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Sample records for platelet function phenotypes

  1. Enu mutagenesis identifies a novel platelet phenotype in a loss-of-function Jak2 allele.

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    Nicole M Anderson

    Full Text Available Utilizing ENU mutagenesis, we identified a mutant mouse with elevated platelets. Genetic mapping localized the mutation to an interval on chromosome 19 that encodes the Jak2 tyrosine kinase. We identified a A3056T mutation resulting in a premature stop codon within exon 19 of Jak2 (Jak2(K915X, resulting in a protein truncation and functionally inactive enzyme. This novel platelet phenotype was also observed in mice bearing a hemizygous targeted disruption of the Jak2 locus (Jak2(+/-. Timed pregnancy experiments revealed that Jak2(K915X/K915X and Jak2(-/- displayed embryonic lethality; however, Jak2(K915X/K915X embryos were viable an additional two days compared to Jak2(-/- embryos. Our data suggest that perturbing JAK2 activation may have unexpected consequences in elevation of platelet number and correspondingly, important implications for treatment of hematological disorders with constitutive Jak2 activity.

  2. Platelet Function Tests

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    ... Patient Resources For Health Professionals Subscribe Search Platelet Function Tests Send Us Your Feedback Choose Topic At ... Also Known As Platelet Aggregation Studies PFT Platelet Function Assay PFA Formal Name Platelet Function Tests This ...

  3. Congenital platelet function defects

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... pool disorder; Glanzmann's thrombasthenia; Bernard-Soulier syndrome; Platelet function defects - congenital ... Congenital platelet function defects are bleeding disorders that cause reduced platelet function. Most of the time, people with these disorders have ...

  4. Phenotypic approaches to gene mapping in platelet function disorders - identification of new variant of P2Y12, TxA2 and GPVI receptors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watson, S; Daly, M; Dawood, B; Gissen, P; Makris, M; Mundell, S; Wilde, J; Mumford, A

    2010-01-01

    Platelet number or function disorders cause a range of bleeding symptoms from mild to severe. Patients with platelet dysfunction but normal platelet number are the most prevalent and typically have mild bleeding symptoms. The study of this group of patients is particularly difficult because of the lack of a gold-standard test of platelet function and the variable penetrance of the bleeding phenotype among affected individuals. The purpose of this short review is to discuss the way in which this group of patients can be investigated through platelet phenotyping in combination with targeted gene sequencing. This approach has been used recently to identify patients with mutations in key platelet activation receptors, namely those for ADP, collagen and thromboxane A2 (TxA2). One interesting finding from this work is that for some patients, mild bleeding is associated with heterozygous mutations in platelet proteins that are co-inherited with other genetic disorders of haemostasis such as type 1 von Willebrand's disease. Thus, the phenotype of mild bleeding may be multifactorial in some patients and may be considered to be a complex trait.

  5. Platelet function in dogs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Line A.; Zois, Nora Elisabeth; Pedersen, Henrik D.

    2007-01-01

    Background: Clinical studies investigating platelet function in dogs have had conflicting results that may be caused by normal physiologic variation in platelet response to agonists. Objectives: The objective of this study was to investigate platelet function in clinically healthy dogs of 4...... different breeds by whole-blood aggregometry and with a point-of-care platelet function analyzer (PFA-100), and to evaluate the effect of acetylsalicylic acid (ASA) administration on the results from both methods. Methods: Forty-five clinically healthy dogs (12 Cavalier King Charles Spaniels [CKCS], 12...... applied. However, the importance of these breed differences remains to be investigated. The PFA-100 method with Col + Epi as agonists, and ADP-induced platelet aggregation appear to be sensitive to ASA in dogs....

  6. Collagen can selectively trigger a platelet secretory phenotype via glycoprotein VI.

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    Véronique Ollivier

    Full Text Available Platelets are not only central actors of hemostasis and thrombosis but also of other processes including inflammation, angiogenesis, and tissue regeneration. Accumulating evidence indicates that these "non classical" functions of platelets do not necessarily rely on their well-known ability to form thrombi upon activation. This suggests the existence of non-thrombotic alternative states of platelets activation. We investigated this possibility through dose-response analysis of thrombin- and collagen-induced changes in platelet phenotype, with regards to morphological and functional markers of platelet activation including shape change, aggregation, P-selectin and phosphatidylserine surface expression, integrin activation, and release of soluble factors. We show that collagen at low dose (0.25 µg/mL selectively triggers a platelet secretory phenotype characterized by the release of dense- and alpha granule-derived soluble factors without causing any of the other major platelet changes that usually accompany thrombus formation. Using a blocking antibody to glycoprotein VI (GPVI, we further show that this response is mediated by GPVI. Taken together, our results show that platelet activation goes beyond the mechanisms leading to platelet aggregation and also includes alternative platelet phenotypes that might contribute to their thrombus-independent functions.

  7. Platelet size and age determine platelet function independently

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thompson, C.B.; Jakubowski, J.A.; Quinn, P.G.; Deykin, D.; Valeri, C.R.

    1984-01-01

    A study was undertaken to examine the interaction of platelet size and age in determining in vitro platelet function. Baboon megakaryocytes were labeled in vivo by the injection of 75Se-methionine. Blood was collected when the label was predominantly associated with younger platelets (day 2) and with older platelets (day 9). Size-dependent platelet subpopulations were prepared on both days by counterflow centrifugation. The reactivity of each platelet subpopulation was determined on both days by measuring thrombin-induced aggregation. Platelets were fixed after partial aggregation had occurred by the addition of EDTA/formalin. After removal of the aggregated platelets by differential centrifugation, the supernatant medium was assayed for remaining platelets and 75Se radioactivity. Comparing day 2 and day 9, no significant difference was seen in the rate of aggregation of a given subpopulation. However, aggregation was more rapid in the larger platelet fractions than in the smaller ones on both days. A greater percentage of the 75Se radioactivity appeared in the platelet aggregates on day 2 than on day 9. This effect was independent of platelet size, as it occurred to a similar extent in the unfractionated platelets and in each of the size-dependent platelet subpopulations. The data indicate that young platelets are more active than older platelets. This study demonstrates that size and age are both determinants of platelet function, but by independent mechanisms

  8. Superoxide Dismutase 2 is dispensable for platelet function.

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    Fidler, Trevor P; Rowley, Jesse W; Araujo, Claudia; Boudreau, Luc H; Marti, Alex; Souvenir, Rhonda; Dale, Kali; Boilard, Eric; Weyrich, Andrew S; Abel, E Dale

    2017-10-05

    Increased intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS) promote platelet activation. The sources of platelet-derived ROS are diverse and whether or not mitochondrial derived ROS, modulates platelet function is incompletely understood. Studies of platelets from patients with sickle cell disease, and diabetes suggest a correlation between mitochondrial ROS and platelet dysfunction. Therefore, we generated mice with a platelet specific knockout of superoxide dismutase 2 (SOD2-KO) to determine if increased mitochondrial ROS increases platelet activation. SOD2-KO platelets demonstrated decreased SOD2 activity and increased mitochondrial ROS, however total platelet ROS was unchanged. Mitochondrial function and content were maintained in non-stimulated platelets. However SOD2-KO platelets demonstrated decreased mitochondrial function following thrombin stimulation. In vitro platelet activation and spreading was normal and in vivo, deletion of SOD2 did not change tail-bleeding or arterial thrombosis indices. In pathophysiological models mediated by platelet-dependent immune mechanisms such as sepsis and autoimmune inflammatory arthritis, SOD2-KO mice were phenotypically identical to wildtype controls. These data demonstrate that increased mitochondrial ROS does not result in platelet dysfunction.

  9. Phenotypical and functional characteristics of mesenchymal stem cells from bone marrow: comparison of culture using different media supplemented with human platelet lysate or fetal bovine serum

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-01

    Introduction Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) are multipotent cells able to differentiate into several mesenchymal lineages, classically derived from bone marrow (BM) but potentially from umbilical cord blood (UCB). Although they are becoming a good tool for regenerative medicine, they usually need to be expanded in fetal bovine serum (FBS)-supplemented media. Human platelet lysate (HPL) has recently been proposed as substitute for safety reasons, but it is not yet clear how this supplement influences the properties of expanded MSCs. Methods In the present study, we compared the effect of various media combining autologous HPL with or without FBS on phenotypic, proliferative and functional (differentiation, cytokine secretion profile) characteristics of human BM-derived MSCs. Results Despite less expression of adipogenic and osteogenic markers, MSCs cultured in HPL-supplemented media fully differentiated along osteoblastic, adipogenic, chondrogenic and vascular smooth muscle lineages. The analyses of particular specific proteins expressed during osteogenic differentiation (calcium-sensing receptor (CaSR) and parathormone receptor (PTHR)) showed their decrease at D0 before any induction for MSC cultured with HPL mostly at high percentage (10%HPL). The cytokine dosage showed a clear increase of proliferation capacity and interleukin (IL)-6 and IL-8 secretion. Conclusions This study shows that MSCs can be expanded in media supplemented with HPL that can totally replace FBS. HPL-supplemented media not only preserves their phenotype as well as their differentiation capacity, but also shortens culture time by increasing their growth rate. PMID:22333342

  10. Defining predictive values using three different platelet function tests for CYP2C19 phenotype status on maintenance dual antiplatelet therapy after PCI.

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    Zhang, Hong-Zhe; Kim, Moo Hyun; Han, Jin-Yeong; Jeong, Young-Hoon

    2014-01-01

    Published data suggests that the presence of CYP2C19*2 or *3 loss of function (LOF) alleles is indicative of increased platelet aggregation and a higher risk of adverse cardiovascular events after clopidogrel administration. We sought to determine cut-off values using three different assays for prediction of the CYP2C19 phenotype in Korean percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI) patients. We enrolled 244 patients with drug-eluting stent implantation who were receiving clopidogrel and aspirin maintenance therapy for one month or more. Platelet reactivity was assessed with light transmittance aggregometry (LTA), multiple electrode aggregometry (MEA) and the VerifyNow P2Y12 assay (VN). The CYP2C19 genotype was analyzed by polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and snapshot method. The frequency of CYP2C19 LOF allele carriers was 58.6%. The cut-off values from LTA, MEA and VerifyNow for the identification of LOF allele carriers were as follows: 10 µM ADP-induced LTA ≥ 48 %, VN>242 PRU and MEA ≥ 37 U. Between the three tests, correlation was higher between LTA vs. VN assays (r=0.69) and LTA vs. MEA (r=0.56), with moderate agreement (κ=0.46 and κ=0.46), but between VN assay and MEA, both devices using whole blood showed a lower correlation (r=0.42) and agreement (κ=0.3). Our results provide guidance regarding cut-off levels for LTA, VerifyNow and MEA assays to detect the CYP2C19 LOF allele in patients during dual antiplatelet maintenance therapy.

  11. Overview of platelet physiology and laboratory evaluation of platelet function.

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    Rodgers, G M

    1999-06-01

    Appropriate laboratory testing for the platelet-type bleeding disorders hinges on an adequate assessment in the history and physical examination. Patients with histories and screening laboratory results consistent with coagulation disorders (hemophilia, disseminated intravascular coagulation) are not appropriate candidates for platelet function testing. In contrast, patients with a lifelong history of platelet-type bleeding symptoms and perhaps a positive family history of bleeding would be appropriate for testing. Figure 6 depicts one strategy to evaluate these patients. Platelet morphology can easily be evaluated to screen for two uncommon qualitative platelet disorders: Bernard-Soulier syndrome (associated with giant platelets) and gray platelet syndrome, a subtype of storage pool disorder in which platelet granulation is morphologically abnormal by light microscopy. If the bleeding disorder occurred later in life (no bleeding with surgery or trauma early in life), the focus should be on acquired disorders of platelet function. For those patients thought to have an inherited disorder, testing for vWD should be done initially because approximately 1% of the population has vWD. The complete vWD panel (factor VIII coagulant activity, vWf antigen, ristocetin cofactor activity) should be performed because many patients will have abnormalities of only one particular panel component. Patients diagnosed with vWD should be classified using multimeric analysis to identify the type 1 vWD patients likely to respond to DDAVP. If vWD studies are normal, platelet aggregation testing should be performed, ensuring that no antiplatelet medications have been ingested at least 1 week before testing. If platelet aggregation tests are normal and if suspicion for an inherited disorder remains high, vWD testing should be repeated. The evaluation of thrombocytopenia may require bone marrow examination to exclude primary hematologic disorders. If future studies with thrombopoietin assays

  12. Platelet function testing in pediatric patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hvas, Anne-Mette; Favaloro, Emmanuel J

    2017-01-01

    Introduction: Platelets play a key role in primary hemostasis and are also intricately linked to secondary hemostasis. Investigation of platelet function in children, especially in neonates, is seriously challenged by the volumes required to perform the majority of platelet function tests and due...

  13. Methods for evaluation of platelet function.

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    Lindahl, Tomas L; Ramström, Sofia

    2009-10-01

    There are a multitude of platelet function tests available, reflecting the complex nature of the platelet in haemostasis. No simple single test will ever cover all aspects of platelet function. Some tests focus on the aggregation of platelets, for example aggregometry, other on the swelling in response to hypotonic solutions, i.e. the well-known hypotonic shock response, or adhesion or coagulation and clot retraction, for example thromboelastography. In general there is a lack of clinical studies showing a predictive value of analysis of platelet concentrates.

  14. Valproic acid modulates platelet and coagulation function ex vivo

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bambakidis, Ted; Dekker, Simone E; Halaweish, Ihab

    2017-01-01

    of coagulopathy, it remains unknown whether this is a direct effect of the drug, or the establishment of an overall prosurvival phenotype. We thus conducted an ex-vivo experiment to determine if VPA has an effect on coagulation and platelet function. Ten swine were subjected to traumatic brain injury (TBI...

  15. Effect of ionizing radiation on platelet function in vitro

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kalovidouris, A.E.; Papayannis, A.G.

    1981-01-01

    The effect of ionizing radiation on platelet function was investigated in vitro. Platelet-rich plasma (300x10 9 /l) was irradiated with doses of 1, 4, 10, 20 and 50 Gy. Platelet function tests were performed on both irradiated and control (non-irradiated) platelet samples. The platelet function tests were (1) platelet aggregation by ADP (1, 2, 4 μmol final concentration), adrenaline and collagen, (2) ADP-release from platelets, (3) clot retraction and (4) platelet factor-3 availability. It was found that roentgen irradiation of platelets in vitro did not affect these platelet function tests. (Auth.)

  16. Generation of mesenchymal stromal cells in the presence of platelet lysate: a phenotypic and functional comparison of umbilical cord blood- and bone marrow-derived progenitors

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    Avanzini, Maria Antonietta; Bernardo, Maria Ester; Cometa, Angela Maria; Perotti, Cesare; Zaffaroni, Nadia; Novara, Francesca; Visai, Livia; Moretta, Antonia; Del Fante, Claudia; Villa, Raffaella; Ball, Lynne M.; Fibbe, Willem E.; Maccario, Rita; Locatelli, Franco

    2009-01-01

    Background Mesenchymal stromal cells are employed in various different clinical settings in order to modulate immune response. However, relatively little is known about the mechanisms responsible for their immunomodulatory effects, which could be influenced by both the cell source and culture conditions. Design and Methods We tested the ability of a 5% platelet lysate-supplemented medium to support isolation and ex vivo expansion of mesenchymal stromal cells from full-term umbilical-cord blood. We also investigated the biological/functional properties of umbilical cord blood mesenchymal stromal cells, in comparison with platelet lysate-expanded bone marrow mesenchymal stromal cells. Results The success rate of isolation of mesenchymal stromal cells from umbilical cord blood was in the order of 20%. These cells exhibited typical morphology, immunophenotype and differentiation capacity. Although they have a low clonogenic efficiency, umbilical cord blood mesenchymal stromal cells may possess high proliferative potential. The genetic stability of these cells from umbilical cord blood was demonstrated by a normal molecular karyotype; in addition, these cells do not express hTERT and telomerase activity, do express p16ink4a protein and do not show anchorage-independent cell growth. Concerning alloantigen-specific immune responses, umbilical cord blood mesenchymal stromal cells were able to: (i) suppress T- and NK-lymphocyte proliferation, (ii) decrease cytotoxic activity and (iii) only slightly increase interleukin-10, while decreasing interferon-γ secretion, in mixed lymphocyte culture supernatants. While an indoleamine 2,3-dioxygenase-specific inhibitor did not reverse mesenchymal stromal cell-induced suppressive effects, a prostaglandin E2-specific inhibitor hampered the suppressive effect of both umbilical cord blood- and bone marrow-mesenchymal stromal cells on alloantigen-induced cytotoxic activity. Mesenchymal stromal cells from both sources expressed HLA

  17. Iron deficiency alters megakaryopoiesis and platelet phenotype independent of thrombopoietin.

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    Evstatiev, Rayko; Bukaty, Adam; Jimenez, Kristine; Kulnigg-Dabsch, Stefanie; Surman, Lidia; Schmid, Werner; Eferl, Robert; Lippert, Kathrin; Scheiber-Mojdehkar, Barbara; Kvasnicka, Hans Michael; Khare, Vineeta; Gasche, Christoph

    2014-05-01

    Iron deficiency is a common cause of reactive thrombocytosis, however, the exact pathways have not been revealed. Here we aimed to study the mechanisms behind iron deficiency-induced thrombocytosis. Within few weeks, iron-depleted diet caused iron deficiency in young Sprague-Dawley rats, as reflected by a drop in hemoglobin, mean corpuscular volume, hepatic iron content and hepcidin mRNA in the liver. Thrombocytosis established in parallel. Moreover, platelets produced in iron deficient animals displayed a higher mean platelet volume and increased aggregation. Bone marrow studies revealed subtle alterations that are suggestive of expansion of megakaryocyte progenitors, an increase in megakaryocyte ploidy and accelerated megakaryocyte differentiation. Iron deficiency did not alter the production of hematopoietic growth factors such as thrombopoietin, interleukin 6 or interleukin 11. Megakaryocytic cell lines grown in iron-depleted conditions exhibited reduced proliferation but increased ploidy and cell size. Our data suggest that iron deficiency increases megakaryopoietic differentiation and alters platelet phenotype without changes in megakaryocyte growth factors, specifically TPO. Iron deficiency-induced thrombocytosis may have evolved to maintain or increase the coagulation capacity in conditions with chronic bleeding. Copyright © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  18. Platelet function in the postprandial period

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    Sinzinger Helmut

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Postprandial hyperlipidemia and hyperglycemia have been related to cardiovascular events. Among different underlying mechanisms platelet activation seems to be responsible too. No comparable data between various tests in normo- vs. hyperlipidemics before and at different time intervals are available after a fat meal. We aimed to compare 9 of them within the same patients at several time points in postprandial hyperlipidemia. Results For some tests baseline values between the groups were significantly different (TXB2, platelet sensitivity, sedimentation and WU-test. However, hyperlipidemia revealed a variable influence on the tests examined. Some of the available tests apparently sensitive to show platelet activation reflect the increase in triglycerides (TG, such as the sedimentation index. ADP-induced platelet aggregatory activity in count adjusted washed isolated platelet samples during postprandial hyperlipidemia indicates mildly enhanced platelet activity, but does not seem to induce significant changes in aggregation. In patients with severe hypertriglyceridemia (> 400 mg/dl fasting changes in platelet function are more pronounced due to delayed decay and may last up to 16 hours paralleling TG reaching the prevalue. The overwhelming majority of platelet function tests do not significantly respond to postprandial hyperlipidemia. The correlation between the tests applied is poor. For standardization purpose, platelet aggregation tests, aimed to examine proaggregatory capacity in atherosclerosis, should only be performed at the same time of the day after a fasting period > 6 hours. The great variation in preanalytical work-up on comparison of various tests, large number of platelet tests available and their respective potential value are discussed. Conclusions At present, the suspicion that platelet function is significantly activated in the postprandial period cannot be supported by any of the tests used. The

  19. Platelet mitochondrial function and dysfunction: physiological consequences

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Popov, D.

    2015-01-01

    There is a general trend in revisiting mitochondria using the up-to-date technologies that uncovered novel attributes of this organelle, such as the intracellular displacement to locations where an energy supply is needed, the dynamic shape changes and turnover, the initiation of signaling to the rest of the cell, and the ability to crosstalk with other cellular organelles. The in-depth scrutiny of platelet mitochondria role in health and pathology is included within this ongoing revisiting trend. The current article puts into a nutshell the most recent data on platelet mitochondria function and disease-related ion, focusing on generation of stress- and apoptosis-related signaling molecules, overproduction of reactive oxygen species during activation and disease, on the biomarker potential of platelets mitochondria, and their prospective exploitation in translational applications. These novel findings complete the physiological profile of platelets and could have potential therapeutic effectiveness in platelet-associated disorders.

  20. Platelet mitochondrial function and dysfunction: physiological consequences

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Popov, D.

    2015-07-01

    There is a general trend in revisiting mitochondria using the up-to-date technologies that uncovered novel attributes of this organelle, such as the intracellular displacement to locations where an energy supply is needed, the dynamic shape changes and turnover, the initiation of signaling to the rest of the cell, and the ability to crosstalk with other cellular organelles. The in-depth scrutiny of platelet mitochondria role in health and pathology is included within this ongoing revisiting trend. The current article puts into a nutshell the most recent data on platelet mitochondria function and disease-related ion, focusing on generation of stress- and apoptosis-related signaling molecules, overproduction of reactive oxygen species during activation and disease, on the biomarker potential of platelets mitochondria, and their prospective exploitation in translational applications. These novel findings complete the physiological profile of platelets and could have potential therapeutic effectiveness in platelet-associated disorders.

  1. In vitro function of random donor platelets stored for 7 days in composol platelet additive solution

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    Gupta Ashish

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Background and Aim: Platelets are routinely isolated from whole blood and stored in plasma for 5 days. The present study was done to assess the in vitro function of random donor platelets stored for 7 days in composol platelet additive solution at 22°C. Materials and Methods: The study sample included 30 blood donors of both sex in State Blood Bank, CSM Medical University, Lucknow. Random donor platelets were prepared by platelet rich plasma method. Whole blood (350 ml was collected in anticoagulant Citrate Phosphate Dextrose Adenine triple blood bags. Random donor platelets were stored for 7 days at 22°C in platelet incubators and agitators, with and without additive solution. Results: Platelet swirling was present in all the units at 22°C on day 7, with no evidence of bacterial contamination. Comparison of the mean values of platelet count, platelet factor 3, lactate dehydrogenase, pH, glucose and platelet aggregation showed no significant difference in additive solution, whereas platelet factor 3, glucose and platelet aggregation showed significant difference (P < 0.001 on day 7 without additive solution at 22°C. Conclusion: Our study infers that platelet viability and aggregation were best maintained within normal levels on day 7 of storage in platelet additive solution at 22°C. Thus, we may conclude that in vitro storage of random donor platelets with an extended shelf life of 7 days using platelet additive solution may be advocated to improve the inventory of platelets.

  2. Multiple alterations of platelet functions dominated by increased secretion in mice lacking Cdc42 in platelets

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pleines, Irina; Eckly, Anita; Elvers, Margitta

    2010-01-01

    formation and exocytosis in various cell types, but its exact function in platelets is not established. Here, we show that the megakaryocyte/platelet-specific loss of Cdc42 leads to mild thrombocytopenia and a small increase in platelet size in mice. Unexpectedly, Cdc42-deficient platelets were able to form...

  3. Effects of drugs on platelet function.

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    Morse, E E

    1977-01-01

    Numerous drugs and chemicals affect the function of human blood platelets. The mechanism of action of some medications is partly understood. Aspirin is the most frequently involved drug. It appears to interfere with the platelet release reaction by acetylation of a platelet membrane protein which may be involved in the synthesis of prostaglandins. Other anti-inflammatory drugs, including indomethacin, phenylbutazone, ibuprophen (Motrin) and clonixin, also interfere with the release reaction but have a shorter acting course than aspirin. Some drugs stimulate adenylcyclase (gliclazide) or block phosphodiesterase, (dipyridamole, caffeine) both of which actions lead to an increase in adenosine cyclic 3':5' monophosphate (cAMP) and decrease aggregation by adenosine diphosphate (ADP). These interactions should be known to clinical scientists since patients using these medicaments may manifest abnormal platelet function tests in the laboratory and mild hemorrhagic syndromes in the clinic.

  4. Defining Platelet Function During Polytrauma

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-04-01

    scaffold of the clot after its thrombin-induced polymerization to fibrin fibers. Formation of a stiff fibrin fiber network and its contraction by platelet...In another study (PROTEC T) Refused Participat ion (Yes=Y, No=N, W=Unqua lified , Refused further draws (agreed to keep previous data

  5. Effects of irradiation on platelet function

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rock, G.; Adams, G.A.; Labow, R.S.

    1988-01-01

    Current medical practice involves the irradiation of blood components, including platelet concentrates, before their administration to patients with severe immunosuppression. The authors studied the effect of irradiation on in vitro platelet function and the leaching of plasticizers from the bag, both immediately and after 5 days of storage. The platelet count, white cell count, pH, glucose, lactate, platelet aggregation and release reaction, and serotonin uptake were not altered by the irradiation of random-donor or apheresis units with 2000 rads carried out at 0 and 24 hours and 5 days after collection. The leaching of di(2-ethylhexyl)phthalate from the plastic bags followed by the conversion to mono(2-ethylhexyl)phthalate was not increased by irradiation. Therefore, it is possible to irradiate platelet concentrates on the day of collection and subsequently store them for at least 5 days while maintaining in vitro function. This procedure could have considerable benefit for blood banks involved in the provision of many platelet products

  6. Identification of functional VEGF receptors on human platelets.

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    Selheim, Frode; Holmsen, Holm; Vassbotn, Flemming S

    2002-02-13

    Platelets secrete platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF) and vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) upon stimulation. We have demonstrated that platelets have functionally active PDGF alpha-receptors, a transmembrane tyrosine kinase involved in negative feedback regulation. Here we demonstrate the presence of the related VEGF receptors fms-like tyrosine kinase-1 and kinase-insert domain region on human platelets. VEGF itself did not cause platelet aggregation. However, addition of exogenous VEGF to SFRLLN or thrombin-stimulated platelets potentiated platelet aggregation. Moreover, thrombin-induced phosphoinositide 3-kinase and mitogen-activated protein kinase activity were enhanced in the presence of VEGF.

  7. In vitro function of random donor platelets stored for 7 days in composol platelet additive solution

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gupta Ashish

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Background and Aim: Platelets are routinely isolated from whole blood and stored in plasma for 5 days. This study was done to assess the in vitro function of random donor platelets stored for 7 days in composol platelet additive solution at 22°C. Materials and Methods: The study sample included 30 blood donors of both sex in State Blood Bank, C S M Medical University, Lucknow. Random donor platelets were prepared by the platelet-rich plasma method. Whole blood (350 ml was collected in anticoagulant Citrate Phosphate Dextrose Adenine triple blood bags. Random donor platelets were stored for 7 days at 22°C in platelet incubators and agitators with and without additive solution. Results: Platelet swirling was present in all the units at 22°C on day 7 with no evidence of bacterial contamination. Comparison of the mean values of platelet count, platelet factor 3, lactate dehydrogenase, pH, glucose and platelet aggregation showed no significant difference in additive solution while platelet factor 3, glucose and platelet aggregation showed significant difference (P < 0.001 on day 7 without additive solution at 22°C. Conclusion: Our study infers that the platelet viability and aggregation were the best maintained within normal levels on day 7 of storage in platelet additive solution at 22°C. Thus, we may conclude that in vitro storage of random donor platelets with an extended shelf life of 7 days using platelet additive solution may be advocated to improve the inventory of platelets.

  8. Assessment of platelet function in healthy sedated cats using three whole blood platelet function tests.

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    Ho, Kimberly K; Abrams-Ogg, Anthony C G; Wood, R Darren; O'Sullivan, M Lynne; Kirby, Gordon M; Blois, Shauna L

    2015-05-01

    The objectives of this study were to establish feline references intervals for 3 commercial whole blood platelet function test analyzer systems: Multiplate analyzer (MP; Roche Diagnostics International Ltd., Rotkreuz, Switzerland), Platelet Function Analyzer-100 (PF: Siemens Canada, Mississauga, Ontario, Canada), and Plateletworks Combo-25 kit (PW; Helena Laboratories, Beaumont, TX). Venipuncture was performed on 55 healthy sedated cats, and platelet aggregation in response to adenosine diphosphate (ADP), collagen (COL), and arachidonic acid (AA; MP only) was assessed using citrated blood. For the MP analyzer, median (95% confidence intervals [CIs]) area under curve (Units) for ADP, COL, and AA agonists were 87 (11-176), 81 (32-129), and 91 (59-129), respectively. For the PF analyzer, median (95% CIs) closure time, using COL-ADP cartridges, was 69 (46-89) sec. For the PW assay, median (95% CIs) percent aggregations for ADP and COL agonists were 71 (18-92) and 49 (9-96), respectively, using impedance hematology analyzer platelet counts, and 94 (25-98) and 68 (14-119), respectively, using flow cytometry hematology analyzer platelet counts. There were low correlations between the PF analyzer (COL-ADP cartridge) and MP analyzer (COL agonist; ρ = 0.11), and between the PF analyzer (COL-ADP cartridge) and PW assay (COL agonist using impedance platelet counts; ρ = 0.14). The PW assay percent aggregations using impedance and flow cytometric platelet counts were correlated for both ADP (ρ = 0.64) and COL (ρ = 0.64) agonists. Platelet function testing using these tests are feasible in cats, but 95% CIs are wide, so single results may be difficult to interpret. Platelet counting by impedance or flow cytometry may be used for the PW assay but are not interchangeable. © 2015 The Author(s).

  9. Regulator of G-protein signaling 18 controls both platelet generation and function.

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    Nathalie Delesque-Touchard

    Full Text Available RGS18 is a myeloerythroid lineage-specific regulator of G-protein signaling, highly expressed in megakaryocytes (MKs and platelets. In the present study, we describe the first generation of a RGS18 knockout mouse model (RGS18-/-. Interesting phenotypic differences between RGS18-/- and wild-type (WT mice were identified, and show that RGS18 plays a significant role in both platelet generation and function. RGS18 deficiency produced a gain of function phenotype in platelets. In resting platelets, the level of CD62P expression was increased in RGS18-/- mice. This increase correlated with a higher level of plasmatic serotonin concentration. RGS18-/- platelets displayed a higher sensitivity to activation in vitro. RGS18 deficiency markedly increased thrombus formation in vivo. In addition, RGS18-/- mice presented a mild thrombocytopenia, accompanied with a marked deficit in MK number in the bone marrow. Analysis of MK maturation in vitro and in vivo revealed a defective megakaryopoiesis in RGS18-/- mice, with a lower bone marrow content of only the most committed MK precursors. Finally, RGS18 deficiency was correlated to a defect of platelet recovery in vivo under acute conditions of thrombocytopenia. Thus, we highlight a role for RGS18 in platelet generation and function, and provide additional insights into the physiology of RGS18.

  10. Platelet function and HIV: a case-control study.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Satchell, Claudette S

    2010-03-13

    Cardiovascular disease and myocardial infarction are of increasing concern in HIV-infected populations. Although platelets mediate arterial thrombosis, central to myocardial infarction, data on platelet function in HIV infection are lacking. We hypothesized that HIV-infected patients would have altered platelet reactivity.

  11. Functional genomics in zebrafish permits rapid characterization of novel platelet membrane proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Connor, Marie N; Salles, Isabelle I; Cvejic, Ana; Watkins, Nicholas A; Walker, Adam; Garner, Stephen F; Jones, Chris I; Macaulay, Iain C; Steward, Michael; Zwaginga, Jaap-Jan; Bray, Sarah L; Dudbridge, Frank; de Bono, Bernard; Goodall, Alison H; Deckmyn, Hans; Stemple, Derek L; Ouwehand, Willem H

    2009-05-07

    In this study, we demonstrate the suitability of the vertebrate Danio rerio (zebrafish) for functional screening of novel platelet genes in vivo by reverse genetics. Comparative transcript analysis of platelets and their precursor cell, the megakaryocyte, together with nucleated blood cell elements, endothelial cells, and erythroblasts, identified novel platelet membrane proteins with hitherto unknown roles in thrombus formation. We determined the phenotype induced by antisense morpholino oligonucleotide (MO)-based knockdown of 5 of these genes in a laser-induced arterial thrombosis model. To validate the model, the genes for platelet glycoprotein (GP) IIb and the coagulation protein factor VIII were targeted. MO-injected fish showed normal thrombus initiation but severely impaired thrombus growth, consistent with the mouse knockout phenotypes, and concomitant knockdown of both resulted in spontaneous bleeding. Knockdown of 4 of the 5 novel platelet proteins altered arterial thrombosis, as demonstrated by modified kinetics of thrombus initiation and/or development. We identified a putative role for BAMBI and LRRC32 in promotion and DCBLD2 and ESAM in inhibition of thrombus formation. We conclude that phenotypic analysis of MO-injected zebrafish is a fast and powerful method for initial screening of novel platelet proteins for function in thrombosis.

  12. Platelet Function Tests: Preanalytical Variables, Clinical Utility, Advantages, and Disadvantages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hvas, Anne-Mette; Grove, Erik Lerkevang

    2017-01-01

    Platelet function tests are mainly used in the diagnostic work-up of platelet disorders. During the last decade, the additional use of platelet function tests to evaluate the effect of antiplatelet therapy has also emerged in an attempt to identify patients with an increased risk of arterial thrombosis. Furthermore, platelet function tests are increasingly used to measure residual effect of antiplatelet therapy prior to surgery with the aim of reducing the risk of bleeding. To a limited extend, platelet function tests are also used to evaluate hyperaggregability as a potential marker of a prothrombotic state outside the setting of antiplatelet therapy. This multifaceted use of platelet function tests and the development of simpler point-of-care tests with narrower application have increased the use of platelet function testing and also facilitated the use of platelet function tests outside the highly specialized laboratories. The present chapter describes the preanalytical variables, which should be taken into account when planning platelet function testing. Also, the most widely used platelet function tests are introduced, and their clinical utility and their relative advantages and disadvantages are discussed.

  13. Abnormal megakaryocyte development and platelet function in Nbeal2(-/-) mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kahr, Walter H A; Lo, Richard W; Li, Ling; Pluthero, Fred G; Christensen, Hilary; Ni, Ran; Vaezzadeh, Nima; Hawkins, Cynthia E; Weyrich, Andrew S; Di Paola, Jorge; Landolt-Marticorena, Carolina; Gross, Peter L

    2013-11-07

    Gray platelet syndrome (GPS) is an inherited bleeding disorder associated with macrothrombocytopenia and α-granule-deficient platelets. GPS has been linked to loss of function mutations in NEABL2 (neurobeachin-like 2), and we describe here a murine GPS model, the Nbeal2(-/-) mouse. As in GPS, Nbeal2(-/-) mice exhibit splenomegaly, macrothrombocytopenia, and a deficiency of platelet α-granules and their cargo, including von Willebrand factor (VWF), thrombospondin-1, and platelet factor 4. The platelet α-granule membrane protein P-selectin is expressed at 48% of wild-type levels and externalized upon platelet activation. The presence of P-selectin and normal levels of VPS33B and VPS16B in Nbeal2(-/-) platelets suggests that NBEAL2 acts independently of VPS33B/VPS16B at a later stage of α-granule biogenesis. Impaired Nbeal2(-/-) platelet function was shown by flow cytometry, platelet aggregometry, bleeding assays, and intravital imaging of laser-induced arterial thrombus formation. Microscopic analysis detected marked abnormalities in Nbeal2(-/-) bone marrow megakaryocytes, which when cultured showed delayed maturation, decreased survival, decreased ploidy, and developmental abnormalities, including abnormal extracellular distribution of VWF. Our results confirm that α-granule secretion plays a significant role in platelet function, and they also indicate that abnormal α-granule formation in Nbeal2(-/-) mice has deleterious effects on megakaryocyte survival, development, and platelet production.

  14. Platelet Function Analyzed by Light Transmission Aggregometry

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hvas, Anne-Mette; Favaloro, Emmanuel J

    2017-01-01

    function can also be assessed for hyper-aggregability, but this is less often evaluated. Light transmission aggregometry (LTA) was introduced in the early 1960s and has since been considered the gold standard. This optical detection system is based on changes in turbidity measured as a change in light...... transmission, which is proportional to the extent of platelet aggregation induced by addition of an agonist. LTA is a flexible method, as different agonists can be used in varying concentrations, but performance of the test requires large blood volumes and experienced laboratory technicians as well...

  15. Biochemical and functional abnormalities in hypercholesterolemic rabbit platelets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dalal, K.B.; Ebbe, S.; Mazoyer, E.; Carpenter, D.; Yee, T.

    1990-01-01

    This study was designed to elucidate changes in rabbit platelet lipids induced by a cholesterol rich diet and to explore the possible correlation of these lipid changes with platelet abnormalities. Pronounced biochemical alterations were observed when serum cholesterol levels of 700-1000 mg% were reached. Hypercholesterolemic (HC) platelets contained 37% more neutral lipids and 16% less phospholipids than the controls. Lysolecithin, cholesterol esters and phosphatidylinositol (PI) levels were increased in HC platelets, and the levels of phosphatidylcholine (PC) were decreased. The cholesterol/phospholipid molar ratio of lipidemic platelets increased from 0.55 +/- 0.011 to 0.89 +/- 0.016 (P less than 0.01) in eight weeks. HC platelets had 90% more arachidonic acid (AA) in the PI than normal platelets. No significant changes in AA of PC were observed. Platelet function was monitored by the uptake and release of [14C]serotonin in platelet rich plasma (PRP), using varying concentrations of collagen as an aggregating agent. The uptake of [14C]serotonin in HC and normal platelets ranged from 78-94%. The percent of [14C]serotonin released from normal and HC platelets was proportional to the concentration of collagen. However, lipidemic platelets were hyperreactive to low concentrations of collagen. Incorporation of 50 microM acetylsalicylic acid into the aggregating medium suppressed the release of [14C]serotonin in normal PRP by more than 90%, but had only a partial effect on lipidemic PRP

  16. Platelet function testing: methods of assessment and clinical utility.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Mylotte, Darren

    2012-02-01

    Platelets play a central role in the regulation of both thrombosis and haemostasis yet tests of platelet function have, until recently, been exclusively used in the diagnosis and management of bleeding disorders. Recent advances have demonstrated the clinical utility of platelet function testing in patients with cardiovascular disease. The ex vivo measurement of response to antiplatelet therapies (aspirin and clopidogrel), by an ever-increasing array of platelet function tests, is with some assays, predictive of adverse clinical events and thus, represents an emerging area of interest for both the clinician and basic scientist. This review article will describe the advantages and disadvantages of the currently available methods of measuring platelet function and discuss both the limitations and emerging data supporting the role of platelet function studies in clinical practice.

  17. Platelet function testing: methods of assessment and clinical utility.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Mylotte, Darren

    2011-01-01

    Platelets play a central role in the regulation of both thrombosis and haemostasis yet tests of platelet function have, until recently, been exclusively used in the diagnosis and management of bleeding disorders. Recent advances have demonstrated the clinical utility of platelet function testing in patients with cardiovascular disease. The ex vivo measurement of response to antiplatelet therapies (aspirin and clopidogrel), by an ever-increasing array of platelet function tests, is with some assays, predictive of adverse clinical events and thus, represents an emerging area of interest for both the clinician and basic scientist. This review article will describe the advantages and disadvantages of the currently available methods of measuring platelet function and discuss both the limitations and emerging data supporting the role of platelet function studies in clinical practice.

  18. Monitoring aspirin therapy with the Platelet Function Analyzer-100

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mortensen, Jette; Poulsen, Tina Svenstrup; Grove, Erik Lerkevang

    2008-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Low platelet response to aspirin has been reported to be associated with a high incidence of vascular events. The reported prevalence of aspirin low-responsiveness varies, which may be explained by poor reproducibility of the methods used to evaluate aspirin response and low compliance....... The Platelet Function Analyzer-100 (PFA-100) is a commonly used platelet function test. We aimed to assess the reproducibility of the PFA-100 and the agreement with optical platelet aggregometry (OPA) in healthy volunteers and in patients with coronary artery disease (CAD) treated with low-dose aspirin....... MATERIAL AND METHODS: Twenty-one healthy volunteers and 43 patients with CAD took part in the study. During treatment with aspirin 75 mg daily, all participants had platelet function assessed in duplicate with the PFA-100 and OPA on 4 consecutive days. Additionally, platelet function was assessed before...

  19. An Inherited Platelet Function Defect in Basset Hounds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnstone, I. B.; Lotz, F.

    1979-01-01

    An inherited platelet function defect occurring in a family of basset hounds has been described. The trait is transmitted as an autosomal characteristic and appears to be expressed clinically only in the homozygous state. The characteristics of this platelet defect include: 1) marked bleeding tendencies and prolonged skin bleeding times in either male or female dogs. 2) normal blood coagulation mechanism. 3) adequate numbers of circulating platelets which appear morphologically normal by light microscopy. 4) normal whole blood clot retraction. 5) deficient in vivo platelet consumption and in vitro platelet retention in glass bead columns. 6) defective ADP-induced platelet aggregation in homozygotes, apparently normal ADP response in heterozygotes, and defective collagen-induced platelet aggregation in both. PMID:509382

  20. Platelet transfusions reduce fibrinolysis but do not restore platelet function during trauma hemorrhage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vulliamy, Paul; Gillespie, Scarlett; Gall, Lewis S; Green, Laura; Brohi, Karim; Davenport, Ross A

    2017-09-01

    Platelets play a critical role in hemostasis with aberrant function implicated in trauma-induced coagulopathy. However, the impact of massive transfusion protocols on platelet function during trauma hemorrhage is unknown. The aim of this study was to characterize the effects of platelet transfusion on platelet aggregation and fibrinolytic markers during hemostatic resuscitation. Trauma patients enrolled into the prospective Activation of Coagulation and Inflammation in Trauma study between January 2008 and November 2015 who received at least four units of packed red blood cells (PRBCs) were included. Blood was drawn in the emergency department within 2 hours of injury and at intervals after every four units of PRBCs transfused. Platelet aggregation was assessed in whole blood with multiple electrode aggregometry. Plasma proteins were quantified by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. Of 161 patients who received four or more PRBCs as part of their initial resuscitation, 44 received 8 to 11 units and 28 received 12 units or more. At each timepoint during bleeding, platelet aggregation was similar in patients who had received a platelet transfusion compared with those who had only received other blood products (p > 0.05 for all timepoints). Platelet transfusion during the four PRBC intervals was associated with a decrease in maximum lysis on rotational thromboelastometry (start of interval, 6% [2-12] vs. end of interval, 2% [0-5]; p = 0.001), an increase in plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 (start of interval, 35.9 ± 14.9 vs. end of interval, 66.7 ± 22.0; p = 0.007) and a decrease in tissue plasminogen activator (start of interval, 26.2 ± 10.5 vs. end of interval, 19.0 +/- 5.1; p = 0.04). No statistically significant changes in these parameters occurred in intervals which did not contain platelets. Current hemostatic resuscitation strategies do not appear to restore platelet aggregation during active hemorrhage. However, stored platelets may attenuate fibrinolysis

  1. Rapid Evaluation of Platelet Function With T2 Magnetic Resonance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cuker, Adam; Husseinzadeh, Holleh; Lebedeva, Tatiana; Marturano, Joseph E.; Massefski, Walter; Lowery, Thomas J.; Lambert, Michele P.; Abrams, Charles S.; Weisel, John W.

    2016-01-01

    Objectives: The clinical diagnosis of qualitative platelet disorders (QPDs) based on light transmission aggregometry (LTA) requires significant blood volume, time, and expertise, all of which can be barriers to utilization in some populations and settings. Our objective was to develop a more rapid assay of platelet function by measuring platelet-mediated clot contraction in small volumes (35 µL) of whole blood using T2 magnetic resonance (T2MR). Methods: We established normal ranges for platelet-mediated clot contraction using T2MR, used these ranges to study patients with known platelet dysfunction, and then evaluated agreement between T2MR and LTA with arachidonic acid, adenosine diphosphate, epinephrine, and thrombin receptor activator peptide. Results: Blood from 21 healthy donors was studied. T2MR showed 100% agreement with LTA with each of the four agonists and their cognate inhibitors tested. T2MR successfully detected abnormalities in each of seven patients with known QPDs, with the exception of one patient with a novel mutation leading to Hermansky-Pudlak syndrome. T2MR appeared to detect platelet function at similar or lower platelet counts than LTA. Conclusions: T2MR may provide a clinically useful approach to diagnose QPDs using small volumes of whole blood, while also providing new insight into platelet biology not evident using plasma-based platelet aggregation tests. PMID:28028118

  2. The origin and function of platelet glycosyltransferases

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wandall, Hans H; Rumjantseva, Viktoria; Sørensen, Anne Louise Tølbøll

    2012-01-01

    Platelets are megakaryocyte subfragments that participate in hemostatic and host defense reactions and deliver pro- and anti-angiogenic factors throughout the vascular system. Platelets are anucleated cells and lack a complex secretory apparatus with distinct Golgi/endoplasmic reticulum compartme...

  3. Platelet function in brown bear (Ursus arctos compared to man

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Särndahl Eva

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Information on hemostasis and platelet function in brown bear (Ursus arctos is of importance for understanding the physiological, protective changes during hibernation. Objective The study objective was to document platelet activity values in brown bears shortly after leaving the den and compare them to platelet function in healthy humans. Methods Blood was drawn from immobilized wild brown bears 7-10 days after leaving the den in mid April. Blood samples from healthy human adults before and after clopidogrel and acetylsalicylic acid administration served as control. We analyzed blood samples by standard blood testing and platelet aggregation was quantified after stimulation with various agonists using multiple electrode aggregometry within 3 hours of sampling. Results Blood samples were collected from 6 bears (3 females between 1 and 16 years old and from 10 healthy humans. Results of adenosine diphosphate, aspirin, and thrombin receptor activating peptide tests in bears were all half or less of those in humans. Platelet and white blood cell counts did not differ between species but brown bears had more and smaller red blood cells compared with humans. Conclusion Using three different tests, we conclude that platelet function is lower in brown bears compared to humans. Our findings represent the first descriptive study on platelet function in brown bears and may contribute to explain how bears can endure denning without obvious thrombus building. However, the possibility that our findings reflect test-dependent and not true biological variations in platelet reactivity needs further studies.

  4. Platelet function, anthropometric and metabolic variables in Nigerian ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Platelet function, anthropometric and metabolic variables in Nigerian Type 2 Diabetic patients. ... (BSA) were assessed as indices of anthropometry, fasting blood sugar (FBS), plasma cholesterol and triglycerides (TAG) were determined using standard method and platelet aggregation test was done on the whole blood.

  5. Changes in platelet functional parameters and CD62 P expression ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    EB

    Objective: To investigate the changes in platelet functional parameters and CD62 P expression in liver cirrhosis as a possible .... bleeding and non-bleeding group with hepatic cirrhosis (±s). Group ... the body's coagulate function requirement.

  6. Thioredoxin Inhibitors Attenuate Platelet Function and Thrombus Formation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Metcalfe, Clive; Ramasubramoni, Anjana; Pula, Giordano; Harper, Matthew T; Mundell, Stuart J; Coxon, Carmen H

    2016-01-01

    Thioredoxin (Trx) is an oxidoreductase with important physiological function. Imbalances in the NADPH/thioredoxin reductase/thioredoxin system are associated with a number of pathologies, particularly cancer, and a number of clinical trials for thioredoxin and thioredoxin reductase inhibitors have been carried out or are underway. Due to the emerging role and importance of oxidoreductases for haemostasis and the current interest in developing inhibitors for clinical use, we thought it pertinent to assess whether inhibition of the NADPH/thioredoxin reductase/thioredoxin system affects platelet function and thrombosis. We used small molecule inhibitors of Trx (PMX 464 and PX-12) to determine whether Trx activity influences platelet function, as well as an unbiased proteomics approach to identify potential Trx substrates on the surface of platelets that might contribute to platelet reactivity and function. Using LC-MS/MS we found that PMX 464 and PX-12 affected the oxidation state of thiols in a number of cell surface proteins. Key surface receptors for platelet adhesion and activation were affected, including the collagen receptor GPVI and the von Willebrand factor receptor, GPIb. To experimentally validate these findings we assessed platelet function in the presence of PMX 464, PX-12, and rutin (a selective inhibitor of the related protein disulphide isomerase). In agreement with the proteomics data, small molecule inhibitors of thioredoxin selectively inhibited GPVI-mediated platelet activation, and attenuated ristocetin-induced GPIb-vWF-mediated platelet agglutination, thus validating the findings of the proteomics study. These data reveal a novel role for thioredoxin in regulating platelet reactivity via proteins required for early platelet responses at sites of vessel injury (GPVI and GPIb). This work also highlights a potential opportunity for repurposing of PMX 464 and PX-12 as antiplatelet agents.

  7. Thioredoxin Inhibitors Attenuate Platelet Function and Thrombus Formation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Clive Metcalfe

    Full Text Available Thioredoxin (Trx is an oxidoreductase with important physiological function. Imbalances in the NADPH/thioredoxin reductase/thioredoxin system are associated with a number of pathologies, particularly cancer, and a number of clinical trials for thioredoxin and thioredoxin reductase inhibitors have been carried out or are underway. Due to the emerging role and importance of oxidoreductases for haemostasis and the current interest in developing inhibitors for clinical use, we thought it pertinent to assess whether inhibition of the NADPH/thioredoxin reductase/thioredoxin system affects platelet function and thrombosis. We used small molecule inhibitors of Trx (PMX 464 and PX-12 to determine whether Trx activity influences platelet function, as well as an unbiased proteomics approach to identify potential Trx substrates on the surface of platelets that might contribute to platelet reactivity and function. Using LC-MS/MS we found that PMX 464 and PX-12 affected the oxidation state of thiols in a number of cell surface proteins. Key surface receptors for platelet adhesion and activation were affected, including the collagen receptor GPVI and the von Willebrand factor receptor, GPIb. To experimentally validate these findings we assessed platelet function in the presence of PMX 464, PX-12, and rutin (a selective inhibitor of the related protein disulphide isomerase. In agreement with the proteomics data, small molecule inhibitors of thioredoxin selectively inhibited GPVI-mediated platelet activation, and attenuated ristocetin-induced GPIb-vWF-mediated platelet agglutination, thus validating the findings of the proteomics study. These data reveal a novel role for thioredoxin in regulating platelet reactivity via proteins required for early platelet responses at sites of vessel injury (GPVI and GPIb. This work also highlights a potential opportunity for repurposing of PMX 464 and PX-12 as antiplatelet agents.

  8. The role of platelets in hemostasis and the effects of snake venom toxins on platelet function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Queiroz, Mayara Ribeiro; de Sousa, Bruna Barbosa; da Cunha Pereira, Déborah Fernanda; Mamede, Carla Cristine Neves; Matias, Mariana Santos; de Morais, Nadia Cristina Gomes; de Oliveira Costa, Júnia; de Oliveira, Fábio

    2017-07-01

    The human body has a set of physiological processes, known as hemostasis, which keeps the blood fluid and free of clots in normal vessels; in the case of vascular injury, this process induces the local formation of a hemostatic plug, preventing hemorrhage. The hemostatic system in humans presents complex physiological interactions that involve platelets, plasma proteins, endothelial and subendothelial structures. Disequilibrium in the regulatory mechanisms that control the growth and the size of the thrombus is one of the factors that favors the development of diseases related to vascular disorders such as myocardial infarction and stroke, which are among the leading causes of death in the western world. Interfering with platelet function is a strategy for the treatment of thrombotic diseases. Antiplatelet drugs are used mainly in cases related to arterial thrombosis and interfere in the formation of the platelet plug by different mechanisms. Aspirin (acetylsalicylic acid) is the oldest and most widely used antithrombotic drug. Although highly effective in most cases, aspirin has limitations compared to other drugs used in the treatment of homeostatic disorders. For this reason, research related to molecules that interfere with platelet aggregation are of great relevance. In this regard, snake venoms are known to contain a number of molecules that interfere with hemostasis, including platelet function. The mechanisms by which snake venom components inhibit or activate platelet aggregation are varied and can be used as tools for the diagnosis and the treatment of several hemostatic disorders. The aim of this review is to present the role of platelets in hemostasis and the mechanisms by which snake venom toxins interfere with platelet function. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Platelet function in stored heparinised autologous blood is not superior to in patient platelet function during routine cardiopulmonary bypass.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rolf C G Gallandat Huet

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: In cardiac surgery, cardiopulmonary bypass (CPB and unfractionated heparin have negative effects on blood platelet function. In acute normovolemic haemodilution autologous unfractionated heparinised blood is stored ex-vivo and retransfused at the end of the procedure to reduce (allogeneic transfusion requirements. In this observational study we assessed whether platelet function is better preserved in ex vivo stored autologous blood compared to platelet function in the patient during CPB. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDING: We measured platelet aggregation responses pre-CPB, 5 min after the start of CPB, at the end of CPB, and after unfractionated heparin reversal, using multiple electrode aggregometry (Multiplate® with adenosine diphosphate (ADP, thrombin receptor activating peptide (TRAP and ristocetin activated test cells. We compared blood samples taken from the patient with samples taken from 100 ml ex-vivo stored blood, which we took to mimick blood storage during normovolemic haemodilution. Platelet function declined both in ex-vivo stored blood as well as in blood taken from the patient. At the end of CPB there were no differences in platelet aggregation responses between samples from the ex vivo stored blood and the patient. CONCLUSION/SIGNIFICANCE: Ex vivo preservation of autologous blood in unfractionated heparin does not seem to be profitable to preserve platelet function.

  10. Impact of Silver Nanoparticles on Haemolysis, Platelet Function and Coagulation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Julie Laloy

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Silver nanoparticles (Ag NPs are increasingly used in biomedical applications because of their large antimicrobial spectrum. Data in the literature on the ability of Ag NPs to perform their desired function without eliciting undesirable effects on blood elements are very limited and contradictory. We studied the impact of Ag NPs on erythrocyte integrity, platelet function and blood coagulation. Erythrocyte integrity was assessed by spectrophotometric measurement of haemoglobin release. Platelet adhesion and aggregation was determined by light transmission aggregometry and scanning electron microscopy. The calibrated thrombin generation test was used to study the impact on coagulation cascade. We demonstrated that Ag NPs induced haemolysis. They also increase platelet adhesion without having any impact on platelet aggregation. Finally, they also had procoagulant potential. Bringing all data from these tests together, the no observed effect concentration is 5 μg/mL.

  11. Using the Platelet Function Analyzer-100 for monitoring aspirin therapy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Poulsen, Tina Svenstrup; Mickley, Hans; Korsholm, Lars

    2007-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: The aim of the study was to evaluate the test characteristics of the Platelet Function Analyzer-100 (PFA-100) in patients treated with aspirin. METHODS AND RESULTS: The study consisted of two sub-studies. In study 1, 10 patients with ischemic heart disease (IHD) and 10 controls had...... platelet function assessed by optical platelet aggregation and the PFA-100 method in two 5-week periods. Patients with IHD were treated with aspirin 150 mg/day (first 5-week period), and 300 mg/day (second 5-week period), whereas the controls only received aspirin (150 mg/day) during the second 5-week...... period. From the results of study 1, we found that a cut-off value for the PFA-100 collagen/epinephrine cartridge PFA-100 method and optical platelet aggregation was found. Within...

  12. GFI1B mutation causes a bleeding disorder with abnormal platelet function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stevenson, W S; Morel-Kopp, M-C; Chen, Q; Liang, H P; Bromhead, C J; Wright, S; Turakulov, R; Ng, A P; Roberts, A W; Bahlo, M; Ward, C M

    2013-11-01

    GFI1B is a transcription factor important for erythropoiesis and megakaryocyte development but previously unknown to be associated with human disease. A family with a novel bleeding disorder was identified and characterized. Genetic linkage analysis and massively parallel sequencing were used to localize the mutation causing the disease phenotype on chromosome 9. Functional studies were then performed in megakaryocytic cell lines to determine the biological effects of the mutant transcript. We have identified a family with an autosomal dominant bleeding disorder associated with macrothrombocytopenia, red cell anisopoikilocytosis, and platelet dysfunction. The severity of bleeding is variable with some affected individuals experiencing spontaneous bleeding while other family members exhibit only abnormal bleeding with surgery. A single nucleotide insertion was identified in GFI1B that predicts a frameshift mutation in the fifth zinc finger DNA-binding domain. This mutation alters the transcriptional activity of the protein, resulting in a reduction in platelet α-granule content and aberrant expression of key platelet proteins. GFI1B mutation represents a novel human bleeding disorder, and the described phenotype identifies GFI1B as a critical regulator of platelet shape, number, and function. © 2013 International Society on Thrombosis and Haemostasis.

  13. Effects of alcohol on platelet functions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Renaud, S C; Ruf, J C

    1996-03-15

    Recent epidemiologic studies have consistently shown that moderate intake of alcoholic beverages protect against morbidity and mortality from coronary heart disease and ischemic stroke. By contrast, alcohol drinking may also predispose to cerebral hemorrhage. These observations suggest an effect of alcohol similar to that of aspirin. Several studies in humans and animals have shown that the immediate effect of alcohol, either added in vitro to platelets or 10 to 20 min after ingestion, is to decrease platelet aggregation in response to most agonists (thrombin, ADP, epinephrine, collagen). Several hours later, as, in free-living populations deprived of drinking since the previous day it is mostly secondary aggregation to ADP and epinephrine and aggregation to collagen that are still inhibited in alcohol drinkers. By contrast, in binge drinkers or in alcoholics after alcohol withdrawal, response to aggregation, especially that induced by thrombin, is markedly increased. This rebound phenomenon, easily reproduced in rats, may explain ischemic strokes or sudden death known to occur after episodes of drunkenness. The platelet rebound effect of alcohol drinking was not observed with moderate red wine consumption in man. The protection afforded by wine has been recently duplicated in rats by grape tannins added to alcohol. This protection was associated with a decrease in the level of conjugated dienes, the first step in lipid peroxidation. In other words, wine drinking does not seem to be associated with the increased peroxidation usually observed with spirit drinking. Although further studies are required, the platelet rebound effect of alcohol drinking could be associated with an excess of lipid peroxides known to increase platelet reactivity, especially to thrombin.

  14. The influence of platelets, plasma and red blood cells on functional haemostatic assays

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bochsen, Louise; Johansson, Pär I.; Kristensen, Annemarie Thuri

    2011-01-01

    concentrates, fresh frozen plasma and stored RBC. Pure platelets were investigated by removing plasma components from platelet concentrates by diafiltration against the platelet storage solution Intersol. Plasma was readded by diafiltration against plasma in Intersol. Haemostatic function was evaluated by TEG...... plasma from platelet concentrates eliminated the TEG response and diminished the Multiplate aggregation response, but readding plasma to the pure platelet concentrates restored the response. Each of the elements in whole blood, plasma, platelets and RBC, affected the Multiplate and TEG results...

  15. Study of methods for platelet function testing in the perspective of lab-on-chip applications

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zijp, van H.M.

    2013-01-01

    Research goals Platelets are reactive cells with the main function to maintain blood vessel integrity. Altered platelet function can lead to cardiovascular diseases such as thrombosis or bleeding disorders and platelets can also play a role in atherosclerosis. Current methods to quantify platelet

  16. The effects of ropivacaine hydrochloride on platelet function: an assessment using the platelet function analyser (PFA-100).

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Porter, J

    2012-02-03

    Amide local anaesthetics impair blood clotting in a concentration-dependent manner by inhibition of platelet function and enhanced fibrinolysis. We hypothesised that the presence of ropivacaine in the epidural space could decrease the efficacy of an epidural blood patch, as this technique requires that the injected blood can clot in order to be effective. Ropivacaine is an aminoamide local anaesthetic used increasingly for epidural analgesia during labour. The concentration of local anaesthetic in blood achieved in the epidural space during the performance of an epidural blood patch is likely to be the greatest which occurs (intentionally) in any clinical setting. This study was undertaken to investigate whether concentrations of ropivacaine in blood, which could occur: (i) clinically in the epidural space and (ii) in plasma during an epidural infusion of ropivacaine, alter platelet function. A platelet function analyser (Dade PFA-100, Miami) was employed to assess the effects of ropivacaine-treated blood on platelet function. The greater concentrations of ropivacaine studied (3.75 and 1.88 mg x ml(-1)), which correspond to those which could occur in the epidural space, produced significant inhibition of platelet aggregation. We conclude that the presence of ropivacaine in the epidural space may decrease the efficacy of an early or prophylactic epidural blood patch.

  17. Rethinking platelet function: thrombocytopenia induced immunodeficiency in critical illness

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ostrowski, Sisse R; Johansson, Per Ingemar

    2011-01-01

    Thrombocytopenia in critical illness predicts a poor clinical outcome. Apart from its role in microvascular thrombus formation, it is widely anticipated that this association is indirect rather than causal. Emerging evidence however indicates that platelets are also immune competent cells. Like...... per se results in immunodeficiency through loss of platelet-mediated immune functions, and propose that thrombocytopenia induced immunodeficiency in critical illness in part explain the negative predictive value of low or declining platelet count. We propose that rethinking the risks...... of thrombocytopenia to include not only bleeding but also immunodeficiency and immune dysregulation along with the conduct of studies investigating mechanisms contributing to thrombocytopenia induced poor non-hemorrhagic outcome in critical illness, may be means to improve outcome in these patients through...

  18. Leukocyte-reduction filters and radiation do not cause significant changes in platelet function

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nagura, Yutaka; Tsuno, Hirokazu; Shibata, Yoichi; Takahashi, Koki

    2003-01-01

    In the present study, we investigated the effects of radiation and leukocyte-reduction filters on platelet function. Platelet aggregation in response to collagen and ADP were measured prior to and after irradiation and filtration, as were the platelet recovery rate and complement factor C3. Four types of leukocyte-reduction filter were used, namely positively-, negatively-, and non-charged filters (all of polyester composition), as well as a polyurethane filter. Radiation itself did not significantly affect either the platelet recovery rate, platelet function, or C3 value. On the other hand, filtration through polyester leukocyte-reduction filters resulted in a significant reduction in the platelet recovery rate, an effect not observed with the polyurethane filter. However, none of the filters caused significant changes in platelet function or in C3 value. We concluded that radiation and filtration do not cause significant changes in platelet function, but polyurethane filters are superior to polyester filters in relation to platelet recovery. (author)

  19. Blood conservation techniques and platelet function in cardiac surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boldt, J; Zickmann, B; Czeke, A; Herold, C; Dapper, F; Hempelmann, G

    1991-09-01

    Postoperative alterations in platelet function induced by cardiopulmonary bypass (CPB) are of importance. The effect on platelet aggregation of three different techniques for reducing blood consumption was studied in 30 patients undergoing elective aortocoronary bypass grafting from the beginning of anesthesia until the 1st postoperative day. The patients were randomly divided into three groups, in which 1) a cell separator was used during and after CPB; 2) a hemofiltration device was used; and 3) high-dose aprotinin was used in order to reduce the need of homologous blood. A fourth group undergoing neurosurgery procedures served as a control. Platelet aggregation induced by adenosine diphosphate (concentration 0.25, 0.50, 1.0, and 2.0 microM), collagen (4 microliters/ml), and epinephrine (25 microM) was determined by the turbidimetric method. Platelet aggregation was not significantly changed in the control group, indicating that the operation itself did not impair platelet function. At the end of the operation (after retransfusion of the salvaged pump blood), the maximum aggregation and maximum gradient of aggregation induced by all three inductors were most reduced (significantly) in the cell-separator patients. On the 1st postoperative day, platelet aggregation in the hemofiltration patients and the patients treated with aprotinin had normalized. Aggregation of patients pretreated with high-dose aprotinin was not different from that of the hemofiltration patients throughout the investigation. Blood loss was significantly highest in the cell-separator group (770 +/- 400 ml on the 1st postoperative day) but was not different between the hemofiltration (390 +/- 230 ml) and the aprotinin-treated patients (260 +/- 160 ml).(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  20. Effects of pathogen reduction systems on platelet microRNAs, mRNAs, activation, and function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Osman, Abdimajid; Hitzler, Walter E; Meyer, Claudius U; Landry, Patricia; Corduan, Aurélie; Laffont, Benoit; Boilard, Eric; Hellstern, Peter; Vamvakas, Eleftherios C; Provost, Patrick

    2015-01-01

    Pathogen reduction (PR) systems for platelets, based on chemically induced cross-linking and inactivation of nucleic acids, potentially prevent transfusion transmission of infectious agents, but can increase clinically significant bleeding in some clinical studies. Here, we documented the effects of PR systems on microRNA and mRNA levels of platelets stored in the blood bank, and assessed their impact on platelet activation and function. Unlike platelets subjected to gamma irradiation or stored in additive solution, platelets treated with Intercept (amotosalen+ ultraviolet-A [UVA] light) exhibited significantly reduced levels of 6 of the 11 microRNAs, and 2 of the 3 anti-apoptotic mRNAs (Bcl-xl and Clusterin) that we monitored, compared with platelets stored in plasma. Mirasol (riboflavin+ UVB light) treatment of platelets did not produce these effects. PR neither affected platelet microRNA synthesis or function nor induced cross-linking of microRNA-sized endogenous platelet RNA species. However, the reduction in the platelet microRNA levels induced by Intercept correlated with the platelet activation (p < 0.05) and an impaired platelet aggregation response to ADP (p < 0.05). These results suggest that Intercept treatment may induce platelet activation, resulting in the release of microRNAs and mRNAs from platelets. The clinical implications of this reduction in platelet nucleic acids secondary to Intercept remain to be established.

  1. Platelet modulation of human neutrophil functions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McGarrity, S.T.; Hyers, T.M.; Webster, R.O.

    1986-03-01

    The combined presence of platelets (PLTS) and neutrophils (PMN) at inflammatory sites has led to examination of the hypothesis that interaction of these cells modulates their responses to stimuli. Gel-filtered human PLTS (GFP) were found to inhibit N-formyl-met-leu-phe (FMLP) and phorbol myristate acetate (PMA) stimulated PMN O/sub 2//sup -/ generation in a concentration-dependent fashion. The heat-stable inhibitory activity was present in the supernatants of GFP after incubation with FMLP (10/sup -7/M), thrombin (0.5 U/ml) or ADP (20 ..mu..M), suggesting a role for PLT release products. PLT lysates added to PMN produced up to 80% inhibition of O/sub 2//sup -/ generation for PMA and 40% for FMLP. Like GFP, lysates failed to scavenge O/sub 2/..pi.. produced by xanthine oxidase-hypoxanthine. The inhibitory activity could not be ascribed to serotonin or adenosine. PLT lysates failed to compete with /sup 3/H-FMLP for binding to PMN. Sephadex G-200 fractionation of PLT lysates releaved two peaks of inhibitory activity with apparent Mr > 200,000 and < 14,000 Daltons. Pretreatment of PMN with PLT lysates also results in a concentration-dependent inhibition of degranulation provoked by FMLP (2 x 10/sup -7/M) or PMA (2 ng/ml) and PMN chemotaxis to FMLP (10/sup -8/M). These studies indicate that preformed PLT mediator(s) released in response to physiological stimuli may limit tissue damage by PMN at sites of inflammation.

  2. Assessment of platelet function in healthy cats in response to commonly prescribed antiplatelet drugs using three point-of-care platelet function tests.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ho, Kimberly K; Abrams-Ogg, Anthony Cg; Wood, R Darren; O'Sullivan, M Lynne; Kirby, Gordon M; Blois, Shauna L

    2017-06-01

    Objectives The objective was to determine if decreased platelet function could be detected after treatment with aspirin and/or clopidogrel in healthy cats using three point-of-care platelet function tests that evaluate platelet function by different methods: Multiplate (by impedance), Platelet Function Analyzer 100 (by mechanical aperture closure) and Plateletworks (by platelet counting). Methods Thirty-six healthy cats were randomly assigned to receive one of three oral treatments over an 8 day period: (1) aspirin 5 mg q72h; (2) aspirin 20.25 mg q72h; or (3) clopidogrel 18.75 mg q24h. Cats treated with 5 and 20.25 mg aspirin also received clopidogrel on days 4-8. Platelet aggregation in response to adenosine diphosphate and collagen ± arachidonic acid was assessed on days 1 (baseline), 4 and 8. Aspirin and clopidogrel metabolites were measured by high-performance liquid chromatography. Platelet function in response to treatment was analyzed by ANCOVA, linear regression and Spearman correlation. Results The only solitary aspirin effect was detected using Plateletworks with collagen in cats treated with 20.25 mg. The only effect detected by Multiplate was using arachidonic acid in cats treated with both aspirin 20.25 mg and clopidogrel. All clopidogrel treatment effects were detected by Platelet Function Analyzer 100, Plateletworks (adenosine diphosphate) and Plateletworks (collagen). Drug metabolites were present in all cats, but concentrations were minimally correlated to platelet function test results. Conclusions and relevance Platelet Function Analyzer 100 and Plateletworks using adenosine diphosphate ± collagen agonists may be used to detect decreased platelet function in response to clopidogrel treatment. Either aspirin is not as effective an antiplatelet drug as clopidogrel, or the tests used were not optimal to measure aspirin effect. Cats with heart disease are commonly prescribed antiplatelet drugs to decrease the risk of aortic thromboembolism

  3. Platelet function in patients with a history of unexplained recurrent miscarriage who subsequently miscarry again.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Dempsey, Mark Anthony

    2015-05-01

    This study was designed to evaluate platelet aggregation in pregnant women with a history of unexplained recurrent miscarriage (RM) and to compare platelet function in such patients who go on to have either another subsequent miscarriage or a successful pregnancy.

  4. Platelet Arachidonic Acid Deficiency May Contribute to Abnormal Platelet Function During Parenteral Fish Oil Monotherapy in a Piglet Model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turner, Justine M; Field, Catherine J; Goruk, Sue; Wizzard, Pamela; Dicken, Bryan J; Bruce, Aisha; Wales, Paul W

    2016-05-01

    Fish oil monotherapy has been an advance for treating intestinal failure-associated liver disease (IFALD). However, such patients are at risk of bleeding complications from liver disease and because fish oil can inhibit thrombosis. We have previously reported abnormal platelet function in neonatal piglets given fish oil monotherapy during parenteral nutrition (PN). The purpose of this study was to determine if abnormal fatty acid composition of the platelets could explain the prior observed antiplatelet effect. Neonatal piglets were assigned to 2 treatments: PN with fish oil monotherapy (FO; n = 4) or PN with soy oil (SO; n = 5). On day 14, plasma was collected and platelets isolated by centrifuging. The fatty acid content in plasma and platelet plug were measured using gas liquid chromatography and compared with controls (CON; n = 5). The arachidonic acid (AA) content in the FO group was on average half that of the SO group, in both the platelets (FO, 3.5% vs SO, 7.6%; P = .021; CON, 4.5%-11%) and the plasma (FO, 3.8% vs SO, 9.2%; P = .002; CON, 6.1%-9.5%). No bleeding complications were observed for any piglets during PN treatment. Using platelet mapping, we have previously shown that neonatal piglets given fish oil monotherapy have abnormal platelet function in the AA pathway. This report demonstrates that such an abnormality can be explained by platelet AA deficiency. Platelet mapping and platelet fatty acid analysis should be undertaken in human infants treated with fish oil monotherapy during PN. © 2015 American Society for Parenteral and Enteral Nutrition.

  5. Functional alterations of human platelets following indium-111 labelling using different incubation media and labelling agents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Isaka, Yoshinari; Imaizumi, Masatoshi; Kimura, Kazufumi; Matsumoto, Masayasu; Kamada, Takenobu

    1991-01-01

    Human platelets were labelled in the absence of presence of plasma using 111 In-labelled oxine sulphate, tropolone or 2-mercaptopyridine-N-oxide (MPO). Under in vitro and in vivo conditions, platelet functions were evaluated by measuring their aggregability, survival, recovery and early distribution. High labelling efficiency was achieved in saline labelling, whereas with plasma labelling, it was necessary to concentrate the platelet-rich plasma to 4.8x10 6 platelets/μl. The aggregation of platelets labelled in plasma or saline was compared with that of controls; platelets labelled in saline showed lower aggregability in 2 μM ADP but not in 5 μM ADP nor with collagen. No significant differences in platelet survival and recovery were noted between platelets labelled in plasma and those labelled in saline. Our results indicate that partial loss of ADP aggregability in vitro does not influence the in vivo viability of platelets labelled in saline. Scintigraphic studies showed that platelets labelled in a saline medium were temporarily sequestrated in the liver but not in the spleen or heart. Thus, platelet labelling in saline does not affect platelet function adversely, but platelets labelled in plasma are more desirable for assessing the early distribution of platelets in the reticuloendothelial system. (orig.)

  6. The use of indium-111 platelet scintigraphy in man: comparisons with in vitro tests and in vivo platelet function--a five year experience

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ezikowitz, M.D.; Ferri, P.; Pope, C.; Smith, E.O.; Snyder, E.L.

