlPO{sub 4}-doped KDP {l_brace}100{r_brace} stepped surfaces are prepared and studied using ab initio quantum methods. Results of Hartree-Fock partial optimizations are presented, including estimated energies of ion pair binding to the steps. We find that the PO{sub 4}{sup 3-} ion takes a position not unlike that of a standard phosphate in the crystal lattice, while the aluminum atom is displaced far from a K{sup +} ion position to establish coordinations with the PO{sub 4}{sup 3-} ion and to bind with another lattice-bound phosphate. Our optimized structures suggest that it is the formation of a fourth coordination of Al(III) to a third phosphate ion from solution, or perhaps from a nearby position in the lattice, that disrupts further deposition, pinning the steps.

  10. Self-assembled monolayers of 1-alkenes on oxidized platinum surfaces as platforms for immobilized enzymes for biosensing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alonso, Jose Maria; Bielen, Abraham A.M. [Laboratory of Organic Chemistry, Wageningen University, Dreijenplein 8, 6703 HB, Wageningen (Netherlands); Olthuis, Wouter [BIOS Lab on a Chip Group, MESA+ and MIRA Institutes, University of Twente, P.O. Box 217, 7500 AE Enschede (Netherlands); Kengen, Servé W.M. [Laboratory of Microbiology, Wageningen University, 6703HB Wageningen (Netherlands); Zuilhof, Han, E-mail: han.zuilhof@wur.nl [Laboratory of Organic Chemistry, Wageningen University, Dreijenplein 8, 6703 HB, Wageningen (Netherlands); Department of Chemical and Materials Engineering, King Abdulaziz University, Jeddah 22254 (Saudi Arabia); Franssen, Maurice C.R., E-mail: maurice.franssen@wur.nl [Laboratory of Organic Chemistry, Wageningen University, Dreijenplein 8, 6703 HB, Wageningen (Netherlands)

    2016-10-15

    Highlights: • Three different oxidases are covalently attached to alkene based SAMs on PtOx. • Attached enzymes remain active and their activity is assessed by chronoamperometry. • Functionalized PtOx allows electron mediator free chronoamperometry measurements. • The thus formed enzyme electrodes are useful as biosensors for glucose and lactate. • Immobilization of human HAOX foresees in vivo lactate monitoring in humans. - Abstract: Alkene-based self-assembled monolayers grafted on oxidized Pt surfaces were used as a scaffold to covalently immobilize oxidase enzymes, with the aim to develop an amperometric biosensor platform. NH{sub 2}-terminated organic layers were functionalized with either aldehyde (CHO) or N-hydroxysuccinimide (NHS) ester-derived groups, to provide anchoring points for enzyme immobilization. The functionalized Pt surfaces were characterized by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), static water contact angle (CA), infrared reflection absorption spectroscopy (IRRAS) and atomic force microscopy (AFM). Glucose oxidase (GOX) was covalently attached to the functionalized Pt electrodes, either with or without additional glutaraldehyde crosslinking. The responses of the acquired sensors to glucose concentrations ranging from 0.5 to 100 mM were monitored by chronoamperometry. Furthermore, lactate oxidase (LOX) and human hydroxyacid oxidase (HAOX) were successfully immobilized onto the PtOx surface platform. The performance of the resulting lactate sensors was investigated for lactate concentrations ranging from 0.05 to 20 mM. The successful attachment of active enzymes (GOX, LOX and HAOX) on Pt electrodes demonstrates that covalently functionalized PtOx surfaces provide a universal platform for the development of oxidase enzyme-based sensors.

  11. Improved adhesion of superhydrophobic layer on metal surfaces via one step spraying method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wael I. El Dessouky

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Superhydrophobic metal substrates have been fabricated by a simple spraying method. The processes of decreasing surface free energy and increasing surface roughness have been accomplished in one step via the addition of functionalized silica (silica nano particles with octyltriethoxysilane to adhesive polymer. The method is simple, cost-effective and can be applied on the large industrial scale. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM was used for surface morphology analysis, showing the roughness produced by surface treatment. The wettability of the micro-nano silica film varied from hydrophilicity (water contact angle 88° to superhydrophobicity (water contact angle 156.9°, while sliding contact angles dramatically decreased (<5° by adding Functionalized silica and/or adhesive polymer. Roughness increased with silica increment which improves the wettability. The coatings were electrochemically characterized by electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS and Tafel polarization curves; it was found that both systems had good performance against corrosion in 3.5% sodium chloride solution. Furthermore, the stability of the coated layer on copper substrate was investigated.

  12. Biocompatible gold nanorods: one-step surface functionalization, highly colloidal stability, and low cytotoxicity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Kang; Zheng, Yuanhui; Lu, Xun; Thai, Thibaut; Lee, Nanju Alice; Bach, Udo; Gooding, J Justin

    2015-05-05

    The conjugation of gold nanorods (AuNRs) with polyethylene glycol (PEG) is one of the most effective ways to reduce their cytotoxicity arising from the cetyltrimethylammonium bromide (CTAB) and silver ions used in their synthesis. However, typical PEGylation occurs only at the tips of the AuNRs, producing partially modified AuNRs. To address this issue, we have developed a novel, facile, one-step surface functionalization method that involves the use of Tween 20 to stabilize AuNRs, bis(p-sulfonatophenyl)phenylphosphine (BSPP) to activate the AuNR surface for the subsequent PEGylation, and NaCl to etch silver from the AuNRs. This method allows for the complete removal of the surface-bound CTAB and the most active surface silver from the AuNRs. The produced AuNRs showed far lower toxicity than other methods to PEGylate AuNRs, with no apparent toxicity when their concentration is lower than 5 μg/mL. Even at a high concentration of 80 μg/mL, their cell viability is still four times higher than that of the tip-modified AuNRs.

  13. The over-step coalescence of carbon atoms on copper surface in the CVD growth of graphene: density functional calculations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yingfeng Li

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available The ways in which carbon atoms coalesce over the steps on copper (111 surface are ascertained by density functional theory (DFT calculations in the context of chemical vapor deposition (CVD growth of graphene. Two strategies, (1 by putting carbon atoms on and under the steps separately and (2 by importing additional carbon atoms between the ones separated by the steps, have been attempted to investigate if an over-step coalescence of carbon atoms could take place. Based on analyses about the optimized configurations and adsorption energies of carbon atoms nearby the steps, as well as the energy evolution curve of the system throughout the geometry optimizations process, we determined the main way in which graphene grows over the steps continuously: the carbon atoms, adsorbed additionally on the locations between the already existing ones which are separated by the steps, link them (these carbon atoms separated by the steps together. The direct over-step coalescence of the carbon atoms separated by the steps is very difficult, although the energy barrier preventing their coalescence can be weakened by importing carbon atoms on and under the steps gradually. Our results imply potential applications in directing the fabrication of graphene with particular structure by controlling the surface topography of copper substrate.

  14. Characterization of the surfaces of platinum/tin oxide based catalysts by Fourier Transform Infrared Spectroscopy (FTIR)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keiser, Joseph T.; Upchurch, Billy T.

    1990-01-01

    A Pt/SnO2 catalyst has been developed at NASA Langley that is effective for the oxidation of CO at room temperature (1). A mechanism has been proposed to explain the effectiveness of this catalyst (2), but most of the species involved in this mechanism have not been observed under actual catalytic conditions. A number of these species are potentially detectable by Fourier Transform Infrared Spectroscopy (FTIR), e.g., HOSnO sub x, HO sub y PtO sub z, Pt-CO, and SnHCO3. Therefore a preliminary investigation was conducted to determine what might be learned about this particular catalyst by transmission FTIR. The main advantage of FTIR for this work is that the catalyst can be examined under conditions similar to the actual catalytic conditions. This can be of critical importance since some surface species may exist only when the reaction gases are present. Another advantage of the infrared approach is that since vibrations are probed, subtle chemical details may be obtained. The main disadvantage of this approach is that FTIR is not nearly as sensitive as the Ultra High Vacuum (UHV) surface analytical techniques such as Auger, Electron Spectroscopy for Chemical Analysis (ESCA), Electron Energy Loss Spectroscopy (EELS), etc. Another problem is that the assignment of the observed infrared bands may be difficult.

  15. Dynamics of O2 Chemisorption on a Flat Platinum Surface Probed by an Alignment-Controlled O2 Beam.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ueta, Hirokazu; Kurahashi, Mitsunori

    2017-04-03

    O2 adsorption on Pt surfaces is of great technological importance owing to its relevance to reactions for the purification of car exhaust gas and the oxygen reduction on fuel-cell electrodes. Although the O2 /Pt(111) system has been investigated intensively, questions still remain concerning the origin of the low O2 sticking probability and its unusual energy dependence. We herein clarify the alignment dependence of the initial sticking probability (S0 ) using the single spin-rotational state-selected [(J,M)=(2,2)] O2 beam. The results indicate that, at low translational energy (E0 ) conditions, direct activated chemisorption occurs only when the O2 axis is nearly parallel to the surface. At high energy conditions (E0 >0.5 eV), however, S0 for the parallel O2 decreases with increasing E0 while that of the perpendicular O2 increases, accounting for the nearly energy-independent O2 sticking probability determined previously by a non-state-resolved experiment. © 2017 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  16. Surface roughness and morphology of resin composites polished with two-step polishing systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Can Say, Esra; Yurdagüven, Haktan; Yaman, Batu Can; Özer, Füsun

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate surface roughness (Ra) and morphology of supra-nanofilled [Estelite Omega (EO), Estelite ∑ Quick (EQ)], micro-hybrid [Esthet.X HD (EHD), G-aenial (GAE)] and nano-hybrid [Clearfil Majesty Posterior (CMP), Charisma Diamond (CD), Beautifil II (BII)] composites polished with two-step polishing systems [Enhance/PoGo (EP); Venus Supra (VS)]. Composite discs, 30 of each type, were prepared. Each composite group was divided into three subgroups: Mylar (control), EP and VS. Ra was evaluated with profilometer. In each composite group, the control had the lowest Ra. With both polishing systems, EO and EQ had significantly the lowest Ra, whereas CMP and BII had the highest. Except for GAE, CD and BII, the differences in Ra between EP and VS in each composite group were significant, showing smoother surfaces for EP. Supra-nanofilled composites created smoother surfaces than nano-hybrids, and their performance was similar or slightly better than that of micro-hybrids.

  17. One-step photoembossing for submicrometer surface relief structures in liquid crystal semiconductors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liedtke, Alicia; Lei, Chunhong; O'Neill, Mary; Dyer, Peter E; Kitney, Stuart P; Kelly, Stephen M

    2010-06-22

    We report a new single-step method to directly imprint nanometer-scale structures on photoreactive organic semiconductors. A surface relief grating is spontaneously formed when a light-emitting, liquid crystalline, and semiconducting thin film is irradiated by patterned light generated using a phase mask. Grating formation requires no postannealing nor wet etching so there is potential for high-throughput fabrication. The structured film is cross-linked for robustness. Gratings deeper than the original film thickness are made with periods as small as 265 nm. Grating formation is attributed to mass transfer, enhanced by self-assembly, from dark to illuminated regions. A photovoltaic device incorporating the grating is discussed.

  18. Platinum hypersensitivity and desensitization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miyamoto, Shingo; Okada, Rika; Ando, Kazumichi

    2015-09-01

    Platinum agents are drugs used for various types of cancer. With increased frequency of administration of platinum agents, hypersensitivity reactions appear more frequently, occurring in over 25% of cases from the seventh cycle or second line onward. It then becomes difficult to conduct treatment using these agents. Various approaches have been investigated to address hypersensitivity reactions to platinum agents. Desensitization, which gradually increases the concentration of the anticancer drug considered to be the antigen until the target dosage, has been reported as being particularly effective, with a success rate of 80-100%. The aims of this paper are to present the current findings regarding hypersensitivity reactions to platinum agents and to discuss attempts of using desensitization against hypersensitivity reactions worldwide. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  19. Underpotential Deposition of Copper on Pt(S)[n(100)×(110)] Stepped Surfaces%Pt(S)[n(100)×(110)]表面Cu欠电位沉积

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Rubén Gisbert; Víctor Climent; Enrique Herrero; Juan M.Feliu

    2012-01-01

    本文研究了Cu在Pt(100)台阶面和(110)单原子台阶的欠电位沉积.发现若不考虑阴离子吸附,初始阶段Cu在台阶面和台阶处的电沉积同时进行.在电沉积满单层的伏安曲线上,可以观察到若干峰.通过对峰电荷与台阶密度关系的分析,可认为这些峰分别对应于不同的沉积位点.较正电位的峰对应于Cu在台阶面上的电沉积,而在台阶处Cu的电沉积则因溶液中的阴离子而具有不同的伏安性质.此外,还发现Pt电极表面的Cu沉积电荷转移数接近2e,且沉积初始阶段阴离子覆盖度不变.%The underpotential deposition of Cu on platinum stepped surfaces composed of (100) terraces and (110) monoatomic steps has been studied in different acidic solutions.It has been found that the initial stage of copper deposition on the surface takes place simultaneously on terrace and step sites,irrespective of the nature of the adsorbing anion.During the voltammetric deposition of a full monolayer,several peaks can be observed.The analysis of the dependence of the peak charge with the step density allows assigning the different peaks to different deposition sites.The peak appearing at most positive potentials corresponds to the deposition of Cu on the terrace sites,whereas deposition on the step sites gives rise to different voltammetric contributions depending on the anion present in solution.Additionally,it has been found that the charge transferred upon Cu deposition is very close to 2e and that the anion coverage does not change during this process from that initially present on the platinum substrate.

  20. Kinematic strategies in newly walking toddlers stepping over different support surfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dominici, Nadia; Ivanenko, Yuri P; Cappellini, Germana; Zampagni, Maria Luisa; Lacquaniti, Francesco

    2010-03-01

    In adults, locomotor movements are accommodated to various support surface conditions by means of specific anticipatory locomotor adjustments and changes in the intersegmental coordination. Here we studied the kinematic strategies of toddlers at the onset of independent walking when negotiating various support surface conditions: stepping over an obstacle, walking on an inclined surface, and on a staircase. Generally, toddlers could perform these tasks only when supported by the arm. They exhibited strategies very different from those of the adults. Although adults maintained walking speed roughly constant, toddlers markedly accelerated when walking downhill or downstairs and decelerated when walking uphill or upstairs. Their coordination pattern of thigh-shank-foot elevation angles exhibited greater inter-trial variability than that in adults, but it did not undergo the systematic change as a function of task that was present in adults. Thus the intersegmental covariance plane rotated across tasks in adults, whereas its orientation remained roughly constant in toddlers. In contrast with the adults, the toddlers often tended to place the foot onto the obstacle or across the edges of the stairs. We interpret such foot placements as part of a haptic exploratory repertoire and we argue that the maintenance of a roughly constant planar covariance--irrespective of the surface inclination and height--may be functional to the exploratory behavior. The latter notion is consistent with the hypothesis proposed decades ago by Bernstein that, when humans start to learn a skill, they may restrict the number of degrees of freedom to reduce the size of the search space and simplify the coordination.

  1. Surface-step defect in three-dimensional topological insulators: Electric manipulation of spin and quantum spin Hall effect

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Yan-Feng; Guo, Ai-Min; Sun, Qing-Feng

    2016-08-01

    We study the influence of a step defect on surface states in three-dimensional topological insulators subject to a perpendicular magnetic field. By calculating the energy spectrum of the surface states, we find that Landau levels (LLs) can form on flat regions of the surface and are distant from the step defect, and several subbands emerge at the side surface of the step defect. The subband which connects to the two zeroth LLs is spin polarized and chiral. In particular, when the electron transports along the side surface, the electron spin direction can be manipulated arbitrarily by gate voltage. Also, no reflection occurs even if the electron spin direction is changed. This provides a fascinating avenue to control the electron spin easily and coherently. In addition, regarding the subbands with a high LL index, there exist spin-momentum locking helical states and the quantum spin Hall effect can appear.

  2. Self-terminating growth of platinum films by electrochemical deposition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yihua; Gokcen, Dincer; Bertocci, Ugo; Moffat, Thomas P

    2012-12-07

    A self-terminating rapid electrodeposition process for controlled growth of platinum (Pt) monolayer films from a K(2)PtCl(4)-NaCl electrolyte has been developed that is tantamount to wet atomic layer deposition. Despite the deposition overpotential being in excess of 1 volt, Pt deposition was quenched at potentials just negative of proton reduction by an alteration of the double-layer structure induced by a saturated surface coverage of underpotential deposited H (H(upd)). The surface was reactivated for further Pt deposition by stepping the potential to more positive values, where H(upd) is oxidized and fresh sites for the adsorption of PtCl(4)(2-) become available. Periodic pulsing of the potential enables sequential deposition of two-dimensional Pt layers to fabricate films of desired thickness, relevant to a range of advanced technologies.

  3. Lateral arrangement of self-assembled GaN islands on periodically stepped AlN surfaces

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brault, J.; Tanaka, S.; Sarigiannidou, E.; Rouviere, J.L.; Daudin, B. [Departement de Recherche Fondamentale sur la Matiere Condensee, SPMM, LPSC, 17 rue des Martyrs, 38054 Grenoble Cedex 9 (France); Nakagawa, H. [Research Institute for Electronic Science, Hokkaido University, Sapporo 060-0812 (Japan); Feuillet, G. [CEA/LETI, DTS/SRD/LaboSiC, 17 rue des Martyrs, 38054 Grenoble Cedex 9 (France)

    2002-12-01

    The organisation of GaN quantum dots on vicinal (0001) AlN surfaces has been investigated. Such surfaces were obtained using (0001)-misoriented SiC substrates. It is shown that AlN growth leads to a step bunching instability that can be kinetically controlled by temperature. The study of the GaN growth mechanism reveals a preferential alignment along AlN step edges and facets. Finally, the possibility of obtaining an efficient control of the island spatial distribution via step density and periodicity is demonstrated. (Abstract Copyright [2002], Wiley Periodicals, Inc.)

  4. Epoxy Resins Toughened with Surface Modified Epoxidized Natural Rubber Fibers by One-Step Electrospinning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Joo Ran; Kim, Jung J

    2017-04-27

    Epoxidized natural rubber fibers (ERFs) are developed through one-step electrospinning and directly deposited into epoxy resins without collecting and distributing of fibers. The shape of ERFs shows rough surface due to different evaporation rate of solvent mixture consisting of chloroform and dichloromethane and the average diameter of ERFs is 6.2 µm. The increase of ERFs loading from 0 to 20 wt % into the epoxy resin increases the fracture strain significantly from 1.2% to 13% and toughness from 0.3 MPa to 1.9 MPa by a factor of 7. However, the tensile strength and Young's modulus decrease about 34% from 58 MPa to 34 MPa and from 1.4 GPa to 0.9 GPa, respectively. Due to the crosslinking reactions between oxirane groups of ERFs and amine groups in the resin, surface roughness and the high aspect ratio of ERFs, ERFs result in more effective toughening effect with the minimum loss of tensile properties in epoxy resins.

  5. Interface characteristics at an organic/metal junction: pentacene on Cu stepped surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matos, Jeronimo; Kara, Abdelkader

    2016-11-01

    The adsorption of pentacene on Cu (2 2 1), Cu (5 1 1) and Cu (9 1 1) is investigated using density functional theory (DFT) with the self-consistent inclusion of van der Waals (vdW) interactions. Cu (2 1 1) is a vicinal of Cu (1 1 1) while Cu (5 1 1) and (9 1 1) are vicinals of Cu (1 0 0). For all the three surfaces, we found pentacene to prefer to adsorb parallel to the surface and near the steps. The addition of vdW interactions resulted in an enhancement in adsorption energies, with reference to the PBE functional, of around 2 eV. With vdWs inclusion, the adsorption energies were found to be 2.98 eV, 3.20 eV and 3.49 eV for Cu (2 2 1), Cu (5 1 1) and Cu (9 1 1) respectively. These values reflect that pentacene adsorbs stronger on (1 0 0) terraces with a preference for larger terraces. The molecule tilts upon adsorption with a small tilt angle on the (1 0 0) vicinals (about a few degrees) as compared to a large one on Cu (2 2 1) where the tilt angle is found to be about 20°. We find that the adsorption results in a net charge transfer to the molecule of ~1 electron, for all surfaces.

  6. TWO STEPS CHEMICAL-MECHANICAL POLISHING OF RIGID DISK SUBSTRATE TO GET ATOM-SCALE PLANARIZATION SURFACE

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LEI Hong; LUO Jianbin; LU Xinchun

    2006-01-01

    In order to get atomic smooth rigid disk substrate surface, ultra-fined alumina slurry and nanometer silica slurry are prepared, and two steps chemical-mechanical polishing (CMP) of rigid disk substrate in the two slurries are studied. The results show that, during the first step CMP in the alumina slurry, a high material removal rate is reached, and the average roughness (Ra) and the average waviness (Wa) of the polished surfaces can be decreased from previous 1.4 nm and 1.6 nm to about 0.6 nm and 0.7 nm, respectively. By using the nanometer silica slurry and optimized polishing process parameters in the second step CMP, the Ra and the Wa of the polished surfaces can be further reduced to 0.038 nm and 0.06 nm, respectively. Atom force microscopy (AFM) analysis shows that the final polished surfaces are ultra-smooth without micro-defects.

  7. Influence of the step properties on submonolayer growth of Ge and Si at the Si(111) surface

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Romanyuk, Konstantin

    2009-10-21

    The present work describes an experimental investigation of the influence of the step properties on the submonolayer growth at the Si(111) surface. In particular the influence of step properties on the morphology, shape and structural stability of 2D Si/Ge nanostructures was explored. Visualization, morphology and composition measurements of the 2D SiGe nanostructures were carried out by scanning tunneling microscopy (STM). The formation of Ge nanowire arrays on highly ordered kink-free Si stepped surfaces is demonstrated. The crystalline nanowires with minimal kink densities were grown using Bi surfactant mediated epitaxy. The nanowires extend over lengths larger than 1 {mu}m have a width of 4 nm. To achieve the desired growth conditions for the formation of such nanowire arrays, a modified variant of surfactant mediated epitaxy was explored. It was shown that controlling the surfactant coverage at the surface and/or at step edges modifies the growth properties of surface steps in a decisive way. The surfactant coverage at step edges can be associated with Bi passivation of the step edges. The analysis of island size distributions showed that the step edge passivation can be tuned independently by substrate temperature and by Bi rate deposition. The measurements of the island size distributions for Si and Ge in surfactant mediated growth reveal different scaling functions for different Bi deposition rates on Bi terminated Si(111) surface. The scaling function changes also with temperature. The main mechanism, which results in the difference of the scaling functions can be revealed with data of Kinetic Monte-Carlo simulations. According to the data of the Si island size distributions at different growth temperatures and different Bi deposition rates the change of SiGe island shape and preferred step directions were attributed to the change of the step edge passivation. It was shown that the change of the step edge passivation is followed by a change of the

  8. Sputtering of stepped Cu surfaces by 3 keV Ar projectiles with glancing angles of incidence

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Karolewski, M.A. E-mail: mkarol@fos.ubd.edu.bn

    2003-10-01

    The sputtering characteristics of Cu crystal targets with stepped surfaces have been examined with classical dynamics computer simulations. The predicted yields, angular distributions, statistical properties and spatial origins of sputtered atoms are reported. The three targets investigated were: a Cu(1 0 0) surface with a monatomic step, denoted Cu(1 0 0)-(S); the Cu(29, 1, 1) surface; and the Cu(20, 1, 1) surface. A 3 keV Ar projectile with a glancing angle of incidence (phi (cursive,open) Greek=5 deg. ) was employed. The surface structures of the targets consist of (1 0 0) terraces separated by monatomic (1 1 1) steps. For the Cu(29, 1, 1) and Cu(20, 1, 1) targets, the spatial distributions of sputtered atom lattice sites display a bimodal character. The peaks of the distributions are localised in the vicinity of the (1 1 1) steps which lie behind the primary zone of projectile impact. This pattern of sputtering can be understood with the help of a two-dimensional description of the projectile-target interaction. Projectile-surface atom close encounters are possible when projectiles undergo direct collisions with atoms at the leading terrace edge on their approach to the surface, or when projectiles reflected from the primary impact zone are focussed onto edge atoms in the adjacent terrace. For the Cu(1 0 0)-(S) target, only the first mechanism is feasible.

  9. Studies of the surface structures of molecular crystals and of adsorbed molecular monolayers on the (111) crystal faces of platinum and silver by low-energy electron diffraction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Firment, L.E.

    1977-01-01

    The structures of molecular crystal surfaces were investigated for the first time by the use of low-energy electron diffraction (LEED). The experimental results from a variety of molecular crystals were examined and compared as a first step towards understanding the properties of these surfaces on a microscopic level. The method of sample preparation employed, vapor deposition onto metal single-crystal substrates at low temperatures in ultrahigh vacuum, allowed concurrent study of the structures of adsorbed monolayers on metal surfaces and of the growth processes of molecular films on metal substrates. The systems investigated were ice, ammonia, naphthalene, benzene, the n-paraffins (C/sub 3/ to C/sub 8/), cyclohexane, trioxane, acetic acid, propionic acid, methanol, and methylamine adsorbed and condensed on both Pt(111) and Ag(111) surfaces. Electron-beam-induced damage of the molecular surfaces was observed after electron exposures of 10/sup -4/ A sec cm/sup -2/ at 20 eV. Aromatic molecular crystal samples were more resistant to damage than samples of saturated molecules. The quality and orientation of the grown molecular crystal films were influenced by substrate preparation and growth conditions. Forty ordered monolayer structures were observed. 110 figures, 22 tables, 162 references.

  10. Toxicity of platinum compounds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hartmann, Jörg Thomas; Lipp, Hans-Peter

    2003-06-01

    Since the introduction of platinum-based combination chemotherapy, particularly cisplatin, the outcome of the treatment of many solid tumours has changed. The leading platinum compounds in cancer chemotherapy are cisplatin, carboplatin and oxaliplatin. They share some structural similarities; however, there are marked differences between them in therapeutic use, pharmacokinetics and adverse effects profiles [1-4]. Compared to cisplatin, carboplatin has inferior efficacy in germ-cell tumour, head and neck cancer and bladder and oesophageal carcinoma, whereas both drugs seem to have comparable efficacy in advanced non-small cell and small cell lung cancer as well as ovarian cancer [5-7]. Oxaliplatin belongs to the group of diaminocyclohexane platinum compounds. It is the first platinum-based drug that has marked efficacy in colorectal cancer when given in combination with 5-fluorouracil and folinic acid [8,9]. Other platinum compounds such as oral JM216, ZD0473, BBR3464 and SPI-77, which is a pegylated liposomal formulation of cisplatin, are still under investigation [10-13], whereas nedaplatin has been approved in Japan for the treatment of non-small cell lung cancer and other solid tumours. This review focuses on cisplatin, carboplatin and oxaliplatin.

  11. Partial oxidation of step-bound water leads to anomalous pH effects on metal electrode step-edges.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwarz, Kathleen; Xu, Bingjun; Yan, Yushan; Sundararaman, Ravishankar

    2016-06-28

    The design of better heterogeneous catalysts for applications such as fuel cells and electrolyzers requires a mechanistic understanding of electrocatalytic reactions and the dependence of their activity on operating conditions such as pH. A satisfactory explanation for the unexpected pH dependence of electrochemical properties of platinum surfaces has so far remained elusive, with previous explanations resorting to complex co-adsorption of multiple species and resulting in limited predictive power. This knowledge gap suggests that the fundamental properties of these catalysts are not yet understood, limiting systematic improvement. Here, we analyze the change in charge and free energies upon adsorption using density-functional theory (DFT) to establish that water adsorbs on platinum step edges across a wide voltage range, including the double-layer region, with a loss of approximately 0.2 electrons upon adsorption. We show how this as-yet unreported change in net surface charge due to this water explains the anomalous pH variations of the hydrogen underpotential deposition (Hupd) and the potentials of zero total charge (PZTC) observed in published experimental data. This partial oxidation of water is not limited to platinum metal step edges, and we report the charge of the water on metal step edges of commonly used catalytic metals, including copper, silver, iridium, and palladium, illustrating that this partial oxidation of water broadly influences the reactivity of metal electrodes.

  12. High-surface step density on dendritic pd leads to exceptional catalytic activity for formic acid oxidation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patra, S; Viswanath, B; Barai, K; Ravishankar, N; Munichandraiah, N

    2010-11-01

    Dendritic Pd with corrugated surfaces, obtained by a novel AC technique, exhibits an exceptionally high catalytic activity for the oxidation of formic acid because of the presence of a high density of surface steps. The formation of twinned dendrites leads to a predominance of exposed 111 facets with a high density of surface steps as evident from high resolution electron microscopy investigations. These surface sites provide active sites for the adsorption of the formic acid molecules, thereby enhancing the reaction rate. Control experiments by varying the time of deposition reveal the formation of partially grown dendrites at shorter times indicating that the dendrites were formed by growth rather than particle attachment. Our deposition method opens up interesting possibilities to produce anisotropic nanostructures with corrugated surfaces by exploiting the perturbations involved in the growth process.

  13. Comparison of surface roughness of nanofilled and nanohybrid composite resins after polishing with a multi-step technique

    Science.gov (United States)

    Itanto, B. S. H.; Usman, M.; Margono, A.

    2017-08-01

    To compare the surface roughness of nanofilled and nanohybrid composite resins after polishing using a multi-step technique. 40 composite resin specimens were divided into two groups (20 nanofilled specimens using Filtek Z350 XT [group A] and 20 nanohybrid specimens using Filtek Z250 XT [group B]), prepared, and then polished. After immersion in artificial saliva for 24 hours, the surface roughness was measured with a surface roughness tester. The mean surface roughness results along with the standard deviation of group A were 0.0967 μm ± 0.0174, while the results of group B were 0.1217 μm ± 0.0244. Statistically (with p = 0.05), there were significant differences between each group. The surface roughness of a nanofilled composite resin after polishing with a multi-step technique is better than that of a nanohybrid composite resin.

  14. Effects of support surface and optic flow on step-like movements in pre-crawling and crawling infants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, David I; Kobayashi, Yuka; Hamel, Kate; Rivera, Monica; Campos, Joseph J; Barbu-Roth, Marianne

    2016-02-01

    Step-like movements were examined in pre-crawling (n=9) and crawling (n=9) 6-13 month-old infants in the air and on a surface in response to a static pattern or optic flows that moved toward or away from the infant. Infants completed six 60-s trials. A significant interaction between locomotor status and support condition revealed that pre-crawling infants made more step-like movements in the air than on a rigid surface. In contrast, crawling infants made an equivalent number of step-like movements in the air and on the surface. Optic flow did not influence the number of step-like movements made by infants. The pre-crawling infant finding is consistent with a finding in a previous study in which two month-old infants were shown to step more in the air than on the ground. This finding is discussed relative to the idea that the infant stepping pattern disappears because the legs become too heavy to lift.

  15. Effects of Support Surface and Optic Flow on Step-Like Movements in Pre-crawling and Crawling Infants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, David I.; Kobayashi, Yuka; Hamel, Kate; Rivera, Monica; Campos, Joseph J.; Barbu-Roth, Marianne

    2016-01-01

    Step-like movements were examined in pre-crawling (n=9) and crawling (n=9) 6–13 month-old infants in the air and on a surface in response to a static pattern or optic flows that moved toward or away from the infant. Infants completed six 60-second trials. A significant interaction between locomotor status and support condition revealed that pre-crawling infants made more step-like movements in the air than on a rigid surface. In contrast, crawling infants made an equivalent number of step-like movements in the air and on the surface. Optic flow did not influence the number of step-like movements made by infants. The pre-crawling infant finding is consistent with a finding in a previous study in which two month-old infants were shown to step more in the air than on the ground. This finding is discussed relative to the idea that the infant stepping pattern disappears because the legs become too heavy to lift. PMID:26773774

  16. Platinum single crystal electrodes for the electrocatalysis of methane oxidation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mayara Munaretto

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available The main objective of this paper is to characterize the voltammetric profiles of platinum single crystals of low Miller indexes Pt(100 and Pt(110 and study their catalytic activities on the oxidation of methane. In this way, it was developed a metallic surface modified by presence of other metal oxide, which presents catalytic activity for this reaction. It is well known that the electrooxidation of methane (CH4 leads mainly to the formation of CO2 and H2O, however, the oxidation can also lead to the formation of CO, a reaction intermediate that has strong interaction with metal surfaces, such as platinum. This molecule tends to accumulate on the platinum surface and to passive it, due to the self-poisoning, decreasing its catalytic activity. Therefore, the main aim of this work was the development of a platinum electrode modified by deposition of titanium oxide, which presented electrocatalytic properties for the oxidation of methane.

  17. Oxygen Reduction on Platinum

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nesselberger, Markus

    This thesis investigates the electro reduction of oxygen on platinum nanoparticles, which serve as catalyst in low temperature fuel cells. Kinetic studies on model catalysts as well as commercially used systems are presented in order to investigate the particle size effect, the particle proximity...... carbon (HSAC) supported Pt nanoparticle (Pt/C) catalysts (of various size between 1 and 5 nm). The difference in SA between the individual Pt/C catalysts (1 to 5 nm) is very small and within the error of the measurements. The factor four of loss in SA when comparing platinum bulk and Pt/C can largely...

  18. The impact of microgeometry pistons with a stepped bearing surface for the friction loss of the internal combustion engine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wroblewski Emil

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper present the results of experimental piston friction losses on stepped bearing surface microgeometry obtained on the test rig. This test rig is equipped with special temperature control system, which provides better stability to temperature than in standard systems. The results of station tests was discussed. Tests was analyzed depending the moment caused by the friction on the oil temperature in the oil sump. Specified conclusions allow to assess the impact of the stepped profile of the pistons bearing surface microgeometry for different values of engine speed and the oil temperature at the friction losses in the main kinematic engine node which is piston-cylinder.

  19. Site-selective substitutional doping with atomic precision on stepped Al (111) surface by single-atom manipulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Chang; Zhang, Jinhu; Dong, Guofeng; Shao, Hezhu; Ning, Bo-Yuan; Zhao, Li; Ning, Xi-Jing; Zhuang, Jun

    2014-01-01

    In fabrication of nano- and quantum devices, it is sometimes critical to position individual dopants at certain sites precisely to obtain the specific or enhanced functionalities. With first-principles simulations, we propose a method for substitutional doping of individual atom at a certain position on a stepped metal surface by single-atom manipulation. A selected atom at the step of Al (111) surface could be extracted vertically with an Al trimer-apex tip, and then the dopant atom will be positioned to this site. The details of the entire process including potential energy curves are given, which suggests the reliability of the proposed single-atom doping method.

  20. Biomineralization of platinum by microorganisms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pavlova, L. M.; Radomskaya, V. I.; Shumilova, L. P.; Ionov, A. M.; Sorokin, P.

    2017-04-01

    The mechanism of platinum biomineralization by microscopic fungi is displayed based on data of electron microscopy, infrared and X-ray photoelectronic spectroscopy. It was suggested the platinum sorption process by microscopic fungi has some stages. The initial interaction is carried out by the mechanisms of physical and chemical sorption. Hereafter the reduction process of adsorbed platinum ions up to zero state is performed, probably, for account of organic compounds, which are produced by fungi biomass as metabolism result, and the process terminates by nulvalent particles aggregating up to nanosize forms. Obtained data on the platinum biomineralization extends the concept concerning the character of forming platinum nanoparticles in carbonous paleobasin.

  1. Platinum metals in the environment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zereini, Fathi [Frankfurt Univ. (Germany). Dept. of Environmental Analytical Chemistry; Wiseman, Clare L.S. (ed.) [Toronto Univ. (Canada). School of the Environment

    2015-03-01

    This book contains the five chapters with the following topics: 1. SOURCES OF PGE EMISSIONS ELEMENTS: Sources of Platinum Group Elements (PGE) in the Environment; Impact of Platinum Group Element Emissions from Mining and Production Activities. 2. ANALYTICAL METHODS FOR THE DETERMINATION OF PGE IN BIOLOGICAL AND ENVIRONMENTAL MATRICES: Appraisal of Biosorption for Recovery, Separation and Determination of Platinum, Palladium and Rhodium in Environmental Samples; On the Underestimated Factors Influencing the Accuracy of Determination of Pt and Pd by Electrothermal Atomic Absorption Spectrometry in Road Dust Samples; Application of Solid Sorbents for Enrichment and Separation of Platinum Metal Ions; Voltammetric Analysis of Platinum in Environmental Matrices; Speciation Analysis of Chloroplatinates; Analysis of Platinum Group Elements in Environmental Samples: A Review. 3. OCCURRENCE, CHEMICAL BEHAVIOR AND FATE OF PGE IN THE ENVIRONMENT: Brazilian PGE Research Data Survey on Urban and Roadside Soils; Platinum, Palladium and Rhodium in a Bavarian Roadside Soil; Increase of Platinum Group Element Concentrations in Soils and Airborne Dust During the Period of Vehicular Exhaust Catalysts Introduction; Platinum-Group Elements in Urban Fluvial Bed Sediments-Hawaii; Long-Term Monitoring of Palladium and Platinum Contents in Road Dust of the City of Munich, Germany; Characterization of PGEs and Other Elements in Road Dusts and Airborne Particles in Houston, Texas; Accumulation and Distribution of Pt and Pd in Roadside Dust, Soil and Vegetation in Bulgaria; Increase of the Environmental Pt Concentration in the Metropolitan Area of Mexico City Associated to the Use of Automobile Catalytic Converters; Solubility of Emitted Platinum Group Elements (Pt, Pd and Rh) in Airborne Particulate Matter (PM10) in the Presence of Organic Complexing Agents; The Influence of Anionic Species (Cl{sup -}, NO{sub 3}{sup -}, SO{sub 4}{sup 2-}) on the Transformation and Solubility of Platinum in

  2. Platinum nanoparticles decorated dendrite-like gold nanostructure on glassy carbon electrodes for enhancing electrocatalysis performance to glucose oxidation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jia, Hongmei; Chang, Gang; Lei, Ming; He, Hanping; Liu, Xiong; Shu, Honghui; Xia, Tiantian; Su, Jie; He, Yunbin

    2016-10-01

    Platinum nanoparticles decorated dendrite-like gold nanostructure, bimetal composite materials on glassy carbon electrode (Pt/DGNs/GC) for enhancing electrocatalysis to glucose oxidation was designed and successfully fabricated by a facile two-step deposition method without any templates, surfactants, or stabilizers. Dendrite-like gold nanostructure was firstly deposited on the GC electrode via the potentiostatic method, and then platinum nanoparticles were decorated on the surface of gold substrate through chemical reduction deposition. X-ray diffraction (XRD), field-emission scanning electron microscope (FE-SEM), energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDS) were applied to characterize the evolution of morphology and structure of the as-prepared Pt/DGNs/GC. Based on electrochemical measurements such as cyclic voltammetry, linear voltammetry and chronoamperometry, Pt/DGNs/GC exhibited significantly enhanced electrocatalytic performance to glucose oxidation compared those of pure dendrite-like Au nanoparticles in our previous report. Controlling chemical reduction deposition time, the amount of platinum nanoparticles on Au surface could be regulated, which further tuned electrocatalytic properties toward glucose oxidation. The dendrite-like gold surface partially covered by platinum nanoparticles dramatically enhanced the electrocatalytic performance for the oxidation of glucose because of excellent synergetic effects between gold and platinum species and the increased electrochemical active area from Pt nanoparticles loading. The non-enzymatic glucose biosensor based on Pt/DGNs/GC showed a rapid respond time (within 2 s), wide linear range (from 0.1 mM to 14 mM), low detection limit (0.01 mM), supernal sensitivity (275.44 μA cm-2 mM-1, R = 0.993), satisfactory reproducibility and good stability for glucose sensing. It was demonstrated that Pt/DGNs/GC could work as promising candidate for factual non-enzymatic glucose detection.

  3. Partial oxidation of Step-Bound Water Leads to Anomalous pH Effects on Metal Electrode Step-Edges

    CERN Document Server

    Schwarz, Kathleen; Yan, Yushan; Sundararaman, Ravishankar

    2016-01-01

    The design of better heterogeneous catalysts for applications such as fuel cells and electrolyzers requires a mechanistic understanding of electrocatalytic reactions and the dependence of their activity on operating conditions such as pH. A satisfactory explanation for the unexpected pH dependence of electrochemical properties of platinum surfaces has so far remained elusive, with previous explanations resorting to complex co-adsorption of multiple species and resulting in limited predictive power. This knowledge gap suggests that the fundamental properties of these catalysts are not yet understood, limiting systematic improvement. Here, we analyze the change in charge and free energies upon adsorption using density-functional theory (DFT) to establish that water adsorbs on platinum step edges across a wide voltage range, including the double-layer region, with a loss of approximately 0.2 electrons upon adsorption. We show how the change in net surface charge due to this water explains the anomalous pH variat...

  4. Molecular Surface Chemistry by Metal Single Crystals and Nanoparticles from Vacuum to High Pressure.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Somorjai, Gabor A.; Park, Jeong Y.

    2008-04-05

    Model systems for studying molecular surface chemistry have evolved from single crystal surfaces at low pressure to colloidal nanoparticles at high pressure. Low pressure surface structure studies of platinum single crystals using molecular beam surface scattering and low energy electron diffraction techniques probe the unique activity of defects, steps and kinks at the surface for dissociation reactions (H-H, C-H, C-C, O{double_bond}O bonds). High-pressure investigations of platinum single crystals using sum frequency generation vibrational spectroscopy have revealed the presence and the nature of reaction intermediates. High pressure scanning tunneling microscopy of platinum single crystal surfaces showed adsorbate mobility during a catalytic reaction. Nanoparticle systems are used to determine the role of metal-oxide interfaces, site blocking and the role of surface structures in reactive surface chemistry. The size, shape and composition of nanoparticles play important roles in determining reaction activity and selectivity.

  5. 76 FR 50312 - Surface Transportation Environment and Planning Cooperative Research Program (STEP)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-08-12

    ... transportation safety planning strategies for surface transportation systems and improvements; (5) Improving... Federal Highway Administration Surface Transportation Environment and Planning Cooperative Research...-LU) established the Surface Transportation Environment and Planning Cooperative Research Program...

