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Sample records for platinum anticancer drugs

  1. Selective speciation improves efficacy and lowers toxicity of platinum anticancer and vanadium antidiabetic drugs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doucette, Kaitlin A; Hassell, Kelly N; Crans, Debbie C

    2016-12-01

    Improving efficacy and lowering resistance to metal-based drugs can be addressed by consideration of the coordination complex speciation and key reactions important to vanadium antidiabetic drugs or platinum anticancer drugs under biological conditions. The methods of analyses vary depending on the specific metal ion chemistry. The vanadium compounds interconvert readily, whereas the reactions of the platinum compounds are much slower and thus much easier to study. However, the vanadium species are readily differentiated due to vanadium complexes differing in color. For both vanadium and platinum systems, understanding the processes as the compounds, Lipoplatin and Satraplatin, enter cells is needed to better combat the disease; there are many cellular metabolites, which may affect processing and thus the efficacy of the drugs. Examples of two formulations of platinum compounds illustrate how changing the chemistry of the platinum will result in less toxic and better tolerated drugs. The consequence of the much lower toxicity of the drug, can be readily realized because cisplatin administration requires hospital stay whereas Lipoplatin can be done in an outpatient manner. Similarly, the properties of Satraplatin allow for development of an oral drug. These forms of platinum demonstrate that the direct consequence of more selective speciation is lower side effects and cheaper administration of the anticancer agent. Therefore we urge that as the community goes forward in development of new drugs, control of speciation chemistry will be considered as one of the key strategies in the future development of anticancer drugs.

  2. Platinum anticancer drugs. From serendipity to rational design.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monneret, C

    2011-11-01

    The discovery of cis-platin was serendipitous. In 1965, Rosenberg was looking into the effects of an electric field on the growth of Escherichia coli bacteria. He noticed that bacteria ceased to divide when placed in an electric field but what Rosenberg also observed was a 300-fold increase in the size of the bacteria. He attributed this to the fact that somehow the platinum-conducting plates were inducing cell growth but inhibiting cell division. It was later deduced that the platinum species responsible for this was cis-platin. Rosenberg hypothesized that if cis-platin could inhibit bacterial cell division it could also stop tumor cell growth. This conjecture has proven correct and has led to the introduction of cis-platin in cancer therapy. Indeed, in 1978, six years after clinical trials conducted by the NCI and Bristol-Myers-Squibb, the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) approved cis-platin under the name of Platinol(®) for treating patients with metastatic testicular or ovarian cancer in combination with other drugs but also for treating bladder cancer. Bristol-Myers Squibb also licensed carboplatin, a second-generation platinum drug with fewer side effects, in 1979. Carboplatin entered the U.S. market as Paraplatin(®) in 1989 for initial treatment of advanced ovarian cancer in established combination with other approved chemotherapeutic agents. Numerous platin derivatives have been further developed with more or less success and the third derivative to be approved in 1994 was oxaliplatin under the name of Eloxatin(®). It was the first platin-based drug to be active against metastatic colorectal cancer in combination with fluorouracil and folinic acid. The two others platin-based drugs to be approved were nedaplatin (Aqupla(®)) in Japan and lobaplatin in China, respectively. More recently, a strategy to overcome resistance due to interaction with thiol-containing molecules led to the synthesis of picoplatin in which one of the amines linked to Pt

  3. The status of platinum anticancer drugs in the clinic and in clinical trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wheate, Nial J; Walker, Shonagh; Craig, Gemma E; Oun, Rabbab

    2010-09-21

    Since its approval in 1979 cisplatin has become an important component in chemotherapy regimes for the treatment of ovarian, testicular, lung and bladder cancers, as well as lymphomas, myelomas and melanoma. Unfortunately its continued use is greatly limited by severe dose limiting side effects and intrinsic or acquired drug resistance. Over the last 30 years, 23 other platinum-based drugs have entered clinical trials with only two (carboplatin and oxaliplatin) of these gaining international marketing approval, and another three (nedaplatin, lobaplatin and heptaplatin) gaining approval in individual nations. During this time there have been more failures than successes with the development of 14 drugs being halted during clinical trials. Currently there are four drugs in the various phases of clinical trial (satraplatin, picoplatin, Lipoplatin and ProLindac). No new small molecule platinum drug has entered clinical trials since 1999 which is representative of a shift in focus away from drug design and towards drug delivery in the last decade. In this perspective article we update the status of platinum anticancer drugs currently approved for use, those undergoing clinical trials and those discontinued during clinical trials, and discuss the results in the context of where we believe the field will develop over the next decade.

  4. Nanoscale coordination polymers for platinum-based anticancer drug delivery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rieter, William J; Pott, Kimberly M; Taylor, Kathryn M L; Lin, Wenbin

    2008-09-01

    Pt-containing nanoscale coordination polymer (NCP) particles with the formula of Tb2(DSCP)3(H2O)12 (where DSCP represents disuccinatocisplatin), NCP-1, were precipitated from an aqueous solution of Tb3+ ions and DSCP bridging ligands via the addition of a poor solvent. SEM and TEM images showed that as-synthesized NCP-1 exhibited a spherical morphology with a DLS diameter of 58.3 +/- 11.3 nm. NCP-1 particles were stabilized against rapid dissolution in water by encapsulation in shells of amorphous silica. The resulting silica-coated particles NCP-1' exhibited significantly longer half-lives for DSCP release from the particles (a t1/2 of 9 h for NCP-1' with 7 nm silica coating vs t1/2 of 1 h for as-synthesized NCP-1). In vitro cancer cell cytotoxicity assays with the human colon carcinoma cell line (HT-29) showed that internalized NCP-1' particles readily released the DSCP moieties which were presumably reduced to cytotoxic Pt(II) species to give the Pt-containing NCPs anticancer efficacy superior to the cisplatin standard. The generality of this degradable nanoparticle formulation should allow for the design of NCPs as effective delivery vehicles for a variety of biologically and medically important cargoes such as therapeutic and imaging agents.

  5. Nanocarriers for delivery of platinum anticancer drugs☆

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oberoi, Hardeep S.; Nukolova, Natalia V.; Kabanov, Alexander V.; Bronich, Tatiana K.

    2014-01-01

    Platinum based anticancer drugs have revolutionized cancer chemotherapy, and continue to be in widespread clinical use especially for management of tumors of the ovary, testes, and the head and neck. However, several dose limiting toxicities associated with platinum drug use, partial anti-tumor response in most patients, development of drug resistance, tumor relapse, and many other challenges have severely limited the patient quality of life. These limitations have motivated an extensive research effort towards development of new strategies for improving platinum therapy. Nanocarrier-based delivery of platinum compounds is one such area of intense research effort beginning to provide encouraging preclinical and clinical results and may allow the development of the next generation of platinum chemotherapy. This review highlights current understanding on the pharmacology and limitations of platinum compounds in clinical use, and provides a comprehensive analysis of various platinum–polymer complexes, micelles, dendrimers, liposomes and other nanoparticles currently under investigation for delivery of platinum drugs. PMID:24113520

  6. Platinum-based anticancer drugs in waste waters of a major UK hospital and predicted concentrations in recipient surface waters.

    OpenAIRE

    Vyas, N; Turner, A; Sewell, G.

    2014-01-01

    Concentrations of the cytotoxic platinum-based anticancer drugs, as total Pt, have been measured over a three week period in one of the main drains and in the effluent of the oncology ward of a major UK hospital (Derriford, Plymouth). Concentrations of Pt were highly variable in both discharges, and ranged from about 0.02 to 140 μg L(-1) in the oncology effluent and from about 0.03 to 100 μg L(-1) in the main drain. A comparison of drug administration figures over the study period with an est...

  7. Inorganic nanocarriers for platinum drug delivery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ping’an Ma

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Nowadays platinum drugs take up almost 50% of all the clinically used anticancer drugs. Besides cisplatin, novel platinum agents including sterically hindered platinum (II drugs, chemically reductive platinum (IV drugs, photosensitive platinum (IV drugs, and multinuclear platinum drugs have been developed recently, with a few entering clinic trials. Rapid development of nanobiotechnology makes targeted delivery of anticancer platinum agents to the tumor site possible, while simultaneously minimizing toxicity and maximizing the drug efficacy. Being versatile drug carriers to deliver platinum drugs, inorganic nanovehicles such as gold nanoparticles, iron oxide nanomaterials, carbon nanotubes, mesoporous nanosilica, metal-organic frameworks (MOFs, have been extensively studied over the past decades. In contrast to conventional polymeric and lipid nanoparticles, inorganic nanoparticles based drug carriers are peculiar as they have shown excellent theranostic effects, revealing themselves an indispensable part of future nanomedicine. Here, we will elaborate recent research advances on fabrication of inorganic nanoparticles for platinum drug delivery.

  8. DNA compaction by mononuclear platinum cancer drug cisplatin and the trisplatinum anticancer agent BBR3464: Differences and similarities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banerjee, T; Dubey, P; Mukhopadhyay, R

    2012-02-01

    Cisplatin, a mononuclear platinum compound, which is known as a cancer drug for long time, can exhibit considerable side effects and is also not effective in many types of cancer. Therefore, the alternative platinum anticancer agents that can act at a much lower dose limit compared to the dose relevant for cisplatin treatment have been searched for. BBR3464, a trinuclear platinum compound, is found to exhibit cytotoxic effects at 10 to 1000 times lower dose limit, even in cisplatin-resistant cancer cells. The primary cellular target for cisplatin and BBR3464 is thought to be DNA. Herein, we report the nature of DNA structural changes that are induced by cisplatin and BBR3464, considering the same DNA sequence and similar sample deposition methods for comparison purpose. We have applied high-resolution atomic force microscopy (AFM) in order to obtain an idea about the molecular basis of BBR3464's effectiveness at the lower dose limit. We show from the molecularly resolved AFM images that both the compounds can compact the whole dsDNA molecules, though the degree of compaction in case of BBR3464 treatment is significantly higher. Furthermore, local compaction in terms of loop structure formation could be induced by both BBR3464 and cisplatin, though BBR3464 generated microloops and macroloops both, whereas cisplatin could generate primarily the microloops. It is a significant observation that BBR3464 could induce relatively drastic DNA structural changes in terms of loop formation as well as overall DNA compaction at a molar ratio, which is 50 times less than that applied for cisplatin treatment. Implications of such structural changes in cytotoxic effects of the platinum anticancer agents will be mentioned.

  9. A first principles study of pristine and Al-doped boron nitride nanotubes interacting with platinum-based anticancer drugs

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    Shakerzadeh, Ehsan; Noorizadeh, Siamak

    2014-03-01

    Interaction of cis-platin and neda-platin, two conventional platinum-based anticancer drugs, with pristine [8,8] and Al-doped [8,0] boron nitride nanotubes (BNNTs) are investigated using the density functional theory (DFT) method. The obtained results indicate that cis-platin and neda-platin weakly interact with pristine zig zag or armchair BNNTs with a little dependency on the adsorbing positions; while both cis-platin and neda-platin are preferentially adsorbed onto the Al atom of the Al-doped BNNT with considerable adsorption energies. Therefore the Al-doped-BNNT might be an efficient carrier for delivery of these drugs in nanomedicine domain. The electronic structures of the stable configurations are also investigated through both DOS and PDOS spectra. The obtained results introduce the Al-doped-BNNT as an efficient carrier for delivery of cis-platin and neda-platin in nanomedicine domain.

  10. Anticancer platinum (IV) prodrugs with novel modes of activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chin, Chee Fei; Wong, Daniel Yuan Qiang; Jothibasu, Ramasamy; Ang, Wee Han

    2011-01-01

    Over the past four decades, the search for improved platinum drugs based on the classical platinum (II)-diam(m)ine pharmacophore has yielded only a handful of successful candidates. New methodologies centred on platinum (IV) complexes, with better stability and expanded coordination spheres, offer the possibility of overcoming limitations inherent to platinum (II) drugs. In this review, novel strategies of targeting and killing cancer cells using platinum (IV) constructs are discussed. These approaches exploit the unique electrochemical characteristics and structural attributes of platinum (IV) complexes as a means of developing anticancer prodrugs that can target and selectively destroy cancer cells. Anticancer platinum (IV) prodrugs represent promising new strategies as targeted chemotherapeutic agents in the ongoing battle against cancer.

  11. EXAFS structural study of platinum-based anticancer drugs degradation in presence of sulfur nucleophilic species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Provost, Karine; Bouvet-Muller, Diane; Crauste-Manciet, Sylvie; Moscovici, Jacques; Olivi, Luca; Vlaic, Gilberto; Michalowicz, Alain

    2009-10-01

    Three platinum complexes, cisplatin, carboplatin and oxaliplatin are currently used worldwide. Investigation of their main structural modifications in presence of sulfur nucleophiles is of particular interest because of the implication of thiol and thioether groups in biochemical mechanism of action, resistance mechanism and in vivo or in vitro detoxification. We present the main structural results we have obtained concerning the reaction of these drugs with diverse sulfur nucleophiles (cysteine, glutathione, methionine, thiosulfate and thiocyanate), monitored in solution or as precipitates by EXAFS spectroscopy. The reactivities of the carboxylate and amine ligands of both carboplatin and oxaliplatin are compared, on the basis of first-coordination sphere modeling. Among the new results of this EXAFS study, we present the first observation of oxaliplatin diaminocyclohexane ligand displacement by sulfur nucleophiles.

  12. Comparative in vitro and in vivo pharmacological investigation of platinum(IV) complexes as novel anticancer drug candidates for oral application.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Theiner, Sarah; Varbanov, Hristo P; Galanski, Markus; Egger, Alexander E; Berger, Walter; Heffeter, Petra; Keppler, Bernhard K

    2015-01-01

    Platinum(IV) complexes are promising candidates as prodrugs for oral application in anticancer chemotherapy. However, only a few Pt(IV) compounds entered (pre)clinical trials, e.g. satraplatin, while most of the others were only tested in vitro. Aim of the study was investigation of the in vivo pharmacological behavior as well as the anticancer activity of two novel platinum(IV) complexes vs. satraplatin. The drugs were selected due to significantly different in vitro cytotoxicity while sharing some physicochemical properties (e.g. lipophilicity). Initial experiments indicated that the highly in vitro cytotoxic compound 1 ((OC-6-33)-dichloridobis((4-ethoxy)-4-oxobutanoato)-bis(ethylamine)platinum(IV)) was also characterized by high drug absorption and tissue platinum levels after oral application. Interestingly, analysis of serum samples using SEC-ICP-MS revealed that the administered drugs have completely been metabolized and/or bound to proteins in serum within 2 h after treatment. With regard to the activity in vivo, the outcomes were rather unexpected: although potent anticancer effect of 1 was observed in cell culture, the effects in vivo were rather minor. Nevertheless, 1 was superior to 2 ((OC-6-33)-diammine(cyclobutane-1,1-dicarboxylato)-bis((4-cyclopentylamino)-4-oxobutanoato)platinum(IV)) after i.p. administration, which was, at least to some extent, in accordance to the cell culture experiments. After oral gavage, both compounds exhibited comparable activity. This is remarkable considering the distinctly lower activity of 2 in cell culture as well as the low platinum levels detected both in serum and tissues after oral application. Consequently, our data indicate that the prediction of in vivo anticancer activity by cell culture experiments is not trivial, especially for orally applied drugs.

  13. Platinum-based anticancer drugs in waste waters of a major UK hospital and predicted concentrations in recipient surface waters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vyas, Nitin; Turner, Andrew; Sewell, Graham

    2014-09-15

    Concentrations of the cytotoxic platinum-based anticancer drugs, as total Pt, have been measured over a three week period in one of the main drains and in the effluent of the oncology ward of a major UK hospital (Derriford, Plymouth). Concentrations of Pt were highly variable in both discharges, and ranged from about 0.02 to 140 μg L(-1) in the oncology effluent and from about 0.03 to 100 μg L(-1) in the main drain. A comparison of drug administration figures over the study period with an estimate of the quantity of Pt discharged through the drains suggests that about 22% of total Pt is emitted to the environment from the hospital with the remainder being discharged by treated patients in the wider community. Administration figures for the three Pt-based drugs used in the hospital (cisplatin, carboplatin and oxaliplatin) coupled with published measurements on the removal of the drugs by conventional sewage treatment allowed the concentrations of Pt arising from each drug to be predicted in recipient surface waters as a function of water flow rate. For conditions representative of the region under study, concentrations of total Pt between a few tens and in excess of 100 pg L(-1) are predicted, with the principal form of the metal occurring as carboplatin and its metabolites. Although predicted concentrations are below EMEA guidelines warranting further risk assessment, the presence of substances in surface waters that are potentially carcinogenic, mutagenic and teratogenic and yet whose environmental effects are not understood is cause for concern. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. Monofunctional and Higher-Valent Platinum Anticancer Agents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnstone, Timothy C.; Wilson, Justin J.

    2013-01-01

    Platinum compounds represent one of the great success stories of metals in medicine. Following the serendipitous discovery of the anticancer activity of cisplatin by Rosenberg, a large number of cisplatin variants have been prepared and tested for their ability to kill cancer cells and inhibit tumor growth. These efforts continue today with increased realization that new strategies are needed to overcome issues of toxicity and resistance inherent to treatment by the approved platinum anticancer agents. One approach has been the use of so-called “non-traditional” platinum(II) and platinum(IV) compounds that violate the structure-activity relationships that governed platinum drug-development research for many years. Another is the use of specialized drug delivery strategies. Here we describe recent developments from our laboratory involving monofunctional platinum(II) complexes together with an historical account of the manner by which we came to investigate these compounds and their relationship to previously studied molecules. We also discuss work carried out using platinum(IV) prodrugs and the development of nanoconstructs designed to deliver them in vivo. PMID:23738524

  15. Theoretical study of amino derivatives and anticancer platinum drug grafted on various carbon nanostructures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kraszewski, S; Duverger, E; Ramseyer, C; Picaud, F

    2013-11-07

    Density functional theory calculations with van der Waals approximation have been conducted to analyze the functionalization of various carbon-based nanostructures (fullerene, metallic, and semi-conducting nanotubes) with amino derivative groups. The results obtained with azomethine, show the formation of a five membered ring on fullerenes, and on nanotubes consistent with experimental observations. The attachment of an azomethine plus subsequent drug like a Pt(IV) complex does not perturb the cycloaddition process. Moreover, all theoretical results show that the length of different amino derivatives with subsequent Pt(IV) complex does not affect the complexed therapeutic agent when it is attached onto these carbon-based nanostructures.

  16. Theoretical study of amino derivatives and anticancer platinum drug grafted on various carbon nanostructures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kraszewski, S.; Duverger, E.; Ramseyer, C.; Picaud, F.

    2013-11-01

    Density functional theory calculations with van der Waals approximation have been conducted to analyze the functionalization of various carbon-based nanostructures (fullerene, metallic, and semi-conducting nanotubes) with amino derivative groups. The results obtained with azomethine, show the formation of a five membered ring on fullerenes, and on nanotubes consistent with experimental observations. The attachment of an azomethine plus subsequent drug like a Pt(IV) complex does not perturb the cycloaddition process. Moreover, all theoretical results show that the length of different amino derivatives with subsequent Pt(IV) complex does not affect the complexed therapeutic agent when it is attached onto these carbon-based nanostructures.

  17. Selenium-platinum coordination compounds as novel anticancer drugs: selectively killing cancer cells via a reactive oxygen species (ROS)-mediated apoptosis route.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeng, Lingwu; Li, Yang; Li, Tianyu; Cao, Wei; Yi, Yu; Geng, Weijia; Sun, Zhiwei; Xu, Huaping

    2014-08-01

    We report the preparation of selenium-containing platinum-based anticancer drug EG-Se/Pt. EG-Se/Pt was obtained from the coordination of selenium-containing molecules (EG-Se) with cisplatin (CDDP). The structure of EG-Se/Pt was characterized by (1) H and (77) Se NMR spectroscopy, XPS, ESI-MS, and MALDI-TOF. In aqueous solution, EG-Se/Pt self-assembles to form spherical aggregates. EG-Se/Pt shows enhanced stability against dilution and high salt concentration compared with EG-Se. EG-Se/Pt induces cell apoptosis via reactive oxygen species (ROS), which leads to high selectivity between cancer cells and normal cells in cytotoxicity assays. More importantly, EG-Se/Pt effectively inhibits tumor growth in vivo in tumor-bearing mice. It is anticipated that tuning the ROS level through the assembly of selenium-containing molecules can be a general method to realize anticancer selectivity.

  18. Development of Platinum(iv) Complexes as Anticancer Prodrugs: the Story so Far

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong, Daniel Yuan Qiang; Ang, Wee Han

    2012-06-01

    The serendipitous discovery of the antitumor properties of cisplatin by Barnett Rosenberg some forty years ago brought about a paradigm shift in the field of medicinal chemistry and challenged conventional thinking regarding the role of potentially toxic heavy metals in drugs. Platinum(II)-based anticancer drugs have since become some of the most effective and widely-used drugs in a clinician's arsenal and have saved countless lives. However, they are limited by high toxicity, severe side-effects and the incidence of drug resistance. In recent years, attention has shifted to stable platinum(IV) complexes as anticancer prodrugs. By exploiting the unique chemical and structural attributes of their scaffolds, these platinum(IV) prodrugs offer new strategies of targeting and killing cancer cells. This review summarizes the development of anticancer platinum(IV) prodrugs to date and some of the exciting strategies that utilise the platinum(IV) construct as targeted chemotherapeutic agents against cancer.

  19. Tuning the activity of platinum(IV) anticancer complexes through asymmetric acylation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chin, Chee Fei; Tian, Quan; Setyawati, Magdiel Inggrid; Fang, Wanru; Tan, Emelyn Sue Qing; Leong, David Tai; Ang, Wee Han

    2012-09-13

    Platinum(II) anticancer drug cisplatin is one of the most important chemotherapeutic agents in clinical use but is limited by its high toxicity and severe side effects. Platinum(IV) anticancer prodrugs can overcome these limitations by resisting premature aquation and binding to essential plasma proteins. Structure-activity relationship studies revealed a link between the efficacy of platinum(IV) complexes with the nature of their axial ligands, which can be modified to enhance the properties of the prodrug. The existing paradigm of employing platinum(IV) complexes with symmetrical axial carboxylate ligands does not fully exploit their vast potential. A new approach was conceived to control properties of platinum(IV) prodrugs using contrasting axial ligands via sequential acylation. We report a novel class of asymmetric platinum(IV) carboxylates based on the cisplatin template containing both hydrophilic and lipophilic ligands on the same scaffold designed to improve their aqueous properties and enhance their efficacy against cancer cells in vitro.

  20. In vitro effects of combinations of cis-amminedichloro (2-methylpyridine) platinum (II) (ZD0473) with other novel anticancer drugs on the growth of SBC-3, a human small cell lung cancer cell line.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kanzawa, F; Akiyama, Y; Saijo, N; Nishio, K

    2003-06-01

    Among numerous clinical regimens of combination chemotherapy, synergy has been observed to be particularly marked with combinations containing cisplatin (CDDP). However, the clinical use of CDDP has sometimes been limited by acquired resistance. The new-generation platinum drug, ZD0473, was synthesized with the aim of hindering the reaction of the drug with thiols, by the introduction of a 2-methylpyridine ligand. This enables the drug to exert antitumor activity against cisplatin-resistant cancer cells with elevated glutathione and/or metallothionein levels. The drug was also shown experimentally to overcome cisplatin resistance due to impaired drug accumulation, and enhanced DNA repair/tolerance to platinum-DNA adducts. We investigated the effects of combinations of ZD0473 with other anticancer drugs on the growth of a human small-cell lung cancer cell line (SBC-3). Six novel anticancer drugs were tested: docetaxel (TXT), paclitaxel (TXL), vinorelbine (VNB), irinotecan (CPT-11), gemcitabine (GEM) and pemetrexed (MTA). The growth inhibitory effect of the drugs was measured by MTT assay and the effects of the combination regimens were evaluated by the combination index analysis method developed by Chou and Talalay. Synergy was demonstrated for the combination regimens of ZD0473-GEM and ZD0473-TXL, while an additive effect was observed with combinations containing TXT, VNB, CPT-11 or MTA. In the case of the ZD0473-GEM combination, synergy was observed over a wide range of inhibition levels at dose ratios of 50:1, 100:1 and 250:1. The level of synergy was equivalent to that observed for combinations of CDDP-etoposide, CDDP-GEM and nedaplatin-CPT-11. The results suggest that the combination of ZD0473 with GEM merits further investigation in small cell lung cancer.

  1. [Anticancer drug adherence].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Despas, Fabien; Roche, Henri; Laurent, Guy

    2013-05-01

    A large number of anticancer drugs have been introduced during the two last decades with significant impact for survival, making cancer a chronic disease in a growing number of indications. However, these drugs are costly, induce adverse effects and their efficacy frequently depends on the dose. For all these reasons, adherence in cancer therapy is critical for an optimal benefit-risk ratio. Patient adherence remains virtually unexplored in many cancers, such as malignant blood diseases. When measured, adherence is poor, especially when the drug is administered as oral and prolonged therapy (hormonotherapy in breast cancer, imatinib). Physician nonadherence represents another form of drug misadministration; poorly documented, its mechanism remains obscure. Adherence may be measured by a panel of methods, each of them displaying limits and pitfalls, suggesting that several complementary methods should be used in the context of prospective studies. Risk factors are age, socio-educative profile, disease stage and physician profile. This review emphasizes some methods to prevent nonadherence. Finally, this review argues for prospective studies, which should integrate a social pharmacology approach, including medicine, psycho-sociology and economics.

  2. Platinum Complexes with Edda (Ethylenediamine -N, N - Diacetate Ligands as Potential Anticancer Agents

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jurisevic Milena

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available The design of platinum based drugs is not a new field of interest. Platinum complexes are widely used as anticancer agents and currently, approximately 30 platinum(II and platinum(IV entered into some of the phases of clinical trials. A special place in today’s research belongs to platinum complexes with diammine ligands. A large number of edda (ethylenediamine- N, N’-diacetate-type ligands and their corresponding metal complexes has been successfully synthesized. This article summarizes recent progress in research on edda-type-platinum complexes. Some of these agents achieves better effect compared to the gold standard (cisplatin. It has been shown that there is a possible relationship between the length of the ligand ester group carbon chain and its cytotoxic effect. In most cases the longer the ester chain is the greater is the antitumor activity. Of particular interest are the noticeable effects of some new platinum compound with edda-type ligand on cell lines that are known to have a high level of cisplatin-resistance. Exanimate complexes appear to have a different mode of mechanism of action compared with cisplatin which includes apoptotic and necrotic cell death. There are indications that further investigations of these compounds may be very useful in overcoming the problems associated global cancer statistic.

  3. Oral delivery of anticancer drugs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thanki, Kaushik; Gangwal, Rahul P; Sangamwar, Abhay T

    2013-01-01

    The present report focuses on the various aspects of oral delivery of anticancer drugs. The significance of oral delivery in cancer therapeutics has been highlighted which principally includes improvement in quality of life of patients and reduced health care costs. Subsequently, the challenges...... incurred in the oral delivery of anticancer agents have been especially emphasized. Sincere efforts have been made to compile the various physicochemical properties of anticancer drugs from either literature or predicted in silico via GastroPlus™. The later section of the paper reviews various emerging...... trends to tackle the challenges associated with oral delivery of anticancer drugs. These invariably include efflux transporter based-, functional excipient- and nanocarrier based-approaches. The role of drug nanocrystals and various others such as polymer based- and lipid based...

  4. Recent Advances in Platinum (IV) Complex-Based Delivery Systems to Improve Platinum (II) Anticancer Therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Xiaopeng; Sun, Jin; Wang, Yongjun; He, Zhonggui

    2015-11-01

    Cisplatin and its platinum (Pt) (II) derivatives play a key role in the fight against various human cancers such as testicular, ovarian, head and neck, lung tumors. However, their application in clinic is limited due to dose- dependent toxicities and acquired drug resistances, which have prompted extensive research effort toward the development of more effective Pt (II) delivery strategies. The synthesis of Pt (IV) complex is one such an area of intense research fields, which involves their in vivo conversion into active Pt (II) molecules under the reducing intracellular environment, and has demonstrated encouraging preclinical and clinical outcomes. Compared with Pt (II) complexes, Pt (IV) complexes not only exhibit an increased stability and reduced side effects, but also facilitate the intravenous-to-oral switch in cancer chemotherapy. The overview briefly analyzes statuses of Pt (II) complex that are in clinical use, and then focuses on the development of Pt (IV) complexes. Finally, recent advances in Pt (IV) complexes in combination with nanocarriers are highlighted, addressing the shortcomings of Pt (IV) complexes, such as their instability in blood and irreversibly binding to plasma proteins and nonspecific distribution, and taking advantage of passive and active targeting effect to improve Pt (II) anticancer therapy. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  5. Current View in Platinum Drug Mechanisms of Peripheral Neurotoxicity

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    Alessia Chiorazzi

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Peripheral neurotoxicity is the dose-limiting factor for clinical use of platinum derivatives, a class of anticancer drugs which includes cisplatin, carboplatin, and oxaliplatin. In particular cisplatin and oxaliplatin induce a severe peripheral neurotoxicity while carboplatin is less neurotoxic. The mechanisms proposed to explain these drugs’ neurotoxicity are dorsal root ganglia alteration, oxidative stress involvement, and mitochondrial dysfunction. Oxaliplatin also causes an acute and reversible neuropathy, supposed to be due by transient dysfunction of the voltage-gated sodium channels of sensory neurons. Recent studies suggest that individual genetic variation may play a role in the pathogenesis of platinum drug neurotoxicity. Even though all these mechanisms have been investigated, the pathogenesis is far from clearly defined. In this review we will summarize the current knowledge and the most up-to-date hypotheses on the mechanisms of platinum drug-induced peripheral neurotoxicity.

  6. Electrolyte disorders associated with the use of anticancer drugs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liamis, George; Filippatos, Theodosios D; Elisaf, Moses S

    2016-04-15

    The use of anticancer drugs is beneficial for patients with malignancies but is frequently associated with the occurrence of electrolyte disorders, which can be hazardous and in many cases fatal. The review presents the electrolyte abnormalities that can occur with the use of anticancer drugs and provides the related mechanisms. Platinum-containing anticancer drugs induce hypomagnesemia, hypokalemia and hypocalcemia. Moreover, platinum-containing drugs are associated with hyponatremia, especially when combined with large volumes of hypotonic fluids aiming to prevent nephrotoxicity. Alkylating agents have been linked with the occurrence of hyponatremia [due to syndrome of inappropriate antidiuretic hormone secretion (SIADH)] and Fanconi's syndrome (hypophosphatemia, aminoaciduria, hypouricemia and/or glucosuria). Vinca alkaloids are associated with hyponatremia due to SIADH. Epidermal growth factor receptor monoclonal antibody inhibitors induce hypomagnesemia, hypokalemia and hypocalcemia. Other, monoclonal antibodies, such as cixutumumab, cause hyponatremia due to SIADH. Tyrosine kinase inhibitors are linked to hyponatremia and hypophosphatemia. Mammalian target of rapamycin inhibitors induce hyponatremia (due to aldosterone resistance), hypokalemia and hypophosphatemia. Other drugs such as immunomodulators or methotrexate have been also associated with hyponatremia. The administration of estrogens at high doses, streptozocin, azacitidine and suramin may induce hypophosphatemia. Finally, the drug-related tumor lysis syndrome is associated with hyperphosphatemia, hyperkalemia and hypocalcemia. The prevention of electrolyte derangements may lead to reduction of adverse events during the administration of anticancer drugs.

  7. Platinum(iv) anticancer prodrugs - hypotheses and facts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gibson, Dan

    2016-08-16

    In this manuscript we focus on Pt(iv) anticancer prodrugs. We explore the main working hypotheses for the design of effective Pt(iv) prodrugs and note the exceptions to the common assumptions that are prevalent in the field. Special attention was devoted to the emerging class of "dual action" Pt(iv) prodrugs, where bioactive ligands are conjugated to the axial positions of platinum in order to obtain orthogonal or complementary effects that will increase the efficacy of killing the cancer cells. We discuss the rationale behind the design of the "dual action" prodrugs and the results of the pharmacological studies obtained. Simultaneous release of two bioactive moieties inside the cancer cells often triggers several processes that together determine the fate of the cell. Pt(iv) complexes provide many opportunities for applying new concepts in targeting, synergistic cell killing and exploiting novel nanodelivery systems.

  8. Novel platinum(IV) complexes conjugated with a wogonin derivative as multi-targeted anticancer agents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qin, Xiaodong; Xu, Gang; Chen, Feihong; Fang, Lei; Gou, Shaohua

    2017-04-15

    Platinum-based complexes like cisplatin and oxaliplatin are well known the mainstay of chemotherapy regimens on clinic. Wogonin, a natural product that possesses wide biological activities, is now in phase I clinical test as an anticancer agent in China. Herein reported are a series of novel Pt(IV) complexes that conjugated a wogonin derivative (compound 3) to the axial position via a linker group. After being tethered to the platinum(IV) complexes, the wogonin derivative provided multiple anticancer effects, especially in compound 10, a fusion containing wogonin and cisplatin units. Compound 10 not only inherited the genotoxicity from cisplatin, but also obtained the COX inhibitory property from the wogonin derivative. Further mechanistic investigation revealed that compound 10 caused the accumulation of ROS, decreased the mitochondrial membrane potential (ΔΨm) and then activated the p53 pathway. Overall, the research demonstrates that the "integrative" prodrug can be an effective strategy to promote the anticancer potency of Pt-based drugs for cancer treatment. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Clinical pharmacology of novel anticancer drug formulations

    OpenAIRE

    Stuurman, F.E.

    2013-01-01

    Studies outlined in this thesis describe the impact of drug formulations on pharmacology of anticancer drugs. It consists of four parts and starts with a review describing the mechanisms of low oral bioavailability of anti-cancer drugs and strategies for improvement of the bioavailability. The majority of new anti-cancer drugs are oral pharmaceutical formulations, consisting of new chemical entities, like molecular targeted agents and novel variants of existing drugs. The development of oral ...

  10. Anticancer and DNA binding activities of platinum (IV) complexes; importance of leaving group departure rate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pouryasin, Zahra; Yousefi, Reza; Nabavizadeh, S Masoud; Rashidi, Mehdi; Hamidizadeh, Peyman; Alavianmehr, Mohammad-Mehdi; Moosavi-Movahedi, Ali Akbar

    2014-03-01

    The two six-coordinate Pt(IV) complexes, containing bidentate nitrogen donor/methyl ligands with general formula [Pt(X)2Me2((t)bu2bpy)], where (t)bu2bpy = 4,4'-ditert-butyl-2,2'-bipyridine and X = Cl (C1) or Br (C2), serving as the leaving groups were synthesized for evaluation of their anticancer activities and DNA binding properties. To examine anticancer activities of the synthetic complexes, 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide assay and ethidium bromide/acridine orange (EB/AO) staining method were performed. The binding properties of these complexes to DNA and purine nucleotides were examined, using different spectroscopic techniques. These complexes demonstrated significant anticancer activities against three cancer cell lines Jurkat, K562, and MCF-7. On the basis of the results of EB/AO staining, C1 and C2 were also capable to induce apoptosis in cancer cells. These complexes comprise halide leaving groups, displaying different departure rates; accordingly, they demonstrated slightly dissimilar anticancer activity and significantly different DNA/purine nucleotide binding properties. The results of DNA interaction studies of these complexes suggest a mixed-binding mode, comprising partial intercalation and groove binding. Overall, the results presented herein indicate that the newly synthesized Pt(IV) complexes are promising class of the potential anticancer agents which can be considered as molecular templates in designing novel platinum anticancer drugs. This study also highlights the importance of leaving group in anticancer activity and DNA binding properties of Pt(IV) complexes.

  11. Design and development of polynuclear ruthenium and platinum polypyridyl complexes in search of new anticancer agents

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schilden, Karlijn van der

    2006-01-01

    The research described in this Ph.D. Thesis has been devoted to the design and development of polynuclear polypyridyl ruthenium and ruthenium-platinum complexes in search of new anticancer agents. A variety of polynuclear ruthenium and ruthenium-platinum complexes has been synthesized with a long an

  12. Serendipity in anticancer drug discovery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hargrave-Thomas, Emily; Yu, Bo; Reynisson, Jóhannes

    2012-01-10

    It was found that the discovery of 5.8% (84/1437) of all drugs on the market involved serendipity. Of these drugs, 31 (2.2%) were discovered following an incident in the laboratory and 53 (3.7%) were discovered in a clinical setting. In addition, 263 (18.3%) of the pharmaceuticals in clinical use today are chemical derivatives of the drugs discovered with the aid of serendipity. Therefore, in total, 24.1% (347/1437) of marketed drugs can be directly traced to serendipitous events confirming the importance of this elusive phenomenon. In the case of anticancer drugs, 35.2% (31/88) can be attributed to a serendipitous event, which is somewhat larger than for all drugs. The therapeutic field that has benefited the most from serendipity are central nervous system active drugs reflecting the difficulty in designing compounds to pass the blood-brain-barrier and the lack of laboratory-based assays for many of the diseases of the mind.

  13. Hydrolysis mechanisms of trans platinum-based anticancer drug with heterocyclic amine ligands: A comparative DFT study%杂环反铂(Ⅱ)抗癌药物水解反应机理的DFT研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李添; 周立新; 李娟

    2012-01-01

    In this work, the hydrolysis processes of the anticancer drugs trans-[PtCl2 (piperi-dine) ( Am)], Am = 2.-pico]ine( 1), 3-picoline(2) , 4-picoiine(3), trans-[PtCl; (piperidine) ( piper-azine)] (4), trans-[PtCl2 ( piperazme )2 ] (5 ) and trans-[ PtCl2 (iminoether )2 ] (6 ) have been studied using hybrid density functional theory (B3LYP) and iso-electnc focusing polarized con-tinuum model CIEF-PCM) solvation models. The hydrolysis reactions leading to the activated drug form a key step for the reaction with the target DNA. The stationary points on the poten-tial energy surfaces for the first and second hydrolysis steps, proceeding via a general SN2 pathway, were fully optimized and characterized. It is found that the processes of the reactions follow the established theory for ligand substitution in square planar complexes,that is, substi-tution reactions usually occur via Pt-Iigand exchange reactions with a trigonal-bipyramidsl transition stale structure; the geometries of the transition states (TS) agree with the previous related work and all of the reactions are endothermic; the barrier height of the second hydroly-sis is always higher than that of the first step for all the systems. In comparison with previous work on cisplatin, a faster rate of hydrolysis is determined for the reaction. We make a com-parison with previous work on the hydrolysis processes of analogous trans platinum-based anti- cancer drugs. The results provide detailed energy profiles for the mechanism of hydrolysis of 1, 2, 3. 4, 5 and 6, which may assist in understanding the reaction mechanism of the drug with the DNA target and in the design of novel Pt-based anticancer drugs with trans geometries.%用DFT-B3LYP方法和IEF-PCM溶剂化模型研究了反铂抗癌药物trans-[PtCl2(piperidine)(Am)](Am=2-picoline(1).3-picoline(2),4 picoline(3)),trans-[PtCl2(piperidine)(piperazine)](4),trans-[PtCl2(piperazine)2](5)and trans-[PtCl2(iminoether)2](6)的水解过程.水解反应是药物与DNA靶

  14. Clinical pharmacology of novel anticancer drug formulations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Stuurman, F.E.

    2013-01-01

    Studies outlined in this thesis describe the impact of drug formulations on pharmacology of anticancer drugs. It consists of four parts and starts with a review describing the mechanisms of low oral bioavailability of anti-cancer drugs and strategies for improvement of the bioavailability. The

  15. Clinical pharmacology of novel anticancer drug formulations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Stuurman, F.E.

    2013-01-01

    Studies outlined in this thesis describe the impact of drug formulations on pharmacology of anticancer drugs. It consists of four parts and starts with a review describing the mechanisms of low oral bioavailability of anti-cancer drugs and strategies for improvement of the bioavailability. The major

  16. Rising cost of anticancer drugs in Australia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karikios, D J; Schofield, D; Salkeld, G; Mann, K P; Trotman, J; Stockler, M R

    2014-05-01

    Anticancer drugs are often expensive and are contributing to the growing cost of cancer care. Concerns have been raised about the effect rising costs may have on availability of new anticancer drugs. This study aims to determine the recent changes in the costs of anticancer drugs in Australia. Publicly available expenditure and prices paid by the Australian Pharmaceutical Benefits Scheme (PBS) for anticancer drugs from 2000 to 2012 were reviewed. The measures used to determine changes in cost were total PBS expenditure and average price paid by the PBS per prescription for anticancer drugs and for all PBS listed drugs. An estimated monthly price paid for newly listed anticancer drugs was also calculated. Annual PBS expenditure on anticancer drugs rose from A$65 million in 1999-2000 to A$466 million in 2011-2012; an average increase of 19% per annum. The average price paid by the PBS per anticancer drug prescription, adjusted for inflation, increased 133% from A$337 to A$786. The real average annual increase in the price per anticancer drug prescription was more than double that for all other PBS drugs combined (7.6% vs 2.8%, difference 4.8%, 95% confidence interval -0.4% to 10.1%, P = 0.07). The median price for a month's treatment of the new anticancer drugs listed was A$4919 (range A$1003 to A$12 578, 2012 prices). PBS expenditure and the price of anticancer drugs in Australia rose substantially from 2000 to 2012. Dealing with these burgeoning costs will be a major challenge for our health system and for those affected by cancer. © 2014 The Authors; Internal Medicine Journal © 2014 Royal Australasian College of Physicians.

  17. The new platinum-based anticancer agent LA-12 induces retinol binding protein 4 in vivo

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bouchal Pavel

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The initial pharmacokinetic study of a new anticancer agent (OC-6-43-bis(acetato(1-adamantylamineamminedichloroplatinum (IV (LA-12 was complemented by proteomic screening of rat plasma. The objective of the study was to identify new LA-12 target proteins that serve as markers of LA-12 treatment, response and therapy monitoring. Methods Proteomic profiles were measured by surface-enhanced laser desorption-ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry (SELDI-TOF MS in 72 samples of rat plasma randomized according to LA-12 dose and time from administration. Correlation of 92 peak clusters with platinum concentration was evaluated using Spearman correlation analysis. Results We identified Retinol-binding protein 4 (RBP4 whose level correlated with LA-12 level in treated rats. Similar results were observed in randomly selected patients involved in Phase I clinical trials. Conclusions RBP4 induction is in agreement with known RBP4 regulation by amantadine and cisplatin. Since retinol metabolism is disrupted in many cancers and inversely associates with malignancy, these data identify a potential novel mechanism for the action of LA-12 and other similar anti-cancer drugs.

  18. Modulation of anticancer drug toxicity by solcoseryl.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sołtysiak-Pawluczuk, D; Jedrych, A; Jastrzebski, Z; Czyzewska-Szafran, H; Danysz, A

    1991-01-01

    The studies of the effect of solcoseryl on toxicity of selected anticancer drugs were performed in mice. The observed differential influence of solcoseryl was dependent on the type of anticancer drug as well as on the schedule of solcoseryl administration. The protective effect of the biostimulator was noticed exclusively against 5-FU toxicity. The results of our studies could provide possible implications for therapeutic approach.

  19. STABILITY OF THE NEW ANTICANCER PLATINUM ANALOG 1,2-DIAMINOMETHYL-CYCLOBUTANE-PLATINUM(II)-LACTATE (LOBAPLATIN-D19466) IN INTRAVENOUS SOLUTIONS

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    GUCHELAAR, HJ; UGES, DRA; AULENBACHER, P; DEVRIES, EGE; MULDER, NH

    The chemical stability of the new anticancer platinum analogue 1,2-diaminomethyl-cyclobutane-platinum(II)-lactate (D19466) in infusion media was studied in an accelerated stability testing experiment with a selective HPLC-UV method. Variables were time, temperature, light, concentration, and

  20. TAILORING IMMUNOTOXIN AS ANTICANCER DRUG

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Santoso Cornain

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available The conventional treatments for cancer have been considered unsatisfatory, with limited efficiency in terms of discriminative cancer cell adverse reaction against the normal compartments, a number of immunological approaches had been implemented. Since cancer cells could exhibit tumor specific antigen (s, a highly specific antibody could be used to direct any anticancer drug, biological agent or radioisotope selectively against the cancer cells and does not harm the normal cells. The specific antibody could be raised by immunization with purified tumor specific antigen (s. The biological agent could be obtained as toxin, either derived from bacteria e.g. diphtheria toxin or derived from plants e.g. castor ricin, which could destroy and kill cancer cells after contacts. A hybrid molecule constructed between antibody and toxin has been known as "immunotoxin". The selectivity of the antibody against a given tumor specific antigen could be increased by using a monoclonal antibody, made by hybridoma technique and immunological engineering. Accordingly, the efficiency of the destructive or killing effect of the toxin could be eventually increased by purification technique, biochemical and genetic engineering. In a preliminary study ricin from castor (Ricinus communis have been purified and separated into two protein fractions (RCAI = 12.000 dalton and RCA II = 60.000 - 65.000 dalton. The latter showed toxin property, and was tested in vitro both against normal cells and against cancer cells. In the microcy totoxicity assay the ricin showed both the short term and the long term killing effect as measured after 1, 4, 16 and 24 hours. The killing effect against cancer cells was stronger as compared to that against normal cells. The acute or short term effect was observed at lower concentration of ricin (10-6 and 10-12 g/ml after 1 and 4 hours contacts. The long term effect resulted in 90% and nearly 100% cytotoxicity in higher concentration of ricin

  1. Polyamide platinum anticancer complexes designed to target specific DNA sequences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaramillo, David; Wheate, Nial J; Ralph, Stephen F; Howard, Warren A; Tor, Yitzhak; Aldrich-Wright, Janice R

    2006-07-24

    Two new platinum complexes, trans-chlorodiammine[N-(2-aminoethyl)-4-[4-(N-methylimidazole-2-carboxamido)-N-methylpyrrole-2-carboxamido]-N-methylpyrrole-2-carboxamide]platinum(II) chloride (DJ1953-2) and trans-chlorodiammine[N-(6-aminohexyl)-4-[4-(N-methylimidazole-2-carboxamido)-N-methylpyrrole-2-carboxamido]-N-methylpyrrole-2-carboxamide]platinum(II) chloride (DJ1953-6) have been synthesized as proof-of-concept molecules in the design of agents that can specifically target genes in DNA. Coordinate covalent binding to DNA was demonstrated with electrospray ionization mass spectrometry. Using circular dichroism, these complexes were found to show greater DNA binding affinity to the target sequence: d(CATTGTCAGAC)(2), than toward either d(GTCTGTCAATG)(2,) which contains different flanking sequences, or d(CATTGAGAGAC)(2), which contains a double base pair mismatch sequence. DJ1953-2 unwinds the DNA helix by around 13 degrees , but neither metal complex significantly affects the DNA melting temperature. Unlike simple DNA minor groove binders, DJ1953-2 is able to inhibit, in vitro, RNA synthesis. The cytotoxicity of both metal complexes in the L1210 murine leukaemia cell line was also determined, with DJ1953-6 (34 microM) more active than DJ1953-2 (>50 microM). These results demonstrate the potential of polyamide platinum complexes and provide the structural basis for designer agents that are able to recognize biologically relevant sequences and prevent DNA transcription and replication.

  2. Analysis of damaged DNA / proteins interactions: Methodological optimizations and applications to DNA lesions induced by platinum anticancer drugs; Analyse des interactions ADN lese / proteines: Optimisations methodologiques et applications aux dommages de l'ADN engendres par les derives du platine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bounaix Morand du Puch, Ch

    2010-10-15

    DNA lesions contribute to the alteration of DNA structure, thereby inhibiting essential cellular processes. Such alterations may be beneficial for chemotherapies, for example in the case of platinum anticancer agents. They generate bulky adducts that, if not repaired, ultimately cause apoptosis. A better understanding of the biological response to such molecules can be obtained through the study of proteins that directly interact with the damages. These proteins constitute the DNA lesions interactome. This thesis presents the development of tools aiming at increasing the list of platinum adduct-associated proteins. Firstly, we designed a ligand fishing system made of damaged plasmids immobilized onto magnetic beads. Three platinum drugs were selected for our study: cisplatin, oxali-platin and satra-platin. Following exposure of the trap to nuclear extracts from HeLa cancer cells and identification of retained proteins by proteomics, we obtained already known candidates (HMGB1, hUBF, FACT complex) but also 29 new members of the platinated-DNA interactome. Among them, we noted the presence of PNUTS, TOX4 and WDR82, which associate to form the recently-discovered PTW/PP complex. Their capture was then confirmed with a second model, namely breast cancer cell line MDA MB 231, and the biological consequences of such an interaction now need to be elucidated. Secondly, we adapted a SPRi bio-chip to the study of platinum-damaged DNA/proteins interactions. Affinity of HMGB1 and newly characterized TOX4 for adducts generated by our three platinum drugs could be validated thanks to the bio-chip. Finally, we used our tools, as well as analytical chemistry and biochemistry methods, to evaluate the role of DDB2 (a factor involved in the recognition of UV-induced lesions) in the repair of cisplatin adducts. Our experiments using MDA MB 231 cells differentially expressing DDB2 showed that this protein is not responsible for the repair of platinum damages. Instead, it appears to act

  3. Magnetic polymer nanospheres for anticancer drug targeting

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    JurIkova, A; Csach, K; Koneracka, M; Zavisova, V; Tomasovicova, N; Lancz, G; Kopcansky, P; Timko, M; Miskuf, J [Institute of Experimental Physics, Slovak Academy of Sciences, 040 01 Kosice (Slovakia); Muckova, M, E-mail: akasard@saske.s [Hameln rds a.s., 900 01 Modra (Slovakia)

    2010-01-01

    Poly(D,L-lactide-co-glycolide) polymer (PLGA) nanospheres loaded with biocom-patible magnetic fluid as a magnetic carrier and anticancer drug Taxol were prepared by the modified nanoprecipitation method with size of 200-250 nm in diameter. The PLGA polymer was utilized as a capsulation material due to its biodegradability and biocompatibility. Taxol as an important anticancer drug was chosen for its significant role against a wide range of tumours. Thermal properties of the drug-polymer system were characterized using thermal analysis methods. It was determined the solubility of Taxol in PLGA nanospheres. Magnetic properties investigated using SQUID magnetometry showed superparamagnetism of the prepared magnetic polymer nanospheres.

  4. The Next Generation of Platinum Drugs: Targeted Pt(II) Agents, Nanoparticle Delivery, and Pt(IV) Prodrugs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnstone, Timothy C; Suntharalingam, Kogularamanan; Lippard, Stephen J

    2016-03-09

    The platinum drugs, cisplatin, carboplatin, and oxaliplatin, prevail in the treatment of cancer, but new platinum agents have been very slow to enter the clinic. Recently, however, there has been a surge of activity, based on a great deal of mechanistic information, aimed at developing nonclassical platinum complexes that operate via mechanisms of action distinct from those of the approved drugs. The use of nanodelivery devices has also grown, and many different strategies have been explored to incorporate platinum warheads into nanomedicine constructs. In this Review, we discuss these efforts to create the next generation of platinum anticancer drugs. The introduction provides the reader with a brief overview of the use, development, and mechanism of action of the approved platinum drugs to provide the context in which more recent research has flourished. We then describe approaches that explore nonclassical platinum(II) complexes with trans geometry or with a monofunctional coordination mode, polynuclear platinum(II) compounds, platinum(IV) prodrugs, dual-threat agents, and photoactivatable platinum(IV) complexes. Nanoparticles designed to deliver platinum(IV) complexes will also be discussed, including carbon nanotubes, carbon nanoparticles, gold nanoparticles, quantum dots, upconversion nanoparticles, and polymeric micelles. Additional nanoformulations, including supramolecular self-assembled structures, proteins, peptides, metal-organic frameworks, and coordination polymers, will then be described. Finally, the significant clinical progress made by nanoparticle formulations of platinum(II) agents will be reviewed. We anticipate that such a synthesis of disparate research efforts will not only help to generate new drug development ideas and strategies, but also will reflect our optimism that the next generation of approved platinum cancer drugs is about to arrive.

  5. Under-Reported Aspects of Platinum Drug Pharmacology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dirk Theile

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Platinum drugs remain the backbone of many antineoplastic regimens. Among the numerous chemical or pharmacological effects of platinum drugs, some aspects tend to be under-reported. Thus, this perspective paper intends to stress some neglected properties of platinum drugs: first, the physico-chemical characteristics (aquation reaction kinetics that determine site-specific toxicity; second, the impact on RNA molecules. Knowledge of the ‘RNA world’ has dramatically changed our understanding of cellular and molecular biology. The inherent RNA-crosslinking properties should make platinum-based drugs interact with coding and non-coding RNAs. Third, we will discuss the impact on the immune system, which is now recognized to substantially contribute to chemotherapy efficacy. Together, platinum drugs are in fact old drugs, but are worth re-focusing on. Many aspects are still mysterious but can pave the way to new drugs or an improved application of the already existing compounds.

  6. De novo generation of singlet oxygen and ammine ligands by photoactivation of a platinum anticancer complex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Yao; Farrer, Nicola J; Li, Huilin; Butler, Jennifer S; McQuitty, Ruth J; Habtemariam, Abraha; Wang, Fuyi; Sadler, Peter J

    2013-12-16

    Worth the excitement: Highly reactive oxygen and nitrogen species are generated by photoactivation of the anticancer platinum(IV) complex trans,trans,trans-[Pt(N3 )2 (OH)2 (MA)(Py)] (MA=methylamine, Py=pyridine). Singlet oxygen is formed from the hydroxido ligands and not from dissolved oxygen, and ammine ligands are products from the conversion of azido ligands to nitrenes. Both processes can induce oxidation of guanine.

  7. Modelling and sensitivity analysis of urinary platinum excretion in anticancer chemotherapy for the recovery of platinum

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Folens, Karel; Mortier, Séverine Thérèse F C; Baeten, Janis

    2016-01-01

    Platinum (Pt) based antineoplastics are important in cancer therapy. To date the Pt which is urinary excreted by the patients ends up in wastewater. This is disadvantageous from both an economic as from an ecological point of view because Pt is a valuable material and the excretion products are t...

  8. Bacterial inactivation of the anticancer drug doxorubicin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Westman, Erin L; Canova, Marc J; Radhi, Inas J; Koteva, Kalinka; Kireeva, Inga; Waglechner, Nicholas; Wright, Gerard D

    2012-10-26

    Microbes are exposed to compounds produced by members of their ecological niche, including molecules with antibiotic or antineoplastic activities. As a result, even bacteria that do not produce such compounds can harbor the genetic machinery to inactivate or degrade these molecules. Here, we investigated environmental actinomycetes for their ability to inactivate doxorubicin, an aminoglycosylated anthracycline anticancer drug. One strain, Streptomyces WAC04685, inactivates doxorubicin via a deglycosylation mechanism. Activity-based purification of the enzymes responsible for drug inactivation identified the NADH dehydrogenase component of respiratory electron transport complex I, which was confirmed by gene inactivation studies. A mechanism where reduction of the quinone ring of the anthracycline by NADH dehydrogenase leads to deglycosylation is proposed. This work adds anticancer drug inactivation to the enzymatic inactivation portfolio of actinomycetes and offers possibilities for novel applications in drug detoxification. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Reactions and interactions in handling anticancer drugs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    D'Arcy, P F

    1983-01-01

    The clinical toxicity of anticancer drugs has been well documented with regard to the adverse effects of treatment in patients. However, many of these drugs have a direct irritant effect on the skin, eyes, mucous membranes, and other tissues. Handled without due care, especially when being prepared for injection, most cytotoxic drugs can cause local toxic or allergic reactions; they also present hazards of carcinogenicity and mutagenicity. This spectrum of potential risk should be kept in mind by personnel administering or handling these drugs, especially in oncology units where just a few individuals may routinely and frequently reconstitute many doses of cytotoxic agents. This is work in which the hospital pharmacist should and must be involved; indeed, many of the techniques and skills required are identical with those used in standard aseptic procedures for preparing pharmaceutical products. Pharmacy departments should take the initiative in making hospital staff aware of the potential risks of handling neoplastic agents, and they should spearhead a multidisciplinary assessment for producing local guidelines for working with these drugs. This article warns practitioners about the inherent dangers of these practitioner-drug interactions and suggests ways in which they may be reduced. Information is given in tabular form regarding recommended procedures for reconstituting 24 anticancer drugs and precautions to protect the personnel handling them, especially when there is spillage of powdered or liquid drugs. Also, guidelines are given about incompatibilities with admixtures of such drugs, and the literature is reviewed relative to recent developments in hospital pharmacy departments where reconstitution of anticancer drugs has been incorporated into existing intravenous fluid preparation/admixture units. Not only has this been shown to be safer and more effective in terms of time and labor, but also it has cut the cost of injectable cytotoxic drugs by an

  10. Exploiting developments in nanotechnology for the preferential delivery of platinum-based anti-cancer agents to tumours: targeting some of the hallmarks of cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parker, James P; Ude, Ziga; Marmion, Celine J

    2016-01-01

    Platinum drugs as anti-cancer therapeutics are held in extremely high regard. Despite their success, there are drawbacks associated with their use; their dose-limiting toxicity, their limited activity against an array of common cancers and patient resistance to Pt-based therapeutic regimes. Current investigations in medicinal inorganic chemistry strive to offset these shortcomings through selective targeting of Pt drugs and/or the development of Pt drugs with new or multiple modes of action. A comprehensive overview showcasing how liposomes, nanocapsules, polymers, dendrimers, nanoparticles and nanotubes may be employed as vehicles to selectively deliver cytotoxic Pt payloads to tumour cells is provided.

  11. PEGylated Silk Nanoparticles for Anticancer Drug Delivery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wongpinyochit, Thidarat; Uhlmann, Petra; Urquhart, Andrew J; Seib, F Philipp

    2015-11-09

    Silk has a robust clinical track record and is emerging as a promising biopolymer for drug delivery, including its use as nanomedicine. However, silk-based nanomedicines still require further refinements for full exploitation of their potential; the application of "stealth" design principals is especially necessary to support their evolution. The aim of this study was to develop and examine the potential of PEGylated silk nanoparticles as an anticancer drug delivery system. We first generated B. mori derived silk nanoparticles by driving β-sheet assembly (size 104 ± 1.7 nm, zeta potential -56 ± 5.6 mV) using nanoprecipitation. We then surface grafted polyethylene glycol (PEG) to the fabricated silk nanoparticles and verified the aqueous stability and morphology of the resulting PEGylated silk nanoparticles. We assessed the drug loading and release behavior of these nanoparticles using clinically established and emerging anticancer drugs. Overall, PEGylated silk nanoparticles showed high encapsulation efficiency (>93%) and a pH-dependent release over 14 days. Finally, we demonstrated significant cytotoxicity of drug loaded silk nanoparticles applied as single and combination nanomedicines to human breast cancer cells. In conclusion, these results, taken together with prior silk nanoparticle data, support a viable future for silk-based nanomedicines.

  12. Teratogens as anti-cancer drugs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blagosklonny, Mikhail V

    2005-11-01

    Most anticancer drugs are teratogens, merely because they target vital cellular functions. Conversely, some plants produce agents that intentionally target embryonic signaling pathways, precisely to cause birth defects if pregnant animals eat such plants. Cyclopamine, a teratogen produced by a flowering plant, inhibits the Hh/Gli pathway, causing developmental defects such as cyclopia (one eye in the middle of the face). In theory, selective teratogens may suppress cancer cells that reactivate embryonic pathways, while sparing most normal cells. I discuss the potential (and limits) of teratogens in cancer therapy, linking diverse topics from morning sickness of pregnancy, embryonic pathways and poisonous plants to the mechanism of action of anticancer teratogens and their combinations with less selective cytotoxic agents.

  13. PEGylated Silk Nanoparticles for Anticancer Drug Delivery

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wongpinyochit, Thidarat; Uhlmann, Petra; Urquhart, Andrew

    2015-01-01

    .6 mV) using nanoprecipitation. We then surface grafted polyethylene glycol (PEG) to the fabricated silk nanoparticles and verified the aqueous stability and morphology of the resulting PEGylated silk nanoparticles. We assessed the drug loading and release behavior of these nanoparticles using...... clinically established and emerging anticancer drugs. Overall, PEGylated silk nanoparticles showed high encapsulation efficiency (>93%) and a pH-dependent release over 14 days. Finally, we demonstrated significant cytotoxicity of drug loaded silk nanoparticles applied as single and combination nanomedicines......Silk has a robust clinical track record and is emerging as a promising biopolymer for drug delivery, including its use as nanomedicine. However, silk-based nanomedicines still require further refinements for full exploitation of their potential; the application of “stealth” design principals...

  14. A Photoactivatable Platinum(IV) Anticancer Complex Conjugated to the RNA Ligand Guanidinoneomycin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shaili, Evyenia; Fernández-Giménez, Marta; Rodríguez-Astor, Savina; Gandioso, Albert; Sandín, Lluís; García-Vélez, Carlos; Massaguer, Anna; Clarkson, Guy J; Woods, Julie A; Sadler, Peter J; Marchán, Vicente

    2015-12-07

    A photoactivatable platinum(IV) complex, trans,trans,trans-[Pt(N3 )2 (OH)(succ)(py)2 ] (succ=succinylate, py=pyridine), has been conjugated to guanidinoneomycin to study the effect of this guanidinum-rich compound on the photoactivation, intracellular accumulation and phototoxicity of the pro-drug. Surprisingly, trifluoroacetic acid treatment causes the replacement of an azido ligand and the axial hydroxide ligand by trifluoroacetate, as shown by NMR spectroscopy, MS and X-ray crystallography. Photoactivation of the platinum-guanidinoneomycin conjugate in the presence of 5'-guanosine monophosphate (5'-GMP) led to the formation of trans-[Pt(N3 )(py)2 (5'-GMP)](+) , as does the parent platinum(IV) complex. Binding of the platinum(II) photoproduct {PtN3 (py)2 }(+) to guanine nucleobases in a short single-stranded oligonucleotide was also observed. Finally, cellular uptake studies showed that guanidinoneomycin conjugation improved the intracellular accumulation of the platinum(IV) pro-drug in two cancer cell lines, particularly in SK-MEL-28 cells. Notably, the higher phototoxicity of the conjugate in SK-MEL-28 cells than in DU-145 cells suggests a degree of selectivity towards the malignant melanoma cell line.

  15. Cisplatin and platinum drugs at the molecular level. (Review).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boulikas, Teni; Vougiouka, Maria

    2003-01-01

    Over twenty years of intensive work toward improvement of cisplatin, and with hundreds of platinum drugs tested, has resulted in the introduction of the widely used carboplatin and of oxaliplatin used only for a very narrow spectrum of cancers. A number of interesting platinum compounds including the orally administered platinum drug JM216, nedaplatin, the sterically hindered platinum(II) complex ZD0473, the trinuclear platinum complex BBR3464, and the liposomal forms Lipoplatin and SPI-77 are under clinical evaluation. This review summarizes the molecular mechanisms of platinum compounds for DNA damage, DNA repair and induction of apoptosis via activation or modulation of signaling pathways and explores the basis of platinum resistance. Cisplatin, carboplatin, oxaliplatin and most other platinum compounds induce damage to tumors via induction of apoptosis; this is mediated by activation of signal transduction leading to the death receptor mechanisms as well as mitochondrial pathways. Apoptosis is responsible for the characteristic nephrotoxicity, ototoxicity and most other toxicities of the drugs. The major limitation in the clinical applications of cisplatin has been the development of cisplatin resistance by tumors. Mechanisms explaining cisplatin resistance include the reduction in cisplatin accumulation inside cancer cells because of barriers across the cell membrane, the faster repair of cisplatin adducts, the modulation of apoptotic pathways in various cells, the upregulation in transcription factors, the loss of p53 and other protein functions and a higher concentration of glutathione and metallothioneins in some type of tumors. A number of experimental strategies to overcome cisplatin resistance are at the preclinical or clinical level such as introduction of the bax gene, inhibition of the JNK pathway, introduction of a functional p53 gene, treatment of tumors with aldose reductase inhibitors and others. Particularly important are combinations of platinum

  16. Anticancer drug sensitivity by human tumor clonogenic assay.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hiraki,Shunkichi

    1986-10-01

    Full Text Available The anticancer drug sensitivity of human cancers was tested by the human tumor clonogenic assay (HTCA. Of 152 human cancer specimens tested, 63 (41% formed more than 30 tumor cell colonies in control plates and could be used to evaluate the drug sensitivity of tumor cells. In 42 (93% of 45 clinical trials in 24 patients, a parallel correlation was observed between the in vitro anticancer drug sensitivity measured by the HTCA and the clinical response of tumors to anticancer drugs. These results suggest that the HTCA is a good technique for the in vitro test of the anticancer drug sensitivity of human cancers.

  17. Anticancer Drugs from Marine Flora: An Overview

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. Sithranga Boopathy

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Marine floras, such as bacteria, actinobacteria, cyanobacteria, fungi, microalgae, seaweeds, mangroves, and other halophytes are extremely important oceanic resources, constituting over 90% of the oceanic biomass. They are taxonomically diverse, largely productive, biologically active, and chemically unique offering a great scope for discovery of new anticancer drugs. The marine floras are rich in medicinally potent chemicals predominantly belonging to polyphenols and sulphated polysaccharides. The chemicals have displayed an array of pharmacological properties especially antioxidant, immunostimulatory, and antitumour activities. The phytochemicals possibly activate macrophages, induce apoptosis, and prevent oxidative damage of DNA, thereby controlling carcinogenesis. In spite of vast resources enriched with chemicals, the marine floras are largely unexplored for anticancer lead compounds. Hence, this paper reviews the works so far conducted on this aspect with a view to provide a baseline information for promoting the marine flora-based anticancer research in the present context of increasing cancer incidence, deprived of the cheaper, safer, and potent medicines to challenge the dreadful human disease.

  18. Glutathione selectively modulates the binding of platinum drugs to human copper chaperone Cox17.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Linhong; Wang, Zhen; Wu, Han; Xi, Zhaoyong; Liu, Yangzhong

    2015-12-01

    The copper chaperone Cox17 (cytochrome c oxidase copper chaperone) has been shown to facilitate the delivery of cisplatin to mitochondria, which contributes to the overall cytotoxicity of the drug [Zhao et al. (2014) Chem. Commun. 50: , 2667-2669]. Kinetic data indicate that Cox17 has reactivity similar to glutathione (GSH), the most abundant thiol-rich molecule in the cytoplasm. In the present study, we found that GSH significantly modulates the reaction of platinum complexes with Cox17. GSH enhances the reactivity of three anti-cancer drugs (cisplatin, carboplatin and oxaliplatin) to Cox17, but suppresses the reaction of transplatin. Surprisingly, the pre-formed cisplatin-GSH adducts are highly reactive to Cox17; over 90% platinum transfers from GSH to Cox17. On the other hand, transplatin-GSH adducts are inert to Cox17. These different effects are consistent with the drug activity of these platinum complexes. In addition, GSH attenuates the protein aggregation of Cox17 induced by platination. These results indicate that the platinum-protein interactions could be substantially influenced by the cellular environment.

  19. Trastuzumab-mediated selective delivery for platinum drug to HER2-positive breast cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Rong; Sun, Yu; Gao, Qihe; Wang, Qiucui; Sun, Baiwang

    2015-10-01

    Oxaliplatin is used widely as an anticancer drug for clinical treatment. However, its applications are limited because of its poor selectivity. In this work, we described the design, synthesis, and characterization of conjugates combining trastuzumab with a platinum (IV) analog of oxaliplatin, in which the trastuzumab acted as an active targeting agent for HER2-positive cancer cells. Indirect enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay and immunofluorescence study indicated the platinum (IV)-trastuzumab conjugates retained specific binding activity to HER2 overexpressed SK-BR-3 cells. In the presence of ascorbic acid, platinum (IV)-trastuzumab conjugates were reduced to platinum (II) analogs, which could bind to and unwind PUC19 DNA in a manner similar to oxaliplatin. The cytotoxic study was tested on three breast cell lines: SK-BR-3, MCF-7, and MDA-MB-231. Platinum (IV)-trastuzumab conjugates showed promising antiproliferative activity against SK-BR-3 cells, but significantly decreased the inhibition to MDA-MB-231 and MCF-7 cells. The flow cytometric analysis showed that the conjugates arrested the cell cycle mainly at the G2/M phase and killed the cells through an apoptotic pathway.

  20. Biodiversity as a source of anticancer drugs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, G; Gyllenhaal, C; Soejarto, D D

    2006-03-01

    Natural Products have been the most significant source of drugs and drug leads in history. Their dominant role in cancer chemotherapeutics is clear with about 74% of anticancer compounds being either natural products, or natural product-derived. The biodiversity of the world provides a resource of unlimited structural diversity for bioprospecting by international drug discovery programs such as the ICBGs and NCDDGs, the latter focusing exclusively on anticancer compounds. However, many sources of natural products remain largely untapped. Technology is gradually overcoming the traditional difficulties encountered in natural products research by improving access to biodiverse resources, and ensuring the compatibility of samples with high throughput procedures. However, the acquisition of predictive biodiversity remains challenging. Plant and organism species may be selected on the basis of potentially useful phytochemical composition by consulting ethnopharmacological, chemosystematic, and ecological information. On the conservation/political front, the Convention on Biological Diversity (CBD) is allaying the anxiety surrounding the notion of biopiracy, which has defeated many attempts to discover and develop new natural products for human benefit. As it becomes increasingly evident and important, the CBD fosters cooperation and adaptation to new regulations and collaborative research agreements with source countries. Even as the past inadequacies of combinatorial chemistry are being analyzed, the intrinsic value of natural products as a source of drug leads is being increasingly appreciated. Their rich structural and stereochemical characteristics make them valuable as templates for exploring novel molecular diversity with the aim of synthesizing lead generation libraries with greater biological relevance. This will ensure an ample supply of starting materials for screening against the multitude of potentially "druggable" targets uncovered by genomics technologies

  1. Artemisinin–Second Career as Anticancer Drug?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thomas Efferth

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Artemisinin represents a showcase example not only for the activity of medicinal herbs deriving from traditional chinese medicine, but for phytotherapy in general. Its isolation from Sweet Wormwood (qinhao, Artemisia annua L. represents the starting point for an unprecedent success story in the treatment of malaria worldwide. Beyond the therapeutic value against Plasmodium parasites, it turned out in recent years that the bioactivity of artemisinin is not restricted to malaria. We and others found that this sesquiterpenoid also exerts profound anticancer activity in vitro and in vivo. Artemisinin-type drugs exert multi-factorial cellular and molecular actions in cancer cells. Ferrous iron reacts with artemisinin, which leads to the formation of reactive oxygen species and ultimately to a plethora anticancer effects of artemisinins, e.g. expression of antioxidant response genes, cell cycle arrest (G1 as well as G2 phase arrests, DNA damage that is repaird by base excision repair, homogous recombination and non-homologous end-joining, as well as different modes of cell death (intrinsic and extrinsic apoptosis, autophagy, necrosis, necroptosis, oncosis, and ferroptosis. Furthermore, artemisinins inhibit neoangiogenesis in tumors. The signaling of major transcription factors (NF-κB, MYC/MAX, AP-1, CREBP, mTOR etc. and signaling pathways are affected by artemisinins (e.g. Wnt/β-catenin pathway, AMPK pathway, metastatic pathways, nitric oxide signaling, and others. Several case reports on the compassionate use of artemisinins as well as clinical Phase I/II pilot studies indicate the clinical activity of artemisinins in veterinary and human cancer patients. Larger scale of Phase II and III clinical studies are required now to further develop artemisinin-type compounds as novel anticancer drugs.

  2. Peptidomimetics and metalloprotease inhibitors as anticancer drugs

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2009-01-01

    Peptidomimetics with three types, as the structural or functional mimetics of natural active peptides, can preserve the bioactivity and improve the bioavailability and the specificity towards the targets of the lead peptides. Peptidomimetics of high bioactivity can be designed through various ways including conformation restriction, modification and non-peptide design. Recently the concentration on the de-velopment of cancer chemotherapeutic drugs was transferred from cytotoxic drugs to target-based drugs, and many proteases and peptidases that play key roles in the process of tumor genesis and development was discovered, which means that peptidomimetics as potential cancer chemotherapeu-tic drugs should be paid close attention to. Our laboratory has focused on the development of small-molecule peptidomimetic inhibitors of APN, MMPs and HDACs as target-based anticancer agents. These three zinc-dependent metalloproteinases play very important roles in the process of tumor genesis, invasion, metastasis, angiogenesis and matrix degradation, so small-molecule peptidomimetic inhibitors based on them would be quite potential in the development of chemotherapeutic drugs with high selectivity.

  3. Anticancer properties of distinct antimalarial drug classes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rob Hooft van Huijsduijnen

    Full Text Available We have tested five distinct classes of established and experimental antimalarial drugs for their anticancer potential, using a panel of 91 human cancer lines. Three classes of drugs: artemisinins, synthetic peroxides and DHFR (dihydrofolate reductase inhibitors effected potent inhibition of proliferation with IC50s in the nM- low µM range, whereas a DHODH (dihydroorotate dehydrogenase and a putative kinase inhibitor displayed no activity. Furthermore, significant synergies were identified with erlotinib, imatinib, cisplatin, dasatinib and vincristine. Cluster analysis of the antimalarials based on their differential inhibition of the various cancer lines clearly segregated the synthetic peroxides OZ277 and OZ439 from the artemisinin cluster that included artesunate, dihydroartemisinin and artemisone, and from the DHFR inhibitors pyrimethamine and P218 (a parasite DHFR inhibitor, emphasizing their shared mode of action. In order to further understand the basis of the selectivity of these compounds against different cancers, microarray-based gene expression data for 85 of the used cell lines were generated. For each compound, distinct sets of genes were identified whose expression significantly correlated with compound sensitivity. Several of the antimalarials tested in this study have well-established and excellent safety profiles with a plasma exposure, when conservatively used in malaria, that is well above the IC50s that we identified in this study. Given their unique mode of action and potential for unique synergies with established anticancer drugs, our results provide a strong basis to further explore the potential application of these compounds in cancer in pre-clinical or and clinical settings.