    1985-01-01

    In this paper, the authors present data collected from 540 patients between July 1978 and July 1983. They discuss briefly the method they employed for labeling platelets, emphasizing in vivo and in vitro markers of platelet function used for quality control of platelet preparation. They discuss the application of their technique for identification of mural left ventrical trombi, and review the disparity between in vivo and in vitro tests of platelet function. Then they deal with diagnosis of subacute bacterial endocarditis, deep veonus thrombosis, coronary trombi, left arterial masses, and the use of tomographic imaging. Finally they report changes in platelet function in stored platelets from normal volunteers

  7. Development of pro-inflammatory phenotype in monocytes after engulfing Hb-activated platelets in hemolytic disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singhal, Rashi; Chawla, Sheetal; Rathore, Deepak K; Bhasym, Angika; Annarapu, Gowtham K; Sharma, Vandana; Seth, Tulika; Guchhait, Prasenjit

    2017-02-01

    Monocytes and macrophage combat infections and maintain homeostatic balance by engulfing microbes and apoptotic cells, and releasing inflammatory cytokines. Studies have described that these cells develop anti-inflammatory properties upon recycling the free-hemoglobin (Hb) in hemolytic conditions. While investigating the phenotype of monocytes in two hemolytic disorders-paroxysmal nocturnal hemoglobinuria (PNH) and sickle cell disease (SCD), we observed a high number of pro-inflammatory (CD14 + CD16 hi ) monocytes in these patients. We further investigated in vitro the phenotype of these monocytes and found an estimated 55% of CD14 + cells were transformed into the CD14 + CD16 hi subset after engulfing Hb-activated platelets. The CD14 + CD16 hi monocytes, which were positive for both intracellular Hb and CD42b (platelet marker), secreted significant amounts of TNF-α and IL-1β, unlike monocytes treated with only free Hb, which secreted more IL-10. We have shown recently the presence of a high number of Hb-bound hyperactive platelets in patients with both diseases, and further investigated if the monocytes engulfed these activated platelets in vivo. As expected, we found 95% of CD14 + CD16 hi monocytes with both intracellular Hb and CD42b in both diseases, and they expressed high TNF-α. Furthermore our data showed that these monocytes whether from patients or developed in vitro after treatment with Hb-activated platelets, secreted significant amounts of tissue factor. Besides, these CD14 + CD16 hi monocytes displayed significantly decreased phagocytosis of E. coli. Our study therefore suggests that this alteration of monocyte phenotype may play a role in the increased propensity to pro-inflammatory/coagulant complications observed in these hemolytic disorders-PNH and SCD. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Platelet content of nitric oxide synthase 3 phosphorylated at Serine 1177 is associated with the functional response of platelets to aspirin.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Javier Modrego

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: To analyse if platelet responsiveness to aspirin (ASA may be associated with a different ability of platelets to generate nitric oxide (NO. PATIENTS/METHODS: Platelets were obtained from 50 patients with stable coronary ischemia and were divided into ASA-sensitive (n = 26 and ASA-resistant (n = 24 using a platelet functionality test (PFA-100. RESULTS: ASA-sensitive platelets tended to release more NO (determined as nitrite + nitrate than ASA-resistant platelets but it did not reach statistical significance. Protein expression of nitric oxide synthase 3 (NOS3 was higher in ASA-sensitive than in ASA-resistant platelets but there were no differences in the platelet expression of nitric oxide synthase 2 (NOS2 isoform. The highest NOS3 expression in ASA-sensitive platelets was independent of the presence of T-to-C mutation at nucleotide position -786 (T(-786 → C in the NOS3-coding gene. However, platelet content of phosphorylated NOS3 at Serine (Ser(1177, an active form of NOS3, was higher in ASA-sensitive than in ASA-resistant platelets. The level of platelet NOS3 Ser(1177 phosphorylation was positively associated with the closure time in the PFA-100 test. In vitro, collagen failed to stimulate the aggregation of ASA-sensitive platelets, determined by lumiaggregometry, and it was associated with a significant increase (p = 0.018 of NOS3 phosphorylation at Ser(1177. On the contrary, collagen stimulated the aggregation of ASA-resistant platelets but did not significantly modify the platelet content of phosphorylated NOS3 Ser(1177. During collagen stimulation the release of NO from ASA-sensitive platelets was significantly enhanced but it was not modified in ASA-resistant platelets. CONCLUSIONS: Functional platelet responsiveness to ASA was associated with the platelet content of phosphorylated NOS3 at Ser(1177.

  9. Coagulation parameters and platelet function analysis in patients with acromegaly.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colak, A; Yılmaz, H; Temel, Y; Demirpence, M; Simsek, N; Karademirci, İ; Bozkurt, U; Yasar, E

    2016-01-01

    Acromegaly is associated with increased cardiovascular morbidity and mortality. The data about the evaluation of coagulation and fibrinolysis in acromegalic patients are very limited and to our knowledge, platelet function analysis has never been investigated. So, we aimed to investigate the levels of protein C, protein S, fibrinogen, antithrombin 3 and platelet function analysis in patients with acromegaly. Thirty-nine patients with active acromegaly and 35 healthy subjects were included in the study. Plasma glucose and lipid profile, fibrinogen levels, GH and IGF-1 levels and protein C, protein S and antithrombin III activities were measured in all study subjects. Also, platelet function analysis was evaluated with collagen/ADP and collagen-epinephrine-closure times. Demographic characteristics of the patient and the control were similar. As expected, fasting blood glucose levels and serum GH and IGF-1 levels were significantly higher in the patient group compared with the control group (pglc: 0.002, pGH: 0.006, pIGF-1: 0.001, respectively). But lipid parameters were similar between the two groups. While serum fibrinogen and antithrombin III levels were found to be significantly higher in acromegaly group (p fibrinogen: 0.005 and pantithrombin III: 0.001), protein S and protein C activity values were significantly lower in the patient group (p protein S: 0.001, p protein C: 0.001). Also significantly enhanced platelet function (measured by collagen/ADP- and collagen/epinephrine-closure times) was demonstrated in acromegaly (p col-ADP: 0.002, p col-epinephrine: 0.002). The results did not change, when we excluded six patients with type 2 diabetes in the acromegaly group. There was a negative correlation between serum GH levels and protein S (r: -0.25, p: 0.04)) and protein C (r: -0.26, p: 0.04) values. Likewise, there was a negative correlation between IGF-1 levels and protein C values (r: -0.39, p: 0.002), protein S values (r: -0.39, p: 0.001), collagen

  10. [Platelet function in acute myeloid leukemia. II. Aggregation of isolated platelets].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zawilska, K; Komarnicki, M; Mańka, B

    1978-01-01

    In 22 patients with acute myeloid leukaemia (17 cases of myeloblastic leukaemia, 4 cases of myelomonocytic leukaemia and 1 case of undifferentiated-cell leukaemia) platelets were isolated from the plasma by the method of Nicholls and Hampton as modified by Levy-Toledano by centrifugation in albumin gradient. The aim of platelet isolation was their "concentration" in cases of thrombocytopenia to values making possible aggregation tests, and platelet separation from the influence of plasma factors. Then aggregation of isolated platelets caused by ADP was studied. In 16 out of 22 patients a fall of aggregation was observed, with the mean values of aggregation rate and intensity were significantly lower. Parallelly done determinations of aggregating activity released from the platelets by thrombin showed lower values as compared with platelets from healthy subjects. In might be thought, in this connection, that the demonstrated reduction of isolated platelets is associated with a diminution of the nucleotide pool or disturbances of the platelet release reaction. The disturbances of the platelet release reaction. The disturbances of aggregation of isolated platelets and reduction of the aggregating activity were most pronounced in acute myelomonocytic leukaemia.

  11. The effect of variation in donor platelet function on transfusion outcome: a semirandomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelly, Anne M; Garner, Stephen F; Foukaneli, Theodora; Godec, Thomas R; Herbert, Nina; Kahan, Brennan C; Deary, Alison; Bakrania, Lekha; Llewelyn, Charlotte; Ouwehand, Willem H; Williamson, Lorna M; Cardigan, Rebecca A

    2017-07-13

    The effect of variation in platelet function in platelet donors on patient outcome following platelet transfusion is unknown. This trial assessed the hypothesis that platelets collected from donors with highly responsive platelets to agonists in vitro assessed by flow cytometry (high-responder donors) are cleared more quickly from the circulation than those from low-responder donors, resulting in lower platelet count increments following transfusion. This parallel group, semirandomized double-blinded trial was conducted in a single center in the United Kingdom. Eligible patients were those 16 or older with thrombocytopenia secondary to bone marrow failure, requiring prophylactic platelet transfusion. Patients were randomly assigned to receive a platelet donation from a high- or low-responder donor when both were available, or when only 1 type of platelet was available, patients received that. Participants, investigators, and those assessing outcomes were masked to group assignment. The primary end point was the platelet count increment 10 to 90 minutes following transfusion. Analysis was by intention to treat. Fifty-one patients were assigned to receive platelets from low-responder donors, and 49 from high-responder donors (47 of which were randomized and 53 nonrandomized). There was no significant difference in platelet count increment 10 to 90 minutes following transfusion in patients receiving platelets from high-responder (mean, 21.0 × 10 9 /L; 95% confidence interval [CI], 4.9-37.2) or low-responder (mean, 23.3 × 10 9 /L; 95% CI, 7.8-38.9) donors (mean difference, 2.3; 95% CI, -1.1 to 5.7; P = .18). These results support the current policy of not selecting platelet donors on the basis of platelet function for prophylactic platelet transfusion. © 2017 by The American Society of Hematology.

  12. Biologic variability and correlation of platelet function testing in healthy dogs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blois, Shauna L; Lang, Sean T; Wood, R Darren; Monteith, Gabrielle

    2015-12-01

    Platelet function tests are influenced by biologic variability, including inter-individual (CVG ) and intra-individual (CVI ), as well as analytic (CVA ) variability. Variability in canine platelet function testing is unknown, but if excessive, would make it difficult to interpret serial results. Additionally, the correlation between platelet function tests is poor in people, but not well described in dogs. The aims were to: (1) identify the effect of variation in preanalytic factors (venipuncture, elapsed time until analysis) on platelet function tests; (2) calculate analytic and biologic variability of adenosine diphosphate (ADP) and arachidonic acid (AA)-induced thromboelastograph platelet mapping (TEG-PM), ADP-, AA-, and collagen-induced whole blood platelet aggregometry (WBA), and collagen/ADP and collagen/epinephrine platelet function analysis (PFA-CADP, PFA-CEPI); and (3) determine the correlation between these variables. In this prospective observational trial, platelet function was measured once every 7 days, for 4 consecutive weeks, in 9 healthy dogs. In addition, CBC, TEG-PM, WBA, and PFA were performed. Overall coefficients of variability ranged from 13.3% to 87.8% for the platelet function tests. Biologic variability was highest for AA-induced maximum amplitude generated during TEG-PM (MAAA; CVG = 95.3%, CVI = 60.8%). Use of population-based reference intervals (RI) was determined appropriate only for PFA-CADP (index of individuality = 10.7). There was poor correlation between most platelet function tests. Use of population-based RI appears inappropriate for most platelet function tests, and tests poorly correlate with one another. Future studies on biologic variability and correlation of platelet function tests should be performed in dogs with platelet dysfunction and those treated with antiplatelet therapy. © 2015 American Society for Veterinary Clinical Pathology.

  13. Glycoprotein Ibα clustering in platelet storage and function

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gitz, E.

    2013-01-01

    Platelets are anucleated, discoid-shaped cells that play an essential role in the formation of a hemostatic plug to prevent blood loss from injured vessels. Initial platelet arrest at the damaged arterial vessel wall is mediated through the interaction between the platelet receptor glycoprotein (GP)

  14. The use of regression analysis in determining reference intervals for low hematocrit and thrombocyte count in multiple electrode aggregometry and platelet function analyzer 100 testing of platelet function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuiper, Gerhardus J A J M; Houben, Rik; Wetzels, Rick J H; Verhezen, Paul W M; Oerle, Rene van; Ten Cate, Hugo; Henskens, Yvonne M C; Lancé, Marcus D

    2017-11-01

    Low platelet counts and hematocrit levels hinder whole blood point-of-care testing of platelet function. Thus far, no reference ranges for MEA (multiple electrode aggregometry) and PFA-100 (platelet function analyzer 100) devices exist for low ranges. Through dilution methods of volunteer whole blood, platelet function at low ranges of platelet count and hematocrit levels was assessed on MEA for four agonists and for PFA-100 in two cartridges. Using (multiple) regression analysis, 95% reference intervals were computed for these low ranges. Low platelet counts affected MEA in a positive correlation (all agonists showed r 2 ≥ 0.75) and PFA-100 in an inverse correlation (closure times were prolonged with lower platelet counts). Lowered hematocrit did not affect MEA testing, except for arachidonic acid activation (ASPI), which showed a weak positive correlation (r 2 = 0.14). Closure time on PFA-100 testing was inversely correlated with hematocrit for both cartridges. Regression analysis revealed different 95% reference intervals in comparison with originally established intervals for both MEA and PFA-100 in low platelet or hematocrit conditions. Multiple regression analysis of ASPI and both tests on the PFA-100 for combined low platelet and hematocrit conditions revealed that only PFA-100 testing should be adjusted for both thrombocytopenia and anemia. 95% reference intervals were calculated using multiple regression analysis. However, coefficients of determination of PFA-100 were poor, and some variance remained unexplained. Thus, in this pilot study using (multiple) regression analysis, we could establish reference intervals of platelet function in anemia and thrombocytopenia conditions on PFA-100 and in thrombocytopenia conditions on MEA.

  15. Normalization methods in time series of platelet function assays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Poucke, Sven; Zhang, Zhongheng; Roest, Mark; Vukicevic, Milan; Beran, Maud; Lauwereins, Bart; Zheng, Ming-Hua; Henskens, Yvonne; Lancé, Marcus; Marcus, Abraham

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Platelet function can be quantitatively assessed by specific assays such as light-transmission aggregometry, multiple-electrode aggregometry measuring the response to adenosine diphosphate (ADP), arachidonic acid, collagen, and thrombin-receptor activating peptide and viscoelastic tests such as rotational thromboelastometry (ROTEM). The task of extracting meaningful statistical and clinical information from high-dimensional data spaces in temporal multivariate clinical data represented in multivariate time series is complex. Building insightful visualizations for multivariate time series demands adequate usage of normalization techniques. In this article, various methods for data normalization (z-transformation, range transformation, proportion transformation, and interquartile range) are presented and visualized discussing the most suited approach for platelet function data series. Normalization was calculated per assay (test) for all time points and per time point for all tests. Interquartile range, range transformation, and z-transformation demonstrated the correlation as calculated by the Spearman correlation test, when normalized per assay (test) for all time points. When normalizing per time point for all tests, no correlation could be abstracted from the charts as was the case when using all data as 1 dataset for normalization. PMID:27428217

  16. Influence of platelet count, platelet mass index, and platelet function on the spontaneous closure of ductus arteriosus in the prematurity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dilek Kahvecioglu

    2018-02-01

    Conclusion: This is the first study in the English literature providing evidence of the influence of platelet dysfunction on the spontaneous closure of ductus arteriosus in prematurity. Longer collagen-ADP duration is identified as a risk factor of ductal closure.

  17. Global phenotypic characterisation of human platelet lysate expanded MSCs by high-throughput flow cytometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reis, Monica; McDonald, David; Nicholson, Lindsay; Godthardt, Kathrin; Knobel, Sebastian; Dickinson, Anne M; Filby, Andrew; Wang, Xiao-Nong

    2018-03-02

    Mesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs) are a promising cell source to develop cell therapy for many diseases. Human platelet lysate (PLT) is increasingly used as an alternative to foetal calf serum (FCS) for clinical-scale MSC production. To date, the global surface protein expression of PLT-expended MSCs (MSC-PLT) is not known. To investigate this, paired MSC-PLT and MSC-FCS were analysed in parallel using high-throughput flow cytometry for the expression of 356 cell surface proteins. MSC-PLT showed differential surface protein expression compared to their MSC-FCS counterpart. Higher percentage of positive cells was observed in MSC-PLT for 48 surface proteins, of which 13 were significantly enriched on MSC-PLT. This finding was validated using multiparameter flow cytometry and further confirmed by quantitative staining intensity analysis. The enriched surface proteins are relevant to increased proliferation and migration capacity, as well as enhanced chondrogenic and osteogenic differentiation properties. In silico network analysis revealed that these enriched surface proteins are involved in three distinct networks that are associated with inflammatory responses, carbohydrate metabolism and cellular motility. This is the first study reporting differential cell surface protein expression between MSC-PLT and MSC-FSC. Further studies are required to uncover the impact of those enriched proteins on biological functions of MSC-PLT.

  18. Platelet activation, function, and reactivity in atherosclerotic carotid artery stenosis: a systematic review of the literature.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Kinsella, J A

    2012-09-27

    An important proportion of transient ischemic attack or ischemic stroke is attributable to moderate or severe (50-99%) atherosclerotic carotid stenosis or occlusion. Platelet biomarkers have the potential to improve our understanding of the pathogenesis of vascular events in this patient population. A detailed systematic review was performed to collate all available data on ex vivo platelet activation and platelet function\\/reactivity in patients with carotid stenosis. Two hundred thirteen potentially relevant articles were initially identified; 26 manuscripts met criteria for inclusion in this systematic review. There was no consistent evidence of clinically informative data from urinary or soluble blood markers of platelet activation in patients with symptomatic moderate or severe carotid stenosis who might be considered suitable for carotid intervention. Data from flow cytometry studies revealed evidence of excessive platelet activation in patients in the early, sub-acute, or late phases after transient ischemic attack or stroke in association with moderate or severe carotid stenosis and in asymptomatic moderate or severe carotid stenosis compared with controls. Furthermore, pilot data suggest that platelet activation may be increased in recently symptomatic than in asymptomatic severe carotid stenosis. Excessive platelet activation and platelet hyperreactivity may play a role in the pathogenesis of first or subsequent transient ischemic attack or stroke in patients with moderate or severe carotid stenosis. Larger longitudinal studies assessing platelet activation status with flow cytometry and platelet function\\/reactivity in symptomatic vs. asymptomatic carotid stenosis are warranted to improve our understanding of the mechanisms responsible for transient ischemic attack or stroke.

  19. Platelet proteome reveals novel pathways of platelet activation and platelet-mediated immunoregulation in dengue.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Monique Ramos de Oliveira Trugilho

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Dengue is the most prevalent human arbovirus disease worldwide. Dengue virus (DENV infection causes syndromes varying from self-limiting febrile illness to severe dengue. Although dengue pathophysiology is not completely understood, it is widely accepted that increased inflammation plays important roles in dengue pathogenesis. Platelets are blood cells classically known as effectors of hemostasis which have been increasingly recognized to have major immune and inflammatory activities. Nevertheless, the phenotype and effector functions of platelets in dengue pathogenesis are not completely understood. Here we used quantitative proteomics to investigate the protein content of platelets in clinical samples from patients with dengue compared to platelets from healthy donors. Our assays revealed a set of 252 differentially abundant proteins. In silico analyses associated these proteins with key molecular events including platelet activation and inflammatory responses, and with events not previously attributed to platelets during dengue infection including antigen processing and presentation, proteasome activity, and expression of histones. From these results, we conducted functional assays using samples from a larger cohort of patients and demonstrated evidence for platelet activation indicated by P-selectin (CD62P translocation and secretion of granule-stored chemokines by platelets. In addition, we found evidence that DENV infection triggers HLA class I synthesis and surface expression by a mechanism depending on functional proteasome activity. Furthermore, we demonstrate that cell-free histone H2A released during dengue infection binds to platelets, increasing platelet activation. These findings are consistent with functional importance of HLA class I, proteasome subunits, and histones that we found exclusively in proteome analysis of platelets in samples from dengue patients. Our study provides the first in-depth characterization of the platelet

  20. [Thrombopenia and radial aplasia: 2 cases with platelet function and ultrastructural studies of megakaryocytes and platelets (author's transl)].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Juhan, I; Bayle, J; Mattei, J F; Thevenieau, D; Perrimond, H; Muratore, R

    1979-10-01

    The authors report on two cases of congenital thrombopenia with radial aplasia. Both children display several formative abnormalities and a mild thrombopenia; hemorragic manifestations occurred in the first case only. Megacryoblastic to platelets series, as studied with electronic microscopy, show small-sized, "microcytic" and hypogranular megacaryocytes, displaying a maturative disorder (dysmegacaryocytopoiesis). In functional studies, platelets of the first patient show an imperfect nucleotidic release and do not agregate normally with ristocetin. The second case exhibits mostly a PF3 reduction. The variety of expression of the megacaryocytic-platelets disorders appears likewise in the squelettal and visceral malformations. The whole disorder could be ascribed to a pleiotropic abnormal gene with a variable expressivity.

  1. Impact of local anaesthetics and needle calibres used for painless PRP injections on platelet functionality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bausset, Olivier; Magalon, Jeremy; Giraudo, Laurent; Louis, Marie-Laure; Serratrice, Nicolas; Frere, Corrine; Magalon, Guy; Dignat-George, Françoise; Sabatier, Florence

    2014-01-01

    The platelet-rich plasma (PRP) is an autologous biotherapy commonly used for its healing properties. Once activated, platelets released a real "cocktail" of growth factor and cytokines implied in numerous regenerative processes. However the impact of medical practices associated to PRP therapeutic use on platelets functionality remains poorly known. we evaluated the in vitro effects of two commonly used local anesthetics (Xylocaine(*) and Naropin(*)) on PRP functionality. We also investigated the quantity and quality of PRP that passed through the smallest gauge needle commercialized. PRP from 9 healthy volunteers were prepared using our previously described home made purification protocol. Platelet aggregation capacity was evaluated by aggregometry assays and the growth factor release was determined by ELISA after platelet activation. We also evaluated the platelet activation status, reactivity and stability of platelets by flow cytometry using the P-selectin expression marker. the association of local anaesthetics with PRP injections resulted in a significant decrease of platelets functionality, assessed by their capacity of aggregating. Local anaesthetics did not interfere with the growth factor release. The different needle sizes and calibres tested for PRP injections did not influence the platelet functionality. the use of local anaesthetics to prevent pain during PRP injections could compromise the therapeutic potential of PRP. These results suggest using carefully local anaesthetics or limiting their use as often is possible. To minimize injection pain, we recommend using 30 G needles. These data will lead to clinical recommendations for painless and controlled PRP injections.

  2. Acute effects of 30 minutes of exposure to a smartphone call on in vitro platelet function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lippi, Giuseppe; Danese, Elisa; Brocco, Giorgio; Gelati, Matteo; Salvagno, Gian Luca; Montagnana, Martina

    2017-05-01

    Significant concerns are now regularly raised about the safety of excessive mobile phone use. This study was aimed to assess the acute effects of radiofrequency waves emitted by a commercial smartphone on platelet function. Two sequential citrated blood samples were collected from 16 healthy volunteers recruited from laboratory staff. The first sample was placed in a plastic rack, 1 cm distant from a commercial smartphone receiving a 30-min call and emitting 900 MHz radiofrequency waves. The second sample was placed in another plastic rack, isolated from radiofrequency wave sources, for the same period. The platelet count and the mean platelet volume were then assessed in all blood samples, whereas platelet function was evaluated using the platelet function analyser-100 (PFA-100). A 30-min exposure of citrated blood to smartphone radiofrequency waves induced significant prolongation of collagen-epinephrine aggregation (median increase, 10%) and a considerable increase of mean platelet volume (median increase, 5%), whereas collagen-adenosine diphosphate aggregation and platelet count remained unchanged. This study demonstrates that smartphone radiofrequency waves induce significant perturbation of platelet structure and function, thus providing further support to concerns regarding excessive use of mobile phones. Caution should also be taken with regards to blood products containing platelets, which should be kept far away from mobile phones and smartphones throughout the production pipeline and storage period.

  3. The proangiogenic phenotype of tumor-derived endothelial cells is reverted by the overexpression of platelet-activating factor acetylhydrolase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doublier, Sophie; Ceretto, Monica; Lupia, Enrico; Bravo, Stefania; Bussolati, Benedetta; Camussi, Giovanni

    2007-10-01

    We previously reported that human tumor-derived endothelial cells (TEC) have an angiogenic phenotype related to the autocrine production of several angiogenic factors. The purpose of the present study was to evaluate whether an enhanced synthesis of platelet-activating factor (PAF) might contribute to the proangiogenic characteristics of TEC and whether its inactivation might inhibit angiogenesis. To address the potential role of PAF in the proangiogenic characteristics of TEC, we engineered TEC to stably overexpress human plasma PAF-acetylhydrolase (PAF-AH), the major PAF-inactivating enzyme, and we evaluated in vitro and in vivo angiogenesis. TECs were able to synthesize a significantly enhanced amount of PAF compared with normal human microvascular endothelial cells when stimulated with thrombin, vascular endothelial growth factor, or soluble CD154. Transfection of TEC with PAF-AH (TEC-PAF-AH) significantly inhibited apoptosis resistance and spontaneous motility of TEC. In addition, PAF and vascular endothelial growth factor stimulation enhanced the motility and adhesion of TEC but not of TEC-PAF-AH. In vitro, TEC-PAF-AH lost the characteristic ability of TEC to form vessel-like structures when plated on Matrigel. Finally, when cells were injected s.c. within Matrigel in severe combined immunodeficiency mice or coimplanted with a renal carcinoma cell line, the overexpression of PAF-AH induced a significant reduction of functional vessel formation. These results suggest that inactivation of PAF, produced by TEC, by the overexpression of plasma PAF-AH affects survival, migration, and the angiogenic response of TEC both in vitro and in vivo.

  4. Platelet function and activation in Cavalier King Charles Spaniels with subclinical chronic valvular heart disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tong, Linda J; Hosgood, Giselle L; French, Anne T; Irwin, Peter J; Shiel, Robert E

    2016-08-01

    OBJECTIVE To assess platelet closure time (CT), mean platelet component (MPC) concentration, and platelet component distribution width (PCDW) in dogs with subclinical chronic valvular heart disease. ANIMALS 89 Cavalier King Charles Spaniels (CKCSs) and 39 control dogs (not CKCSs). PROCEDURES Platelet count, MPC concentration, PCDW, and Hct were measured by use of a hematology analyzer, and CT was measured by use of a platelet function analyzer. Murmur grade and echocardiographic variables (mitral valve regurgitant jet size relative to left atrial area, left atrial-to-aortic diameter ratio, and left ventricular internal dimensions) were recorded. Associations between explanatory variables (sex, age, murmur grade, echocardiographic variables, platelet count, and Hct) and outcomes (CT, MPC concentration, and PCDW) were examined by use of multivariate regression models. RESULTS A model with 5 variables best explained variation in CT (R(2), 0.74), with > 60% of the variance of CT explained by mitral valve regurgitant jet size. The model of best fit to explain variation in MPC concentration included only platelet count (R(2), 0.24). The model of best fit to explain variation in PCDW included platelet count and sex (R(2), 0.25). CONCLUSIONS AND CLINICAL RELEVANCE In this study, a significant effect of mitral valve regurgitant jet size on CT was consistent with platelet dysfunction. However, platelet activation, as assessed on the basis of the MPC concentration and PCDW, was not a feature of subclinical chronic valvular heart disease in CKCSs.

  5. Platelet mimicry

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Moghimi, Seyed Moein; Hunter, Alan Christy; Peer, Dan

    2016-01-01

    Here we critically examine whether coating of nanoparticles with platelet membranes can truly disguise them against recognition by elements of the innate immune system. We further assess whether the "cloaking technology" can sufficiently equip nanoparticles with platelet-mimicking functionalities...

  6. The effect of 60Co-irradiation on platelet cytoskeleton and function

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhuang Qingqi; Li Chengzhu

    1987-01-01

    Changes in rat platelet cytoskeleton and platelet function by 60 Co-irradiation were investigated. When platelet-rich plasma (PRP) was stimulated with ADP, PRP aggregation rates on the 3rd, 6th and 9th day after irradiation were 135%, 96% and 0% of the controls respectively. Although control rat PRP responded to collagen stimulation well, PRP from treated rats had lost the aggregation ability induced by collagen. When same amounts of platelets from the control and the treated rats were extracted with 1% triton X-100-EGTA buffer and the cytoskeleton pellet analysed by SDS-PAGE, it was found that the amount and components of the rat platelet cytoskeleton especially actin and myosin on the 3rd day after irradiation were greatly increased. Those from rat platelets on the 6th day after irradiation showed no difference from the controls, but was significantly decreased on the 9th day after irradiation. Based on these results, the authors concluded that the platelets from rats on the 3rd day after irradiation were in an active state. Exhaustion of granule contents or impairment of collagen receptors might render platelets unable to respond to collagen. Decreased platelet function on the 9th day after irradiation was due to a failure of assembly of its cytoskeleton

  7. Rapid resensitization of purinergic receptor function in human platelets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mundell, S J; Barton, J F; Mayo-Martin, M B; Hardy, A R; Poole, A W

    2008-08-01

    Adenosine diphosphate (ADP) is a critical regulator of platelet activation, mediating its actions through two G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs), the P2Y(1) and P2Y(12) purinergic receptors. Recently, we demonstrated that both receptors desensitize and internalize in human platelets by differential kinase-dependent mechanisms. To demonstrate whether responses to P2Y(1) and P2Y(12) purinergic receptors resensitize in human platelets and determine the role of receptor traffic in this process. These studies were undertaken either in human platelets or in cells stably expressing epitope-tagged P2Y(1) and P2Y(12) purinergic receptor constructs. In this study we show for the first time that responses to both of these receptors can rapidly resensitize following agonist-dependent desensitization in human platelets. Further, we show that in human platelets or in 1321N1 cells stably expressing receptor constructs, the disruption of receptor internalization, dephosphorylation or subsequent receptor recycling is sufficient to block resensitization of purinergic receptor responses. We also show that, in platelets, internalization of both these receptors is dependent upon dynamin, and that this process is required for resensitization of responses. This study is therefore the first to show that both P2Y(1) and P2Y(12) receptor activities are rapidly and reversibly modulated in human platelets, and it reveals that the underlying mechanism requires receptor trafficking as an essential part of this process.

  8. The effects of bupivacaine and pipecoloxylidide on platelet function in vitro

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Odoom, J. A.; Sturk, A.; Dokter, P. W.; Bovill, J. G.; ten Cate, J. W.; Oosting, J.

    1989-01-01

    The influence of bupivacaine and its major metabolite, pipecoloxylidide, on human platelet function was studied in vitro. Significant inhibition of ADP and collagen-induced platelet aggregation occurred only with concentrations of bupivacaine above 10 micrograms.ml-1. This concentration (10-25

  9. The effect of erythropoietin on platelet function and fibrinolysis in chronic renal failure

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stenver, Doris Irene; Jeppesen, L; Nielsen, B

    1994-01-01

    The influence of erythropoietin therapy on platelet function and fibrinolysis was evaluated in 12 anemic hemodialysis patients. Six months of therapy with human erythropoietin (50 to 80 IU/kg initially) raised the hemoglobin level to 10.8 g/dl but did not increase platelet activity in vivo as mea...

  10. Abnormal megakaryocyte development and platelet function in Nbeal2−/− mice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lo, Richard W.; Li, Ling; Pluthero, Fred G.; Christensen, Hilary; Ni, Ran; Vaezzadeh, Nima; Hawkins, Cynthia E.; Weyrich, Andrew S.; Di Paola, Jorge; Landolt-Marticorena, Carolina; Gross, Peter L.

    2013-01-01

    Gray platelet syndrome (GPS) is an inherited bleeding disorder associated with macrothrombocytopenia and α-granule-deficient platelets. GPS has been linked to loss of function mutations in NEABL2 (neurobeachin-like 2), and we describe here a murine GPS model, the Nbeal2−/− mouse. As in GPS, Nbeal2−/− mice exhibit splenomegaly, macrothrombocytopenia, and a deficiency of platelet α-granules and their cargo, including von Willebrand factor (VWF), thrombospondin-1, and platelet factor 4. The platelet α-granule membrane protein P-selectin is expressed at 48% of wild-type levels and externalized upon platelet activation. The presence of P-selectin and normal levels of VPS33B and VPS16B in Nbeal2−/− platelets suggests that NBEAL2 acts independently of VPS33B/VPS16B at a later stage of α-granule biogenesis. Impaired Nbeal2−/− platelet function was shown by flow cytometry, platelet aggregometry, bleeding assays, and intravital imaging of laser-induced arterial thrombus formation. Microscopic analysis detected marked abnormalities in Nbeal2−/− bone marrow megakaryocytes, which when cultured showed delayed maturation, decreased survival, decreased ploidy, and developmental abnormalities, including abnormal extracellular distribution of VWF. Our results confirm that α-granule secretion plays a significant role in platelet function, and they also indicate that abnormal α-granule formation in Nbeal2−/− mice has deleterious effects on megakaryocyte survival, development, and platelet production. PMID:23861251

  11. Functional display of platelet-binding VWF fragments on filamentous bacteriophage.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrew Yee

    Full Text Available von Willebrand factor (VWF tethers platelets to sites of vascular injury via interaction with the platelet surface receptor, GPIb. To further define the VWF sequences required for VWF-platelet interaction, a phage library displaying random VWF protein fragments was screened against formalin-fixed platelets. After 3 rounds of affinity selection, DNA sequencing of platelet-bound clones identified VWF peptides mapping exclusively to the A1 domain. Aligning these sequences defined a minimal, overlapping segment spanning P1254-A1461, which encompasses the C1272-C1458 cystine loop. Analysis of phage carrying a mutated A1 segment (C1272/1458A confirmed the requirement of the cystine loop for optimal binding. Four rounds of affinity maturation of a randomly mutagenized A1 phage library identified 10 and 14 unique mutants associated with enhanced platelet binding in the presence and absence of botrocetin, respectively, with 2 mutants (S1370G and I1372V common to both conditions. These results demonstrate the utility of filamentous phage for studying VWF protein structure-function and identify a minimal, contiguous peptide that bind to formalin-fixed platelets, confirming the importance of the VWF A1 domain with no evidence for another independently platelet-binding segment within VWF. These findings also point to key structural elements within the A1 domain that regulate VWF-platelet adhesion.

  12. Platelet-derived growth factor regulates vascular smooth muscle phenotype via mammalian target of rapamycin complex 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ha, Jung Min; Yun, Sung Ji; Kim, Young Whan; Jin, Seo Yeon; Lee, Hye Sun; Song, Sang Heon; Shin, Hwa Kyoung; Bae, Sun Sik

    2015-01-01

    Mammalian target of rapamycin complex (mTORC) regulates various cellular processes including proliferation, growth, migration and differentiation. In this study, we showed that mTORC1 regulates platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF)-induced phenotypic conversion of vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs). Stimulation of contractile VSMCs with PDGF significantly reduced the expression of contractile marker proteins in a time- and dose-dependent manner. In addition, angiotensin II (AngII)-induced contraction of VSMCs was completely blocked by the stimulation of VSMCs with PDGF. PDGF-dependent suppression of VSMC marker gene expression was significantly blocked by inhibition of phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K), extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK), and mTOR whereas inhibition of p38 MAPK had no effect. In particular, inhibition of mTORC1 by rapamycin or by silencing of Raptor significantly blocked the PDGF-dependent phenotypic change of VSMCs whereas silencing of Rictor had no effect. In addition, loss of AngII-dependent contraction by PDGF was significantly retained by silencing of Raptor. Inhibition of mTORC1 by rapamycin or by silencing of Raptor significantly blocked PDGF-induced proliferation of VSMCs. Taken together, we suggest that mTORC1 plays an essential role in PDGF-dependent phenotypic changes of VSMCs. - Graphical abstract: Regulation of VSMC phenotype by PDGF-dependent activation of mTORC1. - Highlights: • The expression of contractile marker proteins was reduced by PDGF stimulation. • PDGF-dependent phenotypic conversion of VSMCs was blocked by inhibition of mTOR. • PDGF-induced proliferation of VSMCs was attenuated by inhibition of mTORC1. • mTORC1 plays a critical role in PDGF-dependent phenotypic conversion of VSMCs

  13. Platelet-derived growth factor regulates vascular smooth muscle phenotype via mammalian target of rapamycin complex 1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ha, Jung Min; Yun, Sung Ji; Kim, Young Whan; Jin, Seo Yeon; Lee, Hye Sun [Medical Research Institute, Department of Pharmacology, Pusan National University School of Medicine, Yangsan (Korea, Republic of); Song, Sang Heon [Department of Internal Medicine, Pusan National University Hospital, Busan (Korea, Republic of); Shin, Hwa Kyoung [Department of Anatomy, Pusan National University School of Korean Medicine, Yangsan (Korea, Republic of); Bae, Sun Sik, E-mail: sunsik@pusan.ac.kr [Medical Research Institute, Department of Pharmacology, Pusan National University School of Medicine, Yangsan (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-08-14

    Mammalian target of rapamycin complex (mTORC) regulates various cellular processes including proliferation, growth, migration and differentiation. In this study, we showed that mTORC1 regulates platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF)-induced phenotypic conversion of vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs). Stimulation of contractile VSMCs with PDGF significantly reduced the expression of contractile marker proteins in a time- and dose-dependent manner. In addition, angiotensin II (AngII)-induced contraction of VSMCs was completely blocked by the stimulation of VSMCs with PDGF. PDGF-dependent suppression of VSMC marker gene expression was significantly blocked by inhibition of phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K), extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK), and mTOR whereas inhibition of p38 MAPK had no effect. In particular, inhibition of mTORC1 by rapamycin or by silencing of Raptor significantly blocked the PDGF-dependent phenotypic change of VSMCs whereas silencing of Rictor had no effect. In addition, loss of AngII-dependent contraction by PDGF was significantly retained by silencing of Raptor. Inhibition of mTORC1 by rapamycin or by silencing of Raptor significantly blocked PDGF-induced proliferation of VSMCs. Taken together, we suggest that mTORC1 plays an essential role in PDGF-dependent phenotypic changes of VSMCs. - Graphical abstract: Regulation of VSMC phenotype by PDGF-dependent activation of mTORC1. - Highlights: • The expression of contractile marker proteins was reduced by PDGF stimulation. • PDGF-dependent phenotypic conversion of VSMCs was blocked by inhibition of mTOR. • PDGF-induced proliferation of VSMCs was attenuated by inhibition of mTORC1. • mTORC1 plays a critical role in PDGF-dependent phenotypic conversion of VSMCs.

  14. Peroxiredoxin II is an antioxidant enzyme that negatively regulates collagen-stimulated platelet function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jang, Ji Yong; Wang, Su Bin; Min, Ji Hyun; Chae, Yun Hee; Baek, Jin Young; Yu, Dae-Yeul; Chang, Tong-Shin

    2015-05-01

    Collagen-induced platelet signaling is mediated by binding to the primary receptor glycoprotein VI (GPVI). Reactive oxygen species produced in response to collagen have been found to be responsible for the propagation of GPVI signaling pathways in platelets. Therefore, it has been suggested that antioxidant enzymes could down-regulate GPVI-stimulated platelet activation. Although the antioxidant enzyme peroxiredoxin II (PrxII) has emerged as having a role in negatively regulating signaling through various receptors by eliminating H2O2 generated upon receptor stimulation, the function of PrxII in collagen-stimulated platelets is not known. We tested the hypothesis that PrxII negatively regulates collagen-stimulated platelet activation. We analyzed PrxII-deficient murine platelets. PrxII deficiency enhanced GPVI-mediated platelet activation through the defective elimination of H2O2 and the impaired protection of SH2 domain-containing tyrosine phosphatase 2 (SHP-2) against oxidative inactivation, which resulted in increased tyrosine phosphorylation of key components for the GPVI signaling cascade, including Syk, Btk, and phospholipase Cγ2. Interestingly, PrxII-mediated antioxidative protection of SHP-2 appeared to occur in the lipid rafts. PrxII-deficient platelets exhibited increased adhesion and aggregation upon collagen stimulation. Furthermore, in vivo experiments demonstrated that PrxII deficiency facilitated platelet-dependent thrombus formation in injured carotid arteries. This study reveals that PrxII functions as a protective antioxidant enzyme against collagen-stimulated platelet activation and platelet-dependent thrombosis. © 2015 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  15. The impact of night-shift work on platelet function in healthy medical staff.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakao, Tomoko; Yasumoto, Atsushi; Tokuoka, Suzumi; Kita, Yoshihiro; Kawahara, Takuya; Daimon, Masao; Yatomi, Yutaka

    2018-04-18

    Rotating shift work has been reported to increase the risk of cardiovascular diseases. Vascular endothelial dysfunction and platelet activation are among the leading causes of thrombus formation in patients with myocardial infarction or stroke. Endothelial function has been shown to be impaired immediately after night-shift work; however, it is not known whether platelets are also activated. The aim of this study was to investigate the acute impact of night-shift work on platelet function. This observational study included 11 healthy medical staff members (seven women, median age 32 years). We examined each subject's platelet aggregation rates and the serum concentrations of eicosanoid mediators after night-shift work and on day-shift work without preceding night-shift work (baseline). Platelet aggregation did not differ from baseline levels after night-shift work. However, serum cyclooxygenase (COX)-metabolized eicosanoid mediators, particularly thromboxane (Tx) B 2 (a stable metabolite of TxA 2 and the most important marker of platelet activation), were significantly higher after the night-shift than at baseline (median 65.3 vs 180.4 ng/ml). Although platelet aggregation did not increase, there was an increase in serum COX-metabolized eicosanoid mediators such as TxB 2 in healthy medical staff after night-shift work. This platelet hypersensitivity may be one of the mechanisms underlying the significant association between night-shift work and adverse cardiovascular outcomes.

  16. Modulation of platelet functions by crude rice (Oryza sativa) bran policosanol extract.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong, Wai-Teng; Ismail, Maznah; Imam, Mustapha Umar; Zhang, Yi-Da

    2016-07-28

    Rice bran is bioactive-rich and has proven health benefits for humans. Moreover, its source, the brown rice has antioxidant, hypolipidemic and other functional properties that are increasingly making it a nutritional staple especially in Asian countries. This study investigated the antiplatelet aggregation mechanisms of crude hexane/methanolic rice bran extract, in which policosanol was the targeted bioactive. Platelets play a vital role in pathogenesis of atherosclerosis and cardiovascular diseases, and their increased activities could potentially cause arterial thrombus formation or severe bleeding disorders. Thus, in this study, platelet aggregation and adhesion of platelets to major components of basal lamina were examined in vitro. In addition, cellular protein secretion was quantified as a measurement of platelet activation. Adenosine diphosphate (ADP), collagen, and arachidonic acid (AA)-induced aggregation were studied using the microtiter technique. Rat platelets were pre-treated with various concentrations of policosanol extract, and the adhesion of platelets onto collagen- and laminin-coated surface (extracellular matrix) was studied using the acid phosphatase assay. The effect of crude policosanol extract on released proteins from activated platelets was measured using modified Lowry determination method. Rice bran policosanol extract significantly inhibited in vitro platelet aggregation induced by different agonists in a dose dependent manner. The IC50 of ADP-, collagen-, and AA-induced platelet aggregation were 533.37 ± 112.16, 635.94 ± 78.45 and 693.86 ± 70.57 μg/mL, respectively. The present study showed that crude rice bran policosanol extract significantly inhibited platelet adhesion to collagen in a dose dependent manner. Conversely, at a low concentration of 15.625 μg/mL, the extract significantly inhibited platelet adhesion to laminin stimulated by different platelet agonists. In addition to the alteration of cell adhesive

  17. Comparative evaluation of Plateletworks, Multiplate analyzer and Platelet function analyzer-200 in cardiology patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Jeeyong; Cho, Chi Hyun; Jung, Bo Kyeung; Nam, Jeonghun; Seo, Hong Seog; Shin, Sehyun; Lim, Chae Seung

    2018-04-14

    The objective of this study was to comparatively evaluate three commercial whole-blood platelet function analyzer systems: Platelet Function Analyzer-200 (PFA; Siemens Canada, Mississauga, Ontario, Canada), Multiplate analyzer (MP; Roche Diagnostics International Ltd., Rotkreuz, Switzerland), and Plateletworks Combo-25 kit (PLW; Helena Laboratories, Beaumont, TX, USA). Venipuncture was performed on 160 patients who visited a department of cardiology. Pairwise agreement among the three platelet function assays was assessed using Cohen's kappa coefficient and percent agreement within the reference limit. Kappa values with the same agonists were poor between PFA-collagen (COL; agonist)/adenosine diphosphate (ADP) and MP-ADP (-0.147), PFA-COL/ADP and PLW-ADP (0.089), MP-ADP and PLW-ADP (0.039), PFA-COL/ADP and MP-COL (-0.039), and between PFA-COL/ADP and PLW-COL (-0.067). Nonetheless, kappa values for the same assay principle with a different agonist were slightly higher between PFA-COL/ADP and PFA-COL/EPI (0.352), MP-ADP and MP-COL (0.235), and between PLW-ADP and PLW-COL (0.247). The range of percent agreement values was 38.7% to 73.8%. Therefore, various measurements of platelet function by more than one method were needed to obtain a reliable interpretation of platelet function considering low kappa coefficient and modest percent agreement rates among 3 different platelet function tests.

  18. Platelet lysate enhances synovial fluid multipotential stromal cells functions: Implications for therapeutic use.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Altaie, Ala; Baboolal, Thomas G; Wall, Owen; Jones, Elena; McGonagle, Dennis

    2018-03-01

    Although intra-articular injection of platelet products is increasingly used for joint regenerative approaches, there are few data on their biological effects on joint-resident multipotential stromal cells (MSCs), which are directly exposed to the effects of these therapeutic strategies. Therefore, this study investigated the effect of platelet lysate (PL) on synovial fluid-derived MSCs (SF-MSCs), which in vivo have direct access to sites of cartilage injury. SF-MSCs were obtained during knee arthroscopic procedures (N = 7). Colony forming unit-fibroblast (CFU-F), flow-cytometric phenotyping, carboxyfluorescein succinimidyl ester-based immunomodulation for T-cell and trilineage differentiation assays were performed using PL and compared with standard conditions. PL-enhanced SF-MSC (PL-MSC) proliferation as CFU-F colonies was 1.4-fold larger, and growing cultures had shorter population-doubling times. PL-MSCs and fetal calf serum (FCS)-MSCs had the same immunophenotype and similar immunomodulation activities. In chondrogenic and osteogenic differentiation assays, PL-MSCs produced 10% more sulfated-glycosaminoglycan (sGAG) and 45% less Ca ++ compared with FCS-MSCs, respectively. Replacing chondrogenic medium transforming growth factor-β3 with 20% or 50% PL further increased sGAG production of PL-MSCs by 69% and 95%, respectively, compared with complete chondrogenic medium. Also, Dulbecco's Modified Eagle's Medium high glucose (HG-DMEM) plus 50% PL induced more chondrogenesis compared with HG-DMEM plus 10% FCS and was comparable to complete chondrogenic medium. This is the first study to assess SF-MSC responses to PL and provides biological support to the hypothesis that PL may be capable of modulating multiple functional aspects of joint resident MSCs with direct access to injured cartilage. Copyright © 2017 International Society for Cellular Therapy. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. The role of platelets during reproduction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Isermann, Berend; Nawroth, Peter P

    2006-01-01

    The availability of mice with defined defects within the hemostatic system enabled researchers to identify a role the coagulation system for embryonic and placental development. However, the role of platelets during development has only recently been experimentally addressed, giving some insight into potential functions of platelets during development. Thus, a quantitative embryonic platelet defect (severe thrombopenia secondary to NF-E2 deficiency) is associated with an embryonic growth retardation and reduced vascularisation of the placenta. Maternal platelet deficiency is associated with placental hemorrhage, which, however, does not impair embryonic or maternal survival. In vitro studies established that platelets or platelet conditioned medium regulate the invasive properties of human extravillous trophoblast cells and induce a phenotypical switch of trophoblast cells. These data imply that platelets are of relevance during placentation. Conversely, platelets and the formation of platelet-fibrin aggregates are dispensable for the development of the embryo proper, establishing that the lethal phenotypes observed in some embryo slacking coagulation regulators does not result from an inability to form platelet-fibrin aggregates, but likely reflects altered protease dependent signaling during vascular development.

  20. Function and platelet count in thrombocyte concentrate (TC during the storage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elida Marpaung

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available AbstrakLatar belakang: Evaluasi terhadap pemberian transfusi belum dilakukan secara optimal baik di hulumaupun di hilir. Tujuan penelitian ini untuk mengetahui pengaruh waktu penyimpanan terhadap perubahanpH, jumlah trombosit, dan fungsi agregasi yang terjadi pada trombosit pada beberapa hari penyimpanan.Metode: Disain penelitian potong lintang terhadap sample kantong konsentrat trombosit yang yang telahlolos skrining infeksi penyakit menular melalui transfusi darah. Pengujian yang dilakukan ialah terhadappH, jumlah trombosit dan fungsi agregasi terhadap sampel pada tiga waktu pengujian pada hari ke-0, ketiga, dan ke lima penyimpanan.Hasil: Pada 50 sampel kantong konsentrat trombosit didapatkan kenaikan pH pada hari ke tigapenyimpanan kantong trombosit yang disertai penurunan pada hari ke lima. Hal serupa ditemui pulapada jumlah trombosit. Sementara penurunan fungsi agregasi trombosit ditemukan lebih awal pada harike tiga penyimpanan dan didapatkan nilai rendah pada hampir semua sampel.Kesimpulan: Ketiga parameter yaitu pH, jumlah trombosit, dan fungsi agregasi mengalami penurunanpada hari kelima. (Health Science Journal of Indonesia;2015;6:48-51Kata kunci: thrombocyte, concentrate, pH, agregasi, waktu penyimpanan. AbstractBackground: Evaluation for platelet transfusion is not optimal for this moment even in upstream at theblood center or in downstream at the hospital. The purpose of this study was to determine the effect ofstorage time to changes in pH, platelet count and function that occurs on platelet aggregation duringdifferent time storage.Methods: The study design was cross-sectional on selected bags of platelet concentrates that have passedthe screening for infection transmitted through blood transfusions. The regular assessment in UTDD forPC has been done every month by random sampling with three parameters pH, platelets count and volumein the bag of blood. The testing for pH, platelet count, and aggregation functions for 50 samples

  1. The study of platelet function in chronic renal diseases by radioimmunoassay-(RIA)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li Fugang; Wu Guoxin; Li Peixia; Ruan Changgeng

    1992-07-01

    The platelet function in patients with chronic renal diseases was studied by radioimmunoassay methods. In the patients with nephritic syndrome, the number of molecules of GMP-140 on the platelet surface and in plasma was greatly increased, and the concentrations of TXB 2 and β-TG in plasma was increased as well. In the patients with uremia, increased β-TG and decreased TXB 2 in plasma were found in comparison with those of control. In the patients with chronic glomerulonephritis, the platelet changed only slightly. These results suggest that the platelet function in patients with nephritic syndrome and uremia changes greatly and plays an important role in the progress of chronic renal diseases

  2. Bio-inspired composites with functionally graded platelets exhibit enhanced stiffness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tapse, Sanjay; S, Anup

    2017-11-09

    Unidirectional composites inspired from biological materials such as nacre, are composed of stiff platelets arranged in a staggered manner within a soft matrix. Elaborate analyses have been conducted on the aforementioned composites and they are found to have excellent mechanical properties like stiffness, strength and fracture toughness. The superior properties exhibited by these composites have been proved to be the result of its unique structure. An emerging development in the field of composite structures is Functionally Graded Composites(FGC), whose properties vary spatially and possess enhanced thermo-mechanical properties. In this paper, the platelets are functionally graded with its Young's Modulus varying parabolically along the length. Two different models - namely, Tension Shear Chain Model and Minimisation of Complementary Energy Model have been employed to obtain the stiffness of the overall composite analytically. The effect of various parameters that define the composite model such as overlapping length between any two neighbouring platelets, different gradation parameters and platelet aspect ratio on the overall mechanical properties have been studied. Composites with functionally graded platelets are found to possess enhanced stiffness (upto 14% higher) for certain values of these parameters. The obtained solutions have been validated using Finite Element Analysis. Bio-inspired composites with functionally graded platelets can be engineered for structural applications, such as in automobile, aerospace and aircraft industry, where stiffness plays a crucial role. © 2017 IOP Publishing Ltd.

  3. New gene functions in megakaryopoiesis and platelet formation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gieger, Christian; Radhakrishnan, Aparna; Cvejic, Ana; Tang, Weihong; Porcu, Eleonora; Pistis, Giorgio; Serbanovic-Canic, Jovana; Elling, Ulrich; Goodall, Alison H.; Labrune, Yann; Lopez, Lorna M.; Mägi, Reedik; Meacham, Stuart; Okada, Yukinori; Pirastu, Nicola; Sorice, Rossella; Teumer, Alexander; Voss, Katrin; Zhang, Weihua; Ramirez-Solis, Ramiro; Bis, Joshua C.; Ellinghaus, David; Gögele, Martin; Hottenga, Jouke-Jan; Langenberg, Claudia; Kovacs, Peter; O'Reilly, Paul F.; Shin, So-Youn; Esko, Tõnu; Hartiala, Jaana; Kanoni, Stavroula; Murgia, Federico; Parsa, Afshin; Stephens, Jonathan; van der Harst, Pim; van der Schoot, C. Ellen; Allayee, Hooman; Attwood, Antony; Balkau, Beverley; Bastardot, François; Basu, Saonli; Baumeister, Sebastian E.; Biino, Ginevra; Bomba, Lorenzo; Bonnefond, Amélie; Cambien, François; Chambers, John C.; Cucca, Francesco; D'Adamo, Pio; Davies, Gail; de Boer, Rudolf A.; de Geus, Eco J. C.; Döring, Angela; Elliott, Paul; Erdmann, Jeanette; Evans, David M.; Falchi, Mario; Feng, Wei; Folsom, Aaron R.; Frazer, Ian H.; Gibson, Quince D.; Glazer, Nicole L.; Hammond, Chris; Hartikainen, Anna-Liisa; Heckbert, Susan R.; Hengstenberg, Christian; Hersch, Micha; Illig, Thomas; Loos, Ruth J. F.; Jolley, Jennifer; Khaw, Kay Tee; Kühnel, Brigitte; Kyrtsonis, Marie-Christine; Lagou, Vasiliki; Lloyd-Jones, Heather; Lumley, Thomas; Mangino, Massimo; Maschio, Andrea; Mateo Leach, Irene; McKnight, Barbara; Memari, Yasin; Mitchell, Braxton D.; Montgomery, Grant W.; Nakamura, Yusuke; Nauck, Matthias; Navis, Gerjan; Nöthlings, Ute; Nolte, Ilja M.; Porteous, David J.; Pouta, Anneli; Pramstaller, Peter P.; Pullat, Janne; Ring, Susan M.; Rotter, Jerome I.; Ruggiero, Daniela; Ruokonen, Aimo; Sala, Cinzia; Samani, Nilesh J.; Sambrook, Jennifer; Schlessinger, David; Schreiber, Stefan; Schunkert, Heribert; Scott, James; Smith, Nicholas L.; Snieder, Harold; Starr, John M.; Stumvoll, Michael; Takahashi, Atsushi; Tang, W. H. Wilson; Taylor, Kent; Tenesa, Albert; Lay Thein, Swee; Tönjes, Anke; Uda, Manuela; Ulivi, Sheila; van Veldhuisen, Dirk J.; Visscher, Peter M.; Völker, Uwe; Wichmann, H.-Erich; Wiggins, Kerri L.; Willemsen, Gonneke; Yang, Tsun-Po; Hua Zhao, Jing; Zitting, Paavo; Bradley, John R.; Dedoussis, George V.; Gasparini, Paolo; Hazen, Stanley L.; Metspalu, Andres; Pirastu, Mario; Shuldiner, Alan R.; Joost van Pelt, L.; Zwaginga, Jaap-Jan; Boomsma, Dorret I.; Deary, Ian J.; Franke, Andre; Froguel, Philippe; Ganesh, Santhi K.; Jarvelin, Marjo-Riitta; Martin, Nicholas G.; Meisinger, Christa; Psaty, Bruce M.; Spector, Timothy D.; Wareham, Nicholas J.; Akkerman, Jan-Willem N.; Ciullo, Marina; Deloukas, Panos; Greinacher, Andreas; Jupe, Steve; Kamatani, Naoyuki; Khadake, Jyoti; Kooner, Jaspal S.; Penninger, Josef; Prokopenko, Inga; Stemple, Derek; Toniolo, Daniela; Wernisch, Lorenz; Sanna, Serena; Hicks, Andrew A.; Rendon, Augusto; Ferreira, Manuel A.; Ouwehand, Willem H.; Soranzo, Nicole

    2011-01-01

    Platelets are the second most abundant cell type in blood and are essential for maintaining haemostasis. Their count and volume are tightly controlled within narrow physiological ranges, but there is only limited understanding of the molecular processes controlling both traits. Here we carried out a

  4. Glucose ameliorates the metabolic profile and mitochondrial function of platelet concentrates during storage in autologous plasma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amorini, Angela M.; Tuttobene, Michele; Tomasello, Flora M.; Biazzo, Filomena; Gullotta, Stefano; De Pinto, Vito; Lazzarino, Giuseppe; Tavazzi, Barbara

    2013-01-01

    Background It is essential that the quality of platelet metabolism and function remains high during storage in order to ensure the clinical effectiveness of a platelet transfusion. New storage conditions and additives are constantly evaluated in order to achieve this. Using glucose as a substrate is controversial because of its potential connection with increased lactate production and decreased pH, both parameters triggering the platelet lesion during storage. Materials and methods In this study, we analysed the morphological status and metabolic profile of platelets stored for various periods in autologous plasma enriched with increasing glucose concentrations (13.75, 27.5 and 55 mM). After 0, 2, 4, 6 and 8 days, high energy phosphates (ATP, GTP, ADP, AMP), oxypurines (hypoxanthine, xanthine, uric acid), lactate, pH, mitochondrial function, cell lysis and morphology, were evaluated. Results The data showed a significant dose-dependent improvement of the different parameters in platelets stored with increasing glucose, compared to what detected in controls. Interestingly, this phenomenon was more marked at the highest level of glucose tested and in the period of time generally used for platelet transfusion (0–6 days). Conclusion These results indicate that the addition of glucose during platelet storage ameliorates, in a dose-dependent manner, the biochemical parameters related to energy metabolism and mitochondrial function. Since there was no correspondence between glucose addition, lactate increase and pH decrease in our experiments, it is conceivable that platelet derangement during storage is not directly caused by glucose through an increase of anaerobic glycolysis, but rather to a loss of mitochondrial functions caused by reduced substrate availability. PMID:22682337

  5. Dietary flavanols and procyanidin oligomers from cocoa (Theobroma cacao) inhibit platelet function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murphy, Karen J; Chronopoulos, Andriana K; Singh, Indu; Francis, Maureen A; Moriarty, Helen; Pike, Marilyn J; Turner, Alan H; Mann, Neil J; Sinclair, Andrew J

    2003-06-01

    Flavonoids may be partly responsible for some health benefits, including antiinflammatory action and a decreased tendency for the blood to clot. An acute dose of flavanols and oligomeric procyanidins from cocoa powder inhibits platelet activation and function over 6 h in humans. This study sought to evaluate whether 28 d of supplementation with cocoa flavanols and related procyanidin oligomers would modulate human platelet reactivity and primary hemostasis and reduce oxidative markers in vivo. Thirty-two healthy subjects were assigned to consume active (234 mg cocoa flavanols and procyanidins/d) or placebo (cocoa flavanols and procyanidins/d) tablets in a blinded parallel-designed study. Platelet function was determined by measuring platelet aggregation, ATP release, and expression of activation-dependent platelet antigens by using flow cytometry. Plasma was analyzed for oxidation markers and antioxidant status. Plasma concentrations of epicatechin and catechin in the active group increased by 81% and 28%, respectively, during the intervention period. The active group had significantly lower P selectin expression and significantly lower ADP-induced aggregation and collagen-induced aggregation than did the placebo group. Plasma ascorbic acid concentrations were significantly higher in the active than in the placebo group (P antioxidant status did not change in either group. Cocoa flavanol and procyanidin supplementation for 28 d significantly increased plasma epicatechin and catechin concentrations and significantly decreased platelet function. These data support the results of acute studies that used higher doses of cocoa flavanols and procyanidins.

  6. A Study of Platelet Inhibition, Using a 'Point of Care' Platelet Function Test, following Primary Percutaneous Coronary Intervention for ST-Elevation Myocardial Infarction [PINPOINT-PPCI].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Thomas W; Mumford, Andrew D; Scott, Lauren J; Mundell, Stuart; Butler, Mark; Strange, Julian W; Rogers, Chris A; Reeves, Barnaby C; Baumbach, Andreas

    2015-01-01

    Rapid coronary recanalization following ST-elevation myocardial infarction (STEMI) requires effective anti-platelet and anti-thrombotic therapies. This study tested the impact of door to end of procedure ('door-to-end') time and baseline platelet activity on platelet inhibition within 24hours post-STEMI. 108 patients, treated with prasugrel and procedural bivalirudin, underwent Multiplate® platelet function testing at baseline, 0, 1, 2 and 24hours post-procedure. Major adverse cardiac events (MACE), bleeding and stent thrombosis (ST) were recorded. Baseline ADP activity was high (88.3U [71.8-109.0]), procedural time and consequently bivalirudin infusion duration were short (median door-to-end time 55minutes [40-70] and infusion duration 30minutes [20-42]). Baseline ADP was observed to influence all subsequent measurements of ADP activity, whereas door-to-end time only influenced ADP immediately post-procedure. High residual platelet reactivity (HRPR ADP>46.8U) was observed in 75% of patients immediately post-procedure and persisted in 24% of patients at 2hours. Five patients suffered in-hospital MACE (4.6%). Acute ST occurred in 4 patients, all were <120mins post-procedure and had HRPR. No significant bleeding was observed. In a post-hoc analysis, pre-procedural morphine use was associated with significantly higher ADP activity following intervention. Baseline platelet function, time to STEMI treatment and opiate use all significantly influence immediate post-procedural platelet activity.

  7. Recognition and management of platelet-refractory bleeding in patients with Glanzmann’s thrombasthenia and other severe platelet function disorders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chitlur M

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Meera Chitlur,1 Madhvi Rajpurkar,1 Michael Recht,2 Michael D Tarantino,3 Donald L Yee,4 David L Cooper,5 Sriya Gunawardena5 1Carman and Ann Adams Department of Pediatrics, Wayne State University and Children’s Hospital of Michigan, Detroit, MI, USA; 2Oregon Health and Science University, Portland, OR, USA; 3Bleeding and Clotting Disorders Institute, Peoria, IL, USA; 4Department of Pediatrics, Baylor College of Medicine, Houston, TX, USA; 5Clinical Development, Medical and Regulatory Affairs, Novo Nordisk Inc., Plainsboro, NJ, USA Abstract: Patients with rare qualitative platelet disorders or platelet function disorders (PFDs may present to the hospital physician with severe bleeding episodes or excessive surgical bleeding. Although standard treatment consists of platelet transfusions, repeated transfusions may result in the development of antiplatelet antibodies (APA or clinical refractoriness, rendering further platelet therapy ineffective. In such settings, an approved treatment option for patients with Glanzmann’s thrombasthenia (GT, one of the well-known rare PFDs, is recombinant activated coagulation factor VII (rFVIIa. Data regarding the efficacy of rFVIIa in patients with GT and platelet refractoriness are available from a large patient registry, an international survey, and multiple case reports and demonstrate efficacy in patients with and without refractoriness or APA. This article reviews the rFVIIa clinical data in patients with GT and platelet refractoriness and discusses clinical implications relevant to the hospital-based physician. Because uncontrolled bleeding can be life-threatening, hospital physicians should be alert to the signs of platelet refractoriness, be able to recognize continued internal or external bleeding, and know how to adapt treatment regimens for the effective management of bleeding. The management of patients who receive rFVIIa should occur in consultation with a hematologist with experience in PFDs, and

  8. Genetic Analysis of the Role of Protein Kinase Cθ in Platelet Function and Thrombus Formation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hall, Kellie J.; Harper, Matthew T.; Gilio, Karen; Cosemans, Judith M.; Heemskerk, Johan W. M.; Poole, Alastair W.

    2008-01-01

    Background PKCθ is a novel protein kinase C isozyme, predominately expressed in T cells and platelets. PKCθ−/− T cells exhibit reduced activation and PKCθ−/− mice are resistant to autoimmune disease, making PKCθ an attractive therapeutic target for immune modulation. Collagen is a major agonist for platelets, operating through an immunoreceptor-like signalling pathway from its receptor GPVI. Although it has recently been shown that PKCθ positively regulates outside-in signalling through integrin αIIbβ3 in platelets, the role of PKCθ in GPVI-dependent signalling and functional activation of platelets has not been assessed. Methodology/Principal Findings In the present study we assessed static adhesion, cell spreading, granule secretion, integrin αIIbβ3 activation and platelet aggregation in washed mouse platelets lacking PKCθ. Thrombus formation on a collagen-coated surface was assessed in vitro under flow. PKCθ−/− platelets exhibited reduced static adhesion and filopodia generation on fibrinogen, suggesting that PKCθ positively regulates outside-in signalling, in agreement with a previous report. In contrast, PKCθ−/− platelets also exhibited markedly enhanced GPVI-dependent α-granule secretion, although dense granule secretion was unaffected, suggesting that PKCθ differentially regulates these two granules. Inside-out regulation of αIIbβ3 activation was also enhanced downstream of GPVI stimulation. Although this did not result in increased aggregation, importantly thrombus formation on collagen under high shear (1000 s−1) was enhanced. Conclusions/Significance These data suggest that PKCθ is an important negative regulator of thrombus formation on collagen, potentially mediated by α-granule secretion and αIIbβ3 activation. PKCθ therefore may act to restrict thrombus growth, a finding that has important implications for the development and safe clinical use of PKCθ inhibitors. PMID:18815612

  9. Genetic analysis of the role of protein kinase Ctheta in platelet function and thrombus formation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kellie J Hall

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available PKCtheta is a novel protein kinase C isozyme, predominately expressed in T cells and platelets. PKCtheta(-/- T cells exhibit reduced activation and PKCtheta(-/- mice are resistant to autoimmune disease, making PKCtheta an attractive therapeutic target for immune modulation. Collagen is a major agonist for platelets, operating through an immunoreceptor-like signalling pathway from its receptor GPVI. Although it has recently been shown that PKCtheta positively regulates outside-in signalling through integrin alpha(IIbbeta(3 in platelets, the role of PKCtheta in GPVI-dependent signalling and functional activation of platelets has not been assessed.In the present study we assessed static adhesion, cell spreading, granule secretion, integrin alpha(IIbbeta(3 activation and platelet aggregation in washed mouse platelets lacking PKCtheta. Thrombus formation on a collagen-coated surface was assessed in vitro under flow. PKCtheta(-/- platelets exhibited reduced static adhesion and filopodia generation on fibrinogen, suggesting that PKCtheta positively regulates outside-in signalling, in agreement with a previous report. In contrast, PKCtheta(-/- platelets also exhibited markedly enhanced GPVI-dependent alpha-granule secretion, although dense granule secretion was unaffected, suggesting that PKCtheta differentially regulates these two granules. Inside-out regulation of alpha(IIbbeta(3 activation was also enhanced downstream of GPVI stimulation. Although this did not result in increased aggregation, importantly thrombus formation on collagen under high shear (1000 s(-1 was enhanced.These data suggest that PKCtheta is an important negative regulator of thrombus formation on collagen, potentially mediated by alpha-granule secretion and alpha(IIbbeta(3 activation. PKCtheta therefore may act to restrict thrombus growth, a finding that has important implications for the development and safe clinical use of PKCtheta inhibitors.

  10. ARF6-dependent regulation of P2Y receptor traffic and function in human platelets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kanamarlapudi, Venkateswarlu; Owens, Sian E; Saha, Keya; Pope, Robert J; Mundell, Stuart J

    2012-01-01

    Adenosine diphosphate (ADP) is a critical regulator of platelet activation, mediating its actions through two G protein-coupled receptors, the P2Y(1) and P2Y(12) purinoceptors. Recently, we demonstrated that P2Y(1) and P2Y(12) purinoceptor activities are rapidly and reversibly modulated in human platelets, revealing that the underlying mechanism requires receptor internalization and subsequent trafficking as an essential part of this process. In this study we investigated the role of the small GTP-binding protein ADP ribosylation factor 6 (ARF6) in the internalization and function of P2Y(1) and P2Y(12) purinoceptors in human platelets. ARF6 has been implicated in the internalization of a number of GPCRs, although its precise molecular mechanism in this process remains unclear. In this study we show that activation of either P2Y(1) or P2Y(12) purinoceptors can stimulate ARF6 activity. Further blockade of ARF6 function either in cell lines or human platelets blocks P2Y purinoceptor internalization. This blockade of receptor internalization attenuates receptor resensitization. Furthermore, we demonstrate that Nm23-H1, a nucleoside diphosphate (NDP) kinase regulated by ARF6 which facilitates dynamin-dependent fission of coated vesicles during endocytosis, is also required for P2Y purinoceptor internalization. These data describe a novel function of ARF6 in the internalization of P2Y purinoceptors and demonstrate the integral importance of this small GTPase upon platelet ADP receptor function.

  11. ARF6-dependent regulation of P2Y receptor traffic and function in human platelets.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Venkateswarlu Kanamarlapudi

    Full Text Available Adenosine diphosphate (ADP is a critical regulator of platelet activation, mediating its actions through two G protein-coupled receptors, the P2Y(1 and P2Y(12 purinoceptors. Recently, we demonstrated that P2Y(1 and P2Y(12 purinoceptor activities are rapidly and reversibly modulated in human platelets, revealing that the underlying mechanism requires receptor internalization and subsequent trafficking as an essential part of this process. In this study we investigated the role of the small GTP-binding protein ADP ribosylation factor 6 (ARF6 in the internalization and function of P2Y(1 and P2Y(12 purinoceptors in human platelets. ARF6 has been implicated in the internalization of a number of GPCRs, although its precise molecular mechanism in this process remains unclear. In this study we show that activation of either P2Y(1 or P2Y(12 purinoceptors can stimulate ARF6 activity. Further blockade of ARF6 function either in cell lines or human platelets blocks P2Y purinoceptor internalization. This blockade of receptor internalization attenuates receptor resensitization. Furthermore, we demonstrate that Nm23-H1, a nucleoside diphosphate (NDP kinase regulated by ARF6 which facilitates dynamin-dependent fission of coated vesicles during endocytosis, is also required for P2Y purinoceptor internalization. These data describe a novel function of ARF6 in the internalization of P2Y purinoceptors and demonstrate the integral importance of this small GTPase upon platelet ADP receptor function.

  12. Haemostatic function and biomarkers of endothelial damage before and after platelet transfusion in patients with acute myeloid leukaemia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, A M; Leinøe, E B; Johansson, P I

    2015-01-01

    and after platelet transfusion in patients with acute myeloid leukaemia. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Blood was sampled before, 1 and 24 h after platelet transfusion. Primary and secondary haemostasis was evaluated by whole blood aggregometry (Multiplate) and thromboelastography (TEG). Endothelial biomarkers (s......OBJECTIVES: The beneficial effect of platelet transfusion on haemostasis is well established, but there is emerging evidence that platelet transfusion induces an inflammatory response in vascular endothelial cells. BACKGROUND: We investigated haemostatic function and endothelial biomarkers before......ICAM-1, syndecan-1, sThrombomodulin, sVE-Cadherin) and platelet activation biomarkers (sCD40L, TGF-beta) were investigated along with haematology/biochemistry analyses. RESULTS: Twenty-two patients were included. Despite continued low platelet counts, platelet transfusion normalised the median values...

  13. Methodology for the inference of gene function from phenotype data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ascensao, Joao A; Dolan, Mary E; Hill, David P; Blake, Judith A

    2014-12-12

    Biomedical ontologies are increasingly instrumental in the advancement of biological research primarily through their use to efficiently consolidate large amounts of data into structured, accessible sets. However, ontology development and usage can be hampered by the segregation of knowledge by domain that occurs due to independent development and use of the ontologies. The ability to infer data associated with one ontology to data associated with another ontology would prove useful in expanding information content and scope. We here focus on relating two ontologies: the Gene Ontology (GO), which encodes canonical gene function, and the Mammalian Phenotype Ontology (MP), which describes non-canonical phenotypes, using statistical methods to suggest GO functional annotations from existing MP phenotype annotations. This work is in contrast to previous studies that have focused on inferring gene function from phenotype primarily through lexical or semantic similarity measures. We have designed and tested a set of algorithms that represents a novel methodology to define rules for predicting gene function by examining the emergent structure and relationships between the gene functions and phenotypes rather than inspecting the terms semantically. The algorithms inspect relationships among multiple phenotype terms to deduce if there are cases where they all arise from a single gene function. We apply this methodology to data about genes in the laboratory mouse that are formally represented in the Mouse Genome Informatics (MGI) resource. From the data, 7444 rule instances were generated from five generalized rules, resulting in 4818 unique GO functional predictions for 1796 genes. We show that our method is capable of inferring high-quality functional annotations from curated phenotype data. As well as creating inferred annotations, our method has the potential to allow for the elucidation of unforeseen, biologically significant associations between gene function and

  14. Function and Phenotype prediction through Data and Knowledge Fusion

    KAUST Repository

    Vespoor, Karen

    2016-01-01

    I will introduce the use of text mining techniques to support analysis of biological data sets, and will specifically discuss applications in protein function and phenotype prediction, as well as analysis of genetic variants that are supported

  15. Comparison of Modified Impedance Whole Blood Platelet Aggregation Method Detecting Platelet Function in ACS Patients with Different CYP2C19 Genotypes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cui, Chanjuan; Qiao, Rui; Zhang, Jie

    2016-01-01

    A reliable laboratory test to monitor onclopidogrel platelet reactivity (PR) is very necessary. In addition, genetic factors also play an important part in onclopidogrel PR. This study aimed to modify the original impedance whole blood platelet aggregation assay associated with the release assay to monitor onclopidogrel PR and assess their relationship with genotype. We adjusted the concentration of calcium in the in vitro reaction system of platelet aggregation to modify the original impedance whole blood platelet aggregation assay. Meanwhile, chronolume, which quantified the adenosine triphosphate (ATP) released from platelet dense granules, is added to this reaction system to reflect the platelet release function. In the modified assay, platelet magnified activation time (MAT) and the maximal platelet ATP release value (RV) were used to reflect platelet function parameters. In the original assay, the electrical resistance (omega) and RV were used to reflect platelet function parameters. Onclopidogrel PR was detected by the original impedance whole blood platelet aggregation assay, modified assay, and flow cytometric vasodilator stimulated phosphoprotein (VASP) assay in 168 patients with acute coronary syndromes (ACS). CYP2C19*2 and CYP2C19*3 polymorphisms were also detected in all of these patients. This modified method showed that when 12.5 microL CaCl2 (0.2 mmol/L) was added to the reaction system, MAT was appropriate (93 +/- 23 seconds). The CVs for the modified impedance assay and release assay were 9.31% and 6.13%, respectively. The mean VASP-PRI in the patient group treated with clopidogrel was significantly lower than that in the control group without antiplatelet therapy (54.88 +/- 16.81% vs. 79.86 +/- 10.24%, p 50% group were shorter than that in the PRI 50% group were higher than that in the PRI omega) and RV of the original method showed no differences between the two groups [0 (0-2) vs. 0 (0-1.25), 0.05 (0-0.25) vs. 0.08 (0-0.24); p > 0.05, p > 0

  16. Influence of cytochrome 2C19 allelic variants on on-treatment platelet reactivity evaluated by five different platelet function tests.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gremmel, Thomas; Kopp, Christoph W; Moertl, Deddo; Seidinger, Daniela; Koppensteiner, Renate; Panzer, Simon; Mannhalter, Christine; Steiner, Sabine

    2012-05-01

    The antiplatelet effect of clopidogrel has been linked to cytochrome P450 2C19 (CYP2C19) carrier status. The presence of loss of function and gain of function variants were found to have a gene-dose effect on clopidogrel metabolism. However, genotyping is only one aspect of predicting response to clopidogrel and several platelet function tests are available to measure platelet response. Patients and methods We studied the influence of CYP2C19 allelic variants on on-treatment platelet reactivity as assessed by light transmission aggregometry (LTA), the VerifyNow P2Y12 assay, the VASP assay, multiple electrode aggregometry (MEA), and the Impact-R in 288 patients after stenting for cardiovascular disease. Allelic variants of CYP2C19 were determined with the Infiniti® CYP450 2C19+ assay and categorized into four metabolizer states (ultrarapid, extensive, intermediate, poor). Platelet reactivity increased linearly from ultrarapid to poor metabolizers using the VerifyNow P2Y12 assay (P = 0.04), the VASP assay (P = 0.02) and the Impact-R (P = 0.04). The proportion of patients with high on-treatment residual platelet reactivity (HRPR) identified by LTA, the VerifyNow P2Y12 assay and the VASP assay increased when the metabolizer status decreased, while no such relationship could be identified for results of MEA and Impact-R. The presence of loss of function variants (*2/*2, *2-8*/wt, *2/*17) was an independent predictor of HRPR in LTA and the VASP assay while it did not reach statistical significance in the VerifyNow P2Y12 assay, MEA, and the Impact-R. Depending on the type of platelet function test differences in the association of on-treatment platelet reactivity with CYP2C19 carrier status are observed. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. [Effects of lysine clonixinate on platelet function. Comparison with other non-steroidal anti-inflammatory agents].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kramer, E H; Sassetti, B; Kaminker, A J; De Los Santos, A R; Martí, M L; Di Girolamo, G

    2001-01-01

    One of the mechanisms of action of non steroid antiinflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) consists of inhibition of prostaglandin synthesis. This explains many of the pharmacological effects and adverse events observed in medical practice. Administration of NSAIDs to patients with hemostatic disorders or perioperative conditions entails the risk of bleeding due to inhibition of platelet function. This study deals with platelet changes induced by lysine clonixinate vs diclofenac, ibuprofen and aspirin in classical tests such as platelet count, platelet factor 3 (PF3) activity and platelet aggregation with various inductors and more recent procedures such as P-selectin measurement by flow cytometry. Unlike control drugs, lysine clonixinate did not induce changes in platelet count or function when administered to healthy volunteers at the commonly used therapeutic doses.

