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Sample records for platelet adhesive interactions

  1. Platelet adhesiveness: the effect of centrifugation on the measurement of adhesiveness in platelet-rich plasma

    Science.gov (United States)

    McBride, J. A.

    1968-01-01

    Platelet adhesiveness has been measured in citrated whole blood and in platelet-rich plasma obtained from normal subjects, splenectomized patients, and from patients in whom the diagnosis of recurrent venous thrombosis had been made. The duration of centrifugation used in the preparation of platelet-rich plasma was found to have a profound effect on the measurement of platelet adhesiveness because the figure for platelet adhesiveness measured in platelet-rich plasma obtained by centrifugation was considerably lower than that found in citrated whole blood. This effect was particularly marked when platelet-rich plasma was obtained from subjects in whom platelet adhesiveness measured in whole blood was increased. PMID:5699080

  2. Multiple integrin-ligand interactions synergize in shear-resistant platelet adhesion at sites of arterial injury in vivo

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Grüner, Sabine; Prostredna, Miroslava; Schulte, Valerie

    2003-01-01

    by intravital fluorescence microscopy that platelet adhesion and thrombus growth on the exposed ECM of the injured carotid artery is not significantly altered in alpha2-null mice and even in mice with a Cre/loxP-mediated loss of all beta1 integrins on their platelets. In contrast, inhibition of alphaIIbbeta3...... integrin on platelets in wild-type mice blocked aggregate formation and reduced platelet adhesion by 60.0%. Strikingly, alphaIIbbeta3 inhibition had a comparable effect in alpha2-null mice, demonstrating that other receptors mediate shear-resistant adhesion in the absence of functional alpha2beta1...... and alphaIIbbeta3. These were identified to be alpha5beta1 and/or alpha6beta1 as alphaIIbbeta3 inhibition abrogated platelet adhesion in beta1-null mice. We conclude that shear-resistant platelet adhesion on the injured vessel wall in vivo is a highly integrated process involving multiple integrin...

  3. Platelet-collagen adhesion enhances platelet aggregation induced by binding of VWF to platelets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Laduca, F.M.; Bell, W.R.; Bettigole, R.E.

    1987-01-01

    Ristocetin-induced platelet aggregation (RIPA) was evaluated in the presence of platelet-collagen adhesion. RIPA of normal donor platelet-rich plasma (PRP) demonstrated a primary wave of aggregation mediated by the binding of von Willebrand factor (VWF) to platelets and a secondary aggregation wave, due to a platelet-release reaction, initiated by VWF-platelet binding and inhibitable by acetylsalicylic acid (ASA). An enhanced RIPA was observed in PRP samples to which collagen had been previously added. These subthreshold concentrations of collagen, which by themselves were insufficient to induce aggregation, caused measurable platelet-collagen adhesion. Subthreshold collagen did not cause microplatelet aggregation, platelet release of [ 3 H]serotonin, or alter the dose-responsive binding of 125 I-labeled VWF to platelets, which occurred with increasing ristocetin concentrations. However, ASA inhibition of the platelet release reaction prevented collagen-enhanced RIPA. These results demonstrate that platelet-collagen adhesion altered the platelet-release reaction induced by the binding of VWF to platelets causing a platelet-release reaction at a level of VWF-platelet binding not normally initiating a secondary aggregation. These findings suggest that platelet-collagen adhesion enhances platelet function mediated by VWF

  4. Human plasma fibrinogen adsorption and platelet adhesion to polystyrene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsai, W B; Grunkemeier, J M; Horbett, T A

    1999-02-01

    The purpose of this study was to further investigate the role of fibrinogen adsorbed from plasma in mediating platelet adhesion to polymeric biomaterials. Polystyrene was used as a model hydrophobic polymer; i.e., we expected that the role of fibrinogen in platelet adhesion to polystyrene would be representative of other hydrophobic polymers. Platelet adhesion was compared to both the amount and conformation of adsorbed fibrinogen. The strategy was to compare platelet adhesion to surfaces preadsorbed with normal, afibrinogenemic, and fibrinogen-replenished afibrinogenemic plasmas. Platelet adhesion was determined by the lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) method, which was found to be closely correlated with adhesion of 111In-labeled platelets. Fibrinogen adsorption from afibrinogenemic plasma to polystyrene (Immulon I(R)) was low and polystyrene preadsorbed with fibrinogen-replenished afibrinogenemic plasma. Addition of even small, subnormal concentrations of fibrinogen to afibrinogenemic plasma greatly increased platelet adhesion. In addition, surface-bound fibrinogen's ability to mediate platelet adhesion was different, depending on the plasma concentration from which fibrinogen was adsorbed. These differences correlated with changes in the binding of a monoclonal antibody that binds to the Aalpha chain RGDS (572-575), suggesting alteration in the conformation or orientation of the adsorbed fibrinogen. Platelet adhesion to polystyrene preadsorbed with blood plasma thus appears to be a strongly bivariate function of adsorbed fibrinogen, responsive to both low amounts and altered states of the adsorbed molecule. Copyright 1999 John Wiley & Sons, Inc.

  5. 21 CFR 864.6650 - Platelet adhesion test.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Platelet adhesion test. 864.6650 Section 864.6650 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES HEMATOLOGY AND PATHOLOGY DEVICES Manual Hematology Devices § 864.6650 Platelet adhesion...

  6. Inhibition of the plasma SCUBE1, a novel platelet adhesive protein, protects mice against thrombosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Meng-Ying; Lin, Yuh-Charn; Liao, Wei-Ju; Tu, Cheng-Fen; Chen, Ming-Huei; Roffler, Steve R; Yang, Ruey-Bing

    2014-07-01

    Signal peptide-CUB-EGF domain-containing protein 1 (SCUBE1), a secreted and surface-exposed glycoprotein on activated platelets, promotes platelet-platelet interaction and supports platelet-matrix adhesion. Its plasma level is a biomarker of platelet activation in acute thrombotic diseases. However, the exact roles of plasma SCUBE1 in vivo remain undefined. We generated new mutant (Δ) mice lacking the soluble but retaining the membrane-bound form of SCUBE1. Plasma SCUBE1-depleted Δ/Δ mice showed normal hematologic and coagulant features and expression of major platelet receptors, but Δ/Δ platelet-rich plasma showed impaired platelet aggregation in response to ADP and collagen treatment. The addition of purified recombinant SCUBE1 protein restored the aggregation of platelets in Δ/Δ platelet-rich plasma and further enhanced platelet aggregation in +/+ platelet-rich plasma. Plasma deficiency of SCUBE1 diminished arterial thrombosis in mice and protected against lethal thromboembolism induced by collagen-epinephrine treatment. Last, antibodies directed against the epidermal growth factor-like repeats of SCUBE1, which are involved in trans-homophilic protein-protein interactions, protected mice against fatal thromboembolism without causing bleeding in vivo. We conclude that plasma SCUBE1 participates in platelet aggregation by bridging adjacent activated platelets in thrombosis. Blockade of soluble SCUBE1 might represent a novel antithrombotic strategy. © 2014 American Heart Association, Inc.

  7. PLATELET ADHESION TO POLYURETHANE UREA UNDER PULSATILE FLOW CONDITIONS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Navitsky, Michael A.; Taylor, Joshua O.; Smith, Alexander B.; Slattery, Margaret J.; Deutsch, Steven; Siedlecki, Christopher A.; Manning, Keefe B.

    2014-01-01

    Platelet adhesion to a polyurethane urea surface is a precursor to thrombus formation within blood-contacting cardiovascular devices, and platelets have been found to adhere strongly to polyurethane surfaces below a shear rate of approximately 500 s−1. The aim of the current work is to determine platelet adhesion properties to the polyurethane urea surface as a function of time varying shear exposure. A rotating disk system is used to study the influence of steady and pulsatile flow conditions (e.g. cardiac inflow and sawtooth waveforms) for platelet adhesion to the biomaterial surface. All experiments retain the same root mean square angular rotation velocity (29.63 rad/s) and waveform period. The disk is rotated in platelet rich bovine plasma for two hours with adhesion quantified by confocal microscopy measurements of immunofluorescently labeled bovine platelets. Platelet adhesion under pulsating flow is found to exponentially decay with increasing shear rate. Adhesion levels are found to depend upon peak platelet flux and shear rate regardless of rotational waveform. In combination with flow measurements, these results may be useful for predicting regions susceptible to thrombus formation within ventricular assist devices. PMID:24721222

  8. Adhesive interactions with wood

    Science.gov (United States)

    Charles R. Frihart

    2004-01-01

    While the chemistry for the polymerization of wood adhesives has been studied systematically and extensively, the critical aspects of the interaction of adhesives with wood are less clearly understood. General theories of bond formation need to be modified to take into account the porosity of wood and the ability of chemicals to be absorbed into the cell wall....

  9. Platelet adhesion studies on dipyridamole coated polyurethane surfaces

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aldenhoff Y. B.J.

    2003-06-01

    Full Text Available Surface modification of polyurethanes (PUs by covalent attachment of dipyridamole (Persantinregistered is known to reduce adherence of blood platelets upon exposure to human platelet rich plasma (PRP. This effect was investigated in further detail. First platelet adhesion under static conditions was studied with four different biomaterial surfaces: untreated PU, PU immobilised with conjugate molecule 1, PU immobilised with conjugate molecule 2, and PU immobilised with conjugate molecule 3. In PU immobilised with 1 dipyridamole is directly linked to the surface, in PU immobilised with 2 there is a short hydrophilic spacer chain in between the surface and the dipyridamole, while conjugate molecule 3 is merely the spacer chain. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM was used to characterise platelet adhesion from human PRP under static conditions, and fluorescence imaging microscopy was used to study platelet adhesion from whole blood under flow. SEM experiments encompassed both density measurements and analysis of the morphology of adherent platelets. In the static experiments the surface immobilised with 2 showed the lowest platelet adherence. No difference between the three modified surfaces emerged from the flow experiments. The surfaces were also incubated with washed blood platelets and labeled with Oregon-Green Annexin V. No capture of Oregon-Green Annexin V was seen, implying that the adhered platelets did not expose any phosphatidyl serine at their exteriour surface.

  10. Characterization of platelet adhesion under flow using microscopic image sequence analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Machin, M; Santomaso, A; Cozzi, M R; Battiston, M; Mazzuccato, M; De Marco, L; Canu, P

    2005-07-01

    A method for quantitative analysis of platelet deposition under flow is discussed here. The model system is based upon perfusion of blood platelets over an adhesive substrate immobilized on a glass coverslip acting as the lower surface of a rectangular flow chamber. The perfusion apparatus is mounted onto an inverted microscope equipped with epifluorescent illumination and intensified CCD video camera. Characterization is based on information obtained from a specific image analysis method applied to continuous sequences of microscopical images. Platelet recognition across the sequence of images is based on a time-dependent, bidimensional, gaussian-like pdf. Once a platelet is located,the variation of its position and shape as a function of time (i.e., the platelet history) can be determined. Analyzing the history we can establish if the platelet is moving on the surface, the frequency of this movement and the distance traveled before its resumes the velocity of a non-interacting cell. Therefore, we can determine how long the adhesion would last which is correlated to the resistance of the platelet-substrate bond. This algorithm enables the dynamic quantification of trajectories, as well as residence times, arrest and release frequencies for a high numbers of platelets at the same time. Statistically significant conclusions on platelet-surface interactions can then be obtained. An image analysis tool of this kind can dramatically help the investigation and characterization of the thrombogenic properties of artificial surfaces such as those used in artificial organs and biomedical devices.

  11. Microfluidics for simultaneous quantification of platelet adhesion and blood viscosity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yeom, Eunseop; Park, Jun Hong; Kang, Yang Jun; Lee, Sang Joon

    2016-01-01

    Platelet functions, including adhesion, activation, and aggregation have an influence on thrombosis and the progression of atherosclerosis. In the present study, a new microfluidic-based method is proposed to estimate platelet adhesion and blood viscosity simultaneously. Blood sample flows into an H-shaped microfluidic device with a peristaltic pump. Since platelet aggregation may be initiated by the compression of rotors inside the peristaltic pump, platelet aggregates may adhere to the H-shaped channel. Through correlation mapping, which visualizes decorrelation of the streaming blood flow, the area of adhered platelets (APlatelet) can be estimated without labeling platelets. The platelet function is estimated by determining the representative index IA·T based on APlatelet and contact time. Blood viscosity is measured by monitoring the flow conditions in the one side channel of the H-shaped device. Based on the relation between interfacial width (W) and pressure ratio of sample flows to the reference, blood sample viscosity (μ) can be estimated by measuring W. Biophysical parameters (IA·T, μ) are compared for normal and diabetic rats using an ex vivo extracorporeal model. This microfluidic-based method can be used for evaluating variations in the platelet adhesion and blood viscosity of animal models with cardiovascular diseases under ex vivo conditions. PMID:27118101

  12. In vivo and in vitro methods to study platelet adhesion to the components of the vessel wall

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cazenave, J.-P.

    1979-01-01

    The methods that are used to measure platelet adhesion can be divided in five groups: methods that use an aggregometer to measure platelet adhesion to collagen in the presence of EDTA; methods that use binding of radiolabeled collagen, affinity chromatography, or gel filtration; the morphometric method of Baumgartner that measures platelet interaction with the subendothelium of an aorta exposed to flow in an annular perfusion chamber; the quantitative isotopic measurement of platelet adhesion to collagen-coated surfaces and to subendothelium with the rotating probe device of Cazenave; and in vivo platelet adhesion to the subendothelium measured by the morphometric method or with platelets radiolabeled with 51 Cr or 111 In. With these methods it has been possible to study the factors (Ca 2+ ; VIII: von Willebrand factor; hemodynamic factors: red cells, shear rate; components of the vessel wall) governing platelet adhesion to subendothelium and to collagen. It has also been possible to screen and study drugs inhibiting platelet adhesion, which is the first step in the formation of a thrombus at the site of vascular injury [fr

  13. Platelet receptor polymorphisms do not influence Staphylococcus aureus–platelet interactions or infective endocarditis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daga, Shruti; Shepherd, James G.; Callaghan, J. Garreth S.; Hung, Rachel K.Y.; Dawson, Dana K.; Padfield, Gareth J.; Hey, Shi Y.; Cartwright, Robyn A.; Newby, David E.; Fitzgerald, J. Ross

    2011-01-01

    Cardiac vegetations result from bacterium–platelet adherence, activation and aggregation, and are associated with increased morbidity and mortality in infective endocarditis. The GPIIb/IIIa and FcγRIIa platelet receptors play a central role in platelet adhesion, activation and aggregation induced by endocarditis pathogens such as Staphylococcus aureus, but the influence of known polymorphisms of these receptors on the pathogenesis of infective endocarditis is unknown. We determined the GPIIIa platelet antigen PlA1/A2 and FcγRIIa H131R genotype of healthy volunteers (n = 160) and patients with infective endocarditis (n = 40), and investigated the influence of these polymorphisms on clinical outcome in infective endocarditis and S. aureus–platelet interactions in vitro. Platelet receptor genotype did not correlate with development of infective endocarditis, vegetation characteristics on echocardiogram or the composite clinical end-point of embolism, heart failure, need for surgery or mortality (P > 0.05 for all), even though patients with the GPIIIa PlA1/A1 genotype had increased in vivo platelet activation (P = 0.001). Furthermore, neither GPIIIa PlA1/A2 nor FcγRIIa H131R genotype influenced S. aureus-induced platelet adhesion, activation or aggregation in vitro (P > 0.05). Taken together, our data suggest that the GPIIIa and FcγRIIa platelet receptor polymorphisms do not influence S. aureus–platelet interactions in vitro or the clinical course of infective endocarditis. PMID:21044892

  14. Fabricating bio-inspired micro/nano-particles by polydopamine coating and surface interactions with blood platelets

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ye, Wei [Jiangsu Provincial Key Lab for Interventional Medical Devices, Huaiyin Institute of Technology, Huaian 223003 (China); State Key Laboratory of Polymer Physics and Chemistry, Changchun Institute of Applied Chemistry, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Changchun 130022 (China); Shi, Qiang, E-mail: shiqiang@ciac.ac.cn [State Key Laboratory of Polymer Physics and Chemistry, Changchun Institute of Applied Chemistry, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Changchun 130022 (China); Hou, Jianwen; Gao, Jian; Li, Chunming; Jin, Jing; Shi, Hengchong [State Key Laboratory of Polymer Physics and Chemistry, Changchun Institute of Applied Chemistry, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Changchun 130022 (China); Yin, Jinghua, E-mail: yinjh@ciac.ac.cn [State Key Laboratory of Polymer Physics and Chemistry, Changchun Institute of Applied Chemistry, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Changchun 130022 (China)

    2015-10-01

    Graphical abstract: The particles or particle aggregations activate the blood platelets and provide the physical adhesive sites for platelets adhesion. - Highlights: • Particles with varied sizes and surface properties were fabricated by facile polydopamine (PDA) coating on polystyrene microsphere. • The direct interaction between PDA particles and blood platelets was qualitatively investigated. • The knowledge on platelet–particle interactions provided the basic principle to select biocompatible micro/nano-particles in biomedical field. - Abstract: Although bio-inspired polydopamine (PDA) micro/nano-particles show great promise for biomedical applications, the knowledge on the interactions between micro/nano-particles and platelets is still lacking. Here, we fabricate PDA-coated micro/nano-particles and investigate the platelet–particle surface interactions. Our strategy takes the advantage of facile PDA coating on polystyrene (PS) microsphere to fabricate particles with varied sizes and surface properties, and the chemical reactivity of PDA layers to immobilize fibrinogen and bovine serum albumin to manipulate platelet activation and adhesion. We demonstrate that PS particles activate the platelets in the size-dependent manner, but PDA nanoparticles have slight effect on platelet activation; PS particles promote platelet adhesion while PDA particles reduce platelet adhesion on the patterned surface; Particles interact with platelets through activating the glycoprotein integrin receptor of platelets and providing physical sites for initial platelet adhesion. Our work sheds new light on the interaction between platelets and particles, which provides the basic principle to select biocompatible micro/nano-particles in biomedical field.

  15. Association of membrane/lipid rafts with the platelet cytoskeleton and the caveolin PY14: participation in the adhesion process.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cerecedo, Doris; Martínez-Vieyra, Ivette; Maldonado-García, Deneb; Hernández-González, Enrique; Winder, Steve J

    2015-11-01

    Platelets are the most prominent elements of blood tissue involved in hemostasis at sites of blood vessel injury. Platelet cytoskeleton is responsible for their shape modifications observed during activation and adhesion to the substratum; therefore the interactions between cytoskeleton and plasma membrane are critical to modulate blood platelet functions. Several cytoskeletal components and binding partners, as well as enzymes that regulate the cytoskeleton, localize to membrane/lipid rafts (MLR) and regulate lateral diffusion of membrane proteins and lipids. Resting, thrombin-activated, and adherent human platelets were processed for biochemical studies including western-blot and immunprecipitation assays and confocal analysis were performed to characterize the interaction of MLR with the main cytoskeleton elements and β-dystroglycan as well as with the association of caveolin-1 PY14 with focal adhesion proteins. We transfected a megakaryoblast cell line (Meg-01) to deplete β-dystroglycan, subsequent to their differentiation to the platelet progenitors. Our data showed a direct interaction of the MLR with cytoskeleton to regulate platelet shape, while an association of caveolin-1 PY14 with vinculin is needed to establish focal adhesions, which are modulated for β-dystroglycan. In conclusion, caveolin-1 PY14 in association with platelet cytoskeleton participate in focal adhesions dynamics. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  16. Granulocyte-platelet interactions and platelet fibrinogen receptor exposure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kornecki, E.; Ehrlich, Y.H.; Egbring, R.; Gramse, M.; Seitz, R.; Eckardt, A.; Lukasiewicz, H.; Niewiarowski, S.

    1988-01-01

    The authors have examined the interaction of human granulocyte elastase with human platelets. Incubation of human platelets with human granulocyte elastase exposed active fibrinogen-binding sites as evidenced by 125 I-labeled fibrinogen binding and spontaneous fibrinogen-induced platelet aggregation. The aggregation of platelets by fibrinogen occurred at low concentrations of human granulocyte elastase. Platelets pretreated with human granulocyte elastase exposed an average of 10,500 fibrinogen-binding sites per platelet, i.e., about one-third the number of binding sites exposed by optimal concentrations of ADP. With the use of a polyclonal antiplatelet membrane antibody, the glycoproteins IIb (GPIIb), IIIa (GPIIIa), and a 60,000-Da (60 kDa) protein (66 kDa in a reduced system) derived from GPIIIa were immunoprecipitated from the surface of detergent extracts of human 125 I-radiolabeled platelets pretreated with increasing concentrations of human granulocyte elastase. They conclude that (1) the proteolytic action of human granulocyte elastase on platelet GPIIIa results in the formation of two major hydrolytic products, and (2) human granulocyte elastase exposes active fibrongen-binding sites associated with the GPIIb/GPIIIa complex, resulting in direct platelet aggregation by fibrinogen

  17. Platelet adhesion and degranulation induce pro-survival and pro-angiogenic signalling in ovarian cancer cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karl Egan

    Full Text Available Thrombosis is common in ovarian cancer. However, the interaction of platelets with ovarian cancer cells has not been critically examined. To address this, we investigated platelet interactions in a range of ovarian cancer cell lines with different metastatic potentials [HIO-80, 59M, SK-OV-3, A2780, A2780cis]. Platelets adhered to ovarian cancer cells with the most significant adhesion to the 59M cell line. Ovarian cancer cells induced platelet activation [P-selectin expression] in a dose dependent manner, with the most significant activation seen in response to the 59M cell line. The platelet antagonists [cangrelor, MRS2179, and apyrase] inhibited 59M cell induced activation suggesting a P2Y12 and P2Y1 receptor mediated mechanism of platelet activation dependent on the release of ADP by 59M cells. A2780 and 59M cells potentiated PAR-1, PAR-4, and TxA2 receptor mediated platelet activation, but had no effect on ADP, epinephrine, or collagen induced activation. Analysis of gene expression changes in ovarian cancer cells following treatment with washed platelets or platelet releasate showed a subtle but valid upregulation of anti-apoptotic, anti-autophagy pro-angiogenic, pro-cell cycle and metabolic genes. Thus, ovarian cancer cells with different metastatic potential adhere and activate platelets differentially while both platelets and platelet releasate mediate pro-survival and pro-angiogenic signals in ovarian cancer cells.

  18. Deposition of Fibrinogen on the Surface of in vitro Thrombi Prevents Platelet Adhesion

    OpenAIRE

    Owaynat, Hadil; Yermolenko, Ivan S.; Turaga, Ramya; Lishko, Valeryi K.; Sheller, Michael R.; Ugarova, Tatiana P.

    2015-01-01

    The initial accumulation of platelets after vessel injury is followed by thrombin-mediated generation of fibrin which is deposited around the plug. While numerous in vitro studies have shown that fibrin is highly adhesive for platelets, the surface of experimental thrombi in vivo contains very few platelets suggesting the existence of natural anti-adhesive mechanisms protecting stabilized thrombi from platelet accumulation and continuous thrombus propagation. We previously showed that adsorpt...

  19. Cyclophilin B binding to platelets supports calcium-dependent adhesion to collagen.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allain, F; Durieux, S; Denys, A; Carpentier, M; Spik, G

    1999-08-01

    We have recently reported that cyclophilin B (CyPB), a secreted cyclosporine-binding protein, could bind to T lymphocytes through interactions with two types of binding sites. The first ones, referred to as type I, involve interactions with the conserved domain of CyPB and promote the endocytosis of surface-bound ligand, while the second type of binding sites, termed type II, are represented by glycosaminoglycans (GAG). Here, we further investigated the interactions of CyPB with blood cell populations. In addition to lymphocytes, CyPB was found to interact mainly with platelets. The binding is specific, with a dissociation constant (kd) of 9 +/- 3 nmol/L and the number of sites estimated at 960 +/- 60 per cell. Platelet glycosaminoglycans are not required for the interactions, but the binding is dramatically reduced by active cyclosporine derivatives. We then analyzed the biologic effects of CyPB and found a significant increase in platelet adhesion to collagen. Concurrently, CyPB initiates a transmembranous influx of Ca(2+) and induces the phosphorylation of the P-20 light chains of myosin. Taken together, the present results demonstrate for the first time that extracellular CyPB specifically interacts with platelets through a functional receptor related to the lymphocyte type I binding sites and might act by regulating the activity of a receptor-operated membrane Ca(2+) channel.

  20. EMMPRIN (CD147) is a novel receptor for platelet GPVI and mediates platelet rolling via GPVI-EMMPRIN interaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seizer, Peter; Borst, Oliver; Langer, Harald F; Bültmann, Andreas; Münch, Götz; Herouy, Yared; Stellos, Konstantinos; Krämer, Björn; Bigalke, Boris; Büchele, Berthold; Bachem, Max G; Vestweber, Dietmar; Simmet, Thomas; Gawaz, Meinrad; May, Andreas E

    2009-04-01

    The Extracellular Matrix Metalloproteinase Inducer (EMMPRIN, CD147, basigin) is an immunoglobulin-like receptor expressed in various cell types. During cellular interactions homotypic EMMPRIN-EMMPRIN interactions are known to induce the synthesis of matrix metalloproteinases. Recently, we have identified EMMPRIN as a novel receptor on platelets. To our knowledge EMMPRIN has not been shown to serve as adhesion receptor, yet. Here we characterise platelet glycoprotein VI (GPVI) as a novel adhesion receptor for EMMPRIN. Human platelets were prestimulated with ADP and perfused over immobilised recombinant EMMPRIN-Fc or Fc-fragments under arterial shear conditions. ADP-stimulated platelets showed significantly enhanced rolling (but not enhanced firm adhesion) on immobilised EMMPRIN-Fc compared to Fc. Pretreatment of platelets with blocking mAbs anti-EMMPRIN or anti-GPVI leads to a significant reduction of rolling platelets on immobilised EMMPRIN-Fc, whereas pretreatment with blocking mAbs anti-p-selectin, anti-alpha4-integrin or anti-GPIIb/IIIa complex (20 microg/ml each) had no effect. Consistently, chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cells stably transfected with GPVI showed enhanced rolling (but not adhesion) on immobilised EMMPRIN-Fc in comparison to non-transfected CHO cells. Similarly, CHO cells stably transfected with EMMPRIN showed enhanced rolling on immobilised GPVI-Fc (or EMMPRIN-Fc) compared to non transfected CHO-cells. Finally, specific binding of EMMPRIN to GPVI was demonstrated by a modified ELISA and surface plasmon resonance technology with a dissociation constant of 88 nM. Platelet GPVI is a novel receptor for EMMPRIN and can mediate platelet rolling via GPVI-EMMPRIN interaction.

  1. Nanomolar concentrations of adrenaline induce platelet adhesion in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eriksson, Andreas C; Whiss, Per A

    2013-01-01

    Adrenaline is a platelet activator having a resting plasma concentration of adrenaline in micromolar concentrations. This makes it difficult to estimate the relevance of in vitro data for the in vivo situation. The aim of this study was to investigate experimental conditions in vitro that could detect platelet effects of adrenaline in nanomolar concentrations. Platelet adhesion to albumin and collagen was evaluated with a static platelet adhesion assay. Our results show that 10 nmol/l adrenaline induced platelet adhesion to albumin in platelet-rich plasma (PRP) prepared at 140 × g, while 100 nmol/l was necessary in order to increase adhesion of platelets prepared at 220 × g. The mean platelet volume was increased after preparation at 140 × g, suggesting that large reactive platelets contributed to the increased adrenaline sensitivity. At optimal Mg(2+)-concentration, adhesion to collagen was increased by 10 nmol/l adrenaline irrespective of centrifugal force applied during PRP preparation. More specifically, we defined two populations where adhesion to collagen was increased by 10 nmol/l adrenaline either upon centrifugation at 140 × g but not 220 × g or vice versa. In some experiments, platelet adhesion to collagen was induced by 3 nmol/l adrenaline, which corresponds to concentrations achieved during stress in vivo. In summary, the static adhesion assay is able to detect platelet activating effects of adrenaline very close to physiological concentrations. This is rare for in vitro assays and motivates further research about adrenergic signalling in platelets.

  2. Mouse podoplanin supports adhesion and aggregation of platelets under arterial shear: A novel mechanism of haemostasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lombard, Stephanie E; Pollitt, Alice Y; Hughes, Craig E; Di, Ying; Mckinnon, Tom; O'callaghan, Chris A; Watson, Steve P

    2017-11-01

    The podoplanin-CLEC-2 axis is critical in mice for prevention of hemorrhage in the cerebral vasculature during mid-gestation. This raises the question as to how platelets are captured by podoplanin on neuroepithelial cells in a high shear environment. In this study, we demonstrate that mouse platelets form stable aggregates on mouse podoplanin at arterial shear through a CLEC-2 and Src kinase-dependent pathway. Adhesion and aggregation are also dependent on the platelet glycoprotein (GP) receptors, integrin αIIbβ3 and GPIb, and the feedback agonists ADP and thromboxane A 2 (TxA 2 ). CLEC-2 does not bind to von Willebrand factor (VWF) suggesting that the interaction with podoplanin is sufficient to both tether and activate platelets. Consistent with this, the surface plasmon resonance measurements reveal that mouse CLEC-2 binds to mouse podoplanin with nanomolar affinity. The present findings demonstrate a novel pathway of hemostasis in which podoplanin supports platelet capture and activation at arteriolar rates of shear.

  3. Platelet-vessel wall interaction in health and disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Löwenberg, E. C.; Meijers, J. C. M.; Levi, M. [=Marcel M.

    2010-01-01

    Upon vessel wall injury platelets rapidly adhere to the exposed subendothelial matrix which is mediated by several cellular receptors present on platelets or endothelial cells and various adhesive proteins such as von Willebrand factor, collagen and fibrinogen. Subsequent platelet activation results

  4. Biomimetic Fluorocarbon Surfactant Polymers Reduce Platelet Adhesion on PTFE/ePTFE Surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Shuwu; Gupta, Anirban Sen; Sagnella, Sharon; Barendt, Pamela M.; Kottke-Marchant, Kandice; Marchant, Roger E.

    2010-01-01

    We describe a series of fluorocarbon surfactant polymers designed as surface-modifying agents for improving the thrombogenicity of ePTFE vascular graft materials by the reduction of platelet adhesion. The surfactant polymers consist of a poly(vinyl amine) backbone with pendent dextran and perfluoroundecanoyl branches. Surface modification is accomplished by a simple dip-coating process in which surfactant polymers undergo spontaneous surface-induced adsorption and assembly on PTFE/ePTFE surface. The adhesion stability of the surfactant polymer on PTFE was examined under dynamic shear conditions in PBS and human whole blood with a rotating disk system. Fluorocarbon surfactant polymer coatings with three different dextran to perfluorocarbon ratios (1:0.5, 1:1 and 1:2) were compared in the context of platelet adhesion on PTFE/ePTFE surface under dynamic flow conditions. Suppression of platelet adhesion was achieved for all three coated surfaces over the shear-stress range of 0–75 dyn/cm2 in platelet-rich plasma (PRP) or human whole blood. The effectiveness depended on the surfactant polymer composition such that platelet adhesion on coated surfaces decreased significantly with increasing fluorocarbon branch density at 0 dyn/cm2. Our results suggest that fluorocarbon surfactant polymers can effectively suppress platelet adhesion and demonstrate the potential application of the fluorocarbon surfactant polymers as non-thrombogenic coatings for ePTFE vascular grafts. PMID:19323880

  5. Focal adhesions and cell-matrix interactions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Woods, A; Couchman, J R

    1988-01-01

    Focal adhesions are areas of cell surfaces where specializations of cytoskeletal, membrane and extracellular components combine to produce stable cell-matrix interactions. The morphology of these adhesions and the components identified in them are discussed together with possible mechanisms...

  6. Dependence of plasmin-mediated degradation of platelet adhesive receptors on temperature and Ca2+

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Winters, K.J.; Eisenberg, P.R.; Jaffe, A.S.; Santoro, S.A.

    1990-01-01

    The effects of activation of plasminogen by streptokinase and tissue-type-plasminogen activator on platelet activation and the membrane glycoproteins (GPs) that mediate platelet adhesion and aggregation are not yet fully defined. To clarify effects on platelets during activation of plasminogen in vitro, we used monoclonal antibodies (MoAbs), flow cytometry, and platelets surface-labeled with 125 I to characterize changes in receptors for fibrinogen (GPIIb-IIIa), von Willebrand factor (GPIb), and collagen (GPIa-IIa). Activation of plasminogen in plasma with pharmacologic concentrations of plasminogen activators did not degrade GPIIb-IIIa or GPIb, and caused only a modest decrease in GPIa. In washed platelets GPIIb-IIIa was extensively degraded by plasmin at 37 degrees C in the absence of exogenous Ca 2+ , conditions that destabilize the IIb-IIIa complex. Degradation of GPIb in washed platelets displayed a similar although less-marked dependence on temperature and the absence of Ca 2+ . The binding of activation-specific MoAbs did not increase during activation of plasminogen in plasma. We conclude that during pharmacologic fibrinolysis, reported inhibition of platelet function in plasma is not due to degradation of platelet-adhesive receptors. In addition, platelet activation observed during thrombolytic therapy does not appear to be a direct consequence of plasminogen activation

  7. Effect of Extreme Wettability on Platelet Adhesion on Metallic Implants: From Superhydrophilicity to Superhydrophobicity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moradi, Sona; Hadjesfandiari, Narges; Toosi, Salma Fallah; Kizhakkedathu, Jayachandran N; Hatzikiriakos, Savvas G

    2016-07-13

    In order to design antithrombotic implants, the effect of extreme wettability (superhydrophilicity to superhydrophobicity) on the biocompatibility of the metallic substrates (stainless steel and titanium) was investigated. The wettability of the surface was altered by chemical treatments and laser ablation methods. The chemical treatments generated different functionality groups and chemical composition as evident from XPS analysis. The micro/nanopatterning by laser ablation resulted in three different pattern geometry and different surface roughness and consequently wettability. The patterned surface were further modified with chemical treatments to generate a wide range of surface wettability. The influence of chemical functional groups, pattern geometry, and surface wettability on protein adsorption and platelet adhesion was studied. On chemically treated flat surfaces, the type of hydrophilic treatment was shown to be a contributing factor that determines the platelet adhesion, since the hydrophilic oxidized substrates exhibit less platelet adhesion in comparison to the control untreated or acid treated surfaces. Also, the surface morphology, surface roughness, and superhydrophobic character of the surfaces are contributing factors to platelet adhesion on the surface. Our results show that superhydrophobic cauliflower-like patterns are highly resistant to platelet adhesion possibly due to the stability of Cassie-Baxter state for this pattern compared to others. Our results also show that simple surface treatments on metals offer a novel way to improve the hemocompatibility of metallic substrates.

  8. EMMPRIN (CD147/basigin) mediates platelet-monocyte interactions in vivo and augments monocyte recruitment to the vascular wall.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schulz, C; von Brühl, M-L; Barocke, V; Cullen, P; Mayer, K; Okrojek, R; Steinhart, A; Ahmad, Z; Kremmer, E; Nieswandt, B; Frampton, J; Massberg, S; Schmidt, R

    2011-05-01

    Platelets play a central role in hemostasis, in inflammatory diseases such as atherosclerosis, and during thrombus formation following vascular injury. Thereby, platelets interact intensively with monocytes and enhance their recruitment to the vascular wall. To investigate the role of the extracellular matrix metalloproteinase inducer (EMMPRIN) in platelet-monocyte interactions. Isolated human monocytes were perfused in vitro over firmly adherent platelets to allow investigation of the role of EMMPRIN in platelet-monocyte interactions under flow conditions. Monocytes readily bound to surface-adherent platelets. Both antibody blockade and gene silencing of monocyte EMMPRIN substantially attenuated firm adhesion of monocytes to platelets at arterial and venous shear rates. In vivo, platelet interactions with the murine monocyte cell line ANA-1 were significantly decreased when ANA-1 cells were pretreated with EMMPRIN-silencing small interfering RNA prior to injection into wild-type mice. Using intravital microscopy, we showed that recruitment of EMMPRIN-silenced ANA-1 to the injured carotid artery was significantly reduced as compared with control cells. Further silencing of EMMPRIN resulted in significantly fewer ANA-1-platelet aggregates in the mouse circulation as determined by flow cytometry. Finally, we identified glycoprotein (GP)VI as a critical corresponding receptor on platelets that mediates interaction with monocyte EMMPRIN. Thus, blocking of GPVI inhibited the effect of EMMPRIN on firm monocyte adhesion to platelets under arterial flow conditions in vitro, and abrogated EMMPRIN-mediated platelet-monocyte aggregate formation in vivo. EMMPRIN supports platelet-monocyte interactions and promotes monocyte recruitment to the arterial wall. Therefore, EMMPRIN might represent a novel target to reduce vascular inflammation and atherosclerotic lesion development. © 2011 International Society on Thrombosis and Haemostasis.

  9. Platelet adhesion and plasma protein adsorption control of collagen surfaces by He+ ion implantation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kurotobi, K.; Suzuki, Y.; Nakajima, H.; Suzuki, H.; Iwaki, M.

    2003-01-01

    He + ion implanted collagen-coated tubes with a fluence of 1 x 10 14 ions/cm 2 were exhibited antithrombogenicity. To investigate the mechanisms of antithrombogenicity of these samples, plasma protein adsorption assay and platelet adhesion experiments were performed. The adsorption of fibrinogen (Fg) and von Willebrand factor (vWf) was minimum on the He + ion implanted collagen with a fluence of 1 x 10 14 ions/cm 2 . Platelet adhesion (using platelet rich plasma) was inhibited on the He + ion implanted collagen with a fluence of 1 x 10 14 ions/cm 2 and was accelerated on the untreated collagen and ion implanted collagen with fluences of 1 x 10 13 , 1 x 10 15 and 1 x 10 16 ions/cm 2 . Platelet activation with washed platelets was observed on untreated collagen and He + ion implanted collagen with a fluence of 1 x 10 14 ions/cm 2 and was inhibited with fluences of 1 x 10 13 , 1 x 10 15 and 1 x 10 16 ions/cm 2 . Generally, platelets can react with a specific ligand inside the collagen (GFOGER sequence). The results of platelets adhesion experiments using washed platelets indicated that there were no ligands such as GFOGER on the He + ion implanted collagen over a fluence of 1 x 10 13 ions/cm 2 . On the 1 x 10 14 ions/cm 2 implanted collagen, no platelet activation was observed due to the influence of plasma proteins. >From the above, it is concluded that the decrease of adsorbed Fg and vWf caused the antithrombogenicity of He + ion implanted collagen with a fluence of 1 x 10 14 ions/cm 2 and that plasma protein adsorption took an important role repairing the graft surface

  10. Deposition of fibrinogen on the surface of in vitro thrombi prevents platelet adhesion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Owaynat, Hadil; Yermolenko, Ivan S; Turaga, Ramya; Lishko, Valeryi K; Sheller, Michael R; Ugarova, Tatiana P

    2015-12-01

    The initial accumulation of platelets after vessel injury is followed by thrombin-mediated generation of fibrin which is deposited around the plug. While numerous in vitro studies have shown that fibrin is highly adhesive for platelets, the surface of experimental thrombi in vivo contains very few platelets suggesting the existence of natural anti-adhesive mechanisms protecting stabilized thrombi from platelet accumulation and continuous thrombus propagation. We previously showed that adsorption of fibrinogen on pure fibrin clots results in the formation of a nonadhesive matrix, highlighting a possible role of this process in surface-mediated control of thrombus growth. However, the deposition of fibrinogen on the surface of blood clots has not been examined. In this study, we investigated the presence of intact fibrinogen on the surface of fibrin-rich thrombi generated from flowing blood and determined whether deposited fibrinogen is nonadhesive for platelets. Stabilized fibrin-rich thrombi were generated using a flow chamber and the time that platelets spend on the surface of thrombi was determined by video recording. The presence of fibrinogen and fibrin on the surface of thrombi was analyzed by confocal microscopy using specific antibodies. Examination of the spatial distribution of two proteins revealed the presence of intact fibrinogen on the surface of stabilized thrombi. By manipulating the surface of thrombi to display either fibrin or intact fibrinogen, we found that platelets adhere to fibrin- but not to fibrinogen-coated thrombi. These results indicate that the fibrinogen matrix assembled on the outer layer of stabilized in vitro thrombi protects them from platelet adhesion. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Flavonoids purified from parsley inhibit human blood platelet aggregation and adhesion to collagen under flow.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gadi, Dounia; Bnouham, Mohamed; Aziz, Mohammed; Ziyyat, Abderrahim; Legssyer, Abdelkhaleq; Bruel, Arlette; Berrabah, Mohamed; Legrand, Chantal; Fauvel-Lafeve, Françoise; Mekhfi, Hassane

    2012-08-10

    Blood platelets are directly involved in both haemostatic and pathologic thrombotic processes, through their adhesion, secretion and aggregation. In this study, we investigated the effect of genins (aglycone flavonoids without sugar group) isolated from parsley (Petroselinum crispum) leaves in vitro on human platelet aggregation and adhesion to a collagen-coated surface under physiologic flow conditions. The aggregation and adhesion studies were monitored after pre-incubation of platelets with genins. Genins inhibited dose dependently aggregation induced by thrombin, ADP and collagen. The strongest effect was observed in collagen induced aggregation (IC50 = 0.08 ± 0.01 mg/ml). The HPLC identification of genins compounds revealed the presence of keampferol, apigenin and other not identified compounds. The aggregation tests showed that these compounds have anti-aggregating activity. In addition, adhesion of human platelets to collagen was greatly decreased (over 75 %) by genins (0.3 mg/ml). While the mechanism by which genins act is unclear, we suggest that these compounds may interfere with a multiple target step in the haemostasis process. These results show that genins isolated from parsley has a potent antiplatelet activity. It may be an important source of beneficial antiplatelet compounds that decrease thrombosis and cardiovascular diseases.

  12. Platelet-tumor cell interaction with the subendothelial extracellular matrix: relationship to cancer metastasis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yahalom, J; Biran, S; Fuks, Z; Vlodavsky, I [Hadassah University Hospital, Jerusalem (Israel). Dept. of Radiation and Clinical Oncology; Eldor, A [Hadassah University Hospital, Jerusalem (Israel). Dept. of Hematology

    1985-04-01

    Dissemination of neoplastic cells within the body involves invasion of blood vessels by tumor cells. This requires adhesion of blood-borne cells to the luminal surface of the vascular endothelium, invasion through the endothelial cell layer and local dissolution of the subendothelial basement membrane. The authors studied the interaction of platelets and tumor cells with cultured vascular endothelial cells and their secreted basement membrane-like extracellular matrix (ECM). Interaction of platelets with this ECM was associated with platelet activation, aggregation and degradation of heparan sulfate in the ECM by means of the platelet heparitinase. Biochemical and scanning electron microscopy (SEM) studies have demonstrated that platelets may detect even minor gaps between adjacent endothelial cells and degrade the ECM heparan sulfate. Platelets were also shown to recruit lymphoma cells into minor gaps in the vascular endothelium. It is suggested that the platelet heparitinase is involved in the impairment of the integrity of the vessel wall and thus play a role in tumor cell metastasis.

  13. Engagement of αIIbβ3 (GPIIb/IIIa) with ανβ3 Integrin Mediates Interaction of Melanoma Cells with Platelets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lonsdorf, Anke S.; Krämer, Björn F.; Fahrleitner, Manuela; Schönberger, Tanja; Gnerlich, Stephan; Ring, Sabine; Gehring, Sarah; Schneider, Stefan W.; Kruhlak, Michael J.; Meuth, Sven G.; Nieswandt, Bernhard; Gawaz, Meinrad; Enk, Alexander H.; Langer, Harald F.

    2012-01-01

    A mutual relationship exists between metastasizing tumor cells and components of the coagulation cascade. The exact mechanisms as to how platelets influence blood-borne metastasis, however, remain poorly understood. Here, we used murine B16 melanoma cells to observe functional aspects of how platelets contribute to the process of hematogenous metastasis. We found that platelets interfere with a distinct step of the metastasis cascade, as they promote adhesion of melanoma cells to the endothelium in vitro under shear conditions. Constitutively active platelet receptor GPIIb/IIIa (integrin αIIbβ3) expressed on Chinese hamster ovary cells promoted melanoma cell adhesion in the presence of fibrinogen, whereas blocking antibodies to aνβ3 integrin on melanoma cells or to GPIIb/IIIa significantly reduced melanoma cell adhesion to platelets. Furthermore, using intravital microscopy, we observed functional platelet-melanoma cell interactions, as platelet depletion resulted in significantly reduced melanoma cell adhesion to the injured vascular wall in vivo. Using a mouse model of hematogenous metastasis to the lung, we observed decreased metastasis of B16 melanoma cells to the lung by treatment with a mAb blocking the aν subunit of aνβ3 integrin. This effect was significantly reduced when platelets were depleted in vivo. Thus, the engagement of GPIIb/IIIa with aνβ3 integrin interaction mediates tumor cell-platelet interactions and highlights how this interaction is involved in hematogenous tumor metastasis. PMID:22102277

  14. SPECIFIC ASPECTS OF INTERACTION OF PLATELETS WITH THE HEPARINIZED MATERIALS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E.A. Nemets

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Comparative analysis of anticoagulant nature on medical materials testing was done. It was found that change of citrate by heparin is accompanied by significant changes in platelet adhesion and activation. This results allowed us to arrive at a conclusion about reasonability of heparin usage as anticoagulant in in vitro testing. 

  15. Platelet activation, adhesion, inflammation, and aggregation potential are altered in the presence of electronic cigarette extracts of variable nicotine concentrations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hom, Sarah; Chen, Li; Wang, Tony; Ghebrehiwet, Berhane; Yin, Wei; Rubenstein, David A

    2016-11-01

    Tobacco smoke extracts prepared from both mainstream and sidestream smoking have been associated with heightened platelet activation, aggregation, adhesion, and inflammation. Conversely, it has been shown that pure nicotine inhibits similar platelet functions. In this work, we 1) evaluated the effects of e-cigarette extracts on platelet activities and 2) elucidated the differences between the nicotine-dependent and non-nicotine dependent (e.g. fine particulate matter or toxic compounds) effects of tobacco and e-cigarette products on platelet activities. To accomplish these goals, platelets from healthy volunteers (n = 50) were exposed to tobacco smoke extracts, e-cigarette vapor extracts, and pure nicotine and changes in platelet activation, adhesion, aggregation, and inflammation were evaluated, using optical aggregation, flow cytometry, and ELISA methods. Interestingly, the exposure of platelets to e-vapor extracts induced a significant up-regulation in the expression of the pro-inflammatory gC1qR and cC1qR and induced a marked increase in the deposition of C3b as compared with traditional tobacco smoke extracts. Similarly, platelet activation, as measured by a prothrombinase based assay, and platelet aggregation were also significantly enhanced after exposure to e-vapor extracts. Finally, platelet adhesion potential toward fibrinogen, von Willebrand factor, and other platelets was also enhanced after exposure to e-cigarette vapor extracts. In the presence of pure nicotine, platelet functions were observed to be inhibited, which further suggests that other constituents of tobacco smoke and electronic vapor can antagonize platelet functions, however, the presence of nicotine in extracts somewhat perpetuated the platelet functional changes in a dose-dependent manner.

  16. Grafting of phosphorylcholine functional groups on polycarbonate urethane surface for resisting platelet adhesion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gao, Bin [School of Chemical Engineering and Technology, Tianjin University, Weijin Road 92, Tianjin 300072 (China); Feng, Yakai, E-mail: yakaifeng@hotmail.com [School of Chemical Engineering and Technology, Tianjin University, Weijin Road 92, Tianjin 300072 (China); Tianjin University-Helmholtz-Zentrum Geesthacht, Joint Laboratory for Biomaterials and Regenerative Medicine, Weijin Road 92, 300072 Tianjin (China); Key Laboratory of Systems Bioengineering, Ministry of Education, Tianjin University, Weijin Road 92, Tianjin 300072 (China); Lu, Jian; Zhang, Li; Zhao, Miao; Shi, Changcan; Khan, Musammir [School of Chemical Engineering and Technology, Tianjin University, Weijin Road 92, Tianjin 300072 (China); Guo, Jintang [School of Chemical Engineering and Technology, Tianjin University, Weijin Road 92, Tianjin 300072 (China); Tianjin University-Helmholtz-Zentrum Geesthacht, Joint Laboratory for Biomaterials and Regenerative Medicine, Weijin Road 92, 300072 Tianjin (China)

    2013-07-01

    In order to improve the resistance of platelet adhesion on material surface, 2-methacryloyloxyethyl phosphorylcholine (MPC) was grafted onto polycarbonate urethane (PCU) surface via Michael reaction to create biomimetic structure. After introducing primary amine groups via coupling tris(2-aminoethyl)amine (TAEA) onto the polymer surface, the double bond of MPC reacted with the amino group to obtain MPC modified PCU. The modified surface was characterized by Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). The results verified that MPC was grafted onto PCU surface by Michael reaction method. The MPC grafted PCU surface had a low water contact angle and a high water uptake. This means that the hydrophilic PC functional groups improved the surface hydrophilicity significantly. In addition, surface morphology of MPC grafted PCU film was imaged by atomic force microscope (AFM). The results showed that the grafted surface was rougher than the blank PCU surface. In addition, platelet adhesion study was evaluated by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) observation. The PCU films after treated with platelet-rich plasma demonstrated that much fewer platelets adhered to the MPC-grafted PCU surface than to the blank PCU surface. The antithrombogenicity of the MPC-grafted PCU surface was determined by the activated partial thromboplastin time (APTT). The result suggested that the MPC modified PCU may have potential application as biomaterials in blood-contacting and some subcutaneously implanted devices. - Highlights: • MPC was successfully grafted onto polycarbonate urethane surface via Michael reaction. • High concentration of PC functional groups on the surface via TAEA molecule • Biomimetic surface modification • The modified surface showed high hydrophilicity and anti-platelet adhesion.

  17. The interaction of thrombin with platelet protease nexin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Knupp, C.L.

    1989-01-01

    Thrombin interacts with a platelet protein which is immunologically related to fibroblast protease nexin and has been termed platelet protease nexin I (PNI). Conflicting hypotheses about the relationship of the thrombin-PNI complex formation to platelet activation have been proposed. The studies presented here demonstrate that the platelet-associated and supernatant complexes with added 125I-thrombin are formed only under conditions which produce platelet activation in normal and chymotrypsin-modified platelets. The platelet-associated complex is formed prior to the appearance of complexes in supernatants. Appearance of the supernatant complex coincides with the appearance of thrombospondin in the reaction supernatants. Excess native thrombin, dansylarginine N-(3-ethyl-1,5-pentanediyl) amide or hirudin can prevent radiolabeled platelet-associated complex formation if added before 125I-thrombin. DAPA or hirudin can prevent or dissociate complex formation if added up to one minute after thrombin but not at later time points. The surface associated complex is accessible to trypsin although a portion remains with the cytoskeletal proteins when thrombin-activated platelets are solubilized with Triton X 100. The surface-associated complex formation parallels many aspects of the specific measurable thrombin binding, yet it does not appear to involve other identified surface glycoprotein thrombin receptors or substrates. Although the time course of appearance of the complexes in supernatants is consistent with other data which suggest that PNI may be released from platelet granules during platelet activation, other explanations for the appearance of PNI on the platelet surface and in supernatants during platelet activation are possible

  18. Impaired platelet adhesion to lysed fibrin, whereas neutrophil adhesion remains intact under conditions of flow

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Remijn, Jasper A.; da Costa Martins, Paula; Ijsseldijk, Martin J. W.; Sixma, Jan J.; de Groot, Philip G.; Zwaginga, Jaap J.

    2006-01-01

    Vessel wall injury induces the formation of a haemostatic plug. Restoration of vascular integrity should involve cessation of further platelet and fibrin deposition and subsequent removal of these thrombi by both the fibrinolytic system and proteases delivered by infiltrating inflammatory cells. We

  19. Platelets and infections—complex interactions with bacteria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hind eHAMZEH-COGNASSE

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Platelets can be considered sentinels of vascular system due to their high number in the circulation and to the range of functional immunoreceptors they express. Platelets express a wide range of potential bacterial receptors, including complement receptors, FcγRII, Toll-Like Receptors but also integrins conventionally described in the hemostatic response, such as GPIIb-IIIa or GPIb. Bacteria bind these receptors either directly, or indirectly via fibrinogen, fibronectin, the first complement C1q, the von Willebrand Factor, etc. The fate of platelet bound bacteria is questioned. Several studies reported the ability of activated platelets to internalize bacteria such as Staphylococcus aureus or Porphyromonas gingivalis, though there is no clue on what happens thereafter. Are they sheltered from the immune system in the cytoplasm of platelets or are they lysed? Indeed, while the presence of phagolysosome has not been demonstrated in platelets, they contain antimicrobial peptides that were shown to be efficient on S. aureus. Besides, the fact that bacteria can bind to platelets via receptors involved in hemostasis suggests that they may induce aggregation; this has indeed been described for Streptococcus sanguinis, S. epidermidis or C. pneumoniae. On the other hand, platelets are able to display an inflammatory response to an infectious triggering. We, and others, have shown that platelet release soluble immunomodulatory factors upon stimulation by bacterial components. Moreover, interactions between bacteria and platelets are not limited to only these two partners. Indeed, platelets are also essential for the formation of Neutrophil Extracellular Traps by neutrophils, resulting in bacterial clearance by trapping bacteria and concentrating antibacterial factors but in enhancing thrombosis. In conclusion, the platelet-bacteria interplay is a complex game; its fine analysis is complicated by the fact that the inflammatory component adds to the

  20. The Role of Platelet and its Interaction with Aspirin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luisa Fernanda Zúñiga Cerón

    2016-04-01

    Conclusion. It is recognized the role of platelet in different physiopathological processes and thus its interaction with aspirin, preventing its aggregation and thrombus formation in the spleen and other organs, this way contributing to the prevention of future cardiovascular events.

  1. In vitro investigation of protein adsorption and platelet adhesion on inorganic biomaterial surfaces

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yan Huang [State Key Laboratory of Bioelectronics, School of Biological Science and Medical Engineering, Southeast University, Nanjing 210096 (China); Lue Xiaoying [State Key Laboratory of Bioelectronics, School of Biological Science and Medical Engineering, Southeast University, Nanjing 210096 (China)], E-mail: luxy@seu.edu.cn; Ma Jingwu [State Key Laboratory of Bioelectronics, School of Biological Science and Medical Engineering, Southeast University, Nanjing 210096 (China); Nan Huang [Institute of Biomaterials and Surface Engineering, Southwest Jiaotong University, Chengdu 610031 (China)], E-mail: nhuang@263.com

    2008-11-15

    The aim of this paper was to study the surface properties, protein adsorption and platelet adhesion behaviors of diamond-like carbon (DLC) and titanium (Ti) films. The surface energy and microstructures of these films were characterized by contact angle measurement and atomic force microscopy (AFM). A modified Coomassie brilliant blue (CBB) protein assay was used to study the amount of adsorbed proteins. Platelet adhesion was assessed by scanning electron microscopy (SEM). The AFM results show that the DLC film is smoother than Ti. Protein adsorption results from CBB protein assay show that the ratio of adsorbed albumin (Alb) to IgG (R{sub A/I}) on DLC is larger than Ti, which coincide with the sequence of the ratio of interfacial tension between solid surface and Alb ({gamma}{sub S,Alb}) to interfacial tension between surface and IgG ({gamma}{sub S,IgG}) ({gamma}{sub S,Alb}/{gamma}{sub S,IgG}). The DLC film has a preferential adsorption for Alb. The results suggest that the ratio of {gamma}{sub S,Alb}/{gamma}{sub S,IgG} may indicate an Alb/IgG affinity ratio of materials. More platelets adhere on Ti film than on DLC, which may correspond to the surface roughness of materials. The conclusion is the blood compatibility of DLC seems to be better than Ti.

  2. Divalent cations and the protein surface co-ordinate the intensity of human platelet adhesion and P-selectin surface expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whiss, P A; Andersson, R G G

    2002-07-01

    At sites of blood vessel injury, platelets adhere to exposed vessel components, such as collagen, or immobilized fibrinogen derived from plasma or activated platelets. The divalent cations Mg(2+) and Ca(2+) are essential for platelet adhesion and activation, but Mg(2+) can also inhibit platelet activation. The present study evaluates, by an enzymatic method, the effects of various divalent cations on the adhesion of isolated human platelets to collagen, fibrinogen, albumin or plastic in vitro. By enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay, platelet surface expression of P-selectin was measured to estimate the state of activation on adherence. Mg(2+) increased platelet adhesion exclusively to collagen and fibrinogen at physiologically relevant concentrations. At higher concentrations, the adhesion declined. Ca(2+) induced a weak adhesion only to fibrinogen at physiological doses and a peak of increased adhesion to all protein-coated surfaces at 10 mmol/l. Mn(2+) elicited dose-dependent adhesion only to collagen and fibrinogen. Zn(2+), Ni(2+) and Cu(2+) increased the adhesion of platelets independently of the surface. Ca(2+) dose-dependently inhibited adhesion elicited by Mg(2+) to collagen and fibrinogen. No other combination of divalent cations elicited such an effect. Mg(2+)-dependent platelet adhesion to collagen and Ca(2+)-dependent adhesion to fibrinogen increased P-selectin expression. Thus, the present study shows that the outcome of the platelet adhesion depends on the surface and the access of divalent cations, which co-ordinate the intensity of platelet adhesion and P-selectin surface expression.

  3. Biodegradable electrospun nanofibers coated with platelet-rich plasma for cell adhesion and proliferation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Diaz-Gomez, Luis; Alvarez-Lorenzo, Carmen; Concheiro, Angel; Silva, Maite; Dominguez, Fernando; Sheikh, Faheem A.; Cantu, Travis; Desai, Raj; Garcia, Vanessa L.; Macossay, Javier

    2014-01-01

    Biodegradable electrospun poly(ε-caprolactone) (PCL) scaffolds were coated with platelet-rich plasma (PRP) to improve cell adhesion and proliferation. PRP was obtained from human buffy coat, and tested on human adipose-derived mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) to confirm cell proliferation and cytocompatibility. Then, PRP was adsorbed on the PCL scaffolds via lyophilization, which resulted in a uniform sponge-like coating of 2.85 (S.D. 0.14) mg/mg. The scaffolds were evaluated regarding mechanical properties (Young's modulus, tensile stress and tensile strain), sustained release of total protein and growth factors (PDGF-BB, TGF-β1 and VEGF), and hemocompatibility. MSC seeded on the PRP–PCL nanofibers showed an increased adhesion and proliferation compared to pristine PCL fibers. Moreover, the adsorbed PRP enabled angiogenesis features observed as neovascularization in a chicken chorioallantoic membrane (CAM) model. Overall, these results suggest that PRP–PCL scaffolds hold promise for tissue regeneration applications. - Highlights: • Platelet-rich plasma (PRP) can be adsorbed on electrospun fibers via lyophilization. • PRP coating enhanced mesenchymal stem cell adhesion and proliferation on scaffolds. • PRP-coated scaffolds showed sustained release of growth factors. • Adsorbed PRP provided angiogenic features. • PRP-poly(ε-caprolactone) scaffolds hold promise for tissue regeneration applications

  4. Biodegradable electrospun nanofibers coated with platelet-rich plasma for cell adhesion and proliferation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Diaz-Gomez, Luis [Departamento de Farmacia y Tecnología Farmacéutica, Facultad de Farmacia, Universidad de Santiago de Compostela, 15872 Santiago de Compostela (Spain); Instituto de Ortopedia y Banco de Tejidos Musculoesqueléticos, Universidad de Santiago de Compostela, 15872 Santiago de Compostela (Spain); Alvarez-Lorenzo, Carmen, E-mail: carmen.alvarez.lorenzo@usc.es [Departamento de Farmacia y Tecnología Farmacéutica, Facultad de Farmacia, Universidad de Santiago de Compostela, 15872 Santiago de Compostela (Spain); Concheiro, Angel [Departamento de Farmacia y Tecnología Farmacéutica, Facultad de Farmacia, Universidad de Santiago de Compostela, 15872 Santiago de Compostela (Spain); Silva, Maite [Instituto de Ortopedia y Banco de Tejidos Musculoesqueléticos, Universidad de Santiago de Compostela, 15872 Santiago de Compostela (Spain); Dominguez, Fernando [Fundación Publica Galega de Medicina Xenómica, Santiago de Compostela (Spain); Sheikh, Faheem A.; Cantu, Travis; Desai, Raj; Garcia, Vanessa L. [Department of Chemistry, University of Texas Pan American, Edinburg, TX 78541 (United States); Macossay, Javier, E-mail: jmacossay@utpa.edu [Department of Chemistry, University of Texas Pan American, Edinburg, TX 78541 (United States)

    2014-07-01

    Biodegradable electrospun poly(ε-caprolactone) (PCL) scaffolds were coated with platelet-rich plasma (PRP) to improve cell adhesion and proliferation. PRP was obtained from human buffy coat, and tested on human adipose-derived mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) to confirm cell proliferation and cytocompatibility. Then, PRP was adsorbed on the PCL scaffolds via lyophilization, which resulted in a uniform sponge-like coating of 2.85 (S.D. 0.14) mg/mg. The scaffolds were evaluated regarding mechanical properties (Young's modulus, tensile stress and tensile strain), sustained release of total protein and growth factors (PDGF-BB, TGF-β1 and VEGF), and hemocompatibility. MSC seeded on the PRP–PCL nanofibers showed an increased adhesion and proliferation compared to pristine PCL fibers. Moreover, the adsorbed PRP enabled angiogenesis features observed as neovascularization in a chicken chorioallantoic membrane (CAM) model. Overall, these results suggest that PRP–PCL scaffolds hold promise for tissue regeneration applications. - Highlights: • Platelet-rich plasma (PRP) can be adsorbed on electrospun fibers via lyophilization. • PRP coating enhanced mesenchymal stem cell adhesion and proliferation on scaffolds. • PRP-coated scaffolds showed sustained release of growth factors. • Adsorbed PRP provided angiogenic features. • PRP-poly(ε-caprolactone) scaffolds hold promise for tissue regeneration applications.

  5. Quantitative Glycoproteomic Analysis Identifies Platelet-Induced Increase of Monocyte Adhesion via the Up-Regulation of Very Late Antigen 5.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Jiqing; Kast, Juergen

    2015-08-07

    Physiological stimuli, such as thrombin, or pathological stimuli, such as lysophosphatidic acid (LPA), activate platelets circulating in blood. Once activated, platelets bind to monocytes via P-selectin-PSGL-1 interactions but also release the stored contents of their granules. These platelet releasates, in addition to direct platelet binding, activate monocytes and facilitate their recruitment to atherosclerotic sites. Consequently, understanding the changes platelet releasates induce in monocyte membrane proteins is critical. We studied the glyco-proteome changes of THP-1 monocytic cells affected by LPA- or thrombin-induced platelet releasates. We employed lectin affinity chromatography combined with filter aided sample preparation to achieve high glyco- and membrane protein and protein sequence coverage. Using stable isotope labeling by amino acids in cell culture, we quantified 1715 proteins, including 852 membrane and 500 glycoproteins, identifying the up-regulation of multiple proteins involved in monocyte extracellular matrix binding and transendothelial migration. Flow cytometry indicated expression changes of integrin α5, integrin β1, PECAM-1, and PSGL-1. The observed increase in monocyte adhesion to fibronectin was determined to be mediated by the up-regulation of very late antigen 5 via a P-selectin-PSGL-1 independent mechanism. This novel aspect could be validated on CD14+ human primary monocytes, highlighting the benefits of the improved enrichment method regarding high membrane protein coverage and reliable quantification.

  6. Glycoprotein VI but not alpha2beta1 integrin is essential for platelet interaction with collagen

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nieswandt, B; Brakebusch, C; Bergmeier, W

    2001-01-01

    Platelet adhesion on and activation by components of the extracellular matrix are crucial to arrest post-traumatic bleeding, but can also harm tissue by occluding diseased vessels. Integrin alpha2beta1 is thought to be essential for platelet adhesion to subendothelial collagens, facilitating subs...

  7. Influence of nitriding atmosphere on the modification of surface titanium with focus on the behavior of blood platelets adhesion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vitoriano, J.O.; Alves, C.; Braz, D.C.; Camara, R.B.G.; Rocha, H.A.O.

    2014-01-01

    The present study aimed to analyze the influence of surface modification of titanium on the adhesion of blood platelets, through techniques of adhesion and morphological analyzes. Discs of titanium grade II received different surface treatments with plasma of Ar + N_2 + H_2 and Ar + H_2, forming two experimental groups including only polished samples used as standard. Before and after treatment the samples were characterized according to topography, crystalline structure and wettability, using atomic force microscopy, X-ray diffraction, Raman spectroscopy and testing of sessile drop, respectively. Platelet rich plasma (PRP) was applied on the modified surfaces in a culture plates. Images obtained by electron microscopy of adhered platelets were analyzed to verify the behavior of platelets in the different experimental conditions. (author)

  8. Silicon-carbide coated coronary stents have low platelet and leukocyte adhesion during platelet activation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Monnink, SHJ; van Boven, AJ; Tigchelaar, [No Value; de Kam, PJ; Crijns, HJGM; van Oeveren, W

    Background: Stent thrombosis and restenosis are of great clinical significance. We constructed a closed loop in vitro heparinized whole human blood circulation model for testing hemocompatibility of coronary stents, This model allows evaluation of human blood activation by blood-stent interaction in

  9. Static platelet adhesion, flow cytometry and serum TXB2 levels for monitoring platelet inhibiting treatment with ASA and clopidogrel in coronary artery disease: a randomised cross-over study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hedbäck Bo

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Despite the use of anti-platelet agents such as acetylsalicylic acid (ASA and clopidogrel in coronary heart disease, some patients continue to suffer from atherothrombosis. This has stimulated development of platelet function assays to monitor treatment effects. However, it is still not recommended to change treatment based on results from platelet function assays. This study aimed to evaluate the capacity of a static platelet adhesion assay to detect platelet inhibiting effects of ASA and clopidogrel. The adhesion assay measures several aspects of platelet adhesion simultaneously, which increases the probability of finding conditions sensitive for anti-platelet treatment. Methods With a randomised cross-over design we evaluated the anti-platelet effects of ASA combined with clopidogrel as well as monotherapy with either drug alone in 29 patients with a recent acute coronary syndrome. Also, 29 matched healthy controls were included to evaluate intra-individual variability over time. Platelet function was measured by flow cytometry, serum thromboxane B2 (TXB2-levels and by static platelet adhesion to different protein surfaces. The results were subjected to Principal Component Analysis followed by ANOVA, t-tests and linear regression analysis. Results The majority of platelet adhesion measures were reproducible in controls over time denoting that the assay can monitor platelet activity. Adenosine 5'-diphosphate (ADP-induced platelet adhesion decreased significantly upon treatment with clopidogrel compared to ASA. Flow cytometric measurements showed the same pattern (r2 = 0.49. In opposite, TXB2-levels decreased with ASA compared to clopidogrel. Serum TXB2 and ADP-induced platelet activation could both be regarded as direct measures of the pharmacodynamic effects of ASA and clopidogrel respectively. Indirect pharmacodynamic measures such as adhesion to albumin induced by various soluble activators as well as SFLLRN

  10. Static platelet adhesion, flow cytometry and serum TXB2 levels for monitoring platelet inhibiting treatment with ASA and clopidogrel in coronary artery disease: a randomised cross-over study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eriksson, Andreas C; Jonasson, Lena; Lindahl, Tomas L; Hedbäck, Bo; Whiss, Per A

    2009-01-01

    Background Despite the use of anti-platelet agents such as acetylsalicylic acid (ASA) and clopidogrel in coronary heart disease, some patients continue to suffer from atherothrombosis. This has stimulated development of platelet function assays to monitor treatment effects. However, it is still not recommended to change treatment based on results from platelet function assays. This study aimed to evaluate the capacity of a static platelet adhesion assay to detect platelet inhibiting effects of ASA and clopidogrel. The adhesion assay measures several aspects of platelet adhesion simultaneously, which increases the probability of finding conditions sensitive for anti-platelet treatment. Methods With a randomised cross-over design we evaluated the anti-platelet effects of ASA combined with clopidogrel as well as monotherapy with either drug alone in 29 patients with a recent acute coronary syndrome. Also, 29 matched healthy controls were included to evaluate intra-individual variability over time. Platelet function was measured by flow cytometry, serum thromboxane B2 (TXB2)-levels and by static platelet adhesion to different protein surfaces. The results were subjected to Principal Component Analysis followed by ANOVA, t-tests and linear regression analysis. Results The majority of platelet adhesion measures were reproducible in controls over time denoting that the assay can monitor platelet activity. Adenosine 5'-diphosphate (ADP)-induced platelet adhesion decreased significantly upon treatment with clopidogrel compared to ASA. Flow cytometric measurements showed the same pattern (r2 = 0.49). In opposite, TXB2-levels decreased with ASA compared to clopidogrel. Serum TXB2 and ADP-induced platelet activation could both be regarded as direct measures of the pharmacodynamic effects of ASA and clopidogrel respectively. Indirect pharmacodynamic measures such as adhesion to albumin induced by various soluble activators as well as SFLLRN-induced activation measured by flow

  11. Mice with deleted multimerin 1 and alpha-synuclein genes have impaired platelet adhesion and impaired thrombus formation that is corrected by multimerin 1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reheman, Adili; Tasneem, Subia; Ni, Heyu; Hayward, Catherine P M

    2010-05-01

    Multimerin 1 is a stored platelet and endothelial cell adhesive protein that shows significant conservation. In vitro, multimerin 1 supports platelet adhesion and it also binds to collagen and enhances von Willebrand factor-dependent platelet adhesion to collagen. As selective, multimerin 1 deficient mice have not been generated, we investigated multimerin 1 effects on platelet adhesion using a subpopulation of C57BL/6J mice with tandem deletion of the genes for multimerin 1 and alpha-synuclein, a protein that inhibits alpha-granule release in vitro. We postulated that multimerin 1/alpha-synuclein deficient mice might show impaired platelet adhesive function from multimerin 1 deficiency and increased alpha-granule release from alpha-synuclein deficiency. Platelet function was assessed by intravital microscopy, after ferric chloride injury, using untreated and human multimerin 1-transfused multimerin 1/alpha-synuclein deficient mice, and by in vitro assays of adhesion, aggregation and thrombin-induced P-selectin release. Multimerin 1/alpha-synuclein deficient mice showed impaired platelet adhesion and their defective thrombus formation at sites of vessel injury improved with multimerin 1 transfusion. Although multimerin 1/alpha-synuclein deficient platelets showed increased P-selectin release at low thrombin concentrations, they also showed impaired adhesion to collagen, and attenuated aggregation with thrombin, that improved with added multimerin 1. Our data suggest that multimerin 1 supports platelet adhesive functions and thrombus formation, which will be important to verify by generating and testing selective multimerin 1 deficient mice. Copyright (c) 2010. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  12. Relationship between the ability of oral streptococci to interact with platelet glycoprotein Ibalpha and with the salivary low-molecular-weight mucin, MG2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plummer, Christopher; Douglas, Charles William Ian

    2006-12-01

    The oral streptococci Streptococcus sanguinis, Streptococcus gordonii and Streptococcus oralis are common aetiological agents of infective endocarditis, and their ability to adhere to and induce the aggregation of platelets is thought to be a virulence trait. The platelet glycoprotein GPIbalpha has been implicated as the adhesion receptor for S. sanguinis and S. gordonii, but it is not known if this is the case for S. oralis and other species. The aim of this study was to determine the GPIbalpha-interactive capability of a range of oral streptococci and to determine the relationship between this capability and their ability to interact with the salivary constituents that they would encounter in their normal habitat. All platelet-adhesive S. sanguinis strains and most S. gordonii strains adhered in a GPIbalpha-dependent manner, but strains of S. oralis, Streptococcus cristatus, Streptococcus parasanguinis and Streptococcus mitis had no direct affinity for platelets. Those strains that were able to bind GPIbalpha also bound to the low-molecular-weight submandibular salivary mucin, MG2, and this interaction was sialic acid-dependent. The data suggest that S. sanguinis and S. gordonii may be efficient colonizers of platelet vegetations because of their adaptation to recognize sialylated salivary mucins. In contrast, S. oralis does not interact with platelets and so is likely to colonize vegetations through an as yet unidentified mechanism.

