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  1. Enhancement by platelets of oxygen radical responses of human neutrophils

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    McCulloch, K.K.; Powell, J.; Johnson, K.J.; Ward, P.A.

    1986-03-01

    When human blood neutrophils were incubated with immune complexes (consisting of IgG antibody) in the presence of platelets, there was a 2 to 10 fold enhancement in the generation of O-/sub 2/ and H/sub 2/O/sub 2/. This enhancement phenomenon was proportional to the dose of immune complex added and the number of platelets present. The response was not agonist specific since similar enhancement also occurred with the following agonists: phorbol myristate acetate, opsonized zymosan particles and the chemotactic peptide N-formyl-met-leu-phe. The platelet related phenomenon of enhanced O-/sub 2/ generation could not be reproduced by the addition of serotonin, histamine or platelet-derived growth factor and was not affected by prior treatment of platelets with cyclooxygenase inhibitors (indomethacin, piroxicam) or lipoxygenase inhibitors (nafazatrom, BW755C or nordihydroguaiaretic acid). However, activation of platelets by thrombin caused release into the platelet supernatant fluid of a factor that, only in the presence of immune complexes, caused enhanced O-/sub 2/ responses to neutrophils. These data indicate that platelets potentiate oxygen radical responses of human neutrophils and suggest a mechanisms by which platelets may participate in tissue injury which is mediated by oxygen radical products from activated neutrophils.

  2. Epinephrine enhances platelet-neutrophil adhesion in whole blood in vitro.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Horn, N.A.; Anastase, D.M.; Hecker, K.E.; Baumert, J.H.; Robitzsch, T.; Rossaint, R.

    2005-01-01

    Previous studies showed that alpha- or beta-adrenoceptor stimulation by catecholamines influenced neutrophil function, cytokine liberation, and platelet aggregability. We investigated whether adrenergic stimulation with epinephrine also alters platelet-neutrophil adhesion. This might be of specific

  3. Epinephrine enhances platelet-neutrophil adhesion in whole blood in vitro.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Horn, N.A.; Anastase, D.M.; Hecker, K.E.; Baumert, J.H.; Robitzsch, T.; Rossaint, R.

    2005-01-01

    Previous studies showed that alpha- or beta-adrenoceptor stimulation by catecholamines influenced neutrophil function, cytokine liberation, and platelet aggregability. We investigated whether adrenergic stimulation with epinephrine also alters platelet-neutrophil adhesion. This might be of specific

  4. Platelets enhance neutrophil transendothelial migration via P-selectin glycoprotein ligand-1

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    Platelets are increasingly recognized as important for inflammation in addition to thrombosis. Platelets promote the adhesion of neutrophils [polymorphonuclear neutrophils (PMNs)] to the endothelium; P-selectin and P-selectin glycoprotein ligand (PSGL)-1 have been suggested to participate in these i...

  5. Arachidonic acid metabolism in the platelets and neutrophils of diabetic rabbit and human subjects

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    Greco, N.J.

    1985-01-01

    An alteration of arachidonic acid metabolism to prostaglandins and leukotrienes from platelets and polymorphonuclear leukocytes respectively is evident in subjects with diabetes mellitus. There is evidence of altered platelet/vascular wall interactions in diabetes mellitus and evidence that polymorphonuclear leukocytes influence the vascular walls. Theories on the pathogenesis of atherosclerosis include both blood cells. Platelet hypersensitivity is evident in those platelets from the alloxan-induced diabetic rabbit either suspended in plasma or buffer. Arachidonic acid- and collagen-induced platelet aggregation, release of /sup 14/serotonin, and T x B/sub 2/ and 12-HETE production is enhanced when responses of diabetic platelets are compared to control platelets. Control rabbit neutrophils produce more LTB/sub 4/, LTB/sub 4/ isomers and 5-HETE than diabetic rabbits neutrophils. Decreased synthesis from diabetic rabbit neutrophils is not explained by increased catabolism of LTB/sub 4/, reesterification of 5-HETE, or increased eicosanoid formation. These experiments demonstrate both platelet and neutrophil dysfunction in diabetic subjects. Because of the involvement of these cells in regulating circulatory homeostatis, abnormal behavior could aggravate the atherosclerotic process. Platelet and neutrophil dysfunctions are noted before macroscopic vascular lesions are apparent suggesting an important role in the pathogenesis of atherosclerosis.

  6. Cathepsin G-dependent modulation of platelet thrombus formation in vivo by blood neutrophils.

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    Nauder Faraday

    Full Text Available Neutrophils are consistently associated with arterial thrombotic morbidity in human clinical studies but the causal basis for this association is unclear. We tested the hypothesis that neutrophils modulate platelet activation and thrombus formation in vivo in a cathepsin G-dependent manner. Neutrophils enhanced aggregation of human platelets in vitro in dose-dependent fashion and this effect was diminished by pharmacologic inhibition of cathepsin G activity and knockdown of cathepsin G expression. Tail bleeding time in the mouse was prolonged by a cathepsin G inhibitor and in cathepsin G knockout mice, and formation of neutrophil-platelet conjugates in blood that was shed from transected tails was reduced in the absence of cathepsin G. Bleeding time was highly correlated with blood neutrophil count in wildtype but not cathepsin G deficient mice. In the presence of elevated blood neutrophil counts, the anti-thrombotic effect of cathepsin G inhibition was greater than that of aspirin and additive to it when administered in combination. Both pharmacologic inhibition of cathepsin G and its congenital absence prolonged the time for platelet thrombus to form in ferric chloride-injured mouse mesenteric arterioles. In a vaso-occlusive model of ischemic stroke, inhibition of cathepsin G and its congenital absence improved cerebral blood flow, reduced histologic brain injury, and improved neurobehavioral outcome. These experiments demonstrate that neutrophil cathepsin G is a physiologic modulator of platelet thrombus formation in vivo and has potential as a target for novel anti-thrombotic therapies.

  7. Single platelets seal neutrophil-induced vascular breaches via GPVI during immune-complex-mediated inflammation in mice.

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    Gros, Angèle; Syvannarath, Varouna; Lamrani, Lamia; Ollivier, Véronique; Loyau, Stéphane; Goerge, Tobias; Nieswandt, Bernhard; Jandrot-Perrus, Martine; Ho-Tin-Noé, Benoît

    2015-08-20

    Platelets protect vascular integrity during inflammation. Recent evidence suggests that this action is independent of thrombus formation and requires the engagement of glycoprotein VI (GPVI), but it remains unclear how platelets prevent inflammatory bleeding. We investigated whether platelets and GPVI act primarily by preventing detrimental effects of neutrophils using models of immune complex (IC)-mediated inflammation in mice immunodepleted in platelets and/or neutrophils or deficient in GPVI. Depletion of neutrophils prevented bleeding in thrombocytopenic and GPVI(-/-) mice during IC-mediated dermatitis. GPVI deficiency did not modify neutrophil recruitment, which was reduced by thrombocytopenia. Neutrophil cytotoxic activities were reduced in thrombocytopenic and GPVI(-/-) mice during IC-mediated inflammation. Intravital microscopy revealed that in this setting, intravascular binding sites for platelets were exposed by neutrophils, and GPVI supported the recruitment of individual platelets to these spots. Furthermore, the platelet secretory response accompanying IC-mediated inflammation was partly mediated by GPVI, and blocking of GPVI signaling impaired the vasculoprotective action of platelets. Together, our results show that GPVI plays a dual role in inflammation by enhancing neutrophil-damaging activities while supporting the activation and hemostatic adhesion of single platelets to neutrophil-induced vascular breaches.

  8. Circulating platelet-neutrophil complexes are important for subsequent neutrophil activation and migration.

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    Kornerup, Kristin N; Salmon, Gary P; Pitchford, Simon C; Liu, Wai L; Page, Clive P

    2010-09-01

    Previous studies in our laboratory have shown that platelets are essential for the migration of eosinophils into the lungs of allergic mice, and that this is dependent on the functional expression of platelet P-selectin. We sought to investigate whether the same is true for nonallergic, acute inflammatory stimuli administered to distinct anatomic compartments. Neutrophil trafficking was induced in two models, namely zymosan-induced peritonitis and LPS-induced lung inflammation, and the platelet dependence of these responses investigated utilizing mice rendered thrombocytopenic. The relative contribution of selectins was also investigated. The results presented herein clearly show that platelet depletion (>90%) significantly inhibits neutrophil recruitment in both models. In addition, we show that P-selectin glycoprotein ligand-1, but not P-selectin, is essential for neutrophil recruitment in mice in vivo, thus suggesting the existence of different regulatory mechanisms for the recruitment of leukocyte subsets in response to allergic and nonallergic stimuli. Further studies in human blood demonstrate that low-dose prothrombotic and pro-inflammatory stimuli (CCL17 or CCL22) synergize to induce platelet and neutrophil activation, as well as the formation of platelet-neutrophil conjugates. We conclude that adhesion between platelets and neutrophils in vivo is an important event in acute inflammatory responses. Targeting this interaction may be a successful strategy for inflammatory conditions where current therapy fails to provide adequate treatment.

  9. Platelets augment respiratory burst in neutrophils activated by selected species of gram-positive or gram-negative bacteria.

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    Kamila Pytel

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available Neutrophils and platelets circulate in blood system and play important physiological roles as part of immunological system. Neutrophils are the first line of host defense against various intruders, and platelets are satellite cells cooperating with other components of defense system. Recent studies report about the cooperation among these types of cells. We analyzed the effect of platelets on oxygen burst in neutrophils triggered by Staphylococcus aureus and Escherichia coli bacteria in vitro. The effect of platelets on oxygen burst in neutrophils was measured by luminol enhanced chemiluminescence. Opsonized and non-opsonized bacteria were used as activators. Activation of neutrophils with live non-opsonized and opsonized bacteria in the presence of platelets increased the oxygen burst as compared to the same system without platelets. The gram-positive bacteria (Staphylococcus aureus were causing higher activation than gram-negative bacteria (Escherichia coli. This work demonstrate that platelets potentate the response of neutrophils augmenting their respiratory burst in vitro when triggered by bacteria.

  10. Acidosis downregulates platelet haemostatic functions and promotes neutrophil proinflammatory responses mediated by platelets.

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    Etulain, Julia; Negrotto, Soledad; Carestia, Agostina; Pozner, Roberto Gabriel; Romaniuk, María Albertina; D'Atri, Lina Paola; Klement, Giannoula Lakka; Schattner, Mirta

    2012-01-01

    Acidosis is one of the hallmarks of tissue injury such as trauma, infection, inflammation, and tumour growth. Although platelets participate in the pathophysiology of all these processes, the impact of acidosis on platelet biology has not been studied outside of the quality control of laboratory aggregation assays or platelet transfusion optimization. Herein, we evaluate the effect of physiologically relevant changes in extracellular acidosis on the biological function of platelets, placing particular emphasis on haemostatic and secretory functions. Platelet haemostatic responses such as adhesion, spreading, activation of αIIbβ3 integrin, ATP release, aggregation, thromboxane B2 generation, clot retraction and procoagulant activity including phosphatidilserine exposure and microparticle formation, showed a statistically significant inhibition of thrombin-induced changes at pH of 7.0 and 6.5 compared to the physiological pH (7.4). The release of alpha granule content was differentially regulated by acidosis. At low pH, thrombin or collagen-induced secretion of vascular endothelial growth factor and endostatin were dramatically reduced. The release of von Willebrand factor and stromal derived factor-1α followed a similar, albeit less dramatic pattern. In contrast, the induction of CD40L was not changed by low pH, and P-selectin exposure was significantly increased. While the generation of mixed platelet-leukocyte aggregates and the increased chemotaxis of neutrophils mediated by platelets were further augmented under acidic conditions in a P-selectin dependent manner, the increased neutrophil survival was independent of P-selectin expression. In conclusion, our results indicate that extracellular acidosis downregulates most of the haemostatic platelet functions, and promotes those involved in amplifying the neutrophil-mediated inflammatory response.

  11. Venous levels of shear support neutrophil-platelet adhesion and neutrophil aggregation in blood via P-selectin and beta2-integrin

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    Konstantopoulos, K.; Neelamegham, S.; Burns, A. R.; Hentzen, E.; Kansas, G. S.; Snapp, K. R.; Berg, E. L.; Hellums, J. D.; Smith, C. W.; McIntire, L. V.; Simon, S. I.

    1998-01-01

    BACKGROUND: After activation, platelets adhere to neutrophils via P-selectin and beta2-integrin. The molecular mechanisms and adhesion events in whole blood exposed to venous levels of hydrodynamic shear in the absence of exogenous activation remain unknown. METHODS AND RESULTS: Whole blood was sheared at approximately 100 s(-1). The kinetics of neutrophil-platelet adhesion and neutrophil aggregation were measured in real time by flow cytometry. P-selectin was upregulated to the platelet surface in response to shear and was the primary factor mediating neutrophil-platelet adhesion. The extent of neutrophil aggregation increased linearly with platelet adhesion to neutrophils. Blocking either P-selectin, its glycoprotein ligand PSGL-1, or both simultaneously by preincubation with a monoclonal antibody resulted in equivalent inhibition of neutrophil-platelet adhesion (approximately 30%) and neutrophil aggregation (approximately 70%). The residual amount of neutrophil adhesion was blocked with anti-CD11b/CD18. Treatment of blood with prostacyclin analogue ZK36374, which raises cAMP levels in platelets, blocked P-selectin upregulation and neutrophil aggregation to baseline. Complete abrogation of platelet-neutrophil adhesion required both ZK36374 and anti-CD18. Electron microscopic observations of fixed blood specimens revealed that platelets augmented neutrophil aggregation both by forming bridges between neutrophils and through contact-mediated activation. CONCLUSIONS: The results are consistent with a model in which venous levels of shear support platelet adherence to neutrophils via P-selectin binding PSGL-1. This interaction alone is sufficient to mediate neutrophil aggregation. Abrogation of platelet adhesion and aggregation requires blocking Mac-1 in addition to PSGL-1 or P-selectin. The described mechanisms are likely of key importance in the pathogenesis and progression of thrombotic disorders that are exacerbated by leukocyte-platelet aggregation.

  12. Cyclosporine A enhances platelet aggregation.

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    Grace, A A; Barradas, M A; Mikhailidis, D P; Jeremy, J Y; Moorhead, J F; Sweny, P; Dandona, P

    1987-12-01

    In view of the reported increase in thromboembolic episodes following cyclosporine A (CyA) therapy, the effect of this drug on platelet aggregation and thromboxane A2 release was investigated. The addition of CyA, at therapeutic concentrations to platelet rich plasma from normal subjects in vitro was found to increase aggregation in response to adrenaline, collagen and ADP. Ingestion of CyA by healthy volunteers was also associated with enhanced platelet aggregation. The CyA-mediated enhancement of aggregation was further enhanced by the addition in vitro of therapeutic concentrations of heparin. Platelets from renal allograft recipients treated with CyA also showed hyperaggregability and increased thromboxane A2 release, which were most marked at "peak" plasma CyA concentration and less so at "trough" concentrations. Platelet hyperaggregability in renal allograft patients on long-term CyA therapy tended to revert towards normal following the replacement of CyA with azathioprine. Hypertensive patients with renal allografts on nifedipine therapy had normal platelet function and thromboxane release in spite of CyA therapy. These observations suggest that CyA-mediated platelet activation may contribute to the pathogenesis of the thromboembolic phenomena associated with the use of this drug. The increased release of thromboxane A2 (a vasoconstrictor) may also play a role in mediating CyA-related nephrotoxicity.

  13. Neutrophil extracellular traps (NETs) and the role of platelets in infection.

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    Andrews, Robert K; Arthur, Jane F; Gardiner, Elizabeth E

    2014-10-01

    In addition to playing a central role in normal haemostasis, platelets make important contributions to host inflammatory and immune responses to injury or infection. Under pathophysiological conditions where platelet function is not tightly controlled, platelets also play critical roles in pathogenic processes underlying cardiovascular disease, uncontrolled inflammation, coagulopathy and in tumour metastasis. Neutrophil extracellular traps (NETs) are webs of histone-modified nuclear material extruded from activated neutrophils during inflammatory responses and these degranulation events can be directly triggered by platelet/neutrophil engagement. Emerging research describes how NETs influence platelet function, particularly in the setting of infection and inflammation. Especially intriguing is the potential for platelet-driven coagulation to be modulated by NETs in plasma and interstitial spaces. These findings also reveal new perspectives related to improved therapy for venous thrombosis.

  14. Effects of copper-aspirin complex on platelet-neutrophil interactions

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    Zhi-qiang SHEN; Peng CHEN; Ling LI; Peng CHEN; Wei-ping LIU

    2004-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the effects of copper-aspirin complex on rat thrombosis and the interaction between platelets and neutrophils. METHODS: The model of electrically stimulated carotid artery thrombosis in Sprague Dawley rats was used; the effects of copper-aspirin complex on rat platelet-neutrophil adhesion and platelet aggregation stimulated by activated neutrophils were observed by rosette assay and Born's method, respectively. RESULTS:Intragastric copper-aspirin complex (5, 7, and 10 mg/kg) dose-dependently prolonged the occlusion time; it significantly decreased the rosette number formed between thrombin-activated platelets and neutrophils; the 50 % of inhibitory concentration (IC50) was (54.6±4.3) μmol/L. Copper-aspirin complex markedly inhibited rat platelet aggregation induced by either cell free supernatant of activated neutrophils or by activated neutrophil suspension.The values of IC50 were (224.5±16.2) μmol/L and (820.5±21.4) μmol/L, whereas aspirin had no influence.CONCLUSION: Copper-aspirin complex inhibited platelet-neutrophil interactions through a different property from aspirin and resulted in a more potent antithrombotic activity.

  15. Platelet-neutrophil complex formation-a detailed in vitro analysis of murine and human blood samples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mauler, Maximilian; Seyfert, Julia; Haenel, David; Seeba, Hannah; Guenther, Janine; Stallmann, Daniela; Schoenichen, Claudia; Hilgendorf, Ingo; Bode, Christoph; Ahrens, Ingo; Duerschmied, Daniel

    2016-05-01

    Platelets form complexes with neutrophils during inflammatory processes. These aggregates migrate into affected tissues and also circulate within the organism. Several studies have evaluated platelet-neutrophil complexes as a marker of cardiovascular diseases in human and mouse. Although multiple publications have reported platelet-neutrophil complex counts, we noticed that different methods were used to analyze platelet-neutrophil complex formation, resulting in significant differences, even in baseline values. We established a protocol for platelet-neutrophil complex measurement with flow cytometry in murine and human whole blood samples. In vitro platelet-neutrophil complex formation was stimulated with ADP or PMA. We tested the effect of different sample preparation steps and cytometer settings on platelet-neutrophil complex detection and noticed false-positive counts with increasing acquisition speed. Platelet-neutrophil complex formation depends on platelet P-selectin expression, and antibody blocking of P-selectin consequently prevented ADP-induced platelet-neutrophil complex formation. These findings may help generating more comparable data among different research groups that examine platelet-neutrophil complexes as a marker for cardiovascular disease and novel therapeutic interventions.

  16. Molecular typing of human platelet and neutrophil antigens (HPA and HNA).

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    Veldhuisen, Barbera; Porcelijn, Leendert; Ellen van der Schoot, C; de Haas, Masja

    2014-04-01

    Genotyping is an important tool in the diagnosis of disorders involving allo-immunisation to antigens present on the membranes of platelets and neutrophils. To date 28 human platelet antigens (HPAs) have been indentified on six polymorphic glycoproteins on the surface of platelets. Antibodies against HPAs play a role in foetal and neonatal alloimmune thrombocytopenia (FNAIT), post-transfusion purpura (PTP) and refractoriness to donor platelets. The 11 human neutrophil antigens (HNAs) described to date have been indentified on five polymorphic proteins on the surface of granulocytes. Antibodies to HNAs are implicated with foetal and neonatal alloimmune neutropenia (FNAIN), autoimmune neutropenia (AIN) and transfusion related acute lung injury (TRALI). In this report, we will review the molecular basis and techniques currently available for the genotyping of human platelet and neutrophil antigens.

  17. Platelet-Derived CCL5 Regulates CXC Chemokine Formation and Neutrophil Recruitment in Acute Experimental Colitis.

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    Yu, Changhui; Zhang, Songen; Wang, Yongzhi; Zhang, Su; Luo, Lingtao; Thorlacius, Henrik

    2016-02-01

    Accumulating data suggest that platelets not only regulate thrombosis and haemostasis but also inflammatory processes. Platelets contain numerous potent pro-inflammatory compounds, including the chemokines CCL5 and CXCL4, although their role in acute colitis remains elusive. The aim of this study is to examine the role of platelets and platelet-derived chemokines in acute colitis. Acute colitis is induced in female Balb/c mice by administration of 5% dextran sodium sulfate (DSS) for 5 days. Animals receive a platelet-depleting, anti-CCL5, anti-CXCL4, or a control antibody prior to DSS challenge. Colonic tissue is collected for quantification of myeloperoxidase (MPO) activity, CXCL5, CXCL2, interleukin-6 (IL-6), and CCL5 levels as well as morphological analyses. Platelet depletion reduce tissue damage and clinical disease activity index in DSS-exposed animals. Platelet depletion not only reduces levels of CXCL2 and CXCL5 but also levels of CCL5 in the inflamed colon. Immunoneutralization of CCL5 but not CXCL4 reduces tissue damage, CXC chemokine expression, and neutrophil recruitment in DSS-treated animals. These findings show that platelets play a key role in acute colitis by regulating CXC chemokine generation, neutrophil infiltration, and tissue damage in the colon. Moreover, our results suggest that platelet-derived CCL5 is an important link between platelet activation and neutrophil recruitment in acute colitis.

  18. Platelet-collagen adhesion enhances platelet aggregation induced by binding of VWF to platelets

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    Laduca, F.M.; Bell, W.R.; Bettigole, R.E. (Johns Hopkins Univ. School of Medicine, Baltimore, MD (USA) State Univ. of New York, Buffalo (USA))

    1987-11-01

    Ristocetin-induced platelet aggregation (RIPA) was evaluated in the presence of platelet-collagen adhesion. RIPA of normal donor platelet-rich plasma (PRP) demonstrated a primary wave of aggregation mediated by the binding of von Willebrand factor (VWF) to platelets and a secondary aggregation wave, due to a platelet-release reaction, initiated by VWF-platelet binding and inhibitable by acetylsalicylic acid (ASA). An enhanced RIPA was observed in PRP samples to which collagen had been previously added. These subthreshold concentrations of collagen, which by themselves were insufficient to induce aggregation, caused measurable platelet-collagen adhesion. Subthreshold collagen did not cause microplatelet aggregation, platelet release of ({sup 3}H)serotonin, or alter the dose-responsive binding of {sup 125}I-labeled VWF to platelets, which occurred with increasing ristocetin concentrations. However, ASA inhibition of the platelet release reaction prevented collagen-enhanced RIPA. These results demonstrate that platelet-collagen adhesion altered the platelet-release reaction induced by the binding of VWF to platelets causing a platelet-release reaction at a level of VWF-platelet binding not normally initiating a secondary aggregation. These findings suggest that platelet-collagen adhesion enhances platelet function mediated by VWF.

  19. Investigation of neutrophil-to-lymphocyte ratio and mean platelet volume in sudden hearing loss.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kum, Rauf Oğuzhan; Ozcan, Muge; Baklaci, Deniz; Yurtsever Kum, Nurcan; Yilmaz, Yavuz Fuat; Unal, Adnan; Avci, Yonca

    2015-01-01

    Several theories attempt to explain the pathophysiology of sudden hearing loss. The objective of this study was to investigate the possible role of inflammation and atherothrombosis in sudden hearing loss patients through the neutrophil-to-lymphocyte ratio and mean platelet volume. Study design - retrospective cross-sectional historical cohort. This study was conducted on two groups: one with 59 individuals diagnosed with sudden hearing loss, and other with 59 healthy individuals with the same characteristics of gender and age distribution, neutrophil-to-lymphocyte ratio and mean platelet volume levels were measured in patients diagnosed with sudden hearing loss as well as in the control group, and it was verified whether these results interfered for a better or worse prognosis with treatment of sudden deafness. Neutrophil-to-lymphocyte ratio levels are much higher in patients diagnosed with sudden hearing loss compared to the control group. Similarly, mean levels of neutrophil-to-lymphocyte ratio are higher in non-recovered versus recovered patients (p=0.001). However, we could not find a correlation with mean platelet volume levels (p>0.05). Neutrophil-to-lymphocyte ratio is a quick and reliable indicator regarding diagnosis and prognosis of sudden hearing loss; on the other hand, mean platelet volume may be considered a less important indicator in this aspect. Copyright © 2015 Associação Brasileira de Otorrinolaringologia e Cirurgia Cérvico-Facial. Published by Elsevier Editora Ltda. All rights reserved.

  20. Investigation of neutrophil-to-lymphocyte ratio and mean platelet volume in sudden hearing loss,

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    Rauf Oguzhan Kum

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT INTRODUCTION: Several theories attempt to explain the pathophysiology of sudden hearing loss. OBJECTIVE: The objective of this study was to investigate the possible role of inflammation and atherothrombosis in sudden hearing loss patients through the neutrophil-to-lymphocyte ratio and mean platelet volume. METHODS: Study design - retrospective cross-sectional historical cohort. This study was conducted on two groups: one with 59 individuals diagnosed with sudden hearing loss, and other with 59 healthy individuals with the same characteristics of gender and age distribution, neutrophil-to-lymphocyte ratio and mean platelet volume levels were measured in patients diagnosed with sudden hearing loss as well as in the control group, and it was verified whether these results interfered for a better or worse prognosis with treatment of sudden deafness. RESULTS: Neutrophil-to-lymphocyte ratio levels are much higher in patients diagnosed with sudden hearing loss compared to the control group. Similarly, mean levels of neutrophil-to-lymphocyte ratio are higher in non-recovered versus recovered patients (p = 0.001. However, we could not find a correlation with mean platelet volume levels (p > 0.05. CONCLUSION: Neutrophil-to-lymphocyte ratio is a quick and reliable indicator regarding diagnosis and prognosis of sudden hearing loss; on the other hand, mean platelet volume may be considered a less important indicator in this aspect.

  1. Platelets may inhibit leucotriene biosynthesis by human neutrophils at the integrin level.

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    Chabannes, Bernard; Moliere, Patrick; Merhi-Soussi, Faten; Poubelle, Patrice E; Lagarde, Michel

    2003-04-01

    Polymorphonuclear leucocytes and blood platelets co-operate in several pathophysiological processes, and arachidonic acid (AA) metabolites produced in response to the activation of these cells are potent mediators of their functions. We studied the role of platelets in the formation of 5-lipoxygenase products from AA by autologous neutrophils, especially the chemotactic agent leucotriene (LT) B4. The formation of all products, namely 5-hydroxy-eicosatetraenoic acid (5-HETE), LTB4 and the other LTA4-derived metabolites, in response to the calcium ionophore A23187 was evaluated by high-performance liquid chromatography. All the 5-lipoxygenase products were significantly diminished by physiological concentrations of platelets. This inhibitory effect was lost when platelets were previously degranulated by thrombin in non-aggregating conditions. Peptides containing the Arg-Gly-Asp-Ser or His-His-Leu-Gly-Gly-Ala-Lys-Gln-Ala-Gly-Asp-Val sequence, which prevent the adhesion of platelets to neutrophils via the fibrinogen released from platelet granules and the integrin glycoprotein IIb/IIIa, markedly decreased the inhibitory effect of non-degranulated platelets. The production of transcellular metabolites of AA such as LTC4, the dual 5- and 12-lipoxygenase product 5,12-diHETE and lipoxins could not account for the decreased formation of 5-HETE and LTA4-derived metabolites. It is concluded that platelets may inhibit the neutrophil 5-lipoxygenase activity at the integrin level and in turn may play a role in slowing down the production of LTB4 in the course of inflammation.

  2. Essential roles for platelets during neutrophil-dependent or lymphocyte-mediated defense against bacterial pathogens.

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    Wang, Zheng; Zhao, Qi; Zhang, Dongxia; Sun, Chengming; Bao, Cuixia; Yi, Maoli; Xing, Li; Luo, Deyan

    2016-09-01

    Emerging evidence from animal models suggests that platelets may participate in a wide variety of processes including the immune response against infection. More than 200 whole blood samples from patients and healthy controls were run in the System XE-5000 analyzer, and plasma fractions were separated for the following tests by ELISA, Luminex and light scattering. We describe two mechanisms by which platelets may contribute to immune function against various bacterial pathogens based on increased mean platelet volume in gram-positive bacterial infections and increased platelet counts in gram-negative bacterial infections. Gram-negative bacteria activate platelets to recruit neutrophils, which participate in the immune response against infection. During this process, fractalkine, macrophage inflammatory protein-1β, interleukin-17A, tumor necrosis factor-α and platelet-activating factor were higher in patients infected with Escherichia coli; additionally, giant platelets were observed under the microscope. Meanwhile, we found that platelets played a different role in gram-positive bacterial infections. Specifically, they could actively adhere to gram-positive bacteria in circulation and transfer them to immune sites to promote antibacterial lymphocyte expansion. During this process, complement C3 and factor XI were more highly expressed in patients infected with Staphylococcus aureus; additionally, we detected more small platelets under the microscope. Platelets participate in the immune response against both gram-negative and gram-positive bacteria, although the mechanisms differ. These results will help us understand the complex roles of platelets during infections, and direct our use of antibiotics based on clinical platelet data.

  3. Human Platelets Utilize Cycloxygenase-1 to Generate Dioxolane A3, a Neutrophil-activating Eicosanoid.

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    Hinz, Christine; Aldrovandi, Maceler; Uhlson, Charis; Marnett, Lawrence J; Longhurst, Hilary J; Warner, Timothy D; Alam, Saydul; Slatter, David A; Lauder, Sarah N; Allen-Redpath, Keith; Collins, Peter W; Murphy, Robert C; Thomas, Christopher P; O'Donnell, Valerie B

    2016-06-24

    Eicosanoids are important mediators of fever, pain, and inflammation that modulate cell signaling during acute and chronic disease. We show by using lipidomics that thrombin-activated human platelets generate a new type of eicosanoid that both stimulates and primes human neutrophil integrin (Mac-1) expression, in response to formylmethionylleucylphenylalanine. Detailed characterization proposes a dioxolane structure, 8-hydroxy-9,11-dioxolane eicosatetraenoic acid (dioxolane A3, DXA3). The lipid is generated in nanogram amounts by platelets from endogenous arachidonate during physiological activation, with inhibition by aspirin in vitro or in vivo, implicating cyclooxygenase-1 (COX). Pharmacological and genetic studies on human/murine platelets revealed that DXA3 formation requires protease-activated receptors 1 and 4, cytosolic phospholipase A2 (cPLA2), Src tyrosine kinases, p38 MAPK, phospholipase C, and intracellular calcium. From data generated by purified COX isoforms and chemical oxidation, we propose that DXA3 is generated by release of an intermediate from the active site followed by oxygenation at C8. In summary, a new neutrophil-activating platelet-derived lipid generated by COX-1 is presented that can activate or prime human neutrophils, suggesting a role in innate immunity and acute inflammation.

  4. Human Platelets Utilize Cycloxygenase-1 to Generate Dioxolane A3, a Neutrophil-activating Eicosanoid*

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    Hinz, Christine; Aldrovandi, Maceler; Uhlson, Charis; Marnett, Lawrence J.; Longhurst, Hilary J.; Warner, Timothy D.; Alam, Saydul; Slatter, David A.; Lauder, Sarah N.; Allen-Redpath, Keith; Collins, Peter W.; Murphy, Robert C.; Thomas, Christopher P.; O'Donnell, Valerie B.

    2016-01-01

    Eicosanoids are important mediators of fever, pain, and inflammation that modulate cell signaling during acute and chronic disease. We show by using lipidomics that thrombin-activated human platelets generate a new type of eicosanoid that both stimulates and primes human neutrophil integrin (Mac-1) expression, in response to formylmethionylleucylphenylalanine. Detailed characterization proposes a dioxolane structure, 8-hydroxy-9,11-dioxolane eicosatetraenoic acid (dioxolane A3, DXA3). The lipid is generated in nanogram amounts by platelets from endogenous arachidonate during physiological activation, with inhibition by aspirin in vitro or in vivo, implicating cyclooxygenase-1 (COX). Pharmacological and genetic studies on human/murine platelets revealed that DXA3 formation requires protease-activated receptors 1 and 4, cytosolic phospholipase A2 (cPLA2), Src tyrosine kinases, p38 MAPK, phospholipase C, and intracellular calcium. From data generated by purified COX isoforms and chemical oxidation, we propose that DXA3 is generated by release of an intermediate from the active site followed by oxygenation at C8. In summary, a new neutrophil-activating platelet-derived lipid generated by COX-1 is presented that can activate or prime human neutrophils, suggesting a role in innate immunity and acute inflammation. PMID:27129261

  5. NEUTROPHIL/LYMPHOCYTE RATIO AND PLATELET/LYMPHOCYTE RATIO IN PATIENTS WITH NSCLC

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    Cukic, Vesna

    2016-01-01

    Objective: to compare neutrophil/lymphocyte ratio (NLR) and platelet/lymphocyte ratio (PLR) in patients with NSCLC (Non- Small- Cell Lung Cancer): with and without metastases at the time of diagnosis to find out if there is the importance of these cell ratios in the assessment of severity NSCLC. Material and Methods: this is the retrospective analysis of NRL and PRL in patients with NSCLC at the time of the diagnosis of disease before any anti tumor treatment (chemotherapy, radiotherapy, surg...

  6. Human platelets utilize cycloxygenase-1 to generate dioxolane A3, a neutrophil activating eicosanoid

    OpenAIRE

    Hinz, Christine; Aldrovandi, MacEler; Alam, Saydul; Slatter, David; Lauder, Sarah Nicol; Allen-Redpath, Keith; Collins, Peter William; Thomas, Christopher P.; O'Donnell, Valerie Bridget

    2016-01-01

    Eicosanoids are important mediators of fever, pain, and inflammation that modulate cell signaling during acute and chronic disease. We show by using lipidomics that thrombin-activated human platelets generate a new type of eicosanoid that both stimulates and primes human neutrophil integrin (Mac-1) expression, in response to formylmethionylleucylphenylalanine. Detailed characterization proposes a dioxolane structure, 8-hydroxy-9,11-dioxolane eicosatetraenoic acid (dioxolane A3, DXA3). The lip...

  7. DioxolaneA3-phosphatidylethanolamines are generated by human platelets and stimulate neutrophil integrin expression

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maceler Aldrovandi

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Activated platelets generate an eicosanoid proposed to be 8-hydroxy-9,10-dioxolane A3 (DXA3. Herein, we demonstrate that significant amounts of DXA3 are rapidly attached to phosphatidylethanolamine (PE forming four esterified eicosanoids, 16:0p, 18:0p, 18:1p and 18:0a/DXA3-PEs that can activate neutrophil integrin expression. These lipids comprise the majority of DXA3 generated by platelets, are formed in ng amounts (24.3±6.1 ng/2×108 and remain membrane bound. Pharmacological studies revealed DXA3-PE formation involves cyclooxygenase-1 (COX, protease-activated receptors (PAR 1 and 4, cytosolic phospholipase A2 (cPLA2, phospholipase C and intracellular calcium. They are generated primarily via esterification of newly formed DXA3, but can also be formed in vitro via co-oxidation of PE during COX-1 co-oxidation of arachidonate. All four DXA3-PEs were detected in human clots. Purified platelet DXA3-PE activated neutrophil Mac-1 expression, independently of its hydrolysis to the free eicosanoid. This study demonstrates the structures and cellular synthetic pathway for a family of leukocyte-activating platelet phospholipids generated on acute activation, adding to the growing evidence that enzymatic PE oxidation is a physiological event in innate immune cells.

  8. Low molecular weight heparin alters porcine neutrophil responses to platelet-activating factor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kruse-Elliott, K T; Chaban, K; Grossman, J E; Tomasko, S; Kamke, C; Darien, B

    1998-09-01

    Because platelet-activating factor (PAF) is an important mediator of inflammation and heparin has anti-inflammatory effects, we hypothesized that low molecular weight heparin (LMWH) would inhibit PAF-induced activation and chemotaxis in porcine neutrophils. Citrated blood was obtained from pentobarbital-anesthetized pigs, and neutrophils were isolated over a 55%/65% Percoll gradient. The effect of LMWH on basal phorbol myristate acetate (PMA)-induced superoxide (SO) release, as well as its effect on PAF priming for PMA-induced SO release, were investigated. Additionally, the effect of LMWH on PAF-induced chemotaxis of neutrophils across transwell membranes was evaluated. Baseline SO release in response to PMA was .351+/-.046 nmol/10(6) cells/min, and this was decreased to .289+/-.034 nmol/10(6) cells/min by pretreatment with 50 U/mL LMWH. PMA-induced SO production was increased by .240+/-.042 nmol/10(6) cells/min when cells were primed with 10 microM PAF. This priming effect of PAF was reduced significantly by pretreatment of neutrophils with LMWH at 10 and 50 U/mL. Chemotaxis of neutrophils in response to 100 microM PAF was significantly decreased to 70.02+/-6.4% (n = 8) of the control response by pretreatment of cells with 50 U/mL LMWH. We conclude that LMWH has anti-inflammatory effects on porcine neutrophils, which includes attenuation of cell activation and chemotaxis in response to the lipid-derived inflammatory mediator, PAF.

  9. ARQ 092, an orally-available, selective AKT inhibitor, attenuates neutrophil-platelet interactions in sickle cell disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Kyungho; Li, Jing; Barazia, Andrew; Tseng, Alan; Youn, Seock-Won; Abbadessa, Giovanni; Yu, Yi; Schwartz, Brian; Andrews, Robert K; Gordeuk, Victor R; Cho, Jaehyung

    2017-02-01

    Previous studies identified the Ser/Thr protein kinase, AKT, as a therapeutic target in thrombo-inflammatory diseases. Here we report that specific inhibition of AKT with ARQ 092, an orally-available AKT inhibitor currently in phase Ib clinical trials as an anti-cancer drug, attenuates the adhesive function of neutrophils and platelets from sickle cell disease patients in vitro and cell-cell interactions in a mouse model of sickle cell disease. Studies using neutrophils and platelets isolated from sickle cell disease patients revealed that treatment with 50-500 nM ARQ 092 significantly blocks αMβ2 integrin function in neutrophils and reduces P-selectin exposure and glycoprotein Ib/IX/V-mediated agglutination in platelets. Treatment of isolated platelets and neutrophils with ARQ 092 inhibited heterotypic cell-cell aggregation under shear conditions. Intravital microscopic studies demonstrated that short-term oral administration of ARQ 092 or hydroxyurea, a major therapy for sickle cell disease, diminishes heterotypic cell-cell interactions in venules of sickle cell disease mice challenged with tumor necrosis factor-α. Co-administration of hydroxyurea and ARQ 092 further reduced the adhesive function of neutrophils in venules and neutrophil transmigration into alveoli, inhibited expression of E-selectin and intercellular adhesion molecule-1 in cremaster vessels, and improved survival in these mice. Ex vivo studies in sickle cell disease mice suggested that co-administration of hydroxyurea and ARQ 092 efficiently blocks neutrophil and platelet activation and that the beneficial effect of hydroxyurea results from nitric oxide production. Our results provide important evidence that ARQ 092 could be a novel drug for the prevention and treatment of acute vaso-occlusive complications in patients with sickle cell disease.

  10. ARQ 092, an orally-available, selective AKT inhibitor, attenuates neutrophil-platelet interactions in sickle cell disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Kyungho; Li, Jing; Barazia, Andrew; Tseng, Alan; Youn, Seock-Won; Abbadessa, Giovanni; Yu, Yi; Schwartz, Brian; Andrews, Robert K.; Gordeuk, Victor R.; Cho, Jaehyung

    2017-01-01

    Previous studies identified the Ser/Thr protein kinase, AKT, as a therapeutic target in thrombo-inflammatory diseases. Here we report that specific inhibition of AKT with ARQ 092, an orally-available AKT inhibitor currently in phase Ib clinical trials as an anti-cancer drug, attenuates the adhesive function of neutrophils and platelets from sickle cell disease patients in vitro and cell-cell interactions in a mouse model of sickle cell disease. Studies using neutrophils and platelets isolated from sickle cell disease patients revealed that treatment with 50–500 nM ARQ 092 significantly blocks αMβ2 integrin function in neutrophils and reduces P-selectin exposure and glycoprotein Ib/IX/V-mediated agglutination in platelets. Treatment of isolated platelets and neutrophils with ARQ 092 inhibited heterotypic cell-cell aggregation under shear conditions. Intravital microscopic studies demonstrated that short-term oral administration of ARQ 092 or hydroxyurea, a major therapy for sickle cell disease, diminishes heterotypic cell-cell interactions in venules of sickle cell disease mice challenged with tumor necrosis factor-α. Co-administration of hydroxyurea and ARQ 092 further reduced the adhesive function of neutrophils in venules and neutrophil transmigration into alveoli, inhibited expression of E-selectin and intercellular adhesion molecule-1 in cremaster vessels, and improved survival in these mice. Ex vivo studies in sickle cell disease mice suggested that co-administration of hydroxyurea and ARQ 092 efficiently blocks neutrophil and platelet activation and that the beneficial effect of hydroxyurea results from nitric oxide production. Our results provide important evidence that ARQ 092 could be a novel drug for the prevention and treatment of acute vaso-occlusive complications in patients with sickle cell disease. PMID:27758820

  11. Oxidatively fragmented phosphatidylcholines activate human neutrophils through the receptor for platelet-activating factor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smiley, P L; Stremler, K E; Prescott, S M; Zimmerman, G A; McIntyre, T M

    1991-06-15

    Platelet-activating factor (PAF, 1-O-alkyl-2-acetyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine) activates neutrophils (polymorphonuclear leukocytes, PMN) through a receptor that specifically recognizes short sn-2 residues. We oxidized synthetic [2-arachidonoyl]phosphatidylcholine to fragment and shorten the sn-2 residue, and then examined the phospholipid products for the ability to stimulate PMN. 1-Palmitoyl-2-arachidonoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine was fragmented by ozonolysis to 1-palmitoyl-2-(5-oxovaleroyl)-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine. This phospholipid activated human neutrophils at submicromolar concentrations, and is effects were inhibited by specific PAF receptor antagonists WEB2086, L659,989, and CV3988. 1-Palmitoyl-2-arachidonoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine next was fragmented by an uncontrolled free radical-catalyzed reaction: it was treated with soybean lipoxygenase to form its sn-2 15-hydroperoxy derivative (which did not activate neutrophils) and then allowed to oxidize under air. The secondary oxidation resulted in the formation of numerous fragmented phospholipids (Stremler, K. E., Stafforini, D. M., Prescott, S. M., and McIntyre, T. M. (1991) J. Biol. Chem. 266, 11095-11103), some of which activated PMN. Hydrolysis of sn-2 residues with phospholipase A2 destroyed biologic activity, as did hydrolysis with PAF acetylhydrolase. PAF acetylhydrolase is specific for short or intermediate length sn-2 residues and does not hydrolyze the starting material (Stremler, K. E., Stafforini, D. M., Prescott, S. M., and McIntyre, T. M. (1991) J. Biol. Chem. 266, 11095-11103). Neutrophil activation was completely blocked by L659,989, a specific PAF receptor antagonist. We conclude that diacylphosphatidylcholines containing an sn-2 polyunsaturated fatty acyl residue can be oxidatively fragmented to species with sn-2 residues short enough to activate the PAF receptor of neutrophils. This suggests a new mechanism for the appearance of biologically active phospholipids, and shows

  12. Platelet-mediated cytotoxicity and its enhancement by platelet activating factor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bykovskaya, S N; Bolvacheva, A V; Kiselevsky, M V; Khaylenko, V A; Bykovsky, A F

    1991-01-01

    Platelet cytotoxicity was assessed in 70 cancer patients with various tumor localizations and in 30 normal donors. The data presented reveal that the ACL cell line displays the highest sensitivity to platelet cytotoxicity. Using the ACL cells, we discovered that platelets from oncological patients and normal donors display comparable cytotoxicity. The level of platelet lytic activity is irrelevant to tumor localisation; however, it appears to be dependent on the stage of tumor growth. Incubation of platelets, both from donors and patients, with PAF (concentration range 10 pM to 10 nM) results in a significant rise of the killing activity of platelets. PAF induces greater cytotoxicity enhancement for platelets with lower initial activity, this pattern appearing to be the specific feature of the PAF mediated effect. Hence, platelets can be considered as effector cells relevant to antitumor immunity; PAF-mediated enhancement of platelet cytotoxicity can appear to be useful in the search for new immunotherapeutic drugs.

  13. The influence of Rubus idaeus and Rubus caesius leaf extracts on platelet aggregation in whole blood. Cross-talk of platelets and neutrophils.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dudzinska, Dominika; Bednarska, Katarzyna; Boncler, Magdalena; Luzak, Boguslawa; Watala, Cezary

    2016-07-01

    Recently, polyphenols have gained attention as potential natural cardioprotective therapeutics, due to their antiplatelet, anti-inflammatory and anticoagulant activity. Species belonging to the genus Rubus sp. have been reported to be a source of polyphenolic compounds with antioxidative proprieties and beneficial biological activities. This study investigates the effects of leaf extracts obtained from red raspberry (Rubus idaeus L.) and European dewberry (Rubus caesius L.) on the reactivity of blood platelets. In ADP-stimulated blood, raspberry and dewberry extracts (15 µg/ml) markedly decreased platelet surface membrane expression of activated GPIIbIIIa receptor by 16% and 21%, respectively (P raspberry and by 38-55% for dewberry, P raspberry and dewberry leaf extracts considerably modulated blood platelet reactivity in whole blood: they influenced blood platelet aggregation, possibly via the modulation of the redox status dependent on the oxidative activity of neutrophils.

  14. Involvement of leukotriene B4 receptor 1 signaling in platelet-activating factor-mediated neutrophil degranulation and chemotaxis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaudreault, Eric; Stankova, Jana; Rola-Pleszczynski, Marek

    2005-01-01

    Platelet-activating factor (PAF) is a potent lipid mediator of inflammation that can act on human neutrophils. When neutrophils are stimulated with PAF at concentrations greater than 10 nM, a double peak of intracellular calcium mobilization is observed. The second calcium peak observed in PAF-treated neutrophils has already been suggested to come from the production of endogenous leukotriene B4 (LTB4). Here we demonstrate the involvement of endogenous LTB4 production and subsequent activation of the high affinity LTB4 receptor (BLT1) in this second calcium mobilization peak observed after stimulation with PAF. We also show that the second, but not the first peak, could be desensitized by prior exposure to LTB4. Moreover, when neutrophils were pre-treated with pharmacological inhibitors of LTB4 production or with the specific BLT1 antagonist, U75302, PAF-mediated neutrophil degranulation was inhibited by more than 50%. On the other hand, pre-treating neutrophils with the PAF receptor specific antagonist (WEB2086) did not prevent any LTB4-induced degranulation. Also, when human neutrophils were pre-treated with U75302, PAF-mediated chemotaxis was reduced by more than 60%. These data indicate the involvement of BLT1 signaling in PAF-mediated neutrophil activities.

  15. Activation of AMPK enhances neutrophil chemotaxis and bacterial killing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Dae Won; Jiang, Shaoning; Tadie, Jean-Marc; Stigler, William S; Gao, Yong; Deshane, Jessy; Abraham, Edward; Zmijewski, Jaroslaw W

    2013-11-08

    An inability of neutrophils to eliminate invading microorganisms is frequently associated with severe infection and may contribute to the high mortality rates associated with sepsis. In the present studies, we examined whether metformin and other 5' adenosine monophosphate-activated protein kinase (AMPK) activators affect neutrophil motility, phagocytosis and bacterial killing. We found that activation of AMPK enhanced neutrophil chemotaxis in vitro and in vivo, and also counteracted the inhibition of chemotaxis induced by exposure of neutrophils to lipopolysaccharide (LPS). In contrast, small interfering RNA (siRNA)-mediated knockdown of AMPKα1 or blockade of AMPK activation through treatment of neutrophils with the AMPK inhibitor compound C diminished neutrophil chemotaxis. In addition to their effects on chemotaxis, treatment of neutrophils with metformin or aminoimidazole carboxamide ribonucleotide (AICAR) improved phagocytosis and bacterial killing, including more efficient eradication of bacteria in a mouse model of peritonitis-induced sepsis. Immunocytochemistry showed that, in contrast to LPS, metformin or AICAR induced robust actin polymerization and distinct formation of neutrophil leading edges. Although LPS diminished AMPK phosphorylation, metformin or AICAR was able to partially decrease the effects of LPS/toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4) engagement on downstream signaling events, particularly LPS-induced IκBα degradation. The IκB kinase (IKK) inhibitor PS-1145 diminished IκBα degradation and also prevented LPS-induced inhibition of chemotaxis. These results suggest that AMPK activation with clinically approved agents, such as metformin, may facilitate bacterial eradication in sepsis and other inflammatory conditions associated with inhibition of neutrophil activation and chemotaxis.

  16. The inhibition of oxygen radical release from human neutrophils by resting platelets is reversed by administration of acetylsalicylic acid or clopidogrel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reinisch, C M; Dunzendorfer, S; Pechlaner, C; Ricevuti, G; Wiedermann, C J

    2001-05-01

    Resting platelets inhibit oxygen radical release from neutrophils. Antiplatelet therapy may support this function by preventing platelet activation. Whether antiplatelet agents affect the antioxidative action of resting platelets in the absence of platelet activation is unknown. The effect of acetylsalicylic acid or clopidogrel administration on the antioxidative action of resting platelets was therefore studied in ten healthy volunteers. Preparations of resting platelets were obtained from 5 subjects each - before, during and after an eight-day course of daily treatment with 100 mg of acetylsalicylic acid or 75 mg of the thienopyridine clopidogrel. Human peripheral blood neutrophils were pretreated with the platelets at a ratio of (1/5)0 for 45 min; then formyl-Met-Leu-Phe-triggered oxygen radical release was measured fluorometrically. The inhibitory effect of platelets on oxygen radical release from neutrophils which was seen before treatment was abolished by antiplatelet therapy with either of the drugs, and inhibition was restored gradually after discontinuing acetlsalicylic acid/ clopidogrel intake. Results suggest that the protective role of resting platelets in controlling oxygen radical release from neutrophils in the absence of platelet activation may be impaired by antiplatelet therapy.

  17. Gut Microbial Metabolite TMAO Enhances Platelet Hyperreactivity and Thrombosis Risk.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Weifei; Gregory, Jill C; Org, Elin; Buffa, Jennifer A; Gupta, Nilaksh; Wang, Zeneng; Li, Lin; Fu, Xiaoming; Wu, Yuping; Mehrabian, Margarete; Sartor, R Balfour; McIntyre, Thomas M; Silverstein, Roy L; Tang, W H Wilson; DiDonato, Joseph A; Brown, J Mark; Lusis, Aldons J; Hazen, Stanley L

    2016-03-24

    Normal platelet function is critical to blood hemostasis and maintenance of a closed circulatory system. Heightened platelet reactivity, however, is associated with cardiometabolic diseases and enhanced potential for thrombotic events. We now show gut microbes, through generation of trimethylamine N-oxide (TMAO), directly contribute to platelet hyperreactivity and enhanced thrombosis potential. Plasma TMAO levels in subjects (n > 4,000) independently predicted incident (3 years) thrombosis (heart attack, stroke) risk. Direct exposure of platelets to TMAO enhanced sub-maximal stimulus-dependent platelet activation from multiple agonists through augmented Ca(2+) release from intracellular stores. Animal model studies employing dietary choline or TMAO, germ-free mice, and microbial transplantation collectively confirm a role for gut microbiota and TMAO in modulating platelet hyperresponsiveness and thrombosis potential and identify microbial taxa associated with plasma TMAO and thrombosis potential. Collectively, the present results reveal a previously unrecognized mechanistic link between specific dietary nutrients, gut microbes, platelet function, and thrombosis risk.

  18. γδ T Cells Are Necessary for Platelet and Neutrophil Accumulation in Limbal Vessels and Efficient Epithelial Repair after Corneal Abrasion

    OpenAIRE

    Li, Zhijie; Burns, Alan R.; Rumbaut, Rolando E.; Smith, C. Wayne

    2007-01-01

    Corneal epithelial abrasion in C57BL/6 mice induces an inflammatory response with peak accumulation of neutrophils in the corneal stroma within 12 hours. Platelets localize in the limbal vessels throughout the same time course as neutrophils and contribute to wound healing because antibody-dependent depletion of platelets retards epithelial division and wound closure. In the present study, T cells in the limbal epithelium were found to predominantly express the γδ T-cell receptor (TCR). Corne...

  19. Surface acoustic waves enhance neutrophil killing of bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loike, John D; Plitt, Anna; Kothari, Komal; Zumeris, Jona; Budhu, Sadna; Kavalus, Kaitlyn; Ray, Yonatan; Jacob, Harold

    2013-01-01

    Biofilms are structured communities of bacteria that play a major role in the pathogenicity of bacteria and are the leading cause of antibiotic resistant bacterial infections on indwelling catheters and medical prosthetic devices. Failure to resolve these biofilm infections may necessitate the surgical removal of the prosthetic device which can be debilitating and costly. Recent studies have shown that application of surface acoustic waves to catheter surfaces can reduce the incidence of infections by a mechanism that has not yet been clarified. We report here the effects of surface acoustic waves (SAW) on the capacity of human neutrophils to eradicate S. epidermidis bacteria in a planktonic state and within biofilms. Utilizing a novel fibrin gel system that mimics a tissue-like environment, we show that SAW, at an intensity of 0.3 mW/cm(2), significantly enhances human neutrophil killing of S. epidermidis in a planktonic state and within biofilms by enhancing human neutrophil chemotaxis in response to chemoattractants. In addition, we show that the integrin CD18 plays a significant role in the killing enhancement observed in applying SAW. We propose from out data that this integrin may serve as mechanoreceptor for surface acoustic waves enhancing neutrophil chemotaxis and killing of bacteria.

  20. Surface acoustic waves enhance neutrophil killing of bacteria.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John D Loike

    Full Text Available Biofilms are structured communities of bacteria that play a major role in the pathogenicity of bacteria and are the leading cause of antibiotic resistant bacterial infections on indwelling catheters and medical prosthetic devices. Failure to resolve these biofilm infections may necessitate the surgical removal of the prosthetic device which can be debilitating and costly. Recent studies have shown that application of surface acoustic waves to catheter surfaces can reduce the incidence of infections by a mechanism that has not yet been clarified. We report here the effects of surface acoustic waves (SAW on the capacity of human neutrophils to eradicate S. epidermidis bacteria in a planktonic state and within biofilms. Utilizing a novel fibrin gel system that mimics a tissue-like environment, we show that SAW, at an intensity of 0.3 mW/cm(2, significantly enhances human neutrophil killing of S. epidermidis in a planktonic state and within biofilms by enhancing human neutrophil chemotaxis in response to chemoattractants. In addition, we show that the integrin CD18 plays a significant role in the killing enhancement observed in applying SAW. We propose from out data that this integrin may serve as mechanoreceptor for surface acoustic waves enhancing neutrophil chemotaxis and killing of bacteria.

  1. Neutrophil-to-Lymphocyte Ratio and Platelet-to-Lymphocyte Ratio are Predictors of Heart Failure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Erdal Durmus

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available AbstractBackground:Neutrophil-to-lymphocyte ratio (NLR and platelet-to-lymphocyte ratio (PLR are inflammatory markers used as prognostic factors in various diseases. The aims of this study were to compare the PLR and the NLR of heart failure (HF patients with those of age-sex matched controls, to evaluate the predictive value of those markers in detecting HF, and to demonstrate the effect of NLR and PLR on mortality in HF patients during follow-up.Methods:This study included 56 HF patients and 40 controls without HF. All subjects underwent transthoracic echocardiography to evaluate cardiac functions. The NLR and the PLR were calculated as the ratio of neutrophil count to lymphocyte count and as the ratio of platelet count to lymphocyte count, respectively. All HF patients were followed after their discharge from the hospital to evaluate mortality, cerebrovascular events, and re-hospitalization.Results:The NLR and the PLR of HF patients were significantly higher compared to those of the controls (p < 0.01. There was an inverse correlation between the NLR and the left ventricular ejection fraction of the study population (r: -0.409, p < 0.001. The best cut-off value of NLR to predict HF was 3.0, with 86.3% sensitivity and 77.5% specificity, and the best cut-off value of PLR to predict HF was 137.3, with 70% sensitivity and 60% specificity. Only NLR was an independent predictor of mortality in HF patients. A cut-off value of 5.1 for NLR can predict death in HF patients with 75% sensitivity and 62% specificity during a 12.8-month follow-up period on average.Conclusion:NLR and PLR were higher in HF patients than in age-sex matched controls. However, NLR and PLR were not sufficient to establish a diagnosis of HF. NLR can be used to predict mortality during the follow-up of HF patients.

  2. 2-Arachidonoylglycerol enhances platelet formation from human megakaryoblasts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gasperi, Valeria; Avigliano, Luciana; Evangelista, Daniela; Oddi, Sergio; Chiurchiù, Valerio; Lanuti, Mirko; Maccarrone, Mauro; Valeria Catani, Maria

    2014-01-01

    Platelets modulate vascular system integrity, and their loss is critical in haematological pathologies and after chemotherapy. Therefore, identification of molecules enhancing platelet production would be useful to counteract thrombocytopenia. We have previously shown that 2-arachidonoylglycerol (2-AG) acts as a true agonist of platelets, as well as it commits erythroid precursors toward the megakaryocytic lineage. Against this background, we sought to further interrogate the role of 2-AG in megakaryocyte/platelet physiology by investigating terminal differentiation, and subsequent thrombopoiesis. To this end, we used MEG-01 cells, a human megakaryoblastic cell line able to produce in vitro platelet-like particles. 2-AG increased the number of cells showing ruffled surface and enhanced surface expression of specific megakaryocyte/platelet surface antigens, typical hallmarks of terminal megakaryocytic differentiation and platelet production. Changes in cytoskeleton modeling also occurred in differentiated megakaryocytes and blebbing platelets. 2-AG acted by binding to CB1 and CB2 receptors, because specific antagonists reverted its effect. Platelets were split off from megakaryocytes and were functional: they contained the platelet-specific surface markers CD61 and CD49, whose levels increased following stimulation with a natural agonist like collagen. Given the importance of 2-AG for driving megakaryopoiesis and thrombopoiesis, not surprisingly we found that its hydrolytic enzymes were tightly controlled by classical inducers of megakaryocyte differentiation. In conclusion 2-AG, by triggering megakaryocyte maturation and platelet release, may have clinical efficacy to counteract thrombocytopenia-related diseases.

  3. Neutrophil-to-lymphocyte and platelet-to-lymphocyte ratios: are they useful for predicting gestational diabetes mellitus during pregnancy?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sargın MA

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Mehmet Akif Sargın, Murat Yassa, Bilge Dogan Taymur, Ayhan Celik, Emrah Ergun, Niyazi Tug Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Fatih Sultan Mehmet Research and Training Hospital, Istanbul, Turkey Objective: We aimed to investigate whether the neutrophil-to-lymphocyte ratio (NLR and platelet-to-lymphocyte ratio (PLR could be utilized to screen for gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM.Subjects and methods: NLR and PLR were assessed by retrospective analysis of 762 healthy and pregnant women with GDM. The patients were stratified into four groups, as follows: GDM (n=144, impaired glucose tolerance (n=76, only screen positive (n=238, and control (n=304.Results: The leukocyte, neutrophil, and lymphocyte counts were significantly higher in the study groups compared with the control group (P=0.001; P<0.01. There were no statistically significant differences between the groups with respect to the NLR and PLR (P>0.05.Conclusion: We do not recommend that blood NLR and PLR can be used to screen for GDM. However, increase in the leukocyte count is an important marker for GDM as it provides evidence of subclinical inflammation. Keywords: inflammation, lymphocytes, neutrophils, platelets, pregnancy

  4. Assessment of neutrophil to lymphocyte ratio and mean platelet volume in pediatric familial Mediterranean fever patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ozge Basaran

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Blood neutrophil to lymphocyte ratio (NLR and mean platelet volume (MPV both have been used as a simple marker of inflammation in many disorders. Here, we aimed to investigate the relationship between NLR, MPV, and familial Mediterranean fever (FMF. Materials and Methods: In this retrospective study, the files of FMF patients in pediatric rheumatology outpatient clinic were reviewed. There were 160 participants (68.4% in the FMF patient group and 74 participants (31.6% in the control group. Ninety of patients were in attack-free period, and 70 were in attack period. Results: The highest values of NLR were found in the patients at attack period. Patients in attack-free period and the participants in control group had similar levels of NLR (1.71 ± 0.83 and 1.91 ± 1.86 respectively (P = 0.457, and they had lower ratios than the patients did at attack period (4.10 ± 3.11 (P < 0.001 for both. There was no significant difference between MPV values of attack patients (8.35 ± 4.91 and attack-free patients (8.43 ± 1.15 (P = 0.074. MPV values of attack patients and attack-free patients were significantly higher than control group (7.99 ± 0.81 (P < 0.001 for both. Conclusion: NLR ratio may indicate FMF attack period. Since there was no significant difference between attack-free patients and control groups, NLR ratio cannot be used as a subclinical inflammation marker. However, NLR could be a useful predictor of inflammation in FMF patients. On the other hand, since our attack and attack-free patients have similar MPV values and both had greater MPV values than control group, we suggest that MPV may be used to show subclinical inflammation.

  5. NEUTROPHIL/LYMPHOCYTE RATIO AND PLATELET/LYMPHOCYTE RATIO IN PATIENTS WITH NSCLC

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cukic, Vesna

    2016-01-01

    Objective: to compare neutrophil/lymphocyte ratio (NLR) and platelet/lymphocyte ratio (PLR) in patients with NSCLC (Non- Small- Cell Lung Cancer): with and without metastases at the time of diagnosis to find out if there is the importance of these cell ratios in the assessment of severity NSCLC. Material and Methods: this is the retrospective analysis of NRL and PRL in patients with NSCLC at the time of the diagnosis of disease before any anti tumor treatment (chemotherapy, radiotherapy, surgery). 57 of patients with NSCLC treated in the first three months of 2016. year were chosen at random regardless of sex and age. We examined full blood count cells (FBC), calculated NLR and PLR in every patient and compared obtained values in patients with and patients without metastases. Results: In 57 patients with NSCLC there were 15 males with metastases, 28 without metastases, and 8 females with metastases, 6 without metastases. Since there was no regularity in the distribution of obtained values of NLR and PLR we made the Mann-Whitney U test. Mean values are presented with a median and interquartile percentiles. There was no significant difference in NLR between patients without and with metastases (p = 0.614; p = NS) as well as in PLR (p=0,068; p=NS). Conclusion: There must be a link between the immune status of the organism and lung cancer development. Immune cells have become of interest in recent years and much work has been done to study their role in the genesis of cancer but it did not give satisfactory results. Further clinical studies on large number of patients and further laboratory examination of the role of immune cells in cancer development and suppression are required. PMID:27999489

  6. Suilysin-induced Platelet-Neutrophil Complexes Formation is Triggered by Pore Formation-dependent Calcium Influx

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Shengwei; Zheng, Yuling; Chen, Shaolong; Huang, Shujing; Liu, Keke; Lv, Qingyu; Jiang, Yongqiang; Yuan, Yuan

    2016-01-01

    Platelet activation and platelet–neutrophil interactions have been found to be involved in inflammation, organ failure and soft-tissue necrosis in bacterial infections. Streptococcus suis, an emerging human pathogen, can cause streptococcal toxic-shock syndrome (STSS) similarly to Streptococcus pyogenes. Currently, S. suis–platelet interactions are poorly understood. Here, we found that suilysin (SLY), the S. suis cholesterol-dependent cytolysin (CDC), was the sole stimulus of S. suis that induced platelet-neutrophil complexes (PNC) formation. Furthermore, P-selectin released in α-granules mediated PNC formation. This process was triggered by the SLY-induced pore forming-dependent Ca2+ influx. Moreover, we demonstrated that the Ca2+ influx triggered an MLCK-dependent pathway playing critical roles in P-selectin activation and PNC formation, however, PLC-β-IP3/DAG-MLCK and Rho-ROCK-MLCK signalling were not involved. Additionally, the “outside-in” signalling had a smaller effect on the SLY-induced P-selectin release and PNC formation. Interestingly, other CDCs including pneumolysin and streptolysin O have also been found to induce PNC formation in a pore forming-dependent Ca2+ influx manner. It is possible that the bacterial CDC-mediated PNC formation is a similar response mechanism used by a wide range of bacteria. These findings may provide useful insight for discovering potential therapeutic targets for S. suis-associated STSS. PMID:27830834

  7. The Neutrophil-Platelet Score (NPS Predicts Survival in Primary Operable Colorectal Cancer and a Variety of Common Cancers.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David G Watt

    Full Text Available Recent in-vitro studies have suggested that a critical checkpoint early in the inflammatory process involves the interaction between neutrophils and platelets. This confirms the importance of the innate immune system in the elaboration of the systemic inflammatory response. The aim of the present study was to examine whether a combination of the neutrophil and platelet counts were predictive of survival in patients with cancer.Patients with histologically proven colorectal cancer who underwent potentially curative resection at a single centre between March 1999 and May 2013 (n = 796 and patients with cancer from the Glasgow Inflammation Outcome Study, who had a blood sample taken between January 2000 and December 2007 (n = 9649 were included in the analysis.In the colorectal cancer cohort, there were 173 cancer and 135 non-cancer deaths. In patients undergoing elective surgery, cancer-specific survival (CSS at 5 years ranged from 97% in patients with TNM I disease and NPS = 0 to 57% in patients with TNM III disease and NPS = 2 (p = 0.019 and in patients undergoing elective surgery for node-negative colon cancer from 98% (TNM I, NPS = 0 to 65% (TNM II, NPS = 2 (p = 0.004. In those with a variety of common cancers there were 5218 cancer and 929 non-cancer deaths. On multivariate analysis, adjusting for age and sex and stratified by tumour site, incremental increase in the NPS was significantly associated with poorer CSS (p<0.001.The neutrophil-platelet score predicted survival in a variety of common cancers and highlights the importance of the innate immune system in patients with cancer.

  8. Neutrophil to Lymphocyte Ratio, Platelet to Lymphocyte Ratio, Mean Platelet Volume and Red Cell Distribution Width Measures in Bells Palsy

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    Caner Sahin

    2017-01-01

    CONCLUSION: Statistically significant changes in the neutrophil count and NLR were determined in the measurements between Bells Palsy and control group (p = 0.013, p = 0.016 respectively on admission. A grade of the disease and NLR measurements had no statistically significant connection. RDW value was investigated for the first time in the literature for Bells Palsy patients.

  9. Association of High Density Lipoprotein with Platelet to Lymphocyte and Neutrophil to Lymphocyte Ratios in Coronary Artery Disease Patients

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    Jayesh H. Prajapati

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. We aimed to evaluate a relationship between platelet-lymphocyte ratio (PLR and neutrophil-lymphocyte ratio (NLR with high density lipoprotein (HDL cholesterol levels in coronary artery disease (CAD patients. Methods. A total of 354 patients with angiographically confirmed coronary blockages were enrolled in the study. Hematological indices and lipid profiling data of all the patients were collected. Results. We have observed significant association between HDL and PLR (P=0.008 and NLR (P=0.009; however no significant relationship was obtained with HDL and isolated platelet (P=0.488, neutrophil (P=0.407, and lymphocyte (P=0.952 counts in CAD patients. The association was subjected to gender specific variation as in males PLR (P=0.024 and NLR (P=0.03 were highly elevated in low HDL patients, whereas in females the elevation could not reach the statistically significant level. The PLR (217.47 versus 190.3; P=0.01 and NLR (6.33 versus 5.10; P=0.01 were significantly higher among the patients with acute coronary syndrome. In young patients the PLR (P=0.007 and NLR (P=0.001 were inversely associated with HDL, whereas in older population only NLR (P=0.05 had showed a significant association. Conclusion. We conclude that PLR and NLR are significantly elevated in CAD patients having low HDL levels.

  10. Homocysteine enhances superoxide anion release and NADPH oxidase assembly by human neutrophils. Effects on MAPK activation and neutrophil migration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alvarez-Maqueda, Moisés; El Bekay, Rajaa; Monteseirín, Javier; Alba, Gonzalo; Chacón, Pedro; Vega, Antonio; Santa María, Consuelo; Tejedo, Juan R; Martín-Nieto, José; Bedoya, Francisco J; Pintado, Elisabeth; Sobrino, Francisco

    2004-02-01

    Hyperhomocysteinaemia has recently been recognized as a risk factor of cardiovascular disease. However, the action mechanisms of homocysteine (Hcy) are not well understood. Given that Hcy may be involved in the recruitment of monocytes and neutrophils to the vascular wall, we have investigated the role of Hcy in essential functions of human neutrophils. We show that Hcy increased superoxide anion (O2*-) release by neutrophils to the extracellular medium, and that this effect was inhibited by superoxide dismutase and diphenyleneiodonium (DPI), an inhibitor of NADPH oxidase activity. The enzyme from rat peritoneal macrophages displayed a similar response. These effects were accompanied by a time-dependent increased translocation of p47phox and p67phox subunits of NADPH oxidase to the plasma membrane. We also show that Hcy increased intracellular H2O2 production by neutrophils, that Hcy enhanced the activation and phosphorylation of mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPKs), specifically p38-MAPK and ERK1/2, and that the migration of neutrophils was increased by Hcy. Present results are the first evidence that Hcy enhances the oxidative stress of neutrophils, and underscore the potential role of phagocytic cells in vascular wall injury through O2*- release in hyperhomocysteinaemia conditions.

  11. Novel anti-bacterial activities of β-defensin 1 in human platelets: suppression of pathogen growth and signaling of neutrophil extracellular trap formation.

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    Bjoern F Kraemer

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Human β-defensins (hBD are antimicrobial peptides that curb microbial activity. Although hBD's are primarily expressed by epithelial cells, we show that human platelets express hBD-1 that has both predicted and novel antibacterial activities. We observed that activated platelets surround Staphylococcus aureus (S. aureus, forcing the pathogens into clusters that have a reduced growth rate compared to S. aureus alone. Given the microbicidal activity of β-defensins, we determined whether hBD family members were present in platelets and found mRNA and protein for hBD-1. We also established that hBD-1 protein resided in extragranular cytoplasmic compartments of platelets. Consistent with this localization pattern, agonists that elicit granular secretion by platelets did not readily induce hBD-1 release. Nevertheless, platelets released hBD-1 when they were stimulated by α-toxin, a S. aureus product that permeabilizes target cells. Platelet-derived hBD-1 significantly impaired the growth of clinical strains of S. aureus. hBD-1 also induced robust neutrophil extracellular trap (NET formation by target polymorphonuclear leukocytes (PMNs, which is a novel antimicrobial function of β-defensins that was not previously identified. Taken together, these data demonstrate that hBD-1 is a previously-unrecognized component of platelets that displays classic antimicrobial activity and, in addition, signals PMNs to extrude DNA lattices that capture and kill bacteria.

  12. The lipooligosaccharide-modifying enzyme LptA enhances gonococcal defence against human neutrophils.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Handing, Jonathan W; Criss, Alison K

    2015-06-01

    Infection with Neisseria gonorrhoeae (Gc) is marked by an influx of neutrophils to the site of infection. Despite a robust immune response, viable Gc can be recovered from neutrophil-rich gonorrhoeal secretions. Gc enzymatically modifies the lipid A portion of lipooligosaccharide by the addition of phosphoethanolamine to the phosphate group at the 4' position. Loss of lipooligosaccharide phosphoethanolamine transferase A (LptA), the enzyme catalysing this reaction, increases bacterial sensitivity to killing by human complement and cationic antimicrobial peptides. Here, we investigated the importance of LptA for interactions between Gc and human neutrophils. We found that lptA mutant Gc was significantly more sensitive to killing by human neutrophils. Three mechanisms underlie the increased sensitivity of lptA mutant Gc to neutrophils. (i) lptA mutant Gc is more likely to reside in mature phagolysosomes than LptA-expressing bacteria. (ii) lptA mutant Gc is more sensitive to killing by components found in neutrophil granules, including CAP37/azurocidin, human neutrophil peptide 1 and the serine protease cathepsin G. (iii) lptA mutant Gc is more susceptible to killing by antimicrobial components that are exocytosed from neutrophils, including those decorating neutrophil extracellular traps. By increasing the resistance of Gc to the bactericidal activity of neutrophils, LptA-catalysed modification of lipooligosaccharide enhances survival of Gc from the human inflammatory response during acute gonorrhoea.

  13. A thermonuclease of Neisseria gonorrhoeae enhances bacterial escape from killing by neutrophil extracellular traps.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Juneau, Richard A; Stevens, Jacqueline S; Apicella, Michael A; Criss, Alison K

    2015-07-15

    Acute gonorrhea is characterized by neutrophilic inflammation that is insufficient to clear Neisseria gonorrhoeae. Activated neutrophils release extracellular traps (NETs), which are composed of chromatin and decorated with antimicrobial proteins. The N. gonorrhoeae NG0969 open reading frame contains a gene (nuc) that encodes a putatively secreted thermonuclease (Nuc) that contributes to biofilm remodeling. Here, we report that Nuc degrades NETs to help N. gonorrhoeae resist killing by neutrophils. Primary human neutrophils released NETs after exposure to N. gonorrhoeae, but NET integrity declined over time with Nuc-containing bacteria. Recombinant Nuc and conditioned medium from Nuc-containing N. gonorrhoeae degraded human neutrophil DNA and NETs. NETs were found to have antimicrobial activity against N. gonorrhoeae, and Nuc expression enhanced N. gonorrhoeae survival in the presence of neutrophils that released NETs. We propose that Nuc enables N. gonorrhoeae to escape trapping and killing by NETs during symptomatic infection, highlighting Nuc as a multifunctional virulence factor for N. gonorrhoeae.

  14. Platelets

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... tiny fraction of the blood volume. The principal function of platelets is to prevent bleeding. Red blood cells are ... forming a long string. This illustrates the basic function of platelets, to stick to any foreign surface and then ...

  15. Lutzomyia longipalpis saliva drives apoptosis and enhances parasite burden in neutrophils.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prates, Deboraci Brito; Araújo-Santos, Théo; Luz, Nívea Farias; Andrade, Bruno B; França-Costa, Jaqueline; Afonso, Lilian; Clarêncio, Jorge; Miranda, José Carlos; Bozza, Patrícia T; Dosreis, George A; Brodskyn, Cláudia; Barral-Netto, Manoel; Borges, Valéria Matos; Borges, Valéria de Matos; Barral, Aldina

    2011-09-01

    Neutrophils are considered the host's first line of defense against infections and have been implicated in the immunopathogenesis of Leishmaniasis. Leishmania parasites are inoculated alongside vectors' saliva, which is a rich source of pharmacologically active substances that interfere with host immune response. In the present study, we tested the hypothesis that salivary components from Lutzomyia longipalpis, an important vector of visceral Leishmaniasis, enhance neutrophil apoptosis. Murine inflammatory peritoneal neutrophils cultured in the presence of SGS presented increased surface expression of FasL and underwent caspase-dependent and FasL-mediated apoptosis. This proapoptosis effect of SGS on neutrophils was abrogated by pretreatment with protease as well as preincubation with antisaliva antibodies. Furthermore, in the presence of Leishmania chagasi, SGS also increased apoptosis on neutrophils and increased PGE(2) release and decreased ROS production by neutrophils, while enhancing parasite viability inside these cells. The increased parasite burden was abrogated by treatment with z-VAD, a pan caspase inhibitor, and NS-398, a COX-2 inhibitor. In the presence of SGS, Leishmania-infected neutrophils produced higher levels of MCP-1 and attracted a high number of macrophages by chemotaxis in vitro assays. Both of these events were abrogated by pretreatment of neutrophils with bindarit, an inhibitor of CCL2/MCP-1 expression. Taken together, our data support the hypothesis that vector salivary proteins trigger caspase-dependent and FasL-mediated apoptosis, thereby favoring Leishmania survival inside neutrophils, which may represent an important mechanism for the establishment of Leishmania infection.

