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Sample records for plate-like snow dendrites

  1. Plate-like osteoma cutis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orme, Charisse M; Hale, Christopher S; Meehan, Shane A; Long, Wendy

    2014-12-16

    Osteoma cutis is the aberrant development of bone within the skin. The bone formation may be de novo (primary) or result from an injury to the skin (secondary). Here we present a healthy 53-year-old man with no known abnormalities in calcium or phosphate metabolism with plate-like osteoma cutis of the scalp. Plate- or plaque-like osteoma cutis was initially described as a congenital condition but has now been reported several times in the literature as an idiopathic process that occurs in adults. Treatment options are limited and are only required if the lesion is bothersome to the patient.

  2. Snow

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    小雅

    2011-01-01

    雪花,雪花,白又凉。雪花,雪花,来了又走。啊,雪花!你去哪儿?我不知道,我不知道,飘到哪儿。%Snow, snow, White and cold. Snow, snow, Come and go. Oh, snow! Where do you go? I don't know, I don't know. Where I go.

  3. Acquired plate-like osteoma cutis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vashi, Neelam; Chu, Julie; Patel, Rishi

    2011-10-15

    Plate-like osteoma cutis is a rare disorder that has been historically classified as a congenital syndrome. It has a possible relationship to a mutation in the gene (GNAS1) that encodes the α-subunit of the stimulatory G protein, which regulates adenyl cyclase activity. We report a case of extensive plaque-like masses on the scalp and face with no abnormalities in calcium or phosphate metabolism and no preceding inflammatory cutaneous conditions. With less than ten reported cases, to our knowledge, this is one the few cases of acquired plate-like osteoma cutis described in the literature.

  4. Thin shell vesicles composed of hydrophilic plate-like nanoparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Subramaniam, Anand; Wan, Jiandi; Gopinath, Arvind; Stone, Howard

    2011-03-01

    Nanopowders of graphene oxide, montmorillonite and laponite spontaneously delaminate into ultrathin nanoscopic plates when dispersed in water. These plates, which are typically ~ 1 nm thick and microns in lateral dimension, have found many uses as precursors to graphene, ceramics, layer-by-layer structures, and as structural modifiers of nanocomposites. Here we show that mechanical forces due to shear in a narrow gap can assemble hydrophilic plate-like particles on air bubbles, forming stable nanoplated armored bubbles. Translucent inorganic vesicles (vesicles defined here as closed thin-shelled structures with the same liquid inside and outside) of these particles are produced when the nanoplated armored bubbles are exposed to common water-miscible organic liquids and surfactants. These inorganic vesicles are mechanically robust, have walls that are about six nanometres thick, and are perforated with pores of submicron dimensions. We characterize the phenomenon and find that a wetting transition at the scale of the nanoparticles is the primary mechanism of formation. The discovery of these novel inorganic structures raises a wealth of questions of fundamental interest in materials and surface science.

  5. Synthesis and ultrastructure of plate-like apatite single crystals as a model for tooth enamel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhuang, Zhi, E-mail: zhuang@meiji.ac.jp [Department of Applied Chemistry, School of Science and Technology, Meiji University, 1-1-1 Higashimita, Tama-ku, Kawasaki, Kanagawa 214-8571 (Japan); Yoshimura, Hideyuki, E-mail: hyoshi@isc.meiji.ac.jp [Department of Physics, School of Science and Technology, Meiji University, 1-1-1 Higashimita, Tama-ku, Kawasaki, Kanagawa 214-8571 (Japan); Aizawa, Mamoru, E-mail: mamorua@isc.meiji.ac.jp [Department of Applied Chemistry, School of Science and Technology, Meiji University, 1-1-1 Higashimita, Tama-ku, Kawasaki, Kanagawa 214-8571 (Japan)

    2013-07-01

    Hydroxyapatite (HAp) is an inorganic constituent compound of human bones and teeth, with superior biocompatibility and bioactivity characteristics. Its crystal structure is hexagonal, characterized by a(b)- and c-planes. In vertebrate long bones, HAp crystals have a c-axis orientation, while in tooth enamel, they have an a(b)-axis orientation. Many methods can be used to synthesize c-axis oriented HAp single crystals; however, to the best of our knowledge, there have been no reports on a synthesis method for a(b)-axis oriented HAp single crystals. In this study, we successfully synthesized plate-like HAp crystals at the air–liquid interface of a starting solution via an enzyme reaction of urea with urease. Crystal phase analysis and ultrastructure observations were carried out, and the results indicated that the particles were single crystals, with almost the same a(b)-axis orientation as tooth enamel. It is hoped that by utilizing their unique surface charge and atomic arrangement, the resulting particles can be used as a high-performance biomaterial, capable of adsorbing bio-related substances and a model for tooth enamel. - Highlights: ► Synthesis of plate-like hydroxyapatite crystals at air–liquid interface ► Ultrastructural analysis of plate-like hydroxyapatite crystals ► Plate-like hydroxyapatite single crystals with a high a(b)-axis orientation ► Plate-like hydroxyapatite single crystals as a model for tooth enamel.

  6. Plate-like convection induced by symmetries in fluids with temperature-dependent viscosity

    CERN Document Server

    Curbelo, Jezabel

    2014-01-01

    The study of instabilities in fluids in which viscosity experiences a transition at a certain temperature range is of great interest for the understanding of planetary interiors, since this phenomena models the melting and solidification of a magma ocean and thus is suitable for representing a lithosphere over a convecting mantle. To this end, we study a 2D convection problem in which viscosity depends on temperature by abruptly changing its value by a factor 400 within a narrow temperature gap at which magma melts. We perform a study which combines bifurcation analysis and time dependent simulations. Solutions such as limit cycles are found that are fundamentally related to the presence of symmetry. Sporadically during these cycles, through abrupt bursts, spontaneous plate-like behaviors that rapidly evolve towards a stagnant lid regime emerge. The plate-like evolution alternates motions towards either right or left, introducing temporary asymmetries on the convecting styles. Further time dependent regimes w...

  7. Time delay controlled annular array transducers for omnidirectional guided wave mode control in plate like structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koduru, Jaya P.; Rose, Joseph L.

    2014-10-01

    Guided waves in plate like structures offer several modes with unique characteristics that can be taken advantage for nondestructive inspection applications. Conditions relating to the structure under inspection like the surrounding media, liquid loading, coatings etc require the use of special modes for successful inspection. Therefore, transducers that can excite mode controlled guided waves are essential for defect detection and discrimination in structures. Array transducers with annular elements can generate omnidirectional guided waves in plate like structures. However, the wave modes excited are limited to a particular wavelength governed by the element spacing. This limitation on the annular array transducers can be overcome by controlling the phase at each element relative to one another. In this work, annular array transducer construction techniques are theoretically examined and the optimum phase delays between the annular elements to excite a desired guided wave mode are calculated. A five element comb type annular array transducer is fabricated utilizing 1-3 type piezocomposite material. The mode control capability of the transducer is experimentally verified by selectively exciting the A0 and S0 guided wave modes in an aluminum plate like structure.

  8. Flaw Imaging Technique for Plate-Like Structures Using Scanning Laser Source Actuation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Changgil Lee

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Recently, the longitudinal, shear, and surface waves have been very widely used as ultrasonic wave-based exploration methods to identify internal defects of host structures. In this context, a noncontact nondestructive testing (NDT method is proposed to detect the damage of plate-like structures and to identify the location of the damage. To achieve this goal, a scanning laser source actuation technique is utilized to generate a guided wave and scans a specific area to find damage location more precisely. The ND:YAG pulsed laser is used to generate Lamb wave and a piezoelectric sensor is installed to measure the structural responses. The measured responses are analyzed using 3-dimensional Fourier transformation (3D FT. The damage-sensitive features are extracted by wavenumber filtering based on the 3D FT. Then, flaw imaging techniques of a plate-like structure are conducted using the damage-sensitive features. Finally, the plates with notches are investigated to verify the effectiveness and the robustness of the proposed NDT approach.

  9. The field-dependent rheological properties of magnetorheological fluids featuring plate-like iron particles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seung-Bok eChoi

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available This study is concerned with an investigation of the plate-like iron particles based MR suspensions under the application of magnetic fields to ascertain the influence of particle size in the rheological performance. A novel synthesis route to prepare magnetorheological fluid (MRF using two different sizes of plate-like iron particles is described in detail. Two different kinds of MRF are then prepared and their rheological properties are presented and discussed extensively. Steady shear flow and small amplitude dynamic oscillatory measurements are carried out in the presence of magnetic field. This experimental study reveals and highlights the importance of exploiting some parameters such as magnetic field strength, effect of particle size, magneto-viscous and visco-elastic properties of the suspending fluid. The magnetization of the fluids is also performed to explain the effect of particle size in the magnetic field which is directly correlated with the yield stress. In the absence of magnetic field, the properties of fluid are isotropic and upon the application of magnetic field the magnetized particles form a strong-chain like structures in the field direction which promotes the appearance of yield stress. This material is known as smart material whose properties amend from liquid to solid immediately after applying the magnetic field. It is found from this work that the large size particle based MRF exhibits high yield stress and strong chain structuration under the applying magnetic field.

  10. Growth and humidity sensing properties of plate-like CuO nanostructures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bayansal, F.; Çetinkara, H. A.; Çankaya, G.

    2014-03-01

    This paper describes a simple, low-temperature and cost-effective liquid-phase method to synthesize homogenous plate-like CuO nanostructures and their sensitivity to humidity. Scanning electron microscopy illustrated that the synthesized CuO nanoplates have thicknesses of ~100 nm. X-ray diffraction measurements showed that the CuO nanostructures have high crystallinity with monoclinic crystal structure preferentially in ? and ? directions. From the temperature-dependant dark electrical resistivity measurements, the ionization energies of the impurity levels and thermal band gap energies of the films are found as 0.30, 0.32 and 1.37, 1.39 for as-synthesized and annealed films, respectively. Gas sensing characteristics of the films were investigated for different concentrations of humidity, isopropyl alcohol, methanol, ethanol, chloroform and acetone vapours. It was found that the sensor is sensitive to humidity but not to the other volatile organic compounds.

  11. Curvature rate approach to the evaluation of the stiffness distribution in plate-like structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldfeld, Yiska

    2014-09-01

    A procedure for identifying the bending stiffness distribution in plate-like structures is presented. The algorithm is based on the correlation between a parameter called curvature increased factor (CIF) and the bending stiffness of the plate, D. Accurate correlation can be achieved only by considering the effect of the redistribution of internal forces and moments due to the damage on the curvature distribution. In order to achieve this goal, the study offers an iterative procedure, which eliminates the effect of the moment redistribution from the CIF and eventually correlates accurately between CIF and D. The curvature rate is evaluated from the displacement mode shape using a 2D smoothing technique. The procedure takes into account the presence of random errors and the limited number of measured nodes. The procedure's effectiveness, reliability, and range of applicability are demonstrated using numerical examples.

  12. Dendritic Cell

    OpenAIRE

    Sevda Söker

    2005-01-01

    Dendritic cells, a member of family of antigen presenting cells, are most effective cells in the primary immune response. Dendritic cells originated from dendron, in mean of tree in the Greek, because of their long and elaborate cytoplasmic branching processes. Dendritic cells constitute approximately 0.1 to 1 percent of the blood’s mononuclear cell. Dendritic cells are widely distributed, and specialized for antigen capture and T cell stimulation. In this article, structures and functions of...

  13. Electromagnetic and Microwave-Absorbing Properties of Plate-Like Nd-Ce-Fe Powder

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qiao, Ziqiang; Pan, Shunkang; Xiong, Jilei; Cheng, Lichun; Lin, Peihao; Luo, Jialiang

    2016-09-01

    Plate-like Ce x Nd2-x Fe17 (x = 0.0, 0.1, 0.2, 0.3, 0.4) powders have been synthesized by an arc melting and high-energy ball milling method. The structure of the Nd-Ce-Fe powders was investigated by x-ray diffraction analysis. Their morphology and particle size distribution were evaluated by scanning electron microscopy and laser particle analysis. The saturation magnetization and electromagnetic parameters of the powders were characterized using vibrating-sample magnetometry and vector network analysis, respectively. The results reveal that the Ce x Nd2-x Fe17 (x = 0.0, 0.1, 0.2, 0.3, 0.4) powders consisted of Nd2Fe17 single phase with different Ce contents. The particle size and saturation magnetization decreased with increasing Ce content. The resonant frequencies of ɛ″ and μ″ moved towards lower frequency with increasing Ce concentration. The minimum reflection loss value decreased as the Ce content was increased. The minimum reflection loss and absorption peak frequency of Ce0.2Nd1.8Fe17 with coating thickness of 1.8 mm were -22.5 dB and 7 GHz, respectively. Increasing the values of the complex permittivity and permeability could result in materials with good microwave absorption properties.

  14. Concept for support and heating of plate-like samples in the ultra-high vacuum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tröger, L.; Pieper, H. H.; Reichling, M.

    2013-01-01

    We present the concept for a sample holder designed for mounting and heating of plate-like samples that is based on a clamping mechanism for easy handling. The clamping mechanism consists of a U-shaped bracket encompassing the sample support plate from the rear. Two spring wires are fixed in the walls of the bracket spanning the sample to secure it with only two point contacts. This enables the sample to freely expand or contract during heating and cooling. To accommodate for a large variety in sample size, shape, and quality, we introduce two designs differing in the generation of the clamping force: One pressing the sample against the spring wires, the other one pulling the spring wires onto the sample. Both designs yield an automatically even alignment of the sample during the mounting process to achieve an even load distribution and reliable fixation specifically for brittle samples. For high temperature treatment, the sample holders are enhanced by a resistive heating plate. As only the sample and a small fraction of the sample holder are heated, temperatures of 1300 °C are reached with only 8 W heating power. The sample support and heating components are mounted on a 11 mm × 13 mm base plate with a handle that can be transferred between the sample entry stage, the preparation stage, and surface science experiments in the ultra-high vacuum system.

  15. Phased annular array transducers for omnidirectional guided wave mode control in isotropic plate like structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koduru, Jaya P.; Momeni, Sepandarmaz; Rose, Joseph L.

    2013-12-01

    Ultrasonic guided waves are fast emerging as a reliable tool for continuous structural health monitoring. Their multi-modal nature along with their long range propagation characteristics offer several possibilities for interrogating structures. Transducers commonly used to generate guided waves in structures excite multiple modes at any frequency; their complex scattering and reflection from defects and boundaries often complicates the extraction of useful information. Often it is desirable to control the guided wave modes propagating in a structure to take advantage of their unique properties for different applications. Earlier attempts at guided wave mode control involved developing fixed wavelength linear and annular array transducers. Their only disadvantage is that the transducer is limited to a particular wavelength and a change in wavelength necessitates a change in the transducer. In this paper, we propose the development of an annular array transducer that can generate mode controlled omnidirectional guided waves by independently controlling the amplitude and phase of the array elements. A simplified actuator model that approximates the transducer loading on the structure to a constant pressure load under the array elements is assumed and an optimization problem is set up to compute the excitation voltage and phase of the elements. A five element annular array transducer is designed utilizing 1-3 type piezocomposite materials. The theoretical computations are experimentally verified on an aluminum plate like structure by exciting A0 and S0 guided wave modes.

  16. Controllability assessment of plate-like structures with uncertainties under piezoelectric actuation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Y. Y.; Cheng, L.

    2005-02-01

    A controllability assessment of plate-like structures with uncertainties under piezoelectric actuation is performed in this paper. Different from the previous studies, a novel index is proposed to quantify the degree of controllability using the sensor/actuator transfer function. Influences of unmodelled high-frequency dynamics and structural parameter variations on controllability are discussed, and the relationship between the indices for the nominal and uncertain cases is derived. In order to validate the controllability assessment numerically, the modelling of a plate with piezoelectric actuation is developed with the consideration of the full coupling between the PZT actuators and the host plate, and verified by experiments. It is demonstrated that a proper design of the polyvinylidene flouride sensor would help eliminate effects of higher order modes on the basis of strain mode shapes. Since the latter is very sensitive to the mass and stiffness added by PZT actuators, the dynamics of PZT actuators must be taken into account during the design, as opposed to the case where a point transducer is used.

  17. A Bayesian Approach for Localization of Acoustic Emission Source in Plate-Like Structures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gang Yan

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents a Bayesian approach for localizing acoustic emission (AE source in plate-like structures with consideration of uncertainties from modeling error and measurement noise. A PZT sensor network is deployed to monitor and acquire AE wave signals released by possible damage. By using continuous wavelet transform (CWT, the time-of-flight (TOF information of the AE wave signals is extracted and measured. With a theoretical TOF model, a Bayesian parameter identification procedure is developed to obtain the AE source location and the wave velocity at a specific frequency simultaneously and meanwhile quantify their uncertainties. It is based on Bayes’ theorem that the posterior distributions of the parameters about the AE source location and the wave velocity are obtained by relating their priors and the likelihood of the measured time difference data. A Markov chain Monte Carlo (MCMC algorithm is employed to draw samples to approximate the posteriors. Also, a data fusion scheme is performed to fuse results identified at multiple frequencies to increase accuracy and reduce uncertainty of the final localization results. Experimental studies on a stiffened aluminum panel with simulated AE events by pensile lead breaks (PLBs are conducted to validate the proposed Bayesian AE source localization approach.

  18. SNOW CLEARING

    CERN Multimedia

    Groupe de Transport/Transport Group

    1999-01-01

    In order to facilitate snow-clearing operations, which commence at 4.30 every morning, drivers of CERN vehicles are kindly requested to group their cars together in the car parks. This will greatly help us in our work. Thank you for your co-operation.Transport Group / ST-HMTel. 72202

  19. Snow clearance

    CERN Multimedia

    Mauro Nonis

    2005-01-01

    In reply to the numerous questions received, we should like to inform you of the actions and measures taken in an effort to maintain the movements of vehicles and pedestrians since the heavy snow fall on Sunday 23 January. Our contractor's employees began clearing the snow during the morning of Sunday 23 January on the main CERN sites (Meyrin, Prévessin), but an accident prevented them from continuing. The vehicle in question was repaired by Monday morning when two other vehicles joined it to resume snow clearing; priority was given to access points to the main sites and the LHC sites, as well as to the main roads inside the sites. The salt sprinklers were also brought into action that same day; the very low temperature during the night from Monday to Tuesday prevented the snow from melting and compacted the ice; the continuing cold during the day on Tuesday (-6°C at 10:00 on the Meyrin site) meant that all efforts to remove the ice were doomed to failure. In order to ensure more efficie...

  20. Synthesis of Plate-like Zinc Oxide Particles by the Transcription of Precursor's Shape

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    YIN, S; GOTO, T; GOBO, F; HUANG, Y F; ZHANG, P L; SATO, T, E-mail: shuyin@tgaen.tohoku.ac.jp [IMRAM, Tohoku University (Japan)

    2011-06-27

    Plate-like zinc contained precursors such as simonkoleite or basic sulphate were successfully synthesized by using equilmolar of Zn{sup 2+} / hexamethylenetetramine (HMT) acted as precursors, ethylene glycol(EG) as dispersant and surfactant additive, respectively. The reaction solution was sealed in a glass bottle and heated at 95 deg. C for 3h. The zinc contained precursors possessed layered structure and plate-like morphology were successfully synthesized by controlling the zinc ions concentration, reaction temperature, organic solvent additives, anion additives. It was found that plate-like simonkolleite transformed to plate-like ZnO after calcination in air at 400 deg. C, while it transformed to rod-like ZnO under hydrothermal conditions above 140 deg. C. The additive of ethylene glycol decreased the particle size and affected the particle size distribution. The conductivity of the pressured powders was improved by small amount of Ga and Al doping followed by H{sub 2} reduction treatment at 500 deg. C for 1h.

  1. Characteristics of plate-like and color-zoning cubic boron nitride crystals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Feng, Shuang [State Key Laboratory on Integrated Optoelectronics, College of Electronic Science and Engineering, Jilin University, 2699 Qianjin Street, Changchun 130012 (China); Hou, Lixin, E-mail: houlixin_2000@126.com [College of Information and Technology, Jilin Agricultural University, 2888 Xincheng Street, Changchun 130118 (China); Liu, Xiuhuan [College of Telecommunication Engineering, Jilin University, 5372 Nanhu Road, Changchun 130012 (China); Gao, Yanjun; Li, Xinlu; Wang, Qi [State Key Laboratory on Integrated Optoelectronics, College of Electronic Science and Engineering, Jilin University, 2699 Qianjin Street, Changchun 130012 (China); Chen, Zhanguo, E-mail: czg@jlu.edu.cn [State Key Laboratory on Integrated Optoelectronics, College of Electronic Science and Engineering, Jilin University, 2699 Qianjin Street, Changchun 130012 (China); Jia, Gang; Zheng, Jie [State Key Laboratory on Integrated Optoelectronics, College of Electronic Science and Engineering, Jilin University, 2699 Qianjin Street, Changchun 130012 (China)

    2013-11-15

    The polarities of a kind of plate-like and color-zoning cubic boron nitride (cBN) crystal were extensively investigated by microscopy, chemical etching, XPS, Raman scattering, and current–voltage measurements. The {1 1 1}B faces and {1"¯1"¯1"¯}N faces of the cBN samples can be easily distinguished by optical microscope as there are a lot of defects incorporate in {1"¯1"¯1"¯}N sectors serving as the color centers, while the {1 1 1}B sectors have less defects and are nearly colorless. Both XPS and Raman spectra also revealed the uneven distributions of N vacancies and substitutional impurities in cBN crystals. The determination of {1 1 1}B faces and {1"¯1"¯1"¯}N faces can also be verified by the results of the chemical etching because the {1"¯1"¯1"¯}N faces have much faster etch rates than the {1 1 1}B faces. According to XPS, the {1 1 1}B faces have more C and O contaminations than the {1"¯1"¯1"¯}N faces, however the {1"¯1"¯1"¯}N faces have larger atomic ratio of B:N after surface cleaning by Ar{sup +} sputtering. In the Raman spectra of the {1"¯1"¯1"¯}N sectors of cBN, several small broad infrared-active phonon bands emerge nearby TO and LO modes because of the disorder-activated Raman scattering. As for the {1 1 1}B sectors, this phenomenon disappears. In addition, the {1 1 1}B faces have much smaller leakage current than the {1"¯1"¯1"¯}N faces, which indicates that the {1 1 1}B sectors have higher crystalline quality.

  2. Characteristics of plate-like and color-zoning cubic boron nitride crystals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feng, Shuang; Hou, Lixin; Liu, Xiuhuan; Gao, Yanjun; Li, Xinlu; Wang, Qi; Chen, Zhanguo; Jia, Gang; Zheng, Jie

    2013-11-01

    The polarities of a kind of plate-like and color-zoning cubic boron nitride (cBN) crystal were extensively investigated by microscopy, chemical etching, XPS, Raman scattering, and current-voltage measurements. The {1 1 1}B faces and {1¯ 1¯ 1¯}N faces of the cBN samples can be easily distinguished by optical microscope as there are a lot of defects incorporate in {1¯ 1¯ 1¯}N sectors serving as the color centers, while the {1 1 1}B sectors have less defects and are nearly colorless. Both XPS and Raman spectra also revealed the uneven distributions of N vacancies and substitutional impurities in cBN crystals. The determination of {1 1 1}B faces and {1¯ 1¯ 1¯}N faces can also be verified by the results of the chemical etching because the {1¯ 1¯ 1¯}N faces have much faster etch rates than the {1 1 1}B faces. According to XPS, the {1 1 1}B faces have more C and O contaminations than the {1¯ 1¯ 1¯}N faces, however the {1¯ 1¯ 1¯}N faces have larger atomic ratio of B:N after surface cleaning by Ar+ sputtering. In the Raman spectra of the {1¯ 1¯ 1¯}N sectors of cBN, several small broad infrared-active phonon bands emerge nearby TO and LO modes because of the disorder-activated Raman scattering. As for the {1 1 1}B sectors, this phenomenon disappears. In addition, the {1 1 1}B faces have much smaller leakage current than the {1¯ 1¯ 1¯}N faces, which indicates that the {1 1 1}B sectors have higher crystalline quality.

  3. Air fractionation in plate-like inclusions within the EPICA-DML deep ice core

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nedelcu, A.; Faria, S. H.; Kipfstuhl, S.; Schmidt, B.; Kuhs, W. F.

    2009-04-01

    On ice samples from the ice core recovered in the frame of the European Project for Ice Coring in Antarctica at the deep drilling site in Dronning Maud Land (75°00S; 00°04E) micro-Raman spectrochemical analysis was applied to typical relaxation features appearing after the extraction of an ice core. Essentially, these relaxation microinclusions are little planar polygonal cavities possessing hexagonal symmetry i.e. thin negative crystals lying on the basal plane of the hosting ice crystallite. Usually named plate-like inclusions, PLIs, they tend to change their aspect ratio becoming in general rounder, thicker or thinner depending on the equilibrium established between the structure-composition of the ice and the minute environmental temperature-pressure conditions around a specific PLI, but still preserving a very large aspect ratio (typically 20:1). Muguruma and others (1966) and Mae (1968) have reported studies on plate hexagonal voids, i.e. PLIs, produced (only) in tensile deformation tests of natural and artificial single ice crystals while the first report of PLIs in Antarctic ice cores was presented by Gow (1971). In spite of these early studies and the abundance of PLIs in stored ice core samples, extended investigations of these relaxation features are scarce. We present the results of the first successful study of the chemical composition of PLIs using microfocus Raman spectroscopy (Nedelcu and others, in press). We observe that the relaxation features contain mainly O2 and N2 in their interior, with N2/O2 ratios smaller than 3.7 (the nowadays atmospheric air N2/O2 ratio), indicating a general oxygen enrichment that is not so different from O2 enrichments reported in other investigations on polar ice samples (Nakahara and others, 1988, Ikeda and others, 1999). These results seem to lend support to the current hypothesis that O2 diffuses faster than N2 through the ice matrix (Ikeda-Fukazawa and others, 2001, 2005; Severinghaus and Battle, 2006). More

  4. Effect of Salt on Crystal Growth of Plate-like Alumina Particles by Molten-salt Method

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Bo Yeon; Lee, Yoon Joo; Kim, Soo Ryong; Kwon, Woo Teck; Shin, Dong Geun; Kim, Young Hee [Korea Institute of Ceramic Engineering and Technology, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Choi, Duck Kyun [Hanyang University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-10-15

    Alumina powder have been expanded its application in industry and required to control its morphology such as powder size and aspect ratio of single particle. It can be synthesized by molten - salt method which is possible to obtain various shapes of ceramic particles by controlling the growth direction because each crystal face has different growth rate. In this study, various combinations of salts such as NaCl, Na{sub 2}SO{sub 4}, Na{sub 3}PO{sub 4} and their mixture were used for control the growth of plate like alumina particle from the initial stage of synthesis because salt having different ionic strength can control the growth direction of ceramic particle under its melting condition around 800-900 .deg. C, and growth behavior of plate-like alumina particle with different reaction conditions such as temperature and concentration on the crystal size and shape was studied.

  5. A comparison of field-dependent rheological properties between spherical and plate-like carbonyl iron particles-based magneto-rheological fluids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan Shilan, Salihah; Amri Mazlan, Saiful; Ido, Yasushi; Hajalilou, Abdollah; Jeyadevan, Balachandran; Choi, Seung-Bok; Azhani Yunus, Nurul

    2016-09-01

    This work proposes different sizes of the plate-like particles from conventional spherical carbonyl iron (CI) particles by adjusting milling time in the ball mill process. The ball mill process to make the plate-like particles is called a solid-state powder processing technique which involves repeated welding, fracturing and re-welding of powder particles in a high-energy ball mill. The effect of ball milling process on the magnetic behavior of CI particles is firstly investigated by vibrating sample magnetometer. It is found form this investigation that the plate-like particles have higher saturation magnetization (about 8%) than that of the spherical particles. Subsequently, for the investigation on the sedimentation behavior the cylindrical measurement technique is used. It is observed from this measurement that the plate-like particles show slower sedimentation rate compared to the spherical particles indicating higher stability of the MR fluid. The field-dependent rheological properties of MR fluids based on the plate-like particles are then investigated with respect to the milling time which is directly connected to the size of the plate-like particles. In addition, the field-dependent rheological properties such as the yield stress are evaluated and compared between the plate-like particles based MR fluids and the spherical particles based MR fluid. It is found that the yield shear stress of the plate-like particles based MR fluid is increased up to 270% compared to the spherical particles based MR fluid.

  6. Effect of Surface Passivation on Photoelectrochemical Water Splitting Performance of WO3 Vertical Plate-Like Films

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yahui Yang

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available WO3 vertical plate-like arrays provide a direct pathway for charge transport, and thus hold great potential as working electrodes for photoelectrochemical (PEC water splitting. However, surface recombination due to surface defects hinders the performance improvement. In this work, WO3 vertical plate-like arrays films with HfO2 passivation layer were fabricated via a simple dip-coating method. In the images of transmission electron microscope, a fluffy layer and some small sphere particles existed on the surface of WO3 plate. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS showed a higher concentration of Hf element than the result of energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDX, which means that HfO2 is rich on the surface of WO3 plates. A higher photocurrent under visible light irradiation was gained with surface passivation. Meanwhile, the results of intensity modulated photocurrent spectrum (IMPS and incident photon to current conversion efficiency (IPCE indicate that HfO2 passivation layer, acting as a barrier for the interfacial recombination, is responsible for the improved photoelectrochemical performance of WO3 vertical plate-like arrays film.

  7. Snow physics as relevant to snow photochemistry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F. Domine

    2007-05-01

    Full Text Available Snow on the ground is a complex multiphase photochemical reactor that dramatically modifies the chemical composition of the overlying atmosphere. A quantitative description of the emissions of reactive gases by snow requires the knowledge of snow physical properties. This overview details our current understanding of how those physical properties relevant to snow photochemistry vary during snow metamorphism. Properties discussed are density, specific surface area, optical properties, thermal conductivity, permeability and gas diffusivity. Inasmuch as possible, equations to parameterize these properties as a function of climatic variables are proposed, based on field measurements, laboratory experiments and theory. The potential of remote sensing methods to obtain information on some snow physical variables such as grain size, liquid water content and snow depth are discussed. The possibilities for and difficulties of building a snow photochemistry model by adapting current snow physics models are explored. Elaborate snow physics models already exist, and including variables of particular interest to snow photochemistry such as light fluxes and specific surface area appears possible. On the other hand, understanding the nature and location of reactive molecules in snow seems to be the greatest difficulty modelers will have to face for lack of experimental data, and progress on this aspect will require the detailed study of natural snow samples.

  8. An l p -norm approach to robust probabilistic inspection of plate-like structure defects with guided waves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Dan; Yu, Hao; Xu, Feng; Liu, Da Peng; Qiu Zhang, Jian; Ta, De an

    2017-10-01

    In this paper, an l p -norm approach to robust probabilistic inspection of plate-like structure defects with guided waves is proposed. Analytical results show that the more the outliers in the measurements, the smaller p is preferred. Moreover, the relationship between our and the conventional signal difference coefficient (SDC) is also provided. While the experimental results verify the analytical ones, it is also shown that our approach has a good tolerance for impulsive noise interference, namely the unexpected artifacts in the reconstructed tomographic image caused by the impulsive interference are eliminated.

  9. [Inflammatory dendritic cells].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Segura, Elodie; Amigorena, Sebastian

    2014-01-01

    Dendritic cells are a rare and heterogeneous population of professional antigen-presenting cells. Several murine dendritic cell subpopulations have been identified that differ in their phenotype and functional properties. In the steady state, committed dendritic cell precursors differentiate into lymphoid organ-resident dendritic cells and migratory tissue dendritic cells. During inflammation appears an additional dendritic cell subpopulation that has been termed « inflammatory dendritic cells ». Inflammatory dendritic cells differentiate in situ from monocytes recruited to the site of inflammation. Here, we discuss how mouse inflammatory dendritic cells differ from macrophages and from other dendritic cell populations. Finally, we review recent work on human inflammatory dendritic cells.

  10. Standard practice for acoustic emission examination of plate-like and flat panel composite structures used in aerospace applications

    CERN Document Server

    American Society for Testing and Materials. Philadelphia

    2010-01-01

    1.1 This practice covers acoustic emission (AE) examination or monitoring of panel and plate-like composite structures made entirely of fiber/polymer composites. 1.2 The AE examination detects emission sources and locates the region(s) within the composite structure where the emission originated. When properly developed AE-based criteria for the composite item are in place, the AE data can be used for nondestructive examination (NDE), characterization of proof testing, documentation of quality control or for decisions relative to structural-test termination prior to completion of a planned test. Other NDE methods may be used to provide additional information about located damage regions. For additional information see Appendix X1. 1.3 This practice can be applied to aerospace composite panels and plate-like elements as a part of incoming inspection, during manufacturing, after assembly, continuously (during structural health monitoring) and at periodic intervals during the life of a structure. 1.4 This pra...

  11. Plate-like structure health monitoring based on ultrasonic guided wave technology by using bonded piezoelectric ceramic wafers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Zenghua; Zhao, Jichen; He, Cunfu; Wu, Bin

    2008-11-01

    Piezoelectric ceramic wafers are applied for the excitation and detection of ultrasonic guided waves to determine the health state of plate-like structures. Two PZT wafers, whose diameter is 11mm and thickness is 0.4mm respectively, are bonded permanently on the surface of a 1mm thick aluminum plate. One of these wafers is actuated by sinusoidal tone burst at various frequencies ranging from 100kHz to 500kHz, the other one is used as a receiver for acquiring ultrasonic guided wave signals. According to the amplitudes and shapes of these received signals, guided wave modes and their proper frequency range by using these wafers are determined. For the improvement of the signal-to-noise ratio, the Daubechies wavelet of order 40 is used for signal denoising as the mother wavelet. Furthermore, the detection of an artificial cylindrical through-hole defect is achieved by using S0 at 300kHz. Experimental results show that it is feasible and effective to detect defects in plate-like structures based on ultrasonic guided wave technology by using bonded piezoelectric ceramic wafers.

  12. ESA GlobSnow Snow Water Equivalent (SWE)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The European Space Agency (ESA) Global Snow Monitoring for Climate Research (GlobSnow) snow water equivalent (SWE) v2.0 data record contains snow information derived...

  13. Characteristics of Heavy Snowfall and Snow Crystal Habits in the ESSAY (Experiment on Snow Storms At Yeongdong) Campaign in Korea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koh, D.

    2016-12-01

    The Yeongdong region in Korea has frequent heavy snowfall in winter, which usually results in societal and economic damages such as collapses of the greenhouse and the temporary building due to heavy snowfall weights and traffic accidents due to snow-slippery road condition. Therefore we have conducted an intensive measurement campaign of `Experiment on Snow Storms At Yeongdong (ESSAY)' using radiosonde soundings, several remote sensors and a digital camera with a magnifier for taking a photograph of snowfall crystals in the region. The analysis period is mainly limited to every winter from 2014 to 2016The typical synoptic situation for the heavy snowfall is Low pressure system passing by the far South of the Korean peninsula along with the Siberian High extending to northern Japan, leading to the northeasterly or easterly flows frequently accompanied by the long-lasting snowfall in the Yeongdong region. The snow crystal habits observed in the ESSAY campaign are mainly dendrite, consisting of about 70% of the entire habits, indicative of relatively warmer East Sea effect. Meanwhile, the rimed habits are frequently captured specifically when two-layered clouds are observed. The homogeneous habit such as dendrite is shown in case of shallow clouds with its thickness below 500 m, whereas various habits are captured such as graupel, dendrites, rimed dendrites, etc in the thicker cloud with its thickness greater than 1.5 km. The association of snow crystal habits with temperature and supersaturation in the cloud will be more discussed.

  14. Necessary Conditions for Nonlinear Ultrasonic Modulation Generation Given a Localized Fatigue Crack in a Plate-Like Structure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hyung Jin Lim

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available It has been shown that nonlinear ultrasonics can be more sensitive to local incipient defects, such as a fatigue crack, than conventional linear ultrasonics. Therefore, there is an increasing interest in utilizing nonlinear ultrasonics for structural health monitoring and nondestructive testing applications. While the conditions, which are the necessary conditions that should be satisfied for the generation of nonlinear harmonic components, are extensively studied for distributed material nonlinearity, little work has been done to understand the necessary conditions at the presence of a localized nonlinear source such as a fatigue crack. In this paper, the necessary conditions of nonlinear ultrasonic modulation generation in a plate-like structure are formulated specifically for a localized nonlinear source. Then, the correctness of the formulated necessary conditions is experimentally verified using ultrasounds obtained from aluminum plates.

  15. Modelling of snow exceedances

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jordanova, Pavlina K.; Sadovský, Zoltán; Stehlík, Milan

    2017-07-01

    Modelling of snow exceedances is of great importance and interest for ecology, civil engineering and general public. We suggest the favorable fit for exceedances related to the exceptional snow loads from Slovakia, assuming that the data is driven by Generalised Pareto Distribution or Generalized Extreme Value Distribution. Further, the statistical dependence between the maximal snow loads and the corresponding altitudes is studied.

  16. Plate-like structure damage location identification based on Lamb wave baseline-free probability imaging method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dongsheng Li

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Damage-scattering signal extraction using conventional ultrasonic guided wave–based damage detection techniques requires the measurement of baseline data under pristine condition. This study proposes a baseline-free ultrasonic guided wave damage localization and imaging method based on Lamb wave baseline-free probability imaging method. Although traditional Lamb wave probability imaging can monitor damage location in plate-like structures, the absolute time of arrival and magnitude of the signal are affected by several factors and are therefore difficult to obtain. This study also proposes a probability-based hyperbola diagnostic imaging method that is based on different times of arrival and has no magnitude information. A distributed active sensor network conforming to a pulse-echo configuration and time window functions is developed to separate damage-scattering signals from structural response signals. Continuous wavelet transform is used to calculate the time of flight of damage signal waves. The numerical simulation and experiments validate the effectiveness of the proposed method in identifying damage.

  17. Structural health monitoring method based on the entropy of an ultrasonic sensor network for a plate-like structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rojas, Erick; Baltazar, Arturo

    2015-03-01

    Piezoelectric ultrasonic sensors used to propagate guided waves can potentially be implemented to inspect large areas in engineering structures. However, the inherent dispersion and noise of the guided acoustic signals, multiple echoes in the plate as well as a lack of an approximate or exact model limits their use as a continuous structural health monitoring system. In this work, the implementation of a network of piezoelectric sensors randomly placed on a plate-like structure to detect and locate artificial damage is studied. A sensor network of randomly located 1MHz transducers working in a pitch-catch configuration was set on an aluminum thin plate 1.9 mm in thickness. Signals were analyzed in time-scale domain by the continuous wavelet transform. The objectives in this work were twofold, first to develop a damage index using the entropy of the ultrasonic waves generated by a sensor network; and second to implement time of arrival (TOA) and time-difference of arrival (TDOA) algorithms on the gathered signals for damage location of an artificial circular discontinuity. Our preliminary test results show that the proposed methodology provides sufficient information for damage detection which, once combined with the TOA and TDOA algorithms, allows localization of the damage.

