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Sample records for platelet-endothelial cell interactions

  1. Biocompatibility of Ir/Ti-oxide coatings: Interaction with platelets, endothelial and smooth muscle cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Habibzadeh, Sajjad [Department of Chemical Engineering, McGill University, Montreal, QC (Canada); Li, Ling [Department of Anatomy and Cell Biology, McGill University, Montreal, QC (Canada); Omanovic, Sasha [Department of Chemical Engineering, McGill University, Montreal, QC (Canada); Shum-Tim, Dominique [Divisions of Cardiac Surgery and Surgical Research, Department of Surgery, McGill University, Montreal, QC (Canada); Davis, Elaine C., E-mail: elaine.davis@mcgill.ca [Department of Anatomy and Cell Biology, McGill University, Montreal, QC (Canada)

    2014-05-01

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • Ir/Ti-oxide coated surfaces are characterized by the so-called “cracked-mud” morphology. • 40% Ir in the coating material results in a morphologically uniform coating. • ECs and SMCs showed a desirable response to the Ir/Ti-oxide coated surfaces. • Ir/Ti-oxide coated surfaces are more bio/hemocompatible than the untreated 316L stainless steel. - Abstract: Applying surface coatings on a biomedical implant is a promising modification technique which can enhance the implant's biocompatibility via controlling blood constituents- or/and cell-surface interaction. In this study, the influence of composition of Ir{sub x}Ti{sub 1−x}-oxide coatings (x = 0, 0.2, 0.4, 0.6, 0.8, 1) formed on a titanium (Ti) substrate on the responses of platelets, endothelial cells (ECs) and smooth muscle cells (SMCs) was investigated. The results showed that a significant decrease in platelet adhesion and activation was obtained on Ir{sub 0.2}Ti{sub 0.8}-oxide and Ir{sub 0.4}Ti{sub 0.6}-oxide coatings, rendering the surfaces more blood compatible, in comparison to the control (316L stainless steel, 316L-SS) and other coating compositions. Further, a substantial increase in the EC/SMC surface count ratio after 4 h of cell attachment to the Ir{sub 0.2}Ti{sub 0.8}-oxide and Ir{sub 0.4}Ti{sub 0.6}-oxide coatings, relative to the 316L-SS control and the other coating compositions, indicated high potential of these coatings for the enhancement of surface endothelialization. This indicates the capability of the corresponding coating compositions to promote EC proliferation on the surface, while inhibiting that of SMCs, which is important in cardiovascular stents applications.

  2. Mechanism of Collaborative Enhancement of Binding of Paired Antibodies to Distinct Epitopes of Platelet Endothelial Cell Adhesion Molecule-1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kiseleva, Raisa; Greineder, Colin F; Villa, Carlos H; Hood, Elizabeth D; Shuvaev, Vladimir V; Sun, Jing; Chacko, Ann-Marie; Abraham, Valsamma; DeLisser, Horace M; Muzykantov, Vladimir R

    2017-01-01

    Monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) directed to extracellular epitopes of human and mouse Platelet Endothelial Cell Adhesion Molecule-1 (CD31 or PECAM-1) stimulate binding of other mAbs to distinct adjacent PECAM-1 epitopes. This effect, dubbed Collaborative Enhancement of Paired Affinity Ligands, or CEPAL, has been shown to enhance delivery of mAb-targeted drugs and nanoparticles to the vascular endothelium. Here we report new insights into the mechanism underlying this effect, which demonstrates equivalent amplitude in the following models: i) cells expressing a full length PECAM-1 and mutant form of PECAM-1 unable to form homodimers; ii) isolated fractions of cellular membranes; and, iii) immobilized recombinant PECAM-1. These results indicate that CEPAL is mediated not by interference in cellular functions or homophilic PECAM-1 interactions, but rather by conformational changes within the cell adhesion molecule induced by ligand binding. This mechanism, mediated by exposure of partially occult epitopes, is likely to occur in molecules other than PECAM-1 and may represent a generalizable phenomenon with valuable practical applications.

  3. Platelet Endothelial Cell Adhesion Molecule-1 Gene Polymorphisms are Associated with Coronary Artery Lesions in the Chronic Stage of Kawasaki Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Wen-Hsien; Huang, Sin-Jhih; Yuh, Yeong-Seng; Hsieh, Kai-Sheng; Tang, Chia-Wan; Liou, Huei-Han; Ger, Luo-Ping

    2017-05-01

    Kawasaki disease is the most common cause of pediatric acquired heart disease. The role of platelet endothelial cell adhesion molecule-1 in the inflammatory process has been documented. To date, no report has investigated the relationship between coronary artery lesions of Kawasaki disease and platelet endothelial cell adhesion molecule-1 polymorphisms. A total of 114 Kawasaki disease children with coronary artery lesions and 185 Kawasaki disease children without coronary artery lesions were recruited in this study. The TaqMan assay was conducted to identify the genotype in this case-control study. In three single nucleotide polymorphisms (Leu125Val, Ser563Asn, and Arg670Gly) of platelet endothelial cell adhesion molecule-1, we found that the Leu-Ser-Arg haplotype was associated with a significantly increased risk for coronary artery lesions in the chronic stage (odds ratio 3.05, 95% confidence interval 1.06-8.80, p = 0.039), but not for coronary artery lesions in the acute stage. Analysis based on the diplotypes of platelet endothelial cell adhesion molecule-1 also showed that Kawasaki disease with one or two alleles of Leu-Ser-Arg had a significantly increased risk of chronic coronary artery lesions (odds ratio 3.38, 95% confidence interval 1.11-10.28, p = 0.032) and had increased platelet counts after Kawasaki disease was diagnosed, as compared to those with other diplotypes. The haplotype of platelet endothelial cell adhesion molecule-1 Leu-Ser-Arg might be associated with the increased platelet counts and the following risk of chronic coronary artery lesions in a dominant manner in Kawasaki disease.

  4. Platelet Endothelial Cell Adhesion Molecule 1 (PECAM-1/CD31): A Multifunctional Vascular Cell Adhesion Molecule.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delisser, H M; Baldwin, H S; Albelda, S M

    1997-08-01

    PECAM-1/CD31 is a member of the immunoglobulin gene superfamily found on platelets, leukocytes, and endothelial cells, where it concentrates at cell-cell borders. It has been shown to both mediate cell-cell adhesion through homophilic and heterophilic interactions and to transduce intracellular signals that upregulate the function of integrins on leukocytes. Its cellular distribution and ability to mediate adhesive and signaling phenomena suggested that PECAM-1 was a multifunctional vascular cell adhesion molecule involved in leukocyte-endothelial and endothelial-endothelial interactions. These initial suggestions have been largely confirmed as recent studies have implicated PECAM-1 in the inflammatory process and in the formation of blood vessels. As our understanding of the molecular and functional properties of PECAM-1 grows, new insights will be gained that may have therapeutic implications for cardiovascular development and disease. (Trends Cardiovasc Med 1997;7:203-210). © 1997, Elsevier Science Inc.

  5. Expression of platelet-endothelial cell adhesion molecule-1 in human umbilical vein endothelial cells by exposure to advanced glycosylation end products and inflammatory mediators

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    孟丹; 刘乃丰

    2003-01-01

    Objective To determine whether advanced glycosylation end products modified bovine serum albumin (AGEs-BSA) affects endothelial cell lateral junction protein, platelet-endothelial cell adhesion molecule-1 (PECAM-1) in the presence or absence of inflammatory mediators.Methods Cultured human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs) were exposed to AGEs-BSA for 6, 12, 24, and 36 hours, and exposed to AGEs-BSA glycosylated with different concentrations of glucose, tumor necrosis factord-α (TNF-α), interferon (IFN-γ), TNF-α+IFN-γ and AGEs-BSA+TNF-α for 24 hours, respectively. Expression of PECAM-1 mRNA was measured by semi-quantitative reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) with β-actin as an internal standard, and sequencing of RT-PCR products was performed to confirm the specificity of amplification for PECAM-1 gene. The endothelial cell surface expression of PECAM-1 was determined by flow cytometry (FCM).Results There were no significant changes in the expression of PECAM-1 mRNA and protein when the cells were exposed to AGEs-BSA with different concentrations or periods (P> 0.05). However, PECAM-1 expression was reduced in the cells treated with TNF-α, IFN-γ, TNF-α+IFN-γ and AGEs-BSA+TNF-α. The level of PECAM-1 treated with AGEs-BSA+TNF-α was lower than that of TNF-α treated alone (P<0.01).Conclusions AGEs-BSA had no effect on the expression of PECAM-1 mRNA and protein in cultured HUVEC. With the presence of inflammatory mediator TNF-α, AGEs-BSA decreased the level of PECAM-1, which might reduce the adhesion interaction between adjacent endothelial cells, enhance the permeability of endothelial cells, and might be implicated in the endothelial dysfunction and pathogenesis of atherosclerosis in patients with diabetes mellitus. The significance of this phenomenon in intracellular signal transduction remains to be determined.

  6. Association of G+1688A Polymorphism of Platelet Endothelial Cell Adhesion Molecule-1 Gene with Myocardial Infarction in the Chinese Han Population

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YANG Ying; CHENG Longxian; Ripen Nsenga; HE Meian; CHANG Zhitang; WU Tangchun

    2007-01-01

    In order to investigate the association of G+1688A (Ser563Asn) polymorphism of platelet endothelial cell adhesion molecule-1 (PECAM-1) gene with myocardial infarction (MI) in the Chi- nese Han population, the G+1688A polymorphism in PECAM-1 gene was detected by polymerase chain reaction-restriction fragment-length polymorphism (PCR-RFLP) method among 502 subjects, including 218 patients with MI and 284 controls. The results showed that there was significant dif-ference in AA frequencies of genotype G+1688A polymorphism between case and control groups (39% vs 24%, P<0.001). A similar trend was observed on the allele frequencies (A/G: 62% vs 49%, P<0.001). Among the subjects with high serum total cholesterol level or high systolic blood pressure level, the variant AA genotype was associated with high risk of MI (adjusted OR, 2.13; 95% CI, 1.08-4.41 and adjusted OR, 2.53; 95%CI, 1.63-3.63). The single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) at position +1688 in the exon 8 of PECAM-1 gene was associated with MI and the allele A might be a risk factor for MI in the Chinese Han population.

  7. Influenza Virus Infection Induces Platelet-Endothelial Adhesion Which Contributes to Lung Injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sugiyama, Michael G; Gamage, Asela; Zyla, Roman; Armstrong, Susan M; Advani, Suzanne; Advani, Andrew; Wang, Changsen; Lee, Warren L

    2015-12-04

    Lung injury after influenza infection is characterized by increased permeability of the lung microvasculature, culminating in acute respiratory failure. Platelets interact with activated endothelial cells and have been implicated in the pathogenesis of some forms of acute lung injury. Autopsy studies have revealed pulmonary microthrombi after influenza infection, and epidemiological studies suggest that influenza vaccination is protective against pulmonary thromboembolism; however, the effect of influenza infection on platelet-endothelial interactions is unclear. We demonstrate that endothelial infection with both laboratory and clinical strains of influenza virus increased the adhesion of human platelets to primary human lung microvascular endothelial cells. Platelets adhered to infected cells as well as to neighboring cells, suggesting a paracrine effect. Influenza infection caused the upregulation of von Willebrand factor and ICAM-1, but blocking these receptors did not prevent platelet-endothelial adhesion. Instead, platelet adhesion was inhibited by both RGDS peptide and a blocking antibody to platelet integrin α5β1, implicating endothelial fibronectin. Concordantly, lung histology from infected mice revealed viral dose-dependent colocalization of viral nucleoprotein and the endothelial marker PECAM-1, while platelet adhesion and fibronectin deposition also were observed in the lungs of influenza-infected mice. Inhibition of platelets using acetylsalicylic acid significantly improved survival, a finding confirmed using a second antiplatelet agent. Thus, influenza infection induces platelet-lung endothelial adhesion via fibronectin, contributing to mortality from acute lung injury. The inhibition of platelets may constitute a practical adjunctive strategy to the treatment of severe infections with influenza.IMPORTANCE There is growing appreciation of the involvement of the lung endothelium in the pathogenesis of severe infections with influenza virus. We have

  8. 血小板内皮细胞黏附分子-1(PECAM-1)与肿瘤关系研究进展%Platelet Endothelial Cell Adhesion Molecule-1 (PECAM-1) and Tumor

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    袁梅琴; 钟海均

    2016-01-01

    Platelet endothelial cell adhesion molecule-1 ( PECAM-1 ) is one of the immunoglobulin superfamily cell adhesion molecules, and is the key factor involved in platelet adhesion and aggregation.The gene and protein structure of PECAM-1 has been already studied.The studies have found that adhesion effect mediated by PECAM-1 including cells and cells,cells and extracellular matrix is closely related to a variety of physiological reaction;and PE-CAM-1 also have the vital significance in inflammation,wound healing and angiogenesis and so on;A variety of disea-ses,especially cardiovascular diseases such as atherosclerosis disease,are closely related to PECAM-1,and PECAM-1 gene polymorphism may affect the function of PECAM-1.Further studies indicate that PECAM-1 plays an important role in tumor growth as an adhesion factor,but its roles in different tumors,the methods and mechanisms of PECAM-1 are still not clear,and need further exploration.Treatments of anti-PECAM-1 have greatly inspired us.In this pa-per,the relationships between PECAM-1 and tumors,and associated research progress have been reviewed as follows.%血小板内皮细胞粘附分子-1(PECAM-1)是免疫球蛋白超家族细胞粘附分子中的一种,是参与血小板黏附和聚集的关键因子,对其基因及蛋白质结构已进行了较为深入的研究。研究发现,PECAM-1所介导的细胞与细胞、细胞与细胞外基质间黏附作用与多种生理反应密切相关;也在炎症反应、创伤愈合及血管生成等多方面均具有重要的意义;多种疾病尤其是心血管疾病如动脉粥样硬化等的发病与 PECAM-1也密切相关,且PECAM-1的基因多态性也会影响PECAM-1的功能。近期越来越多的研究已表明PECAM-1作为黏附因子在肿瘤生长中起着重要作用,但对其在不同肿瘤中的作用、作用方式及机制仍未明确,需要进一步探索。而抗 PECAM-1治疗的情况也很大程度上鼓舞了我们。本文就 PECAM

  9. Inherited human group IVA cytosolic phospholipase A2 deficiency abolishes platelet, endothelial, and leucocyte eicosanoid generation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirkby, Nicholas S.; Reed, Daniel M.; Edin, Matthew L.; Rauzi, Francesca; Mataragka, Stefania; Vojnovic, Ivana; Bishop-Bailey, David; Milne, Ginger L.; Longhurst, Hilary; Zeldin, Darryl C.; Mitchell, Jane A.; Warner, Timothy D.

    2016-01-01

    Eicosanoids are important vascular regulators, but the phospholipase A2 (PLA2) isoforms supporting their production within the cardiovascular system are not fully understood. To address this, we have studied platelets, endothelial cells, and leukocytes from 2 siblings with a homozygous loss-of-function mutation in group IVA cytosolic phospholipase A2 (cPLA2α). Chromatography/mass spectrometry was used to determine levels of a broad range of eicosanoids produced by isolated vascular cells, and in plasma and urine. Eicosanoid release data were paired with studies of cellular function. Absence of cPLA2α almost abolished eicosanoid synthesis in platelets (e.g., thromboxane A2, control 20.5 ± 1.4 ng/ml vs. patient 0.1 ng/ml) and leukocytes [e.g., prostaglandin E2 (PGE2), control 21.9 ± 7.4 ng/ml vs. patient 1.9 ng/ml], and this was associated with impaired platelet activation and enhanced inflammatory responses. cPLA2α-deficient endothelial cells showed reduced, but not absent, formation of prostaglandin I2 (prostacyclin; control 956 ± 422 pg/ml vs. patient 196 pg/ml) and were primed for inflammation. In the urine, prostaglandin metabolites were selectively influenced by cPLA2α deficiency. For example, prostacyclin metabolites were strongly reduced (18.4% of control) in patients lacking cPLA2α, whereas PGE2 metabolites (77.8% of control) were similar to healthy volunteer levels. These studies constitute a definitive account, demonstrating the fundamental role of cPLA2α to eicosanoid formation and cellular responses within the human circulation.—Kirkby, N. S., Reed, D. M., Edin, M. L., Rauzi, F., Mataragka, S., Vojnovic, I., Bishop-Bailey, D., Milne, G. L., Longhurst, H., Zeldin, D. C., Mitchell, J. A., Warner, T. D. Inherited human group IVA cytosolic phospholipase A2 deficiency abolishes platelet, endothelial, and leucocyte eicosanoid generation. PMID:26183771

  10. Inherited human group IVA cytosolic phospholipase A2 deficiency abolishes platelet, endothelial, and leucocyte eicosanoid generation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirkby, Nicholas S; Reed, Daniel M; Edin, Matthew L; Rauzi, Francesca; Mataragka, Stefania; Vojnovic, Ivana; Bishop-Bailey, David; Milne, Ginger L; Longhurst, Hilary; Zeldin, Darryl C; Mitchell, Jane A; Warner, Timothy D

    2015-11-01

    Eicosanoids are important vascular regulators, but the phospholipase A2 (PLA2) isoforms supporting their production within the cardiovascular system are not fully understood. To address this, we have studied platelets, endothelial cells, and leukocytes from 2 siblings with a homozygous loss-of-function mutation in group IVA cytosolic phospholipase A2 (cPLA2α). Chromatography/mass spectrometry was used to determine levels of a broad range of eicosanoids produced by isolated vascular cells, and in plasma and urine. Eicosanoid release data were paired with studies of cellular function. Absence of cPLA2α almost abolished eicosanoid synthesis in platelets (e.g., thromboxane A2, control 20.5 ± 1.4 ng/ml vs. patient 0.1 ng/ml) and leukocytes [e.g., prostaglandin E2 (PGE2), control 21.9 ± 7.4 ng/ml vs. patient 1.9 ng/ml], and this was associated with impaired platelet activation and enhanced inflammatory responses. cPLA2α-deficient endothelial cells showed reduced, but not absent, formation of prostaglandin I2 (prostacyclin; control 956 ± 422 pg/ml vs. patient 196 pg/ml) and were primed for inflammation. In the urine, prostaglandin metabolites were selectively influenced by cPLA2α deficiency. For example, prostacyclin metabolites were strongly reduced (18.4% of control) in patients lacking cPLA2α, whereas PGE2 metabolites (77.8% of control) were similar to healthy volunteer levels. These studies constitute a definitive account, demonstrating the fundamental role of cPLA2α to eicosanoid formation and cellular responses within the human circulation.

  11. A model for studying the effect of shear stress on interactions between vascular endothelial cells and smooth muscle cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiu, Jeng-Jiann; Chen, Li-Jing; Chen, Cheng-Nan; Lee, Pei-Ling; Lee, Chih-I

    2004-04-01

    Vascular endothelial cells (ECs) are constantly subjected to blood flow-induced shear stress and the influences of neighboring smooth muscle cells (SMCs). In the present study, a coculture flow system was developed to study the effect of shear stress on EC-SMC interactions. ECs and SMCs were separated by a porous membrane with only the EC side subjected to the flow condition. When ECs were exposed to a shear stress of 12 dynes/cm2 for 24 h, the cocultured SMCs tended to orient perpendicularly to the flow direction. This perpendicular orientation of the cocultured SMCs to flow direction was not observed when ECs were exposed to a shear stress of 2 dynes/cm2. Under the static condition, long and parallel actin bundles were observed in the central regions of the cocultured SMCs, whereas the actin filaments localized mainly at the periphery of the cocultured ECs. After 24 h of flow application, the cocultured ECs displayed very long, well-organized, parallel actin stress fibers aligned with the flow direction in the central regions of the cells. Immunostaining of platelet endothelial cell adhesion molecule-1 confirmed the elongation and alignment of the cocultured ECs with the flow direction. Coculture with SMCs under static condition induced EC gene expressions of growth-related oncogene-alpha and monocyte chemotactic protein-1, and shear stress was found to abolish these SMC-induced gene expressions. Our results suggest that shear stress may serve as a down-regulator for the pathophysiologically relevant gene expression in ECs cocultured with SMCs.

  12. Fibronectin-cell interactions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Couchman, J R; Austria, M R; Woods, A

    1990-01-01

    Fibronectins are widespread extracellular matrix and body fluid glycoproteins, capable of multiple interactions with cell surfaces and other matrix components. Their structure at a molecular level has been resolved, yet there are still many unanswered questions regarding their biologic activity...... in vivo. Much data suggests that fibronectins may promote extracellular matrix assembly, and cell adhesion to those matrices. However, one outstanding enigma is that fibronectins may, under different circumstances, promote both cell migration and anchorage. An analysis of the interaction of fibroblasts...... with proteolytically derived and purified domains of plasma fibronectin revealed that the type of adhesion and the correlated cytoskeletal organization depended on multiple interactions of fibronectin domains with the cell surface. Human dermal fibroblasts were capable of interacting with the integrin-binding domain...

  13. Endothelial Cell Junctional Adhesion Molecules: Role and Regulation of Expression in Inflammation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reglero-Real, Natalia; Colom, Bartomeu; Bodkin, Jennifer Victoria; Nourshargh, Sussan

    2016-10-01

    Endothelial cells line the lumen of all blood vessels and play a critical role in maintaining the barrier function of the vasculature. Sealing of the vessel wall between adjacent endothelial cells is facilitated by interactions involving junctionally expressed transmembrane proteins, including tight junctional molecules, such as members of the junctional adhesion molecule family, components of adherence junctions, such as VE-Cadherin, and other molecules, such as platelet endothelial cell adhesion molecule. Of importance, a growing body of evidence indicates that the expression of these molecules is regulated in a spatiotemporal manner during inflammation: responses that have significant implications for the barrier function of blood vessels against blood-borne macromolecules and transmigrating leukocytes. This review summarizes key aspects of our current understanding of the dynamics and mechanisms that regulate the expression of endothelial cells junctional molecules during inflammation and discusses the associated functional implications of such events in acute and chronic scenarios. © 2016 American Heart Association, Inc.

  14. PREFACE: Cell-substrate interactions Cell-substrate interactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gardel, Margaret; Schwarz, Ulrich

    2010-05-01

    One of the most striking achievements of evolution is the ability to build cellular systems that are both robust and dynamic. Taken by themselves, both properties are obvious requirements: robustness reflects the fact that cells are there to survive, and dynamics is required to adapt to changing environments. However, it is by no means trivial to understand how these two requirements can be implemented simultaneously in a physical system. The long and difficult quest to build adaptive materials is testimony to the inherent difficulty of this goal. Here materials science can learn a lot from nature, because cellular systems show that robustness and dynamics can be achieved in a synergetic fashion. For example, the capabilities of tissues to repair and regenerate are still unsurpassed in the world of synthetic materials. One of the most important aspects of the way biological cells adapt to their environment is their adhesive interaction with the substrate. Numerous aspects of the physiology of metazoan cells, including survival, proliferation, differentiation and migration, require the formation of adhesions to the cell substrate, typically an extracellular matrix protein. Adhesions guide these diverse processes both by mediating force transmission from the cell to the substrate and by controlling biochemical signaling pathways. While the study of cell-substrate adhesions is a mature field in cell biology, a quantitative biophysical understanding of how the interactions of the individual molecular components give rise to the rich dynamics and mechanical behaviors observed for cell-substrate adhesions has started to emerge only over the last decade or so. The recent growth of research activities on cell-substrate interactions was strongly driven by the introduction of new physical techniques for surface engineering into traditional cell biological work with cell culture. For example, microcontact printing of adhesive patterns was used to show that cell fate depends

  15. Cell to substratum and cell to cell interactions of microalgae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ozkan, Altan; Berberoglu, Halil

    2013-12-01

    This paper reports the cell to substratum and cell to cell interactions of a diverse group of microalgae based on the Extended Derjaguin, Landau, Verwey, Overbeek (XDLVO) approach using the previously reported physico-chemical surface properties. The microalgae included 10 different species of green algae and diatoms from both freshwater and saltwater environments while the substrata included glass, indium-tin oxide (ITO), stainless steel, polycarbonate, polyethylene, and polystryrene. The results indicated that acid-base interactions were the dominating mechanism of interaction for microalgae. For green algae, if at least one of the interacting surfaces was hydrophobic, adhesion at primary minimum was predicted without any energy barrier. However, most diatom systems featured energy barriers for adhesion due to repulsive van der Waals interactions. The results reported in this study are expected to provide useful data and insight into the interaction mechanisms of microalgae cells with each other and with substrata for a number of practical applications including prevention of biofouling of photobioreactors and other man-made surfaces, promotion of biofilm formation in algal biofilm photobioreactors, and developing bioflocculation strategies for energy efficient harvesting of algal biomass. Particularly, Botryococcus braunii and Cerithiopsis fusiformis were identified as promising species for biofloccuation and biofilm formation in freshwater and saltwater aquatic systems, respectively. Finally, based on the observed trends in this study, use of hydrophilic algae and hydrophilic coatings over surfaces are recommended for minimizing biofouling in aquatic systems.

  16. Interactions between semiconductor nanowires and living cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prinz, Christelle N

    2015-06-17

    Semiconductor nanowires are increasingly used for biological applications and their small dimensions make them a promising tool for sensing and manipulating cells with minimal perturbation. In order to interface cells with nanowires in a controlled fashion, it is essential to understand the interactions between nanowires and living cells. The present paper reviews current progress in the understanding of these interactions, with knowledge gathered from studies where living cells were interfaced with vertical nanowire arrays. The effect of nanowires on cells is reported in terms of viability, cell-nanowire interface morphology, cell behavior, changes in gene expression as well as cellular stress markers. Unexplored issues and unanswered questions are discussed.

  17. T cell-B cell interactions in primary immunodeficiencies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tangye, Stuart G; Deenick, Elissa K; Palendira, Umaimainthan; Ma, Cindy S

    2012-02-01

    Regulated interactions between cells of the immune system facilitate the generation of successful immune responses, thereby enabling efficient neutralization and clearance of pathogens and the establishment of both cell- and humoral-mediated immunological memory. The corollary of this is that impediments to efficient cell-cell interactions, normally necessary for differentiation and effector functions of immune cells, underly the clinical features and disease pathogenesis of primary immunodeficiencies. In affected individuals, these defects manifest as impaired long-term humoral immunity and susceptibility to infection by specific pathogens. In this review, we discuss the importance of, and requirements for, effective interactions between B cells and T cells during the formation of CD4(+) T follicular helper cells and the elicitation of cytotoxic function of virus-specific CD8(+) T cells, as well as how these processes are abrogated in primary immunodeficiencies due to loss-of-function mutations in defined genes. © 2012 New York Academy of Sciences.

  18. Focal adhesions and cell-matrix interactions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Woods, A; Couchman, J R

    1988-01-01

    Focal adhesions are areas of cell surfaces where specializations of cytoskeletal, membrane and extracellular components combine to produce stable cell-matrix interactions. The morphology of these adhesions and the components identified in them are discussed together with possible mechanisms of th...

  19. Esophageal muscle cell interaction with biopolymers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Korkmaz, Mevlit; Yakut, Tahsin; Narci, Adnan; Güvenç, B Haluk; Güilten, Tuna; Yağmurca, Murat; Yiğit, Barbaros; Bilir, Ayhan

    2007-02-01

    The in vitro interactions of esophageal smooth muscle cells (SMCs) with synthetic absorbable polymers were tested and artificial muscle tissues harvested from subcutaneous implantation were examined. Esophageal tissue samples from adult and fetal (25-day gestational age) rabbits were cut into small pieces and cultured in Dulbecco's Modified Eagle Medium supplemented with 10% fetal bovine serum. Growing cells were identified as SMCs by immunostaining for anti-actin and anti-myosin antibodies. Equal volumes of agar gel and medium were mixed and used for 3-D culture. 5x10(5) cells and 1 mg polyglycolic acid (PGA) and poly-lactide-co-glycolide acid (PLGA) fibers were seeded in six-well tissue culture plates. On days 2 and 7 growing cells were counted by a hemocytometer and cell-polymer interactions were evaluated with light microscopy. Adult and fetal SMCs were seeded onto the PGA and PLGA scaffolds, cultivated for two weeks, and implanted subcutaneously on the backs of the rabbits. Cell-polymer implants were retrieved after four weeks and muscle formation was evaluated histologically and immunohistochemically. Growing cells stained positive for actin and myosin proteins. Cell-polymer interactions were poor after 24 hours, whereas intensive attachment to the fibers was detected 48 hours following cultivation. Both fiber materials supported cell proliferation. PLGA scaffolds improved muscle formation more efficiently than PGA, and fetal and adult SMCs showed similar mass quality. Scaffolds are important as cell-carrying vehicles, and material-cell interactions should be tested before application. A 3-D culture prepared with agar gel and medium is practical for testing material toxicity.

  20. Niche interactions in epidermal stem cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Hye-Ryung Choi; Sang-Young Byun; Soon-Hyo Kwon; Kyoung-Chan Park

    2015-01-01

    Within the epidermis and dermis of the skin, cellssecrete and are surrounded by the extracellular matrix(ECM), which provides structural and biochemicalsupport. The ECM of the epidermis is the basementmembrane, and collagen and other dermal componentsconstitute the ECM of the dermis. There is significantvariation in the composition of the ECM of the epidermisand dermis, which can affect "cell to cell" and "cellto ECM" interactions. These interactions, in turn, caninfluence biological responses, aging, and woundhealing; abnormal ECM signaling likely contributes toskin diseases. Thus, strategies for manipulating cell-ECM interactions are critical for treating wounds and avariety of skin diseases. Many of these strategies focuson epidermal stem cells, which reside in a unique nichein which the ECM is the most important component;interactions between the ECM and epidermal stemcells play a major role in regulating stem cell fate. Asthey constitute a major portion of the ECM, it is likelythat integrins and type Ⅳ collagens are important instem cell regulation and maintenance. In this review,we highlight recent research-including our previouswork-exploring the role that the ECM and its associatedcomponents play in shaping the epidermal stem cellniche.

  1. Schwann cells-axon interaction in myelination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taveggia, Carla

    2016-08-01

    The remarkable interaction between glial cells and axons is crucial for nervous system development and homeostasis. Alterations in this continuous communication can cause severe pathologies that can compromise the integrity of the nervous system. The most dramatic consequence of this interaction is the generation of the myelin sheath, made by myelinating glial cells: Schwann cells in the peripheral nervous system and oligodendrocytes in the central nervous system. In this review I will focus on signals coming from axons in the first part and then on those from Schwann cells that promote the formation and the maintenance of peripheral myelin. I will discuss their inter-relationship together with seminal and important advances recently made.

  2. Reversible re-programing of cell-cell interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gabrielse, Kari; Gangar, Amit; Kumar, Nigam; Lee, Jae Chul; Fegan, Adrian; Shen, Jing Jing; Li, Qing; Vallera, Daniel; Wagner, Carston R

    2014-05-12

    The ability to engineer and re-program the surfaces of cells would provide an enabling synthetic biological method for the design of cell- and tissue-based therapies. A new cell surface-engineering strategy is described that uses lipid-chemically self-assembled nanorings (lipid-CSANs) that can be used for the stable and reversible modification of any cell surface with a molecular reporter or targeting ligand. In the presence of a non-toxic FDA-approved drug, the nanorings were quickly disassembled and the cell-cell interactions reversed. Similar to T-cells genetically engineered to express chimeric antigen receptors (CARS), when activated peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) were functionalized with the anti-EpCAM-lipid-CSANs, they were shown to selectively kill antigen-positive cancer cells. Taken together, these results demonstrate that lipid-CSANs have the potential to be a rapid, stable, and general method for the reversible engineering of cell surfaces and cell-cell interactions. © 2014 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  3. Investigation of CNTs interaction with fibroblast cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pensabene, V; Vittorio, O; Raffa, V; Menciassi, A; Dario, P

    2007-01-01

    The need for toxicological studies on carbon nanotubes (CNTs) has arisen from the rapidly emerging applications of CNTs well beyond material science and engineering. In order to provide a method to collect data about toxicology, we characterized by Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM), by Energy Dispersive X-ray Spectrometry (EDS) analysis and by Focused Ion Beam (FIB) microscopy different kinds of treated CNTs. The bio-interaction was investigated seeding Crandell feline kidney fibroblasts with CNT-modified medium; a dedicated sample preparation by FIB has been defined to fix cells. In the present study, the cytotoxic effects of CNTs with 91% and 97% of purity were compared and changes in the growth behaviour of cells after 3 days in culture with modified medium have been recorded, considering also the distribution of CNTs within cells. While lower purified CNTs induced a slight cytotoxic effect, homogeneously suspended CNTs with high purity were less cytotoxic, and the rate of cell growth remained constant. CNTs aggregated in bundles, showed high adhesion on cell membrane. Interestingly, CNTs bundles were observed inside cells, underneath the cell membrane, and despite of that, cells were extended, in good vitality conditions and no cell-degeneration was observed.

  4. Plasma treatment of biomaterials to direct the differentiation of embryonic stem cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanley, Erik

    In this work, we explore how embryonic stem (ES) cell differentiation patterns are affected by surface interactions with plasma-processed materials. We hypothesize that mouse embryonic stem-cell exposure to certain plasma-polymerized tetraglyme surfaces will direct their differentiation into endothelial cells. R1 mouse embryonic stem (ES) cells were plated on surfaces onto which tetraglyme was deposited by plasma polymerization. In addition, tissue-treated polystyrene and control glass cover slips were also examined. Some samples were fixed three days after plating and immunofluorescence stained with platelet endothelial-cell adhesion molecule, while the others were fixed seven days after plating and immunofluorescence stained with von Willebrand Factor. Positive results seen by ES cell derivatives precociously expressing the vWF and PECAM genetic markers on the plasma-polymerized tetraglyme treated surfaces suggest that the plasma-polymerized surfaces direct differentiation of ES cells into endothelial cells. Research goals of this dissertation include: characterization of the material properties of the plasma-polymerized tetraglyme surfaces that induce directed differentiation of ES cells into endothelial cells, optimization of the plasma-polymerization process to maximize the number of endothelial cells derived from R1 ES cells, and biological experimentation to characterize properties of the mechanism of directed differentiation. A potential application of this work is in the design and construction of an artificial blood vessel. Current small-scale arterial substitutes have proved inadequate because of thrombogenicity and infection. Moreover, the lower blood flow velocities of smaller vessels pose a different set of design criteria and introduce new problems not encountered in large arterial substitutes. By utilizing a tissue engineering approach that incorporates embryonic stem cell-derived endothelial cells, the longevity of the prosthesis can be ensured.

  5. Platelets Roll on Stimulated Endothelium in vivo: An Interaction Mediated by Endothelial P-Selectin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frenette, Paul S.; Johnson, Robert C.; Hynes, Richard O.; Wagner, Denisa D.

    1995-08-01

    P-selectin, found in storage granules of platelets and endothelial cells, can be rapidly expressed upon stimulation. Mice lacking this membrane receptor exhibit a severe impairment of leukocyte rolling. We observed that, in addition to leukocytes, platelets were rolling in mesenteric venules of wild-type mice. To investigate the role of P-selectin in this process, resting or activated platelets from wild-type or P-selectin-deficient mice were fluorescently labeled and transfused into recipients of either genotype. Platelet-endothelial interactions were monitored by intravital microscopy. We observed rolling of either wild-type or P-selectin-deficient resting platelets on wild-type endothelium. Endothelial stimulation with the calcium ionophore A23187 increased the number of platelets rolling 4-fold. Activated P-selectin-deficient platelets behaved similarly, whereas activated wild-type platelets bound to leukocytes and were seen rolling together. Platelets of either genotype, resting or activated, interacted minimally with mutant endothelium even after A23187 treatment. The velocity of platelet rolling was 6- to 9-fold greater than that of leukocytes. Our results demonstrate that (i) platelets roll on endothelium in vivo, (ii) this interaction requires endothelial but not platelet P-selectin, and (iii) platelet rolling appears to be independent of platelet activation, indicating constitutive expression of a P-selectin ligand(s) on platelets. We have therefore observed an interesting parallel between platelets and leukocytes in that both of these blood cell types roll on stimulated vessel wall and that this process is dependent on the expression of endothelial P-selectin.

  6. Cell Interactions within Biomimetic Apatite Microenvironments

    OpenAIRE

    Tsang, Eric

    2014-01-01

    Bioactive ceramics, such as calcium phosphate-based materials, have been studied extensively for the regeneration of bone tissue. Accelerated apatite coatings prepared from biomimetic methods is one approach that has had a history of success in both in vitro and in vivo studies for bone regeneration [1]-[4]. However, how cells interact within the apatite microenvironment remains largely unclear, despite the vast literature available today. In response, this thesis evaluates the in vitro i...

  7. Nerve growth factor interactions with mast cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kritas, S K; Caraffa, A; Antinolfi, P; Saggini, A; Pantalone, A; Rosati, M; Tei, M; Speziali, A; Saggini, R; Pandolfi, F; Cerulli, G; Conti, P

    2014-01-01

    Neuropeptides are involved in neurogenic inflammation where there is vasodilation and plasma protein extravasion in response to this stimulus. Nerve growth factor (NGF), identified by Rita Levi Montalcini, is a neurotrophin family compound which is important for survival of nociceptive neurons during their development. Therefore, NGF is an important neuropeptide which mediates the development and functions of the central and peripheral nervous system. It also exerts its proinflammatory action, not only on mast cells but also in B and T cells, neutrophils and eosinophils. Human mast cells can be activated by neuropeptides to release potent mediators of inflammation, and they are found throughout the body, especially near blood vessels, epithelial tissue and nerves. Mast cells generate and release NGF after degranulation and they are involved in iperalgesia, neuroimmune interactions and tissue inflammation. NGF is also a potent degranulation factor for mast cells in vitro and in vivo, promoting differentiation and maturation of these cells and their precursor, acting as a co-factor with interleukin-3. In conclusion, these studies are focused on cross-talk between neuropeptide NGF and inflammatory mast cells.

  8. Myeloid cells in tumour-immune interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kareva, Irina; Berezovskaya, Faina; Castillo-Chavez, Carlos

    2010-07-01

    Despite highly developed specific immune responses, tumour cells often manage to escape recognition by the immune system, continuing to grow uncontrollably. Experimental work suggests that mature myeloid cells may be central to the activation of the specific immune response. Recognition and subsequent control of tumour growth by the cells of the specific immune response depend on the balance between immature (ImC) and mature (MmC) myeloid cells in the body. However, tumour cells produce cytokines that inhibit ImC maturation, altering the balance between ImC and MmC. Hence, the focus of this manuscript is on the study of the potential role of this inhibiting mechanism on tumour growth dynamics. A conceptual predator-prey type model that incorporates the dynamics and interactions of tumour cells, CD8(+) T cells, ImC and MmC is proposed in order to address the role of this mechanism. The prey (tumour) has a defence mechanism (blocking the maturation of ImC) that prevents the predator (immune system) from recognizing it. The model, a four-dimensional nonlinear system of ordinary differential equations, is reduced to a two-dimensional system using time-scale arguments that are tied to the maturation rate of ImC. Analysis shows that the model is capable of supporting biologically reasonable patterns of behaviour depending on the initial conditions. A range of parameters, where healing without external influences can occur, is identified both qualitatively and quantitatively.

  9. Homophilic Protocadherin Cell-Cell Interactions Promote Dendrite Complexity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael J. Molumby

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Growth of a properly complex dendrite arbor is a key step in neuronal differentiation and a prerequisite for neural circuit formation. Diverse cell surface molecules, such as the clustered protocadherins (Pcdhs, have long been proposed to regulate circuit formation through specific cell-cell interactions. Here, using transgenic and conditional knockout mice to manipulate γ-Pcdh repertoire in the cerebral cortex, we show that the complexity of a neuron’s dendritic arbor is determined by homophilic interactions with other cells. Neurons expressing only one of the 22 γ-Pcdhs can exhibit either exuberant or minimal dendrite complexity, depending only on whether surrounding cells express the same isoform. Furthermore, loss of astrocytic γ-Pcdhs, or disruption of astrocyte-neuron homophilic matching, reduces dendrite complexity cell non-autonomously. Our data indicate that γ-Pcdhs act locally to promote dendrite arborization via homophilic matching, and they confirm that connectivity in vivo depends on molecular interactions between neurons and between neurons and astrocytes.

  10. Interaction of Defensins with Model Cell Membranes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanders, Lori K.; Schmidt, Nathan W.; Yang, Lihua; Mishra, Abhijit; Gordon, Vernita D.; Selsted, Michael E.; Wong, Gerard C. L.

    2009-03-01

    Antimicrobial peptides (AMPs) comprise a key component of innate immunity for a wide range of multicellular organisms. For many AMPs, activity comes from their ability to selectively disrupt and lyse bacterial cell membranes. There are a number of proposed models for this action, but the detailed molecular mechanism of selective membrane permeation remains unclear. Theta defensins are circularized peptides with a high degree of selectivity. We investigate the interaction of model bacterial and eukaryotic cell membranes with theta defensins RTD-1, BTD-7, and compare them to protegrin PG-1, a prototypical AMP, using synchrotron small angle x-ray scattering (SAXS). The relationship between membrane composition and peptide induced changes in membrane curvature and topology is examined. By comparing the membrane phase behavior induced by these different peptides we will discuss the importance of amino acid composition and placement on membrane rearrangement.

  11. Knowledge discovery of cell-cell and cell-surface interactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Su, Jing

    High-throughput cell culture is an emerging technology that shows promise as a tool for research in tissue engineering, drug discovery, and medical diagnostics. An important, but overlooked, challenge is the integration of experimental methods with information processing suitable for handling large databases of cell-cell and cell-substrate interactions. In this work the traditional global descriptions of cell behaviors and surface characteristics was shown insufficient for investigating short-distance cell-to-cell and cell-to-surface interactions. Traditional summary metrics cannot distinguish information of cell near neighborhood from the average, global features, thus often is not suitable for studying distance-sensitive cell behaviors. The problem of traditional summary metrics was addressed by introducing individual-cell based local metrics that emphasize cell local environment. An individual-cell based local data analysis method was established. Contact inhibition of cell proliferation was used as a benchmark for the effectiveness of the local metrics and the method. Where global, summary metrics were unsuccessful, the local metrics successfully and quantitatively distinguished the contact inhibition effects of MC3T3-E1 cells on PLGA, PCL, and TCPS surfaces. In order to test the new metrics and analysis method in detail, a model of cell contact inhibition was proposed. Monte Carlo simulation was performed for validating the individual-cell based local data analysis method as well as the cell model itself. The simulation results well matched with the experimental observations. The parameters used in the cell model provided new descriptions of both cell behaviors and surface characteristics. Based on the viewpoint of individual cells, the local metrics and local data analysis method were extended to the investigation of cell-surface interactions, and a new high-throughput screening and knowledge discovery method on combinatorial libraries, local cell

  12. Hepatitis C virus host cell interactions uncovered

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gottwein, Judith; Bukh, Jens

    2007-01-01

      Insights into virus-host cell interactions as uncovered by Randall et al. (1) in a recent issue of PNAS further our understanding of the hepatitis C virus (HCV) life cycle, persistence, and pathogenesis and might lead to the identification of new therapeutic targets. HCV persistently infects 180...... million individuals worldwide, causing chronic hepatitis, liver cirrhosis, and hepatocellular carcinoma. The only approved treatment, combination therapy with IFN- and ribavirin, targets cellular pathways (2); however, a sustained virologic response is achieved only in approximately half of the patients...... treated. Therefore, there is a pressing need for the identification of novel drugs against hepatitis C. Although most research focuses on the development of HCV-specific antivirals, such as protease and polymerase inhibitors (3), cellular targets could be pursued and might allow the development of broad...

  13. Hepatitis C virus host cell interactions uncovered

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gottwein, Judith; Bukh, Jens

    2007-01-01

      Insights into virus-host cell interactions as uncovered by Randall et al. (1) in a recent issue of PNAS further our understanding of the hepatitis C virus (HCV) life cycle, persistence, and pathogenesis and might lead to the identification of new therapeutic targets. HCV persistently infects 180...... million individuals worldwide, causing chronic hepatitis, liver cirrhosis, and hepatocellular carcinoma. The only approved treatment, combination therapy with IFN- and ribavirin, targets cellular pathways (2); however, a sustained virologic response is achieved only in approximately half of the patients...... treated. Therefore, there is a pressing need for the identification of novel drugs against hepatitis C. Although most research focuses on the development of HCV-specific antivirals, such as protease and polymerase inhibitors (3), cellular targets could be pursued and might allow the development of broad...

  14. Controlling cell-cell interactions using surface acoustic waves.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Feng; Li, Peng; French, Jarrod B; Mao, Zhangming; Zhao, Hong; Li, Sixing; Nama, Nitesh; Fick, James R; Benkovic, Stephen J; Huang, Tony Jun

    2015-01-06

    The interactions between pairs of cells and within multicellular assemblies are critical to many biological processes such as intercellular communication, tissue and organ formation, immunological reactions, and cancer metastasis. The ability to precisely control the position of cells relative to one another and within larger cellular assemblies will enable the investigation and characterization of phenomena not currently accessible by conventional in vitro methods. We present a versatile surface acoustic wave technique that is capable of controlling the intercellular distance and spatial arrangement of cells with micrometer level resolution. This technique is, to our knowledge, among the first of its kind to marry high precision and high throughput into a single extremely versatile and wholly biocompatible technology. We demonstrated the capabilities of the system to precisely control intercellular distance, assemble cells with defined geometries, maintain cellular assemblies in suspension, and translate these suspended assemblies to adherent states, all in a contactless, biocompatible manner. As an example of the power of this system, this technology was used to quantitatively investigate the gap junctional intercellular communication in several homotypic and heterotypic populations by visualizing the transfer of fluorescent dye between cells.

  15. Lymphoid Cell-Glioma Cell Interaction Enhances Cell Coat Production by Human Gliomas: Novel Suppressor Mechanism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dick, Steven J.; Macchi, Beatrice; Papazoglou, Savvas; Oldfield, Edward H.; Kornblith, Paul L.; Smith, Barry H.; Gately, Maurice K.

    1983-05-01

    Certain human glioma lines produce mucopolysaccharide coats that impair the generation of cytolytic lymphocytes in response to these lines in vitro. Coat production is substantially enhanced by the interaction of glioma cells with a macromolecular factor released by human peripheral blood mononuclear cells in culture. This interaction thus constitutes an unusual mechanism by which inflammatory cells may nonspecifically suppress the cellular immune response to at least one class of solid tumors in humans.

  16. Free-zone electrophoresis of animal cells. 1: Experiments on cell-cell interactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Todd, P. W.; Hjerten, S.

    1985-01-01

    The electrophoretically migrating zones wasa monitored. The absence of fluid flows in the direction of migration permits direct measurement of electrophoretic velocities of any material. Sedimentation is orthogonal to electrokinetic motion and the effects of particle-particle interaction on electrophoretic mobility is studied by free zone electrophoresis. Fixed erythrocytes at high concentrations, mixtures of fixed erythrocytes from different animal species, and mixtures of cultured human cells were studied in low ionic strength buffers. The electrophoretic velocity of fixed erythrocytes was not altered by increasing cell concentration or by the mixing of erythrocytes from different species. When zones containing cultured human glial cells and neuroblastoma cells are permitted to interact during electrophoresis, altered migration patterns occur. It is found that cell-cell interactions depends upon cell type.

  17. Free-zone electrophoresis of animal cells. 1: Experiments on cell-cell interactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Todd, P. W.; Hjerten, S.

    1985-01-01

    The electrophoretically migrating zones wasa monitored. The absence of fluid flows in the direction of migration permits direct measurement of electrophoretic velocities of any material. Sedimentation is orthogonal to electrokinetic motion and the effects of particle-particle interaction on electrophoretic mobility is studied by free zone electrophoresis. Fixed erythrocytes at high concentrations, mixtures of fixed erythrocytes from different animal species, and mixtures of cultured human cells were studied in low ionic strength buffers. The electrophoretic velocity of fixed erythrocytes was not altered by increasing cell concentration or by the mixing of erythrocytes from different species. When zones containing cultured human glial cells and neuroblastoma cells are permitted to interact during electrophoresis, altered migration patterns occur. It is found that cell-cell interactions depends upon cell type.

  18. Shape regulation generates elastic interaction between living cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Golkov, Roman; Shokef, Yair

    2017-06-01

    The organization of live cells to tissues is associated with the mechanical interaction between cells, which is mediated through their elastic environment. We model cells as spherical active force dipoles surrounded by an infinite elastic matrix, and analytically evaluate the interaction energy for different scenarios of their regulatory behavior. We obtain attraction for homeostatic (set point) forces and repulsion for homeostatic displacements. When the translational motion of the cells is regulated, the interaction energy decays with distance as 1/{d}4, while when it is not regulated the energy decays as 1/{d}6. This arises from the same reasons as the van der Waals interaction between induced electric dipoles.

  19. Random matrix analysis for gene interaction networks in cancer cells

    CERN Document Server

    Kikkawa, Ayumi

    2016-01-01

    Motivation: The investigation of topological modifications of the gene interaction networks in cancer cells is essential for understanding the desease. We study gene interaction networks in various human cancer cells with the random matrix theory. This study is based on the Cancer Network Galaxy (TCNG) database which is the repository of huge gene interactions inferred by Bayesian network algorithms from 256 microarray experimental data downloaded from NCBI GEO. The original GEO data are provided by the high-throughput microarray expression experiments on various human cancer cells. We apply the random matrix theory to the computationally inferred gene interaction networks in TCNG in order to detect the universality in the topology of the gene interaction networks in cancer cells. Results: We found the universal behavior in almost one half of the 256 gene interaction networks in TCNG. The distribution of nearest neighbor level spacing of the gene interaction matrix becomes the Wigner distribution when the net...

  20. Cell-Cell Interactions Mediate the Response of Vascular Smooth Muscle Cells to Substrate Stiffness

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sazonova, Olga V.; Lee, Kristen L.; Isenberg, Brett C.; Rich, Celeste B.; Nugent, Matthew A.; Wong, Joyce Y.

    2011-01-01

    The vessel wall experiences progressive stiffening with age and the development of cardiovascular disease, which alters the micromechanical environment experienced by resident vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs). In vitro studies have shown that VSMCs are sensitive to substrate stiffness, but the exact molecular mechanisms of their response to stiffness remains unknown. Studies have also shown that cell-cell interactions can affect mechanotransduction at the cell-substrate interface. Using flexible substrates, we show that the expression of proteins associated with cell-matrix adhesion and cytoskeletal tension is regulated by substrate stiffness, and that an increase in cell density selectively attenuates some of these effects. We also show that cell-cell interactions exert a strong effect on cell morphology in a substrate-stiffness dependent manner. Collectively, the data suggest that as VSMCs form cell-cell contacts, substrate stiffness becomes a less potent regulator of focal adhesion signaling. This study provides insight into the mechanisms by which VSMCs respond to the mechanical environment of the blood vessel wall, and point to cell-cell interactions as critical mediators of VSMC response to vascular injury. PMID:21806930

  1. Micromechanical Devices for Control of Cell-Cell Interaction, and Methods of Use Thereof

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhatia, Sangeeta N. (Inventor); Hui, Elliot (Inventor)

    2017-01-01

    The development and function of living tissues depends largely on interactions between cells that can vary in both time and space; however, temporal control of cell-cell interaction is experimentally challenging. By employing a micromachined silicon substrate with moving parts, herein is disclosed the dynamic regulation of cell-cell interactions via direct manipulation of adherent cells with micron-scale precision. The inventive devices and methods allow mechanical control of both tissue composition and spatial organization. The inventive device and methods enable the investigation of dynamic cell-cell interaction in a multitude of applications, such as intercellular communication, spanning embryogenesis, homeostasis, and pathogenic processes.

  2. Integrin-dependent cell adhesion to neutrophil extracellular traps through engagement of fibronectin in neutrophil-like cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monti, Marcello; Iommelli, Francesca; De Rosa, Viviana; Carriero, Maria Vincenza; Miceli, Roberta; Camerlingo, Rosa; Di Minno, Giovanni; Del Vecchio, Silvana

    2017-01-01

    Neutrophil extracellular traps (NETs), originally recognized as a host defense mechanism, were reported to promote thrombosis and metastatic dissemination of cancer cells. Here we tested the role of integrins α5β1 and ανβ3 in the adhesion of cancer cells to NETs. Neutrophil-like cells stimulated with calcium ionophore (A23187) were used as a stable source of cell-free NETs-enriched suspensions. Using NETs as an adhesion substrate, two human K562 cell lines, differentially expressing α5β1 and ανβ3 integrins, were subjected to adhesion assays in the presence or absence of DNAse 1, blocking antibodies against α5β1 or ανβ3, alone or in combination with DNAse 1, and Proteinase K. As expected DNAse 1 treatment strongly inhibited adhesion of both cell lines to NETs. An equivalent significant reduction of cell adhesion to NETs was obtained after treatment of cells with blocking antibodies against α5β1 or ανβ3 indicating that both integrins were able to mediate cell adhesion to NETs. Furthermore, the combination of DNAse 1 and anti-integrin antibody treatment almost completely blocked cell adhesion. Western blot analysis and immunoprecipitation experiments showed a dose-dependent increase of fibronectin levels in samples from stimulated neutrophil-like cells and a direct or indirect interaction of fibronectin with histone H3. Finally, co-immunolocalization studies with confocal microscopy showed that fibronectin and citrullinated histone H3 co-localize inside the web-structure of NETs. In conclusion, our study showed that α5β1 and ανβ3 integrins mediate cell adhesion to NETs by binding to their common substrate fibronectin. Therefore, in addition to mechanical trapping and aspecific adsorption of different cell types driven by DNA/histone complexes, NETs may provide specific binding sites for integrin-mediated cell adhesion of neutrophils, platelets, endothelial and cancer cells thus promoting intimate interactions among these cells. PMID:28166238

  3. Cell shape recognition by colloidal cell imprints: Energy of the cell-imprint interaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borovička, Josef; Stoyanov, Simeon D.; Paunov, Vesselin N.

    2015-09-01

    The results presented in this study are aimed at the theoretical estimate of the interactions between a spherical microbial cell and the colloidal cell imprints in terms of the Derjaguin, Landau, Vervey, and Overbeek (DLVO) surface forces. We adapted the Derjaguin approximation to take into account the geometry factor in the colloidal interaction between a spherical target particle and a hemispherical shell at two different orientations with respect to each other. We took into account only classical DLVO surface forces, i.e., the van der Waals and the electric double layer forces, in the interaction of a spherical target cell and a hemispherical shell as a function of their size ratio, mutual orientation, distance between their surfaces, their respective surface potentials, and the ionic strength of the aqueous solution. We found that the calculated interaction energies are several orders higher when match and recognition between the target cell and the target cell imprint is achieved. Our analysis revealed that the recognition effect of the hemispherical shell towards the target microsphere comes from the greatly increased surface contact area when a full match of their size and shape is produced. When the interaction between the surfaces of the hemishell and the target cell is attractive, the recognition greatly amplifies the attraction and this increases the likelihood of them to bind strongly. However, if the surface interaction between the cell and the imprint is repulsive, the shape and size match makes this interaction even more repulsive and thus decreases the likelihood of binding. These results show that the surface chemistry of the target cells and their colloidal imprints is very important in controlling the outcome of the interaction, while the shape recognition only amplifies the interaction. In the case of nonmonotonous surface-to-surface interaction we discovered some interesting interplay between the effects of shape match and surface chemistry

  4. Method for physiologic phenotype characterization at the single-cell level in non-interacting and interacting cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelbauskas, Laimonas; Ashili, Shashanka P.; Houkal, Jeff; Smith, Dean; Mohammadreza, Aida; Lee, Kristen B.; Forrester, Jessica; Kumar, Ashok; Anis, Yasser H.; Paulson, Thomas G.; Youngbull, Cody A.; Tian, Yanqing; Holl, Mark R.; Johnson, Roger H.; Meldrum, Deirdre R.

    2012-03-01

    Intercellular heterogeneity is a key factor in a variety of core cellular processes including proliferation, stimulus response, carcinogenesis, and drug resistance. However, cell-to-cell variability studies at the single-cell level have been hampered by the lack of enabling experimental techniques. We present a measurement platform that features the capability to quantify oxygen consumption rates of individual, non-interacting and interacting cells under normoxic and hypoxic conditions. It is based on real-time concentration measurements of metabolites of interest by means of extracellular optical sensors in cell-isolating microwells of subnanoliter volume. We present the results of a series of measurements of oxygen consumption rates (OCRs) of individual non-interacting and interacting human epithelial cells. We measured the effects of cell-to-cell interactions by using the system's capability to isolate two and three cells in a single well. The major advantages of the approach are: 1. ratiometric, intensity-based characterization of the metabolic phenotype at the single-cell level, 2. minimal invasiveness due to the distant positioning of sensors, and 3. ability to study the effects of cell-cell interactions on cellular respiration rates.

  5. Local cell metrics: a novel method for analysis of cell-cell interactions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chen Chien-Chiang

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The regulation of many cell functions is inherently linked to cell-cell contact interactions. However, effects of contact interactions among adherent cells can be difficult to detect with global summary statistics due to the localized nature and noise inherent to cell-cell interactions. The lack of informatics approaches specific for detecting cell-cell interactions is a limitation in the analysis of large sets of cell image data, including traditional and combinatorial or high-throughput studies. Here we introduce a novel histogram-based data analysis strategy, termed local cell metrics (LCMs, which addresses this shortcoming. Results The new LCM method is demonstrated via a study of contact inhibition of proliferation of MC3T3-E1 osteoblasts. We describe how LCMs can be used to quantify the local environment of cells and how LCMs are decomposed mathematically into metrics specific to each cell type in a culture, e.g., differently-labelled cells in fluorescence imaging. Using this approach, a quantitative, probabilistic description of the contact inhibition effects in MC3T3-E1 cultures has been achieved. We also show how LCMs are related to the naïve Bayes model. Namely, LCMs are Bayes class-conditional probability functions, suggesting their use for data mining and classification. Conclusion LCMs are successful in robust detection of cell contact inhibition in situations where conventional global statistics fail to do so. The noise due to the random features of cell behavior was suppressed significantly as a result of the focus on local distances, providing sensitive detection of cell-cell contact effects. The methodology can be extended to any quantifiable feature that can be obtained from imaging of cell cultures or tissue samples, including optical, fluorescent, and confocal microscopy. This approach may prove useful in interpreting culture and histological data in fields where cell-cell interactions play a critical

  6. Extracellular protonation modulates cell-cell interaction mechanics and tissue invasion in human melanoma cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hofschröer, Verena; Koch, Kevin Alexander; Ludwig, Florian Timo; Friedl, Peter; Oberleithner, Hans; Stock, Christian; Schwab, Albrecht

    2017-01-01

    Detachment of cells from the primary tumour precedes metastatic progression by facilitating cell release into the tissue. Solid tumours exhibit altered pH homeostasis with extracellular acidification. In human melanoma, the Na+/H+ exchanger NHE1 is an important modifier of the tumour nanoenvironment. Here we tested the modulation of cell-cell-adhesion by extracellular pH and NHE1. MV3 tumour spheroids embedded in a collagen matrix unravelled the efficacy of cell-cell contact loosening and 3D emigration into an environment mimicking physiological confinement. Adhesive interaction strength between individual MV3 cells was quantified using atomic force microscopy and validated by multicellular aggregation assays. Extracellular acidification from pHe7.4 to 6.4 decreases cell migration and invasion but increases single cell detachment from the spheroids. Acidification and NHE1 overexpression both reduce cell-cell adhesion strength, indicated by reduced maximum pulling forces and adhesion energies. Multicellular aggregation and spheroid formation are strongly impaired under acidification or NHE1 overexpression. We show a clear dependence of melanoma cell-cell adhesion on pHe and NHE1 as a modulator. These effects are opposite to cell-matrix interactions that are strengthened by protons extruded via NHE1. We conclude that these opposite effects of NHE1 act synergistically during the metastatic cascade. PMID:28205573

  7. Genetic interaction mapping with microfluidic-based single cell sequencing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haliburton, John R.; Shao, Wenjun; Deutschbauer, Adam; Arkin, Adam; Abate, Adam R.

    2017-01-01

    Genetic interaction mapping is useful for understanding the molecular basis of cellular decision making, but elucidating interactions genome-wide is challenging due to the massive number of gene combinations that must be tested. Here, we demonstrate a simple approach to thoroughly map genetic interactions in bacteria using microfluidic-based single cell sequencing. Using single cell PCR in droplets, we link distinct genetic information into single DNA sequences that can be decoded by next generation sequencing. Our approach is scalable and theoretically enables the pooling of entire interaction libraries to interrogate multiple pairwise genetic interactions in a single culture. The speed, ease, and low-cost of our approach makes genetic interaction mapping viable for routine characterization, allowing the interaction network to be used as a universal read out for a variety of biology experiments, and for the elucidation of interaction networks in non-model organisms. PMID:28170417

  8. Cellular interactions regulate stem cell differentiation in tri-culture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, I-Ning E; Bogdanowicz, Danielle R; Mitroo, Siddarth; Shan, Jing; Kala, Sonam; Lu, Helen H

    2016-11-01

    Currently, the mechanism governing the regeneration of the soft tissue-to-bone interface, such as the transition between the anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) and bone, is not known. Focusing on the ACL-to-bone insertion, this study tests the novel hypothesis that interactions between cells from the ligament (fibroblasts) and bone (osteoblasts) initiate interface regeneration. Specifically, these heterotypic cell interactions direct the fibrochondrogenic differentiation of interface-relevant cell populations, defined here as ligament fibroblasts and bone marrow stromal cells (BMSC). The objective of this study is to examine the effects of heterotypic cellular interactions on BMSC or fibroblast growth and biosynthesis, as well as expression of fibrocartilage-relevant markers in tri-culture. The effects of cell-cell physical contact and paracrine interactions between fibroblasts and osteoblasts were also determined. It was found that, in tri-culture with fibroblasts and osteoblasts, BMSC exhibited greater fibrochondrogenic potential than ligament fibroblasts. The growth of BMSC decreased while proteoglycan production and TGF-β3 expression increased. Moreover, tri-culture regulated BMSC response via paracrine factors, and interestingly, fibroblast-osteoblast contact further promoted proteoglycan and TGF-β1 synthesis as well as induced SOX9 expression in BMSC. Collectively, the findings of this study suggest that fibroblast-osteoblast interactions play an important role in regulating the stem cell niche for fibrocartilage regeneration, and the mechanisms of these interactions are directed by paracrine factors and augmented with direct cell-cell contact.

  9. Neuronal chemokines : Versatile messengers in central nervous system cell interaction

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Haas, A. H.; van Weering, H. R. J.; de Jong, E. K.; Boddeke, H. W. G. M.; Biber, K. P. H.

    2007-01-01

    Whereas chemokines are well known for their ability to induce cell migration, only recently it became evident that chemokines also control a variety of other cell functions and are versatile messengers in the interaction between a diversity of cell types. In the central nervous system (CNS), chemoki

  10. Methylselenol, a selenium metabolite, induces cell cycle arrest in G1 phase and apoptosis via the extracellular-regulated kinase 1/2 pathway and other cancer signaling genes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeng, Huawei; Wu, Min; Botnen, James H

    2009-09-01

    Methylselenol has been hypothesized to be a critical selenium (Se) metabolite for anticancer activity in vivo, and our previous study demonstrated that submicromolar methylselenol generated by incubating methionase with seleno-l-methionine inhibits the migration and invasive potential of HT1080 tumor cells. However, little is known about the association between cancer signal pathways and methylselenol's inhibition of tumor cell invasion. In this study, we demonstrated that methylselenol exposure inhibited cell growth and we used a cancer signal pathway-specific array containing 15 different signal transduction pathways involved in oncogenesis to study the effect of methylselenol on cellular signaling. Using real-time RT-PCR, we confirmed that cellular mRNA levels of cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor 1C (CDKN1C), heme oxygenase 1, platelet/endothelial cell adhesion molecule, and PPARgamma genes were upregulated to 2.8- to 5.7-fold of the control. BCL2-related protein A1, hedgehog interacting protein, and p53 target zinc finger protein genes were downregulated to 26-52% of the control, because of methylselenol exposure. These genes are directly related to the regulation of cell cycle and apoptosis. Methylselenol increased apoptotic cells up to 3.4-fold of the control and inhibited the extracellular-regulated kinase 1/2 (ERK1/2) signaling and cellular myelocytomatosis oncogene (c-Myc) expression. Taken together, our studies identify 7 novel methylselenol responsive genes and demonstrate that methylselenol inhibits ERK1/2 pathway activation and c-Myc expression. The regulation of these genes is likely to play a key role in G1 cell cycle arrest and apoptosis, which may contribute to the inhibition of tumor cell invasion.

  11. HAMLET interacts with histones and chromatin in tumor cell nuclei.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Düringer, Caroline; Hamiche, Ali; Gustafsson, Lotta; Kimura, Hiroshi; Svanborg, Catharina

    2003-10-24

    HAMLET is a folding variant of human alpha-lactalbumin in an active complex with oleic acid. HAMLET selectively enters tumor cells, accumulates in their nuclei and induces apoptosis-like cell death. This study examined the interactions of HAMLET with nuclear constituents and identified histones as targets. HAMLET was found to bind histone H3 strongly and to lesser extent histones H4 and H2B. The specificity of these interactions was confirmed using BIAcore technology and chromatin assembly assays. In vivo in tumor cells, HAMLET co-localized with histones and perturbed the chromatin structure; HAMLET was found associated with chromatin in an insoluble nuclear fraction resistant to salt extraction. In vitro, HAMLET bound strongly to histones and impaired their deposition on DNA. We conclude that HAMLET interacts with histones and chromatin in tumor cell nuclei and propose that this interaction locks the cells into the death pathway by irreversibly disrupting chromatin organization.

  12. Plasmonic imaging of protein interactions with single bacterial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Syal, Karan; Wang, Wei; Shan, Xiaonan; Wang, Shaopeng; Chen, Hong-Yuan; Tao, Nongjian

    2015-01-15

    Quantifying the interactions of bacteria with external ligands is fundamental to the understanding of pathogenesis, antibiotic resistance, immune evasion, and mechanism of antimicrobial action. Due to inherent cell-to-cell heterogeneity in a microbial population, each bacterium interacts differently with its environment. This large variability is washed out in bulk assays, and there is a need of techniques that can quantify interactions of bacteria with ligands at the single bacterium level. In this work, we present a label-free and real-time plasmonic imaging technique to measure the binding kinetics of ligand interactions with single bacteria, and perform statistical analysis of the heterogeneity. Using the technique, we have studied interactions of antibodies with single Escherichia coli O157:H7 cells and demonstrated a capability of determining the binding kinetic constants of single live bacteria with ligands, and quantify heterogeneity in a microbial population.

  13. Cryptococcal cell morphology affects host cell interactions and pathogenicity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laura H Okagaki

    Full Text Available Cryptococcus neoformans is a common life-threatening human fungal pathogen. The size of cryptococcal cells is typically 5 to 10 microm. Cell enlargement was observed in vivo, producing cells up to 100 microm. These morphological changes in cell size affected pathogenicity via reducing phagocytosis by host mononuclear cells, increasing resistance to oxidative and nitrosative stress, and correlated with reduced penetration of the central nervous system. Cell enlargement was stimulated by coinfection with strains of opposite mating type, and ste3aDelta pheromone receptor mutant strains had reduced cell enlargement. Finally, analysis of DNA content in this novel cell type revealed that these enlarged cells were polyploid, uninucleate, and produced daughter cells in vivo. These results describe a novel mechanism by which C. neoformans evades host phagocytosis to allow survival of a subset of the population at early stages of infection. Thus, morphological changes play unique and specialized roles during infection.

  14. Spatiotemporal control of cell-cell reversible interactions using molecular engineering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Peng; Ju, Enguo; Yan, Zhengqing; Gao, Nan; Wang, Jiasi; Hou, Jianwen; Zhang, Yan; Ren, Jinsong; Qu, Xiaogang

    2016-10-01

    Manipulation of cell-cell interactions has potential applications in basic research and cell-based therapy. Herein, using a combination of metabolic glycan labelling and bio-orthogonal click reaction, we engineer cell membranes with β-cyclodextrin and subsequently manipulate cell behaviours via photo-responsive host-guest recognition. With this methodology, we demonstrate reversible manipulation of cell assembly and disassembly. The method enables light-controllable reversible assembly of cell-cell adhesion, in contrast with previously reported irreversible effects, in which altered structure could not be reused. We also illustrate the utility of the method by designing a cell-based therapy. Peripheral blood mononuclear cells modified with aptamer are effectively redirected towards target cells, resulting in enhanced cell apoptosis. Our approach allows precise control of reversible cell-cell interactions and we expect that it will promote further developments of cell-based therapy.

  15. Nucleus pulposus cell-matrix interactions with laminins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gilchrist, C L; Francisco, A T; Plopper, G E; Chen, J; Setton, L A

    2011-06-20

    The cells of the nucleus pulposus (NP) region of the intervertebral disc play a critical role in this tissue's generation and maintenance, and alterations in NP cell viability, metabolism, and phenotype with aging may be key contributors to progressive disc degeneration. Relatively little is understood about the phenotype of NP cells, including their cell-matrix interactions which may modulate phenotype and survival. Our previous work has identified strong and region-specific expression of laminins and laminin cell-surface receptors in immature NP tissues, suggesting laminin cell-matrix interactions are uniquely important to the biology of NP cells. Whether these observed tissue-level laminin expression patterns reflect functional adhesion behaviors for these cells is not known. In this study, we examined NP cell-matrix interactions with specific matrix ligands, including various laminin isoforms, using quantitative assays of cell attachment, spreading, and adhesion strength. NP cells were found to attach in higher numbers and exhibited rapid cell spreading and higher resistance to detachment force on two laminin isoforms (LM-511,LM-332) identified to be uniquely expressed in the NP region, as compared to another laminin isoform (LM-111) and several other matrix ligands (collagen, fibronectin). Additionally, NP cells were found to attach in higher numbers to laminins as compared to cells isolated from the disc's annulus fibrosus region. These findings confirm that laminin and laminin receptor expression documented in NP tissues translates into unique functional NP cell adhesion behaviors that may be useful tools for in vitro cell culture and biomaterials that support NP cells.

