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Sample records for plate-type ceramic specimens

  1. Study and analysis of the stress state in a ceramic, button-head, tensile specimen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jenkins, M.G.; Ferber, M.K.; Martin, R.L.; Jenkins, V.T.; Tennery, V.J.

    1991-09-01

    The final results are reported for a study to identify and correct the causes of nongage-section failures (notably button-head failures) in ceramic tensile specimens observed in several laboratories. Numerical modeling of several candidate specimen gripping systems has shown inherent stress concentrations near the specimen button head at which the maximum stress may approach 75 to 100% of the gage-section stress for certain grip conditions. Empirical comparisons of both tapered- and straight-collet gripping systems revealed compromises in both systems. The straight-collet system, with deformable collets, is simpler to use but produces statistically significant greater average percent bending for all tests than those produced for the tapered-collet system, which is slightly more difficult to use. Empirical tensile tests of {approximately}50 aluminium oxide and {approximately}50 silicon nitride specimens were conducted to evaluate the loading capability of both gripping systems, the percent bending in each system, and the potential of consistently producing successful test results. These tests revealed that, due to variations in individuals specimens or the individual specimen/grip interfaces, neither of the gripping systems can consistently produce bending of less than 3 to 4% at failure although occasional values of {approximately}0.5% bending were attained. Refinements of grinding procedures and dimensional measurement techniques have shown critical details in both the practices and consistency of machining necessary for achieving the dimensional tolerances while minimizing subsurface damage. Numerical integration techniques indicate that up to a consistent 5.0% bending during fast- fracture tests can be tolerated before large influences are detected in the determination of the Weibull modulus and the Weibull characteristic strength.

  2. COMPARISON OF SHEAR STRENGTH OF CERAMIC JOINTS DETERMINED BY VARIOUS TEST METHODS WITH SMALL SPECIMENS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Katoh, Yutai [ORNL; Kiggans Jr, James O [ORNL; Khalifa, Hesham [General Atomics, San Diego; Back, Christina A. [General Atomics, San Diego; Hinoki, Tatsuya [Kyoto University, Japan; Ferraris, Monica [Politecnico di Torino

    2015-01-01

    Four different shear test methods i.e. doubled notched shear test, asymmetrical four point bend test, Iosipescu test, and torsion test, were investigated for their ability to evaluate one standard SiC to SiC ceramic brittle joint while using small size specimens. Double notched shear test showed higher stress concentration at the notch base and a lower nominal shear strength. Both asymmetrical four point bend test and Iosipescu test utilized epoxy jointed metal extensors, which failed during test and caused misalignment and tensile type of failure. Torsion test can deliver true shear loading. However, base material failure was observed for the torsion joint samples in this study. None of the tests can successfully induce true shear failure of the joint because the joint is stronger and tougher than the SiC substrate. Torsion test appears to be promising because of the pure shear loading, less stress concentration, and easy alignment.

  3. Study of Mechanical Characterization of Ceramic Specimens from a Brazilian Test Adaptation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Iglesias, I.

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available The Brazilian Test is easy to perform and its result is the tensile strength of the material provided certain ratios are fulfilled between the diameter of the sample, the load bearing width and the characteristic length of the material. In this paper we present experimental results obtained from 8 mm-thick ceramic cylinders whose diameter was 40 mm in length. The cylinders were obtained from a standard type of clay by pressing and subsequent baking at 900 ºC. We made a complete mechanical characterization of the material, which included obtaining fracture properties, and a numerical simulation of the Brazilian test based on the cohesive crack model. Numerical results confirm that the size and boundary conditions chosen for the test are adequate to get the actual tensile strength of construction ceramics, which prove that this type of test is useful to compare the strength of several types of construction ceramics in a simple and convenient way. Besides, it requires a very small amount of material to prepare the specimen

    El ensayo de compresión diametral (ensayo Brasileño es un ensayo fácil de realizar que da como resultado la resistencia a tracción del material siempre que se cumplan una serie de proporciones entre el diámetro de la probeta, el ancho de reparto de la carga y la longitud característica del material. En este artículo presentamos unos resultados sobre probetas cerámicas cilíndricas de 40 mm de diámetro y 8 mm de espesor, elaboradas por prensado a partir de arcillas comunes y cocidas a 900 ºC. Se ha realizado una caracterización mecánica de dichas probetas, que incluye sus propiedades en fractura, y una simulación numérica del ensayo brasileño basada en el modelo de fisura cohesiva. Los resultados numéricos confirman que el tamaño y condiciones de contorno elegidos para el ensayo son apropiados para obtener la resistencia a tracción de este tipo de material cerámico con lo que este ensayo se convierte en

  4. Preparation of cross-sectional specimens of ceramic thermal barrier coatings for transmission electron microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Unal, O; Heuer, A H; Mitchell, T E

    1990-04-01

    During the microstructural examination of ceramic thermal barrier coatings by transmission electron microscopy (TEM), initial efforts for the preparation of cross-sectional thin foils from interface regions by conventional means were mostly failures. Delamination of the Y2O3-stabilized ZrO2 ceramic coating from the nickel-base alloy substrate sometimes occurred during fine polishing at around 80 microns thickness but mostly occurred during dimpling. Because of this sensitivity, special techniques for mechanical handling were developed so that ion milling could give thin enough regions of the metal-ceramic interface. TEM showed convincingly that the highly fragile nature of the coatings is in fact due to the extensive porosity at the interface developed as a result of heat treatment.

  5. Strength characterization of tubular ceramic materials by flexure of semi-cylindrical specimens

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kwok, Kawai; Kiesel, Lutz; Frandsen, Henrik Lund;

    2014-01-01

    capable of loading multiple specimens in controlled environments. The stress field is analyzed in detail with finite element analyses. The validity of the test is found to depend on specimen dimensions and the valid range is established. The methodology is demonstrated by experimental measurements...

  6. Transmission Electron Microscopy Specimen Preparation Method for Multiphase Porous Functional Ceramics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhang, Wei; Kuhn, Luise Theil; Jørgensen, Peter Stanley

    2013-01-01

    An optimum method is proposed to prepare thin foil transmission electron microscopy (TEM) lamellae of multiphase porous functional ceramics: prefilling the pore space of these materials with an epoxy resin prior to focused ion beam milling. Several advantages of epoxy impregnation are demonstrate...

  7. Polishing methods for metallic and ceramic transmission electron microscopy specimens: Revision 1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kestel, B.J.

    1986-03-01

    In recent years, the increasing sophistication of transmission electron microscope (TEM) studies of materials has necessitated more exacting methods of specimen preparation. The present report describes improved equipment and techniques for electropolishing and chemically polishing a wide variety of specimens. Many of the specimens used in developing or improving the techniques to be described were irradiated with heavy ions such as nickel or vanadium to study radiation damage. The high cost of these specimens increased the need for reproducible methods of initial preparation postirradiation processing, and final thinning for TEM examination. A technique was also developed to salvage specimens that had previously been thinned but were unusable for various reasons. Jet polishing is, in general, the method of choice for surface polishing, sectioning, and thinning. The older beaker electropolishing method is included in this report because it is inexpensive and simple, and gives some insight into how the more recent methods were developed.

  8. Residual stress in plasma sprayed ceramic turbine tip and gas path seal specimens

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hendricks, R. C.; Mcdonald, G.; Mullen, R. L.

    1983-01-01

    The residual stresses in a ceramic sheet material used for turbine blade tip gas path seals, were estimated. These stresses result from the plasma spraying process which leaves the surface of the sheet in tension. To determine the properties of plasma sprayed ZrO2-Y2O3 sheet material, its load deflection characteristics were measured. Estimates of the mechanical properties for sheet materials were found to differ from those reported for plasma sprayed bulk materials.

  9. Residual stress in plasma-sprayed ceramic turbine tip and gas-path seal specimens

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hendricks, R. C.; Mcdonald, G.; Mullen, R. L.

    1983-01-01

    The residual stresses in a ceramic sheet material used for turbine blade tip gas path seals, were estimated. These stresses result from the plasma spraying process which leaves the surface of the sheet in tension. To determine the properties of plasma sprayed ZrO2-Y2O3 sheet material, its load deflection characteristics were measured. Estimates of the mechanical properties for sheet materials were found to differ from those reported for plasma sprayed bulk materials. Previously announced in STAR as N83-28380

  10. Performance Investigation of Plate Type Heat Exchanger (A Case Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Simarpreet Singh

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Heat exchanger is a thermodynamic system which is most commonly used in the process industry for exchanging heat energy between the fluids. flowing in the same or opposite direction. It is desired that effectiveness of heat exchanger should remain as large as possible. Heat exchanger's performance may be improved by the addition of fins or corrugations. These investigations include design of plate type heat exchanger, heat transfer enhancement, flow phenomenon and cleanliness factor. In process plants, this type of heat exchange is generally used for recovering heat content of exhaust steam. However, with the flow of fluid for a long period, fouling occurs on the plate surface. Therefore, it is required to investigate the effect of fouling, wherever the heat exchanger is installed. An extensive experimental investigation has been carried out under clean and dirty condition of the said plate type heat exchanger. Heat transfer and flow data were collected in experiment. From collected data heat transfer rate, overall heat transfer coefficient, fouling factor and cleanliness factor were evaluated. Based upon the cleanliness factor data, next date of cleanliness for plate type heat exchanger was predicted. It is felt that the outcome of the present research work may be quite useful for efficient operation of plate type heat exchanger installed in Process plants.

  11. Inspection of SiC{sub f}/SiC ceramic matrix composite specimens employed for fatigue experiments via laboratory X-ray computed microtomography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Quiney, Z.; Bache, M.R.; Jones, J.P. [Swansea Univ. (United Kingdom). Inst. of Structural Materials

    2015-07-01

    Hi-Nicalon SiC{sub f}/SiC ceramic matrix composite (CMC) specimens have been inspected using laboratory based X-ray computed micro-tomography (μCT) both prior and subsequent to isothermal fatigue assessment. The fatigue specimens were in the form of a dog bone-shaped geometry with a minimum cross-sectional area of 40 mm{sup 2}. Pre-test μCT inspections were conducted to identify the subsurface composite architecture and locate associated features introduced during the manufacturing process (e.g. isolated or conjoined porosity, matrix or interface discontinuities etc.). These μCT scans were subsequently correlated with matching post-test volumes in an attempt to determine the influence of such features upon damage accumulation and the ultimate failure position and cyclic damage mode(s). The relationship between μCT scan resolution and identification of critical features is also discussed. In typical cone-beam X-ray systems, resolution is proportional to the source-to-specimen distance, but for efficiency may also be chosen so as to minimise the number of scans needed to capture the whole area of interest. The investigations are intended to provide input into the future development of an in situ mechanical testing μCT facility using lab-based X-ray systems.

  12. The study of plate-type electrostatic precipitators electrical supplies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gabriel N. Popa

    2005-10-01

    Full Text Available Stricter environmental legislation in many countries is producing standards governing the emission of fine particles to the atmosphere from all sources. The industrial separating particles from process streams have numerous methods with different principles. In electrostatic precipitators is used electrical charge of dust particles.There are many aspects of pollution control in both solid and liquid phase using electrostatic precipitators.The operation of plate-type electrostatic precipitators is closely related to its electrical energization, to obtain high collection efficiency with low electrical energization consumption. The paper analyze the traditional direct current energization, the intermittent energization, the pulse energization and the switched mode at high frequency power supplies of plate-type electrostatic precipitators sections.

  13. Performance of plate type heat exchanger as ammonia condenser

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rivera, Andrew

    In this study, I experimentally analyzed the performance of a commercial semi-welded plate type heat exchanger (PHE) for use with ammonia systems. I determined performance parameters such as overall heat transfer coefficient, capacity, and pressure drop of the semi-welded PHE. This was analyzed by varying different parameters which demonstrated changes in overall heat transfer coefficient, capacity, and pressure drop. Both water and ammonia flow rates to the semi-welded PHE were varied independently, and analyzed in order to understand how changes in flow rates affected performance. Inlet water temperature was also varied, in order to understand how raising condenser water inlet temperature would affect performance. Finally, pressure drop was monitored to better understand the performance limitations of the semi-welded PHE. Testing of the semi-welded will give insight as to the performance of the semi-welded PHE in a potential ocean thermal energy conversion system, and whether the semi-welded PHE is a viable choice for use as an ammonia condenser.

  14. Improvement of visualization efficiency for the nondestructive inspection image of internal defects in plate type nuclear fuel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, Seung Kyu; Park, Nak Kyu; Baik, Sung Hoon; Lee, Yoon Sang; Cheong, Yong Moo [KAERI, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of); Kang, Young June [Chonbuk National Univ., Chonju (Korea, Republic of)

    2012-10-15

    Plate type nuclear fuel has been adopted in most research reactors. The production quality of the fuel is a key part for an efficient and stable generation of thermal energy in research reactors. Thus, a nondestructive quality inspection for the internal defects of plate type nuclear fuel is a key process during the production of nuclear fuel for safety insurance. Nondestructive quality inspections based on X rays and ultrasounds have been widely used for the defect detection of plate type nuclear fuel. X ray testing is a simple and fast inspection method, and provides an image in real time as the inspection results. Thus, the testing can be carried out by a non expert field worker. However, it is hard to detect closed type defects that should be detected during the production of plate type nuclear fuel. Ultrasonic testing is a powerful tool to detect internal defects including open type and closed type defects in plate type nuclear fuel. However, the inspection process is complicated because an immersion test should be carried out in a water tank. It is also a time consuming inspection method because area testing to acquire image is based on the scanning of the point by point inspections. Among nondestructive inspection techniques, the techniques based on laser interferometry and infrared thermography have been widely used in the detection of internal defects of plate type composite materials, such as aircraft, automotive etc. While infrared thermography technique (IRT) analyses the thermal behavior of the specimen surface, laser interferometry technique (LIT) analyses the deformation field. Both techniques are useful tools for detection and evaluation of internal defects in composite materials. Especially, the laser interferometry technique can provide the depth information of internal defects. Laser interferometry technique (LIT) is a non contact inspection method faster than thermography. Also, this technique requires less energy than thermography and the

  15. 78 FR 33132 - Quality Verification for Plate-Type Uranium-Aluminum Fuel Elements for Use in Research and Test...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-06-03

    ... COMMISSION Quality Verification for Plate-Type Uranium-Aluminum Fuel Elements for Use in Research and Test... Verification for Plate-Type Uranium-Aluminum Fuel Elements for Use in Research and Test Reactors.'' This guide... plate-type uranium-aluminum fuel elements used in research and test reactors (RTRs). ADDRESSES: Please...

  16. Modification of Neutron Kinetic Code for Plate Type Fuel Nuclear Reactor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Salah Ud-Din Khan

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The research is conducted on the modification of neutron kinetic code for the plate type fuel nuclear reactor. REMARK is a neutron kinetic code that works only for the cylindrical type fuel nuclear reactor. In this research, our main emphasis is on the modification of this code in order to be applicable for the plate type fuel nuclear reactor. For this purpose, detailed mathematical studies have been performed and are subjected to write the program in Fortran language. Since REMARK code is written in Fortran language, so we have developed the program in Fortran and then inserted it into the source library of the code. The main emphasis is on the modification of subroutine in the source library of the code for hexagonal fuel assemblies with plate type fuel elements in it. The number of steps involved in the modification of the code has been included in the paper. The verification studies were performed by considering the small modular reactor with hexagonal assemblies and plate type fuel in it to find out the power distribution of the reactor core. The purpose of the research is to make the code work for the hexagonal fuel assemblies with plate type fuel element.

  17. CAD/CAM machining Vs pre-sintering in-lab fabrication techniques of Y-TZP ceramic specimens: Effects on their mechanical fatigue behavior.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zucuni, C P; Guilardi, L F; Fraga, S; May, L G; Pereira, G K R; Valandro, L F

    2017-03-18

    This study evaluated the effects of different pre-sintering fabrication processing techniques of Y-TZP ceramic (CAD/CAM Vs. in-lab), considering surface characteristics and mechanical performance outcomes. Pre-sintered discs of Y-TZP ceramic (IPS e.max ZirCAD, Ivoclar Vivadent) were produced using different pre-sintering fabrication processing techniques: Machined- milling with a CAD/CAM system; Polished- fabrication using a cutting device followed by polishing (600 and 1200 SiC papers); Xfine- fabrication using a cutting machine followed by grinding with extra-fine diamond bur (grit size 30 μm); Fine- fabrication using a cutting machine followed by grinding with fine diamond bur (grit size 46 μm); SiC- fabrication using a cutting machine followed by grinding with 220 SiC paper. Afterwards, the discs were sintered and submitted to roughness (n=35), surface topography (n=2), phase transformation (n=2), biaxial flexural strength (n=20), and biaxial flexural fatigue strength (fatigue limit) (n=15) analyses. No monoclinic-phase content was observed in all processing techniques. It can be observed that obtaining a surface with similar characteristics to CAD/CAM milling is essential for the observation of similar mechanical performance. On this sense, grinding with fine diamond bur before sintering (Fine group) was the best mimic protocol in comparison to the CAD/CAM milling.

  18. Virtual Specimens

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Paor, D. G.

    2009-12-01

    Virtual Field Trips have been around almost as long as the Worldwide Web itself yet virtual explorers do not generally return to their desktops with folders full of virtual hand specimens. Collection of real specimens on fields trips for later analysis in the lab (or at least in the pub) has been an important part of classical field geoscience education and research for generations but concern for the landscape and for preservation of key outcrops from wanton destruction has lead to many restrictions. One of the author’s favorite outcrops was recently vandalized presumably by a geologist who felt the need to bash some of the world’s most spectacular buckle folds with a rock sledge. It is not surprising, therefore, that geologists sometimes leave fragile localities out of field trip itineraries. Once analyzed, most specimens repose in drawers or bins, never to be seen again. Some end up in teaching collections but recent pedagogical research shows that undergraduate students have difficulty relating specimens both to their collection location and ultimate provenance in the lithosphere. Virtual specimens can be created using 3D modeling software and imported into virtual globes such as Google Earth (GE) where, they may be linked to virtual field trip stops or restored to their source localities on the paleo-globe. Sensitive localities may be protected by placemark approximation. The GE application program interface (API) has a distinct advantage over the stand-alone GE application when it comes to viewing and manipulating virtual specimens. When instances of the virtual globe are embedded in web pages using the GE plug-in, Collada models of specimens can be manipulated with javascript controls residing in the enclosing HTML, permitting specimens to be magnified, rotated in 3D, and sliced. Associated analytical data may be linked into javascript and localities for comparison at various points on the globe referenced by ‘fetching’ KML. Virtual specimens open up

  19. 77 FR 16868 - Quality Verification for Plate-Type Uranium-Aluminum Fuel Elements for Use in Research and Test...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-03-22

    ... COMMISSION Quality Verification for Plate-Type Uranium-Aluminum Fuel Elements for Use in Research and Test...-Type Uranium-Aluminum Fuel Elements for Use in Research and Test Reactors,'' is temporarily identified... verifying the quality of plate-type uranium-aluminum fuel elements used in research and test reactors (RTRs...

  20. Performance test of a plate-type ultrasonic waveguide sensor in sodium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joo, Young-Sang; Bae, Jin-Ho; Kim, Hoe-Woong; Kim, Jong-Bum

    2013-01-01

    A plate-type ultrasonic waveguide sensor that uses the A0-mode leaky Lamb waves has been developed for under-sodium viewing of the reactor core and in-vessel structures in the sodiumcooled fast reactor. A new ultrasonic waveguide sensor that has beryllium (Be) and nickel (Ni) coating layers on its surfaces is proposed for the enhancement of the ultrasonic beam radiation and wetting capabilities in sodium. The sodium test facility with a glove box system and a sodium test loop has been designed and constructed to carry out the performance test of the developed ultrasonic waveguide sensor in a sodium environment. A 1.7 m long ultrasonic waveguide sensor with beryllium and nickel coating layers was designed and manufactured. The performance tests were carried out to evaluate the ultrasonic beam radiation characteristics and C-scan imaging resolution of the plate-type ultrasonic waveguide sensor in sodium.

  1. EFFICIENCY ANALYSIS OF DOUBLE CRANK RING-PLATE-TYPE PIN-CYCLOIDAL GEAR PLANETARY DRIVE

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Li Xin; He Weidong; Linda Schmidt; Li Lixing

    2003-01-01

    From the general formula for calculating the efficiency of planetary gear trains, the efficiency of the double crank ring-plate-type pin-cycloidal gear planetary drive is derived. To prove the theory, an experimental study has been conducted. The tested value of the efficiency of a sample set of the new-type drive in the experiment agrees with the calculated one. It shows that the new-type drive is of not merely high bearing capacity, but also quite high efficiency.

  2. Investigation into the aerodynamic processes of air treatment using a plate-type biofilter.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baltrėnas, Pranas; Kleiza, Jonas; Idzelis, Raimondas Leopoldas

    2016-01-01

    The research conducted has involved a laboratory stand of a plate-type air treatment biofilter with a capillary system for humidifying packing material composed of polymer plates vertically arranged next to each other and producing a capillary effect of humidification. The pattern of arranging the plates has sufficiently large spaces (6 mm), and therefore the use of the plate-type structure decreases the aerodynamic resistance of the device. Slightly pressed slabs attached on both sides of the plates are made of heat-treated wood fibre, to increase the longevity of which, wood waste has been heat-treated in the steam explosion reactor under the pressure of 32 bars and a temperature of 235 °C. This is the method for changing the molecular structure of wood, which stops the decay of wood fibre in a humid environment and thus increases the life span of biofilter plates. The research performed has disclosed that, under the application of the above introduced structure of the biofilter, the aerodynamic resistance of the biofilter reaches 1 ÷ 5 Pa when the rate of the air flow passing through the device makes 0.08 m/s. For evaluating the reliability of the obtained results, the theoretical model has been applied.

  3. Improved Tensile Test for Ceramics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Osiecki, R. A.

    1982-01-01

    For almost-nondestructive tensile testing of ceramics, steel rod is bonded to sample of ceramic. Assembly is then pulled apart in conventional tensile-test machine. Test destroys only shallow surface layer which can be machined away making specimen ready for other uses. Method should be useful as manufacturing inspection procedure for low-strength brittle materials.

  4. Hydrogen Recombination Rates of Plate-type Passive Auto-catalytic Recombiner

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Jongtae; Hong, Seong-Wan [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Gun Hong [Kyungwon E-C Co., Seongnam (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-10-15

    The hydrogen mitigation system may include igniters, passive autocatalytic recombiner (PAR), and venting or dilution system. Recently PAR is commonly used as a main component of HMS in a NPP containment because of its passive nature. PARs are categorized by the shape and material of catalytic surface. Catalytic surface coated by platinum is mostly used for the hydrogen recombiners. The shapes of the catalytic surface can be grouped into plate type, honeycomb type and porous media type. Among them, the plate-type PAR is well tested by many experiments. PAR performance analysis can be approached by a multi-scale method which is composed of micro, meso and macro scales. The criterion of the scaling is the ratio of thickness of boundary layer developed on a catalytic surface to representative length of a computational domain. Mass diffusion in the boundary layer must be resolved in the micro scale analysis. In a lumped parameter (LP) analysis using a system code such as MAAP or MELCOR, the chamber of the PAR is much smaller than a computational node. The hydrogen depletion by a PAR is modeled as a source of mass and energy conservation equations. Te catalytic surface reaction of hydrogen must be modeled by a volume-averaged correlation. In this study, a micro scale analysis method is developed using libraries in OpenFOAM to evaluate a hydrogen depletion rate depending on parameters such as size and number of plates and plate arrangement. The analysis code is validated by simulating REKO-3 experiment. And hydrogen depletion analysis is conducted by changing the plate arrangement as a trial of the performance enhancement of a PAR. In this study, a numerical code for an analysis of a PAR performance in a micro scale has been developed by using OpenFOAM libraries. The physical and numerical models were validated by simulating the REKO-3 experiment. As a try to enhance the performance of the plate-type PAR, it was proposed to apply a staggered two-layer arrangement of the

  5. On the use of plate-type normal pressure cells in silos

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ramirez, Alvaro; Nielsen, Jørgen; Ayuga, F.

    2010-01-01

    Pressure cells are measuring devices commonly used in silo research to study loads exerted by a granular material stored against a silo wall. The design of normal pressure cells for use in an experimental silo research project is critical, mainly because measuring errors complicate...... the interpretation of results. Once the cells have been delivered from the manufacturer to the researcher, they should be calibrated and validated with reference to the measurement of pressure from a granular material against a silo wall. Two related papers deal with a specific plate-type normal pressure cell...... for use in an installation of three full-scale steel silos with different hopper eccentricities (concentric, half-eccentric and full-eccentric) as part of a silo research project. It was found to be necessary to validate the performance of the cells when measuring pressures in the silos in order to arrive...

  6. Local equivalent welding element to predict the welding deformations of plate-type structures

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    Considering the Heat Affected Zone (HAZ) of welding joint, the residual strain be-haviors of material under constraint and temperature circulation, as well as the activating mechanism of welding process, this paper addresses a new type welding element for numerical simulation of welding deformation, which is called the LEWE (the local equivalent welding element). This element can describe the basic char-acteristics of welded seam: the local position points of inherent strain, the equiva-lent size, the bending radius (or bending angle) from inherent strain, etc. It could be used to predict the welding deformation of plate-type structure. The comparisons between the computed deflection of welded plate and its experiment measurement are present. The results showed that the LEWE possesses a potential to simulate the deformation of welding process high-efficiently and precisely.

  7. Thermostructural Analysis of Plate-Type Heat Exchanger Prototypes Considering Weld Properties

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kee-nam Song

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The mechanical properties in a weld zone are different from those in the parent material owing to their different microstructures and residual weld stresses. Welded plate-type heat exchanger prototypes made of Hastelloy-X alloy were manufactured, and performance tests on the prototypes were performed in a small-scale nitrogen gas loop at the Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute. Owing to a lack of mechanical properties in the weld zone, previous research on the strength analyses of the prototypes was performed using the parent material properties. In this study, based on the mechanical properties of Hastelloy-X alloy obtained using an instrumented indentation technique, strength analyses considering the mechanical properties in the weld zone were performed, and the analysis results were compared with previous research. As a result of the comparison, a thermostructural analysis considering the weld material properties is needed to understand the structural behavior and evaluate the structural integrity of the prototype more reliably.

  8. Characteristic of Local Boiling Heat Transfer of Ammonia / Water Binary Mixture on the Plate Type Evaporator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okamoto, Akio; Arima, Hirofumi; Kim, Jeong-Hun; Akiyama, Hirokuni; Ikegami, Yasuyuki; Monde, Masanori

    Ocean thermal energy conversion (OTEC) and discharged thermal energy conversion (DTEC) are expected to be the next generation energy production systems. Both systems use a plate type evaporator, and ammonia or ammonia/water mixture as a working fluid. It is important to clarify heat transfer characteristic for designing efficient power generation systems. Measurements of local boiling heat transfer coefficients and visualization were performed for ammonia /water mixture (z = 0.9) on a vertical flat plate heat exchanger in a range of mass flux (7.5 - 15 kg/m2s), heat flux (15 - 23 kW/m2), and pressure (0.7 - 0.9 MPa). The result shows that in the case of ammonia /water mixture, the local heat transfer coefficients increase with an increase of vapor quality and mass flux, and decrease with an increase of heat flux, and the influence of the flow pattern on the local heat transfer coefficient is observed.

  9. Portfolio: Ceramics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hardy, Jane; And Others

    1982-01-01

    Describes eight art activities using ceramics. Elementary students created ceramic tiles to depict ancient Egyptian and medieval European art, made ceramic cookie stamps, traced bisque plates on sketch paper, constructed clay room-tableaus, and designed clay relief masks. Secondary students pit-fired ceramic pots and designed ceramic Victorian…

  10. Portfolio: Ceramics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hardy, Jane; And Others

    1982-01-01

    Describes eight art activities using ceramics. Elementary students created ceramic tiles to depict ancient Egyptian and medieval European art, made ceramic cookie stamps, traced bisque plates on sketch paper, constructed clay room-tableaus, and designed clay relief masks. Secondary students pit-fired ceramic pots and designed ceramic Victorian…

  11. Ceramic Technology Project database: March 1990 summary report. DOE/ORNL Ceramic Technology Project

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Keyes, B.L.P.

    1992-07-01

    This report is the fifth in a series of semiannual data summary reports on information being stored in the Ceramic Technology Project (CTP) database. The overall system status as of March 31, 1990, is summarized, and the latest additions of ceramic mechanical properties data are given for zirconia, silicon carbide, and silicon nitride ceramic mechanical properties data, including some properties on brazed specimens.

  12. Research on Design of Plate-type Electromagnetic Coupler in Underwater Inductive Power Transmission

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qu Li-yan

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Magnetic coupler has a good application in the field of underwater sensor. Magnetic coupler at work, interference by underwater complex situation, stability and efficiency of charging device of the gap is larger fluctuations. The traditional electromagnetic coupling is charging for the stability of the clearance to demand higher. Charging for underwater, as a result of the existence of ocean currents, electromagnetic coupling clearance may not remain very stable. When there is deviation gap, a larger electromagnetic coupling performance deviation. On this particular problem, it puts forward the design method of a new type of plate type electromagnetic coupling. First of all, the leakage inductance of the finite element method to calculate system and excitation inductance, establish electromagnetic coupler with compensation capacitor equivalent circuit, and the primary circuit and secondary circuit was designed. On the basis, the voltage gain and efficiency of the system are carrying on the theoretical derivation and calculation. The simulation experimental results show that the magnetic coupler has a stable voltage gain and charging efficiency, when the partial core within 10 mm, voltage gain remains steady at 5.8%, efficiency remain at around 90%.

  13. Computational simulation of fuel burnup estimation for research reactors plate type

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Santos, Nadia Rodrigues dos, E-mail: nadiasam@gmail.com [Instituto Federal de Educacao, Ciencia e Tecnologia do Rio de Janeiro (IFRJ), Paracambi, RJ (Brazil); Lima, Zelmo Rodrigues de; Moreira, Maria de Lourdes, E-mail: zrlima@ien.gov.br, E-mail: malu@ien.gov.br [Instituto de Engenharia Nuclear (IEN/CNEN-RJ), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil)

    2015-07-01

    The aim of this study is to estimate the spatial fuel burnup, through computational simulation, in two research reactors plate type, loaded with dispersion fuel: the benchmark Material Test Research - International Atomic Energy Agency (MTR-IAEA) and a typical multipurpose reactor (MR). The first composed of plates with uranium oxide dispersed in aluminum (UAlx-Al) and a second composed with uranium silicide (U{sub 3}Si{sub 2}) dispersed in aluminum. To develop this work we used the deterministic code, WIMSD-5B, which performs the cell calculation solving the neutron transport equation, and the DF3DQ code, written in FORTRAN, which solves the three-dimensional neutron diffusion equation using the finite difference method. The methodology used was adequate to estimate the spatial fuel burnup , as the results was in accordance with chosen benchmark, given satisfactorily to the proposal presented in this work, even showing the possibility to be applied to other research reactors. For future work are suggested simulations with other WIMS libraries, other settings core and fuel types. Comparisons the WIMSD-5B results with programs often employed in fuel burnup calculations and also others commercial programs, are suggested too. Another proposal is to estimate the fuel burnup, taking into account the thermohydraulics parameters and the Xenon production. (author)

  14. Durability of feldspathic veneering ceramic on glass-infiltrated alumina ceramics after long-term thermocycling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mesquita, A M M; Ozcan, M; Souza, R O A; Kojima, A N; Nishioka, R S; Kimpara, E T; Bottino, M A

    2010-01-01

    This study compared the bond strength durability of a feldspathic veneering ceramic to glass-infiltrated reinforced ceramics in dry and aged conditions. Disc shaped (thickness: 4 mm, diameter: 4 mm) of glass-infiltrated alumina (In-Ceram Alumina) and glass-infiltrated alumina reinforced by zirconia (In-Ceram Zirconia) core ceramic specimens (N=48, N=12 per groups) were constructed according to the manufacturers' recommendations. Veneering ceramic (VITA VM7) was fired onto the core ceramics using a mold. The core-veneering ceramic assemblies were randomly divided into two conditions and tested either immediately after specimen preparation (Dry) or following 30000 thermocycling (5-55 ºC±1; dwell time: 30 seconds). Shear bond strength test was performed in a universal testing machine (cross-head speed: 1 mm/min). Failure modes were analyzed using optical microscope (x20). The bond strength data (MPa) were analyzed using ANOVA (α=0.05). Thermocycling did not decrease the bond strength results for both In-Ceram Alumina (30.6±8.2 MPa; P=0.2053) and In-Ceram zirconia (32.6±9 MPa; P=0.3987) core ceramic-feldspathic veneering ceramic combinations when compared to non-aged conditions (28.1±6.4 MPa, 29.7±7.3 MPa, respectively). There were also no significant differences between adhesion of the veneering ceramic to either In-Ceram Alumina or In-Ceram Zirconia ceramics (P=0.3289). Failure types were predominantly a mixture of adhesive failure between the veneering and the core ceramic together with cohesive fracture of the veneering ceramic. Long-term thermocycling aging conditions did not impair the adhesion of the veneering ceramic to the glass-infiltrated alumina core ceramics tested.

  15. Research on Precaution and Detection Technology for Flow Blockage of Plate-type Fuel Element in Research Reactors

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    DING; Li; QIAO; Ya-xin; ZHANG; Nian-peng; LUO; Bei-bei; HUA; Xiao; JIA; Shu-jie; YAN; Hui-yang

    2013-01-01

    The main aim of this study is to offer the technical support for safety operation and management of research reactors using plate-type fuel assemblies in China,which is performed from analysis of precaution measures for flow blockage and detection methods of accidents.Study shows that most accidents were induced by in-core foreign objects and the swelling of fuel

  16. Simulation of irradiation hardening of Zircaloy within plate-type dispersion nuclear fuel elements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Yijie; Wang, Qiming; Cui, Yi; Huo, Yongzhong; Ding, Shurong

    2011-06-01

    Within plate-type dispersion nuclear fuel elements, the metal matrix and cladding attacked continuously by fast neutrons undergo irradiation hardening, which might have remarkable effects upon the mechanical behaviors within fuel elements. In this paper, with the irradiation hardening effect of metal materials mainly considered together with irradiation growth effect of the cladding, the three-dimensional large-deformation constitutive relations for the metal matrix and cladding are developed. The method of virtual temperature increase in the previous studies is further developed to model the irradiation swelling of fuel particles; the method of anisotropic thermal expansion is introduced to model irradiation growth of the cladding; and a method of multi-step-temperature loading is proposed to simulate the coupling features of irradiation-induced swelling of the fuel particles together with irradiation growth of the cladding. Above all, based on the developed relationship between irradiation growth at certain burnup and the loaded virtual temperatures, with considering that certain burnup corresponds to certain fast neutron fluence, the time-dependent constitutive relation due to irradiation hardening effect is replaced by the virtual-temperature-dependent one which is introduced into the commercial software to simulate the irradiation hardening effects of the matrix and cladding. Numerical simulations of the irradiation-induced mechanical behaviors are implemented with the finite element method in consideration of the micro-structure of the fuel meat. The obtained results indicate that when the irradiation hardening effects are introduced into the constitutive relations of the metal matrix and cladding: (1) higher maximum Mises stresses for certain burnup at the matrix exist with the equivalent plastic strains remaining almost the same at lower burnups; (2) the maximum Mises stresses for certain burnup at the cladding are enhanced while the maximum equivalent

  17. An Investigation on Monolithic U-Mo Plate Type Fuel by a Pressure-Sintering Method

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, C. K.; Oh, J. M.; Jang, S. J. [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of); Choi, G. H.; Chun, B. S. [Chungnam National University, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2009-05-15

    Previously the average particle diameter of U-Mo powder used for developing U-Mo dispersion fuel was about 50 {mu}m. U-Mo/Al dispersion fuels were shown that an extensive interaction between the UMo particle and the Al matrix occurred in high power- density of dispersion fuel. Because the interaction product has a low thermal conductivity and density, which have harmful effects for fuel performance, several attempts to avoid the above problems have been made such as (1) the decrease of the contacting area between the fuel and Al matrix, (2) the increase of the alloy stability of the interaction phase through the addition of an additional alloying element, such as Si, Ti and Zr, into the Al matrix. In KAERI U-Mo powder with very large particle size of more than 500 {mu}m could be produced by rotating disk centrifugal atomization process through adjusting the operating parameters in 2006. A consideration was taken for an application of a large particle to plate type fuel with a layer array. When the particles of spherical shape arrayed in a closed packing way the equivalent U-density of fuel meat would approach to more than 8 g-U/cc. The interface temperature between the U-Mo particle and the Al matrix is expected to be low because aluminum with good thermal conductivity is connected from the interface to the cooling water without any thermal diffusion interruption. The temperature at the center of the large U-Mo particle is calculated to be not too high. When the heat flux and the particle diameter are supposed to be 560 W/cm{sup 2} and 700 {mu}m, the temperature difference was about 36 .deg. C. In addition, the U-Mo particles are surrounded with an aluminum matrix so that a little of the constraint force will act on the fuel particles from the aluminum matrix. A problem like debonding between U-Mo foil and Al cladding in monolithic U-Mo fuel under development can be avoided. Some experiments related to the fabrication of large particle array fuel were carried out

  18. Vibrations and instabilities of thin rectangular plates separated by fluid medium with applications to the plate type heat exchanger

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gi-Man, Kim [Kum-Oh National Univ., Taegu (Korea, Republic of)

    1994-12-31

    Due to the prohibition law for using preon gas, many items in engineering field, specially heat exchanger, should be redesigned. The newly designed heat exchanger such a plate type heat exchanger is known to have a good efficiency in exchanging heat. From view of structures of a plate type heat exchanger, thin tube are used instead of circular pipe and the path of the fluid is developed for the high efficiency of the heat exchange by varying the array of tubes. The principal problem in the design of the plate heat exchanger is the potentiality of structural instabilities due to the fluid loading effect during operations. Excessive plate deflections would eventually result in permanent deformation or collapse which would cause an obstruction of the fluid flow in the narrow channels. In this study, a fluid-structural interaction model was developed to investigate analytically the static and dynamic instabilities that have been observed in flat plate heat exchanger. The model consist of two flat plates separated by water. The effects of the internal fluid in the channel was studied. As results, the natural frequency coefficients were investigated for the plate aspect ratios, channel heights, and boundary conditions. For the design criteria in plate type heat exchanger, the critical flow velocities which cause the responses of a plate were defined for divergence, resonance and flutter phenomena. (author). 25 refs. 2 tabs. 48 figs.

  19. Structural analysis of plate-type fuel assemblies and development of a non-destructive method to assess their integrity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Caresta, Mauro, E-mail: mcaresta@yahoo.it [School of Mechanical and Manufacturing Engineering, The University of New South Wales, Sydney 2052, NSW (Australia); Wassink, David [Australian Nuclear Science and Technology Organisation (ANSTO), Lucas Heights 2234, NSW (Australia)

    2013-09-15

    Highlights: • A plate-type fuel assembly is made of thin plates mounted in a box-like structure. • Drag force from the coolant can shift the plates. • A non invasive method is proposed to test the strength of the plate connections. • The natural frequencies’ shift is used to assess the fuel integrity. -- Abstract: This work is concerned with the structural behaviour and the integrity of parallel plate-type nuclear fuel assemblies. A plate-type assembly consists of several thin plates mounted in a box-like structure and is subjected to a coolant flow that can result in a considerable drag force. A finite element model of an assembly is presented to study the sensitivity of the natural frequencies to the stiffness of the plates’ junctions. It is shown that the shift in the natural frequencies of the torsional modes can be used to check the global integrity of the fuel assembly while the local natural frequencies of the inner plates can be used to estimate the maximum drag force they can resist. Finally a non-destructive method is developed to assess the resistance of the inner plates to bear an applied load. Extensive computational and experimental results are presented to prove the applicability of the method presented.

  20. Urine culture - catheterized specimen

    Science.gov (United States)

    Culture - urine - catheterized specimen; Urine culture - catheterization; Catheterized urine specimen culture ... urinary tract infections may be found in the culture. This is called a contaminant. You may not ...

  1. On Ceramics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    School Arts, 1982

    1982-01-01

    Presents four ceramics activities for secondary-level art classes. Included are directions for primitive kiln construction and glaze making. Two ceramics design activities are described in which students make bizarrely-shaped lidded jars, feet, and footwear. (AM)

  2. Ceramic Technology Project database: March 1990 summary report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Keyes, B.L.P.

    1992-07-01

    This report is the fifth in a series of semiannual data summary reports on information being stored in the Ceramic Technology Project (CTP) database. The overall system status as of March 31, 1990, is summarized, and the latest additions of ceramic mechanical properties data are given for zirconia, silicon carbide, and silicon nitride ceramic mechanical properties data, including some properties on brazed specimens.

  3. FATIGUE OF DENTAL CERAMICS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yu; Sailer, Irena; Lawn, Brian R

    2013-01-01

    Objectives Clinical data on survival rates reveal that all-ceramic dental prostheses are susceptible to fracture from repetitive occlusal loading. The objective of this review is to examine the underlying mechanisms of fatigue in current and future dental ceramics. Data/sources The nature of various fatigue modes is elucidated using fracture test data on ceramic layer specimens from the dental and biomechanics literature. Conclusions Failure modes can change over a lifetime, depending on restoration geometry, loading conditions and material properties. Modes that operate in single-cycle loading may be dominated by alternative modes in multi-cycle loading. While post-mortem examination of failed prostheses can determine the sources of certain fractures, the evolution of these fractures en route to failure remains poorly understood. Whereas it is commonly held that loss of load-bearing capacity of dental ceramics in repetitive loading is attributable to chemically-assisted 'slow crack growth' in the presence of water, we demonstrate the existence of more deleterious fatigue mechanisms, mechanical rather than chemical in nature. Neglecting to account for mechanical fatigue can lead to gross overestimates in predicted survival rates. Clinical significance Strategies for prolonging the clinical lifetimes of ceramic restorations are proposed based on a crack-containment philosophy. PMID:24135295

  4. Fatigue of dental ceramics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yu; Sailer, Irena; Lawn, Brian R

    2013-12-01

    Clinical data on survival rates reveal that all-ceramic dental prostheses are susceptible to fracture from repetitive occlusal loading. The objective of this review is to examine the underlying mechanisms of fatigue in current and future dental ceramics. The nature of various fatigue modes is elucidated using fracture test data on ceramic layer specimens from the dental and biomechanics literature. Failure modes can change over a lifetime, depending on restoration geometry, loading conditions and material properties. Modes that operate in single-cycle loading may be dominated by alternative modes in multi-cycle loading. While post-mortem examination of failed prostheses can determine the sources of certain fractures, the evolution of these fractures en route to failure remains poorly understood. Whereas it is commonly held that loss of load-bearing capacity of dental ceramics in repetitive loading is attributable to chemically assisted 'slow crack growth' in the presence of water, we demonstrate the existence of more deleterious fatigue mechanisms, mechanical rather than chemical in nature. Neglecting to account for mechanical fatigue can lead to gross overestimates in predicted survival rates. Strategies for prolonging the clinical lifetimes of ceramic restorations are proposed based on a crack-containment philosophy. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Influence of ceramic surface texture on the wear of gold alloy and heat-pressed ceramics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saiki, Osamu; Koizumi, Hiroyasu; Nogawa, Hiroshi; Hiraba, Haruto; Akazawa, Nobutaka; Matsumura, Hideo

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the influence of ceramic surface texture on the wear of rounded rod specimens. Plate specimens were fabricated from zirconia (ZrO2), feldspathic porcelain, and lithium disilicate glass ceramics (LDG ceramics). Plate surfaces were either ground or polished. Rounded rod specimens with a 2.0-mm-diameter were fabricated from type 4 gold alloy and heat-pressed ceramics (HP ceramics). Wear testing was performed by means of a wear testing apparatus under 5,000 reciprocal strokes of the rod specimen with 5.9 N vertical loading. The results were statistically analyzed with a non-parametric procedure. The gold alloy showed the maximal height loss (90.0 µm) when the rod specimen was abraded with ground porcelain, whereas the HP ceramics exhibited maximal height loss (49.8 µm) when the rod specimen was abraded with ground zirconia. There was a strong correlation between height loss of the rod and surface roughness of the underlying plates, for both the gold alloy and HP ceramics.

  6. Effect of mechanical cycling on the flexural strength of densely sintered ceramics

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Itinoche, Koiti Marco; Ozcan, Mudu; Bottino, Marco Antonio; Oyafuso, Denise

    2006-01-01

    Objectives. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of mechanical cycling on the biaxial flexural strength of two densely sintered ceramic materials. Methods. Disc shaped zirconia (In-Ceram Zirconia) and high alumina (Procera AllCeram) ceramic specimens (diameter: 15 min and thickness: 1.2

  7. Y-TZP ceramic processing from coprecipitated powders: a comparative study with three commercial dental ceramics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lazar, Dolores R R; Bottino, Marco C; Ozcan, Mutlu; Valandro, Luiz Felipe; Amaral, Regina; Ussui, Valter; Bressiani, Ana H A

    2008-12-01

    (1) To synthesize 3mol% yttria-stabilized zirconia (3Y-TZP) powders via coprecipitation route, (2) to obtain zirconia ceramic specimens, analyze surface characteristics, and mechanical properties, and (3) to compare the processed material with three reinforced dental ceramics. A coprecipitation route was used to synthesize a 3mol% yttria-stabilized zirconia ceramic processed by uniaxial compaction and pressureless sintering. Commercially available alumina or alumina/zirconia ceramics, namely Procera AllCeram (PA), In-Ceram Zirconia Block (CAZ) and In-Ceram Zirconia (IZ) were chosen for comparison. All specimens (6mmx5mmx5mm) were polished and ultrasonically cleaned. Qualitative phase analysis was performed by XRD and apparent densities were measured on the basis of Archimedes principle. Ceramics were also characterized using SEM, TEM and EDS. The hardness measurements were made employing Vickers hardness test. Fracture toughness (K(IC)) was calculated. Data were analyzed using one-way analysis of variance (ANOVA) and Tukey's test (alpha=0.05). ANOVA revealed that the Vickers hardness (pceramic materials composition. It was confirmed that the PA ceramic was constituted of a rhombohedral alumina matrix, so-called alpha-alumina. Both CAZ and IZ ceramics presented tetragonal zirconia and alpha-alumina mixture of phases. The SEM/EDS analysis confirmed the presence of aluminum in PA ceramic. In the IZ and CAZ ceramics aluminum, zirconium and cerium in grains involved by a second phase containing aluminum, silicon and lanthanum were identified. PA showed significantly higher mean Vickers hardness values (H(V)) (18.4+/-0.5GPa) compared to vitreous CAZ (10.3+/-0.2GPa) and IZ (10.6+/-0.4GPa) ceramics. Experimental Y-TZP showed significantly lower results than that of the other monophased ceramic (PA) (pceramics (pceramic processing conditions led to ceramics with mechanical properties comparable to commercially available reinforced ceramic materials.

  8. Y-TZP ceramic processing from coprecipitated powders : A comparative study with three commercial dental ceramics

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lazar, Dolores R. R.; Bottino, Marco C.; Ozcan, Mutlu; Valandro, Luiz Felipe; Amaral, Regina; Ussui, Valter; Bressiani, Ana H. A.

    2008-01-01

    Objectives. (1) To synthesize 3 mol% yttria-stabilized zirconia (3Y-TZP) powders via coprecipitation route, (2) to obtain zirconia ceramic specimens, analyze surface characteristics, and mechanical properties, and (3) to compare the processed material with three reinforced dental ceramics. Methods.

  9. Y-TZP ceramic processing from coprecipitated powders : A comparative study with three commercial dental ceramics

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lazar, Dolores R. R.; Bottino, Marco C.; Ozcan, Mutlu; Valandro, Luiz Felipe; Amaral, Regina; Ussui, Valter; Bressiani, Ana H. A.

    2008-01-01

    Objectives. (1) To synthesize 3 mol% yttria-stabilized zirconia (3Y-TZP) powders via coprecipitation route, (2) to obtain zirconia ceramic specimens, analyze surface characteristics, and mechanical properties, and (3) to compare the processed material with three reinforced dental ceramics. Methods.

  10. Translucency of dental ceramics with different thicknesses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Fu; Takahashi, Hidekazu; Iwasaki, Naohiko

    2013-07-01

    The increased use of esthetic restorations requires an improved understanding of the translucent characteristics of ceramic materials. Ceramic translucency has been considered to be dependent on composition and thickness, but less information is available about the translucent characteristics of these materials, especially at different thicknesses. The purpose of this study was to investigate the relationship between translucency and the thickness of different dental ceramics. Six disk-shaped specimens of 8 glass ceramics (IPS e.max Press HO, MO, LT, HT, IPS e.max CAD LT, MO, AvanteZ Dentin, and Trans) and 5 specimens of 5 zirconia ceramics (Cercon Base, Zenotec Zr Bridge, Lava Standard, Lava Standard FS3, and Lava Plus High Translucency) were prepared following the manufacturers' instructions and ground to a predetermined thickness with a grinding machine. A spectrophotometer was used to measure the translucency parameters (TP) of the glass ceramics, which ranged from 2.0 to 0.6 mm, and of the zirconia ceramics, which ranged from 1.0 to 0.4 mm. The relationship between the thickness and TP of each material was evaluated using a regression analysis (α=.05). The TP values of the glass ceramics ranged from 2.2 to 25.3 and the zirconia ceramics from 5.5 to 15.1. There was an increase in the TP with a decrease in thickness, but the amount of change was material dependent. An exponential relationship with statistical significance (Pceramics and zirconia ceramics. The translucency of dental ceramics was significantly influenced by both material and thickness. The translucency of all materials increased exponentially as the thickness decreased. All of the zirconia ceramics evaluated in the present study showed some degree of translucency, which was less sensitive to thickness compared to that of the glass ceramics. Copyright © 2013 The Editorial Council of the Journal of Prosthetic Dentistry. Published by Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Ceramic joining

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Loehman, R.E. [Sandia National Lab., Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    1996-04-01

    This paper describes the relation between reactions at ceramic-metal interfaces and the development of strong interfacial bonds in ceramic joining. Studies on a number of systems are described, including silicon nitrides, aluminium nitrides, mullite, and aluminium oxides. Joints can be weakened by stresses such as thermal expansion mismatch. Ceramic joining is used in a variety of applications such as solid oxide fuel cells.

  12. Ceramic Processing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    EWSUK,KEVIN G.

    1999-11-24

    Ceramics represent a unique class of materials that are distinguished from common metals and plastics by their: (1) high hardness, stiffness, and good wear properties (i.e., abrasion resistance); (2) ability to withstand high temperatures (i.e., refractoriness); (3) chemical durability; and (4) electrical properties that allow them to be electrical insulators, semiconductors, or ionic conductors. Ceramics can be broken down into two general categories, traditional and advanced ceramics. Traditional ceramics include common household products such as clay pots, tiles, pipe, and bricks, porcelain china, sinks, and electrical insulators, and thermally insulating refractory bricks for ovens and fireplaces. Advanced ceramics, also referred to as ''high-tech'' ceramics, include products such as spark plug bodies, piston rings, catalyst supports, and water pump seals for automobiles, thermally insulating tiles for the space shuttle, sodium vapor lamp tubes in streetlights, and the capacitors, resistors, transducers, and varistors in the solid-state electronics we use daily. The major differences between traditional and advanced ceramics are in the processing tolerances and cost. Traditional ceramics are manufactured with inexpensive raw materials, are relatively tolerant of minor process deviations, and are relatively inexpensive. Advanced ceramics are typically made with more refined raw materials and processing to optimize a given property or combination of properties (e.g., mechanical, electrical, dielectric, optical, thermal, physical, and/or magnetic) for a given application. Advanced ceramics generally have improved performance and reliability over traditional ceramics, but are typically more expensive. Additionally, advanced ceramics are typically more sensitive to the chemical and physical defects present in the starting raw materials, or those that are introduced during manufacturing.

  13. [Ceramic posts].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mainjot, Amélie; Legros, Caroline; Vanheusden, Alain

    2006-01-01

    As a result of ceramics and all-ceram technologies development esthetic inlay core and abutments flooded the market. Their tooth-colored appearance enhances restoration biomimetism principally on the marginal gingiva area. This article reviews indications and types of cores designed for natural teeth and implants.

  14. Ceramic Methyltrioxorhenium

    CERN Document Server

    Herrmann, R; Eickerling, G; Helbig, C; Hauf, C; Miller, R; Mayr, F; Krug von Nidda, H A; Scheidt, E W; Scherer, W; Herrmann, Rudolf; Troester, Klaus; Eickerling, Georg; Helbig, Christian; Hauf, Christoph; Miller, Robert; Mayr, Franz; Nidda, Hans-Albrecht Krug von; Scheidt, Ernst-Wilhelm; Scherer, Wolfgang

    2006-01-01

    The metal oxide polymeric methyltrioxorhenium [(CH3)xReO3] is an unique epresentative of a layered inherent conducting organometallic polymer which adopts the structural motifs of classical perovskites in two dimensions (2D) in form of methyl-deficient, corner-sharing ReO5(CH3) octahedra. In order to improve the characteristics of polymeric methyltrioxorhenium with respect to its physical properties and potential usage as an inherentconducting polymer we tried to optimise the synthetic routes of polymeric modifications of 1 to obtain a sintered ceramic material, denoted ceramic MTO. Ceramic MTO formed in a solvent-free synthesis via auto-polymerisation and subsequent sintering processing displays clearly different mechanical and physical properties from polymeric MTO synthesised in aqueous solution. Ceramic MTO is shown to display activated Re-C and Re=O bonds relative to MTO. These electronic and structural characteristics of ceramic MTO are also reflected by a different chemical reactivity compared with its...

  15. Effect of different cleaning regimens on the adhesion of resin to saliva-contaminated ceramics

    OpenAIRE

    2015-01-01

    PURPOSE: The aim of this study was to evaluate the influence of different cleaning regimens on the microshear bond strength (μSBS) of three different all-ceramic surfaces after saliva contamination. MATERIAL AND METHODS: Cubic ceramic specimens (3 × 3 × 3 mm(3) ) were prepared from three types of ceramics: zirconium dioxide (Z), leucite-reinforced glass ceramic (E), lithium disilicate glass ceramic (EX; n = 12/subgroup). A total of 144 composite resin cylinders (diameter: 1 mm, height: 3 m...

  16. Structure design and motion simulation of the pin-cycloid gear planetary reducer with ring-plate-type

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duan, Hongjie; Li, Lijun; Tao, Junyi

    2017-06-01

    The pin-cycloid gear planetary reducer with ring-plate-type is a new type of reducers. It has high transmission ratio range and high efficiency. In this paper the working principle of pin-cycloid gear planetary reducer is discussed, and the structure of the reducer is designed. Especially for the complexity and the difficulty in modelling of the cycloid gear tooth profile, the parametric design module of cycloid gear is developed to solve the cycloid gear modelling problem through the second development of Solid Works. At last, the speed schemes of the input shaft and output shaft of the reducer are obtained by the motion simulation. Through the analysis of the simulation curves, the rationality of the structure design is proved, which provides a theoretical basis for the design and manufacture of the reducer.

  17. Irradiation conditions for fiber laser bonding of HAp-glass ceramics with bovine cortical bone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tadano, Shigeru; Yamada, Satoshi; Kanaoka, Masaru

    2014-01-01

    Orthopedic implants are widely used to repair bones and to replace articulating joint surfaces. It is important to develop an instantaneous technique for the direct bonding of bone and implant materials. The aim of this study was to develop a technique for the laser bonding of bone with an implant material like ceramics. Ceramic specimens (10 mm diameter and 1 mm thickness) were sintered with hydroxyapatite and MgO-Al2O3-SiO2 glass powders mixed in 40:60 wt% proportions. A small hole was bored at the center of a ceramic specimen. The ceramic specimen was positioned onto a bovine bone specimen and a 5 mm diameter area of the ceramic specimen was irradiated using a fiber laser beam (1070-1080 nm wavelength). As a result, the bone and the ceramic specimens bonded strongly under the irradiation conditions of a 400 W laser power and a 1.0 s exposure time. The maximum shear strength was 5.3 ± 2.3 N. A bonding substance that penetrated deeply into the bone specimen was generated around the hole in the ceramic specimen. On using the fiber laser, the ceramic specimen instantaneously bonded to the bone specimen. Further, the irradiation conditions required for the bonding were investigated.

  18. Thermal-hydraulic analysis under partial loss of flow accident hypothesis of a plate-type fuel surrounded by two water channels using RELAP5 code

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Itamar Iliuk

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Thermal-hydraulic analysis of plate-type fuel has great importance to the establishment of safety criteria, also to the licensing of the future nuclear reactor with the objective of propelling the Brazilian nuclear submarine. In this work, an analysis of a single plate-type fuel surrounding by two water channels was performed using the RELAP5 thermal-hydraulic code. To realize the simulations, a plate-type fuel with the meat of uranium dioxide sandwiched between two Zircaloy-4 plates was proposed. A partial loss of flow accident was simulated to show the behavior of the model under this type of accident. The results show that the critical heat flux was detected in the central region along the axial direction of the plate when the right water channel was blocked.

  19. 37 CFR 2.59 - Filing substitute specimen(s).

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 37 Patents, Trademarks, and Copyrights 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Filing substitute specimen(s..., DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE RULES OF PRACTICE IN TRADEMARK CASES Drawing § 2.59 Filing substitute specimen(s). (a... specimen(s), the applicant must: (1) For an amendment to allege use under § 2.76, verify by affidavit...

  20. Engineering ceramics

    CERN Document Server

    Bengisu, Murat

    2001-01-01

    This is a comprehensive book applying especially to junior and senior engineering students pursuing Materials Science/ Engineering, Ceramic Engineering and Mechanical Engineering degrees. It is also a reference book for other disciplines such as Chemical Engineering, Biomedical Engineering, Nuclear Engineering and Environmental Engineering. Important properties of most engineering ceramics are given in detailed tables. Many current and possible applications of engineering ceramics are described, which can be used as a guide for materials selection and for potential future research. While covering all relevant information regarding raw materials, processing properties, characterization and applications of engineering ceramics, the book also summarizes most recent innovations and developments in this field as a result of extensive literature search.

  1. Incorporation of Waste Ceramic Blocks in Structural Ceramics

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Oliveira, Orley Magalhães; das Graças da Silva-Valenzuela, Maria; Andrade, Christiano Gianesi Bastos; Junior, Antonio Hortêncio Munhoz; Valenzuela-Díaz, Francisco Rolando

    In Brazil, Ceramics Industries produce bricks and ceramic tiles in practically all the country. In the southwestern region of Bahia are located some of these industries. A considerable proportion of the material produced do not pass the quality control for not having a uniform visual appearance or have cracks. These burned pieces are generally discarded, resulting in a big quantity of waste. The objective of this work is the characterization of this industrial waste and thus consign them to other industrial applications. Our results demonstrate that the burned waste have potential to be used for incorporation in common clay for structural ceramics, thereby avoiding its disposal in nature and reducing this environmental liability. Experimental bodies were tested with different quantities of waste. The common clay and the burned waste were characterized by XRD, TG/DTA, and SEM. The burned specimens were tested for mechanical strength, water absorption, bulk density, and apparent porosity. An incorporation of 10% of waste furnished the best results.

  2. Contrast ratio of veneering and core ceramics as a function of thickness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Antonson, S A; Anusavice, K J

    2001-01-01

    The recent development of several dental ceramic products has raised questions concerning the relative translucency potential of these materials. The objective of this study was to test the hypothesis that the contrast ratio of dental core and veneering ceramics is a linear function of ceramic thickness. Four groups of disk-shaped core ceramic specimens and four groups of veneering ceramic specimens (15 mm in diameter and 0.70, 1.10, 1.25, or 1.50 mm in thickness) were prepared for analysis. Five disks were randomly assigned to each of the eight groups. Four core ceramics were selected for study: (1) tetrasilicic fluormica glass ceramic, (2) quadruple-chain silicate glass ceramic, (3) barium silicate glass ceramic, and (4) sintered alumina. The four veneering ceramics included two feldspathic body porcelains, one fine-grained veneering porcelain, and one ultralow-fusing porcelain. There were significant differences among the mean contrast ratio values of these materials. The most translucent group of the core materials was tetrasilicic fluormica glass ceramic, and the least translucent material was sintered alumina. The most translucent group among the veneering ceramics was one of the feldspathic ceramics (Ceramco), and the least translucent material for all thicknesses was the ultralow-fusing veneering ceramic (Duceram LFC). The mean contrast ratio values were significantly different at a thickness of 1.50 mm of the four core ceramic groups and among the four veneering ceramic groups. The results of this study indicate that the tetrasilicic fluormica glass ceramic is generally the most translucent core ceramic for thicknesses of 0.70, 1.10, and 1.25 mm, and Ceramco porcelain is the most translucent veneering ceramic. However, for a thickness of 1.50 mm, the quadruple-chain silicate glass ceramic was the most translucent core ceramic. The relationship between contrast ratio and thickness was linear for all ceramics except Vita VMK 68.

  3. Structural Ceramics Database

    Science.gov (United States)

    SRD 30 NIST Structural Ceramics Database (Web, free access)   The NIST Structural Ceramics Database (WebSCD) provides evaluated materials property data for a wide range of advanced ceramics known variously as structural ceramics, engineering ceramics, and fine ceramics.

  4. Controlled Environment Specimen Transfer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Damsgaard, Christian Danvad; Zandbergen, Henny W.; Hansen, Thomas Willum

    2014-01-01

    Specimen transfer under controlled environment conditions, such as temperature, pressure, and gas composition, is necessary to conduct successive complementary in situ characterization of materials sensitive to ambient conditions. The in situ transfer concept is introduced by linking an environme...

  5. Residual stresses in bilayer dental ceramics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taskonak, Burak; Mecholsky, John J; Anusavice, Kenneth J

    2005-06-01

    It is clinically observed that lithia-disilicate-based all-ceramic fixed partial dentures (FPD) can fail because of the fragmentation of the veneering material. The hypothesis of this study is that the global residual stresses within the surface of those veneered FPDs may be responsible for partial fragmentation of the veneering ceramic. Bilayer and monolithic ceramic composites were prepared using a lithia disilicate based (Li2OSiO2) glass-ceramic core and a glass veneer. A four-step fracture mechanics approach was used to analyze residual stress in bilayered all-ceramic FPDs. We found a statistically significant increase in the mean flexural strengths of bilayer specimens compared with monolithic glass specimens (p < or = 0.05). There was a statistically significant difference between the mean longitudinal and transverse indentation-induced crack sizes in bilayer specimens (p < or = 0.05), which indicates the existence of residual stress. Global residual stresses in the veneer layer, calculated using a fracture mechanics equation, were determined to be responsible for the increased strength and observed chipping, i.e., spallation in bilayer ceramic composites.

  6. Influence of ceramic thickness and ceramic materials on fracture resistance of posterior partial coverage restorations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bakeman, E M; Rego, N; Chaiyabutr, Y; Kois, J C

    2015-01-01

    This study evaluated the influence of ceramic thickness and ceramic materials on fracture resistance of posterior partial coverage ceramic restorations. Forty extracted molars were allocated into four groups (n=10) to test for two variables: 1) the thickness of ceramic (1 mm or 2 mm) and 2) the ceramic materials (a lithium disilicate glass-ceramic [IPS e.max] or leucite-reinforced glass ceramic [IPS Empress]). All ceramic restorations were luted with resin cement (Variolink II) on the prepared teeth. These luted specimens were loaded to failure in a universal testing machine, in the compression mode, with a crosshead speed of 1.0 mm/min. The data were analyzed using two-way analysis of variance and the Tukey Honestly Significantly Different multiple comparison test (α =0.05). The fracture resistance revealed a significant effect for materials (pceramic was not significant (p=0.074), and the interaction between the thickness of ceramic and the materials was not significant (p=0.406). Mean (standard deviation) fracture resistance values were as follows: a 2-mm thickness of a lithium disilicate bonded to tooth structure (2505 [401] N) revealed a significantly higher fracture resistance than did a 1-mm thickness of leucite-reinforced (1569 [452] N) and a 2-mm thickness of leucite-reinforced ceramic bonded to tooth structure (1716 [436] N) (pceramic at 1-mm thickness (2105 [567] N) and at 2-mm thickness. Using a lithium disilicate glass ceramic for partial coverage restoration significantly improved fracture resistance compared to using a leucite-reinforced glass ceramic. The thickness of ceramic had no significant effect on fracture resistance when the ceramics were bonded to the underlying tooth structure.

  7. Effect of various intermediate ceramic layers on the interfacial stability of zirconia core and veneering ceramics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoon, Hyung-In; Yeo, In-Sung; Yi, Yang-Jin; Kim, Sung-Hun; Lee, Jai-Bong; Han, Jung-Suk

    2015-01-01

    The purposes of this study were to evaluate the effects of intermediate ceramics on the adhesion between the zirconia core and veneer ceramics. The polished surfaces of fully sintered Y-TZP blocks received three different treatments: (1) connector (C), (2) liner (L) or (3) wash layer (W). All the treated zirconia blocks were veneered with either (a) fluorapatite glass-ceramic (E) or (b) feldspathic porcelain (V) and divided into four groups (CE, CV, LE and WV). For the control group, the testing surfaces of metal blocks were veneered with feldspathic porcelain (VM). A half of the samples in each group (n = 21) were exposed to thermocycling, while the other half of the specimens were stored at room temperature under dry conditions. All specimens were subjected to the shear test and the failed surfaces were microscopically examined. The elemental distribution at the zirconia core/veneer interface was analyzed. The specimens in Groups CE and CV exhibited significantly greater mean bond strength values than those in Groups LE and WV, respectively (p ceramic substances into the zirconia surface. A glass-ceramic based connector is significantly more favorable to core/veneer adhesion than the other intermediate ceramics evaluated in the study. However, thermal cycling affected the bond strength at the core/veneer interface differently according to the intermediate ceramics.

  8. Thermal-hydraulic Fortran program for steady-state calculations of plate-type fuel research reactors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Khedr Ahmed

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available The safety assessment of research and power reactors is a continuous process covering their lifespan and requiring verified and validated codes. Power reactor codes all over the world are well established and qualified against real measuring data and qualified experimental facilities. These codes are usually sophisticated, require special skills and consume a lot of running time. On the other hand, most research reactor codes still require much more data for validation and qualification. It is, therefore, of benefit to any regulatory body to develop its own codes for the review and assessment of research reactors. The present paper introduces a simple, one-dimensional Fortran program called THDSN for steady-state thermal-hydraulic calculations of plate-type fuel research reactors. Besides calculating the fuel and coolant temperature distributions and pressure gradients in an average and hot channel, the program calculates the safety limits and margins against the critical phenomena encountered in research reactors, such as the onset of nucleate boiling, critical heat flux and flow instability. Well known thermal-hydraulic correlations for calculating the safety parameters and several formulas for the heat transfer coefficient have been used. The THDSN program was verified by comparing its results for 2 and 10 MW benchmark reactors with those published in IAEA publications and a good agreement was found. Also, the results of the program are compared with those published for other programs, such as the PARET and TERMIC.