  18. Snow Roads and Runways

    Science.gov (United States)

    1990-11-01

    CONSTRUCT ROADS FOR MARCHING COLUMNS ALL ARMS (1) Pass over the trace twice with (1) Two passes with the harrow the harrow. and roller. (2) After harrowing...should be accomplished by successive passes with beams or slabs to the towing bars. A method forballasting D-7 orD-8 tractortracks. Normally twoto five... waffle -type snow surface (Fig. 85)and is notas suitable for snow pavement surface has been previously compacted snow compaction as other types of rollers

  19. Snow molds: A group of fungi that prevail under snow.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsumoto, Naoyuki

    2009-01-01

    Snow molds are a group of fungi that attack dormant plants under snow. In this paper, their survival strategies are illustrated with regard to adaptation to the unique environment under snow. Snow molds consist of diverse taxonomic groups and are divided into obligate and facultative fungi. Obligate snow molds exclusively prevail during winter with or without snow, whereas facultative snow molds can thrive even in the growing season of plants. Snow molds grow at low temperatures in habitats where antagonists are practically absent, and host plants deteriorate due to inhibited photosynthesis under snow. These features characterize snow molds as opportunistic parasites. The environment under snow represents a habitat where resources available are limited. There are two contrasting strategies for resource utilization, i.e., individualisms and collectivism. Freeze tolerance is also critical for them to survive freezing temperatures, and several mechanisms are illustrated. Finally, strategies to cope with annual fluctuations in snow cover are discussed in terms of predictability of the habitat.

  20. Influence of particles shape on the vertical profile of blowing snow concentration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vionnet, Vincent; Trouvilliez, Alexandre; Naaim-Bouvet, Florence; Guyomarc'h, Gilbert

    2013-04-01

    In alpine regions, blowing snow events strongly influence the temporal and spatial evolution of the snow cover throughout the winter season. In Antarctica, blowing snow is an essential surface mass balance process and plays a non-negligible role in the annual accumulation. The vertical profile of blowing snow concentration determines the quantity of snow transported in turbulent suspension. A power law is often used to represent this vertical profile. It serves as an analytical solution representing an equilibrium between vertical turbulent diffusion and gravitational settling. In this work, we study how the exponent of the power law depends on the type of transported particles. Vertical profiles of blowing snow concentration have been collected at the experimental site of Col du Lac Blanc (French Alps) in 2011 and 2012 and near the research station of Cap Prud'homme (Antarctica) in 2010 and 2011. We used mechanical gauges (butterfly nets) and optical devices (Snow Particles Counters). Profiles collected during blowing snow events with precipitation have been corrected to account for the contribution of snowfall. Results show that profiles collected during blowing snow without snowfall differ from the corrected profiles collected during snowfall. At a given wind speed, particles transported during snowfall have a lower settling velocity than particles transported without snowfall. This difference confirms earlier observations (Takahashi, 1985) and can be explained by the change of drag coefficient between dendritic and rounded particles. This difference pertains several hours after the end of the snowfall illustrating the fragmentation of snow grains during blowing snow events.

  1. Effects of aspect ratio and concentration on rheology of epoxy suspensions containing model plate-like nanoparticles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    White, K. L.; Takahara, A. [International Institute for Carbon-Neutral Energy Research (WPI-I2CNER), Kyushu University, Fukuoka 819-0395 (Japan); Institute for Materials Chemistry and Engineering, Kyushu University, Fukuoka 819-0395 (Japan); Hawkins, S.; Sue, H.-J., E-mail: hjsue@tamu.edu [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Texas A& M University, College Station, Texas 77843 (United States); Miyamoto, M. [Kaneka US Materials Research Center, Kaneka America Holdings, Inc., College Station, Texas 77843 (United States)

    2015-12-15

    Hexagonal 2-dimensional α-zirconium phosphate crystals were prepared with lateral diameters ranging from 110 nm to 1.5 μm to investigate the effect of particle size on suspension rheology. The nanoplatelets were exfoliated to individual sheets with monodisperse thickness and dispersed in a Newtonian epoxy fluid. The steady shear response of dilute and semi-dilute suspensions was measured and compared to expressions obtained from theory for infinitely dilute suspensions. For suspensions containing the smaller nanoplatelets, aspect ratio ∼160, the low shear rate viscosity and transition to shear thinning behavior were well described by theory for loadings up to 0.5 vol. %. The agreement was improved by assuming a moderate polydispersity in lateral diameter, ∼30%–50%, which is consistent with experimental observation. For the higher aspect ratio nanoplatelets, good agreement between theory and experiment was observed only at high shear rates. At lower shear rate, theory consistently over-predicted viscosity, which was attributed to a progressive shift to non-isotropic initial conditions with increasing particle size. The results suggest that at a fixed Peclet number, there is an increasing tendency for the nanoplatelets to form transient, local stacks as particle size increases. The largest particles, aspect ratio ∼2200, showed unusual shear thinning and thickening behaviors that were attributed to particle flexibility. The findings demonstrate the surprising utility of theory for infinitely dilute suspensions to interpret, and in some cases quantitatively describe, the non-Newtonian viscosity of real suspensions containing high aspect ratio plate-like particles. A simple framework is proposed to interpret deviations from ideal behavior based on the local and collective behavior of the suspended nanoplatelets.

  2. Loropetalum chinense 'Snow Panda'

    Science.gov (United States)

    A new Loropetalum chinense, ‘Snow Panda’, developed at the U.S. National Arboretum is described. ‘Snow Panda’ (NA75507, PI660659) originated from seeds collected near Yan Chi He, Hubei, China in 1994 by the North America-China Plant Exploration Consortium (NACPEC). Several seedlings from this trip w...

  3. Snow water content estimation from measured snow temperature

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    The vertical temperature profiles of snow and sea ice have been measured in the Arctic during the 2nd Chinese National Arctic Research Expedition in 2003 (CHINARE2003). The high-resolution temperature profile in snow is solved by one-dimensional heat transfer equation. The effective heat diffusivity, internal heat sources are identified. The internal heat source refers to the penetrated solar radiation which usually warms the lower part of the snow layer in summer. By temperature gradient analysis, the zero level can be clarified quantitatively as the boundary of the dry and wet snow. According to the in situ time series of vertical temperature profile, the time series of water content in snow is obtained based on an evaluation method of snow water content associated with the snow and ice physical parameters. The relationship of snow water content and snow temperature and temporal-spatial distribution of snow water content are presented

  4. Modeling angular-dependent spectral emissivity of snow and ice in the thermal infrared atmospheric window.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hori, Masahiro; Aoki, Teruo; Tanikawa, Tomonori; Hachikubo, Akihiro; Sugiura, Konosuke; Kuchiki, Katsuyuki; Niwano, Masashi

    2013-10-20

    A model of angular-dependent emissivity spectra of snow and ice in the 8-14 μm atmospheric window is constructed. Past field research revealed that snow emissivity varies depending on snow grain size and the exitance angle. Thermography images acquired in this study further revealed that not only welded snow particles such as sun crust, but also disaggregated particles such as granular snow and dendrite crystals exhibit high reflectivity on their crystal facets, even when the bulk snow surface exhibits blackbody-like behavior as a whole. The observed thermal emissive behaviors of snow particles suggest that emissivity of the bulk snow surface can be expressed by a weighted sum of two emissivity components: those of the specular and blackbody surfaces. Based on this assumption, a semi-empirical emissivity model was constructed; it is expressed by a linear combination of specular and blackbody surfaces' emissivities with a weighting parameter characterizing the specularity of the bulk surface. Emissivity spectra calculated using the model succeeded in reproducing the past in situ measured directional spectra of various snow types by employing a specific weighting parameter for each snow type.

  5. John Snow and research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shephard, D A

    1989-03-01

    John Snow's leadership in epidemiology as well as anaesthesia resulted from his research as much as his clinical practice. In anaesthesia, Snow's research concerned the regulation of concentrations of volatile agents and the development of efficient inhalers; the uptake and elimination of volatile agents; stages of anaesthesia; carbon dioxide metabolism and rebreathing; and metabolism in anaesthesia and the theory of anaesthesia. In epidemiology, Snow investigated the relationship of water supplies to mortality in cholera during the London epidemic in 1854, which led him to formulate an original and valid theory of the transmission of cholera. Snow's research, which has received less attention than anecdotes concerning his career (e.g., his anaesthetizing Queen Victoria and urging removal of the handle of a contaminated water pump), was always directed towards solving specific problems. The significance of his research is evident in its leading not only to improvements in health care but also to the evolution of anaesthesia and epidemiology as professional disciplines.

  6. Dry Snow Metamorphism

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-09-19

    S. Chen and I. Baker, 12th International Conference on the Physics and Chemistry of Ice, Sapporo , Japan, September 5-10th, 2010. “Advanced...Microstructural Characterization of Snow and Ice”, I. Baker, 12th International Conference on the Physics and Chemistry of Ice, Sapporo , Japan, September 5...on the Physics and Chemistry of Ice, Sapporo , Japan, September 5-10th, 2010. 10 “Advanced Microstructural Characterization of Snow and Ice”, I

  7. Isothermal Dendritic Growth Experiment - PVA Dendrites

    Science.gov (United States)

    1997-01-01

    The Isothermal Dendritic Growth Experiment (IDGE), flown on three Space Shuttle missions, is yielding new insights into virtually all industrially relevant metal and alloy forming operations. IDGE used transparent organic liquids that form dendrites (treelike structures) similar to those inside metal alloys. Comparing Earth-based and space-based dendrite growth velocity, tip size and shape provides a better understanding of the fundamentals of dentritic growth, including gravity's effects. Shalowgraphic images of pivalic acid (PVA) dendrites forming from the melt show the subtle but distinct effects of gravity-driven heat convection on dentritic growth. In orbit, the dendrite grows as its latent heat is liberated by heat conduction. This yields a blunt dendrite tip. On Earth, heat is carried away by both conduction and gravity-driven convection. This yields a sharper dendrite tip. In addition, under terrestrial conditions, the sidebranches growing in the direction of gravity are augmented as gravity helps carry heat out of the way of the growing sidebranches as opposed to microgravity conditions where no augmentation takes place. IDGE was developed by Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute and NASA/Glenn Research Center. Advanced follow-on experiments are being developed for flight on the International Space Station. Photo Credit: NASA/Glenn Research Center

  8. Nordic Snow Radar Experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lemmetyinen, Juha; Kontu, Anna; Pulliainen, Jouni; Vehviläinen, Juho; Rautiainen, Kimmo; Wiesmann, Andreas; Mätzler, Christian; Werner, Charles; Rott, Helmut; Nagler, Thomas; Schneebeli, Martin; Proksch, Martin; Schüttemeyer, Dirk; Kern, Michael; Davidson, Malcolm W. J.

    2016-09-01

    The objective of the Nordic Snow Radar Experiment (NoSREx) campaign was to provide a continuous time series of active and passive microwave observations of snow cover at a representative location of the Arctic boreal forest area, covering a whole winter season. The activity was a part of Phase A studies for the ESA Earth Explorer 7 candidate mission CoReH2O (Cold Regions Hydrology High-resolution Observatory). The NoSREx campaign, conducted at the Finnish Meteorological Institute Arctic Research Centre (FMI-ARC) in Sodankylä, Finland, hosted a frequency scanning scatterometer operating at frequencies from X- to Ku-band. The radar observations were complemented by a microwave dual-polarization radiometer system operating from X- to W-bands. In situ measurements consisted of manual snow pit measurements at the main test site as well as extensive automated measurements on snow, ground and meteorological parameters. This study provides a summary of the obtained data, detailing measurement protocols for each microwave instrument and in situ reference data. A first analysis of the microwave signatures against snow parameters is given, also comparing observed radar backscattering and microwave emission to predictions of an active/passive forward model. All data, including the raw data observations, are available for research purposes through the European Space Agency and the Finnish Meteorological Institute. A consolidated dataset of observations, comprising the key microwave and in situ observations, is provided through the ESA campaign data portal to enable easy access to the data.

  9. Snow White Trenches

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-01-01

    This image was acquired by NASA's Phoenix Mars Lander's Surface Stereo Imager on the 25th Martian day of the mission, or Sol 24 (June 19, 2008), after the May 25, 2008, landing. This image shows the trenches informally called 'Snow White 1' (left) and 'Snow White 2' (right). The trench is about 5 centimeters (2 inches) deep and 30 centimeters (12 inches) long. 'Snow White' is located in a patch of Martian soil near the center of a polygonal surface feature, nicknamed 'Cheshire Cat.' The 'dump pile' is located at the top of the trench, the side farthest away from the lander, and has been dubbed 'Croquet Ground.' The digging site has been named 'Wonderland.' This image has been enhanced to brighten shaded areas. The Phoenix Mission is led by the University of Arizona, Tucson, on behalf of NASA. Project management of the mission is by NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, Calif. Spacecraft development is by Lockheed Martin Space Systems, Denver.

  10. Pavement Snow Melting

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lund, John W.

    2005-01-01

    The design of pavement snow melting systems is presented based on criteria established by ASHRAE. The heating requirements depends on rate of snow fall, air temperature, relative humidity and wind velocity. Piping materials are either metal or plastic, however, due to corrosion problems, cross-linked polyethylene pipe is now generally used instead of iron. Geothermal energy is supplied to systems through the use of heat pipes, directly from circulating pipes, through a heat exchanger or by allowing water to flow directly over the pavement, by using solar thermal storage. Examples of systems in New Jersey, Wyoming, Virginia, Japan, Argentina, Switzerland and Oregon are presented. Key words: pavement snow melting, geothermal heating, heat pipes, solar storage, Wyoming, Virginia, Japan, Argentina, Klamath Falls.

  11. Snow, ice and solar radiation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kuipers Munneke, P.

    2009-01-01

    The snow-covered ice sheets of Antarctica and Greenland reflect most of the incoming solar radiation. The reflectivity, commonly called the albedo, of snow on these ice sheets has been observed to vary in space and time. In this thesis, temporal and spatial changes in snow albedo is found to depend

  12. Snow, ice and solar radiation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kuipers Munneke, P.

    2009-01-01

    The snow-covered ice sheets of Antarctica and Greenland reflect most of the incoming solar radiation. The reflectivity, commonly called the albedo, of snow on these ice sheets has been observed to vary in space and time. In this thesis, temporal and spatial changes in snow albedo is found to depend

  13. snowBOTS: a mobile robot on snow covered ice

    OpenAIRE

    2007-01-01

    We introduce snowBOTs as a generic name for robots working in snow. This paper is a study on using scan ning range measuring lasers towards an autonomous snow cleaning robot, working in an environment consisting al most entirely of snow and ice. The problem addressed here is using lasers for detecting the edges generated by "the snow meeting the road". First the laser data were filtered using his togram/median to discriminate against falling snowflakes and small objects. Then the road surface w...

  14. Free dendritic growth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glicksman, M. E.

    1984-01-01

    Free dendritic growth refers to the unconstrained development of crystals within a supercooled melt, which is the classical 'dendrite problem'. Great strides have been taken in recent years in both the theoretical understanding of dendritic growth and its experimental status. The development of this field will be sketched, showing that transport theory and interfacial thermodynamics (capillarity theory) were sufficient ingredients to develop a truly predictive model of dendrite formation. The convenient, but incorrect, notion of 'maximum velocity' was used for many years to estimate the behavior of dendritic transformations until supplanted by modern dynamic stability theory. The proper combinations of transport theory and morphological stability seem to able to predict the salient aspects of dendritic growth, especially in the neighborhood of the tip. The overall development of cast microstructures, such as equiaxed zone formation, rapidly solidified microstructures, etc., also seems to contain additional non-deterministic features which lie outside the current theories discussed here.

  15. Dendritic polyurea polymers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tuerp, David; Bruchmann, Bernd

    2015-01-01

    Dendritic polymers, subsuming dendrimers as well as hyperbranched or highly branched polymers are well established in the field of polymer chemistry. This review article focuses on urea based dendritic polymers and summarizes their synthetic routes through both isocyanate and isocyanate-free processes. Furthermore, this article highlights applications where dendritic polyureas show their specific chemical and physical potential. For these purposes scientific publications as well as patent literature are investigated to generate a comprehensive overview on this topic.

  16. Snow White II.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gundy, Jan

    1978-01-01

    Presented as a fairy tale with the characters of Snow White and the seven dwarves, this paper points out some of the professional, emotional, and health characteristics and problems of individual teachers, and ways an administrator might deal with them. (SJL)

  17. Snow White 5 Trench

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-01-01

    This image was acquired by NASA's Phoenix Mars Lander's Robotic Arm Camera on the 35th Martian day of the mission, or Sol 34 (June 29, 2008), after the May 25, 2008, landing. This image shows the trench informally called 'Snow White 5.' The trench is 4-to-5 centimeters (about 1.5-to-1.9 inches) deep, 24 centimeters (about 9 inches) wide and 33 centimeters (13 inches) long. Snow White 5 is Phoenix's current active digging area after additional trenching, grooming, and scraping by Phoenix's Robotic Arm in the last few sols to trenches informally called Snow White 1, 2, 3, and 4. Near the top center of the image is the Robotic Arm's Thermal and Electrical Conductivity Probe. Snow White 5 is located in a patch of Martian soil near the center of a polygonal surface feature, nicknamed 'Cheshire Cat.' The digging site has been named 'Wonderland.' This image has been enhanced to brighten shaded areas. The Phoenix Mission is led by the University of Arizona, Tucson, on behalf of NASA. Project management of the mission is by NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, Calif. Spacecraft development is by Lockheed Martin Space Systems, Denver.

  18. Snow-clearing operations

    CERN Multimedia

    EN Department

    2010-01-01

    To facilitate snow clearing operations, which commence at 4.30 in the morning, all drivers of CERN cars are kindly requested to park them together in groups. This will help us greatly assist us in our work. Thank-you for your help. Transport Group / EN-HE Tel. 72202

  19. Principles of snow hydrology

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    DeWalle, David R; Rango, Albert

    2008-01-01

    ... Hydrology describes the factors that control the accumulation, melting, and runoff of water from seasonal snowpacks over the surface of the earth. The book addresses not only the basic principles governing snow in the hydrologic cycle, but also the latest applications of remote sensing, and principles applicable to modelling streamflow from snowmelt across lar...

  20. Backpack Snow Shovel/Snow Kit and Ahkio Snow Shovel/Snow Saw Kit

    Science.gov (United States)

    for backpacking by the individual soldier. A larger, more durable shovel is for use in conjunction with the man-hauled sled (Ahkio). A snow saw in a...scabbard is provided which can be attached either to the handle of the Ahkio shovel, to the disassembled backpack shovel in the carrying case, to the rucksack or to the belt.

  1. Snow-white teeth

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Sarll, D

    2006-01-01

    ... well have pointed out, but unavailingly, that snow-white teeth adorn only the grins of infants.There is, however, another ploy that colleagues might try in their quest to enlighten patients, particularly those of a literary disposition: adduce the attributes of 'youthful beauty' given to us by Virginia Woolf (1882 - 1941). From her novel, Orla...

  2. 'Snow Queen' Animation

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-01-01

    This animation consists of two close-up images of 'Snow Queen,' taken several days apart, by the Robotic Arm Camera (RAC) aboard NASA's Phoenix Mars Lander. Snow Queen is the informal name for a patch of bright-toned material underneath the lander. Thruster exhaust blew away surface soil covering Snow Queen when Phoenix landed on May 25, 2008, exposing this hard layer comprising several smooth rounded cavities beneath the lander. The RAC images show how Snow Queen visibly changed between June 15, 2008, the 21st Martian day, or sol, of the mission and July 9, 2008, the 44th sol. Cracks as long as 10 centimeters (about four inches) appeared. One such crack is visible at the left third and the upper third of the Sol 44 image. A seven millimeter (one-third inch) pebble or clod appears just above and slightly to the right of the crack in the Sol 44 image. Cracks also appear in the lower part of the left third of the image. Other pieces noticeably shift, and some smooth texture has subtly roughened. The Phoenix team carefully positioned and focused RAC the same way in both images. Each image is about 60 centimeters, or about two feet, wide. The object protruding in from the top on the right half of the images is Phoenix's thermal and electrical conductivity probe. Snow Queen and other ice exposed by Phoenix landing and trenching operations on northern polar Mars is the first time scientists have been able to monitor Martian ice at a place where temperatures are cold enough that the ice doesn't immediately sublimate, or vaporize, away. The Phoenix Mission is led by the University of Arizona, Tucson, on behalf of NASA. Project management of the mission is by NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, Calif. Spacecraft development is by Lockheed Martin Space Systems, Denver.

  3. Snow on Antarctic sea ice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Massom, Robert A.; Eicken, Hajo; Hass, Christian; Jeffries, Martin O.; Drinkwater, Mark R.; Sturm, Matthew; Worby, Anthony P.; Wu, Xingren; Lytle, Victoria I.; Ushio, Shuki; Morris, Kim; Reid, Phillip A.; Warren, Stephen G.; Allison, Ian

    2001-08-01

    Snow on Antarctic sea ice plays a complex and highly variable role in air-sea-ice interaction processes and the Earth's climate system. Using data collected mostly during the past 10 years, this paper reviews the following topics: snow thickness and snow type and their geographical and seasonal variations; snow grain size, density, and salinity; frequency of occurrence of slush; thermal conductivity, snow surface temperature, and temperature gradients within snow; and the effect of snow thickness on albedo. Major findings include large regional and seasonal differences in snow properties and thicknesses; the consequences of thicker snow and thinner ice in the Antarctic relative to the Arctic (e.g., the importance of flooding and snow-ice formation); the potential impact of increasing snowfall resulting from global climate change; lower observed values of snow thermal conductivity than those typically used in models; periodic large-scale melt in winter; and the contrast in summer melt processes between the Arctic and the Antarctic. Both climate modeling and remote sensing would benefit by taking account of the differences between the two polar regions.

  4. NASA Airborne Snow Observatory: Measuring Spatial Distribution of Snow Water Equivalent and Snow Albedo

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joyce, M.; Painter, T. H.; Mattmann, C. A.; Ramirez, P.; Laidlaw, R.; Bormann, K. J.; Skiles, M.; Richardson, M.; Berisford, D. F.

    2015-12-01

    The two most critical properties for understanding snowmelt runoff and timing are the spatial and temporal distributions of snow water equivalent (SWE) and snow albedo. Despite their importance in controlling volume and timing of runoff, snowpack albedo and SWE are still largely unquantified in the US and not at all in most of the globe, leaving runoff models poorly constrained. NASA Jet Propulsion Laboratory, in partnership with the California Department of Water Resources, has developed the Airborne Snow Observatory (ASO), an imaging spectrometer and scanning LiDAR system, to quantify SWE and snow albedo, generate unprecedented knowledge of snow properties for cutting edge cryospheric science, and provide complete, robust inputs to water management models and systems of the future. This poster will describe the NASA Airborne Snow Observatory, its outputs and their uses and applications, along with recent advancements to the system and plans for the project's future. Specifically, we will look at how ASO uses its imaging spectrometer to quantify spectral albedo, broadband albedo, and radiative forcing by dust and black carbon in snow. Additionally, we'll see how the scanning LiDAR is used to determine snow depth against snow-free acquisitions and to quantify snow water equivalent when combined with in-situ constrained modeling of snow density.

  5. Rheological properties of bi-dispersed magnetorheological fluids based on plate-like iron particles with application to a small-sized damper

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shah, Kruti; Xuan Phu, Do; Choi, Seung-Bok

    2014-05-01

    In this study, the rheological properties and an application of bi-dispersed magnetorheological fluid (MRF) based on plate-like iron particles are experimentally investigated. A bi-dispersed MR Fluid is prepared using two different micron-scale sizes of plate-like iron particles. In the absence of a magnetic field, the properties of the fluid are isotropic. Upon the application of a magnetic field, the magnetized particles form a chain aligned in the direction of the field, which promotes the appearance of a yield stress. The reversible transition from solid to liquid is the basic requirement of MR applications. Due to the anisotropy in the shape and formation of a less compact structure in the iron plate-like particles, weak sedimentation and good redispersibility of the proposed MR fluid are created. The physical properties of the proposed MR fluids are evaluated and applied to the design of a small-sized controllable MR vibration damper, which can be used for vibration control of a washing machine. The MR damper is a semi-active device that dissipates energy during vibration motion to increase the stability of the application system. Three different weight fractions of the bi-dispersed MR fluids are prepared, and their rheological properties are presented and discussed. Based on their rheological properties, the figures of merit of the proposed MR fluids are derived. A comparison of these figures of merit gives the nominal behavior of the MR fluids, which are important in the design of the application device. A stability test is also performed to check the settling rate of MR fluids per day. The change in damping force due to the problem of particles settling in the MRF and the field-dependent damping force are measured with the MR damper operated just after filling the MRF and with the MR damper operated after waiting for 48 h after filling. With basic rheological properties and outstanding mechanical properties, it is clearly demonstrated that the proposed MR

  6. 'Snow White' Trench

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-01-01

    This image was acquired by NASA's Phoenix Mars Lander's Surface Stereo Imager on Sol 43, the 43rd Martian day after landing (July 8, 2008). This image shows the trench informally called 'Snow White.' Two samples were delivered to the Wet Chemistry Laboratory, which is part of Phoenix's Microscopy, Electrochemistry, and Conductivity Analyzer (MECA). The first sample was taken from the surface area just left of the trench and informally named 'Rosy Red.' It was delivered to the Wet Chemistry Laboratory on Sol 30 (June 25, 2008). The second sample, informally named 'Sorceress,' was taken from the center of the 'Snow White' trench and delivered to the Wet Chemistry Laboratory on Sol 41 (July 6, 2008). The Phoenix Mission is led by the University of Arizona, Tucson, on behalf of NASA. Project management of the mission is by NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, Calif. Spacecraft development is by Lockheed Martin Space Systems, Denver.

  7. Snow Radiance Assimilation Studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, E. J.; Durand, M. T.; Toure, A.; Margulis, S. A.; Goita, K.; Royer, A.; Lu, H.

    2009-12-01

    Passive microwave-based retrievals of terrestrial snow parameters from satellite observations form a 30-year global record which will continue for the forseeable future. So far, these snow retrievals have been generated primarily by regression-based empirical “inversion” methods based on snapshots in time, and are limited to footprints around 25 km in diameter. Assimilation of microwave radiances into physical land surface models may be used to create a retrieval framework that is inherently self-consistent with respect to model physics as well as a more physically-based approach vs. legacy retrieval/inversion methods. This radiance assimilation approach has been used for years for atmospheric parameters by the operational weather forecasting community with great success, and represents one motivation for our work. A radiance assimilation scheme for snow requires a snowpack land surface model (LSM) coupled to a radiative transfer model (RTM). In previous local-scale studies, Durand, Kim, & Margulis (2008) explored the requirements on LSM model fidelity (i.e., snowpack state information) required in order for the RTM to produce brightness temperatures suitable for radiance assimilation purposes at a local scale, using the well-known Microwave Emission Model for Layered Snowpacks (MEMLS) as the RTM and a combination of Simple SIB (SSiB) and Snow Atmosphere (SAST) as the LSM. They also demonstrated improvement of simulated snow depth through the use of an ensemble Kalman filter scheme at this local scale (2009). This modeling framework reflects another motivation—namely, possibilities for downscaling. Our focus at this stage has been at the local scale where high-quality ground truth data is available in order to evaluate radiance assimilation under a “best case scenario.” The quantitative results then form a benchmark for future assessment of effects such as sparse forcing data, upscaling/downscaling, forest attenuation, and model details. Field data from

  8. Snow White Trench (Animation)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-01-01

    [figure removed for brevity, see original site] Click on image for animation This animation shows the evolution of the trench called 'Snow White' that NASA's Phoenix Mars Lander began digging on the 22nd Martian day of the mission after the May 25, 2008, landing. The Phoenix Mission is led by the University of Arizona, Tucson, on behalf of NASA. Project management of the mission is by NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, Calif. Spacecraft development is by Lockheed Martin Space Systems, Denver.

  9. Snow accretion on overhead wires

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sakamoto, Y. [Meteorological Research Inst. for Technology Co. Ltd., Tokyo (Japan); Tachizaki, S.; Sudo, N. [Tohoku Electric Power Co. Ltd., Miyagi (Japan)

    2005-07-01

    Wet snow accretion can cause extensive damage to transmission systems. This paper reviewed some of the difficulties faced by researchers in the study of wet snow accretion on overhead lines in Japan. The study of snow accretion phenomena is complicated by the range of phase changes in water. Snowflakes produced in an upper atmospheric layer with a temperature below freezing do not melt when they go through a lower atmospheric layer with a temperature above freezing, but are in a mixed state of solid and liquid due to the latent heat of melting. The complicated properties of water make studies of snow accretion difficult, as well as the fact that snow changes its physical properties rapidly, due to the effects of ambient temperature, rainfall, and solar radiation. The adhesive forces that cause snow accretion include freezing; bonding through freezing; sintering; condensation and freezing of vapor in the air; mechanical intertwining of snowflakes; capillary action due to liquids; coherent forces between ice particles and water formed through the metamorphosis of snowflakes. In addition to these complexities, differences in laboratory room environments and natural snow environments can also pose difficulties for researchers. Equations describing the relationship between the density of accreted snow and the meteorological parameters involved were presented, as well as empirical equations which suggested that snow accretion efficiency has a dependency on air temperature. An empirical model for estimating snow loads in Japan was outlined, as well as various experiments observing show shedding. Correlations for wet snow accretion included precipitation intensity; duration of precipitation; air temperature; wind speed and wind direction in relation to the overhead line. Issues concerning topography and wet snow accretion were reviewed. It was concluded that studies of snow accretion will benefit by the collection of data in each matrix of the relevant parameters. 12 refs

  10. The snowmaker: nature identical snow production in the laboratory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schleef, S.; Jaggi, M.; Loewe, H.; Schneebeli, M.

    2013-12-01

    Using natural snow for laboratory experiments can be tricky due to shortage of winter periods and snowfall, difficulties of sample casting and transport, and the great variability of natural snow due to the varying conditions of crystal growth in the clouds. This hinders repeatable laboratory experiments with reproducible specimen and microstructural characteristics. To minimize experimental uncertainties we designed an improved machine called snowmaker, which enables us to produce nature-identical snow in a cold laboratory under well defined conditions. The snowmaker is based on well-known principles: warm humid air from a heated water basin is advected into a cold nucleation chamber where the vapor resublimates on stretched Nylon wires. Crystals are automatically harvested by a motor driven brush rack and collected in a box, thereby several kilograms of snow can be produced per day with minimum maintenance. The excess vapor is collected in a moisture trap to avoid frost in the laboratory. The entire construction is designed as a rolling, modular assembly system which can easily carried out of the laboratory for defrosting. In addition to previous attempts we focus on the reproducibility of the samples and the comparison to natural snow down to the microscale. We show that the settings of water temperature and cold laboratory temperature facilitates the production of different crystal shapes like dendrites and needles in a reproducible way. Besides photography, we analyzed the microstructure of snowmaker crystals in aggregated specimen by X-ray microtomography. Depending on the settings we can create reproducible samples with density of 50-170 kg/m3 and specific surface areas of 50-80 mm-1. We briefly touch similarities between artificial and natural snow samples with respect to crystal habit, microstructural parameters and short-time metamorphism.

  11. Analysis of Geometric Effects on Stress Wave Propagation in Epoxy Resins of Plate-Like Structure by Dynamic Photoelasticity Combined with Strain Gauge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayasi, Ryoei; Masuda, Yoshiharu; Hashimoto, Shozo; Kuriyama, Shinhou

    2008-06-01

    Experimental studies have been conducted using the dynamic photoelastic technique combined with a strain gauge to investigate geometric effects on stress wave propagation in axially impacted epoxy resins of plate-like structure. Dynamic photoelasticity provides a means of visualizing the stress wave field inside a solid. A device that triggers the generation of stress waves by direct projectile impact is used to conduct high-speed photoelasticity and strain gauge measurements. This triggering is achieved by an electrical connection between projectile and sample. The geometric effects of the width-to-wavelength ratio on the propagation speed and attenuation coefficient of stress waves were analyzed for isotropic rectangular rods of different width-to-thickness ratios, the thickness being the same in each case. The experimental results for stress wave speed as a function of width-to-wavelength ratio are in reasonable agreement with theoretical predictions based on a modified Love's equation involving the geometric effects due to lateral inertia.

  12. Snow monitoring using microwave radars

    OpenAIRE

    Koskinen, Jarkko

    2001-01-01

    Remote sensing has proven its usefulness in various applications. For mapping, land-use classification and forest monitoring optical satellite and airborne images are used operationally. However, this is not the case with snow monitoring. Currently only ground-based in situ and weather measurements are used operationally for snow monitoring in Finland. Ground measurements are conducted once a month on special snow courses. These measurements are used to update the hydrological model that simu...

  13. Snow Plow Activity (2015-2016)

    Data.gov (United States)

    Allegheny County / City of Pittsburgh / Western PA Regional Data Center — Snow Plow data from the the City of Pittsburgh's Snow Plow Tracker. These data are collected from the Snow Plow Tracker's Fusion Table and converted to geoJSON....

  14. 'Snow White' in Color

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-01-01

    This color image taken by the Surface Stereo Imager on NASA's Phoenix Mars Lander shows the trench dubbed 'Snow White,' after further digging on the 25th Martian day, or sol, of the mission (June 19, 2008). The lander's solar panel is casting a shadow over a portion of the trench. The trench is about 5 centimeters (2 inches) deep and 30 centimeters (12 inches) long. The Phoenix Mission is led by the University of Arizona, Tucson, on behalf of NASA. Project management of the mission is by NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, Calif. Spacecraft development is by Lockheed Martin Space Systems, Denver.

  15. Phoenix's Snow White Trench

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-01-01

    A soil sample taken from the informally named 'Snow White' trench at NASA's Phoenix Mars Lander work site produced minerals that indicate evidence of past interaction between the minerals and liquid water. This image was taken by the Surface Stereo Imager on Sol 103, the 103rd day since landing (Sept. 8, 2008). The trench is approximately 23 centimeters (9 inches) long. The Phoenix Mission is led by the University of Arizona, Tucson, on behalf of NASA. Project management of the mission is by JPL, Pasadena, Calif. Spacecraft development was by Lockheed Martin Space Systems, Denver.

  16. Optimization principles of dendritic structure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Borst Alexander

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Dendrites are the most conspicuous feature of neurons. However, the principles determining their structure are poorly understood. By employing cable theory and, for the first time, graph theory, we describe dendritic anatomy solely on the basis of optimizing synaptic efficacy with minimal resources. Results We show that dendritic branching topology can be well described by minimizing the path length from the neuron's dendritic root to each of its synaptic inputs while constraining the total length of wiring. Tapering of diameter toward the dendrite tip – a feature of many neurons – optimizes charge transfer from all dendritic synapses to the dendritic root while housekeeping the amount of dendrite volume. As an example, we show how dendrites of fly neurons can be closely reconstructed based on these two principles alone.

  17. The value of snow cover

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sokratov, S. A.

    2009-04-01

    Snow is the natural resource, like soil and water. It has specific properties which allow its use not just for skiing but also for houses cooling in summer (Swedish experience), for air fields construction (Arctic and Antarctic), for dams (north of Russia), for buildings (not only snow-houses of some Polar peoples but artistic hotel attracting tourists in Sweden), and as art material (Sapporo snow festival, Finnish events), etc. "Adjustment" of snow distribution and amount is not only rather common practice (avalanche-protection constructions keeping snow on slopes) but also the practice with long history. So-called "snow irrigation" was used in Russia since XIX century to protect winter crop. What is now named "artificial snow production", is part of much larger pattern. What makes it special—it is unavoidable in present climate and economy situation. 5% of national income in Austria is winter tourism. 50% of the economy in Savoy relay on winter tourism. In terms of money this can be less, but in terms of jobs and income involved this would be even more considerable in Switzerland. As an example—the population of Davos is 14000 in Summer and 50000 in Winter. Skiing is growing business. In present time you can find ski slopes in Turkey and Lebanon. To keep a cite suitable for attracting tourists you need certain amount of sunny days and certain amount of snow. The snow cannons are often the only way to keep a place running. On the other hand, more artificial snow does not necessary attract more tourists, while heavy natural snowfall does attract them. Artificial snow making is costly and requires infrastructure (ponds and electric lines) with very narrow range of weather conditions. Related companies are searching for alternatives and one of them can be "weather regulation" by distribution of some chemical components in clouds. It did not happen yet, but can happen soon. The consequences of such interference in Nature is hardly known. The ski tourism is not the

  18. RAB-10 Regulates Dendritic Branching by Balancing Dendritic Transport.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Caitlin A Taylor

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The construction of a large dendritic arbor requires robust growth and the precise delivery of membrane and protein cargoes to specific subcellular regions of the developing dendrite. How the microtubule-based vesicular trafficking and sorting systems are regulated to distribute these dendritic development factors throughout the dendrite is not well understood. Here we identify the small GTPase RAB-10 and the exocyst complex as critical regulators of dendrite morphogenesis and patterning in the C. elegans sensory neuron PVD. In rab-10 mutants, PVD dendritic branches are reduced in the posterior region of the cell but are excessive in the distal anterior region of the cell. We also demonstrate that the dendritic branch distribution within PVD depends on the balance between the molecular motors kinesin-1/UNC-116 and dynein, and we propose that RAB-10 regulates dendrite morphology by balancing the activity of these motors to appropriately distribute branching factors, including the transmembrane receptor DMA-1.

  19. 水热法制备片状氧化铝纳米粉体%Preparation of Plate-Like Alumina Nanometer Powder by Hydrothermal Method

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    马小玲

    2012-01-01

    在碳酸氢铵和PEG2000混合溶液中,加入硫酸铝铵和PEG400的混合溶液得到白色沉淀,将白色沉淀物与正丁醇共沸后,在900℃煅烧1 h,得到γ-Al2O3粉体,粉体粒径约为20 nm;在1 200 ℃煅烧1h,得到片状α-Al2O3粉体,粉体粒径约为60 nm.%When the solution with aluminium ammonium sulfate and PEG400 was mixed with the solution content of ammonium hydrogen carbonate and PEG2000,the white precipitation was obtained. Then the precipitation was azeotropic distillation. The y- A12O3 powder was obtained at 900 C for 1 h.with size about 20 nm. The plate-like a-- AI2O3 powder was obtained at 1 200 "C for 1 h.with size about 60 nm.

  20. 水热法制备片状氧化铝纳米粉体%Preparation of Plate-Like Alumina Nanometer Powder by Hydrothermal Method

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    马小玲

    2013-01-01

    When the solution with aluminium ammonium sulfate and PEG400 was mixed with the solution content of ammonium hydro-gen carbonate and PEG2000 ,the white precipitation was obtained .Then the precipitation was azeotropic distillation .The γ -Al2 O3 powder was obtained at 900 ℃ for 1 h ,with size about 20 nm .The plate-likeα-Al2 O3 powder was obtained at 1 200 ℃ for 1 h ,with size about 60 nm .%在碳酸氢铵和PEG2000混合溶液中,加入硫酸铝铵和PEG400的混合溶液得到白色沉淀,将白色沉淀物与正丁醇共沸后,在900℃煅烧1 h ,得到γ-Al2 O3粉体,粉体粒径约为20 nm ;在1200℃煅烧1 h ,得到片状α-Al2 O3粉体,粉体粒径约为60 nm。

  1. HONO emissions from snow surfaces

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Beine, Harry; Colussi, AgustIn J; Hoffmann, Michael R [California Institute of Technology, Environmental Science and Engineering, Pasadena, CA (United States); Amoroso, Antonio; Esposito, Giulio; Montagnoli, Mauro [Consiglio Nazionale delle Ricerche-Istituto Inquinamento Atmosferico (CNR-IIA), Roma (Italy)], E-mail: hbeine@ucdavis.edu

    2008-10-15

    Photochemical production of NO{sub x} and HONO from surface snow can significantly impact the NO{sub x}, OH, and O{sub 3} budgets in the overlying atmosphere. NO{sub x} production is driven by the solar photolysis of NO{sub 3}{sup -} within or at the surface of snowpacks. HONO, however, is a secondary species that involves H-atom transfer between natural donors and photogenerated NO{sub 2}. Here we investigate the mechanism of HONO generation in snowpacks by exploring how its emissions respond to on-and-off illumination and temperature cycles, and to the addition of various snow dopants. The presence of humic substances within or at the surface of the snowpack significantly enhances, and may be an essential requisite for HONO production. Emission fluxes of NO, NO{sub 2}, and HONO from snow surfaces were measured under controlled temperature, ozone mixing ratio and actinic flux conditions. We used natural mid-latitude surface snow as the snow substrate. Their combined peak emission fluxes reached up to {approx}3 x 10{sup 10} molecules cm{sup -2} s{sup -1}, {approx}10{sup 3} times larger than typical emissions from polar snowpacks. Less than 1% of available N was released in these experiments. We report significant post-irradiation HONO emissions from the snow. Present results indicate a strong, direct correlation between HONO emissions and the HULIS (humic-like substances) content of the snow surface.