  6. SEM method for direct visual tracking of nanoscale morphological changes of platinum based electrocatalysts on fixed locations upon electrochemical or thermal treatments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zorko, Milena; Jozinović, Barbara; Bele, Marjan; Hodnik, Nejc; Gaberšček, Miran

    2014-05-01

    A general method for tracking morphological surface changes on a nanometer scale with scanning electron microscopy (SEM) is introduced. We exemplify the usefulness of the method by showing consecutive SEM images of an identical location before and after the electrochemical and thermal treatments of platinum-based nanoparticles deposited on a high surface area carbon. Observations reveal an insight into platinum based catalyst degradation occurring during potential cycling treatment. The presence of chloride clearly increases the rate of degradation. At these conditions the dominant degradation mechanism seems to be the platinum dissolution with some subsequent redeposition on the top of the catalyst film. By contrast, at the temperature of 60°C, under potentiostatic conditions some carbon corrosion and particle aggregation was observed. Temperature treatment simulating the annealing step of the synthesis reveals sintering of small platinum based composite aggregates into uniform spherical particles. The method provides a direct proof of induced surface phenomena occurring on a chosen location without the usual statistical uncertainty in usual, random SEM observations across relatively large surface areas.

  7. Stepping behavior and muscle activity of dairy cows on uncomfortable standing surfaces presented under 1 or 4 legs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rajapaksha, E; Tucker, C B

    2015-01-01

    The comfort of dairy cattle while standing has important implications for housing design. Research has examined how cattle respond to standing surfaces by presenting options under all 4 legs or under a single leg, but no work, to date, has compared presentation methods. This study examined behavior and muscle activity when cows stood on rough floors under all 4 legs or just 1 hind leg. Three treatments were tested: smooth concrete under all 4 legs (0-ROUGH), a rough surface under all 4 legs [2cm × 2cm × 4cm trapezoidal protrusions (4-ROUGH)], and a rough surface only under 1 hind leg, with other legs on smooth concrete (1-ROUGH). Twenty-four healthy Holstein cows stood on each surface for 1h/d in a repeated-measures design. Surface electromyograms (SEMG) were used to evaluate muscle fatigue and total activity. Muscle fatigue was measured using SEMG to evaluate (1) static contractions when cows were continuously weight bearing on each hind leg, before and after 1h of standing, and (2) dynamic contractions associated with steps during 1h of standing. Behavioral measures included steps per minute, time between each consecutive step, and the latency to lie down after testing. The number of legs affected by roughness influenced both behavioral and physiological responses to flooring. Cows on 1-ROUGH stepped twice as often with the rough-treated leg and one-half as much with the hind leg on smooth concrete compared with other surfaces. Similarly, on the 1-ROUGH surface, total muscle activity was reduced in the leg on the rough surface, and muscle activity was more sustained (3× higher) in the other hind leg, suggesting that cows avoid possible discomfort under 1 leg by using muscles in the other. In the 4-ROUGH treatment, time between steps was more variable than on the other 2 treatments (coefficient of variation, 4-ROUGH: 245; 1-ROUGH: 208; 0-ROUGH: 190±5.8%), likely because cows could not move away from this uneven flooring. Thus, the method of presentation of

  8. Potential-dependent water orientation on Pt(1 1 1) stepped surfaces from laser-pulsed experiments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Garcia-Araez, Nuria [Instituto de Electroquimica, Universidad de Alicante, Ap. 99, E-03080 Alicante (Spain); Climent, Victor [Instituto de Electroquimica, Universidad de Alicante, Ap. 99, E-03080 Alicante (Spain)], E-mail: victor.climent@ua.es; Feliu, Juan M. [Instituto de Electroquimica, Universidad de Alicante, Ap. 99, E-03080 Alicante (Spain)

    2009-01-01

    Coulostatic potential transients induced by nanosecond pulsed laser irradiation on Pt(1 1 1) stepped surfaces in perchloric acid solutions are analyzed here. The results provide unique information on the effect of the structure of the metal surface on the potential-dependent water reorientation at the electrified interphase. The most significant information is obtained from the sign and shape of the laser-induced transients. The existence of two potentials where the transient is zero can be related to the local properties of the surface, i.e. the existence of two local potentials of zero free charge, corresponding to the step and terrace sites. The dependency of these quantities with the step density is studied in detail. In addition, it is found that the presence of steps significantly slows down the coulostatic response at potentials in the double-layer region, which has been interpreted as a decrease in the velocity of water reorganization. The corresponding relaxation time is estimated and its dependency with the step density is also analyzed.

  9. Generation of contact-printing based poly(ethylene glycol) gradient surfaces with micrometer-sized steps.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cai, Yangjun; Yun, Yang H; Newby, Bi-min Zhang

    2010-01-01

    A surface with a density gradient of poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG) is an attractive substrate for combinatorial studies of biological phenomena. In this study, the generation of discrete step-wise density gradients of PEG utilizing a contact-printing approach is reported. The step-wise gradient template is achieved by contact-printing n-octadecyltrichlorosilane (OTS) to a glass from a hemispherical elastomeric stamp when the stamp is brought into contact with the substrate, and then step-wisely increasing the contact area as the corresponding contact-printing time for the step decreases. A PEG-silane is then used to backfill the unoccupied spaces of the contact printed OTS gradient to generate the OTS-PEG density gradient. Various characterizations, including water contact angle measurement, lateral force microscopy, and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, are conducted and confirmed that the surface coverage of OTS increases (or the coverage of PEG decreases) with the increase of contact-printing time of OTS. The step-wise gradient is illustrated by adsorption of a bovine serum albumin labeled with fluorescein isothiocyanate and subsequent attachment of fibroblasts. The amounts of protein adsorption and cellular attachment increase with the decrease of the surface coverage of PEG.

  10. Mechanistic study of electrocatalytic oxidation of formic acid at platinum in acidic solution by time-resolved surface-enhanced infrared absorption spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samjeské, Gabor; Miki, Atsushi; Ye, Shen; Osawa, Masatoshi

    2006-08-24

    Surface-enhanced infrared absorption spectroscopy (SEIRAS) combined with cyclic voltammetry or chronoamperometry has been utilized to examine kinetic and mechanistic aspects of the electrocatalytic oxidation of formic acid on a polycrystalline Pt surface at the molecular scale. Formate is adsorbed on the electrode in a bridge configuration in parallel to the adsorption of linear and bridge CO produced by dehydration of formic acid. A solution-exchange experiment using isotope-labeled formic acids (H(12)COOH and H(13)COOH) reveals that formic acid is oxidized to CO(2) via adsorbed formate and the decomposition (oxidation) of formate to CO(2) is the rate-determining step of the reaction. The adsorption/oxidation of CO and the oxidation/reduction of the electrode surface strongly affect the formic acid oxidation by blocking active sites for formate adsorption and also by retarding the decomposition of adsorbed formate. The interplay of the involved processes also affects the kinetics and complicates the cyclic voltammograms of formic acid oxidation. The complex voltammetric behavior is comprehensively explained at the molecular scale by taking all these effects into account.

  11. Application of Displacement Height and Surface Roughness Length to Determination Boundary Layer Development Length over Stepped Spillway

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiangju Cheng

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available One of the most uncertain parameters in stepped spillway design is the length (from the crest of boundary layer development. The normal velocity profiles responding to the steps as bed roughness are investigated in the developing non-aerated flow region. A detailed analysis of the logarithmic vertical velocity profiles on stepped spillways is conducted through experimental data to verify the computational code and numerical experiments to expand the data available. To determine development length, the hydraulic roughness and displacement thickness, along with the shear velocity, are needed. This includes determining displacement height d and surface roughness length z0 and the relationship of d and z0 to the step geometry. The results show that the hydraulic roughness height ks is the primary factor on which d and z0 depend. In different step height, step width, discharge and intake Froude number, the relations d/ks = 0.22–0.27, z0/ks = 0.06–0.1 and d/z0 = 2.2–4 result in a good estimate. Using the computational code and numerical experiments, air inception will occur over stepped spillway flow as long as the Bauer-defined boundary layer thickness is between 0.72 and 0.79.

  12. Understanding the effect of steps, strain, poisons, and alloying: Methane activation on Ni surfaces

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Abild-Pedersen, Frank; Greeley, Jeffrey Philip; Nørskov, Jens Kehlet

    2005-01-01

    that variations in epsilon(d) can be used to quantitatively describe variations in the activation energy when the surface structure is changed, when the coverage of carbon is changed, when the surface is strained, when the surface is alloyed, and when the surface is poisoned by sulfur. The d-band center is...

  13. Interfacial electronic effects control the reaction selectivity of platinum catalysts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Guangxu; Xu, Chaofa; Huang, Xiaoqing; Ye, Jinyu; Gu, Lin; Li, Gang; Tang, Zichao; Wu, Binghui; Yang, Huayan; Zhao, Zipeng; Zhou, Zhiyou; Fu, Gang; Zheng, Nanfeng

    2016-05-01

    Tuning the electronic structure of heterogeneous metal catalysts has emerged as an effective strategy to optimize their catalytic activities. By preparing ethylenediamine-coated ultrathin platinum nanowires as a model catalyst, here we demonstrate an interfacial electronic effect induced by simple organic modifications to control the selectivity of metal nanocatalysts during catalytic hydrogenation. This we apply to produce thermodynamically unfavourable but industrially important compounds, with ultrathin platinum nanowires exhibiting an unexpectedly high selectivity for the production of N-hydroxylanilines, through the partial hydrogenation of nitroaromatics. Mechanistic studies reveal that the electron donation from ethylenediamine makes the surface of platinum nanowires highly electron rich. During catalysis, such an interfacial electronic effect makes the catalytic surface favour the adsorption of electron-deficient reactants over electron-rich substrates (that is, N-hydroxylanilines), thus preventing full hydrogenation. More importantly, this interfacial electronic effect, achieved through simple organic modifications, may now be used for the optimization of commercial platinum catalysts.

  14. Structure of matrix metalloproteinase-3 with a platinum-based inhibitor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belviso, Benny Danilo; Caliandro, Rocco; Siliqi, Dritan; Calderone, Vito; Arnesano, Fabio; Natile, Giovanni

    2013-06-18

    An X-ray investigation has been performed with the aim of characterizing the binding sites of a platinum-based inhibitor (K[PtCl3(DMSO)]) of matrix metalloproteinase-3 (stromelysin-1). The platinum complex targets His224 in the S1' specificity loop, representing the first step in the selective inhibition process (PDB ID code 4JA1).

  15. Staircase and saw-tooth field emission steps from nanopatterned n-type GaSb surfaces

    CERN Document Server

    Kildemo, M.; Le Roy, S.; Søndergård, E.

    2009-01-01

    High resolution field emission experiments from nanopatterned GaSb surfaces consisting of densely packed nanocones prepared by low ion-beam-energy sputtering are presented. Both uncovered and metal-covered nanopatterned surfaces were studied. Surprisingly, the field emission takes place by regular steps in the field emitted current. Depending on the field, the steps are either regular, flat, plateaus, or saw-tooth shaped. To the author’s knowledge, this is the first time that such results have been reported. Each discrete jump in the field emission may be understood in terms of resonant tunneling through an extended surface space charge region in an n-type, high aspect ratio, single GaSb nanocone. The staircase shape may be understood from the spatial distribution of the aspect ratio of the cones.

  16. Morphologies of solid-liquid interface and surface steps during rapid growth of BaB2O4 single crystals

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    The evolution of solid-liquid interface during BBO single crystal growth was stud- ied by the differential interference microscopy. And the step morphology on (0001) surface of the as-grown crystal was observed by the atomic force microscopy as well. It was found that the transition from a flat solid-liquid interface to a skeletal shape will occur in case of rapid growth. However, AFM images of surface steps revealed morphology differences correlated with crystallographic directions. The steps advancing along <1010 > direction form the step flow, whereas those steps propagating along <0110 > direction shape into step segments. Measurements of step heights by AFM indicated that it is the high anisotropy of the dimension of growth unit and step bunching due to the enlargement of concentration difference along the surface that results in the anisotropy of step morphologies.

  17. Morphologies of solid-liquid interface and surface steps during rapid growth of BaB2O4 single crystals

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    PAN XiuHong; AI Fei; JIN WeiQing; LIU Yan; ZHANG Ying

    2007-01-01

    The evolution of solid-liquid interface during BBO single crystal growth was studied by the differential interference microscopy. And the step morphology on (0001) surface of the as-grown crystal was observed by the atomic force microscopy as well. It was found that the transition from a flat solid-liquid interface to a skeletal shape will occur in case of rapid growth. However, AFM images of surface steps revealed morphology differences correlated with crystallographic directions. The steps advancing along direction form the step flow, whereas those steps propagating along direction shape into step segments. Measurements of step heights by AFM indicated that it is the high anisotropy of the dimension of growth unit and step bunching due to the enlargement of concentration difference along the surface that results in the anisotropy of step morphologies.

  18. 75 FR 38605 - Surface Transportation Environment and Planning Cooperative Research Program (STEP)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-02

    ... research to address congestion reduction efforts; (4) Developing transportation safety planning strategies... Federal Highway Administration Surface Transportation Environment and Planning Cooperative Research...-LU) established the Surface Transportation Environment and Planning Cooperative Research Program...

  19. Effect of Processing Steps on the Mechanical Properties and Surface Appearance of 6063 Aluminium Extruded Products

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Juan Asensio-Lozano; Beatriz Suarez-Peña; George F Vander Voort

    2014-01-01

      6063 aluminum anodized extrusions may exhibit a common surface defect known as streaking, characterized by the formation of narrow bands with a surface gloss different from the surrounding material...

  20. FRACTIONAL-STEP FINITE ELEMENT METHOD FOR CALCULATION OF 3-D FREE SURFACE PROBLEM USING LEVEL SET METHOD

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHAO Lan-hao; LI Tong-chun; WANG Ling; HERREROS M. I.; PASTOR M.

    2006-01-01

    A two-step Taylor-Galerkin fractional-step finite element method, which is of second order accuracy in space and time, was proposed for the three-dimensional free surface problem. With this method, the intermediate velocity was explicitly obtained by neglecting pressure gradient term, and then the velocity was corrected by adding the effects of pressure once the pressure field had been obtained from the pressure Poisson equation. The level set approach was applied to track implicitly the free surface. In order to track the free surface, the transport equation of the level set function was solved at each time step and the level set function is reinitialized through iteration to maintain it as a distance function. The governing equations of the system were discretized by the two- step Taylor-Galerkin method, which is of high-order accuracy and easy to be used. The validity and reliability of this method in this article were proved by two numerical examples.

  1. Step formation on the ion-bombarded Ag(100) surface studied by LEED and Monte Carlo simulations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Teichert, C. (Max-Planck-Inst. fuer Mikrostrukturphysik, Halle (Germany)); Ammer, C. (Max-Planck-Inst. fuer Mikrostrukturphysik, Halle (Germany)); Klaua, M. (Max-Planck-Inst. fuer Mikrostrukturphysik, Halle (Germany))

    1994-11-16

    The development of the morphology of an Ag(100) single-crystal surface bombarded with 600 eV Ar[sup +] ions at 170 K and at room temperature is studied by spot profile analysis of LEED. A temperature-dependent saturation of the step density is observed and a distinct smoothing of the surface after bombardment occurs already at room temperature. Under out-of-phase condition the LEED spots show a fourfold shape that differs in orientation at both temperatures. Monte Carlo simulations of the atom removal including thermal surface diffusion reveal at 170 K the formation of left angle 100 right angle and left angle 110 right angle step edges with equal probability, whereas at room temperature rearrangement processes at the steps lead to the preferential formation of the close-packed left angle 110 right angle edges. The intensity distribution under out-of-phase condition calculated from the Monte Carlo snap shots exhibits the same temperature dependence of the spot shapes as observed experimentally. The interlayer mass transport occurring during annealing at room temperature is found to be based on jumps running downward the left angle 100 right angle step edges. (orig.)

  2. One-dimensional model of interacting-step fluctuations on vicinal surfaces: Analytical formulas and kinetic Monte Carlo simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patrone, Paul N.; Einstein, T. L.; Margetis, Dionisios

    2010-12-01

    We study analytically and numerically a one-dimensional model of interacting line defects (steps) fluctuating on a vicinal crystal. Our goal is to formulate and validate analytical techniques for approximately solving systems of coupled nonlinear stochastic differential equations (SDEs) governing fluctuations in surface motion. In our analytical approach, the starting point is the Burton-Cabrera-Frank (BCF) model by which step motion is driven by diffusion of adsorbed atoms on terraces and atom attachment-detachment at steps. The step energy accounts for entropic and nearest-neighbor elastic-dipole interactions. By including Gaussian white noise to the equations of motion for terrace widths, we formulate large systems of SDEs under different choices of diffusion coefficients for the noise. We simplify this description via (i) perturbation theory and linearization of the step interactions and, alternatively, (ii) a mean-field (MF) approximation whereby widths of adjacent terraces are replaced by a self-consistent field but nonlinearities in step interactions are retained. We derive simplified formulas for the time-dependent terrace-width distribution (TWD) and its steady-state limit. Our MF analytical predictions for the TWD compare favorably with kinetic Monte Carlo simulations under the addition of a suitably conservative white noise in the BCF equations.

  3. Novel Sensorless Six-Step Communication Strategy for a Surface Permanent Magnet Synchronous Motor with DC Link Measurement

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Munteanu, A.; Agarlita, S. C.; Blaabjerg, Frede

    2012-01-01

    The present paper introduces a novel six-step commutation strategy for sensorless control applied for a surface permanent magnet synchronous motor that implies only dc link measurement (battery current and battery voltage). The control strategy makes use of a modified I-f starting procedure...... and then switches seamlessly to sensorless speed control. Soft-switching for the six-step commutation pattern is considered. It will be shown that the current absorbed from the battery contains consistent information that can be used to determine the commutation points; the detection of the zero...

  4. Preparation of platinum/iridium scanning probe microscopy tips

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Alexis Hammer; Hvid, U.; Mortensen, M.W.

    1999-01-01

    for the production of sharp tips. After being etched the tips are ready for use in scanning tunneling microscopes, or they may be bent to form integrated tip/cantilever systems in ordinary commercial atomic force microscopes, being applicable as tapping mode tips and as electrostatic force microscopy tips. ©1999......We report on the development of an etching setup for use in the preparation of platinum/iridium tips for atomic force microscopy and scanning electrostatic force microscopy as well as scanning tunneling microscopy. The etching process is based on a two step electrochemical procedure. The first step....... This mechanism is based on the formation of oxygen and hydrogen at the platinum/iridium electrode when the potential is above the dissociation potential of water (~ 1.23 V) and storage of these products interstitially in the outer layers of the platinum wire. This leads to "microexplosions" that detach fragments...

  5. Platinum nanoparticles decorated dendrite-like gold nanostructure on glassy carbon electrodes for enhancing electrocatalysis performance to glucose oxidation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jia, Hongmei [Hubei Collaborative Innovation Center for Advanced Organic Chemical Materials, Ministry-of-Education Key Laboratory for the Green Preparation and Application of Functional Materials, School of Materials Science and Engineering, Hubei University, No. 368 Youyi Avenue, Wuchang, Wuhan 430062 (China); Chang, Gang, E-mail: changgang@hubu.edu.cn [Hubei Collaborative Innovation Center for Advanced Organic Chemical Materials, Ministry-of-Education Key Laboratory for the Green Preparation and Application of Functional Materials, School of Materials Science and Engineering, Hubei University, No. 368 Youyi Avenue, Wuchang, Wuhan 430062 (China); Lei, Ming [State Key Laboratory of Information Photonics and Optical Communications, Beijing University of Posts and Telecommunications, Beijing 100876 (China); He, Hanping [College of Chemistry and Chemical Engineer, Hubei University, Youyi Road 368, Wuchang, Wuhan, Hubei 430062 (China); Liu, Xiong; Shu, Honghui; Xia, Tiantian; Su, Jie [Hubei Collaborative Innovation Center for Advanced Organic Chemical Materials, Ministry-of-Education Key Laboratory for the Green Preparation and Application of Functional Materials, School of Materials Science and Engineering, Hubei University, No. 368 Youyi Avenue, Wuchang, Wuhan 430062 (China); He, Yunbin, E-mail: ybhe@hubu.edu.cn [Hubei Collaborative Innovation Center for Advanced Organic Chemical Materials, Ministry-of-Education Key Laboratory for the Green Preparation and Application of Functional Materials, School of Materials Science and Engineering, Hubei University, No. 368 Youyi Avenue, Wuchang, Wuhan 430062 (China)

    2016-10-30

    Highlights: • Pt/DGNs/GC composites were obtained via a clean and facile method without any templates, surfactants, or stabilizers. • Controlling chemical reduction deposition time, the amount of platinum nanoparticles on Au surface could be regulated, which further tuned electrocatalytic properties toward glucose oxidation. • The obtained Pt/DGNs/GC composites with high electrochemical active surface area (ECSA) show superior electrocatalytic activity to glucose. • The sensor based on Pt/DGNs/GC exhibited excellent sensitivity, selectivity and stability for nonenzymatic glucose detection. - Abstract: Platinum nanoparticles decorated dendrite-like gold nanostructure, bimetal composite materials on glassy carbon electrode (Pt/DGNs/GC) for enhancing electrocatalysis to glucose oxidation was designed and successfully fabricated by a facile two-step deposition method without any templates, surfactants, or stabilizers. Dendrite-like gold nanostructure was firstly deposited on the GC electrode via the potentiostatic method, and then platinum nanoparticles were decorated on the surface of gold substrate through chemical reduction deposition. X-ray diffraction (XRD), field-emission scanning electron microscope (FE-SEM), energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDS) were applied to characterize the evolution of morphology and structure of the as-prepared Pt/DGNs/GC. Based on electrochemical measurements such as cyclic voltammetry, linear voltammetry and chronoamperometry, Pt/DGNs/GC exhibited significantly enhanced electrocatalytic performance to glucose oxidation compared those of pure dendrite-like Au nanoparticles in our previous report. Controlling chemical reduction deposition time, the amount of platinum nanoparticles on Au surface could be regulated, which further tuned electrocatalytic properties toward glucose oxidation. The dendrite-like gold surface partially covered by platinum nanoparticles dramatically enhanced the electrocatalytic performance for the

  6. The electrooxidation mechanism of formic acid on platinum and on lead ad-atoms modified platinum studied with the kinetic isotope effect

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bełtowska-Brzezinska, M.; Łuczak, T.; Stelmach, J.; Holze, R.

    2014-04-01

    Kinetics and mechanism of formic acid (FA) oxidation on platinum and upd-lead ad-atoms modified platinum electrodes have been studied using unlabelled and deuterated compounds. Poisoning of the electrode surface by CO-like species was prevented by suppression of dissociative chemisorption of FA due to a fast competitive underpotential deposition of lead ad-atoms on the Pt surface from an acidic solution containing Pb2+ cations. Modification of the Pt electrode with upd lead induced a catalytic effect in the direct electrooxidation of physisorbed FA to CO2. With increasing degree of H/D substitution, the rate of this reaction decreased in the order: HCOOH > DCOOH ≥ HCOOD > DCOOD. HCOOH was oxidized 8.5-times faster on a Pt/Pb electrode than DCOOD. This primary kinetic isotope effect proves that the C-H- and O-H-bonds are simultaneously cleaved in the rate determining step. A secondary kinetic isotope effect was found in the dissociative chemisorption of FA in the hydrogen adsorption-desorption range on a bare Pt electrode after H/D exchange in the C-H bond, wherein the influence of deuterium substitution in the O-H group was negligibly small. Thus the C-H bond cleavage is accompanied by the C-OH and not the O-H bond split in the FA decomposition, producing CO-like species on the Pt surface sites.

  7. Step instability of the In0.2Ga0.8As (001) surface during annealing

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhang Bi-Chan; Zhou Xun; Luo Zi-Jiang; Guo Xiang; Ding Zhao

    2012-01-01

    Anisotropic evolution of the step edges on the compressive-strained In0.2Gao.8As/GaAs(001) surface has been investigated by scanning tunneling microscopy (STM).The experiments suggest that step edges are indeed sinuous and protrude somewhere a little way along the [1(1)0] direction,which is different from the classical waviness predicted by the theoretical model.We consider that the monatomic step edges undergo a morphological instability induced by the anisotropic diffusion of adatoms on the terrace during annealing,and we improve a kinetic model of step edge based on the classical Burton-Cabrera-Frank (BCF) model in order to determine the normal velocity of step enlargement.The results show that the normal velocity is proportional to the arc length of the peninsula,which is consistent with the first result of our kinetic model.Additionally,a significant phenomenon is an excess elongation along the [1(1)0] direction at the top of the peninsula with a higher aspect ratio,which is attributed to the restriction of diffusion lengths.

  8. Optical properties and surface morphology of ZnTe thin films prepared by multiple potential steps

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gromboni, Murilo F.; Lucas, Francisco W. S.; Mascaro, Lucia H., E-mail: lmascaro@ufscar.br [Universidade de Federal de Sao Carlos (LIEC/UFSCar), SP (Brazil). Departamento de Quimica. Lab. de Eletroquimica e Ceramica

    2014-03-15

    In this work, the ZnTe thin films were electrodeposited using potentiostatic steps, on Pt substrate. The effect of steps number, the deposition time for each element (Zn or Te) and layer order (Zn/Te or Te/Zn) in the morphology, composition, band gap energy and photocurrent was evaluated. Microanalysis data showed that the ratio Zn/Te ranged from 0.12 and 0.30 and the film was not stoichiometric. However, the band-gap value obtained from in all experimental conditions used in this work was 2.28 eV, indicating film growth of ZnTe. The samples with higher Zn showed higher photocurrent, which was of the order of 2.64 μA cm{sup -2} and dendritic morphology (author)

  9. Continuum Limit of a Mesoscopic Model with Elasticity of Step Motion on Vicinal Surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Yuan; Liu, Jian-Guo; Lu, Jianfeng

    2016-12-01

    This work considers the rigorous derivation of continuum models of step motion starting from a mesoscopic Burton-Cabrera-Frank-type model following the Xiang's work (Xiang in SIAM J Appl Math 63(1):241-258, 2002). We prove that as the lattice parameter goes to zero, for a finite time interval, a modified discrete model converges to the strong solution of the limiting PDE with first-order convergence rate.

  10. Surface Roughness Characterization of Niobium Subjected to Incremental BCP and EP Processing Steps

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hui Tian; Guihem Ribeill; Charles Reece; Michael Kelley

    2008-02-12

    The surface of niobium samples polished under incremental Buffered Chemical Polish (BCP) and Electro-Polishing (EP) have been characterized through Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM) and stylus profilometry across a range of length of scales. The results were analyzed using Power Density Spectral (PSD) technique to determine roughness and characteristic dimensions. This study has shown that the PSD method is a valuable tool that provides quantitative information about surface roughness at different length scales.

  11. A ONE-STEP SURFACE MODIFICATION PROCEDURE TO PEG-GRAFTED NANO-TITANIA

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yong-liang Zhu; Bin Wang; Jian Yu; Zhao-xia Guo

    2007-01-01

    PEG (Polyethylene Glycol)-grafted nano-titania has been obtained in a one-step procedure using hexamethylene diisocyanate as the coupling agent and dibutyltin dilaurate as the catalyst in toluene at 80℃ and characterized qualitatively by FTIR and quantitatively by elemental analysis and thermogravimetric analysis. A comparison of nano-titania with two other commonly used inorganic nanoparticles, nano-silica and nano-alumina, is made, revealing that reactivity order is nanosilica > nano-alumina > nano-titania in view of PEG grafting. Possible mechanism of PEG grafting is also discussed.

  12. Acoustic surface perception from naturally occurring step sounds of a dexterous hexapod robot

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cuneyitoglu Ozkul, Mine; Saranli, Afsar; Yazicioglu, Yigit

    2013-10-01

    Legged robots that exhibit dynamic dexterity naturally interact with the surface to generate complex acoustic signals carrying rich information on the surface as well as the robot platform itself. However, the nature of a legged robot, which is a complex, hybrid dynamic system, renders the more common approach of model-based system identification impractical. The present paper focuses on acoustic surface identification and proposes a non-model-based analysis and classification approach adopted from the speech processing literature. A novel feature set composed of spectral band energies augmented by their vector time derivatives and time-domain averaged zero crossing rate is proposed. Using a multi-dimensional vector classifier, these features carry enough information to accurately classify a range of commonly occurring indoor and outdoor surfaces without using of any mechanical system model. A comparative experimental study is carried out and classification performance and computational complexity are characterized. Different feature combinations, classifiers and changes in critical design parameters are investigated. A realistic and representative acoustic data set is collected with the robot moving at different speeds on a number of surfaces. The study demonstrates promising performance of this non-model-based approach, even in an acoustically uncontrolled environment. The approach also has good chance of performing in real-time.

  13. Platinum nitride with fluorite structure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yu, Rong; Zhang, Xiao-Feng

    2005-01-31

    The mechanical stability of platinum nitride has been studied using first-principles calculations. By calculating the single-crystal elastic constants, we show that platinum nitride can be stabilized in the fluorite structure, in which the nitrogen atoms occupy all the tetrahedral interstitial sites of the metal lattice. The stability is attributed to the pseudogap effect from analysis of the electronic structure.

  14. Mechanical stability of two-step chemically deposited hydroxyapatite coating on Ti substrate: effects of various surface pretreatments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zavgorodniy, Alexander V; Borrero-López, Oscar; Hoffman, Mark; LeGeros, Racquel Z; Rohanizadeh, Ramin

    2011-10-01

    The success of implants in orthopaedic and dental load-bearing applications crucially depends on the initial biological fixation of implants in surrounding bone tissues. Using hydroxyapatite (HA) coating on Ti implant as carrier for bone morphogenetic proteins (BMPs) may promote the osteointegration of implants; therefore, reduce the risk of implant failure. The goal of this study was to develop an HA coating method in conditions allowing the incorporation of protein-based drugs into the coating materials, while achieving a mechanical stable coating on Ti implant. HA coatings were deposited on six different groups of Ti surfaces: control (no pretreatment), pretreated with alkali, acid, heat at 800°C, grit blasted with Al₂O₃, and grit blasted followed by heat treatment. HA coating was prepared using a two-step procedure. First step was the chemical deposition of a monetite coating on Ti substrate in acidic condition at 75°C and the second step was the hydrolysis of the monetite coating to HA. Coatings were characterized by scanning electron microscope (SEM), energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDS), and X-ray diffraction (XRD). The roughness of substrates and coatings was measured using profilometry technique. The mechanical stability of the coatings deposited on the pretreated substrates was assessed using scratch test. The coatings deposited on the grit-blasted Ti surface demonstrated superior adhesive properties with critical shearing stress 131.6 ± 0.2 MPa.

  15. One-dimensional model of interacting-step fluctuations on vicinal surfaces: Analytical formulas and kinetic Monte-Carlo simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patrone, Paul; Einstein, T. L.; Margetis, Dionisios

    2011-03-01

    We study a 1+1D, stochastic, Burton-Cabrera-Frank (BCF) model of interacting steps fluctuating on a vicinal crystal. The step energy accounts for entropic and nearest-neighbor elastic-dipole interactions. Our goal is to formulate and validate a self-consistent mean-field (MF) formalism to approximately solve the system of coupled, nonlinear stochastic differential equations (SDEs) governing fluctuations in surface motion. We derive formulas for the time-dependent terrace width distribution (TWD) and its steady-state limit. By comparison with kinetic Monte-Carlo simulations, we show that our MF formalism improves upon models in which step interactions are linearized. We also indicate how fitting parameters of our steady state MF TWD may be used to determine the mass transport regime and step interaction energy of certain experimental systems. PP and TLE supported by NSF MRSEC under Grant DMR 05-20471 at U. of Maryland; DM supported by NSF under Grant DMS 08-47587.

  16. Detonation nanodiamonds biofunctionalization and immobilization to titanium alloy surfaces as first steps towards medical application

    OpenAIRE

    Gonçalves, Juliana P L; Shaikh, Afnan Q; Manuela Reitzig; Daria A. Kovalenko; Jan Michael; René Beutner; Gianaurelio Cuniberti; Dieter Scharnweber; Jörg Opitz

    2014-01-01

    Due to their outstanding properties nanodiamonds are a promising nanoscale material in various applications such as microelectronics, polishing, optical monitoring, medicine and biotechnology. Beyond the typical diamond characteristics like extreme hardness or high thermal conductivity, they have additional benefits as intrinsic fluorescence due to lattice defects without photobleaching, obtained during the high pressure high temperature process. Further the carbon surface and its various fun...

  17. Elementary steps of NOx adsorption and surface reaction on a commercial storage–reduction catalyst

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sedlmair, Ch.; Seshan, K.; Jentys, A.; Lercher, J.A.

    2003-01-01

    The surface species formed during adsorption of NOx on a commercial NSR catalyst (containing barium oxide, Pt, and alumina as the main components) were investigated by in situ IR spectroscopy. During adsorption of NO, mainly linear and bridged bonded nitrites of Ba- O- N- O- Ba type were formed on A

  18. Carbon nanotube detectors for microchip CE: comparative study of single-wall and multiwall carbon nanotube, and graphite powder films on glassy carbon, gold, and platinum electrode surfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pumera, Martin; Merkoçi, Arben; Alegret, Salvador

    2007-04-01

    The performance of microchip electrophoresis/electrochemistry system with carbon nanotube (CNT) film electrodes was studied. Electrocatalytic activities of different carbon materials (single-wall CNT (SWCNT), multiwall CNT (MWCNT), carbon powder) cast on different electrode substrates (glassy carbon (GC), gold, and platinum) were compared in a microfluidic setup and their performance as microchip electrochemical detectors was assessed. An MWCNT film on a GC electrode shows electrocatalytic effect toward oxidation of dopamine (E(1/2) shift of 0.09 V) and catechol (E(1/2) shift of 0.19 V) when compared to a bare GC electrode, while other CNT/carbon powder films on the GC electrode display negligible effects. Modification of a gold electrode by graphite powder results in a strong electrocatalytic effect toward oxidation of dopamine and catechol (E(1/2) shift of 0.14 and 0.11 V, respectively). A significant shift of the half-wave potentials to lower values also provide the MWCNT film (E(1/2) shift of 0.08 and 0.08 V for dopamine and catechol, respectively) and the SWCNT film (E(1/2) shift of 0.10 V for catechol) when compared to a bare gold electrode. A microfluidic device with a CNT film-modified detection electrode displays greatly improved separation resolution (R(s)) by a factor of two compared to a bare electrode, reflecting the electrocatalytic activity of CNT.

  19. First steps to Virtual Mammography: Simulating external compressions of the breast with the Surface Evolver

    CERN Document Server

    Nascimento, Marcelo Zanchetta do

    2014-01-01

    In this paper we introduce a computational modelling that reproduces the breast compression processes used to obtain the mammogram. The main result is a programme in which one can track the first steps of virtual mammography. On the one hand, our modelling enables addition of structures that represent different tissues, muscles and glands in the breast. On the other hand, we shall validate and implement it by means of laboratory tests with phantoms. To the best of our knowledge, these two characteristics do confer originality to our research. This is because their interrelation seems not to be properly established elsewhere yet. We conclude that our model reproduces the same shapes and measurements really taken from the volunteer's breasts.

  20. Oscillatory instabilities in the electrooxidation of borohydride on platinum

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Machado, Eduardo G.; Varela, Hamilton, E-mail: varela@iqsc.usp.br [Universidade de Sao Paulo (USP), Sao Carlos, SP (Brazil). Instituto de Quimica

    2014-03-15

    The borohydride ion has been pointed as a promising alternative fuel. Most of the investigation on its electrochemistry is devoted to the electrocatalytic aspects of its electrooxidation on platinum and gold surfaces. Besides the known kinetic limitations and intricate mechanism, our Group has recently found the occurrence of two regions of bi-stability and autocatalysis in the electrode potential during the open circuit interaction of borohydride and oxidized platinum surfaces. Following this previous contribution, the occurrence of more complicated phenomena is here presented: namely the presence of electrochemical oscillations during the electrooxidation of borohydride on platinum in alkaline media. Current oscillations were found to be associated to two distinct instability windows and characterized in the resistance-potential parameter plane. The dynamic features of such oscillations suggest the existence of distinct mechanisms according to the potential region. Previously published results obtained under non-oscillatory regime were used to give some hints on the surface chemistry behind the observed dynamics. (author)

  1. A Two-Step Double Filter Method to Extract Open Water Surfaces from Landsat ETM+ Imagery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Haijing; Kinzelbach, Wolfgang

    2010-05-01

    In arid and semi-arid areas, lakes and temporal ponds play a significant role in agriculture and livelihood of local communities as well as in ecology. Monitoring the changes of these open water bodies allows to draw conclusions on water use as well as climatic impacts and can assist in the formulation of a sustainable resource management strategy. The simultaneous monitoring of larger numbers of water bodies with respect to their stage and area is feasible with the aid of remote sensing. Here the monitoring of lake surface areas is discussed. Landsat TM and ETM+ images provide a medium resolution of 30m, and offer an easily available data source to monitor the long term changes of water surfaces in arid and semi-arid regions. In the past great effort was put into developing simple indices to extract water surfaces from satellite images. However, there is a common problem in achieving accurate results with these indices: How to select a threshold value for water pixels without introducing excessive subjective judgment. The threshold value would also have to vary with location, land features and seasons, allowing for inherent uncertainty. A new method was developed using Landsat ETM+ imaginary (30 meter resolution) to extract open water surfaces. This method uses the Normalized Difference of Vegetation Index (NDVI) as the basis for an objective way of selecting threshold values of Modified Normalized Difference of Water Index (MNDWI) and Stress Degree Days (SDD), which were used as a combined filter to extract open water surfaces. We choose two study areas to verify the method. One study area is in Northeast China, where bigger lakes, smaller muddy ponds and wetlands are interspersed with agricultural land and salt crusts. The other one is Kafue Flats in Zambia, where seasonal floods of the Zambezi River create seasonal wetlands in addition to the more permanent water ponds and river channels. For both sites digital globe images of 0.5 meter resolution are available

  2. Thermodynamics, kinetics, and catalytic effect of dehydrogenation from MgH2 stepped surfaces and nanocluster: a DFT study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reich, Jason; Wang, Linlin; Johnson, Duane

    2013-03-01

    We detail the results of a Density Functional Theory (DFT) based study of hydrogen desorption, including thermodynamics and kinetics with(out) catalytic dopants, on stepped (110) rutile and nanocluster MgH2. We investigate competing configurations (optimal surface and nanoparticle configurations) using simulated annealing with additional converged results at 0 K, necessary for finding the low-energy, doped MgH2 nanostructures. Thermodynamics of hydrogen desorption from unique dopant sites will be shown, as well as activation energies using the Nudged Elastic Band algorithm. To compare to experiment, both stepped structures and nanoclusters are required to understanding and predict the effects of ball milling. We demonstrate how these model systems relate to the intermediary sized structures typically seen in ball milling experiments.

  3. Flexible, Low Cost, and Platinum-Free Counter Electrode for Efficient Dye-Sensitized Solar Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ali, Abid; Shehzad, Khurram; Ur-Rahman, Faiz; Shah, Syed Mujtaba; Khurram, Muhammad; Mumtaz, Muhammad; Sagar, Rizwan Ur Rehman

    2016-09-28

    A platinum-free counter electrode composed of surface modified aligned multiwalled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) fibers was fabricated for efficient flexible dye-sensitized solar cells (DSSCs). Surface modification of MWCNTs fibers with simple one step hydrothermal deposition of cobalt selenide nanoparticles, confirmed by scanning electron microscopy and X-ray diffraction, provided a significant improvement (∼2-times) in their electrocatalytic activity. Cyclic voltammetry and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy suggest a photoelectric conversion efficiency of 6.42% for our modified fibers, higher than 3.4% and 5.6% efficeincy of pristine MWCNTs fiber and commonly used Pt wire, respectively. Good mechanical and performance stability after repeated bending and high output voltage for in-series connection suggest that our surface modified MWCNTs fiber based DSSCs may find applications as flexible power source in next-generation flexible/wearable electronics.

  4. SALSA: a regulator of the early steps of complement activation on mucosal surfaces

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martin eReichhardt

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Complement is present mainly in blood. However, following mechanical damage or inflammation, serous exudates enter the mucosal surfaces. Here the complement proteins interact with other endogenous molecules to keep microbes from entering the parenteral tissues. One of the mucosal proteins known to interact with the early complement components of both the classical and the lectin pathway, is the salivary scavenger and agglutinin (SALSA. SALSA is also known as DMBT1 (deleted in malignant brain tumors 1 and gp340. It is found both attached to the epithelium and secreted into the surrounding fluids of most mucosal surfaces. SALSA has been shown to bind directly to C1q, mannose binding lectin (MBL and the ficolins. Through these interactions SALSA regulates activation of the complement system. In addition, SALSA interacts with surfactant proteins A and D, secretory IgA and lactoferrin. Ulcerative colitis and Crohn’s disease are examples of diseases, where complement activation in mucosal tissues may occur. This review describes the latest advances in our understanding of how the early complement components interact with the SALSA molecule. Furthermore, we discuss how these interactions may affect disease propagation on mucosal surfaces in immunological and inflammatory diseases.

  5. Universal steps in quantum dynamics with time-dependent potential-energy surfaces: Beyond the Born-Oppenheimer picture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Albareda, Guillermo; Abedi, Ali; Tavernelli, Ivano; Rubio, Angel

    2016-12-01

    It was recently shown [G. Albareda et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 113, 083003 (2014)], 10.1103/PhysRevLett.113.083003 that within the conditional decomposition approach to the coupled electron-nuclear dynamics, the electron-nuclear wave function can be exactly decomposed into an ensemble of nuclear wave packets effectively governed by nuclear conditional time-dependent potential-energy surfaces (C-TDPESs). Employing a one-dimensional model system, we show that for strong nonadiabatic couplings the nuclear C-TDPESs exhibit steps that bridge piecewise adiabatic Born-Oppenheimer potential-energy surfaces. The nature of these steps is identified as an effect of electron-nuclear correlation. Furthermore, a direct comparison with similar discontinuities recently reported in the context of the exact factorization framework allows us to draw conclusions about the universality of these discontinuities, viz., they are inherent to all nonadiabatic nuclear dynamics approaches based on (exact) time-dependent potential-energy surfaces.