  16. Nucleus pulposus cell-matrix interactions with laminins

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    CL Gilchrist

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available The cells of the nucleus pulposus (NP region of the intervertebral disc play a critical role in this tissue’s generation and maintenance, and alterations in NP cell viability, metabolism, and phenotype with aging may be key contributors to progressive disc degeneration. Relatively little is understood about the phenotype of NP cells, including their cell-matrix interactions which may modulate phenotype and survival. Our previous work has identified strong and region-specific expression of laminins and laminin cell-surface receptors in immature NP tissues, suggesting laminin cell-matrix interactions are uniquely important to the biology of NP cells. Whether these observed tissue-level laminin expression patterns reflect functional adhesion behaviors for these cells is not known. In this study, we examined NP cell-matrix interactions with specific matrix ligands, including various laminin isoforms, using quantitative assays of cell attachment, spreading, and adhesion strength. NP cells were found to attach in higher numbers and exhibited rapid cell spreading and higher resistance to detachment force on two laminin isoforms (LM-511,LM-332 identified to be uniquely expressed in the NP region, as compared to another laminin isoform (LM-111 and several other matrix ligands (collagen, fibronectin. Additionally, NP cells were found to attach in higher numbers to laminins as compared to cells isolated from the disc’s annulus fibrosus region. These findings confirm that laminin and laminin receptor expression documented in NP tissues translates into unique functional NP cell adhesion behaviors that may be useful tools for in vitro cell culture and biomaterials that support NP cells.

  17. Some basic questions on mechanosensing in cell-substrate interaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Shijie; Su, Yewang; Ji, Baohua; Gao, Huajian

    2014-10-01

    Cells constantly probe their surrounding microenvironment by pushing and pulling on the extracellular matrix (ECM). While it is widely accepted that cell induced traction forces at the cell-matrix interface play essential roles in cell signaling, cell migration and tissue morphogenesis, a number of puzzling questions remain with respect to mechanosensing in cell-substrate interactions. Here we show that these open questions can be addressed by modeling the cell-substrate system as a pre-strained elastic disk attached to an elastic substrate via molecular bonds at the interface. Based on this model, we establish analytical and numerical solutions for the displacement and stress fields in both cell and substrate, as well as traction forces at the cell-substrate interface. We show that the cell traction generally increases with distance away from the cell center and that the traction-distance relationship changes from linear on soft substrates to exponential on stiff substrates. These results indicate that cell adhesion and migration behaviors can be regulated by cell shape and substrate stiffness. Our analysis also reveals that the cell traction increases linearly with substrate stiffness on soft substrates but then levels off to a constant value on stiff substrates. This biphasic behavior in the dependence of cell traction on substrate stiffness immediately sheds light on an existing debate on whether cells sense mechanical force or deformation when interacting with their surroundings. Finally, it is shown that the cell induced deformation field decays exponentially with distance away from the cell. The characteristic length of this decay is comparable to the cell size and provides a quantitative measure of how far cells feel into the ECM.

  18. A negative genetic interaction map in isogenic cancer cell lines reveals cancer cell vulnerabilities

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Vizeacoumar, Franco J; Arnold, Roland; Vizeacoumar, Frederick S; Chandrashekhar, Megha; Buzina, Alla; Young, Jordan T F; Kwan, Julian H M; Sayad, Azin; Mero, Patricia; Lawo, Steffen; Tanaka, Hiromasa; Brown, Kevin R; Baryshnikova, Anastasia; Mak, Anthony B; Fedyshyn, Yaroslav; Wang, Yadong; Brito, Glauber C; Kasimer, Dahlia; Makhnevych, Taras; Ketela, Troy; Datti, Alessandro; Babu, Mohan; Emili, Andrew; Pelletier, Laurence; Wrana, Jeff; Wainberg, Zev; Kim, Philip M; Rottapel, Robert; O‧Brien, Catherine A; Andrews, Brenda; Boone, Charles; Moffat, Jason

    ...‐scale sequencing efforts. Using genome‐scale pooled shRNA screening technology, we mapped negative genetic interactions across a set of isogenic cancer cell lines and confirmed hundreds of these interactions in orthogonal co...

  19. Effects of the Interaction between Hydroxyapatite Nanoparticles and Hepatoma Cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YIN Meizhen; XU Weiguo; CUI Bingcun; DAI Honglian; HAN Yingchao; YIN Yixia; LI Shipu

    2014-01-01

    To gain a better understanding of the anticancer effects of hydroxyapatite (HAP) nanoparticles in vivo and in vitro, the effects of the interaction of HAP nanoparticles with hepatoma cells were explored. HAP nanoparticles were prepared by homogeneous precipitation and characterized by laser particle analysis and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). HAP nanoparticles were observed to be uniformly distributed, with rod-like shapes and diameters in the range of 42.1-87.1 nm. Overnight attached, suspended, and proliferating Bel-7402 cells were incubated with HAP nanoparticles. Inverted microscopy observation revealed that HAP nanoparticles with a cell membrane showed good adsorption. TEM demonstrated that HAP nanoparticles were present on the surface of cells, continuously taken up by cells through endocytosis, and transported in vesicles close to the nucleus. Fluorescence microscopy showed that the concentrations of intracellular Ca2+labeled with Fluo-3 calcium fluorescent probe were significantly enhanced. In addition, inverted microscopy observation revealed that suspended cells treated with HAP nanoparticles did not adhere to the culture bottle, resulting in cell death. After the overnight attached cells were treated with HAP nanoparticles for 96 h with increasing doses of HAP nanoparticles, inverted microscopy observation revealed that cell proliferation was slowed and cell-cell adhesion was weakened. Feulgen staining and image analysis indicated that the nuclear DNA content of the cells was markedly reduced, and argyrophilic nucleolar organizer region (AgNOR) staining and image analysis indicated that the number of AgNORs was significantly decreased. Therefore, hepatoma cells brought about the adsorption, uptake, transport and degradation of HAP nanoparticles. In addition, HAP nanoparticles affected hepatoma cells with regard to cell-cell adhesion, cell and extracellular matrix adhesion, and DNA and protein synthesis;thus inhibiting cell proliferation. This

  20. Interaction of Protein and Cell with Different Chitosan Membranes

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    1999-01-01

    Interaction between proteins, cells and biomaterial surfaces is commonly observed and often used to measure biocompatibility of biomaterials.In this investigation, three kinds of biomaterials derived from chitosan were prepared.The surface wettability of these polymers, interaction of protein with material surface, and their effects on cell adhesion and growth were studied.The results show that the surface contact angle and surface charge of biomaterials have a close bearing on protein adsorption as well as cell adhesion and growth, indicating that through different chemical modifications, chitosan can be made into different kinds of biomedical materials to satisfy various needs.

  1. Biomaterial surface proteomic signature determines interaction with epithelial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdallah, Mohamed-Nur; Tran, Simon D; Abughanam, Ghada; Laurenti, Marco; Zuanazzi, David; Mezour, Mohamed A; Xiao, Yizhi; Cerruti, Marta; Siqueira, Walter L; Tamimi, Faleh

    2017-03-01

    Cells interact with biomaterials indirectly through extracellular matrix (ECM) proteins adsorbed onto their surface. Accordingly, it could be hypothesized that the surface proteomic signature of a biomaterial might determine its interaction with cells. Here, we present a surface proteomic approach to test this hypothesis in the specific case of biomaterial-epithelial cell interactions. In particular, we determined the surface proteomic signature of different biomaterials exposed to the ECM of epithelial cells (basal lamina). We revealed that the biomaterial surface chemistry determines the surface proteomic profile, and subsequently the interaction with epithelial cells. In addition, we found that biomaterials with surface chemistries closer to that of percutaneous tissues, such as aminated PMMA and aminated PDLLA, promoted higher selective adsorption of key basal lamina proteins (laminins, nidogen-1) and subsequently improved their interactions with epithelial cells. These findings suggest that mimicking the surface chemistry of natural percutaneous tissues can improve biomaterial-epithelial integration, and thus provide a rationale for the design of improved biomaterial surfaces for skin regeneration and percutaneous medical devices.

  2. Human immunodeficiencies related to APC/T cell interaction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marinos eKallikourdis

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available The primary event for initiating adaptive immune responses is the encounter between T lymphocytes and antigen presenting cells (APC in the T cell area of secondary lymphoid organs and the formation of highly organized inter-cellular junctions referred to as the immune synapses. In vivo live-cell imaging of APC-T cell interactions combined to functional studies unveiled that T cell fate is dictated, in large part, by the stability of the initial contact. Immune cell interaction is equally important during delivery of T cell help to B cells and for the killing of target cells by cytotoxic T cells and NK cells. The critical role of contact dynamics and synapse stability on the immune response is well illustrated by human immune deficiencies in which disease pathogenesis is linked to altered adhesion or defective cross-talk between the synaptic partners. Here we will discuss in details the mechanisms of defective APC-T cell communications in Wiskott-Aldrich syndrome (WAS and in warts, hypogammaglobulinemia, infections, myelokathexis syndrome (WHIM. In addition, we will summarize the evidences pointing to a compromised conjugate formation in WIP deficiency, DOCK8 deficiency and X-linked lymphoproliferative syndrome.

  3. Dual character of interaction between lymphocytes and allogeneic stem cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Petrov, R.V.; Dozmorov, I.M.; Kochetkova, M.O.; Nikolaeva, I.S.

    1986-10-01

    The mechanisms of stimulation of colony formation by small doses of allogeneic lymphocytes were studied in mice. When interaction of lymphocytes with allogeneic stem cells was studied, bone marrow cells of mice were injected into lethally irradiated recipients in the control, and mixtures of bone marrow cells with varied numbers of lymphocytes were injected in the experiment. Dependence of the inactivation indices on the number of lymphocytes injected, based on the results of counting macro- and microcolonies in the spleen, is shown.

  4. Cell interactions between hematopoietic and stromal cells in the embryonic chick bone marrow.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sorrell, J M; Weiss, L

    1980-05-01

    Light microscopic, scanning electron microscopic, and transmission electron microscopic studies of the early developmental stages of chick embryonic bone marrow disclose characteristic associations of the first hematopoietic cells with stromal cells. The first hematopoietic cells, large basophilic cells that we have termed presumptive stem cells, segregate into erythropoietic and granulopoietic regions. Intravascular erythropoietic cells associate with sinusoidal endothelial cells, while granulopoietic cells associate with extravascular reticular cells. Extensive, intimate contacts between erythroid and endothelial cells are maintained, in part, by marginal arrays of microtubules, which promote a flattening of the adherent erythroid cell surface. In addition, cell surface components of opposing cells, visualized by ruthenium red staining, appear to merge and possibly to interact. Granulopoietic cells establish intimate but less extensive associations with reticular cells through cell-surface interactions. Stationary granuloid cells appear to be held in place by small, thin processes emanating from the sheet-like reticular cells. Granuloid cells are capable of moving within the extravascular region, using reticular cell surfaces as a substrate. Intimate associations also occur among granulopoietic cells, the significance of which is unclear. Thus, sinusoidal endothelial cells and reticular cells comprise the critical non-hematopoietic or stromal elements of avian bone marrow, where they have a putative role in segregating presumptive stem cells into erythrocyteic and granulocytic compartments. They serve as an architectual, and possibly regulatory, framework on which hematopoiesis occurs.

  5. Contractile proteins of endothelial cells, platelets and smooth muscle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Becker, C G; Nachman, R L

    1973-04-01

    In experiments described herein it was observed, by direct and indirect immunofluorescence technics, that rabbit antisera to human platelet actomyosin (thrombosthenin) stained mature megakaryocytes, blood platelets, endothelial cells and smooth muscle cells of arteries and veins, endothelial cells of liver sinusoids and certain capillaries, uterine smooth muscle cells, myoepithelial cells, perineurial cells of peripheral nerves and "fibroblastic" cells of granulation tissue. The specificity of immunohistologic staining was confirmed by appropriate absorption and blocking studies and immunodiffusional analysis in agarose gel. It was also observed by immunodiffusional analysis in agarose gel, electrophoresis of actomyosin fragments in polyacrylamide gels, immune inhibition of actomyosin ATPase activity and immune aggregation of platelets that uterine and platelet actomyosin are partially, but not completely, identical.

  6. Irradiation-induced up-regulation of HLA-E on macrovascular endothelial cells confers protection against killing by activated natural killer cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Isabelle Riederer

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Apart from the platelet/endothelial cell adhesion molecule 1 (PECAM-1, CD31, endoglin (CD105 and a positive factor VIII-related antigen staining, human primary and immortalized macro- and microvascular endothelial cells (ECs differ in their cell surface expression of activating and inhibitory ligands for natural killer (NK cells. Here we comparatively study the effects of irradiation on the phenotype of ECs and their interaction with resting and activated NK cells. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Primary macrovascular human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs only express UL16 binding protein 2 (ULBP2 and the major histocompatibility complex (MHC class I chain-related protein MIC-A (MIC-A as activating signals for NK cells, whereas the corresponding immortalized EA.hy926 EC cell line additionally present ULBP3, membrane heat shock protein 70 (Hsp70, intercellular adhesion molecule ICAM-1 (CD54 and HLA-E. Apart from MIC-B, the immortalized human microvascular endothelial cell line HMEC, resembles the phenotype of EA.hy926. Surprisingly, primary HUVECs are more sensitive to Hsp70 peptide (TKD plus IL-2 (TKD/IL-2-activated NK cells than their immortalized EC counterpatrs. This finding is most likely due to the absence of the inhibitory ligand HLA-E, since the activating ligands are shared among the ECs. The co-culture of HUVECs with activated NK cells induces ICAM-1 (CD54 and HLA-E expression on the former which drops to the initial low levels (below 5% when NK cells are removed. Sublethal irradiation of HUVECs induces similar but less pronounced effects on HUVECs. Along with these findings, irradiation also induces HLA-E expression on macrovascular ECs and this correlates with an increased resistance to killing by activated NK cells. Irradiation had no effect on HLA-E expression on microvascular ECs and the sensitivity of these cells to NK cells remained unaffected. CONCLUSION/SIGNIFICANCE: These data emphasize that an irradiation

  7. On the Interaction of Adherent Cells with Thermoresponsive Polymer Coatings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katja Uhlig

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Thermoresponsive polymer coatings allow the control of adhesion of cells on synthetic substrates. In particular, decreasing the temperature below the lower critical solution temperature (LCST of the polymer triggers the non-invasive detachment of cells from their cultivation substrate. Widening the range of applications of these coatings in cellular biotechnology requires a better understanding of their interaction with cells. By monitoring the morphological changes of cells during their detachment at various temperatures, we provide evidence that cell detachment is an active process. Analyses of cell residues that are left behind by the cells on the substrate during their detachment, further support this notion. In the second part of this work, we show that the kinetics of adhesion and the efficiency of detachment of cells can be controlled through the coadsorption of molecules bearing the peptide motif RGD (arginine-glycine-aspartic acid with the polymers.

  8. Micromanipulation of endothelial cells: Ultrasound-microbubble-cell interaction

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wamel, van Annemieke; Bouakaz, Ayache; Versluis, Michel; Jong, de Nico

    2004-01-01

    Ultrasound (US) in combination with contrast microbubbles has been shown to alter the permeability of cell membranes without affecting cell viability. This permeabilisation feature is used to design new drug delivery systems using US and contrast agents. The underlying mechanisms are still unknown.

  9. BTG interacts with retinoblastoma to control cell fate in Dictyostelium.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniele Conte

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: In the genesis of many tissues, a phase of cell proliferation is followed by cell cycle exit and terminal differentiation. The latter two processes overlap: genes involved in the cessation of growth may also be important in triggering differentiation. Though conceptually distinct, they are often causally related and functional interactions between the cell cycle machinery and cell fate control networks are fundamental to coordinate growth and differentiation. A switch from proliferation to differentiation may also be important in the life cycle of single-celled organisms, and genes which arose as regulators of microbial differentiation may be conserved in higher organisms. Studies in microorganisms may thus contribute to understanding the molecular links between cell cycle machinery and the determination of cell fate choice networks. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Here we show that in the amoebozoan D. discoideum, an ortholog of the metazoan antiproliferative gene btg controls cell fate, and that this function is dependent on the presence of a second tumor suppressor ortholog, the retinoblastoma-like gene product. Specifically, we find that btg-overexpressing cells preferentially adopt a stalk cell (and, more particularly, an Anterior-Like Cell fate. No btg-dependent preference for ALC fate is observed in cells in which the retinoblastoma-like gene has been genetically inactivated. Dictyostelium btg is the only example of non-metazoan member of the BTG family characterized so far, suggesting that a genetic interaction between btg and Rb predated the divergence between dictyostelids and metazoa. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: While the requirement for retinoblastoma function for BTG antiproliferative activity in metazoans is known, an interaction of these genes in the control of cell fate has not been previously documented. Involvement of a single pathway in the control of mutually exclusive processes may have relevant implication in the

  10. Interactive cell segmentation based on phase contrast optics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Su, Hang; Su, Zhou; Zheng, Shibao; Yang, Hua; Wei, Sha

    2014-01-01

    Cell segmentation in phase contrast microscopy images lays a crucial foundation for numerous subsequent computer-aided cell image analysis, but it encounters many unsolved challenges due to image qualities and artifacts caused by phase contrast optics. Addressing the unsolved challenges, the authors propose an interactive cell segmentation scheme over phase retardation features. After partitioning the images into phase homogeneous atoms, human annotations are propagated to unlabeled atoms over an affinity graph that is learned based on discrimination analysis. Then, an active query strategy is proposed for which the most informative unlabeled atom is selected for annotation, which is also propagated to the other unlabeled atoms. Cell segmentation converges to quality results after several rounds of interactions involving both the user's intentions and characteristics of image features. Experimental results demonstrate that cells with different optical properties are well segmented via the proposed approach.

  11. Synthetic protein interactions reveal a functional map of the cell

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berry, Lisa K; Ólafsson, Guðjón; Ledesma-Fernández, Elena; Thorpe, Peter H

    2016-01-01

    To understand the function of eukaryotic cells, it is critical to understand the role of protein-protein interactions and protein localization. Currently, we do not know the importance of global protein localization nor do we understand to what extent the cell is permissive for new protein associations – a key requirement for the evolution of new protein functions. To answer this question, we fused every protein in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae with a partner from each of the major cellular compartments and quantitatively assessed the effects upon growth. This analysis reveals that cells have a remarkable and unanticipated tolerance for forced protein associations, even if these associations lead to a proportion of the protein moving compartments within the cell. Furthermore, the interactions that do perturb growth provide a functional map of spatial protein regulation, identifying key regulatory complexes for the normal homeostasis of eukaryotic cells. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.13053.001 PMID:27098839

  12. Interactions between chitosan and cells measured by AFM

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hsiao, Sheng-Wen; Thien, Doan Van Hong; Ho, Ming-Hua [Department of Chemical Engineering, National Taiwan University of Science and Technology, Taipei 10617, Taiwan (China); Hsieh, Hsyue-Jen [Department of Chemical Engineering, National Taiwan University, Taipei 10617, Taiwan (China); Li, Chung-Hsing [Division of Orthodontics and Pediatric Dentistry, Department of Dentistry, Tri-Service General Hospital, Taipei, Taiwan (China); Hung, Chang-Hsiang [Department of Dentistry, Kinmen Hospital Department of Health, Taiwan (China); Li, Hsi-Hsin, E-mail: mhho@mail.ntust.edu.t [Deputy Superintendent, Kinmen Hospital Department of Health, Taiwan (China)

    2010-10-01

    Chitosan, a biocompatible material that has been widely used in bone tissue engineering, is believed to have a high affinity to osteoblastic cells. This research is the first to prove this hypothesis. By using atomic force microscopy (AFM) with a chitosan-modified cantilever, quantitative evaluation of the interforce between chitosan and cells was carried out. A chitosan tip functionalized with Arg-Gly-Asp (RGD) was also used to measure the interforce between RGD-chitosan and osteoblastic cells. This research concluded by examining cell adhesion and spreading of chitosan substrates as further characterization of the interactions between cells and chitosan. The force measured by AFM showed that the interforce between chitosan and osteoblasts was the highest (209 nN). The smallest adhesion force (61.8 nN) appeared between chitosan and muscle fibroblasts, which did not demonstrate any osteoblastic properties. This result proved that there was a significant interaction between chitosan and bone cells, and correlated with the observations of cell attachment and spreading. The technique developed in this research directly quantified the adhesion between chitosan and cells. This is the first study to demonstrate that specific interaction exists between chitosan and osteoblasts.

  13. Fibronectin on the Surface of Myeloma Cell-derived Exosomes Mediates Exosome-Cell Interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Purushothaman, Anurag; Bandari, Shyam Kumar; Liu, Jian; Mobley, James A; Brown, Elizabeth E; Sanderson, Ralph D

    2016-01-22

    Exosomes regulate cell behavior by binding to and delivering their cargo to target cells; however, the mechanisms mediating exosome-cell interactions are poorly understood. Heparan sulfates on target cell surfaces can act as receptors for exosome uptake, but the ligand for heparan sulfate on exosomes has not been identified. Using exosomes isolated from myeloma cell lines and from myeloma patients, we identify exosomal fibronectin as a key heparan sulfate-binding ligand and mediator of exosome-cell interactions. We discovered that heparan sulfate plays a dual role in exosome-cell interaction; heparan sulfate on exosomes captures fibronectin, and on target cells it acts as a receptor for fibronectin. Removal of heparan sulfate from the exosome surface releases fibronectin and dramatically inhibits exosome-target cell interaction. Antibody specific for the Hep-II heparin-binding domain of fibronectin blocks exosome interaction with tumor cells or with marrow stromal cells. Regarding exosome function, fibronectin-mediated binding of exosomes to myeloma cells activated p38 and pERK signaling and expression of downstream target genes DKK1 and MMP-9, two molecules that promote myeloma progression. Antibody against fibronectin inhibited the ability of myeloma-derived exosomes to stimulate endothelial cell invasion. Heparin or heparin mimetics including Roneparstat, a modified heparin in phase I trials in myeloma patients, significantly inhibited exosome-cell interactions. These studies provide the first evidence that fibronectin binding to heparan sulfate mediates exosome-cell interactions, revealing a fundamental mechanism important for exosome-mediated cross-talk within tumor microenvironments. Moreover, these results imply that therapeutic disruption of fibronectin-heparan sulfate interactions will negatively impact myeloma tumor growth and progression.

  14. Heparin-Based Coacervate of FGF2 Improves Dermal Regeneration by Asserting a Synergistic Role with Cell Proliferation and Endogenous Facilitated VEGF for Cutaneous Wound Healing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Jiang; Ye, Jingjing; Zhu, Jingjing; Xiao, Zecong; He, Chaochao; Shi, Hongxue; Wang, Yadong; Lin, Cai; Zhang, Hongyu; Zhao, Yingzheng; Fu, Xiaobing; Chen, Hong; Li, Xiaokun; Li, Lin; Zheng, Jie; Xiao, Jian

    2016-06-13

    Effective wound healing requires complicated, coordinated interactions and responses at protein, cellular, and tissue levels involving growth factor expression, cell proliferation, wound closure, granulation tissue formation, and vascularization. In this study, we develop a heparin-based coacervate consisting of poly(ethylene argininylaspartate digylceride) (PEAD) as a storage matrix, heparin as a bridge, and fibroblast growth factor-2 (FGF2) as a cargo (namely heparin-FGF2@PEAD) for wound healing. First, in vitro characterization demonstrates the loading efficiency and control release of FGF2 from the heparin-FGF2@PEAD coacervate. The following in vivo studies examine the wound healing efficiency of the heparin-FGF2@PEAD coacervate upon delivering FGF2 to full-thickness excisional skin wounds in vivo, in comparison with the other three control groups with saline, heparin@PEAD as vehicle, and free FGF2. Collective in vivo data show that controlled release of FGF2 to the wounds by the coacervate significantly accelerates the wound healing by promoting cell proliferation, stimulating the secretion of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) for re-epithelization, collagen deposition, and granulation tissue formation, and enhancing the expression of platelet endothelial cell adhesion molecule (CD31) and alpha-smooth muscle actin (α-SMA) for blood vessel maturation. In parallel, no obvious wound healing effect is found for the control, vehicle, and free FGF2 groups, indicating the important role of the coavervate in the wound healing process. This work designs a suitable delivery system that can protect and release FGF2 in a sustained and controlled manner, which provides a promising therapeutic potential for topical treatment of wounds.

  15. Biotin-Avidin Based Universal Cell-Matrix Interaction for Promoting Three-Dimensional Cell Adhesion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dou, Xiao-Qiu; Zhang, Jia; Feng, Chuanliang

    2015-09-23

    To promote cell adhesion in three-dimensional (3D) extracellular matrix (ECM) is crucial for avoiding cell anoikis, which is one of the most important issues for fundamental cell biology. Herein, a biotin-avidin based universal cell-matrix interaction for different types of cells is developed in order to achieve the promoted adhesion in 3D ECM. For the purpose, biotinylated nanofibrous hydrogels are constructed by coassembling 1,4-benzyldicarboxamide (C2) based non-biotinylated and biotinylated supramolecular gelators. The used cells are modified by avidin (AV-cells) through biotinylating cells and then interacting with avidin. After in situ encapsulating AV-cells in the hydrogels, the adhered amount can be increased by tens of percent even with adding several percentages of the biotinylated C2 gelators in the coassembly due to the specific biotin-avidin interaction. Reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) confirms that AV-cells can proliferate without varying gene expression and denaturation. Compared with the interaction between RGD and cells, this avidin-biotin interaction should be much more universal and it is feasible to be employed to promote cell adhesion for most types of cells in 3D matrix.

  16. Glycoarray Technologies: Deciphering Interactions from Proteins to Live Cell Responses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tania M. Puvirajesinghe

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Microarray technologies inspired the development of carbohydrate arrays. Initially, carbohydrate array technology was hindered by the complex structures of glycans and their structural variability. The first designs of glycoarrays focused on the HTP (high throughput study of protein–glycan binding events, and subsequently more in-depth kinetic analysis of carbohydrate–protein interactions. However, the applications have rapidly expanded and now achieve successful discrimination of selective interactions between carbohydrates and, not only proteins, but also viruses, bacteria and eukaryotic cells, and most recently even live cell responses to immobilized glycans. Combining array technology with other HTP technologies such as mass spectrometry is expected to allow even more accurate and sensitive analysis. This review provides a broad overview of established glycoarray technologies (with a special focus on glycosaminoglycan applications and their emerging applications to the study of complex interactions between glycans and whole living cells.

  17. Real-Time Observation of Cell and Carbon Nanotube Interactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Michelle; Broman, Melanie; Mathews, Claire; McPherson, Eric

    2014-03-01

    Carbon nanotubes have been widely researched for disease diagnosis and drug delivery applications. However, its impact on biological systems is yet to be sufficiently understood. We studied optical imaging of Chinese hamster ovarian (CHO) cells exposed to various carbon nanotubes concentrations at various time points. The cell stress due to carbon nanotubes exposure is accessed via morphological changes of the CHO cells. Data showed that cell death increases with increasing carbon nanotube concentration and time exposure. To continuously view such changes of any one individual cell, we constructed an optically transparent miniaturized incubator that fits on a microscope stage. This specific incubator is able to maintain desirable temperature, humidity, and CO2 concentration to allow proper cell growth. Such incubator can be used to track real-time interactions of any cells and nanomaterials for future data collection.

  18. M-cadherin-mediated intercellular interactions activate satellite cell division.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marti, Merce; Montserrat, Núria; Pardo, Cristina; Mulero, Lola; Miquel-Serra, Laia; Rodrigues, Alexandre Miguel Cavaco; Andrés Vaquero, José; Kuebler, Bernd; Morera, Cristina; Barrero, María José; Izpisua Belmonte, Juan Carlos

    2013-11-15

    Adult muscle stem cells and their committed myogenic precursors, commonly referred to as the satellite cell population, are involved in both muscle growth after birth and regeneration after damage. It has been previously proposed that, under these circumstances, satellite cells first become activated, divide and differentiate, and only later fuse to the existing myofiber through M-cadherin-mediated intercellular interactions. Our data show that satellite cells fuse with the myofiber concomitantly to cell division, and only when the nuclei of the daughter cells are inside the myofiber, do they complete the process of differentiation. Here we demonstrate that M-cadherin plays an important role in cell-to-cell recognition and fusion, and is crucial for cell division activation. Treatment of satellite cells with M-cadherin in vitro stimulates cell division, whereas addition of anti-M-cadherin antibodies reduces the cell division rate. Our results suggest an alternative model for the contribution of satellite cells to muscle development, which might be useful in understanding muscle regeneration, as well as muscle-related dystrophies.

  19. Cell-material interactions on biphasic polyurethane matrix.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dicesare, Patrick; Fox, Wade M; Hill, Michael J; Krishnan, G Rajesh; Yang, Shuying; Sarkar, Debanjan

    2013-08-01

    Cell-matrix interaction is a key regulator for controlling stem cell fate in regenerative tissue engineering. These interactions are induced and controlled by the nanoscale features of extracellular matrix and are mimicked on synthetic matrices to control cell structure and functions. Recent studies have shown that nanostructured matrices can modulate stem cell behavior and exert specific role in tissue regeneration. In this study, we have demonstrated that nanostructured phase morphology of synthetic matrix can control adhesion, proliferation, organization and migration of human mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs). Nanostructured biodegradable polyurethanes (PU) with segmental composition exhibit biphasic morphology at nanoscale dimensions and can control cellular features of MSCs. Biodegradable PU with polyester soft segment and hard segment composed of aliphatic diisocyanates and dipeptide chain extender were designed to examine the effect polyurethane phase morphology. By altering the polyurethane composition, morphological architecture of PU was modulated and its effect was examined on MSC. Results show that MSCs can sense the nanoscale morphology of biphasic polyurethane matrix to exhibit distinct cellular features and, thus, signifies the relevance of matrix phase morphology. The role of nanostructured phases of a synthetic matrix in controlling cell-matrix interaction provides important insights for regulation of cell behavior on synthetic matrix and, therefore, is an important tool for engineering tissue regeneration. Copyright © 2012 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  20. Heterochrony as Diachronically Modified Cell-Cell Interactions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John S. Torday

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Heterochrony is an enabling concept in evolution theory that metaphorically captures the mechanism of biologic change due to mechanisms of growth and development. The spatio-temporal patterns of morphogenesis are determined by cell-to-cell signaling mediated by specific soluble growth factors and their cognate receptors on nearby cells of different germline origins. Subsequently, down-stream production of second messengers generates patterns of form and function. Environmental upheavals such as Romer’s hypothesized drying up of bodies of water globally caused the vertebrate water-land transition. That transition caused physiologic stress, modifying cell-cell signaling to generate terrestrial adaptations of the skeleton, lung, skin, kidney and brain. These tissue-specific remodeling events occurred as a result of the duplication of the Parathyroid Hormone-related Protein Receptor (PTHrPR gene, expressed in mesodermal fibroblasts in close proximity to ubiquitously expressed endodermal PTHrP, amplifying this signaling pathway. Examples of how and why PTHrPR amplification affected the ontogeny, phylogeny, physiology and pathophysiology of the lung are used to substantiate and further our understanding through insights to the heterochronic mechanisms of evolution, such as the fish swim bladder evolving into the vertebrate lung, interrelated by such functional homologies as surfactant and mechanotransduction. Instead of the conventional description of this phenomenon, lung evolution can now be understood as adaptive changes in the cellular-molecular signaling mechanisms underlying its ontogeny and phylogeny.

  1. INTERACTIONS BETWEEN THE HUMAN GASTRIC CARCINOMA CELL AND THE HUMAN VASCULAR ENDOTHELIAL CELL

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    Objective To definite the interactions between the human gastric carcinoma cell and the human vascular endothelial cell during the establishment and maintenance of the tumor vascular system and the tumor hematogenous metastasis.Methods We prepared the conditioned mediums of each cell so as to study the effect of the conditioned medium on itself or others by MTT colorimetry. The comprehensive effect of interactions between two cells was determined by stratified transfilter co-culture or direct contact co-culture.Results The conditioned medium of human gastric carcinoma cell can stimulate the proliferation of the human vascular endothelial cell, but the CM of HVEC can inhibit the growth of HGCC. Both kinds of cells can inhibit the growth of itself. The ultimate comprehensive effect of the interactions between two kinds of cells was increase of total cell numbers.Conclusion There exist the complicated interactions between the human gastric carcinoma cell and the human vascular endothelial cell during the tumor angiogenesis and the tumor hematogenous metastasis. The ultimate comprehensive effect of the interactions is increase of total cells numbers and tumor volume.

  2. Extracellular Protein Interactions Mediated by the Neural Cell Adhesion Molecule, NCAM: Heterophilic Interactions Between NCAM and Cell Adhesion Molecules, Extracellular Matrix Proteins, and Viruses

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Janne; Kulahin, Nikolaj; Walmod, Peter

    2008-01-01

    Cell adhesion molecules (CAMs) mediate cell-to-cell interactions and interactions between cells and the extracellular matrix (ECM). The neural cell adhesion molecule (NCAM), a prototypic member of the immunoglobulin (Ig) superfamily of CAMs, mediates adhesion through homophilic and heterophilic i...

  3. Engineered Aptamers to Probe Molecular Interactions on the Cell Surface.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Batool, Sana; Bhandari, Sanam; George, Shanell; Okeoma, Precious; Van, Nabeela; Zümrüt, Hazan E; Mallikaratchy, Prabodhika

    2017-08-29

    Significant progress has been made in understanding the nature of molecular interactions on the cell membrane. To decipher such interactions, molecular scaffolds can be engineered as a tool to modulate these events as they occur on the cell membrane. To guarantee reliability, scaffolds that function as modulators of cell membrane events must be coupled to a targeting moiety with superior chemical versatility. In this regard, nucleic acid aptamers are a suitable class of targeting moieties. Aptamers are inherently chemical in nature, allowing extensive site-specific chemical modification to engineer sensing molecules. Aptamers can be easily selected using a simple laboratory-based in vitro evolution method enabling the design and development of aptamer-based functional molecular scaffolds against wide range of cell surface molecules. This article reviews the application of aptamers as monitors and modulators of molecular interactions on the mammalian cell surface with the aim of increasing our understanding of cell-surface receptor response to external stimuli. The information gained from these types of studies could eventually prove useful in engineering improved medical diagnostics and therapeutics.

  4. Microarray analysis of human epithelial cell responses to bacterial interaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mans, Jeffrey J; Lamont, Richard J; Handfield, Martin

    2006-09-01

    Host-pathogen interactions are inherently complex and dynamic. The recent use of human microarrays has been invaluable to monitor the effects of various bacterial and viral pathogens upon host cell gene expression programs. This methodology has allowed the host response transcriptome of several cell lines to be studied on a global scale. To this point, the great majority of reports have focused on the response of immune cells, including macrophages and dendritic cells. These studies revealed that the immune response to microbial pathogens is tailored to different microbial challenges. Conversely, the paradigm for epithelial cells has--until recently--held that the epithelium mostly served as a relatively passive physical barrier to infection. It is now generally accepted that the epithelial barrier contributes more actively to signaling events in the immune response. In light of this shift, this review will compare transcriptional profiling data from studies that involved host-pathogen interactions occurring with epithelial cells. Experiments that defined both a common core response, as well as pathogen-specific host responses will be discussed. This review will also summarize the contributions that transcriptional profiling analysis has made to our understanding of bacterial physio-pathogensis of infection. This will include a discussion of how host transcriptional responses can be used to infer the function of virulence determinants from bacterial pathogens interacting with epithelial mucosa. In particular, we will expand upon the lessons that have been learned from gastro-intestinal and oral pathogens, as well as from members of the commensal flora.

  5. Cell signaling in the interaction between pathogenic bacteria and immune cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Hui; Liu, Yaxiong; Tang, Ruihua; Shao, Dongyan; Li, Jing; Li, Ji; Ye, Linjie; Jin, Mingliang; Huang, Qingsheng; Shi, Junling

    2015-06-01

    Cell signaling is an essential part in the complex system of communication that governs basic cellular activities and coordinates cell actions. The ability of cells to perceive and correctly respond to their microenvironment is essential for cell survival and basic biological function. In the defense from pathogenic bacteria, the immune cells exert their function through various signaling pathways. In this review, we will summarize recent findings on the role of cell signaling in the interaction between pathogenic bacteria and immune cells, focusing on neutrophils and macrophages, which are part of the innate immunity, and also T cells, which are components of the adaptive immune system.

  6. RhoC and ROCKs regulate cancer cell interactions with endothelial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reymond, Nicolas; Im, Jae Hong; Garg, Ritu; Cox, Susan; Soyer, Magali; Riou, Philippe; Colomba, Audrey; Muschel, Ruth J; Ridley, Anne J

    2015-06-01

    RhoC is a member of the Rho GTPase family that is implicated in cancer progression by stimulating cancer cell invasiveness. Here we report that RhoC regulates the interaction of cancer cells with vascular endothelial cells (ECs), a crucial step in the metastatic process. RhoC depletion by RNAi reduces PC3 prostate cancer cell adhesion to ECs, intercalation between ECs as well as transendothelial migration in vitro. Depletion of the kinases ROCK1 and ROCK2, two known RhoC downstream effectors, similarly decreases cancer interaction with ECs. RhoC also regulates the extension of protrusions made by cancer cells on vascular ECs in vivo. Transient RhoC depletion is sufficient to reduce both early PC3 cell retention in the lungs and experimental metastasis formation in vivo. Our results indicate RhoC plays a central role in cancer cell interaction with vascular ECs, which is a critical event for cancer progression.

  7. Inverting adherent cells for visualizing ECM interactions at the basal cell side

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gudzenko, Tetyana [DFG-Center for Functional Nanostructures, Karlsruhe Institute of Technology (KIT), Wolfgang-Gaede-Strasse 1a, 76131 Karlsruhe (Germany); Franz, Clemens M., E-mail: clemens.franz@kit.edu [DFG-Center for Functional Nanostructures, Karlsruhe Institute of Technology (KIT), Wolfgang-Gaede-Strasse 1a, 76131 Karlsruhe (Germany)

    2013-05-15

    Interactions with the extracellular matrix (ECM) govern a wide range of cellular functions, including survival, migration and invasion. However, in adherent cells these interactions occur primarily on the basal cell side, making them inaccessible to high-resolution, surface-scanning imaging techniques such as atomic force microscopy (AFM) or scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Here we describe a fast and reliable method for inverting adherent cells, exposing the basal cell membrane for direct analysis by AFM or SEM in combination with fluorescence microscopy. Cells including their matrix adhesion sites remain intact during the inversion process and are transferred together with the complete array of basally associated ECM proteins. Molecular features of ECM proteins, such as the characteristic 67 nm collagen D-periodicity, are well preserved after inversion. To demonstrate the versatility of the method, we compared basal interactions of fibroblasts with fibrillar collagen I and fibronectin matrices. While fibroblasts remodel the fibronectin layer exclusively from above, they actively invade even thin collagen layers by contacting individual collagen nanofibrils both basally and apically through a network of cellular extensions. Cell–matrix entanglement coincides with enhanced cell spreading and flattening, indicating that nanoscale ECM interactions govern macroscopic changes in cell morphology. The presented cell inversion technique can thus provide novel insight into nanoscale cell–matrix interactions at the basal cell side. - Highlights: ► We present a novel method for inverting adherent cells to expose the basal cell side. ► Basal cell sides can be imaged at high resolution by AFM and SEM. ► Cells can be inverted together with the underlying extracellular matrix. ► AFM images of inverted cells provide a nanoscale look at basal cell–ECM interactions.

  8. Hierarchical partial matching and segmentation of interacting cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Zheng; Gurari, Danna; Wong, Joyce Y; Betke, Margrit

    2012-01-01

    We propose a method that automatically tracks and segments living cells in phase-contrast image sequences, especially for cells that deform and interact with each other or clutter. We formulate the problem as a many-to-one elastic partial matching problem between closed curves. We introduce Double Cyclic Dynamic Time Warping for the scenario where a collision event yields a single boundary that encloses multiple touching cells and that needs to be cut into separate cell boundaries. The resulting individual boundaries may consist of segments to be connected to produce closed curves that match well with the individual cell boundaries before the collision event. We show how to convert this partial-curve matching problem into a shortest path problem that we then solve efficiently by reusing the computed shortest path tree. We also use our shortest path algorithm to fill the gaps between the segments of the target curves. Quantitative results demonstrate the benefit of our method by showing maintained accurate recognition of individual cell boundaries across 8068 images containing multiple cell interactions.

  9. Fundamentals of protein and cell interactions in biomaterials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aiyelabegan, Hammed Tanimowo; Sadroddiny, Esmaeil

    2017-04-01

    The extracellular matrix (ECM) is an active and complex microenvironment with outstanding biomechanical, biophysical, and biochemical characteristics, which can indirectly or directly controls cell adhesion, migration, proliferation, and differentiation, as well as partaking in regeneration and homeostasis of organs and tissues. The ECM has captivated a great deal of attention with the rapid progress of tissue engineering (TE) in the field of regenerative medicine (RM). Approaches to TE, RM and cancer therapy center on the necessity to deliver cell signals to direct cell proliferation and differentiation. These "external signals" are induced from cell-cell, and cell-ECM, interactions, as well as from physico-chemical, mechanical stimuli and growth factors. With the advent of new biomaterials such as casein, we gave a general insight into cell-ECM protein interactions in biomaterials and their applications in TE, RM and cancer therapy. An account of the main ECM molecules and cellular receptors with emphasis on integrins and its ligands was given, their effect on the induction of particular signal transduction pathways is also elucidated. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  10. The Dynamics of Interactions Among Immune and Glioblastoma Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eder, Katalin; Kalman, Bernadette

    2015-12-01

    Glioblastoma is the most common intracranial malignancy that constitutes about 50 % of all gliomas. Despite aggressive, multimodal therapy consisting of surgery, radiation, and chemotherapy, the outcome of patients with glioblastoma remains poor with 5-year survival rates of immune mediators may represent a critical contributor to this resistance. The tumor microenvironment contains innate and adaptive immune cells in addition to the cancer cells and their surrounding stroma. These various cells communicate with each other by means of direct cell-cell contact or by soluble factors including cytokines and chemokines, and act in autocrine and paracrine manners to modulate tumor growth. There are dynamic interactions among the local immune elements and the tumor cells, where primarily the protective immune cells attempt to overcome the malignant cells. However, by developing somatic mutations and epigenetic modifications, the glioblastoma tumor cells acquire the capability of counteracting the local immune responses, and even exploit the immune cells and products for their own growth benefits. In this review, we survey those immune mechanisms that likely contribute to glioblastoma pathogenesis and may serve as a basis for novel treatment strategies.

  11. Probing mechanical principles of cell-nanomaterial interactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Huajian

    2014-01-01

    With the rapid development of nanotechnology, various types of nanoparticles, nanowires, nanofibers, nanotubes, and atomically thin plates and sheets have emerged as candidates for an ever increasing list of potential applications for next generation electronics, microchips, composites, barrier coatings, biosensors, drug delivery, and energy harvesting and conversion systems. There is now an urgent societal need to understand both beneficial and hazardous effects of nanotechnology which is projected to produce and release thousands of tons of nanomaterials into the environment in the coming decades. This paper aims to present an overview of some recent studies conducted at Brown University on the mechanics of cell-nanomaterial interactions, including the modeling of nanoparticles entering cells by receptor-mediated endocytosis and coarse-grained molecular dynamics simulations of nanoparticles interacting with cell membranes. The discussions will be organized around the following questions: Why and how does cellular uptake of nanoparticles depend on particle size, shape, elasticity and surface structure? In particular, we will discuss the effect of nanoparticle size on receptor-mediated endocytosis, the effect of elastic stiffness on cell-particle interactions, how high aspect ratio nanomaterials such as carbon nanotubes and graphenes enter cells and how different geometrical patterns of ligands on a nanoparticle can be designed to control the rate of particle uptake.

  12. Spatial modelling of brief and long interactions between T cells and dendritic cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beltman, Joost B; Marée, Athanasius F M; de Boer, Rob J

    2007-06-01

    In the early phases of an immune response, T cells of appropriate antigen specificity become activated by antigen-presenting cells in secondary lymphoid organs. Two-photon microscopy imaging experiments have shown that this stimulation occurs in distinct stages during which T cells exhibit different motilities and interactions with dendritic cells (DCs). In this paper, we utilize the Cellular Potts Model, a model formalism that takes cell shapes and cellular interactions explicitly into account, to simulate the dynamics of, and interactions between, T cells and DCs in the lymph node paracortex. Our three-dimensional simulations suggest that the initial decrease in T-cell motility after antigen appearance is due to "stop signals" transmitted by activated DCs to T cells. The long-lived interactions that occur at a later stage can only be explained by the presence of both stop signals and a high adhesion between specific T cells and antigen-bearing DCs. Furthermore, our results indicate that long-lasting contacts with T cells are promoted when DCs retract dendrites that detect a specific contact at lower velocities than other dendrites. Finally, by performing long simulations (after prior fitting to short time scale data) we are able to provide an estimate of the average contact duration between T cells and DCs.

  13. Mechanobiology of cell migration in the context of dynamic two-way cell-matrix interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurniawan, Nicholas A; Chaudhuri, Parthiv Kant; Lim, Chwee Teck

    2016-05-24

    Migration of cells is integral in various physiological processes in all facets of life. These range from embryonic development, morphogenesis, and wound healing, to disease pathology such as cancer metastasis. While cell migratory behavior has been traditionally studied using simple assays on culture dishes, in recent years it has been increasingly realized that the physical, mechanical, and chemical aspects of the matrix are key determinants of the migration mechanism. In this paper, we will describe the mechanobiological changes that accompany the dynamic cell-matrix interactions during cell migration. Furthermore, we will review what is to date known about how these changes feed back to the dynamics and biomechanical properties of the cell and the matrix. Elucidating the role of these intimate cell-matrix interactions will provide not only a better multi-scale understanding of cell motility in its physiological context, but also a more holistic perspective for designing approaches to regulate cell behavior.

  14. Ionizing radiation induces heritable disruption of epithelial cell interactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Catherine C.; Henshall-Powell, Rhonda L.; Erickson, Anna C.; Talhouk, Rabih; Parvin, Bahram; Bissell, Mina J.; Barcellos-Hoff, Mary Helen; Chatterjee, A. (Principal Investigator)

    2003-01-01

    Ionizing radiation (IR) is a known human breast carcinogen. Although the mutagenic capacity of IR is widely acknowledged as the basis for its action as a carcinogen, we and others have shown that IR can also induce growth factors and extracellular matrix remodeling. As a consequence, we have proposed that an additional factor contributing to IR carcinogenesis is the potential disruption of critical constraints that are imposed by normal cell interactions. To test this hypothesis, we asked whether IR affected the ability of nonmalignant human mammary epithelial cells (HMEC) to undergo tissue-specific morphogenesis in culture by using confocal microscopy and imaging bioinformatics. We found that irradiated single HMEC gave rise to colonies exhibiting decreased localization of E-cadherin, beta-catenin, and connexin-43, proteins necessary for the establishment of polarity and communication. Severely compromised acinar organization was manifested by the majority of irradiated HMEC progeny as quantified by image analysis. Disrupted cell-cell communication, aberrant cell-extracellular matrix interactions, and loss of tissue-specific architecture observed in the daughters of irradiated HMEC are characteristic of neoplastic progression. These data point to a heritable, nonmutational mechanism whereby IR compromises cell polarity and multicellular organization.

  15. Stem cell autotomy and niche interaction in differentsystems

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2015-01-01

    The best known cases of cell autotomy are theformation of erythrocytes and thrombocytes (platelets)from progenitor cells that reside in special niches.Recently, autotomy of stem cells and its enigmaticinteraction with the niche has been reported from malegermline stem cells (GSCs) in several insect species.First described in lepidopterans, the silkmoth, followedby the gipsy moth and consecutively in hemipterans,foremost the milkweed bug. In both, moths and themilkweed bug, GSCs form finger-like projectionstoward the niche, the apical cells (homologs of thehub cells in Drosophila). Whereas in the milkweedbug the projection terminals remain at the surfaceof the niche cells, in the gipsy moth they protrudedeeply into the singular niche cell. In both cases, theprojections undergo serial retrograde fragmentationwith progressing signs of autophagy. In the gipsy moth,the autotomized vesicles are phagocytized and digestedby the niche cell. In the milkweed bug the autotomizedvesicles accumulate at the niche surface and disintegrate.Autotomy and sprouting of new projectionsappears to occur continuously. The significance of theGSC-niche interactions, however, remains enigmatic.Our concept on the signaling relationship betweenstem cell-niche in general and GSC and niche (hubcells and cyst stem cells) in particular has been greatlyshaped by Drosophila melanogaster. In comparingthe interactions of GSCs with their niche in Drosophilawith those in species exhibiting GSC autotomy itis obvious that additional or alternative modes ofstem cell-niche communication exist. Thus, essentialsignaling pathways, including niche-stem cell adhesion(E-cadherin) and the direction of asymmetrical GSCdivision - as they were found in Drosophila - can hardlybe translated into the systems where GSC autotomy was reported. It is shown here that the serial autotomyof GSC projections shows remarkable similarities withWallerian axonal destruction, developmental axonpruning and dying

  16. EBI2 augments Tfh cell fate by promoting interaction with IL-2-quenching dendritic cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Jianhua; Lu, Erick; Yi, Tangsheng; Cyster, Jason G

    2016-05-05

    T follicular helper (Tfh) cells are a subset of T cells carrying the CD4 antigen; they are important in supporting plasma cell and germinal centre responses. The initial induction of Tfh cell properties occurs within the first few days after activation by antigen recognition on dendritic cells, although how dendritic cells promote this cell-fate decision is not fully understood. Moreover, although Tfh cells are uniquely defined by expression of the follicle-homing receptor CXCR5 (refs 1, 2), the guidance receptor promoting the earlier localization of activated T cells at the interface of the B-cell follicle and T zone has been unclear. Here we show that the G-protein-coupled receptor EBI2 (GPR183) and its ligand 7α,25-dihydroxycholesterol mediate positioning of activated CD4 T cells at the interface of the follicle and T zone. In this location they interact with activated dendritic cells and are exposed to Tfh-cell-promoting inducible co-stimulator (ICOS) ligand. Interleukin-2 (IL-2) is a cytokine that has multiple influences on T-cell fate, including negative regulation of Tfh cell differentiation. We demonstrate that activated dendritic cells in the outer T zone further augment Tfh cell differentiation by producing membrane and soluble forms of CD25, the IL-2 receptor α-chain, and quenching T-cell-derived IL-2. Mice lacking EBI2 in T cells or CD25 in dendritic cells have reduced Tfh cells and mount defective T-cell-dependent plasma cell and germinal centre responses. These findings demonstrate that distinct niches within the lymphoid organ T zone support distinct cell fate decisions, and they establish a function for dendritic-cell-derived CD25 in controlling IL-2 availability and T-cell differentiation.

  17. Interactions between airway epithelial cells and dendritic cells during viral infections using an in vitro co-culture model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rationale: Historically, single cell culture models have been limited in pathological and physiological relevance. A co-culture model of dendritic cells (DCs) and differentiated human airway epithelial cells was developed to examine potential interactions between these two cell t...

  18. Cell-based modeling of cell-matrix interactions in angiogenesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Merks Roeland M.H.

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The self-organization of endothelial cells into blood vessel networks and sprouts can be studied using computational, cell-based models. These take as input the behavior of individual, endothelial cells, as observed in experiments, and gives as output the resulting, collective behavior, i.e. the formation of shapes and tissue structures. Many cell-based models ignore the extracellular matrix, i.e., the fibrous or homogeneous materials that surround cells and gives tissue structural support. In this extended abstract, we highlight two approaches that we have taken to explore the role of the extracellular matrix in our cellular Potts models of blood vessel formation (angiogenesis: first we discuss a model considering chemical endothelial cell-matrix interactions, then we discuss a model that include mechanical cell-matrix interactions. We end by discussing some potential new directions.

  19. Lineage Specification of Ovarian Theca Cells Requires Multi-Cellular Interactions via Oocyte and Granulosa Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Chang; Peng, Jia; Matzuk, Martin M.; Yao, Humphrey H-C

    2015-01-01

    Organogenesis of the ovary is a highly orchestrated process involving multiple lineage determinations of ovarian surface epithelium, granulosa cells, and theca cells. While the sources of ovarian surface epithelium and granulosa cells are known, the origin(s) of theca progenitor cells have not been definitively identified. Here we show that theca cells derive from two sources: Wt1+ cells indigenous to the ovary and Gli1+ mesenchymal cells migrated from the mesonephros. These progenitors acquire theca lineage marker Gli1 in response to paracrine signals Desert hedgehog (Dhh) and Indian hedgehog (Ihh) from granulosa cells. Ovaries lacking Dhh/Ihh exhibit theca layer loss, blunted steroid production, arrested folliculogenesis, and failure to form corpora lutea. Production of Dhh/Ihh in granulosa cells requires Growth differentiation factor 9 (GDF9) from the oocyte. Our studies provide the first genetic evidence for the origins of theca cells and reveal a multicellular interaction critical for the formation of a functional theca. PMID:25917826

  20. Identification of chikungunya virus interacting proteins in mammalian cells

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Mandar S Paingankar; Vidya A Arankalle

    2014-06-01

    Identification and characterization of virus host interactions is an essential step for the development of novel antiviral strategies. Very few studies have been targeted towards identification of chikungunya virus (CHIKV) interacting host proteins. In current study, virus overlay protein binding assay (VOPBA) and matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time of flight analysis (MALDI TOF/TOF) were employed for the identification of CHIKV binding proteins in mammalian cells. HSP70 and actin were identified as virus binding proteins in HEK-293T and Vero-E6 cells, whereas STAT-2 was identified as an additional protein in Vero-E6 cells. Pre-incubation with anti-HSP70 antibody and miRNA silencing of HSP70 significantly reduced the CHIKV production in HEK-293T and Vero-E6 cells at early time points. These results suggest that CHIKV exploits the housekeeping molecules such as actin, HSP70 and STAT-2 to establish infection in the mammalian cells.

  1. Gammadelta receptor bearing T cells in scleroderma: enhanced interaction with vascular endothelial cells in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kahaleh, M B; Fan, P S; Otsuka, T

    1999-05-01

    In view of the documented perivascular mononuclear cell infiltration in the involved organs in scleroderma (SSc) and the reported accumulation of gammadelta-T cells in SSc skin and lung, we evaluated gammadelta-T cell interaction with endothelial cells (EC) in vitro. gammadelta- and alphabeta-T cells were isolated from BPMN of SSc patients with early diffuse disease and of matched control subjects by an immunomagnetic method after stimulation with mycobacterium lysate and interleukin-2 for 2 weeks. Lymphocyte adhesion, proliferation, and cytotoxicity to EC were investigated. SSc gammadelta-T cells adhered to cultured EC and proliferated at higher rates than control cells. Furthermore, significant EC cytotoxicity by SSc gammadelta was seen. The cytotoxicity was blocked by addition of anti-gammadelta-TCR antibody and by anti-granzyme A antibody but not by anti-MHC class I and II antibodies. Expression of granzyme A mRNA was seen in five/five SSc gammadelta-T cells and in one/five control cells. alphabeta-T cells from both SSc and control subjects were significantly less interactive with EC than gammadelta-T cells. The data demonstrate EC recognition by SSc gammadelta-T cells and propose gammadelta-T cells as a possible effector cell type in the immune pathogenesis of SSc.

  2. Dimethylsulfoxide exposure modulates HL-60 cell rolling interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gee, David J; Wright, L Kate; Zimmermann, Jonathan; Cole, Kayla; Soule, Karen; Ubowski, Michelle

    2012-08-01

    Human leukaemic HL-60 cells are widely used for studying interactions involving adhesion molecules [e.g. P-selectin and PSGL-1 (P-selectin glycoprotein ligand-1)] since their rolling behaviour has been shown to mimic the dynamics of leucocyte rolling in vitro. HL-60 cells are neutrophilic promyelocytes that can undergo granulocytic differentiation upon exposure to compounds such as DMSO (dimethylsulfoxide). Using a parallel plate flow chamber functionalized with recombinant P-selectin-Fc chimaera, undifferentiated and DMSO-induced (48, 72 and 96 h) HL-60 cells were assayed for rolling behaviour. We found that depending on P-selectin incubation concentration, undifferentiated cells incurred up to a 6-fold increase in rolling velocity while subjected to an approximately 10-fold increase in biologically relevant shear stress. HL-60 cells exposed to DMSO for up to 72 h incurred up to a 3-fold increase in rolling velocity over the same shear stress range. Significantly, cells exposed for up to 96 h incurred up to a 9-fold decrease in rolling velocity, compared with undifferentiated HL-60 cells. Although cell surface and nuclear morphological changes were evident upon exposure to DMSO, flow cytometric analysis revealed that PSGL-1 expression was unchanged, irrespective of treatment duration. The results suggest that DMSO-treated HL-60 cells may be problematic as a substitute for neutrophils for trafficking studies during advanced stages of the LAC (leucocyte adhesion cascade). We suggest that remodelling of the cell surface during differentiation may affect rolling behaviour and that DMSO-treated HL-60 cells would behave differently from the normal leucocytes during inflammatory response in vivo.

  3. Detecting protein-protein interactions in living cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gottschalk, Marie; Bach, Anders; Hansen, Jakob Lerche

    2009-01-01

    The PDZ domain mediated interaction between the NMDA receptor and its intracellular scaffolding protein, PSD-95, is a potential target for treatment of ischemic brain diseases. We have recently developed a number of peptide analogues with improved affinity for the PDZ domains of PSD-95 compared......-terminal of the NMDA receptor and PDZ2 of PSD-95 were fused to green fluorescent protein (GFP) and Renilla luciferase (Rluc) and expressed in COS7 cells. A robust and specific BRET signal was obtained by expression of the appropriate partner proteins and subsequently, the assay was used to evaluate a Tat......-conjugated peptide for its ability to disrupt the PSD-95/NMDA receptor interaction in living cells....

  4. Novel interactions between erythroblast macrophage protein and cell migration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Javan, Gulnaz T; Can, Ismail; Yeboah, Fred; Lee, Youngil; Soni, Shivani

    2016-09-01

    Erythroblast macrophage protein is a novel protein known to mediate attachment of erythroid cells to macrophages to form erythroblastic islands in bone marrow during erythropoiesis. Emp-null macrophages are small with round morphologies, and lack cytoplasmic projections which imply immature structure. The role of Emp in macrophage development and function is not fully elucidated. Macrophages perform varied functions (e.g. homeostasis, erythropoiesis), and are implicated in numerous pathophysiological conditions such as cellular malignancy. The objective of the current study is to investigate the interaction of Emp with cytoskeletal- and cell migration-associated proteins involved in macrophage functions. A short hairpin RNA lentiviral system was use to down-regulate the expression of Emp in macrophage cells. A cell migration assay revealed that the relocation of macrophages was significantly inhibited when Emp expression was decreased. To further analyze changes in gene expression related to cell motility, PCR array was performed by down-regulating Emp expression. The results indicated that expression of mitogen-activated protein kinase 1 and thymoma viral proto-oncogene 1 were significantly higher when Emp was down-regulated. The results implicate Emp in abnormal cell motility, thus, warrants to assess its role in cancer where tumor cell motility is required for invasion and metastasis.

  5. Endothelial cells derived from human embryonic stem cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levenberg, Shulamit; Golub, Justin S.; Amit, Michal; Itskovitz-Eldor, Joseph; Langer, Robert

    2002-04-01

    Human embryonic stem cells have the potential to differentiate into various cell types and, thus, may be useful as a source of cells for transplantation or tissue engineering. We describe here the differentiation steps of human embryonic stem cells into endothelial cells forming vascular-like structures. The human embryonic-derived endothelial cells were isolated by using platelet endothelial cell-adhesion molecule-1 (PECAM1) antibodies, their behavior was characterized in vitro and in vivo, and their potential in tissue engineering was examined. We show that the isolated embryonic PECAM1+ cells, grown in culture, display characteristics similar to vessel endothelium. The cells express endothelial cell markers in a pattern similar to human umbilical vein endothelial cells, their junctions are correctly organized, and they have high metabolism of acetylated low-density lipoprotein. In addition, the cells are able to differentiate and form tube-like structures when cultured on matrigel. In vivo, when transplanted into SCID mice, the cells appeared to form microvessels containing mouse blood cells. With further studies, these cells could provide a source of human endothelial cells that could be beneficial for potential applications such as engineering new blood vessels, endothelial cell transplantation into the heart for myocardial regeneration, and induction of angiogenesis for treatment of regional ischemia.

  6. Centrality of host cell death in plant-microbe interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dickman, Martin B; Fluhr, Robert

    2013-01-01

    Programmed cell death (PCD) is essential for proper growth, development, and cellular homeostasis in all eukaryotes. The regulation of PCD is of central importance in plant-microbe interactions; notably, PCD and features associated with PCD are observed in many host resistance responses. Conversely, pathogen induction of inappropriate cell death in the host results in a susceptible phenotype and disease. Thus, the party in control of PCD has a distinct advantage in these battles. PCD processes appear to be of ancient origin, as indicated by the fact that many features of cell death strategy are conserved between animals and plants; however, some of the details of death execution differ. Mammalian core PCD genes, such as caspases, are not present in plant genomes. Similarly, pro- and antiapoptotic mammalian regulatory elements are absent in plants, but, remarkably, when expressed in plants, successfully impact plant PCD. Thus, subtle structural similarities independent of sequence homology appear to sustain operational equivalence. The vacuole is emerging as a key organelle in the modulation of plant PCD. Under different signals for cell death, the vacuole either fuses with the plasmalemma membrane or disintegrates. Moreover, the vacuole appears to play a key role in autophagy; evidence suggests a prosurvival function for autophagy, but other studies propose a prodeath phenotype. Here, we describe and discuss what we know and what we do not know about various PCD pathways and how the host integrates signals to activate salicylic acid and reactive oxygen pathways that orchestrate cell death. We suggest that it is not cell death as such but rather the processes leading to cell death that contribute to the outcome of a given plant-pathogen interaction.

  7. Interactions of light and gravity in Chara internodal cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Staves, Mark P.; Whitsit, Kimberly; Yeung, Edward

    2005-08-01

    The "shoots" of Chara corallina are composed of large (ca. 2-5 cm length and 0.5 mm diameter) internodal cells alternating with smaller, node-forming cells. We find that these shoots are both negatively gravitropic as well as positively phototropic. Differential growth in response to both gravity and light typically takes place in the two most apical (youngest) internodal cells, however the plants can be manipulated so that all curvature takes place in a single cell. We grew Chara in aquaria filled with artificial pond water with their rhizoids in 35 mm film canisters containing soil. Thus, it was easy to reorient the axis of the plant with respect to gravity. Experimental plants were allowed to develop to a stage where they had one or two visible internodal cells. In the absence of light, internodal cells are negatively gravitropic. If gravistimulated (horizontal) internodal cells are illuminated with white light from above, gravity and light act together and more rapid curvature ensues. If however, gravistimulated internodal cells are illuminated from below, gravity and light act antagonistically and light can overcome the gravity signal. We find that gravistimulated cells illuminated from below will bend up (i.e. negatively gravitropic and negatively phototropic) at light intensities below ca. 1 μmol m-2 s-1 whereas they curve downward (positively gravitropic and positively phototropic) at higher light intensities. Preliminary studies indicate that both blue and green light stimulate phototropism whereas red light is not effective. Chara thus provides a system in which a single, statolith-free cell responds to both light and gravity and in which the interactions of the light- and gravity-induced signal transduction pathways can be investigated.

  8. Modelling of Yeast Mating Reveals Robustness Strategies for Cell-Cell Interactions.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Weitao Chen

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Mating of budding yeast cells is a model system for studying cell-cell interactions. Haploid yeast cells secrete mating pheromones that are sensed by the partner which responds by growing a mating projection toward the source. The two projections meet and fuse to form the diploid. Successful mating relies on precise coordination of dynamic extracellular signals, signaling pathways, and cell shape changes in a noisy background. It remains elusive how cells mate accurately and efficiently in a natural multi-cell environment. Here we present the first stochastic model of multiple mating cells whose morphologies are driven by pheromone gradients and intracellular signals. Our novel computational framework encompassed a moving boundary method for modeling both a-cells and α-cells and their cell shape changes, the extracellular diffusion of mating pheromones dynamically coupled with cell polarization, and both external and internal noise. Quantification of mating efficiency was developed and tested for different model parameters. Computer simulations revealed important robustness strategies for mating in the presence of noise. These strategies included the polarized secretion of pheromone, the presence of the α-factor protease Bar1, and the regulation of sensing sensitivity; all were consistent with data in the literature. In addition, we investigated mating discrimination, the ability of an a-cell to distinguish between α-cells either making or not making α-factor, and mating competition, in which multiple a-cells compete to mate with one α-cell. Our simulations were consistent with previous experimental results. Moreover, we performed a combination of simulations and experiments to estimate the diffusion rate of the pheromone a-factor. In summary, we constructed a framework for simulating yeast mating with multiple cells in a noisy environment, and used this framework to reproduce mating behaviors and to identify strategies for robust cell-cell

  9. Crotamine and crotoxin interact with tumor cells and trigger cell death

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Soares, Marcella Araugio; Pujatti, Priscilla Brunelli; Santos, Raquel Gouvea dos [Centro de Desenvolvimento da Tecnologia Nuclear CDTN/CNEN-MG, Belo Horizonte, MG (Brazil)]. E-mails: maso@cdtn.br; santosr@cdtn.br; Dias, Consuelo Latorre Fortes [Fundacao Ezequiel Dias FUNED, Belo Horizonte, MG (Brazil); Chavez Olortegui, Carlos Delfin [Universidade Federal de Minas Gerais UFMG, Belo Horizonte, MG (Brazil). Inst. de Ciencias Biologicas; Santos, Wagner Gouvea dos [Medical College of Virginia, Richmond, VA (United States). Neurosurgery Dept.

    2007-07-01

    Crotoxin (Crtx) and Crotamine (Crota) are polypeptides isolated from Crotalus durissus terrificus snake venom (CV). Previous reports have been shown therapeutic effects of Crotalus durissus terrificus venom and Crtx on skin, breast and lung tumours, although, the mechanisms of this antitumoral effect are still unknown. The aim of this work was to investigate the antitumoral effect of Crtx and Crota on brain tumours cells (GH3 and RT2) in vitro and their capacity of interaction with these tumour cells membranes. Cell survival after Crtx and Crota treatment was evaluated by MTT assay in different times post-treatment and apoptosis was evaluated by DAPI staining. In order to evaluate the specific interaction of Crtx and Crota, these polypeptides were radiolabelled, using {sup 125}I as radiotracer and binding assays were performed. The results were compared with the binding in nontumoral brain tissue. Crtx and Crota induced apoptosis on both tumour cells lineages but, Crota was more powerful than Crtx 90% and 20% cell death for RT2 cells; 80% and 20% cell death for GH3 cells, respectively). Both {sup 125}I-Crtx and {sup 125}I-Crota bound specifically in glioblastoma membranes. Nonetheless, CV polypeptides recognised glioblastoma cells with higher specificity than normal brain tissue. These results suggest that the Crtx and Crota interactions with the plasmatic membrane of tumour cells may be the first step of the cascade of signalling that trigger their antitumoral effect. (author)

  10. Interaction of oral bacteria with gingival epithelial cell multilayers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dickinson, B C; Moffatt, C E; Hagerty, D; Whitmore, S E; Brown, T A; Graves, D T; Lamont, R J

    2011-06-01

    Primary gingival epithelial cells were cultured in multilayers as a model for the study of interactions with oral bacteria associated with health and periodontal disease. Multilayers maintained at an air-liquid interface in low-calcium medium displayed differentiation and cytokeratin properties characteristic of junctional epithelium. Multilayers were infected with fluorescently labeled Porphyromonas gingivalis, Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans, Fusobacterium nucleatum or Streptococcus gordonii, and bacterial association was determined by confocal microscopy and quantitative image analysis. Porphyromonas gingivalis invaded intracellularly and spread from cell to cell; A. actinomycetemcomitans and F. nucleatum remained extracellular and showed intercellular movement through the multilayer; whereas S. gordonii remained extracellular and predominantly associated with the superficial cell layer. None of the bacterial species disrupted barrier function as measured by transepithelial electrical resistance. P. gingivalis did not elicit secretion of proinflammatory cytokines. However, A. actinomycetemcomitans and S. gordonii induced interleukin-1β (IL-1β), tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α), IL-6 and IL-8 secretion; and F. nucleatum stimulated production of IL-1β and TNF-α. Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans, F. nucleatum and S. gordonii, but not P. gingivalis, increased levels of apoptosis after 24 h infection. The results indicate that the organisms with pathogenic potential were able to traverse the epithelium, whereas the commensal bacteria did not. In addition, distinct host responses characterized the interaction between the junctional epithelium and oral bacteria.