  16. Formyl-Peptide Receptor 2/3/Lipoxin A4 Receptor Regulates Neutrophil-Platelet Aggregation and Attenuates Cerebral Inflammation: Impact for Therapy in Cardiovascular Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vital, Shantel A; Becker, Felix; Holloway, Paul M; Russell, Janice; Perretti, Mauro; Granger, D Neil; Gavins, Felicity N E

    2016-05-31

    Platelet activation at sites of vascular injury is essential for hemostasis, but it is also a major pathomechanism underlying ischemic injury. Because anti-inflammatory therapies limit thrombosis and antithrombotic therapies reduce vascular inflammation, we tested the therapeutic potential of 2 proresolving endogenous mediators, annexin A1 N-terminal derived peptide (AnxA1Ac2-26) and aspirin-triggered lipoxin A4 (15-epi-lipoxin A4), on the cerebral microcirculation after ischemia/reperfusion injury. Furthermore, we tested whether the lipoxin A4 receptor formyl-peptide receptor 2/3 (Fpr2/3; ortholog to human FPR2/lipoxin A4 receptor) evoked neuroprotective functions after cerebral ischemia/reperfusion injury. Using intravital microscopy, we found that cerebral ischemia/reperfusion injury was accompanied by neutrophil and platelet activation and neutrophil-platelet aggregate formation within cerebral microvessels. Moreover, aspirin-triggered lipoxin A4 activation of neutrophil Fpr2/3 regulated neutrophil-platelet aggregate formation in the brain and inhibited the reactivity of the cerebral microvasculature. The same results were obtained with AnxA1Ac2-26 administration. Blocking Fpr2/lipoxin A4 receptor with the antagonist Boc2 reversed this effect, and treatments were ineffective in Fpr2/3 knockout mice, which displayed an exacerbated disease severity, evidenced by increased infarct area, blood-brain barrier dysfunction, increased neurological score, and elevated levels of cytokines. Furthermore, aspirin treatment significantly reduced cerebral leukocyte recruitment and increased endogenous levels of aspirin-triggered lipoxin A4, effects again mediated by Fpr2/3. Fpr2/lipoxin A4 receptor is a therapeutic target for initiating endogenous proresolving, anti-inflammatory pathways after cerebral ischemia/reperfusion injury. © 2016 American Heart Association, Inc.

  17. Neutrophil-to-Lymphocyte Ratio and Platelet-to-Lymphocyte Ratio: Novel Markers for Diagnosis and Prognosis in Patients with Idiopathic Sudden Sensorineural Hearing Loss

    OpenAIRE

    Young Joon Seo; Jun hui Jeong; Jae Young Choi; In Seok Moon

    2014-01-01

    Background. We aim to provide useful evidence about the association of neutrophil-to-lymphocyte ratio (NLR) and platelet-to-lymphocyte ratio (PLR) with idiopathic sudden sensorineural hearing loss (ISSNHL) and its possibility of emerging as a cheap, reliable, and independent prognostic marker of ISSNHL. Methods. 348 patients diagnosed with ISSNHL were included in our retrospective data analysis. Blood samples and the hearing assessments of the patients were carried out. Then, the patients wer...

  18. Assessment of relation between neutrophil lympocyte, platelet lympocyte ratios and epicardial fat thickness in patients with ankylosing spondylitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boyraz, Ismail; Onur Caglar, Sabri; Erdem, Fatma; Yazici, Mehmet; Yazici, Selma; Koc, Bunyamin; Gunduz, Ramazan; Karakoyun, Ahmet

    2016-02-01

    To investigate whether there is a relation between neutrophillymphocyte (N/L) and platelet- lymphocyte (P/L) ratios and epicardial adipose tissue (EAT) thickness in patients with ankylosing spondylitis (AS). Thirty patients diagnosed with ankylosing spondylitis and 25 healthy people (controls) were included in the study. Age, gender, body mass index (BMI), height, hemogram, sedimentation, neutrophil/lymphocyte ratio, platelet/lymphocyte ratio, CRP, hepatic and renal function tests, lipid profile of the all patients were recorded. Data related to duration of the disease, Bath Ankylosing Spondylitis Disease Activity Index (BASDAI) and Bath Ankylosing Spondylitis Functional Index (BASFI) values of the cases in the patient group were obtained. A cardiologist measured EAT thickness by ECHO in both patient and control groups. In the patient group, mean BASDAI and BASFI scores were 2.48±2.21 and 1.5±2.07, respectively. Age, gender, BMI values did not show statistically significant difference between the patient and the control groups. N/L and P/L ratios did not change significantly in the patient group having higher EAT, BASFI values and taking anti-TNF compared to the control group. In patients with AS, EAT measurements, which are related to inflammatory response increase, can be used for monitoring of the risk of development of cardiac disease. We could not find the relation between EAT and N/L, P/L ratios in terms of evaluation of inflammatory response. Copyright© by the Medical Assotiation of Zenica-Doboj Canton.

  19. Vitamin D and inflammation: evaluation with neutrophil-to-lymphocyte ratio and platelet-to-lymphocyte ratio

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gungor, Adem; Ozcicek, Adalet; Akbas, Nergis; Askin, Seda; Polat, Murat

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Association of vitamin D, inflammation and endothelial dysfunction, beside the classic bone metabolism disorders, may explain the pathogenesis of numerous diseases associated with vitamin D deficiency. While large numbers of reports support the relationship of vitamin D with inflammation, several reports fail to confirm this relationship. Neutrophil-to-lymphocyte ratio (NLR) and platelet-to-lymphocyte ratio (PLR) are novel and inexpensive markers of inflammation that can be studied in all centers. The goal of this study was to investigate the association between 25-hydroxy vitamin D (25(OH)D) and inflammation with the novel inflammatory markers NLR and PLR. Material and methods This study was performed retrospectively. Results of the simultaneously performed 25(OH)D, parathyroid hormone, albumin, calcium, phosphorus, alkaline phosphatase and creatinine level measurements and complete blood count were recorded. The data of 4120 patients were included in the study. Results Between vitamin D deficient and non-deficient groups there were significant differences in PLR (p < 0.001) and NLR (p = 0.001). Vitamin D had a significant negative correlation with PLR (p < 0.001) and NLR (p < 0.001). Multiple regression analysis indicated that 25(OH)D was independently and negatively correlated with PLR (OR = 0.994, 95% CI 0.991–0.998, p = 0.02). Conclusions Platelet-to-lymphocyte ratio and NLR were significantly associated with 25(OH)D levels, and PLR was found to be an independent predictor of 25(OH)D levels. Our study revealed an inverse association of vitamin D levels and inflammation with these inexpensive and universally available markers. PMID:27478451

  20. Predictive role of neutrophil-to-lymphocyte and platelet-to-lymphocyte ratios for diagnosis of acute appendicitis during pregnancy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fatih Mehmet Yazar

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Acute appendicitis (AA is not uncommon during pregnancy but can be difficult to diagnose. This study evaluated the neutrophil-to-lymphocyte ratio (NLR and platelet-to-lymphocyte ratio (PLR in addition to conventional diagnostic indicators of the disease to diagnose AA during pregnancy. Age, gestational age, white blood cell (WBC count, Alvarado scores, C-reactive protein (CRP, lymphocyte count, NLR and PLR were compared among 28 pregnant women who underwent surgery for AA, 35 pregnant women wrongly suspected as having AA, 29 healthy pregnant women, and 30 nonpregnant healthy women. Mean WBC counts and CRP levels were higher in women with proven AA than in those of control groups (all p < 0.05. Among all the groups, the median NLR and PLR were significantly different in women with proven AA (all p < 0.05. Receiver operating characteristic analysis was used to determine cut-off values for WBC count, CRP, lymphocyte count, NLR and PLR, and multiple logistic regression analysis showed that NLR and PLR used with routine methods could diagnose AA with 90.5% accuracy. Used in addition to routine diagnostic methods, NLR and PLR increased the accuracy of the diagnosis of AA in pregnant women.

  1. Are neutrophil/lymphocyte ratio and platelet/lymphocyte ratio reliable parameters as prognostic indicators in malignant mesothelioma?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tural Onur, Seda; Sokucu, Sinem Nedime; Dalar, Levent; Iliaz, Sinem; Kara, Kaan; Buyukkale, Songül; Altin, Sedat

    2016-01-01

    Background Malignant mesothelioma (MM) is an aggressive asbestos-related pleural tumor. The incidence is increasing with intensive use of asbestos in developing countries. We need an easily accessible, inexpensive, and reliable method for determining the low survival time prognosis of this tumor. The aim of our study was to investigate the viability of neutrophil/lymphocyte ratio (NLR) and platelet/lymphocyte ratio (PLR) as prognostic indicators in MM. Patients and methods Thirty-six patients with MM, whose histopathologic diagnosis and follow-up were performed by our clinic and whose complete archive data were accessible, were included in this retrospective study. The patients’ histopathologic disease types and stages, complete blood count parameters at diagnosis, and survival were recorded. Results Eighteen of the patients with MM were male and the remaining 18 of them were female; the average follow-up period was 24.83±3.61 months. The PLR levels of the patients were statistically significant (P<0.05). The NLR and PLR area under the receiver operating characteristic curve values were 0.559 and 0.749, respectively (P=0.631 and P=0.044, respectively). Conclusion PLR was a significant prognostic indicator of MM at diagnosis on complete blood count parameters; however, NLR was not a significant prognostic indicator. A large number of prospective studies are needed to prove the reliability of the parameters. PMID:27217757

  2. Effect of a Korean traditional formulation, Hwaotang, on superoxide generation in human neutrophils, platelet aggregation in human blood, and nitric oxide, prostaglandin E2 production and paw oedema induced by carrageenan in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Won-Hwan; Park, Soo-Young; Kim, Hyung-Min; Kim, Cheorl-Ho

    2004-02-01

    Hwaotang, a traditional Korean medicinal formulation, is a dried decoctum of a mixture of 7 herbal medicines, consisting of Angelica gigantis Radix, Rehmanniae radix, Paeoniae radix, Ciniamomi cortex, Cnidii rhizoma, Persicae semen and Carthami flos. We have investigated that Hwaotang water extract (HOT) has various effects on stimulus-induced superoxide generation in human neutrophils. The effects of HOT on superoxide generation in human neutrophils were investigated. HOT significantly inhibited N-formyl-methionyl-leucyl-phenylalanine (fMLP)-induced superoxide generation in a concentration-dependent manner, but not that induced by arachidonic acid (AA). On the other hand, HOT enhanced superoxide generation induced by phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate (PMA) in a concentration-dependent manner. The superoxide generation induced by PMA with HOT was suppressed by staurosporine, an inhibitor of protein kinase C, but was not suppressed by genistein, an inhibitor of protein tyrosine kinase. Tyrosyl phosphorylation of a 58 kDa protein, which was increased by fMLP, was inhibited by HOT. HOT also inhibited the generation of a 47 kDa protein and platelet aggregation in human blood. The results suggest that protein tyrosine kinase participates in fMLP-mediated superoxide generation by HOT-treated human neutrophils. HOT inhibited neutrophil functions, including degranulation, superoxide generation, and leukotriene B4 production, without any effect on 5-lipoxygenase activity. HOT reduced nitric oxide (NO) and prostaglandin E2 production in mouse peritoneal macrophages stimulated with lipopolysaccharide, whereas no influence on the activity of iNOS, COX-2 or COX-1 was observed. HOT significantly reduced mouse paw oedema induced by carrageenan. Western blot analysis showed that HOT reduced the expression of iNOS and COX-2. The results indicate that HOT exerts anti-inflammatory effects related to the inhibition of neutrophil functions and of NO and prostaglandin E2 production, which

  3. Inhibition of platelet-activating factor- and zymosan-activated serum-induced chemotaxis of human neutrophils by nedocromil sodium, BN 52021 and sodium cromoglycate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bruijnzeel, P. L.; Warringa, R. A.; Kok, P. T.

    1989-01-01

    1. Inflammatory cells such as eosinophils and neutrophils are thought to contribute actively to the pathogenesis of asthma since they infiltrate into the lung tissue. These cells are mobilized by lipid-like and protein-like chemotactic factors. As illustrative examples of both groups, platelet-activating-factor (Paf) and zymosan-activated-serum (ZAS) were used in this study. The inhibitory effects of nedocromil sodium, the Paf antagonist BN 52021 and sodium cromoglycate on Paf- and ZAS-induced neutrophil chemotaxis were evaluated. 2. All tested drugs inhibited Paf-induced neutrophil chemotaxis with approximately the same potency (IC50 approximately 1 nM). 3. Nedocromil sodium and sodium cromoglycate were equally potent in inhibiting ZAS-induced neutrophil chemotaxis (IC50 = 0.1-1 microM), whereas BN 52021 was considerably less potent (IC30 = 10 microM). 4. To find out whether the drugs tested could inhibit early events in cell activation, their capacity to inhibit Paf- and ZAS-induced cytosolic free Ca2+-mobilization was investigated. BN 52021, at a concentration of 100 microM, completely inhibited Paf-induced Ca2+-mobilization and inhibited ZAS-induced Ca2+-mobilization by about 50%. Nedocromil sodium and sodium cromoglycate were ineffective. PMID:2551444

  4. Platelets Mediate Host Defense against Staphylococcus aureus through Direct Bactericidal Activity and by Enhancing Macrophage Activities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ali, Ramadan A; Wuescher, Leah M; Dona, Keith R; Worth, Randall G

    2017-01-01

    Platelets are the chief effector cells in hemostasis. However, recent evidence suggests they have multiple roles in host defense against infection. Reports by us and others showed that platelets functionally contribute to protection against Staphylococcus aureus infection. In the current study, the capacity of mouse platelets to participate in host defense against S. aureus infection was determined by assessing two possibilities. First, we determined the ability of platelets to kill S. aureus directly; and, second, we tested the possibility that platelets enhance macrophage phagocytosis and intracellular killing of S. aureus In this study we report evidence in support of both mechanisms. Platelets effectively killed two different strains of S. aureus. A clinical isolate of methicillin-resistant S. aureus was killed by platelets (>40% killing in 2 h) in a thrombin-dependent manner whereas a methicillin-sensitive strain was killed to equal extent but did not require thrombin. Interestingly, thrombin-stimulated platelets also significantly enhanced peritoneal macrophage phagocytosis of both methicillin-resistant S. aureus and methicillin-sensitive S. aureus by >70%, and restricted intracellular growth by >40%. Enhancement of macrophage anti-S. aureus activities is independent of contact with platelets but is mediated through releasable products, namely IL-1β. These data confirm our hypothesis that platelets participate in host defense against S. aureus both through direct killing of S. aureus and enhancing the antimicrobial function of macrophages in protection against S. aureus infection. Copyright © 2016 by The American Association of Immunologists, Inc.

  5. Neutrophil-to-lymphocyte ratio and platelet-to-lymphocyte ratio as predictors of survival after heart transplantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seropian, Ignacio M; Romeo, Francisco J; Pizarro, Rodolfo; Vulcano, Norberto O; Posatini, Ricardo A; Marenchino, Ricardo G; Berrocal, Daniel H; Belziti, Cesar A

    2017-07-31

    The aim of this study was to evaluate whether neutrophil-to-lymphocyte ratio (NLR) and platelet-to-lymphocyte ratio (PLR) predict outcome in heart failure (HF) patients undergoing heart transplantation (HTX). Data from 111 HF patients undergoing HTX 2010-2015 were retrospectively reviewed. NLR and PLR were calculated before HTX, immediately after HTX, and at 6 and 24 hours. Primary endpoint was in-hospital mortality, and secondary endpoints were 1 year mortality and renal replacement therapy (RRT). Prognostic factors were assessed by multivariate analysis, and the predictive values of NLR and PLR for mortality were compared. The discriminatory performance for predicting in-hospital mortality was better for NLR [area under the receiver operating characteristic curve (AUC) = 0.644, 95% confidence interval 0.492-0.797] than for PLR (AUC = 0.599, 95% confidence interval 0.423-0.776). Best cut-off value was 2.41 for NLR (sensitivity 86%, specificity 67%) and 92.5 for PLR (sensitivity 86%, specificity 68%). When divided according to best cut-off value, in-hospital mortality was significantly higher in the high NLR group (17.5% vs. 3.2%, P < 0.05), but not in the high PLR group (16.5% vs. 6.3%, P = ns). One year mortality was not significantly higher for either group (37.5% vs. 6.5% for NLR; 36.7% vs. 9.4% for PLR, P = ns for both), while RRT was significantly higher in both the NLR and PLR high groups (33.8% vs. 0%; 32.9% vs. 3.1%, respectively, P < 0.001). Multivariate analysis indicated that only high NLR (hazard ratio = 3.403, P < 0.05) and pre-transplant diabetes (hazard ratio = 3.364, P < 0.05) were independent prognostic factors for 1 year mortality. High NLR was a predictor for in-hospital mortality, and an independent prognostic factor for 1 year mortality. Both high NLR and high PLR were predictors for RRT. © 2017 The Authors. ESC Heart Failure published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd on behalf of the European Society of Cardiology.

  6. BIRM 270: a novel inhibitor of arachidonate release that blocks leukotriene B4 and platelet-activating factor biosynthesis in human neutrophils.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farina, P R; Graham, A G; Hoffman, A F; Watrous, J M; Borgeat, P; Nadeau, M; Hansen, G; Dinallo, R M; Adams, J; Miao, C K

    1994-12-01

    (S)-N-[2-Cyclohexyl-1-(2-pyridinyl)ethyl]-5-methyl-2-benzoxazolamine+ ++ (BIRM 270) was identified as a potent and enantiomerically selective inhibitor of calcium ionophore A23187-stimulated leukotriene B4 biosynthesis in human neutrophils. The (S)- and (R)-enantiomers exhibited IC50 values of 1 nM and 40 nM, respectively. BIRM 270 did not inhibit 5-lipoxygenase activity in a cell-free assay. In addition, the compound did not interfere with the conversion of exogenous 5-lipoxygenase substrate (15S)-hydroperoxyeicosatetraenoic acid to (5S, 15S)-dihydroxyeicosatetraenoic acid in intact, ionophore-stimulated neutrophils. Under the same experimental conditions, BIRM 270 inhibited the production of 5-lipoxygenase products from endogenous substrate, suggesting that the compound affected arachidonate availability rather than metabolism. Consistent with this concept, the inhibition of leukotriene B4 biosynthesis by BIRM 270 was overcome by the addition of exogenous arachidonic acid to the leukocyte preparation. Direct measurement of free arachidonate by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry confirmed that BIRM 270 inhibited arachidonate release from ionophore-stimulated neutrophils. The compound did not affect arachidonate reacylation. The blockage of arachidonate release coincided with inhibition of leukotriene B4 biosynthesis in these cells. BIRM 270 also inhibited ionophore-stimulated platelet-activating factor biosynthesis by human neutrophils. Although these results suggest that BIRM 270 inhibited phospholipase A2-mediated deacylation of membrane phospholipids, the compound did not directly inhibit the high molecular weight, cytosolic phospholipase A2 derived from human neutrophils or U937 cells. Thus, suppression of arachidonate mobilization by BIRM 270 may be due to indirect inhibition of intracellular phospholipase A2 or to inhibition of another acylhydrolase activity.

  7. Enhanced platelet adhesion in essential thrombocythemia after in vitro activation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andreas C. Eriksson

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Objective: Essential thrombocythemia (ET is a chronic myeloproliferative disorder characterized by elevated platelet counts and increased risk of thrombosis. Ex vivo data suggest increased platelet reactivity in agreement with the increased thrombosis risk, while in vitro tests often detect decreased platelet activity. The present study aimed to investigate adhesion of ET-platelets in vitro, which is an aspect of platelet function that has been addressed in only a few studies on ET patients. Material and Methods: The study included 30 ET patients and 14 healthy controls. Platelet adhesion was measured with a static platelet adhesion assay. Results: The main finding was that ET-platelets were more readily activated by adhesion-inducing stimuli in vitro than control platelets. This was particularly evident in elderly patients and when using multiple stimuli, such as surfaces of collagen or fibrinogen combined with addition of adenosine 5’-diphosphate or ristocetin. Such multiple stimuli resulted in adhesion above the control mean +2 standard deviations for approximately 50% of the patients.Conclusion: The results are in accordance with the concept of increased platelet activity in ET, but opposite to most other in vitro studies. We suggest that the conditions in the adhesion assay might mimic the in vivo situation regarding the presence of chronic platelet activation.

  8. Prolyl hydroxylase 2 inactivation enhances glycogen storage and promotes excessive neutrophilic responses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sadiku, Pranvera; Willson, Joseph A; Dickinson, Rebecca S; Murphy, Fiona; Harris, Alison J; Lewis, Amy; Sammut, David; Mirchandani, Ananda S; Ryan, Eilise; Watts, Emily R; Thompson, A A Roger; Marriott, Helen M; Dockrell, David H; Taylor, Cormac T; Schneider, Martin; Maxwell, Patrick H; Chilvers, Edwin R; Mazzone, Massimilliano; Moral, Veronica; Pugh, Chris W; Ratcliffe, Peter J; Schofield, Christopher J; Ghesquiere, Bart; Carmeliet, Peter; Whyte, Moira Kb; Walmsley, Sarah R

    2017-09-01

    Fully activated innate immune cells are required for effective responses to infection, but their prompt deactivation and removal are essential for limiting tissue damage. Here, we have identified a critical role for the prolyl hydroxylase enzyme Phd2 in maintaining the balance between appropriate, predominantly neutrophil-mediated pathogen clearance and resolution of the innate immune response. We demonstrate that myeloid-specific loss of Phd2 resulted in an exaggerated inflammatory response to Streptococcus pneumonia, with increases in neutrophil motility, functional capacity, and survival. These enhanced neutrophil responses were dependent upon increases in glycolytic flux and glycogen stores. Systemic administration of a HIF-prolyl hydroxylase inhibitor replicated the Phd2-deficient phenotype of delayed inflammation resolution. Together, these data identify Phd2 as the dominant HIF-hydroxylase in neutrophils under normoxic conditions and link intrinsic regulation of glycolysis and glycogen stores to the resolution of neutrophil-mediated inflammatory responses. These results demonstrate the therapeutic potential of targeting metabolic pathways in the treatment of inflammatory disease.

  9. Circulating primers enhance platelet function and induce resistance to antiplatelet therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blair, T A; Moore, S F; Hers, I

    2015-01-01

    Background Aspirin and P2Y12 antagonists are antiplatelet compounds that are used clinically in patients with thrombosis. However, some patients are ‘resistant’ to antiplatelet therapy, which increases their risk of developing acute coronary syndromes. These patients often present with an underlying condition that is associated with altered levels of circulating platelet primers and platelet hyperactivity. Platelet primers cannot stimulate platelet activation, but, in combination with physiologic stimuli, significantly enhance platelet function. Objectives To explore the role of platelet primers in resistance to antiplatelet therapy, and to evaluate whether phosphoinositide 3-kinase (PI3K) contributes to this process. Methods and Results We used platelet aggregation, thromboxane A2 production and ex vivo thrombus formation as functional readouts of platelet activity. Platelets were treated with the potent P2Y12 inhibitor AR-C66096, aspirin, or a combination of both, in the presence or absence of the platelet primers insulin-like growth factor-1 (IGF-1) and thrombopoietin (TPO), or the Gz-coupled receptor ligand epinephrine. We found that platelet primers largely overcame the inhibitory effects of antiplatelet compounds on platelet functional responses. IGF-1-mediated and TPO-mediated, but not epinephrine-mediated, enhancements in the presence of antiplatelet drugs were blocked by the PI3K inhibitors wortmannin and LY294002. Conclusions These results demonstrate that platelet primers can contribute to antiplatelet resistance. Furthermore, our data demonstrate that there are PI3K-dependent and PI3K-independent mechanisms driving primer-mediated resistance to antiplatelet therapy. PMID:26039631

  10. Effects of corilagin on platelet-neutrophil interaction%鞣云实素对血小板与中性粒细胞之间相互作用的影响

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    武鸿翔; 董跃伟; 刘毅; 彭玉高; 王丽; 沈志强

    2009-01-01

    目的:研究鞣云实素(corilagin)对血小板与中性粒细胞之间相互作用的影响.方法:应用玫瑰花结试验及Born方法分别探讨corilagin对中性粒细胞与血小板间的粘附作用和激活的中性粒细胞诱导血小板聚集功能的影响.结果:corilagin显著降低血小板与中性粒细胞之间的粘附率,其IC_(50)为73.5 mol/L.corilagin明显抑制肉豆蔻佛波醇(fMLP)激活的中性粒细胞上清液引起的血小板聚集,IC_(50)为134.3 mol/L.结论:corilagin呈浓度依赖性阻抑血小板与中性粒细胞之间的相互作用.%Objective: To investigate the effects of corilagin on neutrophil-platelet interaction. Methods: The effect of corilagin on neutrophil-plate-let adhesion was observed by use of rosette assay. Borns method was used to test the platelet aggregation induced by the supernatant of fMLP-activated neutrophils. Results: Corilagin significantly suppressed the binding of thrombin-stimulated platelets to neutrophils, with the IC_(50) value of 73. 5 mol/L, and inhibited neutrophil-induced platelet aggregation. The IC_(50) values was 134.3 mol/L. Conclusion: Corilagin showed inhibitory effects on the interaction between neutrophils and platelets.

  11. Matrix metalloproteinase-2 enhances platelet deposition on collagen under flow conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guglielmini, Giuseppe; Appolloni, Viviana; Momi, Stefania; De Groot, Philip G; Battiston, Monica; De Marco, Luigi; Falcinelli, Emanuela; Gresele, Paolo

    2016-01-01

    Platelets contain and release matrix metalloproteinase-2 (MMP-2) that in turn potentiates platelet aggregation. Platelet deposition on a damaged vascular wall is the first, crucial, step leading to thrombosis. Little is known about the effects of MMP-2 on platelet activation and adhesion under flow conditions. We studied the effect of MMP-2 on shear-dependent platelet activation using the O'Brien filtration system, and on platelet deposition using a parallel-plate perfusion chamber. Preincubation of human whole blood with active MMP-2 (50 ng/ml, i.e. 0.78 nM) shortened filter closure time (from 51.8 ± 3.6 sec to 40 ± 2.7 sec, pMMP-2 inhibitor. High shear stress induced the release of MMP-2 from platelets, while TIMP-2 levels were not significantly reduced, therefore, the MMP-2/TIMP-2 ratio increased significantly showing enhanced MMP-2 activity. Preincubation of whole blood with active MMP-2 (0.5 to 50 ng/ml, i.e 0.0078 to 0.78 nM) increased dose-dependently human platelet deposition on collagen under high shear-rate flow conditions (3000 sec⁻¹) (maximum +47.0 ± 11.9%, pMMP-2 inhibitor reduced platelet deposition. In real-time microscopy studies, increased deposition of platelets on collagen induced by MMP-2 started 85 sec from the beginning of perfusion, and was abolished by a GPIIb/IIIa antagonist, while MMP-2 had no effect on platelet deposition on fibrinogen or VWF. Confocal microscopy showed that MMP-2 enhances thrombus volume (+20.0 ± 3.0% vs control) rather than adhesion. In conclusion, we show that MMP-2 potentiates shear-induced platelet activation by enhancing thrombus formation.

  12. Factor H and factor H-related protein 1 bind to human neutrophils via complement receptor 3, mediate attachment to Candida albicans, and enhance neutrophil antimicrobial activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Losse, Josephine; Zipfel, Peter F; Józsi, Mihály

    2010-01-15

    The host complement system plays an important role in protection against infections. Several human-pathogenic microbes were shown to acquire host complement regulators, such as factor H (CFH), that downregulate complement activation at the microbial surface and protect the pathogens from the opsonic and lytic effects of complement. Because CFH can also bind to host cells, we addressed the role of CFH and CFH-related proteins as adhesion ligands in host-pathogen interactions. We show that the CFH family proteins CFH, CFH-like protein 1 (CFHL1), CFH-related protein (CFHR) 1, and CFHR4 long isoform bind to human neutrophil granulocytes and to the opportunistic human-pathogenic yeast Candida albicans. Two major binding sites, one within the N-terminus and one in the C-terminus of CFH, were found to mediate binding to neutrophils. Complement receptor 3 (CD11b/CD18; alpha(M)beta2 integrin) was identified as the major cellular receptor on neutrophils for CFH, CFHL1, and CFHR1, but not for CFHR4 long isoform. CFH and CFHR1 supported cell migration. Furthermore, CFH, CFHL1, and CFHR1 increased attachment of neutrophils to C. albicans. Adhesion of neutrophils to plasma-opsonized yeasts was reduced when CFH binding was inhibited by specific Abs or when using CFH-depleted plasma. Yeast-bound CFH and CFHR1 enhanced the generation of reactive oxygen species and the release of the antimicrobial protein lactoferrin by human neutrophils, and resulted in a more efficient killing of the pathogen. Thus, CFH and CFHR1, when bound on the surface of C. albicans, enhance antimicrobial activity of human neutrophils.

  13. Mean platelet volume, red cell distribution width, platelet-to-lymphocyte and neutrophil-to-lymphocyte ratios in patients with ankylosing spondylitis and their relationships with high-frequency hearing thresholds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bozan, Nazim; Alpaycı, Mahmut; Aslan, Mehmet; Cankaya, Hakan; Kıroglu, Ahmet Faruk; Turan, Mahfuz; Ayral, Abdurrahman; Senkoy, Emre; Ilter, Server

    2016-11-01

    The mean platelet volume (MPV), red cell distribution width (RDW) and neutrophil-to-lymphocyte ratio (NLR) comprise laboratory markers in ankylosing spondylitis (AS). There is a controversy in the literature regarding which type of ear involvement is characteristic of AS. The aim of this study was to simultaneously investigate the MPV, RDW, platelet to lymphocyte (PLR) and NLR in patients with AS and their relationships with high-frequency hearing thresholds. Thirty patients with AS and 35 age-matched healthy subjects were included. Each subject was tested with low- (250, 500, 1000 and 2000 Hz) and high- (4000, 8000, 10,000, 12,000, 14,000 and 16,000 Hz) frequency audiometry. Additionally, the case and control groups were evaluated regarding the average hearing thresholds in bone conduction. The erythrocyte sedimentation rate (ESR) and C-reactive protein (CRP) levels were measured. The RDW, MPV, neutrophils, lymphocytes and platelet counts were evaluated with the complete blood count. Furthermore, the NLR and PLR were calculated. The complete blood count, platelet numbers, ESR, CRP and NLR levels were significantly increased in the AS patients compared with the healthy controls (p  0.05) in the AS patients compared with the healthy controls. The BASDAI score and disease duration were not correlated with the ESR, CRP levels, MPV, PLR, RDW or NLR in patients with AS (all; p > 0.05). The AS patients had increased average measurement values for the hearing threshold in both ears at frequencies of 250, 500, 1000 and 2000 Hz; however, there was no statistically significant difference (p > 0.05). The average values of the hearing threshold in both ears at the high frequencies of 4000, 6000, 8000, 10,000, 12,000 and 14,000 Hz were significantly increased in the case group; however, it was not significantly increased at 16,000 Hz. The current study is the first to investigate the PLR, NLR, MPV and RDW levels in acute AS. We identified a significantly increased

  14. The ratio Neutrophil/Lymphocyte and Platelet/Lymphocyte in patient with Rheumatoid Arthritis that are Treating with Anti-TNF

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    İsmail Boyraz

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVES: Rheumatoid arthritis (RA is a chronic inflammatory disorder with unknown etiology. RA is characterized by a variable course of remissions and relapses, and subclinical inflammation persists between the disease exacerbations. Anti-TNF therapies have become more often preferred in recent years in the treatment of RA. The aim of the present study was to determine the relationship between N/L and P/L ratios and subclinical inflammation in patients with RA who achieved remission with anti-TNF therapy. METHODS: The present study was a retrospective, controlled and multicenter study. The present study reviewed the medical records of the patients who were on follow-up in the outpatient clinics of the Department of Physical Therapy in Abant İzzet Baysal University and Harran University due to rheumatoid arthritis (RA and who achieved remission with anti-TNF therapy.A total of 80 patients in the inactive phase of RA and 45 healthy subjects in the control group were included in the study. Hemogram results of the people were examined retrospectively. RESULTS: There was significant difference between the patient and the control group in terms of platelet ratio and lymphocyte and neutrophil ratio. There was no significant difference between the group in terms of N/L and P/L ratios.CONCLUSIONS:  In the current study, we found significant differences between the patient and the control group in terms of neutrophil, lymphocyte, and platelet counts; however, there was no significant difference between the two groups in terms of N/L and P/L ratios. These findings suggest that therapies with anti-TNF agents in patients with RA achieved complete control of inflammation. 

  15. The impact of admission neutrophil-to-platelet ratio on in-hospital and long-term mortality in patients with infective endocarditis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Xue-Biao; Liu, Yuan-Hui; He, Peng-Cheng; Yu, Dan-Qing; Tan, Ning; Zhou, Ying-Ling; Chen, Ji-Yan

    2017-05-01

    Infective endocarditis (IE) is associated with increased neutrophil and reduced platelet counts. We assessed the relationship between the neutrophil-to-platelet ratio (NPR) on admission and adverse outcomes in patients with IE. Patients diagnosed with IE between January 2009 and July 2015 (n=1293) were enrolled, and 1046 were finally entered into the study. Study subjects were categorized into four groups according to NPR quartiles: Q143.3 (n=262). Cox proportional hazards regression was performed to identify risk factors for long-term mortality; the optimal cut-off was evaluated by receiver operating characteristic curves. Risk of in-hospital death increased progressively with NPR group number (1.9 vs. 5.0 vs. 9.8 vs. 14.1%, p<0.001). The follow-up period was a median of 28.8 months, during which 144 subjects (14.3%) died. Long-term mortality increased from the lowest to the highest NPR quartiles (7.6, 11.8, 17.4, and 26.2%, respectively, p<0.001). Multivariate Cox proportional hazard analysis revealed that lgNPR (HR=2.22) was an independent predictor of long-term mortality. Kaplan-Meier survival curves showed that subjects in Q4 had an increased long-term mortality compared with the other groups. Increased NPR was associated with in-hospital and long-term mortality in patients with IE. As a simple and inexpensive index, NPR may be a useful and rapid screening tool to identify IE patients at high risk of mortality.

  16. Pyocyanin-enhanced neutrophil extracellular trap formation requires the NADPH oxidase.

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    Balázs Rada

    Full Text Available Beyond intracellular killing, a novel neutrophil-based antimicrobial mechanism has been recently discovered: entrapment and killing by neutrophil extracellular traps (NETs. NETs consist of extruded nuclear DNA webs decorated with granule proteins. Although NET formation is an important innate immune mechanism, uncontrolled NET release damages host tissues and has been linked to several diseases including cystic fibrosis (CF. The major CF airway pathogen Pseudomonas aeruginosa establishes chronic infection. Pseudomonas imbedded within biofilms is protected against the immune system, but maintains chronic inflammation that worsens disease symptoms. Aberrant NET release from recruited neutrophils was found in CF, but the underlying mechanisms remain unclear. One of the most important Pseudomonas virulence factors is pyocyanin, a redox-active pigment that has been associated with diminished lung function in CF. Here we show that pyocyanin promotes NET formation in a time- and dose-dependent manner. Most CF Pseudomonas clinical isolates tested produce pyocyanin in vitro. Pyocyanin-derived reactive oxygen species are required for its NET release. Inhibitor experiments demonstrated involvement of Jun N-terminal Kinase (JNK and phosphatidylinositol 3-Kinase (PI3K in pyocyanin-induced NET formation. Pyocyanin-induced NETs also require the NADPH oxidase because NET release in chronic granulomatous disease neutrophils was greatly reduced. Comparison of neutrophils from gp91phox- and p47phox-deficient patients revealed that pyocyanin-triggered NET formation is proportional to their residual superoxide production. Our studies identify pyocyanin as the first secreted bacterial toxin that enhances NET formation. The involvement of NADPH oxidase in pyocyanin-induced NET formation represents a novel mechanism of pyocyanin toxicity.

  17. Intravascular clearance of disseminating Cryptococcus neoformans in the brain can be improved by enhancing neutrophil recruitment in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Donglei; Zhang, Mingshun; Liu, Gongguan; Wu, Hui; Li, Chang; Zhou, Hong; Zhang, Xiquan; Shi, Meiqing

    2016-07-01

    Extrapulmonary dissemination of Cryptococcus neoformans (C. neoformans) is one of the most critical steps in the development of meningoencephalitis. Here, we report that clearance of the disseminating C. neoformans occurs within the brain microvasculature. Interestingly, the efficiency of the intravascular clearance in the brain is reduced compared to that in the lung. Intravascular clearance is mainly mediated by neutrophils, and complement C5a receptor signaling is crucial for mediating neutrophil recruitment in the vasculature. C. neoformans stimulated actin polymerization of neutrophils is critically involved in their recruitment to the lung, which is associated with the unique vascular structure detected in the lung. The relatively lower efficiency of fungal clearance in the brain vasculature correlates with less efficient recruitment of neutrophils. Accordingly, intravascular clearance of C. neoformans in the brain could be remarkably improved by increasing the recruitment of neutrophils. We conclude that neutrophils have the ability to eliminate C. neoformans arrested in the vasculature. However, insufficient recruitment of neutrophils limited the optimal clearance of this microorganism in the brain. These results imply that a therapeutic strategy aimed at enhancing the accumulation of neutrophils could help prevent cryptococcal meningoencephalitis.

  18. Platelet function is modified by common sequence variation in megakaryocyte super enhancers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petersen, Romina; Lambourne, John J; Javierre, Biola M; Grassi, Luigi; Kreuzhuber, Roman; Ruklisa, Dace; Rosa, Isabel M; Tomé, Ana R; Elding, Heather; van Geffen, Johanna P; Jiang, Tao; Farrow, Samantha; Cairns, Jonathan; Al-Subaie, Abeer M; Ashford, Sofie; Attwood, Antony; Batista, Joana; Bouman, Heleen; Burden, Frances; Choudry, Fizzah A; Clarke, Laura; Flicek, Paul; Garner, Stephen F; Haimel, Matthias; Kempster, Carly; Ladopoulos, Vasileios; Lenaerts, An-Sofie; Materek, Paulina M; McKinney, Harriet; Meacham, Stuart; Mead, Daniel; Nagy, Magdolna; Penkett, Christopher J; Rendon, Augusto; Seyres, Denis; Sun, Benjamin; Tuna, Salih; van der Weide, Marie-Elise; Wingett, Steven W; Martens, Joost H; Stegle, Oliver; Richardson, Sylvia; Vallier, Ludovic; Roberts, David J; Freson, Kathleen; Wernisch, Lorenz; Stunnenberg, Hendrik G; Danesh, John; Fraser, Peter; Soranzo, Nicole; Butterworth, Adam S; Heemskerk, Johan W; Turro, Ernest; Spivakov, Mikhail; Ouwehand, Willem H; Astle, William J; Downes, Kate; Kostadima, Myrto; Frontini, Mattia

    2017-07-13

    Linking non-coding genetic variants associated with the risk of diseases or disease-relevant traits to target genes is a crucial step to realize GWAS potential in the introduction of precision medicine. Here we set out to determine the mechanisms underpinning variant association with platelet quantitative traits using cell type-matched epigenomic data and promoter long-range interactions. We identify potential regulatory functions for 423 of 565 (75%) non-coding variants associated with platelet traits and we demonstrate, through ex vivo and proof of principle genome editing validation, that variants in super enhancers play an important role in controlling archetypical platelet functions.

  19. TAK1 contributes to the enhanced responsiveness of LTB(4)-treated neutrophils to Toll-like receptor ligands.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaudreault, Éric; Paquet-Bouchard, Carine; Fiola, Stéphanie; Le Bel, Manon; Lacerte, Patricia; Shio, Marina Tiemi; Olivier, Martin; Gosselin, Jean

    2012-11-01

    Pattern-recognition receptors such as Toll-like receptors (TLRs) are essential sensors implicated in the early and efficient innate immune response against pathogens. We have previously demonstrated that leukotriene B(4)(LTB(4)) has the capacity to enhance leukocyte responses to TLR9 ligands and to control viral infection. In this report, we provide evidence that LTB(4) treatment of human neutrophils leads to a potentiation in proinflammatory cytokine secretion induced by various myeloid differentiation factor 88-dependent TLR agonists. LTB(4) failed to enhance TLR mRNA levels as well as expression of TLR2 and TLR4 receptors, suggesting that LTB(4) acts through intracellular mechanism(s) to potentiate neutrophil responses to TLR ligands. We found that while IRAK can be activated by LTB(4), this process is dispensable to LTB(4) to potentiate neutrophil responses to TLR ligands since pretreatment of neutrophils with IRAK1/4 inhibitor did not affect its potentiating effects. However, our data clearly show that LTB(4) treatment of neutrophils led to the phosphorylation of downstream signaling molecules, TAK1 and p38, a process found essential to observe an increased secretion of cytokines by neutrophils activated with TLR ligands. Pretreatment of neutrophils with TAK1 or p38 kinase inhibitors strongly repressed the effect of LTB(4) on cytokine synthesis by neutrophils stimulated with LTA, LPS or CpG. The same pattern was observed in agonist-treated human embryonic kidney 293 cells transfected with TAK1-targeting siRNA where secretion of IL-8 was significantly reduced to basal levels. These results indicate that TAK1 and p38 kinases appear to be central in the 'priming effect' of LTB(4) on neutrophils to enhance response to TLR ligands.

  20. Reduced platelet-mediated and enhanced leukocyte-mediated fibrinolysis in experimentally induced diabetes in rats

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Winocour, P.D.; Colwell, J.A.

    1985-05-01

    Studies of fibrinolytic activity in diabetes mellitus have produced conflicting results. This may be a result of methodologic insensitivity or of variable contributions of the different blood components to whole blood fibrinolysis. To explore these two possibilities, the authors used a sensitive solid-phase radiometric assay to examine the fibrinolytic activity of whole blood, platelet-rich plasma, leukocytes, and platelet- and leukocyte-poor plasma prepared from control rats and rats with streptozocin-induced diabetes at various times after induction of diabetes. Fibrinolytic activity of whole blood from diabetic rats after 7 days was significantly reduced, and remained reduced after longer durations of diabetes up to 28 days. Platelet-rich plasma from diabetic rats had decreased fibrinolytic activity, which followed the same time course of changes as in whole blood. The platelet contribution to whole blood fibrinolysis was further reduced in vivo after 14 days of diabetes by a reduced whole blood platelet count. In contrast, fibrinolytic activity of leukocytes from diabetic rats became enhanced after 7 days of diabetes. After 49 days of diabetes, the whole blood leukocyte count was reduced, and in vivo would offset the enhanced activity. Plasma fibrinolytic activity was small compared with that of whole blood and was unaltered in diabetic rats. The authors conclude that altered platelet function contributes to decreased fibrinolytic activity of whole blood in diabetic rats, and that this may be partially offset by enhanced leukocyte-mediated fibrinolysis.

  1. P-selectin promotes neutrophil extracellular trap formation in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Etulain, Julia; Martinod, Kimberly; Wong, Siu Ling; Cifuni, Stephen M; Schattner, Mirta; Wagner, Denisa D

    2015-07-01

    Neutrophil extracellular traps (NETs) can be released in the vasculature. In addition to trapping microbes, they promote inflammatory and thrombotic diseases. Considering that P-selectin induces prothrombotic and proinflammatory signaling, we studied the role of this selectin in NET formation. NET formation (NETosis) was induced by thrombin-activated platelets rosetting with neutrophils and was inhibited by anti-P-selectin aptamer or anti-P-selectin glycoprotein ligand-1 (PSGL-1) inhibitory antibody but was not induced by platelets from P-selectin(-/-) mice. Moreover, NETosis was also promoted by P-selectin-immunoglobulin fusion protein but not by control immunoglobulin. We isolated neutrophils from mice engineered to overproduce soluble P-selectin (P-selectin(ΔCT/ΔCT) mice). Although the levels of circulating DNA and nucleosomes (indicative of spontaneous NETosis) were normal in these mice, basal neutrophil histone citrullination and presence of P-selectin on circulating neutrophils were elevated. NET formation after stimulation with platelet activating factor, ionomycin, or phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate was significantly enhanced, indicating that the P-selectin(ΔCT/ΔCT) neutrophils were primed for NETosis. In summary, P-selectin, cellular or soluble, through binding to PSGL-1, promotes NETosis, suggesting that this pathway is a potential therapeutic target for NET-related diseases.

  2. Enhancement of neutrophil-mediated killing of Plasmodium falciparum asexual blood forms by fatty acids: importance of fatty acid structure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumaratilake, L M; Ferrante, A; Robinson, B S; Jaeger, T; Poulos, A

    1997-10-01

    Effects of fatty acids on human neutrophil-mediated killing of Plasmodium falciparum asexual blood forms were investigated by using a quantitative radiometric assay. The results showed that the antiparasitic activity of neutrophils can be greatly increased (>threefold) by short-term treatment with fatty acids with 20 to 24 carbon atoms and at least three double bonds. In particular, the n-3 polyenoic fatty acids, eicosapentaenoic and docosahexaenoic acids, and the n-6 fatty acid, arachidonic acid, significantly enhanced neutrophil antiparasitic activity. This effect was >1.5-fold higher than that induced by an optical concentration of the known agonist cytokine tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-alpha). At suboptimal concentrations, the combination of arachidonic acid and TNF-alpha caused a synergistic increase in neutrophil-mediated parasite killing. The fatty acid-induced effect was independent of the availability of serum opsonins but dependent on the structure of the fatty acids. The length of the carbon chain, degree of unsaturation, and availability of a free carboxyl group were important determinants of fatty acid activity. The fatty acids which increased neutrophil-mediated killing primed the enhanced superoxide radical generation of neutrophils in response to P. falciparum as detected by chemiluminescence. Scavengers of oxygen radicals significantly reduced the fatty acid-enhanced parasite killing, but cyclooxygenase and lipoxygenase inhibitors had no effect. These findings have identified a new class of immunoenhancers that could be exploited to increase resistance against Plasmodium species.

  3. Platelets in inflammation and infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jenne, Craig N; Kubes, Paul

    2015-01-01

    Although platelets are traditionally recognized for their central role in hemostasis, many lines of research clearly demonstrate these rather ubiquitous blood components are potent immune modulators and effectors. Platelets have been shown to directly recognize, sequester and kill pathogens, to activated and recruit leukocytes to sites of infection and inflammation, and to modulate leukocyte behavior, enhancing their ability to phagocytose and kill pathogens and inducing unique effector functions, such as the production of Neutrophil Extracellular Traps (NETs). This multifaceted response to infection and inflammation is due, in part, to the huge array of soluble mediators and cell surface molecules expressed by platelets. From their earliest origins as primordial hemocytes in invertebrates to their current form as megakaryocyte-derived cytoplasts, platelets have evolved to be one of the key regulators of host intravascular immunity and inflammation. In this review, we present the diverse roles platelets play in immunity and inflammation associated with autoimmune diseases and infection. Additionally, we highlight recent advances in our understanding of platelet behavior made possible through the use of advanced imaging techniques that allow us to visualize platelets and their interactions, in real-time, within the intact blood vessels of a living host.

  4. Neutrophil-to-Lymphocyte Ratio and Platelet-to-Lymphocyte Ratio: Novel Markers for Diagnosis and Prognosis in Patients with Idiopathic Sudden Sensorineural Hearing Loss

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Young Joon Seo

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. We aim to provide useful evidence about the association of neutrophil-to-lymphocyte ratio (NLR and platelet-to-lymphocyte ratio (PLR with idiopathic sudden sensorineural hearing loss (ISSNHL and its possibility of emerging as a cheap, reliable, and independent prognostic marker of ISSNHL. Methods. 348 patients diagnosed with ISSNHL were included in our retrospective data analysis. Blood samples and the hearing assessments of the patients were carried out. Then, the patients were divided into 2 groups as “recovered” and “unrecovered” according to their response to the treatment. Results. Both mean NLR and PLR values of the ISSNHL patients were significantly higher than the control group (both P<0.001. The NLR value was 5.98±4.22 in the unrecovered group and 3.50±3.38 in the recovered group (P<0.001. After adjustment in a binary logistic regression model, only NLR value was associated with the recovery of ISSNHL (P=0.001. Discussion. We demonstrated for the first time that NLR and PLR values were significantly high in ISSNHL patients. Also the NLR level might be taken into account as a novel potential marker to predict the patients’ prognosis in terms of recovery.

  5. Neutrophil to lymphocyte ratio and platelet to lymphocyte ratio are predictive of chemotherapeutic response and prognosis in epithelial ovarian cancer patients treated with platinum-based chemotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miao, Yi; Yan, Qin; Li, Shuangdi; Li, Bilan; Feng, Youji

    2016-06-07

    The aim of present study was to investigate the role of preoperative neutrophil to lymphocyte ratio (NLR) and platelet to lymphocyte ratio (PLR) used as prognostic markers for predicting chemotherapeutic response and survival outcomes in patients with epithelial ovarian cancer (EOC) who are receiving platinum-based chemotherapy. A total of 344 patients diagnosed with EOC who are receiving platinum-based chemotherapy from 2005 to 2010 in the hospital were enrolled. NLR and PLR were calculated from complete blood cell count taken before operation. The patients were divided into platinum-resistant (P-R) group and platinum-sensitive (P-S) group according to chemotherapeutic response. Clinicopathologic variables and outcomes were retrospectively collected and compared among groups. We used receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curves to calculate optimal cut-off values for NLR and PLR to predict chemotherapeutic response and prognosis. The AUC, sensitivity, specificity of NLR > 3.02 to predict platinum resistance were 0.819, 75.0% and 81.45%, respectively. The corresponding values of PLR > 207 were 0.727, 60.42% and 85.48%, respectively. Patients with lower value of NLR (NLR platinum resistance in patients with EOC.

  6. The relationship between neutrophil-to-lymphocyte ratio and platelet-to-lymphocyte ratio in patients with obstructive sleep apnea syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hülya Günbatar

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Objective: There is a strong relationship between obstructive sleep apnea syndrome (OSAS and cardiovascular disease (CVD. Chronic intermittent hypoxia, inflammation, oxidative stress, and endothelial dysfunction may create etiologic mechanisms, connection between OSAS to CVD. Inflammation play an important role in the development of CVD. Platelet- Lymphocyte Ratio (PLR and Neutrophil-lymphocyte Ratio (NLR are new biomarkers showing inflammation. This study was designed to investigate the association between PLR, NLR and relationship between severity of OSAS, polysomnographic parameters and PLR. Methods: This was a cohort study in which patients who had undergone a full night polysomnography for diagnosis of OSA were recruited. Patients were divided according to their apnea hypopnea index (AHI scores into OSAS negative simple snoring (Group 1; AHI 30 groups. Results: A total of 111 patients were included in this study. There were 26, 22 and 63 patients in Groups 1, 2 and 3, respectively. PLR were significantly different between groups (Group 1: 87.12, Group 2: 103.6, Group 3: 112.5, p < 0.05. PLR were significantly correlated with NLR, AHI, oxygen desaturation index, average and minimum O2 saturation values (p < 0.05. Multiple regression analysis demonstrated that PLR is an independent predictor of CVD. PLR cut-off value for demonstrating the presence of CVD is higher than 86.03. Conclusion: In the light of these findings, PLR is strongly associated with the severity of OSAS. PLR might be used as a biomarker to predict CVD in OSAS patients.

  7. Enzyme-activatable imaging probe reveals enhanced neutrophil elastase activity in tumors following photodynamic therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitra, Soumya; Modi, Kshitij D; Foster, Thomas H

    2013-10-01

    We demonstrate the use of an enzyme-activatable fluorogenic probe, Neutrophil Elastase 680 FAST (NE680), for in vivo imaging of neutrophil elastase (NE) activity in tumors subjected to photodynamic therapy (PDT). NE protease activity was assayed in SCC VII and EMT6 tumors established in C3H and BALB/c mice, respectively. Four nanomoles of NE680 was injected intravenously immediately following PDT irradiation. 5 h following administration of NE680, whole-mouse fluorescence imaging was performed. At this time point, levels of NE680 fluorescence were at least threefold greater in irradiated versus unirradiated SCC VII and EMT6 tumors sensitized with Photofrin. To compare possible photosensitizer-specific differences in therapy-induced elastase activity, EMT6 tumors were also subjected to 2-(1-hexyloxyethyl)-2-devinyl pyropheophorbide-a (HPPH)-PDT. NE levels measured in HPPH-PDT-treated tumors were twofold higher than in unirradiated controls. Ex vivo labeling of host cells using fluorophore-conjugated antibodies and confocal imaging were used to visualize Gr1+ cells in Photofrin-PDT-treated EMT6 tumors. These data were compared with recently reported analysis of Gr1+ cell accumulation in EMT6 tumors subjected to HPPH-PDT. The population density of infiltrating Gr1+ cells in treated versus unirradiated drug-only control tumors suggests that the differential in NE680 fold enhancement observed in Photofrin versus HPPH treatment may be attributed to the significantly increased inflammatory response induced by Photofrin-PDT. The in vivo imaging of NE680, which is a fluorescent reporter of NE extracellular release caused by neutrophil activation, demonstrates that PDT results in increased NE levels in treated tumors, and the accumulation of the cleaved probe tracks qualitatively with the intratumor Gr1+ cell population.

  8. Engagement of PSGL-1 enhances β2-integrin-involved adhesion of neutrophils to recombinant ICAM-1

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xiao-guang WANG; Yan-ping CHENG; Xue-qing BA

    2006-01-01

    Aim: The interactions of selectins and their ligands initiate the process of leukocyte migrating into inflamed tissue. P-selectin glycoprotein ligand 1 (PSGL-1) is the best characterized ligand of selectins, and has been demonstrated to mediate the adhesion of leukocytes to all three selectins in vivo. PSGL-1 not only functions as an anchor molecule to capture the leukocytes to the activated endothelial cells by its interaction with selectins, but also transduces the signals to activate leukocytes. Our present work aimed to investigate the mechanism by which PSGL-1-mediated signal activates neutrophils and enhances the adhesion to the endothelial cells. Methods: We detected the effects of the engagement of PSGL-1 with monoclonal antibodies (mAb) or P-selectin on the adhesion of neutrophils to the recombinant intercellular adhesion molecule-1 (ICAM-1), and on the expression of β2-integrin. Additionally, the role of cytoskeleton in these process was studied by using inhibitor cytochalasin B. Results: The engagement of PSGL-1 increased the expression of β2-integrin on the surface of neutrophils and enhanced the adhesion of neutrophils to the recombinant ICAM-1. mAb against CD 18 impaired the adhesion of PSGL-1 -engaged neutrophils to ICAM-1. Moreover, the inhibitor cytochalasin B largely blocked the increase of CD 18 expression as well as the adhesion of PSGL-1-engaged neutrophils to ICAM-1. Conclusion: The PSGL-1-transduced signals can enhance β2-integrin-involved adhesion of neutrophils to the recombinant ICAM-1, and this process depends on the dynamics of cytoskeleton.

  9. Use of fluo-3 to measure cytosolic Ca2+ in platelets and neutrophils. Loading cells with the dye, calibration of traces, measurements in the presence of plasma, and buffering of cytosolic Ca2+.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Merritt, J E; McCarthy, S A; Davies, M P; Moores, K E

    1990-07-15

    A description is given of the methodology, and problems encountered, for the use of a new fluorescent Ca2(+)-indicator dye, fluo-3, in neutrophils and platelets. The higher Kd and longer excitation wavelength of fluo-3 can have significant advantages over fura-2. Although neutrophils and platelets are used as examples, these observations will be applicable to other cell types. The Kd of fluo-3 for binding Ca2+ at 37 degrees C was measured and found to be 864 nM; the previously published value was 400 nM at 22 degrees C. The Kd of fluo-3, like that of fura-2, is therefore very temperature-dependent. Protocols for loading cells, and preventing leakage of fluo-3, are described; probenecid, known to inhibit fura-2 leakage from cells, was found to be essential to get good fluo-3 signals from platelets. Calibration of fluo-3 fluorescence signals to [Ca2+] and methods for obtaining maximum and minimum fluorescence signals are described; these methods differ from those used with fura-2. Agonist-stimulated responses of fluo-3-loaded neutrophils and platelets are shown, and the calculated cytosolic [Ca2+] is comparable with that previously obtained with fura-2. Responses of cells in the presence of plasma are also shown; such measurements, unobtainable with quin2, fura-2 or indo-1, are possible with fluo-3, owing to its longer excitation wavelengths. Co-loading of cells with bis-(o-aminophenoxy)ethane-NNN'N'-tetra-acetic acid and fluo-3 is included as an example of how cytosolic [Ca2+] can be buffered and manipulated. Many of these observations will be of value when using fluo-3 (or other Ca2(+)-indicator dyes) in most cell types.

  10. Contrast-enhanced imaging of SPIO-labeled platelets using magnetomotive ultrasound

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pope, Ava G.; Wu, Gongting; McWhorter, Frances Y.; Merricks, Elizabeth P.; Nichols, Timothy C.; Czernuszewicz, Tomasz J.; Gallippi, Caterina M.; Oldenburg, Amy L.

    2013-10-01

    The ability to image platelets in vivo can provide insight into blood clotting processes and coagulopathies, and aid in identifying sites of vascular endothelial damage related to trauma or cardiovascular disease. Toward this end, we have developed a magnetomotive ultrasound (MMUS) system that provides contrast-enhanced imaging of superparamagnetic iron oxide (SPIO) labeled platelets via magnetically-induced vibration. Platelets are a promising platform for functional imaging contrast because they readily take up SPIOs and are easily harvested from blood. Here we report a novel MMUS system that accommodates an arbitrarily thick sample while maintaining portability. We employed a frequency- and phase-locked motion detection algorithm based on bandpass filtering of the differential RF phase, which allows for the detection of sub-resolution vibration amplitudes on the order of several nanometers. We then demonstrated MMUS in homogenous tissue phantoms at SPIO concentrations as low as 0.09 mg ml-1 Fe (p < 0.0001, n = 6, t-test). Finally, we showed that our system is capable of three-dimensional imaging of a 185 µL simulated clot containing SPIO-platelets. This highlights the potential utility for non-invasive imaging of platelet-rich clots, which would constitute a fundamental advance in technology for the study of hemostasis and detection of clinically relevant thrombi.

  11. Neutrophil-to-Lymphocyte Ratio and Platelet-to-Lymphocyte Ratio as Novel Markers for Diagnosis of Sudden Sensorineural Hearing Loss: A Systematic Review and Meta-analysis

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    Mohammad Amin Bahrami

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Background: Sudden sensorineural hearing loss (SSNHL is a common otologic disease characterized by a loss of hearing greater than 30 dB in three consecutive frequen­cies which occurs in less than 72 hours. Objective: To investigate the role of neutrophil-to-lymphocyte ratio (NLR and platelet-to-lymphocyte ratio (PLR on sudden sensorineural hearing loss (SSNHL. Search strategy: A PubMed, Science Direct, Scopus, OVID, EMBASE and Google Scholar search (date last searched April 2016 without any time, language and location restriction was done. Inclusion criteria: All case-control studies, which have been investigated the relationship of NLR and PLR with the occurrence of SSNHL were included in our meta-analysis. Results: A total of 5 case-control studies were included in the study. All 5 studies have been reported NLR of patients and control groups (611 patients and 804 controls. Our analysis showed that the mean NLR of patients is 1.12 (0.82-1.43 unit higher than that of controls with 95% CI which is statistically significant. Also, 3 studies have been reported PLR of patients and control groups (512 patients and 705 controls. Our analysis showed that the mean PLR of patients is 0.57 (0.08-1.05 unit higher than that of controls with 95% CI which is statistically significant too. Conclusions: This meta-analysis confirmed the relationship of NLR and PLR with SSNHL. Therefore, these parameters can be considered as new markers in diagnosis of SSNHL. 

  12. Neutrophil-lymphocyte ratio (NLR) and platelet-lymphocyte ratio (PLR) can risk stratify patients in transcatheter aortic-valve replacement (TAVR).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Condado, Jose F; Junpaparp, Parichart; Binongo, Jose N; Lasanajak, Yi; Witzke-Sanz, Christian F; Devireddy, Chandan; Leshnower, Bradley; Mavromatis, Kreton; Stewart, James; Guyton, Robert; Wheeler, David; Forcillo, Jessica; Patel, Ateet; Block, Peter C; Thourani, Vinod; Rangaswami, Janani; Babaliaros, Vasilis

    2016-11-15

    Neutrophil-lymphocyte (NLR) and platelet-lymphocyte ratios (PLR) mark systemic inflammation. Patients with high NLR and PLR have worse cardiovascular disease and outcomes. We assessed the role of these ratios in predicting outcomes after transcatheter aortic valve replacement (TAVR). The association between NLR and PLR with baseline characteristics, 30-day outcomes, and 1-year readmission/survival was determined in patients that underwent TAVR between 2007 and 2014 and had baseline complete blood count with differential. A subgroup analysis determined the association between change in NLR and PLR (discharge-baseline) and 1-year outcomes. In 520 patients that underwent TAVR, a higher NLR (p=0.01) and PLR (p=0.02) were associated with a higher STS-PROM score, and with increased occurrence of the 30-day early-safety outcome (by VARC-2), even after adjusting for STS-PROM score, valve generation (Sapien vs. Sapien XT), and access (transfemoral vs. non-transfemoral) (NLR: OR 1.29, 95% CI 1.04-1.61; PLR: OR 1.27, 95% CI 1.01-1.60) but not with 1-year readmission or survival. In our subgroup analysis (N=294), change in PLR was not associated with the 1-year outcomes but a high change in NLR was associated with worse 1-year survival/readmission and 1-year survival, even after adjusting for STS-PROM score, valve generation and access (HR 1.22, 95% CI 1.04-1.44 and HR 1.26, 95% CI 0.99-1.6, respectively). NLR and PLR correlate with surgical risk. An elevated NLR and PLR were associated with the occurrence of 30-day adverse outcomes, similar to the STS-PROM score. A high variation of NLR from baseline to discharge may help stratify patients that underwent TAVR in addition to traditional risk factors. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Association of the Preoperative Neutrophil-to-ymphocyte Count Ratio and Platelet-to-Lymphocyte Count Ratio with Clinicopathological Characteristics in Patients with Papillary Thyroid Cancer

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    Sang Mi Kim

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available BackgroundSeveral inflammatory biomarkers, especially a high preoperative neutrophil-to-lymphocyte count ratio (NLR and platelet-to-lymphocyte count ratio (PLR, are known to be indicator of poor prognosis in several cancers. However, very few studies have evaluated the significance of the NLR and PLR in papillary thyroid cancer (PTC. We evaluated the association of the preoperative NLR and PLR with clinicopathological characteristics in patients with PTC.MethodsThis study included 1,066 female patients who underwent total thyroidectomy for PTC. Patients were stratified into 4 quartiles by preoperative NLR and PLR. And the combination of preoperative NLR and PLR was calculated on the basis of data obtained value of tertile as follows: patients with both an elevated PLR and an elevated NLR were allocated a score of 2, and patients showing one or neither were allocated a score of 1 or 0, respectively.ResultsThe preoperative NLR and PLR were significantly lower in patients aged ≥45 years and in patients with Hashimoto's thyroiditis. The PLR was significantly higher in patients with tumor size >1 cm (P=0.021.When the patients were categorized into the aforementioned four groups, the group with the higher preoperative PLR was found to have a significantly increased incidence of lateral lymph node metastasis (LNM (P=0.018. However, there are no significant association between the combination of preoperative NLR and PLR and prognostic factors in PTC patients.ConclusionThese results suggest that a preoperative high PLR were significant associated with lateral LNM in female patients with PTC.

  14. Neutrophils accentuate renal cold ischemia-reperfusion injury. Dose-dependent protective effect of a platelet-activating factor receptor antagonist.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riera, M; Torras, J; Herrero, I; Valles, J; Paubert-Braquet, M; Cruzado, J M; Alsina, J; Grinyo, J M

    1997-02-01

    This study was undertaken to evaluate whether the renal damage induced by cold ischemia-reperfusion was worsened by neutrophils (PMN), and if blockade of platelet-activating factor (PAF) could effectively decrease this injury. After flushing with EuroCollins, 85 kidneys from Sprague-Dawley rats underwent either no cold ischemia or a 4-h cold ischemia, and then were reperfused for 75 min at 37 degrees C and 100 mm Hg in an isolated perfusion circuit. Reperfusion was performed with a Krebs-Henseleit solution containing 4.5% albumin, with and without human PMN (7.5 x 10(5) cells/ml) and with and without addition of a PAF receptor antagonist (BN 52021). Hemodynamic and functional parameters were continuously assessed during reperfusion. At end of the study, PAF production was evaluated. Presence of PMN during reperfusion of nonischemic kidneys produced no alteration of functional parameters or PAF production. After 4-h cold ischemia, the presence of PMN during reperfusion produced a significant worsening of plasma flow rate, glomerular filtration rate and sodium reabsorption in comparison with kidneys reperfused without PMN. Also, higher production of PAF was observed in the kidneys reperfused with PMN than in the kidneys reperfused without PMN. After 4-h cold ischemia, addition of BN 52021 during reperfusion in the presence of PMN significantly increased the plasma flow rate, glomerular filtration rate and sodium reabsorption in comparison with kidneys reperfused without this PAF antagonist. This effect was dose dependent. After 4-h cold ischemia, addition of BN 52021 during reperfusion in the absence of PMN produced no significant effect on functional parameters in comparison with kidneys reperfused without this PAF antagonist. These results indicate that PMN contribute to renal cold ischemia-reperfusion injury evaluated in the isolated perfused kidney. Treatment with a PAF receptor antagonist attenuated this injury in a dose-dependent manner, which suggests that it

  15. The Use of Platelet-Rich and Platelet-Poor Plasma to Enhance Differentiation of Skeletal Myoblasts: Implications for the Use of Autologous Blood Products for Muscle Regeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miroshnychenko, Olga; Chang, Wen-Teh; Dragoo, Jason L

    2017-03-01

    Platelet-rich plasma (PRP) has been used to augment tissue repair and regeneration after musculoskeletal injury. However, there is increasing clinical evidence that PRP does not show a consistent clinical effect. Purpose/Hypothesis: This study aimed to compare the effects of the following non-neutrophil-containing (leukocyte-poor) plasma fractions on human skeletal muscle myoblast (HSMM) differentiation: (1) PRP, (2) modified PRP (Mod-PRP), in which transforming growth factor β1 (TGF-β1) and myostatin (MSTN) were depleted, and (3) platelet-poor plasma (PPP). The hypothesis was that leukocyte-poor PRP would lead to myoblast proliferation (not differentiation), whereas certain modifications of PRP preparations would increase myoblast differentiation, which is necessary for skeletal muscle regeneration. Controlled laboratory study. Blood from 7 human donors was individually processed to simultaneously create leukocyte-poor fractions: PRP, Mod-PRP, PPP, and secondarily spun PRP and Mod-PRP (PRPss and Mod-PRPss, respectively). Mod-PRP was produced by removing TGF-β1 and MSTN from PRP using antibodies attached to sterile beads, while a second-stage centrifugal spin of PRP was performed to remove platelets. The biologics were individually added to cell culture groups. Analysis for induction into myoblast differentiation pathways included Western blot analysis, reverse-transcription polymerase chain reaction, and immunohistochemistry, as well as confocal microscopy to assess polynucleated myotubule formation. HSMMs cultured with PRP showed an increase in proliferation but no evidence of differentiation. Western blot analysis confirmed that MSTN and TGF-β1 could be decreased in Mod-PRP using antibody-coated beads, but this modification mildly improved myoblast differentiation. However, cell culture with PPP, PRPss, and Mod-PRPss led to a decreased proliferation rate but a significant induction of myoblast differentiation verified by increased multinucleated myotubule

  16. Tumor-Associated Macrophages and Neutrophils in Tumor Microenvironment

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    Jaehong Kim

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Distinct tumor microenvironment forms in each progression step of cancer and has diverse capacities to induce both adverse and beneficial consequences for tumorigenesis. It is now known that immune cells can be activated to favor tumor growth and progression, most probably influenced by the tumor microenvironment. Tumor-associated macrophages and tumor-associated neutrophils can exert protumoral functions, enhancing tumor cell invasion and metastasis, angiogenesis, and extracellular matrix remodeling, while inhibiting the antitumoral immune surveillance. Considering that neutrophils in inflammatory environments recruit macrophages and that recruited macrophages affect neutrophil functions, there may be various degrees of interaction between tumor-associated macrophages and tumor-associated neutrophils. Platelets also play an important role in the recruitment and regulation of monocytic and granulocytic cells in the tumor tissues, suggesting that platelet function may be essential for generation of tumor-associated macrophages and tumor-associated neutrophils. In this review, we will explore the biology of tumor-associated macrophages and tumor-associated neutrophils and their possible interactions in the tumor microenvironment. Special attention will be given to the recruitment and activation of these tumor-associated cells and to the roles they play in maintenance of the tumor microenvironment and progression of tumors.

  17. Intravenous immunoglobulin enhances the killing activity and autophagy of neutrophils isolated from immunocompromised patients against multidrug-resistant bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsuo, Hidemasa; Itoh, Hiroshi; Kitamura, Naoko; Kamikubo, Yasuhiko; Higuchi, Takeshi; Shiga, Shuichi; Ichiyama, Satoshi; Kondo, Tadakazu; Takaori-Kondo, Akifumi; Adachi, Souichi

    2015-08-14

    Intravenous immunoglobulin (IVIG) is periodically administered to immunocompromised patients together with antimicrobial agents. The evidence that supports the effectiveness of IVIG is mostly based on data from randomized clinical trials; the underlying mechanisms are poorly understood. A recent study revealed that killing of multidrug-resistant bacteria and drug-sensitive strains by neutrophils isolated from healthy donors is enhanced by an IVIG preparation. However, the effectiveness of IVIG in immunocompromised patients remains unclear. The present study found that IVIG increased both killing activity and O2(-) release by neutrophils isolated from six patients receiving immune-suppressive drugs after hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT); these neutrophils killed both multidrug-resistant extended-spectrum β-lactamase-producing Escherichia coli (E. coli) and multidrug-resistant Pseudomonas aeruginosa (P. aeruginosa). Moreover, IVIG increased the autophagy of the neutrophils, which is known to play an important role in innate immunity. These results suggest that IVIG promotes both the killing activity and autophagy of neutrophils isolated from immunocompromised patients against multidrug-resistant bacteria.

  18. The Fungal Exopolysaccharide Galactosaminogalactan Mediates Virulence by Enhancing Resistance to Neutrophil Extracellular Traps.

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    Mark J Lee

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Of the over 250 Aspergillus species, Aspergillus fumigatus accounts for up to 80% of invasive human infections. A. fumigatus produces galactosaminogalactan (GAG, an exopolysaccharide composed of galactose and N-acetyl-galactosamine (GalNAc that mediates adherence and is required for full virulence. Less pathogenic Aspergillus species were found to produce GAG with a lower GalNAc content than A. fumigatus and expressed minimal amounts of cell wall-bound GAG. Increasing the GalNAc content of GAG of the minimally pathogenic A. nidulans, either through overexpression of the A. nidulans epimerase UgeB or by heterologous expression of the A. fumigatus epimerase Uge3 increased the amount of cell wall bound GAG, augmented adherence in vitro and enhanced virulence in corticosteroid-treated mice to levels similar to A. fumigatus. The enhanced virulence of the overexpression strain of A. nidulans was associated with increased resistance to NADPH oxidase-dependent neutrophil extracellular traps (NETs in vitro, and was not observed in neutropenic mice or mice deficient in NADPH-oxidase that are unable to form NETs. Collectively, these data suggest that cell wall-bound GAG enhances virulence through mediating resistance to NETs.

  19. Mincle activation enhances neutrophil migration and resistance to polymicrobial septic peritonitis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Wook-Bin; Yan, Ji-Jing; Kang, Ji-Seon; Zhang, Quanri; Choi, Won Young; Kim, Lark Kyun; Kim, Young-Joon

    2017-01-01

    Sepsis is a systemic inflammatory response to bacterial infection. The therapeutic options for treating sepsis are limited. Impaired neutrophil recruitment into the infection site is directly associated with severe sepsis, but the precise mechanism is unclear. Here, we show that Mincle plays a key role in neutrophil migration and resistance during polymicrobial sepsis. Mincle-deficient mice exhibited lower survival rates in experimental sepsis from cecal ligation and puncture and Escherichia coli–induced peritonitis. Mincle deficiency led to higher serum inflammatory cytokine levels and reduced bacterial clearance and neutrophil recruitment. Transcriptome analyses revealed that trehalose dimycolate, a Mincle ligand, reduced the expression of G protein–coupled receptor kinase 2 (GRK2) in neutrophils. Indeed, GRK2 expression was upregulated, but surface expression of the chemokine receptor CXCR2 was downregulated in blood neutrophils from Mincle-deficient mice with septic injury. Moreover, CXCL2-mediated adhesion, chemotactic responses, and F-actin polymerization were reduced in Mincle-deficient neutrophils. Finally, we found that fewer Mincle-deficient neutrophils infiltrated from the blood circulation into the peritoneal fluid in bacterial septic peritonitis compared with wild-type cells. Thus, our results indicate that Mincle plays an important role in neutrophil infiltration and suggest that Mincle signaling may provide a therapeutic target for treating sepsis. PMID:28112221

  20. Neutrophil elastase alters the murine gut microbiota resulting in enhanced Salmonella colonization.

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    Navkiran Gill

    Full Text Available The intestinal microbiota has been found to play a central role in the colonization of Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium in the gastrointestinal tract. In this study, we present a novel process through which Salmonella benefit from inflammatory induced changes in the microbiota in order to facilitate disease. We show that Salmonella infection in mice causes recruitment of neutrophils to the gut lumen, resulting in significant changes in the composition of the intestinal microbiota. This occurs through the production of the enzyme elastase by neutrophils. Administration of recombinant neutrophil elastase to infected animals under conditions that do not elicit neutrophil recruitment caused shifts in microbiota composition that favored Salmonella colonization, while inhibition of neutrophil elastase reduced colonization. This study reveals a new relationship between the microbiota and the host during infection.

  1. The stress of birth enhances in vitro spontaneous and IL-8-induced neutrophil chemotaxis in the human newborn.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yektaei-Karin, Elham; Moshfegh, Ali; Lundahl, Joachim; Berggren, Veronica; Hansson, Lars-Olof; Marchini, Giovanna

    2007-12-01

    The birth process induces fetal stress. Stress has profound effects on the immune system, also by acting on the trafficking of leukocytes, a process in which adhesion and chemotaxis are primordial and critical events for the development of effective antimicrobial defenses. The newborn is rapidly challenged by a microflora at the epithelia linings and therefore depending on early, innate immunity onset. The objective of the study was to investigate the immune response in cord blood from newborns in relation to different degrees of fetal stress, with focus on neutrophil chemotaxis. We analyzed in vitro transmigration ability of neutrophils and their CD11b expression, measured total white blood count (WBC) and the major leukocyte populations, interleukin (IL)-8, interferon (IFN)-gamma, and soluble E-Selectin, as well as relevant immuno-modulating hormones in infants born at term after Cesarean section prior to the start of labor (n = 55), normal vaginal delivery (n = 87), and assisted delivery (n = 26). Arterial pH and lactate were used as stress markers. We found that spontaneous and IL-8-induced transmigration ability of neutrophils from newborns after normal delivery was significantly higher compared with that of neutrophils from Cesarean section or from adults. With a progressive increase in fetal stress, there were significant elevations in total WBC, in particular neutrophils and monocytes, as well as an enhanced IL-8 and soluble E-Selectin level. Assisted delivery, associated with the highest degree of fetal stress in addition had an enhanced lymphocyte and monocytes count as well as an increased IFN-gamma level. There were significant direct correlations between neutrophils and monocytes, respectively, with cortisol, beta-endorphin, and prolactin. Interferon-gamma was directly related to dopamine, as well as to the lymphocyte and monocyte count. The setting of the HPA-axis at birth is a promoter of an alarm response and a surge of neuroendocrine immuno

  2. Low-Frequency Electromagnetic Field Exposure Enhances Extracellular Trap Formation by Human Neutrophils through the NADPH Pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Golbach, Lieke A; Scheer, Marleen H; Cuppen, Jan J M; Savelkoul, Huub; Verburg-van Kemenade, B M Lidy

    2015-01-01

    Low-frequency (LF) electromagnetic fields (EMFs) are abundantly present in modern society, and the potential biological consequences of exposure to these fields are under intense debate. Immune cells are suggested as possible target cells, though a clear mechanism is lacking. Considering their crucial role in innate immune activation, we selected an ex vivo exposure set-up with human neutrophils to investigate a possible correlation between neutrophil extracellular trap (NET) formation and LF EMF exposure. Our study shows that formation of NETs is enhanced by LF EMF exposure. Enhanced NET formation leads to increased antimicrobial properties as well as damage to surrounding cells. We found that LF-EMF-induced NET formation is dependent on the NADPH oxidase pathway and production of reactive oxygen species. Additionally, LF EMF exposure does not influence autophagy and PAD4 activity. Our study provides a mechanism by which exposure to LF EMFs could influence the innate immune system.