  4. Cellular accumulation, lipophilicity and photocytotoxicity of diazido platinum(IV) anticancer complexes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pizarro, Ana M; McQuitty, Ruth J; Mackay, Fiona S; Zhao, Yao; Woods, Julie A; Sadler, Peter J

    2014-06-01

    The lipophilicity of ten photoactivatable platinum(IV) diazido prodrugs of formula trans,trans,trans-[Pt(N3 )2 (OH)2 (R)(R')] (where R and R' are NH3 , methylamine, ethylamine, pyridine, 2-picoline, 3-picoline or thiazole) has been determined by their retention times on reversed-phase HPLC. The lipophilicity of the complexes shows a linear dependence on the lipophilicity (partition coefficient) of the ligands. Accumulation of platinum in A2780 human ovarian cancer cells after one hour drug exposure in the dark is compared with their cytotoxic potency on activation with UVA (365 nm) and to their lipophilicity. No correlation between lipophilicity and intracellular accumulation of platinum was observed, perhaps suggesting involvement of active transport and favoured influx of selected structures. Furthermore, no correlation between platinum accumulation and photocytotoxicity was observed in A2780 cancer cells, implying that the type of intracellular damage induced by these complexes plays a key role in their cytotoxic effects. © 2014 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  5. Presentation and Diagnosis of Hypersensitivity to Platinum Drugs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caiado, Joana; Castells, Mariana

    2015-04-01

    Hypersensitivity reactions (HSRs) to platinum drugs are increasing due to their extensive use in a wide variety of malignancies and the repeated exposures in patients with increased life expectancy. Understanding the incidence of HSR to platinum drugs and associated risk factors can help with the diagnosis and may provide protection against severe HSRs. A thorough clinical history with identification of the typical and atypical symptoms, the relationship with the platin administration, and the number of previous exposures are the key to the diagnosis. An elevated serum tryptase at the time of the HSR indicates that IgE and/or mast cells/basophils were involved in the HSR. Skin testing to platinum drugs is a highly sensitive and specific diagnostic tool, which helps provide risk stratification and management recommendations. Platinum specific IgE measurement and basophil activation test (BAT) are emerging as new diagnostic tools and in combination with skin testing can help support the diagnosis and the cross-reactivity between the three most commonly used platinum drugs, namely carboplatin, cisplatin, and oxaliplatin.

  6. Prevalence of potential drug-drug interactions in cancer patients treated with oral anticancer drugs

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    R.W.F. van Leeuwen (Roelof); D.H.S. Brundel (D. H S); C. Neef (Cees); T. van Gelder (Teun); A.H.J. Mathijssen (Ron); D.M. Burger (David); F.G.A. Jansman (Frank)

    2013-01-01

    textabstractBackground: Potential drug-drug interactions (PDDIs) in patients with cancer are common, but have not previously been quantified for oral anticancer treatment. We assessed the prevalence and seriousness of potential PDDIs among ambulatory cancer patients on oral anticancer treatment.

  7. Prevalence of potential drug-drug interactions in cancer patients treated with oral anticancer drugs

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Leeuwen, R. W. F.; Brundel, D. H. S.; Neef, C.; van Gelder, T.; Mathijssen, R. H. J.; Burger, D. M.; Jansman, F. G. A.

    2013-01-01

    Background: Potential drug-drug interactions (PDDIs) in patients with cancer are common, but have not previously been quantified for oral anticancer treatment. We assessed the prevalence and seriousness of potential PDDIs among ambulatory cancer patients on oral anticancer treatment. Methods: A

  8. Design, synthesis and anticancer activity of diam(m)ine platinum(II) complexes bearing a small-molecular cell apoptosis inducer dichloroacetate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Weiping; Jiang, Jing; Xu, Yongping; Hou, Shuqian; Sun, Liping; Ye, Qingsong; Lou, Liguang

    2015-05-01

    Four new diam(m)ine platinum complexes containing the dichloroacetate moiety in 3-dichoroacetoxylcyclobutane-1,1-dicarboxylate as the leaving group were synthesized, characterized by elemental analysis as well as by ESI(+)-MS (electrospray ionization mass spectrometry in positive mode), FT-IR, (1)H- and (13)C-NMR, and evaluated for their in vitro anticancer activity against human lung cancer cell line (A549) and ovarian cancer cell lines (SK-OV-3, SK-OV-3/DDP). Diam(m)ines used in the present study belong to the carriers of six clinically approved platinum drugs. Among the complexes synthesized, complex 2, cis-[Pt(II)(1R,2R-diaminocyclohexane)·(3-dichoroacetoxylcyclobutane-1,1-dicarboxylate)] is the most promising in terms of water solubility and potential of being totally devoid of cross-drug resistance with cisplatin. Therefore, complex 2 was selected for the dichloroacetate release test. The test shows dichloroacetate can be efficiently released from complex 2 under physiological conditions via the hydrolysis of an ester bond bridging the dichloroacetate moiety and platinum pharmacophores together. Our study supports the further evaluation of this complex as a drug candidate.

  9. NSAIDs: Old Drugs Reveal New Anticancer Targets

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gary A. Piazza

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available There is compelling evidence that nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs and cyclooxygenase-2 selective inhibitors have antineoplastic activity, but toxicity from cyclooxygenase (COX inhibition and the suppression of physiologically important prostaglandins limits their use for cancer chemoprevention. Previous studies as reviewed here suggest that the mechanism for their anticancer properties does not require COX inhibition, but instead involves an off-target effect. In support of this possibility, recent molecular modeling studies have shown that the NSAID sulindac can be chemically modified to selectively design out its COX-1 and COX-2 inhibitory activity. Unexpectedly, certain derivatives that were synthesized based on in silico modeling displayed increased potency to inhibit tumor cell growth. Other experiments have shown that sulindac can inhibit phosphodiesterase to increase intracellular cyclic GMP levels and that this activity is closely associated with its ability to selectively induce apoptosis of tumor cells. Together, these studies suggest that COX-independent mechanisms can be targeted to develop safer and more efficacious drugs for cancer chemoprevention.

  10. MECHANOMAGNETIC REACTOR FOR ACTIVATION OF ANTICANCER DRUGS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Orel V. E.

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Mechanomagnetochemical activation can increase the concentration of paramagnetic centers (free radicals in the anticancer drug, for example, doxorubicin that enables to influence its magnetic properties under external electromagnetic field and improve its magnetic sensitivity and antitumor activity. The principles of design and operation of mechanomagnetic reactor for implementation of this technology which includes mechanomagnetochemical activation and electromagnetic radiation of the drug are described in the paper. The methods of vibration magnetometry, electron paramagnetic resonance spectroscopy and high-performance liquid chromatography were used for studying of doxorubicin mechanomagnetic activation effects. The studies have shown that a generator of sinusoidal electromagnetic wave, working chambers from caprolactam, fluoroplastic or organic materials with metal inserts and working bodies made from steel or agate depending on the required doxorubicin magnetic properties are expedient to use in the designed mechanomagnic reactor. Under influence of mechanomagnetochemical activation doxorubicin, which is diamagnetic, acquires the properties of paramagnetic without changing g-factors in the spectra of electron paramagnetic resonance. Mechanomagnetochemical activation of doxorubicin satisfies pharmacopoeia condi tions according to the results of liquid chromatography that points on perspective of this method using in technology of tumor therapy with nanosized structures and external electromagnetic radiation.

  11. Computational metallomics of the anticancer drug cisplatin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calandrini, Vania; Rossetti, Giulia; Arnesano, Fabio; Natile, Giovanni; Carloni, Paolo

    2015-12-01

    Cisplatin, cis-diamminedichlorido-platinum(II), is an important therapeutic tool in the struggle against different tumors, yet it is plagued with the emergence of resistance mechanisms after repeated administrations. This hampers greatly its efficacy. Overcoming resistance problems requires first and foremost an integrated and systematic understanding of the structural determinants and molecular recognition processes involving the drug and its cellular targets. Here we review a strategy that we have followed for the last few years, based on the combination of modern tools from computational chemistry with experimental biophysical methods. Using hybrid Quantum Mechanics/Molecular Mechanics (QM/MM) simulations, validated by spectroscopic experiments (including NMR, and CD), we have worked out for the first time at atomic level the structural determinants in solution of platinated cellular substrates. These include the copper homeostasis proteins Ctr1, Atox1, and ATP7A. All of these proteins have been suggested to influence the pre-target resistance mechanisms. Furthermore, coupling hybrid QM/MM simulations with classical Molecular Dynamics (MD) and free energy calculations, based on force field parameters refined by the so-called "Force Matching" procedure, we have characterized the structural modifications and the free energy landscape associated with the recognition between platinated DNA and the protein HMGB1, belonging to the chromosomal high-mobility group proteins HMGB that inhibit the repair of platinated DNA. This may alleviate issues relative to on-target resistance process. The elucidation of the mechanisms by which tumors are sensitive or refractory to cisplatin may lead to the discovery of prognostic biomarkers. The approach reviewed here could be straightforwardly extended to other metal-based drugs.

  12. Clinically relevant drug interactions between anticancer drugs and psychotropic agents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yap, K Y-L; Tay, W L; Chui, W K; Chan, A

    2011-01-01

    Drug interactions are commonly seen in the treatment of cancer patients. Psychotropics are often indicated for these patients since they may also suffer from pre-existing psychological disorders or experience insomnia and anxiety associated with cancer therapy. Thus, the risk of anticancer drug (ACD)-psychotropic drug-drug interactions (DDIs) is high. Drug interactions were compiled from the British National Formulary (53rd edn), Lexi-Comp's Drug Information Handbook (15th edn), Micromedex (v5.1), Hansten & Horn's Drug Interactions (2000) and Drug Interaction Facts (2008 edn). Product information of the individual drugs, as well as documented literature on ACD-psychotropic interactions from PubMed and other databases was also incorporated. This paper identifies clinically important ACD-psychotropic DDIs that are frequently observed. Pharmacokinetic DDIs were observed for tyrosine kinase inhibitors, corticosteroids and antimicrotubule agents due to their inhibitory or inductive effects on cytochrome P450 isoenzymes. Pharmacodynamic DDIs were identified for thalidomide with central nervous system depressants, procarbazine with antidepressants, myelosuppressive ACDs with clozapine and anthracyclines with QT-prolonging psychotropics. Clinicians should be vigilant when psychotropics are prescribed concurrently with ACDs. Close monitoring of plasma drug levels should be carried out to avoid toxicity in the patient, as well as to ensure adequate chemotherapeutic and psychotropic coverage.

  13. Dose critical in-vivo detection of anti-cancer drug levels in blood

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Miller, Holly H. (Bethel Island, CA); Hirschfeld, deceased, Tomas B. (late of Livermore, CA)

    1991-01-01

    A method and apparatus are disclosed for the in vivo and in vitro detection and measurement of dose critical levels of DNA-binding anti-cancer drug levels in biological fluids. The apparatus comprises a laser based fiber optic sensor (optrode) which utilizes the secondary interactions between the drug and an intercalating fluorochrome bound to a probe DNA, which in turn is attached to the fiber tip at one end thereof. The other end of the optical fiber is attached to an illumination source, detector and recorder. The fluorescence intensity is measured as a function of the drug concentration and its binding constant to the probe DNA. Anticancer drugs which lend themselves to analysis by the use of the method and the optrode of the present invention include doxorubicin, daunorubicin, carminomycin, aclacinomycin, chlorambucil, cyclophosphamide, methotrexate, 5-uracil, arabinosyl cytosine, mitomycin, cis-platinum 11 diamine dichloride procarbazine, vinblastine vincristine and the like. The present method and device are suitable for the continuous monitoring of the levels of these and other anticancer drugs in biological fluids such as blood, serum, urine and the like. The optrode of the instant invention also enables the measurement of the levels of these drugs from a remote location and from multiple samples.

  14. Hyaluronic acid for anticancer drug and nucleic acid delivery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dosio, Franco; Arpicco, Silvia; Stella, Barbara; Fattal, Elias

    2016-02-01

    Hyaluronic acid (HA) is widely used in anticancer drug delivery, since it is biocompatible, biodegradable, non-toxic, and non-immunogenic; moreover, HA receptors are overexpressed on many tumor cells. Exploiting this ligand-receptor interaction, the use of HA is now a rapidly-growing platform for targeting CD44-overexpressing cells, to improve anticancer therapies. The rationale underlying approaches, chemical strategies, and recent advances in the use of HA to design drug carriers for delivering anticancer agents, are reviewed. Comprehensive descriptions are given of HA-based drug conjugates, particulate carriers (micelles, liposomes, nanoparticles, microparticles), inorganic nanostructures, and hydrogels, with particular emphasis on reports of preclinical/clinical results.

  15. Biomarker method validation in anticancer drug development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cummings, J; Ward, T H; Greystoke, A; Ranson, M; Dive, C

    2008-02-01

    Over recent years the role of biomarkers in anticancer drug development has expanded across a spectrum of applications ranging from research tool during early discovery to surrogate endpoint in the clinic. However, in Europe when biomarker measurements are performed on samples collected from subjects entered into clinical trials of new investigational agents, laboratories conducting these analyses become subject to the Clinical Trials Regulations. While these regulations are not specific in their requirements of research laboratories, quality assurance and in particular assay validation are essential. This review, therefore, focuses on a discussion of current thinking in biomarker assay validation. Five categories define the majority of biomarker assays from 'absolute quantitation' to 'categorical'. Validation must therefore take account of both the position of the biomarker in the spectrum towards clinical end point and the level of quantitation inherent in the methodology. Biomarker assay validation should be performed ideally in stages on 'a fit for purpose' basis avoiding unnecessarily dogmatic adherence to rigid guidelines but with careful monitoring of progress at the end of each stage. These principles are illustrated with two specific examples: (a) absolute quantitation of protein biomarkers by mass spectrometry and (b) the M30 and M65 ELISA assays as surrogate end points of cell death.

  16. Dual-drug loaded nanoformulation with a galactosamine homing moiety for liver-targeted anticancer therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muhammad, Nafees; Wang, Xiaoyong; Wang, Kun; Zhu, Chengcheng; Zhu, Zhenzhu; Jiao, Yang; Guo, Zijian

    2016-08-16

    Drug resistance and unfavorable pharmacokinetics are the major obstacles for conventional anticancer drugs. A combination of different anticancer drugs into one formulation is a common strategy to alleviate the side effects of individual drugs in clinical practice. Platinum anticancer drugs are the typical defective therapeutic agents for cancer chemotherapy and have poor selectivity for tumor cells. In this study, a nanosystem composed of poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid) (PLGA), Pt(IV) prodrug (PPD) and α-tocopheryl succinate (α-TOS) was designed to overcome these defects. The Pt(IV) prodrug, c,c,t-[Pt(NH3)2Cl2(O2CC(CH3)3)2], was prepared by the reaction of oxoplatin with trimethylacetic anhydride and its structure was characterized by X-ray crystallography. The PPD and α-TOS self-assembled with PLGA, forming a dual-drug loaded nanoparticle (DDNP). The surface of the DDNP was decorated with galactosamine (G), giving rise to a G-DDNP that can actively target the liver cancer cells through the overexpressed asialoglycoprotein receptors. The DDNPs and G-DDNPs were characterized by SEM, TEM, and DLS. They are spherical in shape with required polydispersity and suitable mean size (ca. 150 nm). The in vitro cytotoxicity of DDNPs and G-DDNPs was tested against the human SMMC-7721 liver cancer cell line. G-DDNPs are more potent than the corresponding free drugs and untargeted DDNP, showing that some synergistic and tumor-specific effects are achieved by this strategy. The results demonstrate that dual-drug loaded nanoformulations with tumor-targeting function could be effective anticancer agents for conquering the shortcomings related to single-drug chemotherapy.

  17. Nanoscale coordination polymers for anticancer drug delivery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phillips, Rachel Huxford

    This dissertation reports the synthesis and characterization of nanoscale coordination polymers (NCPs) for anticancer drug delivery. Nanoparticles have been explored in order to address the limitations of small molecule chemotherapeutics. NCPs have been investigated as drug delivery vehicles as they can exhibit the same beneficial properties as the bulk metal-organic frameworks as well as interesting characteristics that are unique to nanomaterials. Gd-MTX (MTX = methotrexate) NCPs with a MTX loading of 71.6 wt% were synthesized and stabilized by encapsulation within a lipid bilayer containing anisamide (AA), a small molecule that targets sigma receptors which are overexpressed in many cancer tissues. Functionalization with AA allows for targeted delivery and controlled release to cancer cells, as shown by enhanced efficacy against leukemia cells. The NCPs were doped with Ru(bpy)32+ (bpy = 2,2'-bipyridine), and this formulation was utilized as an optical imaging agent by confocal microscopy. NCPs containing the chemotherapeutic pemetrexed (PMX) were synthesized using different binding metals. Zr-based materials could not be stabilized by encapsulation with a lipid bilayer, and Gd-based materials showed that PMX had degraded during synthesis. However, Hf-based NCPs containing 19.7 wt% PMX were stabilized by a lipid coating and showed in vitro efficacy against non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) cell lines. Enhanced efficacy was observed for formulations containing AA. Additionally, NCP formulations containing the cisplatin prodrug disuccinatocisplatin were prepared; one of these formulations could be stabilized by encapsulation within a lipid layer. Coating with a lipid layer doped with AA rendered this formulation an active targeting agent. The resulting formulation proved more potent than free cisplatin in NSCLC cell lines. Improved NCP uptake was demonstrated by confocal microscopy and competitive binding assays. Finally, a Pt(IV) oxaliplatin prodrug was

  18. Novel platinum-palladium bimetallic nanoparticles synthesized by Dioscorea bulbifera: anticancer and antioxidant activities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghosh, Sougata; Nitnavare, Rahul; Dewle, Ankush; Tomar, Geetanjali B; Chippalkatti, Rohan; More, Piyush; Kitture, Rohini; Kale, Sangeeta; Bellare, Jayesh; Chopade, Balu A

    2015-01-01

    Medicinal plants serve as rich sources of diverse bioactive phytochemicals that might even take part in bioreduction and stabilization of phytogenic nanoparticles with immense therapeutic properties. Herein, we report for the first time the rapid efficient synthesis of novel platinum-palladium bimetallic nanoparticles (Pt-PdNPs) along with individual platinum (PtNPs) and palladium (PdNPs) nanoparticles using a medicinal plant, Dioscorea bulbifera tuber extract (DBTE). High-resolution transmission electron microscopy revealed monodispersed PtNPs of size 2-5 nm, while PdNPs and Pt-PdNPs between 10 and 25 nm. Energy dispersive spectroscopy analysis confirmed 30.88% ± 1.73% elemental Pt and 68.96% ± 1.48% elemental Pd in the bimetallic nanoparticles. Fourier transform infrared spectra indicated strong peaks at 3,373 cm(-1), attributed to hydroxyl group of polyphenolic compounds in DBTE that might play a key role in bioreduction in addition to the sharp peaks at 2,937, 1,647, 1,518, and 1,024 cm(-1), associated with C-H stretching, N-H bending in primary amines, N-O stretching in nitro group, and C-C stretch, respectively. Anticancer activity against HeLa cells showed that Pt-PdNPs exhibited more pronounced cell death of 74.25% compared to individual PtNPs (12.6%) or PdNPs (33.15%). Further, Pt-PdNPs showed an enhanced scavenging activity against 2,2-diphenyl-1-picrylhydrazyl, superoxide, nitric oxide, and hydroxyl radicals.

  19. Imaging of anticancer drug action in single cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Miles A; Weissleder, Ralph

    2017-06-23

    Imaging is widely used in anticancer drug development, typically for whole-body tracking of labelled drugs to different organs or to assess drug efficacy through volumetric measurements. However, increasing attention has been drawn to pharmacology at the single-cell level. Diverse cell types, including cancer-associated immune cells, physicochemical features of the tumour microenvironment and heterogeneous cell behaviour all affect drug delivery, response and resistance. This Review summarizes developments in the imaging of in vivo anticancer drug action, with a focus on microscopy approaches at the single-cell level and translational lessons for the clinic.

  20. Sensitization for Anticancer Drug-Induced Apoptosis by Betulinic Acid

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Simone Fulda

    2005-02-01

    Full Text Available We previously described that betulinic acid (BetA, a naturally occurring pentacyclic triterpenoid, induces apoptosis in tumor cells through the mitochondrial pathway. Here, for the first time, we provide evidence that BetA cooperated with anticancer drugs to induce apoptosis and to inhibit clonogenic survival of tumor cells. Combined treatment with BetA and anticancer drugs acted in concert to induce loss of mitochondrial membrane potential and the release of cytochrome c and Smac from mitochondria, resulting in activation of caspases and apoptosis. Overexpression of Bcl-2, which blocked mitochondrial perturbations, also inhibited the cooperative effect of BetA and anticancer drugs, indicating that cooperative interaction involved the mitochondrial pathway. Notably, cooperation of BetA and anticancer drugs was found for various cytotoxic compounds with different modes of action (e.g., doxorubicin, cisplatin, Taxol, VP16, or actinomycin D. Importantly, BetA and anticancer drugs cooperated to induce apoptosis in different tumor cell lines, including p53 mutant cells, and also in primary tumor cells, but not in human fibroblasts indicating some tumor specificity. These findings indicate that using BetA as sensitizer in chemotherapy-based combination regimens may be a novel strategy to enhance the efficacy of anticancer therapy, which warrants further investigation.

  1. The molecular shape and the field similarities as criteria to interpret SAR studies for fragment-based design of platinum(IV) anticancer agents. Correlation of physicochemical properties with cytotoxicity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lorenzo, Julia; Montaña, Ángel M

    2016-09-01

    Molecular shape similarity and field similarity have been used to interpret, in a qualitative way, the structure-activity relationships in a selected series of platinum(IV) complexes with anticancer activity. MM and QM calculations have been used to estimate the electron density, electrostatic potential maps, partial charges, dipolar moments and other parameters to correlate the stereo-electronic properties with the differential biological activity of complexes. Extended Electron Distribution (XED) field similarity has been also evaluated for the free 1,4-diamino carrier ligands, in a fragment-based drug design approach, comparing Connolly solvent excluded surface, hydrophobicity field surface, Van der Waals field surface, nucleophilicity field surface, electrophilicity field surface and the extended electron-distribution maxima field points. A consistency has been found when comparing the stereo-electronic properties of the studied series of platinum(IV) complexes and/or the free ligands evaluated and their in vitro anticancer activity.

  2. CNS Anticancer Drug Discovery and Development Conference White Paper.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levin, Victor A; Tonge, Peter J; Gallo, James M; Birtwistle, Marc R; Dar, Arvin C; Iavarone, Antonio; Paddison, Patrick J; Heffron, Timothy P; Elmquist, William F; Lachowicz, Jean E; Johnson, Ted W; White, Forest M; Sul, Joohee; Smith, Quentin R; Shen, Wang; Sarkaria, Jann N; Samala, Ramakrishna; Wen, Patrick Y; Berry, Donald A; Petter, Russell C

    2015-11-01

    Following the first CNS Anticancer Drug Discovery and Development Conference, the speakers from the first 4 sessions and organizers of the conference created this White Paper hoping to stimulate more and better CNS anticancer drug discovery and development. The first part of the White Paper reviews, comments, and, in some cases, expands on the 4 session areas critical to new drug development: pharmacological challenges, recent drug approaches, drug targets and discovery, and clinical paths. Following this concise review of the science and clinical aspects of new CNS anticancer drug discovery and development, we discuss, under the rubric "Accelerating Drug Discovery and Development for Brain Tumors," further reasons why the pharmaceutical industry and academia have failed to develop new anticancer drugs for CNS malignancies and what it will take to change the current status quo and develop the drugs so desperately needed by our patients with malignant CNS tumors. While this White Paper is not a formal roadmap to that end, it should be an educational guide to clinicians and scientists to help move a stagnant field forward. © The Author(s) 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Society for Neuro-Oncology. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  3. Inhibition of thioredoxin reductase but not of glutathione reductase by the major classes of alkylating and platinum-containing anticancer compounds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Witte, Anne-Barbara; Anestål, Karin; Jerremalm, Elin; Ehrsson, Hans; Arnér, Elias S J

    2005-09-01

    Mammalian thioredoxin reductase (TrxR) is important for cell proliferation, antioxidant defense, and redox signaling. Together with glutathione reductase (GR) it is the main enzyme providing reducing equivalents to many cellular processes. GR and TrxR are flavoproteins of the same enzyme family, but only the latter is a selenoprotein. With the active site containing selenocysteine, TrxR may catalyze reduction of a wide range of substrates, but can at the same time easily be targeted by electrophilic compounds due to the extraordinarily high reactivity of a selenolate moiety. Here we addressed the inhibition of the enzyme by major anticancer alkylating agents and platinum-containing compounds and we compared it to that of GR. We confirmed prior studies suggesting that the nitrosourea carmustine can inhibit both GR and TrxR. We next found, however, that nitrogen mustards (chlorambucil and melphalan) and alkyl sulfonates (busulfan) efficiently inhibited TrxR while these compounds, surprisingly, did not inhibit GR. Inhibitions were concentration and time dependent and apparently irreversible. Anticancer anthracyclines (daunorubicin and doxorubicin) were, in contrast to the alkylating agents, not inhibitors but poor substrates of TrxR. We also found that TrxR, but not GR, was efficiently inhibited by both cisplatin, its monohydrated complex, and oxaliplatin. Carboplatin, in contrast, could not inhibit any of the two enzymes. These findings lead us to conclude that representative compounds of the major classes of clinically used anticancer alkylating agents and most platinum compounds may easily target TrxR, but not GR. The TrxR inhibition should thereby be considered as a factor that may contribute to the cytotoxicity seen upon clinical use of these drugs.

  4. Chemical Imaging of Platinum-Based Drugs and their Metabolites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Xin; Hummon, Amanda B

    2016-12-05

    Platinum-based drugs (cisplatin, carboplatin, and oxaliplatin) are widely used therapeutic agents for cancer treatment. Even though the platinum (Pt)-drugs are routinely used clinically, a clear picture of their distribution within tumor tissues is lacking. The current methods to image the distribution of Pt drugs are limited and do not enable the discrimination of the drug from its metabolites. In this manuscript, we demonstrate a methodology that enables chemical imaging of a Pt drug and its metabolites simultaneously and specifically. Matrix-Assisted Laser Desorption/Ionization (MALDI) Mass Spectrometry Imaging (MSI) is combined with an on-tissue chemical derivatization using diethyldithiocarbamate (DDTC). DDTC abstracts the Pt atom to generate ionizable complexes that can be imaged by MALDI MSI. We demonstrate that Pt drugs and their metabolites can be specifically imaged. This approach was successfully applied to map the penetration and metabolism of oxaliplatin in hyperthermic intraperitoneal chemotherapy (HIPEC)-like treated 3D colorectal tumor mimics. The distribution of cisplatin and carboplatin was mapped in additional 3D tumor mimics. We demonstrate that the approach can also be used to image the distribution of copper ions in cells. This method has the potential to be used to evaluate the penetration and distribution of a wide range of compounds.

  5. Antibody Positron Emission Tomography Imaging in Anticancer Drug Development

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lamberts, Laetitia E.; Williams, Simon P.; Terwisscha Van Scheltinga, Anton; Lub-de Hooge, Marjolijn N.; Schroeder, Carolien P.; Gietema, Jourik A.; Brouwers, Adrienne H.; de Vries, Elisabeth G. E.

    2015-01-01

    More than 50 monoclonal antibodies (mAbs), including several antibody-drug conjugates, are in advanced clinical development, forming an important part of the many molecularly targeted anticancer therapeutics currently in development. Drug development is a relatively slow and expensive process,

  6. Preclinical and clinical pharmacology of oral anticancer drugs

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Oostendorp, R.L.

    2009-01-01

    Nowadays, more than 25% of all anticancer drugs are developed as oral formulations. Oral administration of drugs has several advantages over intravenous (i.v.) administration. It will on average be more convenient for patients, because they can take oral medication themselves, there is no need for

  7. Preclinical and clinical pharmacology of oral anticancer drugs

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Oostendorp, R.L.

    2009-01-01

    Nowadays, more than 25% of all anticancer drugs are developed as oral formulations. Oral administration of drugs has several advantages over intravenous (i.v.) administration. It will on average be more convenient for patients, because they can take oral medication themselves, there is no need for f

  8. Recent development in platinum complexes with anticancer activities and the underlying mechanisms%具有抗肿瘤活性的铂类配合物及其作用机制研究进展

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    陈填烽; 李林林; 禹莲玲; 杨芳; 郑文杰

    2012-01-01

    顺铂自二十世纪七十年代起被批准并广泛应用于肿瘤的临床治疗,对多肿瘤疗效显著.但水溶性小、毒副作用大及获得性耐药等缺点极大的限制了铂类配合物的发展与应用.为了获得高效低毒的抗肿瘤药物,科学家们合成了数以千计的铂类配合物,并取得了阶段性进展.本文综述了近五年合成的铂类配合物的结构及其抗肿瘤活性与机制,分成:①具有空间位阻的铂(Ⅱ)配合物;②多核铂(Ⅱ)配合物;③含硫、磷酸(盐)配位原子铂(Ⅱ)配合物;④改变配体或离去基团合成的配合物及⑤铂(Ⅳ)配合物等五个类型分别阐述.%Cisplatin has been approved and widely used as anticancer drugs in clinical application since 1970s. Although cisplatin exhibited excellent and broad-spectrum anticancer activities, its low solubility , high toxicity, drug resistance, and other adverse side effects have limited its clinical applications. To obtain anticancer complexes 4with high efficacy and low toxicity, scientists have synthesized thousands of platinum complexes and have acquired gradual improvement. This paper reviews the recent developments in platinum complexes with anticancer activities and the underlying mechanisms. The complexes were classified as (Dsterically hindered platinum (II) complexes; @multinuclear platinum (II) complexes; (§) platinum (II) complexes with P or S as coordination atom; ?other platinum (II) complexes with small ligands; ?platinum (IV) complexes and so on.

  9. Are isothiocyanates potential anti-cancer drugs?

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xiang WU; Qing-hua ZHOU; Ke XU

    2009-01-01

    Isothiocyanates are naturally occurring small molecules that are formed from glucosinolate precursors of cruciferous vegetables. Many isothiocyanates, both natural and synthetic, display anticarcinogenic activity because they reduce activation of carcinogens and increase their detoxification. Recent studies show that they exhibit anti-tumor activity by affecting multiple pathways including apoptosis, MAPK signaling, oxidative stress, and cell cycle progression. This review summarizes the current knowledge on isothiocyanates and focuses on their role as potential anti-cancer agents.

  10. Methods for Elucidation of DNA-Anticancer Drug Interactions and their Applications in the Development of New Drugs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Misiak, Majus; Mantegazza, Francesco; Beretta, Giovanni L

    2016-01-01

    DNA damaging agents including anthracyclines, camptothecins and platinum drugs are among most frequently used drugs in the chemotherapeutic routine. Due to their relatively low selectivity for cancer cells, administration of these drugs is associated with adverse side effects, inherent genotoxicity with risk of developing secondary cancers. Development of new drugs, which could be spared of these drawbacks and characterize by improved antitumor efficacy, remains challenging yet vitally important task. These properties are in large part dictated by the selectivity of interaction between the drug and DNA and in this way the studies aimed at elucidating the complex interactions between ligand and DNA represent a key step in the drug development. Studies of the drug-DNA interactions encompass determination of DNA sequence specificity and mode of DNA binding as well as kinetic, dynamic and structural parameters of binding. Here, we consider the types of interactions between small molecule ligands and polynucleotides, how they are affected by DNA sequence and structure, and what is their significance for the antitumor activity. Based on this knowledge, we discuss the wide array of experimental techniques available to researchers for studying drug-DNA interactions, which include absorption and emission spectroscopies, NMR, magnetic and optical tweezers or atomic force microscopy. We show, using the clinical and experimental anticancer drugs as examples, how these methods provide various types of information and at the same time complement each other to provide full picture of drug- DNA interaction and aid in the development of new drugs.

  11. CEST theranostics: label-free MR imaging of anticancer drugs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Jiadi; Yadav, Nirbhay N.; Chan, Kannie W. Y.; Luo, Liangping; McMahon, Michael T.; Vogelstein, Bert; van Zijl, Peter C.M.; Zhou, Shibin; Liu, Guanshu

    2016-01-01

    Image-guided drug delivery is of great clinical interest. Here, we explored a direct way, namely CEST theranostics, to detect diamagnetic anticancer drugs simply through their inherent Chemical Exchange Saturation Transfer (CEST) MRI signal, and demonstrated its application in image-guided drug delivery of nanoparticulate chemotherapeutics. We first screened 22 chemotherapeutic agents and characterized the CEST properties of representative agents and natural analogs in three major categories, i.e., pyrimidine analogs, purine analogs, and antifolates, with respect to chemical structures. Utilizing the inherent CEST MRI signal of gemcitabine, a widely used anticancer drug, the tumor uptake of the i.v.-injected, drug-loaded liposomes was successfully detected in CT26 mouse tumors. Such label-free CEST MRI theranostics provides a new imaging means, potentially with an immediate clinical impact, to monitor the drug delivery in cancer. PMID:26837220

  12. An Integrated Approach to Anti-Cancer Drug Sensitivity Prediction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berlow, Noah; Haider, Saad; Wan, Qian; Geltzeiler, Mathew; Davis, Lara E; Keller, Charles; Pal, Ranadip

    2014-01-01

    A framework for design of personalized cancer therapy requires the ability to predict the sensitivity of a tumor to anticancer drugs. The predictive modeling of tumor sensitivity to anti-cancer drugs has primarily focused on generating functions that map gene expressions and genetic mutation profiles to drug sensitivity. In this paper, we present a new approach for drug sensitivity prediction and combination therapy design based on integrated functional and genomic characterizations. The modeling approach when applied to data from the Cancer Cell Line Encyclopedia shows a significant gain in prediction accuracy as compared to elastic net and random forest techniques based on genomic characterizations. Utilizing a Mouse Embryonal Rhabdomyosarcoma cell culture and a drug screen of 60 targeted drugs, we show that predictive modeling based on functional data alone can also produce high accuracy predictions. The framework also allows us to generate personalized tumor proliferation circuits to gain further insights on the individualized biological pathway.

  13. Two mixed-NH3/amine platinum (II) anticancer complexes featuring a dichloroacetate moiety in the leaving group

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Weiping; Su, Jia; Jiang, Jing; Li, Xingyao; Ye, Qingsong; Zhou, Hongyu; Chen, Jialin; Li, Yan

    2013-08-01

    Two mixed-NH3/amine platinum (II) complexes of 3-dichoroacetoxylcyclobutane-1, 1-dicarboxylate have been prepared in the present study and characterized by elemental analysis and IR, HPLC-MS and 1H, 13C-NMR. The complexes exist in equilibrium between two position isomeric forms and undergo hydrolysis reaction in aqueous solution, releasing the platinum pharmacophores and dichloroacetate which is a small-molecular cell apoptosis inducer. Both complexes were evaluated for in vitro cytotoxic profile in A549, SGC-7901 and SK-OV-3 caner cells as well as in BEAS-2B normal cells. They exhibit markedly cytoxicity toward cancer cells by selectively inducing the apoptosis of cancer cells, whereas leaving normal cells less affected. They have also the ability to overcome the resistance of SK-OV-3 cancer cells to cisplatin. Our findings offer an alternative novel way to develop platinum drugs which can both overcome the drug resistance and selectively target tumor cells.

  14. Molecular dynamics study on DNA nanotubes as drug delivery vehicle for anticancer drugs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, Lijun; Shen, Jia-Wei; Wang, Qi

    2017-05-01

    In recent years, self-assembled DNA nanotubes have emerged as a type of nano-biomaterials with great potential for biomedical applications. To develop universal nanocarriers for smart and targeted drug delivery from DNA nanotubes, the understanding of interaction mechanism between DNA nanotubes and drugs is essential. In this study, the interactions between anti-cancer drugs and DNA nanotubes were investigated via molecular dynamics simulation. Our simulation results demonstrated that the DNA nanotubes could serve as a good drug delivery material by absorption of anti-cancer drugs with π-π interactions. At high concentration of anti-cancer drugs, most of the drugs could be absorbed by DNA nanotubes. Therefore, it could greatly decrease the aggregation of anti-cancer drugs in aqueous solution. In addition, the stability of DNA nanotubes could be improved with the absorption of anti-cancer drugs. These findings greatly enhance the understanding of the interaction mechanism of DNA nanotubes and anti-cancer drugs. Our study suggests that DNA nanotubes are promising delivery vehicles by strong absorption of anti-cancer drugs. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. Kinetics and mechanism for reduction of anticancer-active tetrachloroam(m)ine platinum(IV) compounds by glutathione.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lemma, K; Berglund, J; Farrell, N; Elding, L I

    2000-06-01

    Glutathione (GSH) reduction of the anticancer-active platinum(IV) compounds trans-[PtCl4(NH3)(thiazole)] (1), trans-[PtCl4(cha)(NH3)] (2), cis-[PtCl4(cha)(NH3)] (3) (cha=cyclohexylamine), and cis-[PtCl4(NH3)2] (4) has been investigated at 25 degrees C in a 1.0 M aqueous medium at pH 2.0-5.0 (1) and 4.5-6.8 (2-4) using stopped-flow spectrophotometry. The redox reactions follow the second-order rate law d[Pt(IV)]/dt=k[GSH]tot[Pt(IV)], where k is a pH-dependent rate constant and [GSH]tot the total concentration of glutathione. The reduction takes place via parallel reactions between the platinum(IV) complexes and the various protolytic species of glutathione. The pH dependence of the redox kinetics is ascribed to displacement of these protolytic equilibria. The thiolate species GS is the major reductant under the reaction conditions used. The second-order rate constants for reduction of compounds 1-4 by GS- are (1.43 +/- 0.01) x 10(7), (3.86 +/- 0.03) x 10(6), (1.83 +/- 0.01) x 10(6), and (1.18 +/- 0.01) x 10(6) M(-1)s(-1), respectively. Rate constants for reduction of 1 by the protonated species GSH are more than five orders of magnitude smaller. The mechanism for the reductive elimination reactions of the Pt(IV) compounds is proposed to involve an attack by glutathione on one of the mutually trans coordinated chloride ligands, leading to two-electron transfer via a chloride-bridged activated complex. The kinetics results together with literature data indicate that platinum(IV) complexes with a trans Cl-Pt-Cl axis are reduced rapidly by glutathione as well as by ascorbate. In agreement with this observation, cytotoxicity profiles for such complexes are very similar to those for the corresponding platinum(II) product complexes. The rapid reduction within 1 s of the platinum(IV) compounds with a trans Cl-Pt-C1 axis to their platinum(II) analogs does not seem to support the strategy of using kinetic inertness as a parameter to increase anticancer activity, at least for

  16. Part 3: Pharmacogenetic Variability in Phase II Anticancer Drug Metabolism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deenen, Maarten J.; Cats, Annemieke; Beijnen, Jos H.

    2011-01-01

    Equivalent drug doses may lead to wide interpatient variability in drug response to anticancer therapy. Known determinants that may affect the pharmacological response to a drug are, among others, nongenetic factors, including age, gender, use of comedication, and liver and renal function. Nonetheless, these covariates do not explain all the observed interpatient variability. Differences in genetic constitution among patients have been identified to be important factors that contribute to differences in drug response. Because genetic polymorphism may affect the expression and activity of proteins encoded, it is a key covariate that is responsible for variability in drug metabolism, drug transport, and pharmacodynamic drug effects. We present a series of four reviews about pharmacogenetic variability. This third part in the series of reviews is focused on genetic variability in phase II drug-metabolizing enzymes (glutathione S-transferases, uridine diphosphoglucuronosyl transferases, methyltransferases, sulfotransferases, and N-acetyltransferases) and discusses the effects of genetic polymorphism within the genes encoding these enzymes on anticancer drug therapy outcome. Based on the literature reviewed, opportunities for patient-tailored anticancer therapy are proposed. PMID:21659608

  17. Chemistry and pharmacology of anticancer drugs

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Thurston, David E

    2007-01-01

    ... in the development of novel drugs and therapies has occurred within the last 60 years and, thanks to the discovery of drugs such as cisplatin, the taxanes, and the nitrogen mustards in the last century, trea...

  18. Mechanisms of Anticancer Drugs Resistance: An Overview

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. R. Chorawala

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The management of cancer involves surgery, radiotherapy and chemotherapy. Development of chemoresistance is a persistent problem during the chemotherapy treatment. Cytotoxic drugs that selectively, but not exclusively, target actively proliferating cells include such diverse groups as DNA-alkylating agents, anti-metabolites, intercalating agents and mitotic inhibitors. Resistance constitutes a lack of response to drug-induced tumour growth inhibition; it may be inherent in a subpopulation of heterogeneous cancer cells or be acquired as a cellular response to drug exposure. Principle mechanisms may include altered membrane transport involving the p-glycoprotein product of the multidrug resistance (MDR gene as well as other associated proteins, altered target enzyme, decreased drug activation, increased drug degradation due to altered expression of drug metabolising enzymes, drug inactivation due to conjugation with increased glutathione, subcellular redistribution, drug interaction, enhanced DNA repair and failure to apoptosis as a result of mutated cell cycle proteins such as p53. Attempts to overcome resistance involves the use of combination drug therapy using different classes of drugs with minimally overlapping toxicities to allow maximal dosages, necessary for bone marrow recovery. Adjuvant therapy with p-glycoprotein inhibitors and in specific instances, the use of growth factor and protein kinase C inhibitors are newer experimental approaches that may also prove effective in delaying onset of resistance. Gene knockout using antisense molecules may be effective way of blocking drug resistance.

  19. Peptides: A new class of anticancer drugs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ryszard Smolarczyk

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available Peptides are a novel class of anticancer agents embracing two distinct categories: natural antibacterial peptides, which are preferentially bound by cancer cells, and chemically synthesized peptides, which bind specifically to precise molecular targets located on the surface of tumor cells. Antibacterial peptides bind to both cell and mitochondrial membranes. Some of these peptides attach to the cell membrane, resulting in its disorganization. Other antibacterial peptides penetrate cancer cells without causing cell membrane damage, but they disrupt mitochondrial membranes. Thanks to phage and aptamer libraries, it has become possible to obtain synthetic peptides blocking or activating some target proteins found in cancer cells as well as in cells forming the tumor environment. These synthetic peptides can feature anti-angiogenic properties, block enzymes indispensable for sustained tumor growth, and reduce tumor ability to metastasize. In this review the properties of peptides belonging to both categories are discussed and attempts of their application for therapeutic purposes are outlined.

  20. Fenbendazole as a Potential Anticancer Drug

    Science.gov (United States)

    DUAN, QIWEN; LIU, YANFENG; ROCKWELL, SARA

    2013-01-01

    Background/Aims To evaluate the anticancer activity of fenbendazole, a widely used antihelminth with mechanisms of action that overlap with those of the hypoxia-selective nitroheterocyclic cytotoxins/radiosensitizers and the taxanes. Materials and Methods We used EMT6 mouse mammary tumor cells in cell culture and as solid tumors in mice to examine the cytotoxic and antitumor effects of fenbendazole as a single agent and in combination regimens. Results Intensive treatments with fenbendazole were toxic to EMT6 cells in vitro; toxicity increased with incubation time and under conditions of severe hypoxia. Fenbendazole did not alter the dose-response curves for radiation or docetaxel; instead, the agents produced additive cytotoxicities. Febendazole in maximally-intensive regimens did not alter the growth of EMT6 tumors, or increase the antineoplastic effects of radiation. Conclusion These studies provided no evidence that fenbendazole would have value in cancer therapy, but suggested that this general class of compounds merits further investigation. PMID:23393324

  1. Increase of Candida cell virulence by anticancer drugs and irradiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ueta, E; Tanida, T; Yoneda, K; Yamamoto, T; Osaki, T

    2001-08-01

    The influence of anticancer drugs and irradiation on Candida cell proliferation, adherence to HeLa cells and susceptibility to antifungal drugs (amphotericin B and miconazole) and neutrophils were examined using two Candida albicans strains. After treatment with 5-fluorouracil (25 microg/ml to 250 microg/ml), cis-diammine-dichloroplatinum (10 microg/ml to 100 microg/ml), peplomycin (0.5 microg/ml to 5 microg/ml) or 137Cs (20 Gy to 40 Gy) for 3 days or more, surviving Candida cells proliferated more rapidly than did untreated control cells. Anticancer agent-pretreated Candida cells revealed an increased adhesion to HeLa cells corresponding to an increase of binding to the lectins. The concentration of half limited colony formation (IC50) of amphotericin B and miconazole was increased to near two-fold that of the control by pretreatment of Candida cells with the anticancer agents, except peplomycin, which only weakly increased IC50. In addition, the enolase and Candida acid proteinase activities in the culture supernatants were increased by pretreatment with the drugs and irradiation. Correspondingly, surviving Candida cells after these treatments were resistant to neutrophils, with a reduction to half of the killing. These results indicate that anti-cancer drugs and irradiation potentiate the virulence of Candida cells, or they eliminate Candida cells with low virulence, thereby enhancing the risk of oral and systemic candidiasis.

  2. Mitochondrial chaperones may be targets for anti-cancer drugs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scientists at NCI have found that a mitochondrial chaperone protein, TRAP1, may act indirectly as a tumor suppressor as well as a novel target for developing anti-cancer drugs. Chaperone proteins, such as TRAP1, help other proteins adapt to stress, but sc

  3. Metabolic monosaccharides altered cell responses to anticancer drugs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Long; Liang, Jun F

    2012-06-01

    Metabolic glycoengineering has been used to manipulate the glycochemistry of cell surfaces and thus the cell/cell interaction, cell adhesion, and cell migration. However, potential application of glycoengineering in pharmaceutical sciences has not been studied until recently. Here, we reported that Ac(4)ManNAc, an analog of N-acetyl-D-mannosamine (ManNAc), could affect cell responses to anticancer drugs. Although cells from different tissues and organs responded to Ac(4)ManNAc treatment differently, treated cells with increased sialic acid contents showed dramatically reduced sensitivity (up to 130 times) to anti-cancer drugs as tested on various drugs with distinct chemical structures and acting mechanisms. Neither increased P-glycoprotein activity nor decreased drug uptake was observed during the course of Ac(4)ManNAc treatment. However, greatly altered intracellular drug distributions were observed. Most intracellular daunorubicin was found in the perinuclear region, but not the expected nuclei in the Ac(4)ManNAc treated cells. Since sialoglycoproteins and gangliosides were synthesized in the Golgi, intracellular glycans affected intracellular signal transduction and drug distributions seem to be the main reason for Ac(4)ManNAc affected cell sensitivity to anticancer drugs. It was interesting to find that although Ac(4)ManNAc treated breast cancer cells (MDA-MB-231) maintained the same sensitivity to 5-Fluorouracil, the IC(50) value of 5-Fluorouracil to the same Ac(4)ManNAc treated normal cells (MCF-10A) was increased by more than 20 times. Thus, this Ac(4)ManNAc treatment enlarged drug response difference between normal and tumor cells provides a unique opportunity to further improve the selectivity and therapeutic efficiency of anticancer drugs.

  4. Potential anti-cancer drugs commonly used for other indications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanusova, Veronika; Skalova, Lenka; Kralova, Vera; Matouskova, Petra

    2015-01-01

    An increasing resistance of mammalian tumor cells to chemotherapy along with the severe side effects of commonly used cytostatics has raised the urgency in the search for new anti-cancer agents. Several drugs originally approved for indications other than cancer treatment have recently been found to have a cytostatic effect on cancer cells. These drugs could be expediently repurposed as anti-cancer agents, since they have already been tested for toxicity in humans and animals. The groups of newly recognized potential cytostatics discussed in this review include benzimidazole anthelmintics (albendazole, mebendazole, flubendazole), anti-hypertensive drugs (doxazosin, propranolol), psychopharmaceuticals (chlorpromazine, clomipramine) and antidiabetic drugs (metformin, pioglitazone). All these drugs have a definite potential to be used especially in combinations with other cytostatics; the chemotherapy targeting of multiple sites now represents a promising approach in cancer treatment. The present review summarizes recent information about the anti-cancer effects of selected drugs commonly used for other medical indications. Our aim is not to collect all the reported results, but to present an overview of various possibilities. Advantages, disadvantages and further perspectives regarding individual drugs are discussed and evaluated.

  5. Diazido mixed-amine platinum(IV) anticancer complexes activatable by visible-light form novel DNA adducts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Yao; Woods, Julie A; Farrer, Nicola J; Robinson, Kim S; Pracharova, Jitka; Kasparkova, Jana; Novakova, Olga; Li, Huilin; Salassa, Luca; Pizarro, Ana M; Clarkson, Guy J; Song, Lijiang; Brabec, Viktor; Sadler, Peter J

    2013-07-15

    Platinum diam(m)ine complexes, such as cisplatin, are successful anticancer drugs, but suffer from problems of resistance and side-effects. Photoactivatable Pt(IV) prodrugs offer the potential of targeted drug release and new mechanisms of action. We report the synthesis, X-ray crystallographic and spectroscopic properties of photoactivatable diazido complexes trans,trans,trans-[Pt(N3)2(OH)2(MA)(Py)] (1; MA=methylamine, Py=pyridine) and trans,trans,trans-[Pt(N3)2(OH)2(MA)(Tz)] (2; Tz=thiazole), and interpret their photophysical properties by TD-DFT modelling. The orientation of the azido groups is highly dependent on H bonding and crystal packing, as shown by polymorphs 1p and 1q. Complexes 1 and 2 are stable in the dark towards hydrolysis and glutathione reduction, but undergo rapid photoreduction with UVA or blue light with minimal amine photodissociation. They are over an order of magnitude more potent towards HaCaT keratinocytes, A2780 ovarian, and OE19 oesophageal carcinoma cells than cisplatin and show particular potency towards cisplatin-resistant human ovarian cancer cells (A2780cis). Analysis of binding to calf-thymus (CT), plasmids, oligonucleotide DNA and individual nucleotides reveals that photoactivated 1 and 2 form both mono- and bifunctional DNA lesions, with preference for G and C, similar to transplatin, but with significantly larger unwinding angles and a higher percentage of interstrand cross-links, with evidence for DNA strand cross-linking further supported by a comet assay. DNA lesions of 1 and 2 on a 50 bp duplex were not recognised by HMGB1 protein, in contrast to cisplatin-type lesions. The photo-induced platination reactions of DNA by 1 and 2 show similarities with the products of the dark reactions of the Pt(II) compounds trans-[PtCl2(MA)(Py)] (5) and trans-[PtCl2(MA)(Tz)] (6). Following photoactivation, complex 2 reacted most rapidly with CT DNA, followed by 1, whereas the dark reactions of 5 and 6 with DNA were comparatively slow

  6. Anticancer drugs in Portuguese surface waters - Estimation of concentrations and identification of potentially priority drugs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santos, Mónica S F; Franquet-Griell, Helena; Lacorte, Silvia; Madeira, Luis M; Alves, Arminda

    2017-10-01

    Anticancer drugs, used in chemotherapy, have emerged as new water contaminants due to their increasing consumption trends and poor elimination efficiency in conventional water treatment processes. As a result, anticancer drugs have been reported in surface and even drinking waters, posing the environment and human health at risk. However, the occurrence and distribution of anticancer drugs depend on the area studied and the hydrological dynamics, which determine the risk towards the environment. The main objective of the present study was to evaluate the risk of anticancer drugs in Portugal. This work includes an extensive analysis of the consumption trends of 171 anticancer drugs, sold or dispensed in Portugal between 2007 and 2015. The consumption data was processed aiming at the estimation of predicted environmental loads of anticancer drugs and 11 compounds were identified as potentially priority drugs based on an exposure-based approach (PECb> 10 ng L(-1) and/or PECc> 1 ng L(-1)). In a national perspective, mycophenolic acid and mycophenolate mofetil are suspected to pose high risk to aquatic biota. Moderate and low risk was also associated to cyclophosphamide and bicalutamide exposition, respectively. Although no evidences of risk exist yet for the other anticancer drugs, concerns may be associated with long term effects. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Platinum hypersensitivity and desensitization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miyamoto, Shingo; Okada, Rika; Ando, Kazumichi

    2015-09-01

    Platinum agents are drugs used for various types of cancer. With increased frequency of administration of platinum agents, hypersensitivity reactions appear more frequently, occurring in over 25% of cases from the seventh cycle or second line onward. It then becomes difficult to conduct treatment using these agents. Various approaches have been investigated to address hypersensitivity reactions to platinum agents. Desensitization, which gradually increases the concentration of the anticancer drug considered to be the antigen until the target dosage, has been reported as being particularly effective, with a success rate of 80-100%. The aims of this paper are to present the current findings regarding hypersensitivity reactions to platinum agents and to discuss attempts of using desensitization against hypersensitivity reactions worldwide. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  8. Buckysomes: New Nanocarriers for Anticancer Drugs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Delia Danila

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Buckysomes, liposome-like vesicles comprised of dendritic C60 subunits that self-assemble into unilamellar vesicles, are unique nanovectors that have utility in drug delivery. We have prepared paclitaxel-embedded buckysomes (PEBs and examined biodistriubition profiles with commercially available formulations of the drug. As compared to Abraxane, an albumin-bound formulation of paclitaxel, PEBs showed higher tissue accumulation in the liver and the kidney at 45 and 60 minutes and in the lungs at 30 minutes, making them suitable drug-delivery carriers for short-term therapy to the mentioned organs. These buckysomes can be further functionalized to specifically deliver paclitaxel to the tumor site.

  9. DNA topoisomerases and their poisoning by anticancer and antibacterial drugs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pommier, Yves; Leo, Elisabetta; Zhang, HongLiang; Marchand, Christophe

    2010-05-28

    DNA topoisomerases are the targets of important anticancer and antibacterial drugs. Camptothecins and novel noncamptothecins in clinical development (indenoisoquinolines and ARC-111) target eukaryotic type IB topoisomerases (Top1), whereas human type IIA topoisomerases (Top2alpha and Top2beta) are the targets of the widely used anticancer agents etoposide, anthracyclines (doxorubicin, daunorubicin), and mitoxantrone. Bacterial type II topoisomerases (gyrase and Topo IV) are the targets of quinolones and aminocoumarin antibiotics. This review focuses on the molecular and biochemical characteristics of topoisomerases and their inhibitors. We also discuss the common mechanism of action of topoisomerase poisons by interfacial inhibition and trapping of topoisomerase cleavage complexes.

  10. Drug utilization review of anticancer drugs in cancer outpatient department of the Government Medical College, Aurangabad

    OpenAIRE

    M. D. Kulkarni; Samra A. Hussaini; S. L. Padwal; P. N. Khandelwal; S. M. Doifode; P. P. More

    2014-01-01

    Background: To study drug utilization of anticancer drugs in cancer outpatient department (OPD) of Government Medical College, Aurangabad. Methods: Five hundred and twelve prescription records were screened and analyzed as per the study parameters from cancer OPD of Government Medical College and Hospital, Aurangabad. Commonly used anticancer drugs were recorded; furthermore, different types of carcinomas were noted. Results: Age group of patients was in between 30 and 70, 267 were fema...

  11. The application of platinum drugs in the treatment of cancer%铂类药物在肿瘤治疗中的应用

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    崔然; 许青

    2013-01-01

    经过将近半个世纪的发展,铂类药物的研究取得了重要进展。一方面,新型铂类药物不断涌现,奈达铂、奥沙利铂、乐铂、舒铂相继通过临床试验投入临床使用,另还有许多卡铂和顺铂的类似物、亲脂性的铂配合物、具有空间位阻的铂配合物和可口服的铂配合物正处于临床试验阶段,其中有些可能成为未来的新型铂类药物;另一方面,铂类药物联合其他抗癌药物治疗能显著提高抗癌疗效,对肿瘤耐药性研究也取得了重要突破。%The important progress in platinum drugs has been witnessed in past nearly half a century. On the one hand, new platinum drugs such as nedaplatin, oxaliplatin, lobaplatin and sunpla have continuously emerged, and put into use in clinic after clinical trials were successfully completed. The analogues of cisplatin and carboplatin, the lipophilic and sterically hindered complexes and even some oral platinum complexes are in clinical trials, some of which will become new-type platinum drugs in the near future. On the other hand, combination of platinum with other anticancer drugs has signiifcantly improved the anticancer efifcacy and some important breakthroughs have been made in platinum-induced chemoresistance research.

  12. The New Anticancer Platinum Complex Designed on the Basis of Nucleic Acid%基于核酸修饰新策略的抗肿瘤铂配合物设计

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    郑小辉; 夏立新; 毛宗万

    2016-01-01

    肿瘤已成为严重威胁人类健康的重大疾病之一.以顺铂为首的铂类抗肿瘤药物一直是化疗首选药物.但是长期用药导致的一系列的毒副作用如肾毒性、耳毒性和耐药性等极大地限制了铂类配合物的发展与应用.本文针对目前铂类药物所处形势重点综述了新一代铂类药物的设计研发方法:(1)研发具有新颖结构的铂类药物,例如经过改造的反式铂类配合物、多核铂类配合物、Pt(Ⅳ)配合物等;(2)发展新的抗肿瘤靶点,例如以G-四螺旋DNA(G4-DNA)为靶点,为寻找更有效的铂类抗肿瘤药物提供新的思路.同时通过列举最新研究成果,分析药物的抗肿瘤机理及在克服顺铂耐药性机理方面的研究进展,提出铂类药物的设计研发方法,让读者了解铂类抗肿瘤药物的发展历程和未来的发展趋势.%Tumor is one of the serious diseases which greatly threaten human's health.Therefore,the large amount of innovative anticancer drugs have been discovered and created.Among these anticancer drugs,cisplatinum and its analogs are some of the most effective chemotherapeutic agents in clinical use,particularly in the treatment of testicular and ovarian cancers.Unfortunately,they have several major drawbacks,such as cumulative toxicities of nephrotoxicity and ototoxicity,inherent or treatment-induced resistance.This has provided the urgency and motivation for developing novel platinum complexes with high antitumor effect and low toxic side effect on normal cells.This review highlights some methods on the development of the novel platinum complexes:(1) developing the platinum complex with new structure,like trans-platinum complex,multinuclear platinum complex,Pt(Ⅳ) complex;(2) developing new anticancer target,such as G-quadruplex (G4) DNA.By consideration of the anticancer mechanism of the drugs and the tolerance of cis-platinum,the prospect provides new ways to develop novel platinum complexes with high

  13. Platinum-Based Drugs Differentially Affect the Ultrastructure of Breast Cancer Cell Types

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Adawi, Kawther; Al-Nabhani, Abdurahman; Al-Kindi, Mohamed

    2017-01-01

    Breast cancer (BC) is the most common cause of cancer-related death worldwide. Although platinum-based drugs (PBDs) are effective anticancer agents, responsive patients eventually become resistant. While resistance of some cancers to PBDs has been explored, the cellular responses of BC cells are not studied yet. Therefore, we aim to assess the differential effects of PBDs on BC ultrastructure. Three representative cells were treated with different concentrations and timing of Cisplatin, Carboplatin, and Oxaliplatin. Changes on cell surface and ultrastructure were detected by scanning (SEM) and transmission electron microscope (TEM). In SEM, control cells were semiflattened containing microvilli with extending lamellipodia while treated ones were round with irregular surface and several pores, indicating drug entry. Prolonged treatment resembled distinct apoptotic features such as shrinkage, membrane blebs, and narrowing of lamellipodia with blunt microvilli. TEM detected PBDs' deposits that scattered among cellular organelles inducing structural distortion, lumen swelling, chromatin condensation, and nuclear fragmentation. Deposits were attracted to fat droplets, explained by drug hydrophobic properties, while later they were located close to cell membrane, suggesting drug efflux. Phagosomes with destructed organelles and deposits were detected as defending mechanism. Understanding BC cells response to PBDs might provide new insight for an effective treatment.

  14. Autophagy modulation as a target for anticancer drug discovery

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xin LI; Huai-long XU; Yong-xi LIU; Na AN; Si ZHAO; Jin-ku BAO

    2013-01-01

    Autophagy,an evolutionarily conserved catabolic process involving the engulfment and degradation of non-essential or abnormal cellular organelles and proteins,is crucial for homeostatic maintenance in living cells.This highly regulated,multi-step process has been implicated in diverse diseases including cancer.Autophagy can function as either a promoter or a suppressor of cancer,which makes it a promising and challenging therapeutic target.Herein,we overview the regulatory mechanisms and dual roles of autophagy in cancer.We also describe some of the representative agents that exert their anticancer effects by regulating autophagy.Additionally,some emerging strategies aimed at modulating autophagy are discussed as having the potential for future anticancer drug discovery.In summary,these findings will provide valuable information to better utilize autophagy in the future development of anticancer therapeutics that meet clinical requirements.

  15. Research progress in nanoparticles as anticancer drug carrier

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yingying Sun; Huaqing Lin ; Chuqin Yu; Suna Lin

    2014-01-01

    Nanoparticles drug delivery system has sustained and controled release features as wel as targeted drug deliv-ery, which can change the characteristics of drug distributionin vivo. It can increase the stability of the drug and enhance drug bioavailability. The selective targeting of nanoparticles can be achieved through enhanced permeability and retention efect and a conjugated specific ligand or through the efects of physiological conditions, such as pH and temperature. Nanoparticles can be prepared by using a wide range of materials and can be used to encapsulate chemotherapeutic agents to reduce toxic-ity, which can be used for imaging, therapy, and diagnosis. In this research, recent progress on nanoparticles as a targeted drug delivery system wil be reviewed, including positive-targeting, negative-targeting, and physicochemical-targeting used as anticancer drug carriers.

  16. Microfluidics: Emerging prospects for anti-cancer drug screening.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wlodkowic, Donald; Darzynkiewicz, Zbigniew

    2010-11-10

    Cancer constitutes a heterogenic cellular system with a high level of spatio-temporal complexity. Recent discoveries by systems biologists have provided emerging evidence that cellular responses to anti-cancer modalities are stochastic in nature. To uncover the intricacies of cell-to-cell variability and its relevance to cancer therapy, new analytical screening technologies are needed. The last decade has brought forth spectacular innovations in the field of cytometry and single cell cytomics, opening new avenues for systems oncology and high-throughput real-time drug screening routines. The up-and-coming microfluidic Lab-on-a-Chip (LOC) technology and micro-total analysis systems (μTAS) are arguably the most promising platforms to address the inherent complexity of cellular systems with massive experimental parallelization and 4D analysis on a single cell level. The vast miniaturization of LOC systems and multiplexing enables innovative strategies to reduce drug screening expenditures while increasing throughput and content of information from a given sample. Small cell numbers and operational reagent volumes are sufficient for microfluidic analyzers and, as such, they enable next generation high-throughput and high-content screening of anti-cancer drugs on patient-derived specimens. Herein we highlight the selected advancements in this emerging field of bioengineering, and provide a snapshot of developments with relevance to anti-cancer drug screening routines.

  17. Internalization of Ineffective Platinum Complex in Nanocapsules Renders It Cytotoxic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vrana, Oldrich; Novohradsky, Vojtech; Medrikova, Zdenka; Burdikova, Jana; Stuchlikova, Olga; Kasparkova, Jana; Brabec, Viktor

    2016-02-18

    Anticancer therapy by platinum complexes, based on nanocarrier-based delivery, may offer a new approach to improve the efficacy and tolerability of the platinum family of anticancer drugs. The original rules for the design of new anticancer platinum drugs were affected by the fact that, although cisplatin (cis-[PtCl2 (NH3)2) was an anticancer drug, its isomer transplatin was not cytotoxic. For the first time, it is demonstrated that simple encapsulation of an inactive platinum compound in phospholipid bilayers transforms it into an efficient cytotoxic agent. Notably, the encapsulation of transplatin makes it possible to overcome the resistance mechanisms operating in cancer cells treated with cisplatin and prevents inactivation of transplatin in the extracellular environment. It is also shown that transplatin delivered to the cells in nanocapsules, in contrast to free (nonencapsulated) complex, forms cytotoxic cross-links on DNA.

  18. Dialkyl bisphosphonate platinum(II) complex as a potential drug for metastatic bone tumor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakatake, Hidetoshi; Ekimoto, Hisao; Aso, Mariko; Ogawa, Atsushi; Yamaguchi, Asami; Suemune, Hiroshi

    2011-01-01

    Bisphosphonates have high affinity for hydroxyapatite (HA), which is abundantly present in bone. Also, platinum complexes are known that have a wide spectrum of antitumor activities. The conjugate of bisphosphonate and a platinum complex might have HA affinity and antitumor activity, and become a drug for metastatic bone tumor. In this study, the authors synthesized platinum complexes that had dialkyl bisphosphonic acid as a ligand, and evaluated the possibility of the synthesized complexes as a drug for metastatic bone tumor. The synthesized dialkyl bisphosphonate platinum(II) complex was characterized, and its stability in an aqueous solution was also confirmed. The synthesized platinum complex showed higher HA affinity than other platinum complexes such as cisplatin and carboplatin in an experiment of adsorption to HA. In vitro, the platinum complex showed tumor growth inhibitory effect stronger than or equal to cisplatin, which is the most commonly used antitumor agent. Moreover, the platinum complex showed a bone absorption inhibitory effect on the osteoclast. These results suggest potential of dialkyl bisphosphonate platinum(II) complexes as a drug for metastatic bone tumor.

  19. A functional perspective of nitazoxanide as a potential anticancer drug

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Di Santo, Nicola, E-mail: nico.disanto@duke.edu; Ehrisman, Jessie, E-mail: jessie.ehrisman@duke.edu

    2014-10-15

    Highlights: • Combination anti-cancer therapies are associated with increased toxicity and cross-resistance. • Some antiparasitic compounds may have anti-cancer potential. • Nitazoxanide interferes with metabolic and pro-death signaling. • Preclinical studies are needed to confirm anticancer ability of nitazoxanide. - Abstract: Cancer is a group of diseases characterized by uncontrolled cell proliferation, evasion of cell death and the ability to invade and disrupt vital tissue function. The classic model of carcinogenesis describes successive clonal expansion driven by the accumulation of mutations that eliminate restraints on proliferation and cell survival. It has been proposed that during cancer's development, the loose-knit colonies of only partially differentiated cells display some unicellular/prokaryotic behavior reminiscent of robust ancient life forms. The seeming “regression” of cancer cells involves changes within metabolic machinery and survival strategies. This atavist change in physiology enables cancer cells to behave as selfish “neo-endo-parasites” that exploit the tumor stromal cells in order to extract nutrients from the surrounding microenvironment. In this framework, it is conceivable that anti-parasitic compounds might serve as promising anticancer drugs. Nitazoxanide (NTZ), a thiazolide compound, has shown antimicrobial properties against anaerobic bacteria, as well as against helminths and protozoa. NTZ has also been successfully used to promote Hepatitis C virus (HCV) elimination by improving interferon signaling and promoting autophagy. More compelling however are the potential anti-cancer properties that have been observed. NTZ seems to be able to interfere with crucial metabolic and pro-death signaling such as drug detoxification, unfolded protein response (UPR), autophagy, anti-cytokine activities and c-Myc inhibition. In this article, we review the ability of NTZ to interfere with integrated survival mechanisms of

  20. A platinum-based hybrid drug design approach to circumvent acquired resistance to molecular targeted tyrosine kinase inhibitors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Yuming; Poon, Daniel C.; Fei, Rong; Lam, Amy S. M.; Au-Yeung, Steve C. F.; To, Kenneth K. W.

    2016-05-01

    Three molecular targeted tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKI) were conjugated to classical platinum-based drugs with an aim to circumvent TKI resistance, predominately mediated by the emergence of secondary mutations on oncogenic kinases. The hybrids were found to maintain specificity towards the same oncogenic kinases as the original TKI. Importantly, they are remarkably less affected by TKI resistance, presumably due to their unique structure and the observed dual mechanism of anticancer activity (kinase inhibition and DNA damage). The study is also the first to report the application of a hybrid drug approach to switch TKIs from being efflux transporter substrates into non-substrates. TKIs cannot penetrate into the brain for treating metastases because of efflux transporters at the blood brain barrier. The hybrids were found to escape drug efflux and they accumulate more than the original TKI in the brain in BALB/c mice. Further development of the hybrid compounds is warranted.

  1. A platinum-based hybrid drug design approach to circumvent acquired resistance to molecular targeted tyrosine kinase inhibitors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Yuming; Poon, Daniel C; Fei, Rong; Lam, Amy S M; Au-Yeung, Steve C F; To, Kenneth K W

    2016-05-06

    Three molecular targeted tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKI) were conjugated to classical platinum-based drugs with an aim to circumvent TKI resistance, predominately mediated by the emergence of secondary mutations on oncogenic kinases. The hybrids were found to maintain specificity towards the same oncogenic kinases as the original TKI. Importantly, they are remarkably less affected by TKI resistance, presumably due to their unique structure and the observed dual mechanism of anticancer activity (kinase inhibition and DNA damage). The study is also the first to report the application of a hybrid drug approach to switch TKIs from being efflux transporter substrates into non-substrates. TKIs cannot penetrate into the brain for treating metastases because of efflux transporters at the blood brain barrier. The hybrids were found to escape drug efflux and they accumulate more than the original TKI in the brain in BALB/c mice. Further development of the hybrid compounds is warranted.

  2. Lack of nephrotoxicity of new oral platinum drug JM216 in lung cancer patients

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Fokkema, E; de Vries, EGE; Meijer, S; Groen, HJM

    Purpose: The purpose of this study was to assess renal function in patients treated with the oral platinum drug JM216 [bisacetato-ammine-dichloro-cyclohexylamine-platinum (IV)I, since the effects of JM216 on renal function have only partly been investigated using serum parameters or Cr-51-EDTA

  3. Effect of selected ABC-drug transporters and anticancer drug disposition in vitro and in vivo

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Marchetti, S.

    2013-01-01

    Studies described in the thesis that is lying in front of you aim to address the possible implications of selected ABC-drug transporters on the disposition of a number of important anticancer drugs. Although variability in drug disposition has been known for as long as pharmacological studies

  4. Calculation of lipophilicity of a large, diverse dataset of anticancer platinum complexes and the relation to cellular uptake.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oldfield, Steven P; Hall, Matthew D; Platts, James A

    2007-10-18

    A quantitative structure--property relationship (QPSR) for the octanol--water partition of platinum complexes was constructed using molecular descriptors derived from density functional (DFT) calculations. A dataset of partition data for 64 complexes, consisting of 43 square-planar platinum(II) and 21 octahedral platinum(IV) complexes, was drawn from literature sources. Not only does this dataset include considerable structural diversity of complexes considered but also a variety of techniques for the measurement of partition coefficients. These data were modeled using descriptors drawn from electrostatic potentials and hardness/softness indices projected onto molecular surfaces. This required initial descriptor selection using a genetic algorithm approach, followed by partial least-squares regression against log Po/w data. In this way, a statistically robust model was constructed, with errors of similar size to the variation in log Po/w from multiple experimental measurements. Implications of lipophilicity for cellular accumulation of Pt-based drugs, and hence for design of new drugs, are discussed, as is the uptake of metabolites of cisplatin.

  5. Calcium carbonate microspheres as carriers for the anticancer drug camptothecin

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Qiu, Neng [Division of Biomedical Engineering, School of Engineering, University of Glasgow, Glasgow, G12 8LT (United Kingdom); State Key Laboratory of Biotherapy and Cancer Center, West China Hospital, West China Medical School, Sichuan University, Chengdu 610041 (China); Department of Bio-pharmaceutical Engineering, School of Chemical Engineering, Sichuan University, Chengdu ,610065 (China); Yin, Huabing, E-mail: huabing.yin@glasgow.ac.uk [Division of Biomedical Engineering, School of Engineering, University of Glasgow, Glasgow, G12 8LT (United Kingdom); Ji, Bozhi; Klauke, Norbert; Glidle, Andrew [Division of Biomedical Engineering, School of Engineering, University of Glasgow, Glasgow, G12 8LT (United Kingdom); Zhang, Yongkui; Song, Hang [Department of Bio-pharmaceutical Engineering, School of Chemical Engineering, Sichuan University, Chengdu ,610065 (China); Cai, Lulu; Ma, Liang; Wang, Guangcheng [State Key Laboratory of Biotherapy and Cancer Center, West China Hospital, West China Medical School, Sichuan University, Chengdu 610041 (China); Chen, Lijuan, E-mail: lijuan17@hotmail.com [State Key Laboratory of Biotherapy and Cancer Center, West China Hospital, West China Medical School, Sichuan University, Chengdu 610041 (China); Wang, Wenwen [State Key Laboratory of Biotherapy and Cancer Center, West China Hospital, West China Medical School, Sichuan University, Chengdu 610041 (China)

    2012-12-01

    Biogenic calcium carbonate has come to the attention of many researchers as a promising drug delivery system due to its safety, pH sensitivity and the large volume of information already in existence on its medical use. In this study, we employed bovine serum albumin (BSA) as an additive to synthesize a series of porous calcium carbonate microspheres (CCMS). These spheres, identified as vaterite, are stable both in aqueous solutions and organic solvents. Camptothecin, an effective anticancer agent, was loaded into the CCMS by simple diffusion and adsorption. The camptothecin loaded CCMS showed sustained cell growth inhibitory activity and a pH dependent release of camptothecin. With a few hours, the release is negligible under physiological conditions (pH = 7.4) but almost complete at pH 4 to 6 (i.e. pHs found in lysosomes and solid tumor tissue respectively). These findings suggest that porous, biogenic calcium carbonate microspheres could be promising carriers for the safe and efficient delivery of anticancer drugs of low aqueous solubility. - Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer BSA-doped calcium carbonate microspheres with porous structure were prepared. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Camptothecin was encapsulated in the spherical microparticles with encapsulation efficiency up to 11%. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The release of encapsulated camptothecin is pH dependent Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer In vitro studies showed an effective anticancer activity of the camptothecin- microspheres.

  6. Topological Indices Study of Molecular Structure in Anticancer Drugs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wei Gao

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Numerous studies indicate that there is strong inherent relationship between the chemical characteristics of chemical compounds and drugs (e.g., boiling point and melting point and their molecular structures. Topological indices defined on these chemical molecular structures can help researchers better understand the physical features, chemical reactivity, and biological activity. Thus, the study of the topological indices on chemical structure of chemical materials and drugs can make up for lack of chemical experiments and can provide a theoretical basis for the manufacturing of drugs and chemical materials. In this paper, we focus on the family of smart polymer which is widely used in anticancer drugs manufacturing. Several topological indices are determined in view of edge dividing methods, and these results remedy the lack of chemical and medicine experiments thus providing the theoretical basis for pharmaceutical engineering.

  7. [A novel anticancer drug delivery system -DAC-70/CDDP].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sugitachi, Akio; Otsuka, Koki; Fujisawa, Kentaro; Itabashi, Tetsuya; Akiyama, Yuji; Sasaki, Akira; Ikeda, Kenichiro; Yoshida, Yasuo; Takamori, Yoshimori; Kurozumi, Seiji; Mori, Takatoshi; Wakabayashi, Go

    2007-11-01

    We devised a muco-adhesive anticancer drug delivery system using 70% deacetylated chitin (DAC-70) and cisplatin (CDDP) and 5-fluorouracil (5-FU). The adhesive force between the system and human colonic mucosa was measured ex vivo, and a release profile of each drug was examined in vitro. Each system demonstrated a stronger muco-adhesive force at 37 degrees C than that of 25 degrees C. The CDDP-loaded system showed a sustained release of the drug while the 5-FU-loaded system exhibited an initial bursting of the agent. We presume that the release profile of CDDP and 5-FU is closely related to both degradability of the chitin and interactions between the chitin and each drug. The DAC-70/CDDP system would be clinically promising in loco-regional cancer chemotherapy.