  11. Elastic Interaction between a String of Cells and an Individual Cell

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WU Heng-An; LONG Rong; WANG Xiu-Xi; WANG Feng-Chao

    2007-01-01

    The elastic interaction between a string of cells and an individual cell on an elastic substrate is investigated numerically using the force-dipole model. This interaction is found to be of short range, and the cut-off distance is about 1.4 times of the length of the cell. The energy-minimization distance is about half the cellular length. The specific relationship between the cellular reorientation and the cellular position are obtained quantitatively. A critical distance is found, and the cellular orientation has an abrupt change at this transition point.

  12. Spatial Evolutionary Games of Interaction among Generic Cancer Cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bach, Lars Arve; Sumpter, David J.T.; Alsner, Jan

    2003-01-01

    Evolutionary game models of cellular interactions have shown that heterogeneity in the cellular genotypic composition is maintained through evolution to stable coexistence of growth-promoting and non-promoting cell types. We generalise these mean-field models and relax the assumption of perfect...... mixing of cells by instead implementing an individual-based model that includes the stochastic and spatial effects likely to occur in tumours. The scope for coexistence of genotypic strategies changed with the inclusion of explicit space and stochasticity. The spatial models show some interesting...... deviations from their mean-field counterparts, for example the possibility of altruistic (paracrine) cell strategies to thrive. Such effects can however, be highly sensitive to model implementation and the more realistic models with semi-synchronous and stochastic updating do not show evolution of altruism...

  13. Stochastic dynamics of interacting haematopoietic stem cell niche lineages.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tamás Székely

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Since we still know very little about stem cells in their natural environment, it is useful to explore their dynamics through modelling and simulation, as well as experimentally. Most models of stem cell systems are based on deterministic differential equations that ignore the natural heterogeneity of stem cell populations. This is not appropriate at the level of individual cells and niches, when randomness is more likely to affect dynamics. In this paper, we introduce a fast stochastic method for simulating a metapopulation of stem cell niche lineages, that is, many sub-populations that together form a heterogeneous metapopulation, over time. By selecting the common limiting timestep, our method ensures that the entire metapopulation is simulated synchronously. This is important, as it allows us to introduce interactions between separate niche lineages, which would otherwise be impossible. We expand our method to enable the coupling of many lineages into niche groups, where differentiated cells are pooled within each niche group. Using this method, we explore the dynamics of the haematopoietic system from a demand control system perspective. We find that coupling together niche lineages allows the organism to regulate blood cell numbers as closely as possible to the homeostatic optimum. Furthermore, coupled lineages respond better than uncoupled ones to random perturbations, here the loss of some myeloid cells. This could imply that it is advantageous for an organism to connect together its niche lineages into groups. Our results suggest that a potential fruitful empirical direction will be to understand how stem cell descendants communicate with the niche and how cancer may arise as a result of a failure of such communication.

  14. Interaction of Low Temperature Plasmas with Prokaryotic and Eukaryotic Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laroussi, Mounir

    2008-10-01

    Due to promising possibilities for their use in medical applications such as wound healing, surface modification of biocompatible materials, and the sterilization of reusable heat-sensitive medical instruments, low temperature plasmas and plasma jets are making big strides as a technology that can potentially be used in medicine^1-2. At this stage of research, fundamental questions about the effects of plasma on prokaryotic and eukaryotic cells are still not completely answered. An in-depth understanding of the pathway whereby cold plasma interact with biological cells is necessary before real applications can emerge. In this paper, first an overview of non-equilibrium plasma sources (both low and high pressures) will be presented. Secondly, the effects of plasma on bacterial cells will be discussed. Here, the roles of the various plasma agents in the inactivation process will be outlined. In particular, the effects of UV and that of various reactive species (O3, O, OH) are highlighted. Thirdly, preliminary findings on the effects of plasma on few types of eukaryotic cells will be presented. How plasma affects eukaryotic cells, such as mammalian cells, is very important in applications where the viability/preservation of the cells could be an issue (such as in wound treatment). Another interesting aspect is the triggering of apoptosis (programmed cell death). Some investigators have claimed that plasma is able to induce apoptosis in some types of cancer cells. If successfully replicated, this can open up a novel method of cancer treatment. In this talk however, I will briefly focus more on the wound healing potential of cold plasmas. ^1E. A. Blakely, K. A. Bjornstad, J. E. Galvin, O. R. Monteiro, and I. G. Brown, ``Selective Neuron Growth on Ion Implanted and Plasma Deposited Surfaces'', In Proc. IEEE Int. Conf. Plasma Sci., (2002), p. 253. ^2M. Laroussi, ``Non-thermal Decontamination of Biological Media by Atmospheric Pressure Plasmas: Review, Analysis, and

  15. Use of scanning electron microscopy to monitor nanofibre/cell interaction in digestive epithelial cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Millaku, Agron, E-mail: agron.mi@hotmail.com [Limnos-Company for Applied Ecology Ltd, Podlimbarskega 31, 1000 Ljubljana (Slovenia); Drobne, Damjana [University of Ljubljana, Biotechnical Faculty, Department of Biology, Večna pot 111, 1000 Ljubljana (Slovenia); Centre of Excellence, Advanced Materials and Technologies for the Future (CO NAMASTE), Jamova cesta 39, 1000 Ljubljana (Slovenia); Centre of Excellence, Nanoscience and Nanotechnology (Nanocentre), Jamova cesta 39, 1000 Ljubljana (Slovenia); Torkar, Matjaz [Institute of Metals and Technology IMT, Lepi pot 11, 1000 Ljubljana (Slovenia); Jožef Stefan Institute, Condensed Matter Physics Department, Jamova cesta 39, 1000 Ljubljana (Slovenia); Novak, Sara [University of Ljubljana, Biotechnical Faculty, Department of Biology, Večna pot 111, 1000 Ljubljana (Slovenia); Remškar, Maja [Jožef Stefan Institute, Condensed Matter Physics Department, Jamova cesta 39, 1000 Ljubljana (Slovenia); Pipan-Tkalec, Živa [University of Ljubljana, Biotechnical Faculty, Department of Biology, Večna pot 111, 1000 Ljubljana (Slovenia)

    2013-09-15

    Graphical abstract: Scanning electron microscopy is particularly well suited to the observation of nanofibre/cell interaction in the endothelial cells lining the hepatopancreas. (a) Tungsten oxide nanofibres, (b) test organism Porcellio scaber and schematic appearance of digestive tubes, (c) digestive tube (hepatopancreas) prepared for SEM investigation, (d) digestive gland cells (C) with nanofibres (NF) embedded in the cell membrane and (e) nanofibres inserted deeply in the cells and damaged nanofibres due to peristalsis. -- Highlights: • Tungsten oxide nanofibres react physically with digestive gland epithelial cells in Porcellio scaber. • Physical peristaltic forces of lead to insertion of nanofibres into the cells. • No toxic responses as measured by conventional toxicity biomarkers were detected. • Physical interactions were observed in a majority of the investigated animals. -- Abstract: We provide data obtained by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDS) on the interaction of ingested tungsten nanofibers with epithelial cells of the digestive tubes of a test organism Porcellio scaber. Conventional toxicity endpoints including feeding behaviour, weight loss and mortality were also measured in each investigated animal. No toxicity was detected in any of exposed animals after 14 days of feeding on tungsten nanofiber dosed food, but when nanofibers enter the digestive system they can react with epithelial cells of the digestive tubes, becoming physically inserted into the cells. In this way, nanofibers can injure the epithelial cells of digestive gland tubes when they are ingested with food. Our SEM data suggest that peristaltic forces may have an important role, not predicted by in vitro experiments, in the interactions of nanomaterials with digestive intestinal cells.

  16. TEX14 Interacts with CEP55 To Block Cell Abscission▿

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iwamori, Tokuko; Iwamori, Naoki; Ma, Lang; Edson, Mark A.; Greenbaum, Michael P.; Matzuk, Martin M.

    2010-01-01

    In somatic cells, abscission, the physical separation of daughter cells at the completion of cytokinesis, requires CEP55, ALIX, and TSG101. In contrast, cytokinesis is arrested prior to abscission in differentiating male germ cells that are interconnected by TEX14-positive intercellular bridges. We have previously shown that targeted deletion of TEX14 disrupts intercellular bridges in all germ cells and causes male sterility. Although these findings demonstrate that intercellular bridges are essential for spermatogenesis, it remains to be shown how TEX14 and other proteins come together to prevent abscission and form stable intercellular bridges. Using a biochemical enrichment of male germ cell intercellular bridges, we identified additional bridge proteins, including CEP55. Although CEP55 is highly expressed in testes at the RNA level, there is no report of the presence of CEP55 in germ cells. We show here that CEP55 becomes a stable component of the intercellular bridge and that an evolutionarily conserved GPPX3Y motif of TEX14 binds strongly to CEP55 to block similar GPPX3Y motifs of ALIX and TSG101 from interacting and localizing to the midbody. Thus, TEX14 prevents the completion of cytokinesis by altering the destiny of CEP55 from a nidus for abscission to an integral component of the intercellular bridge. PMID:20176808

  17. E-cadherin interactions are required for Langerhans cell differentiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mayumi, Nobuko; Watanabe, Eri; Norose, Yoshihiko; Watari, Eiji; Kawana, Seiji; Geijtenbeek, Teunis B H; Takahashi, Hidemi

    2013-01-01

    Human skin contains the following two distinct DC subsets: (i) Langerhans cells (LCs), expressing Langerin but not DC-specific intercellular adhesion molecule-3-grabbing nonintegrin (DC-SIGN), are predominantly localized in the epidermis; and (ii) dermal DCs, expressing DC-SIGN but not Langerin, are observed mainly in the dermis. It is not known whether localization in the epidermis provides cues for LC differentiation. Here, we show that E-cadherin expressed by epidermal keratinocytes (KCs) is crucial for differentiation of LCs. Monocytes differentiated into LC-like cells in presence of IL-4, GM-CSF, and TGF-β1. However, these LC-like cells expressed not only Langerin but also DC-SIGN. Notably, co-culturing of these LC-like cells with KCs expressing E-cadherin or recombinant E-cadherin strongly decreased expression of DC-SIGN and further induced a phenotype similar to purified epidermal LCs. Moreover, pretreatment of LC-like cells with anti-E-cadherin-specific antibody completely abolished their Langerin expression, indicating the requirement of E-cadherin–E-cadherin interactions for the differentiation into Langerin+ cells. These findings suggest that E-cadherin expressed by KCs provide environmental cues that induce differentiation of LCs in the epidermis. PMID:23135957

  18. Curcumin targets fibroblast–tumor cell interactions in oral squamous cell carcinoma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dudás, József, E-mail: jozsef.dudas@i-med.ac.at [Department of Otorhinolaryngology and Head and Neck Surgery, Medical University Innsbruck, Anichstrasse 35, A-6020 Innsbruck (Austria); Fullár, Alexandra, E-mail: fullarsz@gmail.com [Department of Otorhinolaryngology and Head and Neck Surgery, Medical University Innsbruck, Anichstrasse 35, A-6020 Innsbruck (Austria); 1st Department of Pathology and Experimental Cancer Research, Semmelweis University, Üllői út 26, 1085 Budapest (Hungary); Romani, Angela, E-mail: angela.romani@i-med.ac.at [Department of Otorhinolaryngology and Head and Neck Surgery, Medical University Innsbruck, Anichstrasse 35, A-6020 Innsbruck (Austria); Pritz, Christian, E-mail: christian.pritz@i-med.ac.at [Department of Otorhinolaryngology and Head and Neck Surgery, Medical University Innsbruck, Anichstrasse 35, A-6020 Innsbruck (Austria); Kovalszky, Ilona, E-mail: koval@korb1.sote.hu [1st Department of Pathology and Experimental Cancer Research, Semmelweis University, Üllői út 26, 1085 Budapest (Hungary); Hans Schartinger, Volker, E-mail: volker.schartinger@i-med.ac.at [Department of Otorhinolaryngology and Head and Neck Surgery, Medical University Innsbruck, Anichstrasse 35, A-6020 Innsbruck (Austria); Mathias Sprinzl, Georg, E-mail: georg.sprinzl@i-med.ac.at [Department of Otorhinolaryngology and Head and Neck Surgery, Medical University Innsbruck, Anichstrasse 35, A-6020 Innsbruck (Austria); Riechelmann, Herbert, E-mail: herbert.riechelmann@i-med.ac.at [Department of Otorhinolaryngology and Head and Neck Surgery, Medical University Innsbruck, Anichstrasse 35, A-6020 Innsbruck (Austria)

    2013-04-01

    Co-culture of periodontal ligament fibroblasts (PDLs) and SCC-25 oral squamous carcinoma cells (OSCC) results in conversion of PDLs into carcinoma-associated fibroblasts (CAFs) and induces epithelial-to mesenchymal transition (EMT) of OSCC tumor cells. We hypothesized that Curcumin targets this dynamic mutual interaction between CAFs and tumor cells. Normal and 2 μM Curcumin-treated co-culture were performed for 4 days, followed by analysis of tumor cell invasivity, mRNA/protein expression of EMT-markers and mediators, activity measure of matrix metalloproteinase 9 (MMP-9), and western blot analysis of signal transduction in tumor cells and fibroblasts. In Curcumin-treated co-culture, in tumor cells, the levels of nuclear factor κB (NFκBα) and early response kinase (ERK)—decreased, in fibroblasts, integrin αv protein synthesis decreased compared to corresponding cells in normal co-culture. The signal modulatory changes induced by Curcumin caused decreased release of EMT-mediators in CAFs and reversal of EMT in tumor cells, which was associated with decreased invasion. These data confirm the palliative potential of Curcumin in clinical application. - Graphical abstract: Co-culture of periodontal ligament fibroblasts (PDLs) and SCC-25 oral squamous carcinoma cells (OSCC) results in conversion of PDLs into carcinoma-associated fibroblasts (CAFs) and induces epithelial-to mesenchymal transition (EMT) of tumor cells. Curcumin targets this dynamic mutual interaction between CAFs and tumor cells by inhibiting the production of EMT mediators in CAFs and by modification of intracellular signaling in tumor cells. This causes less invasivity and reversal of EMT in tumor cells. Highlights: ► Curcumin targets tumor–fibroblast interaction in head and neck cancer. ► Curcumin suppresses mediators of epithelial–mesenchymal transition. ► Curcumin decreases the invasivity of tumor cells.

  19. Targeting proliferating cell nuclear antigen and its protein interactions induces apoptosis in multiple myeloma cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rebekka Müller

    Full Text Available Multiple myeloma is a hematological cancer that is considered incurable despite advances in treatment strategy during the last decade. Therapies targeting single pathways are unlikely to succeed due to the heterogeneous nature of the malignancy. Proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA is a multifunctional protein essential for DNA replication and repair that is often overexpressed in cancer cells. Many proteins involved in the cellular stress response interact with PCNA through the five amino acid sequence AlkB homologue 2 PCNA-interacting motif (APIM. Thus inhibiting PCNA's protein interactions may be a good strategy to target multiple pathways simultaneously. We initially found that overexpression of peptides containing the APIM sequence increases the sensitivity of cancer cells to contemporary therapeutics. Here we have designed a cell-penetrating APIM-containing peptide, ATX-101, that targets PCNA and show that it has anti-myeloma activity. We found that ATX-101 induced apoptosis in multiple myeloma cell lines and primary cancer cells, while bone marrow stromal cells and primary healthy lymphocytes were much less sensitive. ATX-101-induced apoptosis was caspase-dependent and cell cycle phase-independent. ATX-101 also increased multiple myeloma cells' sensitivity against melphalan, a DNA damaging agent commonly used for treatment of multiple myeloma. In a xenograft mouse model, ATX-101 was well tolerated and increased the anti-tumor activity of melphalan. Therefore, targeting PCNA by ATX-101 may be a novel strategy in multiple myeloma treatment.

  20. GFP-specific CD8 T cells enable targeted cell depletion and visualization of T-cell interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agudo, Judith; Ruzo, Albert; Park, Eun Sook; Sweeney, Robert; Kana, Veronika; Wu, Meng; Zhao, Yong; Egli, Dieter; Merad, Miriam; Brown, Brian D

    2015-12-01

    There are numerous cell types with scarcely understood functions, whose interactions with the immune system are not well characterized. To facilitate their study, we generated a mouse bearing enhanced green fluorescent protein (EGFP)-specific CD8(+) T cells. Transfer of the T cells into EGFP reporter animals can be used to kill EGFP-expressing cells, allowing selective depletion of desired cell types, or to interrogate T-cell interactions with specific populations. Using this system, we eliminate a rare EGFP-expressing cell type in the heart and demonstrate its role in cardiac function. We also show that naive T cells are recruited into the mouse brain by antigen-expressing microglia, providing evidence of an immune surveillance pathway in the central nervous system. The just EGFP death-inducing (Jedi) T cells enable visualization of a T-cell antigen. They also make it possible to utilize hundreds of existing EGFP-expressing mice, tumors, pathogens and other tools, to study T-cell interactions with many different cell types, to model disease states and to determine the functions of poorly characterized cell populations.

  1. Brown spider venom toxins interact with cell surface and are endocytosed by rabbit endothelial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nowatzki, Jenifer; de Sene, Reginaldo Vieira; Paludo, Katia Sabrina; Veiga, Silvio Sanches; Oliver, Constance; Jamur, Maria Célia; Nader, Helena Bonciani; Trindade, Edvaldo S; Franco, Célia Regina C

    2010-09-15

    Bites from the Loxosceles genus (brown spiders) cause severe clinical symptoms, including dermonecrotic injury, hemorrhage, hemolysis, platelet aggregation and renal failure. Histological findings of dermonecrotic lesions in animals exposed to Loxosceles intermedia venom show numerous vascular alterations. Study of the hemorrhagic consequences of the venom in endothelial cells has demonstrated that the degeneration of blood vessels results not only from degradation of the extracellular matrix molecule or massive leukocyte infiltration, but also from a direct and primary activity of the venom on endothelial cells. Exposure of an endothelial cell line in vitro to L. intermedia venom induce morphological alterations, such as cell retraction and disadhesion to the extracellular matrix. The aim of the present study was to investigate the interaction between the venom toxins and the endothelial cell surface and their possible internalization, in order to illuminate the information about the deleterious effect triggered by venom. After treating endothelial cells with venom toxins, we observed that the venom interacts with cell surface. Venom treatment also can cause a reduction of cell surface glycoconjugates. When cells were permeabilized, it was possible to verify that some venom toxins were internalized by the endothelial cells. The venom internalization involves endocytic vesicles and the venom was detected in the lysosomes. However, no damage to lysosomal integrity was observed, suggesting that the cytotoxic effect evoked by L. intermedia venom on endothelial cells is not mediated by venom internalization.

  2. An Interactive Exercise To Learn Eukaryotic Cell Structure and Organelle Function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klionsky, Daniel J.; Tomashek, John J.

    1999-01-01

    Describes a cooperative, interactive problem-solving exercise for studying eukaryotic cell structure and function. Highlights the dynamic aspects of movement through the cell. Contains 15 references. (WRM)

  3. [Adhesive cell interactions in the biology of cancer].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bocharova, O A

    2002-01-01

    The present review describes a hypothesis for a critical role of cell adhesive interactions in tumorigenesis. Dysregulation of tissue cell-cell interactions initiates first of all local (in the tissue) and then general (in whole body) conditions for tumor growth. Otherwise imbalance of tissue-specific adhesion factor at the very beginning of carcinogenesis is considered to trigger a cascade of pathological reactions responsible for more severe adhesive disorders that are in turn critical for the "totalitarian" behavior of a tumor and its "colonization" of other tissues and organs. Impaired disturbance is likely to be the key mechanism of carcinogenesis since it is significantly associated with the main features of a tumor: tissue proliferation control loss, anaplasia, invasion, metastasis, and immune surveillance deficit. The hypothesis is supported by evolutionary, biological, histological, immunological, and clinical arguments whose combination does not characterize any other known mechanisms of oncogenesis. The concept of adhesiveness opens new possibilities for the diagnosis, prevention, and treatment of tumors and also improves a strategy for designing new drugs.

  4. Use of scanning electron microscopy to monitor nanofibre/cell interaction in digestive epithelial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Millaku, Agron; Drobne, Damjana; Torkar, Matjaz; Novak, Sara; Remškar, Maja; Pipan-Tkalec, Živa

    2013-09-15

    We provide data obtained by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDS) on the interaction of ingested tungsten nanofibers with epithelial cells of the digestive tubes of a test organism Porcellio scaber. Conventional toxicity endpoints including feeding behaviour, weight loss and mortality were also measured in each investigated animal. No toxicity was detected in any of exposed animals after 14 days of feeding on tungsten nanofiber dosed food, but when nanofibers enter the digestive system they can react with epithelial cells of the digestive tubes, becoming physically inserted into the cells. In this way, nanofibers can injure the epithelial cells of digestive gland tubes when they are ingested with food. Our SEM data suggest that peristaltic forces may have an important role, not predicted by in vitro experiments, in the interactions of nanomaterials with digestive intestinal cells.

  5. Towards estimating the true duration of dendritic cell interactions with T cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beltman, Joost B; Henrickson, Sarah E; von Andrian, Ulrich H; de Boer, Rob J; Marée, Athanasius F M

    2009-08-15

    To initiate an adaptive immune response, T cells need to interact with dendritic cells (DCs), and the duration of these interactions plays an important role. In vitro and in vivo experiments have generally tried to estimate the required period of opportunity for T cell stimulation rather than the duration of individual T cell-DC interactions. Since the application of multi-photon microscopy (MPM) to living lymphoid tissues, the interactions between immune cells, as well as the duration thereof, can directly be observed in vivo. Indeed, long-lasting interactions between T cells and DCs were shown to be important for the onset of immune responses. However, because MPM imaging is typically restricted to experiments lasting 1 h, and because T cell-DC conjugates frequently move into and out of the imaged volume, it is difficult to estimate the true duration of interactions from MPM contact data. Here, we present a method to properly make such an estimate of (the average of) the distribution of contact durations. We validate the method by applying it to spatially explicit computer simulations where the true distribution of contact duration is known. Finally, we apply our analysis to a large experimental data set of T-DC contacts, and predict an average contact time of about three hours. However, we identify a mismatch between the experimental data and the model predictions, and investigate possible causes of the mismatch, including minor tissue drift during imaging experiments. We discuss in detail how future experiments can be optimized such that MPM contact data will be minimally affected by these factors.

  6. Interactions between MSCs and Immune Cells: Implications for Bone Healing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tracy K. Kovach

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available It is estimated that, of the 7.9 million fractures sustained in the United States each year, 5% to 20% result in delayed or impaired healing requiring therapeutic intervention. Following fracture injury, there is an initial inflammatory response that plays a crucial role in bone healing; however, prolonged inflammation is inhibitory for fracture repair. The precise spatial and temporal impact of immune cells and their cytokines on fracture healing remains obscure. Some cytokines are reported to be proosteogenic while others inhibit bone healing. Cell-based therapy utilizing mesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs is an attractive option for augmenting the fracture repair process. Osteoprogenitor MSCs not only differentiate into bone, but they also exert modulatory effects on immune cells via a variety of mechanisms. In this paper, we review the current literature on both in vitro and in vivo studies on the role of the immune system in fracture repair, the use of MSCs in the enhancement of fracture healing, and interactions between MSCs and immune cells. Insight into this paradigm can provide valuable clues in identifying cellular and noncellular targets that can potentially be modulated to enhance both natural bone healing and bone repair augmented by the exogenous addition of MSCs.

  7. Interaction between antigen presenting cells and autoreactive T cells derived from BXSB mice with murine lupus

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Peng Yang; Bo Li; Ping Lv; Yan Zhang; XiaoMing Gao

    2007-01-01

    Systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) is a typical autoimmune disease involving multiple systems and organs. Ample evidence suggests that autoreactive T cells play a pivotal role in the development of this autoimmune disorder. This study was undertaken to investigate the mechanisms of interaction between antigen presenting cells (APCs) and an autoreactive T cell (ATL1) clone obtained from lupus-prone BXSB mice. ATL1 cells, either before or after γ-ray irradiation, were able to activate naive B cells, as determined by B cell proliferation assays. Macrophages from BXSB mice were able to stimulate the proliferation of resting ATL1 cells at a responder/stimulator (R/S) ratio of 1/2.5. Dendritic cells (DCs) were much more powerful stimulators for ATL1 cells on a per cell basis. The T cell stimulating ability of macrophages and B cells, but not DCs, was sensitive toγ-ray irradiation. Monoclonal antibodies against mouse MHC-Ⅱand CD4 were able to block DC-mediated stimulation of ATL1 proliferation, indicating cognate recognition between ATL1 and APCs. Our data suggest that positive feedback loops involving macrophages, B cells and autoreactive T cells may play a pivotal role in keeping the momentum of autoimmune responses leading to autoimmune diseases.

  8. Quantitative genetic-interaction mapping in mammalian cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roguev, Assen; Talbot, Dale; Negri, Gian Luca; Shales, Michael; Cagney, Gerard; Bandyopadhyay, Sourav; Panning, Barbara; Krogan, Nevan J

    2013-01-01

    Mapping genetic interactions (GIs) by simultaneously perturbing pairs of genes is a powerful tool for understanding complex biological phenomena. Here we describe an experimental platform for generating quantitative GI maps in mammalian cells using a combinatorial RNA interference strategy. We performed ~11,000 pairwise knockdowns in mouse fibroblasts, focusing on 130 factors involved in chromatin regulation to create a GI map. Comparison of the GI and protein-protein interaction (PPI) data revealed that pairs of genes exhibiting positive GIs and/or similar genetic profiles were predictive of the corresponding proteins being physically associated. The mammalian GI map identified pathways and complexes but also resolved functionally distinct submodules within larger protein complexes. By integrating GI and PPI data, we created a functional map of chromatin complexes in mouse fibroblasts, revealing that the PAF complex is a central player in the mammalian chromatin landscape. PMID:23407553

  9. Human eosinophil–airway smooth muscle cell interactions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Margaret Hughes

    2000-01-01

    Full Text Available Eosinophils are present throughout the airway wall of asthmatics. The nature of the interaction between human airway smooth muscle cells (ASMC and eosinophils was investigated in this study. We demonstrated, using light microscopy, that freshly isolated eosinophils from healthy donors rapidly attach to ASMC in vitro. Numbers of attached eosinophils were highest at 2 h, falling to 50% of maximum by 20 h. Eosinophil attachment at 2 h was reduced to 72% of control by anti-VCAM-1, and to 74% at 20 h by anti-ICAM-1. Pre-treatment of ASMC for 24 h with TNF-α, 10 nM, significantly increased eosinophil adhesion to 149 and 157% of control after 2 and 20 h. These results provide evidence that eosinophil interactions with ASMC involve VCAM-1 and ICAM-1 and are modulated by TNF-α.

  10. Interactions between endothelial progenitor cells (EPC) and titanium implant surfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ziebart, Thomas; Schnell, Anne; Walter, Christian; Kämmerer, Peer W; Pabst, Andreas; Lehmann, Karl M; Ziebart, Johanna; Klein, Marc O; Al-Nawas, Bilal

    2013-01-01

    Endothelial cells play an important role in peri-implant angiogenesis during early bone formation. Therefore, interactions between endothelial progenitor cells (EPCs) and titanium dental implant surfaces are of crucial interest. The aim of our in vitro study was to investigate the reactions of EPCs in contact with different commercially available implant surfaces. EPCs from buffy coats were isolated by Ficoll density gradient separation. After cell differentiation, EPC were cultured for a period of 7 days on different titanium surfaces. The test surfaces varied in roughness and hydrophilicity: acid-etched (A), sand-blasted-blasted and acid-etched (SLA), hydrophilic A (modA), and hydrophilic SLA (modSLA). Plastic and fibronectin-coated plastic surfaces served as controls. Cell numbers and morphology were analyzed by confocal laser scanning microscopy. Secretion of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF)-A was measured by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay and expressions of iNOS and eNOS were investigated by real-time polymerase chain reaction. Cell numbers were higher in the control groups compared to the cells of titanium surfaces. Initially, hydrophilic titanium surfaces (modA and modSLA) showed lower cell numbers than hydrophobic surfaces (A and SLA). After 7 days smoother surfaces (A and modA) showed increased cell numbers compared to rougher surfaces (SLA and modSLA). Cell morphology of A, modA, and control surfaces was characterized by a multitude of pseudopodia and planar cell soma architecture. SLA and modSLA promoted small and plump cell soma with little quantity of pseudopodia. The lowest VEGF level was measured on A, the highest on modSLA. The highest eNOS and iNOS expressions were found on modA surfaces. The results of this study demonstrate that biological behaviors of EPCs can be influenced by different surfaces. The modSLA surface promotes an undifferentiated phenotype of EPCs that has the ability to secrete growth factors in great quantities. In

  11. B cell: T cell interactions occur within hepatic granulomas during experimental visceral leishmaniasis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John W J Moore

    Full Text Available Hepatic resistance to Leishmania donovani infection in mice is associated with the development of granulomas, in which a variety of lymphoid and non-lymphoid populations accumulate. Although previous studies have identified B cells in hepatic granulomas and functional studies in B cell-deficient mice have suggested a role for B cells in the control of experimental visceral leishmaniasis, little is known about the behaviour of B cells in the granuloma microenvironment. Here, we first compared the hepatic B cell population in infected mice, where ≈60% of B cells are located within granulomas, with that of naïve mice. In infected mice, there was a small increase in mIgM(lomIgD(+ mature B2 cells, but no enrichment of B cells with regulatory phenotype or function compared to the naïve hepatic B cell population, as assessed by CD1d and CD5 expression and by IL-10 production. Using 2-photon microscopy to quantify the entire intra-granuloma B cell population, in conjunction with the adoptive transfer of polyclonal and HEL-specific BCR-transgenic B cells isolated from L. donovani-infected mice, we demonstrated that B cells accumulate in granulomas over time in an antigen-independent manner. Intra-vital dynamic imaging was used to demonstrate that within the polyclonal B cell population obtained from L. donovani-infected mice, the frequency of B cells that made multiple long contacts with endogenous T cells was greater than that observed using HEL-specific B cells obtained from the same inflammatory environment. These data indicate, therefore, that a subset of this polyclonal B cell population is capable of making cognate interactions with T cells within this unique environment, and provide the first insights into the dynamics of B cells within an inflammatory site.

  12. Real-time sensing of epithelial cell-cell and cell-substrate interactions by impedance spectroscopy on porous substrates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mondal, D.; RoyChaudhuri, C., E-mail: chirosreepram@yahoo.com [Department of Electronics and Telecommunication Engineering, Indian Institute of Engineering Science and Technology, Shibpur, Howrah 711103 (India); Pal, D. [Department of Aerospace Engineering and Applied Mechanics, Indian Institute of Engineering Science and Technology, Shibpur, Howrah 711103 (India)

    2015-07-28

    Oxidized porous silicon (PS) is a common topographical biocompatible substrate that potentially provides a distinct in vitro environment for better understanding of in vivo behavior. But in the reported studies on oxidized PS, cell-cell and cell-substrate interactions have been detected only by fluorescent labeling. This paper is the first attempt to investigate real-time sensing of these interactions on HaCaT cells by label-free impedance spectroscopy on oxidized PS of two pore diameters (50 and 500 nm). One of the major requirements for successful impedance spectroscopy measurement is to restrict the channeling of electric field lines through the pores. To satisfy this criterion, we have designed the pore depths after analyzing the penetration of the medium by using computational fluid dynamics simulation. A distributed electrical model was also developed for estimating the various cellular attributes by considering a pseudorandom distribution of pores. It is observed from the impedance measurements and from the model that the proliferation rate increases for 50 nm pores but decreases for 500 nm pores compared to that for planar substrates. The rate of decrease in cell substrate separation (h) in the initial stage is more than the rate of increase in cell-cell junction resistance (R{sub b}) corresponding to the initial adhesion phase of cells. It is observed that R{sub b} and h are higher for 50 nm pores than those for planar substrates, corresponding to the fact that substrates more conducive toward cell adhesion encourage cell-cell interactions than direct cell-substrate interactions. Thus, the impedance spectroscopy coupled with the proposed theoretical framework for PS substrates can sense and quantify the cellular interactions.

  13. Interactions between fibroblastic reticular cells and B cells promote mesenteric lymph node lymphangiogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dubey, Lalit Kumar; Karempudi, Praneeth; Luther, Sanjiv A; Ludewig, Burkhard; Harris, Nicola L

    2017-08-28

    Lymphatic growth (lymphangiogenesis) within lymph nodes functions to promote dendritic cell entry and effector lymphocyte egress in response to infection or inflammation. Here we demonstrate a crucial role for lymphotoxin-beta receptor (LTβR) signaling to fibroblastic reticular cells (FRCs) by lymphotoxin-expressing B cells in driving mesenteric lymph node lymphangiogenesis following helminth infection. LTβR ligation on fibroblastic reticular cells leads to the production of B-cell-activating factor (BAFF), which synergized with interleukin-4 (IL-4) to promote the production of the lymphangiogenic factors, vascular endothelial growth factors (VEGF)-A and VEGF-C, by B cells. In addition, the BAFF-IL-4 synergy augments expression of lymphotoxin by antigen-activated B cells, promoting further B cell-fibroblastic reticular cell interactions. These results underlie the importance of lymphotoxin-dependent B cell-FRC cross talk in driving the expansion of lymphatic networks that function to promote and maintain immune responsiveness.The growth of lymph nodes in response to infection requires lymphangiogenesis. Dubey et al. show that the mesenteric lymph node lymphangiogenesis upon helminth infection depends on the signaling loop between the B and fibroblastic reticular cells (FRCs), whereby the FRCs respond to lymphotoxin secreted by B cells by releasing B cell activating factor.

  14. Pyramidal cell-interneuron interactions underlie hippocampal ripple oscillations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stark, Eran; Roux, Lisa; Eichler, Ronny; Senzai, Yuta; Royer, Sebastien; Buzsáki, György

    2014-07-16

    High-frequency ripple oscillations, observed most prominently in the hippocampal CA1 pyramidal layer, are associated with memory consolidation. The cellular and network mechanisms underlying the generation, frequency control, and spatial coherence of the rhythm are poorly understood. Using multisite optogenetic manipulations in freely behaving rodents, we found that depolarization of a small group of nearby pyramidal cells was sufficient to induce high-frequency oscillations, whereas closed-loop silencing of pyramidal cells or activation of parvalbumin- (PV) or somatostatin-immunoreactive interneurons aborted spontaneously occurring ripples. Focal pharmacological blockade of GABAA receptors abolished ripples. Localized PV interneuron activation paced ensemble spiking, and simultaneous induction of high-frequency oscillations at multiple locations resulted in a temporally coherent pattern mediated by phase-locked interneuron spiking. These results constrain competing models of ripple generation and indicate that temporally precise local interactions between excitatory and inhibitory neurons support ripple generation in the intact hippocampus.

  15. Interaction of Human Tumor Viruses with Host Cell Surface Receptors and Cell Entry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Georgia Schäfer

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Currently, seven viruses, namely Epstein-Barr virus (EBV, Kaposi’s sarcoma-associated herpes virus (KSHV, high-risk human papillomaviruses (HPVs, Merkel cell polyomavirus (MCPyV, hepatitis B virus (HBV, hepatitis C virus (HCV and human T cell lymphotropic virus type 1 (HTLV-1, have been described to be consistently associated with different types of human cancer. These oncogenic viruses belong to distinct viral families, display diverse cell tropism and cause different malignancies. A key to their pathogenicity is attachment to the host cell and entry in order to replicate and complete their life cycle. Interaction with the host cell during viral entry is characterized by a sequence of events, involving viral envelope and/or capsid molecules as well as cellular entry factors that are critical in target cell recognition, thereby determining cell tropism. Most oncogenic viruses initially attach to cell surface heparan sulfate proteoglycans, followed by conformational change and transfer of the viral particle to secondary high-affinity cell- and virus-specific receptors. This review summarizes the current knowledge of the host cell surface factors and molecular mechanisms underlying oncogenic virus binding and uptake by their cognate host cell(s with the aim to provide a concise overview of potential target molecules for prevention and/or treatment of oncogenic virus infection.

  16. Extracellular Matrix Ligand and Stiffness Modulate Immature Nucleus Pulposus Cell-Cell Interactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gilchrist, Christopher L.; Darling, Eric M.; Chen, Jun; Setton, Lori A.

    2011-01-01

    The nucleus pulposus (NP) of the intervertebral disc functions to provide compressive load support in the spine, and contains cells that play a critical role in the generation and maintenance of this tissue. The NP cell population undergoes significant morphological and phenotypic changes during maturation and aging, transitioning from large, vacuolated immature cells arranged in cell clusters to a sparse population of smaller, isolated chondrocyte-like cells. These morphological and organizational changes appear to correlate with the first signs of degenerative changes within the intervertebral disc. The extracellular matrix of the immature NP is a soft, gelatinous material containing multiple laminin isoforms, features that are unique to the NP relative to other regions of the disc and that change with aging and degeneration. Based on this knowledge, we hypothesized that a soft, laminin-rich extracellular matrix environment would promote NP cell-cell interactions and phenotypes similar to those found in immature NP tissues. NP cells were isolated from porcine intervertebral discs and cultured in matrix environments of varying mechanical stiffness that were functionalized with various matrix ligands; cellular responses to periods of culture were assessed using quantitative measures of cell organization and phenotype. Results show that soft (<720 Pa), laminin-containing extracellular matrix substrates promote NP cell morphologies, cell-cell interactions, and proteoglycan production in vitro, and that this behavior is dependent upon both extracellular matrix ligand and substrate mechanical properties. These findings indicate that NP cell organization and phenotype may be highly sensitive to their surrounding extracellular matrix environment. PMID:22087260

  17. Extracellular matrix ligand and stiffness modulate immature nucleus pulposus cell-cell interactions.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christopher L Gilchrist

    Full Text Available The nucleus pulposus (NP of the intervertebral disc functions to provide compressive load support in the spine, and contains cells that play a critical role in the generation and maintenance of this tissue. The NP cell population undergoes significant morphological and phenotypic changes during maturation and aging, transitioning from large, vacuolated immature cells arranged in cell clusters to a sparse population of smaller, isolated chondrocyte-like cells. These morphological and organizational changes appear to correlate with the first signs of degenerative changes within the intervertebral disc. The extracellular matrix of the immature NP is a soft, gelatinous material containing multiple laminin isoforms, features that are unique to the NP relative to other regions of the disc and that change with aging and degeneration. Based on this knowledge, we hypothesized that a soft, laminin-rich extracellular matrix environment would promote NP cell-cell interactions and phenotypes similar to those found in immature NP tissues. NP cells were isolated from porcine intervertebral discs and cultured in matrix environments of varying mechanical stiffness that were functionalized with various matrix ligands; cellular responses to periods of culture were assessed using quantitative measures of cell organization and phenotype. Results show that soft (<720 Pa, laminin-containing extracellular matrix substrates promote NP cell morphologies, cell-cell interactions, and proteoglycan production in vitro, and that this behavior is dependent upon both extracellular matrix ligand and substrate mechanical properties. These findings indicate that NP cell organization and phenotype may be highly sensitive to their surrounding extracellular matrix environment.

  18. The organochlorine herbicide chloridazon interacts with cell membranes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suwalsky, M; Benites, M; Villena, F; Norris, B; Quevedo, L

    1998-07-01

    Chloridazon is a widely used organochlorine herbicide. In order to evaluate its perturbing effect on cell membranes it was made to interact with human erythrocytes, frog adrenergic neuroepithelial synapse and molecular models. These consisted in multilayers of dimyristoylphosphatidylethanolamine (DMPE) and of dimyristoylphosphatidyltidylcholine (DMPC), representative of phospholipid classes located in the inner and outer monolayers of the erythrocyte membrane, respectively. X-ray diffraction showed that chloridazon interacted preferentially with DMPC multilayers. Scanning electron microscopy revealed that 0.1 mM chloridazon induced erythrocyte crenation. According to the bilayer couple hypothesis, this is due to the preferential insertion of chloridazon in the phosphatidylcholine-rich external moiety of the red cell membrane. Electrophysiological measurements showed that nerve stimulation was followed immediately by a transient increase in short-circuit current (SCC) and in the potential difference (PD) of the neuroepithelial synapse. Increasing concentrations of chloridazon caused a dose-dependent and reversible decrease of the responses of both parameters to 76% of their control values. The pesticide induced a similar (28%) significant time-dependent decrease in the basal values of the SCC and of PD. These results are in accordance with a perturbing effect of chloridazon on the phospholipid moiety of the nerve fibre membrane leading to interference with total ion transport across the nerve skin junction.

  19. Eph/ephrin-B-mediated cell-to-cell interactions govern MTS20(+) thymic epithelial cell development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montero-Herradón, Sara; García-Ceca, Javier; Sánchez Del Collado, Beatriz; Alfaro, David; Zapata, Agustín G

    2016-08-01

    Thymus development is a complex process in which cell-to-cell interactions between thymocytes and thymic epithelial cells (TECs) are essential to allow a proper maturation of both thymic cell components. Although signals that control thymocyte development are well known, mechanisms governing TEC maturation are poorly understood, especially those that regulate the maturation of immature TEC populations during early fetal thymus development. In this study, we show that EphB2-deficient, EphB2LacZ and EphB3-deficient fetal thymuses present a lower number of cells and delayed maturation of DN cell subsets compared to WT values. Moreover, deficits in the production of chemokines, known to be involved in the lymphoid seeding into the thymus, contribute in decreased proportions of intrathymic T cell progenitors (PIRA/B(+)) in the mutant thymuses from early stages of development. These features correlate with increased proportions of MTS20(+) cells but fewer MTS20(-) cells from E13.5 onward in the deficient thymuses, suggesting a delayed development of the first epithelial cells. In addition, in vitro the lack of thymocytes or the blockade of Eph/ephrin-B-mediated cell-to-cell interactions between either thymocytes-TECs or TECs-TECs in E13.5 fetal thymic lobes coursed with increased proportions of MTS20(+) TECs. This confirms, for the first time, that the presence of CD45(+) cells, corresponding at these stages to DN1 and DN2 cells, and Eph/ephrin-B-mediated heterotypic or homotypic cell interactions between thymocytes and TECs, or between TECs and themselves, contribute to the early maturation of MTS20(+) TECs.

  20. Lassa Virus Cell Entry Reveals New Aspects of Virus-Host Cell Interaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torriani, Giulia; Galan-Navarro, Clara; Kunz, Stefan

    2017-02-15

    Viral entry represents the first step of every viral infection and is a determinant for the host range and disease potential of a virus. Here, we review the latest developments on cell entry of the highly pathogenic Old World arenavirus Lassa virus, providing novel insights into the complex virus-host cell interaction of this important human pathogen. We will cover new discoveries on the molecular mechanisms of receptor recognition, endocytosis, and the use of late endosomal entry factors.

  1. Nitric oxide regulates cell behavior on an interactive cell-derived extracellular matrix scaffold.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xing, Qi; Zhang, Lijun; Redman, Travis; Qi, Shaohai; Zhao, Feng

    2015-12-01

    During tissue injury and wound healing process, there are dynamic reciprocal interactions among cells, extracellular matrix (ECM), and mediating molecules which are crucial for functional tissue repair. Nitric oxide (NO) is one of the key mediating molecules that can positively regulate various biological activities involved in wound healing. Various ECM components serve as binding sites for cells and mediating molecules, and the interactions further stimulate cellular activities. Human mesenchymal stem cells (hMSCs) can migrate to the wound site and contribute to tissue regeneration through differentiation and paracrine signaling. The objective of this work was to investigate the regulatory effect of NO on hMSCs in an interactive ECM-rich microenvironment. In order to mimic the in vivo stromal environment in wound site, a cell-derived ECM scaffold that was able to release NO within the range of in vivo wound fluid NO level was fabricated. Results showed that the micro-molar level of NO released from the ECM scaffold had an inhibitory effect on cellular activities of hMSCs. The NO impaired cell growth, altered cell morphology, disrupted the F-actin organization, also decreased the expression of focal adhesion related molecules integrin α5 and paxillin. These results may contribute to the elucidation of how NO acts on hMSCs in wound healing process.

  2. Hypertonic saline impedes tumor cell-endothelial cell interaction by reducing adhesion molecule and laminin expression.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Shields, Conor J

    2012-02-03

    BACKGROUND: Hypertonic saline infusion dampens inflammatory responses and suppresses neutrophil-endothelial interaction by reducing adhesion molecule expression. This study tested the hypothesis that hypertonic saline attenuates tumor cell adhesion to the endothelium through a similar mechanism. METHODS: Human colon cancer cells (LS174T) were transfected with green fluorescent protein and exposed to lipopolysaccharide, tumor necrosis factor-alpha, and interleukin-6 under hypertonic and isotonic conditions for 1 and 4 hours. Confluent human umbilical vein endothelial cells were similarly exposed. Cellular apoptosis and expression of adhesion molecules and laminin were measured by flow cytometry. Tumor cell adhesion to endothelium and laminin was assessed with fluorescence microscopy. Data are represented as mean +\\/- standard error of mean, and an ANOVA test was performed to gauge statistical significance, with P <.05 considered significant. RESULTS: Hypertonic exposure significantly reduced tumor cell adhesion despite the presence of the perioperative cell stressors (42 +\\/- 2.9 vs 172.5 +\\/- 12.4, P <.05), attenuated tumor cell beta-1 integrin (14.43 vs 23.84, P <.05), and endothelial cell laminin expression (22.78 +\\/- 2.2 vs 33.74 +\\/- 2.4, P <.05), but did not significantly alter cell viability. CONCLUSION: Hypertonic saline significantly attenuates tumor cell adhesion to endothelium by inhibiting adhesion molecule and laminin expression. This may halt the metastatic behavior of tumor cells shed at surgery.

  3. A three-dimensional finite element model for the mechanics of cell-cell interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Viens, Denis; Brodland, G Wayne

    2007-10-01

    Technical challenges, including significant ones associated with cell rearrangement, have hampered the development of three-dimensional finite element models for the mechanics of embryonic cells. These challenges have been overcome by a new formulation in which the contents of each cell, assumed to have a viscosity mu, are modeled using a system of orthogonal dashpots. This approach overcomes a stiffening artifact that affects more traditional models, in which space-filling viscous elements are used to model the cytoplasm. Cells are assumed to be polyhedral in geometry, and each n-sided polygonal face is subdivided into n triangles with a common node at the face center so that it needs not remain flat. A constant tension gamma is assumed to act along each cell-cell interface, and cell rearrangements occur through one of two complementary topological transformations. The formulation predicts mechanical interactions between pairs of similar or dissimilar cells that are consistent with experiments, two-dimensional simulations, contact angle theory, and intracellular pressure calculations. Simulations of the partial engulfment of one tissue type by another show that the formulation is able to model aggregates of several hundred cells without difficulty. Simulations carried out using this formulation suggest new experimental approaches for measuring cell surface tensions and interfacial tensions. The formulation holds promise as a tool for gaining insight into the mechanics of isolated or aggregated embryonic cells and for the design and interpretation of experiments that involve them.

  4. Cell-collagen interactions: the use of peptide Toolkits to investigate collagen-receptor interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farndale, Richard W; Lisman, Ton; Bihan, Dominique; Hamaia, Samir; Smerling, Christiane S; Pugh, Nicholas; Konitsiotis, Antonios; Leitinger, Birgit; de Groot, Philip G; Jarvis, Gavin E; Raynal, Nicolas

    2008-04-01

    Fibrillar collagens provide the most fundamental platform in the vertebrate organism for the attachment of cells and matrix molecules. We have identified specific sites in collagens to which cells can attach, either directly or through protein intermediaries. Using Toolkits of triple-helical peptides, each peptide comprising 27 residues of collagen primary sequence and overlapping with its neighbours by nine amino acids, we have mapped the binding of receptors and other proteins on to collagens II or III. Integrin alpha2beta1 binds to several GXX'GER motifs within the collagens, the affinities of which differ sufficiently to control cell adhesion and migration independently of the cellular regulation of the integrin. The platelet receptor, Gp (glycoprotein) VI binds well to GPO (where O is hydroxyproline)-containing model peptides, but to very few Toolkit peptides, suggesting that sequence in addition to GPO triplets is important in defining GpVI binding. The Toolkits have been applied to the plasma protein vWF (von Willebrand factor), which binds to only a single sequence, identified by truncation and amino acid substitution within Toolkit peptides, as GXRGQOGVMGFO in collagens II and III. Intriguingly, the receptor tyrosine kinase, DDR2 (discoidin domain receptor 2) recognizes three sites in collagen II, including its vWF-binding site, although the amino acids that support the interaction differ slightly within this motif. Furthermore, the secreted protein BM-40 (basement membrane protein 40) also binds well to this same region. Thus the availability of extracellular collagen-binding proteins may be important in regulating and facilitating direct collagen-receptor interaction.

  5. Mesenchymal stem cells directly interact with breast cancer cells and promote tumor cell growth in vitro and in vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mandel, Katharina; Yang, Yuanyuan; Schambach, Axel; Glage, Silke; Otte, Anna; Hass, Ralf

    2013-12-01

    Cellular interactions were investigated between human mesenchymal stem cells (MSC) and human breast cancer cells. Co-culture of the two cell populations was associated with an MSC-mediated growth stimulation of MDA-MB-231 breast cancer cells. A continuous expansion of tumor cell colonies was progressively surrounded by MSC(GFP) displaying elongated cell bodies. Moreover, some MSC(GFP) and MDA-MB-231(cherry) cells spontaneously generated hybrid/chimeric cell populations, demonstrating a dual (green fluorescent protein+cherry) fluorescence. During a co-culture of 5-6 days, MSC also induced expression of the GPI-anchored CD90 molecule in breast cancer cells, which could not be observed in a transwell assay, suggesting the requirement of direct cellular interactions. Indeed, MSC-mediated CD90 induction in the breast cancer cells could be partially blocked by a gap junction inhibitor and by inhibition of the notch signaling pathway, respectively. Similar findings were observed in vivo by which a subcutaneous injection of a co-culture of primary MSC with MDA-MB-231(GFP) cells into NOD/scid mice exhibited an about 10-fold increased tumor size and enhanced metastatic capacity as compared with the MDA-MB-231(GFP) mono-culture. Flow cytometric evaluation of the co-culture tumors revealed more than 90% of breast cancer cells with about 3% of CD90-positive cells, also suggesting an MSC-mediated in vivo induction of CD90 in MDA-MB-231 cells. Furthermore, immunohistochemical analysis demonstrated an elevated neovascularization and viability in the MSC/MDA-MB-231(GFP)-derived tumors. Together, these data suggested an MSC-mediated growth stimulation of breast cancer cells in vitro and in vivo by which the altered MSC morphology and the appearance of hybrid/chimeric cells and breast cancer-expressing CD90(+) cells indicate mutual cellular alterations.

  6. Wnt and the cancer niche: paracrine interactions with gastrointestinal cancer cells undergoing asymmetric cell division.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xin, Hong-Wu; Ambe, Chenwi M; Ray, Satyajit; Kim, Bo-Kyu; Koizumi, Tomotake; Wiegand, Gordon W; Hari, Danielle; Mullinax, John E; Jaiswal, Kshama R; Garfield, Susan H; Stojadinovic, Alexander; Rudloff, Udo; Thorgeirsson, Snorri S; Avital, Itzhak

    2013-01-01

    Stem-like cancer cells contribute to cancer initiation and maintenance. Stem cells can self-renew by asymmetric cell division (ACD). ACD with non-random chromosomal cosegregation (ACD-NRCC) is one possible self-renewal mechanism. There is a paucity of evidence supporting ACD-NRCC in human cancer. Our aim was to investigate ACD-NRCC and its potential interactions with the cancer niche (microenvironment) in gastrointestinal cancers. We used DNA double and single labeling approaches with FACS to isolate live cells undergoing ACD-NRCC. Gastrointestinal cancers contain rare subpopulations of cells capable of ACD-NRCC. ACD-NRCC was detected preferentially in subpopulations of cells previously suggested to be stem-like/tumor-initiating cancer cells. ACD-NRCC was independent of cell-to-cell contact, and was regulated by the cancer niche in a heat-sensitive paracrine fashion. Wnt pathway genes and proteins are differentially expressed in cells undergoing ACD-NRCC vs. symmetric cell division. Blocking the Wnt pathway with IWP2 (WNT antagonist) or siRNA-TCF4 resulted in suppression of ACD-NRCC. However, using a Wnt-agonist did not increase the relative proportion of cells undergoing ACD-NRCC. Gastrointestinal cancers contain subpopulations of cells capable of ACD-NRCC. Here we show for the first time that ACD-NRCC can be regulated by the Wnt pathway, and by the cancer niche in a paracrine fashion. However, whether ACD-NRCC is exclusively associated with stem-like cancer cells remains to be determined. Further study of these findings might generate novel insights into stem cell and cancer biology. Targeting the mechanism of ACD-NRCC might engender novel approaches for cancer therapy.

  7. A co-culture device with a tunable stiffness to understand combinatorial cell-cell and cell-matrix interactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rao, Nikhil; Grover, Gregory N.; Vincent, Ludovic G.; Evans, Samantha C.; Choi, Yu Suk; Vincent, Ludovic G.; Spencer, Katrina H.; Hui, Elliot E.; Engler, Adam J.; Christman, Karen L.

    2013-01-01

    Cell behavior on 2-D in vitro cultures is continually being improved to better mimic in vivo physiological conditions by combining niche cues including multiple cell types and substrate stiffness, which are well known to impact cell phenotype. However, no system exists in which a user can systematically examine cell behavior on a substrate with a specific stiffness (elastic modulus) in culture with a different cell type, while maintaining distinct cell populations. We demonstrate the modification of a silicon reconfigurable co-culture system with a covalently linked hydrogel of user-defined stiffness. This device allows the user to control whether two separate cell populations are in contact with each other or only experience paracrine interactions on substrates of controllable stiffness. To illustrate the utility of this device, we examined the role of substrate stiffness combined with myoblast co-culture on adipose derived stem cell (ASC) differentiation and found that the presence of myoblasts and a 10 kPa substrate stiffness increased ASC myogenesis versus co-culture on stiff substrates. As this example highlights, this technology better controls the in vitro microenvironment, allowing the user to develop a more thorough understanding of the combined effects of cell-cell and cell-matrix interactions. PMID:24061208

  8. Heparan sulfate proteoglycans: structure, protein interactions and cell signaling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juliana L. Dreyfuss

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available Heparan sulfate proteoglycans are ubiquitously found at the cell surface and extracellular matrix in all the animal species. This review will focus on the structural characteristics of the heparan sulfate proteoglycans related to protein interactions leading to cell signaling. The heparan sulfate chains due to their vast structural diversity are able to bind and interact with a wide variety of proteins, such as growth factors, chemokines, morphogens, extracellular matrix components, enzymes, among others. There is a specificity directing the interactions of heparan sulfates and target proteins, regarding both the fine structure of the polysaccharide chain as well precise protein motifs. Heparan sulfates play a role in cellular signaling either as receptor or co-receptor for different ligands, and the activation of downstream pathways is related to phosphorylation of different cytosolic proteins either directly or involving cytoskeleton interactions leading to gene regulation. The role of the heparan sulfate proteoglycans in cellular signaling and endocytic uptake pathways is also discussed.Proteoglicanos de heparam sulfato são encontrados tanto superfície celular quanto na matriz extracelular em todas as espécies animais. Esta revisão tem enfoque nas características estruturais dos proteoglicanos de heparam sulfato e nas interações destes proteoglicanos com proteínas que levam à sinalização celular. As cadeias de heparam sulfato, devido a sua variedade estrutural, são capazes de se ligar e interagir com ampla gama de proteínas, como fatores de crescimento, quimiocinas, morfógenos, componentes da matriz extracelular, enzimas, entreoutros. Existe uma especificidade estrutural que direciona as interações dos heparam sulfatos e proteínas alvo. Esta especificidade está relacionada com a estrutura da cadeia do polissacarídeo e os motivos conservados da cadeia polipeptídica das proteínas envolvidas nesta interação. Os heparam

  9. Stromal interaction molecule 1 regulates growth, cell cycle, and apoptosis of human tongue squamous carcinoma cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cui, Xiaobo; Song, Laixiao; Bai, Yunfei; Wang, Yaping; Wang, Boqian; Wang, Wei

    2017-04-30

    Oral tongue squamous cell carcinoma (OTSCC) is the most common type of oral carcinomas. However, the molecular mechanism by which OTSCC developed is not fully identified. Stromal interaction molecule 1 (STIM1) is a transmembrane protein, mainly located in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER). STIM1 is involved in several types of cancers. Here, we report that STIM1 contributes to the development of human OTSCC. We knocked down STIM1 in OTSCC cell line Tca-8113 with lentivirus-mediated shRNA and found that STIM1 knockdown repressed the proliferation of Tca-8113 cells. In addition, we also showed that STIM1 deficiency reduced colony number of Tca-8113 cells. Knockdown of STIM1 repressed cells to enter M phase of cell cycle and induced cellular apoptosis. Furthermore, we performed microarray and bioinformatics analysis and found that STIM1 was associated with p53 and MAPK pathways, which may contribute to the effects of STIM1 on cell growth, cell cycle, and apoptosis. Finally, we confirmed that STIM1 controlled the expression of MDM2, cyclin-dependent kinase 4 (CDK4), and growth arrest and DNA damage inducible α (GADD45A) in OTSCC cells. In conclusion, we provide evidence that STIM1 contributes to the development of OTSCC partially through regulating p53 and MAPK pathways to promote cell cycle and survival.

  10. Interaction of KSHV with Host Cell Surface Receptors and Cell Entry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohanan Valiya Veettil

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Virus entry is a complex process characterized by a sequence of events. Since the discovery of KSHV in 1994, tremendous progress has been made in our understanding of KSHV entry into its in vitro target cells. KSHV entry is a complex multistep process involving viral envelope glycoproteins and several cell surface molecules that is utilized by KSHV for its attachment and entry. KSHV has a broad cell tropism and the attachment and receptor engagement on target cells have an important role in determining the cell type-specific mode of entry. KSHV utilizes heparan sulfate, integrins and EphrinA2 molecules as receptors which results in the activation of host cell pre-existing signal pathways that facilitate the subsequent cascade of events resulting in the rapid entry of virus particles, trafficking towards the nucleus followed by viral and host gene expression. KSHV enters human fibroblast cells by dynamin dependant clathrin mediated endocytosis and by dynamin independent macropinocytosis in dermal endothelial cells. Once internalized into endosomes, fusion of the viral envelope with the endosomal membranes in an acidification dependent manner results in the release of capsids which subsequently reaches the nuclear pore vicinity leading to the delivery of viral DNA into the nucleus. In this review, we discuss the principal mechanisms that enable KSHV to interact with the host cell surface receptors as well as the mechanisms that are required to modulate cell signaling machinery for a successful entry.

  11. Sheep primary cells as in vitro models to investigate Mycoplasma agalactiae host cell interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hegde, Shrilakshmi; Gabriel, Cordula; Kragl, Martin; Chopra-Dewasthaly, Rohini

    2015-10-01

    Appropriate infection models are imperative for the understanding of pathogens like mycoplasmas that are known for their strict host and tissue specificity, and lack of suitable cell and small animal models has hindered pathogenicity studies. This is particularly true for the economically important group of ruminant mycoplasmas whose virulence factors need to be elucidated for designing effective intervention strategies. Mycoplasma agalactiae serves as a useful role model especially because it is phylogenetically very close to M. bovis and causes similar symptoms by as yet unknown mechanisms. Here, we successfully prepared and characterized four different primary sheep cell lines, namely the epithelial and stromal cells from the mammary gland and uterus, respectively. Using immunohistochemistry, we identified vimentin and cytokeratin as specific markers to confirm the typical cell phenotypes of these primary cells. Furthermore, M. agalactiae's consistent adhesion and invasion into these primary cells proves the reliability of these cell models. Mimicking natural infections, mammary epithelial and stromal cells showed higher invasion and adhesion rates compared to the uterine cells as also seen via double immunofluorescence staining. Altogether, we have generated promising in vitro cell models to study host-pathogen interactions of M. agalactiae and related ruminant pathogens in a more authentic manner.

  12. A glimpse into the interactions of cells in a microenvironment: the modulation of T cells by mesenchymal stem cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Choi J

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Jonghoon Choi,1,2 Mintai P Hwang,3 Jong-Wook Lee,3 Kwan Hyi Lee3,41Institute of Research Strategy and Development (IRSD, Seoul, Republic of Korea; 2Department of Bionano Engineering, Hanyang University, Ansan, Republic of Korea; 3Center for Biomaterials, Biomedical Research Institute, Korea Institute of Science and Technology, Seoul, Republic of Korea; 4Department of Biomedical Engineering, University of Science and Technology, Seoul, Republic of KoreaAbstract: Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs have been thought to hold potential as a mode of therapy for immuno-related pathologies, particularly for autoimmune diseases. Despite their potential, the interaction between MSCs and T cells, key players in the pathophysiology of autoimmune diseases, is not yet well understood, thereby preventing further clinical progress. A major obstacle is the highly heterogeneous nature of MSCs in vitro. Unfortunately, bulk assays do not provide information with regard to cell–cell contributions that may play a critical role in the overall cellular response. To address these issues, we investigated the interaction between smaller subsets of MSCs and CD4 T cells in a microwell array. We demonstrate that MSCs appear capable of modulating the T cell proliferation rate in response to persistent cell–cell interactions, and we anticipate the use of our microwell array in the classification of subpopulations within MSCs, ultimately leading to specific therapeutic interventions.Keywords: mesenchymal stem cell, T cell, microwell array

  13. Human amniotic membrane-derived stromal cells (hAMSC) interact depending on breast cancer cell type through secreted molecules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Sun-Hee; Bang, So Hee; Kang, So Yeong; Park, Ki Dae; Eom, Jun Ho; Oh, Il Ung; Yoo, Si Hyung; Kim, Chan-Wha; Baek, Sun Young

    2015-02-01

    Human amniotic membrane-derived stromal cells (hAMSC) are candidates for cell-based therapies. We examined the characteristics of hAMSC including the interaction between hAMSC and breast cancer cells, MCF-7, and MDA-MB-231. Human amniotic membrane-derived stromal cells showed typical MSC properties, including fibroblast-like morphology, surface antigen expression, and mesodermal differentiation. To investigate cell-cell interaction via secreted molecules, we cultured breast cancer cells in hAMSC-conditioned medium (hAMSC-CM) and analyzed their proliferation, migration, and secretome profiles. MCF-7 and MDA-MB-231 cells exposed to hAMSC-CM showed increased proliferation and migration. However, in hAMSC-CM, MCF-7 cells proliferated significantly faster than MDA-MB-231 cells. When cultured in hAMSC-CM, MCF-7 cells migrated faster than MDA-MB-231 cells. Two cell types showed different profiles of secreted factors. MCF-7 cells expressed much amounts of IL-8, GRO, and MCP-1 in hAMSC-CM. Human amniotic membrane-derived stromal cells interact with breast cancer cells through secreted molecules. Factors secreted by hAMSCs promote the proliferation and migration of MCF-7 breast cancer cells. For much safe cell-based therapies using hAMSC, it is necessary to study carefully about interaction between hAMSC and cancer cells.

  14. A DLM/FD/IB Method for Simulating Cell/Cell and Cell/Particle Interaction in Microchannels

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Tsorng-Whay PAN; Lingling SHI; Roland GLOWINSKI

    2010-01-01

    A spring model is used to simulate the skeleton structure of the red blood cell(RBC)membrane and to study the red blood cell(RBC)rheology in Poiseuille flow with an immersed boundary method.The lateral migration properties of many cells in Poiseuille flow have been investigated.The authors also combine the above methodology with a distributed Lagrange multiplier/fictitious domain method to simulate the interaction of cells and neutrally buoyant particles in a microchannel for studying the margination of particles.

  15. Persistent Polyclonal B Cell Lymphocytosis B Cells Can Be Activated through CD40-CD154 Interaction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emmanuelle Dugas-Bourdages

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Persistent polyclonal B cell lymphocytosis (PPBL is a rare disorder, diagnosed primarily in adult female smokers and characterized by an expansion of CD19+CD27+IgM+ memory B cells, by the presence of binucleated lymphocytes, and by a moderate elevation of serum IgM. The clinical course is usually benign, but it is not known whether or not PPBL might be part of a process leading to the emergence of a malignant proliferative disorder. In this study we sought to investigate the functional response of B cells from patients with PPBL by use of an optimal memory B cell culture model based on the CD40-CD154 interaction. We found that the proliferation of PPBL B cells was almost as important as that of B cells from normal controls, resulting in high immunoglobulin secretion with in vitro isotypic switching. We conclude that the CD40-CD154 activation pathway is functional in the memory B cell population of PPBL patients, suggesting that the disorder may be due to either a dysfunction of other cells in the microenvironment or a possible defect in another B cell activation pathway.

  16. Haemodynamic and extracellular matrix cues regulate the mechanical phenotype and stiffness of aortic endothelial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collins, Caitlin; Osborne, Lukas D; Guilluy, Christophe; Chen, Zhongming; O'Brien, E Tim; Reader, John S; Burridge, Keith; Superfine, Richard; Tzima, Ellie

    2014-06-11

    Endothelial cells (ECs) lining blood vessels express many mechanosensors, including platelet endothelial cell adhesion molecule-1 (PECAM-1), that convert mechanical force into biochemical signals. While it is accepted that mechanical stresses and the mechanical properties of ECs regulate vessel health, the relationship between force and biological response remains elusive. Here we show that ECs integrate mechanical forces and extracellular matrix (ECM) cues to modulate their own mechanical properties. We demonstrate that the ECM influences EC response to tension on PECAM-1. ECs adherent on collagen display divergent stiffening and focal adhesion growth compared with ECs on fibronectin. This is because of protein kinase A (PKA)-dependent serine phosphorylation and inactivation of RhoA. PKA signalling regulates focal adhesion dynamics and EC compliance in response to shear stress in vitro and in vivo. Our study identifies an ECM-specific, mechanosensitive signalling pathway that regulates EC compliance and may serve as an atheroprotective mechanism that maintains blood vessel integrity in vivo.

  17. Proteomic analysis of HIV-T cell interaction: an update.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dave eSpeijer

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available This mini-review summarizes techniques applied in, and results obtained with, proteomic studies of HIV-1 T cell interaction. Our group previously reported on the use of two-dimensional differential gel electrophoresis (2D-DIGE coupled to MALDI-TOF peptide mass fingerprint analysis, to study T cell responses upon HIV-1 infection. Only one in three differentially expressed proteins could be identified using this experimental setup. Here we report on our latest efforts to test models generated by this data set and extend its analysis by using novel bioinformatic algorithms. The 2D-DIGE results are compared with other studies including a pilot study using one-dimensional peptide separation coupled to MSE, a novel mass spectrometric approach. It can be concluded that although the latter method detects fewer proteins, it is much faster and less labor intensive. Last but not least, recent developments and remaining challenges in the field of proteomic studies of HIV-1 infection and proteomics in general are discussed.

  18. Modeling of interactions between nanoparticles and cell membranes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ban, Young-Min

    containing the nanoparticles exhibit localized perturbation around the nanoparticle. The nanoparticles are not likely to affect membrane protein function by the weak perturbation of the internal stress in the membrane. Due to the short-ranged interactions between the nanoparticles, the nanoparticles would not form aggregates inside membranes. The effect of lipid peroxidation on cell membrane deformation is assessed. The peroxidized lipids introduce a perturbation to the internal structure of the membrane leading to higher amplitude of the membrane fluctuations. Higher concentration of the peroxidized lipids induces more significant perturbation. Cumulative effects of lipid peroxidation caused by nanoparticles are examined for the first time. The considered amphiphilic particle appears to reduce the perturbation of the membrane structure at its equilibrium position inside the peroxidized membrane. This suggests a possibility of antioxidant effect of the nanoparticle.

  19. Interaction of tumor cells with the immune system: implications for dendritic cell therapy and cancer progression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Imhof, Marianne; Karas, Irene; Gomez, Ivan; Eger, Andreas; Imhof, Martin

    2013-01-01

    There is a continuous demand for preclinical modeling of the interaction of dendritic cells with the immune system and cancer cells. Recent progress in gene expression profiling with nucleic acid microarrays, in silico modeling and in vivo cell and animal approaches for non-clinical proof of safety and efficacy of these immunotherapies is summarized. Immunoinformatic approaches look promising to unfold this potential, although still unstable and difficult to interpret. Animal models have progressed a great deal in recent years, finally narrowing the gap from bench to bedside. However, translation to the clinic should be done with precaution. The most significant results concerning clinical benefit might come from detailed immunologic investigations made during well designed clinical trials of dendritic-cell-based therapies, which in general prove safe.