  3. Rac1 regulates platelet shedding of CD40L in abdominal sepsis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hwaiz, Rundk; Rahman, Milladur; Zhang, Enming; Thorlacius, Henrik

    2014-09-01

    Matrix metalloproteinase-9 (MMP-9) regulates platelet shedding of CD40L in abdominal sepsis. However, the signaling mechanisms controlling sepsis-induced shedding of CD40L from activated platelets remain elusive. Rac1 has been reported to regulate diverse functions in platelets; we hypothesized herein that Rac1 might regulate platelet shedding of CD40L in sepsis. The specific Rac1 inhibitor NSC23766 (N6-[2-[[4-(diethylamino)-1-methylbutyl] amino]-6-methyl-4-pyrimidinyl]-2 methyl-4, 6-quinolinediamine trihydrochloride) was administered to mice undergoing cecal ligation and puncture (CLP). Levels of CD40L and MMP-9 in plasma, platelets, and neutrophils were determined by use of ELISA, western blot, and confocal microscopy. Platelet depletion abolished the CLP-induced increase in plasma levels of CD40L. Rac1 activity was significantly increased in platelets from septic animals. Administration of NSC23766 abolished the CLP-induced enhancement of soluble CD40L levels in the plasma. Moreover, Rac1 inhibition completely inhibited proteinase-activated receptor-4-induced surface mobilization and secretion of CD40L in isolated platelets. CLP significantly increased plasma levels of MMP-9 and Rac1 activity in neutrophils. Treatment with NSC23766 markedly attenuated MMP-9 levels in the plasma from septic mice. In addition, Rac1 inhibition abolished chemokine-induced secretion of MMP-9 from isolated neutrophils. Finally, platelet shedding of CD40L was significantly reduced in response to stimulation with supernatants from activated MMP-9-deficient neutrophils compared with supernatants from wild-type neutrophils, indicating a direct role of neutrophil-derived MMP-9 in regulating platelet shedding of CD40L. Our novel data suggest that sepsis-induced platelet shedding of CD40L is dependent on Rac1 signaling. Rac1 controls surface mobilization of CD40L on activated platelets and MMP-9 secretion from neutrophils. Thus, our findings indicate that targeting Rac1 signaling might be a

  4. Supramolecular Chitosan Micro-Platelets Synergistically Enhance Anti-Candida albicans Activity of Amphotericin B Using an Immunocompetent Murine Model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grisin, Tiphany; Bories, Christian; Bombardi, Martina; Loiseau, Philippe M; Rouffiac, Valérie; Solgadi, Audrey; Mallet, Jean-Maurice; Ponchel, Gilles; Bouchemal, Kawthar

    2017-05-01

    The aim of this work is to design new chitosan conjugates able to self-organize in aqueous solution in the form of micrometer-size platelets. When mixed with amphotericin B deoxycholate (AmB-DOC), micro-platelets act as a drug booster allowing further improvement in AmB-DOC anti-Candida albicans activity. Micro-platelets were obtained by mixing oleoyl chitosan and α-cyclodextrin in water. The formulation is specifically-engineered for mucosal application by dispersing chitosan micro-platelets into thermosensitive pluronic(®) F127 20 wt% hydrogel. The formulation completely cured C. albicans vaginal infection in mice and had a superior activity in comparison with AmB-DOC without addition of chitosan micro-platelets. In vitro studies showed that the platelets significantly enhance AmB-DOC antifungal activity since the IC50 and the MIC90 decrease 4.5 and 4.8-times. Calculation of fractional inhibitory concentration index (FICI = 0.198) showed that chitosan micro-platelets act in a synergistic way with AmB-DOC against C. albicans. No synergy is found between spherical nanoparticles composed poly(isobutylcyanoacrylate)/chitosan and AmB-DOC. These results demonstrate for the first time the ability of flattened chitosan micro-platelets to have synergistic activity with AmB-DOC against C. albicans candidiasis and highlight the importance of rheological and mucoadhesive behaviors of hydrogels in the efficacy of the treatment.

  5. Hydrogen sulfide augments neutrophil migration through enhancement of adhesion molecule expression and prevention of CXCR2 internalization: role of ATP-sensitive potassium channels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dal-Secco, Daniela; Cunha, Thiago M; Freitas, Andressa; Alves-Filho, José Carlos; Souto, Fabrício O; Fukada, Sandra Y; Grespan, Renata; Alencar, Nylane M N; Neto, Alberto F; Rossi, Marcos A; Ferreira, Sérgio H; Hothersall, John S; Cunha, Fernando Q

    2008-09-15

    In this study, we have addressed the role of H(2)S in modulating neutrophil migration in either innate (LPS-challenged naive mice) or adaptive (methylated BSA (mBSA)-challenged immunized mice) immune responses. Treatment of mice with H(2)S synthesis inhibitors, dl-propargylglycine (PAG) or beta-cyanoalanine, reduced neutrophil migration induced by LPS or methylated BSA (mBSA) into the peritoneal cavity and by mBSA into the femur/tibial joint of immunized mice. This effect was associated with decreased leukocyte rolling, adhesion, and P-selectin and ICAM-1 expression on endothelium. Predictably, treatment of animals with the H(2)S donors, NaHS or Lawesson's reagent, enhanced these parameters. Moreover, the NaHS enhancement of neutrophil migration was not observed in ICAM-1-deficient mice. Neither PAG nor NaHS treatment changed LPS-induced CD18 expression on neutrophils, nor did the LPS- and mBSA-induced release of neutrophil chemoattractant mediators TNF-alpha, keratinocyte-derived chemokine, and LTB(4). Furthermore, in vitro MIP-2-induced neutrophil chemotaxis was inhibited by PAG and enhanced by NaHS treatments. Accordingly, MIP-2-induced CXCR2 internalization was enhanced by PAG and inhibited by NaHS treatments. Moreover, NaHS prevented MIP-2-induced CXCR2 desensitization. The PAG and NaHS effects correlated, respectively, with the enhancement and inhibition of MIP-2-induced G protein-coupled receptor kinase 2 expression. The effects of NaHS on neutrophil migration both in vivo and in vitro, together with CXCR2 internalization and G protein-coupled receptor kinase 2 expression were prevented by the ATP-sensitive potassium (K(ATP)(+)) channel blocker, glybenclamide. Conversely, diazoxide, a K(ATP)(+) channel opener, increased neutrophil migration in vivo. Together, our data suggest that during the inflammatory response, H(2)S augments neutrophil adhesion and locomotion, by a mechanism dependent on K(ATP)(+) channels.

  6. The GPIIb/IIIa antagonist eptifibatide markedly potentiates platelet-leukocyte interaction and tissue factor expression following platelet activation in whole blood in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scholz, Thomas; Zhao, Lian; Temmler, Uta; Bath, Philip; Heptinstall, Stan; Lösche, Wolfgang

    2002-11-01

    Tissue factor (TF) is the most important initiator of intravascular coagulation. Activated platelets are able to adhere to leukocytes and this heterotypic cell-cell interaction results in a CD62P-dependent TF expression on monocytes. GPIIb/IIIa antagonists are inhibitors of the common pathway of platelet aggregation and they are widely used in patients with acute coronary syndromes undergoing coronary interventions. As GPIIb/IIIa antagonists do not prevent platelet activation we investigated the effect a GPIIb/IIIa antagonist, eptifibatide, on the formation of platelet-leukocyte conjugates and leukocyte TF expression. Flow cytometry was used to detect conjugates and TF. When platelets in citrated human blood were stimulated for 30 min with collagen there was a increase in the number of both neutrophils and monocytes with the platelet-specific antigen CD42a, indicating the formation of platelet-neutrophil (P/N) and platelet-monocyte (P/M) conjugates. P/M formation was associated with about a 2.5-fold increase in TF expression on monocytes, whereas P/N formation changed TF expression neutrophils only by about 10%. Eptifibatide enhanced dose-dependently (0.0625-1.5 microg/ml) both collagen-induced P/M formation and monocyte TF expression. Maximum enhancement by about 60 and 120%, respectively, was observed at 0.5 microg/ml eptifibatide. In contrast, eptifibatide had only a minor effect on P/N formation and no effect on neutrophil TF expression. The augmented P/M formation and monocyte TF expression in the presence of a GPIIb/IIIa antagonist may be relevant to the poor antithrombotic efficiency of oral GPIIb/IIIa antagonists as shown in recent large clinical trials.

  7. Synergy between IL-8 and GM-CSF in reproductive tract epithelial cell secretions promotes enhanced neutrophil chemotaxis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Li; Fahey, John V; Hussey, Stephen B; Asin, Susana N; Wira, Charles R; Fanger, Michael W

    2004-07-01

    Neutrophils occur in tissues of the female reproductive tract (FRT) under non-infected conditions. These cells generally enter tissues under the influence of chemoattractants called chemokines. Primary epithelial cells (EC) from FRT were a potent source of chemokines, IL-8 being the chief neutrophil chemoattractant secreted. Blocking with neutralizing anti-IL-8 showed that IL-8 did not account for all of the chemoattraction observed. A mixture of 25 ng/mL rIL-8 and 1 ng/mL rGM-CSF mediated 2.7-fold more chemotaxis than that expected if the two agents were additive. We then found that GM-CSF was produced by EC in amounts that synergised strongly with IL-8 to enhance chemotaxis. Treatment of uterine EC conditioned medium with saturating doses of anti-IL-8 plus anti-GM-CSF antibodies produced an 84% inhibition of chemotaxis. These findings demonstrate that the majority of neutrophil chemoattractant activity produced by FRT EC results from the synergistic effects of IL-8 and GM-CSF.

  8. Platelets promote bacterial dissemination in a mouse model of streptococcal sepsis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kahn, Fredrik; Hurley, Sinead; Shannon, Oonagh

    2013-01-01

    Platelets have been reported to contribute to inflammation and inflammatory disorders. In the present study, we demonstrate that platelets contribute to the acute response to bacterial infection in a mouse model of invasive Streptococcus pyogenes infection. Thrombocytopenia occurred rapidly in infected animals and this was associated with platelet activation, formation of platelet-neutrophil complexes and neutrophil activation. In order to assess the role of platelets during infection, platelets were depleted prior to infection. Platelet-depleted animals had significantly decreased platelet-neutrophil complex formation and neutrophil activation in response to infection. Importantly, significantly fewer bacteria disseminated to the blood, lungs, and spleen of platelet-depleted animals. Platelet-depleted animals did not decrease as significantly in weight as the infected control animals. The results demonstrate a previously unappreciated role for platelets during the pathophysiological response to infection, whereby S. pyogenes bacteria bind to platelets and platelets facilitate bacterial dissemination.

  9. Neutrophil function of neonatal foals is enhanced in vitro by CpG oligodeoxynucleotide stimulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rhodococcus equi is an intracellular bacterium that causes pneumonia in foals and immunocompromised adult horses. Evidence exists that foals become infected with R. equi early in life, a period when innate immune responses are critically important for protection against infection. Neutrophils are i...

  10. Annexin A1 modulates natural and glucocorticoid-induced resolution of inflammation by enhancing neutrophil apoptosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vago, Juliana P; Nogueira, Camila R C; Tavares, Luciana P; Soriani, Frederico M; Lopes, Fernando; Russo, Remo C; Pinho, Vanessa; Teixeira, Mauro M; Sousa, Lirlândia P

    2012-08-01

    This study aimed at assessing whether AnxA1, a downstream mediator for the anti-inflammatory effects of GCs, could affect the fate of immune cells in tissue exudates, using LPS-induced pleurisy in BALB/c mice. AnxA1 protein expression in exudates was increased during natural resolution, as seen at 48-72 h post-LPS, an effect augmented by treatment with GC and associated with marked presence of apoptotic neutrophils in the pleural exudates. The functional relevance of AnxA1 was determined using a neutralizing antibody or a nonspecific antagonist at FPR/ALXRs: either treatment inhibited both spontaneous and GC-induced resolution of inflammation. Injection of Ac2-26 (100 μg, given 4 h into the LPS response), an AnxA1-active N-terminal peptide, promoted active resolution and augmented the extent of neutrophil apoptosis. Such an effect was prevented by the pan-caspase inhibitor zVAD-fmk. Mechanistically, resolution of neutrophilic inflammation was linked to cell apoptosis with activation of Bax and caspase-3 and inhibition of survival pathways Mcl-1, ERK1/2, and NF-κB. These novel in vivo data, using a dynamic model of acute inflammation, provide evidence that AnxA1 is a mediator of natural and GC-induced resolution of inflammation with profound effects on neutrophil apoptosis.

  11. Enhanced neutrophil phagocytic capacity in rheumatoid arthritis related to the autoantibodies rheumatoid factor and anti-cyclic citrullinated peptides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Siqueira, Marcelo Bogliolo Piancastelli; da Mota, Licia Maria Henrique; Couto, Shirley Claudino Pereira; Muniz-Junqueira, Maria Imaculada

    2015-06-30

    There is no consensus on the mechanisms by which anti-cyclic citrullinated peptide antibodies (anti-CCP) and rheumatoid factor (RF) influence the pathogenesis of rheumatoid arthritis (RA). The current study verified if the presence of RF or anti-CCP is associated with phagocytic capacity and reactive oxygen species (ROS) production by phagocytes in RA patients to better clarify the role played by these antibodies in pathogenesis of the disease. A cohort of 30 RA patients followed from early stages of the disease were characterized by positivity for RF or anti-CCP, disease activity score (DAS-28), health assessment questionnaire (HAQ), use of synthetic or biologic therapy, lifestyle, comorbidities and radiographic erosions. Phagocytic capacity against Saccharomyces cerevisiae and superoxide anion production were assessed in RA patients and compared with 20 healthy controls. Phagocytic capacity and superoxide anion production were also compared between RF- and anti-CCP-positive and -negative RA patients. Anti-CCP- and RF-positive RA patients had higher neutrophil phagocytic capacity than anti-CCP- (p = 0.005) and RF (p = 0.005)-negative individuals through pattern-recognition receptors. As assessed via pattern recognition or opsonin receptors, neutrophils and monocytes from RA patients presented overall higher phagocytic capacity than neutrophils and monocytes from healthy controls (p autoantibodies. Furthermore, there was an overall hyperactivation of the phagocytes in RA patients. Our data suggest that anti-CCP and RF may indirectly enhance the inflammation cascade involving neutrophils and may indirectly sustain tissue damage in RA. Targeting the production of these autoantibodies may be a promising strategy in the management of RA.

  12. Sulfur dioxide attenuates LPS-induced acute lung injury via enhancing polymorphonuclear neutrophil apoptosis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Hui-jie MA; Xin-li HUANG; Yan LIU; Ya-min FAN

    2012-01-01

    Aim:We speculated that the enhanced apoptosis of polymorphonuclear neutrophil (PMN) might be responsible for the inhibition of PMN infiltration in the lung.This study was designed to investigate the effects of sulfur dioxide (SO2) on PMN apoptosis in vivo and in vitro,which may mediate the protective action of SO2 on pulmonary diseases.Methods:Acute lung injury (ALI) was induced by intratracheally instillation of lipopolysaccharide (LPS,100 μg/100 g.in 200 μL saline) in adult male SD rats.SO2 solution (25 μmol/kg) was administered intraperitoneally 30 min before LPS treatment.The rats were killed 6 h after LPS treatment.Lung tissues were collected for histopathologic study and SO2 concentration assay.Bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF) was collected for the measurement of PMN apoptosis.For in vitro experiments,rat peripheral blood PMNs were cultured and treated with LPS (30 mg/L) and S02 (10,20 and 30 μmol/L) for 6 h,and apoptosis-related protein expression was detected by Western blotting,and apoptosis rate was measured with flow cytometry.Results:LPS treatment significantly reduced the SO2 concentrations in the lung tissue and peripheral blood,as compared with the control group.Pretreatment with SO2 prevented LPS-induced reduction of the SO2 concentration in the lung tissue and peripheral blood.LPS treatment significantly reduced PMN apoptosis both in vivo and in vitro,which could be prevented by the pretreatment with SO2.The protein levels of caspase-3 and Bax was significantly increased,but Bcl-2 was decreased by the pretreatment with SO2,as compared with LPS administration alone.Conclusion:SO2 plays an important role as the modulator of PMN apoptosis during LPS-induced ALl,which might be one of the mechanisms underlying the protective action of SO2 on pulmonary diseases.

  13. Fish-Free Diet in Patients with Phenylketonuria Is Not Associated with Early Atherosclerotic Changes and Enhanced Platelet Activation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patrik Htun

    Full Text Available Since patients with phenylketonuria (PKU have to follow a lifelong restriction of natural protein to lower phenylalanine-intake, they never eat fish. This diet may lead to a chronic deficit of omega-3 and omega-6 fatty acids with the risk of early atherosclerotic changes. The aim of the study was to analyse the fatty acid profile of PKU patients and to correlate the results with surrogate markers of early atherosclerotic changes [enhanced carotid intima media thickness (CIMT and ß-stiffness index] and platelet activation.In 43 PKU patients and in 58 healthy controls we prospectively examined the fatty acid profile, CIMT, ß-stiffness index and platelet activation (flow cytometric determination of markers of platelet activation. CIMT was measured bilaterally by ultrasound. CIMTmean was defined as the mean value of the sum of CIMTleft and CIMTright.Despite of lower HDL-cholesterol and higher triglyceride concentrations in the PKU group, there was no significant difference in the omega-6 or omega-3 fatty acid profile, CIMT, ß-stiffness index between both groups. Platelet activation was not enhanced in the PKU group.Fish-free diet does not induce early atherosclerotic changes or enhanced platelet activation in PKU patients.

  14. Activities of enzymes that metabolize platelet-activating factor (1-alkyl-2-acetyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine) in neutrophils and eosinophils from humans and the effect of a calcium ionophore

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, T. (Oak Ridge Associated Univ., TN); Malone, B.; Wasserman, S.I.; Fitzgerald, V.; Snyder, F.

    1982-04-29

    Enzymatic systems in human blood cells are described for the activation and inactivation of a biologically active phospholipid (l-alkyl-2-acetyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine) with hypotensive, platelet-aggregating, and inflammatory properties. The results document the presence of alkyldihydroxyacetone-phosphate synthase (forms the O-alkyl linkage in lipids), l-alkyl-2-lyso-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine:acetyl-CoA acetyltransferase (produces the biologically active molecule), and 1-alkyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine: acetylhydrolase (destroys the biological activity) in human neutrophils and eosinophils. Both the acetyltransferase and acetylhydrolase activities are increased severalfold after treatment of normal neutrophils with ionophore A23187; however, alkyldihydroxyacetone-phosphate synthase activity is not influenced by the ionophore. Eosinophils isolated from patients with eosinophilia have significantly greater activities of all the enzymes studied than the eosinophils isolated from normal individuals. Our results indicate the acetyltransferase responsible for 1-alkyl-2-acetyl-sn-glycero-3-phospho-choline synthesis may serve an important role in human blood cells that release this biologically active phospholipid. Moreover, the acetyltransferase activity was found to be dramatically influenced by calcium flux.

  15. Zinc sequestration by the neutrophil protein calprotectin enhances Salmonella growth in the inflamed gut.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Janet Z; Jellbauer, Stefan; Poe, Adam J; Ton, Vivian; Pesciaroli, Michele; Kehl-Fie, Thomas E; Restrepo, Nicole A; Hosking, Martin P; Edwards, Robert A; Battistoni, Andrea; Pasquali, Paolo; Lane, Thomas E; Chazin, Walter J; Vogl, Thomas; Roth, Johannes; Skaar, Eric P; Raffatellu, Manuela

    2012-03-15

    Neutrophils are innate immune cells that counter pathogens by many mechanisms, including release of antimicrobial proteins such as calprotectin to inhibit bacterial growth. Calprotectin sequesters essential micronutrient metals such as zinc, thereby limiting their availability to microbes, a process termed nutritional immunity. We find that while calprotectin is induced by neutrophils during infection with the gut pathogen Salmonella Typhimurium, calprotectin-mediated metal sequestration does not inhibit S. Typhimurium proliferation. Remarkably, S. Typhimurium overcomes calprotectin-mediated zinc chelation by expressing a high affinity zinc transporter (ZnuABC). A S. Typhimurium znuA mutant impaired for growth in the inflamed gut was rescued in the absence of calprotectin. ZnuABC was also required to promote the growth of S. Typhimurium over that of competing commensal bacteria. Thus, our findings indicate that Salmonella thrives in the inflamed gut by overcoming the zinc sequestration of calprotectin and highlight the importance of zinc acquisition in bacterial intestinal colonization.

  16. Chronic Prosopis glandulosa treatment blunts neutrophil infiltration and enhances muscle repair after contusion injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    George, Cindy; Smith, Carine; Isaacs, Ashwin W; Huisamen, Barbara

    2015-01-23

    The current treatment options for soft tissue injuries remain suboptimal and often result in delayed/incomplete recovery of damaged muscle. The current study aimed to evaluate the effects of oral Prosopis glandulosa treatment on inflammation and regeneration in skeletal muscle after contusion injury, in comparison to a conventional treatment. The gastrocnemius muscle of rats was subjected to mass-drop injury and muscle samples collected after 1-, 3 h, 1- and 7 days post-injury. Rats were treated with P. glandulosa (100 mg/kg/day) either for 8 weeks prior to injury (up until day 7 post-injury), only post-injury, or with topically applied diclofenac post-injury (0.57 mg/kg). Neutrophil (His48-positive) and macrophage (F4/80-positive) infiltration was assessed by means of immunohistochemistry. Indicators of muscle satellite cell proliferation (ADAM12) and regeneration (desmin) were used to evaluate muscle repair. Chronic P. glandulosa and diclofenac treatment (p<0.0001) was associated with suppression of the neutrophil response to contusion injury, however only chronic P. glandulosa treatment facilitated more effective muscle recovery (increased ADAM12 (p<0.05) and desmin (p<0.001) expression), while diclofenac treatment had inhibitory effects on repair, despite effective inhibition of neutrophil response. Data indicates that P. glandulosa treatment results in more effective muscle repair after contusion.

  17. ENHANCED PLATELET AGGREGABILITY UNDER HIGH SHEAR STRESS IN CORONARY CIRCULATION OF PATIENTS WITH UNSTABLE ANGINA

    OpenAIRE

    Doi, Naofumi

    2000-01-01

    Mechanical forces, including high shear stress, have been found to cause platelet aggregation. Although increased platelet aggregation is also associated with the pathophysiology of unstable angina, it is not known whether platelet aggregation induced by high shear stress occurs in the coronary circulation of patients with unstable angina. We assayed high shear stress induced platelet aggregation (h-SIPA) in each of 25 patients with unstable angina and a severe stenotic lesion of the left cor...

  18. Activated platelets enhance IL-10 secretion and reduce TNF-α secretion by monocytes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gudbrandsdottir, Sif; Hasselbalch, Hans C; Nielsen, Claus H

    2013-01-01

    Activated platelets are known to modulate immune responses by secreting or shedding a range of immunomodulatory substances. We examined the influence of activated platelets on cytokine production by normal human mononuclear cells, induced by tetanus toxoid (TT), human thyroglobulin (TG), Escheric......Activated platelets are known to modulate immune responses by secreting or shedding a range of immunomodulatory substances. We examined the influence of activated platelets on cytokine production by normal human mononuclear cells, induced by tetanus toxoid (TT), human thyroglobulin (TG...

  19. Differential stimulation of luminol-enhanced chemiluminescence (CL) and arachidonic acid metabolism in rat peritoneal neutrophils

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sturm, R.J.; Adams, L.M.; Cullinan, C.A.; Berkenkopf, J.W.; Weichman, B.M.

    1986-03-05

    Phorbol 12-myristate, 13-acetate (PMA) induced the production of radical oxygen species (ROS) from rat peritoneal neutrophils as assessed by CL. ROS generation occurred in a time- (maximum at 13.5 min) and dose- (concentration range of 1.7-498 nM) related fashion. However, 166 nM PMA did not induce either cyclooxygenase (CO) or lipoxygenase (LPO) product formation by 20 min post-stimulation. Conversely, A23187, at concentrations between 0.1 and 10 ..mu..M, stimulated both pathways of arachidonic acid metabolism, but had little or no effect upon ROS production. When suboptimal concentrations of PMA (5.5 nM) and A23187 (0.1-1 ..mu..M) were coincubated with the neutrophils, a synergistic ROS response was elicited. However, arachidonic acid metabolism in the presence of PMA was unchanged relative to A12187 alone. Nordihydroguaiaretic acid (NDGA) inhibited both PMA-induced CL (IC/sub 50/ = 0.9 ..mu..M) and A23187-induced arachidonic acid metabolism (IC/sub 50/ = 1.7 ..mu..M and 6.0 ..mu..M for LPO and CO, respectively). The mixed LPO-CO inhibitor, BW755C, behaved in a qualitatively similar manner to NDGA, whereas the CO inhibitors, indomethacin, piroxicam and naproxen had no inhibitory effect on ROS generation at concentrations as high as 100 ..mu..M. These results suggest that NDGA and BW755C may inhibit CL and arachidonic acid metabolism by distinct mechanisms in rat neutrophils.

  20. Label-free Detection of Protein Released during Platelet Activation by CNT-Enhanced Love Mode SAW Sensors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Huiyan; Zu, Hongfei; Wang, Qing-Ming; Zhao, Gangyi; Wang, Jamesu H-C

    2014-09-01

    Platelet-rich plasma (PRP) has been applied in a series of clinical treatments. PRP contains high-concentrated platelets, which, when activated, could secret a variety of growth factors and cytokines, to promote and/or enhance healing of injured tissues. Non-activated platelets suspension could be prepared by an isolation method of centrifugation and washing currently. However, it is not clear whether platelets, if any, are already activated during this process and there is no simple method to monitor their activation accordingly. Shear-Horizontal Surface Acoustic Wave sensors (SH-SAW, Love Mode) are promising in fundamental biology as well as biomedical engineering, detecting cell behaviors in liquid in a non-invasive, simple and quantitative manner. In this study, Love mode sensors are adopted for the label-free detection of protein secreted by platelets. Carbon nanotube (CNT) is reported as an advisable platform of both non-specific protein adsorption and specific protein binding. For further improvement of Love mode sensor performance, novel CNT -coated parylene-C film is prepared on its surface as both the acoustic-wave-guiding layer and bio-interface layer. The S21 loss curves of Love mode sensors were recorded and the corresponding resonance frequencies were extracted. The results showed that the CNT-enhanced sensor possessed an increased resonance frequency shift when compared to normal sensor with single parylene-C film under identical collagen concentrations. Then, the modified sensor is used for label-free detection of protein released by various concentrations of platelets. The results revealed high sensitivity and consistency, indicating the potential of CNT-enhanced Love mode sensors in cell-based applications.

  1. Neutrophils recruited to sites of infection protect from virus challenge by releasing neutrophil extracellular traps.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jenne, Craig N; Wong, Connie H Y; Zemp, Franz J; McDonald, Braedon; Rahman, Masmudur M; Forsyth, Peter A; McFadden, Grant; Kubes, Paul

    2013-02-13

    Neutrophils mediate bacterial clearance through various mechanisms, including the release of mesh-like DNA structures or neutrophil extracellular traps (NETs) that capture bacteria. Although neutrophils are also recruited to sites of viral infection, their role in antiviral innate immunity is less clear. We show that systemic administration of virus analogs or poxvirus infection induces neutrophil recruitment to the liver microvasculature and the release of NETs that protect host cells from virus infection. After systemic intravenous poxvirus challenge, mice exhibit thrombocytopenia and the recruitment of both neutrophils and platelets to the liver vasculature. Circulating platelets interact with, roll along, and adhere to the surface of adherent neutrophils, forming large, dynamic aggregates. These interactions facilitate the release of NETs within the liver vasculature that are able to protect host cells from poxvirus infection. These findings highlight the role of NETs and early tissue-wide responses in preventing viral infection.

  2. Enhanced P-selectin expression on platelet-a marker of platelet activation, in young patients with angiographically proven coronary artery disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    George, Reema; Bhatt, Anugya; Narayani, Jayakumari; Thulaseedharan, Jissa Vinoda; Sivadasanpillai, Harikrishnan; Tharakan, Jaganmohan A

    2016-08-01

    P-selectin (CD62p) exposure is an established marker for platelet activation. P-selectin exposure can trigger variety of thrombotic and inflammatory reactions. In patients with coronary artery disease (CAD), platelets are activated, and hence, there is increased P-selectin exposure. The role of P-selectin exposure in patients on treatment with statins and anti-platelets is conflicting. A case-control study was performed to determine P-selectin exposure in consecutively recruited 142 patients (age ≤ 55 years) with angiographically proven CAD on treatment and 92 asymptomatic controls. P-selectin exposure was determined by flow cytometry. Data on conventional risk factors were obtained along with estimation of levels of thrombotic [fibrinogen, lipoprotein (a), tissue plasminogen activator, plasminogen activator inhibitor-1, homocysteine and von Willebrand factor] and anti-thrombotic factors (antithrombin III). The P-selectin exposure was compared among patient groups who had different modes of presentation of CAD and categories of CAD disease severity. The patients were followed up for a period of 26 months. The results indicate that P-selectin exposure was significantly elevated in patients (mean ± SD 9.24 ± 11.81) compared to controls (mean ± SD 1.48 ± 2.85) with p P-selectin exposure showed significant negative correlation with antithrombin III levels. P-selectin exposure was higher in patients who presented with acute coronary syndromes than those who presented with effort angina. Cardiovascular event rate was 6 % on follow-up. The study establishes that thrombotic-inflammatory pathways enhancing P-selectin exposure unrelated to treatment might be activated in patients, while the event rate remained lowered, and hence, treatment strategies should be inclusive to control these factors.

  3. Enhancement of neutrophil autophagy by an IVIG preparation against multidrug-resistant bacteria as well as drug-sensitive strains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Itoh, Hiroshi; Matsuo, Hidemasa; Kitamura, Naoko; Yamamoto, Sho; Higuchi, Takeshi; Takematsu, Hiromu; Kamikubo, Yasuhiko; Kondo, Tadakazu; Yamashita, Kouhei; Sasada, Masataka; Takaori-Kondo, Akifumi; Adachi, Souichi

    2015-07-01

    Autophagy occurs in human neutrophils after the phagocytosis of multidrug-resistant bacteria and drug-sensitive strains, including Escherichia coli and Pseudomonas aeruginosa. The present study detected autophagy by immunoblot analysis of LC3B conversion, by confocal scanning microscopic examination of LC3B aggregate formation and by transmission electron microscopic examination of bacteria-containing autophagosomes. Patients with severe bacterial infections are often treated with IVIG alongside antimicrobial agents. Here, we showed that IVIG induced neutrophil-mediated phagocytosis of multidrug-resistant strains. Compared with untreated neutrophils, neutrophils exposed to IVIG showed increased levels of bacterial cell killing, phagocytosis, O(2)(-) release, MPO release, and NET formation. IVIG also increased autophagy in these cells. Inhibiting the late phase of autophagy (fusion of lysosomes with autophagosomes) with bafilomycin A1-reduced, neutrophil-mediated bactericidal activity. These findings indicate that autophagy plays a critical role in the bactericidal activity mediated by human neutrophils. Furthermore, the autophagosomes within the neutrophils contained bacteria only and their organelles only, or both bacteria and their organelles, a previously undocumented observation. Taken together, these results suggest that the contents of neutrophil autophagosomes may be derived from specific autophagic systems, which provide the neutrophil with an advantage. Thus, IVIG promotes the neutrophil-mediated killing of multidrug-resistant bacteria as well as drug-sensitive strains.

  4. Prognostic Significance of Combination of Preoperative Platelet Count and Neutrophil-Lymphocyte Ratio (COP-NLR in Patients with Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer: Based on a Large Cohort Study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hua Zhang

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to investigate the prognostic significance of the combination of the preoperative platelet count and neutrophil-lymphocyte ratio (COP-NLR for predicting postoperative survival of patients undergoing complete resection for non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC.The preoperative COP-NLR was calculated on the basis of data obtained.Patients with both an increased platelet count (>30.0 × 104 mm(-3 and an elevated NLR (>2.3 were assigned a score of 2, and patients with one or neither were assigned as a score of 1 or 0, respectively.A total of 1238 NSCLC patients were enrolled in this analysis. Multivariate analysis using the 15 clinicolaboratory variables selected by univariate analyses demonstrated that the preoperative COP-NLR was an independent prognostic factor for DFS (HR: 1.834, 95%CI: 1.536 to 2.200, P<0.001 and OS (HR: 1.810, 95%CI: 1.587 to 2.056, P<0.001. In sub-analyses by tumor stage (I, II, IIIA, a significant association was found between DFS and OS and level of COP-NLR in each subgroup (P<0.001, P=0.002, P<0.001 for DFS, respectively; P<0.001, P=0.001, P<0.001 for OS. When the subgroup of patients with high-risk COP-NLR (score of 2 was analyzed, no benefit of adjuvant chemotherapy could be found (P=0.237 for DFS and P=0.165 for OS.The preoperative COP-NLR is able to predict the prognosis of patients with NSCLC and divide these patients into three independent groups before surgery. Our results also demonstrate that high-risk patients based on the COP-NLR do not benefit from adjuvant chemotherapy. Independent validation of our findings is warranted.

  5. Ticagrelor reduces neutrophil recruitment and lung damage in abdominal sepsis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rahman, Milladur; Gustafsson, David; Wang, Yongzhi; Thorlacius, Henrik; Braun, Oscar Ö

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Platelets play an important role in abdominal sepsis and P2Y12 receptor antagonists have been reported to exert anti-inflammatory effects. Herein, we assessed the impact of platelet inhibition with the P2Y12 receptor antagonist ticagrelor on pulmonary neutrophil recruitment and tissue damage in a model of abdominal sepsis. Wild-type C57BL/6 mice were subjected to cecal ligation and puncture (CLP). Animals were treated with ticagrelor (100 mg/kg) or vehicle prior to CLP induction. Edema formation and bronchoalveolar neutrophils as well as lung damage were quantified. Flow cytometry was used to determine expression of platelet-neutrophil aggregates, neutrophil activation and CD40L expression on platelets. CLP-induced pulmonary infiltration of neutrophils at 24 hours was reduced by 50% in ticagrelor-treated animals. Moreover, ticagrelor abolished CLP-provoked lung edema and decreased lung damage score by 41%. Notably, ticagrelor completely inhibited formation of platelet-neutrophil aggregates and markedly reduced thrombocytopenia in CLP animals. In addition, ticagrelor reduced platelet shedding of CD40L in septic mice. Our data indicate that ticagrelor can reduce CLP-induced pulmonary neutrophil recruitment and lung damage suggesting a potential role for platelet antagonists, such as ticagrelor, in the management of patients with abdominal sepsis.

  6. Platelet-rich plasma: a biomimetic approach to enhancement of surgical wound healing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernandez-Moure, Joseph S; Van Eps, Jeffrey L; Cabrera, Fernando J; Barbosa, Zonia; Medrano Del Rosal, Guillermo; Weiner, Bradley K; Ellsworth, Warren A; Tasciotti, Ennio

    2017-01-01

    Platelets are small anucleate cytoplasmic cell bodies released by megakaryocytes in response to various physiologic triggers. Traditionally thought to be solely involved in the mechanisms of hemostasis, platelets have gained much attention due to their involvement wound healing, immunomodulation, and antiseptic properties. As the field of surgery continues to evolve so does the need for therapies to aid in treating the increasingly complex patients seen. With over 14 million obstetric, musculoskeletal, and urological and gastrointestinal surgeries performed annually, the healing of surgical wounds continues to be of upmost importance to the surgeon and patient. Platelet-rich plasma, or platelet concentrate, has emerged as a possible adjuvant therapy to aid in the healing of surgical wounds and injuries. In this review, we will discuss the wound healing properties of platelet-rich plasma and various surgical applications. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Significance of neutrophil-to-lymphocyte ratio, platelet-to-lymphocyte ratio and prognostic nutrition index as preoperative predictors of early mortality after liver resection for huge (≥10 cm) hepatocellular carcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goh, Brian K P; Kam, Juinn Huar; Lee, Ser-Yee; Chan, Chung-Yip; Allen, John C; Jeyaraj, Premaraj; Cheow, Peng-Chung; Chow, Pierce K H; Ooi, London L P J; Chung, Alexander Y F

    2016-05-01

    This study aimed to determine preoperative predictors of early (huge (≥10 cm) HCC, with special emphasis on the importance of neutrophil-to-lymphocyte ratio (NLR), platelet-to-lymphocyte ratio (PLR), and prognostic nutrition index (PNI). Between 2000 to 2013, 166 patients underwent LR for huge HCC. Optimal cut-offs for alpha fetoprotein (AFP), NLR, PLR, and PNI were determined by plotting the receiver operator curves (ROC) in predicting early mortality and utilizing the Youden index. The 30-day/in-hospital postoperative mortality rate was 4.2%. The 5-year overall survival (OS) and the 5-year recurrence-free survival (RFS) was 43% and 24%, respectively. Early mortality from disease recurrence occurred in 35 of 159 (22%) patients. Multivariate analyses demonstrated that tumor rupture and high AFP (>1,085 ng/ml) were independent preoperative predictors of early mortality after LR for HCC, and both a low PNI (huge HCC. J. Surg. Oncol. 2016;113:621-627. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  8. Platelet-Rich Fibrin Promotes Periodontal Regeneration and Enhances Alveolar Bone Augmentation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qi Li

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available In the present study we have determined the suitability of platelet-rich fibrin (PRF as a complex scaffold for periodontal tissue regeneration. Replacing PRF with its major component fibrin increased mineralization in alveolar bone progenitors when compared to periodontal progenitors, suggesting that fibrin played a substantial role in PRF-induced osteogenic lineage differentiation. Moreover, there was a 3.6-fold increase in the early osteoblast transcription factor RUNX2 and a 3.1-fold reduction of the mineralization inhibitor MGP as a result of PRF application in alveolar bone progenitors, a trend not observed in periodontal progenitors. Subcutaneous implantation studies revealed that PRF readily integrated with surrounding tissues and was partially replaced with collagen fibers 2 weeks after implantation. Finally, clinical pilot studies in human patients documented an approximately 5 mm elevation of alveolar bone height in tandem with oral mucosal wound healing. Together, these studies suggest that PRF enhances osteogenic lineage differentiation of alveolar bone progenitors more than of periodontal progenitors by augmenting osteoblast differentiation, RUNX2 expression, and mineralized nodule formation via its principal component fibrin. They also document that PRF functions as a complex regenerative scaffold promoting both tissue-specific alveolar bone augmentation and surrounding periodontal soft tissue regeneration via progenitor-specific mechanisms.

  9. Platelet-rich fibrin promotes periodontal regeneration and enhances alveolar bone augmentation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Qi; Pan, Shuang; Dangaria, Smit J; Gopinathan, Gokul; Kolokythas, Antonia; Chu, Shunli; Geng, Yajun; Zhou, Yanmin; Luan, Xianghong

    2013-01-01

    In the present study we have determined the suitability of platelet-rich fibrin (PRF) as a complex scaffold for periodontal tissue regeneration. Replacing PRF with its major component fibrin increased mineralization in alveolar bone progenitors when compared to periodontal progenitors, suggesting that fibrin played a substantial role in PRF-induced osteogenic lineage differentiation. Moreover, there was a 3.6-fold increase in the early osteoblast transcription factor RUNX2 and a 3.1-fold reduction of the mineralization inhibitor MGP as a result of PRF application in alveolar bone progenitors, a trend not observed in periodontal progenitors. Subcutaneous implantation studies revealed that PRF readily integrated with surrounding tissues and was partially replaced with collagen fibers 2 weeks after implantation. Finally, clinical pilot studies in human patients documented an approximately 5 mm elevation of alveolar bone height in tandem with oral mucosal wound healing. Together, these studies suggest that PRF enhances osteogenic lineage differentiation of alveolar bone progenitors more than of periodontal progenitors by augmenting osteoblast differentiation, RUNX2 expression, and mineralized nodule formation via its principal component fibrin. They also document that PRF functions as a complex regenerative scaffold promoting both tissue-specific alveolar bone augmentation and surrounding periodontal soft tissue regeneration via progenitor-specific mechanisms.

  10. Platelet-Derived Short-Chain Polyphosphates Enhance the Inactivation of Tissue Factor Pathway Inhibitor by Activated Coagulation Factor XI

    Science.gov (United States)

    Puy, Cristina; Tucker, Erik I.; Ivanov, Ivan S.; Gailani, David; Smith, Stephanie A.; Morrissey, James H.; Gruber, András; McCarty, Owen J. T.

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Factor (F) XI supports both normal human hemostasis and pathological thrombosis. Activated FXI (FXIa) promotes thrombin generation by enzymatic activation of FXI, FIX, FX, and FV, and inactivation of alpha tissue factor pathway inhibitor (TFPIα), in vitro. Some of these reactions are now known to be enhanced by short-chain polyphosphates (SCP) derived from activated platelets. These SCPs act as a cofactor for the activation of FXI and FV by thrombin and FXIa, respectively. Since SCPs have been shown to inhibit the anticoagulant function of TFPIα, we herein investigated whether SCPs could serve as cofactors for the proteolytic inactivation of TFPIα by FXIa, further promoting the efficiency of the extrinsic pathway of coagulation to generate thrombin. Methods and Results Purified soluble SCP was prepared by size-fractionation of sodium polyphosphate. TFPIα proteolysis was analyzed by western blot. TFPIα activity was measured as inhibition of FX activation and activity in coagulation and chromogenic assays. SCPs significantly accelerated the rate of inactivation of TFPIα by FXIa in both purified systems and in recalcified plasma. Moreover, platelet-derived SCP accelerated the rate of inactivation of platelet-derived TFPIα by FXIa. TFPIα activity was not affected by SCP in recalcified FXI-depleted plasma. Conclusions Our data suggest that SCP is a cofactor for TFPIα inactivation by FXIa, thus, expanding the range of hemostatic FXIa substrates that may be affected by the cofactor functions of platelet-derived SCP. PMID:27764259

  11. Human neutrophil migration and activation by BJcuL, a galactose binding lectin purified from Bothrops jararacussu venom

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fernandes Luiz

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Neutrophil migration to an inflamed site constitutes the first line of the innate immune response against invading microorganisms. Given the crucial role of endogenous lectins in neutrophil mobilization and activation, lectins from exogenous sources have often been considered as putative modulators of leukocyte function. Lectins purified from snake venom have been described as galactoside ligands that induce erythrocyte agglutination and platelet aggregation. This study evaluated human neutrophil migration and activation by C-type lectin BJcuL purified from Bothrops jararacussu venom. Results Utilizing fluorescence microscopy, we observed that biotinylated-BJcuL was evenly distributed on the neutrophil surface, selectively inhibited by D-galactose. Lectin was able to induce modification in the neutrophil morphology in a spherical shape for a polarized observed by optical microscopy and exposure to BJcuL in a Boyden chamber assay resulted in cell migration. After 30 minutes of incubation with BJcuL we found enhanced neutrophil functions, such as respiratory burst, zymozan phagocytosis and an increase in lissosomal volume. In addition, BJcuL delays late apoptosis neutrophils. Conclusion These results demonstrate that BJcuL can be implicated in a wide variety of immunological functions including first-line defense against pathogens, cell trafficking and induction of the innate immune response since lectin was capable of inducing potent neutrophil activation.

  12. Differential neutrophil activation in viral infections: Enhanced TLR-7/8-mediated CXCL8 release in asthma

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tang, Francesca S.M.; Van Ly, David; Spann, Kirsten; Reading, Patrick C.; Burgess, Janette K.; Hartl, Dominik; Baines, Katherine J.; Oliver, Brian G.

    2016-01-01

    Background and objective Respiratory viral infections are a major cause of asthma exacerbations. Neutrophils accumulate in the airways and the mechanisms that link neutrophilic inflammation, viral infections and exacerbations are unclear. This study aims to investigate anti-viral responses in neutro

  13. Platelets: bridging hemostasis, inflammation, and immunity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jenne, C N; Urrutia, R; Kubes, P

    2013-06-01

    Although the function of platelets in the maintenance of hemostasis has been studied in great detail, more recent evidence has highlighted a central role for platelets in the host inflammatory and immune responses. Platelets by virtue of their large numbers and their ability to rapidly release a broad spectrum of immunomodulatory cytokines, chemokines, and other mediators act as circulating sentinels. Upon detection of a pathogen, platelets quickly activate and begin to drive the ensuing inflammatory response. Platelets have the ability to directly modulate the activity of neutrophils (phagocytosis, oxidative burst), endothelium (adhesion molecule and chemokine expression), and lymphocytes. Due to their diverse array of adhesion molecules and preformed chemokines, platelets are able to adhere to leukocytes and facilitate their recruitment to sites of tissue damage or infection. Furthermore, platelets directly participate in the capture and sequestration of pathogens within the vasculature. Platelet-neutrophil interactions are known to induce the release of neutrophil extracellular traps (NETs) in response to either bacterial or viral infection, and platelets have been shown to internalize pathogens, sequestering them in engulfment vacuoles. Finally, emerging data indicate that platelets also participate in the host immune response by directly killing infected cells. This review will highlight the central role platelets play in the initiation and modulation of the host inflammatory and immune responses.

  14. Role of platelet-rich-fibrin in enhancing palatal wound healing after free graft

    OpenAIRE

    2012-01-01

    Platelet-rich fibrin has long been used as a wound healing therapy in skin wounds and recently evidence has suggested its usage in oral cavity for different treatment procedures. This article proposes an overview of use of platelet-rich fibrin in management of complicated oral wounds. Excessive hemorrhage of the donor area, necrosis of epithelium, and morbidity associated with donor site have been described as the possible complications after harvesting subepithelial connective tissue graft, ...

  15. Cells and mediators of inflammation (C-reactive protein, nitric oxide, platelets and neutrophils) in the acute and convalescent phases of uncomplicated Plasmodium vivax and Plasmodium falciparum infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lima-Junior, Josué da Costa; Rodrigues-da-Silva, Rodrigo Nunes; Pereira, Virgínia Araújo; Storer, Fábio Luiz; Perce-da-Silva, Daiana de Souza; Fabrino, Daniela Leite; Santos, Fátima; Banic, Dalma Maria; Oliveira-Ferreira, Joseli de

    2012-12-01

    The haematological changes and release of soluble mediators, particularly C-reactive protein (CRP) and nitric oxide (NO), during uncomplicated malaria have not been well studied, especially in Brazilian areas in which the disease is endemic. Therefore, the present study examined these factors in acute (day 0) and convalescent phase (day 15) patients infected with Plasmodium falciparum and Plasmodium vivax malaria in the Brazilian Amazon. Haematologic parameters were measured using automated cell counting, CRP levels were measured with ELISA and NO plasma levels were measured by the Griess reaction. Our data indicate that individuals with uncomplicated P. vivax and P. falciparum infection presented similar inflammatory profiles with respect to white blood cells, with high band cell production and a considerable degree of thrombocytopaenia during the acute phase of infection. Higher CRP levels were detected in acute P. vivax infection than in acute P. falciparum infection, while higher NO was detected in patients with acute and convalescent P. falciparum infections. Although changes in these mediators cannot predict malaria infection, the haematological aspects associated with malaria infection, especially the roles of platelets and band cells, need to be investigated further.

  16. Hypercholesterolemia Increases the Production of Leukotriene B4 in Neutrophils by Enhancing the Nuclear Localization of 5-Lipoxygenase

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiao-Feng Lai

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Aims: Neutrophils can synthesize leukotriene B4 (LTB4 by activating the 5-lipoxygenase (5-LOsignaling pathway. LTB4 is a pro-inflammatory mediator associated with the etiology and progression of atherosclerosis. It can increase function and number of neutrophils in an autocrine manner. Since hypercholesterolemia is associated with an increase in the number and function of neutrophils, we hypothesized that this effect could be mediated through increased production of LTB4 in neutrophils. Methods/Results: Hypercholesterolemia was modeled in Wistar rats by feeding them with a high cholesterol diet. The induction of hypercholesterolemia caused an increase in the plasma levels of LTB4, following lipopolysaccharide stimulation. This effect was recapitulated in vitro, both in the presence and absence of stimulation with the activator of 5-LO, A23187. Neutrophils in hypercholesterolemia rats expressed similar total levels of 5-LO as control rats, but displayed increased nuclear localization of 5-LO, as well as elevated levels of phosphorylated 5-LO and ERK1/2. In vitro, MβCD/cholesterol complexes enriched cholesterol in neutrophils, resulted in similar changes in 5-LO/LTB4. In addition, these alterations could be inhibited with the ERK inhibitor PD98059. Conclusion: Hypercholesterolemia increases LTB4 production in neutrophils by increasing the nuclear localization of 5-LO, which is the result of its phosphorylation by activated ERK1/2.

  17. Plasma kallikrein enhances platelet aggregation response by subthreshold doses of ADP.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ottaiano, Tatiana F; Andrade, Sheila S; de Oliveira, Cleide; Silva, Mariana C C; Buri, Marcus V; Juliano, Maria A; Girão, Manoel J B C; Sampaio, Misako U; Schmaier, Alvin H; Wlodawer, Alexander; Maffei, Francisco H A; Oliva, Maria Luiza V

    2017-04-01

    Human plasma kallikrein (huPK) potentiates platelet responses to subthreshold doses of ADP, although huPK itself, does not induce platelet aggregation. In the present investigation, we observe that huPK pretreatment of platelets potentiates ADP-induced platelet activation by prior proteolysis of the G-protein-coupled receptor PAR-1. The potentiation of ADP-induced platelet activation by huPK is mediated by the integrin αIIbβ3 through interactions with the KGD/KGE sequence motif in huPK. Integrin αIIbβ3 is a cofactor for huPK binding to platelets to support PAR-1 hydrolysis that contributes to activation of the ADP signaling pathway. This activation pathway leads to phosphorylation of Src, AktS(473), ERK1/2, and p38 MAPK, and to Ca(2+) release. The effect of huPK is blocked by specific antagonists of PAR-1 (SCH 19197) and αIIbβ3 (abciximab) and by synthetic peptides comprising the KGD and KGE sequence motifs of huPK. Further, recombinant plasma kallikrein inhibitor, rBbKI, also blocks this entire mechanism. These results suggest a new function for huPK. Formation of plasma kallikrein lowers the threshold for ADP-induced platelet activation. The present observations are consistent with the notion that plasma kallikrein promotes vascular disease and thrombosis in the intravascular compartment and its inhibition may ameliorate cardiovascular disease and thrombosis. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. and Société Française de Biochimie et Biologie Moléculaire (SFBBM). All rights reserved.

  18. Platelet-TLR7 mediates host survival and platelet count during viral infection in the absence of platelet-dependent thrombosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koupenova, Milka; Vitseva, Olga; MacKay, Christopher R; Beaulieu, Lea M; Benjamin, Emelia J; Mick, Eric; Kurt-Jones, Evelyn A; Ravid, Katya; Freedman, Jane E

    2014-07-31

    Viral infections have been associated with reduced platelet counts, the biological significance of which has remained elusive. Here, we show that infection with encephalomyocarditis virus (EMCV) rapidly reduces platelet count, and this response is attributed to platelet Toll-like receptor 7 (TLR7). Platelet-TLR7 stimulation mediates formation of large platelet-neutrophil aggregates, both in mouse and human blood. Intriguingly, this process results in internalization of platelet CD41-fragments by neutrophils, as assessed biochemically and visualized by microscopy, with no influence on platelet prothrombotic properties. The mechanism includes TLR7-mediated platelet granule release, translocation of P-selectin to the cell surface, and a consequent increase in platelet-neutrophil adhesion. Viral infection of platelet-depleted mice also led to increased mortality. Transfusion of wild-type, TLR7-expressing platelets into TLR7-deficient mice caused a drop in platelet count and increased survival post EMCV infection. Thus, this study identifies a new link between platelets and their response to single-stranded RNA viruses that involves activation of TLR7. Finally, platelet-TLR7 stimulation is independent of thrombosis and has implications to the host immune response and survival.

  19. Neutrophil biology

    OpenAIRE

    Kobayashi, Yoshiro

    2015-01-01

    Neutrophil extracellular traps (NETs) are involved in bacterial killing as well as autoimmunity, because NETs contain proteases, bactericidal peptides, DNA and ribonucleoprotein. NETs are formed via a novel type of cell death called NETosis. NETosis is distinct from apoptosis, but it resembles necrosis in that both membranes are not intact so that they allow intracellular proteins to leak outside of the cells. Removal of NETs and neutrophils undergoing NETosis by phagocytes and its subsequent...

  20. Enhancing the performance of dye-sensitized solar cells by incorporating nanosilicate platelets in gel electrolyte

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lai, Yi-Hsuan; Chen, Jian-Ging; Wang, Chun-Chieh [Department of Chemical Engineering, National Taiwan University, Taipei 10617 (China); Chiu, Chih-Wei [Department of Chemical Engineering, National Chung Hsing University, Taichung 40227 (China); Lin, Jiang-Jen [Institute of Polymer Science and Engineering, National Taiwan University, Taipei 10617 (China); Lin, King-Fu [Institute of Polymer Science and Engineering, National Taiwan University, Taipei 10617 (China); Department of Materials Science and Engineering, National Taiwan University, Taipei 10617 (China); Ho, Kuo-Chuan [Department of Chemical Engineering, National Taiwan University, Taipei 10617 (China); Institute of Polymer Science and Engineering, National Taiwan University, Taipei 10617 (China)

    2009-10-15

    Two kinds of gel-type dye-sensitized solar cells (DSSCs), composed of two types of electrolytes, were constructed and the respective cell performance was evaluated in this study. One electrolyte, TEOS-Triton X-100 gel, was based on a hybrid organic/inorganic gel electrolyte made by the sol-gel method and the other was based on poly(vinyidene fluoride-co-hexafluoro propylene) (PVDF-HFP) copolymer. TEOS-Triton X-100 gel was based on the reticulate structure of silica, formed by hydrolysis, and condensation of tetraethoxysilane (TEOS), while its organic subphase was a mixture of surfactant (Triton X-100) and ionic liquid electrolytes. Both DSSC gel-type electrolytes were composed of iodine, 1-propy-3-methyl-imidazolium iodide, and 3-methoxypropionitrile to create the redox couple of I{sub 3}{sup -}/I{sup -}. Based on the results obtained from the I-V characteristics, it was found that the optimal iodine concentrations for the TEOS-Triton X-100 gel electrolyte and PVDF-HFP gel electrolyte are 0.05 M and 0.1 M, respectively. Although the increase in the iodine concentration could enhance the short-circuit current density (J{sub SC}), a further increase in the iodine concentration would reduce the J{sub SC} due to increased dark current. Therefore, the concentration of I{sub 2} is a significant factor in determining the performance of DSSCs. In order to enhance cell performance, the addition of nanosilicate platelets (NSPs) in the above-mentioned gel electrolytes was investigated. By incorporating NSP-Triton X-100 into the electrolytes, the J{sub SC} of the cells increased due to the decrease of diffusion resistance, while the open circuit voltage (V{sub OC}) remained almost the same. As the loading of the NSP-Triton X-100 in the TEOS-Triton X-100 gel electrolyte increased to 0.5 wt%, the J{sub SC} and the conversion efficiency increased from 8.5 to 12 mA/cm{sup 2} and from 3.6% to 4.7%, respectively. However, the J{sub SC} decreased as the loading of NSP-Triton X-100

  1. Enhancing the performance of dye-sensitized solar cells by incorporating nanosilicate platelets in gel electrolyte

    KAUST Repository

    Lai, Yi-Hsuan

    2009-10-01

    Two kinds of gel-type dye-sensitized solar cells (DSSCs), composed of two types of electrolytes, were constructed and the respective cell performance was evaluated in this study. One electrolyte, TEOS-Triton X-100 gel, was based on a hybrid organic/inorganic gel electrolyte made by the sol-gel method and the other was based on poly(vinyidene fluoride-co-hexafluoro propylene) (PVDF-HFP) copolymer. TEOS-Triton X-100 gel was based on the reticulate structure of silica, formed by hydrolysis, and condensation of tetraethoxysilane (TEOS), while its organic subphase was a mixture of surfactant (Triton X-100) and ionic liquid electrolytes. Both DSSC gel-type electrolytes were composed of iodine, 1-propy-3-methyl-imidazolium iodide, and 3-methoxypropionitrile to create the redox couple of I3 -/I-. Based on the results obtained from the I-V characteristics, it was found that the optimal iodine concentrations for the TEOS-Triton X-100 gel electrolyte and PVDF-HFP gel electrolyte are 0.05 M and 0.1 M, respectively. Although the increase in the iodine concentration could enhance the short-circuit current density (JSC), a further increase in the iodine concentration would reduce the JSC due to increased dark current. Therefore, the concentration of I2 is a significant factor in determining the performance of DSSCs. In order to enhance cell performance, the addition of nanosilicate platelets (NSPs) in the above-mentioned gel electrolytes was investigated. By incorporating NSP-Triton X-100 into the electrolytes, the JSC of the cells increased due to the decrease of diffusion resistance, while the open circuit voltage (VOC) remained almost the same. As the loading of the NSP-Triton X-100 in the TEOS-Triton X-100 gel electrolyte increased to 0.5 wt%, the JSC and the conversion efficiency increased from 8.5 to 12 mA/cm2 and from 3.6% to 4.7%, respectively. However, the JSC decreased as the loading of NSP-Triton X-100 exceeded 0.5 wt%. At higher NSP-Triton X-100 loading, NSPs acted as

  2. Role of platelet-rich-fibrin in enhancing palatal wound healing after free graft

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vinita Jain

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Platelet-rich fibrin has long been used as a wound healing therapy in skin wounds and recently evidence has suggested its usage in oral cavity for different treatment procedures. This article proposes an overview of use of platelet-rich fibrin in management of complicated oral wounds. Excessive hemorrhage of the donor area, necrosis of epithelium, and morbidity associated with donor site have been described as the possible complications after harvesting subepithelial connective tissue graft, but little has been mentioned about their management. The article includes a case report of a 45-year-old male patient who showed a delayed wound healing after subepithelial connective tissue graft harvestation, which was treated with platelet-rich fibrin.

  3. Evaluation of blood neutrophil to lymphocyte and platelet to lymphocyte ratios according to plasma glucose status and serum insulin-like growth factor 1 levels in patients with acromegaly.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Üçler, R; Aslan, M; Atmaca, M; Alay, M; Ademoğlu, E N; Gülşen, I

    2016-06-01

    Cardiovascular, respiratory, and cerebrovascular diseases and malignancies are responsible for morbidity and mortality in acromegaly. Also these diseases are associated with chronic inflammation. The neutrophil to lymphocyte ratio (NLR) and platelet to lymphocyte ratio (PLR) are currently gaining interest as new markers of inflammation. Moreover, increased morbidity and mortality are positively correlated with the presence of diabetes and levels of insulin-like growth factor 1 (IGF-1) in acromegaly. The objective of the present study was to investigate the relationship between these markers and acromegaly according to plasma glucose status and serum IGF-1 levels. We retrospectively analyzed data from 61 acromegaly patients who were in a newly diagnosed period (35 male, 26 female; mean age 38.13 ± 13.98). Patients with normal plasma glucose (n = 27), impaired fasting glucose (n = 18), and diabetes mellitus (n = 16) were categorized into three different groups. NLR and PLR were compared between the study groups and were evaluated according to IGF-1 levels. There were no statistically significant differences in NLR and PLR measurements among the study groups (p > 0.05). However, there were significant positive correlations between NLR and IGF-1 levels and between PLR and IGF-1 levels when all patients were evaluated (r = 0.334, p = 0.011 and r = 0.277, p = 0.035, respectively). This is the first report studying the relationship of NLR and PLR with glucose status and IGF-1 levels in acromegaly patients. Our study results suggest that subclinical inflammation may play a role in increased incidence of mortality and morbidity, which depends on uncontrolled IGF-1 levels in patients with acromegaly. © The Author(s) 2015.

  4. Glycoprotein Ib-IX-V Complex Transmits Cytoskeletal Forces That Enhance Platelet Adhesion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feghhi, Shirin; Munday, Adam D; Tooley, Wes W; Rajsekar, Shreya; Fura, Adriane M; Kulman, John D; López, Jose A; Sniadecki, Nathan J

    2016-08-09

    Platelets bind to exposed vascular matrix at a wound site through a highly specialized surface receptor, glycoprotein (GP) Ib-IX-V complex, which recognizes von Willebrand factor (VWF) in the matrix. GPIb-IX-V is a catch bond for it becomes more stable as force is applied to it. After attaching to the wound site, platelets generate cytoskeletal forces to compact and reinforce the hemostatic plug. Here, we evaluated the role of the GPIb-IX-V complex in the transmission of cytoskeletal forces. We used arrays of flexible, silicone nanoposts to measure the contractility of individual platelets on VWF. We found that a significant proportion of cytoskeletal forces were transmitted to VWF through GPIb-IX-V, an unexpected finding given the widely held notion that platelet forces are transmitted exclusively through its integrins. In particular, we found that the interaction between GPIbα and the A1 domain of VWF mediates this force transmission. We also demonstrate that the binding interaction between GPIbα and filamin A is involved in force transmission. Furthermore, our studies suggest that cytoskeletal forces acting through GPIbα are involved in maintaining platelet adhesion when external forces are absent. Thus, the GPIb-IX-V/VWF bond is able to transmit force, and uses this force to strengthen the bond through a catch-bond mechanism. This finding expands our understanding of how platelets attach to sites of vascular injury, describing a new, to the best of our knowledge, mechanism in which the catch bonds of GPIb-IX-V/VWF can be supported by internal forces produced by cytoskeletal tension.

  5. Vitamin E deficiency and enhanced platelet function: reversal following E supplementation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lake, A M; Stuart, M J; Oski, F A

    1977-05-01

    Marked platelet hyperaggregability to adenosine diphosphate, epinephrine, and collagen was demonstrated in two children with vitamin E deficiency, with complete reversal following E supplementation. No clinical thrombotic tendency was observed during the E-deficient state. The action of vitamin E in the schema of platelet arachidonate peroxidation appears to be at the step of phosphilpase A activation, or the conversion of arachidonic acid into the cyclic endoperoxides, since the peroxidation product malonaldehyde was increased during the E-deficient state with normalization following E sufficiency.

  6. Co-stimulation with LPS or Poly I:C markedly enhances the anti-platelet immune response and severity of fetal and neonatal alloimmune thrombocytopenia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Conglei; Chen, Pingguo; Vadasz, Brian; Ma, Li; Zhou, Hui; Lang, Sean; Freedman, John; Ni, Heyu

    2013-12-01

    Fetal and neonatal alloimmune thrombocytopenia (FNAIT) is a life-threatening bleeding disorder caused by maternal antibodies against fetal/neonatal platelets. FNAIT is also linked with miscarriages, although the incidence and mechanisms of fetal death have not been well studied. IntegrinαIIbβ3 (GPIIbIIIa) and the GPIbα complex are major glycoproteins expressed on platelets and are also major antigens targeted in autoimmune thrombocytopenia (ITP), but reported cases of anti-GPIb-mediated FNAIT are rare. Bacterial and viral infections have been causally linked with the pathogenesis of immune-mediated thrombocytopenia (ITP); however, it is unknown whether these infections contribute to the severity of FNAIT. Here, immune responses against platelet antigens were examined by transfusing wild-type (WT) mouse platelets into β3-/- or GPIbα-/- mice. To mimic bacterial or viral infections, lipopolysaccharide (LPS) or polyinosinic:polycytidylic acid (Poly I:C) were injected intraperitoneally following platelet transfusions. The FNAIT model was established by breeding the immunised female mice with WT male mice. We demonstrated for the first time that the platelet GPIbα has lower immunogenicity compared to β3 integrin. Interestingly, co-stimulation with LPS or Poly I:C markedly enhanced the immune response against platelet GPIbα and caused severe pathology of FNAIT (i.e. miscarriages). LPS or Poly I:C also enhanced the immune response against platelet β3 integrin. Our data suggest that bacterial and viral infections facilitate the anti-platelet GPIbα response, which may lead to a severe non-classical FNAIT (i.e. miscarriage but not neonatal bleeding) that has not been adequately reported in humans.

  7. Protectin D1 promotes resolution of inflammation in a murine model of lipopolysaccharide-induced acute lung injury via enhancing neutrophil apoptosis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Li Xingwang; Li Chunlai; Liang Wandong; Bi Yuntian; Chen Maohua; Dong Sheng

    2014-01-01

    Background Protectin D1 (PD1),derived from docosahexaenoic acid,has been shown to control and resolve inflammation in some experimental models of inflammatory disorders.We investigated the protective roles of protectin D1 in pulmonary inflammation and lung injury induced by lipopolysaccharide (LPS).Methods Mice were randomly assigned to six groups (n=6 per group):sham-vehicle group,sham-PD1 group,shamzVAD-fmk group,LPS-vehicle group,LPS-PD1 group,and LPS-PD1-zVAD-fmk group.Mice were injected intratracheally with 3 mg/kg LPS or saline,followed 24 hours later by intravenous injection of 200 μg/mouse PD1 or vehicle.At the same time,some mice were also injected intraperitoneally with the pan-caspase inhibitor zVAD-fmk.Seventy-two hours after LPS challenge,samples of pulmonary tissue and bronchoalveolar lavage fluid were collected.Optical microscopy was used to examine pathological changes in lungs.Cellularity and protein concentration in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid were analyzed.Lung wet/dry ratios and myeloperoxidase activity were measured.Apoptosis of neutrophils in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF) was also evaluated by flow cytometry.Results Intratracheal instillation of LPS increased neutrophil counts,protein concentration in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid and myeloperoxidase activity,it induced lung histological injury and edema,and also suppressed apoptosis of neutrophils in BALF.Posttreatment with PD1 inhibited LPS-evoked changes in BALF neutrophil counts and protein concentration and lung myeloperoxidase activity,with the outcome of decreased pulmonary edema and histological injury.In addition,PD1 promoted apoptosis of neutrophils in BALF.The beneficial effects of PD1 were blocked by zVAD-fmk.Conclusion Posttreatment with PD1 enhances resolution of lung inflammation during LPS-induced acute lung injury by enhancing apoptosis in emigrated neutrophils,which is,at least in part,caspase-dependent.

  8. No increase in kidney injury molecule-1 and neutrophil gelatinase-associated lipocalin excretion following intravenous contrast enhanced-CT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kooiman, Judith [Leiden University Medical Center, Department of Thrombosis and Haemostasis, Leiden (Netherlands); Leiden University Medical Center, Department of Nephrology, Leiden (Netherlands); Peppel, Wilke R. van de; Huisman, Menno V. [Leiden University Medical Center, Department of Thrombosis and Haemostasis, Leiden (Netherlands); Sijpkens, Yvo W.J. [Bronovo Hospital, Department of Nephrology, The Hague (Netherlands); Brulez, Harald F.H. [Sint Lucas Andreas Hospital, Department of Nephrology, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Vries, P.M. de [St. Antonius Hospital, Department of Vascular Surgery, Nieuwegein (Netherlands); Nicolaie, Mioara A.; Putter, H. [Leiden University Medical Center, Department of Medical Statistics and Bioinformatics, Leiden (Netherlands); Kooij, W. van der; Kooten, Cees van; Rabelink, Ton J. [Leiden University Medical Center, Department of Nephrology, Leiden (Netherlands)

    2015-07-15

    To analyze kidney injury molecule-1 (KIM-1) and neutrophil gelatinase-associated lipocalin (N-GAL) excretion post-intravenous contrast enhanced-CT (CE-CT) in patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD). Patients were enrolled in a trial on hydration regimes to prevent contrast-induced acute kidney injury (CI-AKI). Blood and urine samples were taken at baseline, 4 - 6, and 48 - 96 h post CE-CT. Urinary KIM-1 and N-GAL values were normalized for urinary creatinine levels, presented as medians with 2.5 - 97.5 percentiles. Of the enrolled 511 patients, 10 (2 %) were lost to follow-up. CI-AKI occurred in 3.9 % of patients (20/501). Median KIM-1 values were 1.2 (0.1 - 7.7) at baseline, 1.3 (0.1 - 8.6) at 4 - 6 h, and 1.3 ng/mg (0.1 - 8.1) at 48 - 96 h post CE-CT (P = 0.39). Median N-GAL values were 41.0 (4.4 - 3,174.4), 48.9 (5.7 - 3,406.1), and 37.8 μg/mg (3.5 - 3,200.4), respectively (P = 0.07). The amount of KIM-1 and N-GAL excretion in follow-up was similar for patients with and without CI-AKI (P-value KIM-1 0.08, P-value N-GAL 0.73). Neither patient characteristics at baseline including severe CKD, medication use, nor contrast dose were associated with increased excretion of KIM-1 or N-GAL during follow-up. KIM-1 and N-GAL excretion were unaffected by CE-CT both in patients with and without CI-AKI, suggesting that CI-AKI was not accompanied by tubular injury. (orig.)

  9. Neutrophil killing of human umbilical vein endothelial cells is oxygen radical-mediated and enhanced by TNF-. alpha

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dame, M.K.; Varani, J.; Weinberg, J.M.; Ward, P.A. (Univ. of Michigan, Ann Arbor (United States))

    1991-03-11

    Human umbilical vein endothelial cells are sensitive to killing by activated human neutrophils. Killing is inhibited in the presence of catalase and deferoxamine mesylate but not soybean trypsin inhibitor. Reagent hydrogen peroxide can substitute for activated neutrophils in producing endothelial cell injury. These data suggest that lethal injury is due to the production of oxygen radicals by activated neutrophils. In these respects, the human umbilical vein endothelial cells are similar to rat pulmonary artery endothelial cells in that pretreatment with TNF-{alpha} increases sensitivity to injury by activated neutrophils. In part, the increased endothelial cell sensitivity to killing by neutrophils may be due to up-regulation of surface adhesion molecules. However, it was observed that cells passaged more than two times in culture did not demonstrate increased killing after treatment with TNF-{alpha} while up-regulation of neutrophil adhesion could be detected through several additional passages. Although the human umbilical vein endothelial cells are qualitatively similar to rat pulmonary artery endothelial cells in their sensitivity to killing, they are quantitatively much more resistant. What accounts for the relative resistance of the human umbilical vein endothelial cells is not fully understood. In the rat pulmonary artery endothelial cells, killing is known to be dependent on an intraendothelial source of iron. Pre-treatment of the human umbilical vein endothelial cells with 8-hydroxyquinoline-bound iron increased their sensitivity to oxidant injury. These data suggest that the availability of iron within the human umbilical vein endothelial cells may be a limiting factor in sensitivity to oxygen radical-mediated injury.

  10. A new fabrication route for PVA/graphene platelets composites with enhanced functionalities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lavecchia, Teresa; Tamburri, Emanuela; Angjellari, Mariglen; Savi, Damiano; Terranova, Maria Letizia

    2016-05-01

    This work deals with the synthesis and characterization of composites made of poly(vinyl alcohol) (PVA) and oxidized graphene platelets obtained from an ad hoc treatment of graphite. The composite is produced by a modified solution mixing procedure in which the in situ crosslinking of PVA with maleic anhydride has been carried out in the presence of the carbon filler. A complete characterization of the material is presented carried out by SEM, DTGA, Raman spectroscopy and I-V characteristics analysis.

  11. A Preliminary Evaluation of Lyophilized Gelatin Sponges, Enhanced with Platelet-Rich Plasma, Hydroxyapatite and Chitin Whiskers for Bone Regeneration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrew J. Spence

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study was to perform a number of preliminary in vitro evaluations on an array of modified gelatin gel sponge scaffolds for use in a bone graft application. The gelatin gels were modified through the addition of a number of components which each possess unique properties conducive to the creation and regeneration of bone: a preparation rich in growth factors (PRGF, a bioactive, lyophilized form of platelet-rich plasma, hydroxyapatite, and chitin whiskers. Platelet-rich plasma therapy is an emerging practice that has proven effective in a number of clinical applications, including enhancing bone repair through improved deposition of new bony matrix and angiogenesis. As such, the inclusion of PRGF in our gelatin scaffolds was intended to significantly enhance scaffold bioactivity, while the addition of hydroxyapatite and chitin whiskers were anticipated to increase scaffold strength. Additionally, the gelatin sponges, which readily dissolve in aqueous solutions, were subjected to 1-Ethyl-3-[3-dimethylaminopropyl]carbodiimide hydrochloride (EDC cross-linking, either during or post-gelation, to control their rate of degradation. Scaffolds were evaluated in vitro with respect to compressive strength, mass loss/degradation, protein release, and cellular interaction, with results demonstrating the potential of the gelatin gel sponge scaffold for use in the regeneration of bone.

  12. Neutrophil-derived S100 calcium-binding proteins A8/A9 promote reticulated thrombocytosis and atherogenesis in diabetes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kraakman, Michael J.; Lee, Man K.S.; Al-Sharea, Annas; Dragoljevic, Dragana; Barrett, Tessa J.; Montenont, Emilie; Basu, Debapriya; Heywood, Sarah; Kammoun, Helene L.; Flynn, Michelle; Whillas, Alexandra; Hanssen, Nordin M.J.; Febbraio, Mark A.; Westein, Erik; Chin-Dusting, Jaye; Cooper, Mark E.; Berger, Jeffrey S.; Goldberg, Ira J.; Nagareddy, Prabhakara R.; Murphy, Andrew J.

    2017-01-01

    Platelets play a critical role in atherogenesis and thrombosis-mediated myocardial ischemia, processes that are accelerated in diabetes. Whether hyperglycemia promotes platelet production and whether enhanced platelet production contributes to enhanced atherothrombosis remains unknown. Here we found that in response to hyperglycemia, neutrophil-derived S100 calcium-binding proteins A8/A9 (S100A8/A9) interact with the receptor for advanced glycation end products (RAGE) on hepatic Kupffer cells, resulting in increased production of IL-6, a pleiotropic cytokine that is implicated in inflammatory thrombocytosis. IL-6 acts on hepatocytes to enhance the production of thrombopoietin, which in turn interacts with its cognate receptor c-MPL on megakaryocytes and bone marrow progenitor cells to promote their expansion and proliferation, resulting in reticulated thrombocytosis. Lowering blood glucose using a sodium-glucose cotransporter 2 inhibitor (dapagliflozin), depleting neutrophils or Kupffer cells, or inhibiting S100A8/A9 binding to RAGE (using paquinimod), all reduced diabetes-induced thrombocytosis. Inhibiting S100A8/A9 also decreased atherogenesis in diabetic mice. Finally, we found that patients with type 2 diabetes have reticulated thrombocytosis that correlates with glycated hemoglobin as well as increased plasma S100A8/A9 levels. These studies provide insights into the mechanisms that regulate platelet production and may aid in the development of strategies to improve on current antiplatelet therapies and to reduce cardiovascular disease risk in diabetes. PMID:28504650

  13. Advanced platelet-rich fibrin: a new concept for cell-based tissue engineering by means of inflammatory cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghanaati, Shahram; Booms, Patrick; Orlowska, Anna; Kubesch, Alica; Lorenz, Jonas; Rutkowski, Jim; Landes, Constantin; Sader, Robert; Kirkpatrick, Cj; Choukroun, Joseph

    2014-12-01

    Choukroun's platelet-rich fibrin (PRF) is obtained from blood without adding anticoagulants. In this study, protocols for standard platelet-rich fibrin (S-PRF) (2700 rpm, 12 minutes) and advanced platelet-rich fibrin (A-PRF) (1500 rpm, 14 minutes) were compared to establish by histological cell detection and histomorphometrical measurement of cell distribution the effects of the centrifugal force (speed and time) on the distribution of cells relevant for wound healing and tissue regeneration. Immunohistochemistry for monocytes, T and B -lymphocytes, neutrophilic granulocytes, CD34-positive stem cells, and platelets was performed on clots produced from four different human donors. Platelets were detected throughout the clot in both groups, although in the A-PRF group, more platelets were found in the distal part, away from the buffy coat (BC). T- and B-lymphocytes, stem cells, and monocytes were detected in the surroundings of the BC in both groups. Decreasing the rpm while increasing the centrifugation time in the A-PRF group gave an enhanced presence of neutrophilic granulocytes in the distal part of the clot. In the S-PRF group, neutrophils were found mostly at the red blood cell (RBC)-BC interface. Neutrophilic granulocytes contribute to monocyte differentiation into macrophages. Accordingly, a higher presence of these cells might be able to influence the differentiation of host macrophages and macrophages within the clot after implantation. Thus, A-PRF might influence bone and soft tissue regeneration, especially through the presence of monocytes/macrophages and their growth factors. The relevance and feasibility of this tissue-engineering concept have to be proven through in vivo studies.