  2. Active properties of neuronal dendrites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnston, D; Magee, J C; Colbert, C M; Cristie, B R

    1996-01-01

    Dendrites of neurons in the central nervous system are the principal sites for excitatory synaptic input. Although little is known about their function, two disparate perspectives have arisen to describe the activity patterns inherent to these diverse tree-like structures. Dendrites are thus considered either passive or active in their role in integrating synaptic inputs. This review follows the history of dendritic research from before the turn of the century to the present, with a primary focus on the hippocampus. A number of recent techniques, including high-speed fluorescence imaging and dendritic patch clamping, have provided new information and perspectives about the active properties of dendrites. The results support previous notions about the dendritic propagation of action potentials and also indicate which types of voltage-gated sodium and calcium channels are expressed and functionally active in dendrites. Possible roles for the active properties of dendrites in synaptic plasticity and integration are also discussed.

  3. Snow economics and the NOHRSC Snow Information System (SNOW-INFO) for the United States

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carroll, T.; Cline, D.; Berkowitz, E.; Savage, D.

    2003-04-01

    The National Operational Hydrologic Remote Sensing Center (NOHRSC) in the National Weather Service (NWS), National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA), provides remotely sensed and modeled snow cover products and data sets to support river and flood forecasting in the United States and also to enhance the national economy. Nationwide, on average, about 16% of the total annual precipitation occurs as snowfall. Many sectors of the U.S. economy rely on surface water from snowfall for production, including manufacturing, mining, thermoelectric power, agriculture, and others. Snow contributes 1.7 trillion annually (16%) to the Nation's gross domestic product (GDP) of 10.5 trillion. Manufacturing is by far the largest contributor to the Nation's GDP and is also the Nation's largest surface-water user. The contribution of snow to manufacturing revenue totals 1.6 trillion annually for the Nation and ranges from just a few billion dollars in the southeastern U.S. to over 200 billion each in Michigan and New York. Hydropower supplies about 10% of the electricity used in the United States, enough to serve the needs of 28 million people. Annual hydroelectric power production exceeds 250 billion kilowatt-hours with the contribution from snow exceeding 6 billion in energy revenue each year (i.e., 30% of the Nation's annual hydroelectric production of 20 billion). Seasonal snowpacks are an essential component of agricultural water supplies throughout most of the U.S. and provide much of the surface water used to irrigate over 55 million acres of U.S. farmland each year. Agriculture net revenue supported by snowmelt exceeds 33 billion annually. Surface water supplies are essential for thermoelectric power generation by coal-fired, oil-fired, and nuclear power plants. Providing about 90% of the Nation's electricity supply, thermoelectric power revenues exceed 215 billion each year while water from snow contributes about 25 billion to this revenue annually. With 1

  4. Isothermal Dendritic Growth Experiment Video

    Science.gov (United States)

    1997-01-01

    This video, captured during the Isothermal Dendritic Growth Experiment (IDGE) flown on STS-87 as a part of the fourth United States Microgravity payload, shows the growth of a dendrite, and the surface solidification that occurred on the front and back windows of the growth chamber. Dendrites are tiny, tree like structures that form as metals solidify.

  5. MODIS Snow Cover Mapping Decision Tree Technique: Snow and Cloud Discrimination

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riggs, George A.; Hall, Dorothy K.

    2010-01-01

    Accurate mapping of snow cover continues to challenge cryospheric scientists and modelers. The Moderate-Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) snow data products have been used since 2000 by many investigators to map and monitor snow cover extent for various applications. Users have reported on the utility of the products and also on problems encountered. Three problems or hindrances in the use of the MODIS snow data products that have been reported in the literature are: cloud obscuration, snow/cloud confusion, and snow omission errors in thin or sparse snow cover conditions. Implementation of the MODIS snow algorithm in a decision tree technique using surface reflectance input to mitigate those problems is being investigated. The objective of this work is to use a decision tree structure for the snow algorithm. This should alleviate snow/cloud confusion and omission errors and provide a snow map with classes that convey information on how snow was detected, e.g. snow under clear sky, snow tinder cloud, to enable users' flexibility in interpreting and deriving a snow map. Results of a snow cover decision tree algorithm are compared to the standard MODIS snow map and found to exhibit improved ability to alleviate snow/cloud confusion in some situations allowing up to about 5% increase in mapped snow cover extent, thus accuracy, in some scenes.

  6. Transport Processes in Dendritic Crystallization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glicksman, M. E.

    1984-01-01

    Free dentritic growth refers to the unconstrained development of crystals within a supercooled melt, which is the classical dendrite problem. The development of theoretical understanding of dendritic growth and its experimental status is sketched showing that transport theory and interfacial thermodynamics (capillarity theory) are insufficient ingredients to develop a truly predictive model of dendrite formation. The convenient, but incorrect, notion of maximum velocity was used for many years to estimate the behavior of dendritic transformations until supplanted by modern dynamic stability theory. The proper combinations of transport theory and morphological stability seem to be able to predict the salient aspects of dendritic growth, especially in the neighborhood of the tip.

  7. Modification of dendritic development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feria-Velasco, Alfredo; del Angel, Alma Rosa; Gonzalez-Burgos, Ignacio

    2002-01-01

    Since 1890 Ramón y Cajal strongly defended the theory that dendrites and their processes and spines had a function of not just nutrient transport to the cell body, but they had an important conductive role in neural impulse transmission. He extensively discussed and supported this theory in the Volume 1 of his extraordinary book Textura del Sistema Nervioso del Hombre y de los Vertebrados. Also, Don Santiago significantly contributed to a detailed description of the various neural components of the hippocampus and cerebral cortex during development. Extensive investigation has been done in the last Century related to the functional role of these complex brain regions, and their association with learning, memory and some limbic functions. Likewise, the organization and expression of neuropsychological qualities such as memory, exploratory behavior and spatial orientation, among others, depend on the integrity and adequate functional activity of the cerebral cortex and hippocampus. It is known that brain serotonin synthesis and release depend directly and proportionally on the availability of its precursor, tryptophan (TRY). By using a chronic TRY restriction model in rats, we studied their place learning ability in correlation with the dendritic spine density of pyramidal neurons in field CA1 of the hippocampus during postnatal development. We have also reported alterations in the maturation pattern of the ability for spontaneous alternation and task performance evaluating short-term memory, as well as adverse effects on the density of dendritic spines of hippocampal CA1 field pyramidal neurons and on the dendritic arborization and the number of dendritic spines of pyramidal neurons from the third layer of the prefrontal cortex using the same model of TRY restriction. The findings obtained in these studies employing a modified Golgi method, can be interpreted as a trans-synaptic plastic response due to understimulation of serotoninergic receptors located in the

  8. Wind tunnel observations of drifting snow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paterna, Enrico; Crivelli, Philip; Lehning, Michael

    2016-04-01

    Drifting snow has a significant impact on snow redistribution in mountains, prairies as well as on glaciers, ice shelves, and sea ice. In all these environments, the local mass balance is highly influenced by drifting snow. Understanding the dynamic of snow saltation is crucial to the accurate description of the process. We applied digital shadowgraphy in a cold wind tunnel to measure drifting snow over natural snow covers. The acquisition and evaluation of time-resolved shadowgraphy images allowed us to resolve a large part of the saltation layer. The technique has been successfully compared to the measurements obtained from a Snow Particle Counter, considered the most robust technique for snow mass-flux measurements so far. The streamwise snow transport is dominated by large-scale events. The vertical snow transport has a more equal distribution of energy across the scales, similarly to what is observed for the flow turbulence velocities. It is hypothesized that the vertical snow transport is a quantity that reflects the local entrainment of the snow crystals into the saltation layer while the streamwise snow transport results from the streamwise development of the trajectories of the snow particles once entrained, and therefore is rather a non-local quantity.

  9. Densification and grain coarsening of melting snow

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    周石硚; 中尾正义; 桥本重将; 坂井亚规子; 成田英器; 石川信敬

    2003-01-01

    A field work was conducted at Moshiri in Japan.The work included intensive snow pit work, taking snow grain photos, recording snow and air temperatures, as well as measuring snow water content.By treating the snow as a viscous fluid, it is found that the snow compactive viscosity decreases as the density increases, which is opposite to the relation for dry snow.Based on the measurements of snow grain size, it is shown that, similar to the water-saturated snow, the frequency distributions of grain size at different times almost have the same shape.This reveals that the water-unsaturated melting snow holds the same grain-coarsening behavior as the water-saturated snow does.It is also shown that the water-unsaturated melting snow coarsens much more slowly than the water-saturated snow.The C value, which is the viscosity when the snow density is zero, is related to the mean grain size and found to decrease with increasing grain size.The decreasing rate of C value increases with decreasing grain-coarsening rate.

  10. Sodankylä manual snow survey program

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. Leppänen

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The manual snow survey program of the Arctic Research Centre of Finnish Meteorological Institute (FMI-ARC consists of numerous observations of natural seasonal taiga snowpack in Sodankylä, northern Finland. The easily accessible measurement areas represent the typical forest and soil types in the boreal forest zone. Systematic snow measurements began in 1909 with snow depth (SD and snow water equivalent (SWE; however some older records of the snow and ice cover exists. In 2006 the manual snow survey program expanded to cover snow macro- and microstructure from regular snow pits at several sites using both traditional and novel measurement techniques. Present-day measurements include observations of SD, SWE, temperature, density, horizontal layers of snow, grain size, specific surface area (SSA, and liquid water content (LWC. Regular snow pit measurements are performed weekly during the snow season. Extensive time series of manual snow measurements are important for the monitoring of temporal and spatial changes in seasonal snowpack. This snow survey program is an excellent base for the future research of snow properties.

  11. Assimilation of snow cover and snow depth into a snow model to estimate snow water equivalent and snowmelt runoff in a Himalayan catchment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stigter, Emmy E.; Wanders, Niko; Saloranta, Tuomo M.; Shea, Joseph M.; Bierkens, Marc F. P.; Immerzeel, Walter W.

    2017-07-01

    Snow is an important component of water storage in the Himalayas. Previous snowmelt studies in the Himalayas have predominantly relied on remotely sensed snow cover. However, snow cover data provide no direct information on the actual amount of water stored in a snowpack, i.e., the snow water equivalent (SWE). Therefore, in this study remotely sensed snow cover was combined with in situ observations and a modified version of the seNorge snow model to estimate (climate sensitivity of) SWE and snowmelt runoff in the Langtang catchment in Nepal. Snow cover data from Landsat 8 and the MOD10A2 snow cover product were validated with in situ snow cover observations provided by surface temperature and snow depth measurements resulting in classification accuracies of 85.7 and 83.1 % respectively. Optimal model parameter values were obtained through data assimilation of MOD10A2 snow maps and snow depth measurements using an ensemble Kalman filter (EnKF). Independent validations of simulated snow depth and snow cover with observations show improvement after data assimilation compared to simulations without data assimilation. The approach of modeling snow depth in a Kalman filter framework allows for data-constrained estimation of snow depth rather than snow cover alone, and this has great potential for future studies in complex terrain, especially in the Himalayas. Climate sensitivity tests with the optimized snow model revealed that snowmelt runoff increases in winter and the early melt season (December to May) and decreases during the late melt season (June to September) as a result of the earlier onset of snowmelt due to increasing temperature. At high elevation a decrease in SWE due to higher air temperature is (partly) compensated by an increase in precipitation, which emphasizes the need for accurate predictions on the changes in the spatial distribution of precipitation along with changes in temperature.

  12. Politics of Snow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burko, D.

    2012-12-01

    In a 2010 catalog introduction for my exhibition titled: POLITICS OF SNOW, Eileen Claussen, President of the Pew Center on Global Climate Change wrote the following: "Climate change has been taken over by politics…We are awash in talking points, briefing papers, scientific studies, and communiqués from national governments… Diane Burko's paintings remind us that all these words can often obscure or even obstruct our view of what is truly happening …..There is only so much you can do with words. People need to see that the world is changing before our eyes. When we look at Diane's images of the effects of climate change, we connect to something much deeper and more profound (and more moving) than the latest political pitch from one side or another in this debate…These paintings also connect us to something else. Even as Diane documents how things are changing, she also reminds us of the stunning beauty of nature - and, in turn, the urgency of doing everything in our power to protect it." The creation of this body of work was made possible because of the collaboration of many glacial geologists and scientists who continually share their visual data with me. Since 2006 I've been gathering repeats from people like Bruce Molnia (USGS) and Tad Pfeffer of Alaskan glaciers, from Daniel Fagre (USGS) of Glacier National Park and Lonnie Thompson and Jason Box (Ohio University's Byrd Polar Center) about Kilimanjaro, Qori Kalis and Petermann glaciers as well as from photographer David Breashears on the disappearing Himalayan glaciers. In my practice, I acknowledge the photographers, or archive agencies, such as USGS, NASA or Snow and Ice Center, in the title and all printed material. As a landscape painter and photographer my intent is to not reproduce those images but rather use them as inspiration. At first I used the documentary evidence in sets of diptychs or triptychs. Since 2010 I have incorporated geological charts of recessional lines, graphs, symbols and

  13. Role of blowing snow in snow processes in Qilian Mountainous region

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    HongYi Li; Jian Wang; XiaoHua Hao

    2014-01-01

    Blowing snow is an important part of snow hydrologic processes in mountainous region, however the related researches were rare for the Qilian mountainous region where blowing snow is frequent. Using the observation dataset in 2008 snow season in Binggou wa-tershed in Qilian mountainous region, we systematically studied the energy and mass processes of blowing snow by field observation and model simulation. The results include the analysis of snow observation, the occurrence probability of blowing snow, blowing snow transport and blowing snow sublimation. It was found that blowing snow was obvious in high altitude region (4,146 m), the snow redistribution phenomena was remarkable. In Yakou station in the study region, blowing snow was easily occurred in midwinter and early spring when no snowmelt, the blowing snow transport was dominated in this period;when snowmelt beginning, the occur-rence probability of blowing snow decreased heavily because of the increasing air temperature, melt, and refrozen phenomena. The blowing snow sublimation accounted for 41.5%of total snow sublimation at Yakou station in 2008 snow season.

  14. Sodankylä manual snow survey program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leppänen, Leena; Kontu, Anna; Hannula, Henna-Reetta; Sjöblom, Heidi; Pulliainen, Jouni

    2016-05-01

    The manual snow survey program of the Arctic Research Centre of the Finnish Meteorological Institute (FMI-ARC) consists of numerous observations of natural seasonal taiga snowpack in Sodankylä, northern Finland. The easily accessible measurement areas represent the typical forest and soil types in the boreal forest zone. Systematic snow measurements began in 1909 with snow depth (HS) and snow water equivalent (SWE). In 2006 the manual snow survey program expanded to cover snow macro- and microstructure from regular snow pits at several sites using both traditional and novel measurement techniques. Present-day snow pit measurements include observations of HS, SWE, temperature, density, stratigraphy, grain size, specific surface area (SSA) and liquid water content (LWC). Regular snow pit measurements are performed weekly during the snow season. Extensive time series of manual snow measurements are important for the monitoring of temporal and spatial changes in seasonal snowpack. This snow survey program is an excellent base for the future research of snow properties.

  15. Snow Roads at McMurdo Station, Antarctica

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-05-01

    We found that the disaggregation was not uniform and it left the snow in larger clumps rather than fine particles . These data indicate that snow...33 Snow moisture ............................................................................................................................ 33...52 Snow moisture

  16. Changes of snow cover in Poland

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szwed, Małgorzata; Pińskwar, Iwona; Kundzewicz, Zbigniew W.; Graczyk, Dariusz; Mezghani, Abdelkader

    2017-02-01

    The present paper examines variability of characteristics of snow cover (snow cover depth, number of days with snow cover and dates of beginning and end of snow cover) in Poland. The study makes use of a set of 43 long time series of observation records from the stations in Poland, from 1952 to 2013. To describe temporal changes in snow cover characteristics, the intervals of 1952-1990 and of 1991-2013 are compared and trends in analysed data are sought (e.g., using the Mann-Kendall test). Observed behaviour of time series of snow-related variables is complex and not easy to interpret, for instance because of the location of the research area in the zone of transitional moderate climate, where strong variability of climate events is one of the main attributes. A statistical link between the North Atlantic Oscillation (NAO) index and the snow cover depth, as well as the number of snow cover days is found.

  17. MONITORING OF SNOW COVER VARIATION USING MODIS SNOW PRODUCT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. Fayaz

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Snow is one of the integral components of hydrological and climatic systems. Needless to say, snow cover areas (SCA are considered as indispensable input of hydrological and general circulation models. Studying the spatial and temporal variability of SCA is of the paramount importance for tremendous variety of research such as climate change, water supply and properly managing water resources. In this study by means of Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS snow cover product, the variation of snow cover extent (SCE in Karoun basin located in western part of Iran is evaluated for twelve years' duration; since 2000 to 2012. The results show that the paramount occurrence of SCE is observed during February months of 2003, 2010 and 2011 as well as during December months of 2006 and 2009.The utmost occurrence of SCE is considered during January months of the other remaining years. Annual average shows that SCE varies from 11% in 2011 to 22% in 2006. According to Mann-Kendal trend test, throughout twelve years; 2000 to 2012, a majority of the pixels in the study area have no considerable trend although there is a decreasing trend on a small portion of the pixels located in the eastern part the study domain.

  18. [Snow cover pollution monitoring in Ufa].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daukaev, R A; Suleĭmanov, R A

    2008-01-01

    The paper presents the results of examining the snow cover polluted with heavy metals in the large industrial town of Ufa. The level of man-caused burden on the snow cover of the conventional parts of the town was estimated and compared upon exposure to a wide range of snow cover pollutants. The priority snow cover pollutants were identified among the test heavy metals.

  19. 片状氧化铝晶种对氧化铝陶瓷断裂韧性的影响%Effect of plate-like alumina seed on the fracture toughness of alumina ceramics

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    于佳伟; 廖其龙

    2011-01-01

    以片状氧化铝晶种作为第二相,采用无压烧结制备了氧化铝陶瓷,分析了片状氧化铝含量对氧化铝陶瓷微观结构的影响,采用扫描电子显微镜(SEM)观察分析试样的断口形貌;采用压痕法计算试样的断裂韧性(KIC)值;研究了不同含量的晶种引入量对氧化铝陶瓷断裂韧性的影响。结果表明烧结温度为1575℃时,相对致密度可以达到96.7%;片状氧化铝晶种的引入能够显著提高氧化铝陶瓷的断裂韧性;其片晶的裂纹偏转、片晶拔出效应等增韧机制发挥了主导作用;随着片状氧化铝含量的提高,氧化铝陶瓷的力学性能逐渐提高,当掺杂含量达到35%(质量分数)时,KIC达到6.4MPa.m1/2,当含量继续增加,KIC呈现逐渐降低的趋势。%The effects of plate-like alumina seed amount on the microstructure and properties of alumina ceramics prepared by pressureless sintering were studied,when plate-like alumina seed was used as the second phase.The effects of plate-like alumina content on the microstructure of fracture surface of alumina ceramics were studied by SEM.The fracture toughness(KIC) of specimen was calculated by the indentation method and the effects of crystal seed with different contents on the fracture toughness of alumina ceramic were studied.The results demonstrate that the relative density of alumina ceramics reaches 96.7% when sintering temperature is 1575℃.The fracture toughness of alumina ceramics increases gradually as crack deflection and plate-like alumina seed pullout working.With the content of the plate-like alumina increasing,the mechanical properties of alumina ceramic gradually increased.When 35wt % seeds were added,the fracture toughness can reach 6.4MPa·m1/2

  20. Changes in Snow Albedo Resulting from Snow Darkening Caused by Black Carbon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Engels, J.; Kloster, S.; Bourgeois, Q.

    2014-12-01

    We investigate the potential impact of snow darkening caused by pre-industrial and present-day black carbon (BC) emissions on snow albedo and subsequently climate. To assess this impact, we implemented the effect of snow darkening caused by BC emitted from natural as well as anthropogenic sources into the Max Planck Institute for Meteorology Earth System Model (MPI-M ESM). Considerable amounts of BC are emitted e.g. from fires and are transported through the atmosphere for several days before being removed by rain or snow precipitation in snow covered regions. Already very small quantities of BC reduce the snow reflectance significantly, with consequences for snow melting and snow spatial coverage. We implemented the snow albedo reduction caused by BC contamination and snow aging in the one layer land surface component (JSBACH) of the atmospheric general circulation model ECHAM6, developed at MPI-M. For this we used the single-layer simulator of the SNow, Ice, and Aerosol Radiation (SNICAR-Online (Flanner et al., 2007); http://snow.engin.umich.edu) model to derive snow albedo values for BC in snow concentrations ranging between 0 and 1500 ng(BC)/g(snow) for different snow grain sizes for the visible (0.3 - 0.7 μm) and near infrared range (0.7 - 1.5 μm). As snow grains grow over time, we assign different snow ages to different snow grain sizes (50, 150, 500, and 1000 μm). Here, a radius of 50 μm corresponds to new snow, whereas a radius of 1000 μm corresponds to old snow. The deposition rates of BC on snow are prescribed from previous ECHAM6-HAM simulations for two time periods, pre-industrial (1880-1889) and present-day (2000-2009), respectively. We perform a sensitivity study regarding the scavenging of BC by snow melt. To evaluate the newly implemented albedo scheme we will compare the modeled black carbon in snow concentrations to observed ones. Moreover, we will show the impact of the BC contamination and snow aging on the simulated snow albedo. The

  1. 'Snow White' and Language Awareness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larson, Deborah Aldrich

    1987-01-01

    Noting that knowledge of grammar rules does not ensure correct usage in one's own writing, describes an approach used in a summer workshop to promote awareness of appropriate idiom where 35 highly motivated black students produced 'Snow White' using their own script, half in standard dialect and half in black dialect. (JG)

  2. Phase field modeling of dendrite growth

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yutuo ZHANG; Chengzhi WANG; Dianzhong LI; Yiyi LI

    2009-01-01

    Single dendrite and multi-dendrite growth for A1-2 mol pct Si alloy during isothermal solidification are simulated by phase field method. In the case of single equiaxed dendrite growth, the secondary and the necking phenomenon can be observed. For multi-dendrite growth, there exists the competitive growth among the dendrites dur-ing solidification. As solidification proceeds, growing and coarsening of the primary arms occurs, together with the branching and coarsening of the secondary arms.When the diffusion fields of dendrite tips come into contact with those of the branches growing from the neighboring dendrites, the dendrites stop growing and being to ripen and thicken.

  3. Snow hydrology in a general circulation model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marshall, Susan; Roads, John O.; Glatzmaier, Gary

    1994-01-01

    A snow hydrology has been implemented in an atmospheric general circulation model (GCM). The snow hydrology consists of parameterizations of snowfall and snow cover fraction, a prognostic calculation of snow temperature, and a model of the snow mass and hydrologic budgets. Previously, only snow albedo had been included by a specified snow line. A 3-year GCM simulation with this now more complete surface hydrology is compared to a previous GCM control run with the specified snow line, as well as with observations. In particular, the authors discuss comparisons of the atmospheric and surface hydrologic budgets and the surface energy budget for U.S. and Canadian areas. The new snow hydrology changes the annual cycle of the surface moisture and energy budgets in the model. There is a noticeable shift in the runoff maximum from winter in the control run to spring in the snow hydrology run. A substantial amount of GCM winter precipitation is now stored in the seasonal snowpack. Snow cover also acts as an important insulating layer between the atmosphere and the ground. Wintertime soil temperatures are much higher in the snow hydrology experiment than in the control experiment. Seasonal snow cover is important for dampening large fluctuations in GCM continental skin temperature during the Northern Hemisphere winter. Snow depths and snow extent show good agreement with observations over North America. The geographic distribution of maximum depths is not as well simulated by the model due, in part, to the coarse resolution of the model. The patterns of runoff are qualitatively and quantitatively similar to observed patterns of streamflow averaged over the continental United States. The seasonal cycles of precipitation and evaporation are also reasonably well simulated by the model, although their magnitudes are larger than is observed. This is due, in part, to a cold bias in this model, which results in a dry model atmosphere and enhances the hydrologic cycle everywhere.

  4. Downscaling Snow Cover Fraction Data in Mountainous Regions Based on Simulated Inhomogeneous Snow Ablation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hong Yi Li

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available High-resolution snow distributions are essential for studying cold regions. However, the temporal and spatial resolutions of current remote sensing snow maps remain limited. Remotely sensed snow cover fraction (SCF data only provide quantitative descriptions of snow area proportions and do not provide information on subgrid-scale snow locations. We present a downscaling method based on simulated inhomogeneous snow ablation capacities that are driven by air temperature and solar radiation data. This method employs a single parameter to adjust potential snow ablation capacities. Using this method, SCF data with a resolution of 500 m are downscaled to a resolution of 30 m. Then, 18 remotely sensed TM, CHRIS and EO-1 snow maps are used to verify the downscaled results. The mean overall accuracy is 0.69, the average root-mean-square error (RMSE of snow-covered slopes between the downscaled snow map and the real snow map is 3.9°, and the average RMSE of the sine of the snow covered aspects between the downscaled snow map and the real snow map is 0.34, which is equivalent to 19.9°. This method can be applied to high-resolution snow mapping in similar mountainous regions.

  5. EBSD Characterization of Dendrites in Synthetic and Natural Rocks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hammer, J. E.; Tiley, J.; Shiveley, A.; Knox, S.; Viswanathan, G.

    2011-12-01

    Arborescent crystals in igneous rocks are associated with extreme crystallization environments: the protoplanary disk (chondrules), Earth's ultramafic Archean mantle (komatiite), and terrestrial submarine-erupted lavas (pillow basalts), although the role of morphological instabilities in more mundane settings such as magma reservoirs of modern oceanic islands is increasingly appreciated (see Welsch et al., V16). Fundamentals of dendrite formation are presumably well understood: branching morphologies belie crystal growth conditions in which the driving force for solidification produces a kinetic roughening transition, transforming an atomically smooth crystal-liquid interface into a rough, adhesive interface capable of extremely rapid advancement. However, not since photomicrograhic advances made possible close observations of snow crystals (Nakaya 1936), has there been a more promising set of analytical tools to characterize dendrites in natural and synthetic materials in pursuit of new insights. We are investigating clinopyroxene (cpx) in the quenched top of Fe-rich tholeiitic lava (Munro Township, Northeast Ontario; Fig. 1) and a synthetic basalt of similar character (Hammer 2006) with electron backscatter diffraction (EBSD), 3D reconstruction of optical serial sections, and TEM. Here we report intriguing phenomena observed with EBSD common to both samples. Severe thinning of dendrite trunks and repeated tip splitting destroys the self-similarity associated with classical dendrites and instead presages 'seaweed' morphology. Split tips manifest incremental trajectory deflections, producing gently arched trunks (Fig. 1A) as well as tightly curved (r, producing distinctive misorientation maps and pole figures (Fig. 1C). Parallel branches exhibit similar rotational trajectories, carving parallel arcs in the pole figure. The high incidence of side branching and tip splitting is consistent with very rapid growth velocity, associated with extremely high kinetic

  6. Snow Melting and Freezing on Older Townhouses

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Anker; Claesson, Johan

    2011-01-01

    The snowy winter of 2009/2010 in Scandinavia prompted many newspaper articles on icicles falling from buildings and the risk this presented for people walking below. The problem starts with snow melting on the roof due to heat loss from the building. Melt water runs down the roof and some...... of it will freeze on the overhang. The rest of the water will either run off or freeze in gutters and downpipes or turn into icicles. This paper describes use of a model for the melting and freezing of snow on roofs. Important parameters are roof length, overhang length, heat resistance of roof and overhang......, outdoor and indoor temperature, snow thickness and thermal conductivity. If the snow thickness is above a specific limit value – the snow melting limit- some of the snow will melt. Another interesting limit value is the dripping limit. All the melt water will freeze on the overhang, if the snow thickness...

  7. Can a snow structure model estimate snow characteristics relevant to reindeer husbandry?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sirpa Rasmus

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Snow affects foraging conditions of reindeer e.g. by increasing the energy expenditures for moving and digging work or, in contrast, by making access of arboreal lichen easier. Still the studies concentrating on the role of the snow pack structure on reindeer population dynamics and reindeer management are few. We aim to find out which of the snow characteristics are relevant for reindeer in the northern boreal zone according to the experiences of reindeer herders and is this relevance seen also in reproduction rate of reindeer in this area. We also aim to validate the ability of the snow model SNOWPACK to reliably estimate the relevant snow structure characteristics. We combined meteorological observations, snow structure simulations by the model SNOWPACK and annual reports by reindeer herders during winters 1972-2010 in the Muonio reindeer herding district, northern Finland. Deep snow cover and late snow melt were the most common unfavorable conditions reported. Problematic conditions related to snow structure were icy snow and ground ice or unfrozen ground below the snow, leading to mold growth on ground vegetation. Calf production percentage was negatively correlated to the measured annual snow depth and length of the snow cover time and to the simulated snow density. Winters with icy snow could be distinguished in three out of four reported cases by SNOWPACK simulations and we could detect reliably winters with conditions favorable for mold growth. Both snow amount and also quality affects the reindeer herding and reindeer reproduction rate in northern Finland. Model SNOWPACK can relatively reliably estimate the relevant structural properties of snow. Use of snow structure models could give valuable information about grazing conditions, especially when estimating the possible effects of warming winters on reindeer populations and reindeer husbandry. Similar effects will be experienced also by other arctic and boreal species.

  8. Estimating Snow Budget of Karaj Dam Reservoir

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manijeh G. Tali

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Problem statement: Most of the cold period precipitation of Karaj Basin falls in the form of snow. This snow and its run off are important to the dam and the local needs such as agriculture and the drinking water of Tehran. But due to the scarcity and in some elevations the lack of weather stations, measuring this snow cover and its run off is difficult. We have decided to estimate the amount of this snow cover by using surrogate methods such as satellite images of MODIS and temperature thresholds. Approach: To estimate the snow water budget of the Karaj Dam Reservoir Basin, first a temperature threshold of 3° Celsius was defined according to the analysis of daily temperature and precipitation values of Nesa station during 1960-2000. The elevation of this temperature was as low as 1590 m in February and 5734 m in August. During each month the melting snow was computed over the area between 3 and zero degrees Celsius and precipitation below zero degrees was considered as permanent snow cover. The precipitation of areas above 3° was computed as rain. Using this temperature threshold and the DEM map of the basin we estimated the snow cover and snow melt water of the basin. The snow cover area on the MODIS images was estimated and compared with that computed from temperature threshold. Both methods gave relatively similar results. At the end the snow melt water of the whole cold period was calculated and added up to estimate the total snow water budget. Results: The results showed that during the study months most (67.7% of the precipitation comes in the form of snow. And most of this snow (97.5% melts during months March and onward. Its monthly distributions are 3.8% in March, 22.7% in April and 71% in May. The total snow water entering the dam was about 181.73 million cubic meters. Conclusion: The comparison of the results from temperature thresholds with the MODIS images snow cover showed very little and negligible discrepancy. Therefore, this

  9. Snow and ice: Chapter 3

    Science.gov (United States)

    Littell, Jeremy; McAfee, Stephanie A.; O'Neel, Shad; Sass, Louis; Burgess, Evan; Colt, Steve; Clark, Paul; Hayward, Gregory D.; Colt, Steve; McTeague, Monica L.; Hollingsworth, Teresa N.

    2017-01-01

    Temperature and precipitation are key determinants of snowpack levels. Therefore, climate change is likely to affect the role of snow and ice in the landscapes and hydrology of the Chugach National Forest region.Downscaled climate projections developed by Scenarios Network for Alaska and Arctic Planning (SNAP) are useful for examining projected changes in snow at relatively fine resolution using a variable called “snowday fraction (SDF),” the percentage of days with precipitation falling as snow.We summarized SNAP monthly SDF from five different global climate models for the Chugach region by 500 m elevation bands, and compared historical (1971–2000) and future (2030–2059) SDF. We found that:Snow-day fraction and snow-water equivalent (SWE) are projected to decline most in late autumn (October to November) and at lower elevations.Snow-day fraction is projected to decrease 23 percent (averaged across five climate models) from October to March, between sea level and 500 m. Between sea level and 1000 m, SDF is projected to decrease by 17 percent between October and March.Snow-water equivalent is projected to decrease most in autumn (October and November) and at lower elevations (below 1500 m), an average of -26 percent for the 2030–2059 period compared to 1971– 2000. Averaged across the cool season and the entire domain, SWE is projected to decrease at elevations below 1000 m because of increased temperature, but increase at higher elevations because of increased precipitation.Compared to 1971–2000, the percentage of the landscape that is snowdominant in 2030–2059 is projected to decrease, and the percentage in which rain and snow are co-dominant (transient hydrology) is projected to increase from 27 to 37 percent. Most of this change is at lower elevations.Glaciers on the Chugach National Forest are currently losing about 6 km3 of ice per year; half of this loss comes from Columbia Glacier (Berthier et al. 2010).Over the past decade, almost all

  10. Field Investigations on Snow Leopards

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2006-01-01

    @@ The snow leopard (Uncia uncia) is a rare and endangered species of large feline animals. Although sharing its name with the common leopard, it is not believed to be closely related to the leopard or the other members of the Pantherine group and is classified as the sole member of its genus. Its total number in the world is generally estimated at somewhere between 3,500 to 7,000, and experts say the figure is far more outdated. Although it is believed that China is home to more snow leopards than any of the other 11 countries in which they occur, such as Afghanistan, India, Pakistan,Tajikistan, Kazakstan, Kyrgyzstan and Mongolia, no one knows exactly how many of them are there in this country.

  11. Light Attenuation in Falling Snow

    Science.gov (United States)

    1978-08-01

    Mexico 38002 DA Task No. 1L161102-B3A I I -CNTROLLING OFFICE NAME AkD ADDRESS 12 REPORT DATE US Army Electronics Resedrch 3 August 1978 and Development...Range 1.5 km 0- I ’ ’ I S1 1 VINO \\ t 01 111 -- I 0- l L _ l-..-1. . . i . . . 4 0 DiAMETER (CM) Figure 7. Snow particle size distribution functions

  12. Snow water equivalent mapping in Norway

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tveito, O. E.; Udnæs, H.-C.; Engeset, R.; Førland, E. J.; Isaksen, K.; Mengistu, Z.

    2003-04-01

    In high latitude area snow covers the ground large parts of the year. Information about the water volume as snow is of major importance in many respects. Flood forecasters at NVE need it in order to assess possible flood risks. Hydropower producers need it to plan the most efficient production of the water in their reservoirs, traders to estimate the potential energy available for the market. Meteorologists on their side use the information as boundary conditions in weather forecasting models. The Norwegian meteorological institute has provided snow accumulation maps for Norway for more than 50 years. These maps are now produced twice a month in the winter season. They show the accumulated precipitation in the winter season from the day the permanent snow cover is established. They do however not take melting into account, and do therefore not give a good description of the actual snow amounts during and after periods with snowmelt. Due to an increased need for a direct measure of water volumes as snow cover, met.no and NVE initialized a joint project in order to establish maps of the actual snow cover expressed in water equivalents. The project utilizes recent developments in the use of GIS in spatial modeling. Daily precipitation and temperature are distributed in space by using objective spatial interpolation methods. The interpolation considers topographical and other geographical parameters as well as weather type information. A degree-day model is used at each modeling point to calculate snow-accumulation and snowmelt. The maps represent a spatial scale of 1x1 km2. The modeled snow reservoir is validated by snow pillow values as well traditional snow depth observations. Preliminary results show that the new snow modeling approach reproduces the snow water equivalent well. The spatial approach also opens for a wide use in the terms of areal analysis.

  13. Spatiotemporal analysis of snow trends in Austria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koch, Roland; Schöner, Wolfgang

    2015-04-01

    This study presents the spatiotemporal analysis of Austrian snow observations. A set of consistent and reliable long-term time series of snow depth on a daily scale from selected meteorological sites across Austria is used. The time series were collected by the Central Institute for Meteorology and Geodynamics (ZAMG) and the Hydrographical Central Bureau of Austria (HZB). The data cover a time period from the late nineteenth century until today. In the first part of the study spatiotemporal characteristics of seasonal snow depth observations were investigated by the method of principal component analysis (PCA). Furthermore, the spatial patterns of variability have been used for a regionalisation, identifying regions with similar conditions during the base period 1961 to 2010. The results show a clear separation of four major regions including various sub-regions. However, the regionalisation was limited due to sparse data coverage. The non-parametric Mann-Kendall statistical test had been used to assess the significance of trends in snow indices, e.g. snow depth, maximum snow depth, snow cover duration, at monthly and seasonal time scales. In order to remove the influence of the lag-1 serial correlation from the snow data, the trend-free pre-whitening approach was applied. In the monthly and seasonal time series during the period 1961-2010, negative trends in snow indices were significant at the 95% confidence level primarily at stations in the Western and Southern part of Austria. In addition, the correlation between snow observations and gridded HISTALP winter temperature and precipitation fields was investigated. The analysis has shown an increased temperature and decreased precipitation during the 1990s, yielding a pronounced reduction in snow depth and duration. As a matter of fact, the results indicate major shifts of the snow depth and snow cover duration around the 1970s and especially the 1990s, which are predominantly responsible for trends.

  14. Snow specific surface area simulation using the one-layer snow model in the Canadian LAnd Surface Scheme (CLASS)

    OpenAIRE

    2013-01-01

    Snow grain size is a key parameter for modeling microwave snow emission properties and the surface energy balance because of its influence on the snow albedo, thermal conductivity and diffusivity. A model of the specific surface area (SSA) of snow was implemented in the one-layer snow model in the Canadian LAnd Surface Scheme (CLASS) version 3.4. This offline multilayer model (CLASS-SSA) simulates the decrease of SSA based on snow age, snow temperature and t...

  15. Identification of Multi-defects in Plate-like Structure Based on Time-reversal%板状结构中多损伤的时间逆转成像评价研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    许伯强; 叶佳佳

    2016-01-01

    基于Mindlin板理论, 采用微扰方法分析得到超声导波与板状结构微损伤相互作用的散射波场, 并利用有限元方法模拟研究含损伤的板状结构中激光超声导波场. 构建散射波的传递矩阵, 采用时间逆转损伤成像评价结构微损伤. 将时间逆转损伤成像结果与超声相控阵成像结果进行比较. 结果表明, 相比于传统的超声相控阵损伤成像,时间逆转成像方法灵敏度高, 能对板中的多损伤精确识别, 且损伤成像精度更精细.%Based on Mindlin plate theory , the scattered wave fields of the interaction between ultrasonic guided wave and the micro damages in the plate-like structure are analyzed by means of the small perturbation method .The ultrasonic guided wave in the plate-like structure with damages generated by a pulsed laser is researched by the finite element method (FEM).The transmission matrix of scattered waves is rebuilt , and the images of mini structural damages obtained by the time reversal imaging method are evaluated .The time-reversal imaging method is more sen-sitive in terms of the reconstructed damage images than the traditional phased array imaging method , offering both ac-curate identification of multi-damages in the plate-like structure and higher resolution images of damages .