  9. Succession of microorganisms in a plate-type air treatment biofilter during filtration of various volatile compounds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Repečkienė, Jūratė; Švedienė, Jurgita; Paškevičius, Algimantas; Tekorienė, Rūta; Raudonienė, Vita; Gudeliūnaitė, Eglė; Baltrėnas, Pranas; Misevičius, Antonas

    2015-01-01

    Changes in the number and species diversity of cultivable microorganisms in a newly developed plate-type biofilter during filtration of various volatile pollutants were studied. The novelty of the investigation is the monitoring of microorganism succession in different parts of biofilter plates with original packing material consisting of birch fibre and needle-punched non-woven fabric. It was shown that the largest number of fungi and yeasts develop on the top and middle, while bacteria develop on the bottom and middle parts of plates. The number of microorganisms depends on the origin of the pollutant, the pH and temperature inside the biofilter and the moisture of the porous plates. The statistically significant correlation between the number of microorganisms and inlet concentration of acetone was estimated, while ammonia showed a negative influence on yeast distribution. Paecilomyces variotii, Rhodotorula mucilaginosa and Bacillus subtilis were the most common organisms found during filtration of all examined volatiles; however, some differences of microbial communities in different parts of the biofilter plates and filtrated volatile compounds were obtained.

  10. The Optimum Plate to Plate Spacing for Maximum Heat Transfer Rate from a Flat Plate Type Heat Exchanger

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ambarita, Himsar; Kishinami, Koki; Daimaruya, Mashashi; Tokura, Ikuo; Kawai, Hideki; Suzuki, Jun; Kobiyama, Mashayosi; Ginting, Armansyah

    The present paper is a study on the optimum plate to plate spacing for maximum heat transfer rate from a flat plate type heat exchanger. The heat exchanger consists of a number of parallel flat plates. The working fluids are flowed at the same operational conditions, either fixed pressure head or fixed fan power input. Parallel and counter flow directions of the working fluids were considered. While the volume of the heat exchanger is kept constant, plate number was varied. Hence, the spacing between plates as well as heat transfer rate will vary and there exists a maximum heat transfer rate. The objective of this paper is to seek the optimum plate to plate spacing for maximum heat transfer rate. In order to solve the problem, analytical and numerical solutions have been carried out. In the analytical solution, the correlations of the optimum plate to plate spacing as a function of the non-dimensional parameters were developed. Furthermore, the numerical simulation is carried out to evaluate the correlations. The results show that the optimum plate to plate spacing for a counter flow heat exchanger is smaller than parallel flow ones. On the other hand, the maximum heat transfer rate for a counter flow heat exchanger is bigger than parallel flow ones.

  11. Crack Growth along Interfaces in Porous Ceramic Layers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Bent F.; Horsewell, Andy

    2001-01-01

    Crack growth along porous ceramic layers was studied experimentally. Double cantilever beam sandwich specimens were loaded with pure bending moments to obtain stable crack growth. The experiments were conducted in an environmental scanning electron microscope enabling in situ observations...

  12. Effect of surface conditioning methods on the bond strength of luting cement to ceramics

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ozcan, M; Vallittu, PK; Özcan, Mutlu; Vallittu, Pekka K.

    2003-01-01

    Objectives. This study evaluated the effect of three different surface conditioning methods on the bond strength of a Bis-GMA based luting cement to six commercial dental ceramics. Methods. Six disc shaped ceramic specimens (glass ceramics, glass infiltrated alumina, glass infiltrated zirconium diox

  13. Evaluation of Ceramic Honeycomb Core Compression Behavior at Room Temperature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bird, Richard K.; Lapointe, Thomas S.

    2013-01-01

    Room temperature flatwise compression tests were conducted on two varieties of ceramic honeycomb core specimens that have potential for high-temperature structural applications. One set of specimens was fabricated using strips of a commercially-available thin-gage "ceramic paper" sheet molded into a hexagonal core configuration. The other set was fabricated by machining honeycomb core directly from a commercially available rigid insulation tile material. This paper summarizes the results from these tests.

  14. Bonding polycarbonate brackets to ceramic: : Effects of substrate treatment on bond strength

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Özcan, Mutlu; Vallittu, Pekka K.; Peltomäki, Timo; Huysmans, Marie-Charlotte; Kalk, Warner

    2004-01-01

    This study evaluated the effects of 5 different surface conditioning methods on the bond strength of polycarbonate brackets bonded to ceramic surfaces with resin based cement. Six disc-shaped ceramic specimens (feldspathic porcelain) with glazed surfaces were used for each group. The specimens were

  15. Bonding polycarbonate brackets to ceramic : Effects of substrate treatment on bond strength

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Özcan, Mutlu; Vallittu, Pekka K.; Peltomäki, Timo; Huysmans, Marie-Charlotte; Kalk, Warner

    2004-01-01

    This study evaluated the effects of 5 different surface conditioning methods on the bond strength of polycarbonate brackets bonded to ceramic surfaces with resin based cement. Six disc-shaped ceramic specimens (feldspathic porcelain) with glazed surfaces were used for each group. The specimens were

  16. A Novel Conservation Method of Historical Outdoor Ceramics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aivaras Kareiva

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available In this study, a novel conservation method was developed for the protection of historical outdoor ceramics. The historical ceramics from monastery of “San Filippo di Fragalà” (Sicily, Italy were chosen for this study. Polymeric films on the surface of ceramics specimens were formed using Silres BS 16 as a precursor. For the comparison, the material Paraloid B-82, which is already known in the conservation practice, was also used for the formation of protective coatings on historical ceramics. The investigated samples were characterized by SEM, TG, EDX, XRD methods and contact angle measurements. The results obtained showed that ceramic samples were successfully preserved and saturated by Silres BS 16 with forming effective polymeric coatings on ancient ceramics surfaces. Keywords: Ancient ceramics, conservation, Silres BS 16, SEM, TG, contact angle.DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.5755/j01.ms.21.2.6823

  17. Electron beam joining of structural ceramics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Turman, B.N.; Glass, S.J.; Halbleib, J.A.; Helmich, D.R.; Loehman, R.E.

    1995-04-01

    Feasibility of ceramic joining using a high energy (10 MeV) electron beam. The experiments used refractory metals as bonding materials in buried interfaces between Si{sub 3}N{sub 4} pieces. Because the heat capacity of the metal bonding layer is much lower than the ceramic, the metal reaches much higher temperatures than the adjoining ceramic. Using the right combination of beam parameters allows the metal to be melted without causing the adjoining ceramics to melt or decompose. Beam energy deposition and thermal simulations were performed to guide the experiments. Joints were shear tested and interfaces between the metal and the ceramic were examined to identify the bonding mechanism. Specimens joined by electron beams were compared to specimens produced by hot-pressing. Similar reactions occurred using both processes. Reactions between the metal and ceramic produced silicides that bond the metal to the ceramic. The molybdenum silicide reaction products appeared to be more brittle than the platinum silicides. Si{sub 3}N{sub 4} was also joined to Si{sub 3} N{sub 4} directly. The bonding appears to have been produced by the flow of intergranular glass into the interface. Shear strength was similar to the metal bonded specimens. Bend specimens Of Si{sub 3}N{sub 4} were exposed to electron beams with similar parameters to those used in joining experiments to determine how beam exposure degrades the strength. Damage was macroscopic in nature with craters being tonned by material ablation, and cracking occurring due to excessive thermal stresses. Si was also observed on the surface indicating the Si{sub 3}N{sub 4} was decomposing. Bend strength after exposure was 62% of the asreceived strength. No obvious microstructural differences were observed in the material close to the damaged region compared to material in regions far away from the damage.

  18. Ceramic Seal.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Smartt, Heidi A. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Romero, Juan A. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Custer, Joyce Olsen [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Hymel, Ross W. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Krementz, Dan [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL); Gobin, Derek [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL); Harpring, Larry [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL); Martinez-Rodriguez, Michael [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL); Varble, Don [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL); DiMaio, Jeff [Tetramer Technologies, Pendleton, SC (United States); Hudson, Stephen [Tetramer Technologies, Pendleton, SC (United States)

    2016-11-01

    Containment/Surveillance (C/S) measures are critical to any verification regime in order to maintain Continuity of Knowledge (CoK). The Ceramic Seal project is research into the next generation technologies to advance C/S, in particular improving security and efficiency. The Ceramic Seal is a small form factor loop seal with improved tamper-indication including a frangible seal body, tamper planes, external coatings, and electronic monitoring of the seal body integrity. It improves efficiency through a self-securing wire and in-situ verification with a handheld reader. Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) and Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL), under sponsorship from the U.S. National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA) Office of Defense Nuclear Nonproliferation Research and Development (DNN R&D), have previously designed and have now fabricated and tested Ceramic Seals. Tests have occurred at both SNL and SRNL, with different types of tests occurring at each facility. This interim report will describe the Ceramic Seal prototype, the design and development of a handheld standalone reader and an interface to a data acquisition system, fabrication of the seals, and results of initial testing.

  19. Genomics and museum specimens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nachman, Michael W

    2013-12-01

    Nearly 25 years ago, Allan Wilson and colleagues isolated DNA sequences from museum specimens of kangaroo rats (Dipodomys panamintinus) and compared these sequences with those from freshly collected animals (Thomas et al. 1990). The museum specimens had been collected up to 78 years earlier, so the two samples provided a direct temporal comparison of patterns of genetic variation. This was not the first time DNA sequences had been isolated from preserved material, but it was the first time it had been carried out with a population sample. Population geneticists often try to make inferences about the influence of historical processes such as selection, drift, mutation and migration on patterns of genetic variation in the present. The work of Wilson and colleagues was important in part because it suggested a way in which population geneticists could actually study genetic change in natural populations through time, much the same way that experimentalists can do with artificial populations in the laboratory. Indeed, the work of Thomas et al. (1990) spawned dozens of studies in which museum specimens were used to compare historical and present-day genetic diversity (reviewed in Wandeler et al. 2007). All of these studies, however, were limited by the same fundamental problem: old DNA is degraded into short fragments. As a consequence, these studies mostly involved PCR amplification of short templates, usually short stretches of mitochondrial DNA or microsatellites. In this issue, Bi et al. (2013) report a breakthrough that should open the door to studies of genomic variation in museum specimens. They used target enrichment (exon capture) and next-generation (Illumina) sequencing to compare patterns of genetic variation in historic and present-day population samples of alpine chipmunks (Tamias alpinus) (Fig. 1). The historic samples came from specimens collected in 1915, so the temporal span of this comparison is nearly 100 years.

  20. Biaxial Creep Specimen Fabrication

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    JL Bump; RF Luther

    2006-02-09

    This report documents the results of the weld development and abbreviated weld qualification efforts performed by Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) for refractory metal and superalloy biaxial creep specimens. Biaxial creep specimens were to be assembled, electron beam welded, laser-seal welded, and pressurized at PNNL for both in-pile (JOYO reactor, O-arai, Japan) and out-of-pile creep testing. The objective of this test campaign was to evaluate the creep behavior of primary cladding and structural alloys under consideration for the Prometheus space reactor. PNNL successfully developed electron beam weld parameters for six of these materials prior to the termination of the Naval Reactors program effort to deliver a space reactor for Project Prometheus. These materials were FS-85, ASTAR-811C, T-111, Alloy 617, Haynes 230, and Nirnonic PE16. Early termination of the NR space program precluded the development of laser welding parameters for post-pressurization seal weldments.

  1. The upgrade and conversion of the ET-RR-1 research reactor using plate type fuel elements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ashoub, N. [Reactor Physics Dept., Nuclear Research Center, Atomic Energy Authority, Cairo (Egypt); Saleh, H.G. [Faculty of Girls for Arts and Education, Ain-Shams Univ., Cairo (Egypt)

    2001-11-01

    The ET-RR-1 research reactor has been operated at 2 MW since 1961 using EK-10 fuel elements with 10% enriched uranium. The reactor has been used for nuclear applied research and isotope production. In order to upgrade the reactor power to a reasonable limit facing up-to-date uses, core conversion by a new type of fuel element available is necessary. Two fuel elements in plate type are suggested in this study to be used in the ET-RR-1 reactor core rather than the utilized ones. The first element has a dimension of 8 x 8 x 50 cm and consists of 19.7% enriched uranium, which is typical for that utilized in the ET-RR-2 reactor, but with a different length. The other element is proposed with a dimension of 7 x 7 x 50 cm and has the same uranium enrichment. To accomplish safety requirements for these fuel elements, thermal-hydraulic evaluation has been carried out using the PARET code. To reach a core conversion of the ET-RR-1 reactor with the above two types of fuel elements, neutronic calculations have been performed using WIMSD4, DIXY2 and EREBUS codes. Some important nuclear parameters needed in the physical design of the reactor were calculated and included in this study. (orig.) [German] Der ET-RR-1 Forschungsreaktor wird seit 1961 unter Verwendung von EK-10 Brennelementen mit einer Leistung von 2 MW betrieben. Der Reaktor wird in der angewandten Forschung und zur Isotopenherstellung eingesetzt. Um die Reaktorleistung im Hinblick auf eine zeitgemaesse Nutzung der Anlage in einem vernuenftigen Mass zu erhoehen, ist eine Umwandlung des Kerns durch Verwendung neuartiger Brennelemente noetig. In der vorliegenden Untersuchung wird vorgeschlagen, anstelle der z. Z. verwendeten Elemente zwei neue, plattenfoermige Brennelemente zu verwenden. Das erste Element hat eine Groesse von 8 x 8 x 50 cm und besteht aus 19,7% angereichertem Uran, was den im ET-RR-2 Reaktor verwendeten Elementen entspricht, allerdings mit einer anderen Groesse. Das zweite Element hat die gleiche

  2. [Blood Count Specimen].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tamura, Takako

    2015-12-01

    The circulating blood volume accounts for 8% of the body weight, of which 45% comprises cellular components (blood cells) and 55% liquid components. We can measure the number and morphological features of blood cells (leukocytes, red blood cells, platelets), or count the amount of hemoglobin in a complete blood count: (CBC). Blood counts are often used to detect inflammatory diseases such as infection, anemia, a bleeding tendency, and abnormal cell screening of blood disease. This count is widely used as a basic data item of health examination. In recent years, clinical tests before consultation have become common among outpatient clinics, and the influence of laboratory values on consultation has grown. CBC, which is intended to count the number of raw cells and to check morphological features, is easily influenced by the environment, techniques, etc., during specimen collection procedures and transportation. Therefore, special attention is necessary to read laboratory data. Providing correct test values that accurately reflect a patient's condition from the laboratory to clinical side is crucial. Inappropriate medical treatment caused by erroneous values resulting from altered specimens should be avoided. In order to provide correct test values, the daily management of devices is a matter of course, and comprehending data variables and positively providing information to the clinical side are important. In this chapter, concerning sampling collection, blood collection tubes, dealing with specimens, transportation, and storage, I will discuss their effects on CBC, along with management or handling methods.

  3. Evaluation of plate type fuel options for small power reactors; Avaliacao de alternativas de combustivel tipo placa para reatores de pequeno porte

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Andrzejewski, Claudio de Sa

    2005-07-01

    Plate type fuels are generally used in research reactor. The utilization of this kind of configuration improves significantly the overall performance fuel. The conception of new fuels for small power reactors based in plate-type configuration needs a complete review of the safety criteria originally used to conduce power and research reactor projects. In this work, a group of safety criteria is established for the utilization of plate-type fuels in small power reactors taking into consideration the characteristics of power and research reactors. The performance characteristics of fuel elements are strongly supported by its materials properties and the adopted configuration for its fissile particles. The present work makes an orientated bibliographic investigation searching the best material properties (structural materials and fuel compounds) related to the performance fuel. Looking for good parafermionic characteristics and manufacturing exequibility associated to existing facilities in national research centres, this work proposes several alternatives of plate type fuels, considering its utilization in small power reactors: dispersions of UO{sub 2} in stainless steel, of UO{sub 2} in zircaloy, and of U-Mo alloy in zircaloy, and monolithic plates of U-Mo cladded with zircaloy. Given the strong dependency of radiation damage with temperature increase, the safety criteria related to heat transfer were verified for all the alternatives, namely the DNBR; coolant temperature lower than saturation temperature; peak meat temperature to avoid swelling; peak fuel temperature to avoid meat-matrix reaction. It was found that all alternatives meet the safety criteria including the 0.5 mm monolithic U-Mo plate cladded with zircaloy. (author)

  4. Ceramic susceptor for induction bonding of metals, ceramics, and plastics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fox, Robert L.; Buckley, John D.

    1991-01-01

    A thin (.005) flexible ceramic susceptor (carbon) was discovered. It was developed to join ceramics, plastics, metals, and combinations of these materials using a unique induction heating process. Bonding times for laboratory specimens comparing state of the art technology to induction bonding were cut by a factor of 10 to 100 times. This novel type of carbon susceptor allows for applying heat directly and only to the bondline without heating the entire structure, supports, and fixtures of a bonding assembly. The ceramic (carbon film) susceptor produces molten adhesive or matrix material at the bond interface. This molten material flows through the perforated susceptor producing a fusion between the two parts to be joined, which in many instances has proven to be stronger than the parent material. Bonding can be accomplished in 2 minutes on areas submitted to the inductive heating. Because a carbon susceptor is used in bonding carbon fiber reinforced plastics and ceramics, there is no radar signature or return making it an ideal process for joining advanced aerospace composite structures.

  5. Specimen Holder For Flammability Tests

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rucker, Michelle A.

    1992-01-01

    Fixture holds sheet specimens for flammability tests. Frame and clamps designed to minimize local overstress on specimen. Heat capacity of fixture low, interfering less with interpretation of results of test by drawing less heat away from specimen. Accepts films, fabrics, foams, and other sheets, rigid or flexible. Specimens thin or thick, or of variable thickness. Bent to accommodate curved rigid specimens. Also used for such other tests as particle-impact tests.

  6. NASA Biological Specimen Repository

    Science.gov (United States)

    McMonigal, K. A.; Pietrzyk, R. A.; Sams, C. F.; Johnson, M. A.

    2010-01-01

    The NASA Biological Specimen Repository (NBSR) was established in 2006 to collect, process, preserve and distribute spaceflight-related biological specimens from long duration ISS astronauts. This repository provides unique opportunities to study longitudinal changes in human physiology spanning may missions. The NBSR collects blood and urine samples from all participating ISS crewmembers who have provided informed consent. These biological samples are collected once before flight, during flight scheduled on flight days 15, 30, 60, 120 and within 2 weeks of landing. Postflight sessions are conducted 3 and 30 days after landing. The number of in-flight sessions is dependent on the duration of the mission. Specimens are maintained under optimal storage conditions in a manner that will maximize their integrity and viability for future research The repository operates under the authority of the NASA/JSC Committee for the Protection of Human Subjects to support scientific discovery that contributes to our fundamental knowledge in the area of human physiological changes and adaptation to a microgravity environment. The NBSR will institute guidelines for the solicitation, review and sample distribution process through establishment of the NBSR Advisory Board. The Advisory Board will be composed of representatives of all participating space agencies to evaluate each request from investigators for use of the samples. This process will be consistent with ethical principles, protection of crewmember confidentiality, prevailing laws and regulations, intellectual property policies, and consent form language. Operations supporting the NBSR are scheduled to continue until the end of U.S. presence on the ISS. Sample distribution is proposed to begin with selections on investigations beginning in 2017. The availability of the NBSR will contribute to the body of knowledge about the diverse factors of spaceflight on human physiology.

  7. Modelling of Specimen Fracture

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-09-23

    the plate center. An end load of 1.0 MPa was applied. 1 2 3 Modelling of Specimen Fracture – Final Report 11 TR-13-47 Figure 2.5: Crack Geometry Figure...Christopher Bayley DRDC Atlantic Dockyard Laboratory Pacific CFB Esquimalt, Building 199 PO Box 17000, Station Forces Victoria, British Columbia Canada...q The weighting function, q , can be any arbitrary function within the J-integral domain, and must be zero on the domain boundary . An easy function

  8. Labeling of Patient Specimens

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-26

    noted during the event that the actu.al number of near miss incidmts reported monthly was low due to laboratory personnel performing rounds each...specimens never leaves label and if moved it is labeled), All orders in system and all near misses and errors reported to patient safety Purchase/Install...Meeting 14 Aug 09, 1400 in lab break room thru out Develop TICK sheet to track near misses .JDI Ms. Clark Clinics will provide toPS 1st working day of

  9. SHEAR BOND STRENGTHS BETWEEN CERAMIC CORES AND VENEERING CERAMICS OF DENTAL BI-LAYERED CERAMIC SYSTEMS AND THE SENSITIVITY TO THERMOCYCLING

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    SUN TING, BDS, DDS

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study was to investigate the bond strength between various commercial ceramic core materials and veneering ceramics of dental bi-layered ceramic combinations and the effect of thermocycling. The shear bond strength of four dental bi-layered ceramic combinations (white Cercon, yellow Cercon, white Lava, yellow Lava, IPS E.max were tested. Metal ceramic combinations were conducted as a control group. Half of each group was subjected to thermocycling. All specimens were thereafter subjected to a shear force. The initial mean shear bond strength values in MPa ± S.D were 28.02 ± 3.04 for White Cercon Base/Cercon Ceram Kiss, 27.54 ± 2.20 for Yellow Cercon Base/Cercon Ceram Kiss, 28.43 ± 2.13for White Lava Frame/Lava Ceram, 27.36 ± 2.25 for Yellow Lava Frame/Lava Ceram, 47.10 ± 3.77 for IPS E.max Press/IPS E.max Ceram and 30.11 ± 2.15 for metal ceramic control. The highest shear strength was recorded for IPS E.max Press/IPS E.max Ceram before and after thermocycling. The mean shear bond strength values of five other combinations were not significantly different (P < 0.05. Lithium-disilicate based combinations produced the highest core-veneer bonds that overwhelmed the metal ceramic combinations. Thermocycling had no effect on the core-veneer bonds. The core-veneer bonds of zirconia based combinations were not weakened by the addition of coloring pigments.

  10. Type specimen studies in Pleurotus

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Petersen, Ronald H.; Krisai-Greilhuber, Irmgard

    1999-01-01

    An epitype specimen is designated for Pleurotus cornucopiae. Morphological examination of Mexican material and the type specimen of P. opuntiae showed that the distribution of this species includes North Africa and the highlands of Mexico. The type specimen of Lentinus (Pleurotus) eugrammus reveals

  11. The method used for justification of engineering solutions for multistage plate-type mufflers attached to gas-air ducts of thermal power plants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tupov, V. B.

    2013-08-01

    This paper describes technical and economic problems associated with the selection of designs of mufflers attached to gas-air ducts of thermal power plants. A method is suggested that makes it possible to determine the dimensions of each stage of plate-type mufflers on the basis of achieving the lowest total discounted costs in order to provide the required acoustical performance at a permissible aerodynamic resistance of a muffler. The condition of the lowest total discounted costs for a multistage muffler, which is valid for different types of mufflers, has been obtained.

  12. New Technique for Successful Thermal Barrier Coating Specimen Preparation for Transmission Electron Microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brickey; Lee

    2000-05-01

    Reliability of thermal barrier coatings (TBC) hinges on the adhesion of a thermally grown oxide scale to an insulative ceramic topcoat and an underlying metallic bondcoat. The width of the scale and its interfaces makes transmission electron microscopy (TEM) an appropriate tool for its analysis. However, specimen preparation has proven to be a challenging obstacle leading to a dearth of TEM research on TBCs. A new approach to cross-section TBC TEM specimen preparation is described. The principal advantages of this technique are reproducibility, reduced specimen damage, and time savings resulting from decreased ion milling. This technique has been successfully applied to numerous TBC specimens with various thermal histories.

  13. Curvature behaviour of multilayer specimens of thermal barrier systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Blandin, G.; Bruenings, S.E.; Steinbrech, R.W.; Singheiser, L. [Forschungszentrum Juelich GmbH (Germany). Inst. fuer Werkstoffe und Verfahren der Energietechnik

    2000-07-01

    The impact of residual stresses on the elastic and plastic deformation behavior of plasma sprayed and physical vapor deposited thermal barrier systems was studied. In particular, multilayer specimen strips composed of plasma sprayed partially stabilized zirconia, oxidation resistant NiCoCrAlY bond-coat and Ni-based superalloy substrate were tested. The experiments focused on the in-situ observation of specimen curvature during thermal cycling between room temperature and 1000 C. The mechanical response of specimens with different layer thickness was analyzed with a thermoelastic model to derive elastic modulus and thermal expansion of the ceramic top coat, both parameters as a function of temperature. With the thermoelastic data of all three layers, the residual stress distribution could be calculated analytically. The results of the two coating variants are compared. The deviation from thermoelastic behavior at higher temperature is discussed in terms of stress relaxation in the bond coat due to plastic deformation. (orig.)

  14. 42号CNTT板式道岔铺设施工技术%Construction Techniques for Laying No.42 CNNT Plate-Type Switches

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    帅建兵

    2012-01-01

    42号CNTT板式道岔由转辙器、连接段和辙叉三部分组成,线形为复合曲线,具有容许通过速度高、高安全性等特点。以京沪高速铁路徐州东站42号CNTT板式道岔铺设施工为依托,介绍了道岔铺设的工艺流程、钢轨焊接及精调方法,为今后同类工程施工提供了良好的借鉴。%The No.42 CNTT Plate-type Switch is made up of a switch,a connective section and some frogs.With the characteristics of allowing high-speed passage,being high in safety,etc.,the linearity of the switch is of the multi-curve linearity.With the laying construction of the No.42 CNTT Plate-type Switch at the Xuzhou East Station of the Beijing-Shanghai High-speed Railway as a practical example,the construction processes for laying the switch,the rail-welding and fine-rail-adjustment methods are introduced in the paper,which may serve as a good reference for the construction of other similar projects in the future.

  15. Development and Validation of Capabilities to Measure Thermal Properties of Layered Monolithic U-Mo Alloy Plate-Type Fuel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burkes, Douglas E.; Casella, Andrew M.; Buck, Edgar C.; Casella, Amanda J.; Edwards, Matthew K.; MacFarlan, Paul J.; Pool, Karl N.; Smith, Frances N.; Steen, Franciska H.

    2014-07-01

    The uranium-molybdenum (U-Mo) alloy in a monolithic form has been proposed as one fuel design capable of converting some of the world's highest power research reactors from the use of high enriched uranium to low enriched uranium. One aspect of the fuel development and qualification process is to demonstrate appropriate understanding of the thermal-conductivity behavior of the fuel system as a function of temperature and expected irradiation conditions. The purpose of this paper is to verify functionality of equipment installed in hot cells for eventual measurements on irradiated uranium-molybdenum (U-Mo) monolithic fuel specimens, refine procedures to operate the equipment, and validate models to extract the desired thermal properties. The results presented here demonstrate the adequacy of the equipment, procedures, and models that have been developed for this purpose based on measurements conducted on surrogate depleted uranium-molybdenum (DU-Mo) alloy samples containing a Zr diffusion barrier and clad in aluminum alloy 6061 (AA6061). The results are in excellent agreement with thermal property data reported in the literature for similar U-Mo alloys as a function of temperature.

  16. Nondestructive Characterization of As-Fabricated Composite Ceramic Panels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Green, W. H.; Brennan, R. E.

    2011-06-01

    Decreasing the weight of protective systems, while minimizing the decrease in ballistic performance, is an ongoing goal of the Army. Ceramic materials are currently combined with other materials in these types of structures in order to decrease weight without losing ballistic performance. This includes structures in which the ceramic material is confined in some way and in which the ceramic material is completely encapsulated. Confinement or encapsulation of ceramic material within a structure generally adds complexity and cost. Relatively simple panel specimens fabricated with ceramic tiles on aluminum backings and side confinement using steel were evaluated using nondestructive methods, including x-ray computed tomography and ultrasonic testing. The nondestructive evaluation results will be discussed and compared, including the detectability and mapping of fabrication features.

  17. Effect of Ceramic Surface Treatments After Machine Grinding on the Biaxial Flexural Strength of Different CAD/CAM Dental Ceramics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bagheri, Hossein; Hooshmand, Tabassom; Aghajani, Farzaneh

    2015-09-01

    This study aimed to evaluate the effect of different ceramic surface treatments after machining grinding on the biaxial flexural strength (BFS) of machinable dental ceramics with different crystalline phases. Disk-shape specimens (10mm in diameter and 1.3mm in thickness) of machinable ceramic cores (two silica-based and one zirconia-based ceramics) were prepared. Each type of the ceramic surfaces was then randomly treated (n=15) with different treatments as follows: 1) machined finish as control, 2) machined finish and sandblasting with alumina, and 3) machined finish and hydrofluoric acid etching for the leucite and lithium disilicate-based ceramics, and for the zirconia; 1) machined finish and post-sintered as control, 2) machined finish, post-sintered, and sandblasting, and 3) machined finish, post-sintered, and Nd;YAG laser irradiation. The BFS were measured in a universal testing machine. Data based were analyzed by ANOVA and Tukey's multiple comparisons post-hoc test (α=0.05). The mean BFS of machined finish only surfaces for leucite ceramic was significantly higher than that of sandblasted (P=0.001) and acid etched surfaces (P=0.005). A significantly lower BFS was found after sandblasting for lithium disilicate compared with that of other groups (Pceramics was affected by the type of ceramic material and surface treatment method. Sandblasting with alumina was detrimental to the strength of only silica-based ceramics. Nd:YAG laser irradiation may lead to substantial strength degradation of zirconia.

  18. Attachment of epithelial cells and fibroblasts to ceramic materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niederauer, G G; McGee, T D; Keller, J C; Zaharias, R S

    1994-04-01

    This study examined in vitro gingival epithelial and fibroblast cell attachment to ceramic materials made of tricalcium phosphate and/or magnesium aluminate spinel. The composite made of tricalcium phosphate and spinel is called 'osteoceramic'. These ceramics had various compositions and surface structures, which were initially characterized. Cell attachment assays were performed using both cell types to compare cellular response to the ceramic materials. Specimens were also prepared for scanning electron microscopy to investigate cellular morphology. The highest levels of cell attachment for gingival epithelial cells were observed on the rough osteoceramic surface, whereas gingival fibroblasts attached least to the rough osteoceramic surface.

  19. Ceramic Matrix Composites .

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Mukerji

    1993-10-01

    Full Text Available The present state of the knowledge of ceramic-matrix composites have been reviewed. The fracture toughness of present structural ceramics are not enough to permit design of high performance machines with ceramic parts. They also fail by catastrophic brittle fracture. It is generally believed that further improvement of fracture toughness is only possible by making composites of ceramics with ceramic fibre, particulate or platelets. Only ceramic-matrix composites capable of working above 1000 degree centigrade has been dealt with keeping reinforced plastics and metal-reinforced ceramics outside the purview. The author has discussed the basic mechanisms of toughening and fabrication of composites and the difficulties involved. Properties of available fibres and whiskers have been given. The best results obtained so far have been indicated. The limitations of improvement in properties of ceramic-matrix composites have been discussed.

  20. Ceramic Laser Materials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guillermo Villalobos

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Ceramic laser materials have come a long way since the first demonstration of lasing in 1964. Improvements in powder synthesis and ceramic sintering as well as novel ideas have led to notable achievements. These include the first Nd:yttrium aluminum garnet (YAG ceramic laser in 1995, breaking the 1 KW mark in 2002 and then the remarkable demonstration of more than 100 KW output power from a YAG ceramic laser system in 2009. Additional developments have included highly doped microchip lasers, ultrashort pulse lasers, novel materials such as sesquioxides, fluoride ceramic lasers, selenide ceramic lasers in the 2 to 3 μm region, composite ceramic lasers for better thermal management, and single crystal lasers derived from polycrystalline ceramics. This paper highlights some of these notable achievements.

  1. Ceramic Laser Materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanghera, Jasbinder; Kim, Woohong; Villalobos, Guillermo; Shaw, Brandon; Baker, Colin; Frantz, Jesse; Sadowski, Bryan; Aggarwal, Ishwar

    2012-01-01

    Ceramic laser materials have come a long way since the first demonstration of lasing in 1964. Improvements in powder synthesis and ceramic sintering as well as novel ideas have led to notable achievements. These include the first Nd:yttrium aluminum garnet (YAG) ceramic laser in 1995, breaking the 1 KW mark in 2002 and then the remarkable demonstration of more than 100 KW output power from a YAG ceramic laser system in 2009. Additional developments have included highly doped microchip lasers, ultrashort pulse lasers, novel materials such as sesquioxides, fluoride ceramic lasers, selenide ceramic lasers in the 2 to 3 μm region, composite ceramic lasers for better thermal management, and single crystal lasers derived from polycrystalline ceramics. This paper highlights some of these notable achievements. PMID:28817044

  2. Flexural strength and fracture toughness of dental core ceramics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yilmaz, Handan; Aydin, Cemal; Gul, Basak E

    2007-08-01

    Many different strengthened all-ceramic core materials are available. In vitro study of their mechanical properties, such as flexural strength and fracture toughness, is necessary before they are used clinically. The purpose of this study was to evaluate and compare the mechanical properties of 6 commonly used all-ceramic core materials using biaxial flexural strength and indentation fracture toughness tests. Specimens of 6 ceramic core materials (Finesse, Cergo, IPS Empress, In-Ceram Alumina, In-Ceram Zirconia, and Cercon Zirconia) were fabricated (n=25) with a diameter of 15 mm and width of 1.2 +/- 0.2 mm. For each group, the specimens were tested to compare their biaxial flexural strength (piston on 3 balls) (n=15), Weibull modulus, and indentation fracture toughness (n=10) (IF method). The data were analyzed with 1-way ANOVA test (a=.05). The Tamhane multiple comparison test was used for post hoc analysis. Mean (SD) of biaxial flexural strength values (MPa) and Weibull modulus (m) results were: Finesse (F): 88.04 (31.61), m=3.17; Cergo (C): 94.97 (13.62), m=7.94; IPS Empress (E): 101.18 (13.49), m=10.13; In-Ceram Alumina (ICA): 341.80 (61.13), m=6.96; In-Ceram Zirconia (ICZ): 541.80 (61.10), m=10.17; and Cercon Zirconia (CZ): 1140.89 (121.33), m=13.26. The indentation fracture toughness results showed that there were significant differences between the tested ceramics. The highest fracture toughness values (MPa x m(0.5)) were obtained with the zirconia-based ceramic core materials. Significant differences were found in strength and toughness values of the materials evaluated. Cercon Zirconia core material showed high values of biaxial flexural strength and indentation fracture toughness when compared to the other ceramics studied.

  3. Ceramic art in sculpture

    OpenAIRE

    Rokavec, Eva

    2014-01-01

    Diploma seminar speaks of ceramics as a field of artistic expression and not just as pottery craft. I presented short overview of developing ceramic sculpture and its changing role. Clay inspires design and touch more than other sculpture media. It starts as early as in prehistory. Although it sometimes seems that was sculptural ceramics neglected in art history overview, it was not so in actual praxis. There is a rich tradition of ceramics in the East and also in Europe during the renaissanc...

  4. A Comprehensive Study on Microstructure Mechanics Relationships of Ceramic Matrix Composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    1989-12-20

    The background of this research stems from the need to understand the physical mechanisms of brittle matrix cracks in fiber reinforced ceramic matrix composites . Three...theoretical and the simulative aspects. Ceramic matrix composites , Matrix cracking stress, Specimen fabrication, Testing, Theory, Simulations, Uniaxial fiber, Fracture mechanics, Oxidation, Fiber breaks.

  5. In Vitro Comparison of the Bond Strength between Ceramic Repair Systems and Ceramic Materials and Evaluation of the Wettability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kocaağaoğlu, Hasan; Manav, Taha; Albayrak, Haydar

    2017-04-01

    When fracture of an all-ceramic restoration occurs, it can be necessary to repair without removing the restoration. Although there are many studies about the repair of metal-ceramic restorations, there are few about all-ceramic restorations. The aim of this study was to evaluate the shear bond strength between ceramic repair systems and esthetic core materials and to evaluate the wettability of all-ceramic core materials. Disk-like specimens (N = 90) made of three dental ceramic infrastructure materials (zirconia ceramic, alumina ceramic, glass ceramic) were polished with silicon carbide paper, prepared for bonding (abrasion with 30 μm diamond rotary cutting instrument). Thirty specimens of each infrastructure were obtained. Each infrastructure group was divided into three subgroups; they were bonded using 3 repair systems: Bisco Intraoral Repair Kit, Cimara & Cimara Zircon Repair System, and Clearfil Repair System. After 1200 thermocycles, shear bond strength was measured in a universal testing machine at a 0.5 mm/min crosshead speed. In addition, the contact angle values of the infrastructures after surface treatments were examined for wettability. Data were analyzed by using ANOVA and Tukey post hoc tests. Although there were no significant differences among the repair systems (p > 0.05) in the glass ceramic and zirconia groups, a significant difference was found among the repair systems in alumina infrastructure (p 0.05); however, a statistically significant difference was found among the repair systems (p < 0.05). No difference was found among the infrastructures and repair systems in terms of contact angle values. Cimara & Cimara Zircon Repair System had higher bond strength values than the other repair systems. Although no difference was found among the infrastructures and repair systems, contact wettability angle was decreased by surface treatments compared with polished surfaces. © 2015 by the American College of Prosthodontists.

  6. Ceramic to metal seal

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Snow, Gary S. (Albuquerque, NM); Wilcox, Paul D. (Albuquerque, NM)

    1976-01-01

    Providing a high strength, hermetic ceramic to metal seal by essentially heating a wire-like metal gasket and a ceramic member, which have been chemically cleaned, while simultaneously deforming from about 50 to 95 percent the metal gasket against the ceramic member at a temperature of about 30 to 75 percent of the melting temperature of the metal gasket.

  7. Light element ceramics

    OpenAIRE

    Rao, KJ; Varma, KBR; Raju, AR

    1988-01-01

    An overview of a few structually important light element ceramics is presented. Included in the overview are silicon nitide, sialon, aluminium nitride, boron carbide and silicon carbide. Methods of preparation, characterization and industrial applications of these ceramics are summarized. Mechanical properties, industrial production techniques and principal uses of these ceramics are emphasized.

  8. The effect of ceramic thickness and number of firings on the color of a zirconium oxide based all ceramic system fabricated using CAD/CAM technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aras, Meena Ajay

    2011-01-01

    PURPOSE Ceramics have a long history in fixed prosthodontics for achieving optimal esthetics and various materials have been used to improve ceramic core strength. However, there is a lack of information on how color is affected by fabrication procedure. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effects of various dentin ceramic thicknesses and repeated firings on the color of zirconium oxide all-ceramic system (Lava™) fabricated using CAD/CAM technology. MATERIALS AND METHODS Thirty disc-shaped cores, 12 mm in diameter with a 1 mm thickness were fabricated from zirconium oxide based all ceramic systems (Lava™, 3M ESPE, St Paul, MN, USA) and divided into three groups (n = 10) according to veneering with dentin ceramic thicknesses: as 0.5, 1, or 1.5 mm. Repeated firings (3, 5, 7, or 9) were performed, and the color of the specimens was compared with the color after the initial firing. Color differences among ceramic specimens were measured using a spectrophotometer (VITA Easyshade, VITA Zahnfabrik, Bad Säckingen, Germany) and data were expressed in CIELAB system coordinates. A repeated measures ANOVA and Bonferroni post hoc test were used to analyze the data (n = 10, α=.05). RESULTS L*a*b* values of the ceramic systems were affected by the number of firings (3, 5, 7, or 9 firings) (P<.001) and ceramic thickness (0.5, 1, or 1.5 mm) (P<.001). Significant interactions were present in L*a*b* values between the number of firings and ceramic thickness (P<.001). An increase in number of firings resulted in significant increase in L* values for both 0.5 mm and 1.5 mm thicknesses (P<.01, P=.013); however it decreased for 1 mm thickness (P<.01). The a* values increased for 1 mm and 1.5 mm thicknesses (P<.01), while it decreased for 0.5 mm specimens. The b* values increased significantly for all thicknesses (P<.01, P=.022). As the dentin ceramic thickness increased, significant reductions in L* values (P<.01) were recorded. There were significant increases in both a

  9. An anodic alumina supported Ni-Pt bimetallic plate-type catalysts for multi-reforming of methane, kerosene and ethanol

    KAUST Repository

    Zhou, Lu

    2014-05-01

    An anodic alumina supported Ni-Pt bimetallic plate-type catalyst was prepared by a two-step impregnation method. The trace amount 0.08 wt% of Pt doping efficiently suppressed the nickel particle sintering and improved the nickel oxides reducibility. The prepared Ni-Pt catalyst showed excellent performance during steam reforming of methane, kerosene and ethanol under both 3000 h stationary and 500-time daily start-up and shut-down operation modes. Self-activation ability of this catalyst was evidenced, which was considered to be resulted from the hydrogen spillover effect over Ni-Pt alloy. In addition, an integrated combustion-reforming reactor was proposed in this study. However, the sintering of the alumina support is still a critical issue for the industrialization of Ni-Pt catalyst. Copyright © 2014, Hydrogen Energy Publications, LLC. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Does plate type influence the clinical outcomes and implant removal in midclavicular fractures fixed with 2.7-mm anteroinferior plates? A retrospective cohort study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gilde, Alex K; Jones, Clifford B; Sietsema, Debra L; Hoffmann, Martin F

    2014-07-04

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate surgical healing rates, implant failure, implant removal, and the need for surgical revision with regards to plate type in midshaft clavicle fractures fixed with 2.7-mm anteroinferior plates utilizing modern plating techniques. This retrospective exploratory cohort review took place at a level I teaching trauma center and a single large private practice office. A total of 155 skeletally mature individuals with 156 midshaft clavicle fractures between March 2002 and March 2012 were included in the final results. Fractures were identified by mechanism of injury and classified based on OTA/AO criteria. All fractures were fixed with 2.7-mm anteroinferior plates. Primary outcome measurements included implant failure, malunion, nonunion, and implant removal. Secondary outcome measurements included pain with the visual analog scale and range of motion. Statistically significant testing was set at 0.05, and testing was performed using chi-square, Fisher's exact, Mann-Whitney U, and Kruskall-Wallis. Implant failure occurred more often in reconstruction plates as compared to dynamic compression plates (p = 0.029). Malunions and nonunions occurred more often in fractures fixed with reconstruction plates as compared to dynamic compression plates, but it was not statistically significant. Implant removal attributed to irritation or implant prominence was observed in 14 patients. Statistically significant levels of pain were seen in patients requiring implant removal (p = 0.001) but were not associated with the plate type. Anteroinferior clavicular fracture fixation with 2.7-mm dynamic compression plates results in excellent healing rates with low removal rates in accordance with the published literature. Given higher rates of failure, 2.7-mm reconstruction plates should be discouraged in comparison to stiffer and more reliable 2.7-mm dynamic compression plates.

  11. Development of a plate-type fuel model for the neutronics and thermal-hydraulics coupled code - SIMMER-III - and its application to the analyses of SPERT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu Ping, E-mail: ping.liu@areva.co [Karlsruhe Institute of Technology (KIT), Institute for Nuclear and Energy Technologies (IKET), P.O. Box 3640, D-76021 Karlsruhe (Germany); Gabrielli, Fabrizio; Rineiski, Andrei; Maschek, Werner [Karlsruhe Institute of Technology (KIT), Institute for Nuclear and Energy Technologies (IKET), P.O. Box 3640, D-76021 Karlsruhe (Germany); Bruna, Giovanni B. [Reactor Safety Division, French Institute for Radioprotection and Nuclear Safety (IRSN), B.P. 17, 92262 Fontenay aux Roses Cedex (France)

    2010-10-15

    SIMMER-III, a neutronics and thermal-hydraulics coupled code, was originally developed for core disruptive accident analyses of liquid metal cooled fast reactors. Due to its versatility in investigating scenarios of core disruption, the code has also been extended to the simulation of transients in thermal neutron systems such as the criticality accident at the JCO fuel fabrication plant, and, in recent years, applied to water-moderated thermal research reactor transient studies, too. Originally, SIMMER considered only cylindrical fuel pin geometry. Therefore, implementation of a plate-type fuel model to the SIMMER-III code is of importance for the analysis of research reactors adopting this kind of fuel. Furthermore, validation of the SIMMER-III modeling of light water-cooled thermal reactor reactivity initiated transients is of necessity. This paper presents the work carried out on the SIMMER-III code in the framework of a KIT and IRSN joint activity aimed at providing the code with experimental reactor transient study capabilities. The first step of the job was the implementation of a new fuel model in SIMMER-III. Verification on this new model indicates that it can well simulate the steady-state temperature profile in the fuel. Secondly, three cases with the shortest reactor periods of 5.0 ms, 4.6 ms and 3.2 ms among the Special Power Excursion Reactor Tests (SPERT) performed in the SPERT I D-12/25 facility have been simulated. Comparison of the results between the SIMMER-III simulation and the reported SPERT results indicates that although there is space for further improvement on the modeling of negative feedback mechanisms, with this plate-type fuel model SIMMER-III can well represent the transient phenomena of reactivity driven power excursion.

  12. Evaluation of plate type fuel elements by eddy current test method; Avaliacao de combustiveis nucleares tipo placa pelo metodo de correntes parasitas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Frade, Rangel Teixeira

    2015-07-01

    Plate type fuel elements are used in MTR research nuclear reactors. The fuel plates are manufactured by assembling a briquette containing the fissile material inserted in a frame, with metal plates in both sides of the set, to act as a cladding. This set is rolled under controlled conditions in order to obtain the fuel plate. In Brazil, this type of fuel is manufactured by IPEN and used in the IEA-R1 reactor. After fabrication of three batches of fuel plates, 24 plates, one of them is taken, in order to verify the thickness of the cladding. For this purpose, the plate is sectioned and the thickness measurements are carried out by using optical microscopy. This procedure implies in damage of the plate, with the consequent cost. Besides, the process of sample preparation for optical microscopy analysis is time consuming, it is necessary an infrastructure for handling radioactive materials and there is a generation of radioactive residues during the process. The objective of this study was verify the applicability of eddy current test method for nondestructive measurement of cladding thickness in plate type nuclear fuels, enabling the inspection of all manufactured fuel plates. For this purpose, reference standards, representative of the cladding of the fuel plates, were manufactured using thermomechanical processing conditions similar to those used for plates manufacturing. Due to no availability of fuel plates for performing the experiments, the presence of the plate’s core was simulated using materials with different electrical conductivities, fixed to the thickness reference standards. Probes of eddy current testing were designed and manufactured. They showed high sensitivity to thickness variations, being able to separate small thickness changes. The sensitivity was higher in tests performed on the reference standards and samples without the presence of the materials simulating the core. For examination of the cladding with influence of materials simulating the

  13. Minimal compliance design for metal–ceramic composites with lamellar microstructures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Piat, R.; Sinchuk, Y.; Vasoya, M.;

    2011-01-01

    . Micromechanical models are applied for the calculation of the effective elastic properties of the composites. Optimized local lamella orientations and ceramic contents are calculated, and the difference between the initial (specimen with constant ceramic content and orientation) and the optimized designs......Metal–ceramic composites produced by melt infiltration of ceramic preforms are studied in an optimal design context. The ceramic preforms are manufactured through a process of freeze-casting of Al2O3 particle suspension. The microstructure of these composites can be presented as distributions...... of lamellar domains. With local ceramic volume fraction and lamella orientation chosen as the design variables, a minimum compliance optimization problem is solved based on topology optimization and finite element methods for metal–ceramic samples with different geometries and boundary conditions...

  14. Thin film ceramic thermocouples

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gregory, Otto (Inventor); Fralick, Gustave (Inventor); Wrbanek, John (Inventor); You, Tao (Inventor)

    2011-01-01

    A thin film ceramic thermocouple (10) having two ceramic thermocouple (12, 14) that are in contact with each other in at least on point to form a junction, and wherein each element was prepared in a different oxygen/nitrogen/argon plasma. Since each element is prepared under different plasma conditions, they have different electrical conductivity and different charge carrier concentration. The thin film thermocouple (10) can be transparent. A versatile ceramic sensor system having an RTD heat flux sensor can be combined with a thermocouple and a strain sensor to yield a multifunctional ceramic sensor array. The transparent ceramic temperature sensor that could ultimately be used for calibration of optical sensors.

  15. Forming of superplastic ceramics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lesuer, D.R.; Wadsworth, J.; Nieh, T.G.

    1994-05-01

    Superplasticity in ceramics has now advanced to the stage that technologically viable superplastic deformation processing can be performed. In this paper, examples of superplastic forming and diffusion bonding of ceramic components are given. Recent work in biaxial gas-pressure forming of several ceramics is provided. These include yttria-stabilized, tetragonal zirconia (YTZP), a 20% alumina/YTZP composite, and silicon. In addition, the concurrent superplastic forming and diffusion bonding of a hybrid ceramic-metal structure are presented. These forming processes offer technological advantages of greater dimensional control and increased variety and complexity of shapes than is possible with conventional ceramic shaping technology.

  16. Ceramic gas turbine shroud

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Jun; Green, Kevin E.

    2014-07-22

    An example gas turbine engine shroud includes a first annular ceramic wall having an inner side for resisting high temperature turbine engine gasses and an outer side with a plurality of radial slots. A second annular metallic wall is positioned radially outwardly of and enclosing the first annular ceramic wall and has a plurality of tabs in communication with the slot of the first annular ceramic wall. The tabs of the second annular metallic wall and slots of the first annular ceramic wall are in communication such that the first annular ceramic wall and second annular metallic wall are affixed.

  17. Creep in ceramics

    CERN Document Server

    Pelleg, Joshua

    2017-01-01

    This textbook is one of its kind, since there are no other books on Creep in Ceramics. The book consist of two parts: A and B. In part A general knowledge of creep in ceramics is considered, while part B specifies creep in technologically important ceramics. Part B covers creep in oxide ceramics, carnides and nitrides. While covering all relevant information regarding raw materials and characterization of creep in ceramics, the book also summarizes most recent innovations and developments in this field as a result of extensive literature search.

  18. Effect of colouring green stage zirconia on the adhesion of veneering ceramics with different thermal expansion coefficients

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Guliz Aktas; Erdal Sahin; Pekka Vallittu; Mutlu Ozcan; Lippo Lassila

    2013-01-01

    This study evaluated the adhesion of zirconia core ceramics with their corresponding veneering ceramics, having different thermal expansion coefficients (TECs), when zirconia ceramics were coloured at green stage. Zirconia blocks (N5240;6 mm37 mm37 mm) were manufactured from two materials namely, ICE Zirconia (Group 1) and Prettau Zirconia (Group 2). In their green stage, they were randomly divided into two groups. Half of the specimens were coloured with colouring liquid (shade A2). Three different veneering ceramics with different TEC (ICE Ceramic, GC Initial Zr and IPS e.max Ceram) were fired on both coloured and non-coloured zirconia cores. Specimens of high noble alloys (Esteticor Plus) veneered with ceramic (VM 13) (n516) acted as the control group. Core-veneer interface of the specimens were subjected to shear force in the Universal Testing Machine (0.5 mm?min21). Neither the zirconia core material (P50.318) nor colouring (P50.188) significantly affected the results (three-way analysis of variance, Tukey’s test). But the results were significantly affected by the veneering ceramic (P50.000). Control group exhibited significantly higher mean bond strength values (45.768) MPa than all other tested groups ((27.164.1)2(39.764.7) and (27.465.6)2(35.964.7) MPa with and without colouring, respectively) (P,0.001). While in zirconia-veneer test groups, predominantly mixed type of failures were observed with the veneering ceramic covering ,1/3 of the substrate surface, in the metal-ceramic group, veneering ceramic was left adhered .1/3 of the metal surface. Colouring zirconia did not impair adhesion of veneering ceramic, but veneering ceramic had a significant influence on the core-veneer adhesion. Metal-ceramic adhesion was more reliable than all zirconia-veneer ceramics tested.

  19. Microstructural characterization and comparative evaluation of physical, mechanical and biological properties of three ceramics for metal-ceramic restorations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kontonasaki, Eleana; Kantiranis, Nikolaos; Papadopoulou, Lambrini; Chatzistavrou, Xanthippi; Kavouras, Panagiotis; Zorba, Triantafillia; Sivropoulou, Afroditi; Chrissafis, Konstantinos; Paraskevopoulos, Konstantinos M; Koidis, Petros T

    2008-10-01

    A wide variety of dental ceramics compositions have been introduced in dental clinical practice in order to combine desired aesthetics with superior mechanical performance. The aim of the present study was to investigate the microstructural changes in three dental ceramics after their sintering according to manufacturers' instructions and to comparatively evaluate some of their physical, mechanical and biological properties. The analysis of the phases present in each material before and after sintering was performed with scanning electron microscopy (SEM), Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) and X-ray diffraction analysis (XRD). The thermal properties of ceramic specimens were evaluated with differential thermal and thermogravimetric analysis (TG-DTA). The mechanical properties evaluated were fracture toughness, Young's modulus and microhardness with the Vickers indentation method. MTT assay was used for cell proliferation assessment. One-way analysis of variance (ANOVA) with Bonferroni multiple comparisons tests was used to determine statistically significant differences (significance level of pceramic compositions of leucite content in the starting unheated ceramic powders ranging between 14 and 32 wt.% and in the respective sintered powders ranging between 15 and 41 wt.% The low fusing glass-ceramic and the high fusing leucite-based ceramic presented significantly higher fracture toughness (pceramic. The three ceramics were almost equivalent concerning their in vitro biological behavior. Variations in crystal structure, distribution and composition are related to differences concerning mechanical properties of dental ceramics.

  20. 2003 Dead Bald Eagle Specimen

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — The specimen report states the Bald Eagle was found along the side of the I-95 by a motorist who contacted Santee National Wildlife Refuge. The Bald Eagle was taken...

  1. Effect of LASER Irradiation on the Shear Bond Strength of Zirconia Ceramic Surface to Dentin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sima Shahabi

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Background and Aims: Reliable bonding between tooth substrate and zirconia-based ceramic restorations is always of great importance. The laser might be useful for treatment of ceramic surfaces. The aim of the present study was to investigate the effect of laser irradiation on the shear bond strength of zirconia ceramic surface to dentin. Materials and Methods: In this experimental in vitro study, 40 Cercon zirconia ceramic blocks were fabricated. The surface treatment was performed using sandblasting with 50-micrometer Al2O3, CO2 laser, or Nd:YAG laser in each test groups. After that, the specimens were cemented to human dentin with resin cement. The shear bond strength of ceramics to dentin was determined and failure mode of each specimen was analyzed by stereo-microscope and SEM investigations. The data were statistically analyzed by one-way analysis of variance and Tukey multiple comparisons. The surface morphology of one specimen from each group was investigated under SEM. Results: The mean shear bond strength of zirconia ceramic to dentin was 7.79±3.03, 9.85±4.69, 14.92±4.48 MPa for CO2 irradiated, Nd:YAG irradiated, and sandblasted specimens, respectively. Significant differences were noted between CO2 (P=0.001 and Nd:YAG laser (P=0.017 irradiated specimens with sandblasted specimens. No significant differences were observed between two laser methods (P=0.47. The mode of bond failure was predominantly adhesive in test groups (CO2 irradiated specimens: 75%, Nd:YAG irradiated: 66.7%, and sandblasting: 41.7%. Conclusion: Under the limitations of the present study, surface treatment of zirconia ceramics using CO2 and Nd:YAG lasers was not able to produce adequate bond strength with dentin surfaces in comparison to sandblasting technique. Therefore, the use of lasers with the mentioned parameters may not be recommended for the surface treatment of Cercon ceramics.

  2. Manufacturing of Plutonium Tensile Specimens

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Knapp, Cameron M [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2012-08-01

    Details workflow conducted to manufacture high density alpha Plutonium tensile specimens to support Los Alamos National Laboratory's science campaigns. Introduces topics including the metallurgical challenge of Plutonium and the use of high performance super-computing to drive design. Addresses the utilization of Abaqus finite element analysis, programmable computer numerical controlled (CNC) machining, as well as glove box ergonomics and safety in order to design a process that will yield high quality Plutonium tensile specimens.

  3. Characterization of ceramics used in mass ceramic industry Goianinha/RN; Caracterizacao de massa ceramica utilizada em industria ceramica de Goianinha/RN

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sales Junior, J.C.C.; Nascimento, R.M. do; Andrade, J.C.S.; Saldanha, K.M., E-mail: jccalado@gmail.com [Universidade Federal do Rio Grande do Norte (UFRN), Natal, RN (Brazil); Dutra, R.P.S. [Universidade Federal da Paraiba (UFPB), PB (Brazil). Laboratorio de Materiais Ceramicos

    2011-07-01

    The preparation of the the ceramic mass is one of the most important steps in the manufacture of ceramic products, since the characteristics of the raw materials used, and the proportions that they are added, directly influence the final properties of ceramic products and the operational conditions of processing. The objective of this paper is to present the results of the characterization of a ceramic mass used in the manufacture of sealing blocks by a red ceramic industry of the city of Goianinha / RN. We analyzed the chemical and mineralogical composition; thermogravimetric and differential thermal analysis; granulometric analysis; evaluation of plasticity; and determining the technological properties of specimens used in test firing at 700, 900 and 1100 ° C. The results show that the ceramic body studied has characteristics that allow use in the manufacture of sealing blocks when burned at a temperature of 900 ° C. (author)

  4. The friction and wear of ceramic/ceramic and ceramic/metal combinations in sliding contact

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sliney, Harold E.; Dellacorte, Christopher

    1994-01-01

    The tribological characteristics of ceramics sliding on ceramics are compared to those of ceramics sliding on a nickel-based turbine alloy. The friction and wear of oxide ceramics and silicon-based ceramics in air at temperatures from room ambient to 900 C (in a few cases to 1200 C) were measured for a hemispherically-tipped pin on a flat sliding contact geometry. In general, especially at high temperature, friction and wear were lower for ceramic/metal combinations than for ceramic/ceramic combinations. The better tribological performance for ceramic/metal combinations is attributed primarily to the lubricious nature of the oxidized surface of the metal.

  5. Illuminating light-dependent color shifts in core and veneer layers of dental all-ceramics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Yong-Keun; Cha, Hyun-Suk; Yu, Bin

    2014-09-01

    The color of an object is perceived differently depending on the ambient light conditions. Since dental all-ceramic restorations are fabricated by building up several layers to reproduce the tooth shade, the optical properties of each layer should be optimized for successful shade reproduction. This study aimed to determine the separate contributions of the color shifts in each of the core and veneer layers of all-ceramics by switching the illuminating lights on the color shifts of layered ceramics. Specimens of seven kinds of core ceramics and the corresponding veneer ceramics for each core were fabricated with a layered thickness of 1.5 mm. A sintering ceramic was used as a reference core material. The Commission Internationale de l’Eclairage (CIE) color coordinates of core, veneer, and layered specimens were measured with a spectroradiometer under the CIE illuminant D65 (daylight), A (incandescent lamp), and F9 (fluorescent lamp) simulating lights. Color shifts of the layered specimens were primarily determined by the CIE a shifts (D65 to A switch) or by the CIE b shifts (D65 to F9 switch) of the veneer layer. The color coordinates shifts in the constituent layers differentially influenced those of the layered specimens by the kind of switched lights. Therefore, the optical properties of the constituent layers of all-ceramics should be controlled to reflect these findings.

  6. Influence of hydrofluoric acid concentration on the flexural strength of a feldspathic ceramic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Venturini, Andressa B; Prochnow, Catina; May, Liliana G; Bottino, Marco C; Felipe Valandro, Luiz

    2015-08-01

    This study evaluated the effects of etching with increasing hydrofluoric (HF) acid concentrations on the roughness and flexural strength of a feldspathic ceramic. One hundred and fifty ceramic specimens (14×4×1.2 mm(2)) were produced from ceramic blocks (VitaBlocks Mark II). All specimens were polished, chamfered and sonically cleaned in isopropyl alcohol. Specimens were randomly divided into 5 groups (n=30): SC (control) no ceramic surface etching; HF1, HF3, HF5 and HF10 ceramic surface etching for 60s with 1%, 3%, 5% and 10% HF acid concentrations, respectively. Profilometry was performed in all specimens to evaluate roughness prior to flexural strength testing. Data were analyzed using one-way ANOVA and Tukey׳s test (α=0.05). Weibull module (m) and characteristic stress (σc) were also determined. HF acid etching, regardless of the concentration used, led to significantly rougher surfaces than the control (pAcid etching significantly reduced the mean flexural strength when compared with the control (143.3 MPa). Weibull modulus of the groups was similar, except for the HF5 group that was higher compared to HF3. Flexural strength was similarly affected by the different HF acid concentrations tested, but roughness increased higher the acid concentration. Ceramic etching led to a significant reduction in strength when compared to the untreated ceramic, regardless of its concentration.

  7. Illuminating light-dependent color shifts in core and veneer layers of dental all-ceramics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Yong-Keun; Cha, Hyun-Suk; Yu, Bin

    2014-09-01

    The color of an object is perceived differently depending on the ambient light conditions. Since dental all-ceramic restorations are fabricated by building up several layers to reproduce the tooth shade, the optical properties of each layer should be optimized for successful shade reproduction. This study aimed to determine the separate contributions of the color shifts in each of the core and veneer layers of all-ceramics by switching the illuminating lights on the color shifts of layered ceramics. Specimens of seven kinds of core ceramics and the corresponding veneer ceramics for each core were fabricated with a layered thickness of 1.5 mm. A sintering ceramic was used as a reference core material. The Commission Internationale de l'Eclairage (CIE) color coordinates of core, veneer, and layered specimens were measured with a spectroradiometer under the CIE illuminant D65 (daylight), A (incandescent lamp), and F9 (fluorescent lamp) simulating lights. Color shifts of the layered specimens were primarily determined by the CIE a* shifts (D65 to A switch) or by the CIE b* shifts (D65 to F9 switch) of the veneer layer. The color coordinates shifts in the constituent layers differentially influenced those of the layered specimens by the kind of switched lights. Therefore, the optical properties of the constituent layers of all-ceramics should be controlled to reflect these findings.

  8. Fatigue and frictional heating in ceramic matrix composites

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jacobsen, T.K.; Sørensen, B.F.; Brøndsted, P.

    1997-01-01

    This paper describes an experimental technique for monitoring the damage evolution in ceramic matrix composites during cyclic testing. The damage is related to heat dissipation, which may be measured as radiated heat from the surface of the test specimen. In the present experimental set-up an iso......This paper describes an experimental technique for monitoring the damage evolution in ceramic matrix composites during cyclic testing. The damage is related to heat dissipation, which may be measured as radiated heat from the surface of the test specimen. In the present experimental set...... with a high spatial and temperature resolution and changes in the heat dissipation can be measured almost instantaneously. The technique has been tested on uni-directional ceramic matrix composites. Experimental results are shown and the possibilities and the limitations of the technique are discussed....

  9. Analyses of fine paste ceramics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sabloff, J A [ed.

    1980-01-01

    Four chapters are included: history of Brookhaven fine paste ceramics project, chemical and mathematical procedures employed in Mayan fine paste ceramics project, and compositional and archaeological perspectives on the Mayan fine paste ceramics. (DLC)

  10. Ceramic laser materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ikesue, Akio; Aung, Yan Lin

    2008-12-01

    The word 'ceramics' is derived from the Greek keramos, meaning pottery and porcelain. The opaque and translucent cement and clay often used in tableware are not appropriate for optical applications because of the high content of optical scattering sources, that is, defects. Recently, scientists have shown that by eliminating the defects, a new, refined ceramic material - polycrystalline ceramic - can be produced. This advanced ceramic material offers practical laser generation and is anticipated to be a highly attractive alternative to conventional glass and single-crystal laser technologies in the future. Here we review the history of the development of ceramic lasers, the principle of laser generation based on this material, some typical results achieved with ceramic lasers so far, and discuss the potential future outlook for the field.

  11. Strength degradation and lifetime prediction of dental zirconia ceramics under cyclic normal loading.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Wanzhong; Xu, Yingqiang; He, Huiming; Zhao, Haidan; Sun, Jian; Hou, Yue

    2015-01-01

    Clinical cases show that zirconia restoration could happen fracture by accident under overloading after using a period of time. The purpose of this study is to research mechanical behavior and predict lifetime of dental zirconia ceramics under cyclic normal contact loading with experiments. Cyclic normal contact loading test and three point bending test are carried on specimens made of two brands of dental zirconia ceramic to obtain flexure strength and damage degree after different number of loading cycles. By means of damage mechanics model, damage degree under different number of contact loading cycles are calculated according to flexure strength, and verified by SEM photographs of cross section morphology of zirconia ceramics specimen phenomenologically. Relation curve of damage degree and number of cycles is fitted by polynomial fitting, then the number of loading cycles can be concluded when the specimen is complete damage. Strength degradation of two brands dental zirconia ceramics are researched in vitro, and prediction method of contact fatigue lifetime is established.

  12. Antibacterial ceramic for sandbox. Sunabayo kokin ceramics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yamamoto, K. (Ishizuka Glass Co. Ltd. Nagoya (Japan))

    1993-10-01

    Sands in sandboxes in parks have been called into question of being contaminated by colon bacilli and spawns from ascarides. This paper introduces an antibacterial ceramic for sandbox developed as a new material effective to help reduce the contamination. The ceramic uses natural sand as the main raw material, which is added with borax and silver to contain silver ions that have bacteria and fungus resistance and deodorizing effect. The ceramic has an average grain size ranging from 0.5 mm to 0.7 mm, and is so devised as to match specific gravity, grain size and shape of the sand, hence no separation and segregation can occur. The result of weatherability and antibacterial strength tests on sand for a sandbox mixed with the ceramic at 1% suggests that its efficacy lasts for about three years. Its actual use is under observation. Its efficacy has been verified in a test that measures a survival factor of spawns from dog ascardides contacted with aqueous solution containing the ceramic at 1%. Safety and sanitation tests have proved the ceramic a highly safe product that conforms to the food sanitation law. 5 refs., 3 figs., 3 tabs.