  14. Azurophil granule proteins constitute the major mycobactericidal proteins in human neutrophils and enhance the killing of mycobacteria in macrophages.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Prajna Jena

    Full Text Available Pathogenic mycobacteria reside in, and are in turn controlled by, macrophages. However, emerging data suggest that neutrophils also play a critical role in innate immunity to tuberculosis, presumably by their different antibacterial granule proteins. In this study, we purified neutrophil azurophil and specific granules and systematically analyzed the antimycobacterial activity of some purified azurophil and specific granule proteins against M. smegmatis, M. bovis-BCG and M. tuberculosis H37Rv. Using gel overlay and colony forming unit assays we showed that the defensin-depleted azurophil granule proteins (AZP were more active against mycobacteria compared to other granule proteins and cytosolic proteins. The proteins showing antimycobacterial activity were identified by MALDI-TOF mass spectrometry. Electron microscopic studies demonstrate that the AZP disintegrate bacterial cell membrane resulting in killing of mycobacteria. Exogenous addition of AZP to murine macrophage RAW 264.7, THP-1 and peripheral blood monocyte-derived macrophages significantly reduced the intracellular survival of mycobacteria without exhibiting cytotoxic activity on macrophages. Immunofluorescence studies showed that macrophages actively endocytose neutrophil granular proteins. Treatment with AZP resulted in increase in co-localization of BCG containing phagosomes with lysosomes but not in increase of autophagy. These data demonstrate that neutrophil azurophil proteins may play an important role in controlling intracellular survival of mycobacteria in macrophages.

  15. Azurophil granule proteins constitute the major mycobactericidal proteins in human neutrophils and enhance the killing of mycobacteria in macrophages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jena, Prajna; Mohanty, Soumitra; Mohanty, Tirthankar; Kallert, Stephanie; Morgelin, Matthias; Lindstrøm, Thomas; Borregaard, Niels; Stenger, Steffen; Sonawane, Avinash; Sørensen, Ole E

    2012-01-01

    Pathogenic mycobacteria reside in, and are in turn controlled by, macrophages. However, emerging data suggest that neutrophils also play a critical role in innate immunity to tuberculosis, presumably by their different antibacterial granule proteins. In this study, we purified neutrophil azurophil and specific granules and systematically analyzed the antimycobacterial activity of some purified azurophil and specific granule proteins against M. smegmatis, M. bovis-BCG and M. tuberculosis H37Rv. Using gel overlay and colony forming unit assays we showed that the defensin-depleted azurophil granule proteins (AZP) were more active against mycobacteria compared to other granule proteins and cytosolic proteins. The proteins showing antimycobacterial activity were identified by MALDI-TOF mass spectrometry. Electron microscopic studies demonstrate that the AZP disintegrate bacterial cell membrane resulting in killing of mycobacteria. Exogenous addition of AZP to murine macrophage RAW 264.7, THP-1 and peripheral blood monocyte-derived macrophages significantly reduced the intracellular survival of mycobacteria without exhibiting cytotoxic activity on macrophages. Immunofluorescence studies showed that macrophages actively endocytose neutrophil granular proteins. Treatment with AZP resulted in increase in co-localization of BCG containing phagosomes with lysosomes but not in increase of autophagy. These data demonstrate that neutrophil azurophil proteins may play an important role in controlling intracellular survival of mycobacteria in macrophages.

  16. The antidepressant 5-HT2A receptor antagonists pizotifen and cyproheptadine inhibit serotonin-enhanced platelet function.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Olivia A Lin

    Full Text Available There is considerable interest in defining new agents or targets for antithrombotic purposes. The 5-HT2A receptor is a G-protein coupled receptor (GPCR expressed on many cell types, and a known therapeutic target for many disease states. This serotonin receptor is also known to regulate platelet function. Thus, in our FDA-approved drug repurposing efforts, we investigated the antiplatelet activity of cyproheptadine and pizotifen, two antidepressant 5-HT2A Receptor antagonists. Our results revealed that cyproheptadine and pizotifen reversed serotonin-enhanced ADP-induced platelet aggregation in vitro and ex vivo. And the inhibitory effects of these two agents were found to be similar to that of EMD 281014, a 5-HT2A Receptor antagonist under development. In separate experiments, our studies revealed that these 5-HT2A receptor antagonists have the capacity to reduce serotonin-enhanced ADP-induced elevation in intracellular calcium levels and tyrosine phosphorylation. Using flow cytometry, we also observed that cyproheptadine, pizotifen, and EMD 281014 inhibited serotonin-enhanced ADP-induced phosphatidylserine (PS exposure, P-selectin expression, and glycoprotein IIb-IIIa activation. Furthermore, using a carotid artery thrombosis model, these agents prolonged the time for thrombotic occlusion in mice in vivo. Finally, the tail-bleeding time was investigated to assess the effect of cyproheptadine and pizotifen on hemostasis. Our findings indicated prolonged bleeding time in both cyproheptadine- and pizotifen-treated mice. Notably, the increases in occlusion and bleeding times associated with these two agents were comparable to that of EMD 281014, and to clopidogrel, a commonly used antiplatelet drug, again, in a fashion comparable to clopidogrel and EMD 281014. Collectively, our data indicate that the antidepressant 5-HT2A antagonists, cyproheptadine and pizotifen do exert antiplatelet and thromboprotective effects, but similar to clopidogrel and

  17. Paroxysmal nocturnal hemoglobinuria. Enhanced stimulation of platelets by the terminal complement components is related to the lack of C8bp in the membrane.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blaas, P; Berger, B; Weber, S; Peter, H H; Hänsch, G M

    1988-05-01

    Recently, a protein isolated from the membrane of human E, the so-called C8 binding protein (C8bp), has been described. C8bp is characterized as a 65-kDa protein that binds to C8 and inhibits the C5b-9-mediated lysis in a homologous system. In the present study, membranes of peripheral blood cells were tested for the presence of C8bp by SDS-PAGE and immunoblotting. In all cells a protein band reacting with anti-C8bp was seen, the Mr, however, was only about 50 kDa. To further analyze the 50-kDa protein, we isolated the protein by phenol-water extraction and isoelectric focusing from papain-treated platelets. The isolated protein behaved similar to the E-derived C8bp: it inhibited the lysis of model target cells by C5b-9. To examine the function of C8bp in platelets, we tested platelets from patients suffering from paroxysmal nocturnal hemoglobinuria (PNH). These platelets were deficient in C8bp, being in accordance with their higher lytic susceptibility in vitro. In response to sublytic C5b-9 doses, the PNH platelets released considerably more serotonin and thromboxane B2 than normal platelets. By addition of purified C8bp, the thromboxane B2 release was suppressed, indicating that C8bp not only restricts the lytic complement attack, but also regulates the C5b-9-mediated stimulation of target cells. Thus, lack of C8bp might not only result in enhanced hemolysis, but also in enhanced stimulation of platelets, which in turn might contribute to the thrombotic complications seen in some PNH-type III patients.

  18. Thrombopoietin, c-Mpl ligand, induces tyrosine phosphorylation of Tyk2, JAK2, and STAT3, and enhances agonists-induced aggregation in platelets in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ezumi, Y; Takayama, H; Okuma, M

    1995-10-23

    We investigated in vitro effects of recombinant human thrombopoietin (TPO), or c-Mpl ligand, on human platelets. TPO induced rapid dose-dependent tyrosine phosphorylation of several proteins. We identified Janus tyrosine kinases, Tyk2 and JAK2, and a member of STAT (signal transducers and activators of transcription) family, STAT3, as the tyrosine-phosphorylated proteins in response to TPO. TPO by itself did not cause platelet aggregation and shape change, but augmented ADP-induced aggregation in a dose-dependent manner. Acetylsalicylic acid inhibited the secondary aggregation enhanced by TPO, but not the TPO-induced potentiation of the primary aggregation. TPO modulates platelet activation possibly through protein-tyrosine phosphorylation.

  19. Deletion of the SSK1 response regulator gene in Candida albicans contributes to enhanced killing by human polymorphonuclear neutrophils.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Du, Chen; Calderone, Richard; Richert, John; Li, Dongmei

    2005-02-01

    The isolation and partial functional characterization of the two-component response regulator SSK1 gene of Candida albicans was previously reported. Compared to wild-type (CAF2-1) and gene-reconstituted (SSK23) strains, the ssk1 null strain (SSK21) was avirulent in a murine model of hematogenously disseminated candidiasis and less able to adhere to human esophageal cells. More recent data indicate that SSK21 is sensitive to 4 to 8 mM H(2)O(2) in vitro than CAF2-1 and SSK23. Furthermore, microarray studies indicate that the regulation of two classes of genes, those encoding cell wall functions and stress adaptation, are altered in the ssk1 mutant. In the present study, the susceptibility of strains CAF2-1, SSK21, and SSK23 to killing by human polymorphonuclear neutrophils (PMNs) was assessed. Results are also described for a newly constructed ssk1 mutant (SSK24) in which the URA3 gene is integrated into its native locus. Our results indicate that killing of SSK21 and SSK24 was significantly greater than that of CAF2-1 and SSK23 (P killing activity of human PMNs, we compared the signal transduction activity and the inflammatory response gene profiles of PMNs infected with either the wild type or the ssk1 mutant. Phosphorylation of the mitogen-activated protein kinases p42/44 and p38 from neutrophils infected with either CAF2-1 (wild type) or SSK21 (ssk1/ssk1) was similar, while expression and phosphorylation of the JNK mitogen-activated protein kinase was not observed following infection with either strain. On the other hand, we observed an upregulation of seven inflammatory response genes in PMNs infected with the SSK21 mutant only, while an increase in interleukin-10 expression was measured in PMNs infected with either strain. Downregulation of interleukin-2 was observed in PMNs infected with either strain. Verification of the transcriptional profiling was obtained by reverse transcription-PCR for three of the genes that were upregulated in neutrophils infected

  20. Platelet mimicry

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Moghimi, Seyed Moein; Hunter, Alan Christy; Peer, Dan

    2016-01-01

    Here we critically examine whether coating of nanoparticles with platelet membranes can truly disguise them against recognition by elements of the innate immune system. We further assess whether the "cloaking technology" can sufficiently equip nanoparticles with platelet-mimicking functionalities...

  1. Platelet Count

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... their spleen removed surgically Use of birth control pills (oral contraceptives) Some conditions may cause a temporary (transitory) increased ... increased platelet counts include estrogen and birth control pills (oral contraceptives). Mildly decreased platelet counts may be seen in ...

  2. Platelet satellitism in infectious disease?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laskaj, Renata; Sikiric, Dubravka; Skerk, Visnja

    2015-01-01

    Background Platelet satellitism is a phenomenon of unknown etiology of aggregating platelets around polymorphonuclear neutrophils and other blood cells which causes pseudothrombocytopenia, visible by microscopic examination of blood smears. It has been observed so far in about a hundred cases in the world. Case subject and methods Our case involves a 73-year-old female patient with a urinary infection. Biochemical serum analysis (CRP, glucose, AST, ALT, ALP, GGT, bilirubin, sodium, potassium, chloride, urea, creatinine) and blood cell count were performed with standard methods on autoanalyzers. Serum protein fractions were examined by electrophoresis and urinalysis with standard methods on autoanalyzer together with microscopic examination of urine sediment. Erythrocyte sedimentation rate, blood culture and urine culture tests were performed with standard methods. Results Due to typical pathological values for bacterial urinary infection, the patient was admitted to the hospital. Blood smear examination revealed phenomenon, which has persisted for three weeks after the disease has been cured. Blood smears with EDTA as an anticoagulant had platelet satellitism whereas the phenomenon was not observed in tubes with different anticoagulants (Na, Li-heparin) and capillary blood. Discussion We hypothesize that satellitism was induced by some immunological mechanism through formation of antibodies which have mediated platelets binding to neutrophil membranes and vice versa. Unfortunately we were unable to determine the putative trigger for this phenomenon. To our knowledge this is the second case of platelet satellitism ever described in Croatia. PMID:26110042

  3. Platelet-rich concentrate in serum free medium enhances osteogenic differentiation of bone marrow-derived human mesenchymal stromal cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shani Samuel

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Previous studies have shown that platelet concentrates used in conjunction with appropriate growth media enhance osteogenic differentiation of human mesenchymal stromal cells (hMSCs. However, their potential in inducing osteogenesis of hMSCs when cultured in serum free medium has not been explored. Furthermore, the resulting osteogenic molecular signatures of the hMSCs have not been compared to standard osteogenic medium. We studied the effect of infrequent supplementation (8-day interval of 15% non-activated platelet-rich concentrate (PRC in serum free medium on hMSCs proliferation and differentiation throughout a course of 24 days, and compared the effect with those cultured in a standard osteogenic medium (OM. Cell proliferation was analyzed by alamar blue assay. Gene expression of osteogenic markers (Runx2, Collagen1, Alkaline Phosphatase, Bone morphogenetic protein 2, Osteopontin, Osteocalcin, Osteonectin were analyzed using Q-PCR. Immunocytochemical staining for osteocalcin, osteopontin and transcription factor Runx2 were done at 8, 16 and 24 days. Biochemical assays for the expression of ALP and osteocalcin were also performed at these time-points. Osteogenic differentiation was further confirmed qualitatively by Alizarin Red S staining that was quantified using cetylpyridinium chloride. Results showed that PRC supplemented in serum free medium enhanced hMSC proliferation, which peaked at day 16. The temporal pattern of gene expression of hMSCs under the influence of PRC was comparable to that of the osteogenic media, but at a greater extent at specific time points. Immunocytochemical staining revealed stronger staining for Runx2 in the PRC-treated group compared to OM, while the staining for Osteocalcin and Osteopontin were comparable in both groups. ALP activity and Osteocalcin/DNA level were higher in the PRC group. Cells in the PRC group had similar level of bone mineralization as those cultured in OM, as reflected by the intensity of

  4. Platelet-rich concentrate in serum free medium enhances osteogenic differentiation of bone marrow-derived human mesenchymal stromal cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramasamy, Thamil Selvee; Karunanithi, Puvanan; Naveen, Sangeetha Vasudevaraj; Murali, Malliga Raman; Abbas, Azlina A.; Kamarul, Tunku

    2016-01-01

    Previous studies have shown that platelet concentrates used in conjunction with appropriate growth media enhance osteogenic differentiation of human mesenchymal stromal cells (hMSCs). However, their potential in inducing osteogenesis of hMSCs when cultured in serum free medium has not been explored. Furthermore, the resulting osteogenic molecular signatures of the hMSCs have not been compared to standard osteogenic medium. We studied the effect of infrequent supplementation (8-day interval) of 15% non-activated platelet-rich concentrate (PRC) in serum free medium on hMSCs proliferation and differentiation throughout a course of 24 days, and compared the effect with those cultured in a standard osteogenic medium (OM). Cell proliferation was analyzed by alamar blue assay. Gene expression of osteogenic markers (Runx2, Collagen1, Alkaline Phosphatase, Bone morphogenetic protein 2, Osteopontin, Osteocalcin, Osteonectin) were analyzed using Q-PCR. Immunocytochemical staining for osteocalcin, osteopontin and transcription factor Runx2 were done at 8, 16 and 24 days. Biochemical assays for the expression of ALP and osteocalcin were also performed at these time-points. Osteogenic differentiation was further confirmed qualitatively by Alizarin Red S staining that was quantified using cetylpyridinium chloride. Results showed that PRC supplemented in serum free medium enhanced hMSC proliferation, which peaked at day 16. The temporal pattern of gene expression of hMSCs under the influence of PRC was comparable to that of the osteogenic media, but at a greater extent at specific time points. Immunocytochemical staining revealed stronger staining for Runx2 in the PRC-treated group compared to OM, while the staining for Osteocalcin and Osteopontin were comparable in both groups. ALP activity and Osteocalcin/DNA level were higher in the PRC group. Cells in the PRC group had similar level of bone mineralization as those cultured in OM, as reflected by the intensity of Alizarin red

  5. Mechanism of Collaborative Enhancement of Binding of Paired Antibodies to Distinct Epitopes of Platelet Endothelial Cell Adhesion Molecule-1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kiseleva, Raisa; Greineder, Colin F; Villa, Carlos H; Hood, Elizabeth D; Shuvaev, Vladimir V; Sun, Jing; Chacko, Ann-Marie; Abraham, Valsamma; DeLisser, Horace M; Muzykantov, Vladimir R

    2017-01-01

    Monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) directed to extracellular epitopes of human and mouse Platelet Endothelial Cell Adhesion Molecule-1 (CD31 or PECAM-1) stimulate binding of other mAbs to distinct adjacent PECAM-1 epitopes. This effect, dubbed Collaborative Enhancement of Paired Affinity Ligands, or CEPAL, has been shown to enhance delivery of mAb-targeted drugs and nanoparticles to the vascular endothelium. Here we report new insights into the mechanism underlying this effect, which demonstrates equivalent amplitude in the following models: i) cells expressing a full length PECAM-1 and mutant form of PECAM-1 unable to form homodimers; ii) isolated fractions of cellular membranes; and, iii) immobilized recombinant PECAM-1. These results indicate that CEPAL is mediated not by interference in cellular functions or homophilic PECAM-1 interactions, but rather by conformational changes within the cell adhesion molecule induced by ligand binding. This mechanism, mediated by exposure of partially occult epitopes, is likely to occur in molecules other than PECAM-1 and may represent a generalizable phenomenon with valuable practical applications.

  6. Magnesium-enhanced enzymatically mineralized platelet-rich fibrin for bone regeneration applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gassling, Volker; Douglas, Timothy E L; Purcz, Nicolai; Schaubroeck, David; Balcaen, Lieve; Bliznuk, Vitaliy; Declercq, Heidi A; Vanhaecke, Frank; Dubruel, Peter

    2013-10-01

    Membranes of the autologous blood-derived biomaterial platelet-rich fibrin (PRF) were mineralized enzymatically with calcium phosphate (CaP) by the incorporation of alkaline phosphatase (ALP) followed by incubation for 3 days in solutions of either 0.1 M calcium glycerophosphate (CaGP) or a combination of CaGP and magnesium glycerophosphate (CaGP:MgGP; both 0.05 M), resulting in the formation of two different PRF-mineral composites. Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, transmission electron microscopy and selected area electron diffraction examinations showed that the CaP formed was amorphous. Inductively coupled plasma optical emission spectroscopy analysis revealed similar amounts of Ca and P in both composite types, while a smaller amount of Mg (Ca:Mg molar ratio = 10) was detected in the composites formed in the CaGP:MgGP solution, which was supported by the results of energy-dispersive x-ray spectroscopy-based elemental mapping. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) imaging showed that the mineral deposits in PRF incubated in the CaGP:MgGP solution were markedly smaller. The mass percentage attributable to the mineral phase was similar in both composite types. MTT and WST tests with SAOS-2 cells revealed that incubation in the CaGP:MgGP solution had no negative effect on cytocompatibility and cell proliferation compared to the CaGP solution. Cells on all samples displayed a well-spread morphology as revealed by SEM imaging. In conclusion, the incorporation of Mg reduces mineral deposit dimensions and promotes cell proliferation.

  7. The use of autologous platelet-leukocyte gels to enhance the healing process in surgery, a review

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Everts, P. A.; Overdevest, E. P.; Jakimowicz, J. J.; Oosterbos, C. J.; Schonberger, J. P.; Knape, J. T.; van Zundert, A.

    2007-01-01

    Background: The therapeutic use of autologously prepared, platelet-leukocyte-enriched gel (PLG) is a relatively new technology for the stimulation and acceleration of soft tissue and bone healing. The effectiveness of this procedure lies in the delivery of a wide range of platelet growth factors mim

  8. Enhanced antimicrobial activity of peptide‐cocktails against common bacterial contaminants of ex vivo stored platelets

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Mohan, K. V. K; Rao, S. Sainath; Gao, Y; Atreya, C. D; Grobusch, M

    2014-01-01

    .... In the present study, we selected PD 3, PD 4, RW 2, RW 3 and RW 4 and evaluated each individual peptide and their various combinations to see whether the cocktail regimen enhances the antimicrobial...

  9. Low-level laser therapy to the mouse femur enhances the fungicidal response of neutrophils against Paracoccidioides brasiliensis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eva Burger

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Neutrophils (PMN play a central role in host defense against the neglected fungal infection paracoccidioidomycosis (PCM, which is caused by the dimorphic fungus Paracoccidioides brasiliensis (Pb. PCM is of major importance, especially in Latin America, and its treatment relies on the use of antifungal drugs. However, the course of treatment is lengthy, leading to side effects and even development of fungal resistance. The goal of the study was to use low-level laser therapy (LLLT to stimulate PMN to fight Pb in vivo. Swiss mice with subcutaneous air pouches were inoculated with a virulent strain of Pb or fungal cell wall components (Zymosan, and then received LLLT (780 nm; 50 mW; 12.5 J/cm2; 30 seconds per point, giving a total energy of 0.5 J per point on alternate days at two points on each hind leg. The aim was to reach the bone marrow in the femur with light. Non-irradiated animals were used as controls. The number and viability of the PMN that migrated to the inoculation site was assessed, as well as their ability to synthesize proteins, produce reactive oxygen species (ROS and their fungicidal activity. The highly pure PMN populations obtained after 10 days of infection were also subsequently cultured in the presence of Pb for trials of protein production, evaluation of mitochondrial activity, ROS production and quantification of viable fungi growth. PMN from mice that received LLLT were more active metabolically, had higher fungicidal activity against Pb in vivo and also in vitro. The kinetics of neutrophil protein production also correlated with a more activated state. LLLT may be a safe and non-invasive approach to deal with PCM infection.

  10. Neutrophils in Cancer: Two Sides of the Same Coin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eileen Uribe-Querol

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Neutrophils are the most abundant leukocytes in blood and are considered to be the first line of defense during inflammation and infections. In addition, neutrophils are also found infiltrating many types of tumors. Tumor-associated neutrophils (TANs have relevant roles in malignant disease. Indeed neutrophils may be potent antitumor effector cells. However, increasing clinical evidence shows TANs correlate with poor prognosis. The tumor microenvironment controls neutrophil recruitment and in turn TANs help tumor progression. Hence, TANs can be beneficial or detrimental to the host. It is the purpose of this review to highlight these two sides of the neutrophil coin in cancer and to describe recent studies that provide some light on the mechanisms for neutrophil recruitment to the tumor, for neutrophils supporting tumor progression, and for neutrophil activation to enhance their antitumor functions.

  11. Emerging Evidence for Platelets as Immune and Inflammatory Effector Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matthew Thomas Rondina

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available While traditionally recognized for their roles in hemostatic pathways, emerging evidence demonstrates that platelets have previously unrecognized, dynamic roles that span the immune continuum. These newly-recognized platelet functions, including the secretion of immune mediators, interactions with endothelial cells, monocytes, and neutrophils, toll-like receptor (TLR mediated responses, and induction of neutrophil extracellular trap (NET formation, bridge thrombotic and inflammatory pathways and contribute to host defense mechanisms against invading pathogens. In this focused review, we highlight several of these emerging aspects of platelet biology and their implications in clinical infectious syndromes.

  12. Platelet proteomics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zufferey, Anne; Fontana, Pierre; Reny, Jean-Luc; Nolli, Severine; Sanchez, Jean-Charles

    2012-01-01

    Platelets are small cell fragments, produced by megakaryocytes, in the bone marrow. They play an important role in hemostasis and diverse thrombotic disorders. They are therefore primary targets of antithrombotic therapies. They are implicated in several pathophysiological pathways, such as inflammation or wound repair. In blood circulation, platelets are activated by several pathways including subendothelial matrix and thrombin, triggering the formation of the platelet plug. Studying their proteome is a powerful approach to understand their biology and function. However, particular attention must be paid to different experimental parameters, such as platelet quality and purity. Several technologies are involved during the platelet proteome processing, yielding information on protein identification, characterization, localization, and quantification. Recent technical improvements in proteomics combined with inter-disciplinary strategies, such as metabolomic, transcriptomics, and bioinformatics, will help to understand platelets biological mechanisms. Therefore, a comprehensive analysis of the platelet proteome under different environmental conditions may contribute to elucidate complex processes relevant to platelet function regarding bleeding disorders or platelet hyperreactivity and identify new targets for antiplatelet therapy.

  13. Clostridium butyricum MIYAIRI 588 shows antitumor effects by enhancing the release of TRAIL from neutrophils through MMP-8.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shinnoh, Masahide; Horinaka, Mano; Yasuda, Takashi; Yoshikawa, Sae; Morita, Mie; Yamada, Takeshi; Miki, Tsuneharu; Sakai, Toshiyuki

    2013-03-01

    Bacillus Calmette-Guérin (BCG) intravesical therapy against superficial bladder cancer is one of the most successful immunotherapies in cancer, though the precise mechanism has not been clarified. Recent studies have demonstrated urinary tumor necrosis factor-related apoptosis-inducing ligand (TRAIL) levels to be higher in BCG-responsive patients than non-responders and shown that polymorphonuclear neutrophils (PMNs) migrating to the bladder after BCG instillation release large amounts of TRAIL. To establish a safer and more effective intravesical therapy than BCG, we examined whether other bacteria induced similar effects. We stimulated PMNs or peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) with BCG or other bacteria, and then aliquots of the culture supernatants or cell lysates were assayed for TRAIL. We examined the signaling pathway regulating the release of TRAIL from PMNs and evaluated the antitumor effects of BCG or other bacteria in vitro and in vivo. We have found that Clostridium butyricum MIYAIRI 588 (CBM588) induces the release of endogenous TRAIL from PMNs as well as BCG. In addition, we have shown that matrix metalloproteinase 8 (MMP-8) is one of the key factors responsible for the release. Interestingly, TLR2/4 signaling pathway has been suggested to be important for the release of TRAIL by MMP-8. CBM588 has been proven to be as effective as BCG against cancer cells by inducing apoptosis in vivo as well as in vitro. Taken together, these results strongly suggest that CBM588 is promising for a safer and more effective therapy against bladder cancer.

  14. Platelets as immune cells in infectious diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Speth, Cornelia; Löffler, Jürgen; Krappmann, Sven; Lass-Flörl, Cornelia; Rambach, Günter

    2013-11-01

    Platelets have been shown to cover a broad range of functions. Besides their role in hemostasis, they have immunological functions and thus participate in the interaction between pathogens and host defense. Platelets have a broad repertoire of receptor molecules that enable them to sense invading pathogens and infection-induced inflammation. Consequently, platelets exert antimicrobial effector mechanisms, but also initiate an intense crosstalk with other arms of the innate and adaptive immunity, including neutrophils, monocytes/macrophages, dendritic cells, B cells and T cells. There is a fragile balance between beneficial antimicrobial effects and detrimental reactions that contribute to the pathogenesis, and many pathogens have developed mechanisms to influence these two outcomes. This review aims to highlight aspects of the interaction strategies between platelets and pathogenic bacteria, viruses, fungi and parasites, in addition to the subsequent networking between platelets and other immune cells, and the relevance of these processes for the pathogenesis of infections.

  15. Platelet lipidomic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dolegowska, B; Lubkowska, A; De Girolamo, L

    2012-01-01

    Lipids account for 16-19 percent dry platelet matter and includes 65 percent phospholipids, 25 percent neutral lipids and about 8 percent glycosphingolipids. The cell membrane that surrounds platelets is a bilayer that contains different types phospholipids symmetrically distributed in resting platelets, such as phosphatidylserine (PS), phosphatidylethanolamine (PE), phosphatidylcholine, and sphingomyelin. The collapse of lipid asymmetry is exposure of phosphatidylserine in the external leaflet of the plasma bilayer, where it is known to serve at least two major functions: providing a platform for development of the blood coagulation cascade and presenting the signal that induces phagocytosis of apoptotic cells. During activation, this asymmetrical distribution becomes disrupted, and PS and PE become exposed on the cell surface. The transbilayer movement of phosphatidylserine is responsible for the platelet procoagulant activity. Exposure of phosphatidylserine is a flag for macrophage recognition and clearance from the circulation. Platelets, stored at room temperature for transfusion for more than 5 days, undergo changes collectively known as platelet storage lesions. Thus, the platelet lipid composition and its possible modifications over time are crucial for efficacy of platelet rich plasma therapy. Moreover, a number of substances derived from lipids are contained into platelets. Eicosanoids are lipid signaling mediators generated by the action of lipoxygenase and include prostaglandins, thromboxane A2, 12-hydroxyeicosatetraenoic acid. Isoprostanes have a chemical structure similar to this of prostanoids, but are differently produced into the particle, and are ligands for prostaglandins receptors, exhibiting biological activity like thromboxane A2. Endocannabinoids are derivatives from arachidonic acid which could reduce local pain. Phospholipids growth factors (sphingolipids, lysophosphatidic acid, platelet-activating factor) are involved in tissue

  16. Platelets in inflammation and immunity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herter, J M; Rossaint, J; Zarbock, A

    2014-11-01

    The paradigm of platelets as mere mediators of hemostasis has long since been replaced by a dual role: hemostasis and inflammation. Now recognized as key players in innate and adaptive immune responses, platelets have the capacity to interact with almost all known immune cells. These platelet-immune cell interactions represent a hallmark of immunity, as they can potently enhance immune cell functions and, in some cases, even constitute a prerequisite for host defense mechanisms such as NETosis. In addition, recent studies have revealed a new role for platelets in immunity: They are ubiquitous sentinels and rapid first-line immune responders, as platelet-pathogen interactions within the vasculature appear to precede all other host defense mechanisms. Here, we discuss recent advances in our understanding of platelets as inflammatory cells, and provide an exemplary review of their role in acute inflammation.

  17. Modulation of polymorphonuclear neutrophil functions by astrocytes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xie Luokun

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Neuroinflammation is a complex process involving cells from the immune system and the central nerve system (CNS. Polymorphonuclear neutrophils (PMN are the most abundant class of white blood cells, and typically the first type of leukocyte recruited to sites of inflammation. In the CNS, astrocytes are the most abundant glial cell population and participate in the local innate immune response triggered by a variety of insults. In the present study, we investigated the impacts of astrocytes on PMN function. Methods Primary astrocyte cultures were derived from postnatal C57BL/6 mice and primary neutrophils were isolated from 8 to 12 weeks old C57BL/6 mice. PMNs respiratory burst was analyzed by H2DCFDA assay. For phagocytosis assay, neutrophils were incubated with FITC-labeled E. coli and the phagocytosis of E coli was determined by flow cytometer. PMNs degranulation was determined by myeloperoxidase assay. Cytokine expression was determined by real-time PCR. To determine the involvement of different signaling pathway, protein lysates were prepared and western blots were conducted to assess the activation of Akt, Erk1/2, and p38. Results Using ex vivo neutrophils and primary astrocyte cultures, our study demonstrated that astrocytes differentially regulate neutrophil functions, depending upon whether the interactions between the two cell types are direct or indirect. Upon direct cell-cell contact, astrocytes attenuate neutrophil apoptosis, respiratory bust, and degranulation, while enhancing neutrophil phagocytic capability and pro-inflammatory cytokine expression. Through indirect interaction with neutrophils, astrocytes attenuate apoptosis and enhance necrosis in neutrophils, augment neutrophil phagocytosis and respiratory burst, and inhibit neutrophil degranulation. In addition, astrocytes could augment Akt, Erk1/2, and p38 activation in neutrophils. Conclusions Astrocytes differentially regulate neutrophil functions through

  18. Important role of platelets in modulating endotoxin-induced lung inflammation in CFTR-deficient mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Caiqi Zhao

    Full Text Available Mutation of CFTR (cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator leads to cystic fibrosis (CF. Patients with CF develop abnormalities of blood platelets and recurrent lung inflammation. However, whether CFTR-mutated platelets play a role in the development of lung inflammation is elusive. Therefore, we intratracheally challenged wildtype and F508del (a common type of CFTR mutation mice with LPS to observe changes of F508del platelets in the peripheral blood and indexes of lung inflammation (BAL neutrophils and protein levels. Furthermore, we investigated whether or not and how F508del platelets modulate the LPS-induced acute lung inflammation by targeting anti-platelet aggregation, depletion of neutrophils, reconstitution of bone marrow or neutrophils, blockade of P-selectin glycoprotein ligand-1 (PSGL-1, platelet activating factor (PAF, and correction of mutated CFTR trafficking. We found that LPS-challenged F508del mice developed severe thrombocytopenia and had higher levels of plasma TXB2 coincided with neutrophilic lung inflammation relative to wildtype control. Inhibition of F508del platelet aggregation or depletion of F508del neutrophils diminished the LPS-induced lung inflammation in the F508del mice. Moreover, wildtype mice reconstituted with either F508del bone marrow or neutrophils developed worse thrombocytopenia. Blocking PSGL-1, platelet activating factor (PAF, or rectifying trafficking of mutated CFTR in F508del mice diminished and alveolar neutrophil transmigration in the LPS-challenged F508del mice. These findings suggest that F508del platelets and their interaction with neutrophils are requisite for the development of LPS-induced lung inflammation and injury. As such, targeting platelets might be an emerging strategy for dampening recurrent lung inflammation in cystic fibrosis patients.

  19. Comparison of coronary artery specific leukocyte-platelet conjugate formation in unstable versus stable angina pectoris.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patel, Parag B; Pfau, Steven E; Cleman, Michael W; Brennan, Joseph J; Howes, Christopher; Remetz, Michael; Cabin, Henry S; Setaro, John F; Rinder, Henry M

    2004-02-15

    This study evaluates transcoronary changes in neutrophil and platelet activation and conjugate formation in patients with angina pectoris secondary to coronary artery disease. We examined parameters of neutrophil and platelet activation as well as the neutrophil-platelet conjugate formation in patients who underwent diagnostic coronary angiography. Thirty-nine patients with chest pain referred for cardiac catheterization were studied (23 patients with unstable angina pectoris [UAP] and 16 with stable angina pectoris [SAP]). Before coronary angiography, blood samples were obtained simultaneously from the aortic root and coronary sinus to assess leukocyte (CD11b) and platelet (CD62P) activation and leukocyte-platelet conjugates. There was a 94% increase in CD62-expressing platelets from the aorta to the coronary sinus in patients with UAP compared with a 49% increase in patients with SAP. The percentage of neutrophil-platelet conjugates increased by 22% in patients with UAP compared with a 16% decrease in those with SAP (p <0.01). In contrast, monocyte-platelet binding across the coronary bed increased to a similar degree in both groups. This study demonstrates an increase in neutrophil-platelet conjugates across the coronary circulation in UAP, compatible with a higher activation state in both cell types.

  20. Enhanced retention of in vitro functional activity of platelets from recombinant human thrombopoietin-treated patients following long-term cryopreservation with a platelet-preserving solution (ThromboSol) and 2% DMSO.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vadhan-Raj, S; Currie, L M; Bueso-Ramos, C; Livesey, S A; Connor, J

    1999-02-01

    Chemotherapy-induced thrombocytopenia represents a significant clinical problem in the management of patients with malignancy. Recombinant human thrombopoietin (rhTPO) is a potent stimulator of platelet production in vivo. The ability to cryopreserve rhTPO-derived platelets would enable the use of autologous platelets during the period of thrombocytopenia. ThromboSol is a platelet-stabilizing formulation consisting of second messenger effectors that inhibit specific activation pathways endogenous to platelets. To investigate the effect of ThromboSol cryopreservation, platelets from rhTPO-treated patients (n = 23) and normal donors were treated with ThromboSol and 2% DMSO and cryopreserved for up to 6 months. The platelets were thawed at different intervals and tested for retention of platelet functional activity in vitro. Following a short-term storage (1 week), the cryopreserved platelets from patients treated with rhTPO exhibited significantly higher retention of functional activities including discoid morphology (70% v 57%), extent of shape change (19% v 13%) stirring shape change (15% v 11%) and hypotonic shock response (56% v 25%), as compared to the cryopreserved platelets from controls. Furthermore, there was no further significant loss of functional activity following cryopreservation for up to 6 months. These findings suggest that cryopreservation of platelets from rhTPO-treated donors may provide a useful novel strategy for autologous or allogeneic donation for subsequent transfusions to manage treatment-related thrombocytopenia.

  1. Neutrophils at work

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nauseef, William M; Borregaard, Niels

    2014-01-01

    blood to tissues in models of blood-borne infections versus bacterial invasion through epithelial linings. We examine data on novel aspects of the activation of NADPH oxidase and the heterogeneity of phagosomes and, finally, consider the importance of two neutrophil-derived biological agents: neutrophil......In this Review we discuss data demonstrating recently recognized aspects of neutrophil homeostasis in the steady state, granulopoiesis in 'emergency' conditions and interactions of neutrophils with the adaptive immune system. We explore in vivo observations of the recruitment of neutrophils from...

  2. Alcohol enhances Acinetobacter baumannii-associated pneumonia and systemic dissemination by impairing neutrophil antimicrobial activity in a murine model of infection.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jay A Gandhi

    Full Text Available Acinetobacter baumannii (Ab is a common cause of community-acquired pneumonia (CAP in chronic alcoholics in tropical and sub-tropical climates and associated with a >50% mortality rate. Using a murine model of alcohol (EtOH administration, we demonstrated that EtOH enhances Ab-mediated pneumonia leading to systemic infection. Although EtOH did not affect neutrophil recruitment to the lungs of treated mice, it decreased phagocytosis and killing of bacteria by these leukocytes leading to increased microbial burden and severity of disease. Moreover, we determined that mice that received EtOH prior to Ab infection were immunologically impaired, which was reflected in increased pulmonary inflammation, sequential dissemination to the liver and kidneys, and decreased survival. Furthermore, immunosuppression by EtOH was associated with deregulation of cytokine production in the organs of infected mice. This study establishes that EtOH impairs immunity in vivo exacerbating Ab infection and disease progression. The ability of Ab to cause disease in alcoholics warrants the study of its virulence mechanisms and host interactions.

  3. The quorum-sensing molecule N-3-oxododecanoyl homoserine lactone (3OC12-HSL) enhances the host defence by activating human polymorphonuclear neutrophils (PMN).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wagner, Christof; Zimmermann, Sabine; Brenner-Weiss, Gerald; Hug, Friederike; Prior, Birgit; Obst, Ursula; Hänsch, Gertrud Maria

    2007-01-01

    The P. aeruginosa quorum-sensing molecule N-3-oxododecanoyl homoserine lactone (3OC12-HSL) interacts not only with bacteria, but also with mammalian cells, among others with those of the immune defence system. We focussed on the possible interaction of 3OC12-HSL with human polymorphonuclear neutrophils (PMN), because these cells are the first to enter an infected site. We found that 3OC12-HSL attracts PMN, and up-regulates expression of receptors known to be involved in host defence, including the adhesion proteins CD11b/CD18 and the immunoglobulin receptors CD16 and CD64. Furthermore, the uptake of bacteria (phagocytosis), which is crucial for an efficient defence against infection, was enhanced. Thus, recognising and responding to 3OC12-HSL not only attracts the PMN to the site of a developing biofilm, but also reinforces their defence mechanisms, and hence could be a means to control the infection in an early stage and to prevent biofilm formation.

  4. Acquired platelet function defect

    Science.gov (United States)

    Acquired qualitative platelet disorders; Acquired disorders of platelet function ... blood clotting. Disorders that can cause problems in platelet function include: Idiopathic thrombocytopenic purpura Chronic myelogenous leukemia Multiple ...

  5. Platelet Donation

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... of gratitude that washed over me when I saw those platelets going into my husband’s body. I ... Needles LGBTQ+ Donors Blood Donor Community SleevesUp Games Facebook Avatars and Badges Banners eCards Red Cross Information ...

  6. Platelets and cardiac arrhythmia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jonas S De Jong

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Sudden cardiac death remains one of the most prevalent modes of death in industrialized countries, and myocardial ischemia due to thrombotic coronary occlusion is its primary cause. The role of platelets in the occurrence of SCD extends beyond coronary flow impairment by clot formation. Here we review the substances released by platelets during clot formation and their arrhythmic properties. Platelet products are released from three types of platelet granules: dense core granules, alpha-granules, and platelet lysosomes. The physiologic properties of dense granule products are of special interest as a potential source of arrhythmic substances. They are released readily upon activation and contain high concentrations of serotonin, histamine, purines, pyrimidines, and ions such as calcium and magnesium. Potential arrhythmic mechanisms of these substances, e.g. serotonin and high energy phosphates, include induction of coronary constriction, calcium overloading, and induction of delayed after-depolarizations. Alpha-granules produce thromboxanes and other arachidonic acid products with many potential arrhythmic effects mediated by interference with cardiac sodium, calcium and potassium channels. Alpha-granules also contain hundreds of proteins that could potentially serve as ligands to receptors on cardiomyocytes. Lysosomal products probably do not have an important arrhythmic effect. Platelet products and ischemia can induce coronary permeability, thereby enhancing interaction with surrounding cardiomyocytes. Antiplatelet therapy is known to improve survival after myocardial infarction. Although an important part of this effect results from prevention of coronary clot formation, there is evidence to suggest that antiplatelet therapy also induces anti-arrhythmic effects during ischemia by preventing the release of platelet activation products.

  7. Psoralen-mediated virus photoinactivation in platelet concentrates: enhanced specificity of virus kill in the absence of shorter UVA wavelengths

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Margolis-Nunno, Henrietta; Robinson, Richard; Horowitz, Bernard; Ben-Hur, Ehud [New York Blood Center, NY (United States); Geacintov, N.E. [New York Univ., NY (United States). Dept. of Chemistry

    1995-11-01

    Treatments with psoralens and long-wavelength ultraviolet radiation (UVA, 320-400 nm; PUVA) have shown efficacy for virus sterilization of platelet concentrates (PC). We have employed the psoralen derivative 4`-aminomethyl-4,5`,8-trimethylpsoralen (AMT), and have found that platelet integrity is best preserved when rutin, a flavonoid that quenches multiple reactive oxygen species, is present during AMT/UVA treatment of PC. In this report, we examine the effects of different UVA spectra under our standard PC treatment conditions (i.e. 50 {mu}g/mL AMT, 0.35 mM rutin and 38 J/cm{sup 2} UVA). Added vesicular stomatitis virus (VSV; {>=} 5.5 log{sub 10}) was completely inactivated with the simultaneous maintenance of the platelet aggregation response (> 90% of control) when a UVA light source with transmission mainly between 360 and 370 nm (narrow UVA1) was used. In contrast, with a broad-band UVA (320-400 nm; broad UVA) light source, the aggregation response was greatly compromised (< 50% of control) with only a minor increase in the rate of VSV kill. With this lamp, platelet function could be improved to about 75% of the control by adding a long-pass filter, which reduced the transmission of shorter ({<=} 345 nm) UVA wavelengths (340-400 nm; UVA1). At equivalent levels of virus kill, aggregation function was always best preserved when narrow UVA1 was used for PUVA treatment. Even in the absence of AMT, and with or without rutin present, narrow UVA1 irradiation was better tolerated by platelets than was broad UVA. (author).

  8. Isolation of Mouse Neutrophils.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swamydas, Muthulekha; Luo, Yi; Dorf, Martin E; Lionakis, Michail S

    2015-08-03

    Neutrophils represent the first line of defense against bacterial and fungal pathogens. Indeed, patients with inherited and acquired qualitative and quantitative neutrophil defects are at high risk for developing bacterial and fungal infections and suffering adverse outcomes from these infections. Therefore, research aiming at defining the molecular factors that modulate neutrophil effector function under homeostatic conditions and during infection is essential for devising strategies to augment neutrophil function and improve the outcome of infected individuals. This unit describes a reproducible density gradient centrifugation-based protocol that can be applied in any laboratory to harvest large numbers of highly enriched and highly viable neutrophils from the bone marrow of mice both at the steady state and following infection with Candida albicans as described in UNIT. In another protocol, we also present a method that combines gentle enzymatic tissue digestion with a positive immunomagnetic selection technique or Fluorescence-activated cell sorting (FACS) to harvest highly pure and highly viable preparations of neutrophils directly from mouse tissues such as the kidney, the liver or the spleen. Finally, methods for isolating neutrophils from mouse peritoneal fluid and peripheral blood are included. Mouse neutrophils isolated by these protocols can be used for examining several aspects of cellular function ex vivo including pathogen binding, phagocytosis and killing, neutrophil chemotaxis, oxidative burst, degranulation and cytokine production, and for performing neutrophil adoptive transfer experiments.

  9. Blood platelets in the progression of Alzheimer's disease.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nina S Gowert

    Full Text Available Alzheimer's disease (AD is characterized by neurotoxic amyloid-ß plaque formation in brain parenchyma and cerebral blood vessels known as cerebral amyloid angiopathy (CAA. Besides CAA, AD is strongly related to vascular diseases such as stroke and atherosclerosis. Cerebrovascular dysfunction occurs in AD patients leading to alterations in blood flow that might play an important role in AD pathology with neuronal loss and memory deficits. Platelets are the major players in hemostasis and thrombosis, but are also involved in neuroinflammatory diseases like AD. For many years, platelets were accepted as peripheral model to study the pathophysiology of AD because platelets display the enzymatic activities to generate amyloid-ß (Aß peptides. In addition, platelets are considered to be a biomarker for early diagnosis of AD. Effects of Aß peptides on platelets and the impact of platelets in the progression of AD remained, however, ill-defined. The present study explored the cellular mechanisms triggered by Aß in platelets. Treatment of platelets with Aß led to platelet activation and enhanced generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS and membrane scrambling, suggesting enhanced platelet apoptosis. More important, platelets modulate soluble Aß into fibrillar structures that were absorbed by apoptotic but not vital platelets. This together with enhanced platelet adhesion under flow ex vivo and in vivo and platelet accumulation at amyloid deposits of cerebral vessels of AD transgenic mice suggested that platelets are major contributors of CAA inducing platelet thrombus formation at vascular amyloid plaques leading to vessel occlusion critical for cerebrovascular events like stroke.

  10. Hypoxia Selectively Inhibits Respiratory Burst Activity and Killing of Staphylococcus aureus in Human Neutrophils

    OpenAIRE

    McGovern, Naomi N.; Cowburn, Andrew S.; Porter, Linsey; Walmsley, Sarah R.; Summers, Charlotte; Thompson, Alfred A. R.; Anwar, Sadia; Willcocks, Lisa C.; Moira K B Whyte; Condliffe, Alison M; Chilvers, Edwin R.

    2010-01-01

    Neutrophils play a central role in the innate immune response and a critical role in bacterial killing. Most studies of neutrophil function have been conducted under conditions of ambient oxygen, but inflamed sites where neutrophils operate may be extremely hypoxic. Previous studies indicate that neutrophils sense and respond to hypoxia via the ubiquitous prolyl hydroxylase/hypoxia-inducible factor pathway and that this can signal for enhanced survival. In the current study, human neutrophils...

  11. Microparticle production, neutrophil activation, and intravascular bubbles following open-water SCUBA diving.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thom, Stephen R; Milovanova, Tatyana N; Bogush, Marina; Bhopale, Veena M; Yang, Ming; Bushmann, Kim; Pollock, Neal W; Ljubkovic, Marko; Denoble, Petar; Dujic, Zeljko

    2012-04-01

    The goal of this study was to evaluate annexin V-positive microparticles (MPs) and neutrophil activation in humans following decompression from open-water SCUBA diving with the hypothesis that changes are related to intravascular bubble formation. Sixteen male volunteer divers followed a uniform profile of four daily SCUBA dives to 18 m of sea water for 47 min. Blood was obtained prior to and at 80 min following the first and fourth dives to evaluate the impact of repetitive diving, and intravascular bubbles were quantified by trans-thoracic echocardiography carried out at 20-min intervals for 2 h after each dive. MPs increased by 3.4-fold after each dive, neutrophil activation occurred as assessed by surface expression of myeloperoxidase and the CD18 component of β(2)-integrins, and there was an increased presence of the platelet-derived CD41 protein on the neutrophil surface indicating interactions with platelet membranes. Intravascular bubbles were detected in all divers. Surprisingly, significant inverse correlations were found among postdiving bubble scores and MPs, most consistently at 80 min or more after the dive on the fourth day. There were significant positive correlations between MPs and platelet-neutrophil interactions after the first dive and between platelet-neutrophil interactions and neutrophil activation documented as an elevation in β(2)-integrin expression after the fourth dive. We conclude that MPs- and neutrophil-related events in humans are consistent with findings in an animal decompression model. Whether there are causal relationships among bubbles, MPs, platelet-neutrophil interactions, and neutrophil activation remains obscure and requires additional study.

  12. Hypertonic saline enhances host response to bacterial challenge by augmenting receptor-independent neutrophil intracellular superoxide formation.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Shields, Conor J

    2012-02-03

    OBJECTIVE: This study sought to determine whether hypertonic saline (HTS) infusion modulates the host response to bacterial challenge. METHODS: Sepsis was induced in 30 Balb-C mice by intraperitoneal injection of Escherichia coli (5 x 107 organisms per animal). In 10 mice, resuscitation was performed at 0 and 24 hours with a 4 mL\\/kg bolus of HTS (7.5% NaCl), 10 animals received 4 mL\\/kg of normal saline (0.9% NaCl), and the remaining animals received 30 mL\\/kg of normal saline. Samples of blood, spleen, and lung were cultured at 8 and 36 hours. Polymorphonucleocytes were incubated in isotonic or hypertonic medium before culture with E. coli. Phagocytosis was assessed by flow cytometry, whereas intracellular bacterial killing was measured after inhibition of phagocytosis with cytochalasin B. Intracellular formation of free radicals was assessed by the molecular probe CM-H(2)DCFDA. Mitogen-activated protein (MAP) kinase p38 and ERK-1 phosphorylation, and nuclear factor kappa B (NFkappaB) activation were determined. Data are represented as means (SEM), and an analysis of variance test was performed to gauge statistical significance. RESULTS: Significantly reduced bacterial culture was observed in the animals resuscitated with HTS when compared with their NS counterparts, in blood (51.8 +\\/- 4.3 vs. 82.0 +\\/- 3.3 and 78.4 +\\/- 4.8, P = 0.005), lung (40.0 +\\/- 4.1 vs. 93.2 +\\/- 2.1 and 80.9 +\\/- 4.7, P = 0.002), and spleen (56.4 +\\/- 3.8 vs. 85.4 +\\/- 4.2 and 90.1 +\\/- 5.9, P = 0.05). Intracellular killing of bacteria increased markedly (P = 0.026) and superoxide generation was enhanced upon exposure to HTS (775.78 +\\/- 23.6 vs. 696.57 +\\/- 42.2, P = 0.017) despite inhibition of MAP kinase and NFkappaB activation. CONCLUSIONS: HTS significantly enhances intracellular killing of bacteria while attenuating receptor-mediated activation of proinflammatory cascades.

  13. Neutrophilic dermatoses in children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berk, David R; Bayliss, Susan J

    2008-01-01

    The neutrophilic dermatoses are rare disorders, especially in children, and are characterized by neutrophilic infiltrates in the skin and less commonly in extracutaneous tissue. The neutrophilic dermatoses share similar clinical appearances and associated conditions, including inflammatory bowel disease, malignancies, and medications. Overlap forms of disease demonstrating features of multiple neutrophilic dermatoses may be seen. The manuscript attempts to provide an up-to-date review of (i) classical neutrophilic dermatoses, focusing on distinctive features in children and (ii) neutrophilic dermatoses which may largely be pediatric or genodermatosis-associated (Majeed, SAPHO [synovitis, severe acne, sterile palmoplantar pustulosis, hyperostosis, and osteitis] syndrome, PAPA (pyogenic sterile arthritis, pyoderma gangrenosum, and acne), PFAPA (periodic fever with aphthous stomatitis, pharyngitis, and cervical adenopathy), and other periodic fever syndromes, and congenital erosive and vesicular dermatosis healing with reticulated supple scarring).

  14. Enhanced photo-, sono- and sonophotocatalysis of methylene blue via SnO2 nanoparticle supported on nanographene platelets (NGP)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paramarta, V.; Taufik, A.; Saleh, R.

    2017-07-01

    In our previous study, we have reported the catalytic (photo- and sono-) performance of SnO2 nanoparticles in methylene blue (MB) removal from aqueous solution. In this study, SnO2/nanographene platelets (NGP) composites were fabricated by depositing SnO2 nanoparticle onto nanographene platelets surface to develop photo-, sono-, and sonophotocatalysts, SnO2 nanoparticle, and SnO2/NGP composites were successfully synthesized using the sol-gel and coprecipitation method, respectively. The nanographene platelets (NGP) content was varied from 5, 10, and 15 weight percentages (wt.%). The optical properties and thermal stability of the samples were characterized using X-ray Diffraction (XRD), Fourier Transform Infrared (FTIR), and Thermal Gravimetric Analysis (TGA). The catalytic ability of the samples was investigated using photo-, sono-, and sonophoto degradation of MB which was observed when nanographene platelets (NGP) were added into SnO2 nanocomposite. The photo-, sono- and sonophotocatalytic activities of SnO2/NGP composites on dyes were analyzed by measuring the change in absorbance of dyes under UV-spectrophotometer. The degradation of the organic dyes has been calculated by monitoring the degradation in concentration of the dyes before and after irradiation of UV light, ultrasound, and both of them respectively. The influence of other parameters such as catalyst dosage, pH, and scavenger have also been investigated. The results showed that SnO2/NGP composite with 10 weight percent (wt.%) has better catalytic performance than pure SnO2 nanoparticle. The reusability tests have also been done to ensure the stability of the used catalysts.

  15. Hypervirulent Mycobacterium tuberculosis strain triggers necrotic lung pathology associated with enhanced recruitment of neutrophils in resistant C57BL/6 mice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Almeida, Fabrício M.; Ventura, Thatiana L. B.; Amaral, Eduardo P.; Ribeiro, Simone C. M.; Calixto, Sanderson D.; Manhães, Marcelle R.; Rezende, Andreza L.; Souzal, Giliane S.; de Carvalho, Igor S.; Silva, Elisangela C.; da Silva, Juliana Azevedo; Carvalho, Eulógio C. Q.; Kritski, Afranio L.

    2017-01-01

    Tuberculosis (TB) is a chronic infectious disease caused by Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb) that in most cases induces irreversible necrosis of lung tissue as a result of excessive inflammatory reactions. The murine model of TB in resistant C57BL/6 mice infected with reference Mtb strains is widely used in TB studies; however, these mice do not show a necrotic pathology, which restricts their use in studies of irreversible tissue damage. Recently, we demonstrated that necrotic lung lesions could be induced in the C57BL/6 mice by highly virulent Mtb strains belonging to the modern Beijing sublineage. However, the pathogenic mechanisms leading to necrosis in this model were not elucidated. In this study, we investigated the dynamics of lung lesions in mice infected with highly virulent Beijing Mtb strain M299, compared with those infected with laboratory Mtb strain H37Rv. The data demonstrate that necrotic lung lesions in mice infected by the strain M299 were associated with enhanced recruitment of myeloid cells, especially neutrophils, and increased levels of proinflammatory cytokines, consistent with exacerbated inflammation. High levels of IFN-γ production contributed to the control of bacterial growth. Further progression to chronic disease was associated with a reduction in the levels of inflammatory mediators in the lungs, the accumulation of foamy macrophages and partial healing of the necrotic tissue by fibrosis. At a late stage of disease, degradation of foamy cells resulted in the liberation of accumulated lipids and persisting bacilli and further activation of inflammation, which promoted lung consolidation. Overall, our studies show that C57BL/6 mice infected with highly virulent Mtb strain may serve as a TB model reproducing an exacerbated inflammatory response in a resistant host to hypervirulent mycobacteria, leading to irreversible necrotic lung lesions. PMID:28306733

  16. Platelet-rich fibrin matrix for facial plastic surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sclafani, Anthony P; Saman, Masoud

    2012-05-01

    Platelets are known primarily for their role in hemostasis, but there is increasing interest in the effect of platelets on wound healing. Platelet isolates such as platelet-rich plasma have been advocated to enhance and accelerate wound healing. This article describes the use of a novel preparation, platelet-rich fibrin matrix (PRFM), for facial plastic surgery applications such as volume augmentation, fat transfer supplementation, and as an adjunct to open surgical procedures.

  17. The relationship between fractional flow reserve, platelet reactivity and platelet leukocyte complexes in stable coronary artery disease.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jan-Willem E M Sels

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The presence of stenoses that significantly impair blood flow and cause myocardial ischemia negatively affects prognosis of patients with stable coronary artery disease. Altered platelet reactivity has been associated with impaired prognosis of stable coronary artery disease. Platelets are activated and form complexes with leukocytes in response to microshear gradients caused by friction forces on the arterial wall or flow separation. We hypothesized that the presence of significantly flow-limiting stenoses is associated with altered platelet reactivity and formation of platelet-leukocyte complexes. METHODS: One hundred patients with stable angina were studied. Hemodynamic significance of all coronary stenoses was assessed with Fractional Flow Reserve (FFR. Patients were classified FFR-positive (at least one lesion with FFR≤0.75 or FFR-negative (all lesions FFR>0.80. Whole blood samples were stimulated with increasing concentrations of ADP, TRAP, CRP and Iloprost with substimulatory ADP. Expression of P-selectin as platelet activation marker and platelet-leukocyte complexes were measured by flowcytometry. Patients were stratified on clopidogrel use. FFR positive and negative patient groups were compared on platelet reactivity and platelet-leukocyte complexes. RESULTS: Platelet reactivity between FFR-positive patients and FFR-negative patients did not differ. A significantly lower percentage of circulating platelet-neutrophil complexes in FFR-positive patients and a similar non-significant decrease in percentage of circulating platelet-monocyte complexes in FFR-positive patients was observed. CONCLUSION: The presence of hemodynamically significant coronary stenoses does not alter platelet reactivity but is associated with reduced platelet-neutrophil complexes in peripheral blood of patients with stable coronary artery disease.

  18. Argan oil prevents prothrombotic complications by lowering lipid levels and platelet aggregation, enhancing oxidative status in dyslipidemic patients from the area of Rabat (Morocco).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haimeur, Adil; Messaouri, Hafida; Ulmann, Lionel; Mimouni, Virginie; Masrar, Azelarab; Chraibi, Abdelmjid; Tremblin, Gérard; Meskini, Nadia

    2013-07-20

    It is now established that patients with hyperlipidemia have a high risk of atherosclerosis and thrombotic complications, which are two important events responsible for the onset and progression of cardiovascular disease. In the context of managing dyslipidemia by means of dietary advice based on the consumption of argan oil, we wanted to investigate the effect of virgin argan oil on plasma lipids, and for the first time, on the platelet hyperactivation and oxidative status associated with dyslipidemia. This study concerns patients recruited in the area of Rabat in Morocco. 39 dyslipidemic (79% women) patients were recruited for our study in the area of Rabat in Morocco. They were randomly assigned to the two following groups: the argan group, in which the subjects consumed 25 mL/day of argan oil at breakfast for 3 weeks, and the control group in which argan oil was replaced by butter. After a 3-week consumption period, blood total cholesterol was significantly lower in the argan oil group, as was LDL cholesterol (23.8% and 25.6% lower, respectively). However, the HDL cholesterol level had increased by 26% at the end of the intervention period compared to baseline. Interestingly, in the argan oil group thrombin-induced platelet aggregation was lower, and oxidative status was enhanced as a result of lower platelet MDA and higher GPx activity, respectively. In conclusion, our results, even if it is not representative of the Moroccan population, show that argan oil can prevent the prothrombotic complications associated with dyslipidemia, which are a major risk factor for cardiovascular disease.

  19. Platelet satellitism in a trauma patient

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kopcinovic, Lara Milevoj; Pavic, Marina

    2012-01-01

    Platelet satellitism (PS) is a rare phenomenon observed in blood smears obtained from blood anticoagulated with EDTA. It is characterised by platelet rosetting around polymorphonuclear neutrophils and in rare cases around other blood cells. PS is a rare cause of pseudothrombocytopenia. References about the phenomenon of PS in medical literature are few. In this report we describe a case of PS fortunately noticed in one trauma patient. Furthermore, we discuss the possible pathophysiological mechanisms of PS proposed in the literature. To our knowledge this is the first case of PS reported in Croatia. PMID:22384529

  20. Neutrophil-mediated phagocytosis of Staphylococcus aureus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jos A.G. Van Strijp

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available For invading staphylococci, phagocytosis an killing bij human neutrophils is the biggest threat. Neutrophils are the only cells that can effectively kill staphylococci by engulfment and subsequent bombardment with proteases, amidases, antimicrobial peptides and proteins in concert with reactive oxygen species that are generated during the metabolic burst.Both complement and antibodies are crucial for effective uptake and neutrophil activation. S. aureus is not an innocent bystander in this process. It actively secretes several proteins to impair every single step in this process from receptor modulation, to complement inhibition to neutrophil lysis to protease, antimicrobial peptide inhibition and resistance to reactive oxygen species. For the design of future novel antimicrobial strategies: therapeutic antibodies, vaccines, novel antibiotics, all this should be taken into account. Still the best way to treat diseases is to help to enhance the natural defence mechanism that are already in place.

  1. Phagocytosis and killing of Staphylococcus aureus by human neutrophils.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Thea; Porter, Adeline R; Kennedy, Adam D; Kobayashi, Scott D; DeLeo, Frank R

    2014-01-01

    Neutrophils are essential for host defense against Staphylococcus aureus infections. Although significant progress has been made, our understanding of neutrophil interactions with S. aureus remains incomplete. To provide a more comprehensive view of this process, we investigated phagocytosis and killing of S. aureus by human neutrophils using varied assay conditions in vitro. A greater percentage of bacteria were internalized by adherent neutrophils compared to those in suspension, and, unexpectedly, uptake of S. aureus by adherent neutrophils occurred efficiently in the absence of opsonins. An antibody specific for S. aureus promoted uptake of unopsonized bacteria in suspension, but had little or no capacity to enhance phagocytosis of S. aureus opsonized with normal human serum or by adherent neutrophils. Collectively, these results indicate that assay conditions can have a significant influence on the phagocytosis and killing of S. aureus by neutrophils. More importantly, the results suggest a vaccine approach directed to enhance opsonophagocytosis alone is not sufficient to promote increased killing of S. aureus by human neutrophils. With the emergence and reemergence of antibiotic-resistant microorganisms, establishing parameters that are optimal for studying neutrophil-S. aureus interactions will pave the way towards developing immune-directed strategies for anti-staphylococcal therapies.

  2. Elevated Neutrophil Lymphocyte Ratio in Recurrent Optic Neuritis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hande Guclu

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose. To demonstrate the relation between optic neuritis (ON and systemic inflammation markers as neutrophil lymphocyte ratio (N/L ratio, platelet count, mean platelet volume (MPV, and red cell distribution width (RDW and furthermore to evaluate the utilization of these markers to predict the frequency of the ON episodes. Methods. Forty-two patients with acute ON and forty healthy subjects were enrolled into the study. The medical records were reviewed for age, sex, hemoglobin (Hb, Haematocrit (Htc, RDW, platelet count, MPV, white blood cell count (WBC, neutrophil and lymphocyte count, and neutrophil lymphocyte ratio (N/L ratio. Results. The mean N/L ratio, platelet counts, and RDW were significantly higher in ON group (p=0.000, p=0.048, and p=0.002. There was a significant relation between N/L ratio and number of episodes (r=0.492, p=0.001. There was a statistically significant difference for MPV between one episode group and recurrent ON group (p=0.035. Conclusions. Simple and inexpensive laboratory methods could help us show systemic inflammation and monitor ON patients. Higher N/L ratio can be a useful marker for predicting recurrent attacks.

  3. Trehalose lyophilized platelets for wound healing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pietramaggiori, Giorgio; Kaipainen, Arja; Ho, David; Orser, Cindy; Pebley, Walter; Rudolph, Alan; Orgill, Dennis P

    2007-01-01

    Fresh platelet preparations are utilized to treat a wide variety of wounds, although storage limitations and mixed results have hampered their clinical use. We hypothesized that concentrated lyophilized and reconstituted platelet preparations, preserved with trehalose, maintain and possibly enhance fresh platelets' ability to improve wound healing. We studied the ability of a single dose of trehalose lyophilized and reconstituted platelets to enhance wound healing when topically applied on full-thickness wounds in the genetically diabetic mouse. We compared these results with the application of multiple doses of fresh platelet preparations and trehalose lyophilized and reconstituted platelets as well as multiple doses of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) and wounds left untreated. Trehalose lyophilized and reconstituted platelets, in single and multiple applications, multiple applications of fresh platelets and multiple applications of VEGF increased granulation tissue deposition, vascularity, and proliferation when compared with untreated wounds, as assessed by histology and immunohistochemistry. Wounds treated with multiple doses of VEGF and a single dose of freeze-dried platelets reached 90% closure faster than wounds left untreated. A single administration of trehalose lyophilized and reconstituted platelet preparations enhanced diabetic wound healing, therefore representing a promising strategy for the treatment of nonhealing wounds.

  4. Neutrophil extracellular traps (NETs) and infection-related vascular dysfunction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gardiner, Elizabeth E; Andrews, Robert K

    2012-11-01

    The innate immune system orchestrated by leukocytes primarily neutrophils, serves to remove dead and dying host cells and to provide protection against invasion by pathogens. Failure of this system results in the onset of sepsis leading to grave consequences for the host. Together with mechanical methods to physically isolate and remove the pathogen, neutrophils also release an important set of proinflammatory biological modulators that mediate recruitment of additional cells to a site of infection and amplify the innate protective response. Additionally, neutrophils release highly charged mixtures of DNA and nuclear proteins named neutrophil extracellular traps (NETs). These electrostatically-charged adhesive networks trigger intrinsic coagulation, limit dispersion and entrap the pathogens. NETs also contain the neutrophil secretary granule-derived serine proteases, neutrophil elastase and cathepsin G, known to regulate the reactivity of both neutrophils and platelets. Since the characterization of NETs in 2004, new studies of their functional effect in vivo continue to expand upon unexpected extracellular roles for DNA, and in doing so renew attention to the haemostatic role of the leukocyte. This review will provide a basic description of NETs and examine current knowledge of this important system of defense, including recent work illustrating a role for NETs in activation of thrombosis. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Characterization of neutrophil adhesion to different titanium surfaces

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    V Campos; R C N Melo; L P Silva; E N Aquino; M S Castro; W Fontes

    2014-02-01

    Although titanium (Ti) is known to elicit a foreign body response when implanted into humans, Ti implant healing resembles normal wound healing in terms of inflammatory cell recruitment and inflammation persistence. Rough implant surfaces may present better conditions for protein adsorption and for the adhesion of platelets and inflammatory cells such as neutrophils. Implanted biomedical devices initially interact with coagulating blood; however, direct contact between the oxide layer of the implant and neutrophils has not been completely described. The aim of the present study is to compare the behaviours of neutrophils in direct contact with different Ti surfaces. Isolated human neutrophils were placed into contact with Ti discs, which had been rendered as `smooth' or `rough', following different surface treatments. Scanning electron microscopy and flow cytometry were used to measure cell adhesion to the surfaces and exposure of membrane proteins such as CD62L and CD11b. Topographic roughness was demonstrated as higher for SLA treated surfaces, measured by atomic force microscopy and elemental analysis was performed by energy dispersive X-ray, showing a similar composition for both surfaces. The adhesion of neutrophils to the `rough' Ti surface was initially stronger than adhesion to the `smooth' surface. The cell morphology and adhesion marker results revealed clear signs of neutrophil activation by either surface, with different neutrophil morphological characteristics being observed between the two surface types. Understanding the cellular mechanisms regulating cell–implant interactions should help researchers to improve the surface topography of biomedical implant devices.

  6. Production of interleukin-1 like activity by neutrophils derived from rat lung.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kusaka, Y; Donaldson, K

    1990-01-01

    Interleukin-1 like activity was produced by neutrophils obtained by bronchoalveolar lavage from experimentally inflamed rat lung. Activity was released spontaneously from neutrophils at high levels but it was enhanced by stimulation with endotoxin in vitro. PMID:2141440

  7. Influence of recombinant bovine gamma interferon on neutrophil function

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Steinbeck, M.J.

    1987-01-01

    To determine the role of cytokines in enhancing neutrophil function, peripheral blood neutrophils from healthy cattle were preincubated with recombinant bovine gamma interferon (rboIFN-gamma). Pretreatment of neutrophils with rboIFN-gamma activated neutrophils to have enhanced antibody-dependent (ADCC) and -independent (AINC) cytotoxicity and impaired random migration. Neutrophil ingestion, superoxide anion production, and iodination activity were not consistently affected by rboIFN-gamma pretreatment. In order to better understand the activation process, the molecular events involved in the enhancement of neutrophil cytotoxicity and the inhibition random migration were investigated. Both RNA and protein syntheses by neutrophils were required for the enhancement of AINC activity and the inhibition of random migration, but were not required for the enhancement of ADCC by rboIFN-gamma. Specifically, rbo-IFN-gamma treatment of neutrophils enhanced the expression of two major proteins of molecular mass 60,000 and 94,000 as determined by SDS-polyacrylamide, linear-gradient gel electrophoresis and /sup 35/S-fluorography.

  8. Heparin-conjugated poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid) nanospheres enhance large-wound healing by delivering growth factors in platelet-rich plasma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    La, Wan-Geun; Yang, Hee Seok

    2015-04-01

    Platelet-rich plasma (PRP) contains many growth factors that are involved in tissue regeneration processes. For successful tissue regeneration, protein growth factors require a delivery vehicle for long-term and sustained release to a defect site in order to maintain their bioactivity. Previously, we showed that heparin-conjugated poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid) nanospheres (HCPNs) can provide long-term delivery of growth factors with affinity for heparin. In this study, we hypothesize that treatment of a skin wound with a mixture of PRP and HCPNs would provide long-term delivery of several growth factors contained in PRP to promote the skin wound healing process with preservation of bioactivity. The release of platelet-derived growth factor-BB (PDGF-BB), contained in PRP, from HCPN with fibrin gel (FG) showed a prolonged release period versus a PRP mixture with FG alone (FG-PRP). Also, growth factors released from PRP with HCPN and FG showed sustained human dermal fibroblast growth for 12 days. Full-thickness skin wound treatment in mice with FG-HCPN-PRP resulted in much faster wound closure as well as dermal and epidermal regeneration at day 9 compared with treatment with FG-HCPN or FG-PRP. The enhanced wound healing using FG-HCPN-PRP may be due to the prolonged release not only of PDGF-BB but also of other growth factors in the PRP. The delivered growth factors accelerated angiogenesis at the wound site.

  9. Myeloperoxidase Stimulates Neutrophil Degranulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grigorieva, D V; Gorudko, I V; Sokolov, A V; Kostevich, V A; Vasilyev, V B; Cherenkevich, S N; Panasenko, O M

    2016-08-01

    Myeloperoxidase, heme enzyme of azurophilic granules in neutrophils, is released into the extracellular space in the inflammation foci. In neutrophils, it stimulates a dose-dependent release of lactoferrin (a protein of specific granules), lysozyme (a protein of specific and azurophilic granules), and elastase (a protein of azurophilic granules). 4-Aminobenzoic acid hydrazide, a potent inhibitor of peroxidase activity of myeloperoxidase, produced no effect on neutrophil degranulation. Using signal transduction inhibitors (genistein, methoxyverapamil, wortmannin, and NiCl2), we demonstrated that myeloperoxidase-induced degranulation of neutrophils resulted from enzyme interaction with the plasma membrane and depends on activation of tyrosine kinases, phosphatidylinositol 3-kinases (PI3K), and calcium signaling. Myeloperoxidase modified by oxidative/halogenation stress (chlorinated and monomeric forms of the enzyme) lost the potency to activate neutrophil degranulation.

  10. LDL oxidation by platelets propagates platelet activation via an oxidative stress-mediated mechanism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carnevale, Roberto; Bartimoccia, Simona; Nocella, Cristina; Di Santo, Serena; Loffredo, Lorenzo; Illuminati, Giulio; Lombardi, Elisabetta; Boz, Valentina; Del Ben, Maria; De Marco, Luigi; Pignatelli, Pasquale; Violi, Francesco

    2014-11-01

    Platelets generate oxidized LDL (ox-LDL) via NOX2-derived oxidative stress. We investigated if once generated by activated platelets ox-LDL can propagate platelet activation. Experiments were performed in platelets from healthy subjects (HS), hyper-cholesterolemic patients and patients with NOX2 hereditary deficiency. Agonist-stimulated platelets from HS added with LDL were associated with a dose-dependent increase of reactive oxidant species and ox-LDL. Agonist-stimulated platelets from HS added with a fixed dose of LDL (57.14 μmol/L) or added with homogenized human atherosclerotic plaque showed enhanced ox-LDL formation (approximately +50% and +30% respectively), which was lowered by a NOX2 inhibitor (approximately -35% and -25% respectively). Compared to HS, ox-LDL production was more pronounced in agonist-stimulated platelet rich plasma (PRP) from hyper-cholesterolemic patients but was almost absent in PRP from NOX2-deficient patients. Platelet aggregation and 8-iso-PGF2α-ΙΙΙ formation increased in LDL-treated washed platelets (+42% and +53% respectively) and PRP (+31% and +53% respectively). Also, LDL enhanced platelet-dependent thrombosis at arterial shear rate (+33%) but did not affect platelet activation in NOX2-deficient patients. Platelet activation by LDL was significantly inhibited by CD36 or LOX1 blocking peptides, two ox-LDL receptor antagonists, or by a NOX2 inhibitor. LDL-added platelets showed increased p38MAPK (+59%) and PKC (+51%) phosphorylation, p47(phox) translocation to platelet membrane (+34%) and NOX2 activation (+30%), which were inhibited by ox-LDL receptor antagonists. Platelets oxidize LDL, which in turn amplify platelet activation via specific ox-LDL receptors; both effects are mediated by NOX2 activation. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Platelet activation and platelet-leukocyte interaction in dogs naturally infected with Babesia rossi

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Goddard, Amelia; Leisewitz, Andrew L; Kristensen, Annemarie Thuri;

    2015-01-01

    EDTA as anticoagulant. Activated platelets and PLA formation were detected by measuring surface expression of P-selectin (CD62P) on platelets, monocytes and neutrophils. Of the Babesia-infected dogs, 29 survived and seven died. The percentage of CD62P-positive monocytes was significantly higher (P = 0.......036) in the Babesia-infected dogs (54%) than in healthy control dogs (35.3%). However, there were no significant differences between the Babesia-infected and control groups for CD62P-positive platelets (4.9% and 1.2%, respectively) and CD62P-positive neutrophils (28.3% and 17.9%, respectively). The percentage of CD62...... groups for the percentage of CD62P-positive platelets (survivors 4.8%; non-survivors 5.3%; controls 1.2%) or CD62P-positive neutrophils (survivors 31.6%; non-survivors 5.6%; controls 17.9%). In conclusion, Babesia-infected dogs, specifically dogs that survived, had a significantly increased percentage...