  6. Why (1 0 0) terraces break and make bonds: oxidation of dimethyl ether on platinum single-crystal electrodes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Hongjiao; Calle-Vallejo, Federico; Kolb, Manuel J; Kwon, Youngkook; Li, Yongdan; Koper, Marc T M

    2013-09-25

    A surface structural preference for (1 0 0) terraces of fcc metals is displayed by many bond-breaking or bond-making reactions in electrocatalysis. Here, this phenomenon is explored in the electrochemical oxidation of dimethyl ether (DME) on platinum. The elementary C-O bond-breaking step is identified and clarified by combining information obtained from single-crystal experiments and density functional theory (DFT) calculations. Experiments on Pt(1 0 0), Pt(5 1 0), and Pt(10 1 0) surfaces show that the surface structure sensitivity is due to the bond-breaking step, which is unfavorable on step sites. DFT calculations suggest that the precursor for the bond-breaking step is a CHOC adsorbate that preferentially adsorbs on a square ensemble of four neighboring atoms on Pt(1 0 0) terraces, named as "the active site". Step sites fail to strongly adsorb CHOC and are, therefore, ineffective in breaking C-O bonds, resulting in a decrease in activity on surfaces with increasing step density. Our combined experimental and computational results allow the formulation of a new mechanism for the electro-oxidation of DME as well as a simple general formula for the activity of different surfaces toward electrocatalytic reactions that prefer (1 0 0) terrace active sites.

  7. A Novel Single-Step Surface-Treatment Process for Forming Cr-Nitride Coatings on Steels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, X. J.; Xiang, Z. D.

    2017-02-01

    A novel single-step surface-treatment process is demonstrated for forming Cr-nitride coatings on steels. The process was carried out at 1327 K (1100 °C) for two steel grades with differing carbon concentrations. For steel grade with 0.42 to 0.5C (wt pct), the coatings formed consisted of an outer Cr2N layer and an inner Cr-carbide layer with a Cr-enriched interdiffusion zone underneath. However, for steel grade with C ≤ 0.17 wt pct, the inner Cr-carbide layer was absent.

  8. One-Step Fabrication of Hierarchically Structured Silicon Surfaces and Modification of Their Morphologies Using Sacrificial Layers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seong J. Cho

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Fabrication of one-dimensional nanostructures is a key issue for optical devices, fluidic devices, and solar cells because of their unique functionalities such as antireflection and superhydrophobicity. Here, we report a novel one-step process to fabricate patternable hierarchical structures consisting of microstructures and one-dimensional nanostructures using a sacrificial layer. The layer plays a role as not only a micromask for producing microstructures but also as a nanomask for nanostructures according to the etching time. Using this method, we fabricated patterned hierarchical structures, with the ability to control the shape and density of the nanostructure. The various architectures provided unique functionalities. For example, our sacrificial-layer etching method allowed nanostructures denser than what would be attainable with conventional processes to form. The dense nanostructure resulted in a very low reflectance of the silicon surface (less than 1%. The nanostructured surface and hierarchically structured surface also exhibited excellent antiwetting properties, with a high contact angle (>165° and low sliding angle (<1°. We believe that our fabrication approach will provide new insight into functional surfaces, such as those used for antiwetting and antireflection surface applications.

  9. Distribution of platinum and cobalt atoms in a bimetallic nanoparticle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chui, Yu Hang; Chan, Kwong-Yu

    2005-06-01

    Molecular dynamics simulations are performed to investigate the atomic distribution and the structure of platinum-cobalt nanoparticles. Heating and cooling techniques are applied before getting equilibrated structures at 298 K. Both crystalline (fcc) and amorphous structures are partly observed depending on cooling rates. The atomic distributions in different regions of a bimetallic nanoparticle are analyzed. Although platinum tends to occupy surface and near-surface sites of the bimetallic nanoparticle, a complete segregation to form a core-shell structure is not observed.

  10. One-step surface selective modification of UV-curable hard coatings with photochemical metal organics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Yoon Kwang; Park, Chang-Sun; Park, Hyung-Ho

    2016-12-01

    An organic-inorganic hybrid bi-layer film with a selective distribution of inorganic components was synthesized from a one-pot process of UV irradiation. A photochemical metal oxide precursor (Sr 2-ethylhexanoate) varying from 0 to 4 wt% was dispersed in UV-curable coating materials. Under UV exposure, the bi-layer started reacting simultaneously but at different rates due to differences in the two UV-condensable components' reactivity. The effects of the dispersed inorganic component on the surface morphology and mechanical properties were investigated by atomic force microscopy and nanoindentation, respectively. The reaction process and rates were studied from linkage change using Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy at various UV exposure times (0-30 min). The elemental distribution and the interface on the coating layer were characterized by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy from Ar etching, revealing continuous and gradual composition changes in depth. The results showed that a flattened and surface-selectively hardened SrO containing the coating film could be obtained by this simple process. Consequently, a small ratio of photochemical metal oxide reinforced the organic hard coating film's mechanical properties through the formation of an effective SrO top layer.

  11. Grafting oligothiophenes on surfaces by diazonium electroreduction: a step toward ultrathin junction with well-defined metal/oligomer interface.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stockhausen, Verena; Ghilane, Jalal; Martin, Pascal; Trippé-Allard, Gaelle; Randriamahazaka, Hyacinthe; Lacroix, Jean-Christophe

    2009-10-21

    The functionalization of electrode materials through diazonium electroreduction using a heteroaromatic compound, without phenyl groups, has been investigated for the first time. The electrochemical reduction of 2-aminoterthiophenyldiazonium cation, generated in situ, coats the electrode (glassy carbon (GC), gold or platinum) with an ultrathin organic layer, shown by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) of that deposited on gold to consist of terthiophene or oligothiophene. The coating is electroactive at potential close to that of terthiophene in solution. The electrochemical response of the modified GC electrode in the presence of various reversible redox couples shows that the attached layer acts as a conductive switch. It behaves as a barrier to electron transfer when the standard redox potential is below 0.5 V/SCE; in this case diode-like behavior is observed. However, for more oxidizing redox probes the layer can be considered as transparent and no barrier effect is observed. The layer deposited on a platinum ultramicroelectrode (UME) behaves similarly to that obtained on the large GC electrode. Scanning electrochemical microscopy (SECM) can be performed using this electroswitchable modified platinum UME which can act as a filter toward competitive redox exchange pathways.

  12. Zwitterionic sulfobetaine-grafted poly(vinylidene fluoride) membrane surface with stably anti-protein-fouling performance via a two-step surface polymerization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li Qian; Bi Qiuyan; Zhou Bo [Membrane Technology and Engineering Research Center, Department of Chemical Engineering, Tsinghua University, Beijing 100084 (China); Wang Xiaolin, E-mail: xl-wang@tsinghua.edu.cn [Membrane Technology and Engineering Research Center, Department of Chemical Engineering, Tsinghua University, Beijing 100084 (China)

    2012-03-01

    A zwitterionic polymer, poly(3-(methacryloylamino) propyl-dimethyl-(3-sulfopropyl) ammonium hydroxide) (poly(MPDSAH)) was successfully grafted in high density from the surface of poly(vinylidene fluoride) (PVDF) hollow fiber membrane via a two-step polymerization. Poly(2-hydroxyethyl methacrylate) (poly(HEMA)) chains were firstly grafted from outside surface of PVDF membrane through atom transfer radical polymerization (ATRP) to provide the initiation sites for subsequent cerium (Ce (IV))-induced graft copolymerization of polyMPDSAH in the presence of N,N Prime -ethylene bisacrylamide (EBAA) as a cross-linking agent. Attenuated total reflectance-Fourier transform infrared (ATR-FTIR) spectroscopy, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) confirmed that the EBAA could stimulate zwitterionic polymers grafting onto the membrane surface. The dense poly(MPDSAH) layers on the PVDF membrane surface were revealed by the scanning electron microscope (SEM). The mechanical property of PVDF membrane was improved by the zwitterionic surface layers. The gravimetry results indicated the grafting amount increased to 520 {mu}g/cm{sup 2} for a copolymerization time of more than 3 h. Static and dynamic water contact angle measurements showed that the surface hydrophilicity of the PVDF membranes was significantly enhanced. As the grafting amount reached 513 {mu}g cm{sup -2}, the value of contact angle dropped to 22.1 Degree-Sign and the amount of protein adsorption decreased to zero. The cyclic experiments for BSA solution filtration demonstrated that the extent of protein fouling was significantly reduced and most of the fouling was reversible. The grafted polymer layer on the PVDF membrane showed a good stability during the membrane cleaning process. The experimental results concluded a good prospect in obtaining the sulfobetaine-modified PVDF membranes with high mechanical strength, good anti-protein-fouling performance, and long-term stability via the two-step polymerization.

  13. Platinum-polyaniline-modified carbon fiber electrode for the electrooxidation of methanol

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WU Kezhong; MENG Xu; WANG Xindong; LI Jingling

    2005-01-01

    Platinum was electrodeposited onto a polyaniline-modified carbon fiber electrode by the cyclic voltammetric method in sulfuric acid, which may enable an increase in the level of platinum u tilization currently achieved in electrocatalyric systems. This electrode preparation consists of a two-step procedure: first electropolymerization of aniline onto carbon fiber and then electrodeposition of platinum. The catalytic activity of the platinum-polyaniline-modified carbon fiber electrode (Pt/PAni/C) was compared with that of a bare carbon fiber electrode (Pt/C) by the oxidation of methanol. The maximum oxidation current of methanol on Pt/PAni/C is 50.7 mA.cm-2, which is 6.7 times higher than 7.6 mA.cm-2 on the Pt/C.Scanning electron microscopy was used to investigate the dispersion of the platinum particles of about 0.4 μm.

  14. Effect of the Platinum Electroplated Layer Thickness on the Coatings' Microstructure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zagula-Yavorska, Maryana; Gancarczyk, Kamil; Sieniawski, Jan

    2017-03-01

    CMSX 4 and Inconel 625 superalloys were coated by platinum layers (3 and 7 μm thick) in the electroplating process. The heat treatment of platinum layers (at 1,050 ˚C for 2 h) was performed to increase platinum adherence to the superalloys substrate. The diffusion zone obtained on CMSX 4 superalloy (3 and 7 μm platinum thick before heat treatment) consisted of two phases: γ-Ni(Al, Cr) and (Al0.25Pt0.75)Ni3. The diffusion zone obtained on Inconel 625 superalloy (3 μm platinum thick before heat treatment) consisted of the α-Pt(Ni, Cr, Al) phase. Moreover, γ-Ni(Cr, Al) phase was identified. The X-ray diffraction (XRD) results revealed the presence of platinum in the diffusion zone of the heat-treated coating (7 μm platinum thick) on Inconel 625 superalloy. The surface roughness parameter Ra of heat-treated coatings increased with the increase of platinum layers thickness. This was due to the unequal mass flow of platinum and nickel.

  15. Low specific contact resistance on epitaxial p-type 4H-SiC with a step-bunching surface

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    韩超; 张玉明; 宋庆文; 汤晓燕; 张义门; 郭辉; 王悦湖

    2015-01-01

    This paper reports the performances of Ti/Al based ohmic contacts fabricated on highly doped p-type 4H-SiC epitaxial layer which has a severe step-bunching surface. Different contact schemes are investigated based on the Al:Ti composition with no more than 50 at.%Al. The specific contact resistance (SCR) is obtained to be as low as 2.6 × 10−6Ω·cm2 for the bilayered Ti(100 nm)/Al(100 nm) contact treated with 3 min rapid thermal annealing (RTA) at 1000◦C. The microstructure analyses examined by physical and chemical characterization techniques reveal an alloy-assisted ohmic contact formation mechanism, i.e., a high degree of alloying plays a decisive role in forming the interfacial ternary Ti3SiC2 dominating the ohmic behavior of the Ti/Al based contact. Furthermore, a globally covered Ti3SiC2 layer with (0001)-oriented texture can be formed, regardless of the surface step bunching as well as its structural evolution during the metallization annealing.

  16. Quantum dot-enhanced detection of dual short RNA sequences via one-step template-dependent surface hybridization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Song Wenqing; Qiu Xue; Lau Choiwan [School of Pharmacy, Key Laboratory of Smart Drug Delivery, Ministry of Education and PLA, Fudan University, 826 Zhangheng Road, Shanghai 201203 (China); Lu Jianzhong, E-mail: jzlu@shmu.edu.cn [School of Pharmacy, Key Laboratory of Smart Drug Delivery, Ministry of Education and PLA, Fudan University, 826 Zhangheng Road, Shanghai 201203 (China)

    2012-07-20

    Graphical abstract: A novel multiplexed method for short RNA detection is reported that employed a design strategy in which quantum dots functionalized reporter DNA were used to capture a short single-stranded RNA sequence from a target solution and then to specifically adsorb onto a common capture probe-modified 96-well plate via a one-step template-dependent, surface hybridization for simultaneous fluorescence detection. Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer A ligase-free sensor was demonstrated for the specific detection of dual short RNA. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The method was sensitive and simultaneous. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Quantum dots-modified reporter probes could increase the melting temperature. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Quantum dots functionalized reporter DNA hybridized with capture DNA and target RNA. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Target RNA was captured via a one-step template-dependent hybridization. - Abstract: A novel multiplexed method for short RNA detection is reported that employs a design strategy in which capture and reporter probes anneal to each other in the presence of a short RNA target via the formation of a stable three-component complex. Quantum dots (QDs) functionalized with reporter DNA are thus specifically bound onto a capture probe-modified 96-well plate by one-step hybridization for simple RNA detection. In comparison with conventional organic dye-modified reporter probes, the use of reporter DNA-modified QD conjugates increase the melting temperature and lead to the detection of short RNA without the need for a ligation reaction. Moreover, QD properties allow multiple short RNA sequences to be simultaneously determined via rapid and simple one-step hybridization, as exemplified herein. The present results clearly demonstrate that this new strategy can be used to detect dual-short RNA sequence at concentrations of 10 pM in 100 {mu}L.

  17. Surface protection of light metals by one-step laser cladding with oxide ceramics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nowotny, S.; Richter, A.; Tangermann, K.

    1999-06-01

    Today, intricate problems of surface treatment can be solved through precision cladding using advanced laser technology. Metallic and carbide coatings have been produced with high-power lasers for years, and current investigations show that laser cladding is also a promising technique for the production of dense and precisely localized ceramic layers. In the present work, powders based on Al2O3 and ZrO2 were used to clad aluminum and titanium light alloys. The compact layers are up to 1 mm thick and show a nonporous cast structure as well as a homogeneous network of vertical cracks. The high adhesive strength is due to several chemical and mechanical bonding mechanisms and can exceed that of plasmasprayed coatings. Compared to thermal spray techniques, the material deposition is strictly focused onto small functional areas of the workpiece. Thus, being a precision technique, laser cladding is not recommended for large-area coatings. Examples of applications are turbine components and filigree parts of pump casings.

  18. Mussel-inspired one-step copolymerization to engineer hierarchically structured surface with superhydrophobic properties for removing oil from water.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Shouying

    2014-10-08

    In the present study, a superhydrophobic polyurethane (PU) sponge with hierarchically structured surface, which exhibits excellent performance in absorbing oils/organic solvents, was fabricated for the first time through mussel-inspired one-step copolymerization approach. Specifically, dopamine (a small molecular bioadhesive) and n-dodecylthiol were copolymerized in an alkaline aqueous solution to generate polydopamine (PDA) nanoaggregates with n-dodecylthiol motifs on the surface of the PU sponge skeletons. Then, the superhydrophobic sponge that comprised a hierarchical structured surface similar to the chemical/topological structures of lotus leaf was fabricated. The topological structures, surface wettability, and mechanical property of the sponge were characterized by scanning electron microscopy, contact angle experiments, and compression test. Just as a result of the highly porous structure, superhydrophobic property and strong mechanical stability, this sponge exhibited desirable absorption capability of oils/organic solvents (weight gains ranging from 2494% to 8670%), suggesting a promising sorbents for the removal of oily pollutants from water. Furthermore, thanks to the nonutilization of the complicated processes or sophisticated equipment, the fabrication of the superhydrophobic sponge seemed to be quite easy to scale up. All these merits make the sponge a competitive candidate when compared to the conventional absorbents, for example, nonwoven polypropylene fabric.

  19. One Step Quick Detection of Cancer Cell Surface Marker by Integrated NiFe-based Magnetic Biosensing Cell Cultural Chip

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Chenchen Bao; Lei Chen; Tao Wang; Chong Lei; Furong Tian; Daxiang Cui; Yong Zhou

    2013-01-01

    RGD peptides has been used to detect cell surface integrin and direct clinical effective therapeutic drug selection. Herein we report that a quick one step detection of cell surface marker that was realized by a specially designed NiFe-based magnetic biosensing cell chip combined with functionalized magnetic nanoparti-cles. Magnetic nanoparticles with 20-30 nm in diameter were prepared by coprecipitation and modified with RGD-4C, and the resultant RGD-functionalized magnetic nanoparticles were used for targeting cancer cells cul-tured on the NiFe-based magnetic biosensing chip and distinguish the amount of cell surface receptor-integrin. Cell lines such as Calu3, Hela, A549, CaFbr, HEK293 and HUVEC exhibiting different integrin expression were chosen as test samples. Calu3, Hela, HEK293 and HUVEC cells were successfully identified. This approach has advantages in the qualitative screening test. Compared with traditional method, it is fast, sensitive, low cost, easy-operative, and needs very little human intervention. The novel method has great potential in applications such as fast clinical cell surface marker detection, and diagnosis of early cancer, and can be easily extended to other biomedical applications based on molecular recognition.

  20. Single step method to fabricate durable superliquiphobic coating on aluminum surface with self-cleaning and anti-fogging properties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nanda, D; Varshney, P; Satapathy, M; Mohapatra, S S; Bhushan, B; Kumar, A

    2017-12-01

    The development of self-cleaning and anti-fogging durable superliquiphobic coatings for aluminum surfaces has raised tremendous interest in materials science. In this study, a superliquiphobic coating is fabricated on an aluminum surface by a single-step dip-coating method using 1H,1H,2H,2H-Perfluorooctyltrichlorosilane-modified SiO2 nanoparticles. The successful implementation of the aforesaid coating in different applications requires extensive investigations of its characteristics and stability. To understand the properties of the coating, surface morphology, contact angle, self-cleaning, anti-fogging, and water repellency were investigated under perturbation conditions. Additionally, the dynamics of water and oil on the coated sample also were studied. Furthermore, the durability of the coating also was examined by performing thermal, chemical, and mechanical stability tests. It was found that the coating is superliquiphobic for water, ethylene glycol, glycerol and hexadecane, and shows thermal, chemical, and mechanical stability. Further, it exhibits self-cleaning and anti-fogging properties. This approach can be applied to any size and shape aluminum surface; thus, it has great industrial applications. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Highly trifluoromethylated platinum compounds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martínez-Salvador, Sonia; Forniés, Juan; Martín, Antonio; Menjón, Babil

    2011-07-11

    The homoleptic, square-planar organoplatinum(II) compound [NBu(4)](2) [Pt(CF(3))(4)] (1) undergoes oxidative addition of CF(3) I under mild conditions to give rise to the octahedral organoplatinum(IV) complex [NBu(4)](2) [Pt(CF(3))(5)I] (2). This highly trifluoromethylated species reacts with Ag(+) salts of weakly coordinating anions in Me(2)CO under a wet-air stream to afford the aquo derivative [NBu(4)][Pt(CF(3))(5) (OH(2))] (4) in around 75% yield. When the reaction of 2 with the same Ag(+) salts is carried out in MeCN, the solvento compound [NBu(4) ][Pt(CF(3))(5)(NCMe)] (5) is obtained in around 80% yield. The aquo ligand in 4 as well as the MeCN ligand in 5 are labile and can be cleanly replaced by neutral and anionic ligands to furnish a series of pentakis(trifluoromethyl)platinate(IV) compounds with formulae [NBu(4)][Pt(CF(3))(5) (L)] (L=CO (6), pyridine (py; 7), tetrahydrothiophene (tht; 8)) and [NBu(4)](2) [Pt(CF(3))(5)X] (X=Cl (9), Br (10)). The unusual carbonyl-platinum(IV) derivative [NBu(4)][Pt(CF(3))(5) (CO)] (6) is thermally stable and has a ν(CO) of 2194 cm(-1). The crystal structures of 2⋅CH(2)Cl(2), 5, [PPh(4) ][Pt(CF(3))(5)(CO)] (6'), and 7 have been established by X-ray diffraction methods. Compound 2 has shown itself to be a convenient entry to the chemistry of highly trifluoromethylated platinum compounds. To the best of our knowledge, compounds 2 and 4-10 are the organoelement compounds with the highest CF(3) content to have been isolated and adequately characterized to date.

  2. Hydrogenation of o-cresol on platinum catalyst: Catalytic experiments and first-principles calculations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yaping; Liu, Zhimin; Xue, Wenhua; Crossley, Steven P.; Jentoft, Friederike C.; Wang, Sanwu

    2017-01-01

    Catalytic experiments were performed for the hydrogenation of o-cresol in n-dodecane over a platinum catalyst. Batch reactions analyzed with an in-situ ATR IR probe suggest that the hydrogenation results in the formation of the final product, 2-methyl-cyclohexanol, with 2-methyl-cyclohexanone as the intermediate product. Ab initio density-functional theory was employed to investigate the atomic-scale mechanism of o-cresol hydrogenation on the Pt(111) surface. The formation of 2-methyl-cyclohexanone was found to involve two steps. The first step is a hydrogen abstraction, that is, the H atom in the hydroxyl group migrates to the Pt surface. The second step is hydrogenation, that is, the pre-existing H atoms on Pt react with the carbon atoms in the aromatic ring. On the other hand, 2-methyl-cyclohexanonol may be produced through two paths, with activation energies slightly greater than that for the formation of 2-methyl-cyclohexanone. One path involves direct hydrogenation of the aromatic ring. Another path involves three steps, with the partial hydrogenation of the ring as the first step, hydrogen abstraction of the sbnd OH group as the second, and hydrogenation of remaining C atoms and the O atom the last.

  3. The influence of glancing angle deposited nano-rough platinum surfaces on the adsorption of fibrinogen and the proliferation of primary human fibroblasts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dolatshahi-Pirouz, A; Foss, M; Chevallier, J; Besenbacher, F [Interdisciplinary Nanoscience Center (iNANO), Aarhus University, Aarhus (Denmark); Pennisi, C P; Yoshida, K [Center for Sensory-Motor Interaction (SMI), Aalborg University, Aalborg (Denmark); Skeldal, S; Andreasen, P [Department of Molecular Biology, Aarhus University, Aarhus (Denmark); Zachar, V [Laboratory for Stem Cell Research, Aalborg University (Denmark)], E-mail: foss@inano.au.dk

    2009-03-04

    We have used the glancing angle deposition (GLAD) method as a simple and fast method to generate nano-rough surfaces for protein adsorption experiments and cell assays. The surface roughness and the detailed geometrical surface morphology of the thin films were characterized by atomic force microscopy (AFM) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). As the GLAD deposition angle approaches grazing incidence, sharp and whisker-like columnar protrusions are formed. Smaller and less sharp surface features appear for the thin films synthesized at higher deposition angles. By changing the GLAD deposition angle together with the total amount of mass deposited per area on the respective surfaces, the size of the surface features can be varied on the nanoscale. Using the GLAD topographies as model surfaces, we have investigated the influence of the nano-roughness on fibrinogen adsorption and on the proliferation of primary human fibroblasts. It is found that fibrinogen, an important blood protein, preferentially adheres on the whisker-like nano-rough substrates in comparison to a flat surface. Furthermore, the proliferation of the human fibroblasts is significantly reduced on the nano-rough substrates. These results demonstrate that the GLAD technique can be used to fabricate nano-rough surface morphologies that significantly influence both protein and cellular adhesion to surfaces and are therefore well suited for biological assays.

  4. Understanding platinum-induced ototoxicity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Langer, Thorsten; am Zehnhoff-Dinnesen, Antoinette; Radtke, Susanne; Meitert, Johannes; Zolk, Oliver

    2013-08-01

    Childhood cancer survival rates are now nearly 80% in more developed European countries because of improved therapies and better supportive care. Platinum chemotherapy drugs, such as cisplatin and carboplatin, are the cornerstone of many effective therapeutic protocols for childhood cancer. However, the antitumor efficacy of cisplatin and carboplatin comes at the cost of ototoxicity, which affects at least 60% of pediatric patients. Although ototoxicity is not life threatening, it can have debilitating effects on patients' quality of life. Recently, many initiatives have been launched with the ultimate goal of reducing cisplatin and high-dose carboplatin ototoxicity without compromising antitumor efficacy. This review addresses the incidence of platinum ototoxicity and its clinical presentation, time course, and early diagnostic evaluation. Genetic and non-genetic risk factors for platinum-associated ototoxicity, and their predictive value, are discussed. Recent developments in the prevention of platinum ototoxicity are also summarized. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Cyclic voltammetric investigations of microstructured and platinum-covered glassy carbon electrodes in contact with a polymer electrolyte membrane

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Scherer, G.G.; Veziridis, Z.; Staub, M. [Paul Scherrer Inst. (PSI), Villigen (Switzerland); Freimuth, H. [Inst. fuer Mikrotechnik Mainz IMM, Mainz (Germany)

    1997-06-01

    Model gas diffusion electrodes were prepared by microstructuring glassy carbon surfaces with high aspect ratios and subsequent deposition of platinum. These electrodes were characterized by hydrogen under-potential deposition (H-upd) in contact with a polymer electrolyte membrane employing cyclic voltametry. H-upd was found on platinum areas not in direct contact to the solid electrolyte, as long as a continuous platinum-path existed. A carbon surface between platinum acts as barrier for H-upd. (author) 4 figs., 5 refs.

  6. Inorganic nanocarriers for platinum drug delivery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ping’an Ma

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Nowadays platinum drugs take up almost 50% of all the clinically used anticancer drugs. Besides cisplatin, novel platinum agents including sterically hindered platinum (II drugs, chemically reductive platinum (IV drugs, photosensitive platinum (IV drugs, and multinuclear platinum drugs have been developed recently, with a few entering clinic trials. Rapid development of nanobiotechnology makes targeted delivery of anticancer platinum agents to the tumor site possible, while simultaneously minimizing toxicity and maximizing the drug efficacy. Being versatile drug carriers to deliver platinum drugs, inorganic nanovehicles such as gold nanoparticles, iron oxide nanomaterials, carbon nanotubes, mesoporous nanosilica, metal-organic frameworks (MOFs, have been extensively studied over the past decades. In contrast to conventional polymeric and lipid nanoparticles, inorganic nanoparticles based drug carriers are peculiar as they have shown excellent theranostic effects, revealing themselves an indispensable part of future nanomedicine. Here, we will elaborate recent research advances on fabrication of inorganic nanoparticles for platinum drug delivery.

  7. Platinum availability for future automotive technologies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alonso, Elisa; Field, Frank R; Kirchain, Randolph E

    2012-12-04

    Platinum is an excellent catalyst, can be used at high temperatures, and is stable in many aggressive chemical environments. Consequently, platinum is used in many current industrial applications, notably automotive catalytic converters, and prospective vehicle fuel cells are expected to rely upon it. Between 2005 and 2010, the automotive industry used approximately 40% of mined platinum. Future automotive industry growth and automotive sales shifts toward new technologies could significantly alter platinum demand. The potential risks for decreased platinum availability are evaluated, using an analysis of platinum market characteristics that describes platinum's geophysical constraints, institutional efficiency, and dynamic responsiveness. Results show that platinum demand for an automotive fleet that meets 450 ppm greenhouse gas stabilization goals would require within 10% of historical growth rates of platinum supply before 2025. However, such a fleet, due largely to sales growth in fuel cell vehicles, will more strongly constrain platinum supply in the 2050 time period. While current platinum reserves are sufficient to satisfy this increased demand, decreasing platinum ore grade and continued concentration of platinum supply in a single geographic area are availability risk factors to platinum end-users.

  8. Morphology controlled synthesis of platinum nanoparticles performed on the surface of graphene oxide using a gas-liquid interfacial reaction and its application for high-performance electrochemical sensing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bai, Wushuang; Sheng, Qinglin; Zheng, Jianbin

    2016-07-21

    In this paper, we report a novel morphology-controlled synthetic method. Platinum (Pt) nanoparticles with three kinds of morphology (aggregation-like, cube-like and globular) were grown on the surface of graphene oxide (GO) using a simple gas-liquid interfacial reaction and Pt/GO nanocomposites were obtained successfully. According to the experimental results, the morphology of the Pt nanoparticles can be controlled by adjusting the reaction temperature with the protection of chitosan. The obtained Pt/GO nanocomposites were characterized using transmission electron microscopy (TEM), X-ray diffraction (XRD) and fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR). Then the Pt/GO nanocomposites with the three kinds of morphology were all used to fabricate electrochemical sensors. The electrochemical experimental results indicated that compared with various reported electrochemical sensors, the Pt/GO modified sensors in this work exhibit a low detection limit, high sensitivity and an extra wide linear range for the detection of nitrite. In addition, the synthesis of Pt particles based on a gas-liquid interfacial reaction provides a new platform for the controllable synthesis of nanomaterials.

  9. Preparation of low-platinum-content platinum-nickel, platinum-cobalt binary alloy and platinum-nickel-cobalt ternary alloy catalysts for oxygen reduction reaction in polymer electrolyte fuel cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Mu; Lei, Yanhua; Sheng, Nan; Ohtsuka, Toshiaki

    2015-10-01

    A series of low-platinum-content platinum-nickel (Pt-Ni), platinum-cobalt (Pt-Co) binary alloys and platinum-nickel-cobalt (Pt-Ni-Co) ternary alloys electrocatalysts were successfully prepared by a three-step process based on electrodeposition technique and studied as electrocatalysts for oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) in polymer-electrolyte fuel cells. Kinetics of ORR was studied in 0.5 M H2SO4 solution on the Pt-Ni, Pt-Co and Pt-Ni-Co alloys catalysts using rotating disk electrode technique. Both the series of Pt-Ni, Pt-Co binary alloys and the Pt-Ni-Co ternary alloys catalysts exhibited an obvious enhancement of ORR activity in comparison with pure Pt. The significant promotion of ORR activities of Pt-Ni and Pt-Co binary alloys was attributed to the enhancement of the first electron-transfer step, whereas, Pt-Ni-Co ternary alloys presented a more complicated mechanism during the electrocatalysis process but a much more efficient ORR activities than the binary alloys.

  10. One-step fabrication of biomimetic superhydrophobic surface by electrodeposition on magnesium alloy and its corrosion inhibition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yan; Xue, Jingze; Luo, Dan; Wang, Huiyuan; Gong, Xu; Han, Zhiwu; Ren, Luquan

    2017-04-01

    A facile, rapid and one-step electrodeposition process has been employed to construct a superhydrophobic surface with micro/nano scale structure on a Mg-Sn-Zn (TZ51) alloy, which is expected to be applied as a biodegradable biomedical implant materials. By changing the electrodeposition time, the maximum contact angle of the droplet was observed as high as 160.4°±0.7°. The characteristics of the as-prepared surface were conducted by field emission scanning electron microscopy (FE-SEM), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and Fourier-transform infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR). Besides, the anti-corrosion performance of the coatings in stimulated body fluid (SBF) solution were investigated by electrochemical measurement. The results demonstrated that the anti-corrosion property of superhydrophobic surface was greatly improved. This method show beneficial effects on the wettability and corrosion behavior, and therefore provides a efficient route to mitigate the undesirable rapid corrosion of magnesium alloy in favor of application for clinical field. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Asymptotic degeneracy of the transfer matrix spectrum for systems with interfaces: Relation to surface stiffness and step free energy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Privman, V.; Svrakic, N.M.

    1989-02-01

    Two- and three-dimensional Ising-type systems are considered in the finite-cross-section cylindrical geometry. An interface is forced along the cylinder (strip in 2d) by the antiperiodic or /plus minus/ boundary conditions. Detailed predictions are presented for the largest asymptotically degenerate set of the transfer matrix eigenvalues. For rough interfaces, i.e., for O < T < T/sub c/ in 2d, T/sub R/ < T < T/sub c/ in 3d, the eigenvalues are split algebraically, and the spectral gaps are governed by the surface stiffness coefficient. For rigid interfaces, i.e., O < T < T /sub R/ in 3d, the eigenvalues are split exponentially, with the gaps determined by the step free energy.

  12. Addition of platinum and silver nanoparticles to toughen dental porcelain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fujieda, Tokushi; Uno, Mitsunori; Ishigami, Hajime; Kurachi, Masakazu; Wakamatsu, Nobukazu; Doi, Yutaka

    2012-01-01

    Several studies have investigated toughening porcelain that is layered over a frame or a core. The introduction of residual compressive stress to the surface of porcelain has been shown to be effective to strengthen it. In the present study, nanoparticles of precious metals of silver and platinum (rather than non-precious metals) were used to evaluate if they could increase the fracture resistance of porcelain. The addition of silver and platinum nanoparticles was found to improve the mechanical properties of porcelain since it increased both the Young's modulus and the fracture toughness of commercial porcelain.

  13. Structures of 38-atom gold-platinum nanoalloy clusters

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ong, Yee Pin; Yoon, Tiem Leong [School of Physics, Universiti Sains Malaysia, 11800 USM, Penang (Malaysia); Lim, Thong Leng [Faculty of Engineering and Technology, Multimedia University, Melaka Campus, 75450 Melaka (Malaysia)

    2015-04-24

    Bimetallic nanoclusters, such as gold-platinum nanoclusters, are nanomaterials promising wide range of applications. We perform a numerical study of 38-atom gold-platinum nanoalloy clusters, Au{sub n}Pt{sub 38−n} (0 ≤ n ≤ 38), to elucidate the geometrical structures of these clusters. The lowest-energy structures of these bimetallic nanoclusters at the semi-empirical level are obtained via a global-minimum search algorithm known as parallel tempering multi-canonical basin hopping plus genetic algorithm (PTMBHGA), in which empirical Gupta many-body potential is used to describe the inter-atomic interactions among the constituent atoms. The structures of gold-platinum nanoalloy clusters are predicted to be core-shell segregated nanoclusters. Gold atoms are observed to preferentially occupy the surface of the clusters, while platinum atoms tend to occupy the core due to the slightly smaller atomic radius of platinum as compared to gold’s. The evolution of the geometrical structure of 38-atom Au-Pt clusters displays striking similarity with that of 38-atom Au-Cu nanoalloy clusters as reported in the literature.

  14. Low specific contact resistance on epitaxial p-type 4H-SiC with a step-bunching surface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Chao; Zhang, Yu-Ming; Song, Qing-Wen; Tang, Xiao-Yan; Zhang, Yi-Men; Guo, Hui; Wang, Yue-Hu

    2015-11-01

    This paper reports the performances of Ti/Al based ohmic contacts fabricated on highly doped p-type 4H-SiC epitaxial layer which has a severe step-bunching surface. Different contact schemes are investigated based on the Al:Ti composition with no more than 50 at.% Al. The specific contact resistance (SCR) is obtained to be as low as 2.6 × 10-6 Ω·cm2 for the bilayered Ti(100 nm)/Al(100 nm) contact treated with 3 min rapid thermal annealing (RTA) at 1000 °C. The microstructure analyses examined by physical and chemical characterization techniques reveal an alloy-assisted ohmic contact formation mechanism, i.e., a high degree of alloying plays a decisive role in forming the interfacial ternary Ti3SiC2 dominating the ohmic behavior of the Ti/Al based contact. Furthermore, a globally covered Ti3SiC2 layer with (0001)-oriented texture can be formed, regardless of the surface step bunching as well as its structural evolution during the metallization annealing. Project supported by the Key Specific Projects of Ministry of Education of China (Grant No. 625010101), the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant No. 61234006), the Natural Science Foundation of ShaanXi Province, China (Grant No. 2013JQ8012), the Doctoral Fund of Ministry of Education of China (Grant No. 20130203120017), and the Specific Project of the Core Devices, China (Grant No. 2013ZX0100100-004).

  15. Effects of bismuth addition and photo-deposition of platinum on (surface) composition, morphology and visible light photocatalytic activity of sol-gel derived TiO2

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Yi, Wentao; Yan, Chunyan; Hamdy, Mohamed S.; Baltrusaitis, Jonas; Mul, Guido

    2014-01-01

    Several remarkable observations regarding structure, (surface) composition and visible light induced photocatalytic activity of Bi-promoted Anatase photocatalysts are reported. First, XPS characterization data show that compositions of mixed Bi-Ti-oxide phases obtained by hydrothermal treatment at

  16. Platinum on Carbon Nanofibers as Catalyst for Cinnamaldehyde Hydrogenation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Plomp, A.J.

    2009-01-01

    The aim of the work described in this thesis was to investigate the role and nature of nanostructured carbon materials, oxygen surface groups and promoters on platinum-based catalysts for the selective hydrogenation of cinnamaldehyde. The selective hydrogenation of cinnamaldehyde to cinnamyl alcohol

  17. Platinum redispersion on metal oxides in low temperature fuel cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tripkovic, Vladimir; Cerri, Isotta; Nagami, Tetsuo

    2013-01-01

    in detail; however, due to different operating conditions it is not straightforward to link the chemical and the electrochemical environment. The largest differences reflect in (1) the oxidation state of the surface (the oxygen species coverage), (2) temperature and (3) the possibility of platinum...

  18. Platinum on Carbon Nanofibers as Catalyst for Cinnamaldehyde Hydrogenation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Plomp, A.J.

    2009-01-01

    The aim of the work described in this thesis was to investigate the role and nature of nanostructured carbon materials, oxygen surface groups and promoters on platinum-based catalysts for the selective hydrogenation of cinnamaldehyde. The selective hydrogenation of cinnamaldehyde to cinnamyl alcohol

  19. The Role of Non-Conventional Supports for Single-Atom Platinum-Based Catalysts in Fuel-Cell Technology: A Theoretical Surface Science Approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-02-05

    on the thermodynamic stability of platinized TiN. 15. SUBJECT TERMS fuel cells , Theoretical modeling , electrodes 16. SECURITY CLASSIFICATION OF...system are reported for various surface coverages of Pt. We find that atomic Pt does not bind preferably to the clean TiN surface, but under typical PEM ...could be a promising catalyst for PEM fuel cells. Introduction: Proton exchange membrane fuel cells (PEMFCs) have found wide potential

  20. Interaction of DNA with Bis(diiminosuccinonitrilo)platinum(Ⅱ)

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG Zhi-Gang; SUN Yuan-Yuan; JIANG Xiao-Ming

    2008-01-01

    Interaction of DNA with bis(diiminosuccinonitrilo)platinum(Ⅱ) has been studied by UV-visible absorbance spectra, fluorescence spectra and viscosity measurements. The UV-visible absorption spectra of the metal complex exhibit hypochromism with a small blue shift on interaction with DNA. Scatchard plot analyses indicate that the binding sites of the metal complex on DNA are different from those of ethidium bromide. Viscosity experiments reveal that the binding of the metal complex decreases the relative viscosity of DNA. These results suggest that the platinum diimine complex interact with DNA by surface binding. These studies are helpful for us to understand the action mechanism of bis(diiminosuccinonitrilo)platinum(Ⅱ) as a potential photodynamic therapeutic agent, and further to develop it.

  1. Nanoporous PdZr surface alloy as highly active non-platinum electrocatalyst toward oxygen reduction reaction with unique structure stability and methanol-tolerance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duan, Huimei; Xu, Caixia

    2016-06-01

    Nanoporous (NP) PdZr alloy with controllable bimetallic ratio is successfully fabricated by a simple dealloying method. By leaching out the more reactive Al from PdZrAl precursor alloy, NP-PdZr alloy with smaller ligament size was generated, characterized by the nanoscaled interconnected network skeleton and hollow channels extending in all three dimensions. Upon voltammetric scan in acid solution, the dissolution of surface Zr atoms generates the highly active Pd-Zr surface alloy with a nearly pure Pd surface and Pd-Zr alloy core. The NP-Pd80Zr20 surface alloy exhibits markedly enhanced specific and mass activities as well as higher catalytic stability toward oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) compared with NP-Pd and the state-of-the-art Pt/C catalysts. In addition, the NP-Pd80Zr20 surface alloy shows a better selectivity for ORR than methanol in the 0.1 M HClO4 and 0.1 M methanol mixed solution. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and density functional theory calculations both demonstrate that the weakened Pd-O bond and improved ORR performances in turn depend on the downshifted d-band center of Pd due to the alloying Pd with Zr (20 at.%). The as-made NP-PdZr alloy holds prospective applications as a cathode electrocatalyst in fuel-cell-related technologies with the advantages of superior overall ORR performances, unique structure stability, and easy preparation.

  2. ChromAlign: A two-step algorithmic procedure for time alignment of three-dimensional LC-MS chromatographic surfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sadygov, Rovshan G; Maroto, Fernando Martin; Hühmer, Andreas F R

    2006-12-15

    We present an algorithmic approach to align three-dimensional chromatographic surfaces of LC-MS data of complex mixture samples. The approach consists of two steps. In the first step, we prealign chromatographic profiles: two-dimensional projections of chromatographic surfaces. This is accomplished by correlation analysis using fast Fourier transforms. In this step, a temporal offset that maximizes the overlap and dot product between two chromatographic profiles is determined. In the second step, the algorithm generates correlation matrix elements between full mass scans of the reference and sample chromatographic surfaces. The temporal offset from the first step indicates a range of the mass scans that are possibly correlated, then the correlation matrix is calculated only for these mass scans. The correlation matrix carries information on highly correlated scans, but it does not itself determine the scan or time alignment. Alignment is determined as a path in the correlation matrix that maximizes the sum of the correlation matrix elements. The computational complexity of the optimal path generation problem is reduced by the use of dynamic programming. The program produces time-aligned surfaces. The use of the temporal offset from the first step in the second step reduces the computation time for generating the correlation matrix and speeds up the process. The algorithm has been implemented in a program, ChromAlign, developed in C++ language for the .NET2 environment in WINDOWS XP. In this work, we demonstrate the applications of ChromAlign to alignment of LC-MS surfaces of several datasets: a mixture of known proteins, samples from digests of surface proteins of T-cells, and samples prepared from digests of cerebrospinal fluid. ChromAlign accurately aligns the LC-MS surfaces we studied. In these examples, we discuss various aspects of the alignment by ChromAlign, such as constant time axis shifts and warping of chromatographic surfaces.