  13. Effect of colouring green stage zirconia on the adhesion of veneering ceramics with different thermal expansion coefficients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aktas, Guliz; Sahin, Erdal; Vallittu, Pekka; Ozcan, Mutlu; Lassila, Lippo

    2013-12-01

    This study evaluated the adhesion of zirconia core ceramics with their corresponding veneering ceramics, having different thermal expansion coefficients (TECs), when zirconia ceramics were coloured at green stage. Zirconia blocks (N=240; 6 mm×7 mm×7 mm) were manufactured from two materials namely, ICE Zirconia (Group 1) and Prettau Zirconia (Group 2). In their green stage, they were randomly divided into two groups. Half of the specimens were coloured with colouring liquid (shade A2). Three different veneering ceramics with different TEC (ICE Ceramic, GC Initial Zr and IPS e.max Ceram) were fired on both coloured and non-coloured zirconia cores. Specimens of high noble alloys (Esteticor Plus) veneered with ceramic (VM 13) (n=16) acted as the control group. Core-veneer interface of the specimens were subjected to shear force in the Universal Testing Machine (0.5 mm⋅min(-1)). Neither the zirconia core material (P=0.318) nor colouring (P=0.188) significantly affected the results (three-way analysis of variance, Tukey's test). But the results were significantly affected by the veneering ceramic (P=0.000). Control group exhibited significantly higher mean bond strength values (45.7±8) MPa than all other tested groups ((27.1±4.1)-(39.7±4.7) and (27.4±5.6)-(35.9±4.7) MPa with and without colouring, respectively) (Pceramic covering ceramic group, veneering ceramic was left adhered >1/3 of the metal surface. Colouring zirconia did not impair adhesion of veneering ceramic, but veneering ceramic had a significant influence on the core-veneer adhesion. Metal-ceramic adhesion was more reliable than all zirconia-veneer ceramics tested.

  14. Continuous Fiber Ceramic Composites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    2002-09-01

    Fiber-reinforced ceramic composites demonstrate the high-temperature stability of ceramics--with an increased fracture toughness resulting from the fiber reinforcement of the composite. The material optimization performed under the continuous fiber ceramic composites (CFCC) included a series of systematic optimizations. The overall goals were to define the processing window, to increase the robustinous of the process, to increase process yield while reducing costs, and to define the complexity of parts that could be fabricated.

  15. Defect production in ceramics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zinkle, S.J. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States); Kinoshita, C. [Kyushu Univ. (Japan)

    1997-08-01

    A review is given of several important defect production and accumulation parameters for irradiated ceramics. Materials covered in this review include alumina, magnesia, spinel silicon carbide, silicon nitride, aluminum nitride and diamond. Whereas threshold displacement energies for many ceramics are known within a reasonable level of uncertainty (with notable exceptions being AIN and Si{sub 3}N{sub 4}), relatively little information exists on the equally important parameters of surviving defect fraction (defect production efficiency) and point defect migration energies for most ceramics. Very little fundamental displacement damage information is available for nitride ceramics. The role of subthreshold irradiation on defect migration and microstructural evolution is also briefly discussed.

  16. Repair bond strength of resin composite to a novel CAD/CAM hybrid ceramic using different repair systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elsaka, Shaymaa E

    2015-01-01

    This study evaluated the repair bond strength of a nanohybrid resin composite to a novel CAD/CAM hybrid ceramic based on four intraoral ceramic repair systems. Vita Enamic (VE) CAD/CAM hybrid ceramic was used in this study. Specimens were divided into five test groups according to the repair method performed on the ceramic surface: Gr C (No treatment; control); Gr CZ (Cimara Zircon); Gr PR (Porcelain Repair); Gr CR (Clearfil Repair); and Gr CS (CoJet system). Nanohybrid resin composite (GrandioSO) was packed onto treated ceramic surfaces for adhesion testing using microtensile bond strength test. Debonded specimens were examined with a stereomicroscope and SEM to determine the fracture mode. Data were analyzed using ANOVA and Tukey's HSD test. PR and CZ repair systems significantly enhanced the bond strength of nanohybrid resin composite to VE CAD/CAM hybrid ceramic when compared with the other tested repair systems.

  17. Effect of Ceramic Surface Treatments After Machine Grinding on the Biaxial Flexural Strength of Different CAD/CAM Dental Ceramics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bagheri, Hossein; Aghajani, Farzaneh

    2015-01-01

    Objectives: This study aimed to evaluate the effect of different ceramic surface treatments after machining grinding on the biaxial flexural strength (BFS) of machinable dental ceramics with different crystalline phases. Materials and Methods: Disk-shape specimens (10mm in diameter and 1.3mm in thickness) of machinable ceramic cores (two silica-based and one zirconia-based ceramics) were prepared. Each type of the ceramic surfaces was then randomly treated (n=15) with different treatments as follows: 1) machined finish as control, 2) machined finish and sandblasting with alumina, and 3) machined finish and hydrofluoric acid etching for the leucite and lithium disilicate-based ceramics, and for the zirconia; 1) machined finish and post-sintered as control, 2) machined finish, post-sintered, and sandblasting, and 3) machined finish, post-sintered, and Nd;YAG laser irradiation. The BFS were measured in a universal testing machine. Data based were analyzed by ANOVA and Tukey’s multiple comparisons post-hoc test (α=0.05). Results: The mean BFS of machined finish only surfaces for leucite ceramic was significantly higher than that of sandblasted (P=0.001) and acid etched surfaces (P=0.005). A significantly lower BFS was found after sandblasting for lithium disilicate compared with that of other groups (P<0.05). Sandblasting significantly increased the BFS for the zirconia (P<0.05), but the BFS was significantly decreased after laser irradiation (P<0.05). Conclusions: The BFS of the machinable ceramics was affected by the type of ceramic material and surface treatment method. Sandblasting with alumina was detrimental to the strength of only silica-based ceramics. Nd:YAG laser irradiation may lead to substantial strength degradation of zirconia. PMID:27148372

  18. Interfacial characterization of ceramic core materials with veneering porcelain for all-ceramic bi-layered restorative systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tagmatarchis, Alexander; Tripodakis, Aris-Petros; Filippatos, Gerasimos; Zinelis, Spiros; Eliades, George

    2014-01-01

    The aim of the study was to characterize the elemental distribution at the interface between all-ceramic core and veneering porcelain materials. Three groups of all-ceramic cores were selected: A) Glass-ceramics (Cergo, IPS Empress, IPS Empress 2, e-max Press, Finesse); B) Glass-infiltrated ceramics (Celay Alumina, Celay Zirconia) and C) Densely sintered ceramics (Cercon, Procera Alumina, ZirCAD, Noritake Zirconia). The cores were combined with compatible veneering porcelains and three flat square test specimens were produced for each system. The core-veneer interfaces were examined by scanning electron microscopy and energy dispersive x-ray microanalysis. The glass-ceramic systems showed interfacial zones reach in Si and O, with the presence of K, Ca, Al in core and Ca, Ce, Na, Mg or Al in veneer material, depending on the system tested. IPS Empress and IPS Empress 2 demonstrated distinct transitional phases at the core-veneer interface. In the glassinfiltrated systems, intermixing of core (Ce, La) with veneer (Na, Si) elements occurred, whereas an abrupt drop of the core-veneer elemental concentration was documented at the interfaces of all densely sintered ceramics. The results of the study provided no evidence of elemental interdiffusion at the core-veneer interfaces in densely sintered ceramics, which implies lack of primary chemical bonding. For the glass-containing systems (glassceramics and glass-infiltrated ceramics) interdiffusion of the glass-phase seems to play a critical role in establishing a primary bonding condition between ceramic core and veneering porcelain.

  19. Microstructure, composition, and etching topography of dental ceramics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Della Bona, Alvaro; Anusavice, Kenneth J

    2002-01-01

    Topographic analysis of etched ceramics provides qualitative surface structure information that affects micromechanical retention mechanisms. This study tested the hypothesis that the etching mechanism changes according to the type of etchant and the ceramic microstructure and composition. Quantitative and qualitative analyses of 15 dental ceramics were performed using scanning electron microscopy, back-scattered imaging, X-ray diffraction, optical profilometry, and wavelength dispersive spectroscopy based on Phi-Rho-Z correction. All ceramic specimens were polished to 1 micron with diamond compound, and the following etchants and etching times were used: ammonium bifluoride (ABF) for 1 minute, 9.6% hydrofluoric acid (HF) for 2 minutes, and 4% acidulated phosphate fluoride (APF) for 2 minutes. HF produced an irregular etching pattern in which pores were the characteristic topographic feature. ABF-etched ceramic surfaces showed mostly grooves, and APF etchant caused a buildup of surface precipitate. Core ceramics showed less topographic change after etching because of their high alumina content and low chemical reactivity. The observations suggest that the etching mechanism is different for the three etchants, with HF producing the most prominent etching pattern on all dental ceramics examined.

  20. Magnetic Resonance Imaging of Gel-cast Ceramic Composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dieckman, S. L.; Balss, K. M.; Waterfield, L. G.; Jendrzejczyk, J. A.; Raptis, A. C.

    1997-01-16

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) techniques are being employed to aid in the development of advanced near-net-shape gel-cast ceramic composites. MRI is a unique nondestructive evaluation tool that provides information on both the chemical and physical properties of materials. In this effort, MRI imaging was performed to monitor the drying of porous green-state alumina - methacrylamide-N.N`-methylene bisacrylamide (MAM-MBAM) polymerized composite specimens. Studies were performed on several specimens as a function of humidity and time. The mass and shrinkage of the specimens were also monitored and correlated with the water content.

  1. Raman scattering of light in YBa2Cu3O(7-delta) single-phase ceramics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Limonov, M.F.; Markov, IU.F.; Pollert, E.; Triska, A.

    1988-07-01

    Results of an experimental study of Raman spectra are reported for specimens of YBa/sub 2/Cu/sub 3/O(7-delta) ceramics (delta=0.37) produced by the sintering of Y/sub 2/O/sub 3/, CuO, and BaCO/sub 3/. The characteristics of the Raman spectra of the specimens are discussed, and it is shown that the specimens of superconducting ceramics investigated are characterized by high homogeneity, with no traces of the 'parasitic' Y/sub 2/O/sub 3/ and Y/sub 2/Cu/sub 2/O/sub 5/ phases. 7 references.

  2. Ceramic Technology Project

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1992-03-01

    The Ceramic Technology Project was developed by the USDOE Office of Transportation Systems (OTS) in Conservation and Renewable Energy. This project, part of the OTS's Materials Development Program, was developed to meet the ceramic technology requirements of the OTS's automotive technology programs. Significant accomplishments in fabricating ceramic components for the USDOE and NASA advanced heat engine programs have provided evidence that the operation of ceramic parts in high-temperature engine environments is feasible. These programs have also demonstrated that additional research is needed in materials and processing development, design methodology, and data base and life prediction before industry will have a sufficient technology base from which to produce reliable cost-effective ceramic engine components commercially. A five-year project plan was developed with extensive input from private industry. In July 1990 the original plan was updated through the estimated completion of development in 1993. The objective is to develop the industrial technology base required for reliable ceramics for application in advanced automotive heat engines. The project approach includes determining the mechanisms controlling reliability, improving processes for fabricating existing ceramics, developing new materials with increased reliability, and testing these materials in simulated engine environments to confirm reliability. Although this is a generic materials project, the focus is on the structural ceramics for advanced gas turbine and diesel engines, ceramic bearings and attachments, and ceramic coatings for thermal barrier and wear applications in these engines. To facilitate the rapid transfer of this technology to US industry, the major portion of the work is being done in the ceramic industry, with technological support from government laboratories, other industrial laboratories, and universities.

  3. Joint Strength with Soldering of Al2O3 Ceramics After Ni-P Chemical Plating

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    邹贵生; 吴爱萍; 张德库; 孟繁明; 白海林; 张永清; 黎义; 巫世杰; 顾兆旃

    2004-01-01

    Ni-P alloy was chemically plated on Al2O3 ceramics to produce uniform alloy coatings at temperatures below 70℃. Cu metal was electroplated onto the Ni-P coating to facilitate the soldering and shorten the chemical plating time. Then, the electroplated ceramic specimens were soldered with 60 wt.% Sn-40 wt.% Pb solder in active colophony. The highest shear strength was acquired after the heat treatment at 170℃ for 15 min. The joint fractures mostly propagated along the interface between the ceramics and the Ni-P coating, with some fracture in both the ceramics and the Ni-P coating near the interface and some along the interface between the Cu and Ni-P coatings. The results show that ceramic surface roughness and the chemical plating parameters influence the coating quality, and that suitable heat treatment before the soldering also improves the adhesion between the ceramics and Ni-P coatings, thus strengthening the joints.

  4. Characterisation of dynamic behaviour of alumina ceramics: evaluation of stress uniformity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhiyong Wang

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Accurate characterisation of dynamic behaviour of ceramics requires the reliable split-Hopkinson pressure bar (SHPB technique and the condition of uniaxial homogeneous specimen deformation. In this study, an experimentally validated 3D finite element model of the full scale SHPB experiment was developed to quantitatively evaluate the wave propagation in the bars and the stress distribution/evolution in the alumina specimen. Wave signals in both the SHPB experiments and the finite element model were analysed to characterise the dynamic behaviour of alumina. It was found that the equilibrium of both stresses within the specimen and forces at the specimen ends can be established in the intermediate stage of deformation. The validity of stress uniformity in the alumina specimen supports the assumption of uniaxial homogeneous specimen deformation in the SHPB and validates the characterisation of dynamic behaviour of alumina ceramics.

  5. Experimental Investigation on Active Cooling for Ceramic Matrix Composite

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    PENG Li-na; HE Guo-qiang; LIU Pei-jin

    2009-01-01

    Compared with conventional materials, the active cooling ceramic matrix composite used in ramjet or scramjet makes their structures lighter in mass and better in performance. In this paper, an active and a passive cooling refractory composite specimens are designed and tested with an experimental facility composed of multilayer smale scale cooling penel which consists of a water cooling system and a ceramic matrix composite specimen, and a gas generator used for providing lower and higher transfer rate gases to simulate the temperatures in combustion chamber of ramjst. The active cooling specimen can continuously suffer high surface temperature of 2 000K for 30s and that of 3 000 K for 9.3 s, respectively. The experiment results show that the active cooling composite structure is available for high-temperature condition in ramjet.

  6. Industrial Ceramics: Secondary Schools.

    Science.gov (United States)

    New York City Board of Education, Brooklyn, NY. Bureau of Curriculum Development.

    The expanding use of ceramic products in today's world can be seen in the areas of communications, construction, aerospace, textiles, metallurgy, atomic energy, and electronics. The demands of science have brought ceramics from an art to an industry using mass production and automated processes which requires the services of great numbers as the…

  7. Verification of ceramic structures

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Behar-Lafenetre, S.; Cornillon, L.; Rancurel, M.; Graaf, D. de; Hartmann, P.; Coe, G.; Laine, B.

    2012-01-01

    In the framework of the "Mechanical Design and Verification Methodologies for Ceramic Structures" contract [1] awarded by ESA, Thales Alenia Space has investigated literature and practices in affiliated industries to propose a methodological guideline for verification of ceramic spacecraft and instr

  8. Bond strength of resin cements to leucitereinforced ceramics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rubens Nazareno Garcia

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Objective: The aim of this study was to evaluate the shear bond strength (SBS of two resin cements to four leucite-reinforced ceramics. Material and methods: Forty ceramic blocks (4 mm wide, 14 mm length and 2 mm thick were used and the samples abraded with aluminum oxide (90 µm. The samples were divided into eight groups (n = 5. Two resin cements (conventional RelyX ARC and self-adhesive RelyX U100 – 3M ESPE were bonded to Creapress (CRE-Creation/Klema, Finesse All-Ceramic (FIN-Dentsply/ Ceramco, IPS Empress Esthetic (IEE-Ivoclar Vivadent and Vita PM9 (PM9-Vita. For all groups and in each ceramic block, after application of 10% hydrofluoric acid and silanation, three Tygon tubings were positioned over the ceramics, which were filled in with the resin cements (light-cure for 40 s. The tubings were removed to expose the specimens in format of cylinders (area: 0.38 mm2 and samples were stored in relative humidity at 24±2 °C for one week. After this period, each sample was attached to testing machine and the specimens were submitted to shear bond test (applied at the base of the specimen/cement cylinder with a thin wire/0.2 mm at speed of 0.5 mm/ min, until failure. The results were analyzed by two-way ANOVA (resin cements and ceramic systems and Tukey test (p<0.05. Results: The means (SD were (in MPa: ARC + CRE = 32.1±4.3; ARC + FIN = 28.3±3.7; ARC + IEE = 25.9±4.4; ARC + PM9 = 22.2±2.1; U100 + CRE = 38.0±5.2; U100 + FIN = 36.9±2.8; U100 + IEE = 38.4±2.9; U100 + PM9 = 34.3 ±7.3. U100 showed higher SBS to ceramics than ARC. U100 had higher SBS when applied on IEE ceramic than on PM9. For ARC, SBS obtained with CRE was higher than with IEE and PM9. Conclusion: RelyX U100 can provide higher SBS to leucite-reinforced ceramics than conventional resin cement. The resin cements applied on the PM9 ceramic surface resulted in lower SBS.

  9. Evaluation of shear bond strength between zirconia core and ceramic veneers fabricated by pressing and layering techniques: In vitro study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Subash, M; Vijitha, D; Deb, Saikat; Satish, A; Mahendirakumar, N

    2015-08-01

    Although ceramic veneered on to zirconia core have been in use for quite some time, information regarding the comparative evaluation of the Shear bond strength of Pressable & Layered ceramic veneered on to zirconia core is limited. To evaluate the shear bond strength of zirconia core and ceramic veneer fabricated by two different techniques, Layering (Noritake CZR) and Pressing (Noritake, CZR Press). 20 samples of zirconia blocks were fabricated and the samples were divided into group A & B. Group A - Ceramic Veneered over zirconia core by pressing using Noritake CZR Press. Group B - Ceramic Veneered over zirconia core by layering using Noritake CZR. The veneered specimens were mounted on to the center of a PVC tube using self-cure acrylic resin leaving 3 mm of the veneered surface exposed as cantilever. Using a Universal testing machine the blocks were loaded up to failure. The results were tabulated by using independent samples t-test. The mean shear bond strength for Pressed specimens was 12.458 ± 1.63(S.D) MPa and for layered specimens was 8.458 ± 0.845(S.D) MPa. Pressed specimens performed significantly better than the layered specimen with a P value 0.001. Clinicians and dental laboratory technicians should consider the use of pressed ceramics as an alternative to traditional layering procedures to reduce the chances of chipping or de-lamination of ceramics.

  10. Ceramics As Materials Of Construction

    OpenAIRE

    Zaki, A.; Eteiba, M. B.; Abdelmonem, N.M.

    1988-01-01

    This paper attempts to review the limitations for using the important ceramics in contact with corrosive media. Different types of ceramics are included. Corrosion properties of ceramics and their electrical properties are mentioned. Recommendations are suggested for using ceramics in different media.

  11. Thermal compatibility of dental ceramic systems using cylindrical and spherical geometries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeHoff, Paul H; Barrett, Allyson A; Lee, Robert B; Anusavice, Kenneth J

    2008-06-01

    To test the hypothesis that bilayer ceramic cylinders and spheres can provide valid confirmation of thermal incompatibility stresses predicted by finite element analyses. A commercial core ceramic and an experimental core ceramic were used to fabricate open-ended cylinders and core ceramic spheres. The core cylinders and spheres were veneered with one of four commercial dental ceramics representing four thermally compatible groups and four thermally incompatible groups. Axisymmetric thermal and viscoelastic elements in the ANSYS finite element program were used to calculate temperatures and stresses for each geometry and ceramic combination. This process required a transient heat transfer analysis for each combination to determine input temperatures for the structural model. After fabrication, each specimen was examined visually using fiberoptic transillumination for evidence of cracking. There were 100% failures of the thermally incompatible cylinders while none of the thermally compatible combinations failed. Among the spheres, 100% of the thermally incompatible systems failed, 16% of one of the thermally compatible systems failed, and none of the remaining compatible combinations failed. The calculated stress values were in general agreement with the experimental observations, i.e., low residual stresses for the specimens that did not fail and high residual stresses for the specimens that did fail. Simple screening geometries can be used to identify highly incompatible ceramic combinations, but they do not identify marginally incompatible systems.

  12. Effect of ceramic surface treatment on tensile bond strength to a resin cement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Della Bona, Alvaro; Anusavice, Kenneth J; Hood, James A A

    2002-01-01

    The objective of this study was to test the following hypotheses: (1) hydrofluoric acid (HF)-treated ceramic surfaces produce the highest tensile bond strength to resin cements, independent of the ceramic microstructure and composition; and (2) the tensile bond strength test is appropriate for analysis of interfacial adhesion for ceramic-bonded-to-resin systems. Ceramic specimens were polished with 1-micron alumina abrasive and divided into four groups of 10 specimens for each of seven ceramic types. One of the following surface treatments was applied: (1) 10% ammonium bifluoride (ABF) for 1 minute; (2) 9.6% HF for 2 minutes; (3) 4% acidulated phosphate fluoride (APF) for 2 minutes; and (4) a silane coupling agent. The surface-treated areas were coated with an adhesive resin and bonded to a resin cement. Specimens were loaded to failure in tension using a testing machine. Tensile bond strength data were statistically analyzed, and fracture surfaces were examined to determine the mode of failure. Silane-treated surfaces showed statistically higher mean tensile bond strength values than surfaces treated with any etchant (HF, ABF, APF). HF produced statistically higher mean tensile bond strengths than ABF and APF. All failures occurred in the adhesion zone. The tensile bond strength test is adequate for analysis of the adhesive zone of resin-ceramic systems. The chemical adhesion produced by silane promoted higher mean bond strength values than the micromechanical retention produced by any etchant for the resin-ceramic systems used in this study.

  13. Fracture behavior of lithia disilicate- and leucite-based ceramics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Della Bona, Alvaro; Mecholsky, John J; Anusavice, Kenneth J

    2004-12-01

    This study was designed to characterize the fracture behavior of ceramics and test the hypothesis that variation in strength is associated with a variation in fracture toughness. The following four groups of 20 bar specimens (25 x 4 x 1.2 mm) were fabricated (ISO standard 6872): E1, a hot-pressed leucite-based core ceramic (IPS Empress); E2, a hot-pressed lithia-based core ceramic (IPS Empress 2); ES, a hot-pressed lithia-based core ceramic (Experimental); and GV, a glass veneer (IPS Empress2 body). Specimens were subjected to four-point flexure loading in 37 degrees C distilled water. Fractographic analysis was performed to determine the fracture origin (c) for calculation of fracture toughness (KIC). Weibull analysis of flexure strength (sigma) data was also performed. Differences in mean sigma and KIC were statistically significant for E1 and GV (p<0.05). These differences are associated with processing effects and composition. The higher mean sigma and KIC values of E2 and ES core ceramics suggest potentially improved structural performance compared with E1 although the Weibull moduli of E1 and E2 are the same.

  14. Specimen Collection and Submission Manual

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-06-01

    a validated test algorithm . If there is insufficient specimen volume for testing, there may be delays, and the request may be referred to management...Additional guidance on packing and shipping infectious substances can be found through American Society for Microbiology: http://www.asm.org...images/pdf/Clinical/ pack -ship-7-15-2011.pdf TR-16-161 DISTRIBUTION STATEMENT A: Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited. UNCLASSIFIED

  15. Fungal contaminants in cytopathology specimens

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Prashant Sharma

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available A pseudo-epidemic of environmental fungi, most likely by Fusarium spp., leading to inappropriate investigations for disseminated systemic mycosis is described. Subtle diagnostic clues, including the specimens affected, the nature of the host response, and the type of fungal elements noted helped to determine the nature of contaminants. The potential pitfall can be avoided by the knowledge of pertinent disease biology, prompt consultation for infectious diseases, and investigations of the potential environmental sources followed by source control.

  16. Biaxial flexural strength of Turkom-Cera core compared to two other all-ceramic systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bandar Mohammed Abdullah Al-Makramani

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Advances in all-ceramic systems have established predictable means of providing metal-free aesthetic and biocompatible materials. These materials must have sufficient strength to be a practical treatment alternative for the fabrication of crowns and fixed partial dentures. OBJECTIVES: The aim of this study was to compare the biaxial flexural strength of three core ceramic materials. MATERIAL AND METHODS: Three groups of 10 disc-shaped specimens (16 mm diameter x 1.2 mm thickness - in accordance with ISO-6872, 1995 were made from the following ceramic materials: Turkom-Cera Fused Alumina [(Turkom-Ceramic (M Sdn Bhd, Puchong, Selangor, Malaysia], In-Ceram (Vita Zahnfabrik, Bad Säckingen, Baden-Württemberg, Germany and Vitadur-N (Vita Zahnfabrik, Bad Säckingen, Baden-Württemberg, Germany, which were sintered according to the manufacturer's recommendations. The specimens were subjected to biaxial flexural strength test in an universal testing machine at a crosshead speed of 0.5 mm/min. The definitive fracture load was recorded for each specimen and the biaxial flexural strength was calculated from an equation in accordance with ISO-6872. RESULTS: The mean biaxial flexural strength values were: Turkom-Cera: 506.8±87.01 MPa, In-Ceram: 347.4±28.83 MPa and Vitadur-N: 128.7±12.72 MPa. The results were analyzed by the Levene's test and Dunnett's T3 post-hoc test (SPSS software V11.5.0 for Windows, SPSS, Chicago, IL, USA at a preset significance level of 5% because of unequal group variances (P<0.001. There was statistically significant difference between the three core ceramics (P<0.05. Turkom-Cera showed the highest biaxial flexural strength, followed by In-Ceram and Vitadur-N. CONCLUSIONS: Turkom-Cera core had significantly higher flexural strength than In-Ceram and Vitadur-N ceramic core materials.

  17. Surface characterization of dental ceramics and initial streptococcal adhesion in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hahnel, Sebastian; Rosentritt, Martin; Handel, Gerhard; Bürgers, Ralf

    2009-08-01

    The aim of this in vitro study was to investigate the surface properties of dental ceramic materials belonging to different ceramic classes, and to correlate the findings to the initial adherence of three oral streptococcal strains. Rectangular specimens were prepared from different ceramic materials (glass/lithium disilicate glass/glass-infiltrated zirconia/partially sintered zirconia/hipped zirconia ceramic) and polished; surface roughness (Ra) was determined. Glass plates were used as a control. Specimens were incubated with phosphate-buffered saline or an artificial saliva (protein mixture; 2h, 37 degrees C). Surface free energy (gamma(t)) and its polar (gamma(p)) and disperse (gamma(d)) contribution were determined prior to and after artificial saliva exposure. Uncoated and protein-coated specimens were incubated with Streptococcus gordonii DSMZ 6777, Streptococcus oralis DSMZ 20068 or Streptococcus sanguinis DSMZ 20068 suspension for 2.5h at 37 degrees C (n=15 for each treatment and strain). Adherent streptococci were quantified fluorometrically. The lithium disilicate glass ceramic showed the highest values for Ra; the lowest values were found for the glass ceramic, the partially sintered zirconia and the hipped zirconia ceramic. Protein coating caused a significant increase in gamma(t) and gamma(p), but not in the control material. The control material showed higher values for streptococcal adhesion than all ceramic materials. After protein coating, only slight and random differences in streptococcal adhesion were found between the various ceramic materials. Dental ceramic materials show differences in terms of Ra, gamma(t) and initial streptococcal adhesion; however, correlations between surface properties and streptococcal adhesion were poor.

  18. Biaxial flexural strength of Turkom-Cera core compared to two other all-ceramic systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Makramani, Bandar Mohammed Abdullah; Razak, Abdul Aziz Abdul; Abu-Hassan, Mohamed Ibrahim

    2010-12-01

    Advances in all-ceramic systems have established predictable means of providing metal-free aesthetic and biocompatible materials. These materials must have sufficient strength to be a practical treatment alternative for the fabrication of crowns and fixed partial dentures. The aim of this study was to compare the biaxial flexural strength of three core ceramic materials. Three groups of 10 disc-shaped specimens (16 mm diameter x 1.2 mm thickness - in accordance with ISO-6872, 1995) were made from the following ceramic materials: Turkom-Cera Fused Alumina [(Turkom-Ceramic (M) Sdn Bhd, Puchong, Selangor, Malaysia)], In-Ceram (Vita Zahnfabrik, Bad Säckingen, Baden-Württemberg, Germany) and Vitadur-N (Vita Zahnfabrik, Bad Säckingen, Baden-Württemberg, Germany), which were sintered according to the manufacturer's recommendations. The specimens were subjected to biaxial flexural strength test in an universal testing machine at a crosshead speed of 0.5 mm/min. The definitive fracture load was recorded for each specimen and the biaxial flexural strength was calculated from an equation in accordance with ISO-6872. The mean biaxial flexural strength values were: Turkom-Cera: 506.8 ± 87.01 MPa, In-Ceram: 347.4 ± 28.83 MPa and Vitadur-N: 128.7 ± 12.72 MPa. The results were analyzed by the Levene's test and Dunnett's T3 post-hoc test (SPSS software V11.5.0 for Windows, SPSS, Chicago, IL, USA ) at a preset significance level of 5% because of unequal group variances (Pcore ceramics (Pstrength, followed by In-Ceram and Vitadur-N. Turkom-Cera core had significantly higher flexural strength than In-Ceram and Vitadur-N ceramic core materials.

  19. The effect of ceramic thickness and resin cement shades on the color matching of ceramic veneers in discolored teeth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xing, Wenzhong; Chen, Xiaodong; Ren, Dafei; Zhan, Kangru; Wang, Yining

    2017-01-10

    The objective of this study was to analyze the effects of ceramic material thickness and resin cement shade on the color matching of ceramic veneers at the gray tooth structures. Seventy-two artificial maxillary right central incisor teeth (C2 shade) were prepared according to veneer tooth preparation in practice. Ceramic materials (LT, A2 shade, IPS e.max Press) were selected to fabricate the 0.50- and 0.75-mm thick veneers at the body region. The ceramic veneer specimens were bonded to the artificial teeth by the 6 shades of resin cements (Variolink Veneer: shades of HV+3, LV-2, LV-3; and RelyX(TM) Veneer: shades of WO, TR, A3). A clinical spectrophotometer (Crystaleye, Olympus) was used to measure the color parameters. The color differences (ΔE values) of ceramic veneers and A2 shade tab (Vitapan Classical, Vita) and C* ab values were calculated. The results of three-way ANOVA indicated that the ΔE values of ceramic veneer and A2 shade tab were significantly different in the thickness of ceramic materials, shades of resin cements, and measuring regions (p veneers that exhibited higher ΔE values compared with veneers that were 0.75-mm thick. Tukey's HSD test showed that the average ΔE values in body region were significantly smaller than that in cervical and incisal regions. The color matching of ceramic veneers was significantly influenced not only by the ceramic thickness and the resin cement shades but also the tooth regions.

  20. High pressure ceramic joint

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ward, Michael E.; Harkins, Bruce D.

    1993-01-01

    Many recuperators have components which react to corrosive gases and are used in applications where the donor fluid includes highly corrosive gases. These recuperators have suffered reduced life, increased service or maintenance, and resulted in increased cost. The present joint when used with recuperators increases the use of ceramic components which do not react to highly corrosive gases. Thus, the present joint used with the present recuperator increases the life, reduces the service and maintenance, and reduces the increased cost associated with corrosive action of components used to manufacture recuperators. The present joint is comprised of a first ceramic member, a second ceramic member, a mechanical locking device having a groove defined in one of the first ceramic member and the second ceramic member. The joint and the mechanical locking device is further comprised of a refractory material disposed in the groove and contacting the first ceramic member and the second ceramic member. The present joint mechanically provides a high strength load bearing joint having good thermal cycling characteristics, good resistance to a corrosive environment and good steady state strength at elevated temperatures.

  1. Comparison of the microshear bond strength of two resin cements to Cercon and Zirkonzahn ceramics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saeed Nokar

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available   Background and Aims: Nowadays, the application of all ceramic restorations are being raised, because of their physical characteristics, such as translucency and good appearance. Numerous researchers investigated the impact of surface treatments on the bond strength of zirconia ceramic with resin cements. The aim of this study was to compare the microshear bond strength of Cercon and Zirkonzahn (two kind of zirconia ceramics, to two types of resin cements after thermocycling.   Materials and Methods: In this study, 24 rectangular specimens were made from each group of Cercon and Zirkonzahn ceramics. After sandblasting, these specimens were connected to 3×1 mm2 composite cylinders by two resin cements (Panavia F2 and Rely X Unicem2. After performing a thermocycling regime for 5000 cycles (5-55 ◦ C, the microshear bond strengths were measured by a universal testing machine. The mode of failures were determined by a stereomicroscope. Data were analyzed using two-way ANOVA.   Results: Type of ceramics had no significant impact on the microshear bond strength (P=0.317. The highest bond strengths in both ceramics were obtained with Reply X Unicem (P=0.035. The predominant failure mode was adhesive between the cement and ceramic.   Conclusion: Type of resin cement had a significant effect on their bond strengths to zirconia ceramics.

  2. Ceramic-to-metal sealing. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gates, W.G.

    1977-03-01

    Ceramic-to-metal sealing was accomplished by brazing a metallized alumina insulator to a Kovar (Carpenter Technology Corporation) pin and header. A braze alloy wetting evaluation and a braze joint tensile strength evaluation were completed by brazing the specimens in a hydrogen atmosphere. From these evaluations the best braze alloy and brazing cycle were selected. Twelve braze alloys were evaluated and Nicusil 3 (Western Gold and Platinum Company) braze alloy was found to have good wetting characteristics and optimum strength. Assemblies brazed with this alloy were vacuum leak tight and metallurgically sound.

  3. Low temperature sintering of fluorapatite glass-ceramics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Denry, Isabelle; Holloway, Julie A

    2014-02-01

    Fluorapatite glass-ceramics have been shown to be excellent candidates as scaffold materials for bone grafts, however, scaffold production by sintering is hindered by concurrent crystallization of the glass. Objective, our goal was to investigate the effect of Ca/Al ratio on the sintering behavior of Nb-doped fluorapatite-based glasses in the SiO2-Al2O3-P2O5-MgO-Na2O-K2O-CaO-CaF2 system. Methods, glass compositions with Ca/Al ratio of 1 (A), 2 (B), 4 (C) and 19 (D) were prepared by twice melting at 1525°C for 3h. Glasses were either cast as cylindrical ingots or ground into powders. Disk-shaped specimens were prepared by either sectioning from the ingots or powder-compacting in a mold, followed by heat treatment at temperatures ranging between 700 and 1050°C for 1h. The density was measured on both sintered specimens and heat treated discs as controls. The degree of sintering was determined from these measurements. Results and Significance XRD showed that fluorapatite crystallized in all glass-ceramics. A high degree of sintering was achieved at 775°C for glass-ceramic D (98.99±0.04%), and 900°C for glass-ceramic C (91.31±0.10). Glass-ceramics A or B were only partially sintered at 1000°C (63.6±0.8% and 74.1±1.5%, respectively). SEM revealed a unique microstructure of micron-sized spherulitic fluorapatite crystals in glass-ceramics C and D. Increasing the Ca/Al ratio promoted low temperature sintering of fluorapatite glass-ceramics, which are traditionally difficult to sinter.

  4. Failure analysis of resin composite bonded to ceramic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Della Bona, Alvaro; Anusavice, Kenneth J; Mecholsky, John J

    2003-12-01

    To use fractographic principles to classify the mode of failure of resin composite bonded to ceramic specimens after microtensile testing. A leucite-based ceramic (IPS Empress)-E1) and a lithia disilicate-based ceramic (IPS Empress2)-E2) were selected for the study. Fifteen blocks of E1 and E2 were polished through 1 microm alumina abrasive. The following ceramic surface treatments were applied to three blocks of each ceramic: (1) 9.5% hydrofluoric acid (HF) for 2 min; (2) 4% acidulated phosphate fluoride (APF) for 2 min; (3) Silane coating (S); (4) HF+S; (5) APF+S. An adhesive resin and a resin composite were applied to all treated surfaces and light cured. Twenty bar specimens for each group were prepared from the composite-ceramic blocks and stored in 37 degrees C distilled water for 30 days before loading to failure under tension in an Instron testing machine. Fracture surfaces were examined using scanning electron microscopy and X-ray dot mapping. Statistical analysis was performed using one-way ANOVA, Duncan's multiple range test, and Weibull analyses. Similar surface treatments were associated with significantly different bond strengths and modes of failures for E1 and E2. All fractures occurred within the adhesion zone. The microstructural difference between etched E1 and E2 ceramics was a major controlling factor on adhesion. The quality of the bond should not be assessed based on bond strength data alone. Mode of failure and fractographic analyses should provide important information leading to predictions of clinical performance limits.

  5. The APS ceramic chambers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Milton, S.; Warner, D.

    1994-07-01

    Ceramics chambers are used in the Advanced Photon Source (APS) machines at the locations of the pulsed kicker and bumper magnets. The ceramic will be coated internally with a resistive paste. The resistance is chosen to allow the low frequency pulsed magnet field to penetrate but not the high frequency components of the circulating beam. Another design goal was to keep the power density experienced by the resistive coating to a minimum. These ceramics, their associated hardware, the coating process, and our recent experiences with them are described.

  6. Wetting characteristic of ceramic to water and adhesive resin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oh, Won-Suck; Shen, Chiayi; Alegre, Brandon; Anusavice, Kenneth J

    2002-12-01

    Maximum wetting of ceramic by adhesive resin is required to achieve optimal adhesion of the resin to ceramic. It is unknown whether the adhesion of the resin to the ceramic is affected by the surface topography and wetting by water or the adhesive resin. This study was designed to characterize the effect of surface topography on the wetting of ceramics by water and adhesive resin. Three materials, a veneering ceramic, Eris (ERV), and 2 core ceramics, Empress 1 core ceramic (E1C) and an experimental core ceramic (EXC), were used. Four surface-roughening procedures were used. They included polishing through 1200-grit SiC paper (P), air abrasion with 50 microm Al(2)O(3) (A), etching with 5% hydrofluoric acid gel (E), and a combination of airborne particle abrasion and etching (A/E). Forty bar specimens (15 x 10 x 1.5 mm) were prepared from each material (N=120). Twelve groups of 10 specimens each were prepared for the 4 surface-roughening procedures. Advancing (theta(A)) and receding (theta(R)) contact angles were measured with a CAHN Dynamic Contact Analyzer, on the basis of the Wilhelmy plate technique, with water and adhesive resin. The work of adhesion (W(A)) by the probing media was calculated by use of advancing contact angle data. The data were analyzed by t testing, analysis of variance, and Duncan's tests (alpha=0.05) to determine the statistical significance of differences in the contact angles between ceramic and water or resin as a function of surface roughening. In general, the mean theta(A) values were higher than the mean theta(R) values except for groups of E or A/E specimens with water used as a probing medium. E and A/E treatments yielded the lowest contact angle values, followed by A and P treatments (P<.001). The E1C exhibited the highest mean contact angles, whereas EXC exhibited the lowest mean contact angle except for the theta(R) with resin. The corresponding values for ERV were between those of E1C and EXC except for theta(R) values with resin

  7. 陶瓷材料放射性核素测量样品衰变时间研究及最短平衡周期的确定%The Radioactive Decay Time of Ceramic Materials Radionuclide Test Specimen and Determination of the Shortest Decay Balance Cycle

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李文杰; 鲁学军; 杨宝星

    2016-01-01

    This paper sketched the theory of radioactive samples’ decay balance cycle The speciifc activity of three groups of specimens with the radioactive decay balance time between 0 to 27 days was tested by sodium iodideγ-ray detector, then the differences between test results of the same specimen after different decay balance time were analyzed using t-test method. Researches show that if the signiifcant difference between the test results is 5%, the shortest radioactive decay time should not be less than 12 days.%简述了陶瓷材料放射性衰变平衡的基本理论,利用碘化钠γ谱仪对0-27 d内不同衰变时长的3组样品进行比活度测定,采用t检验法分析了同一组样品在不同衰变时间条件下放射性测量结果之间的差异程度。研究表明,若确保检测结果数据的显著性差异水平为5%,则样品最短衰变时间应不小于12 d。

  8. Influence of ceramic surface treatment on shear bond strength of ceramic brackets

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tatiana Fernandes Ramos

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To compare four different surface treatment methods and determine which produces adequate bond strength between ceramic brackets and facets of porcelain (feldspathic, and evaluate the Adhesive Remnant Index (ARI scores. Materials and Methods: Ten facets of porcelain specimens with glazed surfaces were used for each group. The specimens were randomly assigned to one of the following treatment conditions of the porcelain surface: (1 no surface treatment (control group, (2 fine diamond bur + orthophosphoric acid gel 37%, (3 hydrofluoric acid (HFL 10%, and (4 HFL 10% + silane. Ceramic brackets were bonded with the adhesive cement Transbond XT. The shear bond strength values were measured on a universal testing machine at a crosshead speed of 0.5 mm/min. Results: There was a significant difference (P<0.05 between the control group and all other groups. There was no significant difference (P<0.05 between treated porcelain surface with diamond bur + orthophosphoric acid gel 37% (4.8 MPa and HFL 10% (6.1 MPa, but the group treated with HFL 10% had clinically acceptable bond strength values. The group treated with HFL 10% + silane (17.5 MPa resulted in a statistically significant higher tensile bond strength (P<0.05. In group 4, 20% of the porcelain facets displayed damage. Conclusion: Etching of the surface with HFL increased the bond strength values. Silane application was recommended to bond a ceramic bracket to the porcelain surface in order to achieve bond strengths that are clinically acceptable.

  9. Characterization of a red ceramic body used in the manufacture of ceramic bricks in the region of Campos dos Goytacazes, RJ, Brazil; Caracterizacao de massa ceramica vermelha utilizada na fabricacao de blocos ceramicos na regiao de Campos dos Goytacazes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Almeida, L.L.P. de; Petrucci, L.J.T.; Pessanha, E.M.; Paixao, L.P.; Maia, F.S. [Faetec, Campos dos Goytacazes, RJ (Brazil). Centro Vocacional Tecnologico. Ceramica

    2010-07-01

    This work aims at the physical and mineralogical characterization of a ceramic body, used industrially in the manufacture of ceramic bricks in the region of Campos dos Goytacazes. The clay was characterized by chemical composition, X-ray diffraction, dilatometry, differential thermal analysis and gravimetric. We test specimens were obtained by extrusion. The bodies were burned from 750 to 1000 deg C and then it was determined water absorption, linear shrinkage, loss on ignition and modulus of rupture. The results showed that the ceramic body consists mainly of kaolinite, quartz and feldspar is thus suitable for mass production of ceramic bricks in accordance with technical standards. (author)

  10. Advanced Ceramics Property Measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salem, Jonathan; Helfinstine, John; Quinn, George; Gonczy, Stephen

    2013-01-01

    Mechanical and physical properties of ceramic bodies can be difficult to measure correctly unless the proper techniques are used. The Advanced Ceramics Committee of ASTM, C-28, has developed dozens of consensus test standards and practices to measure various properties of a ceramic monolith, composite, or coating. The standards give the "what, how, how not, and why" for measurement of many mechanical, physical, thermal, and performance properties. Using these standards will provide accurate, reliable, and complete data for rigorous comparisons with other test results from your test lab, or another. The C-28 Committee has involved academics, producers, and users of ceramics to write and continually update more than 45 standards since the committee's inception in 1986. Included in this poster is a pictogram of the C-28 standards and information on how to obtain individual copies with full details or the complete collection of standards in one volume.

  11. Ceramic fiber filter technology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Holmes, B.L.; Janney, M.A.

    1996-06-01

    Fibrous filters have been used for centuries to protect individuals from dust, disease, smoke, and other gases or particulates. In the 1970s and 1980s ceramic filters were developed for filtration of hot exhaust gases from diesel engines. Tubular, or candle, filters have been made to remove particles from gases in pressurized fluidized-bed combustion and gasification-combined-cycle power plants. Very efficient filtration is necessary in power plants to protect the turbine blades. The limited lifespan of ceramic candle filters has been a major obstacle in their development. The present work is focused on forming fibrous ceramic filters using a papermaking technique. These filters are highly porous and therefore very lightweight. The papermaking process consists of filtering a slurry of ceramic fibers through a steel screen to form paper. Papermaking and the selection of materials will be discussed, as well as preliminary results describing the geometry of papers and relative strengths.

  12. Making Ceramic Cameras

    Science.gov (United States)

    Squibb, Matt

    2009-01-01

    This article describes how to make a clay camera. This idea of creating functional cameras from clay allows students to experience ceramics, photography, and painting all in one unit. (Contains 1 resource and 3 online resources.)

  13. Making Ceramic Cameras

    Science.gov (United States)

    Squibb, Matt

    2009-01-01

    This article describes how to make a clay camera. This idea of creating functional cameras from clay allows students to experience ceramics, photography, and painting all in one unit. (Contains 1 resource and 3 online resources.)

  14. The influences of accelerated aging on mechanical properties of veneering ceramics used for zirconia restorations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Huinan; Tang, Xuehua; Dong, Zhen; Tang, Hui; Nakamura, Takashi; Yatani, Hirofumi

    2016-01-01

    This study evaluated the influences of accelerated aging on the mechanical properties of veneering ceramics used for zirconia frameworks. Five different veneering ceramics for zirconia frameworks were used. Twenty specimens were fabricated for each veneering ceramic. All specimens were divided into two groups. One was subjected to accelerated aging and the other was used as a control. Accelerated aging was performed in distilled water for 5 h at 200ºC and 2 atm. The density, open porosity, surface roughness, three-point flexural strength, and Vickers hardness were measured. The results showed that the density, open porosity, and surface roughness of all examined veneering ceramics were changed by the accelerated aging process. Accelerated aging was also found to have a positive effect on strength and a negative effect on the hardness.

  15. The Effect of Luting Agents and Ceramic Thickness on the Color Variation of Different Ceramics against a Chromatic Background.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Azevedo Cubas, Gloria Beatriz; Camacho, Guilherme Brião; Demarco, Flávio Fernando; Pereira-Cenci, Tatiana

    2011-07-01

    The aim of this study was to assess the influence of various ceramic thicknesses and luting agents on color variation in five ceramic systems. Fifteen disc-shaped ceramic specimens (11 mm diameter; shade A3) were fabricated with each of the six veneering ceramics tested, with 1, 1.5, or 2 mm thickness (n=5). Resin composite discs (Z-250, shade C4) were used as bases to simulate a chromatic background. The cementation of the veneers was carried out with an opaque resin-based cement (Enforce, shade C4), a resin-based cement (Enforce, shade A3), or without cement (C4, control group). Color differences (ΔE*) were determined using a colorimeter. Three-way ANOVA was used to analyze the data, followed by a Tukey post-hoc test (α=.05). The L*a*b* values of the ceramic systems were affected by both the luting agent and the ceramic thickness (Pceramics tested, regardless of the thickness (Pceramics and were independent of the luting agent used. The association of 2-mm thickness with opaque cement presented the strongest masking ability of a dark colored background when compared to a non- opaque luting agent and the other thicknesses tested.

  16. Fission product release model for failed plate-type fuel element and storage under water; Modelo para liberacao de produtos de fissao por placa combustivel falhada e armazenada sob agua

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Terremoto, L.A.A.; Zeituni, C.A.; Silva, J.E.R. da; Castanheira, M.; Lucki, G.; Silva, A.T. e; Teodoro, C.A.; Damy, M. de A. [Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleares (IPEN), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil). Centro de Engenharia Nuclear]. E-mail: laaterre@ipen.br

    2005-07-01

    Plate-type fuel elements burned-up inside the core of nuclear research reactors are stored mainly under deionized water of storage pools. When cladding failure occurs in such elements, radioactive fission products are released into the storage pool water. This work proposes a model to describe the release mechanism considering the diffusion through a postulated small cylindrical failure. As a consequence, an analytical expression is obtained for the activity released into the water as a function of the total storage time of a failed fuel plate. The proposed model reproduces the linear increasing of {sup 137}Cs specific activity observed in sipping tests already performed on failed plate-type fuel elements. (author)

  17. OXYGEN TRANSPORT CERAMIC MEMBRANES

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dr. Sukumar Bandopadhyay; Dr. Nagendra Nagabhushana

    2000-07-01

    This is the fourth quarterly report on a new study to develop a ceramic membrane/metal joint. The first experiments using the La-Sr-Fe-O ceramic are reported. Some of the analysis performed on the samples obtained are commented upon. A set of experiments to characterize the mechanical strength and thermal fatigue properties of the joints has been designed and begun. Finite element models of joints used to model residual stresses are described.

  18. Bonding of a mica-based castable ceramic material with a tri-n-butylborane-initiated adhesive resin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morikawa, T; Matsumura, H; Atsuta, M

    1996-07-01

    Adhesive bonding of a mica-based castable ceramic material (Olympus Castable Ceramics, OCC) was evaluated in vitro with the use of a silane primer in conjunction with an adhesive luting material. The primer contained a silane coupler and 4-methacryloxyethyl trimellitate anhydride (4-META), while the methyl methacrylate (MMA)-based luting agent was initiated with a tri-n-butylborane derivative (TBB) and contained 4-META (4-META/MMA-TBB resin). Ceramic specimens were sanded with No. 600 silicon carbide paper followed by blasting with alumina and/or etching with ammonium bifluoride. The specimens were bonded with various combinations and shear bond strengths were determined. Both priming and alumina blasting enhanced the bond between 4-META resin and OCC. Although etching with ammonium bifluoride roughened the ceramic surface, this procedure did not improve the bond strength. Electron probe microanalysis of the ceramic surface revealed a decrease in silicon and aluminium elements after etching with ammonium bifluoride.

  19. Degradability of dental ceramics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anusavice, K J

    1992-09-01

    The degradation of dental ceramics generally occurs because of mechanical forces or chemical attack. The possible physiological side-effects of ceramics are their tendency to abrade opposing dental structures, the emission of radiation from radioactive components, the roughening of their surfaces by chemical attack with a corresponding increase in plaque retention, and the release of potentially unsafe concentrations of elements as a result of abrasion and dissolution. The chemical durability of dental ceramics is excellent. With the exception of the excessive exposure to acidulated fluoride, ammonium bifluoride, or hydrofluoric acid, there is little risk of surface degradation of virtually all current dental ceramics. Extensive exposure to acidulated fluoride is a possible problem for individuals with head and/or neck cancer who have received large doses of radiation. Such fluoride treatment is necessary to minimize tooth demineralization when saliva flow rates have been reduced because of radiation exposure to salivary glands. Porcelain surface stains are also lost occasionally when abraded by prophylaxis pastes and/or acidulated fluoride. In each case, the solutes are usually not ingested. Further research that uses standardized testing procedures is needed on the chemical durability of dental ceramics. Accelerated durability tests are desirable to minimize the time required for such measurements. The influence of chemical durability on surface roughness and the subsequent effect of roughness on wear of the ceramic restorations as well as of opposing structures should also be explored on a standardized basis.

  20. Hydraulically Driven Grips For Hot Tensile Specimens

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bird, R. Keith; Johnson, George W.

    1994-01-01

    Pair of grips for tensile and compressive test specimens operate at temperatures up to 1,500 degrees F. Grips include wedges holding specimen inside furnace, where heated to uniform temperature. Hydraulic pistons drive wedges, causing them to exert clamping force. Hydraulic pistons and hydraulic fluid remain outside furnace, at room temperature. Cooling water flows through parts of grips to reduce heat transferred to external components. Advantages over older devices for gripping specimens in high-temperature tests; no need to drill holes in specimens, maintains constant gripping force on specimens, and heated to same temperature as that of specimen without risk of heating hydraulic fluid and acuator components.

  1. Optical properties of CAD-CAM ceramic systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Della Bona, Alvaro; Nogueira, Audrea D; Pecho, Oscar E

    2014-09-01

    To evaluate the direct transmittance (T%), translucency, opacity and opalescence of CAD-CAM ceramic systems and the correlation between the translucency parameter (TP) and the contrast ratio (CR). Specimens of shades A1, A2 and A3 (n=5) were fabricated from CAD-CAM ceramic blocks (IPS e.max(®) CAD HT and LT, IPS Empress(®) CAD HT and LT, Paradigm™ C, and VITABLOCS(®) Mark II) and polished to 1.0±0.01mm in thickness. A spectrophotometer (Lambda 20) was used to measure T% on the wavelength range of 400-780nm. Another spectrophotometer (VITA Easyshade(®) Advance) was used to measure the CIE L(*)a(*)b(*) coordinates and the reflectance value (Y) of samples on white and black backgrounds. TP, CR and the opalescence parameter (OP) were calculated. Data were statistically analysed using VAF (variance accounting for) coefficient with Cauchy-Schwarz inequality, one-way ANOVA, Tukey's test, Bonferroni correction and Pearson's correlation. T% of some ceramic systems is dependent on the wavelength. The spectral behaviour showed a slight and constant increase in T% up to approximately 550nm, then some ceramics changed the behaviour as the wavelength gets longer. TP and CR values ranged, respectively, from 16.79 to 21.69 and from 0.52 to 0.64 (r(2)=-0.97). OP values ranged from 3.01 to 7.64. The microstructure of CAD-CAM ceramic systems influenced the optical properties. TP and CR showed a strong correlation for all ceramic systems evaluated. Yet, all ceramics showed some degree of light transmittance. In addition to shade, this study showed that other optical properties influence on the natural appearance of dental ceramics. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Two-body wear of dental porcelain and substructure oxide ceramics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosentritt, Martin; Preis, Verena; Behr, Michael; Hahnel, Sebastian; Handel, Gerhard; Kolbeck, Carola

    2012-06-01

    The aim of this in vitro study was to investigate the two-body wear of different ceramics. Two-body wear tests were performed in a chewing simulator with steatite and enamel antagonists, respectively. Specimens were loaded in a pin-on-block design with a vertical load of 50 N for 1.2 × 10(5) cycles; (f = 1.6 Hz; lateral movement, 1 mm; mouth opening: 2 mm). Human enamel was used as a reference. Three zirconia ceramics, three veneering porcelains, two glass-infiltrated and one lithium disilicate ceramic were investigated. Veneering and lithium disilicate ceramics were glazed before testing. Surface roughness Ra (SP6, Perthen-Feinprüf, G) and wear depth were determined using a 3D scanner (Laserscan 3D, Willytec, G). SEM (Quanta FEG 400, FEI, USA) pictures of the worn specimens and antagonists were made for evaluating wear performance. Veneering porcelain provided wear traces between 71.2 and 124.1 μm (enamel antagonist) and 117.4 and 274.1 μm (steatite). Wear of the steatite antagonists varied between 0.618 and 2.85 mm². No wear was found for zirconia and glass-infiltrated substructure ceramics. Also, no wear was found for the corresponding antagonists. Wear of specimens and antagonists was strongly material dependent. No visible wear was found on zirconia and glass-infiltrated ceramics. Porcelain and lithium disilicate ceramic showed a comparable or lower wear than the enamel reference. Antagonist wear was found to be lower when specimens were made of substructure oxide ceramics instead of veneering porcelain. From the point of wear testing, zirconia may be used for the fabrication of fixed dental prosthesis without veneering.

  3. Clinical application of bio ceramics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anu, Sharma; Gayatri, Sharma

    2016-05-01

    Ceramics are the inorganic crystalline material. These are used in various field such as biomedical, electrical, electronics, aerospace, automotive and optical etc. Bio ceramics are the one of the most active areas of research. Bio ceramics are the ceramics which are biocompatible. The unique properties of bio ceramics make them an attractive option for medical applications and offer some potential advantages over other materials. During the past three decades, a number of major advances have been made in the field of bio ceramics. This review focuses on the use of these materials in variety of clinical scenarios.

  4. [Effect of ceramic thickness and resin cement shades on final color of heat-pressed ceramic veneers].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ren, D F; Zhan, K R; Chen, X D; Xing, W Z

    2017-02-09

    Objective: To analyze the effect of ceramic materials thickness and resin cement shades on the final color of ceramic veneers in the discolored teeth, and to investigate the color agreement of try-in pastes to the corresponding resin cements. Methods: Sixty artificial maxillary central incisor teeth (C2 shade) were used to simulate the natural discolored teeth and prepared according to veneer tooth preparation protocol. Veneers of different thickness in the body region (0.50 and 0.75 mm) were fabricated using ceramic materials (LT A2 shade, IPS e.max Press). The ceramic veneer specimens were bonded to the artificial teeth using the 6 shades of resin cements (Variolink Veneer: shades of LV-3, LV-2, HV+3; RelyX™ Veneer: shades of TR, A3, WO) (n=5). A clinical spectrophotometer was used to measure the color parameters of ceramic veneers at the cervical, body and incisal regions. Color changes of veneers before and after cementation were calculated and registered as ΔE1, and the changes between try-in paste and the corresponding resin cements were registered as ΔE2. Results: Three-way ANOVA indicated that ΔE1 and ΔE2 values were significantly affected by the ceramic thickness, resin cement shades and measuring regions (Pveneers were cemented with resin cements in shades of HV+3 and WO. The ΔE2 values of six shades ranged from 0.60-2.56. The shades of HV+3, WO and A3 resin cements were more than 1.60. Conclusions: Different thickness of ceramic materials, resin cement shades and measuring regions could affect the final color of ceramic veneers. The color differences of some resin cements and corresponding try-in pastes might be observed in clinical practice.

  5. Fly ash of mineral coal as ceramic tiles raw material.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zimmer, A; Bergmann, C P

    2007-01-01

    The aim of this work was to evaluate the use of mineral coal fly ash as a raw material in the production of ceramic tiles. The samples of fly ash came from Capivari de Baixo, a city situated in the Brazilian Federal State of Santa Catarina. The fly ash and the raw materials were characterized regarding their physical chemical properties, and, based on these results; batches containing fly ash and typical raw materials for ceramic tiles were prepared. The fly ash content in the batches varied between 20 and 80 wt%. Specimens were molded using a uniaxial hydraulic press and were fired. All batches containing ash up to 60 wt% present adequate properties to be classified as several kinds of products in the ISO 13006 standard () regarding its different absorption groups (pressed). The results obtained indicate that fly ash, when mixed with traditional raw materials, has the necessary requirements to be used as a raw material for production of ceramic tiles.

  6. Comparison of load-fatigue performance of posterior ceramic onlay restorations under different preparation designs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kois, Dean E; Chaiyabutr, Yada; Kois, John C

    2012-06-01

    The objective of this study was to evaluate the load-fatigue performance of posterior ceramic onlay restorations relative to two variables: preparation design (with or without buccal veneers); and the existing amount of tooth structure (non-worn tooth, worn tooth). Sixty extracted third molars were divided into five groups. One group received a mesial-occlusal-distal (MOD) gold onlay restoration (control). The other four experimental groups were prepared for ceramic onlay restorations. Two of the groups additionally received 2-mm occlusal reduction to simulate occlusal wear. All restored teeth were subjected to thermocycling prior to fatigue testing. A fatigue load of 150 N was applied on the occlusal surface at a frequency of 1.2 hz, at an angle of 135 degrees to the long axis of the tooth. Specimen failure was defined as the occurrence of crack propagation in the luting cement layer. This was monitored by the strain gauge on the specimen. All specimens restored on worn tooth had significantly lower fatigue failure cycle counts than those of non-worn tooth. The fracture mode analysis revealed that ceramic fracture tended to be demonstrated only in the group of worn tooth groups. The addition of a buccal veneer component had no significant effect on the load-fatigue performance of posterior ceramic onlay restorations, but the existing amount of tooth structure did have a significant effect on the load-fatigue performance of posterior ceramic onlay restorations. Catastrophic failures (ceramic fracture) occurred only in the group of worn tooth.

  7. Measurements and Counts for Notacanthidae Specimens

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Taxonomic data were collected for specimens of deep-sea spiny eels (Notacanthidae) from the Hawaiian Ridge by Bruce C. Mundy. Specimens were collected off the north...

  8. [Ceramic-on-ceramic bearings in total hip arthroplasty (THA)].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sentürk, U; Perka, C

    2015-04-01

    The main reason for total hip arthroplasty (THA) revision is the wear-related aseptic loosening. Younger and active patients after total joint replacement create high demands, in particular, on the bearings. The progress, especially for alumina ceramic-on-ceramic bearings and mixed ceramics have solved many problems of the past and lead to good in vitro results. Modern ceramics (alumina or mixed ceramics containing alumina) are extremely hard, scratch-resistant, biocompatible, offer a low coefficient of friction, superior lubrication and have the lowest wear rates in comparison to all other bearings in THA. The disadvantage of ceramic is the risk of material failure, i.e., of ceramic fracture. The new generation of mixed ceramics (delta ceramic), has reduced the risk of head fractures to 0.03-0.05 %, but the risk for liner fractures remains unchanged at about 0.02 %. Assuming a non-impinging component implantation, ceramic-on-ceramic bearings have substantial advantages over all other bearings in THA. Due to the superior hardness, ceramic bearings produce less third body wear and are virtually impervious to damage from instruments during the implantation process. A specific complication for ceramic-on-ceramic bearings is "squeaking". The high rate of reported squeaking (0.45 to 10.7 %) highlights the importance of precise implant positioning and the stem and patient selection. With precise implant positioning this problem is rare with many implant designs and without clinical relevance. The improved tribology and the presumable resulting implant longevity make ceramic-on-ceramic the bearing of choice for young and active patients. Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  9. Plasma etching a ceramic composite. [evaluating microstructure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hull, David R.; Leonhardt, Todd A.; Sanders, William A.

    1992-01-01

    Plasma etching is found to be a superior metallographic technique for evaluating the microstructure of a ceramic matrix composite. The ceramic composite studied is composed of silicon carbide whiskers (SiC(sub W)) in a matrix of silicon nitride (Si3N4), glass, and pores. All four constituents are important in evaluating the microstructure of the composite. Conventionally prepared samples, both as-polished or polished and etched with molten salt, do not allow all four constituents to be observed in one specimen. As-polished specimens allow examination of the glass phase and porosity, while molten salt etching reveals the Si3N4 grain size by removing the glass phase. However, the latter obscures the porosity. Neither technique allows the SiC(sub W) to be distinguished from the Si3N4. Plasma etching with CF4 + 4 percent O2 selectively attacks the Si3N4 grains, leaving SiC(sub W) and glass in relief, while not disturbing the pores. An artifact of the plasma etching reaction is the deposition of a thin layer of carbon on Si3N4, allowing Si3N4 grains to be distinguished from SiC(sub W) by back scattered electron imaging.

  10. Ceramic Hosts for Fission Products Immobilization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Peter C Kong

    2010-07-01

    Natural spinel, perovskite and zirconolite rank among the most leach resistant of mineral forms. They also have a strong affinity for a large number of other elements and including actinides. Specimens of natural perovskite and zirconolite were radioisotope dated and found to have survived at least 2 billion years of natural process while still remain their loading of uranium and thorium . Developers of the Synroc waste form recognized and exploited the capability of these minerals to securely immobilize TRU elements in high-level waste . However, the Synroc process requires a relatively uniform input and hot pressing equipment to produce the waste form. It is desirable to develop alternative approaches to fabricate these durable waste forms to immobilize the radioactive elements. One approach is using a high temperature process to synthesize these mineral host phases to incorporate the fission products in their crystalline structures. These mineral assemblages with immobilized fission products are then isolated in a durable high temperature glass for periods measured on a geologic time scale. This is a long term research concept and will begin with the laboratory synthesis of the pure spinel (MgAl2O4), perovskite (CaTiO3) and zirconolite (CaZrTi2O7) from their constituent oxides. High temperature furnace and/or thermal plasma will be used for the synthesis of these ceramic host phases. Nonradioactive strontium oxide will be doped into these ceramic phases to investigate the development of substitutional phases such as Mg1-xSrxAl2O4, Ca1-xSrxTiO3 and Ca1-xSrxZrTi2O7. X-ray diffraction will be used to establish the crystalline structures of the pure ceramic hosts and the substitution phases. Scanning electron microscopy and energy dispersive X-ray analysis (SEM-EDX) will be performed for product morphology and fission product surrogates distribution in the crystalline hosts. The range of strontium doping is planned to reach the full substitution of the divalent

  11. 滑板式汽车侧滑检验台测试结果不确定度评定%Evaluating on Uncertainty of Measurement for Automobile Sideslip Tester of Sliding Plate Type

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    高蔚; 郭辉; 王岩松

    2012-01-01

    在简述汽车前轮定位技术在交通运输企业和交通安全检测领域中应用的基础上,阐述了汽车前轮定位检测技术的必要性和可行性.针对目前滑板式汽车侧滑试验台存在检测精度低、重复性差的不足,以滑板为研究对象,依照测量不确定度方法,对求解滑板式汽车侧滑实验台的测试结果不确定度的各种数学参数、误差来源进行了分析,建立了双滑板式汽车侧滑试验台的数学模型,推导出不确定度的计算式.通过对公式中各变量的分析,计算了各变量的不确定度,最后计算出合成不确定度.本研究成果为未来开发性能更可靠、效果更佳的滑板式汽车侧滑实验台提供了一定理论依.%Based on brief introduction to the application of automotive test of wheel alignment in traffic transportation enterprise and traffic safety test system,the necessity and feasibility of automobile test technology of wheel alignment was expounded. Aimed at shortage of lower accuracy and bad repeatability of automobile sideslip tester of sliding plate type,regarded sliding plate as research object,according to the measurement method of automobile sideslipe tester of sliding plate type and assessment way of measurement uncertainty,the mathematical model and error source used to revolve uncertainly of automobile sideslip tester of sliding plate type are analyzed,and a mathematic model for automobile side tester of sliding plate type is developed.The calculation formula is deduced and then each component uncertainty is calculated through, analyzing the variable among the procedures.The combined uncertainty is finally obtained by synthesizing the uncertainties of various component variables.The result of this research can provide an theoretical reference for future developement of active automobile sideslip tester of sliding plate type

  12. Testing method for ceramic armor and bare ceramic tiles

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Carton, E.P.; Roebroeks, G.H.J.J.

    2014-01-01

    TNO has developed an alternative, more configuration independent ceramic test method than the standard Depth-of-Penetration test method. In this test ceramic tiles and ceramic based armor are evaluated as target without a semi-infinite backing layer. An energy approach is chosen to evaluate and rank

  13. Testing method for ceramic armour and bare ceramic tiles

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Carton, E.P.; Roebroeks, G.H.J.J.

    2016-01-01

    TNO developed an alternative, more configuration independent ceramic test method than the Depth-of-Penetration test method. In this alternative test ceramic tiles and ceramic based armour are evaluated as target without a semi-infinite backing layer. An energy approach is chosen to evaluate and rank

  14. Testing method for ceramic armor and bare ceramic tiles

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Carton, E.P.; Roebroeks, G.H.J.J.

    2014-01-01

    TNO has developed an alternative, more configuration independent ceramic test method than the standard Depth-of-Penetration test method. In this test ceramic tiles and ceramic based armor are evaluated as target without a semi-infinite backing layer. An energy approach is chosen to evaluate and rank

  15. Testing method for ceramic armour and bare ceramic tiles

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Carton, E.P.; Roebroeks, G.H.J.J.