  12. In vivo characterization of neutrophil extracellular traps in various organs of a murine sepsis model.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Koji Tanaka

    Full Text Available Neutrophil extracellular traps (NETs represent extracellular microbial trapping and killing. Recently, it has been implicated in thrombogenesis, autoimmune disease, and cancer progression. The aim of this study was to characterize NETs in various organs of a murine sepsis model in vivo and to investigate their associations with platelets, leukocytes, or vascular endothelium. NETs were classified as two distinct forms; cell-free NETs that were released away from neutrophils and anchored NETs that were anchored to neutrophils. Circulating cell-free NETs were characterized as fragmented or cotton-like structures, while anchored NETs were characterized as linear, reticular, membranous, or spot-like structures. In septic mice, both anchored and cell-free NETs were significantly increased in postcapillary venules of the cecum and hepatic sinusoids with increased leukocyte-endothelial interactions. NETs were also observed in both alveolar space and pulmonary capillaries of the lung. The interactions of NETs with platelet aggregates, leukocyte-platelet aggregates or vascular endothelium of arterioles and venules were observed in the microcirculation of septic mice. Microvessel occlusions which may be caused by platelet aggregates or leukocyte-platelet aggregates and heterogeneously decreased blood flow were also observed in septic mice. NETs appeared to be associated with the formation of platelet aggregates or leukocyte-platelet aggregates. These observational findings may suggest the adverse effect of intravascular NETs on the host during a sepsis.

  13. Enhanced ex vivo inhibition of platelet function following addition of dipyridamole to aspirin after transient ischaemic attack or ischaemic stroke: first results from the TRinity AntiPlatelet responsiveness (TrAP) study.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Tobin, William Oliver

    2012-02-01

    Ex vivo dipyridamole \\'non-responsiveness\\' has not been extensively studied in ischaemic cerebrovascular disease. Platelet surface marker expression, leucocyte-platelet complex formation and inhibition of platelet function at high shear stress as detected by the PFA-100(R) Collagen-Adenosine-diphosphate (C-ADP) and Collagen-Epinephrine cartridges was assessed in 52 patients within 4 weeks of transient ischaemic attack (TIA) or ischaemic stroke on aspirin, and then 14 d (14 d) and >90 d (90 d) after adding dipyridamole. A novel definition of \\'Dipyridamole non-responsiveness\\' was used. The median C-ADP closure time increased following addition of dipyridamole, remained elevated at 90 d (P <\\/= 0.03), and was unaffected by aspirin dose. 59% at 14 d and 56% at 90 d were \\'dipyridamole non-responders\\' on the PFA-100. The proportion of non-responders at 14 and 90 d was similar (P= 0.9). Compared with baseline (4.6%), median monocyte-platelet complexes increased at 14 d (5.0%, P= 0.03) and 90 d (4.9%, P= 0.04). Low C-ADP closure times were associated with increased monocyte-platelet complexes at 14 d (r= -0.32, P= 0.02) and 90 d (r= -0.33, P = 0.02). Monocyte-platelet complexes increased in the subgroup of dipyridamole non-responders on the PFA-100 (P<\\/= 0.045), but not in responders (P >\\/= 0.5), at 14 and 90 d versus baseline. Additional inhibition of platelet function has been detected with the PFA-100 when dipyridamole is added to aspirin. Elevated monocyte-platelet complexes may contribute to ex vivo dipyridamole non-responsiveness.

  14. Quantitative proteomics reveals differential biological processes in healthy neonatal cord neutrophils and adult neutrophils

    KAUST Repository

    Zhu, Jiang

    2014-06-11

    Neonatal neutrophils are characterized by the immaturity of bactericidal mechanisms that contributes largely to neonatal mortality. However, underlying molecular mechanism associated with the immaturity remains incompletely understood. In this study, we performed comparative proteomic analysis on neonatal neutrophils derived from human cord blood and adult peripheral neutrophils. A total of 1332 proteins were identified and quantified, and 127 proteins were characterized as differentially expressed between adult and cord neutrophils. The differentially expressed proteins are mapped in KEGG pathways into five clusters and indicated impaired functions of neonatal neutrophils in proteasome, lysosome, phagosome, and leukocyte transendothelial migration. In particular, many proteins associated with NETosis, a critical mechanism for antimicrobial process and auto-clearance, were also found to be downregulated in cord neutrophils. This study represents a first comparative proteome profiling of neonatal and adult neutrophils, and provides a global view of differentially expressed proteome for enhancing our understanding of their various functional difference. © 2014 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  15. Neutrophils, from marrow to microbes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Borregaard, Niels

    2010-01-01

    . Neutrophils circulate in the blood as dormant cells. At sites of infection, endothelial cells capture bypassing neutrophils and guide them through the endothelial cell lining whereby the neutrophils are activated and tuned for the subsequent interaction with microbes. Once in tissues, neutrophils kill...... microorganisms by microbicidal agents liberated from granules or generated by metabolic activation. As a final act, neutrophils can extrude stands of DNA with bactericidal proteins attached that act as extracellular traps for microorganisms....

  16. Neutrophil biology: an update

    OpenAIRE

    Kobayashi, Yoshiro

    2015-01-01

    Neutrophil extracellular traps (NETs) are involved in bacterial killing as well as autoimmunity, because NETs contain proteases, bactericidal peptides, DNA and ribonucleoprotein. NETs are formed via a novel type of cell death called NETosis. NETosis is distinct from apoptosis, but it resembles necrosis in that both membranes are not intact so that they allow intracellular proteins to leak outside of the cells. Removal of NETs and neutrophils undergoing NETosis by phagocytes and its subsequent...

  17. Platelet Function Tests

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... be limited. Home Visit Global Sites Search Help? Platelet Function Tests Share this page: Was this page helpful? ... their patients by ordering one or more platelet function tests. Platelet function testing may include one or more of ...

  18. Congenital platelet function defects

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... storage pool disorder; Glanzmann's thrombasthenia; Bernard-Soulier syndrome; Platelet function defects - congenital ... Congenital platelet function defects are bleeding disorders that ... function, even though there are normal platelet numbers. Most ...

  19. Neonatal Sepsis and Neutrophil Insufficiencies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Melvan, John Nicholas; Bagby, Gregory J.; Welsh, David A.; Nelson, Steve; Zhang, Ping

    2011-01-01

    Sepsis has continuously been a leading cause of neonatal morbidity and mortality despite current advances in chemotherapy and patient intensive care facilities. Neonates are at high risk for developing bacterial infections due to quantitative and qualitative insufficiencies of innate immunity, particularly granulocyte lineage development and response to infection. Although antibiotics remain the mainstay of treatment, adjuvant therapies enhancing immune function have shown promise in treating sepsis in neonates. This chapter reviews current strategies for the clinical management of neonatal sepsis and analyzes mechanisms underlying insufficiencies of neutrophil defense in neonates with emphasis on new directions for adjuvant therapy development. PMID:20521927

  20. Plerixafor (a CXCR4 antagonist following myeloablative allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation enhances hematopoietic recovery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael M. B. Green

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The binding of CXCR4 with its ligand (stromal-derived factor-1 maintains hematopoietic stem/progenitor cells (HSPCs in a quiescent state. We hypothesized that blocking CXCR4/SDF-1 interaction after hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT promotes hematopoiesis by inducing HSC proliferation. Methods We conducted a phase I/II trial of plerixafor on hematopoietic cell recovery following myeloablative allogeneic HSCT. Patients with hematologic malignancies receiving myeloablative conditioning were enrolled. Plerixafor 240 μg/kg was administered subcutaneously every other day beginning day +2 until day +21 or until neutrophil recovery. The primary efficacy endpoints of the study were time to absolute neutrophil count >500/μl and platelet count >20,000/μl. The cumulative incidence of neutrophil and platelet engraftment of the study cohort was compared to that of a cohort of 95 allogeneic peripheral blood stem cell transplant recipients treated during the same period of time and who received similar conditioning and graft-versus-host disease prophylaxis. Results Thirty patients received plerixafor following peripheral blood stem cell (n = 28 (PBSC or bone marrow (n = 2 transplantation. Adverse events attributable to plerixafor were mild and indistinguishable from effects of conditioning. The kinetics of neutrophil and platelet engraftment, as demonstrated by cumulative incidence, from the 28 study subjects receiving PBSC showed faster neutrophil (p = 0.04 and platelet recovery >20 K (p = 0.04 compared to the controls. Conclusions Our study demonstrated that plerixafor can be given safely following myeloablative HSCT. It provides proof of principle that blocking CXCR4 after HSCT enhances hematopoietic recovery. Larger, confirmatory studies in other settings are warranted. Trial registration ClinicalTrials.gov NCT01280955

  1. Autophagy Primes Neutrophils for Neutrophil Extracellular Trap Formation during Sepsis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, So Young; Shrestha, Sanjeeb; Youn, Young-Jin; Kim, Jun-Kyu; Kim, Shin-Yeong; Kim, Hyun Jung; Park, So-Hee; Ahn, Won-Gyun; Kim, Shin; Lee, Myung Goo; Jung, Ki-Suck; Park, Yong Bum; Mo, Eun-Kyung; Ko, Yousang; Lee, Suh-Young; Koh, Younsuck; Park, Myung Jae; Song, Dong-Keun; Hong, Chang-Won

    2017-09-01

    Neutrophils are key effectors in the host's immune response to sepsis. Excessive stimulation or dysregulated neutrophil functions are believed to be responsible for sepsis pathogenesis. However, the mechanisms regulating functional plasticity of neutrophils during sepsis have not been fully determined. We investigated the role of autophagy in neutrophil functions during sepsis in patients with community-acquired pneumonia. Neutrophils were isolated from patients with sepsis and stimulated with phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate (PMA). The levels of reactive oxygen species generation, neutrophil extracellular trap (NET) formation, and granule release, and the autophagic status were evaluated. The effect of neutrophil autophagy augmentation was further evaluated in a mouse model of sepsis. Neutrophils isolated from patients who survived sepsis showed an increase in autophagy induction, and were primed for NET formation in response to subsequent PMA stimulation. In contrast, neutrophils isolated from patients who did not survive sepsis showed dysregulated autophagy and a decreased response to PMA stimulation. The induction of autophagy primed healthy neutrophils for NET formation and vice versa. In a mouse model of sepsis, the augmentation of autophagy improved survival via a NET-dependent mechanism. These results indicate that neutrophil autophagy primes neutrophils for increased NET formation, which is important for proper neutrophil effector functions during sepsis. Our study provides important insights into the role of autophagy in neutrophils during sepsis.

  2. Ganglioside GD3 Enhances Invasiveness of Gliomas by Forming a Complex with Platelet-derived Growth Factor Receptor α and Yes Kinase*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohkawa, Yuki; Momota, Hiroyuki; Kato, Akira; Hashimoto, Noboru; Tsuda, Yusuke; Kotani, Norihiro; Honke, Koichi; Suzumura, Akio; Furukawa, Keiko; Ohmi, Yuhsuke; Natsume, Atsushi; Wakabayashi, Toshihiko; Furukawa, Koichi

    2015-01-01

    There have been a few studies on the ganglioside expression in human glioma tissues. However, the role of these gangliosides such as GD3 and GD2 has not been well understood. In this study we employed a genetically engineered mouse model of glioma to clarify the functions of GD3 in gliomas. Forced expression of platelet-derived growth factor B in cultured astrocytes derived from p53-deficient mice resulted in the expression of GD3 and GD2. GD3-positive astrocytes exhibited increased cell growth and invasion activities along with elevated phosphorylation of Akt and Yes kinase. By enzyme-mediated activation of radical sources reaction and mass spectrometry, we identified PDGF receptor α (PDGFRα) as a GD3-associated molecule. GD3-positive astrocytes showed a significant amount of PDGFRα in glycolipid-enriched microdomains/rafts compared with GD3-negative cells. Src kinase family Yes was co-precipitated with PDGFRα, and its pivotal role in the increased cell invasion of GD3-positive astrocytes was demonstrated by silencing with anti-Yes siRNA. Direct association between PDGFRα and GD3 was also shown, suggesting that GD3 forms ternary complex with PDGFRα and Yes. The fact that GD3, PDGFRα, and activated Yes were colocalized in lamellipodia and the edge of tumors in cultured cells and glioma tissues, respectively, suggests that GD3 induced by platelet-derived growth factor B enhances PDGF signals in glycolipid-enriched microdomain/rafts, leading to the promotion of malignant phenotypes such as cell proliferation and invasion in gliomas. PMID:25940087

  3. Ganglioside GD3 Enhances Invasiveness of Gliomas by Forming a Complex with Platelet-derived Growth Factor Receptor α and Yes Kinase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohkawa, Yuki; Momota, Hiroyuki; Kato, Akira; Hashimoto, Noboru; Tsuda, Yusuke; Kotani, Norihiro; Honke, Koichi; Suzumura, Akio; Furukawa, Keiko; Ohmi, Yuhsuke; Natsume, Atsushi; Wakabayashi, Toshihiko; Furukawa, Koichi

    2015-06-26

    There have been a few studies on the ganglioside expression in human glioma tissues. However, the role of these gangliosides such as GD3 and GD2 has not been well understood. In this study we employed a genetically engineered mouse model of glioma to clarify the functions of GD3 in gliomas. Forced expression of platelet-derived growth factor B in cultured astrocytes derived from p53-deficient mice resulted in the expression of GD3 and GD2. GD3-positive astrocytes exhibited increased cell growth and invasion activities along with elevated phosphorylation of Akt and Yes kinase. By enzyme-mediated activation of radical sources reaction and mass spectrometry, we identified PDGF receptor α (PDGFRα) as a GD3-associated molecule. GD3-positive astrocytes showed a significant amount of PDGFRα in glycolipid-enriched microdomains/rafts compared with GD3-negative cells. Src kinase family Yes was co-precipitated with PDGFRα, and its pivotal role in the increased cell invasion of GD3-positive astrocytes was demonstrated by silencing with anti-Yes siRNA. Direct association between PDGFRα and GD3 was also shown, suggesting that GD3 forms ternary complex with PDGFRα and Yes. The fact that GD3, PDGFRα, and activated Yes were colocalized in lamellipodia and the edge of tumors in cultured cells and glioma tissues, respectively, suggests that GD3 induced by platelet-derived growth factor B enhances PDGF signals in glycolipid-enriched microdomain/rafts, leading to the promotion of malignant phenotypes such as cell proliferation and invasion in gliomas.

  4. Platelet-rich plasma loaded in situ-formed hydrogel enhances hyaline cartilage regeneration by CB1 upregulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Hye-Rim; Park, Kyung Min; Joung, Yoon Ki; Park, Ki Dong; Do, Sun Hee

    2012-11-01

    The efficacy of three-dimensional (3D) culture on the proliferation and maturation of chondrocytes seeded into a hydrogel scaffold was assessed. Three types of hydrogel were prepared for the 3D culture of primary isolated chondrocytes. Chondrocyte proliferation was assessed using a live/dead viability/cytotoxicity assay and semiquantitative RT-PCR after 3D culture in hydrogel. Cylindrical defects in the center of rat xyphoids were used for the implantation of platelet-rich plasma (PRP)/hydrogel composites. Rats were killed at day 7 postoperatively and evaluated histochemically and immunohistologically. Xyphoid chondrocytes proliferated well with time in hydrogels. In the PRP-containing hydrogels, xyphoid defects displayed early formation of chondroid matrix with massive peripheral infiltration of spindle cells. These results were consistent with Safranin-O staining for proteoglycans and immunohistochemistry for type II collagen. Gene expression analyses in vitro revealed aggrecan, type II collagen, and ChM-1 and CB1 upregulation by PRP/hydrogel. PRP/hydrogel provided a suitable environment for hyaline cartilaginous regeneration, leading to anti-inflammation by significant increase of CB1 and inhibiting vascular ingrowth via considerable upregulation of ChM-1. The results provide a valuable reference for the clinical application of hydrogel scaffolds for hyaline cartilage regeneration, as well as the use of autologous PRP to improve cellular proliferation and maturation of xyphoid repair. Copyright © 2012 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  5. Epic Immune Battles of History: Neutrophils vs. Staphylococcus aureus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guerra, Fermin E.; Borgogna, Timothy R.; Patel, Delisha M.; Sward, Eli W.; Voyich, Jovanka M.

    2017-01-01

    Neutrophils are the most abundant leukocytes in human blood and the first line of defense after bacteria have breached the epithelial barriers. After migration to a site of infection, neutrophils engage and expose invading microorganisms to antimicrobial peptides and proteins, as well as reactive oxygen species, as part of their bactericidal arsenal. Ideally, neutrophils ingest bacteria to prevent damage to surrounding cells and tissues, kill invading microorganisms with antimicrobial mechanisms, undergo programmed cell death to minimize inflammation, and are cleared away by macrophages. Staphylococcus aureus (S. aureus) is a prevalent Gram-positive bacterium that is a common commensal and causes a wide range of diseases from skin infections to endocarditis. Since its discovery, S. aureus has been a formidable neutrophil foe that has challenged the efficacy of this professional assassin. Indeed, proper clearance of S. aureus by neutrophils is essential to positive infection outcome, and S. aureus has developed mechanisms to evade neutrophil killing. Herein, we will review mechanisms used by S. aureus to modulate and evade neutrophil bactericidal mechanisms including priming, activation, chemotaxis, production of reactive oxygen species, and resolution of infection. We will also highlight how S. aureus uses sensory/regulatory systems to tailor production of virulence factors specifically to the triggering signal, e.g., neutrophils and defensins. To conclude, we will provide an overview of therapeutic approaches that may potentially enhance neutrophil antimicrobial functions. PMID:28713774

  6. Human filarial Wolbachia lipopeptide directly activates human neutrophils in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tamarozzi, F; Wright, H L; Johnston, K L; Edwards, S W; Turner, J D; Taylor, M J

    2014-10-01

    The host inflammatory response to the Onchocerca volvulus endosymbiont, Wolbachia, is a major contributing factor in the development of chronic pathology in humans (onchocerciasis/river blindness). Recently, the toll-like pattern recognition receptor motif of the major inflammatory ligands of filarial Wolbachia, membrane-associated diacylated lipoproteins, was functionally defined in murine models of pathology, including mediation of neutrophil recruitment to the cornea. However, the extent to which human neutrophils can be activated in response to this Wolbachia pattern recognition motif is not known. Therefore, the responses of purified peripheral blood human neutrophils to a synthetic N-terminal diacylated lipopeptide (WoLP) of filarial Wolbachia peptidoglycan-associated lipoprotein (PAL) were characterized. WoLP exposure led to a dose-dependent activation of healthy, human neutrophils that included gross morphological alterations and modulation of surface expressed integrins involved in tethering, rolling and extravasation. WoLP exposure induced chemotaxis but not chemokinesis of neutrophils, and secretion of the major neutrophil chemokine, interleukin 8. WoLP also induced and primed the respiratory burst, and enhanced neutrophil survival by delay of apoptosis. These results indicate that the major inflammatory motif of filarial Wolbachia lipoproteins directly activates human neutrophils in vitro and promotes a molecular pathway by which human neutrophils are recruited to sites of Onchocerca parasitism.

  7. Transcellular lipoxygenase metabolism between monocytes and platelets

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bigby, T.D.; Meslier, N. (Univ. of California, San Francisco (USA))

    1989-09-15

    We have examined the effects of co-culture and in vitro co-stimulation on lipoxygenase metabolism in monocytes and platelets. Monocytes were obtained from the peripheral blood of normal volunteers by discontinuous gradient centrifugation and adherence to tissue culture plastic. Platelets were obtained from the platelet-rich plasma of the same donor. When 10(9) platelets and 2.5 x 10(6) monocytes were co-stimulated with 1 microM A23187, these preparations released greater quantities of 12(S)-hydroxy-10-trans-5,8,14-cis-eicosatetraenoic acid, 5(S),12-(S)dihydroxy-6,10-trans-8,14-cis-eicosatetraenoic acid, and leukotriene C4, 5(S)-hydroxy-6(R)-S-glutathionyl-7,9-trans-11,14-cis-eicosatetraenoic (LTC4) when compared with monocytes alone. Release of arachidonic acid, 5-HETE, delta 6-trans-LTB4, and delta 6-trans-12-epi-LTB4 from monocytes was decreased in the presence of platelets. A dose-response curve was constructed and revealed that the above changes became evident when the platelet number exceeded 10(7). Dual radiolabeling experiments with 3H- and 14C-arachidonic acid revealed that monocytes provided arachidonic acid, 5-HETE, and LTA4 for further metabolism by the platelet. Monocytes did not metabolize platelet intermediates detectably. In addition, as much as 1.2 microM 12(S)-hydroxy-10-trans-5,8,14-cis-eicosatetraenoic acid and 12(S)-hydroperoxy-10-trans-5,8,14-cis-eicosatetraenoic acid had no effect on monocyte lipoxygenase metabolism. Platelets were capable of converting LTA4 to LTC4, but conversion of LTA4 to LTB4 was not detected. We conclude that the monocyte and platelet lipoxygenase pathways undergo a transcellular lipoxygenase interaction that differs from the interaction of the neutrophil and platelet lipoxygenase pathways. In this interaction monocytes provide intermediate substrates for further metabolic conversion by platelets in an unidirectional manner.

  8. Platelets protect lung from injury induced by systemic inflammatory response

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Shuhua; Wang, Yabo; An, Qi; Chen, Hao; Zhao, Junfei; Zhang, Jie; Meng, Wentong; Du, Lei

    2017-01-01

    Systemic inflammatory responses can severely injure lungs, prompting efforts to explore how to attenuate such injury. Here we explored whether platelets can help attenuate lung injury in mice resulting from extracorporeal circulation (ECC)-induced systemic inflammatory responses. Mice were subjected to ECC for 30 min, then treated with phosphate-buffered saline, platelets, the GPIIb/IIIa inhibitor Tirofiban, or the combination of platelets and Tirofiban. Blood and lung tissues were harvested 60 min later, and lung injury and inflammatory status were assessed. As expected, ECC caused systemic inflammation and pulmonary dysfunction, and platelet transfusion resulted in significantly milder lung injury and higher lung function. It also led to greater numbers of circulating platelet-leukocyte aggregates and greater platelet accumulation in the lung. Platelet transfusion was associated with higher production of transforming growth factor-β and as well as lower levels of tumour necrosis factor-α and neutrophil elastase in plasma and lung. None of these platelet effects was observed in the presence of Tirofiban. Our results suggest that, at least under certain conditions, platelets can protect lung from injury induced by systemic inflammatory responses. PMID:28155889

  9. Platelet factor XIII increases the fibrinolytic resistance of platelet-rich clots by accelerating the crosslinking of alpha 2-antiplasmin to fibrin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reed, G. L.; Matsueda, G. R.; Haber, E.

    1992-01-01

    Platelet clots resist fibrinolysis by plasminogen activators. We hypothesized that platelet factor XIII may enhance the fibrinolytic resistance of platelet-rich clots by catalyzing the crosslinking of alpha 2-antiplasmin (alpha 2AP) to fibrin. Analysis of plasma clot structure by polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis and immunoblotting revealed accelerated alpha 2AP-fibrin crosslinking in platelet-rich compared with platelet-depleted plasma clots. A similar study of clots formed with purified fibrinogen (depleted of factor XIII activity), isolated platelets, and specific factor XIII inhibitors indicated that this accelerated crosslinking was due to the catalytic activity of platelet factor XIII. Moreover, when washed platelets were aggregated by thrombin, there was evidence of platelet factor XIII-mediated crosslinking between platelet alpha 2AP and platelet fibrin(ogen). Specific inhibition (by a monoclonal antibody) of the alpha 2AP associated with washed platelet aggregates accelerated the fibrinolysis of the platelet aggregate. Thus in platelet-rich plasma clots, and in thrombin-induced platelet aggregates, platelet factor XIII actively formed alpha 2AP-fibrin crosslinks, which appeared to enhance the resistance of platelet-rich clots to fibrinolysis.

  10. Platelet inhibition by nitrite is dependent on erythrocytes and deoxygenation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sirada Srihirun

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Nitrite is a nitric oxide (NO metabolite in tissues and blood, which can be converted to NO under hypoxia to facilitate tissue perfusion. Although nitrite is known to cause vasodilation following its reduction to NO, the effect of nitrite on platelet activity remains unclear. In this study, the effect of nitrite and nitrite+erythrocytes, with and without deoxygenation, on platelet activity was investigated. METHODOLOGY/FINDING: Platelet aggregation was studied in platelet-rich plasma (PRP and PRP+erythrocytes by turbidimetric and impedance aggregometry, respectively. In PRP, DEANONOate inhibited platelet aggregation induced by ADP while nitrite had no effect on platelets. In PRP+erythrocytes, the inhibitory effect of DEANONOate on platelets decreased whereas nitrite at physiologic concentration (0.1 µM inhibited platelet aggregation and ATP release. The effect of nitrite+erythrocytes on platelets was abrogated by C-PTIO (a membrane-impermeable NO scavenger, suggesting an NO-mediated action. Furthermore, deoxygenation enhanced the effect of nitrite as observed from a decrease of P-selectin expression and increase of the cGMP levels in platelets. The ADP-induced platelet aggregation in whole blood showed inverse correlations with the nitrite levels in whole blood and erythrocytes. CONCLUSION: Nitrite alone at physiological levels has no effect on platelets in plasma. Nitrite in the presence of erythrocytes inhibits platelets through its reduction to NO, which is promoted by deoxygenation. Nitrite may have role in modulating platelet activity in the circulation, especially during hypoxia.

  11. Arbutin and decrease of potentially toxic substances generated in human blood neutrophils.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pečivová, Jana; Nosál', Radomír; Sviteková, Klára; Mačičková, Tatiana

    2014-12-01

    Neutrophils, highly motile phagocytic cells, constitute the first line of host defense and simultaneously they are considered to be central cells of chronic inflammation. In combination with standard therapeutic procedures, natural substances are gaining interest as an option for enhancing the effectiveness of treatment of inflammatory diseases. We investigated the effect of arbutin and carvedilol and of their combination on 4β-phorbol-12β-myristate-13α-acetate- stimulated functions of human isolated neutrophils. Cells were preincubated with the drugs tested and subsequently stimulated. Superoxide (with or without blood platelets, in the rate close to physiological conditions [1:50]) and HOCl generation, elastase and myeloperoxidase release were determined spectrophotometrically and phospholipase D activation spectrofluorometrically. The combined effect of arbutin and carvedilol was found to be more effective than the effect of each compound alone. Our study provided evidence supporting the potential beneficial effect of arbutin alone or in combination with carvedilol in diminishing tissue damage by decreasing phospholipase D, myeloperoxidase and elastase activity and by attenuating the generation of superoxide and the subsequently derived reactive oxygen species. The presented data indicate the ability of arbutin to suppress the onset and progression of inflammation.

  12. Multiple Phenotypic Changes Define Neutrophil Priming

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miralda, Irina; Uriarte, Silvia M.; McLeish, Kenneth R.

    2017-01-01

    Exposure to pro-inflammatory cytokines, chemokines, mitochondrial contents, and bacterial and viral products induces neutrophils to transition from a basal state into a primed one, which is currently defined as an enhanced response to activating stimuli. Although, typically associated with enhanced generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) by the NADPH oxidase, primed neutrophils show enhanced responsiveness of exocytosis, NET formation, and chemotaxis. Phenotypic changes associated with priming also include activation of a subset of functions, including adhesion, transcription, metabolism, and rate of apoptosis. This review summarizes the breadth of phenotypic changes associated with priming and reviews current knowledge of the molecular mechanisms behind those changes. We conclude that the current definition of priming is too restrictive. Priming represents a combination of enhanced responsiveness and activated functions that regulate both adaptive and innate immune responses. PMID:28611952

  13. Early intraplatelet signaling enhances the release of human platelet PAR-1 and -4 amino-terminal peptides in response to thrombin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ofosu, Frederick A; Dewar, Lori; Song, Yingqi; Cedrone, Aisha C; Hortelano, Gonzalo; Craven, Sharon J

    2009-02-24

    Activation of washed human platelets initiated with alpha-thrombin, SFLLRN, or AYPGKF invariably results in the generation of PAR-1-(1-41) and PAR-4-(1-47). PAR-1-(1-41) and PAR-4-(1-47) are amino-terminal peptides generated when PAR-1 and -4 are cleaved in their first extracellular domains after R(41) and R(47), respectively, to expose the tethered ligand domains of PAR-1 and -4. Since soybean trypsin inhibitor decreases generation of PAR-1-(1-41) and PAR-4-(1-47) and other platelet aggregation-related responses to these three agonists, but does not inactivate alpha-thrombin, a platelet trypsin-like proteinase apparently activates PAR-1 and -4 to propagate PAR-dependent platelet responses. This study identified the signaling pathways implicated in the generation of the platelet proteinase that in turn produces PAR-1-(1-41) and PAR-4-(1-47), to thereby drive the subsequent PAR-dependent platelet aggregation-related responses to alpha-thrombin, SFLLRN, or AYPGKF. Only inhibitors of signaling enzymes that prevented ATP release (forskolin, PGE(1), or BIMI-1) prevented or delayed the generation of PAR-1-(1-41) and PAR-4-(1-47) in response to all three agonists. SBTI prevented platelet aggregation initiated by alpha-thrombin, SFLLRN, or AYPGKF but did so less effectively when it was added 10 s after each agonist. Thus, the platelet-derived proteinase acts within 10 s of each agonist addition to generate PAR-1-(1-41) and PAR-4-(1-47). Furthermore, alpha-thrombin may not effectively catalyze PAR-1-(1-41) and PAR-4-(1-47) generation. We propose that unidentified ATP-dependent phosphorylation reactions catalyzed by PKC help to generate the platelet-derived proteinase that propagates human platelet PAR-1 and -4 activation by the three agonists.

  14. Neutrophils, from marrow to microbes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Borregaard, Niels

    2010-01-01

    . Neutrophils circulate in the blood as dormant cells. At sites of infection, endothelial cells capture bypassing neutrophils and guide them through the endothelial cell lining whereby the neutrophils are activated and tuned for the subsequent interaction with microbes. Once in tissues, neutrophils kill......Neutrophils are produced in the bone marrow from stem cells that proliferate and differentiate to mature neutrophils fully equipped with an armory of granules. These contain proteins that enable the neutrophil to deliver lethal hits against microorganisms, but also to cause great tissue damage...... microorganisms by microbicidal agents liberated from granules or generated by metabolic activation. As a final act, neutrophils can extrude stands of DNA with bactericidal proteins attached that act as extracellular traps for microorganisms....

  15. Unaltered Angiogenesis-Regulating Activities of Platelets in Mild Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus despite a Marked Platelet Hyperreactivity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miao, Xinyan; Zhang, Wei; Huang, Zhangsen

    2016-01-01

    Type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) is associated with platelet dysfunction and impaired angiogenesis. Aim of the study is to investigate if platelet dysfunction might hamper platelet angiogenic activities in T2DM patients. Sixteen T2DM patients and gender/age-matched non-diabetic controls were studied. Flow cytometry and endothelial colony forming cell (ECFC) tube formation on matrigel were used to assess platelet reactivity and angiogenic activity, respectively. Thrombin receptor PAR1-activating peptide (PAR1-AP) induced higher platelet P-selectin expression, and evoked more rapid and intense platelet annexin V binding in T2DM patients, seen as a more rapid increase of annexin V+ platelets (24.3±6.4% vs 12.6±3.8% in control at 2 min) and a higher elevation (30.9±5.1% vs 24.3±3.0% at 8 min). However, PAR1-AP and PAR4-AP induced similar releases of angiogenic regulators from platelets, and both stimuli evoked platelet release of platelet angiogenic regulators to similar extents in T2DM and control subjects. Thus, PAR1-stimulated platelet releasate (PAR1-PR) and PAR4-PR similarly enhanced capillary-like network/tube formation of ECFCs, and the enhancements did not differ between T2DM and control subjects. Direct supplementation of platelets to ECFCs at the ratio of 1:200 enhanced ECFC tube formation even more markedly, leading to approximately 100% increases of the total branch points of ECFC tube formation, for which the enhancements were also similar between patients and controls. In conclusion, platelets from T2DM subjects are hyperreactive. Platelet activation induced by high doses of PAR1-AP, however, results in similar releases of angiogenic regulators in mild T2DM and control subjects. Platelets from T2DM and control subjects also demonstrate similar enhancements on ECFC angiogenic activities. PMID:27612088

  16. Platelet matching for alloimmunized patients

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    S H.Hsu

    2010-01-01

    @@ Platelets play an essential role in blood coagulation,hemostasis and maintenance of vascular integrity.Platelets are utilized primarily to prevent or treat bleeding in thrombocytopenic patients and patients with impaired platelet production in the bone marrow and/or with dysfunctional platelets.In current practice,platelet transfusion begins with randomly selected platelet products:either pooled platelets prepared from whole blood derived platelets; or single donor platelets prepared by apheresis procedures.

  17. Enhancement of osteogenic differentiation of human adipose derived stem cells by the controlled release of platelet lysates from hybrid scaffolds produced by supercritical fluid foaming.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santo, Vítor E; Duarte, Ana Rita C; Popa, Elena G; Gomes, Manuela E; Mano, João F; Reis, Rui L

    2012-08-20

    A new generation of scaffolds capable of acting not only as support for cells but also as a source of biological cues to promote tissue regeneration is currently a hot topic of in bone Tissue Engineering (TE) research. The inclusion of growth factor (GF) controlled release functionalities in the scaffolds is a possible strategy to achieve such goal. Platelet Lysate (PL) is an autologous source of GFs, providing several bioactive agents known to act on bone regeneration. In this study, chitosan-chondroitin sulfate nanoparticles loaded with PL were included in a poly(D,L-lactic acid) foam produced by supercritical fluid foaming. The tridimensional (3D) structures were then seeded with human adipose-derived stem cells (hASCs) and cultured in vitro under osteogenic stimulus. The osteogenic differentiation of the seeded hASCs was observed earlier for the PL-loaded constructs, as shown by the earlier alkaline phosphatase peak and calcium detection and stronger Runx2 expression at day 7 of culture, in comparison with the control scaffolds. Osteocalcin gene expression was upregulated in presence of PL during all culture period, which indicates an enhanced osteogenic induction. These results suggest the synergistic effect of PL and hASCs in combinatory TE strategies and support the potential of PL to increase the multifunctionality of the 3D hybrid construct for bone TE applications.

  18. Platelet-rich plasma loaded hydrogel scaffold enhances chondrogenic differentiation and maturation with up-regulation of CB1 and CB2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Hye-Rim; Park, Kyung Min; Joung, Yoon Ki; Park, Ki Dong; Do, Sun Hee

    2012-05-10

    Three-dimensional scaffolds like hydrogels can be used for cell and drug delivery and have become a major research focus in tissue engineering. Presently, we investigated the regenerative potency of platelet-rich plasma (PRP) combined with a chondrocyte/hydrogel composite scaffold in the repair of articular cartilage defects using a rabbit model. Primary isolated joint chondrocytes from the trachlear groove of rabbit were cultured in hydrogels as follows; hydrogel (2900 Pa or 5900 Pa)+chondrocytes and hydrogel+chondrocytes+PRP for in vitro analysis and in vivo implantation. The 5900 Pa hydrogel markedly increased cellular viability and development in a time-dependent manner. Furthermore, the hydrogels attenuated the expression of SOX-9, aggrecan, and type II collagen. PRP-containing hydrogels produced an immediate increase in mRNA levels of cannabinoid receptor (CB)1 and CB2, compared with control and PRP-free hydrogels. Osteochondral defects were enhanced recovery with formation of cartilage and perichondrium in the 5900 Pa hydrogel+chondrocytes+PRP. Hydrogel may provide a suitable environment for proliferation and maturation of joint chondrocytes in relation to the gelation density and bioactive sources like PRP resulting in improvement for cartilage regeneration.

  19. Polyethylene Oxide Films Polymerized by Radio Frequency Plasma-Enhanced Chemical Vapour Phase Deposition and Its Adsorption Behaviour of Platelet-Rich Plasma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Wen-Juan; Xie, Fen-Yan; Chen, Qiang; Weng, Jing

    2008-10-01

    We present polyethylene oxide (PEO) functional films polymerized by rf plasma-enhanced vapour chemical deposition (rf-PECVD) on p-Si (100) surface with precursor ethylene glycol dimethyl ether (EGDME) and diluted Ar in pulsed plasma mode. The influences of discharge parameters on the film properties and compounds are investigated. The film structure is analysed by Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy. The water contact angle measurement and atomic force microscope (AFM) are employed to examine the surface polarity and to detect surface morphology, respectively. It is concluded that the smaller duty cycle in pulsed plasma mode contributes to the rich C-O-C (EO) group on the surfaces. As an application, the adsorption behaviour of platelet-rich plasma on plasma polymerization films performed in-vitro is explored. The shapes of attached cells are studied in detail by an optic invert microscope, which clarifies that high-density C-O-C groups on surfaces are responsible for non-fouling adsorption behaviour of the PEO films.

  20. Polyethylene Oxide Films Polymerized by Radio Frequency Plasma-Enhanced Chemical Vapour Phase Deposition and Its Adsorption Behaviour of Platelet-Rich Plasma

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    HU Wen-Juan; XIE Fen-Yan; CHEN Qiang; WENG Jing

    2008-01-01

    We present polyethylene oxide (PEO) functional films polymerized by rf plasma-enhanced vapour chemical deposition (rf-PECVD) on p-Si (100) surface with precursor ethylene glycol dimethyl ether (EGDME) and diluted Ar in pulsed plasma mode. The influences of discharge parameters on the film properties and compounds are investigated. The film structure is analysed by Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy. The water contact angle measurement and atomic force microscope (AFM) are employed to examine the surface polarity and to detect surface morphology, respectively. It is concluded that the smaller duty cycle in pulsed plasma mode contributes to the rich C-O-C (EO) group on the surfaces. As an application, the adsorption behaviour of platelet-rich plasma on plasma polymerization films performed in-vitro is explored. The shapes of attached cells are studied in detail by an optic invert microscope, which clarifies that high-density C-O-C groups on surfaces are responsible for non-fouling adsorption behaviour of the PEO films.

  1. Platelet-rich plasma and fibrin glue-coated bioactive ceramics enhance growth and differentiation of goat bone marrow-derived stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nair, Manitha B; Varma, H K; John, Annie

    2009-07-01

    New biotechnologies such as tissue engineering require functionally active cells within supportive matrices where the physical and chemical stimulus provided by the matrix is indispensable to determine the cellular behavior. This study has investigated the influence of platelet-rich plasma (PRP) and fibrin glue (FG) on the functional activity of goat bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells (gBMSCs) that differentiated into the osteogenic lineage. To achieve this goal, PRP and FG were separately coated on bioactive ceramics like hydroxyapatite (HA) and silica-coated HA (HASi), on which gBMSCs were seeded and induced to differentiate into the osteogenic lineage for 28 days. The cells were then analyzed for viability (lactate dehydrogenase assay: acridine orange and ethidium bromide staining), morphology (scanning electron microscopy), proliferation (picogreen assay), cell cycle assay (propidium iodide staining), and differentiation (alkaline phosphatase [ALP] activity and real-time PCR analysis of ALP, osteocalcin, and osteopontin gene). It has been observed that PRP and FG have appreciably favored the viability, spreading, and proliferation of osteogenic-induced gBMSCs. The osteopontin and osteocalcin expression was significantly enhanced on PRP- and FG-coated HA and HASi, but PRP had effect on neither ALP expression nor ALP activity. The results of this study have depicted that FG-coated ceramics were better than PRP-coated and bare matrices. Among all, the excellent performance was shown by FG coated HASi, which may be attributed to the communal action of the stimulus emanated by Si in HASi and the temporary extracellular matrix provided by FG over HASi. Thus, we can conclude that PRP or FG in combination with bioactive ceramics could possibly enhance the functional activity of cells to a greater extent, promoting the hybrid composite as a promising candidate for bone tissue engineering applications.

  2. Platelet-Derived Growth Factor B-Chain of Hematopoietic Origin Is Not Necessary for Granulation Tissue Formation and Its Absence Enhances Vascularization

    OpenAIRE

    Buetow, Bernard S; Crosby, Jeffrey R.; Wolfgang E Kaminski; Ramachandran, Ravi K.; Lindahl, Per; Martin, Paul; Betsholtz, Christer; Seifert, Ronald A.; Raines, Elaine W.; Bowen-Pope, Daniel F.

    2001-01-01

    The hypothesis that wound repair is augmented by delivery of platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF) from platelets and macrophages is an attractive extrapolation from the known activities of PDGF in cell culture and in vivo. To test this hypothesis in mice, we prepared hematopoietic chimeras, in which the hematopoietic system of a normal adult mouse was replaced by the hematopoietic system of a PDGF B-chain −/− or +/+ donor. We initiated local granulation tissue formation either by implanting ...

  3. Cefodizime (HR 221) potentiation of human neutrophil oxygen-independent bactericidal activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Labro, M T; Amit, N; Babin-Chevaye, C; Hakim, J

    1987-03-01

    The enhanced bactericidal activity of human neutrophils induced by cefotaxime and cefodizime, two methoxy-imino-amino- 2-thiazolyl cephalosporins, is linked to the cell stimulation of oxygen-dependent and oxygen-independent killing systems, respectively. Cefotaxime enhances both the killing and the oxidative response of neutrophils to opsonized particulate stimuli (bacteria for both activities and opsonized zymosan for the oxidative burst). These effects were not observed with non-opsonized particles (bacteria or zymosan) or soluble stimuli. On the contrary, cefodizime enhances killing of opsonized and non-opsonized bacteria by neutrophils regardless of treatment with phenylbutazone which blocks neutrophil oxidative metabolism. Cefodizime does not universally alter the oxidative burst induced by various stimuli, but has been shown to enhance the bactericidal activity of crude extracts of neutrophil granules. The data suggest that cefodizime and non O2-dependent killing systems of neutrophils cooperate in killing bacteria.

  4. At the Bench: Neutrophil extracellular traps (NETs) highlight novel aspects of innate immune system involvement in autoimmune diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grayson, Peter C; Kaplan, Mariana J

    2016-02-01

    The putative role of neutrophils in host defense against pathogens is a well-recognized aspect of neutrophil function. The discovery of neutrophil extracellular traps has expanded the known range of neutrophil defense mechanisms and catalyzed a discipline of research focused upon ways in which neutrophils can shape the immunologic landscape of certain autoimmune diseases, including systemic lupus erythematosus. Enhanced neutrophil extracellular trap formation and impaired neutrophil extracellular trap clearance may contribute to immunogenicity in systemic lupus erythematosus and other autoimmune diseases by promoting the externalization of modified autoantigens, inducing synthesis of type I IFNs, stimulating the inflammasome, and activating both the classic and alternative pathways of the complement system. Vasculopathy is a central feature of many autoimmune diseases, and neutrophil extracellular traps may contribute directly to endothelial cell dysfunction, atherosclerotic plaque burden, and thrombosis. The elucidation of the subcellular events of neutrophil extracellular trap formation may generate novel, therapeutic strategies that target the innate immune system in autoimmune and vascular diseases.

  5. Clinical application of radiolabelled platelets

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kessler, C. (Medical Univ. Lubeck, Lubeck (DE))

    1990-01-01

    This book presents papers on the clinical applications of radiolabelled platelets. The papers are grouped into six sections on platelet labelling techniques, radiolabelled platelets in cardiology, monitoring of antiplatelet therapy, platelet scintigraphy in stroke patients, platelet scintigraphy in angiology, and platelet scintigraphy in hematology and other clinical applications, including renal transplant rejection.

  6. The reported clinical utility of taurine in ischemic disorders may reflect a down-regulation of neutrophil activation and adhesion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCarty, M F

    1999-10-01

    The first publications regarding clinical use of taurine were Italian reports claiming therapeutic efficacy in angina, intermittent claudication and symptomatic cerebral arteriosclerosis. A down-regulation of neutrophil activation and endothelial adhesion might plausibly account for these observations. Endothelial platelet-activating factor (PAF) is a crucial stimulus to neutrophil adhesion and activation, whereas endothelial nitric oxide (NO) suppresses PAF production and acts in various other ways to antagonize binding and activation of neutrophils. Hypochlorous acid (HOCl), a neutrophil product which avidly oxidizes many sulfhydryl-dependent proteins, can be expected to inhibit NO synthase while up-regulating PAF generation; thus, a vicious circle can be postulated whereby HOCl released by marginating neutrophils acts on capillary or venular endothelium to promote further neutrophil adhesion and activation. Taurine is the natural detoxicant of HOCl, and thus has the potential to intervene in this vicious circle, promoting a less adhesive endothelium and restraining excessive neutrophil activation. Agents which inhibit the action of PAF on neutrophils, such as ginkgolides and pentoxifylline, have documented utility in ischemic disorders and presumably would complement the efficacy of taurine in this regard. Fish oil, which inhibits endothelial expression of various adhesion factors and probably PAF as well, and which suppresses neutrophil leukotriene production, may likewise be useful in ischemia. These agents may additionally constitute a non-toxic strategy for treating inflammatory disorders in which activated neutrophils play a prominent pathogenic role. Double-blind studies to confirm the efficacy of taurine in symptomatic chronic ischemia are needed.

  7. Autophagy is induced by anti-neutrophil cytoplasmic Abs and promotes neutrophil extracellular traps formation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sha, Li-Li; Wang, Huan; Wang, Chen; Peng, Hong-Ying; Chen, Min; Zhao, Ming-Hui

    2016-11-01

    Dysregulated neutrophil extracellular traps (NETs) formation contributes to the pathogenesis of anti-neutrophil cytoplasmic Ab (ANCA)-associated vasculitis (AAV). Increasing evidence indicates that autophagy is involved in the process of NETs formation. In this study, we aimed to investigate whether ANCA could induce autophagy in the process of NETs formation. Autophagy was detected using live cell imaging, microtubule-associated protein light chain 3B (LC3B) accumulation and Western blotting. The results showed that autophagy vacuolization was detected in neutrophils treated with ANCA-positive IgG by live cell imaging. This effect was enhanced by rapamycin, the autophagy inducer, and weakened by 3-methyladenine (3-MA), the autophagy inhibitor. In line with these results, the autophagy marker, LC3B, showed a punctate distribution pattern in the neutrophils stimulated with ANCA-positive IgG. In the presence of rapamycin, LC3B accumulation was further increased; however, this effect was attenuated by 3-MA. Moreover, incubated with ANCA-positive IgG, the NETosis rate significantly increased compared with the unstimulated group. And, the rate significantly increased or decreased in the neutrophils pretreated with rapamycin or 3-MA, respectively, as compared with the cells incubated with ANCA-positive IgG. Overall, this study demonstrates that autophagy is induced by ANCA and promotes ANCA-induced NETs formation.

  8. Neutrophil bactericidal activity against Staphylococcus aureus adherent on biological surfaces. Surface-bound extracellular matrix proteins activate intracellular killing by oxygen-dependent and -independent mechanisms.

    OpenAIRE

    Hermann, M.; Jaconi, M E; Dahlgren, C; Waldvogel, F A; Stendahl, O; Lew, D P

    1990-01-01

    The activation patterns of surface adherent neutrophils are modulated via interaction of extracellular matrix proteins with neutrophil integrins. To evaluate neutrophil bactericidal activity, Staphylococcus aureus adherent to biological surfaces were incubated with neutrophils and serum, and the survival of surface bacteria was determined. When compared to albumin-coated surfaces, the bactericidal activity of neutrophils adherent to purified human extracellular matrix was markedly enhanced (m...

  9. Stimulation of Platelet Death by Vancomycin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Syeda T. Towhid

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Background/Aims: Side effects of vancomycin, a widely used antibiotic, include thrombocytopenia. The vancomycin-induced thrombocytopenia has been attributed to immune reactions. At least in theory, thrombocytopenia could result in part from the triggering of apoptosis, which results in cell shrinkage and cell membrane scrambling with subsequent phosphatidylserine exposure at the cell surface. The cell membrane scrambling could be initiated by a signaling involving increase of cytosolic Ca2+ activity, ceramide formation, mitochondrial depolarization and/or caspase activation. Vancomycin has indeed been shown to trigger neutrophil apoptosis. An effect of vancomycin on platelet apoptosis has, however, never been tested. The present study thus explored the effect of vancomycin on platelet activation and apoptosis. Methods: Human blood platelets were exposed to vancomycin and forward scatter was utilized to estimate cell volume, annexin V-binding to quantify phosphatidylserine (PS exposure, Fluo-3 AM fluorescence to estimate cytosolic Ca2+ activity ([Ca2+]i, antibodies to quantify ceramide formation and immunofluorescence to quantify protein abundance of active caspase-3. Results: A 30 minutes exposure to vancomycin (≥1 µg/ ml decreased cell volume, triggered annexin V-binding, increased [Ca2+]i, activated caspase 3, stimulated ceramide formation, triggered release of thromboxane B2, and upregulated surface expression of CD62P (P-selectin as well as activated integrin αllbβ3. Annexin V-binding and upregulation of CD62P (P-selectin and integrin αllbβ3 was significantly blunted by removal of extracellular Ca2+. Annexin V-binding was not significantly blunted by pan-caspase inhibitor zVAD-FMK (1 µM. In conclusion, vancomycin results in platelet activation and suicidal platelet death with increase of [Ca2+]i, caspase-3 activation, cell membrane scrambling and cell shrinkage. Activation and cell membrane scrambling required the presence of Ca2

  10. Activated Neutrophils Are Associated with Pediatric Cerebral Malaria Vasculopathy in Malawian Children

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feintuch, Catherine Manix; Saidi, Alex; Seydel, Karl; Chen, Grace; Goldman-Yassen, Adam; Mita-Mendoza, Neida K.; Kim, Ryung S.; Frenette, Paul S.; Taylor, Terrie

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Most patients with cerebral malaria (CM) sustain cerebral microvascular sequestration of Plasmodium falciparum-infected red blood cells (iRBCs). Although many young children are infected with P. falciparum, CM remains a rare outcome; thus, we hypothesized that specific host conditions facilitate iRBC cerebral sequestration. To identify these host factors, we compared the peripheral whole-blood transcriptomes of Malawian children with iRBC cerebral sequestration, identified as malarial-retinopathy-positive CM (Ret+CM), to the transcriptomes of children with CM and no cerebral iRBC sequestration, defined as malarial-retinopathy-negative CM (Ret-CM). Ret+CM was associated with upregulation of 103 gene set pathways, including cytokine, blood coagulation, and extracellular matrix (ECM) pathways (P < 0.01; false-discovery rate [FDR] of <0.05). Neutrophil transcripts were the most highly upregulated individual transcripts in Ret+CM patients. Activated neutrophils can modulate diverse host processes, including the ECM, inflammation, and platelet biology to potentially facilitate parasite sequestration. Therefore, we compared plasma neutrophil proteins and neutrophil chemotaxis between Ret+CM and Ret-CM patients. Plasma levels of human neutrophil elastase, myeloperoxidase, and proteinase 3, but not lactoferrin or lipocalin, were elevated in Ret+CM patients, and neutrophil chemotaxis was impaired, possibly related to increased plasma heme. Neutrophils were rarely seen in CM brain microvasculature autopsy samples, and no neutrophil extracellular traps were found, suggesting that a putative neutrophil effect on endothelial cell biology results from neutrophil soluble factors rather than direct neutrophil cellular tissue effects. Meanwhile, children with Ret-CM had lower levels of inflammation, higher levels of alpha interferon, and upregulation of Toll-like receptor pathways and other host transcriptional pathways, which may represent responses that do not favor

  11. Platelets in leucocyte recruitment and function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rossaint, Jan; Zarbock, Alexander

    2015-08-01

    Platelets have a longstanding recognition as an essential cellular component of the coagulation system. However, substantial research over the last decade has added another important aspect to platelet function in that they are also an integral part of the innate immune system. Complex organisms are facing a constant threat of infections by invading pathogens, and they have developed a sophisticated and elegant measure to combat this threat, namely the immune system. Leucocyte recruitment to sites of infections is an essential step at the forefront of the immune response. Platelets have been shown to be involved in several steps of this process and they are an integrated connecting element among haemostasis, host defence, and additional immunological functions (e.g. neutrophil extracellular traps formation). However, the immune system also requires a tight regulation, as an overshooting immune response carries the risk of harming the host itself. This review aims at highlighting the unique features and molecular mechanisms that allow for the interactions of platelets and leucocytes and the regulation of this process. Furthermore, this article identifies the functional relevance of these events for the immune response.

  12. Platelets: at the nexus of antimicrobial defence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yeaman, Michael R

    2014-06-01

    Platelets have traditionally been viewed as fragmentary mediators of coagulation. However, recent molecular and cellular evidence suggests that they have multiple roles in host defence against infection. From first-responders that detect pathogens and rapidly deploy host-defence peptides, to beacons that recruit and enhance leukocyte functions in the context of infection, to liaisons that facilitate the T cell-B cell crosstalk that is required in adaptive immunity, platelets represent a nexus at the intersection of haemostasis and antimicrobial host defence. In this Review, I consider recent insights into the antimicrobial roles of platelets, which are mediated both directly and indirectly to integrate innate and adaptive immune responses to pathogens.

  13. PLATELET COUNT, ITS SIGNIFICANCE IN BURN INJURY MANAGEMENT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shanti Prakash

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION: Platelet count evaluation in a burn trauma patient has much significance because it has been studied in literature that decrease i n platelet count is an indicator of septicaemia in the patient and vice versa thus knowing the count level of platelets, the treatment of burn patients can be done accordingly. Septicaemia is most important cause of mortality in burn patients, the survival of the patients can only be assured if septicaemia is detected early and controlled. Platelet s play an important role in haemostaticdisorder and immune response impairment in burn patient . [1] The aim of study is to see the significance of platelet count i nvestigation in burn patient and then their outcome, whether survival or not survival. MATERIAL METHODS: We investigated 480 burn patients within the ages of 18 and 60 Years and the percentage of the burn was between 20% and 70%. Platelet count was investi gated by visual method in all patients. The investigation of the platelet count was done on day 1, 3, 7, 14 & 21 of the patients. Other parameters TLC , neutrophil count was done by visual methods. Serum creatinine estimation was also done in all patients. RESULT: In our study we found that the platelet count gradually increased towards normal count and maintained till the discharge in survival patients, and in non - survival the platelet count gradually declined. The statistical significant of difference in m ean platelet counts on different post burn days in survivors and non survivors were studied by using standard t test. It was observed that the actual difference between two means is more than double of the SED between two means in different post burn days – i . e. , (Day 1, 3, 7, 14 &, 21. So difference is significant (P<0.05. CONCLUSION: It can be concluded that platelet count decreases initially in all cases of burn sepsis. It gradually rises to normal in case of survivors and declines gradually in non surv ivors. So serial declining

  14. Stimulation of Toll-like receptor 2 in human platelets induces a thromboinflammatory response through activation of phosphoinositide 3-kinase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blair, Price; Rex, Sybille; Vitseva, Olga; Beaulieu, Lea; Tanriverdi, Kahraman; Chakrabarti, Subrata; Hayashi, Chie; Genco, Caroline A; Iafrati, Mark; Freedman, Jane E

    2009-02-13

    Cells of the innate immune system use Toll-like receptors (TLRs) to initiate the proinflammatory response to microbial infection. Recent studies have shown acute infections are associated with a transient increase in the risk of vascular thrombotic events. Although platelets play a central role in acute thrombosis and accumulating evidence demonstrates their role in inflammation and innate immunity, investigations into the expression and functionality of platelet TLRs have been limited. In the present study, we demonstrate that human platelets express TLR2, TLR1, and TLR6. Incubation of isolated platelets with Pam(3)CSK4, a synthetic TLR2/TLR1 agonist, directly induced platelet aggregation and adhesion to collagen. These functional responses were inhibited in TLR2-deficient mice and, in human platelets, by pretreatment with TLR2-blocking antibody. Stimulation of platelet TLR2 also increased P-selectin surface expression, activation of integrin alpha(IIb)beta(3), generation of reactive oxygen species, and, in human whole blood, formation of platelet-neutrophil heterotypic aggregates. TLR2 stimulation also activated the phosphoinositide 3-kinase (PI3-K)/Akt signaling pathway in platelets, and inhibition of PI3-K significantly reduced Pam(3)CSK4-induced platelet responses. In vivo challenge with live Porphyromonas gingivalis, a Gram-negative pathogenic bacterium that uses TLR2 for innate immune signaling, also induced significant formation of platelet-neutrophil aggregates in wild-type but not TLR2-deficient mice. Together, these data provide the first demonstration that human platelets express functional TLR2 capable of recognizing bacterial components and activating the platelet thrombotic and/or inflammatory pathways. This work substantiates the role of platelets in the immune and inflammatory response and suggests a mechanism by which bacteria could directly activate platelets.

  15. Leukotriene B4 mediates neutrophil migration induced by heme.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monteiro, Ana Paula T; Pinheiro, Carla S; Luna-Gomes, Tatiana; Alves, Liliane R; Maya-Monteiro, Clarissa M; Porto, Barbara N; Barja-Fidalgo, Christina; Benjamim, Claudia F; Peters-Golden, Marc; Bandeira-Melo, Christianne; Bozza, Marcelo T; Canetti, Claudio

    2011-06-01

    High concentrations of free heme found during hemolytic events or cell damage leads to inflammation, characterized by neutrophil recruitment and production of reactive oxygen species, through mechanisms not yet elucidated. In this study, we provide evidence that heme-induced neutrophilic inflammation depends on endogenous activity of the macrophage-derived lipid mediator leukotriene B(4) (LTB(4)). In vivo, heme-induced neutrophil recruitment into the peritoneal cavity of mice was attenuated by pretreatment with 5-lipoxygenase (5-LO) inhibitors and leukotriene B(4) receptor 1 (BLT1) receptor antagonists as well as in 5-LO knockout (5-LO(-/-)) mice. Heme administration in vivo increased peritoneal levels of LTB(4) prior to and during neutrophil recruitment. Evidence that LTB(4) was synthesized by resident macrophages, but not mast cells, included the following: 1) immuno-localization of heme-induced LTB(4) was compartmentalized exclusively within lipid bodies of resident macrophages; 2) an increase in the macrophage population enhanced heme-induced neutrophil migration; 3) depletion of resident mast cells did not affect heme-induced LTB(4) production or neutrophil influx; 4) increased levels of LTB(4) were found in heme-stimulated peritoneal cavities displaying increased macrophage numbers; and 5) in vitro, heme was able to activate directly macrophages to synthesize LTB(4). Our findings uncover a crucial role of LTB(4) in neutrophil migration induced by heme and suggest that beneficial therapeutic outcomes could be achieved by targeting the 5-LO pathway in the treatment of inflammation associated with hemolytic processes.

  16. Pseudomonas aeruginosa ExoU augments neutrophil transepithelial migration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pazos, Michael A; Lanter, Bernard B; Yonker, Lael M; Eaton, Alex D; Pirzai, Waheed; Gronert, Karsten; Bonventre, Joseph V; Hurley, Bryan P

    2017-08-01

    Excessive neutrophil infiltration of the lungs is a common contributor to immune-related pathology in many pulmonary disease states. In response to pathogenic infection, airway epithelial cells produce hepoxilin A3 (HXA3), initiating neutrophil transepithelial migration. Migrated neutrophils amplify this recruitment by producing a secondary gradient of leukotriene B4 (LTB4). We sought to determine whether this two-step eicosanoid chemoattractant mechanism could be exploited by the pathogen Pseudomonas aeruginosa. ExoU, a P. aeruginosa cytotoxin, exhibits phospholipase A2 (PLA2) activity in eukaryotic hosts, an enzyme critical for generation of certain eicosanoids. Using in vitro and in vivo models of neutrophil transepithelial migration, we evaluated the impact of ExoU expression on eicosanoid generation and function. We conclude that ExoU, by virtue of its PLA2 activity, augments and compensates for endogenous host neutrophil cPLA2α function, leading to enhanced transepithelial migration. This suggests that ExoU expression in P. aeruginosa can circumvent immune regulation at key signaling checkpoints in the neutrophil, resulting in exacerbated neutrophil recruitment.

  17. Do neutrophil extracellular traps contribute to the heightened risk of thrombosis in inflammatory diseases?

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ashish N Rao; Nayef M Kazzaz; Jason S Knight

    2015-01-01

    Thrombotic events,both arterial and venous,are a major health concern worldwide. Further,autoimmune diseases,such as systemic lupus erythematosus,anti-neutrophil cytoplasmic antibody(ANCA)-associated vasculitis,and antiphospholipid syndrome,predispose to thrombosis,and thereby push the risk for these morbid events even higher. In recent years,neutrophils have been identified as important players in both arterial and venous thrombosis. Specifically,chromatin-based structures called neutrophil extracellular traps(NETs) play a key role in activating the coagulation cascade,recruiting platelets,and serving as scaffolding upon which the thrombus can be assembled. At the same time,neutrophils and NETs are emerging as important mediators of pathogenic inflammation in the aforementioned autoimmune diseases. Here,we first review the general role of NETs in thrombosis. We then posit that exaggerated NET release contributes to the prothrombotic diatheses of systemic lupus erythematosus,ANCA-associated vasculitis,and antiphospholipid syndrome.

  18. Clearance of circulating activated platelets in polycythemia vera and essential thrombocythemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maugeri, Norma; Malato, Simona; Femia, Eti A; Pugliano, Mariateresa; Campana, Lara; Lunghi, Francesca; Rovere-Querini, Patrizia; Lussana, Federico; Podda, Gianmarco; Cattaneo, Marco; Ciceri, Fabio; Manfredi, Angelo A

    2011-09-22

    Essential thrombocythemia (ET) and polycythemia vera (PV) are characterized by persistent platelet activation. The mechanisms involved in their clearance are poorly characterized. In the present study, we report that leukocytes were actively involved in platelet disposal in 51 patients with ET and 30 with PV, but not in 70 age- and sex-matched controls. The fraction of circulating neutrophils and monocytes that had phagocytosed platelets, as assessed by flow cytometry, was significantly higher in patients with PV or ET, independently of hydroxyurea treatment, than in controls. Platelet phagocytosis by circulating leukocytes was confirmed by confocal and electron microscopy. The lack of effect of hydroxyurea, which disrupts the P-selectin/P-selectin glycoprotein ligand 1 (PSGL-1) interaction, suggests a P-selectin-independent mechanism. This hypothesis was confirmed in an ad hoc animal model based on the in vivo injection of activated platelets from P-selectin(+/+) and P-selectin(-/-) mice. P-selectin expression was associated with an earlier and effective clearance of platelets by neutrophils. A second delayed, P-selectin-independent phase actively involved monocytes. Our results suggest that phagocytic clearance of platelets by leukocytes occurs in PV and ET, possibly involving P-selectin-dependent and -independent pathways, thus representing a novel mechanism to remove activated platelets from the circulation.

  19. Leukocyte accumulation promoting fibrin deposition is mediated in vivo by P-selectin on adherent platelets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palabrica, Theresa; Lobb, Roy; Furie, Barbara C.; Aronovitz, Mark; Benjamin, Christopher; Hsu, Yen-Ming; Sajer, Susan A.; Furie, Bruce

    1992-10-01

    THE glycoprotein P-selectin is a cell adhesion molecule of stimulated platelets and endothelial cells, which mediates the interaction of these cells with neutrophils and monocytes1,2. It is a membrane component of cell storage granules3-6, and is a member of the selectin family which includes E-selectin and L-selectin7,8. P-selectin recognizes both lineage-specific carbohydrate ligands on monocytes and neutrophils, including the Lewis x antigen, sialic acid, and a protein component9-12. In inflammation and thrombosis, P-selectin may mediate the interaction of leukocytes with platelets bound in the region of tissue injury and with stimulated endothelium1,2. To evaluate the role of P-selectin in platelet-leukocyte adhesion in vivo, the accumulation of leukocytes within an experimental thrombus was explored in an arteriovenous shunt model in baboons13. A Dacron graft implanted within an arteriovenous shunt is thrombogenic, accumulating platelets and fibrin within its lumen. These bound platelets express P-selectin14. Here we show that antibody inhibition of leukocyte binding to P-selectin expressed on platelets immobilized on the graft blocks leukocyte accumulation and inhibits the deposition of fibrin within the thrombus. These results indicate that P-selectin is an important adhesion molecule on platelets, mediating platelet-leukocyte binding in vivo, that the presence of leukocytes in thrombi is mediated by P-selectin, and that these leukocytes promote fibrin deposition.

  20. Human neutrophil alloantigens systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elyse Moritz

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available Neutrophil alloantigens are involved in a variety of clinical conditions including immune neutropenias, transfusion-related acute lung injury (TRALI, refractoriness to granulocyte transfusions and febrile transfusion reactions. In the last decade, considerable progress has been made in the characterization of the implicated antigens. Currently, seven antigens are assigned to five human neutrophil antigen (HNA systems. The HNA-1a, HNA-1b and HNA-1c antigens have been identified as polymorphic forms of the neutrophil Fcγ receptor IIIb (CD16b, encoded by three alleles. Recently, the primary structure of the HNA-2a antigen was elucidated and the HNA-2a-bearing glycoprotein was identified as a member of the Ly-6/uPAR superfamily, which has been clustered as CD177. The HNA-3a antigen is located on a 70-95 kDa glycoprotein; however, its molecular basis is still unknown. Finally, the HNA-4a and HNA-5a antigens were found to be caused by single nucleotide mutations in the αM (CD11b and αL (CD11a subunits of the leucocyte adhesion molecules (β2 integrins. Molecular and biochemical characterization of neutrophil antigenshave expanded our diagnostic tools by the introduction of genotyping techniques and immunoassays for antibody identification. Further studies in the field of neutrophil immunology will facilitate the prevention and management of transfusion reactions and immune diseases caused by neutrophil antibodies.Os aloantígenos de neutrófilos estão associados a várias condições clínicas como neutropenias imunes, insuficiência pulmonar relacionada à transfusão (TRALI, refratariedade à transfusão de granulócitos, e reações transfusionais febris. Na última década, foi observado considerável progresso na caracterização dos aloantígenos envolvidos nestas condições clínicas. Atualmente sete antígenos estão incluídos em cinco sistemas de antígenos de neutrófilo humano (HNA. Os antígenos HNA-1a, HNA-1b e HNA-1c foram

  1. Platelets and hemostasis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. A. Panteleev

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Platelets are anuclear cell fragments playing important role in hemostasis, termination of bleeding after damage, as well as in pathological thrombus formation. The main action of platelets is the formation of aggregates, overlapping the injury. They obtained the ability to aggregate by the transition process called activation. Despite the relatively simple and definite function platelet structure is very difficult: they have almost a full set of organelles, including the endoplasmic reticulum, mitochondria and other entities. When activated platelets secrete various granules interact with plasma proteins and red blood cells and other tissues. Their activation is controlled by multiple receptors and complex signaling cascades. In this review platelet structure, mechanisms of its functioning in health and disease, diagnostic methods of platelet function and approaches to their correction were considered. Particular attention will be given to those areas of the science of platelets, which still lay hidden mysteries.

  2. Cell Intrinsic Galectin-3 Attenuates Neutrophil ROS-Dependent Killing of Candida by Modulating CR3 Downstream Syk Activation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Sheng-Yang; Huang, Juin-Hua; Chen, Wen-Yu; Chan, Yi-Chen; Lin, Chun-Hung; Chen, Yee-Chun; Liu, Fu-Tong; Wu-Hsieh, Betty A.

    2017-01-01

    Invasive candidiasis is a leading cause of nosocomial bloodstream infection. Neutrophils are the important effector cells in host resistance to candidiasis. To investigate the modulation of neutrophil fungicidal function will advance our knowledge on the control of candidiasis. While recombinant galectin-3 enhances neutrophil phagocytosis of Candida, we found that intracellular galectin-3 downregulates neutrophil fungicidal functions. Co-immunoprecipitation and immunofluorescence staining reveal that cytosolic gal3 physically interacts with Syk in neutrophils after Candida stimulation. Gal3−/− neutrophils have higher level of Syk activation as well as greater abilities to generate reactive oxygen species (ROS) and kill Candida than gal3+/+ cells. While galectin-3 deficiency modulates neutrophil and macrophage activation and the recruitment of monocytes and dendritic cells, the deficiency does not affect the numbers of infiltrating neutrophils or macrophages. Galectin-3 deficiency ameliorates systemic candidiasis by reducing fungal burden, renal pathology, and mortality. Adoptive transfer experiments demonstrate that cell intrinsic galectin-3 negatively regulates neutrophil effector functions against candidiasis. Reducing galectin-3 expression or activity by siRNA or gal3 inhibitor TD139 enhances human neutrophil ROS production. Mice treated with TD139 have enhanced ability to clear the fungus. Our work unravels the mechanism by which galectin-3 regulates Syk-dependent neutrophil fungicidal functions and raises the possibility that blocking gal3 in neutrophils may be a promising therapeutic strategy for treating systemic candidiasis. PMID:28217127

  3. Generation of Anti-platelet Autoantibody During Dengue Virus Infection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Huan-Yao Lei

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Dengue virus infection causes dengue fever, Dengue Hemorrhagic Fever (DHF and Dengue Shock Syndrome (DSS. Thrombocytopenia is common in dengue fever and is always found in DHF/DSS. The pathogenesis of thrombocytopenia is poorly understood. To further understand the relationship between anti-dengue virus antibody and anti-platelet antibody, we generated monoclonal anti-dengue virus antibodies from the dengue virus infected mice that developed transient thrombocytopenia post dengue infection. The analysis of a panel of monoclonal anti-NS-1 antibodies reveals three different patterns of platelet binding: strong, intermediate, or dull. Their isotypes are different, some are IgM while others are IgG1. Most of anti-platelet antibodies are cross-reactive with NS-1 of dengue virus and can be competitively inhibited by recombinant NS-1 protein, suggesting a molecular mimicry between dengue virus NS-1 protein and platelet. A clone, 13-F4-G5, preferentially bound activated platelets, can recognize two or three proteins around 150 kD on platelets. The binding to platelet would lyse the platelet in the presence of complement or enhance the ADP-induced platelet aggregation. Furthermore, some of these monoclonal antibodies would also react with the cellular antigens of BHK. Based on the data, we conclude that dengue virus infection induces auto anti-platelet antibodies which thereafter may involve in the manifestation of thrombocytopenia. A molecular mimicry between NS-1 and platelet is demonstrated.

  4. Modified expression of surface glyconjugates in stored human platelets

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dhar, A.; Ganguly, P.

    1987-05-01

    Platelets are anucleated cells which play an important part in blood coagulation and thrombosis. These cells may be stored in the blood bank for only 4/5 days. In order to improve the storage of platelets, it is essential to first understand the changes in these cells due to storage. In this work, human platelets were stored in autologous plasma at 4/sup 0/ or 22/sup 0/ and their surface changes were monitored with three lectins - wheat germ afflutinin (WGA), concanavalin A (Con A) and lentil lectin (LL). Blood was drawn from healthy donors and platelet rich plasma (PRP) was collected by slow speed centrifugation. Platelets stored at either temperature for different times showed increased sensitivity to agglutination by WGA after 34-48 hrs. Lectins, Con A and LL, which were not agglutinating to fresh platelets readily caused agglutination after 48-72 hrs. The platelets stored for 25 hrs or longer period were insensitive to thrombin but showed enhanced aggregation with WGA. Labelling of surface glycoconjugates of stored platelets with /sup 3/H-boro-hydride revealed progressive loss of a glycoprotein of Mr 150,000 (GPIb infinity) together with the appearance of components of Mr 69,000; Mr 60,000; Mr 25,000. New high molecular weight glycoproteins were also detected only in stored platelets. The author studies clearly indicate that modification or altered expression of platelets surface glycoproteins may be one factor of storage related dysfunction of platelets.

  5. Neutrophils and intracellular pathogens: beyond phagocytosis and killing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Appelberg, Rui

    2007-02-01

    Neutrophils are not simply scavenging phagocytes that clear extracellular spaces of rapidly proliferating microbes; they are also active in the control of infections by intracellular pathogens. Several mechanisms for nonphagocytic roles of neutrophils in protective immunity have been put forth over the years but further evidence has recently been accumulating at an increasing pace. In this review, I present the evidence that suggests neutrophils are involved in pathogen shuttling into the lymphoid tissues, in antigen presentation, and in early T cell recruitment and initiation of granuloma organization. Also, a clearer view on the antimicrobial molecules that can be acquired by macrophages to enhance their antimicrobial activity is now emerging. Finally, neutrophils can adversely affect immunity against certain parasites by causing immune deviation.

  6. High glucose enhances transient receptor potential channel canonical type 6-dependent calcium influx in human platelets via phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase-dependent pathway

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Liu, Daoyan; Maier, Alexandra; Scholze, Alexandra;

    2008-01-01

    Transient receptor potential canonical type 6 (TRPC6) channels mediating 1-oleoyl-2-acetyl-sn-glycerol (OAG)-induced calcium entry have been identified on human platelets. In the present study we tested the hypothesis that hyperglycemia increases the expression of TRPC6 channels....

  7. Autologous platelet gel and fibrin sealant enhance the efficacy of total knee arthroplasty : improved range of motion, decreased length of stay and a reduced incidence of arthrofibrosis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Everts, Peter A. M.; Devilee, Roger J. J.; Oosterbos, Cornelis J. M.; Mahoney, Christine Brown; Schattenkerk, Maarten Eeftinck; Knape, Johannes T. A.; van Zundert, Andre

    2007-01-01

    In this study we describe the potential role of autologous platelet gel and fibrin sealant in unilateral total knee arthroplasty to improve the postoperative range of motion and to reduce the incidence of arthrofibrosis. Total knee arthroplasty is often associated with a considerable amount of post-

  8. Autologous platelet gel and fibrin sealant enhance the efficacy of total knee arthroplasty : improved range of motion, decreased length of stay and a reduced incidence of arthrofibrosis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Everts, Peter A. M.; Devilee, Roger J. J.; Oosterbos, Cornelis J. M.; Mahoney, Christine Brown; Schattenkerk, Maarten Eeftinck; Knape, Johannes T. A.; van Zundert, Andre

    2007-01-01

    In this study we describe the potential role of autologous platelet gel and fibrin sealant in unilateral total knee arthroplasty to improve the postoperative range of motion and to reduce the incidence of arthrofibrosis. Total knee arthroplasty is often associated with a considerable amount of post-

  9. Autologous platelet gel and fibrin sealant enhance the efficacy of total knee arthroplasty: improved range of motion, decreased length of stay and a reduced incidence of arthrofibrosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Everts, Peter A M; Devilee, Roger J J; Oosterbos, Cornelis J M; Mahoney, Christine Brown; Schattenkerk, Maarten Eeftinck; Knape, Johannes T A; van Zundert, André

    2007-07-01

    In this study we describe the potential role of autologous platelet gel and fibrin sealant in unilateral total knee arthroplasty to improve the postoperative range of motion and to reduce the incidence of arthrofibrosis. Total knee arthroplasty is often associated with a considerable amount of post-operative blood loss. Persistent limited motion directly after surgery may ultimately result in arthrofibrosis. To counteract these effects we investigated whether the use of autologous derived platelet gel and fibrin sealant would reduce postoperative blood loss, decrease the impaired range of motion and the incidence of arthrofibrosis. All patients were consecutively operated and assigned to the study or control groups. Study group patients (n = 85) were treated with the application of autologous platelet gel and fibrin sealant at the end of surgery. Eighty patients were operated without the use of platelet gel and fibrin sealant, and served as the control group. The postoperative hemoglobin decrease, range of motion and length of hospitalization were recorded. During a 5-month postoperative period patients were followed to observe the incidence of arthrofibrosis. In patients in the treatment group the hemoglobin concentration in blood decreased significantly less when compared to the control group. They also showed a superior postoperative range of motion when compared to those of the control group (P arthrofibrosis and subsequent forced manipulation was significantly less (P arthrofibrosis.