  3. 3-Step dynamical downscaling with empirical correction of sea-surface conditions: application to a CORDEX Africa simulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hernández-Díaz, Leticia; Laprise, René; Nikiéma, Oumarou; Winger, Katja

    2016-06-01

    Dynamical downscaling of climate projections over a limited-area domain using a Regional Climate Model (RCM) requires boundary conditions (BC) from a Coupled Global Climate Model (CGCM) simulation. Biases in CGCM-generated BC can have detrimental effects in RCM simulations, so attempts to improve the BC used to drive the RCM simulations are worth exploring. It is in this context that an empirical method involving the bias correction of the sea-surface conditions (SSCs; sea-surface temperature and sea-ice concentration) simulated by a CGCM has been developed: The 3-step dynamical downscaling approach. The SSCs from a CGCM simulation are empirically corrected and used as lower BC over the ocean for an atmosphere-only global climate model (AGCM) simulation, which in turn provides the atmospheric lateral BC to drive the RCM simulation. We analyse the impact of this strategy on the simulation of the African climate, with a special attention to the West African Monsoon (WAM) precipitation, using the fifth-generation Canadian Regional Climate Model (CRCM5) over the CORDEX-Africa domain. The Earth System Model of the Max-Planck-Institut für Meteorologie (MPI-ESM-LR) is used as CGCM and a global version of CRCM5 is used as AGCM. The results indicate that the historical climate is much improved, approaching the skill of reanalysis-driven hindcast simulations. The most remarkable effect of this approach is the positive impact on the simulation of all aspects of the WAM precipitation, mainly due to the correction of SSCs. In fact, our results show that proper sea surface temperature (SST) in the Gulf of Guinea is a necessary condition for an adequate simulation of WAM precipitation, especially over the equatorial region of West Africa. It was found that the climate-change projections under RCP4.5 scenario obtained with the 3-step approach are substantially different from those obtained with usual downscaling approach in which the RCM is directly driven by the CGCM output; in

  4. Cross-reactivity of Halogenated Platinum Salts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Halogenated platinum (Pt) salts are well-known respiratory sensitizers associated with the development of asthma. People may be exposed to a variety of platinum compounds in different contexts (e.g. occupationally, automobile exhaust). Published reports suggest that sensitizati...

  5. Effects of bismuth addition and photo-deposition of platinum on (surface) composition, morphology and visible light photocatalytic activity of sol-gel derived TiO2

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Yi, Wentao; Yan, Chunyan; Hamdy, Mohamed S.; Baltrusaitis, Jonas; Mul, Guido

    2014-01-01

    Several remarkable observations regarding structure, (surface) composition and visible light induced photocatalytic activity of Bi-promoted Anatase photocatalysts are reported. First, XPS characterization data show that compositions of mixed Bi-Ti-oxide phases obtained by hydrothermal treatment at 1

  6. Bridging the pressure gap: In situ atomic-level investigations of model platinum catalyst surfaces under reaction conditions by scanning tunneling microscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McIntyre, B.J.

    1994-05-01

    Results of this thesis show that STM measurements can provide information about the surfaces and their adsorbates. Stability of Pt(110) under high pressures of H2, O2, and CO was studied (Chap. 4). In situ UHV and high vacuum experiments were carried out for sulfur on Pt(111) (Chap.5). STM studies of CO/S/Pt(111) in high CO pressures showed that the Pt substrate undergoes a stacking-fault-domain reconstruction involving periodic transitions from fcc to hcp stacking of top-layer atoms (Chap.6). In Chap.7, the stability of propylene on Pt(111) and the decomposition products were studied in situ with the HPSTM. Finally, in Chap.8, results are presented which show how the Pt tip of the HPSTM was used to locally rehydrogenate and oxidize carbonaceous clusters deposited on the Pt(111) surface; the Pt tip acted as a catalyst after activation by short voltage pulses.

  7. Novel non-platinum metal catalyst material

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2014-01-01

    The present invention relates to a novel non-platinum metal catalyst material for use in low temperature fuel cells and electrolysers and to fuel cells and electrolysers comprising the novel non-platinum metal catalyst material. The present invention also relates to a novel method for synthesizing...... the novel non-platinum metal catalyst material....

  8. The impact of the surface on step-bunching and diffusion of Ga on GaAs (001) in metal-organic vapour phase epitaxy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pristovsek, Markus; Poser, Florian; Richter, Wolfgang

    2016-07-01

    We studied diffusion by measuring step-bunching, island spacing, and the transition from step-flow growth to two-dimensional island growth of (001) GaAs in metal-organic vapour phase epitaxy and correlated them with the surface reconstruction measured by reflectance anisotropy spectroscopy. The V/III ratio had a small effect, while the square root of the growth rate was anti-proportional to the diffusion length. The thermal activation energy was about 2.3 eV on {{c}}(4× 4) terraces and 1.6 eV on (2× 4) domains at higher temperatures. Pronounced step-bunching coincided with large (4× 2) domains at the step-edges, causing smoother steps for the [11̅0] misorientation. This Ga-rich reconstruction at the step-edges is needed for the Schwoebel barrier to induce step-bunching. At higher temperatures of (2× 4) domains grow in size, the Schwoebel barrier reduces and nucleation becomes easier on this surface which reduces diffusion length and thus step-bunching.

  9. Platinum contamination issues in ferroelectric memories

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boubekeur, H.; Mikolajick, T.; Pamler, W.; Hopfner, J.; Frey, L.; Ryssel, H.

    2002-09-01

    The contamination risk of processing with platinum electrodes on device performance in ferroelectric memories is assessed in this work. Details of platinum diffusion to the active regions at annealing temperatures of 800 degC are investigated by secondary ion mass spectroscopy, deep level transient spectroscopy, and Rutherford backscattering spectrometry techniques. Cross sectional transmission electron microscopy and local elemental analysis by energy dispersive x-ray spectroscopy were used to examine the precipitation of Pt in defect free silicon as an eventual cause of gate oxide degradation. The impact of platinum contamination on device performance is evaluated under the typical ferroelectric memory processing conditions. Results from leakage current and charge to breakdown measurements of intentionally contaminated diode and metal-oxide-semiconductor (MOS) structures, respectively, are presented. The results show that the degradation depends strongly on device design and configuration. A phosphorus doped polysilicon plug, which has the function of connecting the select transistor to the capacitor module, provides effective gettering regions and prevents the diffusion of Pt atoms to the active regions. Under typical processing conditions, no evident Pt precipitates were observed and up to a concentration level of 4 x1014 atoms/cm2, the leakage current of intentionally contaminated diodes does not increase, if the contamination occurs after front-end phosphorus doped poly-Si processing. Results from constant current charge to breakdown show a small number of breakdown events due to redeposition of Pt at the periphery of the MOS structure. The risk of processing with Pt electrodes in ferroelectric memories requires great care. Precautions like sealing the back surface and incorporating phosphorus doped polysilicon as the plug material are necessary to avoid the detrimental effects of Pt.

  10. Relation between etch-pit morphology and step retreat velocity on a calcite surface in aspartic acid solution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoshino, Toru; Kagi, Hiroyuki; Kamiya, Natsumi; Kokawa, Ryohei

    2010-04-01

    Effects of L-aspartic acid ( L-Asp) on dissolution of calcite were investigated. The step retreat velocity and dissolution rate of calcite were measured simultaneously using an AFM flow-through system. The etch-pit morphology of calcite was observed using confocal laser scanning microscopy. Results show that the etch-pit morphologies changed drastically depending on the L-Asp concentration ([ L-Asp]) in the order of rhomboidal, pentagonal, and triangular (not perfectly, but retaining an extra step). The change in obtuse step directions and appearance of the [0 1 0] step triggered these morphological changes. Addition of L-Asp accelerated all step retreats at [ L-Asp]0.01 M, L-Asp inhibited the retreats of obtuse steps and [0 1 0] step, although the retreat velocities of acute steps were constant irrespective of [ L-Asp]. These results suggest that the directional changes and the inhibition of retreat velocities of obtuse steps were attributed to the generation of [ 4 1 1] and [4 5 1] steps caused by L-Asp. Moreover, we confirmed the preferential effects of L-Asp on the [4 8 1] + to [ 4 4 1] ± step edge, and proposed the preferential effects of L-Asp on the [ 4 1 1] to [4 5 1] step edge.

  11. Anisotropy in Ostwald ripening and step-terraced surface formation on GaAs(0 0 1): Experiment and Monte Carlo simulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kazantsev, D. M.; Akhundov, I. O.; Shwartz, N. L.; Alperovich, V. L.; Latyshev, A. V.

    2015-12-01

    Ostwald ripening and step-terraced morphology formation on the GaAs(0 0 1) surface during annealing in equilibrium conditions are investigated experimentally and by Monte Carlo simulation. Fourier and autocorrelation analyses are used to reveal surface relief anisotropy and provide information about islands and pits shape and their size distribution. Two origins of surface anisotropy are revealed. At the initial stage of surface smoothing, crystallographic anisotropy is observed, which is caused presumably by the anisotropy of surface diffusion at GaAs(0 0 1). A difference of diffusion activation energies along [1 1 0] and [1 1 bar 0] axes of the (0 0 1) face is estimated as ΔEd ≈ 0.1 eV from the comparison of experimental results and simulation. At later stages of surface smoothing the anisotropy of the surface relief is determined by the vicinal steps direction. At the initial stage of step-terraced morphology formation the kinetics of monatomic islands and pits growth agrees with the Ostwald ripening theory. At the final stage the size of islands and pits decreases due to their incorporation into the forming vicinal steps.

  12. Platinum Group Metals New Material

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    XIE Ming; ZHANG Jiankang; WANG Saibei; HU Jieqiong; LIU Manmen; CHEN Yongtai; ZHANG Jiming; YANG Youcai; YANG Yunfeng; ZHANG Guoquan

    2012-01-01

    Platinum group metals (PGM) include six elements,namely Pt,Pd,Rh,Ir,Os and Ru.PGM and their alloys are the important fundamental materials for modern industry and national defense construction,they have special physical and chemical properties,widely used in metallurgy,chemical,electric,electronic,information,energy,environmental protection,aviation,aerospace,navigation and other high technology industry.Platinum group metals and their alloys,which have good plasticity and processability,can be processed to electrical contact materials,resistance materials,solder,electronic paste,temperature-measurement materials,elastic materials,magnetic materials and high temperature structural materials.

  13. A self-polishing platinum ring voltammetric sensor and its application to complex media.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cavanillas, Santiago; Winquist, Fredrik; Eriksson, Mats

    2015-02-15

    A self-polishing voltammetric sensor was recently developed and has been applied to samples of urea, milk and sewage water. The polishing device continuously grinds a platinum ring electrode, offering a reproducible and clean electrode surface. Principal component analysis (PCA) and partial least squares (PLS) techniques were applied to interpret the data and to build prediction models. In an evaluation of samples with different urea concentrations, the grinding step allows for repeatable measurements, similar to those after electrochemical cleaning. Furthermore, for the determination of sewage water concentrations in drinking water and for the evaluation of different fat contents in milk samples, the polishing eliminates sensor drift produced by electrode fouling. The results show that the application of a self-polishing unit offers a promising tool for electrochemical studies of difficult analytes and complex media. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. One-step Synthesis of Shape-controllable Gold Nanoparticles and Their Application in Surface-enhanced Raman Scattering

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Lanlan Sun; Dongxu Zhao; Meng Ding; Haifeng Zhao; Zhenzhong Zhang; Binghui Li; Dezhen Shen

    2013-01-01

    Gold nanoparticles (NPs) of various shapes were synthesized by a one-step method at ambient temperature in the presence of NaCl.2-mercaptosuccinic acid (MSA) was used as both reducing agent and stabilizing agent.The shapes of gold NPs were controllable by simply tuning S/Au ratio (S is from MSA molecule,and S/Au ratio is controlled by tuning the volume of added MSA solution),and triangle,polygonal and spherical nanoparticles were obtained.This result suggested a new way to consider the effects of MSA on the growth of nanoparticles,which showed that MSA is a strong capping agent and facilitates more uniform growth of nanoparticles in every dimension.And other important factors on nanoparticles growth including NaCl and temperature were discussed.Furthermore,a typical probe molecule,4-aminothiophenol (4-ATP) was used to test the surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) activity of these gold NPs and the results indicated good Raman activity on these substrates.And the enhancement factor (EF) at 1078 cm-1 (a1) was estimated to be as large as 6.3 × 104 and 5.5 × 104 for triangular plates and truncated particles,respectively.

  15. Optimization of two-step bioleaching of spent petroleum refinery catalyst by Acidithiobacillus thiooxidans using response surface methodology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Srichandan, Haragobinda; Pathak, Ashish; Kim, Dong Jin; Lee, Seoung-Won

    2014-01-01

    A central composite design (CCD) combined with response surface methodology (RSM) was employed for maximizing bioleaching yields of metals (Al, Mo, Ni, and V) from as-received spent refinery catalyst using Acidithiobacillus thiooxidans. Three independent variables, namely initial pH, sulfur concentration, and pulp density were investigated. The pH was found to be the most influential parameter with leaching yields of metals varying inversely with pH. Analysis of variance (ANOVA) of the quadratic model indicated that the predicted values were in good agreement with experimental data. Under optimized conditions of 1.0% pulp density, 1.5% sulfur and pH 1.5, about 93% Ni, 44% Al, 34% Mo, and 94% V was leached from the spent refinery catalyst. Among all the metals, V had the highest maximum rate of leaching (Vmax) according to the Michaelis-Menten equation. The results of the study suggested that two-step bioleaching is efficient in leaching of metals from spent refinery catalyst. Moreover, the process can be conducted with as received spent refinery catalyst, thus making the process cost effective for large-scale applications.

  16. Surface chemical modification of TEOS based silica aerogels synthesized by two step (acid-base) sol-gel process

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bhagat, Sharad D. [Air Glass Laboratory, Department of Physics, Shivaji University, Kolhapur 416 004, Maharashtra (India); Rao, A. Venkateswara [Air Glass Laboratory, Department of Physics, Shivaji University, Kolhapur 416 004, Maharashtra (India)]. E-mail: avrao_phy@unishivaji.ac.in

    2006-04-15

    The present paper describes the comparative studies on the hydrophobic and physical properties of the tetraethoxysilane (TEOS) based silica aerogels prepared by two step sol-gel process followed by supercritical drying. Silica alcogels were prepared by keeping the molar ratio of TEOS:methanol (MeOH):H{sub 2}O (acidic):H{sub 2}O (basic) constant at 1:33:3.5:3.5 with oxalic acid and ammonium hydroxide concentrations fixed at 0.001 and 1 M, respectively. In all, nine different co-precursors (CP) of the type R {sub n}SiX{sub 4-n}, have been used. The aerogels have been characterized by density, porosity, percentage of volume shrinkage, optical transmission, contact angle and thermal conductivity measurements. The surface chemical modification of silica aerogels was confirmed by the presence of C-H and Si-C peaks at 2900, 1450 and 840 cm{sup -1}, respectively, from the Fourier transform-infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR). The microstructure of the aerogels was studied using transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM) techniques. In addition to these studies, the stability of the hydrophobic aerogels against an organic impurity (methanol, in the present studies) in water has also been studied.

  17. Surface chemical modification of TEOS based silica aerogels synthesized by two step (acid base) sol gel process

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhagat, Sharad D.; Rao, A. Venkateswara

    2006-04-01

    The present paper describes the comparative studies on the hydrophobic and physical properties of the tetraethoxysilane (TEOS) based silica aerogels prepared by two step sol-gel process followed by supercritical drying. Silica alcogels were prepared by keeping the molar ratio of TEOS:methanol (MeOH):H 2O (acidic):H 2O (basic) constant at 1:33:3.5:3.5 with oxalic acid and ammonium hydroxide concentrations fixed at 0.001 and 1 M, respectively. In all, nine different co-precursors (CP) of the type R nSiX 4 - n, have been used. The aerogels have been characterized by density, porosity, percentage of volume shrinkage, optical transmission, contact angle and thermal conductivity measurements. The surface chemical modification of silica aerogels was confirmed by the presence of C sbnd H and Si sbnd C peaks at 2900, 1450 and 840 cm -1, respectively, from the Fourier transform-infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR). The microstructure of the aerogels was studied using transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM) techniques. In addition to these studies, the stability of the hydrophobic aerogels against an organic impurity (methanol, in the present studies) in water has also been studied.

  18. Atomic layer deposition precursor step repetition and surface plasma pretreatment influence on semiconductor–insulator–semiconductor heterojunction solar cell

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Talkenberg, Florian, E-mail: florian.talkenberg@ipht-jena.de; Illhardt, Stefan; Schmidl, Gabriele; Schleusener, Alexander; Sivakov, Vladimir [Leibniz Institute of Photonic Technology, Albert-Einstein-Str. 9, D-07745 Jena (Germany); Radnóczi, György Zoltán; Pécz, Béla [Centre for Energy Research, Institute of Technical Physics and Materials Science, Konkoly-Thege Miklós u. 29-33, H-1121 Budapest (Hungary); Dikhanbayev, Kadyrjan; Mussabek, Gauhar [Department of Physics and Engineering, al-Farabi Kazakh National University, 71 al-Farabi Ave., 050040 Almaty (Kazakhstan); Gudovskikh, Alexander [Nanotechnology Research and Education Centre, St. Petersburg Academic University, Russian Academy of Sciences, Hlopina Str. 8/3, 194021 St. Petersburg (Russian Federation)

    2015-07-15

    Semiconductor–insulator–semiconductor heterojunction solar cells were prepared using atomic layer deposition (ALD) technique. The silicon surface was treated with oxygen and hydrogen plasma in different orders before dielectric layer deposition. A plasma-enhanced ALD process was applied to deposit dielectric Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} on the plasma pretreated n-type Si(100) substrate. Aluminum doped zinc oxide (Al:ZnO or AZO) was deposited by thermal ALD and serves as transparent conductive oxide. Based on transmission electron microscopy studies the presence of thin silicon oxide (SiO{sub x}) layer was detected at the Si/Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} interface. The SiO{sub x} formation depends on the initial growth behavior of Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} and has significant influence on solar cell parameters. The authors demonstrate that a hydrogen plasma pretreatment and a precursor dose step repetition of a single precursor improve the initial growth behavior of Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} and avoid the SiO{sub x} generation. Furthermore, it improves the solar cell performance, which indicates a change of the Si/Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} interface states.

  19. Platinum adsorption onto graphene and oxidized graphene: A quantum mechanics study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jafari, S.A.; Jahanshahi, M. [Nanotechnology Research Institute, School of Chemical Engineering, Babol University of Technology, Babol (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Ahangari, M. Ghorbanzadeh, E-mail: ghorbanzadeh.morteza@gmail.com [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Faculty of Engineering and Technology, University of Mazandaran, Babolsar (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2017-04-01

    Density functional theory based on first-principle calculations was used to examine platinum-supported oxidized graphene as a beneficial nanomaterial in terms of its catalytic activity and utility for contaminant removal and disinfecting polluted solutions in both domestic and industrial applications. The first step was to select the most appropriate available computing package to apply the supercell technique, which would provide a better representation of a large and real graphene slab. Using OpenMX was less time-consuming after we enforced a basis set for valence electrons to avoid an all-electron calculation, and this had very slight and negligible effect on the accuracy of the calculations. The OpenMX software was selected to perform forward steps of investigating changes in the properties such as adsorption energy and ground state structure of the complexes made by the adsorption of a platinum atom on the surface of pristine graphene (Pt/PG) and oxidized graphene (Pt/OG), which had the lowest adsorption energy of −5.28 eV. Moreover, we examined the effect of Pt atom adsorption on the surface and between two layers of graphene. Our results show that, there was no specific change observed in mentioned properties of Pt atom adsorption on bilayer graphene in comparison with single layer. - Highlights: • Pt adsorption on graphene and oxidized graphene was examined. • We have also considered the effect of the layered graphene on the Pt adsorption. • We first compared two different DFT calculation codes, SIESTA and OpenMX. • We then used ORCA to validate and select a suitable computation package for this study.

  20. Electrooxidation of saccharides at platinum electrode

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Ji-Hyung; Chung, Taek Dong

    2012-10-01

    Saccharides have been emerging as promising fuels for future energy industry because they possess high energy density and tremendous amount of them can be obtained from abundant biomass. Direct electrochemical oxidation of saccharides to generate electricity is a potentially competitive approach in terms of the demand for small, handy, and cost-effective electric power sources. To develop efficient sugar fuel cell, it is necessary to understand mechanism of electrooxidation of saccharide at electrode surface. Although glucose oxidation at platinum surface has been well known, fundamental mechanism study on electrooxidation of other sugars is still in its infancy. Based on research of glucose oxidation, we will predict the electrooxidation of other saccharides such as fructose.

  1. In-mine (tunnel-to-tunnel) electrical resistance tomography in South African platinum mines

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Van Schoor, Abraham M

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available is considered here; that is, tunnels surrounding an area of interest. These 176 studies, however, essentially represented once-off trial surveys. Sasaki and Matsuo 177 exploited a tunnel-to-surface geometry for ERT investigations in a copper-scarn mine 178... 357 358 CASE STUDY ? WATERVAL PLATINUM MINE 359 Site description 360 In May 2009, an ERT trial survey was conducted at Anglo Platinum?s Waterval Mine 361 near Rustenburg. Waterval Mine is a bord-and-pillar, mechanised operation where the 362 UG2...

  2. Nanocarriers for delivery of platinum anticancer drugs☆

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oberoi, Hardeep S.; Nukolova, Natalia V.; Kabanov, Alexander V.; Bronich, Tatiana K.

    2014-01-01

    Platinum based anticancer drugs have revolutionized cancer chemotherapy, and continue to be in widespread clinical use especially for management of tumors of the ovary, testes, and the head and neck. However, several dose limiting toxicities associated with platinum drug use, partial anti-tumor response in most patients, development of drug resistance, tumor relapse, and many other challenges have severely limited the patient quality of life. These limitations have motivated an extensive research effort towards development of new strategies for improving platinum therapy. Nanocarrier-based delivery of platinum compounds is one such area of intense research effort beginning to provide encouraging preclinical and clinical results and may allow the development of the next generation of platinum chemotherapy. This review highlights current understanding on the pharmacology and limitations of platinum compounds in clinical use, and provides a comprehensive analysis of various platinum–polymer complexes, micelles, dendrimers, liposomes and other nanoparticles currently under investigation for delivery of platinum drugs. PMID:24113520

  3. Invited: Tailoring Platinum Group Metals Towards Optimal Activity for Oxygen Electroreduction to H2o and H2O2: From Extended Surfaces to Nanoparticles

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stephens, Ifan

    2014-01-01

    demonstrated the very high activity of Pt3Y and Pt5Gd on extended polycrystalline surfaces. However, we have more recently shown that model, size-selected nanoparticles of PtxY exhibit up to 3 Ag-1at 0.9 V. These promising results provide a strong impetus towards the large scale synthesis of these catalysts...... a catalyst that is active, stable and selective for H2O2 production. We recently discovered a set of electrocatalysts that showed an unprecedented combination of all three of these desired properties: alloys of Pt, Ag or Pd with Hg.(10, 11) I will present data collected a wide range of different methods...... ). The figure shows transmission electron miscroscopy images of 9 nm diameter PtxY nanoparticles, based on high angle annular dark field –scanning transmission electron microscopy (left) and Y, Pt and combined Pt+Y X-ray energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy elemental maps. (a) as-prepared catalyst and (b) after...

  4. Electroanalytical method for determination of lead(II) in orange and apple using kaolin modified platinum electrode.

    Science.gov (United States)

    El Mhammedi, M A; Achak, M; Bakasse, M; Chtaini, A

    2009-08-01

    This paper reports on the use of platinum electrode modified with kaolin (K/Pt) and square wave voltammetry for analytical detection of trace lead(II) in pure water, orange and apple samples. The electroanalytical procedure for determination of the Pb(II) comprises two steps: the chemical accumulation of the analyte under open-circuit conditions followed by the electrochemical detection of the preconcentrated species using square wave voltammetry. The analytical performances of the extraction method has been explored by studying the incubating time, and effect of interferences due to other ions. During the preconcentration step, Pb(II) was accumulated on the surface of the kaolin. The observed detection and quantification limits in pure water were 3.6x10(-9)molL(-1) and 1.2x10(-8)molL(-1), respectively. The precision of the method was also determined; the results was 2.35% (n=5).

  5. [Formylation of porphyrin platinum complexes].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rumiantseva, V D; Konovalenko, L I; Nagaeva, E A; Mironov, A F

    2005-01-01

    The formylation reaction of platinum complexes of beta-unsubstituted porphyrins was studied. The interaction of deuteroporphyrin IX derivatives with the Vilsmeyer reagent led to the selective formylation of their macrocycles in the beta position. The resulting formyl derivatives of the porphyrins are of interest for fluorescent immunoassay.

  6. Synthesis and Development of Modified OMC-Supported Platinum Electrocatalyst for PEMFC

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muonagolu, Emeka Paul

    Ordered mesoporous carbon (OMC) has been considered as a promising Platinum catalyst support because of its large surface area, uniform ordered hexagonal mesopores, porous structure and high electrical conductivity. Graphitization of the walls of OMC is vital when the electrical conductivity of the catalyst is the main concern. The objective of this work was to improve the electrical conductivity of the ordered mesoporous carbon (OMC) support by utilizing transition metals such as Ni, Co and Fe to graphitize the pore walls of OMC via catalytic graphitization. Metal modified OMCs have been synthesized following two steps. First step is synthesizing metal modified SBA-15 as a template containing 10wt% transition metals (Ni, Co, Fe) and TEOS as a source of silica followed by calcination. The second step is introducing sucrose as the carbon source into the pores of the silica template followed by carbonization at 900°C and removal of the silica template using hydrofluoric acid. The synthesized Metal modified OMCs were characterized using Brunaeur Emmit Teller (BET) analysis, X-ray diffraction (XRD), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), Raman spectroscopy. Surface area for the metal modified --OMC was found around 1300--1500m 2/g and pore sizes in the range of 3--4nm. The membrane electrode assembly (MEA) was prepared using the synthesized electrocatalyst and was used to evaluate the performance of the catalyst by testing it on the fuel cell test station. The results were compared to that of commercial catalyst.

  7. Electro-oxidation of Formic Acid on Carbon Supported Edge-Truncated Cubic Platinum Nanoparticles Catalysts

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI She-Qiang; FU Xing-Qiu; HU Bing; DENG Jia-Jun; CHEN Lei

    2009-01-01

    The oxidation of formic acid on edge-truncated cubic platinum nanoparticles/C catalysts is investigated. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy analysis indicates that the surface of edge-truncated cubic platinum nanoparticles is composed of two types of coordination sites. The oxidation behavior of formic acid on edge-truncated cubic platinum nanoparticles/C is investigated using cyclic voltammetry. The apparent activation energies are found to be 54.2, 55.0, 61.8, 69.5, 71.9, 69.26, 65.28kJ/mol at 0.15, 0.3, 0.4, 0.5, 0.6, 0.65, 0.7 V, respectively. A specific surface area activity of 1.76mA·cm~(-2) at 0.4 V indicates that the edge-truncated cubic Platinum nanoparticles are a promising anode catalyst for direct formic acid fuel cells.

  8. Structure, activity, and stability of platinum alloys as catalysts for the oxygen reduction reaction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vej-Hansen, Ulrik Grønbjerg

    and dealloying due to kinetic barriers, despite the thermodynamic driving force for dissolution. This is followed by our results on trying to decouple the strain and ligand effects for platinum skin structures, and determining whether there is any correlation between adsorption energy and surface stability...... in these systems. We find that there is such a correlation for some adsorbates, indicating that there exists a limit for the stability of an overlayer for a given adsorption strength. Finally, we introduce our work on platinum alloy nanoparticles, and our attempt to isolate the features which result...... in the increased activity that has been seen experimentally. We show how the platinum-platinum distance at the surface is decreased for a variety of alloy phases in the core, with greater compression of the overlayer for core phases with lattice parameters which are either much smaller or much larger than pure...

  9. A Semi-Empirical Two Step Carbon Corrosion Reaction Model in PEM Fuel Cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Young, Alan; Colbow, Vesna; Harvey, David; Rogers, Erin; Wessel, Silvia

    2013-01-01

    The cathode CL of a polymer electrolyte membrane fuel cell (PEMFC) was exposed to high potentials, 1.0 to 1.4 V versus a reversible hydrogen electrode (RHE), that are typically encountered during start up/shut down operation. While both platinum dissolution and carbon corrosion occurred, the carbon corrosion effects were isolated and modeled. The presented model separates the carbon corrosion process into two reaction steps; (1) oxidation of the carbon surface to carbon-oxygen groups, and (2) further corrosion of the oxidized surface to carbon dioxide/monoxide. To oxidize and corrode the cathode catalyst carbon support, the CL was subjected to an accelerated stress test cycled the potential from 0.6 VRHE to an upper potential limit (UPL) ranging from 0.9 to 1.4 VRHE at varying dwell times. The reaction rate constants and specific capacitances of carbon and platinum were fitted by evaluating the double layer capacitance (Cdl) trends. Carbon surface oxidation increased the Cdl due to increased specific capacitance for carbon surfaces with carbon-oxygen groups, while the second corrosion reaction decreased the Cdl due to loss of the overall carbon surface area. The first oxidation step differed between carbon types, while both reaction rate constants were found to have a dependency on UPL, temperature, and gas relative humidity.

  10. Shapiro Steps in Flux-Trapped Surface Intrinsic Junctions of Bi2Sr2CaCu2O8+δ

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WEI Yan-Feng; ZHAO Shi-Ping; ZHU Xiao-Bo; CHEN Geng-Hua; REN Yu-Feng; YU Hong-Wei; YANG Qian-Sheng; HU Yun

    2005-01-01

    @@ Microwave-field responses of the surface intrinsic Josephson junctions (IJJs) of Bi2Sr2 CaCu2 O8+δ superconductors are investigated. The IJJs are fabricated using an in situ low-temperature cleavage technique, which leads to the well-characterized surface CuO2 double layers and surface junctions. For the surface junctions in the largejunction limit, usually no Shapiro steps appear when a microwave field is applied. It is found that when thejunctions are in a flux-trapped state, which is produced by a pulsed current and in which the critical current is significantly suppressed, clear Shapiro steps can be observed. These results are important for the study of the microwave-field properties of vortex-carrying IJJs and may find their use in device applications.

  11. Effects of Ga-induced reconstructed surfaces and atomic steps on the morphology of GaSb islands on Si(1 0 0)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Machida, Ryuto, E-mail: 8113703@ed.tus.ac.jp [Department of Applied Electronics, Graduate School of Industrial Science and Technology, Tokyo University of Science, 6-3-1 Niijuku, Katsushika-ku, Tokyo 125-8585 (Japan); Toda, Ryusuke; Fujikawa, Sachie [Department of Applied Electronics, Graduate School of Industrial Science and Technology, Tokyo University of Science, 6-3-1 Niijuku, Katsushika-ku, Tokyo 125-8585 (Japan); Hara, Shinsuke; Watanabe, Issei [National Institute of Information and Communications Technology (NICT), 4-2-1 Nukui-Kitamachi, Koganei, Tokyo 184-8795 (Japan); Fujishiro, Hiroki I., E-mail: fujisiro@te.noda.tus.ac.jp [Department of Applied Electronics, Graduate School of Industrial Science and Technology, Tokyo University of Science, 6-3-1 Niijuku, Katsushika-ku, Tokyo 125-8585 (Japan)

    2015-10-01

    Highlights: • The shape and morphology of GaSb islands were studied under various conditions. • The atomic step type affected the shape and morphology of the GaSb islands. • The reconstructed surface type affects the density and size of the islands. - Abstract: The effects of the Ga-induced reconstructed surface and atomic step type on the shape and morphology of GaSb islands on a Si(1 0 0) surface were studied using ultrahigh-vacuum scanning tunneling microscopy and atomic force microscopy. Though both anisotropic elongated islands and isotropic islands were formed on clean Si and Ga/Si(1 0 0)-2 × 3 substrates, isotropic islands were dominantly formed on Ga/Si(1 0 0)-2 × 2 substrates at 300 °C. The density and size of GaSb islands on 2 × 2-Ga at 300 °C were estimated to be 4.9 × 10{sup 10} cm{sup −2} and 29.1 nm, respectively. The difference in the GaSb island shapes could be caused by the terrace and step of the substrate surface being changed by step rearrangement due to the deposition of Ga atoms at high temperatures. Above 350 °C, the density and size of islands decreased to 2.7 × 10{sup 9} cm{sup −2} and increased to 62.0 nm, respectively. In the initial growth stage, scanning tunneling microscopy results revealed that a Sb/Si(1 0 0)-2 × 1 reconstructed surface was formed above 350 °C. The large islands were assumed to aggregate from the surface diffusion of each atom because the Sb-terminated Si surface is inactive against Ga and Sb atoms. The type of the reconstructed surface is also suggested to affect the density and size of the islands.

  12. Growth of Thin, Anisotropic, π-Conjugated Molecular Films by Step-Wise `Click' Assembly of Molecular Building Blocks: Characterizing Reaction Yield, Surface Coverage, and Film Thickness vs. Addition Step Number

    Science.gov (United States)

    Demissie, Abel; Haugstad, Greg; Frisbie, C. Daniel

    2015-03-01

    Molecular electronics is an active field of nanotechnology that has gained much interest due to the advent of modern microscopy techniques, and thin film synthesis using click chemistry - an approach which has enabled scientists to achieve a sub-angstrom control of monolayer length. Among the major challenges to grow oriented, surface-confined wires by click chemistry is development of synthetic routes that yield monodisperse wires, and lack of systematic way to measure the surface coverage of molecules. In this work, we report a comprehensive characterization of π-conjugated oligophenylene imine (OPI) wires synthesized step-wise by imine condensation click chemistry. OPI wire synthesis began with a self-assembled monolayer (SAM) of 4-formylthiophenol or 4-aminothiophenol on Au, followed by alternate addition of terepthaldehyde or phenylenediamine. OPI wires were characterized after each monomer addition via Rutherford backscattering spectrometry, x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, cyclic voltammetry, reflection-absorption infra-red spectroscopy, and nuclear reaction analysis. We have determined an average extent of reaction greater than 98% completion for each growth step using five different techniques. Overall, these nanoscale scale surface characterization techniques proved to be an extremely sufficient method for monitoring wire growth and surface coverage.

  13. Determination of platinum traces contamination by graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrometry after preconcentration by cloud point extraction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chappuy, M. [Analytical Development Laboratory, Pharmaceutical Establishment of Paris Hospitals, 7 rue du Fer a Moulin, 75005 Paris (France); Caudron, E., E-mail: eric.caudron@eps.aphp.fr [Analytical Development Laboratory, Pharmaceutical Establishment of Paris Hospitals, 7 rue du Fer a Moulin, 75005 Paris (France); Groupe de Chimie Analytique de Paris-Sud, EA 4041, IFR 141, School of Pharmacy, Univ Paris-Sud, 92296 Chatenay-Malabry (France); Bellanger, A. [Department of Pharmacy, Pitie-Salpetriere Hospital (Paris Public Hospital Authority), 47 boulevard de l' hopital, 75013 Paris (France); Pradeau, D. [Analytical Development Laboratory, Pharmaceutical Establishment of Paris Hospitals, 7 rue du Fer a Moulin, 75005 Paris (France)

    2010-04-15

    A simple and sensitive method is described for the determination of platinum surface contamination originating from cisplatin, carboplatin and oxaliplatin. Following extraction from swabs and preconcentration with the cloud point extraction (CPE) method, detection was by graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrometry (GFAAS). After desorption of platinum compounds from the swab, CPE involved on preconcentration of platinum in aqueous solution with diethyldithiocarbamate (DDTC) as chelating agent and Triton X-114 as extraction medium. DDTC is not only a chelating agent, but may also be a good candidate for the inactivation of platinum compounds. DDTC is recommended by the Word Health Organization (WHO) for the destruction of platinum-based anticancer drugs. The main factors affecting CPE efficiency, pH of the sample solution, concentrations of DDTC and Triton X-114, equilibration temperature and incubation time, were evaluated in order to enhance sensitivity of the method. The desorption of platinum compounds from the swab was investigated in parallel. Since platinum is bound to DDTC, it must exchange with copper in order to enhance platinum atomizing by GFAAS. A preconcentration factor of 29 was obtained for 10 mL of a platinum solution at 10 {mu}g mL{sup -1}. In optimal conditions, the limit of detection was 0.2 ng mL{sup -1}, corresponding to 2.0 ng of platinum metal on the swab. Absorbance was linear between 0.7 and 15 ng mL{sup -1}. The proposed method was applied for the determination of surface contamination by platinum compounds with correct results.

  14. Chemistry of Platinum and Palladium Metal Complexes in Homogeneous and Heterogeneous Catalysis: A Mini Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mehrban Ashiq

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Transition metal complexes of platinum and palladium are most widely used in catalysis. Many synthetic reactions have been carried out with such complexes (used as a catalyst which have specifically polymer ligands, through hydrosilylation, acetoxylation, hydrogenation, hydro-formylation, oligo-merisation and polymerization. Almost many platinum and palladium catalysts are heterogeneous in nature i.e. the reaction taking place on a solid surface. Now from few years homogeneous catalysts which are completely soluble in the liquid phase reactant, has acknowledged too much attention, yet having small industrial applications, mainly due to the striving of platinum and palladium complexes separation from the catalytic products. More recently a transitional type of platinum and palladium catalysts have been synthesized through attachment of the activated transition metal complexes on the surface of polymer support particularly insoluble which has been establish to offer encouraging new collection of catalysts for effective research on synthesis. Many of such complexes will be based on the palladium and platinum metals group. The major objective of this review is to inaugurate the relationship among the reactivity’s of homogeneous platinum and palladium complexes and heterogeneous complexes of these metals (those bonded to the surface of metals.

  15. Characterization of TiO[sub 2] films modified by platinum doping

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Avalle, L.; Santos, E.; Leiva, E.; Macagno, V.A. (Dept. de Fisicoquimica, Univ. Nacional de Cordoba, INFIQC (Argentina))

    1992-10-30

    TiO[sub 2]-Pt films were prepared through galvanostatic platinum deposition from acidic H[sub 2]PtCl[sub 6] solutions, followed by potentiodynamic TiO[sub 2] growth in Na[sub 2]SO[sub 4] solutions. The characterization of the doped films was carried out by means of Auger electron spectroscopy and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) in combination with argon bombardment. The dopant concentration profiles and the valence states of the elements present within the films were also determined. The predominant species present is metallic platinum, although oxidized species probably make some contributions. Titanium changed from TiO[sub 2] to lower oxidation states in going from the surface to the film depth. XPS indicates the presence of hydrated oxides at the surface. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) analyses indicate that platinum deposition occurs preferentially on grain boundaries. At high platinum content, clusters are evident and the substructure of titanium substrate is reproduced. At low platinum content, SEM cannot detect its presence at the surface in spite of the electrochemical evidence. The electrochemical behaviour of modified oxide films was also analysed. The potentiodynamic response correlates with the response of a polycrystalline platinum electrode. Electron transfer reactions reveal a catalytic effect due to the platinum incorporated into the TiO[sub 2] layer. The oxygen evolution reaction was investigated using impedance as a function of both the platinum content and the thickness of the TiO[sub 2] layer. Finally, an approximate physical model for the system is proposed.

  16. Comparison of single-step reverse transepithelial all-surface laser ablation (ASLA to alcohol-assisted photorefractive keratectomy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aslanides IM

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Ioannis M Aslanides,1 Sara Padroni,1 Samuel Arba Mosquera,2 Antonis Ioannides,1 Achyut Mukherjee11Emmetropia Mediterranean Eye Institute, Heraklion, Crete, Greece; 2Schwind eye-tech-solutions GmbH, Kleinostheim, GermanyPurpose: To evaluate postoperative pain, corneal epithelial healing, development of corneal haze, refractive outcomes, and corneal aberrations in a novel one-step, modified transepithelial photorefractive keratectomy (PRK, termed All-surface laser ablation (ASLA, compared to conventional, alcohol-assisted PRK.Materials and methods: Sixty eyes of 30 myopic patients were prospectively recruited to a randomized fellow eye study. Patients underwent conventional alcohol-assisted PRK in one eye (control group and ASLA-modified transepithelial PRK in the other (30 eyes in each treatment arm. Primary endpoints were postoperative pain and haze scores at 1 day, 3 days, 1 week, and 1, 3, 6, and 12 months. Secondary endpoints included visual acuity at 1, 3, 6, and 12 months, corneal aberrations at 3, 6, and 12 months, and early and late onset haze. Refractive predictability, safety, and efficacy of the two methods were considered.Results: The average age of the cohort was 29 years (standard deviation [SD]: 9; range: 18–46, and the average spherical equivalent refractive error was -4.18 diopters (SD: 1.9. At 3 days after surgery, the average pain score was 64% lower in the ASLA group (P < 0.0005. At this point, 96% of ASLA eyes had no epithelial defect, whereas 43% in the alcohol-assisted group did not achieve complete epithelial healing, and required replacement of bandage contact lens. The haze level was consistently lower in the ASLA group at all time points from 1 to 6 months.Conclusion: This study shows that the ASLA technique may have a future role in refractive surgery, due to the fact that it offers faster epithelial healing, lower pain scores, and significantly less haze formation.Keywords: cornea, ASLA, PRK, alcohol

  17. Characterization of Deposited Platinum Contacts onto Discrete Graphene Flakes for Electrical Devices

    KAUST Repository

    Holguin Lerma, Jorge A.