  13. Mechanism underlying bioinertness of self-assembled monolayers of oligo(ethyleneglycol)-terminated alkanethiols on gold: protein adsorption, platelet adhesion, and surface forces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayashi, Tomohiro; Tanaka, Yusaku; Koide, Yuki; Tanaka, Masaru; Hara, Masahiko

    2012-08-07

    The mechanism underlying the bioinertness of the self-assembled monolayers of oligo(ethylene glycol)-terminated alkanethiol (OEG-SAM) was investigated with protein adsorption experiments, platelet adhesion tests, and surface force measurements with an atomic force microscope (AFM). In this work, we performed systematic analysis with SAMs having various terminal groups (-OEG, -OH, -COOH, -NH(2), and -CH(3)). The results of the protein adsorption experiment by the quartz crystal microbalance (QCM) method suggested that having one EG unit and the neutrality of total charges of the terminal groups are essential for protein-resistance. In particular, QCM with energy dissipation analyses indicated that proteins absorb onto the OEG-SAM via a very weak interaction compared with other SAMs. Contrary to the protein resistance, at least three EG units as well as the charge neutrality of the SAM are found to be required for anti-platelet adhesion. When the identical SAMs were formed on both AFM probe and substrate, our force measurements revealed that only the OEG-SAMs possessing more than two EG units showed strong repulsion in the range of 4 to 6 nm. In addition, we found that the SAMs with other terminal groups did not exhibit such repulsion. The repulsion between OEG-SAMs was always observed independent of solution conditions [NaCl concentration (between 0 and 1 M) and pH (between 3 and 11)] and was not observed in solution mixed with ethanol, which disrupts the three-dimensional network of the water molecules. We therefore concluded that the repulsion originated from structured interfacial water molecules. Considering the correlation between the above results, we propose that the layer of the structured interfacial water with a thickness of 2 to 3 nm (half of the range of the repulsion observed in the surface force measurements) plays an important role in deterring proteins and platelets from adsorption or adhesion.

  14. Asperity interaction in adhesive contact of metallic rough surfaces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sahoo, Prasanta; Banerjee, Atanu

    2005-01-01

    The analysis of adhesive contact of metallic rough surfaces considering the effect of asperity interaction is the subject of this investigation. The micro-contact model of asperity interactions developed by Zhao and Chang (2001 Trans. ASME: J. Tribol. 123 857-64) is combined with the elastic plastic adhesive contact model developed by Chang et al (1988 Trans. ASME: J. Tribol. 110 50-6) to consider the asperity interaction and elastic-plastic deformation in the presence of surface forces simultaneously. The well-established elastic adhesion index and plasticity index are used to consider the different contact conditions. Results show that asperity interaction influences the load-separation behaviour in elastic-plastic adhesive contact of metallic rough surfaces significantly and, in general, adhesion is reduced due to asperity interactions

  15. Double-chain phospholipid end-capped polyurethanes: Synthesis, characterization and platelet adhesion study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tan Dongsheng; Zhang Xiaoqing; Li Jiehua; Tan Hong; Fu Qiang

    2012-01-01

    A novel phospholipid containing double chains and phosphotidylcholine polar head groups, 2-(10-(2-aminoethylamino)-10-oxodecanamido)-3-(decyloxy)-3-oxopropyl phosphorylcholine (ADDPC), was synthesized and characterized. Two kinds of double-chain phospholipid end-capped polyurethanes with different soft segments were prepared. The structure of prepared polyurethanes was characterized by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopic (XPS), attenuated total reflection Fourier transform infrared (ATR-FTIR) spectrometry and atomic force microscope (AFM), which indicated that the double-chain phospholipids enriched onto the top surface of the prepared polyurethane films. The preliminary evaluation of blood compatibility showed that these novel phospholipid end-capped polyurethanes could suppress platelet adhesion and activation effectively. This property did not depend on the chemical structure of polyurethanes. In addition, according to tensile test results, the phospholipid polyurethanes kept good mechanical properties in comparison with original polyurethanes. It is suggested that double-chain phospholipid end-caption has good potential for achieving both hemocompatibility and good mechanical properties simultaneously for polyurethanes.

  16. Platelet endothelial cell adhesion molecule 1 deficiency misguides venous thrombus resolution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kellermair, Joerg; Redwan, Bassam; Alias, Sherin; Jabkowski, Joerg; Panzenboeck, Adelheid; Kellermair, Lukas; Winter, Max P; Weltermann, Ansgar; Lang, Irene M

    2013-11-07

    Platelet endothelial cell adhesion molecule 1 (PECAM-1) is involved in leukocyte migration and angiogenesis, which are key components of venous thrombus resolution. This study investigated the effect of PECAM-1 deficiency on thrombus resolution in FVB/n mice and the extent to which levels of soluble PECAM-1 (sPECAM-1) correlate with delayed thrombus resolution in humans after acute symptomatic deep vein thrombosis (DVT). In a mouse stagnant flow venous thrombosis model Pecam-1(-/-) thrombi were larger, persisted for longer periods of time, and displayed attenuated macrophage invasion and decreased vessel formation in the presence of increased fibrosis. In humans, higher levels of truncated plasma sPECAM-1 possibly cleaved from cell surfaces, were found in patients with delayed thrombus resolution (assessed via duplex-based thrombus scoring) relative to those whose thrombi resolved (median, 25th/75th percentile): 92.5 (87.7/103.4) ng/mL vs 71.5 (51.1/81.0) ng/mL; P deep vein thrombus specimens stained positively with antibodies specific for the extracellular, but not the cytoplasmic domain of PECAM-1, consistent with accumulation of cleaved PECAM-1. Our data suggest a regulatory role of PECAM-1 in venous thrombus resolution and suggest a predictive value of sPECAM-1 for postthrombotic syndrome (PTS) after acute DVT.

  17. Utilization of star-shaped polymer architecture in the creation of high-density polymer brush coatings for the prevention of platelet and bacteria adhesion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Totani, Masayasu; Terada, Kayo; Terashima, Takaya; Kim, Ill Yong; Ohtsuki, Chikara; Xi, Chuanwu; Tanihara, Masao

    2014-01-01

    We demonstrate utilization of star-shaped polymers as high-density polymer brush coatings and their effectiveness to inhibit the adhesion of platelets and bacteria. Star polymers consisting of poly(2-hydroxyethyl methacrylate) (PHEMA) and/or poly(methyl methacrylate) (PMMA), were synthesized using living radical polymerization with a ruthenium catalyst. The polymer coatings were prepared by simple drop casting of the polymer solution onto poly(ethylene terephthalate) (PET) surfaces and then dried. Among the star polymers prepared in this study, the PHEMA star polymer (star-PHEMA) and the PHEMA/PMMA (mol. ratio of 71/29) heteroarm star polymer (star-H71M29) coatings showed the highest percentage of inhibition against platelet adhesion (78–88% relative to noncoated PET surface) and Escherichia coli (94–97%). These coatings also showed anti-adhesion activity against platelets after incubation in Dulbecco's phosphate buffered saline or surfactant solution for 7 days. In addition, the PMMA component of the star polymers increased the scratch resistance of the coating. These results indicate that the star-polymer architecture provides high polymer chain density on PET surfaces to prevent adhesion of platelets and bacteria, as well as coating stability and physical durability to prevent exposure of bare PET surfaces. The star polymers provide a simple and effective approach to preparing anti-adhesion polymer coatings on biomedical materials against the adhesion of platelets and bacteria. PMID:25485105

  18. Superior integrin activating capacity and higher adhesion to fibrinogen matrix in buffy coat-derived platelet concentrates (PCs) compared to PRP-PCs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beshkar, Pezhman; Hosseini, Ehteramolsadat; Ghasemzadeh, Mehran

    2018-02-01

    Regardless of different sources, methods or devices which are applied for preparation of therapeutic platelets, these products are generally isolated from whole blood by the sedimentation techniques which are based on PRP or buffy coat (BC) separation. As a general fact, platelet preparation and storage are also associated with some deleterious changes that known as platelet storage lesion (PSL). Although these alternations in platelet functional activity are aggravated during storage, whether technical issues within preparation can affect integrin activation and platelet adhesion to fibrinogen were investigated in this study. PRP- and BC-platelet concentrates (PCs) were subjected to flowcytometry analysis to examine the expression of platelet activation marker, P-selectin as well as active confirmation of the GPIIb/IIIa (α IIb β 3 ) on day 0, 1, 3 and 5 post-storage. Platelet adhesion to fibrinogen matrix was evaluated by fluorescence microscopy. Glucose concentration and LDH activity were also measured by colorimetric methods. The increasing P-selectin expression during storage was in a reverse correlation with PAC-1 binding (r = -0.67; p = .001). PRP-PCs showed the higher level of P-selectin expression than BC-PCs, whereas the levels of PAC-1 binding and platelet adhesion to fibrinogen matrix were significantly lower in PRP-PCs. Higher levels of active confirmation of the GPIIb/IIIa in BC-PCs were also associated with greater concentration of glucose in these products. We demonstrated the superior capacities of integrin activation and adhesion to fibrinogen for BC-PCs compared to those of PRP-PCs. These findings may provide more advantages for BC method of platelet preparation. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. A single-cell analysis platform for electrochemiluminescent detection of platelets adhesion to endothelial cells based on Au@DL-ZnCQDs nanoprobes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Long, Dongping; Shang, Yunfei; Qiu, Youyi; Zhou, Bin; Yang, Peihui

    2018-04-15

    A novel single-cell analysis platform (SCA) was developed for the investigation of platelets adhesion to single human umbilical vein endothelial cell (HUVEC) via using the adhesion molecule (E-selectin) on the damaged HUVEC as the marker site, and integrating electrochemiluminescence (ECL) with the ultrasensitive Au@DL-ZnCQDs nanoprobes. The Au@DL-ZnCQDs nanocomposite, a kind of double layer zinc-coadsorbed carbon quantum dot (ZnCQDs) core-shell nanoprobe, was firstly constructed by using gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) as the core to load with ZnCQDs and then the citrate-modified silver nanoparticles (AgNPs) as the bridge to link AuNPs-ZnCQDs with ZnCQDs to form the core-shell with double layer ZnCQDs (DL-ZnCQDs) nanoprobe, revealed a 10-fold signal amplification. The H 2 O 2 -induced oxidative damage HUVECs were utilized as the cellular model on which anti-E-selectin functionalized nanoprobes specially recognized E-selectin, the SCA showed that the ECL signals decreased with platelets adhesion to single HUVEC. The proposed SCA could effectively and dynamically monitor the adhesion between single HUVEC and platelets in the absence and presence of collagen activation, moreover, be able to quantitatively detect the number of platelets adhesion to single HUVEC, and show a good analytical performance with linear range from 1 to 15 platelets. In contrast, the HUVEC was down-regulated the expression of adhesion molecules by treating with quercetin inhibitor, and the SCA also exhibited the feasibility for analysis of platelets adhesion to single HUVEC. Therefore, the single-cell analysis platform provided a novel and promising protocol for analysis of the single intercellular adhesion, and it will be beneficial to elucidate the pathogenesis of cardiovascular diseases. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. In vitro cell culture, platelet adhesion tests and in vivo implant tests of plasma-polymerized para-xylene films

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chou, Chia-Man; Yeh, Chou-Ming; Chung, Chi-Jen; He, Ju-Liang

    2013-01-01

    Plasma-polymerized para-xylene (PPX) was developed in a previous study by adjusting the process parameters: pulse frequency of the power supply (ω p ) and para-xylene monomer flow rate (f p ). All the obtained PPX films exhibit an amorphous structure and present hydrophobicity (water contact angle ranging from 98.5° to 121.1°), higher film growth rate and good fibroblast cell proliferation. In this study, in vitro tests (fibroblast cell compatibility and platelet adhesion) and an in vivo animal study were performed by using PPX deposited industrial-grade silicone sheets (IGS) and compared with medical-grade silicone ones (MS), which were commonly manufactured into catheters or drainage tubes in clinical use. The results reveal that PPX deposited at high ω p or high f p , in comparison with MS, exhibit better cell proliferation and clearly shows less cell adhesion regardless of ω p and f p . PPX also exhibit a comparatively lower level of platelet adhesion than MS. In the animal study, PPX-coated IGS result in similar local tissue responses at 3, 7 and 28 days (short-term) and 84 days (long-term) after subcutaneous implantation the abdominal wall of rodents compared with respective responses to MS. These results suggest that PPX-coated industrial-grade silicone is one alternative to high cost medical-grade silicone.

  1. In vitro cell culture, platelet adhesion tests and in vivo implant tests of plasma-polymerized para-xylene films

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chou, Chia-Man [Department of Surgery, Taichung Veterans General Hospital, Taiwan, ROC (China); National Yang-Ming University, Taipei, Taiwan, ROC (China); Yeh, Chou-Ming, E-mail: cmchou4301@gmail.com [Taichung Hospital, Department of Health, Executive Yuan, Taiwan, ROC (China); Chung, Chi-Jen [Department of Dental Technology and Materials Science, Central Taiwan University of Science and Technology, Taiwan, ROC (China); He, Ju-Liang [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Feng Chia University, Taiwan, ROC (China)

    2013-09-01

    Plasma-polymerized para-xylene (PPX) was developed in a previous study by adjusting the process parameters: pulse frequency of the power supply (ω{sub p}) and para-xylene monomer flow rate (f{sub p}). All the obtained PPX films exhibit an amorphous structure and present hydrophobicity (water contact angle ranging from 98.5° to 121.1°), higher film growth rate and good fibroblast cell proliferation. In this study, in vitro tests (fibroblast cell compatibility and platelet adhesion) and an in vivo animal study were performed by using PPX deposited industrial-grade silicone sheets (IGS) and compared with medical-grade silicone ones (MS), which were commonly manufactured into catheters or drainage tubes in clinical use. The results reveal that PPX deposited at high ω{sub p} or high f{sub p}, in comparison with MS, exhibit better cell proliferation and clearly shows less cell adhesion regardless of ω{sub p} and f{sub p}. PPX also exhibit a comparatively lower level of platelet adhesion than MS. In the animal study, PPX-coated IGS result in similar local tissue responses at 3, 7 and 28 days (short-term) and 84 days (long-term) after subcutaneous implantation the abdominal wall of rodents compared with respective responses to MS. These results suggest that PPX-coated industrial-grade silicone is one alternative to high cost medical-grade silicone.

  2. Stapled peptides as a new technology to investigate protein-protein interactions in human platelets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iegre, Jessica; Ahmed, Niaz S; Gaynord, Josephine S; Wu, Yuteng; Herlihy, Kara M; Tan, Yaw Sing; Lopes-Pires, Maria E; Jha, Rupam; Lau, Yu Heng; Sore, Hannah F; Verma, Chandra; O' Donovan, Daniel H; Pugh, Nicholas; Spring, David R

    2018-05-28

    Platelets are blood cells with numerous crucial pathophysiological roles in hemostasis, cardiovascular thrombotic events and cancer metastasis. Platelet activation requires the engagement of intracellular signalling pathways that involve protein-protein interactions (PPIs). A better understanding of these pathways is therefore crucial for the development of selective anti-platelet drugs. New strategies for studying PPIs in human platelets are required to overcome limitations associated with conventional platelet research methods. For example, small molecule inhibitors can lack selectivity and are often difficult to design and synthesise. Additionally, development of transgenic animal models is costly and time-consuming and conventional recombinant techniques are ineffective due to the lack of a nucleus in platelets. Herein, we describe the generation of a library of novel, functionalised stapled peptides and their first application in the investigation of platelet PPIs. Moreover, the use of platelet-permeable stapled Bim BH3 peptides confirms the part of Bim in phosphatidyl-serine (PS) exposure and reveals a role for the Bim protein in platelet activatory processes. Our work demonstrates that functionalised stapled peptides are a complementary alternative to conventional platelet research methods, and could make a significant contribution to the understanding of platelet signalling pathways and hence to the development of anti-platelet drugs.

  3. Intercellular adhesion molecule-1 augments myoblast adhesion and fusion through homophilic trans-interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pizza, Francis X; Martin, Ryan A; Springer, Evan M; Leffler, Maxwell S; Woelmer, Bryce R; Recker, Isaac J; Leaman, Douglas W

    2017-07-11

    The overall objective of the study was to identify mechanisms through which intercellular adhesion molecule-1 (ICAM-1) augments the adhesive and fusogenic properties of myogenic cells. Hypotheses were tested using cultured myoblasts and fibroblasts, which do not constitutively express ICAM-1, and myoblasts and fibroblasts forced to express full length ICAM-1 or a truncated form lacking the cytoplasmic domain of ICAM-1. ICAM-1 mediated myoblast adhesion and fusion were quantified using novel assays and cell mixing experiments. We report that ICAM-1 augments myoblast adhesion to myoblasts and myotubes through homophilic trans-interactions. Such adhesive interactions enhanced levels of active Rac in adherent and fusing myoblasts, as well as triggered lamellipodia, spreading, and fusion of myoblasts through the signaling function of the cytoplasmic domain of ICAM-1. Rac inhibition negated ICAM-1 mediated lamellipodia, spreading, and fusion of myoblasts. The fusogenic property of ICAM-1-ICAM-1 interactions was restricted to myogenic cells, as forced expression of ICAM-1 by fibroblasts did not augment their fusion to ICAM-1+ myoblasts/myotubes. We conclude that ICAM-1 augments myoblast adhesion and fusion through its ability to self-associate and initiate Rac-mediated remodeling of the actin cytoskeleton.

  4. Biocompatibility of Ir/Ti-oxide coatings: Interaction with platelets, endothelial and smooth muscle cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Habibzadeh, Sajjad; Li, Ling; Omanovic, Sasha; Shum-Tim, Dominique; Davis, Elaine C.

    2014-05-01

    Applying surface coatings on a biomedical implant is a promising modification technique which can enhance the implant's biocompatibility via controlling blood constituents- or/and cell-surface interaction. In this study, the influence of composition of IrxTi1-x-oxide coatings (x = 0, 0.2, 0.4, 0.6, 0.8, 1) formed on a titanium (Ti) substrate on the responses of platelets, endothelial cells (ECs) and smooth muscle cells (SMCs) was investigated. The results showed that a significant decrease in platelet adhesion and activation was obtained on Ir0.2Ti0.8-oxide and Ir0.4Ti0.6-oxide coatings, rendering the surfaces more blood compatible, in comparison to the control (316L stainless steel, 316L-SS) and other coating compositions. Further, a substantial increase in the EC/SMC surface count ratio after 4 h of cell attachment to the Ir0.2Ti0.8-oxide and Ir0.4Ti0.6-oxide coatings, relative to the 316L-SS control and the other coating compositions, indicated high potential of these coatings for the enhancement of surface endothelialization. This indicates the capability of the corresponding coating compositions to promote EC proliferation on the surface, while inhibiting that of SMCs, which is important in cardiovascular stents applications.

  5. Bone Marrow-Derived Mesenchymal Stromal Cells Enhanced by Platelet-Rich Plasma Maintain Adhesion to Scaffolds in Arthroscopic Simulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoberman, Alexander R; Cirino, Carl; McCarthy, Mary Beth; Cote, Mark P; Pauzenberger, Leo; Beitzel, Knut; Mazzocca, Augustus D; Dyrna, Felix

    2018-03-01

    To assess the response of bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stromal cells (bMSCs) enhanced by platelet-rich plasma (PRP) in the setting of a normal human tendon (NHT), a demineralized bone matrix (DBM), and a fibrin scaffold (FS) with simulated arthroscopic mechanical washout stress. Bone marrow was aspirated from the humeral head and concentrated. BMSCs were counted, plated, and grown to confluence. Cells were seeded onto 3 different scaffolds: (1) NHT, (2) DBM, and (3) FS. Each scaffold was treated with a combination of (+)/(-) PRP and (+)/(-) arthroscopic washout simulation. A period of 60 minutes was allotted before arthroscopic washout. Adhesion, proliferation, and differentiation assays were performed to assess cellular activity in each condition. Significant differences were seen in mesenchymal stromal cell adhesion, proliferation, and differentiation among the scaffolds. DBM and FS showed superior results to NHT for cell adhesion, proliferation, and differentiation. PRP significantly enhanced cellular adhesion, proliferation, and differentiation. Arthroscopic simulation did not significantly decrease bMSC adhesion. We found that the type of scaffold impacts bMSCs' behavior. Both scaffolds (DBM and FS) were superior to NHT. The use of an arthroscopic simulator did not significantly decrease the adhesion of bMSCs to the scaffolds nor did it decrease their biologic differentiation potential. In addition, PRP enhanced cellular adhesion, proliferation, and differentiation. Improved healing after tendon repair can lead to better clinical outcomes. BMSCs are attractive for enhancing healing given their accessibility and regenerative potential. Application of bMSCs using scaffolds as cell carriers relies on arthroscopic feasibility. Copyright © 2017 Arthroscopy Association of North America. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Human platelet glycoprotein IX: An adhesive prototype of leucine-rich glycoproteins with flank-center-flank structures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hickey, M.J.; Williams, S.A.; Roth, G.J.

    1989-01-01

    The glycoprotein (GP) Ib-IX complex on the surface of human platelets functions as the von Willebrand factor receptor and mediates von Willebrand factor-dependent platelet adhesion to blood vessels. GPIX is a relatively small (M r , 17,000) protein that may provide for membrane insertion and orientation of the larger component of the complex. GPIb (M r , 165,000). Using antibody screening, the authors cloned a cDNA encoding GPIX from a human erythroleukemia cell cDNA library constructed in phage λgt11. Lacking a 5' untranslated region and start codon, the cDNA sequence includes 604 nucleotides, beginning with 495 bases at the 5' end coding for 165 amino acids, followed by a stop codon and 106 noncoding bases at the 3' end. By Northern blot analysis, the GPIX cDNA hybridizes with a single 1.0-kilobase species of platelet poly(A) + RNA. Translation of the cDNA sequence gives a predicted protein sequence beginning with a truncated putative signal sequence of 5 amino acids followed by a sequence of 17 amino acids matching that determined directly by Edman degradation of intact GPIX. GPIX contains a leucine-rich glycoprotein (LRG) sequence of 24 amino acids similar to conserved LRG sequences in GPIb and other proteins from humans, Drosophila, and yeast. The role of the flank-LRG center-flank structure in the evolution and function of the LRG proteins remains to be defined

  7. Identification of Aspergillus fumigatus Surface Components That Mediate Interaction of Conidia and Hyphae With Human Platelets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rambach, Günter; Blum, Gerhard; Latgé, Jean-Paul; Fontaine, Thierry; Heinekamp, Thorsten; Hagleitner, Magdalena; Jeckström, Hanna; Weigel, Günter; Würtinger, Philipp; Pfaller, Kristian; Krappmann, Sven; Löffler, Jürgen; Lass-Flörl, Cornelia; Speth, Cornelia

    2015-10-01

    Platelets were recently identified as a part of innate immunity. They are activated by contact with Aspergillus fumigatus; putative consequences include antifungal defense but also thrombosis, excessive inflammation, and thrombocytopenia. We aimed to identify those fungal surface structures that mediate interaction with platelets. Human platelets were incubated with Aspergillus conidia and hyphae, isolated wall components, or fungal surface mutants. Interaction was visualized microscopically; activation was quantified by flow cytometry of specific markers. The capacity of A. fumigatus conidia to activate platelets is at least partly due to melanin, because this effect can be mimicked with "melanin ghosts"; a mutant lacking melanin showed reduced platelet stimulating potency. In contrast, conidial hydrophobin masks relevant structures, because an A. fumigatus mutant lacking the hydrophobin protein induced stronger platelet activation than wild-type conidia. A. fumigatus hyphae also contain surface structures that interact with platelets. Wall proteins, galactomannan, chitin, and β-glucan are not the relevant hyphal components; instead, the recently identified fungal polysaccharide galactosaminogalactan potently triggered platelet activation. Conidial melanin and hydrophobin as well as hyphal galactosaminogalactan represent important pathogenicity factors that modulate platelet activity and thus might influence immune responses, inflammation, and thrombosis in infected patients. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Infectious Diseases Society of America. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  8. Examining platelet-fibrin interactions during traumatic shock in a swine model using platelet contractile force and clot elastic modulus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    White, Nathan J; Martin, Erika J; Brophy, Donald F; Ward, Kevin R

    2011-07-01

    A significant proportion of severely injured patients develop early coagulopathy, characterized by abnormal clot formation, which impairs resuscitation and increases mortality. We have previously demonstrated an isolated decrease in clot strength by thrombelastography in a swine model of nonresuscitated traumatic shock. In order to more closely examine platelet-fibrin interactions in this setting, we define the observed decrease in clot strength in terms of platelet-induced clot contraction and clot elastic modulus using the Hemostasis Analysis System (HAS) (Hemodyne Inc., Richmond, Virginia, USA). Whole blood was sampled for HAS measurements, metabolic measurements, cell counts, and fibrinogen concentration at baseline prior to injury and again at a predetermined level of traumatic shock defined by oxygen debt. Male swine (N=17) received femur fracture and controlled arterial hemorrhage to achieve an oxygen debt of 80 ml/kg. Platelet counts were unchanged, but fibrinogen concentration was reduced significantly during shock (167.6 vs. 66.7 mg/dl, P=0.0007). Platelet contractile force generated during clot formation did not change during shock (11.7 vs. 10.4 kdynes, P=0.41), but clot elastic modulus was dynamically altered, resulting in a lower final value (22.9 vs. 17.3 kdynes/cm, Pshock, platelet function was preserved, whereas terminal clot elastic modulus was reduced during shock in a manner most consistent with early changes in the mechanical properties of the developing fibrin fiber network.

  9. Influence of cardiopulmonary bypass on the interaction of recombinant factor VIIa with activated platelets

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kjalke, M.; Runge, M.; Rojkjaer, R.

    2009-01-01

    Recombinant factor VIIa (rFVIIa) interacts preferentially with coated platelets characterized by a high exposure of phosphatidyl serine (PS), FV, FVIII, FIX, and FX binding, and fibrinogen. Cardiopulmonary bypass (CPB) is known to impair platelet function. In this study, the influence of CPB...

  10. Of von Willebrand factor and platelets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bryckaert, Marijke; Rosa, Jean-Philippe; Denis, Cécile V; Lenting, Peter J

    2015-01-01

    Hemostasis and pathological thrombus formation are dynamic processes that require multiple adhesive receptor-ligand interactions, with blood platelets at the heart of such events. Many studies have contributed to shed light on the importance of von Willebrand factor (VWF) interaction with its platelet receptors, glycoprotein (GP) Ib-IX-V and αIIbβ3 integrin, in promoting primary platelet adhesion and aggregation following vessel injury. This review will recapitulate our current knowledge on the subject from the rheological aspect to the spatio-temporal development of thrombus formation. We will also discuss the signaling events generated by VWF/GPIb-IX-V interaction, leading to platelet activation. Additionally, we will review the growing body of evidence gathered from the recent development of pathological mouse models suggesting that VWF binding to GPIb-IX-V is a promising target in arterial and venous pathological thrombosis. Finally, the pathological aspects of VWF and its impact on platelets will be addressed.

  11. Platelets promote tumor growth and metastasis via direct interaction between Aggrus/podoplanin and CLEC-2.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Satoshi Takagi

    Full Text Available The platelet aggregation-inducing factor Aggrus, also known as podoplanin, is frequently upregulated in several types of tumors and enhances hematogenous metastasis by interacting with and activating the platelet receptor CLEC-2. Thus, Aggrus-CLEC-2 binding could be a therapeutic molecular mechanism for cancer therapy. We generated a new anti-human Aggrus monoclonal antibody, MS-1, that suppressed Aggrus-CLEC-2 binding, Aggrus-induced platelet aggregation, and Aggrus-mediated tumor metastasis. Interestingly, the MS-1 monoclonal antibody attenuated the growth of Aggrus-positive tumors in vivo. Moreover, the humanized chimeric MS-1 antibody, ChMS-1, also exhibited strong antitumor activity against Aggrus-positive lung squamous cell carcinoma xenografted into NOD-SCID mice compromising antibody-dependent cellular cytotoxic and complement-dependent cytotoxic activities. Because Aggrus knockdown suppressed platelet-induced proliferation in vitro and tumor growth of the lung squamous cell carcinoma in vivo, Aggrus may be involved in not only tumor metastasis but also tumor growth by promoting platelet-tumor interaction, platelet activation, and secretion of platelet-derived factors in vivo. Our results indicate that molecular target drugs inhibiting specific platelet-tumor interactions can be developed as antitumor drugs that suppress both metastasis and proliferation of tumors such as lung squamous cell carcinoma.

  12. Electric double layer interactions in bacterial adhesion to surfaces

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Poortinga, AT; Norde, W; Busscher, HJ; Bos, R.R.M.

    2002-01-01

    The DLVO (Derjaguin, Landau, Verwey, Overbeek) theory was originally developed to describe interactions between non-biological lyophobic colloids such as polystyrene particles, but is also used to describe bacterial adhesion to surfaces. Despite the differences between the surface of bacteria and

  13. New strategy for sepsis: Targeting a key role of platelet-neutrophil interaction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xu Wang

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Neutrophil and platelet are essential arms of the innate immune response. In sepsis, platelet abnormal activation as well as neutrophil paralysis are well recognized. For platelet, it is characterized by the contribution to disseminated intravascular coagulation (DIC and the enhanced inflammation response. In terms of neutrophil, its dysfunction is manifested by the impaired recruitment and migration to the infectious foci, abnormal sequestration in the remote organs, and the delayed clearance. More recently, it has been apparent that together platelet-neutrophil interaction can induce a faster and harder response during sepsis. This article focuses on the activation of platelet, dysfunction of neutrophil, and the interaction between them during sepsis and profiles some of the molecular mechanisms and outcomes in these cellular dialogues, providing a novel strategy for treatment of sepsis.

  14. Functional groups grafted nonwoven fabrics for blood filtration-The effects of functional groups and wettability on the adhesion of leukocyte and platelet

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yang Chao [State Key Lab of Metal Matrix Composites, Shanghai Jiao Tong University, 800 Dongchuan Road, Shanghai 200240 (China); Cao Ye [Institute of Blood Transfusion, Chinese Academy of Medical Sciences and Peking Union Medical College, Chengdu 610081 (China); Sun Kang, E-mail: ksun@sjtu.edu.cn [State Key Lab of Metal Matrix Composites, Shanghai Jiao Tong University, 800 Dongchuan Road, Shanghai 200240 (China); Liu Jiaxin; Wang Hong [Institute of Blood Transfusion, Chinese Academy of Medical Sciences and Peking Union Medical College, Chengdu 610081 (China)

    2011-01-15

    In this work, the effects of grafted functional groups and surface wettability on the adhesion of leukocyte and platelet were investigated by the method of blood filtration. The filter materials, poly(butylene terephthalate) nonwoven fabrics bearing different functional groups including hydroxyl (OH), carboxyl (COOH), sulfonic acid group (SO{sub 3}H) and zwitterionic sulfobetaine group ({sup +}N((CH{sub 3}){sub 2})(CH{sub 2}){sub 3}SO{sub 3}{sup Circled-Minus }) with controllable wettability were prepared by UV radiation grafting vinyl monomers with these functional groups. Our results emphasized that both surface functional groups and surface wettability had significant effects on the adhesion of leukocyte and platelet. In the case of filter materials with the same wettability, leukocytes adhering to filter materials decreased in the order: the surface bearing OH only > the surface bearing both OH and COOH > the surface bearing sulfobetaine group > the surface bearing SO{sub 3}H, while platelets adhering to filter materials decreased as the following order: the surface bearing SO{sub 3}H > the surface bearing both OH and COOH > the surface bearing OH only > the surface bearing sulfobetaine group. As the wettability of filter materials increased, both leukocyte and platelet adhesion to filter materials declined, except that leukocyte adhesion to the surface bearing OH only remained unchanged.

  15. Acid-base interactions in microbial adhesion to hexadecane and chloroform

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bos, R; Busscher, HJ; Geertsema-Doornbusch, GI; Van Der Mei, HC; Mittal, KL

    2000-01-01

    Acid-base interactions play an important role in adhesion, including microbial adhesion to surfaces. Qualitatively acid-base interactions in microbial adhesion can be demonstrated by comparing adhesion to hexadecane (a negatively charged interface in aqueous solutions, unable to exert acid-base

  16. Complement Activation Induces Neutrophil Adhesion and Neutrophil-Platelet Aggregate Formation on Vascular Endothelial Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Magdalena Riedl

    2017-01-01

    Discussion: Therefore, our findings of (i neutrophils adhering to complement-activated endothelial cells, (ii the formation of neutrophil-platelet aggregates on endothelial cells, and (iii the ability of aHUS serum to induce similar effects identify a possible role for neutrophils in aHUS manifestation.

  17. Biocompatibility of Ir/Ti-oxide coatings: Interaction with platelets, endothelial and smooth muscle cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Habibzadeh, Sajjad [Department of Chemical Engineering, McGill University, Montreal, QC (Canada); Li, Ling [Department of Anatomy and Cell Biology, McGill University, Montreal, QC (Canada); Omanovic, Sasha [Department of Chemical Engineering, McGill University, Montreal, QC (Canada); Shum-Tim, Dominique [Divisions of Cardiac Surgery and Surgical Research, Department of Surgery, McGill University, Montreal, QC (Canada); Davis, Elaine C., E-mail: elaine.davis@mcgill.ca [Department of Anatomy and Cell Biology, McGill University, Montreal, QC (Canada)

    2014-05-01

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • Ir/Ti-oxide coated surfaces are characterized by the so-called “cracked-mud” morphology. • 40% Ir in the coating material results in a morphologically uniform coating. • ECs and SMCs showed a desirable response to the Ir/Ti-oxide coated surfaces. • Ir/Ti-oxide coated surfaces are more bio/hemocompatible than the untreated 316L stainless steel. - Abstract: Applying surface coatings on a biomedical implant is a promising modification technique which can enhance the implant's biocompatibility via controlling blood constituents- or/and cell-surface interaction. In this study, the influence of composition of Ir{sub x}Ti{sub 1−x}-oxide coatings (x = 0, 0.2, 0.4, 0.6, 0.8, 1) formed on a titanium (Ti) substrate on the responses of platelets, endothelial cells (ECs) and smooth muscle cells (SMCs) was investigated. The results showed that a significant decrease in platelet adhesion and activation was obtained on Ir{sub 0.2}Ti{sub 0.8}-oxide and Ir{sub 0.4}Ti{sub 0.6}-oxide coatings, rendering the surfaces more blood compatible, in comparison to the control (316L stainless steel, 316L-SS) and other coating compositions. Further, a substantial increase in the EC/SMC surface count ratio after 4 h of cell attachment to the Ir{sub 0.2}Ti{sub 0.8}-oxide and Ir{sub 0.4}Ti{sub 0.6}-oxide coatings, relative to the 316L-SS control and the other coating compositions, indicated high potential of these coatings for the enhancement of surface endothelialization. This indicates the capability of the corresponding coating compositions to promote EC proliferation on the surface, while inhibiting that of SMCs, which is important in cardiovascular stents applications.

  18. Platelet activation and platelet-leukocyte interaction in dogs naturally infected with Babesia rossi

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Goddard, Amelia; Leisewitz, Andrew L; Kristensen, Annemarie Thuri

    2015-01-01

    EDTA as anticoagulant. Activated platelets and PLA formation were detected by measuring surface expression of P-selectin (CD62P) on platelets, monocytes and neutrophils. Of the Babesia-infected dogs, 29 survived and seven died. The percentage of CD62P-positive monocytes was significantly higher (P = 0.......036) in the Babesia-infected dogs (54%) than in healthy control dogs (35.3%). However, there were no significant differences between the Babesia-infected and control groups for CD62P-positive platelets (4.9% and 1.2%, respectively) and CD62P-positive neutrophils (28.3% and 17.9%, respectively). The percentage of CD62...... groups for the percentage of CD62P-positive platelets (survivors 4.8%; non-survivors 5.3%; controls 1.2%) or CD62P-positive neutrophils (survivors 31.6%; non-survivors 5.6%; controls 17.9%). In conclusion, Babesia-infected dogs, specifically dogs that survived, had a significantly increased percentage...

  19. Inhibition of platelet-tumour cell interaction with ibrutinib reduces ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    BTK) inhibitor, ibrutinib, in tumour cell-platelet crosstalk in lung cancer. Methods: Human lung cancer cells A549 were treated with ibrutinib or DMSO. mRNA expression was assessed using reverse transcription-quantitative polymerase chain ...

  20. A randomized controlled experimental study of the efficacy of platelet-rich plasma and hyaluronic acid for the prevention of adhesion formation in a rat uterine horn model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oz, Murat; Cetinkaya, Nilufer; Bas, Sevda; Korkmaz, Elmas; Ozgu, Emre; Terzioglu, Gokay Serdar; Buyukkagnici, Umran; Akbay, Serap; Caydere, Muzaffer; Gungor, Tayfun

    2016-09-01

    Platelet-rich plasma (PRP) has been known to possess an efficacy in tissue regeneration. The aim of this study was to determine the role of PRP on post-operative adhesion formation in an experimental rat study. Thirty Sprague-Dawley rats were randomly divided into control, hyaluronic acid, and PRP treatment groups and operated on for uterine horn adhesion modeling. Blood was collected to produce a PRP with platelet counts of 688 × 10(3)/μL, and 1 ml of either hyaluronic acid gel or PRP was administered over the standard lesions, while the control group received no medication. The evaluation of post-operative adhesions was done on the 30th post-operative day. The location, extent, type, and tenacity of adhesions as well as total adhesion scores, tissue inflammation, fibrosis and transforming growth factor-1beta (TGF-1β) expressions were evaluated. The total adhesion score was significantly lower in the PRP group (3.2 ± 1.5) compared with the hyaluronic acid (5.0 ± 1.3) and control (8.1 ± 1.7) groups. The extent of the adhesions was significantly lower in the PRP group. There was no significant difference in the type and tenacity of adhesions between the hyaluronic acid and the PRP group. The level of inflammation was significantly higher in the control group than the others, while there was no difference between the PRP and hyaluronic acid groups. TGF-1β expression was significantly lesser in the PRP group than the control and hyaluronic acid groups. PRP is more effective than hyaluronic acid treatment in preventing post-operative adhesion formation in an experimental rat uterine horn adhesion model.

  1. Ibrutinib Inhibits Platelet Integrin αIIbβ3 Outside-In Signaling and Thrombus Stability But Not Adhesion to Collagen.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bye, Alexander P; Unsworth, Amanda J; Vaiyapuri, Sakthivel; Stainer, Alexander R; Fry, Michael J; Gibbins, Jonathan M

    2015-11-01

    Ibrutinib is an irreversible Bruton tyrosine kinase inhibitor approved for treatment of Waldenstrom macroglobulinemia, chronic lymphocytic leukemia, and mantle cell lymphoma that increases the risk of bleeding among patients. Platelets from ibrutinib-treated patients exhibit deficiencies in collagen-evoked signaling in suspension; however, the significance of this observation and how it relates to bleeding risk is unclear, as platelets encounter immobile collagen in vivo. We sought to clarify the effects of ibrutinib on platelet function to better understand the mechanism underlying bleeding risk. By comparing signaling in suspension and during adhesion to immobilized ligands, we found that the collagen signaling deficiency caused by ibrutinib is milder during adhesion to immobilized collagen. We also found that platelets in whole blood treated with ibrutinib adhered to collagen under arterial shear but formed unstable thrombi, suggesting that the collagen signaling deficiency caused by ibrutinib may not be the predominant cause of bleeding in vivo. However, clot retraction and signaling evoked by platelet adhesion to immobilized fibrinogen were also inhibited by ibrutinib, indicating that integrin αIIbβ3 outside-in signaling is also effected in addition to GPVI signaling. When ibrutinib was combined with the P2Y12 inhibitor, cangrelor, thrombus formation under arterial shear was inhibited additively. These findings suggest that (1) ibrutinib causes GPVI and integrin αIIbβ3 platelet signaling deficiencies that result in formation of unstable thrombi and may contribute toward bleeding observed in vivo and (2) combining ibrutinib with P2Y12 antagonists, which also inhibit thrombus stability, may have a detrimental effect on hemostasis. © 2015 American Heart Association, Inc.

  2. Physiopathology of blood platelets: a model system for studies of cell-to-cell interaction. Progress report, November 1, 1978-October 31, 1979

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baldini, M G

    1979-01-01

    In this report, we will limit ourselves to the detailed description of four major sections of our research done during the past year: platelet interaction with tumor cells; studies of the interaction of platelets with macrophages; interaction of platelets with vessel walls; and further studies of cyclic nucleotides on stored platelets.

  3. The nature of interactions between tissue-type plasminogen activator and platelets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Torr, S.R.; Winters, K.J.; Santoro, S.A.; Sobel, B.E.

    1990-01-01

    To elucidate interactions responsible for inhibition of aggregation of platelets in platelet-rich plasma (PRP) harvested from whole blood preincubated with t-PA, experiments were performed with PRP and washed platelets under diverse conditions of preincubation. Both ADP and collagen induced aggregation were inhibited in PRP unless aprotinin had been added to the preincubated whole blood concomitantly with t-PA. However, in washed platelets prepared after the same exposure aggregation was intact. When washed platelets were supplemented with fibrinogen degradation products (FDPs) in concentrations simulating those in whole blood preincubated with t-PA, aggregation induced with either ADP or collagen was inhibited. Thus, the inhibition in PRP depended on generation of FDPs by activated plasminogen. The functional integrity of surface glycoprotein (GP) IIb/IIIa receptors in washed platelets was documented by autoradiography after SDS-PAGE of surface labeled GPs and by fibrinogen binding despite preincubation of the whole blood or washed platelets themselves with t-PA and plasminogen as long as exogenous calcium (greater than or equal to 0.1 microM) was present. In contrast, when calcium was absent, the platelet GP IIb/IIIa receptor was rendered susceptible to degradation by plasmin, and aggregation was inhibited by preincubation at 37 degrees C even if aprotinin was present when aggregation was being assayed. These observations reconcile disparate results in the literature from studies in vivo and in vitro by demonstrating that inhibition of aggregation of platelets in PRP and in whole blood reflects indirect effects of plasminogen activation rather than direct effects of t-PA or plasmin on the platelets themselves

  4. Adhesion

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Supplements Videos & Tools Español You Are Here: Home → Medical Encyclopedia → Adhesion URL of this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/001493.htm Adhesion To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Adhesions are bands of scar-like tissue that form between two ...

  5. The value of flow cytometric analysis of platelet glycoprotein expression of CD34+ cells measured under conditions that prevent P-selectin-mediated binding of platelets

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dercksen, M. W.; Weimar, I. S.; Richel, D. J.; Breton-Gorius, J.; Vainchenker, W.; Slaper-Cortenbach, C. M.; Pinedo, H. M.; von dem Borne, A. E.; Gerritsen, W. R.; van der Schoot, C. E.

    1995-01-01

    In the present study, we show by adhesion assays and ultrastructural studies that platelets can bind to CD34+ cells from human blood and bone marrow and that this interaction interferes with the accurate detection of endogenously expressed platelet glycoproteins (GPs). The interaction between these

  6. Amino-terminal domain of classic cadherins determines the specificity of the adhesive interactions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Klingelhöfer, Jörg; Troyanovsky, R B; Laur, O Y

    2000-01-01

    Classic cadherins are transmembrane receptors involved in cell type-specific calcium-dependent intercellular adhesion. The specificity of adhesion is mediated by homophilic interactions between cadherins extending from opposing cell surfaces. In addition, classic cadherins can self-associate form......Classic cadherins are transmembrane receptors involved in cell type-specific calcium-dependent intercellular adhesion. The specificity of adhesion is mediated by homophilic interactions between cadherins extending from opposing cell surfaces. In addition, classic cadherins can self....... To study lateral and adhesive intercadherin interactions, we examined interactions between two classic cadherins, E- and P-cadherins, in epithelial A-431 cells co-producing both proteins. We showed that these cells exhibited heterocomplexes consisting of laterally assembled E- and P....... The specificity of adhesive interaction was localized to the amino-terminal (EC1) domain of both cadherins. Thus, EC1 domain of classic cadherins exposes two determinants responsible for nonspecific lateral and cadherin type-specific adhesive dimerization....

  7. Soluble CD40 ligand stimulates CD40-dependent activation of the β2 integrin Mac-1 and protein kinase C zeda (PKCζ in neutrophils: implications for neutrophil-platelet interactions and neutrophil oxidative burst.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rong Jin

    Full Text Available Recent work has revealed an essential involvement of soluble CD40L (sCD40L in inflammation and vascular disease. Activated platelets are the major source of sCD40L, which has been implicated in platelet and leukocyte activation, although its exact functional impact on leukocyte-platelet interactions and the underlying mechanisms remain undefined. We aimed to determine the impact and the mechanisms of sCD40L on neutrophils. We studied neutrophil interactions with activated, surface-adherent platelets as a model for leukocyte recruitment to the sites of injury. Our data show that CD40L contributes to neutrophil firm adhesion to and transmigration across activated surface-adherent platelets, possibly through two potential mechanisms. One involves the direct interaction of ligand-receptor (CD40L-CD40, i.e., platelet surface CD40L interaction with neutrophil CD40; another involves an indirect mechanism, i.e. soluble CD40L stimulates activation of the leukocyte-specific β2 integrin Mac-1 in neutrophils and thereby further promotes neutrophil adhesion and migration. Activation of the integrin Mac-1 is known to be critical for mediating neutrophil adhesion and migration. sCD40L activated Mac-1 in neutrophils and enhanced neutrophil-platelet interactions in wild-type neutrophils, but failed to elicit such responses in CD40-deficient neutrophils. Furthermore, our data show that the protein kinase C zeta (PKCζ is critically required for sCD40L-induced Mac-1 activation and neutrophil adhesive function. sCD40L strongly stimulated the focal clustering of Mac-1 (CD11b and the colocalization of Mac-1 with PKCζ in wild-type neutrophils, but had minimal effect in CD40-deficient neutrophils. Blocking PKCζ completely inhibited sCD40L-induced neutrophil firm adhesion. Moreover, sCD40L strongly stimulates neutrophil oxidative burst via CD40-dependent activation of PI3K/NF-KB, but independent of Mac-1 and PKCζ. These findings may contribute to a better

  8. Platelet "first responders" in wound response, cancer, and metastasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Menter, David G; Kopetz, Scott; Hawk, Ernest; Sood, Anil K; Loree, Jonathan M; Gresele, Paolo; Honn, Kenneth V

    2017-06-01

    Platelets serve as "first responders" during normal wounding and homeostasis. Arising from bone marrow stem cell lineage megakaryocytes, anucleate platelets can influence inflammation and immune regulation. Biophysically, platelets are optimized due to size and discoid morphology to distribute near vessel walls, monitor vascular integrity, and initiate quick responses to vascular lesions. Adhesion receptors linked to a highly reactive filopodia-generating cytoskeleton maximizes their vascular surface contact allowing rapid response capabilities. Functionally, platelets normally initiate rapid clotting, vasoconstriction, inflammation, and wound biology that leads to sterilization, tissue repair, and resolution. Platelets also are among the first to sense, phagocytize, decorate, or react to pathogens in the circulation. These platelet first responder properties are commandeered during chronic inflammation, cancer progression, and metastasis. Leaky or inflammatory reaction blood vessel genesis during carcinogenesis provides opportunities for platelet invasion into tumors. Cancer is thought of as a non-healing or chronic wound that can be actively aided by platelet mitogenic properties to stimulate tumor growth. This growth ultimately outstrips circulatory support leads to angiogenesis and intravasation of tumor cells into the blood stream. Circulating tumor cells reengage additional platelets, which facilitates tumor cell adhesion, arrest and extravasation, and metastasis. This process, along with the hypercoagulable states associated with malignancy, is amplified by IL6 production in tumors that stimulate liver thrombopoietin production and elevates circulating platelet numbers by thrombopoiesis in the bone marrow. These complex interactions and the "first responder" role of platelets during diverse physiologic stresses provide a useful therapeutic target that deserves further exploration.

  9. Flotillins Regulate Focal Adhesions by Interacting with α-Actinin and by Influencing the Activation of Focal Adhesion Kinase

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antje Banning

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available Cell–matrix adhesion and cell migration are physiologically important processes that also play a major role in cancer spreading. In cultured cells, matrix adhesion depends on integrin-containing contacts such as focal adhesions. Flotillin-1 and flotillin-2 are frequently overexpressed in cancers and are associated with poor survival. Our previous studies have revealed a role for flotillin-2 in cell–matrix adhesion and in the regulation of the actin cytoskeleton. We here show that flotillins are important for cell migration in a wound healing assay and influence the morphology and dynamics of focal adhesions. Furthermore, anchorage-independent growth in soft agar is enhanced by flotillins. In the absence of flotillins, especially flotillin-2, phosphorylation of focal adhesion kinase and extracellularly regulated kinase is diminished. Flotillins interact with α-actinin, a major regulator of focal adhesion dynamics. These findings are important for understanding the molecular mechanisms of how flotillin overexpression in cancers may affect cell migration and, especially, enhance metastasis formation.

  10. Interaction between the Staphylococcus aureus extracellular adherence protein Eap and its subdomains with platelets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palankar, Raghavendra; Binsker, Ulrike; Haracska, Bianca; Wesche, Jan; Greinacher, Andreas; Hammerschmidt, Sven

    2018-04-18

    S. aureus associated bacteremia can lead to severe infections with high risk of mortality (e.g. sepsis, infective endocarditis). Many virulence factors and adhesins of S. aureus are known to directly interact with platelets. Extracellular adherence protein, Eap, one of the most important virulence factors in S. aureus mediated infections is a multi-tandem domain protein and has been shown to interact with almost all cell types in the human circulatory system. By using amine reactive fluorescent N-hydroxysuccinimidyl (NHS)-ester dyes and by direct detection with primary fluorescently conjugated anti-histidine (His-tag) antibodies against detect N-terminal His6, we show Eap subdomain Eap D 3 D 4 specifically interacts and rapidly activates human platelets. Furthermore, we validate our finding by using site directed directional immobilization of Eap D 3 D 4 through N-terminal His 6 on nickel (II)-nitrilotriacetic acid (Ni-NTA) functionalized bacteriomimetic microbead arrays to visualize real-time platelet activation through calcium release assay. These methods offer an easily adoptable protocols for screening of S.aureus derived virulence factors and adhesins with platelets. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  11. Low-affinity FcγR interactions can decide the fate of novel human IgG-sensitised red blood cells and platelets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Armour, Kathryn L; Smith, Cheryl S; Turner, Craig P; Kirton, Christopher M; Wilkes, Anthony M; Hadley, Andrew G; Ghevaert, Cedric; Williamson, Lorna M; Clark, Michael R

    2014-01-01

    G1Δnab is a mutant human IgG1 constant region with a lower ability to interact with FcγR than the natural IgG constant regions. Radiolabelled RBCs and platelets sensitised with specific G1Δnab Abs were cleared more slowly from human circulation than IgG1-sensitised counterparts. However, non-destructive splenic retention of G1Δnab-coated RBCs required investigation and plasma radioactivities now suggest this also occurred for platelets sensitised with an IgG1/G1Δnab mixture. In vitro assays with human cells showed that G1Δnab-sensitised RBCs did not cause FcγRI-mediated monocyte activation, FcγRIIIa-mediated antibody-dependent cell-mediated cytotoxicity (ADCC) or macrophage phagocytosis although they did adhere to macrophages. Thus, FcγRII was implicated in the adhesion despite the Δnab mutation reducing the already low-affinity binding to this receptor class. Additional contacts via P-selectin enhance the interaction of sensitised platelets with monocytes and this system provided evidence of FcγRII-dependent activation by G1Δnab. These results emphasise the physiological relevance of low-affinity interactions: It appears that FcγRII interactions of G1Δnab allowed splenic retention of G1Δnab-coated RBCs with inhibitory FcγRIIb binding preventing RBC destruction and that FcγRIIb engagement by G1Δnab on IgG1/G1Δnab-sensitised platelets overcame activation by IgG1. Considering therapeutic blocking Abs, G1Δnab offers lower FcγR binding and a greater bias towards inhibition than IgG2 and IgG4 constant regions. PMID:24285214

  12. Platelet activation and platelet-leukocyte interaction in β-thalassemia/hemoglobin E patients with marked nucleated erythrocytosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keawvichit, Rassamon; Khowawisetsut, Ladawan; Chaichompoo, Porntip; Polsrila, Korakot; Sukklad, Suchana; Sukapirom, Kasama; Khuhapinant, Archrob; Fucharoen, Suthat; Pattanapanyasat, Kovit

    2012-11-01

    Patients with thalassemia, an inherited hemolytic anemia, have increased risk of hypercoagulable complications. A whole blood flow cytometric (FCM) method has been used for studies of platelet activation and platelet-leukocyte aggregation in these patients. However, this FCM method presents technical difficulties because of the high proportion of immature red blood cells (RBCs) in these patients. A protocol for the simultaneous measurement of platelet activation and their aggregation with leukocyte populations in whole blood using four-color FCM which excluded immature RBC was devised, and evaluated for the evaluation of platelet function in patients with β-thalassemia/hemoglobin E (HbE). Whole blood from these patients and from healthy volunteers was stained for platelet activation and platelet-leukocyte aggregates using anti-CD42a, anti-CD62P, anti-CD45 and glycophorin A (GPA) conjugated with different fluorochromes. Our FCM method is simple, effective and based on the assumption that GPA is present on all immature RBCs, but is not expressed on CD45⁺ leukocytes. Results from the studies showed that blood samples from these patients contained a high frequency of circulating activated platelets (CD42a⁺/CD62P⁺) when compared to samples from healthy individuals. The percentage of platelet-neutrophil, platelet-monocyte-but not platelet-lymphocyte-aggregates were also elevated in both thalassemia genotypes with marked increase in patients who had undergone splenectomy. These findings suggest that platelets adhere to neutrophils and monocytes are activated which support the clinical observation that splenectomized thalassemia patients have an increased risk of arterial or venous thrombotic manifestations.

  13. Influence of nitriding atmosphere on the modification of surface titanium with focus on the behavior of blood platelets adhesion; Influencia da atmosfera nitretante na modificacao de superficies de titanio com enfase no comportamento de adesao de plaquetas sanguineas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vitoriano, J.O.; Alves, C. [Universidade Federal Rural do Semi-Arido (UFERSA), RN (Brazil); Braz, D.C.; Camara, R.B.G.; Rocha, H.A.O., E-mail: clodomiro.jr@hotmail.com [Universidade Federal do Rio Grande do Norte (UFRN), RN (Brazil)

    2014-07-01

    The present study aimed to analyze the influence of surface modification of titanium on the adhesion of blood platelets, through techniques of adhesion and morphological analyzes. Discs of titanium grade II received different surface treatments with plasma of Ar + N{sub 2} + H{sub 2} and Ar + H{sub 2}, forming two experimental groups including only polished samples used as standard. Before and after treatment the samples were characterized according to topography, crystalline structure and wettability, using atomic force microscopy, X-ray diffraction, Raman spectroscopy and testing of sessile drop, respectively. Platelet rich plasma (PRP) was applied on the modified surfaces in a culture plates. Images obtained by electron microscopy of adhered platelets were analyzed to verify the behavior of platelets in the different experimental conditions. (author)

  14. Competitions between fibrinogen with its degradation products for interactions with the platelet-fibrinogen receptor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thorsen, L.I.; Brosstad, F.; Gogstad, G.; Sletten, K.; Solum, N.O.

    1986-01-01

    Direct binding of 125 -I-labelled plasmic and CNBr-derived fibrin (ogen) fragments (pre-X, X, Y, D, Degta, Efg, E1, N-DSK, N-dsk) to gel-filtered platelets was compared to their ability to support or inhibit ADP-induced aggregation, and to compete with fibrinogen for binding to ADP-stimulated platelets. Pre-X was the only fragment that supported aggregation. All fragments tested except for E derived from fibrinogen (Efg) and Degta bound specifically to the platelets and inhibited ADP-induced aggregation in the presence of fibrinogen. Competitive binding studies with fibrinogen and fragments labelled with different isotopes of iodine, or inhibition of binding of labelled fibrinogen with unlabelled fragments showed that all of the fragments except Efg and Degta were able to compete with fibrinogen for binding. When simultaneous binding of N-dsk and fibrinogen was studied, an increased binding of both ligands was observed probably due to complex formation. The results fully agree with previous findings of binding to immunoprecipitated glycoprotein IIb-IIIa after crossed immunoelectrophoresis. We conclude that the fibrinogen molecule contains at least six sequences responsible for platelet interaction, two in the E domain and two in each of the C-terminal parts of the fibrinogen molecule

  15. Sphingosine 1-Phosphate Induces Platelet/Endothelial Cell Adhesion Molecule-1 Tyrosine Phosphorylation in Bovine Aortic Endothelial Cells through a PP2-Inhibitable Mechanism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu-Ting Huang

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available Sphingosine-1-phosphate (S1P is a low-molecular-weight phospholipid derivative released by activated platelets. S1P transduces signals through a family of G protein-coupled receptors to modulate various physiological behaviors of endothelial cells. Platelet/endothelial cell adhesion molecule-1 (PECAM-1; CD31 is a 130-kDa protein expressed on the surfaces of leukocytes, platelets, and endothelial cells. Upon PECAM-1 activation, its cytoplasmic tyrosine residues become phosphorylated and bind with SH2 domain-containing proteins, thus leading to the downstream functions mediated by PECAM-1. In the present study, we found that S1P induced PECAM-1 tyrosine phosphorylation and SHP-2 association in bovine aortic endothelial cells (BAECs by immunoprecipitation and western blotting. The pretreatment of BAECs with a series of chemical inhibitors to determine the signaling pathway showed that the PECAM-1 phosphorylation was inhibited by PP2, indicating the participation of Src family kinases. These results demonstrated that S1P induced PECAM-1 tyrosine phosphorylation in BAECs through mediation of Src family kinases, and this may regulate the physiological behaviors of endothelial cells.

  16. Improved degree of conversion of model self-etching adhesives through their interaction with dentin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Ying; Wang, Yong

    2011-01-01

    Objective To investigate the correlation of the chemical interaction between model self-etching adhesives and dentin with the degree of conversion (DC) of the adhesives. Methods The model self-etching adhesives contained bis[2-methacryloyloxy)ethyl] phosphate (2MP) and 2-hydroxyethyl methacrylate (HEMA) with a mass ratio of 1/1, and 0-40% water contents, respectively. The adhesives were applied either onto the prepared dentin surface or unreactive substrates (such as glass slides), agitated for 15s, then light-cured for 40s. The DCs of the adhesives were determined using micro-Raman spectral and mapping analysis. Results The DCs of the adhesives cured on the dentin substrate were found to be significantly higher than those on the unreactive glass substrate. Moreover, the DCs of the adhesives displayed a decreasing trend as the distance from the dentin surface became greater. The chemical interaction of the acidic 2MP/HEMA adhesives with the mineral apatite in dentin was proposed to play a significant role for the observations. The chemical interaction could be validated by the spectral comparison in the phosphate regions of 1100 cm−1 and 960 cm−1 in the Raman spectra. The results also revealed a notable influence of water content on the DC of adhesives. The DCs of the adhesive at 10% water content exhibited the highest DC level for both substrates. Conclusions Interaction with dentin dramatically improved the degree of conversion of self-etching adhesives. Our ability to chemically characterize the a/d interface including in situ detection of the DC distribution is very important in understanding self-etching adhesive bonding under in vivo conditions. PMID:22024375

  17. Improved degree of conversion of model self-etching adhesives through their interaction with dentine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Ying; Wang, Yong

    2012-01-01

    To investigate the correlation of the chemical interaction between model self-etching adhesives and dentine with the degree of conversion (DC) of the adhesives. The model self-etching adhesives contained bis[2-methacryloyloxy)ethyl] phosphate (2MP) and 2-hydroxyethyl methacrylate (HEMA) with a mass ratio of 1/1, and 0-40% water contents, respectively. The adhesives were applied either onto the prepared dentine surface or unreactive substrates (such as glass slides), agitated for 15s, then light-cured for 40s. The DCs of the adhesives were determined using micro-Raman spectral and mapping analysis. The DCs of the adhesives cured on the dentine substrate were found to be significantly higher than those on the unreactive glass substrate. Moreover, the DCs of the adhesives displayed a decreasing trend as the distance from the dentine surface became greater. The chemical interaction of the acidic 2MP/HEMA adhesives with the mineral apatite in dentine was proposed to play a significant role for the observations. The chemical interaction could be validated by the spectral comparison in the phosphate regions of 1100 cm(-1) and 960 cm(-1) in the Raman spectra. The results also revealed a notable influence of water content on the DC of adhesives. The DCs of the adhesive at 10% water content exhibited the highest DC level for both substrates. Interaction with dentine dramatically improved the degree of conversion of self-etching adhesives. Our ability to chemically characterise the a/d interface including in situ detection of the DC distribution is very important in understanding self-etching adhesive bonding under in vivo conditions. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Homophilic and Heterophilic Interactions of Type II Cadherins Identify Specificity Groups Underlying Cell-Adhesive Behavior

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Julia Brasch

    2018-05-01

    Full Text Available Summary: Type II cadherins are cell-cell adhesion proteins critical for tissue patterning and neuronal targeting but whose molecular binding code remains poorly understood. Here, we delineate binding preferences for type II cadherin cell-adhesive regions, revealing extensive heterophilic interactions between specific pairs, in addition to homophilic interactions. Three distinct specificity groups emerge from our analysis with members that share highly similar heterophilic binding patterns and favor binding to one another. Structures of adhesive fragments from each specificity group confirm near-identical dimer topology conserved throughout the family, allowing interface residues whose conservation corresponds to specificity preferences to be identified. We show that targeted mutation of these residues converts binding preferences between specificity groups in biophysical and co-culture assays. Our results provide a detailed understanding of the type II cadherin interaction map and a basis for defining their role in tissue patterning and for the emerging importance of their heterophilic interactions in neural connectivity. : Type II cadherins are a family of vertebrate cell adhesion proteins expressed primarily in the CNS. Brasch et al. measure binding between adhesive fragments, revealing homophilic and extensive selective heterophilic binding with specificities that define groups of similar cadherins. Structures reveal common adhesive dimers, with residues governing cell-adhesive specificity. Keywords: cell adhesion, crystal structure, hemophilic specificity, heterophilic specificity, neural patterning, synaptic targeting, cadherin

  19. Platelets in thrombosis and hemostasis: old topic with new mechanisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yiming; Andrews, Marc; Yang, Yan; Lang, Sean; Jin, Joseph W; Cameron-Vendrig, Alison; Zhu, Guangheng; Reheman, Adili; Ni, Heyu

    2012-12-01

    Platelets are small anucleate cells generated from megakaryocytes in the bone marrow. After being released into the circulation, platelets play key roles in the surveillance of vascular injury, and can quickly adhere and aggregate at the site of injury, which are critical events for vascular repair and hemostasis. However, the same biological processes of platelet adhesion and aggregation may also cause thrombotic disorders. The formation of a platelet plug at sites of atherosclerotic lesion rupture is the most common mechanism leading to myocardial or cerebral infarction. Platelet-related deep vein thrombosis is also one of the leading causes of mortality worldwide. The contribution of several platelet receptors and their ligands has been highlighted in these processes. In platelet adhesion, particularly at high shear stress, GPIbα-von Willebrand factor (VWF) interaction may initiate this event, which is followed by GPVI signalling and firm platelet adhesion mediated by members of the integrin family, such as β3 (αIIbβ3) and β1 (α2β1, α5β1) integrins. In platelet aggregation, although GPIbα-VWF, P selectin-sulfatides, and other molecules, may be involved, the process is mainly mediated by β3 (αIIbβ3) integrin and its ligands, such as fibrinogen and VWF. It is intriguing that platelet adhesion and aggregation still occur in mice lacking both fibrinogen and VWF, suggesting that other unforeseen molecule(s) may also be important in these processes. Identification and characterization of these molecules will enrich our knowledge in the basic science of hemostasis and thrombosis, and may lead to the development of new therapies against bleeding disorders and thrombotic diseases.

  20. Platelet size and density affect shear-induced thrombus formation in tortuous arterioles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chesnutt, Jennifer K. W.; Han, Hai-Chao

    2013-10-01

    Thrombosis accounts for 80% of deaths in patients with diabetes mellitus. Diabetic patients demonstrate tortuous microvessels and larger than normal platelets. Large platelets are associated with increased platelet activation and thrombosis, but the physical effects of large platelets in the microscale processes of thrombus formation are not clear. Therefore, the objective of this study was to determine the physical effects of mean platelet volume (MPV), mean platelet density (MPD) and vessel tortuosity on platelet activation and thrombus formation in tortuous arterioles. A computational model of the transport, shear-induced activation, collision, adhesion and aggregation of individual platelets was used to simulate platelet interactions and thrombus formation in tortuous arterioles. Our results showed that an increase in MPV resulted in a larger number of activated platelets, though MPD and level of tortuosity made little difference on platelet activation. Platelets with normal MPD yielded the lowest amount of mural thrombus. With platelets of normal MPD, the amount of mural thrombus decreased with increasing level of tortuosity but did not have a simple monotonic relationship with MPV. The physical mechanisms associated with MPV, MPD and arteriole tortuosity play important roles in platelet activation and thrombus formation.

  1. Adhesive interactions of geckos with wet and dry fluoropolymer substrates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stark, Alyssa Y; Dryden, Daniel M; Olderman, Jeffrey; Peterson, Kelly A; Niewiarowski, Peter H; French, Roger H; Dhinojwala, Ali

    2015-07-06

    Fluorinated substrates like Teflon® (poly(tetrafluoroethylene); PTFE) are well known for their role in creating non-stick surfaces. We showed previously that even geckos, which can stick to most surfaces under a wide variety of conditions, slip on PTFE. Surprisingly, however, geckos can stick reasonably well to PTFE if it is wet. In an effort to explain this effect, we have turned our attention to the role of substrate surface energy and roughness when shear adhesion occurs in media other than air. In this study, we removed the roughness component inherent to commercially available PTFE and tested geckos on relatively smooth wet and dry fluoropolymer substrates. We found that roughness had very little effect on shear adhesion in air or in water and that the level of fluorination was most important for shear adhesion, particularly in air. Surface energy calculations of the two fluorinated substrates and one control substrate using the Tabor-Winterton approximation and the Young-Dupré equation were used to determine the interfacial energy of the substrates. Using these interfacial energies we estimated the ratio of wet and dry normal adhesion for geckos clinging to the three substrates. Consistent with the results for rough PTFE, our predictions show a qualitative trend in shear adhesion based on fluorination, and the quantitative experimental differences highlight the unusually low shear adhesion of geckos on dry smooth fluorinated substrates, which is not captured by surface energy calculations. Our work has implications for bioinspired design of synthetics that can preferentially stick in water but not in air.

  2. Role of focal adhesion tyrosine kinases in GPVI-dependent platelet activation and reactive oxygen species formation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Naadiya Carrim

    Full Text Available We have previously shown the presence of a TRAF4/p47phox/Hic5/Pyk2 complex associated with the platelet collagen receptor, GPVI, consistent with a potential role of this complex in GPVI-dependent ROS formation. In other cell systems, NOX-dependent ROS formation is facilitated by Pyk2, which along with its closely related homologue FAK are known to be activated and phosphorylated downstream of ligand binding to GPVI.To evaluate the relative roles of Pyk2 and FAK in GPVI-dependent ROS formation and to determine their location within the GPVI signaling pathway.Human and mouse washed platelets (from WT or Pyk2 KO mice were pre-treated with pharmacological inhibitors targeting FAK or Pyk2 (PF-228 and Tyrphostin A9, respectively and stimulated with the GPVI-specific agonist, CRP. FAK, but not Pyk2, was found to be essential for GPVI-dependent ROS production and aggregation. Subsequent human platelet studies with PF-228 confirmed FAK is essential for GPVI-mediated phosphatidylserine exposure, α-granule secretion (P-selectin (CD62P surface expression and integrin αIIbβ3 activation. To determine the precise location of FAK within the GPVI pathway, we analyzed the effect of PF-228 inhibition in CRP-stimulated platelets in conjunction with immunoprecipitation and pulldown analysis to show that FAK is downstream of Lyn, Spleen tyrosine kinase (Syk, PI3-K and Bruton's tyrosine kinase (Btk and upstream of Rac1, PLCγ2, Ca2+ release, PKC, Hic-5, NOX1 and αIIbβ3 activation.Overall, these data suggest a novel role for FAK in GPVI-dependent ROS formation and platelet activation and elucidate a proximal signaling role for FAK within the GPVI pathway.

  3. Mechanobiology of Platelets: Techniques to Study the Role of Fluid Flow and Platelet Retraction Forces at the Micro- and Nano-Scale

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nathan J. Sniadecki

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Coagulation involves a complex set of events that are important in maintaining hemostasis. Biochemical interactions are classically known to regulate the hemostatic process, but recent evidence has revealed that mechanical interactions between platelets and their surroundings can also play a substantial role. Investigations into platelet mechanobiology have been challenging however, due to the small dimensions of platelets and their glycoprotein receptors. Platelet researchers have recently turned to microfabricated devices to control these physical, nanometer-scale interactions with a higher degree of precision. These approaches have enabled exciting, new insights into the molecular and biomechanical factors that affect platelets in clot formation. In this review, we highlight the new tools used to understand platelet mechanobiology and the roles of adhesion, shear flow, and retraction forces in clot formation.

  4. Combined modeling of cell aggregation and adhesion mediated by receptor–ligand interactions under shear flow

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu Du

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Blood cell aggregation and adhesion to endothelial cells under shear flow are crucial to many biological processes such as thrombi formation, inflammatory cascade, and tumor metastasis, in which these cellular interactions are mainly mediated by the underlying receptor–ligand bindings. While theoretical modeling of aggregation dynamics and adhesion kinetics of interacting cells have been well studied separately, how to couple these two processes remains unclear. Here we develop a combined model that couples cellular aggregation dynamics and adhesion kinetics under shear flow. The impacts of shear rate (or shear stress and molecular binding affinity were elucidated. This study provides a unified model where the action of a fluid flow drives cell aggregation and adhesion under the modulations of the mechanical shear flow and receptor–ligand interaction kinetics. It offers an insight into understanding the relevant biological processes and functions.

  5. Alkali treatment of microrough titanium surfaces affects macrophage/monocyte adhesion, platelet activation and architecture of blood clot formation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V Milleret

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Titanium implants are most commonly used for bone augmentation and replacement due to their favorable osseointegration properties. Here, hyperhydrophilic sand-blasted and acid-etched (SBA titanium surfaces were produced by alkali treatment and their responses to partially heparinized whole human blood were analyzed. Blood clot formation, platelet activation and activation of the complement system was analyzed revealing that exposure time between blood and the material surface is crucial as increasing exposure time results in higher amount of activated platelets, more blood clots formed and stronger complement activation. In contrast, the number of macrophages/monocytes found on alkali-treated surfaces was significantly reduced as compared to untreated SBA Ti surfaces. Interestingly, when comparing untreated to modified SBA Ti surfaces very different blood clots formed on their surfaces. On untreated Ti surfaces blood clots remain thin (below 15 mm, patchy and non-structured lacking large fibrin fiber networks whereas blood clots on differentiated surfaces assemble in an organized and layered architecture of more than 30 mm thickness. Close to the material surface most nucleated cells adhere, above large amounts of non-nucleated platelets remain entrapped within a dense fibrin fiber network providing a continuous cover of the entire surface. These findings might indicate that, combined with findings of previous in vivo studies demonstrating that alkali-treated SBA Ti surfaces perform better in terms of osseointegration, a continuous and structured layer of blood components on the blood-facing surface supports later tissue integration of an endosseous implant.

  6. Detachment dynamics of colloidal spheres with adhesive interactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bergenholtz, J.