  16. Digging of 'Snow White' Begins

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-01-01

    NASA's Phoenix Mars Lander began excavating a new trench, dubbed 'Snow White,' in a patch of Martian soil located near the center of a polygonal surface feature, nicknamed 'Cheshire Cat.' The trench is about 2 centimeters (.8 inches) deep and 30 centimeters (about 12 inches) long. The 'dump pile' is located at the top of the trench, the side farthest away from the lander, and has been dubbed 'Croquet Ground.' The digging site has been named 'Wonderland.' At this early stage of digging, the Phoenix team did not expect to find any of the white material seen in the first trench, now called 'Dodo-Goldilocks.' That trench showed white material at a depth of about 5 centimeters (2 inches). More digging of Snow White is planned for coming sols, or Martian days. The dark portion of this image is the shadow of the lander's solar panel; the bright areas within this region are not in shadow. Snow White was dug on Sol 22 (June 17, 2008) with Phoenix's Robotic Arm. This picture was acquired on the same day by the lander's Surface Stereo Imager. This image has been enhanced to brighten shaded areas. The Phoenix Mission is led by the University of Arizona, Tucson, on behalf of NASA. Project management of the mission is by NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, Calif. Spacecraft development is by Lockheed Martin Space Systems, Denver.

  17. Dendrite Injury Triggers DLK-Independent Regeneration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michelle C. Stone

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Axon injury triggers regeneration through activation of a conserved kinase cascade, which includes the dual leucine zipper kinase (DLK. Although dendrites are damaged during stroke, traumatic brain injury, and seizure, it is not known whether mature neurons monitor dendrite injury and initiate regeneration. We probed the response to dendrite damage using model Drosophila neurons. Two larval neuron types regrew dendrites in distinct ways after all dendrites were removed. Dendrite regeneration was also triggered by injury in adults. Next, we tested whether dendrite injury was initiated with the same machinery as axon injury. Surprisingly, DLK, JNK, and fos were dispensable for dendrite regeneration. Moreover, this MAP kinase pathway was not activated by injury to dendrites. Thus, neurons respond to dendrite damage and initiate regeneration without using the conserved DLK cascade that triggers axon regeneration.

  18. [The research of the relationship between snow properties and the bidirectional polarized reflectance from snow surface].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Zhong-Qiu; Wu, Zheng-Fang; Zhao, Yun-Sheng

    2014-10-01

    In the context of remote sensing, the reflectance of snow is a key factor for accurate inversion for snow properties, such as snow grain size, albedo, because of it is influenced by the change of snow properties. The polarized reflectance is a general phenomenon during the reflected progress in natural incident light In this paper, based on the correct measurements for the multiple-angle reflected property of snow field in visible and near infrared wavelength (from 350 to 2,500 nm), the influence of snow grain size and wet snow on the bidirectional polarized property of snow was measured and analyzed. Combining the results measured in the field and previous conclusions confirms that the relation between polarization and snow grain size is obvious in infrared wavelength (at about 1,500 nm), which means the degree of polarization increasing with an increase of snow grain size in the forward scattering direction, it is because the strong absorption of ice near 1,500 nm leads to the single scattering light contributes to the reflection information obtained by the sensor; in other word, the larger grain size, the more absorption accompanying the larger polarization in forward scattering direction; we can illustrate that the change from dry snow to wet snow also influences the polarization property of snow, because of the water on the surface of snow particle adheres the adjacent particles, that means the wet snow grain size is larger than the dry snow grain size. Therefore, combining the multiple-angle polarization with reflectance will provide solid method and theoretical basis for inversion of snow properties.

  19. Storing snow for the next winter: Two case studies on the application of snow farming.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grünewald, Thomas; Wolfsperger, Fabian

    2016-04-01

    Snow farming is the conservation of snow during the warm half-year. This means that large piles of snow are formed in spring in order to be conserved over the summer season. Well-insulating materials such as chipped wood are added as surface cover to reduce melting. The aim of snow farming is to provide a "snow guaranty" for autumn or early winter - this means that a specific amount of snow will definitively be available, independent of the weather conditions. The conserved snow can then be used as basis for the preparation of winter sports grounds such as cross-country tracks or ski runs. This helps in the organization of early winter season sport events such as World Cup races or to provide appropriate training conditions for athletes. We present a study on two snow farming projects, one in Davos (Switzerland) and one in the Martell valley of South Tyrol. At both places snow farming has been used for several years. For the summer season 2015, we monitored both snow piles in order to assess the amount of snow conserved. High resolution terrestrial laser scanning was performed to measure snow volumes of the piles at the beginning and at the end of the summer period. Results showed that only 20% to 30 % of the snow mass was lost due to ablation. This mass loss was surprisingly low considering the extremely warm and dry summer. In order to identify the most relevant drivers of snow melt we also present simulations with the sophisticated snow cover models SNOWPACK and Alpine3D. The simulations are driven by meteorological input data recorded in the vicinity of the piles and enable a detailed analysis of the relevant processes controlling the energy balance. The models can be applied to optimize settings for snow farming and to examine the suitability of new locations, configurations or cover material for future snow farming projects.

  20. On the facet-skeletal transition of snow crystals - Experiments in high and low gravity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alena, T.; Hallett, J.; Saunders, C. P. R.

    1990-01-01

    A laboratory investigation of the influence of air velocity on the growth of columnar ice crystals from the vapor over the range -3 to -5 C shows that the linear growth velocity increases and that columns transform to sheath crystals or needles as air velocity increases from a few cm/s to 40 cm/s. Comparison with a similar transition of plates to dendrites shows that, macroscopically, in both cases the facets sprout rounded tips at a critical velocity which is lower for higher ambient supersaturation. Studies in low gravity show that chamber scale convection under normal gravity may have significant influence on growth even in the absence of an imposed air velocity. Falling snow crystals become more skeletal in shape as they grow and fall with increasing velocity. This development depends critically on temperature (+ or - 0.5 C) and demonstrates that the snow crystal shape is even more dependent on environmental growth conditions that previously thought.

  1. Snow depth and snow persistence patterns in the Arctic from analysis of the entire Landsat archive

    Science.gov (United States)

    Macander, M. J.; Swingley, C. S.; Parr, C.; Sturm, M.; Selkowitz, D.; Larsen, C.

    2016-12-01

    The entire archive of Landsat 5 TM, Landat 7 ETM+, and Landsat 8 OLI imagery collected between March 1 and August 31, 1999-2016 was analyzed to map the presence or absence of snow, with consideration given to clouds, cloud shadows, terrain shadows, and canopy cover. Google Earth Engine was utilized to rapidly classify and summarize the entire time-series. The time-series of observations were then pooled across all the years and a binary classification tree determined the day of year that based split the observations into a snow-covered and a snow-free season. The analysis was completed for arctic Alaska and covers approximately one million square kilometers. The snow persistence product was validated using SNOTEL sites and MODIS time series metrics. The snow persistence patterns are highly correlated with end of winter snow depth patterns. We compared the Landsat snow persistence to the normal snow depth from repeat LIDAR surveys and field snow depth measurements and applied the results to estimate snow distribution over much larger regions. A nonlinear relationship between normal snow-free day of year and mean end of winter snow depth was observed. A polynomial model (r-squared = 0.95) was developed and was extrapolated to the surrounding area to produce a regional map of modeled mean end of winter snow depth.

  2. From the clouds to the ground - snow precipitation patterns vs. snow accumulation patterns

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gerber, Franziska; Besic, Nikola; Mott, Rebecca; Gabella, Marco; Germann, Urs; Bühler, Yves; Marty, Mauro; Berne, Alexis; Lehning, Michael

    2017-04-01

    Knowledge about snow distribution and snow accumulation patterns is important and valuable for different applications such as the prediction of seasonal water resources or avalanche forecasting. Furthermore, accumulated snow on the ground is an important ground truth for validating meteorological and climatological model predictions of precipitation in high mountains and polar regions. Snow accumulation patterns are determined by many different processes from ice crystal nucleation in clouds to snow redistribution by wind and avalanches. In between, snow precipitation undergoes different dynamical and microphysical processes, such as ice crystal growth, aggregation and riming, which determine the growth of individual particles and thereby influence the intensity and structure of the snowfall event. In alpine terrain the interaction of different processes and the topography (e.g. lifting condensation and low level cloud formation, which may result in a seeder-feeder effect) may lead to orographic enhancement of precipitation. Furthermore, the redistribution of snow particles in the air by wind results in preferential deposition of precipitation. Even though orographic enhancement is addressed in numerous studies, the relative importance of micro-physical and dynamically induced mechanisms on local snowfall amounts and especially snow accumulation patterns is hardly known. To better understand the relative importance of different processes on snow precipitation and accumulation we analyze snowfall and snow accumulation between January and March 2016 in Davos (Switzerland). We compare MeteoSwiss operational weather radar measurements on Weissfluhgipfel to a spatially continuous snow accumulation map derived from airborne digital sensing (ADS) snow height for the area of Dischma valley in the vicinity of the weather radar. Additionally, we include snow height measurements from automatic snow stations close to the weather radar. Large-scale radar snow accumulation

  3. Some fundamentals of handheld snow surface thermography

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. Shea

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents the concepts needed to perform snow surface thermography with a modern thermal imager. Snow-specific issues in the 7.5 to 13 μm spectrum such as ice emissivity, photographic angle, operator heating, and others receive detailed review and discussion. To illustrate the usefulness of this measurement technique, various applications are presented. These include detecting spatial temperature variation on snow pit walls and measuring the dependence of heat conduction on grain type.

  4. Some fundamentals of handheld snow surface thermography

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. Shea

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents the concepts needed to perform snow surface thermography with a modern thermal imager. Snow-specific issues in the 7.5 to 13 μm spectrum such as ice emissivity, photographic angle, operator heating, and others receive detailed review and discussion. To illustrate the usefulness of this measurement technique, various applications are presented. These include detecting spatial temperature variation on snow pit walls and measuring the dependence of heat conduction on grain type.

  5. Optimal Current Transfer in Dendrites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bird, Alex D.

    2016-01-01

    Integration of synaptic currents across an extensive dendritic tree is a prerequisite for computation in the brain. Dendritic tapering away from the soma has been suggested to both equalise contributions from synapses at different locations and maximise the current transfer to the soma. To find out how this is achieved precisely, an analytical solution for the current transfer in dendrites with arbitrary taper is required. We derive here an asymptotic approximation that accurately matches results from numerical simulations. From this we then determine the diameter profile that maximises the current transfer to the soma. We find a simple quadratic form that matches diameters obtained experimentally, indicating a fundamental architectural principle of the brain that links dendritic diameters to signal transmission. PMID:27145441

  6. Observed Differences between North American Snow Extent and Snow Depth Variability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ge, Y.; Gong, G.

    2006-12-01

    Snow extent and snow depth are two related characteristics of a snowpack, but they need not be mutually consistent. Differences between these two variables at local scales are readily apparent. However at larger scales which interact with atmospheric circulation and climate, snow extent is typically the variable used, while snow depth is often assumed to be minor and/or mutually consistent compared to snow extent, though this is rarely verified. In this study, a new regional/continental-scale gridded dataset derived from field observations is utilized to quantitatively evaluate the relationship between snow extent and snow depth over North America. Various statistical methods are applied to assess the mutual consistency of monthly snow depth vs. snow extent, including correlations, composites and principal components. Results indicate that snow depth variations are significant in their own rights, and that depth and extent anomalies are largely unrelated, especially over broad high latitude regions north of the snowline. In the vicinity of the snowline, where precipitation and ablation can affect both snow extent and snow depth, the two variables vary concurrently, especially in autumn and spring. It is also found that deeper winter snow translates into larger snow-covered area in the subsequent spring/summer season, which suggests a possible influence of winter snow depth on summer climate. The observed lack of mutual consistency at continental/regional scales suggests that snowpack depth variations may be of sufficiently large magnitude, spatial scope and temporal duration to influence regional-hemispheric climate, in a manner unrelated to the more extensively studied snow extent variations.

  7. The reflectance characteristics of snow covered surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Batten, E. S.

    1979-01-01

    Data analysis techniques were developed to most efficiently use available satellite measurements to determine and understand components of the surface energy budget for ice and snow-covered areas. The emphasis is placed on identifying the important components of the heat budget related to snow surfaces, specifically the albedo and the energy consumed in the melting process. Ice and snow charts are prepared by NOAA from satellite observations which map areas into three relative reflectivity zones. Field measurements are analyzed of the reflectivity of an open snow field to assist in the interpretation of the NOAA reflectivity zones.

  8. Remotely Measuring Snow Depth in Inaccessible Terrain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dixon, D.; Boon, S.

    2010-12-01

    In watershed-scale studies of snow accumulation, high alpine areas are typically important accumulation areas. While snow depth measurements may not be collected in these regions due to avalanche danger, failing to include them in basin-wide estimates of snow accumulation may lead to large underestimates of basin-scale water yield. We present a new method to measure spatially distributed point snow depths remotely. Previously described methods using terrestrial laser scanning (TLS) systems, airborne light detection and ranging (LiDAR) systems, and hand-held laser distance meters have several limitations related to cost, data processing, and accuracy, thus reducing their applicability. The use of a modern robotic total station attempts to resolve these limitations. Total stations have much greater measurement accuracy than laser distance meters, and are significantly less expensive then TLS and LiDAR systems. Data can be output in common data formats, simplifying data processing and management. Measurement points can also be resampled repeatedly throughout the season with high accuracy and precision. Simple trigonometry is used to convert total station measurements into estimates of snow depth perpendicular to the slope. We present results of remote snow depth measurements using a Leica Geosystems TCRP 1201+ robotic total station. Snow depth estimates from the station are validated against measured depths in a field trial. The method is then applied in a basin-scale study to collect and calculate high elevation snow depth, in combination with traditional snow surveys at lower elevations.

  9. Microwave emission from dry and wet snow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, T. C.; Gloersen, P.

    1975-01-01

    A microscopic model was developed to study the microwave emission from snow. In this model, the individual snow particles are considered to be the scattering centers. Mie scattering theory for spherical particles is then used to compute the volume scattering and extinction coefficients of the closely packed scattering spheres, which are assumed not to interact coherently. The results of the computations show significant volume scattering effects in the microwave region which result in low observed emissivities from cold, dry snow. In the case of wet snow, the microwave emissivities are increased considerably, in agreement with earlier experimental observations in which the brightness temperatures have increased significantly at the onset of melting.

  10. Electrical advantages of dendritic spines.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Allan T Gulledge

    Full Text Available Many neurons receive excitatory glutamatergic input almost exclusively onto dendritic spines. In the absence of spines, the amplitudes and kinetics of excitatory postsynaptic potentials (EPSPs at the site of synaptic input are highly variable and depend on dendritic location. We hypothesized that dendritic spines standardize the local geometry at the site of synaptic input, thereby reducing location-dependent variability of local EPSP properties. We tested this hypothesis using computational models of simplified and morphologically realistic spiny neurons that allow direct comparison of EPSPs generated on spine heads with EPSPs generated on dendritic shafts at the same dendritic locations. In all morphologies tested, spines greatly reduced location-dependent variability of local EPSP amplitude and kinetics, while having minimal impact on EPSPs measured at the soma. Spine-dependent standardization of local EPSP properties persisted across a range of physiologically relevant spine neck resistances, and in models with variable neck resistances. By reducing the variability of local EPSPs, spines standardized synaptic activation of NMDA receptors and voltage-gated calcium channels. Furthermore, spines enhanced activation of NMDA receptors and facilitated the generation of NMDA spikes and axonal action potentials in response to synaptic input. Finally, we show that dynamic regulation of spine neck geometry can preserve local EPSP properties following plasticity-driven changes in synaptic strength, but is inefficient in modifying the amplitude of EPSPs in other cellular compartments. These observations suggest that one function of dendritic spines is to standardize local EPSP properties throughout the dendritic tree, thereby allowing neurons to use similar voltage-sensitive postsynaptic mechanisms at all dendritic locations.

  11. Snow Conditions Near Barrow in Spring 2012

    Science.gov (United States)

    Webster, M.; Rigor, I.; Nghiem, S. V.; Sturm, M.; Kurtz, N. T.; Farrell, S. L.; Gleason, E.; Lieb-Lappen, R.; Saiet, E.

    2012-12-01

    Snow has a dual role in the growth and decay of Arctic sea ice. It provides insulation from colder air temperatures during the winter, which hinders sea ice formation. Snow is highly reflective and, as a result, it delays the surface ice melt during the spring. Summer snow melt influences the formation and location of melt ponds on sea ice, which further modifies heat transport into sea ice and the underlying ocean. Identifying snow thickness and extent is of key importance in understanding the surface heat budget, particularly during the early spring when the maximum snowfall has surpassed, and surface melt has not yet occurred. Regarding Arctic atmospheric chemical processes, snow may sustain or terminate halogen chemical recycling and distribution, depending on the state of the snow cover. Therefore, an accurate assessment of the snow cover state in the changing Arctic is important to identify subsequent impacts of snow change on both physical and chemical processes in the Arctic environment. In this study, we assess the springtime snow conditions near Barrow, Alaska using coordinated airborne and in situ measurements taken during the NASA Operation IceBridge and BRomine, Ozone, and Mercury EXperiment (BROMEX) field campaigns in March 2012, and compare these to climatological records. Operation IceBridge was conceived to bridge the gap between satellite retrievals ice thickness by ICESat which ceased operating in 2009 and ICESat-2 which is planned for launch in 2016. As part of the IceBridge mission, snow depth may be estimated by taking the difference between the snow/air surface and the snow/ice interface measured by University of Kansas's snow radar installed on a P-3 Orion and the measurements have an approximate spatial resolution of 40 m along-track and 16 m across-track. The in situ snow depth measurements were measured by an Automatic Snow Depth Probe (Magnaprobe), which has an accuracy of 0.5 cm. Samples were taken every one-to-two meters at two sites

  12. Operational snow mapping with simplified data assimilation using the seNorge snow model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saloranta, Tuomo M.

    2016-07-01

    Frequently updated maps of snow conditions are useful for many applications, e.g., for avalanche and flood forecasting services, hydropower energy situation analysis, as well as for the general public. Numerical snow models are often applied in snow map production for operational hydrological services. However, inaccuracies in the simulated snow maps due to model uncertainties and the lack of suitable data assimilation techniques to correct them in near-real time may often reduce the usefulness of the snow maps in operational use. In this paper the revised seNorge snow model (v.1.1.1) for snow mapping is described, and a simplified data assimilation procedure is introduced to correct detected snow model biases in near real-time. The data assimilation procedure is theoretically based on the Bayesian updating paradigm and is meant to be pragmatic with modest computational and input data requirements. Moreover, it is flexible and can utilize both point-based snow depth and satellite-based areal snow-covered area observations, which are generally the most common data-sources of snow observations. The model and analysis codes as well as the "R" statistical software are freely available. All these features should help to lower the challenges and hurdles hampering the application of data-assimilation techniques in operational hydrological modeling. The steps of the data assimilation procedure (evaluation, sensitivity analysis, optimization) and their contribution to significantly increased accuracy of the snow maps are demonstrated with a case from eastern Norway in winter 2013/2014.

  13. The Isothermal Dendritic Growth Experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glicksman, M. E.; Koss, M. B.; Malarik, D. C.

    1998-01-01

    The growth of dendrites is one of the commonly observed forms of solidification encountered when metals and alloys freeze under low thermal gradients, as occurs in most casting and welding processes. In engineering alloys, the details of the dendritic morphology directly relates to important material responses and properties. Of more generic interest, dendritic growth is also an archetypical problem in morphogenesis, where a complex pattern evolves from simple starting conditions. Thus, the physical understanding and mathematical description of how dendritic patterns emerge during the growth process are of interest to both scientists and engineers. The Isothermal Dendritic Growth Experiment (IDGE) is a basic science experiment designed to measure, for a fundamental test of theory, the kinetics and morphology of dendritic growth without complications induced by gravity-driven convection. The IDGE, a collaboration between Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute, in Troy NY, and NASA's Lewis Research Center (LeRC) was developed over a ten year period from a ground-based research program into a space flight experiment. Important to the success of this flight experiment was provision of in situ near-real-time teleoperations during the spaceflight experiment.

  14. Weekly LiDAR snow depth mapping for operational snow hydrology - the NASA JPL Airborne Snow Observatory (Invited)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deems, J. S.; Painter, T. H.; McGurk, B. J.

    2013-12-01

    Operational hydrologic simulation and forecasting in snowmelt-dominated watersheds currently relies on indices of snow accumulation and melt from measurements at a small number of point locations or geographically-limited manual surveys. These data sources cannot adequately characterize the spatial distribution of snow depth/water equivalent, which is the primary determinant of snowpack volume and runoff rates. The NASA JPL Airborne Snow Observatory's airborne laser scanning system maps snow depth at high spatial and temporal resolutions, providing an unprecedented snowpack monitoring capability and enabling a new operational paradigm. In the Spring of 2013, the ASO mapped snow depth in the Tuolumne River Basin in California's Yosemite National Park on a nominally weekly basis, and provided fast-turnaround spatial snow depth and water equivalent maps to the operators of Hetch Hetchy Reservoir, the water supply for 2.5 million people on the San Francisco peninsula. These products enabled more accurate runoff simulation and optimal reservoir management in a year of very low snow accumulation. We present the initial results from this new application of multi-temporal LiDAR mapping in operational snow hydrology.

  15. Some considerations about snow crystallogenesis

    CERN Document Server

    Falcon, Federico

    2010-01-01

    We investigate about the possibility of knowing the thermal history of each snow crystal through the analysis of its individual habitus. Supposition, based on experimental observations, that prevailing growth mechanisms of basal and prismatic surfaces are helicoidal and 2D nucleation-spread, respectively, make possible to establish the relation temperature-habitus for all the different kinds of crystals, with the exception of plates in the interval -3^\\circ C < T < 0^\\circ C, where probably the surface melting plays an important role on the habitus development.

  16. Digging in 'Snow White' Trench

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-01-01

    This image was acquired by NASA's Phoenix Mars Lander's Surface Stereo Imager on the 44th Martian day of the mission, or Sol 43 (July 7, 2008), after the May 25, 2008, landing, showing the current sample scraping area in the trench informally called 'Snow White.' The Phoenix Mission is led by the University of Arizona, Tucson, on behalf of NASA. Project management of the mission is led by NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, Calif. Spacecraft development is by Lockheed Martin Space Systems, Denver.

  17. Water losses during technical snow production

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grünewald, Thomas; Wolfsperger, Fabian

    2017-04-01

    These days, the production of technical snow can be seen as a prerequisite for winter tourism. Huge amounts of water are used for technical snow production by ski resorts, especially in the beginning of the winter season. The aim is to guarantee an appropriate amount of snow to reliably provide optimal ski runs until the date of season opening in early December. Technical snow is generated by pumping pressurized water through the nozzles of a snow machine and dispersing the resulting spray of small water droplets which freeze during their travel to the ground. Cooling and freezing of the droplets can only happen if energy is emitted to the air mass surrounding the droplets. This heat transfer is happening through convective cooling and though evaporation and sublimation of water droplets and ice particles. This means that also mass is lost from the droplets and added in form of vapor to the air. It is important to note that not all water that is pumped through the snow machine is converted to snow distributed on the ground. Significant amounts of water are lost due to wind drift, sublimation and evaporation while droplets are traveling through the air or to draining of water which is not fully frozen when arriving at the ground. Studies addressing this question are sparse and the quantity of the water losses is still unclear. In order to assess this question in more detail, we obtained several systematic field observations at a test site near Davos, Switzerland. About a dozen of snow making tests had been performed during the last winter seasons. We compare the amount of water measured at the intake of the snow machine with the amount of snow accumulating at the ground during a night of snow production. The snow mass was calculated from highly detailed repeated terrestrial laser scanning measurements in combination with manually gathered snow densities. In addition a meteorological station had been set up in the vicinity observing all relevant meteorological

  18. Acetaldehyde in the Alaskan subarctic snow pack

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F. Domine

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available Acetaldehyde is a reactive intermediate in hydrocarbon oxidation. It is both emitted and taken up by snowpacks and photochemical and physical processes are probably involved. Understanding the reactivity of acetaldehyde in snow and its processes of physical and chemical exchanges requires the knowledge of its incorporation mechanism in snow crystals. We have performed a season-long study of the evolution of acetaldehyde concentrations in the subarctic snowpack near Fairbanks (65° N, central Alaska, which is subjected to a vigorous metamorphism due to persistent elevated temperature gradients in the snowpack, between 20 and 200°C m−1. The snowpack therefore almost entirely transforms into depth hoar. We have also analyzed acetaldehyde in a manipulated snowpack where temperature gradients were suppressed. Snow crystals there transformed much more slowly and their original shapes remained recognizable for months. The specific surface area of snow layers in both types of snowpacks was also measured. We deduce that acetaldehyde is not adsorbed onto the surface of snow crystals and that most of the acetaldehyde is probably not dissolved in the ice lattice of the snow crystals. We propose that most of the acetaldehyde measured is either trapped or dissolved within organic aerosol particles trapped in snow, or that acetaldehyde is formed by the hydrolysis of organic precursors contained in organic aerosols trapped in the snow, when the snow is melted for analysis. These precursors are probably aldehyde polymers formed within the aerosol particles by acid catalysis, but might also be biological molecules. In a laboratory experiment, acetaldehyde-di-n-hexyl acetal, representing a potential acetaldehyde precursor, was subjected to our analytical procedure and reacted to form acetaldehyde. This confirms our suggestion that acetaldehyde in snow could be produced during the melting of snow for analysis.

  19. Effects of snow accumulation on soil temperature and change of salinity in frozen soil from laboratory experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harada, K.; Sato, E.; Ishii, M.; Nemoto, M.; Mochizuki, S.

    2008-12-01

    In order to clarify the effect of snow depth on the ground temperature, snowfalls were occurred on soil samples using an artificial snowfall machine in the laboratory and variations of soil temperatures up to 30cm were measured during snowfall. The snow types used here were dendrites (type A) and sphere (type B). The snow depths on the soil surface were 10cm and 30cm for each snow type, so four deferent experimental results were obtained. At each experiment, two samples with deferent initial volumetric water content were prepared, about 10% and 20%. The initial soil temperature was set to 5°C and temperature in the laboratory was kept at -10°C. Soil temperatures were measured at the depths of 0cm, 10cm, 20cm and 30cm during the snowfall, and continuous measurements were conducted for ten hours after the stop of snowfall. From the experiments, it is confirmed that the soil temperature strongly depended on the depths of snow on the surface, density and water content. The soil sample using the type A with the depth of 30cm snow accumulation had the highest temperature at the surface, followed by the type A with 10cm snow, type B with 30cm snow and type B with 10cm snow. It was also pointed that temperature of the high water content samples showed the high temperature decrease compared with the low water one due to the high heat capacity except for the sample using type A with 10cm snow. Numerical calculation will be needed to explain these results. In addition, another experiment will be carried out to clarify the change of salinity during soil freezing with snow accumulation. The method to measure the salinity of soil is to measure the electrical conductivity of soil and volumetric water content at the same depth. The temperature condition in the cooling bath is ranged between -10 and 5°C and changed in 24 hours. Firstly, the temperature profiles will be measured to detect the frozen front, then measurements will start and discuss the results.

  20. Quantifying the impacts of snow on surface energy balance through assimilating snow cover fraction and snow depth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meng, Chunlei

    2016-10-01

    Seasonal snow plays an important part in Earth's climate system. Snow cover regulates the land surface energy balance through altering the albedo of the land surface. To utilize the satellite-retrieved snow cover fraction (SCF) and snow depth (SD) data sufficiently and avoid inconsistency, this paper developed a very simple but robust quality control method to assimilate Fengyun satellite-retrieved SCF and SD simultaneously. The results show that the assimilation method which this paper implemented can not only utilize the satellite-retrieved SCF and SD data sufficiently but also avoid the inconsistency of them. Two experiments were designed and performed to quantify the impacts of snow on land surface energy balance using the integrated urban land model. With the increase of the SCF and SD, the net radiation decreased significantly during the day and increased a little at night; the sensible heat flux decreased significantly during the day; the evapotranspiration and ground heat flux decreased during the day too.

  1. Vegetation and Variable Snow Cover: Spatial Patterns of Shrubland, and Grassland Snow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liston, G. E.; Hiemstra, C. A.; Strack, J. E.

    2003-12-01

    Regions that experience long winters with snowfall and high winds frequently exhibit heterogeneous snow distribution patterns that arise from interactions among snow, wind, topography, and vegetation. Variable snow cover and resultant heterogeneities in albedo and growing season length can affect local weather patterns and energy budgets, and produce spatially co-variable ecosystem properties. While snow influences local atmospheric processes and ecosystems, an important and underappreciated feedback exists between vegetation and snow cover. Plant size, canopy density, and rigidity determine how much snow accumulates on the lee side of individual plants (e.g., shrubland vs. grassland). In addition, the canopy can also influence how much energy reaches the snowpack, thereby hindering or accelerating snowmelt. An overhanging canopy reduces incoming solar radiation while providing a source of turbulent sensible and longwave radiative energy. Historically, most snow vegetation interaction studies have been limited to areas that experience an abundance of snow (e.g., mountainous areas) where trees have a large influence on seasonal snow-cover. In contrast, snow cover patterns associated with shrublands and grasslands have received little attention, despite covering vast expanses (53%) of the seasonally snow-covered globe. In this study, snow depths were measured every two weeks from December through March in a small, 0.25 km2 study area located in North Park, Colorado. The study area possesses little topographic relief and consists of shrub patches, dominated by greasewood (Sarcobatus vermiculatus) and sagebrush (Artemisia tridentata), embedded in a matrix of graminoids (sedges, rushes, and grasses). Snow cover patterns and spatial statistics were dramatically different in graminoid-dominated cover compared with shrub cover. The graminoid snow cover was thinner, less variable, and more ephemeral than the shrub snow pack. Snow was readily eroded by wind from graminoid

  2. Seeing the Snow through the Trees: Towards a Validated Canopy Adjustment for Fractional Snow Covered Area

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coons, L.; Nolin, A. W.; Painter, T.

    2012-12-01

    Satellite remote sensing is an important tool for monitoring the spatial distribution of snow cover, which acts as a vital reservoir of water for human and ecosystem needs. Current methods exist mapping the fraction of snow in each image pixel from NASA's Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) and Landsat Thematic Mapper (TM). Although these methods can effectively detect this fractional snow-covered area (fSCA) in open areas, snow cover is underestimated in forested areas where canopy cover obscures the snow. Accounting for obscured snow cover will significantly improve estimates of fSCA for hydrologic forecasting and monitoring. This study will address how individual trees and the overall forest canopy affect snow distributions on the ground with the goal of determining metrics that can parameterize the spatial patterns of sub-canopy snow cover. Snow cover measurements were made during winter 2011-2012 at multiple sites representing a range of canopy densities. In the snow-free season, we used terrestrial laser scanning (TLS) and manual field methods to fully characterize the forest canopy height, canopy gap fraction, crown width, tree diameter at breast height (DBH), and stand density. We also use multi-angle satellite imagery from MISR and airborne photos to map canopy characteristics over larger areas. Certain canopy structure characteristics can be represented with remote sensing data. These data serve as a key first step in developing canopy adjustment factors for fSCA from MODIS, TM, and other snow mapping sensors.

  3. Soot on snow experiment: bidirectional reflectance factor measurements of contaminated snow

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. I. Peltoniemi

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available In order to quantify the effects of absorbing contaminants on snow, a series of spectral reflectance measurements were conducted. Chimney soot, volcanic sand, and glaciogenic silt were deposited on a natural snow surface in a controlled way as a part of the Soot on Snow (SoS campaign. The bidirectional reflectance factors of these soiled surfaces and untouched snow were measured using the Finnish Geodetic Institute's Field Goniospectropolariradiometer, FIGIFIGO. A remarkable feature is the fact that the absorbing contaminants on snow enhanced in our experiments the metamorphosis of snow under strong sunlight. Immediately after deposition, the contaminated snow surface appeared darker than the pure snow in all viewing directions, but the absorbing particles sank deep into the snow in minutes. The nadir measurement remained the darkest, but at larger zenith angles the surface of the contaminated snow changed back to almost as white as clean snow. Thus, for a ground observer the darkening caused by impurities can be completely invisible, overestimating the albedo, but a nadir observing satellite sees the darkest points, now underestimating the albedo. By a reciprocity argument, we predict, that at noon the albedo should be lower than in the morning or afternoon. When sunlight stimulates sinking more than melting, the albedo should be higher in the afternoon than in the morning, and vice versa when melting dominates. However, differences in the hydrophobic properties, porosity, clumping, or size of the impurities may cause different results than observed in these measurements.

  4. Modeling the spatial variability of snow instability with the snow cover model SNOWPACK

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richter, Bettina; Reuter, Benjamin; Gaume, Johan; Fierz, Charles; Bavay, Mathias; van Herwijnen, Alec; Schweizer, Jürg

    2016-04-01

    Snow stratigraphy - key information for avalanche forecasting - can be obtained using numerical snow cover models driven by meteorological data. Simulations are typically performed for the locations of automatic weather station or for virtual slopes of varying aspect. However, it is unclear to which extent these simulations can represent the snowpack properties in the surrounding terrain, in particular snow instability, which is known to vary in space. To address this issue, we implemented two newly developed snow instability criteria in SNOWPACK relating to failure initiation and crack propagation, two fundamental processes for dry-snow slab avalanche release. Snow cover simulations were performed for the Steintälli field site above Davos (Eastern Swiss Alps), where snowpack data from several field campaigns are available. In each campaign, about 150 vertical snow penetration resistance profiles were sampled with the snow micro-penetrometer (SMP). For each profile, SMP and SNOWPACK- based instability criteria were compared. In addition, we carried out SNOWPACK simulations for multiple aspects and slope angles, allowing to obtain statistical distributions of the snow instability at the basin scale. Comparing the modeled to the observed distributions of snow instability suggests that it is feasible to obtain an adequate spatial representation of snow instability without high resolution distributed modeling. Hence, for the purpose of regional avalanche forecasting, simulations for a selection of virtual slopes seems sufficient to assess the influence of basic terrain features such as aspect and elevation.

  5. Soot on Snow experiment: bidirectional reflectance factor measurements of contaminated snow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peltoniemi, J. I.; Gritsevich, M.; Hakala, T.; Dagsson-Waldhauserová, P.; Arnalds, Ó.; Anttila, K.; Hannula, H.-R.; Kivekäs, N.; Lihavainen, H.; Meinander, O.; Svensson, J.; Virkkula, A.; de Leeuw, G.

    2015-12-01

    In order to quantify the effects of absorbing contaminants on snow, a series of spectral reflectance measurements were conducted. Chimney soot, volcanic sand, and glaciogenic silt were deposited on a natural snow surface in a controlled way as a part of the Soot on Snow (SoS) campaign. The bidirectional reflectance factors of these soiled surfaces and untouched snow were measured using the Finnish Geodetic Institute's Field Goniospectropolariradiometer, FIGIFIGO. A remarkable feature is the fact that the absorbing contaminants on snow enhanced the metamorphism of snow under strong sunlight in our experiments. Immediately after deposition, the contaminated snow surface appeared darker than the natural snow in all viewing directions, but the absorbing particles sank deep into the snow in minutes. The nadir measurement remained the darkest, but at larger zenith angles, the surface of the contaminated snow changed back to almost as white as clean snow. Thus, for a ground observer the darkening caused by impurities can be completely invisible, overestimating the albedo, but a nadir-observing satellite sees the darkest points, underestimating the albedo. Through a reciprocity argument, we predict that at noon, the albedo perturbation should be lower than in the morning or afternoon. When sunlight stimulates sinking more than melting, the albedo should be higher in the afternoon than in the morning, and vice versa when melting dominates. However, differences in the hydrophobic properties, porosity, clumping, or size of the impurities may cause different results than observed in these measurements.

  6. Brilliant Colours from a White Snow Cover

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vollmer, Michael; Shaw, Joseph A

    2013-01-01

    Surprisingly colourful views are possible from sparkling white snow. It is well known that similarly colourful features can exist in the sky whenever appropriate ice crystals are around. However, the transition of light reflection and refraction from ice crystals in the air to reflection and refraction from those in snow on the ground is not…

  7. A drought index accounting for snow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Staudinger, Maria; Stahl, Kerstin; Seibert, Jan

    2015-04-01

    The Standardized Precipitation Index (SPI) is the most widely used index to characterize and monitor droughts that are related to precipitation deficiencies. However, the SPI does not always deliver the relevant information for hydrological drought management when precipitation deficiencies are not the only reason for droughts as it is the case for example in snow influenced catchments. If precipitation is temporarily stored as snow, then there is a significant difference between meteorological and hydrological drought because the delayed release of melt water from the snow accumulation to the stream. In this study we introduce an extension to the SPI, the Standardized Snow Melt and Rain Index (SMRI), that captures both rain and snow melt deficits, which in effect modify streamflow. The SMRI does not require any snow data instead observations of temperature and precipitation are used to model snow. The SMRI is evaluated for seven Swiss catchments with varying degrees of snow influence. In particular for catchments with a larger component of snowmelt in runoff generation, we found the SMRI to be a good complementary index to the SPI to describe streamflow droughts. In a further step, the SPI and the SMRI were compared for the summer drought of 2003 and the spring drought of 2011 for Switzerland, using gridded products of precipitation and temperature including the entire country.

  8. Characteristics, dynamics and significance of marine snow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alldredge, Alice L.; Silver, Mary W.

    Macroscopic aggregates of detritus, living organisms and inorganic matter known as marine snow, have significance in the ocean both as unique, partially isolated microenvironments and as transport agents: much of surface-derived matter in the ocean fluxes to the ocean interior and the sea floor as marine snow. As microhabitats, marine snow aggregates contain enriched microbial communities and chemical gradients within which processes of photosynthesis, decomposition, and nutrient regeneration occur at highly elevated levels. Microbial communities associated with marine snow undergo complex successional changes on time scales of hours to days which significantly alter the chemical and biological properties of the particles. Marine snow can be produced either de novo by living plants and animals especially as mucus feeding webs of zooplankton, or by the biologically-enhanced physical aggregation of smaller particles. By the latter pathway, microaggregates, phytoplankton, fecal pellets, organic debris and clay-mineral particles collide by differential settlement or physical shear and adhere by the action of various, biologically-generated, organic compounds. Diatom flocculation is a poorly understood source of marine snow of potential global significance. Rates of snow production and breakdown are not known but are critical to predicting flux and to understanding biological community structure and transformations of matter and energy in the water column. The greatest challenge to the study of marine snow at present is the development of appropriate technology to measure abundances and characteristics of aggregates in situ.

  9. Modelling stable atmospheric boundary layers over snow

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sterk, H.A.M.