  8. Effects of anticancer drugs on the metabolism of the anticancer drug 5,6-dimethylxanthenone-4-acetic (DMXAA) by human liver microsomes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Shufeng; Chin, Rebecca; Kestell, Philip; Tingle, Malcolm D; Paxton, James W

    2001-01-01

    Aims To investigate the effects of various anticancer drugs on the major metabolic pathways (glucuronidation and 6-methylhydroxylation) of DMXAA in human liver microsomes. Methods The effects of various anticancer drugs at 100 and 500 µm on the formation of DMXAA acyl glucuronide (DMXAA-G) and 6-hydroxymethyl-5-methylxanthenone-4-acetic acid (6-OH-MXAA) in human liver microsomes were determined by high performance liquid chromatography (h.p.l.c.). For those anticancer drugs showing significant inhibition of DMXAA metabolism, the inhibition constants (Ki) were determined. The resulting in vitro data were extrapolated to predict in vivo changes in DMXAA pharmacokinetics. Results Vinblastine, vincristine and amsacrine at 500 µm significantly (P drugs such as 5-fluoroucacil, paclitaxel, tirapazamine and methotrexate exhibited little or negligible inhibition of the metabolism of DMXAA. Pre-incubation of microsomes with the anticancer drugs (100 and 500 µm) did not enhance their inhibitory effects on DMXAA metabolism. Prediction of DMXAA–drug interactions in vivo based on these in vitro data indicated that all the anticancer drugs investigated except DACA appear unlikely to alter the pharmacokinetics of DMXAA, whereas DACA may increase the plasma AUC of DMXAA by 6%. Conclusions These results indicate that alteration of the pharmacokinetics of DMXAA appears unlikely when used in combination with other common anticancer drugs. However, this does not rule out the possibility of pharmacokinetic interactions with other drugs used concurrently with this combination of anticancer drugs. PMID:11488768

  9. pH-dependent anticancer drug release from silk nanoparticles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seib, F Philipp; Jones, Gregory T; Rnjak-Kovacina, Jelena; Lin, Yinan; Kaplan, David L

    2013-12-01

    Silk has traditionally been used as a suture material because of its excellent mechanical properties and biocompatibility. These properties have led to the development of different silk-based material formats for tissue engineering and regenerative medicine. Although there have been a small number of studies about the use of silk particles for drug delivery, none of these studies have assessed the potential of silk to act as a stimulus-responsive anticancer nanomedicine. This report demonstrates that an acetone precipitation of silk allows the formation of uniform silk nanoparticles (98 nm diameter, polydispersity index 0.109), with an overall negative surface charge (-33.6 ± 5.8 mV), in a single step. Silk nanoparticles are readily loaded with doxorubicin (40 ng doxorubicin/μg silk) and show pH-dependent release (pH 4.5≫ 6.0 > 7.4). In vitro studies with human breast cancer cell lines demonstrates that the silk nanoparticles are not cytotoxic (IC50 > 120 μg mL(-1) ) and that doxorubicin-loaded silk nanoparticles are able to overcome drug resistance mechanisms. Live cell fluorescence microscopy studies show endocytic uptake and lysosomal accumulation of silk nanoparticles. In summary, the pH-dependent drug release and lysosomal accumulation of silk nanoparticles demonstrate the ability of drug-loaded silk nanoparticles to serve as a lysosomotropic anticancer nanomedicine.

  10. Strategies for the Optimization of Natural Leads to Anticancer Drugs or Drug Candidates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiao, Zhiyan; Morris-Natschke, Susan L; Lee, Kuo-Hsiung

    2016-01-01

    Natural products have made significant contribution to cancer chemotherapy over the past decades and remain an indispensable source of molecular and mechanistic diversity for anticancer drug discovery. More often than not, natural products may serve as leads for further drug development rather than as effective anticancer drugs by themselves. Generally, optimization of natural leads into anticancer drugs or drug candidates should not only address drug efficacy, but also improve absorption, distribution, metabolism, excretion, and toxicity (ADMET) profiles and chemical accessibility associated with the natural leads. Optimization strategies involve direct chemical manipulation of functional groups, structure-activity relationship directed optimization and pharmacophore-oriented molecular design based on the natural templates. Both fundamental medicinal chemistry principles (e.g., bioisosterism) and state-of-the-art computer-aided drug design techniques (e.g., structure-based design) can be applied to facilitate optimization efforts. In this review, the strategies to optimize natural leads to anticancer drugs or drug candidates are illustrated with examples and described according to their purposes. Furthermore, successful case studies on lead optimization of bioactive compounds performed in the Natural Products Research Laboratories at UNC are highlighted.

  11. Strategies for the Optimization of Natural Leads to Anticancer Drugs or Drug Candidates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiao, Zhiyan; Morris-Natschke, Susan L.; Lee, Kuo-Hsiung

    2015-01-01

    Natural products have made significant contribution to cancer chemotherapy over the past decades and remain an indispensable source of molecular and mechanistic diversity for anticancer drug discovery. More often than not, natural products may serve as leads for further drug development rather than as effective anticancer drugs by themselves. Generally, optimization of natural leads into anticancer drugs or drug candidates should not only address drug efficacy, but also improve ADMET profiles and chemical accessibility associated with the natural leads. Optimization strategies involve direct chemical manipulation of functional groups, structure-activity relationship-directed optimization and pharmacophore-oriented molecular design based on the natural templates. Both fundamental medicinal chemistry principles (e.g., bio-isosterism) and state-of-the-art computer-aided drug design techniques (e.g., structure-based design) can be applied to facilitate optimization efforts. In this review, the strategies to optimize natural leads to anticancer drugs or drug candidates are illustrated with examples and described according to their purposes. Furthermore, successful case studies on lead optimization of bioactive compounds performed in the Natural Products Research Laboratories at UNC are highlighted. PMID:26359649

  12. Peptide-based proteasome inhibitors in anticancer drug design.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Micale, Nicola; Scarbaci, Kety; Troiano, Valeria; Ettari, Roberta; Grasso, Silvana; Zappalà, Maria

    2014-09-01

    The identification of the key role of the eukaryotic 26S proteasome in regulated intracellular proteolysis and its importance as a target in many pathological conditions wherein the proteasomal activity is defective (e.g., malignancies, autoimmune diseases, neurodegenerative diseases, etc.) prompted several research groups to the development of specific inhibitors of this multicatalytic complex with the aim of obtaining valid drug candidates. In regard to the anticancer therapy, the peptide boronate bortezomib (Velcade®) represents the first molecule approved by FDA for the treatment of multiple myeloma in 2003 and mantle cell lymphoma in 2006. Since then, a plethora of molecules targeting the proteasome have been identified as potential anticancer agents and a few of them reached clinical trials or are already in the market (i.e., carfilzomib; Kyprolis®). In most cases, the design of new proteasome inhibitors (PIs) takes into account a proven peptide or pseudopeptide motif as a base structure and places other chemical entities throughout the peptide skeleton in such a way to create an efficacious network of interactions within the catalytic sites. The purpose of this review is to provide an in-depth look at the current state of the research in the field of peptide-based PIs, specifically those ones that might find an application as anticancer agents.

  13. SWCNT-Polymer Nanocomplexes for Anti-Cancer Drug Delivery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Withey, Paul; Momin, Zoya; Bommoju, Anvesh; Hoang, Trung; Rashid, Bazlur

    2015-03-01

    Utilization of single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) as more effective drug-delivery agents are being considered due to their ability to easily cross cell membranes, while their high aspect ratio and large surface area provide multiple attachment sites for biocompatible drug complexes. However, excessive bundling of pristine SWCNTs caused by strong attractive Van der Walls forces between CNT sidewalls is a major obstacle. We have successfully dispersed SWCNTs with both polyvinyl alcohol and Pluronic biocompatible polymers, and attached anti-cancer drugs Camptothecin (CPT) and Doxorubicin to form non-covalent CNT-polymer-drug conjugates in aqueous solution. Polymeric dispersion of SWCNTs by both polymers is confirmed by clearly identifiable near-infrared (NIR) fluorescence emission peaks of individual (7,5) and (7,6) nanotubes, and drug attachment to form complete complexes verified by UV-Vis spectroscopy. These complexes, with varying SWCNT and drug concentrations, were tested for effectiveness by exposing them to a line of human embryonic kidney cancer cells and analyzed for cell viability. Preliminary results indicate significant improvement in drug effectiveness on the cancer cells, with more successful internalization due to unaltered SWCNTs as the drug carriers. Supported by the UHCL Faculty Research Support Fund.

  14. CNIO cancer conference: targeted search for anticancer drugs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fischer, Peter M

    2003-06-01

    The topics discussed at the conference covered many aspects of cancer research, from the genetic search for new targets, target validation and drug discovery, all the way to preclinical and clinical development of oncology drugs. Here the presentations on new metabolic, angiogenic, cell cycle and other molecular targets, as well as recent developments with experimental drugs with action on some of these targets, are summarised. Particular emphasis is placed on the emerging realisation that changes in the metabolic phenotype lie at the heart of cellular transformation. New insights into the biological links between cancer cell metabolism and the balance between survival and death signalling are likely to lead to the identification of a new category of anticancer targets.

  15. Anti-cancer drug delivery using carbohydrate-based polymers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ranjbari, Javad; Mokhtarzadeh, Ahad; Alibakhshi, Abbas; Tabarzad, Maryam; Hejazi, Maryam; Ramezani, Mohammad

    2017-05-05

    Polymeric drug delivery systems in the form of nanocarriers are the most interesting vehicles in anti-cancer therapy. Among different types of biocompatible polymers, carbohydrate-based polymers or polysaccharides are the most common natural polymers with complex structures consisting of long chains of monosaccharide or disaccharide units bound by glycosidic linkages. Their appealing properties such as availability, biocompatibility, biodegradability, low toxicity, high chemical reactivity, facile chemical modification and low cost led to their extensive applications in biomedical and pharmaceutical fields including development of nano-vehicles for delivery of anti-cancer therapeutic agents. Generally, reducing systemic toxicity, increasing short half-lives and tumor localization of agents are the top priorities for a successful cancer therapy. Polysaccharide-based or -coated nanosystems with respect to their advantageous features as well as accumulation in tumor tissue due to enhanced permeation and retention (EPR) effect can provide promising carrier systems for the delivery of noblest impressive agents. Most challenging factor in cancer therapy was the toxicity of anti-cancer therapeutic agents for normal cells and therefore, targeted delivery of these drugs to the site of action can be considered as an interesting therapeutic strategy. In this regard, several polysaccharides exhibited selective affinity for specific cell types, and so they can act as a targeting agent in drug delivery systems. Accordingly, different aspects of polysaccharide applications in cancer treatment or diagnosis were reviewed in this paper. In this regard, after a brief introduction of polysaccharide structure and their importance, the pharmaceutical usage of carbohydrate-based polymers was considered according to the identity of accompanying active pharmaceutical agents. It was also presented that the carbohydrate based polymers have been extensively considered as promising materials

  16. A drug-specific nanocarrier design for efficient anticancer therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Changying; Guo, Dandan; Xiao, Kai; Wang, Xu; Wang, Lili; Luo, Juntao

    2015-01-01

    The drug-loading properties of nanocarriers depend on the chemical structures and properties of their building blocks. Here, we customize telodendrimers (linear-dendritic copolymer) to design a nanocarrier with improved in vivo drug delivery characteristics. We do a virtual screen of a library of small molecules to identify the optimal building blocks for precise telodendrimer synthesis using peptide chemistry. With rationally designed telodendrimer architectures, we then optimize the drug binding affinity of a nanocarrier by introducing an optimal drug-binding molecule (DBM) without sacrificing the stability of the nanocarrier. To validate the computational predictions, we synthesize a series of nanocarriers and evaluate systematically for doxorubicin delivery. Rhein-containing nanocarriers have sustained drug release, prolonged circulation, increased tolerated dose, reduced toxicity, effective tumor targeting and superior anticancer effects owing to favourable doxorubicin-binding affinity and improved nanoparticle stability. This study demonstrates the feasibility and versatility of the de novo design of telodendrimer nanocarriers for specific drug molecules, which is a promising approach to transform nanocarrier development for drug delivery. PMID:26158623

  17. Hurdles in anticancer drug development from a regulatory perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jonsson, Bertil; Bergh, Jonas

    2012-02-21

    Between January 2001 and January 2012, 48 new medicinal products for cancer treatment were licensed within the EU, and 77 new indications were granted for products already licensed. In some cases, a major improvement to existing therapies was achieved, for example, trastuzumab in breast cancer. In other cases, new fields for effective drug therapy opened up, such as in chronic myeloid leukemia, and renal-cell carcinoma. In most cases, however, the benefit-risk balance was considered to be only borderline favorable. Based on our assessment of advice procedures for marketing authorization, 'need for speed' seems to be the guiding principle in anticancer drug development. Although, for drugs that make a difference, early licensure is of obvious importance to patients, this is less evident in the case of borderline drugs. Without proper incentives and with hurdles inside and outside companies, a change in drug development cannot be expected; drugs improving benefit-risk modestly over available therapies will be brought forward towards licensure. In this Perspectives article, we discuss some hurdles to biomarker-driven drug development and provide some suggestions to overcome them.

  18. A novel class of bis- and tris-chelate diam(m)inebis(dicarboxylato)platinum(IV) complexes as potential anticancer prodrugs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Varbanov, Hristo P; Göschl, Simone; Heffeter, Petra; Theiner, Sarah; Roller, Alexander; Jensen, Frank; Jakupec, Michael A; Berger, Walter; Galanski, Markus; Keppler, Bernhard K

    2014-08-14

    A novel class of platinum(IV) complexes of the type [Pt(Am)(R(COO)2)2], where Am is a chelating diamine or two monodentate am(m)ine ligands and R(COO)2 is a chelating dicarboxylato moiety, was synthesized. For this purpose, the reaction between the corresponding tetrahydroxidoplatinum(IV) precursors and various dicarboxylic acids, such as oxalic, malonic, 3-methylmalonic, and cyclobutanedicarboxylic acid, was utilized. All new compounds were characterized in detail, using 1D and 2D NMR techniques, ESI-MS, FTIR spectroscopy, elemental analysis, TGA, and X-ray diffraction. Their in vitro cytotoxicity was determined in a panel of human tumor cell lines (CH1, SW480 and A549) by means of the MTT colorimetric assay. Furthermore, the lipophilicity and redox properties of the novel complexes were evaluated in order to better understand their pharmacological behavior. The most promising drug candidate, 4b (Pt(DACH)(mal)2), demonstrated low in vivo toxicity but profound anticancer activity against both the L1210 leukemia and CT-26 colon carcinoma models.

  19. Co-targeting cancer drug escape pathways confers clinical advantage for multi-target anticancer drugs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tao, Lin; Zhu, Feng; Xu, Feng; Chen, Zhe; Jiang, Yu Yang; Chen, Yu Zong

    2015-12-01

    Recent investigations have suggested that anticancer therapeutics may be enhanced by co-targeting the primary anticancer target and the corresponding drug escape pathways. Whether this strategy confers statistically significant clinical advantage has not been systematically investigated. This question was probed by the evaluation of the clinical status and the multiple targets of 23 approved and 136 clinical trial multi-target anticancer drugs with particular focus on those co-targeting EGFR, HER2, Abl, VEGFR2, mTOR, PI3K, Alk, MEK, KIT, and DNA topoisomerase, and some of the 14, 7, 13, 20, 6, 5, 7, 2, 4 and 10 cancer drug escape pathways respectively. Most of the approved (73.9%) and phase III (75.0%), the majority of the Phase II (62.8%) and I (53.6%), and the minority of the discontinued (35.3%) multi-target drugs were found to co-target cancer drug escape pathways. This suggests that co-targeting anticancer targets and drug escape pathways confer significant clinical advantage and such strategy can be more extensively explored. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Anticancer Drug-Incorporated Layered Double Hydroxide Nanohybrids and Their Enhanced Anticancer Therapeutic Efficacy in Combination Cancer Treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tae-Hyun Kim

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective. Layered double hydroxide (LDH nanoparticles have been studied as cellular delivery carriers for anionic anticancer agents. As MTX and 5-FU are clinically utilized anticancer drugs in combination therapy, we aimed to enhance the therapeutic performance with the help of LDH nanoparticles. Method. Anticancer drugs, MTX and 5-FU, and their combination, were incorporated into LDH by reconstruction method. Simply, LDHs were thermally pretreated at 400°C, and then reacted with drug solution to simultaneously form drug-incorporated LDH. Thus prepared MTX/LDH (ML, 5-FU/LDH (FL, and (MTX + 5-FU/LDH (MFL nanohybrids were characterized by X-ray diffractometer, scanning electron microscopy, infrared spectroscopy, thermal analysis, zeta potential measurement, dynamic light scattering, and so forth. The nanohybrids were administrated to the human cervical adenocarcinoma, HeLa cells, in concentration-dependent manner, comparing with drug itself to verify the enhanced therapeutic efficacy. Conclusion. All the nanohybrids successfully accommodated intended drug molecules in their house-of-card-like structures during reconstruction reaction. It was found that the anticancer efficacy of MFL nanohybrid was higher than other nanohybrids, free drugs, or their mixtures, which means the multidrug-incorporated LDH nanohybrids could be potential drug delivery carriers for efficient cancer treatment via combination therapy.

  1. Medication adherence to oral anticancer drugs: systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Wen-Chuan; Chen, Chung-Yu; Lin, Shun-Jin; Chang, Chao-Sung

    2016-01-01

    Many studies have demonstrated that non-adherence to oral anticancer drugs (OACDs) has challenged treatment efficacy. Otherwise, few validated tools exist to measure patients' adherence to medication regimen in clinical practice. To synthesize previous studies on adherence by cancer patients taking OACDs, especially in targeted therapy, a systematic search of several electronic databases was conducted. We analyzed existing scales' contents for various cancer patients and outcomes of studies assessing adherence. However, a well-validated scale designed particularly for OACD adherence is still lacking. Most adherence scales used in the studies reviewed contain items focused on measuring patients' medication-taking behavior more than their barriers to medication compliance and beliefs. However, non-adherence to OACDs is a complex phenomenon, and drug-taking barriers and patient beliefs significantly affect patients' non-adherence. To understand the key drivers and predisposing factors for non-adherence, we need to develop a well-validated, multidimensional scale.

  2. Determinants and associated factors influencing medication adherence and persistence to oral anticancer drugs: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verbrugghe, M; Verhaeghe, S; Lauwaert, K; Beeckman, D; Van Hecke, A

    2013-10-01

    The use of oral anticancer drugs has increased in modern oncology treatment. The move from intravenous treatments towards oral anticancer drugs has increased the patients' own responsibility to take oral anticancer drugs as being prescribed. High rates of non-adherence to oral anticancer drugs have been reported. A systematic literature review was conducted to gain insight into determinants and associated factors of non-adherence and non-persistence in patients taking oral anticancer therapy. PubMed, Cochrane, Web of Science and Cinahl were systematically searched for studies focusing on determinants and associated factors of medication non-adherence and non-persistence to oral anticancer drugs. The methodological quality of the included studies was assessed by two independent reviewers. No studies were excluded based on the quality assessment. Twenty-five studies were included and systematically reviewed. The quality of the studies was moderate. Associated factors influencing medication non-adherence and non-persistence to oral anticancer drugs are multifactorial and interrelated. Older and younger age, and the influence of therapy related side effects were found to be predominant factors. Non-adherence and non-persistence to oral anticancer drug therapy are complex phenomena. More qualitative research is needed to facilitate the development of patient tailored complex interventions by exploring patients' needs and underlying processes influencing medication non-adherence and non-persistence to oral anticancer drugs. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Platinum drugs and DNA repair mechanisms in lung cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonanno, Laura; Favaretto, Adolfo; Rosell, Rafael

    2014-01-01

    The standard first-line treatment for around 80% of newly-diagnosed advanced non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) is chemotherapy. Currently, patients are allocated to chemotherapy on the basis of clinical conditions, comorbidities and histology. If feasible, platinum-based chemotherapy is considered as the most efficacious option. Due to the heterogeneity in terms of platinum-sensitivity among patients with NSCLC, great efforts have been made in order to identify molecular predictive markers of platinum resistance. Based on the mechanism of action of platinum, several components of DNA repair pathways have been investigated as potential predictive markers. The main DNA repair pathways involved in the repair of platinum-induced DNA damage are nucleotide excision repair and homologous recombination. The most studied potential predictive markers of platinum-sensitivity are Excision Repair Cross Complementing-1 (ERCC1) and Brest Cancer Type-I Susceptibility protein (BRCA1); however, increasing biological knowledge about DNA repair pathways suggests the potential clinical usefulness of integrated analysis of multiple DNA repair components.

  4. Linker design for the modular assembly of multifunctional and targeted platinum(ii)-containing anticancer agents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ding, S; Bierbach, U

    2016-08-16

    A versatile and efficient modular synthetic platform was developed for assembling multifunctional conjugates and targeted forms of platinum-(benz)acridines, a class of highly cytotoxic DNA-targeted hybrid agents. The synthetic strategy involved amide coupling between succinyl ester-modified platinum compounds (P1, P2) and a set of 11 biologically relevant primary and secondary amines (N1-N11). To demonstrate the feasibility and versatility of the approach, a structurally and functionally diverse range of amines was introduced. These include biologically active molecules, such as rucaparib (a PARP inhibitor), E/Z-endoxifen (an estrogen receptor antagonist), and a quinazoline-based tyrosine kinase inhibitor. Micro-scale reactions in Eppendorf tubes or on 96-well plates were used to screen for optimal coupling conditions in DMF solution with carbodiimide-, uronium-, and phosphonium-based compounds, as well as other common coupling reagents. Reactions with the phosphonium-based coupling reagent PyBOP produced the highest yields and gave the cleanest conversions. Furthermore, it was demonstrated that the chemistry can also be performed in aqueous media and is amenable to parallel synthesis based on multiple consecutive reactions in DMF in a "one-tube" format. In-line LC-MS was used to assess the stability of the conjugates in physiologically relevant buffers. Hydrolysis of the conjugates occurs at the ester moiety and is facilitated by the aquated metal moiety under low-chloride ion conditions. The rate of ester cleavage greatly depends on the nature of the amine component. Potential applications of the linker technology are discussed.

  5. Antitumor activity of cis-malonato[(4R,5R)-4,5-bis(aminomethyl)-2- isopropyl-1,3-dioxolane]platinum(II), a new platinum analogue, as an anticancer agent.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, D K; Kim, H T; Cho, Y B; Tai, J H; Ahn, J S; Kim, T S; Kim, K H; Hong, W S

    1995-01-01

    The in vitro and in vivo antitumor activity of a new antitumor platinum complex, cis-malonato[(4R, 5R)-4,5- bis(aminomethyl)-2-isopropyl-1,3-dioxolane]platinum(II) (SKI2053R, NSC D644591), were evaluated and compared with those of cisplatin (CDDP) and carboplatin (CBDCA) using murine tumors. SKI 2053R was highly active in vitro against both L1210 murine leukemia and its CDDP-resistant subline, L1210/DDP; the relative resistances were 20.0-, 14.5-, and 2.7-fold for CDDP, CBDCA, and SKI 2053R, respectively. SKI 2053R showed activity comparable with or superior to either CDDP or CBDCA in mice implanted with L1210. In mice implanted with L1210/DDP, as compared with CBDCA, SKI 2053R showed high values for the percentage of treated survivors relative to controls and for numbers of cured mice, whereas CDDP had virtually no activity. In mice implanted with P388, all three drugs were highly active, but the intensity of activity was shown to be ranked in the following order: SKI 2053R > CDDP > CBDCA. The antitumor activity of SKI 2053R against Lewis lung carcinoma was comparable with that of both CDDP and CBDCA. The antitumor activity of SKI 2053R was further investigated against two human tumor xenografts, KATO III (stomach adenocarcinoma) and WiDr (colon adenocarcinoma), implanted s.c. in nude mice and was compared with that of CDDP. In SKI 2053R-treated groups, the time required for a mean tumor weight of 1,000 mg was 33.1 days in KATO III xenografts and 35.0 days in WiDr xenografts as compared with 30.2 and 27.2 days in CDDP-treated groups, respectively. SKI 2053R achieved growth-inhibition rates comparable with those of CDDP against KATO III (65% versus 59%) and WiDr xenografts (64% versus 54%) on day 35. These results indicate that SKI 2053R is an attractive candidate for further development as a clinically useful anticancer drug.

  6. Enhancement of anticancer efficacy using modified lipophilic nanoparticle drug encapsulation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lee P

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Puiyan Lee1, Ruizhong Zhang1, Vincent Li1, Xuelai Liu1, Raymond WY Sun2, Chi-Ming Che2, Kenneth KY Wong11Department of Surgery, Li Ka Shing Faculty of Medicine, 2Department of Chemistry and Open Laboratory of Chemical Biology of the Institute of Molecular Technology for Drug Discovery and Synthesis, The University of Hong Kong, Hong KongBackground: Development of anticancer drugs is challenging. Indeed, much research effort has been spent in the development of new drugs to improve clinical outcomes with minimal toxicity. We have previously reported that a formulation of lipid gold porphyrin nanoparticles reduced systemic drug toxicity when compared with free gold porphyrin. In this study, we investigated the delivery and treatment efficiency of PEG surface-modified lipid nanoparticles as a carrier platform.Methods: We encapsulated antitumor drugs into PEG-modified lipid nanoparticles and these were characterized by size, zeta potential, and encapsulation efficiency. The delivery efficiency into tumor tissue was evaluated using a biodistribution study. To evaluate antitumor efficacy, gold porphyrin or camptothecin (a DNA topoisomerase I inhibitor were encapsulated and compared using an in vivo neuroblastoma (N2A model.Results: We showed that drug encapsulation into PEG-modified lipid nanoparticles enhanced the preferential uptake in tumor tissue. Furthermore, higher tumor killing efficiency was observed in response to treatment with PEG-modified lipid nanoparticles encapsulating gold porphyrin or camptothecin when compared with free gold porphyrin or free camptothecin. The in vivo antitumor effect was further confirmed by study of tumor inhibition and positive apoptosis activity. Surface modification of lipophilic nanoparticles with PEG increased the efficiency of drug delivery into tumor tissue and subsequently more effective antitumor activity.Conclusion: This specific design of a chemotherapeutic agent using nanotechnology is important in the

  7. The Metabolism of Anticancer Drugs by the Liver: Current Approaches to the Drug Development Process.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belka, Mariusz; Bączek, Tomasz

    2015-01-01

    The worldwide scientific community is in agreement that the activities of metabolic enzymes greatly impact the efficacies of anticancer drugs. Elucidation of the influences of these drugs on metabolism, especially that occurring in the liver, appears to be an extremely important step in the development of new anticancer drugs. Considering the continuous need to search for safe and effective chemotherapeutics, studies of the metabolism of new potent drugs are very important and should be included in the modern, innovative drug development pipeline. This article summarizes most of the current metabolic case studies involving anticancer drug development. Firstly, the impacts of diverse metabolic enzymes, particularly cytochrome P450, and the utilities of a few model in vitro enzymatic systems are described. Then, different analytical techniques, with particular emphasis on liquid chromatography- mass spectrometry detection and structural elucidation, are discussed. Finally, some computer-aided strategies for decision making in the drug design process are described. Recent advances in drug development, including microdosing, in vitro-in vivo correlation and pharmacologic audit trail, are also discussed in relation to metabolic studies.

  8. Genetic Interactions of STAT3 and Anticancer Drug Development

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bingliang Fang

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 (STAT3 plays critical roles in tumorigenesis and malignant evolution and has been intensively studied as a therapeutic target for cancer. A number of STAT3 inhibitors have been evaluated for their antitumor activity in vitro and in vivo in experimental tumor models and several approved therapeutic agents have been reported to function as STAT3 inhibitors. Nevertheless, most STAT3 inhibitors have yet to be translated to clinical evaluation for cancer treatment, presumably because of pharmacokinetic, efficacy, and safety issues. In fact, a major cause of failure of anticancer drug development is lack of efficacy. Genetic interactions among various cancer-related pathways often provide redundant input from parallel and/or cooperative pathways that drives and maintains survival environments for cancer cells, leading to low efficacy of single-target agents. Exploiting genetic interactions of STAT3 with other cancer-related pathways may provide molecular insight into mechanisms of cancer resistance to pathway-targeted therapies and strategies for development of more effective anticancer agents and treatment regimens. This review focuses on functional regulation of STAT3 activity; possible interactions of the STAT3, RAS, epidermal growth factor receptor, and reduction-oxidation pathways; and molecular mechanisms that modulate therapeutic efficacies of STAT3 inhibitors.

  9. Genetic Interactions of STAT3 and Anticancer Drug Development

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fang, Bingliang [Department of Thoracic and Cardiovascular Surgery, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX 77030 (United States)

    2014-03-06

    Signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 (STAT3) plays critical roles in tumorigenesis and malignant evolution and has been intensively studied as a therapeutic target for cancer. A number of STAT3 inhibitors have been evaluated for their antitumor activity in vitro and in vivo in experimental tumor models and several approved therapeutic agents have been reported to function as STAT3 inhibitors. Nevertheless, most STAT3 inhibitors have yet to be translated to clinical evaluation for cancer treatment, presumably because of pharmacokinetic, efficacy, and safety issues. In fact, a major cause of failure of anticancer drug development is lack of efficacy. Genetic interactions among various cancer-related pathways often provide redundant input from parallel and/or cooperative pathways that drives and maintains survival environments for cancer cells, leading to low efficacy of single-target agents. Exploiting genetic interactions of STAT3 with other cancer-related pathways may provide molecular insight into mechanisms of cancer resistance to pathway-targeted therapies and strategies for development of more effective anticancer agents and treatment regimens. This review focuses on functional regulation of STAT3 activity; possible interactions of the STAT3, RAS, epidermal growth factor receptor, and reduction-oxidation pathways; and molecular mechanisms that modulate therapeutic efficacies of STAT3 inhibitors.

  10. In vivo evaluation on the effects of HemoHIM in promoting anticancer activities and reducing the side-effects of anticancer drugs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jo, Sung Kee; Jung, U Hee; Park, Hae Ran; Ju, Eun Jin; Cho, Eun Hee

    2009-07-15

    In this project, we aimed to obtain the preclinical in vivo evaluation data for the development of the herbal composition (HemoHIM) as the auxiliary agent for the anticancer treatment that can reduce the side-effects of anticancer drugs and enhance their anticancer activities. Firstly, in vitro studies showed that HemoHIM did not show any effects on the tumor cell growth inhibition by 2 anticancer drugs (cisplatin, 5-FU), which indicated that at least HemoHIM does not exert any adverse effects on the activities of anticancer drugs. Next, the in vivo studies with mice implanted with tumor cells(B16F0, LLC1) showed that HemoHIM partially enhanced the anticancer activities of drugs (cisplatin, 5-FU), and improved endogenous anticancer immune activities. Furthermore, in the same animal models, HemoHIM effectively reduced the side-effects of anticancer drugs (liver and renal toxicities by cisplatin, immune and hematopoietic disorders by 5-FU). These results collectively showed that HemoHIM can enhance the activities of anticancer drugs and reduce their side-effects in vitro and in vivo and HemoHIM does not exert any adverse effects on the efficacy of anticancer drugs. The results of this project can be utilized as the basic preclinical data for the development and approval of HemoHIM as the auxiliary agent for the anticancer treatment

  11. Halloysite Nanotubes, a Multifunctional Nanovehicle for Anticancer Drug Delivery

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    郭明义; 王艾菲; 费海姆; 齐文秀; 任浩; 郭颖杰; 朱广山

    2012-01-01

    Targeted drug delivery systems have attracted a great deal of interest by virtue of their potential use in chemotherapy. In this study, multicomponent halloysite nanotubes (HNTs) have been evaluated as a platform to assist and direct the delivery of anticancer drug doxorubicin (DOX) into cancer cells. Folic acid (FA) and magnetite nanopar- ticles were successfully grafted onto HNTs via amide reaction whereas the drug has been introduced by capitalizing electrostatic interaction between cationic drug and anionic exterior of HNTs, which eventually leads to pH respon- sive release. The resultant DOX loaded FA-Fe304@HNTs were well characterized by transmission electron mi- croscopy (TEM), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) and XRD. The clinical efficacy of the system was validated by confocal microscopy and cell cytotoxicity assay (MTT assay). MTT assay results revealed a high biocompatibility up to a concentration of 200 μg/mL of HNTs, while, DOX loaded FA-Fe304@HNTs were markedly cytotoxic to HeLa cells. This multifunctional nanovehicle has a great po- tential for cancer diagnosis and therapy, and could further advance the clinical use of nanomedicine.

  12. Nanoformulation for anticancer drug delivery: Enhanced pharmacokinetics and circulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parekh, Gaurav

    In this study, we have explored the application of the Layer-by-Layer (LbL) assembly technique for improving injectable drug delivery systems of low soluble anticancer drugs (e.g. Camptothecin (CPT), Paclitaxel (PTX) or Doxorubicin (DOX)). For this study, a polyelectrolyte shell encapsulates different types of drug nanocores (e.g. soft core, nanomicelle or solid lipid nanocores).The low soluble drugs tend to crystallize and precipitate in an aqueous medium. This is the reason they cannot be injected and may have low concentrations and low circulation time in the blood. Even though these drugs when present in the cancer microenvironment have high anti-tumor inhibition, the delivery to the tumor site after intravenous administration is a challenge. We have used FDA-approved biopolymers for the process and elaborated formation of 60-90 nm diameter initial cores, which was stabilized by multilayer LbL shells for controlled release and longer circulation. A washless LbL assembly process was applied as an essential advancement in nano-assembly technology using low density nanocore (lipids) and preventing aggregation. This advancement reduced the number of process steps, enhanced drug loading capacity, and prevented the loss of expensive polyelectrolytes. Finally, we elaborated a general nano-encapsulation process, which allowed these three important anticancer drug core-shell nanocapsules with diameters of ca. 100-130 nm (this small size is a record for LbL encapsulation technique) to be stable in the serum and the blood for at least one week, efficient for cancer cell culture studies, injectable to mice with circulation for 4 hrs, and effective in suppressing tumors. This work is divided into three studies. The first study (CHAPTER 4) explores the application of LbL assembly for encapsulating a soft core of albumin protein and CPT anticancer drug. In order to preserve the activity of drug in the core, a unique technique of pH reversal is employed where the first few

  13. Finely Tuned Asymmetric Platinum(IV) Anticancer Complexes: Structure-Activity Relationship and Application as Orally Available Prodrugs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yap, Siew Qi; Chin, Chee Fei; Hong Thng, Agnes Hwee; Pang, Yi Yun; Ho, Han Kiat; Ang, Wee Han

    2017-02-20

    Platinum(IV) bis-carboxylates are highly versatile prodrug scaffolds with different axial ligands that can be functionalized while keeping the platinum(II) pharmacophore intact. Using a sequential acylation strategy, we developed a class of Pt(IV) prodrugs of cisplatin with contrasting lipophilic and hydrophilic ligands. We investigated their stability, reduction rates, lipophilicity, aqueous solubility, and antiproliferative efficacies, and assessed for correlations among the parameters that could be useful in drug design. We showed that compounds with high lipophilicity result in better antiproliferative effects in vitro and in vivo, with one of the three compounds tested showing better efficacy than satraplatin against an animal model of colorectal cancer, owing to its higher solubility and lower reduction rates. Our asymmetric Pt(IV) prodrugs may pave the way for a highly predictable, fine-tuned class of orally available Pt(IV) prodrugs for the treatment of colorectal cancer. © 2017 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  14. The nuclear matrix as a site of anticancer drug action.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernandes, D J; Catapano, C V

    1995-01-01

    Many nuclear functions, including the organization of the chromatin within the nucleus, depend upon the presence of a nuclear matrix. Nuclear matrix proteins are involved in the formation of chromatin loops, control of DNA supercoiling, and regulation and coordination of transcriptional and replicational activities within individual loops. Various structural and functional components of the nuclear matrix represent potential targets for anticancer agents. Alkylating agents and ionizing radiation interact preferentially with nuclear matrix proteins and matrix-associated DNA. Other chemotherapeutic agents, such as fludarabine phosphate and topoisomerase II-active drugs, interact specifically with matrix-associated enzymes, such as DNA primase and the DNA topoisomerase II alpha isozyme. The interactions of these agents at the level of the nuclear matrix may compromise multiple nuclear functions and be relevant to their antitumor activities.

  15. The Pharmacokinetic/Pharmacodynamic Pipeline: Translating Anticancer Drug Pharmacology to the Clinic

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Zhou, Qingyu; Gallo, James M

    2011-01-01

    Progress in an understanding of the genetic basis of cancer coupled to molecular pharmacology of potential new anticancer drugs calls for new approaches that are able to address key issues in the drug...

  16. Strategic development on generic anti-cancer drugs Bevacizumab and Erlotinib Hydrochloride for Harbin Pharmaceutical Group

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Cheung Fat Ping

    2011-01-01

    @@ With improved economy, changing life styles, aging population and health care reform, China had a very potential anti-cancer drug market.The patents of popular anti-cancer drugs Avastin and Tarceva would expire in few years.Generic versions of Avastin and Tarceva were Bevacizumab and Erlotinib Hydrochloride respectively.Harbin Pharmaceutical Group was proposed to develop strategically both generic medicines to enter the high-end anti-cancer drug market for targeted cancer therapies.The vital to success of developing the generic drugs were discussed.

  17. Fermented wheat germ extract - nutritional supplement or anticancer drug?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Voigt Wieland

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Fermented wheat germ extract (FWGE is a multisubstance composition and, besides others, contains 2-methoxy benzoquinone and 2, 6-dimethoxy benzoquinone which are likely to exert some of its biological effects. FWGE interferes with anaerobic glycolysis, pentose cycle and ribonucleotide reductase. It has significant antiproliferative effects and kills tumor cells by the induction of apoptosis via the caspase-poly [ADP-ribose] polymerase-pathway. FWGE interacts synergistically with a variety of different anticancer drugs and exerted antimetastatic properties in mouse models. In addition, FWGE modulates immune response by downregulation of MHC-I complex and the induction of TNF-α and various interleukins. Data in the F-344 rat model provide evidence for a colon cancer preventing effect of FWGE. Clinical data from a randomized phase II trial in melanoma patients indicate a significant benefit for patients treated with dacarbazine in combination with FWGE in terms of progression free survival (PFS and overall survival (OS. Similarly, data from studies in colorectal cancer suggested a benefit of FWGE treatment. Besides extension of OS and PFS, FWGE improved the quality of life in several studies. Conclusion In conclusion, available data so far, justify the use of FWGE as a non-prescription medical nutriment for cancer patients. Further randomized, controlled and large scale clinical studies are mandatory, to further clarify the value of FWGE as a drug component of future chemotherapy regimens.

  18. Pharmacokinetics of peptide mediated delivery of anticancer drug ellipticine.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Weina Ma

    Full Text Available The amino acid pairing peptide EAK16-II (EAK has shown the ability to stabilize the hydrophobic anticancer agent ellipticine (EPT in aqueous solution. In this study, we investigate pharmacokinetics of the formulation of EAK-EPT complexes in vivo. The developed formulation can achieve a sufficiently high drug concentration required in vivo animal models. The nanostructure and surface properties of EAK-EPT complexes or nanoparticle were characterized by transmission electron microscopy (TEM and zeta potential measurements, respectively. 12 healthy male SD rats were divided into EPT group and EAK-EPT group randomly. Rats in EPT group were tail intravenously injected with the EPT (20 mg/kg; rats in EAK-EPT group were injected with EAK-EPT complexes (EPT's concentration is 20 mg/kg. EPT was extracted from rat plasma with dexamethasone sodium phosphate as internal standards (IS. The pharmacokinetic parameters were obtained using high pressure liquid chromatography (HPLC. Significant differences in main pharmacokinetic parameters between EPT and EAK-EPT complexes were observed, demonstrating that the complexation with EAK prolongs the residence time of the drug and enlarges the area under the concentration-time curve (AUC. This means that EAK can serve as a suitable carrier to increase the bioavailability of EPT.

  19. Oxidation of 3,6-dioxa-1,8-octanedithiol by platinum(IV) anticancer prodrug and model complex: kinetic and mechanistic studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huo, Shuying; Shen, Shigang; Liu, Dongzhi; Shi, Tiesheng

    2012-06-07

    Thioredoxins are small redox proteins and have the active sites of Cys-Xaa-Yaa-Cys; they are overexpressed by many different cancer cells. Cisplatin and Pt(II) analogues could bind to the active sites and inhibit the activities of the proteins, as demonstrated by other researchers. Platinum(IV) anticancer drugs are often regarded as prodrugs, but their interactions with thioredoxins have not been studied. In this work, 3,6-dioxa-1,8-octanedithiol (dithiol) was chosen as a model compound for the active sites of thioredoxins, and its reactions with cis-[Pt(NH(3))(2)Cl(4)] and trans-[PtCl(2)(CN)(4)](2-) (cisplatin prodrug and a model complex) were studied. The pK(a) values for the dithiol were characterized to be 8.7 ± 0.2 and 9.6 ± 0.2 at 25.0 °C and an ionic strength of 1.0 M. The reaction kinetics was followed by a stopped-flow spectrophotometer over a wide pH range. An overall second-order rate law was established, -d[Pt(IV)]/dt = k'[Pt(IV)][dithiol], where k' stands for the observed second-order rate constants. Values of k' increased several orders of magnitude when the solution pH was increased from 3 to 9. A stoichiometry of Δ[Pt(IV)]/Δ[dithiol] = 1:1 derived for the reduction process and product analysis by mass spectrometry indicated that the dithiol was oxidized to form an intramolecular disulfide, coinciding with the nature of thioredoxin proteins. All of the reaction features are rationalized in terms of a reaction mechanism, involving three parallel rate-determining steps depending on the pH of the reaction medium. Rate constants for the rate-determining steps were evaluated. It can be concluded that Pt(IV) anticancer prodrugs can oxidize the reduced thioredoxins, and the oxidation mechanism is similar to those of the oxidations of biologically important reductants by some reactive oxygen species (ROS) such as hypochlorous acid/hypochlorite and chloramines.

  20. Nanovectors for anti-cancer drug delivery in the treatment of advanced pancreatic adenocarcinoma

    OpenAIRE

    Hsueh, Chung-Tzu; Selim, Julie H; Tsai, James Y; Hsueh, Chung-Tsen

    2016-01-01

    Liposome, albumin and polymer polyethylene glycol are nanovector formulations successfully developed for anti-cancer drug delivery. There are significant differences in pharmacokinetics, efficacy and toxicity between pre- and post-nanovector modification. The alteration in clinical pharmacology is instrumental for the future development of nanovector-based anticancer therapeutics. We have reviewed the results of clinical studies and translational research in nanovector-based anti-cancer thera...

  1. Developing Exposure/Response Models for Anticancer Drug Treatment: Special Considerations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mould, DR; Walz, A-C; Lave, T; Gibbs, JP; Frame, B

    2015-01-01

    Anticancer agents often have a narrow therapeutic index (TI), requiring precise dosing to ensure sufficient exposure for clinical activity while minimizing toxicity. These agents frequently have complex pharmacology, and combination therapy may cause schedule-specific effects and interactions. We review anticancer drug development, showing how integration of modeling and simulation throughout development can inform anticancer dose selection, potentially improving the late-phase success rate. This article has a companion article in Clinical Pharmacology & Therapeutics with practical examples. PMID:26225225

  2. Developing Exposure/Response Models for Anticancer Drug Treatment: Special Considerations

    OpenAIRE

    Mould, DR; Walz, A-C; Lave, T; Gibbs, JP; Frame, B

    2015-01-01

    Anticancer agents often have a narrow therapeutic index (TI), requiring precise dosing to ensure sufficient exposure for clinical activity while minimizing toxicity. These agents frequently have complex pharmacology, and combination therapy may cause schedule-specific effects and interactions. We review anticancer drug development, showing how integration of modeling and simulation throughout development can inform anticancer dose selection, potentially improving the late-phase success rate. ...

  3. Facile preparation of mono-, di- and mixed-carboxylato platinum(IV) complexes for versatile anticancer prodrug design.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Jenny Z; Bonnitcha, Paul; Wexselblatt, Ezequiel; Klein, Alice V; Najajreh, Yousef; Gibson, Dan; Hambley, Trevor W

    2013-01-28

    Facile strategies were developed for the versatile functionalization of platinum(IV) axial sites, allowing for easy accessibility to unsymmetric mono- and mixed-carboxylato, as well as symmetric di-substituted platinum(IV) complexes. The first method involves the direct oxidation and carboxylation of the platinum(II) center using an appropriate peroxide and the carboxylate of choice to firstly yield a monocarboxylato monohydroxido platinum(IV) complex. This platinum(IV) intermediate can undergo further carboxylation to give rise to a mixed-carboxylato platinum(IV) complex. The second method involves the activation of the carboxylate of choice by a common carbodiimide coupling reagent, and its reaction with a dihydroxido platinum(IV) precursor to give the monocarboxylato platinum(IV) complex. Uronium salts can be employed to promote efficient dicarboxylation of the dihydroxido platinum(IV) precursor. Lastly, an axial azide pendant group was demonstrated to be suitable for orthogonal "click" conjugation reactions. Copyright © 2013 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  4. Hydrolysis Process of the Anticancer Agents Novel Non-classical trans-Platinum(Ⅱ) with Aliphatic Amines

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YUAN Qing-Hui; ZHOU Li-Xin

    2007-01-01

    The hydrolysis process of the anticancer agents novel non-classical transplatinum( Ⅱ ) with aliphatic amines and the influence of solvent models therein have been studied by using hybrid density functional theory (B3LYP). In this study, the stepwise hydrolysis, trans[PtCl2(Am)(isopropylamine)] + 2H2O → trans-[Pt(Am)(isopropylamine)(OH2)2]2++ 2Cl-, was explored. Implicit solvent effects were incorporated through polarized continuum models. The stationary points on the potential energy surfaces for the first and second hydrolysis steps,proceeding via a general SN2 pathway, were fully optimized and characterized. It was found that the first hydrolysis reaction is easier than the second one and the hydrolysis of trans- [PtCl2-(isopropylamine)2] is the easiest in our studying systems. The result can assist in under- tanding the hydrolysis mechanism of trans-[PtCl2(Am)(isopropylamine)] and designing novel Pt-based anticancer drugs.

  5. Recent Advances in chemistry and pharmacology of 2-methoxyestradiol: An anticancer investigational drug.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, B Sathish; Raghuvanshi, Dushyant Singh; Hasanain, Mohammad; Alam, Sarfaraz; Sarkar, Jayanta; Mitra, Kalyan; Khan, Feroz; Negi, Arvind S

    2016-06-01

    2-Methoxyestradiol (2ME2), an estrogen hormone metabolite is a potential cancer chemotherapeutic agent. Presently, it is an investigational drug under various phases of clinical trials alone or in combination therapy. Its anticancer activity has been attributed to its antitubulin, antiangiogenic, pro-apoptotic and ROS induction properties. This anticancer drug candidate has been explored extensively in last twenty years for its detailed chemistry and pharmacology. Present review is an update of its chemistry and biological activity. It also extends an assessment of potential of 2ME2 and its analogues as possible anticancer drug in future. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Human recombinant RNASET2: A potential anti-cancer drug

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roiz, Levava; Smirnoff, Patricia; Lewin, Iris; Shoseyov, Oded; Schwartz, Betty

    2016-01-01

    The roles of cell motility and angiogenetic processes in metastatic spread and tumor aggressiveness are well established and must be simultaneously targeted to maximize antitumor drug potency. This work evaluated the antitumorigenic capacities of human recombinant RNASET2 (hrRNASET2), a homologue of the Aspergillus niger T2RNase ACTIBIND, which has been shown to display both antitumorigenic and antiangiogenic activities. hrRNASET2 disrupted intracellular actin filament and actin-rich extracellular extrusion organization in both CT29 colon cancer and A375SM melanoma cells and induced a significant dose-dependent inhibition of A375SM cell migration. hrRNASET2 also induced full arrest of angiogenin-induced tube formation and brought to a three-fold lower relative HT29 colorectal and A375SM melanoma tumor volume, when compared to Avastin-treated animals. In parallel, mean blood vessel counts were 36.9% lower in hrRNASET2-vs. Avastin-treated mice and survival rates of hrRNASET2-treated mice were 50% at 73 days post-treatment, while the median survival time for untreated animals was 22 days. Moreover, a 60-day hrRNASET2 treatment period reduced mean A375SM lung metastasis foci counts by three-fold when compared to untreated animals. Taken together, the combined antiangiogenic and antitumorigenic capacities of hrRNASET2, seemingly arising from its direct interaction with intercellular and extracellular matrices, render it an attractive anticancer therapy candidate. PMID:27014725

  7. Selective anti-cancer agents as anti-aging drugs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blagosklonny, Mikhail V

    2013-12-01

    Recent groundbreaking discoveries have revealed that IGF-1, Ras, MEK, AMPK, TSC1/2, FOXO, PI3K, mTOR, S6K, and NFκB are involved in the aging process. This is remarkable because the same signaling molecules, oncoproteins and tumor suppressors, are well-known targets for cancer therapy. Furthermore, anti-cancer drugs aimed at some of these targets have been already developed. This arsenal could be potentially employed for anti-aging interventions (given that similar signaling molecules are involved in both cancer and aging). In cancer, intrinsic and acquired resistance, tumor heterogeneity, adaptation, and genetic instability of cancer cells all hinder cancer-directed therapy. But for anti-aging applications, these hurdles are irrelevant. For example, since anti-aging interventions should be aimed at normal postmitotic cells, no selection for resistance is expected. At low doses, certain agents may decelerate aging and age-related diseases. Importantly, deceleration of aging can in turn postpone cancer, which is an age-related disease.

  8. [Carboxyl nanodiamond as intracellular transporters of anticancer drug--podophyllotoxin].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Tao-Li; Wang, Bin; Peng, Yan; Ni, Jing-Man

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to investigate the intracellular transporters effect and the cytotoxicity of carboxyl nanodiamond (CND) - podophyllotoxin (PPT). Nanodiamond (ND) was treated with mixed carboxylic acid and finally got 64 nm CND by centrifugation, and then it was reacted with PPT to form CND-PPT. UV spectrophotometry was used to calculate the content of PPT in CND-PPT, the particle size distribution and zeta potential were measured by Dynamic laser scattering instrument. CND, PPT, CND-PPT and CND + PPT (physical mixture of CND and PPT) were characterized by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, at the same time, thermal analysis and element analysis were used to estimate the content of the PPT in CND-PPT. The affect of CND, PPT, CND-PPT on HeLa cell was measured with MTT assay. The results showed that content of PPT combined with CND accounted for about 10%. MTT assay showed that CND has low cytotoxicity and CND-PPT can increase the water soluble of PPT. As a conclusion, CND as a hydrophilic pharmaceutical carrier combined with PPT is able to increase the water solubility of PPT, at low concentration, CND-PPT can enhance the antitumor activity in comparison with PPT, so CND can be used as a potential anticancer drug carrier.

  9. Human recombinant RNASET2: A potential anti-cancer drug.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roiz, Levava; Smirnoff, Patricia; Lewin, Iris; Shoseyov, Oded; Schwartz, Betty

    2016-01-01

    The roles of cell motility and angiogenetic processes in metastatic spread and tumor aggressiveness are well established and must be simultaneously targeted to maximize antitumor drug potency. This work evaluated the antitumorigenic capacities of human recombinant RNASET2 (hrRNASET2), a homologue of the Aspergillus niger T2RNase ACTIBIND, which has been shown to display both antitumorigenic and antiangiogenic activities. hrRNASET2 disrupted intracellular actin filament and actin-rich extracellular extrusion organization in both CT29 colon cancer and A375SM melanoma cells and induced a significant dose-dependent inhibition of A375SM cell migration. hrRNASET2 also induced full arrest of angiogenin-induced tube formation and brought to a three-fold lower relative HT29 colorectal and A375SM melanoma tumor volume, when compared to Avastin-treated animals. In parallel, mean blood vessel counts were 36.9% lower in hrRNASET2-vs. Avastin-treated mice and survival rates of hrRNASET2-treated mice were 50% at 73 days post-treatment, while the median survival time for untreated animals was 22 days. Moreover, a 60-day hrRNASET2 treatment period reduced mean A375SM lung metastasis foci counts by three-fold when compared to untreated animals. Taken together, the combined antiangiogenic and antitumorigenic capacities of hrRNASET2, seemingly arising from its direct interaction with intercellular and extracellular matrices, render it an attractive anticancer therapy candidate.

  10. Copper transporters and the cellular pharmacology of the platinum-containing cancer drugs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Howell, Stephen B; Safaei, Roohangiz; Larson, Christopher A; Sailor, Michael J

    2010-06-01

    Multiple lines of evidence indicate that the platinum-containing cancer drugs enter cells, are distributed to various subcellular compartments, and are exported from cells via transporters that evolved to manage copper homeostasis. The cytotoxicity of the platinum drugs is directly related to how much drug enters the cell, and almost all cells that have acquired resistance to the platinum drugs exhibit reduced drug accumulation. The major copper influx transporter, copper transporter 1 (CTR1), has now been shown to control the tumor cell accumulation and cytotoxic effect of cisplatin, carboplatin, and oxaliplatin. There is a good correlation between change in CTR1 expression and acquired cisplatin resistance among ovarian cancer cell lines, and genetic knockout of CTR1 renders cells resistant to cisplatin in vivo. The expression of CTR1 is regulated at the transcriptional level by copper via Sp1 and at the post-translational level by the proteosome. Copper and cisplatin both trigger the down-regulation of CTR1 via a process that involves ubiquitination and proteosomal degradation and requires the copper chaperone antioxidant protein 1 (ATOX1). The cisplatin-induced degradation of CTR1 can be blocked with the proteosome inhibitor bortezomib, and this increases the cellular uptake and the cytotoxicity of cisplatin in a synergistic manner. Copper and platinum(II) have similar sulfur binding characteristics, and the presence of stacked rings of methionines and cysteines in the CTR1 trimer suggest a mechanism by which CTR1 selectively transports copper and the platinum-containing drugs via sequential transchelation reactions similar to the manner in which copper is passed from ATOX1 to the copper efflux transporters.

  11. 金属类抗癌药物的研究进展%Metal-based anticancer drug research progress

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    徐新华; 张国刚; 王林; 杨勤玲; 张毓萍

    2012-01-01

    在新型抗癌药物中,金属类抗癌药物已成为重要的一类.金属类抗癌药物有许多其它药物无法比拟的独特性质,近年,新的高效、低毒、具有抗癌活性的金属化合物不断被合成出来.其中有铂类抗癌药物,有机锡及其配合物、有机锗化合物、钯配合物、钌配合物、铜配位化合物、钛类化合物等,本文综述了这些化合物在抗癌领域的研究与应用新进展.%In recent years, metal - based anti - cancer drugs have become one important type among the new developing anti - cancer drugs. Metal - based anti - cancer drugs have many unique properties that are superior to those of other drugs. With the further understanding of the pharmacological action of the metal complexes, the new metal compounds with high efficiency, low toxicity, and anticancer activity were continuously synthesized. Those compounds included platinum anti - cancer drugs, organic tin complexes, organic germanium compound, palladium complexes, ruthenium complexes, copper coordination compounds, titanium compounds, etc. This article reviews research and application progress of these compounds in the anti ?cancer field.

  12. Highly water-soluble platinum(II) complexes as GLUT substrates for targeted therapy: improved anticancer efficacy and transporter-mediated cytotoxic properties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Pengxing; Lu, Yanhui; Gao, Xiangqian; Liu, Ran; Zhang-Negrerie, Daisy; Shi, Ying; Wang, Yiqiang; Wang, Songqing; Gao, Qingzhi

    2013-03-25

    Glucose-conjugated malonato-platinum(II) complexes are designed and synthesized to target tumor-specific active transporters, namely, glucose transporters (GLUTs); the complexes exhibit much higher aqueous solubility by 150 times, improved potency in cytotoxicities by 10 times, and increased therapeutic index by over 30 fold compared to the newest generation of clinical drugs oxaliplatin.

  13. Piperin and piplartin as natural oral anticancer drug

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Berlian Bidarisugma

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Background: Since the last few decades, oral cancer as pathology has become an attention in medicine and dentistry. The majority cases of oral cancer are affecting people with smoking habit and alcohol consumption. Many herbs contain substances which can stop cancer cells proliferation, such as Piper retrofractum/Retrofracti fructus, an herb plant from Piperaceae family which contains piperin and piplartin. Purpose: The purpose of this study was to examine the mechanism of piperin and pilplartin as natural oral anticancer drug. Reviews: Piperin and piplartin has function as antioxidant that can protect body cell from damage caused by free radicals. Piperin works synergistically with another bioactive substance like capsaicin and curcumin. Piperin increase the number of serum and life time of serum from a few nutrition substance like co-enzyme Q10 and beta-carotene. Beta-carotene can catch reactive O2 and peroxil radicals. The activity of anticancer piplartin related with obstruction of proliferation cell rate, observe form Ki67 reduction as antigen in nucleus that associated with G1, S, G2, and M phase in cell cycle. Comparing with piplartin, piperin is more potential to inhibit proliferation rate of Ki67, but piplartin’s antiproliferation mechanism will increase if supported by piperin. Conclusion: Piperin and piplartin contained in Javanese chili are potential for natural oral anticancer, by directly or indirectly suppress tumor cell development by increasing the number of immunity cells (immunomodulator, and by inhibiting cell proliferation with reduction of Ki67, nucleus antigen that associated with G1,S,G2, dan M phase of cell cycle.Latar belakang: Sejak beberapa dekade terakhir, patologi kanker rongga mulut telah banyak menjadi perhatian di bidang kedokteran dan kedokteran gigi. Risiko paling tinggi ditemukan pada penderita perokok dan peminum alkohol. Banyak tanaman herbal yang memiliki kandungan untuk menghambat pertumbuhan sel kanker

  14. Platinum-RNA modifications following drug treatment in S. cerevisiae identified by click chemistry and enzymatic mapping.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Osborn, Maire F; White, Jonathan D; Haley, Michael M; DeRose, Victoria J

    2014-10-17

    With the importance of RNA-based regulatory pathways, the potential for targeting noncoding and coding RNAs by small molecule therapeutics is of great interest. Platinum(II) complexes including cisplatin (cis-diamminedichloroplatinum(II)) are widely prescribed anticancer compounds that form stable adducts on nucleic acids. In tumors, DNA damage from Pt(II) initiates apoptotic signaling, but this activity is not necessary for cytotoxicity (e.g., Yu et al., 2008), suggesting accumulation and consequences of Pt(II) lesions on non-DNA targets. We previously reported an azide-functionalized compound, picazoplatin, designed for post-treatment click labeling that enables detection of Pt complexes (White et al., 2013). Here, we report in-gel fluorescent detection of Pt-bound rRNA and tRNA extracted from picazoplatin-treated S. cerevisiae and labeled using Cu-free click chemistry. These data provide the first evidence that cellular tRNA is a platinum drug substrate. We assess Pt(II) binding sites within rRNA from cisplatin-treated S. cerevisiae, in regions where damage is linked to significant downstream consequences including the sarcin-ricin loop (SRL) Helix 95. Pt-RNA adducts occur on the nucleotide substrates of ribosome-inactivating proteins, as well as on the bulged-G motif critical for elongation factor recognition of the loop. At therapeutically relevant concentrations, Pt(II) also binds robustly within conserved cation-binding pockets in Domains V and VI rRNA at the peptidyl transferase center. Taken together, these results demonstrate a convenient click chemistry methodology that can be applied to identify other metal or covalent modification-based drug targets and suggest a ribotoxic mechanism for cisplatin cytotoxicity.

  15. A Photoactivatable Platinum(IV) Complex Targeting Genomic DNA and Histone Deacetylases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kasparkova, Jana; Kostrhunova, Hana; Novakova, Olga; Křikavová, Radka; Vančo, Ján; Trávníček, Zdeněk; Brabec, Viktor

    2015-11-23

    We report toxic effects of a photoactivatable platinum(IV) complex conjugated with suberoyl-bis-hydroxamic acid in tumor cells. The conjugate exerts, after photoactivation, two functions: activity as both a platinum(II) anticancer drug and histone deacetylase (HDAC) inhibitor in cancer cells. This approach relies on the use of a Pt(IV) pro-drug, acting by two independent mechanisms of biological action in a cooperative manner, which can be selectively photoactivated to a cytotoxic species in and around a tumor, thereby increasing selectivity towards cancer cells. These results suggest that this strategy is a valuable route to design new platinum agents with higher efficacy for photodynamic anticancer chemotherapy.

  16. An ERK-dependent pathway to Noxa expression regulates apoptosis by platinum-based chemotherapeutic drugs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheridan, C; Brumatti, G; Elgendy, M; Brunet, M; Martin, S J

    2010-12-09

    Cisplatin is a widely used cancer chemotherapeutic that promotes DNA damage-associated apoptosis. Although platinum compounds are known to form DNA adducts and provoke DNA damage, the molecular mechanism of cisplatin-induced cell death remains unclear. In this article, we show that the BH3-only protein Noxa is strongly transcriptionally upregulated in response to cisplatin and related platinum compounds. Cisplatin-induced Noxa expression was ERK dependent, but p53 independent, and inhibition of ERK activation markedly attenuated cisplatin-induced cell death, as well as Noxa expression. Furthermore, siRNA-mediated ablation of Noxa expression also inhibited cisplatin-induced cell death and permitted clonogenic survival. These observations reveal a novel ERK-regulated route to Noxa expression that is important for the cell killing activity of platinum-based chemotherapeutic drugs.

  17. Pharmacokinetics of Selected Anticancer Drugs in Elderly Cancer Patients: Focus on Breast Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crombag, Marie-Rose B.S.; Joerger, Markus; Thürlimann, Beat; Schellens, Jan H.M.; Beijnen, Jos H.; Huitema, Alwin D.R.

    2016-01-01

    Background: Elderly patients receiving anticancer drugs may have an increased risk to develop treatment-related toxicities compared to their younger peers. However, a potential pharmacokinetic (PK) basis for this increased risk has not consistently been established yet. Therefore, the objective of this study was to systematically review the influence of age on the PK of anticancer agents frequently administered to elderly breast cancer patients. Methods: A literature search was performed using the PubMed electronic database, Summary of Product Characteristics (SmPC) and available drug approval reviews, as published by EMA and FDA. Publications that describe age-related PK profiles of selected anticancer drugs against breast cancer, excluding endocrine compounds, were selected and included. Results: This review presents an overview of the available data that describe the influence of increasing age on the PK of selected anticancer drugs used for the treatment of breast cancer. Conclusions: Selected published data revealed differences in the effect and magnitude of increasing age on the PK of several anticancer drugs. There may be clinically-relevant, age-related PK differences for anthracyclines and platina agents. In the majority of cases, age is not a good surrogate marker for anticancer drug PK, and the physiological state of the individual patient may better be approached by looking at organ function, Charlson Comorbidity Score or geriatric functional assessment. PMID:26729170

  18. Pharmacokinetics of Selected Anticancer Drugs in Elderly Cancer Patients: Focus on Breast Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marie-Rose B.S. Crombag

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Elderly patients receiving anticancer drugs may have an increased risk to develop treatment-related toxicities compared to their younger peers. However, a potential pharmacokinetic (PK basis for this increased risk has not consistently been established yet. Therefore, the objective of this study was to systematically review the influence of age on the PK of anticancer agents frequently administered to elderly breast cancer patients. Methods: A literature search was performed using the PubMed electronic database, Summary of Product Characteristics (SmPC and available drug approval reviews, as published by EMA and FDA. Publications that describe age-related PK profiles of selected anticancer drugs against breast cancer, excluding endocrine compounds, were selected and included. Results: This review presents an overview of the available data that describe the influence of increasing age on the PK of selected anticancer drugs used for the treatment of breast cancer. Conclusions: Selected published data revealed differences in the effect and magnitude of increasing age on the PK of several anticancer drugs. There may be clinically-relevant, age-related PK differences for anthracyclines and platina agents. In the majority of cases, age is not a good surrogate marker for anticancer drug PK, and the physiological state of the individual patient may better be approached by looking at organ function, Charlson Comorbidity Score or geriatric functional assessment.

  19. Review of pharmacological interactions of oral anticancer drugs provided at pharmacy department

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. Sánchez Gómez

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract: Objective: To identify the pharmacologic interactions of oral anti-cancer drugs provided at an outpatient clinic. Material and methods: Anti-cancer drugs included in the Phamacotherapeutic Guideline of the Hospital were identified. A literature search was carried out on the pharmacologic interactions in MEDLINE® and EMBASE® (with the filer language English or Spanish, and the descriptors: “name of the anti-cancer drug” AND (“drug interactions” OR “pharmacokinetic”, Up-to-date®, MICROMEDEX® and the drug information sheet for the EMA and the FDA. Information was also gathered from the abstract presented to European and Spanish scientific meetings for the last 4 years. When an interaction was analyzed and had clinical relevance, the best pharmacotherapeutic interaction-free alternative was sought. Results: Twenty-three drugs were identified, of which Chlorambucil, Fludarabine, Lenalidomide, Melphalan, and Thalidomide were the active compounds with the lowest likelihood of producing a pharmacologic interaction. Tyrosine kinase inhibitors (particularly Erlotinib, Imatinib, Lapatinib, and Pazopanib are the drugs with highest number of pharmacologic interactions described, many of them with severe clinical consequences, with increases and decreases of the plasma levels of anti-cancer drugs. The active compounds identified that may have pharmacologic interactions with anticancer drugs were mainly: Allopurinol, Amiodarone, Carbamazepine, Dabigatran, Digoxin, Spironolactone, Phenytoin, Itraconazol, Repaglinide, Silodosin, Tamoxifen, Verapamil, and Warfarin. Pharmacologic interactions through the cytochrome P450 1A2, 2D6, 2C8, 2C9, 3A4 were the most important for tyrosine kinase inhibitors. Other non-pharmacologic compounds, with an important potential of producing relevant pharmacologic interaction were immunomodulators (Echinacea extracts and Hypericum perforatum. Conclusions: Oral anticancer drugs have numerous pharmacologic

  20. [The history of developing anticancer Drugs and their evaluation guidelines in Japan].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maeda, Hideki; Kurokawa, Tatsuo

    2014-01-01

    The cancer therapies currently available do not yet offer fully satisfactory treatments, even in 21st century, and efforts and progress are being made daily in the area of drug development. Anticancer drugs, which play the leading role in cancer therapy, are being developed dynamically around the world, and Japan is not an exception. Looking back on the history of developing anticancer drugs, cytotoxic drugs were the mainstream of drug development until the end of the 20th century. In the 21st century, they have been replaced by molecularly targeted drugs, and thus the development of cytotoxic drugs has been declining rapidly. There were various approaches to the development of anticancer drugs and clinical trial endpoints until the 1980s. In 1991, the "Guidelines for Clinical Evaluation Methods of Anti-Cancer Drugs in Japan" was issued. From 2000 onwards, there was vigorous discussion on the clinical trial endpoints of anticancer drugs in the United States. In conjunction with this discussion, the "Guidelines for Clinical Evaluation Methods of Anti-Cancer Drugs in Japan" was revised in 2005. The revised guidelines required survival data at the time of filing a new drug application (NDA) as a general rule. Around 2005, a bridging strategy was promoted as the "International Conference on Harmonization E5" was promulgated among Japan, the U.S. and EU, resulting in an outflow of clinical trials to overseas, with more non-Japanese survival data generated outside of Japan used for NDAs than Japanese data. Subsequently, the "Guideline for Basic Principles on Global Clinical Trials" was issued in 2007, which promoted the change in the mainstream approach from a bridging strategy to a pivotal, global study involving Japan. Thus, an era of full-fledged globalization in clinical trials began. We believe Japan will need systems to enhance the motivation for anticancer drug development, such as an expedited program or pediatric program, from now on. We hope that the

  1. Biomarkers to assess the efficiency of treatment with platinum-based drugs: what can metallomics add?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Araujo, Thiago de O; Costa, Lilian T; Fernandes, Janaina; Aucélio, Ricardo Queiroz; de Campos, Reinaldo Calixto

    2014-12-01

    Since the approval of cisplatin as an antineoplastic drug, the medical and the scientific communities have been concerned about the side effects of platinum-based drugs, and this has been the dose-limiting factor that leads to reduced treatment efficiency. Another important issue is the intrinsic or acquired resistance of some patients to treatment. Identifying proper biomarkers is crucial in evaluating the efficiency of a treatment, assisting physicians in determining, at early stages, whether or not the patient presents resistance to the drug, minimizing severe side effects, and allowing them to redirect the established course of chemotherapy. A great effort is being made to identify biomarkers that can be used to predict the outcome of the treatment of cancer patients with platinum-based drugs. In this context, the metallomic approach has not yet been used to its full potential. Since the basis of these drugs is platinum, the monitoring of biomarkers containing this metal should be the natural approach to evaluate treatment progress. This review intends to show where the research in this field stands and points out some gaps that can be filled by metallomics.

  2. Recent insights in nanotechnology-based drugs and formulations designed for effective anti-cancer therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piktel, Ewelina; Niemirowicz, Katarzyna; Wątek, Marzena; Wollny, Tomasz; Deptuła, Piotr; Bucki, Robert

    2016-05-26

    The rapid development of nanotechnology provides alternative approaches to overcome several limitations of conventional anti-cancer therapy. Drug targeting using functionalized nanoparticles to advance their transport to the dedicated site, became a new standard in novel anti-cancer methods. In effect, the employment of nanoparticles during design of antineoplastic drugs helps to improve pharmacokinetic properties, with subsequent development of high specific, non-toxic and biocompatible anti-cancer agents. However, the physicochemical and biological diversity of nanomaterials and a broad spectrum of unique features influencing their biological action requires continuous research to assess their activity. Among numerous nanosystems designed to eradicate cancer cells, only a limited number of them entered the clinical trials. It is anticipated that progress in development of nanotechnology-based anti-cancer materials will provide modern, individualized anti-cancer therapies assuring decrease in morbidity and mortality from cancer diseases. In this review we discussed the implication of nanomaterials in design of new drugs for effective antineoplastic therapy and describe a variety of mechanisms and challenges for selective tumor targeting. We emphasized the recent advantages in the field of nanotechnology-based strategies to fight cancer and discussed their part in effective anti-cancer therapy and successful drug delivery.

  3. Pharmacokinetics and tissue distribution of novel platinum containing anticancer agent BP‐C1 studied in rabbits using sector field inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Navolotskii, Denis V.; Ivanenko, Natalya B.; Fedoros, Elena I.; Panchenko, Andrey V.

    2015-01-01

    A method of platinum quantification in whole blood samples after microwave digestion using sector field inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry has been developed. The following analytical figures of merit have been established: limit of detection 1.1 µg/L for blood samples, dynamic range 3.6–200 µg/L, intra‐day precision (relative standard deviation, n = 9) did not exceed 5%. Spiked samples were analyzed for method validation. The method was used for pharmacokinetics studies of a novel anti‐cancer drug BP‐С1, a complex of cis‐configured platinum and benzene‐poly‐carboxylic acids. Main pharmacokinetic parameters (area under curve, maximum concentration, clearance, half‐life times for α‐ and β‐phase) were estimated for two dosage forms of BP‐C1 0.05 and 0.125 mass %. Pharmacokinetic curves were assessed for single and course administration. Studies were performed using rabbits (n = 6) as a model. BP‐C1 was injected intramuscularly. The study established dose proportionality of the tested dosage forms and suggested clinical dosing schedule: 5 days of injections followed by 2 days’ break. Platinum tissue distribution was studied in tissue samples collected 20 days after the last injection. Predominant platinum accumulation was observed in kidneys, liver, and muscles near injection site. ‘Slow’ phase of platinum excretion kinetics may be related to the muscles at the injection site. © 2015 The Authors. Drug Testing and Analysis published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd. PMID:26061351

  4. Bioequivalence study designs for generic solid oral anticancer drug products: scientific and regulatory considerations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaur, Paramjeet; Chaurasia, Chandra S; Davit, Barbara M; Conner, Dale P

    2013-12-01

    The demonstration of bioequivalence (BE) between the test and reference products is an integral part of generic drug approval process. A sound BE study design is pivotal to the successful demonstration of BE of generic drugs to their corresponding reference listed drug product. Generally, BE of systemically acting oral dosage forms is demonstrated in a crossover, single-dose in vivo study in healthy subjects. The determination of BE of solid oral anticancer drug products is associated with its own unique challenges due to the serious safety risks involved. Unlike typical BE study in healthy subjects, the safety issues often necessitate conducting BE studies in cancer patients. Such BE studies of an anticancer drug should be conducted without disturbing the patients' therapeutic dosing regimen. Attributes such as drug permeability and solubility, pharmacokinetics, dosing regimen, and approved therapeutic indication(s) are considered in the BE study design of solid anticancer drug products. To streamline the drug approval process, the Division of Bioequivalence posts the Bioequivalence Recommendations for Specific Products guidances on the FDA public website. The objective of this article is to illustrate the scientific and regulatory considerations in the design of BE studies for generic solid oral anticancer drug products through examples.

  5. Quinoxaline Nucleus: A Promising Scaffold in Anti-cancer Drug Discovery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pinheiro, Alessandra C; Mendonça Nogueira, Thais C; de Souza, Marcus V N

    2016-01-01

    Heterocyclic compounds are a class of substances, which play a critical role in modern drug discovery being incorporated in the structure of a large variety of drugs used in many different types of diseases. Quinoxaline is an important heterocyclic nucleus with a wide spectrum of biological activities, and recently much attention has been found on anticancer drug discovery based on this class. Owing to the importance of this system, the aim of this review is to provide an update on the synthesis and anticancer activity of quinoxaline derivatives covering articles published between 2010 and 2015.