    2016-01-01

    TNO developed an alternative, more configuration independent ceramic test method than the Depth-of-Penetration test method. In this alternative test ceramic tiles and ceramic based armour are evaluated as target without a semi-infinite backing layer. An energy approach is chosen to evaluate and rank

  16. Microwave processing of a dental ceramic used in computer-aided design/computer-aided manufacturing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pendola, Martin; Saha, Subrata

    2015-01-01

    Because of their favorable mechanical properties and natural esthetics, ceramics are widely used in restorative dentistry. The conventional ceramic sintering process required for their use is usually slow, however, and the equipment has an elevated energy consumption. Sintering processes that use microwaves have several advantages compared to regular sintering: shorter processing times, lower energy consumption, and the capacity for volumetric heating. The objective of this study was to test the mechanical properties of a dental ceramic used in computer-aided design/computer-aided manufacturing (CAD/CAM) after the specimens were processed with microwave hybrid sintering. Density, hardness, and bending strength were measured. When ceramic specimens were sintered with microwaves, the processing times were reduced and protocols were simplified. Hardness was improved almost 20% compared to regular sintering, and flexural strength measurements suggested that specimens were approximately 50% stronger than specimens sintered in a conventional system. Microwave hybrid sintering may preserve or improve the mechanical properties of dental ceramics designed for CAD/CAM processing systems, reducing processing and waiting times.

  17. Structural reliability of alumina-, feldspar-, leucite-, mica- and zirconia-based ceramics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tinschert, J; Zwez, D; Marx, R; Anusavice, K J

    2000-09-01

    The objective of this study was to test the hypothesis that industrially manufactured ceramic materials, such as Cerec Mark II and Zirconia-TZP, have a smaller range of fracture strength variation and therefore greater structural reliability than laboratory-processed dental ceramic materials. Thirty bar specimens per material were prepared and tested. The four-point bend test was used to determine the flexure strength of all ceramic materials. The fracture stress values were analyzed by Weibull analysis to determine the Weibull modulus values (m) and the 1 and 5% probabilities of failure. The mean strength and standard deviation values for these ceramics are as follows: (MPa+/-SD) were: Cerec Mark II, 86.3+/-4.3; Dicor, 70.3+/-12.2; In-Ceram Alumina, 429. 3+/-87.2; IPS Empress, 83.9+/-11.3; Vitadur Alpha Core, 131.0+/-9.5; Vitadur Alpha Dentin, 60.7+/-6.8; Vita VMK 68, 82.7+/-10.0; and Zirconia-TZP, 913.0+/-50.2. There was no statistically significant difference among the flexure strength of Cerec Mark II, Dicor, IPS Empress, Vitadur Alpha Dentin, and Vita VMK 68 ceramics (p>0.05). The highest Weibull moduli were associated with Cerec Mark II and Zirconia-TZP ceramics (23.6 and 18.4). Dicor glass-ceramic and In-Ceram Alumina had the lowest m values (5.5 and 5.7), whereas intermediate values were observed for IPS-Empress, Vita VMK 68, Vitadur Alpha Dentin and Vitadur Alpha Core ceramics (8.6, 8.9, 10.0 and 13.0, respectively). Except for In-Ceram Alumina, Vitadur Alpha and Zirconia-TZP core ceramics, most of the investigated ceramic materials fabricated under the condition of a dental laboratory were not stronger or more structurally reliable than Vita VMK 68 veneering porcelain. Only Cerec Mark II and Zirconia-TZP specimens, which were prepared from an industrially optimized ceramic material, exhibited m values greater than 18. Hence, we conclude that industrially prepared ceramics are more structurally reliable materials for dental applications although CAD

  18. Masking properties of ceramics for veneer restorations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skyllouriotis, Andreas L; Yamamoto, Hideo L; Nathanson, Dan

    2017-10-01

    The translucency and opacity of ceramics play a significant role in emulating the natural color of teeth, but studies of the masking properties and limitations of dental ceramics when used as monolayer restorations are lacking. The purpose of this in vitro study was to determine the translucency of 6 materials used for veneer restorations by assessing their translucency parameters (TPs), contrast ratios (CRs), and potential to mask dark tooth colors. Ten square- or disk-shaped specimens (0.5-mm thickness, shade A2) were fabricated from Vitablocks Mark II (VMII; Vita Zahnfabrik), IPS e.max CAD LT (EMXC LT; Ivoclar Vivadent AG), IPS e.max CAD HT (EMXC HT; Ivoclar Vivadent AG), IPS Empress CAD LT (EMP LT; Ivoclar Vivadent AG), IPS e.max Press LT (EMXP LT; Ivoclar Vivadent AG), and CZR (CZR; Kuraray Noritake Dental Inc). Their luminance (Y) values over black and over white tiles were measured, followed by their color (CIELab) over black tiles and white tiles and shaded A2 (control group), A3.5, A4, and B4 acrylic resin blocks. All measurements were performed using a spectrophotometer in 2 different areas on each specimen. Then CRs, TPs, and color differences (over shaded backgrounds) were determined. Data were subjected to 1-way and 2-way ANOVA (α=.05) for analysis. Mean CR values of EMXP LT were significantly higher than those of the other tested materials, whereas VMII and EMXC HT had the lowest values (Pceramic materials, whereas shade B4 demonstrated the lowest mean background effect (Pceramics were revealed (Pceramics exhibited poor masking properties against the A4 background. The color differences of most tested ceramics were more acceptable when tested against the B4 background (ΔE*≤3.3). Copyright © 2016 Editorial Council for the Journal of Prosthetic Dentistry. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Cooled Ceramic Turbine Vane Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — N&R Engineering will investigate the feasibility of cooled ceramics, such as ceramic matrix composite (CMC) turbine blade concepts that can decrease specific...

  20. Additive Manufacturing of Ceramic Structures by Laser Engineered Net Shaping

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    NIU Fangyong; WU Dongjiang; MA Guangyi; ZHANG Bi

    2015-01-01

    Ceramic is an important material with outstanding physical properties whereas impurities and porosities generated by traditional manufacturing methods limits its further industrial applications. In order to solve this problem, direct fabrication of Al2O3 ceramic structures is conducted by laser engineered net shaping system and pure ceramic powders. Grain refinement strengthening method by doping ZrO2 and dispersion strengthening method by doping SiC are proposed to suppress cracks in fabricating Al2O3 structure. Phase compositions, microstructures as well as mechanical properties of fabricated specimens are then analyzed. The results show that the proposed two methods are effective in suppressing cracks and structures of single-bead wall, arc and cylinder ring are successfully deposited. Stable phase ofα-Al2O3 and t-ZrO2 are obtained in the fabricated specimens. Micro-hardness higher than 1700 HV are also achieved for both Al2O3 and Al2O3/ZrO2, which are resulted from fine directional crystals generated by the melting-solidification process. Results presented indicate that additive manufacturing is a very attractive technique for the production of high-performance ceramic structures in a single step.

  1. Rolling contact fatigue of ceramics

    OpenAIRE

    Hadfield, Mark

    1993-01-01

    This thesis was submitted for the degree of Doctor of Philosophy and awarded by Brunel University. Ceramic/ceramic and ceramic/steel contacts under lubricated rolling conditions are studied. This work is of interest to ball bearing manufacturers as the use of ceramics in the design of these components has some advantages over traditional bearing-steel materials. Low density and increased stiffness are the mechanical properties which gas-turbine and machine tool manufacturers are most likel...

  2. OXYGEN TRANSPORT CERAMIC MEMBRANES

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dr. Sukumar Bandopadhyay; Dr. Nagendra Nagabhushana

    2000-10-01

    This is the third quarterly report on oxygen Transport Ceramic Membranes. In the following, the report describes the progress made by our university partners in Tasks 1 through 6, experimental apparatus that was designed and built for various tasks of this project, thermodynamic calculations, where applicable and work planned for the future. (Task 1) Design, fabricate and evaluate ceramic to metal seals based on graded ceramic powder/metal braze joints. (Task 2) Evaluate the effect of defect configuration on ceramic membrane conductivity and long term chemical and structural stability. (Task 3) Determine materials mechanical properties under conditions of high temperatures and reactive atmospheres. (Task 4) Evaluate phase stability and thermal expansion of candidate perovskite membranes and develop techniques to support these materials on porous metal structures. (Task 5) Assess the microstructure of membrane materials to evaluate the effects of vacancy-impurity association, defect clusters, and vacancy-dopant association on the membrane performance and stability. (Task 6) Measure kinetics of oxygen uptake and transport in ceramic membrane materials under commercially relevant conditions using isotope labeling techniques.

  3. Diffusion in ceramics

    CERN Document Server

    Pelleg, Joshua

    2016-01-01

    This textbook provides an introduction to changes that occur in solids such as ceramics, mainly at high temperatures, which are diffusion controlled, as well as presenting research data. Such changes are related to the kinetics of various reactions such as precipitation, oxidation and phase transformations, but are also related to some mechanical changes, such as creep. The book is composed of two parts, beginning with a look at the basics of diffusion according to Fick's Laws. Solutions of Fick’s second law for constant D, diffusion in grain boundaries and dislocations are presented along with a look at the atomistic approach for the random motion of atoms. In the second part, the author discusses diffusion in several technologically important ceramics. The ceramics selected are monolithic single phase ones, including: A12O3, SiC, MgO, ZrO2 and Si3N4. Of these, three refer to oxide ceramics (alumina, magnesia and zirconia). Carbide based ceramics are represented by the technologically very important Si-ca...

  4. OXYGEN TRANSPORT CERAMIC MEMBRANES

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dr. Sukumar Bandopadhyay; Dr. Nagendra Nagabhushana

    2000-10-01

    This is the third quarterly report on oxygen Transport Ceramic Membranes. In the following, the report describes the progress made by our university partners in Tasks 1 through 6, experimental apparatus that was designed and built for various tasks of this project, thermodynamic calculations, where applicable and work planned for the future. (Task 1) Design, fabricate and evaluate ceramic to metal seals based on graded ceramic powder/metal braze joints. (Task 2) Evaluate the effect of defect configuration on ceramic membrane conductivity and long term chemical and structural stability. (Task 3) Determine materials mechanical properties under conditions of high temperatures and reactive atmospheres. (Task 4) Evaluate phase stability and thermal expansion of candidate perovskite membranes and develop techniques to support these materials on porous metal structures. (Task 5) Assess the microstructure of membrane materials to evaluate the effects of vacancy-impurity association, defect clusters, and vacancy-dopant association on the membrane performance and stability. (Task 6) Measure kinetics of oxygen uptake and transport in ceramic membrane materials under commercially relevant conditions using isotope labeling techniques.

  5. Ceramic impregnated superabrasives

    Science.gov (United States)

    Radtke, Robert P.; Sherman, Andrew

    2009-02-10

    A superabrasive fracture resistant compact is formed by depositing successive layers of ceramic throughout the network of open pores in a thermally stable self-bonded polycrystalline diamond or cubic boron nitride preform. The void volume in the preform is from approximately 2 to 10 percent of the volume of the preform, and the average pore size is below approximately 3000 nanometers. The preform is evacuated and infiltrated under at least about 1500 pounds per square inch pressure with a liquid pre-ceramic polymerizable precursor. The precursor is infiltrated into the preform at or below the boiling point of the precursor. The precursor is polymerized into a solid phase material. The excess is removed from the outside of the preform, and the polymer is pyrolized to form a ceramic. The process is repeated at least once more so as to achieve upwards of 90 percent filling of the original void volume. When the remaining void volume drops below about 1 percent the physical properties of the compact, such as fracture resistance, improve substantially. Multiple infiltration cycles result in the deposition of sufficient ceramic to reduce the void volume to below 0.5 percent. The fracture resistance of the compacts in which the pores are lined with formed in situ ceramic is generally at least one and one-half times that of the starting preforms.

  6. Mechanical properties of ceramics

    CERN Document Server

    Pelleg, Joshua

    2014-01-01

    This book discusses the mechanical properties of ceramics and aims to provide both a solid background for undergraduate students, as well as serving as a text to bring practicing engineers up to date with the latest developments in this topic so they can use and apply these to their actual engineering work.  Generally, ceramics are made by moistening a mixture of clays, casting it into desired shapes and then firing it to a high temperature, a process known as 'vitrification'. The relatively late development of metallurgy was contingent on the availability of ceramics and the know-how to mold them into the appropriate forms. Because of the characteristics of ceramics, they offer great advantages over metals in specific applications in which hardness, wear resistance and chemical stability at high temperatures are essential. Clearly, modern ceramics manufacturing has come a long way from the early clay-processing fabrication method, and the last two decades have seen the development of sophisticated technique...

  7. Assessment of ceramic membrane filters

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ahluwalia, R.K.; Geyer, H.K.; Im, K.H. [and others

    1995-08-01

    The objectives of this project include the development of analytical models for evaluating the fluid mechanics of membrane coated, dead-end ceramic filters, and to determine the effects of thermal and thermo-chemical aging on the material properties of emerging ceramic hot gas filters. A honeycomb cordierite monolith with a thin ceramic coating and a rigid candle filter were evaluated.

  8. Ceramic composites: Enabling aerospace materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levine, S. R.

    1992-01-01

    Ceramics and ceramic matrix composites (CMC) have the potential for significant impact on the performance of aerospace propulsion and power systems. In this paper, the potential benefits are discussed in broad qualitative terms and are illustrated by some specific application case studies. The key issues in need of resolution for the potential of ceramics to be realized are discussed.

  9. Internal strain analysis of ceramics using scanning laser acoustic microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kent, Renee M.

    1993-01-01

    Quantitative studies of material behavior characteristics are essential for predicting the functionality of a material under its operating conditions. A nonintrusive methodology for measuring the in situ strain of small dimeter (to 11 microns) ceramic fibers under uniaxial tensile loading and the local internal strains of ceramics and ceramic composites under flexural loading is introduced. The strain measurements and experimentally observed mechanical behavior are analyzed in terms of the microstructural development and fracture behavior of each test specimen evaluated. Measurement and analysis of Nicalon silicon carbide (SiC) fiber (15 microns diameter) indicate that the mean elastic modulus of the individual fiber is 185.3 GPa. Deviations observed in the experimentally determined elastic modulus values between specimens were attributed to microstructural variations which occur during processing. Corresponding variations in the fracture surface morphology were also observed. The observed local mechanical behavior of a lithium alumino-silicate (LAS) glass ceramic, a LAS/SiC monofilament composite, and a calcium alumino-silicate (CAS)/SiC fully reinforced composite exhibits nonlinearities and apparent hysteresis due to the subcritical mechanical loading. Local hysteresis in the LAS matrices coincided with the occurrence of multiple fracture initiation sites, localized microcracking, and secondary cracking. The observed microcracking phenomenon was attributed to stress relaxation of residual stresses developed during processing, and local interaction of the crack front with the microstructure. The relaxation strain and stress predicted on apparent mechanical hysteresis effects were defined and correlated with the magnitude of the measured fracture stress for each specimen studied. This quantitative correlation indicated a repeatable measure of the stress at which matrix microcracking occurred for stress relief of each material system. Stress relaxation occurred

  10. Environment Conscious Ceramics (Ecoceramics)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Mrityunjay; Levine, Stanley R. (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    Environment conscious ceramics (Ecoceramics) are a new class of materials, which can be produced with renewable natural resources (wood) or wood wastes (wood sawdust). Silicon carbide-based ecoceramics have been fabricated by reactive infiltration of carbonaceous preforms by molten silicon or silicon-refractory metal alloys. These carbonaceous preforms have been fabricated by pyrolysis of solid wood bodies at 1000 C. The fabrication approach, microstructure, and mechanical properties of SiC-based ecoceramics are presented. Ecoceramics have tailorable properties and behave like ceramic materials manufactured by conventional approaches.

  11. Displacive Transformation in Ceramics

    Science.gov (United States)

    1994-02-28

    single cycle[21]. In zirconia , ferroelastic domains appeared during the cubic to tetragonal transformation at -2200’C, where [c] axes were elongated...Mechanism in Tetragonal Zirconia ( TZP ) Ceramics," Adv. in Ceramics 24 (1986) 653-662. 26. K. Mehta, J. F. Jue and A. V. Virkar, "Grinding-Liduced...barium copper oxide (YBa2Cu306+x) and dicalcium silicate (Ca 2 SiO4 ). The cubic to tetragonal transformation in PbTiO3 40 was proven to be

  12. Clinicopathological study of hysterectomised specimens

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saravana A.

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Background: Hysterectomy is the commonest major surgical procedure performed in gynecology. It can be done by abdominal or vaginal route and with the help of laparoscopy. Hysterectomy is an effective treatment option for many conditions like fibroid, abnormal uterine bleeding, endometriosis, adenomyosis, uterine prolapse, pelvic inflammatory disease and cancer of reproductive organ when other treatment options are contraindicated or have failed, or if the woman no longer wishes to retain her menstrual and reproductive. The aim and objective of the study was to correlate indications of hysterectomy with histopathological findings in hysterectomised patients. Methods: A retrospective study was carried on 113 hysterectomised cases over a period of one year from June 2015 to May 2016. The data regarding the patient’s age, parity, clinical diagnosis, type of hysterectomy and histopathological diagnosis were reviewed by the records and analyzed. Results: A total of 113 cases of hysterectomies were studied. Hysterectomies were distributed over a wide age ranging from 20 years to 75 years. Most common age group was 41-50 years. Among hystectomies majority were done through vaginal route 86 (76.1% and 26 (23% cases were done through abdominal route. Most common clinical diagnosis was fibroid uterus in 44(38.9% cases. Most of the hysterectomies were done for benign conditions. In final histopathological report most common diagnosis was fibroid uterus in 45(39.8% hysterectomy specimens. It was correlated well with clinical diagnosis. Next most common histopathological diagnosis was Adenomyosis. Conclusions: Histopathological analysis correlated well with preoperative clinical diagnosis in majority of cases. The commonest indication and histopathological finding in our study was fibroid uterus. Next most common histopathological finding was Adenomyosis. Most commonly hysterectomies were done through vaginal route in our study.

  13. [The German Environmental Specimen Bank].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schröter-Kermani, Christa; Gies, Andreas; Kolossa-Gehring, Marike

    2016-03-01

    The main objective of the German Environmental Specimen Bank (ESB) is the long-term storage of environmental and human samples under stable deep-freeze conditions for future research. The ESB is unique in providing a continuous historical record of environmental and human exposure to chemicals in Germany. ESB was started parallel to the development of the first German Chemicals Legislation in the late 1970s. In 1979, the ESB test operation began. After the Chemicals Law came into force in 1982, the ESB was established as a permanent facility in 1985. With the new European Chemicals Legislation, REACH, in 2007 responsibility for the safety of commercial chemicals and risk assessment was assigned to the industry. Since then, the ESB has become even more important in verifying the self-assessment of the industry, in evaluating the effectiveness of regulations, thus ensuring the protection of humans and the environment against adverse effects caused by exposure to chemicals. These objectives are pursued by the regular monitoring of contaminations and the assessment of temporal trends. Demonstrating the necessity of deriving exposure reduction measures, ESB results serve as key information for policy-makers. Information on preventing exposure to chemicals is available to the general public and to the public health services. The ESB is thus an important monitoring instrument of the Federal Ministry for the Environment, Nature Conservation, Building and Nuclear Safety. The Federal Environment Agency operates the ESB based on its own concepts, heads the scientific data evaluation and transfers results into the environmental policy arena and to the general public.

  14. Effect of abutment shade, ceramic thickness, and coping type on the final shade of zirconia all-ceramic restorations: in vitro study of color masking ability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oh, Seon-Hee

    2015-01-01

    PURPOSE The aim of the study was to evaluate the effect of abutment shade, ceramic thickness, and coping type on the final shade of zirconia all-ceramic restorations. MATERIALS AND METHODS Three different types of disk-shaped zirconia coping specimens (Lava, Cercon, Zirkonzahn: ø10 mm × 0.4 mm) were fabricated and veneered with IPS e.max Press Ceram (shade A2), for total thicknesses of 1 and 1.5 mm. A total of sixty zirconia restoration specimens were divided into six groups based on their coping types and thicknesses. The abutment specimens (ø10 mm × 7 mm) were prepared with gold alloy, base metal (nickel-chromium) alloy, and four different shades (A1, A2, A3, A4) of composite resins. The average L*, a*, b* values of the zirconia specimens on the six abutment specimens were measured with a dental colorimeter, and the statistical significance in the effects of three variables was analyzed by using repeated measures analysis of variance (α=.05).The average shade difference (ΔE) values of the zirconia specimens between the A2 composite resin abutment and other abutments were also evaluated. RESULTS The effects of zirconia specimen thickness (Pcomposite resin and gold alloy abutments was higher (close to the acceptability threshold of 5.5 ΔE) than th ose between the A2 composite resin and other abutments. CONCLUSION This in-vitro study demonstrated that abutment shade, ceramic thickness, and coping type affected the resulting shade of zirconia restorations. PMID:26576252

  15. Effect of test method on flexural strength of recent dental ceramics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jin, Jingyue; Takahashi, Hidekazu; Iwasaki, Naohiko

    2004-12-01

    The purpose of the present study was to evaluate the relationships among three flexural strengths of recent dental ceramics using 3-point and 4-point bending tests and biaxial flexural test. Three brands of porcelain for veneering (d.SIGN, Supper porcelain AAA, Vintage Hallo), two injectable ceramics (Empress 2, OPC 3G), and one castable ceramic (Crys-Cera) were used. Twenty bar-shaped and 10 disc-shaped specimens of each ceramic type were prepared according to manufacturers' instructions, polished, and subjected to 3-point and 4-point bending tests and biaxial flexural test, respectively. Three flexural strengths for each ceramics were compared using one-way analysis of variance and Tukey comparison, and also investigated by Weibull analysis. The biaxial flexural strength and 3-point bending strength of all ceramics, except OPC 3G and Crys-Cera, were significantly greater than the corresponding 4-point bending strength. As for OPC 3G and Crys-Cera, their biaxial flexural strengths were significantly greater than their 3-point bending strengths, which is contrary to the other ceramics. The Weibull moduli ranged from 6.6 to 20.8. The Weibull moduli of examined ceramics, except Crys-cera, were statistically insignificant regardless of test methods.

  16. Distorting the ceramic familiar: materiality and non-ceramic intervention, Conference, Keramik Museum, Germany

    OpenAIRE

    Livingstone, Andrew

    2009-01-01

    Invited conference speaker, Westerwald Keramik Museum, August 2009. Paper title: Distorting the ceramic familiar: materiality and non-ceramic intervention.\\ud \\ud This paper will examine the integration of non-ceramic media into the discourse of ceramics.

  17. Flexible laboratory system for 3D x-ray microtomography of 3-50 mm specimens

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reimann, David A.; Flynn, Michael J.; Hames, Sean M.

    1995-03-01

    Point projection microradiography has established value for imaging large, wet, opaque, and intact specimens in 2D projection views. We have developed a 3D microtomography system by combining the principles of microradiography with computed tomography (CT). An extension of conventional CT methods is utilized to yield 3D data from 2D microradiographic projections. Use of 2D cone beam projections rather than 1D projections of a slice simplifies the specimen motion hardware, and reduces the amount of wasted radiation. Our imaging system consists of a microfocus x-ray source and x-ray image intensifier coupled to a CCD camera. The system is flexible in the size of specimens which can be imaged. Resolving power varies with specimen size from 4 lp/mm for 50 mm diameter objects to 40 lp/mm for 3 mm diameter objects. Image resolution is isotropic in three dimensions. The 3D nature of the resulting image data can be used to visualize internal structure and compute stereologic parameters such as volume, surface area, and surface/volume orientation. This instrument has been used to image bone specimens in studies of human vertebrae, human femoral necks, dog metacarpals, and rabbit tibias. Other applications include imaging small industrial parts, plastics, ceramics, composite materials, and geologic specimens.

  18. Luminescent properties of Ce3+-doped transparent oxyfluoride glass ceramics containing BaGdF5 nanocrystals

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王倩; 欧阳绍业; 张为欢; 杨斌; 张约品; 夏海平

    2015-01-01

    The transparent oxyfluoride glass ceramics containing BaGdF5 nanocrystals were prepared with a composition of 42SiO2-12Na2O-16Al2O3-24BaF2-4Gd2O3-2CeF3 (mol.%) by thermal treatment technology. The typical DSC curve, X-ray diffraction (XRD) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM) patterns were measured. The transmission spectra and luminescent properties were in-vestigated. The decay times of the Gd3+ions at 312 nm excited with 275 nm for the Ce3+ions doped glass and glass ceramics speci-mens and the energy transfer process between Gd3+ions and Ce3+ions were also studied. The XRD analysis and the TEM images confirmed the generation of the spherical BaGdF5 nanocrystals. Compared with the PG specimen, the intensity of the luminescence spectra of the glass ceramics specimens was apparently enhanced with the heat treatment temperature increasing, and a blue shift in the excitation spectra and the emission spectra of glass ceramics specimens was obviously observed. In the fluorescence decay curves of the Gd3+ions, it could be obviously observed that the fluorescent intensity decays in the Ce3+ions doped glass and glass ceramics specimens decreased rapidly with the increase of the heat treatment temperature. In addition, the energy transfer efficiency from Gd3+ions to Ce3+ions was also calculated.

  19. Micro-morphological changes prior to adhesive bonding: high-alumina and glassy-matrix ceramics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marco Cícero Bottino

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to qualitatively demonstrate surface micro-morphological changes after the employment of different surface conditioning methods on high-alumina and glassy-matrix dental ceramics. Three disc-shaped high-alumina specimens (In-Ceram Alumina, INC and 4 glassy-matrix ceramic specimens (Vitadur Alpha, V (diameter: 5 mm and height: 5 mm were manufactured. INC specimens were submitted to 3 different surface conditioning methods: INC1 - Polishing with silicon carbide papers (SiC; INC2 - Chairside air-borne particle abrasion (50 µm Al2O3; INC3 - Chairside silica coating (CoJet; 30 µm SiOx. Vitadur Alpha (V specimens were subjected to 4 different surface conditioning methods: V1 - Polishing with SiC papers; V2 - HF acid etching; V3 - Chairside air-borne particle abrasion (50 µm Al2O3; V4 - Chairside silica coating (30 µm SiOx. Following completion of the surface conditioning methods, the specimens were analyzed using SEM. After polishing with SiC, the surfaces of V specimens remained relatively smooth while those of INC exhibited topographic irregularities. Chairside air-abrasion with either aluminum oxide or silica particles produced retentive patterns on both INC and V specimens, with smoother patterns observed after silica coating. V specimens etched with HF presented a highly porous surface. Chairside tribochemical silica coating resulted in smoother surfaces with particles embedded on the surface even after air-blasting. Surface conditioning using air-borne particle abrasion with either 50 µm alumina or 30 µm silica particles exhibited qualitatively comparable rough surfaces for both INC and V. HF acid gel created the most micro-retentive surface for the glassy-matrix ceramic tested.

  20. OXYGEN TRANSPORT CERAMIC MEMBRANES

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dr. Sukumar Bandopadhyay; Dr. Nagendra Nagabhushana

    2001-05-01

    The mechanical properties of model systems were analyzed. A reasonably accurate finite element model was implemented and a rational metric to predict the strength of ceramic/metal concentrical joints was developed. The mode of failure of the ceramic/metal joints was determined and the importance of the mechanical properties of the braze material was assessed. Thermal cycling experiments were performed on the model systems and the results were discussed. Additionally, experiments using the concept of placing diffusion barriers on the ceramic surface to limit the extent of the reaction with the braze were performed. It was also observed that the nature and morphology of the reaction zone depends greatly on the nature of the perovskite structure being used. From the experiments, it is observed that the presence of Cr in the Fe-occupied sites decreases the tendency of Fe to segregate and to precipitate out of the lattice. In these new experiments, Ni was observed to play a major role in the decomposition of the ceramic substrate.

  1. Nanocrystalline and Nanoporous Ceramics

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Verweij, Henk

    1996-01-01

    Nanocrystalline and nanoporous ceramics, renowned for their special transport properties, have typical applications in the fields of energy, the environment, and separation technology. One example is a solid oxide fuel cell, where an anode with improved characteristics was obtained by an optimized n

  2. Transformation Toughening of Ceramics

    Science.gov (United States)

    1992-03-01

    chanical twing of ualaneeting Ceramica at High Temperatures. ILondo, Patigue-crack growth in overaged and partially stabi- U.K., 198.""IS. Itoribe... Ceramica " Chapter 18 In Mechanical Prop- ŗR. M. !AcMeeding and A. 0. Evans, ’Mechanics of Transformation ertles of Engineering Ceramics. Edited by W.W

  3. Statistic><Ceramics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Flemming Tvede

    2008-01-01

    Co-organizer for and participant at the exhibition: Statistic><Ceramics The Röhsska Museum of Design and Decorative Arts; Gothenborg 5/2-16/3 2008 Museum fur Kunst und Gewerbe, Hamburg 3/4-27/4 2008...

  4. Nondestructive DNA extraction from museum specimens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hofreiter, Michael

    2012-01-01

    Natural history museums around the world hold millions of animal and plant specimens that are potentially amenable to genetic analyses. With more and more populations and species becoming extinct, the importance of these specimens for phylogenetic and phylogeographic analyses is rapidly increasing. However, as most DNA extraction methods damage the specimens, nondestructive extraction methods are useful to balance the demands of molecular biologists, morphologists, and museum curators. Here, I describe a method for nondestructive DNA extraction from bony specimens (i.e., bones and teeth). In this method, the specimens are soaked in extraction buffer, and DNA is then purified from the soaking solution using adsorption to silica. The method reliably yields mitochondrial and often also nuclear DNA. The method has been adapted to DNA extraction from other types of specimens such as arthropods.

  5. Fatigue cyclic loading test of an auro-galvanoforming ceramic bridge

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG Xiang-hao; SUN Feng; WANG Huan; XU Man-qiong

    2008-01-01

    Background In dental clinics, dentition defects are commonly restored with conventional porcelain-fused-to-metal fixedbridges. However, Ni-Cr alloy ceramic fixed bridges are known to have several drawbacks such as marginal coloration of the neck, low casting precision and, most seriously, poor biocompatibility. These problems could be circumvented by using noble metal ceramic bridges; however, one negative issue related to the conventional noble metal ceramic bridges is its high price due to the use of a large amount of gold for pontic. Therefore, an auro-galvanoforming ceramic bridge would be ideal to retain the advantages of a conventional material, yet reduce the amount of noble metal used. This study aimed to investigate whether any destructive changes occur to the auro-galvanoforming ceramic bridge under a fatigue cyclic loading test.Methods On standard models which the left maxillary first premolar is lost and with the cuspid teeth and the second premolar as the fixed bridge abutment teeth, six maxillary auro-galvanoforming ceramic bridges and six corresponding nichrome ceramic jointed crowns were made as group A, six nichrome ceramic bridges and six corresponding nichromeceramic jointed crowns were made as group B (control group). And then all specimens were fixed and tested on a fatigue cyclic loading machine; the changes occurring to the surfaces of occlusal contact with large functional area and to the porcelain-metal interfaces of the nichrome primary copings margins were observed through a scanning electron microscope (SEM).Results In 120 hours' continual observation, none of the specimens had porcelain coating fractures or scraping occurrence and all of the porcelain coatings had been kept intact under sinusoidal cyclic loading with the load range of 120-200 N and frequency of 5 Hz.Conclusions Auro-galvanoforming ceramic bridges exhibited excellent fatigue strength in the fatigue cyclic loading test and may satisfy the clinical demand in theory, while

  6. Making Durable Specimens For Electron Microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doychak, Joseph

    1989-01-01

    Consistent metal-oxide cross sections prepared quickly. New process makes TEM/STEM cross sections of metal/oxide interfaces. After specimen bars oxidized, placed in specially designed mold. Following encapsulation in zinc alloy, 3-mm-diameter specimen bar sliced into disks suitable for further preparation steps. Technique used to prepare 3-mm-diameter specimens of cross sections of oxides of alloys intended for use at temperatures greater than approximately 600 degree C.

  7. RSB: Research Specimen Banking across the Institution

    OpenAIRE

    Pense, Rick; Grose, Tim; Anderson, Lynn; Lee, H

    2001-01-01

    Research Specimen Banking (RSB) system is a component of the translational investigations infrastructure at Moffitt Cancer Center & Research Institute. It was implemented to provide specimen management functions to support basic science cancer research taking place in conjunction with caner clinical trials. RSB handles the receipt and distribution of clinical specimens to the research labs, with identifiers that both mask personal identity and enable linkage of clinical data to correlative re...

  8. Ceramic tubesheet design analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mallett, R.H.; Swindeman, R.W.

    1996-06-01

    A transport combustor is being commissioned at the Southern Services facility in Wilsonville, Alabama to provide a gaseous product for the assessment of hot-gas filtering systems. One of the barrier filters incorporates a ceramic tubesheet to support candle filters. The ceramic tubesheet, designed and manufactured by Industrial Filter and Pump Manufacturing Company (EF&PM), is unique and offers distinct advantages over metallic systems in terms of density, resistance to corrosion, and resistance to creep at operating temperatures above 815{degrees}C (1500{degrees}F). Nevertheless, the operational requirements of the ceramic tubesheet are severe. The tubesheet is almost 1.5 m in (55 in.) in diameter, has many penetrations, and must support the weight of the ceramic filters, coal ash accumulation, and a pressure drop (one atmosphere). Further, thermal stresses related to steady state and transient conditions will occur. To gain a better understanding of the structural performance limitations, a contract was placed with Mallett Technology, Inc. to perform a thermal and structural analysis of the tubesheet design. The design analysis specification and a preliminary design analysis were completed in the early part of 1995. The analyses indicated that modifications to the design were necessary to reduce thermal stress, and it was necessary to complete the redesign before the final thermal/mechanical analysis could be undertaken. The preliminary analysis identified the need to confirm that the physical and mechanical properties data used in the design were representative of the material in the tubesheet. Subsequently, few exploratory tests were performed at ORNL to evaluate the ceramic structural material.

  9. Ceramic Laser Materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Soules, T F; Clapsaddle, B J; Landingham, R L; Schaffers, K I

    2005-02-15

    Transparent ceramic materials have several major advantages over single crystals in laser applications, not the least of which is the ability to make large aperture parts in a robust manufacturing process. After more than a decade of working on making transparent YAG:Nd, Japanese workers have recently succeeded in demonstrating samples that performed as laser gain media as well as their single crystal counterparts. Since then several laser materials have been made and evaluated. For these reasons, developing ceramic laser materials is the most exciting and futuristic materials topic in today's major solid-state laser conferences. We have established a good working relationship with Konoshima Ltd., the Japanese producer of the best ceramic laser materials, and have procured and evaluated slabs designed by us for use in our high-powered SSHCL. Our measurements indicate that these materials will work in the SSHCL, and we have nearly completed retrofitting the SSHCL with four of the largest transparent ceramic YAG:Nd slabs in existence. We have also begun our own effort to make this material and have produced samples with various degrees of transparency/translucency. We are in the process of carrying out an extensive design-of-experiments to establish the significant process variables for making transparent YAG. Finally because transparent ceramics afford much greater flexibility in the design of lasers, we have been exploring the potential for much larger apertures, new materials, for example for the Mercury laser, other designs for SSHL, such as, edge pumping designs, slabs with built in ASE suppression, etc. This work has just beginning.

  10. STEM tomography for thick biological specimens

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aoyama, Kazuhiro [FEI Company Japan Ltd., Application Laboratory, NSS-II Building, 2-13-34 Kohnan, Minato-ku, Tokyo 108-0075 (Japan)], E-mail: kazuhiro.aoyama@fei.com; Takagi, Tomoko [FEI Company Japan Ltd., Application Laboratory, NSS-II Building, 2-13-34 Kohnan, Minato-ku, Tokyo 108-0075 (Japan); Laboratory of Electron Microscopy, Japan Women' s University, 2-8-1 Mejirodai, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo 112-8681 (Japan); Hirase, Ai; Miyazawa, Atsuo [Bio-multisome Research Team, RIKEN SPring-8 Center, Harima Institute, 1-1-1 Kouto, Sayo, Hyogo 679-5148 (Japan); CREST, JST (Japan)

    2008-12-15

    Scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM) tomography was applied to biological specimens such as yeast cells, HEK293 cells and primary culture neurons. These cells, which were embedded in a resin, were cut into 1-{mu}m-thick sections. STEM tomography offers several important advantages including: (1) it is effective even for thick specimens, (2) 'dynamic focusing', (3) ease of using an annular dark field (ADF) mode and (4) linear contrasts. It has become evident that STEM tomography offers significant advantages for the observation of thick specimens. By employing STEM tomography, even a 1-{mu}m-thick specimen (which is difficult to observe by conventional transmission electron microscopy (TEM)) was successfully analyzed in three dimensions. The specimen was tilted up to 73 deg. during data acquisition. At a large tilt angle, the specimen thicknesses increase dramatically. In order to observe such thick specimens, we introduced a special small condenser aperture that reduces the collection angle of the STEM probe. The specimen damage caused by the convergent electron beam was expected to be the most serious problem; however, the damage in STEM was actually smaller than that in TEM. In this study, the irradiation damage caused by TEM- and STEM-tomography in biological specimens was quantitatively compared.

  11. Novel Prospects and Possibilities in Additive Manufacturing of Ceramics by means of Direct Inkjet Printing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anja Mareike Wätjen

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Direct inkjet printing is a versatile additive manufacturing technology to produce complex three-dimensional components from ceramic suspensions. By successive printing of cross-sections, the sample is built up layer by layer. The aim of this paper is to show the different possibilities of direct inkjet printing of ceramic suspensions, like printing of oxide (3Y-TZP, Al2O3, and ZTA or nonoxide (Si3N4, MoSi2 ceramics, featuring microstructures, laminates, three-dimensional specimens, and dispersion ceramics. A modified thermal inkjet printer was used and the ink replaced by aqueous ceramic suspensions of high solids content. The suspensions were processed in an attrition mill or agitator bead mill to reduce the grain size <1 μm to avoid clogging of printhead nozzles. Further significant parameters are rheological properties (viscosity and surface tension and solids content which were adjusted to the requirements of the printheads. The printed and sintered samples were analysed by SEM. Mechanical properties of 3Y-TZP samples were examined as well by use of the ball-on-three-balls test. The biaxial flexural strength of 3Y-TZP specimens was up to 1393 MPa with a Weibull modulus of 10.4 for small specimens (3 × 4×0.3 mm3.

  12. Least Squares Best Fit Method for the Three Parameter Weibull Distribution: Analysis of Tensile and Bend Specimens with Volume or Surface Flaw Failure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gross, Bernard

    1996-01-01

    Material characterization parameters obtained from naturally flawed specimens are necessary for reliability evaluation of non-deterministic advanced ceramic structural components. The least squares best fit method is applied to the three parameter uniaxial Weibull model to obtain the material parameters from experimental tests on volume or surface flawed specimens subjected to pure tension, pure bending, four point or three point loading. Several illustrative example problems are provided.

  13. Effects of Starch on Properties of Alumina-based Ceramic Cores

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    LI Fengguang

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available In order to improve the poor leachability of alumina-based ceramic cores, different amount of starch was added to the specimens as pore former. Alumina-based ceramic cores were prepared by hot injection technology using corundum powder as base material, paraffin wax and beeswax as plasticizer, silica powder and magnesium oxide powder as mineralizing agent, wherein the parameters of the hot injection process were as follows:temperature of the slurry was 90℃, hot injection pressure was 0.5 MPa and holding time was 25 s. The effects of starch content on the properties of alumina-based ceramic cores were studied and discussed. The results indicate that during sintering period, the loss of starch in the specimens makes porosity of the alumina-based ceramic cores increase. When starch content increases, the room-temperature flexural strength of the ceramic cores reduces and the apparent porosity increases; the volatile solvent increases and the bulk density decreases. After being sintered at 1560℃ for 2.5 h, room-temperature flexural strength of the alumina-based ceramic cores with starch content of 8%(mass fraction is 24.8 MPa, apparent porosity is 47.98% when the volatile solvent is 1.92 g/h and bulk density is 1.88 g/cm3, the complex properties are optimal.

  14. Stress and Reliability Analysis of a Metal-Ceramic Dental Crown

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anusavice, Kenneth J; Sokolowski, Todd M.; Hojjatie, Barry; Nemeth, Noel N.

    1996-01-01

    Interaction of mechanical and thermal stresses with the flaws and microcracks within the ceramic region of metal-ceramic dental crowns can result in catastrophic or delayed failure of these restorations. The objective of this study was to determine the combined influence of induced functional stresses and pre-existing flaws and microcracks on the time-dependent probability of failure of a metal-ceramic molar crown. A three-dimensional finite element model of a porcelain fused-to-metal (PFM) molar crown was developed using the ANSYS finite element program. The crown consisted of a body porcelain, opaque porcelain, and a metal substrate. The model had a 300 Newton load applied perpendicular to one cusp, a load of 30ON applied at 30 degrees from the perpendicular load case, directed toward the center, and a 600 Newton vertical load. Ceramic specimens were subjected to a biaxial flexure test and the load-to-failure of each specimen was measured. The results of the finite element stress analysis and the flexure tests were incorporated in the NASA developed CARES/LIFE program to determine the Weibull and fatigue parameters and time-dependent fracture reliability of the PFM crown. CARES/LIFE calculates the time-dependent reliability of monolithic ceramic components subjected to thermomechanical and/Or proof test loading. This program is an extension of the CARES (Ceramics Analysis and Reliability Evaluation of Structures) computer program.

  15. Characterization of the bioactive and mechanical behavior of dental ceramic/sol-gel derived bioactive glass mixtures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abbasi, Zahra; Bahrololoum, Mohammad E; Bagheri, Rafat; Shariat, Mohammad H

    2016-02-01

    Dental ceramics can be modified by bioactive glasses in order to develop apatite layer on their surface. One of the benefits of such modification is to prolong the lifetime of the fixed dental prosthesis by preventing the formation of secondary caries. Dental ceramic/sol-gel derived bioactive glass mixture is one of the options for this modification. In the current study, mixtures of dental ceramic/bioactive glass with different compositions were successfully produced. To evaluate their bioactive behavior, prepared samples were immersed in a simulated body fluid at various time intervals. The prepared and soaked specimens were characterized using Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, X-ray diffractometry and scanning electron microscopy. Since bioactive glasses have deleterious effects on the mechanical properties of dental ceramics, 3-point bending tests were used to evaluate the flexural strength, flexural strain, tangent modulus of elasticity and Weibull modulus of the specimens in order to find the optimal relationship between mechanical and bioactive properties.

  16. Ceramic Stereolithography: Additive Manufacturing for Ceramics by Photopolymerization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Halloran, John W.

    2016-07-01

    Ceramic stereolithography and related additive manufacturing methods involving photopolymerization of ceramic powder suspensions are reviewed in terms of the capabilities of current devices. The practical fundamentals of the cure depth, cure width, and cure profile are related to the optical properties of the monomer, ceramic, and photo-active components. Postpolymerization steps, including harvesting and cleaning the objects, binder burnout, and sintering, are discussed and compared with conventional methods. The prospects for practical manufacturing are discussed.

  17. FIBROUS CERAMIC-CERAMIC COMPOSITE MATERIALS PROCESSING AND PROPERTIES

    OpenAIRE

    1986-01-01

    The introduction of continuous fibers in a ceramic matrix can improve its toughness, if the fiber-matrix bonding is weak enough, due to matrix microcracking and fiber pull-out. Ceramic-ceramic composite materials are processed according to liquid or gas phase techniques. The most important are made of glass, carbide, nitride or oxide matrices reinforced with carbon, SiC or Al2O3 fibers.

  18. Integrally cored ceramic investment casting mold fabricated by ceramic stereolithography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bae, Chang-Jun

    Superalloy airfoils are produced by investment casting (IC), which uses ceramic cores and wax patterns with ceramic shell molds. Hollow cored superalloy airfoils in a gas turbine engine are an example of complex IC parts. The complex internal hollow cavities of the airfoil are designed to conduct cooling air through one or more passageways. These complex internal passageways have been fabricated by a lost wax process requiring several processing steps; core preparation, injection molding for wax pattern, and dipping process for ceramic shell molds. Several steps generate problems such as high cost and decreased accuracy of the ceramic mold. For example, costly tooling and production delay are required to produce mold dies for complex cores and wax patterns used in injection molding, resulting in a big obstacle for prototypes and smaller production runs. Rather than using separate cores, patterns, and shell molds, it would be advantageous to directly produce a mold that has the casting cavity and the ceramic core by one process. Ceramic stereolithography (CerSLA) can be used to directly fabricate the integrally cored ceramic casting mold (ICCM). CerSLA builds ceramic green objects from CAD files from many thin liquid layers of powder in monomer, which are solidified by polymerization with a UV laser, thereby "writing" the design for each slice. This dissertation addresses the integrally cored casting ceramic mold (ICCM), the ceramic core with a ceramic mold shell in a single patternless construction, fabricated by ceramic stereolithography (CerSLA). CerSLA is considered as an alternative method to replace lost wax processes, for small production runs or designs too complex for conventional cores and patterns. The main topic is the development of methods to successfully fabricate an ICCM by CerSLA from refractory silica, as well as related issues. The related issues are the segregation of coarse fused silica powders in a layer, the degree of segregation parameter to

  19. BVH all-welded plate type heat exchanger in the application of the cogeneration unit%BVH型全焊板式热交换器在热电联产机组中的应用

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    吴剑

    2014-01-01

    本文介绍了BVH型全焊板式热交换器的特点及其在热电联产机组中的应用。将其与传统管壳式热交换器进行对比分析。结果表明,BVH型全焊板式热交换器是一种新型结构紧凑高效的热交换器,可在多个工况中替代管壳式热交换器,在热电联产机组中有着广泛的应用优势和市场。%This paper introduces the characteristic of BVH all-welded plate type heat exchanger and its application in cogeneration units. Comparison and analyses of the shell-and-tube exchanger. The results show that the BVH all-welded plate type heat exchanger is a new type compact structure and high efficiency heat exchanger, it can replace the shell-and-tube exchanger, and it will be widely used in the cogeneration unitfor the distinct advantages.

  20. Performance of different polishing techniques for direct CAD/CAM ceramic restorations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flury, Simon; Lussi, Adrian; Zimmerli, Brigitte

    2010-01-01

    This in vitro study evaluated the performance of three ceramic and two commonly used polishing methods on two CAD/CAM ceramics. Surface roughness and quality were compared. A glazed group (GLGR) of each ceramic material served as reference. One-hundred and twenty specimens of VITABLOCS Mark II (VITA) and 120 specimens of IPS Empress CAD (IPS) were roughened in a standardized manner. Twenty VITA and 20 IPS specimens were glazed (VITA Akzent Glaze/Empress Universal Glaze). Five polishing methods were investigated (n=20/group): 1) EVE Diacera W11DC-Set (EVE), 2) JOTA 9812-Set (JOTA), 3) OptraFine-System (OFI), 4) Sof-Lex 2382 discs (SOF) and 5) Brownie/Greenie/Occlubrush (BGO). Polishing quality was measured with a surface roughness meter (Ra and Rz values). The significance level was set at alpha=0.05. Kruskal Wallis tests and pairwise Wilcoxon rank sum tests with Bonferroni-Holm adjustment were used. Qualitative surface evaluation of representative specimens was done with SEM. On VITA ceramics, SOF produced lower Ra (psystems are still of interest to clinicians using CAD/CAM, as these methods are universally applicable and showed an increased durability compared to the investigated silicon polishers.

  1. Three-Point Bending Tests of Zirconia Core/Veneer Ceramics for Dental Restorations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Massimo Marrelli

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. The mechanical strength and the surface hardness of commercially available yttrium-doped zirconia were investigated. Furthermore, a comparative study of eight different ceramic veneers, to be used for the production of two-layered all-ceramic restorative systems, was carried out. Materials and Methods. Four types of zirconia specimens were analyzed, according to a standard ISO procedure (ISO 6872. Besides, two-layered zirconia-veneer specimens were prepared for three-point bending tests. Results. A strong effect of the surface roughness on the mechanical strength of zirconia specimens was observed. Finally, a comparative study of eight commercially available veneering ceramics shows different modes of failure between the selected veneers. Conclusion. The results indicate that close attention should be paid to the preparation of zirconia-based crowns and bridges by CAD/CAM process, because surface roughness has an important effect on the mechanical strength of the material. Finally, the results of the mechanical tests on two-layered specimens represent an important support to the choice of the veneering ceramic.

  2. Effect of resin shades on opacity of ceramic veneers and polymerization efficiency through ceramics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Öztürk, Elif; Chiang, Yu-Chih; Coşgun, Erdal; Bolay, Şükran; Hickel, Reinhard; Ilie, Nicoleta

    2013-11-01

    The aim of this study was to assess the effect of different resin cement shades on the opacity and color difference of ceramics and to determine the polymerization efficiency of the resin cement at different shades after curing through ceramics. Two different ceramics (IPS e.max Press and IPS Empress(®)CAD, Ivoclar Vivadent) were used for this study. A light-cured veneer luting resin (Variolink Veneer, Ivoclar Vivadent) in four different shades of HV+1, HV+3, LV-1, and LV-3 was used for the colorimetric measurements. The color and spectral reflectance of the ceramics were measured according to the CIELab color scale relative to the standard illuminant D65 on a reflection spectrophotometer (ColorEye7000A, USA). Color differences (ΔE values) and the contrast ratios (CR) of the different groups of samples were calculated. In order to analyse the polymerization efficiency of the resin cements, the micromechanical properties of the resins were measured with an automatic microhardness indenter (Fisherscope H100C, Germany). The results were analysed using one-way ANOVA and Tukey's HSD post hoc tests (SPSS 18.0). The one-way ANOVA test showed that the values of ΔE and CR of the different specimen groups were significantly different (p<0.05). Group 1 (20.7 ± 0.5) (IPS-CAD without resin cement) exhibited the highest and group 10 (14.8 ± 0.5) (e.max:HV+3) exhibited the lowest ΔE value. Significant differences in the micromechanical properties were identified among the tested resin cements in different shades (p<0.05). Resin cement shade is an important factor for the opacity of a restoration. Furthermore, the resin shade affects the micromechanical properties of the underlying resin cement. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Creep-Rupture and Fatigue Behavior of a Notched Oxide/Oxide Ceramic Matrix Composite at Elevated Temperature

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-06-01

    ultrasonic bath of deionized water to remove any excess debris and then dried in an oven at 90°C for 30 minutes. 16 Figure 9. Specimen dimensions...Figure 107. 155 MPa Fatigue (right) 100 Bibliography 1. “3M Ceramic Fiber Typical Properties,” Nextel™ Ceramic Textiles Technical Notebook... ultrasonic C-scans,” Composites Science and Technology, 61[11], 1561-1570 (2001). 20. Kramb, Victoria A., Reji John and Larry P. Zawada. “Notched

  4. Sol-gel derived ceramics

    OpenAIRE

    1990-01-01

    The synthesis of ceramic raw materials has become an important factor in ceramic technologies. The increasing demands to the performance of ceramic compounds has caused increased activities for the preparation of tailor-made raw materials. Amongst a variety of new syntheses like flame pyrolysis, reactive spray drying, plasma or laser assisted techniques, the sol-gel process plays an important and increasing role. The process describes the building up of an inorganic (in general an oxide) netw...

  5. Tailored Ceramics for Laser Applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hollingsworth, Joel [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States)

    2007-12-10

    Transparent ceramics match or exceed the performance of single-crystal materials in laser applications, with a more-robust fabrication process. Controlling the distribution of optical dopants in transparent ceramics would allow qualitative improvements in amplifier slab design by allowing gain and loss to be varied within the material. My work aims to achieve a controlled pattern or gradient of dopant prior to sintering, in order to produce tailored ceramics.

  6. Flash sintering of ceramic materials

    OpenAIRE

    Dancer, C. E. J.

    2016-01-01

    During flash sintering, ceramic materials can sinter to high density in a matter of seconds while subjected to electric field and elevated temperature. This process, which occurs at lower furnace temperatures and in shorter times than both conventional ceramic sintering and field-assisted methods such as spark plasma sintering, has the potential to radically reduce the power consumption required for the densification of ceramic materials. This paper reviews the experimental work on flash sint...

  7. Ceramics for High Power Lasers

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-07-01

    ICP-MS) on 25 elements ranging from transition metals, rare earths , alkali, alkaline earths and silicon on a set of selected YAG ceramics and...our knowledge of the origin of optical losses in ceramic laser host materials while initiating a program of research on 2-micron, thulium- doped fiber...During Year 1 of this program, we produced and characterized laser grade Nd:YAG and low optical loss Gd3+ doped YAG and Tm:YAG ceramics . Laser

  8. Longevity of silicate ceramic restorations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beier, Ulrike Stephanie; Dumfahrt, Herbert

    2014-09-01

    The demand for esthetic restorations has resulted in an increased use of dental ceramics as a biocompatible and functionally sufficient alternative to conventional restorative materials. Silicate ceramic restorations are widely used for veneers, inlays, onlays, and crowns in dentistry. Long-term data are of crucial importance to optimize clinical practice. The purpose of the present article is to summarize data of the Innsbruck ceramic evaluation up to 261 months with the focus on longevity and failure characteristics.

  9. Preparation and characteristics of porous ceramics

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Dongmei SHAO; Peiping ZHANG; Liyan MA; Juanjuan LIU

    2007-01-01

    Pyrophyllite is always used for making porous ceramics. In order to design the preparation technics of porous ceramics with pyrophyllite reasonably we must know the classifications, characteristics, properties and applications of porous ceramics. The classification and characteristics of porous ceramics are reviewed in this article; and several common preparations with their advantages and disadvantages are also introduced. The authors discussed the problems existing in researching and developing process for porous ceramics, and forecasted the development prospect of porous ceramics.

  10. Ceramic Composite Thin Films

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruoff, Rodney S. (Inventor); Stankovich, Sasha (Inventor); Dikin, Dmitriy A. (Inventor); Nguyen, SonBinh T. (Inventor)

    2013-01-01

    A ceramic composite thin film or layer includes individual graphene oxide and/or electrically conductive graphene sheets dispersed in a ceramic (e.g. silica) matrix. The thin film or layer can be electrically conductive film or layer depending the amount of graphene sheets present. The composite films or layers are transparent, chemically inert and compatible with both glass and hydrophilic SiOx/silicon substrates. The composite film or layer can be produced by making a suspension of graphene oxide sheet fragments, introducing a silica-precursor or silica to the suspension to form a sol, depositing the sol on a substrate as thin film or layer, at least partially reducing the graphene oxide sheets to conductive graphene sheets, and thermally consolidating the thin film or layer to form a silica matrix in which the graphene oxide and/or graphene sheets are dispersed.

  11. Effect of in vitro aging on the flexural strength and probability to fracture of Y-TZP zirconia ceramics for all-ceramic restorations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siarampi, Eleni; Kontonasaki, Eleana; Andrikopoulos, Konstantinos S; Kantiranis, Nikolaos; Voyiatzis, George A; Zorba, Triantafillia; Paraskevopoulos, Konstantinos M; Koidis, Petros

    2014-12-01

    Dental zirconia restorations should present long-term clinical survival and be in service within the oral environment for many years. However, low temperature degradation could affect their mechanical properties and survival. The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of in vitro aging on the flexural strength of yttrium-stabilized (Y-TZP) zirconia ceramics for ceramic restorations. One hundred twenty bar-shaped specimens were prepared from two ceramics (ZENO Zr (WI) and IPS e.max(®) ZirCAD (IV)), and loaded until fracture according to ISO 6872. The specimens from each ceramic (nx=60) were divided in three groups (control, aged for 5h, aged for 10h). One-way ANOVA was used to assess statistically significant differences among flexural strength values (Pceramics, however statistically significant was for the WI group (Pceramics presented a t→m phase transformation, with the m-phase increasing from 4 to 5% at 5h to around 15% after 10h. The significant reduction of the flexural strength after 10h of in vitro aging, suggests high fracture probability for one of the zirconia ceramics tested. Copyright © 2014 Academy of Dental Materials. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Structural Ceramic Composites for Nuclear Applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    William Windes; P.A. Lessing; Y. Katoh; L. L. Snead; E. Lara-Curzio; J. Klett; C. Henager, Jr.; R. J. Shinavski

    2005-08-01

    A research program has been established to investigate fiber reinforced ceramic composites to be used as control rod components within a Very High Temperature Reactor. Two candidate systems have been identified, carbon fiber reinforced carbon (Cf/C) and silicon carbide fiber reinforced silicon carbide (SiCf/SiC) composites. Initial irradiation stability studies to determine the maximum dose for each composite type have been initiated within the High Flux Isotope Reactor at Oak Ridge National Laboratory. Test samples exposed to 10 dpa irradiation dose have been completed with future samples to dose levels of 20 and 30 dpa scheduled for completion in following years. Mechanical and environmental testing is being conducted concurrently at the Idaho National Laboratory and at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory. High temperature test equipment, testing methodologies, and test samples for high temperature (up to 1600º C) tensile strength and long duration creep studies have been established. Specific attention was paid to the architectural fiber preform design as well as the materials used in construction of the composites. Actual testing of both tubular and flat, "dog-bone" shaped tensile composite specimens will begin next year. Since there is no precedence for using ceramic composites within a nuclear reactor, ASTM standard test procedures will be established from these mechanical and environmental tests. Close collaborations between the U.S. national laboratories and international collaborators (i.e. France and Japan) are being forged to establish both national and international test standards to be used to qualify ceramic composites for nuclear reactor applications.

  13. Microstructure and fracture analysis of fully ceramic microencapsulated fuel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, H. G.; Kim, D. J.; Park, J. Y.; Kim, W. J. [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of); Lee, S. J. [KEPCO, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-05-15

    Nuclear fuel enhancing the accident tolerance is satisfied two parts. First, the performance has to be retained compared to the existing UO{sub 2} nuclear fuel and zircaloy cladding system under the normal operation condition. Second, under the severe accident condition, the high temperature structural integrity has to be kept and the generation rate of hydrogen has to be reduced largely. FCM nuclear fuel is composed of tristructural isotropic(TRISO) fuel particle and SiC ceramic matrix. SiC ceramic matrix play an essential part in protecting fission product. In the FCM fuel concept, fission product is doubly protected by TRISO coating layer and SiC ceramic matrix compared to the current commercial UO{sub 2} fuel system. SiC ceramic has excellent properties for fuel application. SiC ceramic has low neutron absorption cross-section, excellent irradiation resistivity and high thermal conductivity. Additionally, the relative thermal conductivity of the SiC ceramic as compared to UO{sub 2} is quite good, reducing operational release of fission products form the fuel. TRISO coating layer which is deposited on UO{sub 2} kernel is consists of PyC/SiC/PyC trialyer and buffer PyC layer. SiC matrix composite with TRISO particle was fabricated by hot pressing. 3 to 20 wt.% of sintering additives were added to investigate reaction between sintering additives and outer PyC layer of TRISO coating layer. The relative densities of all specimens show above 92%. The reaction between sintering additives and PyC is observed in most TRISO particles, the thickness of reactants shows about ten micrometers. The thermal shock resistance of SiC matrix composite was investigated.

  14. Effects of different concentrations of carbamide peroxide and bleaching periods on the roughness of dental ceramics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sérgio Augusto Morey Ourique

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available The wide use of dental bleaching treatment has brought concern about the possible effects of hydrogen peroxide on dental tissue and restorative materials. The objective of this study was to evaluate in vitro the effect of nightguard bleaching on the surface roughness of dental ceramics after different periods of bleaching treatment. Fifteen specimens of 5 × 3 × 1 mm were created with three dental ceramics following the manufacturers' instructions: IPS Classic (Ivoclar-Vivadent; IPS d.Sign (Ivoclar-Vivadent; and VMK-95 (Vita. A profilometer was used to evaluate baseline surface roughness (Ra values of all ceramics by five parallel measurements with five 0.25 mm cut off (Λc at 0.1 mm/s. Afterwards, all specimens were submitted to 6-h daily bleaching treatments with 10% or 16% carbamide peroxide (Whiteness- FGM for 21 days, while control groups from each ceramic system were stored in artificial saliva. The surface roughness of all groups was evaluated after 18 h, 42 h, 84 h, and 126 h of bleaching treatment. The surface roughness of each specimen (n = 5 was based on the mean value of five parallel measurements in each time and all data were submitted to two-way repeated measures ANOVA and Tukey's post-hoc test (α = 0.05. No significant differences in ceramic surface roughness were observed between untreated and bleached ceramic surfaces, regardless of bleaching intervals or bleaching treatments. This study provided evidence that at-home bleaching systems do not cause detrimental effects on surface roughness of dental ceramics.

  15. Crack Arrest in Brittle Ceramics Subjected to Thermal Shock and Ablation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yan-Wei; Yu, He-Long; Tang, Hong-Xiang; Feng, Xue

    2014-09-01

    Ceramics are suitable for high temperature applications, especially for aerospace materials. When serving in high temperature environments, ceramics usually have to deal with the challenge of both thermal shock and ablation. We report the crack arrest in brittle ceramics during thermal shock and ablation. In our experiment, the specimens of Al2O3 are subjected to oxygen-propane flame heating until the temperature arises up to 1046°C and then are cooled down in air. The crack occurs, however, it does not propagate when arrested by the microstructures (e.g., micro-bridges) of the crack tip. Such micro-bridge enhances the toughness of the brittle ceramics and prevents the crack propagation, which provides a hint for design of materials against the thermal shock.

  16. Fracture resistance of teeth restored with all-ceramic inlays and onlays: an in vitro study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saridag, S; Sevimay, M; Pekkan, G

    2013-01-01

    Fracture resistance of inlays and onlays may be influenced by the quantity of the dental structure removed and the restorative materials used. The purpose of this in vitro study was to evaluate the effects of two different cavity preparation designs and all-ceramic restorative materials on the fracture resistance of the tooth-restoration complex. Fifty mandibular third molar teeth were randomly divided into the following five groups: group 1: intact teeth (control); group 2: inlay preparations, lithium-disilicate glass-ceramic (IPS e.max Press, Ivoclar Vivadent AG, Schaan, Liechtenstein); group 3: inlay preparations, zirconia ceramic (ICE Zirkon, Zirkonzahn SRL, Gais, Italy); group 4: onlay preparations, lithium-disilicate glass-ceramic (IPS e.max Press); and group 5: onlay preparations, zirconia ceramic (ICE Zirkon). The inlay and onlay restorations were adhesively cemented with dual polymerizing resin cement (Variolink II, Ivoclar Vivadent AG). After thermal cycling (5° to 55°C × 5000 cycles), specimens were subjected to a compressive load until fracture at a crosshead speed of 0.5 mm/min. Statistical analyses were performed using one-way analysis of variance and Tukey HSD tests. The fracture strength values were significantly higher in the inlay group (2646.7 ± 360.4) restored with lithium-disilicate glass-ceramic than those of the onlay group (1673.6 ± 677) restored with lithium-disilicate glass-ceramic. The fracture strength values of teeth restored with inlays using zirconia ceramic (2849 ± 328) and onlays with zirconia ceramic (2796.3 ± 337.3) were similar to those of the intact teeth (2905.3 ± 398.8). In the IPS e.max Press groups, as the preparation amount was increased (from inlay to onlay preparation), the fracture resistance was decreased. In the ICE Zirkon ceramic groups, the preparation type did not affect the fracture resistance results.

  17. Rheology of Superplastic Ceramics

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    Constitutive equation of rheglogy describing a phenomenological level of superplastic deformation as functional correlation between tensor components of stress and strain rate has been analyzed for the case of superplastic ceramic flow. Rheological properties of material are taken into account by means of scalar rheological coefficients of shear and volume viscosity, which are functions of temperature, effective stress (or strain rate) and density of material.

  18. Processing Nanostructured Structural Ceramics

    Science.gov (United States)

    2006-08-01

    aspects of the processing of nanostructured ceramics, viz. • • • The production of a flowable and compactable dry nanopowder suitable for use in... composition due to the different synthesis routes used. Therefore, ‘industry-standard’ dispersants can cause flocculation rather than dispersion...stabilised zirconia (3-YSZ) were no higher than for conventional, micron-sized material of the same composition . However, detailed crystallographic

  19. Dental ceramics: a current review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lawson, Nathaniel C; Burgess, John O

    2014-03-01

    Ceramics are used for many dental applications and are characterized in various ways, including by their hardness, brittleness, thermal and electrical insulation, and biocompatibility. The ceramics most commonly used in dentistry are oxides, particularly silicon dioxide (SiO2), or silica; aluminum oxide (Al2O3), or alumina; and zirconium dioxide (ZrO2), or zirconia. This article reviews the microstructure of current dental ceramic materials and how it relates to their mechanical properties, clinical techniques, and optical properties. Typical ceramics currently in use are described, and their clinically relevant properties such as strength, fracture, polishability, and wear are compared. Cementation methods are also discussed.

  20. Reorientation of Defect Dipoles in Ferroelectric Ceramics

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Bao-Shan; LI Guo-Rong; ZHAO Su-Chuan; ZHU Zhi-Gang; DING Ai-Li

    2005-01-01

    @@ We investigate the frequency, temperature, tetragonality and quenched temperature dependences of the hysteresis loops in Pb[(Zr0.52 Ti0.48)0.95 (Mn1/3Nb2/3)0.05]O3 (PMnN-PZT) ceramics. It has been demonstrated that the polarization-field hysteresis curves show "pinched" shapes when tested at room temperature, higher frequency or using the large-tetragonality specimen. While normal square-like loops are observed at 200 ℃ and 0.01 Hz or using the small-tetragonality one. Meanwhile, close relations between the P-E loops and the applied frequency,temperature or tetragonality reveal that there exists a typical relaxation time corresponding to the reorientation of the defect dipoles. It can be seen further from the quenched temperature dependences of the loops that the reorientation of the defect dipoles may influence the pinching. Compared to the intrinsic depinning procedure induced by changes of the distribution of defect dipoles, we provide new evidence for extrinsic depinning mechanism of the defect dipoles in the ferroelectric ceramics.

  1. Characterization of CVI densification of ceramic composites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Starr, T.L.; Stock, S.R.; Lee, S. [Georgia Institute of Technology, Atlanta, GA (United States)

    1995-05-01

    Ceramic matrix composites promise higher operating temperature and better thermodynamic efficiency in many enregy conversion systems. In particular, composites fabricated by the chemical vapor infiltration (CVI) process have excellent mechanical properties and, using the forced flow-thermal gradient variation, good processing economics in small scale demonstrations. Scale-up to larger, more complex shapes requires understanding of gas flow through the fiber preform and of the relationship between fiber architecture and densification behavior. This understanding is needed for design of preforms for optimum infiltration. The objective of this research is to observe the deposition of matrix material in the pores of a ceramic fiber preform at various stages of the CVI process. These observations allow us to relate local deposition rates in various regions of the composite to the connectivity of the surrounding network of porosity and to better model the relationship between gas transport and fiber architecture in CVI preforms. Our observation of the CVI process utilizes high resolution X-ray tomographic microscopy (XTM) in collaboration with Dr. John Kinney at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory with repeated imaging of a small preform specimens after various processing times. We use these images to determine geometry and dimensions of channels between and through layers in cloth lay-up preform during CVI densification and relate these to a transport model.