    2015-01-01

    Thesis entitled: Modelling Stable Atmospheric Boundary Layers over Snow H.A.M. Sterk Wageningen, 29th of April, 2015 Summary The emphasis of this thesis is on the understanding and forecasting of the Stable Boundary Layer (SBL) over snow-covered surfaces. SBLs typically form at night and in polar re

  10. Prevent Snow from Blocking your Tailpipe

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2014-12-11

    If it's snowing, make sure your vehicle’s tailpipe is clear of snow before starting the engine to prevent carbon monoxide poisoning.  Created: 12/11/2014 by National Center for Environmental Health (NCEH).   Date Released: 12/11/2014.

  11. Modelling stable atmospheric boundary layers over snow

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sterk, H.A.M.

    2015-01-01

    Thesis entitled: Modelling Stable Atmospheric Boundary Layers over Snow H.A.M. Sterk Wageningen, 29th of April, 2015 Summary The emphasis of this thesis is on the understanding and forecasting of the Stable Boundary Layer (SBL) over snow-covered surfaces. SBLs typically form at night and in polar re

  12. Livestock Husbandry and Snow Leopard Conservation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mohammad, Ghulam; Mostafawi, Sayed Naqibullah; Dadul, Jigmet; Rosen, Tatjana; Mishra, Charudutt; Bhatnagar, Yash Veer; Trivedi, Pranav; Timbadia, Radhika; Bijoor, Ajay; Murali, Ranjini; Sonam, Karma; Thinley, Tanzin; Namgail, Tsewang; Prins, Herbert H.T.; Nawaz, Muhammad Ali; Ud Din, Jaffar; Buzdar, Hafeez

    2016-01-01

    Livestock depredation is a key source of snow leopard mortality across much of the species' range. Snow leopards break into livestock corrals, killing many domestic animals and thereby inflicting substantial economic damage. Locals may retaliate by killing the cat and selling its parts.

  13. User requirements for satellite snow data service

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kolberg, S.; Standley, A.; Hiltbrunner, D.; Hallikainen, M.

    1997-12-31

    This report discusses the answers given by ten users or potential users of remotely sensed snow data when asked about their data needs and present measurements, their requirements for remote sensing data and potential of using such, and the models or other analysis tools in which the information is used. The answers show both consensus and differences among the respondents` use of snow data and requirements for remote sensing snow products. For water resources planning and management, the most important variable is snow water equivalent, with acceptable errors around 10%. Acceptable spatial error is typically in the range of 200 m to 1 km. For flood forecasting and short-term runoff simulation, snow covered area is more important, with a classification of 5 to 8 steps being generally sufficient. Meteorologists tend to focus on albedo and snow coverage data, with 5% steps desired for albedo. Geometric resolution and accuracy is less important, temporal resolution and delivery time is more important than in water resource management. For avalanche use, most snow variables except water equivalent are important, several in depth profiles. Spatial and temporal requirements are high. In all user groups there is a desire for models which can use measured values quantitatively. Today, measured snow information is largely interpreted manually and subjectively and lead to actions based on experience and judgement. The organizing of measurements, simulations and calibrated sub-models with varying uncertainty levels is partly a conceptual problem, partly a software problem. 1 ref.

  14. Comments on Nancy Snow, "Generativity and Flourishing"

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamtekar, Rachana

    2015-01-01

    In her rich and wide-ranging paper, Nancy Snow argues that there is a virtue of generativity--an other-regarding desire to invest one's substance in forms of life and work that will outlive the self (p. 10). By "virtue" Snow means not just a desirable or praiseworthy quality of a person, but more precisely, as Aristotle defined it, a…

  15. Livestock Husbandry and Snow Leopard Conservation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mohammad, Ghulam; Mostafawi, Sayed Naqibullah; Dadul, Jigmet; Rosen, Tatjana; Mishra, Charudutt; Bhatnagar, Yash Veer; Trivedi, Pranav; Timbadia, Radhika; Bijoor, Ajay; Murali, Ranjini; Sonam, Karma; Thinley, Tanzin; Namgail, Tsewang; Prins, Herbert H.T.; Nawaz, Muhammad Ali; Ud Din, Jaffar; Buzdar, Hafeez

    2016-01-01

    Livestock depredation is a key source of snow leopard mortality across much of the species' range. Snow leopards break into livestock corrals, killing many domestic animals and thereby inflicting substantial economic damage. Locals may retaliate by killing the cat and selling its parts. Predator-

  16. Livestock Husbandry and Snow Leopard Conservation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mohammad, Ghulam; Mostafawi, Sayed Naqibullah; Dadul, Jigmet; Rosen, Tatjana; Mishra, Charudutt; Bhatnagar, Yash Veer; Trivedi, Pranav; Timbadia, Radhika; Bijoor, Ajay; Murali, Ranjini; Sonam, Karma; Thinley, Tanzin; Namgail, Tsewang; Prins, Herbert H.T.; Nawaz, Muhammad Ali; Ud Din, Jaffar; Buzdar, Hafeez

    2016-01-01

    Livestock depredation is a key source of snow leopard mortality across much of the species' range. Snow leopards break into livestock corrals, killing many domestic animals and thereby inflicting substantial economic damage. Locals may retaliate by killing the cat and selling its parts. Predator-

  17. Modelling stable atmospheric boundary layers over snow

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sterk, H.A.M.

    2015-01-01

    Thesis entitled: Modelling Stable Atmospheric Boundary Layers over Snow H.A.M. Sterk Wageningen, 29th of April, 2015 Summary The emphasis of this thesis is on the understanding and forecasting of the Stable Boundary Layer (SBL) over snow-covered surfaces. SBLs typically form at night and in polar

  18. Another Story of Snow white

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2006-01-01

    "白兰氏"杯 2006 广东省中学生英语作文比赛决赛题(初中组)命题作文:你的读者是国际幼儿园的 3- 6 岁的小朋友。实际上, 你的作文是要读给他们听的。内容是鼓励孩子们回家后做一件促进文明保护环境的具体的事。可以包括爱护环境、讲究卫生、节约不浪费资源、爱护小动物、语言和行为文明。文体不限 ( 可以包括倡议书、阐述文、议论文、散文、诗歌、童话等)。自定题目。 My dear children,have you ever heard of the story of Snow White?You are very clever children,I know you must remember the happy ending in the story. The beautiful girl who named Snow White went to live in the palace with her lover. Do you want to know what happend next?listen carefully and I'll tell you the story . It is said ...

  19. Observing snow cover using unmanned aerial vehicle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spallek, Waldemar; Witek, Matylda; Niedzielski, Tomasz

    2016-04-01

    Snow cover is a key environmental variable that influences high flow events driven by snow-melt episodes. Estimates of snow extent (SE), snow depth (SD) and snow water equivalent (SWE) allow to approximate runoff caused by snow-melt episodes. These variables are purely spatial characteristics, and hence their pointwise measurements using terrestrial monitoring systems do not offer the comprehensive and fully-spatial information on water storage in snow. Existing satellite observations of snow reveal moderate spatial resolution which, not uncommonly, is not fine enough to estimate the above-mentioned snow-related variables for small catchments. High-resolution aerial photographs and the resulting orthophotomaps and digital surface models (DSMs), obtained using unmanned aerial vehicles (UAVs), may offer spatial resolution of 3 cm/px. The UAV-based observation of snow cover may be done using the near-infrared (NIR) cameras and visible-light cameras. Since the beginning of 2015, in frame of the research project no. LIDER/012/223/L-5/13/NCBR/2014 financed by the National Centre for Research and Development of Poland, we have performed a series of the UAV flights targeted at four sites in the Kwisa catchment in the Izerskie Mts. (part of the Sudetes, SW Poland). Observations are carried out with the ultralight UAV swinglet CAM (produced by senseFly, lightweight 0.5 kg, wingspan 80 cm) which enables on-demand sampling at low costs. The aim of the field work is to acquire aerial photographs taken using the visible-light and NIR cameras for a purpose of producing time series of DSMs and orthophotomaps with snow cover for all sites. The DSMs are used to calculate SD as difference between observational (with snow) and reference (without snow) models. In order to verify such an approach to compute SD we apply several procedures, one of which is the estimation of SE using the corresponding orthophotomaps generated on a basis of visual-light and NIR images. The objective of this

  20. A conceptual, distributed snow redistribution model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frey, S.; Holzmann, H.

    2015-11-01

    When applying conceptual hydrological models using a temperature index approach for snowmelt to high alpine areas often accumulation of snow during several years can be observed. Some of the reasons why these "snow towers" do not exist in nature are vertical and lateral transport processes. While snow transport models have been developed using grid cell sizes of tens to hundreds of square metres and have been applied in several catchments, no model exists using coarser cell sizes of 1 km2, which is a common resolution for meso- and large-scale hydrologic modelling (hundreds to thousands of square kilometres). In this paper we present an approach that uses only gravity and snow density as a proxy for the age of the snow cover and land-use information to redistribute snow in alpine basins. The results are based on the hydrological modelling of the Austrian Inn Basin in Tyrol, Austria, more specifically the Ötztaler Ache catchment, but the findings hold for other tributaries of the river Inn. This transport model is implemented in the distributed rainfall-runoff model COSERO (Continuous Semi-distributed Runoff). The results of both model concepts with and without consideration of lateral snow redistribution are compared against observed discharge and snow-covered areas derived from MODIS satellite images. By means of the snow redistribution concept, snow accumulation over several years can be prevented and the snow depletion curve compared with MODIS (Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer) data could be improved, too. In a 7-year period the standard model would lead to snow accumulation of approximately 2900 mm SWE (snow water equivalent) in high elevated regions whereas the updated version of the model does not show accumulation and does also predict discharge with more accuracy leading to a Kling-Gupta efficiency of 0.93 instead of 0.9. A further improvement can be shown in the comparison of MODIS snow cover data and the calculated depletion curve, where

  1. Surface decontamination using dry ice snow

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ryu, Jungdong; Park, Kwangheon [College of Mechnical and Industrial System Engineering, Kyunghee University, Yongin (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Bumsik; Kim Yangeun [Wolsung Nuclear Power Plants, KEPCO (Korea, Republic of)

    1999-07-01

    An adjustable nozzle for controlling the size of dry ice snow was developed. The converging/diverging nozzle can control the size of snows from sub-microns to 10 micron size. Using the nozzle, a surface decontamination device was made. The removal mechanisms of surface contaminants are mechanical impact, partial dissolving and evaporation process, and viscous flow. A heat supply system is added for the prevention of surface ice layer formation. The cleaning power is slightly dependent on the size of snow. Small snows are the better in viscous flow cleaning, while large snows are slightly better in dissolving and sublimation process. Human oils like fingerprints on glass were easy to remove. Decontamination ability was tested using a contaminated pump-housing surface. About 40 to 80% of radioactivity was removed. This device is effective in surface-decontamination of any electrical devices like detector, controllers which cannot be cleaned in aqueous solution. (author)

  2. Constraining snow model choices in a transitional snow environment with intensive observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wayand, N. E.; Massmann, A.; Clark, M. P.; Lundquist, J. D.

    2014-12-01

    The performance of existing energy balance snow models exhibits a large spread in the simulated snow water equivalent, snow depth, albedo, and surface temperature. Indentifying poor model representations of physical processes within intercomparison studies is difficult due to multiple differences between models as well as non-orthogonal metrics used. Efforts to overcome these obstacles for model development have focused on a modeling framework that allows multiple representations of each physical process within one structure. However, there still exists a need for snow study sites within complex terrain that observe enough model states and fluxes to constrain model choices. In this study we focus on an intensive snow observational site located in the maritime-transitional snow climate of Snoqualmie Pass WA (Figure 1). The transitional zone has been previously identified as a difficult climate to simulate snow processes; therefore, it represents an ideal model-vetting site. From two water years of intensive observational data, we have learned that a more honest comparison with observations requires that the modeled states or fluxes be as similar to the spatial and temporal domain of the instrument, even if it means changing the model to match what is being observed. For example, 24-hour snow board observations do not capture compaction of the underlying snow; therefore, a modeled "snow board" was created that only includes new snow accumulation and new snow compaction. We extend this method of selective model validation to all available Snoqualmie observations to constrain model choices within the Structure for Understanding Multiple Modeling Alternatives (SUMMA) framework. Our end goal is to provide a more rigorous and systematic method for diagnosing problems within snow models at a site given numerous snow observations.

  3. Coding and decoding with dendrites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Papoutsi, Athanasia; Kastellakis, George; Psarrou, Maria; Anastasakis, Stelios; Poirazi, Panayiota

    2014-02-01

    Since the discovery of complex, voltage dependent mechanisms in the dendrites of multiple neuron types, great effort has been devoted in search of a direct link between dendritic properties and specific neuronal functions. Over the last few years, new experimental techniques have allowed the visualization and probing of dendritic anatomy, plasticity and integrative schemes with unprecedented detail. This vast amount of information has caused a paradigm shift in the study of memory, one of the most important pursuits in Neuroscience, and calls for the development of novel theories and models that will unify the available data according to some basic principles. Traditional models of memory considered neural cells as the fundamental processing units in the brain. Recent studies however are proposing new theories in which memory is not only formed by modifying the synaptic connections between neurons, but also by modifications of intrinsic and anatomical dendritic properties as well as fine tuning of the wiring diagram. In this review paper we present previous studies along with recent findings from our group that support a key role of dendrites in information processing, including the encoding and decoding of new memories, both at the single cell and the network level. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Dendritic Cells—Ontogeny—

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Satoshi Takeuchi

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Dendritic cells (DC play key rolls in various aspects of immunity. The functions of DC depend on the subsets as well as their location or activation status. Understanding developmental lineages, precursors and inducing factors for various DC subsets would help their clinical application, but despite extensive efforts, the precise ontogeny of various DC, remain unclear and complex. Because of their many functional similarities to macrophages, DC were originally thought to be of myeloid-lineage, an idea supported by many in vitro studies where monocytes or GM-CSF (a key myeloid growth factor has been extensively used for generating DC. However, there has been considerable evidence which suggests the existence of lymphoid-lineage DC. After the confusion of myeloid-/lymphoid-DC concept regarding DC surface markers, we have now reached a consensus that each DC subset can differentiate through both myeloid- and lymphoid-lineages. The identification of committed populations (such as common myeloid- and lymphoid progenitors as precursors for every DC subsets and findings from various knockout (KO mice that have selected lymphoid- or myeloid-lineage deficiency appear to indicate flexibility of DC development rather than their lineage restriction. Why is DC development so flexible unlike other hematopoitic cells? It might be because there is developmental redundancy to maintain such important populations in any occasions, or such developmental flexibility would be advantageous for DC to be able to differentiate from any “available” precursors in situ irrespective of their lineages. This review will cover ontogeny of conventional (CD8+/- DC DC, plasmacytoid DC and skin Langerhans cells, and recently-identified many Pre-DC (immediate DC precursor populations, in addition to monocytes and plasmacytoid DC, will also be discussed.

  5. Spatial and temporal variability in seasonal snow density

    KAUST Repository

    Bormann, Kathryn J.

    2013-03-01

    Snow density is a fundamental physical property of snowpacks used in many aspects of snow research. As an integral component in the remote sensing of snow water equivalent and parameterisation of snow models, snow density may be used to describe many important features of snowpack behaviour. The present study draws on a significant dataset of snow density and climate observations from the United States, Australia and the former Soviet Union and uses regression-based techniques to identify the dominant climatological drivers for snow densification rates, characterise densification rate variability and estimate spring snow densities from more readily available climate data. Total winter precipitation was shown to be the most prominent driver of snow densification rates, with mean air temperature and melt-refreeze events also found to be locally significant. Densification rate variance is very high at Australian sites, very low throughout the former Soviet Union and between these extremes throughout much of the US. Spring snow densities were estimated using a statistical model with climate variable inputs and best results were achieved when snow types were treated differently. Given the importance of snow density information in many snow-related research disciplines, this work has implications for current methods of converting snow depths to snow water equivalent, the representation of snow dynamics in snow models and remote sensing applications globally. © 2013 Elsevier B.V.

  6. The Deterministic Dendritic Cell Algorithm

    CERN Document Server

    Greensmith, Julie

    2010-01-01

    The Dendritic Cell Algorithm is an immune-inspired algorithm orig- inally based on the function of natural dendritic cells. The original instantiation of the algorithm is a highly stochastic algorithm. While the performance of the algorithm is good when applied to large real-time datasets, it is difficult to anal- yse due to the number of random-based elements. In this paper a deterministic version of the algorithm is proposed, implemented and tested using a port scan dataset to provide a controllable system. This version consists of a controllable amount of parameters, which are experimented with in this paper. In addition the effects are examined of the use of time windows and variation on the number of cells, both which are shown to influence the algorithm. Finally a novel metric for the assessment of the algorithms output is introduced and proves to be a more sensitive metric than the metric used with the original Dendritic Cell Algorithm.

  7. Snow modeling using SURFEX with the CROCUS snow scheme for Norway

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vikhamar-Schuler, D.; Müller, K.

    2012-04-01

    In 2010 a research project was initiated with the aim to investigate methods to establish a regional snow avalanche forecasting system for Norway. A part of this project concerns snow models that simulate snow stratigraphy and physical parameters in the snow pack. For this purpose we have used the CROCUS snow scheme within the land surface model SURFEX for the location of 18 weather stations in Norway. We have carried out a sensitivity study of available meteorological data. Few weather stations have measurements of all the parameters used by the model on an hourly basis. Therefore it is interesting to investigate if certain parameters can be replaced by short-term prognoses from the operational weather prediction models (Unified Model-4 km, HARMONIE-4 km and postprocessed prognoses of temperature and precipitation). This study indicates that short-term prognoses of radiation, air humidity, wind and air pressure may replace observations without loosing the quality of the snow simulations. For all stations the modeled snow depth is validated with the observed snow depth for the last 2-3 winter seasons. Our results show that the modeled snow depth is most sensitive to precipitation and air temperature. Overall, very good estimates of the snow depth are obtained using the CROCUS snow scheme, except for very wind exposed stations. Temperatures within the snowpack were compared with observations of snow temperature at the Filefjell station, showing promising results. A cold bias was observed, but daily variations were reasonably modeled. During the winter 2011/2012 a series of snow stratigraphy observations from the Filefjell station is carried out for validation purposes of other intra-snowpack physical properties (density, liquid water content, temperature, grain type).

  8. [Was Snow White a transsexual?].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michel, A; Mormont, C

    2002-01-01

    modalities in the transsexual dynamics. Nevertheless, one can ask oneself about the possibility of a request based on a desire rather than on a defense, or even on the existence of a defensive process diametrically opposed to the counter-phobic attitude and which, instead of actively provoking the dreaded reality, would privilege its avoidance and the search of passivity. This latter hypothesis has the advantage of being rather easy to explore with the Rorschach because, according to Exner, the predominance of passive compared to active human movement responses (which he terms the Snow White Syndrome) indicates the propensity to escape into passive fantasies and the tendency to avoid the initiative for behaviour or decision-making, if other people can do it in the subject's place (12). Our results largely confirmed the hypothesis of the existence of an opposite mechanism, as a third of subjects (n = 26) presented Snow White Syndrome. According to Exner, these transsexuals are typically characterized by hiding into a world of make believe, avoiding all responsibility, as well as any decision-making. This passivity in our Snow White Syndrome group was all the more remarkable in that, on the whole, it infiltrated into all the movement responses and seemed to define a rigid style of thinking and mental elaboration, in addition to a suggestive content of passivity. However, this condition cannot be associated with a general lack of dynamism or energy. In fact, the treatment of information, which provides data concerning the motivation to treat a stimulus field of the stimulus--whether this concerns the capture (L) of the stimulus or the elaboration (DQ+) of the response--displayed a sufficient amount of motivation. Furthermore, internal resources (EA) were considerable and were brought into play whenever it was necessary to adopt a behaviour or make a decision. Furthermore, based on these Rorschach findings, we note that in transsexuals with Snow White Syndrome, there is a

  9. 'Snow White' Trench After Scraping

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-01-01

    This view from the Surface Stereo Imager on NASA's Phoenix Mars Lander shows the trench informally named 'Snow White.' This image was taken after a series of scrapings by the lander's Robotic Arm on the 58th Martian day, or sol, of the mission (July 23, 2008). The scrapings were done in preparation for collecting a sample for analysis from a hard subsurface layer where soil may contain frozen water. The trench is 4 to 5 centimeters (about 2 inches) deep, about 23 centimeters (9 inches) wide and about 60 centimeters (24 inches) long. The Phoenix Mission is led by the University of Arizona, Tucson, on behalf of NASA. Project management of the mission is by NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, Calif. Spacecraft development is by Lockheed Martin Space Systems, Denver.

  10. Dendritic cells star in Vancouver

    OpenAIRE

    Klechevsky, Eynav; Kato, Hiroki; Sponaas, Anne-Marit

    2005-01-01

    The fast-moving field of dendritic cell (DC) biology is hard to keep pace with. Here we report on advances from the recent Keystone Symposium, “Dendritic Cells at the Center of Innate and Adaptive Immunity,” organized in Vancouver, BC on Feb. 1–7, 2005 by Anne O'Garra, Jacques Banchereau, and Alan Sher. New insights into the molecular mechanisms of DC function and their influence on immune regulation, their role in infectious and autoimmune disease, and new clinical applications are highlight...

  11. The Snow Data System at NASA JPL

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laidlaw, R.; Painter, T. H.; Mattmann, C. A.; Ramirez, P.; Brodzik, M. J.; Rittger, K.; Bormann, K. J.; Burgess, A. B.; Zimdars, P.; McGibbney, L. J.; Goodale, C. E.; Joyce, M.

    2015-12-01

    The Snow Data System at NASA JPL includes a data processing pipeline built with open source software, Apache 'Object Oriented Data Technology' (OODT). It produces a variety of data products using inputs from satellites such as MODIS, VIIRS and Landsat. Processing is carried out in parallel across a high-powered computing cluster. Algorithms such as 'Snow Covered Area and Grain-size' (SCAG) and 'Dust Radiative Forcing in Snow' (DRFS) are applied to satellite inputs to produce output images that are used by many scientists and institutions around the world. This poster will describe the Snow Data System, its outputs and their uses and applications, along with recent advancements to the system and plans for the future. Advancements for 2015 include automated daily processing of historic MODIS data for SCAG (MODSCAG) and DRFS (MODDRFS), automation of SCAG processing for VIIRS satellite inputs (VIIRSCAG) and an updated version of SCAG for Landsat Thematic Mapper inputs (TMSCAG) that takes advantage of Graphics Processing Units (GPUs) for faster processing speeds. The pipeline has been upgraded to use the latest version of OODT and its workflows have been streamlined to enable computer operators to process data on demand. Additional products have been added, such as rolling 8-day composites of MODSCAG data, a new version of the MODSCAG 'annual minimum ice and snow extent' (MODICE) product, and recoded MODSCAG data for the 'Satellite Snow Product Intercomparison and Evaluation Experiment' (SnowPEx) project.

  12. Potential for Monitoring Snow Cover in Boreal Forests by Combining MODIS Snow Cover and AMSR-E SWE Maps

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riggs, George A.; Hall, Dorothy K.; Foster, James L.

    2009-01-01

    Monitoring of snow cover extent and snow water equivalent (SWE) in boreal forests is important for determining the amount of potential runoff and beginning date of snowmelt. The great expanse of the boreal forest necessitates the use of satellite measurements to monitor snow cover. Snow cover in the boreal forest can be mapped with either the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) or the Advanced Microwave Scanning Radiometer for EOS (AMSR-E) microwave instrument. The extent of snow cover is estimated from the MODIS data and SWE is estimated from the AMSR-E. Environmental limitations affect both sensors in different ways to limit their ability to detect snow in some situations. Forest density, snow wetness, and snow depth are factors that limit the effectiveness of both sensors for snow detection. Cloud cover is a significant hindrance to monitoring snow cover extent Using MODIS but is not a hindrance to the use of the AMSR-E. These limitations could be mitigated by combining MODIS and AMSR-E data to allow for improved interpretation of snow cover extent and SWE on a daily basis and provide temporal continuity of snow mapping across the boreal forest regions in Canada. The purpose of this study is to investigate if temporal monitoring of snow cover using a combination of MODIS and AMSR-E data could yield a better interpretation of changing snow cover conditions. The MODIS snow mapping algorithm is based on snow detection using the Normalized Difference Snow Index (NDSI) and the Normalized Difference Vegetation Index (NDVI) to enhance snow detection in dense vegetation. (Other spectral threshold tests are also used to map snow using MODIS.) Snow cover under a forest canopy may have an effect on the NDVI thus we use the NDVI in snow detection. A MODIS snow fraction product is also generated but not used in this study. In this study the NDSI and NDVI components of the snow mapping algorithm were calculated and analyzed to determine how they changed

  13. Mac OS X Snow Leopard pocket guide

    CERN Document Server

    Seiblod, Chris

    2009-01-01

    Whether you're new to the Mac or a longtime user, this handy book is the quickest way to get up to speed on Snow Leopard. Packed with concise information in an easy-to-read format, Mac OS X Snow Leopard Pocket Guide covers what you need to know and is an ideal resource for problem-solving on the fly. This book goes right to the heart of Snow Leopard, with details on system preferences, built-in applications, and utilities. You'll also find configuration tips, keyboard shortcuts, guides for troubleshooting, lots of step-by-step instructions, and more. Learn about new features and changes s

  14. Tensile Strength of Snow using Centrifugal Technique

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Agraj Upadhyay

    2007-11-01

    Full Text Available Tensile strength of snow was determined using indigenously developed automated centrifugalmachine. Processed snow (sintered at 20 °C for 4 days samples of dia: 65 mm andheight:130 mm were tested using this machine.The experiments were conducted on sieved snowat four temperature levels of 0 °C, 3 °C,6 °C and 9 °C at density ranging from 200-460 kg/m3.Results of these experiments have been compared with the earlier  suggested models. Probabilitydistribution of snow strength on the basis of current experimental data has also been presented.

  15. Resume of Interview with Professor Charles Snow

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dorthe Døjbak Håkonsson

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available This interview is with Professor Charles Snow. Snow is Professor Emeritus of Strategy and Organization at Penn State University. He was a professor at Penn State from 1974 to 2012. The interview was conducted in 2013 while he was visiting professor at ICOA (Interdisciplinary Center for Organizational Architecture at Aarhus University. Professor Snow is a founding member of the Organizational Design Community and co-editor of the Journal of Organization Design. He is a Fellow of the Academy of Management and is listed in Who’s Who in the Management Sciences and Great Writers on Organizations.

  16. SNOWMIP2: An evaluation of forest snow process simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richard Essery; Nick Rutter; John Pomeroy; Robert Baxter; Manfred Stahli; David Gustafsson; Alan Barr; Paul Bartlett; Kelly Elder

    2009-01-01

    Models of terrestrial snow cover, or snow modules within land surface models, are used in many meteorological, hydrological, and ecological applications. Such models were developed first, and have achieved their greatest sophistication, for snow in open areas; however, huge tracts of the Northern Hemisphere both have seasonal snow cover and are forested (Fig. 1)....

  17. Distribution of Snow and Maximum Snow Water Equivalent Obtained by LANDSAT Data and Degree Day Method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takeda, K.; Ochiai, H.; Takeuchi, S.

    1985-01-01

    Maximum snow water equivalence and snowcover distribution are estimated using several LANDSAT data taken in snowmelting season over a four year period. The test site is Okutadami-gawa Basin located in the central position of Tohoku-Kanto-Chubu District. The year to year normalization for snowmelt volume computation on the snow line is conducted by year to year correction of degree days using the snowcover percentage within the test basin obtained from LANDSAT data. The maximum snow water equivalent map in the test basin is generated based on the normalized snowmelt volume on the snow line extracted from four LANDSAT data taken in a different year. The snowcover distribution on an arbitrary day in snowmelting of 1982 is estimated from the maximum snow water equivalent map. The estimated snowcover is compared with the snowcover area extracted from NOAA-AVHRR data taken on the same day. The applicability of the snow estimation using LANDSAT data is discussed.

  18. Estimation of Snow Thickness on Sea Ice and Lake Ice Using Airborne SnowSAR Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Veijola, Katriina; Makynen, Marko; Lemmetyinen, Juha; Praks, Jaan

    2016-08-01

    Currently, snow thickness on sea ice is operationally estimated using microwave radiometer data. However, the estimates are hampered by the inherent coarse spatial resolution of passive microwave sensors. Successful application of SAR imagery for snow thickness estimation has the potential of providing estimates of snow thickness with much finer spatial resolution.In this study, we concentrate on assessing the capability of X- and Ku-band SAR backscattering to estimate snow thickness on sea and lake ice. Co- and cross -polarized X- and Ku-band SAR backscattering data, acquired with the ESA airborne SnowSAR sensor, are applied. The SAR data acquisition and co-incident in-situ measurements were conducted in Finland in the winter of 2012 over sea ice and lake ice test sites.Our analysis shows which frequency and polarization combinations have best sensitivity to snow thickness on sea and lake ice and in deep discussion provides plausible ways to improve the results.

  19. Research on the seasonal snow of the Arctic Slope

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Benson, C.S.

    1986-01-01

    This project deals with the seasonal snow on Alaska's Arctic Slope. It is concentrated on snow of the R{sub 4}D project area. However, an important aspect of this study is to relate the snow cover of this area with the rest of the Arctic Slope. The goals include determination of the amount of precipitation which comes as snow, the wind transport of this snow and its depositional pattern as influenced by drifting, the physical properties of the snow, the physical processes which operate in it, the proportions of it which go into evaporation, infiltration and runoff, and the biological role of the snow cover.

  20. Research on the seasonal snow of the Arctic Slope

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Benson, C.S.

    1991-01-01

    This project deals with the seasonal snow on Alaska's Arctic Slope. Although it is concentrated on snow of the R{sub 4}D project area, it is important to relate the snow cover of this area with the rest of the Arctic Slope. The goals include determination of the amount of precipitation which comes as snow, the wind transport of this snow and its depositional pattern as influenced by drifting, the physical properties of the snow, the physical processes which operate in it, the proportions of it which go into evaporation, infiltration and runoff, and the biological role of the snow cover.

  1. Research on the seasonal snow of the Arctic Slope

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Benson, C.S.

    1989-01-01

    This project deals with the seasonal snow on Alaska's Arctic Slope. Although it is concentrated on snow of the R40 project area, it is important to relate the snow cover of this area with the rest of the Arctic Slope. The goals include determination Of the amount of precipitation which comes as snow, the wind transport of this snow and its depositional pattern as influenced by drifting, the physical properties of the snow, the physical processes which operate in it, the proportions of it which go into evaporation, infiltration and runoff, and the biological role of the snow cover.

  2. Bone marrow-derived dendritic cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roney, Kelly

    2013-01-01

    While much is understood about dendritic cells and their role in the immune system, the study of these cells is critical to gain a more complete understanding of their function. Dendritic cell isolation from mouse body tissues can be difficult and the number of cells isolated small. This protocol describes the growth of large number of dendritic cells from the culture of mouse bone marrow cells. The dendritic cells grown in culture facilitate experiments that may require large number of dendritic cells without great expense or use of large number of mice.

  3. Simulating snow maps for Norway: description and statistical evaluation of the seNorge snow model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. M. Saloranta

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Daily maps of snow conditions have been produced in Norway with the seNorge snow model since 2004. The seNorge snow model operates with 1 × 1 km resolution, uses gridded observations of daily temperature and precipitation as its input forcing, and simulates, among others, snow water equivalent (SWE, snow depth (SD, and the snow bulk density (ρ. In this paper the set of equations contained in the seNorge model code is described and a thorough spatiotemporal statistical evaluation of the model performance from 1957–2011 is made using the two major sets of extensive in situ snow measurements that exist for Norway. The evaluation results show that the seNorge model generally overestimates both SWE and ρ, and that the overestimation of SWE increases with elevation throughout the snow season. However, the R2-values for model fit are 0.60 for (log-transformed SWE and 0.45 for ρ, indicating that after removal of the detected systematic model biases (e.g. by recalibrating the model or expressing snow conditions in relative units the model performs rather well. The seNorge model provides a relatively simple, not very data-demanding, yet nonetheless process-based method to construct snow maps of high spatiotemporal resolution. It is an especially well suited alternative for operational snow mapping in regions with rugged topography and large spatiotemporal variability in snow conditions, as is the case in the mountainous Norway.

  4. Assimilation of AMSR-E snow water equivalent data in a spatially-lumped snow model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dziubanski, David J.; Franz, Kristie J.

    2016-09-01

    Accurately initializing snow model states in hydrologic prediction models is important for estimating future snowmelt, water supplies, and flooding potential. While ground-based snow observations give the most reliable information about snowpack conditions, they are spatially limited. In the north-central USA, there are no continual observations of hydrologically critical snow variables. Satellites offer the most likely source of spatial snow data, such as the snow water equivalent (SWE), for this region. In this study, we test the impact of assimilating SWE data from the Advanced Microwave Scanning Radiometer - Earth Observing System (AMSR-E) instrument into the US National Weather Service (NWS) SNOW17 model for seven watersheds in the Upper Mississippi River basin. The SNOW17 is coupled with the NWS Sacramento Soil Moisture Accounting (SACSMA) model, and both simulated SWE and discharge are evaluated. The ensemble Kalman filter (EnKF) assimilation framework is applied and updating occurs on a daily cycle for water years 2006-2011. Prior to assimilation, AMSR-E data is bias corrected using data from the National Operational Hydrologic Remote Sensing Center (NOHRSC) airborne snow survey program. An average AMSR-E SWE bias of -17.91 mm was found for the study basins. SNOW17 and SAC-SMA model parameters from the North Central River Forecast Center (NCRFC) are used. Compared to a baseline run without assimilation, the SWE assimilation improved discharge for five of the seven study sites, in particular for high discharge magnitudes associated with snow melt runoff. SWE and discharge simulations suggest that the SNOW17 is underestimating SWE and snowmelt rates in the study basins. Deep snow conditions and periods of snowmelt may have introduced error into the assimilation due to difficulty obtaining accurate brightness temperatures under these conditions. Overall results indicate that the AMSR-E data and EnKF are viable and effective solutions for improving simulations

  5. Snow water equivalent interpolation for the Colorado River Basin from snow telemetry (SNOTEL) data

    OpenAIRE

    Fassnacht, SR; Dressler, KA; Bales, RC

    2003-01-01

    Inverse weighted distance and regression nonexact techniques were evaluated for interpolating methods snow water equivalent (SWE) across the entire Colorado River Basin of the western United States. A 1-km spacing was used for the gridding of snow telemetry (SNOTEL) measurements for the years 1993, 1998, and 1999, which on average, represented higher than average, average, and lower than average snow years. Because of the terrain effects, the regression techniques (hypsometric elevation and m...

  6. Application of MODIS snow cover products: wildfire impacts on snow and melt in the Sierra Nevada

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. D. Micheletty

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available The current work evaluates the spatial and temporal variability in snow after a large forest fire in northern California with Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS snow covered area and grain size (MODSCAG algorithm. MODIS MOD10A1 fractional snow covered area and MODSCAG fractional snow cover products are utilized to detect spatial and temporal changes in snowpack after the 2007 Moonlight Fire and an unburned basin, Grizzly Ridge, for water years (WY 2002–2012. Estimates of canopy adjusted and non-adjusted MODSCAG fractional snow covered area (fSCA are smoothed and interpolated to provide a continuous timeseries of daily basin average snow extent over the two basins. The removal of overstory canopy by wildfire exposes more snow cover; however, elemental pixel comparisons and statistical analysis show that the MOD10A1 product has a tendency to overestimate snow coverage pre-fire, muting the effects of wildfire. The MODSCAG algorithm better distinguishes sub-pixel snow coverage in forested areas and is highly correlated to soil burn severity after the fire. Annual MODSCAG fSCA estimates show statistically significant increased fSCA in the Moonlight Fire study area after the fire (WY 2008–2011; P < 0.01 compared to pre-fire averages and the control basin. After the fire, the number of days exceeding a pre-fire high snow cover threshold increased by 81%. Canopy reduction increases exposed viewable snow area and the amount of solar radiation that reaches the snowpack leading to earlier basin average melt-out dates compared to the nearby unburned basin. There is also a significant increase in MODSCAG fSCA post-fire regardless of slope or burn severity. Alteration of regional snow cover has significant implications for both short and long-term water supplies for downstream communities and resource managers.

  7. Arctic Snow Microstructure Experiment for the development of snow emission modelling

    OpenAIRE

    Maslanka, William; Leppänen, Leena; Kontu, Anna; Sandells, Mel; Lemmetyinen, Juha; Schneebeli, Martin; Proksch, Martin; Matzl, Margret; Hannula, Henna-Reetta; Gurney, Robert

    2016-01-01

    The Arctic Snow Microstructure Experiment (ASMEx) took place in Sodankylä, Finland in the winters of 2013–2014 and 2014–2015. Radiometric, macro-, and microstructure measurements were made under different experimental conditions of homogenous snow slabs, extracted from the natural seasonal taiga snowpack. Traditional and modern measurement techniques were used for snow macro- and microstructure observations. Radiometric measurements of the microwave emission of s...

  8. Spectral Reflectance Characteristics of Different Snow and Snow-Covered Land Surface Objects and Mixed Spectrum Fitting

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG Jia-hua; ZHOU Zheng-ming; WANG Pei-juan; YAO Feng-mei; Liming Yang

    2011-01-01

    The field spectroradiometer was used to measure spectra of different snow and snow-covered land surface objects in Beijing area.The result showed that for a pure snow spectrum,the snow reflectance peaks appeared from visible to 800 nm band locations; there was an obvious absorption valley of snow spectrum near 1 030 nm wavelength.Compared with fresh snow,the reflection peaks of the old snow and melting snow showed different degrees of decline in the ranges of 300~1 300,1 700~1 800 and 2 200~2 300 nm,the lowest was from the compacted snow and frozen ice.For the vegetation and snow mixed spectral characteristics,it was indicated that the spectral reflectance increased for the snow-covered land types (including pine leaf with snow and pine leaf on snow background),due to the influence of snow background in the range of 350~1 300 nm.However,the spectrum reflectance of mixed pixel remained a vegetation spectral characteristic.In the end,based on the spectrum analysis of snow,vegetation,and mixed snow/vegetation pixels,the mixed spectral fitting equations were established,and the results showed that there was good correlation between spectral curves by simulation fitting and observed ones (correlation coefficient R2 =0.950 9).

  9. Spectral reflectance characteristics of different snow and snow-covered land surface objects and mixed spectrum fitting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Jia-Hua; Zhou, Zheng-Ming; Wang, Pei-Juan; Yao, Feng-Mei; Liming, Yang

    2011-09-01

    The field spectroradiometer was used to measure spectra of different snow and snow-covered land surface objects in Beijing area. The result showed that for a pure snow spectrum, the snow reflectance peaks appeared from visible to 800 nm band locations; there was an obvious absorption valley of snow spectrum near 1 030 nm wavelength. Compared with fresh snow, the reflection peaks of the old snow and melting snow showed different degrees of decline in the ranges of 300-1 300, 1 700-1 800 and 2 200-2 300 nm, the lowest was from the compacted snow and frozen ice. For the vegetation and snow mixed spectral characteristics, it was indicated that the spectral reflectance increased for the snow-covered land types (including pine leaf with snow and pine leaf on snow background), due to the influence of snow background in the range of 350-1 300 nm. However, the spectrum reflectance of mixed pixel remained a vegetation spectral characteristic. In the end, based on the spectrum analysis of snow, vegetation, and mixed snow/vegetation pixels, the mixed spectral fitting equations were established, and the results showed that there was good correlation between spectral curves by simulation fitting and observed ones (correlation coefficient R2 = 0.950 9).