  20. Stem cell-paved biobridges facilitate stem transplant and host brain cell interactions for stroke therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duncan, Kelsey; Gonzales-Portillo, Gabriel S; Acosta, Sandra A; Kaneko, Yuji; Borlongan, Cesar V; Tajiri, Naoki

    2015-10-14

    Distinguished by an infarct core encased within a penumbra, stroke remains a primary source of mortality within the United States. While our scientific knowledge regarding the pathology of stroke continues to improve, clinical treatment options for patients suffering from stroke are extremely limited. Tissue plasminogen activator (tPA) remains the sole FDA-approved drug proven to be helpful following stroke. However, due to the need to administer the drug within 4.5h of stroke onset its usefulness is constrained to less than 5% of all patients suffering from ischemic stroke. One experimental therapy for the treatment of stroke involves the utilization of stem cells. Stem cell transplantation has been linked to therapeutic benefit by means of cell replacement and release of growth factors; however the precise means by which this is accomplished has not yet been clearly delineated. Using a traumatic brain injury model, we recently demonstrated the ability of transplanted mesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs) to form a biobridge connecting the area of injury to the neurogenic niche within the brain. We hypothesize that MSCs may also have the capacity to create a similar biobridge following stroke; thereby forming a conduit between the neurogenic niche and the stroke core and peri-infarct area. We propose that this biobridge could assist and promote interaction of host brain cells with transplanted stem cells and offer more opportunities to enhance the effectiveness of stem cell therapy in stroke. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled SI: Cell Interactions In Stroke. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. Observation on human ovarian theca cell and granulosa cell interaction in polycystic ovary syndrome

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    焦泽旭; 周灿权; 庄广伦; 梁晓燕

    2002-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the role of human theca cell(TC) and granulo sa cell(GC) interaction and insulin(INS) in steroidogenesis in normal ovarian cy cle and in patients with PCOS. Methods: Ovarian theca and granulosa cells from eleven normal wo men and eight PCOS patients were co-cultured on opposite side of collagen with or without INS. The concentrations of estradiol(E2), progesterone(P) and andro stenedione (A) in the culture medium were examined by ELISA method.Results: When co-cultured with GC, TC in PCOS group produced mo re A and less P than those of normal group. When co-cultured with theca cells, granulosa cells in PCOS group produced more E2 than those of normal group. Add ition of INS increased the difference significantly.Conclusions: The GC and TC interaction from the normal and PCOS ovaries is different. There is a high A and high E2 intraovary loop of PC OS leading to premature arrest of follicle growth and anovulation. Insulin may p lay an important regulatory role.

  2. Computerized image analysis of cell-cell interactions in human renal tissue by using multi-channel immunoflourescent confocal microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peng, Yahui; Jiang, Yulei; Liarski, Vladimir M.; Kaverina, Natalya; Clark, Marcus R.; Giger, Maryellen L.

    2012-03-01

    Analysis of interactions between B and T cells in tubulointerstitial inflammation is important for understanding human lupus nephritis. We developed a computer technique to perform this analysis, and compared it with manual analysis. Multi-channel immunoflourescent-microscopy images were acquired from 207 regions of interest in 40 renal tissue sections of 19 patients diagnosed with lupus nephritis. Fresh-frozen renal tissue sections were stained with combinations of immunoflourescent antibodies to membrane proteins and counter-stained with a cell nuclear marker. Manual delineation of the antibodies was considered as the reference standard. We first segmented cell nuclei and cell membrane markers, and then determined corresponding cell types based on the distances between cell nuclei and specific cell-membrane marker combinations. Subsequently, the distribution of the shortest distance from T cell nuclei to B cell nuclei was obtained and used as a surrogate indicator of cell-cell interactions. The computer and manual analyses results were concordant. The average absolute difference was 1.1+/-1.2% between the computer and manual analysis results in the number of cell-cell distances of 3 μm or less as a percentage of the total number of cell-cell distances. Our computerized analysis of cell-cell distances could be used as a surrogate for quantifying cell-cell interactions as either an automated and quantitative analysis or for independent confirmation of manual analysis.

  3. Structural characteristics of an antigen required for its interaction with Ia and recognition by T cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sette, A; Buus, S; Colon, S;

    1987-01-01

    A detailed analysis of the residues within an immunogenic peptide that endow it with the capacity to interact with Ia and to be recognized by T cells is presented. Ia interacts with only a few of the peptide residues and overall exhibits a very broad specificity. Some residues appear to interact...... both with Ia and with T cells, leading to a model in which a peptide antigen is 'sandwiched' between Ia and the T-cell receptor....

  4. Genotype by environment interaction for somatic cell score across bulk milk somatic cell count and days in milk

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Calus, M.P.L.; Janss, L.L.G.; Veerkamp, R.F.

    2006-01-01

    The objective of this paper was to investigate the importance of a genotype x environment interaction (G x E) for somatic cell score (SCS) across levels of bulk milk somatic cell count (BMSCC), number of days in milk (DIM), and their interaction. Variance components were estimated with a model inclu

  5. Membrane alterations in irreversibly sickled cells: hemoglobin--membrane interaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lessin, L S; Kurantsin-Mills, J; Wallas, C; Weems, H

    1978-01-01

    Irreversibly sickled cells (ISCs) are sickle erythrocytes which retain bipolar elongated shapes despite reoxygenation and owe their biophysical abnormalities to acquired membrane alterations. Freeze-etched membranes both of ISCs produced in vitro and ISCs isolated in vivo reveal microbodies fixed to the internal (PS) surface which obscure spectrin filaments. Intramembranous particles (IMPs) on the intramembrane (PF) surface aggregate over regions of subsurface microbodies. Electron microscopy of diaminobenzidine-treated of ISC ghosts show the microbodies to contain hemoglobin and/or hemoglobin derivatives. Scanning electron microscopy and freeze-etching demonstrate that membrane--hemoglobin S interaction in ISCs enhances the membrane loss by microspherulation. Membrane-bound hemoglobin is five times greater in in vivo ISCs than non-ISCs, and increases during ISC production, parallelling depletion of adenosine triphosphate. Polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis of ISC membranes shows the presence of high-molecular-weight heteropolymers in the pre--band 1 region, a decrease in band 4.1 and an increase in bands 7, 8, and globin. The role of cross-linked membrane protein polymers in the generation of ISCs is discussed and is synthesized in terms of a unified concept for the determinants of the genesis of ISCs.

  6. In vivo tumor cell adhesion in the pulmonary microvasculature is exclusively mediated by tumor cell - endothelial cell interaction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mees Soeren T

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Metastasis formation is the leading cause of death among colon cancer patients. We established a new in-situ model of in vivo microscopy of the lung to analyse initiating events of metastatic tumor cell adhesion within this typical metastatic target of colon cancer. Methods Anaesthetized CD rats were mechanically ventilated and 106 human HT-29LMM and T84 colon cancer cells were injected intracardially as single cell suspensions. Quantitative in vivo microscopy of the lung was performed in 10 minute intervals for a total of 40 minutes beginning with the time of injection. Results After vehicle treatment of HT-29LMM controls 15.2 ± 5.3; 14.2 ± 7.5; 11.4 ± 5.5; and 15.4 ± 6.5 cells/20 microscopic fields were found adherent within the pulmonary microvasculature in each 10 minute interval. Similar numbers were found after injection of the lung metastasis derived T84 cell line and after treatment of HT-29LMM with unspecific mouse control-IgG. Subsequently, HT-29LMM cells were treated with function blocking antibodies against β1-, β4-, and αv-integrins wich also did not impair tumor cell adhesion in the lung. In contrast, after hydrolization of sialylated glycoproteins on the cells' surface by neuraminidase, we observed impairment of tumor cell adhesion by more than 50% (p Conclusions These results demonstrate that the initial colon cancer cell adhesion in the capillaries of the lung is predominantly mediated by tumor cell - endothelial cell interactions, possibly supported by platelets. In contrast to reports of earlier studies that metastatic tumor cell adhesion occurs through integrin mediated binding of extracellular matrix proteins in liver, in the lung, the continuously lined endothelium appears to be specifically targeted by circulating tumor cells.

  7. Epithelial cell-extracellular matrix interactions and stem cells in airway epithelial regeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coraux, Christelle; Roux, Jacqueline; Jolly, Thomas; Birembaut, Philippe

    2008-08-15

    In healthy subjects, the respiratory epithelium forms a continuous lining to the airways and to the environment, and plays a unique role as a barrier against external deleterious agents to protect the airways from the insults. In respiratory diseases such as cystic fibrosis (CF), chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), chronic bronchitis, or asthma, the airway epithelium is frequently remodeled and injured, leading to the impairment of its defense functions. The rapid restoration of the epithelial barrier is crucial for these patients. The complete regeneration of the airway epithelium is a complex phenomenon, including not only the epithelial wound repair but also the epithelial differentiation to reconstitute a fully well differentiated and functional epithelium. The regeneration implies two partners: the epithelial stem/progenitor cells and factors able to regulate this process. Among these factors, epithelial cells-extracellular matrix (ECM) interactions play a crucial role. The secretion of a provisional ECM, the cell-ECM relationships through epithelial receptors, and the remodeling of the ECM by proteases (mainly matrix metalloproteinases) contribute not only to airway epithelial repair by modulating epithelial cell migration and proliferation, but also to the differentiation of repairing cells leading to the complete restoration of the wounded epithelium. A better characterization of resident stem cells and of effectors of the regeneration process is an essential prerequisite to propose new regenerative therapeutics to patients suffering from infectious/inflammatory respiratory diseases.

  8. Numerical simulation of hemodynamic interactions of red blood cells in micro-capillary flow

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    石兴; 张帅; 王双连

    2014-01-01

    The hemodynamic interactions of red blood cells (RBCs) in a microcapillary flow are investigated in this paper. This kind of interaction is considered as the non-contact mutual interaction of cells, which is important in the suspension flow of blood, but not sufficiently understood. The distributed Lagrange multiplier/fictitious domain method in the lattice Boltzmann framework is used to solve the suspension of the RBCs. The modification of the flow due to the cells, the dependence of the cell deformation on the flow and the cell-cell interaction via the fluid are discussed. It is revealed that the long-range hydrodynamic interaction with a long interacting distance, more than about 5 times of the RBC equivalent radius, mainly has effect on the rheology properties of the suspension, such as the mean velocity, and the short-range interaction is sensitive to the shape of the cell in the microcapillary flow. The flow velocity around the cell plays a key role in the cell deformation. In the current configuration of the flow and cells, the cells repel each other along the capillary.

  9. In vitro human immunodeficiency virus and sperm cell interaction mediated by the mannose receptor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cardona-Maya, Walter; Velilla, Paula A; Montoya, Carlos Julio; Cadavid, Ángela; Rugeles, María T

    2011-12-01

    Leukocytes are considered to be the main source of HIV-1 infection in semen. However, HIV-1 interaction with spermatozoa has also been demonstrated, suggesting that both spermatozoa and leukocytes might play a role during sexual transmission of HIV-1. The purpose of the present study was to evaluate if HIV-1 particles interact with sperm cells through the mannose receptor (MR), and then to determine the ability of "infected" sperm cells to transmit the virus to susceptible targets. The expression of classical HIV-1 receptor and co-receptors and the MR by sperm cells was determined by flow cytometry; the interaction in vitro between sperm and HIV-1 was evaluated by fluorescence microscopy. Additionally, the in vitro interaction of sperm cells and HIV-1 was determined detecting viral nucleic acids by PCR. D-Mannose was used to block HIV-1-sperm cell interaction. Sperm cells preincubated with HIV-1 particles and activated mononuclear cells were co-cultured to determine viral transmission. The presence of viral RNA was detected in 28% of the samples in which sperm cells were preincubated with HIV-1 particles. Mannose was able to block interaction in 75% of the cases. Finally, we demonstrated that "infected" sperm cells were able to transmit the HIV-1 infection to susceptible targets. In conclusion, these results indicate that the MR is involved in sperm cell-HIV-1 interaction. Our results also suggest that sperm cells could be an important source of infection.

  10. Electric Cell-Substrate Impedance Sensing (ECIS) with Microelectrode Arrays for Investigation of Cancer Cell – Fibroblasts Interaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tran, Trong Binh; Baek, Changyoon; Min, Junhong

    2016-01-01

    The tumor microenvironment, including stromal cells, surrounding blood vessels and extracellular matrix components, has been defined as a crucial factor that influences the proliferation, drug-resistance, invasion and metastasis of malignant epithelial cells. Among other factors, the communications and interaction between cancer cells and stromal cells have been reported to play pivotal roles in cancer promotion and progression. To investigate these relationships, an on-chip co-culture model was developed to study the cellular interaction between A549—human lung carcinoma cells and MRC-5—human lung epithelial cells in both normal proliferation and treatment conditions. In brief, a co-culture device consisting of 2 individual fluidic chambers in parallel, which were separated by a 100 μm fence was utilized for cell patterning. Microelectrodes arrays were installed within each chamber including electrodes at various distances away from the confrontation line for the electrochemical impedimetric sensing assessment of cell-to-cell influence. After the fence was removed and cell-to-cell contact occurred, by evaluating the impedance signal responses representing cell condition and behavior, both direct and indirect cell-to-cell interactions through conditioned media were investigated. The impact of specific distances that lead to different influences of fibroblast cells on cancer cells in the co-culture environment was also defined. PMID:27088611

  11. Electric Cell-Substrate Impedance Sensing (ECIS with Microelectrode Arrays for Investigation of Cancer Cell - Fibroblasts Interaction.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Trong Binh Tran

    Full Text Available The tumor microenvironment, including stromal cells, surrounding blood vessels and extracellular matrix components, has been defined as a crucial factor that influences the proliferation, drug-resistance, invasion and metastasis of malignant epithelial cells. Among other factors, the communications and interaction between cancer cells and stromal cells have been reported to play pivotal roles in cancer promotion and progression. To investigate these relationships, an on-chip co-culture model was developed to study the cellular interaction between A549-human lung carcinoma cells and MRC-5-human lung epithelial cells in both normal proliferation and treatment conditions. In brief, a co-culture device consisting of 2 individual fluidic chambers in parallel, which were separated by a 100 μm fence was utilized for cell patterning. Microelectrodes arrays were installed within each chamber including electrodes at various distances away from the confrontation line for the electrochemical impedimetric sensing assessment of cell-to-cell influence. After the fence was removed and cell-to-cell contact occurred, by evaluating the impedance signal responses representing cell condition and behavior, both direct and indirect cell-to-cell interactions through conditioned media were investigated. The impact of specific distances that lead to different influences of fibroblast cells on cancer cells in the co-culture environment was also defined.

  12. Cell-autonomous defects in thymic epithelial cells disrupt endothelial-perivascular cell interactions in the mouse thymus.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jerrod L Bryson

    Full Text Available The thymus is composed of multiple stromal elements comprising specialized stromal microenvironments responsible for the development of self-tolerant and self-restricted T cells. Here, we investigated the ontogeny and maturation of the thymic vasculature. We show that endothelial cells initially enter the thymus at E13.5, with PDGFR-β(+ mesenchymal cells following at E14.5. Using an allelic series of the thymic epithelial cell (TEC specific transcription factor Foxn1, we showed that these events are delayed by 1-2 days in Foxn1 (Δ/Δ mice, and this phenotype was exacerbated with reduced Foxn1 dosage. At subsequent stages there were fewer capillaries, leaky blood vessels, disrupted endothelium - perivascular cell interactions, endothelial cell vacuolization, and an overall failure of vascular organization. The expression of both VEGF-A and PDGF-B, which are both primarily expressed in vasculature-associated mesenchyme or endothelium in the thymus, were reduced at E13.5 and E15.5 in Foxn1 (Δ/Δ mice compared with controls. These data suggest that Foxn1 is required in TECs both to recruit endothelial cells and for endothelial cells to communicate with thymic mesenchyme, and for the differentiation of vascular-associated mesenchymal cells. These data show that Foxn1 function in TECs is required for normal thymus size and to generate the cellular and molecular environment needed for normal thymic vascularization. These data further demonstrate a novel TEC-mesenchyme-endothelial interaction required for proper fetal thymus organogenesis.

  13. Surface modification for interaction study with bacteria and preosteoblast cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Qing

    Surface modification plays a pivotal role in bioengineering. Polymer coatings can provide biocompatibility and biofunctionalities to biomaterials through surface modification. In this dissertation, initiated chemical vapor deposition (iCVD) was utilized to coat two-dimensional (2D) and three-dimensional (3D) substrates with differently charged polyelectrolytes in order to generate antimicrobial and osteocompatible biomaterials. ICVD is a modified CVD technique that enables surface modification in an all-dry condition without substrate damage and solvent contamination. The free-radical polymerization allows the vinyl polymers to conformally coat on various micro- and nano-structured substrates and maintains the delicate structure of the functional groups. The vapor deposition of polycations provided antimicrobial activity to planar and porous substrates through destroying the negatively charged bacterial membrane and brought about high contact-killing efficiency (99.99%) against Gram-positive Bacillus subtilis and Gram-negative Escherichia coli. Additionally, the polyampholytes synthesized by iCVD exhibited excellent antifouling performance against the adhesion of Gram-positive Listeria innocua and Gram-negative E. coli in phosphate buffered saline (PBS). Their antifouling activities were attributed to the electrostatic interaction and hydration layers that served as physical and energetic barriers to prevent bacterial adhesion. The contact-killing and antifouling polymers synthesized by iCVD can be applied to surface modification of food processing equipment and medical devices with the aim of reducing foodborne diseases and medical infections. Moreover, the charged polyelectrolyte modified 2D polystyrene surfaces displayed good osteocompatibility and enhanced osteogenesis of preosteoblast cells than the un-modified polystyrene surface. In order to promote osteoinduction of hydroxyapatite (HA) scaffolds, bioinspired polymer-controlled mineralization was conducted

  14. Requirement of interaction between mast cells and skin dendritic cells to establish contact hypersensitivity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Atsushi Otsuka

    Full Text Available The role of mast cells (MCs in contact hypersensitivity (CHS remains controversial. This is due in part to the use of the MC-deficient Kit (W/Wv mouse model, since Kit (W/Wv mice congenitally lack other types of cells as a result of a point mutation in c-kit. A recent study indicated that the intronic enhancer (IE for Il4 gene transcription is essential for MCs but not in other cell types. The aim of this study is to re-evaluate the roles of MCs in CHS using mice in which MCs can be conditionally and specifically depleted. Transgenic Mas-TRECK mice in which MCs are depleted conditionally were newly generated using cell-type specific gene regulation by IE. Using this mouse, CHS and FITC-induced cutaneous DC migration were analyzed. Chemotaxis assay and cytoplasmic Ca²⁺ imaging were performed by co-culture of bone marrow-derived MCs (BMMCs and bone marrow-derived dendritic cells (BMDCs. In Mas-TRECK mice, CHS was attenuated when MCs were depleted during the sensitization phase. In addition, both maturation and migration of skin DCs were abrogated by MC depletion. Consistently, BMMCs enhanced maturation and chemotaxis of BMDC in ICAM-1 and TNF-α dependent manners Furthermore, stimulated BMDCs increased intracellular Ca²⁺ of MC upon direct interaction and up-regulated membrane-bound TNF-α on BMMCs. These results suggest that MCs enhance DC functions by interacting with DCs in the skin to establish the sensitization phase of CHS.

  15. Neoantigen landscape dynamics during human melanoma-T cell interactions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Verdegaal, Els M. E.; De Miranda, Noel F. C. C.; Visser, Marten

    2016-01-01

    Recognition of neoantigens that are formed as a consequence of DNA damage is likely to form a major driving force behind the clinical activity of cancer immunotherapies such as T-cell checkpoint blockade and adoptive T-cell therapy. Therefore, strategies to selectively enhance T-cell reactivity...... is constant over time is unclear. Here we analyse the stability of neoantigen-specific T-cell responses and the antigens they recognize in two patients with stage IV melanoma treated by adoptive T-cell transfer. The T-cell-recognized neoantigens can be selectively lost from the tumour cell population, either...

  16. A role for neuropilins in the interaction between Schwann cells and meningeal cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kasper C D Roet

    Full Text Available In their natural habitat, the peripheral nerve, Schwann cells (SCs form nicely aligned pathways (also known as the bands of Büngner that guide regenerating axons to their targets. Schwann cells that are implanted in the lesioned spinal cord fail to align in pathways that could support axon growth but form cellular clusters that exhibit only limited intermingling with the astrocytes and meningeal cells (MCs that are present in the neural scar. The formation of cell clusters can be studied in co-cultures of SCs and MCs. In these co-cultures SCs form cluster-like non-overlapping cell aggregates with well-defined boundaries. There are several indications that neuropilins (NRPs play an important role in MC-induced SC aggregation. Both SCs and MCs express NRP1 and NRP2 and SCs express the NRP ligands Sema3B, C and E while MCs express Sema3A, C, E and F. We now demonstrate that in SC-MC co-cultures, siRNA mediated knockdown of NRP2 in SCs decreased the formation of SC clusters while these SCs maintained their capacity to align in bands of Büngner-like columnar arrays. Unexpectedly, knockdown of NRP1 expression resulted in a significant increase in SC aggregation. These results suggest that a reduction in NRP2 expression may enhance the capacity of implanted SCs to interact with MCs that invade a neural scar formed after a lesion of the spinal cord.

  17. Human epithelial cells exposed to functionalized multiwalled carbon nanotubes: interactions and cell surface modifications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fanizza, C; Casciardi, S; Incoronato, F; Cavallo, D; Ursini, C L; Ciervo, A; Maiello, R; Fresegna, A M; Marcelloni, A M; Lega, D; Alvino, A; Baiguera, S

    2015-09-01

    With the expansion of the production and applications of multiwalled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) in several industrial and science branches, the potential adverse effects on human health have attracted attention. Numerous studies have been conducted to evaluate how chemical functionalization may affect MWCNT effects; however, controversial data have been reported, showing either increased or reduced toxicity. In particular, the impact of carboxylation on MWCNT cytotoxicity is far from being completely understood. The aim of this work was the evaluation of the modifications induced by carboxylated-MWCNTs (MWCNTs-COOH) on cell surface and the study of cell-MWCNT-COOH interactions by means of field emission scanning electron microscope (FESEM). Human pulmonary epithelial cells (A549) were incubated with MWCNTs-COOH for different exposure times and concentrations (10 μg/mL for 1, 2, 4 h; 5, 10, 20 μg/mL for 24 h). At short incubation time, MWCNTs-COOH were easily observed associated with plasma membrane and in contact with microvilli. After 24 h exposure, FESEM analysis revealed that MWCNTs-COOH induced evident changes in the cellular surface in comparison to control cells: treated cells showed blebs, holes and a depletion of the microvilli density in association with structure modifications, such as widening and/or lengthening. In particular, an increase of cells showing holes and microvilli structure alterations was observed at 20 μg/mL concentration. FESEM analysis showed nanotube agglomerates, of different sizes, entering into the cell with two different mechanisms: inward bending of the membrane followed by nanotube sinking, and nanotube internalization directly through holes. The observed morphological microvilli modifications, induced by MWCNTs-COOH, could affect epithelial functions, such as the control of surfactant production and secretion, leading to pathological conditions, such as alveolar proteinosis. More detailed studies will be, however, necessary to

  18. Interactions between muscle stem cells, mesenchymal-derived cells and immune cells in muscle homeostasis, regeneration and disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farup, J; Madaro, L; Puri, P L; Mikkelsen, U R

    2015-07-23

    Recent evidence has revealed the importance of reciprocal functional interactions between different types of mononuclear cells in coordinating the repair of injured muscles. In particular, signals released from the inflammatory infiltrate and from mesenchymal interstitial cells (also known as fibro-adipogenic progenitors (FAPs)) appear to instruct muscle stem cells (satellite cells) to break quiescence, proliferate and differentiate. Interestingly, conditions that compromise the functional integrity of this network can bias muscle repair toward pathological outcomes that are typically observed in chronic muscular disorders, that is, fibrotic and fatty muscle degeneration as well as myofiber atrophy. In this review, we will summarize the current knowledge on the regulation of this network in physiological and pathological conditions, and anticipate the potential contribution of its cellular components to relatively unexplored conditions, such as aging and physical exercise.

  19. Stimulatory interactions between human coronary smooth muscle cells and dendritic cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sara Paccosi

    Full Text Available Despite inflammatory and immune mechanisms participating to atherogenesis and dendritic cells (DCs driving immune and non-immune tissue injury response, the interactions between DCs and vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs possibly relevant to vascular pathology including atherogenesis are still unclear. To address this issue, immature DCs (iDCs generated from CD14+ cells isolated from healthy donors were matured either with cytokines (mDCs, or co-cultured (ccDCs with human coronary artery VSMCs (CASMCs using transwell chambers. Co-culture induced DC immunophenotypical and functional maturation similar to cytokines, as demonstrated by flow cytometry and mixed lymphocyte reaction. In turn, factors from mDCs and ccDCs induced CASMC migration. MCP-1 and TNFα, secreted from DCs, and IL-6 and MCP-1, secreted from CASMCs, were primarily involved. mDCs adhesion to CASMCs was enhanced by CASMC pre-treatment with IFNγ and TNFα ICAM-1 and VCAM-1 were involved, since the expression of specific mRNAs for these molecules increased and adhesion was inhibited by neutralizing antibodies to the counter-receptors CD11c and CD18. Adhesion was also inhibited by CASMC pre-treatment with the HMG-CoA-reductase inhibitor atorvastatin and the PPARγ agonist rosiglitazone, which suggests a further mechanism for the anti-inflammatory action of these drugs. Adhesion of DCs to VSMCs was shown also in vivo in rat carotid 7 to 21 days after crush and incision injury. The findings indicate that DCs and VSMCs can interact with reciprocal stimulation, possibly leading to perpetuate inflammation and vascular wall remodelling, and that the interaction is enhanced by a cytokine-rich inflammatory environment and down-regulated by HMGCoA-reductase inhibitors and PPARγ agonists.

  20. The control of neural cell-to-cell interactions through non-contact electrical field stimulation using graphene electrodes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heo, Chaejeong; Yoo, Jeongwan; Lee, Siyoung; Jo, Areum; Jung, Susie; Yoo, Hyosun; Lee, Young Hee; Suh, Minah

    2011-01-01

    Electric field stimulation has become one of the most promising therapies for a variety of neurological diseases. However, the safety and effectiveness of the stimulator are critical in determining the outcome. Because there are few safe and effective in vivo and/or in vitro stimulator devices, we demonstrate a method that allows for non-contact electric field stimulation with a specific strength that is able to control cell-to-cell interaction in vitro. Graphene, a form of graphite, and polyethylene terephthalate (PET) was used to create a non-cytotoxic in vitro graphene/PET film stimulator. A transient non-contact electric field was produced by charge-balanced biphasic stimuli through the graphene/PET film electrodes and applied to cultured neural cells. We found that weak electric field stimulation (pulse duration of 10 s) as low as 4.5 mV/mm for 32 min was particularly effective in shaping cell-to-cell interaction. Under weak electric field stimulation, we observed a significant increase in the number of cells forming new cell-to-cell couplings and in the number of cells strengthening existing cell-to-cell couplings. The underlying mechanism of the altered cellular interactions may be related to an altered regulation of the endogenous cytoskeletal proteins fibronectin, actin, and vinculin. In conclusion, this technique may open a new therapeutic approach for augmenting cell-to-cell coupling in cell transplantation therapy in the central nervous system. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Interaction of localized convection cells in the bioconvection of Euglena gracilis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iima, Makoto; Yamaguchi, Takayuki

    2016-11-01

    Euglena gracilis is a unicellular flagellated photosynthetic alga. The suspension of Euglena has behavioral responses to light, which causes a macroscopic localized bioconvection pattern when illuminated from below. One of the fundamental structures of this is a pair of convection cells, and high cell density region exists in the middle of the pair. Experimental studies show various types of interaction in the localized convection cells; bound state, collision, etc. We performed numerical simulation of a hydrodynamic model of this system, and show results of the interactions. Long-range interaction due to the conservation of cell number and merging process of two localized structures will be discussed. KAKENHI.

  2. A Handy Interactive Class for Teaching Introductory Cell Biology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hande, Shyamala

    2009-01-01

    In this paper we share the experience of an interactive method of teaching that involves every student in the learning process in the classroom. We describe an interactive class conducted over a two year period for premedical students. The process involved three stages namely a study session, a test-yourself session and a review session. Through…

  3. Cell-cell interaction in blood flow in patients with coronary heart disease (in vitro study)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malinova, Lidia I.; Simonenko, Georgy V.; Denisova, Tatyana P.; Tuchin, Valery V.

    2007-02-01

    Blood cell-cell and cell-vessel wall interactions are one of the key patterns in blood and vascular pathophysiology. We have chosen the method of reconstruction of pulsative blood flow in vitro in the experimental set. Blood flow structure was studied by PC integrated video camera with following slide by slide analysis. Studied flow was of constant volumetric blood flow velocity (1 ml/h). Diameter of tube in use was comparable with coronary arteries diameter. Glucose solution and unfractured heparin were used as the nonspecial irritants of studied flow. Erythrocytes space structure in flow differs in all groups of patients in our study (men with stable angina pectoris (SAP), myocardial infarction (MI) and practically healthy men (PHM). Intensity of erythrocytes aggregate formation was maximal in patients with SAP, but time of their "construction/deconstruction" at glucose injection was minimal. Phenomena of primary clotting formation in patients with SAP of high function class was reconstructed under experimental conditions. Heparin injection (10 000 ED) increased linear blood flow velocity both in patients with SAP, MI and PHP but modulated the cell profile in the flow. Received data correspond with results of animal model studies and noninvasive blood flow studies in human. Results of our study reveal differences in blood flow structure in patients with coronary heart disease and PHP under irritating conditions as the possible framework of metabolic model of coronary blood flow destabilization.

  4. Inflammation and the Intestinal Barrier: Leukocyte–Epithelial Cell Interactions, Cell Junction Remodeling, and Mucosal Repair

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luissint, Anny-Claude; Parkos, Charles A.; Nusrat, Asma

    2017-01-01

    The intestinal tract is lined by a single layer of columnar epithelial cells that forms a dynamic, permeable barrier allowing for selective absorption of nutrients, while restricting access to pathogens and food-borne antigens. Precise regulation of epithelial barrier function is therefore required for maintaining mucosal homeostasis and depends, in part, on barrier-forming elements within the epithelium and a balance between pro- and anti-inflammatory factors in the mucosa. Pathologic states, such as inflammatory bowel disease, are associated with a leaky epithelial barrier, resulting in excessive exposure to microbial antigens, recruitment of leukocytes, release of soluble mediators, and ultimately mucosal damage. An inflammatory microenvironment affects epithelial barrier properties and mucosal homeostasis by altering the structure and function of epithelial intercellular junctions through direct and indirect mechanisms. We review our current understanding of complex interactions between the intestinal epithelium and immune cells, with a focus on pathologic mucosal inflammation and mechanisms of epithelial repair. We discuss leukocyte–epithelial interactions, as well as inflammatory mediators that affect the epithelial barrier and mucosal repair. Increased knowledge of communication networks between the epithelium and immune system will lead to tissue-specific strategies for treating pathologic intestinal inflammation. PMID:27436072

  5. Effect of Interaction between Chromatin Loops on Cell-to-Cell Variability in Gene Expression.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tuoqi Liu

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available According to recent experimental evidence, the interaction between chromatin loops, which can be characterized by three factors-connection pattern, distance between regulatory elements, and communication form, play an important role in determining the level of cell-to-cell variability in gene expression. These quantitative experiments call for a corresponding modeling effect that addresses the question of how changes in these factors affect variability at the expression level in a systematic rather than case-by-case fashion. Here we make such an effort, based on a mechanic model that maps three fundamental patterns for two interacting DNA loops into a 4-state model of stochastic transcription. We first show that in contrast to side-by-side loops, nested loops enhance mRNA expression and reduce expression noise whereas alternating loops have just opposite effects. Then, we compare effects of facilitated tracking and direct looping on gene expression. We find that the former performs better than the latter in controlling mean expression and in tuning expression noise, but this control or tuning is distance-dependent, remarkable for moderate loop lengths, and there is a limit loop length such that the difference in effect between two communication forms almost disappears. Our analysis and results justify the facilitated chromatin-looping hypothesis.

  6. Quantum theory analysis on microscopic mechanism of the interaction of laser with cell membrane

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    XU Lin; ZHANG Can-bang; WANG Sheng-yu; LI Ling; WANG Rui-li; ZHOU Ling-yun

    2007-01-01

    On the basis of liquid crystal model with the electric dipole moment of cell membrane,the microscopic mechanism of the electricity and thermology effects of interaction of laser with cell membrane is researched by electromagnetic, quantum mechanics and quantum statistics. We derive the formulas on the polarization effects and "temperature-rising effect" of laser-cell membrane interaction. The results of the theoretical research can explain some experiments.

  7. Measurement of interaction forces between red blood cells in aggregates by optical tweezers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maklygin, A Yu; Priezzhev, A V; Karmenian, A; Nikitin, Sergei Yu; Obolenskii, I S; Lugovtsov, Andrei E; Kisun Li

    2012-06-30

    We have fabricated double-beam optical tweezers and demonstrated the possibility of their use for measuring the interaction forces between red blood cells (erythrocytes). It has been established experimentally that prolonged trapping of red blood cells in a tightly focused laser beam does not cause any visible changes in their shape or size. We have measured the interaction between red blood cells in the aggregate, deformed by optical tweezers.

  8. Cell-Biomaterial Mechanical Interaction in the Framework of Tissue Engineering: Insights, Computational Modeling and Perspectives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Esther Reina-Romo

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Tissue engineering is an emerging field of research which combines the use of cell-seeded biomaterials both in vitro and/or in vivo with the aim of promoting new tissue formation or regeneration. In this context, how cells colonize and interact with the biomaterial is critical in order to get a functional tissue engineering product. Cell-biomaterial interaction is referred to here as the phenomenon involved in adherent cells attachment to the biomaterial surface, and their related cell functions such as growth, differentiation, migration or apoptosis. This process is inherently complex in nature involving many physico-chemical events which take place at different scales ranging from molecular to cell body (organelle levels. Moreover, it has been demonstrated that the mechanical environment at the cell-biomaterial location may play an important role in the subsequent cell function, which remains to be elucidated. In this paper, the state-of-the-art research in the physics and mechanics of cell-biomaterial interaction is reviewed with an emphasis on focal adhesions. The paper is focused on the different models developed at different scales available to simulate certain features of cell-biomaterial interaction. A proper understanding of cell-biomaterial interaction, as well as the development of predictive models in this sense, may add some light in tissue engineering and regenerative medicine fields.

  9. Cell-Biomaterial Mechanical Interaction in the Framework of Tissue Engineering: Insights, Computational Modeling and Perspectives

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanz-Herrera, Jose A.; Reina-Romo, Esther

    2011-01-01

    Tissue engineering is an emerging field of research which combines the use of cell-seeded biomaterials both in vitro and/or in vivo with the aim of promoting new tissue formation or regeneration. In this context, how cells colonize and interact with the biomaterial is critical in order to get a functional tissue engineering product. Cell-biomaterial interaction is referred to here as the phenomenon involved in adherent cells attachment to the biomaterial surface, and their related cell functions such as growth, differentiation, migration or apoptosis. This process is inherently complex in nature involving many physico-chemical events which take place at different scales ranging from molecular to cell body (organelle) levels. Moreover, it has been demonstrated that the mechanical environment at the cell-biomaterial location may play an important role in the subsequent cell function, which remains to be elucidated. In this paper, the state-of-the-art research in the physics and mechanics of cell-biomaterial interaction is reviewed with an emphasis on focal adhesions. The paper is focused on the different models developed at different scales available to simulate certain features of cell-biomaterial interaction. A proper understanding of cell-biomaterial interaction, as well as the development of predictive models in this sense, may add some light in tissue engineering and regenerative medicine fields. PMID:22174660

  10. Interaction of PC-3 cells with fibronectin adsorbed on sulfonated polystyrene surfaces

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hanna M. Kowalczyńska

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The ability of cancer cells to invade neighboring tissues is crucial for cell dissemination and tumor metastasis. It is generally assumed that cell adhesion to extracellular matrix proteins is an important stage of cancer progression. Hence, adhesion of cancer cells under in vitro conditions to proteins adsorbed on a substratum surface has been studied to provide a better understanding of cell-protein interaction mechanisms. A protein, adsorbed in an appropriate conformation on a substratum surface, creates a biologically active layer that regulates such cell functions as adhesion, spreading, proliferation and migration. In our study, we examined the interaction of PC-3 cells under in vitro conditions with fibronectin adsorbed on sulfonated polystyrene surfaces of a defined chemical composition and topography. We investigated cell adhesion to fibronectin and cell spreading. Using automatic, sequential microscopic image registration, we are the first to present observations of the dynamics of PC-3 cell spreading and the cell shape during this process. Our results show that cell adhesion and the shape of spreading cells strongly depend on the time interaction with fibronectin. The analysis of images of cytoskeletal protein distribution in the cell region near the cell-substratum interface revealed that induction of a signal cascade took place, which led to the reorganization of the cytoskeletal proteins and the activation of focal adhesion kinase (FAK. (Folia Histochemica et Cytobiologica 2011; Vol. 49, No. 4, pp. 706–718

  11. Interaction of PC-3 cells with fibronectin adsorbed on sulfonated polystyrene surfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stachurska, Anna; Kowalczyńska, Hanna M

    2011-01-01

    The ability of cancer cells to invade neighboring tissues is crucial for cell dissemination and tumor metastasis. It is generally assumed that cell adhesion to extracellular matrix proteins is an important stage of cancer progression. Hence, adhesion of cancer cells under in vitro conditions to proteins adsorbed on a substratum surface has been studied to provide a better understanding of cell-protein interaction mechanisms. A protein, adsorbed in an appropriate conformation on a substratum surface, creates a biologically active layer that regulates such cell functions as adhesion, spreading, proliferation and migration. In our study, we examined the interaction of PC-3 cells under in vitro conditions with fibronectin adsorbed on sulfonated polystyrene surfaces of a defined chemical composition and topography. We investigated cell adhesion to fibronectin and cell spreading. Using automatic, sequential microscopic image registration, we are the first to present observations of the dynamics of PC-3 cell spreading and the cell shape during this process. Our results show that cell adhesion and the shape of spreading cells strongly depend on the time interaction with fibronectin. The analysis of images of cytoskeletal protein distribution in the cell region near the cell-substratum interface revealed that induction of a signal cascade took place, which led to the reorganization of the cytoskeletal proteins and the activation of focal adhesion kinase (FAK).

  12. Interaction between human monocytes and vascular smooth muscle cells induces vascular endothelial growth factor expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hojo, Y; Ikeda, U; Maeda, Y; Takahashi, M; Takizawa, T; Okada, M; Funayama, H; Shimada, K

    2000-05-01

    The objective of this study was to investigate whether synthesis of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), a major mitogen for vascular endothelial cells, was induced by a cell-to-cell interaction between monocytes and vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs). Human VSMCs and THP-1 cells (human monocytoid cell) were cocultured. VEGF levels in the coculture medium were determined by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. Northern blot analysis of VEGF mRNA was performed using a specific cDNA probe. Immunohistochemistry was performed to determine which types of cell produce VEGF. Adding THP-1 cells to VSMCs for 24 h increased VEGF levels of the culture media, 8- and 10-fold relative to those of THP-1 cells and VSMCs alone, respectively. Northern blot analysis showed that VEGF mRNA expression was induced in the cocultured cells and peaked after 12 h. Immunohistochemistry disclosed that both types of cell in the coculture produced VEGF. Separate coculture experiments revealed that both direct contact and a soluble factor(s) contributed to VEGF production. Neutralizing anti-interleukin (IL)-6 antibody inhibited VEGF production by the coculture of THP-1 cells and VSMCs. A cell-to-cell interaction between monocytes and VSMCs induced VEGF synthesis in both types of cell. An IL-6 mediated mechanism is at least partially involved in VEGF production by the cocultures. Local VEGF production induced by a monocyte-VSMC interaction may play an important role in atherosclerosis and vascular remodeling.

  13. Understanding Peptide Dendrimer Interactions with Model Cell Membrane Mimics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lind, Tania Kjellerup

    membranes or highly conserved motifs, effectively making resistance due to mutations less likely to develop and spread. For this we studied the conditions to form supported lipid bilayers with basic systems and further established a protocol for producing biomimetic bacterial model membranes via the vesicle...... fusion method, which presents improved means for studying drug-membrane interactions in the future. The interaction mechanism of a family of dendrimers was examined and in particular one dendrimer (BALY) was extensively studied by the combined use of quartz crystal microbalance, atomic force microscopy...... and neutron reection. The application of several complementary surface-sensitive techniques allowed for systematically addressing the interface-related processes and gain insights into different aspects of the interaction. BALY was found to interact via a uidity-dependent mechanism. It inserted into the outer...

  14. Aquatic flower-inspired cell culture platform with simplified medium exchange process for facilitating cell-surface interaction studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hong, Hyeonjun; Park, Sung Jea; Han, Seon Jin; Lim, Jiwon; Kim, Dong Sung

    2016-02-01

    Establishing fundamentals for regulating cell behavior with engineered physical environments, such as topography and stiffness, requires a large number of cell culture experiments. However, cell culture experiments in cell-surface interaction studies are generally labor-intensive and time-consuming due to many experimental tasks, such as multiple fabrication processes in sample preparation and repetitive medium exchange in cell culture. In this work, a novel aquatic flower-inspired cell culture platform (AFIP) is presented. AFIP aims to facilitate the experiments on the cell-surface interaction studies, especially the medium exchange process. AFIP was devised to capture and dispense cell culture medium based on interactions between an elastic polymer substrate and a liquid medium. Thus, the medium exchange can be performed easily and without the need of other instruments, such as a vacuum suction and pipette. An appropriate design window of AFIP, based on scaling analysis, was identified to provide a criterion for achieving stability in medium exchange as well as various surface characteristics of the petal substrates. The developed AFIP, with physically engineered petal substrates, was also verified to exchange medium reliably and repeatedly. A closed structure capturing the medium was sustained stably during cell culture experiments. NIH3T3 proliferation results also demonstrated that AFIP can be applied to the cell-surface interaction studies as an alternative to the conventional method.

  15. Interaction between submicron COD crystals and renal epithelial cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peng H

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Hua Peng1,2 Jian-Ming Ouyang1,2 Xiu-Qiong Yao1, Ru-E Yang11Department of Chemistry, Jinan University, 2Institute of Biomineralization and Lithiasis Research, Jinan University, Guangzhou, ChinaObjectives: This study aims to investigate the adhesion characteristics between submicron calcium oxalate dihydrate (COD with a size of 150 ± 50 nm and African green monkey kidney epithelial cells (Vero cells before and after damage, and to discuss the mechanism of kidney stone formation.Methods: Vero cells were oxidatively injured by hydrogen peroxide to establish a model of injured cells. Scanning electron microscopy was used to observe Vero–COD adhesion. Inductively coupled plasma emission spectrometry was used to quantitatively measure the amount of adhered COD microcrystals. Nanoparticle size analyzer and laser scanning confocal microscopy were performed to measure the change in the zeta potential on the Vero cell surface and the change in osteopontin expression during the adhesion process, respectively. The level of cell injury was evaluated by measuring the changes in malonaldehyde content, and cell viability during the adhesion process.Results: The adhesion capacity of Vero cells in the injury group to COD microcrystals was obviously stronger than that of Vero cells in the control group. After adhesion to COD, cell viability dropped, both malonaldehyde content and cell surface zeta potential increased, and the fluorescence intensity of osteopontin decreased because the osteopontin molecules were successfully covered by COD. Submicron COD further damaged the cells during the adhesion process, especially for Vero cells in the control group, leading to an elevated amount of attached microcrystals.Conclusion: Submicron COD can further damage injured Vero cells during the adhesion process. The amount of attached microcrystals is proportional to the degree of cell damage. The increased amount of microcrystals that adhered to the injured epithelial

  16. Studying host cell protein interactions with monoclonal antibodies using high throughput protein A chromatography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sisodiya, Vikram N; Lequieu, Joshua; Rodriguez, Maricel; McDonald, Paul; Lazzareschi, Kathlyn P

    2012-10-01

    Protein A chromatography is typically used as the initial capture step in the purification of monoclonal antibodies produced in Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cells. Although exploiting an affinity interaction for purification, the level of host cell proteins in the protein A eluent varies significantly with different feedstocks. Using a batch binding chromatography method, we performed a controlled study to assess host cell protein clearance across both MabSelect Sure and Prosep vA resins. We individually spiked 21 purified antibodies into null cell culture fluid generated with a non-producing cell line, creating mock cell culture fluids for each antibody with an identical composition of host cell proteins and antibody concentration. We demonstrated that antibody-host cell protein interactions are primarily responsible for the variable levels of host cell proteins in the protein A eluent for both resins when antibody is present. Using the additives guanidine HCl and sodium chloride, we demonstrated that antibody-host cell protein interactions may be disrupted, reducing the level of host cell proteins present after purification on both resins. The reduction in the level of host cell proteins differed between antibodies suggesting that the interaction likely varies between individual antibodies but encompasses both an electrostatic and hydrophobic component.

  17. Interaction of extracellular vesicles with endothelial cells under physiological flow conditions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Dommelen, Susan M.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/337396639; Fish, Margaret; Barendrecht, Arjan D|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/304818437; Schiffelers, Raymond M.; Eniola-Adefeso, Omolola; Vader, Pieter

    2017-01-01

    In the last few years it has become clear that, in addition to soluble molecules such as growth factors and cytokines, cells use extracellular vesicles (EVs) for intercellular communication. For example, EVs derived from cancer cells interact with endothelial cells, thereby affecting angiogenesis

  18. Western blotting as a method for studying cell-biomaterial interactions : The role of protein collection

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Kooten, TG; Klein, CL; Kirkpatrick, CJ

    2001-01-01

    Research of cell-biomaterial interactions is building on knowledge and methods available in cell and molecular biology. Western blotting is one of the options to characterize protein expression in cell populations. Method transfer to biomaterial model systems is not trivial because of the structure

  19. Exploiting serum interactions with cationic biomaterials enables label-free circulating tumor cell isolation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castellanos, Carlos

    Herein we investigate the role charged biomaterials and fluid dielectric properties have on microfluidic capture and isolation of circulating tumor cells. We determine that heparan sulfate proteoglycans on cancer cell surfaces are responsible for elevated electric charge of cancer cells compared with white blood cells and that these proteoglycans help mediate adhesive interactions between cells and charged surfaces in albumin-containing fluids. Cancer cell firm adhesion to charged surfaces persists when cells are bathed in up to 1% (w/v) human albumin solution, while white blood cell adhesion is nearly abrogated. As many protocols rely on electrical interactions between cells and biomaterials, our study could reveal a new determinant of efficient adhesion and targeting of specific tissue types in the context of a biological fluid environment.

  20. Systematic Pan-Cancer Analysis Reveals Immune Cell Interactions in the Tumor Microenvironment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Varn, Frederick S; Wang, Yue; Mullins, David W; Fiering, Steven; Cheng, Chao

    2017-03-15

    With the recent advent of immunotherapy, there is a critical need to understand immune cell interactions in the tumor microenvironment in both pan-cancer and tissue-specific contexts. Multidimensional datasets have enabled systematic approaches to dissect these interactions in large numbers of patients, furthering our understanding of the patient immune response to solid tumors. Using an integrated approach, we inferred the infiltration levels of distinct immune cell subsets in 23 tumor types from The Cancer Genome Atlas. From these quantities, we constructed a coinfiltration network, revealing interactions between cytolytic cells and myeloid cells in the tumor microenvironment. By integrating patient mutation data, we found that while mutation burden was associated with immune infiltration differences between distinct tumor types, additional factors likely explained differences between tumors originating from the same tissue. We concluded this analysis by examining the prognostic value of individual immune cell subsets as well as how coinfiltration of functionally discordant cell types associated with patient survival. In multiple tumor types, we found that the protective effect of CD8(+) T cell infiltration was heavily modulated by coinfiltration of macrophages and other myeloid cell types, suggesting the involvement of myeloid-derived suppressor cells in tumor development. Our findings illustrate complex interactions between different immune cell types in the tumor microenvironment and indicate these interactions play meaningful roles in patient survival. These results demonstrate the importance of personalized immune response profiles when studying the factors underlying tumor immunogenicity and immunotherapy response. Cancer Res; 77(6); 1271-82. ©2017 AACR.

  1. Astrocytes Enhance Streptococcus suis-Glial Cell Interaction in Primary Astrocyte-Microglial Cell Co-Cultures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seele, Jana; Nau, Roland; Prajeeth, Chittappen K; Stangel, Martin; Valentin-Weigand, Peter; Seitz, Maren

    2016-06-13

    Streptococcus (S.) suis infections are the most common cause of meningitis in pigs. Moreover, S. suis is a zoonotic pathogen, which can lead to meningitis in humans, mainly in adults. We assume that glial cells may play a crucial role in host-pathogen interactions during S. suis infection of the central nervous system. Glial cells are considered to possess important functions during inflammation and injury of the brain in bacterial meningitis. In the present study, we established primary astrocyte-microglial cell co-cultures to investigate interactions of S. suis with glial cells. For this purpose, microglial cells and astrocytes were isolated from new-born mouse brains and characterized by flow cytometry, followed by the establishment of astrocyte and microglial cell mono-cultures as well as astrocyte-microglial cell co-cultures. In addition, we prepared microglial cell mono-cultures co-incubated with uninfected astrocyte mono-culture supernatants and astrocyte mono-cultures co-incubated with uninfected microglial cell mono-culture supernatants. After infection of the different cell cultures with S. suis, bacteria-cell association was mainly observed with microglial cells and most prominently with a non-encapsulated mutant of S. suis. A time-dependent induction of NO release was found only in the co-cultures and after co-incubation of microglial cells with uninfected supernatants of astrocyte mono-cultures mainly after infection with the capsular mutant. Only moderate cytotoxic effects were found in co-cultured glial cells after infection with S. suis. Taken together, astrocytes and astrocyte supernatants increased interaction of microglial cells with S. suis. Astrocyte-microglial cell co-cultures are suitable to study S. suis infections and bacteria-cell association as well as NO release by microglial cells was enhanced in the presence of astrocytes.

  2. Non-Chemical Distant Cellular Interactions as a potential confounder of cell biology experiments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farhadi, Ashkan

    2014-01-01

    Distant cells can communicate with each other through a variety of methods. Two such methods involve electrical and/or chemical mechanisms. Non-chemical, distant cellular interactions may be another method of communication that cells can use to modify the behavior of other cells that are mechanically separated. Moreover, non-chemical, distant cellular interactions may explain some cases of confounding effects in Cell Biology experiments. In this article, we review non-chemical, distant cellular interactions studies to try to shed light on the mechanisms in this highly unconventional field of cell biology. Despite the existence of several theories that try to explain the mechanism of non-chemical, distant cellular interactions, this phenomenon is still speculative. Among candidate mechanisms, electromagnetic waves appear to have the most experimental support. In this brief article, we try to answer a few key questions that may further clarify this mechanism.

  3. Non-Chemical Distant Cellular Interactions as a potential confounder of Cell Biology Experiments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ashkan eFarhadi

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Distant cells can communicate with each other through a variety of methods. Two such methods involve electrical and/or chemical mechanisms. Non-chemical, distant cellular interactions may be another method of communication that cells can use to modify the behavior of other cells that are mechanically separated. Moreover, non-chemical, distant cellular interactions may explain some cases of confounding effects in Cell Biology experiments. In this article, we review non-chemical, distant cellular interactions studies to try to shed light on the mechanisms in this highly unconventional field of cell biology. Despite the existence of several theories that try to explain the mechanism of non-chemical, distant cellular interactions, this phenomenon is still speculative. Among candidate mechanisms, electromagnetic waves appear to have the most experimental support. In this brief article, we try to answer a few key questions that may further clarify this mechanism.

  4. The "sweet" side of the protein corona: effects of glycosylation on nanoparticle-cell interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wan, Sha; Kelly, Philip M; Mahon, Eugene; Stöckmann, Henning; Rudd, Pauline M; Caruso, Frank; Dawson, Kenneth A; Yan, Yan; Monopoli, Marco P

    2015-02-24

    The significance of a protein corona on nanoparticles in modulating particle properties and their biological interactions has been widely acknowledged. The protein corona is derived from proteins in biological fluids, many of which are glycosylated. To date, the glycans on the proteins have been largely overlooked in studies of nanoparticle-cell interactions. In this study, we demonstrate that glycosylation of the protein corona plays an important role in maintaining the colloidal stability of nanoparticles and influences nanoparticle-cell interactions. The removal of glycans from the protein corona enhances cell membrane adhesion and cell uptake of nanoparticles in comparison with the fully glycosylated form, resulting in the generation of a pro-inflammatory milieu by macrophages. This study highlights that the post-translational modification of proteins can significantly impact nanoparticle-cell interactions by modulating the protein corona properties.

  5. Interaction between monocytes and vascular smooth muscle cells enhances matrix metalloproteinase-1 production.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Y; Hojo, Y; Ikeda, U; Takahashi, M; Shimada, K

    2000-08-01

    Matrix metalloproteinase-1 (MMP-1) plays an important role in atherosclerotic plaque rupture. The purpose of this study was to investigate the expression of MMP-1 by cell-to-cell interactions between monocytes and vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs). Human VSMCs and THP-1 cells (human monocytoid cells) were cocultured. MMP-1 levels were measured by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. Collagenolytic activity was determined by fluorescent labeled-collagen digestion. Immunohistochemistry was performed to determine which types of cells produce MMP-1. Adding THP-1 cells to VSMCs markedly increased the MMP-1 levels and activity of the culture media. MMP-1 levels were maximal when the cellular ratio of THP-1 cells/VSMCs was 1.0. Immunohistochemistry revealed that both types of cells in the coculture produced MMP-1. Separated coculture experiments showed that both direct contact and a soluble factor(s) contributed to MMP-1 production. Neutralizing anti-interleukin (IL)-6 and tumor necrosis factor-alpha antibodies inhibited coculture conditioned medium-induced MMP-1 production by VSMCs and THP-1 cells. Protein kinase C inhibitors, tyrosine kinase inhibitors, and a mitogen-activated protein kinase inhibitor significantly inhibited MMP-1 production by cocultures. Direct cell-to-cell interaction between THP-1 cells and VSMCs enhanced MMP-1 synthesis in both types of cells. Increased local MMP-1 production and activity induced by monocyte-VSMC interaction play an important pathogenic role in atherosclerotic plaque rupture.

  6. T cell development in mouse thymus : studies on lymphostromal interactions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    P.J.A.M. Brekelmans (Pieter)

    1993-01-01

    textabstractT lymphocytes, the effectors of cell-mediated immunity, are concerned with the control of intracellular infections: cytotoxic T lymphocytes recognize and destroy vi rally infected cells, whereas helper T lymphocytes, through lymphokines, may activate macrophages in killing intracellular

  7. Keynote Paper: Cell-Surface Adhesive Interactions in Microchannels and Microvessels

    CERN Document Server

    King, M R

    2003-01-01

    Adhesive interactions between white blood cells and the interior surface of the blood vessels they contact is important in inflammation and in the progression of heart disease. Parallel-plate microchannels have been useful in characterizing the strength of these interactions, in conditions that are much simplified over the complex environment these cells experience in the body. Recent computational and experimental work by several laboratories have attempted to bridge this gap between behavior observed in flow chamber experiments, and cell-surface interactions observed in the microvessels of anesthetized animals.

  8. Cell-collagen interactions : the use of peptide Toolkits to investigate collagen-receptor interactions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Farndale, Richard W.; Lisman, Ton; Bihan, Dominique; Hamaia, Samir; Smerling, Christiane S.; Pugh, Nicholas; Konitsiotis, Antonios; Leitinger, Birgit; de Groot, Philip G.; Jarvis, Gavin E.; Raynal, Nicolas

    2008-01-01

    Fibrillar collagens provide the most fundamental platform in the vertebrate organism for the attachment of cells and matrix molecules. we have identified specific sites in collagens to which cells can attach, either directly or through protein intermediaries. Using Toolkits of triple-helical peptide

  9. Human mammary progenitor cell fate decisions are productsof interactions with combinatorial microenvironments

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    LaBarge, Mark A.; Nelson, Celeste M.; Villadsen, René

    2009-01-01

    as constellations of signaling molecules; and these were used in conjunction with physiologically relevant 3 dimensional human breast cultures. Both immortalized and primary human breast progenitors were analyzed. We report on the functional ability of those proteins of the mammary gland that maintain quiescence...... combinations of cell-extrinsic mammary gland proteins and ECM molecules that imposed specific cell fates on bipotent human mammary progenitor cells.Micropatterned cell culture surfaces were fabricated to distinguish between the instructive effects of cell-cell versus cell-ECM interactions, as well...

  10. Depressed immune surveillance against cancer: role of deficient T cell: extracellular matrix interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Górski, A; Castronovo, V; Stepień-Sopniewska, B; Grieb, P; Ryba, M; Mrowiec, T; Korczak-Kowalska, G; Wierzbicki, P; Matysiak, W; Dybowska, B

    1994-07-01

    Although T cells infiltrate malignant tumors, the local immune response is usually inefficient and tumors escape destruction. While extracellular matrix proteins strongly costimulate T cell responses in normal individuals, our studies indicate that peripheral blood T cells from cancer patients and tumor infiltrating cells respond poorly or are resistant to stimulative signals mediated by collagen I and IV and fibronectin. Moreover, the adhesive properties of cancer T cells are markedly depressed. Those functional deficiencies are paralleled by variable deficits in integrin and non-integrin T cell receptors for extracellular matrix. Immunotherapy with BCG causes a dramatic but transient increase in T cell: ECM interactions.

  11. Treg/Th17 polarization by distinct subsets of breast cancer cells is dictated by the interaction with mesenchymal stem cells

    OpenAIRE

    Patel, Shyam A.; Dave, Meneka A.; Bliss, Sarah A.; Giec-Ujda, Agata B.; Bryan, Margarette; Pliner, Lillian F.; Rameshwar, Pranela

    2014-01-01

    Breast cancer (BC) cells (BCCs) exist within a hierarchy beginning with cancer stem cells (CSCs). Unsorted BCCs interact with mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) to induce regulatory T cells (Tregs). This study investigated how distinct BCC subsets interacted with MSCs to polarize T-cell response, Tregs versus T helper 17 (Th17). This study tested BC initiating cells (CSCs) and the relatively more mature early and late BC progenitors. CSCs interacted with the highest avidity to MSCs. This interacti...

  12. Tolerogenic interactions between CD8+ dendritic cells and NKT cells prevent rejection of bone marrow and organ grafts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hongo, David; Tang, Xiaobin; Zhang, Xiangyue; Engleman, Edgar G; Strober, Samuel

    2017-01-17

    The combination of total lymphoid irradiation and anti-T cell antibodies safely induces immune tolerance to combined hematopoietic cell and organ allografts in humans. Our mouse model required host natural killer T (NKT) cells to induce tolerance. Since NKT cells normally depend on signals from CD8+ dendritic cells (DCs) for their activation, we used the mouse model to test the hypothesis that after lymphoid irradiation host CD8+DCs play a requisite role in tolerance induction through interactions with NKT cells. Selective deficiency of either CD8+DCs or NKT cells abrogated chimerism and organ graft acceptance. After radiation, the CD8+DCs increased expression of surface molecules required for NKT and apoptotic cell interactions and developed suppressive immune functions including production of indoleamine 2,3-deoxygenase (IDO). Injection of naïve mice with apoptotic spleen cells generated by irradiation led to DC changes similar to those induced by lymphoid radiation, suggesting that apoptotic body ingestion by CD8+DCs initiates tolerance induction. Tolerogenic CD8+DCs induced the development of tolerogenic NKT cells with a marked Th2 bias that, in turn, regulated the differentiation of the DCs and suppressed rejection of the transplants. Thus, reciprocal interactions between CD8+DCs and iNKT cells are required for tolerance induction in this system that was translated into a successful clinical protocol.

  13. Mesenchymal stem cell-cardiomyocyte interactions under defined contact modes on laser-patterned biochips.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhen Ma

    Full Text Available Understanding how stem cells interact with cardiomyocytes is crucial for cell-based therapies to restore the cardiomyocyte loss that occurs during myocardial infarction and other cardiac diseases. It has been thought that functional myocardial repair and regeneration could be regulated by stem cell-cardiomyocyte contact. However, because various contact modes (junction formation, cell fusion, partial cell fusion, and tunneling nanotube formation occur randomly in a conventional coculture system, the particular regulation corresponding to a specific contact mode could not be analyzed. In this study, we used laser-patterned biochips to define cell-cell contact modes for systematic study of contact-mediated cellular interactions at the single-cell level. The results showed that the biochip design allows defined stem cell-cardiomyocyte contact-mode formation, which can be used to determine specific cellular interactions, including electrical coupling, mechanical coupling, and mitochondria transfer. The biochips will help us gain knowledge of contact-mediated interactions between stem cells and cardiomyocytes, which are fundamental for formulating a strategy to achieve stem cell-based cardiac tissue regeneration.

  14. A photoactivatable nanopatterned substrate for analyzing collective cell migration with precisely tuned cell-extracellular matrix ligand interactions.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yoshihisa Shimizu

    Full Text Available Collective cell migration is involved in many biological and pathological processes. Various factors have been shown to regulate the decision to migrate collectively or individually, but the impact of cell-extracellular matrix (ECM interactions is still debated. Here, we developed a method for analyzing collective cell migration by precisely tuning the interactions between cells and ECM ligands. Gold nanoparticles are arrayed on a glass substrate with a defined nanometer spacing by block copolymer micellar nanolithography (BCML, and photocleavable poly(ethylene glycol (Mw  =  12 kDa, PEG12K and a cyclic RGD peptide, as an ECM ligand, are immobilized on this substrate. The remaining glass regions are passivated with PEG2K-silane to make cells interact with the surface via the nanoperiodically presented cyclic RGD ligands upon the photocleavage of PEG12K. On this nanostructured substrate, HeLa cells are first patterned in photo-illuminated regions, and cell migration is induced by a second photocleavage of the surrounding PEG12K. The HeLa cells gradually lose their cell-cell contacts and become disconnected on the nanopatterned substrate with 10-nm particles and 57-nm spacing, in contrast to their behavior on the homogenous substrate. Interestingly, the relationship between the observed migration collectivity and the cell-ECM ligand interactions is the opposite of that expected based on conventional soft matter models. It is likely that the reduced phosphorylation at tyrosine-861 of focal adhesion kinase (FAK on the nanopatterned surface is responsible for this unique migration behavior. These results demonstrate the usefulness of the presented method in understanding the process of determining collective and non-collective migration features in defined micro- and nano-environments and resolving the crosstalk between cell-cell and cell-ECM adhesions.

  15. On the importance of electrostatic interactions between cell penetrating peptides and membranes: a pathway toward tumor cell selectivity?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jobin, Marie-Lise; Alves, Isabel D

    2014-12-01

    Cell-penetrating peptides (CPPs) are small molecules of major interest due to their ability to efficiently transport cargos across cell membranes in a receptor- and energy-independent way and without being cytotoxic to cells. Since their discovery 20 years ago their potential interest in drug delivery and diagnosis became undeniable. CPPs are being used to deliver inside cells a large variety of cargos such as proteins, DNA, antibodies, imaging agents and nanoparticle drug carriers. Their cellular uptake mechanisms are still debated and may vary depending on their structure, nature and size of cargo they transport and type of cell line targeted. CPPs are generally rich in positively charged residues, thus they are prone to establish electrostatic interactions with anionic membrane components (sugars and lipids). Understanding the molecular basis of CPP membrane interaction and cellular uptake is crucial to improve their in vivo efficiency target-specificity. A great number of studies demonstrated the high potential of CPPs to translocate efficiently therapeutic cargos into cells and some peptides are even in clinical phase studies. Although these molecules seem perfect for a therapeutic or diagnosis purpose, they still possess a small but non negligible drawback: a complete lack of cell type specificity. Tumor cells have recently been shown to over-express certain glycosaminoglycans at the cell membrane surface and to possess a higher amount of anionic lipids in their outer leaflet than healthy cells. Such molecules confer the cell membrane an enhanced anionic character, property that could be used by CPPs to selectively target these cells. Moreover previous studies demonstrate the importance of electrostatic interactions between basic residues in the peptide, especially Arg, and the lipid headgroups and glycosaminoglycans in the cell membrane. Electrostatic interactions put at stake in this process might be one of the keys to resolve the puzzle of CPP cell type

  16. Enhancing whole-tumor cell vaccination by engaging innate immune system through NY-ESO-1/dendritic cell interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Le; Zheng, Junying; Nguyen, David H; Luong, Quang T; Zeng, Gang

    2013-10-01

    NY-ESO-1 is a cancer/germline antigen (Ag) with distinctively strong immunogenicity. We have previously demonstrated that NY-ESO-1 serves as an endogenous adjuvant by engaging dendritic cell (DC)-surface receptors of calreticulin (CRT) and toll-like receptor (TLR) 4. In the present study, NY-ESO-1 was investigated for its immunomodulatory roles as a molecular adjuvant in whole-tumor cell vaccines using the Renca kidney cancer model. Renca cells were genetically engineered to express NY-ESO-1 on the cell surface to enhance direct interactions with DC. The effect of ectopic cell-surface expression of NY-ESO-1 was investigated on tumor immunogenicity, DC activation, cytotoxic T lymphocytes against model tumor-associated Ags, and the effectiveness of the modified tumor cells as a therapeutic whole-cell vaccine. Cell-surface expression of NY-ESO-1 was able to reduce the tumor growth of Renca cells in BALB/c mice, although the modification did not alter cell proliferation rate in vitro. Directly engaging the innate immune system through NY-ESO-1 facilitated the interaction of tumor cells with DC, leading to enhanced DC activation and subsequent tumor-specific T-cell priming. When used as a therapeutic whole-cell vaccine, Renca cells with NY-ESO-1 on the surface mediated stronger inhibitory effects on tumor growth and metastasis compared with parental Renca or Renca cells expressing a control protein GFP on the surface. Augmented antitumor efficacy correlated with increased CD8 T-cell infiltration into tumors and decreased myeloid-derived suppressor cells and regulatory T cells in the spleen. As a cancer/germline Ag and as an immunomodulatory adjuvant through engaging innate immune receptors, NY-ESO-1 offers a unique opportunity for improved whole-tumor cell vaccinations upon the classic GM-CSF-engineered cell vaccines.

  17. Sulfated polysaccharides from marine sponges (Porifera): an ancestor cell-cell adhesion event based on the carbohydrate-carbohydrate interaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vilanova, Eduardo; Coutinho, Cristiano C; Mourão, Paulo A S

    2009-08-01

    Marine sponges (Porifera) are ancient and simple eumetazoans. They constitute key organisms in the evolution from unicellular to multicellular animals. We now demonstrated that pure sulfated polysaccharides from marine sponges are responsible for the species-specific cell-cell interaction in these invertebrates. This conclusion was based on the following observations: (1) each species of marine sponge has a single population of sulfated polysaccharide, which differ among the species in their sugar composition and sulfate content; (2) sulfated polysaccharides from sponge interact with each other in a species-specific way, as indicated by an affinity chromatography assay, and this interaction requires calcium; (3) homologous, but not heterologous, sulfated polysaccharide inhibits aggregation of dissociated sponge cells; (4) we also observed a parallel between synthesis of the sulfated polysaccharide and formation of large aggregates of sponge cells, known as primmorphs. Once aggregation reached a plateau, the demand for the de novo synthesis of sulfated polysaccharides ceased. Heparin can mimic the homologous sulfated polysaccharide on the in vitro interaction and also as an inhibitor of aggregation of the dissociated sponge cells. However, this observation is not relevant for the biology of the sponge since heparin is not found in the invertebrate. In conclusion, marine sponges display an ancestor event of cell-cell adhesion, based on the calcium-dependent carbohydrate-carbohydrate interaction.

  18. Utilizing cell-matrix interactions to modulate gene transfer to stem cells inside hyaluronic acid hydrogels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gojgini, Shiva; Tokatlian, Talar; Segura, Tatiana

    2011-10-01

    The effective delivery of DNA locally would increase the applicability of gene therapy in tissue regeneration, where diseased tissue is to be repaired in situ. One promising approach is to use hydrogel scaffolds to encapsulate and deliver plasmid DNA in the form of nanoparticles to the diseased tissue, so that cells infiltrating the scaffold are transfected to induce regeneration. This study focuses on the design of a DNA nanoparticle-loaded hydrogel scaffold. In particular, this study focuses on understanding how cell-matrix interactions affect gene transfer to adult stem cells cultured inside matrix metalloproteinase (MMP) degradable hyaluronic acid (HA) hydrogel scaffolds. HA was cross-linked to form a hydrogel material using a MMP degradable peptide and Michael addition chemistry. Gene transfer inside these hydrogel materials was assessed as a function of polyplex nitrogen to phosphate ratio (N/P = 5 to 12), matrix stiffness (100-1700 Pa), RGD (Arg-Gly-Asp) concentration (10-400 μM), and RGD presentation (0.2-4.7 RGDs per HA molecule). All variables were found to affect gene transfer to mouse mensenchymal stem cells culture inside the DNA loaded hydrogels. As expected, higher N/P ratios lead to higher gene transfer efficiency but also higher toxicity; softer hydrogels resulted in higher transgene expression than stiffer hydrogels, and an intermediate RGD concentration and RGD clustering resulted in higher transgene expression. We believe that the knowledge gained through this in vitro model can be utilized to design better scaffold-mediated gene delivery for local gene therapy.

  19. Tumor-stem cells interactions by fluorescence imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meleshina, Aleksandra V.; Cherkasova, Elena I.; Sergeeva, Ekaterina; Turchin, Ilya V.; Kiseleva, Ekaterina V.; Dashinimaev, Erdem B.; Shirmanova, Marina V.; Zagaynova, Elena V.

    2013-02-01

    Recently, great deal of interest is investigation the function of the stem cells (SC) in tumors. In this study, we studied «recipient-tumor- fluorescent stem cells » system using the methods of in vivo imaging and laser scanning microscopy (LSM). We used adipose-derived adult stem (ADAS) cells of human lentiviral transfected with the gene of fluorescent protein Turbo FP635. ADAS cells were administrated into nude mice with transplanted tumor HeLa Kyoto (human cervical carcinoma) at different stages of tumor growth (0-8 days) intravenously or into tumor. In vivo imaging was performed on the experimental setup for epi - luminescence bioimaging (IAP RAS, Nizhny Novgorod). The results of the imaging showed localization of fluorophore tagged stem cells in the spleen on day 5-9 after injection. The sensitivity of the technique may be improved by spectral separation autofluorescence and fluorescence of stem cells. We compared the results of in vivo imaging and confocal laser scanning microscopy (LSM 510 META, Carl Zeiss, Germany). Internal organs of the animals and tumor tissue were investigated. It was shown that with i.v. injection of ADAS, bright fluorescent structures with spectral characteristics corresponding to TurboFP635 protein are locally accumulated in the marrow, lungs and tumors of animals. These findings indicate that ADAS cells integrate in the animal body with transplanted tumor and can be identified by fluorescence bioimaging techniques in vivo and ex vivo.