    2018-04-01

    Escape of colloidal-size particles from various kinds of solids, such as aggregates and surfaces, occurs in a wide variety of settings of both fundamental and applied scientific interest. In this paper an exact solution for the detachment of adhesive spheres from each other by means of diffusion is presented. The solution takes into account repeated detachment and reattachment events in the course of time on the way toward the permanently separated state. For strongly adhesive spheres this state is approached in an exponential manner essentially regardless of how the bound state is specified. The analytical solution is shown to capture semiquantitatively the escape from more realistic potential wells using a mapping procedure whereby equality of second virial coefficients is imposed.

  7. Asperity interaction in elastic-plastic contact of rough surfaces in presence of adhesion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sahoo, Prasanta; Banerjee, Atanu

    2005-01-01

    This paper presents an analysis of the effect of asperity interaction in elastic-plastic contact of rough surfaces in the presence of adhesion. The micro-contact model of asperity interactions, developed by Zhao and Chang (2001 Trans. ASME: J. Tribol. 123 857-64), is integrated into the elastic-plastic contact model developed by Roy Chowdhury and Ghosh (1994 Wear 174 9-19) to allow the asperity interaction and elastic-plastic deformation in the presence of surface forces to be considered simultaneously. The well-established elastic and plastic adhesion indices are used to consider the different conditions that arise as a result of varying load and material parameters. Results show that asperity interaction influences the loading-unloading behaviour in elastic-plastic adhesive contact of rough surfaces and in general asperity interactions reduce the effect of surface forces

  8. Physicochemical and biochemical interactions in yeast immobilization by adhesion to a cellulose based support

    OpenAIRE

    Kurec, M.; Brányik, Tomáš; Mota, André; Domingues, Lucília; Teixeira, J. A.

    2008-01-01

    An important quality of yeast cell wall is the ability to adhere to other cell walls or solid surfaces. This feature of yeast is responsible for technologically important phenomena such as flocculation at the end of beer fermentation and cell adhesion to immobilization supports e.g. spent grains, DEAE-cellulose etc. Physicochemical properties of yeast surfaces, e.g. hydrophobicity and surface charge, have a substantial impact on cell adhesion and flocculation. The interaction e...

  9. Regulation of epithelial and lymphocyte cell adhesion by adenosine deaminase-CD26 interaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ginés, Silvia; Mariño, Marta; Mallol, Josefa; Canela, Enric I; Morimoto, Chikao; Callebaut, Christian; Hovanessian, Ara; Casadó, Vicent; Lluis, Carmen; Franco, Rafael

    2002-01-01

    The extra-enzymic function of cell-surface adenosine deaminase (ADA), an enzyme mainly localized in the cytosol but also found on the cell surface of monocytes, B cells and T cells, has lately been the subject of numerous studies. Cell-surface ADA is able to transduce co-stimulatory signals in T cells via its interaction with CD26, an integral membrane protein that acts as ADA-binding protein. The aim of the present study was to explore whether ADA-CD26 interaction plays a role in the adhesion of lymphocyte cells to human epithelial cells. To meet this aim, different lymphocyte cell lines (Jurkat and CEM T) expressing endogenous, or overexpressing human, CD26 protein were tested in adhesion assays to monolayers of colon adenocarcinoma human epithelial cells, Caco-2, which express high levels of cell-surface ADA. Interestingly, the adhesion of Jurkat and CEM T cells to a monolayer of Caco-2 cells was greatly dependent on CD26. An increase by 50% in the cell-to-cell adhesion was found in cells containing higher levels of CD26. Incubation with an anti-CD26 antibody raised against the ADA-binding site or with exogenous ADA resulted in a significant reduction (50-70%) of T-cell adhesion to monolayers of epithelial cells. The role of ADA-CD26 interaction in the lymphocyte-epithelial cell adhesion appears to be mediated by CD26 molecules that are not interacting with endogenous ADA (ADA-free CD26), since SKW6.4 (B cells) that express more cell-surface ADA showed lower adhesion than T cells. Adhesion stimulated by CD26 and ADA is mediated by T cell lymphocyte function-associated antigen. A role for ADA-CD26 interaction in cell-to-cell adhesion was confirmed further in integrin activation assays. FACS analysis revealed a higher expression of activated integrins on T cell lines in the presence of increasing amounts of exogenous ADA. Taken together, these results suggest that the ADA-CD26 interaction on the cell surface has a role in lymphocyte-epithelial cell adhesion. PMID

  10. Cell Adhesions: Actin-Based Modules that Mediate Cell-Extracellular Matrix and Cell-Cell Interactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bachir, Alexia; Horwitz, Alan Rick; Nelson, W. James; Bianchini, Julie M.

    2018-01-01

    Cell adhesions link cells to the extracellular matrix (ECM) and to each other, and depend on interactions with the actin cytoskeleton. Both cell-ECM and cell-cell adhesion sites contain discrete, yet overlapping functional modules. These modules establish physical association with the actin cytoskeleton, locally modulate actin organization and dynamics, and trigger intracellular signaling pathways. Interplay between these modules generates distinct actin architectures that underlie different stages, types, and functions of cell-ECM and cell-cell adhesions. Actomyosin contractility is required to generate mature, stable adhesions, as well as sense and translate the mechanical properties of the cellular environment to changes in cell organization and behavior. In this chapter we discuss the organization and function of different adhesion modules and how they interact with the actin cytoskeleton. We highlight the molecular mechanisms of mechanotransduction in adhesions, and how adhesion molecules mediate crosstalk between cell-ECM and cell-cell adhesion sites. PMID:28679638

  11. Hypertonic saline impedes tumor cell-endothelial cell interaction by reducing adhesion molecule and laminin expression.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Shields, Conor J

    2012-02-03

    BACKGROUND: Hypertonic saline infusion dampens inflammatory responses and suppresses neutrophil-endothelial interaction by reducing adhesion molecule expression. This study tested the hypothesis that hypertonic saline attenuates tumor cell adhesion to the endothelium through a similar mechanism. METHODS: Human colon cancer cells (LS174T) were transfected with green fluorescent protein and exposed to lipopolysaccharide, tumor necrosis factor-alpha, and interleukin-6 under hypertonic and isotonic conditions for 1 and 4 hours. Confluent human umbilical vein endothelial cells were similarly exposed. Cellular apoptosis and expression of adhesion molecules and laminin were measured by flow cytometry. Tumor cell adhesion to endothelium and laminin was assessed with fluorescence microscopy. Data are represented as mean +\\/- standard error of mean, and an ANOVA test was performed to gauge statistical significance, with P <.05 considered significant. RESULTS: Hypertonic exposure significantly reduced tumor cell adhesion despite the presence of the perioperative cell stressors (42 +\\/- 2.9 vs 172.5 +\\/- 12.4, P <.05), attenuated tumor cell beta-1 integrin (14.43 vs 23.84, P <.05), and endothelial cell laminin expression (22.78 +\\/- 2.2 vs 33.74 +\\/- 2.4, P <.05), but did not significantly alter cell viability. CONCLUSION: Hypertonic saline significantly attenuates tumor cell adhesion to endothelium by inhibiting adhesion molecule and laminin expression. This may halt the metastatic behavior of tumor cells shed at surgery.

  12. Staphylococcal superantigen-like 5 activates platelets and supports platelet adhesion under flow conditions, which involves glycoprotein Ib alpha and alpha(IIb)beta(3)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    De Haas, C. J. C.; Weeterings, C.; Vughs, M. M.; De Groot, P. G.; Van Strijp, J. A.; Lisman, T.

    2009-01-01

    Objectives: Staphylococcal superantigen-like 5 (SSL5) is an exoprotein secreted by Staphylococcus aureus that has been shown to inhibit neutrophil rolling over activated endothelial cells via a direct interaction with P-selectin glycoprotein ligand 1 (PSGL-1). Methods and Results: When purified

  13. Disrupting functional interactions between platelet chemokines inhibits atherosclerosis in hyperlipidemic mice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Koenen, RR; Hundelshausen, P; Nesmelova, IV

    2009-01-01

    Atherosclerosis is characterized by chronic inflammation of the arterial wall due to chemokine-driven mononuclear cell recruitment. Activated platelets can synergize with chemokines to exacerbate atherogenesis; for example, by deposition of the chemokines platelet factor-4 (PF4, also known as CXC...... monocyte recruitment and reducing atherosclerosis without the aforementioned side effects. These results establish the in vivo relevance of chemokine heteromers and show the potential of targeting heteromer formation to achieve therapeutic effects......) and RANTES (CCL5), triggering monocyte arrest on inflamed endothelium. Homo-oligomerization is required for the recruitment functions of CCL5, and chemokine heteromerization has more recently emerged as an additional regulatory mechanism, as evidenced by a mutual modulation of CXCL8 and CXCL4 activities...... compromise systemic immune responses, delay macrophage-mediated viral clearance and impair normal T cell functions. Here we determined structural features of CCL5-CXCL4 heteromers and designed stable peptide inhibitors that specifically disrupt proinflammatory CCL5-CXCL4 interactions, thereby attenuating...

  14. Interactions with nanoscale topography: adhesion quantification and signal transduction in cells of osteogenic and multipotent lineage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biggs, Manus J P; Richards, R Geoff; Gadegaard, Nikolaj; McMurray, Rebecca J; Affrossman, Stanley; Wilkinson, Chris D W; Oreffo, Richard O C; Dalby, Mathew J

    2009-10-01

    Polymeric medical devices widely used in orthopedic surgery play key roles in fracture fixation and orthopedic implant design. Topographical modification and surface micro-roughness of these devices regulate cellular adhesion, a process fundamental in the initiation of osteoinduction and osteogenesis. Advances in fabrication techniques have evolved the field of surface modification; in particular, nanotechnology has allowed the development of nanoscale substrates for the investigation into cell-nanofeature interactions. In this study human osteoblasts (HOBs) were cultured on ordered nanoscale pits and random nano "craters" and "islands". Adhesion subtypes were quantified by immunofluorescent microscopy and cell-substrate interactions investigated via immuno-scanning electron microscopy. To investigate the effects of these substrates on cellular function 1.7 k microarray analysis was used to establish gene profiles of enriched STRO-1+ progenitor cell populations cultured on these nanotopographies. Nanotopographies affected the formation of adhesions on experimental substrates. Adhesion formation was prominent on planar control substrates and reduced on nanocrater and nanoisland topographies; nanopits, however, were shown to inhibit directly the formation of large adhesions. STRO-1+ progenitor cells cultured on experimental substrates revealed significant changes in genetic expression. This study implicates nanotopographical modification as a significant modulator of osteoblast adhesion and cellular function in mesenchymal populations.

  15. Platelets Promote Metastasis via Binding Tumor CD97 Leading to Bidirectional Signaling that Coordinates Transendothelial Migration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yvona Ward

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available Summary: Tumor cells initiate platelet activation leading to the secretion of bioactive molecules, which promote metastasis. Platelet receptors on tumors have not been well-characterized, resulting in a critical gap in knowledge concerning platelet-promoted metastasis. We identify a direct interaction between platelets and tumor CD97 that stimulates rapid bidirectional signaling. CD97, an adhesion G protein-coupled receptor (GPCR, is an overexpressed tumor antigen in several cancer types. Purified CD97 extracellular domain or tumor cell-associated CD97 stimulated platelet activation. CD97-initiated platelet activation led to granule secretion, including the release of ATP, a mediator of endothelial junction disruption. Lysophosphatidic acid (LPA derived from platelets induced tumor invasiveness via proximal CD97-LPAR heterodimer signaling, coupling coincident tumor cell migration and vascular permeability to promote transendothelial migration. Consistent with this, CD97 was necessary for tumor cell-induced vascular permeability in vivo and metastasis formation in preclinical models. These findings support targeted blockade of tumor CD97 as an approach to ameliorate metastatic spread. : Tumor-initiated platelet activation promotes tissue invasion of cancer cells and metastasis. Ward et al. demonstrate that a common tumor-associated antigen, CD97, accounts for platelet activation and participates directly in LPA-mediated signal transduction leading to tumor cell invasion. CD97 promotes vascular extravasation and metastasis in pre-clinical models. Keywords: platelets, metastasis, transendothelial migration, circulating tumor cells, CD97, adhesion GPCR, LPA

  16. Platelet biomechanics, platelet bioenergetics, and applications to clinical practice and translational research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    George, Mitchell J; Bynum, James; Nair, Prajeeda; Cap, Andrew P; Wade, Charles E; Cox, Charles S; Gill, Brijesh S

    2018-07-01

    The purpose of this review is to explore the relationship between platelet bioenergetics and biomechanics and how this relationship affects the clinical interpretation of platelet function devices. Recent experimental and technological advances highlight platelet bioenergetics and biomechanics as alternative avenues for collecting clinically relevant data. Platelet bioenergetics drive energy production for key biomechanical processes like adhesion, spreading, aggregation, and contraction. Platelet function devices like thromboelastography, thromboelastometry, and aggregometry measure these biomechanical processes. Platelet storage, stroke, sepsis, trauma, or the activity of antiplatelet drugs alters measures of platelet function. However, the specific mechanisms governing these alterations in platelet function and how they relate to platelet bioenergetics are still under investigation.

  17. Effect of long-range repulsive Coulomb interactions on packing structure of adhesive particles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Sheng; Li, Shuiqing; Liu, Wenwei; Makse, Hernán A

    2016-02-14

    The packing of charged micron-sized particles is investigated using discrete element simulations based on adhesive contact dynamic model. The formation process and the final obtained structures of ballistic packings are studied to show the effect of interparticle Coulomb force. It is found that increasing the charge on particles causes a remarkable decrease of the packing volume fraction ϕ and the average coordination number 〈Z〉, indicating a looser and chainlike structure. Force-scaling analysis shows that the long-range Coulomb interaction changes packing structures through its influence on particle inertia before they are bonded into the force networks. Once contact networks are formed, the expansion effect caused by repulsive Coulomb forces are dominated by short-range adhesion. Based on abundant results from simulations, a dimensionless adhesion parameter Ad*, which combines the effects of the particle inertia, the short-range adhesion and the long-range Coulomb interaction, is proposed and successfully scales the packing results for micron-sized particles within the latest derived adhesive loose packing (ALP) regime. The structural properties of our packings follow well the recent theoretical prediction which is described by an ensemble approach based on a coarse-grained volume function, indicating some kind of universality in the low packing density regime of the phase diagram regardless of adhesion or particle charge. Based on the comprehensive consideration of the complicated inter-particle interactions, our findings provide insight into the roles of short-range adhesion and repulsive Coulomb force during packing formation and should be useful for further design of packings.

  18. Cell-substrate interaction with cell-membrane-stress dependent adhesion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, H; Yang, B

    2012-01-10

    Cell-substrate interaction is examined in a two-dimensional mechanics model. The cell and substrate are treated as a shell and an elastic solid, respectively. Their interaction through adhesion is treated using nonlinear springs. Compared to previous cell mechanics models, the present model introduces a cohesive force law that is dependent not only on cell-substrate distance but also on internal cell-membrane stress. It is postulated that a living cell would establish focal adhesion sites with density dependent on the cell-membrane stress. The formulated mechanics problem is numerically solved using coupled finite elements and boundary elements for the cell and the substrate, respectively. The nodes in the adhesion zone from either side are linked by the cohesive springs. The specific cases of a cell adhering to a homogeneous substrate and a heterogeneous bimaterial substrate are examined. The analyses show that the substrate stiffness affects the adhesion behavior significantly and regulates the direction of cell adhesion, in good agreement with the experimental results in the literature. By introducing a reactive parameter (i.e., cell-membrane stress) linking biological responses of a living cell to a mechanical environment, the present model offers a unified mechanistic vehicle for characterization and prediction of living cell responses to various kinds of mechanical stimuli including local extracellular matrix and neighboring cells. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Developmental endothelial locus-1 modulates platelet-monocyte interactions and instant blood-mediated inflammatory reaction in islet transplantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kourtzelis, Ioannis; Kotlabova, Klara; Lim, Jong-Hyung; Mitroulis, Ioannis; Ferreira, Anaisa; Chen, Lan-Sun; Gercken, Bettina; Steffen, Anja; Kemter, Elisabeth; Klotzsche-von Ameln, Anne; Waskow, Claudia; Hosur, Kavita; Chatzigeorgiou, Antonios; Ludwig, Barbara; Wolf, Eckhard; Hajishengallis, George; Chavakis, Triantafyllos

    2016-04-01

    Platelet-monocyte interactions are strongly implicated in thrombo-inflammatory injury by actively contributing to intravascular inflammation, leukocyte recruitment to inflamed sites, and the amplification of the procoagulant response. Instant blood-mediated inflammatory reaction (IBMIR) represents thrombo-inflammatory injury elicited upon pancreatic islet transplantation (islet-Tx), thereby dramatically affecting transplant survival and function. Developmental endothelial locus-1 (Del-1) is a functionally versatile endothelial cell-derived homeostatic factor with anti-inflammatory properties, but its potential role in IBMIR has not been previously addressed. Here, we establish Del-1 as a novel inhibitor of IBMIR using a whole blood-islet model and a syngeneic murine transplantation model. Indeed, Del-1 pre-treatment of blood before addition of islets diminished coagulation activation and islet damage as assessed by C-peptide release. Consistently, intraportal islet-Tx in transgenic mice with endothelial cell-specific overexpression of Del-1 resulted in a marked decrease of monocytes and platelet-monocyte aggregates in the transplanted tissues, relative to those in wild-type recipients. Mechanistically, Del-1 decreased platelet-monocyte aggregate formation, by specifically blocking the interaction between monocyte Mac-1-integrin and platelet GPIb. Our findings reveal a hitherto unknown role of Del-1 in the regulation of platelet-monocyte interplay and the subsequent heterotypic aggregate formation in the context of IBMIR. Therefore, Del-1 may represent a novel approach to prevent or mitigate the adverse reactions mediated through thrombo-inflammatory pathways in islet-Tx and perhaps other inflammatory disorders involving platelet-leukocyte aggregate formation.

  20. Adhesive friction for elastic-plastic contacting rough surfaces considering asperity interaction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sahoo, Prasanta

    2006-01-01

    The paper describes a theoretical study of adhesive friction at the contact between rough surfaces taking asperity interaction into consideration and using an elastic-plastic model of contact deformation that is based on an accurate finite element analysis of an elastic-plastic single asperity contact. The micro-contact model of asperity interactions, developed by Zhao and Chang, is integrated into the improved elastic-plastic rough surface adhesive contact analysis to consider the adhesive friction behaviour of rough surfaces. The model considers a large range of interference values from fully elastic through elastic-plastic to fully plastic regimes of contacting asperities. Two well-established adhesion indices are used to consider different conditions that arise as a result of varying load, surface and material parameters. Results are obtained for the coefficient of friction against applied load for various combinations of these parameters. The results show that the coefficient of friction depends strongly on the applied load for the no-interaction case while it becomes insensitive to the load for interaction consideration. Moreover, the inclusion of elastic-plastic asperities further reduces the friction coefficient

  1. Subpopulations in purified platelets adhering on glass.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donati, Alessia; Gupta, Swati; Reviakine, Ilya

    2016-06-22

    Understanding how platelet activation is regulated is important in the context of cardiovascular disorders and their management with antiplatelet therapy. Recent evidence points to different platelet subpopulations performing different functions. In particular, procoagulant and aggregating subpopulations have been reported in the literature in platelets treated with the GPVI agonists. How the formation of platelet subpopulations upon activation is regulated remains unclear. Here, it is shown that procoagulant and aggregating platelet subpopulations arise spontaneously upon adhesion of purified platelets on clean glass surfaces. Calcium ionophore treatment of the adhering platelets resulted in one platelet population expressing both the procoagulant and the adherent population markers phosphatidylserine and the activated form of GPIIb/IIIa, while all of the platelets expressed CD62P independently of the ionophore treatment. Therefore, all platelets have the capacity to express all three activation markers. It is concluded that platelet subpopulations observed in various studies reflect the dynamics of the platelet activation process.

  2. How to awaken your nanomachines: Site-specific activation of focal adhesion kinases through ligand interactions

    KAUST Repository

    Walkiewicz, Katarzyna Wiktoria

    2015-06-17

    The focal adhesion kinase (FAK) and the related protein-tyrosine kinase 2-beta (Pyk2) are highly versatile multidomain scaffolds central to cell adhesion, migration, and survival. Due to their key role in cancer metastasis, understanding and inhibiting their functions are important for the development of targeted therapy. Because FAK and Pyk2 are involved in many different cellular functions, designing drugs with partial and function-specific inhibitory effects would be desirable. Here, we summarise recent progress in understanding the structural mechanism of how the tug-of-war between intramolecular and intermolecular interactions allows these protein ‘nanomachines’ to become activated in a site-specific manner.

  3. Engagement of αIIbβ3 (GPIIb/IIIa) with ανβ3 Integrin Mediates Interaction of Melanoma Cells with Platelets: A CONNECTION TO HEMATOGENOUS METASTASIS*

    OpenAIRE

    Lonsdorf, Anke S.; Krämer, Björn F.; Fahrleitner, Manuela; Schönberger, Tanja; Gnerlich, Stephan; Ring, Sabine; Gehring, Sarah; Schneider, Stefan W.; Kruhlak, Michael J.; Meuth, Sven G.; Nieswandt, Bernhard; Gawaz, Meinrad; Enk, Alexander H.; Langer, Harald F.

    2011-01-01

    A mutual relationship exists between metastasizing tumor cells and components of the coagulation cascade. The exact mechanisms as to how platelets influence blood-borne metastasis, however, remain poorly understood. Here, we used murine B16 melanoma cells to observe functional aspects of how platelets contribute to the process of hematogenous metastasis. We found that platelets interfere with a distinct step of the metastasis cascade, as they promote adhesion of melanoma cells to the endothel...

  4. Adhesive interaction measured between AFM probe and lung epithelial type II cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Leonenko, Zoya; Finot, Eric; Amrein, Matthias

    2007-01-01

    The toxicity of inhaled nanoparticles entering the body through the lung is thought to be initially defined by the electrostatic and adhesive interaction of the particles with lung's wall. Here, we investigated the first step of the interaction of nanoparticles with lung epithelial cells using atomic force microscope (AFM) as a force apparatus. Nanoparticles were modeled by the apex of the AFM tip and the forces of interaction between the tip and the cell analyzed over time. The adhesive force and work of adhesion strongly increased for the first 100 s of contact and then leveled out. During this time, the tip was penetrating deeply into the cell. It first crossed a stiff region of the cell and then entered a much more compliant cell region. The work of adhesion and its progression over time were not dependent on the load with which the tip was brought into contact with the cell. We conclude that the initial thermodynamic aspects and the time course of the uptake of nanoparticles by lung epithelial cells can be studied using our experimental approach. It is discussed how the potential health threat posed by nanoparticles of different size and surface characteristics can be evaluated using the method presented

  5. Disrupting functional interactions between platelet chemokines inhibits atherosclerosis in hyperlipidemic mice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Koenen, Rory R; von Hundelshausen, Philipp; Nesmelova, Irina V

    2009-01-01

    Atherosclerosis is characterized by chronic inflammation of the arterial wall due to chemokine-driven mononuclear cell recruitment. Activated platelets can synergize with chemokines to exacerbate atherogenesis; for example, by deposition of the chemokines platelet factor-4 (PF4, also known as CXC...

  6. Glu- and Lys-forms of plasminogen differentially affect phosphatidylserine exposure on the platelet surface

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. D. Zhernossekov

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Plasminogen/plasmin system is known for its ability to support hemostatic balance of blood. However, plasminogen may be considered as an adhesive ligand and in this way could affect the functioning of blood cells. We showed that exogenous Lys-plasminogen, but not its Glu-form, inhibited platelet aggregation and suppressed platelet α-granule secretion. The aim of this work was to investigate the influence of Glu- and Lys-form of plasminogen on the formation of platelet procoagulant surface using phosphatidylserine exposure as a marker. Human platelets were obtained from human platelet-rich plasma (donors were healthy volunteers, men aged 30-40 years by gel-filtration on Sepharose 2B. Phosphatidylserine exposure on the platelet surface was evaluated by flow cytometry with FITC-conjugated annexin A5. Glu- and Lys-plasminogen have different impact on the platelet functioning. Exogenous Lys-plasminogen has no significant effect on phosphatidylserine exposure, while Glu-plasminogen increases phosphatidylserine exposure on the surface of thrombin- and collagen-activated human platelets. Glu-plasminogen can be considered as a co-stimulator of agonist-induced platelet secretion and procoagulant surface formation. Meanwhile effects of Lys-plasminogen are probably directed at platelet-platelet interactions and not related to agonist-stimulated pro-apoptotic changes. The observed different effects of Glu- and Lys-plasminogen on phosphatidylserine exposure can be explained by their structural peculiarities.

  7. Identification of five novel 14-3-3 isoforms interacting with the GPIb-IX complex in platelets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mangin, P H; Receveur, N; Wurtz, V; David, T; Gachet, C; Lanza, F

    2009-09-01

    Binding of von Willebrand factor to the platelet glycoprotein (GP)Ib-IX complex initiates a signaling cascade leading to integrin alpha(IIb)beta(3) activation, a key process in hemostasis and thrombosis. Interaction of 14-3-3zeta with the intracytoplasmic domain of GPIb appears to be a major effector of this activation pathway. The aim of our study was to determine whether other members of the 14-3-3 family bind to GPIb-IX. In this study, western blot analyses showed that platelets also contain the 14-3-3beta, 14-3-3gamma, 14-3-3epsilon, 14-3-3eta and 14-3-3theta isoforms, but lack 14-3-3sigma. Coimmunoprecipitation studies in platelets and CHO transfectants demonstrated that all six 14-3-3 isoforms expressed in platelets, including, as previously reported, 14-3-3zeta, bind to GPIb-IX. In addition, their interaction was found to critically require the same GPIbalpha domains (580-590 and 605-610) already identified as essential for 14-3-3zeta binding, in agreement with the conservation of the sequence of the I-helix among these different isoforms. Pull-down experiments indicated that all six 14-3-3 isoforms present in platelets bind to GPIbbeta. In contrast, deletion or mutation of the GPIbbeta intracytoplasmic tail did not affect the interaction of GPIb-IX with the 14-3-3 isoforms, questioning the importance of this domain. Our study suggests that, to inhibit GPIb-induced integrin alpha(IIb)beta(3) activation, a more appropriate strategy than inhibiting individual 14-3-3 isoforms would be to target the 14-3-3-binding motif on GPIb or, alternatively, the conserved 14-3-3 I-helix.

  8. Study of Adhesion Interaction Using Atomic Force Microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grybos, J.; Pyka-Fosciak, G.; Lebed, K.; Lekka, M.; Stachura, Z.; Styczeñ, J.

    2003-05-01

    An atomic force microscope is a useful tool to study the interaction forces at molecular level. In particular the atomic force microscope can measure an unbinding force needed to separate the two single molecule complexes. Recent studies have shown that such unbinding force depends linearly on the logarithm of the applied loading rate, defined as a product of scanning velocity and the spring constant characterizing the investigated system (cantilever vs. surface). This dependence can be used to study the energy landscape shape of a molecular complex by the estimation of energy barrier locations and the related dissociation rates. In the present work the complex consisting of ethylene(di)aminetetraacetic acid and the bovine serum albumin was measured. The dependence between the unbinding force and the logarithm of the loading rate was linear. Using the Bell model describing the dissociation of the above molecules caused by the action of the external bond breaking force, two parameters were estimated: the dissociation rate and the position of the energy barrier needed to overcome during a transition from a bound to unbound state. The obtained results are similar to those obtained for a typical ligand--receptor interaction.

  9. Platelet size and age determine platelet function independently

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thompson, C.B.; Jakubowski, J.A.; Quinn, P.G.; Deykin, D.; Valeri, C.R.

    1984-01-01

    A study was undertaken to examine the interaction of platelet size and age in determining in vitro platelet function. Baboon megakaryocytes were labeled in vivo by the injection of 75Se-methionine. Blood was collected when the label was predominantly associated with younger platelets (day 2) and with older platelets (day 9). Size-dependent platelet subpopulations were prepared on both days by counterflow centrifugation. The reactivity of each platelet subpopulation was determined on both days by measuring thrombin-induced aggregation. Platelets were fixed after partial aggregation had occurred by the addition of EDTA/formalin. After removal of the aggregated platelets by differential centrifugation, the supernatant medium was assayed for remaining platelets and 75Se radioactivity. Comparing day 2 and day 9, no significant difference was seen in the rate of aggregation of a given subpopulation. However, aggregation was more rapid in the larger platelet fractions than in the smaller ones on both days. A greater percentage of the 75Se radioactivity appeared in the platelet aggregates on day 2 than on day 9. This effect was independent of platelet size, as it occurred to a similar extent in the unfractionated platelets and in each of the size-dependent platelet subpopulations. The data indicate that young platelets are more active than older platelets. This study demonstrates that size and age are both determinants of platelet function, but by independent mechanisms

  10. Platelet glycoprotein VI binds to polymerized fibrin and promotes thrombin generation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mammadova-Bach, Elmina; Ollivier, Véronique; Loyau, Stéphane; Schaff, Mathieu; Dumont, Bénédicte; Favier, Rémi; Freyburger, Geneviève; Latger-Cannard, Véronique; Nieswandt, Bernhard; Gachet, Christian; Mangin, Pierre H; Jandrot-Perrus, Martine

    2015-07-30

    Fibrin, the coagulation end product, consolidates the platelet plug at sites of vascular injury and supports the recruitment of circulating platelets. In addition to integrin αIIbβ3, another as-yet-unidentified receptor is thought to mediate platelet interaction with fibrin. Platelet glycoprotein VI (GPVI) interacts with collagen and several other adhesive macromolecules. We evaluated the hypothesis that GPVI could be a functional platelet receptor for fibrin. Calibrated thrombin assays using platelet-rich plasma (PRP) showed that tissue factor-triggered thrombin generation was impaired in GPVI-deficient patients and reduced by the anti-GPVI Fab 9O12. Assays on reconstituted PRP and PRP from fibrinogen-deficient patients revealed a fibrinogen-dependent enhancement of thrombin generation, which relied on functional GPVI. The effect of GPVI was found to depend on fibrin polymerization. A binding assay showed a specific interaction between GPVI-Fc and fibrin, inhibited by the Fab 9O12. This Fab also reduced platelet adhesion to fibrin at low (300 s(-1)) and high (1500 s(-1)) wall shear rates. Platelets adherent to fibrin displayed shape change, exposure of procoagulant phospholipids, and the formation of small clots. When hirudinated blood was perfused at 1500 s(-1) over preformed fibrin-rich clots, the Fab 9O12 decreased the recruitment of platelets by up to 85%. This study identifies GPVI as a platelet receptor for polymerized fibrin with 2 major functions: (1) amplification of thrombin generation and (2) recruitment of circulating platelets to clots. These so-far-unrecognized properties of GPVI confer on it a key role in thrombus growth and stabilization. © 2015 by The American Society of Hematology.

  11. Characteristics of laser ultrasound interaction with multi-layered dissimilar metals adhesive interface by numerical simulation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Kuanshuang, E-mail: zkuanshuang@buaa.edu.cn [School of Mechanical Engineering and Automation, BeiHang University, Beijing 100191 (China); Collaborative Innovation Center of Advanced Aero-Engine, Beijing 100191 (China); Zhou, Zhenggan; Zhou, Jianghua; Sun, Guangkai [School of Mechanical Engineering and Automation, BeiHang University, Beijing 100191 (China); Collaborative Innovation Center of Advanced Aero-Engine, Beijing 100191 (China)

    2015-10-30

    Highlights: • We investigate laser generated ultrasound in multi-layered adhesive structure. • We find the difference of waveforms with different probe points. • Probe points and frequency range influence characterization of the damage interface. • Reflection coefficients of longitudinal waves can quantify the void defect. - Abstract: The characteristics of laser-generated ultrasonic wave interaction with multi-layered dissimilar metals adhesive interface are investigated by finite element method (FEM). The physical model of laser-generated ultrasonic wave in the multi-layered dissimilar metals adhesive structure is built. The surface temperature evolution with different laser power densities is analyzed to obtain the parameters of pulsed laser with thermoelastic regime. The differences of laser ultrasonic waves with different center frequencies measured at the center of laser irradiation would verify the interfacial features of adhesive structures. The optimum frequency range and probe point would be beneficial for the detection of the small void defect. The numerical results indicate that the different frequency range and probe points would evidently influence the identification and quantitative characterization of the small void defect. The research findings would lay a foundation for testing interfacial integrity.

  12. Characteristics of laser ultrasound interaction with multi-layered dissimilar metals adhesive interface by numerical simulation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang, Kuanshuang; Zhou, Zhenggan; Zhou, Jianghua; Sun, Guangkai

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • We investigate laser generated ultrasound in multi-layered adhesive structure. • We find the difference of waveforms with different probe points. • Probe points and frequency range influence characterization of the damage interface. • Reflection coefficients of longitudinal waves can quantify the void defect. - Abstract: The characteristics of laser-generated ultrasonic wave interaction with multi-layered dissimilar metals adhesive interface are investigated by finite element method (FEM). The physical model of laser-generated ultrasonic wave in the multi-layered dissimilar metals adhesive structure is built. The surface temperature evolution with different laser power densities is analyzed to obtain the parameters of pulsed laser with thermoelastic regime. The differences of laser ultrasonic waves with different center frequencies measured at the center of laser irradiation would verify the interfacial features of adhesive structures. The optimum frequency range and probe point would be beneficial for the detection of the small void defect. The numerical results indicate that the different frequency range and probe points would evidently influence the identification and quantitative characterization of the small void defect. The research findings would lay a foundation for testing interfacial integrity.

  13. Adhesive activity of Lu glycoproteins is regulated by interaction with spectrin

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    An, Xiuli; Gauthier, Emilie; Zhang, Xihui; Guo, Xinhua; Anstee, David; Mohandas, Narla; Anne Chasis, Joel

    2008-03-18

    The Lutheran (Lu) and Lu(v13) blood group glycoproteins function as receptors for extracellular matrix laminins. Lu and Lu(v13) are linked to the erythrocyte cytoskeleton through a direct interaction with spectrin. However, neither the molecular basis of the interaction nor its functional consequences have previously been delineated. In the present study, we defined the binding motifs of Lu and Lu(v13) on spectrin and identified a functional role for this interaction. We found that the cytoplasmic domains of both Lu and Lu(v13) bound to repeat 4 of the spectrin chain. The interaction of full-length spectrin dimer to Lu and Lu(v13) was inhibited by repeat 4 of {alpha}-spectrin. Further, resealing of this repeat peptide into erythrocytes led to weakened Lu-cytoskeleton interaction as demonstrated by increased detergent extractability of Lu. Importantly, disruption of the Lu-spectrin linkage was accompanied by enhanced cell adhesion to laminin. We conclude that the interaction of the Lu cytoplasmic tail with the cytoskeleton regulates its adhesive receptor function.

  14. Crosstalk between Platelets and the Immune System: Old Systems with New Discoveries

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Conglei Li

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Platelets are small anucleate cells circulating in the blood. It has been recognized for more than 100 years that platelet adhesion and aggregation at the site of vascular injury are critical events in hemostasis and thrombosis; however, recent studies demonstrated that, in addition to these classic roles, platelets also have important functions in inflammation and the immune response. Platelets contain many proinflammatory molecules and cytokines (e.g., P-selectin, CD40L, IL-1β, etc., which support leukocyte trafficking, modulate immunoglobulin class switch, and germinal center formation. Platelets express several functional Toll-like receptors (TLRs, such as TLR-2, TLR-4, and TLR-9, which may potentially link innate immunity with thrombosis. Interestingly, platelets also contain multiple anti-inflammatory molecules and cytokines (e.g., transforming growth factor-β and thrombospondin-1. Emerging evidence also suggests that platelets are involved in lymphatic vessel development by directly interacting with lymphatic endothelial cells through C-type lectin-like receptor 2. Besides the active contributions of platelets to the immune system, platelets are passively targeted in several immune-mediated diseases, such as autoimmune thrombocytopenia, infection-associated thrombocytopenia, and fetal and neonatal alloimmune thrombocytopenia. These data suggest that platelets are important immune cells and may contribute to innate and adaptive immunity under both physiological and pathological conditions.

  15. Platelet kinetics with indium-111 platelets: comparison with chromium-51 platelets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Peters, A.M.; Lavender, J.P.

    1983-01-01

    The application of 111In-oxine to platelet labeling has contributed to the understanding of platelet kinetics along three lines: 1. It allows the measurement of new parameters of splenic function, such as the intrasplenic platelet transit time, which has shed new light on the physiology of splenic blood cell handling. 2. It facilitates the measurement of platelet life span in conditions, such as ITP, in which 51Cr may undergo undesirable elution from the platelet as a result of platelet-antibody interaction. 3. It allows the determination of the fate of platelets, that is, the site of platelet destruction in conditions in which reduced platelet life span is associated with abnormal platelet consumption, as a result of either premature destruction of ''abnormal'' platelets by the RE system, or the consumption (or destruction) of normal platelets after their interaction with an abnormal vasculature. Future research using 111In platelets may yield further valuable information on the control as well as the significance of intrasplenic platelet pooling, on the role of platelets in the development of chronic vascular lesions, and on the sites of platelet destruction in ITP. With regard to the latter, methods will have to be developed for harvesting sufficient platelets representative of the total circulating platelet population from severely thrombocytopenic patients for autologous platelet labeling. This would avoid the use of homologous platelets, which is likely to be responsible for some of the contradictory data relating to the use of radiolabeled platelet studies for the prediction of the response of patients with ITP to splenectomy

  16. Platelet-Derived MRP-14 Induces Monocyte Activation in Patients With Symptomatic Peripheral Artery Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dann, Rebecca; Hadi, Tarik; Montenont, Emilie; Boytard, Ludovic; Alebrahim, Dornaszadat; Feinstein, Jordyn; Allen, Nicole; Simon, Russell; Barone, Krista; Uryu, Kunihiro; Guo, Yu; Rockman, Caron; Ramkhelawon, Bhama; Berger, Jeffrey S

    2018-01-02

    Peripheral artery disease (PAD), a diffuse manifestation of atherothrombosis, is a major cardiovascular threat. Although platelets are primary mediators of atherothrombosis, their role in the pathogenesis of PAD remains unclear. The authors sought to investigate the role of platelets in a cohort of symptomatic PAD. The authors profiled platelet activity, mRNA, and effector roles in patients with symptomatic PAD and in healthy controls. Patients with PAD and carotid artery stenosis were recruited into ongoing studies (NCT02106429 and NCT01897103) investigating platelet activity, platelet RNA, and cardiovascular disease. Platelet RNA sequence profiling mapped a robust up-regulation of myeloid-related protein (MRP)-14 mRNA, a potent calcium binding protein heterodimer, in PAD. Circulating activated platelets were enriched with MRP-14 protein, which augmented the expression of the adhesion mediator, P-selectin, thereby promoting monocyte-platelet aggregates. Electron microscopy confirmed the firm interaction of platelets with monocytes in vitro and colocalization of macrophages with MRP-14 confirmed their cross talk in atherosclerotic manifestations of PAD in vivo. Platelet-derived MRP-14 was channeled to monocytes, thereby fueling their expression of key PAD lesional hallmarks and increasing their directed locomotion, which were both suppressed in the presence of antibody-mediated blockade. Circulating MRP-14 was heightened in the setting of PAD, significantly correlated with PAD severity, and was associated with incident limb events. The authors identified a heightened platelet activity profile and unraveled a novel immunomodulatory effector role of platelet-derived MRP-14 in reprograming monocyte activation in symptomatic PAD. (Platelet Activity in Vascular Surgery and Cardiovascular Events [PACE]; NCT02106429; and Platelet Activity in Vascular Surgery for Thrombosis and Bleeding [PIVOTAL]; NCT01897103). Copyright © 2018 American College of Cardiology Foundation

  17. Dermatopontin interacts with fibronectin, promotes fibronectin fibril formation, and enhances cell adhesion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kato, Aiko; Okamoto, Osamu; Ishikawa, Kazushi; Sumiyoshi, Hideaki; Matsuo, Noritaka; Yoshioka, Hidekatsu; Nomizu, Motoyoshi; Shimada, Tatsuo; Fujiwara, Sakuhei

    2011-04-29

    We report that dermatopontin (DP), an abundant dermal extracellular matrix protein, is found in the fibrin clot and in the wound fluid, which comprise the provisional matrix at the initial stage of wound healing. DP was also found in the serum but at a lower concentration than that in wound fluid. DP co-localized with both fibrin and fibronectin on fibrin fibers and interacted with both proteins. Both normal fibroblast and HT1080 cell adhesion to the fibrin-fibronectin matrix were dose-dependently enhanced by DP, and the adhesion was mediated by α5β1 integrin. The cytoskeleton was more organized in the cells that adhered to the fibrin-fibronectin-DP complex. When incubated with DP, fibronectin formed an insoluble complex of fibronectin fibrils as visualized by electron microscopy. The interacting sites of fibronectin with DP were the first, thirteenth, and fourteenth type III repeats (III(1), III(13), and III(14)), with III(13) and III(14) assumed to be the major sites. The interaction between III(2-3) and III(12-14) was inhibited by DP, whereas the interaction between I(1-5) and III(12-14) was specifically and strongly enhanced by DP. Because the interaction between III(2-3) and III(12-14) is involved in forming a globular conformation of fibronectin, and that between I(1-5) and III(12-14) is required for forming fibronectin fibrils, DP promotes fibronectin fibril formation probably by changing the fibronectin conformation. These results suggest that DP has an accelerating role in fibroblast cell adhesion to the provisional matrix in the initial stage of wound healing.

  18. Effects of hormones on platelet aggregation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farré, Antonio López; Modrego, Javier; Zamorano-León, José J

    2014-04-01

    Platelets and their activation/inhibition mechanisms play a central role in haemostasis. It is well known agonists and antagonists of platelet activation; however, during the last years novel evidences of hormone effects on platelet activation have been reported. Platelet functionality may be modulated by the interaction between different hormones and their platelet receptors, contributing to sex differences in platelet function and even in platelet-mediated vascular damage. It has suggested aspects that apparently are well established should be reviewed. Hormones effects on platelet activity are included among them. This article tries to review knowledge about the involvement of hormones in platelet biology and activity.

  19. Functional display of platelet-binding VWF fragments on filamentous bacteriophage.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrew Yee

    Full Text Available von Willebrand factor (VWF tethers platelets to sites of vascular injury via interaction with the platelet surface receptor, GPIb. To further define the VWF sequences required for VWF-platelet interaction, a phage library displaying random VWF protein fragments was screened against formalin-fixed platelets. After 3 rounds of affinity selection, DNA sequencing of platelet-bound clones identified VWF peptides mapping exclusively to the A1 domain. Aligning these sequences defined a minimal, overlapping segment spanning P1254-A1461, which encompasses the C1272-C1458 cystine loop. Analysis of phage carrying a mutated A1 segment (C1272/1458A confirmed the requirement of the cystine loop for optimal binding. Four rounds of affinity maturation of a randomly mutagenized A1 phage library identified 10 and 14 unique mutants associated with enhanced platelet binding in the presence and absence of botrocetin, respectively, with 2 mutants (S1370G and I1372V common to both conditions. These results demonstrate the utility of filamentous phage for studying VWF protein structure-function and identify a minimal, contiguous peptide that bind to formalin-fixed platelets, confirming the importance of the VWF A1 domain with no evidence for another independently platelet-binding segment within VWF. These findings also point to key structural elements within the A1 domain that regulate VWF-platelet adhesion.

  20. How to awaken your nanomachines: Site-specific activation of focal adhesion kinases through ligand interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walkiewicz, Katarzyna W; Girault, Jean-Antoine; Arold, Stefan T

    2015-10-01

    The focal adhesion kinase (FAK) and the related protein-tyrosine kinase 2-beta (Pyk2) are highly versatile multidomain scaffolds central to cell adhesion, migration, and survival. Due to their key role in cancer metastasis, understanding and inhibiting their functions are important for the development of targeted therapy. Because FAK and Pyk2 are involved in many different cellular functions, designing drugs with partial and function-specific inhibitory effects would be desirable. Here, we summarise recent progress in understanding the structural mechanism of how the tug-of-war between intramolecular and intermolecular interactions allows these protein 'nanomachines' to become activated in a site-specific manner. Copyright © 2015 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  1. Localized Modeling of Biochemical and Flow Interactions during Cancer Cell Adhesion.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Julie Behr

    Full Text Available This work focuses on one component of a larger research effort to develop a simulation tool to model populations of flowing cells. Specifically, in this study a local model of the biochemical interactions between circulating melanoma tumor cells (TC and substrate adherent polymorphonuclear neutrophils (PMN is developed. This model provides realistic three-dimensional distributions of bond formation and attendant attraction and repulsion forces that are consistent with the time dependent Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD framework of the full system model which accounts local pressure, shear and repulsion forces. The resulting full dynamics model enables exploration of TC adhesion to adherent PMNs, which is a known participating mechanism in melanoma cell metastasis. The model defines the adhesion molecules present on the TC and PMN cell surfaces, and calculates their interactions as the melanoma cell flows past the PMN. Biochemical rates of reactions between individual molecules are determined based on their local properties. The melanoma cell in the model expresses ICAM-1 molecules on its surface, and the PMN expresses the β-2 integrins LFA-1 and Mac-1. In this work the PMN is fixed to the substrate and is assumed fully rigid and of a prescribed shear-rate dependent shape obtained from micro-PIV experiments. The melanoma cell is transported with full six-degrees-of-freedom dynamics. Adhesion models, which represent the ability of molecules to bond and adhere the cells to each other, and repulsion models, which represent the various physical mechanisms of cellular repulsion, are incorporated with the CFD solver. All models are general enough to allow for future extensions, including arbitrary adhesion molecule types, and the ability to redefine the values of parameters to represent various cell types. The model presented in this study will be part of a clinical tool for development of personalized medical treatment programs.

  2. Localized Modeling of Biochemical and Flow Interactions during Cancer Cell Adhesion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Behr, Julie; Gaskin, Byron; Fu, Changliang; Dong, Cheng; Kunz, Robert

    2015-01-01

    This work focuses on one component of a larger research effort to develop a simulation tool to model populations of flowing cells. Specifically, in this study a local model of the biochemical interactions between circulating melanoma tumor cells (TC) and substrate adherent polymorphonuclear neutrophils (PMN) is developed. This model provides realistic three-dimensional distributions of bond formation and attendant attraction and repulsion forces that are consistent with the time dependent Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) framework of the full system model which accounts local pressure, shear and repulsion forces. The resulting full dynamics model enables exploration of TC adhesion to adherent PMNs, which is a known participating mechanism in melanoma cell metastasis. The model defines the adhesion molecules present on the TC and PMN cell surfaces, and calculates their interactions as the melanoma cell flows past the PMN. Biochemical rates of reactions between individual molecules are determined based on their local properties. The melanoma cell in the model expresses ICAM-1 molecules on its surface, and the PMN expresses the β-2 integrins LFA-1 and Mac-1. In this work the PMN is fixed to the substrate and is assumed fully rigid and of a prescribed shear-rate dependent shape obtained from micro-PIV experiments. The melanoma cell is transported with full six-degrees-of-freedom dynamics. Adhesion models, which represent the ability of molecules to bond and adhere the cells to each other, and repulsion models, which represent the various physical mechanisms of cellular repulsion, are incorporated with the CFD solver. All models are general enough to allow for future extensions, including arbitrary adhesion molecule types, and the ability to redefine the values of parameters to represent various cell types. The model presented in this study will be part of a clinical tool for development of personalized medical treatment programs.

  3. Biomechanics of P-selectin PSGL-1 bonds: Shear threshold and integrin-independent cell adhesion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xiao, Zhihua; Goldsmith, Harry L.; MacIntosh, Fiona A.; Shankaran, Harish; Neelamegham, Sriram

    2006-03-01

    Platelet-leukocyte adhesion may contribute to thrombosis and inflammation. We examined the heterotypic interaction between unactivated neutrophils and either thrombin receptor activating peptide (TRAP) stimulated platelets or P-selectin bearing beads (Ps-beads) in suspension. Cone-plate viscometers were used to apply controlled shear rates from 14-3000/s. Platelet-neutrophil and bead-neutrophil adhesion analysis was performed using both flow cytometry and high-speed videomicroscopy. We observed that while blocking antibodies against either P-selectin or P-selectin glycoprotein ligand-1 (PSGL-1) alone inhibited platelet-neutrophil adhesion by ~60% at 140/s, these reagents completely blocked adhesion at 3000/s. Anti-Mac-1 alone did not alter platelet-neutrophil adhesion rates at any shear rate, though in synergy with selectin antagonists it abrogated cell binding. Unstimulated neutrophils avidly bound Ps-beads and activated platelets in an integrin-independent manner, suggesting that purely selectin-dependent cell adhesion is possible. In support of this, antagonists against P-selectin or PSGL-1 dissociated previously formed platelet-neutrophil and Ps-bead neutrophil aggregates under shear in a variety of experimental systems, including in assays performed with whole blood. In studies where medium viscosity and shear rate were varied, a subtle shear threshold for P-selectin PSGL-1 binding was also noted at shear rates<100/s and at force loading rates of ~300pN/sec. Results are discussed in light of biophysical computations that characterize the collision between unequal size particles in linear shear flow. Overall, our studies reveal an integrin-independent regime for cell adhesion that may be physiologically relevant.

  4. Diatom Attachment at Aquatic Interfaces: Molecular Interactions, Mechanisms, and Physiology of Adhesion

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Gretz, Michael

    1997-01-01

    .... those more hydrophobic and that bacterial 'preconditioning' has variable effects on adhesion; (3) developed methodology for mass culture of fouling diatoms and isolation of adhesive components; (4...

  5. Hybridization quality and bond strength of adhesive systems according to interaction with dentin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salvio, Luciana Andrea; Hipólito, Vinicius Di; Martins, Adriano Luis; de Goes, Mario Fernando

    2013-07-01

    To evaluate the hybridization quality and bond strength of adhesives to dentin. Ten human molars were ground to expose the dentin and then sectioned in four tooth-quarters. They were randomly divided into 5 groups according to the adhesive used: Two single-step self-etch adhesives - Adper Prompt (ADP) and Xeno III (XE), two two-step self-etching primer systems - Clearfil SE Bond (SE) and Adhe SE (ADSE), and one one-step etch-and-rinse system - Adper Single Bond (SB). Resin composite (Filtek Z250) crown buildups were made on the bonded surfaces and incrementally light-cured for 20 s. The restored tooth-quarters were stored in water at 37°C for 24 h and then sectioned into beams (0.8 mm(2) in cross-section). Maximal microtensile bond strength (μ-TBS) was recorded (0.5 mm/min in crosshead speed). The results were submitted to one-way ANOVA and Tukey's test (α = 0.05). Thirty additional teeth were used to investigate the hybridization quality by SEM using silver methenamine or ammoniacal silver nitrate dyes. SE reached significantly higher μ-TBS (P 0.05), and between SB and ADP (P > 0.05); ADSE and XE were significantly higher than SB and ADP (P quality than that observed for ADP and XE. The bond strength and hybridization quality were affected by the interaction form of the adhesives with dentin. The hybridization quality was essential to improve the immediate μ-TBS to dentin.

  6. Alternatives to allogeneic platelet transfusion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Desborough, Michael J R; Smethurst, Peter A; Estcourt, Lise J; Stanworth, Simon J

    2016-11-01

    Allogeneic platelet transfusions are widely used for the prevention and treatment of bleeding in thrombocytopenia. Recent evidence suggests platelet transfusions have limited efficacy and are associated with uncertain immunomodulatory risks and concerns about viral or bacterial transmission. Alternatives to transfusion are a well-recognised tenet of Patient Blood Management, but there has been less focus on different strategies to reduce bleeding risk by comparison to platelet transfusion. Direct alternatives to platelet transfusion include agents to stimulate endogenous platelet production (thrombopoietin mimetics), optimising platelet adhesion to endothelium by treating anaemia or increasing von Willebrand factor levels (desmopressin), increasing formation of cross-linked fibrinogen (activated recombinant factor VII, fibrinogen concentrate or recombinant factor XIII), decreasing fibrinolysis (tranexamic acid or epsilon aminocaproic acid) or using artificial or modified platelets (cryopreserved platelets, lyophilised platelets, haemostatic particles, liposomes, engineered nanoparticles or infusible platelet membranes). The evidence base to support the use of these alternatives is variable, but an area of active research. Much of the current randomised controlled trial focus is on evaluation of the use of thrombopoietin mimetics and anti-fibrinolytics. It is also recognised that one alternative strategy to platelet transfusion is choosing not to transfuse at all. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  7. Characterization of a tubular flow chamber for studying platelet interaction with biologic and prosthetic materials: deposition of indium 111-labeled platelets on collagen, subendothelium, and expanded polytetrafluoroethylene

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Badimon, L.; Turitto, V.; Rosemark, J.A.; Badimon, J.J.; Fuster, V.

    1987-01-01

    A plastic (Plexiglas) chamber for evaluating platelet deposition under controlled hemodynamic conditions has been developed. The perfusion chamber has been designed to retain the cylindrical shape typical of the vasculature, to be flexible enough to accept a variety of biologic and prosthetic materials, and to simulate a broad range of physiologic flow conditions in either an ex vivo or in vitro perfusion system. Three type of surfaces were exposed to blood flowing directly from the carotid artery of a heparinized pig through the perfusion chamber: de-endothelialized pig aorta, collagen strips from rabbit Achilles tendon, and an expanded polytetrafluoroethylene material (Gore-Tex). Platelets, previously radiolabeled with indium 111 and injected into the animal, were quantified on the material surface, and the total number of deposited platelets determined for a range of blood flow rates (5 to 40 ml/min) and exposure times (0.5 to 20 minutes). The deposition rates were correlated with theory for describing the mass transport of platelets to the test surface. At the wall shear rates investigated (105 to 850 sec-1), the deposition of platelets on subendothelium was strongly dependent on the local flow conditions. Values of deposition on Gore-Tex obtained at similar flow conditions (105 to 425 sec-1) were reduced compared with that observed on subendothelium and showed a markedly weaker dependence on the shear rate. In contrast, deposition of platelets on collagen was more than an order of magnitude greater than on subendothelium and showed a dependence on flow only at the lowest flow rate studied (10 ml/min). The results indicate that collagen is much more reactive than subendothelium and Gore-Tex with respect to the growth and stability of platelet aggregates and moreover suggest that flow mechanisms for depositing platelets on various surface may be substantially different

  8. Characterization of a tubular flow chamber for studying platelet interaction with biologic and prosthetic materials: deposition of indium 111-labeled platelets on collagen, subendothelium, and expanded polytetrafluoroethylene

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Badimon, L.; Turitto, V.; Rosemark, J.A.; Badimon, J.J.; Fuster, V.

    1987-12-01

    A plastic (Plexiglas) chamber for evaluating platelet deposition under controlled hemodynamic conditions has been developed. The perfusion chamber has been designed to retain the cylindrical shape typical of the vasculature, to be flexible enough to accept a variety of biologic and prosthetic materials, and to simulate a broad range of physiologic flow conditions in either an ex vivo or in vitro perfusion system. Three type of surfaces were exposed to blood flowing directly from the carotid artery of a heparinized pig through the perfusion chamber: de-endothelialized pig aorta, collagen strips from rabbit Achilles tendon, and an expanded polytetrafluoroethylene material (Gore-Tex). Platelets, previously radiolabeled with indium 111 and injected into the animal, were quantified on the material surface, and the total number of deposited platelets determined for a range of blood flow rates (5 to 40 ml/min) and exposure times (0.5 to 20 minutes). The deposition rates were correlated with theory for describing the mass transport of platelets to the test surface. At the wall shear rates investigated (105 to 850 sec-1), the deposition of platelets on subendothelium was strongly dependent on the local flow conditions. Values of deposition on Gore-Tex obtained at similar flow conditions (105 to 425 sec-1) were reduced compared with that observed on subendothelium and showed a markedly weaker dependence on the shear rate. In contrast, deposition of platelets on collagen was more than an order of magnitude greater than on subendothelium and showed a dependence on flow only at the lowest flow rate studied (10 ml/min). The results indicate that collagen is much more reactive than subendothelium and Gore-Tex with respect to the growth and stability of platelet aggregates and moreover suggest that flow mechanisms for depositing platelets on various surface may be substantially different.

  9. Radiolabeled platelets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Datz, F.L.; Taylor, A.T.

    1986-01-01

    Initial interest in developing techniques to radiolabel platelets was spurred by the lack of an accurate method for measuring platelet life span in both normals and in thrombocytopenic patients. Early investigators could obtain only rough estimates of platelet life spans by monitoring the platelet counts of thrombocytopenic patients undergoing platelet transfusions. Labels were also sought that would allow imaging of platelets in vivo in order to better understand the pathophysiology of atherosclerosis, thrombophlebitis, and clotting disorders, and to improve the clinical diagnosis of these diseases. Two types of platelet labels were investigated: cohort (pulse) labels and random labels. Cohort labels are taken up by megakaryocytes in the bone marrow and incorporated in the DNA and other components of the forming platelet. In theory, only freshly released platelets of a uniform age are labeled. Random labels, on the other hand, tag platelets in the peripheral blood, labeling platelets of all ages

  10. Molecular spectroscopic and thermodynamic studies on the interaction of anti-platelet drug ticlopidine with calf thymus DNA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Afrin, Shumaila; Rahman, Yusra; Sarwar, Tarique; Husain, Mohammed Amir; Ali, Abad; Shamsuzzaman; Tabish, Mohammad

    2017-11-01

    Ticlopidine is an anti-platelet drug which belongs to the thienopyridine structural family and exerts its effect by functioning as an ADP receptor inhibitor. Ticlopidine inhibits the expression of TarO gene in S. aureus and may provide protection against MRSA. Groove binding agents are known to disrupt the transcription factor DNA complex and consequently inhibit gene expression. Understanding the mechanism of interaction of ticlopidine with DNA can prove useful in the development of a rational drug designing system. At present, there is no such study on the interaction of anti-platelet drugs with nucleic acids. A series of biophysical experiments were performed to ascertain the binding mode between ticlopidine and calf thymus DNA. UV-visible and fluorescence spectroscopic experiments confirmed the formation of a complex between ticlopidine and calf thymus DNA. Moreover, the values of binding constant were found to be in the range of 103 M- 1, which is indicative of groove binding between ticlopidine and calf thymus DNA. These results were further confirmed by studying the effect of denaturation on double stranded DNA, iodide quenching, viscometric studies, thermal melting profile as well as CD spectral analysis. The thermodynamic profile of the interaction was also determined using isothermal titration calorimetric studies. The reaction was found to be endothermic and the parameters obtained were found to be consistent with those of known groove binders. In silico molecular docking studies further corroborated well with the experimental results.

  11. Neutrophil transmigration mediated by the neutrophil-specific antigen CD177 is influenced by the endothelial S536N dimorphism of platelet endothelial cell adhesion molecule-1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bayat, Behnaz; Werth, Silke; Sachs, Ulrich J H; Newman, Debra K; Newman, Peter J; Santoso, Sentot

    2010-04-01

    The human neutrophil-specific adhesion molecule CD177 (also known as the NB1 alloantigen) becomes upregulated on the cell surface in a number of inflammatory settings. We recently showed that CD177 functions as a novel heterophilic counterreceptor for the endothelial junctional protein PECAM-1 (CD31), an interaction that is mediated by membrane-proximal PECAM-1 IgD 6, which is known to harbor an S(536)N single nucleotide polymorphism of two major isoforms V(98)N(536)G(643) and L(98)S(536)R(643) and a yet-to-be-determined region on CD177. In vitro transendothelial migration experiments revealed that CD177(+) neutrophils migrated significantly faster through HUVECs expressing the LSR, compared with the VNG, allelic variant of PECAM-1 and that this correlated with the decreased ability of anti-PECAM-1 Ab of ITIM tyrosine phosphorylation in HUVECs expressing the LSR allelic variant relative to the VNG allelic variant. Moreover, engagement of PECAM-1 with rCD177-Fc (to mimic heterophilic CD177 binding) suppressed Ab-induced tyrosine phosphorylation to a greater extent in cells expressing the LSR isoform compared with the VNG isoform, with a corresponding increased higher level of beta-catenin phosphorylation. These data suggest that heterophilic PECAM-1/CD177 interactions affect the phosphorylation state of PECAM-1 and endothelial cell junctional integrity in such a way as to facilitate neutrophil transmigration in a previously unrecognized allele-specific manner.

  12. Pregnancy-specific glycoproteins bind integrin αIIbβ3 and inhibit the platelet-fibrinogen interaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shanley, Daniel K; Kiely, Patrick A; Golla, Kalyan; Allen, Seamus; Martin, Kenneth; O'Riordan, Ronan T; Ball, Melanie; Aplin, John D; Singer, Bernhard B; Caplice, Noel; Moran, Niamh; Moore, Tom

    2013-01-01

    Pregnancy-specific glycoproteins (PSGs) are immunoglobulin superfamily members encoded by multigene families in rodents and primates. In human pregnancy, PSGs are secreted by the syncytiotrophoblast, a fetal tissue, and reach a concentration of up to 400 ug/ml in the maternal bloodstream at term. Human and mouse PSGs induce release of anti-inflammatory cytokines such as IL-10 and TGFβ1 from monocytes, macrophages, and other cell types, suggesting an immunoregulatory function. RGD tri-peptide motifs in the majority of human PSGs suggest that they may function like snake venom disintegrins, which bind integrins and inhibit interactions with ligands. We noted that human PSG1 has a KGD, rather than an RGD motif. The presence of a KGD in barbourin, a platelet integrin αIIbβ3 antagonist found in snake venom, suggested that PSG1 may be a selective αIIbβ3 ligand. Here we show that human PSG1 binds αIIbβ3 and inhibits the platelet - fibrinogen interaction. Unexpectedly, however, the KGD is not critical as multiple PSG1 domains independently bind and inhibit αIIbβ3 function. Human PSG9 and mouse Psg23 are also inhibitory suggesting conservation of this function across primate and rodent PSG families. Our results suggest that in species with haemochorial placentation, in which maternal blood is in direct contact with fetal trophoblast, the high expression level of PSGs reflects a requirement to antagonise abundant (3 mg/ml) fibrinogen in the maternal circulation, which may be necessary to prevent platelet aggregation and thrombosis in the prothrombotic maternal environment of pregnancy.

  13. Radiative interaction of a focused relativistic electron beam in energy-loss spectroscopy of nanoscopic platelets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Itskovsky, M. A.; Maniv, T.; Cohen, H.

    2008-01-01

    A quantum-mechanical scattering theory for relativistic, highly focused electron beams in the vacuum near nanoscopic platelets is presented, revealing an excitation mechanism due to the electron wave scattering from the platelet edges. Radiative electromagnetic excitations within the light cone are shown to arise, allowed by the breakdown of momentum conservation along the beam axis in the inelastic-scattering process. Calculated for metallic (silver and gold) and insulating (SiO 2 and MgO) nanoplatelets, radiative features are revealed above the main surface-plasmon-polariton peak, and dramatic enhancements in the electron-energy-loss probability at gaps of the 'classical' spectra are found. The corresponding radiation should be detectable in the vacuum far-field zone, with e beams exploited as sensitive 'tip detectors' of electronically excited nanostructures

  14. Radiative interaction of a focused relativistic electron beam in energy-loss spectroscopy of nanoscopic platelets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Itskovsky, M. A.; Cohen, H.; Maniv, T.

    2008-07-01

    A quantum-mechanical scattering theory for relativistic, highly focused electron beams in the vacuum near nanoscopic platelets is presented, revealing an excitation mechanism due to the electron wave scattering from the platelet edges. Radiative electromagnetic excitations within the light cone are shown to arise, allowed by the breakdown of momentum conservation along the beam axis in the inelastic-scattering process. Calculated for metallic (silver and gold) and insulating ( SiO2 and MgO) nanoplatelets, radiative features are revealed above the main surface-plasmon-polariton peak, and dramatic enhancements in the electron-energy-loss probability at gaps of the “classical” spectra are found. The corresponding radiation should be detectable in the vacuum far-field zone, with e beams exploited as sensitive “tip detectors” of electronically excited nanostructures.

  15. Thromboelastometric and platelet responses to silk biomaterials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kundu, Banani; Schlimp, Christoph J; Nürnberger, Sylvia; Redl, Heinz; Kundu, S C

    2014-05-13

    Silkworm's silk is natural biopolymer with unique properties including mechanical robustness, all aqueous base processing and ease in fabrication into different multifunctional templates. Additionally, the nonmulberry silks have cell adhesion promoting tri-peptide (RGD) sequences, which make it an immensely potential platform for regenerative medicine. The compatibility of nonmulberry silk with human blood is still elusive; thereby, restricts its further application as implants. The present study, therefore, evaluate the haematocompatibility of silk biomaterials in terms of platelet interaction after exposure to nonmulberry silk of Antheraea mylitta using thromboelastometry (ROTEM). The mulberry silk of Bombyx mori and clinically used Uni-Graft W biomaterial serve as references. Shortened clotting time, clot formation times as well as enhanced clot strength indicate the platelet mediated activation of blood coagulation cascade by tested biomaterials; which is comparable to controls.

  16. Inhibitory Effects of Red Wine Extracts on Endothelial-Dependent Adhesive Interactions with Monocytes Induced by Oxysterols

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuji Naito

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available Red wine polyphenolic compounds have been demonstrated to possess antioxidant properties, and several studies have suggested that they might constitute a relevant dietary factor in the protection from coronary heart disease. The aim of the present study is to examine whether red wine extracts (RWE can ameliorate oxysterol-induced endothelial response, and whether inhibition of adhesion molecule expression is involved in monocyte adhesion to endothelial cells. Surface expression and mRNA levels of adhesion molecules (intercellular adhesion molecule 1 and vascular cell adhesion molecule 1 were determined by ELISA and RT-PCR performed on human aortic endothelial cells (HAEC monolayers stimulated with 7b-hydroxycholesterol or 25-hydroxycholesterol. Incubation of HAEC with oxysterols (10 muM increased expression of adhesion molecules in a time-dependent manner. Pretreatment of HAEC with RWE at final concentrations of 1, 10, and 100 ng/ml significantly inhibited the increase of surface protein expression and mRNA levels. Adherence of monocytes to oxysterol-stimulated HAEC was increased compared to that of unstimulated cells. Treatment of HAEC with RWE significantly inhibited adherence of monocytes. These results suggest that RWE works as an anti-atherogenic agent through the inhibition of endothelial-dependent adhesive interactions with monocytes induced by oxysterols

  17. Robust cross-links in molluscan adhesive gels: testing for contributions from hydrophobic and electrostatic interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, A M; Robinson, T M; Salt, M D; Hamilton, K S; Silvia, B E; Blasiak, R

    2009-02-01

    The cross-linking interactions that provide cohesive strength to molluscan adhesive gels were investigated. Metal-based interactions have been shown to play an important role in the glue of the slug Arion subfuscus (Draparnaud), but other types of interactions may also contribute to the glue's strength and their role has not been investigated. This study shows that treatments that normally disrupt hydrophobic or electrostatic interactions have little to no effect on the slug glue. High salt concentrations and non-ionic detergent do not affect the solubility of the proteins in the glue or the ability of the glue proteins to stiffen gels. In contrast, metal chelation markedly disrupts the gel. Experiments with gel filtration chromatography identify a 40 kDa protein that is a central component of the cross-links in the glue. This 40 kDa protein forms robust macromolecular aggregations that are stable even in the presence of high concentrations of salt, non-ionic detergent, urea or metal chelators. Metal chelation during glue secretion, however, may block some of these cross-links. Such robust, non-specific interactions in an aqueous environment are highly unusual for hydrogels and reflect an intriguing cross-linking mechanism.

  18. Study of the adhesion interaction using 51Cr labelling method between the myeloma cell lines and the endothelial cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang Xueguang; Wang Jiangfang; Mao Zijun

    1995-06-01

    Using 51 Cr labelled multiple myeloma (MM) cell lines U266/XG-7, the regulatory effect of cytokines on the adhesive interaction between myeloma-cell lines U266/XG-7 and the endothelial cells, and the effects of these cytokines on expression of adhesion molecules and secretion of other cytokines were studied. The experimental results were as follows: (1) IL-6 and IL-6 Rgp 130-associated growth factors (such as GM-CSF) are not only myeloma cell growth factors, but also can enhance the adhesion between MM cells and endothelial cells and thus facilitated the metastasis of tumor cells. (2) Cytokines could induce increase in the expression of CD54 and CD44 on the endothelial cells and the secretion of IL-6 and TNF by the endothelial cells. On the other hand, the adhesion could also cause the change of CD11a, CD54, CD44 and VLA-4 on surface of myeloma cells XG-7. Finally, the interaction between MM cells and stromal cells from murine bone marrow could rapidly induce autocrine of IL-6 in human IL-6-dependent MM cells. (3) The interaction between stromal cells and tumor cells regulated by the cytokines and adhesion molecules was a key element in the pathogenesis and development of human MM. Among these factors, VLA-4 might be one of the molecules involved in U266/XG-7-EC interaction. (5 tabs., 8 figs.)

  19. Effect of red blood cells on platelet activation and thrombus formation in tortuous arterioles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jennifer K. W. Chesnutt

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Thrombosis is a major contributor to cardiovascular disease, which can lead to myocardial infarction and stroke. Thrombosis may form in tortuous microvessels, which are often seen throughout the human body, but the microscale mechanisms and processes are not well understood. In straight vessels, the presence of red blood cells (RBCs is known to push platelets toward walls, which may affect platelet aggregation and thrombus formation. However in tortuous vessels, the effects of RBC interactions with platelets in thrombosis are largely unknown. Accordingly, the objective of this work was to determine the physical effects of RBCs, platelet size, and vessel tortuosity on platelet activation and thrombus formation in tortuous arterioles. A discrete element computational model was used to simulate the transport, collision, adhesion, aggregation, and shear-induced platelet activation of hundreds of individual platelets and RBCs in thrombus formation in tortuous arterioles. Results showed that high shear stress near the inner sides of curved arteriole walls activated platelets to initiate thrombosis. RBCs initially promoted platelet activation, but then collisions of RBCs with mural thrombi reduced the amount of mural thrombus and the size of emboli. In the absence of RBCs, mural thrombus mass was smaller in a highly tortuous arteriole compared to a less tortuous arteriole. In the presence of RBCs however, mural thrombus mass was larger in the highly tortuous arteriole compared to the less tortuous arteriole. As well, smaller platelet size yielded less mural thrombus mass and smaller emboli, either with or without RBCs. This study shed light on microscopic interactions of RBCs and platelets in tortuous microvessels, which have implications in various pathologies associated with thrombosis and bleeding.

  20. Platelet activation in pregnancy-induced hypertension.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karalis, Ioannis; Nadar, Sunil K; Al Yemeni, Eman; Blann, Andrew D; Lip, Gregory Y H

    2005-01-01

    Although excess platelet activation, as indicated by increased plasma beta thromboglobulin (beta-TG), has been shown in pregnancy-induced hypertension (PIH), platelet adhesion, platelet morphology and a comparison of platelet and soluble (plasma) levels of the adhesion molecules P-selectin (pPsel and sPsel, respectively) have not been studied. We conducted a cross-sectional study of 35 consecutive women with PIH (age 31+/-6 years), 31 consecutive women with normotensive pregnancies (age 29+/-5 years) and 30 normotensive non pregnant women (age 30+/-5 years). Platelet adhesion was studied in vitro by binding to fibrinogen-coated microwells, platelet morphology [mass and volume by flow cytometry], whole-platelet P-selectin (pPsel) by ELISA of the lysate of 2 x 10(8) cells, and the plasma markers soluble P-selectin (sP-sel) and beta-TG, by ELISA. The women with PIH had significantly raised sPsel, pPsel and (as expected) beta-TG (all p<0.05), when compared to the normotensive pregnant women and controls. However, in PIH platelet adhesion was similar to that in the normotensive pregnancy, but still higher than the normal controls (p<0.001). There was no difference among the three groups with respect to platelet mass and volume. pPsel and platelet adhesion correlated with gestational age and with systolic and diastolic blood pressure (all p<0.05). Increased platelet activation and adhesion develop during normal pregnancy, with some indices being further altered in PIH.