  18. Combined Quantification of the Global Proteome, Phosphoproteome, and Proteolytic Cleavage to Characterize Altered Platelet Functions in the Human Scott Syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Solari, Fiorella A; Mattheij, Nadine J A; Burkhart, Julia M; Swieringa, Frauke; Collins, Peter W; Cosemans, Judith M E M; Sickmann, Albert; Heemskerk, Johan W M; Zahedi, René P

    2016-10-01

    The Scott syndrome is a very rare and likely underdiagnosed bleeding disorder associated with mutations in the gene encoding anoctamin-6. Platelets from Scott patients are impaired in various Ca 2+ -dependent responses, including phosphatidylserine exposure, integrin closure, intracellular protein cleavage, and cytoskeleton-dependent morphological changes. Given the central role of anoctamin-6 in the platelet procoagulant response, we used quantitative proteomics to understand the underlying molecular mechanisms and the complex phenotypic changes in Scott platelets compared with control platelets. Therefore, we applied an iTRAQ-based multi-pronged strategy to quantify changes in (1) the global proteome, (2) the phosphoproteome, and (3) proteolytic events between resting and stimulated Scott and control platelets. Our data indicate a limited number of proteins with decreased (70) or increased (64) expression in Scott platelets, among those we confirmed the absence of anoctamin-6 and the strong up-regulation of aquaporin-1 by parallel reaction monitoring. The quantification of 1566 phosphopeptides revealed major differences between Scott and control platelets after stimulation with thrombin/convulxin or ionomycin. In Scott platelets, phosphorylation levels of proteins regulating cytoskeletal or signaling events were increased. Finally, we quantified 1596 N-terminal peptides in activated Scott and control platelets, 180 of which we identified as calpain-regulated, whereas a distinct set of 23 neo-N termini was caspase-regulated. In Scott platelets, calpain-induced cleavage of cytoskeleton-linked and signaling proteins was downregulated, in accordance with an increased phosphorylation state. Thus, multipronged proteomic profiling of Scott platelets provides detailed insight into their protection against detrimental Ca 2+ -dependent changes that are normally associated with phosphatidylserine exposure. © 2016 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular

  19. Effect of spirapril and hydrochlorothiazide on platelet function and euglobulin clot lysis time in patients with mild hypertension

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fonitz, Gitte (Gleerup); Petersen, J R; Mehlsen, J

    1996-01-01

    Thirteen patients with mild hypertension (untreated diastolic blood pressure of 95 to 114 mmHg) received, in random order, three successive treatments of four weeks with placebo, spirapril (6 mg daily), or hydrochlorothiazide (HCT2) (24 mg daily). At the end of each treatment, blood samples for a...... not produce any unwanted side effect on platelet function or fibrinolysis. HCT2 seems to decrease platelet activity at rest, whereas spirapril seems to some extent to decrease platelet activity at exercise....

  20. Deletion of GLUT1 and GLUT3 Reveals Multiple Roles for Glucose Metabolism in Platelet and Megakaryocyte Function

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Trevor P. Fidler

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Anucleate platelets circulate in the blood to facilitate thrombosis and diverse immune functions. Platelet activation leading to clot formation correlates with increased glycogenolysis, glucose uptake, glucose oxidation, and lactic acid production. Simultaneous deletion of glucose transporter (GLUT 1 and GLUT3 (double knockout [DKO] specifically in platelets completely abolished glucose uptake. In DKO platelets, mitochondrial oxidative metabolism of non-glycolytic substrates, such as glutamate, increased. Thrombosis and platelet activation were decreased through impairment at multiple activation nodes, including Ca2+ signaling, degranulation, and integrin activation. DKO mice developed thrombocytopenia, secondary to impaired pro-platelet formation from megakaryocytes, and increased platelet clearance resulting from cytosolic calcium overload and calpain activation. Systemic treatment with oligomycin, inhibiting mitochondrial metabolism, induced rapid clearance of platelets, with circulating counts dropping to zero in DKO mice, but not wild-type mice, demonstrating an essential role for energy metabolism in platelet viability. Thus, substrate metabolism is essential for platelet production, activation, and survival.

  1. Phenotypic and functional characterization of earthworm coelomocyte subsets

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Engelmann, Péter; Hayashi, Yuya; Bodo, Kornélia

    2016-01-01

    Flow cytometry is a common approach to study invertebrate immune cells including earthworm coelomocytes. However, the link between light-scatter- and microscopy-based phenotyping remains obscured. Here we show, by means of light scatter-based cell sorting, both subpopulations (amoebocytes...... amoebocytes and eleocytes, with the former being in favor of bacterial engulfment. This study has proved successful in linking flow cytometry and microscopy analysis and provides further experimental evidence of phenotypic and functional heterogeneity in earthworm coelomocyte subsets....

  2. A detailed examination of platelet function inhibition by nitric oxide in platelet-rich plasma and whole blood.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zimmermann, Robert; Krueger, Julia; Filipović, Milos R; Ivanović-Burmazović, Ivana; Calatzis, Andreas; Weiss, Dominik R; Eckstein, Reinhold

    2013-01-01

    The question of whether novel instruments such as multiple electrode aggregometry (MEA) can be used for measurement of the effects of nitric oxide (NO) on platelets (PLTs) has not been examined. Therefore, we compared the effects of NO concentrations (1, 10, and 100 microM) on the PLT aggregation response to ADP, arachidonic acid (AA), collagen, ristocetin, and thrombin receptor-activating peptide 6 (TRAP6) using light transmission aggregometry (LTA) and multiple electrode aggregometry (MEA) and examined the effects of NO using the platelet function analyzer (PFA)-100. The response of PLTs to ADP and AA was strongly inhibited by all NO concentrations in LTA and MEA. The inhibition of the responses to ristocetin and collagen was detectable in MEA at lower NO concentrations than in LTA. However, the typically increasing lag phase between collagen addition and the aggregation response in the presence of NO was more obvious in LTA. TRAP caused a reproducible early response in the presence of NO in LTA which was followed by rapid PLT disaggregation, whereas even 100 microM NO did not inhibit the response to TRAP in MEA. Finally, NO prolonged the in-vitro bleeding time remarkably more in the PFA-100 collagen-epinephrin cartridge than in the collagen-ADP cartridge. Whole blood versus PLT rich plasma, citrate versus hirudin, and high versus low shear influenced the effects of NO. This shows that a careful selection of models and potentially a combination of different methods is appropriate for a differentiated evaluation of pharmacological or physiological mechanisms of NO-donors or of NO-inhibitors.

  3. Pilot study of novel lab methodology and testing of platelet function in adolescent women with heavy menstrual bleeding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rocheleau, Anne D; Khader, Ayesha; Ngo, Anh T P; Boehnlein, Colin; McDavitt, Cara; Lattimore, Susan; Recht, Michael; McCarty, Owen J T; Haley, Kristina M

    2018-03-01

    BackgroundApproximately 40% of adolescent women experience heavy menstrual bleeding (HMB), and 10-62% of them have an underlying bleeding disorder (BD). Diagnosing a BD remains challenging because of limitations of available clinical platelet function assays. The aim of this study was to characterize platelet function in a population of adolescent women with HMB using small-volume whole-blood assays.MethodsAnticoagulated whole blood was used to assess platelet GPIIbIIIa activation, α-granule secretion, and aggregation in response to multiple agonists. Platelet adhesion on collagen or von Willebrand Factor (VWF) under static and shear flow was also assessed.ResultsFifteen participants with HMB were included in the study, of which eight were diagnosed with a clinically identifiable BD. Platelet activation was blunted in response to calcium ionophore in participants without a BD diagnosis compared with that in all other participants. Impaired GPIIbIIIa activation was observed in response to all GPCR agonists, except adenosine diphosphate (ADP), in participants with qualitative platelet disorders. Our assays detected platelet aggregation in the majority of participants with a BD in response to ADP, collagen-related peptide (CRP), thrombin receptor activator 6 (TRAP-6), or U46619. Platelet adhesion and aggregation on collagen and VWF was decreased for participants with VWD.ConclusionParticipants with and without BD exhibited aberrant platelet function in several assays in response to select agonists.

  4. Role of Tumor Suppressor P53 in Megakaryopoiesis and Platelet Function

    Science.gov (United States)

    Apostolidis, Pani A.; Woulfe, Donna S.; Chavez, Massiel; Miller, William M.; Papoutsakis, Eleftherios T.

    2011-01-01

    The pathobiological role of p53 has been widely studied, however its role in normophysiology is relatively unexplored. We previously showed that p53 knock-down increased ploidy in megakaryocytic cultures. This study aims to examine the effect of p53 loss on in vivo megakaryopoiesis, platelet production and function, and to investigate the basis for greater ploidy in p53−/− megakaryocytic cultures. Here, we used flow cytometry to analyze ploidy, DNA synthesis and apoptosis in murine cultured and bone marrow megakaryocytes following thrombopoietin administration and to analyze fibrinogen binding to platelets in vitro. Culture of p53−/− marrow cells for 6 days with thrombopoietin gave rise to 1.7-fold more megakaryocytes, 26.1±3.6% of which reached ploidy classes ≥64N compared to 8.2±0.9% of p53+/+ megakaryocytes. This was due to 30% greater DNA synthesis in p53−/− megakaryocytes and 31% greater apoptosis in p53+/+ megakaryocytes by day 4 of culture. Although the bone marrow and spleen steady-state megakaryocytic content and ploidy were similar in p53+/+ and p53−/− mice, thrombopoietin administration resulted in increased megakaryocytic polyploidization in p53−/− mice. Although their platelet counts were normal, p53−/− mice exhibited significantly longer bleeding times and p53−/− platelets were less sensitive than p53+/+ platelets to agonist-induced fibrinogen binding and P-selectin secretion. In summary, our in vivo and ex-vivo studies indicate that p53 loss leads to increased polyploidization during megakaryopoiesis. Our findings also suggest for the first time a direct link between p53 loss and the development of fully functional platelets resulting in hemostatic deficiencies. PMID:22024107

  5. A Study of Platelet Inhibition, Using a 'Point of Care' Platelet Function Test, following Primary Percutaneous Coronary Intervention for ST-Elevation Myocardial Infarction [PINPOINT-PPCI].

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thomas W Johnson

    Full Text Available Rapid coronary recanalization following ST-elevation myocardial infarction (STEMI requires effective anti-platelet and anti-thrombotic therapies. This study tested the impact of door to end of procedure ('door-to-end' time and baseline platelet activity on platelet inhibition within 24hours post-STEMI.108 patients, treated with prasugrel and procedural bivalirudin, underwent Multiplate® platelet function testing at baseline, 0, 1, 2 and 24hours post-procedure. Major adverse cardiac events (MACE, bleeding and stent thrombosis (ST were recorded. Baseline ADP activity was high (88.3U [71.8-109.0], procedural time and consequently bivalirudin infusion duration were short (median door-to-end time 55minutes [40-70] and infusion duration 30minutes [20-42]. Baseline ADP was observed to influence all subsequent measurements of ADP activity, whereas door-to-end time only influenced ADP immediately post-procedure. High residual platelet reactivity (HRPR ADP>46.8U was observed in 75% of patients immediately post-procedure and persisted in 24% of patients at 2hours. Five patients suffered in-hospital MACE (4.6%. Acute ST occurred in 4 patients, all were <120mins post-procedure and had HRPR. No significant bleeding was observed. In a post-hoc analysis, pre-procedural morphine use was associated with significantly higher ADP activity following intervention.Baseline platelet function, time to STEMI treatment and opiate use all significantly influence immediate post-procedural platelet activity.

  6. The hydraulic permeability of blood clots as a function of fibrin and platelet density.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wufsus, A R; Macera, N E; Neeves, K B

    2013-04-16

    Interstitial fluid flow within blood clots is a biophysical mechanism that regulates clot growth and dissolution. Assuming that a clot can be modeled as a porous medium, the physical property that dictates interstitial fluid flow is the hydraulic permeability. The objective of this study was to bound the possible values of the hydraulic permeability in clots formed in vivo and present relationships that can be used to estimate clot permeability as a function of composition. A series of clots with known densities of fibrin and platelets, the two major components of a clot, were formed under static conditions. The permeability was calculated by measuring the interstitial fluid velocity through the clots at a constant pressure gradient. Fibrin gels formed with a fiber volume fraction of 0.02-0.54 had permeabilities of 1.2 × 10(-1)-1.5 × 10(-4)μm(2). Platelet-rich clots with a platelet volume fraction of 0.01-0.61 and a fibrin volume fraction of 0.03 had permeabilities over a range of 1.1 × 10(-2)-1.5 × 10(-5)μm(2). The permeability of fibrin gels and of clots with platelet volume fraction of platelet volume fraction of >0.2 were modeled as a Brinkman medium of coarse solids (platelets) embedded in a mesh of fine fibers (fibrin). Our data suggest that the permeability of clots formed in vivo can vary by up to five orders of magnitude, with pore sizes that range from 4 to 350 nm. These findings have important implications for the transport of coagulation zymogens/enzymes in the interstitial spaces during clot formation, as well as the design of fibrinolytic drug delivery strategies. Copyright © 2013 Biophysical Society. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Favorable effects of berry consumption on platelet function, blood pressure, and HDL cholesterol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erlund, Iris; Koli, Raika; Alfthan, Georg; Marniemi, Jukka; Puukka, Pauli; Mustonen, Pirjo; Mattila, Pirjo; Jula, Antti

    2008-02-01

    Berries are a particularly rich source of polyphenols. They also contain other bioactive substances, such as vitamin C. Previous studies indicated that the consumption of polyphenol-rich foods (eg, cocoa, tea, and red wine) may induce beneficial changes in pathways related to cardiovascular health. Whether the consumption of berries has similar effects is unknown. We aimed to investigate the effects of berry consumption on hemostatic function, serum lipids, and blood pressure (BP). Middle-aged unmedicated subjects (n = 72) with cardiovascular risk factors consumed moderate amounts of berry or control products for 8 wk in a single-blind, randomized, placebo-controlled intervention trial. Berry consumption inhibited platelet function as measured with a platelet function analyzer (using collagen and ADP as platelet activator) [changes: 11% and -1.4% in the berry and control groups, respectively; P = 0.018, analysis of covariance (ANCOVA)]. Plasma biomarkers of platelet activation, coagulation, and fibrinolysis did not change during the intervention. Serum HDL-cholesterol concentrations increased significantly more (P = 0.006, ANCOVA) in the berry than in the control group (5.2% and 0.6%, respectively), but total cholesterol and triacylglycerol remained unchanged. Systolic BP decreased significantly (P = 0.050, ANCOVA); the decrease mostly occurred in subjects with high baseline BP (7.3 mm Hg in highest tertile; P = 0.024, ANCOVA). Polyphenol and vitamin C concentrations in plasma increased, whereas other nutritional biomarkers (ie, folate, tocopherols, sodium, and potassium) were unaffected. The consumption of moderate amounts of berries resulted in favorable changes in platelet function, HDL cholesterol, and BP. The results indicate that regular consumption of berries may play a role in the prevention of cardiovascular disease.

  8. Effects of carprofen, meloxicam and deracoxib on platelet function in dogs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mullins, Kathleen B; Thomason, John M; Lunsford, Kari V; Pinchuk, Lesya M; Langston, Vernon C; Wills, Robert W; McLaughlin, Ronald M; Mackin, Andrew J

    2012-03-01

    To determine effects of anti-inflammatory doses of COX-2 selective NSAIDs carprofen, meloxicam, and deracoxib on platelet function in dogs and urine 11-dehydro-thromboxane B2. Randomized, blocked, crossover design with a 14-day washout period. Healthy intact female Walker Hounds aged 1-6 years and weighing 20.5-24.2 kg. Dogs were given NSAIDs for 7 days at recommended doses: carprofen (2.2 mg kg(-1), PO, every 12 hours), carprofen (4.4 mg kg(-1), PO, every 24 hours), meloxicam (0.2 mg kg(-1), PO, on the 1st day then 0.1 mg kg(-1), PO, every 24 hours), and deracoxib (2 mg kg(-1), PO, every 24 hours). Collagen/epinephrine and collagen/ADP PFA-100 cartridges were used to evaluate platelet function before and during and every other day after administration of each drug. Urine 11-dehydro-thromboxane B(2) was also measured before and during administration of each drug. All NSAIDs significantly prolonged PFA-100 closure times when measured with collagen/epinephrine cartridges, but not with collagen/ADP cartridges. The average duration from drug cessation until return of closure times (collagen/epinephrine cartridges) to baseline values was 11.6, 10.6, 11 and 10.6 days for carprofen (2.2 mg kg(-1) every 12 hours), carprofen (4.4 mg kg(-1) every 24 hours), meloxicam and deracoxib, respectively. Oral administration of some COX-2 selective NSAIDs causes detectable alterations in platelet function in dogs. As in humans, PFA-100 collagen/ADP cartridges do not reliably detect COX-mediated platelet dysfunction in dogs. Individual assessment of platelet function is advised when administering these drugs prior to surgery, particularly in the presence of other risk factors for bleeding. © 2011 The Authors. Veterinary Anaesthesia and Analgesia. © 2011 Association of Veterinary Anaesthetists and the American College of Veterinary Anesthesiologists.

  9. Bitistatin-functionalized fluorescent nanodiamond particles specifically bind to purified human platelet integrin receptor αIIbβ3 and activated platelets

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcinkiewicz C

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Cezary Marcinkiewicz,1,2 Jonathan A Gerstenhaber,1 Mark Sternberg,2 Peter I Lelkes,1 Giora Feuerstein1,2 1Department of Bioengineering, College of Engineering, Temple University, Philadelphia, 2Debina Diagnostic, Inc., Newton Square, PA, USA Abstract: Thromboembolic events (TEE underwrite key causes of death in developed countries. While advanced imaging technologies such as computed tomography scans serve to diagnose blood clots during acute cardiovascular events, no such technology is available in routine primary care for TEE risk assessment. Here, we describe an imaging platform technology based on bioengineered fluorescent nanodiamond particles (F-NDPs functionalized with bitistatin (Bit, a disintegrin that specifically binds to the αIIbβ3 integrin, platelet fibrinogen receptor (PFR on activated platelets. Covalent linkage of purified Bit to F-NDP was concentration-dependent and saturable, as validated by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay using specific anti-Bit antibodies. F-NDP–Bit interacted with purified PFR, either in immobilized or soluble form. Lotrafiban, a nonpeptide, αIIbβ3 receptor antagonist, specifically blocked F-NDP–Bit–PFR complex formation. Moreover, F-NDP–Bit specifically binds to activated platelets incorporated into a clot generated by thrombin-activated rat platelet-rich plasma (PRP. Our results suggest that engineered F-NDP–Bit particles could serve as noninvasive, “real-time” optical diagnostics for clots present in blood vessels. Keywords: carbon nanoparticles, blood clots, imaging, platelet fibrinogen receptor, fluorescence, disintegrin, thromboembolic complications, thrombosis

  10. Platelets and hemophilia: A review of the literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riedl, Julia; Ay, Cihan; Pabinger, Ingrid

    2017-07-01

    Hemophilia A and B are inherited bleeding disorders due to deficiencies of the clotting factors VIII and IX, respectively. The severity of the disease correlates with remaining factor levels, although individual differences in bleeding tendency are seen despite similar factor levels. While thrombin generation is severely impaired in persons with hemophilia, primary hemostasis, i.e. platelet function, has been generally considered to be normal. However, some studies reported prolonged bleeding times in hemophilia, suggesting that also primary hemostasis is affected. In several other studies different aspects of platelet function in hemophilia have been investigated in more detail and various alterations were discovered, such as increased platelet P-selectin expression, a lower number of procoagulant, so-called 'coated' platelets, lower aggregation upon co-incubation with tissue factor, or reduced platelet contractile forces during clot formation in comparison to healthy individuals. An influence of platelet function on clinical phenotype was suggested, which might contribute in part to variations in bleeding tendency in hemophilic patients with similar factor levels. However, the available evidence is currently limited and no clear correlations between platelet function parameters and clinical phenotypes have been demonstrated. The impact of alterations of platelet function in hemophilia remains to be better defined. Another interesting role of platelets in hemophilia has been reported recently by establishing a novel gene-therapeutic strategy using platelets as a delivery system for FVIII, showing promising results in animal models. This review gives an overview on the currently published literature on platelet function and the potential roles of platelets in hemophilia. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Increasing platelet concentration in platelet-rich plasma inhibits anterior cruciate ligament cell function in three-dimensional culture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoshida, Ryu; Cheng, Mingyu; Murray, Martha M

    2014-02-01

    Tissue engineering is one new strategy being developed to treat ACL ruptures. One such approach is bio-enhanced ACL repair, where a suture repair is supplemented with a bio-active scaffold containing platelets. However, the optimal concentration of platelets to stimulate ACL healing is not known. We hypothesized that increasing platelet concentrations in the scaffold would enhance critical cell behaviors. Porcine ACL fibroblasts were obtained from explant culture and suspended in platelet poor plasma (PPP), 1× platelet-rich plasma (PRP), 3× PRP, 5× PRP, or phosphate buffered saline (PBS). The cell suspensions were cultured in a 3D collagen scaffold. Cellular metabolism (MTT assay), apoptosis (TUNEL assay), and gene expression for type I and type III collagen were measured. 1× PRP significantly outperformed 5× PRP in all parameters studied: Type I and III collagen gene expression, apoptosis prevention, and cell metabolism stimulation. ACL fibroblasts cultured with 1× PRP had the highest type I and type III collagen gene expression. 1× PRP and PPP groups had the highest cell metabolism and lowest apoptosis rates. Concentration of platelets had significant effects on the behavior of ACL fibroblasts; thus, it is an important parameter that should be specified in clinical or basic science studies. © 2013 Orthopaedic Research Society. Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  12. Grafting of phosphorylcholine functional groups on polycarbonate urethane surface for resisting platelet adhesion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gao, Bin [School of Chemical Engineering and Technology, Tianjin University, Weijin Road 92, Tianjin 300072 (China); Feng, Yakai, E-mail: yakaifeng@hotmail.com [School of Chemical Engineering and Technology, Tianjin University, Weijin Road 92, Tianjin 300072 (China); Tianjin University-Helmholtz-Zentrum Geesthacht, Joint Laboratory for Biomaterials and Regenerative Medicine, Weijin Road 92, 300072 Tianjin (China); Key Laboratory of Systems Bioengineering, Ministry of Education, Tianjin University, Weijin Road 92, Tianjin 300072 (China); Lu, Jian; Zhang, Li; Zhao, Miao; Shi, Changcan; Khan, Musammir [School of Chemical Engineering and Technology, Tianjin University, Weijin Road 92, Tianjin 300072 (China); Guo, Jintang [School of Chemical Engineering and Technology, Tianjin University, Weijin Road 92, Tianjin 300072 (China); Tianjin University-Helmholtz-Zentrum Geesthacht, Joint Laboratory for Biomaterials and Regenerative Medicine, Weijin Road 92, 300072 Tianjin (China)

    2013-07-01

    In order to improve the resistance of platelet adhesion on material surface, 2-methacryloyloxyethyl phosphorylcholine (MPC) was grafted onto polycarbonate urethane (PCU) surface via Michael reaction to create biomimetic structure. After introducing primary amine groups via coupling tris(2-aminoethyl)amine (TAEA) onto the polymer surface, the double bond of MPC reacted with the amino group to obtain MPC modified PCU. The modified surface was characterized by Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). The results verified that MPC was grafted onto PCU surface by Michael reaction method. The MPC grafted PCU surface had a low water contact angle and a high water uptake. This means that the hydrophilic PC functional groups improved the surface hydrophilicity significantly. In addition, surface morphology of MPC grafted PCU film was imaged by atomic force microscope (AFM). The results showed that the grafted surface was rougher than the blank PCU surface. In addition, platelet adhesion study was evaluated by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) observation. The PCU films after treated with platelet-rich plasma demonstrated that much fewer platelets adhered to the MPC-grafted PCU surface than to the blank PCU surface. The antithrombogenicity of the MPC-grafted PCU surface was determined by the activated partial thromboplastin time (APTT). The result suggested that the MPC modified PCU may have potential application as biomaterials in blood-contacting and some subcutaneously implanted devices. - Highlights: • MPC was successfully grafted onto polycarbonate urethane surface via Michael reaction. • High concentration of PC functional groups on the surface via TAEA molecule • Biomimetic surface modification • The modified surface showed high hydrophilicity and anti-platelet adhesion.

  13. Platelet reactivity in the early and late phases of acute coronary syndromes according to cytochrome P450 2C19 phenotypes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagashima, Zenko; Tsukahara, Kengo; Morita, Satoshi; Endo, Tsutomu; Sugano, Teruyasu; Hibi, Kiyoshi; Himeno, Hideo; Fukui, Kazuki; Umemura, Satoshi; Kimura, Kazuo

    2013-09-01

    It remains unknown whether the time course of the antiplatelet effects of clopidogrel differs according to cytochrome P450 (CYP) 2C19 phenotype in Japanese patients with acute coronary syndromes (ACS). Platelet reactivity was serially assessed by VerifyNow-P2Y12 assay (Accumetrics, San Diego, CA, USA). Results were expressed as P2Y12-reaction-units (PRU) in 177 patients with ACS who underwent stent implantation and received aspirin plus a 300-mg loading dose of clopidogrel followed by 75 mg/day. High on-clopidogrel treatment platelet reactivity (HTPR) was defined as PRU>235. On the basis of the CYP2C19*2 and *3 alleles, 46 patients (26.0%) were classified as extensive metabolizers (EM), 103 (58.2%) as intermediate metabolizers (IM), and 28 (15.8%) as poor metabolizers (PM). At fashion (168±99 vs. 213±77 vs. 278±69, pJapanese patients with ACS carried CYP2C19 variant alleles. The majority of IM and PM had increased platelet reactivity during the early phase of ACS. Although HTPR was frequently observed even 14-28 days after standard maintenance doses of clopidogrel in PM, the incidence of adverse outcomes did not differ, irrespective of CYP2C19 genotype. Copyright © 2013 Japanese College of Cardiology. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Exogenous modification of platelet membranes with the omega-3 fatty acids EPA and DHA reduces platelet procoagulant activity and thrombus formation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larson, Mark K; Tormoen, Garth W; Weaver, Lucinda J; Luepke, Kristen J; Patel, Ishan A; Hjelmen, Carl E; Ensz, Nicole M; McComas, Leah S; McCarty, Owen J T

    2013-02-01

    Several studies have implicated the omega-3 fatty acids eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA) and docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) in inhibition of normal platelet function, suggesting a role for platelets in EPA- and DHA-mediated cardioprotection. However, it is unclear whether the cardioprotective mechanisms arise from alterations to platelet-platelet, platelet-matrix, or platelet-coagulation factor interactions. Our previous results led us to hypothesize that EPA and DHA alter the ability of platelets to catalyze the generation of thrombin. We tested this hypothesis by exogenously modifying platelet membranes with EPA and DHA, which resulted in compositional changes analogous to increased dietary EPA and DHA intake. Platelets treated with EPA and DHA showed reductions in the rate of thrombin generation and exposure of platelet phosphatidylserine. In addition, treatment of platelets with EPA and DHA decreased thrombus formation and altered the processing of thrombin precursor proteins. Furthermore, treatment of whole blood with EPA and DHA resulted in increased occlusion time and a sharply reduced accumulation of fibrin under flow conditions. These results demonstrate that EPA and DHA inhibit, but do not eliminate, the ability of platelets to catalyze thrombin generation in vitro. The ability of EPA and DHA to reduce the procoagulant function of platelets provides a possible mechanism behind the cardioprotective phenotype in individuals consuming high levels of EPA and DHA.

  15. Effects of aspirin, carprofen, deracoxib, and meloxicam on platelet function and systemic prostaglandin concentrations in healthy dogs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blois, Shauna L; Allen, Dana G; Wood, R Darren; Conlon, Peter D

    2010-03-01

    To determine effects of therapeutic dosages of aspirin, carprofen, deracoxib, and meloxicam on platelet function and systemic prostaglandin concentrations in healthy dogs. 10 hound-crossbred dogs. Aspirin (10 mg/kg, PO, q 12 h), carprofen (4.4 mg/kg, PO, q 24 h), deracoxib (2 mg/kg, PO, q 24 h), meloxicam (0.1 mg/kg, PO, q 24 h), and a placebo were administered for 7 days in a random order to each of 10 healthy dogs; there was a 21-day washout period between subsequent treatments. One-stage prothrombin time (PT), activated partial thromboplastin time (aPTT), fibrinogen concentration, and plasma concentrations of thromboxane (TX)B(2) and 6-keto prostaglandin (PG)F(1alpha) were measured before and after treatment administration. Platelet function was assessed by use of a platelet-function analyzer and aggregation. Aspirin, carprofen, and meloxicam did not significantly affect platelet function. Deracoxib caused a mild decrease in platelet aggregation induced by 50microM ADP. Platelet number, Hct, PT, aPTT, and plasma TXB(2) and 6-keto PGF(1alpha) concentrations were unchanged after NSAID administration. Meloxicam administration resulted in a significant decrease in fibrinogen concentration, but results remained within the laboratory reference interval. Oral administration of commonly used NSAIDs at therapeutic dosages in healthy dogs did not alter plasma TXB(2) and 6-keto PGF(1alpha) concentrations. Deracoxib administration resulted in a minor abnormality in platelet aggregation. Anti-inflammatory doses of aspirin did not affect platelet function as measured by use of optical aggregometry and a platelet-function analyzer. Further evaluation of the effects of aspirin and cyclooxygenase-2-selective inhibitors on hemostasis should be performed.

  16. Human Platelets Exhibit Chemotaxis using Functional N-Formyl Peptide Receptors

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Czapiga, Meggan; Gao, Ji-Liang; Kirk, Allen; Lekstrom-Himes, Julie

    2005-01-01

    Activated platelets participate in inflammatory and microbicidal processes by upregulation of surface selectins, shedding of CD40 ligand, and release of platelet microbicidal proteins and microparticles...

  17. Premature aging of cardiovascular/platelet function in polycystic ovarian syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chan, Wai Ping A; Ngo, Doan T; Sverdlov, Aaron L; Rajendran, Sharmalar; Stafford, Irene; Heresztyn, Tamila; Chirkov, Yuliy Y; Horowitz, John D

    2013-07-01

    The objective of this study was to compare the impact of aging on nitric oxide (NO) modulation of platelet and vascular function in healthy women and women with polycystic ovary syndrome. A case-control study of women ages 18 to 60 years, comparing women with polycystic ovarian syndrome against age-matched healthy controls, was performed. A total of 242 women, of whom 109 had polycystic ovarian syndrome (based on Rotterdam criteria), participated in the study. Women who were pregnant or on clopidogrel were excluded from the study. Inhibition of platelet aggregation by nitric oxide (primary outcome measure), vascular endothelial function, plasma concentrations of N(G), N(G)-dimethyl-L-arginine (ADMA), endothelial progenitor cell count, and high-sensitivity C-reactive protein (markers of endothelial dysfunction and inflammation) were assessed. With increasing age in control women, there was progressive attenuation of platelet responses to NO, impairment of endothelial function, and elevation of ADMA levels (P ≤.001). Irrespective of age, women with polycystic ovarian syndrome exhibited greater impairment of all these parameters (all P polycystic ovarian syndrome, these changes are present from early adult life and may contribute to premature atherogenesis. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Macrophage Phenotype and Function in Different Stages of Atherosclerosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tabas, Ira; Bornfeldt, Karin E.

    2016-01-01

    The remarkable plasticity and plethora of biological functions performed by macrophages have enticed scientists to study these cells in relation to atherosclerosis for more than 50 years, and major discoveries continue to be made today. It is now understood that macrophages play important roles in all stages of atherosclerosis, from initiation of lesions and lesion expansion, to necrosis leading to rupture and the clinical manifestations of atherosclerosis, to resolution and regression of atherosclerotic lesions. Lesional macrophages are derived primarily from blood monocytes, although recent research has shown that lesional macrophage-like cells can also be derived from smooth muscle cells. Lesional macrophages take on different phenotypes depending on their environment and which intracellular signaling pathways are activated. Rather than a few distinct populations of macrophages, the phenotype of the lesional macrophage is more complex and likely changes during the different phases of atherosclerosis and with the extent of lipid and cholesterol loading, activation by a plethora of receptors, and metabolic state of the cells. These different phenotypes allow the macrophage to engulf lipids, dead cells, and other substances perceived as danger signals; efflux cholesterol to HDL; proliferate and migrate; undergo apoptosis and death; and secrete a large number of inflammatory and pro-resolving molecules. This review article, part of the Compendium on Atherosclerosis, discusses recent advances in our understanding of lesional macrophage phenotype and function in different stages of atherosclerosis. With the increasing understanding of the roles of lesional macrophages, new research areas and treatment strategies are beginning to emerge. PMID:26892964

  19. Functional Dysregulation of CDC42 Causes Diverse Developmental Phenotypes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martinelli, Simone; Krumbach, Oliver H F; Pantaleoni, Francesca; Coppola, Simona; Amin, Ehsan; Pannone, Luca; Nouri, Kazem; Farina, Luciapia; Dvorsky, Radovan; Lepri, Francesca; Buchholzer, Marcel; Konopatzki, Raphael; Walsh, Laurence; Payne, Katelyn; Pierpont, Mary Ella; Vergano, Samantha Schrier; Langley, Katherine G; Larsen, Douglas; Farwell, Kelly D; Tang, Sha; Mroske, Cameron; Gallotta, Ivan; Di Schiavi, Elia; Della Monica, Matteo; Lugli, Licia; Rossi, Cesare; Seri, Marco; Cocchi, Guido; Henderson, Lindsay; Baskin, Berivan; Alders, Mariëlle; Mendoza-Londono, Roberto; Dupuis, Lucie; Nickerson, Deborah A; Chong, Jessica X; Meeks, Naomi; Brown, Kathleen; Causey, Tahnee; Cho, Megan T; Demuth, Stephanie; Digilio, Maria Cristina; Gelb, Bruce D; Bamshad, Michael J; Zenker, Martin; Ahmadian, Mohammad Reza; Hennekam, Raoul C; Tartaglia, Marco; Mirzaa, Ghayda M

    2018-01-17

    Exome sequencing has markedly enhanced the discovery of genes implicated in Mendelian disorders, particularly for individuals in whom a known clinical entity could not be assigned. This has led to the recognition that phenotypic heterogeneity resulting from allelic mutations occurs more commonly than previously appreciated. Here, we report that missense variants in CDC42, a gene encoding a small GTPase functioning as an intracellular signaling node, underlie a clinically heterogeneous group of phenotypes characterized by variable growth dysregulation, facial dysmorphism, and neurodevelopmental, immunological, and hematological anomalies, including a phenotype resembling Noonan syndrome, a developmental disorder caused by dysregulated RAS signaling. In silico, in vitro, and in vivo analyses demonstrate that mutations variably perturb CDC42 function by altering the switch between the active and inactive states of the GTPase and/or affecting CDC42 interaction with effectors, and differentially disturb cellular and developmental processes. These findings reveal the remarkably variable impact that dominantly acting CDC42 mutations have on cell function and development, creating challenges in syndrome definition, and exemplify the importance of functional profiling for syndrome recognition and delineation. Copyright © 2017 American Society of Human Genetics. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Bitistatin-functionalized fluorescent nanodiamond particles specifically bind to purified human platelet integrin receptor αIIbβ3 and activated platelets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marcinkiewicz, Cezary; Gerstenhaber, Jonathan A; Sternberg, Mark; Lelkes, Peter I; Feuerstein, Giora

    2017-01-01

    Thromboembolic events (TEE) underwrite key causes of death in developed countries. While advanced imaging technologies such as computed tomography scans serve to diagnose blood clots during acute cardiovascular events, no such technology is available in routine primary care for TEE risk assessment. Here, we describe an imaging platform technology based on bioengineered fluorescent nanodiamond particles (F-NDPs) functionalized with bitistatin (Bit), a disintegrin that specifically binds to the α IIb β 3 integrin, platelet fibrinogen receptor (PFR) on activated platelets. Covalent linkage of purified Bit to F-NDP was concentration-dependent and saturable, as validated by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay using specific anti-Bit antibodies. F-NDP-Bit interacted with purified PFR, either in immobilized or soluble form. Lotrafiban, a nonpeptide, α IIb β 3 receptor antagonist, specifically blocked F-NDP-Bit-PFR complex formation. Moreover, F-NDP-Bit specifically binds to activated platelets incorporated into a clot generated by thrombin-activated rat platelet-rich plasma (PRP). Our results suggest that engineered F-NDP-Bit particles could serve as noninvasive, "real-time" optical diagnostics for clots present in blood vessels.

  1. Progress in bio-manufacture of platelets for transfusion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heazlewood, Shen Y; Nilsson, Susan K; Cartledge, Kellie; Be, Cheang Ly; Vinson, Andrew; Gel, Murat; Haylock, David N

    2017-11-01

    Blood transfusion services face an ever-increasing demand for donor platelets to meet clinical needs. Whilst strategies for increasing platelet storage life and improving the efficiency of donor platelet collection are important, in the longer term, platelets generated by bio-manufacturing processes will be required to meet demands. Production of sufficient numbers of in vitro-derived platelets for transfusion represents a significant bioengineering challenge. In this review, we highlight recent progress in this area of research and outline the main technical and biological obstacles that need to be met before this becomes feasible and economic. A critical consideration is assurance of the functional properties of these cells as compared to their fresh, donor collected, counterparts. We contend that platelet-like particles and in vitro-derived platelets that phenotypically resemble fresh platelets must deliver the same functions as these cells upon transfusion. We also note recent progress with immortalized megakaryocyte progenitor cell lines, molecular strategies for reducing expression of HLA Class I to generate universal donor platelets and the move to early clinical studies with in vitro-derived platelets.

  2. Pneumatic tube system transport does not alter platelet function in optical and whole blood aggregometry, prothrombin time, activated partial thromboplastin time, platelet count and fibrinogen in patients on anti-platelet drug therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Enko, Dietmar; Mangge, Harald; Münch, Andreas; Niedrist, Tobias; Mahla, Elisabeth; Metzler, Helfried; Prüller, Florian

    2017-01-01

    Introduction The aim of this study was to assess pneumatic tube system (PTS) alteration on platelet function by the light transmission aggregometry (LTA) and whole blood aggregometry (WBA) method, and on the results of platelet count, prothrombin time (PT), activated partial thromboplastin time (APTT), and fibrinogen. Materials and methods Venous blood was collected into six 4.5 mL VACUETTE® 9NC coagulation sodium citrate 3.8% tubes (Greiner Bio-One International GmbH, Kremsmünster, Austria) from 49 intensive care unit (ICU) patients on dual anti-platelet therapy and immediately hand carried to the central laboratory. Blood samples were divided into 2 Groups: Group 1 samples (N = 49) underwent PTS (4 m/s) transport from the central laboratory to the distant laboratory and back to the central laboratory, whereas Group 2 samples (N = 49) were excluded from PTS forces. In both groups, LTA and WBA stimulated with collagen, adenosine-5’-diphosphate (ADP), arachidonic acid (AA) and thrombin-receptor-activated-peptide 6 (TRAP-6) as well as platelet count, PT, APTT, and fibrinogen were performed. Results No statistically significant differences were observed between blood samples with (Group 1) and without (Group 2) PTS transport (P values from 0.064 – 0.968). The AA-induced LTA (bias: 68.57%) exceeded the bias acceptance limit of ≤ 25%. Conclusions Blood sample transportation with computer controlled PTS in our hospital had no statistically significant effects on platelet aggregation determined in patients with anti-platelet therapy. Although AA induced LTA showed a significant bias, the diagnostic accuracy was not influenced. PMID:28392742

  3. Aspirin and P2Y12 inhibition attenuate platelet-induced ovarian cancer cell invasion.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Cooke, Niamh M

    2015-09-09

    Platelet-cancer cell interactions play a key role in successful haematogenous metastasis. Disseminated malignancy is the leading cause of death among ovarian cancer patients. It is unknown why different ovarian cancers have different metastatic phenotypes. To investigate if platelet-cancer cell interactions play a role, we characterized the response of ovarian cancer cell lines to platelets both functionally and at a molecular level.

  4. Aspirin exposure reveals novel genes associated with platelet function and cardiovascular events.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Voora, Deepak; Cyr, Derek; Lucas, Joseph; Chi, Jen-Tsan; Dungan, Jennifer; McCaffrey, Timothy A; Katz, Richard; Newby, L Kristin; Kraus, William E; Becker, Richard C; Ortel, Thomas L; Ginsburg, Geoffrey S

    2013-10-01

    The aim of this study was to develop ribonucleic acid (RNA) profiles that could serve as novel biomarkers for the response to aspirin. Aspirin reduces death and myocardial infarction (MI), suggesting that aspirin interacts with biological pathways that may underlie these events. Aspirin was administered, followed by whole-blood RNA microarray profiling, in a discovery cohort of healthy volunteers (HV1) (n = 50) and 2 validation cohorts of healthy volunteers (HV2) (n = 53) and outpatient cardiology patients (OPC) (n = 25). Platelet function was assessed using the platelet function score (PFS) in HV1 and HV2 and the VerifyNow Aspirin Test (Accumetrics, Inc., San Diego, California) in OPC. Bayesian sparse factor analysis identified sets of coexpressed transcripts, which were examined for associations with PFS in HV1 and validated in HV2 and OPC. Proteomic analysis confirmed the association of validated transcripts in platelet proteins. Validated gene sets were tested for association with death or MI in 2 patient cohorts (n = 587 total) from RNA samples collected at cardiac catheterization. A set of 60 coexpressed genes named the "aspirin response signature" (ARS) was associated with PFS in HV1 (r = -0.31, p = 0.03), HV2 (r = -0.34, Bonferroni p = 0.03), and OPC (p = 0.046). Corresponding proteins for the 17 ARS genes were identified in the platelet proteome, of which 6 were associated with PFS. The ARS was associated with death or MI in both patient cohorts (odds ratio: 1.2 [p = 0.01]; hazard ratio: 1.5 [p = 0.001]), independent of cardiovascular risk factors. Compared with traditional risk factors, reclassification (net reclassification index = 31% to 37%, p ≤ 0.0002) was improved by including the ARS or 1 of its genes, ITGA2B. RNA profiles of platelet-specific genes are novel biomarkers for identifying patients who do not respond adequately to aspirin and who are at risk for death or MI. Copyright © 2013 American College of Cardiology Foundation. Published by

  5. In Vitro impairment of whole blood coagulation and platelet function by hypertonic saline hydroxyethyl starch

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Görlinger Klaus

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Hypertonic saline hydroxyethyl starch (HH has been recommended for first line treatment of hemorrhagic shock. Its effects on coagulation are unclear. We studied in vitro effects of HH dilution on whole blood coagulation and platelet function. Furthermore 7.2% hypertonic saline, 6% hydroxyethylstarch (as ingredients of HH, and 0.9% saline solution (as control were tested in comparable dilutions to estimate specific component effects of HH on coagulation. Methods The study was designed as experimental non-randomized comparative in vitro study. Following institutional review board approval and informed consent blood samples were taken from 10 healthy volunteers and diluted in vitro with either HH (HyperHaes®, Fresenius Kabi, Germany, hypertonic saline (HT, 7.2% NaCl, hydroxyethylstarch (HS, HAES6%, Fresenius Kabi, Germany or NaCl 0.9% (ISO in a proportion of 5%, 10%, 20% and 40%. Coagulation was studied in whole blood by rotation thrombelastometry (ROTEM after thromboplastin activation without (ExTEM and with inhibition of thrombocyte function by cytochalasin D (FibTEM, the latter was performed to determine fibrin polymerisation alone. Values are expressed as maximal clot firmness (MCF, [mm] and clotting time (CT, [s]. Platelet aggregation was determined by impedance aggregrometry (Multiplate after activation with thrombin receptor-activating peptide 6 (TRAP and quantified by the area under the aggregation curve (AUC [aggregation units (AU/min]. Scanning electron microscopy was performed to evaluate HyperHaes induced cell shape changes of thrombocytes. Statistics: 2-way ANOVA for repeated measurements, Bonferroni post hoc test, p Results Dilution impaired whole blood coagulation and thrombocyte aggregation in all dilutions in a dose dependent fashion. In contrast to dilution with ISO and HS, respectively, dilution with HH as well as HT almost abolished coagulation (MCFExTEM from 57.3 ± 4.9 mm (native to 1.7 ± 2.2 mm (HH 40

  6. Macrophage heterogeneity in tissues: phenotypic diversity and functions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gordon, Siamon; Plüddemann, Annette; Martinez Estrada, Fernando

    2014-01-01

    During development and throughout adult life, macrophages derived from hematopoietic progenitors are seeded throughout the body, initially in the absence of inflammatory and infectious stimuli as tissue-resident cells, with enhanced recruitment, activation, and local proliferation following injury and pathologic insults. We have learned a great deal about macrophage properties ex vivo and in cell culture, but their phenotypic heterogeneity within different tissue microenvironments remains poorly characterized, although it contributes significantly to maintaining local and systemic homeostasis, pathogenesis, and possible treatment. In this review, we summarize the nature, functions, and interactions of tissue macrophage populations within their microenvironment and suggest questions for further investigation. PMID:25319326

  7. Hemodynamics, functional state of endothelium and renal function, platelets depending on the body mass index in patients with chronic heart failure and preserved systolic function

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kushnir Yu.

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the study was to evaluate hemodynamics, endothelium function of kidneys and platelets depending on the body mass index (BMI in patients with chronic heart failure (CHF and preserved systolic function. 42 patients (mean age - 76,690,83 years with CHF II-III FC NYHA with preserved systolic function (LVEF>45% were enrolled. Echocardiography was performed, endothelial function, serum creatinine levels and microalbuminuria were determined in patients. BMI and glomerulation filtration rate were calculated by formulas. The morphological and functional status of platelets was estimated by electronic microscopy. It was defined that increased BMI in patients with CHF and preserved systolic function determines the structural and functional changes of the myocardium and leads to the endothelial and renal functional changes. An increased risk of thrombogenesis was established in patients with overweight and obesity.

  8. Impaired thromboxane receptor dimerization reduces signaling efficiency: A potential mechanism for reduced platelet function in vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Capra, Valérie; Mauri, Mario; Guzzi, Francesca; Busnelli, Marta; Accomazzo, Maria Rosa; Gaussem, Pascale; Nisar, Shaista P; Mundell, Stuart J; Parenti, Marco; Rovati, G Enrico

    2017-01-15

    Thromboxane A 2 is a potent mediator of inflammation and platelet aggregation exerting its effects through the activation of a G protein-coupled receptor (GPCR), termed TP. Although the existence of dimers/oligomers in Class A GPCRs is widely accepted, their functional significance still remains controversial. Recently, we have shown that TPα and TPβ homo-/hetero-dimers interact through an interface of residues in transmembrane domain 1 (TM1) whose disruption impairs dimer formation. Here, biochemical and pharmacological characterization of this dimer deficient mutant (DDM) in living cells indicates a significant impairment in its response to agonists. Interestingly, two single loss-of-function TPα variants, namely W29C and N42S recently identified in two heterozygous patients affected by bleeding disorders, match some of the residues mutated in our DDM. These two naturally occurring variants display a reduced potency to TP agonists and are characterized by impaired dimer formation in transfected HEK-293T cells. These findings provide proofs that lack of homo-dimer formation is a crucial process for reduced TPα function in vivo, and might represent one molecular mechanism through which platelet TPα receptor dysfunction affects the patient(s) carrying these mutations. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Disrupting functional interactions between platelet chemokines inhibits atherosclerosis in hyperlipidemic mice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Koenen, RR; Hundelshausen, P; Nesmelova, IV

    2009-01-01

    Atherosclerosis is characterized by chronic inflammation of the arterial wall due to chemokine-driven mononuclear cell recruitment. Activated platelets can synergize with chemokines to exacerbate atherogenesis; for example, by deposition of the chemokines platelet factor-4 (PF4, also known as CXC...... monocyte recruitment and reducing atherosclerosis without the aforementioned side effects. These results establish the in vivo relevance of chemokine heteromers and show the potential of targeting heteromer formation to achieve therapeutic effects......) and RANTES (CCL5), triggering monocyte arrest on inflamed endothelium. Homo-oligomerization is required for the recruitment functions of CCL5, and chemokine heteromerization has more recently emerged as an additional regulatory mechanism, as evidenced by a mutual modulation of CXCL8 and CXCL4 activities...... compromise systemic immune responses, delay macrophage-mediated viral clearance and impair normal T cell functions. Here we determined structural features of CCL5-CXCL4 heteromers and designed stable peptide inhibitors that specifically disrupt proinflammatory CCL5-CXCL4 interactions, thereby attenuating...

  10. Function and Phenotype prediction through Data and Knowledge Fusion

    KAUST Repository

    Vespoor, Karen

    2016-01-27

    The biomedical literature captures the most current biomedical knowledge and is a tremendously rich resource for research. With over 24 million publications currently indexed in the US National Library of Medicine’s PubMed index, however, it is becoming increasingly challenging for biomedical researchers to keep up with this literature. Automated strategies for extracting information from it are required. Large-scale processing of the literature enables direct biomedical knowledge discovery. In this presentation, I will introduce the use of text mining techniques to support analysis of biological data sets, and will specifically discuss applications in protein function and phenotype prediction, as well as analysis of genetic variants that are supported by analysis of the literature and integration with complementary structured resources.

  11. Functional alterations of human platelets following 111In labeling with different ligands and incubation media

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mieno, Masayuki; Isaka, Yoshinori; Kimura, Kazutumi

    1990-01-01

    We studied the effects of various 111 In-water soluble chelates and incubation media on labeling efficiency of platelets and in vitro platelet aggregability. High labeling efficiency of platelets in ACD-saline was achieved with 111 In-oxine sulfate, 111 In-tropolone and 111 In-MPO (2-mercaptopyridine-N-oxide). In the condition with 4.8 x 10 6 /mm 3 platelets in ACD-plasma, 111 In-oxine-sulfate had low labeling efficiency and inconsistent labeling, while 111 In-tropolone and 111 In-MPO had high labeling efficiency. In vitro platelet aggregability (ADP 2μM) was reduced when platelets were labeled in the absence of plasma. However, there was no significant difference in platelet aggregability among 111 In-platelets labeled by three different chelates. In conclusion, to maintain aggregation activity of the platelets with relatively high labeling efficiency, the best result was obtained by using MPO or tropolone chelate in plasma at 4.8 x 10 6 /μl platelet concentration. (author)

  12. In vitro study of platelet function confirms the contribution of the ultraviolet B (UVB) radiation in the lesions observed in riboflavin/UVB-treated platelet concentrates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abonnenc, Mélanie; Sonego, Giona; Crettaz, David; Aliotta, Alessandro; Prudent, Michel; Tissot, Jean-Daniel; Lion, Niels

    2015-09-01

    Platelet inactivation technologies (PITs) have been shown to increase platelet storage lesions (PSLs). This study investigates amotosalen/ultraviolet (UV)A- and riboflavin/UVB-induced platelet (PLT) lesions in vitro. Particular attention is given to the effect of UVB alone on PLTs. Buffy coat-derived PLT concentrates (PCs) were treated with amotosalen/UVA, riboflavin/UVB, or UVB alone and compared to untreated PCs throughout storage. In vitro PLT function was assessed by blood gas and metabolite analyses, flow cytometry-based assays (CD62P, JC-1, annexin V, PAC-1), hypotonic shock response, and static adhesion to fibrinogen-coated wells. In our experimental conditions, riboflavin/UVB-treated PCs showed the most pronounced differences compared to untreated and amotosalen/UVA-treated PCs. The riboflavin/UVB treatment led to a significant increase of anaerobic glycolysis rate despite functional mitochondria, a significant increase of CD62P on Day 2, and a decrease of JC-1 aggregates and increase of annexin V on Day 7. The expression of active GPIIbIIIa (PAC-1) and the adhesion to fibrinogen was significantly increased from Day 2 of storage in riboflavin/UVB-treated PCs. Importantly, we showed that these lesions were caused by the UVB radiation alone, independently of the presence of riboflavin. The amotosalen/UVA-treated PCs confirmed previously published results with a slight increase of PSLs compared to untreated PCs. Riboflavin/UVB-treated PCs present significant in vitro PSLs compared to untreated PCs. These lesions are caused by the UVB radiation alone and probably involve the generation of reactive oxygen species. The impact of these observations on clinical use must be investigated. © 2015 AABB.

  13. Platelet-collagen adhesion enhances platelet aggregation induced by binding of VWF to platelets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Laduca, F.M.; Bell, W.R.; Bettigole, R.E.

    1987-01-01

    Ristocetin-induced platelet aggregation (RIPA) was evaluated in the presence of platelet-collagen adhesion. RIPA of normal donor platelet-rich plasma (PRP) demonstrated a primary wave of aggregation mediated by the binding of von Willebrand factor (VWF) to platelets and a secondary aggregation wave, due to a platelet-release reaction, initiated by VWF-platelet binding and inhibitable by acetylsalicylic acid (ASA). An enhanced RIPA was observed in PRP samples to which collagen had been previously added. These subthreshold concentrations of collagen, which by themselves were insufficient to induce aggregation, caused measurable platelet-collagen adhesion. Subthreshold collagen did not cause microplatelet aggregation, platelet release of [ 3 H]serotonin, or alter the dose-responsive binding of 125 I-labeled VWF to platelets, which occurred with increasing ristocetin concentrations. However, ASA inhibition of the platelet release reaction prevented collagen-enhanced RIPA. These results demonstrate that platelet-collagen adhesion altered the platelet-release reaction induced by the binding of VWF to platelets causing a platelet-release reaction at a level of VWF-platelet binding not normally initiating a secondary aggregation. These findings suggest that platelet-collagen adhesion enhances platelet function mediated by VWF

  14. Effects of hormones on platelet aggregation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farré, Antonio López; Modrego, Javier; Zamorano-León, José J

    2014-04-01

    Platelets and their activation/inhibition mechanisms play a central role in haemostasis. It is well known agonists and antagonists of platelet activation; however, during the last years novel evidences of hormone effects on platelet activation have been reported. Platelet functionality may be modulated by the interaction between different hormones and their platelet receptors, contributing to sex differences in platelet function and even in platelet-mediated vascular damage. It has suggested aspects that apparently are well established should be reviewed. Hormones effects on platelet activity are included among them. This article tries to review knowledge about the involvement of hormones in platelet biology and activity.

  15. PAF-receptor is preferentially expressed in a distinct synthetic phenotype of smooth muscle cells cloned from human internal thoracic artery: Functional implications in cell migration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stengel, Dominique; O'Neil, Caroline; Brocheriou, Isabelle; Karabina, Sonia-Athina; Durand, Herve; Caplice, Noel M.; Pickering, J. Geoffrey; Ninio, Ewa

    2006-01-01

    Platelet-activating-Factor (PAF) and its structural analogues formed upon low density lipoprotein oxidation are involved in atherosclerotic plaque formation and may signal through PAF-receptor (PAF-R) expressed in human macrophages and in certain smooth muscle cells (SMCs) in the media, but rarely in the intima of human plaques. Our aim was to determine which SMC phenotype expresses PAF-R and whether this receptor is functional in cell migration. Circulating SMC progenitors and two phenotypically distinct clones of proliferative, epithelioid phenotype vs contractile, spindle-shaped SMCs from the media of adult internal thoracic artery were studied for the presence of PAF-receptor (PAF-R). The levels of specific mRNA were obtained by reverse transcription/real-time PCR, the protein expression was deduced from immunohistochemistry staining, and the functional transmigration assay was performed by Boyden chamber-type chemotaxis assay. Only SMCs of spindle-shape and synthetic phenotype expressed both mRNA and PAF-R protein and in the functional test migrated at low concentrations of PAF. Two unrelated, specific PAF-R antagonists inhibited PAF-induced migration, but did not modify the migration initiated by PDGF. The presence of functional PAF-R in arterial spindle-shaped SMCs of synthetic phenotype may be important for their migration from the media into the intima and atherosclerotic plaques formation

  16. Changes in pre- and post-donation platelet function in plateletpheresis donors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Q; Yu, X; Cai, Y; Liu, L

    2017-11-01

    This study aimed to investigate the changes of platelet (PLT) function and coagulation time before and after plateletpheresis donation. The healthy donors were divided into four groups according to the annual number of plateletpheresis donation: 20 times group, 15 times group, 10 times group and 5 times group. The healthy non-blood donors were selected as controls. The donation interval was 14 days. The blood samples were collected before plateletpheresis donation and after 30min, 7 d, and 14 d of donation for determination of coagulation time, PLT function, plasma protein, serum iron and blood routine change. After 30min of plateletpheresis donation, the PLT function decreased and the coagulation time was prolonged. However, PLT function recovered to the pre-collection after 7 d of plateletpheresis donation and coagulation time recovered to the pre-collection after 14 d of plateletpheresis donation. Additionally, there was no difference regarding blood coagulation time and PLT function among blood donors and controls. The plasma protein and serum iron levels in 20 times and 15 times groups were within the normal reference range. The frequency of plateletpheresis donation will not affect PLT function, coagulation time, plasma protein and serum iron in donors. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  17. Alterations of blood platelet functional tests in whole-body irradiated rabbits

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zitko, M.; Pospisil, J.; Klir, P.; Dienstbier, Z.

    1983-01-01

    With a selected spectrum of coagulation tests the functional capacity of thrombocytes was investigated in rabbits exposed to a whole-body irradiation by means of 60 Co radiation with a LD 5/30. A reduced retraction could be proved for postirradiation days 5, 8, 11, 21, 35, and 56. A reduced formation of malondialdehyde could be identified in thrombocytes on the 8th and 21st day after irradiation. No changes could be found in determining adhesiveness, platelet aggregation caused by ADP, and PF 3 A and PF 3 F tests. In the course of additional investigations (coagulation time in unprepared and siliconized glass tubes, thromboelastogram, activated partial thromboplastine time), significant changes of coagulation time could be observed in siliconized glass tubes on the 8th, 11th, 21st, and 56th postirradiation days. (author)

  18. Measurement of platelet aggregation, independently of patient platelet count

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vinholt, P J; Frederiksen, H; Hvas, A-M

    2017-01-01

    with collagen-related peptide). Platelet aggregation had a negative predictive value of 100% for a bleeding tendency among patients. Conclusion The established platelet aggregation assay was applicable for thrombocytopenic patients, and improved the identification of bleeding risk.......Essentials •Platelet function may influence bleeding risk in thrombocytopenia, but useful tests are needed. •A flow cytometric platelet aggregation test independent of the patient platelet count was made. •Platelet aggregation was reduced in thrombocytopenic patients with hematological cancer....... •High platelet aggregation ruled out bleeding tendency in thrombocytopenic patients. Summary Background Methods for testing platelet aggregation in thrombocytopenia are lacking. Objective To establish a flow-cytometric test of in vitro platelet aggregation independently of the patient's platelet count...

  19. Clinical and laboratory characteristics of adolescents with platelet function disorders and heavy menstrual bleeding

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amesse Lawrence S

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Platelet function disorders (PFDs have emerged as an important etiology of heavy menstrual bleeding (HMB in adolescents. However, neither clinical nor laboratory data have been methodically analyzed in this population subset. The objective of this study was to evaluate these parameters in order to distinguish characteristics of the disorder that in turn will lead to earlier diagnosis and therapy initiation. Methods Retrospective review of medical records from postmenarcheal adolescents with documented PFDs referred to a hemophilia treatment center and university faculty practices for bleeding diatheses with their clinical and laboratory data evaluated. Results Of 63 teens with documented PFDs, HMB was the most common clinical manifestation of PFD (43; 68.3%. Of these, 37 (86% were diagnosed with PFD either at or after menarche with the diagnosis based on HMB symptoms alone. Only 6 (14% were diagnosed with a PFD prior to menarche, based on associated bleeding, i.e., epistaxis, ecchymosis, and all developed HMB after menstruation onset. Interestingly, 20 girls were diagnosed with a PFD prior to menarche and of these, only 6 (30% went on to develop HMB after pubertal transition, while the majority (14; 70% did not. The average age-at-PFD diagnosis was 14.5yrs, significantly differing from the 10.9yrs average age-at-PFD diagnosis in their counterparts that, after menarche, did not develop HMB (PP P Conclusions Adolescents with PFDs and HMB appear to be clinically distinct from their non-HMB counterparts. This group of girls is characterized by HMB the major bleeding symptom, significantly high incidences of blood group O and the δ-SPD with a PFD diagnosed well after menarche. High false negative standard platelet function study results indicate additional diagnostic strategies, particularly for δ-SPD, should be considered.

  20. A pilot study to assess the hemostatic function of pathogen-reduced platelets in patients with thrombocytopenia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Johansson, Pär I; Simonsen, Anne Catrine; Brown, Peter de Nully

    2013-01-01

    Platelet (PLT) support is critical to the care of patients with thrombocytopenia, but allogeneic transfusions carry risk. Pathogen reduction mitigates some transfusion risks, but effects on PLT function remain a concern. This clinical pilot study assessed the effect of pathogen reduction technolo...... with riboflavin plus ultraviolet light using thrombelastography (TEG)....

  1. Platelet biomechanics, platelet bioenergetics, and applications to clinical practice and translational research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    George, Mitchell J; Bynum, James; Nair, Prajeeda; Cap, Andrew P; Wade, Charles E; Cox, Charles S; Gill, Brijesh S

    2018-07-01

    The purpose of this review is to explore the relationship between platelet bioenergetics and biomechanics and how this relationship affects the clinical interpretation of platelet function devices. Recent experimental and technological advances highlight platelet bioenergetics and biomechanics as alternative avenues for collecting clinically relevant data. Platelet bioenergetics drive energy production for key biomechanical processes like adhesion, spreading, aggregation, and contraction. Platelet function devices like thromboelastography, thromboelastometry, and aggregometry measure these biomechanical processes. Platelet storage, stroke, sepsis, trauma, or the activity of antiplatelet drugs alters measures of platelet function. However, the specific mechanisms governing these alterations in platelet function and how they relate to platelet bioenergetics are still under investigation.

  2. Effects of the NO/soluble guanylate cyclase/cGMP system on the functions of human platelets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Makhoul, Stephanie; Walter, Elena; Pagel, Oliver; Walter, Ulrich; Sickmann, Albert; Gambaryan, Stepan; Smolenski, Albert; Zahedi, René P; Jurk, Kerstin

    2018-06-01

    Platelets are circulating sentinels of vascular integrity and are activated, inhibited, or modulated by multiple hormones, vasoactive substances or drugs. Endothelium- or drug-derived NO strongly inhibits platelet activation via activation of the soluble guanylate cyclase (sGC) and cGMP elevation, often in synergy with cAMP-elevation by prostacyclin. However, the molecular mechanisms and diversity of cGMP effects in platelets are poorly understood and sometimes controversial. Recently, we established the quantitative human platelet proteome, the iloprost/prostacyclin/cAMP/protein kinase A (PKA)-regulated phosphoproteome, and the interactions of the ADP- and iloprost/prostacyclin-affected phosphoproteome. We also showed that the sGC stimulator riociguat is in vitro a highly specific inhibitor, via cGMP, of various functions of human platelets. Here, we review the regulatory role of the cGMP/protein kinase G (PKG) system in human platelet function, and our current approaches to establish and analyze the phosphoproteome after selective stimulation of the sGC/cGMP pathway by NO donors and riociguat. Present data indicate an extensive and diverse NO/riociguat/cGMP phosphoproteome, which has to be compared with the cAMP phosphoproteome. In particular, sGC/cGMP-regulated phosphorylation of many membrane proteins, G-proteins and their regulators, signaling molecules, protein kinases, and proteins involved in Ca 2+ regulation, suggests that the sGC/cGMP system targets multiple signaling networks rather than a limited number of PKG substrate proteins. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Activated platelet-derived growth factor autocrine pathway drives the transformed phenotype of a human glioblastoma cell line.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vassbotn, F S; Ostman, A; Langeland, N; Holmsen, H; Westermark, B; Heldin, C H; Nistér, M

    1994-02-01

    Human glioblastoma cells (A172) were found to concomitantly express PDGF-BB and PDGF beta-receptors. The receptors were constitutively autophosphorylated in the absence of exogenous ligand, suggesting the presence of an autocrine PDGF pathway. Neutralizing PDGF antibodies as well as suramin inhibited the autonomous PDGF receptor tyrosine kinase activity and resulted in up-regulation of receptor protein. The interruption of the autocrine loop by the PDGF antibodies reversed the transformed phenotype of the glioblastoma cell, as determined by (1) diminished DNA synthesis, (2) inhibition of tumor colony growth, and (3) reversion of the transformed morphology of the tumor cells. The PDGF antibodies showed no effect on the DNA synthesis of another glioblastoma cells line (U-343MGa 31L) or on Ki-ras-transformed fibroblasts. The present study demonstrates an endogenously activated PDGF pathway in a spontaneous human glioblastoma cell line. Furthermore, we provide evidence that the autocrine PDGF pathway drives the transformed phenotype of the tumor cells, a process that can be blocked by extracellular antagonists.

  4. Platelet-activating factor podoplanin: from discovery to drug development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takemoto, Ai; Miyata, Kenichi; Fujita, Naoya

    2017-06-01

    Tumor cell-induced platelet aggregation facilitates hematogenous metastasis by promoting tumor embolization, preventing immunological assaults and shear stress, and the platelet-releasing growth factors support tumor growth and invasion. Podoplanin, also known as Aggrus, is a type I transmembrane mucin-like glycoprotein and is expressed on wide range of tumor cells. Podoplanin has a role in platelet aggregation and metastasis formation through the binding to its platelet receptor, C-type lectin-like receptor 2 (CLEC-2). The podoplanin research was originally started from the cloning of highly metastatic NL-17 subclone from mouse colon 26 cancer cell line and from the establishment of 8F11 monoclonal antibody (mAb) that could neutralize NL-17-induced platelet aggregation and hematogenous metastasis. Later on, podoplanin was identified as the antigen of 8F11 mAb, and its ectopic expression brought to cells the platelet-aggregating abilities and hematogenous metastasis phenotypes. From the 8F11 mAb recognition epitopes, podoplanin is found to contain tandemly repeated, highly conserved motifs, designated platelet aggregation-stimulating (PLAG) domains. Series of analyses using the cells expressing the mutants and the established neutralizing anti-podoplanin mAbs uncovered that both PLAG3 and PLAG4 domains are associated with the CLEC-2 binding. The neutralizing mAbs targeting PLAG3 or PLAG4 could suppress podoplanin-induced platelet aggregation and hematogenous metastasis through inhibiting the podoplanin-CLEC-2 binding. Therefore, these domains are certainly functional in podoplanin-mediated metastasis through its platelet-aggregating activity. This review summarizes the platelet functions in metastasis formation, the role of platelet aggregation-inducing factor podoplanin in pathological and physiological situations, and the possibility to develop podoplanin-targeting drugs in the future.

  5. Platelet function in whole-blood donors is impaired: the effects of painkillers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Curvers, Joyce; Dielis, Arne W J H; Heeremans, Judith; van Wersch, Jan W J

    2007-01-01

    Aspirin (ASA) or non-aspirin-like nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) influence platelet (PLT) function by inhibiting cyclooxygenase enzymes. In this study, the aim was to address the use of ASA or NSAIDs before donation and the effect on PLT function. Donors were asked questions about recent use of ASA or NSAIDs. Furthermore, PLT function was evaluated by measurement of the closure time (CT) in a PLT function analyzer (PFA-100, Dade Behring) and by aggregometry (response to ADP or arachidonic acid [AA]). Of 100 questioned donors, 22 percent had used ASA (n = 4), NSAIDs (n = 6), or paracetamol (n = 12) before donation. Upon assessment of the PLT function in the PFA-100, 27 donors showed values of greater than 180 seconds, indicative of impaired PLT function. Of these, only 7 had used pain killers before donation. Furthermore, 15 of 22 users had normal CTs. Aggregation after stimulation with AA was absent in 33 PLT-rich samples. Again only 8 had reported use of ASA (3), NSAIDs (1), or paracetamol (4). Of the 22 users, 14 had normal AA aggregation responses. All donor samples showed ADP-induced aggregation, indicating PLT integrity. There was no difference between the group of donors who reported the intake of ASA or NSAIDs and the group of donors who did not with respect to the tested PLT function assays. It is concluded that there is a considerable group of donors that use PLT-influencing medication before donation. A relation between the reported use and impaired PLT function in blood donors could not be established, however. Impaired PLT function as tested may have other causes than intake of ASA or NSAIDs.

  6. Leukocyte and platelet depletion improves blood flow and function in a renal transplant model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yates, Phillip J; Hosgood, Sarah A; Nicholson, Michael L

    2012-01-01

    Donation after cardiac death (DCD) donors are an important source of organs for transplantation. Due to warm and cold ischemic injury, DCD kidneys undergo a significant reperfusion insult when transplanted. This is manifested clinically as a high incidence of delayed graft function (DGF) and primary non-function (PNF). The importance of leukocytes in the generation of reperfusion injury is pivotal. Using an ex vivo porcine model of kidney transplantation, the effects of reperfusion with leukocyte and platelet depleted blood (LDB) and whole blood (WB) on renal blood flow and function were compared. Hemodynamic measurements were recorded, and biochemical, hematological, and histologic samples taken at set time-points. Reperfusion with LDB improved renal blood flow significantly compared with WB reperfusion. In addition, there was a significant improvement in creatinine clearance and renal oxygen consumption, but not fractional excretion of sodium, acid-base homeostasis, urinary nitric oxide (NO), or 8-isoprostane levels. This study represents a good model for the initial reperfusion period in renal transplantation. Improvement in only some functional markers and neither urinary NO nor 8-isoprostane levels indicates that improved blood flow alone is not sufficient to reverse the severe ischemic insult endured by DCD kidneys. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Functional divergence of platelet protein kinase C (PKC) isoforms in thrombus formation on collagen.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gilio, Karen; Harper, Matthew T; Cosemans, Judith M E M; Konopatskaya, Olga; Munnix, Imke C A; Prinzen, Lenneke; Leitges, Michael; Liu, Qinghang; Molkentin, Jeffery D; Heemskerk, Johan W M; Poole, Alastair W

    2010-07-23

    Arterial thrombosis, a major cause of myocardial infarction and stroke, is initiated by activation of blood platelets by subendothelial collagen. The protein kinase C (PKC) family centrally regulates platelet activation, and it is becoming clear that the individual PKC isoforms play distinct roles, some of which oppose each other. Here, for the first time, we address all four of the major platelet-expressed PKC isoforms, determining their comparative roles in regulating platelet adhesion to collagen and their subsequent activation under physiological flow conditions. Using mouse gene knock-out and pharmacological approaches in human platelets, we show that collagen-dependent alpha-granule secretion and thrombus formation are mediated by the conventional PKC isoforms, PKCalpha and PKCbeta, whereas the novel isoform, PKC, negatively regulates these events. PKCdelta also negatively regulates thrombus formation but not alpha-granule secretion. In addition, we demonstrate for the first time that individual PKC isoforms differentially regulate platelet calcium signaling and exposure of phosphatidylserine under flow. Although platelet deficient in PKCalpha or PKCbeta showed reduced calcium signaling and phosphatidylserine exposure, these responses were enhanced in the absence of PKC. In summary therefore, this direct comparison between individual subtypes of PKC, by standardized methodology under flow conditions, reveals that the four major PKCs expressed in platelets play distinct non-redundant roles, where conventional PKCs promote and novel PKCs inhibit thrombus formation on collagen.

  8. Functional Divergence of Platelet Protein Kinase C (PKC) Isoforms in Thrombus Formation on Collagen*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gilio, Karen; Harper, Matthew T.; Cosemans, Judith M. E. M.; Konopatskaya, Olga; Munnix, Imke C. A.; Prinzen, Lenneke; Leitges, Michael; Liu, Qinghang; Molkentin, Jeffery D.; Heemskerk, Johan W. M.; Poole, Alastair W.

    2010-01-01

    Arterial thrombosis, a major cause of myocardial infarction and stroke, is initiated by activation of blood platelets by subendothelial collagen. The protein kinase C (PKC) family centrally regulates platelet activation, and it is becoming clear that the individual PKC isoforms play distinct roles, some of which oppose each other. Here, for the first time, we address all four of the major platelet-expressed PKC isoforms, determining their comparative roles in regulating platelet adhesion to collagen and their subsequent activation under physiological flow conditions. Using mouse gene knock-out and pharmacological approaches in human platelets, we show that collagen-dependent α-granule secretion and thrombus formation are mediated by the conventional PKC isoforms, PKCα and PKCβ, whereas the novel isoform, PKCθ, negatively regulates these events. PKCδ also negatively regulates thrombus formation but not α-granule secretion. In addition, we demonstrate for the first time that individual PKC isoforms differentially regulate platelet calcium signaling and exposure of phosphatidylserine under flow. Although platelet deficient in PKCα or PKCβ showed reduced calcium signaling and phosphatidylserine exposure, these responses were enhanced in the absence of PKCθ. In summary therefore, this direct comparison between individual subtypes of PKC, by standardized methodology under flow conditions, reveals that the four major PKCs expressed in platelets play distinct non-redundant roles, where conventional PKCs promote and novel PKCs inhibit thrombus formation on collagen. PMID:20479008

  9. Disrupting functional interactions between platelet chemokines inhibits atherosclerosis in hyperlipidemic mice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Koenen, Rory R; von Hundelshausen, Philipp; Nesmelova, Irina V

    2009-01-01

    Atherosclerosis is characterized by chronic inflammation of the arterial wall due to chemokine-driven mononuclear cell recruitment. Activated platelets can synergize with chemokines to exacerbate atherogenesis; for example, by deposition of the chemokines platelet factor-4 (PF4, also known as CXC...