  20. Interaction of Biofunctionalized Nanoparticles with Receptors on Cell Surfaces: MC Simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dormidontova, Elena; Wang, Shihu

    2015-03-01

    One of the areas of active development of modern nanomedicine is drug/gene delivery and imaging application of nanoparticles functionalized by ligands, aptamers or antibodies capable of specific interactions with cell surface receptors. Being a complex multifunctional system different structural aspects of nanoparticles affect their interactions with cell surfaces and the surface properties of cells can be different (e.g. density, distribution and mobility of receptors). Computer simulations allow a systematic investigation of the influence of multiple factors and provide a unified platform for the comparison. Using Monte Carlo simulations we investigate the influence of the nanoparticle properties (nanoparticle size, polymer tether length, polydispersity, density, ligand energy, valence and density) on nanoparticle-cell surface interactions and make predictions regarding favorable nanoparticle design for achieving multiple ligand-receptor binding. We will also discuss the implications of nanoparticle design on the selectivity of attachment to cells with high receptor density while ``ignoring'' cells with a low density of receptors.

  1. Investigation of interaction between the drug and cell membrane by capillary electrophoresis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2009-01-01

    By introducing cell membrane into electrophoretic buffer as pseudo-stationary phase,a novel capillary electrophoresis method was established to explore the interaction between drugs and cell membrane,where the interaction between citalopram and rabbit red blood cell membrane was used as an example. A series of concentrations of cell membrane were suspended into the running buffer by peak-shift method. The binding constant of citalopram to rabbit red blood cell membrane of 0.977 g-1·L was obtained after treatment of Scatchard plot. This method could provide not only a new way for the investigation on the interactions between drugs and cell membrane,but also a new approach for high throughput screening of the drug membrane permeability,biological activity,and evaluating drugs in vivo.

  2. Cell-material interactions revealed via material techniques of surface patterning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yao, Xiang; Peng, Rong; Ding, Jiandong

    2013-10-04

    Cell-material interactions constitute a key fundamental topic in biomaterials study. Various cell cues and matrix cues as well as soluble factors regulate cell behaviors on materials. These factors are coupled with each other as usual, and thus it is very difficult to unambiguously elucidate the role of each regulator. The recently developed material techniques of surface patterning afford unique ways to reveal the underlying science. This paper reviews the pertinent material techniques to fabricate patterns of microscale and nanoscale resolutions, and corresponding cell studies. Some issues are emphasized, such as cell localization on patterned surfaces of chemical contrast, and effects of cell shape, cell size, cell-cell contact, and seeding density on differentiation of stem cells. Material cues to regulate cell adhesion, cell differentiation and other cell events are further summed up. Effects of some physical properties, such as surface topography and matrix stiffness, on cell behaviors are also discussed; nanoscaled features of substrate surfaces to regulate cell fate are summarized as well. The pertinent work sheds new insight into the cell-material interactions, and is stimulating for biomaterial design in regenerative medicine, tissue engineering, and high-throughput detection, diagnosis, and drug screening. Copyright © 2013 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  3. Interactions between the intestinal microbiota and innate lymphoid cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Vincent L; Kasper, Dennis L

    2014-01-01

    The mammalian intestine must manage to contain 100 trillion intestinal bacteria without inducing inappropriate immune responses to these microorganisms. The effects of the immune system on intestinal microorganisms are numerous and well-characterized, and recent research has determined that the microbiota influences the intestinal immune system as well. In this review, we first discuss the intestinal immune system and its role in containing and maintaining tolerance to commensal organisms. We next introduce a category of immune cells, the innate lymphoid cells, and describe their classification and function in intestinal immunology. Finally, we discuss the effects of the intestinal microbiota on innate lymphoid cells.

  4. Evolvement of cell-substrate interaction over time for cells cultivated on a 3-aminopropyltriethoxysilane (γ-APTES) modified silicon dioxide (SiO2) surface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsu, Chung-Ping; Hsu, Po-Yen; Wu, You-Lin; Hsu, Wan-Yun; Lin, Jing-Jenn

    2012-09-01

    Since cell-substrate interaction is directly related to the traction force of the cell, the cell property can be judged from the imprint it leaves on the soft substrate surface onto which the cell is cultured. In this letter, the evolvement of the cell-substrate interaction over time was observed by cultivating cells on a 3-aminopropyltriethoxysilane (γ-APTES) modified silicon dioxide (SiO2) surface for different periods of time. The cell-substrate interaction property as a function of time can then be found from the post-cell-removal surface morphology profiles determined by atomic force microscopy (AFM). Different surface morphology profiles were found between normal cells and cancer cells. It was found that the cancer cells tend to form deeper trenches along the circumference of the imprints, while the normal cells do not. In addition, our results indicated that normal cells involve cell-substrate interaction mechanisms that are different from those for cancer cells.

  5. Cancer immunoediting by GITR (glucocorticoid-induced TNF-related protein) ligand in humans: NK cell/tumor cell interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baltz, Katrin M; Krusch, Matthias; Bringmann, Anita; Brossart, Peter; Mayer, Frank; Kloss, Mercedes; Baessler, Tina; Kumbier, Ingrid; Peterfi, Andrea; Kupka, Susan; Kroeber, Stefan; Menzel, Dagmar; Radsak, Markus P; Rammensee, Hans-Georg; Salih, Helmut R

    2007-08-01

    Glucocorticoid-induced TNF-related protein (GITR) has been shown to stimulate T cell-mediated antitumor immunity in mice. However, the functional relevance of GITR and its ligand (GITRL) for non-T cells has yet to be fully explored. In addition, recent evidence suggests that GITR plays different roles in mice and humans. We studied the role of GITR-GITRL interaction in human tumor immunology and report for the first time that primary gastrointestinal cancers and tumor cell lines of different histological origin express substantial levels of GITRL. Signaling through GITRL down-regulated the expression of the immunostimulatory molecules CD40 and CD54 and the adhesion molecule EpCAM, and induced production of the immunosuppressive cytokine TGF-beta by tumor cells. On NK cells, GITR is constitutively expressed and up-regulated following activation. Blocking GITR-GITRL interaction in cocultures of tumor cells and NK cells substantially increased cytotoxicity and IFN-gamma production of NK cells demonstrating that constitutive expression of GITRL by tumor cells diminishes NK cell antitumor immunity. GITRL-Ig fusion protein or cell surface-expressed GITRL did not induce apoptosis in NK cells, but diminished nuclear localized c-Rel and RelB, indicating that GITR might negatively modulate NK cell NF-kappaB activity. Taken together, our data indicate that tumor-expressed GITRL mediates immunosubversion in humans.

  6. Mapping the complex morphology of cell interactions with nanowire substrates using FIB-SEM.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rafał Wierzbicki

    Full Text Available Using high resolution focused ion beam scanning electron microscopy (FIB-SEM we study the details of cell-nanostructure interactions using serial block face imaging. 3T3 Fibroblast cellular monolayers are cultured on flat glass as a control surface and on two types of nanostructured scaffold substrates made from silicon black (Nanograss with low- and high nanowire density. After culturing for 72 hours the cells were fixed, heavy metal stained, embedded in resin, and processed with FIB-SEM block face imaging without removing the substrate. The sample preparation procedure, image acquisition and image post-processing were specifically optimised for cellular monolayers cultured on nanostructured substrates. Cells display a wide range of interactions with the nanostructures depending on the surface morphology, but also greatly varying from one cell to another on the same substrate, illustrating a wide phenotypic variability. Depending on the substrate and cell, we observe that cells could for instance: break the nanowires and engulf them, flatten the nanowires or simply reside on top of them. Given the complexity of interactions, we have categorised our observations and created an overview map. The results demonstrate that detailed nanoscale resolution images are required to begin understanding the wide variety of individual cells' interactions with a structured substrate. The map will provide a framework for light microscopy studies of such interactions indicating what modes of interactions must be considered.

  7. Mapping the complex morphology of cell interactions with nanowire substrates using FIB-SEM.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wierzbicki, Rafał; Købler, Carsten; Jensen, Mikkel R B; Lopacińska, Joanna; Schmidt, Michael S; Skolimowski, Maciej; Abeille, Fabien; Qvortrup, Klaus; Mølhave, Kristian

    2013-01-01

    Using high resolution focused ion beam scanning electron microscopy (FIB-SEM) we study the details of cell-nanostructure interactions using serial block face imaging. 3T3 Fibroblast cellular monolayers are cultured on flat glass as a control surface and on two types of nanostructured scaffold substrates made from silicon black (Nanograss) with low- and high nanowire density. After culturing for 72 hours the cells were fixed, heavy metal stained, embedded in resin, and processed with FIB-SEM block face imaging without removing the substrate. The sample preparation procedure, image acquisition and image post-processing were specifically optimised for cellular monolayers cultured on nanostructured substrates. Cells display a wide range of interactions with the nanostructures depending on the surface morphology, but also greatly varying from one cell to another on the same substrate, illustrating a wide phenotypic variability. Depending on the substrate and cell, we observe that cells could for instance: break the nanowires and engulf them, flatten the nanowires or simply reside on top of them. Given the complexity of interactions, we have categorised our observations and created an overview map. The results demonstrate that detailed nanoscale resolution images are required to begin understanding the wide variety of individual cells' interactions with a structured substrate. The map will provide a framework for light microscopy studies of such interactions indicating what modes of interactions must be considered.

  8. Trichomonas vaginalis and Tritrichomonas foetus: interaction with fibroblasts and muscle cells - new insights into parasite-mediated host cell cytotoxicity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ricardo Chaves Vilela

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Trichomonas vaginalis and Tritrichomonas foetus are parasitic, flagellated protists that inhabit the urogenital tract of humans and bovines, respectively. T. vaginalis causes the most prevalent non-viral sexually transmitted disease worldwide and has been associated with an increased risk for human immunodeficiency virus-1 infection in humans. Infections by T. foetus cause significant losses to the beef industry worldwide due to infertility and spontaneous abortion in cows. Several studies have shown a close association between trichomonads and the epithelium of the urogenital tract. However, little is known concerning the interaction of trichomonads with cells from deeper tissues, such as fibroblasts and muscle cells. Published parasite-host cell interaction studies have reported contradictory results regarding the ability of T. foetus and T. vaginalis to interact with and damage cells of different tissues. In this study, parasite-host cell interactions were examined by culturing primary human fibroblasts obtained from abdominal biopsies performed during plastic surgeries with trichomonads. In addition, mouse 3T3 fibroblasts, primary chick embryo myogenic cells and L6 muscle cells were also used as models of target cells. The parasite-host cell cultures were processed for scanning and transmission electron microscopy and were tested for cell viability and cell death. JC-1 staining, which measures mitochondrial membrane potential, was used to determine whether the parasites induced target cell damage. Terminal deoxynucleotidyltransferase-mediated dUTP nick end labelling staining was used as an indicator of chromatin damage. The colorimetric crystal violet assay was performed to ana-lyse the cytotoxicity induced by the parasite. The results showed that T. foetus and T. vaginalis adhered to and were cytotoxic to both fibroblasts and muscle cells, indicating that trichomonas infection of the connective and muscle tissues is likely to occur; such

  9. Hyaluronan Tumor Cell Interactions in Prostate Cancer Growth and Survival

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-12-01

    RHAMM remaining following CD44 knockdown. Secondly, RHAMM will be knocked down using RNAi and the level of CD44 remaining will be measured using Western...hyaluronidase pretreatment or by using RNAi for the hyaluronan synthase enzymes expressed by these cells. The prediction, again, is that limiting HA...vertebrates and is not found in lower organisms or in insects (Fig. 9.2). Given its roles in such important cellular processes as motility and cell division in

  10. Physiopathology of blood platelets: a model system for studies of cell-to-cell interaction. Progress report, November 1, 1979-October 31, 1980

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    1980-01-01

    This report covers the studies on basic mechanisms of cellular interactions, utilizing platelets as a model system and, when possible, concentrating on the influence that environmental factors (nutritional, metabolic, cellular, immunologic and others) have on them. The four major sections include: platelet interaction with tumor cells; a model for the study of cell-to-cell interaction; interaction of platelets with vessel walls; and platelet interactions with immune proteins.

  11. Antigen availability determines CD8⁺ T cell-dendritic cell interaction kinetics and memory fate decisions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henrickson, Sarah E; Perro, Mario; Loughhead, Scott M; Senman, Balimkiz; Stutte, Susanne; Quigley, Michael; Alexe, Gabriela; Iannacone, Matteo; Flynn, Michael P; Omid, Shaida; Jesneck, Jonathan L; Imam, Sabrina; Mempel, Thorsten R; Mazo, Irina B; Haining, W Nicholas; von Andrian, Ulrich H

    2013-09-19

    T cells are activated by antigen (Ag)-bearing dendritic cells (DCs) in lymph nodes in three phases. The duration of the initial phase of transient, serial DC-T cell interactions is inversely correlated with Ag dose. The second phase, characterized by stable DC-T cell contacts, is believed to be necessary for full-fledged T cell activation. Here we have shown that this is not the case. CD8⁺ T cells interacting with DCs presenting low-dose, short-lived Ag did not transition to phase 2, whereas higher Ag dose yielded phase 2 transition. Both antigenic constellations promoted T cell proliferation and effector differentiation but yielded different transcriptome signatures at 12 hr and 24 hr. T cells that experienced phase 2 developed long-lived memory, whereas conditions without stable contacts yielded immunological amnesia. Thus, T cells make fate decisions within hours after Ag exposure, resulting in long-term memory or abortive effector responses, correlating with T cell-DCs interaction kinetics. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Polymer nanofibrous structures: Fabrication, biofunctionalization, and cell interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beachley, Vince; Wen, Xuejun

    2010-07-01

    Extracellular matrix fibers (ECM) such as collagen, elastin, and keratin provide biological and physical support for cell attachment, proliferation, migration, differentiation and ultimately cell fate. Therefore, ECM fibers are an important component in tissue and organ development and regeneration. Meanwhile, polymer nanofibers could play the same critical role in tissue regeneration process. Fibrous structures can be fabricated from a variety of materials and methods with diameters ranging throughout the size scale where cells can sense individual fibers (several nanometers to several microns). Polymer nanofiber scaffolds can be designed in a way that predictably modulates a variety of important cell behaviors towards a desired overall function. The nanofibrous topography itself, independent of the fiber material, has demonstrated the potential to modulate cell behaviors desirable in tissue engineering such as: unidirectional alignment; increased viability, attachment, and ECM production; guided migration; and controlled differentiation. The versatility of polymer nanofibers for functionalization with biomolecules opens the door to vast opportunities for the design of tissue engineering scaffolds with even greater control over cell incorporation and function. Despite the promise of polymer nanofibers as tissue engineering scaffolds there have been few clinically relevant successes because no single fabrication technique currently combines control over structural arrangement, material composition, and biofunctionalization, while maintaining reasonable cost and yield. Promising strategies are currently being investigated to allow for the fabrication of optimal polymer nanofiber tissue engineering scaffolds with the goal of treating damaged and degenerated tissues in a clinical setting.

  13. Polymer nanofibrous structures: Fabrication, biofunctionalization, and cell interactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beachley, Vince; Wen, Xuejun

    2010-01-01

    Extracellular matrix fibers (ECM) such as collagen, elastin, and keratin provide biological and physical support for cell attachment, proliferation, migration, differentiation and ultimately cell fate. Therefore, ECM fibers are an important component in tissue and organ development and regeneration. Meanwhile, polymer nanofibers could play the same critical role in tissue regeneration process. Fibrous structures can be fabricated from a variety of materials and methods with diameters ranging throughout the size scale where cells can sense individual fibers (several nanometers to several microns). Polymer nanofiber scaffolds can be designed in a way that predictably modulates a variety of important cell behaviors towards a desired overall function. The nanofibrous topography itself, independent of the fiber material, has demonstrated the potential to modulate cell behaviors desirable in tissue engineering such as: unidirectional alignment; increased viability, attachment, and ECM production; guided migration; and controlled differentiation. The versatility of polymer nanofibers for functionalization with biomolecules opens the door to vast opportunities for the design of tissue engineering scaffolds with even greater control over cell incorporation and function. Despite the promise of polymer nanofibers as tissue engineering scaffolds there have been few clinically relevant successes because no single fabrication technique currently combines control over structural arrangement, material composition, and biofunctionalization, while maintaining reasonable cost and yield. Promising strategies are currently being investigated to allow for the fabrication of optimal polymer nanofiber tissue engineering scaffolds with the goal of treating damaged and degenerated tissues in a clinical setting. PMID:20582161

  14. Mechanical interactions between ice crystals and red blood cells during directional solidification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ishiguro, H; Rubinsky, B

    1994-10-01

    Experiments in which red blood cells were frozen on a directional solidification stage under a microscope show that there is a mechanical interaction between ice crystals and cells in which cells are pushed and deformed by the ice crystals. The mechanical interaction occurs during freezing of cells in physiological saline and is significantly inhibited by the addition of 20% v/v glycerol to the solution. The addition of osmotically insignificant quantities of antifreeze proteins from the winter flounder or ocean pout to the physiological saline with 20% v/v glycerol generates strong mechanical interactions between the ice and the cells. The cells were destroyed during freezing in physiological saline, survived freezing in physiological saline with glycerol, and were completely destroyed by the addition of antifreeze proteins to the solution with glycerol. The difference in cell survival through freezing and thawing appears to be related, in part, to the habit of ice crystal growing in the suspension of red blood cells and the nature of mechanical interaction between the ice crystal and the cells. This suggests that mechanical damage may be a factor during cryopreservation of cells.

  15. RGD-Dependent Epithelial Cell-Matrix Interactions in the Human Intestinal Crypt

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yannick D. Benoit

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Interactions between the extracellular matrix (ECM and integrin receptors trigger structural and functional bonds between the cell microenvironment and the cytoskeleton. Such connections are essential for adhesion structure integrity and are key players in regulating transduction of specific intracellular signals, which in turn regulate the organization of the cell microenvironment and, consequently, cell function. The RGD peptide-dependent integrins represent a key subgroup of ECM receptors involved in the maintenance of epithelial homeostasis. Here we review recent findings on RGD-dependent ECM-integrin interactions and their roles in human intestinal epithelial crypt cells.

  16. In vitro model for study the interaction between tumor and stromal cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shkarina K. A.

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim. To develop a model to study the interaction between tumor and stromal cells in three-dimensional culture. Methods. Cultivation of HeLa cell lines and human dermal fibroblasts in monolayer and three-dimensional culture, immunofluorescent and immunohistochemical analysis. Results. In this work we present an approach based on a direct interaction between the cells of multicellular tumor spheroids and spheroids of fibroblasts. Subsequent immunofluorescence analysis allows to determine an origin of cells in the area of their contact. Conclusions. This model will be useful to study the basic mechanisms of carcinogenesis, and to find targets for anticancer therapy.

  17. Bacterial Toxins and the Nervous System: Neurotoxins and Multipotential Toxins Interacting with Neuronal Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Popoff, Michel R.; Poulain, Bernard

    2010-01-01

    Toxins are potent molecules used by various bacteria to interact with a host organism. Some of them specifically act on neuronal cells (clostridial neurotoxins) leading to characteristics neurological affections. But many other toxins are multifunctional and recognize a wider range of cell types including neuronal cells. Various enterotoxins interact with the enteric nervous system, for example by stimulating afferent neurons or inducing neurotransmitter release from enterochromaffin cells which result either in vomiting, in amplification of the diarrhea, or in intestinal inflammation process. Other toxins can pass the blood brain barrier and directly act on specific neurons. PMID:22069606

  18. Bacterial toxins and the nervous system: neurotoxins and multipotential toxins interacting with neuronal cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Popoff, Michel R; Poulain, Bernard

    2010-04-01

    Toxins are potent molecules used by various bacteria to interact with a host organism. Some of them specifically act on neuronal cells (clostridial neurotoxins) leading to characteristics neurological affections. But many other toxins are multifunctional and recognize a wider range of cell types including neuronal cells. Various enterotoxins interact with the enteric nervous system, for example by stimulating afferent neurons or inducing neurotransmitter release from enterochromaffin cells which result either in vomiting, in amplification of the diarrhea, or in intestinal inflammation process. Other toxins can pass the blood brain barrier and directly act on specific neurons.

  19. Disruptive effect of Dzyaloshinskii-Moriya interaction on the magnetic memory cell performance

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sampaio, J.; Cubukcu, M.; Cros, V.; Reyren, N., E-mail: nicolas.reyren@thalesgroup.com [Unité Mixte de Physique, CNRS, Thales, Univ. Paris-Sud, Université Paris-Saclay, 91767, Palaiseau (France); Khvalkovskiy, A. V. [Samsung Electronics, Semiconductor R& D Center (Grandis), San Jose, California 95134 (United States); Moscow Institute of Physics and Technology, State University, Moscow 141700 (Russian Federation); Kuteifan, M.; Lomakin, V. [Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, University of California at San Diego, La Jolla, California 92093-0407 (United States); Apalkov, D. [Samsung Electronics, Semiconductor R& D Center (Grandis), San Jose, California 95134 (United States)

    2016-03-14

    In order to increase the thermal stability of a magnetic random access memory cell, materials with high spin-orbit interaction are often introduced in the storage layer. As a side effect, a strong Dzyaloshinskii-Moriya interaction (DMI) may arise in such systems. Here, we investigate the impact of DMI on the magnetic cell performance, using micromagnetic simulations. We find that DMI strongly promotes non-uniform magnetization states and non-uniform switching modes of the magnetic layer. It appears to be detrimental for both the thermal stability of the cell and its switching current, leading to considerable deterioration of the cell performance even for a moderate DMI amplitude.

  20. FRET and FRAP imaging: approaches to characterise tau and stathmin interactions with microtubules in cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nouar, Roqiya; Devred, François; Breuzard, Gilles; Peyrot, Vincent

    2013-04-01

    Microtubules (MTs) are involved in many crucial processes such as cell morphogenesis, mitosis and motility. These dynamic structures resulting from the complex assembly of tubulin are tightly regulated by stabilising MT-associated proteins (MAPs) such as tau and destabilising proteins, notably stathmin. Because of their key role, these MAPs and their interactions have been extensively studied using biochemical and biophysical approaches, particularly in vitro. Nevertheless, numerous questions remain unanswered and the mechanisms of interaction between MT and these proteins are still unclear in cells. Techniques coupling cell imaging and fluorescence methods, such as Förster resonance energy transfer and fluorescence recovery after photobleaching, are excellent tools to study these interactions in situ. After describing these methods, we will present emblematic data from the literature and unpublished experimental results from our laboratory concerning the interactions between MTs, tau and stathmin in cells.

  1. Toxicological interactions of silver nanoparticles and non-essential metals in human hepatocarcinoma cell line

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Miranda, Renata Rank; Bezerra, Arandi Ginane; Ribeiro, Ciro Alberto Oliveira

    2017-01-01

    Toxicological interaction represents a challenge to toxicology, particularly for novel contaminants. There are no data whether silver nanoparticles (AgNPs), present in a wide variety of products, can interact and modulate the toxicity of ubiquitous contaminants, such as nonessential metals....... In the current study, we investigated the toxicological interactions of AgNP (size=1-2nm; zeta potential=-23mV), cadmium and mercury in human hepatoma HepG2 cells. The results indicated that the co-exposures led to toxicological interactions, with AgNP+Cd being more toxic than AgNP+Hg. Early (2-4h) increases...... (MTT), cell viability (neutral red uptake assay), cell proliferation (crystal violet assay) and ABC-transporters activity (rhodamine accumulation assay) were also more pronounced in the co-exposure groups. Foremost, co-exposure to AgNP and metals potentiated cell death (mainly by necrosis) and Hg(2...

  2. Interstitial cells of Cajal, macrophages and mast cells in the gut musculature: morphology, distribution, spatial and possible functional interactions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mikkelsen, Hanne B

    2010-01-01

    Interstitial cells of Cajal (ICC) are recognized as pacemaker cells for gastrointestinal movement and are suggested to be mediators of neuromuscular transmission. Intestinal motility disturbances are often associated with a reduced number of ICC and/or ultrastructural damage, sometimes associated...... with immune cells. Macrophages and mast cells in the intestinal muscularis externa of rodents can be found in close spatial contact with ICC. Macrophages are a constant and regularly distributed cell population in the serosa and at the level of Auerbach's plexus (AP). In human colon, ICC are in close contact...... with macrophages at the level of AP, suggesting functional interaction. It has therefore been proposed that ICC and macrophages interact. Macrophages and mast cells are considered to play important roles in the innate immune defence by producing pro-inflammatory mediators during classical activation, which may...

  3. Gut chemosensing: interactions between gut endocrine cells and visceral afferents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raybould, Helen E

    2010-02-16

    Chemosensing in the gastrointestinal tract is less well understood than many aspects of gut mechanosensitivity; however, it is important in the overall function of the GI tract and indeed the organism as a whole. Chemosensing in the gut represents a complex interplay between the function of enteroendocrine (EEC) cells and visceral (primarily vagal) afferent neurons. In this brief review, I will concentrate on a new data on endocrine cells in chemosensing in the GI tract, in particular on new findings on glucose-sensing by gut EEC cells and the importance of incretin peptides and vagal afferents in glucose homeostasis, on the role of G protein coupled receptors in gut chemosensing, and on the possibility that gut endocrine cells may be involved in the detection of a luminal constituent other than nutrients, the microbiota. The role of vagal afferent pathways as a downstream target of EEC cell products will be considered and, in particular, exciting new data on the plasticity of the vagal afferent pathway with respect to expression of receptors for GI hormones and how this may play a role in energy homeostasis will also be discussed.

  4. CD28–B7 Interaction Modulates Short- and Long-Lived Plasma Cell Function

    OpenAIRE

    2012-01-01

    The interaction of CD28, which is constitutively expressed on T cells, with B7.1/B7.2 expressed on APCs is critical for T cell activation. CD28 is also expressed on murine and human plasma cells but its function on these cells remains unclear. There are two types of plasma cells: short-lived ones that appear in the secondary lymphoid tissue shortly after Ag exposure, and long-lived plasma cells that mainly reside in the bone marrow. We demonstrate that CD28-deficient murine short- and long-li...

  5. Direct interactions of early and late assembling division proteins in Escherichia coli cells resolved by FRET

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Alexeeva, S.; Gadella (jr.), T.W.J.; Verheul, J.; Verhoeven, G.S.; den Blaauwen, T.

    2010-01-01

    The bacterial cell division machinery is organized in the so-called divisome composed of highly dynamic but low abundant interacting (membrane-bound) proteins. In order to elucidate the molecular interactions between these proteins, we developed a robust background-insensitive quantitative spectral

  6. Identification of calgranulin B interacting proteins and network analysis in gastrointestinal cancer cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoo, Byong Chul

    2017-01-01

    Calgranulin B is known to be involved in tumor development, but the underlying molecular mechanism is not clear. To gain insight into possible roles of calgranulin B, we screened for calgranulin B-interacting molecules in the SNU-484 gastric cancer and the SNU-81 colon cancer cells. Calgranulin B-interacting partners were identified by yeast two-hybrid and functional information was obtained by computational analysis. Most of the calgranulin B-interacting partners were involved in metabolic and cellular processes, and found to have molecular function of binding and catalytic activities. Interestingly, 46 molecules in the network of the calgranulin B-interacting proteins are known to be associated with cancer and FKBP2 was found to interact with calgranulin B in both SNU-484 and SNU-81 cells. Polyubiquitin-C encoded by UBC, which exhibited an interaction with calgranulin B, has been associated with various molecules of the extracellular space and plasma membrane identified in our screening, including Na-K-Cl cotransporter 1 and dystonin in SNU-484 cells, and ATPase subunit beta-1 in SNU-81 cells. Our data provide novel insight into the roles of calgranulin B of gastrointestinal cancer cells, and offer new clues suggesting calgranulin B acts as an effector molecule through which the cell can communicate with the tumor microenvironment via polyubiquitin-C. PMID:28152021

  7. Interfacial energetics approach for analysis of endothelial cell and segmental polyurethane interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hill, Michael J; Cheah, Calvin; Sarkar, Debanjan

    2016-08-01

    Understanding the physicochemical interactions between endothelial cells and biomaterials is vital for regenerative medicine applications. Particularly, physical interactions between the substratum interface and spontaneously deposited biomacromolecules as well as between the induced biomolecular interface and the cell in terms of surface energetics are important factors to regulate cellular functions. In this study, we examined the physical interactions between endothelial cells and segmental polyurethanes (PUs) using l-tyrosine based PUs to examine the structure-property relations in terms of PU surface energies and endothelial cell organization. Since, contact angle analysis used to probe surface energetics provides incomplete interpretation and understanding of the physical interactions, we sought a combinatorial surface energetics approach utilizing water contact angle, Zisman's critical surface tension (CST), Kaelble's numerical method, and van Oss-Good-Chaudhury theory (vOGCT), and applied to both substrata and serum adsorbed matrix to correlate human umbilical vein endothelial cell (HUVEC) behavior with surface energetics of l-tyrosine based PU surfaces. We determined that, while water contact angle of substratum or adsorbed matrix did not correlate well with HUVEC behavior, overall higher polarity according to the numerical method as well as Lewis base character of the substratum explained increased HUVEC interaction and monolayer formation as opposed to organization into networks. Cell interaction was also interpreted in terms of the combined effects of substratum and adsorbed matrix polarity and Lewis acid-base character to determine the effect of PU segments.

  8. The Importance of Physiologically Relevant Cell Lines for Studying Virus–Host Interactions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David Hare

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Viruses interact intimately with the host cell at nearly every stage of replication, and the cell model that is chosen to study virus infection is critically important. Although primary cells reflect the phenotype of healthy cells in vivo better than cell lines, their limited lifespan makes experimental manipulation challenging. However, many tumor-derived and artificially immortalized cell lines have defects in induction of interferon-stimulated genes and other antiviral defenses. These defects can affect virus replication, especially when cells are infected at lower, more physiologically relevant, multiplicities of infection. Understanding the selective pressures and mechanisms underlying the loss of innate signaling pathways is helpful to choose immortalized cell lines without impaired antiviral defense. We describe the trials and tribulations we encountered while searching for an immortalized cell line with intact innate signaling, and how directed immortalization of primary cells avoids many of the pitfalls of spontaneous immortalization.

  9. Interactions between neutrophils and macrophages promote macrophage killing of rat muscle cells in vitro

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, Hal X.; Tidball, James G.

    2003-01-01

    Current evidence indicates that the physiological functions of inflammatory cells are highly sensitive to their microenvironment, which is partially determined by the inflammatory cells and their potential targets. In the present investigation, interactions between neutrophils, macrophages and muscle cells that may influence muscle cell death are examined. Findings show that in the absence of macrophages, neutrophils kill muscle cells in vitro by superoxide-dependent mechanisms, and that low concentrations of nitric oxide (NO) protect against neutrophil-mediated killing. In the absence of neutrophils, macrophages kill muscle cells through a NO-dependent mechanism, and the presence of target muscle cells causes a three-fold increase in NO production by macrophages, with no change in the concentration of inducible nitric oxide synthase. Muscle cells that are co-cultured with both neutrophils and macrophages in proportions that are observed in injured muscle show cytotoxicity through a NO-dependent, superoxide-independent mechanism. Furthermore, the concentration of myeloid cells that is necessary for muscle killing is greatly reduced in assays that use mixed myeloid cell populations, rather than uniform populations of neutrophils or macrophages. These findings collectively show that the magnitude and mechanism of muscle cell killing by myeloid cells are modified by interactions between muscle cells and neutrophils, between muscle cells and macrophages and between macrophages and neutrophils.

  10. A systems model for immune cell interactions unravels the mechanism of inflammation in human skin.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Najl V Valeyev

    Full Text Available Inflammation is characterized by altered cytokine levels produced by cell populations in a highly interdependent manner. To elucidate the mechanism of an inflammatory reaction, we have developed a mathematical model for immune cell interactions via the specific, dose-dependent cytokine production rates of cell populations. The model describes the criteria required for normal and pathological immune system responses and suggests that alterations in the cytokine production rates can lead to various stable levels which manifest themselves in different disease phenotypes. The model predicts that pairs of interacting immune cell populations can maintain homeostatic and elevated extracellular cytokine concentration levels, enabling them to operate as an immune system switch. The concept described here is developed in the context of psoriasis, an immune-mediated disease, but it can also offer mechanistic insights into other inflammatory pathologies as it explains how interactions between immune cell populations can lead to disease phenotypes.

  11. Interaction and modulation of two antagonistic cell wall enzymes of mycobacteria.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Erik C Hett

    Full Text Available Bacterial cell growth and division require coordinated cell wall hydrolysis and synthesis, allowing for the removal and expansion of cell wall material. Without proper coordination, unchecked hydrolysis can result in cell lysis. How these opposing activities are simultaneously regulated is poorly understood. In Mycobacterium tuberculosis, the resuscitation-promoting factor B (RpfB, a lytic transglycosylase, interacts and synergizes with Rpf-interacting protein A (RipA, an endopeptidase, to hydrolyze peptidoglycan. However, it remains unclear what governs this synergy and how it is coordinated with cell wall synthesis. Here we identify the bifunctional peptidoglycan-synthesizing enzyme, penicillin binding protein 1 (PBP1, as a RipA-interacting protein. PBP1, like RipA, localizes both at the poles and septa of dividing cells. Depletion of the ponA1 gene, encoding PBP1 in M. smegmatis, results in a severe growth defect and abnormally shaped cells, indicating that PBP1 is necessary for viability and cell wall stability. Finally, PBP1 inhibits the synergistic hydrolysis of peptidoglycan by the RipA-RpfB complex in vitro. These data reveal a post-translational mechanism for regulating cell wall hydrolysis and synthesis through protein-protein interactions between enzymes with antagonistic functions.

  12. VE-cadherin interacts with cell polarity protein Pals1 to regulate vascular lumen formation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brinkmann, Benjamin F; Steinbacher, Tim; Hartmann, Christian; Kummer, Daniel; Pajonczyk, Denise; Mirzapourshafiyi, Fatemeh; Nakayama, Masanori; Weide, Thomas; Gerke, Volker; Ebnet, Klaus

    2016-09-15

    Blood vessel tubulogenesis requires the formation of stable cell-to-cell contacts and the establishment of apicobasal polarity of vascular endothelial cells. Cell polarity is regulated by highly conserved cell polarity protein complexes such as the Par3-aPKC-Par6 complex and the CRB3-Pals1-PATJ complex, which are expressed by many different cell types and regulate various aspects of cell polarity. Here we describe a functional interaction of VE-cadherin with the cell polarity protein Pals1. Pals1 directly interacts with VE-cadherin through a membrane-proximal motif in the cytoplasmic domain of VE-cadherin. VE-cadherin clusters Pals1 at cell-cell junctions. Mutating the Pals1-binding motif in VE-cadherin abrogates the ability of VE-cadherin to regulate apicobasal polarity and vascular lumen formation. In a similar way, deletion of the Par3-binding motif at the C-terminus of VE-cadherin impairs apicobasal polarity and vascular lumen formation. Our findings indicate that the biological activity of VE-cadherin in regulating endothelial polarity and vascular lumen formation is mediated through its interaction with the two cell polarity proteins Pals1 and Par3.

  13. CD147 stimulates hepatoma cells escaping from immune surveillance of T cells by interaction with Cyclophilin A.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ren, Yi-Xin; Wang, Shu-Jing; Fan, Jian-Hui; Sun, Shi-Jie; Li, Xia; Padhiar, Arshad Ahmed; Zhang, Jia-Ning

    2016-05-01

    T cells play an important role in tumor immune surveillance. CD147 is a member of immunoglobulin superfamily present on the surface of many tumor cells and mediates malignant cell behaviors. Cyclophilin A (CypA) is an intracellular protein promoting inflammation when released from cells. CypA is a natural ligand for CD147. In this study, CD147 specific short hairpin RNAs (shRNA) were transfected into murine hepatocellular carcinoma Hepa1-6 cells to assess the effects of CD147 on hepatoma cells escaping from immune surveillance of T cells. We found extracellular CypA stimulated cell proliferation through CD147 by activating ERK1/2 signaling pathway. Downregulation of CD147 expression on Hepa1-6 cells significantly suppressed tumor progression in vivo, and decreased cell viability when co-cultured with T cells in vitro. Importantly, knockdown of CD147 on Hepa1-6 cells resulted in significantly increased T cells chemotaxis induced by CypA both in vivo and in vitro. These findings provide novel mechanisms how tumor cells escaping from immune surveillance of T cells. We provide a potential therapy for hepatocellular carcinoma by targeting CD147 or CD147-CypA interactions.

  14. Snake venom metalloproteinases and disintegrins: interactions with cells

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    Kamiguti A.S.

    1998-01-01

    Full Text Available Metalloproteinases and disintegrins are important components of most viperid and crotalid venoms. Large metalloproteinases referred to as MDC enzymes are composed of an N-terminal Metalloproteinase domain, a Disintegrin-like domain and a Cys-rich C-terminus. In contrast, disintegrins are small non-enzymatic RGD-containing cysteine-rich polypeptides. However, the disintegrin region of MDC enzymes bears a high degree of structural homology to that of the disintegrins, although it lacks the RGD motif. Despite these differences, both components share the property of being able to recognize integrin cell surface receptors and thereby to inhibit integrin-dependent cell reactions. Recently, several membrane-bound MDC enzymes, closely related to soluble venom MDC enzymes, have been described in mammalian cells. This group of membrane-anchored mammalian enzymes is also called the ADAM family of proteins due to the structure revealing A Disintegrin And Metalloproteinase domains. ADAMs are involved in the shedding of molecules from the cell surface, a property which is also shared by some venom MDC enzymes.

  15. Fast polyhedral cell sorting for interactive rendering of unstructured grids

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Combra, J; Klosowski, J T; Max, N; Silva, C T; Williams, P L

    1998-10-30

    Direct volume rendering based on projective methods works by projecting, in visibility order, the polyhedral cells of a mesh onto the image plane, and incrementally compositing the cell's color and opacity into the final image. Crucial to this method is the computation of a visibility ordering of the cells. If the mesh is ''well-behaved'' (acyclic and convex), then the MPVO method of Williams provides a very fast sorting algorithm; however, this method only computes an approximate ordering in general datasets, resulting in visual artifacts when rendered. A recent method of Silva et al. removed the assumption that the mesh is convex, by means of a sweep algorithm used in conjunction with the MPVO method; their algorithm is substantially faster than previous exact methods for general meshes. In this paper we propose a new technique, which we call BSP-XMPVO, which is based on a fast and simple way of using binary space partitions on the boundary elements of the mesh to augment the ordering produced by MPVO. Our results are shown to be orders of magnitude better than previous exact methods of sorting cells.

  16. Interaction of late apoptotic and necrotic cells with vitronectin.

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    Ondrej Stepanek

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Vitronectin is an abundant plasma glycoprotein identified also as a part of extracellular matrix. Vitronectin is substantially enriched at sites of injured, fibrosing, inflamed, and tumor tissues where it is believed to be involved in wound healing and tissue remodeling. Little is known about the mechanism of vitronectin localization into the damaged tissues. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: 2E12 antibody has been described to bind a subset of late apoptotic cells. Using immunoisolation followed by mass spectrometry, we identified the antigen recognized by 2E12 antibody as vitronectin. Based on flow cytometry, we described that vitronectin binds to the late apoptotic and necrotic cells in cell cultures in vitro as well as in murine thymus and spleen in vivo. Confocal microscopy revealed that vitronectin binds to an intracellular cytoplasmic structure after the membrane rupture. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: We propose that vitronectin could serve as a marker of membrane disruption in necrosis and apoptosis for flow cytometry analysis. Moreover, we suggest that vitronectin binding to dead cells may represent one of the mechanisms of vitronectin incorporation into the injured tissues.

  17. Interaction of low density lipoproteins with rat liver cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    L. Harkes (Leendert)

    1985-01-01

    textabstractThe most marked conclusion is the establishment of the important role of non-parenchymal cells in the catabolism of the low density lipoproteins by the rat liver. Because the liver is responsible for 70-80% of the removal of LDL from blood this conclusion can be extended to total LDL tur

  18. Interaction of classical swine fever virus with dendritic cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Carrasco, C.P.; Rigden, R.C.; Vincent, I.E.; Balmelli, C.; Ceppi, M.; Bauhofer, O.; Tache, V.; Hjertner, B.; McNeilly, F.; Gennip, van H.G.P.; McCullough, K.C.; Summerfield, A.

    2004-01-01

    Functional disruption of dendritic cells (DCs) is an important strategy for viral pathogens to evade host defences. Monocytotropic viruses such as classical swine fever virus (CSFV) could employ such a mechanism, since the virus can suppress immune responses and induce apoptosis without infecting ly

  19. Proteins that interact with calgranulin B in the human colon cancer cell line HCT-116

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Kyung Hee; Baek, Kwang-Soo; Shin, Daye; Kim, Jong Heon; Cho, Jae Youl; Yoo, Byong Chul

    2017-01-01

    Calgranulin B is released from immune cells and can be internalized into colon cancer cells to prevent proliferation. The present study aimed to identify proteins that interact with calgranulin B to suppress the proliferation of colon cancer cells, and to obtain information on the underlying anti-tumor mechanism(s) of calgranulin B. Calgranulin B expression was induced in colon cancer cell line HCT-116 by infection with calgranulin B-FLAG expressing lentivirus, and it led to a significant suppression of cell proliferation. Proteins that interacted with calgranulin B were obtained by immunoprecipitation using whole homogenate of lentivirus-infected HCT-116 cells which expressing calgranulin B-FLAG, and identified using liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry/mass spectrometry analysis. A total of 454 proteins were identified that potentially interact with calgranulin B, and most identified proteins were associated with RNA processing, post-transcriptional modifications and the EIF2 signaling pathway. Direct interaction of calgranulin B with flotillin-1, dynein intermediate chain 1, and CD59 glycoprotein has been confirmed, and the molecules N-myc proto-oncogene protein, rapamycin-insensitive companion of mTOR, and myc proto-oncogene protein were shown to regulate calgranulin B-interacting proteins. Our results provide new insight and useful information to explain the possible mechanism(s) underlying the role of calgranulin B as an anti-tumor effector in colon cancer cells. PMID:28036279

  20. Gamma globulins-induced interaction between two red blood cells: forces measurement with optical tweezers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Kisung; Muravyov, Alexei; Semenov, Alexei; Wagner, Christian; Priezzhev, Alexander; Lyubin, Eugeny; Fedyanin, Andrey

    2017-03-01

    The protein contribution to the red blood cell (RBC) aggregation is studied using the in-house made two-channeled optical tweezers. The cells interaction was characterized using two forces: the force required for separating two cells (FD - disaggregating force) and the force required for holding them from their spontaneous aggregation (FA - aggregating force). The gamma globulin solutions with/without albumin were used to induce the RBC aggregation. The strong interaction (3-10 pN) between the cells was measured within the contact formed using optical tweezers. We found that FD becomes stronger as the gamma globulin concentration increases, while the addition of albumin to the solution led to the significant (few fold) enhancement of the cells interaction forces. However, despite of the strong interaction between the cells their spontaneous overlapping was not observed, unlike the case in plasma, where the cells did increase their overlapping surface, when attached with small interacting surface and released from optical traps. This work in addition to our previous work with model solutions of fibrinogen allows us to conclude that the synergy of blood components is one of the most important features that contribute to the reversible RBC aggregation.

  1. Interaction between lanthanide ions and Saccharomyces cerevisiae cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ene, Cristian D; Ruta, Lavinia L; Nicolau, Ioana; Popa, Claudia V; Iordache, Virgil; Neagoe, Aurora D; Farcasanu, Ileana C

    2015-10-01

    Lanthanides are a group of non-essential elements with important imaging and therapeutic applications. Although trivalent lanthanide ions (Ln³⁺) are used as potent blockers of Ca²⁺ channels, the systematic studies correlating Ln³⁺ accumulation and toxicity to Ca²⁺ channel blocking activity are scarce. In this study, we made use of the eukaryotic model Saccharomyces cerevisiae to investigate the correlation between Ln³⁺ accumulation, their toxicity and their capacity to block the exogenous stress-induced Ca²⁺ influx into the cytosol. It was found that the Ln³⁺ blocked the Ca²⁺ entry into the yeast cells only when present at concentration high enough to allow rapid binding to cell surface. At lower concentrations, Ln³⁺ were taken up by the cell, but Ca²⁺ blockage was no longer achieved. At 1 mM concentration, all ions from the Ln³⁺ series could block Ca²⁺ entry into cytosol with the exception of La³⁺, and to a lesser extent, Pr³⁺ and Nd³⁺. The plasma membrane Ca²⁺-channel Cch1/Mid1 contributed to La³⁺ and Gd³⁺ entry into the cells, with a significant preference for La³⁺. The results open the possibility to obtain cells loaded with controlled amounts and ratios of Ln³⁺.

  2. Gene expression profiles of the NCI-60 human tumor cell lines define molecular interaction networks governing cell migration processes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kurt W Kohn

    Full Text Available Although there is extensive information on gene expression and molecular interactions in various cell types, integrating those data in a functionally coherent manner remains challenging. This study explores the premise that genes whose expression at the mRNA level is correlated over diverse cell lines are likely to function together in a network of molecular interactions. We previously derived expression-correlated gene clusters from the database of the NCI-60 human tumor cell lines and associated each cluster with function categories of the Gene Ontology (GO database. From a cluster rich in genes associated with GO categories related to cell migration, we extracted 15 genes that were highly cross-correlated; prominent among them were RRAS, AXL, ADAM9, FN14, and integrin-beta1. We then used those 15 genes as bait to identify other correlated genes in the NCI-60 database. A survey of current literature disclosed, not only that many of the expression-correlated genes engaged in molecular interactions related to migration, invasion, and metastasis, but that highly cross-correlated subsets of those genes engaged in specific cell migration processes. We assembled this information in molecular interaction maps (MIMs that depict networks governing 3 cell migration processes: degradation of extracellular matrix, production of transient focal complexes at the leading edge of the cell, and retraction of the rear part of the cell. Also depicted are interactions controlling the release and effects of calcium ions, which may regulate migration in a spaciotemporal manner in the cell. The MIMs and associated text comprise a detailed and integrated summary of what is currently known or surmised about the role of the expression cross-correlated genes in molecular networks governing those processes.

  3. Single-cell protein secretomic signatures as potential correlates to tumor cell lineage evolution and cell-cell interaction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Minsuk eKwak

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Secreted proteins including cytokines, chemokines and growth factors represent important functional regulators mediating a range of cellular behavior and cell-cell paracrine/autocrine signaling, e.g. in the immunological system, tumor microenvironment or stem cell niche. Detection of these proteins is of great value not only in basic cell biology but also for diagnosis and therapeutic monitoring of human diseases such as cancer. However, due to co-production of multiple effector proteins from a single cell, referred to as polyfunctionality, it is biologically informative to measure a panel of secreted proteins, or secretomic signature, at the level of single cells. Recent evidence further indicates that a genetically-identical cell population can give rise to diverse phenotypic differences. It is known that cytokines, for example, in the immune system define the effector functions and lineage differentiation of immune cells. In this Perspective Article, we hypothesize that protein secretion profile may represent a universal measure to identify the definitive correlate in the larger context of cellular functions to dissect cellular heterogeneity and evolutionary lineage relationship in human cancer.

  4. PRL-3 promotes cell adhesion by interacting with JAM2 in colon cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lian, Shenyi; Meng, Lin; Xing, Xiaofang; Yang, Yongyong; Qu, Like; Shou, Chengchao

    2016-01-01

    Phosphatase of regenerating liver-3 (PRL-3), also termed PTP4A3, is a metastasis-related protein tyrosine phosphatase. Its expression levels are significantly correlated with the progression and survival of a wide range of malignant tumors. However, the mechanism by which PRL-3 promotes tumor invasion and metastasis is not clear. In the present study, the functions of PRL-3 were systemically analyzed in the key events of metastasis including, motility and adhesion. A cell wounding assay, cell spread assay and cell-matrix adhesion assay were carried out to analyze the cell movement and cell adhesion ability of colon cancer, immunoprecipitation and immunofluorescence assay was confirmed the interaction of PRL-3 and JAM2. It was demonstrated that PRL-3 promoted the motility of Flp-In-293 and LoVo colon cancer cells and increased the distribution of cell skeleton proteins on the cell protrusions. In addition, stably expressing PRL-3 reduced the spreading speed of colon cancer cells and cell adhesion on uncoated, fibronectin-coated and collagen I-coated plates. Mechanistically, junction adhesion molecular 2 (JAM2) was identified as a novel interacting protein of PRL-3. The findings of the present study revealed the roles of PRL-3 in cancer cell motility and adhesion process, and provided information on the possibility of PRL-3 increase cell-cell adhesion by associating with JAM2. PMID:27588115

  5. PRL-3 promotes cell adhesion by interacting with JAM2 in colon cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lian, Shenyi; Meng, Lin; Xing, Xiaofang; Yang, Yongyong; Qu, Like; Shou, Chengchao

    2016-09-01

    Phosphatase of regenerating liver-3 (PRL-3), also termed PTP4A3, is a metastasis-related protein tyrosine phosphatase. Its expression levels are significantly correlated with the progression and survival of a wide range of malignant tumors. However, the mechanism by which PRL-3 promotes tumor invasion and metastasis is not clear. In the present study, the functions of PRL-3 were systemically analyzed in the key events of metastasis including, motility and adhesion. A cell wounding assay, cell spread assay and cell-matrix adhesion assay were carried out to analyze the cell movement and cell adhesion ability of colon cancer, immunoprecipitation and immunofluorescence assay was confirmed the interaction of PRL-3 and JAM2. It was demonstrated that PRL-3 promoted the motility of Flp-In-293 and LoVo colon cancer cells and increased the distribution of cell skeleton proteins on the cell protrusions. In addition, stably expressing PRL-3 reduced the spreading speed of colon cancer cells and cell adhesion on uncoated, fibronectin-coated and collagen I-coated plates. Mechanistically, junction adhesion molecular 2 (JAM2) was identified as a novel interacting protein of PRL-3. The findings of the present study revealed the roles of PRL-3 in cancer cell motility and adhesion process, and provided information on the possibility of PRL-3 increase cell-cell adhesion by associating with JAM2.

  6. Inducible DNA - protein interactions of the murine kappa immunoglobulin enhancer in intact cells: comparison with in vitro interactions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hromas, R.; Pauli, U.; Marcuzzi, A.; Lafrenz, D.; Nick, H.; Stein, J.; Stein, G.; Ness, B.V.

    1988-02-11

    The large intron of the kappa immunoglobulin gene contains a cis-acting enhancer element, which is important in the tissue-specific expressions of the gene. The authors have confirmed the binding activity of a sequence-specific factor present in lymphoid extracts derived from cell lines expressing, or induced to express, the kappa gene. They have extended these studies to show the binding activity is present in normal activated splenic B cells as well as lambda producing cells, and have demonstrated by DNAse footprint analysis full, protection of a sequence containing the 11 bp homology to the SV-40 core enhancer. They have compared these in vitro binding studies with an analysis of protein-DNA interactions in intact murine cell lines using genomic sequencing techniques. They demonstrate significant alterations in DMS reactivity of DNA in the murine 70Z/3 cell line after it is induced to kappa expression. These alterations occur at guanine residues which are part of the 11 bp core sequence, and are identical to those observed in cells constitutively expressing kappa. This provides direct evidence for the induced binding of the tissue specific factor to intact chromatin. In intact chromatin they also observed significant alteration in the reactivity of a guanine, 3' of the core sequence, which is part of a potential secondary DNA structure, and protection of four residues that are part of a region homologous to the heavy chain enhancer.

  7. Inducible DNA-protein interactions of the murine kappa immunoglobulin enhancer in intact cells: comparison with in vitro interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hromas, R; Pauli, U; Marcuzzi, A; Lafrenz, D; Nick, H; Stein, J; Stein, G; Van Ness, B

    1988-01-01

    The large intron of the kappa immunoglobulin gene contains a cis-acting enhancer element, which is important in the tissue-specific expression of the gene. We have confirmed the binding activity of a sequence-specific factor present in lymphoid extracts derived from cell lines expressing, or induced to express, the kappa gene. We have extended these studies to show the binding activity is present in normal activated splenic B cells as well as lambda producing cells, and have demonstrated by DNAse footprint analysis full protection of a sequence containing the 11 bp homology to the SV-40 core enhancer. We have compared these in vitro binding studies with an analysis of protein-DNA interactions in intact murine cell lines using genomic sequencing techniques. We demonstrate significant alterations in DMS reactivity of DNA in the murine 70Z/3 cell line after it is induced to kappa expression. These alterations occur at guanine residues which are part of the the 11 bp core sequence, and are identical to those observed in cells constitutively expressing kappa. This provides direct evidence for the induced binding of the tissue specific factor to intact chromatin. In intact chromatin we also observed significant alteration in the reactivity of a guanine, 3' of the core sequence, which is part of a potential secondary DNA structure, and protection of four residues that are part of a region homologous to the heavy chain enhancer. Images PMID:2830597

  8. Regulation of IL-6 and IL-8 production by reciprocal cell-to-cell interactions between tumor cells and stromal fibroblasts through IL-1α in ameloblastoma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fuchigami, Takao [Department of Biochemistry and Genetics, Kagoshima University Graduate School of Medical and Dental Sciences, 8-35-1 Sakuragaoka, Kagoshima 890-8544 (Japan); Department of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery, Kagoshima University Graduate School of Medical and Dental Sciences, 8-35-1 Sakuragaoka, Kagoshima 890-8544 (Japan); Kibe, Toshiro [Department of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery, Kagoshima University Graduate School of Medical and Dental Sciences, 8-35-1 Sakuragaoka, Kagoshima 890-8544 (Japan); Koyama, Hirofumi; Kishida, Shosei; Iijima, Mikio [Department of Biochemistry and Genetics, Kagoshima University Graduate School of Medical and Dental Sciences, 8-35-1 Sakuragaoka, Kagoshima 890-8544 (Japan); Nishizawa, Yoshiaki [Kagoshima University Faculty of Medicine, 8-35-1 Sakuragaoka, Kagoshima 890-8544 (Japan); Hijioka, Hiroshi; Fujii, Tomomi [Department of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery, Kagoshima University Graduate School of Medical and Dental Sciences, 8-35-1 Sakuragaoka, Kagoshima 890-8544 (Japan); Ueda, Masahiro [Natural Science Centre for Research and Education, Kagoshima University, 1-21-24 Koorimoto, Kagoshima 890-8580 (Japan); Nakamura, Norifumi [Department of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery, Kagoshima University Graduate School of Medical and Dental Sciences, 8-35-1 Sakuragaoka, Kagoshima 890-8544 (Japan); Kiyono, Tohru [Department of Virology, National Cancer Center Research Institute, 5-1-1 Tsukiji, Chuouku, Tokyo 104-0045 (Japan); Kishida, Michiko, E-mail: kmichiko@m2.kufm.kagoshima-u.ac.jp [Department of Biochemistry and Genetics, Kagoshima University Graduate School of Medical and Dental Sciences, 8-35-1 Sakuragaoka, Kagoshima 890-8544 (Japan)

    2014-09-05

    Highlights: • We studied the interaction between tumor cells and fibroblasts in ameloblastoma. • AM-3 ameloblastoma cells secreted significantly high IL-1α levels. • IL-1α derived from AM-3 cells promoted IL-6 and IL-8 secretion of fibroblasts. • IL-6 and IL-8 activated the cellular motility and proliferation of AM-3 cells. - Abstract: Ameloblastoma is an odontogenic benign tumor that occurs in the jawbone, which invades bone and reoccurs locally. This tumor is treated by wide surgical excision and causes various problems, including changes in facial countenance and mastication disorders. Ameloblastomas have abundant tumor stroma, including fibroblasts and immune cells. Although cell-to-cell interactions are considered to be involved in the pathogenesis of many diseases, intercellular communications in ameloblastoma have not been fully investigated. In this study, we examined interactions between tumor cells and stromal fibroblasts via soluble factors in ameloblastoma. We used a human ameloblastoma cell line (AM-3 ameloblastoma cells), human fibroblasts (HFF-2 fibroblasts), and primary-cultured fibroblasts from human ameloblastoma tissues, and analyzed the effect of ameloblastoma-associated cell-to-cell communications on gene expression, cytokine secretion, cellular motility and proliferation. AM-3 ameloblastoma cells secreted higher levels of interleukin (IL)-1α than HFF-2 fibroblasts. Treatment with conditioned medium from AM-3 ameloblastoma cells upregulated gene expression and secretion of IL-6 and IL-8 of HFF-2 fibroblasts and primary-cultured fibroblast cells from ameloblastoma tissues. The AM3-stimulated production of IL-6 and IL-8 in fibroblasts was neutralized by pretreatment of AM-3 cells with anti-IL-1α antibody and IL-1 receptor antagonist. Reciprocally, cellular motility of AM-3 ameloblastoma cells was stimulated by HFF-2 fibroblasts in IL-6 and IL-8 dependent manner. In conclusion, ameloblastoma cells and stromal fibroblasts behave

  9. A DDB2 mutant protein unable to interact with PCNA promotes cell cycle progression of human transformed embryonic kidney cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perucca, Paola; Sommatis, Sabrina; Mocchi, Roberto; Prosperi, Ennio; Stivala, Lucia Anna; Cazzalini, Ornella

    2015-01-01

    DNA damage binding protein 2 (DDB2) is a protein involved in the early step of DNA damage recognition of the nucleotide excision repair (NER) process. Recently, it has been suggested that DDB2 may play a role in DNA replication, based on its ability to promote cell proliferation. We have previously shown that DDB2 binds PCNA during NER, but also in the absence of DNA damage; however, whether and how this interaction influences cell proliferation is not known. In this study, we have addressed this question by using HEK293 cell clones stably expressing DDB2(Wt) protein, or a mutant form (DDB2(Mut)) unable to interact with PCNA. We report that overexpression of the DDB2(Mut) protein provides a proliferative advantage over the wild type form, by influencing cell cycle progression. In particular, an increase in the number of S-phase cells, together with a reduction in p21(CDKN1A) protein level, and a shorter cell cycle length, has been observed in the DDB2(Mut) cells. These results suggest that DDB2 influences cell cycle progression thanks to its interaction with PCNA.

  10. The interaction of inflammatory cells in granuloma faciale

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Takeshi Nakahara

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Granuloma faciale (GF is a rare chronic inflammatory skin disease characterized by single or multiple reddish-brown cutaneous plaques or nodules. Although this condition is benign, its clinical course is extremely chronic with poor response to therapy. The typical histopathological features of GF include vasculitis with mixed cellular infiltration; however, its etiopathogenesis remains unknown. Here, we describe the case of a 76-year-old man with GF resistant to topical steroids. Biopsy of the lesion revealed i dense mixed inflammatory cellular infiltrates of lymphocytes, histiocytes, neutrophils, and eosino­phils, ii mild perivascular nuclear dust and swollen endothelium of blood vessels, and iii a narrow Grenz zone beneath the epidermis. Immunohistochemical staining demonstrated mixed cellular infiltrates intermixed with CD1a+ dendritic cells, CD68+ histiocytes, and CD4+ and CD8+ T cells.

  11. HPMA and HEMA copolymer bead interactions with eukaryotic cells

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    Cristina D. Vianna-Soares

    2004-09-01

    Full Text Available Two different hydrophilic acrylate beads were prepared via aqueous suspension polymerization. Beads produced of a hydroxypropyl methacrylate (HPMA and ethyleneglycol methacrylate (EDMA copolymer were obtained using a polyvinyl alcohol suspending medium. Copolymers of 2hydroxyethyl methacrylate (HEMA, methyl methacrylate (MMA and ethyleneglycol methacrylate (EDMA beads were obtained using magnesium hydroxide as the suspending agent. Following characterization by scanning electron microscopy (SEM, nitrogen sorption analysis (NSA and mercury intrusion porosimetry (MIP, the beads were cultured with monkey fibroblasts (COS7 to evaluate their ability to support cell growth, attachment and adhesion. Cell growth behavior onto small HPMA/EDMA copolymer beads and large HEMA/MMA/EDMA copolymer beads is evaluated regarding their hidrophilicity/hidrophobicity and surface roughness.

  12. Metabolic protein interactions in Bacillus subtilis studied at the single cell level

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Detert Oude Weme, Ruud Gerardus Johannes

    2015-01-01

    We have investigated protein-protein interactions in live Bacillus subtilis cells (a bacterium). B. subtilis’ natural habitat is the soil and the roots of plants, but also the human microbiota. B. subtilis is used worldwide as a model organism. Unlike eukaryotic cells, bacteria do not have organelle

  13. Visualization of the specific interaction of sulfonylurea-incorporated polymer with insulinoma cell line MIN6.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Keun-Hong; Akaike, Toshihiro

    2004-02-01

    A derivative of sulfonylurea (SU) that mimics glibenclamide in chemical structure was synthesized and incorporated into a water-soluble polymeric backbone as a biospecific polymer for stimulating insulin secretion. In this study, a backbone polymer fluorescence-labeled with rodamine-B isothiocyanate was found to be strongly adsorbed onto MIN6 cells, probably due to its specific interaction mediated by SU receptors on the cell membrane. The intensity of fluorescence on the cells was significantly increased by increasing the incubation time and polymer concentration. To verify the specific interaction between the SU (K(+) channel closer)-incorporated copolymer and MIN6 cells, the cells were pretreated with diazoxide, an agonist of the ATP-sensitive K(+) channel (K(+) channel opener), before adding the polymer to the cell culture medium. This treatment suppressed the interaction between SU and MIN6 cells. A confocal laser microscopic study confirmed this effect. The results of this study provide evidence that SU-incorporated copolymer stimulates insulin secretion through the specific interactions of SU moieties in the polymer with MIN6 cells.

  14. Insights into the role of material surface topography and wettability on cell-material interactions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Papenburg, Bernke J.; Rodrigues, Emillie Dooms; Wessling, Matthias; Stamatialis, Dimitris

    2010-01-01

    This work investigates the effect of surface topography and biomaterial wettability on protein absorption, cell attachment, proliferation and morphology and reveals important insights in the complexity of cell-material interactions. We use various materials, i.e. poly(dimethyl siloxane) (PDMS), poly

  15. Obtaining control of cell surface functionalizations via Pre-targeting and Supramolecular host guest interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rood, Mark T M; Spa, Silvia J; Welling, Mick M; Ten Hove, Jan Bart; van Willigen, Danny M; Buckle, Tessa; Velders, Aldrik H; van Leeuwen, Fijs W B

    2017-01-06

    The use of mammalian cells for therapeutic applications is finding its way into modern medicine. However, modification or "training" of cells to make them suitable for a specific application remains complex. By envisioning a chemical toolbox that enables specific, but straight-forward and generic cellular functionalization, we investigated how membrane-receptor (pre)targeting could be combined with supramolecular host-guest interactions based on β-cyclodextrin (CD) and adamantane (Ad). The feasibility of this approach was studied in cells with membranous overexpression of the chemokine receptor 4 (CXCR4). By combining specific targeting of CXCR4, using an adamantane (Ad)-functionalized Ac-TZ14011 peptide (guest; KD = 56 nM), with multivalent host molecules that entailed fluorescent β-CD-Poly(isobutylene-alt-maleic-anhydride)-polymers with different fluorescent colors and number of functionalities, host-guest cell-surface modifications could be studied in detail. A second set of Ad-functionalized entities enabled introduction of additional surface functionalities. In addition, the attraction between CD and Ad could be used to drive cell-cell interactions. Combined we have shown that supramolecular interactions, that are based on specific targeting of an overexpressed membrane-receptor, allow specific and stable, yet reversible, surface functionalization of viable cells and how this approach can be used to influence the interaction between cells and their surroundings.

  16. Bifidobacterium breve - HT-29 cell line interaction: modulation of TNF-a induced gene expression

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Boesten, R.J.; Vos, de W.M.; Schuren, F.H.J.; Willemsen, L.E.M.; Knol, J.

    2011-01-01

    To provide insight in the molecular basis for intestinal host-microbe interactions, we determined the genome-wide transcriptional response of human intestinal epithelial cells following exposure to cells of Bifidobacterium breve. To select an appropriate test system reflecting inflammatory condition

  17. Bifidobacterium breve-HT-29 cell line interaction: Modulation of TNF-a induced gene expression

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Boesten, R.J.; Schuren, F.H.J.; Willemsen, L.E.M.; Vriesema, A.; Knol, J.; Vos, W.M. de

    2011-01-01

    To provide insight in the molecular basis for intestinal host-microbe interactions, we determined the genome-wide transcriptional response of human intestinal epithelial cells following exposure to cells of Bifidobacterium breve. To select an appropriate test system reflecting inflammatory condition

  18. Dendritic cell interaction with Candida albicans critically depends on N-linked mannan.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cambi, A.; Netea, M.G.; Mora-Montes, H.M.; Gow, N.A.; Hato, S.V.; Lowman, D.W.; Kullberg, B.J.; Torensma, R.; Williams, D.L.; Figdor, C.G.

    2008-01-01

    The fungus Candida albicans is the most common cause of mycotic infections in immunocompromised hosts. Little is known about the initial interactions between Candida and immune cell receptors, because a detailed characterization at the structural level is lacking. Antigen-presenting dendritic cells

  19. Interaction of targeted liposomes with primary cultured hepatic stellate cells : Involvement of multiple receptor systems

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Adrian, Joanna Ewa; Poelstra, Klaas; Scherphof, Gerrit; Molema, Ingrid; Meijer, D.K F; Reker-Smit, Catharina; Morselt, Henriette; Kamps, Jan

    2006-01-01

    Background/Aims: In designing a versatile liposomal drug carrier to hepatic stellate cells (HSC), the interaction of mannose 6-phosphate human serum albumin (M6P-HSA) liposomes with cultured cells was studied. Methods: M6P-HSA was covalently coupled to the liposomal surface and the uptake and bindin

  20. Mapping the Complex Morphology of Cell Interactions with Nanowire Substrates Using FIB-SEM

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wierzbicki, Rafal; Købler, Carsten; Jensen, Mikkel Ravn Boye;

    2013-01-01

    a wide phenotypic variability. Depending on the substrate and cell, we observe that cells could for instance: break the nanowires and engulf them, flatten the nanowires or simply reside on top of them. Given the complexity of interactions, we have categorised our observations and created an overview map...

  1. Multiple receptor-ligand interactions direct tissue resident gamma delta T cell activation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Deborah A. Witherden

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Gamma delta T cells represent a major T cell population in epithelial tissues, such as skin, intestine, and lung, where they function in maintenance of the epithelium and provide a crucial first line defense against environmental and pathogenic insults. Despite their importance, the molecular mechanisms directing their activation and function have remained elusive. Epithelial resident gamma delta T cells function through constant communication with neighboring cells, either via direct cell-to-cell contact or cell-to-matrix interactions. These intimate relationships allow gamma delta T cells to facilitate the maintenance of epithelial homeostasis, tissue repair following injury, inflammation, and protection from malignancy. Recent studies have identified a number of molecules involved in these complex interactions, under both homeostatic conditions, as well as following perturbation of these barrier tissues. These interactions are crucial to the timely production of cytokines, chemokines, growth factors and extracellular matrix proteins for restoration of homeostasis. In this review, we discuss recent advances in understanding the mechanisms directing epithelial-T cell crosstalk and the distinct roles played by individual receptor-ligand pairs of cell surface molecules in this process.

  2. Mechanisms of interaction of monochromatic visible light with cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karu, Tiina I.

    1996-01-01

    Biological responses of cells to visible and near IR (laser) radiation occur due to physical and/or chemical changes in photoacceptor molecules, components of respiratory chains (cyt a/a3 in mitochondria). As a result of the photoexcitation of electronic states, the following physical and/or chemical changes can occur: alteration of redox properties and acceleration of electron transfer, changes in biochemical activity due to local transient heating of chromophores, one-electron auto-oxidation and O'2- production, and photodynamic action and 1O2 production. Different reaction channels can be activated to achieve the photobiological macroeffect. The primary physical and/or chemical changes induced by light in photoacceptor molecules are followed by a cascade of biochemical reactions in the cell that do not need further light activation and occur in the dark (photosignal transduction and amplification chains). These reactions are connected with changes in cellular homeostasis parameters. The crucial step here is thought to be an alteration of the cellular redox state: a shift towards oxidation is associated with stimulation of cellular vitality, and a shift towards reduction is linked to inhibition. Cells with a lower than normal pH, where the redox state is shifted in the reduced direction, are considered to be more sensitive to the stimulative action of light than those with the respective parameters being optimal or near optimal. This circumstance explains the possible variations in observed magnitudes of low- power laser effects. Light action on the redox state of a cell via the respiratory chain also explains the diversity of low-power laser effects. Besides explaining many controversies in the field of low-power laser effects (i.e., the diversity of effects, the variable magnitude or absence of effects in certain studies), the proposed redox-regulation mechanism may be a fundamental explanation for some clinical effects of irradiation, for example the positive

  3. E-cadherin interactions are required for Langerhans cell differentiation

    OpenAIRE

    Mayumi, Nobuko; Watanabe, Eri; Norose, Yoshihiko; Watari, Eiji; Kawana, Seiji; Geijtenbeek, Teunis B H; Takahashi, Hidemi

    2012-01-01

    Human skin contains the following two distinct DC subsets: (i) Langerhans cells (LCs), expressing Langerin but not DC-specific intercellular adhesion molecule-3-grabbing nonintegrin (DC-SIGN), are predominantly localized in the epidermis; and (ii) dermal DCs, expressing DC-SIGN but not Langerin, are observed mainly in the dermis. It is not known whether localization in the epidermis provides cues for LC differentiation. Here, we show that E-cadherin expressed by epidermal keratinocytes (KCs) ...