  1. Filamin A Modulates Store-Operated Ca2+ Entry by Regulating STIM1 (Stromal Interaction Molecule 1)-Orai1 Association in Human Platelets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lopez, Jose J; Albarrán, Letizia; Jardín, Isaac; Sanchez-Collado, Jose; Redondo, Pedro C; Bermejo, Nuria; Bobe, Regis; Smani, Tarik; Rosado, Juan A

    2018-02-01

    Here, we provide evidence for the role of FLNA (filamin A) in the modulation of store-operated calcium entry (SOCE). SOCE is a major mechanism for calcium influx controlled by the intracellular Ca 2+ stores. On store depletion, the endoplasmic reticulum calcium sensor STIM1 (stromal interaction molecule 1) redistributes into puncta at endoplasmic reticulum/plasma membrane junctions, a process supported by the cytoskeleton, where it interacts with the calcium channels; however, the mechanism for fine-tuning SOCE is not completely understood. Our results demonstrate that STIM1 interacts with FLNA on calcium store depletion in human platelets. The interaction is dependent on the phosphorylation of FLNA at Ser 2152 by the cAMP-dependent protein kinase. Impairment of FLNA phosphorylation and knockdown of FLNA expression using siRNA increased SOCE in platelets. Similarly, SOCE was significantly greater in FLNA-deficient melanoma M2 cells than in the FLNA-expressing M2 subclone A7. Expression of FLNA in M2 cells attenuated SOCE, an effect prevented when the cells were transfected with the nonphosphorylatable FLNA S2152A mutant. Transfection of M2 cells with the STIM1(K684,685E) mutant reduced the STIM1-FLNA interaction. In platelets, attenuation of FLNA expression using siRNA resulted in enhanced association of STIM1 with the cytoskeleton, greater STIM1-Orai1 interaction, and SOCE. Introduction of an anti-FLNA (2597-2647) antibody attenuated the STIM1-FLNA interaction and enhanced thrombin-induced platelet aggregation. Our results indicate that FLNA modulates SOCE and then the correct platelet function, by fine-tuning the distribution of STIM1 in the cytoskeleton and the interaction with Orai1 channels. © 2017 American Heart Association, Inc.

  2. Methods for evaluation of platelet function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lindahl, Tomas L; Ramström, Sofia

    2009-10-01

    There are a multitude of platelet function tests available, reflecting the complex nature of the platelet in haemostasis. No simple single test will ever cover all aspects of platelet function. Some tests focus on the aggregation of platelets, for example aggregometry, other on the swelling in response to hypotonic solutions, i.e. the well-known hypotonic shock response, or adhesion or coagulation and clot retraction, for example thromboelastography. In general there is a lack of clinical studies showing a predictive value of analysis of platelet concentrates.

  3. Expression, purification, and analysis of three recombinant ECD disintegrins (r-colombistatins) from P-III class snake venom metalloproteinases affecting platelet aggregation and SK-MEL-28 cell adhesion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suntravat, Montamas; Helmke, Thomas J; Atphaisit, Chairat; Cuevas, Esteban; Lucena, Sara E; Uzcátegui, Nestor L; Sánchez, Elda E; Rodriguez-Acosta, Alexis

    2016-11-01

    Crotalid venoms are rich sources of components that affect the hemostatic system. Snake venom metalloproteinases are zinc-dependent enzymes responsible for hemorrhage that also interfere with hemostasis. The disintegrin domain is a part of snake venom metalloproteinases, which involves the binding of integrin receptors. Integrins play an essential role in cancer survival and invasion, and they have been major targets for drug development and design. Both native and recombinant disintegrins have been widely investigated for their anti-cancer activities in biological systems as well as in vitro and in vivo systems. Here, three new cDNAs encoding ECD disintegrin-like domains of metalloproteinase precursor sequences obtained from a Venezuelan mapanare (Bothrops colombiensis) venom gland cDNA library have been cloned. Three different N- and C-terminal truncated ECD disintegrin-like domains of metalloproteinases named colombistatins 2, 3, and 4 were amplified by PCR, cloned into a pGEX-4T-1 vector, expressed in Escherichia coli BL21, and tested for inhibition of platelet aggregation and inhibition of adhesion of human skin melanoma (SK-Mel-28) cancer cell lines on collagen I. Purified recombinant colombistatins 2, 3, and 4 were able to inhibit ristocetin- and collagen-induced platelet aggregation. r-Colombistatins 2 showed the most potent inhibiting SK-Mel-28 cancer cells adhesion to collagen. These results suggest that colombistatins may have utility in the development of therapeutic tools in the treatment of melanoma cancers and also thrombotic diseases. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  4. Interaction between focal adhesion kinase and Crk-associated tyrosine kinase substrate p130Cas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Polte, T R; Hanks, S K

    1995-11-07

    The focal adhesion kinase (FAK) has been implicated in integrin-mediated signaling events and in the mechanism of cell transformation by the v-Src and v-Crk oncoproteins. To gain further insight into FAK signaling pathways, we used a two-hybrid screen to identify proteins that interact with mouse FAK. The screen identified two proteins that interact with FAK via their Src homology 3 (SH3) domains: a v-Crk-associated tyrosine kinase substrate (Cas), p130Cas, and a still uncharacterized protein, FIPSH3-2, which contains an SH3 domain closely related to that of p130Cas. These SH3 domains bind to the same proline-rich region of FAK (APPKPSR) encompassing residues 711-717. The mouse p130Cas amino acid sequence was deduced from cDNA clones, revealing an overall high degree of similarity to the recently reported rat sequence. Coimmunoprecipitation experiments confirmed that p130Cas and FAK are associated in mouse fibroblasts. The stable interaction between p130Cas and FAK emerges as a likely key element in integrin-mediated signal transduction and further represents a direct molecular link between the v-Src and v-Crk oncoproteins. The Src family kinase Fyn, whose Src homology 2 (SH2) domain binds to the major FAK autophosphorylation site (tyrosine 397), was also identified in the two-hybrid screen.

  5. Interactions between Rotavirus and Suwannee River Organic Matter: Aggregation, Deposition, and Adhesion Force Measurement

    KAUST Repository

    Gutierrez, Leonardo

    2012-08-21

    Interactions between rotavirus and Suwannee River natural organic matter (NOM) were studied by time-resolved dynamic light scattering, quartz crystal microbalance, and atomic force microscopy. In NOM-containing NaCl solutions of up to 600 mM, rotavirus suspension remained stable for over 4 h. Atomic force microscopy (AFM) measurement for interaction force decay length at different ionic strengths showed that nonelectrostatic repulsive forces were mainly responsible for eliminating aggregation in NaCl solutions. Aggregation rates of rotavirus in solutions containing 20 mg C/L increased with divalent cation concentration until reaching a critical coagulation concentration of 30 mM CaCl2 or 70 mM MgCl2. Deposition kinetics of rotavirus on NOM-coated silica surface was studied using quartz crystal microbalance. Experimental attachment efficiencies for rotavirus adsorption to NOM-coated surface in MgCl2 solution were lower than in CaCl2 solution at a given divalent cation concentration. Stronger adhesion force was measured for virus-virus and virus-NOM interactions in CaCl2 solution compared to those in MgCl2 or NaCl solutions at the same ionic strength. This study suggested that divalent cation complexation with carboxylate groups in NOM and on virus surface was an important mechanism in the deposition and aggregation kinetics of rotavirus. © 2012 American Chemical Society.

  6. Flavanols and Platelet Reactivity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Debra A. Pearson

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available Platelet activity and platelet-endothelial cell interactions are important in the acute development of thrombosis, as well as in the pathogenesis of cardiovascular disease. An increasing number of foods have been reported to have platelet-inhibitory actions, and research with a number of flavanol-rich foods, including, grape juice, cocoa and chocolate, suggests that these foods may provide some protection against thrombosis. In the present report, we review a series of in vivo studies on the effects of flavanol-rich cocoa and chocolate on platelet activation and platelet-dependent primary hemostasis. Consumption of flavanol-rich cocoa inhibited several measures of platelet activity including, epinephrine- and ADP-induced glycoprotein (GP IIb/IIIa and P-Selectin expression, platelet microparticle formation, and epinephrine-collagen and ADP-collagen induced primary hemostasis. The epinephrine-induced inhibitory effects on GP IIb/IIIa and primary hemostasis were similar to, though less robust than those associated with the use of low dose (81 mg aspirin. These data, coupled with information from other studies, support the concept that flavanols present in cocoa and chocolate can modulate platelet function through a multitude of pathways.

  7. Platelets promote osteosarcoma cell growth through activation of the platelet-derived growth factor receptor-Akt signaling axis

    OpenAIRE

    Takagi, Satoshi; Takemoto, Ai; Takami, Miho; Oh-hara, Tomoko; Fujita, Naoya

    2014-01-01

    The interactions of tumor cells with platelets contribute to the progression of tumor malignancy, and the expression levels of platelet aggregation-inducing factors positively correlate with the metastatic potential of osteosarcoma cells. However, it is unclear how tumor-platelet interaction contributes to the proliferation of osteosarcomas. We report here that osteosarcoma-platelet interactions induce the release of platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF) from platelets, which promotes the pro...

  8. Platelet mimicry

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Moghimi, Seyed Moein; Hunter, Alan Christy; Peer, Dan

    2016-01-01

    Here we critically examine whether coating of nanoparticles with platelet membranes can truly disguise them against recognition by elements of the innate immune system. We further assess whether the "cloaking technology" can sufficiently equip nanoparticles with platelet-mimicking functionalities...

  9. Endothelial cell SHP-2 negatively regulates neutrophil adhesion and promotes transmigration by enhancing ICAM-1-VE-cadherin interaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Meiping; Zhang, Xinhua; Chen, Ao; Gu, Wei; Liu, Jie; Ren, Xiaojiao; Zhang, Jianping; Wu, Xiaoxiong; Place, Aaron T; Minshall, Richard D; Liu, Guoquan

    2017-11-01

    Intercellular adhesion molecule-1 (ICAM-1) mediates the firm adhesion of leukocytes to endothelial cells and initiates subsequent signaling that promotes their transendothelial migration (TEM). Vascular endothelial (VE)-cadherin plays a critical role in endothelial cell-cell adhesion, thereby controlling endothelial permeability and leukocyte transmigration. This study aimed to determine the molecular signaling events that originate from the ICAM-1-mediated firm adhesion of neutrophils that regulate VE-cadherin's role as a negative regulator of leukocyte transmigration. We observed that ICAM-1 interacts with Src homology domain 2-containing phosphatase-2 (SHP-2), and SHP-2 down-regulation via silencing of small interfering RNA in endothelial cells enhanced neutrophil adhesion to endothelial cells but inhibited neutrophil transmigration. We also found that VE-cadherin associated with the ICAM-1-SHP-2 complex. Moreover, whereas the activation of ICAM-1 leads to VE-cadherin dissociation from ICAM-1 and VE-cadherin association with actin, SHP-2 down-regulation prevented ICAM-1-VE-cadherin association and promoted VE-cadherin-actin association. Furthermore, SHP-2 down-regulation in vivo promoted LPS-induced neutrophil recruitment in mouse lung but delayed neutrophil extravasation. These results suggest that SHP-2- via association with ICAM-1-mediates ICAM-1-induced Src activation and modulates VE-cadherin switching association with ICAM-1 or actin, thereby negatively regulating neutrophil adhesion to endothelial cells and enhancing their TEM.-Yan, M., Zhang, X., Chen, A., Gu, W., Liu, J., Ren, X., Zhang, J., Wu, X., Place, A. T., Minshall, R. D., Liu, G. Endothelial cell SHP-2 negatively regulates neutrophil adhesion and promotes transmigration by enhancing ICAM-1-VE-cadherin interaction. © FASEB.

  10. The heterotrimeric G protein Gβ1 interacts with the catalytic subunit of protein phosphatase 1 and modulates G protein-coupled receptor signaling in platelets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pradhan, Subhashree; Khatlani, Tanvir; Nairn, Angus C; Vijayan, K Vinod

    2017-08-11

    Thrombosis is caused by the activation of platelets at the site of ruptured atherosclerotic plaques. This activation involves engagement of G protein-coupled receptors (GPCR) on platelets that promote their aggregation. Although it is known that protein kinases and phosphatases modulate GPCR signaling, how serine/threonine phosphatases integrate with G protein signaling pathways is less understood. Because the subcellular localization and substrate specificity of the catalytic subunit of protein phosphatase 1 (PP1c) is dictated by PP1c-interacting proteins, here we sought to identify new PP1c interactors. GPCRs signal via the canonical heterotrimeric Gα and Gβγ subunits. Using a yeast two-hybrid screen, we discovered an interaction between PP1cα and the heterotrimeric G protein Gβ 1 subunit. Co-immunoprecipitation studies with epitope-tagged PP1c and Gβ 1 revealed that Gβ 1 interacts with the PP1c α, β, and γ1 isoforms. Purified PP1c bound to recombinant Gβ 1 -GST protein, and PP1c co-immunoprecipitated with Gβ 1 in unstimulated platelets. Thrombin stimulation of platelets induced the dissociation of the PP1c-Gβ 1 complex, which correlated with an association of PP1c with phospholipase C β3 (PLCβ3), along with a concomitant dephosphorylation of the inhibitory Ser 1105 residue in PLCβ3. siRNA-mediated depletion of GNB1 (encoding Gβ 1 ) in murine megakaryocytes reduced protease-activated receptor 4, activating peptide-induced soluble fibrinogen binding. Thrombin-induced aggregation was decreased in PP1cα -/- murine platelets and in human platelets treated with a small-molecule inhibitor of Gβγ. Finally, disruption of PP1c-Gβ 1 complexes with myristoylated Gβ 1 peptides containing the PP1c binding site moderately decreased thrombin-induced human platelet aggregation. These findings suggest that Gβ 1 protein enlists PP1c to modulate GPCR signaling in platelets.

  11. An in vitro study on bacterial growth interactions and intestinal epithelial cell adhesion characteristics of probiotic combinations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moussavi, Mahta; Adams, Michelle Catherine

    2010-05-01

    The aims of this study were to examine long-term growth interactions of five probiotic strains (Lactobacillus casei 01, Lactobacillus plantarum HA8, Lactobacillus rhamnosus GG, Lactobacillus reuteri ATCC 55730 and Bifidobacterium lactis Bb12) either alone or in combination with Propionibacterium jensenii 702 in a co-culture system and to determine their adhesion ability to human colon adenocarcinoma cell line Caco-2. Growth patterns of probiotic Lactobacillus strains were not considerably affected by the presence of P. jensenii 702, whereas lactobacilli exerted a strong antagonistic action against P. jensenii 702. In the co-culture of Bif. lactis Bb12 and P. jensenii 702, a significant synergistic influence on growth of both bacteria was observed (P < 0.05). The results of adhesion assay showed that when probiotic strains were tested in combination, there was evidence of an associated effect on percentage adherence. However, in most cases these differences were not statistically significant (P < 0.05). Adhesion percentage of Lb. casei 01 and Lb. rhamnosus GG both decreased significantly in the presence of P. jensenii 702 compared to their adhesion levels when alone (P < 0.05). These results show that the survival and percentage adhesion of some probiotic strains may be influenced by the presence of other strains and this should be considered when formulating in the probiotic products.

  12. MICROBIAL CELL-SURFACE HYDROPHOBICITY - THE INVOLVEMENT OF ELECTROSTATIC INTERACTIONS IN MICROBIAL ADHESION TO HYDROCARBONS (MATH)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    GEERTSEMADOORNBUSCH, GI; VANDERMEI, HC; BUSSCHER, HJ

    Microbial adhesion to hydrocarbons (MATH) is the most commonly used method to determine microbial cell surface hydrophobicity. Since, however, the assay is based on adhesion, it is questionable whether the results reflect only the cell surface hydrophobicity or an interplay of hydrophobicity and

  13. Peptide-Mediated Platelet Capture at Gold Micropore Arrays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adamson, Kellie; Spain, Elaine; Prendergast, Una; Moran, Niamh; Forster, Robert J; Keyes, Tia E

    2016-11-30

    Ordered spherical cap gold cavity arrays with 5.4, 1.6, and 0.98 μm diameter apertures were explored as capture surfaces for human blood platelets to investigate the impact of surface geometry and chemical modification on platelet capture efficiency and their potential as platforms for surface enhanced Raman spectroscopy of single platelets. The substrates were chemically modified with single-constituent self-assembled monolayers (SAM) or mixed SAMs comprised of thiol-functionalized arginine-glycine-aspartic acid (RGD, a platelet integrin target) with or without 1-octanethiol (adhesion inhibitor). As expected, platelet adhesion was promoted and inhibited at RGD and alkanethiol modified surfaces, respectively. Platelet adhesion was reversible, and binding efficiency at the peptide modified substrates correlated inversely with pore diameter. Captured platelets underwent morphological change on capture, the extent of which depended on the topology of the underlying substrate. Regioselective capture of the platelets enabled study for the first time of the surface enhanced Raman spectroscopy of single blood platelets, yielding high quality Raman spectroscopy of individual platelets at 1.6 μm diameter pore arrays. Given the medical importance of blood platelets across a range of diseases from cancer to psychiatric illness, such approaches to platelet capture may provide a useful route to Raman spectroscopy for platelet related diagnostics.

  14. The role of electrostatic interactions in the Streptococcus thermophilus adhesion on human erythrocytes in media with different 1:1 electrolyte concentration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    О. І. Гордієнко

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available The process of bacterial adhesion is usually discussed in terms of the two-stage sorption model. According to the model, at the first stage the bacteria fastly attaches to the surface by weak physical interactions, while at the second stage irreversible molecular and cellular adhesion process takes place. An important factor, influencing the adhesion processes, is physical-chemical characteristics of the medium, in particular, the presence of monovalent cations therein. The aim of this work is to assess the role of electrostatic component of the intercellular interactions at the first reversible stage of adhesion. Comparison of experimental data of adhesion of lactobacilli S. thermophilus on human erythrocytes and theoretical definition of the Debye radius and the erythrocytes surface potential in the experimental solutions showed that with decreasing ionic strength of the solution the change in the adhesion index in our experiments is fully in line with the theory DLVO predictions.

  15. Adhesion structures and their cytoskeleton-membrane interactions at podosomes of osteoclasts in culture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akisaka, Toshitaka; Yoshida, Hisaho; Suzuki, Reiko; Takama, Keiko

    2008-03-01

    The organization of the cytoskeleton in the podosomes of osteoclasts was studied by use of cell shearing, rotary replication, and fluorescence cytochemical techniques. After shearing, clathrin plaques and particles associated with the cytoskeleton were left behind on the exposed cytoplasmic side of the membrane. The cytoskeleton of the podosomes was characterized by two types of actin filaments: relatively long filaments in the portion surrounding the podosome core, and highly branched short filaments in the core. Individual actin filaments radiating from the podosomes interacted with several membrane particles along the length of the filaments. Many lateral contacts with the membrane surface by the particles were made along the length of individual actin filaments. The polarity of actin filaments in podosomes became oriented such that their barbed ends were directed toward the core of podosomes. The actin cytoskeletons terminated or branched at the podosomes, where the membrane tightly adhered to the substratum. Microtubules were not usually present in the podosome structures; however, certain microtubules appeared to be morphologically in direct contact with the podosome core. Most of the larger clathrin plaques consisted of flat sheets of clathrin lattices that interconnected neighboring clathrin lattices to form an extensive clathrin area. However, the small deeply invaginated clathrin plaques and the podosomal cytoskeleton were located close together. Thus, the clathrin plaques on the ventral membrane of osteoclasts might be involved in both cell adhesion and the formation of receptor-ligand complexes, i.e., endocytosis.

  16. Mechanism of smectic arrangement of montmorillonite and bentonite clay platelets incorporated in gels of poly(acrylamide) induced by the interaction with cationic surfactants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Starodoubtsev, S G; Lavrentyeva, E K; Khokhlov, A R; Allegra, G; Famulari, A; Meille, S V

    2006-01-03

    Structure transitions, induced by the interaction with the cationic surfactant cetylpyridinium chloride in nanocomposite gels of poly(acrylamide) with incorporated suspensions of the two closely related layered clays bentonite and montmorillonite, were studied. Unexpectedly, different behaviors were revealed. X-ray diffraction measurements confirm that, due to the interaction with the surfactant, initially disordered bentonite platelets arrange into highly ordered structures incorporating alternating clay platelets and surfactant bilayers. The formation of these smectic structures also in the cross-linked polymer gels, upon addition of the surfactant, is explained by the existence of preformed, poorly ordered aggregates of the clay platelets in the suspensions before the gel formation. In the case of montmorillonite, smectic ordering of the disordered platelets in the presence of the surfactant is observed only after drying the suspensions and the clay-gel composites. Rheology studies of aqueous suspensions of the two clays, in the absence of both surfactant and gel, evidence a much higher viscosity for bentonite than for montmorillonite, suggesting smaller clay-aggregate size in the latter case. Qualitatively consistent results are obtained from optical micrographs.

  17. Reflections about Adhesive Systems

    OpenAIRE

    de Freitas Borges, Marciano; Diesel, Pâmela Gutheil; Corrêa, Fernanda Gomez; Bernardi, Eledana; Fernandes Montagner, Anelise; Skupien, Jovito Adiel; Susin, Alexandre Henrique

    2010-01-01

    The adhesive systems are responsible for an efficient union between teeth and resin, resulting in a longevity restoration. They are organic molecules di or multifunctional that contain reactive groups that interact with dentin and with the resin monomer of composite resin. The adhesive systems are characterized by wet adhesion, which is a result of presence of hidrophylics radicals in their compositions, to promote a better bond and the best properties of the adhesion. Adhesive systems may us...

  18. Adhesion science

    CERN Document Server

    Comyn, John

    1997-01-01

    The use of adhesives is widespread and growing, and there are few modern artefacts, from the simple cereal packet, to the jumbo jet, that are without this means of joining. Adhesion Science provides an illuminating account of the science underlying the use of adhesives, a branch of chemical technology which is fundamental to the science of coatings and composite materials and to the performance of all types of bonded structures. This book guides the reader through the essential basic polymer science, and the chemistry of adhesives in use at present. It discusses surface preparation for adhesive bonding, and the use of primers and coupling agents. There is a detailed chapter on contact angles and what can be predicted from them. A simple guide on stress distribution joints and how this relates to testing is included. It also examines the interaction of adhesives and the environment, including an analysis of the resistance of joints to water, oxygen and ultra-violet light. Adhesion Science provides a comprehens...

  19. Platelet-activating factor and group I metabotropic glutamate receptors interact for full development and maintenance of long-term potentiation in the rat medial vestibular nuclei.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grassi, S; Francescangeli, E; Goracci, G; Pettorossi, V E

    1999-01-01

    In rat brainstem slices, we investigated the interaction between platelet-activating factor and group I metabotropic glutamate receptors in mediating long-term potentiation within the medial vestibular nuclei. We analysed the N1 field potential wave evoked in the ventral portion of the medial vestibular nuclei by primary vestibular afferent stimulation. The group I metabotropic glutamate receptor antagonist, (R,S)-1-aminoindan-1,5-dicarboxylic acid, prevented long-term potentiation induced by a platelet-activating factor analogue [1-O-hexadecyl-2-O-(methylcarbamyl)-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine], as well as the full development of potentiation, induced by high-frequency stimulation under the blocking agent for synaptosomal platelet-activating factor receptors (ginkolide B), at drug washout. However, potentiation directly induced by the group I glutamate metabotropic receptor agonist, (R,S)-3,5-dihydroxyphenylglycine, was reduced by ginkolide B. These findings suggest that platelet-activating factor, whether exogenous or released following potentiation induction, exerts its effect through presynaptic group I metabotropic glutamate receptors, mediating the increase of glutamate release. In addition, we found that this mechanism, which led to full potentiation through presynaptic group I metabotropic glutamate receptor activation, was inactivated soon after application of potentiation-inducing stimulus. In fact, the long-lasting block of the platelet-activating factor and metabotropic glutamate receptors prevented the full potentiation development and the induced potentiation progressively declined to null. Moreover, ginkolide B, given when high-frequency-dependent potentiation was established, only reduced it within 5 min after potentiation induction. We conclude that to fully develop vestibular long-term potentiation requires presynaptic events. Platelet-activating factor, released after the activation of postsynaptic mechanisms which induce potentiation, is necessary

  20. Adhesion in microelectronics

    CERN Document Server

    Mittal, K L

    2014-01-01

    This comprehensive book will provide both fundamental and applied aspects of adhesion pertaining to microelectronics in a single and easily accessible source. Among the topics to be covered include; Various theories or mechanisms of adhesionSurface (physical or chemical) characterization of materials as it pertains to adhesionSurface cleaning as it pertains to adhesionWays to improve adhesionUnraveling of interfacial interactions using an array of pertinent techniquesCharacterization of interfaces / interphasesPolymer-polymer adhesionMetal-polymer adhesion  (metallized polymers)Polymer adhesi

  1. The role of electrostatic interactions in the Streptococcus thermophilus adhesion on human erythrocytes in media with different 2:1 electrolyte concentration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    О. І. Гордієнко

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available In the two-stage sorption model at the first stage is mostly reversible attachment, while at the second irreversible stage molecular and cellular adhesion processes take place. An important factor, influencing the adhesion processes, is physical-chemical characteristics of the medium, in particular, the presence of divalent cations therein. The aim of this work is to assess the role of electrostatic component of the intercellular interactions in media with different 2:1 electrolyte concentration at the first reversible stage of adhesion and probability of further occurrence of specific binding. Electrostatic interactions play a decisive role in intercellular adhesion process. The obtained experimental results and theoretical calculations of the electrostatic interaction parameters once again confirmed the acceptability of a two-stage model of sorption and DLVO theory to describe a cell-cell adhesion.

  2. Platelets alter gene expression profile in human brain endothelial cells in an in vitro model of cerebral malaria.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mathieu Barbier

    Full Text Available Platelet adhesion to the brain microvasculature has been associated with cerebral malaria (CM in humans, suggesting that platelets play a role in the pathogenesis of this syndrome. In vitro co-cultures have shown that platelets can act as a bridge between Plasmodium falciparum-infected red blood cells (pRBC and human brain microvascular endothelial cells (HBEC and potentiate HBEC apoptosis. Using cDNA microarray technology, we analyzed transcriptional changes of HBEC in response to platelets in the presence or the absence of tumor necrosis factor (TNF and pRBC, which have been reported to alter gene expression in endothelial cells. Using a rigorous statistical approach with multiple test corrections, we showed a significant effect of platelets on gene expression in HBEC. We also detected a strong effect of TNF, whereas there was no transcriptional change induced specifically by pRBC. Nevertheless, a global ANOVA and a two-way ANOVA suggested that pRBC acted in interaction with platelets and TNF to alter gene expression in HBEC. The expression of selected genes was validated by RT-qPCR. The analysis of gene functional annotation indicated that platelets induce the expression of genes involved in inflammation and apoptosis, such as genes involved in chemokine-, TREM1-, cytokine-, IL10-, TGFβ-, death-receptor-, and apoptosis-signaling. Overall, our results support the hypothesis that platelets play a pathogenic role in CM.

  3. Extracellular Protein Interactions Mediated by the Neural Cell Adhesion Molecule, NCAM: Heterophilic Interactions Between NCAM and Cell Adhesion Molecules, Extracellular Matrix Proteins, and Viruses

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Janne; Kulahin, Nikolaj; Walmod, Peter

    2008-01-01

    interactions, thereby modulating a range of biological processes. This review summarizes interactions between NCAM and other CAMs and ECM proteins. Additionally, the role of NCAM as a receptor for rabies virus, and its implications in rabies infections is briefly described. Interactions between NCAM and its...

  4. Adhesion and degranulation promoting adapter protein (ADAP is a central hub for phosphotyrosine-mediated interactions in T cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marc Sylvester

    Full Text Available TCR stimulation leads to an increase in cellular adhesion among other outcomes. The adhesion and degranulation promoting adapter protein (ADAP is known to be rapidly phosphorylated after T cell stimulation and relays the TCR signal to adhesion molecules of the integrin family. While three tyrosine phosphorylation sites have been characterized biochemically, the binding capabilities and associated functions of several other potential phosphotyrosine motifs remain unclear. Here, we utilize in vitro phosphorylation and mass spectrometry to map novel phosphotyrosine sites in the C-terminal part of human ADAP (486-783. Individual tyrosines were then mutated to phenylalanine and their relevance for cellular adhesion and migration was tested experimentally. Functionally important tyrosine residues include two sites within the folded hSH3 domains of ADAP and two at the C-terminus. Furthermore, using a peptide pulldown approach in combination with stable isotope labeling in cell culture (SILAC we identified SLP-76, PLCgamma, PIK3R1, Nck, CRK, Gads, and RasGAP as phospho-dependent binding partners of a central YDDV motif of ADAP. The phosphorylation-dependent interaction between ADAP and Nck was confirmed by yeast two-hybrid analysis, immunoprecipitation and binary pulldown experiments, indicating that ADAP directly links integrins to modulators of the cytoskeleton independent of SLP-76.

  5. Multiscale approaches to protein-mediated interactions between membranes—relating microscopic and macroscopic dynamics in radially growing adhesions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bihr, Timo; Smith, Ana-Suncana; Seifert, Udo

    2015-01-01

    Macromolecular complexation leading to coupling of two or more cellular membranes is a crucial step in a number of biological functions of the cell. While other mechanisms may also play a role, adhesion always involves the fluctuations of deformable membranes, the diffusion of proteins and the molecular binding and unbinding. Because these stochastic processes couple over a multitude of time and length scales, theoretical modeling of membrane adhesion has been a major challenge. Here we present an effective Monte Carlo scheme within which the effects of the membrane are integrated into local rates for molecular recognition. The latter step in the Monte Carlo approach enables us to simulate the nucleation and growth of adhesion domains within a system of the size of a cell for tens of seconds without loss of accuracy, as shown by comparison to 10 6 times more expensive Langevin simulations. To perform this validation, the Langevin approach was augmented to simulate diffusion of proteins explicitly, together with reaction kinetics and membrane dynamics. We use the Monte Carlo scheme to gain deeper insight to the experimentally observed radial growth of micron sized adhesion domains, and connect the effective rate with which the domain is growing to the underlying microscopic events. We thus demonstrate that our technique yields detailed information about protein transport and complexation in membranes, which is a fundamental step toward understanding even more complex membrane interactions in the cellular context. (paper)

  6. Blood platelets in the progression of Alzheimer's disease.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nina S Gowert

    Full Text Available Alzheimer's disease (AD is characterized by neurotoxic amyloid-ß plaque formation in brain parenchyma and cerebral blood vessels known as cerebral amyloid angiopathy (CAA. Besides CAA, AD is strongly related to vascular diseases such as stroke and atherosclerosis. Cerebrovascular dysfunction occurs in AD patients leading to alterations in blood flow that might play an important role in AD pathology with neuronal loss and memory deficits. Platelets are the major players in hemostasis and thrombosis, but are also involved in neuroinflammatory diseases like AD. For many years, platelets were accepted as peripheral model to study the pathophysiology of AD because platelets display the enzymatic activities to generate amyloid-ß (Aß peptides. In addition, platelets are considered to be a biomarker for early diagnosis of AD. Effects of Aß peptides on platelets and the impact of platelets in the progression of AD remained, however, ill-defined. The present study explored the cellular mechanisms triggered by Aß in platelets. Treatment of platelets with Aß led to platelet activation and enhanced generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS and membrane scrambling, suggesting enhanced platelet apoptosis. More important, platelets modulate soluble Aß into fibrillar structures that were absorbed by apoptotic but not vital platelets. This together with enhanced platelet adhesion under flow ex vivo and in vivo and platelet accumulation at amyloid deposits of cerebral vessels of AD transgenic mice suggested that platelets are major contributors of CAA inducing platelet thrombus formation at vascular amyloid plaques leading to vessel occlusion critical for cerebrovascular events like stroke.

  7. Platelet count

    Science.gov (United States)

    The normal number of platelets in the blood is 150,000 to 400,000 platelets per microliter (mcL) or 150 to 400 × 10 9 /L. Normal value ranges may vary slightly. Some lab use different measurements or ...

  8. Platelet serotonin promotes the recruitment of neutrophils to sites of acute inflammation in mice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suidan, Georgette L.; Demers, Melanie; Herr, Nadine; Carbo, Carla; Brill, Alexander; Cifuni, Stephen M.; Mauler, Maximilian; Cicko, Sanja; Bader, Michael; Idzko, Marco; Bode, Christoph

    2013-01-01

    The majority of peripheral serotonin is stored in platelets, which secrete it on activation. Serotonin releases Weibel-Palade bodies (WPBs) and we asked whether absence of platelet serotonin affects neutrophil recruitment in inflammatory responses. Tryptophan hydroxylase (Tph)1–deficient mice, lacking non-neuronal serotonin, showed mild leukocytosis compared with wild-type (WT), primarily driven by an elevated neutrophil count. Despite this, 50% fewer leukocytes rolled on unstimulated mesenteric venous endothelium of Tph1−/− mice. The velocity of rolling leukocytes was higher in Tph1−/− mice, indicating fewer selectin-mediated interactions with endothelium. Stimulation of endothelium with histamine, a secretagogue of WPBs, or injection of serotonin normalized the rolling in Tph1−/− mice. Diminished rolling in Tph1−/− mice resulted in reduced firm adhesion of leukocytes after lipopolysaccharide treatment. Blocking platelet serotonin uptake with fluoxetine in WT mice reduced serum serotonin by > 80% and similarly reduced leukocyte rolling and adhesion. Four hours after inflammatory stimulation, neutrophil extravasation into lung, peritoneum, and skin wounds was reduced in Tph1−/− mice, whereas in vitro neutrophil chemotaxis was independent of serotonin. Survival of lipopolysaccharide-induced endotoxic shock was improved in Tph1−/− mice. In conclusion, platelet serotonin promotes the recruitment of neutrophils in acute inflammation, supporting an important role for platelet serotonin in innate immunity. PMID:23243271

  9. Wood : adhesives

    Science.gov (United States)

    A.H. Conner

    2001-01-01

    This chapter on wood adhesives includes: 1) Classification of wood adhesives 2) Thermosetting wood adhesives 3) Thermoplastic adhesives, 4) Wood adhesives based on natural sources 5) Nonconventional bonding of wood 6) Wood bonding.

  10. Far-field interaction of focused relativistic electron beams in electron energy loss spectroscopy of nanoscopic platelets

    OpenAIRE

    Itskovsky, M. A.; Cohen, H.; Maniv, T.

    2008-01-01

    A quantum mechanical scattering theory for relativistic, highly focused electron beams near nanoscopic platelets is presented, revealing a new excitation mechanism due to the electron wave scattering from the platelet edges. Radiative electromagnetic excitations within the light cone are shown to arise, allowed by the breakdown of momentum conservation along the beam axis in the inelastic scattering process. Calculated for metallic (silver and gold) and insulating (SiO2 and MgO) nanoplatelets...

  11. Molecular dynamics analysis of the influence of Coulomb and van der Waals interactions on the work of adhesion at the solid-liquid interface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Surblys, Donatas; Leroy, Frédéric; Yamaguchi, Yasutaka; Müller-Plathe, Florian

    2018-04-01

    We investigated the solid-liquid work of adhesion of water on a model silica surface by molecular dynamics simulations, where a methodology previously developed to determine the work of adhesion through thermodynamic integration was extended to a system with long-range electrostatic interactions between solid and liquid. In agreement with previous studies, the work of adhesion increased when the magnitude of the surface polarity was increased. On the other hand, we found that when comparing two systems with and without solid-liquid electrostatic interactions, which were set to have approximately the same total solid-liquid interfacial energy, former had a significantly smaller work of adhesion and a broader distribution in the interfacial energies, which has not been previously reported in detail. This was explained by the entropy contribution to the adhesion free energy; i.e., the former with a broader energy distribution had a larger interfacial entropy than the latter. While the entropy contribution to the work of adhesion has already been known, as a work of adhesion itself is free energy, these results indicate that, contrary to common belief, wetting behavior such as the contact angle is not only governed by the interfacial energy but also significantly affected by the interfacial entropy. Finally, a new interpretation of interfacial entropy in the context of solid-liquid energy variance was offered, from which a fast way to qualitatively estimate the work of adhesion was also presented.

  12. Toughening of Epoxy Adhesives by Combined Interaction of Carbon Nanotubes and Silsesquioxanes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giuseppina Barra

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available The extensive use of adhesives in many structural applications in the transport industry and particularly in the aeronautic field is due to numerous advantages of bonded joints. However, still many researchers are working to enhance the mechanical properties and rheological performance of adhesives by using nanoadditives. In this study the effect of the addition of Multi-Wall Carbon Nanotubes (MWCNTs with Polyhedral Oligomeric Silsesquioxane (POSS compounds, either Glycidyl Oligomeric Silsesquioxanes (GPOSS or DodecaPhenyl Oligomeric Silsesquioxanes (DPHPOSS to Tetraglycidyl Methylene Dianiline (TGMDA epoxy formulation, was investigated. The formulations contain neither a tougher matrix such as elastomers nor other additives typically used to provide a closer match in the coefficient of thermal expansion in order to discriminate only the effect of the addition of the above-mentioned components. Bonded aluminium single lap joints were made using both untreated and Chromic Acid Anodisation (CAA-treated aluminium alloy T2024 adherends. The effects of the different chemical functionalities of POSS compounds, as well as the synergistic effect between the MWCNT and POSS combination on adhesion strength, were evaluated by viscosity measurement, tensile tests, Dynamic Mechanical Analysis (DMA, single lap joint shear strength tests, and morphological investigation. The best performance in the Lap Shear Strength (LSS of the manufactured joints has been found for treated adherends bonded with epoxy adhesive containing MWCNTs and GPOSS. Carbon nanotubes have been found to play a very effective bridging function across the fracture surface of the bonded joints.

  13. Hybridization quality and bond strength of adhesive systems according to interaction with dentin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salvio, Luciana Andrea; Hipólito, Vinicius Di; Martins, Adriano Luis; de Goes, Mario Fernando

    2013-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the hybridization quality and bond strength of adhesives to dentin. Materials and Methods: Ten human molars were ground to expose the dentin and then sectioned in four tooth-quarters. They were randomly divided into 5 groups according to the adhesive used: Two single-step self-etch adhesives – Adper Prompt (ADP) and Xeno III (XE), two two-step self-etching primer systems – Clearfil SE Bond (SE) and Adhe SE (ADSE), and one one-step etch-and-rinse system – Adper Single Bond (SB). Resin composite (Filtek Z250) crown buildups were made on the bonded surfaces and incrementally light-cured for 20 s. The restored tooth-quarters were stored in water at 37°C for 24 h and then sectioned into beams (0.8 mm2 in cross-section). Maximal microtensile bond strength (μ-TBS) was recorded (0.5 mm/min in crosshead speed). The results were submitted to one-way ANOVA and Tukey's test (α = 0.05). Thirty additional teeth were used to investigate the hybridization quality by SEM using silver methenamine or ammoniacal silver nitrate dyes. Results: SE reached significantly higher μ-TBS (P 0.05), and between SB and ADP (P > 0.05); ADSE and XE were significantly higher than SB and ADP (P adhesives with dentin. The hybridization quality was essential to improve the immediate μ-TBS to dentin. PMID:24926212

  14. Adhesive protein interactions with chitosan: consequences for valve endothelial cell growth on tissue-engineering materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cuy, Janet L; Beckstead, Benjamin L; Brown, Chad D; Hoffman, Allan S; Giachelli, Cecilia M

    2003-11-01

    Stable endothelialization of a tissue-engineered heart valve is essential for proper valve function, although adhesive characteristics of the native valve endothelial cell (VEC) have rarely been explored. This research evaluated VEC adhesive qualities and attempted to enhance VEC growth on the biopolymer chitosan, a novel tissue-engineering scaffold material with promising biological and chemical properties. Aortic VEC cultures were isolated and found to preferentially adhere to fibronectin, collagen types IV and I over laminin and osteopontin in a dose-dependent manner. Seeding of VEC onto comparison substrates revealed VEC growth and morphology to be preferential in the order: tissue culture polystyrene > gelatin, poly(DL-lactide-co-glycolide), chitosan > poly(hydroxy alkanoate). Adhesive protein precoating of chitosan did not significantly enhance VEC growth, despite equivalent protein adsorption as to polystyrene. Initial cell adhesion to protein-precoated chitosan, however, was higher than for polystyrene. Composite chitosan/collagen type IV films were investigated as an alternative to simple protein precoatings, and were shown to improve VEC growth and morphology over chitosan alone. These findings suggest potential manipulation of chitosan properties to improve amenability to valve tissue-engineering applications. Copyright 2003 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  15. Mouse CD23 regulates monocyte activation through an interaction with the adhesion molecule CD11b/CD18.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lecoanet-Henchoz, S; Plater-Zyberk, C; Graber, P; Gretener, D; Aubry, J P; Conrad, D H; Bonnefoy, J Y

    1997-09-01

    CD23 is expressed on a variety of hemopoietic cells. Recently, we have reported that blocking CD23 interactions in a murine model of arthritis resulted in a marked improvement of disease severity. Here, we demonstrate that CD11b, the alpha chain of the beta 2 integrin adhesion molecule complex CD11b/CD18 expressed on monocytes interacts with CD23. Using a recombinant fusion protein (ZZ-CD23), murine CD23 was shown to bind to peritoneal macrophages and peripheral blood cells isolated from mice as well as the murine macrophage cell line, RAW. The interactions between mouse ZZ-CD23 and CD11b/CD18-expressing cells were significantly inhibited by anti-CD11b monoclonal antibodies. A functional consequence was then demonstrated by inducing an up-regulation of interleukin-6 (IL-6) production following ZZ-CD23 incubation with monocytes. The addition of Fab fragments generated from the monoclonal antibody CD11b impaired this cytokine production by 50%. Interestingly, a positive autocrine loop was identified as IL-6 was shown to increase CD23 binding to macrophages. These results demonstrate that similar to findings using human cells, murine CD23 binds to the surface adhesion molecule, CD11b, and these interactions regulate biological activities of murine myeloid cells.

  16. PECAM-1 polymorphism affects monocyte adhesion to endothelial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goodman, Reyna S; Kirton, Christopher M; Oostingh, Gertie J; Schön, Michael P; Clark, Michael R; Bradley, J Andrew; Taylor, Craig J

    2008-02-15

    Platelet endothelial cell adhesion molecule-1 (PECAM-1/CD31) plays an important role in leukocyte-endothelial cell adhesion and transmigration. Single nucleotide polymorphisms of PECAM-1 encoding amino acid substitutions at positions 98 leucine/valine (L/V), 536 serine/asparagine (S/N), and 643 arginine/glycine (R/G) occur in strong genetic linkage resulting in two common haplotypes (LSR and VNG). These PECAM-1 polymorphisms are associated with graft-versus-host disease after hematopoietic stem cell transplantation and with cardiovascular disease, but whether they influence PECAM-1 function is unknown. We examined the effect of homozygous and heterozygous expression of the PECAM-1 LSR and VNG genotypes on the adhesive interactions of peripheral blood monocytes and activated endothelial cell monolayers under shear stress in a flow-based cell adhesion assay. There was no difference in monocyte adhesion between the two homozygous genotypes of PECAM-1 but when monocytes expressed both alleles in heterozygous form, firm adhesion of monocytes to endothelial cells was markedly increased. PECAM-1 polymorphism expressed in homozygous or heterozygous form by endothelial cells did not influence monocyte adhesion. This is, to our knowledge, the first demonstration that PECAM-1 genotype can alter the level of monocyte binding to endothelial cells and a demonstration that heterozygous expression of a polymorphic protein may lead to altered function.

  17. Platelet Donation

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... During your donation you can relax, watch a movie, listen to music…in a few hours you’ ... requirements may become eligible to donate platelets. Please review our eligibility requirements as some states require parental ...

  18. VANGL2 interacts with integrin αv to regulate matrix metalloproteinase activity and cell adhesion to the extracellular matrix.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jessen, Tammy N; Jessen, Jason R

    2017-12-15

    Planar cell polarity (PCP) proteins are implicated in a variety of morphogenetic processes including embryonic cell migration and potentially cancer progression. During zebrafish gastrulation, the transmembrane protein Vang-like 2 (VANGL2) is required for PCP and directed cell migration. These cell behaviors occur in the context of a fibrillar extracellular matrix (ECM). While it is thought that interactions with the ECM regulate cell migration, it is unclear how PCP proteins such as VANGL2 influence these events. Using an in vitro cell culture model system, we previously showed that human VANGL2 negatively regulates membrane type-1 matrix metalloproteinase (MMP14) and activation of secreted matrix metalloproteinase 2 (MMP2). Here, we investigated the functional relationship between VANGL2, integrin αvβ3, and MMP2 activation. We provide evidence that VANGL2 regulates cell surface integrin αvβ3 expression and adhesion to fibronectin, laminin, and vitronectin. Inhibition of MMP14/MMP2 activity suppressed the cell adhesion defect in VANGL2 knockdown cells. Furthermore, our data show that MMP14 and integrin αv are required for increased proteolysis by VANGL2 knockdown cells. Lastly, we have identified integrin αvβ3 as a novel VANGL2 binding partner. Together, these findings begin to dissect the molecular underpinnings of how VANGL2 regulates MMP activity and cell adhesion to the ECM. Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Mechanisms of Staphylococcus epidermidis adhesion to model biomaterial surfaces: Establising a link between thrombosis and infection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Higashi, Julie Miyo

    Infections involving Staphylococcus epidermidis remain a life threatening complication associated with the use of polymer based cardiovascular devices. One of the critical steps in infection pathogenesis is the adhesion of the bacteria to the device surface. Currently, mechanisms of S. epidermidis adhesion are incompletely understood, but are thought to involve interactions between bacteria, device surface, and host blood elements in the form of adsorbed plasma proteins and surface adherent platelets. Our central hypothesis is that elements participating in thrombosis also promote S. epidermidis adhesion by specifically binding to the bacterial surface. The adhesion kinetics of S. epidermidis RP62A to host modified model biomaterial surface octadecyltrichlorosilane (OTS) under hydrodynamic shear conditions were characterized. Steady state adhesion to adsorbed proteins and surface adherent platelets was achieved at 90-120 minutes and 60-90 minutes, respectively. A dose response curve of S. epidermidis adhesion in the concentration range of 10sp7{-}10sp9 bac/mL resembled a multilayer adsorption isotherm. Increasing shear stress was found to LTA, and other LTA blocking agents significantly decreased S. epidermidis adhesion to the fibrin-platelet clots, suggesting that this interaction between S. epidermidis and fibrin-platelet clots is specific. Studies evaluated the adhesion of S. epidermidis to polymer immobilized heparin report conflicting results. Paulsson et al., showed that coagulase negative staphylococci adhered in comparable numbers to both immobilized heparin and nonheparinized surfaces, while exhibiting significantly greater adhesion to both surfaces than S. aureus. Preadsorption of the surfaces with specific heparin binding plasma proteins vitronectin, fibronectin, laminin, and collagen significantly increased adhesion. It was postulated that immobilized heparin contained binding sites for the plasma proteins, exposing bacteria binding domains of the

  20. Focal adhesion interactions with topographical structures: a novel method for immuno-SEM labelling of focal adhesions in S-phase cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biggs, M J P; Richards, R G; Wilkinson, C D W; Dalby, M J

    2008-07-01

    Current understanding of the mechanisms involved in osseointegration following implantation of a biomaterial has led to adhesion quantification being implemented as an assay of cytocompatibility. Such measurement can be hindered by intra-sample variation owing to morphological changes associated with the cell cycle. Here we report on a new scanning electron microscopical method for the simultaneous immunogold labelling of cellular focal adhesions and S-phase nuclei identified by BrdU incorporation. Prior to labelling, cellular membranes are removed by tritonization and antigens of non-interest blocked by serum incubation. Adhesion plaque-associated vinculin and S-phase nuclei were both separately labelled with a 1.4 nm gold colloid and visualized by subsequent colloid enhancement via silver deposition. This study is specifically concerned with the effects microgroove topographies have on adhesion formation in S-phase osteoblasts. By combining backscattered electron (BSE) imaging with secondary electron (SE) imaging it was possible to visualize S-phase nuclei and the immunogold-labelled adhesion sites in one energy 'plane' and the underlying nanotopography in another. Osteoblast adhesion to these nanotopographies was ascertained by quantification of adhesion complex formation.

  1. Heterogeneity of rabbit platelets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Karpatkin, S.

    1978-01-01

    Rabbits were injected intravenously with a cohort platelet label, 75 Se-selenomethionine. Platelet-rich plasma was separated into five different platelet density fractions on each of seven days by repetitively centrifuging the same sample of platelet-rich plasma at increasing gravitational force. The heaviest platelet sediment fraction was enriched with larger platelets. The lightest platelet sediment fraction was enriched with smaller platelets. Incorporation of isotope into the heaviest platelet fraction was considerably greater than incorporation into the lightest platelet fraction. The mean platelet survival of the lightest two fractions was significantly shorter than that of the heaviest three fractions. SDS-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis of the platelet cell sap generally revealed 10 prominent protein bands for the heaviest platelet fractions. The lightest platelet fraction had six absent to markedly diminished platelet proteins. The data are compatible with two models, (1) heavy-large platelets are, on average, young platelets which become lighter-smaller platelets while losing platelet membranes and cell sap components with time. (2) Heavy-large platelets and light-small platelets are produced independently by specific megakarocytes. The heavy-large platelets incorporate more isotope that lighter-smaller platelets (possibly because of their megakarocyte precursor). However, they are released earlier into the circulation than lighter-smaller platelets and are therefore younger platelets. The light-smaller platelets which are released later into the circulation have a shorter survival. (author)

  2. The Src SH2 domain interacts dynamically with the focal adhesion kinase binding site as demonstrated by paramagnetic NMR spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lindfors, Hanna E; Drijfhout, Jan Wouter; Ubbink, Marcellus

    2012-06-01

    The interaction between the tyrosine kinases Src and focal adhesion kinase (FAK) is a key step in signaling processes from focal adhesions. The phosphorylated tyrosine residue 397 in FAK is able to bind the Src SH2 domain. To establish the extent of the FAK binding motif, the binding affinity of the SH2 domain for phosphorylated and unphosphorylated FAK-derived peptides of increasing length was determined and compared with that of the internal Src SH2 binding site. It is shown that the FAK peptides have higher affinity than the internal binding site and that seven negative residues adjacent to the core SH2 binding motif increase the binding constant 30-fold. A rigid spin-label incorporated in the FAK peptides was used to establish on the basis of paramagnetic relaxation enhancement whether the peptide-protein complex is well defined. A large spread of the paramagnetic effects on the surface of the SH2 domain suggests that the peptide-protein complex exhibits dynamics, despite the high affinity of the peptide. The strong electrostatic interaction between the positive side of the SH2 domain and the negative peptide results in a high affinity but may also favor a dynamic interaction. Copyright © 2012 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  3. Effects of hydrodynamic interaction on random adhesive loose packings of micron-sized particles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liu Wenwei

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Random loose packings of monodisperse spherical micron-sized particles under a uniform flow field are investigated via an adhesive discrete-element method with the two-way coupling between the particles and the fluid. Characterized by a dimensionless adhesion parameter, the packing fraction follows the similar law to that without fluid, but results in larger values due to the hydrodynamic compression. The total pressure drop through the packed bed shows a critical behaviour at the packing fraction of ϕ ≈ 0.22 in the present study. The normalized permeability of the packed bed for different parameters increases with the increase of porosities and is also in consistent with the Kozeny-Carman equation.

  4. Platelets Inhibit Migration of Canine Osteosarcoma Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bulla, S C; Badial, P R; Silva, R C; Lunsford, K; Bulla, C

    2017-01-01

    The interaction between platelets and tumour cells is important for tumour growth and metastasis. Thrombocytopenia or antiplatelet treatment negatively impact on cancer metastasis, demonstrating potentially important roles for platelets in tumour progression. To our knowledge, there is no information regarding the role of platelets in cancer progression in dogs. This study was designed to test whether canine platelets affected the migratory behaviour of three canine osteosarcoma cell lines and to give insights of molecular mechanisms. Intact platelets, platelet lysate and platelet releasate inhibited the migration of canine osteosarcoma cell lines. Addition of blood leucocytes to the platelet samples did not alter the inhibitory effect on migration. Platelet treatment also significantly downregulated the transcriptional levels of SNAI2 and TWIST1 genes. The interaction between canine platelets or molecules released during platelet activation and these tumour cell lines inhibits their migration, which suggests that canine platelets might antagonize metastasis of canine osteosarcoma. This effect is probably due to, at least in part, downregulation of genes related to epithelial-mesenchymal transition. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  5. Fer and Fps/Fes participate in a Lyn-dependent pathway from FcepsilonRI to platelet-endothelial cell adhesion molecule 1 to limit mast cell activation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Udell, Christian M; Samayawardhena, Lionel A; Kawakami, Yuko; Kawakami, Toshiaki; Craig, Andrew W B

    2006-07-28

    Mast cells express the high affinity IgE receptor FcepsilonRI, which upon aggregation by multivalent antigens elicits signals that cause rapid changes within the mast cell and in the surrounding tissue. We previously showed that FcepsilonRI aggregation caused a rapid increase in phosphorylation of both Fer and Fps/Fes kinases in bone marrow-derived mast cells. In this study, we report that FcepsilonRI aggregation leads to increased Fer/Fps kinase activities and that Fer phosphorylation downstream of FcepsilonRI is independent of Syk, Fyn, and Gab2 but requires Lyn. Activated Fer/Fps readily phosphorylate the C terminus of platelet-endothelial cell adhesion molecule 1 (Pecam-1) on immunoreceptor tyrosine-based inhibitory motifs (ITIMs) and a non-ITIM residue (Tyr(700)) in vitro and in transfected cells. Mast cells devoid of Fer/Fps kinase activities display a reduction in FcepsilonRI aggregation-induced tyrosine phosphorylation of Pecam-1, with no defects in recruitment of Shp1/Shp2 phosphatases observed. Lyn-deficient mast cells display a dramatic reduction in Pecam-1 phosphorylation at Tyr(685) and a complete loss of Shp2 recruitment, suggesting a role as an initiator kinase for Pecam-1. Consistent with previous studies of Pecam-1-deficient mast cells, we observe an exaggerated degranulation response in mast cells lacking Fer/Fps kinases at low antigen dosages. Thus, Lyn and Fer/Fps kinases cooperate to phosphorylate Pecam-1 and activate Shp1/Shp2 phosphatases that function in part to limit mast cell activation.

  6. Catalase and superoxide dismutase conjugated with platelet-endothelial cell adhesion molecule antibody distinctly alleviate abnormal endothelial permeability caused by exogenous reactive oxygen species and vascular endothelial growth factor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Jingyan; Shuvaev, Vladimir V; Muzykantov, Vladimir R

    2011-07-01

    Reactive oxygen species (ROS) superoxide anion (O(2)()) and hydrogen peroxide (H(2)O(2)) produced by activated leukocytes and endothelial cells in sites of inflammation or ischemia cause endothelial barrier dysfunction that may lead to tissue edema. Antioxidant enzymes (AOEs) catalase and superoxide dismutase (SOD) conjugated with antibodies to platelet-endothelial cell adhesion molecule-1 (PECAM-1) specifically bind to endothelium, quench the corresponding ROS, and alleviate vascular oxidative stress and inflammation. In the present work, we studied the effects of anti-PECAM/catalase and anti-PECAM/SOD conjugates on the abnormal permeability manifested by transendothelial electrical resistance decline, increased fluorescein isothiocyanate-dextran influx, and redistribution of vascular endothelial-cadherin in human umbilical vein endothelial cell (HUVEC) monolayers. Anti-PECAM/catalase protected HUVEC monolayers against H(2)O(2)-induced endothelial barrier dysfunction. Polyethylene glycol-conjugated catalase exerted orders of magnitude lower endothelial uptake and no protective effect, similarly to IgG/catalase. Anti-PECAM/catalase, but not anti-PECAM/SOD, alleviated endothelial hyperpermeability caused by exposure to hypoxanthine/xanthine oxidase, implicating primarily H(2)O(2) in the disruption of the endothelial barrier in this model. Thrombin-induced endothelial permeability was not affected by treatment with anti-PECAM/AOEs or the NADPH oxidase inhibitor apocynin or overexpression of AOEs, indicating that the endogenous ROS play no key role in thrombin-mediated endothelial barrier dysfunction. In contrast, anti-PECAM/SOD, but not anti-PECAM/catalase, inhibited a vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF)-induced increase in endothelial permeability, identifying a key role of endogenous O(2)() in the VEGF-mediated regulation of endothelial barrier function. Therefore, AOEs targeted to endothelial cells provide versatile molecular tools for testing the roles of

  7. Platelet Function Tests

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Patient Resources For Health Professionals Subscribe Search Platelet Function Tests Send Us Your Feedback Choose Topic At ... Also Known As Platelet Aggregation Studies PFT Platelet Function Assay PFA Formal Name Platelet Function Tests This ...

  8. Platelet antibodies blood test

    Science.gov (United States)

    This blood test shows if you have antibodies against platelets in your blood. Platelets are a part of the blood ... Chernecky CC, Berger BJ. Platelet antibody - blood. In: Chernecky ... caused by platelet destruction, hypersplenism, or hemodilution. ...

  9. Functional Analysis of Lactobacillus rhamnosus GG Pili in Relation to Adhesion and Immunomodulatory Interactions with Intestinal Epithelial Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Claes, Ingmar; Tytgat, Hanne L. P.; Verhoeven, Tine L. A.; Marien, Eyra; von Ossowski, Ingemar; Reunanen, Justus; Palva, Airi; de Vos, Willem M.; De Keersmaecker, Sigrid C. J.; Vanderleyden, Jos

    2012-01-01

    Lactobacillus rhamnosus GG, a probiotic with good survival capacity in the human gut, has well-documented adhesion properties and health effects. Recently, spaCBA-encoded pili that bind to human intestinal mucus were identified on its cell surface. Here, we report on the phenotypic analysis of a spaCBA pilus knockout mutant in comparison with the wild type and other adhesin mutants. The SpaCBA pilus of L. rhamnosus GG showed to be key for efficient adherence to the Caco-2 intestinal epithelial cell (IEC) line and biofilm formation. Moreover, the spaCBA mutant induces an elevated level of interleukin-8 (IL-8) mRNA in Caco-2 cells compared to the wild type, possibly involving an interaction of lipoteichoic acid with Toll-like receptor 2. In contrast, an L. rhamnosus GG mutant without exopolysaccharides but with an increased exposure of pili leads to the reduced expression of IL-8. Using Transwells to partition bacteria from Caco-2 cells, IL-8 induction is blocked completely regardless of whether wild-type or mutant L. rhamnosus GG cells are used. Taken together, our data suggest that L. rhamnosus GG SpaCBA pili, while promoting strong adhesive interactions with IECs, have a functional role in balancing IL-8 mRNA expression induced by surface molecules such as lipoteichoic acid. PMID:22020518

  10. Particle adhesion and removal

    CERN Document Server

    Mittal, K L

    2015-01-01

    The book provides a comprehensive and easily accessible reference source covering all important aspects of particle adhesion and removal.  The core objective is to cover both fundamental and applied aspects of particle adhesion and removal with emphasis on recent developments.  Among the topics to be covered include: 1. Fundamentals of surface forces in particle adhesion and removal.2. Mechanisms of particle adhesion and removal.3. Experimental methods (e.g. AFM, SFA,SFM,IFM, etc.) to understand  particle-particle and particle-substrate interactions.4. Mechanics of adhesion of micro- and  n

  11. Fibronectin type III (FN3) modules of the neuronal cell adhesion molecule L1 interact directly with the fibroblast growth factor (FGF) receptor

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kulahin, Nikolaj; Li, Shizhong; Hinsby, Anders Mørkeberg

    2008-01-01

    The neuronal cell adhesion molecule (CAM) L1 promotes axonal outgrowth, presumably through an interaction with the fibroblast growth factor receptor (FGFR). The present study demonstrates a direct interaction between L1 fibronectin type III (FN3) modules I-V and FGFR1 immunoglobulin (Ig) modules II...

  12. Analysis of leukocyte binding to depletion filters: role of passive binding, interaction with platelets, and plasma components.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henschler, R; Rüster, B; Steimle, A; Hansmann, H L; Walker, W; Montag, T; Seifried, E

    2005-08-01

    Since limited knowledge exists on the mechanisms which regulate cell binding to leukocyte removal filter surfaces, we investigated the binding patterns of leukocytes to individual layers of leukocyte depletion filters. After passage of 1 unit of whole blood, blotting of isolated filter layers on glass slides or elution of cells from filter layers revealed that most leukocytes were located within the first 10 of a total of 28 filter layers, peaking at layers 6 to 8, with granulocytes binding on average to earlier filter layers than lymphocytes. Leukocytes preincubated with inhibitors of actin activation showed unchanged distribution between filter layers, suggesting that cytoskeletal activation does not significantly contribute to their binding. When leukocytes were directly incubated with single filter layers, binding of up to 30% of input cells was recorded in the absence of Ca(2+). Immunohistological analyses showed colocalization of platelets and leukocytes, with co-clustering of platelets and leukocytes. Monocytes and to some degree lymphocytes but not granulocytes competed with platelets for filter binding. Precoating of filter layers with individual plasma components showed that hyaluronic acid, plasma type fibronectin, and fibrinogen all increased the binding of leukocytes compared with albumin coating. In conclusion, leukocytes can bind passively to filters in a process which does not require Ca(2+), which is independent of cytoskeletal activation and which may depend on individual plasma components. These results are of importance when new selective cell enrichment or depletion strategies through specific filters are envisaged.

  13. Chemical interaction and adhesion characteristics at the interface of metals (Cu, Ta) and low-k cyclohexane-based plasma polymer (CHexPP) films

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, K.J.; Kim, K.S.; Lee, N.-E.; Choi, J.; Jung, D.

    2001-01-01

    Chemical interaction and adhesion characteristics between metals (Cu, Ta) and low-k plasma-treated cyclohexane-based plasma polymer (CHexPP) films were studied. In order to generate new functional groups that may contribute to the improvement of adhesion between metal and plasma polymer, we performed O 2 , N 2 , and H 2 /He mixture plasma treatment on the surfaces of CHexPP films. Chemical interactions at the interface between metals (Cu, Ta) and plasma-treated CHexPP films were analyzed by x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. The effect of plasma treatment and thermal annealing on the adhesion characteristics was measured by a tape test and scratch test. The formation of new binding states on the surface of plasma-treated CHexPP films improved adhesion characteristics between metals and CHexPP films. Thermal annealing improves the adhesion property of Cu/CHexPP films, but degrades the adhesion property of Ta/CHexPP films

  14. Platelet Donation

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... time’ to unwind from the daily stresses of life while helping save lives. What are the benefits to donating platelets? Knowing you’re helping cancer ... of your arm. That pinch is similar to what you will feel when the needle is ... compared to a traditional whole blood donation so some donors find it to ...

  15. Comparison of three different methods for effective introduction of platelet-rich plasma on PLGA woven mesh.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Ji-Hye; Nam, Jinwoo; Kim, Hee Joong; Yoo, Jeong Joon

    2015-03-11

    For successful tissue regeneration, effective cell delivery to defect site is very important. Various types of polymer biomaterials have been developed and applied for effective cell delivery. PLGA (poly lactic-co-glycolic acid), a synthetic polymer, is a commercially available and FDA approved material. Platelet-rich plasma (PRP) is an autologous growth factor cocktail containing various growth factors including PDGF, TGFβ-1 and BMPs, and has shown positive effects on cell behaviors. We hypothesized that PRP pretreatment on PLGA mesh using different methods would cause different patterns of platelet adhesion and stages which would modulate cell adhesion and proliferation on the PLGA mesh. In this study, we pretreated PRP on PLGA using three different methods including simple dripping (SD), dynamic oscillation (DO) and centrifugation (CE), then observed the amount of adhered platelets and their activation stage distribution. The highest amount of platelets was observed on CE mesh and calcium treated CE mesh. Moreover, calcium addition after PRP coating triggered dramatic activation of platelets which showed large and flat morphologies of platelets with rich fibrin networks. Human chondrocytes (hCs) and human bone marrow stromal cells (hBMSCs) were next cultured on PRP-pretreated PLGA meshes using different preparation methods. CE mesh showed a significant increase in the initial cell adhesion of hCs and proliferation of hBMSCs compared with SD and DO meshes. The results demonstrated that the centrifugation method can be considered as a promising coating method to introduce PRP on PLGA polymeric material which could improve cell-material interaction using a simple method.

  16. Comparison of three different methods for effective introduction of platelet-rich plasma on PLGA woven mesh

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Ji-Hye; Nam, Jinwoo; Kim, Hee Joong; Yoo, Jeong Joon

    2015-01-01

    For successful tissue regeneration, effective cell delivery to defect site is very important. Various types of polymer biomaterials have been developed and applied for effective cell delivery. PLGA (poly lactic-co-glycolic acid), a synthetic polymer, is a commercially available and FDA approved material. Platelet-rich plasma (PRP) is an autologous growth factor cocktail containing various growth factors including PDGF, TGFβ-1 and BMPs, and has shown positive effects on cell behaviors. We hypothesized that PRP pretreatment on PLGA mesh using different methods would cause different patterns of platelet adhesion and stages which would modulate cell adhesion and proliferation on the PLGA mesh. In this study, we pretreated PRP on PLGA using three different methods including simple dripping (SD), dynamic oscillation (DO) and centrifugation (CE), then observed the amount of adhered platelets and their activation stage distribution. The highest amount of platelets was observed on CE mesh and calcium treated CE mesh. Moreover, calcium addition after PRP coating triggered dramatic activation of platelets which showed large and flat morphologies of platelets with rich fibrin networks. Human chondrocytes (hCs) and human bone marrow stromal cells (hBMSCs) were next cultured on PRP-pretreated PLGA meshes using different preparation methods. CE mesh showed a significant increase in the initial cell adhesion of hCs and proliferation of hBMSCs compared with SD and DO meshes. The results demonstrated that the centrifugation method can be considered as a promising coating method to introduce PRP on PLGA polymeric material which could improve cell-material interaction using a simple method. (paper)

  17. Nucleation theory with delayed interactions: an application to the early stages of the receptor-mediated adhesion/fusion kinetics of lipid vesicles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raudino, Antonio; Pannuzzo, Martina

    2010-01-28

    A semiquantitative theory aimed to describe the adhesion kinetics between soft objects, such as living cells or vesicles, has been developed. When rigid bodies are considered, the adhesion kinetics is successfully described by the classical Derjaguin, Landau, Verwey, and Overbeek (DLVO) picture, where the energy profile of two approaching bodies is given by a two asymmetrical potential wells separated by a barrier. The transition probability from the long-distance to the short-distance minimum defines the adhesion rate. Conversely, soft bodies might follow a different pathway to reach the short-distance minimum: thermally excited fluctuations give rise to local protrusions connecting the approaching bodies. These transient adhesion sites are stabilized by short-range adhesion forces (e.g., ligand-receptor interactions between membranes brought at contact distance), while they are destabilized both by repulsive forces and by the elastic deformation energy. Above a critical area of the contact site, the adhesion forces prevail: the contact site grows in size until the complete adhesion of the two bodies inside a short-distance minimum is attained. This nucleation mechanism has been developed in the framework of a nonequilibrium Fokker-Planck picture by considering both the adhesive patch growth and dissolution processes. In addition, we also investigated the effect of the ligand-receptor pairing kinetics at the adhesion site in the time course of the patch expansion. The ratio between the ligand-receptor pairing kinetics and the expansion rate of the adhesion site is of paramount relevance in determining the overall nucleation rate. The theory enables one to self-consistently include both thermodynamics (energy barrier height) and dynamic (viscosity) parameters, giving rise in some limiting cases to simple analytical formulas. The model could be employed to rationalize fusion kinetics between vesicles, provided the short-range adhesion transition is the rate

  18. Platelets promote osteosarcoma cell growth through activation of the platelet-derived growth factor receptor-Akt signaling axis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takagi, Satoshi; Takemoto, Ai; Takami, Miho; Oh-Hara, Tomoko; Fujita, Naoya

    2014-08-01

    The interactions of tumor cells with platelets contribute to the progression of tumor malignancy, and the expression levels of platelet aggregation-inducing factors positively correlate with the metastatic potential of osteosarcoma cells. However, it is unclear how tumor-platelet interaction contributes to the proliferation of osteosarcomas. We report here that osteosarcoma-platelet interactions induce the release of platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF) from platelets, which promotes the proliferation of osteosarcomas. Co-culture of platelets with MG63 or HOS osteosarcoma cells, which could induce platelet aggregation, enhanced the proliferation of each cell line in vitro. Analysis of phospho-antibody arrays revealed that co-culture of MG63 cells with platelets induced the phosphorylation of platelet derived growth factor receptor (PDGFR) and Akt. The addition of supernatants of osteosarcoma-platelet reactants also increased the growth of MG63 and HOS cells as well as the level of phosphorylated-PDGFR and -Akt. Sunitinib or LY294002, but not erlotinib, significantly inhibited the platelet-induced proliferation of osteosarcoma cells, indicating that PDGF released from platelets plays an important role in the proliferation of osteosarcomas by activating the PDGFR and then Akt. Our results suggest that inhibitors that specifically target osteosarcoma-platelet interactions may eradicate osteosarcomas. © 2014 The Authors. Cancer Science published by Wiley Publishing Asia Pty Ltd on behalf of Japanese Cancer Association.

  19. Energetics of bacterial adhesion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Loosdrecht, M.C.M. van; Zehnder, A.J.B.

    1990-01-01

    For the description of bacterial adhesion phenomena two different physico-chemical approaches are available. The first one, based on a surface Gibbs energy balance, assumes intimate contact between the interacting surfaces. The second approach, based on colloid chemical theories (DLVO theory), allows for two types of adhesion: 1) secondary minimum adhesion, which is often weak and reversible, and 2) irreversible primary minimum adhesion. In the secondary minimum adhesion a thin water film remains present between the interacting surface. The merits of both approaches are discussed in this paper. In addition, the methods available to measure the physico-chemical surface characteristics of bacteria and the influence of adsorbing (in)organic compounds, extracellular polymers and cell surface appendages on adhesion are summarized. (author) 2 figs., 1 tab., 50 refs

  20. Denture Adhesives

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Devices Products and Medical Procedures Dental Devices Denture Adhesives Share Tweet Linkedin Pin it More sharing options ... Wearers Reporting Problems to the FDA Background Denture adhesives are pastes, powders or adhesive pads that may ...

  1. Polyphosphate nanoparticles on the platelet surface trigger contact system activation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Verhoef, Johan J F; Barendrecht, Arjan D; Nickel, Katrin F; Dijkxhoorn, Kim; Kenne, Ellinor; Labberton, Linda; McCarty, Owen J T; Schiffelers, Raymond; Heijnen, Harry F G; Hendrickx, Antoni P A; Schellekens, Huub; Fens, Marcel H; de Maat, Steven; Renné, Thomas; Maas, Coen

    2017-01-01

    Polyphosphate is an inorganic polymer that can potentiate several interactions in the blood coagulation system. Blood platelets contain polyphosphate, and the secretion of platelet-derived polyphosphate has been associated with increased thrombus formation and activation of coagulation factor XII.