  10. Investigation of function similarities between the sarcoplasmic reticulum and platelet calcium-dependent adenosinetriphosphatases with the inhibitors quercetin and calmidazolium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fischer, T.H.; Campbell, K.P.; White, G.C. II

    1987-01-01

    The platelet and skeletal sarcoplasmic reticulum calcium-dependent adenosinetriphosphatases (Ca 2+ -ATPases) were functionally compared with respect to substrate activation by steady-state kinetic methods using the inhibitors quercetin and calmidazolium. Quercetin inhibited platelet and sarcoplasmic reticulum Ca 2+ -ATPase activities in a dose-dependent manner with IC 50 values of 25 and 10 μM, respectively. Calmidazolium also inhibited platelet and sarcoplasmic reticulum Ca 2+ -ATPase activities, with half-maximal inhibition measured at 5 and 4 μM, respectively. Both inhibitors also affected the [ 45 Ca] calcium transport activity of intact platelet microsomes at concentrations similar to those which reduced Ca 2+ -ATPase activity. These inhibitors were then used to examine substrate ligation by the platelet and sarcoplasmic reticulum calcium pump proteins. For both Ca 2+ -ATPase proteins, quercetin has an affinity for the E-Ca 2 (fully ligated with respect to calcium at the exterior high-affinity calcium binding sites, unligated with respect to ATP) conformational state of the protein that is approximately 10-fold grater than for other conformational states in the hydrolytic cycle. Quercetin can thus be considered a competitive inhibitor of the calcium pump proteins with respect to ATP. In contrast to the effect of quercetin, calmidazolium interacts with the platelet and sarcoplasmic reticulum Ca 2+ -ATPases in an uncompetitive manner. The dissociation constants for this inhibitor for the different conformational states of the calcium pump proteins were similar, indicating that calmidazolium has equal affinity for all of the reaction intermediates probed. These observations indicate that the substrate ligation processes are similar for the two pump proteins. This supports the concept that the hydrolytic cycles of the two proteins are comparable

  11. Protease-Activated Receptor 4 Variant p.Tyr157Cys Reduces Platelet Functional Responses and Alters Receptor Trafficking.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Norman, Jane E; Cunningham, Margaret R; Jones, Matthew L; Walker, Mary E; Westbury, Sarah K; Sessions, Richard B; Mundell, Stuart J; Mumford, Andrew D

    2016-05-01

    Protease-activated receptor 4 (PAR4) is a key regulator of platelet reactivity and is encoded by F2RL3, which has abundant rare missense variants. We aimed to provide proof of principle that rare F2LR3 variants potentially affect platelet reactivity and responsiveness to PAR1 antagonist drugs and to explore underlying molecular mechanisms. We identified 6 rare F2RL3 missense variants in 236 cardiac patients, of which the variant causing a tyrosine 157 to cysteine substitution (Y157C) was predicted computationally to have the greatest effect on PAR4 structure. Y157C platelets from 3 cases showed reduced responses to PAR4-activating peptide and to α-thrombin compared with controls, but no reduction in responses to PAR1-activating peptide. Pretreatment with the PAR1 antagonist vorapaxar caused lower residual α-thrombin responses in Y157C platelets than in controls, indicating greater platelet inhibition. HEK293 cells transfected with a PAR4 Y157C expression construct had reduced PAR4 functional responses, unchanged total PAR4 expression but reduced surface expression. PAR4 Y157C was partially retained in the endoplasmic reticulum and displayed an expression pattern consistent with defective N-glycosylation. Mutagenesis of Y322, which is the putative hydrogen bond partner of Y157, also reduced PAR4 surface expression in HEK293 cells. Reduced PAR4 responses associated with Y157C result from aberrant anterograde surface receptor trafficking, in part, because of disrupted intramolecular hydrogen bonding. Characterization of PAR4 Y157C establishes that rare F2RL3 variants have the potential to markedly alter platelet PAR4 reactivity particularly after exposure to therapeutic PAR1 antagonists. © 2016 American Heart Association, Inc.

  12. Platelet kinetics with indium-111 platelets: comparison with chromium-51 platelets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Peters, A.M.; Lavender, J.P.

    1983-01-01

    The application of 111In-oxine to platelet labeling has contributed to the understanding of platelet kinetics along three lines: 1. It allows the measurement of new parameters of splenic function, such as the intrasplenic platelet transit time, which has shed new light on the physiology of splenic blood cell handling. 2. It facilitates the measurement of platelet life span in conditions, such as ITP, in which 51Cr may undergo undesirable elution from the platelet as a result of platelet-antibody interaction. 3. It allows the determination of the fate of platelets, that is, the site of platelet destruction in conditions in which reduced platelet life span is associated with abnormal platelet consumption, as a result of either premature destruction of ''abnormal'' platelets by the RE system, or the consumption (or destruction) of normal platelets after their interaction with an abnormal vasculature. Future research using 111In platelets may yield further valuable information on the control as well as the significance of intrasplenic platelet pooling, on the role of platelets in the development of chronic vascular lesions, and on the sites of platelet destruction in ITP. With regard to the latter, methods will have to be developed for harvesting sufficient platelets representative of the total circulating platelet population from severely thrombocytopenic patients for autologous platelet labeling. This would avoid the use of homologous platelets, which is likely to be responsible for some of the contradictory data relating to the use of radiolabeled platelet studies for the prediction of the response of patients with ITP to splenectomy

  13. [The effect of electromagnetic waves of very high frequency of molecular spectra of radiation and absorption of nitric oxide on the functional activity of platelets].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirichuk, V F; Maĭborodin, A V; Volin, M V; Krenitskiĭ, A P; Tupikin, V D

    2001-01-01

    A study was made of the effect of electromagnetic EMI MMD-fluctuation on the frequencies of molecular spectra of radiation, and nitric oxide absorption under in vitro conditions on the functional activity of platelets in patients with unstable angina pectoris, with the help of a specially created generator. At amplitude-modulated and continuous modes of EMI MMD-irradiation of platelet-rich plasma for 5, 15 and 30 min the platelet functional activity decreases, which was shown up in reduction of their activation and fall of aggregative ability. The degree, to which platelet functional activity was inhibited, depended on the mode of irradiation and on duration of EMI MMD effect. The most obvious changes in platelet activation and in their readiness to aggregative response were observed at a continuous mode of irradiation within a 15 min interval.

  14. Radiolabeled platelets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Datz, F.L.; Taylor, A.T.

    1986-01-01

    Initial interest in developing techniques to radiolabel platelets was spurred by the lack of an accurate method for measuring platelet life span in both normals and in thrombocytopenic patients. Early investigators could obtain only rough estimates of platelet life spans by monitoring the platelet counts of thrombocytopenic patients undergoing platelet transfusions. Labels were also sought that would allow imaging of platelets in vivo in order to better understand the pathophysiology of atherosclerosis, thrombophlebitis, and clotting disorders, and to improve the clinical diagnosis of these diseases. Two types of platelet labels were investigated: cohort (pulse) labels and random labels. Cohort labels are taken up by megakaryocytes in the bone marrow and incorporated in the DNA and other components of the forming platelet. In theory, only freshly released platelets of a uniform age are labeled. Random labels, on the other hand, tag platelets in the peripheral blood, labeling platelets of all ages

  15. Enhanced ex vivo inhibition of platelet function following addition of dipyridamole to aspirin after transient ischaemic attack or ischaemic stroke: first results from the TRinity AntiPlatelet responsiveness (TrAP) study.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Tobin, William Oliver

    2012-02-01

    Ex vivo dipyridamole \\'non-responsiveness\\' has not been extensively studied in ischaemic cerebrovascular disease. Platelet surface marker expression, leucocyte-platelet complex formation and inhibition of platelet function at high shear stress as detected by the PFA-100(R) Collagen-Adenosine-diphosphate (C-ADP) and Collagen-Epinephrine cartridges was assessed in 52 patients within 4 weeks of transient ischaemic attack (TIA) or ischaemic stroke on aspirin, and then 14 d (14 d) and >90 d (90 d) after adding dipyridamole. A novel definition of \\'Dipyridamole non-responsiveness\\' was used. The median C-ADP closure time increased following addition of dipyridamole, remained elevated at 90 d (P <\\/= 0.03), and was unaffected by aspirin dose. 59% at 14 d and 56% at 90 d were \\'dipyridamole non-responders\\' on the PFA-100. The proportion of non-responders at 14 and 90 d was similar (P= 0.9). Compared with baseline (4.6%), median monocyte-platelet complexes increased at 14 d (5.0%, P= 0.03) and 90 d (4.9%, P= 0.04). Low C-ADP closure times were associated with increased monocyte-platelet complexes at 14 d (r= -0.32, P= 0.02) and 90 d (r= -0.33, P = 0.02). Monocyte-platelet complexes increased in the subgroup of dipyridamole non-responders on the PFA-100 (P<\\/= 0.045), but not in responders (P >\\/= 0.5), at 14 and 90 d versus baseline. Additional inhibition of platelet function has been detected with the PFA-100 when dipyridamole is added to aspirin. Elevated monocyte-platelet complexes may contribute to ex vivo dipyridamole non-responsiveness.

  16. Functional characterization of recombinant snake venom rhodocytin: rhodocytin mutant blocks CLEC-2/podoplanin-dependent platelet aggregation and lung metastasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sasaki, T; Shirai, T; Tsukiji, N; Otake, S; Tamura, S; Ichikawa, J; Osada, M; Satoh, K; Ozaki, Y; Suzuki-Inoue, K

    2018-02-28

    Essentials We generated recombinant rhodocytin that could aggregate platelets via CLEC-2. Recombinant wild-type rhodocytin formed heterooctamer with four α- and β-subunits. Asp 4 in α-subunit of rhodocytin was required for binding to CLEC-2. Inhibitory mutant of rhodocytin blocked podoplanin-dependent hematogenous metastasis. Background Rhodocytin, a disulfide-linked heterodimeric C-type lectin from Calloselasma rhodostoma consisting of α-subunits and β-subunits, induces platelet aggregation through C-type lectin-like receptor 2 (CLEC-2). CLEC-2 is a physiological binding partner of podoplanin (PDPN), which is expressed on some tumor cell types, and is involved in tumor cell-induced platelet aggregation and tumor metastasis. Thus, modified rhodocytin may be a possible source of anti-CLEC-2 drugs for both antiplatelet and antimetastasis therapy. However, its molecular function has not been well characterized, because of the lack of recombinant rhodocytin that induces platelet aggregation. Objective To produce recombinant rhodocytin, in order to verify its function with mutagenesis, and to develop an anti-CLEC-2 drug based on the findings. Methods We used Chinese hamster ovary cells to express recombinant rhodocytin (wild-type [WT] and mutant), which was analyzed for induction/inhibition of platelet aggregation with light transmission aggregometry, the formation of multimers with blue native PAGE, and binding to CLEC-2 with flow cytometry. Finally, we investigated whether mutant rhodocytin could suppress PDPN-induced metastasis in an experimental lung metastasis mouse model. Results Functional WT] rhodocytin (αWTβWT) was obtained by coexpression of both subunits. Asp4 in α-subunits of rhodocytin was required for CLEC-2 binding. αWTβWT formed a heterooctamer similarly to native rhodocytin. Moreover, an inhibitory mutant of rhodocytin (αWTβK53A/R56A), forming a heterotetramer, bound to CLEC-2 without inducing platelet aggregation, and blocked CLEC-2-PDPN

  17. In vitro viability effects on apheresis and buffy-coat derived platelets administered through infusion pumps

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sandgren P

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Per Sandgren,1,2 Veronica Berggren,3 Carl Westling,1,2 Viveka Stiller1 1Department of Clinical Immunology and Transfusion Medicine, Karolinska University Hospital, 2Department of Laboratory Medicine, Karolinska Institutet, 3Department of Neonatology, Karolinska University Hospital, Stockholm, SwedenBackground: Different infusion pump systems as well as gravity infusion have been widely used in neonatal transfusion. However, the limited number of published studies describing the use of infusion pumps on platelets illustrates the necessity for more robust data.Methods: To evaluate the potential in vitro effects on the cellular, metabolic, functional and phenotypic properties of platelets, we set up a four-arm paired study simultaneously comparing the use of different infusion pumps (Alaris® CC/GP with unexposed platelets. The platelet units (n=8 were either produced by the apheresis technique and suspended in 100% plasma or derived from buffy coats to yield platelet units stored in approximately 30% plasma and 70% SSP+. Fresh and 5-day old platelets were tested.Results: Regardless of the production system or storage time used, no significant differences were observed in glucose and lactate concentration, pH, adenosine triphosphate levels, response to extent of shape change, hypotonic shock response reactivity, and CD62P expression. Similarly, no differences were observed in expression of the conformational epitope on glycoprotein IIb/IIIa, determined using procaspase-activating compound 1, or in the expression of CD42b and platelet-endothelial cell adhesion molecule-1 in a comparison between platelets administered through infusion pumps versus unexposed platelets.Conclusion: Using Alaris CC/GP infusion pumps had no influence on the cellular, functional, and phenotypic in vitro properties of platelets. This fact seems not to be affected by different production systems or storage time.Keywords: platelets, neonatal platelet transfusion

  18. Analysis of mammalian gene function through broad based phenotypic screens across a consortium of mouse clinics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adams, David J; Adams, Niels C; Adler, Thure; Aguilar-Pimentel, Antonio; Ali-Hadji, Dalila; Amann, Gregory; André, Philippe; Atkins, Sarah; Auburtin, Aurelie; Ayadi, Abdel; Becker, Julien; Becker, Lore; Bedu, Elodie; Bekeredjian, Raffi; Birling, Marie-Christine; Blake, Andrew; Bottomley, Joanna; Bowl, Mike; Brault, Véronique; Busch, Dirk H; Bussell, James N; Calzada-Wack, Julia; Cater, Heather; Champy, Marie-France; Charles, Philippe; Chevalier, Claire; Chiani, Francesco; Codner, Gemma F; Combe, Roy; Cox, Roger; Dalloneau, Emilie; Dierich, André; Di Fenza, Armida; Doe, Brendan; Duchon, Arnaud; Eickelberg, Oliver; Esapa, Chris T; El Fertak, Lahcen; Feigel, Tanja; Emelyanova, Irina; Estabel, Jeanne; Favor, Jack; Flenniken, Ann; Gambadoro, Alessia; Garrett, Lilian; Gates, Hilary; Gerdin, Anna-Karin; Gkoutos, George; Greenaway, Simon; Glasl, Lisa; Goetz, Patrice; Da Cruz, Isabelle Goncalves; Götz, Alexander; Graw, Jochen; Guimond, Alain; Hans, Wolfgang; Hicks, Geoff; Hölter, Sabine M; Höfler, Heinz; Hancock, John M; Hoehndorf, Robert; Hough, Tertius; Houghton, Richard; Hurt, Anja; Ivandic, Boris; Jacobs, Hughes; Jacquot, Sylvie; Jones, Nora; Karp, Natasha A; Katus, Hugo A; Kitchen, Sharon; Klein-Rodewald, Tanja; Klingenspor, Martin; Klopstock, Thomas; Lalanne, Valerie; Leblanc, Sophie; Lengger, Christoph; le Marchand, Elise; Ludwig, Tonia; Lux, Aline; McKerlie, Colin; Maier, Holger; Mandel, Jean-Louis; Marschall, Susan; Mark, Manuel; Melvin, David G; Meziane, Hamid; Micklich, Kateryna; Mittelhauser, Christophe; Monassier, Laurent; Moulaert, David; Muller, Stéphanie; Naton, Beatrix; Neff, Frauke; Nolan, Patrick M; Nutter, Lauryl MJ; Ollert, Markus; Pavlovic, Guillaume; Pellegata, Natalia S; Peter, Emilie; Petit-Demoulière, Benoit; Pickard, Amanda; Podrini, Christine; Potter, Paul; Pouilly, Laurent; Puk, Oliver; Richardson, David; Rousseau, Stephane; Quintanilla-Fend, Leticia; Quwailid, Mohamed M; Racz, Ildiko; Rathkolb, Birgit; Riet, Fabrice; Rossant, Janet; Roux, Michel; Rozman, Jan; Ryder, Ed; Salisbury, Jennifer; Santos, Luis; Schäble, Karl-Heinz; Schiller, Evelyn; Schrewe, Anja; Schulz, Holger; Steinkamp, Ralf; Simon, Michelle; Stewart, Michelle; Stöger, Claudia; Stöger, Tobias; Sun, Minxuan; Sunter, David; Teboul, Lydia; Tilly, Isabelle; Tocchini-Valentini, Glauco P; Tost, Monica; Treise, Irina; Vasseur, Laurent; Velot, Emilie; Vogt-Weisenhorn, Daniela; Wagner, Christelle; Walling, Alison; Weber, Bruno; Wendling, Olivia; Westerberg, Henrik; Willershäuser, Monja; Wolf, Eckhard; Wolter, Anne; Wood, Joe; Wurst, Wolfgang; Yildirim, Ali Önder; Zeh, Ramona; Zimmer, Andreas; Zimprich, Annemarie

    2015-01-01

    The function of the majority of genes in the mouse and human genomes remains unknown. The mouse ES cell knockout resource provides a basis for characterisation of relationships between gene and phenotype. The EUMODIC consortium developed and validated robust methodologies for broad-based phenotyping of knockouts through a pipeline comprising 20 disease-orientated platforms. We developed novel statistical methods for pipeline design and data analysis aimed at detecting reproducible phenotypes with high power. We acquired phenotype data from 449 mutant alleles, representing 320 unique genes, of which half had no prior functional annotation. We captured data from over 27,000 mice finding that 83% of the mutant lines are phenodeviant, with 65% demonstrating pleiotropy. Surprisingly, we found significant differences in phenotype annotation according to zygosity. Novel phenotypes were uncovered for many genes with unknown function providing a powerful basis for hypothesis generation and further investigation in diverse systems. PMID:26214591

  19. [Effect of L-arginine on platelet aggregation, endothelial function adn exercise tolerance in patients with stable angina pectoris].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sozykin, A V; Noeva, E A; Balakhonova, T V; Pogorelova, O A; Men'shikov, M Iu

    2000-01-01

    Examination of the action of donor NO (L-arginine) on platelet aggregation, endothelial function and exercise tolerance in patients with stable angina of effort (SAE). 42 patients with SAE (functional class I-II) and 10 healthy volunteers (control group) were assigned to two groups. 22 patients of group 1 were randomized to cross-over. They received cardiket (60 mg/day for 10 days or cardiket (60 mg/day) in combination with L-arginine (15 g/day for 10 days). 20 SAE patients of group 2 and control group received L-arginine (15 g/day for 10 days). In each group blood lipids were examined, and bicycle exercise test (BET) was performed. In addition, platelet aggregation and endothelial function were studied in group 2 and control group before and after the course of L-arginine. Compared to control group, endothelial function significantly improved in group 2 (from 5.0 +/- 2.9 to 7.8 +/- 4.1% vs 7.1 +/- 1.9 to 6.6 +/- 4.8%) (M +/- SD). BET duration increased in all the patients. After ADP addition in concentrations 1.5, 2.0, and 5.0 micromol/l platelet aggregation declined in 17 patients except 3 in whom the aggregation remained unchanged. Positive effect of L-arginine on endothelial function, exercise tolerance and platelet aggregation was observed in patients with stable angina of effort (functional class I-II). Therefore, arginine can be recommended as an adjuvant in the treatment of patients with ischemic heart disease.

  20. Indium-111 labelled platelet scintigraphy can predict the immunological origin of fever in patients on dialysis carrying a non-functioning renal allograft

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fuster, D.; Lomena, F.; Piera, C.; Setoain, F.J.; Laterza, C.; Herranz, R.; Setoain, J.; Torregrosa, J.V.; Oppenheimer, F.

    2000-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the usefulness of labelled platelet scintigraphy in the differential diagnosis of a prolonged febrile syndrome (PFS) in patients on dialysis carrying a non-functioning renal allograft. We prospectively performed an indium-111 mercaptopyridine-labelled platelet scan on 91 patients (54 men, 37 women; mean age 39.6±12 years). The mean duration of PFS was 35 days (range 7-122). Forty-six of the 91 patients underwent steroid therapy (2- 10 mg/day). Platelet labelling was carried out following Thakur's method. Platelet scans were performed 48 h after reinjection of labelled platelets. The platelet uptake index (PUI) was calculated by dividing the cpm/pixel in the allograft ROI by cpm/pixel in a mirror background ROI. The final diagnosis of PFS was established depending on the outcome after treatment. In 61/91 patients the fever had an immunological origin because it disappeared after graft embolisation or transplantectomy. In 30/91 patients the PFS disappeared after antibiotic therapy (non-immunological origin). The PUI in patients with immunological PFS was 1.80±0.7, while in patients with non-immunological PFS it was 1.12±0.1 (P 111 In-labelled platelet scintigraphy can accurately predict an immunological PFS in patients on dialysis carrying a non-functioning renal allograft. Therapy with steroids could reduce the sensitivity of 111 In-labelled platelet scintigraphy in detecting immunological PFS. (orig.)

  1. Hemostatic function of buffy coat platelets in additive solution treated with pathogen reduction technology

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ostrowski, Sisse R; Bochsen, Louise; Windeløv, Nis Agerlin

    2011-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Pathogen reduction technologies (PRTs) may influence the hemostatic potential of stored platelet (PLT) concentrates. To investigate this, buffy coat PLTs (BCPs) stored in PLT additive solution (SSP+) with or without Mirasol PRT treatment (CaridianBCT Biotechnologies) were compared...

  2. Platelet-rich plasma to improve the bio-functionality of biomaterials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anitua, Eduardo; Tejero, Ricardo; Alkhraisat, Mohammad H; Orive, Gorka

    2013-04-01

    Growth factors and cytokines are active players in controlling the different stages of wound healing and tissue regeneration. Recent trends in personalized regenerative medicine involve using patient's own platelet-rich plasma for stimulating wound healing and tissue regeneration. This technology provides a complex cocktail of growth factors and even a fibrin scaffold with multiple biologic effects. In the last few years, an increasing number of studies provide evidence of the potential of combining platelet-rich plasma with different biomaterials in order to improve their properties, including handling, administration, bioactivity, and level of osseointegration, among others. In this review, we discuss the use of platelet-rich plasma as an alternative, easy, cost-effective, and controllable strategy for the release of high concentrations of many endogenous growth factors. Additionally, we provide an overview of the current progress and future directions of research combining different types of biomaterials with platelet-rich plasma in tissue engineering and regenerative medicine.

  3. Quality of harvested autologous platelets compared with stored donor platelets for use after cardiopulmonary bypass procedures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crowther, M; Ford, I; Jeffrey, R R; Urbaniak, S J; Greaves, M

    2000-10-01

    Platelet dysfunction has a major contribution in bleeding after cardiopulmonary bypass (CPB) and transfusion of platelets is frequently used to secure haemostasis. Allogeneic platelets prepared for transfusion are functionally impaired. Autologous platelets harvested preoperatively require a shorter storage time before transfusion and their use also avoids the risks associated with transfusion of allogeneic blood products. For the first time, we have compared the functional quality of autologous platelets with allogeneic platelets prepared by two methods, immediately before infusion. Platelet activation was assessed by P-selectin expression and fibrinogen binding using flow cytometry. We also monitored the effects of CPB surgery and re-infusion of autologous platelets on platelet function. Autologous platelet-rich plasma (PRP) contained a significantly lower (P platelets compared with allogeneic platelet preparations, and also contained a significantly higher (P platelets. Allogeneic platelets prepared by donor apheresis were more activated and less responsive than those produced by centrifugation of whole blood. In patients' blood, the percentage of platelets expressing P-selectin or binding fibrinogen increased significantly after CPB (P platelets responsive to in vitro agonists was decreased (P platelet activation during the procedure. The percentage of activated platelets decreased (statistically not significant) after re-infusion of autologous PRP. P-selectin expression had returned to pre-CPB levels 24 h post-operatively. Autologous platelet preparations display minimal activation, but remain responsive. Conservation of platelet function may contribute to the potential clinical benefits of autologous transfusion in cardiopulmonary bypass.

  4. Functional groups grafted nonwoven fabrics for blood filtration-The effects of functional groups and wettability on the adhesion of leukocyte and platelet

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yang Chao [State Key Lab of Metal Matrix Composites, Shanghai Jiao Tong University, 800 Dongchuan Road, Shanghai 200240 (China); Cao Ye [Institute of Blood Transfusion, Chinese Academy of Medical Sciences and Peking Union Medical College, Chengdu 610081 (China); Sun Kang, E-mail: ksun@sjtu.edu.cn [State Key Lab of Metal Matrix Composites, Shanghai Jiao Tong University, 800 Dongchuan Road, Shanghai 200240 (China); Liu Jiaxin; Wang Hong [Institute of Blood Transfusion, Chinese Academy of Medical Sciences and Peking Union Medical College, Chengdu 610081 (China)

    2011-01-15

    In this work, the effects of grafted functional groups and surface wettability on the adhesion of leukocyte and platelet were investigated by the method of blood filtration. The filter materials, poly(butylene terephthalate) nonwoven fabrics bearing different functional groups including hydroxyl (OH), carboxyl (COOH), sulfonic acid group (SO{sub 3}H) and zwitterionic sulfobetaine group ({sup +}N((CH{sub 3}){sub 2})(CH{sub 2}){sub 3}SO{sub 3}{sup Circled-Minus }) with controllable wettability were prepared by UV radiation grafting vinyl monomers with these functional groups. Our results emphasized that both surface functional groups and surface wettability had significant effects on the adhesion of leukocyte and platelet. In the case of filter materials with the same wettability, leukocytes adhering to filter materials decreased in the order: the surface bearing OH only > the surface bearing both OH and COOH > the surface bearing sulfobetaine group > the surface bearing SO{sub 3}H, while platelets adhering to filter materials decreased as the following order: the surface bearing SO{sub 3}H > the surface bearing both OH and COOH > the surface bearing OH only > the surface bearing sulfobetaine group. As the wettability of filter materials increased, both leukocyte and platelet adhesion to filter materials declined, except that leukocyte adhesion to the surface bearing OH only remained unchanged.

  5. Toward the Relevance of Platelet Subpopulations for Transfusion Medicine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stefan Handtke

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Circulating platelets consist of subpopulations with different age, maturation state and size. In this review, we address the association between platelet size and platelet function and summarize the current knowledge on platelet subpopulations including reticulated platelets, procoagulant platelets and platelets exposing signals to mediate their clearance. Thereby, we emphasize the impact of platelet turnover as an important condition for platelet production in vivo. Understanding of the features that characterize platelet subpopulations is very relevant for the methods of platelet concentrate production, which may enrich or deplete particular platelet subpopulations. Moreover, the concept of platelet size being associated with platelet function may be attractive for transfusion medicine as it holds the perspective to separate platelet subpopulations with specific functional capabilities.

  6. Platelet Function Analyzer 100 and Brain Natriuretic Peptide as Biomarkers in Obstructive Hypertrophic Cardiomyopathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blackshear, Joseph L; Safford, Robert E; Thomas, Colleen S; Bos, J Martijn; Ackerman, Michael J; Geske, Jeffrey B; Ommen, Steve R; Shapiro, Brian P; Johns, Gretchen S

    2018-03-15

    To test dual blood biomarkers compared with electrocardiogram (ECG) for hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HC) screening, we performed 3 analyses and cut-point assessments. First, we measured platelet function analyzer (PFA)-100 (n = 99) and normalized B-type natriuretic peptide (BNP) or NT-proBNP (BNP/upper limit of normal [ULN], n = 92) in 64 patients with HC and 29 normal controls (NCs). Second, from the regression equation between PFA and gradient (r = 0.77), we derived estimated PFA in a population of 189 patients with functional class I HC in whom measured BNP/ULN and ECG were available, and calculated single and dual biomarker sensitivity and specificity compared with ECG. Finally, we compared BNP/ULN in class I patients based on mutation and familial history status. In 42 patients with obstructive HC versus NCs, there was a slight overlap of PFA and BNP/ULN, but for the product of PFA × BNP/ULN, there was near-complete separation of values. Among patients with class I obstructive HC, estimated PFA × BNP/ULN had a sensitivity of 93% and a specificity of 100%; in latent and nonobstructive HC, sensitivity dropped to 61% and 72%; for ECG in obstructive, latent, and nonobstructive HC, sensitivity was 71%, 34%, and 67%. Functional class I patients with positive (n = 28) and negative (n = 36) sarcomere mutations and a positive (n = 71) or a negative (n = 109) family history had significant elevations of BNP/ULN versus NC, with no between-group differences. In conclusion, PFA and BNP were highly associated with obstructive HC and could potentially be used for screening; BNP was not uniquely elevated in patients with familial versus nonfamilial or mutation-positive versus mutation-negative HC. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Evaluation value of coronary CTA for coronary plaque features and its correlation with platelet function and serum biochemical indexes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jin-Xia Yang

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To analyze the evaluation value of coronary CT angiography for coronary plaque features and its correlation with platelet function and serum biochemical indexes. Methods: A total of 450 patients with coronary heart disease were divided into calcified plaque group (CT value≥130HU (n=117, soft plaque group (CT value≤60HU (n=150 and mixed plaque group (CT value 60-130HU (n=183 by coronary CT angiography (CTA, and 100 healthy subjects who received physical examination in our hospital during the same period were selected as control group. Differences in platelet function and serum biochemical indexes were compared among four groups of patients, and the judgment value of atheromatous plaque CT value from CTA for the severity of coronary heart disease was analyzed. Results: Platelet function parameters MPV, TEG-MA, P-selectin, PDGF-BB and vWF levels in peripheral blood of soft plaque group were higher than those of the other three groups; inflammatory factors CRP, IL-6, IL-12, IL-18 and IL-23 content in serum were higher than those of the other three groups; chemokines MCP-1, CXCL16, Fractalkine and RANTES content in serum were higher than those of the other three groups; adipocytokines Leptin and RBP4 content in serum were higher than those of the other three groups while SFRP5 content was lower than those of the other three groups. Atheromatous plaque CT value in patients with coronary heart disease was directly correlated with platelet function and the content of serum biochemical indexes. Conclusions: Coronary CTA can accurately assess coronary atheromatous plaque features, and can also be a reliable noninvasive method to judge coronary heart disease severity, treatment prognosis and so on.

  8. Platelet-biased stem cells reside at the apex of the haematopoietic stem-cell hierarchy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanjuan-Pla, Alejandra; Macaulay, Iain C; Jensen, Christina T; Woll, Petter S; Luis, Tiago C; Mead, Adam; Moore, Susan; Carella, Cintia; Matsuoka, Sahoko; Bouriez Jones, Tiphaine; Chowdhury, Onima; Stenson, Laura; Lutteropp, Michael; Green, Joanna C A; Facchini, Raffaella; Boukarabila, Hanane; Grover, Amit; Gambardella, Adriana; Thongjuea, Supat; Carrelha, Joana; Tarrant, Paul; Atkinson, Deborah; Clark, Sally-Ann; Nerlov, Claus; Jacobsen, Sten Eirik W

    2013-10-10

    The blood system is maintained by a small pool of haematopoietic stem cells (HSCs), which are required and sufficient for replenishing all human blood cell lineages at millions of cells per second throughout life. Megakaryocytes in the bone marrow are responsible for the continuous production of platelets in the blood, crucial for preventing bleeding--a common and life-threatening side effect of many cancer therapies--and major efforts are focused at identifying the most suitable cellular and molecular targets to enhance platelet production after bone marrow transplantation or chemotherapy. Although it has become clear that distinct HSC subsets exist that are stably biased towards the generation of lymphoid or myeloid blood cells, we are yet to learn whether other types of lineage-biased HSC exist or understand their inter-relationships and how differently lineage-biased HSCs are generated and maintained. The functional relevance of notable phenotypic and molecular similarities between megakaryocytes and bone marrow cells with an HSC cell-surface phenotype remains unclear. Here we identify and prospectively isolate a molecularly and functionally distinct mouse HSC subset primed for platelet-specific gene expression, with enhanced propensity for short- and long-term reconstitution of platelets. Maintenance of platelet-biased HSCs crucially depends on thrombopoietin, the primary extrinsic regulator of platelet development. Platelet-primed HSCs also frequently have a long-term myeloid lineage bias, can self-renew and give rise to lymphoid-biased HSCs. These findings show that HSC subtypes can be organized into a cellular hierarchy, with platelet-primed HSCs at the apex. They also demonstrate that molecular and functional priming for platelet development initiates already in a distinct HSC population. The identification of a platelet-primed HSC population should enable the rational design of therapies enhancing platelet output.

  9. Phenotypic and functional plasticity of cells of innate immunity: macrophages, mast cells and neutrophils

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Galli, Stephen J; Borregaard, Niels; Wynn, Thomas A

    2011-01-01

    Hematopoietic cells, including lymphoid and myeloid cells, can develop into phenotypically distinct 'subpopulations' with different functions. However, evidence indicates that some of these subpopulations can manifest substantial plasticity (that is, undergo changes in their phenotype and function......). Here we focus on the occurrence of phenotypically distinct subpopulations in three lineages of myeloid cells with important roles in innate and acquired immunity: macrophages, mast cells and neutrophils. Cytokine signals, epigenetic modifications and other microenvironmental factors can substantially...... and, in some cases, rapidly and reversibly alter the phenotype of these cells and influence their function. This suggests that regulation of the phenotype and function of differentiated hematopoietic cells by microenvironmental factors, including those generated during immune responses, represents...

  10. Phenotypic and functional plasticity of cells of innate immunity: macrophages, mast cells and neutrophils

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Galli, Stephen J; Borregaard, Niels; Wynn, Thomas A

    2011-01-01

    ). Here we focus on the occurrence of phenotypically distinct subpopulations in three lineages of myeloid cells with important roles in innate and acquired immunity: macrophages, mast cells and neutrophils. Cytokine signals, epigenetic modifications and other microenvironmental factors can substantially......Hematopoietic cells, including lymphoid and myeloid cells, can develop into phenotypically distinct 'subpopulations' with different functions. However, evidence indicates that some of these subpopulations can manifest substantial plasticity (that is, undergo changes in their phenotype and function...... and, in some cases, rapidly and reversibly alter the phenotype of these cells and influence their function. This suggests that regulation of the phenotype and function of differentiated hematopoietic cells by microenvironmental factors, including those generated during immune responses, represents...

  11. Subpopulations in purified platelets adhering on glass.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donati, Alessia; Gupta, Swati; Reviakine, Ilya

    2016-06-22

    Understanding how platelet activation is regulated is important in the context of cardiovascular disorders and their management with antiplatelet therapy. Recent evidence points to different platelet subpopulations performing different functions. In particular, procoagulant and aggregating subpopulations have been reported in the literature in platelets treated with the GPVI agonists. How the formation of platelet subpopulations upon activation is regulated remains unclear. Here, it is shown that procoagulant and aggregating platelet subpopulations arise spontaneously upon adhesion of purified platelets on clean glass surfaces. Calcium ionophore treatment of the adhering platelets resulted in one platelet population expressing both the procoagulant and the adherent population markers phosphatidylserine and the activated form of GPIIb/IIIa, while all of the platelets expressed CD62P independently of the ionophore treatment. Therefore, all platelets have the capacity to express all three activation markers. It is concluded that platelet subpopulations observed in various studies reflect the dynamics of the platelet activation process.

  12. Retinal function in patients with the neuronal ceroid lipofuscinosis phenotype

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elizabeth Maria Aparecida Barasnevicius Quagliato

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Purpose: To analyze the clinical features, visual acuity, and full-field electroretinogram (ERG findings of 15 patients with the neuronal ceroid lipofuscinosis (NCL phenotype and to establish the role of ERG testing in NCL diagnosis. Methods: The medical records of five patients with infantile NCL, five with Jansky-Bielschowsky disease, and five with juvenile NCL who underwent full-field ERG testing were retrospectively analyzed. Results: Progressive vision loss was the initial symptom in 66.7% of patients and was isolated or associated with ataxia, epilepsy, and neurodevelopmental involution. Epilepsy was present in 93.3% of patients, of whom 86.6% presented with neurodevelopmental involution. Fundus findings ranged from normal to pigmentary/atrophic abnormalities. Cone-rod, rod-cone, and both types of dysfunction were observed in six, one, and eight patients, respectively. Conclusion: In our study, all patients with the NCL phenotype had abnormal ERG findings, and the majority exhibited both cone-rod and rod-cone dysfunction. We conclude that ERG is a valuable tool for the characterization of visual dysfunction in patients with the NCL phenotype and is useful for diagnosis.

  13. Orientation of Al3Ti platelets in Al-Al3Ti functionally graded material manufactured by centrifugal method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Watanabe, Y.; Fukui, Y.

    1997-01-01

    Al-Al 3 Ti functionally graded materials (FGMs) were manufactured by the centrifugal method with a commercial ingot of Al-5 mass% Ti master alloy. The alloy was melted at a liquid/solid coexisting temperature, at which Al 3 Ti remains as a solid, and then it was cast into a thick-walled ring. It was found that the Al-Al 3 Ti functionally graded material can be successfully fabricated by the centrifugal method. It was also found that the volume fraction of the Al 3 Ti can be increased by repetition of the centrifugal method. Since the shape of Al 3 Ti particles in a commercial alloy ingot is that of a platelet, the Al 3 Ti particles are arranged with their platelet planes nearly perpendicular to the radial direction. The orientation effects become stronger when the G number becomes larger. Although the final centrifugal casting was conducted under a very large centrifugal force for the specimen cast three times, the orientation effects were weaker than those in the specimen cast one time. From these observations, it is concluded that the origin of orientation of Al 3 Ti platelets can be attributed to the angular velocity gradient of the melt along the radial direction produced by the difference in the viscosity. (orig.)

  14. Genotype-phenotype associations in filaggrin loss-of-function mutation carriers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Landeck, Lilla; Visser, Maaike; Kezic, Sanja; John, Swen M.

    2013-01-01

    Loss-of-function mutations in the filaggrin gene (FLG) have been reported to be associated with specific phenotypic characteristics such as hyperlinearity and keratosis pilaris. To study phenotypic features in patients with occupational irritant contact eczema of the hands in relation to FLG

  15. GWIS: Genome-Wide Inferred Statistics for Functions of Multiple Phenotypes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nieuwboer, H.A.; Pool, R.; Dolan, C.V.; Boomsma, D.I.; Nivard, M.G.

    2016-01-01

    Here we present a method of genome-wide inferred study (GWIS) that provides an approximation of genome-wide association study (GWAS) summary statistics for a variable that is a function of phenotypes for which GWAS summary statistics, phenotypic means, and covariances are available. A GWIS can be

  16. Platelet-free shear flow assay facilitates analysis of shear-dependent functions of VWF and ADAMTS13.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kraus, Emma; Kraus, Kristina; Obser, Tobias; Oyen, Florian; Klemm, Ulrike; Schneppenheim, Reinhard; Brehm, Maria A

    2014-12-01

    The multimeric form of von Willebrand factor (VWF), is the largest soluble protein in mammals and exhibits a multidomain structure resulting in multiple functions. Upon agonist stimulation endothelial cells secrete VWF multimers from Weibel-Palade bodies into the blood stream where VWF plays an essential role in platelet-dependent primary hemostasis. Elongation of VWF strings on the cells' surface leads to accessibility of VWF binding sites for proteins, such as platelet membrane glycoprotein Ib. The prothrombotic strings are size-regulated by the metalloprotease ADAMTS13 by shear force-activated proteolytic cleavage. VWF string formation was induced by histamine stimulation of HUVEC cells under unidirectional shear flow and VWF strings were detected employing the VWF binding peptide of platelet glycoprotein Ib coupled to latex beads. VWF strings were then used as substrate for kinetic studies of recombinant and plasma ADAMTS13. To investigate specific aspects of the shear-dependent functions of VWF and ADAMTS13, we developed a shear flow assay that allows observation of VWF string formation and their degradation by ADAMTS13 without the need for isolated platelets. Our assay specifically detects VWF strings, can be coupled with fluorescent applications and allows semi-automated, quantitative assessment of recombinant and plasma ADAMTS13 activity. Our assay may serve as a valuable research tool to investigate the biochemical characteristics of VWF and ADAMTS13 under shear flow and could complement diagnostics of von Willebrand Disease and Thrombotic Thrombocytopenic Purpura as it allows detection of shear flow-dependent dysfunction of VWD-associated VWF mutants as well as TTP-associated ADAMTS13 mutants. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Assessment of Platelet Function in Traumatic Brain Injury-A Retrospective Observational Study in the Neuro-Critical Care Setting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lindblad, Caroline; Thelin, Eric Peter; Nekludov, Michael; Frostell, Arvid; Nelson, David W; Svensson, Mikael; Bellander, Bo-Michael

    2018-01-01

    Despite seemingly functional coagulation, hemorrhagic lesion progression is a common and devastating condition following traumatic brain injury (TBI), stressing the need for new diagnostic techniques. Multiple electrode aggregometry (MEA) measures platelet function and could aid in coagulopathy assessment following TBI. The aims of this study were to evaluate MEA temporal dynamics, influence of concomitant therapy, and its capabilities to predict lesion progression and clinical outcome in a TBI cohort. Adult TBI patients in a neurointensive care unit that underwent MEA sampling were retrospectively included. MEA was sampled if the patient was treated with antiplatelet therapy, bled heavily during surgery, or had abnormal baseline coagulation values. We assessed platelet activation pathways involving the arachidonic acid receptor (ASPI), P2Y 12 receptor, and thrombin receptor (TRAP). ASPI was the primary focus of analysis. If several samples were obtained, they were included. Retrospective data were extracted from hospital charts. Outcome variables were radiologic hemorrhagic progression and Glasgow Outcome Scale assessed prospectively at 12 months posttrauma. MEA levels were compared between patients on antiplatelet therapy. Linear mixed effect models and uni-/multivariable regression models were used to study longitudinal dynamics, hemorrhagic progression and outcome, respectively. In total, 178 patients were included (48% unfavorable outcome). ASPI levels increased from initially low values in a time-dependent fashion ( p  trend of MEA is identified in this TBI cohort, even in patients without known antiplatelet therapies. Values appear also affected by platelet inhibitory treatment and by platelet transfusions. While significant in univariate models to predict outcome, MEA values did not independently correlate to outcome or lesion progression in multivariable analyses. Further prospective studies to monitor coagulation in TBI patients are warranted, in

  18. Human endometrial stromal stem cells differentiate into megakaryocytes with the ability to produce functional platelets.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jinju Wang

    Full Text Available Human endometrium is a high dynamic tissue that contains endometrial stromal stem cells (hESSCs. The hESSCs have been differentiated into a number of cell lineages. However, differentiation of hESSCs into megakaryocytes (MKs has not yet been investigated. The aim of this study was to investigate the feasibility of MK generation from hESSCs and subsequent production of functional platelets (PLTs. In our study, hESSCs were cultured from endometrial stromal cells as confirmed by positive stromal cell specific markers (CD90 and CD29 and negative hematopoietic stem cell markers (CD45 and CD34 expression. Then, hESSCs were differentiated in a medium supplemented with thrombopoietin (TPO for 18 days. The MK differentiation was analyzed by flow cytometry and confocal microscopy. The differentiation medium was collected for PLT production analysis by flow cytometry, transmission electron microscopy and functional measurements. Our results show: 1 MKs were successfully generated from hESSCs as identified by expression of specific markers (CD41a: 1 ± 0.09% and 39 ± 3.0%; CD42b: 1.2 ± 0.06% and 28 ± 2.0%, control vs. differentiation accompanied with reduction of pluripotent transcription factors (Oct4 and Sox2 expression; 2 The level of PLTs in the differentiation medium was 16 ± 1 number/µl as determined by size (2-4 µm and CD41a expression (CD41a: 1 ± 0.4% and 90±2.0%, control vs. differentiation; 3 Generated PLTs were functional as evidenced by the up-regulation of CD62p expression and fibrinogen binding following thrombin stimulation; 4 Released PLTs showed similar ultra-structure characteristics (alpha granules, vacuoles and dense tubular system as PLTs from peripheral blood determined by electron microscopic analysis. Data demonstrate the feasibility of generating MKs from hESSCs, and that the generated MKs release functional PLTs. Therefore, hESSCs could be a potential new stem cell source for in vitro MK/PLT production.

  19. Tropolonate vs oxine 111-Indium platelet labeling: Comparison of efficiency, ultrastructure and function

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Spicer, K.M.; Lowe, L.; Gordon, L.

    1984-01-01

    Indium (I) labeled cells have proven valuable as a diagnostic tool. Recent reports indicate that Tropolonate (T) is superior to Oxine (0) as a chelator for Indium, due to its increased lipid solubility precluding cell exposure to injurious solvents. The authors examined in vivo biologic behavior of rabbit platelets (P) labeled by either IT or IO. Labeling efficiency for IT-P averaged 61% and for IO-P averaged 88%. The arachidonate induced aggregation of P labeled by both IT and 10 were normal; not significantly different from each other. Pulmonary clearance of labeled cells was determined by imaging with gamma camera and computer (256 byte, 500K count images). Average counts per pixel (ACP) wee determined at 15-minute intervals for lung (L) and blood pool (H) for 4 hours and at 24 hours. While ACP from both L and H decreased with time, in both the T and O labeled animals, the ratio of L to H (L/H) in the T rabbits was significantly lower than for O rabbits and remained so for 24 hours. At 24 hours, 0.15mg/kg oleic acid (OA) was infused via ear vein over 20 minutes. Images every 10 minutes for 2 hours were analyzed and ACP for L and H determined. The L/H for T rabbits rose 120% in an average of 46 minutes post OA insult. L/H rose an average of 44% in the O rabbits, and took longer to peak (81 min). Electron micrography revealed IO-P to have slightly more degranulation and vacuolization (thromborhexis) than the IT-P. The author conclude that while IT-P are labeled with less efficiency than the IO-P, adequate activity levels are obtained for diagnostic purposes, and ultrastructural and functional capabilities are better preserved with tropolonate labeling

  20. The effects of aspirin on platelet function and lysophosphatidic acids depend on plasma concentrations of EPA and DHA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Block, Robert C; Abdolahi, Amir; Tu, Xin; Georas, Steve N; Brenna, J Thomas; Phipps, Richard P; Lawrence, Peter; Mousa, Shaker A

    2015-05-01

    Aspirin's prevention of cardiovascular disease (CVD) events in individuals with type 2 diabetes mellitus is controversial. Eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA) and docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) and aspirin all affect the cyclooxygenase enzyme. The relationship between plasma EPA and DHA and aspirin's effects has not been determined. Thirty adults with type 2 diabetes mellitus ingested aspirin (81 mg/day) for 7 days, then EPA+DHA (2.6g/day) for 28 days, then both for another 7 days. Lysophosphatidic acid (LPA) species and more classic platelet function outcomes were determined. Plasma concentrations of total EPA+DHA were associated with 7-day aspirin reduction effects on these outcomes in a "V"-shaped manner for all 11 LPA species and ADP-induced platelet aggregation. This EPA+DHA concentration was quite consistent for each of the LPA species and ADP. These results support aspirin effects on lysolipid metabolism and platelet aggregation depending on plasma EPA+DHA concentrations in individuals with a disturbed lipid milieu. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Bypassing Evolutionary Roadblocks: Phenotypic Diversity in Isogenic Population Bridges Tradeoff in Evolution of a New Function

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petrie, K. L.; Meyer, J. R.

    2017-07-01

    A novel mechanism of innovation bridges fitness valleys by violating the one gene-one phenotype dogma. Protein products of a single gene partition into populations, some of which carry out a new function and some the old, avoiding tradeoffs.

  2. Hemostatic Function of Apheresis Platelets Stored at 4 deg C and 22 deg C

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-05-01

    isothiocyanate conjugated bovine lactadherin was purchased from Haematologic Technologies, Inc (Essex Junction, VT). Gibco 1 Hanks balanced salt solution...prevent poor gas exchange, acidosis (pHG6), loss of normal morphology, and low platelet recovery (55Y57). Thus, cold storage may reduce storage costs and

  3. On the Eulerian formulation of a stress induced platelet activation function

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Bodnár, Tomáš

    2014-01-01

    Roč. 257, November (2014), s. 91-95 ISSN 0025-5564 Institutional support: RVO:61388998 Keywords : blood flow * platelet * stress * activation Subject RIV: BK - Fluid Dynamics Impact factor: 1.303, year: 2014 http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0025556414001163

  4. Biogenetic mechanisms predisposing to complex phenotypes in parents may function differently in their children

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kulminski, Alexander M; Arbeev, Konstantin G; Christensen, Kaare

    2013-01-01

    rule. Our findings suggest that biogenetic mechanisms underlying relationships among different phenotypes, even if they are causally related, can function differently in successive generations or in different age groups of biologically related individuals. The results suggest that the role of aging-related......This study focuses on the participants of the Long Life Family Study to elucidate whether biogenetic mechanisms underlying relationships among heritable complex phenotypes in parents function in the same way for the same phenotypes in their children. Our results reveal 3 characteristic groups...

  5. Assessment of Platelet Function in Traumatic Brain Injury—A Retrospective Observational Study in the Neuro-Critical Care Setting

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Caroline Lindblad

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available BackgroundDespite seemingly functional coagulation, hemorrhagic lesion progression is a common and devastating condition following traumatic brain injury (TBI, stressing the need for new diagnostic techniques. Multiple electrode aggregometry (MEA measures platelet function and could aid in coagulopathy assessment following TBI. The aims of this study were to evaluate MEA temporal dynamics, influence of concomitant therapy, and its capabilities to predict lesion progression and clinical outcome in a TBI cohort.Material and methodsAdult TBI patients in a neurointensive care unit that underwent MEA sampling were retrospectively included. MEA was sampled if the patient was treated with antiplatelet therapy, bled heavily during surgery, or had abnormal baseline coagulation values. We assessed platelet activation pathways involving the arachidonic acid receptor (ASPI, P2Y12 receptor, and thrombin receptor (TRAP. ASPI was the primary focus of analysis. If several samples were obtained, they were included. Retrospective data were extracted from hospital charts. Outcome variables were radiologic hemorrhagic progression and Glasgow Outcome Scale assessed prospectively at 12 months posttrauma. MEA levels were compared between patients on antiplatelet therapy. Linear mixed effect models and uni-/multivariable regression models were used to study longitudinal dynamics, hemorrhagic progression and outcome, respectively.ResultsIn total, 178 patients were included (48% unfavorable outcome. ASPI levels increased from initially low values in a time-dependent fashion (p < 0.001. Patients on cyclooxygenase inhibitors demonstrated low ASPI levels (p < 0.001, while platelet transfusion increased them (p < 0.001. The first ASPI (p = 0.039 and TRAP (p = 0.009 were significant predictors of outcome, but not lesion progression, in univariate analyses. In multivariable analysis, MEA values were not independently correlated with outcome

  6. Flavanols and Platelet Reactivity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Debra A. Pearson

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available Platelet activity and platelet-endothelial cell interactions are important in the acute development of thrombosis, as well as in the pathogenesis of cardiovascular disease. An increasing number of foods have been reported to have platelet-inhibitory actions, and research with a number of flavanol-rich foods, including, grape juice, cocoa and chocolate, suggests that these foods may provide some protection against thrombosis. In the present report, we review a series of in vivo studies on the effects of flavanol-rich cocoa and chocolate on platelet activation and platelet-dependent primary hemostasis. Consumption of flavanol-rich cocoa inhibited several measures of platelet activity including, epinephrine- and ADP-induced glycoprotein (GP IIb/IIIa and P-Selectin expression, platelet microparticle formation, and epinephrine-collagen and ADP-collagen induced primary hemostasis. The epinephrine-induced inhibitory effects on GP IIb/IIIa and primary hemostasis were similar to, though less robust than those associated with the use of low dose (81 mg aspirin. These data, coupled with information from other studies, support the concept that flavanols present in cocoa and chocolate can modulate platelet function through a multitude of pathways.

  7. Radioimmune assay of human platelet prostaglandin synthetase

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roth, G.J.; Machuga, E.T.

    1982-01-01

    Normal platelet function depends, in part, on platelet PG synthesis. PG synthetase (cyclo-oxygenase) catalyzes the first step in PG synthesis, the formation of PGH 2 from arachidonic acid. Inhibition of the enzyme by ASA results in an abnormality in the platelet release reaction. Patients with pparent congenital abnormalities in the enzyme have been described, and the effects have been referred to as ''aspirin-like'' defects of the platelet function. These patients lack platelet PG synthetase activity, but the actual content of PG synthetase protein in these individuals' platelets is unknown. Therefore an RIA for human platelet PG synthetase would provide new information, useful in assessing the aspirin-like defects of platelet function. An RIA for human platelet PG synthetase is described. The assay utilizes a rabbit antibody directed against the enzyme and [ 125 I]-labelled sheep PG synthetase as antigen. The human platelet enzyme is assayed by its ability to inhibit precipitation of the [ 125 I]antigen. The assay is sensitive to 1 ng of enzyme. By the immune assay, human platelets contain approximately 1200 ng of PG synethetase protein per 1.5 mg of platelet protein (approximately 10 9 platelets). This content corresponds to 10,000 enzyme molecules per platelet. The assay provides a rapid and convenient assay for the human platelet enzyme, and it can be applied to the assessment of patients with apparent platelet PG synthetase (cyclo-oxygenase) deficiency

  8. The Effect of Disinfection on Viability and Function of Baboon Red Blood Cells and Platelets

    Science.gov (United States)

    1997-07-11

    blood cells was evaluated by their ability to transport oxygen as assessed by measurement of 2,3 diphosphoglycerate (DPG)14 and red blood cell p50,15...Blood collected from the bleeding time site (referred to as "shed blood") had a significantly reduced thromboxane A2 level . The ability of the...preserved or treated platelets to increase the shed blood thromboxane A2 level and reduce the 8; extended bleeding time is the measure of their

  9. A comprehensive dataset of genes with a loss-of-function mutant phenotype in Arabidopsis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lloyd, Johnny; Meinke, David

    2012-03-01

    Despite the widespread use of Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) as a model plant, a curated dataset of Arabidopsis genes with mutant phenotypes remains to be established. A preliminary list published nine years ago in Plant Physiology is outdated, and genome-wide phenotype information remains difficult to obtain. We describe here a comprehensive dataset of 2,400 genes with a loss-of-function mutant phenotype in Arabidopsis. Phenotype descriptions were gathered primarily from manual curation of the scientific literature. Genes were placed into prioritized groups (essential, morphological, cellular-biochemical, and conditional) based on the documented phenotypes of putative knockout alleles. Phenotype classes (e.g. vegetative, reproductive, and timing, for the morphological group) and subsets (e.g. flowering time, senescence, circadian rhythms, and miscellaneous, for the timing class) were also established. Gene identities were classified as confirmed (through molecular complementation or multiple alleles) or not confirmed. Relationships between mutant phenotype and protein function, genetic redundancy, protein connectivity, and subcellular protein localization were explored. A complementary dataset of 401 genes that exhibit a mutant phenotype only when disrupted in combination with a putative paralog was also compiled. The importance of these genes in confirming functional redundancy and enhancing the value of single gene datasets is discussed. With further input and curation from the Arabidopsis community, these datasets should help to address a variety of important biological questions, provide a foundation for exploring the relationship between genotype and phenotype in angiosperms, enhance the utility of Arabidopsis as a reference plant, and facilitate comparative studies with model genetic organisms.

  10. Effects of single oral doses of lysine clonixinate and acetylsalicylic acid on platelet functions in man.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pallapies, D; Muhs, A; Bertram, L; Rohleder, G; Nagyiványi, P; Peskar, B A

    1996-01-01

    Lysine clonixinate is an analgesic drug with a so far unknown mechanism of action. We have determined its effect on platelet cyclooxygenase in man. Biosynthesis of thromboxane (TX)B2 and prostaglandin (PG)F2 alpha in clotting whole blood ex vivo as well as collagen-induced platelet aggregation measured before and at various time points after oral administration of 125 mg lysine clonixinate were compared to results obtained with 500 mg acetylsalicylic acid (ASA). While biosynthesis of both TXB2 and PGF2 alpha measured radioimmunologically was inhibited significantly 2.5 h, but not 6 h, after administration of lysine clonixinate, inhibition by ASA was much greater and still highly significant after 48 h. Similarly, collagen-induced aggregation of platelet-rich plasma was inhibited for a longer period and to a greater extent after administration of ASA than after lysine clonixinate. Our results indicate that lysine clonixinate is a cyclooxygenase inhibitor of moderate potency. It remains to be investigated whether mechanisms other than inhibition of cyclooxygenase contribute to the analgesic activity of lysine clonixinate.

  11. Pharmacology of functional endogenous IP prostanoid receptors in NCB-20 cells: comparison with binding data from human platelets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crider, J Y; Xu, S X; Sharif, N A

    2001-01-01

    The objective of these studies was to characterize the effects of a broad range of prostanoid agonists upon the stimulation of cAMP production in National Cancer Bank (NCB-20; mouse neuroblastoma/hamster brain hybridoma) cells. The pharmacology of these functional responses in NCB-20 cells was compared with that of the classic endogenous IP receptor present on human platelets using [3H]-iloprost binding techniques. In both assay systems, agonists from the IP prostanoid class exhibited the highest affinities and functional potencies. Specific prostanoids exhibited the following rank order of potency (EC50 +/- SEM) in stimulating cAMP production in the NCB-20 cells: carbaprostacyclin (4.3 +/- 0.9 nM) = PGI2 (6.6 +/-1.5 nM) > iloprost (75+/-13 nM) > 11-deoxy PGE, (378+/-138 nM) > misoprostol (1,243+/-48) > PGE2 (3020+/-700 nM) > ZK-118182 (7265+/-455 nM). Iloprost wasthe most potent compound in the human platelet binding assay while prostanoidsfromthe DPand EP receptor classes showed modest affinity. These studies provide functional and binding information for a broad range of both natural and synthetic prostanoid receptor ligands at the endogenous IP receptor in two different cell types.

  12. Structural and functional analysis of a platelet-activating lysophosphatidylcholine of Trypanosoma cruzi.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Felipe Gazos-Lopes

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Trypanosoma cruzi is the causative agent of the life-threatening Chagas disease, in which increased platelet aggregation related to myocarditis is observed. Platelet-activating factor (PAF is a potent intercellular lipid mediator and second messenger that exerts its activity through a PAF-specific receptor (PAFR. Previous data from our group suggested that T. cruzi synthesizes a phospholipid with PAF-like activity. The structure of T. cruzi PAF-like molecule, however, remains elusive.Here, we have purified and structurally characterized the putative T. cruzi PAF-like molecule by electrospray ionization-tandem mass spectrometry (ESI-MS/MS. Our ESI-MS/MS data demonstrated that the T. cruzi PAF-like molecule is actually a lysophosphatidylcholine (LPC, namely sn-1 C18:1(delta 9-LPC. Similar to PAF, the platelet-aggregating activity of C18:1-LPC was abrogated by the PAFR antagonist, WEB 2086. Other major LPC species, i.e., C16:0-, C18:0-, and C18:2-LPC, were also characterized in all T. cruzi stages. These LPC species, however, failed to induce platelet aggregation. Quantification of T. cruzi LPC species by ESI-MS revealed that intracellular amastigote and trypomastigote forms have much higher levels of C18:1-LPC than epimastigote and metacyclic trypomastigote forms. C18:1-LPC was also found to be secreted by the parasite in extracellular vesicles (EV and an EV-free fraction. A three-dimensional model of PAFR was constructed and a molecular docking study was performed to predict the interactions between the PAFR model and PAF, and each LPC species. Molecular docking data suggested that, contrary to other LPC species analyzed, C18:1-LPC is predicted to interact with the PAFR model in a fashion similar to PAF.Taken together, our data indicate that T. cruzi synthesizes a bioactive C18:1-LPC, which aggregates platelets via PAFR. We propose that C18:1-LPC might be an important lipid mediator in the progression of Chagas disease and its biosynthesis could

  13. Platelet-derived growth factor inhibits platelet activation in heparinized whole blood.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Selheim, F; Holmsen, H; Vassbotn, F S

    1999-08-15

    We previously have demonstrated that human platelets have functionally active platelet-derived growth factor alpha-receptors. Studies with gel-filtered platelets showed that an autocrine inhibition pathway is transduced through this tyrosine kinase receptor during platelet activation. The physiological significance of this inhibitory effect of platelet-derived growth factor on gel-filtered platelets activation is, however, not known. In the present study, we investigated whether platelet-derived growth factor inhibits platelet activation under more physiological conditions in heparinized whole blood, which represents a more physiological condition than gel-filtered platelets. Using flow cytometric assays, we demonstrate here that platelet-derived growth factor inhibits thrombin-, thrombin receptor agonist peptide SFLLRN-, and collagen-induced platelet aggregation and shedding of platelet-derived microparticles from the platelet plasma membrane during platelet aggregation in stirred heparinized whole blood. The inhibitory effect of platelet-derived growth factor was dose dependent. However, under nonaggregating conditions (no stirring), we could not demonstrate any significant effect of platelet-derived growth factor on thrombin- and thrombin receptor agonist peptide-induced platelet surface expression of P-selectin. Our results demonstrate that platelet-derived growth factor appears to be a true antithrombotic agent only under aggregating conditions in heparinized whole blood.

  14. Functionalized Magnetic Resonance Contrast Agent Selectively Binds to Glycoprotein IIb/IIIa on Activated Human Platelets under Flow Conditions and Is Detectable at Clinically Relevant Field Strengths

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Constantin von zur Mühlen

    2008-03-01

    Full Text Available Recent progress in molecular magnetic resonance imaging (MRI provides the opportunity to image cells and cellular receptors using microparticles of iron oxide (MPIOs. However, imaging targets on vessel walls remains challenging owing to the quantity of contrast agents delivered to areas of interest under shear stress conditions. We evaluated ex vivo binding characteristics of a functional MRI contrast agent to ligand-induced binding sites (LIBSs on activated glycoprotein IIb/IIIa receptors of human platelets, which were lining rupture-prone atherosclerotic plaques and could therefore facilitate detection of platelet-mediated pathology in atherothrombotic disease. MPIOs were conjugated to anti-LIBS single-chain antibodies (LIBS-MPIO or control antibodies (control MPIO. Ex vivo binding to human platelet-rich clots in a dose-dependent manner was confirmed on a 3 T clinical MRI scanner and by histology (p < .05 for LIBS-MPIO vs control MPIO. By using a flow chamber setup, significant binding of LIBS-MPIO to a platelet matrix was observed under venous and arterial flow conditions, but not for control MPIO (p < .001. A newly generated MRI contrast agent detects activated human platelets at clinically relevant magnetic field strengths and binds to platelets under venous and arterial flow conditions, conveying high payloads of contrast to specific molecular targets. This may provide the opportunity to identify vulnerable, rupture-prone atherosclerotic plaques via noninvasive MRI.

  15. The role of point-of-care assessment of platelet function in predicting postoperative bleeding and transfusion requirements after coronary artery bypass grafting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mishra, Pankaj Kumar; Thekkudan, Joyce; Sahajanandan, Raj; Gravenor, Mike; Lakshmanan, Suresh; Fayaz, Khazi Mohammed; Luckraz, Heyman

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVE platelet function assessment after cardiac surgery can predict postoperative blood loss, guide transfusion requirements and discriminate the need for surgical re-exploration. We conducted this study to assess the predictive value of point-of-care testing platelet function using the Multiplate® device. Patients undergoing isolated coronary artery bypass grafting were prospectively recruited ( n = 84). Group A ( n = 42) patients were on anti-platelet therapy until surgery; patients in Group B ( n = 42) stopped anti-platelet treatment at least 5 days preoperatively. Multiplate® and thromboelastography (TEG) tests were performed in the perioperative period. Primary end-point was excessive bleeding (>2.5 ml/kg/h) within first 3 h postoperative. Secondary end-points included transfusion requirements, re-exploration rates, intensive care unit and in-hospital stays. Patients in Group A had excessive bleeding (59% vs. 33%, P = 0.02), higher re-exploration rates (14% vs. 0%, P function testing was the most significant predictor of excessive bleeding (odds ratio [OR]: 2.3, P = 0.08), need for blood (OR: 5.5, P functional assessment with Multiplate® was the strongest predictor for bleeding and transfusion requirements in patients on anti-platelet therapy until the time of surgery.

  16. Functional phenotype of airway myocytes from asthmatic airways

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wright, David B.; Trian, Thomas; Siddiqui, Sana; Pascoe, Chris D.; Ojo, Oluwaseun O.; Johnson, Jill R.; Dekkers, Bart G. J.; Dakshinamurti, Shyamala; Bagchi, Rushita; Burgess, Janette K.; Kanabar, Varsha

    In asthma, the airway smooth muscle (ASM) cell plays a central role in disease pathogenesis through cellular changes which may impact on its microenvironment and alter ASM response and function. The answer to the long debated question of what makes a 'healthy' ASM cell become 'asthmatic' still

  17. Sub-Microscopic Organization and Functional Properties of Cells Stored in a Bank for Frozen Leucocytes and Platelets

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vinograd-Finkel, F. R.; Terentieva, E. I.; Leontovich, V. A.; Skopina, S. B.; Abezgauz, N. N.; Totskaya, A. A. [Central Institute of Haematology and Blood Transfusion, Moscow, USSR (Russian Federation)

    1969-07-15

    Massive transfusions of leucocyte mass containing young and stem cells in addition to adult cells are carried out successfully in the treatment of patients suffering from depressed haemopoiesis. To meet the needs of clinics a leucocyte mass bank-has been established and methods have been developed for the long-term storage of leucocyte mass by keeping it in the frozen state at -196 Degree-Sign C. Various carrier solutions containing cryoprotective substances (dimethylsulphoxide, glycerine, polyvinyl pyrrolidone) have been proposed. These make it possible to conserve from 70 to 90% of live cells for as long as two years or more. The viability of the frozen cells is proved by supravital staining and luminescent microscopy, and also by determining the extent to which their functional properties are preserved, the phagocytic activity of the granulocytes and the ability of the lymphocytes to produce young forms in tissue culture. It has also been observed that their glycolytic activity is preserved (up to 60%). All these data correlate with the data obtained by electron microscopy regarding the extent to which the sub-microscopic organization of frozen leucocytes is preserved. The bank is also used to store a frozen platelet mass, dimethylsulphoxide being used as the cryoprotective agent. The ultrastructure of the platelets and their functional properties (retractile activity) suffer least impairment. (author)

  18. Staphylococcal β-Toxin Modulates Human Aortic Endothelial Cell and Platelet Function through Sphingomyelinase and Biofilm Ligase Activities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alfa Herrera

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Staphylococcus aureus causes many infections, such as skin and soft tissue, pneumonia, osteomyelitis, and infective endocarditis (IE. IE is an endovascular infection of native and prosthetic valves and the lining of the heart; it is characterized by the formation of cauliflower-like “vegetations” composed of fibrin, platelets, other host factors, bacteria, and bacterial products. β-Toxin is an S. aureus virulence factor that contributes to the microorganism’s ability to cause IE. This cytolysin has two enzymatic activities: sphingomyelinase (SMase and biofilm ligase. Although both activities have functions in a rabbit model of IE, the mechanism(s by which β-toxin directly affects human cells and is involved in the infectious process has not been elucidated. Here, we compared the in vitro effects of purified recombinant wild-type β-toxin, SMase-deficient β-toxin (H289N, and biofilm ligase-deficient β-toxin (H162A and/or D163A on human aortic endothelial cells (HAECs and platelets. β-Toxin was cytotoxic to HAECs and inhibited the production of interleukin 8 (IL-8 from these cells by both SMase and biofilm ligase activities. β-Toxin altered HAEC surface expression of CD40 and vascular cell adhesion molecule 1 (VCAM-1. HAECs treated with β-toxin displayed granular membrane morphology not seen in treatment with the SMase-deficient mutant. The altered morphology resulted in two possibly separable activities, cell rounding and redistribution of cell membranes into granules, which were not the result of endosome production from the Golgi apparatus or lysosomes. β-Toxin directly aggregated rabbit platelets via SMase activity.

  19. A discrepancy between platelet alpha 2-receptor density and functional circulatory changes in hypertensives

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mores, N.; Martire, M.; Pistritto, G.; Cardillo, C.; Folli, G.

    1990-01-01

    To investigate whether differences exist in peripheral alpha 2-adrenoceptors between normotensive and hypertensive subjects, we determined platelet alpha 2-adrenoceptor density in 10 (7 males) untreated essential hypertensives (mean age of 51.1 years, range of 44-59 years) and in 10 age- and sex-matched normotensive controls. Moreover, in hypertensive patients, we examined the relationship between receptor density and cardiovascular reactivity to mental arithmetic, static handgrip, and bicycle exercise, to verify the hypothesis that alpha 2-adrenoceptors might play a role in modulation of hemodynamic response to sympathetic stimuli. alpha 2-Adrenoceptor density, as calculated by binding of [3H]yohimbine to platelets, was significantly higher in essential hypertensives (314.8 +/- 38.7 fmol/mg) than in normotensive subjects (213.6 +/- 34.7 fmol/mg) (p less than 0.05), whereas receptor affinity was similar in both groups (4.0 +/- 0.5 nM hypertensives, 4.3 +/- 0.5 nM normotensives; p greater than 0.05). Mental arithmetic increased mean arterial pressure (MAP) by 21.5% from basal values and heart rate (HR) by 13.2%. During isometric exercise, MAP increased by 38.1% and HR by 24.7%, while during bicycle ergometry, mean increases in MAP and HR from baseline were of 27.2 and 54.3%, respectively. No correlation was found between platelet alpha 2-adrenoceptor density and percent changes in MAP induced by all tests, or between adrenoceptors and absolute basal and peak MAP values. Our findings suggest that in hypertensive patients, peripheral alpha 2-adrenoceptors are increased with respect to matched normotensives, but these receptors seem not to be involved in the modulation of cardiovascular adaptation to enhanced sympathetic activity

  20. Storage of platelets: effects associated with high platelet content in platelet storage containers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gulliksson, Hans; Sandgren, Per; Sjödin, Agneta; Hultenby, Kjell

    2012-04-01

    A major problem associated with platelet storage containers is that some platelet units show a dramatic fall in pH, especially above certain platelet contents. The aim of this study was a detailed investigation of the different in vitro effects occurring when the maximum storage capacity of a platelet container is exceeded as compared to normal storage. Buffy coats were combined in large-volume containers to create primary pools to be split into two equal aliquots for the preparation of platelets (450-520×10(9) platelets/unit) in SSP+ for 7-day storage in two containers (test and reference) with different platelet storage capacity (n=8). Exceeding the maximum storage capacity of the test platelet storage container resulted in immediate negative effects on platelet metabolism and energy supply, but also delayed effects on platelet function, activation and disintegration. Our study gives a very clear indication of the effects in different phases associated with exceeding the maximum storage capacity of platelet containers but throw little additional light on the mechanism initiating those negative effects. The problem appears to be complex and further studies in different media using different storage containers will be needed to understand the mechanisms involved.

  1. Functional and phenotypic heterogeneity of group 3 innate lymphoid cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Melo-Gonzalez, Felipe; Hepworth, Matthew R

    2017-03-01

    Group 3 innate lymphoid cells (ILC3), defined by expression of the transcription factor retinoid-related orphan receptor γt, play key roles in the regulation of inflammation and immunity in the gastrointestinal tract and associated lymphoid tissues. ILC3 consist largely of two major subsets, NCR + ILC3 and LTi-like ILC3, but also demonstrate significant plasticity and heterogeneity. Recent advances have begun to dissect the relationship between ILC3 subsets and to define distinct functional states within the intestinal tissue microenvironment. In this review we discuss the ever-expanding roles of ILC3 in the context of intestinal homeostasis, infection and inflammation - with a focus on comparing and contrasting the relative contributions of ILC3 subsets. © 2016 The Authors. Immunology published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  2. Platelet-derived-growth-factor-induced signalling in human platelets: phosphoinositide-3-kinase-dependent inhibition of platelet activation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Selheim, F; Fukami, M H; Holmsen, H; Vassbotn, F S

    2000-09-01

    Human platelets release platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF) from alpha-granules during platelet activation. We have previously shown that platelets have PDGF alpha-receptors, a transmembrane tyrosine kinase that takes part in negative feedback regulation during platelet activation. Here we have described a study of PDGF-induced tyrosine phosphorylation of platelet substrates and phosphoinositide 3-kinase (PI-3K) activity in collagen-stimulated platelets. By immunoblotting with phosphotyrosine antibodies of collagen-activated platelets we found that PDGF increased the phosphorylation of several platelet substrates, e.g. pp140, pp120 and pp85. PDGF inhibited collagen-induced platelet activation in the presence of inhibitors of autocrine stimulation, thus blocking the pure collagen-induced signal transduction. PDGF enhanced the collagen-induced formation of PtdIns(3,4)P(2) and PtdIns(3,4,5)P(3) as measured by HPLC. Wortmannin and LY294002, two unrelated inhibitors of PI-3K, were used to investigate the role of PI-3K in PDGF-induced platelet signalling. Incubation of platelets with wortmannin and LY294002 blocked the formation of three phosphorylated inositides as well as the inhibitory effect of PDGF on collagen-induced platelet activation. We conclude that the inhibitory effect of PDGF on platelet activation is PI-3K dependent. This is the first demonstration of a negative regulatory function of 3-phosphorylated inositides in platelets.

  3. Vagal innervation is required for pulmonary function phenotype in Htr4-/- mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    House, John S; Nichols, Cody E; Li, Huiling; Brandenberger, Christina; Virgincar, Rohan S; DeGraff, Laura M; Driehuys, Bastiaan; Zeldin, Darryl C; London, Stephanie J

    2017-04-01

    Human genome-wide association studies have identified over 50 loci associated with pulmonary function and related phenotypes, yet follow-up studies to determine causal genes or variants are rare. Single nucleotide polymorphisms in serotonin receptor 4 ( HTR4 ) are associated with human pulmonary function in genome-wide association studies and follow-up animal work has demonstrated that Htr4 is causally associated with pulmonary function in mice, although the precise mechanisms were not identified. We sought to elucidate the role of neural innervation and pulmonary architecture in the lung phenotype of Htr4 -/- animals. We report here that the Htr4 -/- phenotype in mouse is dependent on vagal innervation to the lung. Both ex vivo tracheal ring reactivity and in vivo flexiVent pulmonary functional analyses demonstrate that vagotomy abrogates the Htr4 -/- airway hyperresponsiveness phenotype. Hyperpolarized 3 He gas magnetic resonance imaging and stereological assessment of wild-type and Htr4 -/- mice reveal no observable differences in lung volume, inflation characteristics, or pulmonary microarchitecture. Finally, control of breathing experiments reveal substantive differences in baseline breathing characteristics between mice with/without functional HTR4 in breathing frequency, relaxation time, flow rate, minute volume, time of inspiration and expiration and breathing pauses. These results suggest that HTR4's role in pulmonary function likely relates to neural innervation and control of breathing. Copyright © 2017 the American Physiological Society.