  10. Measured black carbon deposition on the Sierra Nevada snow pack and implication for snow pack retreat

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O. L. Hadley

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Modeling studies show that the darkening of snow and ice by black carbon (BC deposition is a major factor for the rapid disappearance of arctic sea ice, mountain glaciers and snow packs. This study provides one of the first direct measurements for the efficient removal of black carbon from the atmosphere by snow and its subsequent deposition on the snow packs of California. The early melting of the snow packs in the Sierras is one of the contributing factors to the severe water problems in California. BC concentrations in falling snow were measured at two mountain locations and in rain at a coastal site. All three stations reveal large BC concentrations in precipitation, ranging from 1.7 ng/g to 12.9 ng/g. The BC concentrations in the air after the snow fall were negligible suggesting an extremely efficient removal of BC by snow. The data suggest that below cloud scavenging, rather than ice nuclei, was the dominant source of BC in the snow. A five-year comparison of BC, dust, and total fine aerosol mass concentrations at multiple sites reveals that the measurements made at the sampling sites were representative of large scale deposition in the Sierra Nevada. The relative concentration of iron and calcium in the mountain aerosol indicates that one-quarter to one-third of the BC may have been transported from Asia.

  11. Measured black carbon deposition on the Sierra Nevada snow pack and implication for snow pack retreat

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O. L. Hadley

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available Modeling studies show that the darkening of snow and ice by black carbon deposition is a major factor for the rapid disappearance of arctic sea ice, mountain glaciers and snow packs. This study provides one of the first direct measurements for the efficient removal of black carbon from the atmosphere by snow and its subsequent deposition to the snow packs of California. The early melting of the snow packs in the Sierras is one of the contributing factors to the severe water problems in California. BC concentrations in falling snow were measured at two mountain locations and in rain at a coastal site. All three stations reveal large BC concentrations in precipitation, ranging from 1.7 ng/g to 12.9 ng/g. The BC concentrations in the air after the snow fall were negligible suggesting an extremely efficient removal of BC by snow. The data suggest that below cloud scavenging, rather than ice nuclei, was the dominant source of BC in the snow. A five-year comparison of BC, dust, and total fine aerosol mass concentrations at multiple sites reveals that the measurements made at the sampling sites were representative of large scale deposition in the Sierra Nevada. The relative concentration of iron and calcium in the mountain aerosol indicates that one-quarter to one-third of the BC may have been transported from Asia.

  12. Modelling high-resolution snow cover precipitation supply for German river catchments with SNOW 4

    Science.gov (United States)

    Böhm, Uwe; Reich, Thomas; Schneider, Gerold; Fiedler, Anett

    2013-04-01

    Formation of snow cover causes a delayed response of surface to precipitation. Both melting of snow and release of liquid water retained within the snow cover form precipitation supply which contributes to runoff and infiltration. The model SNOW 4 is developed to simulate snow cover accumulation and depletion and the resulting precipitation supply on a regular grid. The core of the model is formed by a set of equations which describe the snow cover energy and mass balance. The snow surface energy balance is calculated as a result of the radiation balance and the heat fluxes between atmosphere, soil and snow cover. The available melting heat enters the mass balance computation part of the model and melting of snow or freezing of liquid water within the snow layer takes place depending on its sign. Retention, aging and snow cover regeneration are taken into consideration. The model runs operationally 4 times a day and provides both a snow cover and precipitation supply analysis for the last 30 hours and a forecast for up to 72 hours. For the 30-hour analysis, regionalised observations are used both to define the initial state and force the model. Hourly measurements of air temperature, water vapour pressure, wind speed, global radiation or sunshine duration and precipitation are interpolated to the model grid. For the forecast period, SNOW 4 obtains the required input data from the operational products of the COSMO-EU weather forecast model. The size of a grid box is 1km2. The model area covers a region of 1100x1000km2 and includes the catchments of the German rivers completely. The internal time step is set to 1 hour. Once a day, the compliance between model and regionalized snow cover data is assessed. If discrepancies exceed certain thresholds, the model must be adjusted by a weighted approach towards the observations. The model simulations are updated every six hours based on the most recent observations and weather forecasts. The model works operationally since

  13. Measured Black Carbon Deposition on the Sierra Nevada Snow Pack and Implication for Snow Pack Retreat

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hadley, O.L.; Corrigan, C.E.; Kirchstetter, T.W.; Cliff, S.S.; Ramanathan, V.

    2010-01-12

    Modeling studies show that the darkening of snow and ice by black carbon deposition is a major factor for the rapid disappearance of arctic sea ice, mountain glaciers and snow packs. This study provides one of the first direct measurements for the efficient removal of black carbon from the atmosphere by snow and its subsequent deposition to the snow packs of California. The early melting of the snow packs in the Sierras is one of the contributing factors to the severe water problems in California. BC concentrations in falling snow were measured at two mountain locations and in rain at a coastal site. All three stations reveal large BC concentrations in precipitation, ranging from 1.7 ng/g to 12.9 ng/g. The BC concentrations in the air after the snow fall were negligible suggesting an extremely efficient removal of BC by snow. The data suggest that below cloud scavenging, rather than ice nuclei, was the dominant source of BC in the snow. A five-year comparison of BC, dust, and total fine aerosol mass concentrations at multiple sites reveals that the measurements made at the sampling sites were representative of large scale deposition in the Sierra Nevada. The relative concentration of iron and calcium in the mountain aerosol indicates that one-quarter to one-third of the BC may have been transported from Asia.

  14. Central Asian Snow Cover from Hydrometeorological Surveys

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The Central Asian Snow Cover from Hydrometeorological Surveys data are based on observations made by personnel for three river basins: Amu Darya, Sir Darya, and...

  15. SNOW CLEARING SERVICE WINTER 2001-2002

    CERN Multimedia

    ST-HM Group; Tel. 72202

    2001-01-01

    As usual at this time of the year, the snowing clearing service, which comes under the control of the Transport Group (ST-HM), is preparing for the start of snow-clearing operations (timetable, stand-by service, personnel responsible for driving vehicles and machines, preparation of useful and necessary equipment, work instructions, etc.) in collaboration with the Cleaning Service (ST-TFM) and the Fire Brigade (TIS-FB). The main difficulty for the snow-clearing service is the car parks, which cannot be properly cleared because of the presence of CERN and private vehicles parked there overnight in different parts of the parking areas. The ST-HM Transport Group would therefore like to invite you to park vehicles together in order to facilitate the access of the snow ploughs, thus allowing the car parks to be cleared more efficiently before the personnel arrives for work in the mornings.

  16. Light-absorbing impurities in Arctic snow

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. J. Doherty

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available Absorption of radiation by ice is extremely weak at visible and near-ultraviolet wavelengths, so small amounts of light-absorbing impurities in snow can dominate the absorption of solar radiation at these wavelengths, reducing the albedo relative to that of pure snow, contributing to the surface energy budget and leading to earlier snowmelt. In this study Arctic snow is surveyed for its content of light-absorbing impurities, expanding and updating the 1983–1984 survey of Clarke and Noone. Samples were collected in Alaska, Canada, Greenland, Svalbard, Norway, Russia, and the Arctic Ocean during 2005–2009, on tundra, glaciers, ice caps, sea ice, frozen lakes, and in boreal forests. Snow was collected mostly in spring, when the entire winter snowpack is accessible for sampling. Sampling was carried out in summer on the Greenland ice sheet and on the Arctic Ocean, of melting glacier snow and sea ice as well as cold snow. About 1200 snow samples have been analyzed for this study.

    The snow is melted and filtered; the filters are analyzed in a specially designed spectrophotometer system to infer the concentration of black carbon (BC, the fraction of absorption due to non-BC light-absorbing constituents and the absorption Ångstrom exponent of all particles. The reduction of snow albedo is primarily due to BC, but other impurities, principally brown (organic carbon, are typically responsible for ~40% of the visible and ultraviolet absorption. The meltwater from selected snow samples was saved for chemical analysis to identify sources of the impurities. Median BC amounts in surface snow are as follows (nanograms of carbon per gram of snow: Greenland 3, Arctic Ocean snow 7, melting sea ice 8, Arctic Canada 8, Subarctic Canada 14, Svalbard 13, Northern Norway 21, Western Arctic Russia 26, Northeastern Siberia 17. Concentrations are more variable in the European Arctic than in Arctic Canada or the Arctic Ocean, probably because of the proximity

  17. Georadar Measurements for the Snow Cover Density

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Godio

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Ground Probing Radar (GPR devices is adopted for the analysis of thickness and the mechanical properties (density of the snow cover in some test site in Alps, in Northern Italy. The performances of standard radar systems for the snow cover characterisation are analysed, the main aim is to assess the reliability of the method to estimate the snow density, the snowpack thickness and the depth resolution in terms of capability to detect thin layers. The main relationships between the electrical permittivity and the density of the dry-snow are applied to estimate the density vertical profiles inferred by the GPR investigation. The data were calibrated and compared with the results coming from direct measurements of the density and thickness.

  18. Who made John Snow a hero?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vandenbroucke, J P; Eelkman Rooda, H M; Beukers, H

    1991-05-15

    This paper describes how and why John Snow's investigation of the transmission of cholera grew into an epidemiologic classic. The evolution of the interpretation of the work of John Snow was first studied in depth in the Dutch medical literature, and thereafter traced more superficially in the bacteriologic, hygienic, and epidemiologic literature of Germany, the United Kingdom, and the United States. From the oral tradition of teaching, as well as from the written sources, it is concluded that US epidemiologist W. H. Frost was responsible for the revival of the work of John Snow in the 1930s. Besides the obvious and enjoyable clarity of thinking and reasoning, epidemiologically and medically, of the writings of John Snow, his example well suited epidemiology of the 1930s since his convictions came very close to the bacteriologic paradigm of the day.

  19. Rand Corporation Mean Monthly Global Snow Depth

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — All available monthly snow depth climatologies were integrated by the Rand Corporation, in the early 1980s, into one global (excluding Africa and South America)...

  20. Modeling of AC arc inside wet snow

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hemmatjou, H.

    2006-07-01

    Overhead transmission lines cover long distances over a broad range of topographic relief, climates, and environments. As such, the high voltage equipment is subject to pollution, wet snow and atmospheric icing. Each of these factors have been the source of power outages recorded on power transmission lines. Electric arcs can develop on outdoor insulators until they cause a total flashover. This study involved the modeling of flashover in snow-covered insulators to better understand how electric discharges initiate inside snow and how they develop into flashover. The main objective of this thesis was to develop a mathematical model to predict the flashover voltage of snow-covered insulator surfaces and to ultimately design adequate insulators for cold regions. The results obtained through mathematical modeling were in good agreement with those obtained in experiments.

  1. 50 years of snow stratigraphy observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johansson, C.; Pohjola, V.; Jonasson, C.; Challagan, T. V.

    2012-04-01

    With start in autumn 1961 the Abisko Scientific Research Station (ASRS) located in the Swedish sub Arctic has performed snow stratigraphy observations, resulting in a unique 50 year long time series of data. The data set contains grain size, snow layer hardness, grain compactness and snow layer dryness, observed every second week during the winter season. In general snow and snow cover are important factors for the global radiation budget, and the earth's climate. On a more local scale the layered snowpack creates a relatively mild microclimate for Arctic plants and animals, and it also determines the water content of the snowpack (snow water equivalent) important for e.g. hydrological applications. Analysis of the snow stratigraphy data, divided into three consecutive time periods, show that there has been a change in the last time period. The variable most affected is the snow layer hardness, which shows an increase in hardness of the snowpack. The number of observations with a very hard snow layer/ice at ground level increased three-fold between the first two time periods and the last time period. The thickness of the bottom layer in the snowpack is also highly affected. There has been a 60% increase in layers thinner than 10 cm in the last time period, resulting in a mean reduction in the thickness of the bottom layer from 14 cm to 11 cm. Hence the living conditions for plants and animals at the ground surface have been highly changed. The changes in the snowpack are correlated to an increased mean winter air temperature. Thus, continued increasing, or temperatures within the same ranges as in the last time period, is likely to create harder snow condition in the future. These changes are likely to affect animals that live under the snow such as lemmings and voles or animals that graze sub-Arctic vegetation in winter (e.g. reindeer that would potentially require increased supplementary feeding that incurs financial costs to Sami reindeer herders). Any decrease

  2. Evidence that dendritic mitochondria negatively regulate dendritic branching in pyramidal neurons in the neocortex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kimura, Toshiya; Murakami, Fujio

    2014-05-14

    The precise branching patterns of dendritic arbors have a profound impact on information processing in individual neurons and the brain. These patterns are established by positive and negative regulation of the dendritic branching. Although the mechanisms for positive regulation have been extensively investigated, little is known about those for negative regulation. Here, we present evidence that mitochondria located in developing dendrites are involved in the negative regulation of dendritic branching. We visualized mitochondria in pyramidal neurons of the mouse neocortex during dendritic morphogenesis using in utero electroporation of a mitochondria-targeted fluorescent construct. We altered the mitochondrial distribution in vivo by overexpressing Mfn1, a mitochondrial shaping protein, or the Miro-binding domain of TRAK2 (TRAK2-MBD), a truncated form of a motor-adaptor protein. We found that dendritic mitochondria were preferentially targeted to the proximal portion of dendrites only during dendritic morphogenesis. Overexpression of Mfn1 or TRAK2-MBD depleted mitochondria from the dendrites, an effect that was accompanied by increased branching of the proximal portion of the dendrites. This dendritic abnormality cannot be accounted for by changes in the distribution of membrane trafficking organelles since the overexpression of Mfn1 did not alter the distributions of the endoplasmic reticulum, Golgi, or endosomes. Additionally, neither did these constructs impair neuronal viability or mitochondrial function. Therefore, our results suggest that dendritic mitochondria play a critical role in the establishment of the precise branching pattern of dendritic arbors by negatively affecting dendritic branching.

  3. Snow management practices in French ski resorts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spandre, Pierre; Francois, Hugues; George-Marcelpoil, Emmanuelle; Morin, Samuel

    2016-04-01

    Winter tourism plays a fundamental role in the economy of French mountain regions but also in other countries such as Austria, USA or Canada. Ski operators originally developed grooming methods to provide comfortable and safe skiing conditions. The interannual variability of snow conditions and the competition with international destinations and alternative tourism activities encouraged ski resorts to mitigate their dependency to weather conditions through snowmaking facilities. However some regions may not be able to produce machine made snow due to inadequate conditions and low altitude resorts are still negatively impacted by low snow seasons. In the meantime, even though the operations of high altitude resorts do not show any dependency to the snow conditions they invest in snowmaking facilities. Such developments of snowmaking facilities may be related to a confused and contradictory perception of climate change resulting in individualistic evolutions of snowmaking facilities, also depending on ski resorts main features such as their altitude and size. Concurrently with the expansion of snowmaking facilities, a large range of indicators have been used to discuss the vulnerability of ski resorts such as the so-called "100 days rule" which was widely used with specific thresholds (i.e. minimum snow depth, dates) and constraints (i.e. snowmaking capacity). The present study aims to provide a detailed description of snow management practices and major priorities in French ski resorts with respect to their characteristics. We set up a survey in autumn 2014, collecting data from 56 French ski operators. We identify the priorities of ski operators and describe their snowmaking and grooming practices and facilities. The operators also provided their perception of the ski resort vulnerability to snow and economic challenges which we could compare with the actual snow conditions and ski lift tickets sales during the period from 2001 to 2012.

  4. A Creep Model for High Density Snow

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-04-01

    Director of ERDC-CRREL was Dr. Lance Hansen, and the Director was Dr. Robert E. Davis. COL Bryan S. Green was Commander of ERDC, and Dr. David W...Station, Green - land, and that will be founded on a compacted snow surface. The defor- mation of snow under a constant load (creep deformation, or...developed in this study are enough similar to the generalized creep model used in the ABAQUS finite element software that the ABAQUS creep model was used

  5. Snow Drift Management: Summit Station Greenland

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-05-01

    ER D C/ CR RE L TR -1 6- 6 Engineering for Polar Operations, Logistics, and Research (EPOLAR) Snow Drift Management Summit Station...Drift Management Summit Station Greenland Robert B. Haehnel and Matthew F. Bigl U.S. Army Engineer Research and Development Center (ERDC) Cold...Engineering for Polar Operations, Logistics, and Research (EPOLAR) EP-ARC-15-33, “Monitoring and Managing Snow Drifting at Summit Station, Greenland” ERDC

  6. UV albedo of arctic snow in spring

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O. Meinander

    2008-02-01

    Full Text Available The relevance of snow for climate studies is based on its physical properties, such as high surface reflectivity. Surface ultraviolet (UV albedo is an essential parameter for various applications based on radiative transfer modeling. Here, new continuous measurements of the local UV albedo of natural Arctic snow were made at Sodankylä (67.37° N, 26.63° E, 179 m a.s.l. during the spring of 2007. The data were logged at 1-min intervals. The accumulation of snow was up to 68 cm. The surface layer thickness varied from 0.5 to 35 cm with the snow grain size between 0.2 and 2.5 mm. The midday erythemally weighted UV albedo ranged from 0.6 to 0.8 in the accumulation period and 0.5–0.7 during melting. During the snow melt period, under cases of an almost clear sky and variable cloudiness, an unexpected diurnal decrease of 0.05 in albedo soon after midday, and recovery thereafter, was detected. This diurnal decrease in albedo was found to be asymmetric with respect to solar midday, thus indicating a change in the properties of the snow. Independent UV albedo results with two different types of instruments confirm these findings. The measured temperature of the snow surface was below 0°C on the following mornings. Hence, the reversible diurnal change, evident for ~1–2 h, could be explained by the daily metamorphosis of the surface of the snowpack, in which the temperature of the surface increases, melting some of the snow to liquid water, after which the surface freezes again.

  7. The structure of powder snow avalanches

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sovilla, Betty; McElwaine, Jim N.; Louge, Michel Y.

    2015-01-01

    Powder snow avalanches (PSAs) can be hundreds of metres high and descend at astonishing speeds. This review paints a composite picture of PSAs from data acquired at the Vallée de la Sionne test site in Switzerland, including time-histories of snow cover thickness from buried RADAR and, at several elevations on a pylon, impact pressures from load cells, air pressure, particle velocity from optical sensors, and cloud density and particle cluster size from capacitance probes. PSAs feature distinct flow regions with stratification in mean density. At the head, highly fluctuating impact pressures weaken with elevation, while vertical velocity profiles evolve rapidly along the flow, suggesting that surface snow layers of light, cold, cohesionless snow erupt into a turbulent, inhomogeneous, recirculating frontal cloud region. For hundreds of metres behind the head, cloud stratification sharpens with the deposition of suspended cloud particles, while a denser basal flow of increasing thickness forms as deeper, warmer and heavier parts of the weakened snow cover are entrained. Toward the tail, vertical velocity profiles are more uniform, impact pressures become lower and steadier as the flow becomes thinner, and snow pack entrainment is negligible.

  8. Snow as a habitat for microorganisms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoham, Ronald W.

    1989-01-01

    There are three major habitats involving ice and snow, and the microorganisms studied from these habitats are most eukaryotic. Sea ice is inhabited by algae called diatoms, glacial ice has sparse populations of green algai cal desmids, and the temporary and permanent snows in mountainous regions and high latitudes are inhabited mostly by green algal flagellates. The life cycle of green algal flagellates is summarized by discussing the effects of light, temperature, nutrients, and snow melts. Specific examples of optimal conditions and environmental effects for various snow algae are given. It is not likely that the eukaryotic snow algae presented are candidated for life on the planet Mars. Evolutionally, eukaryotic cells as know on Earth may not have had the opportunity to develop on Mars (if life evolved at all on Mars) since eukaryotes did not appear on Earth until almost two billion years after the first prokaryotic organisms. However, the snow/ice ecosystems on Earth present themselves as extreme habitats were there is evidence of prokaryotic life (eubacteria and cyanbacteria) of which literally nothing is known. Any future surveillances of extant and/or extinct life on Mars should include probes (if not landing sites) to investigate sites of concentrations of ice water. The possibility of signs of life in Martian polar regions should not be overlooked.

  9. Evaluation of SNODAS snow depth and snow water equivalent estimates for the Colorado Rocky Mountains, USA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clow, David W.; Nanus, Leora; Verdin, Kristine L.; Schmidt, Jeffrey

    2012-01-01

    The National Weather Service's Snow Data Assimilation (SNODAS) program provides daily, gridded estimates of snow depth, snow water equivalent (SWE), and related snow parameters at a 1-km2 resolution for the conterminous USA. In this study, SNODAS snow depth and SWE estimates were compared with independent, ground-based snow survey data in the Colorado Rocky Mountains to assess SNODAS accuracy at the 1-km2 scale. Accuracy also was evaluated at the basin scale by comparing SNODAS model output to snowmelt runoff in 31 headwater basins with US Geological Survey stream gauges. Results from the snow surveys indicated that SNODAS performed well in forested areas, explaining 72% of the variance in snow depths and 77% of the variance in SWE. However, SNODAS showed poor agreement with measurements in alpine areas, explaining 16% of the variance in snow depth and 30% of the variance in SWE. At the basin scale, snowmelt runoff was moderately correlated (R2 = 0.52) with SNODAS model estimates. A simple method for adjusting SNODAS SWE estimates in alpine areas was developed that uses relations between prevailing wind direction, terrain, and vegetation to account for wind redistribution of snow in alpine terrain. The adjustments substantially improved agreement between measurements and SNODAS estimates, with the R2 of measured SWE values against SNODAS SWE estimates increasing from 0.42 to 0.63 and the root mean square error decreasing from 12 to 6 cm. Results from this study indicate that SNODAS can provide reliable data for input to moderate-scale to large-scale hydrologic models, which are essential for creating accurate runoff forecasts. Refinement of SNODAS SWE estimates for alpine areas to account for wind redistribution of snow could further improve model performance. Published 2011. This article is a US Government work and is in the public domain in the USA.

  10. Understanding snow-transport processes shaping the mountain snow-cover

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Mott

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Mountain snow-cover is normally heterogeneously distributed due to wind and precipitation interacting with the snow cover on various scales. The aim of this study was to investigate snow deposition and wind-induced snow-transport processes on different scales and to analyze some major drift events caused by north-west storms during two consecutive accumulation periods. In particular, we distinguish between the individual processes that cause specific drifts using a physically based model approach. Very high resolution wind fields (5 m were computed with the atmospheric model Advanced Regional Prediction System (ARPS and used as input for a model of snow-surface processes (Alpine3D to calculate saltation, suspension and preferential deposition of precipitation. Several flow features during north-west storms were identified with input from a high-density network of permanent and mobile weather stations and indirect estimations of wind directions from snow-surface structures, such as snow dunes and sastrugis. We also used Terrestrial and Airborne Laser Scanning measurements to investigate snow-deposition patterns and to validate the model. The model results suggest that the in-slope deposition patterns, particularly two huge cross-slope cornice-like drifts, developed only when the prevailing wind direction was northwesterly and were formed mainly due to snow redistribution processes (saltation-driven. In contrast, more homogeneous deposition patterns on a ridge scale were formed during the same periods mainly due to preferential deposition of precipitation. The numerical analysis showed that snow-transport processes were sensitive to the changing topography due to the smoothing effect of the snow cover.

  11. 微波辅助合成镍铁尖晶石纳米片晶%FORMATION OF NANOSIZED NICKEL FERRITE PLATE-LIKE CRYSTAL ASSISTED WITH MICROWAVE RADIATION

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张磊; 焦万丽

    2008-01-01

    以FeSO4·7H2O,NiSO4·6H2O和NaOH为反应物,充分研磨后经微波辐射和常规热处理分别制得NiFe2O4纳米粉体.通过X射线衍射和扫描电镜分析了粉体的相结构和形貌,并分析了微波作用与NiFe2O4形成的关系.结果表明:在热处理过程中存在的Na2SO4熔盐作为模板使得NiFe2O4晶粒呈片状,而采用微波技术可以快速地获得粒径分布均匀的单相NiFe2O4纳米片晶.由于NiFe2O4是一种磁性介电材料,在低温下,其磁偶极子易与微波发生相互作用,从而可以有效地解决存在于常规低温固相反应中的热控问题.%Two types of nickel ferrite nanopowder were prepared by the solid state method using microwave radiation or general heating of the precursor synthesized using FeSO4·7H2O, NiSO4·6H2O and NaOH as reactants by grinding. The phase structure and morphology of the powder were analyzed by X-ray diffraction and scanning electron microscopy. The mechanism of NiFe2O4 cou-pling to microwaves was analyzed. The results show that NiFe2O4 plate-like particles can be obtained by the product of Na2SO4 melt as template during the microwave treatment to make the NiFe2O4 crystal grow in the form of a plate. It is a single phase NiFe2O4 nano-sized plate-like crystal with uniform particle size. Because NiFe2O4 is a magnetic spinel dielectric material, at lower tempera-tures, the relation of the initial coupling to microwaves occurs easily by the magnetic dipoles, and it effectively solves the heat con-trolling problem that exists in low temperature solid state reactions.

  12. Quantification of uncertainties in snow accumulation, snowmelt, and snow disappearance dates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raleigh, Mark S.

    Seasonal mountain snowpack holds hydrologic and ecologic significance worldwide. However, observation networks in complex terrain are typically sparse and provide minimal information about prevailing conditions. Snow patterns and processes in this data sparse environment can be characterized with numerical models and satellite-based remote sensing, and thus it is essential to understand their reliability. This research quantifies model and remote sensing uncertainties in snow accumulation, snowmelt, and snow disappearance as revealed through comparisons with unique ground-based measurements. The relationship between snow accumulation uncertainty and model configuration is assessed through a controlled experiment at 154 snow pillow sites in the western United States. To simulate snow water equivalent (SWE), the National Weather Service SNOW-17 model is tested as (1) a traditional "forward" model based primarily on precipitation, (2) a reconstruction model based on total snowmelt before the snow disappearance date, and (3) a combination of (1) and (2). For peak SWE estimation, the reliability of the parent models was indistinguishable, while the combined model was most reliable. A sensitivity analysis demonstrated that the parent models had opposite sensitivities to temperature that tended to cancel in the combined model. Uncertainty in model forcing and parameters significantly controlled model accuracy. Uncertainty in remotely sensed snow cover and snow disappearance in forested areas is enhanced by canopy obstruction but has been ill-quantified due to the lack of sub-canopy observations. To better quantify this uncertainty, dense networks of near-surface temperature sensors were installed at four study areas (≤ 1 km2) with varying forest cover in the Sierra Nevada, California. Snow presence at each sensor was detected during periods when temperature was damped, which resulted from snow cover insulation. This methodology was verified using time-lapse analysis and

  13. Phase field modeling of dendritic coarsening during isothermal

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhang Yutuo

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Dendritic coarsening in Al-2mol%Si alloy during isothermal solidification at 880K was investigated by phase field modeling. Three coarsening mechanisms operate in the alloy: (a melting of small dendrite arms; (b coalescence of dendrites near the tips leading to the entrapment of liquid droplets; (c smoothing of dendrites. Dendrite melting is found to be dominant in the stage of dendritic growth, whereas coalescence of dendrites and smoothing of dendrites are dominant during isothermal holding. The simulated results provide a better understanding of dendrite coarsening during isothermal solidification.

  14. Snow measurement system for airborne snow surveys (GPR system from helicopter) in high mountian areas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sorteberg, Hilleborg K.

    2010-05-01

    In the hydropower industry, it is important to have precise information about snow deposits at all times, to allow for effective planning and optimal use of the water. In Norway, it is common to measure snow density using a manual method, i.e. the depth and weight of the snow is measured. In recent years, radar measurements have been taken from snowmobiles; however, few energy supply companies use this method operatively - it has mostly been used in connection with research projects. Agder Energi is the first Norwegian power producer in using radar tecnology from helicopter in monitoring mountain snow levels. Measurement accuracy is crucial when obtaining input data for snow reservoir estimates. Radar screening by helicopter makes remote areas more easily accessible and provides larger quantities of data than traditional ground level measurement methods. In order to draw up a snow survey system, it is assumed as a basis that the snow distribution is influenced by vegetation, climate and topography. In order to take these factors into consideration, a snow survey system for fields in high mountain areas has been designed in which the data collection is carried out by following the lines of a grid system. The lines of this grid system is placed in order to effectively capture the distribution of elevation, x-coordinates, y-coordinates, aspect, slope and curvature in the field. Variation in climatic conditions are also captured better when using a grid, and dominant weather patterns will largely be captured in this measurement system.

  15. Snow Monitoring Using Remote Sensing Data: Modification of Normalized Difference Snow Index

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaplan, G.; Avdan, U.

    2016-12-01

    Snow cover is an important part of the Earth`s climate system so its continuous monitoring is necessary to map snow cover in high resolution. Satellite remote sensing can successfully fetch land cover and land cover changes. Although normalized difference snow index NDSI has quite good accuracy, topography shadow, water bodies and clouds can be easily misplaced as snow. Using Landsat TM, +ETM and TIRS/OLI satellite images, the NDSI was modified for more accurate snow mapping. In this paper, elimination of the misplaced water bodies was made using the high reflectance of the snow in the blue band. Afterwards, the modified NDSI (MNDSI) was used for estimating snow cover through the years on the highest mountains in Republic of Macedonia. The results from this study show that the MNDSI accuracy is bigger than the NDSI`s, totally eliminating the misplaced water bodies, and partly the one caused from topography and clouds. Also, it was noticed that the snow cover in the study area has been lowered through the years. For future studies, the MNDSI should be validated on different study areas with different characteristics.

  16. A blending snow cover data base on MODIS and AMSR-E snow cover in Qinghai-Tibet Plateau

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiaohua, H.; Wang, J.; Che, T.; Dai, L. Y.

    2012-04-01

    The algorithms of MODIS Terra and MODIS Aqua versions of the snow products have been developed by the NASA National Snow and Ice Data Center (NSIDC). The MODIS global snow-cover products have been available through the NSIDC Distributed Active Archive Center (DAAC) since February 24, 2000 to Terra and July 4, 2002 to Aqua. The MODIS snow-cover maps represent a potential improvement relative to hemispheric-scale snow maps that are available today mainly because of the improved spatial resolution and snow/cloud discrimination capabilities of MODIS, and the frequent global coverage. In China, the snow distribution is different to other regions. Their accuracy on Qinghai-Tibet Plateau (QTP), however, has not yet been established. There are some drawbacks about NSIDC global snow cover products on QTP: 1. The characteristics of snow depth distribution on QTP: Thin, discontinuous. Our research indicated the MODIS snow-cover products underestimated the snow cover area in QTP. 2. The daily snow cover product from MODIS-Terra and Aqua can include the data gaps. 3. The snow products can separate snow from most obscuring clouds. However, there are still many cloud pixels in daily snow cover products. The study developed a new blending daily snow cover algorithm through improving the NSIDC snow algorithms and combining MODIS and AMSR-E data in QTP. The new snow cover products will provide daily snow cover at 500-m resolution in QTP. The new snow cover algorithm employs a grouped-criteria technique using the Normalized Difference Snow Index (NDSI) and other spectral threshold tests and image fusion technology to identify and classify snow on a pixel-by-pixel basis. The usefulness of the NDSI is based on the fact that snow and ice are considerably more reflective in the visible than in the shortwave IR part of the spectrum, and the reflectance of most clouds remains high in the short-wave IR, while the reflectance of snow is low. We propose a set of three steps, based on a

  17. The Importance of Snow Distribution on Sea Ice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Butler, B.; Polashenski, C.; Divine, D.; King, J.; Liston, G. E.; Nicolaus, M.; Rösel, A.

    2015-12-01

    Snow's insulating and reflective properties substantially influence Arctic sea ice growth and decay. A particularly important, but under-appreciated, aspect of snow on sea ice is its fine-scale spatial distribution. Snow redistribution into dunes and drifts controls the effective thermal conductivity of a snowpack and dictates the locations of melt pond formation, exerting considerable control over ice mass balance. The effective thermal conductivity of snow distributions created on sea ice, for example, is often considerably greater than a uniform snowpack of equivalent mean thickness. During the N-ICE 2015 campaign north of Svalbard, we studied snow distributions across multiple ice types and the impacts these have on thermal fluxes and ice mass balance. We used terrestrial LiDAR to observe the snow surface topography over km2 areas, conducted many thousands of manual snow depth measurements, and collected hundreds of observations of the snow physical properties in snow pits. We find that the wind driven redistribution of snow can alter the net effect of a constant snow cover volume on ice mass balance as strongly as inter-annual variability in the amount and timing of snowfall. Further comparison with snow depth distributions from field campaigns in other parts of the Arctic highlights regional and inter-annual differences in snow distribution. We quantify the impact of this variability on ice mass balance and demonstrate the need for considering snow distributions and redistribution processes in sea ice models.

  18. A snow cover climatology for the Pyrenees from MODIS snow products

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gascoin, S.; Hagolle, O.; Huc, M.; Jarlan, L.; Dejoux, J.-F.; Szczypta, C.; Marti, R.; Sanchez, R.

    2015-05-01

    The seasonal snow in the Pyrenees is critical for hydropower production, crop irrigation and tourism in France, Spain and Andorra. Complementary to in situ observations, satellite remote sensing is useful to monitor the effect of climate on the snow dynamics. The MODIS daily snow products (Terra/MOD10A1 and Aqua/MYD10A1) are widely used to generate snow cover climatologies, yet it is preferable to assess their accuracies prior to their use. Here, we use both in situ snow observations and remote sensing data to evaluate the MODIS snow products in the Pyrenees. First, we compare the MODIS products to in situ snow depth (SD) and snow water equivalent (SWE) measurements. We estimate the values of the SWE and SD best detection thresholds to 40 mm water equivalent (w.e.) and 150 mm, respectively, for both MOD10A1 and MYD10A1. κ coefficients are within 0.74 and 0.92 depending on the product and the variable for these thresholds. However, we also find a seasonal trend in the optimal SWE and SD thresholds, reflecting the hysteresis in the relationship between the depth of the snowpack (or SWE) and its extent within a MODIS pixel. Then, a set of Landsat images is used to validate MOD10A1 and MYD10A1 for 157 dates between 2002 and 2010. The resulting accuracies are 97% (κ = 0.85) for MOD10A1 and 96% (κ = 0.81) for MYD10A1, which indicates a good agreement between both data sets. The effect of vegetation on the results is analyzed by filtering the forested areas using a land cover map. As expected, the accuracies decrease over the forests but the agreement remains acceptable (MOD10A1: 96%, κ = 0.77; MYD10A1: 95%, κ = 0.67). We conclude that MODIS snow products have a sufficient accuracy for hydroclimate studies at the scale of the Pyrenees range. Using a gap-filling algorithm we generate a consistent snow cover climatology, which allows us to compute the mean monthly snow cover duration per elevation band and aspect classes. There is snow on the ground at least 50% of the

  19. Uncertainty in alpine snow mass balance simulations due to snow model parameterisation and windflow representation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Musselman, K. N.; Pomeroy, J. W.; Essery, R.; Leroux, N.

    2013-12-01

    Despite advances in alpine snow modelling there remain two fundamental areas of divergent scientific thought in estimating alpine snow mass balances: i) blowing snow sublimation losses, and ii) wind flow representation. Sublimation calculations have poorly understood humidity feedbacks that vary considerably and mathematical representations of alpine windflow vary in complexity - these differences introduce uncertainty. To better estimate and restrain this uncertainty, a variety of physically based, spatially distributed snowmelt models that consider the physics of wind redistribution and sublimation of blowing snow were evaluated for their ability to simulate seasonal snow distribution and melt patterns in a windy alpine environment in the Canadian Rockies. The primary difference in the snow models was their calculation of blowing snow sublimation losses which ranged from large to small estimates. To examine the uncertainty introduced by windflow calculations on the snow model simulations, each model was forced with output from windflow models of varying computational complexity and physical realism from a terrain-based empirical interpolation of station observations to a simple turbulence model to a computational fluid dynamics model that solves for the Navier-Stokes equations. The high-resolution snow simulations were run over a 1 km2 spatial extent centred on a ridgetop meteorological station within the Marmot Creek Research basin, Alberta, Canada. The three windflow simulations all produced reasonable results compared to wind speeds measured on two opposing slopes (bias better than ×0.3 m s-1; RMSE errors were greatest when forced with output from the empirical wind model and smallest using output from either of the two turbulence models. Simulations with higher blowing snow sublimation rates tended to better match measured SWE at multiple scales, confirming that alpine blowing snow sublimation is an important component of the snow mass balance in this region

  20. Dendritic cells and contact dermatitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sasaki, Yoshinori; Aiba, Setsuya

    2007-10-01

    Contact dermatitis is a biological response to simple chemicals in the skin. Although it is well known that allergic contact dermatitis is mediated by the immune system, it is still uncertain whether it is a kind of protective response or it is simply an unnecessary response. We have demonstrated the following: (1) haptens activate Langerhans cells in the initiation phase of murine allergic contact dermatitis in vivo, (2) haptens activate human monocyte-derived dendritic cells in vitro, (3) the activation of dendritic cells by haptens is primarily mediated by the activation of p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK), and (4) the activation of p38 MAPK is mediated by stimulation related to an imbalance of intracellular redox. Based on these observations, we will discuss the biological significance of contact dermatitis. In addition, we will review some up-to-date findings on Langerhans cell biology.

  1. Lipid dynamics at dendritic spines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dotti, Carlos Gerardo; Esteban, Jose Antonio; Ledesma, María Dolores

    2014-01-01

    Dynamic changes in the structure and composition of the membrane protrusions forming dendritic spines underlie memory and learning processes. In recent years a great effort has been made to characterize in detail the protein machinery that controls spine plasticity. However, we know much less about the involvement of lipids, despite being major membrane components and structure determinants. Moreover, protein complexes that regulate spine plasticity depend on specific interactions with membrane lipids for proper function and accurate intracellular signaling. In this review we gather information available on the lipid composition at dendritic spine membranes and on its dynamics. We pay particular attention to the influence that spine lipid dynamism has on glutamate receptors, which are key regulators of synaptic plasticity.

  2. Data sets for snow cover monitoring and modelling from the National Snow and Ice Data Center

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holm, M.; Daniels, K.; Scott, D.; McLean, B.; Weaver, R.

    2003-04-01

    A wide range of snow cover monitoring and modelling data sets are pending or are currently available from the National Snow and Ice Data Center (NSIDC). In-situ observations support validation experiments that enhance the accuracy of remote sensing data. In addition, remote sensing data are available in near-real time, providing coarse-resolution snow monitoring capability. Time series data beginning in 1966 are valuable for modelling efforts. NSIDC holdings include SMMR and SSM/I snow cover data, MODIS snow cover extent products, in-situ and satellite data collected for NASA's recent Cold Land Processes Experiment, and soon-to-be-released ASMR-E passive microwave products. The AMSR-E and MODIS sensors are part of NASA's Earth Observing System flying on the Terra and Aqua satellites Characteristics of these NSIDC-held data sets, appropriateness of products for specific applications, and data set access and availability will be presented.

  3. Estimating maritime snow density from seasonal climate variables

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bormann, K. J.; Evans, J. P.; Westra, S.; McCabe, M. F.; Painter, T. H.