  10. Mycobacterium tuberculosis 19-kDa lipoprotein promotes neutrophil activation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neufert, C; Pai, R K; Noss, E H; Berger, M; Boom, W H; Harding, C V

    2001-08-01

    Certain microbial substances, e.g., LPS, can activate neutrophils or prime them to enhance their response to other activating agents, e.g., fMLP. We investigated the role of the Mycobacterium tuberculosis (MTB) 19-kDa lipoprotein in activation of human neutrophils. MTB 19-kDa lipoprotein initiated phenotypic changes characteristic of neutrophil activation, including down-regulation of CD62 ligand (L-selectin) and up-regulation of CD35 (CR1) and CD11b/CD18 (CR3, Mac-1). In addition, exposure of neutrophils to MTB 19-kDa lipoprotein enhanced the subsequent oxidative burst in response to fMLP as assessed by oxidation of dihydrorhodamine 123 (determined by flow cytometry). LPS also produced these effects with similar kinetics, but an oligodeoxynucleotide containing a CpG motif failed to induce any priming or activation response. Although the effects of LPS required the presence of serum, neutrophil activation by MTB 19-kDa lipoprotein occurred independently of serum factors, suggesting the involvement of different receptors and signaling mechanisms for LPS and MTB 19-kDa lipoprotein. Thus, MTB 19-kDa lipoprotein serves as a pathogen-associated molecular pattern that promotes neutrophil priming and activation.

  11. Immunosenescence of Polymorphonuclear Neutrophils

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Inga Wessels

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available All immune cells are affected by aging, contributing to the high susceptibility to infections and increased mortality observed in the elderly. The effect of aging on cells of the adaptive immune system is well documented. In contrast, knowledge concerning age-related defects of polymorphonuclear neutrophils (PMN is limited. During the past decade, it has become evident that in addition to their traditional role as phagocytes, neutrophils are able to secrete a wide array of immunomodulating molecules. Their importance is underlined by the finding that genetic defects that lead to neutropenia increase susceptibility to infections. Whereas there is consistence about the constant circulating number of PMN throughout aging, the abilities of tissue infiltration, phagocytosis, and oxidative burst of PMN from aged donors are discussed controversially. Furthermore, there are numerous discrepancies between in vivo and in vitro results, as well as between results for murine and human PMN. Most of the reported functional changes can be explained by defective signaling pathways, but further research is required to get a detailed insight into the underlying molecular mechanisms. This could form the basis for drug development in order to prevent or treat age-related diseases, and thus to unburden the public health systems.

  12. Occupational Neutrophilic Asthma

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    Richard Leigh

    1999-01-01

    Full Text Available Occupational asthma is typically associated with an eosinophilic bronchitis. The case of a 41-year-old woman who developed symptoms of asthma after occupational exposure to metal working fluids is reported. The diagnosis of asthma was confirmed by an forced expiratory volume in 1 s (FEV1 of 1.7 (59% predicted, with 11% reversibility after inhaled bronchodilator and a provocation concentration of methacholine to cause a fall in FEV1 of 20% (PC20 of 0.4 mg/mL. Induced sputum examination showed a marked neutrophilia. Over the next six months, serial sputum analyses confirmed the presence of a marked sterile neutrophilic bronchitis during periods of occupational exposure to metal working fluids, which resolved when the patient was away from work and recurred when she returned to work. The sputum findings were mirrored by corresponding changes in spirometry and PC20 methacholine. The findings indicate the occurrence of occupational asthma associated with an intense, sterile neutrophilic bronchitis after exposure to metal working fluids.

  13. Human neutrophil antimicrobial activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, E L; Lehrer, R I; Rest, R F

    1988-01-01

    Polymorphonuclear neutrophilic leukocytes (PMNs) take up opsonized microorganisms into phagosomes that fuse with secretory granules in the PMN cytoplasm to form phagolysosomes. Killing and digestion of microorganisms take place within phagolysosomes. Antimicrobial activities in phagolysosomes are divided into two classes. Oxygen (O2)-dependent mechanisms are expressed when PMNs undergo the "respiratory burst." An NADPH oxidase in the phagolysosome membrane is activated and reduces O2 to superoxide (O2-). O2 reduction is the first step in a series of reactions that produce toxic oxidants. For example, .O2- dismutases to hydrogen peroxide (H2O2), and the azurophil granule enzyme myeloperoxidase catalyzes the oxidation of Cl- by H2O2 to yield hypochlorous acid (HOCl). The reaction of HOCl with ammonia and amines modulates the toxicity of this oxidant. O2-independent antimicrobial mechanisms include the activities of lysosomal proteases, other hydrolytic enzymes, and proteins and peptides that bind to microorganisms and disrupt essential processes or structural components. For example, the bactericidal/permeability-increasing protein, cathepsin G, and the defensins are released into phagolysosomes from the azurophil granules. Proposed mechanisms of action of neutrophil antimicrobial agents, their range of microbial targets, and their possible interactions within phagolysosomes are discussed.

  14. Human Neutrophils Kill Bacillus anthracis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    2005-11-01

    Full Text Available Bacillus anthracis spores cause natural infections and are used as biological weapons. Inhalation infection with B. anthracis, the etiological agent of anthrax, is almost always lethal, yet cutaneous infections usually remain localized and resolve spontaneously. Neutrophils are typically recruited to cutaneous but seldom to other forms of anthrax infections, raising the possibility that neutrophils kill B. anthracis. In this study we infected human neutrophils with either spores or vegetative bacteria of a wild-type strain, or strains, expressing only one of the two major virulence factors. The human neutrophils engulfed B. anthracis spores, which germinated intracellularly and were then efficiently killed. Interestingly, neutrophil killing was independent of reactive oxygen species production. We fractionated a human neutrophil granule extract by high-performance liquid chromatography and identified alpha-defensins as the component responsible for B. anthracis killing. These data suggest that the timely recruitment of neutrophils can control cutaneous infections and possibly other forms of B. anthracis infections, and that alpha-defensins play an important role in the potent anti-B. anthracis activity of neutrophils.

  15. Human neutrophils kill Bacillus anthracis.

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    Anne Mayer-Scholl

    2005-11-01

    Full Text Available Bacillus anthracis spores cause natural infections and are used as biological weapons. Inhalation infection with B. anthracis, the etiological agent of anthrax, is almost always lethal, yet cutaneous infections usually remain localized and resolve spontaneously. Neutrophils are typically recruited to cutaneous but seldom to other forms of anthrax infections, raising the possibility that neutrophils kill B. anthracis. In this study we infected human neutrophils with either spores or vegetative bacteria of a wild-type strain, or strains, expressing only one of the two major virulence factors. The human neutrophils engulfed B. anthracis spores, which germinated intracellularly and were then efficiently killed. Interestingly, neutrophil killing was independent of reactive oxygen species production. We fractionated a human neutrophil granule extract by high-performance liquid chromatography and identified alpha-defensins as the component responsible for B. anthracis killing. These data suggest that the timely recruitment of neutrophils can control cutaneous infections and possibly other forms of B. anthracis infections, and that alpha-defensins play an important role in the potent anti-B. anthracis activity of neutrophils.

  16. Human neutrophils kill Bacillus anthracis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mayer-Scholl, Anne; Hurwitz, Robert; Brinkmann, Volker; Schmid, Monika; Jungblut, Peter; Weinrauch, Yvette; Zychlinsky, Arturo

    2005-11-01

    Bacillus anthracis spores cause natural infections and are used as biological weapons. Inhalation infection with B. anthracis, the etiological agent of anthrax, is almost always lethal, yet cutaneous infections usually remain localized and resolve spontaneously. Neutrophils are typically recruited to cutaneous but seldom to other forms of anthrax infections, raising the possibility that neutrophils kill B. anthracis. In this study we infected human neutrophils with either spores or vegetative bacteria of a wild-type strain, or strains, expressing only one of the two major virulence factors. The human neutrophils engulfed B. anthracis spores, which germinated intracellularly and were then efficiently killed. Interestingly, neutrophil killing was independent of reactive oxygen species production. We fractionated a human neutrophil granule extract by high-performance liquid chromatography and identified alpha-defensins as the component responsible for B. anthracis killing. These data suggest that the timely recruitment of neutrophils can control cutaneous infections and possibly other forms of B. anthracis infections, and that alpha-defensins play an important role in the potent anti-B. anthracis activity of neutrophils.

  17. Platelet Content of Nitric Oxide Synthase 3 Phosphorylated At Serine1177 Is Associated with the Functional Response of Platelets to Aspirin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Modrego, Javier; Azcona, Luis; Martín-Palacios, Naiara; Zamorano-León, José J.; Segura, Antonio; Rodríguez, Pablo; Guerra, Reddy; Tamargo, Juan; Macaya, Carlos; López-Farré, Antonio J.

    2013-01-01

    Objective To analyse if platelet responsiveness to aspirin (ASA) may be associated with a different ability of platelets to generate nitric oxide (NO). Patients/Methods Platelets were obtained from 50 patients with stable coronary ischemia and were divided into ASA-sensitive (n = 26) and ASA-resistant (n = 24) using a platelet functionality test (PFA-100). Results ASA-sensitive platelets tended to release more NO (determined as nitrite + nitrate) than ASA-resistant platelets but it did not reach statistical significance. Protein expression of nitric oxide synthase 3 (NOS3) was higher in ASA-sensitive than in ASA-resistant platelets but there were no differences in the platelet expression of nitric oxide synthase 2 (NOS2) isoform. The highest NOS3 expression in ASA-sensitive platelets was independent of the presence of T-to-C mutation at nucleotide position −786 (T−786→C) in the NOS3-coding gene. However, platelet content of phosphorylated NOS3 at Serine (Ser)1177, an active form of NOS3, was higher in ASA-sensitive than in ASA-resistant platelets. The level of platelet NOS3 Ser1177 phosphorylation was positively associated with the closure time in the PFA-100 test. In vitro, collagen failed to stimulate the aggregation of ASA-sensitive platelets, determined by lumiaggregometry, and it was associated with a significant increase (p = 0.018) of NOS3 phosphorylation at Ser1177. On the contrary, collagen stimulated the aggregation of ASA-resistant platelets but did not significantly modify the platelet content of phosphorylated NOS3 Ser1177. During collagen stimulation the release of NO from ASA-sensitive platelets was significantly enhanced but it was not modified in ASA-resistant platelets. Conclusions Functional platelet responsiveness to ASA was associated with the platelet content of phosphorylated NOS3 at Ser1177. PMID:24376548

  18. Platelet content of nitric oxide synthase 3 phosphorylated at Serine 1177 is associated with the functional response of platelets to aspirin.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Javier Modrego

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: To analyse if platelet responsiveness to aspirin (ASA may be associated with a different ability of platelets to generate nitric oxide (NO. PATIENTS/METHODS: Platelets were obtained from 50 patients with stable coronary ischemia and were divided into ASA-sensitive (n = 26 and ASA-resistant (n = 24 using a platelet functionality test (PFA-100. RESULTS: ASA-sensitive platelets tended to release more NO (determined as nitrite + nitrate than ASA-resistant platelets but it did not reach statistical significance. Protein expression of nitric oxide synthase 3 (NOS3 was higher in ASA-sensitive than in ASA-resistant platelets but there were no differences in the platelet expression of nitric oxide synthase 2 (NOS2 isoform. The highest NOS3 expression in ASA-sensitive platelets was independent of the presence of T-to-C mutation at nucleotide position -786 (T(-786 → C in the NOS3-coding gene. However, platelet content of phosphorylated NOS3 at Serine (Ser(1177, an active form of NOS3, was higher in ASA-sensitive than in ASA-resistant platelets. The level of platelet NOS3 Ser(1177 phosphorylation was positively associated with the closure time in the PFA-100 test. In vitro, collagen failed to stimulate the aggregation of ASA-sensitive platelets, determined by lumiaggregometry, and it was associated with a significant increase (p = 0.018 of NOS3 phosphorylation at Ser(1177. On the contrary, collagen stimulated the aggregation of ASA-resistant platelets but did not significantly modify the platelet content of phosphorylated NOS3 Ser(1177. During collagen stimulation the release of NO from ASA-sensitive platelets was significantly enhanced but it was not modified in ASA-resistant platelets. CONCLUSIONS: Functional platelet responsiveness to ASA was associated with the platelet content of phosphorylated NOS3 at Ser(1177.

  19. Synchronized integrin engagement and chemokine activation is crucial in neutrophil extracellular trap-mediated sterile inflammation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rossaint, Jan; Herter, Jan M; Van Aken, Hugo; Napirei, Markus; Döring, Yvonne; Weber, Christian; Soehnlein, Oliver; Zarbock, Alexander

    2014-04-17

    There is emerging evidence that neutrophil extracellular traps (NETs) play important roles in inflammatory processes. Here we report that neutrophils have to be simultaneously activated by integrin-mediated outside-in- and G-protein-coupled receptor (GPCR) signaling to induce NET formation in acute lung injury (ALI), which is associated with a high mortality rate in critically ill patients. NETs consist of decondensed chromatin decorated with granular and cytosolic proteins and they can trap extracellular pathogens. The prerequisite for NET formation is the activation of neutrophils and the release of their DNA. In a neutrophil- and platelet-dependent mouse model of ventilator-induced lung injury (VILI), NETs were found in the lung microvasculature, and circulating NET components increased in the plasma. In this model, blocking integrin-mediated outside-in or either GPCR-signaling or heteromerization of platelet chemokines decreased NET formation and lung injury. Targeting NET components by DNAse1 application or neutrophil elastase-deficient mice protected mice from ALI, whereas DNase1(-/-)/Trap1(m/m) mice had an aggravated ALI, suggesting that NETs directly influence the severity of ALI. These data suggest that NETs form in the lungs during VILI, contribute to the disease process, and thus may be a promising new direction for the treatment of ALI.

  20. Efficient capture of infected neutrophils by dendritic cells in the skin inhibits the early anti-leishmania response.

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    Flavia L Ribeiro-Gomes

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Neutrophils and dendritic cells (DCs converge at localized sites of acute inflammation in the skin following pathogen deposition by the bites of arthropod vectors or by needle injection. Prior studies in mice have shown that neutrophils are the predominant recruited and infected cells during the earliest stage of Leishmania major infection in the skin, and that neutrophil depletion promotes host resistance to sand fly transmitted infection. How the massive influx of neutrophils aimed at wound repair and sterilization might modulate the function of DCs in the skin has not been previously addressed. The infected neutrophils recovered from the skin expressed elevated apoptotic markers compared to uninfected neutrophils, and were preferentially captured by dermal DCs when injected back into the mouse ear dermis. Following challenge with L. major directly, the majority of the infected DCs recovered from the skin at 24 hr stained positive for neutrophil markers, indicating that they acquired their parasites via uptake of infected neutrophils. When infected, dermal DCs were recovered from neutrophil depleted mice, their expression of activation markers was markedly enhanced, as was their capacity to present Leishmania antigens ex vivo. Neutrophil depletion also enhanced the priming of L. major specific CD4(+ T cells in vivo. The findings suggest that following their rapid uptake by neutrophils in the skin, L. major exploits the immunosuppressive effects associated with the apoptotic cell clearance function of DCs to inhibit the development of acquired resistance until the acute neutrophilic response is resolved.

  1. P-selectin glycoprotein ligand-1 mediates rolling of human neutrophils on P-selectin

    OpenAIRE

    1995-01-01

    Neutrophils roll on P-selectin expressed by activated platelets or endothelial cells under the shear stresses in the microcirculation. P- selectin glycoprotein ligand-1 (PSGL-1) is a high affinity ligand for P- selectin on myeloid cells. However, it has not been demonstrated that PSGL-1 contributes to the rolling of neutrophils on P-selectin. We developed two IgG mAbs, PL1 and PL2, that appear to recognize protein- dependent epitopes on human PSGL-1. The mAbs bound to PSGL-1 on all leukocytes...

  2. Blood mean platelet volume and platelet lymphocyte ratio as new predictors of hip osteoarthritis severity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taşoğlu, Özlem; Şahin, Ali; Karataş, Gülşah; Koyuncu, Engin; Taşoğlu, İrfan; Tecimel, Osman; Özgirgin, Neşe

    2017-02-01

    Osteoarthritis (OA) is a low grade systemic inflammatory disease in which many inflammatory mediators are known to be elevated in the peripheric blood. Blood platelet lymphocyte ratio (PLR) and mean platelet volume (MPV) are accepted as novel markers in many of the systemic inflammatory disorders, but have not been investigated in synovitis-free radiographic OA yet.The aim of this study was to evaluate the levels of blood PLR and MPV in radiographic hip OA. A total of 880 patients were evaluated retrospectively and after certain exclusion criteria, 237 of them who have primary hip OA were included. Age, sex, height, weight, body mass index, neutrophil, lymphocyte and platelet counts, erythrocyte sedimentation rate (ESR), PLR, and MPV levels were recorded, Kellgren-Lawrence (KL) grading of the hip joints were performed. Patients were then divided into 2 groups as KL grades 1 to 2 (mild-moderate) and KL grades 3 to 4 (severe) hip OA.Mean age, mean neutrophil, lymphocyte and platelet counts, mean MPV, mean PLR, and mean ESR were statistically significantly different between mild/moderate hip OA group and severe hip OA group. In univariate analysis, older age and higher MPV, PLR, and ESR were severely associated with severe hip OA. In multiple logistic regression analysis, MPV, PLR, and ESR emerged as independent predictors of severe hip OA.The results of the present study, for the first time in the literature, suggest blood PLR and MPV as novel inflammatory markers predicting the radiographic severity of hip OA in the daily practice.

  3. Pneumococcal association to platelets is mediated by soluble fibrin and supported by thrombospondin-1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niemann, Silke; Kehrel, Beate E; Heilmann, Christine; Rennemeier, Claudia; Peters, Georg; Hammerschmidt, Sven

    2009-10-01

    Platelets and coagulation are involved in bacterial colonisation of the host. Streptocococcus pneumoniae (pneumococcus) are important etiologic agents of respiratory tract infections in humans. The formation of pneumococci-platelet associations may facilitate haematogenous dissemination of pneumococci by providing an adhesive surface on damaged endothelium. However, the formation of platelet-pneumococci associations and the factors involved in this process have not been described so far. The formation of platelet-pneumococci associates was analysed and quantified using flow cytometry. Binding of pneumococci to platelets was significantly increased after activation of platelets with thrombin, while platelet activation by ADP or collagen did not promote formation of platelet-pneumococci associates. In addition to be a platelet agonist, thrombin cleaves fibrinogen, which results in the generation of fibrin. The simultaneous formation of fibrin and activation of platelets was shown to be a prerequisite for a high number of platelet-pneumococci associates. Moreover, exogenously added human thrombospondin-1 (TSP-1) significantly enhanced the association of pneumococci with activated platelets. Soluble fibrin and TSP-1 are key co-factors of platelet-pneumococci-association. Similar results were recently demonstrated for S. aureus-platelet adhesion. Consequently, we hypothesise that the described mechanism of platelet-bacteria-association might represent a general and important strategy of Gram-positive bacteria during development of invasive diseases.

  4. Neutrophil Functions in Periodontal Homeostasis

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    Ricarda Cortés-Vieyra

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Oral tissues are constantly exposed to damage from the mechanical effort of eating and to microorganisms, mostly bacteria. In healthy gingiva tissue remodeling and a balance between bacteria and innate immune cells are maintained. However, excess of bacteria biofilm (plaque creates an inflammation state that recruits more immune cells, mainly neutrophils to the gingiva. Neutrophils create a barrier for bacteria to reach inside tissues. When neutrophils are insufficient, bacteria thrive causing more inflammation that has been associated with systemic effects on other conditions such as atherosclerosis, diabetes, and cancer. But paradoxically when neutrophils persist, they can also promote a chronic inflammatory state that leads to periodontitis, a condition that leads to damage of the bone-supporting tissues. In periodontitis, bone loss is a serious complication. How a neutrophil balance is needed for maintaining healthy oral tissues is the focus of this review. We present recent evidence on how alterations in neutrophil number and function can lead to inflammatory bone loss, and how some oral bacteria signal neutrophils to block their antimicrobial functions and promote an inflammatory state. Also, based on this new information, novel therapeutic approaches are discussed.

  5. d(− Lactic Acid-Induced Adhesion of Bovine Neutrophils onto Endothelial Cells Is Dependent on Neutrophils Extracellular Traps Formation and CD11b Expression

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    Pablo Alarcón

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Bovine ruminal acidosis is of economic importance as it contributes to reduced milk and meat production. This phenomenon is mainly attributed to an overload of highly fermentable carbohydrate, resulting in increased d(− lactic acid levels in serum and plasma. Ruminal acidosis correlates with elevated acute phase proteins in blood, along with neutrophil activation and infiltration into various tissues leading to laminitis and aseptic polysynovitis. Previous studies in bovine neutrophils indicated that d(− lactic acid decreased expression of L-selectin and increased expression of CD11b to concentrations higher than 6 mM, suggesting a potential role in neutrophil adhesion onto endothelia. The two aims of this study were to evaluate whether d(− lactic acid influenced neutrophil and endothelial adhesion and to trigger neutrophil extracellular trap (NET production (NETosis in exposed neutrophils. Exposure of bovine neutrophils to 5 mM d(− lactic acid elevated NET release compared to unstimulated neutrophil negative controls. Moreover, this NET contains CD11b and histone H4 citrullinated, the latter was dependent on PAD4 activation, a critical enzyme in DNA decondensation and NETosis. Furthermore, NET formation was dependent on d(− lactic acid plasma membrane transport through monocarboxylate transporter 1 (MCT1. d(− lactic acid enhanced neutrophil adhesion onto endothelial sheets as demonstrated by in vitro neutrophil adhesion assays under continuous physiological flow conditions, indicating that cell adhesion was a NET- and a CD11b/ICAM-1-dependent process. Finally, d(− lactic acid was demonstrated for the first time to trigger NETosis in a PAD4- and MCT1-dependent manner. Thus, d(− lactic acid-mediated neutrophil activation may contribute to neutrophil-derived pro-inflammatory processes, such as aseptic laminitis and/or polysynovitis in animals suffering acute ruminal acidosis.

  6. Platelet-derived growth factor B-chain of hematopoietic origin is not necessary for granulation tissue formation and its absence enhances vascularization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buetow, B S; Crosby, J R; Kaminski, W E; Ramachandran, R K; Lindahl, P; Martin, P; Betsholtz, C; Seifert, R A; Raines, E W; Bowen-Pope, D F

    2001-11-01

    The hypothesis that wound repair is augmented by delivery of platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF) from platelets and macrophages is an attractive extrapolation from the known activities of PDGF in cell culture and in vivo. To test this hypothesis in mice, we prepared hematopoietic chimeras, in which the hematopoietic system of a normal adult mouse was replaced by the hematopoietic system of a PDGF B-chain -/- or +/+ donor. We initiated local granulation tissue formation either by implanting small surgical sponges to elicit a foreign body granulation tissue response, or by ligating the left common carotid to form an organized thrombus. We found that the absence of hematopoietic PDGF B-chain did not decrease the extent of granulation tissue or vascular lesion formation, and that the vascularization of both lesions increased by approximately 100%. We conclude that PDGF B-chain from cells of hematopoietic origin, including platelets and macrophages, is not important for granulation tissue formation, and that it reduces vascularization of granulation issue, probably through disabling of the short-range chemotactic gradients of PDGF that are important for recruiting pericytes/smooth muscle cells to the endothelium of new vessels.

  7. Amyloid precursor protein expression is enhanced in human platelets from subjects with Alzheimer's disease and frontotemporal lobar degeneration: a real-time PCR study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vignini, Arianna; Morganti, Stefano; Salvolini, Eleonora; Sartini, Davide; Luzzi, Simona; Fiorini, Rosamaria; Provinciali, Leandro; Di Primio, Roberto; Mazzanti, Laura; Emanuelli, Monica

    2013-12-01

    Frontotemporal lobar degeneration (FTLD) and Alzheimer's disease (AD) represent the most frequent causes of early-onset and late-onset degenerative dementia, respectively. A correct diagnosis entails the choice of appropriate therapies. In this view the present study aimed to identify biomarkers that could improve the differential diagnosis. We recently found an overexpression of platelet amyloid precursor protein (APP) in AD; furthermore, recent studies have suggested the presence of changes in APP processing in FTLD. In this context, we analyzed the mRNA expression level of Total APP (TOT) and APP containing a Kunitz-type serine protease inhibitor domain (KPI) in platelets obtained from AD patients, subjects with FTLD, and healthy subjects. In addition, we evaluated the correlation between platelet APP mRNA expression levels and cognitive impairment.Differential gene expression measurements revealed a significant up-regulation of APP TOT and APP KPI in both AD and FTLD patients compared to the controls (being AD/Controls: 1.67 for APP TOT and 1.47 for APP KPI; FTLD/Controls: 1.62 for APP TOT and 1.51 for APP KPI; p < 0.05), although it is interesting to note that in FTLD patients this expression did not correlate with the severity of cognitive impairment.This could be related to a reduced beta-amyloid (Aβ) formation, caused by an alteration of secretase enzymatic activity, even though a post-transcriptional regulation of APP mRNAs in FTLD cannot be excluded.

  8. ATTENUATION OF ANTI-THY1 GLOMERULONEPHRITIS IN THE RAT BY ANTIINFLAMMATORY PLATELET-INHIBITING AGENTS

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    POELSTRA, K; BROUWER, E; BALLER, JFW; HARDONK, MJ; BAKKER, WW

    Although both ecto-ADPase and prostacyclin (PGI2) inhibit platelets and neutrophils, their action in acute glomerulonephritis is unknown. We tested the PGI2 analog Iloprost and 2chloro-adenosine (2Cl-ADO), an analog of adenosine, the end product of nucleotidase activities, during anti-Thy1

  9. Mycobacterium abscessus induces a limited pattern of neutrophil activation that promotes pathogen survival.

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    Kenneth C Malcolm

    Full Text Available Mycobacterium abscessus is a rapidly growing mycobacterium increasingly detected in the neutrophil-rich environment of inflamed tissues, including the cystic fibrosis airway. Studies of the immune reaction to M. abscessus have focused primarily on macrophages and epithelial cells, but little is known regarding the neutrophil response despite the predominantly neutrophillic inflammation typical of these infections. In the current study, human neutrophils released less superoxide anion in response to M. abscessus than to Staphylococcus aureus, a pathogen that shares common sites of infection. Exposure to M. abscessus induced neutrophil-specific chemokine and proinflammatory cytokine genes. Although secretion of these protein products was confirmed, the quantity of cytokines released, and both the number and level of gene induction, was reduced compared to S. aureus. Neutrophils mediated killing of M. abscessus, but phagocytosis was reduced when compared to S. aureus, and extracellular DNA was detected in response to both bacteria, consistent with extracellular trap formation. In addition, M. abscessus did not alter cell death compared to unstimulated cells, while S. aureus enhanced necrosis and inhibited apoptosis. However, neutrophils augment M. abscessus biofilm formation. The response of neutrophils to M. abscessus suggests that the mycobacterium exploits neutrophil-rich settings to promote its survival and that the overall neutrophil response was reduced compared to S. aureus. These studies add to our understanding of M. abscessus virulence and suggest potential targets of therapy.

  10. Neutrophilic dermatosis of dorsal hands

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    S Kaur

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Sweet′s syndrome is characterized by erythematous tender nodules and plaques over face and extremities. Fever, leukocytosis with neutrophilia, and a neutrophilic infiltrate in the dermis are characteristic features. Neutrophilic dermatosis of dorsal hands is a rare localized variant of Sweet′s syndrome occurring predominantly over dorsa of hands. Various degrees of vascular damage may be observed on histopathology of these lesions. Both Sweet′s syndrome and its dorsal hand variant have been reported in association with malignancies, inflammatory bowel diseases, and drugs. We report a patient with neutrophilic dermatoses of dorsal hands associated with erythema nodosum. He showed an excellent response to corticosteroids and dapsone.

  11. Extracellular acidosis promotes neutrophil transdifferentiation to MHC class II-expressing cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pliyev, Boris K; Sumarokov, Alexander B; Buriachkovskaia, Lyudmila I; Menshikov, Mikhail

    2011-01-01

    Inflammation in peripheral tissues is usually associated with local acidosis. In the present study, we demonstrate that extracellular acidification enhances GM-CSF- and IFN-γ-induced expression of HLA-DR, CD80 and CD86 in human neutrophils (neutrophil transdifferentiation), and potentiates antigen-capturing capacities (both endocytosis and phagocytosis) of the transdifferentiated cells. Furthermore, in acidic conditions the transdifferentiated neutrophils have stronger antigen-presenting capacity, inducing more intense proliferation of autologous T lymphocytes in the presence of staphylococcal enterotoxin A. Thus, extracellular acidosis can represent a factor that promotes neutrophil transdifferentiation and potentiates the functional abilities of the transdifferentiated cells in inflammatory foci in vivo.

  12. Inhibition of pre-B cell colony-enhancing factor (PBEF/NAMPT/visfatin) decreases the ability of human neutrophils to generate reactive oxidants but does not impair bacterial killing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roberts, Kate J; Cross, Andrew; Vasieva, Olga; Moots, Robert J; Edwards, Steven W

    2013-09-01

    NAMPT, also known as PBEF and visfatin, can act extracellularly as a cytokine-like molecule or intracellularly as a NAMPT, regulating NAD biosynthesis in the NAD salvage pathway. Inhibitors of NAMPT have anti-inflammatory and anticancer activity and are finding use as therapeutic agents. In view of the importance of NAD metabolism in neutrophil function, we determined the effects of NAMPT inhibition on a variety of neutrophil functions associated with their role in host protection against infections. Incubation of human neutrophils with the NAMPT inhibitor APO866 decreased neutrophil NAD(P)/H levels in a dose- and time-dependent manner but without a concomitant change in cell viability. NAMPT inhibition did not affect the expression of a number of cell-surface receptors involved in adhesion and opsono-phagocytosis, but the respiratory burst was decreased significantly. Whereas opsono-phagocytosis of Staphylococcus aureus was unaffected by NAMPT inhibition, intraphagosomal oxidant production was decreased. However, the killing efficiency of neutrophils was unaffected. These data indicate that therapeutic NAMPT inhibition is unlikely to have deleterious effects on host protection against infections, in spite of this ability to down-regulate neutrophil respiratory burst activity significantly.

  13. Analysis of Platelet-Rich Plasma Extraction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fitzpatrick, Jane; Bulsara, Max K.; McCrory, Paul Robert; Richardson, Martin D.; Zheng, Ming Hao

    2017-01-01

    Background: Platelet-rich plasma (PRP) has been extensively used as a treatment in tissue healing in tendinopathy, muscle injury, and osteoarthritis. However, there is variation in methods of extraction, and this produces different types of PRP. Purpose: To determine the composition of PRP obtained from 4 commercial separation kits, which would allow assessment of current classification systems used in cross-study comparisons. Study Design: Controlled laboratory study. Methods: Three normal adults each donated 181 mL of whole blood, some of which served as a control and the remainder of which was processed through 4 PRP separation kits: GPS III (Biomet Biologics), Smart-Prep2 (Harvest Terumo), Magellan (Arteriocyte Medical Systems), and ACP (Device Technologies). The resultant PRP was tested for platelet count, red blood cell count, and white blood cell count, including differential in a commercial pathology laboratory. Glucose and pH measurements were obtained from a blood gas autoanalyzer machine. Results: Three kits taking samples from the “buffy coat layer” were found to have greater concentrations of platelets (3-6 times baseline), while 1 kit taking samples from plasma was found to have platelet concentrations of only 1.5 times baseline. The same 3 kits produced an increased concentration of white blood cells (3-6 times baseline); these consisted of neutrophils, leukocytes, and monocytes. This represents high concentrations of platelets and white blood cells. A small drop in pH was thought to relate to the citrate used in the sample preparation. Interestingly, an unexpected increase in glucose concentrations, with 3 to 6 times greater than baseline levels, was found in all samples. Conclusion: This study reveals the variation of blood components, including platelets, red blood cells, leukocytes, pH, and glucose in PRP extractions. The high concentrations of cells are important, as the white blood cell count in PRP samples has frequently been ignored

  14. New insights in platelet signaling by Low Density Lipoprotein

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Relou, Ingrid Anne Maria

    2003-01-01

    Contact between LDL and human blood platelets enhances their responsiveness to various aggregation-inducing agents. Although the sensitization and upstream signaling has been well characterized, the identity of the platelet surface receptor for LDL-particles has remained obscure. We report that the

  15. Characterization of canine platelet adhesion to extracellular matrix proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pelagalli, Alessandra; Pero, Maria Elena; Mastellone, Vincenzo; Cestaro, Anna; Signoriello, Simona; Lombardi, Pietro; Avallone, Luigi

    2011-07-01

    Canine platelets have been extensively studied but little is known about specific aspects such as adhesion. Platelet adhesion is a critical step during haemostasis and thrombosis as well as during inflammatory and immunopathogenic responses. The aim of this study was to evaluate the adhesive properties of canine platelets using fibrinogen and collagen as substrates immobilized on plates. Adhesion was monitored for 120 min and the effect of adenosine 5'-diphosphate (ADP) was assayed. The results showed that canine platelets displayed good adhesion activity that was significantly time-dependent. Moreover, ADP was able to enhance platelet adhesion in a dose-dependent manner. The findings aid knowledge of the adhesion process and suggest a specific role of surface platelet receptors in mediating the interaction with extracellular matrix proteins.

  16. Anti-neutrophil cytoplasmic antibodies stimulate release of neutrophil microparticles.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Hong, Ying

    2012-01-01

    The mechanisms by which anti-neutrophil cytoplasmic antibodies (ANCAs) may contribute to the pathogenesis of ANCA-associated vasculitis are not well understood. In this study, both polyclonal ANCAs isolated from patients and chimeric proteinase 3-ANCA induced the release of neutrophil microparticles from primed neutrophils. These microparticles expressed a variety of markers, including the ANCA autoantigens proteinase 3 and myeloperoxidase. They bound endothelial cells via a CD18-mediated mechanism and induced an increase in endothelial intercellular adhesion molecule-1 expression, production of endothelial reactive oxygen species, and release of endothelial IL-6 and IL-8. Removal of the neutrophil microparticles by filtration or inhibition of reactive oxygen species production with antioxidants abolished microparticle-mediated endothelial activation. In addition, these microparticles promoted the generation of thrombin. In vivo, we detected more neutrophil microparticles in the plasma of children with ANCA-associated vasculitis compared with that in healthy controls or those with inactive vasculitis. Taken together, these results support a role for neutrophil microparticles in the pathogenesis of ANCA-associated vasculitis, potentially providing a target for future therapeutics.

  17. Characterization of Neutrophil Function in Human Cutaneous Leishmaniasis Caused by Leishmania braziliensis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jacilara Conceição

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Infection with different Leishmania spp. protozoa can lead to a variety of clinical syndromes associated in many cases with inflammatory responses in the skin. Although macrophages harbor the majority of parasites throughout chronic infection, neutrophils are the first inflammatory cells to migrate to the site of infection. Whether neutrophils promote parasite clearance or exacerbate disease in murine models varies depending on the susceptible or resistant status of the host. Based on the hypothesis that neutrophils contribute to a systemic inflammatory state in humans with symptomatic L. braziliensis infection, we evaluated the phenotype of neutrophils from patients with cutaneous leishmaniasis (CL during the course of L. braziliensis infection. After in vitro infection with L. braziliensis, CL patient neutrophils produced more reactive oxygen species (ROS and higher levels of CXCL8 and CXCL9, chemokines associated with recruitment of neutrophils and Th1-type cells, than neutrophils from control healthy subjects (HS. Despite this, CL patient and HS neutrophils were equally capable of phagocytosis of L. braziliensis. There was no difference between the degree of activation of neutrophils from CL versus healthy subjects, assessed by CD66b and CD62L expression using flow cytometry. Of interest, these studies revealed that both parasite-infected and bystander neutrophils became activated during incubation with L. braziliensis. The enhanced ROS and chemokine production in neutrophils from CL patients reverted to baseline after treatment of disease. These data suggest that the circulating neutrophils during CL are not necessarily more microbicidal, but they have a more pro-inflammatory profile after parasite restimulation than neutrophils from healthy subjects.

  18. Characterization of Neutrophil Function in Human Cutaneous Leishmaniasis Caused by Leishmania braziliensis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conceição, Jacilara; Davis, Richard; Carneiro, Pedro Paulo; Giudice, Angela; Muniz, Aline C.; Wilson, Mary E.; Carvalho, Edgar M.; Bacellar, Olívia

    2016-01-01

    Infection with different Leishmania spp. protozoa can lead to a variety of clinical syndromes associated in many cases with inflammatory responses in the skin. Although macrophages harbor the majority of parasites throughout chronic infection, neutrophils are the first inflammatory cells to migrate to the site of infection. Whether neutrophils promote parasite clearance or exacerbate disease in murine models varies depending on the susceptible or resistant status of the host. Based on the hypothesis that neutrophils contribute to a systemic inflammatory state in humans with symptomatic L. braziliensis infection, we evaluated the phenotype of neutrophils from patients with cutaneous leishmaniasis (CL) during the course of L. braziliensis infection. After in vitro infection with L. braziliensis, CL patient neutrophils produced more reactive oxygen species (ROS) and higher levels of CXCL8 and CXCL9, chemokines associated with recruitment of neutrophils and Th1-type cells, than neutrophils from control healthy subjects (HS). Despite this, CL patient and HS neutrophils were equally capable of phagocytosis of L. braziliensis. There was no difference between the degree of activation of neutrophils from CL versus healthy subjects, assessed by CD66b and CD62L expression using flow cytometry. Of interest, these studies revealed that both parasite-infected and bystander neutrophils became activated during incubation with L. braziliensis. The enhanced ROS and chemokine production in neutrophils from CL patients reverted to baseline after treatment of disease. These data suggest that the circulating neutrophils during CL are not necessarily more microbicidal, but they have a more pro-inflammatory profile after parasite restimulation than neutrophils from healthy subjects. PMID:27167379

  19. [The role of blood platelets in infections].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Micota, Bartłomiej; Sadowska, Beata; Różalska, Barbara

    2015-05-17

    Platelets are primarily associated with their main function, hemostasis, although it is known that these cells also exhibit biological activity in cancer progression, inflammation and infectious processes. During infection platelets, due to the expression of specific receptors - Toll-like receptors (TLRs) - which recognize molecular patterns associated with pathogens - pathogen-associated molecular patterns (PAMPs) - are activated by the presence of microorganism components and/or substances released from damaged cells/tissue. Further antimicrobial activity of platelets is based on their capacity for phagocytosis, generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS), and the synthesis, storage and release of proteins/peptides with antimicrobial activity. Another mechanism of platelet action is their immunomodulatory activity. It is based mainly on the ability to secrete chemotactic factors allowing the accumulation of professional immunocompetent cells at the site of infection, thus enhancing the effective eradication of an infectious agent. In chronic infections, platelets, due to release of numerous growth factors and various cytokines, support mechanisms of acquired immunity. They accelerate the maturation of dendritic cells, stimulate B cells to be immunoglobulin-producing plasma cells and potentiate the activity of T cells. Unfortunately, in certain situations (the existence of specific risk factors) the interaction of microorganisms with activated platelets may also be the cause of pathology within the cardiovascular system.

  20. A factor VIII-derived peptide enables von Willebrand factor (VWF)-binding of artificial platelet nanoconstructs without interfering with VWF-adhesion of natural platelets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haji-Valizadeh, Hassan; Modery-Pawlowski, Christa L; Sen Gupta, Anirban

    2014-05-01

    There is substantial clinical interest in synthetic platelet analogs for potential application in transfusion medicine. To this end, our research is focused on self-assembled peptide-lipid nanoconstructs that can undergo injury site-selective adhesion and subsequently promote site-directed active platelet aggregation, thus mimicking platelet's primary hemostatic actions. For injury site-selective adhesion, we have utilized a coagulation factor FVIII-derived VWF-binding peptide (VBP). FVIII binds to VWF's D'-D3 domain while natural platelet GPIbα binds to VWF's A1 domain. Therefore, we hypothesized that the VBP-decorated nanoconstructs will adhere to VWF without mutual competition with natural platelets. We further hypothesized that the adherent VBP-decorated constructs can enhance platelet aggregation when co-decorated with a fibrinogen-mimetic peptide (FMP). To test these hypotheses, we used glycocalicin to selectively block VWF's A1 domain and, using fluorescence microscopy, studied the binding of fluorescently labeled VBP-decorated nanoconstructs versus platelets to ristocetin-treated VWF. Subsequently, we co-decorated the nanoconstructs with VBP and FMP and incubated them with human platelets to study construct-mediated enhancement of platelet aggregation. Decoration with VBP resulted in substantial construct adhesion to ristocetin-treated VWF even if the A1-domain was blocked by glycocalicin. In comparison, such A1-blocking resulted in significant reduction of platelet adhesion. Without A1-blocking, the VBP-decorated constructs and natural platelets could adhere to VWF concomitantly. Furthermore, the constructs co-decorated with VBP and FMP enhanced active platelet aggregation. The results indicate significant promise in utilizing the FVIII-derived VBP in developing synthetic platelet analogs that do not interfere with VWF-binding of natural platelets but allow site-directed enhancement of platelet aggregation when combined with FMP.

  1. Simvastatin antagonizes CD40L secretion, CXC chemokine formation, and pulmonary infiltration of neutrophils in abdominal sepsis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Su; Rahman, Milladur; Zhang, Songen; Qi, Zhongquan; Thorlacius, Henrik

    2011-05-01

    Statins have been reported to exert anti-inflammatory actions and protect against septic organ dysfunction. Herein, we hypothesized that simvastatin may attenuate neutrophil activation and lung damage in abdominal sepsis. Male C57BL/6 mice were pretreated with simvastatin (0.5 or 10 mg/kg) before CLP. In separate groups, mice received an anti-CD40L antibody or a CXCR2 antagonist (SB225002) prior to CLP. BALF and lung tissue were harvested for analysis of neutrophil infiltration, as well as edema and CXC chemokine formation. Blood was collected for analysis of Mac-1 and CD40L expression on neutrophils and platelets, as well as soluble CD40L in plasma. Simvastatin decreased CLP-induced neutrophil infiltration and edema formation in the lung. Moreover, Mac-1 expression increased on septic neutrophils, which was significantly attenuated by simvastatin. Inhibition of CD40L reduced CLP-induced up-regulation of Mac-1 on neutrophils. Simvastatin prevented CD40L shedding from the surface of platelets and reduced circulating levels of CD40L in septic mice. CXC chemokine-induced migration of neutrophils in vitro was decreased greatly by simvastatin. Moreover, simvastatin abolished CLP-evoked formation of CXC chemokines in the lung, and a CXCR2 antagonist attenuated pulmonary accumulation of neutrophils. Our data suggest that the inhibitory effect of simvastatin on pulmonary accumulation of neutrophils may be related to a reduction of CD40L secretion into the circulation, as well as a decrease in CXC chemokine formation in the lung. Thus, these protective mechanisms help to explain the beneficial actions exerted by statins, such as simvastatin, in sepsis.

  2. Platelet alloimmunization after transfusion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Taaning, E; Simonsen, A C; Hjelms, E;

    1997-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVES: The frequency of platelet-specific antibodies after one series of blood transfusions has not been reported, and in multiply transfused patients is controversial. MATERIALS AND METHODS: We studied the frequency of alloimmunization against platelet antigens in 117 patient...

  3. Flavanols and Platelet Reactivity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Debra A. Pearson

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available Platelet activity and platelet-endothelial cell interactions are important in the acute development of thrombosis, as well as in the pathogenesis of cardiovascular disease. An increasing number of foods have been reported to have platelet-inhibitory actions, and research with a number of flavanol-rich foods, including, grape juice, cocoa and chocolate, suggests that these foods may provide some protection against thrombosis. In the present report, we review a series of in vivo studies on the effects of flavanol-rich cocoa and chocolate on platelet activation and platelet-dependent primary hemostasis. Consumption of flavanol-rich cocoa inhibited several measures of platelet activity including, epinephrine- and ADP-induced glycoprotein (GP IIb/IIIa and P-Selectin expression, platelet microparticle formation, and epinephrine-collagen and ADP-collagen induced primary hemostasis. The epinephrine-induced inhibitory effects on GP IIb/IIIa and primary hemostasis were similar to, though less robust than those associated with the use of low dose (81 mg aspirin. These data, coupled with information from other studies, support the concept that flavanols present in cocoa and chocolate can modulate platelet function through a multitude of pathways.

  4. Platelet activation and aggregation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Maria Sander; Larsen, O H; Christiansen, Kirsten

    2013-01-01

    This study introduces a new laboratory model of whole blood platelet aggregation stimulated by endogenously generated thrombin, and explores this aspect in haemophilia A in which impaired thrombin generation is a major hallmark. The method was established to measure platelet aggregation initiated...

  5. Gasotransmitters and platelets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Truss, Nicola J; Warner, Timothy D

    2011-11-01

    Platelets are essential to prevent blood loss and promote wound healing. Their activation comprises of several complex steps which are regulated by a range of mediators. Over the last few decades there has been intense interest in a group of gaseous mediators known as gasotransmitters; currently comprising nitric oxide (NO), carbon monoxide (CO) and hydrogen sulphide (H(2)S). Here we consider the action of gasotransmitters on platelet activity. NO is a well established platelet inhibitor which mediates its effects predominantly through activation of soluble guanylyl cyclase leading to a decrease in intraplatelet calcium. More recently CO has been identified as a gasotransmitter with inhibitory actions on platelets; CO acts through the same mechanism as NO but is less potent. The in vivo and platelet functions of the most recently identified gasotransmitter, H(2)S, are still the subject of investigations, but they appear generally inhibitory. Whilst there is evidence for the individual action of these mediators, it is also likely that combinations of these mediators are more relevant regulators of platelets. Furthermore, current evidence suggests that these mediators in combination alter the production of each other, and so modify the circulating levels of gasotransmitters. The use of gasotransmitters as therapeutic agents is also being explored for a range of indications. In conclusion, the importance of NO in the regulation of vascular tone and platelet activity has long been understood. Other gasotransmitters are now establishing themselves as mediators of vascular tone, and recent evidence suggests that these other gasotransmitters may also modulate platelet function.

  6. Reduction of CTRP9, a novel anti-platelet adipokine, contributes to abnormal platelet activity in diabetic animals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Wenqing; Lau, Wayne Bond; Wang, Yajing; Ma, Xinliang; Li, Rong

    2016-01-11

    Platelet hyper-reactivity is a crucial cause of accelerated atherosclerosis increasing risk of thrombotic vascular events in diabetic patients. The mechanisms leading to abnormal platelet activity during diabetes are complex and not fully defined. The current study attempted to clarify the role of CTRP9, a novel adiponectin paralog, in enhanced platelet activity and determined whether CTRP9 may inhibit platelet activity. Adult male C57BL/6 J mice were randomized to receive high-fat diet (HFD) or normal diet (ND). 8 weeks after HFD, animals were sacrificed, and both plasma CTRP9 and platelet aggregation were determined. HFD-fed animals increased weight gain significantly, and became hyperglycemic and hyperinsulinemic 8 weeks post-HFD. Compared to ND animals, HFD animals exhibited significantly decreased plasma CTRP9 concentration and increased platelet response to ADP, evidenced by augmented aggregation amplitude, steeper aggregation slope, larger area under the curve, and shorter lag time (P animals. Taken together, our results suggest reduced plasma CTRP9 concentration during diabetes plays a causative role in platelet hyper-activity, contributing to platelet-induced cardiovascular damage during this pathologic condition. Enhancing CTRP9 production and/or exogenous supplementation of CTRP9 may protect against diabetic cardiovascular injury via inhibition of abnormal platelet activity.

  7. Alloimmune refractoriness to platelet transfusions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sandler, S G

    1997-11-01

    Patients who are transfused on multiple occasions with red cells or platelets may develop platelet-reactive alloantibodies and experience decreased clinical responsiveness to platelet transfusion. This situation, conventionally described as "refractoriness to platelet transfusions," is defined by an unsatisfactory low post-transfusion platelet count increment. If antibodies to HLAs are detected, improved clinical outcomes may result from transfusions of HLA-matched or donor-recipient cross-matched platelets. Because refractoriness is an expected, frequently occurring phenomenon, prevention of HLA alloimmunization is an important management strategy. Prevention strategies include efforts to decrease the number of transfusions, filtration of cellular components to reduce the number of HLA-bearing leukocytes, or pretransfusion ultraviolet B irradiation of cellular components to decrease their immunogenicity. Other investigational approaches include reducing the expression of HLAs on transfused platelets, inducing a transient reticuloendothelial system blockade by infusions of specialized immunoglobulin products, or transfusing semisynthetic platelet substitutes (thromboerythrocytes, thrombospheres) or modified platelets (infusible platelet membranes, lyophilized platelets).

  8. Platelet function in dogs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Line A.; Zois, Nora Elisabeth; Pedersen, Henrik D.

    2007-01-01

    Cairn Terriers, 10 Boxers, and 11 Labrador Retrievers) were included in the study. Platelet function was assessed by whole-blood aggregation with ADP (1, 5, 10, and 20 µM) as agonist and by PFA-100 using collagen and epinephrine (Col + Epi) and Cpæ + ADP as agonists. Plasma thromboxane B2 concentration......Background: Clinical studies investigating platelet function in dogs have had conflicting results that may be caused by normal physiologic variation in platelet response to agonists. Objectives: The objective of this study was to investigate platelet function in clinically healthy dogs of 4...... different breeds by whole-blood aggregometry and with a point-of-care platelet function analyzer (PFA-100), and to evaluate the effect of acetylsalicylic acid (ASA) administration on the results from both methods. Methods: Forty-five clinically healthy dogs (12 Cavalier King Charles Spaniels [CKCS], 12...

  9. Cisplatin triggers platelet activation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Togna, G I; Togna, A R; Franconi, M; Caprino, L

    2000-09-01

    Clinical observations suggest that anticancer drugs could contribute to the thrombotic complications of malignancy in treated patients. Thrombotic microangiopathy, myocardial infarction, and cerebrovascular thrombotic events have been reported for cisplatin, a drug widely used in the treatment of many solid tumours. The aim of this study is to explore in vitro cisplatin effect on human platelet reactivity in order to define the potentially active role of platelets in the pathogenesis of cisplatin-induced thrombotic complications. Our results demonstrate that cisplatin increases human platelet reactivity (onset of platelet aggregation wave and thromboxane production) to non-aggregating concentrations of the agonists involving arachidonic acid metabolism. Direct or indirect activation of platelet phospholipase A(2) appears to be implicated. This finding contributes to a better understanding of the pathogenesis of thrombotic complications occurring during cisplatin-based chemotherapy.

  10. Platelet function in dogs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Line A.; Zois, Nora Elisabeth; Pedersen, Henrik D.

    2007-01-01

    Background: Clinical studies investigating platelet function in dogs have had conflicting results that may be caused by normal physiologic variation in platelet response to agonists. Objectives: The objective of this study was to investigate platelet function in clinically healthy dogs of 4...... different breeds by whole-blood aggregometry and with a point-of-care platelet function analyzer (PFA-100), and to evaluate the effect of acetylsalicylic acid (ASA) administration on the results from both methods. Methods: Forty-five clinically healthy dogs (12 Cavalier King Charles Spaniels [CKCS], 12...... applied. However, the importance of these breed differences remains to be investigated. The PFA-100 method with Col + Epi as agonists, and ADP-induced platelet aggregation appear to be sensitive to ASA in dogs....

  11. Mechanisms of Degranulation in Neutrophils

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lacy Paige

    2006-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Neutrophils are critical inflammatory cells that cause tissue damage in a range of diseases and disorders. Being bone marrow-derived white blood cells, they migrate from the bloodstream to sites of tissue inflammation in response to chemotactic signals and induce inflammation by undergoing receptor-mediated respiratory burst and degranulation. Degranulation from neutrophils has been implicated as a major causative factor in pulmonary disorders, including severe asphyxic episodes of asthma. However, the mechanisms that control neutrophil degranulation are not well understood. Recent observations indicate that granule release from neutrophils depends on activation of intracellular signalling pathways, including β-arrestins, the Rho guanosine triphosphatase Rac2, soluble NSF attachment protein (SNAP receptors, the src family of tyrosine kinases, and the tyrosine phosphatase MEG2. Some of these observations suggest that degranulation from neutrophils is selective and depends on nonredundant signalling pathways. This review focuses on new findings from the literature on the mechanisms that control the release of granule-derived mediators from neutrophils.

  12. AUTOINFLAMMATORY PUSTULAR NEUTROPHILIC DISEASES

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naik, Haley B.; Cowen, Edward W.

    2013-01-01

    SYNOPSIS The inflammatory pustular dermatoses constitute a spectrum of non-infectious conditions ranging from localized involvement to generalized disease with associated acute systemic inflammation and multi-organ involvement. Despite the variability in extent and severity of cutaneous presentation, each of these diseases is characterized by non-infectious neutrophilic intra-epidermal microabscesses. Many share systemic findings including fever, elevated inflammatory markers, inflammatory bowel disease and/or osteoarticular involvement, suggesting potential common pathogenic links (Figure 1). The recent discoveries of several genes responsible for heritable pustular diseases have revealed a distinct link between pustular skin disease and regulation of innate immunity. These genetic advances have led to a deeper exploration of common pathways in pustular skin disease and offer the potential for a new era of biologic therapy which targets these shared pathways. This chapter provides a new categorization of inflammatory pustular dermatoses in the context of recent genetic and biologic insights. We will discuss recently-described monogenic diseases with pustular phenotypes, including deficiency of IL-1 receptor antagonist (DIRA), deficiency of the IL-36 receptor antagonist (DITRA), CARD14-associated pustular psoriasis (CAMPS), and pyogenic arthritis, pyoderma gangrenosum, acne (PAPA). We will then discuss how these new genetic advancements may inform how we view previously described pustular diseases, including pustular psoriasis and its clinical variants, with a focus on historical classification by clinical phenotype. PMID:23827244

  13. Predictive Contribution of Neutrophil/Lymphocyte Ratio in Diagnosis of Brucellosis

    OpenAIRE

    Serdar Olt; Hasan Ergenç; Seyyid Bilal Açıkgöz

    2015-01-01

    Here we wanted to investigate predictive value of neutrophil/lymphocyte ratio (NLR) and platelet/lymphocyte ratio (PLR) in the diagnosis of brucellosis. Thirty-two brucellosis patients diagnosed with positive serum agglutination test and thirty-two randomized healthy subjects were enrolled in this study retrospectively. Result with ROC analyzes the baseline NLR and hemoglobin values were found to be significantly associated with brucellosis (P=0.01, P=0.01, resp.). Herein we demonstrated for ...

  14. Predictive Contribution of Neutrophil/Lymphocyte Ratio in Diagnosis of Brucellosis

    OpenAIRE

    Olt, Serdar; Ergenç, Hasan; Açıkgöz, Seyyid Bilal

    2015-01-01

    Here we wanted to investigate predictive value of neutrophil/lymphocyte ratio (NLR) and platelet/lymphocyte ratio (PLR) in the diagnosis of brucellosis. Thirty-two brucellosis patients diagnosed with positive serum agglutination test and thirty-two randomized healthy subjects were enrolled in this study retrospectively. Result with ROC analyzes the baseline NLR and hemoglobin values were found to be significantly associated with brucellosis (P = 0.01, P = 0.01, resp.). Herein we demonstrated ...

  15. Measurement of platelet aggregation, independently of patient platelet count

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vinholt, P. J.; Frederiksen, H.; Hvas, A.M.

    2017-01-01

    platelet aggregation ruled out bleeding tendency in thrombocytopenic patients. Summary: Background: Methods for testing platelet aggregation in thrombocytopenia are lacking. Objective: To establish a flow-cytometric test of in vitro platelet aggregation independently of the patient's platelet count......, and examine the association of aggregation with a bleeding history in thrombocytopenic patients. Patients/methods: We established a flow-cytometric assay of platelet aggregation, and measured samples from healthy individuals preincubated with antiplatelet drugs, and samples from two patients with inherited...... platelets at platelet counts of > 10 × 109 L-1; otherwise, platelet isolation was required. The platelet aggregation percentage decreased with increasing antiplatelet drug concentration. Platelet aggregation in patients was reduced as compared with healthy individuals: 42% (interquartile range [IQR] 27...

  16. Phagocytosis and Killing of Carbapenem-Resistant ST258 Klebsiella pneumoniae by Human Neutrophils.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kobayashi, Scott D; Porter, Adeline R; Dorward, David W; Brinkworth, Amanda J; Chen, Liang; Kreiswirth, Barry N; DeLeo, Frank R

    2016-05-15

    Carbapenem-resistant Klebsiella pneumoniae strains classified as multilocus sequence type 258 (ST258) are among the most widespread multidrug-resistant hospital-acquired pathogens. Treatment of infections caused by these organisms is difficult, and mortality is high. The basis for the success of ST258, outside of antibiotic resistance, remains incompletely determined. Here we tested the hypothesis that ST258K. pneumoniae has enhanced capacity to circumvent killing by human neutrophils, the primary cellular defense against bacterial infections. There was limited binding and uptake of ST258 by human neutrophils, and correspondingly, there was limited killing of bacteria. On the other hand, transmission electron microscopy revealed that any ingested organisms were degraded readily within neutrophil phagosomes, thus indicating that survival in the neutrophil assays is due to limited phagocytosis, rather than to microbicide resistance after uptake. Our findings suggest that enhancing neutrophil phagocytosis is a potential therapeutic approach for treatment of infection caused by carbapenem-resistant ST258K. pneumoniae.

  17. The pore-forming toxin listeriolysin O is degraded by neutrophil metalloproteinase-8 and fails to mediate Listeria monocytogenes intracellular survival in neutrophils.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arnett, Eusondia; Vadia, Stephen; Nackerman, Colleen C; Oghumu, Steve; Satoskar, Abhay R; McLeish, Kenneth R; Uriarte, Silvia M; Seveau, Stephanie

    2014-01-01

    The pore-forming toxin listeriolysin O (LLO) is a major virulence factor secreted by the facultative intracellular pathogen Listeria monocytogenes. This toxin facilitates L. monocytogenes intracellular survival in macrophages and diverse nonphagocytic cells by disrupting the internalization vesicle, releasing the bacterium into its replicative niche, the cytosol. Neutrophils are innate immune cells that play an important role in the control of infections, yet it was unknown if LLO could confer a survival advantage to L. monocytogenes in neutrophils. We report that LLO can enhance the phagocytic efficiency of human neutrophils and is unable to protect L. monocytogenes from intracellular killing. To explain the absence of L. monocytogenes survival in neutrophils, we hypothesized that neutrophil degranulation leads to the release of LLO-neutralizing molecules in the forming phagosome. In support of this, L. monocytogenes is a potent inducer of neutrophil degranulation, since its virulence factors, such as LLO, facilitate granule exocytosis. Within the first few minutes of interaction with L. monocytogenes, granules can fuse with the plasma membrane at the bacterial interaction site before closure of the phagosome. Furthermore, granule products directly degrade LLO, irreversibly inhibiting its activity. The matrix metalloproteinase-8, stored in secondary granules, was identified as an endoprotease that degrades LLO, and blocking neutrophil proteases increased L. monocytogenes intracellular survival. In conclusion, we propose that LLO degradation by matrix metalloproteinase-8 during phagocytosis protects neutrophil membranes from perforation and contributes to maintaining L. monocytogenes in a bactericidal phagosome from which it cannot escape.

  18. Thrombin Increases Expression of Fibronectin Antigen on the Platelet Surface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ginsberg, Mark H.; Painter, Richard G.; Forsyth, Jane; Birdwell, Charles; Plow, Edward F.

    1980-02-01

    Fibronectins (fn) are adhesive glycoproteins which bind to collagen and to fibrin and appear to be important in cellular adhesion to other cells or surfaces. Fn-related antigen is present in human platelets, suggesting a possible role for fn in the adhesive properties of platelets. We have studied the localization of fn in resting and thrombin-stimulated platelets by immunofluorescence and quantitative binding of radiolabeled antibody. In resting fixed platelets, variable light surface staining for fn was observed. When these cells were made permeable to antibody with detergent, staining for fn was markedly enhanced and was present in a punctate distribution, suggesting intracellular localization. Stimulation with thrombin, which is associated with increased platelet adhesiveness, resulted in increased staining for fn antigen on intact platelets. These stimulated cells did not leak 51Cr nor did they stain for F-actin, thus documenting that the increased fn staining was not due to loss of plasma membrane integrity. The thrombin-induced increase in accessible platelet fn antigen was confirmed by quantitative antibody binding studies in which thrombin-stimulated platelets specifically bound 15 times as much radiolabeled F(ab')2 anti-fn as did resting cells. Thus, thrombin stimulation results in increased expression of fn antigen on the platelet surface. Here it may participate in interactions with fibrin, connective tissue, or other cells.

  19. MET is required for the recruitment of anti-tumoural neutrophils.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Finisguerra, Veronica; Di Conza, Giusy; Di Matteo, Mario; Serneels, Jens; Costa, Sandra; Thompson, A A Roger; Wauters, Els; Walmsley, Sarah; Prenen, Hans; Granot, Zvi; Casazza, Andrea; Mazzone, Massimiliano

    2015-06-18

    Mutations or amplification of the MET proto-oncogene are involved in the pathogenesis of several tumours, which rely on the constitutive engagement of this pathway for their growth and survival. However, MET is expressed not only by cancer cells but also by tumour-associated stromal cells, although its precise role in this compartment is not well characterized. Here we show that MET is required for neutrophil chemoattraction and cytotoxicity in response to its ligand hepatocyte growth factor (HGF). Met deletion in mouse neutrophils enhances tumour growth and metastasis. This phenotype correlates with reduced neutrophil infiltration to both the primary tumour and metastatic sites. Similarly, Met is necessary for neutrophil transudation during colitis, skin rash or peritonitis. Mechanistically, Met is induced by tumour-derived tumour necrosis factor (TNF)-α or other inflammatory stimuli in both mouse and human neutrophils. This induction is instrumental for neutrophil transmigration across an activated endothelium and for inducible nitric oxide synthase production upon HGF stimulation. Consequently, HGF/MET-dependent nitric oxide release by neutrophils promotes cancer cell killing, which abates tumour growth and metastasis. After systemic administration of a MET kinase inhibitor, we prove that the therapeutic benefit of MET targeting in cancer cells is partly countered by the pro-tumoural effect arising from MET blockade in neutrophils. Our work identifies an unprecedented role of MET in neutrophils, suggests a potential 'Achilles' heel' of MET-targeted therapies in cancer, and supports the rationale for evaluating anti-MET drugs in certain inflammatory diseases.

  20. With Friends Like These: The Complex Role of Neutrophils in the Progression of Severe Pneumonia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roger D. Pechous

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Pneumonia is a leading cause of death from infection in the United States and across the globe. During pulmonary infection, clear resolution of host inflammatory responses occurs in the absence of appreciable lung damage. Neutrophils are the first wave of leukocytes to arrive in the lung upon infection. After activation, neutrophils traffic from the vasculature via transendothelial migration through the lung interstitium and into the alveolar space. Successful pulmonary immunity requires neutrophil-mediated killing of invading pathogens by phagocytosis and release of a myriad of antimicrobial molecules, followed by resolution of inflammation, neutrophil apoptosis, and clearing of dead or dying neutrophils by macrophages. In addition to their antimicrobial role, it is becoming clear that neutrophils are also important modulators of innate and adaptive immune responses, primarily through the release of cytokines and recruitment of additional waves of neutrophils into the airways. Though typically essential to combating severe pneumonia, neutrophil influx into the airways is a double-edged sword: Overzealous neutrophil activation can cause severe tissue damage as a result of the release of toxic agents including proteases, cationic polypeptides, cytokines, and reactive oxygen species (ROS aimed at killing invading microbes. In extreme cases, the damage caused by neutrophils and other innate immune mediators become the primary source of morbidity and mortality. Here, we review the complex role of neutrophils during severe pneumonia by highlighting specific molecules and processes that contribute to pulmonary immunity, but can also drive progression of severe disease. Depending on the identity of the infectious agent, enhancing or suppressing neutrophil-mediated responses may be key to effectively treating severe and typically lethal pneumonia.

  1. Defining Platelet Function During Polytrauma

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-02-01

    using calibrated automated thrombography ( CAT ). 3. Platelet-induced clot contraction and using viscoelastic measures such as TEG with Platelet Mapping...using calibrated automated thrombography ( CAT ) in platelet-rich plasma. 3. Platelet-induced clot contraction and effect on clot structure by platelet...if injury with stable vital signs on initial evaluation.  Pregnancy (confirmed with urine pregnancy testing)  Documented do not resuscitate order

  2. Specific Inflammatory Stimuli Lead to Distinct Platelet Responses in Mice and Humans

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beaulieu, Lea M.; Clancy, Lauren; Tanriverdi, Kahraman; Benjamin, Emelia J.; Kramer, Carolyn D.; Weinberg, Ellen O.; He, Xianbao; Mekasha, Samrawit; Mick, Eric; Ingalls, Robin R.; Genco, Caroline A.; Freedman, Jane E.

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Diverse and multi-factorial processes contribute to the progression of cardiovascular disease. These processes affect cells involved in the development of this disease in varying ways, ultimately leading to atherothrombosis. The goal of our study was to compare the differential effects of specific stimuli – two bacterial infections and a Western diet – on platelet responses in ApoE-/- mice, specifically examining inflammatory function and gene expression. Results from murine studies were verified using platelets from participants of the Framingham Heart Study (FHS; n = 1819 participants). Methods Blood and spleen samples were collected at weeks 1 and 9 from ApoE-/- mice infected with Porphyromonas gingivalis or Chlamydia pneumoniae and from mice fed a Western diet for 9 weeks. Transcripts based on data from a Western diet in ApoE-/- mice were measured in platelet samples from FHS using high throughput qRT-PCR. Results At week 1, both bacterial infections increased circulating platelet-neutrophil aggregates. At week 9, these cells individually localized to the spleen, while Western diet resulted in increased platelet-neutrophil aggregates in the spleen only. Microarray analysis of platelet RNA from infected or Western diet-fed mice at week 1 and 9 showed differential profiles. Genes, such as Serpina1a, Ttr, Fgg, Rpl21, and Alb, were uniquely affected by infection and diet. Results were reinforced in platelets obtained from participants of the FHS. Conclusion Using both human studies and animal models, results demonstrate that variable sources of inflammatory stimuli have the ability to influence the platelet phenotype in distinct ways, indicative of the diverse function of platelets in thrombosis, hemostasis, and immunity. PMID:26148065

  3. Specific Inflammatory Stimuli Lead to Distinct Platelet Responses in Mice and Humans.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lea M Beaulieu

    Full Text Available Diverse and multi-factorial processes contribute to the progression of cardiovascular disease. These processes affect cells involved in the development of this disease in varying ways, ultimately leading to atherothrombosis. The goal of our study was to compare the differential effects of specific stimuli--two bacterial infections and a Western diet--on platelet responses in ApoE-/- mice, specifically examining inflammatory function and gene expression. Results from murine studies were verified using platelets from participants of the Framingham Heart Study (FHS; n = 1819 participants.Blood and spleen samples were collected at weeks 1 and 9 from ApoE-/- mice infected with Porphyromonas gingivalis or Chlamydia pneumoniae and from mice fed a Western diet for 9 weeks. Transcripts based on data from a Western diet in ApoE-/- mice were measured in platelet samples from FHS using high throughput qRT-PCR.At week 1, both bacterial infections increased circulating platelet-neutrophil aggregates. At week 9, these cells individually localized to the spleen, while Western diet resulted in increased platelet-neutrophil aggregates in the spleen only. Microarray analysis of platelet RNA from infected or Western diet-fed mice at week 1 and 9 showed differential profiles. Genes, such as Serpina1a, Ttr, Fgg, Rpl21, and Alb, were uniquely affected by infection and diet. Results were reinforced in platelets obtained from participants of the FHS.Using both human studies and animal models, results demonstrate that variable sources of inflammatory stimuli have the ability to influence the platelet phenotype in distinct ways, indicative of the diverse function of platelets in thrombosis, hemostasis, and immunity.

  4. Effects of argon laser on in vitro aggregation of platelets in platelet rich plasma and whole blood

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Doerger, P.T.; Glueck, H.I.; McGill, M.

    1988-06-01

    The effects of an Argon laser on platelet aggregation were studied, since platelets may be exposed to laser energy when used intravascularly. Various preparations of platelets in platelet rich plasma (PRP) and whole blood, with or without aspirin, were tested with the aggregating agents ADP, collagen, thrombin, and epinephrine. Simultaneous release of ATP was also measured in PRP. At relatively low levels of irradiation, platelet aggregation was potentiated. Enhancement was evidenced by an increase in percent aggregation, earlier onset of the reaction, and reduction in the amount of aggregating agent required. In PRP, the mechanism of laser potentiation appeared to be the release of endogenous ATP from platelets. At relatively high levels of irradiation, platelets were destroyed and aggregation abolished. In whole blood, the mechanism was somewhat more complicated since release of ATP occurred from RBCs as well as platelets. Spontaneous aggregation following laser treatment occurred in isolated instances in PRP and in every trial in whole blood preparations. Aspirin ingestion inhibited the laser's effects in PRP but not in whole blood. These results may have important clinical implications for laser angioplasty, and the potentiated aggregation response may prove useful in laboratory studies of platelet function.

  5. Neutrophil extracellular traps - the dark side of neutrophils

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Ole E.; Borregaard, Niels

    2016-01-01

    Neutrophil extracellular traps (NETs) were discovered as extracellular strands of decondensed DNA in complex with histones and granule proteins, which were expelled from dying neutrophils to ensnare and kill microbes. NETs are formed during infection in vivo by mechanisms different from those...... originally described in vitro. Citrullination of histones by peptidyl arginine deiminase 4 (PAD4) is central for NET formation in vivo. NETs may spur formation of autoantibodies and may also serve as scaffolds for thrombosis, thereby providing a link among infection, autoimmunity, and thrombosis...

  6. Doxycycline induced photodamage to human neutrophils and tryptophan

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sandberg, S.; Glette, J.; Hopen, G.; Solberg, C.O. (Haukeland Sykehus, Bergen (Norway))

    1984-01-01

    Neutrophil function were studied following irradiation (340-380 nm) of the cells in the presence of 22 ..mu..M doxycycline. At increasing light fluence the locomotion, chemiluminescence and glucose oxidation (by the hexose monophosphate shunt) of the neutrophils steadily decreased. The photodamage increased with increasing preincubation temperature and time and was enhanced in D/sub 2/O, reduced in azide and abolished in anaerobiosis. Superoxide dismutase, catalase or mannitol did not influence the photodamage. Photooxidation of tryptophan in the presence of doxycycline was increased 9-10-fold in D/sub 2/O and nearly abolished in the presence of 0.25 mM NaN/sub 3/, indicating that singlet oxygen is the most important reactive oxygen species in the doxycycline-induced photodamage. The results may explain some of the features of tetracycline-induced photosensitivity and why other authors have obtained diverging results when studying the influence of tetracyclines on neutrophil functions.

  7. The influence of platelets, plasma and red blood cells on functional haemostatic assays

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bochsen, Louise; Johansson, Pär I.; Kristensen, Annemarie Thuri

    2011-01-01

    and combined, influenced the two methodologically different assays, thrombelastography (TEG) and impedance aggregometry (Multiplate). Platelet-rich plasma (200 × 10/l) or pure plasma (0 platelets), with and without added red blood cells (RBCs), hematocrit 0, 0.15 or 0.29, were produced in vitro from platelet...... concentrates, fresh frozen plasma and stored RBC. Pure platelets were investigated by removing plasma components from platelet concentrates by diafiltration against the platelet storage solution Intersol. Plasma was readded by diafiltration against plasma in Intersol. Haemostatic function was evaluated by TEG...... and Multiplate. In the TEG, increasing amounts of RBC reduced clot strength and clot kinetics (α-angle), most markedly in plasma/RBC without platelets. In contrast, RBC in a platelet concentrate matrix enhanced Multiplate aggregation in response to weak agonists (ADP and arachidonic acid). Furthermore, removing...

  8. Platelet receptor expression and shedding: glycoprotein Ib-IX-V and glycoprotein VI.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gardiner, Elizabeth E; Andrews, Robert K

    2014-04-01

    Quantity, quality, and lifespan are 3 important factors in the physiology, pathology, and transfusion of human blood platelets. The aim of this review is to discuss the proteolytic regulation of key platelet-specific receptors, glycoprotein(GP)Ib and GPVI, involved in the function of platelets in hemostasis and thrombosis, and nonimmune or immune thrombocytopenia. The scope of the review encompasses the basic science of platelet receptor shedding, practical aspects related to laboratory analysis of platelet receptor expression/shedding, and clinical implications of using the proteolytic fragments as platelet-specific biomarkers in vivo in terms of platelet function and clearance. These topics can be relevant to platelet transfusion regarding both changes in platelet receptor expression occurring ex vivo during platelet storage and/or clinical use of platelets for transfusion. In this regard, quantitative analysis of platelet receptor profiles on blood samples from individuals could ultimately enable stratification of bleeding risk, discrimination between causes of thrombocytopenia due to impaired production vs enhanced clearance, and monitoring of response to treatment prior to change in platelet count.

  9. Clinical application of radiolabelled platelets

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kessler, C. (Medical University Luebeck (Federal Republic of Germany). Department of Neurology); Hardeman, M.R. (Amsterdam Univ. (Netherlands). Academisch Ziekenhuis); Henningsen, H. (Heidelberg Univ. (Germany, F.R.). Neurologische Klinik); Petrovici, J.-N. (Cologne-Merheim Hospital (Federal Republic of Germany). Department of Neurology) (eds.)

    1990-01-01

    The increasing number of therapeutic modalities available for the management of patients with thromboembolic complications, such as fibrinolytic treatment or vascular surgery, require the development of new imaging techniques to provide more information on the xtent, age and activity of the thromboembolic material causing clinical symptoms. Since the introduction of radiolabelling of platelets with indium-111, platelet scintigraphy (PSC) has been used as a tool in the diagnosis of various thromboembolic diseases. During the International Symposium on Radiolabelled Platelets scientists from a variety of medical backgrounds presented their results on the clinical applictions of radiolabelled platelets. The papers presented there have been updated to take account of the latest results before publication in this volume. The papers are grouped into six sections on platelet labelling techniques, radiolabelled platelets in cardiology, monitoring of antiplatelet therapy, platelet scintigraphy in stroke patients, platelet scintigraphy in angiology, and platelet scintigraphy in hematology and other clinical applications, including renal transplant rejection. refs.; figs.; tabs.

  10. Platelet preservation: agitation and containers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van der Meer, Pieter F; de Korte, Dirk

    2011-06-01

    For platelets to maintain their in vitro quality and in vivo effectiveness, they need to be stored at room temperature with gentle agitation in gas-permeable containers. The mode of agitation affects the quality of the platelets, and a gentle method of agitation, either a circular or a flat bed movement, provides the best results. Tumblers or elliptical agitators induce platelet activation and subsequent damage. As long as the platelets remain in suspension, the agitation speed is not important. Agitation of the platelet concentrates ensures that the platelets are continuously oxygenated, that sufficient oxygen can enter the storage container and that excess carbon dioxide can be expelled. During transportation of platelet concentrates, nowadays over long distances where they are held without controlled agitation, platelets may tolerate a certain period without agitation. However, evidence is accumulating that during the time without agitation, local hypoxia surrounding the platelets may induce irreversible harm to the platelets. Over the decades, more gas-permeable plastics have been used to manufacture platelet containers. The use of different plastics and their influence on the platelet quality both in vitro and in vivo is discussed. The improved gas-permeability has allowed the extension of platelet storage from 3 days in the early 1980s, to currently at least 7 days. In the light of new developments, particularly the introduction of pathogen reduction techniques, the use of platelet additive solutions and the availability of improved automated separators, further (renewed) research in this area is warranted.

  11. Myeloperoxidase attracts neutrophils by physical forces

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Klinke, Anna; Nussbaum, Claudia; Kubala, Lukas; Friedrichs, Kai; Rudolph, Tanja K.; Rudolph, Volker; Paust, Hans-Joachim; Schroeder, Christine; Benten, Daniel; Lau, Denise; Szocs, Katalin; Furtmueller, Paul G.; Heeringa, Peter; Sydow, Karsten; Duchstein, Hans-Juergen; Ehmke, Heimo; Schumacher, Udo; Meinertz, Thomas; Sperandio, Markus; Baldus, Stephan

    2011-01-01

    Recruitment of polymorphonuclear neutrophils (PMNs) remains a paramount prerequisite in innate immune defense and a critical cofounder in inflammatory vascular disease. Neutrophil recruitment comprises a cascade of concerted events allowing for capture, adhesion and extravasation of the leukocyte.