  4. Association of Canine Osteosarcoma and Monocyte Phenotype and Chemotactic Function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tuohy, J L; Lascelles, B D X; Griffith, E H; Fogle, J E

    2016-07-01

    Monocytes/macrophages are likely key cells in immune modulation in dogs with osteosarcoma (OSA). Increased peripheral monocyte counts are negatively correlated with shorter disease-free intervals in dogs with OSA. Understanding the monocyte/macrophage's modulatory role in dogs with OSA can direct further studies in immunotherapy development for OSA. That OSA evades the immune response by down-regulating monocyte chemokine receptor expression and migratory function, and suppresses host immune responses. Eighteen dogs with OSA that have not received definitive treatment and 14 healthy age-matched controls Clinical study-expression of peripheral blood monocyte cell surface receptors, monocyte mRNA expression and cytokine secretion, monocyte chemotaxis, and survival were compared between clinical dogs with OSA and healthy control dogs. Cell surface expression of multiple chemokine receptors is significantly down-regulated in peripheral blood monocytes of dogs with OSA. The percentage expression of CCR2 (median 58%, range 2-94%) and CXCR2 expression (median 54%, range 2-92%) was higher in control dogs compared to dogs with OSA (CCR2 median 29%, range 3-45%, P = 0.0006; CXCR2 median 23%, range 0.2-52%, P = 0.0007). Prostaglandin E2 (PGE2 ) (OSA, median 347.36 pg/mL, range 103.4-1268.5; control, 136.23 pg/mL, range 69.93-542.6, P = .04) and tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-α) (P = .02) levels are increased in OSA monocyte culture supernatants compared to controls. Peripheral blood monocytes of dogs with OSA exhibit decreased chemotactic function when compared to control dogs (OSA, median 1.2 directed to random migration, range 0.8-1.25; control, 1.6, range of 0.9-1.8, P = .018). Dogs with OSA have decreased monocyte chemokine receptor expression and monocyte chemotaxis, potential mechanisms by which OSA might evade the immune response. Reversal of monocyte dysfunction using immunotherapy could improve survival in dogs with OSA. Copyright © 2016 The Authors. Journal of

  5. Heterogeneity of functional properties of Clone 66 murine breast cancer cells expressing various stem cell phenotypes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mukhopadhyay, Partha; Farrell, Tracy; Sharma, Gayatri; McGuire, Timothy R; O'Kane, Barbara; Sharp, J Graham

    2013-01-01

    Breast cancer grows, metastasizes and relapses from rare, therapy resistant cells with a stem cell phenotype (cancer stem cells/CSCs). However, there is a lack of studies comparing the functions of CSCs isolated using different phenotypes in order to determine if CSCs are homogeneous or heterogeneous. Cells with various stem cell phenotypes were isolated by sorting from Clone 66 murine breast cancer cells that grow orthotopically in immune intact syngeneic mice. These populations were compared by in vitro functional assays for proliferation, growth, sphere and colony formation; and in vivo limiting dilution analysis of tumorigenesis. The proportion of cells expressing CD44(high)CD24(low/neg), side population (SP) cells, ALDH1(+), CD49f(high), CD133(high), and CD34(high) differed, suggesting heterogeneity. Differences in frequency and size of tumor spheres from these populations were observed. Higher rates of proliferation of non-SP, ALDH1(+), CD34(low), and CD49f(high) suggested properties of transit amplifying cells. Colony formation was higher from ALDH1(-) and non-SP cells than ALDH1(+) and SP cells suggesting a progenitor phenotype. The frequency of clonal colonies that grew in agar varied and was differentially altered by the presence of Matrigel™. In vivo, fewer cells with a stem cell phenotype were needed for tumor formation than "non-stem" cells. Fewer SP cells were needed to form tumors than ALDH1(+) cells suggesting further heterogeneities of cells with stem phenotypes. Different levels of cytokines/chemokines were produced by Clone 66 with RANTES being the highest. Whether the heterogeneity reflects soluble factor production remains to be determined. These data demonstrate that Clone 66 murine breast cancer cells that express stem cell phenotypes are heterogeneous and exhibit different functional properties, and this may also be the case for human breast cancer stem cells.

  6. Structural and Functional Phenotyping of the Failing Heart: Is the Left Ventricular Ejection Fraction Obsolete?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bristow, Michael R; Kao, David P; Breathett, Khadijah K; Altman, Natasha L; Gorcsan, John; Gill, Edward A; Lowes, Brian D; Gilbert, Edward M; Quaife, Robert A; Mann, Douglas L

    2017-11-01

    Diagnosis, prognosis, treatment, and development of new therapies for diseases or syndromes depend on a reliable means of identifying phenotypes associated with distinct predictive probabilities for these various objectives. Left ventricular ejection fraction (LVEF) provides the current basis for combined functional and structural phenotyping in heart failure by classifying patients as those with heart failure with reduced ejection fraction (HFrEF) and those with heart failure with preserved ejection fraction (HFpEF). Recently the utility of LVEF as the major phenotypic determinant of heart failure has been challenged based on its load dependency and measurement variability. We review the history of the development and adoption of LVEF as a critical measurement of LV function and structure and demonstrate that, in chronic heart failure, load dependency is not an important practical issue, and we provide hemodynamic and molecular biomarker evidence that LVEF is superior or equal to more unwieldy methods of identifying phenotypes of ventricular remodeling. We conclude that, because it reliably measures both left ventricular function and structure, LVEF remains the best current method of assessing pathologic remodeling in heart failure in both individual clinical and multicenter group settings. Because of the present and future importance of left ventricular phenotyping in heart failure, LVEF should be measured by using the most accurate technology and methodologic refinements available, and improved characterization methods should continue to be sought. Copyright © 2017 American College of Cardiology Foundation. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Salivary gland NK cells are phenotypically and functionally unique.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marlowe S Tessmer

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Natural killer (NK cells and CD8(+ T cells play vital roles in containing and eliminating systemic cytomegalovirus (CMV. However, CMV has a tropism for the salivary gland acinar epithelial cells and persists in this organ for several weeks after primary infection. Here we characterize a distinct NK cell population that resides in the salivary gland, uncommon to any described to date, expressing both mature and immature NK cell markers. Using RORγt reporter mice and nude mice, we also show that the salivary gland NK cells are not lymphoid tissue inducer NK-like cells and are not thymic derived. During the course of murine cytomegalovirus (MCMV infection, we found that salivary gland NK cells detect the infection and acquire activation markers, but have limited capacity to produce IFN-γ and degranulate. Salivary gland NK cell effector functions are not regulated by iNKT or T(reg cells, which are mostly absent in the salivary gland. Additionally, we demonstrate that peripheral NK cells are not recruited to this organ even after the systemic infection has been controlled. Altogether, these results indicate that viral persistence and latency in the salivary glands may be due in part to the presence of unfit NK cells and the lack of recruitment of peripheral NK cells.

  8. Platelet count

    Science.gov (United States)

    The normal number of platelets in the blood is 150,000 to 400,000 platelets per microliter (mcL) or 150 to 400 × 10 9 /L. Normal value ranges may vary slightly. Some lab use different measurements or ...

  9. Effects of combined therapy of traditional Chinese medicine and western medicine on platelets, coagulative functions and inflammatory cytokines with ulcerative colitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yun-Xia Lei

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To explore the effects of combined therapy of traditional Chinese medicine and western medicine on platelets, coagulative functions and inflammatory cytokines in patients with ulcerative colitis (UC. Methods: A total of 267 patients with UC were collected. 137 patients were treated with combined therapy of traditional Chinese medicine and western medicine as experimental group and 130 patients were treated with only western medicine as controls. Platelet count, coagulation function indexes and inflammatory cytokines were measured before and 15 d after the treatment. Results: No significantly differences were found in all indexes before treatment between two groups. After different treatments, platelet count (PLT, platelet distribution width (PDW were significantly decreased in both groups, but mean platelet volumn (MPV were significantly increased than before treatment. PLT and PDW were significantly lower and MPV were significantly higher in experimental group than control group. Fibrinogen (Fib and D-dimer (DD decreased significantly after treatment. Fib and DD in experimental group were significantly lower than controls. No significantly differences were found in activated partial thromboplastin time (APTT and prothrobin time (PT. Tumor necrosisi factor-α (TNF-α, interleukin-6 (IL-6 and interleukin-8 (IL-8 decreased significantly in both group after treatment. TNF-毩, IL-6 and IL-8 were significantly lower in experimental group than controls. Conclusion: Combined therapy of traditional Chinese medicine and western medicine can more effectively improve the cogulation, fibrinolysis and inflammation in patients with UC than only western medicine therapy.

  10. The effect of the perfluorocarbon emulsion Oxycyte on platelet count and function in the treatment of decompression sickness in a swine model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cronin, William A; Senese, Angela L; Arnaud, Francoise G; Regis, David P; Auker, Charles R; Mahon, Richard T

    2016-09-01

    Decompression from elevated ambient pressure is associated with platelet activation and decreased platelet counts. Standard treatment for decompression sickness (DCS) is hyperbaric oxygen therapy. Intravenous perfluorocarbon (PFC) emulsion is a nonrecompressive therapy being examined that improves mortality in animal models of DCS. However, PFC emulsions are associated with a decreased platelet count. We used a swine model of DCS to study the effect of PFC therapy on platelet count, function, and hemostasis. Castrated male swine (n = 50) were fitted with a vascular port, recovered, randomized, and compressed to 180 feet of sea water (fsw) for 31 min followed by decompression at 30 fsw/min. Animals were observed for DCS, administered 100% oxygen, and treated with either emulsified PFC Oxycyte (DCS-PFC) or isotonic saline (DCS-NS). Controls underwent the same procedures, but were not compressed (Sham-PFC and Sham-NS). Measurements of platelet count, thromboelastometry, and coagulation were obtained 1 h before compression and 1, 24, 48, 96, 168 and 192 h after treatment. No significant changes in normalized platelet counts were observed. Prothrombin time was elevated in DCS-PFC from 48 to 192 h compared with DCS-NS, and from 96 to 192 h compared with Sham-PFC. Normalized activated partial thromboplastin time was also elevated in DCS-PFC from 168 to 192 h compared with Sham-PFC. No bleeding events were noted. DCS treated with PFC (Oxycyte) does not impact platelet numbers, whole blood clotting by thromboelastometry, or clinical bleeding. Late changes in prothrombin time and activated partial thromboplastin time associated with PFC use in both DCS therapy and controls warrant further investigation.

  11. Prolonged platelet preservation by transient metabolic suppression

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Badlou, Bahram Alamdary

    2006-01-01

    Introduction: Different clinical studies have shown that transfusion of stored platelets results in better haemostasis in patients with thrombocytopenia with and without a platelet function defect. Objectives: Current preservation procedures aim to optimally preserve the metabolic status of

  12. Insomnia, platelet serotonin and platelet monoamine oxidase in chronic alcoholism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nenadic Sviglin, Korona; Nedic, Gordana; Nikolac, Matea; Mustapic, Maja; Muck-Seler, Dorotea; Borovecki, Fran; Pivac, Nela

    2011-08-18

    Insomnia is a common sleep disorder frequently occurring in chronic alcoholic patients. Neurobiological basis of insomnia, as well as of alcoholism, is associated with disrupted functions of the main neurotransmitter systems, including the serotonin (5-hydroxytryptamine, 5-HT) system. Blood platelets are considered a limited peripheral model for the central 5-HT neurons, since both platelets and central 5-HT synaptosomes have similar dynamics of 5-HT. Platelet 5-HT concentration and platelet monoamine oxidase type B (MAO-B) are assumed to represent biomarkers for particular symptoms and behaviors in psychiatric disorders. The hypothesis of this study was that platelet 5-HT concentration and platelet MAO-B activity will be altered in chronic alcoholic patients with insomnia compared to comparable values in patients without insomnia. The study included 498 subjects: 395 male and 103 female medication-free patients with alcohol dependence and 502 healthy control subjects: 325 men and 177 women. The effects of early, middle and late insomnia (evaluated using the Hamilton Depression Rating Scale), as well as sex, age and smoking on platelet 5-HT concentration and platelet MAO-B activity were evaluated using one-way ANOVA and multiple regression analysis by the stepwise method. Platelet 5-HT concentration, but not platelet MAO-B activity, was significantly reduced in alcoholic patients with insomnia compared to patients without insomnia. Multiple regression analysis revealed that platelet 5-HT concentration was affected by middle insomnia, smoking and sex, while platelet MAO activity was affected only by sex and age. The present and previous data suggest that platelet 5-HT concentration might be used, after controlling for sex and smoking, as a biomarker for insomnia in alcoholism, PTSD and in rotating shift workers. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. A comprehensive proteomics study on platelet concentrates: Platelet proteome, storage time and Mirasol pathogen reduction technology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salunkhe, Vishal; De Cuyper, Iris M; Papadopoulos, Petros; van der Meer, Pieter F; Daal, Brunette B; Villa-Fajardo, María; de Korte, Dirk; van den Berg, Timo K; Gutiérrez, Laura

    2018-03-19

    Platelet concentrates (PCs) represent a blood transfusion product with a major concern for safety as their storage temperature (20-24°C) allows bacterial growth, and their maximum storage time period (less than a week) precludes complete microbiological testing. Pathogen inactivation technologies (PITs) provide an additional layer of safety to the blood transfusion products from known and unknown pathogens such as bacteria, viruses, and parasites. In this context, PITs, such as Mirasol Pathogen Reduction Technology (PRT), have been developed and are implemented in many countries. However, several studies have shown in vitro that Mirasol PRT induces a certain level of platelet shape change, hyperactivation, basal degranulation, and increased oxidative damage during storage. It has been suggested that Mirasol PRT might accelerate what has been described as the platelet storage lesion (PSL), but supportive molecular signatures have not been obtained. We aimed at dissecting the influence of both variables, that is, Mirasol PRT and storage time, at the proteome level. We present comprehensive proteomics data analysis of Control PCs and PCs treated with Mirasol PRT at storage days 1, 2, 6, and 8. Our workflow was set to perform proteomics analysis using a gel-free and label-free quantification (LFQ) approach. Semi-quantification was based on LFQ signal intensities of identified proteins using MaxQuant/Perseus software platform. Data are available via ProteomeXchange with identifier PXD008119. We identified marginal differences between Mirasol PRT and Control PCs during storage. However, those significant changes at the proteome level were specifically related to the functional aspects previously described to affect platelets upon Mirasol PRT. In addition, the effect of Mirasol PRT on the platelet proteome appeared not to be exclusively due to an accelerated or enhanced PSL. In summary, semi-quantitative proteomics allows to discern between proteome changes due to

  14. Genetics and evolution of function-valued traits: understanding environmentally responsive phenotypes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stinchcombe, John R; Kirkpatrick, Mark

    2012-11-01

    Many central questions in ecology and evolutionary biology require characterizing phenotypes that change with time and environmental conditions. Such traits are inherently functions, and new 'function-valued' methods use the order, spacing, and functional nature of the data typically ignored by traditional univariate and multivariate analyses. These rapidly developing methods account for the continuous change in traits of interest in response to other variables, and are superior to traditional summary-based analyses for growth trajectories, morphological shapes, and environmentally sensitive phenotypes. Here, we explain how function-valued methods make flexible use of data and lead to new biological insights. These approaches frequently offer enhanced statistical power, a natural basis of interpretation, and are applicable to many existing data sets. We also illustrate applications of function-valued methods to address ecological, evolutionary, and behavioral hypotheses, and highlight future directions. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Tissue-specific functional networks for prioritizing phenotype and disease genes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuanfang Guan

    Full Text Available Integrated analyses of functional genomics data have enormous potential for identifying phenotype-associated genes. Tissue-specificity is an important aspect of many genetic diseases, reflecting the potentially different roles of proteins and pathways in diverse cell lineages. Accounting for tissue specificity in global integration of functional genomics data is challenging, as "functionality" and "functional relationships" are often not resolved for specific tissue types. We address this challenge by generating tissue-specific functional networks, which can effectively represent the diversity of protein function for more accurate identification of phenotype-associated genes in the laboratory mouse. Specifically, we created 107 tissue-specific functional relationship networks through integration of genomic data utilizing knowledge of tissue-specific gene expression patterns. Cross-network comparison revealed significantly changed genes enriched for functions related to specific tissue development. We then utilized these tissue-specific networks to predict genes associated with different phenotypes. Our results demonstrate that prediction performance is significantly improved through using the tissue-specific networks as compared to the global functional network. We used a testis-specific functional relationship network to predict genes associated with male fertility and spermatogenesis phenotypes, and experimentally confirmed one top prediction, Mbyl1. We then focused on a less-common genetic disease, ataxia, and identified candidates uniquely predicted by the cerebellum network, which are supported by both literature and experimental evidence. Our systems-level, tissue-specific scheme advances over traditional global integration and analyses and establishes a prototype to address the tissue-specific effects of genetic perturbations, diseases and drugs.

  16. GRIN2B encephalopathy : Novel findings on phenotype, variant clustering, functional consequences and treatment aspects

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Platzer, Konrad; Yuan, Hongjie; Schütz, Hannah; Winschel, Alexander; Chen, Wenjuan; Hu, Chun; Kusumoto, Hirofumi; Heyne, Henrike O; Helbig, Katherine L; Tang, Sha; Willing, Marcia C; Tinkle, Brad T; Adams, Darius J; Depienne, Christel; Keren, Boris; Mignot, Cyril; Frengen, Eirik; Strømme, Petter; Biskup, Saskia; Döcker, Dennis; Strom, Tim M.; Mefford, Heather C.; Myers, Candace T.; Muir, Alison M; LaCroix, Amy; Sadleir, Lynette G.; Scheffer, Ingrid E.; Brilstra, Eva; van Haelst, Mieke M.; van der Smagt, Jasper J.; Bok, Levinus A; Møller, Rikke S.; Jensen, Uffe Birk; Millichap, John J; Berg, Anne T; Goldberg, Ethan M; De Bie, Isabelle; Fox, Stephanie; Major, Philippe; Jones, Julie R; Zackai, Elaine H.; Abou Jamra, Rami; Rolfs, Arndt; Leventer, Richard J; Lawson, John A; Roscioli, Tony; Jansen, Floor E.; Ranza, Emmanuelle; Korff, Christian M; Lehesjoki, Anna-Elina; Courage, Carolina; Linnankivi, Tarja; Smith, Douglas R; Stanley, Christine; Mintz, Mark; McKnight, Dianalee; Decker, Amy; Tan, Wen-Hann; Tarnopolsky, Mark A; Brady, Lauren I; Wolff, Markus; Dondit, Lutz; Pedro, Helio F; Parisotto, Sarah E; Jones, Kelly L; Patel, Anup D; Franz, David N; Vanzo, Rena; Marco, Elysa; Ranells, Judith D; Di Donato, Nataliya; Dobyns, William B.; Laube, Bodo; Traynelis, Stephen F; Lemke, Johannes R.

    2017-01-01

    Background: We aimed for a comprehensive delineation of genetic, functional and phenotypic aspects of GRIN2B encephalopathy and explored potential prospects of personalised medicine. Methods: Data of 48 individuals with de novo GRIN2B variants were collected from several diagnostic and research

  17. Phenotypic, functional, and quantitative characterization of canine peripheral blood monocyte-derived macrophages

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R Bueno

    2005-08-01

    Full Text Available The yield as well as phenotypic and functional parameters of canine peripheral blood monocyte-derived macrophages were analyzed. The cells that remained adherent to Teflon after 10 days of culture had high phagocytic activity when inoculated with Leishmania chagasi. Flow cytometric analysis demonstrated that more than 80% of cultured cells were positive for the monocyte/macrophage marker CD14.

  18. Abnormalities of lymphocyte function and phenotypic pattern in a case of toxic epidermal necrolysis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hagdrup, H; Tønnesen, E; Clemmensen, O

    1992-01-01

    We examined the blood lymphocyte function and phenotypic pattern in a patient with toxic epidermal necrolysis after taking salazopyrin. We studied cell surface markers, natural killer cell activity and mitogen-induced lymphocyte transformation. Our results point to temporary immunosuppression...... as evidenced by lymphopenia with a large "null cell" population, reduced natural killer cell activity, and impaired lymphocyte response to mitogens....

  19. In vitro atrazine exposure affects the phenotypic and functional maturation of dendritic cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pinchuk, Lesya M.; Lee, Sang-Ryul; Filipov, Nikolay M.

    2007-01-01

    Recent data suggest that some of the immunotoxic effects of the herbicide atrazine, a very widely used pesticide, may be due to perturbations in dendritic cell (DC) function. As consequences of atrazine exposure on the phenotypic and functional maturation of DC have not been studied, our objective was, using the murine DC line, JAWSII, to determine whether atrazine will interfere with DC maturation. First, we characterized the maturation of JAWSII cells in vitro by inducing them to mature in the presence of growth factors and selected maturational stimuli in vitro. Next, we exposed the DC cell line to a concentration range of atrazine and examined its effects on phenotypic and functional maturation of DC. Atrazine exposure interfered with the phenotypic and functional maturation of DC at non-cytotoxic concentrations. Among the phenotypic changes caused by atrazine exposure was a dose-dependent removal of surface MHC-I with a significant decrease being observed at 1 μM concentration. In addition, atrazine exposure decreased the expression of the costimulatory molecule CD86 and it downregulated the expression of the CD11b and CD11c accessory molecules and the myeloid developmental marker CD14. When, for comparative purposes, we exposed primary thymic DC to atrazine, MHC-I and CD11c expression was also decreased. Phenotypic changes in JAWSII DC maturation were associated with functional inhibition of maturation as, albeit at higher concentrations, receptor-mediated antigen uptake was increased by atrazine. Thus, our data suggest that atrazine directly targets DC maturation and that toxicants such as atrazine that efficiently remove MHC-I molecules from the DC surface are likely to contribute to immune evasion

  20. Proteomic analysis uncovers a metabolic phenotype in C. elegans after nhr-40 reduction of function

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pohludka, Michal; Simeckova, Katerina; Vohanka, Jaroslav; Yilma, Petr; Novak, Petr; Krause, Michael W.; Kostrouchova, Marta; Kostrouch, Zdenek

    2008-01-01

    Caenorhabditis elegans has an unexpectedly large number (284) of genes encoding nuclear hormone receptors, most of which are nematode-specific and are of unknown function. We have exploited comparative two-dimensional chromatography of synchronized cultures of wild type C. elegans larvae and a mutant in nhr-40 to determine if proteomic approaches will provide additional insight into gene function. Chromatofocusing, followed by reversed-phase chromatography and mass spectrometry, identified altered chromatographic patterns for a set of proteins, many of which function in muscle and metabolism. Prompted by the proteomic analysis, we find that the penetrance of the developmental phenotypes in the mutant is enhanced at low temperatures and by food restriction. The combination of our phenotypic and proteomic analysis strongly suggests that NHR-40 provides a link between metabolism and muscle development. Our results highlight the utility of comparative two-dimensional chromatography to provide a relatively rapid method to gain insight into gene function

  1. Mutations in RIT1 cause Noonan syndrome - additional functional evidence and expanding the clinical phenotype.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koenighofer, M; Hung, C Y; McCauley, J L; Dallman, J; Back, E J; Mihalek, I; Gripp, K W; Sol-Church, K; Rusconi, P; Zhang, Z; Shi, G-X; Andres, D A; Bodamer, O A

    2016-03-01

    RASopathies are a clinically heterogeneous group of conditions caused by mutations in 1 of 16 proteins in the RAS-mitogen activated protein kinase (RAS-MAPK) pathway. Recently, mutations in RIT1 were identified as a novel cause for Noonan syndrome. Here we provide additional functional evidence for a causal role of RIT1 mutations and expand the associated phenotypic spectrum. We identified two de novo missense variants p.Met90Ile and p.Ala57Gly. Both variants resulted in increased MEK-ERK signaling compared to wild-type, underscoring gain-of-function as the primary functional mechanism. Introduction of p.Met90Ile and p.Ala57Gly into zebrafish embryos reproduced not only aspects of the human phenotype but also revealed abnormalities of eye development, emphasizing the importance of RIT1 for spatial and temporal organization of the growing organism. In addition, we observed severe lymphedema of the lower extremity and genitalia in one patient. We provide additional evidence for a causal relationship between pathogenic mutations in RIT1, increased RAS-MAPK/MEK-ERK signaling and the clinical phenotype. The mutant RIT1 protein may possess reduced GTPase activity or a diminished ability to interact with cellular GTPase activating proteins; however the precise mechanism remains unknown. The phenotypic spectrum is likely to expand and includes lymphedema of the lower extremities in addition to nuchal hygroma. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  2. Role of dystrophin in airway smooth muscle phenotype, contraction and lung function.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pawan Sharma

    Full Text Available Dystrophin links the transmembrane dystrophin-glycoprotein complex to the actin cytoskeleton. We have shown that dystrophin-glycoprotein complex subunits are markers for airway smooth muscle phenotype maturation and together with caveolin-1, play an important role in calcium homeostasis. We tested if dystrophin affects phenotype maturation, tracheal contraction and lung physiology. We used dystrophin deficient Golden Retriever dogs (GRMD and mdx mice vs healthy control animals in our approach. We found significant reduction of contractile protein markers: smooth muscle myosin heavy chain (smMHC and calponin and reduced Ca2+ response to contractile agonist in dystrophin deficient cells. Immunocytochemistry revealed reduced stress fibers and number of smMHC positive cells in dystrophin-deficient cells, when compared to control. Immunoblot analysis of Akt1, GSK3β and mTOR phosphorylation further revealed that downstream PI3K signaling, which is essential for phenotype maturation, was suppressed in dystrophin deficient cell cultures. Tracheal rings from mdx mice showed significant reduction in the isometric contraction to methacholine (MCh when compared to genetic control BL10ScSnJ mice (wild-type. In vivo lung function studies using a small animal ventilator revealed a significant reduction in peak airway resistance induced by maximum concentrations of inhaled MCh in mdx mice, while there was no change in other lung function parameters. These data show that the lack of dystrophin is associated with a concomitant suppression of ASM cell phenotype maturation in vitro, ASM contraction ex vivo and lung function in vivo, indicating that a linkage between the DGC and the actin cytoskeleton via dystrophin is a determinant of the phenotype and functional properties of ASM.

  3. Platelet Donation

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... During your donation you can relax, watch a movie, listen to music…in a few hours you’ ... requirements may become eligible to donate platelets. Please review our eligibility requirements as some states require parental ...

  4. The Antidepressant 5-HT2A Receptor Antagonists Pizotifen and Cyproheptadine Inhibit Serotonin-Enhanced Platelet Function

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Olivia A.; Karim, Zubair A.; Vemana, Hari Priya; Espinosa, Enma V. P.; Khasawneh, Fadi T.

    2014-01-01

    There is considerable interest in defining new agents or targets for antithrombotic purposes. The 5-HT2A receptor is a G-protein coupled receptor (GPCR) expressed on many cell types, and a known therapeutic target for many disease states. This serotonin receptor is also known to regulate platelet function. Thus, in our FDA-approved drug repurposing efforts, we investigated the antiplatelet activity of cyproheptadine and pizotifen, two antidepressant 5-HT2A Receptor antagonists. Our results revealed that cyproheptadine and pizotifen reversed serotonin-enhanced ADP-induced platelet aggregation in vitro and ex vivo. And the inhibitory effects of these two agents were found to be similar to that of EMD 281014, a 5-HT2A Receptor antagonist under development. In separate experiments, our studies revealed that these 5-HT2A receptor antagonists have the capacity to reduce serotonin-enhanced ADP-induced elevation in intracellular calcium levels and tyrosine phosphorylation. Using flow cytometry, we also observed that cyproheptadine, pizotifen, and EMD 281014 inhibited serotonin-enhanced ADP-induced phosphatidylserine (PS) exposure, P-selectin expression, and glycoprotein IIb-IIIa activation. Furthermore, using a carotid artery thrombosis model, these agents prolonged the time for thrombotic occlusion in mice in vivo. Finally, the tail-bleeding time was investigated to assess the effect of cyproheptadine and pizotifen on hemostasis. Our findings indicated prolonged bleeding time in both cyproheptadine- and pizotifen-treated mice. Notably, the increases in occlusion and bleeding times associated with these two agents were comparable to that of EMD 281014, and to clopidogrel, a commonly used antiplatelet drug, again, in a fashion comparable to clopidogrel and EMD 281014. Collectively, our data indicate that the antidepressant 5-HT2A antagonists, cyproheptadine and pizotifen do exert antiplatelet and thromboprotective effects, but similar to clopidogrel and EMD 281014, their

  5. Analysis of mammalian gene function through broad-based phenotypic screens across a consortium of mouse clinics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Angelis, Martin Hrabě; Nicholson, George; Selloum, Mohammed; White, Jacqui; Morgan, Hugh; Ramirez-Solis, Ramiro; Sorg, Tania; Wells, Sara; Fuchs, Helmut; Fray, Martin; Adams, David J; Adams, Niels C; Adler, Thure; Aguilar-Pimentel, Antonio; Ali-Hadji, Dalila; Amann, Gregory; André, Philippe; Atkins, Sarah; Auburtin, Aurelie; Ayadi, Abdel; Becker, Julien; Becker, Lore; Bedu, Elodie; Bekeredjian, Raffi; Birling, Marie-Christine; Blake, Andrew; Bottomley, Joanna; Bowl, Mike; Brault, Véronique; Busch, Dirk H; Bussell, James N; Calzada-Wack, Julia; Cater, Heather; Champy, Marie-France; Charles, Philippe; Chevalier, Claire; Chiani, Francesco; Codner, Gemma F; Combe, Roy; Cox, Roger; Dalloneau, Emilie; Dierich, André; Di Fenza, Armida; Doe, Brendan; Duchon, Arnaud; Eickelberg, Oliver; Esapa, Chris T; El Fertak, Lahcen; Feigel, Tanja; Emelyanova, Irina; Estabel, Jeanne; Favor, Jack; Flenniken, Ann; Gambadoro, Alessia; Garrett, Lilian; Gates, Hilary; Gerdin, Anna-Karin; Gkoutos, George; Greenaway, Simon; Glasl, Lisa; Goetz, Patrice; Da Cruz, Isabelle Goncalves; Götz, Alexander; Graw, Jochen; Guimond, Alain; Hans, Wolfgang; Hicks, Geoff; Hölter, Sabine M; Höfler, Heinz; Hancock, John M; Hoehndorf, Robert; Hough, Tertius; Houghton, Richard; Hurt, Anja; Ivandic, Boris; Jacobs, Hughes; Jacquot, Sylvie; Jones, Nora; Karp, Natasha A; Katus, Hugo A; Kitchen, Sharon; Klein-Rodewald, Tanja; Klingenspor, Martin; Klopstock, Thomas; Lalanne, Valerie; Leblanc, Sophie; Lengger, Christoph; le Marchand, Elise; Ludwig, Tonia; Lux, Aline; McKerlie, Colin; Maier, Holger; Mandel, Jean-Louis; Marschall, Susan; Mark, Manuel; Melvin, David G; Meziane, Hamid; Micklich, Kateryna; Mittelhauser, Christophe; Monassier, Laurent; Moulaert, David; Muller, Stéphanie; Naton, Beatrix; Neff, Frauke; Nolan, Patrick M; Nutter, Lauryl Mj; Ollert, Markus; Pavlovic, Guillaume; Pellegata, Natalia S; Peter, Emilie; Petit-Demoulière, Benoit; Pickard, Amanda; Podrini, Christine; Potter, Paul; Pouilly, Laurent; Puk, Oliver; Richardson, David; Rousseau, Stephane; Quintanilla-Fend, Leticia; Quwailid, Mohamed M; Racz, Ildiko; Rathkolb, Birgit; Riet, Fabrice; Rossant, Janet; Roux, Michel; Rozman, Jan; Ryder, Ed; Salisbury, Jennifer; Santos, Luis; Schäble, Karl-Heinz; Schiller, Evelyn; Schrewe, Anja; Schulz, Holger; Steinkamp, Ralf; Simon, Michelle; Stewart, Michelle; Stöger, Claudia; Stöger, Tobias; Sun, Minxuan; Sunter, David; Teboul, Lydia; Tilly, Isabelle; Tocchini-Valentini, Glauco P; Tost, Monica; Treise, Irina; Vasseur, Laurent; Velot, Emilie; Vogt-Weisenhorn, Daniela; Wagner, Christelle; Walling, Alison; Weber, Bruno; Wendling, Olivia; Westerberg, Henrik; Willershäuser, Monja; Wolf, Eckhard; Wolter, Anne; Wood, Joe; Wurst, Wolfgang; Yildirim, Ali Önder; Zeh, Ramona; Zimmer, Andreas; Zimprich, Annemarie; Holmes, Chris; Steel, Karen P; Herault, Yann; Gailus-Durner, Valérie; Mallon, Ann-Marie; Brown, Steve Dm

    2015-09-01

    The function of the majority of genes in the mouse and human genomes remains unknown. The mouse embryonic stem cell knockout resource provides a basis for the characterization of relationships between genes and phenotypes. The EUMODIC consortium developed and validated robust methodologies for the broad-based phenotyping of knockouts through a pipeline comprising 20 disease-oriented platforms. We developed new statistical methods for pipeline design and data analysis aimed at detecting reproducible phenotypes with high power. We acquired phenotype data from 449 mutant alleles, representing 320 unique genes, of which half had no previous functional annotation. We captured data from over 27,000 mice, finding that 83% of the mutant lines are phenodeviant, with 65% demonstrating pleiotropy. Surprisingly, we found significant differences in phenotype annotation according to zygosity. New phenotypes were uncovered for many genes with previously unknown function, providing a powerful basis for hypothesis generation and further investigation in diverse systems.

  6. Heterogeneity of rabbit platelets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Karpatkin, S.

    1978-01-01

    Rabbits were injected intravenously with a cohort platelet label, 75 Se-selenomethionine. Platelet-rich plasma was separated into five different platelet density fractions on each of seven days by repetitively centrifuging the same sample of platelet-rich plasma at increasing gravitational force. The heaviest platelet sediment fraction was enriched with larger platelets. The lightest platelet sediment fraction was enriched with smaller platelets. Incorporation of isotope into the heaviest platelet fraction was considerably greater than incorporation into the lightest platelet fraction. The mean platelet survival of the lightest two fractions was significantly shorter than that of the heaviest three fractions. SDS-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis of the platelet cell sap generally revealed 10 prominent protein bands for the heaviest platelet fractions. The lightest platelet fraction had six absent to markedly diminished platelet proteins. The data are compatible with two models, (1) heavy-large platelets are, on average, young platelets which become lighter-smaller platelets while losing platelet membranes and cell sap components with time. (2) Heavy-large platelets and light-small platelets are produced independently by specific megakarocytes. The heavy-large platelets incorporate more isotope that lighter-smaller platelets (possibly because of their megakarocyte precursor). However, they are released earlier into the circulation than lighter-smaller platelets and are therefore younger platelets. The light-smaller platelets which are released later into the circulation have a shorter survival. (author)

  7. Superoxide dismutase of human platelets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kimura, Akiro; Fujimura, Kingo; Kuramoto, Atsushi

    1979-01-01

    Superoxide dismutase (S.O.D.) is the enzyme to protect from destructive effect of superoxide (O 2 -) produced in many metabolic pathways related to oxygen. The purpose of this study was to investigate the possibility that S.O.D. may play an important role in the platelet function. The cytoplasmic and mitochondrial S.O.D. has been investigated spectrophotometrically and gel electrophoretically in human platelets from eleven patients of chronic myelogenous leukemia (CML) and three patients of primary thrombocythemia (P.Th.). Neither deficiency nor abnormality of cytoplasmic and mitochondrial S.O.D. has been found electrophoretically in any case compared to normal platelets. However, the total activity from three of the CML patients and one of the P.Th. patients were above 3 unit/mg platelet protein (normal subject: 2.11 - 2.70 unit/mg protein), suggesting the possibility either that more O 2 -production occurs in the platelets or that rather little O 2 -production due to much O 2 -deprivation by the increased S.O.D. The S.O.D. activity of human platelets has been also investigated in several conditions, where much O 2 -generation might occur in platelets. Sodium fluoride (2 mM), which increases platelet O 2 -production about 3 fold, had no effect on platelet S.O.D. The aggregated platelets induced by ADP (10 -5 M), epinephrin (50 μg/ml), ristocetin (1.5 mg/ml) or collagen (1 - 20 μg/ml) had no increase of S.O.D. activity compared to that from non aggregated platelets. X-ray irradiation (1,000 - 20,000R) had not induced its activity increase or decrease. These findings indicated the induction of platelet S.O.D. was not brought about under these conditions. (author)

  8. Potential fluid mechanic pathways of platelet activation

    OpenAIRE

    Shadden, Shawn C.; Hendabadi, Sahar

    2012-01-01

    Platelet activation is a precursor for blood clotting, which plays leading roles in many vascular complications and causes of death. Platelets can be activated by chemical or mechanical stimuli. Mechanically, platelet activation has been shown to be a function of elevated shear stress and exposure time. These contributions can be combined by considering the cumulative stress or strain on a platelet as it is transported. Here we develop a framework for computing a hemodynamic-based activation ...

  9. Platelet activation in outpatients undergoing esophagogastroduodenoscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sagripanti, A.; Polloni, A.; Materazzi, F.; Ferdeghini, M.; Pinori, E.; Bianchi, R.

    1989-01-01

    To evaluate the influence of emotional stress on platelet function mesured by radioimmunoassay in plasma two platelet factor 4, in a series of outpatients undergoing esophagogastroduodenoscopy for upper digestive complaints has been measured. The plasma levels of β-thromboglobulin and platelet factor 4, determined just before the instrumental examination, were significantly more elevated as compared to basal values, checked a week later. These results provide evidence of enhanced in vivo platelet release reaction during emotional stress

  10. Platelet antibodies blood test

    Science.gov (United States)

    This blood test shows if you have antibodies against platelets in your blood. Platelets are a part of the blood ... Chernecky CC, Berger BJ. Platelet antibody - blood. In: Chernecky ... caused by platelet destruction, hypersplenism, or hemodilution. ...

  11. Specific Inflammatory Stimuli Lead to Distinct Platelet Responses in Mice and Humans.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lea M Beaulieu

    Full Text Available Diverse and multi-factorial processes contribute to the progression of cardiovascular disease. These processes affect cells involved in the development of this disease in varying ways, ultimately leading to atherothrombosis. The goal of our study was to compare the differential effects of specific stimuli--two bacterial infections and a Western diet--on platelet responses in ApoE-/- mice, specifically examining inflammatory function and gene expression. Results from murine studies were verified using platelets from participants of the Framingham Heart Study (FHS; n = 1819 participants.Blood and spleen samples were collected at weeks 1 and 9 from ApoE-/- mice infected with Porphyromonas gingivalis or Chlamydia pneumoniae and from mice fed a Western diet for 9 weeks. Transcripts based on data from a Western diet in ApoE-/- mice were measured in platelet samples from FHS using high throughput qRT-PCR.At week 1, both bacterial infections increased circulating platelet-neutrophil aggregates. At week 9, these cells individually localized to the spleen, while Western diet resulted in increased platelet-neutrophil aggregates in the spleen only. Microarray analysis of platelet RNA from infected or Western diet-fed mice at week 1 and 9 showed differential profiles. Genes, such as Serpina1a, Ttr, Fgg, Rpl21, and Alb, were uniquely affected by infection and diet. Results were reinforced in platelets obtained from participants of the FHS.Using both human studies and animal models, results demonstrate that variable sources of inflammatory stimuli have the ability to influence the platelet phenotype in distinct ways, indicative of the diverse function of platelets in thrombosis, hemostasis, and immunity.

  12. Platelet aggregation following trauma

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Windeløv, Nis A; Sørensen, Anne M; Perner, Anders

    2014-01-01

    We aimed to elucidate platelet function in trauma patients, as it is pivotal for hemostasis yet remains scarcely investigated in this population. We conducted a prospective observational study of platelet aggregation capacity in 213 adult trauma patients on admission to an emergency department (ED...... severity score (ISS) was 17; 14 (7%) patients received 10 or more units of red blood cells in the ED (massive transfusion); 24 (11%) patients died within 28 days of trauma: 17 due to cerebral injuries, four due to exsanguination, and three from other causes. No significant association was found between...... aggregation response and ISS. Higher TRAP values were associated with death due to cerebral injuries (P 

  13. Functional specialization and phenotypic generalization in the pollination system of an epiphytic cactus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cristiane Martins

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Plant-pollinator interactions range from obligatory specialists to facultative generalists, and floral morphology and pollination system may not match completely. The floral biology, reproductive system and floral visitors of a species of the tribe Rhipsalideae were investigated with a focus on the consistency between the pollination system and the floral phenotype. Rhipsalis neves-armondii is an obligate xenogamous species, due to self-sterility. Its flowers are white, small and diurnal, and radially symmetrical. These features, along with their small amount of nectar, characterize the flowers as phenotypic generalists. The most frequent pollinators were a solitary oligolectic species of Andrenidae (Rhophitulus solani, two species of Meliponinae (Trigona spinipes and T. braueri and Apis mellifera. Despite the generalist floral phenotype, the pollination system is functionally specialized, since only small bees performed effective visits. Flowers of R. neves-armondii may represent a case of cryptic floral specialization in which attributes other than morphology act as filters, restricting them to a single functional group of pollinators. Moreover, the four most frequent species of pollinators cover a spectrum ranging from solitary oligolectic to social polylectic bees, including an exotic species. These results illustrate the distinct dimensions of specialization-generalization that may occur in the pollination process of a single species.

  14. Does calcium channel blockade and beta-adrenergic blockade affect platelet function and fibrinolysis to a varying degree?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fornitz, Gitte Gleerup; Mehlsen, J; Winther, K

    1995-01-01

    as the fast-acting inhibitor against tissue plasminogen activator usually termed PAI-1. During atenolol and isradipine therapy, blood pressure (BP) was equally reduced (p ... tended to improve fibrinolysis, as shown by a decrease in PAI, 1 h after exercise. Reducing BP with isradipine or atenolol results in a similar decrease in platelet activity and PAI-level, tested at rest and 1 h after rest, respectively. During exercise, platelet activity increased during atenolol...

  15. Physiopathology of blood platelets and development of platelet substitutes. Progress report, August 1, 1975--July 31, 1976

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baldini, M G

    1976-04-28

    Progress is reported on studies on the physiology of blood platelets in thrombocytopenic patients and rabbits. Methods for the detection of platelet antibodies and the preservation of platelets in vitro were investigated. Studies on the effect of low doses of x irradiation (up to 1000 R) on platelet function indicate that platelets exposed to ionizing radiation have increased functional activity. A list is included of publications that report the results of the studies in detail.

  16. Physiopathology of blood platelets and development of platelet substitutes. Progress report, August 1, 1975--July 31, 1976

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baldini, M.G.

    1976-01-01

    Progress is reported on studies on the physiology of blood platelets in thrombocytopenic patients and rabbits. Methods for the detection of platelet antibodies and the preservation of platelets in vitro were investigated. Studies on the effect of low doses of x irradiation (up to 1000 R) on platelet function indicate that platelets exposed to ionizing radiation have increased functional activity. A list is included of publications that report the results of the studies in detail

  17. Platelet function testing to predict hyporesponsiveness to clopidogrel in patients with chest pain seen in the emergency department

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sharma RK

    2013-05-01

    -insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus and African American race were the strongest predictors of hyporesponsiveness to clopidogrel, followed by gender and age. Keywords: clopidogrel, platelet function testing, chest pain, emergency department

  18. Electrochemical and anticorrosion behaviors of hybrid functionalized graphite nano-platelets/tripolyphosphate in epoxy-coated carbon steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mohammadi, Somayeh; Shariatpanahi, Homeira; Taromi, Faramarz Afshar; Neshati, Jaber

    2016-01-01

    Highlights: • FGNP was combined with TPP to obtain a hybrid nano-particle. • TEM image showed uniform distribution of the hybrid nanoparticles in epoxy coating. • FGNP is a substrate for linking of TPP anions by hydrogen bonding. • FGNP as an accelerator, provides rapid iron phosphate passive film formation. • The hybrid nano-particle can provide long-term corrosion protection. - Abstract: Functionalized graphite nano-platelets (FGNP) were combined with tripolyphosphate (TPP) to gain a hybrid nano-particle (FGNP-TPP) with homogenous dispersion in epoxy, resulting in an excellent anti-corrosion coating for carbon steel substrate. Characterization analyses of the hybrid nano-particle were performed by FT-IR, SEM, XRD and TEM. TPP was linked to FGNP nano-particles by hydrogen bondings. Different epoxy coatings formulated with 1 wt.% of FGNP, FGNP-TPP and TPP were evaluated. Electrochemical investigations, salt spray and pull-off tests showed that the hybrid nano-particle can provide long-term corrosion protection compared to FGNP and TPP due to synergistic effect between FGNP as an accelerator and TPP as a corrosion inhibitor to produce a uniform and stable iron-phosphate passive film with high surface coverage.

  19. Evaluation of platelet number and function and fibrinogen level in patients bitten by snakes of the Bothrops genus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fábio Cardoso Luan

    1995-03-01

    Full Text Available Platelet function and plasma fibrinogen levels were evaluated in 14 patients, 10 males and 4females, aged 13-59years bitten by Bothrops genus snakes. There was a statistical difference (p Foram avaliadas a função plaquetária e os níveis séricos de fibrinogênio em 14 doentes picados por serpentes do gênero Bothrops, sendo 10 do sexo masculino e 4 do sexo feminino, com idades compreendidas entre 13 e 59 anos. Houve diferença estatística (p < 0,05 entre os níveis séricos defibrinogênio avaliados 24 e 48 horas após o acidente. Houve tendência à normalização após 48 horas do tratamento. A plaquetopenia foi evidente nas avaliações de 24 e 48 horas. Houve tendência à nomalização no 8o dia após o tratamento (p <0,05. Os níveis de produtos de degradação defibrina (PDF mostraram-se alterados em 83,33 % dos pacientes avaliados. Os autores sugerem que a hipoagregação esteja relacionada com níveis baixos de fibrinogênio e elevados de PDF.

  20. Electrochemical and anticorrosion behaviors of hybrid functionalized graphite nano-platelets/tripolyphosphate in epoxy-coated carbon steel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mohammadi, Somayeh, E-mail: somaye.mohammadi32@aut.ac.ir [Department of Chemistry, Amirkabir University of Technology, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Shariatpanahi, Homeira [Corrosion Department, Research Institute of Petroleum Industry (RIPI), P.O. Box 18745-4163, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Taromi, Faramarz Afshar [Department of Polymer Engineering, Amirkabir University of Technology, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Neshati, Jaber [Corrosion Department, Research Institute of Petroleum Industry (RIPI), P.O. Box 18745-4163, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2016-08-15

    Highlights: • FGNP was combined with TPP to obtain a hybrid nano-particle. • TEM image showed uniform distribution of the hybrid nanoparticles in epoxy coating. • FGNP is a substrate for linking of TPP anions by hydrogen bonding. • FGNP as an accelerator, provides rapid iron phosphate passive film formation. • The hybrid nano-particle can provide long-term corrosion protection. - Abstract: Functionalized graphite nano-platelets (FGNP) were combined with tripolyphosphate (TPP) to gain a hybrid nano-particle (FGNP-TPP) with homogenous dispersion in epoxy, resulting in an excellent anti-corrosion coating for carbon steel substrate. Characterization analyses of the hybrid nano-particle were performed by FT-IR, SEM, XRD and TEM. TPP was linked to FGNP nano-particles by hydrogen bondings. Different epoxy coatings formulated with 1 wt.% of FGNP, FGNP-TPP and TPP were evaluated. Electrochemical investigations, salt spray and pull-off tests showed that the hybrid nano-particle can provide long-term corrosion protection compared to FGNP and TPP due to synergistic effect between FGNP as an accelerator and TPP as a corrosion inhibitor to produce a uniform and stable iron-phosphate passive film with high surface coverage.

  1. Platelet Donation

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... time’ to unwind from the daily stresses of life while helping save lives. What are the benefits to donating platelets? Knowing you’re helping cancer ... of your arm. That pinch is similar to what you will feel when the needle is ... compared to a traditional whole blood donation so some donors find it to ...

  2. COPD phenotypes on computed tomography and its correlation with selected lung function variables in severe patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    da Silva SMD

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Silvia Maria Doria da Silva, Ilma Aparecida Paschoal, Eduardo Mello De Capitani, Marcos Mello Moreira, Luciana Campanatti Palhares, Mônica Corso PereiraPneumology Service, Department of Internal Medicine, School of Medical Sciences, State University of Campinas (UNICAMP, Campinas, São Paulo, BrazilBackground: Computed tomography (CT phenotypic characterization helps in understanding the clinical diversity of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD patients, but its clinical relevance and its relationship with functional features are not clarified. Volumetric capnography (VC uses the principle of gas washout and analyzes the pattern of CO2 elimination as a function of expired volume. The main variables analyzed were end-tidal concentration of carbon dioxide (ETCO2, Slope of phase 2 (Slp2, and Slope of phase 3 (Slp3 of capnogram, the curve which represents the total amount of CO2 eliminated by the lungs during each breath.Objective: To investigate, in a group of patients with severe COPD, if the phenotypic analysis by CT could identify different subsets of patients, and if there was an association of CT findings and functional variables.Subjects and methods: Sixty-five patients with COPD Gold III–IV were admitted for clinical evaluation, high-resolution CT, and functional evaluation (spirometry, 6-minute walk test [6MWT], and VC. The presence and profusion of tomography findings were evaluated, and later, the patients were identified as having emphysema (EMP or airway disease (AWD phenotype. EMP and AWD groups were compared; tomography findings scores were evaluated versus spirometric, 6MWT, and VC variables.Results: Bronchiectasis was found in 33.8% and peribronchial thickening in 69.2% of the 65 patients. Structural findings of airways had no significant correlation with spirometric variables. Air trapping and EMP were strongly correlated with VC variables, but in opposite directions. There was some overlap between the EMP and AWD

  3. Phenotypic and Functional Alterations in Circulating Memory CD8 T Cells with Time after Primary Infection.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matthew D Martin

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Memory CD8 T cells confer increased protection to immune hosts upon secondary viral, bacterial, and parasitic infections. The level of protection provided depends on the numbers, quality (functional ability, and location of memory CD8 T cells present at the time of infection. While primary memory CD8 T cells can be maintained for the life of the host, the full extent of phenotypic and functional changes that occur over time after initial antigen encounter remains poorly characterized. Here we show that critical properties of circulating primary memory CD8 T cells, including location, phenotype, cytokine production, maintenance, secondary proliferation, secondary memory generation potential, and mitochondrial function change with time after infection. Interestingly, phenotypic and functional alterations in the memory population are not due solely to shifts in the ratio of effector (CD62Llo and central memory (CD62Lhi cells, but also occur within defined CD62Lhi memory CD8 T cell subsets. CD62Lhi memory cells retain the ability to efficiently produce cytokines with time after infection. However, while it is was not formally tested whether changes in CD62Lhi memory CD8 T cells over time occur in a cell intrinsic manner or are due to selective death and/or survival, the gene expression profiles of CD62Lhi memory CD8 T cells change, phenotypic heterogeneity decreases, and mitochondrial function and proliferative capacity in either a lymphopenic environment or in response to antigen re-encounter increase with time. Importantly, and in accordance with their enhanced proliferative and metabolic capabilities, protection provided against chronic LCMV clone-13 infection increases over time for both circulating memory CD8 T cell populations and for CD62Lhi memory cells. Taken together, the data in this study reveal that memory CD8 T cells continue to change with time after infection and suggest that the outcome of vaccination strategies designed to elicit

  4. Functional Coding Variation in Recombinant Inbred Mouse Lines Reveals Novel Serotonin Transporter-Associated Phenotypes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Carneiro, Ana [Vanderbilt University; Airey, David [University of Tennessee Health Science Center, Memphis; Thompson, Brent [Vanderbilt University; Zhu, C [Vanderbilt University; Rinchik, Eugene M [ORNL; Lu, Lu [University of Tennessee Health Science Center, Memphis; Chesler, Elissa J [ORNL; Erikson, Keith [University of North Carolina; Blakely, Randy [Vanderbilt University

    2009-01-01

    The human serotonin (5-hydroxytryptamine, 5-HT) transporter (hSERT, SLC6A4) figures prominently in the etiology or treatment of many prevalent neurobehavioral disorders including anxiety, alcoholism, depression, autism and obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD). Here we utilize naturally occurring polymorphisms in recombinant inbred (RI) lines to identify novel phenotypes associated with altered SERT function. The widely used mouse strain C57BL/6J, harbors a SERT haplotype defined by two nonsynonymous coding variants (Gly39 and Lys152 (GK)). At these positions, many other mouse lines, including DBA/2J, encode Glu39 and Arg152 (ER haplotype), assignments found also in hSERT. Synaptosomal 5-HT transport studies revealed reduced uptake associated with the GK variant. Heterologous expression studies confirmed a reduced SERT turnover rate for the GK variant. Experimental and in silico approaches using RI lines (C57Bl/6J X DBA/2J=BXD) identifies multiple anatomical, biochemical and behavioral phenotypes specifically impacted by GK/ER variation. Among our findings are multiple traits associated with anxiety and alcohol consumption, as well as of the control of dopamine (DA) signaling. Further bioinformatic analysis of BXD phenotypes, combined with biochemical evaluation of SERT knockout mice, nominates SERT-dependent 5-HT signaling as a major determinant of midbrain iron homeostasis that, in turn, dictates ironregulated DA phenotypes. Our studies provide a novel example of the power of coordinated in vitro, in vivo and in silico approaches using murine RI lines to elucidate and quantify the system-level impact of gene variation.

  5. Functional variants of the dopamine receptor D2 gene modulate prefronto-striatal phenotypes in schizophrenia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bertolino, Alessandro; Fazio, Leonardo; Caforio, Grazia; Blasi, Giuseppe; Rampino, Antonio; Romano, Raffaella; Di Giorgio, Annabella; Taurisano, Paolo; Papp, Audrey; Pinsonneault, Julia; Wang, Danxin; Nardini, Marcello; Popolizio, Teresa; Sadee, Wolfgang

    2009-02-01

    Dopamine D2 receptor signalling is strongly implicated in the aetiology of schizophrenia. We have recently characterized the function of three DRD2 SNPs: rs12364283 in the promoter affecting total D2 mRNA expression; rs2283265 and rs1076560, respectively in introns 5 and 6, shifting mRNA splicing to two functionally distinct isoforms, the short form of D2 (D2S) and the long form (D2L). These two isoforms differentially contribute to dopamine signalling in prefrontal cortex and in striatum. We performed a case-control study to determine association of these variants and of their main haplotypes with several schizophrenia-related phenotypes. We demonstrate that the minor allele in the intronic variants is associated with reduced expression of %D2S of total mRNA in post-mortem prefrontal cortex, and with impaired working memory behavioural performance, both in patients and controls. However, the fMRI results show opposite effects in patients compared with controls: enhanced engagement of prefronto-striatal pathways in controls and reduced activity in patients. Moreover, the promoter variant is also associated with working memory activity in prefrontal cortex and striatum of patients, and less robustly with negative symptoms scores. Main haplotypes formed by the three DRD2 variants showed significant associations with these phenotypes consistent with those of the individual SNPs. Our results indicate that the three functional DRD2 variants modulate schizophrenia phenotypes possibly by modifying D2S/D2L ratios in the context of different total D2 density.

  6. Exposure of Monocytes to Lipoarabinomannan Promotes Their Differentiation into Functionally and Phenotypically Immature Macrophages

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leslie Chávez-Galán

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Lipoarabinomannan (LAM is a lipid virulence factor secreted by Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb, the etiologic agent of tuberculosis. LAM can be measured in the urine or serum of tuberculosis patients (TB-patients. Circulating monocytes are the precursor cells of alveolar macrophages and might be exposed to LAM in patients with active TB. We speculated that exposing monocytes to LAM could produce phenotypically and functionally immature macrophages. To test our hypothesis, human monocytes were stimulated with LAM (24–120 hours and various readouts were measured. The study showed that when monocytes were exposed to LAM, the frequency of CD68+, CD33+, and CD86+ macrophages decreased, suggesting that monocyte differentiation into mature macrophages was affected. Regarding functionality markers, TLR2+ and TLR4+ macrophages also decreased, but the percentage of MMR+ expression did not change. LAM-exposed monocytes generated macrophages that were less efficient in producing proinflammatory cytokines such as TNF-α and IFN-γ; however, their phagocytic capacity was not modified. Taken together, these data indicate that LAM exposure influenced monocyte differentiation and produced poorly functional macrophages with a different phenotype. These results may help us understand how mycobacteria can limit the quality of the innate and adaptive immune responses.

  7. An Enigmatic Case of Acute Mercury Poisoning: Clinical, Immunological Findings and Platelet Function

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ilka Kleffner

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Severe mercury intoxication is very rare in developed countries, but still occurs as the result of volatile substance abuse, suicide attempts, occupational hazards, or endemic food ingestion as reported in the cases of public health disasters in Iraq and in Minamata Bay, Japan. Here, we describe the dramatic physical and cognitive decline of a 23-year-old patient caused by a severe methyl mercury (MeHg intoxication of unknown origin. We show serial magnetic resonance imaging (MRI of the patient’s brain, as well as ex vivo analyses of blood and cerebrospinal fluid including multicolor flow cytometric measurements, functional assays of hemostaseologic efficacy, and evaluation of regulatory effector molecules. Together with the clinical history, our findings show the progressive neuronal degeneration accompanying the deterioration of the patient. Moreover, the ex vivo analyses display alterations of thrombocyte function and coagulation, as well as an immunological milieu facilitating autoimmunity. Despite the successful reduction of the MeHg concentration in the patient’s blood with erythrocyte apheresis and chelator therapy, his condition did not improve and led to a persistent vegetative state. This case illustrates the neurotoxicity of MeHg following severe intoxication for the first time by serial MRI. Data on immune-cell and thrombocyte function as well as on coagulation in mercury poisoning reveal potential implications for anticoagulation and immunomodulatory treatment.

  8. Quantifying small molecule phenotypic effects using mitochondrial morpho-functional fingerprinting and machine learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blanchet, Lionel; Smeitink, Jan A. M.; van Emst-de Vries, Sjenet E.; Vogels, Caroline; Pellegrini, Mina; Jonckheere, An I.; Rodenburg, Richard J. T.; Buydens, Lutgarde M. C.; Beyrath, Julien; Willems, Peter H. G. M.; Koopman, Werner J. H.

    2015-01-01

    In primary fibroblasts from Leigh Syndrome (LS) patients, isolated mitochondrial complex I deficiency is associated with increased reactive oxygen species levels and mitochondrial morpho-functional changes. Empirical evidence suggests these aberrations constitute linked therapeutic targets for small chemical molecules. However, the latter generally induce multiple subtle effects, meaning that in vitro potency analysis or single-parameter high-throughput cell screening are of limited use to identify these molecules. We combine automated image quantification and artificial intelligence to discriminate between primary fibroblasts of a healthy individual and a LS patient based upon their mitochondrial morpho-functional phenotype. We then evaluate the effects of newly developed Trolox variants in LS patient cells. This revealed that Trolox ornithylamide hydrochloride best counterbalanced mitochondrial morpho-functional aberrations, effectively scavenged ROS and increased the maximal activity of mitochondrial complexes I, IV and citrate synthase. Our results suggest that Trolox-derived antioxidants are promising candidates in therapy development for human mitochondrial disorders.

  9. A preliminary candidate genotype-intermediate phenotype study of satiation and gastric motor function in obesity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Papathanasopoulos, Athanasios; Camilleri, Michael; Carlson, Paula J; Vella, Adrian; Nord, Sara J Linker; Burton, Duane D; Odunsi, Suwebatu T; Zinsmeister, Alan R

    2010-06-01

    Stomach motility contributes significantly to fullness sensation while eating and cessation of food intake in humans. Genes controlling adrenergic and serotonergic mechanisms (ADRA2A, GNB3, and SLC6A4) affect gastric emptying (GE), volume (GV), and satiation. Fat mass and obesity-associated gene (FTO) is linked with satiety. Our aim was to examine the association of these candidate genes with stomach functions that signal postprandial fullness: GE, GV, and maximum tolerated volume (MTV). These biomarkers constitute a component of the intermediate phenotype of satiation. A total of 62 overweight or obese participants underwent genotyping of the candidate genes, and validated measurements of GE of solids and liquids by scintigraphy, fasting and postprandial change in GV by SPECT (single photon emission computed tomography), and MTV by nutrient drink test. These markers of satiation were compared for 38 genetic variants in ADRA2A, ADR2C, ADRB3, uncoupling protein (UCP)-2 and -3, GNB3, FTO, and SLC6A4 using a recessive model of inheritance. ADRA2A, ADR2C, UCP-3, GNB3, and FTO loci were significantly associated with the intermediate phenotype markers of satiation: ADR2C (Ins-Del322_325) with accelerated GE; GNB3 (rs1047776) with delayed GE; ADRA2A (rs491589 and rs553668) and GNB3 (rs2269355, rs10849527, and rs3759348) with decreased postprandial GV; ADRA2A (rs3750625) and GNB3 (rs4963517 and rs1129649) with increased postprandial GV; UCP-3 (rs1685356) with increased MTV, and FTO (rs9939609) decreased MTV. Genetic susceptibility to postprandial satiation can be identified through intermediate phenotype markers. With independent validation, these markers may guide patient selection of weight-loss therapies directed at gastric motor functions.

  10. Bone Morphogenic Protein 4-Smad-Induced Upregulation of Platelet-Derived Growth Factor AA Impairs Endothelial Function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Weining; Zhang, Yang; Wang, Li; Lau, Chi Wai; Xu, Jian; Luo, Jiang-Yun; Gou, Lingshan; Yao, Xiaoqiang; Chen, Zhen-Yu; Ma, Ronald Ching Wan; Tian, Xiao Yu; Huang, Yu

    2016-03-01

    Bone morphogenic protein 4 (BMP4) is an important mediator of endothelial dysfunction in cardio-metabolic diseases, whereas platelet-derived growth factors (PDGFs) are major angiogenic and proinflammatory mediator, although the functional link between these 2 factors is unknown. The present study investigated whether PDGF mediates BMP4-induced endothelial dysfunction in diabetes mellitus. We generated Ad-Bmp4 to overexpress Bmp4 and Ad-Pdgfa-shRNA to knockdown Pdgfa in mice through tail intravenous injection. SMAD4-shRNA lentivirus, SMAD1-shRNA, and SMAD5 shRNA adenovirus were used for knockdown in human and mouse endothelial cells. We found that PDGF-AA impaired endothelium-dependent vasodilation in aortas and mesenteric resistance arteries. BMP4 upregulated PDGF-AA in human and mouse endothelial cells, which was abolished by BMP4 antagonist noggin or knockdown of SMAD1/5 or SMAD4. BMP4-impared relaxation in mouse aorta was also ameliorated by PDGF-AA neutralizing antibody. Tail injection of Ad-Pdgfa-shRNA ameliorates endothelial dysfunction induced by Bmp4 overexpression (Ad-Bmp4) in vivo. Serum PDGF-AA was elevated in both diabetic patients and diabetic db/db mice compared with nondiabetic controls. Pdgfa-shRNA or Bmp4-shRNA adenovirus reduced serum PDGF-AA concentration in db/db mice. PDGF-AA neutralizing antibody or tail injection with Pdgfa-shRNA adenovirus improved endothelial function in aortas and mesenteric resistance arteries from db/db mice. The effect of PDGF-AA on endothelial function in mouse aorta was also inhibited by Ad-Pdgfra-shRNA to inhibit PDGFRα. The present study provides novel evidences to show that PDGF-AA impairs endothelium-dependent vasodilation and PDGF-AA mediates BMP4-induced adverse effect on endothelial cell function through SMAD1/5- and SMAD4-dependent mechanisms. Inhibition of PGDF-AA ameliorates vascular dysfunction in diabetic mice. © 2016 American Heart Association, Inc.

  11. Evaluation of effects of various drugs on platelet functions using phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate-induced megakaryocytic human erythroid leukemia cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tada T

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Tomoki Tada,1 Kensaku Aki,2 Wataru Oboshi,1,3 Kazuyoshi Kawazoe,4 Toshiyuki Yasui,5 Eiji Hosoi2 1Subdivision of Biomedical Laboratory Sciences, Graduate School of Health Sciences, Tokushima University, 2Department of Cells and Immunity Analytics, Institute of Biomedical Sciences, Tokushima University Graduate School, Tokushima, 3Department of Medical Technology, Kagawa Prefectural University of Health Sciences, Kagawa, 4Department of Clinical Pharmacy Practice Pedagogy, Institute of Biomedical Sciences, 5Department of Reproductive and Menopausal Medicine, Institute of Biomedical Sciences, Tokushima University Graduate School, Tokushima, Japan Background: The hyperfunction and activation of platelets have been strongly implicated in the development and recurrence of arterial occlusive disease, and various antiplatelet drugs are used to treat and prevent such diseases. New antiplatelet drugs and many other drugs have been developed, but some drugs may have adverse effects on platelet functions. Objective: The aim of this study was to establish an evaluation method for evaluating the effect and adverse effect of various drugs on platelet functions. Materials and methods: Human erythroid leukemia (HEL cells were used after megakaryocytic differentiation with phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate as an alternative to platelets. Drugs were evaluated by changes in intracellular Ca2+ concentration ([Ca2+]i mobilization in Fura2-loaded phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate-induced HEL cells. Aspirin and cilostazol were selected as antiplatelet drugs and ibuprofen and sodium valproate as other drugs. Results: There was a positive correlation between [Ca2+]i and platelet aggregation induced by thrombin. Aspirin (5.6–560 µM and cilostazol (5–10 µM significantly inhibited thrombin-induced increases in [Ca2+]i in a concentration-dependent manner. On the other hand, ibuprofen (8–200 µM and sodium valproate (50–1,000 µg/mL also significantly inhibited

  12. Depressed reticuloendothelial clearance of platelets in rats after trauma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaplan, J E; Moon, D G; Minnear, F L; Saba, T M

    1984-02-01

    Platelet microembolization may contribute to microcirculatory and organ damage following trauma and shock. It is hypothesized that posttraumatic reticuloendothelial depression predisposes to such microembolization by failure to clear altered platelets from the circulation. The present study evaluated the short-term (1 h) clearance and organ localization of radiolabeled homologous damaged platelets in normal rats and in rats following sublethal Noble-Collip drum trauma. Platelets were collected in citrated platelet-rich plasma from normal rats and labeled with 51Cr in citrated saline. Platelets were altered by repeated centrifugation in protein-free medium. These platelets differed functionally and morphologically from normal platelets. Disappearance of iv injected damaged platelets conformed to a two-compartment exponential clearance. Velocity of clearance in the rapid compartment correlated with hepatic platelet localization, whereas velocity of clearance in the second compartment correlated with splenic platelet localization. Clearance rate of the rapid compartment was depressed at 1 h after trauma and elevated at 24 h. These changes were associated with a decrease in hepatic platelet localization at 1 h and an increase above normal at 24 h. Splenic platelet localization was decreased by 3 h following trauma. Pulmonary platelet localization was increased at all times following trauma. It is concluded that the posttrauma state is associated with a defect in the reticuloendothelial system clearance of altered platelets, which may augment embolization of platelets in the lung.

  13. Platelet RNA as a circulating biomarker trove for cancer diagnostics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Best, M G; Vancura, A; Wurdinger, T

    2017-07-01

    Platelets are multifunctional cell fragments, circulating in blood in high abundance. Platelets assist in thrombus formation, sensing of pathogens entering the blood stream, signaling to immune cells, releasing vascular remodeling factors, and, negatively, enhancing cancer metastasis. Platelets are 'educated' by their environment, including in patients with cancer. Cancer cells appear to initiate intraplatelet signaling, resulting in splicing of platelet pre-mRNAs, and enhance secretion of cytokines. Platelets can induce leukocyte and endothelial cell modeling factors, for example, through adenine nucleotides (ATP), thereby facilitating extravasation of cancer cells. Besides releasing factors, platelets can also sequester RNAs and proteins released by cancer cells. Thus, platelets actively respond to queues from local and systemic conditions, thereby altering their transcriptome and molecular content. Platelets contain a rich repertoire of RNA species, including mRNAs, small non-coding RNAs and circular RNAs; although studies regarding the functionality of the various platelet RNA species require more attention. Recent advances in high-throughput characterization of platelet mRNAs revealed 10 to > 1000 altered mRNAs in platelets in the presence of disease. Hence, platelet RNA appears to be dynamically affected by pathological conditions, thus possibly providing opportunities to use platelet RNA as diagnostic, prognostic, predictive, or monitoring biomarkers. In this review, we cover the literature regarding the platelet RNA families, processing of platelet RNAs, and the potential application of platelet RNA as disease biomarkers. © 2017 International Society on Thrombosis and Haemostasis.

  14. Platelet aggregation and quality control of platelet concentrates produced in the Amazon Blood Bank

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria José Dantas Coêlho

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The study of platelet aggregation is essential to assess in vitro platelet function by different platelet activation pathways. OBJECTIVE: To assess aggregation and biochemical parameters of random platelet concentrates produced at the Fundação HEMOAM using the quality control tests defined by law. METHODS: Whole blood samples from 80 donors and the respective platelet concentrate units were tested. Platelet concentrates were tested (platelet count, aggregation and pH on days 1, 3 and 5 of storage. Additionally a leukocyte count was done only on day 1 and microbiological tests on day 5 of storage. Collagen and adenosine diphosphate were used as inducing agonists for platelet aggregation testing. RESULTS: Donor whole blood had normal aggregation (aggregation with adenosine diphosphate = 67% and with collagen = 78%. The median aggregation in platelet concentrates with adenosine diphosphate was low throughout storage (18% on day 1, 7% on day 3 and 6% on day 5 and the median aggregation with collagen was normal only on day 1 and low thereafter (54.4% on day 1, 20.5% on day 3 and 9% on day 5. CONCLUSION: Although the results were within the norms required by law, platelet concentrates had low aggregation rates. We suggest the inclusion of a functional assessment test for the quality control of platelet concentrates for a more effective response to platelet replacement therapy.

  15. Phenotypic and functional characterization of human mammary stem/progenitor cells in long term culture.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Devaveena Dey

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Cancer stem cells exhibit close resemblance to normal stem cells in phenotype as well as function. Hence, studying normal stem cell behavior is important in understanding cancer pathogenesis. It has recently been shown that human breast stem cells can be enriched in suspension cultures as mammospheres. However, little is known about the behavior of these cells in long-term cultures. Since extensive self-renewal potential is the hallmark of stem cells, we undertook a detailed phenotypic and functional characterization of human mammospheres over long-term passages. METHODOLOGY: Single cell suspensions derived from human breast 'organoids' were seeded in ultra low attachment plates in serum free media. Resulting primary mammospheres after a week (termed T1 mammospheres were subjected to passaging every 7th day leading to the generation of T2, T3, and T4 mammospheres. PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We show that primary mammospheres contain a distinct side-population (SP that displays a CD24(low/CD44(low phenotype, but fails to generate mammospheres. Instead, the mammosphere-initiating potential rests within the CD44(high/CD24(low cells, in keeping with the phenotype of breast cancer-initiating cells. In serial sphere formation assays we find that even though primary (T1 mammospheres show telomerase activity and fourth passage T4 spheres contain label-retaining cells, they fail to initiate new mammospheres beyond T5. With increasing passages, mammospheres showed an increase in smaller sized spheres, reduction in proliferation potential and sphere forming efficiency, and increased differentiation towards the myoepithelial lineage. Significantly, staining for senescence-associated beta-galactosidase activity revealed a dramatic increase in the number of senescent cells with passage, which might in part explain the inability to continuously generate mammospheres in culture. CONCLUSIONS: Thus, the self-renewal potential of human breast stem cells is

  16. Relationship between ADAMTS13 activity, von Willebrand factor antigen levels and platelet function in the early and late phases after TIA or ischaemic stroke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCabe, Dominick J H; Murphy, Stephen J X; Starke, Richard; Harrison, Paul; Brown, Martin M; Sidhu, Paul S; Mackie, Ian J; Scully, Marie; Machin, Samuel J

    2015-01-15

    Reduced ADAMTS13 activity is seen in thrombotic thrombocytopenic purpura (TTP), and may lead to accumulation of prothrombotic ultra-large von Willebrand factor (ULVWF) multimers in vivo. ADAMTS13 activity and its relationship with VWF antigen (VWF:Ag) levels and platelet function in 'non-TTP related' TIA or ischaemic stroke has not been comprehensively studied. In this prospective pilot observational analytical case-control study, ADAMTS13 activity and VWF:Ag levels were quantified in platelet poor plasma in 53 patients in the early phase (≤ 4 weeks) and 34 of these patients in the late phase (≥ 3 months) after TIA or ischaemic stroke on aspirin. Data were compared with those from 22 controls not on aspirin. The impact of ADAMTS13 on platelet function in whole blood was quantified by measuring Collagen-ADP (C-ADP) and Collagen-Epinephrine closure times on a platelet function analyser (PFA-100(®)). Median ADAMTS13 activity was significantly reduced in the early phase (71.96% vs. 95.5%, P TIA or stroke compared with controls (86.3% vs. 95.5%, P=0.19). There was a significant inverse relationship between ADAMTS13 activity and VWF:Ag levels in the early phase (r=-0.31; P=0.024), but not in the late phase after TIA or stroke (P=0.74). There was a positive correlation between ADAMTS13 activity and C-ADP closure times in early phase patients only, likely mediated via VWF:Ag levels. ADAMTS13 activity is reduced and VWF:Ag expression is increased within 4 weeks of TIA or ischaemic stroke onset, and can promote enhanced platelet adhesion and aggregation in response to stimulation with collagen and ADP via VWF-mediated pathways. These data improve our understanding of the dynamic haemostatic and thrombotic profiles of ischaemic cerebrovascular disease (CVD) patients, and are important in view of the potential future role that ADAMTS13 may have to play as an anti-thrombotic agent in CVD. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. Comparison of equine platelet function and survival in whole blood collected in acid-citrate-dextrose solution or citrate-phosphate-dextrose-adenine solution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bozorgmanesh, Rana; Sutton-Burges, Julie W; Tablin, Fern

    2017-06-01

    Equine whole blood collection and storage methods have been evaluated to assess red blood cell viability; however, platelet (PLT) viability has not been comprehensively assessed. The purpose of the study was to compare viability of PLTs collected in whole blood into 2 different anticoagulants. Whole blood from 6 healthy adult Thoroughbred horses was collected into citrate-phosphate-dextrose-adenine (CPDA) or acid-citrate-dextrose (ACD). Platelet count, pH, and concentrations of glucose, lactate, carbon dioxide, oxygen, bicarbonate, sodium, potassium, and chloride were measured within 10 minutes of collection and then again one hour later at which time PLT aggregometry was performed to assess PLT function. Aggregometry mean amplitudes were significantly higher in CPDA compared to ACD. Blood glucose, pH, bicarbonate, sodium, and lactate concentrations were significantly higher in CPDA compared to ACD. Lactate concentration was higher following one hour in either anticoagulant. Potassium, oxygen, and carbon dioxide concentrations were significantly higher in ACD compared to CPDA at collection. Platelet aggregometry results suggest that CPDA is superior to ACD for maintaining PLT viability following whole blood collection. This may be associated with the higher, more neutral pH as well as an increase in glucose available for metabolism. Although lactate was increased in the CPDA samples it was not high enough to decrease pH and therefore may not have been high enough to cause morphologic lesions and loss of PLT viability. © 2017 American Society for Veterinary Clinical Pathology.