    2013-12-01

    Snow density is a complex parameter that influences thermal, optical and mechanical snow properties and processes. Depth-integrated properties of snowpacks, including snow density, remain very difficult to obtain remotely. Observations of snow density are therefore limited to in-situ point locations. In maritime snowfields such as those in Australia and in parts of the western US, snow densification rates are enhanced and inter-annual variability is high compared to continental snow regions. In-situ snow observation networks in maritime climates often cannot characterise the variability in snowpack properties at spatial and temporal resolutions required for many modelling and observations-based applications. Regionalised density-time curves are commonly used to approximate snow densities over broad areas. However, these relationships have limited spatial applicability and do not allow for interannual variability in densification rates, which are important in maritime environments. Physically-based density models are relatively complex and rely on empirical algorithms derived from limited observations, which may not represent the variability observed in maritime snow. In this study, seasonal climate factors were used to estimate late season snow densities using multiple linear regressions. Daily snow density estimates were then obtained by projecting linearly to fresh snow densities at the start of the season. When applied spatially, the daily snow density fields compare well to in-situ observations across multiple sites in Australia, and provide a new method for extrapolating existing snow density datasets in maritime snow environments. While the relatively simple algorithm for estimating snow densities has been used in this study to constrain snowmelt rates in a temperature-index model, the estimates may also be used to incorporate variability in snow depth to snow water equivalent conversion.

  4. Microtubules in Dendritic Spine Development

    OpenAIRE

    2008-01-01

    It is generally believed that only the actin cytoskeleton resides in dendritic spines and controls spine morphology and plasticity. Here we report that microtubules (MTs) are present in spines and that shRNA knockdown of the MT-plus end binding protein EB3 significantly reduces spine formation. Furthermore, stabilization and inhibition of MTs by low doses of taxol and nocodazole enhance and impair spine formation elicited by BDNF, respectively. Therefore, MTs play an important role in the con...

  5. Melanoma immunotherapy: dendritic cell vaccines

    OpenAIRE

    Lozada-Requena, Ivan; Laboratorios de Inmunología #108, Laboratorio de investigación y Desarrollo, Facultad de Ciencieas y Filosofía, Universidad Cayetano Heredia. Lima, Perú Empresa de Investigación y Desarrollo en Cáncer (EMINDES) SAC. Lima, Perú.; Núñez, César; Empresa de Investigación y Desarrollo en Cáncer (EMINDES) SAC. Lima, Perú.; Aguilar, José Luis; Laboratorios de Inmunología #108, Laboratorio de investigación y Desarrollo, Facultad de Ciencieas y Filosofía, Universidad Cayetano Heredia. Lima, Perú.

    2015-01-01

    This is a narrative review that shows accessible information to the scientific community about melanoma and immunotherapy.Dendritic cells have the ability to participate in innate and adaptive immunity, but are not unfamiliar to the immune evasion oftumors. Knowing the biology and role has led to generate in vitro several prospects of autologous cell vaccines against diversetypes of cancer in humans and animal models. However, given the low efficiency they have shown, we must implementstrateg...

  6. Development of Dendritic Cell System

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LiWu; AleksandarDakic

    2004-01-01

    The dendritic cell system contains conventional dendritic cells (DCs) and plasmacytoid pre-dendritic cells (pDCs). Both DCs and pDCs are bone marrow derived calls. Although the common functions of DCs are antigen-processing and T-lymphocyte activation, they differ in surface markers, migratory patterns, and cytokine output. These differences can determine the fate of the T cells they activate. Several subsets of mature DCs have been described in both mouse and human and the developmental processes of these specialized DC subsets have been studied extensively. The original concept that all DCs were of myeloid origin was questioned by several recent studies, which demonstrated that in addition to the DCs derived from myeloid precursors, some DCs could also be efficiently generated from lymphoid-restricted precursors. Moreover, it has been shown recently that both conventional DCs and pDCs can be generated by the Fit3 expressing hemopoietic progenitors regardless of their myeloid- or lymphoid-origin. These findings suggest an early developmental flexibility of precursors for DCs and pDCs. This review summarizes some recent observations on the development of DC system in both human and mouse. Cellular & Molecular Immunology. 2004;1(2):112-118.

  7. Development of Dendritic Cell System

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Li Wu; Aleksandar Dakic

    2004-01-01

    The dendritic cell system contains conventional dendritic cells (DCs) and plasmacytoid pre-dendritic cells (pDCs). Both DCs and pDCs are bone marrow derived cells. Although the common functions of DCs are antigen-processing and T-lymphocyte activation, they differ in surface markers, migratory patterns, and cytokine output. These differences can determine the fate of the T cells they activate. Several subsets of mature DCs have been described in both mouse and human and the developmental processes of these specialized DC subsets have been studied extensively. The original concept that all DCs were of myeloid origin was questioned by several recent studies, which demonstrated that in addition to the DCs derived from myeloid precursors,some DCs could also be efficiently generated from lymphoid-restricted precursors. Moreover, it has been shown recently that both conventional DCs and pDCs can be generated by the Flt3 expressing hemopoietic progenitors regardless of their myeloid- or lymphoid-origin. These findings suggest an early developmental flexibility of precursors for DCs and pDCs. This review summarizes some recent observations on the development of DC system in both human and mouse.

  8. Spring Snow Depth on Arctic Sea Ice using the IceBridge Snow Depth Product (Invited)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Webster, M.; Rigor, I. G.; Nghiem, S. V.; Kurtz, N. T.; Farrell, S. L.

    2013-12-01

    Snow has dual roles in the growth and decay of Arctic sea ice. In winter, it insulates sea ice from colder air temperatures, slowing its growth. From spring into summer, the albedo of snow determines how much insolation is transmitted through the sea ice and into the underlying ocean, ultimately impacting the progression of the summer ice melt. Knowing the snow thickness and distribution are essential for understanding and modeling sea ice thermodynamics and the surface heat budget. Therefore, an accurate assessment of the snow cover is necessary for identifying its impacts in the changing Arctic. This study assesses springtime snow conditions on Arctic sea ice using airborne snow thickness measurements from Operation IceBridge (2009-2012). The 2012 data were validated with coordinated in situ measurements taken in March 2012 during the BRomine, Ozone, and Mercury EXperiment field campaign. We find a statistically significant correlation coefficient of 0.59 and RMS error of 5.8 cm. The comparison between the IceBridge snow thickness product and the 1937, 1954-1991 Soviet drifting ice station data suggests that the snow cover has thinned by 33% in the western Arctic and 44% in the Beaufort and Chukchi Seas. A rudimentary estimation shows that a thinner snow cover in the Beaufort and Chukchi Seas translates to a mid-December surface heat flux as high as 81 W/m2 compared to 32 W/m2. The relationship between the 2009-2012 thinner snow depth distribution and later sea ice freeze-up is statistically significant, with a correlation coefficient of 0.59. These results may help us better understand the surface energy budget in the changing Arctic, and may improve our ability to predict the future state of the sea ice cover.

  9. Progress in Research of Electromagnetic Acoustic Transducer Technique for the Plate-Like Structure Defect Detection%板状结构缺陷电磁超声导波检测技术研究进展

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘燕; 王悦民; 孙丰瑞; 申传俊

    2012-01-01

    The recent research advances in Electromagnetic Acoustic Transducer technique for the plate-ike structure defect detection were reviewed. An important introduction about progresses in Electromagnetic Acoustic Transducer Technique for the plate-like structure defect detection was given including lamb wave generation with EMAT, design and optimization of EMAT, ultrasonic guided wave focusing technique and imaging technique. Some direction or issues which should be further researched and its benefit for this technique to be popularized and applied were put out also.%概述了国内外板状结构缺陷电磁超声导波检测技术的研究进展。从激发兰姆波的电磁超声换能器(EMAT)技术、EMAT的优化设计、超声导波聚焦、EMAT接收信号超声波成像技术等方面,对板状结构缺陷无损检测技术取得的突破进行了评述。提出了有待进一步解决的问题。

  10. Modeling the snow cover in climate studies: 2. The sensitivity to internal snow parameters and interface processes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loth, Bettina; Graf, Hans-F.

    1998-05-01

    In order to find an optimal complexity for snow-cover models in climate studies, the influence of single snow processes on both the snow mass balance and the energy fluxes between snow surface and atmosphere has been investigated. Using a sophisticated model, experiments were performed under several different atmospheric and regional conditions (Arctic, midlatitudes, alpine regions). A high simulation quality can be achieved with a multilayered snow-cover model resolving the internal snow processes (cf. part 1,[Loth and Graf, this issue]). Otherwise, large errors can occur, mostly in zones which are of paramount importance for the entire climate dynamics. Owing to simplifications of such a model, the mean energy balance of the snow cover, the turbulent heat fluxes, and the long-wave radiation at the snow surface may alter by between 1 W/m2 and 8 W/m2. The snow-surface temperatures can be systematically changed by about 10 K.

  11. Dendritic web silicon for solar cell application

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seidensticker, R. G.

    1977-01-01

    The dendritic web process for growing long thin ribbon crystals of silicon and other semiconductors is described. Growth is initiated from a thin wirelike dendrite seed which is brought into contact with the melt surface. Initially, the seed grows laterally to form a button at the melt surface; when the seed is withdrawn, needlelike dendrites propagate from each end of the button into the melt, and the web portion of the crystal is formed by the solidification of the liquid film supported by the button and the bounding dendrites. Apparatus used for dendritic web growth, material characteristics, and the two distinctly different mechanisms involved in the growth of a single crystal are examined. The performance of solar cells fabricated from dendritic web material is indistinguishable from the performance of cells fabricated from Czochralski grown material.

  12. Active dendrites enhance neuronal dynamic range.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leonardo L Gollo

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available Since the first experimental evidences of active conductances in dendrites, most neurons have been shown to exhibit dendritic excitability through the expression of a variety of voltage-gated ion channels. However, despite experimental and theoretical efforts undertaken in the past decades, the role of this excitability for some kind of dendritic computation has remained elusive. Here we show that, owing to very general properties of excitable media, the average output of a model of an active dendritic tree is a highly non-linear function of its afferent rate, attaining extremely large dynamic ranges (above 50 dB. Moreover, the model yields double-sigmoid response functions as experimentally observed in retinal ganglion cells. We claim that enhancement of dynamic range is the primary functional role of active dendritic conductances. We predict that neurons with larger dendritic trees should have larger dynamic range and that blocking of active conductances should lead to a decrease in dynamic range.

  13. Transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) inhibits cortical dendrites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murphy, Sean C; Palmer, Lucy M; Nyffeler, Thomas; Müri, René M; Larkum, Matthew E

    2016-03-18

    One of the leading approaches to non-invasively treat a variety of brain disorders is transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS). However, despite its clinical prevalence, very little is known about the action of TMS at the cellular level let alone what effect it might have at the subcellular level (e.g. dendrites). Here, we examine the effect of single-pulse TMS on dendritic activity in layer 5 pyramidal neurons of the somatosensory cortex using an optical fiber imaging approach. We find that TMS causes GABAB-mediated inhibition of sensory-evoked dendritic Ca(2+) activity. We conclude that TMS directly activates fibers within the upper cortical layers that leads to the activation of dendrite-targeting inhibitory neurons which in turn suppress dendritic Ca(2+) activity. This result implies a specificity of TMS at the dendritic level that could in principle be exploited for investigating these structures non-invasively.

  14. Snow cover and soil moisture in mountains

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wever, N.; Lehning, M.

    2012-04-01

    Soil moisture is an important parameter of the climate system. It constrains evapotranspiration of plants and it functions as a storage of water, giving it an economic value, e.g. for agriculture. Furthermore, soil moisture is an important factor for predicting flood risk. In mountainous areas with a seasonal snow cover, the spatial distribution of snow depth is strongly influencing the spatial variation of soil moisture. To assess potential flooding situations during snow melt and rain on snow events in particular but for any heavy precipitation event in the mountains, it is important to understand the influence of the snow cover on soil status with respect to liquid and solid water. Only if this is known, the reaction of the soil i.e. amount of runoff, storage or melt, on additional water input can be assessed. For an operational assessment of the soil moisture state in the Swiss Alps at 140 measurement sites for snow and avalanche forecasting (IMIS network), the SNOWPACK model has been extended with a soil module, solving the Richards equation for the matrix flow. The modelling is validated with vertical profile measurements of soil moisture at meteorological stations in an Alpine catchment near Davos, Switzerland. It was found that the combination of a physical based snowpack model with a Richards equation solver seems to provide an adequate description of soil moisture fluctuations, especially in near surface layers. Soil moisture fluctuations, both measured and modelled, are strongly reduced when a snow cover is present. The measurements also revealed a strong increase in soil moisture, accompanied by a daily cycle in soil moisture during snow melt, extending down to 120cm depth. When soil properties from literature were assumed for the soil type in the vertical profile, the daily cycle in the model during snow melt was restricted mainly to the top layers, while observations show also a reaction in deeper layers. These observations are consistent with the

  15. Dendritic Cells, New Tools for Vaccination

    Science.gov (United States)

    2003-01-01

    Review Dendritic cells , new tools for vaccination Jesus Colino, Clifford M. Snapper * Department of Pathology, Uniformed Services University of the...2003 Éditions scientifiques et médicales Elsevier SAS. All rights reserved. Keywords: Vaccines; Immunotherapy; Dendritic cells 1. Introduction During...DATE 2003 2. REPORT TYPE 3. DATES COVERED 00-00-2003 to 00-00-2003 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Dendritic cells , new tools for vaccination 5a

  16. Satellite discrimination of snow/cloud surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crane, R. G.; Anderson, M. R.

    1984-01-01

    Differentiation between cloud cover and snow surfaces using remotely sensed data is complicated by the similarity of their radiative temperatures, and also by their similar reflectances at visible wavelengths. A method of cloud analysis over snow-covered regions is presented, using 1.51-1.63 micron data from an experimental sensor on board a U.S. Air Force Defense Meteorological Satellite Program platform. At these wavelengths, snow appears relatively 'black' while clouds are highly reflective. The spatial structure of the 1.51-1.63 micron reflectivity fields over a continuous snow surface are examined. Plots of mean reflectance against coefficients of variation for 4 x 4 pixel areas reveals a cluster of points have low reflectivity and low variability, corresponding to snow-covered (cloud free) areas, and a similar cluster with high reflectances corresponding to 100 per cent cloud cover. For the case of a single layered cloud, the radiances associated with partially filled fields of view are also inferred.

  17. John Snow: the first hired gun?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lilienfeld, D E

    2000-07-01

    The 1854 English cholera outbreak led to reform of Victorian public health legislation, including the Nuisances Removal and Diseases Prevention Act. The reforms threatened the closure of many factories whose fumes were considered hazardous to the public's health. The second witness to appear before the Parliamentary committee considering the reforms was Dr. John Snow. Snow testified on behalf of the manufacturers threatened by the reforms. He stated that the fumes from such establishments were not hazardous. He contended that the workers in these factories did not become ill as a result of their exposures, and therefore these fumes could not be a hazard to the general public's health. Snow also presented data from the 1854 cholera outbreak as the basis for his belief that epidemic diseases were transmitted by water, not air. Although the data concerned cholera, Snow extended the inference to all epidemic diseases. When the committee's report was published, The Lancet chastised Snow in a stinging editorial. Parliament subsequently revised the bill in favor of the manufacturers and passed it into law. The implications of this particular episode in the history of epidemiology are discussed.

  18. Invited commentary: the testimony of Dr. Snow.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vandenbroucke, J P

    2000-07-01

    This paper presents a commentary on the testimony delivered by Dr. John Snow before the British Parliamentary Committee in 1855. It is noted that in Snow's testimony was highlighted his extremely strong belief in germ theory and contagion and his consequent contempt for anything close to the rivaling theory that miasmatic emanations cause disease. Snow's unreasonableness may have been because he already held his germ theory and drinking water convictions before he made his observations. In addition, based on his published books it has become apparent that even his data analysis was guided by such preconceptions. Although Snow's opinion on germ theory created contemporaries, it is noted however, that Snow did not truly sway contemporary opinion, and his theories were not agreed as a complete breakthrough in the way that they are often presented as being in epidemiological textbooks. Overall, the fundamental problem with the miasma and contagion theories at the time was that both failed to answer certain questions, including transmission of diseases, development of diseases, and the issue of temporary carriers of causative germs.

  19. Assessment of Northern Hemisphere Snow Water Equivalent Datasets in ESA SnowPEx project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luojus, Kari; Pulliainen, Jouni; Cohen, Juval; Ikonen, Jaakko; Derksen, Chris; Mudryk, Lawrence; Nagler, Thomas; Bojkov, Bojan

    2016-04-01

    Reliable information on snow cover across the Northern Hemisphere and Arctic and sub-Arctic regions is needed for climate monitoring, for understanding the Arctic climate system, and for the evaluation of the role of snow cover and its feedback in climate models. In addition to being of significant interest for climatological investigations, reliable information on snow cover is of high value for the purpose of hydrological forecasting and numerical weather prediction. Terrestrial snow covers up to 50 million km² of the Northern Hemisphere in winter and is characterized by high spatial and temporal variability. Therefore satellite observations provide the best means for timely and complete observations of the global snow cover. There are a number of independent SWE products available that describe the snow conditions on multi-decadal and global scales. Some products are derived using satellite-based information while others rely on meteorological observations and modelling. What is common to practically all the existing hemispheric SWE products, is that their retrieval performance on hemispherical and multi-decadal scales are not accurately known. The purpose of the ESA funded SnowPEx project is to obtain a quantitative understanding of the uncertainty in satellite- as well as model-based SWE products through an internationally coordinated and consistent evaluation exercise. The currently available Northern Hemisphere wide satellite-based SWE datasets which were assessed include 1) the GlobSnow SWE, 2) the NASA Standard SWE, 3) NASA prototype and 4) NSIDC-SSM/I SWE products. The model-based datasets include: 5) the Global Land Data Assimilation System Version 2 (GLDAS-2) product 6) the European Centre for Medium-Range Forecasts Interim Land Reanalysis (ERA-I-Land) which uses a simple snow scheme 7) the Modern Era Retrospective Analysis for Research and Applications (MERRA) which uses an intermediate complexity snow scheme; and 8) SWE from the Crocus snow scheme, a

  20. Low Power Dendritic Computation for Wordspotting

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stephen Nease

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, we demonstrate how a network of dendrites can be used to build the state decoding block of a wordspotter similar to a Hidden Markov Model (HMM classifier structure. We present simulation and experimental data for a single line dendrite and also experimental results for a dendrite-based classifier structure. This work builds on previously demonstrated building blocks of a neural network: the channel, synapses and dendrites using CMOS circuits. These structures can be used for speech and pattern recognition. The computational efficiency of such a system is >10 MMACs/μW as compared to Digital Systems which perform 10 MMACs/mW.

  1. Neoplasms derived from plasmacytoid dendritic cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Facchetti, Fabio; Cigognetti, Marta; Fisogni, Simona; Rossi, Giuseppe; Lonardi, Silvia; Vermi, William

    2016-02-01

    Plasmacytoid dendritic cell neoplasms manifest in two clinically and pathologically distinct forms. The first variant is represented by nodular aggregates of clonally expanded plasmacytoid dendritic cells found in lymph nodes, skin, and bone marrow ('Mature plasmacytoid dendritic cells proliferation associated with myeloid neoplasms'). This entity is rare, although likely underestimated in incidence, and affects predominantly males. Almost invariably, it is associated with a myeloid neoplasm such as chronic myelomonocytic leukemia or other myeloid proliferations with monocytic differentiation. The concurrent myeloid neoplasm dominates the clinical pictures and guides treatment. The prognosis is usually dismal, but reflects the evolution of the associated myeloid leukemia rather than progressive expansion of plasmacytoid dendritic cells. A second form of plasmacytoid dendritic cells tumor has been recently reported and described as 'blastic plasmacytoid dendritic cell neoplasm'. In this tumor, which is characterized by a distinctive cutaneous and bone marrow tropism, proliferating cells derive from immediate CD4(+)CD56(+) precursors of plasmacytoid dendritic cells. The diagnosis of this form can be easily accomplished by immunohistochemistry, using a panel of plasmacytoid dendritic cells markers. The clinical course of blastic plasmacytoid dendritic cell neoplasm is characterized by a rapid progression to systemic disease via hematogenous dissemination. The genomic landscape of this entity is currently under intense investigation. Recurrent somatic mutations have been uncovered in different genes, a finding that may open important perspectives for precision medicine also for this rare, but highly aggressive leukemia.

  2. Simulation of Snow Processes Beneath a Boreal Scots Pine Canopy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Weiping; LUO Yong; XIA Kun; LIU Xin

    2008-01-01

    A physically-based multi-layer snow model Snow-Atmosphere-Soil-Transfer scheme (SAST) and a land surface model Biosphere-Atmosphere Transfer Scheme (BATS) were employed to investigate how boreal forests influence snow accumulation and ablation under the canopy. Mass balance and energetics of snow beneath a Scots pine canopy in Finland at different stages of the 2003-2004 and 2004-2005 snow seasons are analyzed. For the fairly dense Scots pine forest, drop-off of the canopy-intercepted snow contributes, in some cases, twice as much to the underlying snowpack as the direct throughfall of snow. During early winter snow melting, downward turbulent sensible and condensation heat fluxes play a dominant role together with downward net longwave radiation. In the final stage of snow ablation in middle spring, downward net all-wave radiation dominates the snow melting. Although the downward sensible heat flux is comparable to the net solar radiation during this period, evaporative cooling of the melting snow surface makes the turbulent heat flux weaker than net radiation. Sensitivities of snow processes to leaf area index (LAI) indicate that a denser canopy speeds up early winter snowmelt, but also suppresses melting later in the snow season. Higher LAI increases the interception of snowfall, therefore reduces snow accumulation under the canopy during the snow season; this effect and the enhancement of downward longwave radiation by denser foliage outweighs the increased attenuation of solar radiation, resulting in earlier snow ablation under a denser canopy. The difference in sensitivities to LAI in two snow seasons implies that the impact of canopy density on the underlying snowpack is modulated by interannual variations of climate regimes.

  3. Micrometeorological processes driving snow ablation in an Alpine catchment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Mott

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Mountain snow covers typically become patchy over the course of a melting season. The snow pattern during melt is mainly governed by the end of winter snow depth distribution and the local energy balance. The objective of this study is to investigate micrometeorological processes driving snow ablation in an Alpine catchment. For this purpose we combine a meteorological model (ARPS with a fully distributed energy balance model (Alpine3D. Turbulent fluxes above melting snow are further investigated by using data from eddy-correlation systems. We compare modelled snow ablation to measured ablation rates as obtained from a series of Terrestrial Laser Scanning campaigns covering a complete ablation season. The measured ablation rates indicate that the advection of sensible heat causes locally increased ablation rates at the upwind edges of the snow patches. The effect, however, appears to be active over rather short distances except for very strong wind conditions. Neglecting this effect, the model is able to capture the mean ablation rates for early ablation periods but strongly overestimates snow ablation once the fraction of snow coverage is below a critical value. While radiation dominates snow ablation early in the season, the turbulent flux contribution becomes important late in the season. Simulation results indicate that the air temperatures appear to overestimate the local air temperature above snow patches once the snow coverage is below a critical value. Measured turbulent fluxes support these findings by suggesting a stable internal boundary layer close to the snow surface causing a strong decrease of the sensible heat flux towards the snow cover. Thus, the existence of a stable internal boundary layer above a patchy snow cover exerts a dominant control on the timing and magnitude of snow ablation for patchy snow covers.

  4. Building a Cloud-based Global Snow Observatory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, X.; Coll, J. M.

    2016-12-01

    Snow covers some 40 percent of Earth's land masses year in and year out and constitutes a vitally important variable for the planet's climate, hydrology, and biosphere due to its high albedo and insulation. It affects atmospheric circulation patterns, permafrost, glacier mass balance, river discharge, and groundwater recharge (Dietz et al. 2015). Snow is also nature's igloo where species from microscopic fungi to 800-pound moose survive the winter each in its own way (Pauli et al. 2013; Petty et al. 2015). Many studies have found that snow in high elevation regions is particularly sensitive to global climate change and is considered as sentinel of change. For human beings, about one-sixth of the world's population depends on seasonal snow and glaciers for their water supply (Barnett et al. 2005) and more than 50% of mountainous areas have an essential or supportive role for downstream regions (Viviroli et al. 2007). Large snowstorms also have a major impact on society in terms of human life, economic loss, and disruption (Squires et al. 2014). Remote sensing provides a practical approach of monitoring global snow and ice cover change. Based on our comprehensive validation and assessment on MODIS snow products, we build a cloud-based Global Snow Observatory (GSO) using Google Earth Engine (GEE) to serve as a platform for global researchers and the general public to access, visualize, and analyze snow data and to build snowmelt runoff models for mountain watersheds. Specifically, we build the GSO to serve global MODIS daily snow cover data and their analyses through GEE on Google App Engine. The GSO provides users the functions of accessing and extracting cloud-gap-filled snow data and interactive snow cover change exploration. In addition to snow cover frequency (SCF), we also plan to develop several other snow cover parameters, including snow cover duration/days, snow cover onset dates, and snow cover melting dates, and to study the shift and trend of global snow

  5. Deriving Snow Cover Metrics for Alaska from MODIS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chuck Lindsay

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS daily snow cover products provide an opportunity for determining snow onset and melt dates across broad geographic regions; however, cloud cover and polar darkness are limiting factors at higher latitudes. This study presents snow onset and melt dates for Alaska, portions of western Canada and the Russian Far East derived from Terra MODIS snow cover daily 500 m grid data (MOD10A1 and evaluates our method for filling data gaps caused by clouds or polar darkness. Pixels classified as cloud or no data were reclassified by: spatial filtering using neighboring pixel values; temporal filtering using pixel values for days before/after cloud cover; and snow-cycle filtering based on a time series assessment of a pixel’s position within snow accumulation, cover or melt periods. During the 2012 snow year, these gap-filling methods reduced cloud pixels from 27.7% to 3.1%. A total of 12 metrics (e.g., date of first and last snow, date of persistent snow cover and periods of intermittence for each pixel were calculated by snow year. A comparison of MODIS-derived snow onset and melt dates with in situ observations from 244 weather stations generally showed an early bias in MODIS-derived dates and an effect of increasing cloudiness exacerbating bias. Our results show that mean regional duration of seasonal snow cover is 179–311 days/year and that snow cover is often intermittent, with 41% of the area experiencing ≥2 snow-covered periods during a snow season. Other regional-scale patterns in the timing of snow onset and melt are evident in the yearly 500 m gridded products publically available at http://static.gina.alaska.edu/NPS_products/MODIS_snow/.

  6. Snow Precipitation and Snow Cover Climatic Variability for the Period 1971–2009 in the Southwestern Italian Alps: The 2008–2009 Snow Season Case Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Simona Fratianni

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Snow cover greatly influences the climate in the Alpine region and is one of the most relevant parameters for the climate change analysis. Nevertheless, snow precipitation variability is a relatively underexplored field of research because of the lack of long-term, continuous and homogeneous time series. After a historical research aiming to recover continuous records, three high quality time series of snow precipitation and snow depth recorded in the southwestern Italian Alps were analyzed. The comparison between the climatological indices over the 30 years reference period 1971–2000 and the decade 2000–2009 outlined a general decrease in the amount of snow precipitation, and a shift in the seasonal distribution of the snow precipitation in the most recent period. In the analysis of the last decade snow seasons characteristics, the attention was focused on the heavy snowfalls that occurred in Piedmont during the 2008–2009 snow season: MODerate resolution Imager Spectroradiometer (MODIS snow cover products were used to evaluate snow cover extension at different times during the snow season, and the results were set in relation to the temperatures.

  7. Learn Mac OS X Snow Leopard

    CERN Document Server

    Meyers, Scott

    2009-01-01

    You're smart and savvy, but also busy. This comprehensive guide to Apple's Mac OS X 10.6, Snow Leopard, gives you everything you need to know to live a happy, productive Mac life. Learn Mac OS X Snow Leopard will have you up and connected lickity split. With a minimum of overhead and a maximum of useful information, you'll cover a lot of ground in the time it takes other books to get you plugged in. If this isn't your first experience with Mac OS X, skip right to the "What's New in Snow Leopard" sections. You may also find yourself using this book as a quick refresher course or a way

  8. Mac OS X Snow Leopard for dummies

    CERN Document Server

    LeVitus, Bob

    2010-01-01

    Get to know Snow Leopard and make the most of your Mac Snow Leopard has a few new tricks up its sleeve, so whether you're new to Mac or a longtime Mac-thusiast, Mac expert Bob LeVitus has tips you'll appreciate. Learn how to start up your Mac, get to know the Dock and Finder, work your way through windows and dialogs, and organize and manage files and folders. Open the book and find: How to navigate around the Finder, Dock, and desktop Tips for opening, closing, resizing, and moving windows Steps for keeping Snow Leopard organized How to back up your system with Time Machine® Troubleshooting a

  9. NORMALIZED DIFFERENCE SNOW INDEX SIMULATION FOR SNOW-COVER MAPPING IN FOREST BY GEOSAIL MODEL

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CAO Yun-gang; LIU Chuang

    2006-01-01

    The snow-cover mapping in forest area is always one of the difficult points for optical satellite remote sensing. To investigate reflectance variability and to improve the mapping of snow in forest area, GeoSail model was used to simulate the reflectance of a snow-covered forest. Using this model, the effects of varying canopy density, solar illumination and view geometry on the performance of the MODIS (Moderate-resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer)snow-cover mapping algorithm were investigated. The relationship between NDSI (Normalized Difference Snow Index), NDVI (Normalized Difference Vegetation Index) and snow fraction was discussed in detail. Results indicated that the weak performance would be achieved if fixed criteria were used for different regions especially in the complicated land cover components. Finally, some suggestions to MODIS SNOWMAP algorithm were put forward to improve snow mapping precision in forest area based on the simulation, for example, new criteria should be used in coniferous forest, that is, NDSI greater than 0.3 and NDVI greater than zero. Otherwise, a threshold on view zenith angle may be used in the criteria such as 45°.

  10. Arctic Snow Microstructure Experiment for the development of snow emission modelling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maslanka, William; Leppänen, Leena; Kontu, Anna; Sandells, Mel; Lemmetyinen, Juha; Schneebeli, Martin; Proksch, Martin; Matzl, Margret; Hannula, Henna-Reetta; Gurney, Robert

    2016-04-01

    The Arctic Snow Microstructure Experiment (ASMEx) took place in Sodankylä, Finland in the winters of 2013-2014 and 2014-2015. Radiometric, macro-, and microstructure measurements were made under different experimental conditions of homogenous snow slabs, extracted from the natural seasonal taiga snowpack. Traditional and modern measurement techniques were used for snow macro- and microstructure observations. Radiometric measurements of the microwave emission of snow on reflector and absorber bases were made at frequencies 18.7, 21.0, 36.5, 89.0, and 150.0 GHz, for both horizontal and vertical polarizations. Two measurement configurations were used for radiometric measurements: a reflecting surface and an absorbing base beneath the snow slabs. Simulations of brightness temperatures using two microwave emission models, the Helsinki University of Technology (HUT) snow emission model and Microwave Emission Model of Layered Snowpacks (MEMLS), were compared to observed brightness temperatures. RMSE and bias were calculated; with the RMSE and bias values being smallest upon an absorbing base at vertical polarization. Simulations overestimated the brightness temperatures on absorbing base cases at horizontal polarization. With the other experimental conditions, the biases were small, with the exception of the HUT model 36.5 GHz simulation, which produced an underestimation for the reflector base cases. This experiment provides a solid framework for future research on the extinction of microwave radiation inside snow.

  11. Linking snowfall and snow accumulation to generate spatial maps of SWE and snow depth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Broxton, Patrick D.; Dawson, Nicholas; Zeng, Xubin

    2016-06-01

    It is critically important but challenging to estimate the amount of snow on the ground over large areas due to its strong spatial variability. Point snow data are used to generate or improve (i.e., blend with) gridded estimates of snow water equivalent (SWE) by using various forms of interpolation; however, the interpolation methodologies often overlook the physical mechanisms for the snow being there in the first place. Using data from the Snow Telemetry and Cooperative Observer networks in the western United States, we show that four methods for the spatial interpolation of peak of winter snow water equivalent (SWE) and snow depth based on distance and elevation can result in large errors. These errors are reduced substantially by our new method, i.e., the spatial interpolation of these quantities normalized by accumulated snowfall from the current or previous water years. Our method results in significant improvement in SWE estimates over interpolation techniques that do not consider snowfall, regardless of the number of stations used for the interpolation. Furthermore, it can be used along with gridded precipitation and temperature data to produce daily maps of SWE over the western United States that are comparable to existing estimates (which are based on the assimilation of much more data). Our results also show that not honoring the constraint between SWE and snowfall when blending in situ data with gridded data can lead to the development and propagation of unrealistic errors.

  12. Thermal energy in dry snow avalanches

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steinkogler, W.; Sovilla, B.; Lehning, M.

    2015-09-01

    Avalanches can exhibit many different flow regimes from powder clouds to slush flows. Flow regimes are largely controlled by the properties of the snow released and entrained along the path. Recent investigations showed the temperature of the moving snow to be one of the most important factors controlling the mobility of the flow. The temperature of an avalanche is determined by the temperature of the released and entrained snow but also increases by frictional processes with time. For three artificially released avalanches, we conducted snow profiles along the avalanche track and in the deposition area, which allowed quantifying the temperature of the eroded snow layers. This data set allowed to calculate the thermal balance, from release to deposition, and to discuss the magnitudes of different sources of thermal energy of the avalanches. For the investigated dry avalanches, the thermal energy increase due to friction was mainly depending on the effective elevation drop of the mass of the avalanche with a warming of approximately 0.3 °C per 100 vertical metres. Contrarily, the temperature change due to entrainment varied for the individual avalanches, from -0.08 to 0.3 °C, and depended on the temperature of the snow along the path and the erosion depth. Infrared radiation thermography (IRT) was used to assess the surface temperature before, during and just after the avalanche with high spatial resolution. This data set allowed to identify the warmest temperatures to be located in the deposits of the dense core. Future research directions, especially for the application of IRT, in the field of thermal investigations in avalanche dynamics are discussed.

  13. Snow and ice blocking of tunnels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lia, Leif

    1998-12-31

    Hydroelectric power development in cold regions causes much concern about operational reliability and dam safety. This thesis studies the temperature distribution in tunnels by means of air temperature measurements in six tunnel spillways and five diversion tunnels. The measurements lasted for two consecutive winters. The air through flow tunnel is used as it causes cooling of both rock and water. In open spillway tunnels, frost reaches the entire tunnel. In spillway tunnels with walls, the frost zones reach about 100 m from the downstream end. In mildly-inclined diversion tunnels, a frost free zone is located in the middle of the tunnel and snow and ice problems were only observed in the inlet and outlet. Severe aufeis is accumulation is observed in the frost zones. The heat transfer from rock to air, water and ice is calculated and used in a prediction model for the calculation of aufeis build-up together with local field observation data. The water penetration of snow plugs is also calculated, based on the heat balance. It takes 20 to 50 days for water to enter the blocked tunnel. The empirical values are 30 to 60 days, but only 1 day if the temperature of the snow pack is 0{sup o}C. Sensitivity analyses are carried out for temperature variations in rock, snow, water and ice. Systematic field observation shows that it is important for hydropower companies to know about the effects of snow and ice blocking in an area. A risk analysis of dam safety is presented for a real case. Finally, the thesis proposes solutions which can reduce the snow and ice problems. 79 refs., 63 figs., 11 tabs.

  14. Thermal energy in dry snow avalanches

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    W. Steinkogler

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Avalanches can exhibit many different flow regimes from powder clouds to slush flows. Flow regimes are largely controlled by the properties of the snow released and entrained along the path. Recent investigations showed the temperature of the moving snow to be one of the most important factors controlling the mobility of the flow. The temperature of an avalanche is determined by the temperature of the released and entrained snow but also increases by frictional and collisional processes with time. For three artificially released avalanches, we conducted snow profiles along the avalanche track and in the deposition area, which allowed quantifying the temperature of the eroded snow layers. Infrared radiation thermography (IRT was used to assess the surface temperature before, during and just after the avalanche with high spatial resolution. This data set allowed to calculate the thermal balance, from release to deposition, and to discuss the magnitudes of different sources of thermal energy of the avalanches. We could confirm that, for the investigated dry avalanches, the thermal energy increase due to friction was mainly depending on the elevation drop of the avalanche with a warming of approximately 0.5 °C per 100 height meters. Contrary, warming due to entrainment was very specific to the individual avalanche and depended on the temperature of the snow along the path and the erosion depth ranging from nearly no warming to a maximum observed warming of 1 °C. Furthermore, we could observe the warmest temperatures are located in the deposits of the dense core. Future research directions, especially for the application of IRT, in the field of thermal investigations in avalanche dynamics are discussed.

  15. Monitoring and modelling snow avalanches in Svalbard

    Science.gov (United States)

    Humlum, O.; Christiansen, H.; Neumann, U.; Eckerstorfer, M.; Sjöblom, A.; Stalsberg, K.; Rubensdotter, L.

    2009-04-01

    Monitoring and modelling snow avalanches in Svalbard Ole Humlum 1,3, Hanne H. Christiansen 1, Ulrich Neumann 1, Markus Eckerstorfer 1, Anna Sjöblom 1, Knut Stalsberg 2 and Lena Rubensdotter 2. 1: The University Centre in Svalbard (UNIS). 2: Geological Survey of Norway (NGU) 3: University of Oslo Ground based transportation in Svalbard landscape all takes place across mountainous terrain affected by different geomorphological slope processes. Traffic in and around the Svalbard settlements is increasing, and at the same time global climate models project substantial increases in temperature and precipitation in northern high latitudes for coming century. Therefore improved knowledge on the effect of climatic changes on slope processes in such high arctic landscapes is becoming increasingly important. Motivated by this, the CRYOSLOPE Svalbard research project since 2007 has carried out field observations on snow avalanche frequency and associated meteorological conditions. Snow avalanches are important geomorphic agents of erosion and deposition, and have long been a source of natural disasters in many mid-latitude mountain areas. Avalanches as a natural hazard has thereby been familiar to inhabitants of the Alps and Scandinavia for centuries, while it is a more recent experience in high arctic Svalbard. In addition, overall climate, topography and especially high winter wind speeds makes it difficult to apply snow avalanche models (numerical or empirical) developed for use at lower latitudes, e.g. in central Europe. In the presentation we examplify results from the ongoing (since winter 2006-07) monitoring of snow avalanches in Svalbard along a 70 km long observational route in the mountains. In addition, we present observations on the geomorphological impact of avalanches, with special reference to the formation of rock glaciers. Finally, we also present some initial results from numerical attempts of snow avalanche risk modelling within the study area.

  16. Our sense of Snow: the myth of John Snow in medical geography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McLeod, K S

    2000-04-01

    In 1854, Dr. John Snow identified the Broad Street pump as the source of an intense cholera outbreak by plotting the location of cholera deaths on a dot-map. He had the pump handle removed and the outbreak ended...or so one version of the story goes. In medical geography, the story of Snow and the Broad Street cholera outbreak is a common example of the discipline in action. While authors in other health-related disciplines focus on Snow's "shoe-leather epidemiology", his development of a water-borne theory of cholera transmission, and/or his pioneering role in anaesthesia, it is the dot-map that makes him a hero in medical geography. The story forms part of our disciplinary identity. Geographers have helped to shape the Snow narrative: the map has become part of the myth. Many of the published accounts of Snow are accompanied by versions of the map, but which map did Snow use? What happens to the meaning of our story when the determinative use of the map is challenged? In his book On the Mode of Communication of Cholera (2nd ed., John Churchill, London, 1855), Snow did not write that he used a map to identify the source of the outbreak. The map that accompanies his text shows cholera deaths in Golden Square (the subdistrict of London's Soho district where the outbreak occurred) from August 19 to September 30, a period much longer than the intense outbreak. What happens to the meaning of the myth when the causal connection between the pump's disengagement and the end of the outbreak is examined? Snow's data and text do not support this link but show that the number of cholera deaths was abating before the handle was removed. With the drama of the pump handle being questioned and the map, our artifact, occupying a more illustrative than central role, what is our sense of Snow?