    2016-05-03

    For years, electron beam induced deposition has been used to fabricate electrical contacts for micro and nanostructures. The role of the contact resistance is key to achieve high performance and efficiency in electrical devices. The present thesis reports on the electrical, structural and chemical characterization of electron beam deposited platinum electrodes that are exposed to different steps of thermal annealing and how they are used in four-probe devices of ultrathin graphite (uG) flakes (<100nm thickness). The device integration of liquid phase exfoliated uG is demonstrated, and its performance compared to devices made with analogous mechanically exfoliated uG. For both devices, similar contact resistances of ~2kΩ were obtained. The electrical measurements confirm a 99.5% reduction in contact resistance after vacuum thermal annealing at 300 °C. Parallel to this, Raman characterization confirms the formation of a nanocrystalline carbon structure over the electrode. While this could suggest an enhancement of the electrical transport in the device, an additional thermal annealing step in air at 300 °C, promoted the oxidation and removal of the carbon shell and confirmed that the contact resistance remained the same. Overall this shows that the carbon shell along the electrode has no significant role in the contact resistance. Finally, the challenges based on topographical analysis of the deposited electrodes are discussed. Reduction of the electrode’s height down to one-third of the initial value, increased surface roughness, formation of voids along the electrodes and the onset of platinum nanoparticles near the area of deposition, represent a challenge for future work.

  18. Mechanistic insights on platinum- and palladium-pincer catalyzed coupling and cyclopropanation reactions between olefins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rajeev, Ramanan; Sunoj, Raghavan B

    2012-07-21

    The mechanism of M(II)-PNP-pincer catalyzed reaction between (i) ethene, (ii) trans-butene with 2-methylbut-2-ene, 2,3-dimethylbut-2-ene and tert-butylbutene is examined by using density functional theory methods (where M = Pt or Pd). All key intermediates and transition states involved in the reaction are precisely located on the respective potential energy surfaces using the popular DFT functionals such as mPW1K, M06-2X, and B3LYP in conjunction with the 6-31+G** basis set. The reaction between these olefins can lead to a linear coupling product or a substituted cyclopropane. The energetic comparison between coupling as well as cyclopropanation pathways involving four pairs of olefins for both platinum (1-4) and palladium (5-8) catalyzed reactions is performed. The key events in the lower energy pathway in the mechanistic course involves (i) a C-C bond formation between the metal bound olefin (ethene or trans-butene) and a free olefin, and (ii) two successive [1,2] hydrogen migrations in the ensuing carbocationic intermediates (1c-4c, and 1d-4d), toward the formation of the coupling product. The computed barriers for these steps in the reaction of metal bound ethene to free tert-butylbutene (or other butenes) are found to be much lower than the corresponding steps when trans-butene is bound to the metal pincer. The Gibbs free energy differences between the transition states leading to the coupling product (TS(d-e)) and that responsible for cyclopropanated product (TS(d-g)) are found to be diminishingly closer in the case of the platinum pincer as compared to that in the palladium system. The computed energetics indicate that the coupled product prefers to remain as a metal olefin complex, consistent with the earlier experimental reports.

  19. Nanostructured gold and platinum electrodes on silicon structures for biosensing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ogurtsov, V. I.; Sheehan, M. M.

    2005-01-01

    Gold and platinum metal electrodes on Si/SiO2 having undergone anisotropic potassium hydroxide (KOH) etch treatment are considered. This treatment etches at different rates and directions in the material resulting in creation of numerous pyramid shaped holes in the silicon substrate. This surface is used to make metal electrodes with increased electrode efficiency. The electrodes can serve as the sensors or as the sensor substrates (for surface polymer modification) and because both gold and platinum are inert they have applications for food safety biosensing. Wine, an economically significant food product, was chosen as a matrix, and impedance spectroscopy (EIS) was selected as a method of investigation of electrode behaviour. Based on results of EIS, different complexity equivalent circuits were determined by applying fitting mean square root optimisation of sensor complex impedance measurements.

  20. Characterisation of carbon nanotubes decorated with platinum nanoparticles

    OpenAIRE

    M. Pawlyta; D. Łukowiec; A.D. Dobrzańska-Danikiewicz

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: In presented work results of synthesis of carbon nanotubes decorated with platinum nanoparticles by organic colloidal process as an example of direct formation of nanoparticles onto CNTs are reported.Design/methodology/approach: Powder XRD and transmission electron microscopy were used for characterisation of the morphology of composite as well as the distribution of nanocrystals on the CNTs surfaces.Findings: TEM results confirm that CNT were homogeneous and clean, without any admix...

  1. Request for Correction 11001 Toxicological Review of Halogenated Platinum Salts and Platinum Compounds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Request for Correction by the International Platinum Group Metals Association seeking the correction of information disseminated in the draft EPA document Toxicological Review of Halogenated Platinum Salts and Platinum Compounds: In Support of Summary Information on the Integrated Risk Information System (IRIS).

  2. Bioinspired hierarchical nanotubular titania immobilized with platinum nanoparticles for photocatalytic hydrogen production.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Xiaoyan; Li, Jiao; Zhang, Yiming; Huang, Jianguo

    2015-05-11

    A bioinspired nanocomposite composed of platinum nanoparticles and nanotubular titania was fabricated in which the titania matter was templated by natural cellulose substance. The composite possesses three- dimensional hierarchical structures, and ultrafine metallic platinum particles with sizes of ca. 2 nm were immobilized uniformly on the surfaces of the titania nanotubes. Such a nanocomposite with 1.06 wt % of platinum content shows the optimal photocatalytic hydrogen production activity from water splitting of 16.44 mmol h(-1)  g(-1) , and excessive loading of platinum results in poorer photocatalytic performance. The structural integrity of the nanocomposite upon cyclic water-splitting processes results in its sufficient photocatalytic stability.

  3. Improved heat-responsive electrode for the measurement of electrochemical Peltier heat. The Peltier heat for electrosorption and electrodesorption of oxygen on a platinum electrode in sulfuric acid solution

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shibata, Shigeo; Sumino, M.P.; Yamada, Akifumi

    1985-01-01

    A new plate type electrode with high sensitivity and response to temperature change was made using a thick film thermistor. The electrochemical Peltier heat for the oxygen surface process at a platinized platinum electrode in 0.5 M H/sub 2/SO/sub 4/ solution was measured with this electrode by potentiodynamic and galvanostatic transient techniques. It was demonstrated that the most of Peltier heat is caused by the overpotential due to the irreversible oxygen electrode reaction. That is, a Tafel-type relation between the Peltier heat and the current was confirmed. A step-wise heat change corresponding to consecutive stages of platinum lattice occupation by OH was observed. The amount of heat evolved on PtO formation was apparently larger than that on PtOH formation. The results were compared with those obtained by the voltammetric measurement. (orig.).

  4. A first step towards a quantum mechanical description of surface energy and diffusivity in the bubble model of positronium annihilation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mukherjee, Tapas, E-mail: tapas.mukherjee1@gmail.co [Physics Department, Bhairab Ganguly College, Kolkata-700056 (India); Dutta, Dhanadeep [Radiochemistry Division, Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Trombay, Mumbai-400085 (India)

    2010-07-15

    In the bubble model of positronium annihilation in liquids, the inward contractile force on the bubble surface is described through classical surface tension of the liquids. In the present calculation, we adopted a simple quantum mechanical approach to describe the bubble surface energy in terms of the motion of a representative quasi-free electron outside the bubble. The bubble parameters (radius, potential, etc.) for different liquids obtained using the prescribed model are consistent with the results obtained using classical surface tension.

  5. Phosphoric acid fuel cell platinum use study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lundblad, H. L.

    1983-01-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy is promoting the private development of phosphoric acid fuel cell (PAFC) power plants for terrestrial applications. Current PAFC technology utilizes platinum as catalysts in the power electrodes. The possible repercussions that the platinum demand of PAFC power plant commercialization will have on the worldwide supply and price of platinum from the outset of commercialization to the year 2000 are investigated. The platinum demand of PAFC commercialization is estimated by developing forecasts of platinum use per unit of generating capacity and penetration of PAFC power plants into the electric generation market. The ability of the platinum supply market to meet future demands is gauged by assessing the size of platinum reserves and the capability of platinum producers to extract, refine and market sufficient quantities of these reserves. The size and timing of platinum price shifts induced by the added demand of PAFC commercialization are investigated by several analytical methods. Estimates of these price shifts are then used to calculate the subsequent effects on PAFC power plant capital costs.

  6. Fabrication of a Superhydrophobic Surface with Flower-Like Microstructures with a One-Step Immersion Process

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Younga; Go, Seungcheol; Ahn, Yonghyun [Dankook Univ., Yongin (Korea, Republic of)

    2013-11-15

    It has been demonstrated that flower-like microstructures can be fabricated on a Mg plate using a solution of propylphosphonic acid and HFTHTMS in ethanol. In the presence of propylphosphonic acid, the HFTHTMS is polymerized and then deposited on the surface of the Mg plates during the immersion period. Many flower-like structures were formed on the surface after at least 6 h of immersion, at which point the modified plate became superhydro-phobic. The nano-/micro scale flower-like structure is composed of fluorinated polysiloxane, which acts as a low-surface-energy material. SEM images reveal that the flower-like structure is composed of many thin flakes. It is confirmed that these structures on the surface contain air and result in an ideal structure for obtaining the superhydrophobic surface. This proposed coating method is simple and can be applied to a large sample to fabricate a superhydrophobic surface without expensive instruments. Superhydrophobicity of solid materials has attracted significant attention because it provides strong water repellency and self-cleaning properties. The chemical composition and nano-/microscale structures of the surface are key factors determining the surface properties. Recently, superhydro-phobic surfaces showing high water contact angles (CA) > 150 .deg. and low sliding angles (SA) < 10 .deg. have been the focus of much research because they have many applications in both academic fields and industrial processes.

  7. Preparation of MgO supported platinum nanoparticle catalyst using toluene dispersed platinum sol

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seth, Jhumur; Nepak, Devadutta; Chaudhari, Vijay R.; Prasad, Bhagavatula L. V.

    2017-10-01

    An effective way of anchoring Pt nanoparticles on MgO using toluene dispersed platinum nanoparticles (Pt-NPs) as one of the ingredient is demonstrated. The usage of particles dispersed in toluene allows the retention of size and size distribution of preformed Pt-NPs even after deposition on MgO support with high active surface area, which is crucial for heterogeneous catalysis. The catalyst thus prepared, displayed selective hydrogenation of cinnamaldehyde to cinnamyl alcohol with high turn on frequency (TOF - 105 h-1) with respect to the total Pt content. We attribute this efficient catalytic performance to the uniform distribution and deposition of Pt on the active MgO support and its better accessible surface as evidenced by the cyclic-voltammetry results.

  8. Next Step for STEP

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wood, Claire [CTSI; Bremner, Brenda [CTSI

    2013-08-09

    The Siletz Tribal Energy Program (STEP), housed in the Tribe’s Planning Department, will hire a data entry coordinator to collect, enter, analyze and store all the current and future energy efficiency and renewable energy data pertaining to administrative structures the tribe owns and operates and for homes in which tribal members live. The proposed data entry coordinator will conduct an energy options analysis in collaboration with the rest of the Siletz Tribal Energy Program and Planning Department staff. An energy options analysis will result in a thorough understanding of tribal energy resources and consumption, if energy efficiency and conservation measures being implemented are having the desired effect, analysis of tribal energy loads (current and future energy consumption), and evaluation of local and commercial energy supply options. A literature search will also be conducted. In order to educate additional tribal members about renewable energy, we will send four tribal members to be trained to install and maintain solar panels, solar hot water heaters, wind turbines and/or micro-hydro.

  9. Next Step for STEP

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wood, Claire [CTSI; Bremner, Brenda [CTSI

    2013-08-09

    The Siletz Tribal Energy Program (STEP), housed in the Tribe’s Planning Department, will hire a data entry coordinator to collect, enter, analyze and store all the current and future energy efficiency and renewable energy data pertaining to administrative structures the tribe owns and operates and for homes in which tribal members live. The proposed data entry coordinator will conduct an energy options analysis in collaboration with the rest of the Siletz Tribal Energy Program and Planning Department staff. An energy options analysis will result in a thorough understanding of tribal energy resources and consumption, if energy efficiency and conservation measures being implemented are having the desired effect, analysis of tribal energy loads (current and future energy consumption), and evaluation of local and commercial energy supply options. A literature search will also be conducted. In order to educate additional tribal members about renewable energy, we will send four tribal members to be trained to install and maintain solar panels, solar hot water heaters, wind turbines and/or micro-hydro.

  10. One-step solvothermal deposition of ZnO nanorod arrays on a wood surface for robust superamphiphobic performance and superior ultraviolet resistance

    OpenAIRE

    Qiufang Yao; Chao Wang; Bitao Fan; Hanwei Wang; Qingfeng Sun; Chunde Jin; Hong Zhang

    2016-01-01

    In the present paper, uniformly large-scale wurtzite-structured ZnO nanorod arrays (ZNAs) were deposited onto a wood surface through a one-step solvothermal method. The as-prepared samples were characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD), field-emission scanning electron microscopy (FE-SEM), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), thermogravimetry (TG), and differential thermal analysis (DTA). ZNAs with a diameter of approximately 85 nm and a lengt...

  11. Porous platinum-based catalysts for oxygen reduction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erlebacher, Jonah D; Snyder, Joshua D

    2014-11-25

    A porous metal that comprises platinum and has a specific surface area that is greater than 5 m.sup.2/g and less than 75 m.sup.2/g. A fuel cell includes a first electrode, a second electrode spaced apart from the first electrode, and an electrolyte arranged between the first and the second electrodes. At least one of the first and second electrodes is coated with a porous metal catalyst for oxygen reduction, and the porous metal catalyst comprises platinum and has a specific surface area that is greater than 5 m.sup.2/g and less than 75 m.sup.2/g. A method of producing a porous metal according to an embodiment of the current invention includes producing an alloy consisting essentially of platinum and nickel according to the formula Pt.sub.xNi.sub.1-x, where x is at least 0.01 and less than 0.3; and dealloying the alloy in a substantially pH neutral solution to reduce an amount of nickel in the alloy to produce the porous metal.

  12. Reliability of AlGaN/GaN high electron mobility transistors on low dislocation density bulk GaN substrate: Implications of surface step edges

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Killat, N., E-mail: Nicole.Killat@bristol.ac.uk, E-mail: Martin.Kuball@bristol.ac.uk; Montes Bajo, M.; Kuball, M., E-mail: Nicole.Killat@bristol.ac.uk, E-mail: Martin.Kuball@bristol.ac.uk [Center for Device Thermography and Reliability (CDTR), H.H. Wills Physics Laboratory, Tyndall Avenue, Bristol BS8 1TL (United Kingdom); Paskova, T. [Kyma Technologies, Inc., Raleigh, North Carolina 27617 (United States); Materials Science and Engineering Department, North Carolina State University, Raleigh, North Carolina 27695 (United States); Evans, K. R. [Kyma Technologies, Inc., Raleigh, North Carolina 27617 (United States); Leach, J. [Kyma Technologies, Inc., Raleigh, North Carolina 27617 (United States); Electrical and Computer Engineering Department, Virginia Commonwealth University, Richmond, Virginia 23284 (United States); Li, X.; Özgür, Ü.; Morkoç, H. [Electrical and Computer Engineering Department, Virginia Commonwealth University, Richmond, Virginia 23284 (United States); Chabak, K. D.; Crespo, A.; Gillespie, J. K.; Fitch, R.; Kossler, M.; Walker, D. E.; Trejo, M.; Via, G. D.; Blevins, J. D. [Air Force Research Laboratory, Wright-Patterson Air Force Base, Dayton, Ohio 45433 (United States)

    2013-11-04

    To enable gaining insight into degradation mechanisms of AlGaN/GaN high electron mobility transistors, devices grown on a low-dislocation-density bulk-GaN substrate were studied. Gate leakage current and electroluminescence (EL) monitoring revealed a progressive appearance of EL spots during off-state stress which signify the generation of gate current leakage paths. Atomic force microscopy evidenced the formation of semiconductor surface pits at the failure location, which corresponds to the interaction region of the gate contact edge and the edges of surface steps.

  13. [Platinum compounds: metabolism, toxicity and supportive strategies].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lipp, H P; Hartmann, J T

    2005-02-09

    Although the leading platinum compounds, cisplatin, carboplatin, and oxaliplatin, share some structural similarities, there are marked differences between them in therapeutic uses, pharmacokinetics, and adverse effects profiles. Compared with cisplatin, carboplatin has inferior efficacy in germ-cell tumors, head and neck cancers, and bladder and esophageal carcinomas, whereas the two drugs appear to have comparable efficacy in ovarian cancer, extensive small-cell lung cancers (SCLC), and advanced non-small-cell lung cancers (NSCLC). Oxaliplatin belongs to the group of diaminocyclohexane (DACH) platinum compounds. It is the first platinum-based drug that has marked efficacy in colorectal cancer when given in combination with 5-fluorouracil and folinic acid. Nedaplatin has been registered in Japan, whereas other derivatives, like JM216 (which is the only orally available platinum derivative), ZD0473, BBR3464, and SPI-77 (a liposomal formulation of cisplatin), are still under investigation. The adverse effects of platinum compounds are reviewed together with possible prevention strategies.

  14. Phase transfer of platinum nanoparticles from aqueous to organic solutions using fatty amine molecules

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Ashavani Kumar; Hrushikesh M Joshi; Anandrao B Mandale; Rajendra Srivastava; Suguna D Adyanthaya; Renu Pasricha; Murali Sastry

    2004-08-01

    In this report we demonstrate a simple process based on amine chemistry for the phase transfer of platinum nanoparticles from an aqueous to an organic solution. The phase transfer was accomplished by vigorous shaking of a biphasic mixture of platinum nanoparticles synthesised in an aqueous medium and octadecylamine (ODA) in hexane. During shaking of the biphasic mixture, the aqueous platinum nanoparticles complex via either coordination bond formation or weak covalent interaction with the ODA molecules present in the organic phase. This process renders the nanoparticles sufficiently hydrophobic and dispersible in the organic phase. The ODA-stabilised platinum nanoparticles could be separated out from hexane in the form of a powder that is readily redispersible in weakly polar and nonpolar organic solvents. The ODA-capped platinum nanoparticles show high catalytic activity in hydrogenation reactions and this is demonstrated in the efficient conversion of styrene to ethyl benzene. The nature of binding of the ODA molecules to the platinum nanoparticles surface was characterised by thermogravimetry, transmission electron microscopy (TEM), X-ray photoemission spectroscopy (XPS) and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR).

  15. Photoemission and LEED study of the Sn/Rh(111) surface--early oxidation steps and thermal stability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanyš, Petr; Píš, Igor; Mašek, Karel; Sutara, František; Matolín, Vladimír; Nehasil, Václav

    2012-01-11

    We have deposited two monolayers of Sn onto Rh(111) single crystal. After the deposition, no ordered structure was revealed by low energy electron diffraction (LEED). We oxidized the obtained system in a low-pressure oxygen atmosphere at 420 K. The oxidized sample was then gradually heated to study the thermal stability of the oxide layer. We characterized the system by synchrotron radiation stimulated photoelectron spectroscopy and LEED. Valence band and core level photoelectron spectra of rhodium, tin and oxygen were used to study the oxidation of the Sn-Rh(111) surface and its behaviour upon annealing. A low stoichiometric oxide of Sn was created on the surface. The oxidation process did not continue towards creation of SnO(2) with higher oxygen dose. The annealing at 970 K caused decomposition of the surface oxide of Sn and creation of an ordered (√3 × √3)R30° Sn-Rh(111) surface alloy.

  16. Correlation of Forced-convection Heat-transfer Data for Air Flowing in Smooth Platinum Tube with Long-approach Entrance at High Surface and Inlet-air Temperatures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Desmon, Leland G; Sams, Eldon W

    1950-01-01

    A heat-transfer investigation was conducted with air in an electrically heated platinum tube with long-approach entrance, inside diameter of 0.525 inch, and effective heat-transfer length of 24 inches over ranges of Reynolds number up to 320,000, average inside-tube-wall temperature up to 3053 degrees R, and inlet-air temperature up to 1165 degrees R. Correlation of data by the conventional Nusselt relation resulted in separation of data with tube-wall temperature. Good correlation was obtained, however, by use of a modified Reynolds number.

  17. Friction behavior of members of the platinum metals group with gold

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buckley, D. H.

    1975-01-01

    The adhesion and friction behavior of the platinum metals group was examined with clean surfaces and surfaces selectively contaminated with oxygen, vinyl chloride (C2H3Cl), and methyl mercaptan (CH3SH). A pin or disk specimen configuration was used with the pin being a single crystal of gold of the (111) orientation and with the platinum metal disks also being single crystals of the (111) or (0001) orientation. Loads applied ranged from 1 to 10 g and a sliding velocity of 0.7 mm/min was employed. Results indicate adhesion and transfer of gold to all of the platinum metals. Despite this observation friction differences existed among the metals in the group. These differences are related to surface chemical activity. Adsorption of various friction reducing species was selective. With some adsorbates present strong adhesive forces between metals were still observed.

  18. Formation and Oxidation of Hydrogen Molybdenum Bronze on platinum electrode in sulfuric acid solution

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jin LU; Jun Hua DU; Wei Shan Li; Jia Mo FU

    2004-01-01

    Hydrogen molybdenum bronze (HxMoO3) can be electrodeposited on platinum and oxidized in two steps to the hydrogen molybdenum bronze with less amount of hydrogen HyMoO3 (yplatinum electrode is cycled from -0.2 to 1.3V (vs. SCE) in 0.05 mol/L Na2MoO4 + 0.5 mol/L H2SO4 solution. During the formation of HxMoO3, the electrochemical reduction of molybdate existing in the form of polymolydate is reversible and is about a five-electron transfer reaction.

  19. Organic Solvent’s Effect in the Deposition of Platinum Particles on MWCNTs for Oxygen Reduction Reaction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carolina Silva-Carrillo

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available We reported the synthesis of platinum particles anchored on the surface of multiwall carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs. The synthesis of platinum particles was carried out by microemulsion method using hexadecyltrimethylammonium bromide (CTAB as surfactant to enhance the dispersion of platinum particles in hexane (C6, heptane (C7, and octane (C8 solutions. The effects of the microemulsion dispersion medium on the synthesis of platinum particles on MWCNTs (MWCNT/Pt hybrid materials and their catalytic activities of the oxygen reduction reaction (ORR in HClO4 were investigated. The anchored platinum particles showed good dispersion on carbon nanotubes surface with the average particle sizes of 2.65±0.60, 2.89±0.68, and 0.97±0.29 nm for the dispersion medium of C6, C7, and C8, respectively. The experimental results of ORR experiments indicated a relationship between the size and the dispersion media of the platinum particles; also the catalytic activity of the anchored platinum on MWCNT particles strongly depends on the dispersion medium employed in the microemulsion process.

  20. Thin film assembly of nanosized cobalt(II) bis(5-phenyl-azo-8-hydroxyquinolate) using static step-by-step soft surface reaction technique: Structural characterization and optical properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seleim, S. M.; Hamdalla, Taymour A.; Mahmoud, Mohamed E.

    2017-09-01

    Nanosized (NS) cobalt (II) bis(5-phenyl-azo-8-hydroxyquinolate) (NS Co(II)-(5PA-8HQ)2) thin films have been synthesized using static step-by-step soft surface reaction (SS-b-SSR) technique. Structural and optical characterizations of these thin films have been carried out using thermal gravimetric analysis (TGA), Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), high resolution transmission electron microscopy (HR-TEM) and X-ray diffraction (XRD). The HR-TEM results revealed that the assembled Co(II)-complex exhibited a uniformly NS structure particles in the form of nanorods with width and length up to 16.90 nm and 506.38 nm, respectively. The linear and nonlinear optical properties have been investigated. The identified energy gap of the designed thin film materials was found 4.01 eV. The refractive index of deposited Co(II)-complex thin film was identified by thickness-dependence and found as 1.9 at wavelength 1100 nm. In addition, the refractive index was varied by about 0.15 due to an increase in the thickness by 19 nm.

  1. Novel structure formation at the bottom surface of porous anodic alumina fabricated by single step anodization process.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ali, Ghafar; Ahmad, Maqsood; Akhter, Javed Iqbal; Maqbool, Muhammad; Cho, Sung Oh

    2010-08-01

    A simple approach for the growth of long-range highly ordered nanoporous anodic alumina film in H(2)SO(4) electrolyte through a single step anodization without any additional pre-anodizing procedure is reported. Free-standing porous anodic alumina film of 180 microm thickness with through hole morphology was obtained. A simple and single step process was used for the detachment of alumina from aluminum substrate. The effect of anodizing conditions, such as anodizing voltage and time on the pore diameter and pore ordering is discussed. The metal/oxide and oxide/electrolyte interfaces were examined by high resolution scanning transmission electron microscope. The arrangement of pores on metal/oxide interface was well ordered with smaller diameters than that of the oxide/electrolyte interface. The inter-pore distance was larger in metal/oxide interface as compared to the oxide/electrolyte interface. The size of the ordered domain was found to depend strongly upon anodizing voltage and time.

  2. Global surface density of water mass variations by using a two-step inversion by cumulating daily satellite gravity information

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramillien, Guillaume; Frappart, Frédéric; Seoane, Lucia

    2016-04-01

    We propose a new method to produce time series of global maps of surface mass variations by progressive integration of daily geopotential variations measured by orbiting satellites. In the case of the GRACE mission, these geopotential variations can be determined from very accurate inter-satellite K-Band Range Rate (KBRR) measurements of 5-second daily orbits. In particular, the along-track gravity contribution of hydrological mass changes is extracted by removing de-aliasing models for static field, atmosphere, oceans mass variations (including periodical tides), as well as polar movements. Our determination of surface mass sources is composed of two successive dependent Kalman filter stages. The first one consists of reducing the satellite-based potential anomalies by adjusting the longest spatial wavelengths (i.e., low-degree spherical harmonics lower than 2). In the second stage, the residual potential anomalies from the previous stage are used to recover surface mass density changes - in terms of Equivalent-Water Height (EWH) - over a global network of juxtaposed triangular elements. These surface tiles of ~100,000 km x km (or equivalently 330 km by 330 km) are defined to be of equal areas over the terrestrial sphere. However they can be adapted to the local geometry of the surface mass. Our global approach was tested by inverting geopotential data, and successfully applied to estimate time-varying surface mass densities from real GRACE-based residuals. This strategy of combined Kalman filter-type inversions can also be useful for exploring the possibility of improving time and space resolutions for ocean and land studies that would be hopefully brought by future low altitude geodetic missions.

  3. Patterning of platinum (Pt) thin films by chemical wet etching in Aqua Regia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Köllensperger, P. A.; Karl, W. J.; Ahmad, M. M.; Pike, W. T.; Green, M.

    2012-06-01

    The chemical and physical properties of platinum (Pt) make it a useful material for microelectromechanical systems and microfluidic applications such as lab-on-a-chip devices. Platinum thin-films are frequently employed in applications where electrodes with high chemical stability, low electrical resistance or a high melting point are needed. Due to its chemical inertness it is however also one of the most difficult metals to pattern. The gold standard for patterning is chlorine RIE etching, a capital-intensive process not available in all labs. Here we present simple fabrication protocols for wet etching Pt thin-films in hot Aqua Regia based on sputtered Ti/Pt/Cr and Cr/Pt/Cr metal multilayers. Chromium (Cr) or titanium (Ti) is used as an adhesion layer for the Pt. Cr is used as a hard masking layer during the Pt etch as it can be easily and accurately patterned with photoresist and withstands the Aqua Regia. The Cr pattern is transferred into the Pt and the Cr mask later removed. Only standard chemicals and cleanroom equipment/tools are required. Prior to the Aqua Regia etch any surface passivation on the Pt is needs to be removed. This is usually achieved by a quick dip in dilute hydrofluoric acid (HF). HF is usually also used for wet-etching the Ti adhesion layer. We avoid the use of HF for both steps by replacing the HF-dip with an argon (Ar) plasma treatment and etching the Ti layer with a hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) based etchant.

  4. A novel platinum chromium everolimus-eluting stent for the treatment of coronary artery disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bennett J

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Johan Bennett, Christophe DuboisDepartment of Cardiovascular Diseases, University Hospitals Leuven, Leuven, BelgiumAbstract: The development of coronary stents represents a major step forward in the treatment of obstructive coronary artery disease since the introduction of percutaneous coronary intervention. The initial enthusiasm for bare metal stents was, however, tempered by a significant incidence of in-stent restenosis, the manifestation of excessive neointima hyperplasia within the stented vessel segment, ultimately leading to target vessel revascularization. Later, drug-eluting stents, with controlled local release of antiproliferative agents, consistently reduced this need for repeat revascularization. In turn, the long-term safety of first-generation drug-eluting stents was brought into question with the observation of an increased incidence of late stent thrombosis, often presenting as myocardial infarction or sudden death. Since then, new drugs, polymers, and platforms for drug elution have been developed to improve stent safety and preserve efficacy. Development of a novel platinum chromium alloy with high radial strength and high radiopacity has enabled the design of a new, thin-strut, flexible, and highly trackable stent platform, while simultaneously improving stent visibility. Significant advances in polymer coating, serving as a drug carrier on the stent surface, and in antiproliferative agent technology have further improved the safety and clinical performance of newer-generation drug-eluting stents. This review will provide an overview of the novel platinum chromium everolimus-eluting stents that are currently available. The clinical data from major clinical trials with these devices will be summarized and put into perspective.Keywords: drug-eluting stent, restenosis, Promus Element, Synergy

  5. Surface modification of poly(vinylidene fluoride) membrane with hydrophilic and anti-fouling performance via a two-step polymerization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, Gui-E; Sun, Li; Huang, Hui-Hong; Liu, Yan-Jun [Shanghai Institute of Technology, Shanghai (China); Xu, Zhen-Liang; Yang, Hu [East China University of Science and Technology, Shanghai (China)

    2015-12-15

    The surface modification of poly (vinylidene fluoride) (PVDF) membrane was performed via a two-step polymerization reactions. Poly (acrylic acid) (PAAc) was first grafted onto the membrane surface for the preparation of PVDF-g-PAAc membrane, and then poly (ethylene glycol) 200 (PEG 200) was immobilized on the membrane surface by the esterification reaction for the fabrication of PVDF-g-PEGA membrane. Attenuated total reflectance (ATR) FTIR, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), scanning electron microscope (SEM), and protein adsorption, water flux, water content and dynamic contact angle were conducted to characterize the structures and performance of the resultant PVDF membranes. The experimental results showed that the adsorption of bovine serum albumin (BSA) on the PVDF-g-PEGA membrane decreased about 80% when the grafting ratio reached to 15 wt%, compared with the pristine PVDF membrane. Moreover, the water contact angle of the membrane dropped to 60.5o, while the membrane pore sizes remained little changed.

  6. Enhancing photocatalysis in SrTiO{sub 3} by using Ag nanoparticles: A two-step excitation model for surface plasmon-enhanced photocatalysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ma, Lei; Sun, Tao; Cai, Hua; Zhou, Zhi-Quan; Sun, Jian, E-mail: jsun@fudan.edu.cn, E-mail: minglu55@fudan.edu.cn; Lu, Ming, E-mail: jsun@fudan.edu.cn, E-mail: minglu55@fudan.edu.cn [Department of Optical Science and Engineering, and Shanghai Ultra-Precision Optical Manufacturing Engineering Center, Fudan University, Shanghai 200433 (China)

    2015-08-28

    Surface plasmon (SP)-enhanced ultraviolet and visible photocatalytic activities of SrTiO{sub 3} (STO) are observed after incorporating Ag nanoparticles (Ag-NPs) on STO surfaces. A two-step excitation model is proposed to explain the SP-enhanced photocatalysis. The point of the model is that an electron at the valence band of STO is first excited onto the Fermi level of Ag-NP by the SP field generated on the Ag-NP, and then injected into the conduction band of STO from the SP band, leaving a hole at the valence band of STO. A full redox catalytic reaction at the surface of STO is then available. For Ag-NP incorporated STO, up-converted and inter-band photoluminescence emissions of STO are observed, and nonlinear evolutions of photocatalytic activity with illumination light powers are found. Furthermore, near infrared photocatalysis is detected. These results support the proposed model.

  7. Enhancing photocatalysis in SrTiO3 by using Ag nanoparticles: A two-step excitation model for surface plasmon-enhanced photocatalysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Lei; Sun, Tao; Cai, Hua; Zhou, Zhi-Quan; Sun, Jian; Lu, Ming

    2015-08-28

    Surface plasmon (SP)-enhanced ultraviolet and visible photocatalytic activities of SrTiO3 (STO) are observed after incorporating Ag nanoparticles (Ag-NPs) on STO surfaces. A two-step excitation model is proposed to explain the SP-enhanced photocatalysis. The point of the model is that an electron at the valence band of STO is first excited onto the Fermi level of Ag-NP by the SP field generated on the Ag-NP, and then injected into the conduction band of STO from the SP band, leaving a hole at the valence band of STO. A full redox catalytic reaction at the surface of STO is then available. For Ag-NP incorporated STO, up-converted and inter-band photoluminescence emissions of STO are observed, and nonlinear evolutions of photocatalytic activity with illumination light powers are found. Furthermore, near infrared photocatalysis is detected. These results support the proposed model.

  8. Microwave assisted biodiesel production from Jatropha curcas L. seed by two-step in situ process: optimization using response surface methodology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaliliannosrati, Hamidreza; Amin, Nor Aishah Saidina; Talebian-Kiakalaieh, Amin; Noshadi, Iman

    2013-05-01

    The synthesis of fatty acid ethyl esters (FAEEs) by a two-step in situ (reactive) esterification/transesterification from Jatropha curcas L. (JCL) seeds using microwave system has been investigated. Free fatty acid was reduced from 14% to less than 1% in the first step using H2SO4 as acid catalyst after 35 min of microwave irradiation heating. The organic phase in the first step was subjected to a second reaction by adding 5 N KOH in ethanol as the basic catalyst. Response surface methodology (RSM) based on central composite design (CCD) was utilized to design the experiments and analyze the influence of process variables (particles seed size, time of irradiation, agitation speed and catalyst loading) on conversion of triglycerides (TGs) in the second step. The highest triglycerides conversion to fatty acid ethyl esters (FAEEs) was 97.29% at the optimum conditions:seed size, 12.21 min irradiation time, 8.15 ml KOH catalyst loading and 331.52 rpm agitation speed in the 110 W microwave power system.

  9. A one-step green route to synthesize copper nanocrystals and their applications in catalysis and surface enhanced Raman scattering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Pinhua; Sui, Yongming; Wang, Chao; Wang, Yingnan; Cui, Guangliang; Wang, Chunzhong; Liu, Bingbing; Zou, Bo

    2014-04-01

    A nontoxic, simple, inexpensive, and reproducible strategy, which meets the standard of green chemistry, is introduced for the synthesis of copper nanocrystals (Cu NCs) with olive oil as both reducing agent and capping agent. By changing the reaction parameters, the shape, size and surface structure of the Cu NCs can be well controlled. The obtained Cu nanocubes show excellent catalytic properties for the catalytic reduction of dyes and CO oxidation. Moreover, the prepared Cu nanocubes as substrates exhibit surface enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) activity for 4-mercaptopyridine (4-Mpy). Therefore, this facile route provides a useful platform for the fabrication of Cu NCs which have the potential to replace noble metals for certain applications.A nontoxic, simple, inexpensive, and reproducible strategy, which meets the standard of green chemistry, is introduced for the synthesis of copper nanocrystals (Cu NCs) with olive oil as both reducing agent and capping agent. By changing the reaction parameters, the shape, size and surface structure of the Cu NCs can be well controlled. The obtained Cu nanocubes show excellent catalytic properties for the catalytic reduction of dyes and CO oxidation. Moreover, the prepared Cu nanocubes as substrates exhibit surface enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) activity for 4-mercaptopyridine (4-Mpy). Therefore, this facile route provides a useful platform for the fabrication of Cu NCs which have the potential to replace noble metals for certain applications. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available. See DOI: 10.1039/c4nr00412d

  10. Pt/C催化邻硝基氯苯加氢反应的动力学研究%Kinetics of Ortho-nitrochlorobenzene Hydrogenation on Platinum/Carbon Catalyst

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    蒋成君; 尹红; 陈志荣

    2004-01-01

    The kinetics of catalytic hydrogenation of ortho-nitrochlorobenzene to 2,2′-dichloroazoxybenzene on platinum/carbon catalyst is investigated in a slurry reactor with the temperature range of 313-343 K, and orthochloroaniline is formed as a byproduct. Models based on Rideal-Eley and Langmuir-Hinshelwood mechanism have been proposed based on the rate data and the kinetic regime. The former model can be used to fit the experimental data better. Reaction controlling steps are physical adsorption of hydrogen and adsorbed ortho-nitrochlorobenzene reacted on the surface of catalyst.

  11. First platinum moderated positron beam based on neutron capture

    CERN Document Server

    Hugenschmidt, C; Repper, R; Schreckenbach, K; Sperr, P; Triftshaeuser, W

    2002-01-01

    A positron beam based on absorption of high energy prompt gamma-rays from thermal neutron capture in sup 1 sup 1 sup 3 Cd was installed at a neutron guide of the high flux reactor at the ILL in Grenoble. Measurements were performed for various source geometries, dependent on converter mass, moderator surface and extraction voltages. The results lead to an optimised design of the in-pile positron source which will be implemented at the Munich research reactor FRM-II. The positron source consists of platinum foils acting as gamma-e sup + e sup - -converter and positron moderator. Due to the negative positron work function moderation in heated platinum leads to emission of monoenergetic positrons. The positron work function of polycrystalline platinum was determined to 1.95(5) eV. After acceleration to several keV by four electrical lenses the beam was magnetically guided in a solenoid field of 7.5 mT leading to a NaI-detector in order to detect the 511 keV gamma-radiation of the annihilating positrons. The posi...

  12. A Single Platinum Microelectrode for Identifying Soft Drink Samples

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lígia Bueno

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Cyclic voltammograms recorded with a single platinum microelectrode were used along with a non-supervised pattern recognition, namely, Principal Component Analysis, to conduct a qualitative analysis of sixteen different brands of carbonated soft drinks (Kuat, Soda Antarctica, H2OH!, Sprite 2.0, Guarana Antarctica, Guarana Antarctica Zero, Coca-Cola, Coca-Cola Zero, Coca-Cola Plus, Pepsi, Pepsi Light, Pepsi Twist, Pepsi Twist Light, Pepsi Twist 3, Schin Cola, and Classic Dillar’s. In this analysis, soft drink samples were not subjected to pre-treatment. Good differentiation among all the analysed soft drinks was achieved using the voltammetric data. An analysis of the loading plots shows that the potentials of −0.65 V, −0.4 V, 0.4 V, and 0.750 V facilitated the discrimination process. The electrochemical processes related to this potential are the reduction of hydrogen ions and inhibition of the platinum oxidation by the caffeine adsorption on the electrode surface. Additionally, the single platinum microelectrode was useful for the quality control of the soft drink samples, as it helped to identify the time at which the beverage was opened.

  13. Platinum(II) complexes as spectroscopic probes for biomolecules

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ratilla, E.

    1990-09-21

    The use of platinum(II) complexes as tags and probes for biomolecules is indeed advantageous for their reactivities can be selective for certain purposes through an interplay of mild reaction conditions and of the ligands bound to the platinum. The use of {sup 195}Pt NMR as a method of detecting platinum and its interactions with biomolecules was carried out with the simplest model of platinum(II) tagging to proteins. Variable-temperature {sup 195}Pt NMR spectroscopy proved useful in studying the stereodynamics of complex thioethers like methionine. The complex, Pt(trpy)Cl{sup +}, with its chromophore has a greater potential for probing proteins. It is a noninvasive and selective tag for histidine and cysteine residues on the surface of cytochrome c at pH 5. The protein derivatives obtained are separable, and the tags are easily quantitated and differentiated through the metal-to-ligand charge transfer bands which are sensitive to the environment of the tag. Increasing the pH to 7.0 led to the modification by Pt(trpy)Cl{sup +}of Arg 91 in cytochrome c. Further studies with guanidine-containing ligands as models for arginine modification by Pt(trpy)Cl{sup +} showed that guanidine can act as a terminal ligand and as a bridging ligand. Owing to the potential utility of Pt(trpy)L{sup n+} as electron dense probes of nucleic acid structure, interactions of this bis-Pt(trpy){sup 2+} complex with nucleic acids was evaluated. Indeed, the complex interacts non-covalently with nucleic acids. Its interactions with DNA are not exactly the same as those of its precedents. Most striking is its ability to form highly immobile bands of DNA upon gel electrophoresis. 232 refs.

  14. Hybrid Monte Carlo-molecular dynamics algorithm for the study of islands and step edges on semiconductor surfaces: application to Si/Si (001).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tavazza, F; Nurminen, L; Landau, D P; Kuronen, A; Kaski, K

    2004-09-01

    A classical, hybrid Monte Carlo-molecular dynamic (MC-MD) algorithm is introduced for the study of phenomena like two-dimensional (2D) island stability or step-edge evolution on semiconductor surfaces. This method presents the advantages of working off lattice and utilizing bulk-fitted potentials. It is based on the introduction of collective moves, such as dimer jumps, in the MC algorithm. MD-driven local relaxations are considered as trial moves for the MC. The algorithm is applied to the analysis of 2D Si islands on Si(001). Results on early stages of island formation, island stability versus temperature and system size, and step-edge evolution are presented. In all cases good qualitative agreement with experimental results is found.

  15. Reactivity of monofunctional cis-platinum adducts as a function of DNA sequence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malinge, J M; Leng, M

    1988-08-11

    The purpose of this work was to study the chemical reactivity of monofunctional cis-platinum-nucleic acid adducts as a function of nucleic acid sequence. The first part of the paper deals with the formation of these adducts. It is shown that the ternary nucleic acid-cis-platinum-ethidium bromide complexes in which ethidium bromide and nucleotide residues are cross-linked by cis-platinum, are relatively unstable at 37 degrees C. In the presence of acridine, ethidium bromide (but not cis-platinum) is slowly released which leads to the formation of monofunctional cis-platinum-nucleic acid adducts. After removal of acridine, the monofunctional adducts react further to become bifunctional. The second part of the paper deals with the kinetics of disappearance of the monofunctional adducts in several polynucleotides but not in poly(dG).poly(dC). When the adducts possess a chloride ligand, the limiting step in the cross-linking is the rate of aquation reaction of the chloride ligand. The rate constants are an order of magnitude larger when the monofunctional adducts do not possess a chloride ligand. In both the cases, the rate constants are apparently independent of the nucleic acid sequence.