  2. Influence of specimens' design and manufacturing process on microtensile bond strength to enamel: laboratory and FEA comparison

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fernanda Tranchesi Sadek

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available This study evaluated the effect of specimens' design and manufacturing process on microtensile bond strength, internal stress distributions (Finite Element Analysis - FEA and specimens' integrity by means of Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM and Laser Scanning Confocal Microscopy (LCM. Excite was applied to flat enamel surface and a resin composite build-ups were made incrementally with 1-mm increments of Tetric Ceram. Teeth were cut using a diamond disc or a diamond wire, obtaining 0.8 mm² stick-shaped specimens, or were shaped with a Micro Specimen Former, obtaining dumbbell-shaped specimens (n = 10. Samples were randomly selected for SEM and LCM analysis. Remaining samples underwent microtensile test, and results were analyzed with ANOVA and Tukey test. FEA dumbbell-shaped model resulted in a more homogeneous stress distribution. Nonetheless, they failed under lower bond strengths (21.83 ± 5.44 MPac than stick-shaped specimens (sectioned with wire: 42.93 ± 4.77 MPaª; sectioned with disc: 36.62 ± 3.63 MPa b, due to geometric irregularities related to manufacturing process, as noted in microscopic analyzes. It could be concluded that stick-shaped, nontrimmed specimens, sectioned with diamond wire, are preferred for enamel specimens as they can be prepared in a less destructive, easier, and more precise way.

  3. Ceramic stationary gas turbine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Roode, M. van [Solar Turbines Inc., San Diego, CA (United States)

    1995-10-01

    The performance of current industrial gas turbines is limited by the temperature and strength capabilities of the metallic structural materials in the engine hot section. Because of their superior high-temperature strength and durability, ceramics can be used as structural materials for hot section components (blades, nozzles, combustor liners) in innovative designs at increased turbine firing temperatures. The benefits include the ability to increase the turbine inlet temperature (TIT) to about 1200{degrees}C ({approx}2200{degrees}F) or more with uncooled ceramics. It has been projected that fully optimized stationary gas turbines would have a {approx}20 percent gain in thermal efficiency and {approx}40 percent gain in output power in simple cycle compared to all metal-engines with air-cooled components. Annual fuel savings in cogeneration in the U.S. would be on the order of 0.2 Quad by 2010. Emissions reductions to under 10 ppmv NO{sub x} are also forecast. This paper describes the progress on a three-phase, 6-year program sponsored by the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Industrial Technologies, to achieve significant performance improvements and emissions reductions in stationary gas turbines by replacing metallic hot section components with ceramic parts. Progress is being reported for the period September 1, 1994, through September 30, 1995.

  4. Ceramic stationary gas turbine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Roode, M. van

    1995-12-31

    The performance of current industrial gas turbines is limited by the temperature and strength capabilities of the metallic structural materials in the engine hot section. Because of their superior high-temperature strength and durability, ceramics can be used as structural materials for hot section components (blades, nozzles, combustor liners) in innovative designs at increased turbine firing temperatures. The benefits include the ability to increase the turbine inlet temperature (TIT) to about 1200{degrees}C ({approx}2200{degrees}F) or more with uncooled ceramics. It has been projected that fully optimized stationary gas turbines would have a {approx}20 percent gain in thermal efficiency and {approx}40 percent gain in output power in simple cycle compared to all metal-engines with air-cooled components. Annual fuel savings in cogeneration in the U.S. would be on the order of 0.2 Quad by 2010. Emissions reductions to under 10 ppmv NO{sub x} are also forecast. This paper describes the progress on a three-phase, 6-year program sponsored by the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Industrial Technologies, to achieve significant performance improvements and emissions reductions in stationary gas turbines by replacing metallic hot section components with ceramic parts. Progress is being reported for the period September 1, 1994, through September 30, 1995.

  5. Summary of the U.S. specimen matrix for the HFIR 13J varying temperature irradiation capsule

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zinkle, S.J. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States)

    1998-03-01

    The US specimen matrix for the collaborative DOE/Monbusho HFIR 13J varying temperature irradiation capsule contains two ceramics and 29 different metals, including vanadium alloys, ferritic/martensitic steels, pure iron, austenitic stainless steels, nickel alloys, and copper alloys. This experiment is designed to provide fundamental information on the effects of brief low-temperature excursions on the tensile properties and microstructural evolution of a wide range of materials irradiated at nominal temperatures of 350 and 500 C to a dose of {approximately}5 dpa. A total of 340 miniature sheet tensile specimens and 274 TEM disks are included in the US-supplied matrix for the irradiation capsule.

  6. 16 CFR Figure 3 to Part 1610 - Specimen Holder Supported in Specimen Rack

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 16 Commercial Practices 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Specimen Holder Supported in Specimen Rack 3 Figure 3 to Part 1610 Commercial Practices CONSUMER PRODUCT SAFETY COMMISSION FLAMMABLE FABRICS ACT... Holder Supported in Specimen Rack ER25MR08.002...

  7. Nd:YAG Laser-aided ceramic brackets debonding: Effects on shear bond strength and enamel surface

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Han Xianglong [State Key Laboratory of Oral Diseases, Sichuan University, Chengdu 610041 (China); Department of Orthodontics, West China Hospital of Stomatology, Sichuan University, Chengdu 610041 (China); Liu Xiaolin [Department of Orthodontics, Stomatology Hospital, Dalian University, Dalian 116021 (China); Bai Ding [State Key Laboratory of Oral Diseases, Sichuan University, Chengdu 610041 (China); Department of Orthodontics, West China Hospital of Stomatology, Sichuan University, Chengdu 610041 (China)], E-mail: baiding88@hotmail.com; Meng Yao; Huang Lan [Department of Orthodontics, West China Hospital of Stomatology, Sichuan University, Chengdu 610041 (China)

    2008-11-15

    In order to evaluate the efficiency of Nd:YAG laser-aided ceramic brackets debonding technique, both ceramic brackets and metallic brackets were bonded with orthodontic adhesive to 30 freshly extracted premolars. The specimens were divided into three groups, 10 in each, according to the brackets employed and the debonding techniques used: (1) metallic brackets with shear debonding force, (2) ceramic brackets with shear debonding force, and (3) ceramic brackets with Nd:YAG laser irradiation. The result showed that laser irradiation could diminish shear bond strength (SBS) significantly and produce the most desired ARI scores. Moreover, scanning electron microscopy investigation displayed that laser-aided technique induced little enamel scratch or loss. It was concluded that Nd:YAG laser could facilitate the debonding of ceramic brackets and diminish the amount of remnant adhesive without damaging enamel structure.

  8. Nd:YAG Laser-aided ceramic brackets debonding: Effects on shear bond strength and enamel surface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Xianglong; Liu, Xiaolin; Bai, Ding; Meng, Yao; Huang, Lan

    2008-11-01

    In order to evaluate the efficiency of Nd:YAG laser-aided ceramic brackets debonding technique, both ceramic brackets and metallic brackets were bonded with orthodontic adhesive to 30 freshly extracted premolars. The specimens were divided into three groups, 10 in each, according to the brackets employed and the debonding techniques used: (1) metallic brackets with shear debonding force, (2) ceramic brackets with shear debonding force, and (3) ceramic brackets with Nd:YAG laser irradiation. The result showed that laser irradiation could diminish shear bond strength (SBS) significantly and produce the most desired ARI scores. Moreover, scanning electron microscopy investigation displayed that laser-aided technique induced little enamel scratch or loss. It was concluded that Nd:YAG laser could facilitate the debonding of ceramic brackets and diminish the amount of remnant adhesive without damaging enamel structure.

  9. Reconstituted Charpy impact specimens. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Perrin, J.S.; Wullaert, R.A.; McConnell, P.; Server, W.L.; Fromm, E.O.

    1982-12-01

    The arc stud welding process was used to produce new, full size Charpy V-notch impact specimens from halves of Charpy specimens which had been previously tested. The apparatus was developed such that it could be used not only for unirradiated specimens, but also so that it could be adapted for in-cell use to produce new reconstituted specimens of irradiated material. The materials studied are of interest in nuclear applications. They include A533B, A36, A516-80, submerged arc weld metal (A508 base metal), HY80, cast duplex stainless steel, irradiated A533B, and irradiated submerged arc weld metal (A508 base metal). Both unirradiated and irradiated specimens were successfully produced and subsequently impact tested. In general, there was excellent agreement when comparing the original curves to the subsequent curves generated with reconstituted specimens. This program has shown that the arc stud welding process is well suited for producing reconstituted specimens at a reasonable cost using either unirradiated or irradiated material.

  10. Structure and Physical Properties of PZT-PMnN-PSN Ceramics Near the Morphological Phase Boundary

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nguyen Dinh Tung Luan

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The 0.9Pb(ZrxTi1−xO3-0.07Pb(Mn1/3Nb2/3O3-0.03Pb(Sb1/2Nb1/2O3 (PZT-PMnN-PSN ceramics were prepared by columbite method. The phase structure of the ceramic samples was analyzed. Results show that the pure perovskite phase is in all ceramics specimens. The effect of the Zr/Ti ratio on the region of morphotropic phase boundary for PZT-PMnN-PSN ceramics was studied. Experimental results show that the phase structure of ceramics changes from tetragonal to rhombohedral with the increase of the content of Zr/Ti ratio in the system. The composition of PZT-PMnN-PSN ceramics near the morphotropic phase boundary obtained is the ratio of Zr/Ti: 49/51. At this ratio, the ceramic has the optimal electromechanical properties: the kp=0.61, the εmax=29520, the d31=-236 pC/N, the Qm=2400, high remanent polarization (Pr=49.2 μC·cm−2, and low coercive field Ec=10.28 kV·cm−1.

  11. Wear of primary teeth caused by opposed all-ceramic or stainless steel crowns

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bae, Ik-Hyun; Noh, Tae-Hwan; Ju, Sung-Won; Lee, Tae-Kyoung; Ahn, Jin-Soo; Jeong, Tae-Sung

    2016-01-01

    PURPOSE This study was conducted to evaluate the effects of full-coverage all-ceramic zirconia, lithium disilicate glass-ceramic, leucite glass-ceramic, or stainless steel crowns on antagonistic primary tooth wear. MATERIALS AND METHODS There were four study groups: the stainless steel (Steel) group, the leucite glass-ceramic (Leucite) group, the lithium disilicate glass-ceramic (Lithium) group, and the monolithic zirconia (Zirconia) group. Ten flat crown specimens were prepared per group; opposing teeth were prepared using primary canines. A wear test was conducted over 100,000 chewing cycles using a dual-axis chewing simulator and a 50 N masticating force, and wear losses of antagonistic teeth and restorative materials were calculated using a three-dimensional profiling system and an electronic scale, respectively. Statistical significance was determined using One-way ANOVA and Tukey's test (P.05). CONCLUSION Leucite glass-ceramic and lithium disilicate glass-ceramic cause more primary tooth wear than stainless steel or zirconia. PMID:26949487

  12. ASSESSMENT OF CERAMIC TILE FROST RESISTANCE BY MEANS OF THE FREQUENCY INSPECTION METHOD

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    MICHAL MATYSÍK

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available The paper presents some results of our experimental analysis of ceramic cladding element frost resistance, particular attention being paid to the application of the frequency inspection method. Three different sets of ceramic tiles of the Ia class to EN 14 411 B standard made by various manufacturers have been analyzed. The ceramic tiles under investigation have been subjected to freeze-thaw-cycle-based degradation in compliance with the relevant ČSN EN ISO 10545-12 standard. Furthermore, accelerated degradation procedure has been applied to selected test specimens, consisting in reducing the temperature of water soaked ceramic tiles in the course of the degradation cycles down –70°C. To verify the correctness of the frequency inspection results, additional physical properties of the ceramic tiles under test have been measured, such as, the ceramic tile strength limit, modulus of elasticity and modulus of deformability, resulting from the flexural tensile strength tests, integrity defect and surface micro-geometry tracking. It has been proved that the acoustic method of frequency inspection is a sensitive indicator of the structure condition and can be applied to the ceramic cladding element frost resistance and service life prediction assessment.

  13. Creep functions of dental ceramics measured in a beam-bending viscometer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeHoff, Paul H; Anusavice, Kenneth J

    2004-03-01

    To characterize the high temperature viscoelastic properties of several dental ceramics by the determination of creep functions based on mid-span deflections measured in a beam-bending viscometer (BBV). Six groups of beam specimens (58 x 5.5 x 2.5 mm) were made from the following materials: (1) IPS Empress2 body--a glass veneer ceramic (E2V); (2) an experimental glass veneer (EXV); (3) Vita VMK 68 feldspathic body porcelain--a low-expansion body porcelain (VB); (4) Will-Ceram feldspathic body porcelain--a high-expansion body porcelain (WCB); (5) Vita feldspathic opaque porcelain--a medium-expansion opaque porcelain (VO); and (6) Will-Ceram feldspathic opaque porcelain--a high-expansion opaque porcelain (WCO). Midpoint deflections for each specimen were measured in a BBV under isothermal conditions at furnace temperatures ranging from 450 to 675 degrees C. Non-linear regression and linear regression analyses were used to determine creep functions and shear viscosities, respectively, for each material at each temperature. The shear viscosities of each group of dental ceramics exhibited bilinear Arrhenius behavior with the slope ratios (x) ranging from 0.19 for WCB to 0.71 for EXV. At the higher temperature ranges, activation energies ranged from 363 kJ/mol for VO to 386 kJ/mol for E2V. The viscoelastic properties of dental ceramics at high temperatures are important factors in understanding how residual stresses develop in all-ceramic and metal-ceramic dental restorations.

  14. Weibull analysis and flexural strength of hot-pressed core and veneered ceramic structures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bona, Alvaro Della; Anusavice, Kenneth J; DeHoff, Paul H

    2003-11-01

    To test the hypothesis that the Weibull moduli of single- and multilayer ceramics are controlled primarily by the structural reliability of the core ceramic.Methods. Seven groups of 20 bar specimens (25 x 4 x 1.2 mm) were made from the following materials: (1) IPS Empress--a hot-pressed (HP) leucite-based core ceramic; (2) IPS Empress2--a HP lithia-based core ceramic; (3 and 7) Evision--a HP lithia-based core ceramic (ES); (4) IPS Empress2 body--a glass veneer; (5) ES (1.1 mm thick) plus a glaze layer (0.1 mm); and (6) ES (0.8 mm thick) plus veneer (0.3 mm) and glaze (0.1 mm). Each specimen was subjected to four-point flexure loading at a cross-head speed of 0.5 mm/min while immersed in distilled water at 37 degrees C, except for Group 7 that was tested in a dry environment. Failure loads were recorded and the fracture surfaces were examined using SEM. ANOVA and Duncan's multiple range test were used for statistical analysis. No significant differences were found between the mean flexural strength values of Groups 2, 3, 5, and 6 or between Groups 1 and 4 (p>0.05). However, significant differences were found for dry (Group 7) and wet (Groups 1-6) conditions. Glazing had no significant effect on the flexural strength or Weibull modulus. The strength and Weibull modulus of the ES ceramic were similar to those of Groups 5 and 6. The structural reliability of veneered core ceramic is controlled primarily by that of the core ceramic.

  15. Correlation between metal-ceramic bond strength and coefficient of linear thermal expansion difference

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stella Crosara Lopes

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study was to evaluate the metal-ceramic bond strength (MCBS of 6 metal-ceramic pairs (2 Ni-Cr alloys and 1 Pd-Ag alloy with 2 dental ceramics and correlate the MCBS values with the differences between the coefficients of linear thermal expansion (CTEs of the metals and ceramics. Verabond (VB Ni-Cr-Be alloy, Verabond II (VB2, Ni-Cr alloy, Pors-on 4 (P, Pd-Ag alloy, and IPS (I and Duceram (D ceramics were used for the MCBS test and dilatometric test. Forty-eight ceramic rings were built around metallic rods (3.0 mm in diameter and 70.0 mm in length made from the evaluated alloys. The rods were subsequently embedded in gypsum cast in order to perform a tensile load test, which enabled calculating the CMBS. Five specimens (2.0 mm in diameter and 12.0 mm in length of each material were made for the dilatometric test. The chromel-alumel thermocouple required for the test was welded into the metal test specimens and inserted into the ceramics. ANOVA and Tukey's test revealed significant differences (p=0.01 for the MCBS test results (MPa, with PI showing higher MCBS (67.72 than the other pairs, which did not present any significant differences. The CTE (10-6 oC-1 differences were: VBI (0.54, VBD (1.33, VB2I (-0.14, VB2D (0.63, PI (1.84 and PD (2.62. Pearson's correlation test (r=0.17 was performed to evaluate of correlation between MCBS and CTE differences. Within the limitations of this study and based on the obtained results, there was no correlation between MCBS and CTE differences for the evaluated metal-ceramic pairs.

  16. [Effect of core: dentin thickness ratio on the flexure strength of IPS Empress II heat-pressed all-ceramic restorative material].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yi-hong; Feng, Hai-lan; Bao, Yi-wang; Qiu, Yan

    2007-02-18

    To evaluate the effect of core:dentin thickness ratio on the flexure strength, fracture mode and origin of bilayered IPS Empress II ceramic composite specimens. IPS Empress II core ceramic, dentin porcelain and bilayered composite specimens with core:dentin thickness ratio of 2:1 and 1:1 were tested in three-point flexure strength. Mean strengths and standard deviations were determined. The optical microscopy was employed for identification of the fracture mode and origin. The flexure strength of dentin porcelain was the smallest(62.7 MPa), and the strength of bilayered composite specimens was smaller than single-layered core ceramic(190.2 MPa). The core: dentin ratio did not influence the strength of bilayered composite specimens. The frequency of occurrence of bilayered specimen delaminations was higher in the group of core: dentin thickness ratio of 1:1 than in the group of 2:1. IPS Empress II core ceramic was significantly stronger than veneering dentin porcelain. Core:dentin thickness ratio could significantly influence the fracture mode and origin, and bilayered IPS Empress II ceramic composite specimens showed little influence in the fracture strength.

  17. Improving shear bond strength between feldspathic porcelain and zirconia substructure with lithium disilicate glass-ceramic liner.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wattanasirmkit, Kamolporn; Srimaneepong, Viritpon; Kanchanatawewat, Kanchana; Monmaturapoj, Naruporn; Thunyakitpisal, Pasutha; Jinawath, Supatra

    2015-01-01

    This study investigated the shear bond strength (SBS) between veneering porcelain and zirconia substructure using lithium disilicate glass-ceramic as a liner. The mineral phases and microstructures of lithium disilicate glass-ceramic at temperature range of 800-900°C were preliminarily investigated. SBSs of porcelain-veneered zirconia specimens with and without lithium disilicate glassceramic liner fired at the same temperature were determined. Results showed that SBSs of veneering porcelain and zirconia with lithium disilicate glass-ceramic liner was notably increased (pporcelain and zirconia.

  18. Effects of soldering and laser welding on bond strength of ceramic to metal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aladağ, Akin; Cömlekoğlu, M Erhan; Dündar, Mine; Güngör, M Ali; Artunç, Celal

    2011-01-01

    Welding or soldering of metal frameworks negatively affects the overall bond strength between the veneering ceramic and metal. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effect of soldering and laser-welding procedures on the bond strength between ceramic and metal. Thirty Ni-based metal specimens (Wiron 99) (8 × 4 × 4 mm) were fabricated and divided into 3 groups; soldered (S), laser welded (L), and control (untreated cast alloy) (n=10). In S and L specimens, a notch (1 × 1.5 mm) was prepared longitudinally on the surface of each specimen and filled with compatible alloy (Wiron soldering rods and Wiroweld NC, respectively). Vickers hardness measurements were made after polishing the surfaces with a metallographic polishing kit. A veneering ceramic (VITA VMK 95) was vibrated, condensed in a mold, and fired on the metal frameworks. The specimens were sectioned in 2 axes to obtain nontrimmed bar specimens with a bonding area of approximately 1 mm². Forty bars per block were obtained. Each bar was subjected to microtensile bond strength (μTBS) testing with a crosshead speed of 1 mm/min. The μTBS data (MPa) were recorded, and SEM was used for failure analysis of the tested bars. The measurements were statistically analyzed using a 1-way ANOVA and Tamhane tests (α=.05). The mean differences in μTBS of veneering ceramic to soldered (10.4 ±2.4 MPa) and laser-welded (11.7 ±1.3 MPa) metal surfaces were not significantly different and were significantly lower than that of the cast alloy (25.4 ±3.6 MPa) (Plaser-welded groups (129 ±11 HV) (Plaser welding significantly decreased the μTBS of a veneering ceramic to a base metal alloy. Copyright © 2011 The Editorial Council of the Journal of Prosthetic Dentistry. Published by Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Mode-II-Fracture Specimen And Holder

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buzzard, Robert J.; Ghosn, Louis; Succop, George

    1991-01-01

    Test specimen and loading frame developed for fatigue and fracture testing of materials under mode-II (sliding-mode) loading. Assembly placed in compression-testing machine. Loads directed oppositely along centerline cause self-similar crack to propagate. Enables consistently accurate alignment of specimens before insertion of specimen/frame assemblies into compression-testing machine. Makes design attractive for testing in hostile environments in which access to machine or furnace limited. Additional feature, with little or no modification, placed horizontally into impact testing machine and subjected to loading at high speeds.

  20. Lower energy costs in the ceramics industry - via ceramic fibers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zander, H.P.

    1983-04-01

    Ceramic fibres, due to their high thermal and chemical resistance, receive increasing attention as insulating material for industrial purposes. After a short characterisation, examples of furnace wall lining are given, and a tunnel-kiln car for baking of sanitation ceramics is investigated with a view to possibilities of supplementary insulation.

  1. Surface Hardness of Resin Cement Polymerized under Different Ceramic Materials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pimmada Kesrak

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Objectives. To evaluate the surface hardness of two light-cured resin cements polymerized under different ceramic discs. Methods. 40 experimental groups of 2 light-cured resin cement specimens (Variolink Veneer and NX3 were prepared and polymerized under 5 different ceramic discs (IPS e.max Press HT, LT, MO, HO, and Cercon of 4 thicknesses (0.5, 1.0, 1.5, and 2.0 mm, Those directly activated of both resin cements were used as control. After light activation and 37∘C storage in an incubator, Knoop hardness measurements were obtained at the bottom. The data were analyzed with three-way ANOVA, t-test, and one-way ANOVA. Results. The KHN of NX3 was of significantly higher than that of Variolink Veneer (<0.05. The KHN of resin cement polymerized under different ceramic types and thicknesses was significant difference (<0.05. Conclusion. Resin cements polymerized under different ceramic materials and thicknesses showed statistically significant differences in KHN.

  2. Manufacturing of porous oxide ceramics by replication of plant morphologies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sieber, H.; Rambo, C.; Cao, J.; Vogli, E.; Greil, P. [Erlangen-Nuernberg Univ., Erlangen (DE). Dept. of Materials Science (III) Glass and Ceramics

    2002-07-01

    Biomorphic oxide ceramics of alumina, mullite and zirconia with a directed pore morphology on the micrometer level were manufactured from bioorganic plant structures by sol-gel processing as well as sol-assisted nano-powder infiltrations. The inherent open porous morphology of natural grown rattan palms was used for vacuum-infiltration with aluminum isopropoxide (Al(OC{sub 3}H{sub 7}){sub 3}), zirconium oxichloride (ZrOCl{sub 2}.8H{sub 2}O) and SiO{sub 2} nano powder. Hydrolysis of the sols by adding HNO{sub 3} and pyrolysis in inert atmosphere at 800 C resulted in the formation of biocarbon/ceramic replica of the original wood morphology. The specimens were sintered in air at temperatures up to 1600 C to yield porous oxide ceramics with an unidirected pore structure similar to the original plant material. Repeated infiltration, hydrolysis and annealing steps were applied to increase the density of the ceramic materials. (orig.)

  3. Apparent interfacial fracture toughness of resin/ceramic systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Della Bona, A; Anusavice, K J; Mecholsky, J J

    2006-11-01

    We suggest that the apparent interfacial fracture toughness (K(A)) may be estimated by fracture mechanics and fractography. This study tested the hypothesis that the K(A) of the adhesion zone of resin/ceramic systems is affected by the ceramic microstructure. Lithia disilicate-based (Empress2-E2) and leucite-based (Empress-E1) ceramics were surface-treated with hydrofluoric acid (HF) and/or silane (S), followed by an adhesive resin. Microtensile test specimens (n = 30; area of 1 +/- 0.01 mm(2)) were indented (9.8 N) at the interface and loaded to failure in tension. We used tensile strength (sigma) and the critical crack size (c) to calculate K(A) (K(A) = Ysigmac(1/2)) (Y = 1.65). ANOVA and Weibull analyses were used for statistical analyses. Mean K(A) (MPa.m(1/2)) values were: (E1HF) 0.26 +/- 0.06; (E1S) 0.23 +/- 0.06; (E1HFS) 0.30 +/- 0.06; (E2HF) 0.31 +/- 0.06; (E2S) 0.13 +/- 0.05; and (E2HFS) 0.41 +/- 0.07. All fractures originated from indentation sites. Estimation of interfacial toughness was feasible by fracture mechanics and fractography. The K(A) for the systems tested was affected by the ceramic microstructure and surface treatment.

  4. Behavior of osteoblast-like cells on calcium-deficient hydroxyapatite ceramics composed of particles with different shapes and sizes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamitakahara, Masanobu; Uno, Yuika; Ioku, Koji

    2014-01-01

    In designing the biomaterials, it is important to control their surface morphologies, because they affect the interactions between the materials and cells. We previously reported that porous calcium-deficient hydroxyapatite (HA) ceramics composed of rod-like particles had advantages over sintered porous HA ceramics; however, the effects of the surface morphology of calcium-deficient HA ceramics on cell behavior have remained unclear. Using a hydrothermal process, we successfully prepared porous calcium-deficient HA ceramics with different surface morphologies, composed of plate-like particles of 200-300, 500-800 nm, or 2-3 μm in width and rod-like particles of 1 or 3-5 μm in width, respectively. The effects of these surface morphologies on the behavior of osteoblast-like cells were examined. Although the numbers of cells adhered to the ceramic specimens did not differ significantly among the specimens, the proliferation rates of cells on the ceramics decreased with decreasing particle size. Our results reveal that controlling the surface morphology that is governed by particle shape and size is important for designing porous calcium-deficient HA ceramics.

  5. Ceramic-on-ceramic total hip arthroplasty: update.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Capello, William N; D'Antonio, James A; Feinberg, Judy R; Manley, Michael T; Naughton, Marybeth

    2008-10-01

    This prospective, randomized, multicenter study of alumina ceramic-on-alumina ceramic bearing couples includes 452 patients (475 hips). Their average age was 53 years with approximately two thirds men and 82% with osteoarthritis. At an average 8-year follow-up, clinical results were excellent and cortical erosions significantly less than in the conventional polyethylene-on-metal bearing group. Nine hips have undergone revision of one or both components for any reason. Of the 380 ceramic liners, 2 (0.5%) have fractured requiring reoperation, and 3 (0.8%) ceramic patients reported a transient squeaking sound, one of which had a head and liner change due to groin pain secondary to psoas tendinitis at 5 years. With no revisions for aseptic loosening and minimal cortical erosions, alumina-ceramic bearing couples are performing in a manner superior to the polyethylene-on-metal bearing in this young, active patient population.

  6. Effect of poling condition on piezoelectric properties of (K0.5Na0.5)NbO3 ceramics

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    DU Hong-liang; TANG Fu-sheng; LI Zhi-min; ZHOU Wan-cheng; QU Shao-bo; PEI Zhi-bin

    2006-01-01

    The lead-free piezoelectric ceramics (K0.5Na0.5)NbO3 (abbreviated as KNN) with the relative density of 97.6% were synthesized by press-less sintering owing to the careful control of processing conditions. The phase structure of KNN ceramics was analyzed. The results show that the pure perovskite phase with orthorhombic symmetry is in all ceramics specimens. The effect of poling conditions on the piezoelectric properties of KNN ceramics was investigated. The results show that the piezoelectric constant d33 and electromechanical coupling factor kp increase with poling field,poling temperature and poling time increasing,then decrease because of electric broken. Take into account of poling conditions and piezoelectric properties of pure KNN ceramics,the optimum poling conditions for pure KNN ceramics are poling field of 4 kV/mm,poling temperature of 140 ℃ and poling time of 20-25 min.

  7. THE EFFECT OF DIFFERENT POLYMORPHS TiO2 RAW MATERIALS ON THE DIELECTRIC PROPERTIES AND MICROSTRUCTURE IN CaCu3Ti4O12 CERAMICS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hao W.

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available CaCu3Ti4O12 ceramics with different polymorphs of TiO2 as starting materials were prepared by the conventional solid-state reaction technique. Their crystalline structure, microstructure and dielectric properties were systematically investigated. It has been found that all of the ceramic specimens prepared in the present study have a good polycrystalline structure, and no secondary phase is been found by XRD. However, large differences in dielectric properties and microstructure are observed in them: 1 the characteristic frequency of dielectric relaxation around 1 MHz in the CCTO ceramics prepared with rutile TiO2 is much lower than that in those ceramics prepared with anatase TiO2; 2 no matter dielectric properties or microstructure, the CCTO ceramics prepared with rutile TiO2 are more sensitive to the sintering temperature than those ceramics prepared with anatase TiO2.

  8. Structure of Wet Specimens in Electron Microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parsons, D. F.

    1974-01-01

    Discussed are past work and recent advances in the use of electron microscopes for viewing structures immersed in gas and liquid. Improved environmental chambers make it possible to examine wet specimens easily. (Author/RH)

  9. Testing Biopsy and Cytology Specimens for Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Your Diagnosis Exams and Tests for Cancer Testing Biopsy and Cytology Specimens for Cancer Waiting to hear ... who tell you whether the cells in your biopsy sample are cancer or not. How is cancer ...

  10. Structure of Wet Specimens in Electron Microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parsons, D. F.

    1974-01-01

    Discussed are past work and recent advances in the use of electron microscopes for viewing structures immersed in gas and liquid. Improved environmental chambers make it possible to examine wet specimens easily. (Author/RH)

  11. Impact of specimen adequacy on the assessment of renal allograft biopsy specimens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cimen, S; Geldenhuys, L; Guler, S; Imamoglu, A; Molinari, M

    2016-01-01

    The Banff classification was introduced to achieve uniformity in the assessment of renal allograft biopsies. The primary aim of this study was to evaluate the impact of specimen adequacy on the Banff classification. All renal allograft biopsies obtained between July 2010 and June 2012 for suspicion of acute rejection were included. Pre-biopsy clinical data on suspected diagnosis and time from renal transplantation were provided to a nephropathologist who was blinded to the original pathological report. Second pathological readings were compared with the original to assess agreement stratified by specimen adequacy. Cohen's kappa test and Fisher's exact test were used for statistical analyses. Forty-nine specimens were reviewed. Among these specimens, 81.6% were classified as adequate, 6.12% as minimal, and 12.24% as unsatisfactory. The agreement analysis among the first and second readings revealed a kappa value of 0.97. Full agreement between readings was found in 75% of the adequate specimens, 66.7 and 50% for minimal and unsatisfactory specimens, respectively. There was no agreement between readings in 5% of the adequate specimens and 16.7% of the unsatisfactory specimens. For the entire sample full agreement was found in 71.4%, partial agreement in 20.4% and no agreement in 8.2% of the specimens. Statistical analysis using Fisher's exact test yielded a P value above 0.25 showing that - probably due to small sample size - the results were not statistically significant. Specimen adequacy may be a determinant of a diagnostic agreement in renal allograft specimen assessment. While additional studies including larger case numbers are required to further delineate the impact of specimen adequacy on the reliability of histopathological assessments, specimen quality must be considered during clinical decision making while dealing with biopsy reports based on minimal or unsatisfactory specimens.

  12. Vickers Microhardness Testing with Miniaturized Disk Specimens

    OpenAIRE

    Kurishita, Hiroaki; Kayano, Hideo

    1991-01-01

    The microhardness technique has been increasingly important for testing irradiated materials because of the necessity of small-scale specimen technology. In order to establish Vickers microhardness testing over a wide temperature range using miniaturized specimens such as transmission electron microscopy (TEM) disks, an apparatus that permits the measurements in the temperature range of well below liquid nitrogen temperature to well above room temperature is developed. Effects of indentation ...

  13. Ultrasonic analysis of spherical composite test specimens

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brosey, W.D.

    1984-08-22

    Filament wound spherical test specimens have been examined ultrasonically as part of a program to determine the effectiveness of various nondestructive evaluation techniques for analysis of mechanical characteristics of a composite with enclosed geometry. The Kevlar-epoxy composite specimens contained simulated defect conditions which were located, and the extent of damage determined, using ultrasonic analysis. Effects of transducer frequency and signal parameters have been examined to determine optimum conditions for flaw detection. The data were displayed in rectangular and axonometric projection.

  14. Modeling and testing miniature torsion specimens for SiC joining development studies for fusion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Henager, C.H., E-mail: chuck.henager@pnnl.gov [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland, WA (United States); Nguyen, B.N.; Kurtz, R.J.; Roosendaal, T.J.; Borlaug, B.A. [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland, WA (United States); Ferraris, M.; Ventrella, A. [Politecnico di Torino, Torino (Italy); Katoh, Y. [Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, TN (United States)

    2015-11-15

    The international fusion community has designed a miniature torsion specimen for neutron irradiation studies of joined SiC and SiC/SiC composite materials. Miniature torsion joints based on this specimen design were fabricated using displacement reactions between Si and TiC to produce Ti{sub 3}SiC{sub 2} + SiC joints with SiC and tested in torsion-shear prior to and after neutron irradiation. However, many miniature torsion specimens fail out-of-plane within the SiC specimen body, which makes it problematic to assign a shear strength value to the joints and makes it difficult to compare unirradiated and irradiated strengths to determine irradiation effects. Finite element elastic damage and elastic–plastic damage models of miniature torsion joints are developed that indicate shear fracture is more likely to occur within the body of the joined sample and cause out-of-plane failures for miniature torsion specimens when a certain modulus and strength ratio between the joint material and the joined material exists. The model results are compared and discussed with regard to unirradiated and irradiated test data for a variety of joint materials. The unirradiated data includes Ti{sub 3}SiC{sub 2} + SiC/CVD-SiC joints with tailored joint moduli, and includes steel/epoxy and CVD-SiC/epoxy joints. The implications for joint data based on this sample design are discussed. - Highlights: • Finite element damage models developed and applied to understand miniature torsion specimen. • Damage models correctly predict torsion joint failure locations for wide range of materials. • Tests of strong, stiff ceramic joints will not produce accurate shear strength values. • Miniature torsion specimen has diminished test utility but still valuable.

  15. Ceramics in nuclear waste management

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chikalla, T D; Mendel, J E [eds.

    1979-05-01

    Seventy-three papers are included, arranged under the following section headings: national programs for the disposal of radioactive wastes, waste from stability and characterization, glass processing, ceramic processing, ceramic and glass processing, leaching of waste materials, properties of nuclear waste forms, and immobilization of special radioactive wastes. Separate abstracts were prepared for all the papers. (DLC)

  16. Method of forming a ceramic matrix composite and a ceramic matrix component

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    de Diego, Peter; Zhang, James

    2017-05-30

    A method of forming a ceramic matrix composite component includes providing a formed ceramic member having a cavity, filling at least a portion of the cavity with a ceramic foam. The ceramic foam is deposited on a barrier layer covering at least one internal passage of the cavity. The method includes processing the formed ceramic member and ceramic foam to obtain a ceramic matrix composite component. Also provided is a method of forming a ceramic matrix composite blade and a ceramic matrix composite component.

  17. Thermomechanical Property Data Base Developed for Ceramic Fibers

    Science.gov (United States)

    1996-01-01

    A key to the successful application of metal and ceramic composite materials in advanced propulsion and power systems is the judicious selection of continuous-length fiber reinforcement. Appropriate fibers can provide these composites with the required thermomechanical performance. To aid in this selection, researchers at the NASA Lewis Research Center, using in-house state-of-the-art test facilities, developed an extensive data base of the deformation and fracture properties of commercial and developmental ceramic fibers at elevated temperatures. Lewis' experimental focus was primarily on fiber compositions based on silicon carbide or alumina because of their oxidation resistance, low density, and high modulus. Test approaches typically included tensile and flexural measurements on single fibers or on multifilament tow fibers in controlled environments of air or argon at temperatures from 800 to 1400 C. Some fiber specimens were pretreated at composite fabrication temperatures to simulate in situ composite conditions, whereas others were precoated with potential interphase and matrix materials.

  18. Viscoelastic analysis of a dental metal-ceramic system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Özüpek, Şebnem; Ünlü, Utku Cemal

    2012-11-01

    Porcelain-fused-to-metal (PFM) restorations used in prosthetic dentistry contain thermal stresses which develop during the cooling phase after firing. These thermal stresses coupled with the stresses produced by mechanical loads may be the dominant reasons for failures in clinical situations. For an accurate calculation of these stresses, viscoelastic behavior of ceramics at high temperatures should not be ignored. In this study, the finite element technique is used to evaluate the effect of viscoelasticity on stress distributions of a three-point flexure test specimen, which is the current international standard, ISO 9693, to characterize the interfacial bond strength of metal-ceramic restorative systems. Results indicate that the probability of interfacial debonding due to normal tensile stress is higher than that due to shear stress. This conclusion suggests modification of ISO 9693 bond strength definition from one in terms of the shear stress only to that accounting for both normal and shear stresses.

  19. Survival of resin infiltrated ceramics under influence of fatigue.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aboushelib, Moustafa N; Elsafi, Mohamed H

    2016-04-01

    to evaluate influence of cyclic fatigue on two resin infiltrated ceramics and three all-ceramic crowns manufactured using CAD/CAM technology. CAD/CAM anatomically shaped crowns were manufactured using two resin infiltrated ceramics (Lava Ultimate and Vita Enamic), two reinforced glass ceramic milling blocks ((IPS)Empress CAD and (IPS)e.max CAD) and a veneered zirconia core ((IPS)Zir CAD). (IPS)e.max CAD and (IPS)Zir CAD were milled into 0.5mm thick anatomically shaped core structure which received standardized press-on veneer ceramic. The manufactured crowns were cemented on standardized resin dies using a resin adhesive (Panavia F2.0). Initial fracture strength of half of the specimens was calculated using one cycle load to failure in a universal testing machine. The remaining crowns were subjected to 3.7 million chewing cycles (load range 50-200N at 3s interval) in a custom made pneumatic fatigue tester. Survival statistics were calculated and Weibull modulus was measured from fitted load-cycle-failure diagrams. Scanning electron microscopy was performed to fractographically analyze fractured surfaces. Data were analyzed using two way analysis of variance and Bonferroni post hoc tests (α=0.05). Dynamic fatigue resulted in significant reduction (F=7.54, Pceramics and (IPS)Empress demonstrated the highest percent of fracture incidences under the influence of fatigue (35-45% splitting). None of the tested veneered zirconia restorations were fractured during testing, however, chipping of the veneer ceramics was observed in 6 crowns. The lowest percent of failure was observed for (IPS)e.max crowns manifested as 3 cases of minor chipping in addition to two complete fracture incidences. SEM images demonstrated the internal structure of the tested materials and detected location and size of the critical crack. The internal structure of the tested materials significantly influenced their fatigue behavior. Resin infiltrated ceramics were least influenced by fatigue while

  20. Preparation of Bauxite Ceramic Microsphere

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CHENG Xiaosu; LIU Pingan; LI Xiuyan; SHUI Anze; ZENG Lingke

    2007-01-01

    Ceramic microspheres were prepared by using Chinese bauxite as raw materials through the centrifugal spray drying method. The control technology of microsphere size, degree of sphericity was researched. The ceramic microspheres were sintered by a double sintering process. The microstructure and composition of ceramic microsphere were investigated by X-ray diffraction (XRD), scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and X-ray energy spectroscopy. The results show that the degree of sphericity of the ceramic microsphere was good and the particle size was 10-100 μm. The XRD analysis reveals that the main crystalline phase of the ceramic microsphere was α- Al2O3 and mullite (3Al2O3·2SiO2). The product can be used as reinforced material for composite material, especially for antiskid and hard wearing aluminum alloy coating.

  1. Low thermal expansion glass ceramics

    CERN Document Server

    1995-01-01

    This book is one of a series reporting on international research and development activities conducted by the Schott group of companies With the series, Schott aims to provide an overview of its activities for scientists, engineers, and managers from all branches of industry worldwide where glasses and glass ceramics are of interest Each volume begins with a chapter providing a general idea of the current problems, results, and trends relating to the subjects treated This volume describes the fundamental principles, the manufacturing process, and applications of low thermal expansion glass ceramics The composition, structure, and stability of polycrystalline materials having a low thermal expansion are described, and it is shown how low thermal expansion glass ceramics can be manufactured from appropriately chosen glass compositions Examples illustrate the formation of this type of glass ceramic by utilizing normal production processes together with controlled crystallization Thus glass ceramics with thermal c...

  2. Ceramic membrane development in NGK

    Science.gov (United States)

    Araki, Kiyoshi; Sakai, Hitoshi

    2011-05-01

    NGK Insulators, Ltd. was established in 1919 to manufacture the electric porcelain insulators for power transmission lines. Since then, our business has grown as one of the world-leading ceramics manufacturing companies and currently supply with the various environmentally-benign ceramic products to worldwide. In this paper, ceramic membrane development in NGK is described in detail. We have been selling ceramic microfiltration (MF) membranes and ultra-filtration (UF) membranes for many years to be used for solid/liquid separation in various fields such as pharmaceutical, chemical, food and semiconductor industries. In Corporate R&D, new ceramic membranes with sub-nanometer sized pores, which are fabricated on top of the membrane filters as support, are under development for gas and liquid/liquid separation processes.

  3. Ceramic membrane development in NGK

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Araki, Kiyoshi; Sakai, Hitoshi, E-mail: kinsakai@ngk.co.jp [Corporate R and D, NGK Insulators, Ltd., Nagoya 467-8530 (Japan)

    2011-05-15

    NGK Insulators, Ltd. was established in 1919 to manufacture the electric porcelain insulators for power transmission lines. Since then, our business has grown as one of the world-leading ceramics manufacturing companies and currently supply with the various environmentally-benign ceramic products to worldwide. In this paper, ceramic membrane development in NGK is described in detail. We have been selling ceramic microfiltration (MF) membranes and ultra-filtration (UF) membranes for many years to be used for solid/liquid separation in various fields such as pharmaceutical, chemical, food and semiconductor industries. In Corporate R and D, new ceramic membranes with sub-nanometer sized pores, which are fabricated on top of the membrane filters as support, are under development for gas and liquid/liquid separation processes.

  4. Characterization of a polymer-infiltrated ceramic-network material.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Della Bona, Alvaro; Corazza, Pedro H; Zhang, Yu

    2014-05-01

    To characterize the microstructure and determine some mechanical properties of a polymer-infiltrated ceramic-network (PICN) material (Vita Enamic, Vita Zahnfabrik) available for CAD-CAM systems. Specimens were fabricated to perform quantitative and qualitative analyses of the material's microstructure and to determine the fracture toughness (KIc), density (ρ), Poisson's ratio (ν) and Young's modulus (E). KIc was determined using V-notched specimens and the short beam toughness method, where bar-shaped specimens were notched and 3-point loaded to fracture. ρ was calculated using Archimedes principle, and ν and E were measured using an ultrasonic thickness gauge with a combination of a pulse generator and an oscilloscope. Microstructural analyses showed a ceramic- and a polymer-based interpenetrating network. Mean and standard deviation values for the properties evaluated were: KIc=1.09±0.05MPam(1/2), ρ=2.09±0.01g/cm(3), ν=0.23±0.002 and E=37.95±0.34GPa. The PICN material showed mechanical properties between porcelains and resin-based composites, reflecting its microstructural components. Copyright © 2014 Academy of Dental Materials. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. 沉浸竖板式浴室热泵换热器的研究%Study on the Immersed Vertical Plate Type Heat Exchanger for Bathroom Heat Pump

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王春虎; 杨宗政; 李伶俐; 郝博

    2016-01-01

    The immersed vertical plate type heat exchanger was developed based on the common bathroom heat pump heat ex-changer which was easily blocked and difficult to be regenerated.Structure,operating principle and characteristic parameter equa-tions of the immersed vertical plate type heat exchanger were also introduced.The key factors influenced on the heating load and the pressure drop were calculated and analyzed.The experiment research of the heat transfer coefficient,the operating parameters and the heat pump coefficient of performance were also conducted.The theoretical analysis and the experiment result had a good reference value in designing and controlling of the heat exchanger.%针对普通的浴室热泵换热器存在易堵塞、维护复杂等问题,开发了一种沉浸竖板式换热器,介绍了其结构、工作原理和特性参数方程,并针对关键要素对传热量和压降的影响规律进行计算分析,对换热器的传热系数、换热器操作参数和热泵性能指标的变化规律进行了试验研究,理论分析和试验结果对该浴室热泵换热器的设计和调控均具有较好的参考价值。

  6. Impact Behavior of Three Notched All-Ceramic Restorations after Soaking in Artificial Saliva

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Min Yan

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Biomechanics play a critical role in influencing the clinical applications of all-ceramic dental restorations. The restorative biomaterials have to demonstrate mechanical durability in the oral environment because they are always exposed to a variety of oral environments. This study was designed to evaluate the effect of soaking time, notch and saliva pH values on the impact energy of three commonly used all-ceramic materials for CAD/CAM. The leucite-reinforced glass ceramic (ProCAD, lithium disilicate glass ceramic (IPS e.max CAD and zirconia-based ceramic materials (IPS e.max ZirCAD were used. The experimental results indicated that the impact energy of ProCAD decreased with an increase in soaking time, but not for IPS e.max CAD and IPS e.max ZirCAD. The impact energy of the zirconia system was higher than leucite-reinforced and lithium disilicate-based ceramic systems. When subjected to preformed 0.5 mm U-shape notch on the bar specimen of 3 mm thick, the impact energy of the all-ceramic restorations revealed a markedly reduction of about 80%–90%, almost irrespective of dental compositions, which indicated the effect of flaw to a great degree. No statistically significant influence (p > 0.05 of pH values (4, 7 and 9 on impact energy was found for each group. It is concluded that the no matter which all-ceramic materials were used, it was appreciably sensitive to the presence of notches. The ceramic composition and microstructure have been shown to affect mechanical durability.

  7. Fracture toughness of advanced alumina ceramics and alumina matrix composites used for cutting tool edges

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Szutkowska

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: Specific characteristics in fracture toughness measurements of advanced alumina ceramics and alumina matrix composites with particular reference to α-Al2O3, Al2O3-ZrO2, Al2O3-ZrO2-TiC and Al2O3-Ti(C,N has been presented.Design/methodology/approach: The present study reports fracture toughness obtained by means of the conventional method and direct measurements of the Vickers crack length (DCM method of selected tool ceramics based on alumina: pure alumina, alumina-zirconia composite with unstabilized and stabilized zirconia, alumina–zirconia composite with addition of TiC and alumina–nitride-carbide titanium composite with 2wt% of zirconia. Specimens were prepared from submicro-scale trade powders. Vicker’s hardness (HV1, fracture toughness (KIC at room temperature, the indentation fracture toughness, Young’s modulus and apparent density were also evaluated. The microstructure was observed by means of scanning electron microscopy (SEM.Findings: The lowest value of KIC is revealed by pure alumina ceramics. The addition of (10 wt% unstabilized zirconia to alumina or a small amount (5 wt% of TiC to alumina–zirconia composite improve fracture toughness of these ceramics in comparison to alumina ceramics. Alumina ceramics and alumina-zirconia ceramics reveal the pronounced character of R-curve because of an increasing dependence on crack growth resistance with crack extension as opposed to the titanium carbide-nitride reinforced composite based on alumina. R-curve has not been observed for this composite.Practical implications: The results show the method of fracture toughness improvement of alumina tool ceramics.Originality/value: Taking into account the values of fracture toughness a rational use of existing ceramic tools should be expected.

  8. Influence of glass particle size of resin cements on bonding to glass ceramic: SEM and bond strength evaluation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valentini, Fernanda; Moraes, Rafael R; Pereira-Cenci, Tatiana; Boscato, Noéli

    2014-05-01

    This study investigated the effect of the filler particle size (micron or submicron) of experimental resin cements on the microtensile bond strength to a glass-ceramic pretreated with hydrofluoric acid (HFA) etching or alumina airborne-particle abrasion (AA). Cements were obtained from a Bis-GMA/TEGDMA mixture filled with 60 mass% micron-sized (1 ± 0.2 µm) or submicron-sized (180 ± 30 µm) Ba-Si-Al glass particles. Ceramic blocks (PM9; VITA) were treated with 10% HFA for 60 s or AA for 15 s. Silane and adhesive were applied. Ceramic blocks were bonded to resin composite blocks (Z250; 3M ESPE) using one of the cements. Bonded specimens were sectioned into beams (n = 20/group) and subjected to microtensile bond strength tests. Data were analyzed using ANOVA and Student-Newman-Keuls' tests (5%). Failure modes were classified under magnification. Morphologies of the treated ceramic surfaces and bonded interfaces were evaluated by scanning electron microscopy. The HFA-submicron group had lower bond strengths than the other groups. All AA-submicron specimens debonded prematurely. Mixed failures were predominant for HFA groups, whereas interfacial failures predominated for AA groups. SEM revealed a honeycomb-like aspect in the HFA-treated ceramic, whereas the AA-treated groups showed an irregular retentive pattern. Continuity of cement infiltration along the bonded interface was more uniform for HFA-treated compared to AA-treated specimens. Cracks toward the bulk of the ceramic were observed in AA-treated specimens. Particle size significantly influenced the ceramic bond strength, whereas surface treatment had a minor effect.

  9. Porous biphasic calcium phosphate ceramics coated with nano-hydroxyapatite and seeded with mesenchymal stem cells for reconstruction of radius segmental defects in rabbits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Jianzhong; Yang, Zhiming; Zhou, Yongchun; Liu, Yong; Li, Kaiyang; Lu, Hongbin

    2015-11-01

    The osteoconduction of porous biphasic calcium phosphate (BCP) ceramics has been widely reported. In a previous study, we demonstrated that applying a nano-hydroxyapatite (nHA) coating enhances the osteoinductive potential of BCP ceramics, making these scaffolds more suitable for bone tissue engineering applications. The aim of the present study was to determine the effects of reconstructing radius defects in rabbits using nHA-coated BCP ceramics seeded with mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) and to compare the bone regeneration induced by different scaffolds. Radius defects were created in 20 New Zealand rabbits, which were divided into four groups by treatment: porous BCP ceramics (Group A), nHA-coated porous BCP ceramics (Group B), porous BCP ceramics seeded with rabbit MSCs (Group C), and nHA-coated porous BCP ceramics seeded with rabbit MSCs (Group D). After in vitro incubation, the cell/scaffold complexes were implanted into the defects. Twelve weeks after implantation, the specimens were examined macroscopically and histologically. Both the nHA coating and seeding with MSCs enhanced the formation of new bone tissue in the BCP ceramics, though the osteoinductive potential of the scaffolds with MSCs was greater than that of the nHA-coated scaffolds. Notably, the combination of nHA coating and MSCs significantly improved the bone regeneration capability of the BCP ceramics. Thus, MSCs seeded into porous BCP ceramics coated with nHA may be an effective bone substitute to reconstruct bone defects in the clinic.

  10. Closeout of JOYO-1 Specimen Fabrication Efforts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    ME Petrichek; JL Bump; RF Luther

    2005-10-31

    Fabrication was well under way for the JOYO biaxial creep and tensile specimens when the NR Space program was canceled. Tubes of FS-85, ASTAR-811C, and T-111 for biaxial creep specimens had been drawn at True Tube (Paso Robles, CA), while tubes of Mo-47.5 Re were being drawn at Rhenium Alloys (Cleveland, OH). The Mo-47.5 Re tubes are now approximately 95% complete. Their fabrication and the quantities produced will be documented at a later date. End cap material for FS-85, ASTAR-811C, and T-111 had been swaged at Pittsburgh Materials Technology, Inc. (PMTI) (Large, PA) and machined at Vangura (Clairton, PA). Cutting of tubes, pickling, annealing, and laser engraving were in process at PMTI. Several biaxial creep specimen sets of FS-85, ASTAR-811C, and T-111 had already been sent to Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) for weld development. In addition, tensile specimens of FS-85, ASTAR-811C, T-111, and Mo-47.5 Re had been machined at Kin-Tech (North Huntington, PA). Actual machining of the other specimen types had not been initiated. Flowcharts 1-3 detail the major processing steps each piece of material has experienced. A more detailed description of processing will be provided in a separate document [B-MT(SRME)-51]. Table 1 lists the in-process materials and finished specimens. Also included are current metallurgical condition of these materials and specimens. The available chemical analyses for these alloys at various points in the process are provided in Table 2.

  11. Effect of laser welding on the titanium ceramic tensile bond strength.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galo, Rodrigo; Ribeiro, Ricardo Faria; Rodrigues, Renata Cristina Silveira; Pagnano, Valéria de Oliveira; Mattos, Maria da Glória Chiarello de

    2011-08-01

    Titanium reacts strongly with elements, mainly oxygen at high temperature. The high temperature of titanium laser welding modifies the surface, and may interfere on the metal-ceramic tensile bond strength. The influence of laser welding on the titanium-ceramic bonding has not yet been established. The purpose of this in vitro study was to analyze the influence of laser welding applied to commercially pure titanium (CpTi) substructure on the bond strength of commercial ceramic. The influence of airborne particle abrasion (Al2O3) conditions was also studied. Forty CpTi cylindrical rods (3 mm x 60 mm) were cast and divided into 2 groups: with laser welding (L) and without laser welding (WL). Each group was divided in 4 subgroups, according to the size of the particles used in airborne particle abrasion: A - Al2O3 (250 µm); B - Al2O3 (180 µm); C - Al2O3 (110 µm); D - Al2O3 (50 µm). Ceramic rings were fused around the CpTi rods. Specimens were invested and their tensile strength was measured at fracture with a universal testing machine at a crosshead speed of 2.0 mm/min and 200 kgf load cell. Statistical analysis was carried out with analysis of variance and compared using the independent t test (plaser-welded specimens, i.e. the metal-ceramic tensile bond strength was lower.

  12. Compaction of Ceramic Microspheres, Spherical Molybdenum Powder and Other Materials to 3 GPa

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Carlson, S R; Bonner, B P; Ryerson, F J; Hart, M M

    2006-01-27

    Pressure-volume relationships were measured at room temperature for eight granular materials and one specimen of epoxy foam. The granular materials included hollow ceramic microspheres, spherical molybdenum powder, Ottawa sand, aluminum, copper, titanium and silicon carbide powders and glassy carbon spheres. Measurements were made to 0.9 GPa in a liquid medium press for all of the granular materials and to 3 GPa in a solid medium press for the ceramic microspheres and molybdenum powder. A single specimen of epoxy foam was compressed to 30 MPa in the liquid medium press. Bulk moduli were calculated as a function of pressure for the ceramic microspheres, the molybdenum powder and three other granular materials. The energy expended in compacting the granular materials was determined by numerically integrating pressure-volume curves. More energy was expended per unit volume in compacting the molybdenum powder to 1 GPa than for the other materials, but compaction of the ceramic microspheres required more energy per gram due to their very low initial density. The merge pressure, the pressure at which all porosity is removed, was estimated for each material by plotting porosity against pressure on a semi-log plot. The pressure-volume curves were then extrapolated to the predicted merge pressures and numerically integrated to estimate the energy required to reach full density for each material. The results suggest that the glassy carbon spheres and the ceramic microspheres would require more energy than the other materials to attain full density.

  13. High-temperature corrosion resistance of ceramics and ceramic coatings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tortorelli, P.F.

    1996-06-01

    Ceramics and ceramic composites offer the potential to operate fossil energy systems at the higher temperatures necessary for improved energy efficiency and better environmental control. However, because many fossil fuel-derived processes contain sulfur, chlorine, and carbon, as well as oxygen, degradation from high-temperature corrosion and environmental effects arising from reactions of solids with gases and condensable products is a common life-determining factor in operating systems. Ceramic-based products are not immune to such degradation; adequate corrosion resistance must be assured to exploit the technical and economic potential of such materials. This is normally accomplished by using stable, sound oxides that exist in their bulk form, that naturally grow as surface layers upon exposure to an oxidizing environment, or that are deposited as a coating on a susceptible material. It is therefore important to examine the critical issues with respect to more environmental stability of ceramics that have the potential to be corrosion resistant in particular fossil environments. Key aspects include not only chemical compatibility, but the influence of the environment on the mechanical behavior of the ceramic materials. In addition, for coatings, the mechanical reliability of the ceramic is a key issue in that an otherwise corrosion-resistant surface layer must remain sound and adherent in order to provide protection to the underlying substrate. The purpose of this work is to support the development of advanced ceramics and ceramic composites for applications in fossil environments by examining critical issues related to high-temperature corrosion resistance. More specifically, the overall objective of this task is to examine the chemical compatibility and reliability of potentially corrosion-resistant ceramics being developed as protective overcoats and/or structural materials as parts of other work elements funded by the AR&TD Program.

  14. Hardness of resin cement cured under different thickness of lithium disilicate-based ceramic

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG Xuan; WANG Fu

    2011-01-01

    Background The lithium disilicate-based ceramic is a newly developed all-ceramic material,which is lithium disilicate-based and could be used for fabricating almost all kinds of restorations.The extent of light attenuation by ceramic material was material-dependent.Ceramic materials with different crystal composition or crystalline content would exhibit distinct light-absorbing characteristics.The aim of this study was to analyze the influence of ceramic thickness and light-curing time on the polymerization of a dual-curing resin luting material with a lithium disilicate-based ceramic.Methods A lithium disilicate-based ceramic was used in this study.The light attenuation caused by ceramic with different thickness was determined using a spectral radiometer.The commercial dual-cured resin cement was light-cured directly or through ceramic discs with different thickness (1,2 and 3 mm,respectively) for different times (10,20,30,40,50 and 60 seconds,respectively).The polymerization efficiency of resin cement was expressed in terms as Vickers hardness (VHN) measured after 24 hours storage.Two-way analysis of variance (ANOVA) and Tukey's HSD tests were used to determine differences.Results Intensity of polymerizing light transmitted through ceramic discs was reduced from 584 mW/cm2 to about 216 mW/cm2,80 mW/cm2 and 52 mW/cm2 at thicknesses of 1 mm,2 mm and 3 mm,respectively.Resin cement specimens self-cured alone showed significantly lower hardness values.When resin cement was light-cured through ceramic discs with a thickness of 1 mm,2 mm and 3 mm,no further increasing in hardness values was observed when light-curing time was more than 30 seconds,40 seconds and 60 seconds,respectively.Conclusions Within the limitation of the present study,ceramic thickness and light-curing time had remarkable influence on the polymerization of dual-cured resin cement.When resin cement is light-cured beneath a lithium disilicate ceramic with different thickness,prolonging light

  15. Influence of contamination on resin bond strength to nano-structured alumina-coated zirconia ceramic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Shanchuan; Kocjan, Andraz; Lehmann, Frank; Kosmac, Tomaz; Kern, Matthias

    2010-08-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the influence of contamination and subsequent cleaning on the bond strength and durability of an adhesive resin to nano-structured alumina-coated zirconia ceramic. Zirconia ceramic disks were coated with nano-structured alumina, utilizing the hydrolysis of aluminum nitride powder. After immersion in saliva or the use of a silicone disclosing agent, specimens were cleaned with phosphoric acid etching or with tap water rinsing only. Uncontaminated specimens served as controls. Plexiglas tubes filled with composite resin were bonded with a phosphate monomer [10-methacryloxydecyl-dihydrogenphosphate (MDP)]-containing resin (Panavia 21). Subgroups of eight specimens each were stored in distilled water at 37 degrees C, either for 3 d without thermal cycling (TC) or for 150 d with 37,500 thermal cycles from 5 to 55 degrees C. The tensile bond strength (TBS) was determined using a universal testing machine at a crosshead speed of 2 mm min(-1). The topography of the debonded surface was scrutinized for fractographic features, utilizing both optical and scanning electron microscopy. The TBS to uncontaminated nano-structured alumina-coated zirconia ceramic was durable, while contamination significantly reduced the TBS. Phosphoric acid cleaning was effective in removal of saliva contamination from the coated bonding surface but was not effective in removal of the silicone disclosing agent. Nano-structured alumina coating improves resin bonding to zirconia ceramic and eliminates the need for air-abrasion before bonding.

  16. Calcined clay lightweight ceramics made with wood sawdust and sodium silicate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Santis, Bruno Carlos de; Rossignolo, Joao Adriano, E-mail: desantis.bruno@gmail.com [Universidade de Sao Paulo (USP), Pirassununga, SP (Brazil); Morelli, Marcio Raymundo [Universidade Federal de Sao Carlos (UFSCar), SP (Brazil). Departamento de Engenharia de Materiais

    2016-11-15

    This paper aims to study the influence of including wood sawdust and sodium silicate in the production process of calcined clay lightweight ceramics. In the production process first, a sample used by a company that produces ceramic products in Brazil was collected. The sample was analysed by techniques of liquidity (LL) and plasticity (LP) limits, particle size analysis, specific mass, X-ray diffraction (XRD) and X ray fluorescence spectrometry (XRF). From the clay, specimens of pure clay and mixtures with wood sawdust (10%, 20% and 30% by mass) and sodium silicate were produced and fired at a temperature of 900 deg C. These specimens were submitted to tests of water absorption, porosity, specific mass and compressive strength. Results of this research indicate that the incorporation of wood sawdust and sodium silicate in the ceramic paste specimens can be useful to make calcined clay lightweight ceramics with special characteristics (low values of water absorption and specific mass and high values of compressive strength), which could be used to produce calcined clay lightweight aggregates to be used in structural concrete. (author)

  17. Fracture toughness (K(IC) of a hot-pressed core ceramic based on fractographic analysis of fractured ceramic FPDs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oh, Won-Suck; Park, Ju-Mi; Anusavice, Kenneth

    2003-01-01

    The objective of this study was to test the hypothesis that there is no significant difference between the fracture toughness (K(IC)) of an experimental hot-pressed core ceramic measured by fractographic analysis of failed ceramic prostheses and the values determined by other standard methods. Four groups were subjected to one of four test methods: group 1 = indentation strength technique (standard numerical calculation); group 2 = indentation strength technique (fractographic analysis); group 3 = flexure test of precracked specimens (fractographic analysis); and group 4 = fractographic analysis of failed three-unit fixed partial dentures (FPD). For groups 1 to 3, 20 ceramic bar specimens were subjected to three-point flexure at a cross-head speed of 0.5 mm/min until fracture occurred. For group 4, 10 failed FPDs were collected from a previous study. Stress values at failure were calculated from either a flexure stress equation (groups 1 to 3) or from finite element analyses (group 4). K(IC) values were calculated from an equation and fractographic measurement data. Mean fracture toughness ranged from 3.1 MPa x m1/2 (SD 0.2) (group 1) to 3.4 MPa x m1/2 (SD 0.2) (group 4). The mean K(IC) value for group 1 was significantly different from that of group 4; however, no significant differences were found between groups 1, 2, and 3, or between groups 2, 3, and 4. Fracture toughness for an experimental hot-pressed core ceramic measured by fractographic analysis in combination with finite element analysis was comparable with the values determined with other standard fractographic methods.

  18. Integral Textile Ceramic Structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marshall, David B.; Cox, Brian N.

    2008-08-01

    A new paradigm for ceramic composite structural components enables functionality in heat exchange, transpiration, detailed shape, and thermal strain management that significantly exceeds the prior art. The paradigm is based on the use of three-dimensional fiber reinforcement that is tailored to the specific shape, stress, and thermal requirements of a structural application and therefore generally requires innovative textile methods for each realization. Key features include the attainment of thin skins (less than 1 mm) that are nevertheless structurally robust, transpiration holes formed without cutting fibers, double curvature, compliant integral attachment to other structures that avoids thermal stress buildup, and microcomposite ceramic matrices that minimize spalling and allow the formation of smooth surfaces. All these features can be combined into structures of very varied gross shape and function, using a wide range of materials such as all-oxide systems and SiC and carbon fibers in SiC matrices. Illustrations are drawn from rocket nozzles, thermal protection systems, and gas turbine engines. The new design challenges that arise for such material/structure systems are being met by specialized computational modeling that departs significantly in the representation of materials behavior from that used in conventional finite element methods.

  19. Effects of surface-conditioning methods on shear bond strength of brackets bonded to different all-ceramic materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saraç, Y Şinasi; Külünk, Tolga; Elekdağ-Türk, Selma; Saraç, Duygu; Türk, Tamer

    2011-12-01

    The aims of this study were to investigate the effects of two surface-conditioning methods on the shear bond strength (SBS) of metal brackets bonded to three different all-ceramic materials, and to evaluate the mode of failure after debonding. Twenty feldspathic, 20 fluoro-apatite, and 20 leucite-reinforced ceramic specimens were examined following two surface-conditioning methods: air-particle abrasion (APA) with 25 μm Al(2)O(3) and silica coating with 30 μm Al(2)O(3) particles modified by silica. After silane application, metal brackets were bonded with light cure composite and then stored in distilled water for 1 week and thermocycled (×1000 at 5-55°C for 30 seconds). The SBS of the brackets was measured on a universal testing machine. The ceramic surfaces were examined with a stereomicroscope to determine the amount of composite resin remaining using the adhesive remnant index. Two-way analysis of variance, Tukey's multiple comparison test, and Weibull analysis were used for evaluation of SBS. The lowest SBS was with APA for the fluoro-apatite ceramic (11.82 MPa), which was not significantly different from APA for the feldspathic ceramic (13.58 MPa). The SBS for the fluoro-apatite ceramic was significantly lower than that of leucite-reinforced ceramic with APA (14.82 MPa). The highest SBS value was obtained with silica coating of the leucite-reinforced ceramic (24.17 MPa), but this was not significantly different from the SBS for feldspathic and fluoro-apatite ceramic (23.51 and 22.18 MPa, respectively). The SBS values with silica coating showed significant differences from those of APA. For all samples, the adhesive failures were between the ceramic and composite resin. No ceramic fractures or cracks were observed. Chairside tribochemical silica coating significantly increased the mean bond strength values.