  6. Urinary excretion of platinum, arsenic and selenium of cancer patients from the Antofagasta region in Chile treated with platinum-based drugs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Román Domingo A

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Arsenic exposure increases the risk of non-cancerous and cancerous diseases. In the Antofagasta region in Chile, an established relationship exists between arsenic exposure and the risk of cancer of the bladder, lung and skin. Platinum-based drugs are first-line treatments, and many works recognise selenium as a cancer-fighting nutrient. We characterised the short-term urinary excretion amounts of arsenic, selenium and platinum in 24-h urine samples from patients with lung cancer and those with cancer other than lung treated with cisplatin or/and carboplatin. As - Se - Pt inter-element relationships were also investigated. Results The amounts of platinum excreted in urine were not significantly different between patients with lung cancer and those with other cancers treated with cisplatin, despite the significant variation in platinum amounts supplied from platinum-based drugs. In general, the analytical amounts of excreted selenium were greater than those for arsenic, which could imply that platinum favours the excretion of selenium. For other types of cancers treated with drugs without platinum, excretion of selenium was also greater than that of arsenic, suggesting an antagonist selenium-anti-cancer drug relationship. Conclusions Regards the baseline status of patients, the analytical amounts of excreted Se is greater than those for As, particularly, for cisplatin chemotherapy. This finding could imply that for over the As displacement Pt favours the excretion of Se. The analytical amounts of excreted Se were greater than those for As, either with and without Pt-containing drugs, suggesting an antagonist Se-anti-cancer drug relationship. However, it seemed that differences existed between As - Se - Pt inter-element associations in patients treated for lung cancer in comparison with those treated for cancer other than lung. Therefore, knowledge obtained in this work, can contribute to understanding the arsenic cancer

  7. The absence of functional glucosylceramide synthase does not sensitize melanoma cells for anticancer drugs

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Veldman, RJ; Mita, A; Cuvillier, O; Garcia, [No Value; Klappe, K; Medin, JA; Campbell, JD; Carpentier, S; Kok, JW; Levade, T

    2003-01-01

    Conversion of ceramide, a putative mediator of anticancer drug-induced apoptosis, into glucosylceramide, by the action of glucosylceramide synthase (GCS), has been implicated in drug resistance. Herein, we compared GM95 mouse melanoma cells deficient in GCS activity, with cells stably transfected wi

  8. Double layered hydroxides as potential anti-cancer drug delivery agents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riaz, Ufana; Ashraf, S M

    2013-04-01

    The emergence of nanotechnology has changed the scenario of the medical world by revolutionizing the diagnosis, monitoring and treatment of cancer. This nanotechnology has been proved miraculous in detecting cancer cells, delivering chemotherapeutic agents and monitoring treatment from non-specific to highly targeted killing of tumor cells. In the past few decades, a number of inorganic materials have been investigated such as calcium phosphate, gold, carbon materials, silicon oxide, iron oxide, and layered double hydroxide (LDH) for examining their efficacy in targeting drug delivery. The reason behind the selection of these inorganic materials was their versatile and unique features efficient in drug delivery, such as wide availability, rich surface functionality, good biocompatibility, potential for target delivery, and controlled release of the drug from these inorganic nanomaterials. Although, the drug-LDH hybrids are found to be quite instrumental because of their application as advanced anti-cancer drug delivery systems, there has not been much research on them. This mini review is set to highlight the advancement made in the use of layered double hydroxides (LDHs) as anti-cancer drug delivery agents. Along with the advantages of LDHs as anti-cancer drug delivery agents, the process of interaction of some of the common anti-cancer drugs with LDH has also been discussed.

  9. Mass spectrometric proteomics reveals that nuclear protein positive cofactor PC4 selectively binds to cross-linked DNA by a trans-platinum anticancer complex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Du, Zhifeng; Luo, Qun; Yang, Liping; Bing, Tao; Li, Xianchan; Guo, Wei; Wu, Kui; Zhao, Yao; Xiong, Shaoxiang; Shangguan, Dihua; Wang, Fuyi

    2014-02-26

    An MS-based proteomic strategy combined with chemically functionalized gold nanoparticles as affinity probes was developed and validated by successful identification and quantification of HMGB1, which is well characterized to interact selectively with 1,2-cross-linked DNA by cisplatin, from whole cell lysates. The subsequent application of this method to identify proteins responding to 1,3-cross-linked DNA by a trans-platinum anticancer complex, trans-PtTz (Tz = thiazole), revealed that the human nuclear protein positive cofactor PC4 selectively binds to the damaged DNA, implying that PC4 may play a role in cellular response to DNA damage by trans-PtTz.

  10. Prospective Observational Study of Adverse Drug Reactions of Anticancer Drugs Used in Cancer Treatment in a Tertiary Care Hospital

    OpenAIRE

    Saini, V. K.; Sewal, R. K.; Ahmad, Yusra; B Medhi

    2015-01-01

    Adverse drug reactions associated with the use of anticancer drugs are a worldwide problem and cannot be ignored. Adverse drug reactions can range from nausea, vomiting or any other mild reaction to severe myelosuppression. The study was planned to observe the suspected adverse drug reactions of cancer chemotherapy in patients aged >18 years having cancer attending Postgraduate Institute of Medical Education and Research, Chandigarh. During the study period, 101 patients of breast cancer and ...

  11. Zirconium Phosphate Nanoplatelet Potential for Anticancer Drug Delivery Applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    González, Millie L; Ortiz, Mayra; Hernández, Carmen; Cabán, Jennifer; Rodríguez, Axel; Colón, Jorge L; Báez, Adriana

    2016-01-01

    Zirconium phosphate (ZrP) nanoplatelets can intercalate anticancer agents via an ion exchange reaction creating an inorganic delivery system with potential for cancer treatment. ZrP delivery of anticancer agents inside tumor cells was explored in vitro. Internalization and cytotoxicity of ZrP nanoplatelets were studied in MCF-7 and MCF-10A cells. DOX-loaded ZrP nanoplatelets (DOX@ZrP) uptake was assessed by confocal (CLSM) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). Cytotoxicity to MCF-7 and MCF-10A cells was determined by the MTT assay. Reactive Oxy- gen Species (ROS) production was analyzed by fluorometric assay, and cell cycle alterations and induction of apoptosis were analyzed by flow cytometry. ZrP nanoplatelets were localized in the endosomes of MCF-7 cells. DOX and ZrP nanoplatelets were co-internalized into MCF-7 cells as detected by CLSM. While ZrP showed limited toxicity to MCF-7 cells, DOX@ZrP was cytotoxic at an IC₅₀ similar to that of free DOX. Meanwhile, DOX lC₅₀ was significantly lower than the equivalent concentration of DOX@ZrP in MCF-10A cells. ZrP did not induce apoptosis in both cell lines. DOX and DOX@ZrP induced significant oxidative stress in both cell models. Results suggest that ZrP nanoplatelets are promising as carriers of anticancer agents into cancer cells.

  12. Nanoparticles generated by PEG-Chrysin conjugates for efficient anticancer drug delivery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Hui; Li, Sai; Pu, Yuji; Lai, Yusi; He, Bin; Gu, Zhongwei

    2014-08-01

    Nanoparticle-based drug delivery systems promise the safety and efficacy of anticancer drugs. Herein, we presented a facile approach to fabricate novel nanoparticles generated by PEG-Chrysin conjugates for the delivery of anticancer drug doxorubicin. Chrysin was immobilized on the terminal group of methoxy poly(ethylene glycol) (mPEG) to form mPEG-Chrysin conjugate. The conjugates were self-assembled into nanoparticles. Doxorubicin (DOX) was loaded in the nanoparticles. The self-assembly, drug release profiles, interactions between nanoparticle and drug, cellular uptake and in vitro anticancer activity of the DOX loaded nanoparticles were investigated. The results showed that the mean diameters of drug loaded nanoparticles were below 200 nm. Strong π-π stacking interaction was tested within the drug loaded nanoparticles. The drug release rate was closely related to the chain length of PEG, shorter PEG chain resulted faster release. The mPEG-Chrysin conjugate was non-toxic to both 3T3 fibroblasts and HepG2 cancer cells. The cellular uptake measurements demonstrated that the mPEG1000-Chrysin nanoparticles exhibited higher capability in endocytosis. The IC50 of drug loaded mPEG1000-Chrysin nanoparticles was 4.4 μg/mL, which was much lower than that of drug loaded mPEG2000-Chrysin nanoparticles (6.8 μg/mL). These nanoparticles provided a new strategy for fabricating antitumor drug delivery systems.

  13. Optimization of the route of platinum drugs administration to optimize the concomitant treatment with radiotherapy for glioblastoma implanted in the Fischer rat brain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Charest, Gabriel; Sanche, Léon; Fortin, David; Mathieu, David; Paquette, Benoit

    2013-01-01

    Treatment of glioblastoma with platinum compounds modestly improves progression-free survival and may cause toxic effects which prevent use at higher dose that would otherwise improve the antineoplastic effect. To reduce toxicity, we propose to encapsulate the platinum drug in a liposome. We have also tested three methods of drug administration (intra-venous, intra-arterial and intra-arterial combined with blood brain barrier disruption) to determine which one optimizes the tumor cell uptake, limits the toxicity and delivers the best concomitance effect with radiotherapy. Cisplatin, oxaliplatin, their respective liposomal formulations, Lipoplatin™ and Lipoxal™, and carboplatin were assessed in F98 glioma, orthotopically implanted in Fischer rats. We found that the modest accumulation of drugs in tumor cells after intra-venous injection was significantly improved when the intra-arterial route was used and further increased after the transient opening of the blood brain barrier with mannitol. The liposomal formulations have largely reduced the toxicity and have allowed a better exploitation of the anti-cancer activity of platinum agent. Although the liposomes Lipoplatin™ and Lipoxal™ have shown a similar ability to that of carboplatin, to accumulate in brain tumors, the highest additive effect with radiotherapy was obtained with carboplatin. We conclude that the intra-arterial infusion of carboplatin or Lipoxal™ in concomitance with radiation therapy leads to the best tumor control as measured by an increase of mean survival time in Fischer rats implanted with the F98 glioma with a benefit in survival time of 13.4 and 6.5 days respectively compared to intra-venous. PMID:24026531

  14. Glutamic acid and its derivatives: candidates for rational design of anticancer drugs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ali, Imran; Wani, Waseem A; Haque, Ashanul; Saleem, Kishwar

    2013-05-01

    Throughout the history of human civilizations, cancer has been a major health problem. Its treatment has been interesting but challenging to scientists. Glutamic acid and its derivative glutamine are known to play interesting roles in cancer genesis, hence, it was realized that structurally variant glutamic acid derivatives may be designed and developed and, might be having antagonistic effects on cancer. The present article describes the state-of-art of glutamic acid and its derivatives as anticancer agents. Attempts have been made to explore the effectivity of drug-delivery systems based on glutamic acid for the delivery of anticancer drugs. Moreover, efforts have also been made to discuss the mechanism of action of glutamic acid derivatives as anticancer agents, clinical applications of glutamic acid derivatives, as well as recent developments and future perspectives of glutamic acid drug development have also been discussed.

  15. ROLE OF TRANSPORTERS IN THE DISTRIBUTION OF PLATINUM-BASED DRUGS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saliha eHarrach

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Platinum derivatives used as chemotherapeutic drugs such as cisplatin and oxaliplatin have a potent antitumor activity. However, severe side effects such as nephro-, oto-, and neurotoxicity are associated with their use. Effects and side effects of platinum-based drugs are in part caused by their transporter-mediated uptake in target and non target cells. In this mini review, the transport systems involved in cellular handling of platinum derivatives are illustrated, focusing on transporters for cisplatin. The copper transporter 1 seems to be of particular importance for cisplatin uptake in tumor cells, while the organic cation transporter (OCT 2, due to its specific organ distribution, may play a major role in the development of undesired cisplatin side effects. In polarized cells, e.g. in renal proximal tubule cells, apically expressed transporters, such as multidrug and toxin extrusion protein 1, mediate secretion of cisplatin and in this way contribute to the control of its toxic effects. Specific inhibition of cisplatin uptake transporters such as the OCTs may be an attractive therapeutic option to reduce its toxicity, without impairing its antitumor efficacy.

  16. Stem cells as anticancer drug carrier to reduce the chemotherapy side effect

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salehi, Hamideh; Al-Arag, Siham; Middendorp, Elodie; Gergley, Csilla; Cuisinier, Frederic

    2017-02-01

    Chemotherapy used for cancer treatment, due to the lack of specificity of drugs, is associated to various damaging side effects that have severe impact on patients' quality of life. Over the past 30 years, increasing efforts have been placed on optimizing chemotherapy dosing with the main goal of increasing antitumor efficacy while reducing drug-associated toxicity. A novel research shows that stem cells may act as a reservoir for the anticancer agent, which will subsequently release some of the drug's metabolites, or even the drug in its original form, in vicinity of the cancer cells. These cells may play a dual role in controlling drug toxicity depending on their capacity to uptake and release the chemotherapeutic drug. In our study, we show that Dental Pulp Stem Cells DPSCs are able to rapidly uptake Paclitaxel PTX, and to release it in the culture medium in a time-dependent manner. This resulting conditioned culture medium is to be transferred to breast cancer cells, the MCF-7. By applying Confocal Raman Microscopy, the anticancer drug uptake by the MCF-7 was measured. Surprisingly, the cancer cells -without any direct contact with PTX- showed a drug uptake. This proves that the stem cells carried and delivered the anticancer drug without its modification. It could be a revolution in chemotherapy to avoid the drug's side effects and increase its efficacy.

  17. Hierarchical targeted hepatocyte mitochondrial multifunctional chitosan nanoparticles for anticancer drug delivery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Zhipeng; Zhang, Liujie; Song, Yang; He, Jiayu; Wu, Li; Zhao, Can; Xiao, Yanyu; Li, Wei; Cai, Baochang; Cheng, Haibo; Li, Weidong

    2015-06-01

    The overwhelming majority of drugs exert their pharmacological effects after reaching their target sites of action, however, these target sites are mainly located in the cytosol or intracellular organelles. Consequently, delivering drugs to the specific organelle is the key to achieve maximum therapeutic effects and minimum side-effects. In the work reported here, we designed, synthesized, and evaluated a novel mitochondrial-targeted multifunctional nanoparticles (MNPs) based on chitosan derivatives according to the physiological environment of the tumor and the requirement of mitochondrial targeting drug delivery. The intelligent chitosan nanoparticles possess various functions such as stealth, hepatocyte targeting, multistage pH-response, lysosomal escape and mitochondrial targeting, which lead to targeted drug release after the progressively shedding of functional groups, thus realize the efficient intracellular delivery and mitochondrial localization, inhibit the growth of tumor, elevate the antitumor efficacy, and reduce the toxicity of anticancer drugs. It provides a safe and efficient nanocarrier platform for mitochondria targeting anticancer drug delivery.

  18. Proteomic Approaches in Understanding Action Mechanisms of Metal-Based Anticancer Drugs

    OpenAIRE

    Wang, Ying; Chiu, Jen-Fu

    2008-01-01

    Medicinal inorganic chemistry has been stimulating largely by the success of the anticancer drug, cisplatin. Various metal complexes are currently used as therapeutic agents (e.g., Pt, Au, and Ru) in the treatment of malignant diseases, including several types of cancers. Understanding the mechanism of action of these metal-based drugs is for the design of more effective drugs. Proteomic approaches combined with other biochemical methods can provide comprehensive understanding of responses th...

  19. [Novel oral anticancer drugs: a review of adverse drug reactions, interactions and patient adherence].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bartal, Alexandra; Mátrai, Zoltán; Szucs, Attila; Belinszkaja, Galina; Langmár, Zoltán; Rosta, András

    2012-01-15

    Each aspect of oncological care is widely affected by the spread of oral anticancer agents, which raises several questions in terms of safe medication use and patient adherence. Over the past decade targeted therapies have appeared in clinical practice and revolutionized the pharmacological treatment of malignancies. Regular patient - doctor visits and proper patient education is crucial in order to comply with the therapy previously agreed upon with the oncologist, to increase patient adherence, to detect and to treat adverse effects in early stages. Since the information on the new medicines in Hungarian language is sparse it is the intention of the authors to give an overview of the basic knowledge, patient safety issues, adverse effects and interactions. Official drug information summaries and data on pharmacokinetics, interactions and adverse effects from the literature are reviewed as the basis for this overview.

  20. Microprocessor in controlled transdermal drug delivery of anti-cancer drugs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chandrashekar, N S; Shobha Rani, R H

    2009-12-01

    Microprocessor controlled transdermal delivery of anticancer drugs 5-Fluorouracil (5-FU) and 6-Mercaptopurine (6-MP) was developed and in vitro evaluation was done. Drugs were loaded based on the pharmacokinetics parameters. In vitro diffusion studies were carried at different current density (0.0, 0.1, 0.22, 0.50 mA/cm2). The patches were evaluated for the drug content, thickness, weight, folding endurance, flatness, thumb tack test and adhesive properties all were well with in the specification of transdermal patches with elegant and transparent in appearance. In vitro permeation studies through human cadaver skin showed, passive delivery (0.0 mA/cm2) of 6-MP was low. As the current density was progressively increased, the flux also increased. the flux also increased with 0.1 mA/cm2 for 15-20 min, but it was less than desired flux, 0.2 mA/cm2 for 30 min showed better flux than 0.1 mA/cm2 current, but lag time was more than 4 h, 0.5 mA/cm2 current for more than 1 h, flux was >159 microg/cm2 h which was desired flux for 6-MP. 5-FU flux reached the minimum effective concentration (MEC) of 54 microg/cm2 h with 0.5 mA/cm2 current for 30-45 min, drug concentration were within the therapeutic window in post-current phase. We concluded from Ohm's Law that as the resistance decreases, current increases. Skin resistance decrease with increase in time and current, increase in the drug permeation. Interestingly, for all investigated current densities, as soon as the current was switched off, 5-FU and 6-MP flux decreased fairly, but the controlled drug delivery can be achieved by switching the current for required period of time.

  1. New cancer treatment strategy using combination of green tea catechins and anticancer drugs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suganuma, Masami; Saha, Achinto; Fujiki, Hirota

    2011-02-01

    Green tea is now recognized as the most effective cancer preventive beverage. In one study, 10 Japanese-size cups of green tea daily supplemented with tablets of green tea extract limited the recurrence of colorectal polyps in humans to 50%. Thus, cancer patients who consume green tea and take anticancer drugs will have double prevention. We studied the effects of combining (-)-epigallocatechin gallate (EGCG) and anticancer drugs, focusing on inhibition of cell growth and induction of apoptosis. Numerous anticancer drugs, such as tamoxifen, COX-2 inhibitors, and retinoids were used for the experiments, and the combination of EGCG and COX-2 inhibitors consistently induced the enhancement of apoptosis. To study the mechanism of the enhancement, we paid special attention to the enhanced expressions of DDIT3 (growth arrest and DNA damage-inducible 153, GADD153), GADD45A, and CDKN1A (p21/WAF1/CIP1) genes, based on our previous evidence that a combination of EGCG and sulindac specifically induced upregulated expression of GADD153 and p21 genes in PC-9 lung cancer cells. The synergistic enhancements of apoptosis and GADD153 gene expression in human non-small cell lung cancer cells by the combination of EGCG and celecoxib were mediated through the activation of the MAPK signaling pathway. This article reviews the synergistic enhancement of apoptosis, gene expression, and anticancer effects using various combinations of EGCG and anticancer drugs, including the combination of (-)-epicatechin (EC) and curcumin. Based on the evidence, we present a new concept: green tea catechins as synergists with anticancer drugs.

  2. Anticancer Platinum(IV) Prodrugs Containing Monoaminophosphonate Ester as a Targeting Group Inhibit Matrix Metalloproteinases and Reverse Multidrug Resistance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Xiaochao; Huang, Rizhen; Gou, Shaohua; Wang, Zhimei; Wang, Hengshan

    2017-04-19

    A novel class of platinum(IV) complexes comprising a monoaminophosphonate ester moiety, which can not only act as a bone-targeting group but also inhibit matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs), were designed and synthesized. Biological assay of these compounds showed that they had potent antitumor activities against the tested cancer cell lines compared with cisplatin and oxaliplatin and indicated low cytotoxicity to human normal liver cells. Particularly, the platinum(IV) complexes were very sensitive to cisplatin resistant cancer cell lines. The corresponding structure-activity relationships were studied and discussed. Related mechanism study revealed that the typical complex 11 caused cell cycle arrest at S phase and induced apoptosis in Bel-7404 cells via a mitochondrial-dependent apoptosis pathway. Moreover, complex 11 had potent ability to inhibit the tumor growth in the NCI-H460 xenograft model comparable to cisplatin.

  3. Dual-drug delivery of curcumin and platinum drugs in polymeric micelles enhances the synergistic effects: a double act for the treatment of multidrug-resistant cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scarano, Wei; de Souza, Paul; Stenzel, Martina H

    2015-01-01

    Combinational chemotherapy is often used to prevent drug induced resistance in cancer. The aim of this work is to test whether the co-delivery of drugs within one nanoparticle can result in increased synergistic effects of both drugs. Therefore, a micelle system with two different compartments, one for the drug curcumin and one for the conjugation of platinum drugs was designed. A triblock copolymer, based on the biodegradable polycaprolactone PCL, a PEG based shell and an amine bearing polymer as the interphase for the conjugation of platinum drugs was prepared by combination of ring-opening polymerization and RAFT polymerization. Curcumin was incorporated into the self-assembled onion-type micelle by physical encapsulation into the PCL core with an entrapment capacity of 6 wt%. The platinum(iv) drug oxoplatin was reacted with succinic anhydride to yield Pt(NH3)2Cl2[(COOH)2], which acted as the drug and as a crosslinker for the stabilisation of micelles. The size of the dual drug micelles was measured to be 38 nm by DLS, which was confirmed by TEM. The toxicity of the dual drug delivery system was tested against the A2780 human ovarian cancer cell line and compared with the IC50 value of micelles that deliver either curcumin or the platinum drug alone. The results were analysed using the CalcuSyn software. While curcumin and the platinum drug together without a carrier already showed synergy with a combination index ranging from 0.4 to 0.8, the combined delivery in one nanoparticle did enhance the synergistic effects resulting in a combination index of approximately 0.2-0.35. For comparison, a mixture of two nanoparticles, one with curcumin and the other with the platinum drug, was tested revealing a less noticeable synergistic effect compared to the co-delivery of both drugs in one drug carrier.

  4. In vitro platinum drug chemosensitivity of human cervical squamous cell carcinoma cell lines with intrinsic and acquired resistance to cisplatin.

    OpenAIRE

    Mellish, K. J.; Kelland, L R; Harrap, K. R.

    1993-01-01

    The platinum drug chemosensitivity of five human cervical squamous cell carcinoma cell lines (HX/151, HX/155, HX/156, HX/160 and HX/171) derived from previously untreated patients has been determined. Compared to our data obtained previously using human ovarian carcinoma cell lines, all five lines were relatively resistant to cisplatin, carboplatin, iproplatin and tetraplatin. One of the lines (HX/156) was exceptionally sensitive to the novel platinum (IV) ammine/amine dicarboxylates JM216 [b...

  5. Histone Methylation by Temozolomide; A Classic DNA Methylating Anticancer Drug

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pickard, Amanda J.; Diaz, Anthony Joseph; Mura, Hugo; Nyuwen, Lila; Coello, Daniel; Sheva, Saif; Maria, Nava; Gallo, James M.; Wang, Tieli

    2017-01-01

    Background/Aim The alkylating agent, temozolomide (TMZ), is considered the standard-of-care for high-grade astrocytomas –known as glioblastoma multiforme (GBM)– an aggressive type of tumor with poor prognosis. The therapeutic benefit of TMZ is attributed to formation of DNA adducts involving the methylation of purine bases in DNA. We investigated the effects of TMZ on arginine and lysine amino acids, histone H3 peptides and histone H3 proteins. Materials and Methods Chemical modification of amino acids, histone H3 peptide and protein by TMZ was performed in phosphate buffer at physiological pH. The reaction products were examined by mass spectrometry and western blot analysis. Results Our results showed that TMZ following conversion to a methylating cation, can methylate histone H3 peptide and histone H3 protein, suggesting that TMZ exerts its anticancer activity not only through its interaction with DNA, but also through alterations of protein post-translational modifications. Conclusion The possibility that TMZ can methylate histones involved with epigenetic regulation of protein indicates a potentially unique mechanism of action. The study will contribute to the understanding the anticancer activity of TMZ in order to develop novel targeted molecular strategies to advance the cancer treatment. PMID:27354585

  6. Distribution of the anticancer drugs doxorubicin, mitoxantrone and topotecan in tumors and normal tissues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patel, Krupa J; Trédan, Olivier; Tannock, Ian F

    2013-07-01

    Pharmacokinetic analyses estimate the mean concentration of drug within a given tissue as a function of time, but do not give information about the spatial distribution of drugs within that tissue. Here, we compare the time-dependent spatial distribution of three anticancer drugs within tumors, heart, kidney, liver and brain. Mice bearing various xenografts were treated with doxorubicin, mitoxantrone or topotecan. At various times after injection, tumors and samples of heart, kidney, liver and brain were excised. Within solid tumors, the distribution of doxorubicin, mitoxantrone and topotecan was limited to perivascular regions at 10 min after administration and the distance from blood vessels at which drug intensity fell to half was ~25-75 μm. Although drug distribution improved after 3 and 24 h, there remained a significant decrease in drug fluorescence with increasing distance from tumor blood vessels. Drug distribution was relatively uniform in the heart, kidney and liver with substantially greater perivascular drug uptake than in tumors. There was significantly higher total drug fluorescence in the liver than in tumors after 10 min, 3 and 24 h. Little to no drug fluorescence was observed in the brain. There are marked differences in the spatial distributions of three anticancer drugs within tumor tissue and normal tissues over time, with greater exposure to most normal tissues and limited drug distribution to many cells in tumors. Studies of the spatial distribution of drugs are required to complement pharmacokinetic data in order to better understand and predict drug effects and toxicities.

  7. Systems pharmacology strategies for anticancer drug discovery based on natural products.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Fang; Gu, Jiangyong; Chen, Lirong; Xu, Xiaojie

    2014-07-01

    Cancer is a complex disease, known medically as malignant neoplasm. Natural products (NPs) play a very important role in anticancer drug discovery and a large number of NPs have been proven to have potential anticancer effects. Compared with newly synthesized chemical compounds, NPs show a favorable profile in terms of their absorption and metabolism in the body with low toxicity. Searching for multi-target natural drugs can be regarded as a solution to improve therapeutic efficacy and safety. In this work, we collected 104 cancer-associated target proteins from the Protein Data Bank. Based on the Universal Natural Products Database, all of the NPs were docked to 104 cancer-associated target proteins. Then we explored the potential of NPs and several herbs in anticancer drug discovery by using a network-based multi-target computational approach. The NPs with the most potential for anticancer drug discovery and their indications were predicted based on a docking score-weighted prediction model. We also explored the interactions between NPs and cancer target proteins to find the pathological networks, potential drug candidates and new indications.

  8. Application of imaging mass spectrometry approaches to facilitate metal-based anticancer drug research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Ronald F S; Theiner, Sarah; Meibom, Anders; Koellensperger, Gunda; Keppler, Bernhard K; Dyson, Paul J

    2017-02-03

    Mass spectrometry imaging is being increasingly used in metal-based anticancer drug development to study elemental and/or molecular drug distributions in different biological systems. The main analytical tools employed are SIMS (especially nanoSIMS), LA-ICP-MSI and MALDI-MSI as well as a combination of complementary imaging techniques. Main challenges are appropriate sample preparation methods, reliable and validated quantification strategies and a trade-off between sensitivity and spatial resolution. So far, research has mostly focused on the development of analytical methods for imaging with the long term goal to study drug uptake into tumor tissue and toxicity affected organs and to identify cellular targets of metal-based drugs. In this review we cover the technological features of the mass spectrometry imaging methods used and give an overview of the applications in metal-based anticancer drug research as well as some future perspectives.

  9. Secondary metabolites as DNA topoisomerase inhibitors: A new era towards designing of anticancer drugs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Supriya Baikar

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available A large number of secondary metabolites like alkaloids, terpenoids, polyphenols and quinones are produced by the plants. These metabolites can be utilized as natural medicines for the reason that they inhibit the activity of DNA topoisomerase which are the clinical targets for anticancer drugs. DNA topoisomerases are the cellular enzymes that change the topological state of DNA through the breaking and rejoining of DNA strands. Synthetic drugs as inhibitors of topoisomerases have been developed and used in the clinical trials but severe side effects are a serious problem for them therefore, there is a need for the development of novel plant-derived natural drugs and their analogs which may serve as appropriate inhibitors with respect to drug designing. The theme for this review is how secondary metabolites or natural products inactivate the action of DNA topoisomerases and open new avenues towards isolation and characterization of compounds for the development of novel drugs with anticancer potential.

  10. Two preclinical tests to evaluate anticancer activity and to help validate drug candidates for clinical trials

    Science.gov (United States)

    López-Lázaro, Miguel

    2015-01-01

    Current approaches to assessing preclinical anticancer activity do not reliably predict drug efficacy in cancer patients. Most of the compounds that show remarkable anticancer effects in preclinical models actually fail when tested in clinical trials. We blame these failures on the complexity of the disease and on the limitations of the preclinical tools we require for our research. This manuscript argues that this lack of clinical response may also be caused by poor in vitro and in vivo preclinical designs, in which cancer patients' needs are not fully considered. Then, it proposes two patient-oriented tests to assess in vitro and in vivo anticancer activity and to help validate drug candidates for clinical evaluation. PMID:25859551

  11. Role of copper transporters in the uptake and efflux of platinum containing drugs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Safaei, Roohangiz

    2006-03-08

    Cellular mechanisms for the uptake, intracellular distribution and efflux of the platinum (Pt) containing compounds cisplatin (DDP), carboplatin (CBDCA) and oxaliplatin (LOHP) are unknown. Current data suggest that specialized transporters/carriers mediate the transport of Pt drugs across the cellular membranes. Specific roles for the copper (Cu) transporters CTR1, ATP7A and ATP7B have been demonstrated during recent years. The finding that in cultured cells and tumor samples a correlation can be found between the expression of Cu transporters and the degree of the acquired resistance to Pt drug suggests that the Cu transporters are important constituents of the program that regulates sensitivity to Pt drugs. A model is presented that describes the function of Cu transporters in the regulation of Pt drug uptake and efflux.

  12. Tumor-targeted intracellular delivery of anticancer drugs through the mannose-6-phosphate/insulin-like growth factor II receptor

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Prakash, Jai; Beljaars, Leonie; Harapanahalli, Akshay K.; Zeinstra-Smith, Mieke; de Jager-Krikken, Alie; Hessing, Martin; Steen, Herman; Poelstra, Klaas

    2010-01-01

    Tumor-targeting of anticancer drugs is an interesting approach for the treatment of cancer since chemotherapies possess several adverse effects. In the present study, we propose a novel strategy to deliver anticancer drugs to the tumor cells through the mannose-6-phosphate/insulin-like growth factor

  13. Classification of stimuli-responsive polymers as anticancer drug delivery systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taghizadeh, Bita; Taranejoo, Shahrouz; Monemian, Seyed Ali; Salehi Moghaddam, Zoha; Daliri, Karim; Derakhshankhah, Hossein; Derakhshani, Zaynab

    2015-02-01

    Although several anticancer drugs have been introduced as chemotherapeutic agents, the effective treatment of cancer remains a challenge. Major limitations in the application of anticancer drugs include their nonspecificity, wide biodistribution, short half-life, low concentration in tumor tissue and systemic toxicity. Drug delivery to the tumor site has become feasible in recent years, and recent advances in the development of new drug delivery systems for controlled drug release in tumor tissues with reduced side effects show great promise. In this field, the use of biodegradable polymers as drug carriers has attracted the most attention. However, drug release is still difficult to control even when a polymeric drug carrier is used. The design of pharmaceutical polymers that respond to external stimuli (known as stimuli-responsive polymers) such as temperature, pH, electric or magnetic field, enzymes, ultrasound waves, etc. appears to be a successful approach. In these systems, drug release is triggered by different stimuli. The purpose of this review is to summarize different types of polymeric drug carriers and stimuli, in addition to the combination use of stimuli in order to achieve a better controlled drug release, and it discusses their potential strengths and applications. A survey of the recent literature on various stimuli-responsive drug delivery systems is also provided and perspectives on possible future developments in controlled drug release at tumor site have been discussed.

  14. Gamma irradiation reduces the immunological toxicity of doxorubicin, anticancer drug

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Jae-Hun; Sung, Nak-Yun; Raghavendran, H. Balaji; Yoon, Yohan; Song, Beom-Seok; Choi, Jong-il; Yoo, Young-Choon; Byun, Myung-Woo; Hwang, Young-Jeong; Lee, Ju-Woon

    2009-07-01

    Doxorubicin (DOX) is a widely used anticancer agent, but exhibits some immunological toxicity to patients during chemotherapy. The present study was conducted to evaluate the effect of gamma irradiation on the immunological response and the inhibition activity on in vivo tumor mass of DOX. The results showed that DOX irradiated at 10 and 20 kGy reduce the inhibition of mouse peritoneal macrophage proliferation and induce the release of cytokines (TNF-α and IL-6) when compared with non-irradiated DOX. The cytotoxicity against human breast (MCF-7), murine colon adenocarcinoma (Colon 26) and human monocytic (THP-1) tumor cell were not significantly different between non-irradiated and irradiated DOX ( Pproducts by gamma irradiation.

  15. Targeting aerobic glycolysis: 3-bromopyruvate as a promising anticancer drug.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cardaci, Simone; Desideri, Enrico; Ciriolo, Maria Rosa

    2012-02-01

    The Warburg effect refers to the phenomenon whereby cancer cells avidly take up glucose and produce lactic acid under aerobic conditions. Although the molecular mechanisms underlying tumor reliance on glycolysis remains not completely clear, its inhibition opens feasible therapeutic windows for cancer treatment. Indeed, several small molecules have emerged by combinatorial studies exhibiting promising anticancer activity both in vitro and in vivo, as a single agent or in combination with other therapeutic modalities. Therefore, besides reviewing the alterations of glycolysis that occur with malignant transformation, this manuscript aims at recapitulating the most effective pharmacological therapeutics of its targeting. In particular, we describe the principal mechanisms of action and the main targets of 3-bromopyruvate, an alkylating agent with impressive antitumor effects in several models of animal tumors. Moreover, we discuss the chemo-potentiating strategies that would make unparalleled the putative therapeutic efficacy of its use in clinical settings.

  16. Ratiometric dosing of anticancer drug combinations: controlling drug ratios after systemic administration regulates therapeutic activity in tumor-bearing mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mayer, Lawrence D; Harasym, Troy O; Tardi, Paul G; Harasym, Natashia L; Shew, Clifford R; Johnstone, Sharon A; Ramsay, Euan C; Bally, Marcel B; Janoff, Andrew S

    2006-07-01

    Anticancer drug combinations can act synergistically or antagonistically against tumor cells in vitro depending on the ratios of the individual agents comprising the combination. The importance of drug ratios in vivo, however, has heretofore not been investigated, and combination chemotherapy treatment regimens continue to be developed based on the maximum tolerated dose of the individual agents. We systematically examined three different drug combinations representing a range of anticancer drug classes with distinct molecular mechanisms (irinotecan/floxuridine, cytarabine/daunorubicin, and cisplatin/daunorubicin) for drug ratio-dependent synergy. In each case, synergistic interactions were observed in vitro at certain drug/drug molar ratio ranges (1:1, 5:1, and 10:1, respectively), whereas other ratios were additive or antagonistic. We were able to maintain fixed drug ratios in plasma of mice for 24 hours after i.v. injection for all three combinations by controlling and overcoming the inherent dissimilar pharmacokinetics of individual drugs through encapsulation in liposomal carrier systems. The liposomes not only maintained drug ratios in the plasma after injection, but also delivered the formulated drug ratio directly to tumor tissue. In vivo maintenance of drug ratios shown to be synergistic in vitro provided increased efficacy in preclinical tumor models, whereas attenuated antitumor activity was observed when antagonistic drug ratios were maintained. Fixing synergistic drug ratios in pharmaceutical carriers provides an avenue by which anticancer drug combinations can be optimized prospectively for maximum therapeutic activity during preclinical development and differs from current practice in which dosing regimens are developed empirically in late-stage clinical trials based on tolerability.

  17. Development and characterization of metal oxide nanoparticles for the delivery of anticancer drug.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Harshita; Kumar, Krishan; Choudhary, Chetan; Mishra, Pawan K; Vaidya, Bhuvaneshwar

    2016-01-01

    The aim of the study was to prepare chemotherapeutic agent-loaded zinc oxide nanoparticles for the intracellular delivery of drug, for better therapeutic activity. Zinc oxide nanoparticles have inherent anticancer properties, hence it was envisaged that by loading the anticancer drug into zinc oxide nanoparticles, enhanced anticancer activity might be observed. Zinc oxide nanoparticles were prepared using zinc nitrate and sodium hydroxide. Starch was used as the stabilizing agent. The nanoparticles prepared were characterized for size, shape, entrapment efficiency, and drug release. Further, cell line studies were performed to evaluate cellular uptake and cytotoxicity profile using MCF-7 cells. A hemolysis study was performed to check the acute toxicity of the nanoparticles. The nanoparticles were found to be 476.4 ± 2.51 nm in size, with low PDI (0.312 ± 0.02) and high entrapment efficiency (> 85%). The nanoparticles were stable, and did not form aggregates on storage in the dispersed form. A cytotoxicity study demonstrated that drug-loaded zinc oxide nanoparticles exhibited higher anticancer activity as compared to either blank zinc oxide nanoparticles and doxorubicin (DOX) alone, or their mixture. A hemolytic test revealed that the prepared zinc oxide nanoparticles caused negligible hemolysis. Thus, it can be concluded that zinc oxide nanoparticles loaded with DOX resulted in better uptake of the chemotherapeutic agent, and at the same time, showed low toxicity towards normal cells.

  18. Pharmacokinetics of Selected Anticancer Drugs in Elderly Cancer Patients : Focus on Breast Cancer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Crombag, Marie-Rose B S; Joerger, Markus; Thürlimann, Beat; Schellens, Jan H M; Beijnen, Jos H; Huitema, Alwin D R

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Elderly patients receiving anticancer drugs may have an increased risk to develop treatment-related toxicities compared to their younger peers. However, a potential pharmacokinetic (PK) basis for this increased risk has not consistently been established yet. Therefore, the objective of

  19. Patient adherence to oral anticancer drugs: an emerging issue in modern oncology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foulon, V; Schöffski, P; Wolter, P

    2011-01-01

    The steady increase in the use of oral anticancer drugs in modern oncology has created a paradigm shift, challenging traditional attitudes towards cancer care and requiring new concepts of organization of oncology services. Important issues are the prolonged treatment period, management of toxicity, treatment adherence, reimbursement conditions and patient and family education. Although most patients generally prefer oral therapy over intravenous treatment for reasons of convenience, the daily use of oral anticancer drugs can be a challenging commitment for many patients. Reports on adherence and persistence among patients with cancer show that adherence ranges from 16% to 100%, depending on the type of therapy and the measurement/definition of adherence. Apart from demographic, disease and therapy related factors, the determinants that mostly influence (non-)adherence are the satisfaction with care activities performed at the initiation of the drug treatment, and the perceived necessity of treatment. Therefore, patient education addressing these issues is considered the cornerstone of successful oral anticancer treatment. Studies examining the role of different health care providers in the pharmacotherapeutic care of patients with cancer, treated with oral anti-cancer drugs, support the need for a multidisciplinary approach to achieve a maximum benefit for the individual patient and consequently for the whole health system. Limiting adverse events and developing appropriate supportive care are only some aspects that need to be considered in this.

  20. Anticancer studies of drug encapsulated polyethylene terephthalate-Co-polylactic acid nanocapsules

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K Sathish Kumar

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: The purpose of this study was to investigate the anticancer activity of anticancer drugs (5-fluorouracil and 6-thioguanine in polymeric nanocapsules in the presence and in the absence of gold and iron oxide nanoparticles toward Hep2 cancer cells. Materials and Methods: MTT (3-[4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl]-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide assay was used for quantitative measurements for the anticancer cell activity. Encapsulated drug in polyethylene terephthalate-polylactic acid copolymer (PET-co-PLA nanocapsules in the presence and absence of gold and iron oxide nanoparticles were prepared via the W/O/W emulsification solvent-evaporation method. Morphology of the nanoparticles was characterized by transmission electron microscopy and scanning electron microscopy. Conclusion: The average size of the polymeric nanocapsules, gold nanoparticles, and iron oxide nanoparticles were found to be in range of 230-260, 18 -20 nm, 5-10 nm, respectively. The findings in this study inferred that incorporated drug in polymeric nanocapsules with gold nanoparticles and iron oxide nanoparticles show better anticancer activity when compared with encapsulated drug in polymeric nanocapsules.

  1. Polylactide-based magnetic spheres as efficient carriers for anticancer drug delivery

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Mhlanga, N

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available To improve traditional cancer therapies, we synthesized polylactide (PLA) spheres coencapsulating magnetic nanoparticles (MNPs, Fe(sub3)O(sub4)) and an anticancer drug (doxorubicin, DOX). The synthesis process involves the preparation of Fe(sub3)O...

  2. Harnessing chemoselective imine ligation for tethering bioactive molecules to platinum(IV) prodrugs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong, Daniel Yuan Qiang; Lau, Jia Yi; Ang, Wee Han

    2012-05-28

    Platinum(II) anticancer drugs are among the most effective and often used chemotherapeutic drugs. In recent years, there has been increasing interest in exploiting inert platinum(IV) scaffolds as a prodrug strategy to mitigate the limitations of platinum(II) anticancer complexes. In this prodrug strategy, the axial ligands are released concomitantly upon intracellular reduction to the active platinum(II) congener, offering the possibility of conjugating bioactive co-drugs which may synergistically enhance cytotoxicity on cancer cells. Existing techniques of tethering bioactive molecules to the axial positions of platinum(IV) prodrugs suffer from limited scope, poor yields and low reliability. This report explores the applications of current chemoselective ligation chemistries to platinum(IV) anticancer complexes with the aim of addressing the aforementioned limitations. Here, we describe the synthesis of a platinum(IV) complex bearing an aromatic aldehyde functionality and explored the scope of imine ligation with various hydrazide and aminooxy functionalized substrates. As a proof of concept, we tethered a six sequence long peptide mimetic (AMVSEF) of the anti-inflammatory protein, ANXA1.

  3. Structural and functional evaluation of interaction between mammalian ribosomal RNA with platinum-containing antineoplastic drugs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Theile, Dirk; Kos, Martin

    2016-02-03

    Cisplatin, oxaliplatin, and carboplatin primarily target DNA, but also alter RNA functionality, albeit to different extent. This study determined the in vitro cytotoxicity (IC50 values) of platinum drugs in LS180 cells and compared the rRNA platination patterns following IC50 exposure. Relevance of particular secondary RNA structures for platination susceptibility was evaluated by primer extension methodology using 18S rRNA as a model RNA. Consequences of rRNA platination for translation efficiency were evaluated by monitoring fluorescence of a destabilised green fluorescent protein variant through flow cytometry. Oxaliplatin and cisplatin were most cytotoxic with IC50 values of 1.7 μM±0.8 and 4.1 μM±0.1, respectively. Carboplatin was significantly less efficient (IC50 147.1 μM±19.4). When exposed to equitoxic concentrations (respective IC50), all three compounds caused similar stop signal incidence or intensity. Moreover, the same rRNA sites were targeted without selectivity for particular secondary structures but with a slight preference for guanine-rich regions. Compared to cycloheximide, none of the drugs diminished translation efficiency at typical in vivo concentrations. In conclusion, equitoxic concentrations of platinum drugs target the same sites in cellular rRNA and cause similar platination intensities. At pharmacokinetically relevant concentrations, cisplatin, oxaliplatin or carboplatin do not inhibit translation efficiency. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Optimizing anticancer drug treatment in pregnant cancer patients : pharmacokinetic analysis of gestation-induced changes for doxorubicin, epirubicin, docetaxel and paclitaxel

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Hasselt, J G C; van Calsteren, K; Heyns, L; Han, S; Mhallem Gziri, M; Schellens, J H M; Beijnen, J H; Huitema, A D R; Amant, F

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Pregnant patients with cancer are increasingly treated with anticancer drugs, although the specific impact of pregnancy-induced physiological changes on the pharmacokinetics (PK) of anticancer drugs and associated implications for optimal dose regimens remains unclear. Our objectives wer

  5. Optimizing anticancer drug treatment in pregnant cancer patients : pharmacokinetic analysis of gestation-induced changes for doxorubicin, epirubicin, docetaxel and paclitaxel

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Hasselt, J G C; van Calsteren, K; Heyns, L; Han, S; Mhallem Gziri, M; Schellens, J H M|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/073926272; Beijnen, J H|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/071919570; Huitema, A D R; Amant, F

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Pregnant patients with cancer are increasingly treated with anticancer drugs, although the specific impact of pregnancy-induced physiological changes on the pharmacokinetics (PK) of anticancer drugs and associated implications for optimal dose regimens remains unclear. Our objectives

  6. Optimizing anticancer drug treatment in pregnant cancer patients : pharmacokinetic analysis of gestation-induced changes for doxorubicin, epirubicin, docetaxel and paclitaxel

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Hasselt, J G C; van Calsteren, K; Heyns, L; Han, S; Mhallem Gziri, M; Schellens, J H M; Beijnen, J H; Huitema, A D R; Amant, F

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Pregnant patients with cancer are increasingly treated with anticancer drugs, although the specific impact of pregnancy-induced physiological changes on the pharmacokinetics (PK) of anticancer drugs and associated implications for optimal dose regimens remains unclear. Our objectives wer

  7. Origanum majorana Attenuates Nephrotoxicity of Cisplatin Anticancer Drug through Ameliorating Oxidative Stress

    OpenAIRE

    Amel M. Soliman; Shreen Desouky; Mohamed Marzouk; Sayed, Amany A.

    2016-01-01

    Despite the fact that cisplatin is an important anticancer drug, its clinical utilization is limited by nephrotoxicity during long term medication. Combined cisplatin chemotherapy with plant extracts can diminish toxicity and enhance the antitumor efficacy of the drug. This study evaluated the effect of Originum majorana ethanolic extract (OMEE) on cisplatin-induced nephrotoxicity. Eighteen male rats were divided into three groups as follows: a control group, a group treated with cisplatin (3...

  8. Exploring novel formulations and new classes of anticancer drugs in solid tumors

    OpenAIRE

    Slingerland, Marije

    2014-01-01

    Many current anticancer drugs have non-ideal pharmaceutical and pharmacological properties, which can lead to adverse consequences, including lack of or suboptimal therapeutic activity, dose-limiting side effects and poor patient quality of life. In this thesis we focused on some novel formulations, especially camptothecin glycoconjugate BAY 56-3722 and liposomal drug formulations, hoping to overcome some of these problems. We also focused on ‘old drugs’ for new indications, as an example HDA...

  9. Dendrimer-Functionalized Laponite Nanodisks as a Platform for Anticancer Drug Delivery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rania Mustafa

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available In this study, we synthesized dendrimer-functionalized laponite (LAP nanodisks for loading and delivery of anticancer drug doxorubicin (DOX. Firstly, LAP was modified with silane coupling agents and succinic anhydride to render abundant carboxyl groups on the surface of LAP. Then, poly(amidoamine (PAMAM dendrimer of generation 2 (G2 were conjugated to form LM-G2 nanodisks. Anticancer drug DOX was then loaded on the LM-G2 with an impressively high drug loading efficiency of 98.4% and could be released in a pH-sensitive and sustained manner. Moreover, cell viability assay results indicate that LM-G2/DOX complexes could more effectively inhibit the proliferation of KB cells (a human epithelial carcinoma cell line than free DOX at the same drug concentration. Flow cytometry analysis and confocal laser scanning microscope demonstrated that LM-G2/DOX could be uptaken by KB cells more effectively than free DOX. Considering the exceptional high drug loading efficiency and the abundant dendrimer amine groups on the surface that can be further modified, the developed LM-G2 nanodisks may hold a great promise to be used as a novel platform for anticancer drug delivery.

  10. Are bisphosphonates the suitable anticancer drugs for the elderly?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santini, Daniele; Fratto, Maria Elisabetta; Galluzzo, Sara; Vincenzi, Bruno; Tonini, Giuseppe

    2009-01-01

    Bone metastases represent an important problem in the elderly. These patients are exposed to a higher risk of developing skeletal-related events (SREs) with a subsequent decrease in quality of life and survival. Bisphosphonates have demonstrated to reduce and delay the appearance of SREs and to improve the quality of life also in elderly bone metastatic patients. Moreover, in vitro and in vivo preclinical studies suggest that bisphosphonates exert direct as well as indirect antitumor effect. Interestingly, recent clinical data confirm these results in bone metastatic cancer patients. However, randomized trials restricted to elderly patients with metastatic bone disease and focused to evaluate survival benefits have not yet been planned even if elderly patients, especially multiple myeloma, prostate and lung cancer patients, have been often included in trials. This review will examine in detail the preclinical rationale for using bisphosphonates as anticancer agents in elderly patients and will critically explore the first retrospective and prospective clinical evidences of an increased survival in patients treated with bisphosphonates. Moreover, we will analyze the safety of bisphosphonates in elderly population and discuss the clinical recommendations expressed by the SIOG Society for the use of bisphosphonates in elderly patients. Randomized clinical trials to assess the role of bisphosphonate therapy in the adjuvant setting are currently in progress and will be described in this review. If the results of these ongoing clinical trials will be positive, the indications for bisphosphonates could increase, including also elderly patients.

  11. Synthesis and characterization of polymeric nanospheres loaded with the anticancer drug paclitaxel and magnetic particles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zavisova, Vlasta [Institute of Experimental Physics, Slovak Academy of Sciences, Watsonova 47, 040 01 Kosice (Slovakia)], E-mail: zavisova@saske.sk; Koneracka, Martina [Institute of Experimental Physics, Slovak Academy of Sciences, Watsonova 47, 040 01 Kosice (Slovakia); Muckova, Marta [Hameln rds a.s., Horna 36, Modra (Slovakia); Kopcansky, Peter; Tomasovicova, Natalia; Lancz, Gabor; Timko, Milan [Institute of Experimental Physics, Slovak Academy of Sciences, Watsonova 47, 040 01 Kosice (Slovakia); Paetoprsta, Bozena; Bartos, Peter [Hameln rds a.s., Horna 36, Modra (Slovakia); Fabian, Martin [Institute of Geotechnics, Slovak Academy of Sciences, Watsonova 45, 040 01 Kosice (Slovakia)

    2009-05-15

    We describe the preparation (by nanoprecipitation) and characterization of nanospheres (NPs) for magnetic drug targeting made of a magnetic fluid with poly(ethylene glycol), poly(D,L-lactic-co-glycolic acid) (PLGA), and the anticancer drug paclitaxel (Taxol). Infrared spectroscopy confirmed the incorporation of the drug in the PLGA NPs, which were also characterized in terms of morphology, size (typical diameter 200-250 nm) and colloidal stability in aqueous solutions of NaCl. Drug release and in vivo toxicity experiments of the prepared samples were performed. Their stability, magnetic properties (superparamagnetism), and lethal dose were found to be acceptable for the proposed application in cancer therapy.

  12. Synthesis and characterization of polymeric nanospheres loaded with the anticancer drug paclitaxel and magnetic particles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Závišová, Vlasta; Koneracká, Martina; Múčková, Marta; Kopčanský, Peter; Tomašovičová, Natália; Lancz, Gábor; Timko, Milan; Pätoprstá, Božena; Bartoš, Peter; Fabián, Martin

    2009-05-01

    We describe the preparation (by nanoprecipitation) and characterization of nanospheres (NPs) for magnetic drug targeting made of a magnetic fluid with poly(ethylene glycol), poly( D, L-lactic- co-glycolic acid) (PLGA), and the anticancer drug paclitaxel (Taxol ®). Infrared spectroscopy confirmed the incorporation of the drug in the PLGA NPs, which were also characterized in terms of morphology, size (typical diameter 200-250 nm) and colloidal stability in aqueous solutions of NaCl. Drug release and in vivo toxicity experiments of the prepared samples were performed. Their stability, magnetic properties (superparamagnetism), and lethal dose were found to be acceptable for the proposed application in cancer therapy.

  13. Environmental and biological monitoring of platinum-containing drugs in two hospital pharmacies using positive air pressure isolators.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kopp, Bettina; Crauste-Manciet, Sylvie; Guibert, Agnès; Mourier, Wilhelmine; Guerrault-Moro, Marie-Noelle; Ferrari, Sylvie; Jomier, Jean-Yves; Brossard, Denis; Schierl, Rudolf

    2013-04-01

    Environmental and biological monitoring of platinum containing drugs was implemented in two French hospital pharmacies using positive air pressure isolators and having similar working procedures when preparing antineoplastic drugs. Wipe sampling of surfaces, gloves, and vials was performed in the preparation room and in storage areas. All employees involved in the preparation of antineoplastic drugs were tested for urinary platinum on Monday before work and Friday after shift. Only traces of platinum were detected on surfaces in the preparation room outside the isolators (less than 1.61 pg cm(-2)). However, in one center, significant contamination was found in the storage area of the drug vials, which can most likely be linked to the rupture of a platinum vial and due to inefficient cleaning procedures. Surfaces inside the isolators were found to be contaminated (maximum: 198.4 pg cm(-2)). A higher level of contamination was detected in one pharmacy and could be explained by the lack of overgloving with regular changes during the preparation process. Nitrile gloves used during drug handling outside the isolator showed the highest platinum concentration (maximum: 5.86 ng per pair). With regards to platinum urine concentration, no significant difference was found between exposed and unexposed pharmacy personnel. Isolator technology combined with individual protective measures seems to be efficient to protect workers from occupational exposure to antineoplastic drugs, whereas specific individual protective procedures implemented were focussing on the risk of handling vials outside the isolator (e.g. high frequency of glove changing). Moreover, overgloving inside the isolator would contribute to substantially decrease inner surface contamination and should be recommended in order to limit the transfer of chemical contamination to the end products.

  14. Synthesis, Cytotoxicity and Mechanistic Evaluation of 4-Oxoquinoline-3-carboxamide Derivatives: Finding New Potential Anticancer Drugs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luana da S. M. Forezi

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available As part of a continuing search for new potential anticancer candidates, we describe the synthesis, cytotoxicity and mechanistic evaluation of a series of 4-oxoquinoline-3-carboxamide derivatives as novel anticancer agents. The inhibitory activity of compounds 10–18 was determined against three cancer cell lines using the MTT colorimetric assay. The screening revealed that derivatives 16b and 17b exhibited significant cytotoxic activity against the gastric cancer cell line but was not active against a normal cell line, in contrast to doxorubicin, a standard chemotherapeutic drug in clinical use. Interestingly, no hemolytical activity was observed when the toxicity of 16b and 17b was tested against blood cells. The in silico and in vitro mechanistic evaluation indicated the potential of 16b as a lead for the development of novel anticancer agents against gastric cancer cells.

  15. Promises and challenges of anticancer drugs that target the epigenome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verbrugge, Inge; Johnstone, Ricky W; Bots, Michael

    2011-10-01

    The occurrence of epigenetic aberrations in cancer and their role in promoting tumorigenesis has led to the development of various small molecule inhibitors that target epigenetic enzymes. In preclinical settings, many epigenetic inhibitors demonstrate promising activity against a variety of both hematological and solid tumors. The therapeutic efficacy of those inhibitors that have entered the clinic however, is restricted predominantly to hematological malignancies. Here we outline the observed epigenetic aberrations in various types of cancer and the clinical responses to epigenetic drugs. We furthermore discuss strategies to improve the responsiveness of both hematological and solid malignancies to epigenetic drugs.

  16. Clinical practice guidelines for translating pharmacogenomic knowledge to bedside. Focus on anticancer drugs.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José A G Agúndez

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available The development of clinical practice recommendations or guidelines for the clinical use of pharmacogenomics data is an essential issue for improving drug therapy, particularly for drugs with high toxicity and/or narrow therapeutic index such as anticancer drugs. Although pharmacogenomic-based recommendations have been formulated for over 40 anticancer drugs, the number of clinical practice guidelines available is very low. The guidelines already published indicate that pharmacogenomic testing is useful for patient selection, but final dosing adjustment should be carried out on the basis of clinical or analytical parameters rather than on pharmacogenomic information.Patient selection may seem a modest objective, but it constitutes a crucial improvement with regard to the pre-pharmacogenomics situation and it saves patients’ lives. However we should not overstate the current power of pharmacogenomics. At present the pharmacogenomics of anticancer drugs is not sufficiently developed for dose adjustments based on pharmacogenomics only, and no current guidelines recommend such adjustments without considering clinical and/or analytical parameters.

  17. Self-assembly Polyrotaxanes Nanoparticles as Carriers for Anticancer Drug Methotrexate Delivery

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Longgui Zhang; Ting Su; Bin He; Zhongwei Gu∗

    2014-01-01

    α-Cyclodextrin/poly(ethylene glycol) (α-CD/PEG) polyrotaxane nanoparticles were prepared via a self-assembly method. Anticancer drug methotrexate (MTX) was loaded in the nanoparticles. The interaction between MTX and polyrotaxane was investigated. The formation, morphology, drug release and in vitro anticancer activity of the MTX loaded polyrotaxane nanoparticles were studied. The results show that the MTX could be efficiently absorbed on the nanoparticles, and hydrogen bonds were formed between MTX andα-CDs. The typical channel-type stacking assembly style of polyrotaxane nanoparticles was changed after MTX was loaded. The mean diameter of drug loaded polyrotaxane nanoparticles were around 200 nm and the drug loading content was as high as about 20%. Drug release profiles show that most of the loaded MTX was released within 8 hours and the cumulated release rate was as high as 98%. The blank polyrotaxane nanoparticles were nontoxicity to cells. The in vitro anticancer activity of the MTX loaded polyrotaxane nanoparticles was higher than that of free MTX.

  18. Clinical Pharmacokinetic Interactions between Herbal Supplements and Anticancer Drugs

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Goey, A.K.L.

    2013-01-01

    In cancer treatment the response to chemotherapy is often characterized by a wide interpatient variability. The increasing popularity of herbal supplements among cancer patients may contribute to this phenomenon. Since these supplements may affect drug metabolizing cytochrome P450 (CYP) enzymes, pla

  19. Clinical Pharmacokinetic Interactions between Herbal Supplements and Anticancer Drugs

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Goey, A.K.L.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/315030135

    2013-01-01

    In cancer treatment the response to chemotherapy is often characterized by a wide interpatient variability. The increasing popularity of herbal supplements among cancer patients may contribute to this phenomenon. Since these supplements may affect drug metabolizing cytochrome P450 (CYP) enzymes, pla

  20. Personalized medicine of targeted anti-cancer drugs

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Klümpen, H.J.

    2012-01-01

    Medicine is becoming more and more tailored and that certainly applies to therapies for cancer. The researcher has looked at the genetic profile of the individual and the individual variation in exposure to the drug to improve the prevention, diagnosis and treatment of cancer. His field of interest

  1. Clinical Pharmacokinetic Interactions between Herbal Supplements and Anticancer Drugs

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Goey, A.K.L.

    2013-01-01

    In cancer treatment the response to chemotherapy is often characterized by a wide interpatient variability. The increasing popularity of herbal supplements among cancer patients may contribute to this phenomenon. Since these supplements may affect drug metabolizing cytochrome P450 (CYP) enzymes,

  2. The Effect of Β-casein Nanoparticles on Bioavailability and Cellular Uptake of Platinum Complex as a Cancer Drug

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M Razmi

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background & aim: Due to the low solubility and high toxicity of drugs, treatment of cancers is problematic therefore, the encapsulation and targeted delivery of therapeutic effect is required. The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of nanoparticles on cellular uptake and bioavailability of beta-casein on platinum complexes as cancer drugs. Methods: In the present experimental study, the physicochemical properties of nanoparticles as drug carriers of beta-casein devices using dynamic light scattering (DLS and scanning electron microscopy (SEM were investigated. In order to evaluate the toxicity effects of platinum complexes, the colon cancer cells in the absence or presence of free platinum complex concentration and nanoparticle loaded with platinum complexes were incubated for 24 and 48 hours. LD50 Values (concentration of compound causing 50% mortality in the cells was determined using the MTT assay. Data were analyzed by ANOVA and post-hoc test. Results: At a concentration of 1 mg ml, beta-casein nanoparticle drug carriers were synthesized in the range of 100 to 300 µM. In addition, the mortality rate in cancer cells by the release of platinum complexes (without and with the capsule, were 70 and 26 in 24 hours, and 60 µM and 21 µM in 48 hours respectively, Conclusion: The study showed that the bioavailability of the encapsulated platinum complexes increases and new drug delivery system may be a good candidate for the treatment of cancer. Key words: Beta-casein, Pt (II Complex, Bioavalibility, Nanocarrier, Micelle

  3. Controlled release of an anti-cancer drug from DNA structured nano-films

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cho, Younghyun; Lee, Jong Bum; Hong, Jinkee

    2014-02-01

    We demonstrate the generation of systemically releasable anti-cancer drugs from multilayer nanofilms. Nanofilms designed to drug release profiles in programmable fashion are promising new and alternative way for drug delivery. For the nanofilm structure, we synthesized various unique 3-dimensional anti cancer drug incorporated DNA origami structures (hairpin, Y, and X shaped) and assembled with peptide via layer-by-layer (LbL) deposition method. The key to the successful application of these nanofilms requires a novel approach of the influence of DNA architecture for the drug release from functional nano-sized surface. Herein, we have taken first steps in building and controlling the drug incorporated DNA origami based multilayered nanostructure. Our finding highlights the novel and unique drug release character of LbL systems in serum condition taken full advantages of DNA origami structure. This multilayer thin film dramatically affects not only the release profiles but also the structure stability in protein rich serum condition.

  4. Thiazolidinone motif in anticancer drug discovery. Experience of DH LNMU medicinal chemistry scientific group

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Subtel’na I. Yu.

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available The aim was analysis of 4-thiazolidinones and related heterocyclic systems anticancer activity data and formation of some rational design directions of potential anticancer agents. Synthetic research carried out in Danylo Halytsky Lviv National Medical University (DH LNMU allowed us to propose a whole number of new molecular design directions of biological active 4-thiazolidinones and related heterocyclic systems, as well as obtain directed library that numbers over 5000 of novel compounds. At the present time in vitro anticancer activity screening was carried out for more than 1000 compounds (US NCI protocol (Developmental Therapeutic Program, among them 167 compounds showed high antitumor activity level. For the purpose of optimization and rational design of highly active molecules with optimal «drug-like» characteristics and discovering of possible mechanism of action SAR, QSAR analysis and molecular docking were carried out. The ultimate aim of the project is creating of innovative synthetic drug with special mechanism of action and sufficient pharmacological and toxicological features. Some aspects of structure–activity relationships were determined and structure design directions were proposed. The series of active compounds with high anticancer activity and/or selectivity levels were selected.

  5. Overproduction of reactive oxygen species - obligatory or not for induction of apoptosis by anticancer drugs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ivanova, Donika; Zhelev, Zhivko; Aoki, Ichio; Bakalova, Rumiana; Higashi, Tatsuya

    2016-08-01

    Many studies demonstrate that conventional anticancer drugs elevate intracellular level of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and alter redox-homeostasis of cancer cells. It is widely accepted that anticancer effect of these chemotherapeutics is due to induction of oxidative stress and ROS-mediated apoptosis in cancer. On the other hand, the harmful side effects of conventional anticancer chemotherapy are also due to increased production of ROS and disruption of redox-homeostasis of normal cells and tissues. This article describes the mechanisms for triggering and modulation of apoptosis through ROS-dependent and ROS-independent pathways. We try to answer the question: "Is it possible to induce highly specific apoptosis only in cancer cells, without overproduction of ROS, as well as without harmful effects on normal cells and tissues?" The review also suggests a new therapeutic strategy for selective killing of cancer cells, without significant impact on viability of normal cells and tissues, by combining anticancer drugs with redox-modulators, affecting specific signaling pathways and avoiding oxidative stress.

  6. Potential effects of gamma irradiation on the stability and therapeutic activity of anticancer drug, doxorubicin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fatmah M. Alshammari

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Cancer therapy has progressed dramatically in recent years. In order to decrease the dose and side effects of the anticancer drug, the therapeutic options for patients with cancer include increasingly complex combinations of chemotherapy and radiotherapy. This combination may cause overlapping interaction between the two types of treatment and affect the stability of the anticancer drug. In this study, the effect of gamma irradiation on the stability and therapeutic activity of one anticancer drug (Doxorubicin was studied. For this purpose, doxorubicin drug characterized by two methods, at first, in-vitro study, before and after drug irradiation with different doses of gamma rays (2, 5, 20, 100 GY which achieved through measuring the dielectric relaxation and absorption spectrum of drug solution. Secondly, in-vivo studies, where the unirradiated and the drug, which later exposed to gamma rays, were injected respectively into 6 groups of mice (3 mice in each group. The dielectric relaxation and absorption spectrum were studded for hemoglobin of the injected mice. The results for the in-vitro study indicate that the values of dielectric parameters show unnoticeable change for drug molecules before and after irradiation as compared with the control. The results for in-vivo study indicated an increase in the values of relaxation time and Cole- Cole parameter, that may as a result of changes in the conformational structure in hemoglobin molecules which may affect their properties and hence RBC's physiological functions. The absorption spectra of hemoglobin molecules show an increase in the amplitude of the characteristic bands with irradiation dose indicate an increase of the oxygen binding capacity with hemoglobin. It was concluded that combination between the drugs and gamma irradiation can be used as a powerful conjunction that may give us the benefit chemo and radiotherapy treatment.

  7. Physics considerations in targeted anticancer drug delivery by magnetoelectric nanoparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stimphil, Emmanuel; Nagesetti, Abhignyan; Guduru, Rakesh; Stewart, Tiffanie; Rodzinski, Alexandra; Liang, Ping; Khizroev, Sakhrat

    2017-06-01

    In regard to cancer therapy, magnetoelectric nanoparticles (MENs) have proven to be in a class of its own when compared to any other nanoparticle type. Like conventional magnetic nanoparticles, they can be used for externally controlled drug delivery via application of a magnetic field gradient and image-guided delivery. However, unlike conventional nanoparticles, due to the presence of a non-zero magnetoelectric effect, MENs provide a unique mix of important properties to address key challenges in modern cancer therapy: (i) a targeting mechanism driven by a physical force rather than antibody matching, (ii) a high-specificity delivery to enhance the cellular uptake of therapeutic drugs across the cancer cell membranes only, while sparing normal cells, (iii) an externally controlled mechanism to release drugs on demand, and (iv) a capability for image guided precision medicine. These properties separate MEN-based targeted delivery from traditional biotechnology approaches and lay a foundation for the complementary approach of technobiology. The biotechnology approach stems from the underlying biology and exploits bioinformatics to find the right therapy. In contrast, the technobiology approach is geared towards using the physics of molecular-level interactions between cells and nanoparticles to treat cancer at the most fundamental level and thus can be extended to all the cancers. This paper gives an overview of the current state of the art and presents an ab initio model to describe the underlying mechanisms of cancer treatment with MENs from the perspective of basic physics.

  8. Physicochemical Characterization and Cyclodextrin Complexation of the Anticancer Drug Lapatinib

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gergő Tóth

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Lapatinib (LAP, the tyrosine kinase inhibitor drug with moderate bioavailability, was characterized in terms of physicochemical properties: acid-base characteristics, lipophilicity, and solubility. The highly lipophilic nature of the drug and its extremely low water solubility (S0=0.82 nM limit the development of a parenteral formulation. In order to enhance solubility and bioavailability, inclusion complex formation with cyclodextrins (CDs is a promising method of choice. Therefore, LAP-CD interactions were also studied by a multianalytical approach. The stability constants of LAP with native cyclodextrins, determined by UV spectroscopy, identified the seven-membered β-CD as the most suitable host. Continuous variation method (Job’s plot by 1H NMR showed a 1 : 1 stoichiometry for the complexes. The geometry of the complex was elucidated by 2D ROESY NMR measurements and molecular modeling, indicating that the partial molecular encapsulation includes the fluorophenyl ring of LAP. Phase-solubility studies with four CDs, β-CD, (2-hydroxypropyl-β-cyclodextrin (HP-β-CD, randomly methylated-β- (RAMEB- cyclodextrin, and sulfobutylether-β-cyclodextrin (SBE-β-CD, show an AL type diagram and highly increased solubility via CD complexation. The results are especially promising with SBE-β-CD, exerting more than 600-fold gain in solubility. The equilibrium and structural information presented herein can offer the molecular basis for an improved drug formulation with enhanced bioavailability.

  9. Sequential-release of anticancer drugs microcapsulated with ethylcellulose

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    顾耕华; 黄剑奇; 何虹

    2002-01-01

    Objective To approach the sequential release of antitumor drugs and promote the effect of chemotherapy.Methods Adriamycin (ADM) and carboplatin (CBP) were respectively microcapsulated with ethylcellulose by organic phase separation. The morphology and sizes of the microcapsules were observed and measured with light microscope and scanning electromicroscope. The contents and the release rates of ADM and CBP in microcapsules were measured with fluorescence spectrophotometer and high-efficiency phantom chromatic (HPC) spectrum respectively. The antitumor sensitivity test in vitro was devised with MTT assay.Results The microcapsules of ADM and CBP were spherical in shape with diameters of 196?4 μm and 214?8 μm respectively. The contents of one-layer and two-layer CBP and ADM microcapsules were 51.4%, 35.7% and 39.8% respectively, with the release rates in vitro of 62.4%/day, 54.8%/day and 48.2% /8h. The results of drug sensitivity test in vitro demonstrated that the current preparation has never affected the stability and antitumor activity of CBP and ADM.Conclusion Microcapsules with different drugs and different thickness of material have different release rate. Combined arterial chemoembolization with different microcapsules could approach the sequential release and promote the effect of chemotherapy.

  10. The pharmacokinetic/pharmacodynamic pipeline: translating anticancer drug pharmacology to the clinic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Qingyu; Gallo, James M

    2011-03-01

    Progress in an understanding of the genetic basis of cancer coupled to molecular pharmacology of potential new anticancer drugs calls for new approaches that are able to address key issues in the drug development process, including pharmacokinetic (PK) and pharmacodynamic (PD) relationships. The incorporation of predictive preclinical PK/PD models into rationally designed early-stage clinical trials offers a promising way to relieve a significant bottleneck in the drug discovery pipeline. The aim of the current review is to discuss some considerations for how quantitative PK and PD analyses for anticancer drugs may be conducted and integrated into a global translational effort, and the importance of examining drug disposition and dynamics in target tissues to support the development of preclinical PK/PD models that can be subsequently extrapolated to predict pharmacologic characteristics in patients. In this article, we describe three different physiologically based (PB) PK modeling approaches, i.e., the whole-body PBPK model, the hybrid PBPK model, and the two-pore model for macromolecules, as well as their applications. General conclusions are that greater effort should be made to generate more clinical data that could validate scaled preclinical PB-PK/PD tumor-based models and, thus, stimulate a framework for preclinical to clinical translation. Finally, given the innovative techniques to measure tissue drug concentrations and associated biomarkers of drug responses, development of predictive PK/PD models will become a standard approach for drug discovery and development.

  11. Hierarchical pulmonary target nanoparticles via inhaled administration for anticancer drug delivery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Rui; Xu, Liu; Fan, Qin; Li, Man; Wang, Jingjing; Wu, Li; Li, Weidong; Duan, Jinao; Chen, Zhipeng

    2017-11-01

    Inhalation administration, compared with intravenous administration, significantly enhances chemotherapeutic drug exposure to the lung tissue and may increase the therapeutic effect for pulmonary anticancer. However, further identification of cancer cells after lung deposition of inhaled drugs is necessary to avoid side effects on normal lung tissue and to maximize drug efficacy. Moreover, as the action site of the major drug was intracellular organelles, drug target to the specific organelle is the final key for accurate drug delivery. Here, we designed a novel multifunctional nanoparticles (MNPs) for pulmonary antitumor and the material was well-designed for hierarchical target involved lung tissue target, cancer cell target, and mitochondrial target. The biodistribution in vivo determined by UHPLC-MS/MS method was employed to verify the drug concentration overwhelmingly increasing in lung tissue through inhaled administration compared with intravenous administration. Cellular uptake assay using A549 cells proved the efficient receptor-mediated cell endocytosis. Confocal laser scanning microscopy observation showed the location of MNPs in cells was mitochondria. All results confirmed the intelligent material can progressively play hierarchical target functions, which could induce more cell apoptosis related to mitochondrial damage. It provides a smart and efficient nanocarrier platform for hierarchical targeting of pulmonary anticancer drug. So far, this kind of material for pulmonary mitochondrial-target has not been seen in other reports.

  12. The Valley of Death in anticancer drug development: a re-assessment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adams, David J.

    2012-01-01

    The past decade has seen an explosion in our understanding of cancer biology and with it many new potential disease targets. Yet our ability to translate these advances into therapies is poor, with a failure rate approaching 90%. Much discussion has been devoted to this so-called ‘Valley of Death’ in anticancer drug development, but the problem persists. Could we have overlooked some straight-forward explanations to this highly complex problem? Important aspects of tumor physiology, drug pharmacokinetics, preclinical models, drug delivery, and clinical translation are not often emphasized and could be critical. This perspective summarizes current views on the problem and suggests feasible alternatives. PMID:22410081

  13. Quantification of cell viability and rapid screening anti-cancer drug utilizing nanomechanical fluctuation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Shangquan; Liu, Xiaoli; Zhou, Xiarong; Liang, Xin M; Gao, Dayong; Liu, Hong; Zhao, Gang; Zhang, Qingchuan; Wu, Xiaoping

    2016-03-15

    Cancer is a serious threat to human health. Although numerous anti-cancer drugs are available clinically, many have shown toxic side effects due to poor tumor-selectivity, and reduced effectiveness due to cancers rapid development of resistance to treatment. The development of new highly efficient and practical methods to quantify cell viability and its change under drug treatment is thus of significant importance in both understanding of anti-cancer mechanism and anti-cancer drug screening. Here, we present an approach of utilizing a nanomechanical fluctuation based highly sensitive microcantilever sensor, which is capable of characterizing the viability of cells and quantitatively screening (within tens of minutes) their responses to a drug with the obvious advantages of a rapid, label-free, quantitative, noninvasive, real-time and in-situ assay. The microcantilever sensor operated in fluctuation mode was used in evaluating the paclitaxel effectiveness on breast cancer cell line MCF-7. This study demonstrated that the nanomechanical fluctuations of the microcantilever sensor are sensitive enough to detect the dynamic variation in cellular force which is provided by the cytoskeleton, using cell metabolism as its energy source, and the dynamic instability of microtubules plays an important role in the generation of the force. We propose that cell viability consists of two parts: biological viability and mechanical viability. Our experimental results suggest that paclitaxel has little effect on biological viability, but has a significant effect on mechanical viability. This new method provides a new concept and strategy for the evaluation of cell viability and the screening of anti-cancer drugs.