  16. Simple cerium-triethanolamine complex: Synthesis, characterization, thermal decomposition and its application to prepare ceria support for platinum catalysts used in methane steam reforming

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wattanathana, Worawat; Nootsuwan, Nollapan; Veranitisagul, Chatchai; Koonsaeng, Nattamon; Laosiripojana, Navadol; Laobuthee, Apirat

    2015-06-01

    Cerium-triethanolamine complex was synthesized by simple complexation method in 1-propanol solvent using cerium(III) chloride as a metal source and triethanolamine as a ligand. The structures of the prepared complex were proposed based on FT-IR, FT-Raman and ESI-MS results as equimolar of triethanolamine and cerium chelated complex having monomeric tricyclic structure with and without chloride anion as another coordinating group known as ceratrane. The complex was used as a precursor for ceria material done by thermal decomposition. XRD result revealed that when calcined at 600 °C for 2 h, the cerium complex was totally turned into pure ceria with cubic fluorite structure. The obtained ceria was then employed to synthesize platinum doped ceria catalysts for methane steam reforming. Various amounts of platinum i.e. 1, 3, 5 and 10 mol percents were introduced on the ceria support by microwave-assisted wetness impregnation using ammonium tetrachloroplatinate(II). The platinum-impregnated ceria powders were subjected to calcination in 10% hydrogen/helium atmosphere at 500 °C for 3 h to reduce platinum(II) to platinum(0). XRD patterns of the catalysts confirmed that the platinum particles doped on the ceria support were in the form of platinum(0). Catalytic activity test showed that the catalytic activities got higher as the amounts of platinum doped increased. Besides, the portions of coke formation on the surface of catalysts were reduced as the amounts of platinum doped increased.

  17. Room temperature synthesis of colloidal platinum nanoparticles

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    G Sarala Devi; V J Rao

    2000-12-01

    Efficient preparation of stable dispersions of platinum nanoparticles from platinous chloride (K2PtCl4) was achieved by simultaneous addition of capping polymer material. The size of platinum nanoparticles was controlled by changing the ratio of concentration of capping polymer material to the concentration of platinum cation used. The morphology of colloidal particles were studied by means of UV-visible spectrophotometry and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). Particle size increased with low reagent concentration. The change in absorption spectra with the particle size was observed, i.e. blue shift attributed to decrease in particle size.

  18. Antitumor effect of arabinogalactan and platinum complex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Starkov, A K; Zamay, T N; Savchenko, A A; Ingevatkin, E V; Titova, N M; Kolovskaya, O S; Luzan, N A; Silkin, P P; Kuznetsova, S A

    2016-03-01

    The article presents the results of investigation of antitumor properties of platinum-arabinogalactan complex. We showed the ability of the complex to inhibit the growth of Ehrlich ascites tumor cells. It is found that the distribution of the platinum-arabinogalactan complex is not specific only for tumor cells in mice. The complex was found in all tissues and organs examined (ascites cells, embryonic cells, kidney, and liver). The mechanism of action of the arabinogalactan-platinum complex may be similar to cisplatin as the complex is able to accumulate in tumor cells.

  19. Mechanism of Platinum Derivatives Induced Kidney Injury

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Feifei YAN

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Platinum derivatives are the most widely used chemotherapeutic agents to treat solid tumors including ovarian, head and neck, and testicular germ cell tumors, lung cancer, and colorectal cancer. Two major problems exist, however, in the clinic use of platinum derivatives. One is the development of tumor resistance to the drug during therapy, leading to treatment failure. The other is the drug’s toxicity such as the cisplatin’s nephrotoxicity, which limits the dose that can be administered. This paper describes the mechanism of platinum derivatives induced kidney injury.

  20. A NEW STRUCTURE AND ITS ANALYTICAL BREAKDOWN MODEL OF HIGH VOLTAGE SOI DEVICE WITH STEP UNMOVABLE SURFACE CHARGES OF BURIED OXIDE LAYER

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2006-01-01

    A new SOI (Silicon On Insulator) high voltage device with Step Unmovable Surface Charges(SUSC) of buried oxide layer and its analytical breakdown model are proposed in the paper. The unmovable charges are implemented into the upper surface of buried oxide layer to increase the vertical electric field and uniform the lateral one. The 2-D Poisson's equation is solved to demonstrate the modulation effect of the immobile interface charges and analyze the electric field and breakdown voltage with the various geometric parameters and step numbers. A new RESURF (REduce SURface Field) condition of the SOI device considering the interface charges and buried oxide is derived to maximize breakdown voltage. The analytical results are in good agreement with the numerical analysis obtained by the 2-D semiconductor devices simulator MEDICI. As a result, an 1200V breakdown voltage is firstly obtained in 3μm-thick top Si layer, 2μm-thick buried oxide layer and 70μm-length drift region using a linear doping profile of unmovable buried oxide charges.

  1. Thermally stable single-atom platinum-on-ceria catalysts via atom trapping

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jones, John; Xiong, Haifeng; DelaRiva, Andrew; Peterson, Eric J.; Pham, Hien; Challa, Sivakumar R.; Qi, Gongshin; Oh, Se H.; Wiebenga, Michelle H.; Pereira Hernandez, Xavier I.; Wang, Yong; Datye, Abhaya K.

    2016-07-08

    Catalysts based on single atoms of scarce precious metals can lead to more efficient use through enhanced reactivity and selectivity. However, single atoms on catalyst supports can be mobile and aggregate into nanoparticles when heated at elevated temperatures. High temperatures are detrimental to catalyst performance unless these mobile atoms can be trapped. We used ceria powders having similar surface areas but different exposed surface facets. When mixed with a platinum/ aluminum oxide catalyst and aged in air at 800°C, the platinum transferred to the ceria and was trapped. Polyhedral ceria and nanorods were more effective than ceria cubes at anchoring the platinum. Performing synthesis at high temperatures ensures that only the most stable binding sites are occupied, yielding a sinter-resistant, atomically dispersed catalyst.

  2. Hydrogenation of ortho-nitrochlorobenzene on activated carbon supported platinum catalysts

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    JIANG Cheng-jun; YIN Hong; CHEN Zhi-rong

    2005-01-01

    Platinum/carbon catalyst is one of the most important catalysts in hydrogenation of ortho-nitrochlorobenzene to 2,2'-dichlorohydrazobenzene. The preparation process and the supports of catalysts are studied in this paper. Raw materials and preparation procedure of the activated carbon have great influences on the compositions and surface structure of platinum/carbon catalysts. Platinum catalysts supported on activated carbon with high purity, high surface area, large pore volume and appropriate pore structure usually exhibit higher activities for hydrogenation of ortho-nitrochlorobenzene to 2,2'-dichlorohydrazobenzene.The catalyst prepared from H2PtCl6 with pH=3 shows greater catalytic performance than those prepared under other conditions.

  3. Rumpling phenomenon in platinum modified Ni-Al alloys

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zimmerman, Benjamin Joseph [Iowa State Univ., Ames, IA (United States)

    2005-05-01

    Surface undulations known as rumpling have been shown to develop at the surface of bond coats used in advanced thermal barrier coating systems. Rumpling can result in cracking and eventual spallation of the top coat. Many mechanisms to explain rumpling have been proposed, and among them is a martensitic transformation. High-temperature x-ray diffraction, differential scanning calorimetry and potentiometry were used to investigate the nature of the martensitic transformation in bulk platinum-modified nickel aluminides. It was found that the martensitic transformation has strong time dependence and can form over a range of temperatures. Cyclic oxidation experiments were performed on the bulk alloys to investigate the effect of the martensitic transformation on surface rumpling. It was found that the occurrence of rumpling was associated with the martensitic transformation. The degree of rumpling was found to increase with an increasing number of cycles and was independent of the heating and cooling rates used. The thickness of the oxide layer at the surface of the samples had a significant impact on the amplitude of the resulting undulations, with amplitude increasing with increasing oxide-layer thickness. Rumpling was also observed in an alloy based on the γ-γ' region of the nickel-aluminum-platinum phase diagram. Rumpling in this alloy was found to occur during isothermal oxidation and is associated with a subsurface layer containing a platinum-rich phase known as a. Rumpling in both alloy systems may be explained by creep deformation of a weakened subsurface layer in response to the compressive stresses in the thermally grown oxide layer.

  4. Tannic acid NPs - synthesis and immobilization onto a solid surface in a one-step process and their antibacterial and anti-inflammatory properties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perelshtein, Ilana; Ruderman, Elena; Francesko, Antonio; Fernandes, Margarida M; Tzanov, Tzanko; Gedanken, Aharon

    2014-11-01

    Tannic acid nanoparticles were synthesized from an aqueous solution without the use of stabilizers via a sonochemical process. In order to avoid the dissolution of the formed nanoparticles, the sonochemical reaction was performed in the presence of a cotton fabric: following their formation, the tannic acid nanoparticles were embedded into the cotton substrate in a one-step process. The bioactive properties of the tannic acid coated surface were examined towards the inhibition of myeloperoxidase and collagenase, two major enzymes related with inflammatory processes. In addition, the antibacterial activity of the tannic acid nanoparticles coated textiles was evaluated against Staphylococcus aureus and Pseudomonas aeruginosa.

  5. Two-step Laser Time-of-Flight Mass Spectrometry to Elucidate Organic Diversity in Planetary Surface Materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Getty, Stephanie A.; Brinckerhoff, William B.; Cornish, Timothy; Li, Xiang; Floyd, Melissa; Arevalo, Ricardo Jr.; Cook, Jamie Elsila; Callahan, Michael P.

    2013-01-01

    Laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry (LD-TOF-MS) holds promise to be a low-mass, compact in situ analytical capability for future landed missions to planetary surfaces. The ability to analyze a solid sample for both mineralogical and preserved organic content with laser ionization could be compelling as part of a scientific mission pay-load that must be prepared for unanticipated discoveries. Targeted missions for this instrument capability include Mars, Europa, Enceladus, and small icy bodies, such as asteroids and comets.

  6. Multi-step surface functionalization of polyimide based evanescent wave photonic biosensors and application for DNA hybridization by Mach-Zehnder interferometer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Melnik, Eva [Health and Environment Department, Nano Systems, AIT Austrian Institute of Technology GmbH, Donau-City-Strasse 1, 1220 Vienna (Austria); Department of Analytical Chemistry, University of Vienna, Waehringer Strasse 38, 1090 Vienna (Austria); Bruck, Roman [Health and Environment Department, Nano Systems, AIT Austrian Institute of Technology GmbH, Donau-City-Strasse 1, 1220 Vienna (Austria); Hainberger, Rainer, E-mail: rainer.hainberger@ait.ac.at [Health and Environment Department, Nano Systems, AIT Austrian Institute of Technology GmbH, Donau-City-Strasse 1, 1220 Vienna (Austria); Laemmerhofer, Michael, E-mail: michael.laemmerhofer@univie.ac.at [Department of Analytical Chemistry, University of Vienna, Waehringer Strasse 38, 1090 Vienna (Austria)

    2011-08-12

    Highlights: {yields} We realize a biosensing platform for polyimide evanescent photonic wave sensors. {yields} We show that the surface functionalization via silanisation and biotinylation followed by streptavidin immobilization do not destroy or damage the thin polyimide film. {yields} A highly dense streptavidin layer enables the immobilisation of biotinylated ligands such as biotinylated ssDNA for the selective measurement of DNA hybridization. - Abstract: The process of surface functionalization involving silanization, biotinylation and streptavidin bonding as platform for biospecific ligand immobilization was optimized for thin film polyimide spin-coated silicon wafers, of which the polyimide film serves as a wave guiding layer in evanescent wave photonic biosensors. This type of optical sensors make great demands on the materials involved as well as on the layer properties, such as the optical quality, the layer thickness and the surface roughness. In this work we realized the binding of a 3-mercaptopropyl trimethoxysilane on an oxygen plasma activated polyimide surface followed by subsequent derivatization of the reactive thiol groups with maleimide-PEG{sub 2}-biotin and immobilization of streptavidin. The progress of the functionalization was monitored by using different fluorescence labels for optimization of the chemical derivatization steps. Further, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and atomic force microscopy were utilized for the characterization of the modified surface. These established analytical methods allowed to derive information like chemical composition of the surface, surface coverage with immobilized streptavidin, as well as parameters of the surface roughness. The proposed functionalization protocol furnished a surface density of 144 fmol mm{sup -2} streptavidin with good reproducibility (13.9% RSD, n = 10) and without inflicted damage to the surface. This surface modification was applied to polyimide based Mach-Zehnder interferometer

  7. Platinum-Resistor Differential Temperature Sensor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kolbly, R. B.; Britcliffe, M. J.

    1985-01-01

    Platinum resistance elements used in bridge circuit for measuring temperature difference between two flowing liquids. Temperature errors with circuit are less than 0.01 degrees C over range of 100 degrees C.

  8. Fate of platinum metals in the environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pawlak, Justyna; Łodyga-Chruścińska, Elżbieta; Chrustowicz, Jakub

    2014-07-01

    For many years now automotive exhaust catalysts have been used to reduce the significant amounts of harmful chemical substances generated by car engines, such as carbon monoxide, nitrogen oxides, and aromatic hydrocarbons. Although they considerably decrease environmental contamination with the above-mentioned compounds, it is known that catalysts contribute to the environmental load of platinum metals (essential components of catalysts), which are released with exhaust fumes. Contamination with platinum metals stems mainly from automotive exhaust converters, but other major sources also exist. Since platinum group elements (PGEs): platinum (Pt), palladium (Pd), rhodium (Rh), ruthenium (Ru) and iridium (Ir) seem to spread in the environment and accumulate in living organisms, they may pose a threat to animals and humans. This paper discusses the modes and forms of PGE emission as well as their impact on the environment and living organisms.

  9. VB Platinum Tile & Carpet, Inc. Information Sheet

    Science.gov (United States)

    VB Platinum Tile & Carpet, Inc. (the Company) is located in Bristow, Virginia. The settlement involves renovation activities conducted at a property constructed prior to 1978, located in Washington, DC.

  10. One-Step Reduction and Surface Modification of Graphene Oxide by 3-Hydroxy-2-Naphthoic Acid Hydrazide and Its Polypropylene Nanocomposites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Xiang-Nan; Guan, Xiao-Na; Zhou, Hui-Hua; Zhu, Yue-Feng

    2017-01-01

    3-Hydroxy-2-naphthoic acid hydrazide (HNH), a new reductant and modifier, was applied to reduce and modify graphene oxide (GO) in a one-step process. The obtained HNH reduced graphene oxide (HNH-rGO) was characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD), scanning electron microscope (SEM), Raman spectroscopy, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopic (XPS) and Fourier transform infrared spectra (FTIR). The results demonstrated that GO was successfully reduced to graphene and the surface of HNH-rGO was grafted with HNH. The interlayer space was increased from 0.751 nm to 1.921 nm, and its agglomeration was much more attenuated compared with GO. HNH-rGO/polypropylene and graphene/polypropylene composites were synthesized through melt-blending method. The viscosity was enhanced with increased addition of graphene and surface modified graphene demonstrated stronger rheological behavior improving effect than the untreated graphene.

  11. The optimization of essential oils supercritical CO2 extraction from Lavandula hybrida through static-dynamic steps procedure and semi-continuous technique using response surface method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamali, Hossein; Aminimoghadamfarouj, Noushin; Golmakani, Ebrahim; Nematollahi, Alireza

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to examine and evaluate crucial variables in essential oils extraction process from Lavandula hybrida through static-dynamic and semi-continuous techniques using response surface method. Essential oil components were extracted from Lavandula hybrida (Lavandin) flowers using supercritical carbon dioxide via static-dynamic steps (SDS) procedure, and semi-continuous (SC) technique. Using response surface method the optimum extraction yield (4.768%) was obtained via SDS at 108.7 bar, 48.5°C, 120 min (static: 8×15), 24 min (dynamic: 8×3 min) in contrast to the 4.620% extraction yield for the SC at 111.6 bar, 49.2°C, 14 min (static), 121.1 min (dynamic). The results indicated that a substantial reduction (81.56%) solvent usage (kg CO2/g oil) is observed in the SDS method versus the conventional SC method.

  12. The role of free water surface constructed wetlands as polishing step in municipal wastewater reclamation and reuse.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghermandi, A; Bixio, D; Thoeye, C

    2007-07-15

    In Europe, the last two decades witnessed growing water stress, both in terms of water scarcity and quality deterioration, which prompted many municipalities for a more efficient use of the water resources, including a more widespread acceptance of water reuse practices. Treatment technology encompasses a vast variety of options. Constructed wetlands are regarded as key elements in polishing conventionally treated wastewater for recreational and environmental applications. A survey was conducted to assess the performance of tertiary free water surface constructed wetlands in treating both key and emerging contaminant categories in the perspective of water reuse. A database was created with information concerning systems with emerging and free-floating macrophytes. The database includes results from both full- and pilot-scale systems, and considers a broad variety of operating conditions. This paper provides an overview of the treatment performances of the constructed wetlands in the database and discusses their significance in the optic of water reclamation and reuse practices.

  13. β-Synuclein suppresses both the initiation and amplification steps of α-synuclein aggregation via competitive binding to surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, James W. P.; Buell, Alexander K.; Michaels, Thomas C. T.; Meisl, Georg; Carozza, Jacqueline; Flagmeier, Patrick; Vendruscolo, Michele; Knowles, Tuomas P. J.; Dobson, Christopher M.; Galvagnion, Céline

    2016-11-01

    α-Synuclein is an intrinsically disordered protein that is associated with the pathogenesis of Parkinson’s disease through the processes involved in the formation of amyloid fibrils. α and β-synuclein are homologous proteins found at comparable levels in presynaptic terminals but β-synuclein has a greatly reduced propensity to aggregate and indeed has been found to inhibit α-synuclein aggregation. In this paper, we describe how sequence differences between α- and β-synuclein affect individual microscopic processes in amyloid formation. In particular, we show that β-synuclein strongly suppresses both lipid-induced aggregation and secondary nucleation of α-synuclein by competing for binding sites at the surfaces of lipid vesicles and fibrils, respectively. These results suggest that β-synuclein can act as a natural inhibitor of α-synuclein aggregation by reducing both the initiation of its self-assembly and the proliferation of its aggregates.

  14. Development of radioactive platinum group metal catalysts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chung, H.S.; Kim, Y.S.; Kim, Y.E. [and others

    1999-03-01

    The fission product nuclides generated during the irradiation of reactor fuel include many useful elements, among them platinum group metals such as ruthenium, rhodium and palladium which are of great industrial importance, occur rarely in nature and are highly valuable. In this research, the authors reviewed various PGM recovery methods. Recovery of palladium from seven-component simulated waste solutions was conducted by selective precipitation method. The recovery yield was more than 99.5% and the purity of the product was more than 99%. Wet-proof catalyst was prepared with the recovered palladium. The specific surface area of the catalyst support was more than 400m{sup 2}/g.The content of palladium impregnated on the support was 1 to 10 wt. %. Hydrogen isotope exchange efficiency of more than 93% to equilibrium with small amount of the catalyst was obtained. It was turned out possible to consider using such palladium or other very low active PGM materials in applications where its activity is unimportant as in nuclear industries. (author). 86 refs., 44 tabs., 88 figs.

  15. Development of radioactive platinum group metal catalysts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chung, H.S.; Kim, Y.S.; Kim, Y.E. [and others

    1999-03-01

    The fission product nuclides generated during the irradiation of reactor fuel include many useful elements, among them platinum group metals such as ruthenium, rhodium and palladium which are of great industrial importance, occur rarely in nature and are highly valuable. In this research, the authors reviewed various PGM recovery methods. Recovery of palladium from seven-component simulated waste solutions was conducted by selective precipitation method. The recovery yield was more than 99.5% and the purity of the product was more than 99%. Wet-proof catalyst was prepared with the recovered palladium. The specific surface area of the catalyst support was more than 400m{sup 2}/g.The content of palladium impregnated on the support was 1 to 10 wt. %. Hydrogen isotope exchange efficiency of more than 93% to equilibrium with small amount of the catalyst was obtained. It was turned out possible to consider using such palladium or other very low active PGM materials in applications where its activity is unimportant as in nuclear industries. (author). 86 refs., 44 tabs., 88 figs.

  16. A sensitivity study of the oxidation of compressed natural gas on platinum

    KAUST Repository

    Badra, Jihad

    2013-11-01

    This paper presents a sensitivity study for the oxidation of methane (CH4) over platinum (Pt). Some dominant reactions in the CH 4-Pt surface chemistry were identified and the rates of these reactions were subsequently modified to enhance the calculations. Initially, a range of CH4-Pt surface mechanisms available in the literature are used, along with the relevant detailed gaseous chemistry to compute the structure of premixed compressed natural gas (CNG)/air flames co-flowing around a flat, vertical, unconfined, rectangular, and platinum plate. Comparison with existing measurements of surface temperature and species concentrations revealed significant discrepancies for all mechanisms. Sensitivity analysis has identified nine key reactions which dominate the heterogeneous chemistry of methane over platinum. The rates of these reactions were modified over a reasonable range and in different combinations leading to an "optimal" mechanism for methane/air surface chemistry on platinum. The new mechanism is then used with the same flow geometry for different cases varying the temperature of the incoming mixture (Tjet), its equivalence ratio (Φ) and the Reynolds number (Re). Results from the modified surface mechanism demonstrate reasonably good agreement with the experimental data for a wide range of operating conditions. © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Behavior of platinum(iv) complexes in models of tumor hypoxia: cytotoxicity, compound distribution and accumulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schreiber-Brynzak, Ekaterina; Pichler, Verena; Heffeter, Petra; Hanson, Buck; Theiner, Sarah; Lichtscheidl-Schultz, Irene; Kornauth, Christoph; Bamonti, Luca; Dhery, Vineet; Groza, Diana; Berry, David; Berger, Walter; Galanski, Markus; Jakupec, Michael A; Keppler, Bernhard K

    2016-04-01

    Hypoxia in solid tumors remains a challenge for conventional cancer therapeutics. As a source for resistance, metastasis development and drug bioprocessing, it influences treatment results and disease outcome. Bioreductive platinum(iv) prodrugs might be advantageous over conventional metal-based therapeutics, as biotransformation in a reductive milieu, such as under hypoxia, is required for drug activation. This study deals with a two-step screening of experimental platinum(iv) prodrugs with different rates of reduction and lipophilicity with the aim of identifying the most appropriate compounds for further investigations. In the first step, the cytotoxicity of all compounds was compared in hypoxic multicellular spheroids and monolayer culture using a set of cancer cell lines with different sensitivities to platinum(ii) compounds. Secondly, two selected compounds were tested in hypoxic xenografts in SCID mouse models in comparison to satraplatin, and, additionally, (LA)-ICP-MS-based accumulation and distribution studies were performed for these compounds in hypoxic spheroids and xenografts. Our findings suggest that, while cellular uptake and cytotoxicity strongly correlate with lipophilicity, cytotoxicity under hypoxia compared to non-hypoxic conditions and antitumor activity of platinum(iv) prodrugs are dependent on their rate of reduction.

  18. Development of the "Three-step MACS": a novel strategy for isolating rare cell populations in the absence of known cell surface markers from complex animal tissue.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Mathia Y; Lufkin, Thomas

    2012-07-01

    To circumvent the difficulty of isolating specific cell populations by MACS from dissociated complex animal tissue, when their proportions reached levels similar to that of the background, we developed the "Three-step MACS" strategy. Cells of interest are defined by their expression of a particular gene(s) of interest rather by than their natural cell surface markers or size. A two-component transgenic cell surface protein, for two sequential rounds of MACS, is expressed under the promoter control of the endogenous gene of interest by means of gene targeting and the generation of transgenic tissue. An initial step to remove dead cells is also used. Here, we describe proof-of-concept experiments, using the biotin acceptor peptide (BAP)-low-affinity nerve growth factor receptor as the two-component protein. The first component, the BAP, can be biotinylated in specific subsets of cells expressing a particular gene by expressing the biotinylating enzyme, hBirA = humanized BirA (hBirA), under the promoter control of another gene defining the specific subpopulation. We showed that a rare population of cells (1.1% of the 13.5 days postcoital mouse embryo) could be enriched to a sufficiently high purity (84.4%). From another sample with 0.1% of our cells of interest, we achieved a 40.3% pure sample. The low cost, speed, and technical ease of the Three-step MACS also make it scalable and hence, an ideal method for preparing sufficient quantities of biological samples for sensitive, high-throughput assays.

  19. Catalyst free self-assembled growth of InN nanorings on stepped Si (5 5 3) surface

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chauhan, Amit Kumar Singh; Kumar, Mukesh; Gupta, Govind, E-mail: govind@nplindia.org

    2015-08-01

    Highlights: • Novel technique to synthesis self-assembled InN nanorings by low energy N. • Anisotropic strain relaxation driven self-assembly lead to formation of nanorings. • Strong downward band bending in VB-spectra signify large electron accumulation. - Abstract: A novel technique for synthesis of high crystalline quality self-assembled InN nanorings, by nitriding the bulk deposited In/Si (5 5 3)-1 × 4 system using low energy N{sub 2}{sup +} ions at 520 °C, has been demonstrated. Scanning electron microscopy images reveal the formation of ring shaped InN structures with average size ∼500 nm. Anisotropic strain relaxation via self assembly could be the driving force for the formation of these InN rings on reconstructed Si (5 5 3) surface. High resolution X-ray diffraction analysis indicates high crystalline quality of these wurtzite InN nanostructures with c-plane. A strong downward band bending was observed in X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy valence band spectra which signify the large electron accumulation in the InN nanostructures.

  20. A cytocompatible micro/nano-textured surface with Si-doped titania mesoporous arrays fabricated by a one-step anodization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Huibing; Huang, Xiaobo; Yu, Hanwu; Yang, Xiaoning; Zhang, Xiangyu; Hang, Ruiqiang; Tang, Bin

    2017-04-01

    To mimic the hierarchical structure of bone tissues, a hybrid micro/nano-textured titanium surface with Si-doped TiO2 mesoporous arrays is fabricated by a one-step high current anodization (HCA). Specifically, the HCA is carried out in a electrolyte containing NO3(-) and SiO3(2-). The NO3(-) in the electrolyte is demonstrated to play a key role in mediating the formation of honeycombed TiO2 mesoporous arrays, which are different than the nanotubes formed by the mediating of F(-) ion in the conventional anodization. This unique structure endows the coating with improved mechanical properties compared to the nanotube layer. In addition, the Si is incorporated into the coating in a concentration-dependent manner. With the increase of Si doping amount in the coating, both the hydrophilic properties and surface free energy of coatings are obviously enhanced. The cell culture test shows that the osteoblast behaviors on this surface are positively influenced by the doped Si. Therefore, this micro/nano-textured surface coating doped with Si may endow the Ti-based implants long-term stability and good osseointegration.

  1. A fire-assay and wet chemical method for the determination of palladium, platinum, gold, and silver in ores and concentrates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moloughney, P E

    1980-04-01

    A method is presented for the determination of palladium, platinum, gold and silver in ores and concentrates by a fire-assay and wet chemical technique. After parting of the lead assay button with dilute nitric acid, and separation of the solution from the residue, the palladium and platinum in the solution are precipitated by the addition of stannous chloride, with tellurium as collector. The resulting precipitate is combined with the gold residue and dissolved in aqua regia, then the solution is analysed for palladium, platinum and gold by atomic-absorption spectrophotometry (AAS). Silver is determined in the original solution by AAS before the reduction step.

  2. Effect of platinum nanoparticle deposition parameters on hydrogen peroxide transduction for applications in wearable electrochemical glucose biosensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cargill, Allison A.; Neil, Kathrine M.; Hondred, John A.; McLamore, Eric S.; Claussen, Jonathan C.

    2016-05-01

    Enhanced interest in wearable biosensor technology over the past decade is directly related to the increasing prevalence of diabetes and the associated requirement of daily blood glucose monitoring. In this work we investigate the platinum-carbon transduction element used in traditional first-generation glucose biosensors which rely on the concentration of hydrogen peroxide produced by the glucose-glucose oxidase binding scheme. We electrodeposit platinum nanoparticles on a commercially-available screen printed carbon electrode by stepping an applied current between 0 and 7.12 mA/cm2 for a varying number of cycles. Next, we examine the trends in deposition and the effect that the number of deposition cycles has on the sensitivity of electrochemical glucose sensing. Results from this work indicate that applying platinum nanoparticles to screen printed carbon via electrodeposition from a metal salt solution improves overall biosensor sensitivity. This work also pinpoints the amount of platinum (i.e., number of deposition cycles) that maximizes biosensor sensitivity in an effort to minimize the use of the precious metals, viz., platinum, in electrode fabrication. In summary, this work quantifies the relationship between platinum electrodeposition and sensor performance, which is crucial in designing and producing cost-effective sensors.

  3. Copper deposition and its replacement by platinum on a gold electrode

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Misicak, Daniel; Ruthenburg, Travis C. [Department of Chemistry, University of California, Davis, CA 95616 (United States); Fawcett, W. Ronald, E-mail: wrfawcett@ucdavis.ed [Department of Chemistry, University of California, Davis, CA 95616 (United States)

    2010-11-01

    The decoration of single crystal gold electrodes with platinum using underpotential deposited copper as an intermediate has been studied in detail. It was found that a significant fraction of the copper is lost in the transfer process from the upd cell to the exchange cell. In addition the surface of the gold is not covered uniformly by the platinum. Nevertheless, acceleration of the electroreduction of oxygen was observed with a loading of 0.14 {mu}g cm{sup -2}. The structure of the decorating layer was studied by scanning electron microscopy and atomic force microscopy.

  4. Nanolithographic Fabrication and Heterogeneous Reaction Studies ofTwo-Dimensional Platinum Model Catalyst Systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Contreras, Anthony Marshall [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States)

    2006-05-20

    In order to better understand the fundamental components that govern catalytic activity, two-dimensional model platinum nanocatalyst arrays have been designed and fabricated. These catalysts arrays are meant to model the interplay of the metal and support important to industrial heterogeneous catalytic reactions. Photolithography and sub-lithographic techniques such as electron beam lithography, size reduction lithography and nanoimprint lithography have been employed to create these platinum nanoarrays. Both in-situ and ex-situ surface science techniques and catalytic reaction measurements were used to correlate the structural parameters of the system to catalytic activity.

  5. Laser ablation of a platinum target in water. III. Laser-induced reactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nichols, William T.; Sasaki, Takeshi; Koshizaki, Naoto

    2006-12-01

    This is the third paper in our series studying the laser-target-liquid interactions occurring in laser ablation in liquids (LAL). Here, laser ablation of a platinum target in pure water at 355nm wavelength is studied as a function of laser energy. We describe three distinct reaction regimes between the ablated target species and water at different laser focusing conditions. At low laser fluence (removal is caused by laser heating of the platinum surface and the primary products are small clusters with a large percentage of platinum atoms in a nonzero oxidation state. At intermediate fluences (10-70J/cm2), platinum nanoparticles are the primary products. Our previous studies demonstrated that in this fluence regime ablation occurs through both thermal vaporization and explosive ejection of molten droplets. In both cases reactivity is small due to the low reactivity of platinum with water. At high fluences (>70J/cm2), we find large, faceted particles that are attributed to the drying of PtOx gels formed by reactive plasma etching of the target. Taken together these results demonstrate that significant tunability in the target-liquid interaction is possible during nanomaterial synthesis by LAL.

  6. Microstructural Study on Oxidation Resistance of Nonmodified and Platinum Modified Aluminide Coating

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zagula-Yavorska, Maryana; Sieniawski, Jan

    2014-03-01

    Platinum electroplating layers (3 and 7 μm thick) were deposited on the surface of the Inconel 713 LC, CMSX 4, and Inconel 625 Ni-base superalloys. Diffusion treatment at 1050°C for 2 h under argon atmosphere was performed after electroplating. Diffusion treated samples were aluminized according to the low activity CVD process at 1050°C for 8 h. The nonmodified aluminide coatings consist of NiAl phase. Platinum modification let to obtain the (Ni,Pt)Al phase in coatings. The coated samples were subjected to cyclic oxidation testing at 1100°C. It was discovered that increase of the platinum electroplating thickness from 3 to 7 μm provides the improvement of oxidation resistance of aluminide coatings. Increase of the platinum thickness causes decreases in weight change and decreases in parabolic constant during oxidation. The platinum provides the pure Al2O3 oxide formation, slow growth oxide layer, and delay the oxide spalling during heating-cooling thermal cycles.

  7. Traffic of secondary metabolites to cell surface in the red alga Laurencia dendroidea depends on a two-step transport by the cytoskeleton.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vanessa M Reis

    Full Text Available In Laurencia dendroidea, halogenated secondary metabolites are primarily located in the vacuole named the corps en cerise (CC. For chemical defence at the surface level, these metabolites are intracellularly mobilised through vesicle transport from the CC to the cell periphery for posterior exocytosis of these chemicals. The cell structures involved in this specific vesicle traffic as well as the cellular structures related to the positioning and anchoring of the CC within the cell are not well known. Here, we aimed to investigate the role of cytoskeletal elements in both processes. Cellular and molecular assays were conducted to i determine the ultrastructural apparatus involved in the vesicle traffic, ii localise cytoskeletal filaments, iii evaluate the role of different cytoskeletal filaments in the vesicle transport, iv identify the cytoskeletal filaments responsible for the positioning and anchoring of the CC, and v identify the transcripts related to cytoskeletal activity and vesicle transport. Our results show that microfilaments are found within the connections linking the CC to the cell periphery, playing an essential role in the vesicle traffic at these connections, which means a first step of the secondary metabolites transport to the cell surface. After that, the microtubules work in the positioning of the vesicles along the cell periphery towards specific regions where exocytosis takes place, which corresponds to the second step of the secondary metabolites transport to the cell surface. In addition, microtubules are involved in anchoring and positioning the CC to the cell periphery. Transcriptomic analysis revealed the expression of genes coding for actin filaments, microtubules, motor proteins and cytoskeletal accessory proteins. Genes related to vesicle traffic, exocytosis and membrane recycling were also identified. Our findings show, for the first time, that actin microfilaments and microtubules play an underlying cellular role

  8. Traffic of secondary metabolites to cell surface in the red alga Laurencia dendroidea depends on a two-step transport by the cytoskeleton.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reis, Vanessa M; Oliveira, Louisi S; Passos, Raoni M F; Viana, Nathan B; Mermelstein, Cláudia; Sant'anna, Celso; Pereira, Renato C; Paradas, Wladimir C; Thompson, Fabiano L; Amado-Filho, Gilberto M; Salgado, Leonardo T

    2013-01-01

    In Laurencia dendroidea, halogenated secondary metabolites are primarily located in the vacuole named the corps en cerise (CC). For chemical defence at the surface level, these metabolites are intracellularly mobilised through vesicle transport from the CC to the cell periphery for posterior exocytosis of these chemicals. The cell structures involved in this specific vesicle traffic as well as the cellular structures related to the positioning and anchoring of the CC within the cell are not well known. Here, we aimed to investigate the role of cytoskeletal elements in both processes. Cellular and molecular assays were conducted to i) determine the ultrastructural apparatus involved in the vesicle traffic, ii) localise cytoskeletal filaments, iii) evaluate the role of different cytoskeletal filaments in the vesicle transport, iv) identify the cytoskeletal filaments responsible for the positioning and anchoring of the CC, and v) identify the transcripts related to cytoskeletal activity and vesicle transport. Our results show that microfilaments are found within the connections linking the CC to the cell periphery, playing an essential role in the vesicle traffic at these connections, which means a first step of the secondary metabolites transport to the cell surface. After that, the microtubules work in the positioning of the vesicles along the cell periphery towards specific regions where exocytosis takes place, which corresponds to the second step of the secondary metabolites transport to the cell surface. In addition, microtubules are involved in anchoring and positioning the CC to the cell periphery. Transcriptomic analysis revealed the expression of genes coding for actin filaments, microtubules, motor proteins and cytoskeletal accessory proteins. Genes related to vesicle traffic, exocytosis and membrane recycling were also identified. Our findings show, for the first time, that actin microfilaments and microtubules play an underlying cellular role in the

  9. Traffic of Secondary Metabolites to Cell Surface in the Red Alga Laurencia dendroidea Depends on a Two-Step Transport by the Cytoskeleton

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reis, Vanessa M.; Oliveira, Louisi S.; Passos, Raoni M. F.; Viana, Nathan B.; Mermelstein, Cláudia; Sant'Anna, Celso; Pereira, Renato C.; Paradas, Wladimir C.; Thompson, Fabiano L.; Amado-Filho, Gilberto M.; Salgado, Leonardo T.

    2013-01-01

    In Laurencia dendroidea, halogenated secondary metabolites are primarily located in the vacuole named the corps en cerise (CC). For chemical defence at the surface level, these metabolites are intracellularly mobilised through vesicle transport from the CC to the cell periphery for posterior exocytosis of these chemicals. The cell structures involved in this specific vesicle traffic as well as the cellular structures related to the positioning and anchoring of the CC within the cell are not well known. Here, we aimed to investigate the role of cytoskeletal elements in both processes. Cellular and molecular assays were conducted to i) determine the ultrastructural apparatus involved in the vesicle traffic, ii) localise cytoskeletal filaments, iii) evaluate the role of different cytoskeletal filaments in the vesicle transport, iv) identify the cytoskeletal filaments responsible for the positioning and anchoring of the CC, and v) identify the transcripts related to cytoskeletal activity and vesicle transport. Our results show that microfilaments are found within the connections linking the CC to the cell periphery, playing an essential role in the vesicle traffic at these connections, which means a first step of the secondary metabolites transport to the cell surface. After that, the microtubules work in the positioning of the vesicles along the cell periphery towards specific regions where exocytosis takes place, which corresponds to the second step of the secondary metabolites transport to the cell surface. In addition, microtubules are involved in anchoring and positioning the CC to the cell periphery. Transcriptomic analysis revealed the expression of genes coding for actin filaments, microtubules, motor proteins and cytoskeletal accessory proteins. Genes related to vesicle traffic, exocytosis and membrane recycling were also identified. Our findings show, for the first time, that actin microfilaments and microtubules play an underlying cellular role in the

  10. Merensky pillar strength formulae based on back-analysis of pillar failures at Impala Platinum

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Watson, BP

    2008-08-01

    Full Text Available The Bushveld platinum group metal deposits are two distinct, shallow-dipping stratiform tabular orebodies and strike for many hundreds of kilometres. Mining is extensive, with depths ranging from close-to-surface to 2 000 m. The mining method is a...

  11. The Effect of Size on the Oxygen Electroreduction Activity of Mass‐Selected Platinum Nanoparticles

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pérez Alonso, Francisco; McCarthy, David Norman; Nierhoff, Anders Ulrik Fregerslev

    2012-01-01

    A matter of size: The particle size effect on the activity of the oxygen reduction reaction of size-selected platinum clusters was studied. The ORR activity decreased with decreasing Pt nanoparticle size, corresponding to a decrease in the fraction of terraces on the surfaces of the Pt nanopartic...

  12. The effect of size on the oxygen electroreduction activity of mass-selected platinum nanoparticles

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pérez Alonso, Francisco; McCarthy, David N; Nierhoff, Anders

    2012-01-01

    A matter of size: The particle size effect on the activity of the oxygen reduction reaction of size-selected platinum clusters was studied. The ORR activity decreased with decreasing Pt nanoparticle size, corresponding to a decrease in the fraction of terraces on the surfaces of the Pt nanopartic...

  13. Formic Acid Electrooxidation by a Platinum Nanotubule Array Electrode

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eric Broaddus

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available One-dimensional metallic nanostructures such as nanowires, rods, and tubes have drawn much attention for electrocatalytic applications due to potential advantages that include fewer diffusion impeding interfaces with polymeric binders, more facile pathways for electron transfer, and more effective exposure of active surface sites. 1D nanostructured electrodes have been fabricated using a variety of methods, typically showing improved current response which has been attributed to improved CO tolerance, enhanced surface activity, and/or improved transport characteristics. A template wetting approach was used to fabricate an array of platinum nanotubules which were examined electrochemically with regard to the electrooxidation of formic acid. Arrays of 100 and 200 nm nanotubules were compared to a traditional platinum black catalyst, all of which were found to have similar surface areas. Peak formic acid oxidation current was observed to be highest for the 100 nm nanotubule array, followed by the 200 nm array and the Pt black; however, CO tolerance of all electrodes was similar, as were the onset potentials of the oxidation and reduction peaks. The higher current response was attributed to enhanced mass transfer in the nanotubule electrodes, likely due to a combination of both the more open nanostructure as well as the lack of a polymeric binder in the catalyst layer.

  14. Platinum Clusters on Vacancy-Type Defects of Nanometer-Sized Graphene Patches

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hisayoshi Kobayashi

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Density functional theory calculations found that spin density distributions of platinum clusters adsorbed on nanometer-size defective graphene patches with zigzag edges deviate strongly from those in the corresponding bare clusters, due to strong Pt-C interactions. In contrast, platinum clusters on the pristine patch have spin density distributions similar to the bare cases. The different spin density distributions come from whether underlying carbon atoms have radical characters or not. In the pristine patch, center carbon atoms do not have spin densities, and they cannot influence radical characters of the absorbed cluster. In contrast, radical characters appear on the defective sites, and thus spin density distributions of the adsorbed clusters are modulated by the Pt-C interactions. Consequently, characters of platinum clusters adsorbed on the sp2 surface can be changed by introducing vacancy-type defects.

  15. High-surface-area mesoporous TiO2 microspheres via one-step nanoparticle self-assembly for enhanced lithium-ion storage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Hsin-Yi; Chen, Jiazang; Hy, Sunny; Yu, Linghui; Xu, Zhichuan; Liu, Bin

    2014-12-21

    Mesoporous TiO2 microspheres assembled from TiO2 nanoparticles with specific surface areas as high as 150 m(2) g(-1) were synthesized via a facile one-step solvothermal reaction of titanium isopropoxide and anhydrous acetone. Aldol condensation of acetone gradually releases structural H2O, which hydrolyzes and condenses titanium isopropoxide, forming TiO2 nanocrystals. Simultaneous growth and aggregation of TiO2 nanocrystals leads to the formation of high-surface-area TiO2 microspheres under solvothermal conditions. After a low-temperature post-synthesis calcination, carbonate could be incorporated into TiO2 as a dopant with the carbon source coming from the organic byproducts during the synthesis. Carbonate doping modifies the electronic structure of TiO2 (e.g., Fermi level, Ef), and thus influences its electrochemical properties. Solid electrolyte interface (SEI) formation, which is not common for titania, could be initiated in carbonate-doped TiO2 due to elevated Ef. After removing carbonate dopants by high-temperature calcination, the mesoporous TiO2 microspheres showed much improved performance in lithium insertion and stability at various current rates, attributed to a synergistic effect of high surface area, large pore size and good anatase crystallinity.