  20. Transparent garnet ceramic scintillators for gamma-ray detection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yimin; Baldoni, Gary; Rhodes, William H.; Brecher, Charles; Shah, Ananya; Shirwadkar, Urmila; Glodo, Jarek; Cherepy, Nerine; Payne, Stephen

    2012-10-01

    Lanthanide gallium/aluminum-based garnets have a great potential as host structures for scintillation materials for medical imaging. Particularly attractive features are their high density, chemical radiation stability and more importantly, their cubic structure and isotropic optical properties, which allow them to be fabricated into fully transparent, highperformance polycrystalline optical ceramics. Lutetium/gadolinium aluminum/gallium garnets (described by formulas ((Gd,Lu)3(Al,Ga)5O12:Ce, Gd3(Al,Ga)5O12:Ce and Lu3Al5O12:Pr)) feature high effective atomic number and good scintillation properties, which make them particularly attractive for Positron Emission Tomography (PET) and other γ- ray detection applications. The ceramic processing route offers an attractive alternative to single crystal growth for obtaining scintillator materials at relatively low temperatures and at a reasonable cost, with flexibility in dimension control as well as activator concentration adjustment. In this study, optically transparent polycrystalline ceramics mentioned above were prepared by the sintering-HIP approach, employing nano-sized starting powders. The properties and microstructures of the ceramics were controlled by varying the processing parameters during consolidation. Single-phase, high-density, transparent specimens were obtained after sintering followed by a pressure-assisted densification process, i.e. hot-isostatic-pressing. The transparent ceramics displayed high contact and distance transparency as well as high light yield as high as 60,000-65,000 ph/MeV under gamma-ray excitation, which is about 2 times that of a LSO:Ce single crystal. The excellent scintillation and optical properties make these materials promising candidates for medical imaging and γ-ray detection applications.

  1. High pressure ceramic heat exchanger

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harkins, Bruce D.; Ward, Michael E.

    1998-01-01

    Many recuperators have components which react to corrosive gases and are used in applications where the donor fluid includes highly corrosive gases. These recuperators have suffered reduced life, increased service or maintenance, and resulted in increased cost. The present header assembly when used with recuperators reduces the brittle effect of a portion of the ceramic components. Thus, the present header assembly used with the present recuperator increases the life, reduces the service and maintenance, and reduces the increased cost associated with corrosive action of components used to manufacture recuperators. The present header assembly is comprised of a first ceramic member, a second ceramic member, a strengthening reinforcing member being in spaced relationship to the first ceramic member and the second ceramic member. The header assembly is further comprised of a refractory material disposed in contacting relationship with the first ceramic member, the second ceramic member and the strengthening reinforcing member. The present header assembly provides a high strength load bearing header assembly having good thermal cycling characteristics, good resistance to a corrosive environment and good steady state strength at elevated temperatures.

  2. Tensile Bond Strength of Metal Bracket Bonding to Glazed Ceramic Surfaces With Different Surface Conditionings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Imani

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Objective: The objective of this study was to compare the tensile bond strength of metal brackets bonding to glazed ceramic surfaces using three various surface treatments.Materials and Methods: Forty two glazed ceramic disks were assigned to three groups. In the first and second groups the specimens were etched with 9.5% hydrofluoric acid (HFA. Subsequently in first group, ceramic primer and adhesive were applied, but in second group a bonding agent alone was used. In third group, specimens were treated with 35% phosphoric acid followed by ceramic primerand adhesive application. Brackets were bonded with light cure composites. The specimens were stored in distilled water in the room temperature for 24 hours and thermocycled 500 times between 5°C and 55°C. The universal testing machine was used to test the tensile bond strength and the adhesive remenant index scores between three groups was evaluated. The data were subjected to one-way ANOVA, Tukey and Kruskal-Wallis tests respectively.Results: The tensile bond strength was 3.69±0.52 MPa forfirst group, 2.69±0.91 MPa for second group and 3.60±0.41 MPa for third group. Group II specimens showed tensile strength values significantly different from other groups (P<0.01.Conclusion: In spite of limitations in laboratory studies it may be concluded that in application of Scotch bond multipurpose plus adhesive, phosphoric acid can be used instead of HFA for bonding brackets to the glazed ceramic restorations with enough tensile bond strength.

  3. Bond strength of adhesively luted ceramic discs to different core materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bozogullari, Nalan; Inan, Ozgur; Usumez, Aslihan

    2009-05-01

    The purpose of this in vitro study was to compare the shear bond strengths of resin, glass-ionomer, and ceramic-based core materials to all ceramic discs. Five core materials (Core max, Sankin; Clearfil AP-X, Kuraray; Empress Cosmo, Ivoclar-Vivadent; Photocore, Kuraray; Dyract Extra, Dentsply) were prepared as discs 10 mm in diameter and 2 mm in height according to the manufacturer's instructions. Ten disc specimens per group were prepared, and dentin served as the control. All resin specimens were embedded in autopolymerizing acrylic resin, with one surface facing up. All ceramic discs (IPS Empress I, Ivoclar-Vivadent) 3 mm in diameter and 2 mm in height were prepared and bonded to core specimens with a dual-curing luting resin cement (Variolink II, Vivadent). Specimens were stored in distilled water at 37 degrees C. Shear bond strength of each sample was measured after 24 h using a universal testing machine at a crosshead speed of 0.5 mm/min. The data were analyzed with one-way analysis of variance and Tukey HSD tests (alpha = 0.05). Shear bond strength varied significantly depending on the core material used (p strength value while Empress Cosmo provided the lowest (p Core-Max (p > 0.05). And also there were no statistically significant differences between Dyract Extra and the control group (p > 0.05). In vitro shear bond strengths of ceramic discs bonded to resin-based core materials showed higher bond strength values than ceramic-based core material.

  4. Ceramic Technology Project database: September 1990 summary report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Keyes, B.L.P.

    1992-06-01

    Data generated within the Ceramic Technology Project (CTP) represent a valuable resource for both research and industry. The CTP database was created to provide easy access to this information in electronic and hardcopy forms by using a computerized database and by issuing periodic hardcopy reports on the database contents. This report is the sixth in a series of semiannual database summaries and covers recent additions to the database, including joined brazed specimen test data. It covers 1 SiC, 34 SiN, 10 whisker-reinforced SiN, 2 zirconia-toughened aluminas, 8 zirconias, and 34 joints.

  5. Effect of Nd: YAG laser irradiation on surface properties and bond strength of zirconia ceramics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Li; Liu, Suogang; Song, Xiaomeng; Zhu, Qingping; Zhang, Wei

    2015-02-01

    This study investigated the effect of neodymium-doped yttrium aluminum garnet (Nd: YAG) laser irradiation on surface properties and bond strength of zirconia ceramics. Specimens of zirconia ceramic pieces were divided into 11 groups according to surface treatments as follows: one control group (no treatment), one air abrasion group, and nine laser groups (Nd: YAG irradiation). The laser groups were divided by applying with different output power (1, 2, or 3 W) and irradiation time (30, 60, or 90 s). Following surface treatments, the morphological characteristics of ceramic pieces was observed, and the surface roughness was measured. All specimens were bonded to resin cement. After, stored in water for 24 h and additionally aged by thermocycling, the shear bond strength was measured. Dunnett's t test and one-way ANOVA were performed as the statistical analyses for the surface roughness and the shear bond strength, respectively, with α = .05. Rougher surface of the ceramics could be obtained by laser irradiation with higher output power (2 and 3 W). However, cracks and defects were also found on material surface. The shear bond strength of laser groups was not obviously increased, and it was significantly lower than that of air abrasion group. No significant differences of the shear bond strength were found among laser groups treated with different output power or irradiation time. Nd: YAG laser irradiation cannot improve the surface properties of zirconia ceramics and cannot increase the bond strength of the ceramics. Enhancing irradiation power and extending irradiation time cannot induce higher bond strength of the ceramics and may cause material defect.

  6. Recycling of residual IGCC slags and their benefits as degreasers in ceramics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iglesias Martín, I; Acosta Echeverría, A; García-Romero, E

    2013-11-15

    This work studies the evolution of IGCC slag grains within a ceramic matrix fired at different temperatures to investigate the effect of using IGCC slag as a degreaser. Pressed ceramic specimens from two clay mixtures are used in this study. The M1 mixture is composed of standard clays, whereas the M2 mixture is composed of the same clay mixture as M1 mixture but contains 15% by weight IGCC slag. The amount of IGCC slag added coincides with the amount of slag typically used as a degreaser in the ceramic industry. Specimens are fired at 950 °C, 1000 °C, 1050 °C, 1100 °C and 1150 °C. The mineralogical composition and the IGCC slag grain shape within the ceramic matrix are determined by X-ray diffraction, polarized light microscopy and scanning electron microscopy. The results reveal that the surface of the slag grains is welded to the ceramic matrix while the quartz grains are separated, which causes increased water absorption and reduces the mechanical strength. IGCC slag, however, reduces water absorption. This behaviour is due to the softening temperature of the slag. This property is quite important from an industrial viewpoint because IGCC slag can serve as an alternative to traditional degreasing agents in the ceramic building industry. Additionally, using IGCC slag allows for the transformation of waste into a secondary raw material, thereby avoiding disposal at landfills; moreover, these industrial wastes are made inert and improve the properties of ceramics.

  7. Fracture Resistance and Mode of Failure of Ceramic versus Titanium Implant Abutments and Single Implant-Supported Restorations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sghaireen, Mohd G

    2015-06-01

    The material of choice for implant-supported restorations is affected by esthetic requirements and type of abutment. This study compares the fracture resistance of different types of implant abutments and implant-supported restorations and their mode of failure. Forty-five Oraltronics Pitt-Easy implants (Oraltronics Dental Implant Technology GmbH, Bremen, Germany) (4 mm diameter, 10 mm length) were embedded in clear autopolymerizing acrylic resin. The implants were randomly divided into three groups, A, B and C, of 15 implants each. In group A, titanium abutments and metal-ceramic crowns were used. In group B, zirconia ceramic abutments and In-Ceram Alumina crowns were used. In group C, zirconia ceramic abutments and IPS Empress Esthetic crowns were used. Specimens were tested to failure by applying load at 130° from horizontal plane using an Instron Universal Testing Machine. Subsequently, the mode of failure of each specimen was identified. Fracture resistance was significantly different between groups (p ceramic crowns supported by titanium abutments (p = .000). IPS Empress crowns supported by zirconia abutments had the lowest fracture loads (p = .000). Fracture modes of metal-ceramic crowns supported by titanium abutments included screw fracture and screw bending. Fracture of both crown and abutment was the dominant mode of failure of In-Ceram/IPS Empress crowns supported by zirconia abutments. Metal-ceramic crowns supported by titanium abutments were more resistant to fracture than In-Ceram crowns supported by zirconia abutments, which in turn were more resistant to fracture than IPS Empress crowns supported by zirconia abutments. In addition, failure modes of restorations supported by zirconia abutments were more catastrophic than those for restorations supported by titanium abutments. © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  8. Mechanical fatigue degradation of ceramics versus resin composites for dental restorations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belli, Renan; Geinzer, Eva; Muschweck, Anna; Petschelt, Anselm; Lohbauer, Ulrich

    2014-04-01

    For posterior partial restorations an overlap of indication exists where either ceramic or resin-based composite materials can be successfully applied. The aim of this study was to compare the fatigue resistance of modern dental ceramic materials versus dental resin composites in order to address such conflicts. Bar specimens of five ceramic materials and resin composites were produced according to ISO 4049 and stored for 14 days in distilled water at 37°C. The following ceramic materials were selected for testing: a high-strength zirconium dioxide (e.max ZirCAD, Ivoclar), a machinable lithium disilicate (e.max CAD, Ivoclar), a pressable lithium disilicate ceramic (e-max Press, Ivoclar), a fluorapatite-based glass-ceramic (e.max Ceram, Ivoclar), and a machinable color-graded feldspathic porcelain (Trilux Forte, Vita). The composite materials selected were: an indirect machinable composite (Lava Ultimate, 3M ESPE) and four direct composites with varying filler nature (Clearfil Majesty Posterior, Kuraray; GrandioSO, Voco; Tetric EvoCeram, Ivoclar-Vivadent; and CeramX Duo, Dentsply). Fifteen specimens were tested in water for initial strength (σin) in 4-point bending. Using the same test set-up, the residual flexural fatigue strength (σff) was determined using the staircase approach after 10(4) cycles at 0.5 Hz (n=25). Weibull parameters σ0 and m were calculated for the σin specimens, whereas the σff and strength loss in percentage were obtained from the fatigue experiment. The zirconium oxide ceramic showed the highest σin and σff (768 and 440 MPa, respectively). Although both lithium disilicate ceramics were similar in the static test, the pressable version showed a significantly higher fatigue resistance after cyclic loading. Both the fluorapatite-based and the feldspathic porcelain showed equivalent initial and cyclic fatigue properties. From the composites, the highest filled direct material Clearfil Majesty Posterior showed superior fatigue performance

  9. Ferroelectricity of multiferroic hexagonal TmMnO3 ceramics synthesized under high pressure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, L. J.; Feng, S. M.; Zhu, J. L.; Yu, R. C.; Jin, C. Q.; Yu, W.; Wang, X. H.; Li, L. T.

    2007-10-01

    Dense hexagonal TmMnO3 ceramics were synthesized by solid-state reaction technique combined with high-pressure treatment which significantly increased the density of ceramic samples. The crystal structure of the hexagonal TmMnO3 oxide was refined by using Rietveld analysis based on powder x-ray diffraction experiment. We observed obvious dielectric peaks through dielectric measurement on the specimen subjected to postannealing in oxygen atmosphere. A ferroelectric-paraelectric transition around 348°C is identified. Polarization-electric field hysteresis (P-E ) loop measurement proved the ferroelectricity of the sample at room temperature.

  10. Strength and Microstructure of Ceramics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1991-10-01

    34 microplasticity " stage in crack initiation from the flaw’ " for alumina ceramics has been carried out. Results of (from literal adaptations of the original...us to identify frontal-zone microcracking or even microplasticity . However. bridge degradation as a cause of the fatigue process. "Wear" direct...Ceramics", J. Aust. Ceram. Soc. 16 4-9. [24] A.W. Ruff and S.M. Wiederhorn (1979) "Erosion by Solid Particle Impact ", in Treatise on Materials Science and

  11. The Value of Agricultural Voucher Specimens

    OpenAIRE

    Barkworth,Mary; Wolf, Paul; Kinosian,Sylvia; Dyreson, Curtis; Pearse, Will; Brandt, Ben; Cobb,Neil

    2017-01-01

    Voucher specimens are the ultimate raw data of biodiversity studies because they document the interpretation of the names used in papers and reports resulting from such studies. The value of voucher specimens is increased by making their records web-accessible but they can be further enhanced by linking them to other online resources, particularly if the links are birectional.  In this presentation, we discuss the potential benefits of such links for a group of agricultural significance, the ...

  12. Fracture Strength of Zirconia and Alumina Ceramic Crowns Supported by Implants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Traini, Tonino; Sorrentino, Roberto; Gherlone, Enrico; Perfetti, Federico; Bollero, Patrizio; Zarone, Ferdinando

    2015-07-01

    Due to the brittleness and limited tensile strength of the veneering glass-ceramic materials, the methods that combine strong core material (as zirconia or alumina) are still under debate. The present study aims to evaluate the fracture strength and the mechanism of failure through fractographic analysis of single all-ceramic crowns supported by implants. Forty premolar cores were fabricated with CAD/CAM technology using alumina (n = 20) and zirconia (n = 20). The specimens were veneered with glass-ceramic, cemented on titanium abutments, and subjected to loading test until fracture. SEM fractographic analysis was also performed. The fracture load was 1165 (±509) N for alumina and 1638 (±662) N for zirconia with a statistically significant difference between the two groups (P = 0.026). Fractographic analysis of alumina-glass-ceramic crowns, showed the presence of catastrophic cracks through the entire thickness of the alumina core; for the zirconia-glass-ceramic crowns, the cracks involved mainly the thickness of the ceramic veneering layer. The sandblast procedure of the zirconia core influenced crack path deflection. Few samples (n = 3) showed limited microcracks of the zirconia core. Zirconia showed a significantly higher fracture strength value in implant-supported restorations, indicating the role played by the high resistant cores for premolar crowns.

  13. Novel fabrication method for zirconia restorations: bonding strength of machinable ceramic to zirconia with resin cements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuriyama, Soichi; Terui, Yuichi; Higuchi, Daisuke; Goto, Daisuke; Hotta, Yasuhiro; Manabe, Atsufumi; Miyazaki, Takashi

    2011-01-01

    A novel method was developed to fabricate all-ceramic restorations which comprised CAD/CAM-fabricated machinable ceramic bonded to CAD/CAM-fabricated zirconia framework using resin cement. The feasibility of this fabrication method was assessed in this study by investigating the bonding strength of a machinable ceramic to zirconia. A machinable ceramic was bonded to a zirconia plate using three kinds of resin cements: ResiCem (RE), Panavia (PA), and Multilink (ML). Conventional porcelain-fused-to-zirconia specimens were also prepared to serve as control. Shear bond strength test (SBT) and Schwickerath crack initiation test (SCT) were carried out. SBT revealed that PA (40.42 MPa) yielded a significantly higher bonding strength than RE (28.01 MPa) and ML (18.89 MPa). SCT revealed that the bonding strengths of test groups using resin cement were significantly higher than those of Control. Notably, the bonding strengths of RE and ML were above 25 MPa even after 10,000 times of thermal cycling -adequately meeting the ISO 9693 standard for metal-ceramic restorations. These results affirmed the feasibility of the novel fabrication method, in that a CAD/CAM-fabricated machinable ceramic is bonded to a CAD/CAM-fabricated zirconia framework using a resin cement.

  14. Effect of sintering temperature and composition on microstructure and properties of PMS-PZT ceramics

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    DU Hong-liang; PEI Zhi-bin; LI Zhi-min; LUO Fa; ZHU Dong-mei; ZHOU Wan-cheng; QU Shao-bo

    2006-01-01

    The piezoelectric ceramics xPb(Mn1/3Sb2/3)O3-(1-x)Pb(Zr1/2Ti1/2)O3 (abbreviated as PMS-PZT) were synthesized by traditional ceramics process. The effect of sintering temperature and the amount of Pb(Mn1/3Sb2/3)O3 (abbreviated as PMS) on phase structure,microstructure,piezoelectric and dielectric properties of PMS-PZT ceramics was investigated. The results show that the pure perovskite phase is in all ceramics specimens,the phase structure of PMS-PZT ceramics changes from tetragonal phase to single rhombohedral phase with the increasing amount of PMS. The dielectric constant -r,Curie temperature TC,electromechanical coupling factor kp and piezoelectric constant d33 decrease,whereas the mechanical quality factor Qm and dielectric loss tanδ increase with the increasing amount of PMS in system. The optimum sintering temperature is 1 200-1 250 ℃. It is concluded that the PMS-PZT (x=0.07) ceramics sintered at 1 250 ℃ is suitable for high-power piezoelectric transformer. These properties include -r=674.8,tanδ=0.005 25,kp=0.658,Qm1520,d33=230 pC/N,Tc=275 ℃.

  15. Effect finishing and polishing procedures on the surface roughness of IPS Empress 2 ceramic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boaventura, Juliana Maria Capelozza; Nishida, Rodrigo; Elossais, André Afif; Lima, Darlon Martins; Reis, José Mauricio Santos Nunes; Campos, Edson Alves; de Andrade, Marcelo Ferrarezi

    2013-01-01

    To evaluate the surface roughness of IPS Empress 2 ceramic when treated with different finishing/polishing protocols. Sixteen specimens of IPS Empress 2 ceramic were made from wax patterns obtained using a stainless steel split mold. The specimens were glazed (Stage 0-S0, control) and divided into two groups. The specimens in Group 1 (G1) were finished/polished with a KG Sorensen diamond point (S1), followed by KG Sorensen siliconized points (S2) and final polishing with diamond polish paste (S3). In Group 2 (G2), the specimens were finished/polished using a Shofu diamond point (S1), as well as Shofu siliconized points (S2) and final polishing was performed using Porcelize paste (S3). After glazing (S0) and following each polishing procedure (S1, S2 or S3), the surface roughness was measured using TALYSURF Series 2. The average surface roughness results were analyzed using ANOVA followed by Tukey post-hoc tests (α = 0.01) RESULTS: All of the polishing procedures yielded higher surface roughness values when compared to the control group (S0). S3 yielded lower surface roughness values when compared to S1 and S2. The proposed treatments negatively affected the surface roughness of the glazed IPS Empress 2 ceramic.

  16. Manifestation of Crystal Lattice Distortions in the IR Reflection Spectra of Abrasion-Treated ZnSe Ceramics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sitnikova, V. E.; Dunaev, A. A.; Mamalimov, R. I.; Pakhomov, P. M.; Khizhnyak, S. D.; Chmel, A. E.

    2017-07-01

    The Fourier IR reflection spectra of ZnSe ceramics prepared by hot pressing (HP), physical vapor deposition (PVD), and PVD combined with hot isostatic pressing (HIP) are presented. The optical constants of polished and dry-ground specimens were used for comparison. The grinding treatment simulated the erosion of the outer surface of optical elements made of zinc selenide under the influence of solid dust particles and deposits. In the polished specimens residual stresses showed up in the IR reflection spectra of the ZnSePVD and ZnSeHIP ceramics, which had well-defined orientation of grains, but were not present in the spectra of the ZnSeHIP ceramics as a result of mutual compensation of the stresses in the randomly oriented grains of the material. The stresses, which appeared as a shift of the absorption bands calculated by the Kramers-Kronig method, increased significantly after abrasive treatment of the specimens. For all the treated ceramics the intensity of the absorption bands resulting from the anharmonicity of the vibrations in the distorted crystal lattice increased by several times. The last effect also depends on the production prehistory of the ceramics.

  17. [The effect of solid phase transformation on the metal-ceramic compatibility of Co-Cr alloy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Zhikai; Xu, Sheng; Li, Ning

    2011-12-01

    To study the effect of solid phase transformation on the metal-ceramic compatibility of Co-Cr alloy during firing programs. 9 foils of Co-Cr and Ni-Cr alloy with the dimension of 25 mmx3 mmx0.5 mm were casted using lost wax technology respectively. Among them, 6 specimens were subjected to metal-ceramic bonding strength test (three point bending method), the ceramic layer of 3 specimens were removed for X-ray diffraction (XRD) analysis. One cylindrical specimen of each alloy was casted for the test of coefficient of thermal expansion, cooling curves were recorded. The metal-ceramic bonding strength of Ni-Cr, Co-Cr alloy was (49.1 +/- 3.40), (40.9 +/- 2.02) MPa respectively. There was significant difference between the two groups' bonding strength (P = 0.00). The coefficient of thermal expansion in the 20-500 degrees C interval of Ni-Cr and Co-Cr alloy was 13.9 x 10(-6), 13.8 x 10(-6) x K(-1) respectively. XRD analysis indicated that the microstructure of Ni-Cr alloy was austenite. While Co-Cr alloy was constituted by fcc phase, hcp phase and sigma phase. During the cooling procedure, the transformation of fcc phase to hcp phase and segregation of needle-like sigma phase intensify the linear contraction speed of Co-Cr alloy, which decreases the metal-ceramic adaptability.

  18. 16 CFR Figure 6 to Subpart A of... - Dummy Specimen in Specimen Holder

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 16 Commercial Practices 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Dummy Specimen in Specimen Holder 6 Figure 6 to Subpart A of Part 1209 Commercial Practices CONSUMER PRODUCT SAFETY COMMISSION CONSUMER PRODUCT SAFETY ACT REGULATIONS INTERIM SAFETY STANDARD FOR CELLULOSE INSULATION The Standard Pt. 1209, Subpt. A...

  19. The effect of silane applied to glass ceramics on surface structure and bonding strength at different temperatures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eraslan, Oguz

    2016-01-01

    PURPOSE To evaluate the effect of various surface treatments on the surface structure and shear bond strength (SBS) of different ceramics. MATERIALS AND METHODS 288 specimens (lithium-disilicate, leucite-reinforced, and glass infiltrated zirconia) were first divided into two groups according to the resin cement used, and were later divided into four groups according to the given surface treatments: G1 (hydrofluoric acid (HF)+silane), G2 (silane alone-no heat-treatment), G3 (silane alone-then dried with 60℃ heat-treatment), and G4 (silane alone-then dried with 100℃ heat-treatment). Two different adhesive luting systems were applied onto the ceramic discs in all groups. SBS (in MPa) was calculated from the failure load per bonded area (in N/mm2). Subsequently, one specimen from each group was prepared for SEM evaluation of the separated-resin–ceramic interface. RESULTS SBS values of G1 were significantly higher than those of the other groups in the lithium disilicate ceramic and leucite reinforced ceramic, and the SBS values of G4 and G1 were significantly higher than those of G2 and G3 in glass infiltrated zirconia. The three-way ANOVA revealed that the SBS values were significantly affected by the type of resin cement (Pacid etching. The surface topography of ceramics was affected by surface treatments. PMID:27141250

  20. Influence of silane and heated silane on the bond strength of lithium disilicate ceramics - An in vitro study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abduljabbar, Tariq; AlQahtani, Mohammed Ayedh; Jeaidi, Zaid Al; Vohra, Fahim

    2016-01-01

    Objectives: To evaluate the effect of silane application and silane heat treatment on lithium-disilicate ceramic when bonded to composite resin. Methods: Twelve blocks of lithium-disilicate (LD) ceramic were fabricated and bonding surfaces were etched using 9.5% hydrofluoric acid (90 seconds). Three experimental groups resulted from the various surface treatment combinations, which included, no silane application (NS) (controls), silane application (S) and silane heat treatment (HS) (100°C for 5 minutesutes). Ceramic and composite resin blocks were bonded using an adhesive resin and light cured restorative composite as a luting agent, under standard conditions. A total of 90 specimen sticks (8 x 1mm²) were subjected to micro-tensile bond strength testing. The means of micro-tensile bond strength (µ-tbs) of the study groups were analyzed using t-test and ANOVA. The tested specimens were analyzed for mode of failure using scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Results: The highest µ-tbs value (42.6 ±3.70 MPa) was achieved for LD ceramics with heat-dried silane. Both silane application and heat treatment of silane resulted in significant (pmicro-tensile bond strength of LD ceramics when bonded to resin composite. Conclusions: The application of silane and its heat treatment showed significant improvement in bond strength of lithium disilicate ceramic when bonded to composite. PMID:27375687

  1. Fabrication of functionally gradient materials with internal channels in ceramics and ceramic composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shin, Hyea-Weon

    composition of layered FGMs and non-uniformities introduced in the fabrication process (possibly during powder compaction) give rise to non-uniform densification behavior, which leads to warping, cracking, and the development of residual stress both within the layers and along layer boundaries. As a remedy, powders of different particle size are mixed within component layers, and the effect of particle mixture on final specimen curvature is shown. The optimal mixture ratio gives a flat layer, wherein the effects of thermal expansion and densification are balanced. Different pressing procedures and layer-stacking orders have also been used to minimize warping; these are viewed as optional, complementary steps to particle mixing. A study of the difference between conventional and microwave heating is also presented. The main interest has been to quantify the different sintering behavior associated with conventional heating and microwave heating. Finally, scanning electron microscopy and energy dispersive spectroscopy are used to illustrate the gradual changes in element composition across the thickness of the produced functionally gradient ceramic plates.

  2. Ceramic-like wear behaviour of human dental enamel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arsecularatne, J A; Hoffman, M

    2012-04-01

    This paper reports a transmission electron microscopy (TEM) analysis of subsurfaces of enamel specimens following in vitro reciprocating wear tests with an enamel cusp sliding on a flat enamel specimen under hydrated conditions. The obtained results show that crack formation occurred in the wear scar subsurface. The path followed by these cracks seems to be dictated either by the histological structure of enamel or by the contact stress field. Moreover, the analysis of a set of enamel wear results obtained from the literature and application of fracture-based models, originally developed for ceramics, correlate well, confirming the similar wear processes taking place in these materials. This analysis also reveals a marked influence of coefficient of friction on the enamel wear rate: for a higher coefficient of friction value, enamel wear can be severe even under forces generated during normal operation of teeth. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Detecting Damage in Ceramic Matrix Composites Using Electrical Resistance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Craig E.; Gyekenyesi, Andrew

    2011-01-01

    The majority of damage in SiC/SiC ceramic matrix composites subjected to monotonic tensile loads is in the form of distributed matrix cracks. These cracks initiate near stress concentrations, such as 90 deg fiber tows or large matrix pores and continue to accumulate with additional stress until matrix crack saturation is achieved. Such damage is difficult to detect with conventional nondestructive evaluation techniques (immersion ultrasonics, x-ray, etc.). Monitoring a specimen.s electrical resistance change provides an indirect approach for monitoring matrix crack density. Sylramic-iBN fiber- reinforced SiC composites with a melt infiltrated (MI) matrix were tensile tested at room temperature. Results showed an increase in resistance of more than 500% prior to fracture, which can be detected either in situ or post-damage. A relationship between resistance change and matrix crack density was also determined.

  4. Detecting Cracks in Ceramic Matrix Composites by Electrical Resistance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Craig; Gyekenyesi, Andrew

    2011-01-01

    The majority of damage in SiC/SiC ceramic matrix composites subjected to monotonic tensile loads is in the form of distributed matrix cracks. These cracks initiate near stress concentrations, such as 90o fiber tows or large matrix pores and continue to accumulate with additional stress until matrix crack saturation is achieved. Such damage is difficult to detect with conventional nondestructive evaluation techniques (immersion ultrasonics, x-ray, etc.). Monitoring a specimen.s electrical resistance change provides an indirect approach for monitoring matrix crack density. Sylramic-iBN fiber- reinforced SiC composites with a melt infiltrated (MI) matrix were tensile tested at room temperature. Results showed an increase in resistance of more than 500% prior to fracture, which can be detected either in situ or post-damage. A relationship between resistance change and matrix crack density was also determined.

  5. Program For Evaluation Of Reliability Of Ceramic Parts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nemeth, N.; Janosik, L. A.; Gyekenyesi, J. P.; Powers, Lynn M.

    1996-01-01

    CARES/LIFE predicts probability of failure of monolithic ceramic component as function of service time. Assesses risk that component fractures prematurely as result of subcritical crack growth (SCG). Effect of proof testing of components prior to service also considered. Coupled to such commercially available finite-element programs as ANSYS, ABAQUS, MARC, MSC/NASTRAN, and COSMOS/M. Also retains all capabilities of previous CARES code, which includes estimation of fast-fracture component reliability and Weibull parameters from inert strength (without SCG contributing to failure) specimen data. Estimates parameters that characterize SCG from specimen data as well. Written in ANSI FORTRAN 77 to be machine-independent. Program runs on any computer in which sufficient addressable memory (at least 8MB) and FORTRAN 77 compiler available. For IBM-compatible personal computer with minimum 640K memory, limited program available (CARES/PC, COSMIC number LEW-15248).

  6. Long Term Fatigue Behavior of Zirconia Based Dental Ceramics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Moustafa N. Aboushelib

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available This study evaluated the influence of cyclic loading on zirconia bar-shaped specimens after being subjected to three different surface treatments: particle abrasion with either 50 μm or 110 μm alumina and grinding with diamond points, while polished specimens served as a control. Statistical analysis revealed significant reduction (38-67% in flexure strength (P < 0.001 after three million cycles of dynamic loading for all surface treatments. Scanning electron imaging revealed grain boundary thickening, grain pull-out, and micro-cracking as the main structural defects. The results suggest that various surface treatments of zirconia based dental ceramics may significantly influence their long term fatigue resistance in the oral environment.

  7. Creep in electronic ceramics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Routbort, J. L.; Goretta, K. C.; Arellano-Lopez, A. R.

    2000-04-27

    High-temperature creep measurements combined with microstructural investigations can be used to elucidate deformation mechanisms that can be related to the diffusion kinetics and defect chemistry of the minority species. This paper will review the theoretical basis for this correlation and illustrate it with examples from some important electronic ceramics having a perovskite structure. Recent results on BaTiO{sub 3}, (La{sub 1{minus}x}Sr){sub 1{minus}y}MnO{sub 3+{delta}}, YBa{sub 2}Cu{sub 3}O{sub x}, Bi{sub 2}Sr{sub 2}CaCu{sub 2}O{sub x}, (Bi,Pb){sub 2}Sr{sub 2}Ca{sub 2}Cu{sub 3}O{sub x} and Sr(Fe,Co){sub 1.5}O{sub x} will be presented.

  8. Low Thermal Expansion Glass Ceramics

    CERN Document Server

    Bach, Hans

    2005-01-01

    This book appears in the authoritative series reporting the international research and development activities conducted by the Schott group of companies. This series provides an overview of Schott's activities for scientists, engineers, and managers from all branches of industry worldwide in which glasses and glass ceramics are of interest. Each volume begins with a chapter providing a general idea of the current problems, results, and trends relating to the subjects treated. This new extended edition describes the fundamental principles, the manufacturing process, and applications of low thermal expansion glass ceramics. The composition, structure, and stability of polycrystalline materials having a low thermal expansion are described, and it is shown how low thermal expansion glass ceramics can be manufactured from appropriately chosen glass compositions. Examples illustrate the formation of this type of glass ceramic by utilizing normal production processes together with controlled crystallization. Thus g...

  9. Bringing Ceramic Parts to Earth

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    履之

    1995-01-01

    The benefits of using ceramic engine components are well known:They are tougher than metal parts, weigh less, and can withstand hotter operating temperatures.So why aren’t they being used now? High cost.

  10. Recent progress in ceramic joining

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Loehman, R.E.

    1998-09-01

    Both fundamental and practical aspects of ceramic joining are understood well enough for many, if not most, applications requiring moderate strengths at room temperature. This paper argues that the two greatest needs in ceramic joining are for techniques to join buried interfaces by selective heating, and methods for joining ceramics for use at temperatures of 800 to 1,200 C. Heating with microwave radiation or with high-energy electron beams has been used to join buried ceramic interfaces, for example SiC to SiC. Joints with varying levels of strength at temperatures of 600 to 1,000 C have been made using four techniques: (1) transient liquid phase bonding; (2) joining with refractory braze alloys; (3) joining with refractory glass compositions; and (4) joining using preceramic polymers. Joint strengths as high as 550 MPa at 1,000 C have been reported for silicon nitride-silicon nitride bonds tested in four-point flexure.

  11. 37 CFR 2.56 - Specimens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... indicate membership in the collective organization. (5) A certification mark specimen must show how a... of a union or other organization performed the work or labor on the goods or services. (c) A... be a digitized image in .jpg or .pdf format....

  12. Bond strength of the porcelain repair system to all-ceramic copings and porcelain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Sang J; Cheong, Chan Wook; Wright, Robert F; Chang, Brian M

    2014-02-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the shear bond strength of the porcelain repair system on alumina and zirconia core ceramics, comparing this strength with that of veneering porcelain. Veneering ceramic (n = 12), alumina core (n = 24), and zirconia core (n = 24) blocks measuring 10 × 5 × 5 mm(3) were fabricated. Veneering ceramic blocks were used as the control. Alumina and zirconia core blocks were divided into 2 groups (n = 12 each), and a slot (2 × 2 × 4 mm(3)) filled with veneering ceramics was prepared into one of the alumina and zirconia core groups (n = 12). Followed by surface treatments of micro-abrasion with 30 μm alumina particles, etching with 35% phosphoric acid and silane primer and bond, composite resin blocks (2 × 2 × 2 mm(3)) were built up and light polymerized onto the treated surfaces by 3 configurations: (a) composite blocks bonded onto veneering ceramic surface alone, (b) composite blocks bonded onto alumina core or zirconia core surfaces, (c) a 50% surface area of the composite blocks bonded to veneering ceramics and the other 50% surface area of the composite blocks to alumina core or zirconia core surfaces. The shear bond strength of the composite to each specimen was tested by a universal testing machine at a 0.5 mm/min crosshead speed. The shear bond strength was analyzed by unpaired t-tests for within the configuration groups and ANOVA for among the different configuration groups. When the mean shear bond strength was compared within groups of the same configuration, there were no statistically significant differences. Comparison of the shear bond strength among groups of different configurations revealed statistically significant differences. The mean shear bond strength of composite onto 100% veneering ceramic surface and composite onto 50% veneering 50% all-ceramic cores was statistically higher than that of composite onto 100% all-ceramic cores; however, the differences of the shear bond strength of composite bonded

  13. Contact fatigue mechanisms as a function of crystal aspect ratio in baria-silicate glass ceramics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suputtamongkol, Kallaya

    2003-10-01

    Ceramic materials are potentially useful for dental applications because of their esthetic potential and biocompatibility. However, the existence of fatigue damage in ceramics raises considerable concern regarding its effect on the life prediction of dental prostheses. During normal mastication, dental restorations are subjected to repeated loading more than a thousand times per day and relatively high clinical failure rates for ceramic prostheses have been reported. To simulate the intraoral loads, Hertzian indentation loading was used in this study to characterize the fatigue failure mechanisms of ceramic materials using clinically relevant parameters. The baria-silicate system was chosen because of the nearly identical composition between the crystal and the glass matrix. Little or no residual stress is expected from the elastic modulus and thermal expansion mismatches between the two phases. Crystallites with different aspect ratios can also be produced by controlled heat treatment schedules. The objective of this study was to characterize the effect of crystal morphology on the fatigue mechanisms of bariasilicate glass-ceramics under clinically relevant conditions. The results show that the failure of materials with a low toughness such as baria-silicate glass (0.7 MPa•m1/2) and glass-ceramic with an aspect ratio of 3/1 (1.3 MPa•m1/2) initiated from a cone crack developed during cyclic loading for 103 to 105 cycles. The mean strength values of baria-silicate glass and glass-ceramic with an aspect ratio of 3/1 decreased significantly as a result of the presence of a cone crack. Failure of baria-silicate glass-ceramics with an aspect ratio of 8/1 (Kc = 2.1 MPa•m1/2) was initiated from surface flaws caused by either polishing or cyclic loading. The gradual decrease of fracture stress was observed in specimens with an aspect ratio of 8/1 after loading in air for 103 to 10 5 cycles. A reduction of approximately 50% in fracture stress levels was found for

  14. Ceramic Forum International yearbook 2005

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reh, H. (ed.)

    2004-12-01

    This is the second English-language edition of our 'ceramic forum international Yearbook'. In this year's 'Ceramics World', the perpetually updated textbook section, you will find papers surveying the already in technical ceramics established fields of 'bioceramics' and 'ceramic armouring'. From the traditional ceramics sector, from which news of more and more innovations have been reaching us in recent months, we have picked out 'decorating processes for ceramic tiles' as these are currently enjoying an undreamt-of boom thanks to the development of completely new shaping processes. A soundly researched study on 'rheology in ceramics' completes this section of the yearbook. Interested ceramists will again find everything they need for their day-to-day work - the index will help them to find the information they need fast. This information is available under the following headings: (A) Product News: Short notes on outstanding new machines, kilns, plants and equipment as well as new raw materials on the market, supplied by both European and overseas suppliers. (B) Abstracts: A compilation of abridged articles, all of which published during the last 12 months, discussing interesting processes and products or new directions in research. (C) ESD - European Suppliers Directory: Who supplies what? In English, German, Spanish, Italian and French with about 220 company entries. (D) Appendix: Listing ceramics laboratories in Europe; the periodic system; the most important physical units and the conversion of older ones to SI units (and vice versa); essential formulas for use in the ceramist's daily practice. (orig.)

  15. Method for preparing ceramic composite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alexander, Kathleen B.; Tiegs, Terry N.; Becher, Paul F.; Waters, Shirley B.

    1996-01-01

    A process for preparing ceramic composite comprising blending TiC particulates, Al.sub.2 O.sub.3 particulates and nickle aluminide and consolidating the mixture at a temperature and pressure sufficient to produce a densified ceramic composite having fracture toughness equal to or greater than 7 MPa m.sup.1/2, a hardness equal to or greater than 18 GPa.

  16. Nano-Ceramic Coated Plastics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cho, Junghyun

    2013-01-01

    Plastic products, due to their durability, safety, and low manufacturing cost, are now rapidly replacing cookware items traditionally made of glass and ceramics. Despite this trend, some still prefer relatively expensive and more fragile ceramic/glassware because plastics can deteriorate over time after exposure to foods, which can generate odors, bad appearance, and/or color change. Nano-ceramic coatings can eliminate these drawbacks while still retaining the advantages of the plastic, since the coating only alters the surface of the plastic. The surface coating adds functionality to the plastics such as self-cleaning and disinfectant capabilities that result from a photocatalytic effect of certain ceramic systems. These ceramic coatings can also provide non-stick surfaces and higher temperature capabilities for the base plastics without resorting to ceramic or glass materials. Titanium dioxide (TiO2) and zinc oxide (ZnO) are the candidates for a nano-ceramic coating to deposit on the plastics or plastic films used in cookware and kitchenware. Both are wide-bandgap semiconductors (3.0 to 3.2 eV for TiO2 and 3.2 to 3.3 eV for ZnO), so they exhibit a photocatalytic property under ultraviolet (UV) light. This will lead to decomposition of organic compounds. Decomposed products can be easily washed off by water, so the use of detergents will be minimal. High-crystalline film with large surface area for the reaction is essential to guarantee good photocatalytic performance of these oxides. Low-temperature processing (nano-ceramic coatings (TiO2, ZnO) on plastic materials (silicone, Teflon, PET, etc.) that can possess both photocatalytic oxide properties and flexible plastic properties. Processing cost is low and it does not require any expensive equipment investment. Processing can be scalable to current manufacturing infrastructure.

  17. Rehydration of forensically important larval Diptera specimens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanford, Michelle R; Pechal, Jennifer L; Tomberlin, Jeffery K

    2011-01-01

    Established procedures for collecting and preserving evidence are essential for all forensic disciplines to be accepted in court and by the forensic community at large. Entomological evidence, such as Diptera larvae, are primarily preserved in ethanol, which can evaporate over time, resulting in the dehydration of specimens. In this study, methods used for rehydrating specimens were compared. The changes in larval specimens with respect to larval length and weight for three forensically important blow fly (Diptera: Calliphoridae) species in North America were quantified. Phormia regina (Meigen), Cochliomyia macellaria (F.), and Chrysomya rufifacies (Macquart) third-instar larvae were collected from various decomposing animals and preserved with three preservation methods (80% ethanol, 70% isopropyl alcohol, and hot-water kill then 80% ethanol). Preservative solutions were allowed to evaporate. Rehydration was attempted with either of the following: 80% ethanol, commercial trisodium phosphate substitute solution, or 0.5% trisodium phosphate solution. All three methods partially restored weight and length of specimens recorded before preservation. Analysis of variance results indicated that effects of preservation, rehydration treatment, and collection animal were different in each species. The interaction between preservative method and rehydration treatment had a significant effect on both P. regina and C. macellaria larval length and weight. In addition, there was a significant interaction effect of collection animal on larval C. macellaria measurements. No significant effect was observed in C. rufifacies larval length or weight among the preservatives or treatments. These methods could be used to establish a standard operating procedure for dealing with dehydrated larval specimens in forensic investigations.

  18. Investigation of mechanical properties based on grain growth and microstructure evolution of alumina ceramics during two step sintering process

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khan, U. A.; Hussain, A.; Shah, M.; Shuaib, M.; Qayyum, F.

    2016-08-01

    Alumina ceramics having small grain size and high density yield good mechanical properties, which are required in most mechanical applications. Two Step Sintering (TSS) is used to develop dense alumina ceramics. In this research work the effect of sintering temperatures on microstructure and density of the alumina specimens developed by using TSS has been investigated. It has been observed that TSS is more efficient in controlling grain growth and increasing the density as compared to One Step Sintering (OSS) of alumina. Scanning electron micrographs of sintered alumina specimens have been compared. It has been observed that TSS proves to be a better technique for increasing density and controlling grain growth of alumina ceramics than OSS. More relative density, hardness, fracture toughness and small grain size was achieved by using TSS over OSS technique.

  19. Ceramic materials and growth factors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ohgushi, H.; Yoshikawa, T.; Okumura, M.; Nakajima, H.; Takakura, Y. [Nara Medical Univ. (Japan). Dept. of Orhtopaedic Surgery; Dohi, Y. [Nara Medical Univ. (Japan). Dept. of Public Health; Noshi, T.; Ikeuchi, M. [Nara Medical Univ. (Japan). Dept. of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery

    2001-07-01

    Recently, many types of growth factors have been purified and used for promoting cell differentiation cascade. The activity of growth factors can be detected in vitro such as culture condition. However, the activity is difficult to detect when these factors are locally administered in vivo, because these dissipate soon after the administration. In order to retain growth factors in local milieu, these can be incorporated with biocompatible porous ceramic materials. Such ceramic/factors composites when implanted in vivo, can trigger certain types of cell differentiation cascade resulted in new tissue formation and tissue regeneration. The paper describes the ceramic / growth factors composites especially hydroxyapatite ceramic (HA) / bone morphogenetic protein (BMP) composite to induce osteoblastic differentiation of mesenchymal stem cells. The HA/BMP composite supported the osteoblastic differentiation on the HA surface and finally resulted in bone bonding to the HA. When the marrow mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) were impregnated in pore areas of HA ceramics, the composites showed more and rapid bone formation than the HA/BMP and HA/MSCs composite, indicating the synergistic effect of BMP and MSCs. These findings indicate the importance of ceramic surface to evoke osteoblastic differentiation as well as to capture the molecules of growth factors for the cell differentiation. (orig.)

  20. Microwave sintering of ceramic materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karayannis, V. G.

    2016-11-01

    In the present study, the potential of microwave irradiation as an innovative energy- efficient alternative to conventional heating technologies in ceramic manufacturing is reviewed, addressing the advantages/disadvantages, while also commenting on future applications of possible commercial interest. Ceramic materials have been extensively studied and used due to several advantages they exhibit. Sintering ceramics using microwave radiation, a novel technology widely employed in various fields, can be an efficient, economic and environmentally-friendlier approach, to improve the consolidation efficiency and reduce the processing cycle-time, in order to attain substantial energy and cost savings. Microwave sintering provides efficient internal heating, as energy is supplied directly and penetrates the material. Since energy transfer occurs at a molecular level, heat is generated throughout the material, thus avoiding significant temperature gradients between the surface and the interior, which are frequently encountered at high heating rates upon conventional sintering. Thus, rapid, volumetric and uniform heating of various raw materials and secondary resources for ceramic production is possible, with limited grain coarsening, leading to accelerated densification, and uniform and fine-grained microstructures, with enhanced mechanical performance. This is particularly important for manufacturing large-size ceramic products of quality, and also for specialty ceramic materials such as bioceramics and electroceramics. Critical parameters for the process optimization, including the electromagnetic field distribution, microwave-material interaction, heat transfer mechanisms and material transformations, should be taken into consideration.

  1. Effects of surface-finishing protocols on the roughness, color change, and translucency of different ceramic systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akar, Gülcan Coşkun; Pekkan, Gürel; Çal, Ebru; Eskitaşçıoğlu, Gürcan; Özcan, Mutlu

    2014-08-01

    Surface-finishing protocols have a mechanical impact on ceramic surfaces that could eventually affect surface topography and light scattering. An optimum protocol is needed to avoid damaging the optical properties of ceramics. The purpose of this study was to determine the effects of different surface-finishing protocols on the surface roughness, color change, and translucency of ceramic and metal ceramic restorations. Standardized disk-shaped specimens (1.5 × 10 mm, n=128) were fabricated from 3 different ceramic core materials (aluminum oxide [Al2O3]-AL, zirconium oxide [ZrO2]-ZR, lithium disilicate [Li2Si2O5]-LIT), veneered (V) with dentin ceramics (n=32 per group), and placed in the following groups: ALV, ZRV, and LITV. The metal ceramic group acted as the control (n=32). Four different surface-finishing methods were tested. Airborne-particle abrasion with 50 μm Al2O3, polishing with adjustment kit, polishing with adjustment kit plus diamond polishing paste, and autoglazing (n=8 subgroup) were applied on the veneering ceramics. The specimens were analyzed with a profilometer for surface roughness, and color change and translucency were measured with a clinical spectrophotometer. Statistical analyses were performed with 1-way ANOVA and the Tukey honest significant difference tests (α=.05). Specimens treated with the airborne particle abrasion method showed significantly higher mean profilometer for surface roughness values in all groups (P.05). With the diamond polishing paste method, lower surface roughness values were achieved in the ZRV and metal ceramic groups acted as the control groups. Different surface-finishing methods affected the color change of the ceramic systems, except for ZRV. Surface-finishing protocols significantly affected the translucency values of the ALV, LITV, and metal ceramic groups (Pceramics tested. The airborne-particle abrasion protocol created rougher surfaces and decreased translucency, and color change in zirconia was not

  2. Spectrophotometric evaluation of the influence of different backgrounds on the color of glass-infiltrated ceramic veneers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Charisis, Dimitrios; Koutayas, Spiridon-Oumvertos; Kamposiora, Photini; Doukoudakis, Asterios

    2006-08-01

    The purpose of this spectrophotometric study was to evaluate the influence of different color backgrounds on Vita In-Ceram (Vident) glass-infiltrated ceramic veneers. A total of 50 color background disks were fabricated from Vitadur Alpha 2M2 (n=30) and 5M1 (n=20) dentin porcelain (Vi-dent). Ceramic veneer disks were fabricated from In-Ceram Spinell (n=20) or In-Ceram Alumina (n=20) glass-infiltrated core veneered using Vitadur Alpha 2M2 dentin porcelain. In addition, 10 ceramic veneer disks were fabricated from feldspathic dentin porcelain Vitadur Alpha 2M2. The ceramic veneer specimens were bonded onto the color background specimens using dual-curing luting composite cement, creating the following groups (each n=10): S2M2 (Spinell/2M2), S5M1 (Spinell/5M1), A2M2 (Alumina/2M2), A5M1 (Alumina/5M1), and control (Vitadur Alpha/2M2). L*a*b* color coordinates were measured five times for each specimen using a Vita Easyshade (Vident) spectrophotometer. Mean color differences (deltaE) between each study group and the control group were: 3.79 for S2M2; 7.24 for S5M1; 5.86 for A2M2, and 7.32 for A5M1. Two-way ANOVA showed statistically significant differences in deltaE between all groups. However, a t test revealed that the statistically significant differences only existed between groups S2M2/S5M1, A2M2/A5M1, and S2M2/A2M2. The results suggest that vacuum infiltration with a translucent glass provides the Spinell and Alumina ceramic veneers with increased semi-translucency, which makes them highly influenced by discolored backgrounds. In-Ceram Spinell glass-infiltrated ceramic veneers could be considered as an alternative to conventional feldspathic veneers for the restoration of nondiscolored teeth. Although Spinell and Alumina ceramic veneers could enhance the final color establishment of discolored teeth, the results would not be clinically acceptable.

  3. Evaluation of the surface roughness in dental ceramics submitted to different finishing and polishing methods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vieira, Alex C; Oliveira, Mario C S; Lima, Emilena M C X; Rambob, Isabel; Leite, Mariana

    2013-09-01

    Ceramic restorations have been widely used in dentistry. These restorations often require intraoral adjustment with diamond burs after their cementation causing increasing roughness of the ceramic surface. Consequently some finishing and polishing methods have been used to minimize this occurrence. The aim of this study is to evaluate the roughness of the ceramic surfaces submitted to different finishing and polishing methods. 144 specimens of VITAVM(®)7, VM(®)9 and VM(®)13 (VITA Zahnfabrik) ceramics were fabricated and submitted to grinding using diamond burs. They were then divided into 15 groups (five of each ceramic type). Groups 1, 6 and 11-positive control (Glaze); Groups 2, 7 and 12-negative control (no polishing); Groups 3, 8 and 13-polished with abrasive rubbers (Edenta), felt disc and diamond polishing past; Groups 4, 9 and 14-polished with abrasive rubbers (Shofu), felt disc and diamond polishing past; Groups 5, 10 and 15-polished with aluminum oxide discs (Sof-Lex, 3M-ESPE), felt disc and diamond polishing paste. The roughness of the samples surfaces were measured using the rugosimeter Surfcorder SE 1700 and the data were submitted to statistical analysis using ANOVA and Tukey test at a level of significance of 5 %. There was statistically significance difference between the positive control groups and the other groups in all the ceramic types. Mechanical finishing and polishing methods were not able to provide a surface as smooth as the glazed surface for the tested ceramics. To assist dental practitioners to select the best finishing and polishing methods for the final adjustment of the ceramic restorations.

  4. Ferroelectric ceramics in a pyroelectric accelerator

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shchagin, A. V., E-mail: shchagin@kipt.kharkov.ua [Kharkov Institute of Physics and Technology, Kharkov 61108 (Ukraine); Belgorod State University, Belgorod 308015 (Russian Federation); Miroshnik, V. S.; Volkov, V. I. [Kharkov Institute of Physics and Technology, Kharkov 61108 (Ukraine); Oleinik, A. N. [Belgorod State University, Belgorod 308015 (Russian Federation)

    2015-12-07

    The applicability of polarized ferroelectric ceramics as a pyroelectric in a pyroelectric accelerator is shown by experiments. The spectra of X-ray radiation of energy up to tens of keV, generated by accelerated electrons, have been measured on heating and cooling of the ceramics in vacuum. It is suggested that curved layers of polarized ferroelectric ceramics be used as elements of ceramic pyroelectric accelerators. Besides, nanotubes and nanowires manufactured from ferroelectric ceramics are proposed for the use in nanometer-scale ceramic pyroelectric nanoaccelerators for future applications in nanotechnologies.

  5. Microstructure and electrical properties of potassium strontium niobate (KSr{sub 2}Nb{sub 5}O{sub 15}) ceramics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, Liangliang, E-mail: liuliangliang_2004@163.com [State Key Laboratory of Solidification Processing, College of Material Science and Engineering, Northwestern Polytechnical University, Xi’an 710072 (China); Gao, Feng; Hu, Guoxin [State Key Laboratory of Solidification Processing, College of Material Science and Engineering, Northwestern Polytechnical University, Xi’an 710072 (China); Liu, Jiangnan [State Key Laboratory of Solidification Processing, College of Material Science and Engineering, Northwestern Polytechnical University, Xi’an 710072 (China); School of Materials and Chemical Engineering, Xi’an Technological University, Xi’an 710032 (China); Li, Jinjin [State Key Laboratory of Solidification Processing, College of Material Science and Engineering, Northwestern Polytechnical University, Xi’an 710072 (China)

    2013-12-15

    Highlights: •The high-density KSr{sub 2}Nb{sub 5}O{sub 15} (KSN) ceramics were successfully synthesized. •The seed addition was favorable to the densification of KSN ceramics. •The pinched loops were observed in the KSN ceramics. •This work lays down principles for preparing dense KSN textured ceramics by the (R)TGG method. -- Abstract: High-density tungsten bronze KSr{sub 2}Nb{sub 5}O{sub 15} (KSN) ceramics doped with 2 mol% Bi{sub 2}O{sub 3} were synthesized by using a conventional two-step sintering method with KSN seed. The effects of KSN seed content on microstructure and electric properties of the ceramics were investigated. It was found that the seed addition was favorable to the densification of KSN ceramics. The specimen with 25 mol% seed exhibited the best electric properties with values of D{sub t} = 23.53%, P{sub r} = 3.23 μC/cm{sup 2} and d{sub 33} = 64 pC/N. In addition, pinched loops (ferroelectric hysteresis, P–E curve) were observed in the KSN ceramics, which may lead to novel application in nonlinear actuators. This work provided information on the interrelation between seed content and subsequent properties when preparing dense KSN textured ceramics by using (R)TGG method.

  6. Sintering and microstructure of silicon carbide ceramic with Y3Al5O12 added by sol-gel method

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    GUO Xing-zhong; YANG Hui

    2005-01-01

    Silicon carbide (SiC) ceramic with YAG (Y3Al5O12) additive added by sol-gel method was liquid-phase sintered at different sintering temperatures, and the sintering mechanism and microstructural characteristics of resulting silicon carbide ceramics were analyzed by X-ray diffraction (XRD), scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and elemental distribution of surface (EDS). YAG (yttrium aluminum garnet) phase formed before the sintering and its uniform distribution in the SiC/YAG composite powder decreased the sintering temperature and improved the densification of SiC ceramic. The suitable sintering temperature was 860 ℃ with the specimen sintered at this temperature having superior sintering and mechanical properties, smaller crystal size and fewer microstructure defects. Three characteristics of improved toughness of SiC ceramic with YAG added by sol-gel method were microstructural densification, main-crack deflection and crystal ‘bridging'.

  7. Effect of brushing with conventional versus whitening dentifrices on surface roughness and biofilm formation of dental ceramics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Azevedo, Sarina Maciel Braga; Kantorski, Karla Zanini; Valandro, Luiz Felipe; Bottino, Marco Antonio; Pavanelli, Carlos Augusto

    2012-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of conventional and whitening dentifrices on the weight loss, surface roughness, and early in situ biofilm formation on the surface of dental ceramics. Standardized feldspar ceramic specimens (Vita VM7 and Vita VM13) were submitted to the following experimental conditions: no brushing; brushing without a dentifrice; brushing with a conventional dentifrice; and brushing with a whitening dentifrice. A brushing machine was used to simulate brushing. The mass and surface roughness of all specimens from the test groups were evaluated prior to and after brushing. Ten participants used an oral device for eight hours to evaluate the biofilm formed in situ on the specimens. Scanning electron microscopy was used for qualitative and quantitative analysis of the biofilm. ANOVA and Tukey tests were used to analyze the results of weight loss, surface roughness, and presence of bacteria. A one-way Kruskal-Wallis test was used for bacterial colonization results. For both ceramics, brushing with a whitening dentifrice resulted in weight loss that was significantly greater when compared to brushing without a dentifrice or with a conventional dentifrice. Increased surface roughness was noticed on VM13 ceramic samples with both dentifrices, whereas only conventional dentifrice had a significant effect on the surface roughness of VM7 samples. For both VM7 and VM13, no difference was found between the experimental conditions with regard to the presence or number of bacteria. Cocci and short rods were the predominant microbial morphotypes. Granular or fibrillar acellular material partially covered the specimens. Brushing with a whitening dentifrice resulted in significant weight loss of ceramic restorations, while brushing with both conventional and whitening dentifrices can roughen ceramic surfaces. The increase in roughness was not clinically significant to contribute to increased biofilm formation.

  8. Osteogenesis process of tricalcium phosphate ceramics in vivo

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    戴红莲; 李世普; 闫玉华; 李小溪; 贾莉

    2003-01-01

    To investigate the osteogenesis of calcium phosphate ceramics, β-TCP ceramics were implanted into thecondyle femur of rabbits, and tetracycline was injected termly. Specimens were host at 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6 months af-ter implanted. The new bone formation and osteogenesis process were observed by the histomorphology, fluorescentmicroscope, SEM and EPMA. The results demonstrate that, osteogenesis is active, there are abundant osteoblastson the surface of osteoid, mesenchymal cell hyperplasia and incursion is found in materials after 1 month. After 2months, there is blood vessel formation and macrophage soakage within materials. Bone-island appears and connectsby bone-bridge after 3 months. β-TCP ceramics degrade and are dispersed by new formation bone. Woven boneturns into bone lamella by rebuilding and calcification. The materials entirely change their original shape and com-bines with bone tissue as a whole after 6 months. The typical structure of spongy bone forms. It is confirmed thatβ-TCP is a degradable biocompatible artificial bone material which can incorporating in life.

  9. Preparation and properties of highly porous, biomorphic YSZ ceramics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rambo, C.R.; Cao, J.; Sieber, H

    2004-10-15

    Highly porous, biomorphic YSZ (yttria-stabilized zirconia) ceramics were manufactured by infiltration of zirconium-oxychloride (ZrOCl{sub 2}{center_dot}8H{sub 2}O) sol into biological template structures derived from rattan and pine wood. 3-5 mol% yttrium nitrate (Y(NO{sub 3}){sub 3}{center_dot}5H{sub 2}O) was added to the sol to stabilize the tetragonal ZrO{sub 2} phase. After vacuum-assisted infiltration, the specimens were pyrolysed at 800 deg. C in N{sub 2} atmosphere. Repeated infiltrations and subsequent annealing in air at temperatures up to 1550 deg. C yields the burn out of the biocarbon template and resulted in the formation of biomorphous YSZ ceramics, which maintained the microstructural features of the biological preform. Depending on the type of the biological template as well as the processing parameters, biomorphic ZrO{sub 2} ceramics with an unidirected pore morphology and a large variety of microstructures can be obtained.

  10. Use of basaltic waste as red ceramic raw material

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. M. Mendes

    Full Text Available Abstract Nowadays, environmental codes restrict the emission of particulate matters, which result in these residues being collected by plant filters. This basaltic waste came from construction aggregate plants located in the Metropolitan Region of Londrina (State of Paraná, Brazil. Initially, the basaltic waste was submitted to sieving (< 75 μm and the powder obtained was characterized in terms of density and particle size distribution. The plasticity of ceramic mass containing 0%, 10%, 20%, 30%, 40% and 50% of basaltic waste was measured by Atterberg method. The chemical composition of ceramic formulations containing 0% and 20% of basaltic waste was determined by X-ray fluorescence. The prismatic samples were molded by extrusion and fired at 850 °C. The specimens were also tested to determine density, water absorption, drying and firing shrinkages, flexural strength, and Young's modulus. Microstructure evaluation was conducted by scanning electron microscopy, X-ray diffraction, and mercury intrusion porosimetry. Basaltic powder has similar physical and chemical characteristics when compared to other raw materials, and contributes to ceramic processing by reducing drying and firing shrinkage. Mechanical performance of mixtures containing basaltic powder is equivalent to mixtures without waste. Microstructural aspects such as pore size distribution were modified by basaltic powder; albite phase related to basaltic powder was identified by X-ray diffraction.

  11. Micro powder-injection moulding of metals and ceramics

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Volker Piotter; Thomas Gietzelt; Lothar Merz

    2003-02-01

    Development of micro-MIM/-CIM was started at Forschungszentrum Karlsruhe with the aim of creating a process suitable for a wide range of materials as well as for medium-scale and large-scale production of micro components. Using enhanced machine technology and special tempering procedures, this process enables the manufacturing of metal and ceramic devices with smallest wall thicknesses of 50 m and structural details of less than 3 m. Using ultra-fine ceramic powders (e.g. zirconia) and high-quality LIGA mould inserts, surface qualities of $R_a =$ 40 nm or $R_{\\text{max}} \\leq$ 3 mm could be obtained. Possible practical applications are demonstrated by components of micro-annular gear pumps made of zirconia for future handling of very small volumes of dangerous fluids and micro samples (tensile and bending specimens) suitable for mechanical testing of metals (316L, 17-4PH) and ceramic materials (Al23, ZrO2) in the micrometre range.

  12. Storing Waste in Ceramic

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bourcier, W L; Sickafus, K

    2004-07-20

    Not all the nuclear waste destined for Yucca Mountain is in the form of spent fuel. Some of it will be radioactive waste generated from the production of nuclear weapons. This so-called defense waste exists mainly as corrosive liquids and sludge in underground tanks. An essential task of the U.S. high-level radioactive waste program is to process these defense wastes into a solid material--called a waste form. An ideal waste form would be extremely durable and unreactive with other repository materials. It would be simple to fabricate remotely so that it could be safely transported to a repository for permanent storage. What's more, the material should be able to tolerate exposure to intense radiation without degradation. And to minimize waste volume, the material must be able to contain high concentrations of radionuclides. The material most likely to be used for immobilization of radioactive waste is glass. Glasses are produced by rapid cooling of high-temperature liquids such that the liquid-like non-periodic structure is preserved at lower temperatures. This rapid cooling does not allow enough time for thermodynamically stable crystalline phases (mineral species) to form. In spite of their thermodynamic instability, glasses can persist for millions of years. An alternate to glass is a ceramic waste form--an assemblage of mineral-like crystalline solids that incorporate radionuclides into their structures. The crystalline phases are thermodynamically stable at the temperature of their synthesis; ceramics therefore tend to be more durable than glasses. Ceramic waste forms are fabricated at temperatures below their melting points and so avoid the danger of handling molten radioactive liquid--a danger that exists with incorporation of waste in glasses. The waste form provides a repository's first line of defense against release of radionuclides. It, along with the canister, is the barrier in the repository over which we have the most control. When a waste

  13. Performance of Ceramics in Severe Environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacobson, Nathan S.; Fox, Dennis S.; Smialek, James L.; Deliacorte, Christopher; Lee, Kang N.

    2005-01-01

    Ceramics are generally stable to higher temperatures than most metals and alloys. Thus the development of high temperature structural ceramics has been an area of active research for many years. While the dream of a ceramic heat engine still faces many challenges, niche markets are developing for these materials at high temperatures. In these applications, ceramics are exposed not only to high temperatures but also aggressive gases and deposits. In this chapter we review the response of ceramic materials to these environments. We discuss corrosion mechanisms, the relative importance of a particular corrodent, and, where available, corrosion rates. Most of the available corrosion information is on silicon carbide (SIC) and silicon nitride (Si3N4) monolithic ceramics. These materials form a stable film of silica (SO2) in an oxidizing environment. We begin with a discussion of oxidation of these materials and proceed to the effects of other corrodents such as water vapor and salt deposits. We also discuss oxidation and corrosion of other ceramics: precurser derived ceramics, ceramic matrix composites (CMCs), ceramics which form oxide scales other than silica, and oxide ceramics. Many of the corrosion issues discussed can be mitigated with refractory oxide coatings and we discuss the current status of this active area of research. Ultimately, the concern of corrosion is loss of load bearing capability. We discuss the effects of corrosive environments on the strength of ceramics, both monolithic and composite. We conclude with a discussion of high temperature wear of ceramics, another important form of degradation at high temperatures.

  14. Survey report on high temperature irradiation experiment programs for new ceramic materials in the HTTR (High Temperature Engineering Test Reactor). 2

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1999-02-01

    A survey research on status of research activities on new ceramic materials in Japan was carried out under contract between Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute and Atomic Energy Society of Japan. The purpose of the survey is to provide information to prioritize prospective experiments and tests in the HTTR. The HTTR as a high temperature gas cooled reactor has a unique and superior capability to irradiate large-volumed specimen at high temperature up to approximately 800degC. The survey was focused on mainly the activities of functional ceramics and heat resisting ceramics as a kind of structural ceramics. As the result, the report recommends that the irradiation experiment of functional ceramics is feasible to date. (K. Itami)

  15. Fundamental studies of ceramic/metal interfacial reactions at elevated temperatures.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McDeavitt, S. M.; Billings, G. W.; Indacochea, J. E.

    2000-12-14

    This work characterizes the interfaces resulting from exposing oxide and non-oxide ceramic substrates to zirconium metal and stainless steel-zirconium containing alloys. The ceramic/metal systems together were preheated at about 600 C and then the temperatures were increased to the test maximum temperature, which exceeded 1800 C, in an atmosphere of high purity argon. Metal samples were placed onto ceramic substrates, and the system was heated to elevated temperatures past the melting point of the metallic specimen. After a short stay at the peak temperature, the system was cooled to room temperature and examined. The chemical changes across the interface and other microstructural developments were analyzed with energy dispersive spectroscopy (EDS). This paper reports on the condition of the interfaces in the different systems studied and describes possible mechanisms influencing the microstructure.