  14. Nanotech revolution for the anti-cancer drug delivery through blood-brain barrier.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caraglia, M; De Rosa, G; Salzano, G; Santini, D; Lamberti, M; Sperlongano, P; Lombardi, A; Abbruzzese, A; Addeo, R

    2012-03-01

    Nanotechnology-based drug delivery was born as a chance for pharmaceutical weapons to be delivered in the body sites where drug action is required. Specifically, the incorporation of anti-cancer agents in nanodevices of 100-300 nm allows their delivery in tissues that have a fenestrated vasculature and a reduced lymphatic drainage. These two features are typical of neoplastic tissues and, therefore, allow the accumulation of nanostructured devices in tumours. An important issue of anti-cancer pharmacological strategies is the overcoming of anatomical barriers such as the bloodbrain- barrier (BBB) that protects brain from toxicological injuries but, at the same time, makes impossible for most of the pharmacological agents with anti-cancer activity to reach tumour cells placed in the brain and derived from either primary tumours or metastases. In fact, only highly lipophilic molecules can passively diffuse through BBB to reach central nervous system (CNS). Another possibility is to use nanotechnological approaches as powerful tools to across BBB, by both prolonging the plasma half-life of the drugs and crossing fenestrations of BBB damaged by brain metastases. Moreover, modifications of nanocarrier surface with specific endogenous or exogenous ligands can promote the crossing of intact BBB as in the case of primary brain tumours. This aim can be achieved through the binding of the nanodevices to carriers or receptors expressed by the endothelial cells of BBB and that can favour the internalization of the nanostructured devices delivering anti-cancer drugs. This review summarizes the most meaningful advances in the field of nanotechnologies for brain delivery of drugs.

  15. A spectroscopic investigations of anticancer drugs binding to bovine serum albumin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bakkialakshmi, S.; Chandrakala, D.

    2012-03-01

    The binding of anticancer drugs (i) Uracil (U), (ii) 5-Fluorouracil (5FU) and (iii) 5-Chlorouracil (5ClU), to bovine serum albumin (BSA) at two levels of temperature was studied by the fluorescence of quenching method. UV/Vis, time-resolved fluorescence, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), proton nuclear magnetic resonance (1H NMR) and scanning electron microscope (SEM) analyses were also made. Binding constants (Ka) and binding sites (n) at various levels of temperature were calculated. The obtained binding sites were found to be equal to one for all the three quenchers (U, 5FU and 5ClU) at two different temperature levels. Thermodynamic parameters ΔH, ΔG and ΔS have been calculated and were presented in tables. Change in FTIR absorption intensity shows strong binding of anticancer drugs to BSA. Changes in chemical shifts of NMR and fluorescence lifetimes of the drugs indicate the presence of interaction and binding of BSA to anticancer drugs. 1H NMR spectra and SEM photographs also conform this binding.

  16. Impact of depression mood disorder on the adverse drug reaction incidence rate of anticancer drugs in cancer patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, T; Duan, J J; Zhou, G P; Cai, J Y; Huang, Z H; Zeng, Y T; Xu, F

    2010-01-01

    The aim of this study was to explore the impact of depression mood disorder on the incidence of adverse drug reactions of anticancer drugs in cancer patients. The Hamilton Depression Scale 17 was used to evaluate the depression mood disorder level in 73 cancer patients before chemotherapy. Pharmacists monitored adverse drug reactions during the chemotherapy period. The relationship between depression mood disorder level and the incidence of adverse drug reactions was analysed. The frequency and extent of total adverse drug reactions were not related to depression mood disorder level. The frequency and extent of subjectively experienced adverse drug reactions such as anorexia, nausea and fatigue were related to depression mood disorder level. In conclusion, psychological support and intervention should be provided to cancer patients in order to improve patient adherence and cancer chemotherapy effectiveness, and to decrease the incidence of adverse drug reactions.

  17. Synthesis and characterization of potential iron–platinum drugs and supplements by laser liquid photolysis

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Nkosi, SS

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available , and structure was systematically investigated. Different nanostructures of iron–platinum alloy and chemically disordered iron–platinum L10 phase were obtained without annealing. The prepared precursor solution underwent deep photolysis to polycrystalline iron...

  18. Folate receptor targeted liposomes encapsulating anti-cancer drugs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaudhury, Anumita; Das, Surajit

    2015-01-01

    Among all available lipid based nanoparticulate systems, the success of liposomal drug delivery system is evident by the number of liposomal products available in the market or under advanced stages of preclinical and clinical trials. Liposome has the ability to deliver chemotherapeutic agents to the targeted tissues or even inside the cancerous cells by enhanced intracellular penetration or improved tumour targeting. In the last decade, folate receptor mediated tumour targeting has emerged as an attractive alternative method of active targeting of cancer cells through liposomes due to its numerous advantages over other targeting methods. Folate receptors, also known as folate binding proteins, allow the binding and internalization of folate or folic acid into the cells by a method called folate receptor mediated endocytosis. They have restricted presence in normal cells and are mostly expressed during malignant transformation. In this review article, folate receptor targeting capability of liposomes has been described. This review article has focussed on the different cancer drugs which have been encapsulated in folate receptor targeted liposomes and their in vitro as well as in vivo efficacies in several tumour models.

  19. Thermodynamical study of interaction of histone H1 chromosomal protein and mitoxantrone anticancer drug

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jafargholizadeh, Naser [Department of Cell and Molecular Biology, School of Biology, College of Science, University of Tehran, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Zargar, Seyed Jalal, E-mail: Zargar@khayam.ut.ac.ir [Department of Cell and Molecular Biology, School of Biology, College of Science, University of Tehran, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Safarian, Shahrokh; Habibi-Rezaei, Mehran [Department of Cell and Molecular Biology, School of Biology, College of Science, University of Tehran, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2012-06-10

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer For the first time, our results show mitoxantrone anticancer drug binds to histone H1, via hydrophobic, hydrogen, van der Waals and electrostatic interactions. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Binding of mitoxantrone molecules to histone H1 is positive cooperative. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Histone H1 may be considered as a new target for mitoxantrone at the chromatin level. - Using ultraviolet spectroscopy technique, we have investigated the interaction of anticancer drug, mitoxantrone with calf thymus histone H1 chromosomal protein in 100 mM phosphate buffer, pH 7.0, at temperatures 300 and 310 K. UV spectroscopy results show interactions between mitoxantrone and histone H1 with a positive cooperative binding process which was confirmed by Scatchard plot. According to the obtained results, it is concluded that histone H1 can be considered as a target for mitoxantrone binding at the chromatin level.

  20. Ginseng and Anticancer Drug Combination to Improve Cancer Chemotherapy: A Critical Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shihong Chen

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Ginseng, a well-known herb, is often used in combination with anticancer drugs to enhance chemotherapy. Its wide usage as well as many documentations are often cited to support its clinical benefit of such combination therapy. However the literature based on objective evidence to make such recommendation is still lacking. The present review critically evaluated relevant studies reported in English and Chinese literature on such combination. Based on our review, we found good evidence from in vitro and in vivo animal studies showing enhanced antitumor effect when ginseng is used in combination with some anticancer drugs. However, there is insufficient clinical evidence of such benefit as very few clinical studies are available. Future research should focus on clinically relevant studies of such combination to validate the utility of ginseng in cancer.

  1. A pH-Sensitive Injectable Nanoparticle Composite Hydrogel for Anticancer Drug Delivery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuanfeng Ye

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available According to previous reports, low pH-triggered nanoparticles were considered to be excellent carriers for anticancer drug delivery, for the reason that they could trigger encapsulated drug release at mild acid environment of tumor. Herein, an acid-sensitive β-cyclodextrin derivative, namely, acetalated-β-cyclodextrin (Ac-β-CD, was synthesized by acetonation and fabricated to nanoparticles through single oil-in-water (o/w emulsion technique. At the same time, camptothecin (CPT, a hydrophobic anticancer drug, was encapsulated into Ac-β-CD nanoparticles in the process of nanoparticle fabrication. Formed nanoparticles exhibited nearly spherical structure with diameter of 209±40 nm. The drug release behavior of nanoparticles displayed pH dependent changes due to hydrolysis of Ac-β-CD. In order to overcome the disadvantages of nanoparticle and broaden its application, injectable hydrogels with Ac-β-CD nanoparticles were designed and prepared by simple mixture of nanoparticles solution and graphene oxide (GO solution in this work. The injectable property was confirmed by short gelation time and good mobility of two precursors. Hydrogels were characterized by dynamic mechanical test and SEM, which also reflected some structural features. Moreover, all hydrogels underwent a reversible sol-gel transition in alkaline environment. Finally, the results of in vitro drug release profile indicated that hydrogel could control drug release or bind drug inside depending on the pH value of released medium.

  2. Mathematical modeling analysis of intratumoral disposition of anticancer agents and drug delivery systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Popilski, Hen; Stepensky, David

    2015-05-01

    Solid tumors are characterized by complex morphology. Numerous factors relating to the composition of the cells and tumor stroma, vascularization and drainage of fluids affect the local microenvironment within a specific location inside the tumor. As a result, the intratumoral drug/drug delivery system (DDS) disposition following systemic or local administration is non-homogeneous and its complexity reflects the differences in the local microenvironment. Mathematical models can be used to analyze the intratumoral drug/DDS disposition and pharmacological effects and to assist in choice of optimal anticancer treatment strategies. The mathematical models that have been applied by different research groups to describe the intratumoral disposition of anticancer drugs/DDSs are summarized in this article. The properties of these models and of their suitability for prediction of the drug/DDS intratumoral disposition and pharmacological effects are reviewed. Currently available mathematical models appear to neglect some of the major factors that govern the drug/DDS intratumoral disposition, and apparently possess limited prediction capabilities. More sophisticated and detailed mathematical models and their extensive validation are needed for reliable prediction of different treatment scenarios and for optimization of drug treatment in the individual cancer patients.

  3. Anticancer compounds as leishmanicidal drugs: challenges in chemotherapy and future perspectives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fuertes, Miguel A; Nguewa, Paul A; Castilla, Josefina; Alonso, Carlos; Pérez, José M

    2008-01-01

    Leishmaniasis comprises a spectrum of parasitic illnesses caused by several species of the protozoan kinetoplastid parasite, Leishmania spp. The disease affects 12 million people around the world with an annual death rate of approximately 80,000 people. Several drugs are available for treating leishmaniasis. For example, pentavalent antimonial compounds, such as sodium stibogluconate and meglumine antimonite are the drugs used in first-line chemotherapy. As second-line drugs, amphotericin B and pentamidine are used. However, current treatments against leishmaniasis are usually unsatisfactory due to some limitations including the route of administration of the drugs, their unaffordable cost and toxicity. Efforts have been made to develop new leishmanicidal drugs and to find new strategies of drug design. Hence, it is interesting to point out that the effectiveness of certain molecules as both anticancer drugs and antiprotozoal agents suggested that this class of compounds and their derivatives might be useful as antileishmanial agents. This review summarizes the anticancer compounds that have been investigated against leishmaniasis. Some of such agents include: compounds with in vitro antileishmanial activities, molecules tested in clinical trials and registered patents. We finally discuss challenges in chemotherapy and future prospects in the treatment of leishmaniasis.

  4. Anti-VEGF Anticancer Drugs: Mind the Hypertension.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katsi, Vasiliki; Zerdes, Ioannis; Manolakou, Stavroula; Makris, Thomas; Nihoyannopoulos, Petros; Tousoulis, Dimitris; Kallikazaros, Ioannis

    2014-01-01

    The introduction of therapies that inhibit tumor angiogenesis and particularly target to vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) and vascular endothelial growth factor receptor (VEGFR) (VEGF inhibitors/VEGFi) have revolutionized the treatment of various cancer types. Although their clinical benefit can be optimal for cancer-affected patients, the safety of these targeted agents is of special concern especially for longer-term adjuvant or maintenance treatment. Importantly, VEGFi therapy has been significantly associated with hypertension (HTN) as an adverse effect and therefore the control of blood pressure (BP) after the administration of these drugs remains a challenging matter to be faced. The aim of this review is to summarize studies which investigate the association of VEGFi agents with HTN manifestation and the possible risks associated with this complication. Additionally, given that the optimal management of HTN caused by VEGFi remains obscure, this review will focus on prevention strategies including BP monitoring plans and propose potential therapeutic approaches.

  5. Potentiation of Anticancer Drugs: Effects of Pentoxifylline on Neoplastic Cells

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    Miroslav Barancik

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available The drug efflux activity of P-glycoprotein (P-gp, a product of the mdr1 gene, ABCB1 member of ABC transporter family represents a mechanism by which tumor cells escape death induced by chemotherapeutics. In this study, we investigated the mechanisms involved in the effects of pentoxifylline (PTX on P-gp-mediated multidrug resistance (MDR in mouse leukemia L1210/VCR cells. Parental sensitive mouse leukemia cells L1210, and multidrug-resistant cells, L1210/VCR, which are characterized by the overexpression of P-gp, were used as experimental models. The cells were exposed to 100 μmol/L PTX in the presence or absence of 1.2 μmol/L vincristine (VCR. Western blot analysis indicated a downregulation of P-gp protein expression when multidrug-resistant L1210/VCR cells were exposed to PTX. The effects of PTX on the sensitization of L1210/VCR cells to VCR correlate with the stimulation of apoptosis detected by Annexin V/propidium iodide apoptosis necrosis kit and proteolytic activation of both caspase-3 and caspase-9 monitored by Western blot analysis. Higher release of matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs, especially MMP-2, which could be attenuated by PTX, was found in L1210/VCR than in L1210 cells by gelatin zymography in electrophoretic gel. Exposure of resistant cells to PTX increased the content of phosphorylated Akt kinase. In contrast, the presence of VCR eliminated the effects of PTX on Akt kinase phosphorylation. Taken together, we conclude that PTX induces the sensitization of multidrug-resistant cells to VCR via downregulation of P-gp, stimulation of apoptosis and reduction of MMPs released from drug-resistant L1210/VCR cells. These facts bring new insights into the mechanisms of PTX action on cancer cells.

  6. The newly synthesized anticancer drug HUHS1015 is useful for treatment of human gastric cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaku, Yoshiko; Tsuchiya, Ayako; Kanno, Takeshi; Nakao, Shuhei; Shimizu, Tadashi; Tanaka, Akito; Nishizaki, Tomoyuki

    2015-03-01

    Naftopidil is clinically for treatment of benign prostate hyperplasia, and emerging evidence has pointed to its anticancer effect. To obtain the anticancer drug with the potential greater than that of naftopidil, we have newly synthesized the naftopidil analogue HUHS1015. The present study investigated the mechanism underlying HUHS1015-induced apoptosis of human gastric cancer cells and assessed the possibility for clinical use as an innovative anticancer drug. HUHS1015 reduced cell viability for MKN28 human well-differentiated gastric adenocarcinoma cell line and MKN45 human poorly differentiated gastric adenocarcinoma cell line in a concentration (0.3-100 μM)-dependent manner more effectively than cisplatin, a chemo-drug widely used. In the flow cytometry using propidium iodide (PI) and annexin V, HUHS1015 significantly increased the population of PI-positive and annexin V-negative cells, corresponding to primary necrosis and that of PI-positive and annexin V-positive cells, corresponding to late apoptosis/secondary necrosis, both in the two cell types. HUHS1015 significantly activated caspase-3, caspase-4, and caspase-8 in MKN45 cells, while no obvious caspase activation was found in MKN28 cells. HUHS1015 upregulated expression of the tumor necrosis factor α (TNFα) mRNA and protein in MKN45 cells, allowing activation of caspase-8 through TNF receptor and the effector caspase-3. HUHS1015 clearly inhibited tumor growth in mice inoculated with MKN45 cells, with the survival rate higher than that for the anticancer drugs cisplatin, paclitaxel, and irinotecan. The results of the present study show that HUHS1015 induces caspase-independent and caspase-dependent apoptosis of MKN28 and MKN45 human gastric cancer cells, respectively, and effectively suppresses MKN45 cell proliferation.

  7. Effects of Complementary and Alternative Medicines (CAM) on the Metabolism and Transport of Anticancer Drugs

    OpenAIRE

    Mooiman, K.D.

    2013-01-01

    The use of complementary and alternative medicines (CAM), such as herbs and dietary supplements, has become more popular among cancer patients. Cancer patients use these supplements for different reasons such as reduction of side effects and improvement of their quality of life. In general, the use of CAM is considered as safe. However, concomitant use of CAM and anticancer drugs could result in serious safety issues since CAM have the potential to cause pharmacokinetic interactions with conv...

  8. Oral anticancer drugs in the elderly: an overview.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lonardi, Sara; Bortolami, Alberto; Stefani, Micaela; Monfardini, Silvio

    2007-01-01

    The increasing number of elderly people in the world population has led to a parallel increase in the number of older cancer patients, with over 45% of all cancers in Europe occurring in patients >70 years of age. The increasing tendency to use oral chemotherapy is thus of interest in the elderly, given that both elderly patients and their physicians prefer to use less complex and toxic regimens when such treatments have equivalent efficacy to more complex regimens. However, data from studies designed to evaluate these therapies in the elderly are currently limited. Factors that must be considered before prescribing oral agents to this subset of patients include age-related physiological changes affecting clinical pharmacology, adherence, the patient's capability to self-administer medications, and safety issues concerning the older patient and his or her caregivers. The idea that elderly patients may benefit from the introduction of oral chemotherapy is very fashionable, but to date there is no proof that this approach is as effective as intravenous therapy in this age group, particularly since randomised trials are lacking. This review discusses these issues and reviews current information about the use of specific oral chemotherapeutic drugs for major neoplastic diseases in the elderly.

  9. ACTIVITY OF LEAF EXTRACTS OF COIX LACHRYMA LINN. AND ASPARAGUS COCHINCHINENSISLINN. AS BREAST ANTICANCER DRUGS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    RESMI MUSTARICHIE

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available In the current economic crisis, the use of plant medicine forcancer prevention should be investigated. Coix lachryma Linn and Asparagus cochinchinensis Linn are among eleven of species of medicinal plants that are noted as plant medicine for cancer in Indonesia, although their mechanism of action are still unknown. The eleven plants were screened using in vitro methods, Sulforhodamin B against breast cancer cells (MCF"7 and skin (KB. The research included a maceration process using ethanol as solvent and an anti"cancer testing process in vitro using Sulforhodamin B indicated by the value of percentage viability. Extracts were classed as being 'active anticancer' if they showed IC50 values below 100 ppm.. Coix lachryma Linn. and Asparagus cochinchinensis Linn. show breast and skin anticancer activity withIC50 values 6.51 ppm and 11.3 ppm of MCF"7 cells. The ethanol plant extracts were further extracted using various solvents with increasing polarity: n"hexane, methylene chloride, and ethyl acetate. The methylene chloride extract of Coix lachryma Linn. had IC50 = 2.75 ppm against MCF"7 cells. Against KB cells, methylene chloride extracts of Coix lachryma Linn. gave IC50 = 5.16 ppm. For Asparagus cochinchinensis Linn., an ethyl acetate extract had IC50 = 3.70 ppm against KB cancer cells and IC50 = 9.80 ppm against MCF"7 cancer cells. These data indicated that both plants can be used as anticancer drugs on breast and skin cancers.

  10. Meeting report on 8th International Symposium on Platinum and Other Metal Coordination Compounds in Cancer Chemotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelland, L R

    1999-10-01

    The platinum-based drugs, cisplatin and carboplatin, represent major agents in the chemotherapeutic treatment of a variety of types of cancer. Novel, "third-generation" agents aimed at broadening the clinical activity of this class of drug are currently undergoing clinical evaluation. These include oxaliplatin, ZD0473 and BBR3464. Clinical trials and preclinical studies are also being conducted with liposomal (SPI-077 and L-NDDP) and polymeric platinum complexes (linked to HPMA or albumin). Combination studies of cisplatin/carboplatin with other anticancer drugs such as gemcitabine and UCN-01 (7-hydroxystaurosporine) and agents designed to reduce platinum drug toxicities (e.g., BNP-7787, DIMESNA) are ongoing. Preclinically, there is interest in trans platinum complexes, terpyridine platinum(II) complexes and other metal-containing agents (ruthenium and gold).

  11. Fatal adverse drug reactions of anticancer drugs detected by all-case post-marketing surveillance in Japan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mori, Jinichi; Tanimoto, Tetsuya; Miura, Yuji; Kami, Masahiro

    2015-06-01

    All-case post-marketing surveillance of newly approved anticancer drugs is usually conducted on all patients in Japan. The present study investigates whether all-case post-marketing surveillance identifies fatal adverse drug reactions undetected before market entry. We examined fatal adverse drug reactions identified via all-case post-marketing surveillance by reviewing the disclosed post-marketing surveillance results, and determined the time points in which the fatal adverse drug reactions were initially reported by reviewing drug labels. We additionally scanned emergency alerts on the Japanese regulatory authority website to assess the relationship between all-case post-marketing surveillance and regulatory action. Twenty-five all-case post-marketing surveillances were performed between January 1999 and December 2009. Eight all-case post-marketing surveillances with final results included information on all fatal cases. Of these, the median number of patients was 1287 (range: 106-4998), the median number of fatal adverse drug reactions was 14.5 (range: 4-23). Of the 111 fatal adverse drug reactions detected in the eight post-marketing surveillances, only 28 (25.0%) and 22 (19.6%) were described on the initial global and the initial Japanese drug label, respectively, and 58 (52.3%) fatal adverse drug reactions were first described in the all-case post-marketing surveillance reports. Despite this, the regulatory authority issued only four warning letters, and two of these were prompted by case reports from the all-case post-marketing surveillance. All-case post-marketing surveillance of newly approved anticancer drugs in Japan was useful for the rigorous compilation of non-specific adverse drug reactions, but it rarely detected clinically significant fatal adverse drug reactions. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  12. Effect of Adherence on Pharmacokinetic/Pharmacodynamic Relationships of Oral Targeted Anticancer Drugs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cardoso, Evelina; Csajka, Chantal; Schneider, Marie P; Widmer, Nicolas

    2017-06-20

    The emergence of oral targeted anticancer agents transformed several cancers into chronic conditions with a need for long-term oral treatment. Although cancer is a life-threatening condition, oncology medication adherence-the extent to which a patient follows the drug regimen that is intended by the prescriber-can be suboptimal in the long term, as in any other chronic disease. Poor adherence can impact negatively on clinical outcomes, notably because most of these drugs are given as a standard non-individualized dosage despite marked inter-individual variabilities that can lead to toxic or inefficacious drug concentrations. This has been especially studied with the prototypal drug imatinib. In the context of therapeutic drug monitoring (TDM), increasingly advocated for oral anticancer treatment optimization, unreported suboptimal adherence affecting drug intake history may lead to significant bias in the concentration interpretation and inappropriate dosage adjustments. In the same way, suboptimal adherence may also bias the results of pharmacokinetic modeling studies, which will affect in turn Bayesian TDM interpretation that relies on such population models. Detailed knowledge of the influence of adherence on plasma concentrations in pharmacokinetic studies or in routine TDM programs is however presently missing in the oncology field. Studies on this topic are therefore eagerly awaited to better pilot the treatment of cancer with the new targeted agents and to find their optimal dosage regimen. Hence, the development and assessment of effective medication adherence programs are warranted for these treatments.

  13. Characteristic effect of an anticancer dinuclear platinum(II) complex on the higher-order structure of DNA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kida, Naoko; Katsuda, Yousuke; Yoshikawa, Yuko; Komeda, Seiji; Sato, Takaji; Saito, Yoshihiro; Chikuma, Masahiko; Suzuki, Mari; Imanaka, Tadayuki; Yoshikawa, Kenichi

    2010-06-01

    It is known that a 1,2,3-triazolato-bridged dinuclear platinum(II) complex, [{cis-Pt(NH(3))(2)}(2)(micro-OH)(micro-1,2,3-ta-N (1),N (2))](NO(3))(2) (AMTA), shows high in vitro cytotoxicity against several human tumor cell lines and circumvents cross-resistance to cisplatin. In the present study, we examined a dose- and time-dependent effect of AMTA on the higher-order structure of a large DNA, T4 phage DNA (166 kbp), by adapting single-molecule observation with fluorescence microscopy. It was found that AMTA induces the shrinking of DNA into a compact state with a much higher potency than cisplatin. From a quantitative analysis of the Brownian motion of individual DNA molecules in solution, it became clear that the density of a DNA segment in the compact state is about 2,000 times greater than that in the absence of AMTA. Circular dichroism spectra suggested that AMTA causes a transition from the B to the C form in the secondary structure of DNA, which is characterized by fast and slow processes. Electrophoretic measurements indicated that the binding of AMTA to supercoiled DNA induces unwinding of the double helix. Our results indicate that AMTA acts on DNA through both electrostatic interaction and coordination binding; the former causes a fast change in the secondary structure from the B to the C form, whereas the latter promotes shrinking in the higher-order structure as a relatively slow kinetic process. The shrinking effect of AMTA on DNA is attributable to the possible increase in the number of bridges along a DNA molecule. It is concluded that AMTA interacts with DNA in a manner markedly different from that of cisplatin.

  14. Synthesis and biological evaluation of novel platinum complexes of imidazolyl-containing bisphosphonates as potential anticancer agents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qiu, Ling; Lv, Gaochao; Cao, Yang; Chen, Liping; Yang, Hui; Luo, Shineng; Zou, Meifen; Lin, Jianguo

    2015-12-01

    Four novel platinum complexes, [Pt(en)]2ZL (1), [Pt(en)]2IPrBP (2), [Pt(en)]2MIBP (3) and [Pt(en)]2EIBP (4) [en = ethylenediamine; ZL = 1-hydroxy-3-(1H-imidazol-1-yl)ethane-1,1-diylbisphosphonic acid, commonly known as zoledronic acid; IPrBP = 1-hydroxy-3-(1H-imidazol-1-yl)propane-1,1-diylbisphosphonic acid; MIBP = 1-hydroxy-2-(2-methyl-1H-imidazol-1-yl)ethane-1,1-diylbisphosphonic acid; EIBP = 1-hydroxy-2-(2-ethyl-1H-imidazol-1-yl)ethane-1,1-diylbisphosphonic acid], were prepared and evaluated against five human cancer cell lines, including U2OS, A549, HCT116, MDA-MB-231 and HepG2. While exhibiting lower efficacy on the inhibition of cancer cell lines than cisplatin (CDDP), four complexes showed higher cytotoxicity than the corresponding ligands and relatively stronger cytotoxic effect on the hepatoma cell lines HepG2, and the complex 1 showed higher cytotoxicity than others on the whole. These complexes have better selectivity than the corresponding ligands in inhibiting hepatocarcinoma cells rather than normal liver cells, and the selective inhibitory effect of the complex 1 at the high concentration (100 μM) is better than that at the low concentration. Morphology studies exhibited typical characteristics of cell apoptosis and the cell cycle distribution analysis indicated that the complexes can inhibit cancer cells by inducing the cell cycle arrest at the G2/M phase, exhibiting a similar mechanism of action to CDDP. The binding interaction of complex with DNA has been explored by circular dichroism (CD) and UV-Vis absorption spectra, demonstrating these new complexes have moderate binding affinity for DNA.

  15. [Development of anti-cancer drugs under new renewed GCP--from the viewpoint of drug development company developer].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ueno, T; Kobayashi, T; Inoue, K; Yanagi, Y; Yamada, Y

    1998-04-01

    During the past 7 years since the enforcement of Japan's first GCP in October 1990, various standards and guidelines have been introduced in Japan. On the other hand, the harmonization of GCP has been the subject of major discussion at ICH in order to allow the mutual acceptance of clinical data from different countries. In order to further improve the reliability and consistency of clinical data and the ethics of clinical trials in Japan, the new GCP was enforced in April 1997. A clinical study is conducted by the sponsor, but will only be successful with the collaboration of trial subjects, medical institutions, heads of medical institutions, investigators, subinvestigators, pharmacists, nurses, laboratory technicians, and other assisting staff. Before the full enforcement of the new GCP, we, as sponsors of clinical trials, carried out a survey of the current status of clinical trials centering on the reactions of medical institutions to the new GCP, future of clinical trials on anti-cancer drugs in Japan, and differences in time from clinical trials to registration in Japan, the United State and Europe. We sent a questionnaire by facsimile to 21 pharmaceutical companies which have developed or are developing anti-cancer drugs and obtained replies from 20 companies (95%) from August 25 to 30, 1997. This paper reports issues concerning clinical trials on anti-cancer drugs based on the results of our survey.

  16. Theoretical Study on the Mechanism Properties of a Novel Trans-platinum Antitumor Drug

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    HE Qin; ZHOU Li-Xin; ZHANG Zhi-Qiang

    2005-01-01

    The mechanism properties of a novel trans-platinum (with one or two of the normal ammine ligands replaced by the planar nitrogen ligand) antitumor drug were explored by using the B3LYP method in the present paper, and the interaction for the monofunctional adduct on DNA trans-[Pt(NH3)(QUIN)GCl] (QUIN = quinoline, G = guanine) with N-containing ligands has been theoretically studied and compared with that of S-containing ligands. The results show that the N-containing ligands are more preferred in the gas phase. Environment effect has been investigated systematically using the PCM model with a series of dielectric constants ε (4.9, 9.0 and 78.4) and compared to the gas phase result with a similar trend.

  17. Applications of nanosystems to anticancer drug therapy (Part I. Nanogels, nanospheres, nanocapsules).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Talevi, Alan; Gantner, Melisa E; Ruiz, María E

    2014-01-01

    One of the greatest challenges in cancer drug therapy is to maximize the effectiveness of the active agent while reducing its systemic adverse effects. To add more, many widely-used chemoterapeutic agents present unfavorable physicochemical properties (e.g. low solubility, lack of chemical or biological stability) that hamper or limit their therapeutic applications. All these issues may be overcome by designing adequate drug delivery systems; nanocarriers are particularly suitable for this purpose. Nanosystems can be used for targeted-drug release, treatment, diagnostic imaging and therapy monitoring. They allow the formulation of drug delivery systems with user-defined characteristics regarding solubility, biodegradability, particle size, release kinetics and active targeting, among others. This review (Part I) focuses on recent patents published between 2008 and the present day, related to nanospheres, nanocapsules and nanogels applied to anticancer drug therapy. Other nanosystems is covered in a second article (Part II).

  18. Alkaloids from Marine Invertebrates as Important Leads for Anticancer Drugs Discovery and Development

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Concetta Imperatore

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available The present review describes research on novel natural antitumor alkaloids isolated from marine invertebrates. The structure, origin, and confirmed cytotoxic activity of more than 130 novel alkaloids belonging to several structural families (indoles, pyrroles, pyrazines, quinolines, and pyridoacridines, together with some of their synthetic analogs, are illustrated. Recent discoveries concerning the current state of the potential and/or development of some of them as new drugs, as well as the current knowledge regarding their modes of action, are also summarized. A special emphasis is given to the role of marine invertebrate alkaloids as an important source of leads for anticancer drug discovery.

  19. Anti-cancer drug discovery: update and comparisons in yeast, Drosophila, and zebrafish.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Guangxun; Chen, Liang; Huang, Chuanshu

    2014-01-01

    Discovery of novel cancer chemotherapeutics focuses on screening and identifying compounds that can target 'cancer-specific' biological processes while causing minimal toxicity to non-tumor cells. Alternatively, model organisms with highly conserved cancer-related cellular processes relative to human cells may offer new opportunities for anticancer drug discovery when combined with chemical screening. Some organisms used for chemotherapeutic discovery include yeast, Drosophila, and zebrafish which are similar in important ways relevant to cancer study but offer distinct advantages as well. Here, we describe these model attributes and the rationale for using them in cancer drug screening research.

  20. Anti-cancer drug loaded iron-gold core-shell nanoparticles (Fe@Au) for magnetic drug targeting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kayal, Sibnath; Ramanujan, Raju Vijayaraghavan

    2010-09-01

    Magnetic drug targeting, using core-shell magnetic carrier particles loaded with anti-cancer drugs, is an emerging and significant method of cancer treatment. Gold shell-iron core nanoparticles (Fe@Au) were synthesized by the reverse micelle method with aqueous reactants, surfactant, co-surfactant and oil phase. XRD, XPS, TEM and magnetic property measurements were utilized to characterize these core-shell nanoparticles. Magnetic measurements showed that the particles were superparamagnetic at room temperature and that the saturation magnetization decreased with increasing gold concentration. The anti-cancer drug doxorubicin (DOX) was loaded onto these Fe@Au nanoparticle carriers and the drug release profiles showed that upto 25% of adsorbed drug was released in 80 h. It was found that the amine (-NH2) group of DOX binds to the gold shell. An in vitro apparatus simulating the human circulatory system was used to determine the retention of these nanoparticle carriers when exposed to an external magnetic field. A high percentage of magnetic carriers could be retained for physiologically relevant flow speeds of fluid. The present findings show that DOX loaded gold coated iron nanoparticles are promising for magnetically targeted drug delivery.

  1. Development of a new type of multifunctional fucoidan-based nanoparticles for anticancer drug delivery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Kun-Ying; Li, Rou; Hsu, Chun-Hua; Lin, Cheng-Wei; Chou, Shen-Chieh; Tsai, Min-Lang; Mi, Fwu-Long

    2017-06-01

    Fucoidan, a sulfated marine polysaccharide, has many potential biological functions, including anticancer activity. Recently, fucoidan has been reported to target P-selectin expressed on metastatic cancer cells. Increasing research attention has been devoted to the developments of fucoidan-based nanomedicine. However, the application of traditional chitosan/fucoidan nanoparticles in anticancer drug delivery may be limited due to the deprotonation of chitosan at a pH greater than 6.5. In this study, a mutli-stimuli-responsive nanoparticle self-assembled by fucoidan and a cationic polypeptide (protamine) was developed, and their pH-/enzyme-responsive properties were characterized by circular dichroism (CD) spectroscopy, dynamic light scattering (DLS), and zeta potential analysis. Enzymatic digestion and acidic intracellular microenvironment (pH 4.5-5.5) in cancer cells triggered the release of an anticancer drug (doxorubicin) from the nanoparticles. The protamine/fucoidan complex nanoparticles with P-selectin mediated endocytosis, charge conversion and stimuli-tunable release properties showed an improved inhibitory effect against a metastatic breast cancer cell line (MDA-MB-231).

  2. Nano-chitosan particles in anticancer drug delivery: An up-to-date review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamath, Pooja R; Sunil, Dhanya

    2017-02-27

    Cancer is one of the most awful lethal diseases all over the world and the success of its current chemotherapeutic treatment strategies is limited due to several associated drawbacks. The exploration of cancer cell physiology and its microenvironment have exposed the potential of various classes of nanocarriers to deliver anticancer chemotherapeutic agents at the tumor target site. These nanocarriers must evade the immune surveillance system and achieve target selectivity. Besides, they must gain access in to the interior of cancerous cells, evade endosomal entrapment and discharge the drugs in a sustained manner. Chitosan, the second naturally abundant polysaccharide is a biocompatible, biodegradable and mucoadhesive cationic polymer which has been exploited extensively in the last few years in the effective delivery of anticancer chemotherapeutics to the target tumor cells. Therapeutic agent-loaded surface modified chitosan nanoparticles are established to be more stable, permeable and bioactive. This review will provide an up-to-date evidence-based background on recent pharmaceutical advancements in the transformation of chitosan nanoparticles for smart anticancer therapeutic drug delivery. Copyright© Bentham Science Publishers; For any queries, please email at epub@benthamscience.org.

  3. Anticancer efficacy and absorption, distribution, metabolism, and toxicity studies of Aspergiolide A in early drug development

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wang Y

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Yuanyuan Wang, Xin Qi, Dehai Li, Tianjiao Zhu, Xiaomei Mo, Jing LiKey Laboratory of Marine Drugs, Ministry of Education, School of Medicine and Pharmacy, Ocean University of China, Qingdao, People's Republic of ChinaAbstract: Since the first anthracycline was discovered, many other related compounds have been studied in order to overcome its defects and improve efficacy. In the present paper, we investigated the anticancer effects of a new anthracycline, aspergiolide A (ASP-A, from a marine-derived fungus in vitro and in vivo, and we evaluated the absorption, distribution, metabolism, and toxicity drug properties in early drug development. We found that ASP-A had activity against topoisomerase II that was comparable to adriamycin. ASP-A decreased the growth of various human cancer cells in vitro and induced apoptosis in BEL-7402 cells via a caspase-dependent pathway. The anticancer efficacy of ASP-A on the growth of hepatocellular carcinoma xenografts was further assessed in vivo. Results showed that, compared with the vehicle group, ASP-A exhibited significant anticancer activity with less loss of body weight. A pharmacokinetics and tissue distribution study revealed that ASP-A was rapidly cleared in a first order reaction kinetics manner, and was enriched in cancer tissue. The maximal tolerable dose (MTD of ASP-A was more than 400 mg/kg, and ASP-A was not considered to be potentially genotoxic or cardiotoxic, as no significant increase of micronucleus rates or inhibition of the hERG channel was seen. Finally, an uptake and transport assay of ASP-A was performed in monolayers of Caco-2 cells, and ASP-A was shown to be absorbed through the active transport pathway. Altogether, these results indicate that ASP-A has anticancer activity targeting topoisomerase II, with a similar structure and mechanism to adriamycin, but with much lower toxicity. Nonetheless, further molecular structure optimization is necessary.Keywords: aspergiolide A, anticancer

  4. Epithelial-mesenchymal transition: a new target in anticancer drug discovery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marcucci, Fabrizio; Stassi, Giorgio; De Maria, Ruggero

    2016-05-01

    The conversion of cells with an epithelial phenotype into cells with a mesenchymal phenotype, referred to as epithelial-mesenchymal transition, is a critical process for embryonic development that also occurs in adult life, particularly during tumour progression. Tumour cells undergoing epithelial-mesenchymal transition acquire the capacity to disarm the body's antitumour defences, resist apoptosis and anticancer drugs, disseminate throughout the organism, and act as a reservoir that replenishes and expands the tumour cell population. Epithelial-mesenchymal transition is therefore becoming a target of prime interest for anticancer therapy. Here, we discuss the screening and classification of compounds that affect epithelial-mesenchymal transition, highlight some compounds of particular interest, and address issues related to their clinical application.

  5. Novel approaches to polynuclear platinum pro-drugs. Selective release of cytotoxic platinum-spermidine species through hydrolytic cleavage of carbamates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hegmans, A; Qu, Y; Kelland, L R; Roberts, J D; Farrell, N

    2001-11-19

    BBR3464 is a novel trinuclear platinum drug currently in Phase II clinical trials. Polyamine-bridged dinuclear platinum compounds as represented by [[trans-Pt(NH(3))(2)Cl](2)-mu-spermidine-N(1),N(8)]Cl(3) (1) are highly interesting second-generation analogues of BBR3464 because the hydrogen-bonding and electrostatic contributions of the central platinum-amine group in BBR3464 are replicated by the free, noncoordinated "central" quaternary nitrogens of the linear polyamine linker while the presence of two separate Pt-Cl bonds maintains the bifunctional binding mode on the DNA adducts. Preclinical investigations confirm the potency of these species with cytotoxicity in the nanomolar range. This remarkable potency results in a relatively narrow therapeutic index. To enhance the therapeutic index of these drugs, we investigated the potential for "pro-drug" delivery of less toxic and better tolerated derivatives such as the compounds [[trans-Pt(NH(3))(2)Cl](2)-mu-N(4)-R-spermidine-N(1),N(8)]Cl(2) where N(4)-R represents BOC (tert-butyl), CBz (benzyl), and Fmoc (fluorenylmethyl) carbamate blocking groups, 2-4, respectively. The bulky Fmoc derivative showed evidence for conformational isomers by (1)H NMR spectroscopy due to the inequivalence of the two n-propyl and n-butyl side chains of the spermidine moiety. The rate constants for hydrolysis and release of 1 were calculated. Release of cytotoxic 1 at physiologically relevant pH followed the order 4 > 2 > 3. The calculated values for 4 (pH 5, 6.0(+/-3.9) x 10(-10) s(-1); pH 6, 6.5(+/-0.2) x 10(-9) s(-1); pH 7, 6.0(+/-0.2) x 10(-8) s(-1); pH 8, 1.6(+/-0.1) x 10(-7) s(-1)) show a more pronounced pH dependence compared to 2 (pH 5, 4.6(+/-0.1) x 10(-8) s(-1); pH 6, 4.2(+/-0.1) x 10(-8) s(-1); pH 7, 3.2(+/-0.1) x 10(-8) s(-1)). Preliminary biological assays of cellular uptake and cytotoxicity confirm the utility of the pro-drug concept. While blocked-polyamine compounds such as 2-4 are, in general, 2-3 orders of magnitude

  6. Distinct Fragmentation Pathways of Anticancer Drugs Induced by Charge-Carrying Cations in the Gas Phase

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hong, Areum; Lee, Hong Hee; Heo, Chae Eun; Cho, Yunju; Kim, Sunghwan; Kang, Dukjin; Kim, Hugh I.

    2017-04-01

    With the growth of the pharmaceutical industry, structural elucidation of drugs and derivatives using tandem mass spectrometry (MS2) has become essential for drug development and pharmacokinetics studies because of its high sensitivity and low sample requirement. Thus, research seeking to understand fundamental relationships between fragmentation patterns and precursor ion structures in the gas phase has gained attention. In this study, we investigate the fragmentation of the widely used anticancer drugs, doxorubicin (DOX), vinblastine (VBL), and vinorelbine (VRL), complexed by a singly charged proton or alkali metal ion (Li+, Na+, K+) in the gas phase. The drug-cation complexes exhibit distinct fragmentation patterns in tandem mass spectra as a function of cation size. The trends in fragmentation patterns are explicable in terms of structures derived from ion mobility mass spectrometry (IM-MS) and theoretical calculations.

  7. Random laser in biological tissues impregnated with a fluorescent anticancer drug

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lahoz, F.; Martín, I. R.; Urgellés, M.; Marrero-Alonso, J.; Marín, R.; Saavedra, C. J.; Boto, A.; Díaz, M.

    2015-04-01

    We have demonstrated that chemically modified anticancer drugs can provide random laser (RL) when infiltrated in a biological tissue. A fluorescent biomarker has been covalently bound to tamoxifen, which is one of the most frequently used drugs for breast cancer therapy. The light emitted by the drug-dye composite is scattered in tissue, which acts as a gain medium. Both non-coherent and coherent RL regimes have been observed. Moreover, the analysis of power Fourier transforms of coherent RL spectra indicates that the tissues show a dominant random laser cavity length of about 18 µm, similar to the average size of single cells. These results show that RL could be obtained from other drugs, if properly marked with a fluorescent tag, which could be appealing for new forms of combined opto-chemical therapies.

  8. Extracellular control of intracellular drug release for enhanced safety of anti-cancer chemotherapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Qian; Qi, Haixia; Long, Ziyan; Liu, Shang; Huang, Zhen; Zhang, Junfeng; Wang, Chunming; Dong, Lei

    2016-06-01

    The difficulty of controlling drug release at an intracellular level remains a key challenge for maximising drug safety and efficacy. We demonstrate herein a new, efficient and convenient approach to extracellularly control the intracellular release of doxorubicin (DOX), by designing a delivery system that harnesses the interactions between the system and a particular set of cellular machinery. By simply adding a small-molecule chemical into the cell medium, we could lower the release rate of DOX in the cytosol, and thereby increase its accumulation in the nuclei while decreasing its presence at mitochondria. Delivery of DOX with this system effectively prevented DOX-induced mitochondria damage that is the main mechanism of its toxicity, while exerting the maximum efficacy of this anti-cancer chemotherapeutic agent. The present study sheds light on the design of drug delivery systems for extracellular control of intracellular drug delivery, with immediate therapeutic implications.

  9. Distinct Fragmentation Pathways of Anticancer Drugs Induced by Charge-Carrying Cations in the Gas Phase

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hong, Areum; Lee, Hong Hee; Heo, Chae Eun; Cho, Yunju; Kim, Sunghwan; Kang, Dukjin; Kim, Hugh I.

    2016-12-01

    With the growth of the pharmaceutical industry, structural elucidation of drugs and derivatives using tandem mass spectrometry (MS2) has become essential for drug development and pharmacokinetics studies because of its high sensitivity and low sample requirement. Thus, research seeking to understand fundamental relationships between fragmentation patterns and precursor ion structures in the gas phase has gained attention. In this study, we investigate the fragmentation of the widely used anticancer drugs, doxorubicin (DOX), vinblastine (VBL), and vinorelbine (VRL), complexed by a singly charged proton or alkali metal ion (Li+, Na+, K+) in the gas phase. The drug-cation complexes exhibit distinct fragmentation patterns in tandem mass spectra as a function of cation size. The trends in fragmentation patterns are explicable in terms of structures derived from ion mobility mass spectrometry (IM-MS) and theoretical calculations.

  10. Mucoadhesive nanoparticles from tamarind seed polysaccharides for sustained delivery of anticancer drug irinotecan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pranjal Saikia

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The present study is aimed at development and optimization of mucoadhesive nanoparticles (NPs from natural mucoadhesive polysaccharides extracted from Tamarind seeds (Tamarindus indica for the sustained delivery of anticancer drug irinotecan. The drug loaded NPs were prepared by ion gelation method with the isolated polysaccharide by homogenization followed by lyophilization. The polysaccharides were cross-linked with sodium alginate in different ratios. The formulations were optimized using two level factorial design (Design Expert - 8.0.7.1 using the polysaccharide to alginate ratio, homogenization time and homogenization speed as independent variables and particle size (PS, drug entrapment efficiency and cumulative drug release as the dependent variables. The NPs were characterized in terms of PS, entrapment efficiency, drug loading (DL, in vitro drug release and cell viability studies in mice. Stable NPs were obtained with average PS of 405 ± 25.2 nm. The preparations were homogenous showing polydispersity index of 0.497 ± 0.02. The formulation showed up to 95.36 ± 3.1% (w/w yield showing DL of 1.0 ± 0.2% (w/w. The entrapment efficiency was found to be 46.56 ± 1.5% (w/w. In vitro drug release showed initial burst release followed by controlled release pattern showing up to 60% release in 12 h. The average cell viability was found to be 80% in case of the control group, which was reduced to 36% for NPs treated groups respectively. The Fourier transform infrared studies showed no incompatibility in the formulated NPs. It may be concluded from the study that tamarind seed polysaccharides may be suitable for formulation of mucoadhesive NPs for better efficacy and sustained delivery of anticancer drug irinotecan with reduced toxicity.

  11. Recent advances in carbon nanotubes as delivery systems for anticancer drugs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iannazzo, Daniela; Piperno, Anna; Pistone, Alessandro; Grassi, Giovanni; Galvagno, Signorino

    2013-01-01

    Problems associated with the administration of anticancer drugs, such as limited solubility, poor biodistribution,lack of selectivity, and healthy tissue damage, can be overcome by the implementation of drug delivery systems. A wide range of materials, including liposomes, microspheres, polymers and recently, carbon nanotubes (CNTs), have been investigated for delivering anticancer drugs on the purpose of reducing the number of necessary administrations, providing more localized and better use of the active agents, and increasing patient compliance. Carbon nanotubes (CNTs) have attracted particular attention as carriers of biologically relevant molecules due to their unique physical, chemical and physiological properties. The exact relationship between the physical-chemical properties of carbon nanotubes, their cell to-cell interactions, reactivity, and biological/systemic consequences are relevant issues and it is important to know suchinter-relationships beforehand to employ the benefits of these nanomaterials without the hazardous consequences. The purpose of this review is to present highlight of recent developments in the application of carbon nanotubes as cargoes for anti cancer drugs and in the diagnosis of cancer diseases.

  12. Dinuclear Pt(II)-bisphosphonate complexes: a scaffold for multinuclear or different oxidation state platinum drugs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piccinonna, Sara; Margiotta, Nicola; Pacifico, Concetta; Lopalco, Antonio; Denora, Nunzio; Fedi, Serena; Corsini, Maddalena; Natile, Giovanni

    2012-08-28

    Geminal bisphosphonates (BPs), used in the clinic for the treatment of hypercalcaemia and skeletal metastases, have been also exploited for promoting the specific accumulation of platinum antitumor drugs in bone tissue. In this work, the platinum dinuclear complex [{Pt(en)}(2)(μ-AHBP-H(2))](+) (1) (the carbon atom bridging the two phosphorous atoms carrying a 2-ammonioethyl and a hydroxyl group, AHBP-H(2)) has been used as scaffold for the synthesis of a Pt(II) trinuclear complex, [{Pt(en)}(3)(μ-AHBP)](+) (2), and a Pt(IV) adamantane-shaped dinuclear complex featuring an oxo-bridge, [{Pt(IV)(en)Cl}(2)(μ-O)(μ-AHBP-H(2))](+) (3) (X-ray structure). Compound 2 undergoes a reversible, pH dependent, rearrangement with a neat switch point around pH = 5.4. Compound 3 undergoes a one-step electrochemical reduction at E(pc) = -0.84 V affording compound 1. Such a potential is far lower than that of glutathione (-0.24 V), nevertheless compound 3 can undergo chemical reduction to 1 by GSH, most probably through a different (inner-sphere) mechanism. In vitro cytotoxicity of the new compounds, tested against murine glioma (C6) and human cervix (HeLa) and hepatoma (HepG2) cell lines, has shown that, while the Pt(IV) dimer 3 is inactive up to a concentration of 50 μM, the two Pt(II) polynuclear compounds 1 and 2 have a cytotoxicity comparable to that of cisplatin with the trinuclear complex 2 generally more active than the dinuclear complex 1.

  13. Recent Approaches to Platinum(IV) Prodrugs: A Variety of Strategies for Enhanced Delivery and Efficacy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Najjar, Anas; Rajabi, Naeema; Karaman, Rafik

    2017-01-01

    Intensive efforts have been implemented to improve the efficacy of platinum complexes especially with emerging cisplatin resistance and elevated cancer deaths. Platinum(IV) agents show better pharmacokinetics and decreased side effects compared to Platinum(II) agents. This review aims to summarize and categorize the strategies being employed to improve the efficacy of Platinum-based anticancer agents in recent years. Nanoparticles and nanoplatforms offer a vast variety of strategies in targeting specific tumor types and delivering one or two lethal drugs simultaneously. Theranostic agents are being developed to achieve enhanced imaging and provide further insight into the activity of platinum containing chemotherapy. Moreover, photoactivation of Pt(IV) prodrugs specifically at the tumor site is gaining attention due to a controlled activity. A platinum agent formulated as large multi-activity complex is the most common strategy being employed. Platinum(IV) agents offer great potential in targeting, increasing efficacy, and decreasing toxicity of Platinum-based anticancer agents. The strategies being employed are aiming to increase specificity and targeting as well as provide more potent agents. Copyright© Bentham Science Publishers; For any queries, please email at epub@benthamscience.org.

  14. Repositioning of Tyrosine Kinase Inhibitors as Antagonists of ATP-Binding Cassette Transporters in Anticancer Drug Resistance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yi-Jun Wang

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available The phenomenon of multidrug resistance (MDR has attenuated the efficacy of anticancer drugs and the possibility of successful cancer chemotherapy. ATP-binding cassette (ABC transporters play an essential role in mediating MDR in cancer cells by increasing efflux of drugs from cancer cells, hence reducing the intracellular accumulation of chemotherapeutic drugs. Interestingly, small-molecule tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKIs, such as AST1306, lapatinib, linsitinib, masitinib, motesanib, nilotinib, telatinib and WHI-P154, have been found to have the capability to overcome anticancer drug resistance by inhibiting ABC transporters in recent years. This review will focus on some of the latest and clinical developments with ABC transporters, TKIs and anticancer drug resistance.

  15. Tocopheryl pullulan-based self assembling nanomicelles for anti-cancer drug delivery

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Jingyun, E-mail: wangjingyun67@dlut.edu.cn [School of Life Science and Biotechnology, Dalian University of Technology, Dalian 116024 (China); Cui, Shuang [School of Life Science and Biotechnology, Dalian University of Technology, Dalian 116024 (China); Bao, Yongming, E-mail: biosci@dlut.edu.cn [School of Life Science and Biotechnology, Dalian University of Technology, Dalian 116024 (China); Xing, Jishuang [School of Life Science and Biotechnology, Dalian University of Technology, Dalian 116024 (China); Hao, Wenbo [Department of Physics and Chemistry, Heihe University, Heihe 164300 (China)

    2014-10-01

    Amphiphilic α-tocopherol pullulan polymers (PUTC1, PUTC2, and PUTC3) with different degrees of substitution were synthesized as new carriers for anticancer drugs. The polymers easily self-assembled into nanomicelles through dialysis method. The critical micelle concentrations (CMCs) were 38.0, 8.0, and 4.3 mg/L for PUTC1, PUTC2, and PUTC3, respectively. 10-Hydroxycamptothecin (HCPT) used as a model drug was successfully loaded into the PUTC nanomicelles. Transmission electron microscopy images demonstrated that HCPT-loaded PUTC nanomicelles were almost spherical and had sizes ranging within 171.5–257.8 nm that increased with increased HCPT-loading content, as determined by dynamic laser scattering. The highest encapsulation efficiency of HCPT in PUTC nanomicelles reached 98.3%. The in vitro release of HCPT from PUTC micelles demonstrated sustained release for over 80 h. 3-(4,5-Dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyl tetrazolium bromide assays showed that blank PUTC micelles were nontoxic to normal cells and that the HCPT-loaded PUTC2 nanomicelles showed higher cytotoxicity than the free drug, which was attributed to the enhanced cellular uptake of drug-loaded nanomicelles. Biodistribution experiments showed that PUTC micelles provided an excellent approach to rapid drug transport into cell nuclei. Moreover, the cellular uptake of micelles was found to be an energy-dependent and actin polymerization-associated endocytic process by endocytosis inhibition experiments. These results suggested that PUTC nanomicelles had considerable potential as a drug carrier for drug intracellular delivery in cancer therapy. - Highlights: • Tocopheryl pullulan-based (PUTC) self-assembling nanomicelles were fabricated. • These micelles showed low CMC and dispersed uniformly with regular spherical shape. • High entrapment efficiency and in vitro sustained release of HCPT in PUTC micelles • HCPT–PUTC micelles accumulated in cell nuclei and showed higher anticancer activity.

  16. Transmembrane delivery of anticancer drugs through self-assembly of cyclic peptide nanotubes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Jian; Zhang, Bei; Xia, Fei; Xie, Yunchang; Jiang, Sifan; Su, Rui; Lu, Yi; Wu, Wei

    2016-03-01

    Breaking the natural barriers of cell membranes achieves fast entry of therapeutics, which leads to enhanced efficacy and helps overcome multiple drug resistance. Herein, transmembrane delivery of a series of small molecule anticancer drugs was achieved by the construction of artificial transmembrane nanochannels formed by self-assembly of cyclic peptide (cyclo[Gln-(d-Leu-Trp)4-d-Leu], CP) nanotubes (CPNTs) in the lipid bilayers. Our in vitro study in liposomes indicated that the transport of molecules with sizes smaller than 1.0 nm, which is the internal diameter of the CPNTs, could be significantly enhanced by CPNTs in a size-selective and dose-dependent manner. Facilitated uptake of 5-fluorouracil (5-FU) was also confirmed in the BEL7402 cell line. On the contrary, CPs could facilitate neither the transport across liposomal membranes nor the uptake by cell lines of cytarabine, a counterevidence drug with a size of 1.1 nm. CPs had a very weak anticancer efficacy, but could significantly reduce the IC50 of 5-FU in BEL7402, HeLa and S180 cell lines. Analysis by a q test revealed that a combination of 5-FU and CP had a synergistic effect in BEL7402 at all CP levels, in S180 at CP levels higher than 64 μg mL-1, but not in HeLa, where an additive effect was observed. Temporarily, intratumoral injection is believed to be the best way for CP administration. In vivo imaging using 125I radio-labelled CP confirmed that CPNPTs were completely localized in the tumor tissues, and translocation to other tissues was negligible. In vivo anticancer efficacy was studied in the grafted S180 solid tumor model in mice, and the results indicated that tumor growth was greatly inhibited by the combinatory use of 5-FU and CP, and a synergistic effect was observed at CP doses of 0.25 mg per kg bw. It is concluded that facilitated transmembrane delivery of anticancer drugs with sizes smaller than 1.0 nm was achieved, and the synergistic anticancer effect was confirmed both in cell lines

  17. Improving anticancer drug development begins with cell culture: misinformation perpetrated by the misuse of cytotoxicity assays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eastman, Alan

    2017-01-31

    The high failure rate of anticancer drug discovery and development has consumed billions of dollars annually. While many explanations have been provided, I believe that misinformation arising from inappropriate cell-based screens has been completely over-looked. Most cell culture experiments are irrelevant to how drugs are subsequently administered to patients. Usually, drug development focuses on growth inhibition rather than cell killing. Drugs are selected based on continuous incubation of cells, then frequently administered to the patient as a bolus. Target identification and validation is often performed by gene suppression that inevitably mimics continuous target inhibition. Drug concentrations in vitro frequently far exceed in vivo concentrations. Studies of drug synergy are performed at sub-optimal concentrations. And the focus on a limited number of cell lines can misrepresent the potential efficacy in a patient population. The intent of this review is to encourage more appropriate experimental design and data interpretation, and to improve drug development in the area of cell-based assays. Application of these principles should greatly enhance the successful translation of novel drugs to the patient.

  18. Dual Kinase-Bromodomain Inhibitors in Anticancer Drug Discovery: A Structural and Pharmacological Perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carlino, Luca; Rastelli, Giulio

    2016-10-27

    Protein kinases play crucial roles in several cell transformation processes and are validated drug targets for many human diseases, including cancer. Nevertheless, most tumors have eluded the effects of inhibition of a single kinase by activating resistance mechanisms and/or alternative pathways and escape mechanisms. In recent years, multitarget approaches directed toward inhibition of kinases and targets of different families have received increasing attention. In particular, co-targeting kinases and bromodomain epigenetic reader proteins has rapidly emerged as a promising approach to cancer drug development. In this manuscript, we will review the recent discoveries that led to the identification and optimization of dual kinase/bromodomain inhibitors. We will analyze and compare the structural features required for dual inhibition and comment on the potential of this approach in anticancer drug discovery. Moreover, we will introduce computational approaches useful for the identification of dual kinase/bromodomain inhibitors and generate ad hoc pharmacophore and docking models.

  19. Gaojushen:a novel anti-cancer drug prepared from SEC superantigen

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    陈廷祚

    2005-01-01

    @@ 1 Clinical observations Gaojushen is a novel anti-cancer drug developed by Xiehe Bio-pharmaceutical Company,Shenyang, China. It is prepared and processed from the filtrate of Staphylococcus aureus culture. The active component contained in it has been shown to be a SEC superantigen that is a metabolite of the culture.This superantigen is marked by its ability to stimulate T cells at a high frequency, thereby giving rise to potent cell-mediated immunological responses and producing a large variety of cytokines with the final rsult of apoptosis of tumor cells. The drug was approved for trial prodoction in 1994 by the Center of the State Evaluation and Review of New Drugs,China,and was licenced for marketing by 1996 after finishing the phase III clinical trial.

  20. How strong is the edge effect in the adsorption of anticancer drugs on a graphene cluster?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rungnim, Chompoonut; Chanajaree, Rungroj; Rungrotmongkol, Thanyada; Hannongbua, Supot; Kungwan, Nawee; Wolschann, Peter; Karpfen, Alfred; Parasuk, Vudhichai

    2016-04-01

    The adsorption of nucleobase-analog anticancer drugs (fluorouracil, thioguanine, and mercaptopurine) on a graphene flake (C54H18) was investigated by shifting the site at which adsorption occurs from one end of the sheet to the other end. The counterpoise-corrected M06-2X/cc-pVDZ binding energies revealed that the binding stability decreases in the sequence thioguanine > mercaptopurine > fluorouracil. We found that adsorption near the middle of the sheet is more favorable than adsorption near the edge due to the edge effect. This edge effect is stronger for the adsorption of thioguanine or mercaptopurine than for fluorouracil adsorption. However, the edge effect reduces the binding energy of the drug to the flake by only a small amount, <5 kcal/mol, depending on the adsorption site and the alignment of the drug at this site.

  1. Trypanocidal activity of the proteasome inhibitor and anti-cancer drug bortezomib

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wang Xia

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The proteasome inhibitor and anti-cancer drug bortezomib was tested for in vitro activity against bloodstream forms of Trypanosoma brucei. The concentrations of bortezomib required to reduce the growth rate by 50% and to kill all trypanosomes were 3.3 nM and 10 nM, respectively. In addition, bortezomib was 10 times more toxic to trypanosomes than to human HL-60 cells. Moreover, exposure of trypanosomes to 10 nM bortezomib for 16 h was enough to kill 90% of the parasites following incubation in fresh medium. However, proteasomal peptidase activities of trypanosomes exposed to bortezomib were only inhibited by 10% and 30% indicating that the proteasome is not the main target of the drug. The results suggest that bortezomib may be useful as drug for the treatment of human African trypanosomiasis.

  2. Impedimetric toxicity assay in microfluidics using free and liposome-encapsulated anticancer drugs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Caviglia, Claudia; Zor, Kinga; Montini, Lucia;

    2015-01-01

    In this work, we have developed a microfluidic cytotoxicity assay for a cell culture and detection platform, which enables both fluid handling and electrochemical/optical detection. The cytotoxic effect of anticancer drugs doxorubicin (DOX), oxaliplatin (OX) as well as OX-loaded liposomes......, developed for targeted drug delivery, was evaluated using real-time impedance monitoring. The time-dependent effect of DOX on HeLa cells was monitored and found to have a delayed onset of cytotoxicity in microfluidics compared with static culture conditions based on data obtained in our previous study......-dependent cytotoxic response of fibrosarcoma cells (HT1080) to free OX and OX-loaded liposomes was observed and attributed to incomplete degradation of the liposomes, which results in lower drug availability. The matrix metalloproteinase (MMP)-dependent release of OX from OX-loaded liposomes was also confirmed using...

  3. The Cancer Cell Line Encyclopedia enables predictive modelling of anticancer drug sensitivity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barretina, Jordi; Caponigro, Giordano; Stransky, Nicolas; Venkatesan, Kavitha; Margolin, Adam A; Kim, Sungjoon; Wilson, Christopher J; Lehár, Joseph; Kryukov, Gregory V; Sonkin, Dmitriy; Reddy, Anupama; Liu, Manway; Murray, Lauren; Berger, Michael F; Monahan, John E; Morais, Paula; Meltzer, Jodi; Korejwa, Adam; Jané-Valbuena, Judit; Mapa, Felipa A; Thibault, Joseph; Bric-Furlong, Eva; Raman, Pichai; Shipway, Aaron; Engels, Ingo H; Cheng, Jill; Yu, Guoying K; Yu, Jianjun; Aspesi, Peter; de Silva, Melanie; Jagtap, Kalpana; Jones, Michael D; Wang, Li; Hatton, Charles; Palescandolo, Emanuele; Gupta, Supriya; Mahan, Scott; Sougnez, Carrie; Onofrio, Robert C; Liefeld, Ted; MacConaill, Laura; Winckler, Wendy; Reich, Michael; Li, Nanxin; Mesirov, Jill P; Gabriel, Stacey B; Getz, Gad; Ardlie, Kristin; Chan, Vivien; Myer, Vic E; Weber, Barbara L; Porter, Jeff; Warmuth, Markus; Finan, Peter; Harris, Jennifer L; Meyerson, Matthew; Golub, Todd R; Morrissey, Michael P; Sellers, William R; Schlegel, Robert; Garraway, Levi A

    2012-03-28

    The systematic translation of cancer genomic data into knowledge of tumour biology and therapeutic possibilities remains challenging. Such efforts should be greatly aided by robust preclinical model systems that reflect the genomic diversity of human cancers and for which detailed genetic and pharmacological annotation is available. Here we describe the Cancer Cell Line Encyclopedia (CCLE): a compilation of gene expression, chromosomal copy number and massively parallel sequencing data from 947 human cancer cell lines. When coupled with pharmacological profiles for 24 anticancer drugs across 479 of the cell lines, this collection allowed identification of genetic, lineage, and gene-expression-based predictors of drug sensitivity. In addition to known predictors, we found that plasma cell lineage correlated with sensitivity to IGF1 receptor inhibitors; AHR expression was associated with MEK inhibitor efficacy in NRAS-mutant lines; and SLFN11 expression predicted sensitivity to topoisomerase inhibitors. Together, our results indicate that large, annotated cell-line collections may help to enable preclinical stratification schemata for anticancer agents. The generation of genetic predictions of drug response in the preclinical setting and their incorporation into cancer clinical trial design could speed the emergence of 'personalized' therapeutic regimens.

  4. Microfluidic-based G-quadruplex ligand displacement assay for alkaloid anticancer drug screening.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Haihui; Zhang, Bo; Xu, Huiyan; Sun, Yue; Wu, Qiwang; Shen, Hong; Liu, Yingchun

    2017-02-05

    Some natural heterocyclic alkaloids containing planar group show potential to complex with specific promoter region of protooncogene for stabilizing the G-quadruplex (G4) structure which nowadays promises to be a target in anticancer drug design. However, in view of the polymorphic characteristics and structural complexity of heterocyclic alkaloids, it is desirable to develop high-throughput and low-consumption approach for anticancer drug screening. In this paper, an intensive study on alkaloid ligand/G4 DNA interaction has been conducted, demonstrating that the end-stacking interaction is the favorable binding mode between the oncogene-related Pu22 G4 DNA and the heterocyclic alkaloid ligand. Based on structural feasibility and energy minimization, a ligand displacement assay for screening alkaloid ligand in stabilizing the oncogene target G4 has been developed, which also helps to facilitate the assessment of drug specificity. Coupled with microfluidic-based DNAzyme-catalytic chemiluminescence detection, the approach showed the advantages of high sensitivity, high throughput with low sample and reagent consumptions.

  5. Hydrophobically modified polysaccharide-based on polysialic acid nanoparticles as carriers for anticancer drugs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jung, Bom; Shim, Man-Kyu; Park, Min-Ju; Jang, Eun Hyang; Yoon, Hong Yeol; Kim, Kwangmeyung; Kim, Jong-Ho

    2017-03-30

    This study presented the development of hydrophobically modified polysialic acid (HPSA) nanoparticles, a novel anticancer drug nanocarrier that increases therapeutic efficacy without causing nonspecific toxicity towards normal cells. HPSA nanoparticles were prepared by 1-ethyl-3-(3-dimethylaminopropyl)-carbodiimide (EDC)/N-hydroxysuccinimide (NHS) coupling between N-deacetylated polysialic acid (PSA) and 5β-cholanic acid. The physicochemical characteristics of HPSA nanoparticles (zeta-potential, morphology and size) were measured, and in vitro cytotoxicity and cellular uptake of PSA and HPSA nanoparticles were tested in A549 cells. In vivo cancer targeting of HPSA nanoparticles was evaluated by labeling PSA and HPSA nanoparticles with Cy5.5, a near-infrared fluorescent dye, for imaging. HPSA nanoparticles showed improved cancer-targeting ability compared with PSA. Doxorubicin-loaded HPSA (DOX-HPSA) nanoparticles were prepared using a simple dialysis method. An analysis of the in vitro drug-release profile and drug-delivery behavior showed that DOX was effectively released from DOX-HPSA nanoparticles. In vivo cancer therapy with DOX-HPSA nanoparticles in mice showed antitumor effects that resembled those of free DOX. Moreover, DOX-HPSA nanoparticles had low toxicity toward other organs, reflecting their tumor-targeting property. Hence, HPSA nanoparticles are considered a potential nanocarrier for anticancer agents. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Design of interior-functionalized fully acetylated dendrimers for anticancer drug delivery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Jingjing; Su, Yunzhang; Zhang, Hongfeng; Xu, Tongwen; Cheng, Yiyun

    2011-12-01

    In this study, dendrimers was synthesized by introducing functional groups into the interior pockets of fully acetylated dendrimers. NMR techniques including COSY and 2D-NOESY revealed the molecular structures of the synthesized dendrimers and the encapsulation of guest molecule such as methotrexate within their interior pockets. The synthesized polymeric nanocarriers showed much lower cytotoxicity on two cell lines than cationic dendrimers, and exhibited better performance than fully acetylated dendrimers in the sustained release of methotrexate. The results provided a new strategy in the design of non-toxic dendrimers with high performance in the delivery of anti-cancer drugs for clinical applications.

  7. Interaction of anthraquinone anti-cancer drugs with DNA:Experimental and computational quantum chemical study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Otaibi, Jamelah S.; Teesdale Spittle, Paul; El Gogary, Tarek M.

    2017-01-01

    Anthraquinones form the basis of several anticancer drugs. Anthraquinones anticancer drugs carry out their cytotoxic activities through their interaction with DNA, and inhibition of topoisomerase II activity. Anthraquinones (AQ4 and AQ4H) were synthesized and studied along with 1,4-DAAQ by computational and experimental tools. The purpose of this study is to shade more light on mechanism of interaction between anthraquinone DNA affinic agents and different types of DNA. This study will lead to gain of information useful for drug design and development. Molecular structures were optimized using DFT B3LYP/6-31 + G(d). Depending on intramolecular hydrogen bonding interactions two conformers of AQ4 were detected and computed as 25.667 kcal/mol apart. Molecular reactivity of the anthraquinone compounds was explored using global and condensed descriptors (electrophilicity and Fukui functions). Molecular docking studies for the inhibition of CDK2 and DNA binding were carried out to explore the anti cancer potency of these drugs. NMR and UV-VIS electronic absorption spectra of anthraquinones/DNA were investigated at the physiological pH. The interaction of the three anthraquinones (AQ4, AQ4H and 1,4-DAAQ) were studied with three DNA (calf thymus DNA, (Poly[dA].Poly[dT]) and (Poly[dG].Poly[dC]). NMR study shows a qualitative pattern of drug/DNA interaction in terms of band shift and broadening. UV-VIS electronic absorption spectra were employed to measure the affinity constants of drug/DNA binding using Scatchard analysis.

  8. [Evolution of reimbursement of high-cost anticancer drugs: Financial impact within a university hospital].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baudouin, Amandine; Fargier, Emilie; Cerruti, Ariane; Dubromel, Amélie; Vantard, Nicolas; Ranchon, Florence; Schwiertz, Vérane; Salles, Gilles; Souquet, Pierre-Jean; Thomas, Luc; Bérard, Frédéric; Nancey, Stéphane; Freyer, Gilles; Trillet-Lenoir, Véronique; Rioufol, Catherine

    2017-06-01

    In the context of health expenses control, reimbursement of high-cost medicines with a 'minor' or 'nonexistent' improvement in actual health benefit evaluated by the Haute Autorité de santé is revised by the decree of March 24, 2016 related to the procedure and terms of registration of high-cost pharmaceutical drugs. This study aims to set up the economic impact of this measure. A six months retrospective study was conducted within a French university hospital from July 1, 2015 to December 31, 2015. For each injectable high-cost anticancer drug prescribed to a patient with cancer, the therapeutic indication, its status in relation to the marketing authorization and the associated improvement in actual health benefit were examined. The total costs of these treatments, the cost per type of indication and, in the case of marketing authorization indications, the cost per improvement in actual health benefit were evaluated considering that all drugs affected by the decree would be struck off. Over six months, 4416 high-cost injectable anticancer drugs were prescribed for a total cost of 4.2 million euros. The costs of drugs with a minor or nonexistent improvement in actual benefit and which comparator is not onerous amount 557,564 euros. The reform of modalities of inscription on the list of onerous drugs represents a significant additional cost for health institutions (1.1 million euros for our hospital) and raises the question of the accessibility to these treatments for cancer patients. Copyright © 2017 Société Française du Cancer. Published by Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  9. Guidelines for the practical stability studies of anticancer drugs: a European consensus conference.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bardin, C; Astier, A; Vulto, A; Sewell, G; Vigneron, J; Trittler, R; Daouphars, M; Paul, M; Trojniak, M; Pinguet, F

    2011-07-01

    Stability studies performed by the pharmaceutical industry are only designed to fulfill licensing requirements. Thus, post-dilution or -reconstitution stability data are frequently limited to 24h only for bacteriological reasons regardless of the true chemical stability which could, in many cases, be longer. In practice, the pharmacy-based centralized preparation may require infusions to be made several days in advance to provide, for example, the filling of ambulatory devices for continuous infusions or batch preparations for dose banding. Furthermore, a non-justified limited stability for expensive products is obviously very costly. Thus, there is a compelling need for additional stability data covering practical uses of anticancer drugs. A European conference consensus was held in France, May 2010, under the auspices of the French Society of Oncology Pharmacy (SFPO) to propose adapted rules on stability in practical situations and guidelines to perform corresponding stability studies. For each anticancer drug, considering their therapeutic index, the pharmacokinetics/pharmacodynamics (PK/PD) variability, specific clinical use and risks related to degradation products, the classical limit of 10% of degradation can be inappropriate. Therefore, acceptance limits must be clinically relevant and should be defined for each drug individually. Design of stability studies has to reflect the different needs of the clinical practice (preparation for the week-ends, outpatient transportations, implantable devices, dose banding…). It is essential to use validated stability-indicating methods, separating degradation products being formed in the practical use of the drug. Sequential temperature designs should be encouraged to replicate problems seen in daily practice such as rupture of the cold-chain or temperature-cycling between refrigerated storage and ambient in-use conditions. Stressed conditions are recommended to evaluate not only the role of classical variables (p

  10. Comparison of the electronic properties, and thermodynamic and kinetic parameters of the aquation of selected platinum(II) derivatives with their anticancer IC50 indexes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bradác, Ondrej; Zimmermann, Tomás; Burda, Jaroslav V

    2008-08-01

    Three potential anticancer agents {trans-[PtCl(2)(NH(3))(thiazole)], cis-[PtCl(2)(NH(3))(piperidine)], and PtCl(2)(NH(3))(cyclohexylamine) (JM118)} were explored and compared with cisplatin and the inactive [PtCl(dien)](+) complex. Basic electronic properties, bonding and stabilization energies were determined, and thermodynamic and kinetic parameters for the aquation reaction were estimated at the B3LYP/6-311++G(2df,2pd) level of theory. Since the aquation process represents activation of these agents, the obtained rate constants were compared with the experimental IC(50) values for several tumor cells. Despite the fact that the processes in which these drugs are involved and the way in which they affect cells are very complex, some correlations can be deduced.