  16. ORR viability of alumina-supported platinum nanocluster: exploring oxidation behaviour by DFT.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nigam, Sandeep; Majumder, Chiranjib

    2017-07-26

    While alumina-supported platinum particles are versatile for several oxidation reactions, their viability as ORR catalysts has not been explored to date. Therefore, to assess the prospects of alumina-supported platinum nanoclusters in ORRs, a systematic DFT study has been carried out to explore the oxidation behavior of a Ptn@Al2O3 (n = 1-7, 10) cluster. The results are compared with the oxidation behavior of the corresponding gas phase platinum cluster and that of an extended Pt(111) slab. Both supported and unsupported clusters activate adsorbed oxygen molecules and energetically favor dissociative chemisorption of oxygen, leading to stable oxide formation with Pt-O-Pt linkages. However, the influence of the alumina substrate downshifts the d-band centre of the platinum cluster, which not only reduces the reaction enthalpy of oxidation by 8-10%, but also elongates the Pt-O bond of the oxide product by 3-8%. These observations indicate that removal of oxide will be relatively easier for supported clusters than for unsupported clusters. Cluster binding is found to sustain during oxidation, as oxidation of the platinum host cluster results in reduction of the distance between the cluster and support surface. While the gas phase Pt10 cluster does not show any similarity to the oxidation behavior shown by THE Pt(111) slab, the Pt10@Al2O3 cluster reveals close resemblance. Both the Pt(111) slab and Pt10@Al2O3 cluster form similar oxide products, having tri-coordinated oxygen with comparable Pt-O bond distances. The observed resemblance has been attributed to the similarity in the electronic structure and d-band centre position of the platinum surface and alumina-supported Pt10 cluster. Whilst this similar oxidation behaviour of the Pt10@Al2O3 cluster endorses its viability as an ORR catalyst, further modulation of this catalyst is desirable to improve its potential.

  17. computer modeling ter modeling ter modeling of platinum reforming ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    eobe

    naphtha to complex chemical reactions, at h temperature and ... at is leaving any stage of the platinum reforming reactors in terms of ... In this study, only platinum reforming .... IV. Hydrocracking of paraffinic hydrocarbons: +. →. ( +. +. +. +. ) (18).

  18. Novel platinum black electroplating technique improving mechanical stability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Raeyoung; Nam, Yoonkey

    2013-01-01

    Platinum black microelectrodes are widely used as an effective neural signal recording sensor. The simple fabrication process, high quality signal recording and proper biocompatibility are the main advantages of platinum black microelectrodes. When microelectrodes are exposed to actual biological system, various physical stimuli are applied. However, the porous structure of platinum black is vulnerable to external stimuli and destroyed easily. The impedance level of the microelectrode increases when the microelectrodes are damaged resulting in decreased recording performance. In this study, we developed mechanically stable platinum black microelectrodes by adding polydopamine. The polydopamine layer was added between the platinum black structures by electrodeposition method. The initial impedance level of platinum black only microelectrodes and polydopamine added microelectrodes were similar but after applying ultrasonication the impedance value dramatically increased for platinum black only microelectrodes, whereas polydopamine added microelectrodes showed little increase which were nearly retained initial values. Polydopamine added platinum black microelectrodes are expected to extend the availability as neural sensors.

  19. Time-resolved spectral characterization of ring cavity surface emitting and ridge-type distributed feedback quantum cascade lasers by step-scan FT-IR spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brandstetter, Markus; Genner, Andreas; Schwarzer, Clemens; Mujagic, Elvis; Strasser, Gottfried; Lendl, Bernhard

    2014-02-10

    We present the time-resolved comparison of pulsed 2nd order ring cavity surface emitting (RCSE) quantum cascade lasers (QCLs) and pulsed 1st order ridge-type distributed feedback (DFB) QCLs using a step-scan Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR) spectrometer. Laser devices were part of QCL arrays and fabricated from the same laser material. Required grating periods were adjusted to account for the grating order. The step-scan technique provided a spectral resolution of 0.1 cm(-1) and a time resolution of 2 ns. As a result, it was possible to gain information about the tuning behavior and potential mode-hops of the investigated lasers. Different cavity-lengths were compared, including 0.9 mm and 3.2 mm long ridge-type and 0.97 mm (circumference) ring-type cavities. RCSE QCLs were found to have improved emission properties in terms of line-stability, tuning rate and maximum emission time compared to ridge-type lasers.

  20. Platinum uptake from chloride solutions using biosorbents

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mehmet Hakan Morcali

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Present work investigates platinum uptake from synthetically prepared, dilute platinum-bearing solutions using biomass residues, i.e. pistachio nut shell and rice husk, which are abundant in Turkey, and provides a comparison between these two biosorbents. Effects of the different uptake parameters, sorbent dosage, contact time, temperature and pH of solution on platinum uptake (% were studied in detail on a batch sorption. Before the pistachio nut shell was activated, platinum uptake (% was poor compared to the rice husk. However, after the pistachio nut shell was activated at 1000 °C under an argon atmosphere, the platinum uptake (% increased two-fold. The pistachio nut shell (original and activated and rice husk were shown to be better than commercially available activated carbon in terms of adsorption capacity. These two sorbents have also been characterized by FTIR and SEM. Adsorption equilibrium data best complied with the Langmuir isotherm model. Maximum adsorption capacities, Qmax, at 25 °C were found to be 38.31 and 42.02 mg.g- 1for the activated pistachio nut shell and rice husk, respectively. Thermodynamic calculations using the measured ∆H°, ∆S° and ∆G° values indicate that the uptake process was spontaneous and endothermic. The experimental data were shown to be fit the pseudo-second-order kinetic model.

  1. Computational insight into the initial steps of the Mars-van Krevelen mechanism: electron transfer and surface defects in the reduction of polyoxometalates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Efremenko, Irena; Neumann, Ronny

    2012-12-26

    Metal oxides as a rule oxidize and oxygenate substrates via the Mars-van Krevelen mechanism. A well-defined α-Keggin polyoxometalate, H(5)PV(2)Mo(10)O(40), can be viewed as an analogue of discrete structure that reacts via the Mars-van Krevelen mechanism both in solution and in the gas phase. Guided by previous experimental observations, we have studied the key intermediates on the reaction pathways of its reduction by various compounds using high-level DFT calculations. These redox reactions of polyoxometalates require protons, and thus such complexes were explicitly considered. First, the energetics of outer-sphere proton and electron transfer as well as coupled proton and electron transfer were calculated for seven substrates. This was followed by identification of possible key intermediates on the subsequent reaction pathways that feature displacement of the metal atom from the Keggin structure and coordinatively unsaturated sites on the H(5)PV(2)Mo(10)O(40) surface. Such metal defects are favored at vanadium sites. For strong reducing agents the initial outer-sphere electron transfer, alone or possibly coupled with proton transfer, facilitates formation of metal defects. Subsequent coordination allows for formation of reactive ensembles on the catalyst surface, for which the selective oxygen-transfer step becomes feasible. Weak reducing agents do not facilitate defect formation by outer-sphere electron and/or proton transfers, and thus formation of metal defect structures prior to the substrate activation is suggested as an initial step. Calculated geometries and energies of metal defect structures support experimentally observed intermediates and demonstrate the complex nature of the Mars-van Krevelen mechanism.

  2. Simple one step synthesis of nonionic dithiol surfactants and their self-assembling with silver nanoparticles: Characterization, surface properties, biological activity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abd-Elaal, Ali A., E-mail: ali_ashour5@yahoo.com; Tawfik, Salah M.; Shaban, Samy M.

    2015-07-01

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • Nonionic dithiol surfactants were synthesized by simple one step esterification. • The surface activity of the synthesized dithiol surfactants showed high tendency toward adsorption and micellization. • The nanostructure of the synthesized nonionic dithiol surfactants with silver nanoparticles was prepared. • The silver nanoparticles enhanced the biological activity of the synthesized dithiol surfactants. - Abstract: Simple esterification of 2-mercaptoacetic acid and polyethylene glycol with different molecular weights was done to form the desired nonionic dithiol surfactants. The chemical structures of synthesized thiol surfactants were confirmed using FT-IR and {sup 1}H NMR spectra. The surface activity of the synthesized surfactants was determined by measurement of the surface tension at different temperatures. The surface activity measurements showed their high tendency towards adsorption and micellization. The thermodynamic parameters of micellization (ΔG{sub mic}, ΔH{sub mic} and ΔS{sub mic}) and adsorption (ΔG{sub ads}, ΔG{sub ads} and ΔS{sub ads}) showed their tendency toward adsorption at the interfaces and also micellization in the bulk of their solutions. The nanostructure of the synthesized nonionic dithiol surfactants with silver nanoparticles was prepared and investigated using UV and TEM techniques. Screening tests of the synthesized dithiol surfactants and their nanostructure with silver nanoparticles, against gram positive bacteria (Bacillus subtilis and Microccus luteus), gram negative bacteria (Escherichia coli and Bordatella pertussis) and fungi (Aspergillus niger and Candida albicans) showed that they are highly active biocides. The presence of silver nanoparticles enhancement the biological activities of the individual synthesized nonionic dithiol surfactants.

  3. Engineering Platinum Alloy Electrocatalysts in Nanoscale for PEMFC Application

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    He, Ting [Idaho National Laboratory

    2016-03-01

    Fuel cells are expected to be a key next-generation energy source used for vehicles and homes, offering high energy conversion efficiency and minimal pollutant emissions. However, due to large overpotentials on anode and cathode, the efficiency is still much lower than theoretically predicted. During the past decades, considerable efforts have been made to investigate synergy effect of platinum alloyed with base metals. But, engineering the alloy particles in nanoscale has been a challenge. Most important challenges in developing nanostructured materials are the abilities to control size, monodispersity, microcomposition, and even morphology or self-assembly capability, so called Nanomaterials-by-Design, which requires interdisciplinary collaborations among computational modeling, chemical synthesis, nanoscale characterization as well as manufacturing processing. Electrocatalysts, particularly fuel cell catalysts, are dramatically different from heterogeneous catalysts because the surface area in micropores cannot be electrochemically controlled on the same time scale as more transport accessible surfaces. Therefore, electrocatalytic architectures need minimal microporous surface area while maximizing surfaces accessible through mesopores or macropores, and to "pin" the most active, highest performance physicochemical state of the materials even when exposed to thermodynamic forces, which would otherwise drive restructuring, crystallization, or densification of the nanoscale materials. In this presentation, results of engineering nanoscale platinum alloy particles down to 2 ~ 4 nm will be discussed. Based on nature of alloyed base metals, various synthesis technologies have been studied and developed to achieve capabilities of controlling particle size and particle microcomposition, namely, core-shell synthesis, microemulsion technique, thermal decomposition process, surface organometallic chemical method, etc. The results show that by careful engineering the

  4. Extensions of Callendar's equations for platinum resistance thermometry

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Diamond, Joseph M.

    1969-01-01

    measurements where the platinum thermometer and the measurement means may be less than ideal. To this end. Callendar's definition of platinum temperature is generalized to mean the temperature found by linear interpolation with a platinum thermometer between given fixed points and using a given measurement...

  5. Platinum Publications as of April 30, 2014 | Poster

    Science.gov (United States)

    Platinum Publications are selected from articles by NCI at Frederick scientists published in 21 prestigious science journals. This list represents new publications generated from PubMed as of the date shown above. Articles designated as Platinum Highlights are noteworthy articles selected by Dr. Craig Reynolds, associate director, National Cancer Institute, from among the most recently published Platinum Publications.

  6. Platinum Publications, September 30–October 27, 2016 | Poster

    Science.gov (United States)

    Platinum Publications are selected from articles by NCI at Frederick scientists published in 42 prestigious science journals. This list represents articles published during the time period shown above, as generated from PubMed. Articles designated as Platinum Highlights are noteworthy articles selected by Dr. Craig Reynolds, associate director, National Cancer Institute, from among the most recently published Platinum Publications.

  7. Platinum Publications as of June 25, 2014 | Poster

    Science.gov (United States)

    Platinum Publications are selected from articles by NCI at Frederick scientists published in 21 prestigious science journals. This list represents new publications generated from PubMed as of the date shown above. Articles designated as Platinum Highlights are noteworthy articles selected by Dr. Craig Reynolds, associate director, National Cancer Institute, from among the most recently published Platinum Publications.

  8. Platinum Publications, July 1–July 28, 2016 | Poster

    Science.gov (United States)

    Platinum Publications are selected from articles by NCI at Frederick scientists published in 42 prestigious science journals. This list represents articles published during the time period shown above, as generated from PubMed. Articles designated as Platinum Highlights are noteworthy articles selected by Dr. Craig Reynolds, associate director, National Cancer Institute, from among the most recently published Platinum Publications.

  9. Platinum Publications as of March 6, 2014 | Poster

    Science.gov (United States)

    Platinum Publications are selected from articles by NCI at Frederick scientists published in 21 prestigious science journals. This list represents new publications generated from PubMed as of the date shown above. Articles designated as Platinum Highlights are noteworthy articles selected by Dr. Craig Reynolds, associate director, National Cancer Institute, from among the most recently published Platinum Publications.

  10. Platinum Publications, October 1–29, 2015 | Poster

    Science.gov (United States)

    Platinum Publications are selected from articles by NCI at Frederick scientists published in 42 prestigious science journals. This list represents articles published during the time period shown above, as generated from PubMed. Articles designated as Platinum Highlights are noteworthy articles selected by Dr. Craig Reynolds, associate director, National Cancer Institute, from among the most recently published Platinum Publications.

  11. Platinum Publications, December 1–December 29, 2016 | Poster

    Science.gov (United States)

    Platinum Publications are selected from articles by NCI at Frederick scientists published in 42 prestigious science journals. This list represents articles published during the time period shown above, as generated from PubMed. Articles designated as Platinum Highlights are noteworthy articles selected from among the most recently published Platinum Publications.

  12. Platinum Publications as of May 29, 2014 | Poster

    Science.gov (United States)

    Platinum Publications are selected from articles by NCI at Frederick scientists published in 21 prestigious science journals. This list represents new publications generated from PubMed as of the date shown above. Articles designated as Platinum Highlights are noteworthy articles selected by Dr. Craig Reynolds, associate director, National Cancer Institute, from among the most recently published Platinum Publications.

  13. Platinum Publications as of September 25, 2014 | Poster

    Science.gov (United States)

    Platinum Publications are selected from articles by NCI at Frederick scientists published in 21 prestigious science journals. This list represents new publications generated from PubMed as of the date shown above. Articles designated as Platinum Highlights are noteworthy articles selected by Dr. Craig Reynolds, associate director, National Cancer Institute, from among the most recently published Platinum Publications.

  14. Platinum Publications, January 26–February 28, 2017 | Poster

    Science.gov (United States)

    Platinum Publications are selected from articles by NCI at Frederick scientists published in 42 prestigious science journals. This list represents articles published during the time period shown above, as generated from PubMed. Articles designated as Platinum Highlights are noteworthy articles selected from among the most recently published Platinum Publications.

  15. Platinum Publications as of December 3, 2013 | Poster

    Science.gov (United States)

    Platinum Publications are selected from articles by NCI at Frederick scientists published in 21 prestigious science journals. This list represents new publications generated from PubMed as of the date shown above. Articles designated as Platinum Highlights are noteworthy articles selected by Dr. Craig Reynolds, associate director, National Cancer Institute, from among the most recently published Platinum Publications.

  16. 76 FR 8627 - Revision of Class E Airspace; Platinum, AK

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-02-15

    ... Federal Aviation Administration 14 CFR Part 71 Revision of Class E Airspace; Platinum, AK AGENCY: Federal... Platinum, AK, to accommodate the addition of a Standard Instrument Approach Procedure (SIAP), at the Platinum Airport. The FAA is taking this action to enhance safety and management of Instrument Flight...

  17. UV-cured, platinum-free, soft poly(dimethylsiloxane) networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goswami, K; Skov, A L; Daugaard, A E

    2014-07-21

    To overcome the drawbacks exhibited by platinum-catalyzed curing of silicones, photoinitiated thiol-ene cross-linking of high-molecular-weight poly(dimethylsiloxane) (PDMS) prepolymers has been investigated as a pathway to novel soft PDMS networks, based on commercially available starting materials was developed. Through a fast and efficient two-step cross-linking reaction highly flexible PDMS elastomers were prepared.

  18. Autonomous movement of platinum-loaded stomatocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, Daniela A; Nolte, Roeland J M; van Hest, Jan C M

    2012-02-26

    Polymer stomatocytes are bowl-shaped structures of nanosize dimensions formed by the controlled deformation of polymer vesicles. The stable nanocavity and strict control of the opening are ideal for the physical entrapment of nanoparticles which, when catalytically active, can turn the stomatocyte morphology into a nanoreactor. Herein we report an approach to generate autonomous movement of the polymer stomatocytes by selectively entrapping catalytically active platinum nanoparticles within their nanocavities and subsequently using catalysis as a driving force for movement. Hydrogen peroxide is free to access the inner stomatocyte cavity, where it is decomposed by the active catalyst (the entrapped platinum nanoparticles) into oxygen and water. This generates a rapid discharge, which induces thrust and directional movement. The design of the platinum-loaded stomatocytes resembles a miniature monopropellant rocket engine, in which the controlled opening of the stomatocytes directs the expulsion of the decomposition products away from the reaction chamber (inner stomatocyte cavity).

  19. Faceting diagram for sticky steps

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Noriko Akutsu

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Faceting diagrams for the step-faceting zone, the step droplet zone, and the Gruber-Mullins-Pokrovsky-Talapov (GMPT zone for a crystal surface are obtained by using the density matrix renormalization group method to calculate the surface tension. The model based on these calculations is the restricted solid-on-solid (RSOS model with a point-contact-type step-step attraction (p-RSOS model on a square lattice. The point-contact-type step-step attraction represents the energy gain obtained by forming a bonding state with orbital overlap at the meeting point of the neighboring steps. In the step-faceting zone, disconnectedness in the surface tension leads to the formation of a faceted macrostep on a vicinal surface at equilibrium. The disconnectedness in the surface tension also causes the first-order shape transition for the equilibrium shape of a crystal droplet. The lower zone boundary line (ZBL, which separates the step-faceting zone and the step droplet zone, is obtained by the condition γ 1 = lim n → ∞ γ n / n , where γn is the step tension of the n-th merged step. The upper ZBL, which separates the GMPT zone and the step droplet zone, is obtained by the condition Aq,eff = 0 and Bq,eff = 0, where Aq,eff and Bq,eff represent the coefficients for the | q → | 2 term and the | q → | 3 term, respectively, in the | q → | -expanded form of the surface free energy f eff ( q → . Here, q → is the surface gradient relative to the (111 surface. The reason why the vicinal surface inclined in the 〈101〉 direction does not exhibit step-faceting is explained in terms of the one-dimensional spinless quasi-impenetrable attractive bosons at absolute zero.

  20. Textured strontium titanate layers on platinum by atomic layer deposition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Blomberg, T., E-mail: tom.blomberg@asm.com [ASM Microchemistry Ltd., Vaeinoe Auerin katu 12 A, 00560 Helsinki (Finland); Anttila, J.; Haukka, S.; Tuominen, M. [ASM Microchemistry Ltd., Vaeinoe Auerin katu 12 A, 00560 Helsinki (Finland); Lukosius, M.; Wenger, Ch. [IHP, Im Technologiepark 25, 15236 Frankfurt (Oder) (Germany); Saukkonen, T. [Aalto University, Puumiehenkuja 3, 02150 Espoo (Finland)

    2012-08-31

    Formation of textured strontium titanate (STO) layers with large lateral grain size (0.2-1 {mu}m) and low X-ray reflectivity roughness ({approx} 1.36 nm) on Pt electrodes by industry proven atomic layer deposition (ALD) method is demonstrated. Sr(t-Bu{sub 3}Cp){sub 2}, Ti(OMe){sub 4} and O{sub 3} precursors at 250 Degree-Sign C were used to deposit Sr rich STO on Pt/Ti/SiO{sub 2}/Si Empty-Set 200 mm substrates. After crystallization post deposition annealing at 600 Degree-Sign C in air, most of the STO grains showed a preferential orientation of the {l_brace}001{r_brace} plane parallel to the substrate surface, although other orientations were also present. Cross sectional and plan view transmission electron microscopy and electron diffraction analysis revealed more than an order of magnitude larger lateral grain sizes for the STO compared to the underlying multicrystalline {l_brace}111{r_brace} oriented platinum electrode. The combination of platinum bottom electrodes with ALD STO(O{sub 3}) shows a promising path towards the formation of single oriented STO film. - Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Amorphous strontium titanate (STO) on platinum formed a textured film after annealing. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Single crystal domains in 60 nm STO film were 0.2-1 {mu}m wide. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Most STO grains were {l_brace}001{r_brace} oriented.

  1. Hybrid-Mode-Assisted Long-Distance Excitation of Short-Range Surface Plasmons in a Nanotip-Enhanced Step-Index Fiber.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tuniz, Alessandro; Chemnitz, Mario; Dellith, Jan; Weidlich, Stefan; Schmidt, Markus A

    2017-02-08

    We propose and experimentally demonstrate a monolithic nanowire-enhanced fiber-based nanoprobe for the broadband delivery of light (550-730 nm) to a deep subwavelength scale using short-range surface plasmons. The geometry is formed by a step index fiber with an integrated gold nanowire in its core and a protruding gold nanotip with sub-10 nm apex radius. We present a novel coupling scheme to excite short-range surface plasmons, whereby the radially polarized hybrid mode propagating inside the nanowire section excites the plasmonic mode close to the fiber endface, which is in turn superfocused down to nanoscale dimensions at the tip apex. We show that in this all-integrated fiber-plasmonic coupling scheme the wire length can be orders of magnitude longer than the attenuation length of short-range plasmon polaritons, yielding a broadband plasmon excitation and reducing demands in fabrication. We observe that the scattered light in the far-field from the nanotip is axially polarized and preferentially excited by a radially polarized input, unambiguously revealing that it originates from a short-range plasmon propagating on the nanotip, in agreement with simulations. This novel excitation scheme will have important applications in near-field microscopy and nanophotonics and potentially offers significantly improved resolution compared to current delivery near-field probes.

  2. Two-step-wise interpretation of highly asymmetric, grazing angle (e,2e) on solids: A real momentum spectroscopy for surfaces and overlayers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liscio, A.; Ruocco, A.; Stefani, G.; Iacobucci, S.

    2008-02-01

    This paper deals with the mechanism of grazing incidence (e,2e) events from surfaces. Two different approaches are considered. In both cases, elastic scattering with the crystal lattice assists the inelastic collision; these two steps are coupled either coherently or incoherently. Experimental evidence is given that the “coherent” approach reproduces better the cross section dependence on momentum transfer in the specific case of asymmetric kinematics at moderate electron energies. This model has allowed us to map out the band dispersion of the outermost valence states of highly oriented pyrolytic graphite and to measure the momentum distribution of π -electron states without invoking the contribution of reciprocal lattice vectors in the momentum conservation. Agreement between theory and experiment is satisfactory, though the presence of events where crystal momentum is reconstructed cannot be ruled out. These results, obtained with a significant reduction of the experiment duration by an implemented apparatus, show that reflection (e,2e) can be used to build up a momentum spectroscopy with high surface sensitivity.

  3. The optimization of essential oils supercritical CO 2 extraction from Lavandula hybrida through static-dynamic steps procedure and semi-continuous technique using response surface method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hossein Kamali

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim: The aim of this study was to examine and evaluate crucial variables in essential oils extraction process from Lavandula hybrida through static-dynamic and semi-continuous techniques using response surface method. Materials and Methods: Essential oil components were extracted from Lavandula hybrida (Lavandin flowers using supercritical carbon dioxide via static-dynamic steps (SDS procedure, and semi-continuous (SC technique. Results: Using response surface method the optimum extraction yield (4.768% was obtained via SDS at 108.7 bar, 48.5° C , 120 min (static: 8×15, 24 min (dynamic: 8×3 min in contrast to the 4.620% extraction yield for the SC at 111.6 bar, 49.2° C , 14 min (static, 121.1 min (dynamic. Conclusion: The results indicated that a substantial reduction (81.56% solvent usage (kg CO 2 /g oil is observed in the SDS method versus the conventional SC method.

  4. One-step solvothermal deposition of ZnO nanorod arrays on a wood surface for robust superamphiphobic performance and superior ultraviolet resistance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yao, Qiufang; Wang, Chao; Fan, Bitao; Wang, Hanwei; Sun, Qingfeng; Jin, Chunde; Zhang, Hong

    2016-01-01

    In the present paper, uniformly large-scale wurtzite-structured ZnO nanorod arrays (ZNAs) were deposited onto a wood surface through a one-step solvothermal method. The as-prepared samples were characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD), field-emission scanning electron microscopy (FE-SEM), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), thermogravimetry (TG), and differential thermal analysis (DTA). ZNAs with a diameter of approximately 85 nm and a length of approximately 1.5 μm were chemically bonded onto the wood surface through hydrogen bonds. The superamphiphobic performance and ultraviolet resistance were measured and evaluated by water or oil contact angles (WCA or OCA) and roll-off angles, sand abrasion tests and an artificially accelerated ageing test. The results show that the ZNA-treated wood demonstrates a robust superamphiphobic performance under mechanical impact, corrosive liquids, intermittent and transpositional temperatures, and water spray. Additionally, the as-prepared wood sample shows superior ultraviolet resistance. PMID:27775091

  5. Polymer Nanocomposite Film with Metal Rich Surface Prepared by In Situ Single-Step Formation of Palladium Nanoparticles: An Interesting Way to Combine Specific Functional Properties

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David Thompson

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents a continuous single-step route that permits preparation of a thermostable polymer/metal nanocomposite film and to combine different functional properties in a unique material. More precisely, palladium nanoparticles are in situ generated in a polyimide matrix thanks to a designed curing cycle which is applied to a polyamic acid/metal precursor solution cast on a glass plate. A metal-rich surface layer which is strongly bonded to the bulk film is formed in addition to homogeneously dispersed metal nanoparticles. This specific morphology leads to obtaining an optically reflective film. The metal nanoparticles act as gas diffusion barriers for helium, oxygen, and carbon dioxide; they induce a tortuosity effect which allows dividing the gas permeation coefficients by a factor near to 2 with respect to the neat polyimide matrix. Moreover, the ability of the in situ synthesized palladium nanoparticles to entrap hydrogen is evidenced. The nanocomposite film properties can be modulated as a function of the location of the film metal-rich surface with respect to the hydrogen feed. The synthesized nanocomposite could represent a major interest for a wide variety of applications, from specific coatings for aerospace or automotive industry, to catalysis applications or sensors.

  6. One-step solvothermal deposition of ZnO nanorod arrays on a wood surface for robust superamphiphobic performance and superior ultraviolet resistance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yao, Qiufang; Wang, Chao; Fan, Bitao; Wang, Hanwei; Sun, Qingfeng; Jin, Chunde; Zhang, Hong

    2016-10-01

    In the present paper, uniformly large-scale wurtzite-structured ZnO nanorod arrays (ZNAs) were deposited onto a wood surface through a one-step solvothermal method. The as-prepared samples were characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD), field-emission scanning electron microscopy (FE-SEM), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), thermogravimetry (TG), and differential thermal analysis (DTA). ZNAs with a diameter of approximately 85 nm and a length of approximately 1.5 μm were chemically bonded onto the wood surface through hydrogen bonds. The superamphiphobic performance and ultraviolet resistance were measured and evaluated by water or oil contact angles (WCA or OCA) and roll-off angles, sand abrasion tests and an artificially accelerated ageing test. The results show that the ZNA-treated wood demonstrates a robust superamphiphobic performance under mechanical impact, corrosive liquids, intermittent and transpositional temperatures, and water spray. Additionally, the as-prepared wood sample shows superior ultraviolet resistance.

  7. Liquid-phase benzene isopropylation using alumina solid lewis superacid-supported platinum catalyst

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yamada, K.; Honda, K.; Kitahara, D.; Miyamoto, M.; Shiga, M.; Ayame, A. [Muroran Inst. of Tech., Hokkaido (Japan)

    2000-03-01

    Supporting platinum on alumina solid Lewis superacid (AmLSA; J. C. S., Chem. Commun., 645 (1989)) was prepared by using of the in situ CVD technique at 773 K with Ar{sup +}-sputtered platinum fine particles and dry chlorine, followed by reduction with hydrogen at 673 K. The AmLSA-supported platinum catalyst (Pt/AmLSA) was applied to isopropylation of benzene with propene in the hydrogen stream at ambient temperature, using a semibatch reactor. Products were mono-, di-, tri-, and tetra-isopropylbenzenes. Conversion of propene to propane was below 1 %, and a trace amount of cyclohexane from benzene was also observed. Deactivation of AmLSA due to strong adsorption of poly-substituted benzenes and/or propene oligomers was remarkably depressed by supporting platinum and supplying hydrogen into the propene stream. Consequently, the activity of Pt/AmLSA catalyst had increased almost 1.5 times that of AmLSA. At the same level of benzene conversion, the product distribution f isopropyl-substituted benzenes obtained on Pt/AmLSA was identical to that on AmLSA, and had shifted slightly into the mono-substituted benzene side compared with the result on AmLSA in the absence of hydrogen. In the isopropylation of benzene with 2-chloropropane, the results quite similar to those described above were obtained. From the above observations, synergetic effects of platinum supporting and hydrogen supplying were considered to be due to the presence of hydrogen atoms spilled over from the platinum surface to the strong Lewis acid sites. (author)

  8. Electrocatalytic activity of platinum nanoparticles supported on nanosilicon

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Miu, M.; Kleps, I.; Danila, M.; Ignat, T.; Simion, M.; Bragaru, A.; Dinescu, A. [Laboratory of Nanotechnology, National Institute for Research and Development in Microtechnologies, Bucharest (Romania)

    2010-04-15

    Platinum (Pt) nanocatalysts were deposited on/inside of nanostructured silicon (nanoSi) matrix using physico-chemical methods, i.e. E-beam high vacuum Pt thin film and, respectively, chemically loaded Pt nanoparticles from hexachloroplatinic acid aqueous or alcoholic precursor solutions. High resolution morphological characterisations, completed by microstructural and compositional analyses have been performed to characterise the nanoSi catalyst support and to investigate the Pt thin film nanostructuration as well as the nanoparticle attachment and clustering processes, evidencing the controlling factors and conditions of the size, morphology and distribution. Furthermore, the experimental structures have been subjected to different electrochemical tests and it was revealed that significant improvement of the long term catalyst stability was achieved when the metal-porous Si nanoassemblies is formed, which represents a step closer to the realisation of the monolithic integrated Si-based microfabricated fuel cell. (Abstract Copyright [2010], Wiley Periodicals, Inc.)

  9. Formic Acid Oxidation at Platinum-Bismuth Clusters

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lovic, J. D.; Stevanovic, S. I.; Tripkovic, D. V.

    2014-01-01

    Formic acid oxidation was studied on platinum-bismuth deposits on glassy carbon (GC) substrate. The catalysts of equimolar ratio were prepared by potentiostatic deposition using chronocoulometry. Bimetallic structures obtained by two-step process, comprising deposition of Bi followed by deposition...... of Pt, were characterized by AFM spectroscopy which indicated that Pt crystallizes preferentially onto previously formed Bi particles. The issue of Bi leaching (dissolution) from PtBi catalysts, and their catalytic effect alongside the HCOOH oxidation is rather unresolved. In order to control Bi...... dissolution, deposits were subjected to electrochemical oxidation, in the relevant potential range and supporting electrolyte, prior to use as catalysts for HCOOH oxidation. Anodic striping charges indicated that along oxidation procedure most of deposited Bi was oxidized. ICP mass spectroscopy analysis...

  10. Electrochemical oxidation of carbon monoxide: from platinum single crystals to low temperature fuel cells catalysts. Part I: Carbon monoxide oxidation onto low index platinum single crystals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    PHILIP N. ROSS JR

    2001-12-01

    Full Text Available The electrochemical oxidation of carbon monoxide and the interfacial structure of the CO adlayer (COads on platinum low index single crystals, Pt(111, Pt(100 and two reconstruction of Pt(110, were examined using the rotation disk electrode method in combination with the in situ surface X-ray diffraction scattering technique. The mechanism of CO oxidation is discussed on the basis of the findings that, depending on the potential, two energetic states of COads exist on the platinum surfaces. Thus, at lower potentials, weakly bonded states (COads,w and at higher potentials strongly bonded states (COads,s are formed. The mechanism of the oxidation of hydrogen-carbon monoxide mixtures is also proposed.

  11. Enhanced catalytic activity of solid and hollow platinum-cobalt nanoparticles towards reduction of 4-nitrophenol

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krajczewski, Jan; Kołątaj, Karol; Kudelski, Andrzej

    2016-12-01

    Previous investigations of hollow platinum nanoparticles have shown that such nanostructures are more active catalysts than their solid counterparts towards the following electrochemical reactions: reduction of oxygen, evolution of hydrogen, and oxidation of borohydride, methanol and formic acid. In this work we show that synthesised using standard galvanic replacement reaction (with Co templates) hollow platinum nanoparticles exhibit enhanced catalytic activity also towards reduction of 4-nitrophenol by sodium borohydride in water. Unlike in the case of procedures involving hollow platinum catalysts employed so far to carry out this reaction it is not necessary to couple analysed platinum nanoparticles to the surface of an electrode. Simplification of the analyzed reaction may eliminate same experimental errors. We found that the enhanced catalytic activity of hollow Pt nanoparticles is not only connected with generally observed larger surface area of hollow nanostructures, but is also due to the contamination of formed hollow nanostructures with cobalt, from which sacrificial templates used in the synthesis of hollow Pt nanostrustures have been formed. Because using sacrificial templates is a typical method of synthesis of hollow metal nanostructures, formed hollow nanoparticles are probably often contaminated, which may significantly influence their catalytic activity.

  12. Potentiodynamic electrochemical impedance spectroscopy of silver on platinum in underpotential and overpotential deposition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ragoisha, Genady A.; Bondarenko, Alexander S.

    2004-09-01

    Simultaneous monitoring of ac and dc responses of the electrode-electrolyte interface with potentiodynamic electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (PDEIS) in silver underpotential and overpotential deposition on platinum has confirmed the role of intrinsic Pt surface changes in the irreversibility of Ag underpotential deposition and disclosed exceptionally high stability of Ag monolayer on Pt. PDEIS has been demonstrated to be a convenient means for wet surface chemistry monitoring.

  13. Potentiodynamic Electrochemical Impedance Spectroscopy of Silver on Platinum in Underpotential and Overpotential Deposition

    OpenAIRE

    Ragoisha, Genady; Bondarenko, Alexander

    2003-01-01

    Simultaneous monitoring of ac and dc responses of the electrode-electrolyte interface with potentiodynamic electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (PDEIS) in silver underpotential and overpotential deposition on platinum has confirmed the role of intrinsic Pt surface changes in the irreversibility of Ag underpotential deposition and disclosed exceptionally high stability of Ag monolayer on Pt. PDEIS has been demonstrated to be a convenient means for wet surface chemistry monitoring.

  14. Electrochemical Analysis of the Electrodeposition of Platinum Nanoparticles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Hae-Min; Cho, Sung-Woon; Kim, Jun-Hyun; Kim, Chang-Koo [Ajou University, Suwon (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-10-15

    A bath for electrodeposition of platinum nanoparticles on low-cost graphite substrates was developed to attach nanoparticles directly onto a substrate, and electrochemical characteristics of the electrodeposition of platinum nanoparticles were investigated. The reaction mechanism was examined by the analysis of polarization behavior. Cyclic voltammetry measurements revealed that the electrodeposition of platinum nanoparticles was limited by mass transfer. The chronoamperometric study showed an instantaneous nucleation mechanism during the electrodeposition of platinum nanoparticles on graphite. Because graphite is much cheaper than other carbon-based substrates, the electrodeposition of platinum nanoparticles on the graphite is expected to have useful applications.

  15. Outpatient desensitization in selected patients with platinum hypersensitivity reactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Malley, David M; Vetter, Monica Hagan; Cohn, David E; Khan, Ambar; Hays, John L

    2017-06-01

    Platinum-based chemotherapies are a standard treatment for both initial and recurrent gynecologic cancers. Given this widespread use, it is important to be aware of the features of platinum hypersensitivity reactions and the subsequent treatment of these reactions. There is also increasing interest in the development of desensitization protocols to allow patients with a history of platinum hypersensitivity to receive further platinum based therapy. In this review, we describe the management of platinum hypersensitivity reactions and the desensitization protocols utilized at our institution. We also describe the clinical categorizations utilized to triage patients to appropriate desensitization protocols. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Synthesis and characterization of new platinum(II) and platinum(IV) triphyrin complexes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xue, Zhaoli; Kuzuhara, Daiki; Ikeda, Shinya; Okujima, Tetsuo; Mori, Shigeki; Uno, Hidemitsu; Yamada, Hiroko

    2013-02-18

    Metalation of 6,13,20,21-tetrakis(4-methylphenyl)-22H-tribenzo[14]triphyrin(2.1.1) with PtCl(2) gave a platinum(II) complex having a square-planar coordination structure with two pyrrolic nitrogen atoms and two chloride ions, with a saddle-shaped macrocycle. This platinum(II) complex was easily oxidized by air to an octahedral platinum(IV) complex coordinated by three pyrrolic nitrogen atoms as a tridentate monoanionic cyclic ligand and three chloride ions. When platinum(II) triphyrin was crystallized in air, an oxygen atom was incorporated between two α-carbon atoms of the pyrroles as an oxygen bridge to intercept the 14π aromatic system.

  17. Sum Frequency Generation Studies of Hydrogenation Reactions on Platinum Nanoparticles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Krier, James M. [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States)

    2013-08-31

    Sum Frequency Generation (SFG) vibrational spectroscopy is used to characterize intermediate species of hydrogenation reactions on the surface of platinum nanoparticle catalysts. In contrast to other spectroscopy techniques which operate in ultra-high vacuum or probe surface species after reaction, SFG collects information under normal conditions as the reaction is taking place. Several systems have been studied previously using SFG on single crystals, notably alkene hydrogenation on Pt(111). In this thesis, many aspects of SFG experiments on colloidal nanoparticles are explored for the first time. To address spectral interference by the capping agent (PVP), three procedures are proposed: UV cleaning, H2 induced disordering and calcination (core-shell nanoparticles). UV cleaning and calcination physically destroy organic capping while disordering reduces SFG signal through a reversible structural change by PVP.

  18. Investigation of the oxidation of NO over platinum catalysts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Despres, J.; Koebel, M.; Elsener, M.; Wokaun, A.

    2002-03-01

    The oxidation of NO to NO{sub 2} over Pt/SiO{sub 2} was investigated in the temperature range 150-450{sup o}C. Powdered catalysts were prepared by incipient wetness impregnation, followed by calcination and reduction. The feed gas typically contained oxygen, nitrogen monoxide, water and nitrogen. The concentration of NO in the feed was varied at constant concentration of O{sub 2} in order to study its influence on the reaction. A decrease of the conversion with increasing concentration of NO was observed. A similar study was performed with various oxygen concentrations at constant concentration of NO. Oxygen involved in the surface reaction originates from the dissociative chemisorption of O{sub 2} on the platinum surface. (author)

  19. Anticancer platinum (IV) prodrugs with novel modes of activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chin, Chee Fei; Wong, Daniel Yuan Qiang; Jothibasu, Ramasamy; Ang, Wee Han

    2011-01-01

    Over the past four decades, the search for improved platinum drugs based on the classical platinum (II)-diam(m)ine pharmacophore has yielded only a handful of successful candidates. New methodologies centred on platinum (IV) complexes, with better stability and expanded coordination spheres, offer the possibility of overcoming limitations inherent to platinum (II) drugs. In this review, novel strategies of targeting and killing cancer cells using platinum (IV) constructs are discussed. These approaches exploit the unique electrochemical characteristics and structural attributes of platinum (IV) complexes as a means of developing anticancer prodrugs that can target and selectively destroy cancer cells. Anticancer platinum (IV) prodrugs represent promising new strategies as targeted chemotherapeutic agents in the ongoing battle against cancer.

  20. The Dynamics of Platinum Precipitation in an Ion Exchange Membrane

    CERN Document Server

    Burlatsky, S F; Atrazhev, V V; Dmitriev, D V; Kuzminyh, N Y; Erikhman, N S

    2013-01-01

    Microscopy of polymer electrolyte membranes that have undergone operation under fuel cell conditions, have revealed a well defined band of platinum in the membrane. Here, we propose a physics based model that captures the mechanism of platinum precipitation in the polymer electrolyte membrane. While platinum is observed throughout the membrane, the preferential growth of platinum at the band of platinum is dependent on the electrochemical potential distribution in the membrane. In this paper, the location of the platinum band is calculated as a function of the gas concentration at the cathode and anode, gas diffusion coefficients and solubility constants of the gases in the membrane, which are functions of relative humidity. Under H2/N2 conditions the platinum band is located near the cathode-membrane interface, as the oxygen concentration in the cathode gas stream increases and/or the hydrogen concentration in the anode gas stream decreases, the band moves towards the anode. The model developed in this paper...

  1. 基于STEP-NC的NURBS曲面插补方法研究%Research of Non-Uniform Rational B-Spline surface interpolation based on STEP-NC

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李丽; 孙军; 王军

    2009-01-01

    讨论了旧的数控编程接口标准ISO6983的缺点,研究了基于新数控编程接口标准STEP-NC的数控系统中的NURBS曲面插补技术.介绍了STEP-NC标准中关于NURBS曲面的描述,详细讨论了NURBS插补原理,插补预处理,NURBS曲面加工路径规划和实时插补轨迹生成算法,并给出了实例和仿真结果.NURBS曲面插补技术的研究为进一步研究STEP-NC数控系统奠定基础.