  18. A Comprehensive Dataset of Genes with a Loss-of-Function Mutant Phenotype in Arabidopsis1[W][OA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lloyd, Johnny; Meinke, David

    2012-01-01

    Despite the widespread use of Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) as a model plant, a curated dataset of Arabidopsis genes with mutant phenotypes remains to be established. A preliminary list published nine years ago in Plant Physiology is outdated, and genome-wide phenotype information remains difficult to obtain. We describe here a comprehensive dataset of 2,400 genes with a loss-of-function mutant phenotype in Arabidopsis. Phenotype descriptions were gathered primarily from manual curation of the scientific literature. Genes were placed into prioritized groups (essential, morphological, cellular-biochemical, and conditional) based on the documented phenotypes of putative knockout alleles. Phenotype classes (e.g. vegetative, reproductive, and timing, for the morphological group) and subsets (e.g. flowering time, senescence, circadian rhythms, and miscellaneous, for the timing class) were also established. Gene identities were classified as confirmed (through molecular complementation or multiple alleles) or not confirmed. Relationships between mutant phenotype and protein function, genetic redundancy, protein connectivity, and subcellular protein localization were explored. A complementary dataset of 401 genes that exhibit a mutant phenotype only when disrupted in combination with a putative paralog was also compiled. The importance of these genes in confirming functional redundancy and enhancing the value of single gene datasets is discussed. With further input and curation from the Arabidopsis community, these datasets should help to address a variety of important biological questions, provide a foundation for exploring the relationship between genotype and phenotype in angiosperms, enhance the utility of Arabidopsis as a reference plant, and facilitate comparative studies with model genetic organisms. PMID:22247268

  19. Molecular cloning and functional characterization of the human platelet-derived growth factor alpha receptor gene promoter

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Afink, G. B.; Nistér, M.; Stassen, B. H.; Joosten, P. H.; Rademakers, P. J.; Bongcam-Rudloff, E.; van Zoelen, E. J.; Mosselman, S.

    1995-01-01

    Expression of the platelet-derived growth factor alpha receptor (PDGF alpha R) is strictly regulated during mammalian development and tumorigenesis. The molecular mechanisms involved in the specific regulation of PDGF alpha R expression are unknown, but transcriptional regulation of the PDGF alpha R

  20. Functional Associations by Response Overlap (FARO), a functional genomics approach matching gene expression phenotypes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Henrik Bjørn; Mundy, J.; Willenbrock, Hanni

    2007-01-01

    The systematic comparison of transcriptional responses of organisms is a powerful tool in functional genomics. For example, mutants may be characterized by comparing their transcript profiles to those obtained in other experiments querying the effects on gene expression of many experimental facto...

  1. Platelet indices in dogs with Babesia rossi infection

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Goddard, Amelia; Leisewitz, Andrew L; Kristensen, Annemarie Thuri

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Thrombocytopenia without clinical bleeding is a consistent finding in virulent canine babesiosis. OBJECTIVES: The purpose of the study was to investigate the platelet index phenotype in Babesia rossi-infected dogs and the association with disease outcome. We hypothesized that an incre......BACKGROUND: Thrombocytopenia without clinical bleeding is a consistent finding in virulent canine babesiosis. OBJECTIVES: The purpose of the study was to investigate the platelet index phenotype in Babesia rossi-infected dogs and the association with disease outcome. We hypothesized...... that an increased proportion of large, activated platelets would be present. METHODS: Ninety-six infected and 15 control dogs were included. Babesia-infected dogs were further divided into survivors and nonsurvivors. Platelet count, mean platelet volume (MPV), platelet volume distribution width (PDW), plateletcrit...

  2. Blood platelet kinetics and platelet transfusion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aster, Richard H

    2013-11-01

    The discovery of citrate anticoagulant in the 1920s and the development of plastic packs for blood collection in the 1960s laid the groundwork for platelet transfusion therapy on a scale not previously possible. A major limitation, however, was the finding that platelet concentrates prepared from blood anticoagulated with citrate were unsuitable for transfusion because of platelet clumping. We found that this could be prevented by simply reducing the pH of platelet-rich plasma to about 6.5 prior to centrifugation. We used this approach to characterize platelet kinetics and sites of platelet sequestration in normal and pathologic states and to define the influence of variables such as anticoagulant and ABO incompatibility on post-transfusion platelet recovery. The "acidification" approach enabled much wider use of platelet transfusion therapy until alternative means of producing concentrates suitable for transfusion became available.

  3. Altered Functional Subnetwork During Emotional Face Processing: A Potential Intermediate Phenotype for Schizophrenia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Hengyi; Bertolino, Alessandro; Walter, Henrik; Schneider, Michael; Schäfer, Axel; Taurisano, Paolo; Blasi, Giuseppe; Haddad, Leila; Grimm, Oliver; Otto, Kristina; Dixson, Luanna; Erk, Susanne; Mohnke, Sebastian; Heinz, Andreas; Romanczuk-Seiferth, Nina; Mühleisen, Thomas W; Mattheisen, Manuel; Witt, Stephanie H; Cichon, Sven; Noethen, Markus; Rietschel, Marcella; Tost, Heike; Meyer-Lindenberg, Andreas

    2016-06-01

    Although deficits in emotional processing are prominent in schizophrenia, it has been difficult to identify neural mechanisms related to the genetic risk for this highly heritable illness. Prior studies have not found consistent regional activation or connectivity alterations in first-degree relatives compared with healthy controls, suggesting that a more comprehensive search for connectomic biomarkers is warranted. To identify a potential systems-level intermediate phenotype linked to emotion processing in schizophrenia and to examine the psychological association, task specificity, test-retest reliability, and clinical validity of the identified phenotype. The study was performed in university research hospitals from June 1, 2008, through December 31, 2013. We examined 58 unaffected first-degree relatives of patients with schizophrenia and 94 healthy controls with an emotional face-matching functional magnetic resonance imaging paradigm. Test-retest reliability was analyzed with an independent sample of 26 healthy participants. A clinical association study was performed in 31 patients with schizophrenia and 45 healthy controls. Data analysis was performed from January 1 to September 30, 2014. Conventional amygdala activity and seeded connectivity measures, graph-based global and local network connectivity measures, Spearman rank correlation, intraclass correlation, and gray matter volumes. Among the 152 volunteers included in the relative-control sample, 58 were unaffected first-degree relatives of patients with schizophrenia (mean [SD] age, 33.29 [12.56]; 38 were women), and 94 were healthy controls without a first-degree relative with mental illness (mean [SD] age, 32.69 [10.09] years; 55 were women). A graph-theoretical connectivity approach identified significantly decreased connectivity in a subnetwork that primarily included the limbic cortex, visual cortex, and subcortex during emotional face processing (cluster-level P corrected for familywise error =

  4. Functional Associations by Response Overlap (FARO, a functional genomics approach matching gene expression phenotypes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Henrik Bjørn Nielsen

    2007-08-01

    Full Text Available The systematic comparison of transcriptional responses of organisms is a powerful tool in functional genomics. For example, mutants may be characterized by comparing their transcript profiles to those obtained in other experiments querying the effects on gene expression of many experimental factors including treatments, mutations and pathogen infections. Similarly, drugs may be discovered by the relationship between the transcript profiles effectuated or impacted by a candidate drug and by the target disease. The integration of such data enables systems biology to predict the interplay between experimental factors affecting a biological system. Unfortunately, direct comparisons of gene expression profiles obtained in independent, publicly available microarray experiments are typically compromised by substantial, experiment-specific biases. Here we suggest a novel yet conceptually simple approach for deriving 'Functional Association(s by Response Overlap' (FARO between microarray gene expression studies. The transcriptional response is defined by the set of differentially expressed genes independent from the magnitude or direction of the change. This approach overcomes the limited comparability between studies that is typical for methods that rely on correlation in gene expression. We apply FARO to a compendium of 242 diverse Arabidopsis microarray experimental factors, including phyto-hormones, stresses and pathogens, growth conditions/stages, tissue types and mutants. We also use FARO to confirm and further delineate the functions of Arabidopsis MAP kinase 4 in disease and stress responses. Furthermore, we find that a large, well-defined set of genes responds in opposing directions to different stress conditions and predict the effects of different stress combinations. This demonstrates the usefulness of our approach for exploiting public microarray data to derive biologically meaningful associations between experimental factors. Finally, our

  5. Phenotypic and Functional Properties of Tumor-Infiltrating Regulatory T Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gap Ryol Lee

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Regulatory T (Treg cells maintain immune homeostasis by suppressing excessive immune responses. Treg cells induce tolerance against self- and foreign antigens, thus preventing autoimmunity, allergy, graft rejection, and fetus rejection during pregnancy. However, Treg cells also infiltrate into tumors and inhibit antitumor immune responses, thus inhibiting anticancer therapy. Depleting whole Treg cell populations in the body to enhance anticancer treatments will produce deleterious autoimmune diseases. Therefore, understanding the precise nature of tumor-infiltrating Treg cells is essential for effectively targeting Treg cells in tumors. This review summarizes recent results relating to Treg cells in the tumor microenvironment, with particular emphasis on their accumulation, phenotypic, and functional properties, and targeting to enhance the efficacy of anticancer treatment.

  6. Phenotype and Tissue Expression as a Function of Genetic Risk in Polycystic Ovary Syndrome.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cindy T Pau

    Full Text Available Genome-wide association studies and replication analyses have identified (n = 5 or replicated (n = 10 DNA variants associated with risk for polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS in European women. However, the causal gene and underlying mechanism for PCOS risk at these loci have not been determined. We hypothesized that analysis of phenotype, gene expression and metformin response as a function of genotype would identify candidate genes and pathways that could provide insight into the underlying mechanism for risk at these loci. To test the hypothesis, subjects with PCOS (n = 427 diagnosed according to the NIH criteria (< 9 menses per year and clinical or biochemical hyperandrogenism and controls (n = 407 with extensive phenotyping were studied. A subset of subjects (n = 38 underwent a subcutaneous adipose tissue biopsy for RNA sequencing and were subsequently treated with metformin for 12 weeks with standardized outcomes measured. Data were analyzed according to genotype at PCOS risk loci and adjusted for the false discovery rate. A gene variant in the THADA locus was associated with response to metformin and metformin was a predicted upstream regulator at the same locus. Genotype at the FSHB locus was associated with LH levels. Genes near the PCOS risk loci demonstrated differences in expression as a function of genotype in adipose including BLK and NEIL2 (GATA4 locus, GLIPR1 and PHLDA1 (KRR1 locus. Based on the phenotypes, expression quantitative trait loci (eQTL, and upstream regulatory and pathway analyses we hypothesize that there are PCOS subtypes. FSHB, FHSR and LHR loci may influence PCOS risk based on their relationship to gonadotropin levels. The THADA, GATA4, ERBB4, SUMO1P1, KRR1 and RAB5B loci appear to confer risk through metabolic mechanisms. The IRF1, SUMO1P1 and KRR1 loci may confer PCOS risk in development. The TOX3 and GATA4 loci appear to be involved in inflammation and its consequences. The data suggest potential PCOS subtypes and

  7. Anomalous baroreflex functionality inherent in floxed and Cre-Lox mice: an overlooked physiological phenotype.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsai, Ching-Yi; Poon, Yan-Yuen; Chen, Chang-Han; Chan, Samuel H H

    2017-10-01

    The last two decades have seen the emergence of Cre-Lox recombination as one of the most powerful and versatile technologies for cell-specific genetic engineering of mammalian cells. Understandably, the primary concerns in the practice of Cre-Lox recombination are whether the predicted genome has been correctly modified and the targeted phenotypes expressed. Rarely are the physiological conditions of the animals routinely examined because the general assumption is that they are normal. Based on corroborative results from radiotelemetric recording, power spectral analysis, and magnetic resonance imaging/diffusion tensor imaging in brain-derived neurotrophic factor-floxed mice, the present study revealed that this assumption requires amendment. We found that despite comparable blood pressure and heart rate with C57BL/6 or Cre mice under the conscious state, floxed and Cre-Lox mice exhibited diminished baroreflex-mediated sympathetic vasomotor tone and cardiac vagal baroreflex. We further found that the capacity and plasticity of baroreflex of these two strains of mice under isoflurane anesthesia were retarded, as reflected by reduced connectivity between the nucleus tractus solitarii and rostral ventrolateral medulla or nucleus ambiguus. The identification of anomalous baroreflex functionality inherent in floxed and Cre-Lox mice points to the importance of incorporating physiological phenotypes into studies that engage gene manipulations such as Cre-Lox recombination. NEW & NOTEWORTHY We established that anomalous baroreflex functionality is inherent in floxed and Cre-Lox mice. These two mouse strains exhibited diminished baroreflex-mediated sympathetic vasomotor tone and cardiac vagal baroreflex under the conscious state, retarded capacity and plasticity of baroreflex under isoflurane anesthesia, and reduced connectivity between key nuclei in the baroreflex neural circuits. Copyright © 2017 the American Physiological Society.

  8. Phenotypic, ultra-structural, and functional characterization of bovine peripheral blood dendritic cell subsets.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Janet J Sei

    Full Text Available Dendritic cells (DC are multi-functional cells that bridge the gap between innate and adaptive immune systems. In bovine, significant information is lacking on the precise identity and role of peripheral blood DC subsets. In this study, we identify and characterize bovine peripheral blood DC subsets directly ex vivo, without further in vitro manipulation. Multi-color flow cytometric analysis revealed that three DC subsets could be identified. Bovine plasmacytoid DC were phenotypically identified by a unique pattern of cell surface protein expression including CD4, exhibited an extensive endoplasmic reticulum and Golgi apparatus, efficiently internalized and degraded exogenous antigen, and were the only peripheral blood cells specialized in the production of type I IFN following activation with Toll-like receptor (TLR agonists. Conventional DC were identified by expression of a different pattern of cell surface proteins including CD11c, MHC class II, and CD80, among others, the display of extensive dendritic protrusions on their plasma membrane, expression of very high levels of MHC class II and co-stimulatory molecules, efficient internalization and degradation of exogenous antigen, and ready production of detectable levels of TNF-alpha in response to TLR activation. Our investigations also revealed a third novel DC subset that may be a precursor of conventional DC that were MHC class II+ and CD11c-. These cells exhibited a smooth plasma membrane with a rounded nucleus, produced TNF-alpha in response to TLR-activation (albeit lower than CD11c+ DC, and were the least efficient in internalization/degradation of exogenous antigen. These studies define three bovine blood DC subsets with distinct phenotypic and functional characteristics which can be analyzed during immune responses to pathogens and vaccinations of cattle.

  9. Quantitative Assessment of Eye Phenotypes for Functional Genetic Studies Using Drosophila melanogaster

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Janani Iyer

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available About two-thirds of the vital genes in the Drosophila genome are involved in eye development, making the fly eye an excellent genetic system to study cellular function and development, neurodevelopment/degeneration, and complex diseases such as cancer and diabetes. We developed a novel computational method, implemented as Flynotyper software (http://flynotyper.sourceforge.net, to quantitatively assess the morphological defects in the Drosophila eye resulting from genetic alterations affecting basic cellular and developmental processes. Flynotyper utilizes a series of image processing operations to automatically detect the fly eye and the individual ommatidium, and calculates a phenotypic score as a measure of the disorderliness of ommatidial arrangement in the fly eye. As a proof of principle, we tested our method by analyzing the defects due to eye-specific knockdown of Drosophila orthologs of 12 neurodevelopmental genes to accurately document differential sensitivities of these genes to dosage alteration. We also evaluated eye images from six independent studies assessing the effect of overexpression of repeats, candidates from peptide library screens, and modifiers of neurotoxicity and developmental processes on eye morphology, and show strong concordance with the original assessment. We further demonstrate the utility of this method by analyzing 16 modifiers of sine oculis obtained from two genome-wide deficiency screens of Drosophila and accurately quantifying the effect of its enhancers and suppressors during eye development. Our method will complement existing assays for eye phenotypes, and increase the accuracy of studies that use fly eyes for functional evaluation of genes and genetic interactions.

  10. Evaluation of coagulation factors and platelet function from an off-line modified ultrafiltration technique for post-cardiopulmonary bypass circuit blood recovery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beckmann, S; Lynn, P; Miller, S; Harris, R; DiMarco, R F; Ross, J E

    2013-05-01

    Modified ultrafiltration (MUF) is a technique that hemoconcentrates residual CPB circuit blood and the patient at the same time. Hemoconcentration and MUF are Class 1-A recommendations in the anesthesia and surgical blood conservation guidelines. This study evaluated the off-line MUF process of the Hemobag (HB, Global Blood Resources, Somers, CT, USA) to quantitate coagulation factor levels, platelet (PLT) count and function in one facility and cellular growth factor concentrations of the final product that were transfused to the patient in another facility In two cardiac surgery facilities, after decannulation, the extracorporeal circuit (ECC) blood from 22 patients undergoing cardiac surgery was processed with the HB device. In eleven patients from the first facility by the study design, blood samples for coagulation factor levels and PLT aggregation were drawn from the reservoir of the MUF device pre- and post-processing. The samples (n = 11) were sent to a reference laboratory where testing for prothrombin time (PT), international normalized ratio (INR), activated partial thromboplastin time (aPTT), reptilase time, fibrinogen, clotting factors II, V, VII, VIII, IX, X, ADAMTS-13, protein C, protein S, antithrombin III, von Willebrand Factor (vWF), and platelet (PLT) aggregation were performed. A portion of the final concentrated HB blood samples (n = 5-10) from the second facility by design were evaluated for transforming and platelet-derived cellular growth factor concentrations. On average, approximately 800 - 2000 mls of whole blood were removed from the ECC post-CPB for processing in the HB device. After processing, there was, on the average, approximately 300 - 950 mls of concentrated whole blood salvaged for reinfusion. The PT and INR were significantly lower in the post-processing product compared to the pre-processing samples while the aPTT times were not significantly different. All coagulation factors and natural anti-coagulants were significantly

  11. Cytokine and nitric oxide levels in patients with sepsis--temporal evolvement and relation to platelet mitochondrial respiratory function

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sjövall, Fredrik; Morota, Saori; Frostner, Eleonor Åsander

    2014-01-01

    the correlation between observed changes in platelet mitochondrial respiration and a set of pro- and anti-inflammatory cytokines as well as NO plasma levels in patients with sepsis. METHODS AND RESULTS: Platelet mitochondrial respiration and levels of TNFα, MCP-1 (monocyte chemotactic protein-1), INFγ (interferon......-γ), IL-1β, IL-4, IL-5, IL-6, IL-8, IL-10 and IL-17 and NO were analyzed in 38 patients with severe sepsis or septic shock at three time points during one week following admission to the ICU. Citrate synthase, mitochondrial DNA and cytochrome c were measured as markers of cellular mitochondrial content....... All mitochondrial respiratory states increased over the week analyzed (prespiration on day 6-7 (p = 0.02, r2 = 0.22) and was also higher in non-survivors compared to survivors on day 3-4 and day 6-7 (p = 0.03 respectively). Neither NO nor any...

  12. Detection of microbial contamination in platelets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berg, Tracy L.; Leparc, German; Huffman, Debra E.; Gennaccaro, Angela L.; Garcia-Lopez, Alicia; Klungness, Greta; Stephans, Christie; Garcia-Rubio, Luis H.

    2005-03-01

    In the United States, approximately 100 patients develop fatal sepsis associated with platelet transfusions every year. Current culture methods take 24-48 hours to acquire results, which in turn decrease the shelf life of platelets. Many of the microorganisms that contaminate platelets can replicate easily at room temperature, which is the necessary storage temperature to keep platelets functional. Therefore, there is a need for in-situ quality control assessment of the platelet quality. For this purpose, a real time spectrophotometric technique has been developed. The Spectral Acquisition Processing Detection (SAPD) method, comprised of a UV-vis spectrophotometer and modeling algorithms, is a rapid method that can be performed prior to platelet transfusion to decrease the risk of bacterial infection to patients. The SAPD method has been used to determine changes in cell suspensions, based on size, shape, chemical composition and internal structure. Changes in these cell characteristics can in turn be used to determine microbial contamination, platelet aging and other physiologic changes. Detection limits of this method for platelet suspensions seeded with bacterial contaminants were identified to be less than 100 cfu/ml of sample. Bacterial counts below 1000 cfu/ml are not considered clinically significant. The SAPD method can provide real-time identification of bacterial contamination of platelets affording patients an increased level of safety without causing undue strain on laboratory budgets or personnel while increasing the time frame that platelets can be used by dramatically shortening contaminant detection time.

  13. Studies of the Effects of Perfluorocarbon Emulsions on Platelet Number and Function in Models of Critical Battlefield Injury

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-01-01

    intubated with an endotracheal tube (ID= 9~10 mm with cuff), an orogastric tube placed to expel vomit, and ventilated with mixed nitrogen/oxygen (80:20...were a few measurements of data which drifted away from baseline without clear reason (might be the size of sheep platelet is smaller than human’s...D) sections. An air blast pressure wave is created by building up pressure behind mylar membrane clamped between the driver (A) and transition

  14. Advances and controversies in neonatal ICU platelet transfusion practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christensen, Robert D

    2008-01-01

    Some of the platelet transfusions currently given to NICU patients are unnecessary and convey no benefits. Although ordered with good intentions, unnecessary platelet transfusions carry known and unknown risks. Identifying and eliminating any unnecessary platelet transfusions in NICUs would be a step toward better care, lower costs, and more careful preservation of blood component resources. A renewed interest in platelet transfusion studies is needed, if essential data is to be gathered to improve NICU platelet transfusion practice. Retrospective studies can be of value: for instance, seeking associations between bleeding events and platelet counts can suggest the possibility of cause and effect relationships. Such studies might identify approximate platelet count levels that convey high hemorrhagic risk and might help focus future prospective trials. Prospective indirect studies also can be of value, for instance, measuring the template bleeding time and the PFA-100 closure time as a function of platelet count and perhaps as a function of circulating platelet mass, and would provide new information with relevance to platelet transfusion benefits. Such studies might give a better awareness of how low the platelet count can fall before platelet plug formation is impaired. It seems inescapable, however, that new, multicentered, randomized, prospective studies are needed, where NICU patients are assigned different platelet transfusion triggers and then carefully tracked for bleeding events and long-term neurodevelopmental outcomes. Only that type of study is likely to generate the evidence base needed for widespread implementation of improvements in NICU platelet transfusion practice.

  15. The Effect of a Simulated Commercial Flight Environment with Hypoxia and Low Humidity on Clotting, Platelet, and Endothelial Function in Participants with Type 2 Diabetes – A Cross-over Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Judit Konya

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available AimsTo determine if clotting, platelet, and endothelial function were affected by simulated short-haul commercial air flight conditions (SF in participants with type 2 diabetes (T2DM compared to controls.Methods10 participants with T2DM (7 females, 3 males and 10 controls (3 females, 7 males completed the study. Participants were randomized to either spend 2 h in an environmental chamber at sea level conditions (temperature: 23°C, oxygen concentration 21%, humidity 45%, or subject to a simulated 2-h simulated flight (SF: temperature: 23°C, oxygen concentration 15%, humidity 15%, and crossed over 7 days later. Main outcome measures: clot formation and clot lysis parameters, functional platelet activation markers, and endothelial function measured by reactive hyperemia index (RHI by EndoPAT and serum microparticles.ResultsComparing baseline with SF conditions, clot maximal absorption was increased in controls (0.375 ± 0.05 vs. 0.39 ± 0.05, p < 0.05 and participants with T2DM (0.378 ± 0.089 vs. 0.397 ± 0.089, p < 0.01, while increased basal platelet activation for both fibrinogen binding and P-selectin expression (p < 0.05 was seen in participants with T2DM. Parameters of clot formation and clot lysis, stimulated platelet function (stimulated platelet response to ADP and sensitivity to prostacyclin, and endothelial function were unchanged.ConclusionWhile SF resulted in the potential of denser clot formation with enhanced basal platelet activation in T2DM, the dynamic clotting, platelet, and endothelial markers were not affected, suggesting that short-haul commercial flying adds no additional hazard for venous thromboembolism for participants with T2DM compared to controls.

  16. Breaking the mold: transcription factors in the anucleate platelet and platelet-derived microparticles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katie L Lannan

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Platelets are small anucleate blood cells derived from megakaryocytes. In addition to their pivotal roles in hemostasis, platelets are the smallest, yet most abundant, immune cell and regulate inflammation, immunity, and disease progression. Although platelets lack DNA, and thus no functional transcriptional activities, they are nonetheless rich sources of RNAs, possess an intact spliceosome, and are thus capable of synthesizing proteins. Previously, it was thought that platelet RNAs and translational machinery were remnants from the megakaryocyte. We now know that the initial description of platelets as cellular fragments is an antiquated notion, as mounting evidence suggests otherwise. Therefore, it is reasonable to hypothesize that platelet transcription factors are not vestigial remnants from megakaryoctes, but have important, if only partly understood functions. Proteins play multiple cellular roles to minimize energy expenditure for maximum cellular function; thus, the same can be expected for transcription factors. In fact, numerous transcription factors have non-genomic roles, both in platelets and in nucleated cells. Our lab and others have discovered the presence and nongenomic roles of transcription factors in platelets, such as the nuclear factor kappa β (NFκB family of proteins and peroxisome proliferator activated receptor gamma (PPARγ. In addition to numerous roles in regulating platelet activation, functional transcription factors can be transferred to vascular and immune cells through platelet microparticles. This method of transcellular delivery of key immune molecules may be a vital mechanism by which platelet transcription factors regulate inflammation and immunity. At the very least, platelets are an ideal model cell to dissect out the nongenomic roles of transcription factors in nucleated cells. There is abundant evidence to suggest that transcription factors in platelets play key roles in regulating inflammatory and

  17. Nonketotic hyperglycinemia: Functional assessment of missense variants in GLDC to understand phenotypes of the disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bravo-Alonso, Irene; Navarrete, Rosa; Arribas-Carreira, Laura; Perona, Almudena; Abia, David; Couce, María Luz; García-Cazorla, Angels; Morais, Ana; Domingo, Rosario; Ramos, María Antonia; Swanson, Michael A; Van Hove, Johan L K; Ugarte, Magdalena; Pérez, Belén; Pérez-Cerdá, Celia; Rodríguez-Pombo, Pilar

    2017-06-01

    The rapid analysis of genomic data is providing effective mutational confirmation in patients with clinical and biochemical hallmarks of a specific disease. This is the case for nonketotic hyperglycinemia (NKH), a Mendelian disorder causing seizures in neonates and early-infants, primarily due to mutations in the GLDC gene. However, understanding the impact of missense variants identified in this gene is a major challenge for the application of genomics into clinical practice. Herein, a comprehensive functional and structural analysis of 19 GLDC missense variants identified in a cohort of 26 NKH patients was performed. Mutant cDNA constructs were expressed in COS7 cells followed by enzymatic assays and Western blot analysis of the GCS P-protein to assess the residual activity and mutant protein stability. Structural analysis, based on molecular modeling of the 3D structure of GCS P-protein, was also performed. We identify hypomorphic variants that produce attenuated phenotypes with improved prognosis of the disease. Structural analysis allows us to interpret the effects of mutations on protein stability and catalytic activity, providing molecular evidence for clinical outcome and disease severity. Moreover, we identify an important number of mutants whose loss-of-functionality is associated with instability and, thus, are potential targets for rescue using folding therapeutic approaches. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  18. Alteration of Lymphocyte Phenotype and Function in Sickle Cell Anemia: Implications for Vaccine Responses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balandya, Emmanuel; Reynolds, Teri; Obaro, Stephen; Makani, Julie

    2016-01-01

    Individuals with sickle cell anemia (SCA) have increased susceptibility to infections, secondary to impairment of immune function. Besides the described dysfunction in innate immunity, including impaired opsonization and phagocytosis of bacteria, evidence of dysfunction of T and B lymphocytes in SCA has also been reported. This includes reduction in the proportion of circulating CD4+ and CD8+ T cells, reduction of CD4+ helper : CD8+ suppressor T cell ratio, aberrant activation and dysfunction of regulatory T cells (Treg), skewing of CD4+ T cells towards Th2 response and loss of IgM-secreting CD27+IgMhighIgDlow memory B cells. These changes occur on the background of immune activation characterized by predominance of memory CD4+ T cell phenotypes, increased Th17 signaling and elevated levels of C-reactive protein and pro-inflammatory cytokines IL-6 and TNF-α, which may affect the immunogenicity and protective efficacy of vaccines available to prevent infections in SCA. Thus, in order to optimize the use of vaccines in SCA, a thorough understanding of T and B lymphocyte functions and vaccine reactivity among individuals with SCA is needed. Studies should be encouraged of different SCA populations, including sub-Saharan Africa where the burden of SCA is highest. This article summarizes our current understanding of lymphocyte biology in SCA, and highlights areas that warrant future research. PMID:27237467

  19. Age-dependent changes in innate immune phenotype and function in rhesus macaques (Macaca mulatta

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mark Asquith

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Aged individuals are more susceptible to infections due to a general decline in immune function broadly referred to as immune senescence. While age-related changes in the adaptive immune system are well documented, aging of the innate immune system remains less well understood, particularly in nonhuman primates. A more robust understanding of age-related changes in innate immune function would provide mechanistic insight into the increased susceptibility of the elderly to infection. Rhesus macaques have proved a critical translational model for aging research, and present a unique opportunity to dissect age-dependent modulation of the innate immune system. We examined age-related changes in: (i innate immune cell frequencies; (ii expression of pattern recognition receptors (PRRs and innate signaling molecules; (iii cytokine responses of monocytes and dendritic cells (DC following stimulation with PRR agonists; and (iv plasma cytokine levels in this model. We found marked changes in both the phenotype and function of innate immune cells. This included an age-associated increased frequency of myeloid DC (mDC. Moreover, we found toll-like receptor (TLR agonists lipopolysaccharide (TLR4, fibroblast stimulating ligand-1 (TLR2/6, and ODN2006 (TLR7/9 induced reduced cytokine responses in aged mDC. Interestingly, with the exception of the monocyte-derived TNFα response to LPS, which increased with age, TNFα, IL-6, and IFNα responses declined with age. We also found that TLR4, TLR5, and innate negative regulator, sterile alpha and TIR motif containing protein (SARM, were all expressed at lower levels in young animals. By contrast, absent in melanoma 2 and retinoic acid-inducible gene I expression was lowest in aged animals. Together, these observations indicate that several parameters of innate immunity are significantly modulated by age and contribute to differential immune function in aged macaques.

  20. In vitro effect of sodium nitrite on platelet aggregation in human platelet rich plasma--preliminary report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kadan, M; Doğanci, S; Yildirim, V; Özgür, G; Erol, G; Karabacak, K; Avcu, F

    2015-10-01

    The role of nitrates and nitric oxide on platelet functions has obtained an increasing attention with respect to their potential effects on cardiovascular disorders. In this study we aimed to analyze the effect of sodium nitrite on platelet functions in human platelets. This in vitro study was designed to show the effect of sodium nitrite on platelet functions in seven healthy volunteers. Blood samples were centrifuged to prepare platelet rich plasma and platelet poor plasma. Platelet rich plasma was diluted with the platelet poor plasma to have a final count of 300,000 ± 25,000 platelets. Platelet rich plasma was incubated with six different increasing doses (from 10 μM to 5 mM) of sodium nitrite for 1 hour at 37°C. Then stimulating agents including collagen (3 μg ml-1), adenosine diphosphate (10 μM), and epinephrine (10 μM) were added to the cuvette. Changes in light transmission were observed for 10 minutes. In addition spontaneous aggregation were performed in control group with all aggregating agents separately. Effect of sodium nitrite on agonist-induced platelet aggregation depends on the concentration of sodium nitrite. Compared with control group, agonist-induced platelet aggregations were significantly suppressed by sodium nitrite at the concentration of 5, 1.0 and 0.5 mM. Our results suggested that sodium nitrite has inhibitory effects in vitro on platelet aggregation in a dose-dependent manner.

  1. Function, expression and localization of annexin A7 in platelets and red blood cells: Insights derived from an annexin A7 mutant mouse

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zamparelli Carlotta

    2003-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Annexin A7 is a Ca2+- and phospholipid-binding protein expressed as a 47 and 51 kDa isoform, which is thought to be involved in membrane fusion processes. Recently the 47 kDa isoform has been identified in erythrocytes where it was proposed to be a key component in the process of the Ca2+-dependent vesicle release, a process with which red blood cells might protect themselves against an attack by for example complement components. Results The role of annexin A7 in red blood cells was addressed in erythrocytes from anxA7-/- mice. Interestingly, the Ca2+-mediated vesiculation process was not impaired. Also, the membrane organization appeared not to be disturbed as assessed using gradient fractionation studies. Instead, lack of annexin A7 led to an altered cell shape and increased osmotic resistance of red blood cells. Annexin A7 was also identified in platelets. In these cells its loss led to a slightly slower aggregation velocity which seems to be compensated by an increased number of platelets. The results appear to rule out an important role of annexin A7 in membrane fusion processes occurring in red blood cells. Instead the protein might be involved in the organization of the membrane cytoskeleton. Red blood cells may represent an appropriate model to study the role of annexin A7 in cellular processes. Conclusion We have demonstrated the presence of both annexin A7 isoforms in red blood cells and the presence of the small isoform in platelets. In both cell types the loss of annexin A7 impairs cellular functions. The defects observed are however not compatible with a crucial role for annexin A7 in membrane fusion processes in these cell types.

  2. Loss-of-function and gain-of-function phenotypes of stomatocytosis mutant RhAG F65S

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stewart, Andrew K.; Shmukler, Boris E.; Vandorpe, David H.; Rivera, Alicia; Heneghan, John F.; Li, Xiaojin; Hsu, Ann; Karpatkin, Margaret; O'Neill, Allison F.; Bauer, Daniel E.; Heeney, Matthew M.; John, Kathryn; Kuypers, Frans A.; Gallagher, Patrick G.; Lux, Samuel E.; Brugnara, Carlo; Westhoff, Connie M.

    2011-01-01

    Four patients with overhydrated cation leak stomatocytosis (OHSt) exhibited the heterozygous RhAG missense mutation F65S. OHSt erythrocytes were osmotically fragile, with elevated Na and decreased K contents and increased cation channel-like activity. Xenopus oocytes expressing wild-type RhAG and RhAG F65S exhibited increased ouabain and bumetanide-resistant uptake of Li+ and 86Rb+, with secondarily increased 86Rb+ influx sensitive to ouabain and to bumetanide. Increased RhAG-associated 14C-methylammonium (MA) influx was severely reduced in RhAG F65S-expressing oocytes. RhAG-associated influxes of Li+, 86Rb+, and 14C-MA were pharmacologically distinct, and Li+ uptakes associated with RhAG and RhAG F65S were differentially inhibited by NH4+ and Gd3+. RhAG-expressing oocytes were acidified and depolarized by 5 mM bath NH3/NH4+, but alkalinized and depolarized by subsequent bath exposure to 5 mM methylammonium chloride (MA/MA+). RhAG F65S-expressing oocytes exhibited near-wild-type responses to NH4Cl, but MA/MA+ elicited attenuated alkalinization and strong hyperpolarization. Expression of RhAG or RhAG F65S increased steady-state cation currents unaltered by bath Li+ substitution or bath addition of 5 mM NH4Cl or MA/MA+. These oocyte studies suggest that 1) RhAG expression increases oocyte transport of NH3/NH4+ and MA/MA+; 2) RhAG F65S exhibits gain-of-function phenotypes of increased cation conductance/permeability, and loss-of-function phenotypes of decreased and modified MA/MA+ transport, and decreased NH3/NH4+-associated depolarization; and 3) RhAG transports NH3/NH4+ and MA/MA+ by distinct mechanisms, and/or the substrates elicit distinct cellular responses. Thus, RhAG F65S is a loss-of-function mutation for amine transport. The altered oocyte intracellular pH, membrane potential, and currents associated with RhAG or RhAG F65S expression may reflect distinct transport mechanisms. PMID:21849667

  3. Effect of platelet-rich plasma (PRP) concentration on proliferation, neurotrophic function and migration of Schwann cells in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Canbin; Zhu, Qingtang; Liu, Xiaolin; Huang, Xijun; He, Caifeng; Jiang, Li; Quan, Daping; Zhou, Xiang; Zhu, Zhaowei

    2016-05-01

    Platelet-rich plasma (PRP) contains various growth factors and appears to have the potential to promote peripheral nerve regeneration, but evidence is lacking regarding its biological effect on Schwann cells (SCs). The present study was designed to investigate the effect of PRP concentration on SCs in order to determine the plausibility of using this plasma-derived therapy for peripheral nerve injury. PRP was obtained from rats by double-step centrifugation and was characterized by determining platelet numbers and growth factor concentrations. Primary cultures of rat SCs were exposed to various concentrations of PRP (40%, 20%, 10%, 5% and 2.5%). Cell proliferation assays and flow cytometry were performed to study to assess SC proliferation. Quantitative real-time PCR and ELISA analysis were performed to determine the ability of PRP to induce SCs to produce nerve growth factor (NGF) and glial cell line-derived neurotrophic factor (GDNF). Microchemotaxis assay was used to analyse the cell migration capacity. The results obtained indicated that the platelet concentration and growth factors in our PRP preparations were significantly higher than in whole blood. Cell culture experiments showed that 2.5-20% PRP significantly stimulated SC proliferation and migration compared to untreated controls in a dose-dependent manner. In addition, the expression and secretion of NGF and GDNF were significantly increased. However, the above effects of SCs were suppressed by high PRP concentrations (40%). In conclusion, the appropriate concentration of PRP had the potency to stimulate cell proliferation, induced the synthesis of neurotrophic factors and significantly increased migration of SCs dose-dependently. Copyright © 2013 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. Copyright © 2013 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  4. Gain-of-function KCNJ6 Mutation in a Severe Hyperkinetic Movement Disorder Phenotype.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horvath, Gabriella A; Zhao, Yulin; Tarailo-Graovac, Maja; Boelman, Cyrus; Gill, Harinder; Shyr, Casper; Lee, James; Blydt-Hansen, Ingrid; Drögemöller, Britt I; Moreland, Jacqueline; Ross, Colin J; Wasserman, Wyeth W; Masotti, Andrea; Slesinger, Paul A; van Karnebeek, Clara D M

    2018-05-29

    Here, we describe a fourth case of a human with a de novo KCNJ6 (GIRK2) mutation, who presented with clinical findings of severe hyperkinetic movement disorder and developmental delay, similar to the Keppen-Lubinsky syndrome but without lipodystrophy. Whole-exome sequencing of the patient's DNA revealed a heterozygous de novo variant in the KCNJ6 (c.512T>G, p.Leu171Arg). We conducted in vitro functional studies to determine if this Leu-to-Arg mutation alters the function of GIRK2 channels. Heterologous expression of the mutant GIRK2 channel alone produced an aberrant basal inward current that lacked G protein activation, lost K + selectivity and gained Ca 2+ permeability. Notably, the inward current was inhibited by the Na + channel blocker QX-314, similar to the previously reported weaver mutation in murine GIRK2. Expression of a tandem dimer containing GIRK1 and GIRK2(p.Leu171Arg) did not lead to any currents, suggesting heterotetramers are not functional. In neurons expressing p.Leu171Arg GIRK2 channels, these changes in channel properties would be expected to generate a sustained depolarization, instead of the normal G protein-gated inhibitory response, which could be mitigated by expression of other GIRK subunits. The identification of the p.Leu171Arg GIRK2 mutation potentially expands the Keppen-Lubinsky syndrome phenotype to include severe dystonia and ballismus. Our study suggests screening for dominant KCNJ6 mutations in the evaluation of patients with severe movement disorders, which could provide evidence to support a causal role of KCNJ6 in neurological channelopathies. Copyright © 2018. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  5. Posterior association networks and functional modules inferred from rich phenotypes of gene perturbations.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xin Wang

    Full Text Available Combinatorial gene perturbations provide rich information for a systematic exploration of genetic interactions. Despite successful applications to bacteria and yeast, the scalability of this approach remains a major challenge for higher organisms such as humans. Here, we report a novel experimental and computational framework to efficiently address this challenge by limiting the 'search space' for important genetic interactions. We propose to integrate rich phenotypes of multiple single gene perturbations to robustly predict functional modules, which can subsequently be subjected to further experimental investigations such as combinatorial gene silencing. We present posterior association networks (PANs to predict functional interactions between genes estimated using a Bayesian mixture modelling approach. The major advantage of this approach over conventional hypothesis tests is that prior knowledge can be incorporated to enhance predictive power. We demonstrate in a simulation study and on biological data, that integrating complementary information greatly improves prediction accuracy. To search for significant modules, we perform hierarchical clustering with multiscale bootstrap resampling. We demonstrate the power of the proposed methodologies in applications to Ewing's sarcoma and human adult stem cells using publicly available and custom generated data, respectively. In the former application, we identify a gene module including many confirmed and highly promising therapeutic targets. Genes in the module are also significantly overrepresented in signalling pathways that are known to be critical for proliferation of Ewing's sarcoma cells. In the latter application, we predict a functional network of chromatin factors controlling epidermal stem cell fate. Further examinations using ChIP-seq, ChIP-qPCR and RT-qPCR reveal that the basis of their genetic interactions may arise from transcriptional cross regulation. A Bioconductor package

  6. The search for Pleiades in trait constellations: functional integration and phenotypic selection in the complex flowers of Morrenia brachystephana (Apocynaceae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baranzelli, M C; Sérsic, A N; Cocucci, A A

    2014-04-01

    Pollinator-mediated natural selection on single traits, such as corolla tube or spur length, has been well documented. However, flower phenotypes are usually complex, and selection is expected to act on several traits that functionally interact rather than on a single isolated trait. Despite the fact that selection on complex phenotypes is expectedly widespread, multivariate selection modelling on such phenotypes still remains under-explored in plants. Species of the subfamily Asclepiadoideae (Apocynaceae) provide an opportunity to study such complex flower contrivances integrated by fine-scaled organs from disparate developmental origin. We studied the correlation structure among linear floral traits (i) by testing a priori morphological, functional or developmental hypotheses among traits and (ii) by exploring the organization of flower covariation, considering alternative expectations of modular organization or whole flower integration through conditional dependence analysis (CDA) and integration matrices. The phenotypic selection approach was applied to determine whether floral traits involved in the functioning of the pollination mechanism were affected by natural selection. Floral integration was low, suggesting that flowers are organized in more than just one correlation pleiad; our hypothetical functional correlation matrix was significantly correlated with the empirical matrix, and the CDA revealed three putative modules. Analyses of phenotypic selection showed significant linear and correlational gradients, lending support to expectations of functional interactions between floral traits. Significant correlational selection gradients found involved traits of different floral whorls, providing evidence for the existence of functional integration across developmental domains. © 2014 The Authors. Journal of Evolutionary Biology © 2014 European Society For Evolutionary Biology.

  7. Analysis of mammalian gene function through broad-based phenotypic screens across a consortium of mouse clinics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    de Angelis, Martin Hrabě; Nicholson, George; Selloum, Mohammed

    2015-01-01

    The function of the majority of genes in the mouse and human genomes remains unknown. The mouse embryonic stem cell knockout resource provides a basis for the characterization of relationships between genes and phenotypes. The EUMODIC consortium developed and validated robust methodologies...

  8. Glycoprotein Ibalpha signalling in platelet apoptosis and clearance

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Wal, E.

    2010-01-01

    Storage of platelets at low temperature reduces bacterial growth and might better preserve the haemostatic function of platelets than current procedures. Incubation at 0C is known to expose ?-N-acetyl-D-glucosamine-residues on glycoprotein (GP)Ibalpha inducing receptor-clustering and platelet

  9. The Role of Platelets in Liver Inflammation and Regeneration

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lisman, Ton; Porte, Robert J.

    Platelets play a pivotal role in thrombosis and hemostasis, but an increasing variety of extra-hemostatic functions of platelets are being recognized. This review summarizes recent advances in the understanding of the role of platelets in various pathologies involving the liver. In

  10. Phenotypic, Functional, and Safety Control at Preimplantation Phase of MSC-Based Therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lech, Wioletta; Figiel-Dabrowska, Anna; Drela, Katarzyna; Obtulowicz, Patrycja; Noszczyk, Bartlomiej Henryk; Buzanska, Leonora

    2016-01-01

    Mesenchymal stem cells (MSC) exhibit enormous heterogeneity which can modify their regenerative properties and therefore influence therapeutic effectiveness as well as safety of these cells transplantation. In addition the high phenotypic plasticity of MSC population makes it enormously sensitive to any changes in environmental properties including fluctuation in oxygen concentration. We have shown here that lowering oxygen level far below air atmosphere has a beneficial impact on various parameters characteristic for umbilical cord Wharton Jelly- (WJ-) MSC and adipose tissue- (AD-) derived MSC cultures. This includes their cellular composition, rate of proliferation, and maintenance of stemness properties together with commitment to cell differentiation toward mesodermal and neural lineages. In addition, the culture genomic stability increased significantly during long-term cell passaging and eventually protected cells against spontaneous transformation. Also by comparing of two routinely used methods of MSCs isolation (mechanical versus enzymatic) we have found substantial divergence arising between cell culture properties increasing along the time of cultivation in vitro. Thus, in this paper we highlight the urgent necessity to develop the more sensitive and selective methods for prediction and control cells fate and functioning during the time of growth in vitro. PMID:27651796

  11. Functional and phenotypic evaluation of eosinophils from patients with the acute form of paracoccidioidomycosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Braga, Fernanda Gambogi; Ruas, Luciana Pereira; Pereira, Ricardo Mendes; Lima, Xinaida Taligare; Antunes, Edson; Mamoni, Ronei Luciano; Blotta, Maria Heloisa Souza Lima

    2017-05-01

    Eosinophilia is a typical finding of the acute/juvenile form of paracoccidioidomycosis (PCM), a systemic mycosis endemic in Latin America. This clinical form is characterized by depressed cellular immune response and production of Th2 cytokines. Moreover, it has been shown that the increased number of eosinophils in peripheral blood of patients returns to normal values after antifungal treatment. However, the role of eosinophils in PCM has never been evaluated. This study aimed to assess the phenotypic and functional characteristics of eosinophils in PCM. In 15 patients with the acute form of the disease, we detected expression of MBP, CCL5 (RANTES) and CCL11 (eotaxin) in biopsies of lymph nodes and liver. In addition, there were higher levels of chemokines and granule proteins in the peripheral blood of patients compared to controls. Isolation of eosinophils from blood revealed a higher frequency of CD69+ and TLR2+ eosinophils in patients compared to controls, and a lower population of CD80+ cells. We also evaluated the fungicidal capacity of eosinophils in vitro. Our results revealed that eosinophils from PCM patients and controls exhibit similar ability to kill P. brasiliensis yeast cells, although eosinophils of patients were less responsive to IL-5 stimulation than controls. In conclusion, we suggest that eosinophils might play a role in the host response to fungi and in the pathophysiology of PCM by inducing an intense and systemic inflammatory response in the initial phase of the infection.

  12. Phenotypic, Functional, and Safety Control at Preimplantation Phase of MSC-Based Therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lech, Wioletta; Figiel-Dabrowska, Anna; Sarnowska, Anna; Drela, Katarzyna; Obtulowicz, Patrycja; Noszczyk, Bartlomiej Henryk; Buzanska, Leonora; Domanska-Janik, Krystyna

    2016-01-01

    Mesenchymal stem cells (MSC) exhibit enormous heterogeneity which can modify their regenerative properties and therefore influence therapeutic effectiveness as well as safety of these cells transplantation. In addition the high phenotypic plasticity of MSC population makes it enormously sensitive to any changes in environmental properties including fluctuation in oxygen concentration. We have shown here that lowering oxygen level far below air atmosphere has a beneficial impact on various parameters characteristic for umbilical cord Wharton Jelly- (WJ-) MSC and adipose tissue- (AD-) derived MSC cultures. This includes their cellular composition, rate of proliferation, and maintenance of stemness properties together with commitment to cell differentiation toward mesodermal and neural lineages. In addition, the culture genomic stability increased significantly during long-term cell passaging and eventually protected cells against spontaneous transformation. Also by comparing of two routinely used methods of MSCs isolation (mechanical versus enzymatic) we have found substantial divergence arising between cell culture properties increasing along the time of cultivation in vitro. Thus, in this paper we highlight the urgent necessity to develop the more sensitive and selective methods for prediction and control cells fate and functioning during the time of growth in vitro.

  13. Platelet dysfunction associated with the novel Trp29Cys thromboxane A₂ receptor variant.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mumford, A D; Nisar, S; Darnige, L; Jones, M L; Bachelot-Loza, C; Gandrille, S; Zinzindohoue, F; Fischer, A-M; Mundell, S J; Gaussem, P

    2013-03-01

    Genetic variations that affect the structure of the thromboxane A2 receptor (TP receptor) provide insights into the function of this key platelet and vascular receptor, but are very rare in unselected populations. To determine the functional consequences of the TP receptor Trp29Cys (W29C) substitution. We performed a detailed phenotypic analysis of an index case (P1) with reduced platelet aggregation and secretion responses to TP receptor pathway activators, and a heterozygous TP receptor W29C substitution. An analysis of the variant W29C TP receptor expressed in heterologous cells was performed. Total TP receptor expression in platelets from P1 was similar to that of controls, but there was reduced maximum binding and reduced affinity of binding to the TP receptor antagonist [(3) H]SQ29548. HEK293 cells transfected with W29C TP receptor cDNA showed similar total TP receptor expression to wild-type (WT) controls. However, the TP receptor agonist U46619 was less potent at inducing rises in cytosolic free Ca(2+) in HEK293 cells expressing the W29C TP receptor than in WT controls, indicating reduced receptor function. Immunofluorescence microscopy and cell surface ELISA showed intracellular retention and reduced cell surface expression of the W29C TP receptor in HEK293 cells. Consistent with the platelet phenotype, both maximum binding and the affinity of binding of [(3) H]SQ29548 to the W29C TP receptor were reduced compared to WT controls. These findings extend the phenotypic description of the very rare disorder TP receptor deficiency, and show that the W29C substitution reduces TP receptor function by reducing surface receptor expression and by disrupting ligand binding. © 2012 International Society on Thrombosis and Haemostasis.

  14. Effects of ticagrelor versus clopidogrel on platelet function in fibrinolytic-treated STEMI patients undergoing early PCI.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dehghani, Payam; Lavoie, Andrea; Lavi, Shahar; Crawford, Jennifer J; Harenberg, Sebastian; Zimmermann, Rodney H; Booker, Jeff; Kelly, Sheila; Cantor, Warren J; Mehta, Shamir R; Bagai, Akshay; Goodman, Shaun G; Cheema, Asim N

    2017-10-01

    Patients undergoing PCI early after fibrinolytic therapy are at high risk for both thrombotic and bleeding complications. We sought to assess the pharmacodynamic effects of ticagrelor versus clopidogrel in the fibrinolytic-treated STEMI patients undergoing early PCI. Patients undergoing PCI within 24 hours of tenecteplase (TNK), aspirin, and clopidogrel for STEMI were randomized to receive additional clopidogrel 300 mg followed by 75 mg daily or ticagrelor 180 mg followed by 90 mg twice daily. The platelet reactivity units (PRU) were measured with the VerifyNow Assay before study drug administration (baseline) at 4 and 24 hours post-PCI. The primary end point was PRU ≤208 at 4 hours. A total of 140 patients (74 in ticagrelor and 66 in clopidogrel group) were enrolled. The mean PRU values at baseline were similar for the 2 groups (257.8±52.9 vs 259.5±56.7, P=.85, respectively). Post-PCI, patients on ticagrelor, compared to those on clopidogrel, had significantly lower PRU at 4 hours (78.7±88 vs 193.6±86.5, respectively, PPCI frequently had PRU >208. In this high-risk population, ticagrelor provides more prompt and potent platelet inhibition compared with clopidogrel (Funded by Astra Zeneca; NCT01930591, https://clinicaltrials.gov/ct2/show/NCT01930591). Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Highly efficient transduction of human plasmacytoid dendritic cells without phenotypic and functional maturation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Plumas Joel

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Gene modified dendritic cells (DC are able to modulate DC functions and induce therapeutic immunity or tolerance in an antigen-specific manner. Among the different DC subsets, plasmacytoid DC (pDC are well known for their ability to recognize and respond to a variety of viruses by secreting high levels of type I interferon. Methods We analyzed here, the transduction efficiency of a pDC cell line, GEN2.2, and of pDC derived from CD34+ progenitors, using lentiviral vectors (LV pseudotyped with different envelope glycoproteins such as the vesicular stomatitis virus envelope (VSVG, the gibbon ape leukaemia virus envelope (GaLV or the feline endogenous virus envelope (RD114. At the same time, we evaluated transgene expression (E-GFP reporter gene under the control of different promoters. Results We found that efficient gene transfer into pDC can be achieved with VSVG-pseudotyped lentiviral vectors (LV under the control of phoshoglycerate kinase (PGK and elongation factor-1 (EF1α promoters (28% to 90% of E-GFP+ cells, respectively in the absence of phenotypic and functional maturation. Surprisingly, promoters (desmin or synthetic C5–12 described as muscle-specific and which drive gene expression in single strand AAV vectors in gene therapy protocols were very highly active in pDC using VSVG-LV. Conclusion Taken together, our results indicate that LV vectors can serve to design pDC-based vaccines in humans, and they are also useful in vitro to evaluate the immunogenicity of the vector preparations, and the specificity and safety of given promoters used in gene therapy protocols.

  16. Blood platelet kinetics and platelet transfusion

    OpenAIRE

    Aster, Richard H.

    2013-01-01

    The discovery of citrate anticoagulant in the 1920s and the development of plastic packs for blood collection in the 1960s laid the groundwork for platelet transfusion therapy on a scale not previously possible. A major limitation, however, was the finding that platelet concentrates prepared from blood anticoagulated with citrate were unsuitable for transfusion because of platelet clumping. We found that this could be prevented by simply reducing the pH of platelet-rich plasma to about 6.5 pr...

  17. Phenotypic and functional analysis of CD1a+ dendritic cells from cats chronically infected with feline immunodeficiency virus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Lin; Reckling, Stacie; Dean, Gregg A

    2015-10-01

    Numerous studies suggest dendritic cell (DC) dysfunction is central to the dysregulated immune response during HIV infection; however, in vivo studies are lacking. In the present study we used feline immunodeficiency virus (FIV) infection of cats as a model for HIV-1 infection to assess the maturation and function of dendritic cells, in vivo and in vitro. We compared CD1a+ DC migration, surface phenotype, endocytosis, mixed leukocyte reaction (MLR) and regulatory T cell (Treg) phenotype induction by CD1a+ cells isolated from lymph nodes of FIV-infected and control cats. Results showed that resident CD1a+ DC in lymph nodes of chronically FIV-infected cats are phenotypically mature, can stimulate normal primary T cell proliferation, override Treg suppression and do not skew toward Treg induction. In contrast, FIV infection had deleterious effects on antigen presentation and migratory capacity of CD1a+ cells in tissues. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Evaluation of platelet aggregation in platelet concentrates: storage implications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Neiva Teresinha J.C.

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available The use of hemo-derivatives is nowadays a fundamentally important therapeutic modality in the exercise of medicine. Among the various hemo-components employed, we have the platelet concentrate (PC, indicated in cases of hemorrhagic disturbances. We previously showed that platelet function in blood donors is reduced in their screening phase and after the separation process of PCs. Currently, we are providing evidence for the existence of biochemical and functional changes in PC preparations stored for three days at temperatures of 20 ± 2 ºC. Platelet concentrates from 40 healthy donors, collected in CPD anticoagulant and PL-146 polyvinylchloride containers, were examined in order to determine the pH value, pCO2 ,pO2 and lactate concentrations. In addition, the aggregation of platelets with thrombin and collagen were examined to evaluate platelet function. A pH increase from 7.07 ± 0.04 to 7.36 ± 0.07 (p < 0.01 was observed. The pCO2 concentration decreased progressively from 69.2 ± 7.7 mmHg to 28.8 ± 6.2 mmHg (p < 0.001 during the storage period. In contrast, pO2 value increase from 103.4 ± 30.6 to 152.3 ± 24.6 mmHg (p < 0.001 was evidenced during the 48 hours of storage. The lactate concentration increased from 17.97 ± 5.2 to 57.21 ± 5.7 mg/dl (p < 0.001. Platelet aggregation using 0.25 U/ml-thrombin and 2.0 µg/ml-collagen showed significant hypofunction from 61.8 ± 2.7% to 24.8 ± 9.8% and 62.7±5.0 to 33.4± 6.2 (p < 0.001, respectively. We concluded that the evaluated biochemical parameters and the platelet function changed significantly when the platelets were kept under routine storage conditions.

  19. Peptide-Mediated Platelet Capture at Gold Micropore Arrays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adamson, Kellie; Spain, Elaine; Prendergast, Una; Moran, Niamh; Forster, Robert J; Keyes, Tia E

    2016-11-30

    Ordered spherical cap gold cavity arrays with 5.4, 1.6, and 0.98 μm diameter apertures were explored as capture surfaces for human blood platelets to investigate the impact of surface geometry and chemical modification on platelet capture efficiency and their potential as platforms for surface enhanced Raman spectroscopy of single platelets. The substrates were chemically modified with single-constituent self-assembled monolayers (SAM) or mixed SAMs comprised of thiol-functionalized arginine-glycine-aspartic acid (RGD, a platelet integrin target) with or without 1-octanethiol (adhesion inhibitor). As expected, platelet adhesion was promoted and inhibited at RGD and alkanethiol modified surfaces, respectively. Platelet adhesion was reversible, and binding efficiency at the peptide modified substrates correlated inversely with pore diameter. Captured platelets underwent morphological change on capture, the extent of which depended on the topology of the underlying substrate. Regioselective capture of the platelets enabled study for the first time of the surface enhanced Raman spectroscopy of single blood platelets, yielding high quality Raman spectroscopy of individual platelets at 1.6 μm diameter pore arrays. Given the medical importance of blood platelets across a range of diseases from cancer to psychiatric illness, such approaches to platelet capture may provide a useful route to Raman spectroscopy for platelet related diagnostics.

  20. Phenotype and Function of CD209+ Bovine Blood Dendritic Cells, Monocyte-Derived-Dendritic Cells and Monocyte-Derived Macrophages.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kun Taek Park

    Full Text Available Phylogenic comparisons of the mononuclear phagocyte system (MPS of humans and mice demonstrate phenotypic divergence of dendritic cell (DC subsets that play similar roles in innate and adaptive immunity. Although differing in phenotype, DC can be classified into four groups according to ontogeny and function: conventional DC (cDC1 and cDC2, plasmacytoid DC (pDC, and monocyte derived DC (MoDC. DC of Artiodactyla (pigs and ruminants can also be sub-classified using this system, allowing direct functional and phenotypic comparison of MoDC and other DC subsets trafficking in blood (bDC. Because of the high volume of blood collections required to study DC, cattle offer the best opportunity to further our understanding of bDC and MoDC function in an outbred large animal species. As reported here, phenotyping DC using a monoclonal antibody (mAb to CD209 revealed CD209 is expressed on the major myeloid population of DC present in blood and MoDC, providing a phenotypic link between these two subsets. Additionally, the present study demonstrates that CD209 is also expressed on monocyte derived macrophages (MoΦ. Functional analysis revealed each of these populations can take up and process antigens (Ags, present them to CD4 and CD8 T cells, and elicit a T-cell recall response. Thus, bDC, MoDC, and MoΦ pulsed with pathogens or candidate vaccine antigens can be used to study factors that modulate DC-driven T-cell priming and differentiation ex vivo.

  1. Comparison of prophylactic effect of UGIB and effects on platelet function between PPIs and H2RAs combined with DAPT: systematic review and meta-analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yi Z

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Zhan-Miao Yi,1 Ting-Ting Qiu,1,2 Yuan Zhang,3 Zhi-Yan Liu,1 Suo-Di Zhai1 1Department of Pharmacy, Peking University Third Hospital, Beijing, 2Department of Pharmacy, China Pharmaceutical University, Nanjing, People’s Republic of China; 3Department of Clinical Epidemiology and Biostatistics, McMaster University, Hamilton, ON, Canada Objective: We compared prophylactic effects of proton pump inhibitors (PPIs and histamine-2 receptor antagonists (H2RAs on upper gastrointestinal bleeding (UGIB associated with dual antiplatelet therapy (DAPT and explored this influence on platelet function. Methods: Randomized controlled trials and cohort studies comparing PPIs with H2RAs in adults receiving DAPT were collected from PubMed, EMBASE and Cochrane databases. Dichotomous data were pooled to obtain risk ratios (RRs for UGIB, major adverse cardiovascular events (MACEs, poor responders to clopidogrel and rehospitalization, and continuous data were pooled to obtain mean differences (MDs for P2Y12 reaction units (PRUs, with 95% confidence intervals (CIs. Results: Twelve clinical trials (n=3,301 met the inclusion criteria. Compared to H2RAs, PPIs lessened UGIB (RR =0.16, 95% CI: 0.03–0.70, and there was no significant difference in the incidence of PRUs (MD =18.21 PRUs, 95% CI: -4.11–40.54, poor responders to clopidogrel (RR =1.21, 95% CI: 0.92–1.61, incidence of MACEs (RR =0.89, 95% CI: 0.45–1.75 or rehospitalization (RR =1.76, 95% CI: 0.79–3.92. Subgroup analysis confirmed fewer PRUs in the H2RAs group compared to the omeprazole group (2 studies, n=189, MD =31.80 PRUs, 95% CI: 11.65–51.96. However, poor responder data for clopidogrel and MACEs might be unreliable because few studies of this kind were included. Conclusion: Limited evidence indicates that PPIs were better than H2RAs for prophylaxis of UGIB associated with DAPT and had no effect on platelet function. Further study is needed to confirm these observations. Keywords: proton pump

  2. Macrophage reaction against biomaterials in the mouse model - Phenotypes, functions and markers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klopfleisch, R

    2016-10-01

    The foreign body reaction (FBR) is a response of the host tissue against more or less degradation-resistant foreign macromolecular material. The reaction is divided into five different phases which involve most aspects of the innate and the adaptive immune system: protein adsorption, acute and chronic inflammation, foreign body giant cell formation and fibrosis. It is long known, that macrophages play a central role in all of these phases except for protein adsorption. Initially it was believed that the macrophage driven FBR has a complete negative effect on biocompatibility. Recent progress in biomaterial and macrophage research however describe macrophages as more than pure antigen phagocytosing and presenting cells and thus pro-inflammatory cells involved in biomaterial encapsulation and failure. Quite contrary, both, pro-inflammatory M1 macrophages, the diverse regulatory M2 macrophage subtypes and even foreign body giant cells (FBGC) are after necessary for integration of non-degradable biomaterials and degradation and replacement of degradable biomaterials. This review gives a comprehensive overview on the taxonomy of the currently known macrophage subtypes. Their diverging functions, metabolism and markers are summarized and the relevance of this more diverse macrophage picture for the design of biomaterials is shortly discussed. The view on role of macrophages in the foreign body reaction against biomaterials is rapidly changing. Despite the initial idea that macrophage are mainly involved in undesired degradation and biomaterial rejection it becomes now clear that they are nevertheless necessary for proper integration of non-degradable biomaterials and degradation of placeholder, degradable biomaterials. As a pathologist I experienced a lack on a good summary on the current taxonomy, functions and phenotypes of macrophages in my recent projects on the biocompatibility of biomaterials in the mouse model. The submitted review therefore intends to gives a

  3. Hypothermia and Platelet Dysfunction

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Michelson, Alan

    1993-01-01

    ... (the OPlib-Illa complex).3 Circulating platelets are normally in a resting state and, despite the presence of platelet surface GPTh-IX and OPlib-Illa complexes, they bind neither plasma von Willebrand factor nor plasma fibrinogen...

  4. Hypothermia and Platelet Dysfunction

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Michelson, A

    1994-01-01

    ... (the GPIIb-IIIa complex). Circulating platelets are normally in a resting state and, despite the presence of platelet surface GPIb-IX and GPIIb-IIIa complexes, they bind neither plasma von Willebrand factor nor plasma fibrinogen...

  5. Phenotypic and functional characteristics of blood natural killer cells from melanoma patients at different clinical stages.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giulia Fregni

    Full Text Available Melanomas are aggressive skin tumors characterized by high metastatic potential. Immunotherapy is a valuable alternative for metastatic melanoma patients resistant to chemotherapy. Natural Killer (NK cells are efficient anti-tumor cytotoxic effectors. We previously showed that blood NK cells from stage IV metastatic melanoma patients display decreased NK receptors and that chemotherapy modifies the functional status of blood NK cells. To investigate the role of NK cells along melanoma progression, we have here studied NK cells from patients at different stages of the disease. First, we showed that ex vivo NK cells from certain stage III-IV patients displayed low degranulation potential. Using a dynamic label-free assay, we found that immunoselected IL-2 activated blood NK cells from patients efficiently lysed melanoma cells through NKp46 and NKG2D receptors, independently to the clinical stage. Moreover, the ex vivo phenotype of circulating NK cells from 33 patients (stage I to IV was extensively analyzed. NK cells from patients displayed higher variability in the percentages of Natural Cytotoxicity Receptors (NCR and Natural Killer Group 2D (NKG2D receptor expression compared to donor NK cells. The main defect was the decreased expression of NCR1 (NKp46 by NK cells from metastatic patients. Interestingly, we found a positive correlation between the NK cell percentages of NKp46 and the duration of stage IV in melanoma patients. Finally, we showed that NK cells infiltrated primary melanomas and displayed a predominant peritumoral distribution. These results are new arguments for the development of NK-based therapies in melanoma patients.

  6. Platelet cyclooxygenase expression in normal dogs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomason, J; Lunsford, K; Mullins, K; Stokes, J; Pinchuk, L; Wills, R; McLaughlin, R; Langston, C; Pruett, S; Mackin, A

    2011-01-01

    Human platelets express both cyclooxygenase-1 (COX-1) and cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2). Variation in COX-2 expression could be a mechanism for variable response to aspirin. The hypotheses were that circulating canine platelets express COX-1 and COX-2, and that aspirin alters COX expression. The objective was to identify changes in platelet COX expression and in platelet function caused by aspirin administration to dogs. Eight female, intact hounds. A single population, repeated measures design was used to evaluate platelet COX-1 and COX-2 expression by flow cytometry before and after aspirin (10 mg/kg Q12h for 10 days). Platelet function was analyzed via PFA-100(®) (collagen/epinephrine), and urine 11-dehydro-thromboxane B(2) (11-dTXB(2)) was measured and normalized to urinary creatinine. Differences in COX expression, PFA-100(®) closure times, and urine 11-dTXB(2 ): creatinine ratio were analyzed before and after aspirin administration. Both COX-1 and COX-2 were expressed in canine platelets. COX-1 mean fluorescent intensity (MFI) increased in all dogs, by 250% (range 63-476%), while COX-2 expression did not change significantly (P = 0.124) after aspirin exposure, with large interindividual variation. PFA-100(®) closure times were prolonged and urine 11-dTXB(2) concentration decreased in all dogs after aspirin administration. Canine platelets express both COX isoforms. After aspirin exposure, COX-1 expression increased despite impairment of platelet function, while COX-2 expression varied markedly among dogs. Variability in platelet COX-2 expression should be explored as a potential mechanism for, or marker of, variable aspirin responsiveness. Copyright © 2011 by the American College of Veterinary Internal Medicine.

  7. The sensitivity of tests to detect in vivo platelet activation induced by ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    No influence on the results of the platelet function tests was found. Tile only test capable of detecting limited injury to the endothelium was the measurement of plasma PF4: The mean platelet life-span (MPLS) shortened, mean platelet density decreased, the circulating platelet aggregate ratio decreased, and plasma levels ...

  8. Dabigatran reduces thrombin-induced platelet aggregation and activation in a dose-dependent manner

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vinholt, Pernille Just; Nielsen, Christian; Söderström, Anna Cecilia

    2017-01-01

    Dabigatran is an oral anticoagulant and a reversible inhibitor of thrombin. Further, dabigatran might affect platelet function through a direct effect on platelet thrombin receptors. The aim was to investigate the effect of dabigatran on platelet activation and platelet aggregation. Healthy donor...

  9. Effect of Continuous Positive Airway Pressure Ventilation on Platelet-activating Factor and Blood Coagulation Function in Patients with Obstructive Sleep Apnea-hypopnea Syndrome

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen Xiangkun; Sheng Chunyong

    2010-01-01

    To investigate the effect of continuous positive airway pressure ventilation (CPAP) on platelet-activating factor (PAF) expression and blood coagulation function in patients with obstructive sleep apnea-hypopnea syndrome (OSAS), the blood sample of 40 patients with OSAS were taken before treatment and on the day 30 after treatment respectively. PAF, thromboxane B 2 (TXB2), prothrombin time (PT), activated partial thromboplastin time (APTT) and fibrin(FIB) in patients and 37 health controls were detected. The results showed that PAF, TXB2, FIB in OSAS patients before treatment were significantly higher than those of after treatment and control group (P 0.05). There were abnormal expression of PAF and hypercoagulability in OSAS patients. CPAP could effectively decrease the expression of PAF, TXB 2 and could also correct dysfunction of blood coagulation. It had certain effect in lightening the clinical symptoms in OSAS patients. (authors)

  10. Platelet Count and Plateletcrit

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    strated that neonates with late onset sepsis (bacteremia after 3 days of age) had a dramatic increase in MPV and. PDW18. We hypothesize that as the MPV and PDW increase and platelet count and PCT decrease in sick children, intui- tively, the ratio of MPV to PCT; MPV to Platelet count,. PDW to PCT, PDW to platelet ...

  11. Genotype-phenotype correlation and functional studies in patients with cystic fibrosis bearing CFTR complex alleles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Terlizzi, Vito; Castaldo, Giuseppe; Salvatore, Donatello; Lucarelli, Marco; Raia, Valeria; Angioni, Adriano; Carnovale, Vincenzo; Cirilli, Natalia; Casciaro, Rosaria; Colombo, Carla; Di Lullo, Antonella Miriam; Elce, Ausilia; Iacotucci, Paola; Comegna, Marika; Scorza, Manuela; Lucidi, Vincenzina; Perfetti, Anna; Cimino, Roberta; Quattrucci, Serena; Seia, Manuela; Sofia, Valentina Maria; Zarrilli, Federica; Amato, Felice

    2017-04-01

    The effect of complex alleles in cystic fibrosis (CF) is poorly defined for the lack of functional studies. To describe the genotype-phenotype correlation and the results of either in vitro and ex vivo studies performed on nasal epithelial cells (NEC) in a cohort of patients with CF carrying cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator ( CFTR ) complex alleles. We studied 70 homozygous, compound heterozygous or heterozygous for CFTR mutations: p.[Arg74Trp;Val201Met;Asp1270Asn], n=8; p.[Ile148Thr;Ile1023_Val1024del], n=5; p.[Arg117Leu;Leu997Phe], n=6; c.[1210-34TG[12];1210-12T[5];2930C>T], n=3; p.[Arg74Trp;Asp1270Asn], n=4; p.Asp1270Asn, n=2; p.Ile148Thr, n=6; p.Leu997Phe, n=36. In 39 patients, we analysed the CFTR gating activity on NEC in comparison with patients with CF (n=8) and carriers (n=4). Finally, we analysed in vitro the p.[Arg74Trp;Val201Met;Asp1270Asn] complex allele. The p.[Ile148Thr;Ile1023_Val1024del] caused severe CF in five compound heterozygous with a class I-II mutation. Their CFTR activity on NEC was comparable with patients with two class I-II mutations (mean 7.3% vs 6.9%). The p.[Arg74Trp;Asp1270Asn] and the p.Asp1270Asn have scarce functional effects, while p.[Arg74Trp;Val201Met;Asp1270Asn] caused mild CF in four of five subjects carrying a class I-II mutation in trans , or CFTR-related disorders (CFTR-RD) in three having in trans a class IV-V mutation. The p.[Arg74Trp;Val201Met;Asp1270Asn] causes significantly (pT] and a class I-II mutation had mild CF or CFTR-RD (gating activity: 18.5-19.0%). The effect of complex alleles partially depends on the mutation in trans . Although larger studies are necessary, the CFTR activity on NEC is a rapid contributory tool to classify patients with CFTR dysfunction. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://www.bmj.com/company/products-services/rights-and-licensing/.

  12. The life cycle of platelet granules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharda, Anish; Flaumenhaft, Robert

    2018-01-01

    Platelet granules are unique among secretory vesicles in both their content and their life cycle. Platelets contain three major granule types-dense granules, α-granules, and lysosomes-although other granule types have been reported. Dense granules and α-granules are the most well-studied and the most physiologically important. Platelet granules are formed in large, multilobulated cells, termed megakaryocytes, prior to transport into platelets. The biogenesis of dense granules and α-granules involves common but also distinct pathways. Both are formed from the trans -Golgi network and early endosomes and mature in multivesicular bodies, but the formation of dense granules requires trafficking machinery different from that of α-granules. Following formation in the megakaryocyte body, both granule types are transported through and mature in long proplatelet extensions prior to the release of nascent platelets into the bloodstream. Granules remain stored in circulating platelets until platelet activation triggers the exocytosis of their contents. Soluble N -ethylmaleimide-sensitive factor attachment protein receptor (SNARE) proteins, located on both the granules and target membranes, provide the mechanical energy that enables membrane fusion during both granulogenesis and exocytosis. The function of these core fusion engines is controlled by SNARE regulators, which direct the site, timing, and extent to which these SNAREs interact and consequently the resulting membrane fusion. In this review, we assess new developments in the study of platelet granules, from their generation to their exocytosis.