  11. The interaction of platinum-based drugs with native biologically relevant proteins

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Brauckmann, Christine; Wehe, Christoph A.; Kieshauer, Michael; Lanvers-Kaminsky, Claudia; Sperling, Michael; Karst, Uwe

    2013-01-01

    This study focuses on the identification of the products that are formed upon binding of therapeutically relevant platinum complexes to proteins like beta-lactoglobulin A (LGA), human serum albumin (HSA), or human hemoglobin (HB). The respective proteins were incubated with the platinum-based antica

  12. Optimization of the route of platinum drugs administration to optimize the concomitant treatment with radiotherapy for glioblastoma implanted in the Fischer rat brain

    OpenAIRE

    Charest, Gabriel; Sanche, Léon; Fortin, David; Mathieu, David; Paquette, Benoit

    2013-01-01

    Treatment of glioblastoma with platinum compounds modestly improves progression-free survival and may cause toxic effects which prevent use at higher dose that would otherwise improve the antineoplastic effect. To reduce toxicity, we propose to encapsulate the platinum drug in a liposome. We have also tested three methods of drug administration (intra-venous, intra-arterial and intra-arterial combined with blood brain barrier disruption) to determine which one optimizes the tumor cell uptake,...

  13. Convection-enhancement delivery of platinum-based drugs and Lipoplatin™ to optimize the concomitant effect with radiotherapy in F98 glioma rat model

    OpenAIRE

    SHI, MINGHAN; Fortin, David; Sanche, Léon; Paquette, Benoit

    2015-01-01

    The prognosis for patients with glioblastoma remains poor with current treatments. Although platinum based drugs are sometimes offered at relapse, their efficacy in this setting is still disputed. In this study, we use convection-enhanced delivery (CED) to deliver the platinum-based drugs (cisplatin, carboplatin, and Lipoplatin™-liposomal formulation of cisplatin) directly into the tumor of F98 glioma-bearing rats that were subsequently treated with γ radiation (15 Gy). CED increased by facto...

  14. Unblocking Blockbusters: Using Boolean Text-Mining to Optimise Clinical Trial Design and Timeline for Novel Anticancer Drugs

    OpenAIRE

    Epstein, Richard J

    2009-01-01

    Two problems now threaten the future of anticancer drug development: (i) the information explosion has made research into new target-specific drugs more duplication-prone, and hence less cost-efficient; and (ii) high-throughput genomic technologies have failed to deliver the anticipated early windfall of novel first-in-class drugs. Here it is argued that the resulting crisis of blockbuster drug development may be remedied in part by innovative exploitation of informatic power. Using scenarios...

  15. Comparison of the effects of the oral anticancer platinum(IV) complexes oxoplatin and metabolite cis-diammine-tetrachlorido-platinum(IV) on global gene expression of NCI-H526 cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olszewski, Ulrike; Ulsperger, Ernst; Geissler, Klaus; Hamilton, Gerhard

    2011-01-01

    Platinum(IV) coordination complexes like oxoplatin (cis,cis,trans-diammine-dichlorido-dihydroxido-platinum[IV]) show high stability and therefore can be utilized orally for outpatient care. Although oxoplatin is capable of binding directly to DNA after prolonged incubation, platinum(IV) agents are considered to be largely inert prodrugs that are converted to highly cytotoxic platinum(II) compounds by reducing substances, enzymes, or microenviron-mental conditions. Reaction of oxoplatin with 0.1 M hydrogen chloride mimicking gastric acid yields cis-diammine-tetrachlorido-platinum(IV) (DATCP[IV]), which exhibits two-fold increased activity. The presence of chlorides as ligands in the axial position results in a high reduction potential that favors transformation to platinum(II) complexes. In this study, the intracellular effect of the highly reactive tetrachlorido derivative was investigated in comparison with an equipotent dose of cisplatin. Genome-wide expression profiling of NCI-H526 small cell lung cancer cells treated with these platinum species revealed clear differences in the expression pattern of affected genes and concerned cellular pathways between DATCP(IV) and cisplatin. Application of DATCP(IV) resulted in extensive downregulation of protein and ATP synthesis, cell cycle regulation, and glycolysis, in contrast to cisplatin, which preferentially targeted glutathione conjugation, pyruvate metabolism, citric acid cycle, and the metabolism of amino acids and a range of carbohydrates. Thus, the oxoplatin metabolite DATCP(IV) constitutes a potent cytotoxic derivative that may be produced by gastric acid or acidic areas prevailing in larger solid tumors, depending on the respective pharmaceutical formulation of oxoplatin. Furthermore, DATCP(IV) exhibits intracellular effects that are clearly different from the expected reduced product cisplatin(II). In conclusion, activation of the platinum(IV) complex oxoplatin seems to involve the generation of a cytotoxic

  16. A comprehensive biological insight of trinuclear copper(II)-tin(IV) chemotherapeutic anticancer drug entity: in vitro cytotoxicity and in vivo systemic toxicity studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zaidi, Yusra; Arjmand, Farukh; Zaidi, Nida; Usmani, Jawed Ahmad; Zubair, Haseeb; Akhtar, Kafil; Hossain, Mobarak; Shadab, G G H A

    2014-08-01

    Cisplatin (cis-diamminedichloroplatinum(II), CDDP) causes severe systemic toxicity, which limits its application in cancer treatment. Nevertheless, incorporation of endogenously present essential metal ions (copper) in anticancer drug regimes in a heterometallic ligand scaffold can substantially modulate the toxic effects of non-essential metals (platinum), thereby reducing unwanted toxic side effects. A chiral l-tryptophan derived [bis(1,2-diaminobenzene) copper(II)] chloride complex [CuSn2(Trp)] was previously synthesized by us as an active chemotherapeutic agent. Furthermore, we have explored CuSn2(Trp) induced in vitro cytotoxicity in a panel of human cancer cell lines and in vivo acute and systemic toxicities in healthy female Rattus norvegicus (Wistar) rats. MTT assay showed that CuSn2(Trp) exhibits strong anticancer potency against ovarian (PA-1) and prostate carcinomas (PC-3) but lower potency towards liver (HepG2) and breast carcinomas (MCF-7). Further, flow cytometric analysis demonstrated that CuSn2(Trp) kills PA-1 cells dose-dependently after 48 h treatment. Fluorescence microscopy and western blotting revealed that the plausible mechanism behind CuSn2(Trp) cytotoxicity was apoptosis, which was substantiated by cleavage of caspase-3 and poly-(ADP-ribose) polymerase (PARP). Furthermore, it has lower toxicity than CDDP in rats as evident from its eight fold (98.11 mg kg(-1)) more medial lethal dose (LD50) than CDDP (12 mg kg(-1)). Besides, the safety profile of CuSn2(Trp) was also established and no measurable DNA damage, nephrotoxicity, hepatotoxicity and neurotoxicity were observed when assessed as a function of oxidative stress markers in contrast to CDDP at equivalent lower doses. Our findings are of high importance in the context of further in vivo cancer studies on the CuSn2(Trp) drug entity.

  17. Novel palladium(II) and platinum(II) complexes with 1H-benzimidazol-2-ylmethyl-N-(4-bromo-phenyl)-amine: structural studies and anticancer activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdel Ghani, Nour T; Mansour, Ahmed M

    2012-01-01

    [MLCl(2)] (L = (1H-benzimidazol-2-ylmethyl)-N-(4-bromo-phenyl)-amine; M = Pd & Pt) and [PdL(OH(2))(2)]∙2X∙zH(2)O (X = Br, I, z = 2; X = SCN, z = 1; X = NO(3), z = 0) complexes have been synthesized as potential anticancer compounds and their structures were elucidated using elemental analysis, spectral, thermal analysis and X-ray powder diffraction. The benzimidazole (L) crystallizes in the space group P2(1)/c with a = 8.6660(3) Å, b = 16.6739(7) Å, c = 9.8611(4) Å and β = 113.505(3) ° and forms an infinite chain structure with a trans-zigzag type along the crystallographic axis "a", through the intermolecular H-bond. FT-IR and (1)H NMR studies revealed that the ligand L is coordinated to the metal ion via the pyridine-type nitrogen (N(py)) of the benzimidazole ring and secondary amino group (NH(sec)). Quantum mechanical calculations of energies, geometries, vibrational wavenumbers, and (1)H NMR of the benzimidazole L and its complexes were carried out by DFT/B3LYP method combined with 6-31G(d) and LANL2DZ basis sets. Natural bond orbital (NBO) analysis and frontier molecular orbitals (FMO) were performed at B3LYP/LANL2DZ level of theory. The benzimidazole L, in comparison to its metal complexes was screened for its antibacterial activity. The complexes showed cyctotoxic effects against human breast cancer (MCF7), hepatocarcinoma (HepG(2)) and colon carcinoma cells (HCT). The platinum complex (6) exhibited a moderate antitumor activity against MCF7 with IC(50) = 10.2 μM comparing to that reported for cis-platin 9.91 μM.

  18. Pharmacologically directed strategies in academic anticancer drug discovery based on the European NCI compounds initiative.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hendriks, Hans R; Govaerts, Anne-Sophie; Fichtner, Iduna; Burtles, Sally; Westwell, Andrew D; Peters, Godefridus J

    2017-07-11

    The European NCI compounds programme, a joint initiative of the EORTC Research Branch, Cancer Research Campaign and the US National Cancer Institute, was initiated in 1993. The objective was to help the NCI in reducing the backlog of in vivo testing of potential anticancer compounds, synthesised in Europe that emerged from the NCI in vitro 60-cell screen. Over a period of more than twenty years the EORTC-Cancer Research Campaign panel reviewed ∼2000 compounds of which 95 were selected for further evaluation. Selected compounds were stepwise developed with clear go/no go decision points using a pharmacologically directed programme. This approach eliminated quickly compounds with unsuitable pharmacological properties. A few compounds went into Phase I clinical evaluation. The lessons learned and many of the principles outlined in the paper can easily be applied to current and future drug discovery and development programmes. Changes in the review panel, restrictions regarding numbers and types of compounds tested in the NCI in vitro screen and the appearance of targeted agents led to the discontinuation of the European NCI programme in 2017 and its transformation into an academic platform of excellence for anticancer drug discovery and development within the EORTC-PAMM group. This group remains open for advice and collaboration with interested parties in the field of cancer pharmacology.

  19. Encapsulation of anticancer drug and magnetic particles in biodegradable polymer nanospheres

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Koneracka, M; Zavisova, V; Tomasovicova, N; Kopcansky, P; Timko, M; JurIkova, A; Csach, K; Kavecansky, V; Lancz, G [Institute of Experimental Physics, Slovak Academy of Sciences, Watsonova 47, Kosice (Slovakia); Muckova, M [Hameln rds a.s., Horna 36, Modra (Slovakia)], E-mail: konerack@saske.sk

    2008-05-21

    In this study, we have prepared PLGA (poly-D,L-lactide-co-glycolide) nanospheres loaded with biocompatible magnetic fluid and anticancer drug taxol by a modified nanoprecipitation technique and investigated their magnetic properties. A magnetic fluid, MF-PEG, with a biocompatible layer of polyethylene glycol (PEG), was chosen as a magnetic carrier. The PLGA, whose copolymer ratio of D,L-lactide to glycolide is 85:15, was utilized as a capsulation material. Taxol, as an important anticancer drug, was chosen for its significant role against a wide range of tumours. The morphology and particle size distributions of the prepared nanospheres were investigated by transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and showed a spherical shape of prepared nanospheres with size 250 nm. Infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) and thermogravimetry (TGA) analysis confirmed incorporation of magnetic particles and taxol into the PLGA polymer. The results showed good encapsulation with magnetite content 21.5 wt% and taxol 0.5 wt%. Magnetic properties of magnetic fluids and taxol within the PLGA polymer matrix were investigated by SQUID magnetometry from 4.2 to 300 K. The SQUID measurements showed superparamagnetism of prepared nanospheres with a blocking temperature of 160 K and saturation magnetization 1.4 mT.

  20. Cyclodextrin conjugated magnetic colloidal nanoparticles as a nanocarrier for targeted anticancer drug delivery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banerjee, Shashwat S.; Chen, Dong-Hwang

    2008-07-01

    A novel magnetic nanocarrier (CD-GAMNPs) was fabricated for targeted anticancer drug delivery by grafting cyclodextrin (CD) onto gum arabic modified magnetic nanoparticles (GAMNPs) using hexamethylene diisocyanate (HMDI) as a linker. Analyses by transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and dynamic light scattering (DLS) revealed that the product had a mean diameter of 17.1 nm and a mean hydrodynamic diameter of 44.1 nm. The CD grafting was confirmed by Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy, and thermogravimetric analysis (TGA) indicated that the amount of CD grafted on the GAMNPs was 16.8 mg g-1. The study on the loading of anticancer drug all-trans-retinoic acid (retinoic acid) revealed that the newly fabricated magnetic nanocarrier possessed a considerably higher adsorption capability as compared to GAMNPs due to the special hydrophobic cavity structure of CD, which could act as a host-guest complex with retinoic acid. Furthermore, it was found that the complexation of CD-GAMNPs with retinoic acid was exothermic and the presence of a surfactant (sodium dodecyl sulfate) led to the decrease in the inclusion of retinoic acid because the linear structure of sodium dodecyl sulfate made it easier to enter the cavity of CD as compared to less linear retinoic acid. In addition, the in vitro release profile of retinoic acid from CD-GAMNPs was characterized by an initial fast release followed by a delayed release phase.

  1. Cyclodextrin conjugated magnetic colloidal nanoparticles as a nanocarrier for targeted anticancer drug delivery

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Banerjee, Shashwat S; Chen, D.-H. [Department of Chemical Engineering, National Cheng Kung University, Tainan 701, Taiwan (China)], E-mail: chendh@mail.ncku.edu.tw

    2008-07-02

    A novel magnetic nanocarrier (CD-GAMNPs) was fabricated for targeted anticancer drug delivery by grafting cyclodextrin (CD) onto gum arabic modified magnetic nanoparticles (GAMNPs) using hexamethylene diisocyanate (HMDI) as a linker. Analyses by transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and dynamic light scattering (DLS) revealed that the product had a mean diameter of 17.1 nm and a mean hydrodynamic diameter of 44.1 nm. The CD grafting was confirmed by Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy, and thermogravimetric analysis (TGA) indicated that the amount of CD grafted on the GAMNPs was 16.8 mg g{sup -1}. The study on the loading of anticancer drug all-trans-retinoic acid (retinoic acid) revealed that the newly fabricated magnetic nanocarrier possessed a considerably higher adsorption capability as compared to GAMNPs due to the special hydrophobic cavity structure of CD, which could act as a host-guest complex with retinoic acid. Furthermore, it was found that the complexation of CD-GAMNPs with retinoic acid was exothermic and the presence of a surfactant (sodium dodecyl sulfate) led to the decrease in the inclusion of retinoic acid because the linear structure of sodium dodecyl sulfate made it easier to enter the cavity of CD as compared to less linear retinoic acid. In addition, the in vitro release profile of retinoic acid from CD-GAMNPs was characterized by an initial fast release followed by a delayed release phase.

  2. Autophagy inhibits cell death induced by the anti-cancer drug morusin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cho, Sang Woo; Na, Wooju; Choi, Minji; Kang, Shin Jung; Lee, Seok-Geun; Choi, Cheol Yong

    2017-01-01

    Autophagy is a cellular process by which damaged organelles and dysfunctional proteins are degraded. Morusin is an anti-cancer drug isolated from the root bark of Morus alba. Morusin induces apoptosis in human prostate cancer cells by reducing STAT3 activity. In this study, we examined whether morusin induces autophagy and also examined the effects of autophagy on the morusin-induced apoptosis. Morusin induces LC3-II accumulation and ULK1 activation in HeLa cells. In addition, we found that induction of ULK1 Ser317 phosphorylation and reduction of ULK1 Ser757 phosphorylation occurred simultaneously during morusin-induced autophagy. Consistently, morusin induces autophagy by activation of AMPK and inhibition of mTOR activity. Next, we investigated the role of autophagy in morusin-induced apoptosis. Inhibition of autophagy by treating cells with the 3-methyladenine (3-MA) autophagic inhibitor induces high levels of morusin-mediated apoptosis, while treatment of cells with morusin alone induces moderate levels of apoptosis. Cell survival was greatly reduced when cells were treated with morusin and 3-MA. Taken together, morusin induces autophagy, which is an impediment for morusin-induced apoptosis, suggesting combined treatment of morusin with an autophagic inhibitor would increase the efficacy of morusin as an anti-cancer drug.

  3. In vitro anticancer drug test: A new method emerges from the model of glioma stem cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gabriele Riva

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Glioblastoma multiforme (GBM is a grade IV astrocytoma and the most common malignant brain tumor. Current therapies provide a median survival of 12–15 months after diagnosis, due to the high recurrence rate. The failure of current therapies may be due to the presence, within the tumor, of cells characterized by enhanced self-renewal capacity, multilineage differentiation potential and elevated invasive behavior, called glioma stem cells (GSCs. To evaluate the pharmacological efficacy of selected drugs on six GSC lines, we set up a multiple drug responsivity assay based on the combined evaluation of cytomorphological and functional parameters, including the analysis of polymorphic nuclei, mitotic index and cell viability. In order to understand the real pharmacological efficacy of the tested drugs, we assigned a specific drug responsivity score to each GSC line, integrating the data produced by multiple assays. In this work we explored the antineoplastic effects of paclitaxel (PTX, an inhibitor of microtubule depolymerization, utilized as standard treatment in several cancers, and of valproic acid (VPA, an inhibitor of histone deacetylases (HDACs with multiple anticancer properties. We classified the six GSC lines as responsive or resistant to these drugs, on the basis of their responsivity scores. This method can also be useful to identify the best way to combine two or more drugs. In particular, we utilized the pro-differentiating effect of VPA to improve the PTX effectiveness and we observed a significant reduction of cell viability compared to single treatments.

  4. Current advances in mathematical modeling of anti-cancer drug penetration into tumor tissues

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    MunJu eKim

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Delivery of anti-cancer drugs to tumor tissues, including their interstitial transport and cellular uptake, is a complex process involving various biochemical, mechanical, and biophysical factors. Mathematical modeling provides a means through which to understand this complexity better, as well as to examine interactions between contributing components in a systematic way via computational simulations and quantitative analyses. In this review, we present the current state of mathematical modeling approaches that address phenomena related to drug delivery. We describe how various types of models were used to predict spatio-temporal distributions of drugs within the tumor tissue, to simulate different ways to overcome barriers to drug transport, or to optimize treatment schedules. Finally, we discuss how integration of mathematical modeling with experimental or clinical data can provide better tools to understand the drug delivery process, in particular to examine the specific tissue- or compound-related factors that limit drug penetration through tumors. Such tools will be important in designing new chemotherapy targets and optimal treatment strategies, as well as in developing non-invasive diagnosis to monitor treatment response and detect tumor recurrence.

  5. Magnetic Properties of Polyvinyl Alcohol and Doxorubicine Loaded Iron Oxide Nanoparticles for Anticancer Drug Delivery Applications.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Muhammad Nadeem

    Full Text Available The current study emphasizes the synthesis of iron oxide nanoparticles (IONPs and impact of hydrophilic polymer polyvinyl alcohol (PVA coating concentration as well as anticancer drug doxorubicin (DOX loading on saturation magnetization for target drug delivery applications. Iron oxide nanoparticles particles were synthesized by a reformed version of the co-precipitation method. The coating of polyvinyl alcohol along with doxorubicin loading was carried out by the physical immobilization method. X-ray diffraction confirmed the magnetite (Fe3O4 structure of particles that remained unchanged before and after polyvinyl alcohol coating and drug loading. Microstructure and morphological analysis was carried out by transmission electron microscopy revealing the formation of nanoparticles with an average size of 10 nm with slight variation after coating and drug loading. Transmission electron microscopy, energy dispersive, and Fourier transform infrared spectra further confirmed the conjugation of polymer and doxorubicin with iron oxide nanoparticles. The room temperature superparamagnetic behavior of polymer-coated and drug-loaded magnetite nanoparticles were studied by vibrating sample magnetometer. The variation in saturation magnetization after coating evaluated that a sufficient amount of polyvinyl alcohol would be 3 wt. % regarding the externally controlled movement of IONPs in blood under the influence of applied magnetic field for in-vivo target drug delivery.

  6. An in vivo C. elegans model system for screening EGFR-inhibiting anti-cancer drugs.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Young-Ki Bae

    Full Text Available The epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR is a well-established target for cancer treatment. EGFR tyrosine kinase (TK inhibitors, such as gefinitib and erlotinib, have been developed as anti-cancer drugs. Although non-small cell lung carcinoma with an activating EGFR mutation, L858R, responds well to gefinitib and erlotinib, tumors with a doubly mutated EGFR, T790M-L858R, acquire resistance to these drugs. The C. elegans EGFR homolog LET-23 and its downstream signaling pathway have been studied extensively to provide insight into regulatory mechanisms conserved from C. elegans to humans. To develop an in vivo screening system for potential cancer drugs targeting specific EGFR mutants, we expressed three LET-23 chimeras in which the TK domain was replaced with either the human wild-type TK domain (LET-23::hEGFR-TK, a TK domain with the L858R mutation (LET-23::hEGFR-TK[L858R], or a TK domain with the T790M-L858R mutations (LET-23::hEGFR-TK[T790M-L858R] in C. elegans vulval cells using the let-23 promoter. The wild-type hEGFR-TK chimeric protein rescued the let-23 mutant phenotype, and the activating mutant hEGFR-TK chimeras induced a multivulva (Muv phenotype in a wild-type C. elegans background. The anti-cancer drugs gefitinib and erlotinib suppressed the Muv phenotype in LET-23::hEGFR-TK[L858R]-expressing transgenic animals, but not in LET-23::hEGFR-TK[T790M-L858R] transgenic animals. As a pilot screen, 8,960 small chemicals were tested for Muv suppression, and AG1478 (an EGFR-TK inhibitor and U0126 (a MEK inhibitor were identified as potential inhibitors of EGFR-mediated biological function. In conclusion, transgenic C. elegans expressing chimeric LET-23::hEGFR-TK proteins are a model system that can be used in mutation-specific screens for new anti-cancer drugs.

  7. Nanoparticulated docetaxel exerts enhanced anticancer efficacy and overcomes existing limitations of traditional drugs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Choi J

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Jinhyang Choi,1,2 Eunjung Ko,1 Hye-Kyung Chung,3 Jae Hee Lee,1 Eun Jin Ju,1 Hyun Kyung Lim,4 Intae Park,1 Kab-Sig Kim,5 Joo-Hwan Lee,5 Woo-Chan Son,6 Jung Shin Lee,1,7 Joohee Jung,1,4 Seong-Yun Jeong,1,2 Si Yeol Song,1,8 Eun Kyung Choi1,3,8 1Institute for Innovative Cancer Research, 2Asan Institute for Life Sciences, 3Center for Development and Commercialization of Anti-cancer Therapeutics, 4College of Pharmacy, Duksung Women’s University, 5Bio-Synectics, 6Department of Pathology, 7Department of Internal Medicine, 8Department of Radiation Oncology, Asan Medical Center, University of Ulsan College of Medicine, Seoul, South Korea Abstract: Nanoparticulation of insoluble drugs improves dissolution rate, resulting in increased bioavailability that leads to increased stability, better efficacy, and reduced toxicity of drugs. Docetaxel (DTX, under the trade name Taxotere™, is one of the representative anticancer chemotherapeutic agents of this era. However, this highly lipophilic and insoluble drug has many adverse effects. Our novel and widely applicable nanoparticulation using fat and supercritical fluid (NUFS™ technology enabled successful nanoscale particulation of DTX (Nufs-DTX. Nufs-DTX showed enhanced dissolution rate and increased aqueous stability in water. After confirming the preserved mechanism of action of DTX, which targets microtubules, we showed that Nufs-DTX exhibited similar effects in proliferation and clonogenic assays using A549 cells. Interestingly, we observed that Nufs-DTX had a greater in vivo tumor growth delay effect on an A549 xenograft model than Taxotere™, which was in agreement with the improved drug accumulation in tumors according to the biodistribution result, and was caused by the enhanced permeability and retention (EPR effect. Although both Nufs-DTX and Taxotere™ showed negative results for our administration dose in the hematologic toxicity test, Nufs-DTX showed much less toxicity than Taxotere™ in

  8. CHIP buffers heterogeneous Bcl-2 expression levels to prevent augmentation of anticancer drug-resistant cell population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsuchiya, M; Nakajima, Y; Waku, T; Hiyoshi, H; Morishita, T; Furumai, R; Hayashi, Y; Kishimoto, H; Kimura, K; Yanagisawa, J

    2015-08-27

    Many types of cancer display heterogeneity in various features, including gene expression and malignant potential. This heterogeneity is associated with drug resistance and cancer progression. Recent studies have shown that the expression of a major protein quality control ubiquitin ligase, carboxyl terminus of Hsc70-interacting protein (CHIP), is negatively correlated with breast cancer clinicopathological stages and poor overall survival. Here we show that CHIP acts as a capacitor of heterogeneous Bcl-2 expression levels and prevents an increase in the anticancer drug-resistant population in breast cancer cells. CHIP knockdown in breast cancer cells increased variation in Bcl-2 expression levels, an antiapoptotic protein, among the cells. Our results also showed that CHIP knockdown increased the proportion of anticancer drug-resistant cells. These findings suggest that CHIP buffers variation in gene expression levels, affecting resistance to anticancer drugs. In single-cell clones derived from breast cancer cell lines, CHIP knockdown did not alter the variation in Bcl-2 expression levels and the proportion of anticancer drug-resistant cells. In contrast, when clonal cells were treated with a mutagen, the variation in Bcl-2 expression levels and proportion of anticancer drug-resistant cells were altered by CHIP knockdown. These results suggest that CHIP masks genetic variations to suppress heterogeneous Bcl-2 expression levels and prevents augmentation of the anticancer drug-resistant population of breast cancer cells. Because genetic variation is a major driver of heterogeneity, our results suggest that the degree of heterogeneity in expression levels is decided by a balance between genetic variation and the buffering capacity of CHIP.

  9. Targeted search for anticancer drugs--CNIO cancer conference. 16-18 March, Madrid, Spain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lacal, Juan-Carlos; Carnero, Amancio

    2003-05-01

    The Spanish National Cancer Center has launched a new series of cancer conferences devoted to timely themes in oncology. These meetings aim to bring together a maximum of 50 participants, including 20 to 25 speakers along with 25 to 30 participants for in-depth discussion of new results and ideas in frontline cancer research. There is no registration fee to attend, but participants must organize their own travel and accommodation expenses; free communications are presented as posters, but a few may be selected for short (15 min) oral presentations. This particular meeting was organized by Amancio Carnero and David H Beach, and was mostly devoted to state of the art methodologies for the identification of new targets for anticancer drug design, although the development of novel drugs was also discussed.

  10. The gender of cell lines matters when screening for novel anti-cancer drugs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nunes, Larissa M; Robles-Escajeda, Elisa; Santiago-Vazquez, Yahaira; Ortega, Nora M; Lema, Carolina; Muro, Almendra; Almodovar, Gladys; Das, Umashankar; Das, Swagatika; Dimmock, Johnatan R; Aguilera, Renato J; Varela-Ramirez, Armando

    2014-07-01

    Current reports indicated that the gender origin of cells is important in all facets of experimental biology. To explore this matter using an anticancer high throughput screening platform, seven male- and seven female-derived human cell lines, six from cancer patients in each group, were exposed to 81 novel cytotoxins. In this screen, the findings revealed that 79 out of 81 of the compounds consistently inflicted higher levels of toxicity towards male derived cells, emphasizing that there is indeed a gender-related difference in cell sensitivity to these anti-neoplastic agents. This gender-related drug sensitivity and toxicity explored at the molecular and cellular level emerged from a drug discovery enterprise.

  11. Backbone-hydrazone-containing biodegradable copolymeric micelles for anticancer drug delivery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Jing; Luan, Shujuan; Qin, Benkai; Wang, Yingying; Wang, Kai; Qi, Peilan; Song, Shiyong

    2016-11-01

    Well-defined biodegradable, pH-sensitive amphiphilic block polymers, poly(ethylene glycol)-Hyd-poly(lactic acid) (mPEG-Hyd-PLA) which have acid-cleavable linkages in their backbones, were synthesized via ring-opening polymerization initiated from hydrazone-containing macroinitiators. Introducing a hydrazone bond onto the backbone of an amphiphilic copolymer will find a broad-spectrum encapsulation of hydrophobic drugs. Dynamic light scattering (DLS) and transmission electron microscopy showed that the diblock copolymers self-assembled into stable micelles with average diameters of 100 nm. The mean diameters and size distribution of the hydrazone-containing micelles changed obviously in mildly acidic pH (multiple peaks from 1 to 202 nm appeared under a pH 4.0 condition) than in neutral, while there were no changes in the case of non-sensitive ones. Doxorubicin (DOX) and paclitaxel (PTX) were loaded with drug loading content ranging from 2.4 to 3.5 %, respectively. Interestingly, the anticancer drugs released from mPEG-Hyd-PLA micelles could also be promoted by the increased acidity. An in vitro cytotoxicity study showed that the DOX-loaded mPEG-Hyd-PLA micelles have significantly enhanced cytotoxicity against HepG2 cells compared with the non-sensitive poly(ethylene glycol)-block-poly(lactic acid) (mPEG-PLA) micelles. Confocal microscopy observation indicated that more DOX were delivered into the nuclei of cells following 6 or 12 h incubation with DOX-loaded mPEG-Hyd-PLA micelles. In vivo studies on H22-bearing Swiss mice demonstrated the superior anticancer activity of DOX-loaded mPEG-Hyd-PLA micelles over free DOX and DOX-loaded mPEG-PLA micelles. These hydrazone-containing pH-responsive degradable micelles provide a useful strategy for antitumor drug delivery.

  12. Repurposing the anticancer drug mitomycin C for the treatment of persistent Acinetobacter baumannii infections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cruz-Muñiz, Martha Yumiko; López-Jacome, Luis Esau; Hernández-Durán, Melissa; Franco-Cendejas, Rafael; Licona-Limón, Paula; Ramos-Balderas, Jose Luis; Martinéz-Vázquez, Mariano; Belmont-Díaz, Javier A; Wood, Thomas K; García-Contreras, Rodolfo

    2017-01-01

    Acinetobacter baumannii is an emergent opportunistic bacterial pathogen responsible for recalcitrant infections owing to its high intrinsic tolerance to most antibiotics; therefore, suitable strategies to treat these infections are needed. One plausible approach is the repurposing of drugs that are already in use. Among them, anticancer drugs may be especially useful due their cytotoxic activities and ample similarities between bacterial infections and growing tumours. In this work, the effectiveness of four anticancer drugs on the growth of A. baumannii ATTC BAA-747 was evaluated, including the antimetabolite 5-fluorouracil and three DNA crosslinkers, namely cisplatin, mitomycin C (MMC) and merphalan. MMC was the most effective drug, having a minimum inhibitory concentration for 50% of growth in Luria-Bertani medium at ca. 7 µg/mL and completely inhibiting growth at 25 µg/mL. Hence, MMC was tested against a panel of 21 clinical isolates, including 18 multidrug-resistant (MDR) isolates, 3 of which were sensitive only to colistin. The minimum inhibitory concentrations and minimum bactericidal concentrations of MMC in all tested strains were found to be similar to those of A. baumannii ATCC BAA-747, and MMC also effectively killed stationary-phase, persister and biofilm cells. Moreover, MMC was able to increase survival of the insect larvae Galleria mellonella against an otherwise lethal A. baumannii infection from 0% to ≥53% for the antibiotic-sensitive A. baumannii ATCC BAA-747 strain and the MDR strains A560 and A578. Therefore, MMC is highly effective at killing the emergent opportunistic pathogen A. baumannii.

  13. Development, Characterization and Evaluation of Solid Lipid Nanoparticles as a potential Anticancer Drug Delivery System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patel, Meghavi

    Solid lipid nanoparticles (SLNs) consist of spherical solid lipid particles in the nanometer size range, which are dispersed in water or in an aqueous surfactant solution. SLN technology represents a promising new approach to deliver hydrophilic as well as lipophilic drugs. The commercialization of SLN technology remains limited despite numerous efforts from researchers. The purpose of this research was to advance SLN preparation methodology by investigating the feasibility of preparing glyceryl monostearate (GMS) nanoparticles by using three preparation methods namely microemulsion technique, magnetic stirring technique and temperature modulated solidification technique of which the latter two were developed in our laboratory. An anticancer drug 5-fluorouracil was incorporated in the SLNs prepared via the temperature modulated solidification process. Optimization of the magnetic stirring process was performed to evaluate how the physicochemical properties of the SLN was influenced by systematically varying process parameters including concentration of the lipid, concentration of the surfactant, type of surfactant, time of stirring and temperature of storage. The results demonstrated 1:2 GMS to tween 80 ratio, 150 ml dispersion medium and 45 min stirring at 4000 RPM speed provided an optimum formulation via the temperature modulated solidification process. SLN dispersions were lyophilized to stabilize the solid lipid nanoparticles and the lyophilizates exhibited good redispersibility. The SLNs were characterized by particle size analysis via dynamic light scattering (DLS), zeta potential, transmission electron microscopy (TEM), differential scanning calorimetry (DSC), drug encapsulation efficiency and in vitro drug release studies. Particle size of SLN dispersion prepared via the three preparation techniques was approximately 66 nm and that of redispersed lyophilizates was below 500 nm. TEM images showed spherical to oval particles that were less dense in the core

  14. Evolution of pre-existing versus acquired resistance to platinum drugs and PARP inhibitors in BRCA-associated cancers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamamoto, Kimiyo N; Hirota, Kouji; Takeda, Shunichi; Haeno, Hiroshi

    2014-01-01

    Platinum drugs and PARP inhibitors ("PARPis") are considered to be effective in BRCA-associated cancers with impaired DNA repair. These agents cause stalled and collapsed replication forks and create double-strand breaks effectively in the absence of repair mechanisms, resulting in arrest of the cell cycle and induction of cell death. However, recent studies have shown failure of these chemotherapeutic agents due to emerging drug resistance. In this study, we developed a stochastic model of BRCA-associated cancer progression in which there are four cancer populations: those with (i) functional BRCA, (ii) dysfunctional BRCA, (iii) functional BRCA and a growth advantage, and (iv) dysfunctional BRCA and a growth advantage. These four cancer populations expand from one cancer cell with normal repair function until the total cell number reaches a detectable amount. We derived formulas for the probability and expected numbers of each population at the time of detection. Furthermore, we extended the model to consider the tumor dynamics during treatment. Results from the model were validated and showed good agreement with clinical and experimental evidence in BRCA-associated cancers. Based on the model, we investigated conditions in which drug resistance during the treatment course originated from either a pre-existing drug-resistant population or a de novo population, due to secondary mutations. Finally, we found that platinum drugs and PARPis were effective if (i) BRCA inactivation is present, (ii) the cancer was diagnosed early, and (iii) tumor growth is rapid. Our results indicate that different types of cancers have a preferential way of acquiring resistance to platinum drugs and PARPis according to their growth and mutational characteristics.

  15. DNA-binding study of anticancer drug cytarabine by spectroscopic and molecular docking techniques.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shahabadi, Nahid; Falsafi, Monireh; Maghsudi, Maryam

    2017-01-02

    The interaction of anticancer drug cytarabine with calf thymus DNA (CT-DNA) was investigated in vitro under simulated physiological conditions by multispectroscopic techniques and molecular modeling study. The fluorescence spectroscopy and UV absorption spectroscopy indicated drug interacted with CT-DNA in a groove-binding mode, while the binding constant of UV-vis and the number of binding sites were 4.0 ± 0.2 × 10(4) L mol(-1) and 1.39, respectively. The fluorimetric studies showed that the reaction between the drugs with CT-DNA is exothermic. Circular dichroism spectroscopy was employed to measure the conformational change of DNA in the presence of cytarabine. Furthermore, the drug induces detectable changes in its viscosity for DNA interaction. The molecular modeling results illustrated that cytarabine strongly binds to groove of DNA by relative binding energy of docked structure -20.61 KJ mol(-1). This combination of multiple spectroscopic techniques and molecular modeling methods can be widely used in the investigation on the interaction of small molecular pollutants and drugs with biomacromolecules for clarifying the molecular mechanism of toxicity or side effect in vivo.

  16. Prospective Observational Study of Adverse Drug Reactions of Anticancer Drugs Used in Cancer Treatment in a Tertiary Care Hospital.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saini, V K; Sewal, R K; Ahmad, Yusra; Medhi, B

    2015-01-01

    Adverse drug reactions associated with the use of anticancer drugs are a worldwide problem and cannot be ignored. Adverse drug reactions can range from nausea, vomiting or any other mild reaction to severe myelosuppression. The study was planned to observe the suspected adverse drug reactions of cancer chemotherapy in patients aged >18 years having cancer attending Postgraduate Institute of Medical Education and Research, Chandigarh. During the study period, 101 patients of breast cancer and 73 patients of lung cancer were screened for occurrence of adverse drug reactions during their treatment with chemotherapy. About 87.36% patients experienced adverse drug reactions, 90.09% and 83.56% of breast and lung cancer patients experienced at least one adverse drug reaction respectively. In breast cancer patients, 41.58% patients were prescribed fluorouracil+doxorubicin+cyclophosphamide while paclitaxel was prescribed to 22.77% patients. Alopecia (54.94%), nail discolouration (43.96%), dysgeusia (38.46%), anorexia (30.77%), nausea (29.67%), and neuropathy (29.67%) were found to be very common in breast cancer patients treated with single/combined regimen. In lung cancer group of patients, cisplatin with docetaxel, cisplatin with pemetrexed and cisplatin with irinotecan were prescribed to 30.14, 24.65 and 17.81% patients, respectively. Dysgeusia (40.98%), diarrhoea (39.34%), anorexia (32.77%) and constipation (31.15%) and alopecia (31.15%) were commonly observed adverse drug reactions having lung cancer patients. Causality assessments using World Health Organization causality assessment scale showed that observed adverse drug reactions were of probable (64.67%) and possible (35.33%) categories. Alopecia, dysgeusia, anorexia, constipation diarrhoea, nausea, nail discoloration were more prevalent amongst the cancer patients undergoing chemotherapy.

  17. Study of Malformin C, a Fungal Source Cyclic Pentapeptide, as an Anti-Cancer Drug.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jing Wang

    Full Text Available Malformin C, a fungal cyclic pentapeptide, has been claimed to have anti-cancer potential, but no in vivo study was available to substantiate this property. Therefore, we conducted in vitro and in vivo experiments to investigate its anti-cancer effects and toxicity. Our studies showed Malformin C inhibited Colon 38 and HCT 116 cell growth dose-dependently with an IC50 of 0.27±0.07μM and 0.18±0.023μM respectively. This inhibition was explicated by Malformin C's effect on G2/M arrest. Moreover, we observed up-regulated expression of phospho-histone H2A.X, p53, cleaved CASPASE 3 and LC3 after Malformin C treatment, while the apoptosis assay indicated an increased population of necrotic and late apoptotic cells. In vivo, the pathological study exhibited the acute toxicity of Malformin C at lethal dosage in BDF1 mice might be caused by an acute yet subtle inflammatory response, consistent with elevated IL-6 in the plasma cytokine assay. Further anti-tumor and toxicity experiments proved that 0.3mg/kg injected weekly was the best therapeutic dosage of Malformin C in Colon 38 xenografted BDF1 mice, whereas 0.1mg/kg every other day showed no effect with higher resistance, and 0.9mg/kg per week either led to fatal toxicity in seven-week old mice or displayed no advantage over 0.3mg/kg group in nine-week old mice. Overall, we conclude that Malformin C arrests Colon 38 cells in G2/M phase and induces multiple forms of cell death through necrosis, apoptosis and autophagy. Malformin C has potent cell growth inhibition activity, but the therapeutic index is too low to be an anti-cancer drug.

  18. Nanostructured SERS-electrochemical biosensors for testing of anticancer drug interactions with DNA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ilkhani, Hoda; Hughes, Taylor; Li, Jing; Zhong, Chuan Jian; Hepel, Maria

    2016-06-15

    Widely used anti-cancer treatments involving chemotherapeutic drugs result in cancer cell damage due to their strong interaction with DNA. In this work, we have developed laboratory biosensors for screening chemotherapeutic drugs and to aid in the assessment of DNA modification/damage caused by these drugs. The sensors utilize surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) spectroscopy and electrochemical methods to monitor sensory film modification and observe the drug-DNA reactivity. The self-assembled monolayer protected gold-disk electrode (AuDE) was coated with a reduced graphene oxide (rGO), decorated with plasmonic gold-coated Fe2Ni@Au magnetic nanoparticles functionalized with double-stranded DNA (dsDNA), a sequence of the breast cancer gene BRCA1. The nanobiosensors AuDE/SAM/rGO/Fe2Ni@Au/dsDNA were then subjected to the action of a model chemotherapeutic drug, doxorubicin (DOX), to assess the DNA modification and its dose dependence. The designed novel nanobiosensors offer SERS/electrochemical transduction, enabling chemically specific and highly sensitive analytical signals generation. The SERS measurements have corroborated the DOX intercalation into the DNA duplex whereas the electrochemical scans have indicated that the DNA modification by DOX proceeds in a concentration dependent manner, with limit of detection LOD=8 µg/mL (S/N=3), with semilog linearity over 3 orders of magnitude. These new biosensors are sensitive to agents that interact with DNA and facilitate the analysis of functional groups for determination of the binding mode. The proposed nanobiosensors can be applied in the first stage of the drug development for testing the interactions of new drugs with DNA before the drug efficacy can be assessed in more expensive testing in vitro and in vivo.

  19. Folate-conjugated boron nitride nanospheres for targeted delivery of anticancer drug

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Feng S

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Shini Feng,1 Huijie Zhang,1 Ting Yan,1 Dandi Huang,1 Chunyi Zhi,2 Hideki Nakanishi,1 Xiao-Dong Gao1 1Key Laboratory of Carbohydrate Chemistry and Biotechnology, Ministry of Education, School of Biotechnology, Jiangnan University, Wuxi, People’s Republic of China; 2Department of Physics and Materials Science, City University of Hong Kong, Hong Kong SAR, People’s Republic of China Abstract: With its unique physical and chemical properties and structural similarity to carbon, boron nitride (BN has attracted considerable attention and found many applications. Biomedical applications of BN have recently started to emerge, raising great hopes in drug and gene delivery. Here, we developed a targeted anticancer drug delivery system based on folate-conjugated BN nanospheres (BNNS with receptor-mediated targeting. Folic acid (FA was successfully grafted onto BNNS via esterification reaction. In vitro cytotoxicity assay showed that BNNS-FA complexes were non-toxic to HeLa cells up to a concentration of 100 µg/mL. Then, doxorubicin hydrochloride (DOX, a commonly used anticancer drug, was loaded onto BNNS-FA complexes. BNNS-FA/DOX complexes were stable at pH 7.4 but effectively released DOX at pH 5.0, which exhibited a pH sensitive and sustained release pattern. BNNS-FA/DOX complexes could be recognized and specifically internalized by HeLa cells via FA receptor-mediated endocytosis. BNNS-FA/DOX complexes exhibited greater cytotoxicity to HeLa cells than free DOX and BNNS/DOX complexes due to the increased cellular uptake of DOX mediated by the FA receptor. Therefore, BNNS-FA complexes had strong potential for targeted cancer therapy. Keywords: boron nitride nanospheres, folic acid, doxorubicin, targeted delivery, cancer therapy

  20. Supramolecular PEGylated Dendritic Systems as pH/Redox Dual-Responsive Theranostic Nanoplatforms for Platinum Drug Delivery and NIR Imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yunkun; Li, Yachao; Zhang, Xiao; Xu, Xianghui; Zhang, Zhijun; Hu, Cheng; He, Yiyan; Gu, Zhongwei

    2016-01-01

    Recently, self-assembling small dendrimers into supramolecular dendritic systems offers an alternative strategy to develop multifunctional nanoplatforms for biomedical applications. We herein report a dual-responsive supramolecular PEGylated dendritic system for efficient platinum-based drug delivery and near-infrared (NIR) tracking. With a refined molecular/supramolecular engineering, supramolecular dendritic systems were stabilized by bioreducible disulfide bonds and endowed with NIR fluorescence probes, and PEGylated platinum derivatives coordinated onto the abundant peripheral groups of supramolecular dendritic templates to generate pH/redox dual-responsive theranostic supramolecular PEGylated dendritic systems (TSPDSs). TSPDSs markedly improved the pharmacokinetics and biodistribution of platinum-based drugs, owing to their stable nanostructures and PEGylated shells during the blood circulation. Tumor intracellular environment (low pH value and high glutathione concentration) could trigger the rapid disintegration of TSPDSs due to acid-labile coordination bonds and redox-cleavable disulfide linkages, and then platinum-based drugs were delivered into the nuclei to exert antitumor activity. In vivo antitumor treatments indicated TSPDSs not only provided high antitumor efficiency which was comparable to clinical cisplatin, but also reduced renal toxicity of platinum-based drugs. Moreover, NIR fluorescence of TSPDSs successfully visualized in vitro and in vivo fate of nanoplatforms and disclosed the intracellular platinum delivery and pharmacokinetics. These results confirm tailor-made supramolecular dendritic system with sophisticated nanostructure and excellent performance is a promising candidate as smart theranostic nanoplatforms.

  1. Successful analysis of anticancer drug sensitivity by CD-DST using pleural fluid and ascites from patients with advanced ovarian cancer: case reports.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawaguchi, Makiko; Banno, Kouji; Susumu, Nobuyuki; Yanokura, Megumi; Kuwabara, Yoshiko; Hirao, Nobumaru; Tsukazaki, Katsumi; Nozawa, Shiro

    2005-01-01

    In vitro anticancer drug sensitivity tests have been performed for various types of cancers, and a relationship with clinical response has been observed. The collagen gel droplet-embedded culture drug sensitivity test (CD-DST) is a new in vitro anticancer drug sensitivity test by Yabushita et al., recently reported to be useful in ovarian cancer. CD-DST allows analysis of a small number of cells, compared to other anticancer drug sensitivity tests. Here, we report a successful analysis of anticancer drug sensitivity by CD-DST using cancerous ascites and pleural fluid samples from 2 patients with advanced ovarian cancer. To our knowledge, this is only the second report of the application of CD-DST in ovarian cancer, and our results suggest that CD-DST could be helpful in the selection of anticancer drugs for neoadjuvant chemotherapy in advanced ovarian cancer.

  2. New challenges and inspired answers for anticancer drug discovery and development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Utsugi, Teruhiro

    2013-10-01

    Many pharmaceutical companies worldwide specialize in oncology drug development and marketing. Among them, we have continued to take up the challenge of understanding the metabolism of pyrimidines as essential components of deoxyribonucleic acid for many years, and have provided unique products such as UFT(®) and TS-1 for cancer patients. Using our cumulative experience and knowledge, we are currently developing novel agents such as TAS-114, a dual inhibitor of deoxyuridine triphosphatase and dihydropyrimidine dehydrogenase, and TAS-102, a unique pyrimidine derivative inducing deoxyribonucleic acid dysfunction in cancer cells. Regarding molecular-targeted drugs, we have made huge efforts to establish ideal drug discovery platforms for the last several years. For kinase inhibitors, we established three core platforms such as a kinase-directed chemical library, a kinase assay panel and a target selection informatics system. The core platforms were further combined with peripheral technologies to measure essential parameters such as physicochemical properties, pharmacokinetics, efficacy and toxicities. Unique drug candidates have been identified at an early stage by assessing all important parameters. Several promising programs are proceeding simultaneously in the clinical or preclinical development stage such as TAS-115, a dual inhibitor of c-Met and vascular endothelial growth factor receptor, TAS-2104, a selective Aurora A inhibitor, TAS-117, an allosteric Akt inhibitor, TAS-2985, an irreversible fibroblast growth factor receptor inhibitor and TAS-2913, a T790M mutant selective epidermal growth factor receptor inhibitor. Other than kinase inhibitors, another drug discovery engine was established based on the fragment-based drug discovery technology. TAS-116, a new class of Hsp-90α/β inhibitor, is one of the products. Taiho's final goal is to provide innovative anticancer drugs together with companion diagnostics that are truly beneficial for patients.

  3. Poly(lactic acid)/chitosan hybrid nanoparticles for controlled release of anticancer drug.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Wenlong; Chen, Shu; Zhang, Liang; Wu, Xi; Wang, Jiexin; Chen, Jian-Feng; Le, Yuan

    2015-01-01

    Poly(lactic acid) (PLA) is a kind of non-toxic biological materials with excellent absorbability, biocompatibility and biodegradability, which can be used for drug release, tissue engineering and surgical treatment applications. In this study, we prepared chitosan modified PLA nanoparticles as carriers for encapsulation of docetaxel by anti-solvent precipitation method. The morphology, particle size, zeta potential and composition of the PLA/chitosan were characterized by SEM, DLS, FTIR and XPS. As-prepared PLA/chitosan particles exhibited average size of 250 nm and showed very narrow distribution with polydispersity index of 0.098. Their large surface charge-ability was confirmed by zeta potential value of 53.9 mV. Docetaxel was released from PLA/chitosan nanoparticles with 40% initial burst release in 5 h and 70% cumulative release within 24 h, while from PLA nanoparticles 65% of docetaxel was released in 5h. In vitro drug release study demonstrated that PLA/chitosan nanoparticles prolonged drug release and decreased the burst release over the unmodified PLA nanoparticles. These results illustrated high potential of chitosan modified PLA nanoparticles for usage as anticancer drug carriers.

  4. Efficient "green" encapsulation of a highly hydrophilic anticancer drug in metal-organic framework nanoparticles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodriguez-Ruiz, Violeta; Maksimenko, Andrei; Anand, Resmi; Monti, Sandra; Agostoni, Valentina; Couvreur, Patrick; Lampropoulou, Maria; Yannakopoulou, Konstantina; Gref, Ruxandra

    2015-01-01

    Metal-organic frameworks (MOFs) are coordination polymers of interest for biomedical applications. Of particular importance, nanoparticles made of iron(III) trimesate (MIL-100, MIL standing for Material Institut Lavoisier) (nanoMOFs) can be conveniently synthesised under mild and green conditions. They were shown to be biodegradable, biocompatible and efficient to encapsulate a variety of active molecules. We have addressed here the challenges to encapsulate a highly hydrophilic anticancer prodrug, phosphated gemcitabin (Gem-MP) known for its instability and inability to bypass cell membranes. MIL-100 nanoMOFs acted as efficient "nanosponges", soaking Gem-MP from its aqueous solution with almost perfect efficiency (>98%). Maximal loadings reached ∼30 wt% reflecting the strong interaction between the drug and the iron trimesate matrices. Neither degradation nor loss of crystalline structure was observed after the loading process. Storage of the loaded nanoMOFs in water did not result in drug release over three days. However, Gem-MP was released in media containing phosphates, as a consequence to particle degradation. Drug-loaded nanoMOFs were effective against pancreatic PANC-1 cells, in contrast to free drug and empty nanoMOFs. However, an efflux phenomenon could contribute to reduce the efficacy of the nanocarriers. Size optimization and surface modification of the nanoMOFs are expected to further improve these findings.

  5. Hydroxypropyl-β-cyclodextrin–graphene oxide conjugates: Carriers for anti-cancer drugs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tan, Jingting; Meng, Na; Fan, Yunting; Su, Yutian; Zhang, Ming [Jiangsu Collaborative Innovation Center for Biological Functional Materials, College of Chemistry and Materials Science, Nanjing Normal University, Nanjing 210023 (China); National and Local Joint Engineering Research Center of Biomedical Functional Materials, Nanjing 210023 (China); Jiangsu Key Laboratory of Biofunctional Materials, Jiangsu Engineering Research Center for Biomedical Function Materials, Nanjing 210023 (China); Xiao, Yinghong, E-mail: yhxiao@njnu.edu.cn [Jiangsu Collaborative Innovation Center for Biological Functional Materials, College of Chemistry and Materials Science, Nanjing Normal University, Nanjing 210023 (China); National and Local Joint Engineering Research Center of Biomedical Functional Materials, Nanjing 210023 (China); Jiangsu Key Laboratory of Biofunctional Materials, Jiangsu Engineering Research Center for Biomedical Function Materials, Nanjing 210023 (China); Zhou, Ninglin, E-mail: zhouninglin@njnu.edu.cn [Jiangsu Collaborative Innovation Center for Biological Functional Materials, College of Chemistry and Materials Science, Nanjing Normal University, Nanjing 210023 (China); National and Local Joint Engineering Research Center of Biomedical Functional Materials, Nanjing 210023 (China); Jiangsu Key Laboratory of Biofunctional Materials, Jiangsu Engineering Research Center for Biomedical Function Materials, Nanjing 210023 (China); Nanjing Zhou Ninglin Advanced Materials Technology Company Limited, Nanjing 211505 (China)

    2016-04-01

    A novel drug carrier based on hydroxypropyl-β-cyclodextrin (HP-β-CD) modified carboxylated graphene oxide (GO-COOH) was designed to incorporate anti-cancer drug paclitaxel (PTX). The formulated nanomedicines were characterized by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) and atomic force microscopy (AFM). Results showed that PTX can be incorporated into GO-COO-HP-β-CD nanospheres successfully, with an average diameter of about 100 nm. The solubility and stability of PTX-loaded GO-COO-HP-β-CD nanospheres in aqueous media were greatly enhanced compared with the untreated PTX. The results of hemolysis test demonstrated that the drug-loaded nanospheres were qualified with good blood compatibility for intravenous use. In vitro anti-tumor activity was measured and results demonstrated that the incorporation of PTX into the newly developed GO-COO-HP-β-CD carrier could confer significantly improved cytotoxicity to the nanosystem against tumor cells than single application of PTX. GO-COO-HP-β-CD nanospheres may represent a promising formulation platform for a broad range of therapeutic agent, especially those with poor solubility. - Highlights: • Hydroxypropyl-β-cyclodextrin (HP-β-CD) modified carboxylated graphene oxide (GO-COOH) was designed as a drug carrier. • The prepared PTX-loaded nanospheres can be dispersed in aqueous medium stably. • The GO-COO-HP-β-CD nanospheres are safe for blood-contact applications. • This newly developed PTX-delivery system could confer significantly improved cytotoxicity against tumor cells.

  6. Antitumor Activity of Artemisinin and Its Derivatives: From a Well-Known Antimalarial Agent to a Potential Anticancer Drug

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria P. Crespo-Ortiz

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Improvement of quality of life and survival of cancer patients will be greatly enhanced by the development of highly effective drugs to selectively kill malignant cells. Artemisinin and its analogs are naturally occurring antimalarials which have shown potent anticancer activity. In primary cancer cultures and cell lines, their antitumor actions were by inhibiting cancer proliferation, metastasis, and angiogenesis. In xenograft models, exposure to artemisinins substantially reduces tumor volume and progression. However, the rationale for the use of artemisinins in anticancer therapy must be addressed by a greater understanding of the underlying mechanisms involved in their cytotoxic effects. The primary targets for artemisinin and the chemical base for its preferential effects on heterologous tumor cells need yet to be elucidated. The aim of this paper is to provide an overview of the recent advances and new development of this class of drugs as potential anticancer agents.

  7. Steady Increase In Prices For Oral Anticancer Drugs After Market Launch Suggests A Lack Of Competitive Pressure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bennette, Caroline S; Richards, Catherine; Sullivan, Sean D; Ramsey, Scott D

    2016-05-01

    The cost of treating cancer has risen to unprecedented heights, putting tremendous financial pressure on patients, payers, and society. Previous studies have documented the rising prices of cancer drugs at launch, but less critical attention has been paid to the cost of these drugs after launch. We used pharmacy claims for commercially insured individuals to examine trends in postlaunch prices over time for orally administered anticancer drugs recently approved by the Food and Drug Administration (FDA). In the period 2007-13, inflation-adjusted per patient monthly drug prices increased 5 percent each year. Certain market changes also played a role, with prices rising an additional 10 percent with each supplemental indication approved by the FDA and declining 2 percent with the FDA's approval of a competitor drug. Our findings suggest that there is currently little competitive pressure in the oral anticancer drug market. Policy makers who wish to reduce the costs of anticancer drugs should consider implementing policies that affect prices not only at launch but also later.

  8. Synthesis and characterization of potential iron–platinum drugs and supplements by laser liquid photolysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Forbes A

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Steven S Nkosi,1,2 Bonex W Mwakikunga,4 Elias Sideras-Haddad,2 Andrew Forbes1,31CSIR National Laser Centre, Pretoria, South Africa; 2DST/NRF Centre for Excellence in Strong Materials and School of Physics, University of the Witwatersrand, Johannesburg, 3School of Physics, University of KwaZulu-Natal, Durban, South Africa; 4DST/CSIR National Centre for Nano-Structured Materials, Pretoria, South AfricaAbstract: Highly crystalline nanospherical iron–platinum systems were produced by 248 nm laser irradiation of a liquid precursor at different laser fluences, ranging from 100–375 mJ/cm2. The influence of laser intensity on particle size, iron composition, and structure was systematically investigated. Different nanostructures of iron–platinum alloy and chemically disordered iron–platinum L10 phase were obtained without annealing. The prepared precursor solution underwent deep photolysis to polycrystalline iron–platinum nanoalloys through Fe(III acetylacetonate and Pt(II acetylacetonate. Fe(II and Pt(I acetylacetone decomposed into Fe0 and Pt0 nanoparticles. We found that the (001 diffraction peak shifted linearly to a lower angle, with the last peak shifting in opposition to the others. This caused the face-centered cubic L10 structure to change its composition according to laser fluence. The nanostructures were shown to contain iron and platinum only by energy-dispersive spectroscopy at several spots. The response of these iron–platinum nanoparticles to infrared depends on their stoichiometric composition, which is controlled by laser fluence.Keywords: nanostructures, iron, platinum, nanoparticles, laser liquid photolysis, composition

  9. The anti-cancer drug-induced pica in rats is related to their clinical emetogenic potential.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamamoto, Kouichi; Nakai, Miho; Nohara, Kyoko; Yamatodani, Atsushi

    2007-01-05

    Cancer chemotherapy is frequently accompanied by severe emesis. The anti-cancer drugs are classified according to their clinical emetogenic potential. We have already found that kaolin ingestion behavior "pica" is analogous to emesis in rats. The aim of this study was to examine the effects of the clinical emetogenic potential of anti-cancer drugs on the induction of the pica in rats. Rats were housed in individual cages with free access to food and kaolin pellets and the daily food and kaolin intakes were measured for 3 days after the intraperitoneal administration of anti-cancer drugs (cisplatin, cyclophosphamide, actinomycin D, 5-fluorouracil and vincristine). The drugs with high potential for inducing emesis, such as cisplatin and cyclophosphamide, induced pica in all animals on the day of administration and the behavior lasted during the observation period. The drugs with moderate emetogenic potential, i.e. actinomycin D and 5-fluorouracil, also induced pica on the first and second day after the drug administration but the kaolin intake was less than that of the drugs with high potential. Vincristine, a drug with low emetogenic potential, slightly increased the kaolin intake in rats on the only first day of the administration. Cyclophosphamide, actinomycin D and vincristine induced anorexia and decreased their body weight during the observation period. These results suggested that the both amounts of kaolin intake and duration of behavior in the anti-cancer drug-induced pica are related to the clinical emetogenic potential of the drugs and the incidence of the anorexia is not related to their emetogenic potential.

  10. Predicting Anticancer Drug Responses Using a Dual-Layer Integrated Cell Line-Drug Network Model.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Naiqian Zhang

    Full Text Available The ability to predict the response of a cancer patient to a therapeutic agent is a major goal in modern oncology that should ultimately lead to personalized treatment. Existing approaches to predicting drug sensitivity rely primarily on profiling of cancer cell line panels that have been treated with different drugs and selecting genomic or functional genomic features to regress or classify the drug response. Here, we propose a dual-layer integrated cell line-drug network model, which uses both cell line similarity network (CSN data and drug similarity network (DSN data to predict the drug response of a given cell line using a weighted model. Using the Cancer Cell Line Encyclopedia (CCLE and Cancer Genome Project (CGP studies as benchmark datasets, our single-layer model with CSN or DSN and only a single parameter achieved a prediction performance comparable to the previously generated elastic net model. When using the dual-layer model integrating both CSN and DSN, our predicted response reached a 0.6 Pearson correlation coefficient with observed responses for most drugs, which is significantly better than the previous results using the elastic net model. We have also applied the dual-layer cell line-drug integrated network model to fill in the missing drug response values in the CGP dataset. Even though the dual-layer integrated cell line-drug network model does not specifically model mutation information, it correctly predicted that BRAF mutant cell lines would be more sensitive than BRAF wild-type cell lines to three MEK1/2 inhibitors tested.

  11. Tumour-initiating cells: challenges and opportunities for anticancer drug discovery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Bin-Bing S; Zhang, Haiying; Damelin, Marc; Geles, Kenneth G; Grindley, Justin C; Dirks, Peter B

    2009-10-01

    The hypothesis that cancer is driven by tumour-initiating cells (popularly known as cancer stem cells) has recently attracted a great deal of attention, owing to the promise of a novel cellular target for the treatment of haematopoietic and solid malignancies. Furthermore, it seems that tumour-initiating cells might be resistant to many conventional cancer therapies, which might explain the limitations of these agents in curing human malignancies. Although much work is still needed to identify and characterize tumour-initiating cells, efforts are now being directed towards identifying therapeutic strategies that could target these cells. This Review considers recent advances in the cancer stem cell field, focusing on the challenges and opportunities for anticancer drug discovery.

  12. Transfer hydrogenation catalysis in cells as a new approach to anticancer drug design.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soldevila-Barreda, Joan J; Romero-Canelón, Isolda; Habtemariam, Abraha; Sadler, Peter J

    2015-03-20

    Organometallic complexes are effective hydrogenation catalysts for organic reactions. For example, Noyori-type ruthenium complexes catalyse reduction of ketones by transfer of hydride from formate. Here we show that such catalytic reactions can be achieved in cancer cells, offering a new strategy for the design of safe metal-based anticancer drugs. The activity of ruthenium(II) sulfonamido ethyleneamine complexes towards human ovarian cancer cells is enhanced by up to 50 × in the presence of low non-toxic doses of formate. The extent of conversion of coenzyme NAD(+) to NADH in cells is dependent on formate concentration. This novel reductive stress mechanism of cell death does not involve apoptosis or perturbation of mitochondrial membrane potentials. In contrast, iridium cyclopentadienyl catalysts cause cancer cell death by oxidative stress. Organometallic complexes therefore have an extraordinary ability to modulate the redox status of cancer cells.

  13. Nano drug delivery Study of Anticancer Properties on Jackfruit using QM/MM Methods

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Behnaz Bonsakhteh

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Nano-biotechnology takes most of its fundamentals from nanotechnology which most of the equipment designed for nano-biotechnological are based on other existing nanotechnologies. Nano-biotechnology is often used to describe the overlapping multidisciplinary activities associated with chemistry, biology and nano-medicine. In this investigation, the ab initio calculations were implemented using Gaussian program package based on density functional level of theory (DFT to achieve the drug delivery technic for unraveling of linkage of Jackfruit to single walled carbon nanotubes . NMR investigation gives deeper physical insight into the impact of different structures . In this work NMR parameters were calculated at the Ethyl isovalerate, Propylisovalerate, Isobutyl isovalerate and 3-methyl butyl acetate extracted of Jack fruit with different functional groups in their active sites so, the anticancer properties of this compound have been clarified.

  14. Applying fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy to evaluate the efficacy of anticancer drugs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawanabe, Satoshi; Araki, Yoshie; Uchimura, Tomohiro; Imasaka, Totaro

    2015-06-01

    Fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy was applied to evaluate the efficacy of anticancer drugs. A decrease in the fluorescence lifetime of the nucleus in apoptotic cancer cells stained by SYTO 13 dye was detected after treatment with antitumor antibiotics such as doxorubicin or epirubicin. It was confirmed that the change in fluorescence lifetime occurred earlier than morphological changes in the cells. We found that the fluorescence lifetime of the nucleus in the cells treated with epirubicin decreased more rapidly than that of the cells treated with doxorubicin. This implies that epirubicin was more efficacious than doxorubicin in the treatment of cancer cells. The change in fluorescence lifetime was, however, not indicated when the cells were treated with cyclophosphamide. The decrease in fluorescence lifetime was associated with the processes involving caspase activation and chromatin condensation. Therefore, this technique would provide useful information about apoptotic cells, particularly in the early stages.

  15. Optimization of anti-cancer drugs and a targeting molecule on multifunctional gold nanoparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rizk, Nahla; Christoforou, Nicolas; Lee, Sungmun

    2016-05-01

    Breast cancer is the most common and deadly cancer among women worldwide. Currently, nanotechnology-based drug delivery systems are useful for cancer treatment; however, strategic planning is critical in order to enhance the anti-cancer properties and reduce the side effects of cancer therapy. Here, we designed multifunctional gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) conjugated with two anti-cancer drugs, TGF-β1 antibody and methotrexate, and a cancer-targeting molecule, folic acid. First, optimum size and shape of AuNPs was selected by the highest uptake of AuNPs by MDA-MB-231, a metastatic human breast cancer cell line. It was 100 nm spherical AuNPs (S-AuNPs) that were used for further studies. A fixed amount (900 μl) of S-AuNP (3.8 × 108 particles/ml) was conjugated with folic acid-BSA or methotrexate-BSA. Methotrexate on S-AuNP induced cellular toxicity and the optimum amount of methotrexate-BSA (2.83 mM) was 500 μl. Uptake of S-AuNPs was enhanced by folate conjugation that binds to folate receptors overexpressed by MDA-MB-231 and the optimum uptake was at 500 μl of folic acid-BSA (2.83 mM). TGF-β1 antibody on S-AuNP reduced extracellular TGF-β1 of cancer cells by 30%. Due to their efficacy and tunable properties, we anticipate numerous clinical applications of multifunctional gold nanospheres in treating breast cancer.

  16. Hydroxycamptothecin-loaded nanoparticles enhance target drug delivery and anticancer effect

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Li Su

    2008-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Hydroxycamptothecin (HCPT has been shown to have activity against a broad spectrum of cancers. In order to enhance its tissue-specific delivery and anticancer activity, we prepared HCPT-loaded nanoparticles made from poly(ethylene glycol-poly(γ-benzyl-L-glutamate (PEG-PBLG, and then studied their release characteristics, pharmacokinetic characteristics, and anticancer effects. PEG-PBLG nanoparticles incorporating HCPT were prepared by a dialysis method. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM was used to observe the shape and diameter of the nanoparticles. The HCPT release characteristics in vitro were evaluated by ultraviolet spectrophotometry. A high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC detection method for determining HCPT in rabbit plasma was established. The pharmacokinetic parameters of HCPT/PEG-PBLG nanoparticles were compared with those of HCPT. Results The HCPT-loaded nanoparticles had a core-shell spherical structure, with a core diameter of 200 nm and a shell thickness of 30 nm. Drug-loading capacity and drug encapsulation were 7.5 and 56.8%, respectively. The HCPT release profile was biphasic, with an initial abrupt release, followed by sustained release. The terminal elimination half-lives (t 1/2 β of HCPT and HCPT-loaded nanoparticles were 4.5 and 10.1 h, respectively. Peak concentrations (Cmax of HCPT and HCPT-loaded nanoparticles were 2627.8 and 1513.5 μg/L, respectively. The apparent volumes of distribution of the HCPT and HCPT-loaded nanoparticles were 7.3 and 20.0 L, respectively. Compared with a blank control group, Lovo cell xenografts or Tca8113 cell xenografts in HCPT or HCPT-loaded nanoparticle treated groups grew more slowly and the tumor doubling times were increased. The tumor inhibition effect in the HCPT-loaded nanosphere-treated group was significantly higher than that of the HCPT-treated group (p 0.05. Conclusion Compared to the HCPT- and control-treated groups, the HCPT-loaded nanoparticle

  17. In Vitro and in Vivo Antitumoral Effects of Combinations of Polyphenols, or Polyphenols and Anticancer Drugs: Perspectives on Cancer Treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Massimo Fantini

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Carcinogenesis is a multistep process triggered by genetic alterations that activate different signal transduction pathways and cause the progressive transformation of a normal cell into a cancer cell. Polyphenols, compounds ubiquitously expressed in plants, have anti-inflammatory, antimicrobial, antiviral, anticancer, and immunomodulatory properties, all of which are beneficial to human health. Due to their ability to modulate the activity of multiple targets involved in carcinogenesis through direct interaction or modulation of gene expression, polyphenols can be employed to inhibit the growth of cancer cells. However, the main problem related to the use of polyphenols as anticancer agents is their poor bioavailability, which might hinder the in vivo effects of the single compound. In fact, polyphenols have a poor absorption and biodistribution, but also a fast metabolism and excretion in the human body. The poor bioavailability of a polyphenol will affect the effective dose delivered to cancer cells. One way to counteract this drawback could be combination treatment with different polyphenols or with polyphenols and other anti-cancer drugs, which can lead to more effective antitumor effects than treatment using only one of the compounds. This report reviews current knowledge on the anticancer effects of combinations of polyphenols or polyphenols and anticancer drugs, with a focus on their ability to modulate multiple signaling transduction pathways involved in cancer.

  18. In vitro and in vivo antitumoral effects of combinations of polyphenols, or polyphenols and anticancer drugs: perspectives on cancer treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fantini, Massimo; Benvenuto, Monica; Masuelli, Laura; Frajese, Giovanni Vanni; Tresoldi, Ilaria; Modesti, Andrea; Bei, Roberto

    2015-04-24

    Carcinogenesis is a multistep process triggered by genetic alterations that activate different signal transduction pathways and cause the progressive transformation of a normal cell into a cancer cell. Polyphenols, compounds ubiquitously expressed in plants, have anti-inflammatory, antimicrobial, antiviral, anticancer, and immunomodulatory properties, all of which are beneficial to human health. Due to their ability to modulate the activity of multiple targets involved in carcinogenesis through direct interaction or modulation of gene expression, polyphenols can be employed to inhibit the growth of cancer cells. However, the main problem related to the use of polyphenols as anticancer agents is their poor bioavailability, which might hinder the in vivo effects of the single compound. In fact, polyphenols have a poor absorption and biodistribution, but also a fast metabolism and excretion in the human body. The poor bioavailability of a polyphenol will affect the effective dose delivered to cancer cells. One way to counteract this drawback could be combination treatment with different polyphenols or with polyphenols and other anti-cancer drugs, which can lead to more effective antitumor effects than treatment using only one of the compounds. This report reviews current knowledge on the anticancer effects of combinations of polyphenols or polyphenols and anticancer drugs, with a focus on their ability to modulate multiple signaling transduction pathways involved in cancer.

  19. Review of therapeutic drug monitoring of anticancer drugs part two--targeted therapies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Widmer, Nicolas; Bardin, Christophe; Chatelut, Etienne; Paci, Angelo; Beijnen, Jos; Levêque, Dominique; Veal, Gareth; Astier, Alain

    2014-08-01

    Most of oral targeted therapies are tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKIs). Oral administration generates a complex step in the pharmacokinetics (PK) of these drugs. Inter-individual PK variability is often large and variability observed in response is influenced not only by the genetic heterogeneity of drug targets, but also by the pharmacogenetic background of the patient (e.g. cytochome P450 and ABC transporter polymorphisms), patient characteristics such as adherence to treatment and environmental factors (drug-drug interactions). Retrospective studies have shown that targeted drug exposure, reflected in the area under the plasma concentration-time curve (AUC) correlates with treatment response (efficacy/toxicity) in various cancers. Nevertheless levels of evidence for therapeutic drug monitoring (TDM) are however heterogeneous among these agents and TDM is still uncommon for the majority of them. Evidence for imatinib currently exists, others are emerging for compounds including nilotinib, dasatinib, erlotinib, sunitinib, sorafenib and mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) inhibitors. Applications for TDM during oral targeted therapies may best be reserved for particular situations including lack of therapeutic response, severe or unexpected toxicities, anticipated drug-drug interactions and/or concerns over adherence treatment. Interpatient PK variability observed with monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) is comparable or slightly lower to that observed with TKIs. There are still few data with these agents in favour of TDM approaches, even if data showed encouraging results with rituximab, cetuximab and bevacizumab. At this time, TDM of mAbs is not yet supported by scientific evidence. Considerable effort should be made for targeted therapies to better define concentration-effect relationships and to perform comparative randomised trials of classic dosing versus pharmacokinetically-guided adaptive dosing. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. A Comprehensive Review on Cyclodextrin-Based Carriers for Delivery of Chemotherapeutic Cytotoxic Anticancer Drugs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vyas, Amber

    2015-01-01

    Most of the cytotoxic chemotherapeutic agents have poor aqueous solubility. These molecules are associated with poor physicochemical and biopharmaceutical properties, which makes the formulation difficult. An important approach in this regard is the use of combination of cyclodextrin and nanotechnology in delivery system. This paper provides an overview of limitations associated with anticancer drugs, their complexation with cyclodextrins, loading/encapsulating the complexed drugs into carriers, and various approaches used for the delivery. The present review article aims to assess the utility of cyclodextrin-based carriers like liposomes, niosomes, nanoparticles, micelles, millirods, and siRNA for delivery of antineoplastic agents. These systems based on cyclodextrin complexation and nanotechnology will camouflage the undesirable properties of drug and lead to synergistic or additive effect. Cyclodextrin-based nanotechnology seems to provide better therapeutic effect and sustain long life of healthy and recovered cells. Still, considerable study on delivery system and administration routes of cyclodextrin-based carriers is necessary with respect to their pharmacokinetics and toxicology to substantiate their safety and efficiency. In future, it would be possible to resolve the conventional and current issues associated with the development and commercialization of antineoplastic agents. PMID:26582104

  1. Bio-modified carbon nanoparticles loaded with methotrexate Possible carrier for anticancer drug delivery

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Muthukumar, Thangavelu [Bio-Products Laboratory, Central Leather Research Institute, Adyar, Chennai 600 020, Tamil Nadu (India); Prabhavathi, Sundaram [Department of Biotechnology, SRM University, Kattankulathur, Chennai 603 203 (India); Chamundeeswari, Munusamy [St. Joseph' s College of Engineering, Sholinganallur, Chennai 600119 (India); Sastry, Thotapalli Parvathaleswara, E-mail: sastrytp@hotmail.com [Bio-Products Laboratory, Central Leather Research Institute, Adyar, Chennai 600 020, Tamil Nadu (India)

    2014-03-01

    The modification of carbon nanoparticles (CNPs) using biological molecules is important in the field of chemical biology, as the CNPs have the potential to deliver the drugs directly to the targeted cells and tissues. We have modified the CNPs by coating bovine serum albumin (BSA) on their surfaces and loaded with methotrexate (Mtx). Infrared spectra have revealed the coating of BSA and Mtx on CNP (CBM). Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and atomic force microscope (AFM) pictures have exhibited the spherical nature of the composite and coating of the proteins on CNPs. The prepared CBM biocomposite has exhibited a sustained release of drug. MTT assay using A549 lung cancer cell lines has revealed 83% cell death at 150 μg/ml concentration of CBM. These results indicate that CNPs based biocomposites may be tried as therapeutic agents in treatment of cancer like diseases. - Highlights: • It's a cost effective method with maximum anticancer activity. • Maximum drug loading (methotrexate) and release have been achieved. • The prepared CBM was found to be biocompatible and hemocompatible. • About 83% of A549 lung cancer cell line apoptosis was observed with CBM.