  2. Mechanisms underlying the attachment and spreading of human osteoblasts: from transient interactions to focal adhesions on vitronectin-grafted bioactive surfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brun, Paola; Scorzeto, Michele; Vassanelli, Stefano; Castagliuolo, Ignazio; Palù, Giorgio; Ghezzo, Francesca; Messina, Grazia M L; Iucci, Giovanna; Battaglia, Valentina; Sivolella, Stefano; Bagno, Andrea; Polzonetti, Giovanni; Marletta, Giovanni; Dettin, Monica

    2013-04-01

    The features of implant devices and the reactions of bone-derived cells to foreign surfaces determine implant success during osseointegration. In an attempt to better understand the mechanisms underlying osteoblasts attachment and spreading, in this study adhesive peptides containing the fibronectin sequence motif for integrin binding (Arg-Gly-Asp, RGD) or mapping the human vitronectin protein (HVP) were grafted on glass and titanium surfaces with or without chemically induced controlled immobilization. As shown by total internal reflection fluorescence microscopy, human osteoblasts develop adhesion patches only on specifically immobilized peptides. Indeed, cells quickly develop focal adhesions on RGD-grafted surfaces, while HVP peptide promotes filopodia, structures involved in cellular spreading. As indicated by immunocytochemistry and quantitative polymerase chain reaction, focal adhesions kinase activation is delayed on HVP peptides with respect to RGD while an osteogenic phenotypic response appears within 24h on osteoblasts cultured on both peptides. Cellular pathways underlying osteoblasts attachment are, however, different. As demonstrated by adhesion blocking assays, integrins are mainly involved in osteoblast adhesion to RGD peptide, while HVP selects osteoblasts for attachment through proteoglycan-mediated interactions. Thus an interfacial layer of an endosseous device grafted with specifically immobilized HVP peptide not only selects the attachment and supports differentiation of osteoblasts but also promotes cellular migration. Copyright © 2012 Acta Materialia Inc. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Interactions between Rotavirus and Suwannee River Organic Matter: Aggregation, Deposition, and Adhesion Force Measurement

    KAUST Repository

    Gutierrez, Leonardo; Nguyen, Thanh H.

    2012-01-01

    M, rotavirus suspension remained stable for over 4 h. Atomic force microscopy (AFM) measurement for interaction force decay length at different ionic strengths showed that nonelectrostatic repulsive forces were mainly responsible for eliminating aggregation

  4. The interaction between LYVE-1 with hyaluronan on the cell surface may play a role in the diversity of adhesion to cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Du, Yan; Liu, Hua; He, Yiqing; Liu, Yiwen; Yang, Cuixia; Zhou, Muqing; Wang, Wenjuan; Cui, Lian; Hu, Jiajie; Gao, Feng

    2013-01-01

    Hyaluronan (HA), a simple disaccharide unit, can polymerize and is considered a primary component of the extracellular matrix, which has a wide range of biological functions. In recent years, HA was found on the surface of tumor cells. According to previous reports, differing HA content on the cell surface of tumor cells is closely related to lymph node metastases, but the mechanisms mediating this process remained unclear. This research intended to study the surface content of HA on tumor cells and analyze cell adhesive changes caused by the interaction between HA and its lymphatic endothelial receptor (LYVE-1). We screened and observed high HA content on HS-578T breast cells and low HA content on MCF-7 breast cells through particle exclusion, immunofluorescence and flow cytometry experiments. The expression of LYVE-1, the lymph-vessel specific HA receptor, was consistent with our previous report and enhanced the adhesion of HA(high)-HS-578T cells to COS-7(LYVE-1(+)) through HA in cell static adhesion and dynamic parallel plate flow chamber experiments. MCF-7 breast cells contain little HA on the surface; however, our results showed little adhesion difference between MCF-7 cells and COS-7(LYVE-1(+)) and COS-7(LYVE-1(-)) cells. Similar results were observed concerning the adhesion of HS-578T cells or MCF-7 cells to SVEC4-10 cells. Furthermore, we observed for the first time that the cell surface HA content of high transfer tumor cells was rich, and we visualized the cross-linking of HA cable structures, which may activate LYVE-1 on lymphatic endothelial cells, promoting tumor adhesion. In summary, high-low cell surface HA content of tumor cells through the interaction with LYVE-1 leads to adhesion differences.

  5. Congenital platelet function defects

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... pool disorder; Glanzmann's thrombasthenia; Bernard-Soulier syndrome; Platelet function defects - congenital ... Congenital platelet function defects are bleeding disorders that cause reduced platelet function. Most of the time, people with these disorders have ...

  6. Decreased soluble cell adhesion molecules after tirofiban infusion in patients with unstable angina pectoris

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aliyev Emil

    2004-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Aim The inflammatory response, initiated by neutrophil and monocyte adhesion to endothelial cells, is important in the pathogenesis of acute coronary syndromes. Platelets play an important role in inflammatory process by interacting with monocytes and neutrophils. In this study, we investigated the effect of tirofiban on the levels of cell adhesion molecules (soluble intercellular adhesion molecule-1, sICAM-1, and vascular cell adhesion molecule-1, sVCAM-1 in patients with unstable angina pectoris (AP. Methods Thirty-five patients with unstable AP (Group I, ten patients with stable AP (Group II and ten subjects who had angiographycally normal coronary arteries (Group III were included the study. Group I was divided into two subgroups for the specific treatment regimens: Group IA (n = 15 received tirofiban and Group IB (n = 20 did not. Blood samples for investigating the cell adhesion molecules were drawn at zero time (baseline; 0 h in all patients and at 72 h in Group I. Results The baseline levels of sICAM-1 and sVCAM-1 were higher in Group I than in Groups II and III. They were higher in Group IA than in Group IB. However, the sICAM-1 and sVCAM-1 levels decreased significantly in Group IA after tirofiban infusion. In contrast, these levels remained unchanged or were increased above the baseline value in Group IB at 72 h. Conclusion The levels of cell adhesion molecules in patients with unstable AP decreased significantly after tirofiban infusion. Inhibition of platelet function by specific glycoprotein IIb/IIIa antagonists may decrease platelet-mediated inflammation and the ischemic end-point.

  7. Peptide array-based interaction assay of solid-bound peptides and anchorage-dependant cells and its effectiveness in cell-adhesive peptide design.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kato, Ryuji; Kaga, Chiaki; Kunimatsu, Mitoshi; Kobayashi, Takeshi; Honda, Hiroyuki

    2006-06-01

    Peptide array, the designable peptide library covalently synthesized on cellulose support, was applied to assay peptide-cell interaction, between solid-bound peptides and anchorage-dependant cells, to study objective peptide design. As a model case, cell-adhesive peptides that could enhance cell growth as tissue engineering scaffold material, was studied. On the peptide array, the relative cell-adhesion ratio of NIH/3T3 cells was 2.5-fold higher on the RGDS (Arg-Gly-Asp-Ser) peptide spot as compared to the spot with no peptide, thus indicating integrin-mediated peptide-cell interaction. Such strong cell adhesion mediated by the RGDS peptide was easily disrupted by single residue substitution on the peptide array, thus indicating that the sequence recognition accuracy of cells was strictly conserved in our optimized scheme. The observed cellular morphological extension with active actin stress-fiber on the RGD motif-containing peptide supported our strategy that peptide array-based interaction assay of solid-bound peptide and anchorage-dependant cells (PIASPAC) could provide quantitative data on biological peptide-cell interaction. The analysis of 180 peptides obtained from fibronectin type III domain (no. 1447-1629) yielded 18 novel cell-adhesive peptides without the RGD motif. Taken together with the novel candidates, representative rules of ineffective amino acid usage were obtained from non-effective candidate sequences for the effective designing of cell-adhesive peptides. On comparing the amino acid usage of the top 20 and last 20 peptides from the 180 peptides, the following four brief design rules were indicated: (i) Arg or Lys of positively charged amino acids (except His) could enhance cell adhesion, (ii) small hydrophilic amino acids are favored in cell-adhesion peptides, (iii) negatively charged amino acids and small amino acids (except Gly) could reduce cell adhesion, and (iv) Cys and Met could be excluded from the sequence combination since they have

  8. Contribution of the LIM domain and nebulin-repeats to the interaction of Lasp-2 with actin filaments and focal adhesions.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hiroyuki Nakagawa

    Full Text Available Lasp-2 binds to actin filaments and concentrates in the actin bundles of filopodia and lamellipodia in neural cells and focal adhesions in fibroblastic cells. Lasp-2 has three structural regions: a LIM domain, a nebulin-repeat region, and an SH3 domain; however, the region(s responsible for its interactions with actin filaments and focal adhesions are still unclear. In this study, we revealed that the N-terminal fragment from the LIM domain to the first nebulin-repeat module (LIM-n1 retained actin-binding activity and showed a similar subcellular localization to full-length lasp-2 in neural cells. The LIM domain fragment did not interact with actin filaments or localize to actin filament bundles. In contrast, LIM-n1 showed a clear subcellular localization to filopodial actin bundles. Although truncation of the LIM domain caused the loss of F-actin binding activity and the accumulation of filopodial actin bundles, these truncated fragments localized to focal adhesions. These results suggest that lasp-2 interactions with actin filaments are mediated through the cooperation of the LIM domain and the first nebulin-repeat module in vitro and in vivo. Actin filament binding activity may be a major contributor to the subcellular localization of lasp-2 to filopodia but is not crucial for lasp-2 recruitment to focal adhesions.

  9. Structure and function of ameloblastin as an extracellular matrix protein: adhesion, calcium binding, and CD63 interaction in human and mouse.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xu; Diekwisch, Thomas G H; Luan, Xianghong

    2011-12-01

    The functional significance of extracellular matrix proteins in the life of vertebrates is underscored by a high level of sequence variability in tandem with a substantial degree of conservation in terms of cell-cell and cell-matrix adhesion interactions. Many extracellular matrix proteins feature multiple adhesion domains for successful attachment to substrates, such as integrin, CD63, and heparin. Here we have used homology and ab initio modeling algorithms to compare mouse ameloblastin (mAMBN) and human ameloblastin (hABMN) isoforms and to analyze their potential for cell adhesion and interaction with other matrix molecules as well as calcium binding. Sequence comparison between mAMBN and hAMBN revealed a 26-amino-acid deletion in mAMBN, corresponding to a helix-loop-helix frameshift. The human AMBN domain (174Q-201G), homologous to the mAMBN 157E-178I helix-loop-helix region, formed a helix-loop motif with an extended loop, suggesting a higher degree of flexibility of hAMBN compared with mAMBN, as confirmed by molecular dynamics simulation. Heparin-binding domains, CD63-interaction domains, and calcium-binding sites in both hAMBN and mAMBN support the concept of AMBN as an extracellular matrix protein. The high level of conservation between AMBN functional domains related to adhesion and differentiation was remarkable when compared with only 61% amino acid sequence homology. © 2011 Eur J Oral Sci.

  10. Blood platelet kinetics and platelet transfusion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aster, Richard H

    2013-11-01

    The discovery of citrate anticoagulant in the 1920s and the development of plastic packs for blood collection in the 1960s laid the groundwork for platelet transfusion therapy on a scale not previously possible. A major limitation, however, was the finding that platelet concentrates prepared from blood anticoagulated with citrate were unsuitable for transfusion because of platelet clumping. We found that this could be prevented by simply reducing the pH of platelet-rich plasma to about 6.5 prior to centrifugation. We used this approach to characterize platelet kinetics and sites of platelet sequestration in normal and pathologic states and to define the influence of variables such as anticoagulant and ABO incompatibility on post-transfusion platelet recovery. The "acidification" approach enabled much wider use of platelet transfusion therapy until alternative means of producing concentrates suitable for transfusion became available.

  11. Biofilm formation by Escherichia coli is stimulated by synergistic interactions and co-adhesion mechanisms with adherence-proficient bacteria

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Castonguay, MH; van der Schaaf, S; Koester, W; Krooneman, J; Harmsen, H; Landini, P; van der Meer, W.

    Laboratory strains of Escherichia coli do not show significant ability to attach to solid surfaces and to form biofilms. We compared the adhesion properties of the E. coli PHL565 laboratory strain to eight environmental E. coli isolates: only four isolates displayed adhesion properties to glass

  12. Glycoprotein Ibα clustering in platelet storage and function

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gitz, E.

    2013-01-01

    Platelets are anucleated, discoid-shaped cells that play an essential role in the formation of a hemostatic plug to prevent blood loss from injured vessels. Initial platelet arrest at the damaged arterial vessel wall is mediated through the interaction between the platelet receptor glycoprotein (GP)

  13. Force-activatable biosensor enables single platelet force mapping directly by fluorescence imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yongliang; LeVine, Dana N; Gannon, Margaret; Zhao, Yuanchang; Sarkar, Anwesha; Hoch, Bailey; Wang, Xuefeng

    2018-02-15

    Integrin-transmitted cellular forces are critical for platelet adhesion, activation, aggregation and contraction during hemostasis and thrombosis. Measuring and mapping single platelet forces are desired in both research and clinical applications. Conventional force-to-strain based cell traction force microscopies have low resolution which is not ideal for cellular force mapping in small platelets. To enable platelet force mapping with submicron resolution, we developed a force-activatable biosensor named integrative tension sensor (ITS) which directly converts molecular tensions to fluorescent signals, therefore enabling cellular force mapping directly by fluorescence imaging. With ITS, we mapped cellular forces in single platelets at 0.4µm resolution. We found that platelet force distribution has strong polarization which is sensitive to treatment with the anti-platelet drug tirofiban, suggesting that the ITS force map can report anti-platelet drug efficacy. The ITS also calibrated integrin molecular tensions in platelets and revealed two distinct tension levels: 12-54 piconewton (nominal values) tensions generated during platelet adhesion and tensions above 54 piconewton generated during platelet contraction. Overall, the ITS is a powerful biosensor for the study of platelet mechanobiology, and holds great potential in antithrombotic drug development and assessing platelet activity in health and disease. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. Molecular-scale tribology of amorphous carbon coatings: effects of film thickness, adhesion, and long-range interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, G T; Mikulski, Paul T; Harrison, Judith A

    2002-06-19

    Classical molecular dynamics simulations have been conducted to investigate the atomic-scale friction and wear when hydrogen-terminated diamond (111) counterfaces are in sliding contact with diamond (111) surfaces coated with amorphous, hydrogen-free carbon films. Two films, with approximately the same ratio of sp(3)-to-sp(2) carbon, but different thicknesses, have been examined. Both systems give a similar average friction in the load range examined. Above a critical load, a series of tribochemical reactions occur resulting in a significant restructuring of the film. This restructuring is analogous to the "run-in" observed in macroscopic friction experiments and reduces the friction. The contribution of adhesion between the probe (counterface) and the sample to friction was examined by varying the saturation of the counterface. Decreasing the degree of counterface saturation, by reducing the hydrogen termination, increases the friction. Finally, the contribution of long-range interactions to friction was examined by using two potential energy functions that differ only in their long-range forces to examine friction in the same system.

  15. Effects of Platelets on Platelet Concentrate Product on the Activation of Human Peripheral Blood Monocyte Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N Sadat Razavi Hoseini

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Monocytes can interact with platelets due to their surface molecules such as P-selectin glycoprotein ligand-1 (PSGL-1, and form monocyte-platelet complex. In the present study, the effects of platelets interaction of platelet concentrates (PCs and peripheral blood monocytes were investigated in vitro as a model to predict the probable interactions of these cells and consequently activation of monocytes. Methods: In this experimental study, units of whole blood and PCs were prepared from Tehran Blood Transfusion Center. After isolation of monocytes from the whole blood, these cells were treated with PC- derived platelets. The activation of monocytes was assessed before and after treatment by the analysis of the respiratory burst of monocytes using dihydrorhodamine 123 (DHR-123. The study data were analyzed using the non-parametric test of Wilcoxon. Results: The purity of monocytes was determined as 86.1±2 using NycoPrep method. The respiratory burst of monocytes was increased after exposure with platelets. In fact, the difference was significant when platelets were used on the 5th day of storage (P=0.001. Conclusions: The study findings revealed that platelets have an efficient capacity to stimulate and activate monocytes. The possible involvement of molecules in the interaction of platelet-monocyte demand to be further studied in future.

  16. SH2 domain-containing protein tyrosine phosphatase 2 and focal adhesion kinase protein interactions regulate pulmonary endothelium barrier function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chichger, Havovi; Braza, Julie; Duong, Huetran; Harrington, Elizabeth O

    2015-06-01

    Enhanced protein tyrosine phosphorylation is associated with changes in vascular permeability through formation and dissolution of adherens junctions and regulation of stress fiber formation. Inhibition of the protein tyrosine phosphorylase SH2 domain-containing protein tyrosine phosphatase 2 (SHP2) increases tyrosine phosphorylation of vascular endothelial cadherin and β-catenin, resulting in disruption of the endothelial monolayer and edema formation in the pulmonary endothelium. Vascular permeability is a hallmark of acute lung injury (ALI); thus, enhanced SHP2 activity offers potential therapeutic value for the pulmonary vasculature in diseases such as ALI, but this has not been characterized. To assess whether SHP2 activity mediates protection against edema in the endothelium, we assessed the effect of molecular activation of SHP2 on lung endothelial barrier function in response to the edemagenic agents LPS and thrombin. Both LPS and thrombin reduced SHP2 activity, correlated with decreased focal adhesion kinase (FAK) phosphorylation (Y(397) and Y(925)) and diminished SHP2 protein-protein associations with FAK. Overexpression of constitutively active SHP2 (SHP2(D61A)) enhanced baseline endothelial monolayer resistance and completely blocked LPS- and thrombin-induced permeability in vitro and significantly blunted pulmonary edema formation induced by either endotoxin (LPS) or Pseudomonas aeruginosa exposure in vivo. Chemical inhibition of FAK decreased SHP2 protein-protein interactions with FAK concomitant with increased permeability; however, overexpression of SHP2(D61A) rescued the endothelium and maintained FAK activity and FAK-SHP2 protein interactions. Our data suggest that SHP2 activation offers the pulmonary endothelium protection against barrier permeability mediators downstream of the FAK signaling pathway. We postulate that further studies into the promotion of SHP2 activation in the pulmonary endothelium may offer a therapeutic approach for patients

  17. Insights on synergy of materials and structures in biomimetic platelet-matrix composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakhavand, Navid; Shahsavari, Rouzbeh

    2018-01-01

    Hybrid materials such as biomimetic platelet-matrix composites are in high demand to confer low weight and multifunctional mechanical properties. This letter reports interfacial-bond regulated assembly of polymers on cement-an archetype model with significant infrastructure applications. We demonstrate a series of 20+ molecular dynamics studies on decoding and optimizing the complex interfacial interactions including the role and types of various heterogeneous, competing interfacial bonds that are key to adhesion and interfacial strength. Our results show an existence of an optimum overlap length scale (˜15 nm) between polymers and cement crystals, exhibiting the best balance of strength, toughness, stiffness, and ductility for the composite. This finding, combined with the fundamental insights into the nature of interfacial bonds, provides key hypotheses for selection and processing of constituents to deliberate the best synergy in the structure and materials of platelet-matrix composites.

  18. Single Cell Force Spectroscopy for Quantification of Cellular Adhesion on Surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christenson, Wayne B.

    Cell adhesion is an important aspect of many biological processes. The atomic force microscope (AFM) has made it possible to quantify the forces involved in cellular adhesion using a technique called single cell force spectroscopy (SCFS). AFM based SCFS offers versatile control over experimental conditions for probing directly the interaction between specific cell types and specific proteins, surfaces, or other cells. Transmembrane integrins are the primary proteins involved in cellular adhesion to the extra cellular matix (ECM). One of the chief integrins involved in the adhesion of leukocyte cells is alpha Mbeta2 (Mac-1). The experiments in this dissertation quantify the adhesion of Mac-1 expressing human embryonic kidney (HEK Mac-1), platelets, and neutrophils cells on substrates with different concentrations of fibrinogen and on fibrin gels and multi-layered fibrinogen coated fibrin gels. It was shown that multi-layered fibrinogen reduces the adhesion force of these cells considerably. A novel method was developed as part of this research combining total internal reflection microscopy (TIRFM) with SCFS allowing for optical microscopy of HEK Mac-1 cells interacting with bovine serum albumin (BSA) coated glass after interacting with multi-layered fibrinogen. HEK Mac-1 cells are able to remove fibrinogen molecules from the multi-layered fibrinogen matrix. An analysis methodology for quantifying the kinetic parameters of integrin-ligand interactions from SCFS experiments is proposed, and the kinetic parameters of the Mac-1 fibrinogen bond are quantified. Additional SCFS experiments quantify the adhesion of macrophages and HEK Mac-1 cells on functionalized glass surfaces and normal glass surfaces. Both cell types show highest adhesion on a novel functionalized glass surface that was prepared to induce macrophage fusion. These experiments demonstrate the versatility of AFM based SCFS, and how it can be applied to address many questions in cellular biology offering

  19. Protein adhesives

    Science.gov (United States)

    Charles R. Frihart; Linda F. Lorenz

    2018-01-01

    Nature uses a wide variety of chemicals for providing adhesion internally (e.g., cell to cell) and externally (e.g., mussels to ships and piers). This adhesive bonding is chemically and mechanically complex, involving a variety of proteins, carbohydrates, and other compounds.Consequently,the effect of protein structures on adhesive properties is only partially...

  20. Receptor-like Molecules on Human Intestinal Epithelial Cells Interact with an Adhesion Factor from Lactobacillus reuteri.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsuo, Yosuke; Miyoshi, Yukihiro; Okada, Sanae; Satoh, Eiichi

    2012-01-01

    A surface protein of Lactobacillus reuteri, mucus adhesion-promoting protein (MapA), is considered to be an adhesion factor. MapA is expressed in L. reuteri strains and adheres to piglet gastric mucus, collagen type I, and human intestinal epithelial cells such as Caco-2. The aim of this study was to identify molecules that mediate the attachment of MapA from L. reuteri to the intestinal epithelial cell surface by investigating the adhesion of MapA to receptor-like molecules on Caco-2 cells. MapA-binding receptor-like molecules were detected in Caco-2 cell lysates by 2D-PAGE. Two proteins, annexin A13 (ANXA13) and paralemmin (PALM), were identified by MALDI TOF-MS. The results of a pull-down assay showed that MapA bound directly to ANXA13 and PALM. Fluorescence microscopy studies confirmed that MapA binding to ANXA13 and PALM was colocalized on the Caco-2 cell membrane. To evaluate whether ANXA13 and PALM are important for MapA adhesion, ANXA13 and PALM knockdown cell lines were established. The adhesion of MapA to the abovementioned cell lines was reduced compared with that to wild-type Caco-2 cells. These knockdown experiments established the importance of these receptor-like molecules in MapA adhesion.

  1. The Interaction of Src Kinase with beta 3 Integrin Tails : A Potential Therapeutic Target in Thrombosis and Cancer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Huveneers, Stephan; Danen, Erik H. J.

    2010-01-01

    Activation of Src family kinases is an important event downstream of integrin adhesion signaling in many cell types. A particularly intriguing connection between an integrin and a Src family kinase was first discovered in platelets, where the selective direct interaction of alpha IIb beta 3

  2. Interaction with glycosaminoglycans is required for cyclophilin B to trigger integrin-mediated adhesion of peripheral blood T lymphocytes to extracellular matrix.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allain, Fabrice; Vanpouille, Christophe; Carpentier, Mathieu; Slomianny, Marie-Christine; Durieux, Sandrine; Spik, Geneviève

    2002-03-05

    Cyclophilins A and B (CyPA and CyPB) are cyclosporin A-binding proteins that are involved in inflammatory events. We have reported that CyPB interacts with two types of cell-surface-binding sites. The first site corresponds to a functional receptor and requires interaction with the central core of CyPB. This region is highly conserved in cyclophilins, suggesting that CyPA and CyPB might share biological activities mediated by interaction with this receptor. The second site is identified with glycosaminoglycans (GAGs), the binding region located in the N terminus of CyPB. The difference in the N-terminal extensions of CyPA and CyPB suggests that a unique interaction with GAGs might account for selective activity of CyPB. To explore this hypothesis, we analyzed the lymphocyte responses triggered by CyPA, CyPB, and CyPB(KKK-), a mutant unable to interact with GAGs. The three ligands seemed capable enough to elicit calcium signal and chemotaxis by binding to the same signaling receptor. In contrast, only CyPB enhanced firm adhesion of T cells to the extracellular matrix. This activity depended on the interactions with GAGs and signaling receptor. CyPB-mediated adhesion required CD147 presumably because it was a costimulatory molecule and was related to an activation of alpha4beta1 and alpha4beta7 integrins. Finally, we showed that CyPB was capable mainly to enhance T cell adhesion of the CD4+CD45RO+ subset. The present data indicate that CyPB rather than CyPA is a proinflammatory factor for T lymphocytes and highlight the crucial role of CyPB-GAG interaction in the chemokine-like activity of this protein.

  3. Releasing growth factors from activated human platelets after chitosan stimulation: a possible bio-material for platelet-rich plasma preparation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, E-Chin; Chou, Tz-Chong; Gau, Ching-Hwa; Tu, Hsiao-Pei; Chen, Yen-Teen; Fu, Earl

    2006-10-01

    Thrombin is commonly used for activating the platelets and releasing the growth factors on the application of platelet-rich plasma (PRP). We have previously reported that chitosan can enhance rabbit platelet aggregation. In this study, the effects of chitosan on the subsequent growth factors release after human platelets activation were examined to evaluate the possibility of chitosan being used as a substitute for thrombin during PRP preparation. Human platelet activation was determined by aggregation, adhesion and alpha-granule membrane glycoprotein expression. Platelet aggregation was measured by the turbidimetric method, the adhesion was directly examined on chitosan-coated glass plates under light microscope and scanning electron microscope (SEM), and the alpha-granule membrane glycoprotein was detected by fluorescent isothiocyanate (FITC)-conjugated anti-CD61 antibody through flow cytometry. The subsequent epidermal growth factor (EGF), platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF)-AB and transforming growth factor (TGF)-beta1 release from platelets were assayed by ELISA after mixing with chitosan. The enhancing effects on the platelet adhesion and the aggregation from chitosan were observed. Under both microscopes, the adhesive platelets on the chitosan-coated plates were not only greater in number but also earlier in activation than those on the control plates. With flow cytometry, increased glycoprotein IIIa expression in platelets was detected after chitosan treatment. Greater concentrations of growth factors were measured from PRP after chitosan treatment than after the solvent treatment. Because of the observations of growth factors releasing from activated human platelets after chitosan stimulation, we suggest that chitosan may be an appropriate substitute for thrombin in PRP preparation.

  4. Impact of Silver Nanoparticles on Haemolysis, Platelet Function and Coagulation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Julie Laloy

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Silver nanoparticles (Ag NPs are increasingly used in biomedical applications because of their large antimicrobial spectrum. Data in the literature on the ability of Ag NPs to perform their desired function without eliciting undesirable effects on blood elements are very limited and contradictory. We studied the impact of Ag NPs on erythrocyte integrity, platelet function and blood coagulation. Erythrocyte integrity was assessed by spectrophotometric measurement of haemoglobin release. Platelet adhesion and aggregation was determined by light transmission aggregometry and scanning electron microscopy. The calibrated thrombin generation test was used to study the impact on coagulation cascade. We demonstrated that Ag NPs induced haemolysis. They also increase platelet adhesion without having any impact on platelet aggregation. Finally, they also had procoagulant potential. Bringing all data from these tests together, the no observed effect concentration is 5 μg/mL.

  5. A Functional Analysis on the Interspecies Interaction between Mouse LFA-1 and Human Intercellular Adhesion Molecule-1 at the Cell Level

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David Núñez

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available The interaction between intercellular adhesion molecules (ICAM and the integrin leukocyte function-associated antigen-1 (LFA-1 is crucial for the regulation of several physiological and pathophysiological processes like cell-mediated elimination of tumor or virus infected cells, cancer metastasis, or inflammatory and autoimmune processes. Using purified proteins it was reported a species restriction for the interaction of ICAM-1 and LFA-1, being mouse ICAM-1 able to interact with human LFA-1 but not human ICAM-1 with mouse LFA-1. However, in vivo results employing tumor cells transfected with human ICAM-1 suggest that functionally mouse LFA-1 can recognize human ICAM-1. In order to clarify the interspecies cross-reactivity of the ICAM-1/LFA-1 interaction, we have performed functional studies analyzing the ability of human soluble ICAM-1 and human/mouse LFA-1 derived peptides to inhibit cell aggregation and adhesion as well as cell-mediated cytotoxicity in both mouse and human systems. In parallel, the affinity of the interaction between mouse LFA-1-derived peptides and human ICAM-1 was determined by calorimetry assays. According to the results obtained, it seems that human ICAM-1 is able to interact with mouse LFA-1 on intact cells, which should be taking into account when using humanized mice and xenograft models for the study of immune-related processes.

  6. A Functional Analysis on the Interspecies Interaction between Mouse LFA-1 and Human Intercellular Adhesion Molecule-1 at the Cell Level.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Núñez, David; Comas, Laura; Lanuza, Pilar M; Sánchez-Martinez, Diego; Pérez-Hernández, Marta; Catalán, Elena; Domingo, María Pilar; Velázquez-Campoy, Adrián; Pardo, Julián; Gálvez, Eva M

    2017-01-01

    The interaction between intercellular adhesion molecules (ICAM) and the integrin leukocyte function-associated antigen-1 (LFA-1) is crucial for the regulation of several physiological and pathophysiological processes like cell-mediated elimination of tumor or virus infected cells, cancer metastasis, or inflammatory and autoimmune processes. Using purified proteins it was reported a species restriction for the interaction of ICAM-1 and LFA-1, being mouse ICAM-1 able to interact with human LFA-1 but not human ICAM-1 with mouse LFA-1. However, in vivo results employing tumor cells transfected with human ICAM-1 suggest that functionally mouse LFA-1 can recognize human ICAM-1. In order to clarify the interspecies cross-reactivity of the ICAM-1/LFA-1 interaction, we have performed functional studies analyzing the ability of human soluble ICAM-1 and human/mouse LFA-1 derived peptides to inhibit cell aggregation and adhesion as well as cell-mediated cytotoxicity in both mouse and human systems. In parallel, the affinity of the interaction between mouse LFA-1-derived peptides and human ICAM-1 was determined by calorimetry assays. According to the results obtained, it seems that human ICAM-1 is able to interact with mouse LFA-1 on intact cells, which should be taking into account when using humanized mice and xenograft models for the study of immune-related processes.

  7. Next Generation Sequencing Analysis of Human Platelet PolyA+ mRNAs and rRNA-Depleted Total RNA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kissopoulou, Antheia; Jonasson, Jon; Lindahl, Tomas L.; Osman, Abdimajid

    2013-01-01

    Background Platelets are small anucleate cells circulating in the blood vessels where they play a key role in hemostasis and thrombosis. Here, we compared platelet RNA-Seq results obtained from polyA+ mRNA and rRNA-depleted total RNA. Materials and Methods We used purified, CD45 depleted, human blood platelets collected by apheresis from three male and one female healthy blood donors. The Illumina HiSeq 2000 platform was employed to sequence cDNA converted either from oligo(dT) isolated polyA+ RNA or from rRNA-depleted total RNA. The reads were aligned to the GRCh37 reference assembly with the TopHat/Cufflinks alignment package using Ensembl annotations. A de novo assembly of the platelet transcriptome using the Trinity software package and RSEM was also performed. The bioinformatic tools HTSeq and DESeq from Bioconductor were employed for further statistical analyses of read counts. Results Consistent with previous findings our data suggests that mitochondrially expressed genes comprise a substantial fraction of the platelet transcriptome. We also identified high transcript levels for protein coding genes related to the cytoskeleton function, chemokine signaling, cell adhesion, aggregation, as well as receptor interaction between cells. Certain transcripts were particularly abundant in platelets compared with other cell and tissue types represented by RNA-Seq data from the Illumina Human Body Map 2.0 project. Irrespective of the different library preparation and sequencing protocols, there was good agreement between samples from the 4 individuals. Eighteen differentially expressed genes were identified in the two sexes at 10% false discovery rate using DESeq. Conclusion The present data suggests that platelets may have a unique transcriptome profile characterized by a relative over-expression of mitochondrially encoded genes and also of genomic transcripts related to the cytoskeleton function, chemokine signaling and surface components compared with other cell and

  8. Investigations of the interactions of silicon dioxide with copper-aluminum alloy used as an adhesion promoter and diffusion barrier for copper metallization on silicon dioxide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Pei-I.

    This study explores the concept of alloying copper with Al in order to impart properties that will make Cu useful for interconnect applications in ICs. The advantages of using Al as the alloying element lies in the thermodynamically favored interaction of Al with the underlying dielectric and with the O 2 at the surface of pure Cu thus achieving both the adhesion and passivation. This approach has been shown to generate an ultra thin interfacial layer, which acts as an adhesion promoter and diffusion barrier against Cu migration in the dielectric, without significantly affecting the resistivity of Cu. An emphasis has been placed to examine (a) the interaction of Al (from the Cu-Al alloy) with SiO2 at the alloy-SiO2 interface, (b) the Al migration to surface of the alloy or pure Cu if used, and (c) the impact of such migration on the bulk Cu film and passivation on the surface. In this work, sputtered Cu-Al (1--5 at%), with a resistivity in the range of 5--6 muO-cm, were studied as diffusion barriers/adhesion promoters between SiO2 and pure Cu. The films were examined in as-deposited state and after anneal at different temperatures for varying times and in different ambients by the use of surface and interface characterization techniques, Rutherford backscattering spectrometry (RBS) and secondary ion mass spectroscopy (SIMS), and resistance measurements together with metal-oxide-silicon (MOS) capacitor studies. Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and X-ray diffraction (XRD) were also used to elucidate the structure. The results elucidate the mechanisms of Al movement and interaction with the interface SiO2 and O2 on surface and indicate that films of Cu doped with Al do act as a suitable diffusion barrier and adhesion promoter between SiO2 and Cu.

  9. Blood platelet kinetics and platelet transfusion

    OpenAIRE

    Aster, Richard H.

    2013-01-01

    The discovery of citrate anticoagulant in the 1920s and the development of plastic packs for blood collection in the 1960s laid the groundwork for platelet transfusion therapy on a scale not previously possible. A major limitation, however, was the finding that platelet concentrates prepared from blood anticoagulated with citrate were unsuitable for transfusion because of platelet clumping. We found that this could be prevented by simply reducing the pH of platelet-rich plasma to about 6.5 pr...

  10. The FAK–Arp2/3 interaction promotes leading edge advance and haptosensing by coupling nascent adhesions to lamellipodia actin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swaminathan, Vinay; Fischer, R. S.; Waterman, Clare M.

    2016-01-01

    Cell migration is initiated in response to biochemical or physical cues in the environment that promote actin-mediated lamellipodial protrusion followed by the formation of nascent integrin adhesions (NAs) within the protrusion to drive leading edge advance. Although FAK is known to be required for cell migration through effects on focal adhesions, its role in NA formation and lamellipodial dynamics is unclear. Live-cell microscopy of FAK−/− cells with expression of phosphorylation deficient or a FERM-domain mutant deficient in Arp2/3 binding revealed a requirement for FAK in promoting the dense formation, transient stabilization, and timely turnover of NA within lamellipodia to couple actin-driven protrusion to adhesion and advance of the leading edge. Phosphorylation on Y397 of FAK promotes dense NA formation but is dispensable for transient NA stabilization and leading edge advance. In contrast, transient NA stabilization and advance of the cell edge requires FAK–Arp2/3 interaction, which promotes Arp2/3 localization to NA and reduces FAK activity. Haptosensing of extracellular matrix (ECM) concentration during migration requires the interaction between FAK and Arp2/3, whereas FAK phosphorylation modulates mechanosensing of ECM stiffness during spreading. Taken together, our results show that mechanistically separable functions of FAK in NA are required for cells to distinguish distinct properties of their environment during migration. PMID:26842895

  11. The life cycle of platelet granules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharda, Anish; Flaumenhaft, Robert

    2018-01-01

    Platelet granules are unique among secretory vesicles in both their content and their life cycle. Platelets contain three major granule types-dense granules, α-granules, and lysosomes-although other granule types have been reported. Dense granules and α-granules are the most well-studied and the most physiologically important. Platelet granules are formed in large, multilobulated cells, termed megakaryocytes, prior to transport into platelets. The biogenesis of dense granules and α-granules involves common but also distinct pathways. Both are formed from the trans -Golgi network and early endosomes and mature in multivesicular bodies, but the formation of dense granules requires trafficking machinery different from that of α-granules. Following formation in the megakaryocyte body, both granule types are transported through and mature in long proplatelet extensions prior to the release of nascent platelets into the bloodstream. Granules remain stored in circulating platelets until platelet activation triggers the exocytosis of their contents. Soluble N -ethylmaleimide-sensitive factor attachment protein receptor (SNARE) proteins, located on both the granules and target membranes, provide the mechanical energy that enables membrane fusion during both granulogenesis and exocytosis. The function of these core fusion engines is controlled by SNARE regulators, which direct the site, timing, and extent to which these SNAREs interact and consequently the resulting membrane fusion. In this review, we assess new developments in the study of platelet granules, from their generation to their exocytosis.

  12. Hypothermia and Platelet Dysfunction

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Michelson, Alan

    1993-01-01

    ... (the OPlib-Illa complex).3 Circulating platelets are normally in a resting state and, despite the presence of platelet surface GPTh-IX and OPlib-Illa complexes, they bind neither plasma von Willebrand factor nor plasma fibrinogen...

  13. Hypothermia and Platelet Dysfunction

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Michelson, A

    1994-01-01

    ... (the GPIIb-IIIa complex). Circulating platelets are normally in a resting state and, despite the presence of platelet surface GPIb-IX and GPIIb-IIIa complexes, they bind neither plasma von Willebrand factor nor plasma fibrinogen...

  14. Phosphodiesterase III inhibition affects platelet-monocyte aggregate formation depending on the axis of stimulation.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Horn, N.A.; Anastase, D.M.; Hecker, K.E.; Baumert, J.H.; Scheffer, G.J.; Rossaint, R.

    2006-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: The purpose of this study was to investigate the effect of the phosphodiesterase (PDE) type 3 inhibitor milrinone on the adhesion of platelets to monocytes in vitro. DESIGN: Prospective study. SETTING: University experimental laboratory. PARTICIPANTS: Ten healthy volunteers.

  15. Platelet Count and Plateletcrit

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    strated that neonates with late onset sepsis (bacteremia after 3 days of age) had a dramatic increase in MPV and. PDW18. We hypothesize that as the MPV and PDW increase and platelet count and PCT decrease in sick children, intui- tively, the ratio of MPV to PCT; MPV to Platelet count,. PDW to PCT, PDW to platelet ...

  16. LFA-1-mediated leukocyte adhesion regulated by interaction of CD43 with LFA-1 and CD147

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Khunkaewla, P.; Schiller, H.B.; Paster, W.; Leksa, V.; Čermák, Lukáš; Anděra, Ladislav; Hořejší, Václav; Stockinger, H.

    2008-01-01

    Roč. 45, č. 6 (2008), s. 1703-1711 ISSN 0161-5890 R&D Projects: GA MŠk 1M0506 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50520514 Keywords : leukocyte adhesion and aggregation * monoclonal antibodies * receptor signaling Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology Impact factor: 3.555, year: 2008

  17. Staphylococcus aureus-Fibronectin Interactions with and without Fibronectin-Binding Proteins and Their Role in Adhesion and Desorption

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Xu, C.P.; Boks, N.P.; Vries, de J.; Kaper, H.J.; Norde, W.; Busscher, H.J.; Mei, van der H.C.

    2008-01-01

    Adhesion and residence-time-dependent desorption of two Staphylococcus aureus strains with and without fibronectin (Fn) binding proteins (FnBPs) on Fn-coated glass were compared under flow conditions. To obtain a better understanding of the role of Fn-FnBP binding, the adsorption enthalpies of Fn

  18. Staphylococcus aureus-fibronectin interactions with and without fibronectin-binding proteins and their role in adhesion and desorption

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Xu, Chun; Boks, Niels P; de Vries, Jacob; Kaper, Harm; Norde, Willem; Busscher, Hendrik; van der Mei, Henderina

    2008-01-01

    Adhesion and residence-time-dependent desorption of two Staphylococcus aureus strains with and without fibronectin (Fn) binding proteins (FnBPs) on Fn-coated glass were compared under flow conditions. To obtain a better understanding of the role of Fn-FnBP binding, the adsorption enthalpies of Fn

  19. Functional Analysis of Lactobacillus rhamnosus GG Pili in Relation to Adhesion and Immunomodulatory Interactions with Intestinal Epithelial Cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lebeer, S.; Claes, I.J.; Tytgat, H.L.P.; Verhoeven, T.L.A.; Marien, E.; Ossowski, von I.; Reunanen, J.; Palva, A.; Vos, de W.M.; Keersmaecker, de S.C.; Vanderleyden, J.

    2012-01-01

    Lactobacillus rhamnosus GG, a probiotic with good survival capacity in the human gut, has well-documented adhesion properties and health effects. Recently, spaCBA-encoded pili that bind to human intestinal mucus were identified on its cell surface. Here, we report on the phenotypic analysis of a

  20. Secreted Immunomodulatory Proteins of Staphylococcus aureus Activate Platelets and Induce Platelet Aggregation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Binsker, Ulrike; Palankar, Raghavendra; Wesche, Jan; Kohler, Thomas P; Prucha, Josephine; Burchhardt, Gerhard; Rohde, Manfred; Schmidt, Frank; Bröker, Barbara M; Mamat, Uwe; Pané-Farré, Jan; Graf, Anica; Ebner, Patrick; Greinacher, Andreas; Hammerschmidt, Sven

    2018-04-01

    Staphylococcus aureus can cause bloodstream infections associated with infective endocarditis (IE) and disseminated intravascular coagulopathy (DIC). Both complications involve platelets. In view of an increasing number of antibiotic-resistant strains, new approaches to control systemic S. aureus infection are gaining importance. Using a repertoire of 52 recombinant S. aureus proteins in flow cytometry-based platelet activation and aggregation assays, we identified, in addition to the extracellular adherence protein Eap, three secreted staphylococcal proteins as novel platelet activating proteins. Eap and the chemotaxis inhibitory protein of S. aureus (CHIPS), the formyl peptide receptor-like 1 inhibitory protein (FLIPr) and the major autolysin Atl induced P-selectin expression in washed platelets and platelet-rich plasma. Similarly, AtlA, CHIPS and Eap induced platelet aggregation in whole blood. Fluorescence microscopy illustrated that P-selectin expression is associated with calcium mobilization and re-organization of the platelet actin cytoskeleton. Characterization of the functionally active domains of the major autolysin AtlA and Eap indicates that the amidase domain of Atl and the tandem repeats 3 and 4 of Eap are crucial for platelet activation. These results provide new insights in S. aureus protein interactions with platelets and identify secreted proteins as potential treatment targets in case of antibiotic-resistant S. aureus infection. Schattauer GmbH Stuttgart.

  1. Platelets Proteomic Profiles of Acute Ischemic Stroke Patients.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ozge Cevik

    Full Text Available Platelets play a crucial role in the pathogenesis of stroke and antiplatelet agents exist for its treatment and prevention. Through the use of LC-MS based protein expression profiling, platelets from stroke patients were analyzed and then correlated with the proteomic analyses results in the context of this disease. This study was based on patients who post ischemic stroke were admitted to hospital and had venous blood drawn within 24 hrs of the incidence. Label-free protein expression analyses of the platelets' tryptic digest was performed in triplicate on a UPLC-ESI-qTOF-MS/MS system and ProteinLynx Global Server (v2.5, Waters was used for tandem mass data extraction. The peptide sequences were searched against the reviewed homo sapiens database (www.uniprot.org and the quantitation of protein variation was achieved through Progenesis LC-MS software (V4.0, Nonlinear Dynamics. These Label-free differential proteomics analysis of platelets ensured that 500 proteins were identified and 83 of these proteins were found to be statistically significant. The differentially expressed proteins are involved in various processes such as inflammatory response, cellular movement, immune cell trafficking, cell-to-cell signaling and interaction, hematological system development and function and nucleic acid metabolism. The expressions of myeloperoxidase, arachidonate 12-Lipoxygenase and histidine-rich glycoprotein are involved in cellular metabolic processes, crk-like protein and ras homolog gene family member A involved in cell signaling with vitronectin, thrombospondin 1, Integrin alpha 2b, and integrin beta 3 involved in cell adhesion. Apolipoprotein H, immunoglobulin heavy constant gamma 1 and immunoglobulin heavy constant gamma 3 are involved in structural, apolipoprotein A-I, and alpha-1-microglobulin/bikunin precursor is involved in transport, complement component 3 and clusterin is involved in immunity proteins as has been discussed. Our data provides

  2. Fibrinogen Motif Discriminates Platelet and Cell Capture in Peptide-Modified Gold Micropore Arrays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adamson, Kellie; Spain, Elaine; Prendergast, Una; Moran, Niamh; Forster, Robert J; Keyes, Tia E

    2018-01-16

    Human blood platelets and SK-N-AS neuroblastoma cancer-cell capture at spontaneously adsorbed monolayers of fibrinogen-binding motifs, GRGDS (generic integrin adhesion), HHLGGAKQAGDV (exclusive to platelet integrin α IIb β 3 ), or octanethiol (adhesion inhibitor) at planar gold and ordered 1.6 μm diameter spherical cap gold cavity arrays were compared. In all cases, arginine/glycine/aspartic acid (RGD) promoted capture, whereas alkanethiol monolayers inhibited adhesion. Conversely only platelets adhered to alanine/glycine/aspartic acid (AGD)-modified surfaces, indicating that the AGD motif is recognized preferentially by the platelet-specific integrin, α IIb β 3 . Microstructuring of the surface effectively eliminated nonspecific platelet/cell adsorption and dramatically enhanced capture compared to RGD/AGD-modified planar surfaces. In all cases, adhesion was reversible. Platelets and cells underwent morphological change on capture, the extent of which depended on the topography of the underlying substrate. This work demonstrates that both the nature of the modified interface and its underlying topography influence the capture of cancer cells and platelets. These insights may be useful in developing cell-based cancer diagnostics as well as in identifying strategies for the disruption of platelet cloaks around circulating tumor cells.

  3. Cellular Adhesion and Adhesion Molecules

    OpenAIRE

    SELLER, Zerrin

    2014-01-01

    In recent years, cell adhesion and cell adhesion molecules have been shown to be important for many normal biological processes, including embryonic cell migration, immune system functions and wound healing. It has also been shown that they contribute to the pathogenesis of a large number of common human disorders, such as rheumatoid arthritis and tumor cell metastasis in cancer. In this review, the basic mechanisms of cellular adhesion and the structural and functional features of adhes...

  4. The effect of polymerization mode on monomer conversion, free radical entrapment, and interaction with hydroxyapatite of commercial self-adhesive cements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    D'Alpino, Paulo Henrique Perlatti; Silva, Marília Santos; Vismara, Marcus Vinícius Gonçalves; Di Hipólito, Vinicius; Miranda González, Alejandra Hortencia; de Oliveira Graeff, Carlos Frederico

    2015-06-01

    This study evaluated the degree of conversion, the free radical entrapment, and the chemical interaction of self-adhesive resin cements mixed with pure hydroxyapatite, as a function of the polymerization activation mode among a variety of commercial self-adhesive cements. Four cements (Embrace WetBond, MaxCem Elite, Bifix SE, and RelyX U200) were mixed, combined with hydroxyapatite, dispensed into molds, and distributed into three groups, according to polymerization protocols: IP (photoactivation for 40s); DP (delayed photoactivation, 10 min self-curing plus 40s light-activated); and CA (chemical activation, no light exposure). Infrared (IR) spectra were obtained and monomer conversion (%) was calculated by comparing the aliphatic-to-aromatic IR absorption peak ratio before and after polymerization (n=10). The free radical entrapment values of the resin cements were characterized using Electron Paramagnetic Resonance (EPR) and the concentration of spins (number of spins/mass) calculated (n=3). Values were compared using two-way ANOVA and Tukey's post-hoc test (α=5%). X-ray diffraction (XRD) characterized the crystallinity of hydroxyapatite as a function of the chemical interactions with the resin cements. The tested parameters varied as a function of resin cement and polymerization protocol. Embrace WetBond and RelyX U200 demonstrated dependence on photoactivation (immediate or delayed), whereas MaxCem Elite exhibited dependence on the chemical activation mode. Bifix SE presented the best balance based on the parameters analyzed, irrespective of the activation protocol. Choice of polymerization protocol affects the degree of conversion, free radical entrapment, and the chemical interaction between hydroxyapatite and self-adhesive resin cement mixtures. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. ADAM2 interactions with mouse eggs and cell lines expressing α4/α9 (ITGA4/ITGA9 integrins: implications for integrin-based adhesion and fertilization.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ulyana V Desiderio

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Integrins are heterodimeric cell adhesion molecules, with 18 α (ITGA and eight β (ITGB subunits forming 24 heterodimers classified into five families. Certain integrins, especially the α(4/α(9 (ITGA4/ITGA9 family, interact with members of the ADAM (a disintegrin and metalloprotease family. ADAM2 is among the better characterized and also of interest because of its role in sperm function. Having shown that ITGA9 on mouse eggs participates in mouse sperm-egg interactions, we sought to characterize ITGA4/ITGA9-ADAM2 interactions.An anti-β(1/ITGB1 function-blocking antibody that reduces sperm-egg binding significantly inhibited ADAM2 binding to mouse eggs. Analysis of integrin subunit expression indicates that mouse eggs could express at least ten different integrins, five in the RGD-binding family, two in the laminin-binding family, two in the collagen-binding family, and ITGA9-ITGB1. Adhesion assays to characterize ADAM2 interactions with ITGA4/ITGA9 family members produced the surprising result that RPMI 8866 cell adhesion to ADAM2 was inhibited by an anti-ITGA9 antibody, noteworthy because ITGA9 has only been reported to dimerize with ITGB1, and RPMI 8866 cells lack detectable ITGB1. Antibody and siRNA studies demonstrate that ITGB7 is the β subunit contributing to RPMI 8866 adhesion to ADAM2.These data indicate that a novel integrin α-β combination, ITGA9-ITGB7 (α(9β(7, in RPMI 8866 cells functions as a binding partner for ADAM2. ITGA9 had previously only been reported to dimerize with ITGB1. Although ITGA9-ITGB7 is unlikely to be a widely expressed integrin and appears to be the result of "compensatory dimerization" occurring in the context of little/no ITGB1 expression, the data indicate that ITGA9-ITGB7 functions as an ADAM binding partner in certain cellular contexts, with implications for mammalian fertilization and integrin function.

  6. Modulation of platelet functions by crude rice (Oryza sativa) bran policosanol extract.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong, Wai-Teng; Ismail, Maznah; Imam, Mustapha Umar; Zhang, Yi-Da

    2016-07-28

    Rice bran is bioactive-rich and has proven health benefits for humans. Moreover, its source, the brown rice has antioxidant, hypolipidemic and other functional properties that are increasingly making it a nutritional staple especially in Asian countries. This study investigated the antiplatelet aggregation mechanisms of crude hexane/methanolic rice bran extract, in which policosanol was the targeted bioactive. Platelets play a vital role in pathogenesis of atherosclerosis and cardiovascular diseases, and their increased activities could potentially cause arterial thrombus formation or severe bleeding disorders. Thus, in this study, platelet aggregation and adhesion of platelets to major components of basal lamina were examined in vitro. In addition, cellular protein secretion was quantified as a measurement of platelet activation. Adenosine diphosphate (ADP), collagen, and arachidonic acid (AA)-induced aggregation were studied using the microtiter technique. Rat platelets were pre-treated with various concentrations of policosanol extract, and the adhesion of platelets onto collagen- and laminin-coated surface (extracellular matrix) was studied using the acid phosphatase assay. The effect of crude policosanol extract on released proteins from activated platelets was measured using modified Lowry determination method. Rice bran policosanol extract significantly inhibited in vitro platelet aggregation induced by different agonists in a dose dependent manner. The IC50 of ADP-, collagen-, and AA-induced platelet aggregation were 533.37 ± 112.16, 635.94 ± 78.45 and 693.86 ± 70.57 μg/mL, respectively. The present study showed that crude rice bran policosanol extract significantly inhibited platelet adhesion to collagen in a dose dependent manner. Conversely, at a low concentration of 15.625 μg/mL, the extract significantly inhibited platelet adhesion to laminin stimulated by different platelet agonists. In addition to the alteration of cell adhesive

  7. Syndecan proteoglycans and cell adhesion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Woods, A; Oh, E S; Couchman, J R

    1998-01-01

    It is now becoming clear that a family of transmembrane proteoglycans, the syndecans, have important roles in cell adhesion. They participate through binding of matrix ligand to their glycosaminoglycan chains, clustering, and the induction of signaling cascades to modify the internal microfilament...... organization. Syndecans can modulate the type of adhesive responses induced by other matrix ligand-receptor interactions, such as those involving the integrins, and so contribute to the control of cell morphology, adhesion and migration....

  8. Study on platelet kinetics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yui, Tokuo

    1981-01-01

    Fundamental study: Factors influencing the labeling on human platelets were evaluated and optimal labeling conditions were chosen. Then, platelet survival times were measured and organ distribution of labeled platelets was observed in rat by four different methods. These results were compared with each other. Based on the findings of those studies, the protocol of human platelet labeling with 111 In-oxine for clinical use was established. Clinical study: In normal cases, a platelet survival time and a platelet turnover rate were quite similar to the results from 51 Cr method. In gamma camera imaging, a radioactivity on the heart decreased with the lapse of time, while that on the spleen and liver gradually increased. In patients with idiopathic thrombocytopenic purpura, platelet survival time was markedly shortened and both a platelet turnover rate and an effective production increased. In patient with congestive splenomegaly, a platelet survival time was normal, whereas a platelet pooling on the spleen markedly increased. In patients who were implanted dacron-graft for abdominal aortic aneurysm, a radioactivity accumulated to the graft and a platelet survival time shortened. In a patient with myocardial infarction, the camera imaging clearly showed the thrombus in the left ventricular aneurysm. In three patients with mitral stenosis, thrombi in left atrium were observed at the camera images. Imaging of a platelet distribution and measurement of platelet survival time using 111 In-oxine labeled platelets are considered to be an excellent method for the diagnosis and decision of treatment on various disorders with thrombocytopenia and thrombosis. (J.P.N.)

  9. Transcellular lipoxygenase metabolism between monocytes and platelets

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bigby, T.D.; Meslier, N. (Univ. of California, San Francisco (USA))

    1989-09-15

    We have examined the effects of co-culture and in vitro co-stimulation on lipoxygenase metabolism in monocytes and platelets. Monocytes were obtained from the peripheral blood of normal volunteers by discontinuous gradient centrifugation and adherence to tissue culture plastic. Platelets were obtained from the platelet-rich plasma of the same donor. When 10(9) platelets and 2.5 x 10(6) monocytes were co-stimulated with 1 microM A23187, these preparations released greater quantities of 12(S)-hydroxy-10-trans-5,8,14-cis-eicosatetraenoic acid, 5(S),12-(S)dihydroxy-6,10-trans-8,14-cis-eicosatetraenoic acid, and leukotriene C4, 5(S)-hydroxy-6(R)-S-glutathionyl-7,9-trans-11,14-cis-eicosatetraenoic (LTC4) when compared with monocytes alone. Release of arachidonic acid, 5-HETE, delta 6-trans-LTB4, and delta 6-trans-12-epi-LTB4 from monocytes was decreased in the presence of platelets. A dose-response curve was constructed and revealed that the above changes became evident when the platelet number exceeded 10(7). Dual radiolabeling experiments with 3H- and 14C-arachidonic acid revealed that monocytes provided arachidonic acid, 5-HETE, and LTA4 for further metabolism by the platelet. Monocytes did not metabolize platelet intermediates detectably. In addition, as much as 1.2 microM 12(S)-hydroxy-10-trans-5,8,14-cis-eicosatetraenoic acid and 12(S)-hydroperoxy-10-trans-5,8,14-cis-eicosatetraenoic acid had no effect on monocyte lipoxygenase metabolism. Platelets were capable of converting LTA4 to LTC4, but conversion of LTA4 to LTB4 was not detected. We conclude that the monocyte and platelet lipoxygenase pathways undergo a transcellular lipoxygenase interaction that differs from the interaction of the neutrophil and platelet lipoxygenase pathways. In this interaction monocytes provide intermediate substrates for further metabolic conversion by platelets in an unidirectional manner.

  10. Gallic Acid Attenuates Platelet Activation and Platelet-Leukocyte Aggregation: Involving Pathways of Akt and GSK3β

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Shih-Sheng; Lee, Viola S. Y.; Tseng, Yu-Lun; Chang, Kuan-Cheng; Chen, Kuen-Bao; Chen, Yuh-Lien; Li, Chi-Yuan

    2012-01-01

    Platelet activation and its interaction with leukocytes play an important role in atherothrombosis. Cardiovascular diseases resulted from atherothrombosis remain the major causes of death worldwide. Gallic acid, a major constituent of red wine and tea, has been believed to have properties of cardiovascular protection, which is likely to be related to its antioxidant effects. Nonetheless, there were few and inconsistent data regarding the effects of gallic acid on platelet function. Therefore, we designed this in vitro study to determine whether gallic acid could inhibit platelet activation and the possible mechanisms. From our results, gallic acid could concentration-dependently inhibit platelet aggregation, P-selectin expression, and platelet-leukocyte aggregation. Gallic acid prevented the elevation of intracellular calcium and attenuated phosphorylation of PKCα/p38 MAPK and Akt/GSK3β on platelets stimulated by the stimulants ADP or U46619. This is the first mechanistic explanation for the inhibitory effects on platelets from gallic acid. PMID:22811749

  11. Gallic Acid Attenuates Platelet Activation and Platelet-Leukocyte Aggregation: Involving Pathways of Akt and GSK3β

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shih-Sheng Chang

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Platelet activation and its interaction with leukocytes play an important role in atherothrombosis. Cardiovascular diseases resulted from atherothrombosis remain the major causes of death worldwide. Gallic acid, a major constituent of red wine and tea, has been believed to have properties of cardiovascular protection, which is likely to be related to its antioxidant effects. Nonetheless, there were few and inconsistent data regarding the effects of gallic acid on platelet function. Therefore, we designed this in vitro study to determine whether gallic acid could inhibit platelet activation and the possible mechanisms. From our results, gallic acid could concentration-dependently inhibit platelet aggregation, P-selectin expression, and platelet-leukocyte aggregation. Gallic acid prevented the elevation of intracellular calcium and attenuated phosphorylation of PKCα/p38 MAPK and Akt/GSK3β on platelets stimulated by the stimulants ADP or U46619. This is the first mechanistic explanation for the inhibitory effects on platelets from gallic acid.

  12. Cancer Cell Adhesion and Metastasis: Selectins, Integrins, and the Inhibitory Potential of Heparins

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gerd Bendas

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Cell adhesion molecules play a significant role in cancer progression and metastasis. Cell-cell interactions of cancer cells with endothelium determine the metastatic spread. In addition, direct tumor cell interactions with platelets, leukocytes, and soluble components significantly contribute to cancer cell adhesion, extravasation, and the establishment of metastatic lesions. Clinical evidence indicates that heparin, commonly used for treatment of thromboembolic events in cancer patients, is beneficial for their survival. Preclinical studies confirm that heparin possesses antimetastatic activities that lead to attenuation of metastasis in various animal models. Heparin contains several biological activities that may affect several steps in metastatic cascade. Here we focus on the role of cellular adhesion receptors in the metastatic cascade and discuss evidence for heparin as an inhibitor of cell adhesion. While P- and L-selectin facilitation of cellular contacts during hematogenous metastasis is being accepted as a potential target of heparin, here we propose that heparin may also interfere with integrin activity and thereby affect cancer progression. This review summarizes recent findings about potential mechanisms of tumor cell interactions in the vasculature and antimetastatic activities of heparin.

  13. The Drosophila cell adhesion molecule Neuroglian regulates Lissencephaly-1 localisation in circulating immunosurveillance cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Williams Michael J

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background When the parasitoid wasp Leptopilina boulardi lays its eggs in Drosophila larvae phagocytic cells called plasmatocytes and specialized cells known as lamellocytes encapsulate the egg. This requires these circulating immunosurveillance cells (haemocytes to change from a non-adhesive to an adhesive state enabling them to bind to the invader. Interestingly, attachment of leukocytes, platelets, and insect haemocytes requires the same adhesion complexes as epithelial and neuronal cells. Results Here evidence is presented showing that the Drosophila L1-type cell adhesion molecule Neuroglian (Nrg is required for haemocytes to encapsulate L. boulardi wasp eggs. The amino acid sequence FIGQY containing a conserved phosphorylated tyrosine is found in the intracellular domain of all L1-type cell adhesion molecules. This conserved tyrosine is phosphorylated at the cell periphery of plasmatocytes and lamellocytes prior to parasitisation, but dephosphorylated after immune activation. Intriguingly, another pool of Nrg located near the nucleus of plasmatocytes remains phosphorylated after parasitisation. In mammalian neuronal cells phosphorylated neurofascin, another L1-type cell adhesion molecule interacts with a nucleokinesis complex containing the microtubule binding protein lissencephaly-1 (Lis1 1. Interestingly in plasmatocytes from Nrg mutants the nucleokinesis regulating protein Lissencephaly-1 (Lis1 fails to localise properly around the nucleus and is instead found diffuse throughout the cytoplasm and at unidentified perinuclear structures. After attaching to the wasp egg control plasmatocytes extend filopodia laterally from their cell periphery; as well as extending lateral filopodia plasmatocytes from Nrg mutants also extend many filopodia from their apical surface. Conclusion The Drosophila cellular adhesion molecule Neuroglian is expressed in haemocytes and its activity is required for the encapsulation of L. boularli eggs. At

  14. Effects of drugs on platelet function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morse, E E

    1977-01-01

    Numerous drugs and chemicals affect the function of human blood platelets. The mechanism of action of some medications is partly understood. Aspirin is the most frequently involved drug. It appears to interfere with the platelet release reaction by acetylation of a platelet membrane protein which may be involved in the synthesis of prostaglandins. Other anti-inflammatory drugs, including indomethacin, phenylbutazone, ibuprophen (Motrin) and clonixin, also interfere with the release reaction but have a shorter acting course than aspirin. Some drugs stimulate adenylcyclase (gliclazide) or block phosphodiesterase, (dipyridamole, caffeine) both of which actions lead to an increase in adenosine cyclic 3':5' monophosphate (cAMP) and decrease aggregation by adenosine diphosphate (ADP). These interactions should be known to clinical scientists since patients using these medicaments may manifest abnormal platelet function tests in the laboratory and mild hemorrhagic syndromes in the clinic.

  15. Platelets and the innate immune system: mechanisms of bacterial-induced platelet activation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cox, D; Kerrigan, S W; Watson, S P

    2011-06-01

    It has become clear that platelets are not simply cell fragments that plug the leak in a damaged blood vessel; they are, in fact, also key components in the innate immune system, which is supported by the presence of Toll-like receptors (TLRs) on platelets. As the cells that respond first to a site of injury, they are well placed to direct the immune response to deal with any resulting exposure to pathogens. The response is triggered by bacteria binding to platelets, which usually triggers platelet activation and the secretion of antimicrobial peptides. The main platelet receptors that mediate these interactions are glycoprotein (GP)IIb-IIIa, GPIbα, FcγRIIa, complement receptors, and TLRs. This process may involve direct interactions between bacterial proteins and the receptors, or can be mediated by plasma proteins such as fibrinogen, von Willebrand factor, complement, and IgG. Here, we review the variety of interactions between platelets and bacteria, and look at the potential for inhibiting these interactions in diseases such as infective endocarditis and sepsis. © 2011 International Society on Thrombosis and Haemostasis.

  16. Bio-inspired reversible underwater adhesive.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Yanhua; Wu, Yang; Wang, Liang; Zhang, Manman; Chen, Xuan; Liu, Minjie; Fan, Jun; Liu, Junqiu; Zhou, Feng; Wang, Zuankai

    2017-12-20

    The design of smart surfaces with switchable adhesive properties in a wet environment has remained a challenge in adhesion science and materials engineering. Despite intense demands in various industrial applications and exciting progress in mimicking the remarkable wet adhesion through the delicate control of catechol chemistry, polyelectrolyte complex, and supramolecular architectures, the full recapitulation of nature's dynamic function is limited. Here, we show a facile approach to synthesize bioinspired adhesive, which entails the reversible, tunable, and fast regulation of the wet adhesion on diverse surfaces. The smart wet adhesive takes advantage of the host-guest molecular interaction and the adhesive nature of catechol chemistry, as well as the responsive polymer, allowing for screening and activation of the interfacial interaction simply by a local temperature trigger in an on-demand manner. Our work opens up an avenue for the rational design of bioinspired adhesives with performances even beyond nature.

  17. Adhesion of Human Probiotic Lactobacillus rhamnosus to Cervical and Vaginal Cells and Interaction with Vaginosis-Associated Pathogens

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sophie Coudeyras

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Objectives. The ability of a probiotic Lactobacillus rhamnosus strain (Lcr35 to adhere to cervical and vaginal cells and to affect the viability of two main vaginosis-associated pathogens, Prevotella bivia, Gardnerella vaginalis, as well as Candida albicans was investigated. Methods. Adhesion ability was determined in vitro with immortalized epithelial cells from the endocervix, ectocervix, and vagina. Coculture experiments were performed to count viable pathogens cells in the presence of Lcr35. Results. Lcr35 was able to specifically and rapidly adhere to the three cell lines. In coculture assays, a decrease in pathogen cell division rate was observed as from 4 hours of incubation and bactericidal activity after a longer period of incubation, mostly with P. bivia. Conclusion. The ability of Lcr35 to adhere to cervicovaginal cells and its antagonist activities against vaginosis-associated pathogens suggest that this probiotic strain is a promising candidate for use in therapy.

  18. Thioredoxin Inhibitors Attenuate Platelet Function and Thrombus Formation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Metcalfe, Clive; Ramasubramoni, Anjana; Pula, Giordano; Harper, Matthew T; Mundell, Stuart J; Coxon, Carmen H

    2016-01-01

    Thioredoxin (Trx) is an oxidoreductase with important physiological function. Imbalances in the NADPH/thioredoxin reductase/thioredoxin system are associated with a number of pathologies, particularly cancer, and a number of clinical trials for thioredoxin and thioredoxin reductase inhibitors have been carried out or are underway. Due to the emerging role and importance of oxidoreductases for haemostasis and the current interest in developing inhibitors for clinical use, we thought it pertinent to assess whether inhibition of the NADPH/thioredoxin reductase/thioredoxin system affects platelet function and thrombosis. We used small molecule inhibitors of Trx (PMX 464 and PX-12) to determine whether Trx activity influences platelet function, as well as an unbiased proteomics approach to identify potential Trx substrates on the surface of platelets that might contribute to platelet reactivity and function. Using LC-MS/MS we found that PMX 464 and PX-12 affected the oxidation state of thiols in a number of cell surface proteins. Key surface receptors for platelet adhesion and activation were affected, including the collagen receptor GPVI and the von Willebrand factor receptor, GPIb. To experimentally validate these findings we assessed platelet function in the presence of PMX 464, PX-12, and rutin (a selective inhibitor of the related protein disulphide isomerase). In agreement with the proteomics data, small molecule inhibitors of thioredoxin selectively inhibited GPVI-mediated platelet activation, and attenuated ristocetin-induced GPIb-vWF-mediated platelet agglutination, thus validating the findings of the proteomics study. These data reveal a novel role for thioredoxin in regulating platelet reactivity via proteins required for early platelet responses at sites of vessel injury (GPVI and GPIb). This work also highlights a potential opportunity for repurposing of PMX 464 and PX-12 as antiplatelet agents.

  19. Thioredoxin Inhibitors Attenuate Platelet Function and Thrombus Formation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Clive Metcalfe

    Full Text Available Thioredoxin (Trx is an oxidoreductase with important physiological function. Imbalances in the NADPH/thioredoxin reductase/thioredoxin system are associated with a number of pathologies, particularly cancer, and a number of clinical trials for thioredoxin and thioredoxin reductase inhibitors have been carried out or are underway. Due to the emerging role and importance of oxidoreductases for haemostasis and the current interest in developing inhibitors for clinical use, we thought it pertinent to assess whether inhibition of the NADPH/thioredoxin reductase/thioredoxin system affects platelet function and thrombosis. We used small molecule inhibitors of Trx (PMX 464 and PX-12 to determine whether Trx activity influences platelet function, as well as an unbiased proteomics approach to identify potential Trx substrates on the surface of platelets that might contribute to platelet reactivity and function. Using LC-MS/MS we found that PMX 464 and PX-12 affected the oxidation state of thiols in a number of cell surface proteins. Key surface receptors for platelet adhesion and activation were affected, including the collagen receptor GPVI and the von Willebrand factor receptor, GPIb. To experimentally validate these findings we assessed platelet function in the presence of PMX 464, PX-12, and rutin (a selective inhibitor of the related protein disulphide isomerase. In agreement with the proteomics data, small molecule inhibitors of thioredoxin selectively inhibited GPVI-mediated platelet activation, and attenuated ristocetin-induced GPIb-vWF-mediated platelet agglutination, thus validating the findings of the proteomics study. These data reveal a novel role for thioredoxin in regulating platelet reactivity via proteins required for early platelet responses at sites of vessel injury (GPVI and GPIb. This work also highlights a potential opportunity for repurposing of PMX 464 and PX-12 as antiplatelet agents.

  20. Platelet activation and aggregation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Maria Sander; Larsen, O H; Christiansen, Kirsten

    2013-01-01

    This study introduces a new laboratory model of whole blood platelet aggregation stimulated by endogenously generated thrombin, and explores this aspect in haemophilia A in which impaired thrombin generation is a major hallmark. The method was established to measure platelet aggregation initiated...

  1. Platelet alloimmunization after transfusion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Taaning, E; Simonsen, A C; Hjelms, E

    1997-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVES: The frequency of platelet-specific antibodies after one series of blood transfusions has not been reported, and in multiply transfused patients is controversial. MATERIALS AND METHODS: We studied the frequency of alloimmunization against platelet antigens in 117 patient...

  2. PKCalpha regulates platelet granule secretion and thrombus formation in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Konopatskaya, Olga; Gilio, Karen; Harper, Matthew T; Zhao, Yan; Cosemans, Judith M E M; Karim, Zubair A; Whiteheart, Sidney W; Molkentin, Jeffery D; Verkade, Paul; Watson, Steve P; Heemskerk, Johan W M; Poole, Alastair W

    2009-02-01

    Platelets are central players in atherothrombosis development in coronary artery disease. The PKC family provides important intracellular mechanisms for regulating platelet activity, and platelets express several members of this family, including the classical isoforms PKCalpha and PKCbeta and novel isoforms PKCdelta and PKCtheta. Here, we used a genetic approach to definitively demonstrate the role played by PKCalpha in regulating thrombus formation and platelet function. Thrombus formation in vivo was attenuated in Prkca-/- mice, and PKCalpha was required for thrombus formation in vitro, although this PKC isoform did not regulate platelet adhesion to collagen. The ablation of in vitro thrombus formation in Prkca-/- platelets was rescued by the addition of ADP, consistent with the key mechanistic finding that dense-granule biogenesis and secretion depend upon PKCalpha expression. Furthermore, defective platelet aggregation in response to either collagen-related peptide or thrombin could be overcome by an increase in agonist concentration. Evidence of overt bleeding, including gastrointestinal and tail bleeding, was not seen in Prkca-/- mice. In summary, the effects of PKCalpha ablation on thrombus formation and granule secretion may implicate PKCalpha as a drug target for antithrombotic therapy.

  3. TRIM15 is a focal adhesion protein that regulates focal adhesion disassembly

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uchil, Pradeep D.; Pawliczek, Tobias; Reynolds, Tracy D.; Ding, Siyuan; Hinz, Angelika; Munro, James B.; Huang, Fang; Floyd, Robert W.; Yang, Haitao; Hamilton, William L.; Bewersdorf, Joerg; Xiong, Yong; Calderwood, David A.; Mothes, Walther

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT Focal adhesions are macromolecular complexes that connect the actin cytoskeleton to the extracellular matrix. Dynamic turnover of focal adhesions is crucial for cell migration. Paxillin is a multi-adaptor protein that plays an important role in regulating focal adhesion dynamics. Here, we identify TRIM15, a member of the tripartite motif protein family, as a paxillin-interacting factor and a component of focal adhesions. TRIM15 localizes to focal contacts in a myosin-II-independent manner by an interaction between its coiled-coil domain and the LD2 motif of paxillin. Unlike other focal adhesion proteins, TRIM15 is a stable focal adhesion component with restricted mobility due to its ability to form oligomers. TRIM15-depleted cells display impaired cell migration and reduced focal adhesion disassembly rates, in addition to enlarged focal adhesions. Thus, our studies demonstrate a cellular function for TRIM15 as a regulatory component of focal adhesion turnover and cell migration. PMID:25015296

  4. Adhesion molecules

    CERN Document Server

    Preedy, Victor R

    2016-01-01

    This book covers the structure and classification of adhesion molecules in relation to signaling pathways and gene expression. It discusses immunohistochemical localization, neutrophil migration, and junctional, functional, and inflammatory adhesion molecules in pathologies such as leukocyte decompression sickness and ischemia reperfusion injury. Highlighting the medical applications of current research, chapters cover diabetes, obesity, and metabolic syndrome; hypoxia; kidney disease; smoking, atrial fibrillation, and heart disease, the brain and dementia; and tumor proliferation. Finally, it looks at molecular imaging and bioinformatics, high-throughput technologies, and chemotherapy.