  12. Functional neutrophils from human ES cells

    OpenAIRE

    Sweeney, Colin L; Malech, Harry L.

    2009-01-01

    In this issue of Blood, Yokoyama and colleagues demonstrate in vitro differentiation of hESCs into mature neutrophils with functional capabilities (chemotaxis, phagocytosis, microbicidal oxidase activity, and bacterial killing) approaching or equal to that of normal peripheral blood neutrophils.

  13. Platelet degranulation and monocyte-platelet complex formation are increased in the acute and convalescent phases after ischaemic stroke or transient ischaemic attack.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    McCabe, Dominick J H

    2004-06-01

    Flow cytometric studies suggest that platelets are activated in ischaemic stroke or transient ischaemic attack (TIA). However, few studies have measured circulating leucocyte-platelet complexes in this patient population. Whole blood flow cytometry was used to quantify the expression of CD62P-, CD63-, and PAC1-binding, and the percentages of leucocyte-platelet complexes in acute (1-27 d, n = 79) and convalescent (79-725 d, n = 70) ischaemic cerebrovascular disease (CVD) patients compared with controls without CVD (n = 27). We performed a full blood count, and measured plasma levels of soluble P-selectin, soluble E-selectin, and von Willebrand factor antigen (VWF:Ag) as additional markers of platelet and\\/or endothelial cell activation. The median percentage CD62P expression and the median percentage monocyte-platelet complexes were higher in both acute and convalescent CVD patients than controls (P <\\/= 0.02). The mean white cell count and mean VWF:Ag levels were significantly elevated in the acute and convalescent phases after ischaemic stroke or TIA (P <\\/= 0.02). Otherwise, there was no significant increase in any other marker of platelet or endothelial activation in CVD patients. There was a positive correlation between the percentage expression of CD62P and the percentages of both neutrophil-platelet and monocyte-platelet complexes in the acute phase, and the percentages of all leucocyte-platelet complexes in the convalescent phase after ischaemic CVD. This study provides evidence for ongoing excessive platelet and\\/or endothelial activation in ischaemic CVD patients despite treatment with antithrombotic therapy.

  14. The Vi capsular polysaccharide enables Salmonella enterica serovar typhi to evade microbe-guided neutrophil chemotaxis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tamding Wangdi

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Salmonella enterica serovar Typhi (S. Typhi causes typhoid fever, a disseminated infection, while the closely related pathogen S. enterica serovar Typhimurium (S. Typhimurium is associated with a localized gastroenteritis in humans. Here we investigated whether both pathogens differ in the chemotactic response they induce in neutrophils using a single-cell experimental approach. Surprisingly, neutrophils extended chemotactic pseudopodia toward Escherichia coli and S. Typhimurium, but not toward S. Typhi. Bacterial-guided chemotaxis was dependent on the presence of complement component 5a (C5a and C5a receptor (C5aR. Deletion of S. Typhi capsule biosynthesis genes markedly enhanced the chemotactic response of neutrophils in vitro. Furthermore, deletion of capsule biosynthesis genes heightened the association of S. Typhi with neutrophils in vivo through a C5aR-dependent mechanism. Collectively, these data suggest that expression of the virulence-associated (Vi capsular polysaccharide of S. Typhi obstructs bacterial-guided neutrophil chemotaxis.

  15. The Vi capsular polysaccharide enables Salmonella enterica serovar typhi to evade microbe-guided neutrophil chemotaxis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wangdi, Tamding; Lee, Cheng-Yuk; Spees, Alanna M; Yu, Chenzhou; Kingsbury, Dawn D; Winter, Sebastian E; Hastey, Christine J; Wilson, R Paul; Heinrich, Volkmar; Bäumler, Andreas J

    2014-08-01

    Salmonella enterica serovar Typhi (S. Typhi) causes typhoid fever, a disseminated infection, while the closely related pathogen S. enterica serovar Typhimurium (S. Typhimurium) is associated with a localized gastroenteritis in humans. Here we investigated whether both pathogens differ in the chemotactic response they induce in neutrophils using a single-cell experimental approach. Surprisingly, neutrophils extended chemotactic pseudopodia toward Escherichia coli and S. Typhimurium, but not toward S. Typhi. Bacterial-guided chemotaxis was dependent on the presence of complement component 5a (C5a) and C5a receptor (C5aR). Deletion of S. Typhi capsule biosynthesis genes markedly enhanced the chemotactic response of neutrophils in vitro. Furthermore, deletion of capsule biosynthesis genes heightened the association of S. Typhi with neutrophils in vivo through a C5aR-dependent mechanism. Collectively, these data suggest that expression of the virulence-associated (Vi) capsular polysaccharide of S. Typhi obstructs bacterial-guided neutrophil chemotaxis.

  16. Effects of Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans leukotoxin on neutrophil migration and extracellular trap formation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Josefine Hirschfeld

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Background: Aggressive periodontitis is associated with the presence of Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans, a leukotoxin (Ltx-producing periodontal pathogen. Ltx has the ability to lyse white blood cells including neutrophils. Objectives: This study was aimed at investigating the interactions between neutrophils and Ltx with regard to the chemotactic properties of Ltx and the release of neutrophil extracellular traps (NETs. Methods: Neutrophils from healthy blood donors were isolated and incubated for 30 min and 3 h with increasing concentrations of Ltx (1, 10, and 100 ng/mL as well as with A. actinomycetemcomitans strains (NCTC 9710 and HK 1651 producing different levels of Ltx. Formation of NETs and cell lysis were assessed by microscopy, fluorescence-based assays, and measurement of released lactate dehydrogenase. Neutrophil migration in response to different Ltx gradients was monitored by real-time video microscopy, and image analysis was performed using ImageJ software. Results: Although Ltx (10 and 100 ng/mL and the leukotoxic A. actinomycetemcomitans strain HK 1651 lysed some neutrophils, other cells were still capable of performing NETosis in a concentration-dependent manner. Low doses of Ltx and the weakly leukotoxic strain NCTC 9710 did not lead to neutrophil lysis, but did induce some NETosis. Furthermore, all three concentrations of Ltx enhanced random neutrophil movement; however, low directional accuracy was observed compared with the positive control (fMLP. Conclusions: The results indicate that Ltx acts both as a neutrophil activator and also causes cell death. In addition, Ltx directly induces NETosis in neutrophils prior to cell lysis. In future studies, the underlying pathways involved in Ltx-meditated neutrophil activation and NETosis need to be investigated further.

  17. Effects of Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans leukotoxin on neutrophil migration and extracellular trap formation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hirschfeld, Josefine; Roberts, Helen M.; Chapple, Iain L. C.; Parčina, Marijo; Jepsen, Søren; Johansson, Anders; Claesson, Rolf

    2016-01-01

    Background Aggressive periodontitis is associated with the presence of Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans, a leukotoxin (Ltx)-producing periodontal pathogen. Ltx has the ability to lyse white blood cells including neutrophils. Objectives This study was aimed at investigating the interactions between neutrophils and Ltx with regard to the chemotactic properties of Ltx and the release of neutrophil extracellular traps (NETs). Methods Neutrophils from healthy blood donors were isolated and incubated for 30 min and 3 h with increasing concentrations of Ltx (1, 10, and 100 ng/mL) as well as with A. actinomycetemcomitans strains (NCTC 9710 and HK 1651) producing different levels of Ltx. Formation of NETs and cell lysis were assessed by microscopy, fluorescence-based assays, and measurement of released lactate dehydrogenase. Neutrophil migration in response to different Ltx gradients was monitored by real-time video microscopy, and image analysis was performed using ImageJ software. Results Although Ltx (10 and 100 ng/mL) and the leukotoxic A. actinomycetemcomitans strain HK 1651 lysed some neutrophils, other cells were still capable of performing NETosis in a concentration-dependent manner. Low doses of Ltx and the weakly leukotoxic strain NCTC 9710 did not lead to neutrophil lysis, but did induce some NETosis. Furthermore, all three concentrations of Ltx enhanced random neutrophil movement; however, low directional accuracy was observed compared with the positive control (fMLP). Conclusions The results indicate that Ltx acts both as a neutrophil activator and also causes cell death. In addition, Ltx directly induces NETosis in neutrophils prior to cell lysis. In future studies, the underlying pathways involved in Ltx-meditated neutrophil activation and NETosis need to be investigated further. PMID:27834173

  18. Platelets release mitochondria serving as substrate for bactericidal group IIA-secreted phospholipase A2 to promote inflammation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boudreau, Luc H.; Duchez, Anne-Claire; Cloutier, Nathalie; Soulet, Denis; Martin, Nicolas; Bollinger, James; Paré, Alexandre; Rousseau, Matthieu; Naika, Gajendra S.; Lévesque, Tania; Laflamme, Cynthia; Marcoux, Geneviève; Lambeau, Gérard; Farndale, Richard W.; Pouliot, Marc; Hamzeh-Cognasse, Hind; Cognasse, Fabrice; Garraud, Olivier; Nigrovic, Peter A.; Guderley, Helga; Lacroix, Steve; Thibault, Louis; Semple, John W.; Gelb, Michael H.

    2014-01-01

    Mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) is a highly potent inflammatory trigger and is reportedly found outside the cells in blood in various pathologies. Platelets are abundant in blood where they promote hemostasis. Although lacking a nucleus, platelets contain functional mitochondria. On activation, platelets produce extracellular vesicles known as microparticles. We hypothesized that activated platelets could also release their mitochondria. We show that activated platelets release respiratory-competent mitochondria, both within membrane-encapsulated microparticles and as free organelles. Extracellular mitochondria are found in platelet concentrates used for transfusion and are present at higher levels in those that induced acute reactions (febrile nonhemolytic reactions, skin manifestations, and cardiovascular events) in transfused patients. We establish that the mitochondrion is an endogenous substrate of secreted phospholipase A2 IIA (sPLA2-IIA), a phospholipase otherwise specific for bacteria, likely reflecting the ancestral proteobacteria origin of mitochondria. The hydrolysis of the mitochondrial membrane by sPLA2-IIA yields inflammatory mediators (ie, lysophospholipids, fatty acids, and mtDNA) that promote leukocyte activation. Two-photon microscopy in live transfused animals revealed that extracellular mitochondria interact with neutrophils in vivo, triggering neutrophil adhesion to the endothelial wall. Our findings identify extracellular mitochondria, produced by platelets, at the midpoint of a potent mechanism leading to inflammatory responses. PMID:25082876

  19. Local IL-17A potentiates early neutrophil recruitment to the respiratory tract during severe RSV infection.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arie Jan Stoppelenburg

    Full Text Available Respiratory syncytial virus (RSV bronchiolitis triggers a strong innate immune response characterized by excessive neutrophil infiltration which contributes to RSV induced pathology. The cytokine IL-17A enhances neutrophil infiltration into virus infected lungs. IL-17A is however best known as an effector of adaptive immune responses. The role of IL-17A in early immune modulation in RSV infection is unknown. We aimed to elucidate whether local IL-17A facilitates the innate neutrophil infiltration into RSV infected lungs prior to adaptive immunity. To this end, we studied IL-17A production in newborns that were hospitalized for severe RSV bronchiolitis. In tracheal aspirates we measured IL-17A concentration and neutrophil counts. We utilized cultured human epithelial cells to test if IL-17A regulates RSV infection-induced IL-8 release as mediator of neutrophil recruitment. In mice we investigated the cell types that are responsible for early innate IL-17A production during RSV infection. Using IL-17A neutralizing antibodies we tested if IL-17A is responsible for innate neutrophil infiltration in mice. Our data show that increased IL-17A production in newborn RSV patient lungs correlates with subsequent neutrophil counts recruited to the lungs. IL-17A potentiates RSV-induced production of the neutrophil-attracting chemokine IL-8 by airway epithelial cells in vitro. Various lung-resident lymphocytes produced IL-17A during early RSV infection in Balb/c mice, of which a local population of CD4 T cells stood out as the predominant RSV-induced cell type. By removing IL-17A during early RSV infection in mice we showed that IL-17A is responsible for enhanced innate neutrophil infiltration in vivo. Using patient material, in vitro studies, and an animal model of RSV infection, we thus show that early local IL-17A production in the airways during RSV bronchiolitis facilitates neutrophil recruitment with pathologic consequences to infant lungs.

  20. Fucoidan delays apoptosis and induces pro-inflammatory cytokine production in human neutrophils.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jin, Jun-O; Yu, Qing

    2015-02-01

    Although some immune modulatory effects of fucoidan have been elucidated, the effects of fucoidan on the apoptosis and activation of human neutrophils have not been investigated. In this study, we demonstrated that fucoidan purified from the brown seaweed Undaria pinnatifilda delays spontaneous apoptosis of human neutrophils and induces their activation. Fucoidan treatment inhibited apoptotic nuclei changes and phosphatidyl serine (PS) exposure on neutrophils cultured in vitro for 24h. The delay in neutrophil apoptosis mediated by fucoidan was associated with increased levels of the anti-apoptotic protein Mcl-1 and decreased levels of activated caspase-3. Screening of the signaling pathways by specific inhibitors indicated that fucoidan-induced delay in neutrophil apoptosis was dependent on the activation of PI3K/AKT signaling pathway, whereas MAPK signaling pathway was not critical. In addition, fucoidan enhanced the production of IL-6, IL-8 and TNF-α from neutrophils in an AKT-dependent manner. Taken together, these results demonstrated that fucoidan delays human neutrophil apoptosis and induces their production of pro-inflammatory cytokines. This knowledge could facilitate the development of novel therapeutic strategies for infectious diseases and neutropenia by controlling neutrophil homeostasis and function with fucoidan.

  1. Altered Innate Immune Responses in Neutrophils from Patients with Well- and Suboptimally Controlled Asthma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francesca S. M. Tang

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Respiratory infections are a major cause of asthma exacerbations where neutrophilic inflammation dominates and is associated with steroid refractory asthma. Structural airway cells in asthma differ from nonasthmatics; however it is unknown if neutrophils differ. We investigated neutrophil immune responses in patients who have good (AGood and suboptimal (ASubopt asthma symptom control. Methods. Peripheral blood neutrophils from AGood (ACQ 0.75, n=7, and healthy controls (HC (n=9 were stimulated with bacterial (LPS (1 μg/mL, fMLF (100 nM, and viral (imiquimod (3 μg/mL, R848 (1.5 μg/mL, and poly I:C (10 μg/mL surrogates or live rhinovirus (RV 16 (MOI1. Cell-free supernatant was collected after 1 h for neutrophil elastase (NE and matrix metalloproteinase- (MMP- 9 measurements or after 24 h for CXCL8 release. Results. Constitutive NE was enhanced in AGood neutrophils compared to HC. fMLF stimulated neutrophils from ASubopt but not AGood produced 50% of HC levels. fMLF induced MMP-9 was impaired in ASubopt and AGood compared to HC. fMLF stimulated CXCL8 but not MMP-9 was positively correlated with FEV1 and FEV1/FVC. ASubopt and AGood responded similarly to other stimuli. Conclusions. Circulating neutrophils are different in asthma; however, this is likely to be related to airflow limitation rather than asthma control.

  2. Neutrophil-Derived Exosomes: A New Mechanism Contributing to Airway Smooth Muscle Remodeling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vargas, Amandine; Roux-Dalvai, Florence; Droit, Arnaud; Lavoie, Jean-Pierre

    2016-09-01

    Neutrophils infiltrate the airways of patients with asthma of all severities, yet their role in the pathogenesis of asthma and their contribution to airway remodeling is largely unknown. We hypothesized that neutrophils modulate airway smooth muscle (ASM) proliferation in asthma by releasing bioactive exosomes. These newly discovered nano-sized vesicles have the capacity to modulate immune responses, cell migration, cell differentiation, and other aspects of cell-to-cell communication. The aim of the study is to determine whether bioactive exosomes are released by neutrophils, and, if so, characterize their proteomic profile and evaluate their capacity to modulate ASM cell proliferation. Exosomes were isolated from equine neutrophil supernatants by differential centrifugation and filtration methods, followed by size-exclusion chromatography. Nanovesicles were characterized using electron microscopy, particle size determination, and proteomic analyses. Exosomes were cocultured with ASM cells and analyzed for exosome internalization by confocal microscopy. ASM proliferation was measured using an impedance-based system. Neutrophils release exosomes that have characteristic size, morphology, and exosomal markers. We identified 271 proteins in exosomes from both LPS and unstimulated neutrophils, and 16 proteins that were differentially expressed, which carried proteins associated with immune response and positive regulation of cell communication. Furthermore, neutrophil-derived exosomes were rapidly internalized by ASM cells and altered their proliferative properties. Upon stimulation of LPS, neutrophil-derived exosomes can enhance the proliferation of ASM cells and could therefore play an important role in the progression of asthma and promoting airway remodeling in severe and corticosteroid-insensitive patients with asthma.

  3. Ginsenoside Rg1 and platelet-rich fibrin enhance human breast adipose-derived stem cell function for soft tissue regeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Fang-Tian; Liang, Zhi-Jie; Li, Hong-Mian; Peng, Qi-Liu; Huang, Min-Hong; Li, De Quan; Liang, Yi-Dan; Chi, Gang-Yi; Li, De Hui; Yu, Bing-Chao; Huang, Ji-Rong

    2016-06-01

    Adipose-derived stem cells (ASCs) can be used to repair soft tissue defects, wounds, burns, and scars and to regenerate various damaged tissues. The cell differentiation capacity of ASCs is crucial for engineered adipose tissue regeneration in reconstructive and plastic surgery. We previously reported that ginsenoside Rg1 (G-Rg1 or Rg1) promotes proliferation and differentiation of ASCs in vitro and in vivio. Here we show that both G-Rg1 and platelet-rich fibrin (PRF) improve the proliferation, differentiation, and soft tissue regeneration capacity of human breast adipose-derived stem cells (HBASCs) on collagen type I sponge scaffolds in vitro and in vivo. Three months after transplantation, tissue wet weight, adipocyte number, intracellular lipid, microvessel density, and gene and protein expression of VEGF, HIF-1α, and PPARγ were higher in both G-Rg1- and PRF-treated HBASCs than in control grafts. More extensive new adipose tissue formation was evident after treatment with G-Rg1 or PRF. In summary, G-Rg1 and/or PRF co-administration improves the function of HBASCs for soft tissue regeneration engineering.

  4. Characterization of a receptor for human monocyte-derived neutrophil chemotactic factor/interleukin-8

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grob, P.M.; David, E.; Warren, T.C.; DeLeon, R.P.; Farina, P.R.; Homon, C.A. (Boehringer Ingelheim Pharmaceuticals, Inc., Ridgefield, CT (USA))

    1990-05-15

    Monocyte-derived neutrophil chemotactic factor/interleukin-8 (MDNCF/IL-8) is an 8,000-dalton protein produced by monocytes which exhibits activity as a chemoattractant for neutrophils with maximal activity achieved at a concentration of 50 ng/ml. This polypeptide has been iodinated by chloramine-T methodology (350 Ci/mM), and specific receptors for MDNCF/IL-8 have been detected on human neutrophils, U937 cells, THP-1 cells, and dimethyl sulfoxide-differentiated HL-60 cells. The binding of MDNCF/IL-8 to human neutrophils is not inhibited by interleukin-1 alpha, tumor necrosis factor-alpha, insulin, or epidermal growth factor. In addition, chemoattractants such as C5a, fMet-Leu-Phe, leukotriene B4, and platelet-activating factor fail to inhibit binding, suggesting that MDNCF/IL-8 utilizes a unique receptor. The receptor for MDNCF/IL-8 is apparently glycosylated since ligand binding is inhibited by the presence of wheat germ agglutinin, a lectin with a binding specificity for N-acetylglucosamine and neuraminic acid. Steady state binding experiments indicate Kd values of 4 and 0.5 nM and receptor numbers of 75,000 and 7,400 for human neutrophils and differentiated HL-60 cells, respectively. 125I-MDNCF/IL-8 bound to human neutrophils is rapidly internalized and subsequently released from cells as trichloroacetic acid-soluble radioactivity. Affinity labeling experiments suggest that the human neutrophil MDNCF/IL-8 receptor exhibits a mass of approximately 58,000 daltons.

  5. Involvement of BLT1 endocytosis and Yes kinase activation in leukotriene B4-induced neutrophil degranulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaudreault, Eric; Thompson, Charles; Stankova, Jana; Rola-Pleszczynski, Marek

    2005-03-15

    One of the important biological activities of human neutrophils is degranulation, which can be induced by leukotriene B4 (LTB4). Here we investigated the intracellular signaling events involved in neutrophil degranulation mediated by the high affinity LTB4 receptor, BLT1. Peripheral blood neutrophils as well as the promyeloid PLB-985 cell line, stably transfected with BLT1 cDNA and differentiated into a neutrophil-like cell phenotype, were used throughout this study. LTB4-induced enzyme release was inhibited by 50-80% when cells were pretreated with the pharmacological inhibitors of endocytosis sucrose, Con A and NH4Cl. In addition, transient transfection with a dominant negative form of dynamin (K44A) resulted in approximately 70% inhibition of ligand-induced degranulation. Pretreating neutrophils or BLT1-expressing PLB-985 cells with the Src family kinase inhibitor PP1 resulted in a 30-60% inhibition in BLT1-mediated degranulation. Yes kinase, but not c-Src, Fgr, Hck, or Lyn, was found to exhibit up-regulated kinase activity after LTB4 stimulation. Moreover, BLT1 endocytosis was found to be necessary for Yes kinase activation in neutrophils. LTB4-induced degranulation was also sensitive to inhibition of PI3K. In contrast, it was not affected by inhibition of the mitogen-activated protein kinase MEK kinase, the Janus kinases, or the receptor tyrosine kinase epidermal growth factor receptor or platelet-derived growth factor receptor. Taken together, our results suggest an essential role for BLT1 endocytosis and Yes kinase activation in LTB4-mediated degranulation of human neutrophils.

  6. Angiogenesis is regulated by a novel mechanism: pro- and antiangiogenic proteins are organized into separate platelet α granules and differentially released

    OpenAIRE

    Italiano, Joseph E.; Richardson, Jennifer L.; Patel-Hett, Sunita; Battinelli, Elisabeth; Zaslavsky, Alexander; Short, Sarah; Ryeom, Sandra; Folkman, Judah; Klement, Giannoula L.

    2008-01-01

    Platelets, in addition to their function in hemostasis, play an important role in wound healing and tumor growth. Because platelets contain angiogenesis stimulators and inhibitors, the mechanisms by which platelets regulate angiogenesis remain unclear. As platelets adhere to activated endothelium, their action can enhance or inhibit local angiogenesis. We therefore suspected a higher organization of angiogenesis regulators in platelets. Using double immunofluorescence and immunoelectron micro...

  7. The Platelet and Platelet Function Testing in Liver Disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hugenholtz, Greg G. C.; Porte, Robert J.; Lisman, Ton

    2009-01-01

    Patients who have liver disease commonly present with alterations in platelet number and function. Recent data have questioned the contribution of these changes to bleeding complications in these patients. Modern tests of platelet function revealed compensatory mechanisms for the decreased platelet

  8. Investigation of platelet function and platelet disorders using flow cytometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rubak, Peter; Nissen, Peter H; Kristensen, Steen D; Hvas, Anne-Mette

    2016-01-01

    Patients with thrombocytopenia or platelet disorders are at risk of severe bleeding. We report the development and validation of flow cytometry assays to diagnose platelet disorders and to assess platelet function independently of platelet count. The assays were developed to measure glycoprotein levels (panel 1) and platelet function (panel 2) in sodium citrated blood. Twenty healthy volunteers and five patients diagnosed with different platelet disorders were included. Glycoprotein expression levels of the receptors Ia, Ib, IIb, IIIa and IX were measured and normalised with forward scatter (FS) as a measurement of platelet size. Platelet function was assessed by CD63, P-selectin and bound fibrinogen in response to arachidonic acid, adenosine diphosphate (ADP), collagen-related peptide, ristocetin and thrombin receptor-activation peptide-6. All patients except one with suspected δ-granule defect showed aberrant levels of glycoproteins in panel 1. Glanzmann's thrombasthenia and genetically verified Bernard-Soulier syndrome could be diagnosed using panel 1. All patients showed reduced platelet function according to at least one agonist. Using panel 2 it was possible to diagnose Bernard-Soulier syndrome, δ-granule defect and GPVI disorder. By combining the two assays, we were able to diagnose different platelet disorders and investigate platelet function independent of platelet count.

  9. Reproducibility of Manual Platelet Estimation Following Automated Low Platelet Counts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zainab S Al-Hosni

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: Manual platelet estimation is one of the methods used when automated platelet estimates are very low. However, the reproducibility of manual platelet estimation has not been adequately studied. We sought to assess the reproducibility of manual platelet estimation following automated low platelet counts and to evaluate the impact of the level of experience of the person counting on the reproducibility of manual platelet estimates. Methods: In this cross-sectional study, peripheral blood films of patients with platelet counts less than 100 × 109/L were retrieved and given to four raters to perform manual platelet estimation independently using a predefined method (average of platelet counts in 10 fields using 100× objective multiplied by 20. Data were analyzed using intraclass correlation coefficient (ICC as a method of reproducibility assessment. Results: The ICC across the four raters was 0.840, indicating excellent agreement. The median difference of the two most experienced raters was 0 (range: -64 to 78. The level of platelet estimate by the least-experienced rater predicted the disagreement (p = 0.037. When assessing the difference between pairs of raters, there was no significant difference in the ICC (p = 0.420. Conclusions: The agreement between different raters using manual platelet estimation was excellent. Further confirmation is necessary, with a prospective study using a gold standard method of platelet counts.

  10. Neuroimmunoendocrine regulation of the prion protein in neutrophils.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mariante, Rafael M; Nóbrega, Alberto; Martins, Rodrigo A P; Areal, Rômulo B; Bellio, Maria; Linden, Rafael

    2012-10-12

    The prion protein (PrP(C)) is a cell surface protein expressed mainly in the nervous system. In addition to the role of its abnormal conformer in transmissible spongiform encephalopathies, normal PrP(C) may be implicated in other degenerative conditions often associated with inflammation. PrP(C) is also present in cells of hematopoietic origin, including T cells, dendritic cells, and macrophages, and it has been shown to modulate their functions. Here, we investigated the impact of inflammation and stress on the expression and function of PrP(C) in neutrophils, a cell type critically involved in both acute and chronic inflammation. We found that systemic injection of LPS induced transcription and translation of PrP(C) in mouse neutrophils. Up-regulation of PrP(C) was dependent on the serum content of TGF-β and glucocorticoids (GC), which, in turn, are contingent on the activation of the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis in response to systemic inflammation. GC and TGF-β, either alone or in combination, directly up-regulated PrP(C) in neutrophils, and accordingly, the blockade of GC receptors in vivo curtailed the LPS-induced increase in the content of PrP(C). Moreover, GC also mediated up-regulation of PrP(C) in neutrophils following noninflammatory restraint stress. Finally, neutrophils with up-regulated PrP(C) presented enhanced peroxide-dependent cytotoxicity to endothelial cells. The data demonstrate a novel interplay of the nervous, endocrine, and immune systems upon both the expression and function of PrP(C) in neutrophils, which may have a broad impact upon the physiology and pathology of various organs and systems.

  11. The role of platelet microvesicles in intercellular communication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edelstein, Leonard C

    2017-05-01

    In recent years, there has been exponential growth in the interest in microvesicles, which is reflected by the number of publications. Initially referred to as "platelet dust" by Peter Wolf in 1967, platelet microvesicles (PMV) are now recognized as important mediators of intercellular communication. There are examples of PMV exerting physiological effects on almost all hematological and vascular cell types, including monocytes, macrophages, neutrophils, T-cells, endothelium cells, and smooth muscle cells (SMCs). PMV can exert these effects by multiple methods: extracellular signaling through receptors, transfer of surface molecules, and delivery of intracellular contents including miRNA. Recent work suggests a complex environment in which cellular contents are being shared multi-directionally between multiple cell types. This review will focus on the communicative properties of PMV.

  12. Platelets in the neonatal period: developmental differences in platelet production, function, and hemostasis and the potential impact of therapies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sola-Visner, Martha

    2012-01-01

    Thrombocytopenia is a common problem among sick neonates admitted to the neonatal intensive care unit. Frequently, platelet transfusions are given to thrombocytopenic infants in an attempt to decrease the incidence or severity of hemorrhage, which is often intracranial. Whereas there is very limited evidence to guide platelet transfusion practices in this population, preterm infants in the first week of life (the highest risk period for bleeding) are nearly universally transfused at higher platelet counts than older infants or children. To a large extent, this practice has been influenced by the observation that neonatal platelets are hyporeactive in response to multiple agonists in vitro, although full-term infants exhibit normal to increased primary hemostasis. This apparently paradoxical finding is due to factors in the neonatal blood that enhance the platelet-vessel wall interaction and counteract the platelet hyporeactivity. Relatively few studies have evaluated the platelet function and primary hemostasis of preterm infants, the subset of neonates at highest risk of bleeding and those most frequently transfused. Current understanding of platelet production and function in preterm and full-term neonates, how these factors affect their response to thrombocytopenia and their primary hemostasis, and the implications of these developmental differences to transfusion medicine are reviewed herein.

  13. Common variants in the human platelet PAR4 thrombin receptor alter platelet function and differ by race

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edelstein, Leonard C.; Simon, Lukas M.; Lindsay, Cory R.; Kong, Xianguo; Teruel-Montoya, Raúl; Tourdot, Benjamin E.; Chen, Edward S.; Ma, Lin; Coughlin, Shaun; Nieman, Marvin; Holinstat, Michael; Shaw, Chad A.

    2014-01-01

    Human platelets express 2 thrombin receptors: protease-activated receptor (PAR)-1 and PAR4. Recently, we reported 3.7-fold increased PAR4-mediated aggregation kinetics in platelets from black subjects compared with white subjects. We now show that platelets from blacks (n = 70) express 14% more PAR4 protein than those from whites (n = 84), but this difference is not associated with platelet PAR4 function. Quantitative trait locus analysis identified 3 common single nucleotide polymorphisms in the PAR4 gene (F2RL3) associated with PAR4-induced platelet aggregation. Among these single nucleotide polymorphisms, rs773902 determines whether residue 120 in transmembrane domain 2 is an alanine (Ala) or threonine (Thr). Compared with the Ala120 variant, Thr120 was more common in black subjects than in white subjects (63% vs 19%), was associated with higher PAR4-induced human platelet aggregation and Ca2+ flux, and generated greater inositol 1,4,5-triphosphate in transfected cells. A second, less frequent F2RL3 variant, Phe296Val, was only observed in blacks and abolished the enhanced PAR4-induced platelet aggregation and 1,4,5-triphosphate generation associated with PAR4-Thr120. PAR4 genotype did not affect vorapaxar inhibition of platelet PAR1 function, but a strong pharmacogenetic effect was observed with the PAR4-specific antagonist YD-3 [1-benzyl-3(ethoxycarbonylphenyl)-indazole]. These findings may have an important pharmacogenetic effect on the development of new PAR antagonists. PMID:25293779

  14. The influence of platelets, plasma and red blood cells on functional haemostatic assays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bochsen, Louise; Johansson, Pär I; Kristensen, Annemarie T; Daugaard, Gedske; Ostrowski, Sisse R

    2011-04-01

    Functional whole blood haemostatic assays are used increasingly to guide transfusion therapy and monitor medical treatment and are also applied for in-vitro evaluations of the haemostatic potential of stored platelets. We investigated how the cellular and plasmatic elements, both isolated and combined, influenced the two methodologically different assays, thrombelastography (TEG) and impedance aggregometry (Multiplate). Platelet-rich plasma (200 × 10/l) or pure plasma (0 platelets), with and without added red blood cells (RBCs), hematocrit 0, 0.15 or 0.29, were produced in vitro from platelet concentrates, fresh frozen plasma and stored RBC. Pure platelets were investigated by removing plasma components from platelet concentrates by diafiltration against the platelet storage solution Intersol. Plasma was readded by diafiltration against plasma in Intersol. Haemostatic function was evaluated by TEG and Multiplate. In the TEG, increasing amounts of RBC reduced clot strength and clot kinetics (α-angle), most markedly in plasma/RBC without platelets. In contrast, RBC in a platelet concentrate matrix enhanced Multiplate aggregation in response to weak agonists (ADP and arachidonic acid). Furthermore, removing plasma from platelet concentrates eliminated the TEG response and diminished the Multiplate aggregation response, but readding plasma to the pure platelet concentrates restored the response. Each of the elements in whole blood, plasma, platelets and RBC, affected the Multiplate and TEG results differently. The results emphasize that the concentrations of all cellular and plasmatic components in whole blood should be taken into account when interpreting results obtained by TEG and multiplate.

  15. Mucosal adaptation to aspirin induced gastric damage in humans. Studies on blood flow, gastric mucosal growth, and neutrophil activation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Konturek, J W; Dembinski, A; Stoll, R; Domschke, W; Konturek, S J

    1994-01-01

    The gastropathy associated with the ingestion of non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) such as aspirin is a common side effect of this class of drugs, but the precise mechanisms by which they cause mucosal damage have not been fully explained. During continued use of an injurious substance, such as aspirin, the extent of gastric mucosal damage decreases and this phenomenon is named gastric adaptation. To assess the extent of mucosal damage by aspirin and subsequent adaptation the effects of 14 days of continuous, oral administration of aspirin (2 g per day) to eight healthy male volunteers was studied. To estimate the rate of mucosal damage, gastroscopy was performed before (day 0) and at days 3, 7, 14 of aspirin treatment. Gastric microbleeding and gastric mucosal blood flow were measured using laser Doppler flowmeter and mucosal biopsy specimens were taken for the estimation of tissue DNA synthesis and RNA and DNA concentration. In addition, the activation of neutrophils in peripheral blood was assessed by measuring their ability to associate with platelets. Aspirin induced acute damage mainly in gastric corpus, reaching at day 3 about 3.5 on the endoscopic Lanza score but lessened to about 1.5 at day 14 pointing to the occurrence of gastric adaptation. Mucosal blood flow increased at day 3 by about 50% in the gastric corpus and by 88% in the antrum. The in vitro DNA synthesis and RNA concentration, an index of mucosal growth, were reduced at day 3 but then increased to reach about 150% of initial value at the end of aspirin treatment. It is concluded that the treatment with aspirin in humans induces gastric adaptation to this agent, which entails the increase in mucosal blood flow, the rise in neutrophil activation, and the enhancement in mucosal growth. PMID:7959223

  16. SDF-1α is a novel autocrine activator of platelets operating through its receptor CXCR4.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walsh, Tony G; Harper, Matthew T; Poole, Alastair W

    2015-01-01

    Platelets store and secrete the chemokine stromal cell-derived factor (SDF)-1α upon platelet activation, but the ability of platelet-derived SDF-1α to signal in an autocrine/paracrine manner mediating functional platelet responses relevant to thrombosis and haemostasis is unknown. We sought to explore the role of platelet-derived SDF-1α and its receptors, CXCR4 and CXCR7 in facilitating platelet activation and determine the mechanism facilitating SDF-1α-mediated regulation of platelet function. Using human washed platelets, CXCR4 inhibition, but not CXCR7 blockade significantly abrogated collagen-mediated platelet aggregation, dense granule secretion and thromboxane (Tx) A2 production. Time-dependent release of SDF-1α from collagen-activated platelets supports a functional role for SDF-1α in this regard. Using an in vitro whole blood perfusion assay, collagen-induced thrombus formation was substantially reduced with CXCR4 inhibition. In washed platelets, recombinant SDF-1α in the range of 20-100 ng/mL(-1) could significantly enhance platelet aggregation responses to a threshold concentration of collagen. These enhancements were completely dependent on CXCR4, but not CXCR7, which triggered TxA2 production and dense granule secretion. Rises in cAMP were significantly blunted by SDF-1α, which could also enhance collagen-mediated Ca2+ mobilisation, both of which were mediated by CXCR4. This potentiating effect of SDF-1α primarily required TxA2 signalling acting upstream of dense granule secretion, whereas blockade of ADP signalling could only partially attenuate SDF-1α-induced platelet activation. Therefore, this study supports a potentially novel autocrine/paracrine role for platelet-derived SDF-1α during thrombosis and haemostasis, through a predominantly TxA2-dependent and ADP-independent pathway.

  17. Platelets--an important element of the immune system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trzeciak-Ryczek, A; Tokarz-Deptuła, B; Deptuła, W

    2013-01-01

    Platelets are anucleate cells derived from the megakaryocyte series, and have long been considered only as cells responsible for coagulation and the fibrinolysis process. However, recently more data shows that they are also effector cells in the inflammatory response and important elements of the immunological response. Platelets store and release many biologically active substances, including growth factors, cytokines and chemokines (tab. 1), which actively affect i.a. elements of the immune system, and thus become regulators of immunity and mediators of inflammatory response. Their impact on the immune system cells is also associated with the induction of leucocytes and progenitor cells to the site of pathogen permeation or vascular injury inflow, as well as endothelial cells. Interacting with neutrophils, monocytes and lymphocytes, they not only activate them, but also form platelet-leukocyte aggregates that immobilise pathogens and prevent their spreading. Furthermore, platelets are capable of absorbing pathogens, affecting anti-infection immunity of the system. It is also assumed that the presence of receptors on their surface, such as Toll-like receptors (TLRs), affects their initiation and activity of the immunological response.

  18. Type I Interferon Transcriptional Signature in Neutrophils and Low-Density Granulocytes Are Associated with Tissue Damage in Malaria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bruno Coelho Rocha

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Neutrophils are the most abundant leukocyte population in the bloodstream, the primary compartment of Plasmodium sp. infection. However, the role of these polymorphonuclear cells in mediating either the resistance or the pathogenesis of malaria is poorly understood. We report that circulating neutrophils from malaria patients are highly activated, as indicated by a strong type I interferon transcriptional signature, increased expression of surface activation markers, enhanced release of reactive oxygen species and myeloperoxidase, and a high frequency of low-density granulocytes. The activation of neutrophils was associated with increased levels of serum alanine and aspartate aminotransferases, indicating liver damage. In a rodent malaria model, we observed intense recruitment of neutrophils to liver sinusoids. Neutrophil migration and IL-1β and chemokine expression as well as liver damage were all dependent on type I interferon signaling. The data suggest that type I interferon signaling has a central role in neutrophil activation and malaria pathogenesis.

  19. Mean platelet volume and mean platelet volume/platelet count ratio ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Amira M. Elsayed

    2016-03-30

    Mar 30, 2016 ... Abstract The mean platelet volume (MPV) is a laboratory marker associated with platelet func- tion and activity. .... the first 24 h of presentation to the emergency department. Severity of ..... J Neurol Neurosurg Psychiatry.

  20. Modulation of neutrophil and monocyte function by recombinant human granulocyte macrophage colony-stimulating factor in patients with lymphoma

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kharazmi, A; Nielsen, H; Hovgaard, D;

    1991-01-01

    Granulocyte macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF) has been shown to inhibit the chemotaxis and enhance the oxidative burst response of human neutrophils in vitro. The present study describes the effect of recombinant GM-CSF on the neutrophil and monocyte function in patients with lymphoma...

  1. Neutrophils and neutrophil serine proteases are increased in the spleens of estrogen-treated C57BL/6 mice and several strains of spontaneous lupus-prone mice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dai, Rujuan; Cowan, Catharine; Heid, Bettina; Khan, Deena; Liang, Zhihong; Pham, Christine T. N.; Ahmed, S. Ansar

    2017-01-01

    Estrogen, a natural immunomodulator, regulates the development and function of diverse immune cell types. There is now renewed attention on neutrophils and neutrophil serine proteases (NSPs) such as neutrophil elastase (NE), proteinase 3 (PR3), and cathepsin G (CG) in inflammation and autoimmunity. In this study, we found that although estrogen treatment significantly reduced total splenocytes number, it markedly increased the splenic neutrophil absolute numbers in estrogen-treated C57BL/6 (B6) mice when compared to placebo controls. Concomitantly, the levels of NSPs and myeloperoxidase (MPO) were highly upregulated in the splenocytes from estrogen-treated mice. Despite the critical role of NSPs in the regulation of non-infectious inflammation, by employing NE-/-/PR3-/-/CG-/- triple knock out mice, we demonstrated that the absence of NSPs affected neither estrogen’s ability to increase splenic neutrophils nor the induction of inflammatory mediators (IFNγ, IL-1β, IL-6, TNFα, MCP-1, and NO) from ex vivo activated splenocytes. Depletion of neutrophils in vitro in splenocytes with anti-Ly6G antibody also had no obvious effect on NSP expression or LPS-induced IFNγ and MCP-1. These data suggest that estrogen augments NSPs, which appears to be independent of enhancing ex vivo inflammatory responses. Since estrogen has been implicated in regulating several experimental autoimmune diseases, we extended our observations in estrogen-treated B6 mice to spontaneous autoimmune-prone female MRL-lpr, B6-lpr and NZB/WF1 mice. There was a remarkable commonality with regards to the increase of neutrophils and concomitant increase of NSPs and MPO in the splenic cells of different strains of autoimmune-prone mice and estrogen-treated B6 mice. Collectively, since NSPs and neutrophils are involved in diverse pro-inflammatory activities, these data suggest a potential pathologic implication of increased neutrophils and NSPs that merits further investigation. PMID:28192517

  2. Evaluation of the correlation between pH and MPV platelet concentrates prepared in Tirana Blood Transfusion Center.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    MERITA XHETANI

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available The quality of platelet concentrates is an important option in transfusion therapy. pH and platelet indices have been found to be valuable parameters for monitoring the in vitro quality of platelet concentrates. Platelet activation which leads to loss of its functionality has been demonstrated by changes in those two parameters. The aim of the study was to evaluate the correlation between pH and mean platelet volume (MPV in platelet concentrates in order to examine the quality of platelet concentrate. 150 units of platelet concentrates were produced by platelet reach plasma (PRP, and stored for 5 days. Then MPV and pH were analyzed by automated hematological cell counter and Ph meter respectively. Regression analysis showed that there was a significant influence of pH changes on the changes in MPV. On the other hand, increase in pH lead to decrease in MPV. Storing platelet concentrates up to 5 days may stimulate platelet activity, enhancing its size and resulted in its destruction, so the remaining platelet are those with significantly lower MPV. Also platelet activation was those with an increase in pH. As a result measurements of MPV and pH have a great potential as quality markers of platelet concentrates.

  3. Extracellular Acidification Acts as a Key Modulator of Neutrophil Apoptosis and Functions.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shannan Cao

    Full Text Available In human pathological conditions, the acidification of local environment is a frequent feature, such as tumor and inflammation. As the pH of microenvironment alters, the functions of immune cells are about to change. It makes the extracellular acidification a key modulator of innate immunity. Here we detected the impact of extracellular acidification on neutrophil apoptosis and functions, including cell death, respiratory burst, migration and phagocytosis. As a result, we found that under the acid environment, neutrophil apoptosis delayed, respiratory burst inhibited, polarization augmented, chemotaxis differed, endocytosis enhanced and bacteria killing suppressed. These findings suggested that extracellular acidification acts as a key regulator of neutrophil apoptosis and functions.

  4. Bioactivity and stability of endogenous fibrogenic factors in platelet-rich fibrin

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lundquist, R.; Dziegiel, M.H.; Agren, M.S.

    2008-01-01

    Platelet-rich fibrin (PRF) is an autologous fibrin sealant (FS) enriched with a platelet concentrate (> 1,000,000 platelets/microL) produced by the automated Vivostat system and used to enhance wound healing. The effects of PRF were compared with supernatant from thrombin-activated platelet...... concentrate, recombinant human platelet-derived growth factor (rhPDGF) isoforms, and a homologous FS in cultured normal human dermal fibroblasts. Also, the release of selected endogenous growth factors from PRF and their stability against proteolytic degradation were studied. The proliferative effect of PRF...... exceeded that of FS and rhPDGF-BB, although it was lower than thrombin-activated platelet concentrate possibly due to sustained growth factor release from platelets in PRF. Anti-PDGF antibody blocked the mitogenic effect of rhPDGF-BB but not that of PRF in growth-arrested fibroblasts. PRF promoted...

  5. Bioactivity and stability of endogenous fibrogenic factors in platelet-rich fibrin

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lundquist, Rasmus; Dziegiel, Morten H; Agren, Magnus S

    2008-01-01

    Platelet-rich fibrin (PRF) is an autologous fibrin sealant (FS) enriched with a platelet concentrate (> 1,000,000 platelets/microL) produced by the automated Vivostat system and used to enhance wound healing. The effects of PRF were compared with supernatant from thrombin-activated platelet...... concentrate, recombinant human platelet-derived growth factor (rhPDGF) isoforms, and a homologous FS in cultured normal human dermal fibroblasts. Also, the release of selected endogenous growth factors from PRF and their stability against proteolytic degradation were studied. The proliferative effect of PRF...... exceeded that of FS and rhPDGF-BB, although it was lower than thrombin-activated platelet concentrate possibly due to sustained growth factor release from platelets in PRF. Anti-PDGF antibody blocked the mitogenic effect of rhPDGF-BB but not that of PRF in growth-arrested fibroblasts. PRF promoted...

  6. Prophylactic platelets in dengue

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Whitehorn, James; Rodriguez Roche, Rosmari; Guzman, Maria G

    2012-01-01

    of platelets in dengue. Respondents were all physicians involved with the treatment of patients with dengue. Respondents were asked that their answers reflected what they would do if they were the treating physician. We received responses from 306 physicians from 20 different countries. The heterogeneity...

  7. Activation of Neutrophils by Nanoparticles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David M. Goncalves

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The use of nanoparticles (NPs has increased in the past few years in various fields, including defence, aerospace, electronics, biology, medicine, and so forth. and in applications such as diagnostic technology, bioimaging, and drug/gene delivery. Thus, human exposure to NPs and nanomaterials is unavoidable and will certainly expand in the future resulting in a growing interest in nanotoxicology, the study of toxicity of nanomaterials. A number of studies have reported the effects of NPs in respect to pulmonary inflammation by investigating in vitro activation of pulmonary cells with NPs and in vivo in a variety of models in which neutrophils appear to be the predominant leukocyte cell type in lungs and in bronchoalveolar lavages following inhalation or intratracheal instillation of NPs. Despite the fact that several studies have reported an increased number of neutrophils, the literature dealing with the direct activation of neutrophils by a given NP is poorly documented. This paper will summarize the current literature in this latter area of research and will end with a perspective view in which our laboratory will be involved in the following years.

  8. Effect of sevoflurane on human neutrophil apoptosis.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Tyther, R

    2012-02-03

    BACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVE: Both chronic occupational exposure to volatile anaesthetic agents and acute in vitro exposure of neutrophils to isoflurane have been shown to inhibit the rate of apoptosis of human neutrophils. It is possible that inhibition of neutrophil apoptosis arises through delaying mitochondrial membrane potential collapse. We assessed mitochondrial depolarization and apoptosis in unexposed neutrophils and neutrophils exposed to sevoflurane in vivo. METHODS: A total of 20 mL venous blood was withdrawn pre- and postinduction of anaesthesia, the neutrophils isolated and maintained in culture. At 1, 12 and 24 h in culture, the percentage of neutrophil apoptosis was assessed by dual staining with annexin V-FITC and propidium iodide. Mitochondrial depolarization was measured using the dual emission styryl dye JC-1. RESULTS: Apoptosis was significantly inhibited in neutrophils exposed to sevoflurane in vivo at 24 (exposed: 38 (12)% versus control: 28 (11)%, P = 0.001), but not at 1 or 12 h, in culture. Mitochondrial depolarization was not delayed in neutrophils exposed to sevoflurane. CONCLUSIONS: The most important findings are that sevoflurane inhibits neutrophil apoptosis in vivo and that inhibition is not mediated primarily by an effect on mitochondrial depolarization.

  9. Vanadium promotes hydroxyl radical formation by activated human neutrophils.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fickl, Heidi; Theron, Annette J; Grimmer, Heidi; Oommen, Joyce; Ramafi, Grace J; Steel, Helen C; Visser, Susanna S; Anderson, Ronald

    2006-01-01

    This study was undertaken to investigate the effects of vanadium in the +2, +3, +4, and +5 valence states on superoxide generation, myeloperoxidase (MPO) activity, and hydroxyl radical formation by activated human neutrophils in vitro, using lucigenin-enhanced chemiluminescence (LECL), autoiodination, and electron spin resonance with 5,5-dimethyl-l-pyrroline N-oxide as the spin trap, respectively. At concentrations of up to 25 microM, vanadium, in the four different valence states used, did not affect the LECL responses of neutrophils activated with either the chemoattractant, N-formyl-l-methionyl-l-leucyl-l-phenylalanine (1 microM), or the phorbol ester, phorbol 12-myristate 12-acetate (25 ng/ml). However, exposure to vanadium in the +2, +3, and +4, but not the +5, valence states was accompanied by significant augmentation of hydroxyl radical formation by activated neutrophils and attenuation of MPO-mediated iodination. With respect to hydroxyl radical formation, similar effects were observed using cell-free systems containing either hydrogen peroxide (100 microM) or xanthine/xanthine oxidase together with vanadium (+2, +3, +4), while the activity of purified MPO was inhibited by the metal in these valence states. These results demonstrate that vanadium in the +2, +3, and +4 valence states interacts prooxidatively with human neutrophils, competing effectively with MPO for hydrogen peroxide to promote formation of the highly toxic hydroxyl radical.

  10. In vivo involvement of polymorphonuclear neutrophils in Leishmania infantum infection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Le Fichoux Yves

    2001-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The role of lymphocytes in the specific defence against L. infantum has been well established, but the part played by polynuclear neutrophil (PN cells in controlling visceral leishmaniasis was much less studied. In this report we examine in vivo the participation of PN in early and late phases of infection by L. infantum. Results Promastigote phagocytosis and killing occurs very early after infection, as demonstrated by electron microscopy analyses which show in BALB/c mouse spleen, but not in liver, numerous PN harbouring ultrastructurally degraded parasites. It is shown, using mAb RB6-8C5 directed against mature mouse granulocytes, that in chronically infected mice, long-term PN depletion did not enhance parasite counts neither in liver nor in spleen, indicating that these cells are not involved in the late phase of L. infantum infection. In acute stage of infection, in mouse liver, where L. infantum load is initially larger than that in spleen but resolves spontaneously, there was no significant effect of neutrophils depletion. By contrast, early in infection the neutrophil cells crucially contributed to parasite killing in spleen, since PN depletion, performed before and up to 7 days after the parasite inoculation, resulted in a ten-fold increase of parasite burden. Conclusions Taken together these data show that neutrophil cells contribute to the early control of the parasite growth in spleen but not in liver and that these cells have no significant effect late in infection in either of these target organs.

  11. Superoxide anion production by neutrophils in myelodysplastic syndromes (preleukemia.

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    Takahashi,Isao

    1988-02-01

    Full Text Available Superoxide anion (O2- production by neutrophils from 14 untreated patients with acute nonlymphocytic leukemia (ANLL was significantly less than that of healthy controls (4.93 +/- 1.99 vx 6.20 +/- 1.53 nmol/min/10(6 neutrophils, p less than 0.05. In 10 patients with myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS, however, it was not significantly different from the control level although 6 of the 10 patients had low levels, when individual patients were compared with the lower limit of the control range. An inverse correlation between the O2- production of neutrophils and the percentage of leukemic cells in the marrow existed in ANLL (r = -0.55, p less than 0.01, but not in MDS. Three of 4 MDS patients who died of pneumonia prior to leukemic conversion showed a low level of O2- production. The impaired O2- production by neutrophils from some MDS patients, probably due to the faulty differentiation from leukemic clones, may be one of the causes of enhanced susceptibility to infection.

  12. Rho GTPases in platelet function.

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    Aslan, J E; McCarty, O J T

    2013-01-01

    The Rho family of GTP binding proteins, also commonly referred to as the Rho GTPases, are master regulators of the platelet cytoskeleton and platelet function. These low-molecular-weight or 'small' GTPases act as signaling switches in the spatial and temporal transduction, and amplification of signals from platelet cell surface receptors to the intracellular signaling pathways that drive platelet function. The Rho GTPase family members RhoA, Cdc42 and Rac1 have emerged as key regulators in the dynamics of the actin cytoskeleton in platelets and play key roles in platelet aggregation, secretion, spreading and thrombus formation. Rho GTPase regulators, including GEFs and GAPs and downstream effectors, such as the WASPs, formins and PAKs, may also regulate platelet activation and function. In this review, we provide an overview of Rho GTPase signaling in platelet physiology. Previous studies of Rho GTPases and platelets have had a shared history, as platelets have served as an ideal, non-transformed cellular model to characterize Rho function. Likewise, recent studies of the cell biology of Rho GTPase family members have helped to build an understanding of the molecular regulation of platelet function and will continue to do so through the further characterization of Rho GTPases as well as Rho GAPs, GEFs, RhoGDIs and Rho effectors in actin reorganization and other Rho-driven cellular processes. © 2012 International Society on Thrombosis and Haemostasis.

  13. Crocin prevents sesamol-induced oxidative stress and apoptosis in human platelets.

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    Thushara, Ram M; Hemshekhar, Mahadevappa; Paul, Manoj; Shanmuga Sundaram, Mahalingam; Shankar, Rohith L; Kemparaju, Kempaiah; Girish, Kesturu S

    2014-10-01

    Recent studies have reported the platelet proapoptotic propensity of plant-derived molecules such as, resveratrol, thymoquinone, andrographolide and gossypol. Meanwhile, there were also reports of phytochemicals such as cinnamtannin B1, which shows antiapoptotic effect towards platelets. Platelets are mainly involved in hemostasis, thrombosis and wound healing. However, altered platelet functions can have serious pathological outcomes that include cardiovascular diseases. Platelets are sensitive to external and internal stimuli including therapeutic and dietary components. The anuclear platelets do undergo apoptosis via mitochondrial pathway. However, exaggerated rate of platelet apoptosis could lead to thrombocytopenia and other bleeding disorders. The present study deals with ameliorative efficacy of crocin on sesamol-induced platelet apoptosis. The antiapoptotic property of crocin and the proapoptotic tendency of sesamol in platelets were previously demonstrated. Therefore, it was interesting to see how these two compounds would interact and wield their effects on human platelets. Crocin effectively inhibited sesamol-induced oxidative stress on platelets, which was evidenced by the measurement of endogenously generated reactive oxygen species, particularly hydrogen peroxide, and changes in thiol levels. Further, crocin abrogated sesamol-induced biochemical events of apoptosis in platelets, which include intracellular calcium mobilization, changes in mitochondrial membrane integrity, cytochrome c release, caspase activity and phosphatidylserine externalization. Even though sesamol has proapoptotic effects on platelets, its anti-platelet activity cannot be neglected. Thus, the study proposes that sesamol could be supplemented with crocin, an approach that could not only abolish the toxic effects of sesamol on platelets, but also enhance the quality of treatment due to their synergistic action.

  14. Quantitative measurement of hepatic fibrosis with gadoxetic acid-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging in patients with chronic hepatitis B infection: A comparative study on aspartate aminotransferase to platelet ratio index and fibrosis-4 index

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    Lee, Guy Mok; Kim, Youe Ree; Cho, Eun Young; Lee, Young Hwan; Yoon, Kwon Ha [Wonkwang University School of Medicine, Iksan (Korea, Republic of); Ryu, Jong Hyun; Kim, Tae Hoon [Imaging Science Research Center, Wonkwang University, Iksan (Korea, Republic of)

    2017-06-15

    To quantitatively measure hepatic fibrosis on gadoxetic acid-enhanced magnetic resonance (MR) in chronic hepatitis B (CHB) patients and identify the correlations with aspartate aminotransferase-to-platelet ratio index (APRI) and fibrosis-4 index (FIB-4) values. This study on gadoxetic acid-enhanced 3T MR imaging included 81 patients with CHB infection. To quantitatively measure hepatic fibrosis, MR images were analyzed with an aim to identify inhomogeneous signal intensities calculated from a coefficient of variation (CV) map in the liver parenchyma. We also carried out a comparative analysis between APRI and FIB-4 based on metaregression results. The diagnostic performance of the CV map was evaluated using a receiver-operating characteristic (ROC) curve. In the MR images, the mean CV values in control, groups I, II, and III based on APRI were 4.08 ± 0.92, 4.24 ± 0.80, 5.64 ± 1.11, and 5.73 ± 1.28, respectively (p < 0.001). In CHB patients grouped by FIB-4, the mean CV values of groups A, B, and C were 4.22 ± 0.95, 5.40 ± 1.19, and 5.71 ± 1.17, respectively (p < 0.001). The mean CV values correlated well with APRI (r = 0.392, p < 0.001) and FIB-4 (r = 0.294, p < 0.001). In significant fibrosis group, ROC curve analysis yielded an area under the curve of 0.875 using APRI and 0.831 using FIB-4 in HB, respectively. Gadoxetic acid-enhanced MR imaging for calculating a CV map showed moderate correlation with APRI and FIB-4 values and could be employed to quantitatively measure hepatic fibrosis in patients with CHB.

  15. Differences between mainstream and sidestream tobacco smoke extracts and nicotine in the activation and aggregation of platelets subjected to cardiovascular conditions in diabetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yin, Wei; Rubenstein, David A

    2013-01-01

    Mainstream and sidestream tobacco smoke extracts have been shown to increase platelet activation directly. Furthermore, advanced glycation end products, which are present in the diabetic vasculature, have also been shown to enhance platelet activity. However, the combined effects of these two risk factors on platelet functions remain unclear. Platelets were exposed to tobacco extracts concurrently with advanced glycation end products. Timed samples were removed to assess the extent of platelet activity. The presence of smoke extracts enhanced platelet activity as compared to control conditions, this was especially prevalent for sidestream extracts. With the addition of irreversibly glycated albumin, there was an additive effect, further enhancing platelet responses. This was at least partially regulated by α-granule release and CD41 expression. The combination of cardiovascular risk factors can significantly enhance platelet activation and aggregation, and therefore it is possible to accelerate cardiovascular diseases through the interactions of multiple cardiovascular risk factors.

  16. Inhibition of neutrophil elastase attenuates airway hyperresponsiveness and inflammation in a mouse model of secondary allergen challenge: neutrophil elastase inhibition attenuates allergic airway responses

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    Koga Hikari

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Chronic asthma is often associated with neutrophilic infiltration in the airways. Neutrophils contain elastase, a potent secretagogue in the airways, nonetheless the role for neutrophil elastase as well as neutrophilic inflammation in allergen-induced airway responses is not well defined. In this study, we have investigated the impact of neutrophil elastase inhibition on the development of allergic airway inflammation and airway hyperresponsiveness (AHR in previously sensitized and challenged mice. Methods BALB/c mice were sensitized and challenged (primary with ovalbumin (OVA. Six weeks later, a single OVA aerosol (secondary challenge was delivered and airway inflammation and airway responses were monitored 6 and 48 hrs later. An inhibitor of neutrophil elastase was administered prior to secondary challenge. Results Mice developed a two-phase airway inflammatory response after secondary allergen challenge, one neutrophilic at 6 hr and the other eosinophilic, at 48 hr. PAR-2 expression in the lung tissues was enhanced following secondary challenge, and that PAR-2 intracellular expression on peribronchial lymph node (PBLN T cells was also increased following allergen challenge of sensitized mice. Inhibition of neutrophil elastase significantly attenuated AHR, goblet cell metaplasia, and inflammatory cell accumulation in the airways following secondary OVA challenge. Levels of IL-4, IL-5 and IL-13, and eotaxin in BAL fluid 6 hr after secondary allergen challenge were significantly suppressed by the treatment. At 48 hr, treatment with the neutrophil elastase inhibitor significantly reduced the levels of IL-13 and TGF-β1 in the BAL fluid. In parallel, in vitro IL-13 production was significantly inhibited in spleen cells from sensitized mice. Conclusion These data indicate that neutrophil elastase plays an important role in the development of allergic airway inflammation and hyperresponsiveness, and would suggest that the

  17. Thioredoxin-1 protects against neutrophilic inflammation and emphysema progression in a mouse model of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease exacerbation.

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    Naoya Tanabe

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Exacerbations of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD are characterized by acute enhancement of airway neutrophilic inflammation under oxidative stress and can be involved in emphysema progression. However, pharmacotherapy against the neutrophilic inflammation and emphysema progression associated with exacerbation has not been established. Thioredoxin-1 has anti-oxidative and anti-inflammatory properties and it can ameliorate neutrophilic inflammation through anti-chemotactic effects and prevent cigarette smoke (CS-induced emphysema. We aimed to determine whether thioredoxin-1 can suppress neutrophilic inflammation and emphysema progression in a mouse model of COPD exacerbation and if so, to reveal the underlying mechanisms. RESULTS: Mice were exposed to CS and then challenged with polyinosine-polycytidylic acid [poly(I:C], an agonist for virus-induced innate immunity. Airway neutrophilic inflammation, oxidative stress and lung apoptosis were enhanced in smoke-sensitive C57Bl/6, but not in smoke-resistant NZW mice. Exposure to CS and poly(I:C challenge accelerated emphysema progression in C57Bl/6 mice. Thioredoxin-1 suppressed neutrophilic inflammation and emphysema progression. Poly(I:C caused early neutrophilic inflammation through keratinocyte-derived chemokine and granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF release in the lung exposed to CS. Late neutrophilic inflammation was caused by persistent GM-CSF release, which thioredoxin-1 ameliorated. Thioredoxin-1 enhanced pulmonary mRNA expression of MAP kinase phosphatase 1 (MKP-1, and the suppressive effects of thioredoxin-1 on prolonged GM-CSF release and late neutrophilic inflammation disappeared by inhibiting MKP-1. CONCLUSION: Using a mouse model of COPD exacerbation, we demonstrated that thioredoxin-1 ameliorated neutrophilic inflammation by suppressing GM-CSF release, which prevented emphysema progression. Our findings deepen understanding of the mechanisms

  18. Duration of exposure to high fluid shear stress is critical in shear-induced platelet activation-aggregation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Jian-ning; Bergeron, Angela L; Yu, Qinghua; Sun, Carol; McBride, Latresha; Bray, Paul F; Dong, Jing-fei

    2003-10-01

    Platelet functions are increasingly measured under flow conditions to account for blood hydrodynamic effects. Typically, these studies involve exposing platelets to high shear stress for periods significantly longer than would occur in vivo. In the current study, we demonstrate that the platelet response to high shear depends on the duration of shear exposure. In response to a 100 dyn/cm2 shear stress for periods less than 10-20 sec, platelets in PRP or washed platelets were aggregated, but minimally activated as demonstrated by P-selectin expression and binding of the activation-dependent alphaIIbbeta3 antibody PAC-1 to sheared platelets. Furthermore, platelet aggregation under such short pulses of high shear was subjected to rapid disaggregation. The disaggregated platelets could be re-aggregated by ADP in a pattern similar to unsheared platelets. In comparison, platelets that are exposed to high shear for longer than 20 sec are activated and aggregated irreversibly. In contrast, platelet activation and aggregation were significantly greater in whole blood with significantly less disaggregation. The enhancement is likely via increased collision frequency of platelet-platelet interaction and duration of platelet-platelet association due to high cell density. It may also be attributed to the ADP release from other cells such as red blood cells because increased platelet aggregation in whole blood was partially inhibited by ADP blockage. These studies demonstrate that platelets have a higher threshold for shear stress than previously believed. In a pathologically relevant timeframe, high shear alone is likely to be insufficient in inducing platelet activation and aggregation, but acts synergistically with other stimuli.

  19. Platelets from pulmonary hypertension patients show increased mitochondrial reserve capacity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, Quyen L.; Corey, Catherine; White, Pamela; Watson, Annie; Gladwin, Mark T.; Simon, Marc A.

    2017-01-01

    Accumulating evidence suggests that altered cellular metabolism is systemic in pulmonary hypertension (PH) and central to disease pathogenesis. However, bioenergetic changes in PH patients and their association with disease severity remain unclear. Here, we hypothesize that alteration in bioenergetic function is present in platelets from PH patients and correlates with clinical parameters of PH. Platelets isolated from controls and PH patients (n = 28) were subjected to extracellular flux analysis to determine oxygen consumption and glycolytic rates. Platelets from PH patients showed greater glycolytic rates than controls. Surprisingly, this was accompanied by significant increases in the maximal capacity for oxygen consumption, leading to enhanced respiratory reserve capacity in PH platelets. This increased platelet reserve capacity correlated with mean pulmonary artery pressure, pulmonary vascular resistance, and right ventricular stroke work index in PH patients and was abolished by the inhibition of fatty acid oxidation (FAO). Consistent with a shift to FAO, PH platelets showed augmented enzymatic activity of carnitine palmitoyltransferase-1 and electron transport chain complex II. These data extend the observation of a metabolic alteration in PH from the pulmonary vascular axis to the hematologic compartment and suggest that measurement of platelet bioenergetics is potentially useful in assessment of disease progression and severity. PMID:28289721

  20. Lysyl oxidase is associated with increased thrombosis and platelet reactivity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsuura, Shinobu; Mi, Rongjuan; Koupenova, Milka; Eliades, Alexia; Patterson, Shenia; Toselli, Paul; Thon, Jonathan; Italiano, Joseph E; Trackman, Philip C; Papadantonakis, Nikolaos; Ravid, Katya

    2016-03-17

    Lysyl oxidase (LOX) is overexpressed in various pathologies associated with thrombosis, such as arterial stenosis and myeloproliferative neoplasms (MPNs). LOX is elevated in the megakaryocytic lineage of mouse models of MPNs and in patients with MPNs. To gain insight into the role of LOX in thrombosis and platelet function without compounding the influences of other pathologies, transgenic mice expressing LOX in wild-type megakaryocytes and platelets (Pf4-Lox(tg/tg)) were generated. Pf4-Lox(tg/tg) mice had a normal number of platelets; however, time to vessel occlusion after endothelial injury was significantly shorter in Pf4-Lox(tg/tg) mice, indicating a higher propensity for thrombus formation in vivo. Exploring underlying mechanisms, we found that Pf4-Lox(tg/tg) platelets adhere better to collagen and have greater aggregation response to lower doses of collagen compared with controls. Platelet activation in response to the ligand for collagen receptor glycoprotein VI (cross-linked collagen-related peptide) was unaffected. However, the higher affinity of Pf4-Lox(tg/tg) platelets to the collagen sequence GFOGER implies that the collagen receptor integrin α2β1 is affected by LOX. Taken together, our findings demonstrate that LOX enhances platelet activation and thrombosis.

  1. IκB kinase phosphorylation of SNAP-23 controls platelet secretion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karim, Zubair A; Zhang, Jinchao; Banerjee, Meenakshi; Chicka, Michael C; Al Hawas, Rania; Hamilton, Tara R; Roche, Paul A; Whiteheart, Sidney W

    2013-05-30

    Platelet secretion plays a key role in thrombosis, thus the platelet secretory machinery offers a unique target to modulate hemostasis. We report the regulation of platelet secretion via phosphorylation of SNAP-23 at Ser95. Phosphorylation of this t-soluble N-ethylmaleimide sensitive factor attachment protein receptor (SNARE) occurs upon activation of known elements of the platelet signaling cascades (ie, phospholipase C, [Ca(2+)]i, protein kinase C) and requires IκB kinase (IKK)-β. Other elements of the nuclear factor κB/IκB cascade (ie, IKK-α,-β,-γ/NEMO and CARMA/MALT1/Bcl10 complex) are present in anucleate platelets and IκB is phosphorylated upon activation, suggesting that this pathway is active in platelets and implying a nongenomic role for IKK. Inhibition of IKK-β, either pharmacologically (with BMS-345541, BAY11-7082, or TPCA-1) or by genetic manipulation (platelet factor 4 Cre:IKK-β(flox/flox)), blocked SNAP-23 phosphorylation, platelet secretion, and SNARE complex formation; but, had no effect on platelet morphology or other metrics of platelet activation. Consistently, SNAP-23 phosphorylation enhanced membrane fusion of SNARE-containing proteoliposomes. In vivo studies with IKK inhibitors or platelet-specific IKK-β knockout mice showed that blocking IKK-β activity significantly prolonged tail bleeding times, suggesting that currently available IKK inhibitors may affect hemostasis.

  2. Neutrophil Reverse Migration Becomes Transparent with Zebrafish

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    Taylor W. Starnes

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The precise control of neutrophil-mediated inflammation is critical for both host defense and the prevention of immunopathology. In vivo imaging studies in zebrafish, and more recently in mice, have made the novel observation that neutrophils leave a site of inflammation through a process called neutrophil reverse migration. The application of advanced imaging techniques to the genetically tractable, optically transparent zebrafish larvae was critical for these advances. Still, the mechanisms underlying neutrophil reverse migration and its effects on the resolution or priming of immune responses remain unclear. Here, we review the current knowledge of neutrophil reverse migration, its potential roles in host immunity, and the live imaging tools that make zebrafish a valuable model for increasing our knowledge of neutrophil behavior in vivo.

  3. [Ambiguity role of neutrophils in oncogenesis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mal'tseva, V N; Safronova, V G

    2009-01-01

    The review is focused on the participation of polymorphonuclear granulocytes (neutrophils) in development and spreading of a tumor. We consider both the well known functions of neutrophils (degranulation, production of reactive oxygen species (ROS)) and the recently shown one (presentation of an antigene). The special attention is focused on the ambiguity of the neutrophil role in oncogenesis. The dominant view is that neutrophils display exclusively antitumor properties. The update information testifies about protumoral activity of neutrophils: they migrate to a tumor and promote angiogenesis and metastasis at late stages of the tumor. It is interesting that certain components of neutrophil cytotoxic arsenal (ROS, cytokines, specific enzymes) participate both in antitumoral defenses of an organism and protumoral activity.

  4. Neutrophil Responses to Sterile Implant Materials.

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    Siddharth Jhunjhunwala

    Full Text Available In vivo implantation of sterile materials and devices results in a foreign body immune response leading to fibrosis of implanted material. Neutrophils, one of the first immune cells to be recruited to implantation sites, have been suggested to contribute to the establishment of the inflammatory microenvironment that initiates the fibrotic response. However, the precise numbers and roles of neutrophils in response to implanted devices remains unclear. Using a mouse model of peritoneal microcapsule implantation, we show 30-500 fold increased neutrophil presence in the peritoneal exudates in response to implants. We demonstrate that these neutrophils secrete increased amounts of a variety of inflammatory cytokines and chemokines. Further, we observe that they participate in the foreign body response through the formation of neutrophil extracellular traps (NETs on implant surfaces. Our results provide new insight into neutrophil function during a foreign body response to peritoneal implants which has implications for the development of biologically compatible medical devices.

  5. Real-Time Imaging of Interactions of Neutrophils with Cryptococcus neoformans Demonstrates a Crucial Role of Complement C5a-C5aR Signaling.

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    Sun, Donglei; Zhang, Mingshun; Liu, Gongguan; Wu, Hui; Zhu, Xiaoping; Zhou, Hong; Shi, Meiqing

    2015-10-26

    Neutrophils have been shown to efficiently kill Cryptococcus neoformans, a causative agent of meningoencephalitis. Here, using live-cell imaging, we characterize the dynamic interactions of neutrophils with C. neoformans and the underlying mechanisms in real time. Neutrophils were directly seen to chase C. neoformans cells and then rapidly internalize them. Complement C5a-C5aR signaling guided neutrophils to migrate to the yeast cells, resulting in optimal phagocytosis and subsequent killing of the organisms. The addition of recombinant complement C5a enhanced neutrophil movement but did not induce chemotaxis, suggesting that the C5a gradient is crucial. Incubation with C. neoformans resulted in enhanced activation of Erk and p38 mitogen-activated protein (MAP) kinases (MAPKs) in neutrophils. Inhibition of the p38 MAPK pathway, but not the Erk pathway, significantly impaired neutrophil migration and its subsequent killing of C. neoformans. Deficiency of CD11b or blocking of CD11b did not affect the migration of neutrophils toward C. neoformans but almost completely abolished phagocytosis and killing of the organisms by neutrophils. C5a-C5aR signaling induced enhanced surface expression of CD11b. Interestingly, the original surface expression of CD11b was essential and sufficient for neutrophils to attach to C. neoformans but was unable to mediate phagocytosis. In contrast, the enhanced surface expression of CD11b induced by C5a-C5aR signaling was essential for neutrophil phagocytosis and subsequent killing of yeast cells. Collectively, this is the first report of the dynamic interactions of neutrophils with C. neoformans, demonstrating a crucial role of C5a-C5aR signaling in neutrophil killing of C. neoformans in real time.

  6. Expansion of the neonatal platelet mass is achieved via an extension of platelet lifespan

    OpenAIRE

    Liu, Zhi-Jian; Hoffmeister, Karin M.; Hu, Zhongbo; Mager, Donald E.; Ait-Oudhia, Sihem; Debrincat, Marlyse A.; Pleines, Irina; Josefsson, Emma C.; Benjamin T Kile; Italiano, Joseph; Ramsey, Haley; Grozovsky, Renata; Veng-Pedersen, Peter; Chavda, Chaitanya; Sola-Visner, Martha

    2014-01-01

    Rapid growth and rising platelet counts result in a significant expansion of platelet mass during neonatal life.The rise in platelet counts is mediated by a prolongation in the neonatal platelet lifespan.

  7. Cryptococcus Neoformans Modulates Extracellular Killing by Neutrophils

    OpenAIRE

    Qureshi, Asfia; Grey, Angus; Rose, Kristie L; Schey, Kevin L.; Del Poeta, Maurizio

    2011-01-01

    We recently established a key role for host sphingomyelin synthase (SMS) in regulating the killing activity of neutrophils against Cryptococcus neoformans. In this paper, we studied the effect of C. neoformans on the killing activity of neutrophils and whether SMS would still be a player against C. neoformans in immunocompromised mice lacking T and natural killer (NK) cells (Tgε26 mice). To this end, we analyzed whether C. neoformans would have any effect on neutrophil survival and killing in...