  2. Mechanical downsizing of a gadolinium(III)-based metal-organic framework for anticancer drug delivery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kundu, Tanay; Mitra, Shouvik; Patra, Prasun; Goswami, Arunava; Díaz Díaz, David; Banerjee, Rahul

    2014-08-11

    A Gd(III) -based porous metal-organic framework (MOF), Gd-pDBI, has been synthesized using fluorescent linker pDBI (pDBI=(1,4-bis(5-carboxy-1H-benzimidazole-2-yl)benzene)), resulting in a three-dimensional interpenetrated structure with a one-dimensional open channel (1.9×1.2 nm) filled with hydrogen-bonded water assemblies. Gd-pDBI exhibits high thermal stability, porosity, excellent water stability, along with organic-solvent and mild acid and base stability with retention of crystallinity. Gd-pDBI was transformed to the nanoscale regime (ca. 140 nm) by mechanical grinding to yield MG-Gd-pDBI with excellent water dispersibility (>90 min), maintaining its porosity and crystallinity. In vitro and in vivo studies on MG-Gd-pDBI revealed its low blood toxicity and highest drug loading (12 wt %) of anticancer drug doxorubicin in MOFs reported to date with pH-responsive cancer-cell-specific drug release.

  3. The anti-cancer drug, doxorubicin, causes oxidant stress-induced endothelial dysfunction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolf, Matthew B; Baynes, John W

    2006-02-01

    The anticancer drug doxorubicin (DOX) is toxic to target cells, but also causes endothelial dysfunction and edema, secondary to oxidative stress in the vascular wall. Thus, the mechanism of action of this drug may involve chemotoxicity to both cancer cells and to the endothelium. Indeed, we found that the permeability of monolayers of bovine pulmonary artery endothelial cells (BPAEC) to albumin was increased by approximately 10-fold above control, following 24-h exposure to clinically relevant concentrations of DOX (up to 1 microM). DOX also caused >4-fold increases in lactate dehydrogenase leakage and large decreases in ATP and reduced glutathione (GSH) in BPAECs, which paralleled the increases in endothelial permeability. A large part of the ATP loss could be attributed to DOX-induced hydrogen peroxide production which inhibited key thiol-enzymes, glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase (GAPDH) and glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PDH). Depletion of reduced nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate (NADPH) appeared to be a major factor leading to DOX-induced GSH depletion. At low concentrations, the sulfhydryl reagent, iodoacetate (IA), inhibited GAPDH, caused a decrease in ATP and increased permeability, without inhibiting G6PDH or decreasing GSH. These results, coupled with those of previous work on a related quinone, menadione, suggest that depletion of either GSH or ATP may lead independently to endothelial dysfunction during chemotherapy, contributing to the cardiotoxicity and other systemic side-effects of the drug.

  4. Enhanced cytotoxicity of anticancer drug delivered by novel nanoscale polymeric carrier

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stoika, R.; Boiko, N.; Senkiv, Y.; Shlyakhtina, Y.; Panchuk, R.; Finiuk, N.; Filyak, Y.; Bilyy, R.; Kit, Y.; Skorohyd, N.; Klyuchivska, O.; Zaichenko, A.; Mitina, N.; Ryabceva, A.

    2013-04-01

    We compared in vitro action of highly toxic anticancer drug doxorubicin under its delivery to the mammalian tumor cells in free form and after encapsulation in novel bio-functionalized nanoscale polymeric carrier. Such encapsulation was found to enhance significantly drug uptake by the targeted cells, as well as its cytotoxic action. 10 times higher cytotoxicity of the carrier-immobilized doxorubicin comparing to its free form was demonstrated by direct cell counting, and 5 times higher cytotoxicity of encapsulated doxorubicin was shown by FACS analysis. The polymeric carrier itself did not possess significant toxicity in vitro or in vivo (laboratory mice). The carrier protected against negative side effects of doxorubicin in mice with experimental NK/Ly lymphoma. The life duration of tumor-bearing animals treated with doxorubicin-carrier complex was significantly longer than life duration in animals treated with free doxorubicin. Besides, the effective treatment dose of the carrier-delivered doxorubicin in tumor-bearing mice was 10 times lower than such dose of free doxorubicin. Thus, novel nanoscale polymers possess high potential as drug carrier.

  5. Nanoparticles Containing High Loads of Paclitaxel-Silicate Prodrugs: Formulation, Drug Release, and Anticancer Efficacy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Jing; Michel, Andrew R; Lee, Han Seung; Kalscheuer, Stephen; Wohl, Adam; Hoye, Thomas R; McCormick, Alon V; Panyam, Jayanth; Macosko, Christopher W

    2015-12-07

    We have investigated particle size, interior structure, drug release kinetics, and anticancer efficacy of PEG-b-PLGA-based nanoparticles loaded with a series of paclitaxel (PTX)-silicate prodrugs [PTX-Si(OR)3]. Silicate derivatization enabled us to adjust the hydrophobicity and hydrolytic lability of the prodrugs by the choice of the alkyl group (R) in the silicate derivatives. The greater hydrophobicity of these prodrugs allows for the preparation of nanoparticles that are stable in aqueous dispersion even when loaded with up to ca. 75 wt % of the prodrug. The hydrolytic lability of silicates allows for facile conversion of prodrugs back to the parent drug, PTX. A suite of eight PTX-silicate prodrugs was investigated; nanoparticles were made by flash nanoprecipitation (FNP) using a confined impingement jet mixer with a dilution step (CIJ-D). The resulting nanoparticles were 80-150 nm in size with a loading level of 47-74 wt % (wt %) of a PTX-silicate, which corresponds to 36-59 effective wt % of free PTX. Cryogenic transmission electron microscopy images show that particles are typically spherical with a core-shell structure. Prodrug/drug release profiles were measured. Release tended to be slower for prodrugs having greater hydrophobicity and slower hydrolysis rate. Nanoparticles loaded with PTX-silicate prodrugs that hydrolyze most rapidly showed in vitro cytotoxicity similar to that of the parent PTX. Nanoparticles loaded with more labile silicates also tended to show greater in vivo efficacy.

  6. Impedimetric toxicity assay in microfluidics using free and liposome-encapsulated anticancer drugs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caviglia, Claudia; Zór, Kinga; Montini, Lucia; Tilli, Valeria; Canepa, Silvia; Melander, Fredrik; Muhammad, Haseena B; Carminati, Marco; Ferrari, Giorgio; Raiteri, Roberto; Heiskanen, Arto; Andresen, Thomas L; Emnéus, Jenny

    2015-02-17

    In this work, we have developed a microfluidic cytotoxicity assay for a cell culture and detection platform, which enables both fluid handling and electrochemical/optical detection. The cytotoxic effect of anticancer drugs doxorubicin (DOX), oxaliplatin (OX) as well as OX-loaded liposomes, developed for targeted drug delivery, was evaluated using real-time impedance monitoring. The time-dependent effect of DOX on HeLa cells was monitored and found to have a delayed onset of cytotoxicity in microfluidics compared with static culture conditions based on data obtained in our previous study. The result of a fluorescent microscopic annexin V/propidium iodide assay, performed in microfluidics, confirmed the outcome of the real-time impedance assay. In addition, the response of HeLa cells to OX-induced cytotoxicity proved to be slower than toxicity induced by DOX. A difference in the time-dependent cytotoxic response of fibrosarcoma cells (HT1080) to free OX and OX-loaded liposomes was observed and attributed to incomplete degradation of the liposomes, which results in lower drug availability. The matrix metalloproteinase (MMP)-dependent release of OX from OX-loaded liposomes was also confirmed using laryngopharynx carcinoma cells (FaDu). The comparison and the observed differences between the cytotoxic effects under microfluidic and static conditions highlight the importance of comparative studies as basis for implementation of microfluidic cytotoxic assays.

  7. A smart magnetic nanoplatform for synergistic anticancer therapy: manoeuvring mussel-inspired functional magnetic nanoparticles for pH responsive anticancer drug delivery and hyperthermia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sasikala, Arathyram Ramachandra Kurup; Ghavaminejad, Amin; Unnithan, Afeesh Rajan; Thomas, Reju George; Moon, Myeongju; Jeong, Yong Yeon; Park, Chan Hee; Kim, Cheol Sang

    2015-10-01

    We report the versatile design of a smart nanoplatform for thermo-chemotherapy treatment of cancer. For the first time in the literature, our design takes advantage of the outstanding properties of mussel-inspired multiple catecholic groups - presenting a unique copolymer poly(2-hydroxyethyl methacrylate-co-dopamine methacrylamide) p(HEMA-co-DMA) to surface functionalize the superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles as well as to conjugate borate containing anticancer drug bortezomib (BTZ) in a pH-dependent manner for the synergistic anticancer treatment. The unique multiple anchoring groups can be used to substantially improve the affinity of the ligands to the surfaces of the nanoparticles to form ultrastable iron oxide nanoparticles with control over their hydrodynamic diameter and interfacial chemistry. Thus the BTZ-incorporated-bio-inspired-smart magnetic nanoplatform will act as a hyperthermic agent that delivers heat when an alternating magnetic field is applied while the BTZ-bound catechol moieties act as chemotherapeutic agents in a cancer environment by providing pH-dependent drug release for the synergistic thermo-chemotherapy application. The anticancer efficacy of these bio-inspired multifunctional smart magnetic nanoparticles was tested both in vitro and in vivo and found that these unique magnetic nanoplatforms can be established to endow for the next generation of nanomedicine for efficient and safe cancer therapy.We report the versatile design of a smart nanoplatform for thermo-chemotherapy treatment of cancer. For the first time in the literature, our design takes advantage of the outstanding properties of mussel-inspired multiple catecholic groups - presenting a unique copolymer poly(2-hydroxyethyl methacrylate-co-dopamine methacrylamide) p(HEMA-co-DMA) to surface functionalize the superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles as well as to conjugate borate containing anticancer drug bortezomib (BTZ) in a pH-dependent manner for the synergistic

  8. Novel morphological features in the death of MCF-7 human breast cancer cells after exposure to anticancer drugs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kugawa, F; Dalkhuren, S-O; Ueno, A; Yamashita, K

    2012-10-01

    Cell death of human breast cancer cell line MCF-7/pDsRed2-Mito, caused by independent- or multi-administration of three anticancer drugs, cyclophosphamide [CPA], doxorubicin [DXR], and 5-fluorouracil [5-FU], was studied using fluorescence and electron microscopy. In our previous study using cell viability assays, microscopic inspection of heterochromatin condensation, a DNA fragmentation assay, and flow cytometric analyses, the death of MCF-7 cells was classified into two groups. The cell death induced by CPA or 5-FU was classified as apoptotic, while the cell death induced by DXR treatment or a mixture of all three anticancer drugs was classified as non-apoptotic. Here, we examined the morphology of the whole cell and its organelles, including the mitochondria, using electron microscopy. Mitochondria are of particular interest because they are the key organelle for the molecular apoptotic-death cascade. To monitor mitochondrial morphology, we used our previously constructed MCF-7/pDsRed2-Mito line, generated by introducing the pDsRed2-Mito vector into MCF-7 cells. The mitochondria in these cells emit red fluorescence. We found that the administration of DXR alone or of all three anticancer drugs together resulted in the clumping of the red-fluorescent materials on both sides of the round dying cells, interrupted by the nucleus. Detailed electron microscopic observation revealed that the novel morphology of the dying MCF-7 cells might be owing, not to destruction of the mitochondrial membrane, but to the tight structure of the nuclear membrane. Other anticancer drugs showed different, characteristic features in electron microscopic images, which suggested that death induced by anti-cancer drugs in the human breast cancer cell line, MCF-7, may result from any of a number of diverse processes.

  9. Evaluation of the ASCO Value Framework for Anticancer Drugs at an Academic Medical Center.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, Leslie; Lin, Tracy; Wang, Ling; Patel, Tanuja; Tran, Denise; Kim, Sarah; Dacey, Katie; Yuen, Courtney; Kroon, Lisa; Brodowy, Bret; Rodondi, Kevin

    2017-02-01

    Anticancer drug prices have increased by an average of 12% each year from 1996 to 2014. A major concern is that the increasing cost and responsibility of evaluating treatment options are being shifted to patients. This research compared 2 value-based pricing models that were being considered for use at the University of California, San Francisco (UCSF) Medical Center to address the growing burden of high-cost cancer drugs while improving patient-centered care. The Medication Outcomes Center (MOC) in the Department of Clinical Pharmacy, University of California, San Francisco (UCSF), School of Pharmacy focuses on assessing the value of medication-related health care interventions and disseminating findings to the UCSF Medical Center. The High Cost Oncology Drug Initiative at the MOC aims to assess and adopt tools for the critical assessment and amelioration of high-cost cancer drugs. The American Society of Clinical Oncology (ASCO) Value Framework (2016 update) and a cost-effectiveness analysis (CEA) framework were identified as potential tools for adoption. To assess 1 prominent value framework, the study investigators (a) asked 8 clinicians to complete the ASCO Value Framework for 11 anticancer medications selected by the MOC; (b) reviewed CEAs assessing the drugs; (c) generated descriptive statistics; and (d) analyzed inter-rater reliability, convergence validity, and ranking consistency. On the scale of -20 to 180, the mean ASCO net health benefit (NHB) total score across 11 drugs ranged from 7.6 (SD = 7.8) to 53 (SD = 9.8). The Kappa coefficient (κ) for NHB scores across raters was 0.11, which is categorized as "slightly reliable." The combined κ score was 0.22, which is interpreted as low to fair inter-rater reliability. Convergent validity indicates that the correlation between NHB scores and CEA-based incremental cost-effectiveness ratios (ICERs) was low (-0.215). Ranking of ICERs, ASCO scores, and wholesale acquisition costs indicated different results

  10. Curcumin and its promise as an anticancer drug: An analysis of its anticancer and antifungal effects in cancer and associated complications from invasive fungal infections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Jin; He, Zheng-Min; Wang, Feng-Ling; Zhang, Zheng-Sheng; Liu, Xiu-zhen; Zhai, Dan-Dan; Chen, Wei-Dong

    2016-02-05

    Invasive fungal infections (IFI) are important complications of cancer, and they have become a major cause of morbidity and mortality in cancer patients. Effective anti-infection therapy is necessary to inhibit significant deterioration from these infections. However, they are difficult to treat, and increasing antifungal drug resistance often leads to a relapse. Curcumin, a natural component that is isolated from the rhizome of Curcuma longa plants, has attracted great interest among many scientists studying solid cancers over the last half century. Interestingly, curcumin provides an ideal alternative to current therapies because of its relatively safe profile, even at high doses. To date, curcumin's potent antifungal activity against different strains of Candida, Cryptococcus, Aspergillus, Trichosporon and Paracoccidioides have been reported, indicating that curcumin anticancer drugs may also possess an antifungal role, helping cancer patients to resist IFI complications. The aim of this review is to discuss curcumin's dual pharmacological activities regarding its applications as a natural anticancer and antifungal agent. These dual pharmacological activities are expected to lead to clinical trials and to improve infection survival among cancer patients. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Synergistically enhanced selective intracellular uptake of anticancer drug carrier comprising folic acid-conjugated hydrogels containing magnetite nanoparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Haneul; Jo, Ara; Baek, Seulgi; Lim, Daeun; Park, Soon-Yong; Cho, Soo Kyung; Chung, Jin Woong; Yoon, Jinhwan

    2017-01-01

    Targeted drug delivery has long been extensively researched since drug delivery and release at the diseased site with minimum dosage realizes the effective therapy without adverse side effects. In this work, to achieve enhanced intracellular uptake of anticancer drug carriers for efficient chemo-therapy, we have designed targeted multifunctional anticancer drug carrier hydrogels. Temperature-responsive poly(N-isopropylacrylamide) (PNIPAm) hydrogel core containing superparamagnetic magnetite nanoparticles (MNP) were prepared using precipitation polymerization, and further polymerized with amine-functionalized copolymer shell to facilitate the conjugation of targeting ligand. Then, folic acid, specific targeting ligand for cervical cancer cell line (HeLa), was conjugated on the hydrogel surface, yielding the ligand conjugated hybrid hydrogels. We revealed that enhanced intracellular uptake by HeLa cells in vitro was enabled by both magnetic attraction and receptor-mediated endocytosis, which were contributed by MNP and folic acid, respectively. Furthermore, site-specific uptake of the developed carrier was confirmed by incubating with several other cell lines. Based on synergistically enhanced intracellular uptake, efficient cytotoxicity and apoptotic activity of HeLa cells incubated with anticancer drug loaded hybrid hydrogels were successfully achieved. The developed dual-targeted hybrid hydrogels are expected to provide a platform for the next generation intelligent drug delivery systems.

  12. Application of concave microwells to pancreatic tumor spheroids enabling anticancer drug evaluation in a clinically relevant drug resistance model.

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    Sang-Eun Yeon

    Full Text Available Intrinsic drug resistance of pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC warrants studies using models that are more clinically relevant for identifying novel resistance mechanisms as well as for drug development. Tumor spheroids (TS mimic in vivo tumor conditions associated with multicellular resistance and represent a promising model for efficient drug screening, however, pancreatic cancer cells often fail to form spheroids using conventional methods such as liquid overlay. This study describes the induction of TS of human pancreatic cancer cells (Panc-1, Aspc-1, Capan-2 in concave polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS microwell plates and evaluation of their usefulness as an anticancer efficacy test model. All three cell lines showed TS formation with varying degree of necrosis inside TS. Among these, Panc-1 spheroid with spherical morphology, a rather rough surface, and unique adhesion structures were successfully produced with no notable necrosis in concave microwell plates. Panc-1 TS contained growth factors or enzymes such as TGF-β1, CTGF, and MT1-MMP, and extracellular matrix proteins such as collagen type I, fibronectin, and laminin. Panc-1 cells grown as TS showed changes in stem cell populations and in expression levels of miRNAs that may play roles in chemoresistance. Visualization of drug penetration and detection of viability indicators, such as Ki-67 and MitoSOX, were optimized for TS for quantitative analysis. Water-soluble tetrazolium (MTS and acid phosphatase (APH assays were also successfully optimized. Overall, we demonstrated that concave PDMS microwell plates are a novel platform for preparation of TS of weakly aggregating cells and that Panc-1 spheroids may represent a novel three-dimensional model for anti-pancreatic cancer drug screening.

  13. Application of concave microwells to pancreatic tumor spheroids enabling anticancer drug evaluation in a clinically relevant drug resistance model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yeon, Sang-Eun; No, Da Yoon; Lee, Sang-Hoon; Nam, Suk Woo; Oh, Il-Hoan; Lee, Jaehwi; Kuh, Hyo-Jeong

    2013-01-01

    Intrinsic drug resistance of pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC) warrants studies using models that are more clinically relevant for identifying novel resistance mechanisms as well as for drug development. Tumor spheroids (TS) mimic in vivo tumor conditions associated with multicellular resistance and represent a promising model for efficient drug screening, however, pancreatic cancer cells often fail to form spheroids using conventional methods such as liquid overlay. This study describes the induction of TS of human pancreatic cancer cells (Panc-1, Aspc-1, Capan-2) in concave polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) microwell plates and evaluation of their usefulness as an anticancer efficacy test model. All three cell lines showed TS formation with varying degree of necrosis inside TS. Among these, Panc-1 spheroid with spherical morphology, a rather rough surface, and unique adhesion structures were successfully produced with no notable necrosis in concave microwell plates. Panc-1 TS contained growth factors or enzymes such as TGF-β1, CTGF, and MT1-MMP, and extracellular matrix proteins such as collagen type I, fibronectin, and laminin. Panc-1 cells grown as TS showed changes in stem cell populations and in expression levels of miRNAs that may play roles in chemoresistance. Visualization of drug penetration and detection of viability indicators, such as Ki-67 and MitoSOX, were optimized for TS for quantitative analysis. Water-soluble tetrazolium (MTS) and acid phosphatase (APH) assays were also successfully optimized. Overall, we demonstrated that concave PDMS microwell plates are a novel platform for preparation of TS of weakly aggregating cells and that Panc-1 spheroids may represent a novel three-dimensional model for anti-pancreatic cancer drug screening.

  14. Considerations in Platinum and Gold Drug Design and the Synthesis of Chloro(2,3-Diphenyl-1,3,4-Thiadiazolium-5-Thiolato-Sexo)Gold(I): The First Gold Meso-Ionic Complex of Its Kind

    Science.gov (United States)

    Howe, B. P.

    1997-01-01

    It is evident that the chemistry of platinum is in a more advanced state than that of gold, mainly due to the success of the former in several anti-cancer drugs. With a view to finding possible, new candidates with chemotherapeutic potential, the use of sulphur-donor ligands bonded to platinum and gold is discussed herein in an attempt to promote the need to investigate similar ligands. Chloro(2,3-diphenyl-1,3,4-thiadiazolium-5-thiolato-Sexo)gold(I) has been synthesised using a standard reaction, whereby Au(III) is initially reduced to Au(I) then reacted with the ligand, 2,3-diphenyl-1,3,4-thiadiazolium-5-thiolate.hydrochloride, isolated and finally characterised by elemental analyses and infrared spectroscopy. The compound is the first example of gold attached to a meso-ionic compound. It has also been tested for anti-bacterial and anti-fungal activity and shown to possess moderate activity against Gram-positive bacteria, although is inactive against, Gram-negative bacteria and fungi. PMID:18475799

  15. Biomaterial-based regional chemotherapy: Local anticancer drug delivery to enhance chemotherapy and minimize its side-effects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krukiewicz, Katarzyna; Zak, Jerzy K

    2016-05-01

    Since the majority of anticancer pharmacological agents affect not only cancer tissue but also normal cells, chemotherapy is usually accompanied with severe side effects. Regional chemotherapy, as the alternative version of conventional treatment, leads to the enhancement of the therapeutic efficiency of anticancer drugs and, simultaneously, reduction of toxic effects to healthy tissues. This paper provides an insight into different approaches of local delivery of chemotherapeutics, such as the injection of anticancer agents directly into tumor tissue, the use of injectable in situ forming drug carriers or injectable platforms in a form of implants. The wide range of biomaterials used as reservoirs of anticancer drugs is described, i.e. poly(ethylene glycol) and its copolymers, polyurethanes, poly(lactic acid) and its copolymers, poly(ɛ-caprolactone), polyanhydrides, chitosan, cellulose, cyclodextrins, silk, conducting polymers, modified titanium surfaces, calcium phosphate based biomaterials, silicone and silica implants, as well as carbon nanotubes and graphene. To emphasize the applicability of regional chemotherapy in cancer treatment, the commercially available products approved by the relevant health agencies are presented. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Anticancer medicines (Doxorubicin and methotrexate) conjugated with magnetic nanoparticles for targeting drug delivery through iron.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samra, Zahoor Qadir; Ahmad, Snober; Javeid, Mehwish; Dar, Nadia; Aslam, Muhammad Shahbaz; Gull, Iram; Ahmad, Mubashar Mustaneer

    2013-01-01

    The uptake of iron is increased by cancer cells. Iron magnetic nanoparticles (MNP) can be used as a nanovehicle for immobilization of anticancer medicines and to integrate them at a target site. The anticancer medicines doxorubicin (DOX) and methotrexate (MTX) were immobilized separately and in combination onto MNP by a glutaraldehyde activation method and confirmed by magnetic nanoparticles linked immunosorbent assay (MagLISA) and Fourier-transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy. The phenol peaks of DOX and MTX at 2896.6 cm⁻¹ to 2912.5 cm⁻¹ in FTIR spectra of immobilized medicines indicated the conjugation. Affinity-purified anti-DOX and anti-MTX antibodies were used to evaluate the coupling of DOX and MTX onto MNP, and the binding was found 34.6% to 37.2% and 51.8% to 54.3% separately, respectively. The immobilization of DOX and MTX in combination onto MNP was 18% and 27%, respectively. HeLa and B cells were cultured with DOX-MNP, MTX-MNP, and DOX-MNP-MTX separately, and MagLISA indicated that the binding of DOX-MNP/MTX-MNP was 41.5% to 45% with HeLa cells and 20% to 26% with B cells. No significant difference was observed in binding of DOX-MNP-MTX with HeLa and B cells. Results also indicated that the release of medicines at pH 5.0 is more (39% to 44%) than at pH 7.4 (3.7% to 10.2%). Sixteen to 22% more killing effect was observed on HeLa cells than on B cells. In immunohistochemical staining, more deposition of brown color on HeLa cells than on B cells may be due to more expression of iron-binding sites on cancer cells. The dual property of MNP can be used for binding of medicines and for targeting drug delivery.

  17. Enzyme-responsive doxorubicin release from dendrimer nanoparticles for anticancer drug delivery

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    Lee SJ

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Sang Joon Lee,1,* Young-Il Jeong,2,* Hyung-Kyu Park,3 Dae Hwan Kang,2,4 Jong-Suk Oh,3 Sam-Gyu Lee,5 Hyun Chul Lee31Department of Biomedical Sciences, Chonnam National University Medical School, Gwangju, 2Biomedical Research Institute, Pusan National University Hospital, Busan, 3Department of Microbiology, Chonnam National University Medical School, Gwangju, 4Research Institute for Convergence of Biomedical Science and Technology, Pusan National University Yangsan Hospital, Gyeongnam, 5Department of Physical and Rehabilitation Medicine, Chonnam National University Medical School, Gwangju, Republic of Korea*These authors contributed equally to this workBackground: Since cancer cells are normally over-expressed cathepsin B, we synthesized dendrimer-methoxy poly(ethylene glycol (MPEG-doxorubicin (DOX conjugates using a cathepsin B-cleavable peptide for anticancer drug targeting.Methods: Gly-Phe-Leu-Gly peptide was conjugated with the carboxylic acid end groups of a dendrimer, which was then conjugated with MPEG amine and doxorubicin by aid of carbodiimide chemistry (abbreviated as DendGDP. Dendrimer-MPEG-DOX conjugates without Gly-Phe-Leu-Gly peptide linkage was also synthesized for comparison (DendDP. Nanoparticles were then prepared using a dialysis procedure.Results: The synthesized DendGDP was confirmed with 1H nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy. The DendDP and DendGDP nanoparticles had a small particle size of less than 200 nm and had a spherical morphology. DendGDP had cathepsin B-sensitive drug release properties while DendDP did not show cathepsin B sensitivity. Further, DendGDP had improved anticancer activity when compared with doxorubicin or DendDP in an in vivo CT26 tumor xenograft model, ie, the volume of the CT26 tumor xenograft was significantly inhibited when compared with xenografts treated with doxorubicin or DendDP nanoparticles. The DendGDP nanoparticles were found to be relatively concentrated in the tumor tissue and

  18. Pharmacological profile and Pharmacogenomics of anti-cancer drugs used for targeted therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Di Francia, Raffaele; De Monaco, Angela; Saggese, Mariangela; Iaccarino, Giancarla; Crisci, Stefania; Frigeri, Ferdinando; De Filippi, Rosaria; Berretta, Massimiliano; Pinto, Antonio

    2017-02-08

    Drugs for targeted therapies are primarily Small Molecules Inhibitors (SMIs), monoclonal antibodies (mAbs), interfering RNA molecules and microRNA. The use of these new agents generates a multifaceted step in the pharmacokinetics (PK) of these drugs. Individual PK variability is often large, and unpredictability observed in the response to the pharmacogenetic profile of the patient (e.g. cytochome P450 enzyme), patient characteristics such as adherence to treatment and environmental factors. Objective This review aims to overview the latest anticancer drugs eligible for targeted therapies and the most recent finding in pharmacogenomics related to toxicity/resistance because either individual gene polymorphisms or acquired mutation in a cancer cell. In addition, an early outline evaluation of the genotyping costs and methods have been taken into consideration. Future outlook To date, therapeutic drug monitoring (TDM) of mAbs and SMIs is not yet supported by heavy scientific evidence. Extensive effort should be made for targeted therapies to better define concentration-effect relationships and to perform comparative randomized trials of classic dosing versus PK-guided adaptive dosing. The detection of individual pharmacogenomics profile could be the key for the oncologists that will have new resources to make treatment decisions for their patients in order to maximize the benefit and minimize the toxicity. Based on this purpose, the clinician should evaluate advantages and limitations, in terms of costs and applicability, of the most appropriate pharmacological approach to performing a tailored therapy. Copyright© Bentham Science Publishers; For any queries, please email at epub@benthamscience.org.

  19. Role of pharmacists in optimizing the use of anticancer drugs in the clinical setting

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    Ma CSJ

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Carolyn SJ Ma Department of Pharmacy Practice, Daniel K. Inouye College of Pharmacy, University of Hawaii at Hilo, Honolulu, HI, USA Abstract: Oncology pharmacists, also known as oncology pharmacy specialists (OPSs have specialized knowledge of anticancer medications and their role in cancer. As essential member of the interdisciplinary team, OPSs optimize the benefits of drug therapy, help to minimize toxicities and work with patients on supportive care issues. The OPSs expanded role as experts in drug therapy extends to seven major key elements of medication management that include: selection, procurement, storage, preparation/dispensing, prescribing/dosing/transcribing, administration and monitoring/evaluation/education. As front line caregivers in hospital, ambulatory care, long-term care facilities, and community specialty pharmacies, the OPS also helps patients in areas of supportive care including nausea and vomiting, hematologic support, nutrition and infection control. This role helps the patient in the recovery phase between treatment cycles and adherence to chemotherapy treatment schedules essential for optimal treatment and outcome. Keywords: oncology pharmacist, oncology pharmacy specialist, medication management, chemotherapy

  20. Anticancer drugs aimed at E6 and E7 activity in HPV-positive cervical cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, S; de Vries, E G E; van der Zee, A G J; de Jong, S

    2012-02-01

    Standard treatment of locally advanced cervical cancer currently consists of concurrent chemoradiation, leading to a 5-year disease-free survival of 66-79%, indicating that there is still ample room for improvement. Characteristic of cervical cancer is the presence of high risk (HR) human papillomavirus (HPV) DNA in more than 99% of these tumors. When the HR HPV genome integrates into the host genome, oncogenic E6 and E7 proteins become constitutively expressed. These oncogenes are also active earlier in the infection cycle and hence are available as therapeutic targets at the preneoplastic stages as well. E7 plays an important role in the early stage of carcinogenesis by stimulating proliferation. HR HPV E6-induced proteasomal degradation of p53 hampers p53 functionality in cell cycle arrest and apoptosis. As p53 plays a key role in the intrinsic apoptotic pathway, current chemoradiation cannot optimally activate this pathway. In this review, we focus on targeted anticancer drugs to eliminate the consequences of HR HPV E6 and E7 activity. Strategies for direct and indirect targeting of HR HPV E6 and E7, including RNA interference, small molecules, proteasome inhibitors, and histone deacetylase inhibitors, are described. In addition, the extrinsic apoptotic pathway as possible alternative therapeutic target for apoptosis induction is reviewed. The rational for implementing recombinant human TRAIL and death receptor agonists and the latest developments on combining these drugs with standard treatment in preclinical settings as well as clinical trials are discussed.

  1. Shotgun ecotoxicoproteomics of Daphnia pulex: biochemical effects of the anticancer drug tamoxifen.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borgatta, Myriam; Hernandez, Céline; Decosterd, Laurent Arthur; Chèvre, Nathalie; Waridel, Patrice

    2015-01-02

    Among pollutants released into the environment by human activities, residues of pharmaceuticals are an increasing matter of concern because of their potential impact on ecosystems. The aim of this study was to analyze differences of protein expression resulting from acute (2 days) and middle-term (7 days) exposure of aquatic microcrustacean Daphnia pulex to the anticancer drug tamoxifen. Using a liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry shotgun approach, about 4000 proteins could be identified, providing the largest proteomics data set of D. pulex published up to now. Considering both time points and tested concentrations, 189 proteins showed a significant fold change. The identity of regulated proteins suggested a decrease in translation, an increase in protein degradation and changes in carbohydrate and lipid metabolism as the major effects of the drug. Besides these impacted processes, which reflect a general stress response of the organism, some other regulated proteins play a role in Daphnia reproduction. These latter results are in accordance with our previous observations of the impact of tamoxifen on D. pulex reproduction and illustrate the potential of ecotoxicoproteomics to unravel links between xenobiotic effects at the biochemical and organismal levels. Data are available via ProteomeXchange with identifier PXD001257.

  2. Origanum majorana Attenuates Nephrotoxicity of Cisplatin Anticancer Drug through Ameliorating Oxidative Stress

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    Amel M. Soliman

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Despite the fact that cisplatin is an important anticancer drug, its clinical utilization is limited by nephrotoxicity during long term medication. Combined cisplatin chemotherapy with plant extracts can diminish toxicity and enhance the antitumor efficacy of the drug. This study evaluated the effect of Originum majorana ethanolic extract (OMEE on cisplatin-induced nephrotoxicity. Eighteen male rats were divided into three groups as follows: a control group, a group treated with cisplatin (3 mg/kg body weight, and a group that received both cisplatin and OMEE (500 mg/kg body weight for 14 days. Cisplatin induced a significant increase in creatinine, urea, uric acid, blood urea nitrogen, malondialdehyde, and nitric oxide levels. However, glutathione, superoxide dismutase, and catalase levels were significantly diminished. Conversely, OMEE significantly modulated the renal and oxidative markers negatively impacted by cisplatin. OMEE significantly reduced the effects of cisplatin-induced changes in renal and oxidative markers, possibly through its free radical scavenging activity. Thus, OMEE may be combined with cisplatin to alleviate nephrotoxicity in cancer chemotherapy.

  3. The new generation drug candidate molecules: Spectral, electrochemical, DNA-binding and anticancer activity properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gölcü, Ayşegül; Muslu, Harun; Kılıçaslan, Derya; Çeşme, Mustafa; Eren, Özge; Ataş, Fatma; Demirtaş, İbrahim

    2016-09-01

    The new generation drug candidate molecules [Cu(5-Fu)2Cl2H2O] (NGDCM1) and [Zn(5-Fu)2(CH3COO)2] (NGDCM2) were obtained from the reaction of copper(II) and zinc(II) salts with the anticancer drug 5-fluoracil (5-Fu). These compounds have been characterized by spectroscopic and analytical techniques. Thermal behavior of the compounds were also investigated. The electrochemical properties of the compounds have been investigated by cyclic voltammetry (CV) using glassy carbon electrode. The biological activity of the NGDCM1 and NGDCM2 has been evaluated by examining their ability to bind to fish sperm double strand DNA (FSdsDNA) with UV spectroscopy. UV studies of the interaction of the 5-Fu and metal derivatives with FSdsDNA have shown that these compounds can bind to FSdsDNA. The binding constants of the compounds with FSdsDNA have also been calculated. Thermal decomposition of the compounds lead to the formation of CuO and ZnO as final products. The effect of proliferation 5-Fu, NGDCM1 and NGDCM2 were examined on the HeLa cells using real-time cell analyzer with three different concentrations.

  4. Self-Assembled Polymeric Micellar Nanoparticles as Nanocarriers for Poorly Soluble Anticancer Drug Ethaselen

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    Yang Zhuoli

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract A series of monomethoxy poly(ethylene glycol-poly(lactide (mPEG-PLA diblock copolymers were synthesized, and mPEG-PLA micelle was fabricated and used as a nanocarrier for solubilization and delivery of a promising anticancer drug ethaselen. Ethaselen was efficiently encapsulated into the micelles by the dialysis method, and the solubility of ethaselen in water was remarkably increased up to 82 μg/mL before freeze-drying. The mean diameter of ethaselen-loaded micelles ranged from 51 to 98 nm with a narrow size distribution and depended on the length of PLA block. In vitro hemolysis study indicated that mPEG-PLA copolymers and ethaselen-loaded polymeric micelles had no hemolytic effect on the erythrocyte. The enhanced antitumor efficacy and reduced toxic effect of ethaselen-loaded polymeric micelle when compared with ethaselen-HP-β-CD inclusion were observed at the same dose in H22human liver cancer cell bearing mouse models. These suggested that mPEG-PLA polymeric micelle nanoparticles had great potential as nanocarriers for effective solubilization of poorly soluble ethaselen and further reducing side effects and toxicities of the drug.

  5. Polylactide-based Magnetic Spheres as Efficient Carriers for Anticancer Drug Delivery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mhlanga, Nikiwe; Sinha Ray, Suprakas; Lemmer, Yolandy; Wesley-Smith, James

    2015-10-14

    To improve traditional cancer therapies, we synthesized polylactide (PLA) spheres coencapsulating magnetic nanoparticles (MNPs, Fe3O4) and an anticancer drug (doxorubicin, DOX). The synthesis process involves the preparation of Fe3O4 NPs by a coprecipitation method and then PLA/DOX/Fe3O4 spheres using the solvent evaporation (oil-in-water) technique. The Fe3O4 NPs were coated with oleic acid to improve their hydrophobicity and biocompatibility for medical applications. The structure, morphology and properties of the MNPs and PLA/DOX/Fe3O4 spheres were studied using various techniques, such as FTIR, SEM, TEM, TGA, VSM, UV-vis spectroscopy, and zeta potential measurements. The in vitro DOX release from the spheres was prolonged, sustained, and pH-dependent and fit a zero-order kinetics model and an anomalous mechanism. Interestingly, the spheres did not show a DOX burst effect, ensuring the minimal exposure of the healthy cells and an increased drug payload at the tumor site. The pronounced biocompatibility of the PLA/DOX/Fe3O4 spheres with HeLa cells was proven by a WST assay. In summary, the synthesized PLA/DOX/Fe3O4 spheres have the potential for magnetic targeting of tumor cells to transform conventional methods.

  6. Possibility as an anti-cancer drug of astemizole: Evaluation of arrhythmogenicity by the chronic atrioventricular block canine model

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    Hiroko Izumi-Nakaseko

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Since astemizole in an oral dose of 50 mg/kg/day was recently reported to exert anti-cancer effect in mice, we evaluated its proarrhythmic potential using the atrioventricular block dogs in order to clarify its cardiac safety profile. An oral dose of 3 mg/kg prolonged the QT interval without affecting the QTc (n = 4, whereas that of 30 mg/kg increased the short-term variability of repolarization and induced premature ventricular contractions in each animal, resulting in the onset of torsade de pointes in 1 animal (n = 4. Thus, proarrhythmic dose of astemizole would be lower than anti-cancer one, limiting its re-profiling as an anti-cancer drug.

  7. Combining anti-cancer drugs with artificial sweeteners: synthesis and anti-cancer activity of saccharinate (sac) and thiosaccharinate (tsac) complexes cis-[Pt(sac)2(NH3)2] and cis-[Pt(tsac)2(NH3)2].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Jibori, Subhi A; Al-Jibori, Ghassan H; Al-Hayaly, Lamaan J; Wagner, Christoph; Schmidt, Harry; Timur, Suna; Baris Barlas, F; Subasi, Elif; Ghosh, Shishir; Hogarth, Graeme

    2014-12-01

    The new platinum(II) complexes cis-[Pt(sac)2(NH3)2] (sac=saccharinate) and cis-[Pt(tsac)2(NH3)2] (tsac=thiosaccharinate) have been prepared, the X-ray crystal structure of cis-[Pt(sac)2(NH3)2] x H2O reveals that both saccharinate anions are N-bound in a cis-arrangement being inequivalent in both the solid-state and in solution at room temperature. Preliminary anti-cancer activity has been assessed against A549 human alveolar type-II like cell lines with the thiosaccharinate complex showing good activity.

  8. ABC transporters in anticancer drug transport – Less ons for Therapy, Drug Development and Delivery Systems

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    Suresh P.K

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available The structural aspects as well as the classification of the ABC superfamily (the largest group of transmembrane proteins has been highlighted. Over-expression of one or more of these transporters, barring exceptions, can correlate with an increased drug resistance (the multidrug resistance phenotype. Hence, studying these proteins, using experimental and in silico approaches, has tremendous benefit for patient selection as well as stratification into “good” and “poor” drug responders. Further, the need to obtain a better insight into “intrinsic” and “extrinsic” mechanisms of resistance were reiterated upon, based on the relative recruitment of the different signal transduction molecules. The concept of the reversal of the MDR phenotype, has been discussed and extended in the context of combination therapy. This form of therapy involves the use of a cocktail of synthetic and biopharmaceutical drugs as well as nanotechnology-based approaches, for improvements in their pharmacokinetic (PK and pharmacodynamic (PD profile. Such strategies have targeted the heterogeneous cancer and cancer stem cells, signaling molecules, marker enzymes as well as the microenvironment for improved efficacy and safety as well as to minimize the chance of relapse

  9. Convection-enhancement delivery of platinum-based drugs and Lipoplatin™ to optimize the concomitant effect with radiotherapy in F98 glioma rat model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Minghan; Fortin, David; Sanche, Léon; Paquette, Benoit

    2015-01-01

    The prognosis for patients with glioblastoma remains poor with current treatments. Although platinum based drugs are sometimes offered at relapse, their efficacy in this setting is still disputed. In this study, we use convection-enhanced delivery (CED) to deliver the platinum-based drugs (cisplatin, carboplatin, and Lipoplatin™-liposomal formulation of cisplatin) directly into the tumor of F98 glioma-bearing rats that were subsequently treated with γ radiation (15 Gy). CED increased by factors varying between 17 and 111, the concentration of these platinum-based drugs in the brain tumor compared to intra-venous (i.v.) administration, and by 9- to 34-fold, when compared to intra-arterial (i.a.) administration. Furthermore, CED resulted in a better systemic tolerance to platinum drugs compared to their i.a. injection. Among the drugs tested, carboplatin showed the highest maximum tolerated dose (MTD). Treatment with carboplatin resulted in the best median survival time (MeST) (38.5 days), which was further increased by the addition of radiotherapy (54.0 days). Although the DNA-bound platinum adduct were higher at 4 h after CED than 24 h for carboplatin group, combination with radiotherapy led to similar improvement of median survival time. However, less toxicity was observed in animals irradiated 24 h after CED-based chemotherapy. In conclusion, CED increased the accumulation of platinum drugs in tumor, reduced the toxicity, and resulted in a higher median survival time. The best treatment was obtained in animals treated with carboplatin and irradiated 24 h later. PMID:25784204

  10. Convection-enhancement delivery of platinum-based drugs and Lipoplatin(TM) to optimize the concomitant effect with radiotherapy in F98 glioma rat model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Minghan; Fortin, David; Sanche, Léon; Paquette, Benoit

    2015-06-01

    The prognosis for patients with glioblastoma remains poor with current treatments. Although platinum-based drugs are sometimes offered at relapse, their efficacy in this setting is still disputed. In this study, we use convection-enhanced delivery (CED) to deliver the platinum-based drugs (cisplatin, carboplatin, and Lipoplatin(TM) - liposomal formulation of cisplatin) directly into the tumor of F98 glioma-bearing rats that were subsequently treated with γ radiation (15 Gy). CED increased by factors varying between 17 and 111, the concentration of these platinum-based drugs in the brain tumor compared to intra-venous (i.v.) administration, and by 9- to 34-fold, when compared to intra-arterial (i.a.) administration. Furthermore, CED resulted in a better systemic tolerance to platinum drugs compared to their i.a. injection. Among the drugs tested, carboplatin showed the highest maximum tolerated dose (MTD). Treatment with carboplatin resulted in the best median survival time (MeST) (38.5 days), which was further increased by the addition of radiotherapy (54.0 days). Although the DNA-bound platinum adduct were higher at 4 h after CED than 24 h for carboplatin group, combination with radiotherapy led to similar improvement of median survival time. However, less toxicity was observed in animals irradiated 24 h after CED-based chemotherapy. In conclusion, CED increased the accumulation of platinum drugs in tumor, reduced the toxicity, and resulted in a higher median survival time. The best treatment was obtained in animals treated with carboplatin and irradiated 24 h later.

  11. Synergistic Cytotoxicity of Melatonin and New-generation Anticancer Drugs Against Leukemia Lymphocytes But Not Normal Lymphocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhelev, Zhivko; Ivanova, Donika; Bakalova, Rumiana; Aoki, Ichio; Higashi, Tatsuya

    2017-01-01

    The present study demonstrates specific sensitization of leukemia lymphocytes towards anticancer drugs using melatonin and clarifies the role of reactive oxygen species (ROS) for induction of apoptosis. The study covers four conventional and 11 new-generation anticancer drugs. Four parameters were analyzed simultaneously in leukemia and normal lymphocytes treated with drug, melatonin, or their combination: cell viability, induction of apoptosis, level of reactive oxygen species (ROS), and level of protein-carbonyl products. Almost all investigated combinations of melatonin with new-generation anticancer drugs were characterized by synergistic cytotoxicity towards leukemia lymphocytes, while the combinations with conventional drugs exhibited additive or antagonistic effects on cell viability. In leukemia lymphocytes, the additive cytotoxicity of doxorubicin plus melatonin was accompanied by low levels of ROS and protein-carbonyl products, as well as by suppression of apoptosis. In normal lymphocytes, none of the studied parameters changed significantly compared to cells treated with doxorubicin only. The combinations of everolimus plus melatonin and barasertib plus melatonin exhibited impressive synergistic cytotoxic effects on leukemia lymphocytes but did not affect the viability of normal lymphocytes. In leukemia cells, the synergistic cytotoxicity was accompanied by strong induction of apoptosis but a decrease of ROS to a level below that of the control. In normal lymphocytes, these combinations did not affect the level of ROS nor of protein-carbonyl products, and did not induce apoptosis. The data suggest that melatonin is a promising supplementary component in chemotherapy which allows the therapeutic doses of anticancer drugs to be reduced, minimizing their side-effects.

  12. Prospective observational study to evaluate the pattern of adverse drug events in cancer patients receiving anti-cancer agents in a tertiary care hospital

    OpenAIRE

    Pooja B. Joshi; Neha G. Kadhe

    2016-01-01

    Background: Adverse drug reactions (ADRs) associated with the use of anticancer drugs are a worldwide problem and cannot be overlooked. They range from nausea, vomiting or any other mild reaction to severe myelosuppression. The study was planned to evaluate the pattern of adverse drug events to anti-cancer agents in a tertiary care hospital. Methods: This observational prospective study was carried out in a tertiary care hospital from 1st January 2011 to 31st December 2011. A total of 213 ...

  13. Overview on the current status of virtual high-throughput screening and combinatorial chemistry approaches in multi-target anticancer drug discovery; Part I.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geromichalos, George D; Alifieris, Constantinos E; Geromichalou, Elena G; Trafalis, Dimitrios T

    2016-01-01

    Conventional drug design embraces the "one gene, one drug, one disease" philosophy. Nowadays, new generation of anti- cancer drugs, able to inhibit more than one pathway, is believed to play a major role in contemporary anticancer drug research. In this way, polypharmacology, focusing on multi-target drugs, has emerged as a new paradigm in drug discovery. A number of recent successful drugs have in part or in whole emerged from a structure-based research approach. Many advances including crystallography and informatics are behind these successes. Increasing insight into the genetics and molecular biology of cancer has resulted in the identification of an increasing number of potential molecular targets, for anticancer drug discovery and development. These targets can be approached through exploitation of emerging structural biology, "rational" drug design, screening of chemical libraries, or a combination of these methods. The result is the rapid discovery of new anticancer drugs. In this article we discuss the application of molecular modeling, molecular docking and virtual high-throughput screening to multi-targeted anticancer drug discovery. Efforts have been made to employ in silico methods for facilitating the search and design of selective multi-target agents. These computer aided molecular design methods have shown promising potential in facilitating drug discovery directed at selective multiple targets and is expected to contribute to intelligent lead anticancer drugs.

  14. Polymer-Chlorambucil Drug Conjugates: A Dynamic Platform of Anticancer Drug Delivery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saha, Biswajit; Haldar, Ujjal; De, Priyadarsi

    2016-07-01

    Recently, polymer drug conjugates (PDCs) have attracted considerable attention in the treatment of cancer. In this work, a simple strategy has been developed to make PDCs of an antitumor alkylating agent, chlorambucil, using a biocompatible disulphide linker. Chlorambucil-based chain transfer agent was used to prepare various homopolymers and block copolymers in a controlled fashion via reversible addition-fragmentation chain transfer polymerization. Chlorambucil conjugated block copolymer, poly(polyethylene glycol monomethyl ether methacrylate)-b-poly(methyl methacrylate), formed nanoaggregates in aqueous solutions, which are characterized by dynamic light scattering and field emission-scanning electron microscopy. Finally, the simplicity of the design is exemplified by performing a release study of chlorambucil under reducing condition by using D,L-dithiothreitol. © 2016 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  15. Natural product Celastrol destabilizes tubulin heterodimer and facilitates mitotic cell death triggered by microtubule-targeting anti-cancer drugs.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hakryul Jo

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Microtubule drugs are effective anti-cancer agents, primarily due to their ability to induce mitotic arrest and subsequent cell death. However, some cancer cells are intrinsically resistant or acquire a resistance. Lack of apoptosis following mitotic arrest is thought to contribute to drug resistance that limits the efficacy of the microtubule-targeting anti-cancer drugs. Genetic or pharmacological agents that selectively facilitate the apoptosis of mitotic arrested cells present opportunities to strengthen the therapeutic efficacy. METHODOLOGY AND PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We report a natural product Celastrol targets tubulin and facilitates mitotic cell death caused by microtubule drugs. First, in a small molecule screening effort, we identify Celastrol as an inhibitor of neutrophil chemotaxis. Subsequent time-lapse imaging analyses reveal that inhibition of microtubule-mediated cellular processes, including cell migration and mitotic chromosome alignment, is the earliest events affected by Celastrol. Disorganization, not depolymerization, of mitotic spindles appears responsible for mitotic defects. Celastrol directly affects the biochemical properties of tubulin heterodimer in vitro and reduces its protein level in vivo. At the cellular level, Celastrol induces a synergistic apoptosis when combined with conventional microtubule-targeting drugs and manifests an efficacy toward Taxol-resistant cancer cells. Finally, by time-lapse imaging and tracking of microtubule drug-treated cells, we show that Celastrol preferentially induces apoptosis of mitotic arrested cells in a caspase-dependent manner. This selective effect is not due to inhibition of general cell survival pathways or mitotic kinases that have been shown to enhance microtubule drug-induced cell death. CONCLUSIONS AND SIGNIFICANCE: We provide evidence for new cellular pathways that, when perturbed, selectively induce the apoptosis of mitotic arrested cancer cells, identifying a

  16. Preliminary neutron diffraction studies of Escherichia coli dihydrofolate reductase bound to the anticancer drug methotrexate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bennett, Brad C. [University of Tennessee, Knoxville (UTK); Meilleur, Flora [Institut Laue-Langevin (ILL); Myles, Dean A A [ORNL; Howell, Elizabeth E. [University of Tennessee, Knoxville (UTK); Dealwis, Chris G. [University of Tennessee, Knoxville (UTK)

    2005-01-01

    The contribution of H atoms in noncovalent interactions and enzymatic reactions underlies virtually all aspects of biology at the molecular level, yet their 'visualization' is quite difficult. To better understand the catalytic mechanism of Escherichia coli dihydrofolate reductase (ecDHFR), a neutron diffraction study is under way to directly determine the accurate positions of H atoms within its active site. Despite exhaustive investigation of the catalytic mechanism of DHFR, controversy persists over the exact pathway associated with proton donation in reduction of the substrate, dihydrofolate. As the initial step in a proof-of-principle experiment which will identify ligand and residue protonation states as well as precise solvent structures, a neutron diffraction data set has been collected on a 0.3 mm{sup 3} D{sub 2}O-soaked crystal of ecDHFR bound to the anticancer drug methotrexate (MTX) using the LADI instrument at ILL. The completeness in individual resolution shells dropped to below 50% between 3.11 and 3.48 {angstrom} and the I/{sigma}(I) in individual shells dropped to below 2 at around 2.46 {angstrom}. However, reflections with I/{sigma}(I) greater than 2 were observed beyond these limits (as far out as 2.2 {angstrom}). To our knowledge, these crystals possess one of the largest primitive unit cells (P6{sub 1}, a = b = 92, c = 73 {angstrom}) and one of the smallest crystal volumes so far tested successfully with neutrons.

  17. On the hydrolysis mechanism of the second-generation anticancer drug carboplatin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pavelka, Matej; Lucas, Maria Fatima A; Russo, Nino

    2007-01-01

    The hydrolysis reaction mechanisms of carboplatin, a second-generation anticancer drug, have been explored by combining density functional theory (DFT) with the conductor-like dielectric continuum model (CPCM) approach. The decomposition of carboplatin in water is expected to take place through a biphasic mechanism with a ring-opening process followed by the loss of the malonato ligand. We have investigated this reaction in water and acid conditions and established that the number of protons present in the malonato ligand has a direct effect on the energetics of this system. Close observation of the optimised structures revealed a necessary systematic water molecule in the vicinity of the amino groups of carboplatin. For this reason we have also investigated this reaction with an explicit water molecule. From the computed potential-energy surfaces it is established that the water hydrolysis takes place with an activation barrier of 30 kcal mol(-1), confirming the very slow reaction observed experimentally. The decomposition of carboplatin upon acidification was also investigated and we have computed a 21 kcal mol(-1) barrier to be overcome (experimental value 23 kcal mol(-1)). We have also established that the rate-limiting process is the first hydration, and ascertained the importance of a water molecule close to the two amine groups in lowering the activation barriers for the ring-opening reaction.

  18. Targeting anticancer drug delivery to pancreatic cancer cells using a fucose-bound nanoparticle approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoshida, Makoto; Takimoto, Rishu; Murase, Kazuyuki; Sato, Yasushi; Hirakawa, Masahiro; Tamura, Fumito; Sato, Tsutomu; Iyama, Satoshi; Osuga, Takahiro; Miyanishi, Koji; Takada, Kohichi; Hayashi, Tsuyoshi; Kobune, Masayoshi; Kato, Junji

    2012-01-01

    Owing to its aggressiveness and the lack of effective therapies, pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma has a dismal prognosis. New strategies to improve treatment and survival are therefore urgently required. Numerous fucosylated antigens in sera serve as tumor markers for cancer detection and evaluation of treatment efficacy. Increased expression of fucosyltransferases has also been reported for pancreatic cancer. These enzymes accelerate malignant transformation through fucosylation of sialylated precursors, suggesting a crucial requirement for fucose by pancreatic cancer cells. With this in mind, we developed fucose-bound nanoparticles as vehicles for delivery of anticancer drugs specifically to cancer cells. L-fucose-bound liposomes containing Cy5.5 or Cisplatin were effectively delivered into CA19-9 expressing pancreatic cancer cells. Excess L-fucose decreased the efficiency of Cy5.5 introduction by L-fucose-bound liposomes, suggesting L-fucose-receptor-mediated delivery. Intravenously injected L-fucose-bound liposomes carrying Cisplatin were successfully delivered to pancreatic cancer cells, mediating efficient tumor growth inhibition as well as prolonging survival in mouse xenograft models. This modality represents a new strategy for pancreatic cancer cell-targeting therapy.

  19. Mesua beccariana (Clusiaceae), a source of potential anti-cancer lead compounds in drug discovery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teh, Soek Sin; Cheng Lian Ee, Gwendoline; Mah, Siau Hui; Lim, Yang Mooi; Rahmani, Mawardi

    2012-09-10

    An investigation on biologically active secondary metabolites from the stem bark of Mesua beccariana was carried out. A new cyclodione, mesuadione, along with several known constituents which are beccamarin, 2,5-dihydroxy-1,3,4-trimethoxy anthraquinone, 4-methoxy-1,3,5-trihydroxyanthraquinone, betulinic acid and stigmasterol were obtained from this ongoing research. Structures of these compounds were elucidated by extensive spectroscopic methods, including 1D and 2D-NMR, GC-MS, IR and UV techniques. Preliminary tests of the in vitro cytotoxic activities of all the isolated metabolites against a panel of human cancer cell lines Raji (lymphoma), SNU-1 (gastric carcinoma), K562 (erythroleukemia cells), LS-174T (colorectal adenocarcinoma), HeLa (cervical cells), SK-MEL-28 (malignant melanoma cells), NCI-H23 (lung adenocarcinoma), IMR-32 (neuroblastoma) and Hep-G2 (hepatocellular liver carcinoma) were carried out using an MTT assay. Mesuadione, beccamarin, betulinic acid and stigmasterol displayed strong inhibition of Raji cell proliferation, while the proliferation rate of SK-MEL-28 and HeLa were strongly inhibited by stigmasterol and beccamarin, indicating these secondary metabolites could be anti-cancer lead compounds in drug discovery.

  20. Physicians' preferences for prescribing oral and intravenous anticancer drugs: a Discrete Choice Experiment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benjamin, Laure; Cotté, François-Emery; Philippe, Caroline; Mercier, Florence; Bachelot, Thomas; Vidal-Trécan, Gwenaëlle

    2012-04-01

    Although efficacy and tolerability are classical criteria for treatment choice, patient adherence and tariff issues related to novel oral anticancer drugs may also influence therapeutic decisions. We estimated the relative influence of efficacy, tolerability, expected adherence and route of administration of a chemotherapy treatment on 203 French physicians' preferences who participated in a Discrete Choice Experiment (DCE), a quantitative method used to elicit preferences. From a questionnaire with six scenarii, respondents had to choose between two treatments which differed with respect to these four attributes. Scenarii were first presented in a curative setting then in a palliative setting. Efficacy, tolerability and expected adherence had two modalities (good versus moderate) and route of administration had three modalities (intravenous (€286-379/session), oral with the current tariff (€28/consultation), oral with a hypothetical tariff (€114)). Efficacy was the reference criterion in choosing a treatment whatever the therapeutic goal (β: 2.114, padherence (β: 1.223, p=0.0001) were influent in curative setting while the route of administration was still predominant in palliative setting (β: 0.431, p<0.0001). Results suggest that economic considerations as well as therapeutic efficacy play a significant role in choosing a treatment. Preference for oral chemotherapy with a hypothetical tariff for a patient support programme should be considered for the development of therapeutic education and healthcare coordination, currently not taken into account in the tariff of oral chemotherapy. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. A novel platform for accelerated pharmacodynamic profiling for lead optimization of anticancer drug candidates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szwaya, Jeffrey; Bruseo, Charles; Nakuci, Enkeleda; McSweeney, Denise; Xiang, Xiaoqin; Senator, David; France, Dennis; Chen, Chang-Rung

    2007-03-01

    Oncology drug discovery is, by definition, a target-rich enterprise. High-throughput screening (HTS) laboratories have supported a wide array of molecularly targeted and chemical genomic approaches for anticancer lead generation, and the number of hits emerging from such campaigns has increased dramatically. Although automation of HTS processes has eliminated primary screening as a bottleneck, the demands on secondary screening in appropriate cell-based assays have increased concomitantly with the numbers of hits delivered to therapeutic area laboratories. The authors describe herein the implementation of a novel platform using off-the-shelf solutions that have allowed them to efficiently characterize hundreds of HTS hits using a palette of Western blot-based pharmacodynamic assays. The platform employs a combination of a flatbed bufferless SDS-PAGE system, a dry ultra-rapid electroblotting apparatus, and a highly sensitive and quantitative infrared imaging system. Cumulatively, this platform has significantly reduced the cycle time for HTS hit evaluation. In addition, the routine use of this platform has resulted in higher quality data that have allowed the development of structure-activity databases that have tangibly improved lead optimization. The authors describe in detail the application of this platform, designated the Accelerated Pharmaco-Dynamic Profiler (APDP), to the annotation of inhibitors of 2 attractive oncology targets, BRAF kinase and Hsp90.

  2. Mesua beccariana (Clusiaceae, A Source of Potential Anti-cancer Lead Compounds in Drug Discovery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Soek Sin Teh

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available An investigation on biologically active secondary metabolites from the stem bark of Mesua beccariana was carried out. A new cyclodione, mesuadione (1, along with several known constituents which are beccamarin (2, 2,5-dihydroxy-1,3,4-trimethoxy anthraquinone (3, 4-methoxy-1,3,5-trihydroxyanthraquinone (4, betulinic acid (5 and stigmasterol (6 were obtained from this ongoing research. Structures of these compounds were elucidated by extensive spectroscopic methods, including 1D and 2D-NMR, GC-MS, IR and UV techniques. Preliminary tests of the in vitro cytotoxic activities of all the isolated metabolites against a panel of human cancer cell lines Raji (lymphoma, SNU-1 (gastric carcinoma, K562 (erythroleukemia cells, LS-174T (colorectal adenocarcinoma, HeLa (cervical cells, SK-MEL-28 (malignant melanoma cells, NCI-H23 (lung adenocarcinoma, IMR-32 (neuroblastoma and Hep-G2 (hepatocellular liver carcinoma were carried out using an MTT assay. Mesuadione (1, beccamarin (2, betulinic acid (5 and stigmasterol (6 displayed strong inhibition of Raji cell proliferation, while the proliferation rate of SK-MEL-28 and HeLa were strongly inhibited by stigmasterol (6 and beccamarin (2, indicating these secondary metabolites could be anti-cancer lead compounds in drug discovery.

  3. Differential scanning calorimetry as a tool to investigate the transfer of anticancer drugs to biomembrane model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarpietro, Maria Grazia; Accolla, Maria Lorena; Celia, Christian; Grattoni, Alessandro; Castelli, Francesco; Fresta, Massimo; Ferrari, Mauro; Paolino, Donatella

    2013-08-01

    Different anticancer drugs clinically approved by international regulatory organizations present poor water solubility and low stability after systemic injection. Their administration requires suitable carriers capable of maximizing therapeutic efficacy. Lipid and polymeric nanotherapeutics, particularly liposomes, are widely used to deliver chemotherapeutics in the clinic. The interaction between chemotherapeutics and biocompatible lipids and polymers can affect their efficacy and play a pivotal role in chemotherapy. Phospholipids are the main components of liposomes and their interactions with therapeutic agents are widely investigated in the pharmaceutical field using differential scanning calorimetry (DSC). In this work, DSC was exploited to investigate the interaction between hydrophobic chemotherapeutics, i.e. docetaxel, tamoxifen and lapatinib, with lipid vesicles. Lipid carriers are prepared using dimyristoylphosphatidylcholine (DMPC), a phosphatidylcholine derivative, showing the same physicochemical features of the main lipids in the biological membranes. DMPC was used as a biological membrane model to evaluate interaction, passage, diffusion, and adsorption of chemotherapeutics. These processes were evaluated through the variation of thermotropic parameters of the biological membrane model. DSC studies were carried out in heating and cooling mode. Results demonstrated a modification of calorimetric curves and this effect is strictly related to the molar fraction and physicochemical features of chemotherapeutics. Furthermore, the interaction between chemotherapeutics and biological membranes affects their internalization and distribution inside tumors and this process depends on gel-liquid crystal transition of phospholipids. DSC results provide suitable information about this effect and can be used as tool to predict further interaction between chemotherapeutics and biological membranes.

  4. In Vitro Anticancer Evaluation of Platinum(II/IV) Complexes with Diisoamyl Ester of (S,S)-ethylenediamine-N,N'-di-2-propanoic Acid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zmejkovski, Bojana B; Pantelić, Nebojša; Filipović, Lana; Aranđelović, Sandra; Radulović, Siniša; Sabo, Tibor J; Kaluđerović, Goran N

    2017-01-01

    Platinum(II) and platinum(IV) complexes [PtCln{(S,S)-(i-Am)2eddip}] (n = 2, 4: 1, 2, respectively; (S,S)-(i-Am)2eddip = O,O'-diisoamyl-(S,S)-ethylenediamine-N,N'-di-2-propanoate) were synthesized and characterized by elemental analysis, IR, 1H and 13C NMR spectroscopy and mass spectrometry. Quantum chemical calculations were used to predict formed isomers of 1 and 2. Furthermore, reduction of 2 with ascorbic acid was followed by time-dependant 13C NMR spectroscopy in order to enable assignation of the formed isomers for complex 1. In vitro cytotoxic activity was determined for 1 and 2 on a panel of five human tumor cell lines derived from cervix adenocarcinoma (HeLa), alveolar basal adenocarcinoma (A549), breast adenocarcinoma (MDA-453), colorectal cancer (LS 174), erythromyeloblastoid leukemia (K562), as well as one non-malignant human lung fibroblast cell line (MRC-5), using MTT assay. Both complexes exhibited high (2 against K562: IC50 = 5.4 μM), more active than cisplatin, to moderate activity (1). Both complexes caused considerable decrease of cell number in K562 cells in G1, S and G2 phases, concordantly increasing subpopulation in sub-G1 fraction. Morphological analysis of K562 cell death induced by platinum(II/IV) complexes indicate apoptosis. Copyright© Bentham Science Publishers; For any queries, please email at epub@benthamscience.org.

  5. Training data selection method for prediction of anticancer drug effects using a genetic algorithm with local search.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hiroyasu, Tomoyuki; Miyabe, Yota; Yokouchi, Hisatake

    2011-01-01

    Here, we propose a training data selection method using a Support Vector Machine (SVM) to predict the effects of anticancer drugs. Conventionally, SVM is used for distinguishing between several types of data. However, in the method proposed here, the SVM is used to distinguish areas with only one or two types of data. The proposed method treats training data selection as an optimization problem and involves application of a genetic algorithm (GA). Moreover, GA with local search was applied to find the solution as the target problem was difficult to find. The composition method of GA for proposed method was examined. To determine its effectiveness, the proposed method was applied to an artificial anticancer drug data set. The verification results showed that the proposed method can be used to create a verifiable and predictable discriminant function by training data selection.

  6. 1-[2-(2-Methoxyphenylaminoethylamino]-3-(naphthalene-1- yloxypropan-2-ol May Be a Promising Anticancer Drug

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tomoyuki Nishizaki

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available We have originally synthesized the naftopidil analogue 1-[2-(2-methoxyphenylaminoethylamino]-3-(naphthalene-1-yloxypropan-2-ol (HUHS 1015 as a new anticancer drug. HUHS1015 induces cell death in a wide variety of human cancer cell lines originated from malignant pleural mesothelioma, lung cancer, hepatoma, gastric cancer, colorectal cancer, bladder cancer, prostate cancer, and renal cancer. HUHS1015-induced cell death includes necrosis (necroptosis and apoptosis, and the underlying mechanism differs depending upon cancer cell types. HUHS1015 effectively suppresses tumor growth in mice inoculated with NCI-H2052, MKN45, or CW2 cells, with a potential similar to or higher than that of currently used anticancer drugs. Here we show how HUHS1015 might offer brilliant hope for cancer therapy.

  7. Au/TiO2 nanobelt heterostructures for the detection of cancer cells and anticancer drug activity by potential sensing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cui, Jingjie; Chen, Jing; Chen, Shaowei; Gao, Li; Xu, Ping; Li, Hong

    2016-03-01

    Cancer is a cell dysfunction disease. The detection of cancer cells is extremely important for early diagnosis and clinical treatments. At present, the pretreatment for the detection of cancer cells is costly, complicated and time-consuming. As different species of the analytes may give rise to specific voltammetric signals at distinctly different potentials, simple potential sensing has the specificity to detect different cellular species. By taking advantage of the different electrochemical characteristics of normal cells, cancer cells and biointeractions between anticancer drugs and cancer cells, we develop a specific, sensitive, direct, cost-effective and rapid method for the detection of cancer cells by electrochemical potential sensing based on Au/TiO2 nanobelt heterostructure electrodes that will be of significance in early cancer diagnosis, in vitro screening of anticancer drugs and molecular biology research.

  8. Calorimetric and spectroscopic studies on the interaction of anticancer drug mitoxantrone with human serum albumin

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Keswani, Neelam [Department of Chemistry, Indian Institute of Technology Bombay, Powai, Mumbai 400 076 (India); Kishore, Nand, E-mail: nandk@chem.iitb.ac.in [Department of Chemistry, Indian Institute of Technology Bombay, Powai, Mumbai 400 076 (India)

    2011-09-15

    Highlights: > Human serum albumin exhibits two binding sites for mitoxantrone. > Discrepancies in calorimetric and spectroscopic results clarify binding sites. > Effect of ionic strength on binding permitted detailed analysis of interactions. > Electrostatic interactions predominate in binding. > One binding site on protein does not have tryptophan in immediate vicinity. - Abstract: Binding of the anticancer drug mitoxantrone with the protein human serum albumin (HSA) has been studied by using isothermal titration calorimetry (ITC), in combination with fluorescence, UV-visible, and circular dichroism spectroscopy. The thermodynamic parameters of binding have been evaluated from ITC and spectroscopic results and compared. The ITC results demonstrate that the binding of mitoxantrone with HSA occurs according to two sets of binding sites on the protein as opposed to the fluorescence and UV-visible spectroscopic results. Blockage of one binding site on HSA for mitoxantrone in the presence of NaCl indicates strong involvement of electrostatic interactions in the binding of the drug with the protein. An insignificant temperature dependence of the association constant observed in fluorescence measurements suggests a very low enthalpy of binding which is in close agreement with the results obtained from ITC measurements. Fluorescence life time measurements suggest formation of a static complex between mitoxantrone and HSA. The discrepancies in the ITC and fluorescence results suggest that one of the binding sites on the protein for mitoxantrone does not contain tryptophan residue in its immediate vicinity. The calorimetric and spectroscopic results have provided quantitative information on the binding of mitoxantrone with HSA and suggest that the binding is dominated by electrostatic interactions.

  9. SynLethDB: synthetic lethality database toward discovery of selective and sensitive anticancer drug targets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Jing; Liu, Hui; Zheng, Jie

    2016-01-04

    Synthetic lethality (SL) is a type of genetic interaction between two genes such that simultaneous perturbations of the two genes result in cell death or a dramatic decrease of cell viability, while a perturbation of either gene alone is not lethal. SL reflects the biologically endogenous difference between cancer cells and normal cells, and thus the inhibition of SL partners of genes with cancer-specific mutations could selectively kill cancer cells but spare normal cells. Therefore, SL is emerging as a promising anticancer strategy that could potentially overcome the drawbacks of traditional chemotherapies by reducing severe side effects. Researchers have developed experimental technologies and computational prediction methods to identify SL gene pairs on human and a few model species. However, there has not been a comprehensive database dedicated to collecting SL pairs and related knowledge. In this paper, we propose a comprehensive database, SynLethDB (http://histone.sce.ntu.edu.sg/SynLethDB/), which contains SL pairs collected from biochemical assays, other related databases, computational predictions and text mining results on human and four model species, i.e. mouse, fruit fly, worm and yeast. For each SL pair, a confidence score was calculated by integrating individual scores derived from different evidence sources. We also developed a statistical analysis module to estimate the druggability and sensitivity of cancer cells upon drug treatments targeting human SL partners, based on large-scale genomic data, gene expression profiles and drug sensitivity profiles on more than 1000 cancer cell lines. To help users access and mine the wealth of the data, we developed other practical functionalities, such as search and filtering, orthology search, gene set enrichment analysis. Furthermore, a user-friendly web interface has been implemented to facilitate data analysis and interpretation. With the integrated data sets and analytics functionalities, SynLethDB would

  10. Folate-conjugated chitosan-polylactide nanoparticles for enhanced intracellular uptake of anticancer drug

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Shengtang; Wan, Ying; Wang, Zheng; Wu, Jiliang

    2013-12-01

    Chitosan was conjugated with folic acid (FA) and the resulting chitosan derivatives with a FA-substitution degree of around 6 % was used to synthesize FA-conjugated chitosan-polylactide (FA-CH-PLA) copolymers to build a drug carrier with active targeting characteristics for the anticancer drug of paclitaxel (PTX). Selected FA-CH-PLAs with various polylactide percentages of about 40 wt% or lower were employed to fabricate nanoparticles using sodium tripolyphosphate as a crosslinker, and different types of nanoparticles were endued with similar average particle-sizes located in a range between 100 and 200 nm. Certain types of PTX-loaded FA-CH-PLA nanoparticles having encapsulation efficiency of around 90 % and initial load of about 12 % were able to release PTX in a controlled manner with significant regulation by polylactide content in FA-CH-PLAs. Targeting characteristic of achieved nanoparticles was confirmed using FA-receptor-expressed MCF-7 breast cancer cells. The uptake of PTX revealed that optimized FA-CH-PLA nanoparticles with an equivalent PTX-dose of around 1 μg/mL could have more than sixfold increasing abilities to facilitate intracellular paclitaxel accumulation in MCF-7 cells after 24 h treatment as compared to free PTX. At a relatively safe equivalent PTX-dose for normal MCF-10A mammary epithelial cells, the obtained results from Hoechst 33342 staining indicated that optimized PTX-loaded FA-CH-PLA nanoparticles had more than threefold increasing abilities to induce MCF-7 cell apoptosis in comparison to free PTX.

  11. Rad51 and BRCA2--New molecular targets for sensitizing glioma cells to alkylating anticancer drugs.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Steve Quiros

    Full Text Available First line chemotherapeutics for brain tumors (malignant gliomas are alkylating agents such as temozolomide and nimustine. Despite growing knowledge of how these agents work, patients suffering from this malignancy still face a dismal prognosis. Alkylating agents target DNA, forming the killing lesion O(6-alkylguanine, which is converted into DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs that trigger apoptosis. Here we assessed whether inhibiting repair of DSBs by homologous recombination (HR or non-homologous end joining (NHEJ is a reasonable strategy for sensitizing glioma cells to alkylating agents. For down-regulation of HR in glioma cells, we used an interference RNA (iRNA approach targeting Rad51 and BRCA2, and for NHEJ we employed the DNA-PK inhibitor NU7026. We also assessed whether inhibition of poly(ADPribosyltransferase (PARP by olaparib would enhance the killing effect. The data show that knockdown of Rad51 or BRCA2 greatly sensitizes cells to DSBs and the induction of cell death following temozolomide and nimustine (ACNU. It did not sensitize to ionizing radiation (IR. The expression of O(6-methylguanine-DNA methyltransferase (MGMT abolished all these effects, indicating that O(6-alkylguanine induced by these drugs is the primary lesion responsible for the formation of DSBs and increased sensitivity of glioma cells following knockdown of Rad51 and BRCA2. Inhibition of DNA-PK only slightly sensitized to temozolomide whereas a significant effect was observed with IR. A triple strategy including siRNA and the PARP inhibitor olaparib further improved the killing effect of temozolomide. The data provides evidence that down-regulation of Rad51 or BRCA2 is a reasonable strategy for sensitizing glioma cells to killing by O(6-alkylating anti-cancer drugs. The data also provide proof of principle that a triple strategy involving down-regulation of HR, PARP inhibition and MGMT depletion may greatly enhance the therapeutic effect of temozolomide.