  5. Platelet function in dogs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Line A.; Zois, Nora Elisabeth; Pedersen, Henrik D.

    2007-01-01

    Background: Clinical studies investigating platelet function in dogs have had conflicting results that may be caused by normal physiologic variation in platelet response to agonists. Objectives: The objective of this study was to investigate platelet function in clinically healthy dogs of 4...... different breeds by whole-blood aggregometry and with a point-of-care platelet function analyzer (PFA-100), and to evaluate the effect of acetylsalicylic acid (ASA) administration on the results from both methods. Methods: Forty-five clinically healthy dogs (12 Cavalier King Charles Spaniels [CKCS], 12...... applied. However, the importance of these breed differences remains to be investigated. The PFA-100 method with Col + Epi as agonists, and ADP-induced platelet aggregation appear to be sensitive to ASA in dogs....

  6. Biomimetic surface modification of polypropylene by surface chain transfer reaction based on mussel-inspired adhesion technology and thiol chemistry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Niu, Zhijun; Zhao, Yang; Sun, Wei; Shi, Suqing, E-mail: shisq@nwu.edu.cn; Gong, Yongkuan

    2016-11-15

    Highlights: • Biomimetic surface modification of PP was successfully conducted by integrating mussel-inspired technology, thiol chemistry and cell outer membranes-like structures. • The resultant biomimetic surface exhibits good interface and surface stability. • The obvious suppression of protein adsorption and platelet adhesion is also achieved. • The residue thoil groups on the surface could be further functionalized. - Abstract: Biomimetic surface modification of polypropylene (PP) is conducted by surface chain transfer reaction based on the mussel-inspired versatile adhesion technology and thiol chemistry, using 2-methacryloyloxyethylphosphorylcholine (MPC) as a hydrophilic monomer mimicking the cell outer membrane structure and 2,2-azobisisobutyronitrile (AIBN) as initiator in ethanol. A layer of polydopamine (PDA) is firstly deposited onto PP surface, which not only offers good interfacial adhesion with PP, but also supplies secondary reaction sites (-NH{sub 2}) to covalently anchor thiol groups onto PP surface. Then the radical chain transfer to surface-bonded thiol groups and surface re-initiated polymerization of MPC lead to the formation of a thin layer of polymer brush (PMPC) with cell outer membrane mimetic structure on PP surface. X-ray photoelectron spectrophotometer (XPS), atomic force microscopy (AFM) and water contact angle measurements are used to characterize the PP surfaces before and after modification. The protein adsorption and platelet adhesion experiments are also employed to evaluate the interactions of PP surface with biomolecules. The results show that PMPC is successfully grafted onto PP surface. In comparison with bare PP, the resultant PP-PMPC surface exhibits greatly improved protein and platelet resistance performance, which is the contribution of both increased surface hydrophilicity and zwitterionic structure. More importantly, the residue thiol groups on PP-PMPC surface create a new pathway to further functionalize such

  7. Biomimetic surface modification of polypropylene by surface chain transfer reaction based on mussel-inspired adhesion technology and thiol chemistry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Niu, Zhijun; Zhao, Yang; Sun, Wei; Shi, Suqing; Gong, Yongkuan

    2016-01-01

    Highlights: • Biomimetic surface modification of PP was successfully conducted by integrating mussel-inspired technology, thiol chemistry and cell outer membranes-like structures. • The resultant biomimetic surface exhibits good interface and surface stability. • The obvious suppression of protein adsorption and platelet adhesion is also achieved. • The residue thoil groups on the surface could be further functionalized. - Abstract: Biomimetic surface modification of polypropylene (PP) is conducted by surface chain transfer reaction based on the mussel-inspired versatile adhesion technology and thiol chemistry, using 2-methacryloyloxyethylphosphorylcholine (MPC) as a hydrophilic monomer mimicking the cell outer membrane structure and 2,2-azobisisobutyronitrile (AIBN) as initiator in ethanol. A layer of polydopamine (PDA) is firstly deposited onto PP surface, which not only offers good interfacial adhesion with PP, but also supplies secondary reaction sites (-NH 2 ) to covalently anchor thiol groups onto PP surface. Then the radical chain transfer to surface-bonded thiol groups and surface re-initiated polymerization of MPC lead to the formation of a thin layer of polymer brush (PMPC) with cell outer membrane mimetic structure on PP surface. X-ray photoelectron spectrophotometer (XPS), atomic force microscopy (AFM) and water contact angle measurements are used to characterize the PP surfaces before and after modification. The protein adsorption and platelet adhesion experiments are also employed to evaluate the interactions of PP surface with biomolecules. The results show that PMPC is successfully grafted onto PP surface. In comparison with bare PP, the resultant PP-PMPC surface exhibits greatly improved protein and platelet resistance performance, which is the contribution of both increased surface hydrophilicity and zwitterionic structure. More importantly, the residue thiol groups on PP-PMPC surface create a new pathway to further functionalize such

  8. [Inhibitory mechanism of ifenprodil tartrate on rabbit platelet aggregation].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Irino, O; Saitoh, K; Hayashi, T; Ohkubo, K

    1985-05-01

    The effects of dl-erythro-4-benzyl-alpha-(4-hydroxyphenyl)-beta-methyl-l-piperidine-eth anol tartrate (ifenprodil tartrate) on rabbit platelet aggregation in vitro and ex vivo were studied. Ifenprodil tartrate inhibited platelet aggregation in vitro induced by ADP, collagen and epinephrine. It also inhibited 5-hydroxytryptamine (5-HT) uptake into platelets and 5-HT release from platelets. Since these inhibitory effects of ifenprodil tartrate on the functions of rabbit platelets were similar to the effects of imipramine, the effects of ifenprodil tartrate may be due to the stabilizing action of ifenprodil tartrate on the platelet membrane. The platelet aggregation by ADP was significantly inhibited in rabbits after oral administration of ifenprodil tartrate, the maximal plasma level of ifenprodil being reached at 20 ng/ml ex vivo, while the maximal level was only 1/40 of the minimal concentration of ifenprodil tartrate necessary to inhibit platelet aggregation in vitro. These results indicate that factors other than ifenprodil tartrate acting directly on the platelets (e.g., PGI2 which is an endogenous inhibitor of platelet aggregation) are involved in inducing the inhibitory effects of ifenprodil tartrate on platelet aggregation ex vivo. The effects of ifenprodil tartrate on both PGI2 release from the aorta and the inhibitory effects of PGI2 on platelet aggregation in vitro were investigated: PGI2 was found to intensify the inhibitory effects of ifenprodil tartrate on platelet aggregation in vitro, but there was little effect, if any, on PGI2 release. Therefore, it is considered that the ex vivo effects of ifenprodil tartrate might be due to its interaction with endogenous PGI2 in the blood.

  9. Platelet Rich Plasma and Knee Surgery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mikel Sánchez

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available In orthopaedic surgery and sports medicine, the knee joint has traditionally been considered the workhorse. The reconstruction of every damaged element in this joint is crucial in achieving the surgeon’s goal to restore the knee function and prevent degeneration towards osteoarthritis. In the last fifteen years, the field of regenerative medicine is witnessing a boost of autologous blood-derived platelet rich plasma products (PRPs application to effectively mimic and accelerate the tissue healing process. The scientific rationale behind PRPs is the delivery of growth factors, cytokines, and adhesive proteins present in platelets and plasma, as well as other biologically active proteins conveyed by the plasma such as fibrinogen, prothrombin, and fibronectin; with this biological engineering approach, new perspectives in knee surgery were opened. This work describes the use of PRP to construct and repair every single anatomical structure involved in knee surgery, detailing the process conducted in ligament, meniscal, and chondral surgery.

  10. Platelet microvesicles in health and disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Melki, Imene; Tessandier, Nicolas; Zufferey, Anne; Boilard, Eric

    2017-05-01

    Interest in cell-derived extracellular vesicles and their physiological and pathological implications is constantly growing. Microvesicles, also known as microparticles, are small extracellular vesicles released by cells in response to activation or apoptosis. Among the different microvesicles present in the blood of healthy individuals, platelet-derived microvesicles (PMVs) are the most abundant. Their characterization has revealed a heterogeneous cargo that includes a set of adhesion molecules. Similarly to platelets, PMVs are also involved in thrombosis through support of the coagulation cascade. The levels of circulatory PMVs are altered during several disease manifestations such as coagulation disorders, rheumatoid arthritis, systemic lupus erythematosus, cancers, cardiovascular diseases, and infections, pointing to their potential contribution to disease and their development as a biomarker. This review highlights recent findings in the field of PMV research and addresses their contribution to both healthy and diseased states.

  11. Stimulus-response coupling in platelets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huang, E.M.

    1986-01-01

    To understand the mechanism of stimulus-response coupling in platelets, the potentiating effect of succinate and lithium on platelet activation was examined. The action of succinate was immediate; preincubation with succinate did not lead to desensitization. Succinate was comparable to ADP in lowering cAMP levels previously elevated by PGl 2 . Since inhibition of cAMP is not a prerequisite for platelet activation, the mechanism of potentiation of succinate remains undefined. Lithium has also been shown to inhibit adenylate cyclase in PGl 2 -pretreated platelets. Lithium, however, can also inhibit inositol phosphate (InsP) phosphatase and lead to an accumulation of InsP. In human platelets, lithium also enhanced the thrombin-induced accumulation of [ 3 H]inositol-labelled inositol trisphosphate (InsP 3 ), and inositol bisphosphate (InsP 2 ). One hour after thrombin addition, all 3 inositol phosphates returned to near basal levels. In the presence of lithium, while labelled InsP 2 and InsP 3 returned to their respective basal levels, the InsP level remained elevated, consistent with the known inhibitory effect of lithium on InsP phosphatase. In thrombin-stimulated platelets prelabeled with [ 32 P]phosphate, lithium led to a decrease in labelled phosphatidylinositol 4-phosphate (PtdIns4P) as well as an enhanced production of labelled lysophosphatidylinositol, suggesting multiple effects of lithium on platelet phosphoinositide metabolism. These observed effects, however, occurred too slowly to be the mechanism by which lithium potentiated agonist-induced platelet activation. To study the agonist-receptor interaction, the effect of the specific, high affinity thrombin inhibitor, hirudin, on thrombin-induced accumulation of [ 3 H]inositol-labelled inositol phosphates was studied

  12. Exogenous modification of platelet membranes with the omega-3 fatty acids EPA and DHA reduces platelet procoagulant activity and thrombus formation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larson, Mark K; Tormoen, Garth W; Weaver, Lucinda J; Luepke, Kristen J; Patel, Ishan A; Hjelmen, Carl E; Ensz, Nicole M; McComas, Leah S; McCarty, Owen J T

    2013-02-01

    Several studies have implicated the omega-3 fatty acids eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA) and docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) in inhibition of normal platelet function, suggesting a role for platelets in EPA- and DHA-mediated cardioprotection. However, it is unclear whether the cardioprotective mechanisms arise from alterations to platelet-platelet, platelet-matrix, or platelet-coagulation factor interactions. Our previous results led us to hypothesize that EPA and DHA alter the ability of platelets to catalyze the generation of thrombin. We tested this hypothesis by exogenously modifying platelet membranes with EPA and DHA, which resulted in compositional changes analogous to increased dietary EPA and DHA intake. Platelets treated with EPA and DHA showed reductions in the rate of thrombin generation and exposure of platelet phosphatidylserine. In addition, treatment of platelets with EPA and DHA decreased thrombus formation and altered the processing of thrombin precursor proteins. Furthermore, treatment of whole blood with EPA and DHA resulted in increased occlusion time and a sharply reduced accumulation of fibrin under flow conditions. These results demonstrate that EPA and DHA inhibit, but do not eliminate, the ability of platelets to catalyze thrombin generation in vitro. The ability of EPA and DHA to reduce the procoagulant function of platelets provides a possible mechanism behind the cardioprotective phenotype in individuals consuming high levels of EPA and DHA.

  13. Investigating the role of ion-pair strategy in regulating nicotine release from patch: Mechanistic insights based on intermolecular interaction and mobility of pressure sensitive adhesive.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Qiaoyun; Wan, Xiaocao; Liu, Chao; Fang, Liang

    2018-07-01

    The aim of this study was to prepare a drug-in-adhesive patch of nicotine (NIC) and use ion-pair strategy to regulate drug delivery rate. Moreover, the mechanism of how ion-pair strategy regulated drug release was elucidated at molecular level. Formulation factors including pressure sensitive adhesives (PSAs), drug loading and counter ions (C 4 , C 6 , C 8 , C 10 , and C 12 ) were screened. In vitro release experiment and in vitro transdermal experiment were conducted to determine the rate-limiting step in drug delivery process. FT-IR and molecular modeling were used to characterize the interaction between drug and PSA. Thermal analysis and rheology study were conducted to investigate the mobility variation of PSA. The optimized patch prepared with NIC-C 8 had the transdermal profile fairly close to that of the commercial product (p > 0.05). The release rate constants (k) of NIC, NIC-C 4 and NIC-C 10 were 21.1, 14.4 and 32.4, respectively. Different release rates of NIC ion-pair complexes were attributed to the dual effect of ion-pair strategy on drug release. On one hand, ion-pair strategy enhanced the interaction between drug and PSA, which inhibited drug release. On the other hand, using ion-pair strategy improved the mobility of PSA, which facilitated drug release. Drug release behavior was determined by combined effect of two aspects above. These conclusions provided a new idea for us to regulate drug release behavior from patch. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. Lectin receptor kinases participate in protein-protein interactions to mediate plasma membrane-cell wall adhesions in Arabidopsis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gouget, A.; Senchou, V.; Govers, F.; Sanson, A.; Barre, A.; Rougé, P.; Pont-Lezica, R.; Canut, H.

    2006-01-01

    Interactions between plant cell walls and plasma membranes are essential for cells to function properly, but the molecules that mediate the structural continuity between wall and membrane are unknown. Some of these interactions, which are visualized upon tissue plasmolysis in Arabidopsis

  15. Bacterial Adhesion & Blocking Bacterial Adhesion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vejborg, Rebecca Munk

    2008-01-01

    , which influence the transition from a planktonic lifestyle to a sessile lifestyle, have been studied. Protein conditioning film formation was found to influence bacterial adhesion and subsequent biofilm formation considerable, and an aqueous extract of fish muscle tissue was shown to significantly...... tract to the microbial flocs in waste water treatment facilities. Microbial biofilms may however also cause a wide range of industrial and medical problems, and have been implicated in a wide range of persistent infectious diseases, including implantassociated microbial infections. Bacterial adhesion...... is the first committing step in biofilm formation, and has therefore been intensely scrutinized. Much however, still remains elusive. Bacterial adhesion is a highly complex process, which is influenced by a variety of factors. In this thesis, a range of physico-chemical, molecular and environmental parameters...

  16. Dose- and time-related platelet response with apheresis platelet concentrates and pooled platelets

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad Mizanur Rahman

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available This study was carried out to compare the post-transfusion platelet increment between the apheresis platelet concentrate (n=74 and pooled platelets (n=54. Pre- and post-transfusion platelet count of the recipient were carried out by automated hematology analyzer. In apheresis platelet concentrate group, the mean 24 hours post-transfusion platelet increment was 47 x 109/L which was statistically significant (p<0.001. On the other hand, in pooled platelets group, the mean 24 hours post–transfusions platelet count increment was 11.0 x 109/L which was also statistically significant (p<0.001. This study concluded that the transfusion of apheresis platelet concentrate was more useful than the transfusion of pooled platelets in terms of platelet count increment and requirement of donor.

  17. Measurement of platelet aggregation, independently of patient platelet count

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vinholt, P J; Frederiksen, H; Hvas, A-M

    2017-01-01

    with collagen-related peptide). Platelet aggregation had a negative predictive value of 100% for a bleeding tendency among patients. Conclusion The established platelet aggregation assay was applicable for thrombocytopenic patients, and improved the identification of bleeding risk.......Essentials •Platelet function may influence bleeding risk in thrombocytopenia, but useful tests are needed. •A flow cytometric platelet aggregation test independent of the patient platelet count was made. •Platelet aggregation was reduced in thrombocytopenic patients with hematological cancer....... •High platelet aggregation ruled out bleeding tendency in thrombocytopenic patients. Summary Background Methods for testing platelet aggregation in thrombocytopenia are lacking. Objective To establish a flow-cytometric test of in vitro platelet aggregation independently of the patient's platelet count...

  18. Taurine and platelet aggregation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nauss-Karol, C.; VanderWende, C.; Gaut, Z.N.

    1986-01-01

    Taurine is a putative neurotransmitter or neuromodulator. The endogenous taurine concentration in human platelets, determined by amino acid analysis, is 15 μM/g. In spite of this high level, taurine is actively accumulated. Uptake is saturable, Na + and temperature dependent, and suppressed by metabolic inhibitors, structural analogues, and several classes of centrally active substances. High, medium and low affinity transport processes have been characterized, and the platelet may represent a model system for taurine transport in the CNS. When platelets were incubated with 14 C-taurine for 30 minutes, then resuspended in fresh medium and reincubated for one hour, essentially all of the taurine was retained within the cells. Taurine, at concentrations ranging from 10-1000 μM, had no effect on platelet aggregation induced by ADP or epinephrine. However, taurine may have a role in platelet aggregation since 35-39% of the taurine taken up by human platelets appears to be secreted during the release reaction induced by low concentrations of either epinephrine or ADP, respectively. This release phenomenon would imply that part of the taurine taken up is stored directly in the dense bodies of the platelet

  19. Regulative mechanisms of chondrocyte adhesion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schmal, Hagen; Mehlhorn, Alexander T; Fehrenbach, Miriam

    2006-01-01

    Interaction between chondrocytes and extracellular matrix is considered a key factor in the generation of grafts for matrix-associated chondrocyte transplantation. Therefore, our objective was to study the influence of differentiation status on cellular attachment. Adhesion of chondrocytes...... to collagen type II increased after removal from native cartilage up to the third day in monolayer in a dose-dependent manner. Following dedifferentiation after the second passage, adhesion to collagen types I (-84%) and II (-46%) decreased, whereas adhesion to fibrinogen (+59%) and fibronectin (+43......%) increased. A cartilage construct was developed based on a clinically established collagen type I scaffold. In this matrix, more than 80% of the cells could be immobilized by mechanisms of adhesion, filtration, and cell entrapment. Confocal laser microscopy revealed focal adhesion sites as points of cell...

  20. Quantitation of thrombogenicity of hemodialyzer with technetium-99m and indium-111 labeled platelets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dewanjee, M.K.; Kapadvanjwala, Mansoor; Ruzius, Kees; Serafini, A.N.; Zilleruelo, G.E.; Sfakianakis, G.N.

    1993-01-01

    The platelet thromobogenicity of a hemodialyzer was quantified with 99m Tc- and 111 In-labeled platelets. The platelets collected from blood of Beagle dogs, Yorkshire pigs and human volunteers were labeled with 111 in-tropolone (detergent-free) and 99m Tc-HMPAO. Hemodialysis was performed with a hollow-fiber dialyzer (HFD) in a flow-loop, the temperature of which was maintained at 37 o C, with flow-rates of 7, 150 and 270 mL/min; after dialysis, the HFD radioactivity was measured with an ionization chamber and imaged with a γ-camera. The radioactivity of samples of hollow-fibers taken from the top, middle and bottom of the dialyzer was determined with a γ-counter. The mean values of hemodialyzer-adherent platelet radioactivity were calculated for both radionuclides. The canine platelets were found to be more thrombogenic than porcine and human platelets. The adhesivity of porcine platelets to the biomaterial (cellulose-acetate) of the dialyzer approximated that of human platelets. The 99m Tc label underestimated the thrombus formation (P 111 In- and 99m Tc-labeled platelets suggests that both radionuclides could be used for measurement of device-induced thrombogenicity and may provide an estimation of prosthesis-induced thrombogenicity of human platelets from animal studies. (Author)

  1. Are Platelets Cells? And if Yes, Are They Immune Cells?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fabrice eCOGNASSE

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Small fragments circulating in the blood were formally identified by the end of the 19th century, and it was suggested that they assisted coagulation via interactions with vessel endothelia. Wright, at the beginning of the 20th century, identified their bone-marrow origin. For long, platelets have been considered sticky assistants of hemostasis and pollutants of blood or tissue samples; they were just cell fragments. As such however, they were acknowledged as immunizing (to specific HPA and HLA markers: the platelet’s dark face. The enlightened face showed that besides hemostasis, platelets contained factors involved in healing. As early as the 1930s, platelets entered the arsenal of medicines; were transfused, and were soon manipulated to become a kind of glue to repair damaged tissues. Some gladly categorized platelets as cells but they were certainly not fully licensed as such for cell physiologists. Actually, platelets possess almost every characteristic of cells, apart from being capable of organizing their genes: they have neither a nucleus nor genes. This view prevailed until it became evident that platelets play a role in homeostasis and interact with cells other than with vascular endothelial cells; then began the era of physiological and also pathological inflammation. Platelets have now entered the field of immunity as inflammatory cells. Does assistance to immune cells itself suffice to license a cell as an immune cell? Platelets prove capable of sensing different types of signals and organizing an appropriate response. Many cells can do that. However, platelets can use a complete signalosome (apart from the last transcription step, though it is likely that this step can be circumvented by retrotranscribing RNA messages. The question has also arisen as to whether platelets can present antigen via their abundantly expressed MHC class I molecules. In combination, these properties argue in favor of allowing platelets the title of

  2. Syndecans and cell adhesion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Couchman, J R; Chen, L; Woods, A

    2001-01-01

    Now that transmembrane signaling through primary cell-matrix receptors, integrins, is being elucidated, attention is turning to how integrin-ligand interactions can be modulated. Syndecans are transmembrane proteoglycans implicated as coreceptors in a variety of physiological processes, including...... cell adhesion, migration, response to growth factors, development, and tumorigenesis. This review will describe this family of proteoglycans in terms of their structures and functions and their signaling in conjunction with integrins, and indicate areas for future research....

  3. Leptospira Immunoglobulin-Like Protein B Interacts with the 20th Exon of Human Tropoelastin Contributing to Leptospiral Adhesion to Human Lung Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsieh, Ching-Lin; Tseng, Andrew; He, Hongxuan; Kuo, Chih-Jung; Wang, Xuannian; Chang, Yung-Fu

    2017-01-01

    Leptospira immunoglobulin-like protein B (LigB), a surface adhesin, is capable of mediating the attachment of pathogenic leptospira to the host through interaction with various components of the extracellular matrix (ECM). Human tropoelastin (HTE), the building block of elastin, confers resilience and elasticity to lung, and other tissues. Previously identified Ig-like domains of LigB, including LigB4 and LigB12, bind to HTE, which is likely to promote Leptospira adhesion to lung tissue. However, the molecular mechanism that mediates the LigB-HTE interaction is unclear. In this study, the LigB-binding site on HTE was further pinpointed to a N-terminal region of the 20th exon of HTE (HTE20N). Alanine mutants of basic and aromatic residues on HTE20N significantly reduced binding to the LigB. Additionally, HTE-binding site was narrowed down to the first β-sheet of LigB12. On this binding surface, residues F1054, D1061, A1065, and D1066 were critical for the association with HTE. Most importantly, the recombinant HTE truncates could diminish the binding of LigB to human lung fibroblasts (WI-38) by 68%, and could block the association of LigA-expressing L. biflexa to lung cells by 61%. These findings should expand our understanding of leptospiral pathogenesis, particularly in pulmonary manifestations of leptospirosis.

  4. Leptospira Immunoglobulin-Like Protein B Interacts with the 20th Exon of Human Tropoelastin Contributing to Leptospiral Adhesion to Human Lung Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ching-Lin Hsieh

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Leptospira immunoglobulin-like protein B (LigB, a surface adhesin, is capable of mediating the attachment of pathogenic leptospira to the host through interaction with various components of the extracellular matrix (ECM. Human tropoelastin (HTE, the building block of elastin, confers resilience and elasticity to lung, and other tissues. Previously identified Ig-like domains of LigB, including LigB4 and LigB12, bind to HTE, which is likely to promote Leptospira adhesion to lung tissue. However, the molecular mechanism that mediates the LigB-HTE interaction is unclear. In this study, the LigB-binding site on HTE was further pinpointed to a N-terminal region of the 20th exon of HTE (HTE20N. Alanine mutants of basic and aromatic residues on HTE20N significantly reduced binding to the LigB. Additionally, HTE-binding site was narrowed down to the first β-sheet of LigB12. On this binding surface, residues F1054, D1061, A1065, and D1066 were critical for the association with HTE. Most importantly, the recombinant HTE truncates could diminish the binding of LigB to human lung fibroblasts (WI-38 by 68%, and could block the association of LigA-expressing L. biflexa to lung cells by 61%. These findings should expand our understanding of leptospiral pathogenesis, particularly in pulmonary manifestations of leptospirosis.

  5. Radioimmunoassay of platelet proteins

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pepper, D.S.

    1987-01-01

    The radioimmunoassay of platelet-specific proteins has proven to be an excellent way of monitoring platelet activation in vivo. In contrast to earlier methods such as aggregometry, which has been the major tool used in the evaluation of antiplatelet drugs, the RIAs are capable of working with samples which have been subjected to physiological conditions such as haematocrit, oxygen tension, shear rate and ionized calcium concentration. Also, in contrast to aggregometry, no choice of agonist is necessary. Thus, for the first time it has been possible to monitor the effects of therapeutic intervention with drugs upon the platelet release reaction in vivo. It seems reasonable to equate the release reaction in vivo with activation in vivo, though the stimuli necessarily remain unknown. Nevertheless, the fact that a significant number of the compounds mentioned in Table 3 are indeed capable of reducing platelet activation in vivo and that this effect can be measured objectively is a major step forward in our understanding of platelet pharmacology. Two important goals remain to be achieved, however, the establishment of nonhuman animal models for the evaluation of newer compounds in vivo and longer-term goal of proving in the clinical setting the relevance or otherwise of platelet activation per se to the clinical outcome of a particular disease. In this respect, the availability of accurate, reliable and specific radioimmunoassays has a central role

  6. UVB therapy decreases the adhesive interaction between peripheral blood mononuclear cells and dermal microvascular endothelium, and regulates the differential expression of CD54, VCAM-1, and E-selectin in psoriatic plaques

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cai, J.-P.; Harris, K.; Chin, Y.H.

    1996-01-01

    A dermal lymphocytic infiltrate is a characteristic feature of psoriasis, and may be involved in the pathogenesis of the disease. We have previously shown that specialized dermal microvascular endothelial cells (DMEC) in psoriatic lesions promote the selective adherence of the CD4 CD45Ro helper T-cell subset. In this study, we examined the adhesive interaction between peripheral blood mononuclear cells and psoriatic DMEC in patients treated with ultraviolet B light (UVB), and correlated the results with the expression and function of endothelial adhesion molecules on DMEC. (author)

  7. Osteoblasts Interaction with PLGA Membranes Functionalized with Titanium Film Nanolayer by PECVD. In vitro Assessment of Surface Influence on Cell Adhesion during Initial Cell to Material Interaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Terriza, Antonia; Vilches-Pérez, José I.; González-Caballero, Juan L.; de la Orden, Emilio; Yubero, Francisco; Barranco, Angel; Gonzalez-Elipe, Agustín R.; Vilches, José; Salido, Mercedes

    2014-01-01

    New biomaterials for Guided Bone Regeneration (GBR), both resorbable and non-resorbable, are being developed to stimulate bone tissue formation. Thus, the in vitro study of cell behavior towards material surface properties turns a prerequisite to assess both biocompatibility and bioactivity of any material intended to be used for clinical purposes. For this purpose, we have developed in vitro studies on normal human osteoblasts (HOB®) HOB® osteoblasts grown on a resorbable Poly (lactide-co-glycolide) (PLGA) membrane foil functionalized by a very thin film (around 15 nm) of TiO2 (i.e., TiO2/PLGA membranes), designed to be used as barrier membrane. To avoid any alteration of the membranes, the titanium films were deposited at room temperature in one step by plasma enhanced chemical vapour deposition. Characterization of the functionalized membranes proved that the thin titanium layer completely covers the PLGA foils that remains practically unmodified in their interior after the deposition process and stands the standard sterilization protocols. Both morphological changes and cytoskeletal reorganization, together with the focal adhesion development observed in HOB osteoblasts, significantly related to TiO2 treated PLGA in which the Ti deposition method described has revealed to be a valuable tool to increase bioactivity of PLGA membranes, by combining cell nanotopography cues with the incorporation of bioactive factors. PMID:28788538

  8. Osteoblasts Interaction with PLGA Membranes Functionalized with Titanium Film Nanolayer by PECVD. In vitro Assessment of Surface Influence on Cell Adhesion during Initial Cell to Material Interaction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antonia Terriza

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available New biomaterials for Guided Bone Regeneration (GBR, both resorbable and non-resorbable, are being developed to stimulate bone tissue formation. Thus, the in vitro study of cell behavior towards material surface properties turns a prerequisite to assess both biocompatibility and bioactivity of any material intended to be used for clinical purposes. For this purpose, we have developed in vitro studies on normal human osteoblasts (HOB® HOB® osteoblasts grown on a resorbable Poly (lactide-co-glycolide (PLGA membrane foil functionalized by a very thin film (around 15 nm of TiO2 (i.e., TiO2/PLGA membranes, designed to be used as barrier membrane. To avoid any alteration of the membranes, the titanium films were deposited at room temperature in one step by plasma enhanced chemical vapour deposition. Characterization of the functionalized membranes proved that the thin titanium layer completely covers the PLGA foils that remains practically unmodified in their interior after the deposition process and stands the standard sterilization protocols. Both morphological changes and cytoskeletal reorganization, together with the focal adhesion development observed in HOB osteoblasts, significantly related to TiO2 treated PLGA in which the Ti deposition method described has revealed to be a valuable tool to increase bioactivity of PLGA membranes, by combining cell nanotopography cues with the incorporation of bioactive factors.

  9. Bacterial interactions with proteins and cells relevant to the development of life-threatening endocarditis studied by use of a quartz-crystal microbalance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krajewski, Stefanie; Rheinlaender, Johannes; Ries, Philip; Canjuga, Denis; Mack, Carmen; Scheideler, Lutz; Schäffer, Tilman E; Geis-Gerstorfer, Jürgen; Wendel, Hans-Peter; Rupp, Frank

    2014-05-01

    Implant-related infections are a major challenge in clinical routine because of severe complications, for example infective endocarditis (IE). The purpose of this study was to investigate the real-time interaction of S. gordonii with proteins and cells important in the development of IE, in a flow system, by use of a quartz-crystal microbalance (QCM). Acoustic sensors were biologically modified by preconditioning with sterile saliva, platelet-poor plasma (PPP), or platelet-rich plasma (PRP), followed then by perfusion of a bacterial suspension. After perfusion, additional fluorescence and scanning electron microscopic (SEM) studies were performed. The surface structure of S. gordonii was analyzed by atomic force microscopy (AFM). Compared with S. gordonii adhesion on the abiotic sensor surface following normal mass loading indicated by a frequency decrease, adhesion on saliva, PPP, or PRP-conditioned sensors resulted in an increase in frequency. Furthermore, adhesion induced slightly increased damping signals for saliva and PPP-coated sensors but a decrease upon bacterial adhesion to PRP, indicating the formation of a more rigid biofilm. Microscopic analysis confirmed the formation of dense and vital bacterial layers and the aggregation of platelets and bacteria. In conclusion, our study shows that the complex patterns of QCM output data observed are strongly dependent on the biological substrate and adhesion mechanisms of S. gordonii. Overall, QCM sheds new light on the pathways of such severe infections as IE.

  10. Current dental adhesives systems. A narrative review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milia, Egle; Cumbo, Enzo; Cardoso, Rielson Jose A; Gallina, Giuseppe

    2012-01-01

    Adhesive dentistry is based on the development of materials which establish an effective bond with the tooth tissues. In this context, adhesive systems have attracted considerable research interest in recent years. Successful adhesive bonding depends on the chemistry of the adhesive, on appropriate clinical handling of the material as well as on the knowledge of the morphological changes caused on dental tissue by different bonding procedures. This paper outlines the status of contemporary adhesive systems, with particular emphasis on chemical characteristics and mode of interaction of the adhesives with enamel and dentinal tissues. Dental adhesives are used for several clinical applications and they can be classified based on the clinical regimen in "etch-and-rinse adhesives" and "self-etch adhesives". Other important considerations concern the different anatomical characteristics of enamel and dentine which are involved in the bonding procedures that have also implications for the technique used as well as for the quality of the bond. Etch-and-rinse adhesive systems generally perform better on enamel than self-etching systems which may be more suitable for bonding to dentine. In order to avoid a possible loss of the restoration, secondary caries or pulp damage due to bacteria penetration or due to cytotoxicity effects of eluted adhesive components, careful consideration of several factors is essential in selecting the suitable bonding procedure and adhesive system for the individual patient situation.

  11. Disruption of focal adhesion kinase and p53 interaction with small molecule compound R2 reactivated p53 and blocked tumor growth

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Golubovskaya, Vita M; Ho, Baotran; Zheng, Min; Magis, Andrew; Ostrov, David; Morrison, Carl; Cance, William G

    2013-01-01

    Focal Adhesion Kinase (FAK) is a 125 kDa non-receptor kinase that plays a major role in cancer cell survival and metastasis. We performed computer modeling of the p53 peptide containing the site of interaction with FAK, predicted the peptide structure and docked it into the three-dimensional structure of the N-terminal domain of FAK involved in the complex with p53. We screened small molecule compounds that targeted the site of the FAK-p53 interaction and identified compounds (called Roslins, or R compounds) docked in silico to this site. By different assays in isogenic HCT116p53 + / + and HCT116 p53 - / - cells we identified a small molecule compound called Roslin 2 (R2) that bound FAK, disrupted the binding of FAK and p53 and decreased cancer cell viability and clonogenicity in a p53-dependent manner. In addition, dual-luciferase assays demonstrated that the R2 compound increased p53 transcriptional activity that was inhibited by FAK using p21, Mdm-2, and Bax-promoter targets. R2 also caused increased expression of p53 targets: p21, Mdm-2 and Bax proteins. Furthermore, R2 significantly decreased tumor growth, disrupted the complex of FAK and p53, and up-regulated p21 in HCT116 p53 + / + but not in HCT116 p53 - / - xenografts in vivo. In addition, R2 sensitized HCT116p53 + / + cells to doxorubicin and 5-fluorouracil. Thus, disruption of the FAK and p53 interaction with a novel small molecule reactivated p53 in cancer cells in vitro and in vivo and can be effectively used for development of FAK-p53 targeted cancer therapy approaches

  12. The Signaling Role of CD40 Ligand in Platelet Biology and in Platelet Component Transfusion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aoui, Chaker; Prigent, Antoine; Sut, Caroline; Tariket, Sofiane; Hamzeh-Cognasse, Hind; Pozzetto, Bruno; Richard, Yolande; Cognasse, Fabrice; Laradi, Sandrine; Garraud, Olivier

    2014-01-01

    The CD40 ligand (CD40L) is a transmembrane molecule of crucial interest in cell signaling in innate and adaptive immunity. It is expressed by a variety of cells, but mainly by activated T-lymphocytes and platelets. CD40L may be cleaved into a soluble form (sCD40L) that has a cytokine-like activity. Both forms bind to several receptors, including CD40. This interaction is necessary for the antigen specific immune response. Furthermore, CD40L and sCD40L are involved in inflammation and a panoply of immune related and vascular pathologies. Soluble CD40L is primarily produced by platelets after activation, degranulation and cleavage, which may present a problem for transfusion. Soluble CD40L is involved in adverse transfusion events including transfusion related acute lung injury (TRALI). Although platelet storage designed for transfusion occurs in sterile conditions, platelets are activated and release sCD40L without known agonists. Recently, proteomic studies identified signaling pathways activated in platelet concentrates. Soluble CD40L is a good candidate for platelet activation in an auto-amplification loop. In this review, we describe the immunomodulatory role of CD40L in physiological and pathological conditions. We will focus on the main signaling pathways activated by CD40L after binding to its different receptors. PMID:25479079

  13. Genetics Home Reference: gray platelet syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... disorder, platelet-type, 4 deficient alpha granule syndrome GPS grey platelet syndrome platelet alpha-granule deficiency platelet ... on PubMed Central Kahr WH, Hinckley J, Li L, Schwertz H, Christensen H, Rowley JW, Pluthero FG, ...

  14. The role of platelets in hemostasis and the effects of snake venom toxins on platelet function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Queiroz, Mayara Ribeiro; de Sousa, Bruna Barbosa; da Cunha Pereira, Déborah Fernanda; Mamede, Carla Cristine Neves; Matias, Mariana Santos; de Morais, Nadia Cristina Gomes; de Oliveira Costa, Júnia; de Oliveira, Fábio

    2017-07-01

    The human body has a set of physiological processes, known as hemostasis, which keeps the blood fluid and free of clots in normal vessels; in the case of vascular injury, this process induces the local formation of a hemostatic plug, preventing hemorrhage. The hemostatic system in humans presents complex physiological interactions that involve platelets, plasma proteins, endothelial and subendothelial structures. Disequilibrium in the regulatory mechanisms that control the growth and the size of the thrombus is one of the factors that favors the development of diseases related to vascular disorders such as myocardial infarction and stroke, which are among the leading causes of death in the western world. Interfering with platelet function is a strategy for the treatment of thrombotic diseases. Antiplatelet drugs are used mainly in cases related to arterial thrombosis and interfere in the formation of the platelet plug by different mechanisms. Aspirin (acetylsalicylic acid) is the oldest and most widely used antithrombotic drug. Although highly effective in most cases, aspirin has limitations compared to other drugs used in the treatment of homeostatic disorders. For this reason, research related to molecules that interfere with platelet aggregation are of great relevance. In this regard, snake venoms are known to contain a number of molecules that interfere with hemostasis, including platelet function. The mechanisms by which snake venom components inhibit or activate platelet aggregation are varied and can be used as tools for the diagnosis and the treatment of several hemostatic disorders. The aim of this review is to present the role of platelets in hemostasis and the mechanisms by which snake venom toxins interfere with platelet function. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Next generation sequencing analysis of human platelet PolyA+ mRNAs and rRNA-depleted total RNA.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antheia Kissopoulou

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Platelets are small anucleate cells circulating in the blood vessels where they play a key role in hemostasis and thrombosis. Here, we compared platelet RNA-Seq results obtained from polyA+ mRNA and rRNA-depleted total RNA. MATERIALS AND METHODS: We used purified, CD45 depleted, human blood platelets collected by apheresis from three male and one female healthy blood donors. The Illumina HiSeq 2000 platform was employed to sequence cDNA converted either from oligo(dT isolated polyA+ RNA or from rRNA-depleted total RNA. The reads were aligned to the GRCh37 reference assembly with the TopHat/Cufflinks alignment package using Ensembl annotations. A de novo assembly of the platelet transcriptome using the Trinity software package and RSEM was also performed. The bioinformatic tools HTSeq and DESeq from Bioconductor were employed for further statistical analyses of read counts. RESULTS: Consistent with previous findings our data suggests that mitochondrially expressed genes comprise a substantial fraction of the platelet transcriptome. We also identified high transcript levels for protein coding genes related to the cytoskeleton function, chemokine signaling, cell adhesion, aggregation, as well as receptor interaction between cells. Certain transcripts were particularly abundant in platelets compared with other cell and tissue types represented by RNA-Seq data from the Illumina Human Body Map 2.0 project. Irrespective of the different library preparation and sequencing protocols, there was good agreement between samples from the 4 individuals. Eighteen differentially expressed genes were identified in the two sexes at 10% false discovery rate using DESeq. CONCLUSION: The present data suggests that platelets may have a unique transcriptome profile characterized by a relative over-expression of mitochondrially encoded genes and also of genomic transcripts related to the cytoskeleton function, chemokine signaling and surface components

  16. The role of platelet and endothelial GARP in thrombosis and hemostasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vermeersch, Elien; Denorme, Frederik; Maes, Wim; De Meyer, Simon F; Vanhoorelbeke, Karen; Edwards, Justin; Shevach, Ethan M; Unutmaz, Derya; Fujii, Hodaka; Deckmyn, Hans; Tersteeg, Claudia

    2017-01-01

    Glycoprotein-A Repetitions Predominant protein (GARP or LRRC32) is present on among others human platelets and endothelial cells. Evidence for its involvement in thrombus formation was suggested by full knockout of GARP in zebrafish. To evaluate the role of GARP in platelet physiology and in thrombus formation using platelet and endothelial conditional GARP knock out mice. Platelet and endothelial specific GARP knockout mice were generated using the Cre-loxP recombination system. The function of platelets without GARP was measured by flow cytometry, spreading analysis and aggregometry using PAR4-activating peptide and collagen related peptide. Additionally, clot retraction and collagen-induced platelet adhesion and aggregation under flow were analyzed. Finally, in vivo tail bleeding time, occlusion time of the mesenteric and carotid artery after FeCl3-induced thrombosis were determined in platelet and endothelial specific GARP knock out mice. Platelet specific GARP knockout mice had normal surface GPIb, GPVI and integrin αIIb glycoprotein expression. Although GARP expression was increased upon platelet activation, platelets without GARP displayed normal agonist induced activation, spreading on fibrinogen and aggregation responses. Furthermore, absence of GARP on platelets did not influence clot retraction and had no impact on thrombus formation on collagen-coated surfaces under flow. In line with this, neither the tail bleeding time nor the occlusion time in the carotid- and mesenteric artery after FeCl3-induced thrombus formation in platelet or endothelial specific GARP knock out mice were affected. Evidence is provided that platelet and endothelial GARP are not important in hemostasis and thrombosis in mice.

  17. The role of platelet and endothelial GARP in thrombosis and hemostasis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elien Vermeersch

    Full Text Available Glycoprotein-A Repetitions Predominant protein (GARP or LRRC32 is present on among others human platelets and endothelial cells. Evidence for its involvement in thrombus formation was suggested by full knockout of GARP in zebrafish.To evaluate the role of GARP in platelet physiology and in thrombus formation using platelet and endothelial conditional GARP knock out mice.Platelet and endothelial specific GARP knockout mice were generated using the Cre-loxP recombination system. The function of platelets without GARP was measured by flow cytometry, spreading analysis and aggregometry using PAR4-activating peptide and collagen related peptide. Additionally, clot retraction and collagen-induced platelet adhesion and aggregation under flow were analyzed. Finally, in vivo tail bleeding time, occlusion time of the mesenteric and carotid artery after FeCl3-induced thrombosis were determined in platelet and endothelial specific GARP knock out mice.Platelet specific GARP knockout mice had normal surface GPIb, GPVI and integrin αIIb glycoprotein expression. Although GARP expression was increased upon platelet activation, platelets without GARP displayed normal agonist induced activation, spreading on fibrinogen and aggregation responses. Furthermore, absence of GARP on platelets did not influence clot retraction and had no impact on thrombus formation on collagen-coated surfaces under flow. In line with this, neither the tail bleeding time nor the occlusion time in the carotid- and mesenteric artery after FeCl3-induced thrombus formation in platelet or endothelial specific GARP knock out mice were affected.Evidence is provided that platelet and endothelial GARP are not important in hemostasis and thrombosis in mice.

  18. Fourier transform infrared photoacoustic spectroscopy study of physicochemical interaction between human dentin and etch-&-rinse adhesives in a simulated moist bond technique

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ubaldini, Adriana L M; Baesso, Mauro L; Sehn, Elizandra

    2012-01-01

    systems: (a) 2-hydroxyethylmethacrylate (HEMA) and 4-methacryloxyethyl trimellitate anhydrate (4-META), and (b) HEMA. The Fourier transform infrared photoacoustic spectroscopy was performed before and after dentin treatment with 37% phosphoric acid, with adhesive systems and also for the adhesive systems...

  19. Platelets and their chemokines in atherosclerosis – clinical applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Philipp evon Hundelshausen

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available The concept of platelets as important players in the process of atherogenesis has become increasingly accepted due to accumulating experimental and clinical evidence. Despite the progress in understanding the molecular details of atherosclerosis, particularly by using animal models, the inflammatory and thrombotic roles of activated platelet s especially in the human system remain difficult to dissect, as often only the complications of atherosclerosis i.e. stroke and myocardial infarction are definable but not the plaque burden.Platelet indices including platelet count and mean platelet volume and soluble mediators released by activated platelets are associated with atherosclerosis. The chemokine CXCL4 has multiple atherogenic activities e.g. altering the differentiation of T cells and macrophages by inhibiting neutrophil and monocyte apoptosis and by increasing the uptake of oxLDL and synergizing with CCL5. CCL5 is released and deposited on endothelium by activated platelets thereby triggering atherogenic monocyte recruitment, which can be attenuated by blocking the corresponding chemokine receptor CCR5. Atheroprotective and plaque stabilizing properties are attributed to CXCL12, which plays an important role in regenerative processes by attracting progenitor cells. Its release from luminal attached platelets accelerates endothelial healing after injury. Platelet surface molecules GPIIb/IIIa, GP1bα, P-selectin, JAM-A and the CD40/CD40L dyade are crucially involved in the interaction with endothelial cells, leukocytes and matrix molecules affecting atherogenesis. Beyond the effects on the arterial inflammatory infiltrate, platelets affect cholesterol metabolism by binding, modifying and endocytosing LDL particles via their scavenger receptors and contribute to the formation of lipid laden macrophages. Current medical therapies for the prevention of atherosclerotic therapies enable the elucidation of mechanisms linking platelets to inflammation

  20. The structure of hookworm platelet inhibitor (HPI), a CAP superfamily member from Ancylostoma caninum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Dongying; Francischetti, Ivo M B; Ribeiro, Jose M C; Andersen, John F

    2015-06-01

    Secreted protein components of hookworm species include a number of representatives of the cysteine-rich/antigen 5/pathogenesis-related 1 (CAP) protein family known as Ancylostoma-secreted proteins (ASPs). Some of these have been considered as candidate antigens for the development of vaccines against hookworms. The functions of most CAP superfamily members are poorly understood, but one form, the hookworm platelet inhibitor (HPI), has been isolated as a putative antagonist of the platelet integrins αIIbβ3 and α2β1. Here, the crystal structure of HPI is described and its structural features are examined in relation to its possible function. The HPI structure is similar to those of other ASPs and shows incomplete conservation of the sequence motifs CAP1 and CAP2 that are considered to be diagnostic of CAP superfamily members. The asymmetric unit of the HPI crystal contains a dimer with an extensive interaction interface, but chromatographic measurements indicate that it is primarily monomeric in solution. In the dimeric structure, the putative active-site cleft areas from both monomers are united into a single negatively charged depression. A potential Lys-Gly-Asp disintegrin-like motif was identified in the sequence of HPI, but is not positioned at the apex of a tight turn, making it unlikely that it interacts with the integrin. Recombinant HPI produced in Escherichia coli was found not to inhibit the adhesion of human platelets to collagen or fibrinogen, despite having a native structure as shown by X-ray diffraction. This result corroborates previous analyses of recombinant HPI and suggests that it might require post-translational modification or have a different biological function.

  1. Cell activation and cellular-cellular interactions during hemodialysis: effect of dialyzer membrane.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sirolli, V; Ballone, E; Di Stante, S; Amoroso, L; Bonomini, M

    2002-06-01

    During hemodialysis (HD), circulating blood cells can be activated and also engage in dynamic interplay. These phenomena may be important factors behind dialysis membrane bio(in)compatibility. In the present prospective cross-over study, we have used flow cytometry to evaluate the influence of different dialysis membranes on the activation of circulating blood cells (leukocytes, platelets) and their dynamic interactions (formation of circulating platelet-leukocyte and platelet-erythrocyte aggregates) during in vivo HD. Each patient (n = 10) was treated with dialyzers containing membranes of cellulose diacetate, polysulfone and ethylenevinylalcohol (EVAL) in a randomized order. Upregulation of adhesion receptor expression (CD15s, CD11b/CD18) occurred mainly with the cellulosic membrane, though an increase in CD11b/CD18 circulating on neutrophils was also found with both synthetic membranes. Circulating activated platelets (P-selectin/CD63-positive platelets) increased during HD sessions with cellulose diacetate and polysulfone. An increased formation of platelet-neutrophil aggregates was found at 15 and 30 min during dialysis with cellulose diacetate and polysulfone but not with EVAL. Platelet-erythrocyte aggregates also increased with cellulose diacetate and at 15 min with polysulfone as well. Generally in concomitance with the increase in platelet-neutrophil coaggregates, there was an increased hydrogen peroxide production by neutrophils. The results of this study indicate that cellular mechanisms can be activated during HD largely depending on the membrane material, EVAL causing less reactivity than the other two membranes. It appears that each dialysis membrane has multiple and different characteristics that may contribute to interactions with blood components. Our results also indicate that derivatizing cellulose (cellulose diacetate) may be a useful way to improve the biocompatibility of the cellulose polymer and that there may be great variability in the

  2. A cluster of aspartic residues in the extracellular loop II of PAR 4 is important for thrombin interaction and activation of platelets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sánchez Centellas, Daniel; Gudlur, Sushanth; Vicente-Carrillo, Alejandro; Ramström, Sofia; Lindahl, Tomas L

    2017-06-01

    Thrombin activates platelets via proteolytic cleavage of protease-activated receptors (PARs) 1 and 4. The two PARs have distinct but complementary roles. The mechanisms responsible for PAR1 activation by thrombin have been extensively studied. However, much less is known regarding thrombin activation of PAR4, especially the potential involvement of regions of PAR4 other than the N-terminal, which is bound to the catalytic site of thrombin. We have studied PAR4 in S. cerevisiae strain MMY12, an expression system in which the GPCR receptors are connected to a Lac Z reporter gene resulting in increased β-galactosidase activity. This approach was used to assess PAR4 mutants to evaluate the contribution of different aspartic residues in facilitating PAR4 activation. Furthermore, peptides mimicking parts of the PAR4 N-terminal and the second extracellular loop (ECLII) were tested for their ability to inhibit platelet activation by thrombin. Binding of these peptides to γ-thrombin was studied by monitoring the decrease in tryptophan fluorescence intensity of thrombin. We conclude that not only the N-terminal but also the electronegative aspartic residues D224, D230 and D235 (located in ECLII) are be important for PAR4 binding to thrombin. We further suggest that they play a role for the tethered ligand binding to the receptor, as mutations also affected activation in response to a PAR4-activating peptide mimicking the new N-terminal formed after cleavage. This agrees with previous results on PAR1 and thrombin binding. We suggest that the ECLII of PAR4 could be a potential target for antithrombotic drug development. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Equid herpesvirus type 1 activates platelets.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tracy Stokol

    Full Text Available Equid herpesvirus type 1 (EHV-1 causes outbreaks of abortion and neurological disease in horses. One of the main causes of these clinical syndromes is thrombosis in placental and spinal cord vessels, however the mechanism for thrombus formation is unknown. Platelets form part of the thrombus and amplify and propagate thrombin generation. Here, we tested the hypothesis that EHV-1 activates platelets. We found that two EHV-1 strains, RacL11 and Ab4 at 0.5 or higher plaque forming unit/cell, activate platelets within 10 minutes, causing α-granule secretion (surface P-selectin expression and platelet microvesiculation (increased small events double positive for CD41 and Annexin V. Microvesiculation was more pronounced with the RacL11 strain. Virus-induced P-selectin expression required plasma and 1.0 mM exogenous calcium. P-selectin expression was abolished and microvesiculation was significantly reduced in factor VII- or X-deficient human plasma. Both P-selectin expression and microvesiculation were re-established in factor VII-deficient human plasma with added purified human factor VIIa (1 nM. A glycoprotein C-deficient mutant of the Ab4 strain activated platelets as effectively as non-mutated Ab4. P-selectin expression was abolished and microvesiculation was significantly reduced by preincubation of virus with a goat polyclonal anti-rabbit tissue factor antibody. Infectious virus could be retrieved from washed EHV-1-exposed platelets, suggesting a direct platelet-virus interaction. Our results indicate that EHV-1 activates equine platelets and that α-granule secretion is a consequence of virus-associated tissue factor triggering factor X activation and thrombin generation. Microvesiculation was only partly tissue factor and thrombin-dependent, suggesting the virus causes microvesiculation through other mechanisms, potentially through direct binding. These findings suggest that EHV-1-induced platelet activation could contribute to the thrombosis

  4. Interaction of L-lysine and soluble elastin with the semicarbazide-sensitive amine oxidase in the context of its vascular-adhesion and tissue maturation functions.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Olivieri, Aldo

    2010-04-01

    The copper-containing quinoenzyme semicarbazide-sensitive amine oxidase (EC 1.4.3.21; SSAO) is a multifunctional protein. In some tissues, such as the endothelium, it also acts as vascular-adhesion protein 1 (VAP-1), which is involved in inflammatory responses and in the chemotaxis of leukocytes. Earlier work had suggested that lysine might function as a recognition molecule for SSAO\\/VAP-1. The present work reports the kinetics of the interaction of L-lysine and some of its derivatives with SSAO. Binding was shown to be saturable, time-dependent but reversible and to cause uncompetitive inhibition with respect to the amine substrate. It was also specific, since D-lysine, L-lysine ethyl ester and epsilon-acetyl-L-lysine, for example, did not bind to the enzyme. The lysine-rich protein soluble elastin bound to the enzyme relatively tightly, which may have relevance to the reported roles of SSAO in maintaining the extracellular matrix (ECM) and in the maturation of elastin. Our data show that lysyl residues are not oxidized by SSAO, but they bind tightly to the enzyme in the presence of hydrogen peroxide. This suggests that binding in vivo of SSAO to lysyl residues in physiological targets might be regulated in the presence of H(2)O(2), formed during the oxidation of a physiological SSAO substrate, yet to be identified.

  5. Platelet size does not correlate with platelet age.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thompson, C B; Love, D G; Quinn, P G; Valeri, C R

    1983-08-01

    The relationship between platelet size and in vivo aging was investigated in the baboon using size-dependent platelet subpopulations separated by counterflow centrifugation. The separation characteristics, size, lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) activity, and dense-body content of the baboon platelet subpopulations were similar to those previously observed in studies of human platelets. Three independent labeling techniques were used: (1) in vivo labeling with 75Se-methionine, (2) in vitro labeling with 51Cr, and (3) in vivo labeling with 14C-serotonin. Maximal incorporation of all three labels showed a close correlation between the mean platelet volume (MPV) of each fraction and the platelet radioactivity. The onset of incorporation and rate of accumulation of 75Se-methionine were comparable in all fractions when corrected for differences in volume, suggesting that platelet size heterogeneity was present from the time of release of the platelets from the bone marrow. Survival studies using 51Cr and 14C-serotonin showed no translocation of the label from one fraction to another in the circulation over time. In vivo survival values for the three radionuclides showed a slight but significant correlation between the lifespan and the MPV of the fractions. The data suggest that large platelets were not younger platelets, but rather platelets with a longer life-span. Platelet size heterogeneity is the result of production factors in the bone marrow and not maturation in the circulation.

  6. Platelet size does not correlate with platelet age

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thompson, C.B.; Love, D.G.; Quinn, P.G.; Valeri, C.R.

    1983-01-01

    The relationship between platelet size and in vivo aging was investigated in the baboon using size-dependent platelet subpopulations separated by counterflow centrifugation. The separation characteristics, size, lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) activity, and dense-body content of the baboon platelet subpopulations were similar to those previously observed in studies of human platelets. Three independent labeling techniques were used: (1) in vivo labeling with 75 Se-methionine, (2) in vitro labeling with 51 Cr, and (3) in vivo labeling with 14C-serotonin. Maximal incorporation of all three labels showed a close correlation between the mean platelet volume (MPV) of each fraction and the platelet radioactivity. The onset of incorporation and rate of accumulation of 75 Se-methionine were comparable in all fractions when corrected for differences in volume, suggesting that platelet size heterogeneity was present from the time of release of the platelets from the bone marrow. Survival studies using 51 Cr and 14 C-serotonin showed no translocation of the label from one fraction to another in the circulation over time. In vivo survival values for the three radionuclides showed a slight but significant correlation between the lifespan and the MPV of the fractions. The data suggest that large platelets were not younger platelets, but rather platelets with a longer life-span. Platelet size heterogeneity is the result of production factors in the bone marrow and not maturation in the circulation

  7. Reproducibility of Manual Platelet Estimation Following Automated Low Platelet Counts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zainab S Al-Hosni

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: Manual platelet estimation is one of the methods used when automated platelet estimates are very low. However, the reproducibility of manual platelet estimation has not been adequately studied. We sought to assess the reproducibility of manual platelet estimation following automated low platelet counts and to evaluate the impact of the level of experience of the person counting on the reproducibility of manual platelet estimates. Methods: In this cross-sectional study, peripheral blood films of patients with platelet counts less than 100 × 109/L were retrieved and given to four raters to perform manual platelet estimation independently using a predefined method (average of platelet counts in 10 fields using 100× objective multiplied by 20. Data were analyzed using intraclass correlation coefficient (ICC as a method of reproducibility assessment. Results: The ICC across the four raters was 0.840, indicating excellent agreement. The median difference of the two most experienced raters was 0 (range: -64 to 78. The level of platelet estimate by the least-experienced rater predicted the disagreement (p = 0.037. When assessing the difference between pairs of raters, there was no significant difference in the ICC (p = 0.420. Conclusions: The agreement between different raters using manual platelet estimation was excellent. Further confirmation is necessary, with a prospective study using a gold standard method of platelet counts.

  8. Pilot study of novel lab methodology and testing of platelet function in adolescent women with heavy menstrual bleeding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rocheleau, Anne D; Khader, Ayesha; Ngo, Anh T P; Boehnlein, Colin; McDavitt, Cara; Lattimore, Susan; Recht, Michael; McCarty, Owen J T; Haley, Kristina M

    2018-03-01

    BackgroundApproximately 40% of adolescent women experience heavy menstrual bleeding (HMB), and 10-62% of them have an underlying bleeding disorder (BD). Diagnosing a BD remains challenging because of limitations of available clinical platelet function assays. The aim of this study was to characterize platelet function in a population of adolescent women with HMB using small-volume whole-blood assays.MethodsAnticoagulated whole blood was used to assess platelet GPIIbIIIa activation, α-granule secretion, and aggregation in response to multiple agonists. Platelet adhesion on collagen or von Willebrand Factor (VWF) under static and shear flow was also assessed.ResultsFifteen participants with HMB were included in the study, of which eight were diagnosed with a clinically identifiable BD. Platelet activation was blunted in response to calcium ionophore in participants without a BD diagnosis compared with that in all other participants. Impaired GPIIbIIIa activation was observed in response to all GPCR agonists, except adenosine diphosphate (ADP), in participants with qualitative platelet disorders. Our assays detected platelet aggregation in the majority of participants with a BD in response to ADP, collagen-related peptide (CRP), thrombin receptor activator 6 (TRAP-6), or U46619. Platelet adhesion and aggregation on collagen and VWF was decreased for participants with VWD.ConclusionParticipants with and without BD exhibited aberrant platelet function in several assays in response to select agonists.

  9. αMβ2-integrin-intercellular adhesion molecule-1 interactions drive the flow-dependent trafficking of Guillain-Barré syndrome patient derived mononuclear leukocytes at the blood-nerve barrier in vitro

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yosef, Nejla; Ubogu, Eroboghene E.

    2012-01-01

    The mechanisms of hematogenous leukocyte trafficking at the human blood-nerve barrier (BNB) are largely unknown. Intercellular adhesion molecule-1 (ICAM-1) has been implicated in the pathogenesis of Guillain-Barré syndrome (GBS). We developed a cytokine-activated human in vitro BNB model using primary endoneurial endothelial cells. Endothelial treatment with 10 U/mL tissue necrosis factor-α and 20 U/mL interferon-γ resulted in de novo expression of proinflammatory chemokines CCL2, CXCL9, CXCL11 and CCL20, with increased expression of CXCL2-3, CXCL8 and CXCL10 relative to basal levels. Cytokine treatment induced/ enhanced ICAM-1, E- and P-selectin, vascular cell adhesion molecule-1 and the alternatively spliced pro-adhesive fibronectin variant, fibronectin connecting segment-1 expression in a time-dependent manner, without alterations in junctional adhesion molecule-A expression. Lymphocytes and monocytes from untreated GBS patients express ICAM-1 counterligands, αM- and αL-integrin, with differential regulation of αM-integrin expression compared to healthy controls. Under flow conditions that mimic capillary hemodynamics in vivo, there was a >3-fold increase in total GBS patient and healthy control mononuclear leukocyte adhesion/ migration at the BNB following cytokine treatment relative to the untreated state. Function neutralizing monoclonal antibodies against human αM-integrin (CD11b) and ICAM-1 reduced untreated GBS patient mononuclear leukocyte trafficking at the BNB by 59% and 64.2% respectively. Monoclonal antibodies against αL-integrin (CD11a) and human intravenous immunoglobulin reduced total leukocyte adhesion/migration by 22.8% and 17.6% respectively. This study demonstrates differential regulation of αM-integrin on circulating mononuclear cells in GBS, as well as an important role for αM-integrin-ICAM-1 interactions in pathogenic GBS patient leukocyte trafficking at the human BNB in vitro. PMID:22552879

  10. Platelet aggregation following trauma

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Windeløv, Nis A; Sørensen, Anne M; Perner, Anders

    2014-01-01

    We aimed to elucidate platelet function in trauma patients, as it is pivotal for hemostasis yet remains scarcely investigated in this population. We conducted a prospective observational study of platelet aggregation capacity in 213 adult trauma patients on admission to an emergency department (ED...... severity score (ISS) was 17; 14 (7%) patients received 10 or more units of red blood cells in the ED (massive transfusion); 24 (11%) patients died within 28 days of trauma: 17 due to cerebral injuries, four due to exsanguination, and three from other causes. No significant association was found between...... aggregation response and ISS. Higher TRAP values were associated with death due to cerebral injuries (P 

  11. Aspirin and P2Y12 inhibition attenuate platelet-induced ovarian cancer cell invasion.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Cooke, Niamh M

    2015-09-09

    Platelet-cancer cell interactions play a key role in successful haematogenous metastasis. Disseminated malignancy is the leading cause of death among ovarian cancer patients. It is unknown why different ovarian cancers have different metastatic phenotypes. To investigate if platelet-cancer cell interactions play a role, we characterized the response of ovarian cancer cell lines to platelets both functionally and at a molecular level.

  12. Sulfatides partition disabled-2 in response to platelet activation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karen E Drahos

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Platelets contact each other at the site of vascular injury to stop bleeding. One negative regulator of platelet aggregation is Disabled-2 (Dab2, which is released to the extracellular surface upon platelet activation. Dab2 inhibits platelet aggregation through its phosphotyrosine-binding (PTB domain by competing with fibrinogen for alphaIIbbeta3 integrin receptor binding by an unknown mechanism. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Using protein-lipid overlay and liposome-binding assays, we identified that the N-terminal region of Dab2, including its PTB domain (N-PTB, specifically interacts with sulfatides. Moreover, we determined that such interaction is mediated by two conserved basic motifs with a dissociation constant (K(d of 0.6 microM as estimated by surface plasmon resonance (SPR analysis. In addition, liposome-binding assays combined with mass spectroscopy studies revealed that thrombin, a strong platelet agonist, cleaved N-PTB at a site located between the basic motifs, a region that becomes protected from thrombin cleavage when bound to sulfatides. Sulfatides on the platelet surface interact with coagulation proteins, playing a major role in haemostasis. Our results show that sulfatides recruit N-PTB to the platelet surface, sequestering it from integrin receptor binding during platelet activation. This is a transient recruitment that follows N-PTB internalization by an actin-dependent process. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Our experimental data support a model where two pools of Dab2 co-exist at the platelet surface, in both sulfatide- and integrin receptor-bound states, and their balance controls the extent of the clotting response.

  13. The hemostatic agent ethamsylate promotes platelet/leukocyte aggregate formation in a model of vascular injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hernandez, Maria Rosa; Alvarez-Guerra, Miriam; Escolar, Ginés; Chiavaroli, Carlo; Hannaert, Patrick; Garay, Ricardo P

    2004-08-01

    The hemostatic agent ethamsylate enhances membrane expression of P-selectin in human platelets, but whether this promotes platelet-leukocyte aggregate formation is unknown. Here we investigated this point by flow cytometry determination of human platelet-leukocyte aggregates under basal conditions and after whole-blood perfusion through a damaged rabbit aorta segment. Actions of ethamsylate on adhesive molecules of platelets and leukocytes were investigated in parallel. Under basal conditions, ethamsylate was unable to modify whole-blood platelet-leukocyte aggregation, but following whole-blood perfusion through a damaged vessel, ethamsylate produced a modest, but significant increase in platelet-leukocyte aggregates (48+/-21 and 45+/-26% above control levels at ethamsylate 20 and 40 microm respectively). In isolated leukocyte plasma membranes, 14C-ethamsylate specifically bound up to an amount of 660 pmol/mg protein. Moreover, at concentrations > or =1 microm, ethamsylate induced an important (100-200%) and significant increase in the P-selectin glycoprotein ligand 1 (PSGL-1) fluorescence signal in isolated leukocytes and was unable to significantly modify the percentage of CD11b-positive cells. However, no significant changes in aggregate formation were found when ethamsylate was incubated with isolated leukocytes and blood was reconstituted and perfused. In isolated platelet cell membranes, anti-P-selectin antibody and the anti-integrin RGD-containing pentapeptide (GRDGS) were unable to displace 14C-ethamsylate binding. In conclusion, ethamsylate specifically binds to plasma membranes of leukocytes, enhances membrane PSGL-1 expression and promotes leukocyte-platelet aggregation in whole-blood perfused through a damaged vascular segment. These results together with the previously observed enhancement of platelet P-selectin membrane expression [Thromb. Res. (2002)107:329-335] confirms and extends the view that ethamsylate acts on the first step of hemostasis, by

  14. Comparative Response of Platelet fV and Plasma fV to Activated Protein C and Relevance to a Model of Acute Traumatic Coagulopathy

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-06-12

    through a series of centrifugation steps: 200 g for 10 min with minimal braking separated platelet rich plasma (PRP) which was collected and stored at...localization of fVa and phospholipid as a result of platelet deposition accelerates thrombin generation and fibrin formation/crosslinking at sites of...is ineffective at inhibiting both platelet adhesion and fibrin formation in blood flow models except at extreme Figure 7. aPC concentrations below 10

  15. In vitro viability effects on apheresis and buffy-coat derived platelets administered through infusion pumps

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sandgren P

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Per Sandgren,1,2 Veronica Berggren,3 Carl Westling,1,2 Viveka Stiller1 1Department of Clinical Immunology and Transfusion Medicine, Karolinska University Hospital, 2Department of Laboratory Medicine, Karolinska Institutet, 3Department of Neonatology, Karolinska University Hospital, Stockholm, SwedenBackground: Different infusion pump systems as well as gravity infusion have been widely used in neonatal transfusion. However, the limited number of published studies describing the use of infusion pumps on platelets illustrates the necessity for more robust data.Methods: To evaluate the potential in vitro effects on the cellular, metabolic, functional and phenotypic properties of platelets, we set up a four-arm paired study simultaneously comparing the use of different infusion pumps (Alaris® CC/GP with unexposed platelets. The platelet units (n=8 were either produced by the apheresis technique and suspended in 100% plasma or derived from buffy coats to yield platelet units stored in approximately 30% plasma and 70% SSP+. Fresh and 5-day old platelets were tested.Results: Regardless of the production system or storage time used, no significant differences were observed in glucose and lactate concentration, pH, adenosine triphosphate levels, response to extent of shape change, hypotonic shock response reactivity, and CD62P expression. Similarly, no differences were observed in expression of the conformational epitope on glycoprotein IIb/IIIa, determined using procaspase-activating compound 1, or in the expression of CD42b and platelet-endothelial cell adhesion molecule-1 in a comparison between platelets administered through infusion pumps versus unexposed platelets.Conclusion: Using Alaris CC/GP infusion pumps had no influence on the cellular, functional, and phenotypic in vitro properties of platelets. This fact seems not to be affected by different production systems or storage time.Keywords: platelets, neonatal platelet transfusion

  16. Emerging Evidence for Platelets as Immune and Inflammatory Effector Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matthew Thomas Rondina

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available While traditionally recognized for their roles in hemostatic pathways, emerging evidence demonstrates that platelets have previously unrecognized, dynamic roles that span the immune continuum. These newly-recognized platelet functions, including the secretion of immune mediators, interactions with endothelial cells, monocytes, and neutrophils, toll-like receptor (TLR mediated responses, and induction of neutrophil extracellular trap (NET formation, bridge thrombotic and inflammatory pathways and contribute to host defense mechanisms against invading pathogens. In this focused review, we highlight several of these emerging aspects of platelet biology and their implications in clinical infectious syndromes.

  17. Effect of Puumala hantavirus infection on Human Umbilical Vein Endothelial Cell hemostatic function: platelet interactions, increased tissue factor expression and fibrinolysis regulator release

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marco Goeijenbier

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Puumala virus (PUUV infection causes over 5000 cases of hemorrhagic fever in Europe annually and can influence the hemostatic balance extensively. Infection might lead to hemorrhage, while a recent study showed an increased risk of myocardial infarction during or shortly after PUUV infection. The mechanism by which this hantavirus influences the coagulation system remains unknown. Therefore we aimed to elucidate mechanisms explaining alterations seen in primary and secondary hemostasis during PUUV infection. By using low passage PUUV isolates to infect primary human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs we were able to show alterations in the regulation of primary- and secondary hemostasis and in the release of fibrinolysis regulators. Our main finding was an activation of secondary hemostasis due to increased tissue factor expression leading to increased thrombin generation in a functional assay. Furthermore, we showed that during infection platelets adhered to HUVECs and subsequently specifically to PUUV virus particles. Infection of HUVECs with PUUV did not result in increased von Willebrand factor while they produced more plasminogen activator inhibitor type-1 (PAI-1 compared to controls. The PAI-1 produced in this model formed complexes with vitronectin. This is the first report that reveals a potential mechanism behind the pro-coagulant changes in PUUV patients, which could be the result of increased thrombin generation due to an increased tissue factor expression on endothelial cells during infection. Furthermore, we provide insight into the contribution of endothelial cell responses regarding hemostasis in PUUV pathogenesis.

  18. Blood platelet inventory management

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Haijema, R.; van Dijk, N. M.; van der Wal, J.; Boucherie, Richard J.; van Dijk, Nico M.

    2017-01-01

    This paper illustrates how MDP or Stochastic Dynamic Programming (SDP) can be used in practice for blood management at blood banks; both to set regular production quantities for perishable blood products (platelets) and how to do so in irregular periods (as holidays). The state space is too large to

  19. Platelet lysate embedded scaffolds for skin regeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sandri, Giuseppina; Bonferoni, Maria Cristina; Rossi, Silvia; Ferrari, Franca; Mori, Michela; Cervio, Marila; Riva, Federica; Liakos, Ioannis; Athanassiou, Athanassia; Saporito, Francesca; Marini, Lara; Caramella, Carla

    2015-04-01

    The work presents the development of acellular scaffolds extemporaneously embedded with platelet lysate (PL), as an innovative approach in the field of tissue regeneration/reparation. PL embedded scaffolds should have a tridimensional architecture to support cell migration and growth, in order to restore skin integrity. For this reason, chondroitin sulfate (CS) was associated with sodium alginate (SA) to prepare highly porous systems. The developed scaffolds were characterized for chemical stability to γ-radiation, morphology, hydration and mechanical properties. Moreover, the capability of fibroblasts and endothelial cells to populate the scaffold was evaluated by means of proliferation test 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide (MTT) and confocal laser scanning microscopy study. The scaffolds, not altered by sterilization, were characterized by limited swelling and high flexibility, by foam-like structure with bubbles that formed a high surface area and irregular texture suitable for cell adhesion. Cell growth and scaffold population were evident on the bubble surface, where the cells appeared anchored to the scaffold structure. Scaffold network based on CS and SA demonstrated to be an effective support to enhance and to allow fibroblasts and endothelial cells (human umbilical vein endothelial cells, HUVEC) adhesion and proliferation. In particular, it could be hypothesized that cell adhesion was facilitated by the synergic effect of PL and CS. Although further in vivo evaluation is needed, on the basis of in vitro results, PL embedded scaffolds seem promising systems for skin wound healing.