  13. Tissue-Resident Memory CD8+ T Cells: From Phenotype to Function

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David J. Topham

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Tissue-resident memory CD8+ T cells are an important first line of defense from infection in peripheral non-lymphoid tissues, such as the mucosal tissues of the respiratory, digestive, and urogenital tracts. This memory T cell subset is established late during resolution of primary infection of those tissues, has a distinct genetic signature, and is often defined by the cell surface expression of CD69, CD103, CD49a, and CD44 in both mouse and human studies. The stimuli that program or imprint the unique gene expression and cell surface phenotypes on TRM are beginning to be defined, but much work remains to be done. It is not clear, for example, when and where the TRM precursors receive these signals, and there is evidence that supports imprinting in both the lymph node and the peripheral tissue sites. In most studies, expression of CD49a, CD103, and CD69 on T cells in the tissues appears relatively late in the response, suggesting there are precise environmental cues that are not present at the height of the acute response. CD49a and CD103 are not merely biomarkers of TRM, they confer substrate specificities for cell adhesion to collagen and E-cadherin, respectively. Yet, little attention has been paid to how expression affects the positioning of TRM in the peripheral tissues. CD103 and CD49a are not mutually exclusive, and not always co-expressed, although whether they can compensate for one another is unknown. In fact, they may define different subsets of TRM in certain tissues. For instance, while CD49a+CD8+ memory T cells can be found in almost all peripheral tissues, CD103 appears to be more restricted. In this review, we discuss the evidence for how these hallmarks of TRM affect positioning of T cells in peripheral sites, how CD49a and CD103 differ in expression and function, and why they are important for immune protection conferred by TRM in mucosal tissues such as the respiratory tract.

  14. MEAN PLATELET VOLUME AND RISK OF THROMBOTIC STROKE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Prasantha Kumar Thankappan

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND Stroke is a major cause of long term morbidity and mortality. Several factors are known to increase the liability to stroke. Platelets play a crucial role in the pathogenesis of atherosclerotic complications, contributing to thrombus formation. Platelet size (mean platelet volume, MPV is a marker and possible determinant of platelet function, large platelets being potentially more reactive. Hence an attempt has-been made to study the association if any between mean platelet volume and thrombotic stroke. The aim of this study was to determine whether an association exists between Mean Platelet Volume (MPV and thrombotic stroke. MATERIALS AND METHODS The study is a case control study and data was collected at Government Medical College Hospital, Kottayam, Kerala a tertiary care referral centre. The study was carried out among fifty patients diagnosed with thrombotic stroke and presenting to the hospital within forty eight hours of onset of symptoms. Fifty age group and sex matched controls were also recruited. Mean platelet volume was obtained using a SYSMEX automated analyser. RESULTS This study has shown a statistically significant relation between mean platelet volume and risk of thrombotic stroke but no statistically significant correlation between clinical severity of stroke and mean platelet volume. CONCLUSION This study has shown an elevation of MPV in acute phase of thrombotic stroke. Platelet mass was found to be more or less a constant. This study did not find a statistically significant correlation between clinical severity of stroke and mean platelet volume.

  15. Leveraging Comparative Genomics to Identify and Functionally Characterize Genes Associated with Sperm Phenotypes in Python bivittatus (Burmese Python

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kristopher J. L. Irizarry

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Comparative genomics approaches provide a means of leveraging functional genomics information from a highly annotated model organism’s genome (such as the mouse genome in order to make physiological inferences about the role of genes and proteins in a less characterized organism’s genome (such as the Burmese python. We employed a comparative genomics approach to produce the functional annotation of Python bivittatus genes encoding proteins associated with sperm phenotypes. We identify 129 gene-phenotype relationships in the python which are implicated in 10 specific sperm phenotypes. Results obtained through our systematic analysis identified subsets of python genes exhibiting associations with gene ontology annotation terms. Functional annotation data was represented in a semantic scatter plot. Together, these newly annotated Python bivittatus genome resources provide a high resolution framework from which the biology relating to reptile spermatogenesis, fertility, and reproduction can be further investigated. Applications of our research include (1 production of genetic diagnostics for assessing fertility in domestic and wild reptiles; (2 enhanced assisted reproduction technology for endangered and captive reptiles; and (3 novel molecular targets for biotechnology-based approaches aimed at reducing fertility and reproduction of invasive reptiles. Additional enhancements to reptile genomic resources will further enhance their value.

  16. Structural and functional concepts in current mouse phenotyping and archiving facilities

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Kollmus, H.; Post, R.; Brielmeier, M.; Fernandez, J.; Fuchs, H.; McKerlie, C.; Montoliu, L.; Otaegui, P.J.; Rebelo, M.; Riedesel, H.; Ruberte, J.; Sedláček, Radislav; de Angelis, M.H.; Schughart, K.

    2012-01-01

    Roč. 51, č. 4 (2012), s. 418-435 ISSN 1559-6109 Grant - others:7.RP EU(XE) 211404 Program:FP7 Institutional support: RVO:68378050 Keywords : Infrafrontier * phenotyping * archiving * animal facility design Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology Impact factor: 1.145, year: 2012

  17. USE OF VITAL STAINING IN STORED HUMAN PLATELETS MORPHOFUNCTIONAL ANALYSIS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. S. Makarov

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Apheresis and pooled platelet concentrates, stored at 22°C during 5 days, were studied with morho-functional platelet rate analysis, based on vital cell staining and registration with fluorescent microscope. It was revealed that apheresis and pooled PC had, on the average, normal values of morphological and functional parameters. On the other hand, both PC kept MFPR of cells only for 2 days storage. Longer PC storage caused the significant decay of morphological and functional platelet parameters.

  18. Platelets of patients with chronic kidney disease demonstrate deficient platelet reactivity in vitro

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    van Bladel Esther R

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In patients with chronic kidney disease studies focusing on platelet function and properties often are non-conclusive whereas only few studies use functional platelet tests. In this study we evaluated a recently developed functional flow cytometry based assay for the analysis of platelet function in chronic kidney disease. Methods Platelet reactivity was measured using flow cytometric analysis. Platelets in whole blood were triggered with different concentrations of agonists (TRAP, ADP, CRP. Platelet activation was quantified with staining for P-selectin, measuring the mean fluorescence intensity. Area under the curve and the concentration of half-maximal response were determined. Results We studied 23 patients with chronic kidney disease (9 patients with cardiorenal failure and 14 patients with end stage renal disease and 19 healthy controls. Expression of P-selectin on the platelet surface measured as mean fluorescence intensity was significantly less in chronic kidney disease patients compared to controls after maximal stimulation with TRAP (9.7 (7.9-10.8 vs. 11.4 (9.2-12.2, P = 0.032, ADP (1.6 (1.2-2.1 vs. 2.6 (1.9-3.5, P = 0.002 and CRP (9.2 (8.5-10.8 vs. 11.5 (9.5-12.9, P = 0.004. Also the area under the curve was significantly different. There was no significant difference in half-maximal response between both groups. Conclusion In this study we found that patients with chronic kidney disease show reduced platelet reactivity in response of ADP, TRAP and CRP compared to controls. These results contribute to our understanding of the aberrant platelet function observed in patients with chronic kidney disease and emphasize the significance of using functional whole blood platelet activation assays.

  19. Extended shelf life of random donor platelets stored for 7 days in platelet additive solution at different temperatures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tulika Chandra

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Background: Platelets are routinely stored in plasma for 5 days at an average temperature of 22°C. In the present study, the shelf life of random donor platelets was extended by storing for 7 days with and without additive solution at temperatures of 22°C, 18°C, and 16°C. Methods: Random donor platelets were stored in 100% plasma and 20%/80% platelet additive solution. The data were compared using paired "t"- test. The confidence limit was kept at 95%, hence a "p" < 0.05 was considered to be statistically significant. Results: Out of total 150 samples, 148 samples were analyzed and 2 were discarded due to the bacterial contamination on day 7 at 22°C without platelet additive solution. A significant difference in platelet count, platelet factor 3 (PF 3, glucose, lactate dehydrogenase (LDH, and platelet aggregation was observed on day 7 (p < 0.001 at 16°C in without platelet additive solution. In platelet additive solution, the mean values of platelet count, platelet distribution width (PDW, LDH, and pH showed no significant difference on day 7 at 22°C, 18°C, and 16°C. Only significant differences were observed in the levels of mean platelet volume (MPV, PF 3, glucose, and platelet aggregation on day 7 (p < 0.001 at 16°C of the storage period. Conclusion: Random donor platelets functions are better maintained in platelet additive solution as compared to plasma at a lower temperature of 18°C but not at 16°C, on the 7 th day.

  20. Secreted Immunomodulatory Proteins of Staphylococcus aureus Activate Platelets and Induce Platelet Aggregation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Binsker, Ulrike; Palankar, Raghavendra; Wesche, Jan; Kohler, Thomas P; Prucha, Josephine; Burchhardt, Gerhard; Rohde, Manfred; Schmidt, Frank; Bröker, Barbara M; Mamat, Uwe; Pané-Farré, Jan; Graf, Anica; Ebner, Patrick; Greinacher, Andreas; Hammerschmidt, Sven

    2018-04-01

    Staphylococcus aureus can cause bloodstream infections associated with infective endocarditis (IE) and disseminated intravascular coagulopathy (DIC). Both complications involve platelets. In view of an increasing number of antibiotic-resistant strains, new approaches to control systemic S. aureus infection are gaining importance. Using a repertoire of 52 recombinant S. aureus proteins in flow cytometry-based platelet activation and aggregation assays, we identified, in addition to the extracellular adherence protein Eap, three secreted staphylococcal proteins as novel platelet activating proteins. Eap and the chemotaxis inhibitory protein of S. aureus (CHIPS), the formyl peptide receptor-like 1 inhibitory protein (FLIPr) and the major autolysin Atl induced P-selectin expression in washed platelets and platelet-rich plasma. Similarly, AtlA, CHIPS and Eap induced platelet aggregation in whole blood. Fluorescence microscopy illustrated that P-selectin expression is associated with calcium mobilization and re-organization of the platelet actin cytoskeleton. Characterization of the functionally active domains of the major autolysin AtlA and Eap indicates that the amidase domain of Atl and the tandem repeats 3 and 4 of Eap are crucial for platelet activation. These results provide new insights in S. aureus protein interactions with platelets and identify secreted proteins as potential treatment targets in case of antibiotic-resistant S. aureus infection. Schattauer GmbH Stuttgart.

  1. Study on platelet kinetics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yui, Tokuo

    1981-01-01

    Fundamental study: Factors influencing the labeling on human platelets were evaluated and optimal labeling conditions were chosen. Then, platelet survival times were measured and organ distribution of labeled platelets was observed in rat by four different methods. These results were compared with each other. Based on the findings of those studies, the protocol of human platelet labeling with 111 In-oxine for clinical use was established. Clinical study: In normal cases, a platelet survival time and a platelet turnover rate were quite similar to the results from 51 Cr method. In gamma camera imaging, a radioactivity on the heart decreased with the lapse of time, while that on the spleen and liver gradually increased. In patients with idiopathic thrombocytopenic purpura, platelet survival time was markedly shortened and both a platelet turnover rate and an effective production increased. In patient with congestive splenomegaly, a platelet survival time was normal, whereas a platelet pooling on the spleen markedly increased. In patients who were implanted dacron-graft for abdominal aortic aneurysm, a radioactivity accumulated to the graft and a platelet survival time shortened. In a patient with myocardial infarction, the camera imaging clearly showed the thrombus in the left ventricular aneurysm. In three patients with mitral stenosis, thrombi in left atrium were observed at the camera images. Imaging of a platelet distribution and measurement of platelet survival time using 111 In-oxine labeled platelets are considered to be an excellent method for the diagnosis and decision of treatment on various disorders with thrombocytopenia and thrombosis. (J.P.N.)

  2. Novel effector phenotype of Tim-3+ regulatory T cells leads to enhanced suppressive function in head and neck cancer patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Zhuqing; McMichael, Elizabeth L; Shayan, Gulidanna; Li, Jing; Chen, Kevin; Srivastava, Raghvendra M; Kane, Lawrence P; Lu, Binfeng; Ferris, Robert L

    2018-04-30

    Regulatory T (Treg) cells are important suppressive cells among tumor infiltrating lymphocytes (TIL). Treg express the well-known immune checkpoint receptor PD-1, which is reported to mark "exhausted" Treg with lower suppressive function. T cell immunoglobulin mucin (Tim)-3, a negative regulator of Th1 immunity, is expressed by a sizeable fraction of TIL Tregs, but the functional status of Tim-3+ Tregs remains unclear. CD4+CTLA-4+CD25high Treg were sorted from freshly excised head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC) TIL based on Tim-3 expression. Functional and phenotypic features of these Tim-3+ and Tim-3- TIL Tregs were tested by in vitro suppression assays and multi-color flow cytometry. Gene expression profiling and NanoString analysis of Tim-3+ TIL Treg were performed. A murine HNSCC tumor model was used to test the effect of anti-PD-1 immunotherapy on Tim-3+ Treg.  Results: Despite high PD-1 expression, Tim-3+ TIL Treg displayed a greater capacity to inhibit naïve T cell proliferation than Tim-3- Treg. Tim-3+ Treg from human HNSCC TIL also displayed an effector-like phenotype, with more robust expression of CTLA-4, PD-1, CD39 and IFN-γ receptor. Exogenous IFN-γ treatment could partially reverse the suppressive function of Tim-3+ TIL Treg. Anti-PD-1 immunotherapy downregulated Tim-3 expression on Tregs isolated from murine HNSCC tumors, and this treatment reversed the suppressive function of HNSCC TIL Tregs. Tim-3+ Treg are functionally and phenotypically distinct in HNSCC TIL, and are highly effective at inhibiting T cell proliferation despite high PD-1 expression.  IFN-γ induced by anti-PD-1 immunotherapy may be beneficial by reversing Tim-3+ Treg suppression. Copyright ©2018, American Association for Cancer Research.

  3. Effects of HIV infection and ART on phenotype and function of circulating monocytes, natural killer, and innate lymphoid cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nabatanzi, Rose; Cose, Stephen; Joloba, Moses; Jones, Sarah Rowland; Nakanjako, Damalie

    2018-03-15

    HIV infection causes upregulation of markers of inflammation, immune activation and apoptosis of host adaptive, and innate immune cells particularly monocytes, natural killer (NK) and innate lymphoid cells (ILCs). Although antiretroviral therapy (ART) restores CD4 T-cell counts, the persistent aberrant activation of monocytes, NK and ILCs observed likely contributes to the incomplete recovery of T-cell effector functions. A better understanding of the effects of HIV infection and ART on the phenotype and function of circulating monocytes, NK, and ILCs is required to guide development of novel therapeutic interventions to optimize immune recovery.

  4. Platelet fibrinogen binding in Basset Hound Hereditary Thrombopathy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Patterson, W.; Estry, D.; Schwartz, K.; Bell, T.

    1986-01-01

    Platelets from dogs with Basset Hound Hereditary Thrombopathy (BHT) display a thrombasthenia-like aggregation defect but have been shown to have normal amounts of platelet membrane glycoproteins IIb and IIIa (GP IIb-IIIa). In order to investigate the possibility of a functionally abnormal GPIIb-IIIa complex, which might be unable to bind fibrinogen after stimulation, fibrinogen binding in BHT was evaluated. Two canine fibrinogen preparations were used, one from BHT dogs and one from normal control dogs, as well as a human fibrinogen preparation. Platelets from BHT and normal dogs were activated with 1 x 10 -5 M ADP in the presence of 125 I-labeled fibrinogen and the surface bound radioactivity quantitated. For all fibrinogen preparations, the amount of fibrinogen bound by BHT platelets was not significantly different than that bound by normal dog platelets. BHT platelets bound 23,972 +/- 3612 and normal dog platelets bound 23,033 +/- 3971 molecules of fibrinogen per platelet. The BHT platelet aggregation defect does not seem to be caused by a functionally abnormal GP IIb-IIIa complex, since BHT platelets bind normal amounts of fibrinogen. The results suggest that fibrinogen binding is not sufficient for platelet aggregation, and other factors, perhaps receptor mobility and membrane phospholipid content should be investigated in BHT

  5. Platelet factor 4 impairs the anticoagulant activity of activated protein C.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Preston, Roger J S

    2012-02-01

    Platelet factor 4 (PF4) is an abundant platelet alpha-granule chemokine released following platelet activation. PF4 interacts with thrombomodulin and the gamma-carboxyglutamic acid (Gla) domain of protein C, thereby enhancing activated protein C (APC) generation by the thrombin-thrombomodulin complex. However, the protein C Gla domain not only mediates protein C activation in vivo, but also plays a critical role in modulating the diverse functional properties of APC once generated. In this study we demonstrate that PF4 significantly inhibits APC anti-coagulant activity. PF4 inhibited both protein S-dependent APC anticoagulant function in plasma and protein S-dependent factor Va (FVa) proteolysis 3- to 5-fold, demonstrating that PF4 impairs protein S cofactor enhancement of APC anticoagulant function. Using recombinant factor Va variants FVa-R506Q\\/R679Q and FVa-R306Q\\/R679Q, PF4 was shown to impair APC proteolysis of FVa at position Arg(306) by 3-fold both in the presence and absence of protein S. These data suggest that PF4 contributes to the poorly understood APC resistance phenotype associated with activated platelets. Finally, despite PF4 binding to the APC Gla domain, we show that APC in the presence of PF4 retains its ability to initiate PAR-1-mediated cytoprotective signaling. In summary, we propose that PF4 acts as a critical regulator of APC generation, but also differentially targets APC toward cytoprotective, rather than anticoagulant function at sites of vascular injury with concurrent platelet activation.

  6. Platelet factor 4 impairs the anticoagulant activity of activated protein C.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Preston, Roger J S

    2009-02-27

    Platelet factor 4 (PF4) is an abundant platelet alpha-granule chemokine released following platelet activation. PF4 interacts with thrombomodulin and the gamma-carboxyglutamic acid (Gla) domain of protein C, thereby enhancing activated protein C (APC) generation by the thrombin-thrombomodulin complex. However, the protein C Gla domain not only mediates protein C activation in vivo, but also plays a critical role in modulating the diverse functional properties of APC once generated. In this study we demonstrate that PF4 significantly inhibits APC anti-coagulant activity. PF4 inhibited both protein S-dependent APC anticoagulant function in plasma and protein S-dependent factor Va (FVa) proteolysis 3- to 5-fold, demonstrating that PF4 impairs protein S cofactor enhancement of APC anticoagulant function. Using recombinant factor Va variants FVa-R506Q\\/R679Q and FVa-R306Q\\/R679Q, PF4 was shown to impair APC proteolysis of FVa at position Arg(306) by 3-fold both in the presence and absence of protein S. These data suggest that PF4 contributes to the poorly understood APC resistance phenotype associated with activated platelets. Finally, despite PF4 binding to the APC Gla domain, we show that APC in the presence of PF4 retains its ability to initiate PAR-1-mediated cytoprotective signaling. In summary, we propose that PF4 acts as a critical regulator of APC generation, but also differentially targets APC toward cytoprotective, rather than anticoagulant function at sites of vascular injury with concurrent platelet activation.

  7. Diversity and impact of rare variants in genes encoding the platelet G protein-coupled receptors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Matthew L; Norman, Jane E; Morgan, Neil V; Mundell, Stuart J; Lordkipanidzé, Marie; Lowe, Gillian C; Daly, Martina E; Simpson, Michael A; Drake, Sian; Watson, Steve P; Mumford, Andrew D

    2015-04-01

    Platelet responses to activating agonists are influenced by common population variants within or near G protein-coupled receptor (GPCR) genes that affect receptor activity. However, the impact of rare GPCR gene variants is unknown. We describe the rare single nucleotide variants (SNVs) in the coding and splice regions of 18 GPCR genes in 7,595 exomes from the 1,000-genomes and Exome Sequencing Project databases and in 31 cases with inherited platelet function disorders (IPFDs). In the population databases, the GPCR gene target regions contained 740 SNVs (318 synonymous, 410 missense, 7 stop gain and 6 splice region) of which 70 % had global minor allele frequency (MAF) < 0.05 %. Functional annotation using six computational algorithms, experimental evidence and structural data identified 156/740 (21 %) SNVs as potentially damaging to GPCR function, most commonly in regions encoding the transmembrane and C-terminal intracellular receptor domains. In 31 index cases with IPFDs (Gi-pathway defect n=15; secretion defect n=11; thromboxane pathway defect n=3 and complex defect n=2) there were 256 SNVs in the target regions of 15 stimulatory platelet GPCRs (34 unique; 12 with MAF< 1 % and 22 with MAF≥ 1 %). These included rare variants predicting R122H, P258T and V207A substitutions in the P2Y12 receptor that were annotated as potentially damaging, but only partially explained the platelet function defects in each case. Our data highlight that potentially damaging variants in platelet GPCR genes have low individual frequencies, but are collectively abundant in the population. Potentially damaging variants are also present in pedigrees with IPFDs and may contribute to complex laboratory phenotypes.

  8. Monocyte-lymphocyte fusion induced by the HIV-1 envelope generates functional heterokaryons with an activated monocyte-like phenotype

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Martínez-Méndez, David; Rivera-Toledo, Evelyn; Ortega, Enrique; Licona-Limón, Ileana; Huerta, Leonor, E-mail: leonorhh@biomedicas.unam.mx

    2017-03-01

    Enveloped viruses induce cell-cell fusion when infected cells expressing viral envelope proteins interact with target cells, or through the contact of cell-free viral particles with adjoining target cells. CD4{sup +} T lymphocytes and cells from the monocyte-macrophage lineage express receptors for HIV envelope protein. We have previously reported that lymphoid Jurkat T cells expressing the HIV-1 envelope protein (Env) can fuse with THP-1 monocytic cells, forming heterokaryons with a predominantly myeloid phenotype. This study shows that the expression of monocytic markers in heterokaryons is stable, whereas the expression of lymphoid markers is mostly lost. Like THP-1 cells, heterokaryons exhibited FcγR-dependent phagocytic activity and showed an enhanced expression of the activation marker ICAM-1 upon stimulation with PMA. In addition, heterokaryons showed morphological changes compatible with maturation, and high expression of the differentiation marker CD11b in the absence of differentiation-inducing agents. No morphological change nor increase in CD11b expression were observed when an HIV-fusion inhibitor blocked fusion, or when THP-1 cells were cocultured with Jurkat cells expressing a non-fusogenic Env protein, showing that differentiation was not induced merely by cell-cell interaction but required cell-cell fusion. Inhibition of TLR2/TLR4 signaling by a TIRAP inhibitor greatly reduced the expression of CD11b in heterokaryons. Thus, lymphocyte-monocyte heterokaryons induced by HIV-1 Env are stable and functional, and fusion prompts a phenotype characteristic of activated monocytes via intracellular TLR2/TLR4 signaling. - Highlights: • Jurkat T cells expressing the HIV-1 envelope fuse with THP-1 monocytes. • Heterokaryons display a dominant myeloid phenotype and monocyte function. • Heterokaryons exhibit activation features in the absence of activation agents. • Activation is not due to cell-cell interaction but requires cell-cell fusion. • The

  9. Monocyte-lymphocyte fusion induced by the HIV-1 envelope generates functional heterokaryons with an activated monocyte-like phenotype

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Martínez-Méndez, David; Rivera-Toledo, Evelyn; Ortega, Enrique; Licona-Limón, Ileana; Huerta, Leonor

    2017-01-01

    Enveloped viruses induce cell-cell fusion when infected cells expressing viral envelope proteins interact with target cells, or through the contact of cell-free viral particles with adjoining target cells. CD4"+ T lymphocytes and cells from the monocyte-macrophage lineage express receptors for HIV envelope protein. We have previously reported that lymphoid Jurkat T cells expressing the HIV-1 envelope protein (Env) can fuse with THP-1 monocytic cells, forming heterokaryons with a predominantly myeloid phenotype. This study shows that the expression of monocytic markers in heterokaryons is stable, whereas the expression of lymphoid markers is mostly lost. Like THP-1 cells, heterokaryons exhibited FcγR-dependent phagocytic activity and showed an enhanced expression of the activation marker ICAM-1 upon stimulation with PMA. In addition, heterokaryons showed morphological changes compatible with maturation, and high expression of the differentiation marker CD11b in the absence of differentiation-inducing agents. No morphological change nor increase in CD11b expression were observed when an HIV-fusion inhibitor blocked fusion, or when THP-1 cells were cocultured with Jurkat cells expressing a non-fusogenic Env protein, showing that differentiation was not induced merely by cell-cell interaction but required cell-cell fusion. Inhibition of TLR2/TLR4 signaling by a TIRAP inhibitor greatly reduced the expression of CD11b in heterokaryons. Thus, lymphocyte-monocyte heterokaryons induced by HIV-1 Env are stable and functional, and fusion prompts a phenotype characteristic of activated monocytes via intracellular TLR2/TLR4 signaling. - Highlights: • Jurkat T cells expressing the HIV-1 envelope fuse with THP-1 monocytes. • Heterokaryons display a dominant myeloid phenotype and monocyte function. • Heterokaryons exhibit activation features in the absence of activation agents. • Activation is not due to cell-cell interaction but requires cell-cell fusion. • The

  10. Extracellular histones promote thrombin generation through platelet-dependent mechanisms: involvement of platelet TLR2 and TLR4

    Science.gov (United States)

    Semeraro, Fabrizio; Ammollo, Concetta T.; Morrissey, James H.; Dale, George L.; Friese, Paul; Esmon, Naomi L.

    2011-01-01

    The release of histones from dying cells is associated with microvascular thrombosis and, because histones activate platelets, this could represent a possible pathogenic mechanism. In the present study, we assessed the influence of histones on the procoagulant potential of human platelets in platelet-rich plasma (PRP) and in purified systems. Histones dose-dependently enhanced thrombin generation in PRP in the absence of any trigger, as evaluated by calibrated automated thrombinography regardless of whether the contact phase was inhibited. Activation of coagulation required the presence of fully activatable platelets and was not ascribable to platelet tissue factor, whereas targeting polyphosphate with phosphatase reduced thrombin generation even when factor XII (FXII) was blocked or absent. In the presence of histones, purified polyphosphate was able to induce thrombin generation in plasma independently of FXII. In purified systems, histones induced platelet aggregation; P-selectin, phosphatidylserine, and FV/Va expression; and prothrombinase activity. Blocking platelet TLR2 and TLR4 with mAbs reduced the percentage of activated platelets and lowered the amount of thrombin generated in PRP. These data show that histone-activated platelets possess a procoagulant phenotype that drives plasma thrombin generation and suggest that TLR2 and TLR4 mediate the activation process. PMID:21673343

  11. Aspirin decreases platelet uptake on Dacron vascular grafts in baboons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mackey, W.C.; Connolly, R.J.; Callow, A.D.

    1984-01-01

    The influence of a single dose of aspirin (5.4-7.4 mg/kg) on platelet uptake on 4-mm Dacron interposition grafts was studied in a baboon model using gamma camera scanning for 111-Indium labeled platelets. In vitro assessment of platelet function after aspirin administration revealed that in the baboon, as in the human, aspirin abolished arachidonic acid-induced platelet aggregation, prolonged the lag time between exposure to collagen and aggregation, and decreased plasma thromboxane B2 levels. Aspirin also prolonged the template bleeding time. Scans for 111-Indium labeled platelets revealed that pretreatment with a single dose of aspirin decreased platelet uptake on 4-mm Dacron carotid interposition grafts. This decrease in platelet uptake was associated with a significant improvement in 2-hour graft patency and with a trend toward improved 2-week patency

  12. Redox Proteomics and Platelet Activation: Understanding the Redox Proteome to Improve Platelet Quality for Transfusion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sonego, Giona; Abonnenc, Mélanie; Tissot, Jean-Daniel; Prudent, Michel; Lion, Niels

    2017-01-01

    Blood banks use pathogen inactivation (PI) technologies to increase the safety of platelet concentrates (PCs). The characteristics of PI-treated PCs slightly differ from those of untreated PCs, but the underlying reasons are not well understood. One possible cause is the generation of oxidative stress during the PI process. This is of great interest since reactive oxygen species (ROS) act as second messengers in platelet functions. Furthermore, there are links between protein oxidation and phosphorylation, another mechanism that is critical for cell regulation. Current research efforts focus on understanding the underlying mechanisms and identifying new target proteins. Proteomics technologies represent powerful tools for investigating signaling pathways involving ROS and post-translational modifications such as phosphorylation, while quantitative techniques enable the comparison of the platelet resting state versus the stimulated state. In particular, redox cysteine is a key player in platelet activation upon stimulation by different agonists. This review highlights the experiments that have provided insights into the roles of ROS in platelet function and the implications for platelet transfusion, and potentially in diseases such as inflammation and platelet hyperactivity. The review also describes the implication of redox mechanism in platelet storage considerations. PMID:28208668

  13. Gallic Acid Attenuates Platelet Activation and Platelet-Leukocyte Aggregation: Involving Pathways of Akt and GSK3β

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Shih-Sheng; Lee, Viola S. Y.; Tseng, Yu-Lun; Chang, Kuan-Cheng; Chen, Kuen-Bao; Chen, Yuh-Lien; Li, Chi-Yuan

    2012-01-01

    Platelet activation and its interaction with leukocytes play an important role in atherothrombosis. Cardiovascular diseases resulted from atherothrombosis remain the major causes of death worldwide. Gallic acid, a major constituent of red wine and tea, has been believed to have properties of cardiovascular protection, which is likely to be related to its antioxidant effects. Nonetheless, there were few and inconsistent data regarding the effects of gallic acid on platelet function. Therefore, we designed this in vitro study to determine whether gallic acid could inhibit platelet activation and the possible mechanisms. From our results, gallic acid could concentration-dependently inhibit platelet aggregation, P-selectin expression, and platelet-leukocyte aggregation. Gallic acid prevented the elevation of intracellular calcium and attenuated phosphorylation of PKCα/p38 MAPK and Akt/GSK3β on platelets stimulated by the stimulants ADP or U46619. This is the first mechanistic explanation for the inhibitory effects on platelets from gallic acid. PMID:22811749

  14. Gallic Acid Attenuates Platelet Activation and Platelet-Leukocyte Aggregation: Involving Pathways of Akt and GSK3β

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shih-Sheng Chang

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Platelet activation and its interaction with leukocytes play an important role in atherothrombosis. Cardiovascular diseases resulted from atherothrombosis remain the major causes of death worldwide. Gallic acid, a major constituent of red wine and tea, has been believed to have properties of cardiovascular protection, which is likely to be related to its antioxidant effects. Nonetheless, there were few and inconsistent data regarding the effects of gallic acid on platelet function. Therefore, we designed this in vitro study to determine whether gallic acid could inhibit platelet activation and the possible mechanisms. From our results, gallic acid could concentration-dependently inhibit platelet aggregation, P-selectin expression, and platelet-leukocyte aggregation. Gallic acid prevented the elevation of intracellular calcium and attenuated phosphorylation of PKCα/p38 MAPK and Akt/GSK3β on platelets stimulated by the stimulants ADP or U46619. This is the first mechanistic explanation for the inhibitory effects on platelets from gallic acid.

  15. Effect of Platelet-Rich Plasma (PRP versus Autologous Whole Blood on Pain and Function Improvement in Tennis Elbow: A Randomized Clinical Trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seyed Ahmad Raeissadat

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Autologous whole blood and platelet-rich plasma (PRP have been both suggested to treat chronic tennis elbow. The aim of the present study was to compare the effects of PRP versus autologous whole blood local injection in chronic tennis elbow. Methods. Forty patients with tennis elbow were randomly divided into 2 groups. Group 1 was treated with a single injection of 2 mL of autologous PRP and group 2 with 2 mL of autologous blood. Tennis elbow strap, stretching, and strengthening exercises were administered for both groups during a 2-month followup. Pain and functional improvements were assessed using visual analog scale (VAS, modified Mayo Clinic performance index for the elbow, and pressure pain threshold (PPT at 0, 4, and 8 weeks. Results. All pain and functional variables including VAS, PPT, and Mayo scores improved significantly in both groups 4 weeks after injection. No statistically significant difference was noted between groups regarding pain scores in 4-week follow-up examination (P>0.05. At 8-week reevaluations, VAS and Mayo scores improved only in PRP group (P<0.05. Conclusion. PRP and autologous whole blood injections are both effective to treat chronic lateral epicondylitis. PRP might be slightly superior in 8-week followup. However, further studies are suggested to get definite conclusion.

  16. Platelet "first responders" in wound response, cancer, and metastasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Menter, David G; Kopetz, Scott; Hawk, Ernest; Sood, Anil K; Loree, Jonathan M; Gresele, Paolo; Honn, Kenneth V

    2017-06-01

    Platelets serve as "first responders" during normal wounding and homeostasis. Arising from bone marrow stem cell lineage megakaryocytes, anucleate platelets can influence inflammation and immune regulation. Biophysically, platelets are optimized due to size and discoid morphology to distribute near vessel walls, monitor vascular integrity, and initiate quick responses to vascular lesions. Adhesion receptors linked to a highly reactive filopodia-generating cytoskeleton maximizes their vascular surface contact allowing rapid response capabilities. Functionally, platelets normally initiate rapid clotting, vasoconstriction, inflammation, and wound biology that leads to sterilization, tissue repair, and resolution. Platelets also are among the first to sense, phagocytize, decorate, or react to pathogens in the circulation. These platelet first responder properties are commandeered during chronic inflammation, cancer progression, and metastasis. Leaky or inflammatory reaction blood vessel genesis during carcinogenesis provides opportunities for platelet invasion into tumors. Cancer is thought of as a non-healing or chronic wound that can be actively aided by platelet mitogenic properties to stimulate tumor growth. This growth ultimately outstrips circulatory support leads to angiogenesis and intravasation of tumor cells into the blood stream. Circulating tumor cells reengage additional platelets, which facilitates tumor cell adhesion, arrest and extravasation, and metastasis. This process, along with the hypercoagulable states associated with malignancy, is amplified by IL6 production in tumors that stimulate liver thrombopoietin production and elevates circulating platelet numbers by thrombopoiesis in the bone marrow. These complex interactions and the "first responder" role of platelets during diverse physiologic stresses provide a useful therapeutic target that deserves further exploration.

  17. Assessment of quality of platelets preserved in plasma and platelet additive solution: A Malaysian experience

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Munirah Binti Mokhtar

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: A use of platelet additives solution (PAS improves storage conditions so as to give increased shelf life to platelets and to maintain hemostatic function. Objective: The present study was aimed to compare in vitro quality of platelet rich plasma (PRP-derived platelet concentrate (PC during extended period of storage in plasma and in additive solution (Composol PS and Fresenius. Study Design: Randomized 19 PCs each were used in the study for plasma and PAS as the storage medium. The measurement parameters, including pH, total white blood cell (WBC count, total platelet count, and platelet activation rate, were studied on day 1, day 5, and day 8 of the storage period. The sterility test was carried out on the eighth day of storage. Results: pH of PC suspended in PAS was significantly lower as compared to that in plasma (P < 0.001 for all the three days of sampling. The WBC count, both in plasma and in PAS, showed an acceptable values of being <0.2 Χ 10 9 /unit during the storage period. Platelet count in PAS was higher as compared to that in plasma, though it was not statistically significant. While both the groups showed increased platelet activation rate during the storage, the PCs suspended in PAS showed significantly higher platelet activation rate (p0.001. Results from sterility test showed no bacterial growth in the PCs in both the groups. Conclusion: Most parameters studied on platelet storage in suspending medium of native plasma and PAS remained well within the acceptable limits. However, the pH values and platelet activation rate significantly differed in PAS as compared with plasma.

  18. Development of functional markers associated with phenotypic characteristics for identification of soy variety

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ibarra, M.; Castro, A; Capdevielle, F.

    2013-01-01

    The organization of agricultural systems requires the verification of the genetic identity and purity of cultivars. The increase in the number of soy varieties to be evaluated, and the narrow genetic base of soybean cultivars, make the identification using phenotypic descriptors very difficult. The International Union for the Protection of New Varieties of Plants (UPOV) has recognized the utility of molecular markers associated with descriptive phenotypic characteristics. With the goal of developing this kind of markers, six genic or genomic S SR were selected in silico (Sat286, Satt229, GmPrx1, GMES1173, Satt571 and Gm Hi), plus two previously reported markers (GmF35H and SoyF3H). All were evaluated in 35 soybean cultivars. The SSRs GmPrx1 and Gm Hi selected for seed coat peroxidase and hilum color respectively were monomorphic. The mean Polymorphism Information Content (PI C) value within the selected group of polymorphic markers was 0.48 with an average of 3.12 allele per locus. GmF35H discriminated the soybean varieties according to the flower color (white and purple). Discrimination tests showed a high percentage of accurate classification of growth habit (95.8%) and pubescence color (80.6%) with Sat286 and Soy F3H, respectively. The classification values for pod color (74.2%) and leaflet size (73.5%) were intermediate using GMES1173 and Satt571, respectively. The marker Satt229 was not discriminating for flowering time (50%) and maturity (42.8%). Molecular markers selected in or close to sequences of interest can be integrated into a genetic identification system as complementary markers to the classic phenotypic descriptors of soybean varieties

  19. A role for BELLRINGER in cell wall development is supported by loss-of-function phenotypes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Etchells J

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Homeodomain transcription factors play critical roles in metazoan development. BELLRINGER (BLR, one such transcription factor, is involved in diverse developmental processes in Arabidopsis, acting in vascular differentiation, phyllotaxy, flower and fruit development. BLR also has a redundant role in meristem maintenance. Cell wall remodelling underpins many of these processes, and BLR has recently been shown to regulate expression of PECTIN METHYL-ESTERASE 5 (PME5, a cell wall modifying enzyme in control of phyllotaxy. We have further explored the role of BLR in plant development by analysing phenotypes and gene expression in a series of plants over-expressing BLR, and generating combinatorial mutants with blr, brevipedicellus (bp, a member of the KNOX1 family of transcription factors that has previously been shown to interact with blr, and the homeodomain transcription factor revoluta (rev, required for radial patterning of the stem. Results Plants over-expressing BLR exhibited a wide range of phenotypes. Some were defective in cell size and demonstrated misregulation of genes predominantly affecting cell wall development. Other lines with more extreme phenotypes failed to generate lateral organs, consistent with BLR repressing transcription in the shoot apex. Cell wall dynamics are also affected in blr mutant plants, and BLR has previously been shown to regulate vascular development in conjunction with BP. We found that when bp and blr were combined with rev, a set of defects was observed that were distinct from those of bp blr lines. In these triple mutants xylem development was most strikingly affected, resulting in an almost complete lack of vessels and xylem parenchyma with secondary thickening. Conclusions Our data support a role for BLR in ordering the shoot apex and, in conjunction with BP and REV, playing a part in determining the composition and organisation of the vascular system. Microarray analysis strongly

  20. Small amounts of functional ATP7A protein permit mild phenotype

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Møller, Lisbeth Birk

    2015-01-01

    concentrations, ATP7A shifts to the post-Golgi compartments or to the plasma membrane to export copper out of the cell. Impaired copper-regulation trafficking has been observed for ATP7A mutants, but its impact on the clinical outcome is not clear. The major problem in patients with MD seems to be insufficient...... of missense mutations on structural models of the ATP7A protein suggests that affected conserved residues generally lead to a severe phenotype. The ATP7A protein traffics within the cells. At low copper levels, ATP7A locates to the Trans-Golgi Network (TGN) to load cuproenzymes with copper, whereas at higher...

  1. Lipid-laden cells differentially distributed in the aging brain are functionally active and correspond to distinct phenotypes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shimabukuro, Marilia Kimie; Langhi, Larissa Gutman Paranhos; Cordeiro, Ingrid; Brito, José M; Batista, Claudia Maria de Castro; Mattson, Mark P; Mello Coelho, Valeria de

    2016-03-31

    We characterized cerebral Oil Red O-positive lipid-laden cells (LLC) of aging mice evaluating their distribution, morphology, density, functional activities and inflammatory phenotype. We identified LLC in meningeal, cortical and neurogenic brain regions. The density of cerebral LLC increased with age. LLC presenting small lipid droplets were visualized adjacent to blood vessels or deeper in the brain cortical and striatal parenchyma of aging mice. LLC with larger droplets were asymmetrically distributed in the cerebral ventricle walls, mainly located in the lateral wall. We also found that LLC in the subventricular region co-expressed beclin-1 or LC3, markers for autophagosome or autophagolysosome formation, and perilipin (PLIN), a lipid droplet-associated protein, suggesting lipophagic activity. Some cerebral LLC exhibited β galactosidase activity indicating a senescence phenotype. Moreover, we detected production of the pro-inflammatory cytokine TNF-α in cortical PLIN(+) LLC. Some cortical NeuN(+) neurons, GFAP(+) glia limitans astrocytes, Iba-1(+) microglia and S100β(+) ependymal cells expressed PLIN in the aging brain. Our findings suggest that cerebral LLC exhibit distinct cellular phenotypes and may participate in the age-associated neuroinflammatory processes.

  2. Lipid-laden cells differentially distributed in the aging brain are functionally active and correspond to distinct phenotypes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shimabukuro, Marilia Kimie; Langhi, Larissa Gutman Paranhos; Cordeiro, Ingrid; Brito, José M.; Batista, Claudia Maria de Castro; Mattson, Mark P.; de Mello Coelho, Valeria

    2016-01-01

    We characterized cerebral Oil Red O-positive lipid-laden cells (LLC) of aging mice evaluating their distribution, morphology, density, functional activities and inflammatory phenotype. We identified LLC in meningeal, cortical and neurogenic brain regions. The density of cerebral LLC increased with age. LLC presenting small lipid droplets were visualized adjacent to blood vessels or deeper in the brain cortical and striatal parenchyma of aging mice. LLC with larger droplets were asymmetrically distributed in the cerebral ventricle walls, mainly located in the lateral wall. We also found that LLC in the subventricular region co-expressed beclin-1 or LC3, markers for autophagosome or autophagolysosome formation, and perilipin (PLIN), a lipid droplet-associated protein, suggesting lipophagic activity. Some cerebral LLC exhibited β galactosidase activity indicating a senescence phenotype. Moreover, we detected production of the pro-inflammatory cytokine TNF-α in cortical PLIN+ LLC. Some cortical NeuN+ neurons, GFAP+ glia limitans astrocytes, Iba-1+ microglia and S100β+ ependymal cells expressed PLIN in the aging brain. Our findings suggest that cerebral LLC exhibit distinct cellular phenotypes and may participate in the age-associated neuroinflammatory processes. PMID:27029648

  3. Lea blood group antigen on human platelets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dunstan, R.A.; Simpson, M.B.; Rosse, W.F.

    1985-01-01

    One- and two-stage radioligand assays were used to determine if human platelets possess the Lea antigen. Goat IgG anti-Lea antibody was purified by multiple adsorptions with Le(a-b-) human red blood cells, followed by affinity chromatography with synthetic Lea substance and labeling with 125 I. Human IgG anti-Lea antibody was used either in a two stage radioassay with 125 I-labeled mouse monoclonal IgG anti-human IgG as the second antibody or, alternatively, purified by Staph protein A chromatography, labeled with 125 I, and used in a one-stage radioassay. Platelets from donors of appropriate red blood cell phenotypes were incubated with the antisera, centrifuged through phthalate esters, and assayed in a gamma scintillation counter. Dose response and saturation curve analysis demonstrate the presence of Lewis a antigen on platelets from Lea+ donors. Furthermore, platelets from an Le(a-b-) donor incubated in Le (a+b-) plasma adsorb Lea antigen in a similar manner to red blood cells. The clinical significance of these antigens in platelet transfusion remains undefined

  4. Metabolomic analysis of platelets during storage

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Paglia, Giuseppe; Sigurjónsson, Ólafur E; Rolfsson, Óttar

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Platelet concentrates (PCs) can be prepared using three methods: platelet (PLT)-rich plasma, apheresis, and buffy coat. The aim of this study was to obtain a comprehensive data set that describes metabolism of buffy coat-derived PLTs during storage and to compare it with a previously...... published parallel data set obtained for apheresis-derived PLTs. STUDY DESIGN AND METHODS: During storage we measured more than 150 variables in 8 PLT units, prepared by the buffy coat method. Samples were collected at seven different time points resulting in a data set containing more than 8000...... after their collection. The transition was evident in PLT produced by both production methods. Apheresis-derived PLTs showed a clearer phenotype of PLT activation during early days of storage. The activated phenotype of apheresis PLTs was accompanied by a higher metabolic activity, especially related...

  5. Negative feedback regulation of human platelets via autocrine activation of the platelet-derived growth factor alpha-receptor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vassbotn, F S; Havnen, O K; Heldin, C H; Holmsen, H

    1994-05-13

    Human platelets contain platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF) in their alpha-granules which is released during platelet exocytosis. We show by immunoprecipitation and 125I-PDGF binding experiments that human platelets have functionally active PDGF alpha-receptors, but not beta-receptors. The PDGF alpha-receptor (PDGFR-alpha) was identified as a 170-kDa glycosylated protein-tyrosine kinase as found in other cell types. Stimulation of platelets with 0.1 unit/ml thrombin resulted in a significant increase (2-5-fold) of the tyrosine phosphorylation of the PDGFR-alpha, as determined by immunoprecipitation with phosphotyrosine antiserum as well as with PDGFR-alpha antiserum. The observed thrombin-induced autophosphorylation of the PDGFR-alpha was inhibited by the addition of a neutralizing monoclonal PDGF antibody. Thus, our results suggest that the platelet PDGFR-alpha is stimulated in an autocrine manner by PDGF secreted during platelet activation. Preincubation of platelets with PDGF inhibited thrombin-induced platelet aggregation and secretion of ATP + ADP and beta-hexosaminidase. Thrombin-induced platelet aggregation was also reversed when PDGF was added 30 s after thrombin stimulation. Inhibition of the autocrine PDGF pathway during platelet activation by the PDGF antibody led to a potentiation of thrombin-induced beta-hexosaminidase secretion. Thus, the PDGFR-alpha takes part in a negative feedback regulation during platelet activation. Our demonstration of PDGF alpha-receptors on human platelets and its inhibitory function during platelet activation identifies a new possible role of PDGF in the regulation of thrombosis.

  6. Development of a Functional Schwann Cell Phenotype from Autologous Porcine Bone Marrow Mononuclear Cells for Nerve Repair

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael J. Rutten

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Adult bone marrow mononuclear cells (BM-MNCs are a potential resource for making Schwann cells to repair damaged peripheral nerves. However, many methods of producing Schwann-like cells can be laborious with the cells lacking a functional phenotype. The objective of this study was to develop a simple and rapid method using autologous BM-MNCs to produce a phenotypic and functional Schwann-like cell. Adult porcine bone marrow was collected and enriched for BM-MNCs using a SEPAX device, then cells cultured in Neurobasal media, 4 mM L-glutamine and 20% serum. After 6–8 days, the cultures expressed Schwann cell markers, S-100, O4, GFAP, were FluoroMyelin positive, but had low p75(NGF expression. Addition of neuregulin (1–25 nM increased p75(NGF levels at 24–48 hrs. We found ATP dose-dependently increased intracellular calcium [Ca2+]i, with nucleotide potency being UTP=ATP>ADP>AMP>adenosine. Suramin blocked the ATP-induced [Ca2+]i but α, β,-methylene-ATP had little effect suggesting an ATP purinergic P2Y2 G-protein-coupled receptor is present. Both the Schwann cell markers and ATP-induced [Ca2+]i sensitivity decreased in cells passaged >20 times. Our studies indicate that autologous BM-MNCs can be induced to form a phenotypic and functional Schwann-like cell which could be used for peripheral nerve repair.

  7. Modulation of phenotypic and functional maturation of murine dendritic cells (DCs) by purified Achyranthes bidentata polysaccharide (ABP).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zou, Yaxuan; Meng, Jingjuan; Chen, Wenna; Liu, Jingling; Li, Xuan; Li, Weiwei; Lu, Changlong; Shan, Fengping

    2011-08-01

    There are a large number of interactions at molecular and cellular levels between the plant polysaccharides and immune system. Plant polysaccharides present an interesting effects as immunomodulators, particularly in the induction of the cells both in innate and adaptive immune systems. Activation of DCs could improve antitumoral responses usually diminished in cancer patients, and natural adjuvants provide a possibility of inducing this activation. ABP is a purified polysaccharide isolated from Achyranthes bidentata, a traditional Chinese medicine (TCM). The aim of this study is to investigate modulation of phenotypic and functional maturation of murine DCs by ABP. Both phenotypic and functional activities were assessed with use of conventional scanning electronic microscopy (SEM) for the morphology of the DC, transmitted electron microscopy (TEM) for intracellular lysosomes inside the DC, cellular immunohistochemistry for phagocytosis by the DCs, flow cytometry (FCM) for the changes in key surface molecules, bio-assay for the activity of acidic phosphatases (ACP), and ELISA for the production of pro-inflammatory cytokine IL-12. In fact, we found that purified ABP induced phenotypic maturation revealed by increased expression of CD86, CD40, and MHC II. Functional experiments showed the down-regulation of ACP inside DCs (which occurs when phagocytosis of DCs is decreased, and antigen presentation increased with maturation). Finally, ABP increased the production of IL-12. These data reveal that ABP promotes effective activation of murine DCs. This adjuvant-like activity may have therapeutic applications in clinical settings where immune responses need boosting. It is therefore concluded that ABP can exert positive modulation to murine DCs. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. Glucose Transporter 3 Potentiates Degranulation and Is Required for Platelet Activation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fidler, Trevor P; Middleton, Elizabeth A; Rowley, Jesse W; Boudreau, Luc H; Campbell, Robert A; Souvenir, Rhonda; Funari, Trevor; Tessandier, Nicolas; Boilard, Eric; Weyrich, Andrew S; Abel, E Dale

    2017-09-01

    On activation, platelets increase glucose uptake, glycolysis, and glucose oxidation and consume stored glycogen. This correlation between glucose metabolism and platelet function is not well understood and even less is known about the role of glucose metabolism on platelet function in vivo. For glucose to enter a cell, it must be transported through glucose transporters. Here we evaluate the contribution of GLUT3 (glucose transporter 3) to platelet function to better understand glucose metabolism in platelets. Platelet-specific knockout of GLUT3 was generated by crossing mice harboring GLUT3 floxed allele to a PF4 (platelet factor 4)-driven Cre recombinase. In platelets, GLUT3 is localized primarily on α-granule membranes and under basal conditions facilitates glucose uptake into α-granules to be used for glycolysis. After activation, platelets degranulate and GLUT3 translocates to the plasma membrane, which is responsible for activation-mediated increased glucose uptake. In vivo, loss of GLUT3 in platelets increased survival in a collagen/epinephrine model of pulmonary embolism, and in a K/BxN model of autoimmune inflammatory disease, platelet-specific GLUT3 knockout mice display decreased disease progression. Mechanistically, loss of GLUT3 decreased platelet degranulation, spreading, and clot retraction. Decreased α-granule degranulation is due in part to an impaired ability of GLUT3 to potentiate exocytosis. GLUT3-mediated glucose utilization and glycogenolysis in platelets promotes α-granule release, platelet activation, and postactivation functions. © 2017 American Heart Association, Inc.

  9. Graph of growth data - The Rice Growth Monitoring for The Phenotypic Functional Analysis | LSDB Archive [Life Science Database Archive metadata

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available List Contact us The Rice Growth Monitoring for The Phenotypic Functional Analysis Graph of growth data Data ...detail Data name Graph of growth data DOI 10.18908/lsdba.nbdc00945-003 Description of data contents The grap...h of chronological changes in root, coleoptile, the first leaf, and the second leaf. Data file File name: growth..._data_graph.zip File URL: ftp://ftp.biosciencedbc.jp/archive/agritogo-rice-phenome/LATEST/data/growth...e Update History of This Database Site Policy | Contact Us Graph of growth data -

  10. Platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF)-signaling mediates radiation-induced apoptosis in human prostate cancer cells with loss of p53 function

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Harold E.; Han, Sue J.; Kasza, Thomas; Han, Richard; Choi, Hyeong-Seon; Palmer, Kenneth C.; Kim, Hyeong-Reh C.

    1997-01-01

    Platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF) signals a diversity of cellular responses in vitro, including cell proliferation, survival, transformation, and chemotaxis. PDGF functions as a 'competence factor' to induce a set of early response genes expressed in G 1 including p21 WAF1/CIP1 , a functional mediator of the tumor suppressor gene p53 in G 1 /S checkpoint. For PDGF-stimulated cells to progress beyond G 1 and transit the cell cycle completely, progression factors in serum such as insulin and IGF-1 are required. We have recently shown a novel role of PDGF in inducing apoptosis in growth-arrested murine fibroblasts. The PDGF-induced apoptosis is rescued by insulin, suggesting that G 1 /S checkpoint is a critical determinant for PDGF-induced apoptosis. Because recent studies suggest that radiation-induced signal transduction pathways interact with growth factor-mediated signaling pathways, we have investigated whether activation of the PDGF-signaling facilitates the radiation-induced apoptosis in the absence of functional p53. For this study we have used the 125-IL cell line, a mutant p53-containing, highly metastatic, and hormone-unresponsive human prostate carcinoma cell line. PDGF signaling is constitutively activated by transfection with a p28 v-sis expression vector, which was previously shown to activate PDGF α- and β- receptors. Although the basal level of p21 WAF1/CIP1 expression and radiation-induced apoptosis were not detectable in control 125-IL cells as would be predicted in mutant p53-containing cells, activation of PDGF-signaling induced expression of p21 WAF1/CIP1 and radiation-induced apoptosis. Our study suggests that the level of 'competence' growth factors including PDGF may be one of the critical determinants for radiation-induced apoptosis, especially in cells with loss of p53 function at the site of radiotherapy in vivo

  11. Characterization of Rod Function Phenotypes Across a Range of Age-Related Macular Degeneration Severities and Subretinal Drusenoid Deposits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flynn, Oliver J; Cukras, Catherine A; Jeffrey, Brett G

    2018-05-01

    To examine spatial changes in rod-mediated function in relationship to local structural changes across the central retina in eyes with a spectrum of age-related macular degeneration (AMD) disease severity. Participants were categorized into five AMD severity groups based on fundus features. Scotopic thresholds were measured at 14 loci spanning ±18° along the vertical meridian from one eye of each of 42 participants (mean = 71.7 ± 9.9 years). Following a 30% bleach, dark adaptation was measured at eight loci (±12°). Rod intercept time (RIT) was defined from the time to detect a -3.1 log cd/m2 stimulus. RITslope was defined from the linear fit of RIT with decreasing retinal eccentricity. The presence of subretinal drusenoid deposits (SDD), ellipsoid (EZ) band disruption, and drusen at the test loci was evaluated using optical coherence tomography. Scotopic thresholds indicated greater rod function loss in the macula, which correlated with increasing AMD group severity. RITslope, which captures the spatial change in the rate of dark adaptation, increased with AMD severity (P < 0.0001). Three rod function phenotypes emerged: RF1, normal rod function; RF2, normal scotopic thresholds but slowed dark adaptation; and RF3, elevated scotopic thresholds with slowed dark adaptation. Dark adaptation was slowed at all loci with SDD or EZ band disruption, and at 32% of loci with no local structural changes. Three rod function phenotypes were defined from combined measurement of scotopic threshold and dark adaptation. Spatial changes in dark adaptation across the macula were captured with RITslope, which may be a useful outcome measure for functional studies of AMD.

  12. Thrombopoietin contributes to enhanced platelet activation in cigarette smokers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lupia, Enrico; Bosco, Ornella; Goffi, Alberto; Poletto, Cesare; Locatelli, Stefania; Spatola, Tiziana; Cuccurullo, Alessandra; Montrucchio, Giuseppe

    2010-05-01

    Thrombopoietin (TPO) is a humoral growth factor that primes platelet activation in response to several agonists. We recently showed that TPO enhances platelet activation in unstable angina and sepsis. Aim of this study was to investigate the role of TPO in platelet function abnormalities described in cigarette smokers. In a case-control study we enrolled 20 healthy cigarette smokers and 20 nonsmokers, and measured TPO and C-reactive protein (CRP), as well as platelet-leukocyte binding and P-selectin expression. In vitro we evaluated the priming activity of smoker or control plasma on platelet activation, and the role of TPO in this effect. We then studied the effects of acute smoking and smoking cessation on TPO levels and platelet activation indices. Chronic cigarette smokers had higher circulating TPO levels than nonsmoking controls, as well as increased platelet-leukocyte binding, P-selectin expression, and CRP levels. Serum cotinine concentrations correlated with TPO concentrations, platelet-monocyte aggregates and P-selectin expression. In addition, TPO levels significantly correlated with ex vivo platelet-monocyte aggregation and P-selectin expression. In vitro, the plasma from cigarette smokers, but not from nonsmoking controls, primed platelet-monocyte binding, which was reduced when an inhibitor of TPO was used. We also found that acute smoking slightly increased TPO levels, but did not affect platelet-leukocyte binding, whereas smoking cessation induced a significant decrease in both circulating TPO and platelet-leukocyte aggregation. Elevated TPO contributes to enhance platelet activation and platelet-monocyte cross-talk in cigarette smokers. Copyright 2009 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Translating inter-individual genetic variation to biological function in complex phenotypes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Yadav, Rachita

    , Chapter 1 provides an introduction to various methodologies utilised in this thesis work. Subsequently, chapters 2, 3 and 4 in the second section, address finding causal variations in childhood asthma. Chapter 2 focuses on a genome wide association study (GWAS) performed on asthma exacerbation case cohort....... This study reports a new susceptibility locus within the gene CDHR3 for exacerbation phenotype of childhood asthma. Chapter 3 of the thesis presents a pilot study, which aims at designing a candidate gene panel for childhood asthma to identify the causal variants from known asthma genes. Chapter 4 describes...... in adipose depots, which is a major tissue implicated in obesity. Chapter 5 sheds light on different mechanisms that result in the replacement of metabolism efficient brown fat with the storage-type white fat in large mammals (including human) especially within the first few months following birth...

  14. Functional and phenotypic changes in human lymphocytes after coincubation with Leishmania donovani in vitro

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hviid, L; Sørensen, A L; Kharazmi, A

    1990-01-01

    . Interleukin-1 production was unaffected, the levels of soluble interleukin-2 receptor in supernatants were not changed by the coincubation, and the addition of exogenous interleukin-2 failed to revert the suppressive effect of the parasites. In addition to the reduction in lymphocyte proliferation, phenotypic...... lymphocyte changes were observed. Cell surface expression of the CD3 antigen, which is part of the CD3-T-cell receptor complex, was significantly reduced with increasing parasite/peripheral blood mononuclear cell ratios; the reduction was general in the sense that the parasites caused a shift...... expression and the other, larger population with only a slight reduction in size and CD25 expression. In addition to the changes in expression of surface antigens, a general reduction in the size of PHA-stimulated lymphocytes after coincubation with the parasites was observed. The data presented thus suggest...

  15. A unified nonlocal strain gradient plate model for nonlinear axial instability of functionally graded porous micro/nano-plates reinforced with graphene platelets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sahmani, Saeid; Aghdam, Mohammad Mohammadi; Rabczuk, Timon

    2018-04-01

    By gradually changing of the porosity across a specific direction, functionally graded porous materials (FGPMs) are produced which can impart desirable mechanical properties. To enhance these properties, it is common to reinforce FGPMs with nanofillers. The main aim of the current study is to investigate the size-dependent nonlinear axial postbuckling characteristics of FGPM micro/nano-plates reinforced with graphene platelets. For this purpose, the theory of nonlocal strain gradient elasticity incorporating the both stiffness reduction and stiffness enhancement mechanisms of size effects is applied to the refined exponential shear deformation plate theory. Three different patterns of porosity dispersion across the plate thickness in conjunction with the uniform one are assumed for FGPM as an open-cell metal foam is utilized associated with the coefficients of the relative density and porosity. With the aid of the virtual work’s principle, the non-classical governing differential equations are constructed. Thereafter, an improved perturbation technique is employed to capture the size dependencies in the nonlinear load-deflection and load-shortening responses of the reinforced FGPM micro/nano-plates with and without initial geometric imperfection. It is indicated that by increasing the value of porosity coefficient, the size-dependent critical buckling loads of reinforced FGPM micro/nano-plates with all types of porosity dispersion pattern reduce, but the associated shortening may increase or decrease which depends on the type of dispersion pattern.

  16. Effect of Puumala hantavirus infection on Human Umbilical Vein Endothelial Cell hemostatic function: platelet interactions, increased tissue factor expression and fibrinolysis regulator release

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marco Goeijenbier

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Puumala virus (PUUV infection causes over 5000 cases of hemorrhagic fever in Europe annually and can influence the hemostatic balance extensively. Infection might lead to hemorrhage, while a recent study showed an increased risk of myocardial infarction during or shortly after PUUV infection. The mechanism by which this hantavirus influences the coagulation system remains unknown. Therefore we aimed to elucidate mechanisms explaining alterations seen in primary and secondary hemostasis during PUUV infection. By using low passage PUUV isolates to infect primary human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs we were able to show alterations in the regulation of primary- and secondary hemostasis and in the release of fibrinolysis regulators. Our main finding was an activation of secondary hemostasis due to increased tissue factor expression leading to increased thrombin generation in a functional assay. Furthermore, we showed that during infection platelets adhered to HUVECs and subsequently specifically to PUUV virus particles. Infection of HUVECs with PUUV did not result in increased von Willebrand factor while they produced more plasminogen activator inhibitor type-1 (PAI-1 compared to controls. The PAI-1 produced in this model formed complexes with vitronectin. This is the first report that reveals a potential mechanism behind the pro-coagulant changes in PUUV patients, which could be the result of increased thrombin generation due to an increased tissue factor expression on endothelial cells during infection. Furthermore, we provide insight into the contribution of endothelial cell responses regarding hemostasis in PUUV pathogenesis.

  17. Ginsenoside Rg1 and platelet-rich fibrin enhance human breast adipose-derived stem cells function for soft tissue regeneration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Hong-Mian; Peng, Qi-Liu; Huang, Min-Hong; Li, De-Quan; Liang, Yi-Dan; Chi, Gang-Yi; Li, De-Hui; Yu, Bing-Chao; Huang, Ji-Rong

    2016-01-01

    Adipose-derived stem cells (ASCs) can be used to repair soft tissue defects, wounds, burns, and scars and to regenerate various damaged tissues. The cell differentiation capacity of ASCs is crucial for engineered adipose tissue regeneration in reconstructive and plastic surgery. We previously reported that ginsenoside Rg1 (G-Rg1 or Rg1) promotes proliferation and differentiation of ASCs in vitro and in vivio. Here we show that both G-Rg1 and platelet-rich fibrin (PRF) improve the proliferation, differentiation, and soft tissue regeneration capacity of human breast adipose-derived stem cells (HBASCs) on collagen type I sponge scaffolds in vitro and in vivo. Three months after transplantation, tissue wet weight, adipocyte number, intracellular lipid, microvessel density, and gene and protein expression of VEGF, HIF-1α, and PPARγ were higher in both G-Rg1- and PRF-treated HBASCs than in control grafts. More extensive new adipose tissue formation was evident after treatment with G-Rg1 or PRF. In summary, G-Rg1 and/or PRF co-administration improves the function of HBASCs for soft tissue regeneration engineering. PMID:27191987

  18. Effects of blood transportation on human peripheral mononuclear cell yield, phenotype and function: implications for immune cell biobanking.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anita Posevitz-Fejfár

    Full Text Available Human biospecimen collection, processing and preservation are rapidly emerging subjects providing essential support to clinical as well as basic researchers. Unlike collection of other biospecimens (e.g. DNA and serum, biobanking of viable immune cells, such as peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC and/or isolated immune cell subsets is still in its infancy. While certain aspects of processing and freezing conditions have been studied in the past years, little is known about the effect of blood transportation on immune cell survival, phenotype and specific functions. However, especially for multicentric and cooperative projects it is vital to precisely know those effects. In this study we investigated the effect of blood shipping and pre-processing delay on immune cell phenotype and function both on cellular and subcellular levels. Peripheral blood was collected from healthy volunteers (n = 9: at a distal location (shipped overnight and in the central laboratory (processed immediately. PBMC were processed in the central laboratory and analyzed post-cryopreservation. We analyzed yield, major immune subset distribution, proliferative capacity of T cells, cytokine pattern and T-cell receptor signal transduction. Results show that overnight transportation of blood samples does not globally compromise T- cell subsets as they largely retain their phenotype and proliferative capacity. However, NK and B cell frequencies, the production of certain PBMC-derived cytokines and IL-6 mediated cytokine signaling pathway are altered due to transportation. Various control experiments have been carried out to compare issues related to shipping versus pre-processing delay on site. Our results suggest the implementation of appropriate controls when using multicenter logistics for blood transportation aiming at subsequent isolation of viable immune cells, e.g. in multicenter clinical trials or studies analyzing immune cells/subsets. One important conclusion might

  19. Functional phenotypic rescue of Caenorhabditis elegans neuroligin-deficient mutants by the human and rat NLGN1 genes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fernando Calahorro

    Full Text Available Neuroligins are cell adhesion proteins that interact with neurexins at the synapse. This interaction may contribute to differentiation, plasticity and specificity of synapses. In humans, single mutations in neuroligin encoding genes lead to autism spectrum disorder and/or mental retardation. Caenorhabditis elegans mutants deficient in nlg-1, an orthologue of human neuroligin genes, have defects in different behaviors. Here we show that the expression of human NLGN1 or rat Nlgn1 cDNAs in C. elegans nlg-1 mutants rescues the fructose osmotic strength avoidance and gentle touch response phenotypes. Two specific point mutations in NLGN3 and NLGN4 genes, involved in autistic spectrum disorder, were further characterized in this experimental system. The R451C allele described in NLGN3, was analyzed with both human NLGN1 (R453C and worm NLG-1 (R437C proteins, and both were not functional in rescuing the osmotic avoidance behavior and the gentle touch response phenotype. The D396X allele described in NLGN4, which produces a truncated protein, was studied with human NLGN1 (D432X and they did not rescue any of the behavioral phenotypes analyzed. In addition, RNAi feeding experiments measuring gentle touch response in wild type strain and worms expressing SID-1 in neurons (which increases the response to dsRNA, both fed with bacteria expressing dsRNA for nlg-1, provided evidence for a postsynaptic in vivo function of neuroligins both in muscle cells and neurons, equivalent to that proposed in mammals. This finding was further confirmed generating transgenic nlg-1 deficient mutants expressing NLG-1 under pan-neuronal (nrx-1 or pan-muscular (myo-3 specific promoters. All these results suggest that the nematode could be used as an in vivo model for studying particular synaptic mechanisms with proteins orthologues of humans involved in pervasive developmental disorders.

  20. Real-Time Live Confocal Fluorescence Microscopy as a New Tool for Assessing Platelet Vitality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hermann, Martin; Nussbaumer, Oliver; Knöfler, Ralf; Hengster, Paul; Nussbaumer, Walter; Streif, Werner

    2010-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Assessment of platelet vitality is important for patients presenting with inherited or acquired disorders of platelet function and for quality assessment of platelet concentrates. METHODS: Herein we combined live stains with intra-vital confocal fluorescence microscopy in order to obtain an imaging method that allows fast and accurate assessment of platelet vitality. Three fluorescent dyes, FITC-coupled wheat germ agglutinin (WGA), tetramethylrhodamine methyl ester perchlorate (TMRM) and acetoxymethylester (Rhod-2), were used to assess platelet morphology, mitochondrial activity and intra-platelet calcium levels. Microscopy was performed with a microlens-enhanced Nipkow spinning disk-based system allowing live confocal imaging. RESULTS: Comparison of ten samples of donor platelets collected before apheresis and platelets collected on days 5 and 7 of storage showed an increase in the percentage of Rhod-2-positive platelets from 3.6 to 47 and finally to 71%. Mitochondrial potential was demonstrated in 95.4% of donor platelets and in 92.5% of platelets stored for 7 days. CONCLUSION: Such fast and accurate visualization of known key parameters of platelet function could be of relevance for studies addressing the quality of platelets after storage and additional manipulation, such as pathogen inactivation, as well as for the analysis of inherited platelet function disorders.

  1. Storage of human platelets by freezing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, B K; Tanoue, K; Baldini, M G

    1976-01-01

    Prolonged, probably indefinite storage of viable and functional human platelets is now possible by freezing with dimethylsulfoxide (DMSO). The platelets have a nearly normal survival upon reinfusion and are capable of sustained hemostatic effectiveness in thrombocytopenic patients. Adaptation of the freezing technique for large-scale usage has more recently been achieved. The method is mainly based on the following principles: (1) use of plasma for suspension of the platelet concentrate; (2) gradual addition (0.5% every 2 min) of DMSO to a final concentration of 5% and its gradual removal; (3) a slow cooling rate of about 1/sup 0/C per min and rapid thawing (in 1 min); (4) use of a polyolefin plastic bag for freezing; (5) a washing medium of 20% plasma in Hanks' balanced salt solution; (6) final resuspension of the platelets in 50% plasma in Hanks' solution.

  2. Platelet activation and aggregation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Maria Sander; Larsen, O H; Christiansen, Kirsten

    2013-01-01

    This study introduces a new laboratory model of whole blood platelet aggregation stimulated by endogenously generated thrombin, and explores this aspect in haemophilia A in which impaired thrombin generation is a major hallmark. The method was established to measure platelet aggregation initiated...

  3. Platelet alloimmunization after transfusion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Taaning, E; Simonsen, A C; Hjelms, E

    1997-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVES: The frequency of platelet-specific antibodies after one series of blood transfusions has not been reported, and in multiply transfused patients is controversial. MATERIALS AND METHODS: We studied the frequency of alloimmunization against platelet antigens in 117 patient...

  4. Patients with previous definite stent thrombosis have a larger fraction of immature platelets and a reduced antiplatelet effect of aspirin

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Würtz, Morten; Grove, Erik; Wulff, Lise Nielsen

    turnover. Key Words: aspirin; immature platelets; platelet aggregation; platelet function tests; stent thrombosis Abbreviations: ARU, aspirin reaction units; AU, aggregation units; BMS, bare-metal stent(s); DES, drug-eluting stent(s); IPF, immature platelet fraction; MEA, multiple electrode aggregometry...

  5. Differential functional readthrough over homozygous nonsense mutations contributes to the bleeding phenotype in coagulation factor VII deficiency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Branchini, A; Ferrarese, M; Lombardi, S; Mari, R; Bernardi, F; Pinotti, M

    2016-10-01

    Essentials Potentially null homozygous Factor(F)7 nonsense mutations are associated to variable bleeding symptoms. Readthrough of p.Ser112X (life-threatening) and p.Cys132X (moderate) stop codons was investigated. Readthrough-mediated insertion of wild-type or tolerated residues produce functional proteins. Functional readthrough over homozygous F7 nonsense mutations contributes to the bleeding phenotype. Background Whereas the rare homozygous nonsense mutations causing factor (F)VII deficiency may predict null conditions that are almost completely incompatible with life, they are associated with appreciable differences in hemorrhagic symptoms. The misrecognition of premature stop codons (readthrough) may account for variable levels of functional full-length proteins. Objectives To experimentally evaluate the basal and drug-induced levels of FVII resulting from the homozygous p.Cys132X and p.Ser112X nonsense mutations that are associated with moderate (132X) or life-threatening (112X) symptoms, and that are predicted to undergo readthrough with (132X) or without (112X) production of wild-type FVII. Methods We transiently expressed recombinant FVII (rFVII) nonsense and missense variants in human embryonic kidney 293 cells, and evaluated secreted FVII protein and functional levels by ELISA, activated FX generation, and coagulation assays. Results The levels of functional FVII produced by p.Cys132X and p.Ser112X mutants (rFVII-132X, 1.1% ± 0.2% of wild-type rFVII; rFVII-112X, 0.5% ± 0.1% of wild-type rFVII) were compatible with the occurrence of spontaneous readthrough, which was magnified by the addition of G418 - up to 12% of the wild-type value for the rFVII-132X nonsense variant. The predicted missense variants arising from readthrough abolished (rFVII-132Trp/Arg) or reduced (rFVII-112Trp/Cys/Arg, 22-45% of wild-type levels) secretion and function. These data suggest that the appreciable rescue of p.Cys132X function was driven by reinsertion of the wild

  6. The impact of evaluating platelet transfusion need by platelet mass index on reducing the unnecessary transfusions in newborns.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kahvecioglu, Dilek; Erdeve, Omer; Alan, Serdar; Cakir, Ufuk; Yildiz, Duran; Atasay, Begum; Arsan, Saadet

    2014-11-01

    Almost 95% of the platelet transfusions (PTs) conducted in the neonatal intensive care unit (NICU) are prophylactic transfusions. Guidelines for prophylactic PTs are based on platelet counts, but not on platelet functions. Nowadays, in order to reduce unnecessary transfusions, utilizing platelet mass index (PMI) was investigated. The aim of study is to find out whether PTs performed in our NICU during last 2 years were in accordance with the current guideline and to evaluate whether the frequency of PTs should be reduced if PMI was considered. Forty-three infants who received 96 prophylactic PTs were enrolled in the study. The guideline utilized in our NICU advocate keeping the platelet count: (a) >100 000 in pre/post-operative, (b) >50 000 in unstable and (c) >20 000 in stable patients. According to PMI criteria, PT should be performed if PMI: (a) platelet functions into account may yield lower transfusion rate, lower costs and better conservation of blood bank resources.

  7. Statistical analysis plan for the WOMAN-ETAPlaT study: Effect of tranexamic acid on platelet function and thrombin generation [version 1; referees: 2 approved, 2 approved with reservations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kastriot Dallaku

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Background. Postpartum haemorrhage (PPH is a potentially life-threatening complication for women, and the leading cause of maternal mortality. Tranexamic acid (TXA is an antifibrinolytic used worldwide to treat uterine haemorrhage and to reduce blood loss in general surgery. TXA may have effects on thrombin generation, platelet function and coagulation factors as a result of its inhibition on the plasmin.   Methods. WOMAN ETAPlaT is a sub-study of the World Maternal Antifibrinolitic trial (WOMAN trial. All adult women clinically diagnosed with PPH after a vaginal delivery or caesarean section, are eligible for inclusion in the study. Blood samples will be collected at the baseline and 30 minutes after the first dose of study treatment is given. Platelet function will be evaluated in whole blood immediately after sampling with Multiplate® tests (ADPtest and TRAPtest. Thrombin generation, fibrinogen, D-dimer, and coagulation factors vW, V and VIII will be analysed using platelet poor plasma.   Results. Recruitment to WOMAN ETAPlaT started on 04 November 2013 and closed on 13 January 2015, during this time  188 patients were recruited. The final participant follow-up was completed on 04 March 2015. This article introduces the statistical analysis plan for the study, without reference to unblinded data.   Conclusion. The data from this study will provide evidence for the effect of TXA on thrombin generation, platelet function and coagulation factors in women with PPH.   Trial registration: ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier: NCT00872469; ISRCTN76912190

  8. Statistical analysis plan for the WOMAN-ETAPlaT study: Effect of tranexamic acid on platelet function and thrombin generation [version 2; referees: 2 approved, 2 approved with reservations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kastriot Dallaku

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Background. Postpartum haemorrhage (PPH is a potentially life-threatening complication for women, and the leading cause of maternal mortality. Tranexamic acid (TXA is an antifibrinolytic used worldwide to treat uterine haemorrhage and to reduce blood loss in general surgery. TXA may have effects on thrombin generation, platelet function and coagulation factors as a result of its inhibition on the plasmin.   Methods. WOMAN ETAPlaT is a sub-study of the World Maternal Antifibrinolitic trial (WOMAN trial. All adult women clinically diagnosed with PPH after a vaginal delivery or caesarean section, are eligible for inclusion in the study. Blood samples will be collected at the baseline and 30 minutes after the first dose of study treatment is given. Platelet function will be evaluated in whole blood immediately after sampling with Multiplate® tests (ADPtest and TRAPtest. Thrombin generation, fibrinogen, D-dimer, and coagulation factors vW, V and VIII will be analysed using platelet poor plasma.   Results. Recruitment to WOMAN ETAPlaT started on 04 November 2013 and closed on 13 January 2015, during this time  188 patients were recruited. The final participant follow-up was completed on 04 March 2015. This article introduces the statistical analysis plan for the study, without reference to unblinded data.   Conclusion. The data from this study will provide evidence for the effect of TXA on thrombin generation, platelet function and coagulation factors in women with PPH.   Trial registration: ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier: NCT00872469; ISRCTN76912190

  9. A Phenotypic Screen for Functional Mutants of Human Adenosine Deaminase Acting on RNA 1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yuru; Havel, Jocelyn; Beal, Peter A

    2015-11-20

    Adenosine deaminases acting on RNA (ADARs) are RNA-editing enzymes responsible for the conversion of adenosine to inosine at specific locations in cellular RNAs. ADAR1 and ADAR2 are two members of the family that have been shown to be catalytically active. Earlier, we reported a phenotypic screen for the study of human ADAR2 using budding yeast S. cerevisiae as the host system. While this screen has been successfully applied to the study of ADAR2, it failed with ADAR1. Here, we report a new reporter that uses a novel editing substrate and is suitable for the study of ADAR1. We screened plasmid libraries with randomized codons for two important residues in human ADAR1 (G1007 and E1008). The screening results combined with in vitro deamination assays led to the identification of mutants that are more active than the wild type protein. Furthermore, a screen of the ADAR1 E1008X library with a reporter construct bearing an A•G mismatch at the editing site suggests one role for the residue at position 1008 is to sense the identity of the base pairing partner for the editing site adenosine. This work has provided a starting point for future in vitro evolution studies of ADAR1 and led to new insight into ADAR's editing site selectivity.