  12. Host-guest interaction induced supramolecular amphiphilic star architecture and uniform nanovesicle formation for anticancer drug delivery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Jing-Ling; Liu, Kerh Li; Wen, Yuting; Song, Xia; Li, Jun

    2016-01-21

    A star polymer of poly[(R,S)-3-hydroxybutyrate] (PHB) with adamantyl end-terminals extended from an α-cyclodextrin (α-CD) core is designed. It subsequently self-assembles to form controllable and uniform nanovesicles induced by host-guest interactions between heptakis(2,6-di-O-methyl)-β-CD and the adamantyl ends. The nanovesicles are suitable for loading and intracellular delivery of the anticancer drug doxorubicin.

  13. How can the Cross-Link Adducts Formed by Novel Trans Platinum Drug be Influenced by Hydrogen Bond

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CHANG Guan-Ru; ZHOU Li-Xin; CHEN Dong

    2006-01-01

    A systematic quantum chemical characterization of intrinsic structure, energies and spectral properties of all the studed cross-link adducts formed by the novel trans platinum with thiazole ligand has been carried out at B3LYP/6-31G* level of theory with the Lanl2dz pseudo potential basis set for the Pt atom.Special attention has been paid to the relative stability of these complexes and the factors that probably alter the order of the relative stability. The imporant influence of hydrogen bond on the structures, the energies and the spectral property was revealed. Other factors that contribute to relative stability including solvation effect, entropy and electronic delocalization energywere taken into account. The stability energy of the whole complex, and the interaction energy between two purinebases and the [Pt-(NH3)thiazole]2+ group were adopted to study the interplay among subsystems and their contribution to relative stability of all thestudied cross-link model. Finally, basic spectral properties of these complexesincludingH(8) chemical shifts of all the studied complexes and the VCD (vibrational circular dichroism) spectra of two pairs of GG chelate enantiomers, were provided in order to define the structure of the most possible duplex bearing novel trans platinum drug lesions.

  14. Expression of Drug-Resistant Factor Genes in Hepatocellular Carcinoma Patients Undergoing Chemotherapy with Platinum Complex by Arterial Infusion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shiro Ueda

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available This study investigated gene expression of drug resistance factors in biopsy tissue samples from hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC patients undergoing chemotherapy by platinum complex. Liver biopsy was performed to collect tissue from the tumor site (T and the non-tumor site (NT prior to the start of treatment. For drug-resistant factors, drug excretion transporters cMOAT and MDR-1, intracellular metal binding protein MT2, DNA repair enzyme ERCC-l and inter-nucleic cell transport protein MVP, were investigated. The comparison of the expression between T and NT indicated a significant decrease of MT2 and MDR-1 in T while a significant increase in ERCC-1 was noted in T. Further, expression was compared between the response cases and non-response cases using the ratios of expression in T to those in NT. The response rate was significantly low in the high expression group when the cutoff value of cMOAT and MT2 was set at 1.5 and 1.0, respectively. Furthermore, when the patients were classified into A group (cMOAT ≧ 1.5 or MT2 ≧ 1.0 and B group (cMOAT < 1.5 and MT2 < 1.0, the response rate of A group was significantly lower than B group when we combined the cutoff values of cMOAT and MT2. It is considered possible to estimate the therapeutic effect of platinum complex at a high probability by combining the expression condition of these two genes.

  15. Effect of Tea Polyphenol Compounds on Anticancer Drugs in Terms of Anti-Tumor Activity, Toxicology, and Pharmacokinetics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jianhua Cao

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Multidrug resistance and various adverse side effects have long been major problems in cancer chemotherapy. Recently, chemotherapy has gradually transitioned from mono-substance therapy to multidrug therapy. As a result, the drug cocktail strategy has gained more recognition and wider use. It is believed that properly-formulated drug combinations have greater therapeutic efficacy than single drugs. Tea is a popular beverage consumed by cancer patients and the general public for its perceived health benefits. The major bioactive molecules in green tea are catechins, a class of flavanols. The combination of green tea extract or green tea catechins and anticancer compounds has been paid more attention in cancer treatment. Previous studies demonstrated that the combination of chemotherapeutic drugs and green tea extract or tea polyphenols could synergistically enhance treatment efficacy and reduce the adverse side effects of anticancer drugs in cancer patients. In this review, we summarize the experimental evidence regarding the effects of green tea-derived polyphenols in conjunction with chemotherapeutic drugs on anti-tumor activity, toxicology, and pharmacokinetics. We believe that the combination of multidrug cancer treatment with green tea catechins may improve treatment efficacy and diminish negative side effects.

  16. Effect of Tea Polyphenol Compounds on Anticancer Drugs in Terms of Anti-Tumor Activity, Toxicology, and Pharmacokinetics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Jianhua; Han, Jie; Xiao, Hao; Qiao, Jinping; Han, Mei

    2016-12-14

    Multidrug resistance and various adverse side effects have long been major problems in cancer chemotherapy. Recently, chemotherapy has gradually transitioned from mono-substance therapy to multidrug therapy. As a result, the drug cocktail strategy has gained more recognition and wider use. It is believed that properly-formulated drug combinations have greater therapeutic efficacy than single drugs. Tea is a popular beverage consumed by cancer patients and the general public for its perceived health benefits. The major bioactive molecules in green tea are catechins, a class of flavanols. The combination of green tea extract or green tea catechins and anticancer compounds has been paid more attention in cancer treatment. Previous studies demonstrated that the combination of chemotherapeutic drugs and green tea extract or tea polyphenols could synergistically enhance treatment efficacy and reduce the adverse side effects of anticancer drugs in cancer patients. In this review, we summarize the experimental evidence regarding the effects of green tea-derived polyphenols in conjunction with chemotherapeutic drugs on anti-tumor activity, toxicology, and pharmacokinetics. We believe that the combination of multidrug cancer treatment with green tea catechins may improve treatment efficacy and diminish negative side effects.

  17. Cytochrome P450 1B1 gene polymorphisms as predictors of anticancer drug activity: studies with in vitro models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laroche-Clary, Audrey; Le Morvan, Valérie; Yamori, Takao; Robert, Jacques

    2010-12-01

    Cytochrome P450 1B1 (CYP1B1) is found in tumor tissue and is suspected to play a role in oncogenesis and drug resistance. CYP1B1 gene polymorphisms have been associated with the risk of developing lung and other cancers. They may be associated with tumor response to anticancer drugs. We have determined 4 frequent nonsynonymous gene polymorphisms of CYP1B1 in the human tumor cell lines panels of the National Cancer Institute (NCI) and the Japanese Foundation for Cancer Research (JFCR): rs10012 (R48G), rs1056827 (A119S), rs1056836 (L432V), and rs1800440 (N453S). Numerous anticancer drugs have been tested against these panels that offer the opportunity to detect associations between gene polymorphisms and drug sensitivity. CYP1B1 single nucleotide polymorphisms were in marked linkage disequilibrium. The L432V allelic variants were significantly associated with reduced sensitivity to DNA-interacting anticancer agents, alkylators, camptothecins, topoisomerase II inhibitors, and some antimetabolites. For instance, in the NCI panel, cell lines homozygous for the V432 allele were globally 2-fold resistant to alkylating agents (P = 5 × 10(-10)) and 4.5-fold to camptothecins (P = 6.6 × 10(-9)) than cell lines homozygous for the L432 allele. Similar features were exhibited by the JFCR panel. Cell lines homozygous for the V432 allele were globally less sensitive to DNA-interfering drugs than cell lines having at least 1 common allele. There was no significant association between mRNA expression of CYP1B1 and CYP1B1 genotype, and no significant association between CYP1B1 mRNA expression and drug cytotoxicity. These observations open the way to clinical studies exploring the role of CYP1B1 gene polymorphisms for predicting tumor sensitivity to chemotherapy.

  18. Mono- and di-bromo platinum(IV) prodrugs via oxidative bromination: synthesis, characterization, and cytotoxicity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Zoufeng; Wang, Zhigang; Yiu, Shek-Man; Zhu, Guangyu

    2015-12-14

    Platinum(IV)-based anticancer prodrugs have attracted much attention due to their relative inertness under physiological conditions, being activated inside cells, and their capacity for functionalization with a variety of small-molecule or macromolecule moieties. Novel asymmetric platinum(IV) compounds synthesized through expedient and unique methods are desired. Here we utilize N-bromosuccinimide (NBS) and carry out oxidative bromination on platinum(II) drugs, namely cisplatin, carboplatin, and oxaliplatin, to obtain asymmetric and mono-bromo platinum(IV) prodrugs. Different solvents are used to obtain various compounds, and the compounds are further functionalized. Di-bromo compounds are also obtained through NBS-directed oxidative bromination in ethanol. The crystal structures of representative compounds are discussed, and the reduction potentials of some compounds are examined. A cytotoxicity test shows that the mono- and di-bromo platinum(IV) compounds are active against human ovarian cancer cells. Our study enriches the family of asymmetric platinum(IV) prodrugs and provides with a convenient strategy to obtain brominated platinum(IV) complexes.

  19. Annular phased array transducer for preclinical testing of anti-cancer drug efficacy on small animals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kujawska, Tamara; Secomski, Wojciech; Byra, Michał; Postema, Michiel; Nowicki, Andrzej

    2017-04-01

    A technique using pulsed High Intensity Focused Ultrasound (HIFU) to destroy deep-seated solid tumors is a promising noninvasive therapeutic approach. A main purpose of this study was to design and test a HIFU transducer suitable for preclinical studies of efficacy of tested, anti-cancer drugs, activated by HIFU beams, in the treatment of a variety of solid tumors implanted to various organs of small animals at the depth of the order of 1-2cm under the skin. To allow focusing of the beam, generated by such transducer, within treated tissue at different depths, a spherical, 2-MHz, 29-mm diameter annular phased array transducer was designed and built. To prove its potential for preclinical studies on small animals, multiple thermal lesions were induced in a pork loin ex vivo by heating beams of the same: 6W, or 12W, or 18W acoustic power and 25mm, 30mm, and 35mm focal lengths. Time delay for each annulus was controlled electronically to provide beam focusing within tissue at the depths of 10mm, 15mm, and 20mm. The exposure time required to induce local necrosis was determined at different depths using thermocouples. Location and extent of thermal lesions determined from numerical simulations were compared with those measured using ultrasound and magnetic resonance imaging techniques and verified by a digital caliper after cutting the tested tissue samples. Quantitative analysis of the results showed that the location and extent of necrotic lesions on the magnetic resonance images are consistent with those predicted numerically and measured by caliper. The edges of lesions were clearly outlined although on ultrasound images they were fuzzy. This allows to conclude that the use of the transducer designed offers an effective noninvasive tool not only to induce local necrotic lesions within treated tissue without damaging the surrounding tissue structures but also to test various chemotherapeutics activated by the HIFU beams in preclinical studies on small animals.

  20. Topographical extracellular matrix cues on anticancer drug-induced cytotoxicity in stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Jangho; Kim, Yeon Ju; Bae, Won-Gyu; Jang, Kyung-Jin; Lim, Ki Taek; Choung, Pill-Hoon; Choung, Yun-Hoon; Chung, Jong Hoon

    2015-08-01

    In recent years, cell chip-based platforms have begun to show promise as a means of corroborating the findings of in vivo animal tests for cytotoxicity, and perhaps in the future partially replacing the need for such animal models. In contrast to the conventional culture methods, micro- and nanofabrication techniques can be utilized to provide a set of mechanostimulatory signals to the cells that mimic the context of extracellular matrix (ECM) of the tissue in which a particular cell line resides. Here, we report periodic lateral topographic striations, with a pitch ranging approximately from 200 to 800 nm with an intention to mimic a common geometry of fibrils in the ECM such as collagen or elastin, as a platform for investigating anticancer drug-induced cytotoxicity in stem cells. The ECM cues could facilitate perimeter, elongation, and gap junction formation of mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs), which eventually influenced the fate of cells in terms of death and survival against the common chemotherapeutic agent cisplatin. Interestingly, the appropriate inhibition of gap junctions of MSCs on the ECM mimicking substrates could prevent the cisplatin-induced cytotoxicity through the inhibition of the cisplatin-induced 'death signal communication' as compared to that on the flat substrates. Our results imply that nanoscale topography is an important consideration for chip-based cytotoxicity assays, which uniquely enable the consideration and rational design of ECM-like topographic features, and furthermore, that the natural topography of the ECM in the context of stem cell niches may serve as an important indicator for chemotherapeutic agent sensitivity. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  1. Evolving concepts in the management of drug resistant ovarian cancer: dose dense chemotherapy and the reversal of clinical platinum resistance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pinato, David J; Graham, Janet; Gabra, Hani; Sharma, Rohini

    2013-04-01

    Despite the initially high response rate to standard front-line debulking surgery followed by platinum-based chemotherapy, the relapse rate in ovarian cancer is high and many patients will recur within 6 months of completing platinum based treatment. These patients may still require further chemotherapy despite being considered "platinum resistant". In this setting, response rates to conventionally scheduled second line platinum and non-platinum agents is low, ranging between 5% and 15%. There is an emerging body of evidence that in this scenario, chemotherapeutic activity can be enhanced using unconventionally scheduled "dose-dense" platinum and non-platinum based regimens with improved response rates of up to 65%. Randomised studies to evaluate the impact of this approach on survival in recurrent, platinum resistant disease are urgently required to confirm the promising phase II findings if there is to be a change in the standard of care of patients with platinum resistant disease. In this review we discuss the evolving strategies to overcome resistance in patients with platinum resistant ovarian cancer with a particular focus on alterations in dose schedule as a means of reversing platinum resistance. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Overview on the current status on virtual high-throughput screening and combinatorial chemistry approaches in multi-target anticancer drug discovery; Part II.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geromichalos, George D; Alifieris, Constantinos E; Geromichalou, Elena G; Trafalis, Dimitrios T

    2016-01-01

    Conventional drug design embraces the "one gene, one drug, one disease" philosophy. Nowadays, new generation of anticancer drugs, able to inhibit more than one pathway, is believed to play a major role in contemporary anticancer drug research. In this way, polypharmacology, focusing on multi-target drugs, has emerged as a new paradigm in drug discovery. A number of recent successful drugs have in part or in whole emerged from a structure-based research approach. Many advances including crystallography and informatics are behind these successes. In this part II we will review the role and methodology of ligand-, structure- and fragment-based computer-aided drug design computer aided drug desing (CADD), virtual high throughput screening (vHTS), de novo drug design, fragment-based design and structure-based molecular docking, homology modeling, combinatorial chemistry and library design, pharmacophore model chemistry and informatics in modern drug discovery.

  3. Energy basis of recognition of base pair for platinum-based antitumour drug ZD0473 and cisplatin

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    Platinum-based antitumour drug ZD0473 was designed to reduce the cisplatin resistance to the tumor cells. In this paper, the mixed method of molecular mechanics and quantum chemistry, HF/lanl2dz// MM/uff and B3LYP/lanl2dz//6-31G*, are used to investigate the differences between four types of GG, 3′AG5′, 3′GA5′, and AA complexes, which are formed from four discrete DNA fragments recognized by ZD0473 and cisplatin. The results show that the binding interaction of both ZD0473 and cisplatin drugs with the GG base pair is much stronger than with other base pairs, namely the recognition capability of such drugs to the GG base pair is more considerable. Moreover, the interaction of four complexes of ZD0473 with DNA fragments is stronger than that of cisplatin with corresponding DNA fragments, which indicates the stronger binding capability of ZD0473 with DNA fragments and high antitumour activity of ZD0473. The main reason for easier forming of 3′GA5′ complex than the 3′AG5′ one is that the drug molecule prefers to bind with a single G base to form a monoligand compound firstly; then the con- figuration transformation from such monoligand compound to the bi-ligand one is limited.

  4. Enersy basis of recognition of base pair for platinum-based antitumour drug ZD0473 and cisplatin

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    HAO Lan; LI XiChen; TAN HongWei; CHEN GuangJu; JIA MuXin

    2008-01-01

    Platinum-based antitumour drug ZD0473 was designed to reduce the cisplatin resistance to the tumor cells. In this paper, the mixed method of molecular mechanics and quantum chemistry, HF/lan12dz//MM/uff and B3LYP/lan12dz//6-31G*, are used to investigate the differences between four types of GG, 3'AG5', 3'GA5', and AA complexes, which are formed from four discrete DNA fragments recognized by ZD0473 and cisplatin. The results show that the binding interaction of both ZD0473 and cisplatin drugs with the GG base pair is much stronger than with other base pairs, namely the recognition capability of such drugs to the GG base pair is more considerable. Moreover, the interaction of four complexes of ZD0473 with DNA fragments is stronger than that of cisplatin with corresponding DNA fragments, which indicates the stronger binding capability of ZD0473 with DNA fragments and high antitumour activity of ZD0473. The main reason for easier forming of 3'GA5' complex than the 3'AG5' one is that the drug molecule prefers to bind with a single G base to form a monoligand compound firstly; then the con-figuration transformation from such monoligand compound to the bi-ligand one is limited.

  5. Targeted anti-cancer prodrug based on carbon nanotube with photodynamic therapeutic effect and pH-triggered drug release

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fan, Jianquan; Zeng, Fang, E-mail: mcfzeng@scut.edu.cn; Xu, Jiangsheng; Wu, Shuizhu, E-mail: shzhwu@scut.edu.cn [South China University of Technology, College of Materials Science and Engineering, State Key Laboratory of Luminescent Materials and Devices (China)

    2013-09-15

    Herein, we describe a multifunctional anti-cancer prodrug system based on water-dispersible carbon nanotube (CNT); this prodrug system features active targeting, pH-triggered drug release, and photodynamic therapeutic properties. For this prodrug system (with the size of {approx}100-300 nm), an anti-cancer drug, doxorubicin (DOX), was incorporated onto CNT via a cleavable hydrazone bond; and a targeting ligand (folic acid) was also coupled onto CNT. This prodrug can preferably enter folate receptor (FR)-positive cancer cells and undergo intracellular release of the drug triggered by the reduced pH. The targeted CNT-based prodrug system can cause lower cell viability toward FR-positive cells compared to the non-targeted ones. Moreover, the CNT carrier exhibits photodynamic therapeutic (PDT) action; and the cell viability of FR-positive cancer cells can be further reduced upon light irradiation. The dual effects of pH-triggered drug release and PDT increase the therapeutic efficacy of the DOX-CNT prodrug. This study may offer some useful insights on designing and improving the applicability of CNT for other drug delivery systems.

  6. Evaluation by quantitative image analysis of anticancer drug activity on multicellular spheroids grown in 3D matrices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gomes, Aurélie; Russo, Adrien; Vidal, Guillaume; Demange, Elise; Pannetier, Pauline; Souguir, Zied; Lagarde, Jean-Michel; Ducommun, Bernard; Lobjois, Valérie

    2016-01-01

    Pharmacological evaluation of anticancer drugs using 3D in vitro models provides invaluable information for predicting in vivo activity. Artificial matrices are currently available that scale up and increase the power of such 3D models. The aim of the present study was to propose an efficient and robust imaging and analysis pipeline to assess with quantitative parameters the efficacy of a particular cytotoxic drug. HCT116 colorectal adenocarcinoma tumor cell multispheres were grown in a 3D physiological hyaluronic acid matrix. 3D microscopy was performed with structured illumination, whereas image processing and feature extraction were performed with custom analysis tools. This procedure makes it possible to automatically detect spheres in a large volume of matrix in 96-well plates. It was used to evaluate drug efficacy in HCT116 spheres treated with different concentrations of topotecan, a DNA topoisomerase inhibitor. Following automatic detection and quantification, changes in cluster size distribution with a topotecan concentration-dependent increase of small clusters according to drug cytotoxicity were observed. Quantitative image analysis is thus an effective means to evaluate and quantify the cytotoxic and cytostatic activities of anticancer drugs on 3D multicellular models grown in a physiological matrix. PMID:28105152

  7. Sandwich-like mesoporous silica flakes for anticancer drug transport-Synthesis, characterization and kinetics release study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mijowska, E; Cendrowski, K; Barylak, M; Konicki, W

    2015-12-01

    In this paper, we present the technology of synthesis, characterization and release kinetics of anticancer drug molecules from sandwich-like mesoporous silica nanoflakes. Mesoporous silica nanoflakes are a very attractive material due to their versatility, low cytotoxicity, large surface area, high pore volume and unique feature of containing parallel pores openon both sides. Nanosilica flakes were prepared through the formation of a mesoporous silica layer on a graphene oxide surface. After graphene oxide removal, the silica nanostructures were filled by an anticancer drug-methotrexate. Release kinetics studies were performed in different temperatures, imitating the conditions in living organisms. Release data was analyzed using the zero-order model, first-order model, Higuchi model and Korsmeyer-Peppas model. The optical properties of samples, and the kinetics of drug release from the nanostructure, were examined by UV-vis spectrophotometer. Data obtained from long term studies showed that the system can serve as an anticancer drug carrier system, since a significant amount of methotrexate was loaded to the material and released. The mechanism of MTX release from mesoporous silica nanoflakes appeared to be a parallel processes of diffusion through water-filled mesopores and degradation of the mSiO2 matrix. Physical and chemical characterization was undertaken by transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and X-ray dispersion spectroscopy (EDX). The specific surface area of the samples was measured through the adsorption of N2 isotherm, interpreted with the Brunauer-Emmett-Teller model (BET). TGA and UV-vis analyses were conducted in order to estimate the amount of the released drug.

  8. Cytotoxicity and genotoxicity of anticancer drug residues and their mixtures in experimental model with zebrafish liver cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Novak, Matjaž; Žegura, Bojana; Modic, Barbara; Heath, Ester; Filipič, Metka

    2017-12-01

    Anticancer drugs enter aquatic environment predominantly via hospital and municipal wastewater effluents where they may, due to their genotoxic potential, cause adverse environmental effects even at very low doses. In this study we evaluated cytotoxic and genotoxic potential of two widely used anticancer drugs, cyclophosphamide (CP) and ifosfamide (IF) as individual compounds and in a complex mixture together with 5-fluorouracil (5-FU) and cisplatin (CDDP) because these four drugs have been frequently detected in an oncological ward effluents. As an experimental model we used zebrafish liver cell (ZFL) line. The cytotoxicity was determined with the MTS assay and genotoxicity with the comet assay and cytokinesis block micronucleus (CBMN) assay that measure the formation of DNA strand breaks and genomic instability, respectively. CP and IF exerted low cytotoxicity towards ZFL cells. Both compounds induced DNA strand breaks and genomic instability, however at relatively high concentrations that are not relevant for the contamination of aquatic environment. The mixture of CP, IF, 5-FU and CDDP was tested at maximal detected concentrations of each drug as determined in the effluents from the oncological ward. The mixture was not cytotoxic and did not induce genomic instability, but it induced significant increase in the formation of DNA strand breaks at concentrations of individual compounds that were several orders of magnitude lower from those that were effective when tested as individual compounds. The results indicate that such mixtures of anticancer drugs may pose a threat to aquatic organisms at environmentally relevant concentrations and contribute to the accumulating evidence that it is not always possible to predict adverse effects of complex mixtures based on the toxicological data for individual compounds. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. Combinational delivery of hydrophobic and hydrophilic anticancer drugs in single nanoemulsions to treat MDR in cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Yan; Liu, Dan; Wang, Dun; Wang, Yongjun; Fu, Qiang; Fallon, John K; Yang, Xinggang; He, Zhonggui; Liu, Feng

    2014-08-04

    In this study, we developed the core-matched nanoemulsions (NEs) functionalized by vitamin E (VE) and tocopherol poly(ethylene glycol)succinate (TPGS) to codeliver hydrophobic and hydrophilic drugs, paclitaxel (PTX) and 5-fluoroucacil (5-FU), in order to achieve synergistic effects and overcome PTX resistance in a multi-drug-resistant (MDR) human epidermal carcinoma cell line KB-8-5. Antitumor effect of the combination therapy based on core-matched technology (CMT) was evaluated in vitro and in vivo in mice. The core-matched NEs showed entrapment efficiency of >90% and were of nanoscale particle size and negative zeta-potential. The combined core-matched NEs exhibited concentration and time-dependent cytotoxicity against PTX-sensitive KB-3-1 cells and PTX-resistant KB-8-5 cells as well as an obviously increased G2/M phase block. The improvements in therapeutic response over either PTX-VE or 5-FU-TPGS therapy alone were demonstrated by the ability to effectively induce the apoptosis of tumor cells via up-regulation of tumor suppressor p53 and β-tubulin and by the significant inhibition of cell cycle progression. The combination therapy led to dramatic inhibition of tumor growth with little toxicity in vivo, especially in the PTX-resistant KB-8-5 tumors, whereas Taxol had little therapeutic effect. This was mainly ascribed to the synergism of PTX and 5-FU and the reverse of MDR by the inhibition of ATPase activity by VE and TPGS. Coencapsulation of two chemotherapeutic agents with different mechanisms allows simultaneous interruption of diverse anticancer pathways, resulting in increased therapeutic response and low toxicity. The CMT markedly facilitated the long circulation of PTX and 5-FU, which was closely associated with the high accumulation of chemotherapeutic agents within the tumors and the improvement of antitumor efficacy. The current study demonstrated the feasibility of incorporating PTX and 5-FU targeting to different pathways into a single core

  10. Mixed PEG-PE/Vitamin E Tumor-Targeted Immunomicelles as Carriers for Poorly Soluble Anti-Cancer Drugs: Improved Drug Solubilization and Enhanced In Vitro Cytotoxicity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sawant, Rupa R.; Sawant, Rishikesh M.; Torchilin, Vladimir P.

    2008-01-01

    Two poorly soluble, potent anticancer drugs, paclitaxel and camptothecin, were successfully solubilized by mixed micelles of polyethylene glycol-phosphatidyl ethanolamine (PEG-PE) and vitamin E. Drug containing micelles were additionally modified with anti-nucleosome monoclonal antibody 2C5 (mAb 2C5), which can specifically bring micelles to tumor cells in vitro. The optimized micelles had an average size of about 13-to-22 nm and the immuno-modification of micelles did not significantly change it. The solubilization of both drugs by the mixed micelles was more efficient than by micelles made of PEG-PE alone. Solubilization of camptothecin in micelles prevented also the hydrolysis of active lactone form of the drug to inactive carboxylate form. Drug loaded mixed micelles and mAb 2C5-immunomicelles demonstrated significantly higher in vitro cytotoxicity than free drug against various cancer cell lines. PMID:18583114

  11. Stable polymer micelle systems as anti-cancer drug delivery carriers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeng, Yi

    2005-07-01

    Several temporarily stable polymer micelle systems that might be used as ultrasonic-activated drug delivery carriers were synthesized and investigated. These polymeric micelle systems were PlurogelRTM, Tetronic RTM, poly(ethylene oxide)-b-poly(N-isopropylacrylamide) and poly(ethylene oxide)-b-poly(N-isopropylacrylamide-co-2-hydroxyethyl methacrylate-lactate n). In previous work in our lab, Pruitt et al. developed a stabilized drug carrier named PlurogelRTM [5, 6]. Unfortunately, the rate of the successful PlurogelRTM synthesis was only about 30% by simply following Pruitt's process. In this work, this rate was improved to 60% by combining the process of adding 0.15 M NaCl and/or 10 mul/ml n-butanol and by preheating the solution before polymerization. TetronicsRTM were proved not to be good candidates to form temporarily stable polymeric micelle system by polymerizing interpenetrating networks inside their micelle cores. Tetronic micelle systems treated by this process still were not stable at concentrations below their critical micelle concentration (CMC). Poly(ethylene oxide)-b-poly(N-isopropylacrylamide)-N,N-bis(acryloyl)cystamine micelle-like nanoparticles were developed and characterized. When the N,N-bis(acryloyl)cystamine (BAC) was from 0.2 wt% to 0.75 wt% of the mass of poly(N-isopropylacrylamide), diameters of the nanoparticles at 40°C were less than 150 nm. The cores of the nanoparticles were hydrophobic enough to sequester 1,6-diphenylhexatriene (DPH) and the anti-cancer drug doxorubicin (DOX). Nanoparticles with 0.5 wt% BAC stored at room temperature in 0.002 mg/ml solutions were stable for up to two weeks. Poly(ethylene oxide)-b-poly(N-isopropylacrylamide-co-2-hydroxyethyl methacrylate-lactate n) micelle systems were synthesized and characterized. The degree of polymerization of lactate side group, n, was 3 or 5. The copolymers with N-isopropylacrylamide:2-hydroxyethyl methacrylate-lactate3: poly(ethylene oxide) (NIPAAm:HEMA-lactate 3:PEO) ratios of

  12. Applying the Fe(III) binding property of a chemical transferrin mimetic to Ti(IV) anticancer drug design.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parks, Timothy B; Cruz, Yahaira M; Tinoco, Arthur D

    2014-02-03

    As an endogenous serum protein binder of Ti(IV), transferrin (Tf) serves as an excellent vehicle to stabilize the hydrolysis prone metal ion and successfully transport it into cells. This transporting role is thought to be central to Ti(IV)'s anticancer function, but efforts to synthesize Ti(IV) compounds targeting transferrin have not produced a drug. Nonetheless, the Ti(IV) transferrin complex (Ti2Tf) greatly informs on a new Ti(IV)-based anticancer drug design strategy. Ti2Tf interferes with cellular uptake of Fe(III), which is particularly detrimental to cancer cells because of their higher requirement for iron. Ti(IV) compounds of chemical transferrin mimetic (cTfm) ligands were designed to facilitate Ti(IV) activity by attenuating Fe(III) intracellular levels. In having a higher affinity for Fe(III) than Ti(IV), these ligands feature the appropriate balance between stability and lability to effectively transport Ti(IV) into cancer cells, release Ti(IV) via displacement by Fe(III), and deplete the intracellular Fe(III) levels. The cTfm ligand N,N'-di(o-hydroxybenzyl)ethylenediamine-N,N'-diacetic acid (HBED) was selected to explore the feasibility of the design strategy. Kinetic studies on the Fe(III) displacement process revealed that Ti(IV) can be transported and released into cells by HBED on a physiologically relevant time scale. Cell viability studies using A549 cancerous and MRC5 normal human lung cells and testing the cytotoxicity of HBED and its Ti(IV), Fe(III), and Ga(III) compounds demonstrate the importance of Fe(III) depletion in the proposed drug design strategy and the specificity of the strategy for Ti(IV) activity. The readily derivatized cTfm ligands demonstrate great promise for improved Ti(IV) anticancer drugs.

  13. Photophysical characterization of anticancer drug valrubicin in rHDL nanoparticles and its use as an imaging agent.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shah, Sunil; Chib, Rahul; Raut, Sangram; Bermudez, Jaclyn; Sabnis, Nirupama; Duggal, Divya; Kimball, Joseph D; Lacko, Andras G; Gryczynski, Zygmunt; Gryczynski, Ignacy

    2016-02-01

    Nanoparticles are target-specific drug delivery agents that are increasingly used in cancer therapy to enhance bioavailability and to reduce off target toxicity of anti-cancer agents. Valrubicin is an anti-cancer drug, currently approved only for vesicular bladder cancer treatment because of its poor water solubility. On the other hand, valrubicin carrying reconstituted high density lipoprotein (rHDL) nanoparticles appear ideally suited for extended applications, including systemic cancer chemotherapy. We determined selected fluorescence properties of the free (unencapsulated) drug vs. valrubicin incorporated into rHDL nanoparticles. We have found that upon encapsulation into rHDL nanoparticles the quantum yield of valrubicin fluorescence increased six fold while its fluorescence lifetime increased about 2 fold. Accordingly, these and potassium iodide (KI) quenching data suggest that upon incorporation, valrubicin is localized deep in the interior of the nanoparticle, inside the lipid matrix. Fluorescence anisotropy of the rHDL valrubicin nanoparticles was also found to be high along with extended rotational correlation time. The fluorescence of valrubicin could also be utilized to assess its distribution upon delivery to prostate cancer (PC3) cells. Overall the fluorescence properties of the rHDL: valrubicin complex reveal valuable novel characteristics of this drug delivery vehicle that may be particularly applicable when used in systemic (intravenous) therapy.

  14. Mapping Novel Metabolic Nodes Targeted by Anti-Cancer Drugs that Impair Triple-Negative Breast Cancer Pathogenicity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roberts, Lindsay S; Yan, Peter; Bateman, Leslie A; Nomura, Daniel K

    2017-03-08

    Triple-negative breast cancers (TNBCs) are estrogen receptor, progesterone receptor, and HER2 receptor-negative subtypes of breast cancers that show the worst prognoses and lack targeted therapies. Here, we have coupled the screening of ∼400 anticancer agents that are under development or in the clinic with chemoproteomic and metabolomic profiling to identify novel metabolic mechanisms for agents that impair TNBC pathogenicity. We identify 20 anticancer compounds that significantly impaired cell survival across multiple types of TNBC cells. Among these 20 leads, the phytoestrogenic natural product licochalcone A was of interest, since TNBCs are unresponsive to estrogenic therapies, indicating that licochalcone A was likely acting through another target. Using chemoproteomic profiling approaches, we reveal that licochalcone A impairs TNBC pathogenicity, not through modulating estrogen receptor activity but rather through inhibiting prostaglandin reductase 1, a metabolic enzyme involved in leukotriene B4 inactivation. We also more broadly performed metabolomic profiling to map additional metabolic mechanisms of compounds that impair TNBC pathogenicity. Overlaying lipidomic profiling with drug responses, we find that deubiquitinase inhibitors cause dramatic elevations in acyl carnitine levels, which impair mitochondrial respiration and contribute to TNBC pathogenic impairments. We thus put forth two unique metabolic nodes that are targeted by drugs or drug candidates that impair TNBC pathogenicity. Our results also showcase the utility of coupling drug screens with chemoproteomic and metabolomic profiling to uncover unique metabolic drivers of TNBC pathogenicity.

  15. The price we pay for progress: a meta-analysis of harms of newly approved anticancer drugs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niraula, Saroj; Seruga, Bostjan; Ocana, Alberto; Shao, Tiffany; Goldstein, Robyn; Tannock, Ian F; Amir, Eitan

    2012-08-20

    Registration of new anticancer drugs is usually based on results of randomized controlled trials (RCTs) showing improved efficacy when compared with standard therapy. There is relatively less emphasis on toxicity. In our study, we analyze serious toxicities of newly approved anticancer drugs reported in pivotal RCTs used for drug registration. We identified RCTs evaluating agents for the treatment of solid tumors approved by the US Food and Drug Administration between 2000 and 2010. Odds ratios (OR) and 95% CI were computed for three end points of safety and tolerability: treatment-related death, treatment-discontinuation related to toxicity, and grade 3 or 4 adverse events (AEs). These were then pooled in a meta-analysis. Correlations between these end points and the hazard ratios for overall survival (OS) and progression-free survival (PFS) were also assessed. Thirty-eight RCTs were analyzed. Compared with control groups, the odds of toxic death was greater for new agents (OR, 1.40; 95% CI, 1.15 to 1.70; P increase morbidity and treatment-related mortality. The balance between efficacy and toxicity may be less favorable in clinical practice because of selection of fewer patients with good performance status and limited comorbidities. Patients' baseline health characteristics should be considered when choosing therapy.

  16. Combination Anticancer Nanopreparations of Novel Proapoptotic Drug, TRAIL and siRNA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riehle, Robert D.

    . The addition of TNFa-related apoptosis-inducing ligand (TRAIL) bound to the surface of the micelle creates a combination micelle with excellent cytotoxic effects. TRAIL has been shown to be an effective apoptosis inducing ligand in a variety of in vitro and in vivo studies. TRAIL receptors are preferentially expressed on many cancer cell types as compared to healthy cells making this ligand an intriguing potential therapy. The combination of TRAIL and PIP3-PH inhibitors in a micellar delivery system has the potential to create a powerful anti-cancer therapeutic. Including modified siRNA to down regulate cancer defense mechanisms can further sensitize the cell to apoptosis. siRNA delivery has been shown to be a difficult task. Rapid metabolism and clearance in the blood hinders their ability to reach the tumor. Additionally, their large size and negative charge prevents them from crossing the cell membrane to reach their location of action. Reversibly conjugating a modified siRNA to a lipid thereby creating an siRNA-S-S-PE, allows for their incorporation into PEG-PE micelles. These mixed micelles have been shown to protect the siRNA and successfully transfect cells. This study aimed to combine the aforementioned therapeutics into a multifunctional PEG-PE based micelle delivery system. Novel proapoptotic drugs targeting the PIP3-PH binding domain have been successfully incorporated into the lipid core of the micelle. These drugs were able to effectively sensitize the cell to the effects of surface-bound TRAIL. Additionally, siRNA targeting the anti-apoptotic protein survivin was shown to be incorporated into the micelles and further sensitize the tumor to the effects of the above compounds. Lastly, conjugating transferrin (TF) to the surface of the micelle was shown increase the tumor cell targeting and cytotoxicity in vitro. Critical evaluation of this system was performed along the following specific aims: (1) characterization of PIP3-PH inhibition and cytotoxicity of

  17. Hollow superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoshells as a hydrophobic anticancer drug carrier: intracelluar pH-dependent drug release and enhanced cytotoxicity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Xiao-Ming; Yuan, Jing; Leung, Ken Cham-Fai; Lee, Siu-Fung; Sham, Kathy W Y; Cheng, Christopher H K; Au, Doris W T; Teng, Gao-Jun; Ahuja, Anil T; Wang, Yi-Xiang J

    2012-09-21

    With curcumin and doxorubicin (DOX) base as model drugs, intracellular delivery of hydrophobic anticancer drugs by hollow structured superparamagnetic iron oxide (SPIO) nanoshells (hydrodynamic diameter: 191.9 ± 2.6 nm) was studied in glioblastoma U-87 MG cells. SPIO nanoshell-based encapsulation provided a stable aqueous dispersion of the curcumin. After the SPIO nanoshells were internalized by U-87 MG cells, they localized at the acidic compartments of endosomes and lysosomes. In endosome/lysosome-mimicking buffers with a pH of 4.5-5.5, pH-dependent drug release was observed from curcumin or DOX loaded SPIO nanoshells (curcumin/SPIO or DOX/SPIO). Compared with the free drug, the intracellular curcumin content delivered via curcumin/SPIO was 30 fold higher. Increased intracellular drug content for DOX base delivered via DOX/SPIO was also confirmed, along with a fast intracellular DOX release that was attributed to its protonation in the acidic environment. DOX/SPIO enhanced caspase-3 activity by twofold compared with free DOX base. The concentration that induced 50% cytotoxic effect (CC(50)) was 0.05 ± 0.03 μg ml(-1) for DOX/SPIO, while it was 0.13 ± 0.02 μg ml(-1) for free DOX base. These results suggested SPIO nanoshells might be a promising intracellular carrier for hydrophobic anticancer drugs.

  18. An amphiphilic graft copolymer-based nanoparticle platform for reduction-responsive anticancer and antimalarial drug delivery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Najer, Adrian; Wu, Dalin; Nussbaumer, Martin G.; Schwertz, Geoffrey; Schwab, Anatol; Witschel, Matthias C.; Schäfer, Anja; Diederich, François; Rottmann, Matthias; Palivan, Cornelia G.; Beck, Hans-Peter; Meier, Wolfgang

    2016-08-01

    Medical applications of anticancer and antimalarial drugs often suffer from low aqueous solubility, high systemic toxicity, and metabolic instability. Smart nanocarrier-based drug delivery systems provide means of solving these problems at once. Herein, we present such a smart nanoparticle platform based on self-assembled, reduction-responsive amphiphilic graft copolymers, which were successfully synthesized through thiol-disulfide exchange reaction between thiolated hydrophilic block and pyridyl disulfide functionalized hydrophobic block. These amphiphilic graft copolymers self-assembled into nanoparticles with mean diameters of about 30-50 nm and readily incorporated hydrophobic guest molecules. Fluorescence correlation spectroscopy (FCS) was used to study nanoparticle stability and triggered release of a model compound in detail. Long-term colloidal stability and model compound retention within the nanoparticles was found when analyzed in cell media at body temperature. In contrast, rapid, complete reduction-triggered disassembly and model compound release was achieved within a physiological reducing environment. The synthesized copolymers revealed no intrinsic cellular toxicity up to 1 mg mL-1. Drug-loaded reduction-sensitive nanoparticles delivered a hydrophobic model anticancer drug (doxorubicin, DOX) to cancer cells (HeLa cells) and an experimental, metabolically unstable antimalarial drug (the serine hydroxymethyltransferase (SHMT) inhibitor (+/-)-1) to Plasmodium falciparum-infected red blood cells (iRBCs), with higher efficacy compared to similar, non-sensitive drug-loaded nanoparticles. These responsive copolymer-based nanoparticles represent a promising candidate as smart nanocarrier platform for various drugs to be applied to different diseases, due to the biocompatibility and biodegradability of the hydrophobic block, and the protein-repellent hydrophilic block.Medical applications of anticancer and antimalarial drugs often suffer from low aqueous

  19. Determination of platinum traces contamination by graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrometry after preconcentration by cloud point extraction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chappuy, M. [Analytical Development Laboratory, Pharmaceutical Establishment of Paris Hospitals, 7 rue du Fer a Moulin, 75005 Paris (France); Caudron, E., E-mail: eric.caudron@eps.aphp.fr [Analytical Development Laboratory, Pharmaceutical Establishment of Paris Hospitals, 7 rue du Fer a Moulin, 75005 Paris (France); Groupe de Chimie Analytique de Paris-Sud, EA 4041, IFR 141, School of Pharmacy, Univ Paris-Sud, 92296 Chatenay-Malabry (France); Bellanger, A. [Department of Pharmacy, Pitie-Salpetriere Hospital (Paris Public Hospital Authority), 47 boulevard de l' hopital, 75013 Paris (France); Pradeau, D. [Analytical Development Laboratory, Pharmaceutical Establishment of Paris Hospitals, 7 rue du Fer a Moulin, 75005 Paris (France)

    2010-04-15

    A simple and sensitive method is described for the determination of platinum surface contamination originating from cisplatin, carboplatin and oxaliplatin. Following extraction from swabs and preconcentration with the cloud point extraction (CPE) method, detection was by graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrometry (GFAAS). After desorption of platinum compounds from the swab, CPE involved on preconcentration of platinum in aqueous solution with diethyldithiocarbamate (DDTC) as chelating agent and Triton X-114 as extraction medium. DDTC is not only a chelating agent, but may also be a good candidate for the inactivation of platinum compounds. DDTC is recommended by the Word Health Organization (WHO) for the destruction of platinum-based anticancer drugs. The main factors affecting CPE efficiency, pH of the sample solution, concentrations of DDTC and Triton X-114, equilibration temperature and incubation time, were evaluated in order to enhance sensitivity of the method. The desorption of platinum compounds from the swab was investigated in parallel. Since platinum is bound to DDTC, it must exchange with copper in order to enhance platinum atomizing by GFAAS. A preconcentration factor of 29 was obtained for 10 mL of a platinum solution at 10 {mu}g mL{sup -1}. In optimal conditions, the limit of detection was 0.2 ng mL{sup -1}, corresponding to 2.0 ng of platinum metal on the swab. Absorbance was linear between 0.7 and 15 ng mL{sup -1}. The proposed method was applied for the determination of surface contamination by platinum compounds with correct results.

  20. Importance of Kier-Hall topological indices in the QSAR of anticancer drug design.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nandi, Sisir; Bagchi, Manish C

    2012-06-01

    , the structural model of an assembled entity (e.g. a molecule consisting of atoms) may be defined as the pattern of relationship among its parts as distinct from the values associated with them. Constitutional formulae of molecules are graphs where vertices represent the set of atoms and edges represent chemical bonds. The pattern of connectedness of atoms in a molecule is preserved by constitutional graphs. A graph (more correctly a non-directed graph) G = [V, E] consists of a finite non-empty set V of points together with a prescribed set E of unordered pairs of distinct points of V. Thus the mathematical characterization of structures represents structural invariants having successful applications in chemical documentation, characterization of molecular branching, enumeration of molecular constitutional associated with a particular empirical formula, calculation of quantum chemical parameters for the generation of quantitative structure-property-activity correlations. Kier developed a number of structural invariants which are now-a-days called as topological indices with wide range of practical applications for QSAR and drug design. The present paper is restricted to the review of Kier-Hall topological indices for QSAR and anticancer drug design for 2,5-bis(1-aziridinyl) 1,4-benzoquinone (BABQ), pyridopyrimidine, 4-anilinoquinazoline and 2-Phenylindoles compounds utilizing various statistical multivariate regression analyses.

  1. PEGylated dendritic diaminocyclohexyl-platinum (II) conjugates as pH-responsive drug delivery vehicles with enhanced tumor accumulation and antitumor efficacy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pan, Dayi; She, Wenchuan; Guo, Chunhua; Luo, Kui; Yi, Qiangying; Gu, Zhongwei

    2014-12-01

    Environmentally responsive peptide dendrimers loaded with drugs are suitable candidates for cancer therapy. In this study, we report the preparation and characterization of mPEGylated peptide dendrimer-linked diaminocyclohexyl platinum (II) (dendrimer-DACHPt) conjugates as pH-responsive drug delivery vehicles for tumor suppression in mice. The DACHPt has a molecular structure, is and activity closely related to oxaliplatin and was linked to dendrimer via N,O-chelate coordination. The products were pH-responsive and released drug significantly faster in acidic environments (pH 5.0) than pH 7.4. Consequently, the conjugates suppressed tumor growth better than clinical oxaliplatin(®) without inducing toxicity in an SKOV-3 human ovarian cancer xenograft. Through the systemic delivery of conjugates, 25-fold higher tumor platinum uptake at 36 h post-injection was seen observed due to the enhanced permeability and retention (EPR) effect thereby remarkably enhancing the therapeutic indexes of this small-molecule drug. Thus, the mPEGylated peptide dendrimer-linked DACH-platinum conjugates are novel potential drug delivery systems with implications in future ovarian cancer therapy.

  2. Human DNA ligase and DNA polymerase as molecular targets for heavy metals and anticancer drugs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yang, S.

    1992-01-01

    DNA ligase and DNA polymerase play important roles in DNA replication, repair, and recombination. Frequencies of spontaneous and chemical- and physical-induced mutations are correlated to the fidelity of DNA replication. This dissertation elucidates the mechanisms of the DNA ligation reaction by DNA ligases and demonstrates that human DNA ligase I and DNA polymerase [alpha] are the molecular targets for two metal ions, Zn[sup 2+] and Cd[sup 2+], and an anticancer drug, F-ara-ATP. The formation of the AMP-DNA intermediate and the successive ligation reaction by human DNA ligases were analyzed. Both reactions showed their substrate specificity for ligases I and II, required Mg2+, and were inhibited by ATP. A protein inhibitor from HeLa cells and specific for human DNA ligase I but not ligase II and T4 ligase was discovered. It reversibly inhibited DNA ligation activity but not the AMP-binding activity due to the formation of a reversible ligase I-inhibitor complex. F-ara-ATP inhibited human DNA ligase I activity by competing with ATP for the AMP-binding site of DNA ligase I, forming a ligase I-F-ara-AMP complex, as well as when it was incorporated at 3[prime]-terminus of DNA nick by DNA polymerase [alpha]. All steps of the DNA ligation reaction were inhibited by Zn[sup 2+] and Cd[sup 2+] in a concentration-dependent manner. Both ions did not show the ability to change the fidelity of DNA ligation reaction catalyzed by human DNA ligase I. However, Zn[sup 2+] and Cd[sup 2+] showed their contradictory effects on the fidelity of the reaction by human DNA polymerase [alpha]. Zn[sup 2+] decreased the frequency of misinsertion but less affected that of mispair extension. On the contrary, Cd[sup 2+] increased the frequencies of both misinsertion and mispair extension at very low concentration. The data provided strong evidence in the molecular mechanisms for the mutagenicity of zinc and cadmium, and were comparable with the results previously reported.

  3. Platinum metals in the environment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zereini, Fathi [Frankfurt Univ. (Germany). Dept. of Environmental Analytical Chemistry; Wiseman, Clare L.S. (ed.) [Toronto Univ. (Canada). School of the Environment

    2015-03-01

    Platinum/Aluminum Oxide Model Substance; Solid State Platinum Speciation from X-ray Absorption Spectroscopic Studies of Fresh and Road Aged Three Way and Diesel Vehicle Emission Control Catalysts. 4. ENVIRONMENTAL BIOAVAILABILITY AND BIOMONITORING OF PGE: Bioavailability of Platinum Group Elements to Plants-A Review; Monitoring of Platinum Group Element Deposition by Bryophytes; Field Studies on PGE in Aquatic Ecosystems; Laboratory Studies on the Uptake and Bioaccumulation of PGE by Aquatic Plants and Animals; Biological Effects of PGE on Aquatic Organisms; Mechanisms of Uptake and Interaction of Platinum Based Drugs in Eukaryotic Cells. 5. HUMAN HEALTH EXPOSURES TO PGE AND POSSIBLE RISKS: Biomonitoring of Platinum Group Elements (PGEs) in Occupational Medicine; Platinum Metals in Airborne Particulate Matter and Their Bioaccessibility; Occupational Health Aspects of Platinum.

  4. Anticancer Drug Resistance of HeLa Cells Transfected With Rat Glutathione S-transferase pi Gene

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WEI CAO; JIN ZUO; YAN MENG; QIANG WEI; ZHAO-HU SHI; LI-MEI JU; FU-DE FANG

    2003-01-01

    Objective To establish a cytologic expressing system of rat glutathione S-transferase pi(GST-pi) cDNA for detecting the resistance of HeLa cells to anticancer drugs. Methods Theassessment was made with various anticancer drugs (adriamycin, mitomycin, cisplatinum andvincristine) that showed different cytotoxicities in transfectant HeLa cells with pSV-GT containing ratGST-pi cDNA (HeLa/pSV-GT) or control pSV-neo (HeLa/pSV-neo). Expression levels of GST-pimRNA in HeLa/pSV-GT and HeLa/pSV-neo were measured by in situ hybridization usingDigoxin-labelled cDNA probe. Results HeLa/pSV-GT expressed significantly high degree ofGST-pi mRNA, whereas both HeLa/pSV-neo and HeLa cells had very low expression. Cytotoxicitiesof HeLa/pSV-GT and HeLa/pSV-neo with 4 anticancer drugs were measured by MTT assay. Drugconcentrations for yielding 50% inhibition (IC50) in HeLa/pSV-GT by adriamycin, mitomycin andcisplatinum were 70.13 μg/mL, 10.95 μg/mL and 16.52 μg/mL, respectively. In contrast, IC50 inHeLa/pSV-neo was 10.34 μg/mL, 7.48 μg/mL and 13.70 μg/mL, respectively. The cytotoxicities ofvincristine on both HeLa/pSV-GT and HeLa/pSV-neo were not significantly different. ConclusionsOur findings suggest that HeLa/pSV-GT containing rat GST-pi cDNA is resistant to some anticancerdrugs due to overexpression of GST-pi. Also, HeLa/pSV-GT cell line could serve as a usefulcytogenetic model for further research.

  5. Efficacy analysis of two drugs consisting platinum combined with first-line chemotherapeutics regimens on 117 elderly patients with advanced non-small cell lung carcinoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Li-li ZHANG

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Objective To investigate the therapeutic effects of Gemcitabine(GEM, Vinorelbine(NVB,Paclitaxel(TAX and other first-line chemotherapeutics plus platinum containing drugs on the elderly patients with advanced non-small cell lung cancer(NSCLC who had undergone surgery, and analyze the clinicopathological factors influencing the prognosis. Methods One hundred and seventeen advanced NSCLC patients aged 60 or over were treated with GP(GEM+platinum, or NP(NVB+platinum, or TP(TAX+platinum, or other first-line chemotherapeutics plus platinum(OCP after surgery, and their clinical data were then retrospectively studied to look for the relationship of patients' prognosis to clinicopathological factors(gender, operation methods, pathologicaltypes, differentiation, clinical stages.The survival curve was plotted with Kaplan-Meier method, hypothesis test was performed by log-rank, and the independent prognostic factors were screened with Cox proportional hazards regression model. Results Theone-, three- and five-year survival rates of the 117 patients were 47.23%,17.52% and 8.05%, respectively. The progression free survival(PFS of GP, NP, TP and OCP groups were 6.0, 5.2, 6.1 and5.5 months(P>0.05, respectively. The median progression free survival was 5.7 months. Univariate and multivariate analysis showed that the differentiated degrees and clinical stages of elderly NSCLC patients were the independent prognostic factors. Conclusions Clinicopathological factors(differentiated degree andclinical stages are closely related to one-, three- and five-year survival rates of advanced NSCLC in elderly patients who received treatment of first-line chemotherapeutics plus platinum. However, the efficacy ofGP, NP, TP or OCP shows no significant difference.

  6. Fresh Water Cyanobacteria Geitlerinema sp. CCC728 and Arthrospira sp. CCC729 as an Anticancer Drug Resource.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Akanksha Srivastava

    Full Text Available An increasing number of cancer patients worldwide, especially in third world countries, have raised concern to explore natural drug resources, such as the less explored fresh water filamentous cyanobacteria. Six strains of cyanobacteria (Phormidium sp. CCC727, Geitlerinema sp. CCC728, Arthrospira sp. CCC729, Phormidium sp. CCC731, Phormidium sp. CCC730, and Leptolyngbya sp. CCC732 were isolated (paddy fields and ponds in the Banaras Hindu University, campus and five strains screened for anticancer potential using human colon adenocarcinoma (HT29 and human kidney adenocarcinoma (A498 cancer cell lines. Geitlerinema sp. CCC728 and Arthrospira sp. CCC729 were the most potent as determined by examination of morphological features and by inhibition of growth by graded concentrations of crude extracts and thin-layer chromatography (TLC eluates. Cell cycle analysis and multiplex assays using cancer biomarkers also confirmed Geitlerinema sp. CCC728 and Arthrospira sp. CCC729 as cancer drug resources. Apoptotic studies in the cells of A498 (cancer and MCF-10A (normal human epithelial exposed to crude extracts and TLC fractions revealed no significant impact on MCF-10A cells emphasizing its importance in the development of anticancer drug. Identification of biomolecules from these extracts are in progress.

  7. Fresh Water Cyanobacteria Geitlerinema sp. CCC728 and Arthrospira sp. CCC729 as an Anticancer Drug Resource.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Srivastava, Akanksha; Tiwari, Ratnakar; Srivastava, Vikas; Singh, Tej Bali; Asthana, Ravi Kumar

    2015-01-01

    An increasing number of cancer patients worldwide, especially in third world countries, have raised concern to explore natural drug resources, such as the less explored fresh water filamentous cyanobacteria. Six strains of cyanobacteria (Phormidium sp. CCC727, Geitlerinema sp. CCC728, Arthrospira sp. CCC729, Phormidium sp. CCC731, Phormidium sp. CCC730, and Leptolyngbya sp. CCC732) were isolated (paddy fields and ponds in the Banaras Hindu University, campus) and five strains screened for anticancer potential using human colon adenocarcinoma (HT29) and human kidney adenocarcinoma (A498) cancer cell lines. Geitlerinema sp. CCC728 and Arthrospira sp. CCC729 were the most potent as determined by examination of morphological features and by inhibition of growth by graded concentrations of crude extracts and thin-layer chromatography (TLC) eluates. Cell cycle analysis and multiplex assays using cancer biomarkers also confirmed Geitlerinema sp. CCC728 and Arthrospira sp. CCC729 as cancer drug resources. Apoptotic studies in the cells of A498 (cancer) and MCF-10A (normal human epithelial) exposed to crude extracts and TLC fractions revealed no significant impact on MCF-10A cells emphasizing its importance in the development of anticancer drug. Identification of biomolecules from these extracts are in progress.

  8. Gold Nanorods Conjugated with Doxorubicin and cRGD for Combined Anticancer Drug Delivery and PET Imaging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuling Xiao, Hao Hong, Vyara Z. Matson, Alireza Javadi, Wenjin Xu, Yunan Yang, Yin Zhang, Jonathan W. Engle, Robert J. Nickles, Weibo Cai, Douglas A. Steeber, Shaoqin Gong

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available A multifunctional gold nanorod (GNR-based nanoplatform for targeted anticancer drug delivery and positron emission tomography (PET imaging of tumors was developed and characterized. An anti-cancer drug (i.e., doxorubicin (DOX was covalently conjugated onto PEGylated (PEG: polyethylene glycol GNR nanocarriers via a hydrazone bond to achieve pH-sensitive controlled drug release. Tumor-targeting ligands (i.e., the cyclo(Arg-Gly-Asp-D-Phe-Cys peptides, cRGD and 64Cu-chelators (i.e., 1,4,7-triazacyclononane-N, N', N''-triacetic acid (NOTA were conjugated onto the distal ends of the PEG arms to achieve active tumor-targeting and PET imaging, respectively. Based on flow cytometry analysis, cRGD-conjugated nanocarriers (i.e., GNR-DOX-cRGD exhibited a higher cellular uptake and cytotoxicity than non-targeted ones (i.e., GNR-DOX in vitro. However, GNR-DOX-cRGD and GNR-DOX nanocarriers had similar in vivo biodistribution according to in vivo PET imaging and biodistribution studies. Due to the unique optical properties of GNRs, this multifunctional GNR-based nanoplatform can potentially be optimized for combined cancer therapies (chemotherapy and photothermal therapy and multimodality imaging (PET, optical, X-ray computed tomography (CT, etc..

  9. [Classification of anticancer drugs with different mechanisms based on amino-acid consumption profiling in culture media].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Xiaofei; Wang, Longxing; Yang, Qianxu; Xiao, Hongbin

    2011-04-01

    An approach for quantitative determination of amino-acid consumption profiling in culture media by high performance liquid chromatography with fluorescence detection (HPLC-FLD) was developed and validated, using o-phthalic dicarboxaldehyde (OPA) as the derivatizing reagent and norvaline as the internal standard. Mobile phase A was 10 mmol/L Na2HPO4Na2B4O7 buffer (pH 7.95), and mobile phase B was acetonitrile-methanol-water (45:45:10, v/v/v). The linear elution program was 5% B at the start and 52% B at the end in 35 min. The 17 free amino-acids (FAAs) were separated satisfactorily in 33 min. Following HeLa cells incubation in conditioned medias of taxol (4 micromol/L) and mitomycin (75 micromol/L), respectively, with control for 24 h, the media 17 amino-acid consumption profilings were determined, and then analyzed by multivariate statistical analysis based on Matlab7.1 software platform. Relation analysis performed by partial least squares-discriminant analysis (PLS-DA) indicated that in comparison with the control group, the media amino-acid consumption profiling can distinguish the two anticancer drugs with different mechanisms, which provides a new perspective for the pre-classification of drug action mechanisms during the screening of new anticancer drugs. Meanwhile, the idea from the outer into the inner has convenient and economic characteristics.

  10. Commercialization strategy of the herbal composition HemoHIM as a complementary drug for anti-cancer therapies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jo, Sungkee; Jung, Uhee; Park, Haeran

    2013-01-15

    Ο Purpose - Establishment of strategy for the development of HemoHIM as a complementary drug for cancer therapies including non-clinical data preparation, obtainment of a research project grant, base of manufacturing process and raw material standardization Ο Research Results - Examination and confirmation of the essential requirements to develop the complementary drug for anticancer therapies by consulting with Korea FDA, and clinical CRO, and medical experts (animal efficacy study, toxicological safety test, standard analytical method, raw material standardization) - Obtainment of a governmental research project for 3 years from Ministry of Health and Welfare to develop HemoHIM as an complementary herbal drug for anti-cancer therapies - Acquisition of fundamental data on the manufacturing process and the raw material standardization for the optimal efficacy of HemoHIM Ο Expected benefit - Planning to get the approval of IND from Korea FDA by 2015 after completing the non-clinical study through the on-going project from Ministry of Health and Welfare - Planning to commercialize the product by 2017.

  11. Synthesis and biological evaluation of novel thalidomide analogues as potential anticancer drugs

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Tao Wang; Yi Hua Zhang; Shan Yu; Hui Ji; Yi Sheng Lai; Si Xun Peng

    2008-01-01

    In search of novel anticancer agents, a series of thalidomide analogs (6a-j) were designed and synthesized. Cytotoxicity of these compounds against human hepatoma cells (HepG2) was evaluated by MTT method. Compounds 6d, 6h and 6i showed significant cytotoxic activities comparable to or stronger than control 5-fluorouracil.

  12. Long-term cultivation of colorectal carcinoma cells with anti-cancer drugs induces drug resistance and telomere elongation: an in vitro study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mochizuki Hidetaka

    2001-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The role of telomerase activation in the expression and/or maintenance of drug resistance is not clearly understood. Therefore, we investigated the relationships, among the telomerase activity, telomere length and the expression of multidrug resistance genes in colorectal cancer cell lines cultivated with anti-cancer drugs. Methods LoVo and DLD-1 cells were continuously grown in the presence of both CDDP and 5-FU for up to 100 days. Cell proliferation, telomerase activity, telomere length and the expression of multidrug resistance genes were serially monitored as the PDL increased. Results The expression of multidrug resistance genes tended to increase as the PDL increased. However, an abnormal aneuploid clone was not detected as far as the cells were monitored by a DNA histogram analysis. Tumor cells showing resistance to anti-cancer drugs revealed a higher cell proliferation rate. The telomere length gradually increased with a progressive PDL. The telomerase activity reached a maximum level at 15 PDL in LoVo cells and at 27 PDL in DLD-1 cells. An increase in the mRNA expression of the telomerase components, especially in hTERT and in hTR, was observed at the same PDLs. Conclusions These results suggest that a high telomerase activity and an elongation of telomeres both appear to help maintain and/or increase drug resistance in colorectal cancer cells. Cancer cells with long telomeres and a high proliferative activity may thus be able to better survive exposure to anti-cancer drugs. This is presumably due to an increased chromosome stability and a strong expression of both mdr-1 and MRP genes.

  13. 3-Bromopyruvate as inhibitor of tumour cell energy metabolism and chemopotentiator of platinum drugs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ihrlund, Linda Strandberg; Hernlund, Emma; Khan, Omar; Shoshan, Maria C

    2008-06-01

    Tumour cells depend on aerobic glycolysis for adenosine triphosphate (ATP) production, making energy metabolism an interesting therapeutic target. 3-Bromopyruvate (BP) has been shown by others to inhibit hexokinase and eradicate mouse hepatocarcinomas. We report that similar to the glycolysis inhibitor 2-deoxyglucose (DG), BP rapidly decreased cellular ATP within hours, but unlike DG, BP concomitantly induced mitochondrial depolarization without affecting levels of reducing equivalents. Over 24h, and at equitoxic doses, DG reduced glucose consumption more than did BP. The observed BP-induced loss of ATP is therefore largely due to mitochondrial effects. Cell death induced over 24h by BP, but not DG, was blocked by N-acetylcysteine, indicating involvement of reactive oxygen species. BP-induced cytotoxicity was independent of p53. When combined with cisplatin or oxaliplatin, BP led to massive cell death. The anti-proliferative effects of low-dose platinum were strikingly potentiated also in resistant p53-deficient cells. Together with the reported lack of toxicity, this indicates the potential of BP as a clinical chemopotentiating agent.

  14. Unblocking blockbusters: using boolean text-mining to optimise clinical trial design and timeline for novel anticancer drugs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Epstein, Richard J

    2009-08-17

    Two problems now threaten the future of anticancer drug development: (i) the information explosion has made research into new target-specific drugs more duplication-prone, and hence less cost-efficient; and (ii) high-throughput genomic technologies have failed to deliver the anticipated early windfall of novel first-in-class drugs. Here it is argued that the resulting crisis of blockbuster drug development may be remedied in part by innovative exploitation of informatic power. Using scenarios relating to oncology, it is shown that rapid data-mining of the scientific literature can refine therapeutic hypotheses and thus reduce empirical reliance on preclinical model development and early-phase clinical trials. Moreover, as personalised medicine evolves, this approach may inform biomarker-guided phase III trial strategies for noncytotoxic (antimetastatic) drugs that prolong patient survival without necessarily inducing tumor shrinkage. Though not replacing conventional gold standards, these findings suggest that this computational research approach could reduce costly 'blue skies' R&D investment and time to market for new biological drugs, thereby helping to reverse unsustainable drug price inflation.

  15. Unblocking Blockbusters: Using Boolean Text-Mining to Optimise Clinical Trial Design and Timeline for Novel Anticancer Drugs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Richard J. Epstein

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available Two problems now threaten the future of anticancer drug development: (i the information explosion has made research into new target-specific drugs more duplication-prone, and hence less cost-efficient; and (ii high-throughput genomic technologies have failed to deliver the anticipated early windfall of novel first-in-class drugs. Here it is argued that the resulting crisis of blockbuster drug development may be remedied in part by innovative exploitation of informatic power. Using scenarios relating to oncology, it is shown that rapid data-mining of the scientific literature can refine therapeutic hypotheses and thus reduce empirical reliance on preclinical model development and early-phase clinical trials. Moreover, as personalised medicine evolves, this approach may inform biomarker-guided phase III trial strategies for noncytotoxic (antimetastatic drugs that prolong patient survival without necessarily inducing tumor shrinkage. Though not replacing conventional gold standards, these findings suggest that this computational research approach could reduce costly ‘blue skies’ R&D investment and time to market for new biological drugs, thereby helping to reverse unsustainable drug price inflation.

  16. Unblocking Blockbusters: Using Boolean Text-Mining to Optimise Clinical Trial Design and Timeline for Novel Anticancer Drugs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Richard J. Epstein

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Two problems now threaten the future of anticancer drug development: (i the information explosion has made research into new target-specific drugs more duplication-prone, and hence less cost-efficient; and (ii high-throughput genomic technologies have failed to deliver the anticipated early windfall of novel first-in-class drugs. Here it is argued that the resulting crisis of blockbuster drug development may be remedied in part by innovative exploitation of informatic power. Using scenarios relating to oncology, it is shown that rapid data-mining of the scientific literature can refine therapeutic hypotheses and thus reduce empirical reliance on preclinical model development and early-phase clinical trials. Moreover, as personalised medicine evolves, this approach may inform biomarker-guided phase III trial strategies for noncytotoxic (antimetastatic drugs that prolong patient survival without necessarily inducing tumor shrinkage. Though not replacing conventional gold standards, these findings suggest that this computational research approach could reduce costly ‘blue skies’ R&D investment and time to market for new biological drugs, thereby helping to reverse unsustainable drug price inflation.

  17. pH-responsive glycol chitosan-cross-linked carboxymethyl-β-cyclodextrin nanoparticles for controlled release of anticancer drugs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wang Y

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Yiwen Wang,* Fei Qin,* Haina Tan, Yan Zhang, Miao Jiang, Mei Lu, Xin Yao School of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, University of Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing, People’s Republic of China *These authors contributed equally to this work Abstract: Carboxymethyl-β-cyclodextrin (CMβ-CD-modified glycol chitosan (GCS nanoparticles (GCS-CMβ-CD NPs were synthesized, and their pH-sensitive drug-release properties were investigated. GCS-CMβ-CD NPs could encapsulate doxorubicin hydrochloride (DOX, and the encapsulation efficiency and loading capacity increased with the amount of CMβ-CD. Drug-release studies indicate that DOX released was greater in acidic medium (pH 5.0 than in weakly basic medium (pH 7.4. The mechanism underlying the pH-sensitive properties of the carrier was analyzed. Finally, the MCF-7 (human breast cancer and SW480 cell lines (human colon cancer were used to evaluate the cytotoxicity of the NPs. The drug-loaded carriers show good inhibition of the growth of cancer cells compared with free DOX, and the carriers have good biocompatibility. In addition, the drug-loaded NPs have sustained drug-release properties. All these properties of the newly synthesized GCS-CMβ-CD NPs suggest a promising potential as an effective anticancer drug-delivery system for controlled drug release. Keywords: MCF-7, SW480, surface plasmon resonance, encapsulation efficiency, loading capacity, cell viability

  18. Anticancer peptides from bacteria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tomasz M. Karpiński

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Cancer is a leading cause of death in the world. The rapid development of medicine and pharmacology allows to create new and effective anticancer drugs. Among modern anticancer drugs are bacterial proteins. Until now has been shown anticancer activity among others azurin and exotoxin A from Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Pep27anal2 from Streptococcus pneumoniae, diphtheria toxin from Corynebacterium diphtheriae, and recently discovered Entap from Enterococcus sp. The study presents the current data regarding the properties, action and anticancer activity of listed peptides.

  19. Platinum hypersensitivity and desensitization

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Miyamoto, Shingo; Okada, Rika; Ando, Kazumichi

    2015-01-01

    .... Desensitization, which gradually increases the concentration of the anticancer drug considered to be the antigen until the target dosage, has been reported as being particularly effective, with a success rate of 80-100...

  20. Clinical developments of chemotherapeutic nanomedicines: polymers and liposomes for delivery of camptothecins and platinum (II) drugs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kieler-Ferguson, Heidi M; Fréchet, Jean M J; Szoka, Francis C

    2013-01-01

    For the past 40 years, liposomal and polymeric delivery vehicles have been studied as systems capable of modulating the cytotoxicity of small molecule chemotherapeutics, increasing tumor bearing animal survival times, and improving drug targeting. Although a number of macromolecular-drug conjugates have progressed to clinical trials, tuning drug release to maintain efficacy in conjunction with controlling drug toxicity has prevented the clinical adoption of many vehicles. In this article, we review the motivations for and approaches to polymer and liposomal delivery with regard to camptothecin and cisplatin delivery.

  1. Platinum (IV)-fatty acid conjugates overcome inherently and acquired Cisplatin resistant cancer cell lines: an in-vitro study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ratzon, Einav; Najajreh, Yousef; Salem, Rami; Khamaisie, Hazem; Ruthardt, Martin; Mahajna, Jamal

    2016-02-23

    Platinum-based drugs are used as cancer chemotherapeutics for the last 40 years. However, drug resistance and nephrotoxicity are the major limitations of the use of platinum-based compounds in cancer therapy. Platinum (IV) complexes are believed to act as platinum prodrugs and are able to overcome some of platinum (II) limitations. A number of previously sensitized platinum (IV) complexes were evaluated for their anti-cancer activity by monitoring ability to affect proliferation, clonigenicity and apoptosis induction of Cisplatin sensitive and resistant cancer cells. In addition, the uptake of Cisplatin and the platinum (IV) derivatives to Cisplatin sensitive and resistant cancer cells was monitored. The bis-octanoatoplatinum (IV) complex (RJY13), a Cisplatin derivative with octanoate as axial ligand, exhibited strong anti-proliferative effect on the Cisplatin resistant and sensitive ovarian cells, A2780cisR and A2780, respectively. Moreover, RJY13 exhibited good activity in inhibiting clonigenicity of both cells. Anti-proliferative activity of RJY13 was mediated by induction of apoptosis. Interestingly, a bis-lauratopaltinum (IV) complex (RJY6) was highly potent in inhibiting clonigenicity of both Cisplatin sensitive and Cisplatin resistant cells, however, exhibited reduced activity in assays that utilize cells growing in two dimensional (2D) conditions. The uptake of Cisplatin was reduced by 30% in A2780 in which the copper transporter-1 (Ctr1) was silenced. Moreover, uptake of RJY6 was marginally dependent on Ctr1, while uptake of RJY13 was Ctr1-independent. Our data demonstrated the potential of platinum (IV) prodrugs in overcoming acquired and inherited drug resistance in cancer cell lines. Moreover, our data demonstrated that the uptake of Cisplatin is partially dependent on Ctr1 transporter, while uptake of RJY6 is marginally dependent on Ctr1 and RJY13 is Ctr1-independent. In addition, our data illustrated the therapeutic potential of platinum (IV) prodrugs

  2. Strategy to enhance the anticancer efficacy of X-ray radiotherapy in melanoma cells by platinum complexes, the role of ROS-mediated signaling pathways.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Qiang; Lan, Guoqiang; Zhou, Yangliang; Huang, Jiamin; Liang, Yuanwei; Zheng, Wenjie; Fu, Xiaoyan; Fan, Cundong; Chen, Tianfeng

    2014-11-01

    Radiotherapy plays an important role in treatment of cancers with low toxicity to the surrounding normal tissues. However, it still fails to eradicate hypoxic tumors due to the occurrence of radioresistance. Therefore, the search for new radiation sensitizers is of great significance. Platinum (Pt) complexes have been identified as potential radiation sensitizers to increase the sensitivity of cancer cells to radiotherapy. In the present study, we have synthesized four Pt complexes containing (2 - benzimidazole [4, 5-f] - [1, 10] phenanthroline) ligand and found that they could effectively enhance the X-ray-induced growth inhibition against A375 human melanoma cells through induction of G2/M cell cycle arrest. In contrast, they showed much lower cytotoxicity toward human normal cells. The complexes also dramatically inhibited the TrxR activity and caused intracellular ROS overproduction, due to the Auger electron effect of heavy metal element under X-ray radiation. Excessive ROS triggered DNA damage and activated downstream signaling pathways, including the phosphorylation of p53 and p38MAPK, and down-regulation of phosphorylated AKT and ERK, finally resulted in increase of radiosensitivity and inhibition of tumor reproduction. Taken together, our results suggest that the synthetic Pt complexes could be further developed as sensitizers of X-ray radiotherapy.

  3. Polymer-drug compatibility: a guide to the development of delivery systems for the anticancer agent, ellipticine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Jubo; Xiao, Yuehua; Allen, Christine

    2004-01-01

    To establish a method for predicting polymer-drug compatibility as a means to guide formulation development, we carried out physicochemical analyses of polymer-drug pairs and compared the difference in total and partial solubility parameters of polymer and drug. For these studies, we employed a range of biodegradable polymers and the anticancer agent Ellipticine as the model drug. The partial and total solubility parameters for the polymer and drug were calculated using the group contribution method. Drug-polymer pairs with different enthalpy of mixing values were analyzed by physicochemical techniques including X-ray diffraction and Fourier transform infrared. Polymers identified to be compatible [i.e., polycaprolactone (PCL) and poly-beta-benzyl-L-aspartate (PBLA)] and incompatible [i.e., poly (d,l-lactide (PLA)], by the above mentioned methods, were used to formulate Ellipticine. Specifically, Ellipticine was loaded into PBLA, PCL, and PLA films using a solvent casting method to produce a local drug formulation; while, polyethylene oxide (PEO)-b-polycaprolactone (PCL) and PEO-b-poly (d,l-lactide) (PLA) copolymer micelles were prepared by both dialysis and dry down methods resulting in a formulation for systemic administration. The drug release profiles for all formulations and the drug loading efficiency for the micelle formulations were also measured. In this way, we compared formulation characteristics with predictions from physicochemical analyses and comparison of total and partial solubility parameters. Overall, a good correlation was obtained between drug formulation characteris