  2. Patterned Platinum Etching Studies in an Argon High Density Plasma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delprat, Sébastien; Chaker, Mohamed; Margot, Joëlle; Pépin, Henri; Tan, Liang; Smy, Tom

    1998-10-01

    A high-density surface-wave Ar plasma operated in the low pressure regime is used to study pure physical etching characteristics of platinum thin films. The platinum samples are RF biased so as to obtain a maximum DC self-bias voltage of 150 V. The sputter-etching characteristics are investigated as a function of the magnetic field intensity, the self-bias voltage and the gas pressure. At 1 mtorr, the etch rate is found to be a unique linear function of both the self-bias voltage and the ion density, independently of the magnetic field intensity value. However, even though the ion density increases, the etch rate is found to decrease with increasing pressure. In the low pressure regime, etch rates as high as 2000 A/min are obtained with a good selectivity over resist. Without any optimization of the etching process, we were able to etch 0.5 micron Pt trenches, 0.6 micron thick yielding fence-free profiles and sidewall angles (75º) that already meets the present industrial requirements of NVRAM technology.

  3. Novel compliant electrodes based on platinum salt reduction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delille, Remi; Urdaneta, Mario; Hsieh, Kuangwen; Smela, Elisabeth

    2006-03-01

    A compliant electrode material is presented that was inspired by the electroding process used to manufacture ionic polymer-metal composites (IPMCs). However, instead of an ion-exchange membrane, a UV-curable acrylated urethane elastomer is employed. The electrode material consists of the UV-curable elastomer (Loctite 3108) loaded with tetraammineplatinum(II) chloride salt particles through physical mixing and homogenization. The composite material is made conductive by immersion in a reducing agent, sodium borohydride, which reduces the salt to platinum metal on the surface of the elastomer film. Because the noble metal is mixed into the elastomer precursor as a salt, the amount of UV light absorbed by the precursor is not significantly reduced, and the composite loses little photopatternability. As a result meso-scale electrodes of varying geometries can be formed by exposing the precursor/salt mixture through a mask. The materials are mechanically and electrically characterized. The percolation threshold of the composite is estimated to be 9 vol. % platinum salt, above which the compliant electrode material exhibits a maximum conductivity of 1 S/cm. The composite maintains its electrical conductivity under axial tensile strains of up to 40%.

  4. Platinum compounds with anti-tumour activity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Plooy, A.C.M.; Lohman, P.H.M.

    1980-01-01

    Ten platinum (Pt) coordination complexes with different ligands, comprising both Pt(II) and Pt(IV) complexes of which the cis-compounds all possessed at least some anti-tumour activity and the trans-compounds were inactive, were tested as to their effect on cell survival and the induction and repair

  5. On the enzymatic formation of platinum nanoparticles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Govender, Y.; Riddin, T. L. [Rhodes University, Department of Biochemistry, Microbiology and Biotechnology (South Africa); Gericke, M. [MINTEK (South Africa); Whiteley, C. G., E-mail: C.Whiteley@ru.ac.z [Rhodes University, Department of Biochemistry, Microbiology and Biotechnology (South Africa)

    2010-01-15

    A dimeric hydrogenase enzyme (44.5 and 39.4 kDa sub units) was isolated in a 39.5% yield from the fungus Fusarium oxysporum and purified 4.64-fold by ion exchange chromatography on Sephacryl S-200. Characterisation of the enzyme afforded pH and temperature optima of 7.5 and 38 {sup o}C, respectively, a half-life stability of 36 min and a V{sub max} and K{sub m} of 3.57 nmol min{sup -1} mL{sup -1} and 2.25 mM, respectively. This enzyme was inhibited (non-competitively) by hydrogen hexachloroplatinic acid (H{sub 2}PtCl{sub 6}) at 1 or 2 mM with a K{sub i} value of 118 {mu}M. Incubation of the platinum salt with the pure enzyme under an atmosphere of hydrogen and optimum enzyme conditions (pH 7.5, 38 {sup o}C) afforded <10% bioreduction after 8 h while at conditions suitable for platinum nanoparticle formation (pH 9, 65 {sup o}C) over 90% reduction took place after the same length of time. Cell-free extract from the fungal isolates produced nearly 90% bioreduction of the platinum salt under both pH and temperature conditions. The bioreduction of the platinum salt by a hydrogenase enzyme takes place by a passive process and not an active one as previously understood.

  6. Platinum catalysed hydrolytic amidation of unactivated nitriles

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cobley, Christopher J.; Heuvel, Marco van den; Abbadi, Abdelilah; Vries, Johannes G. de

    2000-01-01

    The platinum(II) complex, [(Me2PO··H··OPMe2)PtH(PMe2OH)], efficiently catalyses the direct conversion of unactivated nitriles to N-substituted amides with both primary and secondary amines. Possible mechanisms for this reaction are discussed and evidence for initial amidine formation is reported.

  7. Targeting Platinum Compounds: synthesis and biological activity

    OpenAIRE

    VAN ZUTPHEN, Steven

    2005-01-01

    Inspired by cisplatin, the inorganic drug discovered by Barnett Rosenberg in 1965, the research described in this thesis uses targeting ligands, or ligands varied in a combinatorial fashion, to find platinum complexes with more specific modes of action. These studies have lead to the development of novel (solid-phase) synthetic methods and to the discovery of several compounds with promising biological properties.

  8. Targeting Platinum Compounds : synthesis and biological activity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zutphen, Steven van

    2005-01-01

    Inspired by cisplatin, the inorganic drug discovered by Barnett Rosenberg in 1965, the research described in this thesis uses targeting ligands, or ligands varied in a combinatorial fashion, to find platinum complexes with more specific modes of action. These studies have lead to the development of

  9. Skin Sensitizing Potency of Halogenated Platinum Salts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    The relationship between occupational exposure to halogenated platinum (Pt) salts and Pt-specific allergic sensitization is well-established. Although human case reports and clinical studies demonstrate that Pt salts are potent skin sensitizers, no studies have been published tha...

  10. Platinum catalysed hydrolytic amidation of unactivated nitriles

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cobley, Christopher J.; Heuvel, Marco van den; Abbadi, Abdelilah; Vries, Johannes G. de

    2000-01-01

    The platinum(II) complex, [(Me2PO··H··OPMe2)PtH(PMe2OH)], efficiently catalyses the direct conversion of unactivated nitriles to N-substituted amides with both primary and secondary amines. Possible mechanisms for this reaction are discussed and evidence for initial amidine formation is reported. Is

  11. Role of surfactant-mediated electrodeposited titanium oxide substrate in improving electrocatalytic features of supported platinum particles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Spătaru, Tanţa; Preda, Loredana; Osiceanu, Petre; Munteanu, Cornel; Anastasescu, Mihai; Marcu, Maria; Spătaru, Nicolae, E-mail: nspataru@icf.ro

    2014-01-01

    A new hybrid system with improved photocatalytic and electrocatalytic performances was obtained by two-step potentiostatic deposition on highly boron-doped diamond (BDD) substrate. First, hydrated TiO{sub 2} was anodically deposited from a TiCl{sub 3} aqueous solution, both in the presence and in the absence of sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS). The study of the UV irradiation effect evidenced that titanium oxide coatings obtained by surfactant-assisted electrodeposition (TiO{sub 2}:SDS) exhibit enhanced photocurrent, due to its very rough texonsture and presumably to better efficiency of charge carrier separation. Electrochemical deposition of platinum on the oxide-coated BDD was carried out in a second step and AFM, SEM and XPS measurements have shown that, on the TiO{sub 2}:SDS substrate, Pt particles are smaller, more uniformly distributed, and tend to form clusters, leading to a specific surface area of the electrocatalyst of ca. 6.55 m{sup 2} g{sup −1}. Carbon monoxide stripping experiments demonstrated that, when deposited on TiO{sub 2}:SDS, Pt particles are also less sensitive to CO-poisoning during methanol anodic oxidation.

  12. Growth kinetics of step edges on celestite (0 0 1) surfaces as a function of temperature, saturation state, ionic strength, and aqueous strontium:sulfate ratio: An in-situ atomic force microscopy study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bracco, Jacquelyn N.; Gooijer, Yiscka; Higgins, Steven R.

    2016-02-01

    Step velocities on the celestite (0 0 1) surface have been measured as a function of temperature (23-45 °C), saturation state (S = 1.1-2.2), ionic strength (I = 0.01, 0.06, and 0.1 M), and aqueous strontium:sulfate ratio (r = 0.01-100) using atomic force microscopy (AFM). Celestite growth hillocks were flanked by [0 1 0]-aligned step edges, which are polar, and step edges vicinal to , which are non-polar. [0 1 0] step velocities increased with temperature and saturation state, however step velocities did not vary significantly with ionic strength. Step velocities were non-linear with saturation state, suggesting a change in mechanism at high S as compared with low S. At constant S, the step velocities were maximized at r = 1 and decreased significantly at extreme r, demonstrating the governing role of solute stoichiometry. We successfully fit the step velocity data as a function of r using the Stack and Grantham (2010) nucleation and propagation model. Based on the results as a function of ionic strength and r, the mechanism at low S is likely ion-by-ion attachment to the step with an activation energy of 75 (±10) kJ mol-1. At high S the mechanism is a combination of the one at low S and possibly attachment of a neutral species such as an ion pair with an activation energy of 43 (±9) kJ mol-1.

  13. Constraining surface emissions of air pollutants using inverse modelling: method intercomparison and a new two-step two-scale regularization approach

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Saide, Pablo (CGRER, Center for Global and Regional Environmental Research, Univ. of Iowa, Iowa City, IA (United States)), e-mail: pablo-saide@uiowa.edu; Bocquet, Marc (Universite Paris-Est, CEREA Joint Laboratory Ecole des Ponts ParisTech and EDF RandD, Champs-sur-Marne (France); INRIA, Paris Rocquencourt Research Center (France)); Osses, Axel (Departamento de Ingeniera Matematica, Universidad de Chile, Santiago (Chile); Centro de Modelamiento Matematico, UMI 2807/Universidad de Chile-CNRS, Santiago (Chile)); Gallardo, Laura (Centro de Modelamiento Matematico, UMI 2807/Universidad de Chile-CNRS, Santiago (Chile); Departamento de Geofisica, Universidad de Chile, Santiago (Chile))

    2011-07-15

    When constraining surface emissions of air pollutants using inverse modelling one often encounters spurious corrections to the inventory at places where emissions and observations are colocated, referred to here as the colocalization problem. Several approaches have been used to deal with this problem: coarsening the spatial resolution of emissions; adding spatial correlations to the covariance matrices; adding constraints on the spatial derivatives into the functional being minimized; and multiplying the emission error covariance matrix by weighting factors. Intercomparison of methods for a carbon monoxide inversion over a city shows that even though all methods diminish the colocalization problem and produce similar general patterns, detailed information can greatly change according to the method used ranging from smooth, isotropic and short range modifications to not so smooth, non-isotropic and long range modifications. Poisson (non-Gaussian) and Gaussian assumptions both show these patterns, but for the Poisson case the emissions are naturally restricted to be positive and changes are given by means of multiplicative correction factors, producing results closer to the true nature of emission errors. Finally, we propose and test a new two-step, two-scale, fully Bayesian approach that deals with the colocalization problem and can be implemented for any prior density distribution

  14. Electrochemical Tailoring of Fibrous Polyaniline and Electroless Decoration with Gold and Platinum Nanoparticles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdelhamid, Muhammad E; Snook, Graeme A; O'Mullane, Anthony P

    2016-09-06

    Presented in this work is a facile and quick electrochemical method for controlling the morphology of thick polyaniline (PANi) films, without the use of templates. By stepping the polymerization potential from high voltages to a lower (or series of lower) voltage(s), we successfully controlled the morphology of the polymer, and fibrous structures, unique to each potential step, were achieved. In addition, the resultant film was tested electrochemically for its viability as an electrode material for flexible batteries and supercapacitors. Furthermore, the PANi film was decorated with gold and platinum nanoparticles via an electroless deposition process for possible electrocatalytic applications, whereby the oxidation of hydrazine at the composite was investigated.

  15. Platinum supported catalysts for carbon monoxide preferential oxidation: Study of support influence

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Padilla, R.; Rodriguez, L.; Serrano-Lotina, A.; Daza, L. [Instituto de Catalisis y Petroleoquimica (CSIC), C/Marie Curie 2, Campus Cantoblanco, 28049 Madrid (Spain); Benito, M. [Instituto de Catalisis y Petroleoquimica (CSIC), C/Marie Curie 2, Campus Cantoblanco, 28049 Madrid (Spain); Centro de Investigaciones Energeticas Medioambientales y Tecnologicas (CIEMAT), Av. Complutense 22, 28040 Madrid (Spain)

    2009-07-01

    The aim of this work is to study the influence of the addition of different oxides to an alumina support, on surface acidity and platinum reducibility in platinum-based catalysts, as well as their effect on the activity and selectivity in CO preferential oxidation, in presence of hydrogen. A correlation between surface acidity and acid strength of surface sites and metal reducibility was obtained, being Pt-support interaction a function of the acid sites concentration under a particular temperature range. In platinum supported on alumina catalysts, CO oxidation follows a Langmuir-Hinshelwood mechanism, where O{sub 2} and CO compete in the adsorption on the same type of active sites. It is noteworthy that the addition of La{sub 2}O{sub 3} modifies the reaction mechanism. In this case, CO is not only adsorbed on the Pt active sites but also on La{sub 2}O{sub 3}, forming bridge bonded carbonates which leads to high reactivity at low temperatures. An increase on temperature produces CO desorption from Pt surface sites and favours oxygen adsorption producing CO{sub 2}. CO oxidation with surface hydroxyl groups was activated producing simultaneously CO{sub 2} and H{sub 2}. (author)

  16. Role of bonding mechanisms during transfer hydrogenation reaction on heterogeneous catalysts of platinum nanoparticles supported on zinc oxide nanorods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Alawi, Reem A.; Laxman, Karthik; Dastgir, Sarim; Dutta, Joydeep

    2016-07-01

    For supported heterogeneous catalysis, the interface between a metal nanoparticle and the support plays an important role. In this work the dependency of the catalytic efficiency on the bonding chemistry of platinum nanoparticles supported on zinc oxide (ZnO) nanorods is studied. Platinum nanoparticles were deposited on ZnO nanorods (ZnO NR) using thermal and photochemical processes and the effects on the size, distribution, density and chemical state of the metal nanoparticles upon the catalytic activities are presented. The obtained results indicate that the bonding at Pt-ZnO interface depends on the deposition scheme which can be utilized to modulate the surface chemistry and thus the activity of the supported catalysts. Additionally, uniform distribution of metal on the catalyst support was observed to be more important than the loading density. It is also found that oxidized platinum Pt(IV) (platinum hydroxide) provided a more suitable surface for enhancing the transfer hydrogenation reaction of cyclohexanone with isopropanol compared to zero valent platinum. Photochemically synthesized ZnO supported nanocatalysts were efficient and potentially viable for upscaling to industrial applications.

  17. Epitaxial and non-epitaxial platinum, palladium and silver films on yttrium-stabilised zirconia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Beck, Gesa, E-mail: gesa.beck@physik.uni-augsburg.de [Institute of Physics, University Augsburg, Universitaetsstrasse 1a, 86159 Augsburg (Germany); Bachmann, Christoph [Institute of Physical Chemistry, Justus-Liebig-University Giessen, Heinrich-Buff-Ring 58, 35392 Giessen (Germany); Bretzler, Rita [Research Institute Precious Metals & Metals Chemistry, Katharinenstrasse 17, 73525 Schwaebisch Gmuend (Germany); Kmeth, Ralf [Institute of Physics, University Augsburg, Universitaetsstrasse 1a, 86159 Augsburg (Germany)

    2015-05-05

    Platinum, palladium and silver films have been prepared on differently orientated YSZ (yttrium-stabilised zirconia) substrates by PLD (pulsed laser deposition). The deposition temperatures for platinum were 200 °C and 400 °C, whereas palladium and silver were deposited only at 200 °C. The microstructure of the films depends on the particular metal, on the orientation of the substrate and on the deposition temperature. Platinum – deposited at 400 °C – forms single crystalline, epitaxial (111), (311) and (110) orientated as well as (111) orientated polycrystalline films. Platinum, palladium and silver – deposited at 200 °C – always form (111) orientated and polycrystalline films, in some cases also with a fraction of epitaxial grown grains. The formed microstructures were discussed on the basis of interface and surface energy minimization and structure zone models. - Highlights: • Pt, Pd and Ag films are prepared on differently orientated YSZ. • Substrate orientation and deposition temperature influences the microstructure. • Pt forms epitaxial and polycrystalline films. • Pd and Ag form polycrystalline films, sometimes with epitaxial grown grains. • The formed microstructures are described by energy minimization.

  18. Environmental and biological monitoring of platinum-containing drugs in two hospital pharmacies using positive air pressure isolators.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kopp, Bettina; Crauste-Manciet, Sylvie; Guibert, Agnès; Mourier, Wilhelmine; Guerrault-Moro, Marie-Noelle; Ferrari, Sylvie; Jomier, Jean-Yves; Brossard, Denis; Schierl, Rudolf

    2013-04-01

    Environmental and biological monitoring of platinum containing drugs was implemented in two French hospital pharmacies using positive air pressure isolators and having similar working procedures when preparing antineoplastic drugs. Wipe sampling of surfaces, gloves, and vials was performed in the preparation room and in storage areas. All employees involved in the preparation of antineoplastic drugs were tested for urinary platinum on Monday before work and Friday after shift. Only traces of platinum were detected on surfaces in the preparation room outside the isolators (less than 1.61 pg cm(-2)). However, in one center, significant contamination was found in the storage area of the drug vials, which can most likely be linked to the rupture of a platinum vial and due to inefficient cleaning procedures. Surfaces inside the isolators were found to be contaminated (maximum: 198.4 pg cm(-2)). A higher level of contamination was detected in one pharmacy and could be explained by the lack of overgloving with regular changes during the preparation process. Nitrile gloves used during drug handling outside the isolator showed the highest platinum concentration (maximum: 5.86 ng per pair). With regards to platinum urine concentration, no significant difference was found between exposed and unexposed pharmacy personnel. Isolator technology combined with individual protective measures seems to be efficient to protect workers from occupational exposure to antineoplastic drugs, whereas specific individual protective procedures implemented were focussing on the risk of handling vials outside the isolator (e.g. high frequency of glove changing). Moreover, overgloving inside the isolator would contribute to substantially decrease inner surface contamination and should be recommended in order to limit the transfer of chemical contamination to the end products.

  19. Concurrent chemoradiotherapy comparison of taxanes and platinum versus 5-fluorouracil and platinum in nasopharyngeal carcinoma treatment

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Chen Xichuang; Hong Yuan; Feng Jinhua; Ye Jianlin; Zheng Panpan; Guan Xiyin; You Xiaohong

    2014-01-01

    Background Nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC) is a squamous-cell carcinoma especially prevailing among the natives of southern China.The regimen of concurrent chemoradiotherapy (CCRT) that include platinum and 5-fluorouracil (5-FU)is considered to be the standard treatment for NPC.However,its clinical use is limited by its toxicity.Our purpose was to evaluate the efficacy and safety of the regimen of CCRT with taxanes and platinum versus the regimen of CCRT with 5-FU and platinum in NPC treatment.Methods Medline,the Cochrane library,and the Chinese medical literature database were searched for eligible studies.Meta-analysis was performed using Review Manager (Version 5.2).Results Six random controlled trials (RCTs) including 514 patients met our criteria.Meta-analysis showed that the regimen of CCRT with taxanes and platinum had an improved significant difference in complete remission (CR) and less incidence rate in adverse reactions such as gastrointestinal impairment grades Ⅲll-Ⅳ,liver and kidney impairment grades Ⅰ-Ⅱ,and radiodermatitis grades Ⅲ-Ⅳ versus the conventional regimen of CCRT with 5-FU and platinum,while the long-term effectiveness rate of overall survival,Iocoregional failure-free survival,or distant metastasis failure-free survival between the two groups was therapeutic equivalence.Conclusions The regimen of CCRT with taxanes and platinum in NPC therapy may be more efficient and safe compared to the conventional modality of 5-FU and platinum in CCRT.However,we need more high-quality studies of multi-center and randomized double-blind clinical trials to further compare,analyze,and confirm the findings.

  20. Performance assessment of thermal sensors during short-duration convective surface heating measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sahoo, Niranjan; Kumar, Rakesh

    2016-09-01

    The determination of convective surface heating is a very crucial parameter in high speed flow environment. Most of the ground based facilities in this domain have short duration experimental time scale (~milliseconds) of measurements. In these facilities, the calorimetric heat transfer sensors such as thin film gauges (TFGs) and coaxial surface junction thermocouple (CSJT) are quite effective temperature detectors. They have thickness in the range of few microns and have capability of responding in microsecond time scale. The temperature coefficient of resistance (TCR) and the sensitivity are calibration parameter indicators that show the linear change in the resistance of the gauge as a function of temperature. In the present investigation, three of types of heat transfer gauges are fabricated in the laboratory namely, TFG made out of platinum, TFG made out of platinum mixed with CNT and chromel-alumel surface junction coaxial thermocouple (K-type). The calibration parameters of the gauges are determined though oil-bath experiments. The average value TCR and sensitivity of platinum TFG is found to be 0.0024 K-1 and 465 μV/K, while similar values of CSJT are obtained as, 0.064 K-1 and 40.5 μV/K, respectively. The TFG made out of platinum mixed with CNT (5 % by mass) shows the enhancement of TCR as well as sensitivity and the corresponding values are 0.0034 K-1 and 735 μV/K, respectively. The relative performances of heat transfer gauges are compared in a simple laboratory scale experiment in which the gauges are exposed to a sudden step heat load in convection mode for the time duration of 200 ms. The surface heat fluxes are predicted from the temperature history through one dimensional heat conduction modeling. While comparing the experimental results, it is seen that prediction of surface heat flux from all the heat transfer gauges are within the range of ±4 %.

  1. Tailoring ruthenium exposure to enhance the performance of fcc platinum@ruthenium core-shell electrocatalysts in the oxygen evolution reaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    AlYami, Noktan M; LaGrow, Alec P; Joya, Khurram S; Hwang, Jinyeon; Katsiev, Khabiboulakh; Anjum, Dalaver H; Losovyj, Yaroslav; Sinatra, Lutfan; Kim, Jin Young; Bakr, Osman M

    2016-06-28

    The catalytic properties of noble metal nanocrystals are a function of their size, structure, and surface composition. In particular, achieving high activity without sacrificing stability is essential for designing commercially viable catalysts. A major challenge in designing state-of-the-art Ru-based catalysts for the oxygen evolution reaction (OER), which is a key step in water splitting, is the poor stability and surface tailorability of these catalysts. In this study, we designed rapidly synthesizable size-controlled, morphology-selective, and surface-tailored platinum-ruthenium core-shell (Pt@Ru) and alloy (PtRu) nanocatalysts in a scalable continuous-flow reactor. These core-shell nanoparticles with atomically precise shells were produced in a single synthetic step with carbon monoxide as the reducing agent. By varying the metal precursor concentration, a dendritic or layer-by-layer ruthenium shell can be grown. The synthesized Pt@Ru and PtRu nanoparticles exhibit noticeably higher electrocatalytic activity in the OER compared to that of pure Pt and Ru nanoparticles. Promisingly, Pt@Ru nanocrystals with a ∼2-3 atomic layer Ru cuboctahedral shell surpass conventional Ru nanoparticles in terms of both durability and activity.

  2. Tailoring Ruthenium Exposure to Enhance the Performance of fcc Platinum@Ruthenium Core-Shell Electrocatalysts in the Oxygen Evolution Reaction

    KAUST Repository

    AlYami, Noktan Mohammed

    2016-05-17

    The catalytic properties of noble metal nanocrystals are a function of their size, structure, and surface composition. In particular, achieving high activity without sacrificing stability is essential for designing commercially viable catalysts. A major challenge in designing state-of-the-art Ru-based catalysts for the oxygen evolution reaction (OER), which is a key step in water splitting, is the poor stability and surface tailorability of these catalysts. In this study, we designed rapidly synthesizable size-controlled, morphology-selective, and surface-tailored platinum-ruthenium core-shell (Pt@Ru) and alloy (PtRu) nanocatalysts in a scalable continuous-flow reactor. These core-shell nanoparticles with atomically precise shells were produced in a single synthetic step with carbon monoxide as the reducing agent. By varying the metal precursor concentration, a dendritic or layer-by-layer ruthenium shell can be grown. The catalytic activities of the synthesized Pt@Ru and PtRu nanoparticles exhibit noticeably higher electrocatalytic activity in the OER compared to that of pure Pt and Ru nanoparticles. Promisingly, Pt@Ru nanocrystals with a ~2-3 atomic layer Ru cuboctahedral shell surpass conventional Ru nanoparticles in terms of both durability and activity.

  3. Robust optical oxygen sensors based on polymer-bound NIR-emitting platinum(II)-benzoporphyrins

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hutter, L.H.; Müller, B.J.; Koren, Klaus

    2014-01-01

    Several advanced optical oxygen sensor materials are presented. They are based on bright NIR-emitting platinum(II)-benzoporphyrins covalently incorporated into a variety of polymeric matrices. The dye-polymer conjugates are prepared either via Suzuki coupling of the brominated porphyrins to the s......Several advanced optical oxygen sensor materials are presented. They are based on bright NIR-emitting platinum(II)-benzoporphyrins covalently incorporated into a variety of polymeric matrices. The dye-polymer conjugates are prepared either via Suzuki coupling of the brominated porphyrins...... dyes showed significant drift of their calibration. Additionally, we present a new synthetic method for preparation of analytically pure benzoporphyrins via simple 1-step template condensation which a promising alternative to the commonly used Lindsey method. © the Partner Organisations 2014....

  4. Measurement and analysis of the effect of an uneven surface (STEP) in an electron beam quality control planners; Medida y analisis de efecto de una superficie irregular (ESCALON) en un haz de electrones para control de calidad de planificadores

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Angulo Pain, E.; Urena Llinares, A.; Ramos Caballero, L. J.; Quinones Rodriguez, L. A.; Castro Ramirez, I.; Iborro Oquendo, M.

    2011-07-01

    The objective of this study is to analyze the behavior of the algorithm for calculating electron of our scheduler when there is a discontinuity or step in the phantom with respect to the incidence of the beam. It reflects the special situation in some areas of treatment where the irregularity on the surface is very large surface constituting a real step, as for example in areas close to the jaw. Therefore, as stated in the National Protocol for quality control planning systems of radiation therapy in SEFM DOH5 test, we verify the accuracy of the calculation under the conditions described above.

  5. Density functional theory studies on the oxidation of 5'-dGMP and 5'-dAMP by a platinum(IV) complex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ariafard, Alireza; Tabatabaie, Elham S; Aghmasheh, Simin; Najaflo, Sahar; Yates, Brian F

    2012-08-06

    Density functional theory has been used to investigate the oxidation of a guanine nucleotide by platinum(IV), a process that can be important in the degradation of DNA. For the first time, we have provided a comprehensive mechanism for all of the steps in this process. A number of intermediates are predicted to occur but with short lifetimes that would make them difficult to observe experimentally. A key step in the mechanism is electron transfer from guanine to platinum(IV), and we show that this is driven by the loss of a chloride ligand from the platinum complex after nucleophilic attack of 5'-phosphate to C8 of guanine. We have investigated several different initial platinum(IV) guanine adducts and shown that the adduct formed from replacement of an axial chlorine ligand in the platinum(IV) complex undergoes oxidation more easily. We have studied adenine versus guanine adducts, and our results show that oxidation of the former is more difficult because of disruption of the aromatic π system that occurs during the process. Finally, our results show that the acidic hydrolysis step to form the final oxidized product occurs readily via an initial protonation of N7 of the guanine.

  6. Sequential Electrodeposition of Platinum-Ruthenium at Boron-Doped Diamond Electrodes for Methanol Oxidation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ileana González-González

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Sequential electrodeposition of Pt and Ru on boron-doped diamond (BDD films, in 0.5 M H2SO4 by cyclic voltammetry, has been prepared. The potential cycling, in the aqueous solutions of the respective metals, was between 0.00 and 1.00 V versus Ag/AgCl. The catalyst composites, Pt and PtRu, deposited on BDD film substrates, were tested for methanol oxidation. The modified diamond surfaces were also characterized by scanning electron microscopy-X-ray fluorescence-energy dispersive spectroscopy, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, and Auger electron spectroscopy. The scanning Auger electron spectroscopy mapping showed the ruthenium signal only in areas where platinum was electrodeposited. Ruthenium does not deposit on the oxidized diamond surface of the boron-doped diamond. Particles with 5–10% of ruthenium with respect to platinum exhibited better performance for methanol oxidation in terms of methanol oxidation peak current and chronoamperometric current stability. The electrogenerated •OH radicals on BDD may interact with Pt surface, participating in the methanol oxidation as shown in oxidation current and the shift in the peak position. The conductive diamond surface is a good candidate as the support for the platinum electrocatalyst, because it ensures catalytic activity, which compares with the used carbon, and higher stability under severe anodic and cathodic conditions.

  7. Rapid Detection of Melamine in Tap Water and Milk Using Conjugated "One-Step" Molecularly Imprinted Polymers-Surface Enhanced Raman Spectroscopic Sensor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Yaxi; Lu, Xiaonan

    2016-05-01

    An innovative "one-step" sensor conjugating molecularly imprinted polymers and surface enhanced Raman spectroscopic-active substrate (MIPs-SERS) was investigated for simultaneous extraction and determination of melamine in tap water and milk. This sensor was fabricated by integrating silver nanoparticles (AgNPs) with MIPs synthesized by bulk polymerization of melamine (template), methacrylic acid (functional monomer), ethylene glycol dimethacrylate (cross-linking agent), and 2,2'-azobisisobutyronitrile (initiator). Static and kinetic adsorption tests validated the specific affinity of MIPs-AgNPs to melamine and the rapid adsorption equilibration rate. Principal component analysis segregated SERS spectral features of tap water and milk samples with different melamine concentrations. Partial least squares regression models correlated melamine concentrations in tap water and skim milk with SERS spectral features. The limit of detection (LOD) and limit of quantification (LOQ) of melamine in tap water were determined as 0.0019 and 0.0064 mmol/L, while the LOD and LOQ were 0.0165 and 0.055 mmol/L for the determination of melamine in skim milk. However, this sensor is not ideal to quantify melamine in tap water and skim milk. By conjugating MIPs with SERS-active substrate (that is, AgNPs), reproducibility of SERS spectral features was increased, resulting in more accurate detection. The time required to determine melamine in tap water and milk were 6 and 25 min, respectively. The low LOD, LOQ, and rapid detection confirm the potential of applying this sensor for accurate and high-throughput detection of melamine in tap water and milk.

  8. Catalysis on oriented ultrathin films of platinum on Al/sub 2/O/sub 3/

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Glassl, H.; Hayek, K.

    1982-03-26

    The selectivity of the hydrogenolysis of methylcyclopentane on model thin film catalysts was investigated and the morphology of the particles was checked in parallel by transmission electron microscopy and transmission electron diffraction. The catalysts were island-stage platinum films of defined orientation obtained by evaporating platinum onto (100)- and (111)-oriented NaCl substrates, backing with Al/sub 2/O/sub 3/ and dissolving the substrate. The catalysts were quite inactive as long as the single-crystal surface was unchanged, and any increase in activity was accompanied by a change in morphology. The results are compared with those obtained on non-oriented films as well as on bulk single-crystal surfaces.

  9. Evaluation of the contamination of platinum in estuarine and coastal sediments (Tagus Estuary and Prodelta, Portugal).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cobelo-García, Antonio; Neira, Patricia; Mil-Homens, Mario; Caetano, Miguel

    2011-03-01

    Platinum contamination in estuarine and coastal sediments has been evaluated in three cores collected from the Tagus Estuary and Prodelta shelf sediments. Elevated concentrations, up to 25-fold enrichment compared to background values, were found in the upper layers of the estuarine sediments. The degree of Pt enrichment in the estuarine sediments varied depending on the proximity to vehicular traffic sources, with a maximum concentration of 9.5 ng g(-1). A considerable decrease of Pt concentrations with depth indicated the absence of significant contamination before the introduction of catalytic converters in automobiles. Platinum distribution in the Tagus Prodelta shelf sediment core showed no surface enrichment; instead a sub-surface maximum at the base of the mixed layer suggested the possibility of post-depositional mobility, thereby blurring the traffic-borne contamination signature in coastal sediments. Copyright © 2011. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  10. Nano-structured Platinum-based Catalysts for the Complete Oxidation of Ethylene Glycol and Glycerol

    Science.gov (United States)

    Falase, Akinbayowa

    Direct alcohol fuel cells are a viable alternative to the traditional hydrogen PEM fuel cell. Fuel versatility, integration with existing distribution networks, and increased safety when handling these fuels increases their appeal for portable power applications. In order to maximize their utility, the liquid fuel must be fully oxidized to CO2 so as to harvest the full amount of energy. Methanol and ethanol are widely researched as potential fuels to power these devices, but methanol is a toxic substance, and ethanol has a much lower energy density than other liquids such as gasoline or glucose. Oxidation of complex fuels is difficult to realize, due to difficulty in breaking carbon-carbon bonding and poisoning of the catalysts by oxidative byproducts. In order to achieve the highest efficiency, an anode needs to be engineered in such a way as to maximize activity while minimizing poisoning effects of reaction byproducts. We have engineered an anode that uses platinum-based catalysts that is capable of completely oxidizing ethylene glycol and glycerol in neutral and alkaline media with little evidence of CO poisoning. We have constructed a hybrid anode consisting of a nano-structured PtRu electrocatayst with an NAD-dependent alcohol dehydrogenase for improved oxidation of complex molecules. A nano-structured PtRu catalyst was used to oxidize ethylene glycol and glycerol in neutral media. In situ infrared spectroscopy was used to verify complete oxidation via CO2 generation. There was no evidence of poisoning by CO species. A pH study was performed to determine the effect of pH on oxidative current. The peak currents did not trend at 60 mV/pH unit as would be expected from the Nernst equation, suggesting that adsorption of fuel to the surface of the electrode is not an electron-transfer step. We synthesized nano-structured PtRu, PtSn, and PtRuSn catalysts for oxidation of ethylene glycol and glycerol in alkaline media. The PtRu electrocatalyst the highest oxidative

  11. Remarkable NO oxidation on single supported platinum atoms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Narula, Chaitanya K; Allard, Lawrence F; Stocks, G M; Moses-DeBusk, Melanie

    2014-11-28

    Our first-principles density functional theoretical modeling suggests that NO oxidation is feasible on fully oxidized single θ-Al2O3 supported platinum atoms via a modified Langmuir-Hinshelwood pathway. This is in contrast to the known decrease in NO oxidation activity of supported platinum with decreasing Pt particle size believed to be due to increased platinum oxidation. In order to validate our theoretical study, we evaluated single θ-Al2O3 supported platinum atoms and found them to exhibit remarkable NO oxidation activity. A comparison of turnover frequencies (TOF) of single supported Pt atoms with those of platinum particles for NO oxidation shows that single supported Pt atoms are as active as fully formed platinum particles. Thus, the overall picture of NO oxidation on supported Pt is that NO oxidation activity decreases with decreasing Pt particle size but accelerates when Pt is present only as single atoms.

  12. Synthesis of Bimetallic Platinum Nanoparticles for Biosensors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gerard M. Leteba

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available The use of magnetic nanomaterials in biosensing applications is growing as a consequence of their remarkable properties; but controlling the composition and shape of metallic nanoalloys is problematic when more than one precursor is required for wet chemistry synthesis. We have developed a successful simultaneous reduction method for preparation of near-spherical platinum-based nanoalloys containing magnetic solutes. We avoided particular difficulties in preparing platinum nanoalloys containing Ni, Co and Fe by the identification of appropriate synthesis temperatures and chemistry. We used transmission electron microscopy (TEM to show that our particles have a narrow size distribution, uniform size and morphology, and good crystallinity in the as-synthesized condition. Energy dispersive spectroscopy (EDS and X-ray diffraction (XRD confirms the coexistence of Pt with the magnetic solute in a face-centered cubic (FCC solid solution.

  13. Catalytic converters as a source of platinum

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Fornalczyk

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available The increase of Platinum Group Metals demand in automotive industry is connected with growing amount of cars equipped with the catalytic converters. The paper presents the review of available technologies during recycling process. The possibility of removing platinum from the used catalytic converters applying pyrometallurgical and hyrdometallurgical methods were also investigated. Metals such as Cu, Pb, Ca, Mg, Cd were used in the pyrometallurgical research (catalytic converter was melted with Cu, Pb and Ca or Mg and Cd vapours were blown through the whole carrier. In hydrometallurgical research catalytic converters was dissolved in aqua regia. Analysis of Pt contents in the carrier before and after the process was performed by means of atomic absorption spectroscopy. Obtained result were discussed.

  14. Formic acid oxidation at platinum-bismuth catalysts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Popović Ksenija Đ.

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The field of heterogeneous catalysis, specifically catalysis on bimetallic surfaces, has seen many advances over the past few decades. Bimetallic catalysts, which often show electronic and chemical properties that are distinct from those of their parent metals, offer the opportunity to obtain new catalysts with enhanced selectivity, activity, and stability. The oxidation of formic acid is of permanent interest as a model reaction for the mechanistic understanding of the electrooxidation of small organic molecules and because of its technical relevance for fuel cell applications. Platinum is one of the most commonly used catalysts for this reaction, despite the fact that it shows a few significant disadvantages: high cost and extreme susceptibility to poisoning by CO. To solve this problem, several approaches have been used, but generally, they all consist in the modification of platinum with a second element. Especially, bismuth has received significant attention as Pt modifier. According to the results presented in this survey dealing with the effects influencing the formic acid oxidation it was found that two types of Pt-Bi bimetallic catalysts (bulk and low loading deposits on GC showed superior catalytic activity in terms of the lower onset potential and oxidation current density, as well as exceptional stability compared to Pt. The findings in this report are important for the understanding of mechanism of formic acid electrooxidation on a bulk alloy and decorated surface, for the development of advanced anode catalysts for direct formic acid fuel cells, as well as for the synthesis of novel low-loading bimetallic catalysts. The use of bimetallic compounds as the anode catalysts is an effective solution to overcoming the problems of the formic acid oxidation current stability for long term applications. In the future, the tolerance of both CO poisoning and electrochemical leaching should be considered as the key factors in the development

  15. Stability of Porous Platinum Nanoparticles: Combined In Situ TEM and Theoretical Study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chang, Shery L. Y.; Barnard, Amanda S.; Dwyer, Christian

    2012-01-01

    Porous platinum nanoparticles provide a route for the development of catalysts that use less platinum without sacrificing catalytic performance. Here, we examine porous platinum nanoparticles using a combination of in situ transmission electron microscopy and calculations based on a first...

  16. Platinum Acetylide Two-Photon Chromophores (Preprint)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2007-04-01

    the higher energy range that lead to its photodegradation . Secondly, because there is a quadratic dependence of two-photon absorption (2PA) on the...to either an electron donating amino- fluorenyl or electron withdrawing benzothiazolyl-fluorene that are themselves known as two-photon absorbing dyes ...groups in place of phenyl groups have shown a doubling of the intrinsic cr2value at 740 nm.40,41In this paper we describe novel platinum dyes that

  17. Redeposition of electrochemically dissolved platinum as nanoparticles on carbon

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Norgaard, C. F.; Stamatin, S. N.; Skou, E. M.

    2014-01-01

    Electrochemical dissolution of platinum has been proposed by several research groups as an environmentally friendly way to recover platinum from catalytic structures such as fuel cell electrodes. For the case of electrochemical dissolution of platinum in hydrochloric acid electrolyte, the present...... on carbon was then identified, quantified, and the particle size evaluated by powder X-ray diffraction, thermogravimetric analysis and cyclic voltammetry. Copyright (C) 2014, Hydrogen Energy Publications, LLC. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved....

  18. Linear algebra step by step

    CERN Document Server

    Singh, Kuldeep

    2013-01-01

    Linear algebra is a fundamental area of mathematics, and is arguably the most powerful mathematical tool ever developed. It is a core topic of study within fields as diverse as: business, economics, engineering, physics, computer science, ecology, sociology, demography and genetics. For an example of linear algebra at work, one needs to look no further than the Google search engine, which relies upon linear algebra to rank the results of a search with respect to relevance. The strength of the text is in the large number of examples and the step-by-step explanation of each topic as it is introduced. It is compiled in a way that allows distance learning, with explicit solutions to set problems freely available online. The miscellaneous exercises at the end of each chapter comprise questions from past exam papers from various universities, helping to reinforce the reader's confidence. Also included, generally at the beginning of sections, are short historicalbiographies of the leading players in the field of lin...

  19. On the activation energy of the formic acid oxidation reaction on platinum electrodes

    OpenAIRE

    Perales-Rondón, Juan V.; Herrero, Enrique; Feliu, Juan M

    2015-01-01

    A temperature dependent study on the formic acid oxidation reaction has been carried out in order to determine the activation energy of this reaction on different platinum single crystal electrodes, namely Pt(1 0 0), Pt(1 1 1), Pt(5 5 4) and Pt(5 4 4) surfaces. The chronoamperometric transients obtained with pulsed voltammetry have been analyzed to determine the current densities through the active intermediate and the CO formation rate. From the temperature dependency of those parameters, th...

  20. Platinum germanium ordering in UPtGe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoffmann, Rolf-Dieter; Pöttgen, Rainer; Lander, Gerry H.; Rebizant, Jean

    2001-09-01

    The non-centrosymmetric structure of UPtGe was investigated by X-ray diffraction on both powders and single crystals: EuAuGe type, Imm2, a=432.86(5), b=718.81(8), c=751.66(9) pm, wR2=0.0738 for 399 F2 values and 22 variables. The platinum and germanium atoms form two-dimensional layers of puckered Pt 3Ge 3 hexagons with short PtGe intralayer distances of 252 and 253 pm. These condensed two-dimensionally infinite nets are interconnected to each other via weak PtPt contacts with bond distances of 300 pm. The two crystallographically independent uranium atoms are situated above and below the six-membered platinum-germanium rings. The U1 atoms have six closer germanium neighbors while the U2 atoms have six closer platinum neighbors. The group-subgroup relation with the KHg 2 type structure is presented.