  10. Examination of MARCO activity on dendritic cell phenotype and function using a gene knockout mouse.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hiroshi Komine

    Full Text Available We have reported the upregulation of MARCO, a member of the class A scavenger receptor family, on the surface of murine and human dendritic cells (DCs pulsed with tumor lysates. Exposure of murine tumor lysate-pulsed DCs to an anti-MARCO antibody led to loss of dendritic-like processes and enhanced migratory capacity. In this study, we have further examined the biological and therapeutic implications of MARCO expression by DCs. DCs generated from the bone marrow (bm of MARCO knockout (MARCO⁻/⁻ mice were phenotypically similar to DCs generated from the bm of wild-type mice and produced normal levels of IL-12 and TNF-α when exposed to LPS. MARCO⁻/⁻ DCs demonstrated enhanced migratory capacity in response to CCL-21 in vitro. After subcutaneous injection into mice, MARCO⁻/⁻ TP-DCs migrated more efficiently to the draining lymph node leading to enhanced generation of tumor-specific IFN-γ producing T cells and improved tumor regression and survival in B16 melanoma-bearing mice. These results support targeting MARCO on the surface of DCs to improve trafficking and induction of anti-tumor immunity.

  11. Dose- and time-related platelet response with apheresis platelet concentrates and pooled platelets

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad Mizanur Rahman

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available This study was carried out to compare the post-transfusion platelet increment between the apheresis platelet concentrate (n=74 and pooled platelets (n=54. Pre- and post-transfusion platelet count of the recipient were carried out by automated hematology analyzer. In apheresis platelet concentrate group, the mean 24 hours post-transfusion platelet increment was 47 x 109/L which was statistically significant (p<0.001. On the other hand, in pooled platelets group, the mean 24 hours post–transfusions platelet count increment was 11.0 x 109/L which was also statistically significant (p<0.001. This study concluded that the transfusion of apheresis platelet concentrate was more useful than the transfusion of pooled platelets in terms of platelet count increment and requirement of donor.

  12. Red blood cell and platelet genotyping: from current practice to future high-throughput donor typing

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Haas, M.; van der Schoot, C. E.; Beiboer, S. H. W.; Feskens, M.; Cheroutre, G.; Maaskant-van Wijkb, P. A.

    2006-01-01

    The molecular basis of almost all red cell and platelet blood group antigens is known. This enables the prediction of red cell or platelet phenotypes based upon the genotypes. In many laboratories, blood group genotyping assays are routinely used in cases where patient red cells cannot be used for

  13. A comparison of the functionality and in vivo phenotypic stability of cartilaginous tissues engineered from different stem cell sources.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vinardell, Tatiana; Sheehy, Eamon J; Buckley, Conor T; Kelly, Daniel J

    2012-06-01

    Joint-derived stem cells are a promising alternative cell source for cartilage repair therapies that may overcome many of the problems associated with the use of primary chondrocytes (CCs). The objective of this study was to compare the in vitro functionality and in vivo phenotypic stability of cartilaginous tissues engineered using bone marrow-derived stem cells (BMSCs) and joint tissue-derived stem cells following encapsulation in agarose hydrogels. Culture-expanded BMSCs, fat pad-derived stem cells (FPSCs), and synovial membrane-derived stem cells (SDSCs) were encapsulated in agarose and maintained in a chondrogenic medium supplemented with transforming growth factor-β3. After 21 days of culture, constructs were either implanted subcutaneously into the back of nude mice for an additional 28 days or maintained for a similar period in vitro in either chondrogenic or hypertrophic media formulations. After 49 days of in vitro culture in chondrogenic media, SDSC constructs accumulated the highest levels of sulfated glycosaminoglycan (sGAG) (∼2.8% w/w) and collagen (∼1.8% w/w) and were mechanically stiffer than constructs engineered using other cell types. After subcutaneous implantation in nude mice, sGAG content significantly decreased for all stem cell-seeded constructs, while no significant change was observed in the control constructs engineered using primary CCs, indicating that the in vitro chondrocyte-like phenotype generated in all stem cell-seeded agarose constructs was transient. FPSCs and SDSCs appeared to undergo fibrous dedifferentiation or resorption, as evident from increased collagen type I staining and a dramatic loss in sGAG content. BMSCs followed a more endochondral pathway with increased type X collagen expression and mineralization of the engineered tissue. In conclusion, while joint tissue-derived stem cells possess a strong intrinsic chondrogenic capacity, further studies are needed to identify the factors that will lead to the generation

  14. Phenotypic and Functional Changes Induced in Hematopoietic Stem/Progenitor Cells After Gamma-Ray Radiation Exposure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Simonnet, A.J.; Nehme, J.; Leboulch, Ph.; Tronik-Le Roux, D. [Institute of Emerging Diseases and Innovative Therapies, Functional Bioengineering Laboratory, Commissariat a l' Energie Atomique (CEA), Evry (France); Simonnet, A.J.; Nehme, J.; Leboulch, Ph.; Tronik-Le Roux, D. [Institut National de la Sante et de la Recherche Medicale (INSERM) U733 (Unite Mixte de Recherche) - UMR INSERM CEA Paris XI (France); Vaigot, P. [Institute of Cellular and Molecular Radiation Biology, Department of Genetic Instability, Recombination and Repair, Commissariat a l' Energie Atomique, Fontenay-aux-Roses (France); Vaigot, P. [UMR 217, UMR-CEA-Centre National de la Recherche Scientifique (France); Barroca, V. [Laboratory of Gametogenesis, Apoptosis, Genotoxicity, Institute of Cellular and Molecular Radiation Biology, Commissariat a l' Energie Atomique, Fontenay-aux-Roses (France); Barroca, V. [Institut National de la Sante et de la Recherche Medicale U566 - UMR INSERM-CEA-PARIS VII (France); Leboulch, Ph. [Genetics Division, Brigham and Women' s Hospital and Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts (US)

    2009-07-01

    Ionizing radiation (IR) exposure causes rapid and acute bone marrow (BM) suppression that is reversible for nonlethal doses. Evidence is accumulating that IR can also provoke long-lasting residual hematopoietic injury. To better understand these effects, we analyzed phenotypic and functional changes in the stem/progenitor compartment of irradiated mice over a 10-week period. We found that hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) identified by their repopulating ability continued to segregate within the Hoechst dye excluding 'side population (SP)' early after IR exposure. However, transient phenotypic changes were observed within this cell population: Sca-1 (S) and c-Kit (K) expression levels were increased and severely reduced, respectively, with a concurrent increase in the proportion of SPSK cells positive for established indicators of the presence of HSCs: CD150 and CD105. Ten weeks after IR exposure, expression of Sca-1 and c-Kit at the SP cell surface returned to control levels, and BM cellularity of irradiated mice was restored. However, the c-Kit{sup +}Sca-1{sup +}Lin{sup -/low} (KSL) stem/progenitor compartment displayed major phenotypic modifications, including an increase and a severe decrease in the frequencies of CD150{sup +}Flk2{sup -} and CD150{sup -}Flk2{sup +} cells, respectively. CD150{sup +} KSL cells also showed impaired reconstituting ability, an increased tendency to apoptosis, and accrued DNA damage. Finally, 15 weeks after exposure, irradiated mice, but not age matched controls, allowed engraftment and significant hematopoietic contribution from transplanted con-genic HSCs without additional host conditioning. These results provide novel insight in our understanding of immediate and delayed IR-induced hematopoietic injury and highlight similarities between HSCs of young irradiated and old mice. (authors)

  15. Phenotypic and Functional Changes Induced in Hematopoietic Stem/Progenitor Cells After Gamma-Ray Radiation Exposure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Simonnet, A.J.; Nehme, J.; Leboulch, Ph.; Tronik-Le Roux, D.; Simonnet, A.J.; Nehme, J.; Leboulch, Ph.; Tronik-Le Roux, D.; Vaigot, P.; Vaigot, P.; Barroca, V.; Barroca, V.; Leboulch, Ph.

    2009-01-01

    Ionizing radiation (IR) exposure causes rapid and acute bone marrow (BM) suppression that is reversible for nonlethal doses. Evidence is accumulating that IR can also provoke long-lasting residual hematopoietic injury. To better understand these effects, we analyzed phenotypic and functional changes in the stem/progenitor compartment of irradiated mice over a 10-week period. We found that hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) identified by their repopulating ability continued to segregate within the Hoechst dye excluding 'side population (SP)' early after IR exposure. However, transient phenotypic changes were observed within this cell population: Sca-1 (S) and c-Kit (K) expression levels were increased and severely reduced, respectively, with a concurrent increase in the proportion of SPSK cells positive for established indicators of the presence of HSCs: CD150 and CD105. Ten weeks after IR exposure, expression of Sca-1 and c-Kit at the SP cell surface returned to control levels, and BM cellularity of irradiated mice was restored. However, the c-Kit + Sca-1 + Lin -/low (KSL) stem/progenitor compartment displayed major phenotypic modifications, including an increase and a severe decrease in the frequencies of CD150 + Flk2 - and CD150 - Flk2 + cells, respectively. CD150 + KSL cells also showed impaired reconstituting ability, an increased tendency to apoptosis, and accrued DNA damage. Finally, 15 weeks after exposure, irradiated mice, but not age matched controls, allowed engraftment and significant hematopoietic contribution from transplanted con-genic HSCs without additional host conditioning. These results provide novel insight in our understanding of immediate and delayed IR-induced hematopoietic injury and highlight similarities between HSCs of young irradiated and old mice. (authors)

  16. Genetic and Environmental Basis in Phenotype Correlation Between Physical Function and Cognition in Aging Chinese Twins

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Xu, Chunsheng; Zhang, Dongfeng; Tian, Xiaocao

    2017-01-01

    for cognition with handgrip strength, FTSST, near visual acuity, and number of teeth lost. Cognitive function was genetically related to pulmonary function. The FTSST and cognition shared almost the same common environmental factors but only part of the unique environmental factors, both with negative......Although the correlation between cognition and physical function has been well studied in the general population, the genetic and environmental nature of the correlation has been rarely investigated. We conducted a classical twin analysis on cognitive and physical function, including forced...... and cognitive function. Bivariate analysis showed mildly positively genetic correlations between cognition and FEV1, r G = 0.23 [95% CI: 0.03, 0.62], as well as FVC, r G = 0.35 [95% CI: 0.06, 1.00]. We found that FTSST and cognition presented very high common environmental correlation, r C = -1.00 [95% CI: -1...

  17. [Inhibitory mechanism of ifenprodil tartrate on rabbit platelet aggregation].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Irino, O; Saitoh, K; Hayashi, T; Ohkubo, K

    1985-05-01

    The effects of dl-erythro-4-benzyl-alpha-(4-hydroxyphenyl)-beta-methyl-l-piperidine-eth anol tartrate (ifenprodil tartrate) on rabbit platelet aggregation in vitro and ex vivo were studied. Ifenprodil tartrate inhibited platelet aggregation in vitro induced by ADP, collagen and epinephrine. It also inhibited 5-hydroxytryptamine (5-HT) uptake into platelets and 5-HT release from platelets. Since these inhibitory effects of ifenprodil tartrate on the functions of rabbit platelets were similar to the effects of imipramine, the effects of ifenprodil tartrate may be due to the stabilizing action of ifenprodil tartrate on the platelet membrane. The platelet aggregation by ADP was significantly inhibited in rabbits after oral administration of ifenprodil tartrate, the maximal plasma level of ifenprodil being reached at 20 ng/ml ex vivo, while the maximal level was only 1/40 of the minimal concentration of ifenprodil tartrate necessary to inhibit platelet aggregation in vitro. These results indicate that factors other than ifenprodil tartrate acting directly on the platelets (e.g., PGI2 which is an endogenous inhibitor of platelet aggregation) are involved in inducing the inhibitory effects of ifenprodil tartrate on platelet aggregation ex vivo. The effects of ifenprodil tartrate on both PGI2 release from the aorta and the inhibitory effects of PGI2 on platelet aggregation in vitro were investigated: PGI2 was found to intensify the inhibitory effects of ifenprodil tartrate on platelet aggregation in vitro, but there was little effect, if any, on PGI2 release. Therefore, it is considered that the ex vivo effects of ifenprodil tartrate might be due to its interaction with endogenous PGI2 in the blood.

  18. Taurine and platelet aggregation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nauss-Karol, C.; VanderWende, C.; Gaut, Z.N.

    1986-01-01

    Taurine is a putative neurotransmitter or neuromodulator. The endogenous taurine concentration in human platelets, determined by amino acid analysis, is 15 μM/g. In spite of this high level, taurine is actively accumulated. Uptake is saturable, Na + and temperature dependent, and suppressed by metabolic inhibitors, structural analogues, and several classes of centrally active substances. High, medium and low affinity transport processes have been characterized, and the platelet may represent a model system for taurine transport in the CNS. When platelets were incubated with 14 C-taurine for 30 minutes, then resuspended in fresh medium and reincubated for one hour, essentially all of the taurine was retained within the cells. Taurine, at concentrations ranging from 10-1000 μM, had no effect on platelet aggregation induced by ADP or epinephrine. However, taurine may have a role in platelet aggregation since 35-39% of the taurine taken up by human platelets appears to be secreted during the release reaction induced by low concentrations of either epinephrine or ADP, respectively. This release phenomenon would imply that part of the taurine taken up is stored directly in the dense bodies of the platelet

  19. Phenotypic and functional characterization of human memory T cell responses to Burkholderia pseudomallei.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patcharaporn Tippayawat

    Full Text Available Infection with the Gram-negative bacterium Burkholderia pseudomallei is an important cause of community-acquired lethal sepsis in endemic regions in southeast Asia and northern Australia and is increasingly reported in other tropical areas. In animal models, production of interferon-gamma (IFN-gamma is critical for resistance, but in humans the characteristics of IFN-gamma production and the bacterial antigens that are recognized by the cell-mediated immune response have not been defined.Peripheral blood from 133 healthy individuals who lived in the endemic area and had no history of melioidosis, 60 patients who had recovered from melioidosis, and 31 other patient control subjects were stimulated by whole bacteria or purified bacterial proteins in vitro, and IFN-gamma responses were analyzed by ELISPOT and flow cytometry.B. pseudomallei was a potent activator of human peripheral blood NK cells for innate production of IFN-gamma. In addition, healthy individuals with serological evidence of exposure to B. pseudomallei and patients recovered from active melioidosis developed CD4(+ (and CD8(+ T cells that recognized whole bacteria and purified proteins LolC, OppA, and PotF, members of the B. pseudomallei ABC transporter family. This response was primarily mediated by terminally differentiated T cells of the effector-memory (T(EMRA phenotype and correlated with the titer of anti-B. pseudomallei antibodies in the serum.Individuals living in a melioidosis-endemic region show clear evidence of T cell priming for the ability to make IFN-gamma that correlates with their serological status. The ability to detect T cell responses to defined B. pseudomallei proteins in large numbers of individuals now provides the opportunity to screen candidate antigens for inclusion in protein or polysaccharide-conjugate subunit vaccines against this important but neglected disease.

  20. Phenotypic and functional analyses show stem cell-derived hepatocyte-like cells better mimic fetal rather than adult hepatocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baxter, Melissa; Withey, Sarah; Harrison, Sean; Segeritz, Charis-Patricia; Zhang, Fang; Atkinson-Dell, Rebecca; Rowe, Cliff; Gerrard, Dave T; Sison-Young, Rowena; Jenkins, Roz; Henry, Joanne; Berry, Andrew A; Mohamet, Lisa; Best, Marie; Fenwick, Stephen W; Malik, Hassan; Kitteringham, Neil R; Goldring, Chris E; Piper Hanley, Karen; Vallier, Ludovic; Hanley, Neil A

    2015-03-01

    Hepatocyte-like cells (HLCs), differentiated from pluripotent stem cells by the use of soluble factors, can model human liver function and toxicity. However, at present HLC maturity and whether any deficit represents a true fetal state or aberrant differentiation is unclear and compounded by comparison to potentially deteriorated adult hepatocytes. Therefore, we generated HLCs from multiple lineages, using two different protocols, for direct comparison with fresh fetal and adult hepatocytes. Protocols were developed for robust differentiation. Multiple transcript, protein and functional analyses compared HLCs to fresh human fetal and adult hepatocytes. HLCs were comparable to those of other laboratories by multiple parameters. Transcriptional changes during differentiation mimicked human embryogenesis and showed more similarity to pericentral than periportal hepatocytes. Unbiased proteomics demonstrated greater proximity to liver than 30 other human organs or tissues. However, by comparison to fresh material, HLC maturity was proven by transcript, protein and function to be fetal-like and short of the adult phenotype. The expression of 81% phase 1 enzymes in HLCs was significantly upregulated and half were statistically not different from fetal hepatocytes. HLCs secreted albumin and metabolized testosterone (CYP3A) and dextrorphan (CYP2D6) like fetal hepatocytes. In seven bespoke tests, devised by principal components analysis to distinguish fetal from adult hepatocytes, HLCs from two different source laboratories consistently demonstrated fetal characteristics. HLCs from different sources are broadly comparable with unbiased proteomic evidence for faithful differentiation down the liver lineage. This current phenotype mimics human fetal rather than adult hepatocytes. Copyright © 2014 European Association for the Study of the Liver. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. Noise genetics: inferring protein function by correlating phenotype with protein levels and localization in individual human cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shlomit Farkash-Amar

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available To understand gene function, genetic analysis uses large perturbations such as gene deletion, knockdown or over-expression. Large perturbations have drawbacks: they move the cell far from its normal working point, and can thus be masked by off-target effects or compensation by other genes. Here, we offer a complementary approach, called noise genetics. We use natural cell-cell variations in protein level and localization, and correlate them to the natural variations of the phenotype of the same cells. Observing these variations is made possible by recent advances in dynamic proteomics that allow measuring proteins over time in individual living cells. Using motility of human cancer cells as a model system, and time-lapse microscopy on 566 fluorescently tagged proteins, we found 74 candidate motility genes whose level or localization strongly correlate with motility in individual cells. We recovered 30 known motility genes, and validated several novel ones by mild knockdown experiments. Noise genetics can complement standard genetics for a variety of phenotypes.

  2. Functional Characterization and Drug Response of Freshly Established Patient-Derived Tumor Models with CpG Island Methylator Phenotype.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Claudia Maletzki

    Full Text Available Patient-individual tumor models constitute a powerful platform for basic and translational analyses both in vitro and in vivo. However, due to the labor-intensive and highly time-consuming process, only few well-characterized patient-derived cell lines and/or corresponding xenografts exist. In this study, we describe successful generation and functional analysis of novel tumor models from patients with sporadic primary colorectal carcinomas (CRC showing CpG island methylator phenotype (CIMP. Initial DNA fingerprint analysis confirmed identity with the patient in all four cases. These freshly established cells showed characteristic features associated with the CIMP-phenotype (HROC40: APCwt, TP53 mut, KRAS mut; 3/8 marker methylated; HROC43: APC mut, TP53 mut, KRAS mut; 4/8 marker methylated; HROC60: APCwt, TP53 mut, KRASwt; 4/8 marker methylated; HROC183: APC mut, TP53 mut, KRAS mut; 6/8 marker methylated. Cell lines were of epithelial origin (EpCAM+ with distinct morphology and growth kinetics. Response to chemotherapeutics was quite individual between cells, with stage I-derived cell line HROC60 being most susceptible towards standard clinically approved chemotherapeutics (e.g. 5-FU, Irinotecan. Of note, most cell lines were sensitive towards "non-classical" CRC standard drugs (sensitivity: Gemcitabin > Rapamycin > Nilotinib. This comprehensive analysis of tumor biology, genetic alterations and assessment of chemosensitivity towards a broad range of (chemo- therapeutics helps bringing forward the concept of personalized tumor therapy.

  3. Functional characterizations of venom phenotypes in the eastern diamondback rattlesnake (Crotalus adamanteus) and evidence for expression-driven divergence in toxic activities among populations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Margres, Mark J.; Walls, Robert; Suntravat, Montamas; Lucena, Sara; Sánchez, Elda E.; Rokyta, Darin R.

    2016-01-01

    Phenotypes frequently vary across and within species. The connection between specific phenotypic effects and function, however, is less understood despite being essential to our understanding of the adaptive process. Snake venoms are ideal for identifying functionally important phenotypic variation because venom variation is common, and venoms can be functionally characterized through simple assays and toxicity measurements. Previous work with the eastern diamondback rattlesnake (Crotalus adamanteus) used multivariate statistical approaches to identify six unique venom phenotypes. We functionally characterized hemolytic, gelatinase, fibrinogenolytic, and coagulant activity for all six phenotypes, as well as one additional venom, to determine if the statistically significant differences in toxin expression levels previously documented corresponded to differences in venom activity. In general, statistical differences in toxin expression predicted the identified functional differences, or lack thereof, in toxic activity, demonstrating that the statistical approach used to characterize C. adamanteus venoms was a fair representation of biologically meaningful differences. Minor differences in activity not accounted for by the statistical model may be the result of amino-acid differences and/or post-translational modifications, but overall we were able to link variation in protein expression levels to variation in function as predicted by multivariate statistical approaches. PMID:27179420

  4. Systems-level analysis of age-related macular degeneration reveals global biomarkers and phenotype-specific functional networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-01

    Background Age-related macular degeneration (AMD) is a leading cause of blindness that affects the central region of the retinal pigmented epithelium (RPE), choroid, and neural retina. Initially characterized by an accumulation of sub-RPE deposits, AMD leads to progressive retinal degeneration, and in advanced cases, irreversible vision loss. Although genetic analysis, animal models, and cell culture systems have yielded important insights into AMD, the molecular pathways underlying AMD's onset and progression remain poorly delineated. We sought to better understand the molecular underpinnings of this devastating disease by performing the first comparative transcriptome analysis of AMD and normal human donor eyes. Methods RPE-choroid and retina tissue samples were obtained from a common cohort of 31 normal, 26 AMD, and 11 potential pre-AMD human donor eyes. Transcriptome profiles were generated for macular and extramacular regions, and statistical and bioinformatic methods were employed to identify disease-associated gene signatures and functionally enriched protein association networks. Selected genes of high significance were validated using an independent donor cohort. Results We identified over 50 annotated genes enriched in cell-mediated immune responses that are globally over-expressed in RPE-choroid AMD phenotypes. Using a machine learning model and a second donor cohort, we show that the top 20 global genes are predictive of AMD clinical diagnosis. We also discovered functionally enriched gene sets in the RPE-choroid that delineate the advanced AMD phenotypes, neovascular AMD and geographic atrophy. Moreover, we identified a graded increase of transcript levels in the retina related to wound response, complement cascade, and neurogenesis that strongly correlates with decreased levels of phototransduction transcripts and increased AMD severity. Based on our findings, we assembled protein-protein interactomes that highlight functional networks likely to be

  5. Dark chocolate inhibits platelet aggregation in healthy volunteers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Innes, Andrew J; Kennedy, Gwen; McLaren, Margaret; Bancroft, Anne J; Belch, Jill J F

    2003-08-01

    Cardiovascular disease is a leading cause of death in the UK. The flavonoids found in cocoa may produce a cardio-protective role for chocolate with a high cocoa content. Thirty healthy volunteers were randomised to receive 100 g of white, milk or dark chocolate, and assessments of platelet function were undertaken on venous blood samples before and after chocolate consumption. White and milk chocolate had no significant effect on platelets. However dark chocolate inhibited collagen-induced platelet aggregation in platelet rich plasma. In the future dark chocolate may have a role in prevention of cardiovascular and thromboembolic diseases.

  6. Platelet-activating factor increases platelet-dependent glycoconjugate secretion from tracheal submucosal gland

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sasaki, T.; Shimura, S.; Ikeda, K.; Sasaki, H.; Takishima, T.

    1989-01-01

    Using isolated glands from feline trachea, we examined the effect of platelet-activating factor (PAF) on radiolabeled glycoconjugate release and glandular contraction by measuring induced tension in the absence or presence of platelets. PAF alone did not produce any significant glandular contraction nor any significant change in glycoconjugate release from isolated glands. In the presence of purified platelets containing no plasma, PAF (10(-8) to 10(-5) M) produced significant glycoconjugate secretion in a dose-dependent fashion, but it produced no significant glandular contraction. PAF-evoked glycoconjugate secretion was time dependent, reaching a peak response of 277% of control 15-30 min after the exposure of isolated glands to 10(-5) M PAF in the presence of platelets and returning to 135% of controls at 2 h. Platelets alone did not produce any significant stimulation in glycoconjugate release. CV-3988, a known PAF antagonist, inhibited the secretory response to PAF. Methysergide, a known antagonist to receptors for 5-hydroxytryptamine, did not alter PAF-evoked glycoconjugate secretion. Both indomethacin and SQ 29,548, a thromboxane receptor antagonist, abolished the PAF-evoked glycoconjugate secretion from isolated submucosal glands. Epithiomethanothromboxane A2, a stable thromboxane A2 analogue, produced a significant increase in glycoconjugate secretion in a dose-dependent fashion. These findings indicate that PAF increases glycoconjugate release in the presence of platelets and that the increase is dependent on some aspect of platelet function, namely thromboxane generation

  7. Aerobic exercise training lowers platelet reactivity and improves platelet sensitivity to prostacyclin in pre- and postmenopausal women

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lundberg Slingsby, Martina Helena; Nyberg, Michael Permin; Egelund, Jon

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The risk of atherothrombotic events increases after menopause. Regular physical activity has been shown to reduce platelet reactivity in younger women, but it is unknown how regular exercise affects platelet function after menopause. OBJECTIVES: To examine the effects of regular aerobic...... exercise in late pre- and recent postmenopausal women by testing basal platelet reactivity and platelet sensitivity to prostacyclin and nitric oxide. METHODS: 25 sedentary, but healthy, late premenopausal and 24 matched recently postmenopausal women, mean (95% confidence interval) 49.1 (48.2-49.9) and 53...... postmenopausal women, platelet reactivity was tested ex vivo after femoral arterial infusion of prostacyclin, acetylcholine, a cyclooxygenase inhibitor and after acute one-leg knee extensor exercise. RESULTS: Basal platelet reactivity (%aggregation) to TRAP-6(1μM) was higher in the postmenopausal; 59% (50...

  8. Thrombopoietin contributes to enhanced platelet activation in patients with unstable angina.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lupia, Enrico; Bosco, Ornella; Bergerone, Serena; Dondi, Anna Erna; Goffi, Alberto; Oliaro, Elena; Cordero, Marco; Del Sorbo, Lorenzo; Trevi, Giampaolo; Montrucchio, Giuseppe

    2006-12-05

    We sought to investigate the potential role of elevated levels of thrombopoietin (TPO) in platelet activation during unstable angina (UA). Thrombopoietin is a humoral growth factor that does not induce platelet aggregation per se, but primes platelet activation in response to several agonists. No data concerning its contribution to platelet function abnormalities described in patients with UA are available. We studied 15 patients with UA and, as controls, 15 patients with stable angina (SA) and 15 healthy subjects. We measured TPO and C-reactive protein (CRP), as well as monocyte-platelet binding and the platelet expression of P-selectin and of the TPO receptor, c-Mpl. The priming activity of patient or control plasma on platelet aggregation and monocyte-platelet binding and the role of TPO in this effect also were studied. Patients with UA showed higher circulating TPO levels, as well as increased monocyte-platelet binding, platelet P-selectin expression, and CRP levels, than those with SA and healthy control subjects. The UA patients also showed reduced platelet expression of the TPO receptor, c-Mpl. In vitro, the plasma from UA patients, but not from SA patients or healthy controls, primed platelet aggregation and monocyte-platelet binding, which were both reduced when an inhibitor of TPO was used. Thrombopoietin may enhance platelet activation in the early phases of UA, potentially participating in the pathogenesis of acute coronary syndromes.

  9. Platelets release pathogenic serotonin and return to circulation after immune complex-mediated sequestration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cloutier, Nathalie; Allaeys, Isabelle; Marcoux, Genevieve; Machlus, Kellie R; Mailhot, Benoit; Zufferey, Anne; Levesque, Tania; Becker, Yann; Tessandier, Nicolas; Melki, Imene; Zhi, Huiying; Poirier, Guy; Rondina, Matthew T; Italiano, Joseph E; Flamand, Louis; McKenzie, Steven E; Cote, Francine; Nieswandt, Bernhard; Khan, Waliul I; Flick, Matthew J; Newman, Peter J; Lacroix, Steve; Fortin, Paul R; Boilard, Eric

    2018-02-13

    There is a growing appreciation for the contribution of platelets to immunity; however, our knowledge mostly relies on platelet functions associated with vascular injury and the prevention of bleeding. Circulating immune complexes (ICs) contribute to both chronic and acute inflammation in a multitude of clinical conditions. Herein, we scrutinized platelet responses to systemic ICs in the absence of tissue and endothelial wall injury. Platelet activation by circulating ICs through a mechanism requiring expression of platelet Fcγ receptor IIA resulted in the induction of systemic shock. IC-driven shock was dependent on release of serotonin from platelet-dense granules secondary to platelet outside-in signaling by αIIbβ3 and its ligand fibrinogen. While activated platelets sequestered in the lungs and leaky vasculature of the blood-brain barrier, platelets also sequestered in the absence of shock in mice lacking peripheral serotonin. Unexpectedly, platelets returned to the blood circulation with emptied granules and were thereby ineffective at promoting subsequent systemic shock, although they still underwent sequestration. We propose that in response to circulating ICs, platelets are a crucial mediator of the inflammatory response highly relevant to sepsis, viremia, and anaphylaxis. In addition, platelets recirculate after degranulation and sequestration, demonstrating that in adaptive immunity implicating antibody responses, activated platelets are longer lived than anticipated and may explain platelet count fluctuations in IC-driven diseases.

  10. Heterozygous STAT1 gain-of-function mutations underlie an unexpectedly broad clinical phenotype

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Toubiana, Julie; Okada, Satoshi; Hiller, Julia; Oleastro, Matias; Lagos Gomez, Macarena; Aldave Becerra, Juan Carlos; Ouachée-Chardin, Marie; Fouyssac, Fanny; Girisha, Katta Mohan; Etzioni, Amos; van Montfrans, Joris M.; Camcioglu, Yildiz; Kerns, Leigh Ann; Belohradsky, Bernd; Blanche, Stéphane; Bousfiha, Aziz; Rodriguez-Gallego, Carlos; Meyts, Isabelle; Kisand, Kai; Reichenbach, Janine; Renner, Ellen D; Rosenzweig, Sergio; Grimbacher, Bodo; van de Veerdonk, Frank L; Traidl-Hoffmann, Claudia; Picard, Capucine; Marodi, Laszlo; Morio, Tomohiro; Kobayashi, Masao; Lilic, Desa; Milner, Joshua D; Holland, Steven; Casanova, Jean-Laurent; Puel, Anne

    2016-01-01

    Since their discovery in patients with autosomal dominant (AD) chronic mucocutaneous candidiasis (CMC) in 2011, heterozygous STAT1 gain-of-function (GOF) mutations have increasingly been identified worldwide. The clinical spectrum associated with them needed to be delineated. We enrolled 274

  11. Differential surface phenotype and context-dependent reactivity of functionally diverse NKT cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cameron, Garth; Godfrey, Dale I

    2018-03-05

    Natural Killer T (NKT) cells are a functionally diverse population that recognizes lipid-based antigens in association with the antigen-presenting molecule CD1d. Here, we define a technique to separate the functionally distinct thymic NKT1, NKT2 and NKT17 cell subsets by their surface expression of CD278 (ICOS) and the activation-associated glycoform of CD43, enabling the investigation of subset-specific effector-functions. We report that all three subsets express the transcription factor GATA-3 and the potential to produce IL-4 and IL-10 following activation. This questions the notion that NKT2 cells are the predominant source of IL-4 within the NKT cell pool, and suggests that IL-10-production may be more indicative of NKT cell plasticity than the existence of a distinct regulatory lineage or subset. We also show that many NKT17 cells are CD4 + and are biased toward Vβ8.3 TCR gene usage. Lastly, we demonstrate that the toll-like receptor (TLR) ligand lipopolysaccharide (LPS) can induce a NKT17 cell-biased response, even in the absence of exogenous antigen, and that combining LPS with α-GalCer resulted in enhanced IL-17A-production, and reduced levels of the immunosuppressive cytokine IL-10. This study provides a novel means to examine the context-dependent reactivity of the functionally heterogeneous NKT cell population and provides important new insight into the functional biology of these subsets. © 2018 Australasian Society for Immunology Inc.

  12. A mathematical framework for functional mapping of complex phenotypes using delay differential equations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fu, Guifang; Wang, Zhong; Li, Jiahan; Wu, Rongling

    2011-11-21

    All biological phenomena occurring at different levels of organization from cells to organisms can be modeled as a dynamic system, in which the underlying components interact dynamically to comprehend its biological function. Such a systems modeling approach facilitates the use of biochemically and biophysically detailed mathematical models to describe and quantify "living cells," leading to an in-depth and precise understanding of the behavior, development and function of a biological system. Here, we illustrate how this approach can be used to map genes or quantitative trait loci (QTLs) that control a complex trait using the example of the circadian rhythm system which has been at the forefront of analytical mathematical modeling for many years. We integrate a system of biologically meaningful delay differential equations (DDEs) into functional mapping, a statistical model designed to map dynamic QTLs involved in biological processes. The DDEs model the ability of circadian rhythm to generate autonomously sustained oscillations with a period close to 24h, in terms of time-varying mRNA and protein abundances. By incorporating the Runge-Kutta fourth order algorithm within the likelihood-based context of functional mapping, we estimated the genetic parameters that define the periodic pattern of QTL effects on time-varying mRNA and protein abundances and their dynamic association as well as the linkage disequilibrium of the QTL and a marker. We prove theorems about how to choose appropriate parameters to guarantee periodic oscillations. We further used simulation studies to investigate how a QTL influences the period and the amplitude of circadian oscillations through changing model parameters. The model provides a quantitative framework for assessing the interplay between genetic effects of QTLs and rhythmic responses. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Hyperandrogenism in female athletes with functional hypothalamic amenorrhea: a distinct phenotype

    OpenAIRE

    Javed, Asma; Kashyap, Rahul; Lteif, Aida N

    2015-01-01

    Asma Javed,1 Rahul Kashyap,2 Aida N Lteif1 1Pediatric and Adolescent Medicine, Division of Pediatric Endocrinology Mayo Clinic, Rochester, MN, USA; 2Department of Anesthesia and Critical Care Medicine, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, MN, USA Objective: To compare the reproductive, metabolic, and skeletal profiles of young athletic women with functional hypothalamic amenorrhea (FHA) as well as clinical or biochemical hyperandrogenism (FHA-EX+HA) with body mass index matched women with FHA due to exe...

  14. Five species, many genotypes, broad phenotypic diversity: When agronomy meets functional ecology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prieto, Ivan; Litrico, Isabelle; Violle, Cyrille; Barre, Philippe

    2017-01-01

    Current ecological theory can provide insight into the causes and impacts of plant domestication. However, just how domestication has impacted intraspecific genetic variability (ITV) is unknown. We used 50 ecotypes and 35 cultivars from five grassland species to explore how selection drives functional trait coordination and genetic differentiation. We quantified the extent of genetic diversity among different sets of functional traits and determined how much genetic diversity has been generated within populations of natural ecotypes and selected cultivars. In general, the cultivars were larger (e.g., greater height, faster growth rates) and had larger and thinner leaves (greater SLA). We found large (average 63%) and trait-dependent (ranging from 14% for LNC to 95.8% for growth rate) genetic variability. The relative extent of genetic variability was greater for whole-plant than for organ-level traits. This pattern was consistent within ecotypes and within cultivars. However, ecotypes presented greater ITV variability. The results indicated that genetic diversity is large in domesticated species with contrasting levels of heritability among functional traits and that selection for high yield has led to indirect selection of some associated leaf traits. These findings open the way to define which target traits should be the focus in selection programs, especially in the context of community-level selection. © 2017 Botanical Society of America.

  15. Platelet Levels and Implications For Pre-Dialysis Chronic Renal ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Platelet count is assumed to be normal in chronic renal insufficiency. However, the possible effect of loss of platelet function in chronic renal failure (CFR) in relation to occult chronic blood loss, haematuria and overall health of the patient has not been given the desired attention. The aim of this study was to determine the ...

  16. Survival curves study of platelet labelling with 51Cr

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Penas, M.E.

    1981-01-01

    Platelet kinetics and idiopathic thrombocytopenic purpura were researched in the literature. An 'in vitro' platelet labelling with 51 Cr procedure in implementation has been evaluated in human beings. Functions used for fitting considered the cases whether the curve was linear or exponential as well as the presence of hematies. (author)

  17. Platelets and white blood cells in acute coronary syndromes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Smit, Jaap Jan Johannes

    2008-01-01

    In this thesis, we have studied the role of leukocytes and platelets as methods to measure platelets aggregation, in the clinical management of presenting with acute coronary syndromes. We have tried to incidence and to identify predictors of adverse cardiac events with function tests or

  18. Effect of varying concentrations of orally ingested glucose on platelet ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The physiologic basis of bleeding is a function of normal platelets and coagulation factors. This study is aimed at ascertaining the effect of varying concentrations of orally ingested glucose on platelet count and hemoglobin concentration during menstruation. Forty menstruating students between the ages of 18 and 25 from ...

  19. Radioimmunoassay of platelet proteins

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pepper, D.S.

    1987-01-01

    The radioimmunoassay of platelet-specific proteins has proven to be an excellent way of monitoring platelet activation in vivo. In contrast to earlier methods such as aggregometry, which has been the major tool used in the evaluation of antiplatelet drugs, the RIAs are capable of working with samples which have been subjected to physiological conditions such as haematocrit, oxygen tension, shear rate and ionized calcium concentration. Also, in contrast to aggregometry, no choice of agonist is necessary. Thus, for the first time it has been possible to monitor the effects of therapeutic intervention with drugs upon the platelet release reaction in vivo. It seems reasonable to equate the release reaction in vivo with activation in vivo, though the stimuli necessarily remain unknown. Nevertheless, the fact that a significant number of the compounds mentioned in Table 3 are indeed capable of reducing platelet activation in vivo and that this effect can be measured objectively is a major step forward in our understanding of platelet pharmacology. Two important goals remain to be achieved, however, the establishment of nonhuman animal models for the evaluation of newer compounds in vivo and longer-term goal of proving in the clinical setting the relevance or otherwise of platelet activation per se to the clinical outcome of a particular disease. In this respect, the availability of accurate, reliable and specific radioimmunoassays has a central role

  20. Effects of Low-Dose Aspirin and Fish Oil on Platelet Function and NF-kappaB in Adults with Diabetes Mellitus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Block, Robert C; Abdolahi, Amir; Smith, Brian; Meednu, N; Thevenet-Morrison, Kelly; Cai, Xueya; Cui, Huadong; Mousa, Shaker; Brenna, J. Thomas; Georas, S

    2013-01-01

    SUMMARY Introduction Many diabetics are insensitive to aspirin’s platelet anti-aggregation effects. The possible modulating effects of coadministration of aspirin and fish oil in subjects with diabetes are poorly characterized. Participants and Methods Thirty adults with type 2 diabetes mellitus were treated with aspirin 81 mg/d for 7 days, then with fish oil 4g/day for 28 days, then the combination of fish oil and aspirin for another 7 days. Results Aspirin alone and in combination with fish oil reduced platelet aggregation in most participants. Five of 7 participants classified as aspirin insensitive 1 week after daily aspirin ingestion were sensitive after the combination. Although some platelet aggregation measures correlated positively after aspirin and fish oil ingestion alone and (in combination) in all individuals, correlation was only observed in those who were aspirin insensitive after ingestion of the combination. Conclusions Co-adminstration of aspirin and fish oil may reduce platelet aggregation more than aspirin alone in adults with diabetes mellitus. PMID:23664596

  1. Platelet-Rich Plasma Influences Expansion and Paracrine Function of Adipose-Derived Stromal Cells in a Dose-Dependent Fashion

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Willemsen, Joep C. N.; Spiekman, Maroesjka; Stevens, H. P. Jeroen; van der Lei, Berend; Harmsen, Martin C.

    Background: Lipofilling is a treatment modality to restore tissue volume. Both platelet-rich plasma and adipose-derived stromal cells have been reported to augment the efficacy of lipofilling, yet results are not conclusive. The authors hypothesized that the variation reported in literature is

  2. Dose-dependent platelet stimulation and inhibition induced by anti-PIA1 IgG

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ryu, T.; Davis, J.M.; Schwartz, K.A.

    1990-01-01

    The PIA1 antibody produces several clinically distinct and severe thrombocytopenias. Investigations have demonstrated divergent effects on platelet function; prior reports demonstrated inhibition, while a conflicting publication showed platelet activation. We have resolved this conflict using anti-PIA1 IgG produced by a patient with posttransfusion purpura. Relatively low concentrations stimulated platelet aggregation and release of adenosine triphosphate (ATP) whereas high concentrations inhibited platelet function, producing a thrombasthenia-like state. The number of molecules of platelet-associated IgG necessary to initiate aggregation and ATP release (2,086 +/- 556) or produce maximum aggregation (23,420 +/- 3,706) or complete inhibition (63,582 +/- 2654) were measured with a quantitative radiometric assay for bound anti-PIA1. Preincubation of platelets with high concentrations of PIA1 antibody inhibited platelet aggregation with 10 mumol/L adenosine diphosphate and blocked 125I-labeled fibrinogen platelet binding. Platelet activation with nonfibrinogen dependent agonist, 1 U/ml thrombin, was not inhibited by this high concentration of PIA1 IgG. In conclusion, anti-PIAI IgG produces (1) stimulation of platelet aggregation and ATP release that is initiated with 2000 molecules IgG per platelet and is associated with an increase of 125I-fibrinogen binding; (2) conversely, inhibition of platelet aggregation is observed with maximum antibody binding, 63,000 molecules IgG per platelet, and is mediated via a blockade of fibrinogen binding

  3. TPC2 polymorphisms associated with a hair pigmentation phenotype in humans result in gain of channel function by independent mechanisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chao, Yu-Kai; Schludi, Verena; Chen, Cheng-Chang; Butz, Elisabeth; Nguyen, O N Phuong; Müller, Martin; Krüger, Jens; Kammerbauer, Claudia; Ben-Johny, Manu; Vollmar, Angelika M; Berking, Carola; Biel, Martin; Wahl-Schott, Christian A; Grimm, Christian

    2017-10-10

    Two-pore channels (TPCs) are endolysosomal cation channels. Two members exist in humans, TPC1 and TPC2. Functional roles associated with the ubiquitously expressed TPCs include VEGF-induced neoangiogenesis, LDL-cholesterol trafficking and degradation, physical endurance under fasting conditions, autophagy regulation, the acrosome reaction in sperm, cancer cell migration, and intracellular trafficking of pathogens such as Ebola virus or bacterial toxins (e.g., cholera toxin). In a genome-wide association study for variants associated with human pigmentation characteristics two coding variants of TPC2, rs35264875 (encoding M484L) and rs3829241 (encoding G734E), have been found to be associated with a shift from brown to blond hair color. In two recent follow-up studies a role for TPC2 in pigmentation has been further confirmed. However, these human polymorphic variants have not been functionally characterized until now. The development of endolysosomal patch-clamp techniques has made it possible to investigate directly ion channel activities and characteristics in isolated endolysosomal organelles. We applied this technique here to scrutinize channel characteristics of the polymorphic TPC2 variants in direct comparison with WT. We found that both polymorphisms lead to a gain of channel function by independent mechanisms. We next conducted a clinical study with more than 100 blond- and brown/black-haired individuals. We performed a genotype/phenotype analysis and subsequently isolated fibroblasts from WT and polymorphic variant carriers for endolysosomal patch-clamp experimentation to confirm key in vitro findings.

  4. The role of Odontella aurita, a marine diatom rich in EPA, as a dietary supplement in dyslipidemia, platelet function and oxidative stress in high-fat fed rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Haimeur Adil

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Dietary changes are a major factor in determining cardiovascular risk. n-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids modulate the risk factors for metabolic syndrome via multiple mechanisms, including the regulation of the lipid metabolism. We therefore investigated the effect of Odontella aurita, a microalga rich in EPA, which is already used as a food supplement, on the risk factors for high-fat diet induced metabolic syndrome in rats. Methods Male Wistar rats were divided into 4 groups and were fed with a standard diet (control; with the standard diet supplemented with 3% freeze-dried O. aurita (COA; with a high-fat diet (HF; or with the high-fat diet supplemented with 3% of freeze-dried O. aurita (HFOA for 7 weeks. In this study we evaluated the impact of these different diets on the risk factors for metabolic syndrome, such as hyperlipidemia, platelet aggregation, thromboxane B2 production, and oxidative stress. Results After 7 weeks of treatment, high fat feeding had increased final body weight, glycemia, triacylglycerol, and total cholesterol levels in plasma and liver compared to the control diet. Collagen-induced platelet aggregation and basal platelet thromboxane B2 were also higher in the high-fat fed rats than in those in the control group. In the liver, oxidative stress was greater in the HF group than in the control group. O. aurita intake in HFOA-fed rats resulted in lower glycemia and lipid levels in the plasma and liver relative than in the HF group. Thus, in the HFOA group, n-3 polyunsaturated fatty acid levels in the tissues studied (plasma, liver, and platelets were higher than in the HF group. Platelet hyper-aggregability tended to decrease in HFOA-fed rats as basal platelet thromboxane B2 production decreased. Finally, O. aurita reduced oxidative stress in the liver, with lower malondialdehyde levels and increased glutathione peroxidase activity. Conclusions O. aurita is a marine diatom rich in EPA as well as in other

  5. The role of Odontella aurita, a marine diatom rich in EPA, as a dietary supplement in dyslipidemia, platelet function and oxidative stress in high-fat fed rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haimeur, Adil; Ulmann, Lionel; Mimouni, Virginie; Guéno, Frédérique; Pineau-Vincent, Fabienne; Meskini, Nadia; Tremblin, Gérard

    2012-10-31

    Dietary changes are a major factor in determining cardiovascular risk. n-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids modulate the risk factors for metabolic syndrome via multiple mechanisms, including the regulation of the lipid metabolism. We therefore investigated the effect of Odontella aurita, a microalga rich in EPA, which is already used as a food supplement, on the risk factors for high-fat diet induced metabolic syndrome in rats. Male Wistar rats were divided into 4 groups and were fed with a standard diet (control); with the standard diet supplemented with 3% freeze-dried O. aurita (COA); with a high-fat diet (HF); or with the high-fat diet supplemented with 3% of freeze-dried O. aurita (HFOA) for 7 weeks. In this study we evaluated the impact of these different diets on the risk factors for metabolic syndrome, such as hyperlipidemia, platelet aggregation, thromboxane B2 production, and oxidative stress. After 7 weeks of treatment, high fat feeding had increased final body weight, glycemia, triacylglycerol, and total cholesterol levels in plasma and liver compared to the control diet. Collagen-induced platelet aggregation and basal platelet thromboxane B2 were also higher in the high-fat fed rats than in those in the control group. In the liver, oxidative stress was greater in the HF group than in the control group. O. aurita intake in HFOA-fed rats resulted in lower glycemia and lipid levels in the plasma and liver relative than in the HF group. Thus, in the HFOA group, n-3 polyunsaturated fatty acid levels in the tissues studied (plasma, liver, and platelets) were higher than in the HF group. Platelet hyper-aggregability tended to decrease in HFOA-fed rats as basal platelet thromboxane B2 production decreased. Finally, O. aurita reduced oxidative stress in the liver, with lower malondialdehyde levels and increased glutathione peroxidase activity. O. aurita is a marine diatom rich in EPA as well as in other bioactive molecules, such as pigments. The synergistic effect

  6. Functional proteomic analyses of Bothrops atrox venom reveals phenotypes associated with habitat variation in the Amazon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sousa, Leijiane F; Portes-Junior, José A; Nicolau, Carolina A; Bernardoni, Juliana L; Nishiyama, Milton Y; Amazonas, Diana R; Freitas-de-Sousa, Luciana A; Mourão, Rosa Hv; Chalkidis, Hipócrates M; Valente, Richard H; Moura-da-Silva, Ana M

    2017-04-21

    Venom variability is commonly reported for venomous snakes including Bothrops atrox. Here, we compared the composition of venoms from B. atrox snakes collected at Amazonian conserved habitats (terra-firme upland forest and várzea) and human modified areas (pasture and degraded areas). Venom samples were submitted to shotgun proteomic analysis as a whole or compared after fractionation by reversed-phase chromatography. Whole venom proteomes revealed a similar composition among the venoms with predominance of SVMPs, CTLs, and SVSPs and intermediate amounts of PLA 2 s and LAAOs. However, when distribution of particular isoforms was analyzed by either method, the venom from várzea snakes showed a decrease in hemorrhagic SVMPs and an increase in SVSPs, and procoagulant SVMPs and PLA 2 s. These differences were validated by experimental approaches including both enzymatic and in vivo assays, and indicated restrictions in respect to antivenom efficacy to variable components. Thus, proteomic analysis at the isoform level combined to in silico prediction of functional properties may indicate venom biological activity. These results also suggest that the prevalence of functionally distinct isoforms contributes to the variability of the venoms and could reflect the adaptation of B. atrox to distinct prey communities in different Amazon habitats. In this report, we compared isoforms present in venoms from snakes collected at different Amazonian habitats. By means of a species venom gland transcriptome and the in silico functional prediction of each isoform, we were able to predict the principal venom activities in vitro and in animal models. We also showed remarkable differences in the venom pools from snakes collected at the floodplain (várzea habitat) compared to other habitats. Not only was this venom less hemorrhagic and more procoagulant, when compared to the venom pools from the other three habitats studied, but also this enhanced procoagulant activity was not

  7. Exploiting orthologue diversity for systematic detection of gain-of-function phenotypes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cantarella Daniela

    2008-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Systematic search for genes whose gain-of-function by exogenous expression confers an advantage in cell-based selective screenings is a powerful method for unbiased functional exploration of the genome, and has the potential to disclose new targets for cancer therapy. A major limit of this approach resides in the labor-intensive cloning of resistant cells, identification of the integrated genes and validation of their ability to confer a selective advantage. Moreover, the selection has to be drastic and genes conferring a limited advantage are typically missed. Results We developed a new functional screening strategy based on transduction of mammalian cells of a given species with an expression library from another species, followed by one-shot quantitative tracing with DNA microarrays of all library-derived transcripts before and after selection. In this way, exogenous transcripts enriched after selection, and therefore likely to confer resistance, are readily detected. We transduced a retroviral cDNA expression library from mouse testis into human and canine cells, and optimized the use of commercial murine gene expression arrays for species-specific detection of library-derived transcripts. We then conducted a functional screening by growing library-transduced canine MDCK cells in suspension, to enrich for cDNAs conferring anchorage independence. Notably, these cells show partial resistance to loss of anchorage, and the selection can be of limited stringency, compromising approaches based on clonal selection or anyway requiring high stringency. Microarray analysis revealed reproducible enrichment after three weeks of growth on polyhema for seven genes, among which the Hras proto-oncogene and Sox5. When individually transduced into MDCK cells, Sox5 specifically promoted anchorage-independent growth, thereby confirming the validity and specificity of the approach. Conclusion The procedure described here brings substantial

  8. Platelets and infections—complex interactions with bacteria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hind eHAMZEH-COGNASSE

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Platelets can be considered sentinels of vascular system due to their high number in the circulation and to the range of functional immunoreceptors they express. Platelets express a wide range of potential bacterial receptors, including complement receptors, FcγRII, Toll-Like Receptors but also integrins conventionally described in the hemostatic response, such as GPIIb-IIIa or GPIb. Bacteria bind these receptors either directly, or indirectly via fibrinogen, fibronectin, the first complement C1q, the von Willebrand Factor, etc. The fate of platelet bound bacteria is questioned. Several studies reported the ability of activated platelets to internalize bacteria such as Staphylococcus aureus or Porphyromonas gingivalis, though there is no clue on what happens thereafter. Are they sheltered from the immune system in the cytoplasm of platelets or are they lysed? Indeed, while the presence of phagolysosome has not been demonstrated in platelets, they contain antimicrobial peptides that were shown to be efficient on S. aureus. Besides, the fact that bacteria can bind to platelets via receptors involved in hemostasis suggests that they may induce aggregation; this has indeed been described for Streptococcus sanguinis, S. epidermidis or C. pneumoniae. On the other hand, platelets are able to display an inflammatory response to an infectious triggering. We, and others, have shown that platelet release soluble immunomodulatory factors upon stimulation by bacterial components. Moreover, interactions between bacteria and platelets are not limited to only these two partners. Indeed, platelets are also essential for the formation of Neutrophil Extracellular Traps by neutrophils, resulting in bacterial clearance by trapping bacteria and concentrating antibacterial factors but in enhancing thrombosis. In conclusion, the platelet-bacteria interplay is a complex game; its fine analysis is complicated by the fact that the inflammatory component adds to the

  9. Imaging thrombus with radiolabelled monoclonal antibody to platelets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Loutfi, I.; Peters, A.M.; Lavender, J.P.; Epenetos, A.A.

    1988-01-01

    Indium-111-hydroxyquinoline labelled platelets, though useful in the detection of thrombus, have not gained widespread use owing to the time and technical skill required for their preparation. A study was therefore conducted evaluating a new method of imaging thrombus with platelets radiolabelled with a 111 In labelled monoclonal antibody, P 256 , directed to the platelet surface glycoprotein complex IIb/IIIa. When the number of receptors occupied by P 256 was less than 3% of the total available on the platelet surface platelet function, as assessed by platelet aggregometry, was undisturbed. P 256 was radiolabelled with 111 In using diethylenetriaminepenta-acetic acid, which achieved a specific activity of 185 MBq (5 mCi)/mg. No impairment of immunoreactivity was detected at this specific activity. Platelets were labelled with radiolabelled monoclonal antibody in vitro in two patients at a receptor occupancy of 6% and in vivo - that is, by direct intravenous injection of P 256 - in six patients at a receptor occupancy of 1%. In vivo recovery and biodistribution kinetics suggested that after in vitro labelling platelets were minimally activated. The 111 In kinetics recorded after intravenous P 256 suggested rapid and efficient radiolabelling of platelets and gave no indication of platelet activation. Of the six patients who received intravenous P 256 , three had documented thrombus, tow of whom gave positive results on P 256 platelet scintigraphy. The third subject had chromic deep venous thrombosis and was scintigraphically negative. Imaging thrombus using a radiolabelled monoclonal antibody directed to platelets appears to offer great potential as a simple, non-invasive approach to the diagnosis of thrombosis. 3 refs. (Author)

  10. Platelet CD40L mediates thrombotic and inflammatory processes in atherosclerosis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lievens, Dirk; Zernecke, Alma; Seijkens, Tom; Soehnlein, Oliver; Beckers, Linda; Munnix, Imke C. A.; Wijnands, Erwin; Goossens, Pieter; van Kruchten, Roger; Thevissen, Larissa; Boon, Louis; Flavell, Richard A.; Noelle, Randolph J.; Gerdes, Norbert; Biessen, Erik A.; Daemen, Mat J. A. P.; Heemskerk, Johan W. M.; Weber, Christian; Lutgens, Esther

    2010-01-01

    CD40 ligand (CD40L), identified as a costimulatory molecule expressed on T cells, is also expressed and functional on platelets. We investigated the thrombotic and inflammatory contributions of platelet CD40L in atherosclerosis. Although CD40L-deficient (Cd40l(-/-)) platelets exhibited impaired

  11. Human plasma fibrinogen adsorption and platelet adhesion to polystyrene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsai, W B; Grunkemeier, J M; Horbett, T A

    1999-02-01

    The purpose of this study was to further investigate the role of fibrinogen adsorbed from plasma in mediating platelet adhesion to polymeric biomaterials. Polystyrene was used as a model hydrophobic polymer; i.e., we expected that the role of fibrinogen in platelet adhesion to polystyrene would be representative of other hydrophobic polymers. Platelet adhesion was compared to both the amount and conformation of adsorbed fibrinogen. The strategy was to compare platelet adhesion to surfaces preadsorbed with normal, afibrinogenemic, and fibrinogen-replenished afibrinogenemic plasmas. Platelet adhesion was determined by the lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) method, which was found to be closely correlated with adhesion of 111In-labeled platelets. Fibrinogen adsorption from afibrinogenemic plasma to polystyrene (Immulon I(R)) was low and polystyrene preadsorbed with fibrinogen-replenished afibrinogenemic plasma. Addition of even small, subnormal concentrations of fibrinogen to afibrinogenemic plasma greatly increased platelet adhesion. In addition, surface-bound fibrinogen's ability to mediate platelet adhesion was different, depending on the plasma concentration from which fibrinogen was adsorbed. These differences correlated with changes in the binding of a monoclonal antibody that binds to the Aalpha chain RGDS (572-575), suggesting alteration in the conformation or orientation of the adsorbed fibrinogen. Platelet adhesion to polystyrene preadsorbed with blood plasma thus appears to be a strongly bivariate function of adsorbed fibrinogen, responsive to both low amounts and altered states of the adsorbed molecule. Copyright 1999 John Wiley & Sons, Inc.

  12. Imaging thrombus with radiolabelled monoclonal antibody to platelets

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Peters, A.M.; Lavender, J.P.; Needham, S.G.; Loutfi, I.; Snook, D.; Epenetos, A.A.; Lumley, P.; Keery, R.J.; Hogg, N.

    1986-12-13

    A study was conducted evaluating a method of imaging thrombus with platelets radiolabelled with a /sup 111/In labelled monoclonal antibody, P256, directed to the platelet surface glycoprotein complex IIb/IIIa. when the number of receptors occupied by P256 was less than 3% of the total available on the platelet surface, platelet function was undisturbed. P256 was radiolabelled with /sup 111/In using diethylenetriaminepenta-acetic acid, which achieved a specific activity of 185 MBq (5 mCi)/mg. No impairment of immunoreactivity was detected at this specific activity. Platelets were labelled with radiolabelled monoclonal antibody in vitro in two patients at a receptor occupancy of 6% and in vivo in six patients at a receptor occupancy of 1%. In vivo recovery and biodistribution kinetics suggested that after in vitro labelling platelets were minimally activated. The /sup 111/In kinetics recorded after intravenous P256 suggested rapid and efficient radiolabelling of platelets and gave no indication of platelet activation. Of the six patients who received intravenous P256, three had documented thrombus, two of whom gave positive results on P256 platelet scintigraphy. The third had chronic deep venous thrombosis and was scintigraphically negative.

  13. Phenotypic and functional profiling of CD4 T cell compartment in distinct populations of healthy adults with different antigenic exposure.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sophie Roetynck

    Full Text Available Multiparameter flow cytometry has revealed extensive phenotypic and functional heterogeneity of CD4 T cell responses in mice and humans, emphasizing the importance of assessing multiple aspects of the immune response in correlation with infection or vaccination outcome. The aim of this study was to establish and validate reliable and feasible flow cytometry assays, which will allow us to characterize CD4 T cell population in humans in field studies more fully.We developed polychromatic flow cytometry antibody panels for immunophenotyping the major CD4 T cell subsets as well as broadly characterizing the functional profiles of the CD4 T cells in peripheral blood. We then validated these assays by conducting a pilot study comparing CD4 T cell responses in distinct populations of healthy adults living in either rural or urban Kenya. This study revealed that the expression profile of CD4 T cell activation and memory markers differed significantly between African and European donors but was similar amongst African individuals from either rural or urban areas. Adults from rural Kenya had, however, higher frequencies and greater polyfunctionality among cytokine producing CD4 T cells compared to both urban populations, particularly for "Th1" type of response. Finally, endemic exposure to malaria in rural Kenya may have influenced the expansion of few discrete CD4 T cell populations with specific functional signatures.These findings suggest that environmentally driven T cell activation does not drive the dysfunction of CD4 T cells but is rather associated with greater magnitude and quality of CD4 T cell response, indicating that the level or type of microbial exposure and antigenic experience may influence and shape the functionality of CD4 T cell compartment. Our data confirm that it is possible and mandatory to assess multiple functional attributes of CD4 T cell response in the context of infection.

  14. Cathepsin K induces platelet dysfunction and affects cell signaling in breast cancer - molecularly distinct behavior of cathepsin K in breast cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Andrade, Sheila Siqueira; Gouvea, Iuri Estrada; Silva, Mariana Cristina C.; Castro, Eloísa Dognani; Paula, Cláudia A. A. de; Okamoto, Debora; Oliveira, Lilian; Peres, Giovani Bravin; Ottaiano, Tatiana; Facina, Gil; Nazário, Afonso Celso Pinto; Campos, Antonio Hugo J. F. M.; Paredes-Gamero, Edgar Julian; Juliano, Maria; Silva, Ismael D. C. G. da; Oliva, Maria Luiza V.; Girão, Manoel J. B. C.

    2016-01-01

    Breast cancer comprises clinically and molecularly distinct tumor subgroups that differ in cell histology and biology and show divergent clinical phenotypes that impede phase III trials, such as those utilizing cathepsin K inhibitors. Here we correlate the epithelial-mesenchymal-like transition breast cancer cells and cathepsin K secretion with activation and aggregation of platelets. Cathepsin K is up-regulated in cancer cells that proteolyze extracellular matrix and contributes to invasiveness. Although proteolytically activated receptors (PARs) are activated by proteases, the direct interaction of cysteine cathepsins with PARs is poorly understood. In human platelets, PAR-1 and −4 are highly expressed, but PAR-3 shows low expression and unclear functions. Platelet aggregation was monitored by measuring changes in turbidity. Platelets were immunoblotted with anti-phospho and total p38, Src-Tyr-416, FAK-Tyr-397, and TGFβ monoclonal antibody. Activation was measured in a flow cytometer and calcium mobilization in a confocal microscope. Mammary epithelial cells were prepared from the primary breast cancer samples of 15 women with Luminal-B subtype to produce primary cells. We demonstrate that platelets are aggregated by cathepsin K in a dose-dependent manner, but not by other cysteine cathepsins. PARs-3 and −4 were confirmed as the cathepsin K target by immunodetection and specific antagonists using a fibroblast cell line derived from PARs deficient mice. Moreover, through co-culture experiments, we show that platelets activated by cathepsin K mediated the up-regulation of SHH, PTHrP, OPN, and TGFβ in epithelial-mesenchymal-like cells from patients with Luminal B breast cancer. Cathepsin K induces platelet dysfunction and affects signaling in breast cancer cells. The online version of this article (doi:10.1186/s12885-016-2203-7) contains supplementary material, which is available to authorized users

  15. The rice growth image files - The Rice Growth Monitoring for The Phenotypic Functional Analysis | LSDB Archive [Life Science Database Archive metadata

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available List Contact us The Rice Growth Monitoring for The Phenotypic Functional Analysis The rice growth image file...s Data detail Data name The rice growth image files DOI 10.18908/lsdba.nbdc00945-004 Description of data contents The rice growth ima...ge files categorized based on file size. Data file File name: image files (director...y) File URL: ftp://ftp.biosciencedbc.jp/archive/agritogo-rice-phenome/LATEST/image...ite Policy | Contact Us The rice growth image files - The Rice Growth Monitoring for The Phenotypic Functional Analysis | LSDB Archive ...

  16. The list of strains and growth conditions - The Rice Growth Monitoring for The Phenotypic Functional Analysis | LSDB Archive [Life Science Database Archive metadata

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available List Contact us The Rice Growth Monitoring for The Phenotypic Functional Analysis The list of strains and growth... conditions Data detail Data name The list of strains and growth conditions DOI 10.18908/lsdba.nbdc00945...-001 Description of data contents The list of strains and growth conditions for respective samples. Data fil...servation Intervals of imaging Intervals of imaging Growth data Graph of chronological changes in growth Ima...History of This Database Site Policy | Contact Us The list of strains and growth conditions - The Rice Growth Monitoring for The Phenotypic Functional Analysis | LSDB Archive ...

  17. Hyperandrogenism in female athletes with functional hypothalamic amenorrhea: a distinct phenotype

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Javed A

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Asma Javed,1 Rahul Kashyap,2 Aida N Lteif1 1Pediatric and Adolescent Medicine, Division of Pediatric Endocrinology Mayo Clinic, Rochester, MN, USA; 2Department of Anesthesia and Critical Care Medicine, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, MN, USA Objective: To compare the reproductive, metabolic, and skeletal profiles of young athletic women with functional hypothalamic amenorrhea (FHA as well as clinical or biochemical hyperandrogenism (FHA-EX+HA with body mass index matched women with FHA due to exercise (FHA-EX or anorexia nervosa (FHA-AN alone.Design: Retrospective cohort study.Setting: Tertiary care teaching hospital.Population: Adolescents and young women, 15–30 years of age, diagnosed with FHA along with concurrent signs of hyperandrogenism (n=22 and body mass index matched control groups consisting of 22 women in each group of FHA-EX and FHA-AN. Main outcomes: 1 Reproductive hormone profile: luteinizing hormone (LH, follicle stimulating hormone (FSH, total testosterone, pelvic ultrasound features. 2 Metabolic function and skeletal health markers: fasting glucose, cholesterol, number of stress fractures and bone mineral density as assessed by spine dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry z scores. Results: FHA-EX+HA group was older at diagnosis compared to the other groups with a median (interquartile range [IQR] age of 22 (18.75–25.25 years versus (vs 17.5 (15.75–19 for FHA-EX; (P<0.01 and 18 (16–22.25 years for FHA-AN (P=0.01. There were no differences among the groups based on number of hours of exercise per week, type of physical activity or duration of amenorrhea. Median (IQR LH/FSH ratio was higher in FHA-EX+HA than both other groups, 1.44 (1.03–1.77 vs 0.50 (0.20–0.94 for FHA-EX and 0.67 (0.51–0.87 for FHA-AN (P<0.01 for both. Total testosterone concentrations were not different among the groups. Median (IQR fasting serum glucose concentration was higher in FHA-EX+HA vs FHA-EX, 88.5 mg/dL (82.8–90 mg/dL vs 83.5 mg/dL (78.8–86.3 mg

  18. The Role of Natural Killer T Cells in Cancer—A Phenotypical and Functional Approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krijgsman, Daniëlle; Hokland, Marianne; Kuppen, Peter J. K.

    2018-01-01

    Natural killer T (NKT) cells are a subset of CD1d-restricted T cells at the interface between the innate and adaptive immune system. NKT cells can be subdivided into functional subsets that respond rapidly to a wide variety of glycolipids and stress-related proteins using T- or natural killer (NK) cell-like effector mechanisms. Because of their major modulating effects on immune responses via secretion of cytokines, NKT cells are also considered important players in tumor immunosurveillance. During early tumor development, T helper (TH)1-like NKT cell subsets have the potential to rapidly stimulate tumor-specific T cells and effector NK cells that can eliminate tumor cells. In case of tumor progression, NKT cells may become overstimulated and anergic leading to deletion of a part of the NKT cell population in patients via activation-induced cell death. In addition, the remaining NKT cells become hyporesponsive, or switch to immunosuppressive TH2-/T regulatory-like NKT cell subsets, thereby facilitating tumor progression and immune escape. In this review, we discuss this important role of NKT cells in tumor development and we conclude that there should be three important focuses of future research in cancer patients in relation with NKT cells: (1) expansion of the NKT cell population, (2) prevention and breaking of NKT cell anergy, and (3) skewing of NKT cells toward TH1-like subsets with antitumor activity. PMID:29535734

  19. Lactose Induces Phenotypic and Functional Changes of Neutrophils and Macrophages to Alleviate Acute Pancreatitis in Mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Li-Long Pan

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available Acute pancreatitis (AP is one common clinical acute abdominal disease, for which specific pharmacological or nutritional therapies remain elusive. Lactose, a macronutrient and an inducer of host innate immune responses, possesses immune modulatory functions. The current study aimed to investigate potential modulatory effects of lactose and the interplay between the nutrient and pancreatic immunity during experimentally induced AP in mice. We found that either prophylactic or therapeutic treatment of lactose time-dependently reduced the severity of AP, as evidenced by reduced pancreatic edema, serum amylase levels, and pancreatic myeloperoxidase activities, as well as by histological examination of pancreatic damage. Overall, lactose promoted a regulatory cytokine milieu in the pancreas and reduced infiltration of inflammatory neutrophils and macrophages. On acinar cells, lactose was able to suppress caerulein-induced inflammatory signaling pathways and to suppress chemoattractant tumor necrosis factor (TNF-α and monocyte chemotactic protein-1 production. Additionally, lactose acted on pancreas-infiltrated macrophages, increasing interleukin-10 and decreasing tumor necrosis factor alpha production. Notably, lactose treatment reversed AP-associated infiltration of activated neutrophils. Last, the effect of lactose on neutrophil infiltration was mimicked by a galectin-3 antagonist, suggesting a potential endogenous target of lactose. Together, the current study demonstrates an immune regulatory effect of lactose to alleviate AP and suggests its potential as a convenient, value-added therapeutic macronutrient to control AP, and lower the risk of its systemic complications.

  20. Genetics Home Reference: gray platelet syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... disorder, platelet-type, 4 deficient alpha granule syndrome GPS grey platelet syndrome platelet alpha-granule deficiency platelet ... on PubMed Central Kahr WH, Hinckley J, Li L, Schwertz H, Christensen H, Rowley JW, Pluthero FG, ...

  1. Effective ultraviolet irradiation of platelet concentrates in teflon bags

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Capon, S.M.; Sacher, R.A.; Deeg, H.J.

    1990-01-01

    Several plastic materials used in blood storage were evaluated for their ability to transmit ultraviolet B (UVB) light. A plastic bag manufactured from sheets of transparent Teflon efficiently (78-86%) transmitted UVB light and was employed in subsequent functional studies of lymphocytes and platelets exposed to UVB light while contained in these bags. In vitro experiments showed a UVB dose-dependent abrogation of lymphocyte responder and stimulator functions, with concurrent preservation of platelet aggregation responses. In a phase I pilot study, UVB-treated platelet concentrates were administered to four bone marrow transplant recipients. Adverse effects attributable to the transfusions were not observed, and patients showed clinically effective transfusion responses. No patient developed lymphocytotoxic HLA or platelet antibodies. These studies suggest that platelets can be effectively irradiated with UVB light in a closed system. However, numerous variables, including container material, volume and composition of contents, steady exposure versus agitation, and exact UV wavelength, must be considered

  2. T cells in chronic lymphocytic leukaemia display an exhausted phenotype and impaired functionality that can be restored by chemotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gassner, F.

    2012-01-01

    In chronic lymphocytic leukaemia (CLL), beside a massive accumulation of neoplastic B cells, tumour-induced deficiencies in autologous T cells have been reported that impede efficient tumour control and might even support survival of the malignant clone. Here, we investigated our hypothesis that T cells in CLL, due to the persistent availability of tumour antigen, are exhausted, and that reduction of tumour load by chemotherapy might restore T cell functions. We could show that T cells in CLL patients and in a CLL mouse model display an exhausted phenotype, with high expression of the inhibitory surface receptor PD-1, that is clearly induced by the presence of tumour cells. Although the PD-1 ligand PD-L1 is not expressed on peripheral CLL cells, abundant expression could be shown in lymph node sections. Intriguingly, blocking the PD-1/PD-L1 pathway increased short term tumour lysis in a murine in vivo cytotoxicity assay. Furthermore, we present data that after cytoreduction by fludarabine, a standard chemotherapy agent for CLL, the surviving T cell pool consists mainly of fully functional memory T cells with high proliferative potential and increased secretion of pro-inflammatory Th1 cytokines. Taken together, we conclude that the impaired tumour surveillance observed in CLL might be rooted in the exhaustion of tumour-specific effector T cells. A combination of cytodepletion by chemotherapy and blockade of PD-1 might hence represent a novel therapeutic approach for CLL. (author) [de

  3. Comprehensive genetic assessment of a functional TLR9 promoter polymorphism: no replicable association with asthma or asthma-related phenotypes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Celedón Juan C

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Prior studies suggest a role for a variant (rs5743836 in the promoter of toll-like receptor 9 (TLR9 in asthma and other inflammatory diseases. We performed detailed genetic association studies of the functional variant rs5743836 with asthma susceptibility and asthma-related phenotypes in three independent cohorts. Methods rs5743836 was genotyped in two family-based cohorts of children with asthma and a case-control study of adult asthmatics. Association analyses were performed using chi square, family-based and population-based testing. A luciferase assay was performed to investigate whether rs5743836 genotype influences TLR9 promoter activity. Results Contrary to prior reports, rs5743836 was not associated with asthma in any of the three cohorts. Marginally significant associations were found with FEV1 and FVC (p = 0.003 and p = 0.008, respectively in one of the family-based cohorts, but these associations were not significant after correcting for multiple comparisons. Higher promoter activity of the CC genotype was demonstrated by luciferase assay, confirming the functional importance of this variant. Conclusion Although rs5743836 confers regulatory effects on TLR9 transcription, this variant does not appear to be an important asthma-susceptibility locus.

  4. Differential regulation of two FLNA transcripts explains some of the