  20. Mechanical circulatory support is associated with loss of platelet receptors glycoprotein Ibα and glycoprotein VI.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lukito, P; Wong, A; Jing, J; Arthur, J F; Marasco, S F; Murphy, D A; Bergin, P J; Shaw, J A; Collecutt, M; Andrews, R K; Gardiner, E E; Davis, A K

    2016-11-01

    Essentials Relationship of acquired von Willebrand disease (VWD) and platelet dysfunction is explored. Patients with ventricular assist devices and on extracorporeal membrane oxygenation are investigated. Acquired VWD and platelet receptor shedding is demonstrated in the majority of patients. Loss of platelet adhesion receptors glycoprotein (GP) Ibα and GPVI may increase bleeding risk. Background Ventricular assist devices (VADs) and extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (ECMO) are associated with bleeding that is not fully explained by anticoagulant or antiplatelet use. Exposure of platelets to elevated shear in vitro leads to increased shedding. Objectives To investigate whether loss of platelet receptors occurs in vivo, and the relationship with acquired von Willebrand syndrome (AVWS). Methods Platelet counts, coagulation tests and von Willebrand factor (VWF) analyses were performed on samples from 21 continuous flow VAD (CF-VAD), 20 ECMO, 12 heart failure and seven aortic stenosis patients. Levels of platelet receptors were measured by flow cytometry or ELISA. Results The loss of high molecular weight VWF multimers was observed in 18 of 19 CF-VAD and 14 of 20 ECMO patients, consistent with AVWS. Platelet receptor shedding was demonstrated by elevated soluble glycoprotein (GP) VI levels in plasma and significantly reduced surface GPIbα and GPVI levels in CF-VAD and ECMO patients as compared with healthy donors. Platelet receptor levels were also significantly reduced in heart failure patients. Conclusions These data link AVWS and increased platelet receptor shedding in patients with CF-VADs or ECMO for the first time. Loss of the platelet surface receptors GPIbα and GPVI in heart failure, CF-VAD and ECMO patients may contribute to ablated platelet adhesion/activation, and limit thrombus formation under high/pathologic shear conditions. © 2016 International Society on Thrombosis and Haemostasis.

  1. Adhesion studies by instrumental indentation testing

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hangen, U.D.; Downs, S.; Kranenburg, J.M.; Hoogenboom, R.; Schubert, U.S.

    2006-01-01

    The miniaturization of devices and the advances in nanotechnol.-enabled products has led to the requirement of an increased understanding of the various interactions present in nanoscale contacts - including adhesion and surface tension. It is well known that adhesion plays an important role in the

  2. Microparticle adhesion studies by atomic force microscopy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Segeren, L.H.G.J.; Siebum, B.; Karssenberg, F.G.; Berg, van den J.W.A.; Vancso, G.J.

    2002-01-01

    Atomic force microscopy (AFM) is one of the most flexible and simple techniques for probing surface interactions. This article reviews AFM studies on particle adhesion. Special attention is paid to the characterization of roughness and its effect on adhesion. This is of importance when comparing the

  3. Blood coagulation and platelet adhesion on polyaniline films

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Humpolíček, P.; Kuceková, Z.; Kašpárková, V.; Pelková, J.; Modic, M.; Junkar, I.; Trchová, Miroslava; Bober, Patrycja; Stejskal, Jaroslav; Lehocký, M.

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 133, 1 September (2015), s. 278-285 ISSN 0927-7765 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GA13-08944S Institutional support: RVO:61389013 Keywords : polyaniline * poly(2-acrylamido-2-methyl-1-propanesulfonic acid) * hemocompatibility Subject RIV: CD - Macromolecular Chemistry Impact factor: 3.902, year: 2015

  4. Insomnia, platelet serotonin and platelet monoamine oxidase in chronic alcoholism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nenadic Sviglin, Korona; Nedic, Gordana; Nikolac, Matea; Mustapic, Maja; Muck-Seler, Dorotea; Borovecki, Fran; Pivac, Nela

    2011-08-18

    Insomnia is a common sleep disorder frequently occurring in chronic alcoholic patients. Neurobiological basis of insomnia, as well as of alcoholism, is associated with disrupted functions of the main neurotransmitter systems, including the serotonin (5-hydroxytryptamine, 5-HT) system. Blood platelets are considered a limited peripheral model for the central 5-HT neurons, since both platelets and central 5-HT synaptosomes have similar dynamics of 5-HT. Platelet 5-HT concentration and platelet monoamine oxidase type B (MAO-B) are assumed to represent biomarkers for particular symptoms and behaviors in psychiatric disorders. The hypothesis of this study was that platelet 5-HT concentration and platelet MAO-B activity will be altered in chronic alcoholic patients with insomnia compared to comparable values in patients without insomnia. The study included 498 subjects: 395 male and 103 female medication-free patients with alcohol dependence and 502 healthy control subjects: 325 men and 177 women. The effects of early, middle and late insomnia (evaluated using the Hamilton Depression Rating Scale), as well as sex, age and smoking on platelet 5-HT concentration and platelet MAO-B activity were evaluated using one-way ANOVA and multiple regression analysis by the stepwise method. Platelet 5-HT concentration, but not platelet MAO-B activity, was significantly reduced in alcoholic patients with insomnia compared to patients without insomnia. Multiple regression analysis revealed that platelet 5-HT concentration was affected by middle insomnia, smoking and sex, while platelet MAO activity was affected only by sex and age. The present and previous data suggest that platelet 5-HT concentration might be used, after controlling for sex and smoking, as a biomarker for insomnia in alcoholism, PTSD and in rotating shift workers. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Storage of platelets: effects associated with high platelet content in platelet storage containers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gulliksson, Hans; Sandgren, Per; Sjödin, Agneta; Hultenby, Kjell

    2012-04-01

    A major problem associated with platelet storage containers is that some platelet units show a dramatic fall in pH, especially above certain platelet contents. The aim of this study was a detailed investigation of the different in vitro effects occurring when the maximum storage capacity of a platelet container is exceeded as compared to normal storage. Buffy coats were combined in large-volume containers to create primary pools to be split into two equal aliquots for the preparation of platelets (450-520×10(9) platelets/unit) in SSP+ for 7-day storage in two containers (test and reference) with different platelet storage capacity (n=8). Exceeding the maximum storage capacity of the test platelet storage container resulted in immediate negative effects on platelet metabolism and energy supply, but also delayed effects on platelet function, activation and disintegration. Our study gives a very clear indication of the effects in different phases associated with exceeding the maximum storage capacity of platelet containers but throw little additional light on the mechanism initiating those negative effects. The problem appears to be complex and further studies in different media using different storage containers will be needed to understand the mechanisms involved.

  6. Measuring Rock-Fluid Adhesion Directly

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tadmor, R.

    2017-12-01

    We show how to measure directly solid-liquid adhesion. We consider the normal adhesion, the work adhesion, and the lateral adhesion. The technique at the center of the method is Centrifugal Adhesion Balance (CAB) which allows coordinated manipulation of normal and lateral forces. For example: 1. It allows to induce an increase in the normal force which pulls on a liquid drop while keeping zero lateral force. This method mimics a drop that is subjected to a gravitational force that is gradually increasing. 2. It allows to increase the lateral force at zero normal force, mimicking zero gravity. From this one can obtain additional solid-liquid interaction parameters. When performing work of adhesion measurements, the values obtained are independent of drop size and are in agreement with theoretical predictions.

  7. Nucleation and growth of cadherin adhesions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lambert, Mireille; Thoumine, Olivier; Brevier, Julien; Choquet, Daniel; Riveline, Daniel; Mege, Rene-Marc

    2007-01-01

    Cell-cell contact formation relies on the recruitment of cadherin molecules and their anchoring to actin. However, the precise chronology of events from initial cadherin trans-interactions to adhesion strengthening is unclear, in part due to the lack of access to the distribution of cadherins within adhesion zones. Using N-cadherin expressing cells interacting with N-cadherin coated surfaces, we characterized the formation of cadherin adhesions at the ventral cell surface. TIRF and RIC microscopies revealed streak-like accumulations of cadherin along actin fibers. FRAP analysis indicated that engaged cadherins display a slow turnover at equilibrium, compatible with a continuous addition and removal of cadherin molecules within the adhesive contact. Association of cadherin cytoplasmic tail to actin as well as actin cables and myosin II activity are required for the formation and maintenance of cadherin adhesions. Using time lapse microscopy we deciphered how cadherin adhesions form and grow. As lamellipodia protrude, cadherin foci stochastically formed a few microns away from the cell margin. Neo-formed foci coalesced aligned and coalesced with preformed foci either by rearward sliding or gap filling to form cadherin adhesions. Foci experienced collapse at the rear of cadherin adhesions. Based on these results, we present a model for the nucleation, directional growth and shrinkage of cadherin adhesions

  8. Functional divergence of platelet protein kinase C (PKC) isoforms in thrombus formation on collagen.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gilio, Karen; Harper, Matthew T; Cosemans, Judith M E M; Konopatskaya, Olga; Munnix, Imke C A; Prinzen, Lenneke; Leitges, Michael; Liu, Qinghang; Molkentin, Jeffery D; Heemskerk, Johan W M; Poole, Alastair W

    2010-07-23

    Arterial thrombosis, a major cause of myocardial infarction and stroke, is initiated by activation of blood platelets by subendothelial collagen. The protein kinase C (PKC) family centrally regulates platelet activation, and it is becoming clear that the individual PKC isoforms play distinct roles, some of which oppose each other. Here, for the first time, we address all four of the major platelet-expressed PKC isoforms, determining their comparative roles in regulating platelet adhesion to collagen and their subsequent activation under physiological flow conditions. Using mouse gene knock-out and pharmacological approaches in human platelets, we show that collagen-dependent alpha-granule secretion and thrombus formation are mediated by the conventional PKC isoforms, PKCalpha and PKCbeta, whereas the novel isoform, PKC, negatively regulates these events. PKCdelta also negatively regulates thrombus formation but not alpha-granule secretion. In addition, we demonstrate for the first time that individual PKC isoforms differentially regulate platelet calcium signaling and exposure of phosphatidylserine under flow. Although platelet deficient in PKCalpha or PKCbeta showed reduced calcium signaling and phosphatidylserine exposure, these responses were enhanced in the absence of PKC. In summary therefore, this direct comparison between individual subtypes of PKC, by standardized methodology under flow conditions, reveals that the four major PKCs expressed in platelets play distinct non-redundant roles, where conventional PKCs promote and novel PKCs inhibit thrombus formation on collagen.

  9. Functional Divergence of Platelet Protein Kinase C (PKC) Isoforms in Thrombus Formation on Collagen*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gilio, Karen; Harper, Matthew T.; Cosemans, Judith M. E. M.; Konopatskaya, Olga; Munnix, Imke C. A.; Prinzen, Lenneke; Leitges, Michael; Liu, Qinghang; Molkentin, Jeffery D.; Heemskerk, Johan W. M.; Poole, Alastair W.

    2010-01-01

    Arterial thrombosis, a major cause of myocardial infarction and stroke, is initiated by activation of blood platelets by subendothelial collagen. The protein kinase C (PKC) family centrally regulates platelet activation, and it is becoming clear that the individual PKC isoforms play distinct roles, some of which oppose each other. Here, for the first time, we address all four of the major platelet-expressed PKC isoforms, determining their comparative roles in regulating platelet adhesion to collagen and their subsequent activation under physiological flow conditions. Using mouse gene knock-out and pharmacological approaches in human platelets, we show that collagen-dependent α-granule secretion and thrombus formation are mediated by the conventional PKC isoforms, PKCα and PKCβ, whereas the novel isoform, PKCθ, negatively regulates these events. PKCδ also negatively regulates thrombus formation but not α-granule secretion. In addition, we demonstrate for the first time that individual PKC isoforms differentially regulate platelet calcium signaling and exposure of phosphatidylserine under flow. Although platelet deficient in PKCα or PKCβ showed reduced calcium signaling and phosphatidylserine exposure, these responses were enhanced in the absence of PKCθ. In summary therefore, this direct comparison between individual subtypes of PKC, by standardized methodology under flow conditions, reveals that the four major PKCs expressed in platelets play distinct non-redundant roles, where conventional PKCs promote and novel PKCs inhibit thrombus formation on collagen. PMID:20479008

  10. Platelets are a possible regulator of human endometrial re-epithelialization during menstruation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suginami, Koh; Sato, Yukiyasu; Horie, Akihito; Matsumoto, Hisanori; Kyo, Satoru; Araki, Yoshihiko; Konishi, Ikuo; Fujiwara, Hiroshi

    2017-01-01

    The human endometrium periodically breaks down and regenerates. As platelets have been reported to contribute to the tissue remodeling process, we examined the possible involvement of platelets in endometrial regeneration. The distribution of extravasating platelets throughout the menstrual cycle was immunohistochemically examined using human endometrial tissues. EM-E6/E7/hTERT cells, a human endometrial epithelial cell-derived immortalized cell line, were co-cultured with platelets, and the effects of platelets on the epithelialization response of EM-E6/E7/hTERT cells were investigated by attachment and permeability assays, immunohistochemical staining, and Western blot analysis. Immunohistochemical study showed numerous extravasated platelets in the subluminar stroma during the menstrual phase. The platelets promoted the cell-to-matrigel attachment of EM-E6/E7/hTERT cells concomitantly with the phosphorylation of focal adhesion kinase. They also promoted cell-to-cell contact among EM-E6/E7/hTERT cells in parallel with E-cadherin expression. These results indicate the possible involvement of platelets in the endometrial epithelial re-epithelialization process. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  11. Platelet proteome reveals novel pathways of platelet activation and platelet-mediated immunoregulation in dengue.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Monique Ramos de Oliveira Trugilho

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Dengue is the most prevalent human arbovirus disease worldwide. Dengue virus (DENV infection causes syndromes varying from self-limiting febrile illness to severe dengue. Although dengue pathophysiology is not completely understood, it is widely accepted that increased inflammation plays important roles in dengue pathogenesis. Platelets are blood cells classically known as effectors of hemostasis which have been increasingly recognized to have major immune and inflammatory activities. Nevertheless, the phenotype and effector functions of platelets in dengue pathogenesis are not completely understood. Here we used quantitative proteomics to investigate the protein content of platelets in clinical samples from patients with dengue compared to platelets from healthy donors. Our assays revealed a set of 252 differentially abundant proteins. In silico analyses associated these proteins with key molecular events including platelet activation and inflammatory responses, and with events not previously attributed to platelets during dengue infection including antigen processing and presentation, proteasome activity, and expression of histones. From these results, we conducted functional assays using samples from a larger cohort of patients and demonstrated evidence for platelet activation indicated by P-selectin (CD62P translocation and secretion of granule-stored chemokines by platelets. In addition, we found evidence that DENV infection triggers HLA class I synthesis and surface expression by a mechanism depending on functional proteasome activity. Furthermore, we demonstrate that cell-free histone H2A released during dengue infection binds to platelets, increasing platelet activation. These findings are consistent with functional importance of HLA class I, proteasome subunits, and histones that we found exclusively in proteome analysis of platelets in samples from dengue patients. Our study provides the first in-depth characterization of the platelet

  12. Peroxiredoxin II is an antioxidant enzyme that negatively regulates collagen-stimulated platelet function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jang, Ji Yong; Wang, Su Bin; Min, Ji Hyun; Chae, Yun Hee; Baek, Jin Young; Yu, Dae-Yeul; Chang, Tong-Shin

    2015-05-01

    Collagen-induced platelet signaling is mediated by binding to the primary receptor glycoprotein VI (GPVI). Reactive oxygen species produced in response to collagen have been found to be responsible for the propagation of GPVI signaling pathways in platelets. Therefore, it has been suggested that antioxidant enzymes could down-regulate GPVI-stimulated platelet activation. Although the antioxidant enzyme peroxiredoxin II (PrxII) has emerged as having a role in negatively regulating signaling through various receptors by eliminating H2O2 generated upon receptor stimulation, the function of PrxII in collagen-stimulated platelets is not known. We tested the hypothesis that PrxII negatively regulates collagen-stimulated platelet activation. We analyzed PrxII-deficient murine platelets. PrxII deficiency enhanced GPVI-mediated platelet activation through the defective elimination of H2O2 and the impaired protection of SH2 domain-containing tyrosine phosphatase 2 (SHP-2) against oxidative inactivation, which resulted in increased tyrosine phosphorylation of key components for the GPVI signaling cascade, including Syk, Btk, and phospholipase Cγ2. Interestingly, PrxII-mediated antioxidative protection of SHP-2 appeared to occur in the lipid rafts. PrxII-deficient platelets exhibited increased adhesion and aggregation upon collagen stimulation. Furthermore, in vivo experiments demonstrated that PrxII deficiency facilitated platelet-dependent thrombus formation in injured carotid arteries. This study reveals that PrxII functions as a protective antioxidant enzyme against collagen-stimulated platelet activation and platelet-dependent thrombosis. © 2015 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  13. Inhibitory Effect of Flavonolignans on the P2Y12 Pathway in Blood Platelets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bijak, Michal; Szelenberger, Rafal; Dziedzic, Angela; Saluk-Bijak, Joanna

    2018-02-10

    Adenosine diphosphate (ADP) is the major platelet agonist, which is important in the shape changes, stability, and growth of the thrombus. Platelet activation by ADP is associated with the G protein-coupled receptors P2Y1 and P2Y12. The pharmacologic blockade of the P2Y12 receptor significantly reduces the risk of peripheral artery disease, myocardial infarction, ischemic stroke, and vascular death. Recent studies demonstrated the inhibition of ADP-induced blood platelet activation by three major compounds of the flavonolignans group: silybin, silychristin, and silydianin. For this reason, the aim of the current work was to verify the effects of silybin, silychristin, and silydianin on ADP-induced physiological platelets responses, as well as mechanisms of P2Y12-dependent intracellular signal transduction. We evaluated the effect of tested flavonolignans on ADP-induced blood platelets' aggregation in platelet-rich plasma (PRP) (using light transmission aggregometry), adhesion to fibrinogen (using the static method), and the secretion of PF-4 (using the ELISA method). Additionally, using the double labeled flow cytometry method, we estimated platelet vasodilator-stimulated phosphoprotein (VASP) phosphorylation. We demonstrated a dose-dependent reduction of blood platelets' ability to perform ADP-induced aggregation, adhere to fibrinogen, and secrete PF-4 in samples treated with flavonolignans. Additionally, we observed that all of the tested flavonolignans were able to increase VASP phosphorylation in blood platelets samples, which is correlated with P2Y12 receptor inhibition. All of these analyses show that silychristin and silybin have the strongest inhibitory effect on blood platelet activation by ADP, while silydianin also inhibits the ADP pathway, but to a lesser extent. The results obtained in this study clearly demonstrate that silybin, silychristin, and silydianin have inhibitory properties against the P2Y12 receptor and block ADP-induced blood platelet

  14. Comparison of bacterial attachment to platelet bags with and without preconditioning with plasma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loza-Correa, M; Kalab, M; Yi, Q-L; Eltringham-Smith, L J; Sheffield, W P; Ramirez-Arcos, S

    2017-07-01

    Canadian Blood Services produces apheresis and buffy coat pooled platelet concentrates (PCs) stored in bags produced by two different manufacturers (A and B, respectively), both made of polyvinyl chloride-butyryl trihexyl citrate. This study was aimed at comparing Staphylococcus epidermidis adhesion to the inner surface of both bag types in the presence or absence of plasma factors. Sets (N = 2-6) of bags type A and B were left non-coated (control) or preconditioned with platelet-rich, platelet-poor or defibrinated plasma (PRP, PPP and DefibPPP, respectively). Each bag was inoculated with a 200-ml S. epidermidis culture adjusted to 0·5 colony-forming units/ml. Bags were incubated under platelet storage conditions for 7 days. After culture removal, bacteria attached to the plastic surface were either dislodged by sonication for bacterial quantification or examined in situ by scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Higher bacterial adhesion was observed to preconditioned PC bags than control containers for both bag types (P bags was confirmed by SEM. Bacteria adhered equally to both types of containers in the presence of PRP, PPP and DefibPPP residues (P > 0·05). By contrast, a significant increase in bacterial adherence was observed to type A bags compared with type B bags in the absence of plasma (P bags depends on the presence of plasma factors. Future efforts should be focused on reducing plasma proteins' attachment to platelet storage containers to decrease subsequent bacterial adhesion. © 2017 International Society of Blood Transfusion.

  15. Engineering Enriched Microenvironments with Gradients of Platelet Lysate in Hydrogel Fibers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santo, Vítor E; Babo, Pedro; Amador, Miguel; Correia, Cláudia; Cunha, Bárbara; Coutinho, Daniela F; Neves, Nuno M; Mano, João F; Reis, Rui L; Gomes, Manuela E

    2016-06-13

    Gradients of physical and chemical cues are characteristic of specific tissue microenvironments and contribute toward morphogenesis and tissue regeneration upon injury. Recent advances on microfluidics and hydrogel manipulation raised the possibility of generating biomimetic biomaterials enriched with bioactive factors and encapsulating cells following designs specifically tailored for a target application. The novelty of this work relies on the combination of methacrylated gellan gum (MeGG) with platelet lysate (PL), aiming to generate novel advanced 3D PL-enriched photo-cross-linkable hydrogels and overcoming the lack of adhesion sites provided by the native MeGG hydrogels. This combination takes advantage of the availability, enriched growth factor composition, and potential autologous application of PL while simultaneously preserving the ability provided by MeGG to tailor mechanical properties, protein release kinetics, and shape of the construct according to the desired goal. Incorporation of PL in the hydrogels significantly improved cellular adhesion and viability in the constructs. The use of microfluidic tools allowed the design of a fiber-like hydrogel incorporating a gradient of PL along the length of the fiber. These spatial protein gradients led to the viability and cell number gradients caused by maintenance of human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs) survival in the fibers toward the PL-enriched sections in comparison with the nonloaded MeGG sections of the fibers. Altogether, we propose a proof of concept strategy to design a PL gradient biomaterial with potential in tissue engineering approaches and analysis of cell-microenvironment interactions.

  16. Mechanisms and kinetics for platelet and neutrophil localization in immune complex nephritis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Johnson, R.J.; Alpers, C.E.; Pruchno, C.; Schulze, M.; Baker, P.J.; Pritzl, P.; Couser, W.G. (Univ. of Washington, Seattle (USA))

    1989-11-01

    We have previously reported that both neutrophils (PMNs) and platelets mediate proteinuria in a model of subendothelial immune complex (IC) nephritis (GN) in the rat. In order to understand the interaction of PMNs and platelets in this model, we quantitated the uptake of {sup 111}In-labelled platelets in glomeruli and correlated this with the number of PMNs observed histologically at 10 and 30 minutes, 1, 4 and 24 hours following induction of GN. Platelet accumulation was biphasic with a major peak at 10 minutes and a minor peak at four hours. Early platelet accumulation was complement dependent, and PMN-independent. PMN accumulation occurred after the initial platelet influx, peaking at one and four hours, was complement dependent, but was not affected by platelet depletion. Complement depletion significantly reduced proteinuria. This is the first documentation that platelet accumulation in glomeruli in IC GN is complement dependent. In addition, the enhancement of PMN-mediated injury by the platelet in this model does not involve effects of platelets on PMN localization, thus implying a functional interaction between these cells within the glomerulus.

  17. Human Platelet Senescence Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1980-03-01

    ability to measure certain enzymes to their oxidation-reduc other enzymes which can be measured by o phosphatase , acid phosphatase , chymotryp...alkaline sin, trypsin, esterases (17)); M use of n A or wheat germ agglutinin in the second etect specific carbohydrate constituents. We have...Von Willebrand factor. Nurden and Caen also demonstrated that GPI was rich in sialic acid (5) and probably responsible for the platelets’ surface

  18. Anomalous columnar order of charged colloidal platelets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morales-Anda, L.; Wensink, H. H.; Galindo, A.; Gil-Villegas, A.

    2012-01-01

    Monte Carlo computer simulations are carried out for a model system of like-charged colloidal platelets in the isothermal-isobaric ensemble (NpT). The aim is to elucidate the role of electrostatic interactions on the structure of synthetic clay systems at high particle densities. Short-range repulsions between particles are described by a suitable hard-core model representing a discotic particle. This potential is supplemented with an electrostatic potential based on a Yukawa model for the screened Coulombic potential between infinitely thin disklike macro-ions. The particle aspect-ratio and electrostatic parameters were chosen to mimic an aqueous dispersion of thin, like-charged, rigid colloidal platelets at finite salt concentration. An examination of the fluid phase diagram reveals a marked shift in the isotropic-nematic transition compared to the hard cut-sphere reference system. Several statistical functions, such as the pair correlation function for the center-of-mass coordinates and structure factor, are obtained to characterize the structural organization of the platelets phases. At low salinity and high osmotic pressure we observe anomalous hexagonal columnar structures characterized by interpenetrating columns with a typical intercolumnar distance corresponding to about half of that of a regular columnar phase. Increasing the ionic strength leads to the formation of glassy, disordered structures consisting of compact clusters of platelets stacked into finite-sized columns. These so-called "nematic columnar" structures have been recently observed in systems of charge-stabilized gibbsite platelets. Our findings are corroborated by an analysis of the static structure factor from a simple density functional theory.

  19. Characterizing phenolformaldehyde adhesive cure chemistry within the wood cell wall

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daniel J. Yelle; John Ralph

    2016-01-01

    Adhesive bonding of wood using phenol-formaldehyde remains the industrial standard in wood product bond durability. Not only does this adhesive infiltrate the cell wall, it also is believed to form primary bonds with wood cell wall polymers, particularly guaiacyl lignin. However, the mechanism by which phenol-formaldehyde adhesive intergrally interacts and bonds to...

  20. Superoxide dismutase of human platelets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kimura, Akiro; Fujimura, Kingo; Kuramoto, Atsushi

    1979-01-01

    Superoxide dismutase (S.O.D.) is the enzyme to protect from destructive effect of superoxide (O 2 -) produced in many metabolic pathways related to oxygen. The purpose of this study was to investigate the possibility that S.O.D. may play an important role in the platelet function. The cytoplasmic and mitochondrial S.O.D. has been investigated spectrophotometrically and gel electrophoretically in human platelets from eleven patients of chronic myelogenous leukemia (CML) and three patients of primary thrombocythemia (P.Th.). Neither deficiency nor abnormality of cytoplasmic and mitochondrial S.O.D. has been found electrophoretically in any case compared to normal platelets. However, the total activity from three of the CML patients and one of the P.Th. patients were above 3 unit/mg platelet protein (normal subject: 2.11 - 2.70 unit/mg protein), suggesting the possibility either that more O 2 -production occurs in the platelets or that rather little O 2 -production due to much O 2 -deprivation by the increased S.O.D. The S.O.D. activity of human platelets has been also investigated in several conditions, where much O 2 -generation might occur in platelets. Sodium fluoride (2 mM), which increases platelet O 2 -production about 3 fold, had no effect on platelet S.O.D. The aggregated platelets induced by ADP (10 -5 M), epinephrin (50 μg/ml), ristocetin (1.5 mg/ml) or collagen (1 - 20 μg/ml) had no increase of S.O.D. activity compared to that from non aggregated platelets. X-ray irradiation (1,000 - 20,000R) had not induced its activity increase or decrease. These findings indicated the induction of platelet S.O.D. was not brought about under these conditions. (author)

  1. Platelet-Poor Plasma as a Supplement for Fibroblasts Cultured in Platelet-Rich Fibrin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luiz Alexandre Chisini

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to evaluate the proliferation and adhesion of mesenchymal cells (3T3/NIH in Dulbecco’s Modified Eagle Medium (DMEM supplemented with Platelet-Poor Plasma (PPP in a Platelet-Rich Fibrin (PRF scaffold. Human blood was obtained and processed in a centrifuge considering the equation G=1.12xRx (RPM/1000² to obtain PRF and PPP. Cell adhesion and maintenance analyses were performed by MTT assays in a 96 well plate with supplemented DMEM: PPP (90:10 for 24 hours. Besides, the PRF was deposited in a 48 well plate and 10x104 cells were seeded above each PRF (n=3 with 800μl of DMEM: PPP (90:10 and cultured for 7 days. Histological analysis and the immunohistochemical staining for Vimentin were performed. Results were analyzed by one-way ANOVA in Stata12®. A significant decrease (p0.05. Fibroblasts culture for 7 days in PRF supplemented with PPP 10% was possible, showing positive staining for Vimentin. Therefore, PPP cell supplementation decreased the initial adhesion of cells but was able to maintain the proliferation of adhered cells and able to support their viability in PRF. It seems that this method has many clinical advantages since it provides an autologous and natural scaffold with their respective supplement for cell culture by only one process, without using xenogeneic compounds. This could improve the potential of clinical translational therapies based on the use of PRF cultured cells, promoting the regenerative potential for future use in medicine and dentistry.

  2. Overview of platelet physiology and laboratory evaluation of platelet function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodgers, G M

    1999-06-01

    Appropriate laboratory testing for the platelet-type bleeding disorders hinges on an adequate assessment in the history and physical examination. Patients with histories and screening laboratory results consistent with coagulation disorders (hemophilia, disseminated intravascular coagulation) are not appropriate candidates for platelet function testing. In contrast, patients with a lifelong history of platelet-type bleeding symptoms and perhaps a positive family history of bleeding would be appropriate for testing. Figure 6 depicts one strategy to evaluate these patients. Platelet morphology can easily be evaluated to screen for two uncommon qualitative platelet disorders: Bernard-Soulier syndrome (associated with giant platelets) and gray platelet syndrome, a subtype of storage pool disorder in which platelet granulation is morphologically abnormal by light microscopy. If the bleeding disorder occurred later in life (no bleeding with surgery or trauma early in life), the focus should be on acquired disorders of platelet function. For those patients thought to have an inherited disorder, testing for vWD should be done initially because approximately 1% of the population has vWD. The complete vWD panel (factor VIII coagulant activity, vWf antigen, ristocetin cofactor activity) should be performed because many patients will have abnormalities of only one particular panel component. Patients diagnosed with vWD should be classified using multimeric analysis to identify the type 1 vWD patients likely to respond to DDAVP. If vWD studies are normal, platelet aggregation testing should be performed, ensuring that no antiplatelet medications have been ingested at least 1 week before testing. If platelet aggregation tests are normal and if suspicion for an inherited disorder remains high, vWD testing should be repeated. The evaluation of thrombocytopenia may require bone marrow examination to exclude primary hematologic disorders. If future studies with thrombopoietin assays

  3. Histologic Evidence of New Collagen Formulation Using Platelet Rich Plasma in Skin Rejuvenation: A Prospective Controlled Clinical Study

    OpenAIRE

    Abuaf, Ozlem Karabudak; Yildiz, Hamza; Baloglu, H?seyin; Bilgili, Memet Ersan; Simsek, Hasan Aktug; Dogan, Bilal

    2016-01-01

    Background Platelet-rich plasma (PRP) is an autologous concentration of human platelets contained in a small volume of plasma and has recently been shown to accelerate rejuvenate aging skin by various growth factors and cell adhesion molecules. Objective This study was conducted to evaluate the efficacy and safety of intradermal injection of PRP in the human facial rejuvenation. Methods This study was a prospective, single-center, single-dose, open-label, non-randomized controlled clinical st...

  4. Influence of Oxidative Stress on Stored Platelets

    OpenAIRE

    K. Manasa; R. Vani

    2016-01-01

    Platelet storage and its availability for transfusion are limited to 5-6 days. Oxidative stress (OS) is one of the causes for reduced efficacy and shelf-life of platelets. The studies on platelet storage have focused on improving the storage conditions by altering platelet storage solutions, temperature, and materials. Nevertheless, the role of OS on platelet survival during storage is still unclear. Hence, this study was conducted to investigate the influence of storage on platelets. Platele...

  5. Platelet Concentrates: Past, Present and Future

    OpenAIRE

    Prakash, Shobha; Thakur, Aditi

    2011-01-01

    Platelets play a crucial role in hemostasis and wound healing, platelet growth factors are well known source of healing cytokines. Numerous techniques of autologous platelet concentrates have been developed and applied in oral and maxillofacial surgery. This review describes the evolution of the first and second generation of platelet concentrates (platelet rich plasma and platelet rich fibrin respectively) from their fore runner-fibrin sealants.

  6. Rac1 is essential for phospholipase C-gamma2 activation in platelets

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pleines, Irina; Elvers, Margitta; Strehl, Amrei

    2008-01-01

    isoenzymes are activated downstream of G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs), whereas PLCgamma2 is activated downstream of immunoreceptor tyrosine-based activation motif (ITAM)-coupled receptors, such as the major platelet collagen receptor glycoprotein (GP) VI or CLEC-2. The mechanisms underlying PLC......Platelet activation at sites of vascular injury is triggered through different signaling pathways leading to activation of phospholipase (PL) Cbeta or PLCgamma2. Active PLCs trigger Ca(2+) mobilization and entry, which is a prerequisite for adhesion, secretion, and thrombus formation. PLCbeta...... regulation are not fully understood. An involvement of small GTPases of the Rho family (Rho, Rac, Cdc42) in PLC activation has been proposed but this has not been investigated in platelets. We here show that murine platelets lacking Rac1 display severely impaired GPVI- or CLEC-2-dependent activation...

  7. Assessment of Platelet Profile of Healthy Volunteers in the ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ADOWIE PERE

    A similar pattern was observed for Mean Platelet Volume (MPV). However, Platelet ... Keywords: Platelet Count, Plateletcrit, Mean Platelet Volume, Platelet Distribution Width, Trimesters, ... bleeding disorders, diabetes and drugs capable of.

  8. Chapter 9:Wood Adhesion and Adhesives

    Science.gov (United States)

    Charles R. Frihart

    2013-01-01

    The recorded history of bonding wood dates back at least 3000 years to the Egyptians (Skeist and Miron 1990, River 1994a), and adhesive bonding goes back to early mankind (Keimel 2003). Although wood and paper bonding are the largest applications for adhesives, some of the fundamental aspects leading to good bonds are not fully understood. Better understanding of these...

  9. Delayed-onset of procoagulant signalling revealed by kinetic analysis of COAT platelet formation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alberio, Lorenzo; Ravanat, Catherine; Hechler, Béatrice; Mangin, Pierre H; Lanza, François; Gachet, Christian

    2017-06-02

    The combined action of collagen and thrombin induces the formation of COAT platelets, which are characterised by a coat of procoagulant and adhesive molecules on their surface. Although recent work has started to highlight their clinical relevance, the exact mechanisms regulating the formation of procoagulant COAT platelets remain unclear. Therefore, we employed flow cytometry in order to visualise in real time surface and intracellular events following simultaneous platelet activation with convulxin and thrombin. After a rapid initial response pattern characterised by the homogenous activation of the fibrinogen receptor glycoprotein IIb/IIIa in all platelets, starting with a delay of about 2 minutes an increasing fraction transforms to procoagulant COAT platelets. Their surface is characterised by progressive loss of PAC-1 binding, expression of negative phospholipids and retention of α-granule von Willebrand factor. Intracellular events in procoagulant COAT platelets are a marked increase of free calcium into the low micromolar range, concomitantly with early depolarisation of the mitochondrial membrane and activation of caspase-3, while non-COAT platelets keep the intracellular free calcium in the nanomolar range and maintain an intact mitochondrial membrane. We show for the first time that the flow-cytometrically distinct fractions of COAT and non-COAT platelets differentially phosphorylate two signalling proteins, PKCα and p38MAPK, which may be involved in the regulation of the different calcium fluxes observed in COAT versus non-COAT platelets. This study demonstrates the utility of concomitant cellular and signalling evaluation using flow cytometry in order to further dissect the mechanisms underlying the dichotomous platelet response observed after collagen/thrombin stimulation.

  10. Glaucocalyxin A inhibits platelet activation and thrombus formation preferentially via GPVI signaling pathway.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wei Li

    Full Text Available Platelets play a pivotal role in atherothrombosis and the antiplatelet agents have been proved to be useful in preventing onset of acute clinical events including myocardial infarction and stroke. Increasing number of natural compounds has been identified to be potential antiplatelet agents. Here we report the antiplatelet effect of glaucocalyxin A (GLA, an ent-diterpenoid that we isolated and purified from the aerial parts of Rabdosia japonica (Burm. f. var. glaucocalyx (Maxim. Hara, and investigate the molecular mechanisms by which GLA inhibits platelet activation and thrombus formation. The effect of GLA on platelet activation was measured using platelets freshly isolated from peripheral blood of healthy donors. Results showed that pretreatment of human platelets with lower concentrations of GLA (0.01 μg/ml, 0.1 μg/ml significantly inhibited platelet aggregation induced by collagen (P<0.001 and CRP (P<0.01, a synthetic GPVI ligand, but not by ADP and U46619. Accordingly, GLA inhibited collagen-stimulated tyrosine phosphorylation of Syk, LAT, and phospholipase Cγ2, the signaling events in collagen receptor GPⅥ pathway. GLA also inhibited platelet p-selectin secretion and integrin activation by convulxin, a GPVI selective ligand. Additionally, GLA was found to inhibit low-dose thrombin-induced platelet activation. Using a flow chamber device, GLA was found to attenuate platelet adhesion on collagen surfaces in high shear condition. In vivo studies showed that GLA administration increased the time for complete occlusion upon vascular injury in mice, but did not extend tail-bleeding time when mice were administered with relatively lower doses of GLA. Therefore, the present results provide the molecular basis for the inhibition effect of GLA on platelet activation and its in vivo effect on thrombus formation, suggesting that GLA could potentially be developed as an antiplatelet and antithrombotic agent.

  11. Quantitation of thrombogenicity of hemodialyzer with technetium-99m and indium-111 labeled platelets

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dewanjee, M.K.; Kapadvanjwala, Mansoor; Ruzius, Kees; Serafini, A.N.; Zilleruelo, G.E.; Sfakianakis, G.N. (Miami Univ., FL (United States). School of Medicine Althin CD-Medical Inc., Miami Lakes, FL (United States))

    1993-07-01

    The platelet thromobogenicity of a hemodialyzer was quantified with [sup 99m]Tc- and [sup 111]In-labeled platelets. The platelets collected from blood of Beagle dogs, Yorkshire pigs and human volunteers were labeled with [sup 111]in-tropolone (detergent-free) and [sup 99m]Tc-HMPAO. Hemodialysis was performed with a hollow-fiber dialyzer (HFD) in a flow-loop, the temperature of which was maintained at 37[sup o]C, with flow-rates of 7, 150 and 270 mL/min; after dialysis, the HFD radioactivity was measured with an ionization chamber and imaged with a [gamma]-camera. The radioactivity of samples of hollow-fibers taken from the top, middle and bottom of the dialyzer was determined with a [gamma]-counter. The mean values of hemodialyzer-adherent platelet radioactivity were calculated for both radionuclides. The canine platelets were found to be more thrombogenic than porcine and human platelets. The adhesivity of porcine platelets to the biomaterial (cellulose-acetate) of the dialyzer approximated that of human platelets. The [sup 99m]Tc label underestimated the thrombus formation (P < 0.01 ). The dynamic processes of thrombosis and embolization from the hemodialyzer resulted in the large standard deviations around the mean values of the adherent thrombus. In spite of this limitation of the dynamic pathology, the quantitation of comparative throbogenicity with [sup 111]In- and [sup 99m]Tc-labeled platelets suggests that both radionuclides could be used for measurement of device-induced thrombogenicity and may provide an estimation of prosthesis-induced thrombogenicity of human platelets from animal studies. (Author).

  12. Native High Density Lipoproteins (HDL Interfere with Platelet Activation Induced by Oxidized Low Density Lipoproteins (OxLDL

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ivo Volf

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Platelets and lipoproteins play a crucial role in atherogenesis, in part by their ability to modulate inflammation and oxidative stress. While oxidized low density lipoproteins (OxLDL play a central role in the development of this disease, high density lipoproteins (HDL represent an atheroprotective factor of utmost importance. As platelet function is remarkably sensitive to the influence of plasma lipoproteins, it was the aim of this study to clarify if HDL are able to counteract the stimulating effects of OxLDL with special emphasis on aspects of platelet function that are relevant to inflammation. Therefore, HDL were tested for their ability to interfere with pro-thrombotic and pro-inflammatory aspects of platelet function. We are able to show that HDL significantly impaired OxLDL-induced platelet aggregation and adhesion. In gel-filtered platelets, HDL decreased both the formation of reactive oxygen species and CD40L expression. Furthermore, HDL strongly interfered with OxLDL-induced formation of platelet-neutrophil aggregates in whole blood, suggesting that platelets represent a relevant and sensitive target for HDL. The finding that HDL effectively competed with the binding of OxLDL to the platelet surface might contribute to their atheroprotective and antithrombotic properties.

  13. [Quality of buffy-coat-derived platelet concentrates prepared using automated system terumo automated centrifuge and separator integration (TACSI)].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zebrowska, Agnieszka; Lipska, Alina; Rogowska, Anna; Bujno, Magdalena; Nedzi, Marta; Radziwon, Piotr

    2011-03-01

    Platelet recovery, and viability, and function is strongly dependent on the method of the preparation of platelet concentrate (PC). The glucose consumption, decrease of pH, release of alpha granules during storage in platelet concentrate impair their clinical effectiveness. To compare of the quality of buffy-coat-derieved platelet concentrates prepared using automatic system terumo automated centrifuge and separator integration (TACSI) and stored over 7 days. PCs were prepared from buffy coats using manual method (group I), or automatic system TACSI (group II). Fifteen PCs prepared from the 5 buffy coats each were stored over 7 days in 22-24 degrees C and tested. Samples were taken from the PCs container on days 1 and 7. The following laboratory tests were performed: number of platelets, platelets derived microparticles, CD62P expression, platelet adhesion, pH, glucose, lactate dehydrogenase activity. We have observed higher expression of CD62P in PCs prepared using manual method compared to the PCs produced automatically Platelet recovery was significantly higher in PCs prepared using automatic systems compare to manual method. Compared to manual methods, automatic system for preparation of buffy coats, is more efficient and enable production of platelets concentrates of higher quality.

  14. The hemostatic agent ethamsylate enhances P-selectin membrane expression in human platelets and cultured endothelial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alvarez-Guerra, Miriam; Hernandez, Maria Rosa; Escolar, Ginés; Chiavaroli, Carlo; Garay, Ricardo P; Hannaert, Patrick

    2002-09-15

    Ethamsylate possesses antihemorrhagic properties, but whether or not it directly activates blood platelets is unclear. Here we investigated the platelet activation potential of ethamsylate, by measuring membrane P-selectin expression with flow cytometry in human whole blood and also by immunofluorescence imaging of isolated human platelets. Moreover, we measured membrane P-selectin expression in the SV40-transformed aortic rat endothelial cell line (SVAREC) and 14C-ethamsylate membrane binding and/or uptake in platelets and endothelial cells. Whole blood flow cytometry showed a modest, but statistically significant increase by ethamsylate in the percentage of platelets expressing P-selectin (from 2% to 4-5%, p ethamsylate tested (1 microM), with maximal enhancement of P-selectin expression (75-90%) at 10 microM ethamsylate. Similar results were obtained in SVAREC endothelial cells. 14C-ethamsylate specifically bound to platelets and endothelial cell membranes, without significant uptake into the cell interior. In conclusion, ethamsylate enhances membrane P-selectin expression in human platelets and in cultured endothelial cells. Ethamsylate specifically binds to some protein receptor in platelet and endothelial cell membranes, receptor which can signal for membrane P-selectin expression. These results support the view that ethamsylate acts on the first step of hemostasis, by improving platelet adhesiveness and restoring capillary resistance. Copyright 2002 Elsevier Science Ltd.

  15. Mechanisms of the priming effect of low doses of lipopoly-saccharides on leukocyte-dependent platelet aggregation in whole blood.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montrucchio, Giuseppe; Bosco, Ornella; Del Sorbo, Lorenzo; Fascio Pecetto, Paolo; Lupia, Enrico; Goffi, Alberto; Omedè, Paola; Emanuelli, Giorgio; Camussi, Giovanni

    2003-11-01

    Several studies focused on the ability of bacterial lipopolysac-charides (LPS) in triggering platelet and/or leukocyte activation. The aim of this study was to investigate the molecular mechanisms involved in the aggregation of platelets and in their interaction with leukocytes in whole blood after stimulation with low doses of LPS. LPS did not directly induce platelet aggregation in whole blood, but they primed the aggregation of platelets induced by epinephrine, adenosine diphosphate and arachidonic acid. As shown by cytofluorimetry, platelets neither bind FITC-LPS, nor express the LPS-receptors CD14 and toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4). On the contrary, LPS primed monocytes and to a lesser extent polymorphonuclear neutrophils to adhere to platelets. Both platelet-leukocyte interaction and platelet aggregation in whole blood were inhibited by blockade of CD14 and TLR4. Moreover, the interaction between platelets and leukocytes was inhibited by P-selectin, and by blockade of PAF and reactive oxygen species, suggesting a role of P-selectin and of leukocyte-derived mediators. In conclusion, these results elucidate the mechanisms leading to platelet activation and interaction with leukocytes triggered by LPS. They suggest that the activation of platelets by LPS is mainly dependent on leukocytes and especially monocytes as a result of CD14 and TLR4 engagement. Moreover, we found that leukocyte-platelet interaction was triggered by the synthesis of PAF and the generation of oxygen radicals that induced upregulation of surface expression of P-selectin.

  16. Genetic Analysis of the Role of Protein Kinase Cθ in Platelet Function and Thrombus Formation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hall, Kellie J.; Harper, Matthew T.; Gilio, Karen; Cosemans, Judith M.; Heemskerk, Johan W. M.; Poole, Alastair W.

    2008-01-01

    Background PKCθ is a novel protein kinase C isozyme, predominately expressed in T cells and platelets. PKCθ−/− T cells exhibit reduced activation and PKCθ−/− mice are resistant to autoimmune disease, making PKCθ an attractive therapeutic target for immune modulation. Collagen is a major agonist for platelets, operating through an immunoreceptor-like signalling pathway from its receptor GPVI. Although it has recently been shown that PKCθ positively regulates outside-in signalling through integrin αIIbβ3 in platelets, the role of PKCθ in GPVI-dependent signalling and functional activation of platelets has not been assessed. Methodology/Principal Findings In the present study we assessed static adhesion, cell spreading, granule secretion, integrin αIIbβ3 activation and platelet aggregation in washed mouse platelets lacking PKCθ. Thrombus formation on a collagen-coated surface was assessed in vitro under flow. PKCθ−/− platelets exhibited reduced static adhesion and filopodia generation on fibrinogen, suggesting that PKCθ positively regulates outside-in signalling, in agreement with a previous report. In contrast, PKCθ−/− platelets also exhibited markedly enhanced GPVI-dependent α-granule secretion, although dense granule secretion was unaffected, suggesting that PKCθ differentially regulates these two granules. Inside-out regulation of αIIbβ3 activation was also enhanced downstream of GPVI stimulation. Although this did not result in increased aggregation, importantly thrombus formation on collagen under high shear (1000 s−1) was enhanced. Conclusions/Significance These data suggest that PKCθ is an important negative regulator of thrombus formation on collagen, potentially mediated by α-granule secretion and αIIbβ3 activation. PKCθ therefore may act to restrict thrombus growth, a finding that has important implications for the development and safe clinical use of PKCθ inhibitors. PMID:18815612

  17. Genetic analysis of the role of protein kinase Ctheta in platelet function and thrombus formation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kellie J Hall

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available PKCtheta is a novel protein kinase C isozyme, predominately expressed in T cells and platelets. PKCtheta(-/- T cells exhibit reduced activation and PKCtheta(-/- mice are resistant to autoimmune disease, making PKCtheta an attractive therapeutic target for immune modulation. Collagen is a major agonist for platelets, operating through an immunoreceptor-like signalling pathway from its receptor GPVI. Although it has recently been shown that PKCtheta positively regulates outside-in signalling through integrin alpha(IIbbeta(3 in platelets, the role of PKCtheta in GPVI-dependent signalling and functional activation of platelets has not been assessed.In the present study we assessed static adhesion, cell spreading, granule secretion, integrin alpha(IIbbeta(3 activation and platelet aggregation in washed mouse platelets lacking PKCtheta. Thrombus formation on a collagen-coated surface was assessed in vitro under flow. PKCtheta(-/- platelets exhibited reduced static adhesion and filopodia generation on fibrinogen, suggesting that PKCtheta positively regulates outside-in signalling, in agreement with a previous report. In contrast, PKCtheta(-/- platelets also exhibited markedly enhanced GPVI-dependent alpha-granule secretion, although dense granule secretion was unaffected, suggesting that PKCtheta differentially regulates these two granules. Inside-out regulation of alpha(IIbbeta(3 activation was also enhanced downstream of GPVI stimulation. Although this did not result in increased aggregation, importantly thrombus formation on collagen under high shear (1000 s(-1 was enhanced.These data suggest that PKCtheta is an important negative regulator of thrombus formation on collagen, potentially mediated by alpha-granule secretion and alpha(IIbbeta(3 activation. PKCtheta therefore may act to restrict thrombus growth, a finding that has important implications for the development and safe clinical use of PKCtheta inhibitors.

  18. Long ligands reinforce biological adhesion under shear flow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belyaev, Aleksey V.

    2018-04-01

    In this work, computer modeling has been used to show that longer ligands allow biological cells (e.g., blood platelets) to withstand stronger flows after their adhesion to solid walls. A mechanistic model of polymer-mediated ligand-receptor adhesion between a microparticle (cell) and a flat wall has been developed. The theoretical threshold between adherent and non-adherent regimes has been derived analytically and confirmed by simulations. These results lead to a deeper understanding of numerous biophysical processes, e.g., arterial thrombosis, and to the design of new biomimetic colloid-polymer systems.

  19. THz Properties of Adhesives

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stübling, E.; Gomell, L.; Sommer, S.; Winkel, A.; Kahlmeyer, M.; Böhm, S.; Koch, M.

    2018-06-01

    We determined the THz properties of 12 different adhesives which are mainly used for industrial purposes. The adhesives applied can be classified according to their chemical structure: epoxy resins, acrylic resins, and polyurethane based materials. This work represents a basis for future studies, which will concentrate on aging effects, including the absorption of water of adhesive joints. Thus, the dielectric properties of the unaged adhesives are investigated and the results of these measurements are described herein.

  20. Angiopoietin-related growth factor (AGF) supports adhesion, spreading, and migration of keratinocytes, fibroblasts, and endothelial cells through interaction with RGD-binding integrins

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang Yueqing; Hu Xiaobo; Tian Ruiyang; Wei Wangui; Hu Wei; Chen Xia; Han Wei; Chen Huayou; Gong Yi

    2006-01-01

    Angiopoietin-related growth factor (AGF) is a newly identified member of angiopoietin-related proteins (ARPs)/angiopoietin-like proteins (Angptls). AGF has been considered as a novel growth factor in accelerating cutaneous wound healing, as it is capable of stimulating keratinocytes proliferation as well as angiogenesis. But in our paper, we demonstrate that AGF stimulates keratinocytes proliferation only at high protein concentration, however, it can potently promote adhesion, spreading, and migration of keratinocytes, fibroblasts, and endothelial cells. Furthermore, we confirm that the adhesion and migration cellular events are mediated by RGD-binding integrins, most possibly the α v -containing integrins, by in vitro inhibition assays using synthetic competitive peptides. Our results strongly suggest that AGF is an integrin ligand as well as a mitogenic growth factor and theoretically participates in cutaneous wound healing in a more complex mechanism

  1. PH dependent adhesive peptides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tomich, John; Iwamoto, Takeo; Shen, Xinchun; Sun, Xiuzhi Susan

    2010-06-29

    A novel peptide adhesive motif is described that requires no receptor or cross-links to achieve maximal adhesive strength. Several peptides with different degrees of adhesive strength have been designed and synthesized using solid phase chemistries. All peptides contain a common hydrophobic core sequence flanked by positively or negatively charged amino acids sequences.

  2. Prevention of bacterial adhesion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Klemm, Per; Vejborg, Rebecca Munk; Hancock, Viktoria

    2010-01-01

    . As such, adhesion represents the Achilles heel of crucial pathogenic functions. It follows that interference with adhesion can reduce bacterial virulence. Here, we illustrate this important topic with examples of techniques being developed that can inhibit bacterial adhesion. Some of these will become...

  3. Do uniform tangential interfacial stresses enhance adhesion?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Menga, Nicola; Carbone, Giuseppe; Dini, Daniele

    2018-03-01

    We present theoretical arguments, based on linear elasticity and thermodynamics, to show that interfacial tangential stresses in sliding adhesive soft contacts may lead to a significant increase of the effective energy of adhesion. A sizable expansion of the contact area is predicted in conditions corresponding to such scenario. These results are easily explained and are valid under the assumptions that: (i) sliding at the interface does not lead to any loss of adhesive interaction and (ii) spatial fluctuations of frictional stresses can be considered negligible. Our results are seemingly supported by existing experiments, and show that frictional stresses may lead to an increase of the effective energy of adhesion depending on which conditions are established at the interface of contacting bodies in the presence of adhesive forces.

  4. Association of vinculin to the platelet cytoskeleton during thrombin-induced aggregation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Asyee, G. M.; Sturk, A.; Muszbek, L.

    1987-01-01

    Vinculin is a protein generally believed to be involved in membrane-cytoskeleton interaction, and its presence in platelets has been verified earlier. Here we show that in resting bovine platelets, vinculin is not associated with the Triton-insoluble cytoskeletal fraction but becomes incorporated

  5. Radiotherapy- and chemotherapy-induced normal tissue damage. The role of cytokines and adhesion molecules

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Plevova, P.

    2002-01-01

    Background. Ionising radiation and cytostatic agents used in cancer therapy exert damaging effects on normal tissues and induce a complex response at the cellular and molecular levels. Cytokines and adhesion molecules are involved in this response. Methods. Published data on the given topic have been reviewed. Results and conclusions. Various cytokines and adhesion molecules, including tumor necrosis factor α, interleukins- 1,-2,-4, and -6, interferon γ, granulocyte macrophage- and macrophage- colony stimulating factors, transforming growth factor β, platelet-derived growth factor, insulin-like growth factor I, fibroblast and epidermal growth factors, platelet-activating factor, intercellular adhesion molecule-1, vascular cell adhesion molecule-1, E- and P-selectins are involved in the response of normal tissues to ionizing radiation- and chemotherapy- induced normal tissues damage and are co-responsible for some side effects of these treatment modalities, including fever, anorexia and fatigue, suppression of hematopoiesis, both acute and late local tissue response. (author)

  6. Platelet activation during preparation of platelet concentrates: a comparison of the platelet-rich plasma and the buffy coat methods

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Fijnheer, R.; Pietersz, R. N.; de Korte, D.; Gouwerok, C. W.; Dekker, W. J.; Reesink, H. W.; Roos, D.

    1990-01-01

    The activation of platelets during the preparation of platelet concentrates (PCs) by two methods was compared. To eliminate interdonor differences, 2 units of whole blood were pooled and subsequently divided into two batches. From one batch, the platelets were harvested as pelleted platelets from

  7. Sliding Adhesion Dynamics of Isolated Gecko Setal Arrays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sponberg, Simon; Autumn, Kellar

    2003-03-01

    The tokay gecko (Gekko gecko) can adhere to nearly any surface through van der Waals interactions of the specialized setae (b-keratin "hairs") of its toe pads. Our recent research has suggested that a gecko is substantially overbuilt for static adhesion requiring as little as 0.03of its theoretical adhesive capacity. We performed the first sliding adhesion experiments on this novel biological adhesive to determine its response to dynamic loading. We isolated arrays of setae and constructed a precision controlled Robo-toe to study sliding effects. Our results indicate that, unlike many typical adhesives, gecko setal arrays exhibit an increased frictional force upon sliding (mk > ms) which further increases with velocity, suggesting that perturbation rejection may be an evolutionary design principle underlying the evolution of the gecko adhesive. We compare these dynamic properties with those of other adhesives and explore the impacts of these results on the design of artificial adhesives.

  8. Mean platelet volume and mean platelet volume/platelet count ratio

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Amira M. Elsayed

    2016-03-30

    Mar 30, 2016 ... The aim of this study was to compare the MPV and mean platelet volume/platelet count ... brain stroke, both in the acute phase and long after disease.17 ... males, while the healthy controls comprised 12 females and 8.

  9. Glycoprotein Ibα receptor instability is associated with loss of quality in platelets produced in culture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robert, Amélie; Boyer, Lucie; Pineault, Nicolas

    2011-03-01

    The development of culture processes for hematopoietic progenitors could lead to the development of a complementary source of platelets for therapeutic purposes. However, functional characterization of culture-derived platelets remains limited, which raises some uncertainties about the quality of platelets produced in vitro. The aim of this study was to define the proportion of functional platelets produced in cord blood CD34+ cell cultures. Toward this, the morphological and functional properties of culture-derived platelet-like particles (PLPs) were critically compared to that of blood platelets. Flow cytometry combined with transmission electron microscopy analyses revealed that PLPs formed a more heterogeneous population of platelets at a different stage of maturation than blood platelets. The majority of PLPs harbored the fibrinogen receptor αIIbβ3, but a significant proportion failed to maintain glycoprotein (GP)Ibα surface expression, a component of the vWF receptor essential for platelet functions. Importantly, GPIbα extracellular expression correlated closely with platelet function, as the GPIIb+ GPIbα+ PLP subfraction responded normally to agonist stimulation as evidenced by α-granule release, adhesion, spreading, and aggregation. In contrast, the GPIIb+ GPIbα⁻ subfraction was unresponsive in most functional assays and appeared to be metabolically inactive. The present study confirms that functional platelets can be generated in cord blood CD34+ cell cultures, though these are highly susceptible to ectodomain shedding of receptors associated with loss of function. Optimization of culture conditions to prevent these deleterious effects and to homogenize PLPs is necessary to improve the quality and yields of culture-derived platelets before they can be recognized as a suitable complementary source for therapeutic purposes.

  10. Treatment with a histone deacetylase inhibitor, valproic acid, is associated with increased platelet activation in a large animal model of traumatic brain injury and hemorrhagic shock

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dekker, Simone E; Sillesen, Martin; Bambakidis, Ted

    2014-01-01

    synergistic benefits. In this study, we hypothesized that VPA administration would be associated with a conservation of platelet function as measured by increased platelet activation after resuscitation. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Ten swine (42-50 kg) were subjected to TBI and HS (40% blood loss). Animals were...... neuroprotective effects of VPA may be due to a conservation of platelet function as measured by a higher platelet activation response after resuscitation....... left in shock for 2 h before resuscitation with either FFP or FFP + VPA (300 mg/kg). Serum levels of platelet activation markers transforming growth factor beta, CD40 L, P-selectin, and platelet endothelial cell adhesion molecule (PECAM) 1 were measured at baseline, postresuscitation, and after a 6-h...

  11. Quality of harvested autologous platelets compared with stored donor platelets for use after cardiopulmonary bypass procedures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crowther, M; Ford, I; Jeffrey, R R; Urbaniak, S J; Greaves, M

    2000-10-01

    Platelet dysfunction has a major contribution in bleeding after cardiopulmonary bypass (CPB) and transfusion of platelets is frequently used to secure haemostasis. Allogeneic platelets prepared for transfusion are functionally impaired. Autologous platelets harvested preoperatively require a shorter storage time before transfusion and their use also avoids the risks associated with transfusion of allogeneic blood products. For the first time, we have compared the functional quality of autologous platelets with allogeneic platelets prepared by two methods, immediately before infusion. Platelet activation was assessed by P-selectin expression and fibrinogen binding using flow cytometry. We also monitored the effects of CPB surgery and re-infusion of autologous platelets on platelet function. Autologous platelet-rich plasma (PRP) contained a significantly lower (P platelets compared with allogeneic platelet preparations, and also contained a significantly higher (P platelets. Allogeneic platelets prepared by donor apheresis were more activated and less responsive than those produced by centrifugation of whole blood. In patients' blood, the percentage of platelets expressing P-selectin or binding fibrinogen increased significantly after CPB (P platelets responsive to in vitro agonists was decreased (P platelet activation during the procedure. The percentage of activated platelets decreased (statistically not significant) after re-infusion of autologous PRP. P-selectin expression had returned to pre-CPB levels 24 h post-operatively. Autologous platelet preparations display minimal activation, but remain responsive. Conservation of platelet function may contribute to the potential clinical benefits of autologous transfusion in cardiopulmonary bypass.

  12. Conservation of Ebp-type pilus genes among Enterococci and demonstration of their role in adherence of Enterococcus faecalis to human platelets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nallapareddy, Sreedhar R; Sillanpää, Jouko; Mitchell, Jennifer; Singh, Kavindra V; Chowdhury, Shahreen A; Weinstock, George M; Sullam, Paul M; Murray, Barbara E

    2011-07-01

    Ebp are endocarditis- and biofilm-associated pili of Enterococcus faecalis that are also important in experimental urinary tract infections (UTIs). Our analyses, using available genomes, found that the ebp locus is unique to enterococci. In E. faecalis, the ebp locus is very highly conserved and only 1/473 E. faecalis isolates tested lacked ebpABC, while only 1.2% had the bee pilus locus. No other pilus-encoding operon was identified in 55 available genomes, indicating that the vast majority of E. faecalis strains (unlike Enterococcus faecium and streptococci) have a single pilus locus. Surface expression studies showed that Ebp pili were produced in vitro by 91/91 brain heart infusion (BHI) plus serum-grown E. faecalis isolates and that strain OG1RF expressed pili at even higher levels in rat endocarditis vegetations. However, Ebp expression was restricted to 30 to 72% of E. faecalis cells, consistent with a bistability mode of expression. We also evaluated E. faecalis interactions with human platelets and found that growth of E. faecalis in BHI plus serum significantly enhanced adherence to human platelets and that sortase deletion mutants (the ΔsrtA, Δbps, and ΔbpsΔsrtA mutants) were markedly defective. Further studies identified that Ebp pili, but not the microbial surface components recognizing adhesive matrix molecules (MSCRAMMs) Ace and Fss2, mediate adherence of E. faecalis to platelets. Taken together, our data show that the immunogenic (in human endocarditis patients) and commonly expressed Ebp pili, which are known to be important for experimental endocarditis, are highly conserved and mediate adherence to platelets, suggesting that Ebp pili may be a reasonable immunotherapeutic target for prevention or possibly treatment of endocarditis caused by this species.

  13. Conservation of Ebp-Type Pilus Genes among Enterococci and Demonstration of Their Role in Adherence of Enterococcus faecalis to Human Platelets ▿ †

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nallapareddy, Sreedhar R.; Sillanpää, Jouko; Mitchell, Jennifer; Singh, Kavindra V.; Chowdhury, Shahreen A.; Weinstock, George M.; Sullam, Paul M.; Murray, Barbara E.

    2011-01-01

    Ebp are endocarditis- and biofilm-associated pili of Enterococcus faecalis that are also important in experimental urinary tract infections (UTIs). Our analyses, using available genomes, found that the ebp locus is unique to enterococci. In E. faecalis, the ebp locus is very highly conserved and only 1/473 E. faecalis isolates tested lacked ebpABC, while only 1.2% had the bee pilus locus. No other pilus-encoding operon was identified in 55 available genomes, indicating that the vast majority of E. faecalis strains (unlike Enterococcus faecium and streptococci) have a single pilus locus. Surface expression studies showed that Ebp pili were produced in vitro by 91/91 brain heart infusion (BHI) plus serum-grown E. faecalis isolates and that strain OG1RF expressed pili at even higher levels in rat endocarditis vegetations. However, Ebp expression was restricted to 30 to 72% of E. faecalis cells, consistent with a bistability mode of expression. We also evaluated E. faecalis interactions with human platelets and found that growth of E. faecalis in BHI plus serum significantly enhanced adherence to human platelets and that sortase deletion mutants (the ΔsrtA, Δbps, and ΔbpsΔsrtA mutants) were markedly defective. Further studies identified that Ebp pili, but not the microbial surface components recognizing adhesive matrix molecules (MSCRAMMs) Ace and Fss2, mediate adherence of E. faecalis to platelets. Taken together, our data show that the immunogenic (in human endocarditis patients) and commonly expressed Ebp pili, which are known to be important for experimental endocarditis, are highly conserved and mediate adherence to platelets, suggesting that Ebp pili may be a reasonable immunotherapeutic target for prevention or possibly treatment of endocarditis caused by this species. PMID:21502588

  14. Radioimmune assay of human platelet prostaglandin synthetase

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roth, G.J.; Machuga, E.T.

    1982-01-01

    Normal platelet function depends, in part, on platelet PG synthesis. PG synthetase (cyclo-oxygenase) catalyzes the first step in PG synthesis, the formation of PGH 2 from arachidonic acid. Inhibition of the enzyme by ASA results in an abnormality in the platelet release reaction. Patients with pparent congenital abnormalities in the enzyme have been described, and the effects have been referred to as ''aspirin-like'' defects of the platelet function. These patients lack platelet PG synthetase activity, but the actual content of PG synthetase protein in these individuals' platelets is unknown. Therefore an RIA for human platelet PG synthetase would provide new information, useful in assessing the aspirin-like defects of platelet function. An RIA for human platelet PG synthetase is described. The assay utilizes a rabbit antibody directed against the enzyme and [ 125 I]-labelled sheep PG synthetase as antigen. The human platelet enzyme is assayed by its ability to inhibit precipitation of the [ 125 I]antigen. The assay is sensitive to 1 ng of enzyme. By the immune assay, human platelets contain approximately 1200 ng of PG synethetase protein per 1.5 mg of platelet protein (approximately 10 9 platelets). This content corresponds to 10,000 enzyme molecules per platelet. The assay provides a rapid and convenient assay for the human platelet enzyme, and it can be applied to the assessment of patients with apparent platelet PG synthetase (cyclo-oxygenase) deficiency

  15. Platelet Glycoprotein Ib-IX and Malignancy

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-09-01

    provide a unique microenvironment supporting the accumulation of more platelets and the elaboration of a fibrin - rich network produced by coagulation...process and can initiate the formation of a platelet - rich thrombus by tethering the platelet to a thrombogenic surface. Several ligands binding to GP Ib... Platelet Glycoprotein Ib-IX and Malignancy PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR: Jerry Ware, Ph.D

  16. Platelet-derived-growth-factor-induced signalling in human platelets: phosphoinositide-3-kinase-dependent inhibition of platelet activation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Selheim, F; Fukami, M H; Holmsen, H; Vassbotn, F S

    2000-09-01

    Human platelets release platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF) from alpha-granules during platelet activation. We have previously shown that platelets have PDGF alpha-receptors, a transmembrane tyrosine kinase that takes part in negative feedback regulation during platelet activation. Here we have described a study of PDGF-induced tyrosine phosphorylation of platelet substrates and phosphoinositide 3-kinase (PI-3K) activity in collagen-stimulated platelets. By immunoblotting with phosphotyrosine antibodies of collagen-activated platelets we found that PDGF increased the phosphorylation of several platelet substrates, e.g. pp140, pp120 and pp85. PDGF inhibited collagen-induced platelet activation in the presence of inhibitors of autocrine stimulation, thus blocking the pure collagen-induced signal transduction. PDGF enhanced the collagen-induced formation of PtdIns(3,4)P(2) and PtdIns(3,4,5)P(3) as measured by HPLC. Wortmannin and LY294002, two unrelated inhibitors of PI-3K, were used to investigate the role of PI-3K in PDGF-induced platelet signalling. Incubation of platelets with wortmannin and LY294002 blocked the formation of three phosphorylated inositides as well as the inhibitory effect of PDGF on collagen-induced platelet activation. We conclude that the inhibitory effect of PDGF on platelet activation is PI-3K dependent. This is the first demonstration of a negative regulatory function of 3-phosphorylated inositides in platelets.

  17. Renal cells activate the platelet receptor CLEC-2 through podoplanin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christou, Charita M.; Pearce, Andrew C.; Watson, Aleksandra A.; Mistry, Anita R.; Pollitt, Alice Y.; Fenton-May, Angharad E.; Johnson, Louise A.; Jackson, David G.; Watson, Steve P.; O'Callaghan, Chris A.

    2009-01-01

    We have recently shown that the C-type lectin-like receptor, CLEC-2, is expressed on platelets and that it mediates powerful platelet aggregation by the snake venom toxin, rhodocytin. In addition, we have provided indirect evidence for an endogenous ligand for CLEC-2 in renal cells expressing human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1). This putative ligand facilitates transmission of HIV through its incorporation into the viral envelope and binding to CLEC-2 on platelets. The aim of this study was to identify the ligand on these cells which binds to CLEC-2 on platelets. Recombinant CLEC-2 exhibits specific binding to 293T cells in which the HIV can be grown. Further, 293T cells activate both platelets and CLEC-2-transfected DT-40 B cells. The transmembrane protein podoplanin was identified on 293T cells and demonstrated to mediate both binding of 293T cells to CLEC-2 and 293T cell activation of CLEC-2-transfected DT-40 B cells. Podoplanin is expressed on renal cells (podocytes). Further, a direct interaction between CLEC-2 and podoplanin was confirmed using surface plasmon resonance and was shown to be independent of glycosylation of CLEC-2. The interaction has an affinity of 24.5 ± 3.7μM. The present study identifies podoplanin as a ligand for CLEC-2 on renal cells. PMID:18215137

  18. Prophylactic platelets in dengue

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Whitehorn, James; Rodriguez Roche, Rosmari; Guzman, Maria G

    2012-01-01

    Dengue is the most important arboviral infection of humans. Thrombocytopenia is frequently observed in the course of infection and haemorrhage may occur in severe disease. The degree of thrombocytopenia correlates with the severity of infection, and may contribute to the risk of haemorrhage...... of platelets in dengue. Respondents were all physicians involved with the treatment of patients with dengue. Respondents were asked that their answers reflected what they would do if they were the treating physician. We received responses from 306 physicians from 20 different countries. The heterogeneity...... of the responses highlights the variation in clinical practice and lack of an evidence base in this area and underscores the importance of prospective clinical trials to address this key question in the clinical management of patients with dengue....