  8. Increased metabolic activity of neutrophils in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vaidyanathan, Ashwin; Damodar, Komaladevi Sampath

    2015-01-01

    Aims: To compare the metabolic activity of peripheral neutrophils in patients diagnosed with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) with that of healthy, nonsmoking volunteers. Materials and Methods: Venous blood samples were taken from patients diagnosed with COPD as well as from healthy nonsmokers. Each sample was subjected to the nitro blue tetrazolium (NBT) test in which neutrophils exhibiting elevated metabolic activity were detected by light microscopy. The test was repeated after stimulation with Escherichia coli (E. coli) endotoxin with fresh samples. Neutrophils showing dye uptake were then counted in each case. Results: We found that the mean numbers of activated neutrophils without and with the addition of endotoxin were 19% and 23%, respectively, in the control group and 56% and 62%, respectively, in the test group. Two-sample t-test statistic revealed that there was a significant (P < 0.01) increase in neutrophilic metabolic activity in patients with COPD as compared to that in healthy volunteers. This significance remained even after stimulation using E. coli endotoxin. Conclusion: The results hint at a potentially relevant pathogenic mechanism in COPD related to the metabolic activity of neutrophils. By exhibiting enhanced metabolic activity, neutrophils in the COPD patients are more likely to be involved in damaging lung tissues. PMID:26664165

  9. A possible role for neutrophils in allergic rhinitis revealed after cellular subclassification

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arebro, Julia; Ekstedt, Sandra; Hjalmarsson, Eric; Winqvist, Ola; Kumlien Georén, Susanna; Cardell, Lars-Olaf

    2017-01-01

    A re-examination of former concepts is required to meet today’s medical challenges in allergic rhinitis. Previously, neutrophils have been treated as a relatively homogenous cell population found in the nose both when the patient is suffering at the height of the allergic season as well as when the patient report no symptoms. However, new data indicates that neutrophils can be divided into different subsets with diverse roles in inflammation. We showed increased levels of neutrophils in peripheral blood, nasal biopsies and nasal lavage fluid (NAL) from allergic patients during the pollen season compared to healthy controls. A closer examination revealed that the activated subset of neutrophils, CD16high CD62Ldim, outweighed the normal form CD16high CD62Lhigh in nasal tissue among these patients. This skewed distribution was not seen in controls. The normal subset prevailed in peripheral blood from patients as well as controls, whereas CD16high CD62Ldim and CD16dim CD62Ldim subsets, the latter considered “end state” neutrophils before apoptosis, were elevated in NAL. Functional in vitro experiments revealed that activated neutrophils exhibit a T cell priming capacity and an ability to enhance eosinophil migration. Activated neutrophils may thus contribute to allergic inflammation seen in allergic rhinitis by priming T cells and attracting eosinophils. PMID:28272395

  10. Thrombosis, Neuroinflammation, and Poststroke Infection: The Multifaceted Role of Neutrophils in Stroke

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schulze, Juliane

    2017-01-01

    Immune cells can significantly predict and affect the clinical outcome of stroke. In particular, the neutrophil-to-lymphocyte ratio was shown to predict hemorrhagic transformation and the clinical outcome of stroke; however, the immunological mechanisms underlying these effects are poorly understood. Neutrophils are the first cells to invade injured tissue following focal brain ischemia. In these conditions, their proinflammatory properties enhance tissue damage and may promote ischemic incidences by inducing thrombus formation. Therefore, they constitute a potential target for therapeutic approaches and prevention of stroke. Indeed, in animal models of focal brain ischemia, neutrophils have been targeted with successful results. However, even in brain lesions, neutrophils also exert beneficial effects, because they are involved in triggering immunological removal of cell debris. Furthermore, intact neutrophil function is essential for maintaining immunological defense against bacterial infections. Several studies have demonstrated that stroke-derived neutrophils displayed impaired bacterial defense capacity. Because infections are known to impair the clinical course of stroke, therapeutic interventions that target neutrophils should preserve or even restore their function outside the central nervous system (CNS). This complex situation requires well-tailored therapeutic approaches that can effectively tackle immune cell invasion in the brain but avoid increasing poststroke infections. PMID:28331857

  11. Wip1 Deficiency Promotes Neutrophil Recruitment to the Infection Site and Improves Sepsis Outcome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Xiao-Fei; Zhao, Yang; Cao, Ke; Guan, Wen-Xian; Li, Xue; Zhang, Qian; Zhao, Yong; Ding, Yi-Tao; Du, Jun-Feng

    2017-01-01

    Sepsis is defined as an uncontrolled host response to infection, and no specific therapy or drugs have been used in clinical trials currently. Discovering new therapeutic targets for sepsis treatment has always been a central problem in the field of sepsis research. Neutrophils stand at the first line in controlling infection and have been identified to be dysregulated with impaired migration and antimicrobial function during sepsis. Based on our previous results on demonstrating wild-type p53-induced phosphatase 1 in controlling neutrophil development, we explored the possible relationship among Wip1, neutrophils, and sepsis in the present study. Wip1-deficient mice exhibited improved outcomes in cecal ligation and puncture (CLP)-induced sepsis model with enhanced bacterial clearance and less multi-organ damage. The protection seen in Wip1 KO mice was mainly due to an increased accumulation of neutrophils in the primary infectious locus mediated by the decreased internalization of CXCR2, as well as by an increased antimicrobial function. Additionally, we also identified a negative correlation between CXCR2 and Wip1 in human neutrophils during sepsis. Pharmacological inhibition of Wip1 with its inhibitor can also prevent the internalization of CXCR2 on human neutrophils treated with lipopolysaccharides in vitro and significantly improve the outcome in CLP-induced sepsis model. Taken together, our results demonstrate that Wip1 can negatively regulate neutrophil migration and antimicrobial immunity during sepsis and inhibition of Wip1 can be a potential therapeutic target for sepsis treatment.

  12. TLR-induced activation of neutrophils promotes histamine production via a PI3 kinase dependent mechanism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smuda, Craig; Wechsler, Joshua B; Bryce, Paul J

    2011-12-30

    Histamine is a bioactive amine that exerts immunomodulatory functions, including many allergic symptoms. It is preformed and stored in mast cells and basophils but recent evidence suggests that other cell types produce histamine in an inducible fashion. During infection, it has been suggested that neutrophils may produce histamine. We also observed that histamine is released in a neutrophil-mediated LPS-induced model of acute lung injury. Therefore, we sought to examine whether innate signals promote histamine production by neutrophils. Bone marrow-derived neutrophils stimulated with a range of TLR agonists secreted histamine in response to LPS or R837, suggesting TLR4 or TLR7 are important. LPS-driven histamine was enhanced by coculture with GM-CSF and led to a transient release of histamine that peaked at 8h post stimulation. This was dependent upon de novo synthesis of histamine, since cells derived from histidine decarboxylase (HDC) deficient mice were unable to produce histamine but did generate reactive oxygen species upon stimulation. Using pharmacological inhibitors, we show that histamine production requires PI3 kinase, which has been shown to regulate other neutrophil functions, including activation and selective granule release. However, unlike mast cells, HDC deficiency did not alter the granule structure of neutrophils, suggesting that histamine does not participate in granule integrity in these cells. Consequently, our findings establish that neutrophils generate histamine in response to a select panel of innate immune triggers and that this might contribute to acute lung injury responses.

  13. PREGNANCY WITH PLATELET FUNCTION DISORDER

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    Sheila K

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available latelets play a vital role in haemostasis . Antenatal patients with platelet function disorders should be managed in tertiary care centres that are well equipped to tackle any obstetric haemorrhage that can ensue during labour and delivery . Primi gravida was admitted for safe confinement . She had been evaluated earlier for complaints of multiple episodes of mucosal bleeding . On evaluation she had nor mal platelet counts and coagulation factor assay was normal . Platelet aggregometry revealed mild disorder of platelet aggregation . She was planned for induction of labour after arranging enough blood and blood products . She got into active labour and was p ut on syntocinon augmentation . She had emergency Caesarean section for foetal distress . Oxytocics were given proactively . Intraoperatively platelet transfusions and tranexamic acid infusion were given . Complete haemostasis was achieved . She had an uneventf ul postoperative period . Patients with functional platelet disorders can be successfully managed with local application of antifibrinolytic agents like tranexamic acid , in case of minor bleeds . Platelet transfusions are very effective in tackling major ble eds , especially during surgeries and for obstetric indications . If a patient has the history of clinically significant bleeding suggestive of platelet dysfunction , appropriate platelet function tests should be obtained so that the risk of bleeding can be adequately assessed and therapy chosen more rationally . . In obstetric practice the response of such patients to platelet transfusions has been excellent

  14. Effects of hormones on platelet aggregation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farré, Antonio López; Modrego, Javier; Zamorano-León, José J

    2014-04-01

    Platelets and their activation/inhibition mechanisms play a central role in haemostasis. It is well known agonists and antagonists of platelet activation; however, during the last years novel evidences of hormone effects on platelet activation have been reported. Platelet functionality may be modulated by the interaction between different hormones and their platelet receptors, contributing to sex differences in platelet function and even in platelet-mediated vascular damage. It has suggested aspects that apparently are well established should be reviewed. Hormones effects on platelet activity are included among them. This article tries to review knowledge about the involvement of hormones in platelet biology and activity.

  15. Ensemble models of neutrophil trafficking in severe sepsis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sang Ok Song

    Full Text Available A hallmark of severe sepsis is systemic inflammation which activates leukocytes and can result in their misdirection. This leads to both impaired migration to the locus of infection and increased infiltration into healthy tissues. In order to better understand the pathophysiologic mechanisms involved, we developed a coarse-grained phenomenological model of the acute inflammatory response in CLP (cecal ligation and puncture-induced sepsis in rats. This model incorporates distinct neutrophil kinetic responses to the inflammatory stimulus and the dynamic interactions between components of a compartmentalized inflammatory response. Ensembles of model parameter sets consistent with experimental observations were statistically generated using a Markov-Chain Monte Carlo sampling. Prediction uncertainty in the model states was quantified over the resulting ensemble parameter sets. Forward simulation of the parameter ensembles successfully captured experimental features and predicted that systemically activated circulating neutrophils display impaired migration to the tissue and neutrophil sequestration in the lung, consequently contributing to tissue damage and mortality. Principal component and multiple regression analyses of the parameter ensembles estimated from survivor and non-survivor cohorts provide insight into pathologic mechanisms dictating outcome in sepsis. Furthermore, the model was extended to incorporate hypothetical mechanisms by which immune modulation using extracorporeal blood purification results in improved outcome in septic rats. Simulations identified a sub-population (about 18% of the treated population that benefited from blood purification. Survivors displayed enhanced neutrophil migration to tissue and reduced sequestration of lung neutrophils, contributing to improved outcome. The model ensemble presented herein provides a platform for generating and testing hypotheses in silico, as well as motivating further experimental

  16. Bordetella parapertussis Circumvents Neutrophil Extracellular Bactericidal Mechanisms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gorgojo, Juan; Scharrig, Emilia; Gómez, Ricardo M.; Harvill, Eric T.; Rodríguez, Maria Eugenia

    2017-01-01

    B. parapertussis is a whooping cough etiological agent with the ability to evade the immune response induced by pertussis vaccines. We previously demonstrated that in the absence of opsonic antibodies B. parapertussis hampers phagocytosis by neutrophils and macrophages and, when phagocytosed, blocks intracellular killing by interfering with phagolysosomal fusion. But neutrophils can kill and/or immobilize extracellular bacteria through non-phagocytic mechanisms such as degranulation and neutrophil extracellular traps (NETs). In this study we demonstrated that B. parapertussis also has the ability to circumvent these two neutrophil extracellular bactericidal activities. The lack of neutrophil degranulation was found dependent on the O antigen that targets the bacteria to cell lipid rafts, eventually avoiding the fusion of nascent phagosomes with specific and azurophilic granules. IgG opsonization overcame this inhibition of neutrophil degranulation. We further observed that B. parapertussis did not induce NETs release in resting neutrophils and inhibited NETs formation in response to phorbol myristate acetate (PMA) stimulation by a mechanism dependent on adenylate cyclase toxin (CyaA)-mediated inhibition of reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation. Thus, B. parapertussis modulates neutrophil bactericidal activity through two different mechanisms, one related to the lack of proper NETs-inducer stimuli and the other one related to an active inhibitory mechanism. Together with previous results these data suggest that B. parapertussis has the ability to subvert the main neutrophil bactericidal functions, inhibiting efficient clearance in non-immune hosts. PMID:28095485

  17. Fungal and bacterial killing by neutrophils.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ermert, David; Zychlinsky, Arturo; Urban, Constantin

    2009-01-01

    Neutrophils are professional phagocytes of the innate immune system that are essential to control bacterial and fungal infections. These cells engulf and kill invading microbes. Additionally, activated neutrophils are able to release neutrophil extracellular traps (NETs). These fibers consist of chromatin decorated with antimicrobial proteins to trap and kill microbes. Appropriate quantitative methods are required to understand the nature of interactions of neutrophils with pathogens. Here we present assays to measure killing mediated by phagocytosis, by NETs, by a combination of both, and by granular extract. As examples, we use Candida albicans for fungal and Shigella flexneri for bacterial pathogens.

  18. CFTR targeting during activation of human neutrophils.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ng, Hang Pong; Valentine, Vincent G; Wang, Guoshun

    2016-12-01

    Cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR), a cAMP-activated chloride channel, plays critical roles in phagocytic host defense. However, how activated neutrophils regulate CFTR channel distribution subcellularly is not well defined. To investigate, we tested multiple Abs against different CFTR domains, to examine CFTR expression in human peripheral blood neutrophils by flow cytometry. The data confirmed that resting neutrophils had pronounced CFTR expression. Activation of neutrophils with soluble or particulate agonists did not significantly increase CFTR expression level, but induced CFTR redistribution to cell surface. Such CFTR mobilization correlated with cell-surface recruitment of formyl-peptide receptor during secretory vesicle exocytosis. Intriguingly, neutrophils from patients with ΔF508-CF, despite expression of the mutant CFTR, showed little cell-surface mobilization upon stimulation. Although normal neutrophils effectively targeted CFTR to their phagosomes, ΔF508-CF neutrophils had impairment in that process, resulting in deficient hypochlorous acid production. Taken together, activated neutrophils regulate CFTR distribution by targeting this chloride channel to the subcellular sites of activation, and ΔF508-CF neutrophils fail to achieve such targeting, thus undermining their host defense function.

  19. The effect of platelet releasate on wound healing in animal models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ksander, G A; Sawamura, S J; Ogawa, Y; Sundsmo, J; McPherson, J M

    1990-05-01

    The alpha granules of platelets contain growth factors that are important in wound healing. We found that a major effect of thrombin-induced human platelet releasates in animal models of wound healing is to enhance the development of granulation tissue and new connective tissue matrix. These studies provide further evidence that platelet-derived protein factors may be useful in treating full-thickness dermal wounds by increasing the rate of granulation tissue formation.

  20. Pistacia chinensis Methanolic Extract Attenuated MAPK and Akt Phosphorylations in ADP Stimulated Rat Platelets In Vitro

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ji Young Park

    2012-01-01

    (2.5–20 μg/mL inhibited ADP-induced platelet aggregation. While PCME diminished [Ca2+]i, ATP, and TXA2 release in ADP-activated platelets, it enhanced cAMP production in resting platelets. Likewise, PCME inhibited fibrinogen binding to αIIbβ3 and downregulated JNK, ERK, and Akt phosphorylations. Thus, PCME contains potential antiplatelet compounds that could be deployed for their therapeutic values in cardiovascular pathology.

  1. Improved viability and activity of neutrophils differentiated from HL-60 cells by co-culture with adipose tissue-derived mesenchymal stem cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, Yoon Shin; Lim, Goh-Woon [Department of Pediatrics, Ewha Womans University, School of Medicine, Ewha Medical Research Center, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Cho, Kyung-Ah; Woo, So-Youn; Shin, Meeyoung [Department of Microbiology, Ewha Womans University, School of Medicine, Ewha Medical Research Center, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Yoo, Eun-Sun [Department of Pediatrics, Ewha Womans University, School of Medicine, Ewha Medical Research Center, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Chan Ra, Jeong [Stem Cell Research Center, RNL BIO, Seoul 153-768 (Korea, Republic of); Ryu, Kyung-Ha, E-mail: ykh@ewha.ac.kr [Department of Pediatrics, Ewha Womans University, School of Medicine, Ewha Medical Research Center, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2012-06-22

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Neutropenia is a principal complication of cancer treatment. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Co-culture of neutrophils with AD-MSC retained cell survival and proliferation and inhibited neutrophil apoptosis under serum starved conditions. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer AD-MSC increased functions of neutrophil. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer AD-MSC promoted the viability of neutrophils by enhancing respiratory burst through the expression of IFN-{alpha}, G-CSF, and TGF-{beta}. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer AD-MSC can be used to improve immunity for neutropenia treatment. -- Abstract: Neutropenia is a principal complication of cancer treatment. We investigated the supportive effect of adipose tissue-derived mesenchymal stem cells (AD-MSCs) on the viability and function of neutrophils. Neutrophils were derived from HL-60 cells by dimethylformamide stimulation and cultured with or without AD-MSCs under serum-starved conditions to evaluate neutrophil survival, proliferation, and function. Serum starvation resulted in the apoptosis of neutrophils and decreased cell survival. The co-culture of neutrophils and AD-MSCs resulted in cell survival and inhibited neutrophil apoptosis under serum-starved conditions. The survival rate of neutrophils was prolonged up to 72 h, and the expression levels of interferon (IFN)-{alpha}, granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF), granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor, and transforming growth factor (TGF)-{beta} in AD-MSCs were increased after co-culture with neutrophils. AD-MSCs promoted the viability of neutrophils by inhibiting apoptosis as well as enhancing respiratory burst, which could potentially be mediated by the increased expression of IFN-{alpha}, G-CSF, and TGF-{beta}. Thus, we conclude that the use of AD-MSCs may be a promising cell-based therapy for increasing immunity by accelerating neutrophil function.

  2. Platelet indices and platelet-to-lymphocyte ratio predict coronary chronic total occlusion in patients with acute ST-elevation myocardial infarction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hadadi Laszlo

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Coronary chronic total occlusion (CTO is caused by organized thrombi or atherosclerotic plaque progression. The presence of a CTO is an independent predictor of mortality in patients presenting with ST-segment elevation myocardial infarction (STEMI. Platelets have a crucial role in the pathophysiology of atherosclerosis. The aim of this retrospective study was to investigate platelet indices as predictors of CTO in patients with STEMI treated with primary percutaneous coronary intervention (pPCI. A total number of 334 patients admitted for STEMI between January 2011 and December 2013 were included and divided in two groups based on the presence of CTO (48 patients in CTO+ group, 286 patients in CTO-group. Platelet count, mean platelet volume (MPV, platelet distribution width (PDW, platelet-large cell ratio (P-LCR, lymphocyte and neutrophil count determined on admission were analyzed. MPV was larger in patients with CTO compared with patients without CTO (p=0.02, as were PDW (p=0.03 and P-LCR (p=0.01. Platelet-to-lymphocyte ratio (PLT/LYM was lower in patients with CTO: 105.2 (75.86-159.1 compared to 137 (97-188.1, p<0.01. Receiver-operator characteristic curve analysis identified an area under the curve of 0.61 (95%CI=0.57-0.67, p< 0.01 for PLT/LYM in predicting the presence of a CTO, with a cut-off value at 97.73. Lower values than this were independent predictors of a CTO in multivariate logistic regression analysis, with an Odds Ratio of 2.2 (95%CI=1.15-4.20, p=0.02. Our results support the use of platelet indices and PLT/LYM as predictors of CTO in patients presenting with STEMI.

  3. Influence of nanographene platelets (NGP) incorporation on Fe3O4 nanoparticles as materials additives for enhancement thermal properties stearic acid

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nuryadin, M. K.; Andiarto, R.; Taufik, A.; Saleh, R.

    2016-11-01

    In this work, Fe3O4 nanoparticles, and Fe3O4/NGP composite were used as material additive for enhancement thermal properties of stearic acid (SA). The both material additive were synthesized using sol-gel method. Phase change material (PCM) composites SA-Fe3O4 and Sa-Fe3O4/NGP mixtures were made through the dispersion technique with three different weight % ratio of material additives into stearic acid: 1 wt.%, 3 wt.%, and 5 wt.%. X-Ray Diffractometer (XRD) and Fourier Transform Infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy were used to investigate the structural properties. Magnetic properties also measured by vibrating sample magnetometer (VSM) to see influence of NGP in PCM composites. Differential Scanning Calorimetry (DSC) and Thermogravimetric Analysis (TGA) were used in order to analyse the thermal properties of the samples. The results show an enhancement of the latent heat, thermal stability as well as specific heat by the presence of material additives in SA. Compare to SA- Fe3O4, SA-Fe3O4/NGP show better improvement in enhancement of thermal performance of SA. The improvement by about 41.2% in specific heat and 21.2% in latent heat.

  4. Platelet gel for healing cutaneous chronic wounds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crovetti, Giovanni; Martinelli, Giovanna; Issi, Marwan; Barone, Marilde; Guizzardi, Marco; Campanati, Barbara; Moroni, Marco; Carabelli, Angelo

    2004-04-01

    Wound healing is a specific host immune response for restoration of tissue integrity. Experimental studies demonstrated an alteration of growth factors activity due to their reduced synthesis, increased degradation and inactivation. In wound healing platelets play an essential role since they are rich of alpha-granules growth factors (platelet derived growth factor--PDGF; transforming growth factor-beta--TGF-beta; vascular endothelial growth factor--VEGF). Topical use of platelet gel (PG), hemocomponent obtained from mix of activated platelets and cryoprecipitate, gives the exogenous and in situ adding of growth factors (GF). The hemocomponents are of autologous or homologous origin. We performed a technique based on: multicomponent apheretic procedure to obtain plasma rich platelet and cryoprecipitate; manual processing in an open system, in sterile environment, for gel activation. Every step of the gel synthesis was checked by a quality control programme. The therapeutic protocol consists of the once-weekly application of PG. Progressive reduction of the wound size, granulation tissue forming, wound bed detersion, regression and absence of infective processes were considered for evaluating clinical response to hemotherapy. 24 patients were enrolled. They had single or multiple cutaneous ulcers with different ethiopathogenesis. Only 3 patients could perform autologous withdrawal; in the others homologous hemocomponent were used, always considering suitability and traceability criteria for transfusional use of blood. Complete response was observed in 9 patients, 2 were subjected to cutaneous graft, 4 stopped treatment, 9 had partial response and are still receiving the treatment. In each case granulation tissue forming increased following to the first PG applications, while complete re-epithelization was obtained later. Pain was reduced in every treated patient. Topical haemotherapy with PG may be considered as an adjuvant treatment of a multidisciplinary process

  5. Elevated mean neutrophil volume represents altered neutrophil composition and reflects damage after myocardial infarction

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Hout, G. P J; van Solinge, W. W.; Gijsberts, C. M.; Teuben, M. P J; Leliefeld, P. H C; Heeres, M.; Nijhoff, F.; de Jong, S.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/341696706; Bosch, L.; de Jager, S. C A; Huisman, A.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/255170653; Stella, P. R.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/304814717; Pasterkamp, G.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/138488304; Koenderman, L. J.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/074929798; Hoefer, I. E.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/267105649

    2015-01-01

    Myocardial infarction (MI) induces an inflammatory response in which neutrophils fulfill a prominent role. Mean neutrophil volume (MNV) represents the average size of the circulating neutrophil population. Our goal was to determine the effect of MI on MNV and investigate the mechanisms behind MNV

  6. Platelet aggregation following trauma

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Windeløv, Nis A; Sørensen, Anne M; Perner, Anders

    2014-01-01

    We aimed to elucidate platelet function in trauma patients, as it is pivotal for hemostasis yet remains scarcely investigated in this population. We conducted a prospective observational study of platelet aggregation capacity in 213 adult trauma patients on admission to an emergency department (ED......). Inclusion criteria were trauma team activation and arterial cannula insertion on arrival. Blood samples were analyzed by multiple electrode aggregometry initiated by thrombin receptor agonist peptide 6 (TRAP) or collagen using a Multiplate device. Blood was sampled median 65 min after injury; median injury...... severity score (ISS) was 17; 14 (7%) patients received 10 or more units of red blood cells in the ED (massive transfusion); 24 (11%) patients died within 28 days of trauma: 17 due to cerebral injuries, four due to exsanguination, and three from other causes. No significant association was found between...

  7. Platelet-Rich Plasma Peptides: Key for Regeneration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dolores Javier Sánchez-González

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Platelet-derived Growth Factors (GFs are biologically active peptides that enhance tissue repair mechanisms such as angiogenesis, extracellular matrix remodeling, and cellular effects as stem cells recruitment, chemotaxis, cell proliferation, and differentiation. Platelet-rich plasma (PRP is used in a variety of clinical applications, based on the premise that higher GF content should promote better healing. Platelet derivatives represent a promising therapeutic modality, offering opportunities for treatment of wounds, ulcers, soft-tissue injuries, and various other applications in cell therapy. PRP can be combined with cell-based therapies such as adipose-derived stem cells, regenerative cell therapy, and transfer factors therapy. This paper describes the biological background of the platelet-derived substances and their potential use in regenerative medicine.

  8. Activation of circulating platelets and platelet response to activating agents in children with cyanotic congenital heart disease: their relevance to palliative systemic-pulmonary shunt.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kierzkowska, B; Stańczyk, J; Wiectawska, B; Rózalski, M; Boncler, M; Chrul, S; Watala, C

    2001-06-01

    Abnormal platelet function has been hypothesised to play a role in the haemostatic abnormalities in cyanotic congenital heart disease (CCHD) patients. Using whole blood flow cytometry we found that platelets from cyanotic patients were hyperreactive and we related such hyperreactivity directly to young age, unoperated state, high haematocrit, reduced saturation with oxygen and low platelet count. Circulating platelets from CCHD children showed significantly enhanced P-selectin expression (Pplatelet 'priming' largely concerned CCHD children who were not subjected to modified Blalock-Taussig shunts in the past (non-MBTS). Only non-MBTS cyanotic children, but not MBTS-operated patients, showed significantly higher platelet reactivity compared to controls in response to ADP or 1 microM TRAP with respect to P-selectin expression (pchildren and reduced GPIb expression in non-MBTS patients, especially in younger patients, were positively associated with the occurrence of the polymorphic variant Pl(A2) of platelet membrane glycoprotein IIIa gene. Altered blood morphology parameters (elevated RBC, Hb, Hct and MCHC, for all Pchildren correlated with the enhanced degranulation of circulating blood platelets and their hyperreactivity in response to some agonists (Pplatelets are remarkably hyperreactive in non-MBTS cyanotic children, which are at higher risk to often encounter platelets activation in circulation. It seems unlikely that the apparently unchanged platelet reactivity in MBTS-operated children is due to the advantageous effects of the shunt, since these patients showed neither altered haematological parameters nor improved oxygen carrying capacity. Otherwise, it may rather result from more frequent episodes of platelet degranulation and preactivation in the past, and/or post-operative enhanced platelet consumption.

  9. Estrogen, inflammation, and platelet phenotype.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Virginia M; Jayachandran, Muthuvel; Hashimoto, Kazumori; Heit, John A; Owen, Whyte G

    2008-01-01

    Although exogenous estrogenic therapies increase the risk of thrombosis, the effects of estrogen on formed elements of blood are uncertain. This article examines the genomic and nongenomic actions of estrogen on platelet phenotype that may contribute to increased thrombotic risk. To determine aggregation, secretion, protein expression, and thrombin generation, platelets were collected from experimental animals of varying hormonal status and from women enrolled in the Kronos Early Estrogen Prevention Study. Estrogen receptor beta predominates in circulating platelets. Estrogenic treatment in ovariectomized animals decreased platelet aggregation and adenosine triphosphate (ATP) secretion. However, acute exposure to 17beta-estradiol did not reverse decreases in platelet ATP secretion invoked by lipopolysaccharide. Thrombin generation was positively correlated to the number of circulating microvesicles expressing phosphatidylserine. Assessing the effect of estrogen treatments on blood platelets may lead to new ways of identifying women at risk for adverse thrombotic events with such therapies.

  10. Real-time in vivo imaging reveals the ability of neutrophils to remove Cryptococcus neoformans directly from the brain vasculature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Mingshun; Sun, Donglei; Liu, Gongguan; Wu, Hui; Zhou, Hong; Shi, Meiqing

    2016-03-01

    Although neutrophils are typically the first immune cells attracted to an infection site, little is known about how neutrophils dynamically interact with invading pathogens in vivo. Here, with the use of intravital microscopy, we demonstrate that neutrophils migrate to the arrested Cryptococcus neoformans, a leading agent to cause meningoencephalitis, in the brain microvasculature. Following interactions with C. neoformans, neutrophils were seen to internalize the organism and then circulate back into the bloodstream, resulting in a direct removal of the organism from the endothelial surface before its transmigration into the brain parenchyma. C. neoformans infection led to enhanced expression of adhesion molecules macrophage 1 antigen on neutrophils and ICAM-1 on brain endothelial cells. Depletion of neutrophils enhanced the brain fungal burden. Complement C3 was critically involved in the recognition of C. neoformans by neutrophils and subsequent clearance of the organism from the brain. Together, our finding of the direct removal of C. neoformans by neutrophils from its arrested site may represent a novel mechanism of host defense in the brain, in addition to the known, direct killing of microorganisms at the infection sites. These data are the first to characterize directly the dynamic interactions of leukocytes with a microbe in the brain of a living animal.

  11. Neutrophil activation during acetaminophen hepatotoxicity and repair in mice and humans

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Williams, C. David; Bajt, Mary Lynn [Department of Pharmacology, Toxicology and Therapeutics, University of Kansas Medical Center, Kansas City, KS (United States); Sharpe, Matthew R. [Department of Internal Medicine, University of Kansas Hospital, Kansas City, KS (United States); McGill, Mitchell R. [Department of Pharmacology, Toxicology and Therapeutics, University of Kansas Medical Center, Kansas City, KS (United States); Farhood, Anwar [Department of Pathology, St. David' s North Austin Medical Center, Austin, TX 78756 (United States); Jaeschke, Hartmut, E-mail: hjaeschke@kumc.edu [Department of Pharmacology, Toxicology and Therapeutics, University of Kansas Medical Center, Kansas City, KS (United States)

    2014-03-01

    Following acetaminophen (APAP) overdose there is an inflammatory response triggered by the release of cellular contents from necrotic hepatocytes into the systemic circulation which initiates the recruitment of neutrophils into the liver. It has been demonstrated that neutrophils do not contribute to APAP-induced liver injury, but their role and the role of NADPH oxidase in injury resolution are controversial. C57BL/6 mice were subjected to APAP overdose and neutrophil activation status was determined during liver injury and liver regeneration. Additionally, human APAP overdose patients (ALT: > 800 U/L) had serial blood draws during the injury and recovery phases for the determination of neutrophil activation. Neutrophils in the peripheral blood of mice showed an increasing activation status (CD11b expression and ROS priming) during and after the peak of injury but returned to baseline levels prior to complete injury resolution. Hepatic sequestered neutrophils showed an increased and sustained CD11b expression, but no ROS priming was observed. Confirming that NADPH oxidase is not critical to injury resolution, gp91{sup phox}−/− mice following APAP overdose displayed no alteration in injury resolution. Peripheral blood from APAP overdose patients also showed increased neutrophil activation status after the peak of liver injury and remained elevated until discharge from the hospital. In mice and humans, markers of activation, like ROS priming, were increased and sustained well after active liver injury had subsided. The similar findings between surviving patients and mice indicate that neutrophil activation may be a critical event for host defense or injury resolution following APAP overdose, but not a contributing factor to APAP-induced injury. - Highlights: • Neutrophil (PMN) function increases during liver repair after acetaminophen overdose. • Liver repair after acetaminophen (APAP)-overdose is not dependent on NADPH oxidase. • Human PMNs do not appear

  12. Predictive contribution of neutrophil/lymphocyte ratio in diagnosis of brucellosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olt, Serdar; Ergenç, Hasan; Açıkgöz, Seyyid Bilal

    2015-01-01

    Here we wanted to investigate predictive value of neutrophil/lymphocyte ratio (NLR) and platelet/lymphocyte ratio (PLR) in the diagnosis of brucellosis. Thirty-two brucellosis patients diagnosed with positive serum agglutination test and thirty-two randomized healthy subjects were enrolled in this study retrospectively. Result with ROC analyzes the baseline NLR and hemoglobin values were found to be significantly associated with brucellosis (P = 0.01, P = 0.01, resp.). Herein we demonstrated for the first time that NLR values were significantly associated with brucellosis. This situation can help clinicians during diagnosis of brucellosis.

  13. Neutrophil-induced injury of rat pulmonary alveolar epithelial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simon, R H; DeHart, P D; Todd, R F

    1986-11-01

    The damage to pulmonary alveolar epithelial cells that occurs in many inflammatory conditions is thought to be caused in part by phagocytic neutrophils. To investigate this process, we exposed monolayers of purified rat alveolar epithelial cells to stimulated human neutrophils and measured cytotoxicity using a 51Cr-release assay. We found that stimulated neutrophils killed epithelial cells by a process that did not require neutrophil-generated reactive oxygen metabolites. Pretreatment of neutrophils with an antibody (anti-Mo1) that reduced neutrophil adherence to epithelial cells limited killing. Although a variety of serine protease inhibitors partially inhibited cytotoxicity, we found that neutrophil cytoplasts, neutrophil lysates, neutrophil-conditioned medium, purified azurophilic or specific granule contents, and purified human neutrophil elastase did not duplicate the injury. We conclude that stimulated neutrophils can kill alveolar epithelial cells in an oxygen metabolite-independent manner. Tight adherence of stimulated neutrophils to epithelial cell monolayers appears to promote epithelial cell killing.

  14. Neutrophils are immuno-modulatory in rhinovirus infections

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tang, Francesca; Hansbro, Philip; Burgess, Janette; Baines, Katherine; Oliver, Brian

    2015-01-01

    Background: Neutrophils are important in controlling bacterial infections however; their role in viral infections remains unclear. Previously, we found that neutrophils respond to viral mimetics but not replication competent rhinovirus (RV). Aim: To investigate if neutrophils are activated when expo

  15. Neutrophils are immuno-modulatory in rhinovirus infections

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tang, Francesca; Hansbro, Philip; Burgess, Janette; Baines, Katherine; Oliver, Brian

    2015-01-01

    Background: Neutrophils are important in controlling bacterial infections however; their role in viral infections remains unclear. Previously, we found that neutrophils respond to viral mimetics but not replication competent rhinovirus (RV). Aim: To investigate if neutrophils are activated when

  16. Complement Activation Alters Platelet Function

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-12-01

    Award Number: W81XWH-12-1-0523 TITLE: Complement Activation Alters Platelet Function PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR: George Tsokos, M.D. CONTRACTING...Activation Alters Platelet Function 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER 5b. GRANT NUMBER W81XWH-12-1-0523 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER 6. AUTHOR(S) George Tsokos, M.D...a decreased level of disease. Further studies will expand upon these observations better outlining the function of platelets in the injury associated

  17. Intranasal delivery of plasma and platelet growth factors using PRGF-Endoret system enhances neurogenesis in a mouse model of Alzheimer's disease.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eduardo Anitua

    Full Text Available Neurodegeneration together with a reduction in neurogenesis are cardinal features of Alzheimer's disease (AD induced by a combination of toxic amyloid-β peptide (Aβ and a loss of trophic factor support. Amelioration of these was assessed with diverse neurotrophins in experimental therapeutic approaches. The aim of this study was to investigate whether intranasal delivery of plasma rich in growth factors (PRGF-Endoret, an autologous pool of morphogens and proteins, could enhance hippocampal neurogenesis and reduce neurodegeneration in an amyloid precursor protein/presenilin-1 (APP/PS1 mouse model. Neurotrophic and neuroprotective actions were firstly evident in primary neuronal cultures, where cell proliferation and survival were augmented by Endoret treatment. Translation of these effects in vivo was assessed in wild type and APP/PS1 mice, where neurogenesis was evaluated using 5-bromodeoxyuridine (BdrU, doublecortin (DCX, and NeuN immunostaining 5 weeks after Endoret administration. The number of BrdU, DCX, and NeuN positive cell was increased after chronic treatment. The number of degenerating neurons, detected with fluoro Jade-B staining was reduced in Endoret-treated APP/PS1 mice at 5 week after intranasal administration. In conclusion, Endoret was able to activate neuronal progenitor cells, enhancing hippocampal neurogenesis, and to reduce Aβ-induced neurodegeneration in a mouse model of AD.

  18. Staphylococcus aureus capsular polysaccharide types 5 and 8 reduce killing by bovine neutrophils in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kampen, Annette H; Tollersrud, Tore; Lund, Arve

    2005-03-01

    Isogenic variants of Staphylococcus aureus strain Reynolds expressing either no capsule or capsular polysaccharide (CP) type 5 (CP5) or type 8 (CP8) were used to assess the effect of CP on bacterial killing and the respiratory burst of bovine neutrophils. The effects of antisera specific for CP5 and CP8 were also evaluated. The killing of live bacteria by isolated neutrophils was quantified in a bactericidal assay, while the respiratory burst after stimulation with live bacteria in whole blood was measured by flow cytometry. The expression of a CP5 or CP8 capsule protected the bacteria from being killed by bovine neutrophils in vitro (P killing of the capsule-expressing bacteria and enhanced their stimulating effect in the respiratory burst assay (P killing and prevents the bacteria from inducing respiratory burst of bovine neutrophils in vitro and that these effects can be reversed by the addition of serotype-specific antisera.

  19. Respiratory innate immune proteins differentially modulate the neutrophil respiratory burst response to influenza A virus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    White, Mitchell R; Crouch, Erika; Vesona, Jenny

    2005-01-01

    Oxidants and neutrophils contribute to lung injury during influenza A virus (IAV) infection. Surfactant protein (SP)-D plays a pivotal role in restricting IAV replication and inflammation in the first several days after infection. Despite its potent anti-inflammatory effects in vivo, preincubation...... of IAV with SP-D in vitro strongly increases neutrophil respiratory burst responses to the virus. Several factors are shown to modify this apparent proinflammatory effect of SP-D. Although multimeric forms of SP-D show dose-dependent augmentation of respiratory burst responses, trimeric, single-arm forms...... either show no effect or inhibit these responses. Furthermore, if neutrophils are preincubated with multimeric SP-D before IAV is added, oxidant responses to the virus are significantly reduced. The ability of SP-D to increase neutrophil uptake of IAV can be dissociated from enhancement of oxidant...

  20. Integrin-dependent cell adhesion to neutrophil extracellular traps through engagement of fibronectin in neutrophil-like cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monti, Marcello; Iommelli, Francesca; De Rosa, Viviana; Carriero, Maria Vincenza; Miceli, Roberta; Camerlingo, Rosa; Di Minno, Giovanni; Del Vecchio, Silvana

    2017-01-01

    Neutrophil extracellular traps (NETs), originally recognized as a host defense mechanism, were reported to promote thrombosis and metastatic dissemination of cancer cells. Here we tested the role of integrins α5β1 and ανβ3 in the adhesion of cancer cells to NETs. Neutrophil-like cells stimulated with calcium ionophore (A23187) were used as a stable source of cell-free NETs-enriched suspensions. Using NETs as an adhesion substrate, two human K562 cell lines, differentially expressing α5β1 and ανβ3 integrins, were subjected to adhesion assays in the presence or absence of DNAse 1, blocking antibodies against α5β1 or ανβ3, alone or in combination with DNAse 1, and Proteinase K. As expected DNAse 1 treatment strongly inhibited adhesion of both cell lines to NETs. An equivalent significant reduction of cell adhesion to NETs was obtained after treatment of cells with blocking antibodies against α5β1 or ανβ3 indicating that both integrins were able to mediate cell adhesion to NETs. Furthermore, the combination of DNAse 1 and anti-integrin antibody treatment almost completely blocked cell adhesion. Western blot analysis and immunoprecipitation experiments showed a dose-dependent increase of fibronectin levels in samples from stimulated neutrophil-like cells and a direct or indirect interaction of fibronectin with histone H3. Finally, co-immunolocalization studies with confocal microscopy showed that fibronectin and citrullinated histone H3 co-localize inside the web-structure of NETs. In conclusion, our study showed that α5β1 and ανβ3 integrins mediate cell adhesion to NETs by binding to their common substrate fibronectin. Therefore, in addition to mechanical trapping and aspecific adsorption of different cell types driven by DNA/histone complexes, NETs may provide specific binding sites for integrin-mediated cell adhesion of neutrophils, platelets, endothelial and cancer cells thus promoting intimate interactions among these cells. PMID:28166238

  1. 7-Hydroxycoumarin modulates the oxidative metabolism, degranulation and microbial killing of human neutrophils.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kabeya, Luciana M; Fuzissaki, Carolina N; Taleb-Contini, Silvia H; da C Ferreira, Ana Maria; Naal, Zeki; Santos, Everton O L; Figueiredo-Rinhel, Andréa S G; Azzolini, Ana Elisa C S; Vermelho, Roberta B; Malvezzi, Alberto; Amaral, Antonia T-do; Lopes, João Luis C; Lucisano-Valim, Yara Maria

    2013-10-25

    In the present study, we assessed whether 7-hydroxycoumarin (umbelliferone), 7-hydroxy-4-methylcoumarin, and their acetylated analogs modulate some of the effector functions of human neutrophils and display antioxidant activity. These compounds decreased the ability of neutrophils to generate superoxide anion, release primary granule enzymes, and kill Candida albicans. Cytotoxicity did not mediate their inhibitory effect, at least under the assessed conditions. These coumarins scavenged hypochlorous acid and protected ascorbic acid from electrochemical oxidation in cell-free systems. On the other hand, the four coumarins increased the luminol-enhanced chemiluminescence of human neutrophils stimulated with phorbol-12-myristate-13-acetate and serum-opsonized zymosan. Oxidation of the hydroxylated coumarins by the neutrophil myeloperoxidase produced highly reactive coumarin radical intermediates, which mediated the prooxidant effect observed in the luminol-enhanced chemiluminescence assay. These species also oxidized ascorbic acid and the spin traps α-(4-pyridyl-1-oxide)-N-tert-butylnitrone and 5-dimethyl-1-pyrroline-N-oxide. Therefore, 7-hydroxycoumarin and the derivatives investigated here were able to modulate the effector functions of human neutrophils and scavenge reactive oxidizing species; they also generated reactive coumarin derivatives in the presence of myeloperoxidase. Acetylation of the free hydroxyl group, but not addition of the 4-methyl group, suppressed the biological effects of 7-hydroxycoumarin. These findings help clarify how 7-hydroxycoumarin acts on neutrophils to produce relevant anti-inflammatory effects.

  2. Surfactant protein A regulates IgG-mediated phagocytosis in inflammatory neutrophils.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wofford, Jessica A; Wright, Jo Rae

    2007-12-01

    Surfactant proteins (SP)-A and SP-D have been shown to affect the functions of a variety of innate immune cells and to interact with various immune proteins such as complement and immunoglobulins. The goal of the current study is to test the hypothesis that SP-A regulates IgG-mediated phagocytosis by neutrophils, which are major effector cells of the innate immune response that remove invading pathogens by phagocytosis and by extracellular killing mediated by reactive oxygen and nitrogen. We have previously shown that SP-A stimulates chemotaxis by inflammatory, but not peripheral, neutrophils. To evaluate the ability of SP-A to modulate IgG-mediated phagocytosis, polystyrene beads were coated with BSA and treated with anti-BSA IgG. SP-A significantly and specifically enhanced IgG-mediated phagocytosis by inflammatory neutrophils, but it had no effect on beads not treated with IgG. SP-A bound to IgG-coated beads and enhanced their uptake via direct interactions with the beads as well as direct interactions with the neutrophils. SP-A did not affect reactive oxygen production or binding of IgG to neutrophils and had modest effects on polymerization of actin. These data suggest that SP-A plays an important role in mediating the phagocytic response of neutrophils to IgG-opsonized particles.

  3. A bioactive molecule in a complex wound healing process: platelet-derived growth factor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaltalioglu, Kaan; Coskun-Cevher, Sule

    2015-08-01

    Wound healing is considered to be particularly important after surgical procedures, and the most important wounds related to surgical procedures are incisional, excisional, and punch wounds. Research is ongoing to identify methods to heal non-closed wounds or to accelerate wound healing; however, wound healing is a complex process that includes many biological and physiological events, and it is affected by various local and systemic factors, including diabetes mellitus, infection, ischemia, and aging. Different cell types (such as platelets, macrophages, and neutrophils) release growth factors during the healing process, and platelet-derived growth factor is a particularly important mediator in most stages of wound healing. This review explores the relationship between platelet-derived growth factor and wound healing.

  4. Platelet effects on ovarian cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davis, Ashley; Afshar-Kharghan, Vahid; Sood, Anil K.

    2014-01-01

    Growing understanding of the role of thrombocytosis, high platelet turnover, and the presence of activated platelets in the circulation in cancer progression and metastasis has brought megakaryocytes into focus. Platelet biology is essential to hemostasis, vascular integrity, angiogenesis, inflammation, innate immunity, wound healing, and cancer biology. However, before megakaryocyte/platelet-directed therapies can be considered for clinical use, understanding of the mechanism and biology of paraneoplastic thrombocytosis in malignancy is required. Here, we provide an overview of the clinical implications, biological significance, and mechanisms of paraneoplastic thrombocytosis in the context of ovarian cancer. PMID:25023353

  5. Novel aspects of platelet aggregation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roka-Moya Y. M.

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The platelet aggregation is an important process, which is critical for the hemostatic plug formation and thrombosis. Recent studies have shown that the platelet aggregation is more complex and dynamic than it was previously thought. There are several mechanisms that can initiate the platelet aggregation and each of them operates under specific conditions in vivo. At the same time, the influence of certain plasma proteins on this process should be considered. This review intends to summarize the recent data concerning the adhesive molecules and their receptors, which provide the platelet aggregation under different conditions.

  6. Overview of platelet physiology and laboratory evaluation of platelet function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodgers, G M

    1999-06-01

    Appropriate laboratory testing for the platelet-type bleeding disorders hinges on an adequate assessment in the history and physical examination. Patients with histories and screening laboratory results consistent with coagulation disorders (hemophilia, disseminated intravascular coagulation) are not appropriate candidates for platelet function testing. In contrast, patients with a lifelong history of platelet-type bleeding symptoms and perhaps a positive family history of bleeding would be appropriate for testing. Figure 6 depicts one strategy to evaluate these patients. Platelet morphology can easily be evaluated to screen for two uncommon qualitative platelet disorders: Bernard-Soulier syndrome (associated with giant platelets) and gray platelet syndrome, a subtype of storage pool disorder in which platelet granulation is morphologically abnormal by light microscopy. If the bleeding disorder occurred later in life (no bleeding with surgery or trauma early in life), the focus should be on acquired disorders of platelet function. For those patients thought to have an inherited disorder, testing for vWD should be done initially because approximately 1% of the population has vWD. The complete vWD panel (factor VIII coagulant activity, vWf antigen, ristocetin cofactor activity) should be performed because many patients will have abnormalities of only one particular panel component. Patients diagnosed with vWD should be classified using multimeric analysis to identify the type 1 vWD patients likely to respond to DDAVP. If vWD studies are normal, platelet aggregation testing should be performed, ensuring that no antiplatelet medications have been ingested at least 1 week before testing. If platelet aggregation tests are normal and if suspicion for an inherited disorder remains high, vWD testing should be repeated. The evaluation of thrombocytopenia may require bone marrow examination to exclude primary hematologic disorders. If future studies with thrombopoietin assays

  7. Neutrophils: potential therapeutic targets in tularemia?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lee-Ann H Allen

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available The central role of neutrophils in innate immunity and host defense has long been recognized, and the ability of these cells to efficiently engulf and kill invading bacteria has been extensively studied, as has the role of neutrophil apoptosis in resolution of the inflammatory response. In the past few years additional immunoregulatory properties of neutrophils were discovered, and it is now clear that these cells play a much greater role in control of the immune response than was previously appreciated. In this regard, it is noteworthy that Francisella tularensis is one of relatively few pathogens that can successfully parasitize neutrophils as well as macrophages, DC and epithelial cells. Herein we will review the mechanisms used by F. tularensis to evade elimination by neutrophils. We will also reprise effects of this pathogen on neutrophil migration and lifespan as compared with other infectious and inflammatory disease states. In addition, we will discuss the evidence which suggests that neutrophils contribute to disease progression rather than effective defense during tularemia, and consider whether manipulation of neutrophil migration or turnover may be suitable adjunctive therapeutic strategies.

  8. Proteases, neutrophils, and periodontitis: the NET effect.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nauseef, William M

    2014-10-01

    Neutrophils exert potent antimicrobial activities in their role as first-line cellular defenders against infection. The synergistic and collective actions of oxidants and granule proteins, including serine proteases, support the microbial killing in phagosomes, where most neutrophil-mediated antimicrobial action occurs. In addition to phagocytosis, specific stimuli prompt neutrophils to extrude a matrix of DNA, histones, and granule proteins to produce neutrophil extracellular traps (NETs), which can trap microbes. Mice lacking the serine proteases necessary for NET production are more susceptible to infection, an observation suggesting that functional NETs are required for host protection. In this issue of the JCI, Sørensen and colleagues characterize neutrophils from a patient with Papillon-Lefèvre syndrome. The patient has an inactivating mutation in the gene encoding dipeptidyl peptidase I, resulting in neutrophils lacking elastase, a serine protease required for NET production. Despite the inability to form NETS, neutrophils from this patient killed pathogens in vitro, and the patient did not exhibit evidence of an increased propensity toward bacterial infections. Together, these results suggest that proteases in human neutrophils are dispensable for protection against bacterial infection and that the ability to generate NETs in vitro does not compromise host defense.

  9. Neutrophil granules in health and disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Häger, M; Cowland, J B; Borregaard, N

    2010-01-01

    Neutrophil granules store proteins that are critically important for the neutrophil to move from the vascular bed to tissues and to kill microorganisms. This is illustrated in nature when individual proteins are deleted due to inherited mutations of their cognate genes, and such deficiencies resu...

  10. Effects of Antimalarial Tafenoquine on Blood Platelet Activity and Survival

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hang Cao

    2017-01-01

    significantly increased ROS and annexin-V-binding, significantly augmented the effect of thrombin on caspase 3 activity and platelet volume and significantly enhanced platelet aggregation. Conclusions: Tafenoquine counteracts thrombin and CRP induced increase of cytosolic Ca2+ activity and platelet activation, but enhances platelet apoptosis and platelet aggregation.

  11. The role of plasma adenosine deaminase in chemoattractant-stimulated oxygen radical production in neutrophils.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kälvegren, Hanna; Fridfeldt, Jonna; Bengtsson, Torbjörn

    2010-06-01

    Adenosine deaminase (ADA) has a role in many immunity mediated disorders, such as asthma, tuberculosis and coronary artery disease. This study aims to investigate the ability of plasma ADA to modulate reactive oxygen species (ROS) production in neutrophils, and examine the involvement of adenosine and the cyclic AMP signaling pathway in this process. Neutrophils were stimulated, in the absence or presence of plasma, with the chemotactic peptide fMLP (formyl-methionyl-leucyl-phenylalanine), and the ROS production was determined with luminol-enhanced chemiluminescence. Activity of ADA was measured spectrophotometrically. Plasma dose-dependently amplified the ROS generation in fMLP-stimulated neutrophils. In parallel, incubation of neutrophils in plasma elevated the total ADA-activity approximately 10 times from 1.3 U/ml to 12 U/ml. Inhibition of ADA, or type IV phosphodiesterases, significantly lowered the plasma-mediated ROS production. Furthermore, the high-affinity adenosine A(1) receptor antagonists DPCPX and 8-phenyltheophylline markedly inhibited the plasma-induced respiratory burst in neutrophils, suggesting an A(1) receptor-mediated mechanism. This study suggests that plasma ADA amplifies the release of toxic oxygen radicals from neutrophils through a downregulation of the inhibitory adenosine/cAMP-system and an enhanced activation of the stimulatory adenosine A(1)-receptor. This mechanism has probably a crucial role in regulating neutrophil function and in the defence against microbial infections. However, a sustained neutrophil activation could also contribute to inflammatory disorders such as atherosclerosis. 2010 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  12. Increased platelet activation in early symptomatic versus asymptomatic carotid stenosis and relationship with microembolic status: Results from the Platelets And Carotid Stenosis (PACS) Study.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Kinsella, Ja

    2013-04-26

    -negative patients (2.8 vs. 2.3%; p=0.0085). DISCUSSION: Recently symptomatic carotid stenosis patients have higher platelet counts (potentially reflecting increased platelet production, mobilisation or reduced clearance) and platelet activation status than asymptomatic patients. MES were more frequently detected in early symptomatic than asymptomatic patients, but the differences between late symptomatic and asymptomatic groups were not significant. Increased lymphocyte-platelet complex formation in recently symptomatic vs. asymptomatic MES-negative patients indicates enhanced platelet activation in this early symptomatic subgroup. Platelet biomarkers, in combination with TCD, have the potential to aid risk-stratification in asymptomatic and symptomatic carotid stenosis patients. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  13. Platelet Concentrates: Past, Present and Future

    OpenAIRE

    2011-01-01

    Platelets play a crucial role in hemostasis and wound healing, platelet growth factors are well known source of healing cytokines. Numerous techniques of autologous platelet concentrates have been developed and applied in oral and maxillofacial surgery. This review describes the evolution of the first and second generation of platelet concentrates (platelet rich plasma and platelet rich fibrin respectively) from their fore runner-fibrin sealants.

  14. Studies on megakaryopoiesis and platelet function

    OpenAIRE

    Meinders, M.

    2015-01-01

    Platelets are blood circulating specialized subcellular fragments, which are produced by megakaryocytes. Platelets are essential for hemostasis and wound healing but also play a role in non-hemostatic processes such as the immune response or cancer metastasis. Considering the immediate precursors of platelets, normal megakaryocyte development is essential for normal platelet function. Although much is known about platelet development, some aspects of platelet production remain poorly understo...

  15. Evasion of Neutrophil Killing by Staphylococcus aureus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Will A. McGuinness

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Staphylococcus aureus causes many types of infections, ranging from self-resolving skin infections to severe or fatal pneumonia. Human innate immune cells, called polymorphonuclear leukocytes (PMNs or neutrophils, are essential for defense against S. aureus infections. Neutrophils are the most prominent cell type of the innate immune system and are capable of producing non-specific antimicrobial molecules that are effective at eliminating bacteria. Although significant progress has been made over the past few decades, our knowledge of S. aureus-host innate immune system interactions is incomplete. Most notably, S. aureus has the capacity to produce numerous molecules that are directed to protect the bacterium from neutrophils. Here we review in brief the role played by neutrophils in defense against S. aureus infection, and correspondingly, highlight selected S. aureus molecules that target key neutrophil functions.

  16. 3D Neutrophil Tractions in Changing Microenvironments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toyjanova, Jennet; Flores, Estefany; Reichner, Jonathan; Franck, Christian

    2012-02-01

    Neutrophils are well-known as first responders to defend the body against life threatening bacterial diseases, infections and inflammation. The mechanical properties and the local topography of the surrounding microenvironment play a significant role in the regulating neutrophil behavior including cell adhesion, migration and generation of tractions. In navigating to the site of infection, neutrophils are exposed to changing microenvironments that differ in their composition, structure and mechanical properties. Our goal is to investigate neutrophil behavior, specifically migration and cellular tractions in a well-controlled 3D in vitro system. By utilizing an interchangeable 2D-3D sandwich gel structure system with tunable mechanical properties neutrophil migration and cell tractions can be computed as a function of gel stiffness and geometric dimensionality.

  17. Contribution of neutrophils to acute lung injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grommes, Jochen; Soehnlein, Oliver

    2011-01-01

    Treatment of acute lung injury (ALI) and its most severe form, acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS), remain unsolved problems of intensive care medicine. ALI/ARDS are characterized by lung edema due to increased permeability of the alveolar-capillary barrier and subsequent impairment of arterial oxygenation. Lung edema, endothelial and epithelial injury are accompanied by an influx of neutrophils into the interstitium and broncheoalveolar space. Hence, activation and recruitment of neutrophils are regarded to play a key role in progression of ALI/ARDS. Neutrophils are the first cells to be recruited to the site of inflammation and have a potent antimicrobial armour that includes oxidants, proteinases and cationic peptides. Under pathological circumstances, however, unregulated release of these microbicidal compounds into the extracellular space paradoxically can damage host tissues. This review focuses on the mechanisms of neutrophil recruitment into the lung and on the contribution of neutrophils to tissue damage in ALI.

  18. Platelets mediate increased endothelium permeability in dengue through NLRP3-inflammasome activation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hottz, Eugenio D; Lopes, Juliana F; Freitas, Carla; Valls-de-Souza, Rogério; Oliveira, Marcus F; Bozza, Marcelo T; Da Poian, Andrea T; Weyrich, Andrew S; Zimmerman, Guy A; Bozza, Fernando A; Bozza, Patricia T

    2013-11-14

    Dengue is the most frequent hemorrhagic viral disease and re-emergent infection in the world. Although thrombocytopenia is characteristically observed in mild and severe forms of dengue, the role of platelet activation in dengue pathogenesis has not been fully elucidated. We hypothesize that platelets have major roles in inflammatory amplification and increased vascular permeability during severe forms of dengue. Here we investigate interleukin (IL)-1β synthesis, processing, and secretion in platelets during dengue virus (DV) infection and potential contribution of these events to endothelial permeability during infection. We observed increased expression of IL-1β in platelets and platelet-derived microparticles from patients with dengue or after platelet exposure to DV in vitro. We demonstrated that DV infection leads to assembly of nucleotide-binding domain leucine rich repeat containing protein (NLRP3) inflammasomes, activation of caspase-1, and caspase-1-dependent IL-1β secretion. Our findings also indicate that platelet-derived IL-1β is chiefly released in microparticles through mechanisms dependent on mitochondrial reactive oxygen species-triggered NLRP3 inflammasomes. Inflammasome activation and platelet shedding of IL-1β-rich microparticles correlated with signs of increased vascular permeability. Moreover, microparticles from DV-stimulated platelets induced enhanced permeability in vitro in an IL-1-dependent manner. Our findings provide new evidence that platelets contribute to increased vascular permeability in DV infection by inflammasome-dependent release of IL-1β.

  19. Myeloperoxidase modulates human platelet aggregation via actin cytoskeleton reorganization and store-operated calcium entry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Irina V. Gorudko

    2013-07-01

    Myeloperoxidase (MPO is a heme-containing enzyme released from activated leukocytes into the extracellular space during inflammation. Its main function is the production of hypohalous acids that are potent oxidants. MPO can also modulate cell signaling and inflammatory responses independently of its enzymatic activity. Because MPO is regarded as an important risk factor for cardiovascular diseases associated with increased platelet activity, we studied the effects of MPO on human platelet functional properties. Laser scanning confocal microscopy was used to reveal carbohydrate-independent MPO binding to human platelet membrane. Adding MPO to platelets did not activate their aggregation under basal conditions (without agonist. In contrast, MPO augmented agonist-induced platelet aggregation, which was not prevented by MPO enzymatic activity inhibitors. It was found that exposure of platelets to MPO leads to actin cytoskeleton reorganization and an increase in their elasticity. Furthermore, MPO evoked a rise in cytosolic Ca2+ through enhancement of store-operated Ca2+ entry (SOCE. Together, these findings indicate that MPO is not a direct agonist but rather a mediator that binds to human platelets, induces actin cytoskeleton reorganization and affects the mechanical stiffness of human platelets, resulting in potentiating SOCE and agonist-induced human platelet aggregation. Therefore, an increased activity of platelets in vascular disease can, at least partly, be provided by MPO elevated concentrations.

  20. [STRUCTURAL CHARACTERIZATION OF PLATELETS AND PLATELET-DERIVED MICROVESICLES].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ponomareva, A A; Nevzorova, T A; Mordakhanova, E R; Andrianova, I A; Litvinov, R I

    2016-01-01

    Platelets are the anucleated blood cells, wich together with the fibrin stop bleeding (hemostasis). Cellular microvesicles are membrane-surrounded microparticles released into extracellular space upon activation and/or apoptosis of various cells. Platelet-derived macrovesicles from the major population of circulating blood microparticles that play an important role in hemostasis and thrombosis. Despite numerous studies on the pathophysiology of platelet-derived macrovesicles, mechanisms of their formation and structural details remain poorly understood. Here we investigated the ultrastructure of parental platelets and platelet-derived microvesicles formed in vitro by quiescent cells as well as by cells stimulated with one of the following activators: arachidonic acid, ADP, thrombin, calcium ionophore A23187. Using transmission electron microscopy of human platelets and isolated microvesicles, we analyzed the intracellular origin, steps of formation, structural diversity, and size distributions of the subcellular particles. We have revealed that thrombin, unlike other stimuli, not only induced vesiculation of the plasma membrane but also caused break-up of the cells followed by formation of microparticles that are comparable with microvesicles by size. A fraction of these microparticles contained cellular organelles surrounded by a thin membrane. The size of platelet-derived macrovesicles varied from 30 nm to 500 nm, however, the size distributions depended on the nature of a cell-activating stimulus. The results obtained provide new information about the formation of platelet-derived macrovesicles and their structural diversity, wich is important to understand their multiple functions in normal and disease states.

  1. Dynamic interactions of neutrophils and biofilms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Josefine Hirschfeld

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Background: The majority of microbial infections in humans are biofilm-associated and difficult to treat, as biofilms are highly resistant to antimicrobial agents and protect themselves from external threats in various ways. Biofilms are tenaciously attached to surfaces and impede the ability of host defense molecules and cells to penetrate them. On the other hand, some biofilms are beneficial for the host and contain protective microorganisms. Microbes in biofilms express pathogen-associated molecular patterns and epitopes that can be recognized by innate immune cells and opsonins, leading to activation of neutrophils and other leukocytes. Neutrophils are part of the first line of defense and have multiple antimicrobial strategies allowing them to attack pathogenic biofilms. Objective/design: In this paper, interaction modes of neutrophils with biofilms are reviewed. Antimicrobial strategies of neutrophils and the counteractions of the biofilm communities, with special attention to oral biofilms, are presented. Moreover, possible adverse effects of neutrophil activity and their biofilm-promoting side effects are discussed. Results/conclusion: Biofilms are partially, but not entirely, protected against neutrophil assault, which include the processes of phagocytosis, degranulation, and formation of neutrophil extracellular traps. However, virulence factors of microorganisms, microbial composition, and properties of the extracellular matrix determine whether a biofilm and subsequent microbial spread can be controlled by neutrophils and other host defense factors. Besides, neutrophils may inadvertently contribute to the physical and ecological stability of biofilms by promoting selection of more resistant strains. Moreover, neutrophil enzymes can degrade collagen and other proteins and, as a result, cause harm to the host tissues. These parameters could be crucial factors in the onset of periodontal inflammation and the subsequent tissue breakdown.

  2. Functional hyper-IL-6 from vaccinia virus-colonized tumors triggers platelet formation and helps to alleviate toxicity of mitomycin C enhanced virus therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sturm Julia B

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Combination of oncolytic vaccinia virus therapy with conventional chemotherapy has shown promise for tumor therapy. However, side effects of chemotherapy including thrombocytopenia, still remain problematic. Methods Here, we describe a novel approach to optimize combination therapy of oncolytic virus and chemotherapy utilizing virus-encoding hyper-IL-6, GLV-1h90, to reduce chemotherapy-associated side effects. Results We showed that the hyper-IL-6 cytokine was successfully produced by GLV-1h90 and was functional both in cell culture as well as in tumor-bearing animals, in which the cytokine-producing vaccinia virus strain was well tolerated. When combined with the chemotherapeutic mitomycin C, the anti-tumor effect of the oncolytic virotherapy was significantly enhanced. Moreover, hyper-IL-6 expression greatly reduced the time interval during which the mice suffered from chemotherapy-induced thrombocytopenia. Conclusion Therefore, future clinical application would benefit from careful investigation of additional cytokine treatment to reduce chemotherapy-induced side effects.

  3. Beta-lactam antibiotic-mediated changes in platelet reactivity and vascular endothelial functions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Togna, G I; Togna, A R; Caprino, L

    2001-05-01

    To evaluate vascular and platelet compatibility of intravenous administration of beta-lactam antibiotics, we assessed the effects of therapeutic concentrations of ceftriaxone, aztreonam, and ceftazidime on platelet reactivity to different agonists (sodium arachidonate, collagen and adenosine diphosphate) and on selected vascular endothelial functions (adenosine diphosphatase activity, prostacyclin production and t-PA release). Ceftriaxone and, to a lesser degree, aztreonam, enhanced platelet reactivity, evaluated as onset of platelet aggregating response, and increased thromboxane production to subthreshold concentrations of arachidonate. There was no modification in platelet reactivity after ceftazidime treatment. Ceftriaxone and ceftazidime, but not aztreonam, inhibited endothelial adenosine diphosphatase activity. Prostacyclin production and t-PA release were inhibited only by ceftriaxone at high concentrations. While it is difficult to establish which marker (platelet or endothelial functions) has more clinical reference in human vascular compatibility, it seems feasible to consider aztreonam the most compatible of the beta-lactams studied.

  4. Heterogeneity of the Mac-1 expression on peripheral blood neutrophils in patients with different types of epithelial ovarian cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bednarska, Katarzyna; Klink, Magdalena; Wilczyński, Jacek R; Szyłło, Krzysztof; Malinowski, Andrzej; Sułowska, Zofia; Nowak, Marek

    2016-02-01

    The expression level of Mac-1 on the surface of neutrophils is an important indicator of neutrophil activation. Under pathological conditions, Mac-1 is believed a key adhesion molecule that facilitates cancer progression and mediates the adhesion of tumour cells to the endothelium of blood vessels. Our previous findings indicated that circulating peripheral blood neutrophils in patients with advanced epithelial ovarian cancer (EOC) expressed enhanced levels of Mac-1, which was functionally associated with an increased adhesive function of neutrophils. The objective of the current study was to analyse whether the value of individual components of the differential white cell count, including the neutrophil and lymphocyte ratios, which are markers of blood neutrophil activation, might be associated with certain types of ovarian cancer. We showed the increase in Mac-1 expression along with a parallel decrease of L-selectin and PSGL-1 on peripheral blood neutrophils of patients with EOC of early and advanced FIGO stages, which indicates an activated state of neutrophils in comparison to neutrophils of individuals without cancer. Despite a significant difference between Mac-1 expression in patients with and without cancer, a dramatic increase in Mac-1 expression was observed in the blood of patients with undifferentiated carcinomas compared with patients with other histological types of EOC. Moreover, the expression level of Mac-1 correlated with the number of neutrophils in patients with serous, endometrioid and undifferentiated EOC. The results of an ROC analysis demonstrated that the patients with the undifferentiated type of EOC form a distinct group with regard to Mac-1 expression on blood neutrophils. The results suggested a diverse biological cadre of immune cells in patients with undifferentiated ovarian carcinomas compared with patients with other histological types of EOC.

  5. Doxorubicin-loaded platelets as a smart drug delivery system: An improved therapy for lymphoma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Peipei; Zuo, Huaqin; Chen, Bing; Wang, Ruju; Ahmed, Arsalan; Hu, Yong; Ouyang, Jian

    2017-01-01

    Chemotherapy is majorly used for the treatment of many cancers, including lymphoma. However, cytotoxic drugs, utilized in chemotherapy, can induce various side effects on normal tissues because of their non-specific distribution in the body. Natural platelets are used as drug carriers because of their biocompatibility and specific targeting to vascular disorders, such as cancer, inflammation, and thrombosis. In this work, doxorubicin (DOX) was loaded in natural platelets for treatment of lymphoma. Results showed that DOX was loaded into platelets with high drug loading and encapsulation efficiency. DOX did not significantly induce morphological and functional changes in platelets. DOX-platelet facilitated intracellular drug accumulation through “tumor cell-induced platelet aggregation” and released DOX into the medium in a pH-controlled manner. This phenomenon reduced the adverse effects and enhanced the therapeutic efficacy. The growth inhibition of lymphoma Raji cells was enhanced, and the cardiotoxicity of DOX was reduced when DOX was loaded in platelets. DOX-platelet improved the anti-tumor activity of DOX by regulating the expression of apoptosis-related genes. Thus, platelets can serve as potential drug carriers to deliver DOX for clinical treatment of lymphoma. PMID:28198453

  6. In vitro Quality of Platelets with Low Plasma Carryover Treated with Ultraviolet C Light for Pathogen Inactivation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Lacey; Hyland, Ryan; Tan, Shereen; Tolksdorf, Frank; Sumian, Chryslain; Seltsam, Axel; Marks, Denese

    2016-01-01

    Summary Background The THERAFLEX UV-Platelets system uses shortwave ultraviolet C light (UVC, 254 nm) to inactivate pathogens in platelet components. Plasma carryover influences pathogen inactivation and platelet quality following treatment. The plasma carryover in the standard platelets produced by our institution are below the intended specification (30% plasma). The platelets were tested over storage for in vitro quality. Results Platelet metabolism was accelerated following UVC treatment, as demonstrated by increased glucose consumption and lactate production. UVC treatment caused increased externalization of phosphatidylserine on platelets and microparticles, activation of the GPIIb/IIIa receptor (PAC-1 binding), and reduced hypotonic shock response. Platelet function, as measured with thrombelastogram, was not affected by UVC treatment. Components with <30% plasma were similar to those meeting specification with the exception of enhanced glycolytic metabolism. Conclusion This in vitro analysis demonstrates that treatment of platelets with <30% plasma carryover with the THERAFLEX UV-Platelets system affects some aspects of platelet metabolism and activation, although in vitro platelet function was not negatively impacted. This study also provides evidence that the treatment specifications of plasma carryover could be extended to below 30%. PMID:27403091

  7. Helicobacter pylori urease activates blood platelets through a lipoxygenase-mediated pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wassermann, German E; Olivera-Severo, Deiber; Uberti, Augusto F; Carlini, Célia R

    2010-07-01

    The bacterium Helicobacter pylori causes peptic ulcers and gastric cancer in human beings by mechanisms yet not fully understood. H. pylori produces urease which neutralizes the acidic medium permitting its survival in the stomach. We have previously shown that ureases from jackbean, soybean or Bacillus pasteurii induce blood platelet aggregation independently of their enzyme activity by a pathway requiring platelet secretion, activation of calcium channels and lipoxygenase-derived eicosanoids. We investigated whether H. pylori urease displays platelet-activating properties and defined biochemical pathways involved in this phenomenon. For that the effects of purified recombinant H. pylori urease (HPU) added to rabbit platelets were assessed turbidimetrically. ATP secretion and production of lipoxygenase metabolites by activated platelets were measured. Fluorescein-labelled HPU bound to platelets but not to erythrocytes. HPU induced aggregation of rabbit platelets (ED(50) 0.28 microM) accompanied by ATP secretion. No correlation was found between platelet activation and ureolytic activity of HPU. Platelet aggregation was blocked by esculetin (12-lipoxygenase inhibitor) and enhanced approximately 3-fold by indomethacin (cyclooxygenase inhibitor). A metabolite of 12-lipoxygenase was produced by platelets exposed to HPU. Platelet responses to HPU did not involve platelet-activating factor, but required activation of verapamil-inhibitable calcium channels. Our data show that purified H. pylori urease activates blood platelets at submicromolar concentrations. This property seems to be common to ureases regardless of their source (plant or bacteria) or quaternary structure (single, di- or tri-chain proteins). These properties of HPU could play an important role in pathogenesis of gastrointestinal and associated cardiovascular diseases caused by H. pylori.

  8. Evaluation of a BED-SIDE Platelet Function Assay : Performance and Clinical Utility.

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    Lau Wei

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available Platelets have a pivotal role in the initial defense against insult to the vasculature and are also recognized of critical importance in the acute care settings of percutaneous coronary intervention and cardiopulmonary bypass. In these environments both platelet count and function may be markedly compromised. Unfortunately, current assays to evaluate the parameters of platelet count and function are of limited utility for bed-side testing. Moreover, it is suggested that there may be significant inter patient variation in response to antiplatelet therapy that may be exacerbated by other agents (e.g. heparin that are routinely administered during cardiac intervention. Here we describe a practical, rapid and user-friendly whole blood platelet function assay that has been developed for use in bed-side settings. Platelet agonists were formulated with an anticoagulant and lyophilized in blood collection tubes standardised to receive a l mL fresh whole blood sample. In the presence of an agonist, platelets are activated and interact (aggregate. Using traditional cell counting principles, non-aggregated platelets are counted whereas aggregated platelets are not. The percentage (% of functional platelets in reference to a baseline tube may then be determined. Results are available within four minutes. Platelet aggregation in whole blood demonstrated good correlation with turbidometric aggregometry for both ADP (r=0.91 and collagen (r=0.88. Moreover, in clinical settings where antiplatelet agents were administered, this rapid, bed-side, platelet function assay demonstrated utility in monitoring patient response to these therapies. This novel bed-side assay of platelet function is extremely suitable for the clinical environment with a rapid turn-around time. In addition, it provides a full haematology profile, including platelet count, and should permit enhancement of transfusion and interventional decisions.

  9. Platelets, inflammation and tissue regeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nurden, Alan T

    2011-05-01

    Blood platelets have long been recognised to bring about primary haemostasis with deficiencies in platelet production and function manifesting in bleeding while upregulated function favourises arterial thrombosis. Yet increasing evidence indicates that platelets fulfil a much wider role in health and disease. First, they store and release a wide range of biologically active substances including the panoply of growth factors, chemokines and cytokines released from a-granules. Membrane budding gives rise to microparticles (MPs), another active participant within the blood stream. Platelets are essential for the innate immune response and combat infection (viruses, bacteria, micro-organisms). They help maintain and modulate inflammation and are a major source of pro-inflammatory molecules (e.g. P-selectin, tissue factor, CD40L, metalloproteinases). As well as promoting coagulation, they are active in fibrinolysis; wound healing, angiogenesis and bone formation as well as in maternal tissue and foetal vascular remodelling. Activated platelets and MPs intervene in the propagation of major diseases. They are major players in atherosclerosis and related diseases, pathologies of the central nervous system (Alzheimers disease, multiple sclerosis), cancer and tumour growth. They participate in other tissue-related acquired pathologies such as skin diseases and allergy, rheumatoid arthritis, liver disease; while, paradoxically, autologous platelet-rich plasma and platelet releasate are being used as an aid to promote tissue repair and cellular growth. The above mentioned roles of platelets are now discussed.

  10. Platelet-activating factor induces phospholipid turnover, calcium flux, arachidonic acid liberation, eicosanoid generation, and oncogene expression in a human B cell line

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schulam, P.G.; Kuruvilla, A.; Putcha, G.; Mangus, L.; Franklin-Johnson, J.; Shearer, W.T. (Baylor College of Medicine, Houston, TX (USA))

    1991-03-01

    Platelet-activating factor is a potent mediator of the inflammatory response. Studies of the actions of platelet-activating factor have centered mainly around neutrophils, monocytes, and platelets. In this report we begin to uncover the influence of platelet-activating factor on B lymphocytes. Employing the EBV-transformed human B cell line SKW6.4, we demonstrate that platelet-activating factor significantly alters membrane phospholipid metabolism indicated by the incorporation of 32P into phosphatidylcholine, phosphatidylinositol, and phosphatidic acid but not significantly into phosphatidylethanolamine at concentrations ranging from 10(-9) to 10(-6) M. The inactive precursor, lyso-platelet-activating factor, at a concentration as high as 10(-7) M had no effect on any of the membrane phospholipids. We also show that platelet-activating factor from 10(-12) to 10(-6) M induced rapid and significant elevation in intracellular calcium levels, whereas lyso-platelet-activating factor was again ineffective. We further demonstrate the impact of platelet-activating factor binding to B cells by measuring platelet-activating factor induced arachidonic acid release and 5-hydroxyeicosatetraenoic acid production. Moreover, platelet-activating factor was capable of inducing transcription of the nuclear proto-oncogenes c-fos and c-jun. Finally we explored the possible role of 5-hydroxyeicosatetraenoic acid as a regulator of arachidonic acid liberation demonstrating that endogenous 5-lipoxygenase activity modulates platelet-activating factor induced arachidonic acid release perhaps acting at the level of phospholipase A2. In summary, platelet-activating factor is shown here to have a direct and profound effect on a pure B cell line.

  11. Nanoparticle-induced platelet aggregation and vascular thrombosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Radomski, Anna; Jurasz, Paul; Alonso-Escolano, David; Drews, Magdalena; Morandi, Maria; Malinski, Tadeusz; Radomski, Marek W

    2005-11-01

    Ever increasing use of engineered carbon nanoparticles in nanopharmacology for selective imaging, sensor or drug delivery systems has increased the potential for blood platelet-nanoparticle interactions. We studied the effects of engineered and combustion-derived carbon nanoparticles on human platelet aggregation in vitro and rat vascular thrombosis in vivo. Multiplewall (MWNT), singlewall (SWNT) nanotubes, C60 fullerenes (C60CS) and mixed carbon nanoparticles (MCN) (0.2-300 microg ml(-1)) were investigated. Nanoparticles were compared with standard urban particulate matter (SRM1648, average size 1.4 microm). Platelet function was studied using lumi aggregometry, phase-contrast, immunofluorescence and transmission electron microscopy, flow cytometry, zymography and pharmacological inhibitors of platelet aggregation. Vascular thrombosis was induced by ferric chloride and the rate of thrombosis was measured, in the presence of carbon particles, with an ultrasonic flow probe. Carbon particles, except C60CS, stimulated platelet aggregation (MCN>or=SWNT>MWNT>SRM1648) and accelerated the rate of vascular thrombosis in rat carotid arteries with a similar rank order of efficacy. All particles resulted in upregulation of GPIIb/IIIa in platelets. In contrast, particles differentially affected the release of platelet granules, as well as the activity of thromboxane-, ADP, matrix metalloproteinase- and protein kinase C-dependent pathways of aggregation. Furthermore, particle-induced aggregation was inhibited by prostacyclin and S-nitroso-glutathione, but not by aspirin. Thus, some carbon nanoparticles and microparticles have the ability to activate platelets and enhance vascular thrombosis. These observations are of importance for the pharmacological use of carbon nanoparticles and pathology of urban particulate matter.

  12. Neutrophil Extracellular Traps and Microcrystals

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-01-01

    Neutrophil extracellular traps represent a fascinating mechanism by which PMNs entrap extracellular microbes. The primary purpose of this innate immune mechanism is thought to localize the infection