  4. Interaction of recombinant octameric hemoglobin with endothelial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaucher, Caroline; Domingues-Hamdi, Élisa; Prin-Mathieu, Christine; Menu, Patrick; Baudin-Creuza, Véronique

    2015-02-01

    Hemoglobin-based oxygen carriers (HBOCs) may generate oxidative stress, vasoconstriction and inflammation. To reduce these undesirable vasoactive properties, we increased hemoglobin (Hb) molecular size by genetic engineering with octameric Hb, recombinant (r) HbβG83C. We investigate the potential side effects of rHbβG83C on endothelial cells. The rHbβG83C has no impact on cell viability, and induces a huge repression of endothelial nitric oxide synthase gene transcription, a marker of vasomotion. No induction of Intermolecular-Adhesion Molecule 1 and E-selectin (inflammatory markers) transcription was seen. In the presence of rHbβG83C, the transcription of heme oxygenase-1 (oxidative stress marker) is weakly increased compared to the two other HBOCs (references) or Voluven (control). This genetically engineered octameric Hb, based on a human Hb βG83C mutant, leads to little impact at the level of endothelial cell inflammatory response and thus appears as an interesting molecule for HBOC development.

  5. LESION SIMULATING DISEASE1 interacts with catalases to regulate hypersensitive cell death in Arabidopsis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yansha; Chen, Lichao; Mu, Jinye; Zuo, Jianru

    2013-10-01

    LESION SIMULATING DISEASE1 (lsd1) is an important negative regulator of programmed cell death (PCD) in Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana). The loss-of-function mutations in lsd1 cause runaway cell death triggered by reactive oxygen species. lsd1 encodes a novel zinc finger protein with unknown biochemical activities. Here, we report the identification of CATALASE3 (CAT3) as an lsd1-interacting protein by affinity purification and mass spectrometry-based proteomic analysis. The Arabidopsis genome contains three homologous catalase genes (CAT1, CAT2, and CAT3). Yeast two-hybrid and coimmunoprecipitation analyses demonstrated that lsd1 interacted with all three catalases both in vitro and in vivo, and the interaction required the zinc fingers of lsd1. We found that the catalase enzymatic activity was reduced in the lsd1 mutant, indicating that the catalase enzyme activity was partially dependent on lsd1. Consistently, the lsd1 mutant was more sensitive to the catalase inhibitor 3-amino-1,2,4-triazole than the wild type, suggesting that the interaction between lsd1 and catalases is involved in the regulation of the reactive oxygen species generated in the peroxisome. Genetic studies revealed that lsd1 interacted with CATALASE genes to regulate light-dependent runaway cell death and hypersensitive-type cell death. Moreover, the accumulation of salicylic acid was required for PCD regulated by the interaction between lsd1 and catalases. These results suggest that the lsd1-catalase interaction plays an important role in regulating PCD in Arabidopsis.

  6. Using singular value decomposition to characterize protein-protein interactions by in-cell NMR spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Majumder, Subhabrata; DeMott, Christopher M; Burz, David S; Shekhtman, Alexander

    2014-05-05

    Distinct differences between how model proteins interact in-cell and in vitro suggest that the cytosol might have a profound effect in modulating protein-protein and/or protein-ligand interactions that are not observed in vitro. Analyses of in-cell NMR spectra of target proteins interacting with physiological partners are further complicated by low signal-to-noise ratios, and the long overexpression times used in protein-protein interaction studies may lead to changes in the in-cell spectra over the course of the experiment. To unambiguously resolve the principal binding mode between two interacting species against the dynamic cellular background, we analyzed in-cell spectral data of a target protein over the time course of overexpression of its interacting partner by using single-value decomposition (SVD). SVD differentiates between concentration-dependent and concentration-independent events and identifies the principal binding mode between the two species. The analysis implicates a set of amino acids involved in the specific interaction that differs from previous NMR analyses but is in good agreement with crystallographic data. © 2014 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  7. Cell interactions in concanavalin A activated cation flux and DNA synthesis of mouse lymphocytes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Owens, T; Kaplan, J G

    1980-01-01

    Co-culture at constant cell density of nude mouse spleen cells (by themselves unresponsive to the T-cell mitogen concanavalin A (Con A)), with congenic T-enriched lymphocyte suspensions and Con A caused anomalously high activation of K+ transport (measured by 86Rb uptake) and of incorporation...... of thymidine into DNA; the expected dilution of these two responses by nude spleen cells did not occur. However, if the nude splenocytes were added immediately prior to assay to the enriched T cells that had been precultured in presence of Con A, the expected dilution of the activated T-cell responses occurred......; both 86Rb uptake and thymidine incorporation were reduced proportionally to the degree of dilution of the T cells by the nonresponding cells. These data indicate that during co-culture in presence of Con A there is interaction between the T cells, capable of responding to mitogens, and the nude spleen...

  8. The ECM-Cell Interaction of Cartilage Extracellular Matrix on Chondrocytes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yue Gao

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Cartilage extracellular matrix (ECM is composed primarily of the network type II collagen (COLII and an interlocking mesh of fibrous proteins and proteoglycans (PGs, hyaluronic acid (HA, and chondroitin sulfate (CS. Articular cartilage ECM plays a crucial role in regulating chondrocyte metabolism and functions, such as organized cytoskeleton through integrin-mediated signaling via cell-matrix interaction. Cell signaling through integrins regulates several chondrocyte functions, including differentiation, metabolism, matrix remodeling, responses to mechanical stimulation, and cell survival. The major signaling pathways that regulate chondrogenesis have been identified as wnt signal, nitric oxide (NO signal, protein kinase C (PKC, and retinoic acid (RA signal. Integrins are a large family of molecules that are central regulators in multicellular biology. They orchestrate cell-cell and cell-matrix adhesive interactions from embryonic development to mature tissue function. In this review, we emphasize the signaling molecule effect and the biomechanics effect of cartilage ECM on chondrogenesis.

  9. Rap1-GTP-interacting Adaptor Molecule (RIAM) Protein Controls Invasion and Growth of Melanoma Cells*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hernández-Varas, Pablo; Coló, Georgina P.; Bartolomé, Ruben A.; Paterson, Andrew; Medraño-Fernández, Iria; Arellano-Sánchez, Nohemí; Cabañas, Carlos; Sánchez-Mateos, Paloma; Lafuente, Esther M.; Boussiotis, Vassiliki A.; Strömblad, Staffan; Teixidó, Joaquin

    2011-01-01

    The Mig-10/RIAM/lamellipodin (MRL) family member Rap1-GTP-interacting adaptor molecule (RIAM) interacts with active Rap1, a small GTPase that is frequently activated in tumors such as melanoma and prostate cancer. We show here that RIAM is expressed in metastatic human melanoma cells and that both RIAM and Rap1 are required for BLM melanoma cell invasion. RIAM silencing in melanoma cells led to inhibition of tumor growth and to delayed metastasis in a severe combined immunodeficiency xenograft model. Defective invasion of RIAM-silenced melanoma cells arose from impairment in persistent cell migration directionality, which was associated with deficient activation of a Vav2-RhoA-ROCK-myosin light chain pathway. Expression of constitutively active Vav2 and RhoA in cells depleted for RIAM partially rescued their invasion, indicating that Vav2 and RhoA mediate RIAM function. These results suggest that inhibition of cell invasion in RIAM-silenced melanoma cells is likely based on altered cell contractility and cell polarization. Furthermore, we show that RIAM depletion reduces β1 integrin-dependent melanoma cell adhesion, which correlates with decreased activation of both Erk1/2 MAPK and phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase, two central molecules controlling cell growth and cell survival. In addition to causing inhibition of cell proliferation, RIAM silencing led to higher susceptibility to cell apoptosis. Together, these data suggest that defective activation of these kinases in RIAM-silenced cells could account for inhibition of melanoma cell growth and that RIAM might contribute to the dissemination of melanoma cells. PMID:21454517

  10. Uncovering homo-and hetero-interactions on the cell membrane using single particle tracking approaches

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torreno-Pina, Juan A.; Manzo, Carlo; Garcia-Parajo, Maria F.

    2016-03-01

    The plasma membrane of eukaryotic cells is responsible for a myriad of functions that regulate cell physiology and plays a crucial role in a multitude of processes that include adhesion, migration, signaling recognition and cell-cell communication. This is accomplished by specific interactions between different membrane components such as lipids and proteins on the lipid bilayer but also through interactions with the underlying cortical actin cytoskeleton on the intracellular side and the glycocalyx matrix in close proximity to the extracellular side. Advanced biophysical techniques, including single particle tracking (SPT) have revealed that the lateral diffusion of molecular components on the plasma membrane represents a landmark manifestation of such interactions. Indeed, by studying changes in the diffusivity of individual membrane molecules, including sub-diffusion, confined diffusion and/or transient arrest of molecules in membrane compartments, it has been possible to gain insight on the nature of molecular interactions and to infer on its functional role for cell response. In this review, we will revise some exciting results where SPT has been crucial to reveal homo- and hetero-interactions on the cell membrane.

  11. A cell-based method for screening RNA-protein interactions: identification of constitutive transport element-interacting proteins.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robert L Nakamura

    Full Text Available We have developed a mammalian cell-based screening platform to identify proteins that assemble into RNA-protein complexes. Based on Tat-mediated activation of the HIV LTR, proteins that interact with an RNA target elicit expression of a GFP reporter and are captured by fluorescence activated cell sorting. This "Tat-hybrid" screening platform was used to identify proteins that interact with the Mason Pfizer monkey virus (MPMV constitutive transport element (CTE, a structured RNA hairpin that mediates the transport of unspliced viral mRNAs from the nucleus to the cytoplasm. Several hnRNP-like proteins, including hnRNP A1, were identified and shown to interact with the CTE with selectivity in the reporter system comparable to Tap, a known CTE-binding protein. In vitro gel shift and pull-down assays showed that hnRNP A1 is able to form a complex with the CTE and Tap and that the RGG domain of hnRNP A1 mediates binding to Tap. These results suggest that hnRNP-like proteins may be part of larger export-competent RNA-protein complexes and that the RGG domains of these proteins play an important role in directing these binding events. The results also demonstrate the utility of the screening platform for identifying and characterizing new components of RNA-protein complexes.

  12. Experimental approaches to study plant cell walls during plant-microbe interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xia, Ye; Petti, Carloalberto; Williams, Mark A; DeBolt, Seth

    2014-01-01

    Plant cell walls provide physical strength, regulate the passage of bio-molecules, and act as the first barrier of defense against biotic and abiotic stress. In addition to providing structural integrity, plant cell walls serve an important function in connecting cells to their extracellular environment by sensing and transducing signals to activate cellular responses, such as those that occur during pathogen infection. This mini review will summarize current experimental approaches used to study cell wall functions during plant-pathogen interactions. Focus will be paid to cell imaging, spectroscopic analyses, and metabolic profiling techniques.

  13. Experimental approaches to study plant cell walls during plant-microbe interactions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ye eXia

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Plant cell walls provide physical strength, regulate the passage of bio-molecules, and act as the first barrier of defense against biotic and abiotic stress. In addition to providing structural integrity, plant cell walls serve an important function in connecting cells to their extracellular environment by sensing and transducing signals to activate cellular responses, such as those that occur during pathogen infection. This mini review will summarize current experimental approaches used to study cell wall functions during plant-pathogen interactions. Focus will be paid to cell imaging, spectroscopic analyses, and metabolic profiling techniques

  14. Interaction of human endothelial cells and nickel-titanium materials modified with silicon ions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lotkov, Aleksandr I., E-mail: lotkov@ispms.tsc.ru; Kashin, Oleg A., E-mail: okashin@ispms.tsc.ru [Institute of Strength Physics and Materials Science SB RAS, Tomsk, 634055 (Russian Federation); Kudryavtseva, Yuliya A., E-mail: yulia-k1970@mail.ru; Antonova, Larisa V., E-mail: antonova.la@mail.ru; Matveeva, Vera G., E-mail: matveeva-vg@mail.ru; Sergeeva, Evgeniya A., E-mail: sergeewa.ew@yandex.ru [Research Institute for Complex Issues of Cardiovascular Diseases, Kemerovo, 650002 (Russian Federation); Kudryashov, Andrey N., E-mail: kudryashov@angioline.ru [Angioline Interventional Device Ltd, Novosibirsk, 630090 (Russian Federation)

    2015-10-27

    The paper studies the influence of chemical and phase compositions of NiTi surface layers modified with Si ions by plasma immersion implantation on their interaction with endothelial cells. It is shown that certain technological modes of Si ion implantation enhance the adhesion, proliferation, and viability of endothelial cells. It is found that the Si-modified NiTi surface is capable of stimulating the formation of capillary-like structures in the cell culture.

  15. Cellulose-hemicellulose interaction in wood secondary cell-wall

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Ning; Li, Shi; Xiong, Liming; Hong, Yu; Chen, Youping

    2015-12-01

    The wood cell wall features a tough and relatively rigid fiber reinforced composite structure. It acts as a pressure vessel, offering protection against mechanical stress. Cellulose microfibrils, hemicellulose and amorphous lignin are the three major components of wood. The structure of secondary cell wall could be imagined as the same as reinforced concrete, in which cellulose microfibrils acts as reinforcing steel bar and hemicellulose-lignin matrices act as the concrete. Therefore, the interface between cellulose and hemicellulose/lignin plays a significant role in determine the mechanical behavior of wood secondary cell wall. To this end, we present a molecular dynamics (MD) simulation study attempting to quantify the strength of the interface between cellulose microfibrils and hemicellulose. Since hemicellulose binds with adjacent cellulose microfibrils in various patterns, the atomistic models of hemicellulose-cellulose composites with three typical binding modes, i.e. bridge, loop and random binding modes are constructed. The effect of the shape of hemicellulose chain on the strength of hemicellulose-cellulose composites under shear loadings is investigated. The contact area as well as hydrogen bonds between cellulose and hemicellulose, together with the covalent bonds in backbone of hemicellulose chain are found to be the controlling parameters which determine the strength of the interfaces in the composite system. For the bridge binding model, the effect of shear loading direction on the strength of the cellulose material is also studied. The obtained results suggest that the shear strength of wood-inspired engineering composites can be optimized through maximizing the formations of the contributing hydrogen bonds between cellulose and hemicellulose.

  16. Eph/ephrins mediated thymocyte-thymic epithelial cell interactions control numerous processes of thymus biology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Javier eGarcia-Ceca

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Numerous studies emphasize the relevance of thymocyte-thymic epithelial cell (TECs interactions for the functional maturation of intrathymic T lymphocytes. The tyrosine kinase receptors Ephs (Erythropoietin-producing hepatocyte kinases and their ligands, ephrins (Eph receptor interaction proteins, are molecules known to be involved in the regulation of numerous biological systems in which cell-to-cell interactions are particularly relevant. In the last years, we and other authors have demonstrated the importance of these molecules in the thymic functions and the T-cell development. In the present report, we review data on the effects of Ephs and ephrins, in the functional maturation of both thymic epithelial microenvironment and thymocyte maturation as well as on their role in the lymphoid progenitor recruitment into the thymus.

  17. Emerging functions as host cell factors - an encyclopedia of annexin-pathogen interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuehnl, Alexander; Musiol, Agnes; Raabe, Carsten A; Rescher, Ursula

    2016-10-01

    Emerging infectious diseases and drug-resistant infectious agents call for the development of innovative antimicrobial strategies. With pathogenicity now considered to arise from the complex and bi-directional interplay between a microbe and the host, host cell factor targeting has emerged as a promising approach that might overcome the limitations of classical antimicrobial drug development and could open up novel and efficient therapeutic strategies. Interaction with and modulation of host cell membranes is a recurrent theme in the host-microbe relationship. In this review, we provide an overview of what is currently known about the role of the Ca2+ dependent, membrane-binding annexin protein family in pathogen-host interactions, and discuss their emerging functions as host cell derived auxiliary proteins in microbe-host interactions and host cell targets.

  18. Significance of nano- and microtopography for cell-surface interactions in orthopaedic implants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jäger, M; Zilkens, C; Zanger, K; Krauspe, R

    2007-01-01

    Cell-surface interactions play a crucial role for biomaterial application in orthopaedics. It is evident that not only the chemical composition of solid substances influence cellular adherence, migration, proliferation and differentiation but also the surface topography of a biomaterial. The progressive application of nanostructured surfaces in medicine has gained increasing interest to improve the cytocompatibility and osteointegration of orthopaedic implants. Therefore, the understanding of cell-surface interactions is of major interest for these substances. In this review, we elucidate the principle mechanisms of nano- and microscale cell-surface interactions in vitro for different cell types onto typical orthopaedic biomaterials such as titanium (Ti), cobalt-chrome-molybdenum (CoCrMo) alloys, stainless steel (SS), as well as synthetic polymers (UHMWPE, XLPE, PEEK, PLLA). In addition, effects of nano- and microscaled particles and their significance in orthopaedics were reviewed. The significance for the cytocompatibility of nanobiomaterials is discussed critically.

  19. Elisidepsin Interacts Directly with Glycosylceramides in the Plasma Membrane of Tumor Cells to Induce Necrotic Cell Death

    Science.gov (United States)

    Molina-Guijarro, José Manuel; García, Carolina; Macías, Álvaro; García-Fernández, Luis Francisco; Moreno, Cristina; Reyes, Fernando; Martínez-Leal, Juan Fernando; Fernández, Rogelio; Martínez, Valentín; Valenzuela, Carmen; Lillo, M. Pilar; Galmarini, Carlos M.

    2015-01-01

    Plasma membrane integrity is essential for cell life. Any major break on it immediately induces the death of the affected cell. Different molecules were described as disrupting this cell structure and thus showing antitumor activity. We have previously defined that elisidepsin (Irvalec®, PM02734) inserts and self-organizes in the plasma membrane of tumor cells, inducing a rapid loss of membrane integrity, cell permeabilization and necrotic death. Here we show that, in sensitive HCT-116 colorectal cells, all these effects are consequence of the interaction of elisidepsin with glycosylceramides in the cell membrane. Of note, an elisidepsin-resistant subline (HCT-116-Irv) presented reduced levels of glycosylceramides and no accumulation of elisidepsin in the plasma membrane. Consequently, drug treatment did not induce the characteristic necrotic cell death. Furthermore, GM95, a mutant derivative from B16 mouse melanoma cells lacking ceramide glucosyltransferase (UGCG) activity and thus the synthesis of glycosylceramides, was also resistant to elisidepsin. Over-expression of UGCG gene in these deficient cells restored glycosylceramides synthesis, rendering them sensitive to elisidepsin, at a similar level than parental B16 cells. These results indicate that glycosylceramides act as membrane targets of elisidepsin, facilitating its insertion in the plasma membrane and the subsequent membrane permeabilization that leads to drug-induced cell death. They also indicate that cell membrane lipids are a plausible target for antineoplastic therapy. PMID:26474061

  20. MUC1 (CD227) interacts with lck tyrosine kinase in Jurkat lymphoma cells and normal T cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mukherjee, P; Tinder, T L; Basu, G D; Gendler, S J

    2005-01-01

    MUC1 (CD227) is a large transmembrane epithelial mucin glycoprotein, which is aberrantly overexpressed in most adenocarcinomas and is a target for immune therapy for epithelial tumors. Recently, MUC1 has been detected in a variety of hematopoietic cell malignancies including T and B cell lymphomas and myelomas; however, its function in these cells is not clearly defined. Using the Jurkat T cell lymphoma cell line and normal human T cells, we demonstrate that MUC1 is not only expressed in these cells but is also phosphorylated upon T cell receptor (TCR) ligation and associates with the Src-related T cell tyrosine kinase, p56lck. Upon TCR-mediated activation of Jurkat cells, MUC1 is found in the low-density membrane fractions, where linker of T cell activation is contained. Abrogation of MUC1 expression in Jurkat cells by MUC1-specific small interfering RNA resulted in defects in TCR-mediated downstream signaling events associated with T cell activation. These include reduction in Ca2+ influx and extracellular signal-regulated kinase 1/2 phosphorylation, leading to a decrease in CD69 expression, proliferation, and interleukin-2 production. These results suggest a regulatory role of MUC1 in modulating proximal signal transduction events through its interaction with proteins of the activation complex.

  1. Elisidepsin Interacts Directly with Glycosylceramides in the Plasma Membrane of Tumor Cells to Induce Necrotic Cell Death.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José Manuel Molina-Guijarro

    Full Text Available Plasma membrane integrity is essential for cell life. Any major break on it immediately induces the death of the affected cell. Different molecules were described as disrupting this cell structure and thus showing antitumor activity. We have previously defined that elisidepsin (Irvalec®, PM02734 inserts and self-organizes in the plasma membrane of tumor cells, inducing a rapid loss of membrane integrity, cell permeabilization and necrotic death. Here we show that, in sensitive HCT-116 colorectal cells, all these effects are consequence of the interaction of elisidepsin with glycosylceramides in the cell membrane. Of note, an elisidepsin-resistant subline (HCT-116-Irv presented reduced levels of glycosylceramides and no accumulation of elisidepsin in the plasma membrane. Consequently, drug treatment did not induce the characteristic necrotic cell death. Furthermore, GM95, a mutant derivative from B16 mouse melanoma cells lacking ceramide glucosyltransferase (UGCG activity and thus the synthesis of glycosylceramides, was also resistant to elisidepsin. Over-expression of UGCG gene in these deficient cells restored glycosylceramides synthesis, rendering them sensitive to elisidepsin, at a similar level than parental B16 cells. These results indicate that glycosylceramides act as membrane targets of elisidepsin, facilitating its insertion in the plasma membrane and the subsequent membrane permeabilization that leads to drug-induced cell death. They also indicate that cell membrane lipids are a plausible target for antineoplastic therapy.

  2. Modelling spatio-temporal interactions within the cell

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Padmini Rangamani; Ravi Iyengar

    2007-01-01

    Biological phenomena at the cellular level can be represented by various types of mathematical formulations. Such representations allow us to carry out numerical simulations that provide mechanistic insights into complex behaviours of biological systems and also generate hypotheses that can be experimentally tested. Currently, we are particularly interested in spatio-temporal representations of dynamic cellular phenomena and how such models can be used to understand biological specificity in functional responses. This review describes the capability and limitations of the approaches used to study spatio-temporal dynamics of cell signalling components.

  3. Human mammary progenitor cell fate decisions are products of interactions with combinatorial microenvironments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    LaBarge, Mark A; Nelson, Celeste M; Villadsen, Rene; Fridriksdottir, Agla; Ruth, Jason R; Stampfer, Martha R; Petersen, Ole W; Bissell, Mina J

    2008-09-19

    In adult tissues, multi-potent progenitor cells are some of the most primitive members of the developmental hierarchies that maintain homeostasis. That progenitors and their more mature progeny share identical genomes, suggests that fate decisions are directed by interactions with extrinsic soluble factors, ECM, and other cells, as well as physical properties of the ECM. To understand regulation of fate decisions, therefore, would require a means of understanding carefully choreographed combinatorial interactions. Here we used microenvironment protein microarrays to functionally identify combinations of cell-extrinsic mammary gland proteins and ECM molecules that imposed specific cell fates on bipotent human mammary progenitor cells. Micropatterned cell culture surfaces were fabricated to distinguish between the instructive effects of cell-cell versus cell-ECM interactions, as well as constellations of signaling molecules; and these were used in conjunction with physiologically relevant 3 dimensional human breast cultures. Both immortalized and primary human breast progenitors were analyzed. We report on the functional ability of those proteins of the mammary gland that maintain quiescence, maintain the progenitor state, and guide progenitor differentiation towards myoepithelial and luminal lineages.

  4. Claudin-2 promotes breast cancer liver metastasis by facilitating tumor cell interactions with hepatocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tabariès, Sébastien; Dupuy, Fanny; Dong, Zhifeng; Monast, Anie; Annis, Matthew G; Spicer, Jonathan; Ferri, Lorenzo E; Omeroglu, Atilla; Basik, Mark; Amir, Eitan; Clemons, Mark; Siegel, Peter M

    2012-08-01

    We previously identified claudin-2 as a functional mediator of breast cancer liver metastasis. We now confirm that claudin-2 levels are elevated in liver metastases, but not in skin metastases, compared to levels in their matched primary tumors in patients with breast cancer. Moreover, claudin-2 is specifically expressed in liver-metastatic breast cancer cells compared to populations derived from bone or lung metastases. The increased liver tropism exhibited by claudin-2-expressing breast cancer cells requires claudin-2-mediated interactions between breast cancer cells and primary hepatocytes. Furthermore, the reduction of the claudin-2 expression level, either in cancer cells or in primary hepatocytes, diminishes these heterotypic cell-cell interactions. Finally, we demonstrate that the first claudin-2 extracellular loop is essential for mediating tumor cell-hepatocyte interactions and the ability of breast cancer cells to form liver metastases in vivo. Thus, during breast cancer liver metastasis, claudin-2 shifts from acting within tight-junctional complexes to functioning as an adhesion molecule between breast cancer cells and hepatocytes.

  5. SU-F-SPS-08: Measuring the Interaction Of DDR Cell Receptors and Extracellular Matrix Collagen in Prostate Cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dong, J; Sarkar, A; Hoffmann, P [Wayne State University, Detroit, MI (United States); Suhail, A; Fridman, R [Wayne State University School of Medicine, Detroit, MI (United States)

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: Discoidin domain receptors (DDR) have recently been recognized as important players in cancer progression. DDRs are cell receptors that interact with collagen, an extracellular matrix (ECM) protein. However the detailed mechanism of their interaction is unclear. Here we attempted to examine their interaction in terms of structural (surface topography), mechanical (rupture force), and kinetic (binding probability) information on the single molecular scale with the use of atomic force microscopy (AFM). Methods: The Quantitative Nano-mechanical property Mapping (QNM) mode of AFM allowed to assess the cells in liquid growth media at their optimal physiological while being viable. Human benign prostate hyperplasia (BPH-1) cell line was genetically regulated to suppress DDR expression (DDR- cells) and was compared with naturally DDR expressing cells (DDR+). Results: Binding force measurements (n = 1000) were obtained before and after the two groups were treated with fibronectin (FN), an integrin-inhibiting antibody to block the binding of integrin. The quantification indicates that cells containing DDR bind with collagen at a most probable force of 80.3–83.0 ±7.6 pN. The probability of them binding is 0.167 when other interactions (mainly due to integrin-collagen binding) are minimized. Conclusion: Together with further force measurements at different pulling speeds will determine dissociation rate, binding distance and activation barrier. These parameters in benign cells provides some groundwork in understanding DDR’s behavior in various cell microenvironments such as in malignant tumor cells. Funding supported by Richard Barber Interdisciplinary Research Program of Wayne State University.

  6. Revealing the sequence of interactions of PuroA peptide with Candida albicans cells by live-cell imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shagaghi, Nadin; Bhave, Mrinal; Palombo, Enzo A.; Clayton, Andrew H. A.

    2017-03-01

    To determine the mechanism(s) of action of antimicrobial peptides (AMPs) it is desirable to provide details of their interaction kinetics with cellular, sub-cellular and molecular targets. The synthetic peptide, PuroA, displays potent antimicrobial activities which have been attributed to peptide-induced membrane destabilization, or intracellular mechanisms of action (DNA-binding) or both. We used time-lapse fluorescence microscopy and fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy (FLIM) to directly monitor the localization and interaction kinetics of a FITC- PuroA peptide on single Candida albicans cells in real time. Our results reveal the sequence of events leading to cell death. Within 1 minute, FITC-PuroA was observed to interact with SYTO-labelled nucleic acids, resulting in a noticeable quenching in the fluorescence lifetime of the peptide label at the nucleus of yeast cells, and cell-cycle arrest. A propidium iodide (PI) influx assay confirmed that peptide translocation itself did not disrupt the cell membrane integrity; however, PI entry occurred 25-45 minutes later, which correlated with an increase in fractional fluorescence of pores and an overall loss of cell size. Our results clarify that membrane disruption appears to be the mechanism by which the C. albicans cells are killed and this occurs after FITC-PuroA translocation and binding to intracellular targets.

  7. Revealing the sequence of interactions of PuroA peptide with Candida albicans cells by live-cell imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shagaghi, Nadin; Bhave, Mrinal; Palombo, Enzo A.; Clayton, Andrew H. A.

    2017-01-01

    To determine the mechanism(s) of action of antimicrobial peptides (AMPs) it is desirable to provide details of their interaction kinetics with cellular, sub-cellular and molecular targets. The synthetic peptide, PuroA, displays potent antimicrobial activities which have been attributed to peptide-induced membrane destabilization, or intracellular mechanisms of action (DNA-binding) or both. We used time-lapse fluorescence microscopy and fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy (FLIM) to directly monitor the localization and interaction kinetics of a FITC- PuroA peptide on single Candida albicans cells in real time. Our results reveal the sequence of events leading to cell death. Within 1 minute, FITC-PuroA was observed to interact with SYTO-labelled nucleic acids, resulting in a noticeable quenching in the fluorescence lifetime of the peptide label at the nucleus of yeast cells, and cell-cycle arrest. A propidium iodide (PI) influx assay confirmed that peptide translocation itself did not disrupt the cell membrane integrity; however, PI entry occurred 25–45 minutes later, which correlated with an increase in fractional fluorescence of pores and an overall loss of cell size. Our results clarify that membrane disruption appears to be the mechanism by which the C. albicans cells are killed and this occurs after FITC-PuroA translocation and binding to intracellular targets. PMID:28252014

  8. Reciprocal interaction among gasotransmitters in isolated pancreatic β-cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moustafa, Amira; Habara, Yoshiaki

    2016-01-01

    We aimed to elucidate the interplay among the three well-known gas molecules, nitric oxide (NO), carbon monoxide (CO) and hydrogen sulfide (H2S), and their effects on intracellular Ca(2+) concentration ([Ca(2+)]i) and insulin secretion in rat pancreatic β-cells. Immunofluorescence studies demonstrated the expression of constitutive enzymes that are responsible for the production of NO, CO and H2S. CO and H2S increased NO production as indicated by the increase in diaminofluorescein-2 triazole fluorescence. NO and CO induced an elevation in the sulfane sulfur pool and concomitantly H2S production. The NO- and CO-induced H2S production was partially inhibited by hypotaurine, an H2S scavenger. NO and H2S produced CO production as revealed by a myoglobin assay. A calmodulin antagonist in the absence of extracellular Ca(2+) significantly attenuated NO and H2S production. NO and CO induced a [Ca(2+)]i increase mainly via Ca(2+) release from internal stores; however, H2S induced a [Ca(2+)]i increase via the influx of extracellular Ca(2+). NO dose-dependently stimulated basal insulin release but CO dose-dependently inhibited it. H2S showed an insignificant effect on basal insulin secretion from freshly isolated pancreatic islets. Herein, we address for the first time the reciprocal and synergistic relation among gasotransmitters with diverse effects on basal insulin secretion that regulate β-cells functions and homeostasis.

  9. Interactions of the cell-wall glycopolymers of lactic acid bacteria with their bacteriophages

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marie-Pierre eChapot-Chartier

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Lactic acid bacteria (LAB are Gram positive bacteria widely used in the production of fermented food in particular cheese and yoghurts. Bacteriophage infections during fermentation processes have been for many years a major industrial concern and have stimulated numerous research efforts. Better understanding of the molecular mechanisms of bacteriophage interactions with their host bacteria is required for the development of efficient strategies to fight against infections. The bacterial cell wall plays key roles in these interactions. First, bacteriophages must adsorb at the bacterial surface through specific interactions with receptors that are cell wall components. At next step, phages must overcome the barrier constituted by cell wall peptidoglycan to inject DNA inside bacterial cell. Also at the end of the infection cycle, phages synthesize endolysins able to hydrolyze peptidoglycan and lyse bacterial cells to release phage progeny. In the last decade, concomitant development of genomics and structural analysis of cell wall components allowed considerable advances in the knowledge of their structure and function in several model LAB. Here, we describe the present knowledge on the structure of the cell wall glycopolymers of the best characterized LAB emphasizing their structural variations and we present the available data regarding their role in bacteria-phage specific interactions at the different steps of the infection cycle.

  10. Genome-wide maps of nuclear lamina interactions in single human cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kind, Jop; Pagie, Ludo; de Vries, Sandra S.; Nahidiazar, Leila; Dey, Siddharth S.; Bienko, Magda; Zhan, Ye; Lajoie, Bryan; de Graaf, Carolyn A.; Amendola, Mario; Fudenberg, Geoffrey; Imakaev, Maxim; Mirny, Leonid A.; Jalink, Kees; Dekker, Job; van Oudenaarden, Alexander; van Steensel, Bas

    2015-01-01

    Summary Mammalian interphase chromosomes interact with the nuclear lamina (NL) through hundreds of large Lamina Associated Domains (LADs). We report a method to map NL contacts genome-wide in single human cells. Analysis of nearly 400 maps reveals a core architecture of gene-poor LADs that contact the NL with high cell-to-cell consistency, interspersed by LADs with more variable NL interactions. The variable contacts tend to be cell-type specific and are more sensitive to changes in genome ploidy than the consistent contacts. Single-cell maps indicate that NL contacts involve multivalent interactions over hundreds of kilobases. Moreover, we observe extensive intra-chromosomal coordination of NL contacts, even over tens of megabases. Such coordinated loci exhibit preferential interactions as detected by Hi-C. Finally, consistency of NL contacts is inversely linked to gene activity in single cells, and correlates positively with the heterochromatic histone modification H3K9me3. These results highlight fundamental principles of single cell chromatin organization. PMID:26365489

  11. MPQ-cytometry: a magnetism-based method for quantification of nanoparticle-cell interactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shipunova, V. O.; Nikitin, M. P.; Nikitin, P. I.; Deyev, S. M.

    2016-06-01

    Precise quantification of interactions between nanoparticles and living cells is among the imperative tasks for research in nanobiotechnology, nanotoxicology and biomedicine. To meet the challenge, a rapid method called MPQ-cytometry is developed, which measures the integral non-linear response produced by magnetically labeled nanoparticles in a cell sample with an original magnetic particle quantification (MPQ) technique. MPQ-cytometry provides a sensitivity limit 0.33 ng of nanoparticles and is devoid of a background signal present in many label-based assays. Each measurement takes only a few seconds, and no complicated sample preparation or data processing is required. The capabilities of the method have been demonstrated by quantification of interactions of iron oxide nanoparticles with eukaryotic cells. The total amount of targeted nanoparticles that specifically recognized the HER2/neu oncomarker on the human cancer cell surface was successfully measured, the specificity of interaction permitting the detection of HER2/neu positive cells in a cell mixture. Moreover, it has been shown that MPQ-cytometry analysis of a HER2/neu-specific iron oxide nanoparticle interaction with six cell lines of different tissue origins quantitatively reflects the HER2/neu status of the cells. High correlation of MPQ-cytometry data with those obtained by three other commonly used in molecular and cell biology methods supports consideration of this method as a prospective alternative for both quantifying cell-bound nanoparticles and estimating the expression level of cell surface antigens. The proposed method does not require expensive sophisticated equipment or highly skilled personnel and it can be easily applied for rapid diagnostics, especially under field conditions.Precise quantification of interactions between nanoparticles and living cells is among the imperative tasks for research in nanobiotechnology, nanotoxicology and biomedicine. To meet the challenge, a rapid method

  12. Interaction between the solitary bee Chelostoma florisomne and its nest parasite Sapyga clavicornis-empty cells reduce the impact of parasites

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Munster-Swendsen, Mikael; Calabuig, Isabel

    2000-01-01

    Chelostoma, empty cells, interaction, mortality, nest architecture, nest parasite, protection, Sapyga, solitary bee......Chelostoma, empty cells, interaction, mortality, nest architecture, nest parasite, protection, Sapyga, solitary bee...

  13. Cinematographic analysis of vascular smooth muscle cell interactions with extracellular matrix.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Absher, M; Baldor, L

    1991-01-01

    The interactions of vascular smooth muscle cells with growth modulators and extracellular matrix molecules may play a role in the proliferation and migration of these cells after vascular injury and during the development of atherosclerosis. Time-lapse cinematographic techniques have been used to study cell division and migration of bovine carotid artery smooth muscle cells in response to matrix molecules consisting of solubilized basement membrane (Matrigel) and type I collagen. When cells were grown adjacent to Matrigel, both migration and cell proliferation were increased and interdivision time was shortened. Cells grown in Matrigel or in type I collagen had markedly reduced migration rates but interdivision time was not altered. Further, diffusible components of the Matrigel were found to stimulate proliferation of the smooth muscle cells.

  14. Engineering genetic circuit interactions within and between synthetic minimal cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adamala, Katarzyna P.; Martin-Alarcon, Daniel A.; Guthrie-Honea, Katriona R.; Boyden, Edward S.

    2017-05-01

    Genetic circuits and reaction cascades are of great importance for synthetic biology, biochemistry and bioengineering. An open question is how to maximize the modularity of their design to enable the integration of different reaction networks and to optimize their scalability and flexibility. One option is encapsulation within liposomes, which enables chemical reactions to proceed in well-isolated environments. Here we adapt liposome encapsulation to enable the modular, controlled compartmentalization of genetic circuits and cascades. We demonstrate that it is possible to engineer genetic circuit-containing synthetic minimal cells (synells) to contain multiple-part genetic cascades, and that these cascades can be controlled by external signals as well as inter-liposomal communication without crosstalk. We also show that liposomes that contain different cascades can be fused in a controlled way so that the products of incompatible reactions can be brought together. Synells thus enable a more modular creation of synthetic biology cascades, an essential step towards their ultimate programmability.

  15. Tailoring the Interfacial Chemical Interaction for High-Efficiency Perovskite Solar Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zuo, Lijian; Chen, Qi; De Marco, Nicholas; Hsieh, Yao-Tsung; Chen, Huajun; Sun, Pengyu; Chang, Sheng-Yung; Zhao, Hongxiang; Dong, Shiqi; Yang, Yang

    2017-01-11

    The ionic nature of perovskite photovoltaic materials makes it easy to form various chemical interactions with different functional groups. Here, we demonstrate that interfacial chemical interactions are a critical factor in determining the optoelectronic properties of perovskite solar cells. By depositing different self-assembled monolayers (SAMs), we introduce different functional groups onto the SnO2 surface to form various chemical interactions with the perovskite layer. It is observed that the perovskite solar cell device performance shows an opposite trend to that of the energy level alignment theory, which shows that chemical interactions are the predominant factor governing the interfacial optoelectronic properties. Further analysis verifies that proper interfacial interactions can significantly reduce trap state density and facilitate the interfacial charge transfer. Through use of the 4-pyridinecarboxylic acid SAM, the resulting perovskite solar cell exhibits striking improvements to the reach the highest efficiency of 18.8%, which constitutes an ∼10% enhancement compared to those without SAMs. Our work highlights the importance of chemical interactions at perovskite/electrode interfaces and paves the way for further optimizing performances of perovskite solar cells.

  16. Interactions between neuronal and non-neuronal cells in adult rat isolated dorsal root ganglion cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    NG K Y; WONG Y H; WISE H

    2008-01-01

    Objective The glial cells of the central nervous system are involved in tripartite signaling, therefore we have been investigating the relationship between sensory neurons and non-neuronal cells in isolated preparations of dorsal root ganglia (DRG). Methods The mixed cell cultures of dissociated DRG cells were separated to yield enriched fractions of IB4-positive cells (small diameter, non-peptidergic cells), IB4-negative cells (small diameter, peptidergic cells, and large diameter cells), and non-neuronal cells (principally satellite glial cells, Schwarm cells and fibroblasts). Adenylyl cyclase activity was assayed by measuring production of [3H]cAMP from cells preloaded with [3H]adenine. Results PGE2 and the PGI2 mimetic eicaprost stimulated adenylyl cyclase activity which was inhibited by ONO-AE3-208 (EP4 antagonist) or CAY10441 (IP antagonist) with estimated pA2 values of 8.9 and 8.2, respectively. Surprisingly, both PGE2 and cicaprost-stimulated [3H] cAMP production was greatest in the non-neuronal cell preparation. Furthermore, when the number of non-neuronal cells was kept constant and the number of neuronal cells was increased, we observed a progressive decrease in prostanoid-stimulated activity. Conclusions Sensory neurons appear to regulate prostanoid receptor-mediated cell signaling in non-neuronal cells within the DRG.

  17. Optical analysis of nanomaterial-cell interactions: flow cytometry and digital holographic microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mues, Sarah; Antunovic, Jan; Ossig, Rainer; Kemper, Björn; Schnekenburger, Jürgen

    2015-05-01

    The in vitro cytotoxicity assessment of engineered nanoparticles commonly involves the measurement of different endpoints like the formation of reactive oxygen species, cell viability or cell death. Usually these parameters are determined by optical readouts of enzymatically converted substrates that often interfere with the tested nanomaterials. Using cell viability (WST-8) and cell death (LDH) as parameter we have initially investigated the toxic effects of spherical (NM 300) and rod shaped (NM 302) silver nanomaterials with a matrix of four cell lines representing different functions: lung and kidney epithelial cells, macrophages and fibroblasts. In addition, we have used a label-free flow cytometer configuration to investigate interactions of particles and macrophages by side scatter signal analysis. Finally, we explored digital holographic microscopy (DHM) for multimodal label-free analysis of nanomaterial toxicity. Quantitative DHM phase images were analyzed for cell thickness, volume, density, dry mass and refractive index. We could demonstrate that silver spheres lead to more cytotoxic effects than rods in all four examined cell lines and both assay. Exemplarily a dose dependent interaction increase of cells with NM 300 and NM 302 analyzed by flow cytometry is shown. Furthermore, we found that the refractive index of cells is influenced by incubation with NM 300 in a decreasing manner. A 24 hours time-lapse measurement revealed a dose dependent decrease of dry mass and surface area development indicating reduced cell viability and cell death. Our results demonstrate digital holographic microscopy and flow cytometry as valuable label-free tools for nanomaterial toxicity and cell interaction studies.

  18. Matrix metalloproteinase-1 expression by interaction between monocytes and vascular endothelial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hojo, Y; Ikeda, U; Takahashi, M; Sakata, Y; Takizawa, T; Okada, K; Saito, T; Shimada, K

    2000-08-01

    There is accumulating evidence of complicated interactions among vascular cells, i.e. endothelial cells, smooth muscle cells and monocytes/macrophages, in the regulation of vascular function and remodeling. We have investigated the mechanisms responsible for matrix metalloproteinase (MMP)-1 expression by interactions between monocytes and vascular endothelial cells. THP-1 cells (human monocytic cell line) and human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs) were cocultured. MMP-1 levels in the culture medium were measured by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays. Collagenolytic activity in the culture medium was measured by fluorescence labeled-collagen digestion. Immunohistochemistry using an anti-MMP antibody was carried out to determine which types of cell produce MMP-1. The addition of THP-1 cells to HUVECs for 48 h induced increases in MMP-1 levels and collagenolytic activity, which were 5- and 2-fold relative to those of HUVECs alone, respectively. A separate coculture experiment revealed that direct contact of THP-1 cells and HUVECs contributed to enhanced MMP-1 production in the cocolture. Immunohistochemical analysis revealed that both types of cell produce MMP-1 in the coculture. Neutralizing anti-interleukin-1 beta and tumor necrosis factor- alpha antibodies inhibited MMP-1 production by the coculture. The Src kinase and MEK inhibitors significantly inhibited MMP-1 production by the coculture. Coculture of THP-1 cells and HUVECs induced significant increases in Src and mitogen activated protein (MAP) kinase activities. Enhanced MMP-1 expression induced by monocyte-endothelial cell interactions may play an important role in the pathogenesis of atherosclerosis and plaque rupture.

  19. A combined binary interaction and phenotypic map of C. elegans cell polarity proteins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koorman, Thijs; Lemmens, Irma; Ramalho, João J.; Nieuwenhuize, Susan; van den Heuvel, Sander; Tavernier, Jan; Nance, Jeremy; Boxem, Mike

    2015-01-01

    The establishment of cell polarity is an essential process for the development of multicellular organisms and the functioning of cells and tissues. Here, we combine large-scale protein interaction mapping with systematic phenotypic profiling to study the network of physical interactions that underlies polarity establishment and maintenance in the nematode Caenorhabditis elegans. Using a fragment-based yeast two-hybrid strategy, we identified 439 interactions between 296 proteins, as well as the protein regions that mediate these interactions. Phenotypic profiling of the network resulted in the identification of 100 physically interacting protein pairs for which RNAi-mediated depletion caused a defect in the same polarity-related process. We demonstrate the predictive capabilities of the network by showing that the physical interaction between the RhoGAP PAC-1 and PAR-6 is required for radial polarization of the C. elegans embryo. Our network represents a valuable resource of candidate interactions that can be used to further our insight into cell polarization. PMID:26780296

  20. Divisome and segrosome components of Deinococcus radiodurans interact through cell division regulatory proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maurya, Ganesh K; Modi, Kruti; Misra, Hari S

    2016-08-01

    The Deinococcus radiodurans genome encodes many of the known components of divisome as well as four sets of genome partitioning proteins, ParA and ParB on its multipartite genome. Interdependent regulation of cell division and genome segregation is not understood. In vivo interactions of D. radiodurans' sdivisome, segrosome and other cell division regulatory proteins expressed on multicopy plasmids were studied in Escherichia coli using a bacterial two-hybrid system and confirmed by co-immunoprecipitation with the proteins made in E. coli. Many of these showed interactions both with the self and with other proteins. For example, DrFtsA, DrFtsZ, DrMinD, DrMinC, DrDivIVA and all four ParB proteins individually formed at least homodimers, while DrFtsA interacted with DrFtsZ, DrFtsW, DrFtsE, DrFtsK and DrMinD. DrMinD also showed interaction with DrFtsW, DrFtsE and DrMinC. Interestingly, septum site determining protein, DrDivIVA showed interactions with secondary genome ParAs as well as ParB1, ParB3 and ParB4 while DrMinC interacted with ParB1 and ParB3. PprA, a pleiotropic protein recently implicated in cell division regulation, neither interacted with divisome proteins nor ParBs but interacted at different levels with all four ParAs. These results suggest the formation of independent multiprotein complexes of 'DrFts' proteins, segrosome proteins and cell division regulatory proteins, and these complexes could interact with each other through DrMinC and DrDivIVA, and PprA in D. radiodurans.

  1. The role of particle-to-cell interactions in dictating nanoparticle aided magnetophoretic separation of microalgal cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toh, Pey Yi; Ng, Bee Wah; Ahmad, Abdul Latif; Chieh, Derek Chan Juinn; Lim, Jitkang

    2014-10-01

    Successful application of a magnetophoretic separation technique for harvesting biological cells often relies on the need to tag the cells with magnetic nanoparticles. This study investigates the underlying principle behind the attachment of iron oxide nanoparticles (IONPs) onto microalgal cells, Chlorella sp. and Nannochloropsis sp., in both freshwater and seawater, by taking into account the contributions of various colloidal forces involved. The complex interplay between van der Waals (vdW), electrostatic (ES) and Lewis acid-base interactions (AB) in dictating IONP attachment was studied under the framework of extended Derjaguin-Landau-Verwey-Overbeek (XDLVO) analysis. Our results showed that ES interaction plays an important role in determining the net interaction between the Chlorella sp. cells and IONPs in freshwater, while the AB and vdW interactions play a more dominant role in dictating the net particle-to-cell interaction in high ionic strength media (>=100 mM NaCl), such as seawater. XDLVO predicted effective attachment between cells and surface functionalized IONPs (SF-IONPs) with an estimated secondary minimum of -3.12 kT in freshwater. This prediction is in accordance with the experimental observation in which 98.89% of cells can be magnetophoretically separated from freshwater with SF-IONPs. We have observed successful magnetophoretic separation of microalgal cells from freshwater and/or seawater for all the cases as long as XDLVO analysis predicts particle attachment. For both the conditions, no pH adjustment is required for particle-to-cell attachment.Successful application of a magnetophoretic separation technique for harvesting biological cells often relies on the need to tag the cells with magnetic nanoparticles. This study investigates the underlying principle behind the attachment of iron oxide nanoparticles (IONPs) onto microalgal cells, Chlorella sp. and Nannochloropsis sp., in both freshwater and seawater, by taking into account the

  2. Pigment cell interactions and differential xanthophore recruitment underlying zebrafish stripe reiteration and Danio pattern evolution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patterson, Larissa B; Bain, Emily J; Parichy, David M

    2014-11-06

    Fishes have diverse pigment patterns, yet mechanisms of pattern evolution remain poorly understood. In zebrafish, Danio rerio, pigment-cell autonomous interactions generate dark stripes of melanophores that alternate with light interstripes of xanthophores and iridophores. Here, we identify mechanisms underlying the evolution of a uniform pattern in D. albolineatus in which all three pigment cell classes are intermingled. We show that in this species xanthophores differentiate precociously over a wider area, and that cis regulatory evolution has increased expression of xanthogenic Colony Stimulating Factor-1 (Csf1). Expressing Csf1 similarly in D. rerio has cascading effects, driving the intermingling of all three pigment cell classes and resulting in the loss of stripes, as in D. albolineatus. Our results identify novel mechanisms of pattern development and illustrate how pattern diversity can be generated when a core network of pigment-cell autonomous interactions is coupled with changes in pigment cell differentiation.

  3. [The interaction between nerve cells and carbon nanotube networks made by CVD process investigation].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bobrinetskiĭ, I I; Seleznev, A S; Gaĭduchenko, I A; Fedorov, G E; Domantovskiĭ, A G; Presniakov, M Iu; Podcherniaeva, R Ia; Mikhaĭlova, G R; Suetina, I A

    2013-01-01

    In this research we investigate neuroblastoma cells cultivated on single-walled carbon nanotubes networks made by CVD method on silicon substrates. The complex analysis of grown cells made by atomic force, electron microscopy and Raman spectroscopy was carried out and the effect of nanotube growth process on proliferation factor was investigated. It is shown that despite of a weak decrease in proliferation, cell morphology remains unchanged and no physical or chemical interaction between carbon nanotubes and cells is observed. The results of the research can be used to investigate the interaction between conductive nanomaterials and cells for the development of neural replacement implants. Also they can be useful in bio-electronic interface investigation of signal propagation in neurons.

  4. The immune-body cytokine network defines a social architecture of cell interactions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alon Uri

    2006-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Three networks of intercellular communication can be associated with cytokine secretion; one limited to cells of the immune system (immune cells, one limited to parenchymal cells of organs and tissues (body cells, and one involving interactions between immune and body cells (immune-body interface. These cytokine connections determine the inflammatory response to injury and subsequent healing as well as the biologic consequences of the adaptive immune response to antigens. We informatically probed the cytokine database to uncover the underlying network architecture of the three networks. Results We now report that the three cytokine networks are among the densest of complex networks yet studied, and each features a characteristic profile of specific three-cell motifs. Some legitimate cytokine connections are shunned (anti-motifs. Certain immune cells can be paired by their input-output positions in a cytokine architecture tree of five tiers: macrophages (MΦ and B cells (BC comprise the first tier; the second tier is formed by T helper 1 (Th1 and T helper 2 (Th2 cells; the third tier includes dendritic cells (DC, mast cells (MAST, Natural Killer T cells (NK-T and others; the fourth tier is formed by neutrophils (NEUT and Natural Killer cells (NK; and the Cytotoxic T cell (CTL stand alone as a fifth tier. The three-cell cytokine motif architecture of immune system cells places the immune system in a super-family that includes social networks and the World Wide Web. Body cells are less clearly stratified, although cells involved in wound healing and angiogenesis are most highly interconnected with immune cells. Conclusion Cytokine network architecture creates an innate cell-communication platform that organizes the biologic outcome of antigen recognition and inflammation. Informatics sheds new light on immune-body systems organization. Reviewers This article was reviewed by Neil Greenspan, Matthias von Herrath and Anne Cooke.

  5. Interaction of urokinase with specific receptors stimulates mobilization of bovine adrenal capillary endothelial cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fibbi, G.; Ziche, M.; Morbidelli, L. (Mario Aiazzi Mancini - Viale Morgagni, Firenze (Italy)); Magnelli, L.; Del Rosso, M. (Institute of General Pathology, Viale Morgagni, Firenze (Italy))

    1988-12-01

    On the basis of {sup 125}I-labeled plasminogen activator binding analysis the authors have found that bovine adrenal capillary endothelial cells have specific receptors for human urinary-type plasminogen activator on the cell membrane. Each cell exposes about 37,000 free receptors with a K{sub d} of 0.8958{times}10{sup {minus}12} M. A monoclonal antibody against the 17,500 proteolytic fragment of the A chain of the plasminogen activator, not containing the catalytic site of the enzyme, impaired the specific binding, thus suggesting the involvement of a sequence present on the A chain in the interaction with the receptor, as previously shown in other cell model systems. Both the native molecule and the A chain are able to stimulate endothelial cell motility in the Boyden chamber, when used at nanomolar concentrations. The use of the same monoclonal antibody that can inhibit ligand-receptor interaction can impair the plasminogen activator and A-chain-induced endothelial cell motility, suggesting that under the conditions used in this in vitro model system, the motility of bovine adrenal capillary endothelial cells depends on the specific interaction of the ligand with free receptors on the surface of endothelial cells.

  6. Cells Sensing Mechanical Cues: Stiffness Influences the Lifetime of Cell-Extracellular Matrix Interactions by Affecting the Loading Rate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Li; Sun, Zhenglong; Chen, Xiaofei; Li, Jing; Xu, Yue; Zu, Yan; Hu, Jiliang; Han, Dong; Yang, Chun

    2016-01-26

    The question of how cells sense substrate mechanical cues has gained increasing attention among biologists. By introducing contour-based data analysis to single-cell force spectroscopy, we identified a loading-rate threshold for the integrin α2β1-DGEA bond beyond which a dramatic increase in bond lifetime was observed. On the basis of mechanical cues (elasticity or topography), the effective spring constant of substrates k is mapped to the loading rate r under actomyosin pulling speed v, which, in turn, affects the lifetime of the integrin-ligand bond. Additionally, downregulating v with a low-dose blebbistatin treatment promotes the neuronal lineage specification of mesenchymal stem cells on osteogenic stiff substrates. Thus, sensing of the loading rate is central to how cells sense mechanical cues that affect cell-extracellular matrix interactions and stem cell differentiation.

  7. R-Ras regulates migration through an interaction with filamin A in melanoma cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joanna E Gawecka

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Changes in cell adhesion and migration in the tumor microenvironment are key in the initiation and progression of metastasis. R-Ras is one of several small GTPases that regulate cell adhesion and migration on the extracellular matrix, however the mechanism has not been completely elucidated. Using a yeast two-hybrid approach we sought to identify novel R-Ras binding proteins that might mediate its effects on integrins. METHODS AND FINDINGS: We identified Filamin A (FLNa as a candidate interacting protein. FLNa is an actin-binding scaffold protein that also binds to integrin beta1, beta2 and beta7 tails and is associated with diverse cell processes including cell migration. Indeed, M2 melanoma cells require FLNa for motility. We further show that R-Ras and FLNa interact in co-immunoprecipitations and pull-down assays. Deletion of FLNa repeat 3 (FLNaDelta3 abrogated this interaction. In M2 melanoma cells active R-Ras co-localized with FLNa but did not co-localize with FLNa lacking repeat 3. Thus, activated R-Ras binds repeat 3 of FLNa. The functional consequence of this interaction was that active R-Ras and FLNa coordinately increased cell migration. In contrast, co-expression of R-Ras and FLNaDelta3 had a significantly reduced effect on migration. While there was enhancement of integrin activation and fibronectin matrix assembly, cell adhesion was not altered. Finally, siRNA knockdown of endogenous R-Ras impaired FLNa-dependent fibronectin matrix assembly. CONCLUSIONS: These data support a model in which R-Ras functionally associates with FLNa and thereby regulates integrin-dependent migration. Thus in melanoma cells R-Ras and FLNa may cooperatively promote metastasis by enhancing cell migration.

  8. Mutual interaction of Basophils and T cells in chronic inflammatory diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marika eSarfati

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Basophils are, together with mast cells, typical innate effector cells of allergen-induced IgE-dependent allergic diseases. Both cell types express the high affinity receptor for IgE (FcεR1, release histamine, inflammatory mediators and cytokines following FcεR1 cross-linking. Basophils are rare granulocytes in blood, lymphoid and non-lymphoid tissues and the difficulties to detect and isolate these cells has hampered the study of their biology and the understanding of their possible role in pathology. Furthermore, the existence of other FcεR1-expressing cells, including professional Ag-presenting dendritic cells, generated some controversy regarding the ability of basophils to express MHC Class II molecules, present Ag and drive naïve T cell differentiation into Th2 cells. The focus of this review is to present the recent advances on the interactions between basophils and peripheral blood and tissue memory Th1, Th2 and Th17 cells, as well as their potential role in IgE-independent non allergic chronic inflammatory disorders, including human inflammatory bowel diseases. Basophils interactions with the innate players of IgE-dependent allergic inflammation, particularly innate lymphoid cells, will also be considered. The previously unrecognized function for basophils in skewing adaptive immune responses opens novel perspectives for the understanding of their contribution to the pathogenesis of inflammatory diseases.

  9. PIAS1-FAK Interaction Promotes the Survival and Progression of Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jerfiz D. Constanzo

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available The sequence of genomic alterations acquired by cancer cells during tumor progression and metastasis is poorly understood. Focal adhesion kinase (FAK is a non-receptor tyrosine kinase that integrates cytoskeleton remodeling, mitogenic signaling and cell survival. FAK has previously been reported to undergo nuclear localization during cell migration, cell differentiation and apoptosis. However, the mechanism behind FAK nuclear accumulation and its contribution to tumor progression has remained elusive. We report that amplification of FAK and the SUMO E3 ligase PIAS1 gene loci frequently co-occur in non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC cells, and that both gene products are enriched in a subset of primary NSCLCs. We demonstrate that endogenous FAK and PIAS1 proteins interact in the cytoplasm and the cell nucleus of NSCLC cells. Ectopic expression of PIAS1 promotes proteolytic cleavage of the FAK C-terminus, focal adhesion maturation and FAK nuclear localization. Silencing of PIAS1 deregulates focal adhesion turnover, increases susceptibility to apoptosis in vitro and impairs tumor xenograft formation in vivo. Nuclear FAK in turn stimulates gene transcription favoring DNA repair, cell metabolism and cytoskeleton regulation. Consistently, ablation of FAK by CRISPR/Cas9 editing, results in basal DNA damage, susceptibility to ionizing radiation and impaired oxidative phosphorylation. Our findings provide insight into a mechanism regulating FAK cytoplasm-nuclear distribution and demonstrate that FAK activity in the nucleus promotes NSCLC survival and progression by increasing cell-ECM interaction and DNA repair regulation.

  10. Human Epithelial Cells Discriminate between Commensal and Pathogenic Interactions with Candida albicans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rast, Timothy J; Kullas, Amy L; Southern, Peter J; Davis, Dana A

    2016-01-01

    The commensal fungus, Candida albicans, can cause life-threatening infections in at risk individuals. C. albicans colonizes mucosal surfaces of most people, adhering to and interacting with epithelial cells. At low concentrations, C. albicans is not pathogenic nor does it cause epithelial cell damage in vitro; at high concentrations, C. albicans causes mucosal infections and kills epithelial cells in vitro. Here we show that while there are quantitative dose-dependent differences in exposed epithelial cell populations, these reflect a fundamental qualitative difference in host cell response to C. albicans. Using transcriptional profiling experiments and real time PCR, we found that wild-type C. albicans induce dose-dependent responses from a FaDu epithelial cell line. However, real time PCR and Western blot analysis using a high dose of various C. albicans strains demonstrated that these dose-dependent responses are associated with ability to promote host cell damage. Our studies support the idea that epithelial cells play a key role in the immune system by monitoring the microbial community at mucosal surfaces and initiating defensive responses when this community is dysfunctional. This places epithelial cells at a pivotal position in the interaction with C. albicans as epithelial cells themselves promote C. albicans stimulated damage.

  11. Porphyromonas gingivalis as a Model Organism for Assessing Interaction of Anaerobic Bacteria with Host Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wunsch, Christopher M; Lewis, Janina P

    2015-12-17

    Anaerobic bacteria far outnumber aerobes in many human niches such as the gut, mouth, and vagina. Furthermore, anaerobic infections are common and frequently of indigenous origin. The ability of some anaerobic pathogens to invade human cells gives them adaptive measures to escape innate immunity as well as to modulate host cell behavior. However, ensuring that the anaerobic bacteria are live during experimental investigation of the events may pose challenges. Porphyromonas gingivalis, a Gram-negative anaerobe, is capable of invading a variety of eukaryotic non-phagocytic cells. This article outlines how to successfully culture and assess the ability of P. gingivalis to invade human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs). Two protocols were developed: one to measure bacteria that can successfully invade and survive within the host, and the other to visualize bacteria interacting with host cells. These techniques necessitate the use of an anaerobic chamber to supply P. gingivalis with an anaerobic environment for optimal growth. The first protocol is based on the antibiotic protection assay, which is largely used to study the invasion of host cells by bacteria. However, the antibiotic protection assay is limited; only intracellular bacteria that are culturable following antibiotic treatment and host cell lysis are measured. To assess all bacteria interacting with host cells, both live and dead, we developed a protocol that uses fluorescent microscopy to examine host-pathogen interaction. Bacteria are fluorescently labeled with 2',7'-Bis-(2-carboxyethyl)-5-(and-6)-carboxyfluorescein acetoxymethyl ester (BCECF-AM) and used to infect eukaryotic cells under anaerobic conditions. Following fixing with paraformaldehyde and permeabilization with 0.2% Triton X-100, host cells are labeled with TRITC phalloidin and DAPI to label the cell cytoskeleton and nucleus, respectively. Multiple images taken at different focal points (Z-stack) are obtained for temporal

  12. INTERACT

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jochum, Elizabeth; Borggreen, Gunhild; Murphey, TD

    This paper considers the impact of visual art and performance on robotics and human-computer interaction and outlines a research project that combines puppetry and live performance with robotics. Kinesics—communication through movement—is the foundation of many theatre and performance traditions...... interaction between a human operator and an artificial actor or agent. We can apply insights from puppetry to develop culturally-aware robots. Here we describe the development of a robotic marionette theatre wherein robotic controllers assume the role of human puppeteers. The system has been built, tested...

  13. Involvement of hepatitis B X-interacting protein (HBXIP) in proliferation regulation of cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Feng-ze WANG; Li SHA; Wei-ying ZHANG; Lian-ying WU; Ling QIAO; Nan LI; Xiao-dong ZHANG; Li-hong YE

    2007-01-01

    Aim: To investigat the effect of Hepatitis B X-interacting protein (HBXIP) on cell proliferation. Methods: A rabbit antibody against HBXIP was generated. The RNA interference (RNAi) fragment of the HBXIP gene was constructed in the pSilencer-3.0-H1 vector termed pSilencer-hbxip. Plasmids of the pcDNA3-hbxip encoding HBXIP gene and pSilencer-hbxip were transfected into human breast carcinoma MCF-7 cells, hepatoma H7402 cells, and the normal human hepatic cell line L-O2, respectively. 3-[4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl]-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bro- mide (MTT) assay and 5-bromo-2-deoxyuridine incorporation assay were applied to detect cell proliferation. MCF-7 cells and L-O2 cells in the cell cycle were examined by flow cytometry. The proteins involved in cell proliferation and cell cycle were investigated by Western blot. Results: Overexpression of HBXIP resulted in the promotion of proliferation of MCF-7, H7402, and L-O2 cells. Flow cytometry showed that the overexpression of HBXIP promoted the cell prolifera-tion of MCF-7 and L-O2 cells, and led to an increased cell proliferative index in MCF-7 cells (from 46.25% to 58.28%) and L-O2 cells (from 29.62% to 35.54%). Western blot showed that expression levels of c-Myc, Bcl-2, and proliferating cell nuclear antigen were upregulated in MCF-7, H7402, or L-O2 cells, whereas that of p27 was downregulated. However, the RNAi of HBXIP brought opposite results.Conclusion: One of the functions of HBXIP is its involvement in cell proliferation.

  14. Proinflammatory interleukins' production by adipose tissue-derived mesenchymal stromal cells: the impact of cell culture conditions and cell-to-cell interaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andreeva, Elena; Andrianova, Irina; Rylova, Julia; Gornostaeva, Aleksandra; Bobyleva, Polina; Buravkova, Ludmila

    2015-08-01

    The impact of culture conditions and interaction with activated peripheral blood mononuclear cells on the interleukin (IL) gene expression profile and proinflammatory IL-6 and IL-8 production by adipose-derived stromal cells (ASCs) was investigated. A microarray analysis revealed a wide range of IL genes either under standard (20%) or hypoxic (5%) O2 concentrations, some highly up-regulated at hypoxia. IL-6 and IL-8 production was inversely dependent on cell culture density. In early (first-third) passages, IL-6 and IL-8 concentration was higher at 20% O2 and in late (8th-12th) passages under 5% O2. Interaction between ASCs and mononuclear cells in indirect setting was accompanied with a significant decrease of IL-6 and did not result in the elevation of IL-8 concentration. Thereby, the production of proinflammatory interleukins (IL-6 and IL-8) may be affected by the ASC intrinsic features (density in culture, and duration of expansion), as well as by microenvironmental factors, such as hypoxia and the presence of blood-borne cells. These data are important for elucidating ASC paracrine activity regulation in vitro. They would also be on demand for optimisation of the cell therapy protocols, based on the application of ASC biologically active substances. SIGNIFICANCE PARAGRAPH: Ex vivo expansion is widely used for increasing the number of adipose-derived stromal cells (ASCs) and improving of their quality. The present study was designed to elucidate the particular factors influencing the interleukin production in ASCs. The presented data specified the parameters (i.e. cell density, duration of cultivation, hypoxia, etc.) that should be taken in mind when ASCs are intended to be used in protocols implying their paracrine activity. These data would be of considerable interest for researchers and clinicians working in the biomedical science.

  15. Interaction of colloidal nanoparticles with cells (Conference Presentation)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parak, Wolfgang J.

    2017-02-01

    What happens to inorganic nanoparticles (NPs), such as plasmonic gold or silver, superparamagnetic iron oxide, or fluorescent quantum dot NPs, after they have been administrated to an animal or a human being? The review discusses the integrity, biodistribution, and fate of NPs after in vivo administration. First the hybrid nature of the NPs is described, by conceptually dividing them into the inorganic NP core, an engineered surface coating around the core which comprises the ligand shell and optionally also bioconjugation, and into the corona of adsorbed biological molecules. It is shown that in vivo all of these three compounds may degrade individually and that each of them can drastically modify the life-cycle and biodistribution of the whole hetero-structure. The NPs thus may be disintegrated into different parts, of which biodistribution and fate would need to be analyzed individually. Multiple labelling and quantification strategies for such purpose will be discussed. All reviewed data indicate that in vivo NPs no longer should be considered as homogeneous entity, but should be seen as inorganic/organic/biological nano-hybrids with complex and intricately linked degradation pathways. References: M. Chanana, P. Rivera Gil, M. A. Correa-Duarte, L. M. Liz-Marzán. W. J. Parak, "Physicochemical Properties of Protein-Coated Gold Nanoparticles in Biological Fluids and Cells before and after Proteolytic Digestion", Angewandte Chemie International Edition 52, 4179-4183 (2013). W. G. Kreyling, A. M. Abdelmonem, Z. Ali, F. Alves, M. Geiser, N. Haberl, R. Hartmann, S. Hirn, K. Kantner, D. Jimenez de Aberasturi, G. Khadem-Saba, J.-M. Montenegro, J. Rejman, T. Rojo, I. Ruiz de Larramendi, R. Ufartes, A. Wenk, W. J. Parak, "In vivo integrity of polymer-coated gold nanoparticles", Nature Nanotechnology 10, 619-623 (2015).J. Clerk Maxwell, A Treatise on Electricity and Magnetism, 3rd ed., vol. 2. Oxford: Clarendon, 1892, pp.68-73.

  16. Neural cell adhesion molecule differentially interacts with isoforms of the fibroblast growth factor receptor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christensen, Claus; Berezin, Vladimir; Bock, Elisabeth

    2011-10-26

    The fibroblast growth factor receptor (FGFR) can be activated through direct interactions with various fibroblast growth factors or through a number of cell adhesion molecules, including the neural cell adhesion molecule (NCAM). We produced recombinant proteins comprising the ligand-binding immunoglobulin-like modules 2 and 3 of FGFR1b, FGFR1c, FGFR2b, FGFR2c, FGFR3b, FGFR3c, and FGFR4, and found that all FGFR isoforms, except for FGFR4, interacted with NCAM. The binding affinity of NCAM-FGFR interactions was considerably higher for splice variant 'b' than for splice variant 'c'. We suggest that the expression pattern of various FGFR isoforms determines the cell context-specific effects of NCAM signaling through FGFR.