  16. Wear resistance of ceramic coating on AZ91 magnesium alloy by micro-arc oxidation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHAO Hui; LIU Zheng; CHEN Li-jia; CHEN Ji; HAN Zhong

    2006-01-01

    The ceramic coating formed on AZ91 magnesium alloy by micro-arc oxidation (MAO) was characterized. The results show that the ceramic coating(3.4-23 μm in thickness)on the surface of AZ91 alloy was attained under different micro-arc oxidation treatment conditions, which consist mainly of MgO, Mg2SiO4 and MgSiO3 phases. Nano-hardness in a cross-sectional specimen was determined by nano-indentation experiment. The MAO coatings exhibit higher hardness than the substrate. Dry sliding wear tests for the MAO coatings and AZ91 alloy were also carried out using an oscillating friction and wear tester in a ball-on-disc contact configuration. The wear resistance of the MAO coatings is improved respectively under different treatment time as a result of different structures of ceramic coatings formed on AZ91 alloy.

  17. Porosity Detection in Ceramic Armor Tiles via Ultrasonic Time-Of

    Science.gov (United States)

    Margetan, Frank J.; Richter, Nathaniel; Jensen, Terrence

    2011-06-01

    Some multilayer armor panels contain ceramic tiles as one constituent, and porosity in the tiles can affect armor performance. It is well known that porosity in ceramic materials leads to a decrease in ultrasonic velocity. We report on a feasibility study exploring the use of ultrasonic time-of-flight (TOF) to locate and characterize porous regions in armor tiles. The tiles in question typically have well-controlled thickness, thus simplifying the translation of TOF data into velocity data. By combining UT velocity measurements and X-ray absorption measurements on selected specimens, one can construct a calibration curve relating velocity to porosity. That relationship can then be used to translate typical ultrasonic C-scans of TOF-versus-position into C-scans of porosity-versus-position. This procedure is demonstrated for pulse/echo, focused-transducer inspections of silicon carbide (SiC) ceramic tiles.

  18. Wear of human enamel opposing monolithic zirconia, glass ceramic, and composite resin: an in vitro study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sripetchdanond, Jeerapa; Leevailoj, Chalermpol

    2014-11-01

    Demand is increasing for ceramic and composite resin posterior restorations. However, ceramics are recognized for their high abrasiveness to opposing dental structure. The purpose of this study was to investigate the wear of enamel as opposed to dental ceramics and composite resin. Twenty-four test specimens (antagonists), 6 each of monolithic zirconia, glass ceramic, composite resin, and enamel, were prepared into cylindrical rods. Enamel specimens were prepared from 24 extracted human permanent molar teeth. Enamel specimens were abraded against each type of antagonist with a pin-on-disk wear tester under a constant load of 25 N at 20 rpm for 4800 cycles. The maximum depth of wear (Dmax), mean depth of wear (Da), and mean surface roughness (Ra) of the enamel specimens were measured with a profilometer. All data were statistically analyzed by 1-way ANOVA, followed by the Tukey test (α=.05). A paired t test was used to compare the Ra of enamel at baseline and after testing. The wear of both the enamel and antagonists was evaluated qualitatively with scanning electron microscopic images. No significant differences were found in enamel wear depth (Dmax, Da) between monolithic zirconia (2.17 ±0.80, 1.83 ±0.75 μm) and composite resin (1.70 ±0.92, 1.37 ±0.81 μm) or between glass ceramic (8.54 ±2.31, 7.32 ±2.06 μm) and enamel (10.72 ±6.31, 8.81 ±5.16 μm). Significant differences were found when the enamel wear depth caused by monolithic zirconia and composite resin was compared with that of glass ceramic and enamel (Pcomposite resin resulted in less wear depth to human enamel compared with glass ceramic and enamel. All test materials except composite resin similarly increased the enamel surface roughness after wear testing. Copyright © 2014 Editorial Council for the Journal of Prosthetic Dentistry. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. On Construction Technology of Plate-type Ballastless Track for 350km/h Railway Switch%时速350km铁路道岔板式无砟轨道施工工艺研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李同海

    2012-01-01

    铁路道岔是列车安全运行必须通过的“咽喉”区,高速铁路道岔铺设的平顺性和总体施工质量,更是至关重要,决定着高速列车的平稳通过和安全运行。通过石武客运专线工程的施工实践,进一步探索和研究高速铁路道岔板式无砟轨道的施工工艺,使其不断完善和成熟,较好地实现道岔铺设的平顺性,保证工程总体质量,取得一定效果。%he railway switch is a "throat" for the running of trains. The smoothness and overall construction quality of the laying of high-speed railway switch guarantee the successful passing and safe running of high-speed trains. Through construction practice of Shijiazhuang-Wuhan passenger line project, this paper further explores, researches and improves the construction technology of plate-type ballastless track for high-speed railway switch, which better realizes the smoothness of switch laying, ensures the overall construction quality and achieves a certain effect.

  20. Analysis on the `Thermite` reaction consequences in accidents involving research reactors using plate-type fuel; Analisis sobre las concequencias de la reaccion `Termita` en caso de accidentes en reactores de investigacion que utilizan combustible tipo placa

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boero, Norma L.; Bruno, Hernan R.; Camacho, Esteban F.; Cincotta, Daniel O.; Yorio, Daniel [Comision Nacional de Energia Atomica, San Carlos de Bariloche (Argentina). Centro Atomico Constituyentes

    1999-11-01

    The mixture of Al-U{sub 3} O{sub 8} is not in a state of chemical equilibrium, and at temperatures of between 850 deg C and 1000 deg C, it reacts exo thermally. This is known, in corresponding bibliography as a `Thermite reaction. This mixture is used in the manufacturing of the plate-type fuel used in research reactors. It has been pointed out that the release of energy caused by this type of reactions might represent a risk in case of accidents in this type of reactor. Conclusions, in general, tend to indicate that no such risk exists, although no concrete assurance is given that this is the case, and this fact, therefore, leaves room for doubt. The objective of this paper is to provide an in-depth study of what happens to a fuel plate when it is subjected to thermite reaction. We will, furthermore, analyze the consequences of the release of energy generated by this type of reaction within the core of the reactor, clearly defining the problem for this type of fuel and this kind of reactor. (author) 3 refs., 9 figs., 1 tab.

  1. Breast specimen shrinkage following formalin fixation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Horn CL

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Christopher L Horn, Christopher Naugler Department of Pathology and Laboratory Medicine, University of Calgary, and Calgary Laboratory Services, Calgary, AB, Canada Abstract: Accurate measurement of primary breast tumors and subsequent surgical margin assessment is critical for pathology reporting and resulting patient therapy. Anecdotal observations from pathology laboratory staff indicate possible shrinkage of breast cancer specimens due to the formalin fixation process. As a result, we conducted a prospective study to investigate the possible shrinkage effects of formalin fixation on breast cancer specimens. The results revealed no significant changes in tumor size, but there were significant changes in the distance to all surgical resection margins from the unfixed to fixed state. This shrinkage effect could interfere with the accuracy of determining distance to margin assessment and tumor-free margin assessment. Thus, changes in these measurements due to the formalin fixation process have the potential to alter treatment options for the patient. Keywords: breast margins, formalin, shrinkage, cancer

  2. Is routine histopathology of tonsil specimen necessary?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Agida S Adoga

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Tonsillar diseases are common in paediatric and adult otolaryngological practice. These diseases require tonsillectomy. Specimens are subjected to histopathology routinely in my institution for fear of infections and tumour without consideration for risk factors. The financial burden is on the patients and waste of histopathologist′s man hour because other specimens are left un-attended. This study aims to find out the necessity of routine histopathology of tonsil specimens. Materials and Methods : A 2 year retrospective review of the histopathological results of two (paediatric and adult groups of 61 patients managed for tonsillar diseases at the ENT UNIT of Jos University Teaching Hospital from July 2005 to June, 2007. Data extracted included biodata, clinical features and histopathological diagnosis. Result : The 61 patients comprise 35 children and 26 adults. The youngest and oldest paediatric patients were 1 year and 3 months and 16 years respectively, a range of 1 year 3 months to 16 years. The youngest and oldest adults were 17 and 50 years with a range of 17-50 years. Groups mean ages were 5.1 and 28.5 years. The gender ratios were 1:2.7 and 1:1.9 respectively. One adult was HIV positive. The histopathological diagnosis were chronic nonspecific tonsillitis in 10(16.6%, follicular tonsillitis in 23(38.3%, chronic suppurative tonsillitis in 10(16.6%, lymphoid hyperplasia in 18(30.0% and lymphoma in 1(1.0% respectively. Conclusion : Histopathologic request for tonsillectomy specimens should be based on certain risk factors with consideration of the cost to patients and to spare the histopathologist′s man hour.

  3. SQA specimen paper 2013, national 5, French

    CERN Document Server

    SQA

    2013-01-01

    Practise for your exam on the offical National 5 specimen paper from the Scottish Qualifications Authority. Plus each book includes additional model papers and extra revision guidance, making them an essential purchase for any student.; Discover how to get your best grade with answers checked by senior examiners.; Prepare for your exams with study skills guidance sections.; Gain vital extra marks and avoid common mistakes with examiner tips

  4. Damage modeling in Small Punch Test specimens

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Martínez Pañeda, Emilio; Cuesta, I.I.; Peñuelas, I.

    2016-01-01

    Ductile damage modeling within the Small Punch Test (SPT) is extensively investigated. The capabilities ofthe SPT to reliably estimate fracture and damage properties are thoroughly discussed and emphasis isplaced on the use of notched specimens. First, different notch profiles are analyzed...... and constraint conditionsquantified. The role of the notch shape is comprehensively examined from both triaxiality and notchfabrication perspectives. Afterwards, a methodology is presented to extract the micromechanical-basedductile damage parameters from the load-displacement curve of notched SPT samples...

  5. Bond Strength of Resin Cement and Glass Ionomer to Nd:YAG Laser-Treated Zirconia Ceramics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asadzadeh, Nafiseh; Ghorbanian, Foojan; Ahrary, Farzaneh; Rajati Haghi, Hamidreza; Karamad, Reza; Yari, Amir; Javan, Abdollah

    2017-09-05

    To investigate the effect of neodymium-doped yttrium aluminum garnet (Nd:YAG) laser irradiation on the surface properties and bond strength of zirconia ceramics. Forty-eight zirconia ceramic pieces (4 × 4 × 1 mm(3) ) were divided into four groups according to surface treatment as follows: two control groups (no treatment) for resin bonding (CRC) and glass ionomer (GI) bonding (CGC); two laser treatment groups (Nd:YAG irradiation, 3 W, 200 MJ, 10 Hz, 180 μs) for resin bonding (LRC) and GI bonding (LGC). The ceramics in the control groups and the laser groups were distinguished by the application of different cements (resin cement and GI). Following surface treatments, the specimens were cemented to human dentin with resin cement and GI. After bonding, the shear bond strength (SBS) of the ceramic to dentin was measured, and the failure mode of each specimen was analyzed using a stereomicroscope. A one-way ANOVA compared the average bond strength of the four groups. Pairwise comparisons among the groups were performed using the Games-Howell test. The level of significance was set at 0.05. The means (± standard deviation) of SBS values in the CRC, CGC, LRC, and LGC groups were 3.98 ± 1.10, 1.66 ± 0.59, 10.24 ± 2.46, and 2.21 ± 0.38 MPa, respectively. Data showed that the application of the Nd:YAG laser resulted in a significantly greater SBS of the resin cement to the zirconia ceramics (p nd 83.3% in the LRC and LGC groups, respectively. In the CGC group, all failures were adhesive. Pretreatment of zirconia ceramic via Nd:YAG laser improves the bond strength of the resin cement to the zirconia ceramic. GI cement does not provide sufficient bond strength of zirconia ceramics to dentin. © 2017 by the American College of Prosthodontists.

  6. High incidence of squeaking in THAs with alumina ceramic-on-ceramic bearings.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Keurentjes, J.C.; Kuipers, R.M.; Wever, D.J.; Schreurs, B.W.

    2008-01-01

    Ceramic-on-ceramic bearings in THA are a popular alternative to overcome wear concerns in traditional metal-polyethylene bearings. However, squeaking is a potentially worrisome phenomenon in ceramic-on-ceramic THAs which we observed in some of our patients. We reviewed all 42 patients who underwent

  7. Characterization of ceramic bodies to produce bricks from Campos Goytacazes, Brazil; Caracterizacao de massas de blocos de vedacao de Campos dos Goytacazes, Brasil

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Almeida, L.L.P. de; Maia, F.S.; Petrucci, L.J.T.; Pessanha, E.M.; Paixao, L.P. [Faetec, Campos dos Goytacazes, RJ (Brazil). Centro Vocacional Tecnologico. Ceramica; Vieira, C.M.F. [Universidade Estadual do Norte Fluminense Darcy Ribeiro (UENF), Campos dos Goytacazes, RJ (Brazil)

    2010-07-01

    This work has for objective to study comparatively the characteristics and technological properties of four typical ceramic bodies from the region of Campos dos Goytacazes-RJ used to fabricate red ceramics. The characterization techniques used were: X-ray fluorescence, X-ray diffraction, differential thermal analysis (DTA), thermogravimetric analysis (TGA) and dilatometry. Specimens were molded by extrusion and then fired at 750, 850 and 950 deg C. The evaluated firing properties were: linear shrinkage and water absorption. The results showed that the investigated ceramic bodies have similar chemical and mineralogical composition. It is also concluded that the bodies are adequate to produce bricks. (author)

  8. Incidental prostate cancer in radical cystoprostatectomy specimens

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xiao-Dong Jin; Zhao-Dian Chen; Bo Wang; Song-Liang Cai; Xiao-Lin Yao; Bai-Ye Jin

    2008-01-01

    Aim: To investigate the rates of prostate cancer (Pca) in radical cystoprostatectomy (RCP) specimens for bladder cancer in mainland China. To determine the follow-up outcome of patients with two concurrent cancers and identify whether prostate-specific antigen (PSA) is a useful tool for the detection of Pca prior to surgery. Methods: From January 2002 to January 2007, 264 male patients with bladder cancer underwent RCP at our center. All patients underwent digital rectal examination (DRE) and B ultrasound. Serum PSA levels were tested in 168 patients. None of the patients had any evidence of Pca before RCP. Entire prostates were embedded and sectioned at 5 mm intervals. Results: Incidental Pca was observed in 37 of 264 (14.0%) RCP specimens. Of these, 12 (32.4%) were clinically significant according to an accepted definition. The PSA levels were not significantly different between patients with Pca and those without Pca, nor between patients with significant Pca and those with insignificant Pca. Thirty-four patients with incidental Pca were followed up. During a mean follow-up period of 26 months, two patients with PSA > 4 ng/mL underwent castration. None of the patients died of Pca. Conclusion: The incidence of Pca in RCP specimens in mainland China is lower than that in most developed countries. PSA cannot identify asymptomatic Pca prior to RCP. In line with published reports, incidental Pca does not impact the prognosis of bladder cancer patients undergoing RCP.

  9. Bond strength of resin cement to zirconia ceramic with different surface treatments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Usumez, Aslıhan; Hamdemirci, Nermin; Koroglu, Bilge Yuksel; Simsek, Irfan; Parlar, Ozge; Sari, Tugrul

    2013-01-01

    Zirconia-based ceramics offer strong restorations in dentistry, but the adhesive bond strength of resin cements to such ceramics is not optimal. This study evaluated the influence of surface treatments on the bond strength of resin cement to yttrium-stabilized tetragonal zirconia (Y-TZP) ceramic. Seventy-five plates of Y-TZP ceramic were randomly assigned to five groups (n = 15) according to the surface treatments [airborne particle abrasion, neodymium-doped yttrium aluminum garnet (Nd:YAG) laser irradiation (Fidelis Plus 3, Fotona; 2 W, 200 mJ, 10 Hz, with two different pulse durations 180 or 320 μs), glaze applied, and then 9.5 % hydrofluoric acid gel conditioned, control]. One specimen from each group was randomly selected, and specimens were evaluated with x-ray diffraction and SEM analysis. The resin cement (Clearfil Esthetic Cement, Kuraray) was adhered onto the zirconia surfaces with its corresponding adhesive components. Shear bond strength of each sample was measured using a universal testing machine at a crosshead speed of 1 mm/min. Bond strengths were analyzed through one-way ANOVA/Tukey tests. Surface treatments significantly modified the topography of the Y-TZP ceramic. The Nd:YAG laser-irradiated specimens resulted in both increased surface roughness and bond strength of the resin cement. The highest surface roughness and bond strength values were achieved with short pulse duration. Nd:YAG laser irradiation increased both surface roughness of Y-TZP surfaces and bond strength of resin cement to the zirconia surface.

  10. Preparation and Characteristic of Glass-Ceramics with Super Low Thermal Expansion Coefficient

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2006-01-01

    The preparation technics of glass-ceramics with super low coefficient of thermal expansion containing β-quartz solid solution as a main crystal phase based on the glass in the system Li2O-Al2O3-SiO2 was introduced. The composition of base glass, technics of melting and heat treatment effecting on characteristic of glass-ceramics was described. Specimens were prepared by melting, anneal and controlled two steps heat treatment. Crystal phase, microstructure and elementary distributing were studied by using XRD, SEM and EDS respectively. Prepared specimens show excellent transparency and super low thermal expansion coefficient of 2×10-8 ·K-1, which reaches international advanced level.

  11. Bond strength, microhardness, and core/veneer interface quality of an all-ceramic system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fahmy, Nadia Z

    2010-02-01

    This study was designed to evaluate three veneering materials for an all-ceramic alumina system in terms of bond strength, microhardness, and core/veneer interface quality. Fifteen In-Ceram cores were constructed for this study, forming three groups of five specimens each divided by the veneering ceramic disc fired on the occlusal surface of the alumina core: Vitadur N, Vitadur Alpha, or VM7. The specimens underwent shear bond and microhardness testing. Gross examination of debonded discs by SEM and EDAX analysis was conducted. Data for shear bond strength (SBS) and microhardness were presented as means and standard deviation (SD) values. One-way ANOVA and Duncan's post hoc test were used for pairwise comparison between the means when ANOVA test was significant. VM7 showed the highest shear bond value and lowest microhardness values of the three tested veneering materials. No statistically significant difference was evident between the SBSs of Vitadur N and Vitadur Alpha to the alumina cores. Vitadur Alpha showed statistically the highest mean VHN, followed by Vitadur N, while VM7 showed statistically the lowest mean values of VHN. In-Ceram core/Vitadur N disc debondings appeared to be interfacial by complete delaminations, leaving a shiny visible and quite distinct area, whereas there appeared to be perfect adhesion between the core and VM7 veneering material. VM7 appeared to possess ultra-fine texture with intimate contact to the core, forming what seemed like a transition zone where the ceramic and core appeared to blend for a distance. VM7's finer particle size has improved the core/veneer bond strength and decreased micohardness values. This new veneering material will probably enhance the performance and esthetics of the In-Ceram system.

  12. Surface degradation of glass ceramics after exposure to acidulated phosphate fluoride

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vanessa Z.S. Ccahuana

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: This study evaluated the surface degradation effect of acidulated phosphate fluoride (APF gel exposure on the glassy matrix ceramics as a function of time. MATERIAL AND METHODS: Disc-shaped ceramic specimens (N = 120, 10/per ceramic material were prepared in stainless steel molds (inner diameter: 5 mm, height: 2 mm using 6 dental ceramics: 3 indicated for ceramic-fused-to-metal (Vita Omega 900, Carmen and Vita Titankeramik, 2 for all-ceramic (Vitadur Alpha and Finesse® Low Fusing and 1 for both types of restorations (IPS d.SIGN. The specimens were wet ground finished, ultrasonically cleaned and auto-glazed. All specimens were subjected to calculation of percentage of mass loss, surface roughness analysis and topographical description by scanning electron microscopy (SEM before (0 min and after exposure to 1.23 % APF gel for 4 min and 60 min representing short- and long-term etching effect, respectively. The data were analyzed using two-way ANOVA with repeated measures and Tukey's test (a=0.05. RESULTS: Significant effect of the type of the ceramics (p=0.0000, p=0.0031 and exposure time (p=0.0000 was observed in both surface roughness and percentage of mass loss values, respectively. The interaction factor between both parameters was also significant for both parameters (p=0.0904, p=0.0258. Both 4 min (0.44±0.1 - 0.81±0.2 mm and 60 min (0.66±0.1 - 1.04±0.3 mm APF gel exposure created significantly more surface roughness for all groups when compared to the control groups (0.33±0.2 - 0.68±0.2 mm (p0.05 but at 60 min exposure, IPS d.SIGN showed the highest percentage of mass loss (0.1151±0.11. The mean surface roughness for Vita Titankeramik (0.84±0.2 mm and Finesse® Low Fusing (0.74.±0.2 mm was significantly higher than those of the other ceramics (0.59±0.1 mm - 0.49±0.1 mm and Vita Titankeramik (p<0.05 regardless of the exposure time. A positive correlation was found between surface roughness and percentage of mass loss for

  13. III Advanced Ceramics and Applications Conference

    CERN Document Server

    Gadow, Rainer; Mitic, Vojislav; Obradovic, Nina

    2016-01-01

    This is the Proceedings of III Advanced Ceramics and Applications conference, held in Belgrade, Serbia in 2014. It contains 25 papers on various subjects regarding preparation, characterization and application of advanced ceramic materials.

  14. Origin and Development of Chinese Ceramics

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    1993-01-01

    CERAMICS is animportant partof traditionalChinese culture and re-flects the wisdomand creativity of theCinese people.Kilnsfrom many differentdynasties have fired anumber of ceramic arti-cles of high artistic val-

  15. Panel report on high temperature ceramics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nolet, T C [ed.

    1979-01-01

    Fundamental research is reported concerning high temperature ceramics for application in turbines, engines, batteries, gasifiers, MHD, fuel cells, heat exchangers, and hot wall combustors. Ceramics microstructure and behavior are included. (FS)

  16. 42 CFR 493.1232 - Standard: Specimen identification and integrity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 5 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Standard: Specimen identification and integrity... Nonwaived Testing General Laboratory Systems § 493.1232 Standard: Specimen identification and integrity. The... optimum integrity of a patient's specimen from the time of collection or receipt of the specimen through...

  17. Specimen loading list for the varying temperature experiment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Qualls, A.L.; Sitterson, R.G. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States)

    1998-09-01

    The varying temperature experiment HFIR-RB-13J has been assembled and inserted in the reactor. Approximately 5300 specimens were cleaned, inspected, matched, and loaded into four specimen holders. A listing of each specimen loaded into the steady temperature holder, its position in the capsule, and the identification of the corresponding specimen loaded into the varying temperature holder is presented in this report.

  18. HMSRP Hawaiian Monk Seal Specimen Data (includes physical specimens, collection information, status, storage locations, and laboratory results associated with individual specimens)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This data set includes physical specimens, paper logs and Freezerworks database of all logged information on specimens collected from Hawaiian monk seals since 1975....

  19. Ordered ceramic membranes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anderson, M.A.; Hill, C.G. Jr.; Zeltner, W.A.

    1991-10-01

    Ceramic membranes have been formed from colloidal sols coated on porous clay supports. These supported membranes have been characterized in terms of their permeabilities and permselectivities to various aqueous test solutions. The thermal stabilities and pore structures of these membranes have been characterized by preparing unsupported membranes of the correpsonding material and performing N{sub 2} adsorption-desorption and X-ray diffraction studies on these membranes. To date, membranes have been prepared from a variety of oxides, including TiO{sub 2}, SiO{sub 2}, ZrO{sub 2}, and Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}, as well as Zr-, Fe-, and Nb-doped TiO{sub 2}. In many of these membranes pore diameters are less than 2 nm, while in others the pore diameters are between 3 and 5 nm. Procedures for fabricating porous clay supports with reproducible permeabilities for pure water are also discussed. 30 refs., 59 figs., 22 tabs.

  20. Bar piezoelectric ceramic transformers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erhart, Jiří; Pulpan, Půlpán; Rusin, Luboš

    2013-07-01

    Bar-shaped piezoelectric ceramic transformers (PTs) working in the longitudinal vibration mode (k31 mode) were studied. Two types of the transformer were designed--one with the electrode divided into two segments of different length, and one with the electrodes divided into three symmetrical segments. Parameters of studied transformers such as efficiency, transformation ratio, and input and output impedances were measured. An analytical model was developed for PT parameter calculation for both two- and three-segment PTs. Neither type of bar PT exhibited very high efficiency (maximum 72% for three-segment PT design) at a relatively high transformation ratio (it is 4 for two-segment PT and 2 for three-segment PT at the fundamental resonance mode). The optimum resistive loads were 20 and 10 kΩ for two- and three-segment PT designs for the fundamental resonance, respectively, and about one order of magnitude smaller for the higher overtone (i.e., 2 kΩ and 500 Ω, respectively). The no-load transformation ratio was less than 27 (maximum for two-segment electrode PT design). The optimum input electrode aspect ratios (0.48 for three-segment PT and 0.63 for two-segment PT) were calculated numerically under no-load conditions.

  1. Disc piezoelectric ceramic transformers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erhart, Jirií; Půlpán, Petr; Doleček, Roman; Psota, Pavel; Lédl, Vít

    2013-08-01

    In this contribution, we present our study on disc-shaped and homogeneously poled piezoelectric ceramic transformers working in planar-extensional vibration modes. Transformers are designed with electrodes divided into wedge, axisymmetrical ring-dot, moonie, smile, or yin-yang segments. Transformation ratio, efficiency, and input and output impedances were measured for low-power signals. Transformer efficiency and transformation ratio were measured as a function of frequency and impedance load in the secondary circuit. Optimum impedance for the maximum efficiency has been found. Maximum efficiency and no-load transformation ratio can reach almost 100% and 52 for the fundamental resonance of ring-dot transformers and 98% and 67 for the second resonance of 2-segment wedge transformers. Maximum efficiency was reached at optimum impedance, which is in the range from 500 Ω to 10 kΩ, depending on the electrode pattern and size. Fundamental vibration mode and its overtones were further studied using frequency-modulated digital holographic interferometry and by the finite element method. Complementary information has been obtained by the infrared camera visualization of surface temperature profiles at higher driving power.

  2. Ceramic HEPA Filter Program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mitchell, M A; Bergman, W; Haslam, J; Brown, E P; Sawyer, S; Beaulieu, R; Althouse, P; Meike, A

    2012-04-30

    Potential benefits of ceramic filters in nuclear facilities: (1) Short term benefit for DOE, NRC, and industry - (a) CalPoly HTTU provides unique testing capability to answer questions for DOE - High temperature testing of materials, components, filter, (b) Several DNFSB correspondences and presentations by DNFSB members have highlighted the need for HEPA filter R and D - DNFSB Recommendation 2009-2 highlighted a nuclear facility response to an evaluation basis earthquake followed by a fire (aka shake-n-bake) and CalPoly has capability for a shake-n-bake test; (2) Intermediate term benefit for DOE and industry - (a) Filtration for specialty applications, e.g., explosive applications at Nevada, (b) Spin-off technologies applicable to other commercial industries; and (3) Long term benefit for DOE, NRC, and industry - (a) Across industry, strong desire for better performance filter, (b) Engineering solution to safety problem will improve facility safety and decrease dependence on associated support systems, (c) Large potential life-cycle cost savings, and (d) Facilitates development and deployment of LLNL process innovations to allow continuous ventilation system operation during a fire.

  3. Antiferroelectric Shape Memory Ceramics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kenji Uchino

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Antiferroelectrics (AFE can exhibit a “shape memory function controllable by electric field”, with huge isotropic volumetric expansion (0.26% associated with the AFE to Ferroelectric (FE phase transformation. Small inverse electric field application can realize the original AFE phase. The response speed is quick (2.5 ms. In the Pb0.99Nb0.02[(Zr0.6Sn0.41-yTiy]0.98O3 (PNZST system, the shape memory function is observed in the intermediate range between high temperature AFE and low temperature FE, or low Ti-concentration AFE and high Ti-concentration FE in the composition. In the AFE multilayer actuators (MLAs, the crack is initiated in the center of a pair of internal electrodes under cyclic electric field, rather than the edge area of the internal electrodes in normal piezoelectric MLAs. The two-sublattice polarization coupling model is proposed to explain: (1 isotropic volume expansion during the AFE-FE transformation; and (2 piezoelectric anisotropy. We introduce latching relays and mechanical clampers as possible unique applications of shape memory ceramics.

  4. Comparative study of flexural strength test methods on CAD/CAM Y-TZP dental ceramics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Yongxiang; Han, Jianmin; Lin, Hong; An, Linan

    2015-01-01

    Clinically, fractures are the main cause of computer-aided design and computer-aided manufacturing (CAD/CAM) 3 mol%-yttria-stabilized tetragonal zirconia polycrystal (Y-TZP) all-ceramic dental restorations failure because of repetitive occlusal loading. The goal of this work is to study the effect of test methods and specimen’s size on the flexural strength of five ceramic products. Both bi-axial flexure test (BI) and uni-axial flexure tests (UNI), including three-point flexure test (3PF) and four-point flexure test (4PF), are used in this study. For all five products, the flexural strength is as follows: BI > 3PF > 4PF. Furthermore, specimens with smaller size (3PF-s) have higher values than the bigger ones (3PF). The difference between BI and UNI resulted from the edge flaws in ceramic specimens. The relationship between different UNI (including 3PF-s, 3PF and 4PF) can be explained according to Weibull statistical fracture theory. BI is recommended to evaluate the flexural strength of CAD/CAM Y-TZP dental ceramics. PMID:26816646

  5. Flexural strength and the probability of failure of cold isostatic pressed zirconia core ceramics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siarampi, Eleni; Kontonasaki, Eleana; Papadopoulou, Lambrini; Kantiranis, Nikolaos; Zorba, Triantafillia; Paraskevopoulos, Konstantinos M; Koidis, Petros

    2012-08-01

    The flexural strength of zirconia core ceramics must predictably withstand the high stresses developed during oral function. The in-depth interpretation of strength parameters and the probability of failure during clinical performance could assist the clinician in selecting the optimum materials while planning treatment. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the flexural strength based on survival probability and Weibull statistical analysis of 2 zirconia cores for ceramic restorations. Twenty bar-shaped specimens were milled from 2 core ceramics, IPS e.max ZirCAD and Wieland ZENO Zr, and were loaded until fracture according to ISO 6872 (3-point bending test). An independent samples t test was used to assess significant differences of fracture strength (α=.05). Weibull statistical analysis of the flexural strength data provided 2 parameter estimates: Weibull modulus (m) and characteristic strength (σ(0)). The fractured surfaces of the specimens were evaluated by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and energy dispersive spectroscopy (EDS). The investigation of the crystallographic state of the materials was performed with x-ray diffraction analysis (XRD) and Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy. Higher mean flexural strength (Pstrength of WZ ceramics was associated with a lower m and more voids in their microstructure. These findings suggest a greater scattering of strength values and a flaw distribution that are expected to increase failure probability. Copyright © 2012 The Editorial Council of the Journal of Prosthetic Dentistry. Published by Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. The effect of various primers on shear bond strength of zirconia ceramic and resin composite

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sasiwimol Sanohkan

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Aims: To determine the in vitro shear bond strengths (SBS of zirconia ceramic to resin composite after various primer treatments. Materials and Methods: Forty zirconia ceramic (Zeno, Wieland Dental specimens (10 mm in diameter and 2 mm thick were prepared, sandblasted with 50 μm alumina, and divided into four groups (n = 10. Three experimental groups were surface treated with three primers; CP (RelyX Ceramic Primer, 3M ESPE, AP (Alloy Primer, Kuraray Medical, and MP (Monobond Plus, Ivoclar Vivadent AG. One group was not treated and served as the control. All specimens were bonded to a resin composite (Filtek Supreme XT, 3M ESPE cylinder with an adhesive system (Adper Scotchbond Multi-Purpose Plus Adhesive, 3M ESPE and then stored in 100% humidity at 37°C for 24 h before SBS testing in a universal testing machine. Mean SBS (MPa were analyzed with one-way analysis of variance (ANOVA and the Tukey′s Honestly Significant Difference (HSD test (α = 0.05. Results: Group AP yielded the highest mean and standard deviation (SD value of SBS (16.8 ± 2.5 MPa and Group C presented the lowest mean and SD value (15.4 ± 1.6 MPa. The SBS did not differ significantly among the groups (P = 0.079. Conclusions: Within the limitations of this study, the SBS values between zirconia ceramic to resin composite using various primers and untreated surface were not significantly different.

  7. Ceramic cutting tools materials, development and performance

    CERN Document Server

    Whitney, E Dow

    1994-01-01

    Interest in ceramics as a high speed cutting tool material is based primarily on favorable material properties. As a class of materials, ceramics possess high melting points, excellent hardness and good wear resistance. Unlike most metals, hardness levels in ceramics generally remain high at elevated temperatures which means that cutting tip integrity is relatively unaffected at high cutting speeds. Ceramics are also chemically inert against most workmetals.

  8. Emerging Ceramic-based Materials for Dentistry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Denry, I.; Kelly, J.R.

    2014-01-01

    Our goal is to give an overview of a selection of emerging ceramics and issues for dental or biomedical applications, with emphasis on specific challenges associated with full-contour zirconia ceramics, and a brief synopsis on new machinable glass-ceramics and ceramic-based interpenetrating phase composites. Selected fabrication techniques relevant to dental or biomedical applications such as microwave sintering, spark plasma sintering, and additive manufacturing are also reviewed. Where appropriate, the authors have added their opinions and guidance. PMID:25274751

  9. Micromechanical Evaluation of Ceramic Matrix Composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    1991-02-01

    Materials Sciences Corporation AD-A236 756 M.hM. 9 1 0513 IEIN HIfINU IIl- DTIC JUN 06 1991 MICROMECHANICAL EVALUATION OF S 0 CERAMIC MATRIX COMPOSITES C...Classification) \\() Micromechanical Evaluation of Ceramic Matrix Composites ) 12. PERSONAL AUTHOR(S) C-F. Yen, Z. Hashin, C. Laird, B.W. Rosen, Z. Wang 13a. TYPE...and strengthen the ceramic composites. In this task, various possibilities of crack propagation in unidirectional ceramic matrix composites under

  10. Glass-ceramic coating material for the CO2 laser based sintering of thin films as caries and erosion protection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bilandžić, Marin Dean; Wollgarten, Susanne; Stollenwerk, Jochen; Poprawe, Reinhart; Esteves-Oliveira, Marcella; Fischer, Horst

    2017-09-01

    The established method of fissure-sealing using polymeric coating materials exhibits limitations on the long-term. Here, we present a novel technique with the potential to protect susceptible teeth against caries and erosion. We hypothesized that a tailored glass-ceramic material could be sprayed onto enamel-like substrates to create superior adhesion properties after sintering by a CO2 laser beam. A powdered dental glass-ceramic material from the system SiO2-Na2O-K2O-CaO-Al2O3-MgO was adjusted with individual properties suitable for a spray coating process. The material was characterized using X-ray fluorescence analysis (XRF), heating microscopy, dilatometry, scanning electron microscopy (SEM), grain size analysis, biaxial flexural strength measurements, fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), and gas pycnometry. Three different groups of samples (each n=10) where prepared: Group A, powder pressed glass-ceramic coating material; Group B, sintered hydroxyapatite specimens; and Group C, enamel specimens (prepared from bovine teeth). Group B and C where spray coated with glass-ceramic powder. All specimens were heat treated using a CO2 laser beam process. Cross-sections of the laser-sintered specimens were analyzed using laser scanning microscopy (LSM), energy dispersive X-ray analysis (EDX), and SEM. The developed glass-ceramic material (grain size d50=13.1mm, coefficient of thermal expansion (CTE)=13.310(-6)/K) could be spray coated on all tested substrates (mean thickness=160μm). FTIR analysis confirmed an absorption of the laser energy up to 95%. The powdered glass-ceramic material was successfully densely sintered in all sample groups. The coating interface investigation by SEM and EDX proved atomic diffusion and adhesion of the glass-ceramic material to hydroxyapatite and to dental enamel. A glass-ceramic material with suitable absorption properties was successfully sprayed and laser-sintered in thin films on hydroxyapatite as well as on bovine enamel

  11. [Influence of background color on chromatic value of four all-ceramic system core materials].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Yong-gang; Zhang, Nian; Deng, Xu-liang

    2010-06-01

    To investigate the influence of post-core background color on chromatic value of four all-ceramic system core materials at clinically appropriate thicknesses. Disc specimens of 15 mm in diameter and 0.80 mm in thickness (Empress II: Group A), and 0.50 mm in thickness (In-Ceram Zirconia core: Group B; Cercon base color zirconia core: Group C; Cercon base zirconia core: Group D) were fabricated, five in each group. Au-Pt alloy, Ni-Cr alloy and visible light cured dental composite resin (A2 color) background were prepared. Samples were put on different background and their chromatic values were measured with colorimeter (CIE-1976-L(*)a(*)b(*)). Color differences of each specimen on different background material were calculated. The color differences among specimens of Group A on different background material were more than 1.5 (2.83 ± 0.70) which meant it could be noticeable to eyes. Those of zirconia were less than 1.5 [Group B: (0.14 ± 0.08); Group C: (0.90 ± 0.20); Group D: (0.99 ± 0.09)]. The influence of background color on Group A was noticeable to human eyes, and as a result, tooth-colored post should be used for this all-ceramic system. For the other three kinds of zirconia core materia1 system, the color differences among specimens on different background material were unnoticeable. Therefore the three all-ceramic systems have excellent color masking ability and can be used on all color background.

  12. Diffusion synthesis of textured YBa2Cu3O(7-delta) ceramic

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalanda, N. A.; Shambalev, V. N.; Pan'kov, V. V.

    1991-07-01

    A method is described whereby a textured high-temperature superconductor ceramic of the system Y-Ba-Cu-O is synthesized by the diffusion method using various mixtures of Y-Ba-Cu-O and Ba-Cu-O systems. The basal plane of the perovskite structure is shown to be formed in the direction of the diffusion flow. Critical current densities in excess of 1000 A/sq cm at 77 K have been demonstrated for the best specimens.

  13. Machining variability impacts on the strength of a 'chair-side' CAD-CAM ceramic.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Addison, Owen

    2012-08-01

    To develop a novel methodology to generate specimens for bi-axial flexure strength (BFS) determination from a \\'chair-side\\' CAD-CAM feldspathic ceramic with surface defect integrals analogous to the clinical state. The hypotheses tested were: BFS and surface roughness (R(a)) are independent of machining variability introduced by the renewal or deterioration of form-grinding tools and that a post-machining annealing cycle would significantly modify BFS.

  14. Influence of surface treatment and cyclic loading on the durability of repaired all-ceramic crowns

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahmed Attia

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: This study investigated the durability of repaired all-ceramic crowns after cyclic loading. MATERIAL AND METHODS: Eighty In-ceram zirconia crowns were fabricated to restore prepared maxillary premolars. Resin cement was used for cementation of crowns. Palatal cusps were removed to simulate fracture of veneering porcelain and divided into 4 groups (n = 20. Fracture site was treated before repair as follows: roughening with diamond bur, (DB; air abrasion using 50 µm Al2O3, (AA and silica coating using Cojet system followed by silane application, (SC. Control group (CG 20 specimens were left without fracture. Palatal cusps were repaired using composite resin. Specimens were stored in water bath at 37ºC for one week. Ten specimens of each group were subjected to cyclic loading. Fracture load (N was recorded for each specimen using a universal testing machine. Two-way analysis of variance (ANOVA and Tukey honestly significant difference (HSD test (a=.05 were used for statistical analysis. RESULTS: There was statistically significant difference between control and tested groups, (p<0.001. Post Hoc analysis with the Tukey HSD test showed that cyclic loading fatigue significantly decreased means fracture load of control and test groups as follows (CG, 950.4±62.6 / 872.3±87.4, P = 0.0004, (DB, 624.2 ±38 / 425.5± 31.7, P <.001, (AA, 711.5 ±15.5 / 490 ± 25.2, p <0.001 and (SC, 788.7 ± 18.1 / 610.2 ± 25.2, P <.001, while silica coating and silane application significantly increased fracture load of repaired crowns (p<0.05. CONCLUSION: Repair of fractured In-ceram zirconia crowns after chairside treatment of the fracture site by silica coating and silane application could improve longevity of repaired In-ceram zirconia crowns.

  15. Sodium sulfate corrosion of silicon carbide fiber-reinforced lithium aluminosilicate glass-ceramic matrix composites

    OpenAIRE

    1993-01-01

    Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited. Sodium sulfate hot corrosion of a SiC fiber-reinforced lithium aluminosilicate (LAS) glass-ceramic matrix composite was studied using Scanning Electron Microscope (SEM) and X-ray Diffraction (XRD). Changes in the microstructural chemical composition of the specimens were investigated. The samples provided by Naval Air Warfare Center (NAWC), Warminster, PA were grouped as follows: (1) as-received, (2) Na2SO4 salt-coated and heat-treate...

  16. Patches for Repairing Ceramics and Ceramic-Matrix Composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hogenson, Peter A.; Toombs, Gordon R.; Adam, Steven; Tompkins, James V.

    2006-01-01

    Patches consisting mostly of ceramic fabrics impregnated with partially cured polymers and ceramic particles are being developed as means of repairing ceramics and ceramic-matrix composites (CMCs) that must withstand temperatures above the melting points of refractory metal alloys. These patches were conceived for use by space-suited, space-walking astronauts in repairing damaged space-shuttle leading edges: as such, these patches could be applied in the field, in relatively simple procedures, and with minimal requirements for specialized tools. These design characteristics also make the patches useful for repairing ceramics and CMCs in terrestrial settings. In a typical patch as supplied to an astronaut or repair technician, the polymer would be in a tacky condition, denoted as an A stage, produced by partial polymerization of a monomeric liquid. The patch would be pressed against the ceramic or CMC object to be repaired, relying on the tackiness for temporary adhesion. The patch would then be bonded to the workpiece and cured by using a portable device to heat the polymer to a curing temperature above ambient temperature but well below the maximum operating temperature to which the workpiece is expected to be exposed. The patch would subsequently become pyrolized to a ceramic/glass condition upon initial exposure to the high operating temperature. In the original space-shuttle application, this exposure would be Earth-atmosphere-reentry heating to about 3,000 F (about 1,600 C). Patch formulations for space-shuttle applications include SiC and ZrO2 fabrics, a commercial SiC-based pre-ceramic polymer, and suitable proportions of both SiC and ZrO2 particles having sizes of the order of 1 m. These formulations have been tailored for the space-shuttle leading-edge material, atmospheric composition, and reentry temperature profile so as to enable repairs to survive re-entry heating with expected margin. Other formulations could be tailored for specific terrestrial

  17. Ceramics and ceramic matrix composites - Aerospace potential and status

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levine, Stanley R.

    1992-01-01

    Thermostructural ceramics and ceramic-matrix composites are attractive in numerous aerospace applications; the noncatastrophic fracture behavior and flaw-insensitivity of continuous fiber-reinforced CMCs renders them especially desirable. The present development status evaluation notes that, for most highly-loaded high-temperature applications, the requisite fiber-technology base is at present insufficient. In addition to materials processing techniques, the life prediction and NDE methods are immature and require a projection of 15-20 years for the maturity of CMC turbine rotors. More lightly loaded, moderate temperature aircraft engine applications are approaching maturity.

  18. Dense high temperature ceramic oxide superconductors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Landingham, Richard L.

    1993-01-01

    Dense superconducting ceramic oxide articles of manufacture and methods for producing these articles are described. Generally these articles are produced by first processing these superconducting oxides by ceramic processing techniques to optimize materials properties, followed by reestablishing the superconducting state in a desired portion of the ceramic oxide composite.

  19. Ablation Resistant Zirconium and Hafnium Ceramics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bull, Jeffrey (Inventor); White, Michael J. (Inventor); Kaufman, Larry (Inventor)

    1998-01-01

    High temperature ablation resistant ceramic composites have been made. These ceramics are composites of zirconium diboride and zirconium carbide with silicon carbide, hafnium diboride and hafnium carbide with silicon carbide and ceramic composites which contain mixed diborides and/or carbides of zirconium and hafnium. along with silicon carbide.

  20. Journal of the Chinese Ceramic Society

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2015-01-01

    ISSN 2095-7645CN 10-1189/TQAims and Scope The Journal of the Chinese Ceramic Society is a premier archival journal devoted to publishing top quality original research that advances the fundamental and applied science of ceramic materials.Today’s ceramic science is an interdisciplinary field that has expanded beyond its

  1. Recent developments in restorative dental ceramics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anusavice, K J

    1993-02-01

    Since the introduction of porcelain jacket crowns in the early 1900s, dental ceramics have been praised for their esthetic appearance. But there's more to consider: other benefits, longevity, limitations. This review addresses major developments in modern dental ceramics and metal-ceramics.

  2. ZERODUR® glass ceramics for high stress applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hartmann, Peter; Nattermann, Kurt; Döhring, Thorsten; Jedamzik, Ralf; Kuhr, Markus; Thomas, Peter; Kling, Guenther; Lucarelli, Stefano

    2009-08-01

    Recently SCHOTT has shown in a series of investigations the suitability of the zero expansion glass ceramic material ZERODUR® for applications like mirrors and support structures of complicated design used at high mechanical loads. Examples are vibrations during rocket launches, bonded elements to support single mirrors or mirrors of a large array, or controlled deformations for optical image correction, i.e. adaptive mirrors. Additional measurements have been performed on the behavior of ZERODUR® with respect to the etching process, which is capable of increasing strength significantly. It has been determined, which minimum layer thickness has to be removed in order to achieve the strength increase reliably. New data for the strength of the material variant ZERODUR K20® prepared with a diamond grain tool D151 are available and compared with the data of ZERODUR® specimens prepared in the same way. Data for the stress corrosion coefficient n of ZERODUR® for dry and normal humid environment have been measured already in the 1980s. It has been remeasured with the alternative double cleavage drilled compression (DCDC) method.

  3. Dynamic properties of ceramic materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grady, D.E. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States). Experimental Impact Physics Dept.

    1995-02-01

    The present study offers new data and analysis on the transient shock strength and equation-of-state properties of ceramics. Various dynamic data on nine high strength ceramics are provided with wave profile measurements, through velocity interferometry techniques, the principal observable. Compressive failure in the shock wave front, with emphasis on brittle versus ductile mechanisms of deformation, is examined in some detail. Extensive spall strength data are provided and related to the theoretical spall strength, and to energy-based theories of the spall process. Failure waves, as a mechanism of deformation in the transient shock process, are examined. Strength and equation-of-state analysis of shock data on silicon carbide, boron carbide, tungsten carbide, silicon dioxide and aluminum nitride is presented with particular emphasis on phase transition properties for the latter two. Wave profile measurements on selected ceramics are investigated for evidence of rate sensitive elastic precursor decay in the shock front failure process.

  4. Ceramic materials testing and modeling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wilfinger, K. R., LLNL

    1998-04-30

    Certain refractory ceramics (notably oxides) have desirable properties suitable for the construction of ceramic waste containers for long term use in nuclear waste disposal applications. In particular, they are far less prone to environmental corrosion than metals under realistic repository conditions. The aqueous corrosion rates of oxides such as magnesium aluminate spinel (MgAl{sub 2}0{sub 4}) and alumina (Al{sub 2}0{sub 4}) fall in the range of a few millimeters per million years. Oxide ceramics are also not likely to be subject to microbiologically influenced corrosion, which apparently can attack most, if not all, of the available engineering metals. Ceramics have a reputation for poor mechanical performance and large, impermeable objects are not easily fabricated by most current fabrication methods. As a result, the most promising approach for incorporating ceramics in large waste packages appears to be to apply a high density ceramic coating to a supporting metallic structure. Ceramic coatings 2048 applied by a thermal spray technique can be made effectively seamless and provide a method for final closure of the waste package while maintaining low average temperatures for the entire assembly. The corrosion resistance of the ceramic should prevent or delay water penetration to the underlying metal, which will in turn provide most of the mechanical strength and toughness required by the application. In this way, the major concerns regarding the ceramic coating become ensuring it is impervious to moisture, its adherence and its resistance to mechanical stresses during handling or resulting from rock fall in the repository. Without water, electrochemical corrosion and microbiologically influenced corrosion processes are considered impossible, so a complete coating should protect the metal vessels for far longer than the current design requirements. Even an imperfect coating should extend the life of the package, delaying the onset and reducing the severity of

  5. Influence of surrounding wall thickness on the fatigue resistance of molars restored with ceramic inlay

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shizuma Shibata

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study was to evaluate the influence of buccal and lingual wall thickness on the fatigue resistance of molars restored with CAD/CAM ceramic inlays. Forty human third molars were selected and divided into 4 groups, according to the remaining surrounding wall thickness chosen for inlay preparation (n = 10: G1, 2.0 mm; G2, 1.5 mm; G3, 1.0 mm; G4, 0.5 mm. All inlays were made from feldspathic ceramic blocks by a CAD/CAM system, and cemented adhesively. After 1 week stored in distilled water at 37 °C, the specimens were subjected to fatigue testing under the following protocol: 5Hz; pre-load of 200 N for 5,000 cycles, followed by increasing loads of 400, 600, 800, 1000, 1200 and 1400 N for 30,000 cycles each. The specimens were cycled until failure or completion of 185,000 cycles. The survival rate of the groups was compared using the Kaplan-Meier survival curves (p > 0.05. All specimens withstood the fatigue protocol (185,000 cycles, representing a 100% survival rate. The Kaplan-Meier survival curves showed no difference between groups. It can be concluded that the remaining tooth wall thickness did not influence the fatigue resistance of molars restored with CAD/CAM ceramic inlays.

  6. The effect of enamel bleaching on the shear bond strengths of metal and ceramic brackets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oztaş, E; Bağdelen, G; Kiliçoğlu, H; Ulukapi, H; Aydin, I

    2012-04-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the effects of bleaching and delayed bonding on the shear bond strengths of metal and ceramic brackets bonded with light and chemically cure composite resin to human enamel. One hundred and twenty extracted human premolar teeth were randomly divided into three groups of 40 each. The first two groups were bleached with 20 per cent carbamide peroxide (CP) at-home bleaching agent. No bleaching procedures were applied to the third group and served as control. The first two and control groups were divided into equal subgroups according to different adhesive-bracket combinations. Specimens in group 1 (n = 40) were bonded 24 hours after bleaching process was completed while the specimens in group 2 (n = 40) were bonded 14 days after. The specimens in all groups were debonded with a Universal testing machine while the modified adhesive remnant index was used to evaluate fracture properties. No statistically significant differences were found between the shear bond strengths of metal and ceramic brackets bonded to bleached enamel after 24 hours, 14 days, and unbleached enamel with light or chemical cure adhesives (P > 0.05). The mode of failure was mostly at the bracket/adhesive interface and cohesive failures within the resin were also observed. Our findings indicated that at-home bleaching agents that contain 20 per cent CP did not significantly affect the shear bond strength of metal and ceramic orthodontic brackets to enamel when bonding is performed 24 hours or 14 days after bleaching.

  7. A novel ceramic tibial component is as safe as its metal counterpart.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trieb, Klemens

    2017-08-03

    Failure rates of 2-10% provide evidence for further development in knee arthroplasty. The purpose of our study was to examine the safety of the tibial component of a novel all-ceramic total knee replacement (TKR) (BPK-S Integration ceramic) consisting of BIOLOX®delta ceramic. The standards ISO 14879-1 and ASTM F1800-07 describe the test set-up for the experimental strength verification with a significantly increased maximum load of 5300 N (900 N are required) and post-fatigue burst strength testing. All specimens were able to prove their mechanical strength against fracture in the alternating load test. There was no material fracture in any of the included tibial components. The subsequent post-fatigue burst strength testing revealed the maximum strength against fracture of all specimens. With at least 9.7 kN for size 3 and at least 12.1 kN for size 6, all specimens showed relatively large strength reserves to the stress in the alternating load test. So far we simulated an in vivo lifetime of 10 years for the tibial component. Further studies should be conducted in which longer in vivo lifetimes of the components are simulated to investigate possible fatigue of the used material over a longer period of time.

  8. Influence of surrounding wall thickness on the fatigue resistance of molars restored with ceramic inlay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shibata, Shizuma; Gondo, Renata; Araújo, Élito; Mello Roesler, Carlos Rodrigo de; Baratieri, Luiz Narciso

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the influence of buccal and lingual wall thickness on the fatigue resistance of molars restored with CAD/CAM ceramic inlays. Forty human third molars were selected and divided into 4 groups, according to the remaining surrounding wall thickness chosen for inlay preparation (n=10): G1, 2.0 mm; G2, 1.5 mm; G3, 1.0 mm; G4, 0.5 mm. All inlays were made from feldspathic ceramic blocks by a CAD/CAM system, and cemented adhesively. After 1 week stored in distilled water at 37 °C, the specimens were subjected to fatigue testing under the following protocol: 5Hz; pre-load of 200 N for 5,000 cycles, followed by increasing loads of 400, 600, 800, 1000, 1200 and 1400 N for 30,000 cycles each. The specimens were cycled until failure or completion of 185,000 cycles. The survival rate of the groups was compared using the Kaplan-Meier survival curves (p>0.05). All specimens withstood the fatigue protocol (185,000 cycles), representing a 100% survival rate. The Kaplan-Meier survival curves showed no difference between groups. It can be concluded that the remaining tooth wall thickness did not influence the fatigue resistance of molars restored with CAD/CAM ceramic inlays.

  9. Wildlife specimen collection, preservation, and shipment

    Science.gov (United States)

    White, C. LeAnn; Dusek, Robert J.; Franson, J. Christian; Friend, Milton; Gibbs, Samantha E.J.; Wild, Margaret A.

    2015-01-01

    Specimens are used to provide supporting information leading to the determination of the cause of disease or death in wildlife and for disease monitoring or surveillance. Commonly used specimens for wildlife disease investigations include intact carcasses, tissues from carcasses, euthanized or moribund animals, parasites, ingested food, feces, or environmental samples. Samples from live animals or the environment (e.g., contaminated feed) in the same vicinity as a mortality event also may be helpful. The type of specimen collected is determined by availability of samples and biological objectives. Multiple fresh, intact carcasses from affected species are the most useful in establishing a cause for a mortality event. Submission of entire carcasses allows observation of gross lesions and abnormalities, as well as disease testing of multiple tissues. Samples from live animals may be more appropriate when sick animals cannot be euthanized (e.g., threatened or endangered species) or for research and monitoring projects examining disease or agents circulating in apparently healthy animals or those not exhibiting clinical signs. Samples from live animals may include collections of blood, hair, feathers, feces, or ectoparasites, or samples obtained by swabbing lesions or orifices. Photographs and videos are useful additions for recording field and clinical signs and conveying conditions at the site. Collection of environmental samples (e.g., feces, water, feed, or soil) may be appropriate when animals cannot be captured for sampling or the disease agent may persist in the environment. If lethal collection is considered necessary, biologists should refer to the policies, procedures, and permit requirements of their institution/facility and the agency responsible for species management (U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service or State natural resource agency) prior to use in the field. If threatened or endangered species are found dead, or there is evidence of illegal take, field

  10. Histological evaluation of 400 cholecystectomy specimens

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H Kumar

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Background: A majority of gallbladder specimens show changes associated with chronic cholecystitis; however few harbour a highly lethal carcinoma. This study was conducted to review the significant histopathological findings encountered in gallbladder specimens received in our laboratory.Materials and Methods: Four hundred cholecystectomy specimens were studied over a period of five years (May, 2002 to April, 2007 received at department of pathology, Kasturba Medical College, Mangalore, India. Results: Gallstones and associated diseases were more common in women in the 4th to 5th decade as compared to men with M: F ratio of 1:1.33. Maximum number of patients (28.25% being 41 to 50 years old. Histopathologically, the most common diagnosis was chronic cholecystitis (66.75%, followed by chronic active cholecystitis (20.25%, acute cholecystitis (6%, gangrenous cholecystitis (2.25%,xanthogranulomatous cholecystitis (0.50%, empyema (1%, mucocele (0.25%, choledochal cyst (0.25%, adenocarcinoma gallbladder (1.25% and  normal  gallbladders (1%.Conclusion: All lesions were found more frequently in women except chronic active cholecystitis. Gallstones were present in (80.25% cases, and significantly associated with various lesions (P value 0.009. Pigment stones were most common, followed by cholesterol stones and mixed stones. Adequate  sectioning  is  mandatory  in  all  cases  to  assess  epithelial changes arising from cholelithiasis and chronic cholecystitis as it has been known to progress to malignancy in some cases.

  11. Fiber-reinforced ceramics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Belcheva, D. [Technological University `Prof. A. Zlatarov`, Bourgas (Bulgaria); Lubchev, L.; Jelezkov, G.; Georgiev, W.

    1995-03-01

    The possibilities for preparation of reinforced composite materials were studied. Test specimens based on different types of alumina matrices, plasticized with formaldehyde oligomer and polyvinyl alcohol, and reinforced with carbon and mullite fibers were prepared and investigated. The results confirmed that reinforced composite materials with valuable properties such as high thermal shock resistance, chemical resistance and mechanical strength can be produced. The density of technical alumina materials is lower, compared with that of pure alumina. The density can also be influenced by the type and quantity of the plasticizers used. By increasing the fiber content, the density of the material decreases. The shrinkage is influcenced by the type and the quantity of the reinforcing material. (orig.)

  12. Isolation of Klebsiella terrigena from clinical specimens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Podschun, R; Ullmann, U

    1992-04-01

    In a three-year survey conducted from 1988 to 1990 Klebsiella isolates from human clinical specimens were subjected to additional tests to identify any Klebsiella terrigena strains. Ten strains of Klebsiella terrigena (0.4%) were found among 2355 indole-negative Klebsiella isolates. Most of the isolates were recovered from the respiratory tract. In the API20EC system almost exclusively biotypes no. 1777771 and 1777671 were observed. Serotyping revealed capsule types K2, K5 and K18 in two strains each. In antibiotic susceptibility tests the strains were shown to be comparable in sensitivity to Klebsiella pneumoniae.

  13. Oxygen Transport Ceramic Membranes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    S. Bandopadhyay; T. Nithyanantham; X.-D Zhou; Y-W. Sin; H.U. Anderson; Alan Jacobson; C.A. Mims

    2005-08-01

    The present quarterly report describes some of the investigations on the structural properties of dense OTM bars provided by Praxair and studies on newer composition of Ti doped LSF. In the previous research, the reference point of oxygen occupancy was determined and verified. In the current research, the oxygen occupancy was investigated at 1200 C as a function of oxygen activity and compared with that at 1000 C. The cause of bumps at about 200 C was also investigated by using different heating and cooling rates during TGA. The fracture toughness of LSFT and dual phase membranes at room temperature is an important mechanical property. Vicker's indentation method was used to evaluate this toughness. Through this technique, a K{sub Ic} (Mode-I Fracture Toughness) value is attained by means of semi-empirical correlations between the indentation load and the length of the cracks emanating from the corresponding Vickers indentation impression. In the present investigation, crack propagation behavior was extensively analyzed in order to understand the strengthening mechanisms involved in the non-transforming La based ceramic composites. Cracks were generated using Vicker's indenter and used to identify and evaluate the toughening mechanisms involved. Preliminary results of an electron microscopy study of the origin of the slow kinetics on reduction of ferrites have been obtained. The slow kinetics appear to be related to a non-equilibrium reduction pathway that initially results in the formation of iron particles. At long times, equilibrium can be reestablished with recovery of the perovskite phase. Modeling of the isotopic transients on operating membranes (LSCrF-2828 at 900 C) and a ''frozen'' isotope profile have been analyzed in conjunction with a 1-D model to reveal the gradient in oxygen diffusivity through the membrane under conditions of high chemical gradients.

  14. Proton conducting cerate ceramics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Coffey, G.W.; Pederson, L.R.; Armstrong, T.R.; Bates, J.L.; Weber, W.J. [Pacific Northwest Lab., Richland, WA (United States)

    1995-08-01

    Cerate perovskites of the general formula AM{sub x}Ce{sub 1-x}O{sub 3-{delta}}, where A = Sr or Ba and where M = Gd, Nd, Y, Yb or other rare earth dopant, are known to conduct a protonic current. Such materials may be useful as the electrolyte in a solid oxide fuel cell operating at intermediate temperatures, as an electrochemical hydrogen separation membrane, or as a hydrogen sensor. Conduction mechanisms in these materials were evaluated using dc cyclic voltammetry and mass spectrometry, allowing currents and activation energies for proton, electron, and oxygen ion contributions to the total current to be determined. For SrYb{sub 0.05}Ce{sub 0.95}O{sub 3-{delta}}, one of the best and most environmentally stable compositions, proton conduction followed two different mechanisms: a low temperature process, characterized by an activation energy of 0.42{+-}0.04 eV, and a high temperature process, characterized by an activation energy of 1.38{+-}0.13 eV. It is believed that the low temperature process is dominated by grain boundary conduction while bulk conduction is responsible for the high temperature process. The activation energy for oxygen ion conduction (0.97{+-}0.10 eV) agrees well with other oxygen conductors, while that for electronic conduction, 0.90{+-}0.09 eV, is affected by a temperature-dependent electron carrier concentration. Evaluated by direct measurement of mass flux through a dense ceramic with an applied dc field, oxygen ions were determined to be the majority charge carrier except at the lowest temperatures, followed by electrons and then protons.

  15. Ultrahigh-Temperature Ceramics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Sylvia M.; Ellerby, Donald T.; Beckman, Sarah E.; Irby, Edward; Gasch, Matthew J.; Gusman, Michael I.

    2007-01-01

    Ultrahigh temperature ceramics (UHTCs) are a class of materials that include the diborides of metals such as hafnium and zirconium. The materials are of interest to NASA for their potential utility as sharp leading edges for hypersonic vehicles. Such an application requires that the materials be capable of operating at temperatures, often in excess of 2,000 C. UHTCs are highly refractory and have high thermal conductivity, an advantage for this application. UHTCs are potentially applicable for other high-temperature processing applications, such as crucibles for molten-metal processing and high-temperature electrodes. UHTCs were first studied in the 1960 s by the U.S. Air Force. NASA s Ames Research Center concentrated on developing materials in the HfB2/SiC family for a leading-edge application. The work focused on developing a process to make uniform monolithic (2-phase) materials, and on the testing and design of these materials. Figure 1 shows arc-jet models made from UHTC materials fabricated at Ames. Figure 2 shows a cone being tested in the arc-jet. Other variations of these materials being investigated elsewhere include zirconium based materials and fiber-reinforced composites. Current UHTC work at Ames covers four broad topics: monoliths, coatings, composites, and processing. The goals include improving the fracture toughness, thermal conductivity and oxidation resistance of monolithic UHTCs and developing oxidation-resistant UHTC coatings for thermal-protection-system substrates through novel coating methods. As part of this effort, researchers are exploring compositions and processing changes that have yielded improvements in properties. Computational materials science and nanotechnology are being explored as approaches to reduce materials development time and improve and tailor properties.

  16. Ceramic catalyst materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sault, A.G.; Gardner, T.J. [Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque, NM (United States); Hanprasopwattanna, A.; Reardon, J.; Datye, A.K. [Univ. of New Mexico, Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    1995-08-01

    Hydrous titanium oxide (HTO) ion-exchange materials show great potential as ceramic catalyst supports due to an inherently high ion-exchange capacity which allows facile loading of catalytically active transition metal ions, and an ability to be cast as thin films on virtually any substrate. By coating titania and HTO materials onto inexpensive, high surface area substrates such as silica and alumina, the economics of using these materials is greatly improved, particularly for the HTO materials, which are substantially more expensive in the bulk form than other oxide supports. In addition, the development of thin film forms of these materials allows the catalytic and mechanical properties of the final catalyst formulation to be separately engineered. In order to fully realize the potential of thin film forms of titania and HTO, improved methods for the deposition and characterization of titania and HTO films on high surface area substrates are being developed. By varying deposition procedures, titania film thickness and substrate coverage can be varied from the submonolayer range to multilayer thicknesses on both silica and alumina. HTO films can also be formed, but the quality and reproducibility of these films is not nearly as good as for pure titania films. The films are characterized using a combination of isopropanol dehydration rate measurements, point of zero charge (PZC) measurements, BET surface area, transmission electron microscopy (TEM), and elemental analysis. In order to assess the effects of changes in film morphology on catalytic activity, the films are being loaded with MoO{sub 3} using either incipient wetness impregnation or ion-exchange of heptamolybdate anions followed by calcining. The MoO{sub 3} is then sulfided to form MOS{sub 2}, and tested for catalytic activity using pyrene hydrogenation and dibenzothiophene (DBT) desulfurization, model reactions that simulate reactions occurring during coal liquefaction.

  17. Influence of thermomechanical fatigue loading on the fracture resistance of all-ceramic posterior crowns.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Senyilmaz, Dilek Pinar; Canay, Senay; Heydecke, Guido; Strub, Joerg Rudolf

    2010-06-01

    This study evaluated the fracture resistance and the survival rate of different all-ceramic crowns in-vitro after thermomechanical fatigue loading in comparison to porcelain-fused-to-metal posterior crowns. Sixteen crowns for human mandibular first molars were made of each of the following: Cercon, IPS-Empress 2 In-Ceram Zirconia, Procera AllZircon and porcelain-fused-to-metal. Half of the specimens of each group was thermocycled and dynamically loaded using a chewing simulator All samples were thereafter tested for the maximum fracture resistance. The survival rates after 1-2 million cycles in the artificial mouth were 100% in all the tested crown systems. The chewing simulation and thermocycling did not significantly decrease the fracture strength of the ceramic crowns (P>0.005). The median fracture load of Cercon, Procera AllZircon, In-Ceram Zirconia and PFM was significantly higher than IPS-Empress 2 both for loaded and non loaded groups (PZirconia and PFM was not significant (P>0.005). All-ceramic systems showed fracture load values similar to those of porcelain-fused-to-metal molar crowns and therefore may be considered for use in clinical studies.

  18. Effects of surface treatment on the microtensile bond strength of ceramic materials to dentin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vasconcellos, Walison A; Alvim, Hugo H; Saad, Jose R C; Susin, Alexandre H

    2007-01-01

    This study evaluated the effects of distinct surface treatments on the micro-tensile bonding strength (microTBS) of different ceramic materials. The occlusal surfaces of eighteen human maxillary molars were flattened perpendicularly to the long axis and divided in groups based on surface treatment (sandblasting: s; hydrofluoric acid: a; tribochemical silica coating: t): DP-s, DP-a, DP-t, IE-s, IE-a, IE-t, IC-s, IC-a, IC-t) and ceramic materials (Duceran Plus: DP, IPS Empress 2: IE, In-Ceram Alumina, IC). Panavia F luting resins were used according to the manufacturers' instructions to bond ceramic materials to the exposed dentin specimens under a load of 7.5 N. After 3-day storage, microTBS was tested at a cross-head speed of 1 mm/min. Data were analyzed with ANOVA and Tukey's test. ANOVA results showed that the microTBS of DP and IC were significantly different. The microTBS of DP-a was significantly higher than those of DP-s and DP-t. The microTBS of IC-t was significantly higher than those of IC-s and IC-a. Ceramic materials with different chemical formulations and applications yielded significantly different bond strengths to human dentin and must receive distinct surface treatments accordingly.