  19. Platelet activation by extracellular matrix proteins in haemostasis and thrombosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watson, Steve P

    2009-01-01

    The prevention of excessive blood loss to avoid fatal haemorrhage is a pivotal process for all organisms possessing a circulatory system. Increased circulating blood volume and pressure, as required in larger animals, make this process all the more important and challenging. It is essential to have a powerful and rapid system to detect damage and generate an effective seal, and which is also exquisitely regulated to prevent unwanted, excessive or systemic activation so as to avoid blockage of vessels. Thus, a highly specialised and efficient haemostatic system has evolved that consists of cellular (platelets) and protein (coagulation factors) components. Importantly, this is able to support haemostasis in both the low shear environment of the venous system and the high shear environment of the arterial system. Endothelial cells, lining the entire circulation system, play a crucial role in the delicate balance between activation and inhibition of the haemostatic system. An intact and healthy endothelium supports blood flow by preventing attachment of cells and proteins which is required for initiation of coagulation and platelet activation. Endothelial cells produce and release the two powerful soluble inhibitors of platelet activation, nitric oxide and prostacyclin, and express high levels of CD39 which rapidly metabolises the major platelet feedback agonist, ADP. This antithrombotic environment however can rapidly change following activation or removal of endothelial cells through injury or rupture of atherosclerotic plaques. Loss of endothelial cells exposes the subendothelial extracellular matrix which creates strong signals for activation of the haemostatic system including powerful platelet adhesion and activation. Quantitative and qualitative changes in the composition of the subendothelial extracellular matrix influence these prothrombotic characteristics with life threatening thrombotic and bleeding complications, as illustrated by formation of

  20. Molecular cloning and characterization of rhesus monkey platelet glycoprotein Ibα, a major ligand-binding subunit of GPIb-IX-V complex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qiao, Jianlin; Shen, Yang; Shi, Meimei; Lu, Yanrong; Cheng, Jingqiu; Chen, Younan

    2014-05-01

    Through binding to von Willebrand factor (VWF), platelet glycoprotein (GP) Ibα, the major ligand-binding subunit of the GPIb-IX-V complex, initiates platelet adhesion and aggregation in response to exposed VWF or elevated fluid-shear stress. There is little data regarding non-human primate platelet GPIbα. This study cloned and characterized rhesus monkey (Macaca Mullatta) platelet GPIbα. DNAMAN software was used for sequence analysis and alignment. N/O-glycosylation sites and 3-D structure modelling were predicted by online OGPET v1.0, NetOGlyc 1.0 Server and SWISS-MODEL, respectively. Platelet function was evaluated by ADP- or ristocetin-induced platelet aggregation. Rhesus monkey GPIbα contains 2,268 nucleotides with an open reading frame encoding 755 amino acids. Rhesus monkey GPIbα nucleotide and protein sequences share 93.27% and 89.20% homology respectively, with human. Sequences encoding the leucine-rich repeats of rhesus monkey GPIbα share strong similarity with human, whereas PEST sequences and N/O-glycosylated residues vary. The GPIbα-binding residues for thrombin, filamin A and 14-3-3ζ are highly conserved between rhesus monkey and human. Platelet function analysis revealed monkey and human platelets respond similarly to ADP, but rhesus monkey platelets failed to respond to low doses of ristocetin where human platelets achieved 76% aggregation. However, monkey platelets aggregated in response to higher ristocetin doses. Monkey GPIbα shares strong homology with human GPIbα, however there are some differences in rhesus monkey platelet activation through GPIbα engagement, which need to be considered when using rhesus monkey platelet to investigate platelet GPIbα function. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Apheresis platelet concentrates contain platelet-derived and endothelial cell-derived microparticles

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rank, A.; Nieuwland, R.; Liebhardt, S.; Iberer, M.; Grützner, S.; Toth, B.; Pihusch, R.

    2011-01-01

    Background and Objectives Microparticles (MP) are membrane vesicles with thrombogenic and immunomodulatory properties. We determined MP subgroups from resting platelets, activated platelets and endothelial cells in donors and apheresis platelet concentrates (PC). Material and Methods MP were double

  2. Adhesion of multimode adhesives to enamel and dentin after one year of water storage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vermelho, Paulo Moreira; Reis, André Figueiredo; Ambrosano, Glaucia Maria Bovi; Giannini, Marcelo

    2017-06-01

    This study aimed to evaluate the ultramorphological characteristics of tooth-resin interfaces and the bond strength (BS) of multimode adhesive systems to enamel and dentin. Multimode adhesives (Scotchbond Universal (SBU) and All-Bond Universal) were tested in both self-etch and etch-and-rinse modes and compared to control groups (Optibond FL and Clearfil SE Bond (CSB)). Adhesives were applied to human molars and composite blocks were incrementally built up. Teeth were sectioned to obtain specimens for microtensile BS and TEM analysis. Specimens were tested after storage for either 24 h or 1 year. SEM analyses were performed to classify the failure pattern of beam specimens after BS testing. Etching increased the enamel BS of multimode adhesives; however, BS decreased after storage for 1 year. No significant differences in dentin BS were noted between multimode and control in either evaluation period. Storage for 1 year only reduced the dentin BS for SBU in self-etch mode. TEM analysis identified hybridization and interaction zones in dentin and enamel for all adhesives. Silver impregnation was detected on dentin-resin interfaces after storage of specimens for 1 year only with the SBU and CSB. Storage for 1 year reduced enamel BS when adhesives are applied on etched surface; however, BS of multimode adhesives did not differ from those of the control group. In dentin, no significant difference was noted between the multimode and control group adhesives, regardless of etching mode. In general, multimode adhesives showed similar behavior when compared to traditional adhesive techniques. Multimode adhesives are one-step self-etching adhesives that can also be used after enamel/dentin phosphoric acid etching, but each product may work better in specific conditions.

  3. Enhanced Store-Operated Calcium Entry in Platelets is Associated with Peripheral Artery Disease in Type 2 Diabetes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Weijie Xia

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Background/Aims: Platelet dysfunction plays an important role in thrombosis in diabetes with peripheral artery disease (PAD. Store-operated calcium entry (SOCE and stromal interaction molecule 1 (STIM1 regulate platelet activity by modulating calcium influx. We hypothesized that enhanced SOCE in platelets is associated with diabetes with PAD. Methods: We studied the activity of platelets from healthy participants and from type 2 diabetic patients. Platelet calcium influx and protein expression of STIM1 and sarcoendoplasmic reticulum Ca2+-ATPase 3 (SERCA3 were investigated. Results: Compared with platelets from diabetic patients without PAD, platelets from diabetic patients with PAD exhibited significantly increased SOCE . Menthol administration completely inhibited calcium influx in platelets from diabetic patients without PAD, but this effect was blunted in those from diabetic patients with PAD. Furthermore, the increase in SOCE was correlated with the ankle brachial index (ABI in diabetic patients. High glucose significantly up-regulated STIM1 and SERCA3 protein expression and induced the phosphorylation of phospholipase C (PLC in platelets from healthy participants. This effect was attenuated in the presence of menthol or U73122, an inhibitor of PLC. Similarly, significant increases in STIM1 and SERCA3 protein expression were found in platelets from diabetic patients compared to those from healthy participants. Conclusion: Platelets from diabetic patients with PAD exhibited enhanced Store-operated calcium influx, which was associated with elevated STIM1/SERCA3 expression via a PLC-dependent pathway and was inhibited by menthol.

  4. Radiation-curable adhesives

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Woods, J.G.

    1992-01-01

    Radiation-curable adhesives may be classified into two broad categories. In the first category, adhesive bonding occurs as a direct result of irradiation. The second category includes pressure-sensitive and hot-melt adhesives, which are composed of linear or lightly cross-linked polymers prepared by a radiation-induced polymerization reaction. This chapter is mainly concerned with radiation-curable adhesives of the first category. The various adhesive types are discussed and adhesive performance is examined, particularly in relation to the chemistry and chemical technology which underlies the individual materials. A description of a limited number of representative applications is included as is an outline of recent developments of curing and dispensing equipment. 268 refs., 14 figs., 13 tabs

  5. The adhesive strength and initial viscosity of denture adhesives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Jian-Min; Hong, Guang; Dilinuer, Maimaitishawuti; Lin, Hong; Zheng, Gang; Wang, Xin-Zhi; Sasaki, Keiichi

    2014-11-01

    To examine the initial viscosity and adhesive strength of modern denture adhesives in vitro. Three cream-type denture adhesives (Poligrip S, Corect Cream, Liodent Cream; PGS, CRC, LDC) and three powder-type denture adhesives (Poligrip Powder, New Faston, Zanfton; PGP, FSN, ZFN) were used in this study. The initial viscosity was measured using a controlled-stress rheometer. The adhesive strength was measured according to ISO-10873 recommended procedures. All data were analyzed independently by one-way analysis of variance combined with a Student-Newman-Keuls multiple comparison test at a 5% level of significance. The initial viscosity of all the cream-type denture adhesives was lower than the powder-type adhesives. Before immersion in water, all the powder-type adhesives exhibited higher adhesive strength than the cream-type adhesives. However, the adhesive strength of cream-type denture adhesives increased significantly and exceeded the powder-type denture adhesives after immersion in water. For powder-type adhesives, the adhesive strength significantly decreased after immersion in water for 60 min, while the adhesive strength of the cream-type adhesives significantly decreased after immersion in water for 180 min. Cream-type denture adhesives have lower initial viscosity and higher adhesive strength than powder type adhesives, which may offer better manipulation properties and greater efficacy during application.

  6. Inhibitory effects of total saponin from Korean Red Ginseng on [Ca2+]i mobilization through phosphorylation of cyclic adenosine monophosphate-dependent protein kinase catalytic subunit and inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate receptor type I in human platelets

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jung-Hae Shin

    2015-10-01

    Conclusion: These results strongly indicate that KRG-TS is a potent beneficial compound that inhibits [Ca2+]i mobilization in thrombin–platelet interactions, which may result in the prevention of platelet aggregation-mediated thrombotic disease.

  7. Synaptic Cell Adhesion

    OpenAIRE

    Missler, Markus; Südhof, Thomas C.; Biederer, Thomas

    2012-01-01

    Chemical synapses are asymmetric intercellular junctions that mediate synaptic transmission. Synaptic junctions are organized by trans-synaptic cell adhesion molecules bridging the synaptic cleft. Synaptic cell adhesion molecules not only connect pre- and postsynaptic compartments, but also mediate trans-synaptic recognition and signaling processes that are essential for the establishment, specification, and plasticity of synapses. A growing number of synaptic cell adhesion molecules that inc...

  8. In vitro function of random donor platelets stored for 7 days in composol platelet additive solution

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gupta Ashish

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Background and Aim: Platelets are routinely isolated from whole blood and stored in plasma for 5 days. The present study was done to assess the in vitro function of random donor platelets stored for 7 days in composol platelet additive solution at 22°C. Materials and Methods: The study sample included 30 blood donors of both sex in State Blood Bank, CSM Medical University, Lucknow. Random donor platelets were prepared by platelet rich plasma method. Whole blood (350 ml was collected in anticoagulant Citrate Phosphate Dextrose Adenine triple blood bags. Random donor platelets were stored for 7 days at 22°C in platelet incubators and agitators, with and without additive solution. Results: Platelet swirling was present in all the units at 22°C on day 7, with no evidence of bacterial contamination. Comparison of the mean values of platelet count, platelet factor 3, lactate dehydrogenase, pH, glucose and platelet aggregation showed no significant difference in additive solution, whereas platelet factor 3, glucose and platelet aggregation showed significant difference (P < 0.001 on day 7 without additive solution at 22°C. Conclusion: Our study infers that platelet viability and aggregation were best maintained within normal levels on day 7 of storage in platelet additive solution at 22°C. Thus, we may conclude that in vitro storage of random donor platelets with an extended shelf life of 7 days using platelet additive solution may be advocated to improve the inventory of platelets.

  9. Platelet-derived growth factor inhibits platelet activation in heparinized whole blood.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Selheim, F; Holmsen, H; Vassbotn, F S

    1999-08-15

    We previously have demonstrated that human platelets have functionally active platelet-derived growth factor alpha-receptors. Studies with gel-filtered platelets showed that an autocrine inhibition pathway is transduced through this tyrosine kinase receptor during platelet activation. The physiological significance of this inhibitory effect of platelet-derived growth factor on gel-filtered platelets activation is, however, not known. In the present study, we investigated whether platelet-derived growth factor inhibits platelet activation under more physiological conditions in heparinized whole blood, which represents a more physiological condition than gel-filtered platelets. Using flow cytometric assays, we demonstrate here that platelet-derived growth factor inhibits thrombin-, thrombin receptor agonist peptide SFLLRN-, and collagen-induced platelet aggregation and shedding of platelet-derived microparticles from the platelet plasma membrane during platelet aggregation in stirred heparinized whole blood. The inhibitory effect of platelet-derived growth factor was dose dependent. However, under nonaggregating conditions (no stirring), we could not demonstrate any significant effect of platelet-derived growth factor on thrombin- and thrombin receptor agonist peptide-induced platelet surface expression of P-selectin. Our results demonstrate that platelet-derived growth factor appears to be a true antithrombotic agent only under aggregating conditions in heparinized whole blood.

  10. Reversible Thermoset Adhesives

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mac Murray, Benjamin C. (Inventor); Tong, Tat H. (Inventor); Hreha, Richard D. (Inventor)

    2016-01-01

    Embodiments of a reversible thermoset adhesive formed by incorporating thermally-reversible cross-linking units and a method for making the reversible thermoset adhesive are provided. One approach to formulating reversible thermoset adhesives includes incorporating dienes, such as furans, and dienophiles, such as maleimides, into a polymer network as reversible covalent cross-links using Diels Alder cross-link formation between the diene and dienophile. The chemical components may be selected based on their compatibility with adhesive chemistry as well as their ability to undergo controlled, reversible cross-linking chemistry.

  11. Development of Antifouling and Bactericidal Coatings for Platelet Storage Bags Using Dopamine Chemistry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hadjesfandiari, Narges; Weinhart, Marie; Kizhakkedathu, Jayachandran N; Haag, Rainer; Brooks, Donald E

    2018-03-01

    Platelets have a limited shelf life, due to the risk of bacterial contamination and platelet quality loss. Most platelet storage bags are made of a mixture of polyvinyl chloride with a plasticizer, denoted as pPVC. To improve biocompatibility of pPVC with platelets and to inhibit bacterial biofilm formation, an antifouling polymer coating is developed using mussel-inspired chemistry. A copolymer of N,N-dimethylacrylamide and N-(3-aminopropyl)methacrylamide hydrochloride is synthesized and coupled with catechol groups, named DA51-cat. Under mild aqueous conditions, pPVC is first equilibrated with an anchoring polydopamine layer, followed by a DA51-cat layer. Measurements show this coating decreases fibrinogen adsorption to 5% of the control surfaces. One-step coating with DA51-cat does not coat pPVC efficiently although it is sufficient for coating silicon wafers and gold substrates. The dual layer coating on platelet bags resists bacterial biofilm formation and considerably decreases platelet adhesion. A cationic antimicrobial peptide, E6, is conjugated to DA51-cat then coated on silicon wafers and introduces bactericidal activity to these surfaces. Time-of-flight second ion-mass spectroscopy is successfully applied to characterize these surfaces. pPVC is widely used in medical devices; this method provides an approach to controlling biofouling and bacterial growth on it without elaborate surface modification procedures. © 2017 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  12. The effect of platelet lysate supplementation of a dextran-based hydrogel on cartilage formation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moreira Teixeira, Liliana S; Leijten, Jeroen C H; Wennink, Jos W H; Chatterjea, Anindita G; Feijen, Jan; van Blitterswijk, Clemens A; Dijkstra, Pieter J; Karperien, Marcel

    2012-05-01

    In situ gelating dextran-tyramine (Dex-TA) injectable hydrogels have previously shown promising features for cartilage repair. Yet, despite suitable mechanical properties, this system lacks intrinsic biological signals. In contrast, platelet lysate-derived hydrogels are rich in growth factors and anti-inflammatory cytokines, but mechanically unstable. We hypothesized that the advantages of these systems may be combined in one hydrogel, which can be easily translated into clinical settings. Platelet lysate was successfully incorporated into Dex-TA polymer solution prior to gelation. After enzymatic crosslinking, rheological and morphological evaluations were performed. Subsequently, the effect of platelet lysate on cell migration, adhesion, proliferation and multi-lineage differentiation was determined. Finally, we evaluated the integration potential of this gel onto osteoarthritis-affected cartilage. The mechanical properties and covalent attachment of Dex-TA to cartilage tissue during in situ gel formation were successfully combined with the advantages of platelet lysate, revealing the potential of this enhanced hydrogel as a cell-free approach. The addition of platelet lysate did not affect the mechanical properties and porosity of Dex-TA hydrogels. Furthermore, platelet lysate derived anabolic growth factors promoted proliferation and triggered chondrogenic differentiation of mesenchymal stromal cells. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Blood clotting and platelets: a delicate balance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Heyns, A. du P.; Loetter, M.G.; Badenhorst, P.N.

    1988-01-01

    The Medical Research Council Blood Platelet Research Unit has studied many of the facets of platelets. The research highlights of the Unit include the following: the identification of ADPase, an enzyme found in the blood vessel wall, which breaks down adenosine diphospate (ADP) to adenosine, and which inhibits platelet aggregation; the determination of the relationship between the biochemical activity of the vessel wall with the development of atherosclerosis; the development of a method to label platelets with the compound In-111-oxine; the use of labelled platelets to study platelets in the spleen: an investigation of the life-span of platelets, which revealed how aged platelets are removed from circulation, and recently a study of methods to demonstrate in vivo activation of platelets. 1 fig

  14. TgrC1 mediates cell-cell adhesion by interacting with TgrB1 via mutual IPT/TIG domains during development of Dictyostelium discoideum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Gong; Wang, Jun; Xu, Xiaoqun; Wu, Xiangfu; Piao, Ruihan; Siu, Chi-Hung

    2013-06-01

    Cell-cell adhesion plays crucial roles in cell differentiation and morphogenesis during development of Dictyostelium discoideum. The heterophilic adhesion protein TgrC1 (Tgr is transmembrane, IPT, IG, E-set, repeat protein) is expressed during cell aggregation, and disruption of the tgrC1 gene results in the arrest of development at the loose aggregate stage. We have used far-Western blotting coupled with MS to identify TgrB1 as the heterophilic binding partner of TgrC1. Co-immunoprecipitation and pull-down studies showed that TgrB1 and TgrC1 are capable of binding with each other in solution. TgrB1 and TgrC1 are encoded by a pair of adjacent genes which share a common promoter. Both TgrB1 and TgrC1 are type I transmembrane proteins, which contain three extracellular IPT/TIG (immunoglobulin, plexin, transcription factor-like/transcription factor immunoglobulin) domains. Antibodies raised against TgrB1 inhibit cell reassociation at the post-aggregation stage of development and block fruiting body formation. Ectopic expression of TgrB1 and TgrC1 driven by the actin15 promoter leads to heterotypic cell aggregation of vegetative cells. Using recombinant proteins that cover different portions of TgrB1 and TgrC1 in binding assays, we have mapped the cell-binding regions in these two proteins to Lys(537)-Ala(783) in TgrB1 and Ile(336)-Val(360) in TgrC1, corresponding to their respective TIG3 and TIG2 domain.

  15. N-terminal sequence of human leukocyte glycoprotein Mo1: conservation across species and homology to platelet IIb/IIIa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pierce, M W; Remold-O'Donnell, E; Todd, R F; Arnaout, M A

    1986-12-12

    Mo1 and gp160-gp93 are two surface membrane glycoprotein heterodimers present on granulocytes and monocytes derived from humans and guinea pigs, respectively. We purified both antigens and found that their alpha subunits had identical N-termini which were significantly homologous to the alpha subunit of the human adhesion platelet glycoprotein IIb/IIIa.

  16. Adherence of platelets to in situ albumin-binding surfaces under flow conditions: role of surface-adsorbed albumin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guha Thakurta, Sanjukta; Miller, Robert; Subramanian, Anuradha

    2012-01-01

    Surfaces that preferentially bind human serum albumin (HSA) were generated by grafting albumin-binding linear peptide (LP1) onto silicon surfaces. The research aim was to evaluate the adsorption pattern of proteins and the adhesion of platelets from platelet-poor plasma and platelet-rich plasma, respectively, by albumin-binding surfaces under physiological shear rate (96 and 319 s −1 ) conditions. Bound proteins were quantified using enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays (ELISAs) and two-dimensional gel electrophoresis. A ratio of ∼1000:100:1 of adsorbed HSA, human immunoglobulin (HIgG) and human fibrinogen (HFib) was noted, respectively, on LP1-functionalized surfaces, and a ratio of ∼5:2:1 of the same was noted on control surfaces, as confirmed by ELISAs. The surface-adsorbed von Willebrand factor was undetectable by sensitive ELISAs. The amount of adhered platelets correlated with the ratio of adsorbed HSA/HFib. Platelet morphology was more rounded on LP1-functionalized surfaces when compared to control surfaces. The platelet adhesion response on albumin-binding surfaces can be explained by the reduction in the co-adsorption of other plasma proteins in a surface environment where there is an excess of albumin molecules, coupled with restrictions in the conformational transitions of other surface-adsorbed proteins into hemostatically active forms. (paper)

  17. Platelet-rich fibrin: a boon in regenerative endodontics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rebentish, Priyanka D; Umashetty, Girish; Kaur, Harpreet; Doizode, Trupthi; Kaslekar, Mithun; Chowdhury, Shouvik

    2016-12-01

    Research into regenerative dentistry has contributed momentum to the field of molecular biology. Periapical surgery aims at removing periapical pathology to achieve complete wound healing and regeneration of bone and periodontal tissue. Regenerative endodontic procedures are widely being added to the current armamentarium of pulp therapy procedures. The regenerative potential of platelets has been deliberated. Platelet-rich fibrin (PRF) is a wonderful tissue-engineering product and has recently gained much popularity due its promising results in wound healing bone induction. The features of this product are an attribute of platelets which, after cellular interactions, release growth factors and have shown application in diverse disciplines of dentistry. This paper is intended to shed light onto the various prospects of PRF and to provide clinical insight into regenerative endodontic therapy.

  18. Molecular mechanisms of platelet P2Y(12) receptor regulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cunningham, Margaret R; Nisar, Shaista P; Mundell, Stuart J

    2013-02-01

    Platelets are critical for haemostasis, however inappropriate activation can lead to the development of arterial thrombosis, which can result in heart attack and stroke. ADP is a key platelet agonist that exerts its actions via stimulation of two surface GPCRs (G-protein-coupled receptors), P2Y(1) and P2Y(12). Similar to most GPCRs, P2Y receptor activity is tightly regulated by a number of complex mechanisms including receptor desensitization, internalization and recycling. In the present article, we review the molecular mechanisms that underlie P2Y(1) and P2Y(12) receptor regulation, with particular emphasis on the structural motifs within the P2Y(12) receptor, which are required to maintain regulatory protein interaction. The implications of these findings for platelet responsiveness are also discussed.

  19. Adhesive compositions and methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allen, Scott D.; Sendijarevic, Vahid; O'Connor, James

    2017-12-05

    The present invention encompasses polyurethane adhesive compositions comprising aliphatic polycarbonate chains. In one aspect, the present invention encompasses polyurethane adhesives derived from aliphatic polycarbonate polyols and polyisocyanates wherein the polyol chains contain a primary repeating unit having a structure:. In another aspect, the invention provides articles comprising the inventive polyurethane compositions as well as methods of making such compositions.

  20. Soy protein adhesives

    Science.gov (United States)

    Charles R. Frihart

    2010-01-01

    In the quest to manufacture and use building materials that are more environmentally friendly, soy adhesives can be an important component. Trees fix and store carbon dioxide in the atmosphere. After the trees are harvested, machinery converts the wood into strands, which are then bonded together with adhesives to form strandboard, used in constructing long-lasting...

  1. The use of quartz crystal microbalance with dissipation (QCM-D) for studying nanoparticle-induced platelet aggregation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santos-Martinez, Maria Jose; Inkielewicz-Stepniak, Iwona; Medina, Carlos; Rahme, Kamil; D’Arcy, Deirdre M; Fox, Daniel; Holmes, Justin D; Zhang, Hongzhou; Radomski, Marek Witold

    2012-01-01

    Interactions between blood platelets and nanoparticles have both pharmacological and toxicological significance and may lead to platelet activation and aggregation. Platelet aggregation is usually studied using light aggregometer that neither mimics the conditions found in human microvasculature nor detects microaggregates. A new method for the measurement of platelet microaggregation under flow conditions using a commercially available quartz crystal microbalance with dissipation (QCM-D) has recently been developed. The aim of the current study was to investigate if QCM-D could be used for the measurement of nanoparticle-platelet interactions. Silica, polystyrene, and gold nanoparticles were tested. The interactions were also studied using light aggregometry and flow cytometry, which measured surface abundance of platelet receptors. Platelet activation was imaged using phase contrast and scanning helium ion microscopy. QCM-D was able to measure nanoparticle-induced platelet microaggregation for all nanoparticles tested at concentrations that were undetectable by light aggregometry and flow cytometry. Microaggregates were measured by changes in frequency and dissipation, and the presence of platelets on the sensor surface was confirmed and imaged by phase contrast and scanning helium ion microscopy. PMID:22275839

  2. Extended Storage of Pathogen-Reduced Platelet Concentrates (PRECON)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-12-01

    transfusion. Our project proposes to determine the efficacy of using a pathogen inactivation technique (Mirasol) coupled with a platelet additive solution (PAS...technology, platelet additive solution, platelet recovery and survival, platelet storage, platelet storage solution, platelets, thrombocytopenia, transfusion...Platelets Report to 2017 Military Health System Research Symposium ……………………………………………………………….. 29 Extended Storage of Pathogen-Reduced Platelet Concentrates

  3. Effect of losartan on human platelet activation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guerra-Cuesta, J I; Montón, M; Rodríguez-Feo, J A; Jiménez, A M; González-Fernández, F; Rico, L A; García, R; Gómez, J; Farré, J; Casado, S; López-Farré, A

    1999-03-01

    Previous studies have demonstrated that losartan can block the thromboxane A2 receptor on the vascular wall. The aim of the present study was to assess the effect of losartan on human platelet activation. Platelets were obtained from 15 healthy men, aged 26-40 years. Platelet activation was measured by changes in the light transmission of platelet-rich plasma stimulated by the thromboxane A2 analog U46619 (5 x 10(-6) mol/l) or ADP (10(-5) mol/l). U46619-stimulated platelet aggregation was significantly inhibited by losartan in a dose-dependent manner. Only a high dose of EXP 3174 (5 x 10(-5) mol/l), the in vivo active metabolite of losartan, was able to attenuate U46619-induced platelet activation. Captopril, an angiotensin I converting inhibitor, failed to modify U46619-induced platelet aggregation. Furthermore, the binding of [3H]-U46619 to platelets was competitively inhibited by losartan, whereas only a high dose of EXP 3174 reduced the binding of [3H]-U46619. Captopril failed to modify the binding of [3H]-U46619 to platelets. Losartan also reduced the platelet activation induced by ADP (10(-5) mol/l), a platelet agonist partially dependent on thromboxane A2. In addition, when thromboxane A2 generation was blocked by aspirin, ADP-induced platelet aggregation was inhibited to a similar degree to the inhibition induced by losartan. Exogenous angiotensin II did not elicit any modification of either U46619- or ADP-stimulated platelet aggregation. Losartan decreased platelet aggregation by a thromboxane A2-dependent mechanism. EXP 3174 was less potent than losartan in reducing thromboxane A2-dependent platelet activation. Captopril and exogenous angiotensin II had no effect on human platelet activation. These results suggest that losartan reduced thromboxane A2-dependent platelet activation independently of its effect on angiotensin II.

  4. Heterogeneity of Focal Adhesions and Focal Contacts in Motile Fibroblasts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gladkikh, Aleena; Kovaleva, Anastasia; Tvorogova, Anna; Vorobjev, Ivan A

    2018-01-01

    Cell-extracellular matrix (ECM) adhesion is an important property of virtually all cells in multicellular organisms. Cell-ECM adhesion studies, therefore, are very significant both for biology and medicine. Over the last three decades, biomedical studies resulted in a tremendous advance in our understanding of the molecular basis and functions of cell-ECM adhesion. Based on morphological and molecular criteria, several different types of model cell-ECM adhesion structures including focal adhesions, focal complexes, fibrillar adhesions, podosomes, and three-dimensional matrix adhesions have been described. All the subcellular structures that mediate cell-ECM adhesion are quite heterogeneous, often varying in size, shape, distribution, dynamics, and, to a certain extent, molecular constituents. The morphological "plasticity" of cell-ECM adhesion perhaps reflects the needs of cells to sense, adapt, and respond to a variety of extracellular environments. In addition, cell type (e.g., differentiation status, oncogenic transformation, etc.) often exerts marked influence on the structure of cell-ECM adhesions. Although molecular, genetic, biochemical, and structural studies provide important maps or "snapshots" of cell-ECM adhesions, the area of research that is equally valuable is to study the heterogeneity of FA subpopulations within cells. Recently time-lapse observations on the FA dynamics become feasible, and behavior of individual FA gives additional information on cell-ECM interactions. Here we describe a robust method of labeling of FA using plasmids with fluorescent markers for paxillin and vinculin and quantifying the morphological and dynamical parameters of FA.

  5. Proteomics of apheresis platelet supernatants during routine storage: Gender-related differences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dzieciatkowska, Monika; D'Alessandro, Angelo; Burke, Timothy A; Kelher, Marguerite R; Moore, Ernest E; Banerjee, Anirban; Silliman, Christopher C; West, Bernadette F; Hansen, Kirk C

    2015-01-01

    Proteomics has identified potential pathways involved in platelet storage lesions, which correlate with untoward effects in the recipient, including febrile non-haemolytic reactions. We hypothesize that an additional pathway involves protein mediators that accumulate in the platelet supernatants during routine storage in a donor gender-specific fashion. Apheresis platelet concentrates were collected from 5 healthy males and 5 females and routinely stored. The 14 most abundant plasma proteins were removed and the supernatant proteins from days 1 and 5 were analyzed via 1D-SDS-PAGE/nanoLC-MS/MS, before label-free quantitative proteomics analyses. Findings from a subset of 18 proteins were validated via LC-SRM analyses against stable isotope labeled standards. A total of 503 distinct proteins were detected in the platelet supernatants from the 4 sample groups: female or male donor platelets, either at storage day 1 or 5. Proteomics suggested a storage and gender-dependent impairment of blood coagulation mediators, pro-inflammatory complement components and cytokines, energy and redox metabolic enzymes. The supernatants from female donors demonstrated increased deregulation of structural proteins, extracellular matrix proteins and focal adhesion proteins, possibly indicating storage-dependent platelet activation. Routine storage of platelet concentrates induces changes in the supernatant proteome, which may have effects on the transfused patient, some of which are related to donor gender. The rationale behind this study is that protein components in platelet releasates have been increasingly observed to play a key role in adverse events and impaired homeostasis in transfused recipients. In this view, proteomics has recently emerged as a functional tool to address the issue of protein composition of platelet releasates from buffy coat-derived platelet concentrates in the blood bank. Despite early encouraging studies on buffy coat-derived platelet concentrates, platelet

  6. Epoxy Nanocomposites - Curing Rheokinetics, Wetting and Adhesion to Fibers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ilyin, S. O.; Kotomin, S. V.; Kulichikhin, V. G.

    2010-01-01

    Epoxy nanocomposites considered as challenging polymeric matrix for advanced reinforced plastics. Nanofillers change rheokinetics of epoxy resin curing, affect wetting and adhesion to aramid and carbon fibers. In all cases extreme dependence of adhesive strength vs filler content in the binder was observed. New experimental techniques were developed to study wettability and fiber-matrix adhesion interaction, using yarn penetration path length, aramid fiber knot pull-up test and electrical admittance of the fracture surface of CFRP.

  7. Acetylated Rhamnogalacturonans from Immature Fruits of Abelmoschus esculentus Inhibit the Adhesion of Helicobacter pylori to Human Gastric Cells by Interaction with Outer Membrane Proteins

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christian Thöle

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Polysaccharide containing extracts from immature fruits of okra (Abelmoschus esculentus are known to exhibit antiadhesive effects against bacterial adhesion of Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori to stomach tissue. The present study investigates structural and functional features of polymers responsible for this inhibition of bacterial attachment to host cells. Ammonium sulfate precipitation of an aqueous extract yielded two fractions at 60% and 90% saturation with significant antiadhesive effects against H. pylori, strain J99, (FE60% 68% ± 15%; FE90% 75% ± 11% inhibition rates after preincubation of the bacteria at 1 mg/mL. Sequential extraction of okra fruits yielded hot buffer soluble solids (HBSS with dose dependent antiadhesive effects against strain J99 and three clinical isolates. Preincubation of H. pylori with HBSS (1 mg/mL led to reduced binding to 3ʹ-sialyl lactose, sialylated Lea and Lex. A reduction of bacterial binding to ligands complementary to BabA and SabA was observed when bacteria were pretreated with FE90%. Structural analysis of the antiadhesive polysaccharides (molecular weight, monomer composition, linkage analysis, stereochemistry, and acetylation indicated the presence of acetylated rhamnogalacturonan-I polymers, decorated with short galactose side chains. Deacetylation of HBSS and FE90% resulted in loss of the antiadhesive activity, indicating esterification being a prerequisite for antiadhesive activity.

  8. Evaluation of platelet aggregation in platelet concentrates: storage implications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Neiva Teresinha J.C.

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available The use of hemo-derivatives is nowadays a fundamentally important therapeutic modality in the exercise of medicine. Among the various hemo-components employed, we have the platelet concentrate (PC, indicated in cases of hemorrhagic disturbances. We previously showed that platelet function in blood donors is reduced in their screening phase and after the separation process of PCs. Currently, we are providing evidence for the existence of biochemical and functional changes in PC preparations stored for three days at temperatures of 20 ± 2 ºC. Platelet concentrates from 40 healthy donors, collected in CPD anticoagulant and PL-146 polyvinylchloride containers, were examined in order to determine the pH value, pCO2 ,pO2 and lactate concentrations. In addition, the aggregation of platelets with thrombin and collagen were examined to evaluate platelet function. A pH increase from 7.07 ± 0.04 to 7.36 ± 0.07 (p < 0.01 was observed. The pCO2 concentration decreased progressively from 69.2 ± 7.7 mmHg to 28.8 ± 6.2 mmHg (p < 0.001 during the storage period. In contrast, pO2 value increase from 103.4 ± 30.6 to 152.3 ± 24.6 mmHg (p < 0.001 was evidenced during the 48 hours of storage. The lactate concentration increased from 17.97 ± 5.2 to 57.21 ± 5.7 mg/dl (p < 0.001. Platelet aggregation using 0.25 U/ml-thrombin and 2.0 µg/ml-collagen showed significant hypofunction from 61.8 ± 2.7% to 24.8 ± 9.8% and 62.7±5.0 to 33.4± 6.2 (p < 0.001, respectively. We concluded that the evaluated biochemical parameters and the platelet function changed significantly when the platelets were kept under routine storage conditions.

  9. The life cycle of platelet granules [version 1; referees: 2 approved

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anish Sharda

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Platelet granules are unique among secretory vesicles in both their content and their life cycle. Platelets contain three major granule types—dense granules, α-granules, and lysosomes—although other granule types have been reported. Dense granules and α-granules are the most well-studied and the most physiologically important. Platelet granules are formed in large, multilobulated cells, termed megakaryocytes, prior to transport into platelets. The biogenesis of dense granules and α-granules involves common but also distinct pathways. Both are formed from the trans-Golgi network and early endosomes and mature in multivesicular bodies, but the formation of dense granules requires trafficking machinery different from that of α-granules. Following formation in the megakaryocyte body, both granule types are transported through and mature in long proplatelet extensions prior to the release of nascent platelets into the bloodstream. Granules remain stored in circulating platelets until platelet activation triggers the exocytosis of their contents. Soluble N-ethylmaleimide-sensitive factor attachment protein receptor (SNARE proteins, located on both the granules and target membranes, provide the mechanical energy that enables membrane fusion during both granulogenesis and exocytosis. The function of these core fusion engines is controlled by SNARE regulators, which direct the site, timing, and extent to which these SNAREs interact and consequently the resulting membrane fusion. In this review, we assess new developments in the study of platelet granules, from their generation to their exocytosis.

  10. Analysis of angiotensin II binding to human platelets: Differences in young and old subjects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Siebers, M.J.; Goodfriend, T.L.; Ball, D.; Elliott, M.E.

    1990-01-01

    We examined the binding of radiolabeled angiotensin II (AII) to human platelets to characterize the apparent increase in AII receptors observed in older subjects. At 22 degrees C, the amount of radioactivity associated with platelets from older subjects increased continuously for more than 2 hours. The same amount of radioactivity was displaced by addition of unlabeled AII at 30 min and 60 min. In the presence of phenylarsine oxide, in the cold, or when labeled antagonist was the ligand, binding came to equilibrium by 30 min. High pressure liquid chromatography demonstrated that 125 I-AII was the major radioactive compound in the supernatant and platelets after incubation, but the platelets also contained radiolabeled AII fragments. Thus, some degradation accompanied interaction of AII and platelets. Phenylarsine oxide did not prevent degradation of bound AII, suggesting that degradation precedes internalization. On average, maximum binding was greater in older subjects whether platelets were incubated with 125 I-AII alone, with 125 I-AII and phenylarsine oxide to prevent internalization, or when the competitive inhibitor 125 I-sar1,ile8-AII was the radioligand. Variability of binding among subjects also increased with age. Thus, platelets bind, degrade, and internalize AII, and the three processes occur to a greater extent in platelets from some, but not all older subjects

  11. Presence of intratumoral platelets is associated with tumor vessel structure and metastasis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li, Rong; Zhang, Xu; Zhang, Zhuo; Zhang, Xiao; Ran, Bing; Wu, Jianbo; Ren, Meiping; Chen, Ni; Luo, Mao; Deng, Xin; Xia, Jiyi; Yu, Guang; Liu, Jinbo; He, Bing

    2014-01-01

    Platelets play a fundamental role in maintaining hemostasis and have been shown to participate in hematogenous dissemination of tumor cells. Abundant platelets were detected in the tumor microenvironment outside of the blood vessel, thus, platelet -tumor cell interaction outside of the bloodstream may play a role in regulating primary tumor growth and metastasis initiation. However, it is unclear that platelet depletion affects tumor vessel structure and dynamics. Using thrombocytopenia induction in two different tumor-bearing mouse models, tumor tissues were performed by Westernblotting and immunohistochemical staining. Vascular permeability was evaluated by determination of intratumoral Evans blue and Miles vascular permeability assay. Furthermore, microdialysis was used to examining the intratumoral extracellular angiogenic growth factors (VEGF, TGF-β) by ELISA. Platelet depletion showed no change in tumor growth and reduced lung metastasis. Platelet depletion led to reduced tumor hypoxia and Met receptor activation and was associated with a decreased release of MMP-2, 9, PAI-1, VEGF, and TGF-β. Tumor vessels in platelet-depleted mice showed impaired vessel density and maturation. Our findings demonstrate that platelets within the primary tumor microenvironment play a critical role in the induction of vascular permeability and initiation of tumor metastasis

  12. Multiple alterations of platelet functions dominated by increased secretion in mice lacking Cdc42 in platelets

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pleines, Irina; Eckly, Anita; Elvers, Margitta

    2010-01-01

    formation and exocytosis in various cell types, but its exact function in platelets is not established. Here, we show that the megakaryocyte/platelet-specific loss of Cdc42 leads to mild thrombocytopenia and a small increase in platelet size in mice. Unexpectedly, Cdc42-deficient platelets were able to form...

  13. Interaction with glycosaminoglycans is required for cyclophilin B to trigger integrin-mediated adhesion of peripheral blood T lymphocytes to extracellular matrix

    OpenAIRE

    Allain, Fabrice; Vanpouille, Christophe; Carpentier, Mathieu; Slomianny, Marie-Christine; Durieux, Sandrine; Spik, Geneviève

    2002-01-01

    Cyclophilins A and B (CyPA and CyPB) are cyclosporin A-binding proteins that are involved in inflammatory events. We have reported that CyPB interacts with two types of cell-surface-binding sites. The first site corresponds to a functional receptor and requires interaction with the central core of CyPB. This region is highly conserved in cyclophilins, suggesting that CyPA and CyPB might share biological activities mediated by interaction with this receptor. The second site is identified with ...

  14. Encapsulation of Clay Platelets inside Latex Particles

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Voorn, D.J.; Ming, W.; Herk, van A.M.; Fernando, R.H.; Sung, Li-Piin

    2009-01-01

    We present our recent attempts in encapsulating clay platelets inside latex particles by emulsion polymerization. Face modification of clay platelets by cationic exchange has been shown to be insufficient for clay encapsulation, leading to armored latex particles. Successful encapsulation of

  15. Prolonged platelet preservation by transient metabolic suppression

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Badlou, Bahram Alamdary

    2006-01-01

    Introduction: Different clinical studies have shown that transfusion of stored platelets results in better haemostasis in patients with thrombocytopenia with and without a platelet function defect. Objectives: Current preservation procedures aim to optimally preserve the metabolic status of

  16. Physics of adhesion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gerberich, W W; Cordill, M J

    2006-01-01

    Adhesion physics was relegated to the lowest echelons of academic pursuit until the advent of three seemingly disconnected events. The first, atomic force microscopy (AFM), eventually allowed fine-scale measurement of adhesive point contacts. The second, large-scale computational materials science, now permits both hierarchical studies of a few thousand atoms from first principles or of billions of atoms with less precise interatomic potentials. The third is a microelectronics industry push towards the nanoscale which has provided the driving force for requiring a better understanding of adhesion physics. In the present contribution, an attempt is made at conjoining these separate events into an updating of how theoretical and experimental approaches are providing new understanding of adhesion physics. While all material couples are briefly considered, the emphasis is on metal/semiconductor and metal/ceramic interfaces. Here, adhesion energies typically range from 1 to 100 J m -2 where the larger value is considered a practical work of adhesion. Experimental emphasis is on thin-film de-adhesion for 10 to 1000 nm thick films. For comparison, theoretical approaches from first principles quantum mechanics to embedded atom methods used in multi-scale modelling are utilized

  17. Toward the Relevance of Platelet Subpopulations for Transfusion Medicine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stefan Handtke

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Circulating platelets consist of subpopulations with different age, maturation state and size. In this review, we address the association between platelet size and platelet function and summarize the current knowledge on platelet subpopulations including reticulated platelets, procoagulant platelets and platelets exposing signals to mediate their clearance. Thereby, we emphasize the impact of platelet turnover as an important condition for platelet production in vivo. Understanding of the features that characterize platelet subpopulations is very relevant for the methods of platelet concentrate production, which may enrich or deplete particular platelet subpopulations. Moreover, the concept of platelet size being associated with platelet function may be attractive for transfusion medicine as it holds the perspective to separate platelet subpopulations with specific functional capabilities.

  18. Potential fluid mechanic pathways of platelet activation

    OpenAIRE

    Shadden, Shawn C.; Hendabadi, Sahar

    2012-01-01

    Platelet activation is a precursor for blood clotting, which plays leading roles in many vascular complications and causes of death. Platelets can be activated by chemical or mechanical stimuli. Mechanically, platelet activation has been shown to be a function of elevated shear stress and exposure time. These contributions can be combined by considering the cumulative stress or strain on a platelet as it is transported. Here we develop a framework for computing a hemodynamic-based activation ...

  19. Platelet activation in outpatients undergoing esophagogastroduodenoscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sagripanti, A.; Polloni, A.; Materazzi, F.; Ferdeghini, M.; Pinori, E.; Bianchi, R.

    1989-01-01

    To evaluate the influence of emotional stress on platelet function mesured by radioimmunoassay in plasma two platelet factor 4, in a series of outpatients undergoing esophagogastroduodenoscopy for upper digestive complaints has been measured. The plasma levels of β-thromboglobulin and platelet factor 4, determined just before the instrumental examination, were significantly more elevated as compared to basal values, checked a week later. These results provide evidence of enhanced in vivo platelet release reaction during emotional stress

  20. Further studies on the relationship between platelet buoyant density and platelet age

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boneu, B.; Vigoni, F.; Boneu, A.; Caranobe, C.; Sie, P.

    1982-01-01

    The relationship between platelet buoyant density and platelet age was investigated in eight human subjects submitted to an autologous chromium labeled platelet survival study. Platelets were isolated after isopycnic centrifugation using eight discontinuous isoosmotic stractan gradients (five subjects), or various continuous and linear isoosmolar gradients (three subjects). A paradoxical radioactivity enrichment of the dense platelets and a premature loss of radioactivity in the light platelets were observed. These results are explained by a shift of the radioactivity distribution curve toward higher densities during the 3-4 days after platelet injection, while the standard deviation of the distribution was conserved throughout the platelet life span. These results suggest that young platelets are heterogeneous and slightly less dense than the total platelet population

  1. Selection of donor platelets for alloimmunized patients using a platelet-associated IgG assay

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Myers, T.J.; Kim, B.K.; Steiner, M.; Baldini, M.G.

    1981-01-01

    A quantitative immunofluorescence platelet-associated immunoglobulin-G (PA-IgG) assay was used to detect alloimmunity to platelets in 8/12 multitransfused patients and to perform platelet crossmatching in the 8 alloimmunized patients. The correct separation of multitransfused patients into alloimmune and nonalloimmune groups was substantiated with chromium-51-labeled platelet survival studies. For 5 alloimmunized patients, compatible and incompatible donor platelets were demonstrated by PA-IgG crossmatching and were confirmed by platelet survival studies. With the other 3 alloimmunized patients, only Pa-IgG incompatible donor platelets were found. Survival studies with 5 of these incompatible donor platelets showed markedly reduced survival times on 4 occasions. Pa-IgG compatible donor platelets survived 3.5 to 8.7 days, while Pa-IgG incompatible platelets showed survival times of 0.1 to 2.4 days

  2. Secretory products from thrombin-stimulated human platelets exert an inhibitory effect on NK-cytotoxic activity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Skov Madsen, P; Hokland, P; Hokland, M

    1987-01-01

    We have investigated the interaction between human platelets and the NK-system, with special emphasis on the action of secretory products from platelets in an NK assay with 51Cr-labelled K562 as target cells. Supernatants from thrombin-stimulated platelets added to the NK assay consistently...... decreased the NK-cytotoxicity by 40% +/- 4.3%, indicating the existence of secreted products from platelets as a source of NK-inhibiting substances. In contrast, no direct cytotoxic effect of these secretory products on the target cells (K562) was seen. Thus, normal human platelets, when stimulated...... with thrombin, are capable of secreting different, yet undefined factors, which significantly inhibit NK activity in vitro. The results also suggest that the role of products from contaminating in vitro activated platelets should be borne in mind when performing conventional NK assays. Udgivelsesdato: 1986-Oct...

  3. Mechanism study of endothelial protection and inhibits platelet activation of low molecular weight fucoidan from Laminaria japonica

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Anjin; Zhang, Fang; Shi, Jie; Zhao, Xue; Yan, Meixing

    2016-10-01

    Several studies have indicated that fucoidan fractions with low molecular weight and different sulfate content from Laminaria japonica could inhibit the activation of platelets directly by reducing the platelet aggregation. To explore the direct effect of LMW fucoidan on the platelet system furthermore and examine the possible mechanism, the endothelial protection and inhibits platelet activation effects of two LMW fucoidan were investigated. In the present study, Endothelial injury model of rats was made by injection of adrenaline (0.4 mg kg-1) and human umbilical vein endothelial cells were cultured. vWF level was be investigated in vivo and in vitro as an important index of endothelial injury. LMW fucoidan could significantly reduce vWF level in vascular endothelial injury rats and also significantly reduce vWF level in vitro. The number of EMPs was be detected as another important index of endothelial injury. The results showed that LMW fucoidan reduced EMPs stimulated by tumor necrosis factor. In this study, it was found that by inhibiting platelet adhesion, LMW fucoidan played a role in anti-thrombosis and the specific mechanism of action is to inhibit the flow of extracellular Ca2+. All in a word, LMW fucoidan could inhibit the activation of platelets indirectly by reducing the concentration of EMPs and vWF, at the same time; LMW fucoidan inhibited the activation of platelets directly by inhibiting the flow of extracellular Ca2+.

  4. EB curable laminating adhesives

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matsuyama, Asao; Kobayashi, Masahide; Gotoh, Sakiko

    1992-01-01

    New developed solvent free EB curable laminating adhesives have two liquid components, A with hydroxy and acryloyl group, B with isocyanate and acryloyl group in a molecule. These EB laminating adhesives do not need any aging process, which is a big advantage, and are very suitable for environment, safety, and health because of no heating process and solvent free formulas. And we have made basic research about the relation of peel strength or heat seal strength versus Tg of cured film, elongation at break, elastic modulus, and so on. Basic specifications of the new developed adhesives are shown. (author)

  5. Platelet function testing in pediatric patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hvas, Anne-Mette; Favaloro, Emmanuel J

    2017-01-01

    Introduction: Platelets play a key role in primary hemostasis and are also intricately linked to secondary hemostasis. Investigation of platelet function in children, especially in neonates, is seriously challenged by the volumes required to perform the majority of platelet function tests and due...

  6. Platelet counting using the Coulter electronic counter.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eggleton, M J; Sharp, A A

    1963-03-01

    A method for counting platelets in dilutions of platelet-rich plasm using the Coulter electronic counter is described.(1) The results obtained show that such platelet counts are at least as accurate as the best methods of visual counting. The various technical difficulties encountered are discussed.

  7. Platelet kinetics: the state of the art

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Heyns, A. duP

    1984-01-01

    In this paper an overview of the state of the art of platelet kinetics 1982 is presented. The subjects considered include a discussion of the advantages and disadvantages of some of the many radionuclide platelet labels, viz 51 Cr, 111 In, focussing briefly on models for analysis of platelets survival. (Auth.)

  8. Procoagulant expression in platelets and defects leading to clinical disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Solum, N O

    1999-12-01

    Hemostasis is a result of interactions between fibrillar structures in the damaged vessel wall, soluble components in plasma, and cellular elements in blood represented mainly by platelets and platelet-derived material. During formation of a platelet plug at the damaged vessel wall, factors IXa and VIIIa form the "tenase" complex, leading to activation of factor X on the surface of activated platelets. Subsequently, factors Xa and Va form the "prothrombinase" complex, which catalyzes the formation of thrombin from prothrombin, leading to fibrin formation. An enhanced expression of negatively charged phosphatidylserine in the outer membrane leaflet resulting from a breakdown of the phospholipid asymmetry is essential for the formation of the procoagulant surface. An ATP-driven and inward-acting aminophospholipid "translocase" and a "floppase" counterbalancing this have been postulated to maintain the dynamic state of phospholipid asymmetry. A phospholipid-nonspecific "scramblase," believed to be responsible for the fast breakdown of the asymmetry during cell activation, has recently been isolated from erythrocytes, cloned, and characterized. An intracellular calcium-binding segment and one or more thioesterified fatty acids are probably of importance for calcium-induced activation of this transporter protein. Cytosolic calcium ions also activate the calcium-dependent protease calpain associated with shedding of microvesicles from the transformed platelet membrane. These are shed with a procoagulant surface and with surface-exposed P-selectin from the alpha-granules. Theoretically, therefore, microvesicles can be involved in both coagulation and inflammation. Scott syndrome is probably caused by a defect in the activation of an otherwise normal scramblase, resulting in a relatively severe bleeding tendency. In Stormorken syndrome, the patients demonstrate a spontaneous surface expression of aminophospholipids. Activated platelets and the presence of procoagulant

  9. Platelets in Immune Response to Virus and Immunopathology of Viral Infections

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eugenio D. Hottz

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available Platelets are essential effector cells in hemostasis. Aside from their role in coagulation, platelets are now recognized as major inflammatory cells with key roles in the innate and adaptive arms of the immune system. Activated platelets have key thromboinflammatory functions linking coagulation to immune responses in various infections, including in response to virus. Recent studies have revealed that platelets exhibit several pattern recognition receptors (PRR including those from the toll-like receptor, NOD-like receptor, and C-type lectin receptor family and are first-line sentinels in detecting and responding to pathogens in the vasculature. Here, we review the main mechanisms of platelets interaction with viruses, including their ability to sustain viral infection and replication, their expression of specialized PRR, and activation of thromboinflammatory responses against viruses. Finally, we discuss the role of platelet-derived mediators and platelet interaction with vascular and immune cells in protective and pathophysiologic responses to dengue, influenza, and human immunodeficiency virus 1 infections.

  10. Optimized Baxter model of protein solutions : Electrostatics versus adhesion

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Prinsen, P.; Odijk, T.

    2004-01-01

    A theory is set up of spherical proteins interacting by screened electrostatics and constant adhesion, in which the effective adhesion parameter is optimized by a variational principle for the free energy. An analytical approach to the second virial coefficient is first outlined by balancing the

  11. Structural basis of cell-cell adhesion by NCAM

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kasper, C; Rasmussen, H; Kastrup, Jette Sandholm Jensen

    2000-01-01

    The neural cell adhesion molecule NCAM, a member of the immunoglobulin superfamily, mediates cell-cell recognition and adhesion via a homophilic interaction. NCAM plays a key role during development and regeneration of the nervous system and is involved in synaptic plasticity associated with memory...

  12. Effect of ionizing radiation on platelet function in vitro

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kalovidouris, A.E.; Papayannis, A.G.

    1981-01-01

    The effect of ionizing radiation on platelet function was investigated in vitro. Platelet-rich plasma (300x10 9 /l) was irradiated with doses of 1, 4, 10, 20 and 50 Gy. Platelet function tests were performed on both irradiated and control (non-irradiated) platelet samples. The platelet function tests were (1) platelet aggregation by ADP (1, 2, 4 μmol final concentration), adrenaline and collagen, (2) ADP-release from platelets, (3) clot retraction and (4) platelet factor-3 availability. It was found that roentgen irradiation of platelets in vitro did not affect these platelet function tests. (Auth.)

  13. Optical adhesive property study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sundvold, P.D.

    1996-01-01

    Tests were performed to characterize the mechanical and thermal properties of selected optical adhesives to identify the most likely candidate which could survive the operating environment of the Direct Optical Initiation (DOI) program. The DOI system consists of a high power laser and an optical module used to split the beam into a number of channels to initiate the system. The DOI requirements are for a high shock environment which current military optical systems do not operate. Five candidate adhesives were selected and evaluated using standardized test methods to determine the adhesives` physical properties. EC2216, manufactured by 3M, was selected as the baseline candidate adhesive based on the test results of the physical properties.

  14. Platelet count and platelet indices in women with preeclampsia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    AlSheeha, Muneera A; Alaboudi, Rafi S; Alghasham, Mohammad A; Iqbal, Javed; Adam, Ishag

    2016-01-01

    Although the exact pathophysiology of preeclampsia is not completely understood, the utility of different platelets indices can be utilized to predict preeclampsia. To compare platelet indices, namely platelet count (PC), mean platelet volume (MPV), platelet distribution width (PDW), and PC to MPV ratio in women with preeclampsia compared with healthy controls. Qassim Hospital, Kingdom of Saudi Arabia. A case-control study. Sixty preeclamptic women were the cases and an equal number of healthy pregnant women were the controls. There was no significant difference in age, parity, and body mass index between the study groups. Sixteen and 44 of the cases were severe and mild preeclampsia, respectively. There was no significant difference in PDW and MPV between the preeclamptic and control women. Both PC and PC to MPV ratios were significantly lower in the women with preeclampsia compared with the controls. There was no significant difference in the PC, PDW, MPV, and PC to MPV ratio when women with mild and severe preeclampsia were compared. Using receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curves, the PC cutoff was 248.0×10 3 /µL for diagnosis of pre-eclampsia ( P =0.019; the area under the ROC curve was 62.4%). Binary regression suggests that women with PC preeclampsia (odds ratio =2.2, 95% confidence interval =1.08-4.6, P =0.03). The PC/MPV cutoff was 31.2 for diagnosis of preeclampsia ( P =0.035, the area under the ROC curve was 62.2%). PC preeclampsia.

  15. Bioinspired pressure actuated adhesive system

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Paretkar, D.R.; Kamperman, M.M.G.; Schneider, A.S.; Martina, D.; Creton, C.; Arzt, E.

    2011-01-01

    We developed a dry synthetic adhesive system inspired by gecko feet adhesion that can switch reversibly from adhesion to non-adhesion with applied pressure as external stimulus. Micropatterned polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) surfaces with pillars of 30 µm length and 10 µm diameter were fabricated using

  16. Many Roles of Wood Adhesives

    Science.gov (United States)

    Charles R. Frihart

    2014-01-01

    Although wood bonding is one of the oldest applications of adhesives, going back to early recorded history (1), some aspects of wood bonds are still not fully understood. Most books in the general area of adhesives and adhesion do not cover wood bonding. However, a clearer understanding of wood bonding and wood adhesives can lead to improved products. This is important...

  17. Cohesion and Adhesion with Proteins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Charles R. Frihart

    2016-01-01

    With increasing interest in bio-based adhesives, research on proteins has expanded because historically they have been used by both nature and humans as adhesives. A wide variety of proteins have been used as wood adhesives. Ancient Egyptians most likely used collagens tobond veneer to wood furniture, then came casein (milk), blood, fish scales, and soy adhesives, with...

  18. Important role of platelets in modulating endotoxin-induced lung inflammation in CFTR-deficient mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Caiqi Zhao

    Full Text Available Mutation of CFTR (cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator leads to cystic fibrosis (CF. Patients with CF develop abnormalities of blood platelets and recurrent lung inflammation. However, whether CFTR-mutated platelets play a role in the development of lung inflammation is elusive. Therefore, we intratracheally challenged wildtype and F508del (a common type of CFTR mutation mice with LPS to observe changes of F508del platelets in the peripheral blood and indexes of lung inflammation (BAL neutrophils and protein levels. Furthermore, we investigated whether or not and how F508del platelets modulate the LPS-induced acute lung inflammation by targeting anti-platelet aggregation, depletion of neutrophils, reconstitution of bone marrow or neutrophils, blockade of P-selectin glycoprotein ligand-1 (PSGL-1, platelet activating factor (PAF, and correction of mutated CFTR trafficking. We found that LPS-challenged F508del mice developed severe thrombocytopenia and had higher levels of plasma TXB2 coincided with neutrophilic lung inflammation relative to wildtype control. Inhibition of F508del platelet aggregation or depletion of F508del neutrophils diminished the LPS-induced lung inflammation in the F508del mice. Moreover, wildtype mice reconstituted with either F508del bone marrow or neutrophils developed worse thrombocytopenia. Blocking PSGL-1, platelet activating factor (PAF, or rectifying trafficking of mutated CFTR in F508del mice diminished and alveolar neutrophil transmigration in the LPS-challenged F508del mice. These findings suggest that F508del platelets and their interaction with neutrophils are requisite for the development of LPS-induced lung inflammation and injury. As such, targeting platelets might be an emerging strategy for dampening recurrent lung inflammation in cystic fibrosis patients.

  19. Evidence that platelet buoyant density, but not size, correlates with platelet age in man

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mezzano, D.; Hwang, K.; Catalano, P.; Aster, R.H.

    1981-01-01

    Following infusion of 51Cr-labeled autologous platelets into normal subjects, high-density (HD) and low-density (LD) platelet cohorts were isolated by prolonged centrifugation in isosmotic arabino-galactan (Stractan). Specific radio-activity of LD platelets declined rapidly post-infusion (T1/2 . 1.5 days), but specific radioactivity of HD platelets remained constant or increased over a 3--4-day period and gradually declined for 6--7 days thereafter. These differences were exaggerated when platelet cohorts enriched in LD or HD cells by slow centrifugation in high-density albumin were labeled and transfused. Mean survival of a platelet cohort enriched with HD cells was significantly (P less than 0.02) shorter (7.73 days) than that of a cohort enriched with LD cells (9.33) days). In normal subjects treated with aspirin, capacity for thromboxane synthesis was regained more rapidly (P less than 0.05) in LD than in HD platelets. HD and LD platelets differed only slightly in mean volume (HD platelets . 7.57 mu3, LD platelets . 6.87 mu3, 0.05 less than P less than 0.01). We believe the most logical interpretation of these findings is that under normal conditions in man, newly formed platelets are less dense on the average than total platelets and become more dense as they age in the circulation. Thus, specific radioactivity of LD platelets declines rapidly as these platelets move into a more dense compartment and are replaced by newly formed, unlabelled cells; specific radioactivity of HD platelets remains constant or increases as labelled platelets enter this compartment in numbers equal to or greater than the number leaving it at the end of their life span. The similarity in mean volumes of LD and HD platelets suggests that platelet size is unrelated to platelet age under normal conditions

  20. Syndecan-4 and integrins: combinatorial signaling in cell adhesion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Couchman, J R; Woods, A

    1999-01-01

    It is now becoming clear that additional transmembrane components can modify integrin-mediated adhesion. Syndecan-4 is a transmembrane heparan sulfate proteoglycan whose external glycosaminoglycan chains can bind extracellular matrix ligands and whose core protein cytoplasmic domain can signal...... during adhesion. Two papers in this issue of JCS demonstrate, through transfection studies, that syndecan-4 plays roles in the formation of focal adhesions and stress fibers. Overexpression of syndecan-4 increases focal adhesion formation, whereas a partially truncated core protein that lacks the binding...... site for protein kinase C(&agr;) and phosphatidylinositol 4, 5-bisphosphate acts as a dominant negative inhibitor of focal adhesion formation. Focal adhesion induction does not require interaction between heparan sulfate glycosaminoglycan and ligand but can occur when non-glycanated core protein...

  1. Effectiveness of xenogenous-based bovine-derived platelet gel embedded within a three-dimensional collagen implant on the healing and regeneration of the Achilles tendon defect in rabbits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moshiri, Ali; Oryan, Ahmad; Meimandi-Parizi, Abdolhamid; Koohi-Hosseinabadi, Omid

    2014-08-01

    Tissue engineering is an option in reconstructing large tendon defects and managing their healing and regeneration. We designed and produced a novel xenogeneic-based bovine platelet, embedded it within a tissue-engineered collagen implant (CI) and applied it in an experimentally induced large tendon defect model in rabbits to test whether bovine platelets could stimulate tendon healing and regeneration in vivo. One hundred twenty rabbits were randomly divided into two experimental and pilot groups. In all the animals, the left Achilles tendon was surgically excised and the tendon edges were aligned by Kessler suture. Each group was then divided into three groups of control (no implant), treated with CI and treated with collagen-platelet implant. The pilot groups were euthanized at 10, 15, 30 and 40 days post-injury (DPI), and their gross and histologic characteristics were evaluated to study host-graft interaction mechanism. To study the tendon healing and its outcome, the experimental animals were tested during the experiment using hematologic, ultrasonographic and various methods of clinical examinations and then euthanized at 60 DPI and their tendons were evaluated by gross pathologic, histopathologic, scanning electron microscopic, biophysical and biochemical methods. Bovine platelets embedded within a CI increased inflammation at short term while it increased the rate of implant absorption and matrix replacement compared with the controls and CI alone. Treatment also significantly increased diameter, density, amount, alignment and differentiation of the collagen fibrils and fibers and approximated the water uptake and delivery behavior of the healing tendons to normal contralaterals (p tendons and reduced peritendinous adhesion, muscle fibrosis and atrophy, and therefore, it improved the clinical scores and physical activity related to the injured limb when compared with the controls (p Achilles tendon in rabbit. This strategy may be a valuable option in the

  2. Defining Platelet Function During Polytrauma

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-04-01

    scaffold of the clot after its thrombin-induced polymerization to fibrin fibers. Formation of a stiff fibrin fiber network and its contraction by platelet...In another study (PROTEC T) Refused Participat ion (Yes=Y, No=N, W=Unqua lified , Refused further draws (agreed to keep previous data

  3. Cystamine immobilization on TiO2 film surfaces and the influence on inhibition of collagen-induced platelet activation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhou Yujuan; Weng Yajun; Zhang Liping; Jing Fengjuan; Huang Nan; Chen Junying

    2011-01-01

    Poor haemocompatibility is a main issue of artificial cardiovascular materials in clinical application. Nitric oxide (NO), produced by vascular endothelial cells, is a well known inhibitor of platelet adhesion and activation. Thus, NO-releasing biomaterials are beneficial for improving haemocompatibility of blood-contacting biomedical devices. In this paper, a novel method was developed for enhancement of haemocompatibility by exploiting endogenous NO donors. TiO 2 films were firstly synthesized on Si (1 0 0) wafers via unbalanced magnetron sputtering technology, and then polydopamine was grafted on TiO 2 films and used as a linker for further immobilization of cystamine. The obtained surfaces were characterized by scanning electron microscope (SEM), Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) analysis. NO generation is evaluated by saville-griess reagents, and it shows that cystamine immobilized samples are able to catalytically generate NO by decomposing endogenous S-nitrosothiols (RSNO). In vitro platelet adhesion results reveal that cystamine modified surfaces can inhibit collagen-induced platelet activation. ELISA analysis reveals that cGMP in platelets obviously increases on cystamine immobilized surface, which suggests the reducing of platelet activation is through NO/cGMP signal channel. It can be concluded that cystamine immobilized surface shows better blood compatibility by catalyzing NO release from the endogenous NO donor. It may be a promising method for improvement of haemocompatibility of blood-contacting implants.

  4. Anti-platelet activity of water dispersible curcuminoids in rat platelets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maheswaraiah, Anikisetty; Rao, Lingamallu Jaganmohan; Naidu, Kamatham Akhilender

    2015-03-01

    Curcuminoids are active principle of turmeric with plethora of health beneficial properties. In this study, we have evaluated for the first time the effect of water dispersible curcuminoids on rat platelet aggregation. Curcuminoids (10-30 µg/mL) significantly inhibited platelet aggregation induced by agonists viz., collagen, ADP and arachidonic acid. Curcuminoids were found to be two-fold more potent than curcumin in inhibiting platelet aggregation. Intracellular curcuminoid concentration was relatively higher than curcumin in rat platelets. Curcuminoids significantly attenuated thromboxane A2 , serotonin levels in rat platelets which play an important role in platelet aggregation. Curcuminoid treatment increased nitric oxide (NO) levels in platelets treated with agonists. Curcuminoids inhibited free radicals such as superoxide anion released from activated platelets, which ultimately inhibits platelet aggregation. Further, curcuminoids inhibited 12-lipoxygenase activity and formation of 12-hydroperoxyeicosatetraenoic acid (12-HPETE) in activated rat platelets which regulates platelet aggregation. The results suggest that curcuminoids have remarkable anti-platelet activity by modulating multiple mechanisms involved in platelet aggregation. Thus curcuminoids may have a therapeutic potential to prevent platelet activation related disorders. Copyright © 2015 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  5. Streptococcus sanguinis-induced cytokine and matrix metalloproteinase-1 release from platelets

    OpenAIRE

    Cognasse, Fabrice; Hamzeh-Cognasse, Hind; Chabert, Adrien; Jackson, Elke; Arthaud, Charles-Antoine; Garraud, Olivier; McNicol, Archie

    2014-01-01

    Background Streptococcus sanguinis (S.sanguinis), a predominant bacterium in the human oral cavity, has been widely associated with the development of infective endocarditis. Platelets play both a haemostatic function and can influence both innate and adaptive immune responses. Previous studies have shown that S.sanguinis can interact with, and activate, platelets. Results The aim of this study was to determine whether S.sanguinis stimulates the release of matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) 1, ...

  6. Dry adhesives with sensing features

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Krahn, J; Menon, C

    2013-01-01

    Geckos are capable of detecting detachment of their feet. Inspired by this basic observation, a novel functional dry adhesive is proposed, which can be used to measure the instantaneous forces and torques acting on an adhesive pad. Such a novel sensing dry adhesive could potentially be used by climbing robots to quickly realize and respond appropriately to catastrophic detachment conditions. The proposed torque and force sensing dry adhesive was fabricated by mixing Carbon Black (CB) and Polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) to form a functionalized adhesive with mushroom caps. The addition of CB to PDMS resulted in conductive PDMS which, when under compression, tension or torque, resulted in a change in the resistance across the adhesive patch terminals. The proposed design of the functionalized dry adhesive enables distinguishing an applied torque from a compressive force in a single adhesive pad. A model based on beam theory was used to predict the change in resistance across the terminals as either a torque or compressive force was applied to the adhesive patch. Under a compressive force, the sensing dry adhesive was capable of measuring compression stresses from 0.11 Pa to 20.9 kPa. The torque measured by the adhesive patch ranged from 2.6 to 10 mN m, at which point the dry adhesives became detached. The adhesive strength was 1.75 kPa under an applied preload of 1.65 kPa for an adhesive patch with an adhesive contact area of 7.07 cm 2 . (paper)

  7. Dry adhesives with sensing features

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krahn, J.; Menon, C.

    2013-08-01

    Geckos are capable of detecting detachment of their feet. Inspired by this basic observation, a novel functional dry adhesive is proposed, which can be used to measure the instantaneous forces and torques acting on an adhesive pad. Such a novel sensing dry adhesive could potentially be used by climbing robots to quickly realize and respond appropriately to catastrophic detachment conditions. The proposed torque and force sensing dry adhesive was fabricated by mixing Carbon Black (CB) and Polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) to form a functionalized adhesive with mushroom caps. The addition of CB to PDMS resulted in conductive PDMS which, when under compression, tension or torque, resulted in a change in the resistance across the adhesive patch terminals. The proposed design of the functionalized dry adhesive enables distinguishing an applied torque from a compressive force in a single adhesive pad. A model based on beam theory was used to predict the change in resistance across the terminals as either a torque or compressive force was applied to the adhesive patch. Under a compressive force, the sensing dry adhesive was capable of measuring compression stresses from 0.11 Pa to 20.9 kPa. The torque measured by the adhesive patch ranged from 2.6 to 10 mN m, at which point the dry adhesives became detached. The adhesive strength was 1.75 kPa under an applied preload of 1.65 kPa for an adhesive patch with an adhesive contact area of 7.07 cm2.

  8. Wet adhesion with application to tree frog adhesive toe pads and tires

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Persson, B N J

    2007-01-01

    Strong adhesion between solids with rough surfaces is only possible if at least one of the solids is elastically very soft. Some lizards and spiders are able to adhere (dry adhesion) and move on very rough vertical surfaces due to very compliant surface layers on their attachment pads. Flies, bugs, grasshoppers and tree frogs have less compliant pad surface layers, and in these cases adhesion to rough surfaces is only possible because the animals inject a wetting liquid into the pad-substrate contact area, which generates a relative long-range attractive interaction due to the formation of capillary bridges. In this presentation I will discuss some aspects of wet adhesion for tree frogs and give some comments related to tire applications

  9. Wet adhesion with application to tree frog adhesive toe pads and tires

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Persson, B N J [IFF, FZ-Juelich, 52425 Juelich (Germany)

    2007-09-19

    Strong adhesion between solids with rough surfaces is only possible if at least one of the solids is elastically very soft. Some lizards and spiders are able to adhere (dry adhesion) and move on very rough vertical surfaces due to very compliant surface layers on their attachment pads. Flies, bugs, grasshoppers and tree frogs have less compliant pad surface layers, and in these cases adhesion to rough surfaces is only possible because the animals inject a wetting liquid into the pad-substrate contact area, which generates a relative long-range attractive interaction due to the formation of capillary bridges. In this presentation I will discuss some aspects of wet adhesion for tree frogs and give some comments related to tire applications.

  10. Ex vivo expansion of bovine corneal endothelial cells in xeno-free medium supplemented with platelet releasate.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ming-Li Chou

    Full Text Available Clinical-grade ex vivo expansion of corneal endothelial cells can increase the availability of corneal tissues for transplantation and treatment of corneal blindness. However, these cells have very limited proliferative capacity. Successful propagation has required so far to use very complex growth media supplemented with fetal bovine serum and other xenocomponents. We hypothesized that human platelet releasates rich in multiple growth factors, and in particular neurotrophins, could potentially be a useful supplement for ex vivo expansion of corneal endothelium cells due to their neural crest origin. Platelet releasates were prepared by calcium salt activation of apheresis platelet concentrates, subjected or not to complement inactivation by heat treatment at 56°C for 30 minutes. Platelet releasates were characterized for their content in proteins and were found to contain high amount of growth factors including platelet-derived growth factor-AB (30.56 to 39.08 ng/ml and brain-derived neurotrophic factor (30.57 to 37.11 ng/ml neurotrophins. We compared the growth and viability of corneal endothelium cells in DMEM-F12 medium supplemented with different combinations of components, including 2.5%∼10% of the platelet releasates. Corneal endothelium cells expanded in platelet releasates exhibited good adhesion and a typical hexagonal morphology. Their growth and viability were enhanced when using the complement-inactivated platelet releasate at a concentration of 10%. Immunostaining and Western blots showed that CECs maintained the expressions of four important membrane markers: Na-K ATPase α1, zona occludens-1, phospho-connexin 43 and N-cadherin. In conclusion, our study provides the first proof-of-concept that human platelet releasates can be used for ex vivo expansion of corneal endothelium cells. These findings open a new paradigm for ex vivo propagation protocols of corneal endothelium cells in compliance with good tissue culture practices

  11. In vitro function of random donor platelets stored for 7 days in composol platelet additive solution

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)