  17. Choreography of cell motility and interaction dynamics imaged by two-photon microscopy in lymphoid organs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cahalan, Michael D; Parker, Ian

    2008-01-01

    The immune system is the most diffuse cellular system in the body. Accordingly, long-range migration of cells and short-range communication by local chemical signaling and by cell-cell contacts are vital to the control of an immune response. Cellular homing and migration within lymphoid organs, antigen recognition, and cell signaling and activation are clearly vital during an immune response, but these events had not been directly observed in vivo until recently. Introduced to the field of immunology in 2002, two-photon microscopy is the method of choice for visualizing living cells deep within native tissue environments, and it is now revealing an elegant cellular choreography that underlies the adaptive immune response to antigen challenge. We review cellular dynamics and molecular factors that contribute to basal motility of lymphocytes in the lymph node and cellular interactions leading to antigen capture and recognition, T cell activation, B cell activation, cytolytic effector function, and antibody production.

  18. Silicate bioceramics enhanced vascularization and osteogenesis through stimulating interactions between endothelia cells and bone marrow stromal cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Haiyan; Xue, Ke; Kong, Ni; Liu, Kai; Chang, Jiang

    2014-04-01

    The facts that biomaterials affect the behavior of single type of cells have been widely accepted. However, the effects of biomaterials on cell-cell interactions have rarely been reported. Bone tissue engineering involves osteoblastic cells (OCs), endothelial cells (ECs) and the interactions between OCs and ECs. It has been reported that silicate biomaterials can stimulate osteogenic differentiation of OCs and vascularization of ECs. However, the effects of silicate biomaterials on the interactions between ECs and OCs during vascularization and osteogenesis have not been reported, which are critical for bone tissue regeneration in vivo. Therefore, this study aimed to investigate the effects of calcium silicate (CS) bioceramics on interactions between human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs) and human bone marrow stromal cells (HBMSCs) and on stimulation of vascularization and osteogenesis in vivo through combining co-cultures with CS containing scaffolds. Specifically, the effects of CS on the angiogenic growth factor VEGF, osteogenic growth factor BMP-2 and the cross-talks between VEGF and BMP-2 in the co-culture system were elucidated. Results showed that CS stimulated co-cultured HBMSCs (co-HBMSCs) to express VEGF and the VEGF activated its receptor KDR on co-cultured HUVECs (co-HUVECs), which was also up-regulated by CS. Then, BMP-2 and nitric oxide expression from the co-HUVECs were stimulated by CS and the former stimulated osteogenic differentiation of co-HBMSCs while the latter stimulated vascularization of co-HVUECs. Finally, the poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid)/CS composite scaffolds with the co-cultured HBMSCs and HUVECs significantly enhanced vascularization and osteogenic differentiation in vitro and in vivo, which indicates that it is a promising way to enhance bone regeneration by combining scaffolds containing silicate bioceramics and co-cultures of ECs and OCs.

  19. Renal cell carcinoma risk is associated with the interactions of APOE, VHL and MTHFR gene polymorphisms

    OpenAIRE

    Lv, Cai; Bai, Zhiming; Liu, Zhenxiang; Luo, Pengcheng; Zhang, Jie

    2015-01-01

    Objective: The study was designed to explore the association of renal cell carcinoma (RCC) with VHL (rs779805), MTHFR (rs1801133) and APOE (rs8106822 and rs405509) polymorphisms, investigate the interactions among the single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs), and explore roles of the interactions in the pathogenesis of RCC in Chinese Han population. Methods: 81 RCC patients and 80 healthy controls were included in the study. Polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and direct sequencing methods were use...

  20. Mechanical Interactions between Gas Diffusion Layers and Bipolar Plates in low Temperature Fuel Cells

    OpenAIRE

    Knöri, Torsten; Schulze, Mathias; Gülzow, Erich

    2007-01-01

    In contrast to stiff backing materials (e.g. carbon paper) softer ones like carbon cloth are compressed over the ribs of the gas distributors or impressed into the channels when the PEFC is assembled. During fuel cell optimisation the interactions between the gas diffusion layer and the flow field are frequently neglected; hence flow fields as well as gas diffusion layers are commonly optimized independently. The DLR has investigated these interactions with a two-stage approach: At firs...

  1. Anodized titania: Processing and characterization to improve cell-materials interactions for load bearing implants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Das, Kakoli

    The objective of this study is to investigate in vitro cell-materials interactions using human osteoblast cells on anodized titanium. Titanium is a bioinert material and, therefore, gets encapsulated after implantation into the living body by a fibrous tissue that isolates them from the surrounding tissues. In this work, bioactive nonporous and nanoporous TiO2 layers were grown on commercially pure titanium substrate by anodization process using different electrolyte solutions namely (1) H3PO 4, (2) HF and (3) H2SO4, (4) aqueous solution of citric acid, sodium fluoride and sulfuric acid. The first three electrolytes produced bioactive TiO2 films with a nonporous structure showing three distinctive surface morphologies. Nanoporous morphology was obtained on Ti-surfaces from the fourth electrolyte at 20V for 4h. Cross-sectional view of the nanoporous surface reveals titania nanotubes of length 600 nm. It was found that increasing anodization time initially increased the height of the nanotubes while maintaining the tubular array structure, but beyond 4h, growth of nanotubes decreased with a collapsed array structure. Human osteoblast (HOB) cell attachment and growth behavior were studied using an osteoprecursor cell line (OPC 1) for 3, 7 and 11 days. Colonization of the cells was noticed with distinctive cell-to-cell attachment on HF anodized surfaces. TiO2 layer grown in H2SO4 electrolyte did not show significant cell growth on the surface, and some cell death was also noticed. Good cellular adherence with extracellular matrix extensions in between the cells was noticed for samples anodized with H3PO 4 electrolyte and nanotube surface. Cell proliferation was excellent on anodized nanotube surfaces. An abundant amount of extracellular matrix (ECM) between the neighboring cells was also noticed on nanotube surfaces with filopodia extensions coming out from cells to grasp the nanoporous surface for anchorage. To better understand and compare cell-materials interactions

  2. Hydrodynamics of interaction of particles (including cells) with surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duszyk, Marek; Doroszewski, Jan

    particle velocity perpendicular to the streamline direction. This phenomenon is the cause of the lateral migration of particles. Neutrally buoyant rigid particles migrate to a certain concentrical region situated between the tube axis and the wall (tubular pinch region). Deformable neutrally buoyant particles migrate towards the tube axis, and deformable non-neutrally buoyant particles may move either toward the tube axis or toward the wall. In the research on the influence of the flow delimiting surface on the motion of particles in suspension a considerable progress has recently been made. However, the phenomena in this field are extremely complex. At present, two main types of approach may be distinguished. On a microscopic level direct interactions between particles and surfaces are analyzed. A macroscopic approach consists in treating particle suspension as fluid, and overall influence of the surface on its properties are studied. A comprehensive theory linking these two levels has not yet emerged.

  3. Lipid raft association restricts CD44-ezrin interaction and promotion of breast cancer cell migration.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Donatello, Simona

    2012-12-01

    Cancer cell migration is an early event in metastasis, the main cause of breast cancer-related deaths. Cholesterol-enriched membrane domains called lipid rafts influence the function of many molecules, including the raft-associated protein CD44. We describe a novel mechanism whereby rafts regulate interactions between CD44 and its binding partner ezrin in migrating breast cancer cells. Specifically, in nonmigrating cells, CD44 and ezrin localized to different membranous compartments: CD44 predominantly in rafts, and ezrin in nonraft compartments. After the induction of migration (either nonspecific or CD44-driven), CD44 affiliation with lipid rafts was decreased. This was accompanied by increased coprecipitation of CD44 and active (threonine-phosphorylated) ezrin-radixin-moesin (ERM) proteins in nonraft compartments and increased colocalization of CD44 with the nonraft protein, transferrin receptor. Pharmacological raft disruption using methyl-β-cyclodextrin also increased CD44-ezrin coprecipitation and colocalization, further suggesting that CD44 interacts with ezrin outside rafts during migration. Conversely, promoting CD44 retention inside lipid rafts by pharmacological inhibition of depalmitoylation virtually abolished CD44-ezrin interactions. However, transient single or double knockdown of flotillin-1 or caveolin-1 was not sufficient to increase cell migration over a short time course, suggesting complex crosstalk mechanisms. We propose a new model for CD44-dependent breast cancer cell migration, where CD44 must relocalize outside lipid rafts to drive cell migration. This could have implications for rafts as pharmacological targets to down-regulate cancer cell migration.

  4. The interaction of bacterial magnetosomes and human liver cancer cells in vitro

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Pingping; Chen, Chuanfang; Chen, Changyou; Li, Yue; Pan, Weidong; Song, Tao

    2017-04-01

    As the biogenic magnetic nanomaterial, bacterial magnetic nanoparticles, namely magnetosomes, provide many advantages for potential biomedical applications. As such, interactions among magnetosomes and target cells should be elucidated to develop their bioapplications and evaluate their biocompatibilities. In this study, the interaction of magnetosomes and human liver cancer HepG2 cells was examined. Prussian blue staining revealed numerous stained particles in or on the cells. Intracellular iron concentrations, measured through inductively coupled plasma optical emission spectroscopy, increased with the increasing concentration of the magnetosomes. Transmission electron microscopy images showed that magnetosomes could be internalized in cells, mainly encapsulated in membrane vesicles, such as endosomes and lysosomes, and partly found as free particles in the cytosol. Some of the magnetosomes on cellular surfaces were encapsulated through cell membrane ruffling, which is the initiating process of endocytosis. Applying low temperature treatment and using specific endocytic inhibitors, we validated that macropinocytosis and clathrin-mediated endocytosis were involved in magnetosome uptake by HepG2 cells. Consequently, we revealed the interaction and intrinsic endocytic mechanisms of magnetosomes and HepG2 cells. This study provides a basis for the further research on bacterial magnetosome applications in liver diseases.

  5. Three-dimensional traction force microscopy: a new tool for quantifying cell-matrix interactions.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christian Franck

    Full Text Available The interactions between biochemical processes and mechanical signaling play important roles during various cellular processes such as wound healing, embryogenesis, metastasis, and cell migration. While traditional traction force measurements have provided quantitative information about cell matrix interactions in two dimensions, recent studies have shown significant differences in the behavior and morphology of cells when placed in three-dimensional environments. Hence new quantitative experimental techniques are needed to accurately determine cell traction forces in three dimensions. Recently, two approaches both based on laser scanning confocal microscopy have emerged to address this need. This study highlights the details, implementation and advantages of such a three-dimensional imaging methodology with the capability to compute cellular traction forces dynamically during cell migration and locomotion. An application of this newly developed three-dimensional traction force microscopy (3D TFM technique to single cell migration studies of 3T3 fibroblasts is presented to show that this methodology offers a new quantitative vantage point to investigate the three-dimensional nature of cell-ECM interactions.

  6. Three-dimensional traction force microscopy: a new tool for quantifying cell-matrix interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Franck, Christian; Maskarinec, Stacey A; Tirrell, David A; Ravichandran, Guruswami

    2011-03-29

    The interactions between biochemical processes and mechanical signaling play important roles during various cellular processes such as wound healing, embryogenesis, metastasis, and cell migration. While traditional traction force measurements have provided quantitative information about cell matrix interactions in two dimensions, recent studies have shown significant differences in the behavior and morphology of cells when placed in three-dimensional environments. Hence new quantitative experimental techniques are needed to accurately determine cell traction forces in three dimensions. Recently, two approaches both based on laser scanning confocal microscopy have emerged to address this need. This study highlights the details, implementation and advantages of such a three-dimensional imaging methodology with the capability to compute cellular traction forces dynamically during cell migration and locomotion. An application of this newly developed three-dimensional traction force microscopy (3D TFM) technique to single cell migration studies of 3T3 fibroblasts is presented to show that this methodology offers a new quantitative vantage point to investigate the three-dimensional nature of cell-ECM interactions.

  7. Imaging the microanatomy of astrocyte-T-cell interactions in immune-mediated inflammation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carlos eBarcia

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available The role of astrocytes in the immune-mediated inflammatory response in the brain is more prominent than previously thought. Astrocytes become reactive in response to neuro-inflammatory stimuli through multiple pathways, contributing significantly to the machinery that modifies the parenchymal environment. In particular, astrocytic signaling induces the establishment of critical relationships with infiltrating blood cells, such as lymphocytes, which is a fundamental process for an effective immune response. The interaction between astrocytes and T-cells involves complex modifications to both cell types, which undergo micro-anatomical changes and the redistribution of their binding and secretory domains. These modifications are critical for different immunological responses, such as for the effectiveness of the T-cell response, for the specific infiltration of these cells and their homing in the brain parenchyma, and for their correct apposition with antigen-presenting cells to form immunological synapses. In this article, we review the current knowledge of the interactions between T-cells and astrocytes in the context of immune-mediated inflammation in the brain, based on the micro-anatomical imaging of these appositions by high-resolution confocal microscopy and three-dimensional rendering. The study of these dynamic interactions using detailed technical approaches contributes to understanding the function of astrocytes in inflammatory responses and paves the way for new therapeutic strategies.

  8. Mapping the distribution of specific antibody interaction forces on individual red blood cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yeow, Natasha; Tabor, Rico F.; Garnier, Gil

    2017-01-01

    Current blood typing methods rely on the agglutination of red blood cells (RBCs) to macroscopically indicate a positive result. An indirect agglutination mechanism is required when blood typing with IgG forms of antibodies. To date, the interaction forces between anti-IgG and IgG antibodies have been poorly quantified, and blood group related antigens have never been quantified with the atomic force microscope (AFM). Instead, the total intensity resulting from fluorescent-tagged antibodies adsorbed on RBC has been measured to calculate an average antigen density on a series of RBCs. In this study we mapped specific antibody interaction forces on the RBC surface. AFM cantilever tips functionalized with anti-IgG were used to probe RBCs incubated with specific IgG antibodies. This work provides unique insight into antibody-antigen interactions in their native cell-bound location, and crucially, on a per-cell basis rather than an ensemble average set of properties. Force profiles obtained from the AFM directly provide not only the anti-IgG – IgG antibody interaction force, but also the spatial distribution and density of antigens over a single cell. This new understanding might be translated into the development of very selective and quantitative interactions that underpin the action of drugs in the treatment of frontier illnesses. PMID:28157207

  9. Mapping the distribution of specific antibody interaction forces on individual red blood cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yeow, Natasha; Tabor, Rico F.; Garnier, Gil

    2017-02-01

    Current blood typing methods rely on the agglutination of red blood cells (RBCs) to macroscopically indicate a positive result. An indirect agglutination mechanism is required when blood typing with IgG forms of antibodies. To date, the interaction forces between anti-IgG and IgG antibodies have been poorly quantified, and blood group related antigens have never been quantified with the atomic force microscope (AFM). Instead, the total intensity resulting from fluorescent-tagged antibodies adsorbed on RBC has been measured to calculate an average antigen density on a series of RBCs. In this study we mapped specific antibody interaction forces on the RBC surface. AFM cantilever tips functionalized with anti-IgG were used to probe RBCs incubated with specific IgG antibodies. This work provides unique insight into antibody-antigen interactions in their native cell-bound location, and crucially, on a per-cell basis rather than an ensemble average set of properties. Force profiles obtained from the AFM directly provide not only the anti-IgG – IgG antibody interaction force, but also the spatial distribution and density of antigens over a single cell. This new understanding might be translated into the development of very selective and quantitative interactions that underpin the action of drugs in the treatment of frontier illnesses.

  10. α1-Antitrypsin modifies general NK cell interactions with dendritic cells and specific interactions with islet β-cells in favor of protection from autoimmune diabetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guttman, Ofer; Yossef, Rami; Freixo-Lima, Gabriella; Rider, Peleg; Porgador, Angel; Lewis, Eli C

    2014-10-13

    The autoimmune destruction of pancreatic β-cells is the hallmark of type 1 diabetes (T1D). Failure of anti-CD3 antibodies to provide long-lasting reversal of T1D and the expression of an NK cell ligand on β-cells suggest that NK cells play a role in disease pathogenesis. Indeed, killing of β-cells by NK cells has been shown to occur, mediated by activation of the NK cell activating receptor, NKp46. α1-antitrypsin (AAT), an anti-inflammatory and immunomodulatory glycoprotein, protects β-cells from injurious immune responses and is currently evaluated as a therapeutic for recent onset T1D. While isolated T lymphocytes are not inhibited by AAT, dendritic cells (DCs) become tolerogenic in its presence and other innate immune cells become less inflammatory. Yet a comprehensive profile of NK cell responses in the presence of AAT has yet to be described. In the present study, we demonstrate that AAT significantly reduces NK cell degranulation against β-cells, albeit in the whole animal and not in isolated NK cell cultures. AAT-treated mice, and not isolated cultured β-cells, exhibited a marked reduction in NKp46 ligand levels on β-cells. In related experiments, AAT-treated DCs exhibited reduced inducible DC-expressed IL-15 levels and evoked a weaker NK cell response. NK cell depletion in a T1D mouse model resulted in improved β-cell function and survival, similar to the effects observed by AAT treatment alone; nonetheless, the two approaches were non-synergistic. Our data suggest that AAT is a selective immunomodulator that retains pivotal NK cell responses, while diverting their activities away from islet β-cells. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  11. Nematic order by elastic interactions and rigidity sensing of living cells

    CERN Document Server

    Friedrich, Benjamin M

    2010-01-01

    We predict spontaneous nematic order in an ensemble of active force generators with elastic interactions as a minimal model for early cytoskeletal self-polarization. Mean-field theory is formally equivalent to Maier-Saupe theory for a nematic liquid. However, the elastic interactions are long-ranged (and thus depend on cell shape and matrix elasticity) and originate in cell activity. Depending on the density of force generators, we find two regimes of cellular rigidity sensing for which nematic order depends on matrix rigidity either in a step-like manner or with a maximum at an optimal rigidity.

  12. Cluster of red blood cells in microcapillary flow: hydrodynamic versus macromolecule induced interaction

    CERN Document Server

    Clavería, Viviana; Thiébaud, Marine; Abkarian, Manouk; Coupier, Gwennou; Misbah, Chaouqi; John, Thomas; Wagner, Christian

    2016-01-01

    We present experiments on RBCs that flow through microcapillaries under physiological conditions. We show that the RBC clusters form as a subtle imbrication between hydrodynamics interaction and adhesion forces because of plasma proteins. Clusters form along the capillaries and macromolecule-induced adhesion contribute to their stability. However, at high yet physiological flow velocities, shear stresses overcome part of the adhesion forces, and cluster stabilization due to hydrodynamics becomes the only predominant mechanism. For the case of pure hydrodynamic interaction, cell-to-cell distances have a pronounced bimodal distribution. Our 2D-numerical simulations on vesicles captures the transition between adhesive and non-adhesive clusters at different flow velocities.

  13. Proteomic and protein interaction network analysis of human T lymphocytes during cell-cycle entry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orr, Stephen J; Boutz, Daniel R; Wang, Rong; Chronis, Constantinos; Lea, Nicholas C; Thayaparan, Thivyan; Hamilton, Emma; Milewicz, Hanna; Blanc, Eric; Mufti, Ghulam J; Marcotte, Edward M; Thomas, N Shaun B

    2012-01-01

    Regulating the transition of cells such as T lymphocytes from quiescence (G0) into an activated, proliferating state involves initiation of cellular programs resulting in entry into the cell cycle (proliferation), the growth cycle (blastogenesis, cell size) and effector (functional) activation. We show the first proteomic analysis of protein interaction networks activated during entry into the first cell cycle from G0. We also provide proof of principle that blastogenesis and proliferation programs are separable in primary human T cells. We employed a proteomic profiling method to identify large-scale changes in chromatin/nuclear matrix-bound and unbound proteins in human T lymphocytes during the transition from G0 into the first cell cycle and mapped them to form functionally annotated, dynamic protein interaction networks. Inhibiting the induction of two proteins involved in two of the most significantly upregulated cellular processes, ribosome biogenesis (eIF6) and hnRNA splicing (SF3B2/SF3B4), showed, respectively, that human T cells can enter the cell cycle without growing in size, or increase in size without entering the cell cycle. PMID:22415777

  14. Platelet-tumor cell interaction with the subendothelial extracellular matrix: relationship to cancer metastasis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yahalom, J.; Biran, S.; Fuks, Z.; Vlodavsky, I. (Hadassah University Hospital, Jerusalem (Israel). Dept. of Radiation and Clinical Oncology); Eldor, A. (Hadassah University Hospital, Jerusalem (Israel). Dept. of Hematology)

    1985-04-01

    Dissemination of neoplastic cells within the body involves invasion of blood vessels by tumor cells. This requires adhesion of blood-borne cells to the luminal surface of the vascular endothelium, invasion through the endothelial cell layer and local dissolution of the subendothelial basement membrane. The authors studied the interaction of platelets and tumor cells with cultured vascular endothelial cells and their secreted basement membrane-like extracellular matrix (ECM). Interaction of platelets with this ECM was associated with platelet activation, aggregation and degradation of heparan sulfate in the ECM by means of the platelet heparitinase. Biochemical and scanning electron microscopy (SEM) studies have demonstrated that platelets may detect even minor gaps between adjacent endothelial cells and degrade the ECM heparan sulfate. Platelets were also shown to recruit lymphoma cells into minor gaps in the vascular endothelium. It is suggested that the platelet heparitinase is involved in the impairment of the integrity of the vessel wall and thus play a role in tumor cell metastasis.

  15. Reciprocal interactions between endothelial cells and macrophages in angiogenic vascular niches

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baer, Caroline; Squadrito, Mario Leonardo [The Swiss Institute for Experimental Cancer Research (ISREC), School of Life Sciences, Swiss Federal Institute of Technology Lausanne (EPFL), 1015 Lausanne (Switzerland); Iruela-Arispe, M. Luisa, E-mail: arispe@mcdb.ucla.edu [The Swiss Institute for Experimental Cancer Research (ISREC), School of Life Sciences, Swiss Federal Institute of Technology Lausanne (EPFL), 1015 Lausanne (Switzerland); Department of Molecular, Cell and Developmental Biology and Molecular Biology Institute, University of California, Los Angeles 90095, CA (United States); De Palma, Michele, E-mail: michele.depalma@epfl.ch [The Swiss Institute for Experimental Cancer Research (ISREC), School of Life Sciences, Swiss Federal Institute of Technology Lausanne (EPFL), 1015 Lausanne (Switzerland)

    2013-07-01

    The ability of macrophages to promote vascular growth has been associated with the secretion and local delivery of classic proangiogenic factors (e.g., VEGF-A and proteases). More recently, a series of studies have also revealed that physical contact of macrophages with growing blood vessels coordinates vascular fusion of emerging sprouts. Interestingly, the interactions between macrophages and vascular endothelial cells (ECs) appear to be bidirectional, such that activated ECs also support the expansion and differentiation of proangiogenic macrophages from myeloid progenitors. Here, we discuss recent findings suggesting that dynamic angiogenic vascular niches might also exist in vivo, e.g. in tumors, where sprouting blood vessels and immature myeloid cells like monocytes engage in heterotypic interactions that are required for angiogenesis. Finally, we provide an account of emerging mechanisms of cell-to-cell communication that rely on secreted microvesicles, such as exosomes, which can offer a vehicle for the rapid exchange of molecules and genetic information between macrophages and ECs engaged in angiogenesis. -- Highlights: • Macrophages promote angiogenesis by secreting proangiogenic factors. • Macrophages modulate angiogenesis via cell-to-cell contacts with endothelial cells. • Endothelial cells promote the differentiation of proangiogenic macrophages. • Macrophages and endothelial cells may cooperate to form angiogenic vascular niches.

  16. Dynamic assessment of Amyloid oligomers - cell membrane interaction by advanced impedance spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gheorghiu, M.; David, S.; Polonschii, C.; Bratu, D.; Gheorghiu, E.

    2013-04-01

    The amyloid β (Aβ) peptides are believed to be pivotal in Alzheimer's disease (AD) pathogenesis and onset of vascular dysfunction. Recent studies indicate that Aβ1-42 treatment influences the expression of tight junction protein complexes, stress fibre formation, disruption and aggregation of actin filaments and cellular gap formation. Aiming for functional characterization of model cells upon Aβ1-42 treatment, we deployed an advanced Electric Cell-substrate Impedance Sensing for monitoring cell evolution. A precision Impedance Analyzer with a multiplexing module developed in house was used for recording individual electrode sets in the 40 Hz - 100 KHz frequency range. In a step forward from the classical ECIS assays, we report on a novel data analysis algorithm that enables access to cellular and paracellular electrical parameters and cell surface interaction with fully developed cell monolayers. The evolution of the impedance at selected frequencies provides evidence for a dual effect of Aβ42 exposure, at both paracellular permeability and cell adherence level, with intricate dynamics that open up new perspectives on Aβ1-42 oligomers - cell membrane interaction. Validation of electrical impedance assays of the amyloid fibrils effect on cell membrane structure is achieved by both AFM analysis and Surface Plasmon Resonance studies. The capabilities of this noninvasive, real time platform for cell analysis in a wider applicative context are outlined.

  17. In vitro evaluation of the interactions between human corneal endothelial cells and extracellular matrix proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Jin San; Kim, Eun Young; Kim, Min Jeong; Giegengack, Matthew; Khan, Faraaz A; Khang, Gilson; Soker, Shay

    2013-02-01

    The corneal endothelium is the innermost cell layer of the cornea and rests on Descemet's membrane consisting of various extracellular matrix (ECM) proteins which can directly affect the cellular behaviors such as cell adhesion, proliferation, polarity, morphogenesis and function. The objective of this study was to investigate the interactions between the ECM environment and human corneal endothelial cells (HCECs), with the ultimate goal to improve cell proliferation and function in vitro. To evaluate the interaction of HCECs with ECM proteins, cells were seeded on ECM-coated tissue culture dishes, including collagen type I (COL I), collagen type IV (COL IV), fibronectin (FN), FNC coating mix (FNC) and laminin (LM). Cell adhesion and proliferation of HCECs on each substratum and expression of CEC markers were studied. The results showed that HCECs plated on the COL I, COL IV, FN and FNC-coated plates had enhanced cell adhesion initially; the number for COL I, COL IV, FN and FNC was significantly higher than the control (P < 0.05). In addition, cells grown on ECM protein-coated dishes showed more compact cellular morphology and CEC marker expression compared to cells seeded on uncoated dishes. Collectively, our results suggest that an adequate ECM protein combination can provide a long-term culture environment for HCECs for corneal endothelium transplantation.

  18. Interstitial cells of Cajal, macrophages and mast cells in the gut musculature: morphology, distribution, spatial and possible functional interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mikkelsen, Hanne B

    2010-04-01

    Interstitial cells of Cajal (ICC) are recognized as pacemaker cells for gastrointestinal movement and are suggested to be mediators of neuromuscular transmission. Intestinal motility disturbances are often associated with a reduced number of ICC and/or ultrastructural damage, sometimes associated with immune cells. Macrophages and mast cells in the intestinal muscularis externa of rodents can be found in close spatial contact with ICC. Macrophages are a constant and regularly distributed cell population in the serosa and at the level of Auerbach's plexus (AP). In human colon, ICC are in close contact with macrophages at the level of AP, suggesting functional interaction. It has therefore been proposed that ICC and macrophages interact. Macrophages and mast cells are considered to play important roles in the innate immune defence by producing pro-inflammatory mediators during classical activation, which may in itself result in damage to the tissue. They also take part in alternative activation which is associated with anti-inflammatory mediators, tissue remodelling and homeostasis, cancer, helminth infections and immunophenotype switch. ICC become damaged under various circumstances - surgical resection, possibly post-operative ileus in rodents - where innate activation takes place, and in helminth infections - where alternative activation takes place. During alternative activation the muscularis macrophage can switch phenotype resulting in up-regulation of F4/80 and the mannose receptor. In more chronic conditions such as Crohn's disease and achalasia, ICC and mast cells develop close spatial contacts and piecemeal degranulation is possibly triggered.

  19. Interaction of the ATA beam with the TM/sub 030/ mode of the accelerating cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Neil, V.K.

    1985-02-14

    The interaction of the electron beam in the Advanced Test Accelerator with an azimuthally symmetric mode of the accelerating cells is investigated theoretically. The interaction possibly could cause modulation of the beam current at the resonant frequency of the mode. Values of the shunt impedance and Q value of the mode were obtained from previous measurement and analysis. Lagranian hydrodynamics is employed and a WKB solution to the equation of motion is obtained. Results indicate that the interaction will not be a problem in the accelerator.

  20. Molecular Understanding of Fullerene - Electron Donor Interactions in Organic Solar Cells

    KAUST Repository

    Ryno, Sean M.

    2016-09-13

    Organic solar cells hold promise of providing low-cost, renewable power generation, with current devices providing up to 13% power conversion efficiency. The rational design of more performant systems requires an in-depth understanding of the interactions between the electron donating and electron accepting materials within the active layers of these devices. Here, we explore works that give insight into the intermolecular interactions between electron donors and electron acceptors, and the impact of molecular orientations and environment on these interactions. We highlight, from a theoretical standpoint, the effects of intermolecular interactions on the stability of charge carriers at the donor/acceptor interface and in the bulk and how these interactions influence the nature of the charge transfer states as wells as the charge separation and charge transport processes. © 2016 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  1. Species- and cell type-specific interactions between CD47 and human SIRPalpha.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Subramanian, Shyamsundar; Parthasarathy, Ranganath; Sen, Shamik; Boder, Eric T; Discher, Dennis E

    2006-03-15

    CD47 on red blood cells (RBCs) reportedly signals "self" by binding SIRPalpha on phagocytes, at least in mice. Such interactions across and within species, from mouse to human, are not yet clear and neither is the relation to cell adhesion. Using human SIRPalpha1 as a probe, antibody-inhibitable binding to CD47 was found only with human and pig RBCs (not mouse, rat, or cow). In addition, CD47-mediated adhesion of human and pig RBCs to SIRPalpha1 surfaces resists sustained forces in centrifugation (as confirmed by atomic force microscopy) but only at SIRPalpha-coating densities far above those measurable on human neutrophils, monocytes, and THP-1 macrophages. While interactions strengthen with deglycosylation of SIRPalpha1, low copy numbers explain the absence of RBC adhesion to phagocytes under physiologic conditions and imply that the interaction being studied is not responsible for red cell clearance in humans. Evidence of clustering nonetheless suggests mechanisms of avidity enhancement. Finally, using the same CD47 antibodies and soluble SIRPalpha1, bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells were assayed and found to display CD47 but not bind SIRPalpha1 significantly. The results thus demonstrate that SIRPalpha-CD47 interactions, which reportedly define self, exhibit cell type specificity and limited cross-species reactivity.

  2. Interaction between carbon nanotubes and mammalian cells: characterization by flow cytometry and application

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cai Dong; Blair, Derek; Dufort, Fay J; Gumina, Maria R; Chiles, Thomas C [Department of Biology, Boston College, Chestnut Hill, MA 02467 (United States); Huang Zhongping; Canahan, D [NanoLab, Incorporated, Newton, MA 02458 (United States); Hong, George [Bioprocess Division, Millipore Corporation, 80 Ashby Road, Bedford, MA 01730 (United States); Wagner, Dean [Naval Health Research Center, Detachment Environmental Health Effects Laboratory, Wright Patterson Air Force Base, OH 45433 (United States); Kempa, K; Ren, Z F [Department of Physics, Boston College, Chestnut Hill, MA 02467 (United States)], E-mail: caid@bc.edu

    2008-08-27

    We show herein that CNT-cell complexes are formed in the presence of a magnetic field. The complexes were analyzed by flow cytometry as a quantitative method for monitoring the physical interactions between CNTs and cells. We observed an increase in side scattering signals, where the amplitude was proportional to the amount of CNTs that are associated with cells. Even after the formation of CNT-cell complexes, cell viability was not significantly decreased. The association between CNTs and cells was strong enough to be used for manipulating the complexes and thereby conducting cell separation with magnetic force. In addition, the CNT-cell complexes were also utilized to facilitate electroporation. We observed a time constant from CNT-cell complexes but not from cells alone, indicating a high level of pore formation in cell membranes. Experimentally, we achieved the expression of enhanced green fluorescence protein by using a low electroporation voltage after the formation of CNT-cell complexes. These results suggest that higher transfection efficiency, lower electroporation voltage, and miniaturized setup dimension of electroporation may be accomplished through the CNT strategy outlined herein.

  3. Interaction with intestinal epithelial cells promotes an immunosuppressive phenotype in Lactobacillus casei.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Minna Tiittanen

    Full Text Available Maintenance of the immunological tolerance and homeostasis in the gut is associated with the composition of the intestinal microbiota. We here report that cultivation of Lactobacillus casei ATCC 334 in the presence of human intestinal epithelial cells promotes functional changes in bacteria. In particular, the interaction enhanced the immunosuppressive phenotype of L. casei as demonstrated by the ability of L. casei to generate functional regulatory T cells (CD4+CD25+FoxP3+ and production of the anti-inflammatory cytokine interleukin-10 by human peripheral blood mononuclear cells. The results indicate microbe-host cross-talk that changes features of microbes, and suggest that in vitro simulation of epithelial cell interaction can reveal functional properties of gut microbes more accurately than conventional cultivation.

  4. Harvesting energy of interaction between bacteria and bacteriophage in a membrane-less fuel cell.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, Ragini; Bekele, Wasihun; Ghatak, Animangsu

    2013-11-01

    When a fuel and oxidant flow in laminar contact through a micro-fluidic channel, a sharp interface appears between the two liquids, which eliminate the need of a proton exchange membrane. This principle has been used to generate potential in a membrane-less fuel cell. This study use such a cell to harvest energy of interaction between a bacteria having negative charge on its surface and a bacteriophage with positive and negative charges on its tail and head, respectively. When Klebsiella pneumoniae (Kp6) and phage (P-Kp6) are pumped through a fuel cell fitted with two copper electrodes placed at its two sides, interaction between these two charged species at the interface results in a constant open circuit potential which varies with concentration of charged species but gets generated for both specific and non-specific bacteria and phage system. Oxygenation of bacteria or phage however diminishes the potential unlike in conventional microbial fuel cells.

  5. Biomaterial-stem cell interactions and their impact on stem cell response

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Oziemlak-Schaap, Aneta M.; Kuhn, Philipp T.; van Kooten, Theo G.; van Rijn, Patrick

    2014-01-01

    In this review, current research in the field of biomaterial properties for directing stem cells are discussed and placed in a critical perspective. Regenerative medicine, in which stem cells play a crucial role, has become an interdisciplinary field between cell biology and materials science. New i

  6. Biomaterial-stem cell interactions and their impact on stem cell response

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Oziemlak-Schaap, Aneta M.; Kuhn, Philipp T.; van Kooten, Theo G.; van Rijn, Patrick

    2014-01-01

    In this review, current research in the field of biomaterial properties for directing stem cells are discussed and placed in a critical perspective. Regenerative medicine, in which stem cells play a crucial role, has become an interdisciplinary field between cell biology and materials science. New

  7. Beauty is Skin Deep: A Surface Monolayer Perspective on Nanoparticle Interactions with Cells and Biomacromolecules**

    OpenAIRE

    Saha, Krishnendu; Bajaj, Avinash; Duncan, Bradley; Rotello, Vincent M.

    2011-01-01

    Surface recognition of biosystems is a critical component in the development of novel biosensors, delivery vehicles and for the therapeutic regulation of biological processes. Monolayer-protected nanoparticles present a highly versatile scaffold for selective interaction with biomacromolecules and cells. Through engineering of the monolayer surface, nanoparticles can be tailored for surface recognition of biomolecules and cells. This review highlights recent progress in nanoparticle-biomacrom...

  8. Inferring yeast cell cycle regulators and interactions using transcription factor activities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Galbraith Simon J

    2005-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Since transcription factors are often regulated at the post-transcriptional level, their activities, rather than expression levels may provide valuable information for investigating functions and their interactions. The recently developed Network Component Analysis (NCA and its generalized form (gNCA provide a robust framework for deducing the transcription factor activities (TFAs from various types of DNA microarray data and transcription factor-gene connectivity. The goal of this work is to demonstrate the utility of TFAs in inferring transcription factor functions and interactions in Saccharomyces cerevisiae cell cycle regulation. Results Using gNCA, we determined 74 TFAs from both wild type and fkh1 fkh2 deletion mutant microarray data encompassing 1529 ORFs. We hypothesized that transcription factors participating in the cell cycle regulation exhibit cyclic activity profiles. This hypothesis was supported by the TFA profiles of known cell cycle factors and was used as a basis to uncover other potential cell cycle factors. By combining the results from both cluster analysis and periodicity analysis, we recovered nearly 90% of the known cell cycle regulators, and identified 5 putative cell cycle-related transcription factors (Dal81, Hap2, Hir2, Mss11, and Rlm1. In addition, by analyzing expression data from transcription factor knockout strains, we determined 3 verified (Ace2, Ndd1, and Swi5 and 4 putative interaction partners (Cha4, Hap2, Fhl1, and Rts2 of the forkhead transcription factors. Sensitivity of TFAs to connectivity errors was determined to provide confidence level of these predictions. Conclusion By subjecting TFA profiles to analyses based upon physiological signatures we were able to identify cell cycle related transcription factors consistent with current literature, transcription factors with potential cell cycle dependent roles, and interactions between transcription factors.

  9. Interaction of multidrug-resistant Chinese hamster ovary cells with amphiphiles.

    OpenAIRE

    Loe, D. W.; Sharom, F J

    1993-01-01

    The interaction of membrane-active amphiphiles with a series of MDR Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cell lines was investigated. Cross-resistance to cationic amphiphiles was observed, which was effectively sensitised by verapamil. MDR cells showed collateral sensitivity to polyoxyethylene amphiphiles (Triton X-100/Nonidet P-40), which reached a maximum at 9-10 ethylene oxide units. Resistant lines were also highly collaterally sensitive (17-fold) to dibutylphthalate. mdrl transfectants showed cro...

  10. Optical tweezers for measuring the interaction of the two single red blood cells in flow condition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Kisung; Muravyov, Alexei; Semenov, Alexei; Wagner, Christian; Priezzhev, Alexander

    2017-03-01

    Aggregation of red blood cells (RBCs) is an intrinsic property of blood, which has direct effect on the blood viscosity and therefore affects overall the blood circulation throughout the body. It is attracting interest for the research in both fundamental science and clinical application. Despite of the intensive research, the aggregation mechanism is remaining not fully clear. Recent advances in methods allowed measuring the interaction between single RBCs in a well-defined configuration leading the better understanding of the mechanism of the process. However the most of the studies were made on the static cells. Thus, the measurements in flow mimicking conditions are missing. In this work, we aim to study the interaction of two RBCs in the flow conditions. We demonstrate the characterization of the cells interaction strength (or flow tolerance) by measuring the flow velocity to be applied to separate two aggregated cells trapped by double channel optical tweezers in a desired configuration. The age-separated cells were used for this study. The obtained values for the minimum flow velocities needed to separate the two cells were found to be 78.9 +/- 6.1 μm/s and 110 +/- 13 μm/s for old and young cells respectively. The data obtained is in agreement with the observations reported by other authors. The significance of our results is in ability for obtaining a comprehensible and absolute physical value characterizing the cells interaction in flow conditions (not like the Aggregation Index measured in whole blood suspensions by other techniques, which is some abstract parameter)

  11. Progenitor/Stem Cell Fate Determination: Interactive Dynamics of Cell Cycle and Microvesicles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, David; Puente, Napoleon; Faradyan, Sam; Sears, Edmund H.; Amaral, Ashley; Goldberg, Laura; Dooner, Mark S.; Pereira, Mandy; Quesenberry, Peter J.

    2012-01-01

    We have shown that hematopoietic stem/progenitor cell phenotype and differentiative potential change throughout cell cycle. Lung-derived microvesicles (LDMVs) also change marrow cell phenotype by inducing them to express pulmonary epithelial cell-specific mRNA and protein. These changes are accentuated when microvesicles isolated from injured lung. We wish to determine if microvesicle-treated stem/progenitor cell phenotype is linked to cell cycle and to the injury status of the lung providing microvesicles. Lineage depleted, Sca-1+ (Lin-/Sca-1+) marrow isolated from mice were cultured with interleukin 3 (IL-3), IL-6, IL-11, and stem cell factor (cytokine-cultured cells), removed at hours zero (cell cycle phase G0/G1), 24 (late G1/early S), and 48 (late S/early G2/M), and cocultured with lung tissue, lung conditioned media (LCM), or LDMV from irradiated or nonirradiated mice. Alternatively, Lin-/Sca-1+ cells not exposed to exogenous cytokines were separated into G0/G1 and S/G2/M cell cycle phase populations by fluorescence-activated cell sorting (FACS) and used in coculture. Separately, LDMV from irradiated and nonirradiated mice were analyzed for the presence of adhesion proteins. Peak pulmonary epithelial cell-specific mRNA expression was seen in G0/G1 cytokine-cultured cells cocultured with irradiated lung and in late G1/early S cells cocultured with nonirradiated lung. The same pattern was seen in cytokine-cultured Lin-/Sca-1 cells cocultured with LCM and LDMV and when FACS-separated Lin-/Sca-1 cells unexposed to exogenous cytokines were used in coculture. Cells and LDMV expressed adhesion proteins whose levels differed based on cycle status (cells) or radiation injury (LDMV), suggesting a mechanism for microvesicle entry. These data demonstrate that microvesicle modification of progenitor/stem cells is influenced by cell cycle and the treatment of the originator lung tissue. PMID:22214238

  12. Circulating tumor cells from prostate cancer patients interact with E-selectin under physiologic blood flow.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gunjan Gakhar

    Full Text Available Hematogenous metastasis accounts for the majority of cancer-related deaths, yet the mechanism remains unclear. Circulating tumor cells (CTCs in blood may employ different pathways to cross blood endothelial barrier and establish a metastatic niche. Several studies provide evidence that prostate cancer (PCa cell tethering and rolling on microvascular endothelium via E-selectin/E-selectin ligand interactions under shear flow theoretically promote extravasation and contribute to the development of metastases. However, it is unknown if CTCs from PCa patients interact with E-selectin expressed on endothelium, initiating a route for tumor metastases. Here we report that CTCs derived from PCa patients showed interactions with E-selectin and E-selectin expressing endothelial cells. To examine E-selectin-mediated interactions of PCa cell lines and CTCs derived from metastatic PCa patients, we used fluorescently-labeled anti-prostate specific membrane antigen (PSMA monoclonal antibody J591-488 which is internalized following cell-surface binding. We employed a microscale flow device consisting of E-selectin-coated microtubes and human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs on parallel-plate flow chamber simulating vascular endothelium. We observed that J591-488 did not significantly alter the rolling behavior in PCa cells at shear stresses below 3 dyn/cm(2. CTCs obtained from 31 PCa patient samples showed that CTCs tether and stably interact with E-selectin and E-selectin expressing HUVECs at physiological shear stress. Interestingly, samples collected during disease progression demonstrated significantly more CTC/E-selectin interactions than samples during times of therapeutic response (p=0.016. Analysis of the expression of sialyl Lewis X (sLe(x in patient samples showed that a small subset comprising 1.9-18.8% of CTCs possess high sLe(x expression. Furthermore, E-selectin-mediated interactions between prostate CTCs and HUVECs were diminished in the

  13. Regulation of IL-6 and IL-8 production by reciprocal cell-to-cell interactions between tumor cells and stromal fibroblasts through IL-1α in ameloblastoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fuchigami, Takao; Kibe, Toshiro; Koyama, Hirofumi; Kishida, Shosei; Iijima, Mikio; Nishizawa, Yoshiaki; Hijioka, Hiroshi; Fujii, Tomomi; Ueda, Masahiro; Nakamura, Norifumi; Kiyono, Tohru; Kishida, Michiko

    2014-09-05

    Ameloblastoma is an odontogenic benign tumor that occurs in the jawbone, which invades bone and reoccurs locally. This tumor is treated by wide surgical excision and causes various problems, including changes in facial countenance and mastication disorders. Ameloblastomas have abundant tumor stroma, including fibroblasts and immune cells. Although cell-to-cell interactions are considered to be involved in the pathogenesis of many diseases, intercellular communications in ameloblastoma have not been fully investigated. In this study, we examined interactions between tumor cells and stromal fibroblasts via soluble factors in ameloblastoma. We used a human ameloblastoma cell line (AM-3 ameloblastoma cells), human fibroblasts (HFF-2 fibroblasts), and primary-cultured fibroblasts from human ameloblastoma tissues, and analyzed the effect of ameloblastoma-associated cell-to-cell communications on gene expression, cytokine secretion, cellular motility and proliferation. AM-3 ameloblastoma cells secreted higher levels of interleukin (IL)-1α than HFF-2 fibroblasts. Treatment with conditioned medium from AM-3 ameloblastoma cells upregulated gene expression and secretion of IL-6 and IL-8 of HFF-2 fibroblasts and primary-cultured fibroblast cells from ameloblastoma tissues. The AM3-stimulated production of IL-6 and IL-8 in fibroblasts was neutralized by pretreatment of AM-3 cells with anti-IL-1α antibody and IL-1 receptor antagonist. Reciprocally, cellular motility of AM-3 ameloblastoma cells was stimulated by HFF-2 fibroblasts in IL-6 and IL-8 dependent manner. In conclusion, ameloblastoma cells and stromal fibroblasts behave interactively via these cytokines to create a microenvironment that leads to the extension of ameloblastomas. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. N-cadherin adhesive interactions modulate matrix mechanosensing and fate commitment of mesenchymal stem cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cosgrove, Brian D.; Mui, Keeley L.; Driscoll, Tristan P.; Caliari, Steven R.; Mehta, Kush D.; Assoian, Richard K.; Burdick, Jason A.; Mauck, Robert L.

    2016-12-01

    During mesenchymal development, the microenvironment gradually transitions from one that is rich in cell-cell interactions to one that is dominated by cell-ECM (extracellular matrix) interactions. Because these cues cannot readily be decoupled in vitro or in vivo, how they converge to regulate mesenchymal stem cell (MSC) mechanosensing is not fully understood. Here, we show that a hyaluronic acid hydrogel system enables, across a physiological range of ECM stiffness, the independent co-presentation of the HAVDI adhesive motif from the EC1 domain of N-cadherin and the RGD adhesive motif from fibronectin. Decoupled presentation of these cues revealed that HAVDI ligation (at constant RGD ligation) reduced the contractile state and thereby nuclear YAP/TAZ localization in MSCs, resulting in altered interpretation of ECM stiffness and subsequent changes in downstream cell proliferation and differentiation. Our findings reveal that, in an evolving developmental context, HAVDI/N-cadherin interactions can alter stem cell perception of the stiffening extracellular microenvironment.

  15. Interaction of CSR1 with XIAP reverses inhibition of caspases and accelerates cell death.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Zhong-Liang; Tan, Lang-Zhu; Yu, Yan P; Michalopoulos, George; Luo, Jian-Hua

    2012-08-01

    Cellular Stress Response 1 (CSR1) is a tumor suppressor gene that is located at 8p21, a region that is frequently deleted in prostate cancer as well as a variety of human malignancies. Previous studies have indicated that the expression of CSR1 induces cell death. In this study, we found that CSR1 interacts with X-linked Inhibitor of Apoptosis Protein (XIAP), using yeast two-hybrid screening analyses. XIAP overexpression has been found in many human cancers, and forced expression of XIAP blocks apoptosis. Both in vitro and in vivo analyses indicated that the C-terminus of CSR1 binds XIAP with high affinity. Through a series of in vitro recombinant protein-binding analyses, the XIAP-binding motif in CSR1 was determined to include amino acids 513 to 572. Targeted knock-down of XIAP enhanced CSR1-induced cell death, while overexpression of XIAP antagonized CSR1 activity. The binding of CSR1 with XIAP enhanced caspase-9 and caspase-3 protease activities, and CSR1-induced cell death was dramatically reduced on expression of a mutant CSR1 that does not bind XIAP. However, a XIAP mutant that does not interact with caspase-9 had no impact on CSR1-induced cell death. These results suggest that cell death is induced when CSR1 binds XIAP, preventing the interaction of XIAP with caspases. Thus, this study may have elucidated a novel mechanism by which tumor suppressors induce cell death.

  16. Interaction of graphene-related materials with human intestinal cells: an in vitro approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kucki, M; Rupper, P; Sarrieu, C; Melucci, M; Treossi, E; Schwarz, A; León, V; Kraegeloh, A; Flahaut, E; Vázquez, E; Palermo, V; Wick, P

    2016-04-28

    Graphene-related materials (GRM) inherit unique combinations of physicochemical properties which offer a high potential for technological as well as biomedical applications. It is not clear which physicochemical properties are the most relevant factors influencing the behavior of GRM in complex biological environments. In this study we have focused on the interaction of GRM, especially graphene oxide (GO), and Caco-2 cells in vitro. We mimiked stomach transition by acid-treatment of two representative GRM followed by analysis of their physicochemical properties. No significant changes in the material properties or cell viability of exposed Caco-2 cells in respect to untreated GRM could be detected. Furthermore, we explored the interaction of four different GO and Caco-2 cells to identify relevant physicochemical properties for the establishment of a material property-biological response relationship. Despite close interaction with the cell surface and the formation of reactive oxygen species (ROS), no acute toxicity was found for any of the applied GO (concentration range 0-80 μg ml(-1)) after 24 h and 48 h exposure. Graphene nanoplatelet aggregates led to low acute toxicity at high concentrations, indicating that aggregation, the number of layers or the C/O ratio have a more pronounced effect on the cell viability than the lateral size alone.

  17. Spatio-temporal Characterization of Ligand-Receptor Interactions in Blood Stem-Cell Rolling

    KAUST Repository

    Al Alwan, Bader

    2017-08-16

    One of the most important issues in the research on hematopoietic stem/progenitor cells (HSPCs) is to understand the mechanism of the homing process of these cells to the bone marrow after being transplanted into patients and establish the production of various blood cell types. The HSPCs first come in contact with the endothelial cells. This contact is known as adhesion and occurs through a multi-step paradigm ending with transmigration to the bone marrow niche. The initial step of the homing, tethering and rolling of HSPCs is mediated by P- and E-Selectins expressed on the endothelial cell surface through their interactions with the ligands expressed by HSPCs. Here we developed a novel experimental method to unravel the molecular mechanisms of the selectin-ligands interactions in vitro at the single molecule level by combining microfluidics and single-molecule fluorescence imaging. Our method enables direct visualization of the nanoscale spatiotemporal dynamics of the E-selectin-ligand (PSGL-1) interactions under conditions of shear stress acting on the cells at the molecular level in real time.

  18. Complement Interactions with Blood Cells, Endothelial Cells and Microvesicles in Thrombotic and Inflammatory Conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karpman, Diana; Ståhl, Anne-lie; Arvidsson, Ida; Johansson, Karl; Loos, Sebastian; Tati, Ramesh; Békássy, Zivile; Kristoffersson, Ann-Charlotte; Mossberg, Maria; Kahn, Robin

    2015-01-01

    The complement system is activated in the vasculature during thrombotic and inflammatory conditions. Activation may be associated with chronic inflammation on the endothelial surface leading to complement deposition. Complement mutations allow uninhibited complement activation to occur on platelets, neutrophils, monocytes, and aggregates thereof, as well as on red blood cells and endothelial cells. Furthermore, complement activation on the cells leads to the shedding of cell derived-microvesicles that may express complement and tissue factor thus promoting inflammation and thrombosis. Complement deposition on red blood cells triggers hemolysis and the release of red blood cell-derived microvesicles that are prothrombotic. Microvesicles are small membrane vesicles ranging from 0.1 to 1 μm, shed by cells during activation, injury and/or apoptosis that express components of the parent cell. Microvesicles are released during inflammatory and vascular conditions. The repertoire of inflammatory markers on endothelial cell-derived microvesicles shed during inflammation is large and includes complement. These circulating microvesicles may reflect the ongoing inflammatory process but may also contribute to its propagation. This overview will describe complement activation on blood and endothelial cells and the release of microvesicles from these cells during hemolytic uremic syndrome, thrombotic thrombocytopenic purpura and vasculitis, clinical conditions associated with enhanced thrombosis and inflammation.

  19. Modeling circadian clock-cell cycle interaction effects on cell population growth rates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    El Cheikh, R; Bernard, S; El Khatib, N

    2014-12-21

    The circadian clock and the cell cycle are two tightly coupled oscillators. Recent analytical studies have shown counter-intuitive effects of circadian gating of the cell cycle on growth rates of proliferating cells which cannot be explained by a molecular model or a population model alone. In this work, we present a combined molecular-population model that studies how coupling the circadian clock to the cell cycle, through the protein WEE1, affects a proliferating cell population. We show that the cell cycle can entrain to the circadian clock with different rational period ratios and characterize multiple domains of entrainment. We show that coupling increases the growth rate for autonomous periods of the cell cycle around 24 h and above 48 h. We study the effect of mutation of circadian genes on the growth rate of cells and show that disruption of the circadian clock can lead to abnormal proliferation. Particularly, we show that Cry 1, Cry 2 mutations decrease the growth rate of cells, Per 2 mutation enhances it and Bmal 1 knockout increases it for autonomous periods of the cell cycle less than 21 h and decreases it elsewhere. Combining a molecular model to a population model offers new insight on the influence of the circadian clock on the growth of a cell population. This can help chronotherapy which takes benefits of physiological rhythms to improve anti-cancer efficacy and tolerance to drugs by administering treatments at a specific time of the day.

  20. The interactions of intracellular Protista and their host cells, with special reference to heterotrophic organisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bannister, L H

    1979-04-11

    Intracellular genera are found in all the major groups of Protista, but are particularly common among the dinoflagellates, trypanosomatid zooflagellates and suctorian ciliates; the Sporozoa are nearly all intracellular at some stage of their life, and the Microspora entirely so. Intracellular forms can dwell in the nucleus, within phagosomal or other vacuoles or may lie free in the hyaloplasm of their host cells. Organisms tend to select their hosts from a restricted taxonomic range although there are some notable exceptions. There is also great variation in the types of host cell inhabited. There are various reasons for both host and cell selectivity including recognition phenomena at the cell surfaces. Invasion of host cells is usually preceded by surface interactions with the invader. Some organisms depend upon phagocytosis for entry, but others induce host cells to engulf them by non-phagocytic means or invade by microinjection through the host plasma membrane. Protista avoid lysosomal destruction by their resistance to enzyme attack, by surrounding themselves with lysosome-inhibiting vacuoles, by escaping from the phagosomal system into the hyaloplasm and by choosing host cells which lack lysosomes. Nutrition of intracellular heterotrophic organisms involves some degree of competition with the host cell's metabolism as well as erosion of host cell cytoplasm. In Plasmodium infections, red cells are made more permeable to required nutrients by the action of the parasite on the host cell membrane. The parasite is often dependent upon the host cell for complex nutrients which it cannot synthesize for itself. Intracellular forms often profoundly modify the structure and metabolism of the host cell or interfere with its growth and multiplication. This may result in the final lysis of the host cell at the end of the intracellular phase or before the infection of other cells. Certain types of intracellular organisms may have arisen initially as forms attached to the

  1. Gene expression correlations in human cancer cell lines define molecular interaction networks for epithelial phenotype.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kurt W Kohn

    Full Text Available Using gene expression data to enhance our knowledge of control networks relevant to cancer biology and therapy is a challenging but urgent task. Based on the premise that genes that are expressed together in a variety of cell types are likely to functions together, we derived mutually correlated genes that function together in various processes in epithelial-like tumor cells. Expression-correlated genes were derived from data for the NCI-60 human tumor cell lines, as well as data from the Broad Institute's CCLE cell lines. NCI-60 cell lines that selectively expressed a mutually correlated subset of tight junction genes served as a signature for epithelial-like cancer cells. Those signature cell lines served as a seed to derive other correlated genes, many of which had various other epithelial-related functions. Literature survey yielded molecular interaction and function information about those genes, from which molecular interaction maps were assembled. Many of the genes had epithelial functions unrelated to tight junctions, demonstrating that new function categories were elicited. The most highly correlated genes were implicated in the following epithelial functions: interactions at tight junctions (CLDN7, CLDN4, CLDN3, MARVELD3, MARVELD2, TJP3, CGN, CRB3, LLGL2, EPCAM, LNX1; interactions at adherens junctions (CDH1, ADAP1, CAMSAP3; interactions at desmosomes (PPL, PKP3, JUP; transcription regulation of cell-cell junction complexes (GRHL1 and 2; epithelial RNA splicing regulators (ESRP1 and 2; epithelial vesicle traffic (RAB25, EPN3, GRHL2, EHF, ADAP1, MYO5B; epithelial Ca(+2 signaling (ATP2C2, S100A14, BSPRY; terminal differentiation of epithelial cells (OVOL1 and 2, ST14, PRSS8, SPINT1 and 2; maintenance of apico-basal polarity (RAB25, LLGL2, EPN3. The findings provide a foundation for future studies to elucidate the functions of regulatory networks specific to epithelial-like cancer cells and to probe for anti-cancer drug targets.

  2. Proteomics-based systems biology modeling of bovine germinal vesicle stage oocyte and cumulus cell interaction.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Divyaswetha Peddinti

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Oocytes are the female gametes which establish the program of life after fertilization. Interactions between oocyte and the surrounding cumulus cells at germinal vesicle (GV stage are considered essential for proper maturation or 'programming' of oocytes, which is crucial for normal fertilization and embryonic development. However, despite its importance, little is known about the molecular events and pathways involved in this bidirectional communication. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We used differential detergent fractionation multidimensional protein identification technology (DDF-Mud PIT on bovine GV oocyte and cumulus cells and identified 811 and 1247 proteins in GV oocyte and cumulus cells, respectively; 371 proteins were significantly differentially expressed between each cell type. Systems biology modeling, which included Gene Ontology (GO and canonical genetic pathway analysis, showed that cumulus cells have higher expression of proteins involved in cell communication, generation of precursor metabolites and energy, as well as transport than GV oocytes. Our data also suggests a hypothesis that oocytes may depend on the presence of cumulus cells to generate specific cellular signals to coordinate their growth and maturation. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Systems biology modeling of bovine oocytes and cumulus cells in the context of GO and protein interaction networks identified the signaling pathways associated with the proteins involved in cell-to-cell signaling biological process that may have implications in oocyte competence and maturation. This first comprehensive systems biology modeling of bovine oocytes and cumulus cell proteomes not only provides a foundation for signaling and cell physiology at the GV stage of oocyte development, but are also valuable for comparative studies of other stages of oocyte development at the molecular level.

  3. Effects of transforming growth interacting factor on biological behaviors of gastric carcinoma cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhong-Liang Hu; Ji-Fang Wen; De-Sheng Xiao; Hui Zhen; Chun-Yan Fu

    2005-01-01

    AIM:Transforming growth interacting factor (TGIF) is an inhibitor of both transforming growth factor β (TGF-β) and retinoid signaling pathways. Moreover, the activation of MAPK pathway can prolong its half-life. However, its role in carcinogenesis is still unknown. Thus we attempted to investigate the effect of TGIF on biologic behaviors of gastric carcinoma cells.METHODS: Gastric carcinoma cell line, SGC-7901, was stably transfected with plasmid PcDNA3.1-TGIF. Western blotting and cell immunohistochemistry screening for the highly expressing clone of TGIF were employed. The growth of transfected cells was investigated by MTT and colonyformation assays, and apoptosis was measured by flow cytometry (FCM) and transmission electron microscopy.Tumorigenicity of the transfectant cells was also analyzed.RESULTS: TGIF had no effect on the proliferation, cell cycle and apoptosis of SGC-7901 cells, but cellular organelles of cells transfected with TGIF were richer than those of vector control or parental cells. Its clones were smaller than the control ones in plate efficiency, and its tumor tissues also had no obvious necrosis compared with the vector control or parental cells. Moreover, TGIF could resist TGF-β mediated growth inhibition.CONCLUSION: TGIF may induce differentiation of stomach neoplastic cells. In addition, TGIF can counteract the growth inhibition induced by TGF-β.

  4. Interactions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    The main theme of this anthology is the unique interaction between mathematics, physics and philosophy during the beginning of the 20th century. Seminal theories of modern physics and new fundamental mathematical structures were discovered or formed in this period. Significant physicists...... such as Lorentz and Einstein as well as mathematicians such as Poincare, Minkowski, Hilbert and Weyl contributed to this development. They created the new physical theories and the mathematical disciplines that play such paramount roles in their mathematical formulations. These physicists and mathematicians were...

  5. Mechanics of kinetochore microtubules and their interactions with chromosomes during cell division

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nazockdast, Ehssan; Fürthauer, Sebastian; Redemann, Stephanie; Baumgart, Johannes; Lindow, Norbert; Kratz, Andrea; Prohaska, Steffen; Müller-Reichert, Thomas; Shelley, Michael

    2016-11-01

    The accurate segregation of chromosomes, and subsequent cell division, in Eukaryotic cells is achieved by the interactions of an assembly of microtubules (MTs) and motor-proteins, known as the mitotic spindle. We use a combination of our computational platform for simulating cytoskeletal assemblies and our structural data from high-resolution electron tomography of the mitotic spindle, to study the kinetics and mechanics of MTs in the spindle, and their interactions with chromosomes during chromosome segregation in the first cell division in C.elegans embryo. We focus on kinetochore MTs, or KMTs, which have one end attached to a chromosome. KMTs are thought to be a key mechanical component in chromosome segregation. Using exploratory simulations of MT growth, bending, hydrodynamic interactions, and attachment to chromosomes, we propose a mechanical model for KMT-chromosome interactions that reproduces observed KMT length and shape distributions from electron tomography. We find that including detailed hydrodynamic interactions between KMTs is essential for agreement with the experimental observations.

  6. Cell penetrating peptides to dissect host-pathogen protein-protein interactions in Theileria -transformed leukocytes

    KAUST Repository

    Haidar, Malak

    2017-09-08

    One powerful application of cell penetrating peptides is the delivery into cells of molecules that function as specific competitors or inhibitors of protein-protein interactions. Ablating defined protein-protein interactions is a refined way to explore their contribution to a particular cellular phenotype in a given disease context. Cell-penetrating peptides can be synthetically constrained through various chemical modifications that stabilize a given structural fold with the potential to improve competitive binding to specific targets. Theileria-transformed leukocytes display high PKA activity, but PKAis an enzyme that plays key roles in multiple cellular processes; consequently genetic ablation of kinase activity gives rise to a myriad of confounding phenotypes. By contrast, ablation of a specific kinase-substrate interaction has the potential to give more refined information and we illustrate this here by describing how surgically ablating PKA interactions with BAD gives precise information on the type of glycolysis performed by Theileria-transformed leukocytes. In addition, we provide two other examples of how ablating specific protein-protein interactions in Theileria-infected leukocytes leads to precise phenotypes and argue that constrained penetrating peptides have great therapeutic potential to combat infectious diseases in general.

  7. Host parasite communications-Messages from helminths for the immune system: Parasite communication and cell-cell interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coakley, Gillian; Buck, Amy H; Maizels, Rick M

    2016-07-01

    Helminths are metazoan organisms many of which have evolved parasitic life styles dependent on sophisticated manipulation of the host environment. Most notably, they down-regulate host immune responses to ensure their own survival, by exporting a range of immuno-modulatory mediators that interact with host cells and tissues. While a number of secreted immunoregulatory parasite proteins have been defined, new work also points to the release of extracellular vesicles, or exosomes, that interact with and manipulate host gene expression. These recent results are discussed in the overall context of how helminths communicate effectively with the host organism.

  8. Interaction between mouse adenovirus type 1 and cell surface heparan sulfate proteoglycans.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liesbeth Lenaerts

    Full Text Available Application of human adenovirus type 5 (Ad5 derived vectors for cancer gene therapy has been limited by the poor cell surface expression, on some tumor cell types, of the primary Ad5 receptor, the coxsackie-adenovirus-receptor (CAR, as well as the accumulation of Ad5 in the liver following interaction with blood coagulation factor X (FX and subsequent tethering of the FX-Ad5 complex to heparan sulfate proteoglycan (HSPG on liver cells. As an alternative vector, mouse adenovirus type 1 (MAV-1 is particularly attractive, since this non-human adenovirus displays pronounced endothelial cell tropism and does not use CAR as a cellular attachment receptor. We here demonstrate that MAV-1 uses cell surface heparan sulfate proteoglycans (HSPGs as primary cellular attachment receptor. Direct binding of MAV-1 to heparan sulfate-coated plates proved to be markedly more efficient compared to that of Ad5. Experiments with modified heparins revealed that the interaction of MAV-1 to HSPGs depends on their N-sulfation and, to a lesser extent, 6-O-sulfation rate. Whereas the interaction between Ad5 and HSPGs was enhanced by FX, this was not the case for MAV-1. A slot blot assay demonstrated the ability of MAV-1 to directly interact with FX, although the amount of FX complexed to MAV-1 was much lower than observed for Ad5. Analysis of the binding of MAV-1 and Ad5 to the NCI-60 panel of different human tumor cell lines revealed the preference of MAV-1 for ovarian carcinoma cells. Together, the data presented here enlarge our insight into the HSPG receptor usage of MAV-1 and support the development of an MAV-1-derived gene vector for human cancer therapy.

  9. Molecular Dynamics Study on the Biophysical Interactions of Seven Green Tea Catechins with Cell Membranes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Molecular dynamics simulations were performed to study the interactions of bioactive catechins (flavonoids) commonly found in green tea with lipid bilayers, as model for cell membranes. Previously, a number of experimental studies rationalized catechin’s anticarcinogenic, antibacterial, and other be...

  10. Single-cell force spectroscopy of the medically important Staphylococcus epidermidis-Candida albicans interaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beaussart, Audrey; Herman, Philippe; El-Kirat-Chatel, Sofiane; Lipke, Peter N.; Kucharíková, Soňa; van Dijck, Patrick; Dufrêne, Yves F.

    2013-10-01

    Despite the clinical importance of bacterial-fungal interactions, their molecular details are poorly understood. A hallmark of such medically important interspecies associations is the interaction between the two nosocomial pathogens Staphylococcus aureus and Candida albicans, which can lead to mixed biofilm-associated infections with enhanced antibiotic resistance. Here, we use single-cell force spectroscopy (SCFS) to quantify the forces engaged in bacterial-fungal co-adhesion, focusing on the poorly investigated S. epidermidis-C. albicans interaction. Force curves recorded between single bacterial and fungal germ tubes showed large adhesion forces (~5 nN) with extended rupture lengths (up to 500 nm). By contrast, bacteria poorly adhered to yeast cells, emphasizing the important role of the yeast-to-hyphae transition in mediating adhesion to bacterial cells. Analysis of mutant strains altered in cell wall composition allowed us to distinguish the main fungal components involved in adhesion, i.e. Als proteins and O-mannosylations. We suggest that the measured co-adhesion forces are involved in the formation of mixed biofilms, thus possibly as well in promoting polymicrobial infections. In the future, we anticipate that this SCFS platform will be used in nanomedicine to decipher the molecular mechanisms of a wide variety of pathogen-pathogen interactions and may help in designing novel anti-adhesion agents.

  11. Targeting CD47-SIRPα interactions for potentiating therapeutic antibody-mediated tumor cell destruction by phagocytes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zhao, X.W.

    2014-01-01

    The primary aim of the studies described in this thesis was to investigate the role of CD47-SIRPα interactions in therapeutic antibody-dependent tumor cell destruction by human phagocytes and also explore the killing mechanism(s) by which human phagocytes, and in particular human neutrophils, mediat

  12. Probiotic Gut Microbiota Isolate Interacts with Dendritic Cells via Glycosylated Heterotrimeric Pili

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tytgat, Hanne; Teijlingen, van N.H.; Sullan, R.M.; Douillard, F.P.; Rasinkangas, P.; Messing, M.; Reunanen, J.; Satokari, R.; Vanderleyden, J.; Dufrêne, Y.F.; Geijtenbeek, T.B.H.; Vos, de W.M.; Lebeer, S.

    2016-01-01

    Mapping of the microbial molecules underlying microbiota-host interactions is key to understand how microbiota preserve mucosal homeostasis. A pivotal family of such bacterial molecules are pili. Pili are proteinaceous cell wall appendages with a well-documented role in adhesion, whilst their role i

  13. Surface modification of hydrophobic polymers for improvement of endothelial cell-surface interactions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dekker, A.; Reitsma, K.; Beugeling, T.; Bantjes, A.; Feijen, J.; Kirkpatrick, C.J.; Aken, van W.G.

    1992-01-01

    The aim of this study is to improve the interaction of endothelial cells with polymers used in vascular prostheses. Polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE; Teflon) films were treated by means of nitrogen and oxygen plasmas. Depending on the plasma exposure time, modified PTFE surfaces showed water-contact an

  14. Using interactive multimedia e-Books for learning blood cell morphology in pediatric hematology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsiao, Chih-Cheng; Tiao, Mao-Meng; Chen, Chih-Cheng

    2016-11-14

    This prospective study compares the use of interactive multimedia eBooks (IME) with traditional PowerPoint (TPP) for teaching cell morphology of blood and bone marrow. Fifty-one interns from three Taiwan medical schools training by a single teacher in the pediatric hematology department of Kaohsiung Chang Gung Memorial Hospital, Taiwan, participated in this study. 25 interns were allocated for training with a traditional PowerPoint atlas and 26 interns for training with an interactive multimedia eBook atlas. Learning outcomes were examined by pre-test and post-test using the CellQuiz of CellAtlas App. Attitudes and perceptions were collected by survey questions regarding interest, motivation and effectiveness. There was no difference in the pre-test scores between TPP and IME groups (mean score 27.0 versus 27.9, p = 0.807). However, the interns in the interactive multimedia eBook group achieved significantly better scores in the post-test than the ones in the PowerPoint group (mean score 103.2 versus 70.6; p < 0.001). Overall results of interest, motivation and effectiveness were strongly positive in the multimedia eBook group. Our data supports that interactive multimedia eBooks are more effective than PowerPoint to facilitate learning of cell morphology of blood and bone marrow.