  19. Transverse fracture and fiber/matrix interface characteristics of hybrid ceramic matrix composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haug, Stephen Berry

    Ceramic Matrix Composites (CMCs) represent an attractive class of engineering materials for use in high temperature, high wear and corrosive environments. Much effort has been made to ascertain and improve the strength and fracture characteristics of these materials. Approaches that have received a significant amount of attention include enhancing a ceramic material's mechanical properties through the use of continuous fiber reinforcement; fine, randomly dispersed discontinuous fiber (or whisker) reinforcement; and a hybrid combination of both continuous and discontinuous fibers. This dissertation addresses two important aspects of determining and improving the strength and toughness of CMCs and is comprised of three research papers that have been prepared for journal publication. The first paper, "Transverse Fracture Toughness of Unidirectional Continuous Fiber and Hybrid Ceramic Matrix Composites" provides the results of three-point chevron-notched-beam fracture toughness testing and demonstrates a significant improvement in transverse fracture toughness can be obtained through the use of hybrid fiber reinforcements. The second paper, "A Tensile Testing Method for Ceramic Matrix Composites" presents a novel approach to testing small brittle material specimens using conventional testing equipment with minimal specialized fixture components. The third paper, "Fiber/Matrix Interface Properties of Hybrid Ceramic Matrix Composites", presents a method of determining the characteristics of the fiber/matrix interface of a continuous fiber reinforced CMC and a related hybrid CMC reinforced by both continuous fibers and finely dispersed whiskers using a multiple fiber pullout technique.

  20. Simulation of clinical fractures for three different all-ceramic crowns.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oilo, Marit; Kvam, Ketil; Gjerdet, Nils R

    2014-06-01

    Comparison of fracture strength and fracture modes of different all-ceramic crown systems is not straightforward. Established methods for reliable testing of all-ceramic crowns are not currently available. Published in-vitro tests rarely simulate clinical failure modes and are therefore unsuited to distinguish between the materials. The in-vivo trials usually lack assessment of failure modes. Fractographic analyses show that clinical crowns usually fail from cracks initiating in the cervical margins, whereas in-vitro specimens fail from contact damage at the occlusal loading point. The aim of this study was to compare three all-ceramic systems using a clinically relevant test method that is able to simulate clinical failure modes. Ten incisor crowns of three types of all-ceramic systems were exposed to soft loading until fracture. The initiation and propagation of cracks in these crowns were compared with those of a reference group of crowns that failed during clinical use. All crowns fractured in a manner similar to fracture of the clinical reference crowns. The zirconia crowns fractured at statistically significantly higher loads than alumina and glass-ceramic crowns. Fracture initiation was in the core material, cervically in the approximal areas. © 2014 Eur J Oral Sci.

  1. Work of adhesion of resin on treated lithia disilicate-based ceramic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Della Bona, Alvaro; Shen, Chiayi; Anusavice, Kenneth J

    2004-05-01

    This study is to test the hypothesis that chemical etching and silane coating of a ceramic surface will influence the work of adhesion (WA) of adhesive resin to dental ceramic. A hot-pressed lithia disilicate-based ceramic was used as a model material to investigate the influence of probing media and surface treatments on WA using a dynamic contact angle analyzer. Eighty ceramic specimens were randomly divided into eight experimental groups and treated as follows: (1 and 3) as polished; (2 and 4) etched with 9.5% hydrofluoric acid (HF) for 1 min; (5) etched with 4% acidulated phosphate fluoride (APF) for 2 min; (6) silane coated; (7) etched with HF for 1 min and silane coated; (8) etched with APF for 2 min and silane coated. Advancing and receding contact angles (theta(a) and theta(r)) were measured using high purity water (gamma = 72.6 mN/m) for groups 1 and 2, and a liquid resin (gamma = 39.7) for groups 3-8 as probing liquids. The liquid resin medium yielded a lower WA than water. Silanization produced a significantly lower WA (p < 0.001) than non-silanated surfaces. Etching alone consistently yielded a greater WA for all surface treatments (p < 0.001). The silanated ceramic surface exhibited a lower surface energy and did not enhance bonding to the liquid resin by work of adhesion.

  2. Interfacial modulus mapping of layered dental ceramics using nanoindentation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bushby, Andrew J; P'ng, Ken MY; Wilson, Rory M

    2016-01-01

    PURPOSE The aim of this study was to test the modulus of elasticity (E) across the interfaces of yttria stabilized zirconia (YTZP) / veneer multilayers using nanoindentation. MATERIALS AND METHODS YTZP core material (KaVo-Everest, Germany) specimens were either coated with a liner (IPS e.max ZirLiner, Ivoclar-Vivadent) (Type-1) or left as-sintered (Type-2) and subsequently veneered with a pressable glass-ceramic (IPS e.max ZirPress, Ivoclar-Vivadent). A 5 µm (nominal tip diameter) spherical indenter was used with a UMIS CSIRO 2000 (ASI, Canberra, Australia) nanoindenter system to test E across the exposed and polished interfaces of both specimen types. The multiple point load – partial unload method was used for E determination. All materials used were characterized using Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM) and X – ray powder diffraction (XRD). E mappings of the areas tested were produced from the nanoindentation data. RESULTS A significantly (P<.05) lower E value between Type-1 and Type-2 specimens at a distance of 40 µm in the veneer material was associated with the liner. XRD and SEM characterization of the zirconia sample showed a fine grained bulk tetragonal phase. IPS e-max ZirPress and IPS e-max ZirLiner materials were characterized as amorphous. CONCLUSION The liner between the YTZP core and the heat pressed veneer may act as a weak link in this dental multilayer due to its significantly (P<.05) lower E. The present study has shown nanoindentation using spherical indentation and the multiple point load - partial unload method to be reliable predictors of E and useful evaluation tools for layered dental ceramic interfaces. PMID:28018566

  3. Ceramic veneers with minimum preparation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    da Cunha, Leonardo Fernandes; Reis, Rachelle; Santana, Lino; Romanini, Jose Carlos; Carvalho, Ricardo Marins; Furuse, Adilson Yoshio

    2013-10-01

    The aim of this article is to describe the possibility of improving dental esthetics with low-thickness glass ceramics without major tooth preparation for patients with small to moderate anterior dental wear and little discoloration. For this purpose, a carefully defined treatment planning and a good communication between the clinician and the dental technician helped to maximize enamel preservation, and offered a good treatment option. Moreover, besides restoring esthetics, the restorative treatment also improved the function of the anterior guidance. It can be concluded that the conservative use of minimum thickness ceramic laminate veneers may provide satisfactory esthetic outcomes while preserving the dental structure.

  4. 卧板式直线超声电机的特性分析模型%Modeling for Characteristic Analysis of a Plate-type Linear Ultrasonic Motor

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张健滔; 李朝东; 何晓菁

    2012-01-01

    The frictional contact characteristics of the linear ultrasonic motor play a decisive role in motor performance.However,the friction drive mechanism of the linear ultrasonic motor is often different from that of the rotating ultrasonic motor.The contact model of the rotating ultrasonic motor cannot be used for its analysis.Therefore,a plate type linear ultrasonic motor was studied and its mathematical modeling for frictional contact analysis and characteristics estimation was developed based on the elastic contact theory.It was taken into consideration that the working status of the stator with or without the preload force is different and that the friction force is influenced by the relative sliding velocity between the stator and the slider.Simulated performance of the plate type linear ultrasonic motor was calculated using the developed model.The influences of the vibration characteristics of the stator,the preload force,the friction characteristics of the contact interface,the stiffness of the preload spring,and driving frequency on motor performance were discussed.The performance of a prototype motor was measured and compared with the simulation result.The experimental results show that the model for characteristics estimation of the linear ultrasonic motor is effective.The present model can be useful for the design and characteristic analysis of the same type of linear ultrasonic motors.%直线超声电机摩擦接触特性对电机性能的影响很大,直线超声电机的摩擦驱动机理往往不同于旋转超声电机,无法应用旋转超声电机的接触模型对其进行分析。针对一款卧板式直线超声电机,基于弹性接触理论建立了其摩擦接触分析及特性预估模型。该模型考虑了施加预压力后定子工作状态的改变,以及定、动子相对滑动速度差对摩擦力的影响。利用所建立的模型,对卧板式直线超声电机的机械输出特性进行了仿真计算,并分析了定子振动特性

  5. Influence of polishing procedures on the surface roughness of dental ceramics made by different techniques.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oliveira-Junior, Osmir Batista; Buso, Leonardo; Fujiy, Fábio Hiroshi; Lombardo, Geraldo Henrique Leao; Campos, Fernanda; Sarmento, Hugo Ramalho; Souza, Rodrigo Othavio Assuncao

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the influence of 2 different surface polishing procedures-glazing and manual polishing-on the roughness of ceramics processed by computer-aided design/computer-aided manufacturing (CAD/CAM) and conventional systems (stratification technique). Eighty ceramic discs (diameter: 8 mm, thickness: 1 mm) were prepared and divided among 8 groups (n = 10) according to the type of ceramic disc and polishing method: 4 GZ and 4 MP. Specimens were glazed according to each manufacturer's recommendations. Two silicone polishing points were used on the ceramic surface for manual polishing. Roughness was measured using a surface roughness tester. The roughness measurements were made along a distance of 2 mm on the sample surface and the speed of reading was 0.1 mm/s. Three measurements were taken for each sample. The data (μm) were statistically analyzed using analysis of variance (ANOVA) and Tukey's test (α = 0.05). Qualitative analysis was performed using scanning electron microscopy (SEM). The mean (± SD) roughness values obtained for GZ were: 1.1 ± 0.40 μm; 1.0 ± 0.31 μm; 1.6 ± 0.31 μm; and 2.2 ± 0.73 μm. For MP, the mean values were: 0.66 ± 0.13 μm; 0.43 ± 0.14 μm; 1.6 ± 0.55 μm; and 2.0 ± 0.63 μm. The mean roughness values were significantly affected by the ceramic type (P = 0.0001) and polishing technique (P = 0.0047). The SEM images confirmed the roughness data. The manually polished glass CAD/CAM ceramics promoted lower surface roughness than did the glazed feldspathic dental ceramics.

  6. In vitro biocompatibility of a ferrimagnetic glass-ceramic for hyperthermia application.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bretcanu, Oana; Miola, Marta; Bianchi, Claudia L; Marangi, Ida; Carbone, Roberta; Corazzari, Ingrid; Cannas, Mario; Verné, Enrica

    2017-04-01

    Ferrimagnetic glass-ceramics containing magnetite crystals were developed for hyperthermia applications of solid neoplastic tissue. The present work is focused on in vitro evaluation of the biocompatibility of these materials, before and after soaking in a simulated body fluid (SBF). X-ray diffraction, scanning electron microscopy, atomic absorption spectrophotometry, X-ray photoelectron spectrometry and pH measurements were employed in glass-ceramic characterisation. The free-radical mediated reactivity of the glass-ceramic was evaluated by Electron Paramagnetic Resonance (EPR) spin trapping. Cell adhesion and proliferation tests were carried out by using 3T3 murine fibroblasts. Cytotoxicity was performed by qualitative evaluation of human bone osteosarcoma cells U2OS cell line. The results show that almost two times more 3T3 cells proliferated on the samples pre-treated in SBF, compared with the untreated specimens. Moreover a decrease of confluence was observed at 48 and 72h for U2OS cells exposed to the untreated glass-ceramic, while the powder suspensions of glass-ceramic pre-treated in SBF did not influence the cell morphology up to 72h of exposition. The untreated glass-ceramic exhibited Fenton-like reactivity, as well as reactivity towards formate molecule. After pre-treatment with SBF the reactivity towards formate was completely suppressed. The concentration of iron released into the SBF solution was below 0.1ppm at 37°C, during one month of soaking. The different in vitro behaviour of the samples before and after SBF treatment has been correlated to the bioactive glass-ceramic surface modifications as detected by morphological, structural and compositional analyses. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Innovative grinding wheel design for cost-effective machining of advanced ceramics. Phase I, final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Licht, R.H.; Ramanath, S.; Simpson, M.; Lilley, E.

    1996-02-01

    Norton Company successfully completed the 16-month Phase I technical effort to define requirements, design, develop, and evaluate a next-generation grinding wheel for cost-effective cylindrical grinding of advanced ceramics. This program was a cooperative effort involving three Norton groups representing a superabrasive grinding wheel manufacturer, a diamond film manufacturing division and a ceramic research center. The program was divided into two technical tasks, Task 1, Analysis of Required Grinding Wheel Characteristics, and Task 2, Design and Prototype Development. In Task 1 we performed a parallel path approach with Superabrasive metal-bond development and the higher technical risk, CVD diamond wheel development. For the Superabrasive approach, Task 1 included bond wear and strength tests to engineer bond-wear characteristics. This task culminated in a small-wheel screening test plunge grinding sialon disks. In Task 2, an improved Superabrasive metal-bond specification for low-cost machining of ceramics in external cylindrical grinding mode was identified. The experimental wheel successfully ground three types of advanced ceramics without the need for wheel dressing. The spindle power consumed by this wheel during test grinding of NC-520 sialon is as much as to 30% lower compared to a standard resin bonded wheel with 100 diamond concentration. The wheel wear with this improved metal bond was an order of magnitude lower than the resin-bonded wheel, which would significantly reduce ceramic grinding costs through fewer wheel changes for retruing and replacements. Evaluation of ceramic specimens from both Tasks 1 and 2 tests for all three ceramic materials did not show evidence of unusual grinding damage. The novel CVD-diamond-wheel approach was incorporated in this program as part of Task 1. The important factors affecting the grinding performance of diamond wheels made by CVD coating preforms were determined.

  8. Surface degradation of glass ceramics after exposure to acidulated phosphate fluoride

    Science.gov (United States)

    CCAHUANA, Vanessa Zulema S.; ÖZCAN, Mutlu; MESQUITA, Alfredo Mikail Melo; NISHIOKA, Renato Sussumo; KIMPARA, Estevão Tomomitsu; BOTTINO, Marco Antonio

    2010-01-01

    Objective This study evaluated the surface degradation effect of acidulated phosphate fluoride (APF) gel exposure on the glassy matrix ceramics as a function of time. Material and methods Disc-shaped ceramic specimens (N = 120, 10/per ceramic material) were prepared in stainless steel molds (inner diameter: 5 mm, height: 2 mm) using 6 dental ceramics: 3 indicated for ceramic-fused-to-metal (Vita Omega 900, Carmen and Vita Titankeramik), 2 for all-ceramic (Vitadur Alpha and Finesse® Low Fusing) and 1 for both types of restorations (IPS d.SIGN). The specimens were wet ground finished, ultrasonically cleaned and auto-glazed. All specimens were subjected to calculation of percentage of mass loss, surface roughness analysis and topographical description by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) before (0 min) and after exposure to 1.23 % APF gel for 4 min and 60 min representing short- and long-term etching effect, respectively. The data were analyzed using two-way ANOVA with repeated measures and Tukey`s test (α=0.05). Results Significant effect of the type of the ceramics (p=0.0000, p=0.0031) and exposure time (p=0.0000) was observed in both surface roughness and percentage of mass loss values, respectively. The interaction factor between both parameters was also significant for both parameters (p=0.0904, p=0.0258). Both 4 min (0.44±0.1 - 0.81±0.2 µm) and 60 min (0.66±0.1 - 1.04±0.3 µm) APF gel exposure created significantly more surface roughness for all groups when compared to the control groups (0.33±0.2 - 0.68±0.2 µm) (pceramics at 4 min (p>0.05) but at 60 min exposure, IPS d.SIGN showed the highest percentage of mass loss (0.1151±0.11). The mean surface roughness for Vita Titankeramik (0.84±0.2 µm) and Finesse® Low Fusing (0.74.±0.2 µm) was significantly higher than those of the other ceramics (0.59±0.1 µm - 0.49±0.1 µm) and Vita Titankeramik (pceramic materials [(r=0.518 (Vitadur Alpha), r=0.405 (Vita Omega 900), r=0.580 (Carmen), r=0.687 (IPS d

  9. Ceramics in fission and fusion technology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Olander, D.R.

    1986-04-01

    The role of ceramic components in fission and fusion reactors is described. Almost all of the functions normally performed by ceramics, except mechanical, are required of nuclear ceramics. The oxides of uranium and plutonium are of predominant importance in nuclear applications, but a number of other ceramics play peripheral roles. The unique service conditions under which nuclear ceramics must operate include intense radiation fields, high temperatures and large temperature gradients, and aggressive chemical environments. Examples of laboratory research designed to broaden understanding of the behavior of uranium dioxide in such conditions are given. The programs described include high temperature vaporization, diffusional processes, and interaction with hydrogen.

  10. Ceramic nanostructures and methods of fabrication

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ripley, Edward B [Knoxville, TN; Seals, Roland D [Oak Ridge, TN; Morrell, Jonathan S [Knoxville, TN

    2009-11-24

    Structures and methods for the fabrication of ceramic nanostructures. Structures include metal particles, preferably comprising copper, disposed on a ceramic substrate. The structures are heated, preferably in the presence of microwaves, to a temperature that softens the metal particles and preferably forms a pool of molten ceramic under the softened metal particle. A nano-generator is created wherein ceramic material diffuses through the molten particle and forms ceramic nanostructures on a polar site of the metal particle. The nanostructures may comprise silica, alumina, titania, or compounds or mixtures thereof.

  11. Mechanical Characteristics and Crack-Healing of ZIRCONIA(ZrO{sub 2}) Composite Ceramics with SiC and TiO{sub 2}

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nam, Ki Woo [Pukyong National Univ., Busan (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-03-15

    This study evaluated the mechanical properties and crack-healing abilities of zirconia composite ceramics. The six kinds of specimens used were: partially stabilized zirconia (Z) and five zirconia composite (ZS, ZST1, ZST2, ZST3, and ZST5) with SiC and TiO{sub 2}. There was not a large difference between the Vickers hardness of the six types of zirconia ceramics. The bending strength of the ZS specimen degraded rapidly, but the zirconia specimens with TiO{sub 2}(ZST1, ZST2, ZST3, and ZST5) showed improved strength. Therefore, it was determined that the bending strength is affected by the crystallization, which is due to the addition of SiC and TiO{sub 2}. From the crack-healing conditions having the highest bending strength, monolithic zirconia retained its cracks, while the specimens of four types with SiC healed their cracks.

  12. Passive cooling effect of RC roof covered with the ceramics having high water retention and evaporation capacity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamazaki, M.; Kanaya, M.; Shimazu, T.; Ohashi, T.; Kato, N.; Horikoshi, T.

    2011-10-01

    Hot days in metropolitan cities have increased remarkably by the heat island phenomenon these days. Thus the authors tried to develop the porous ceramics with high water retention and evaporation capacity as a maintenance-free material to improve thermal environment. The developed ceramic pellets have high water retention of more than 60 % of water absorption and high water evaporation which is similar to water surface. In this study, three types of 5 meter squared large flat-roofed structural specimen simulated reinforced concrete (RC) slab were constructed on the outside. The variation of water content and temperature of the specimens and atmosphere temperature around the specimens were measured from summer in 2009. In the case of the ceramic pellets, the temperature under RC slab was around 15 degree C lower than that of the control. The results were probably contributed by passive cooling effect of evaporated rain water, and the effect was similar to in the case of the grasses. From the viewpoint of thermal environment improvement, substitution of a rooftop gardening by the porous ceramics could be a promising method.

  13. A new classification system for all-ceramic and ceramic-like restorative materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gracis, Stefano; Thompson, Van P; Ferencz, Jonathan L; Silva, Nelson R F A; Bonfante, Estevam A

    2015-01-01

    Classification systems for all-ceramic materials are useful for communication and educational purposes and warrant continuous revisions and updates to incorporate new materials. This article proposes a classification system for ceramic and ceramic-like restorative materials in an attempt to systematize and include a new class of materials. This new classification system categorizes ceramic restorative materials into three families: (1) glass-matrix ceramics, (2) polycrystalline ceramics, and (3) resin-matrix ceramics. Subfamilies are described in each group along with their composition, allowing for newly developed materials to be placed into the already existing main families. The criteria used to differentiate ceramic materials are based on the phase or phases present in their chemical composition. Thus, an all-ceramic material is classified according to whether a glass-matrix phase is present (glass-matrix ceramics) or absent (polycrystalline ceramics) or whether the material contains an organic matrix highly filled with ceramic particles (resin-matrix ceramics). Also presented are the manufacturers' clinical indications for the different materials and an overview of the different fabrication methods and whether they are used as framework materials or monolithic solutions. Current developments in ceramic materials not yet available to the dental market are discussed.

  14. Effect of annealing procedure on the bonding of ceramic to cobalt-chromium alloys fabricated by rapid prototyping.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tulga, Ayca

    2017-08-22

    An annealing procedure is a heat treatment process to improve the mechanical properties of cobalt-chromium (Co-Cr) alloys. However, information is lacking about the effect of the annealing process on the bonding ability of ceramic to Co-Cr alloys fabricated by rapid prototyping. The purpose of this in vitro study was to evaluate the effects of the fabrication techniques and the annealing procedure on the shear bond strength of ceramic to Co-Cr alloys fabricated by different techniques. Ninety-six cylindrical specimens (10-mm diameter, 10-mm height) made of Co-Cr alloy were prepared by casting (C), milling (M), direct process powder-bed (LaserCUSING) with and without annealing (CL+, CL), and direct metal laser sintering (DMLS) with annealing (EL+) and without annealing (EL). After the application of ceramic to the metal specimens, the metal-ceramic bond strength was assessed using a shear force test at a crosshead speed of 0.5 mm/min. Shear bond strength values were statistically analyzed by 1-way ANOVA and Tukey multiple comparison tests (α=.05). Although statistically significant differences were found among the 3 groups (M, 29.87 ±2.06; EL, 38.92 ±2.04; and CL+, 40.93 ±2.21; P=.002), no significant differences were found among the others (P>.05). The debonding surfaces of all specimens exhibited mixed failure mode. These results showed that the direct process powder-bed method is promising in terms of metal-ceramic bonding ability. The manufacturing technique of Co-Cr alloys and the annealing process influence metal-ceramic bonding. Copyright © 2017 Editorial Council for the Journal of Prosthetic Dentistry. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Effect of hydrofluoric acid etching duration on the roughness and flexural strength of a lithium disilicate-based glass ceramic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zogheib, Lucas Villaça; Bona, Alvaro Della; Kimpara, Estevão Tomomitsu; McCabe, John F

    2011-01-01

    The aim of this study was to examine the effect of different acid etching times on the surface roughness and flexural strength of a lithium disilicate-based glass ceramic. Ceramic bar-shaped specimens (16 mm x 2 mm x 2 mm) were produced from ceramic blocks. All specimens were polished and sonically cleaned in distilled water. Specimens were randomly divided into 5 groups (n=15). Group A (control) no treatment. Groups B-E were etched with 4.9% hydrofluoric acid (HF) for 4 different etching periods: 20 s, 60 s, 90 s and 180 s, respectively. Etched surfaces were observed under scanning electron microscopy. Surface profilometry was used to examine the roughness of the etched ceramic surfaces, and the specimens were loaded to failure using a 3-point bending test to determine the flexural strength. Data were analyzed using one-way ANOVA and Tukey's test (?=0.05). All etching periods produced significantly rougher surfaces than the control group (p<0.05). Roughness values increased with the increase of the etching time. The mean flexural strength values were (MPa): A=417 ± 55; B=367 ± 68; C=363 ± 84; D=329 ± 70; and E=314 ± 62. HF etching significantly reduced the mean flexural strength as the etching time increased (p=0.003). In conclusion, the findings of this study showed that the increase of HF etching time affected the surface roughness and the flexural strength of a lithium disilicate-based glass ceramic, confirming the study hypothesis.

  16. Industrial ceramics in Spain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Regueiro, M.

    2000-02-01

    Full Text Available The Spanish ceramic industry has experienced a amazing growth in the last four years. Such expansion has affected all sector, but has been particularly noteworthy in those directly related to construction: tiles. glazes, bricks and roof tiles. A combination of an extraordinary exporting effort, together with a record figure in new housing projects (415 000 houses in 1999, are responsible for such outburst. Other sectors, such as refractories have undergone significant growths due to the high rate of steel production increase, also in historical record figures (15m t in 1999. All this sectors doubled altogether the growing rate of their main European competitors. Raw material production has had an even more effervescent trend, almost doubling 1995 production. Such dynamic growth has been associated to a remarkable quality increase and to an unparalleled technological innovation process.

    La industria española de la cerámica ha experimentado un notable crecimiento en los últimos cuatro años; expansión que ha alcanzado a todos los sectores, pero que ha sido especialmente notable en los mas directamente asociados a la construcción: revestimientos, esmaltes, tejas y ladrillos. La combinación de un extraordinario esfuerzo exportador unido a las cifras récord en la viviendas iniciadas, 415 000 en 1999, justifican este auge. Otros sectores como refractarios han experimentado crecimientos significativos ante el ritmo elevado en la producción de acero, que alcanzó asimismo un récord histórico, 15 Mt en 1999. Para el conjunto de estos sectores el ritmo de crecimiento ha duplicado el de los principales competidores europeos. La producción de materias primas han experimentado un dinamismo aún mas elevado duplicándose prácticamente las cifras respecto a 1995. Este crecimiento ha estado asociado a un notable incremento en la calidad y en los procesos de innovación tecnológica.

  17. Optical scattering in glass ceramics

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mattarelli, M.; Montagna, M.; Verrocchio, P.

    2008-01-01

    The transparency of glass ceramics with nanocrystals is generally higher than that expected from the theory of Rayleigh scattering. We attribute this ultra-transparency to the spatial correlation of the nanoparticles. The structure factor is calculated for a simple model system, the random sequentia

  18. Doubled-ended ceramic thyratron

    CERN Multimedia

    1974-01-01

    The double-ended ceramic thyratron CX 1171 B, with its coaxial voltage divider for the SPS. Such a switch, paralleled by three ignitrons in series forms the "thyragnitron" arrangement, and can switch 10 kA, 25 ms pulses, with very fast rise times.

  19. Direct foaming porous alumina ceramics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Salvini, V.R.; Sandurkov, B.A.; Klein-Gunnewiek, R.F.; Pandolfelli, V.C. [Federal Univ. of Sao Carlos, Materials Engineering Dept., FIRE Associate Lab., Sao Carlos, SP (Brazil)

    2007-07-01

    This paper presents the work carried out in order to improve the properties of these porous alumina ceramics, concerning their application as thermal insulating. Changes in solid content of ceramic suspension, variations of pore forming agents and other additives were carried out and their effects on the green and the sintered mechanical strength are also shown. According to the literature, several starch types seem to be attractive pore forming agents as well as binders for porous ceramics. Most of them consist of a mixture of two polysaccharide types, amylose (linear) and amylopectin (highly branched). Corn, potato and rice starches were used in the present study because of their difference in size and shape. In order to increase the mechanical strength of the sintered porous ceramics a part of the Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} in the composition was replaced by Al(OH){sub 3}. Due to the changes of the composition and additives, porosities up to 81% and a mechanical strength of 15 MPa were obtained. (orig.)

  20. Radiation Effects in Nuclear Ceramics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. Thomé

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Due to outstanding physicochemical properties, ceramics are key engineering materials in many industrial domains. The evaluation of the damage created in ceramics employed in radiative media is a challenging problem for electronic, space, and nuclear industries. In this latter field, ceramics can be used as immobilization forms for radioactive wastes, inert fuel matrices for actinide transmutation, cladding materials for gas-cooled fission reactors, and structural components for fusion reactors. Information on the radiation stability of nuclear materials may be obtained by simulating the different types of interactions involved during the slowing down of energetic particles with ion beams delivered by various types of accelerators. This paper presents a review of the radiation effects occurring in nuclear ceramics, with an emphasis on recent results concerning the damage accumulation processes. Energetic ions in the KeV-GeV range are used to explore the nuclear collision (at low energy and electronic excitation (at high energy regimes. The recovery by electronic excitation of the damage created by ballistic collisions (SHIBIEC process is also addressed.

  1. Properties Research of Ceramic Layer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Z. Żółkiewicz

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available In the method of full mould the polystyrene model, which fills the mould cavity in the course of filling by the liquid metal is subjected tothe influence of high temperature and passes from the solid, through the liquid, to the gaseous state. During this process solid and gaseousproducts of thermal decomposition of polystyrene patterns occur. The kinetics of this process is significantly influenced by the gasificationtemperature, density and mass of the polystyrene patterns. One of the basic parameters is the amount and rate of gas from the polystyrenemodel during its thermal decomposition. Specific properties of ceramic layer used for lost foam castings are required. To ensure optimalprocess flow of metal in the form proper permeability of the ceramic layer is needed.To ensure optimal conditions for technological casting method EPS patterns are tested and determined are the technological parametersand physical-chemical process in: material properties of the pattern, properties of the ceramic layer applied to the pattern, pattern gasification kinetics pouring processIn the course of the research the characteristics of polystyrene and ceramic layer were determined.

  2. Art Education: Creative Ceramic Arts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swan, Nora; Marinaccio, Louis

    A course in forming, decorating, glazing, and firing pottery is presented. Upon completion of the course, the student will be expected to be familiar with all terms and characteristics connected with pottery and ceramics, and he will be expected to be able to properly handle and form clay. Course content includes the history of clay handling,…

  3. Gas Separations using Ceramic Membranes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Paul KT Liu

    2005-01-13

    This project has been oriented toward the development of a commercially viable ceramic membrane for high temperature gas separations. A technically and commercially viable high temperature gas separation membrane and process has been developed under this project. The lab and field tests have demonstrated the operational stability, both performance and material, of the gas separation thin film, deposited upon the ceramic membrane developed. This performance reliability is built upon the ceramic membrane developed under this project as a substrate for elevated temperature operation. A comprehensive product development approach has been taken to produce an economically viable ceramic substrate, gas selective thin film and the module required to house the innovative membranes for the elevated temperature operation. Field tests have been performed to demonstrate the technical and commercial viability for (i) energy and water recovery from boiler flue gases, and (ii) hydrogen recovery from refinery waste streams using the membrane/module product developed under this project. Active commercializations effort teaming with key industrial OEMs and end users is currently underway for these applications. In addition, the gas separation membrane developed under this project has demonstrated its economical viability for the CO2 removal from subquality natural gas and landfill gas, although performance stability at the elevated temperature remains to be confirmed in the field.

  4. Luminescent properties of Ce3+/Tb3+co-doped glass ceramics containing YPO4 nanocrystals for W-LEDs

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张志雄; 张约品; 冯治刚; 王成; 夏海平; 张新民

    2016-01-01

    Ce3+/Tb3+ co-doped transparent glass ceramics containing YPO4 nanocrystals were prepared using high temperature melt-ing method, and their structural and luminous properties were investigated. XRD analysis and TEM images confirmed the existence of YPO4 nanocrystals in glass ceramics. The transmission spectra proved that the glass ceramics specimens still maintained a high transparency. Then the excitation and emission spectra of the Ce3+ and Tb3+ single-doped and co-doped glass and glass ceramics were discussed, which proved that the glass ceramics had better luminescent properties. Under the near ultraviolet (331 nm) excitation, the broadband emission located at 385 nm was observed which was ascribed to 5d→2F5/2 and2F7/2 transition of Ce3+ ions. Several char-acteristic sharp peaks centered at 489, 543, 578 and 620 nm originated from the5D4 to7FJ (J=6, 5, 4, 3) of Tb3+ ions. The decay time of Tb3+ ions at 543 nm and the relevant energy levels of Ce3+ ions and Tb3+ ions illustrated the transfer process from Ce3+ ions to Tb3+ ions. The best CIE chromaticity coordinate of the glass ceramics specimen was calculated as (x=0.3201,y=0.3749), which was close to the NTSC standard values for white (x=0.333,y=0.333). All the results suggested that the YPO4-based Ce3+/Tb3+ co-doped glass ceramics could act as potential luminescent materials for white light-emitting diodes.

  5. An investigation into the role of core porcelain thickness and lamination in determining the flexural strength of In-Ceram dental materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alshehri, Sharifa Abdullah

    2011-06-01

    A biaxial flexure test was conducted to evaluate the effect of reducing the thickness of In-Ceram core material and veneering with Vitadur α dentine porcelain on its flexural strength. Four groups of 10 discs were tested; group I discs were In-Ceram discs with mean thickness of 1.58 ± 0.08 mm, group II discs were In-Ceram discs with mean thickness of 1.0 ± 0.11 mm, group III discs were laminated In-Ceram core porcelain/Vitadur α discs with a mean total thickness of 2.06 ± 0.15 mm and core porcelain thickness of 1.0 ± 0.11 mm; group IV discs were Vitadur α discs with a mean thickness of 2.08 ± 0.16 mm. Mean flexural strength values decreased between groups: 436 ± 38 MPa for group I, 352 ± 30 MPa for group II, 237 ± 24 MPa for group III, and 77 ± 14 MPa for group IV. The result of ANOVA and Tukey tests indicated that the mean flexural strength of group II was significantly less than group I, indicating that thickness of the In-Ceram core provides critical flexural strength to the final product. The addition of ≈ 1 mm of Vitadur α veneering porcelain to In-Ceram core significantly (p= 0.05) reduced the flexural strength as compared to the nonveneered In-Ceram core specimens (group II). The Vitadur α specimens (group IV) were significantly weaker than all the other groups. This study indicates that lamination should be avoided in areas where maximum strength is required for In-Ceram all-ceramic crowns and bridges. © 2011 by the American College of Prosthodontists.

  6. Ceramic matrix composite article and process of fabricating a ceramic matrix composite article

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cairo, Ronald Robert; DiMascio, Paul Stephen; Parolini, Jason Robert

    2016-01-12

    A ceramic matrix composite article and a process of fabricating a ceramic matrix composite are disclosed. The ceramic matrix composite article includes a matrix distribution pattern formed by a manifold and ceramic matrix composite plies laid up on the matrix distribution pattern, includes the manifold, or a combination thereof. The manifold includes one or more matrix distribution channels operably connected to a delivery interface, the delivery interface configured for providing matrix material to one or more of the ceramic matrix composite plies. The process includes providing the manifold, forming the matrix distribution pattern by transporting the matrix material through the manifold, and contacting the ceramic matrix composite plies with the matrix material.

  7. The effect of zirconia on flexural strength of IPS Empress 2 ceramic

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kermanshah H

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available Background and Aim: All ceramic, inlay-retained resin bonded fixed partial denture is a conservative method for replacement of missing teeth, because of minimal tooth reduction. The connector between the retainer and the pontic is the weak point of these bridges. Reinforcement of ceramic core will increase the clinical longevity. The aim of this study was to determine the effect of zirconia on flexural strength of IPS Empress 2 core ceramic.Materials and Methods: In this experimental in vitro study, twenty eight bar shape specimens (17´3.1´3.1 mm were made of four different materials: (1 Slip casting in-ceram alumina core (control group (2 Hot-pressed lithium disilicate core ceramic (IPS Empress 2 (3 IPS Empress 2 with cosmopost (zirconia post inserted longitudinally in the center of the bar (4 IPS Empress 2 with cosmopost (zirconia post inserted longitudinally in bottom of the bar. Specimens were subjected to three-point flexure loading with the span of 15mm, at a cross-head speed of 0.5 mm/min. Failure loads were recorded and analyzed using one-way ANOVA and Tomhane Post-hoc tests and p<0.05 was set as the level of significance. Fractured surfaces were then observed by scanning electron microscope (SEM. Four additional samples were made as the third group, and zirconia-IPS interface was observed by SEM before fracture.Results: Mean values and standard deviations of three point flexural strengths of groups 1 to 4, were: 378.4±44.6, 258.6±27.5, 144.3±51.7, 230±22.3 MPa respectively. All the groups were statistically different from each other (P<0.05, except groups 2 and 4. The flexural strengths of groups 2, 3, 4 were significantly lower than group 1. Group 3 had the lowest flexural strength. SEM analysis showed that the initiated cracks propagated in the interface of zirconia post and IPS Empress 2 ceramic.Conclusion: Based on the results of this study, inserting zirconia post (cosmopost in IPS Empress 2 ceramic does not reinforce all-ceramic

  8. Fracture resistance of a selection of full-contour all-ceramic crowns: an in vitro study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zesewitz, Tim F; Knauber, Andreas W; Northdurft, Frank P

    2014-01-01

    This study aimed to evaluate the fracture resistance of monolithic single crowns made from zirconia (ZI), lithium disilicate (LS2), or feldspar ceramic (FC). Five groups of crowns representing a maxillary first molar were made with the appropriate dimensions according to the manufacturer's instructions. The ZI and LS2 crowns were luted adhesively or cemented conventionally on a metal abutment tooth analog. The feldspar ceramic crowns were luted adhesively. All specimens underwent axial loading until fracture. The crowns in the ZI groups possessed the highest fracture resistance independent of the mode of fixation.

  9. Origins of enhanced dielectric properties in titania-modified tantalum pentoxide ceramics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brennecka, Geoffrey Lee

    Tantalum oxide (Ta2O5)-based materials are of interest for various applications, including dynamic random access memories (DRAMS) and thermal and environmental barrier coatings (TBCs, EBCs). Widespread use, however, has been limited due to practical difficulties in densification of ceramic forms, and a lack of basic understanding of structure-processing-property relationships for Ta2O5-based ceramics. The current research was designed to investigate these relationships and to determine the origins of a previously reported dielectric enhancement for TiO2 -modified Ta2O5. Rapid and expansive grain growth associated with the L⇒H-Ta 2O5 phase transformation was found to trap residual porosity, so sintering at temperatures below the transformation was required for full densification. A simple and effective solution-coated powder processing route was developed to enable reduced-temperature densification of chemically-homogeneous TiO2-modified H-Ta2O5 ceramics for the first time. A new crystal structure of H-Ta2O5 based upon extensive polyhedral edge-sharing was verified using high-resolution X-ray diffraction at the Advanced Photon Source. Simulated diffraction patterns matched data collected at up to 1500°C out to 2theta values equivalent to 110° (CuKalpha). In-situ XRD and Raman studies both revealed two distinct phase transformations during cooling from the high-temperature prototypic phase for specimens containing ≤5% TiO2, but only one transformation for specimens containing 8% TiO2, and revealed that the H-Ta2O5 form present at room temperature depended strongly upon TiO2 content. Dense and homogeneous specimens enabled the first detailed investigation into the electrical properties of TiO2-modified H-Ta2O 5 ceramics. Specimens containing 8% TiO2 exhibited dielectric constant (K) values of ˜280 at 20°C with tan delta values ˜0.01, but undoped specimens had tan delta values of ˜0.10 and DC resistivity values of <1011O·cm. Hyper-Raman spectroscopy revealed

  10. Enzymatic detection of formalin-fixed museum specimens for DNA analysis and enzymatic maceration of formalin-fixed specimens

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Margrethe; Redsted Rasmussen, Arne; Simonsen, Kim Pilkjær

    2016-01-01

    % ethanol. The method was subsequently tested on wild-living preserved specimens and an archived specimen. The protease enzyme used was SavinaseH 16 L, Type EX from Novozymes A/S. The enzymatic screening test demands only simple laboratory equipment. The method is useful for natural history collections...... in museums where DNA analyses of archived specimens are performed. Wasted time and resources can be avoided through the detection of formalin-fixed specimens because these specimens yield low-quality, damaged DNA. In addition to the screening method, it is shown that formalin-preserved specimens can...

  11. Reheating of zinc-titanate sintered specimens

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Labus N.

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The scope of this work was observing dimensional and heat transfer changes in ZnTiO3 samples during heating in nitrogen and air atmosphere. Interactions of bulk specimens with gaseous surrounding induce microstructure changes during heating. Sintered ZnTiO3 nanopowder samples were submitted to subsequent heating. Dilatation curves and thermogravimetric with simultaneous differential thermal analysis TGA/DTA curves were recorded. Reheating was performed in air and nitrogen atmospheres. Reheated samples obtained at different characteristic temperatures in air were analyzed by X-ray diffraction (XRD. Microstructures obtained by scanning electron microscopy (SEM of reheated sintered samples are presented and compared. Reheating in a different atmosphere induced different microstructures. The goal was indicating possible causes leading to the microstructure changes. [Projekat Ministarstva nauke Republike Srbije, br. OI172057 i br. III45014

  12. Dissolution of bulk specimens of silicon nitride

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davis, W. F.; Merkle, E. J.

    1981-01-01

    An accurate chemical characterization of silicon nitride has become important in connection with current efforts to incorporate components of this material into advanced heat engines. However, there are problems concerning a chemical analysis of bulk silicon nitride. Current analytical methods require the pulverization of bulk specimens. A pulverization procedure making use of grinding media, on the other hand, will introduce contaminants. A description is given of a dissolution procedure which overcomes these difficulties. It has been found that up to at least 0.6 g solid pieces of various samples of hot pressed and reaction bonded silicon nitride can be decomposed in a mixture of 3 mL hydrofluoric acid and 1 mL nitric acid overnight at 150 C in a Parr bomb. High-purity silicon nitride is completely soluble in nitric acid after treatment in the bomb. Following decomposition, silicon and hydrofluoric acid are volatilized and insoluble fluorides are converted to a soluble form.

  13. Ceramic tape fabrication: a review

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anon.

    2005-04-01

    The production flow for green tapes can be roughly divided into the production of slip and the tape casting/tape calendering process. A slip usually consists of ceramic powder, solvents, binders, plasticizers and dispersants. The preparation of the slip is a critical step in the fabrication of ceramic tapes. To obtain a homogeneous slip, the organic additives must first be weighed and dissolved in the solvent. The ceramic powder is then dispersed and existing agglomerates destroyed. A dispersant is added to prevent the reformation of agglomerates. If necessary, the viscosity is then adjusted, and the slip filtered. The exact sequence depends on the type of slip and the equipment used. To destroy the agglomerates, a wide range of mills is employed, from ball mills through attritor mills to ultrasonic devices (mainly on laboratory scale). A wide variety of grinding media, with different sizes, geometries and materials, is also used. The selection depends largely on the characteristics of the slip (e.g.: viscosity, wettability, drying behaviour), the required properties of the ceramic tapes (permitted content of impurities, sintering behaviour) and the quantities to be processed. In most cases, an actual grinding effect, i.e. size reduction of the particles, is avoided. Some of the most commonly used devices are described. At present, tapes with a thickness of 5 {mu}m can be fabricated - in the next years, thicknesses of around 1{mu}m must be reached. To enable this, slip preparation must be further improved and production performed in an absolutely clean environment (for specific products clean rooms are already standard, but even higher clean room standards will be needed in the future). Moreover, new, finer ceramic powders are necessary with particle sizes on the nanometer scale (nanopowders). (orig.)

  14. Tensile test of dumbbell-shaped specimen in thickness direction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iizuka, Takashi

    2016-10-01

    Sheet metal forming is widely used in manufacturing shops, and evaluation of forming limit for sheet metal is important. However, specimen shape influences on the fracture of the sheet metal. As one of methods to decrease these effects, an uniaxial tensile test using specimen dumbbell-shaped in thickness direction had been examined using FEM analysis. In this study, actually specimen dumbbell-shaped in thickness direction was fabricated using a new incremental sheet forging method, and uniaxial tensile test was conducted. Load-stroke diagram, fracture morphologies, stress-strain curves and shape after fracture were investigated, and effects of specimen shape were considered. Elongation was larger as using specimen dumbbell-shaped in the width direction. Stress-strain curves until necking occurred were less influenced by specimen shape. However, yield stress decreased and local elongation increased as using specimen dumbbell-shaped in the width direction. The reasons why these tendencies showed were considered in the view of specimen shapes.

  15. A new specimen management system using RFID technology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shim, Hun; Uh, Young; Lee, Seung Hwan; Yoon, Young Ro

    2011-12-01

    The specimen management system with barcode needs to be improved in order to solve inherent problems in work performance. This study describes the application of Radio Frequency Identification (RFID) which is the solution for the problems associated with specimen labeling and management. A new specimen management system and architecture with RFID technology for clinical laboratory was designed. The suggested system was tested in various conditions such as durability to temperature and aspect of effective utilization of new work flow under a virtual hospital clinical laboratory environment. This system demonstrates its potential application in clinical laboratories for improving work flow and specimen management. The suggested specimen management system with RFID technology has advantages in comparison to the traditional specimen management system with barcode in the aspect of mass specimen processing, robust durability of temperature, humidity changes, and effective specimen tracking.

  16. Thermal Expansion Behavior of Precursor-Derived Amorphous Si-C-N and Si-B-C-N Ceramics

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2002-01-01

    Thermal expansion behaviors of some precursor-derived amorphous Si-C-N and Si-B-C-N ceramics, which were shaped by plastic forming after crosslink, were studied. To complete the shrinkage and densification, after thermolysis specimens were heat treated at a temperature of 1400℃ for 10 h in nitrogen atmosphere. The thermal expansion coefficient of VT50-derived amorphous Si-C-N ceramic increases from 1.98×10-6/K at 400℃ to 3.09×10-6/K at 1000℃, of NCP200-derived amorphous Si-C-N ceramic increases from 2.35× 10-6/K at 400℃ to 3.45×10-6/K at1000℃, and of T2-1-derived amorphous Si-B-C-N ceramic increases from 2.08×10-6/K at 400℃ to 3.18×10-6/K at 1000℃. No glass transition for these amorphous ceramic materials was detected, indicating that as-thermolyzed precursor-derived Si-(B-)C-N ceramic materials are amorphous solids, but not glasses.

  17. Dental ceramics coated with bioactive glass: Surface changes after exposure in a simulated body fluid under static and dynamic conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Papadopoulou, L.; Kontonasaki, E.; Zorba, T.; Chatzistavrou, X.; Pavlidou, E.; Paraskevopoulos, K.; Sklavounos, S.; Koidis, P.

    2003-07-01

    Bioactive materials develop a strong bond with living tissues through a carbonate-containing hydroxyapatite layer, similar to that of bone. The fabrication of a thin bioactive glass coating on dental ceramics used in metal-ceramic restorations, could provide a bioactive surface, which in combination with a tissue regenerative technique could lead to periodontal tissues attachment. The aim of this study was the in vitro investigation of the surface structure changes of dental ceramics used in metal-ceramic restorations, coated with a bioactive glass heat-treated at 950 °C, after exposure in a simulated body fluid (SBF) under two different soaking conditions. Coating of dental ceramics with a bioactive glass resulted in the formation of a stable and well bonded with the ceramic substrate thin layer. The growth of a well-attached carbonate apatite layer on their surface after immersion in a simulated body fluid is well evidenced under both experimental conditions, although in static environment the rate of apatite growth is constant and the grown layers seem to be more dense and compact compared with the respective layers observed on specimens under dynamic conditions.

  18. Effects of surface treatment on bond strength between dental resin agent and zirconia ceramic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moradabadi, Ashkan; Roudsari, Sareh Esmaeily Sabet; Yekta, Bijan Eftekhari; Rahbar, Nima

    2014-01-01

    This paper presents the results of an experimental study to understand the dominant mechanism in bond strength between dental resin agent and zirconia ceramic by investigating the effects of different surface treatments. Effects of two major mechanisms of chemical and micromechanical adhesion were evaluated on bond strength of zirconia to luting agent. Specimens of yttrium-oxide-partially-stabilized zirconia blocks were fabricated. Seven groups of specimens with different surface treatment were prepared. 1) zirconia specimens after airborne particle abrasion (SZ), 2) zirconia specimens after etching (ZH), 3) zirconia specimens after airborne particle abrasion and simultaneous etching (HSZ), 4) zirconia specimens coated with a layer of a Fluorapatite-Leucite glaze (GZ), 5) GZ specimens with additional acid etching (HGZ), 6) zirconia specimens coated with a layer of salt glaze (SGZ) and 7) SGZ specimens after etching with 2% HCl (HSGZ). Composite cylinders were bonded to airborne-particle-abraded surfaces of ZirkonZahn specimens with Panavia F2 resin luting agent. Failure modes were examined under 30× magnification and the effect of surface treatments was analyzed by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and atomic force microscopy (AFM). SZ and HSZ groups had the highest and GZ and SGZ groups had the lowest mean shear bond strengths among all groups. Mean shear bond strengths were significantly decreased by applying a glaze layer on zirconia surfaces in GZ and SGZ groups. However, bond strengths were improved after etching process. Airborne particle abrasion resulted in higher shear bond strengths compared to etching treatment. Modes of failure varied among different groups. Finally, it is concluded that micromechanical adhesion was a more effective mechanism than chemical adhesion and airborne particle abrasion significantly increased mean shear bond strengths compared with another surface treatments.

  19. A non-destructive DNA sampling technique for herbarium specimens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shepherd, Lara D

    2017-01-01

    Herbarium specimens are an important source of DNA for plant research but current sampling methods require the removal of material for DNA extraction. This is undesirable for irreplaceable specimens such as rare species or type material. Here I present the first non-destructive sampling method for extracting DNA from herbarium specimens. DNA was successfully retrieved from robust leaves and/or stems of herbarium specimens up to 73 years old.

  20. Drone Transport of Microbes in Blood and Sputum Laboratory Specimens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amukele, Timothy K; Street, Jeff; Carroll, Karen; Miller, Heather; Zhang, Sean X

    2016-10-01

    Unmanned aerial vehicles (UAVs) could potentially be used to transport microbiological specimens. To examine the impact of UAVs on microbiological specimens, blood and sputum culture specimens were seeded with usual pathogens and flown in a UAV for 30 ± 2 min. Times to recovery, colony counts, morphologies, and matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization-time of flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF MS)-based identifications of the flown and stationary specimens were similar for all microbes studied.

  1. The type specimen of Anoura geoffroyi lasiopyga (Chiroptera: Phyllostomidae)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arroyo-Cabrales, Joaquin; Gardner, A.L.

    2003-01-01

    In 1868, Wilhelm Peters described Glossonycteris lasiopyga, based on a specimen provided by Henri de Saussure and collected in Mexico. The type specimen was presumed to be among those housed in the collections of the Zoologisches Museum of the Humboldt Universitat in Berlin, Germany. Our study of one of Saussure?s specimens from Mexico, discovered in the collections of the Museum d?Histoire Naturelle, Geneva, Switzerland, demonstrates that it and not one of the Berlin specimens is the holotype.

  2. Elastic-plastic analysis of the SS-3 tensile specimen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Majumdar, S. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States)

    1998-09-01

    Tensile tests of most irradiated specimens of vanadium alloys are conducted using the miniature SS-3 specimen which is not ASTM approved. Detailed elastic-plastic finite element analysis of the specimen was conducted to show that, as long as the ultimate to yield strength ratio is less than or equal to 1.25 (which is satisfied by many irradiated materials), the stress-plastic strain curve obtained by using such a specimen is representative of the true material behavior.

  3. Preparation and Microstructure of Glass-ceramics and Ceramic Composite Materials

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    HE Feng; XIE Junlin; HAN Da

    2008-01-01

    The technology and microstructure of glass-ceramics and ceramic composite materials were studied.A suitable ceramic body was chosen on the basis of the sintering temperature of CaO-Al2O3-SiO2 system glass-ceramics.According to the expansion coefficient of the ceramic body,that of CaO-Al2O3-SiO2 system glass-ceramics was adjusted.a-wollastonite was found present as the major crystalline phase in glass-ceramic.The CaO-Al2O3-SiO2 system glass-ceramic layer and ceramic body could be sintered together by adjusting the sintering period.The compositions of glass-ceramic layer and ceramic body diffuse mutually at 1100℃.resulting in an interface between them.To achieve good sintered properties of glass-ceramics and the chosen ceramic body,at least a four-hour sintering time is used.

  4. Effect of artificial saliva and pH on shear bond strength of resin cements to zirconia-based ceramic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geramipanah, F; Majidpour, M; Sadighpour, L; Fard, M J Kharazi

    2013-03-01

    The aim of the present study was to evaluate the effect of media with different pH on shear and strength of resin cements to zirconia-based ceramics. Sixty rectangularly shaped specimens made of a zirconia based ceramic (Cercon, Dentsply) were prepared, air-blasted with 110 microm aluminum oxide particles (Al203) and randomly assigned into three groups (n = 30). A universal resin composite (Filtek Z250, 3M/ESPE) was bonded to each specimen using one of the following three cements: Calibra (Dentsply), Panavia F2 (kurary) and Unicem (3M/ESPE). Specimens were thermal cycled and stored in one of the following three media for two weeks: water at pH = 7, saliva at pH = 7 and saliva at pH = 3.5. The mean shear bond strength of each group was analyzed using the Kruskal-Wallis test (alpha = 0.05). The modes of failure were recorded using a streomicroscope. All specimens in the Calibra groups showed premature debonding. No significant difference was found between the two other cements or different media. The failure modes in the two latter cements were predominantly adhesive. Despite the adverse effect of acidic media on the properties of restorative materials, the media did not significantly influence the bond strength of MDP-containing resin cement and a self-adhesive cement to a zirconia- based ceramic.

  5. Effect of laser welding on the titanium ceramic tensile bond strength

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rodrigo Galo

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Titanium reacts strongly with elements, mainly oxygen at high temperature. The high temperature of titanium laser welding modifies the surface, and may interfere on the metal-ceramic tensile bond strength. OBJECTIVE: The influence of laser welding on the titanium-ceramic bonding has not yet been established. The purpose of this in vitro study was to analyze the influence of laser welding applied to commercially pure titanium (CpTi substructure on the bond strength of commercial ceramic. The influence of airborne particle abrasion (Al2O3 conditions was also studied. MATERIAL AND METHODS: Forty CpTi cylindrical rods (3 mm x 60 mm were cast and divided into 2 groups: with laser welding (L and without laser welding (WL. Each group was divided in 4 subgroups, according to the size of the particles used in airborne particle abrasion: A - Al2O3 (250 µm; B - Al2O3 (180 µm; C - Al2O3 (110 µm; D - Al2O3 (50 µm. Ceramic rings were fused around the CpTi rods. Specimens were invested and their tensile strength was measured at fracture with a universal testing machine at a crosshead speed of 2.0 mm/min and 200 kgf load cell. Statistical analysis was carried out with analysis of variance and compared using the independent t test (p<0.05. RESULTS: Significant differences were found among all subgroups (p<0.05. The highest and the lowest bond strength means were recorded in subgroups WLC (52.62 MPa and LD (24.02 MPa, respectively. CONCLUSION: Airborne particle abrasion yielded significantly lower bond strength as the Al2O3 particle size decreased. Mechanical retention decreased in the laser-welded specimens, i.e. the metal-ceramic tensile bond strength was lower.

  6. Fixture For Hot Stress Tests Of Thin Specimens

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gates, Thomas S.

    1993-01-01

    Fixture designed to hold and heat thin, rectangular-cross-section specimen of composite material during hot lengthwise-stress test. Suitable for testing same specimen in either tension or compression. Clamps lightly onto specimen, providing both heat via thermal conduction and lateral support needed to prevent buckling during compression test.

  7. 49 CFR 219.205 - Specimen collection and handling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Specimen collection and handling. 219.205 Section... § 219.205 Specimen collection and handling. (a) General. Urine and blood specimens must be obtained, marked, preserved, handled, and made available to FRA consistent with the requirements of this subpart...

  8. The CAS Bio-specimen Centers in Sound Progress

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Liangqian; QIAO Gexia; YAO Yijian

    2010-01-01

    @@ Bio-specimen centers, including herbaria and zoological museums, are the most integrated places for the storage of specimens, which are real samples and the most important vouchers for taxonomic and biodiversity studies.The information carried by the specimens is of substantial reference for research on species distribution, history, status, phylogeny and evolution, etc.

  9. Adaptation of Museum Specimens for Use in Anatomical Teaching Aids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harris, P. F.; And Others

    1977-01-01

    Color transparencies are prepared of a re-colored anatomical specimen after placing labels temporarily in position to indicate specific structures. The specimen is also radiographed to show skeletal and soft tissue structures. Cross-reference among the specimen, photographs, and radiographs is supplemented by examination and self-assessment…

  10. Oxygen Transport Ceramic Membranes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    S. Bandopadhyay; N. Nagabhushana; T. Nithyanantham; X.-D Zhou; Y-W. Sin; H.U. Anderson; Alan Jacobson; C.A. Mims

    2005-02-01

    The present quarterly report describes some of the investigations on the structural properties of dense OTM bars provided by Praxair and studies on newer composition of Ti doped LSF. Thermogravimetric analysis (TGA) was carried out on La{sub 0.2}Sr{sub 0.8}Fe{sub 0.55}Ti{sub 0.45}O{sub 3-{delta}} to investigate oxygen deficiency ({delta}) of the sample. The TGA was performed in a controlled atmosphere using oxygen, argon, carbon monoxide and carbon dioxide with adjustable gas flow rates. In this experiment, the weight loss and gain of La{sub 0.2}Sr{sub 0.8}Fe{sub 0.55}Ti{sub 0.45}O{sub 3-{delta}} was directly measured by TGA. The weight change of the sample was evaluated at between 600 and 1250 C in air or 1000 C as a function of oxygen partial pressure. The oxygen deficiencies calculated from TGA data as a function of oxygen activity and temperature will be estimated and compared with that from neutron diffraction measurement in air. The LSFT and LSFT/CGO membranes were fabricated from the powder obtained from Praxair Specialty Ceramics. The sintered membranes were subjected to microstructure analysis and hardness analysis. The LSFT membrane is composed of fine grains with two kinds of grain morphology. The grain size distribution was characterized using image analysis. In LSFT/CGO membrane a lot of grain pullout was observed from the less dense, porous phase. The hardness of the LSFT and dual phase membranes were studied at various loads. The hardness values obtained from the cross section of the membranes were also compared to that of the values obtained from the surface. An electrochemical cell has been designed and built for measurements of the Seebeck coefficient as a function of temperature and pressure. Measurements on La{sub 0.2}Sr{sub 0.8}Fe{sub 0.55}Ti{sub 0.45}O{sub 3-{delta}} as a function of temperature an oxygen partial pressure are reported. Further analysis of the dilatometry data obtained previously is presented. A series of isotope transients

  11. Catalyzed Ceramic Burner Material

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barnes, Amy S., Dr.

    2012-06-29

    period in accomplishing these objectives. Our work in the area of Pd-based, methane oxidation catalysts has led to the development of highly active catalysts with relatively low loadings of Pd metal using proprietary coating methods. The thermal stability of these Pd-based catalysts were characterized using SEM and BET analyses, further demonstrating that certain catalyst supports offer enhanced stability toward both PdO decomposition and/or thermal sintering/growth of Pd particles. When applied to commercially available fiber mesh substrates (both metallic and ceramic) and tested in an open-air burner, these catalyst-support chemistries showed modest improvements in the NOx emissions and radiant output compared to uncatalyzed substrates. More significant, though, was the performance of the catalyst-support chemistries on novel media substrates. These substrates were developed to overcome the limitations that are present with commercially available substrate designs and increase the gas-catalyst contact time. When catalyzed, these substrates demonstrated a 65-75% reduction in NOx emissions across the firing range when tested in an open air burner. In testing in a residential boiler, this translated into NOx emissions of <15 ppm over the 15-150 kBtu/hr firing range.

  12. Oxygen Transport Ceramic Membranes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    S. Bandopadhyay; T. Nithyanantham; X.-D Zhou; Y-W. Sin; H.U. Anderson; Alan Jacobson; C.A. Mims

    2005-02-01

    The present quarterly report describes some of the investigations on the structural properties of dense OTM bars provided by Praxair and studies on newer composition of Ti doped LSF. The in situ electrical conductivity and Seebeck coefficient measurements were made on LSFT at 1000 and 1200 C over the oxygen activity range from air to 10{sup -15} atm. The electrical conductivity measurements exhibited a p to n type transition at an oxygen activity of 1 x 10{sup -10} at 1000 C and 1 x 10{sup -6} at 1200 C. Thermogravimetric studies were also carried out over the same oxygen activities and temperatures. Based on the results of these measurements, the chemical and mechanical stability range of LSFT were determined and defect structure was established. The studies on the fracture toughness of the LSFT and dual phase membranes exposed to air and N{sub 2} at 1000 C was done and the XRD and SEM analysis of the specimens were carried out to understand the structural and microstructural changes. The membranes that are exposed to high temperatures at an inert and a reactive atmosphere undergo many structural and chemical changes which affect the mechanical properties. A complete transformation of fracture behavior was observed in the N{sub 2} treated LSFT samples. Further results to investigate the origin of the slow kinetics on reduction of ferrites have been obtained. The slow kinetics appear to be related to a non-equilibrium reduction pathway that initially results in the formation of iron particles. At long times, equilibrium can be reestablished with recovery of the perovskite phase. Recent results on transient kinetic data are presented. The 2-D modeling of oxygen movement has been undertaken in order to fit isotope data. The model is used to study ''frozen'' profiles in patterned or composite membranes.

  13. Reliability of 46,XX results on miscarriage specimens: a review of 1,222 first-trimester miscarriage specimens

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Lathi, Ruth B; Gustin, Stephanie L F; Keller, Jennifer; Maisenbacher, Melissa K; Sigurjonsson, Styrmir; Tao, Rosina; Demko, Zach

    2014-01-01

    To examine the rate of maternal contamination in miscarriage specimens. Retrospective review of 1,222 miscarriage specimens submitted for chromosome testing with detection of maternal cell contamination (MCC...

  14. Method of forming a ceramic to ceramic joint

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cutler, Raymond Ashton; Hutchings, Kent Neal; Kleinlein, Brian Paul; Carolan, Michael Francis

    2010-04-13

    A method of joining at least two sintered bodies to form a composite structure, includes: providing a joint material between joining surfaces of first and second sintered bodies; applying pressure from 1 kP to less than 5 MPa to provide an assembly; heating the assembly to a conforming temperature sufficient to allow the joint material to conform to the joining surfaces; and further heating the assembly to a joining temperature below a minimum sintering temperature of the first and second sintered bodies. The joint material includes organic component(s) and ceramic particles. The ceramic particles constitute 40-75 vol. % of the joint material, and include at least one element of the first and/or second sintered bodies. Composite structures produced by the method are also disclosed.

  15. New suoid specimens from Gebel Zelten, Libya

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pickford, M.

    2006-12-01

    Full Text Available A restricted collection of suoids from Gebel Zelten was made in the 1990’s by the Spanish-Libyan Palaeontology Expedition. Dr Dolores Soria filmed the specimens with a video camera and took measurements of the teeth with vernier calipers. This paper uses the images from the video, which, even though somewhat limited in terms of picture quality, are of interest because they represent the first known snout of the gigantic suid Megalochoerus khinzikebirus. The images reveal that it is basically an enlarged version of Libycochoerus massai, but with relatively small premolars. The sanithere specimens from the site were photographed with an Olympus 1.4 megapixel digital camera, and the image quality is better than from the video camera. These specimens throw light on the degree of sexual dimorphism exhibited by sanitheres, a feature that was previously inferred from isolated teeth, but which can now be confirmed on the basis of the two mandible fragments from Gebel Zelten. This paper is dedicated to the memory of Dr Soria. This paper takes into account a few undescribed suid post-cranial bones from Gebel Zelten housed in the Natural History Museum, London, collected during the 1960’s by R. Savage.Una limitada colección de suoideos procedentes de Gebel Zelten fue hecha a finales de los años 1990 por una expedición paleontológica internacional, con participación española y libia. La Dra. Dolores Soria filmó los ejemplares con una cámara de vídeo y tomó las medidas de los dientes con calibre. En este trabajo se utilizan las imágenes filmadas, que, aunque algo limitadas en términos de calidad fotográfica, son interesantes porque representan las primeras conocidas del rostro del suido gigante Megalochoerus khinzikebirus. Las imágenes revelan que básicamente es una versión agrandada de Libycochoerus massai, pero con premolares relativamente más pequeños. Los ejemplares de saniterios fueron fotografiados con una cámara digital Olympus

  16. Apparatus and method for magnetically processing a specimen

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ludtka, Gerard M; Ludtka, Gail M; Wilgen, John B; Kisner, Roger A; Jaramillo, Roger A

    2013-09-03

    An apparatus for magnetically processing a specimen that couples high field strength magnetic fields with the magnetocaloric effect includes a high field strength magnet capable of generating a magnetic field of at least 1 Tesla and a magnetocaloric insert disposed within a bore of the high field strength magnet. A method for magnetically processing a specimen includes positioning a specimen adjacent to a magnetocaloric insert within a bore of a magnet and applying a high field strength magnetic field of at least 1 Tesla to the specimen and to the magnetocaloric insert. The temperature of the specimen changes during the application of the high field strength magnetic field due to the magnetocaloric effect.

  17. Apparatus and method for magnetically processing a specimen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ludtka, Gerard M; Ludtka, Gail M; Wilgen, John B; Kisner, Roger A; Jaramillo, Roger A

    2013-09-03

    An apparatus for magnetically processing a specimen that couples high field strength magnetic fields with the magnetocaloric effect includes a high field strength magnet capable of generating a magnetic field of at least 1 Tesla and a magnetocaloric insert disposed within a bore of the high field strength magnet. A method for magnetically processing a specimen includes positioning a specimen adjacent to a magnetocaloric insert within a bore of a magnet and applying a high field strength magnetic field of at least 1 Tesla to the specimen and to the magnetocaloric insert. The temperature of the specimen changes during the application of the high field strength magnetic field due to the magnetocaloric effect.

  18. Instrumented impact testing machine with reduced specimen oscillation effects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rintamaa, R.; Ranka, K.; Wallin, K.; Ikonen, K.; Talja, H.; Kotilainen, H.; Sirkkola, E.

    1984-07-01

    A pendulum-type instrumented Charpy test apparatus based on inverted test geometry was developed. Geometry inversion reduces inertia load and specimen oscillation effects. Initial impact energy is double that of standard (300 J) impact testers, allowing the use of larger (10 x 20 x 110 mm) bend specimens than normal Charpy specimens. The rotation axis in the three point bending is nearly stationary, making COD-measurements possible. Inertia effects and specimen oscillations are compared with the conventional tester, and using an analytical finite element model for Charpy V-notch specimens. Better performance for the inverted geometry is reported.

  19. Build up the Ceramics Platform, Enhance the Brand Effect

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2006-01-01

    @@ To promote the export trade of China ceramics industry, to develop the overseas marking channel for domestic architecture sanitary ceramics industry ,China Ceramics City ,jointly with China's Foreign Trade magazine,start to publicize on the overseas market.

  20. A general mixed mode fracture mechanics test specimen: The DCB-specimen loaded with uneven bending moments

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Bent F.; Jørgensen, K.; Jacobsen, T.K.;

    2004-01-01

    A mixed mode specimen is proposed for fracture mechanics characterisation of adhesive joints, laminates and multilayers. The specimen is a double cantilever beam specimen loaded with uneven bending moments at the two free beams. By varying the ratiobetween the two applied moments, the full mode...