  15. N-cadherin-mediated interaction with multiple myeloma cells inhibits osteoblast differentiation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Groen, R.W.J.; de Rooij, M.F.M.; Kocemba, K.A.; Reijmers, R.M.; de Haan-Kramer, A.; Overdijk, M.B.; Aalders, L.; Rozemuller, H.; Martens, A.C.M.; Bergsagel, P.L.; Kersten, M.J.; Pals, S.T.; Spaargaren, M.

    2011-01-01

    Background Multiple myeloma is a hematologic malignancy characterized by a clonal expansion of malignant plasma cells in the bone marrow, which is accompanied by the development of osteolytic lesions and/or diffuse osteopenia. The intricate bi-directional interaction with the bone marrow

  16. Interactions between membrane-bound cellulose synthases involved in the synthesis of the secondary cell wall

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Timmers, J.F.P.; Vernhettes, S.; Desprez, T.; Vincken, J.P.; Visser, R.G.F.; Trindade, L.M.

    2009-01-01

    It has not yet been reported how the secondary CESA (cellulose synthase) proteins are organized in the rosette structure. A membrane-based yeast two-hybrid (MbYTH) approach was used to analyze the interactions between the CESA proteins involved in secondary cell wall synthesis of Arabidopsis and the

  17. Interaction effects of cell diffusion, cell density and public goods properties on the evolution of cooperation in digital microbes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dobay, A; Bagheri, H C; Messina, A; Kümmerli, R; Rankin, D J

    2014-09-01

    Microbial cooperation typically consists in the sharing of secreted metabolites (referred to as public goods) within the community. Although public goods generally promote population growth, they are also vulnerable to exploitation by cheating mutants, which no longer contribute, but still benefit from the public goods produced by others. Although previous studies have identified a number of key factors that prevent the spreading of cheaters, little is known about how these factors interact and jointly shape the evolution of microbial cooperation. Here, we address this issue by investigating the interaction effects of cell diffusion, cell density, public good diffusion and durability (factors known to individually influence costs and benefits of public goods production) on selection for cooperation. To be able to quantify these effects across a wide parameter space, we developed an individual-based simulation platform, consisting of digital cooperator and cheater bacteria inhabiting a finite two-dimensional continuous toroidal surface. Our simulations, which closely mimic microbial microcolony growth, revealed that: (i) either reduced cell diffusion (which keeps cooperators together) or reduced public good diffusion (which keeps the public goods closer to the producer) is not only essential but also sufficient for cooperation to be promoted; (ii) the sign of selection for or against cooperation can change as a function of cell density and in interaction with diffusion parameters; and (iii) increased public goods durability has opposing effects on the evolution of cooperation depending on the level of cell and public good diffusion. Our work highlights that interactions between key parameters of public goods cooperation give rise to complex fitness landscapes, a finding that calls for multifactorial approaches when studying microbial cooperation in natural systems.

  18. In vitro and in vivo imaging of initial B-T-cell interactions in the setting of B-cell based cancer immunotherapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonzalez, Nela Klein; Wennhold, Kerstin; Balkow, Sandra; Kondo, Eisei; Bölck, Birgit; Weber, Tanja; Garcia-Marquez, Maria; Grabbe, Stephan; Bloch, Wilhelm; von Bergwelt-Baildon, Michael; Shimabukuro-Vornhagen, Alexander

    2015-01-01

    There has been a growing interest in the use of B cells for cancer vaccines, since they have yielded promising results in preclinical animal models. Contrary to dendritic cells (DCs), we know little about the migration behavior of B cells in vivo. Therefore, we investigated the interactions between CD40-activated B (CD40B) cells and cytotoxic T cells in vitro and the migration behavior of CD40B cells in vivo. Dynamic interactions of human antigen-presenting cells (APCs) and T cells were observed by time-lapse video microscopy. The migratory and chemoattractant potential of CD40B cells was analyzed in vitro and in vivo using flow cytometry, standard transwell migration assays, and imaging of fluorescently labeled murine CD40B cells. Murine CD40B cells show migratory features similar to human CD40B cells. They express important lymph node homing receptors which were functional and induced chemotaxis of T cells in vitro. Striking differences were observed with regard to interactions of human APCs with T cells. CD40B cells differ from DCs by displaying a rapid migratory pattern undergoing highly dynamic, short-lived and sequential interactions with T cells. In vivo, CD40B cells are home to the secondary lymphoid organs where they accumulate in the B cell zone before traveling to the B/T cell boundary. Moreover, intravenous (i.v.) administration of murine CD40B cells induced an antigen-specific cytotoxic T cell response. Taken together, this data show that CD40B cells home secondary lymphoid organs where they physically interact with T cells to induce antigen-specific T cell responses, thus underscoring their potential as cellular adjuvant for cancer immunotherapy. PMID:26405608

  19. Cellular behavior in micropatterned hydrogels by bioprinting system depended on the cell types and cellular interaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hong, Soyoung; Song, Seung-Joon; Lee, Jae Yeon; Jang, Hwanseok; Choi, Jaesoon; Sun, Kyung; Park, Yongdoo

    2013-08-01

    The fabrication of patterned microstructures within three-dimensional (3D) matrices is a challenging subject in tissue engineering and regenerative medicine. A 3D, free-moving bioprinting system was developed and hydrogels were patterned by varying the process parameters of z-axis moving velocity and ejection velocity. The patterning of hydrogel based microfibers in a 3D matrigel was achieved with dimensions of 4.5 mm length and widths from 79 to 200 μm. Hyaluronan-based hydrogels mixed with fibroblasts (L929), mouse endothelial cells (MS1), or human mesenchymal stem cells (hMSCs) were patterned using a 3D moving axis bioprinter and cell behavior was monitored in culture for up to 16 days. L929 and MS1 cells and hMSCs in patterned hydrogel revealed cell-cell interactions and a morphological dependency on cell types. HMSCs formed spheres through cell aggregation, while L929 cells increased in cellular mass without cell aggregation and MS1 dispersed into the matrix instead of aggregating. The aggregation of hMSCs was attenuated by treatment with Rho kinase (ROCK) inhibitor and cadherin antibody. This reflected the close relationship between cell aggregation and migration with RhoA and cell-cell adhesion molecules. Angiogenic-specific gene expression profiles showed that expression of CD105 decreased to 22% in the ROCK inhibitor group compared to control group. These results showed that cell-based patterns in a 3D matrix are highly dependent on both cell aggregation and migration over time.

  20. Interaction of capsaicinoids with cell membrane models does not correlate with pungency of peppers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geraldo, Vananélia P. N.; Ziglio, Analine C.; Gonçalves, Débora; Oliveira, Osvaldo N.

    2017-04-01

    Mixed monolayers were prepared using phospholipids in order to mimic cell membranes and fractions of capsaicinoids (extracted from Malagueta, Caps-M, and Bhut Jolokia, Caps-B, peppers). According to their surface-pressure isotherms and polarization-modulated infrared reflection absorption spectra (PM-IRRAS), weak molecular-level interactions were observed between Caps and phospholipids. Both Caps-M and Caps-B penetrated into the alkyl tail region of the monolayer, interacted with the phosphate group of the phospholipids and affected hydration of their Cdbnd O groups. Since the physiological activity of Caps is not governed solely by interaction with cell membranes, it should require participation of a neuronal membrane receptor, e.g. vanilloid receptor (TRPV1).

  1. Focal Adhesion Kinase Regulates Expression of Thioredoxin-interacting Protein (TXNIP) in Cancer Cells

    OpenAIRE

    2014-01-01

    Focal Adhesion Kinase (FAK) plays an important role in cancer cell survival. Previous microarray gene profiling study detected inverse regulation between expression of thioredoxin-interacting protein (TXNIP) and FAK, where down-regulation of FAK by siRNA in MCF-7 cells caused up-regulation of TXNIP mRNA level, and in contrast up-regulation of doxycyclin- induced FAK caused repression of TXNIP. In the present report, we show that overexpression of FAK in MCF-7 cells repressed TXNIP promoter ac...

  2. Structure and interactions of the human programmed cell death 1 receptor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Xiaoxiao; Veverka, Vaclav; Radhakrishnan, Anand; Waters, Lorna C; Muskett, Frederick W; Morgan, Sara H; Huo, Jiandong; Yu, Chao; Evans, Edward J; Leslie, Alasdair J; Griffiths, Meryn; Stubberfield, Colin; Griffin, Robert; Henry, Alistair J; Jansson, Andreas; Ladbury, John E; Ikemizu, Shinji; Carr, Mark D; Davis, Simon J

    2013-04-26

    PD-1, a receptor expressed by T cells, B cells, and monocytes, is a potent regulator of immune responses and a promising therapeutic target. The structure and interactions of human PD-1 are, however, incompletely characterized. We present the solution nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR)-based structure of the human PD-1 extracellular region and detailed analyses of its interactions with its ligands, PD-L1 and PD-L2. PD-1 has typical immunoglobulin superfamily topology but differs at the edge of the GFCC' sheet, which is flexible and completely lacks a C" strand. Changes in PD-1 backbone NMR signals induced by ligand binding suggest that, whereas binding is centered on the GFCC' sheet, PD-1 is engaged by its two ligands differently and in ways incompletely explained by crystal structures of mouse PD-1 · ligand complexes. The affinities of these interactions and that of PD-L1 with the costimulatory protein B7-1, measured using surface plasmon resonance, are significantly weaker than expected. The 3-4-fold greater affinity of PD-L2 versus PD-L1 for human PD-1 is principally due to the 3-fold smaller dissociation rate for PD-L2 binding. Isothermal titration calorimetry revealed that the PD-1/PD-L1 interaction is entropically driven, whereas PD-1/PD-L2 binding has a large enthalpic component. Mathematical simulations based on the biophysical data and quantitative expression data suggest an unexpectedly limited contribution of PD-L2 to PD-1 ligation during interactions of activated T cells with antigen-presenting cells. These findings provide a rigorous structural and biophysical framework for interpreting the important functions of PD-1 and reveal that potent inhibitory signaling can be initiated by weakly interacting receptors.

  3. Effects of spermatozoa-oviductal cell coincubation time and oviductal cell age on spermatozoa-oviduct interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aldarmahi, Ahmed; Elliott, Sarah; Russell, Jean; Fazeli, Alireza

    2014-01-01

    The oviduct plays a crucial role in sperm storage, maintenance of sperm viability and sperm transport to the site of fertilisation. The aim of the present study was to investigate the effects of oviductal cell culture passage number, oviductal cell age and spermatozoa-oviduct coincubation times on gene expression in oviductal cells. Immortalised oviductal epithelial cells (OPEC) obtained from two different cell passages (36 and 57) were subcultured three times with and without spermatozoa for 24 h (control group). In a second study, OPEC were cocultured with spermatozoa for different time intervals (0, 4, 12 and 24 h). Expression of adrenomedullin (ADM), heat shock 70 kDa protein 8 (HSPA8) and prostaglandin E synthase (PGES) in OPEC was measured by quantitative polymerase chain reaction. The expression of ADM and HSPA8 was decreased significantly in OPEC cells from Passage 57, particularly in the later subculture group. These effects on HSPA8, but not ADM, expression in OPEC were further altered after coculture with spermatozoa for 24 h. We also demonstrated that spermatozoa-oviduct coculture for 12 and 24 h resulted in significantly higher expression of ADM, HSPA8 and PGES in OPEC. Overall, the data suggest that the OPEC lose some of their properties as a result of oviductal cell aging and that there are spermatozoa-oviduct interactions leading to increased oviductal cell gene expression.

  4. Activation of secretion and surface alteration of cytolytic T-lymphocytes interacting with target cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bykovskaya, S N; Shevelev, A A; Kupriyanova, T A

    1988-01-01

    Cells obtained in mixed lymphocyte culture (MLC) and memory cells adsorbed on the surface of target cells (TC) were examined using scanning and transmission electron microscopy depending on the time of interaction with TC. Three types of lymphocytes were revealed: type I - cells of spherical shape with a smooth surface or an insignificant amount of microvilli; predominantly small and medium-sized lymphocytes contacting TC with non significant involvement of their surface or by several microvilli; type II - oval or round-shaped lymphocytes evenly covered with microvilli with considerably enlarged region of contact; type III cells - predominantly large lymphocytes and lymphoblasts flattened (spread) on TC, with multiple microvilli, ridge-like projections, and ruffles on their surface. TEM revealed activation of the secretory apparatus in the cytoplasm of such lymphocytes. With increased time of interaction, type III cells increase in number (from 8.6% after 10 min to 90.2% after 60 min of incubation). Memory cells show no morphologic signs of secretion in correlation with the absence of lysis of TC on which they are adsorbed. The surface of the lymphocytes adsorbed on the substrate with poly-L-lysin is not noticeably altered. It is suggested that 3 morphological types of lymphocytes correspond to 3 stages of secretion activation. Lymphocyte contact with TC surface is evidently a specific stimulus for activating secretory apparatus of CTL. SEM can be used for quantitation of activated lymphocytes.

  5. Game theory in the death galaxy: interaction of cancer and stromal cells in tumour microenvironment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Amy; Liao, David; Tlsty, Thea D; Sturm, James C; Austin, Robert H

    2014-08-06

    Preventing relapse is the major challenge to effective therapy in cancer. Within the tumour, stromal (ST) cells play an important role in cancer progression and the emergence of drug resistance. During cancer treatment, the fitness of cancer cells can be enhanced by ST cells because their molecular signalling interaction delays the drug-induced apoptosis of cancer cells. On the other hand, competition among cancer and ST cells for space or resources should not be ignored. We explore the population dynamics of multiple myeloma (MM) versus bone marrow ST cells by using an experimental microecology that we call the death galaxy, with a stable drug gradient and connected microhabitats. Evolutionary game theory is a quantitative way to capture the frequency-dependent nature of interactive populations. Therefore, we use evolutionary game theory to model the populations in the death galaxy with the gradients of pay-offs and successfully predict the future densities of MM and ST cells. We discuss the possible clinical use of such analysis for predicting cancer progression.

  6. Colocalization and interaction between elongasome and divisome during a preparative cell division phase in Escherichia coli.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van der Ploeg, René; Verheul, Jolanda; Vischer, Norbert O E; Alexeeva, Svetlana; Hoogendoorn, Eelco; Postma, Marten; Banzhaf, Manuel; Vollmer, Waldemar; den Blaauwen, Tanneke

    2013-03-01

    The rod-shaped bacterium Escherichia coli grows by insertion of peptidoglycan into the lateral wall during cell elongation and synthesis of new poles during cell division. The monofunctional transpeptidases PBP2 and PBP3 are part of specialized protein complexes called elongasome and divisome, respectively, which catalyse peptidoglycan extension and maturation. Endogenous immunolabelled PBP2 localized in the cylindrical part of the cell as well as transiently at midcell. Using the novel image analysis tool Coli-Inspector to analyse protein localization as function of the bacterial cell age, we compared PBP2 localization with that of other E. coli cell elongation and division proteins including PBP3. Interestingly, the midcell localization of the two transpeptidases overlaps in time during the early period of divisome maturation. Försters Resonance Energy Transfer (FRET) experiments revealed an interaction between PBP2 and PBP3 when both are present at midcell. A decrease in the midcell diameter is visible after 40% of the division cycle indicating that the onset of new cell pole synthesis starts much earlier than previously identified by visual inspection. The data support a new model of the division cycle in which the elongasome and divisome interact to prepare for cell division.

  7. Distinctive characteristics of transcriptional profiles from two epithelial cell lines upon interaction with Actinobacillus actinomycetemcomitans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mans, J J; Baker, H V; Oda, D; Lamont, R J; Handfield, M

    2006-08-01

    Transcriptional profiling and gene ontology analyses were performed to investigate the unique responses of two different epithelial cell lines to an Actinobacillus actinomycetemcomitans challenge. A total of 2867 genes were differentially regulated among all experimental conditions. The analysis of these 2867 genes revealed that the predominant specific response to infection in HeLa cells was associated with the regulation of enzyme activity, RNA metabolism, nucleoside and nucleic acid transport and protein modification. The predominant specific response in immortalized human gingival keratinocytes (IHGK) was associated with the regulation of angiogenesis, chemotaxis, transmembrane receptor protein tyrosine kinase signaling, cell differentiation, apoptosis and response to stress. Of particular interest, stress response genes were significantly - yet differently - affected in both cell lines. In HeLa cells, only three regulated genes impacted the response to stress, and the response to unfolded protein was the only term that passed the ontology filters. This strikingly contrasted with the profiles obtained for IHGK, in which 61 regulated genes impacted the response to stress and constituted an extensive network of cell responses to A. actinomycetemcomitans interaction (response to pathogens, oxidative stress, unfolded proteins, DNA damage, starvation and wounding). Hence, while extensive similarities were found in the transcriptional profiles of these two epithelial cell lines, significant differences were highlighted. These differences were predominantly found in pathways that are associated with host-pathogen interactions.

  8. Correlation between receptor-interacting protein 140 expression and directed differentiation of human embryonic stem cells into neural stem cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Zhu-ran; Yu, Wei-dong; Shi, Cheng; Liang, Rong; Chen, Xi; Feng, Xiao; Zhang, Xue; Mu, Qing; Shen, Huan; Guo, Jing-zhu

    2017-01-01

    Overexpression of receptor-interacting protein 140 (RIP140) promotes neuronal differentiation of N2a cells via extracellular regulated kinase 1/2 (ERK1/2) signaling. However, involvement of RIP140 in human neural differentiation remains unclear. We found both RIP140 and ERK1/2 expression increased during neural differentiation of H1 human embryonic stem cells. Moreover, RIP140 negatively correlated with stem cell markers Oct4 and Sox2 during early stages of neural differentiation, and positively correlated with the neural stem cell marker Nestin during later stages. Thus, ERK1/2 signaling may provide the molecular mechanism by which RIP140 takes part in neural differentiation to eventually affect the number of neurons produced.

  9. Correlation between receptor-interacting protein 140 expression and directed differentiation of human embryonic stem cells into neural stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Zhu-Ran; Yu, Wei-Dong; Shi, Cheng; Liang, Rong; Chen, Xi; Feng, Xiao; Zhang, Xue; Mu, Qing; Shen, Huan; Guo, Jing-Zhu

    2017-01-01

    Overexpression of receptor-interacting protein 140 (RIP140) promotes neuronal differentiation of N2a cells via extracellular regulated kinase 1/2 (ERK1/2) signaling. However, involvement of RIP140 in human neural differentiation remains unclear. We found both RIP140 and ERK1/2 expression increased during neural differentiation of H1 human embryonic stem cells. Moreover, RIP140 negatively correlated with stem cell markers Oct4 and Sox2 during early stages of neural differentiation, and positively correlated with the neural stem cell marker Nestin during later stages. Thus, ERK1/2 signaling may provide the molecular mechanism by which RIP140 takes part in neural differentiation to eventually affect the number of neurons produced.

  10. Fibrocyte and T cell interactions promote disease pathogenesis in rheumatoid arthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galligan, Carole L; Keystone, Edward C; Fish, Eleanor N

    2016-05-01

    Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is a systemic autoimmune disease. We previously identified a circulating cell population, fibrocytes, which is activated early in disease. As RA is characterized by the formation of autoantibodies and autoreactive T cells, which often precede symptom onset, the objective of these studies was to characterize fibrocyte activation in the context of T cell activation. Multidimensional flow cytometry was used to characterize the activation status of peripheral blood (PB) fibrocytes and T cells derived from RA patients with different levels of disease activity. Compared to healthy controls, fibrocytes from RA patients exhibited increased activation, denoted as elevated levels of phosphorylation of STAT3 and NF-κB. RA patients had higher numbers of circulating activated Th17 cells and Tregs compared with healthy controls, Th17 cell numbers being higher in patients with moderate to high disease activity. Additionally, increased numbers of FOXP3+ RORγt+ double positive CD4+ T cells were observed in RA patients with more severe disease. Our data confirm that circulating fibrocytes are expanded in RA and that there is a direct correlation between the increase in number of activated fibrocytes and increased number of CD4+ T cells. Moreover, our data suggest that interactions between circulating fibrocytes and activated T cells may promote disease activity. Specifically, we provide in vitro evidence that mouse-derived CD4+ T cells produce GM-CSF which induces fibrocyte proliferation. In turn, activated fibrocytes produce IL-6, promoting Th17 polarization.

  11. Trichomonas vaginalis exosomes deliver cargo to host cells and mediate host∶parasite interactions.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Olivia Twu

    Full Text Available Trichomonas vaginalis is a common sexually transmitted parasite that colonizes the human urogential tract where it remains extracellular and adheres to epithelial cells. Infections range from asymptomatic to highly inflammatory, depending on the host and the parasite strain. Here, we use a combination of methodologies including cell fractionation, immunofluorescence and electron microscopy, RNA, proteomic and cytokine analyses and cell adherence assays to examine pathogenic properties of T. vaginalis. We have found that T.vaginalis produces and secretes microvesicles with physical and biochemical properties similar to mammalian exosomes. The parasite-derived exosomes are characterized by the presence of RNA and core, conserved exosomal proteins as well as parasite-specific proteins. We demonstrate that T. vaginalis exosomes fuse with and deliver their contents to host cells and modulate host cell immune responses. Moreover, exosomes from highly adherent parasite strains increase the adherence of poorly adherent parasites to vaginal and prostate epithelial cells. In contrast, exosomes from poorly adherent strains had no measurable effect on parasite adherence. Exosomes from parasite strains that preferentially bind prostate cells increased binding of parasites to these cells relative to vaginal cells. In addition to establishing that parasite exosomes act to modulate host∶parasite interactions, these studies are the first to reveal a potential role for exosomes in promoting parasite∶parasite communication and host cell colonization.

  12. Engineering interaction between bone marrow derived endothelial cells and electrospun surfaces for artificial vascular graft applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmed, Furqan; Dutta, Naba K; Zannettino, Andrew; Vandyke, Kate; Choudhury, Namita Roy

    2014-04-14

    The aim of this investigation was to understand and engineer the interactions between endothelial cells and the electrospun (ES) polyvinylidene fluoride-co-hexafluoropropylene (PVDF-HFP) nanofiber surfaces and evaluate their potential for endothelialization. Elastomeric PVDF-HFP samples were electrospun to evaluate their potential use as small diameter artificial vascular graft scaffold (SDAVG) and compared with solvent cast (SC) PVDF-HFP films. We examined the consequences of fibrinogen adsorption onto the ES and SC samples for endothelialisation. Bone marrow derived endothelial cells (BMEC) of human origin were incubated with the test and control samples and their attachment, proliferation, and viability were examined. The nature of interaction of fibrinogen with SC and ES samples was investigated in detail using ELISA, XPS, and FTIR techniques. The pristine SC and ES PVDF-HFP samples displayed hydrophobic and ultrahydrophobic behavior and accordingly, exhibited minimal BMEC growth. Fibrinogen adsorbed SC samples did not significantly enhance endothelial cell binding or proliferation. In contrast, the fibrinogen adsorbed electrospun surfaces showed a clear ability to modulate endothelial cell behavior. This system also represents an ideal model system that enables us to understand the natural interaction between cells and their extracellular environment. The research reported shows potential of ES surfaces for artificial vascular graft applications.

  13. Chemical modification of SWNT alters in vitro cell-SWNT interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nimmagadda, Aditya; Thurston, Karen; Nollert, Matthias U; McFetridge, Peter S

    2006-03-01

    Single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNT) have been the focus of considerable attention as a material with extraordinary mechanical and electrical properties. SWNT have been proposed in a number of biomedical applications, including neural, bone, and dental tissue engineering. In these applications, it is clear that surrounding tissues will come into surface contact with SWNT composites, and compatibility between SWNT and host cells must be addressed. This investigation describes the gross physical and chemical effects of different SWNT preparations on in vitro cell viability and metabolic activity. Three different SWNT preparations were analyzed: as purchased (AP-NT), purified (PUR-NT), and functionalized with glucosamine (GA-NT), over concentrations of 0.001-1.0% (wt/vol). With the exception of the lowest SWNT concentrations, increasing concentrations of SWNT resulted in a decrease of cell viability, which was dependent on SWNT preparation. The metabolic activity of 3T3 cells was also dependent on SWNT preparation and concentration. These investigations have shown that these SWNT preparations have significant effects on in vitro cellular function that cannot be attributed to one factor alone, but are more likely the result of several unfavorable interactions. Effects, such as destabilizing the cell membrane, soluble toxic contaminants, and limitations in mass transfer as the SWNT coalesce into sheets, may all play a role in these interactions. Using comprehensive purification processes and modifying the NT-surface chemistry to introduce functional groups or reduce hydrophobicity or both, these interactions can be significantly improved.

  14. Screening membrane interactions of pesticides by cells decorated with chromatic polymer nanopatches.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mech, Agnieszka; Orynbayeva, Zulfiya; Irgebayev, Kaiyr; Kolusheva, Sofiya; Jelinek, Raz

    2009-01-01

    Elucidating the factors contributing to the cell toxicity of pesticides and other environmentally sensitive small molecules is critical for evaluation of their health impacts and for understanding the biological processes that they affect. Disruption and permeation of the plasma membrane, which constitutes the critical interface between the cell and its environment, are recognized initiators of cytotoxicity. We present a new approach for predicting pesticide cytotoxicity through rapid screening of membrane interactions of pesticides using a recently developed live-cell chromatic sensor. The sensing platform comprises living mammalian cells labeled with polydiacetylene (PDA), a chromatic polymer that undergoes intense fluorescence transformations induced by structural perturbations of the membrane bilayer. Within a short time after the addition of membrane-interacting tested compounds to the labeled cells, the PDA patches emit high fluorescence, which can be monitored by conventional spectroscopy and microscopy apparatuses. The chromatic technology facilitates rapid evaluation of membrane activity of pesticide compounds and is capable of distinguishing between toxic effects associated with membrane interactions vs intracellular mechanisms.

  15. Protein corona mitigates the cytotoxicity of graphene oxide by reducing its physical interaction with cell membrane.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duan, Guangxin; Kang, Seung-gu; Tian, Xin; Garate, Jose Antonio; Zhao, Lin; Ge, Cuicui; Zhou, Ruhong

    2015-10-07

    Many recent studies have shown that the way nanoparticles interact with cells and biological molecules can vary greatly in the serum-containing or serum-free culture medium. However, the underlying molecular mechanisms of how the so-called "protein corona" formed in serum medium affects nanoparticles' biological responses are still largely unresolved. Thus, it is critical to understand how absorbed proteins on the surfaces of nanoparticles alter their biological effects. In this work, we have demonstrated with both experimental and theoretical approaches that protein BSA coating can mitigate the cytotoxicity of graphene oxide (GO) by reducing its cell membrane penetration. Our cell viability and cellular uptake experiments showed that protein corona decreased cellular uptake of GO, thus significantly mitigating the potential cytotoxicity of GO. The electron microscopy images also confirmed that protein corona reduced the cellular morphological damage by limiting GO penetration into the cell membrane. Further molecular dynamics (MD) simulations validated the experimental results and revealed that the adsorbed BSA in effect weakened the interaction between the phospholipids and graphene surface due to a reduction of the available surface area plus an unfavorable steric effect, thus significantly reducing the graphene penetration and lipid bilayer damaging. These findings provide new insights into the underlying molecular mechanism of this important graphene protein corona interaction with cell membranes, and should have implications in future development of graphene-based biomedical applications.

  16. Gene expression changes during Giardia-host cell interactions in serum-free medium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferella, Marcela; Davids, Barbara J; Cipriano, Michael J; Birkeland, Shanda R; Palm, Daniel; Gillin, Frances D; McArthur, Andrew G; Svärd, Staffan

    2014-10-01

    Serial Analysis of Gene Expression (SAGE) was used to quantify transcriptional changes in Giardia intestinalis during its interaction with human intestinal epithelial cells (IECs, HT-29) in serum free M199 medium. Transcriptional changes were compared to those in trophozoites alone in M199 and in TYI-S-33 Giardia growth medium. In total, 90 genes were differentially expressed, mainly those involved in cellular redox homeostasis, metabolism and small molecule transport but also cysteine proteases and structural proteins of the giardin family. Only 29 genes changed their expression due to IEC interaction and the rest were due to M199 medium. Although our findings generated a small dataset, it was consistent with our earlier microarray studies performed under different interaction conditions. This study has confined the number of genes in Giardia to a small subset that specifically change their expression due to interaction with IECs.

  17. Interaction of mesoporous silica nanoparticles with human red blood cell membranes: size and surface effects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Yannan; Sun, Xiaoxing; Zhang, Guannan; Trewyn, Brian G; Slowing, Igor I; Lin, Victor S-Y

    2011-02-22

    The interactions of mesoporous silica nanoparticles (MSNs) of different particle sizes and surface properties with human red blood cell (RBC) membranes were investigated by membrane filtration, flow cytometry, and various microscopic techniques. Small MCM-41-type MSNs (∼100 nm) were found to adsorb to the surface of RBCs without disturbing the membrane or morphology. In contrast, adsorption of large SBA-15-type MSNs (∼600 nm) to RBCs induced a strong local membrane deformation leading to spiculation of RBCs, internalization of the particles, and eventual hemolysis. In addition, the relationship between the degree of MSN surface functionalization and the degree of its interaction with RBC, as well as the effect of RBC-MSN interaction on cellular deformability, were investigated. The results presented here provide a better understanding of the mechanisms of RBC-MSN interaction and the hemolytic activity of MSNs and will assist in the rational design of hemocompatible MSNs for intravenous drug delivery and in vivo imaging.

  18. Real-time visualization of nanoparticles interacting with glioblastoma stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pohlmann, Elliot S; Patel, Kaya; Guo, Sujuan; Dukes, Madeline J; Sheng, Zhi; Kelly, Deborah F

    2015-04-08

    Nanoparticle-based therapy represents a novel and promising approach to treat glioblastoma, the most common and lethal malignant brain cancer. Although similar therapies have achieved significant cytotoxicity in cultured glioblastoma or glioblastoma stem cells (GSCs), the lack of an appropriate approach to monitor interactions between cells and nanoparticle-based therapies impedes their further clinical application in human patients. To address this critical issue, we first obtained NOTCH1 positive GSCs from patient-derived primary cultures. We then developed a new imaging approach to directly observe the dynamic nature of nanoparticles at the molecular level using in situ transmission electron microscopy (TEM). Utilizing these tools we were able to visualize real-time movements of nanoparticles interacting with GSCs for the first time. Overall, we show strong proof-of-concept results that real-time visualization of nanoparticles in single cells can be achieved at the nanoscale using TEM, thereby providing a powerful platform for the development of nanotherapeutics.

  19. DNA-protein interaction at erythroid important regulatory elements of MEL cells by in vivo footprinting

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2000-01-01

    Using ligation-mediated PCR method to study the status of DNA-protein interaction at hypersensitive site 2 of locus control Region and β maj promoter of MEL cell line before and after induction, MEL cell has been cultured and induced to differentiation by Hemin and DMSO, then the live cells have been treated with dimethyl sulfate. Ligation mediated PCR has been carried out following the chemical cleavage. The results demonstrate that before and after induction, the status of DNA-protein interaction at both hypersensitive site 2 and β maj promoter change significantly, indicating that distal regulatory elements (locus control region, hypersensitive sites) as well as proximal regulatory elements (promoter, enhancer) of β -globin gene cluster participate in the regulation of developmental specificity.

  20. [Tissue and cell interactions in the oral mucosa after cytostatic drugs administration].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bykov, V L; Leont'eva, I V

    2011-01-01

    In the preceding work ("Morphology", 2011, issue 2), the regularities of oral mucosal (OM) epithelium injury after the cytostatic drug (CSD) treatment and its further regeneration, were reviewed. This paper presents the systematized summary of current literature data and the authors' own findings on the regularities of CSD effect on non-epithelial OM cell populations and their interactions with each other and the epithelium. The changes of intraepithelial tissue homeostasis, associated with CSD effect on intraepithelial lymphocytes, granulocytes, dendritic antigen presenting cells and melanocytes, interacting with epitheliocytes, are described. The data are presented, indicating that along with the epithelium, the cell populations of lamina propria and submucosal connective tissue, as well as the small blood vessels, are important targets of CSD in the OM tissues. The concept of a unifying model, describing tissue, cellular and molecular mechanisms of the oral mucositis development after CSD treatment, is reviewed.

  1. Pre-B-cell leukemia homeobox interacting protein 1 is overexpressed in astrocytoma and promotes tumor cell growth and migration

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Vuurden, Dannis G.; Aronica, Eleonora; Hulleman, Esther; Wedekind, Laurine E.; Biesmans, Dennis; Malekzadeh, Arjan; Bugiani, Marianna; Geerts, Dirk; Noske, David P.; Vandertop, W. Peter; Kaspers, Gertjan J.L.; Cloos, Jacqueline; Würdinger, Thomas; van der Stoop, Petra P.M.

    2014-01-01

    Background Glial brain tumors cause considerable mortality and morbidity in children and adults. Innovative targets for therapy are needed to improve survival and reduce long-term sequelae. The aim of this study was to find a candidate tumor-promoting protein, abundantly expressed in tumor cells but not in normal brain tissues, as a potential target for therapy. Methods In silico proteomics and genomics, immunohistochemistry, and immunofluorescence microscopy validation were performed. RNA interference was used to ascertain the functional role of the overexpressed candidate target protein. Results In silico proteomics and genomics revealed pre-B-cell leukemia homeobox (PBX) interacting protein 1 (PBXIP1) overexpression in adult and childhood high-grade glioma and ependymoma compared with normal brain. PBXIP1 is a PBX-family interacting microtubule-binding protein with a putative role in migration and proliferation of cancer cells. Immunohistochemical studies in glial tumors validated PBXIP1 expression in astrocytoma and ependymoma but not in oligodendroglioma. RNAi-mediated PBXIP1-knockdown in glioblastoma cell lines strongly reduced proliferation and migration and induced morphological changes, indicating that PBXIP1 knockdown decreases glioma cell viability and motility through rearrangements of the actin cytoskeleton. Furthermore, expression of PBXIP1 was observed in radial glia and astrocytic progenitor cells in human fetal tissues, suggesting that PBXIP1 is an astroglial progenitor cell marker during human embryonic development. Conclusion PBXIP1 is a novel protein overexpressed in astrocytoma and ependymoma, involved in tumor cell proliferation and migration, that warrants further exploration as a novel therapeutic target in these tumors. PMID:24470547

  2. Haemophilus haemolyticus Interaction with Host Cells Is Different to Nontypeable Haemophilus influenzae and Prevents NTHi Association with Epithelial Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pickering, Janessa L; Prosser, Amy; Corscadden, Karli J; de Gier, Camilla; Richmond, Peter C; Zhang, Guicheng; Thornton, Ruth B; Kirkham, Lea-Ann S

    2016-01-01

    Nontypeable Haemophilus influenzae (NTHi) is an opportunistic pathogen that resides in the upper respiratory tract and contributes to a significant burden of respiratory related diseases in children and adults. Haemophilus haemolyticus is a respiratory tract commensal that can be misidentified as NTHi due to high levels of genetic relatedness. There are reports of invasive disease from H. haemolyticus, which further blurs the species boundary with NTHi. To investigate differences in pathogenicity between these species, we optimized an in vitro epithelial cell model to compare the interaction of 10 H. haemolyticus strains with 4 NTHi and 4 H. influenzae-like haemophili. There was inter- and intra-species variability but overall, H. haemolyticus had reduced capacity to attach to and invade nasopharyngeal and bronchoalveolar epithelial cell lines (D562 and A549) within 3 h when compared with NTHi. H. haemolyticus was cytotoxic to both cell lines at 24 h, whereas NTHi was not. Nasopharyngeal epithelium challenged with some H. haemolyticus strains released high levels of inflammatory mediators IL-6 and IL-8, whereas NTHi did not elicit an inflammatory response despite higher levels of cell association and invasion. Furthermore, peripheral blood mononuclear cells stimulated with H. haemolyticus or NTHi released similar and high levels of IL-6, IL-8, IL-10, IL-1β, and TNFα when compared with unstimulated cells but only NTHi elicited an IFNγ response. Due to the relatedness of H. haemolyticus and NTHi, we hypothesized that H. haemolyticus may compete with NTHi for colonization of the respiratory tract. We observed that in vitro pre-treatment of epithelial cells with H. haemolyticus significantly reduced NTHi attachment, suggesting interference or competition between the two species is possible and warrants further investigation. In conclusion, H. haemolyticus interacts differently with host cells compared to NTHi, with different immunostimulatory and cytotoxic

  3. Immunoregulatory Effects Triggered by Lactic Acid Bacteria Exopolysaccharides: New Insights into Molecular Interactions with Host Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jonathan Laiño

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Researchers have demonstrated that lactic acid bacteria (LAB with immunomodulatory capabilities (immunobiotics exert their beneficial effects through several molecules, including cell wall, peptidoglycan, and exopolysaccharides (EPS, that are able to interact with specific host cell receptors. EPS from LAB show a wide heterogeneity in its composition, meaning that biological properties depend on the strain and. therefore, only a part of the mechanism of action has been elucidated for these molecules. In this review, we summarize the current knowledge of the health-promoting actions of EPS from LAB with special focus on their immunoregulatory actions. In addition, we describe our studies using porcine intestinal epithelial cells (PIE cells as a model to evaluate the molecular interactions of EPS from two immunobiotic LAB strains and the host cells. Our studies showed that EPS from immunobiotic LAB have anti-inflammatory capacities in PIE cells since they are able to reduce the production of inflammatory cytokines in cells challenged with the Toll-like receptor (TLR-4-agonist lipopolysaccharide. The effects of EPS were dependent on TLR2, TLR4, and negative regulators of TLR signaling. We also reported that the radioprotective 105 (RP105/MD1 complex, a member of the TLR family, is partially involved in the immunoregulatory effects of the EPS from LAB. Our work described, for the first time, that LAB and their EPS reduce inflammation in intestinal epithelial cells in a RP105/MD1-dependent manner. A continuing challenge for the future is to reveal more effector-receptor relationships in immunobiotic-host interactions that contribute to the beneficial effects of these bacteria on mucosal immune homeostasis. A detailed molecular understanding should lead to a more rational use of immunobiotics in general, and their EPS in particular, as efficient prevention and therapies for specific immune-related disorders in humans and animals.

  4. Intrathymic laminin-mediated interactions: role in T cell migration and development

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wilson eSavino

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Intrathymic T cell differentiation is a key process for the development and maintenance of cell-mediated immunity, and occurs concomitantly to highly regulated migratory events. We have proposed a multivectorial model for describing intrathymic thymocyte migration. One of the individual vectors comprises interactions mediated by laminins, a heterotrimeric protein family of the extracellular matrix. Several laminins are expressed in the thymus, being produced by microenvironmental cells, particularly thymic epithelial cells. Also, thymocytes and epithelial cells express integrin-type laminin receptors. Functionally, it has been reported that the dy/dy mutant mouse (lacking the laminin isoform 211 exhibits defective thymocyte differentiation. Several data show haptotactic effects of laminins upon thymocytes, as well as their adhesion on thymic epithelial cells; both effects being prevented by anti-laminin or anti-laminin receptor antibodies. Interestingly, laminin synergizes with chemokines to enhance thymocyte migration, whereas classe-3 semaphorins and B ephrins, which exhibit chemorepulsive effects in the thymus, downregulate laminin-mediated migratory responses of thymocytes. More recently, we showed that knocking down the ITGA6 gene (which encodes the α6 integrin chain of laminin receptors in human thymic epithelial cells, modulates a large number of cell-migration related genes, and results in changes of adhesion pattern of thymocytes onto the thymic epithelium. Overall, laminin-mediated interactions can be placed at the cross-road of the multivectorial process of thymocyte migration, with a direct influence per se, as well as by modulating other molecular interactions associated with the intrathymic trafficking events.

  5. Response to microtubule-interacting agents in primary epithelial ovarian cancer cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    Background Ovarian cancer constitutes nearly 4% of all cancers among women and is the leading cause of death from gynecologic malignancies in the Western world. Standard first line adjuvant chemotherapy treatments include Paclitaxel (Taxol) and platinum-based agents. Taxol, epothilone B (EpoB) and discodermolide belong to a family of anti-neoplastic agents that specifically interferes with microtubules and arrests cells in the G2/M phase of the cell cycle. Despite initial success with chemotherapy treatment, many patients relapse due to chemotherapy resistance. In vitro establishment of primary ovarian cancer cells provides a powerful tool for better understanding the mechanisms of ovarian cancer resistance. We describe the generation and characterization of primary ovarian cancer cells derived from ascites fluids of patients with epithelial ovarian cancer. Methods Chemosensitivity of these cell lines to Taxol, EpoB and discodermolide was tested, and cell cycle analysis was compared to that of immortalized ovarian cancer cell lines SKOV3 and Hey. The relationship between drug resistance and αβ-tubulin and p53 status was also investigated. Results All newly generated primary cancer cells were highly sensitive to the drugs. αβ-tubulin mutation was not found in any primary cell lines tested. However, one cell line that harbors p53 mutation at residue 72 (Arg to Pro) exhibits altered cell cycle profile in response to all drug treatments. Immortalized ovarian cancer cells respond differently to EpoB treatment when compared to primary ovarian cancer cells, and p53 polymorphism suggests clinical significance in the anti-tumor response in patients. Conclusions The isolation and characterization of primary ovarian cancer cells from ovarian cancer patients’ specimens contribute to further understanding the nature of drug resistance to microtubule interacting agents (MIAs) currently used in clinical settings. PMID:23574945

  6. Gene expression analysis uncovers novel hedgehog interacting protein (HHIP) effects in human bronchial epithelial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Xiaobo; Qiu, Weiliang; Sathirapongsasuti, J Fah; Cho, Michael H; Mancini, John D; Lao, Taotao; Thibault, Derek M; Litonjua, Augusto A; Bakke, Per S; Gulsvik, Amund; Lomas, David A; Beaty, Terri H; Hersh, Craig P; Anderson, Christopher; Geigenmuller, Ute; Raby, Benjamin A; Rennard, Stephen I; Perrella, Mark A; Choi, Augustine M K; Quackenbush, John; Silverman, Edwin K

    2013-05-01

    Hedgehog interacting protein (HHIP) was implicated in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) by genome-wide association studies (GWAS). However, it remains unclear how HHIP contributes to COPD pathogenesis. To identify genes regulated by HHIP, we performed gene expression microarray analysis in a human bronchial epithelial cell line (Beas-2B) stably infected with HHIP shRNAs. HHIP silencing led to differential expression of 296 genes; enrichment for variants nominally associated with COPD was found. Eighteen of the differentially expressed genes were validated by real-time PCR in Beas-2B cells. Seven of 11 validated genes tested in human COPD and control lung tissues demonstrated significant gene expression differences. Functional annotation indicated enrichment for extracellular matrix and cell growth genes. Network modeling demonstrated that the extracellular matrix and cell proliferation genes influenced by HHIP tended to be interconnected. Thus, we identified potential HHIP targets in human bronchial epithelial cells that may contribute to COPD pathogenesis.

  7. PRICKLE1 Contributes to Cancer Cell Dissemination through Its Interaction with mTORC2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daulat, Avais M; Bertucci, François; Audebert, Stéphane; Sergé, Arnauld; Finetti, Pascal; Josselin, Emmanuelle; Castellano, Rémy; Birnbaum, Daniel; Angers, Stéphane; Borg, Jean-Paul

    2016-05-23

    Components of the evolutionarily conserved developmental planar cell polarity (PCP) pathway were recently described to play a prominent role in cancer cell dissemination. However, the molecular mechanisms by which PCP molecules drive the spread of cancer cells remain largely unknown. PRICKLE1 encodes a PCP protein bound to the promigratory serine/threonine kinase MINK1. We identify RICTOR, a member of the mTORC2 complex, as a PRICKLE1-binding partner and show that the integrity of the PRICKLE1-MINK1-RICTOR complex is required for activation of AKT, regulation of focal adhesions, and cancer cell migration. Disruption of the PRICKLE1-RICTOR interaction results in a strong impairment of breast cancer cell dissemination in xenograft assays. Finally, we show that upregulation of PRICKLE1 in basal breast cancers, a subtype characterized by high metastatic potential, is associated with poor metastasis-free survival.

  8. Interactions between grape skin cell wall material and commercial enological tannins. Practical implications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bautista-Ortín, Ana Belén; Cano-Lechuga, Mario; Ruiz-García, Yolanda; Gómez-Plaza, Encarna

    2014-01-01

    Commercial enological tannins were used to investigate the role that cell wall material plays in proanthocyanidin adsorption. Insoluble cell wall material, prepared from the skin of Vitis vinifera L. cv. Monastrell berries, was combined with solutions containing six different commercial enological tannins (proanthocyanidin-type tannins). Analysis of the proanthocyanidins in the solution, after fining with cell wall material, using phloroglucinolysis and size exclusion chromatography, provided quantitative and qualitative information on the non-adsorbed compounds. Cell wall material showed strong affinity for the proanthocyanidins, one of the commercial tannins being bound up to 61% in the experiment. Comparison of the molecular mass distribution of the commercial enological tannins in solution, before and after fining, suggested that cell walls affinity for proanthocyanidins was more related with the proanthocyanidin molecular mass than with their percentage of galloylation. These interactions may have some enological implications, especially as regards the time of commercial tannins addition to the must/wine.

  9. A Role for Neuropilins in the Interaction between Schwann Cells and Meningeal Cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Roet, Kasper C D; Wirz, Kerstin T S; Franssen, Elske H P; Verhaagen, J.

    2014-01-01

    In their natural habitat, the peripheral nerve, Schwann cells (SCs) form nicely aligned pathways (also known as the bands of Büngner) that guide regenerating axons to their targets. Schwann cells that are implanted in the lesioned spinal cord fail to align in pathways that could support axon growth

  10. Unraveling the complex behavior of AgNPs driving NP-Cell interactions and toxicity to algal cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Malysheva, Anzhela; Voelcker, Nicolas; Holm, Peter Engelund

    2016-01-01

    toxicity test. In particular, we investigated NP aggregation and dissolution by time-resolved inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry and ultrafiltration and performed mass balance measurements to study the distribution of Ag in the test system. We also determined the amount of extra......- and intracellular Ag by chemically etching AgNPs on the surface of algal cells and used dark field microscopy for their imaging. We observed that positively charged branched polyethilenimine (bPEI)-coated AgNPs tend to aggregate in the presence of algae and interact with test vessels and algal cells, while citrate...

  11. Increased endothelial cell-leukocyte interaction in murine schistosomiasis: possible priming of endothelial cells by the disease.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Suellen D S Oliveira

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND AND AIMS: Schistosomiasis is an intravascular parasitic disease associated with inflammation. Endothelial cells control leukocyte transmigration and vascular permeability being modulated by pro-inflammatory mediators. Recent data have shown that endothelial cells primed in vivo in the course of a disease keep the information in culture. Herein, we evaluated the impact of schistosomiasis on endothelial cell-regulated events in vivo and in vitro. METHODOLOGY AND PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: The experimental groups consisted of Schistosoma mansoni-infected and age-matched control mice. In vivo infection caused a marked influx of leukocytes and an increased protein leakage in the peritoneal cavity, characterizing an inflamed vascular and cellular profile. In vitro leukocyte-mesenteric endothelial cell adhesion was higher in cultured cells from infected mice as compared to controls, either in the basal condition or after treatment with the pro-inflammatory cytokine tumor necrosis factor (TNF. Nitric oxide (NO donation reduced leukocyte adhesion to endothelial cells from control and infected groups; however, in the later group the effect was more pronounced, probably due to a reduced NO production. Inhibition of control endothelial NO synthase (eNOS increased leukocyte adhesion to a level similar to the one observed in the infected group. Besides, the adhesion of control leukocytes to endothelial cells from infected animals is similar to the result of infected animals, confirming that schistosomiasis alters endothelial cells function. Furthermore, NO production as well as the expression of eNOS were reduced in cultured endothelial cells from infected animals. On the other hand, the expression of its repressor protein, namely caveolin-1, was similar in both control and infected groups. CONCLUSION/SIGNIFICANCE: Schistosomiasis increases vascular permeability and endothelial cell-leukocyte interaction in vivo and in vitro. These effects are partially

  12. Interactions of Francisella tularensis with Alveolar Type II Epithelial Cells and the Murine Respiratory Epithelium.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matthew Faron

    Full Text Available Francisella tularensis is classified as a Tier 1 select agent by the CDC due to its low infectious dose and the possibility that the organism can be used as a bioweapon. The low dose of infection suggests that Francisella is unusually efficient at evading host defenses. Although ~50 cfu are necessary to cause human respiratory infection, the early interactions of virulent Francisella with the lung environment are not well understood. To provide additional insights into these interactions during early Francisella infection of mice, we performed TEM analysis on mouse lungs infected with F. tularensis strains Schu S4, LVS and the O-antigen mutant Schu S4 waaY::TrgTn. For all three strains, the majority of the bacteria that we could detect were observed within alveolar type II epithelial cells at 16 hours post infection. Although there were no detectable differences in the amount of bacteria within an infected cell between the three strains, there was a significant increase in the amount of cellular debris observed in the air spaces of the lungs in the Schu S4 waaY::TrgTn mutant compared to either the Schu S4 or LVS strain. We also studied the interactions of Francisella strains with human AT-II cells in vitro by characterizing the ability of these three strains to invade and replicate within these cells. Gentamicin assay and confocal microscopy both confirmed that F. tularensis Schu S4 replicated robustly within these cells while F. tularensis LVS displayed significantly lower levels of growth over 24 hours, although the strain was able to enter these cells at about the same level as Schu S4 (1 organism per cell, as determined by confocal imaging. The Schu S4 waaY::TrgTn mutant that we have previously described as attenuated for growth in macrophages and mouse virulence displayed interesting properties as well. This mutant induced significant airway inflammation (cell debris and had an attenuated growth phenotype in the human AT-II cells. These

  13. Functional genomics of human bronchial epithelial cells directly interacting with conidia of Aspergillus fumigatus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Moore Margo M

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Aspergillus fumigatus (A. fumigatus is a ubiquitous fungus which reproduces asexually by releasing abundant airborne conidia (spores, which are easily respirable. In allergic and immunocompromised individuals A. fumigatus can cause a wide spectrum of diseases, including allergic bronchopulmonary aspergillosis, aspergilloma and invasive aspergillosis. Previous studies have demonstrated that A. fumigatus conidia are internalized by macrophages and lung epithelial cells; however the exact transcriptional responses of airway epithelial cells to conidia are currently unknown. Thus, the aim of this study was to determine the transcriptomic response of the human bronchial epithelial cell line (16HBE14o- following interaction with A. fumigatus conidia. We used fluorescence-activated cell sorting (FACS to separate 16HBE14o- cells having bound and/or internalized A. fumigatus conidia expressing green fluorescent protein from cells without spores. Total RNA was then isolated and the transcriptome of 16HBE14o- cells was evaluated using Agilent Whole Human Genome microarrays. Results Immunofluorescent staining and nystatin protection assays demonstrated that 16HBE14o- cells internalized 30-50% of bound conidia within six hrs of co-incubation. After FAC-sorting of the same cell culture to separate cells associated with conidia from those without conidia, genome-wide analysis revealed a set of 889 genes showing differential expression in cells with conidia. Specifically, these 16HBE14o- cells had increased levels of transcripts from genes associated with repair and inflammatory processes (e.g., matrix metalloproteinases, chemokines, and glutathione S-transferase. In addition, the differentially expressed genes were significantly enriched for Gene Ontology terms including: chromatin assembly, G-protein-coupled receptor binding, chemokine activity, and glutathione metabolic process (up-regulated; cell cycle phase, mitosis, and intracellular

  14. Role of Convective Cells in Nonlinear Interaction of Kinetic Alfven Waves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luk, Onnie

    The convective cells are observed in the auroral ionosphere and they could play an important role in the nonlinear interaction of Alfven waves and disrupt the kinetic Alfven wave (KAW) turbulence. Zonal fields, which are analogous to convective cells, are generated by microturbulence and regulate microturbulence inside toroidally confined plasmas. It is important to understand the role of convective cells in the nonlinear interaction of KAW leading to perpendicular cascade of spectral energy. A nonlinear gyrokinetic particle simulation has been developed to study the perpendicular spectral cascade of kinetic Alfven wave. However, convective cells were excluded in the study. In this thesis project, we have modified the formulation to implement the convective cells to study their role in the nonlinear interactions of KAW. This thesis contains detail description of the code formulation and convergence tests performed, and the simulation results on the role of convective cells in the nonlinear interactions of KAW. In the single KAW pump wave simulations, we observed the pump wave energy cascades to waves with shorter wavelengths, with three of them as dominant daughter waves. Convective cells are among those dominant daughter waves and they enhance the rate of energy transfer from pump to daughter waves. When zonal fields are present, the growth rates of the dominant daughter waves are doubled. The convective cell (zonal flow) of the zonal fields is shown to play a major role in the nonlinear wave interaction, while the linear zonal vector potential has little effects. The growth rates of the daughter waves linearly depends on the pump wave amplitude and the square of perpendicular wavenumber. On the other hand, the growth rates do not depend on the parallel wavenumber in the limit where the parallel wavenumber is much smaller than the perpendicular wavenumber. The nonlinear wave interactions with various perpendicular wavenumbers are also studied in this work. When

  15. Integrin-mediated interactions with extracellular matrix proteins for nucleus pulposus cells of the human intervertebral disc.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bridgen, D T; Gilchrist, C L; Richardson, W J; Isaacs, R E; Brown, C R; Yang, K L; Chen, J; Setton, L A

    2013-10-01

    The extracellular matrix (ECM) of the human intervertebral disc is rich in molecules that interact with cells through integrin-mediated attachments. Porcine nucleus pulposus (NP) cells have been shown to interact with laminin (LM) isoforms LM-111 and LM-511 through select integrins that regulate biosynthesis and cell attachment. Since human NP cells lose many phenotypic characteristics with age, attachment and interaction with the ECM may be altered. Expression of LM-binding integrins was quantified for human NP cells using flow cytometry. The cell-ECM attachment mechanism was determined by quantifying cell attachment to LM-111, LM-511, or type II collagen after functionally blocking specific integrin subunits. Human NP cells express integrins β1, α3, and α5, with over 70% of cells positive for each subunit. Blocking subunit β1 inhibited NP cell attachment to all substrates. Blocking subunits α1, α2, α3, and α5 simultaneously, but not individually, inhibits NP cell attachment to laminins. While integrin α6β1 mediated porcine NP cell attachment to LM-111, we found integrins α3, α5, and β1 instead contributed to human NP cell attachment. These findings identify integrin subunits that may mediate interactions with the ECM for human NP cells and could be used to promote cell attachment, survival, and biosynthesis in cell-based therapeutics.

  16. CellMiner Companion: an interactive web application to explore CellMiner NCI-60 data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Sufang; Gribskov, Michael; Hazbun, Tony R; Pascuzzi, Pete E

    2016-08-01

    The NCI-60 human tumor cell line panel is an invaluable resource for cancer researchers, providing drug sensitivity, molecular and phenotypic data for a range of cancer types. CellMiner is a web resource that provides tools for the acquisition and analysis of quality-controlled NCI-60 data. CellMiner supports queries of up to 150 drugs or genes, but the output is an Excel file for each drug or gene. This output format makes it difficult for researchers to explore the data from large queries. CellMiner Companion is a web application that facilitates the exploration and visualization of output from CellMiner, further increasing the accessibility of NCI-60 data. The web application is freely accessible at https://pul-bioinformatics.shinyapps.io/CellMinerCompanion The R source code can be downloaded at https://github.com/pepascuzzi/CellMinerCompanion.git ppascuzz@purdue.edu Supplementary data are available at Bioinformatics online. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  17. Slit-2 facilitates interaction of P-cadherin with Robo-3 and inhibits cell migration in an oral squamous cell carcinoma cell line.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bauer, Karin; Dowejko, Albert; Bosserhoff, A-K; Reichert, T E; Bauer, Richard

    2011-06-01

    Slits are a group of secreted glycoproteins that act as molecular guidance cues in cellular migration. Recently, several studies demonstrated that Slit-2 can operate as candidate tumour suppressor protein in various tissues. In this study, we show Slit-2 expression in basal cell layers of normal oral mucosa colocalized with P-cadherin expression. In contrast, there is a loss of Slit-2 and P-cadherin expression in mucosa of oral squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC). Our in vitro investigations reveal a correlation of P-cadherin and Slit-2 expression: OSCC cells with induced P-cadherin expression (PCI52_PC) display an increased Slit-2 expression. However, abrogating P-cadherin function with a function-blocking antibody decreases Slit-2 secretion confirming a direct link between P-cadherin and Slit-2. Moreover, experiments with OSCC cells show that Slit-2 interferes with a Wnt related signalling pathway, which in turn affects Slit-2 expression in a feedback loop. Functionally, transwell migration assays demonstrate a Slit-2 dose-dependent decrease of PCI52_PC cell migration. However, there is no influence on migration in mock control cells. Responsible for this migration block might be an interaction of P-cadherin with Roundabout (Robo)-3, a high affinity receptor of Slit-2. Indeed, proximity ligation assays exhibit P-cadherin/Robo-3 interactions on PCI52_PC cells. Additionally, we detect a modulation of this interaction by addition of recombinant Slit-2. Down-regulation of Robo-3 expression via small interfering RNA neutralizes Slit-2 induced migration block in PCI52_PC cells. In summary, our experiments show antitumorigenic effects of Slit-2 on P-cadherin expressing OSCC cells supposedly via modulation of Robo-3 interaction.

  18. Interaction of graphene-related materials with human intestinal cells: an in vitro approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kucki, M.; Rupper, P.; Sarrieu, C.; Melucci, M.; Treossi, E.; Schwarz, A.; León, V.; Kraegeloh, A.; Flahaut, E.; Vázquez, E.; Palermo, V.; Wick, P.

    2016-04-01

    Graphene-related materials (GRM) inherit unique combinations of physicochemical properties which offer a high potential for technological as well as biomedical applications. It is not clear which physicochemical properties are the most relevant factors influencing the behavior of GRM in complex biological environments. In this study we have focused on the interaction of GRM, especially graphene oxide (GO), and Caco-2 cells in vitro. We mimiked stomach transition by acid-treatment of two representative GRM followed by analysis of their physicochemical properties. No significant changes in the material properties or cell viability of exposed Caco-2 cells in respect to untreated GRM could be detected. Furthermore, we explored the interaction of four different GO and Caco-2 cells to identify relevant physicochemical properties for the establishment of a material property-biological response relationship. Despite close interaction with the cell surface and the formation of reactive oxygen species (ROS), no acute toxicity was found for any of the applied GO (concentration range 0-80 μg ml-1) after 24 h and 48 h exposure. Graphene nanoplatelet aggregates led to low acute toxicity at high concentrations, indicating that aggregation, the number of layers or the C/O ratio have a more pronounced effect on the cell viability than the lateral size alone.Graphene-related materials (GRM) inherit unique combinations of physicochemical properties which offer a high potential for technological as well as biomedical applications. It is not clear which physicochemical properties are the most relevant factors influencing the behavior of GRM in complex biological environments. In this study we have focused on the interaction of GRM, especially graphene oxide (GO), and Caco-2 cells in vitro. We mimiked stomach transition by acid-treatment of two representative GRM followed by analysis of their physicochemical properties. No significant changes in the material properties or cell

  19. Juxtacrine interaction of macrophages and bone marrow stromal cells induce interleukin-6 signals and promote cell migration

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jia Chang; Amy J Koh; Hernan Roca; Laurie K McCauley

    2015-01-01

    The bone marrow contains a heterogeneous milieu of cells, including macrophages, which are key cellular mediators for resolving infection and inflammation. Macrophages are most well known for their ability to phagocytose foreign bodies or apoptotic cells to maintain homeostasis;however, little is known about their function in the bone microenvironment. In the current study, we investigated the in vitro interaction of murine macrophages and bone marrow stromal cells (BMSCs), with focus on the juxtacrine induction of IL-6 signaling and the resultant effect on BMSC migration and growth. The juxtacrine interaction of primary mouse macrophages and BMSCs activated IL-6 signaling in the co-cultures, which subsequently enhanced BMSC migration and increased BMSC numbers. BMSCs and macrophages harvested from IL-6 knockout mice revealed that IL-6 signaling was essential for enhancement of BMSC migration and increased BMSC numbers via juxtacrine interactions. BMSCs were the main contributor of IL-6 signaling, and hence activation of the IL-6/gp130/STAT3 pathway. Meanwhile, macrophage derived IL-6 remained important for the overall production of IL-6 protein in the co-cultures. Taken together, these findings show the function of macrophages as co-inducers of migration and growth of BMSCs, which could directly influence bone formation and turnover.

  20. Focal adhesion kinase regulates expression of thioredoxin-interacting protein (TXNIP) in cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ho, Baotran; Huang, Grace; Golubovskaya, Vita M

    2014-01-01

    Focal Adhesion Kinase (FAK) plays an important role in cancer cell survival. Previous microarray gene profiling study detected inverse regulation between expression of thioredoxin-interacting protein (TXNIP) and FAK, where down-regulation of FAK by siRNA in MCF-7 cells caused up-regulation of TXNIP mRNA level, and in contrast up-regulation of doxycyclin- induced FAK caused repression of TXNIP. In the present report, we show that overexpression of FAK in MCF-7 cells repressed TXNIP promoter activity. Treatment of MCF-7 cells with 1alpha, 25-dihydroxyvitamin D3 (1,25D) down-regulated endogenous FAK and up-regulated TXNIP protein level, and treatment with 5-FU decreased FAK protein expression and up-regulated TXNIP protein expression in 293 cells. Moreover, silencing of FAK with siRNA increased TXNIP protein expression, while overexpression of FAK inhibited TXNIP protein expression in 293 cells. In addition, treatment of DBTRG glioblastoma cells with FAK inhibitor Y15 increased TXNIP mRNA, decreased cancer cell viability and increased apoptosis. These results for the first time demonstrate FAK-regulated TXNIP expression which is important for apoptotic, survival and oxidative stress signaling pathways in cancer cells.

  1. Differential expression of galectin-1 and its interactions with cells and laminins in the intervertebral disc.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jing, Liufang; So, Stephen; Lim, Shaun W; Richardson, William J; Fitch, Robert D; Setton, Lori A; Chen, Jun

    2012-12-01

    Galectin-1 (Gal-1), an endogenous β-galactoside-binding protein, binds to laminins, which are highly expressed in the nucleus pulposus (NP) of the intervertebral disc (IVD). The objective of this study is to evaluate the expression of Gal-1 protein in IVD tissues during aging and the effect of Gal-1 on IVD cell adhesion to laminins. Tissues from rat, porcine, and human (scoliosis or disc degeneration) IVDs were used to evaluate Gal-1 expression via immunostaining, RT-PCR, and Western blot analysis. Attachment of isolated IVD cells (porcine and human) on select laminin isoforms (LM-111 and LM-511) was compared with/without pre-incubation with exogenous Gal-1. A biotinylated Gal-1(B-Gal-1) was used to evaluate for binding to IVD cells and to select for IVD cells by magnetic activated cell sorting (MACS). NP cells expressed high levels of Gal-1 protein as compared to anulus fibrosus (AF) cells in immature tissues, while exogenous Gal-1 increased both NP and AF cell attachment to laminins and exhibited a similar binding to both cell types in vitro. With aging, Gal-1 levels in NP tissue appeared to decrease. In addition, incubation with B-Gal-1 was able to promote the retention of more than 50% of IVD cells via MACS. Our results provide new findings for the presence and functional role of Gal-1 within IVDs. Similar staining patterns for Gal-1 and LM-511 in IVD tissue suggest that Gal-1 may serve as an adhesion molecule to interact with both cells and laminins. This MACS protocol may be useful for selecting pure IVD cells from mixed cells of pathological tissue.

  2. Image informatics for studying signal transduction in cells interacting with 3D matrices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tzeranis, Dimitrios S.; Guo, Jin; Chen, Chengpin; Yannas, Ioannis V.; Wei, Xunbin; So, Peter T. C.

    2014-03-01

    Cells sense and respond to chemical stimuli on their environment via signal transduction pathways, complex networks of proteins whose interactions transmit chemical information. This work describes an implementation of image informatics, imaging-based methodologies for studying signal transduction networks. The methodology developed focuses on studying signal transduction networks in cells that interact with 3D matrices. It utilizes shRNA-based knock down of network components, 3D high-content imaging of cells inside the matrix by spectral multi-photon microscopy, and single-cell quantification using features that describe both cell morphology and cell-matrix adhesion pattern. The methodology is applied in a pilot study of TGFβ signaling via the SMAD pathway in fibroblasts cultured inside porous collagen-GAG scaffolds, biomaterials similar to the ones used clinically to induce skin regeneration. Preliminary results suggest that knocking down all rSMAD components affects fibroblast response to TGFβ1 and TGFβ3 isoforms in different ways, and suggest a potential role for SMAD1 and SMAD5 in regulating TGFβ isoform response. These preliminary results need to be verified with proteomic results that can provide solid evidence about the particular role of individual components of the SMAD pathway.

  3. Control of cell interaction using quasi-monochromatic light with varying spatiotemporal coherence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Budagovsky, A. V.; Maslova, M. V.; Budagovskaya, O. N.; Budagovsky, I. A.

    2017-02-01

    By the example of plants, fungi and bacteria, we consider the possibility of controlling the interaction of cells, being in competitive, antagonistic, or parasitic relations. For this aim we used short-time irradiation (a few seconds or minutes) with the red (633 nm) quasi-monochromatic light having different spatiotemporal coherence. It is shown that the functional activity is mostly increased in the cells whose size does not exceed the coherence length and the correlation radius of the light field. Thus, in the case of cells essentially differing in size, it is possible to increase the activity of smaller cells, avoiding the stimulation of larger ones. For example, the radiation having relatively low coherence (Lcoh, rcor plant cells by pathogen fungi, while the exposure to light with less statistical regularity (Lcoh = 4 μm, rcor = 5 μm) inhibits the growth of the Fusarium microcera fungus, infected by the bacterium of the Pseudomonas species. The quasi-monochromatic radiation with sufficiently high spatiotemporal coherence stimulated all interacting species (bacteria, fungi, plants). In the considered biocenosis, the equilibrium was shifted towards the favour of organisms having the highest rate of cell division or the ones better using their adaptation potential.

  4. The interaction between Acanthamoeba polyphaga and human osteoblastic cells in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rocha-Azevedo, Bruno da; Menezes, Gustavo Conde; Silva-Filho, Fernando Costa e

    2006-01-01

    Acanthamoeba spp. contains a group of free-living amoebae widespread in nature. These microorganisms may cause several diseases in humans including osteomyelitis. Here we characterize the cellular interaction between clinical and freshwater isolates of A. polyphaga with human osteoblasts. Amoeba cytoadherence was evaluated quantitatively and qualitatively. We observed that the clinical isolate readily adheres to human osteoblastic cells (HOB) in a saturable and time-dependent fashion. The cytoadhesion appears to be in part dependent on mannose-associated surface glycoconjugates, since prior incubation of the amoebae with alpha-mannose reduced cytoadhesion approximately 75%. Scanning electron microscopy revealed various amoebae exhibiting acanthapodia contacting the surface of osteoblasts. Some osteoblasts developed morphologies resembling apoptotic cells. The clinical isolate was highly toxic to HOB cells during 24 h of cell-protozoan interaction. Cytotoxicity was also dependent on the amoeba-cell ratio. During the cytopathogenic process we observed amoebae in the apparent process of ingestion of target cells and also amoebae extending projections or digipodia into osteoblast targets. The results indicate that A. polyphaga trophozoites attach and destroy human osteoblasts.

  5. Electrophysical characteristics of Azospirillum brasilense Sp245 during interaction with antibodies to various cell surface epitopes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guliy, Olga I; Matora, Larisa Y; Burygin, Gennady L; Dykman, Lev A; Ostudin, Nikolai A; Bunin, Viktor D; Ignatov, Vladimir V; Ignatov, Oleg V

    2007-11-15

    This work was undertaken to examine the electrooptical characteristics of cells of Azospirillum brasilense Sp245 during their interaction with antibodies developed to various cell surface epitopes. We used the dependences of the cell suspension optical density changes induced by electroorientation on the orienting field frequency (740, 1000, 1450, 2000, and 2800kHz). Cell interactions with homologous strain-specific antibodies to the A. brasilense Sp245 O antigen and with homologous antibodies to whole bacterial cells brought about considerable changes in the electrooptical properties of the bacterial suspension. When genus-specific antibodies to the flagellin of the Azospirillum sheathed flagellum and antibodies to the serologically distinct O antigen of A. brasilense Sp7 were included in the A. brasilense Sp245 suspension, the changes caused in the electrooptical signal were slight and had values close to those for the above changes. These findings agree well with the immunochemical characteristics of the Azospirillum O antigens and with the data on the topographical distribution of the Azospirillum major cell surface antigens. The obtained results can serve as a basis for the development of a rapid test for the intraspecies detection of microorganisms.

  6. Interaction of PTPIP51 with Tubulin, CGI-99 and Nuf2 During Cell Cycle Progression

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Monika Wimmer

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Protein tyrosine phosphatase interacting protein 51 (PTPIP51, also known as regulator of microtubule dynamics protein 3, was identified as an in vitro and in vivo interaction partner of CGI-99 and Nuf-2. PTPIP51 mRNA is expressed in all stages of the cell cycle; it is highly expressed six hours post-nocodazole treatment and minimally expressed one hour post-nocodazole treatment. Recent investigations located PTPIP51 protein at the equatorial plate. This s