  17. Western Italian Alps Monthly Snowfall and Snow Cover Duration

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This data set consists of snow observations for 18 stations in the western Italian Alps. Two types of data are included: monthly snowfall amounts and monthly snow...

  18. Estonian Mean Snow Depth and Duration (1891-1994)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This data set contains the number of days of snow cover in days per year, and three 10-day snow depth means per month in centimeters from stations across Estonia....

  19. Russian Federation Snow Depth and Ice Crust Surveys

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Russian Federation Snow Depth and Ice Crust Surveys, dataset DSI-9808, contains routine snow surveys that run throughout the cold season every 10 days (every five...

  20. Snow in Time for the Solstice

    Science.gov (United States)

    2004-01-01

    In mid-December, the weather in eastern North America cooperated with the calendar, and a wintry blast from the Arctic delivered freezing cold air, blustery winds, and snow just in time for the Winter Solstice on December 21' the Northern Hemisphere's longest night of the year and the official start of winter. This image was captured by the Sea-viewing Wide Field-of-view Sensor (SeaWiFS) on December 20, 2004, the day after an Arctic storm dove down into the United States, bringing snow to New England (upper right of top image); the coastal mid-Atlantic, including Washington, D.C.; and the southern Appalachian Mountains in Tennessee and North Carolina. Over the Atlantic Ocean (image right), the fierce Arctic winds were raking the clouds into rows, like a gardener getting ready to plant the seeds of winter. The detailed close-up at the bottom of this image pair shows the cloud and snow patterns around Lake Ontario, illustrating the occurrence of 'lake-effect snow.' Areas in western upstate New York often get as much as fifteen feet or more of snow each year as cold air from Canada and the Arctic sweeps down over the relatively warm waters of Lakes Ontario and Erie. Cold air plus moisture from the lakes equals heavy snow. Since the wind generally blows from west to east, it is the 'downwind' cities like Buffalo and Rochester that receive the heaping helpings of snowfall, while cities on the upwind side of the lake, such as Toronto, receive much less. Unlike storms that begin with specific low-pressure systems in the Pacific Ocean and march eastward across the Pacific Northwest, the Rockies, the Great Plains, and sometimes the East, the lake-effect snows aren't tied to a specific atmospheric disturbance. They are more a function of geography, which means that the lakes can keep fueling snow storms for as long as they remain ice-free in early winter, as well as when they begin to thaw in late winter and early spring. Image courtesy the SeaWiFS Project, NASA

  1. Integration of snow management practices into a detailed snow pack model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spandre, Pierre; Morin, Samuel; Lafaysse, Matthieu; Lejeune, Yves; François, Hugues; George-Marcelpoil, Emmanuelle

    2016-04-01

    The management of snow on ski slopes is a key socio-economic and environmental issue in mountain regions. Indeed the winter sports industry has become a very competitive global market although this economy remains particularly sensitive to weather and snow conditions. The understanding and implementation of snow management in detailed snowpack models is a major step towards a more realistic assessment of the evolution of snow conditions in ski resorts concerning past, present and future climate conditions. Here we describe in a detailed manner the integration of snow management processes (grooming, snowmaking) into the snowpack model Crocus (Spandre et al., Cold Reg. Sci. Technol., in press). The effect of the tiller is explicitly taken into account and its effects on snow properties (density, snow microstructure) are simulated in addition to the compaction induced by the weight of the grooming machine. The production of snow in Crocus is carried out with respect to specific rules and current meteorological conditions. Model configurations and results are described in detail through sensitivity tests of the model of all parameters related to snow management processes. In-situ observations were carried out in four resorts in the French Alps during the 2014-2015 winter season considering for each resort natural, groomed only and groomed plus snowmaking conditions. The model provides realistic simulations of the snowpack properties with respect to these observations. The main uncertainty pertains to the efficiency of the snowmaking process. The observed ratio between the mass of machine-made snow on ski slopes and the water mass used for production was found to be lower than was expected from the literature, in every resort. The model now referred to as "Crocus-Resort" has been proven to provide realistic simulations of snow conditions on ski slopes and may be used for further investigations. Spandre, P., S. Morin, M. Lafaysse, Y. Lejeune, H. François and E. George

  2. Subgrid snow depth coefficient of variation within complex mountainous terrain

    OpenAIRE

    Sexstone, Graham A.; Fassnacht, Steven R.; López-Moreno, Juan Ignacio; Christopher A. Hiemstra

    2016-01-01

    Given the substantial variability of snow in complex mountainous terrain, a considerable challenge of coarse scale modeling applications is accurately representing the subgrid variability of snowpack properties. The snow depth coefficient of variation (CVds) is a useful metric for characterizing subgrid snow distributions but has not been well defined by a parameterization for mountainous environments. This study utilizes lidar-derived snow depth datasets from mountainous terrain in Colorado,...

  3. In vivo dendrite regeneration after injury is different from dendrite development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Tun; Jan, Lily Yeh; Jan, Yuh Nung

    2016-01-01

    Neurons receive information along dendrites and send signals along axons to synaptic contacts. The factors that control axon regeneration have been examined in many systems, but dendrite regeneration has been largely unexplored. Here we report that, in intact Drosophila larvae, a discrete injury that removes all dendrites induces robust dendritic growth that recreates many features of uninjured dendrites, including the number of dendrite branches that regenerate and responsiveness to sensory stimuli. However, the growth and patterning of injury-induced dendrites is significantly different from uninjured dendrites. We found that regenerated arbors cover much less territory than uninjured neurons, fail to avoid crossing over other branches from the same neuron, respond less strongly to mechanical stimuli, and are pruned precociously. Finally, silencing the electrical activity of the neurons specifically blocks injury-induced, but not developmental, dendrite growth. By elucidating the essential features of dendrites grown in response to acute injury, our work builds a framework for exploring dendrite regeneration in physiological and pathological conditions. PMID:27542831

  4. Drifting snow climate of the Antarctic and Greenland ice sheets

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lenaerts, J.T.M.

    2013-01-01

    This study presents the drifting snow climate of the Earth's ice sheets, Antarctica and Greenland. For that purpose we use a regional atmospheric climate model, RACMO2. We included a routine that is able to calculate the drifting snow fluxes and accounts for the interaction between drifting snow on

  5. Snow instability patterns at the scale of a small basin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reuter, Benjamin; Richter, Bettina; Schweizer, Jürg

    2016-02-01

    Spatial and temporal variations are inherent characteristics of the alpine snow cover. Spatial heterogeneity is supposed to control the avalanche release probability by either hindering extensive crack propagation or facilitating localized failure initiation. Though a link between spatial snow instability variations and meteorological forcing is anticipated, it has not been quantitatively shown yet. We recorded snow penetration resistance profiles with the snow micropenetrometer at an alpine field site during five field campaigns in Eastern Switzerland. For each of about 150 vertical profiles sampled per day a failure initiation criterion and the critical crack length were calculated. For both criteria we analyzed their spatial structure and predicted snow instability in the basin by external drift kriging. The regression models were based on terrain and snow depth data. Slope aspect was the most prominent driver, but significant covariates varied depending on the situation. Residual autocorrelation ranges were shorter than the ones of the terrain suggesting external influences possibly due to meteorological forcing. To explore the causes of the instability patterns we repeated the geostatistical analysis with snow cover model output as covariate data for one case. The observed variations of snow instability were related to variations in slab layer properties which were caused by preferential deposition of precipitation and differences in energy input at the snow surface during the formation period of the slab layers. Our results suggest that 3-D snow cover modeling allows reproducing some of the snow property variations related to snow instability, but in future work all relevant micrometeorological spatial interactions should be considered.

  6. Numerical simulation of drifting snow sublimation in the saltation layer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dai, Xiaoqing; Huang, Ning

    2014-10-14

    Snow sublimation is an important hydrological process and one of the main causes of the temporal and spatial variation of snow distribution. Compared with surface sublimation, drifting snow sublimation is more effective due to the greater surface exposure area of snow particles in the air. Previous studies of drifting snow sublimation have focused on suspended snow, and few have considered saltating snow, which is the main form of drifting snow. In this study, a numerical model is established to simulate the process of drifting snow sublimation in the saltation layer. The simulated results show 1) the average sublimation rate of drifting snow particles increases linearly with the friction velocity; 2) the sublimation rate gradient with the friction velocity increases with increases in the environmental temperature and the undersaturation of air; 3) when the friction velocity is less than 0.525 m/s, the snowdrift sublimation of saltating particles is greater than that of suspended particles; and 4) the snowdrift sublimation in the saltation layer is less than that of the suspended particles only when the friction velocity is greater than 0.625 m/s. Therefore, the drifting snow sublimation in the saltation layer constitutes a significant portion of the total snow sublimation.

  7. Drifting snow climate of the Antarctic and Greenland ice sheets

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lenaerts, J.T.M.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/314850163

    2013-01-01

    This study presents the drifting snow climate of the Earth's ice sheets, Antarctica and Greenland. For that purpose we use a regional atmospheric climate model, RACMO2. We included a routine that is able to calculate the drifting snow fluxes and accounts for the interaction between drifting snow on

  8. Changing images of John Snow in the history of epidemiology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vandenbroucke, J P

    2001-01-01

    Ever since the end of the 19th century, the story of John Snow and his investigations into the contagiousness of cholera has fascinated epidemiologists. Several different lessons have been extracted from the interpretation and reinterpretation of Snow's work--according to prevailing insights. The story of John Snow continues to evolve, even into the 21st century.

  9. Recrystallization phenomena of solution grown paraffin dendrites

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hollander, F.F.A.; Stasse, O.; Suchtelen, van J.; Enckevort, van W.J.P.

    2001-01-01

    Paraffin crystals were grown from decane solutions using a micro-Bridgman set up for in-situ observation of the morphology at the growth front. It is shown that for large imposed velocities, dendrites are obtained. After dendritic growth, aging or recrystallization processes set in rather quickly, c

  10. A Case of Plasmacytoid Dendritic Cell Leukemia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Köpeczi Judit Beáta

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Plasmacytoid dendritic cell leukemia is a rare subtype of acute leukemia, which has recently been established as a distinct pathologic entity that typically follows a highly aggressive clinical course in adults. The aim of this report is to present a case of plasmacytoid dendritic cell leukemia due to its rarity and difficulty to recognize and diagnose it.

  11. Early events in axon/dendrite polarization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Pei-lin; Poo, Mu-ming

    2012-01-01

    Differentiation of axons and dendrites is a critical step in neuronal development. Here we review the evidence that axon/dendrite formation during neuronal polarization depends on the intrinsic cytoplasmic asymmetry inherited by the postmitotic neuron, the exposure of the neuron to extracellular chemical factors, and the action of anisotropic mechanical forces imposed by the environment. To better delineate the functions of early signals among a myriad of cellular components that were shown to influence axon/dendrite formation, we discuss their functions by distinguishing their roles as determinants, mediators, or modulators and consider selective degradation of these components as a potential mechanism for axon/dendrite polarization. Finally, we examine whether these early events of axon/dendrite formation involve local autocatalytic activation and long-range inhibition, as postulated by Alan Turing for the morphogenesis of patterned biological structure.

  12. Numerical simulation of facet dendrite growth

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CHEN Zhi; CHEN Chang-le; HAO Li-mei

    2008-01-01

    Numerical simulation based on phase field method was performed to describe the solidification of silicon. The effect of anisotropy, undercooling and coupling parameter on dendrite growth shape was investigated. It is indicated that the entire facet dendrite shapes are obtained by using regularized phase field model. Steady state tip velocity of dendrite drives to a fixed value when γ≤0.13. With further increasing the anisotropy value, steady state tip velocity decreases and the size is smaller. With the increase in the undercooling and coupling parameter, crystal grows from facet to facet dendrite. In addition, with increasing coupling parameter, the facet part of facet dendrite decreases gradually, which is in good agreement with Wulff theory.

  13. Combining snow depth and innovative skier flow measurements in order to improve snow grooming techniques

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carmagnola, Carlo Maria; Albrecht, Stéphane; Hargoaa, Olivier

    2017-04-01

    In the last decades, ski resort managers have massively improved their snow management practices, in order to adapt their strategies to the inter-annual variability in snow conditions and to the effects of climate change. New real-time informations, such as snow depth measurements carried out on the ski slopes by grooming machines during their daily operations, have become available, allowing high saving, efficiency and optimization gains (reducing for instance the groomer fuel consumption and operation time and the need for machine-made snow production). In order to take a step forward in improving the grooming techniques, it would be necessary to keep into account also the snow erosion by skiers, which depends mostly on the snow surface properties and on the skier attendance. Today, however, most ski resort managers have only a vague idea of the evolution of the skier flows on each slope during the winter season. In this context, we have developed a new sensor (named Skiflux) able to measure the skier attendance using an infrared beam crossing the slopes. Ten Skiflux sensors have been deployed during the 2016/17 winter season at Val Thorens ski area (French Alps), covering a whole sector of the resort. A dedicated software showing the number of skier passages in real time as been developed as well. Combining this new Skiflux dataset with the snow depth measurements from grooming machines (Snowsat System) and the snow and meteorological conditions measured in-situ (Liberty System from Technoalpin), we were able to create a "real-time skiability index" accounting for the quality of the surface snow and its evolution during the day. Moreover, this new framework allowed us to improve the preparation of ski slopes, suggesting new strategies for adapting the grooming working schedule to the snow quality and the skier attendance. In the near future, this work will benefit from the advances made within the H2020 PROSNOW project ("Provision of a prediction system allowing

  14. "Snow Soup" Students Take on Animation Creation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nikirk, Martin

    2009-01-01

    This article describes the process of producing "Snow Soup"--the 2009 Adobe Flash animation produced by the Computer Game Development and Animation seniors of Washington County Technical High School in Hagerstown, Maryland, for libraries in their area. In addition to the Flash product, the students produced two related Game Maker games, a printed…

  15. Meltwater percolation and refreezing in compacting snow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meyer, Colin; Hewitt, Ian

    2016-11-01

    Meltwater is produced on the surface of glaciers and ice sheets when the seasonal surface energy forcing warms the ice above its melting temperature. This meltwater percolates through the porous snow matrix and potentially refreezes, thereby warming the surrounding ice by the release of latent heat. Here we model this process from first principles using a continuum model. We determine the internal ice temperature and glacier surface height based on the surface forcing and the accumulation of snow. When the surface temperature exceeds the melting temperature, we compute the amount of meltwater produced and lower the glacier surface accordingly. As the meltwater is produced, we solve for its percolation through the snow. Our model results in traveling regions of meltwater with sharp fronts where refreezing occurs. We also allow the snow to compact mechanically and we analyze the interplay of compaction with meltwater percolation. We compare these models to observations of the temperature and porosity structure of the surface of glaciers and ice sheets and find excellent agreement. Our models help constrain the role that meltwater percolation and refreezing will have on ice-sheet mass balance and hence sea level. Thanks to the 2016 WHOI GFD Program, which is supported by the National Science Foundation and the Office of Naval Research.

  16. "Snow Soup" Students Take on Animation Creation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nikirk, Martin

    2009-01-01

    This article describes the process of producing "Snow Soup"--the 2009 Adobe Flash animation produced by the Computer Game Development and Animation seniors of Washington County Technical High School in Hagerstown, Maryland, for libraries in their area. In addition to the Flash product, the students produced two related Game Maker games, a printed…

  17. The Snow Day: One Tough Call.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dewar, Randy L.

    2003-01-01

    Describes eight common mistakes that beginning superintendents make when deciding whether the weather forecasts for snow and ice will make roads hazardous enough to cancel schools. For example, delaying an obvious decision to cancel schools until the morning or passing the responsibility to someone else. Describes several elements of an inclement…

  18. The Life and Work of John Snow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Melville, Wayne; Fazio, Xavier

    2007-01-01

    Due to his work to determine how cholera was spread in the 18th century, John Snow (1813-1858) has been hailed as the father of modern epidemiology. This article presents an inquiry model based on his life and work, which teachers can use to develop a series of biology lessons involving the history and nature of science. The lessons presented use…

  19. Timely Tips for Safe Snow Removal

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... to stay warm and dry. A hat, thick socks and warm gloves or mittens will keep your hands dry and free of blisters. Shoes or boots should have traction or soles that are slip-resistant. Don't wait. Start clearing snow as ...

  20. The Life and Work of John Snow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Melville, Wayne; Fazio, Xavier

    2007-01-01

    Due to his work to determine how cholera was spread in the 18th century, John Snow (1813-1858) has been hailed as the father of modern epidemiology. This article presents an inquiry model based on his life and work, which teachers can use to develop a series of biology lessons involving the history and nature of science. The lessons presented use…

  1. An analysis of snow cover changes in the Himalayan region using MODIS snow products and in-situ temperature data

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Maskey, S.; Uhlenbrook, S.; Ojha, S.

    2011-01-01

    Amidst growing concerns over the melting of the Himalayas’ snow and glaciers, we strive to answer some of the questions related to snow cover changes in the Himalayan region covering Nepal and its vicinity using Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) snow cover products from 2000 to

  2. Variability of snow line elevation, snow cover area and depletion in the main Slovak basins in winters 2001–2014

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Krajčí Pavel

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Spatial and temporal variability of snow line (SL elevation, snow cover area (SCA and depletion (SCD in winters 2001–2014 is investigated in ten main Slovak river basins (the Western Carpathians. Daily satellite snow cover maps from MODIS Terra (MOD10A1, V005 and Aqua (MYD10A1, V005 with resolution 500 m are used.

  3. An analysis of snow cover changes in the Himalayan region using MODIS snow products and in-situ temperature data

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Maskey, S.; Uhlenbrook, S.; Ojha, S.

    2011-01-01

    Amidst growing concerns over the melting of the Himalayas’ snow and glaciers, we strive to answer some of the questions related to snow cover changes in the Himalayan region covering Nepal and its vicinity using Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) snow cover products from 2000 to 2

  4. Snow micro-structure at Kongsvegen glacier, Svalbard

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bilgeri, F.; Karner, F.; Steinkogler, W.; Fromm, R.; Obleitner, F.; Kohler, J.

    2012-04-01

    Measurements of physical snow properties have been performed at several sites at Kongsvegen glacier, which is a key Arctic glacier in western Spitzbergen (79N, 13E). The data were collected at six locations along the flow line of the glacier at different elevations (161 to 741m asl.) and describe snow that was deposited during winter 2010/11. We basically consider the vertical profiles of snow temperature, density, hardness, grain size and crystal shapes derived from standard stratigraphic methods (snow pits)and measurements using advanced instruments like Snow Micropen® and NIR imagery. Some parameters were measured repeatedly and with different instruments which proves a high quality as well as long-term and spatial representativeness of the data. The general snow conditions at the end of winter are characterized by a linear increase of snow depth and water equivalent with elevation. Snow hardness also increases with elevation while density remains remarkably constant. At most sites the snow temperature, density, hardness and grain size increase from the surface towards the snow-ice interface. The surface and the bottom layers stand out by specific changes in snow signature (crystal types) and delineate the bulk of the snow pack which itself features a rather complex layering. Comparison of the high-resolution profiles measured at different elevations at the glacier suggests some principal correlations of the signatures of hardness, grain size and crystal type. Thus, some major features (e.g. particularly hard layers) can be traced along the glacier, but the high-resolution layering can not straightforwardly be related from one site to the other. This basically reflects a locally different history of the snow pack in terms of precipitation events and post-depositional snow metamorphism. The issue is investigated more quantitatively by enhanced statistical processing of the observed signatures and simulation of the history of individual layers. These studies are

  5. A snow cover climatology for the Pyrenees from MODIS snow products

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Gascoin

    2015-05-01

    a MODIS pixel. Then, a set of Landsat images is used to validate MOD10A1 and MYD10A1 for 157 dates between 2002 and 2010. The resulting accuracies are 97% (κ = 0.85 for MOD10A1 and 96% (κ = 0.81 for MYD10A1, which indicates a good agreement between both data sets. The effect of vegetation on the results is analyzed by filtering the forested areas using a land cover map. As expected, the accuracies decrease over the forests but the agreement remains acceptable (MOD10A1: 96%, κ = 0.77; MYD10A1: 95%, κ = 0.67. We conclude that MODIS snow products have a sufficient accuracy for hydroclimate studies at the scale of the Pyrenees range. Using a gap-filling algorithm we generate a consistent snow cover climatology, which allows us to compute the mean monthly snow cover duration per elevation band and aspect classes. There is snow on the ground at least 50% of the time above 1600 m between December and April. We finally analyze the snow patterns for the atypical winter 2011–2012. Snow cover duration anomalies reveal a deficient snowpack on the Spanish side of the Pyrenees, which seems to have caused a drop in the national hydropower production.

  6. Arctic Snow Microstructure Experiment for the development of snow emission modelling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    W. Maslanka

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The Arctic Snow Microstructure Experiment (ASMEx took place in Sodankylä, Finland in the winters of 2013–2014 and 2014–2015. Radiometric, macro-, and microstructure measurements were made under different experimental conditions of homogenous snow slabs, extracted from the natural seasonal taiga snowpack. Traditional and modern measurement techniques were used for snow macro- and microstructure observations. Radiometric measurements of the microwave emission of snow on reflector and absorber bases were made at frequencies 18.7, 21.0, 36.5, 89.0 and 150.0 GHz, for both horizontal and vertical polarizations. Two measurement configurations were used for radiometric measurements: a reflecting surface and an absorbing base beneath the snow slabs. Simulations of brightness temperatures using two microwave emission models were compared to observed brightness temperatures. RMSE and bias were calculated; with the RMSE and bias values being smallest upon an absorbing base at vertical polarization. Simulations overestimated the brightness temperatures on absorbing base cases at horizontal polarization. With the other experimental conditions, the biases were small; with the exception of the HUT model 36.5 GHz simulation, which produced an underestimation for the reflector base cases. This experiment provides a solid framework for future research on the extinction of microwave radiation inside snow.

  7. The Goddard Snow Radiance Assimilation Project: An Integrated Snow Radiance and Snow Physics Modeling Framework for Snow/cold Land Surface Modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, E.; Tedesco, M.; Reichle, R.; Choudhury, B.; Peters-Lidard C.; Foster, J.; Hall, D.; Riggs, G.

    2006-01-01

    Microwave-based retrievals of snow parameters from satellite observations have a long heritage and have so far been generated primarily by regression-based empirical "inversion" methods based on snapshots in time. Direct assimilation of microwave radiance into physical land surface models can be used to avoid errors associated with such retrieval/inversion methods, instead utilizing more straightforward forward models and temporal information. This approach has been used for years for atmospheric parameters by the operational weather forecasting community with great success. Recent developments in forward radiative transfer modeling, physical land surface modeling, and land data assimilation are converging to allow the assembly of an integrated framework for snow/cold lands modeling and radiance assimilation. The objective of the Goddard snow radiance assimilation project is to develop such a framework and explore its capabilities. The key elements of this framework include: a forward radiative transfer model (FRTM) for snow, a snowpack physical model, a land surface water/energy cycle model, and a data assimilation scheme. In fact, multiple models are available for each element enabling optimization to match the needs of a particular study. Together these form a modular and flexible framework for self-consistent, physically-based remote sensing and water/energy cycle studies. In this paper we will describe the elements and the integration plan. All modules will operate within the framework of the Land Information System (LIS), a land surface modeling framework with data assimilation capabilities running on a parallel-node computing cluster. Capabilities for assimilation of snow retrieval products are already under development for LIS. We will describe plans to add radiance-based assimilation capabilities. Plans for validation activities using field measurements will also be discussed.

  8. Development of an Automatic Blowing Snow station

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nishimura, K.

    2010-12-01

    On the Antarctic ice sheet, strong katabatic winds blow throughout the year and a large but unknown fraction of the snow which falls on it is removed continuously. This constitutes a significant factor in mass and energy balance and is all the more important when predicting the likely effects of global climate change. Further, recent experimental work has indicated that the snowdrift sublimation can lead to significant mass losses during strong winds and can be also an important factor in the surface mass balance of the Antarctic ice sheets. Nishimura and Nemoto (2005) carried out the blowing snow observations at Mizuho station, Antarctica in 2000 with the snow particle counters (SPC) that can sense not only the number of snow particles but also their diameters. SPC worked properly and the data obtained revealed profiles of mass flux and particle size distributions as a function of the friction velocity. However, the SPC requires rather high power supply and the data is stored in PC; it is not always suitable for the unmanned observations under the severe Antarctic conditions. Thus, we have developed a simpler device by measuring the attenuation of the light intensity, which strongly depends on the blowing snow flux. A small wind turbine and a cold-proof buttery were utilized as a power source. Firstly, its performance was tested with comparing the SPC in a cold wind tunnel system and it proved adequately fit for practical use by combining the output of the anemometer. In 2009/2010 winter, three systems have been set at Ishikari, Col du Lac blanc in France, and S17 near Syowa station in Antarctica, and the tests are still continuing.

  9. Sensitivity of aerosol retrieval over snow surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seidel, F. C.; Painter, T. H.

    2011-12-01

    Significant amounts of black carbon and dust aerosols are transported to and accumulated in snowpacks of mountain ranges around the globe. The direct climate forcing of these particles is increasingly understood, whereas its indirect radiative forcing due to snow albedo and snow cover changes is still under investigation. In-situ and new remote sensing techniques are used to estimate snowpack properties from local to regional scales. Nevertheless, orbital and suborbital Earth observation data are difficult to analyze due to high spatial variability of the snowpack in rugged terrain. In addition, changes in atmospheric turbidity significantly complicate the estimation of snow cover characteristics and requires prior retrieval of optical and microphysical aerosol properties. Unfortunately, most aerosol retrieval techniques work only over dark surfaces. We therefore present a study on the sensitivity of aerosol optical depth (AOD) retrieval over snow surfaces. Radiative transfer calculations show that the sensitivity to surface spectral albedo depends strongly on the aerosol single scattering albedo (ratio of scattering efficiency to total extinction efficiency). Absorbing aerosol types (e.g. soot) provide a relatively good AOD retrieval sensitivity for very bright surfaces. The findings provide a basis for the development of future techniques and algorithms, which are able to concurrently retrieve snow and aerosol properties using remote sensing data. We explore these sensitivities with synthetic data and a time series of imaging spectrometer data, in situ spectral irradiance measurements, and sunphotometer measurements of AOD in the mountains of the Upper Colorado River Basin, USA. Ultimately, this research is important to map and better understand regional influences of aerosol and climate forcings on the cryosphere and water cycle in mountainous and other cold regions.

  10. A new mechanism for dendritic pattern formation in dense systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oikawa, Noriko; Kurita, Rei

    2016-06-01

    Patterns are often formed when particles cluster: Since patterns reflect the connectivity of different types of material, the emergence of patterns affects the physical and chemical properties of systems and shares a close relationship to their macroscopic functions. A radial dendritic pattern (RDP) is observed in many systems such as snow crystals, polymer crystals and biological systems. Although most of these systems are considered as dense particle suspensions, the mechanism of RDP formation in dense particle systems is not yet understood. It should be noted that the diffusion limited aggregation model is not applicable to RDP formation in dense systems, but in dilute particle systems. Here, we propose a simple model that exhibits RDP formation in a dense particle system. The model potential for the inter-particle interaction is composed of two parts, a repulsive and an attractive force. The repulsive force is applied to all the particles all the time and the attractive force is exerted only among particles inside a circular domain, which expands at a certain speed as a wave front propagating from a preselected centre. It is found that an RDP is formed if the velocity of the wave front that triggers the attractive interaction is of the same order of magnitude as the time scale defined by the aggregation speed.

  11. Water and life from snow: A trillion dollar science question

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sturm, Matthew; Goldstein, Michael A.; Parr, Charles

    2017-05-01

    Snow provides essential resources/services in the form of water for human use, and climate regulation in the form of enhanced cooling of the Earth. In addition, it supports a thriving winter outdoor recreation industry. To date, the financial evaluation of the importance of snow is incomplete and hence the need for accelerated snow research is not as clear as it could be. With snow cover changing worldwide in several worrisome ways, there is pressing need to determine global, regional, and local rates of snow cover change, and to link these to financial analyses that allow for rational decision making, as risks related to those decisions involve trillions of dollars.

  12. Stereological characterization of dry alpine snow for microwave remote sensing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davis, Robert E.; Dozier, Jeff

    1989-01-01

    A persistent problem in investigations of electromagnetic properties of snow, from reflectance at visible wavelengths to emission and backscattering in the microwave, has been the proper characterization of the snow's physical properties. It is suggested that the granular and laminar structure of snow can be measured in its aggregated state by stereology performed on sections prepared from snow specimens, and that these kinds of measurements can be incorporated into models of the electromagnetic properties. With careful sampling, anisotropy in the snow microstructure at various scales can be quantified. It is shown how stereological parameters can be averaged over orientation and optical depth for radiative transfer modeling.

  13. Drifting snow and its sublimation in turbulent boundary layer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Guang; Huang, Ning; Wang, Zhengshi

    2017-04-01

    Drifting snow is a special process of mass-energy transport in hydrological cycle especially in alpine region. It can not only change the snow distribution, but also result in phase change of ice crystal into water vapour, which is so called drifting snow sublimation. Thus drifting snow is of glaciological and hydrological importance in cold regions. In this paper, recent research on drifting snow and its sublimation is reviewed, and some new progresses by our research team in Lanzhou University are also introduced.

  14. Snow observations in Mount Lebanon (2011-2016)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fayad, Abbas; Gascoin, Simon; Faour, Ghaleb; Fanise, Pascal; Drapeau, Laurent; Somma, Janine; Fadel, Ali; Bitar, Ahmad Al; Escadafal, Richard

    2017-08-01

    We present a unique meteorological and snow observational dataset in Mount Lebanon, a mountainous region with a Mediterranean climate, where snowmelt is an essential water resource. The study region covers the recharge area of three karstic river basins (total area of 1092 km2 and an elevation up to 3088 m). The dataset consists of (1) continuous meteorological and snow height observations, (2) snowpack field measurements, and (3) medium-resolution satellite snow cover data. The continuous meteorological measurements at three automatic weather stations (MZA, 2296 m; LAQ, 1840 m; and CED, 2834 m a.s.l.) include surface air temperature and humidity, precipitation, wind speed and direction, incoming and reflected shortwave irradiance, and snow height, at 30 min intervals for the snow seasons (November-June) between 2011 and 2016 for MZA and between 2014 and 2016 for CED and LAQ. Precipitation data were filtered and corrected for Geonor undercatch. Observations of snow height (HS), snow water equivalent, and snow density were collected at 30 snow courses located at elevations between 1300 and 2900 m a.s.l. during the two snow seasons of 2014-2016 with an average revisit time of 11 days. Daily gap-free snow cover extent (SCA) and snow cover duration (SCD) maps derived from MODIS snow products are provided for the same period (2011-2016). We used the dataset to characterize mean snow height, snow water equivalent (SWE), and density for the first time in Mount Lebanon. Snow seasonal variability was characterized with high HS and SWE variance and a relatively high snow density mean equal to 467 kg m-3. We find that the relationship between snow depth and snow density is specific to the Mediterranean climate. The current model explained 34 % of the variability in the entire dataset (all regions between 1300 and 2900 m a.s.l.) and 62 % for high mountain regions (elevation 2200-2900 m a.s.l.). The dataset is suitable for the investigation of snow dynamics and for the forcing

  15. Finland Validation of the New Blended Snow Product

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, E. J.; Casey, K. A.; Hallikainen, M. T.; Foster, J. L.; Hall, D. K.; Riggs, G. A.

    2008-01-01

    As part of an ongoing effort to validate satellite remote sensing snow products for the recentlydeveloped U.S. Air Force Weather Agency (AFWA) - NASA blended snow product, Satellite and in-situ data for snow extent and snow water equivalent (SWE) are evaluated in Finland for the 2006-2007 snow season Finnish Meteorological Institute (FMI) daily weather station data and Finnish Environment Institute (SYKE) bi-monthly snow course data are used as ground truth. Initial comparison results display positive agreement between the AFWA NASA Snow Algorithm (ANSA) snow extent and SWE maps and in situ data, with discrepancies in accordance with known AMSR-E and MODIS snow mapping limitations. Future ANSA product improvement plans include additional validation and inclusion of fractional snow cover in the ANSA data product. Furthermore, the AMSR-E 19 GHz (horizontal channel) with the difference between ascending and descending satellite passes (Diurnal Amplitude Variations, DAV) will be used to detect the onset of melt, and QuikSCAT scatterometer data (14 GHz) will be used to map areas of actively melting snow.

  16. Objective Characterization of Snow Microstructure for Microwave Emission Modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Durand, Michael; Kim, Edward J.; Molotch, Noah P.; Margulis, Steven A.; Courville, Zoe; Malzler, Christian

    2012-01-01

    Passive microwave (PM) measurements are sensitive to the presence and quantity of snow, a fact that has long been used to monitor snowcover from space. In order to estimate total snow water equivalent (SWE) within PM footprints (on the order of approx 100 sq km), it is prerequisite to understand snow microwave emission at the point scale and how microwave radiation integrates spatially; the former is the topic of this paper. Snow microstructure is one of the fundamental controls on the propagation of microwave radiation through snow. Our goal in this study is to evaluate the prospects for driving the Microwave Emission Model of Layered Snowpacks with objective measurements of snow specific surface area to reproduce measured brightness temperatures when forced with objective measurements of snow specific surface area (S). This eliminates the need to treat the grain size as a free-fit parameter.

  17. Research of microwave scattering properties of snow fields

    Science.gov (United States)

    Angelakos, D. J.

    1978-01-01

    The results obtained in the research program of microwave scattering properties of snow fields are presented. Experimental results are presented showing backscatter dependence on frequency (5.8-8.0 GHz), angle of incidence (0-60 degrees), snow wetness (time of day), and frequency modulation (0-500 MHz). Theoretical studies are being made of the inverse scattering problem yielding some preliminary results concerning the determination of the dielectric constant of the snow layer. The experimental results lead to the following conclusions: snow layering affects backscatter, layer response is significant up to 45 degrees of incidence, wetness modifies snow layer effects, frequency modulation masks the layer response, and for the proper choice of probing frequency and for nominal snow depths, it appears to be possible to measure the effective dielectric constant and the corresponding water content of a snow pack.

  18. Dendritic potassium channels in hippocampal pyramidal neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnston, D; Hoffman, D A; Magee, J C; Poolos, N P; Watanabe, S; Colbert, C M; Migliore, M

    2000-05-15

    Potassium channels located in the dendrites of hippocampal CA1 pyramidal neurons control the shape and amplitude of back-propagating action potentials, the amplitude of excitatory postsynaptic potentials and dendritic excitability. Non-uniform gradients in the distribution of potassium channels in the dendrites make the dendritic electrical properties markedly different from those found in the soma. For example, the influence of a fast, calcium-dependent potassium current on action potential repolarization is progressively reduced in the first 150 micrometer of the apical dendrites, so that action potentials recorded farther than 200 micrometer from the soma have no fast after-hyperpolarization and are wider than those in the soma. The peak amplitude of back-propagating action potentials is also progressively reduced in the dendrites because of the increasing density of a transient potassium channel with distance from the soma. The activation of this channel can be reduced by the activity of a number of protein kinases as well as by prior depolarization. The depolarization from excitatory postsynaptic potentials (EPSPs) can inactivate these A-type K+ channels and thus lead to an increase in the amplitude of dendritic action potentials, provided the EPSP and the action potentials occur within the appropriate time window. This time window could be in the order of 15 ms and may play a role in long-term potentiation induced by pairing EPSPs and back-propagating action potentials.

  19. Historical Snow Cover and Water Resources Change in central Asia

    Science.gov (United States)

    ZHOU, H.; Aizen, E.; Aizen, V. B.

    2012-12-01

    Seasonal snow cover is a vital source of river runoff in arid and semi-arid regions of central Asia. Decrease of seasonal snow cover is one of the major consequences of climate change in central Asia. To quantify the historical snow cover change, its relationship to global and regional atmospheric processes, and its impact on water resources, a new database for cryospheric research in central Asia has been created in Asiacryoweb.org. It serves a data portal for snow cover, glacier, meteorology, hydrology and ice core data in central Asia, as well as a platform for further research collaborations. We analyze the historical snow cover change using data derived from AVHRR and MODIS images in 1986 - 2008. The results suggest that the snow cover extent in central Asia has declined significantly in general. We found significant decrease of seasonal snow cover in alpine regions surrounding major mountains (Tienshan, Pamir and Altai-Sayan) in summer; while in winter, northern part of Kazakhstan Steppe, mountains in Altai-Sayan and peripheral regions of Tienshan and Pamir mountains have seen significant strong increase of snow cover. Analysis of the relationship between snow cover extent and climate pattern indices shows a significant negative relationship between snow cover in Pamir mountains and Altai-Sayan mountains with Eastern Atlantic Pattern, and a significant negative relationship between snow cover in northern Aral-Caspian desert, Tienshan and the East Atlantic / West Russia pattern. And the Polar / Euraisa Pattern has a positive relationship with snow in Kazakhstan Steppe, Pamir, and Tienshan. The changing snow cover regime will affect not only the amount but also the timing of available water melting from snow.

  20. A new MODIS daily cloud free snow cover mapping algorithm on the Tibetan Plateau

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    XiaoDong Huang; XiaoHua Hao; QiSheng Feng; Wei Wang; TianGang Liang

    2014-01-01

    Because of similar reflective characteristics of snow and cloud, the weather status seriously affects snow monitoring using optical remote sensing data. Cloud amount analysis during 2010 to 2011 snow seasons shows that cloud cover is the major limitation for snow cover monitoring using MOD10A1 and MYD10A1. By use of MODIS daily snow cover products and AMSR-E snow wa-ter equivalent products (SWE), several cloud elimination methods were integrated to produce a new daily cloud free snow cover product, and information of snow depth from 85 climate stations in Tibetan Plateau area (TP) were used to validate the accuracy of the new composite snow cover product. The results indicate that snow classification accuracy of the new daily snow cover product reaches 91.7%when snow depth is over 3 cm. This suggests that the new daily snow cover mapping algorithm is suitable for monitoring snow cover dynamic changes in TP.

  1. Producing Snow Extent and Snow Water Equivalent Information for Climate Research Purposes - ESA DUE Globsnow Effort

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luojus, Kari; Pulliainen, Jouni; Rott, Helmut; Nagler, Thomas; Solberg, Rune; Wiesmann, Andreas; Derksen, Chris; Metsämäki, Sari; Malnes, Eirik; Bojkov, Bojan

    2010-05-01

    The European Space Agency (ESA) Data User Element (DUE) funded GlobSnow project aims at creating a global database of snow parameters for climate research purposes. The main objective is to create a long term dataset on two essential snow parameters. The project will provide information concerning the areal extent of snow (SE) on a global scale and snow water equivalent (SWE) for the Northern Hemisphere. Both products will include the end product derived from the satellite data along with accuracy information for each snow parameter. The temporal span of the SE product will be 15 years and the span for the SWE product will be 30 years. A key improvement of the snow products, when compared with the currently available data sets, will be the inclusion of a statistically derived accuracy estimate accompanying each SE or SWE estimate (on a pixel level). In addition to the SE and SWE time-series, an operational near-real time (NRT) snow information service will be implemented. The service will provide daily snow maps for hydrological, meteorological, and climate research purposes. The snow products will be based on data acquired from optical and passive microwave-based spaceborne sensors combined with ground-based weather station observations. The work was initiated in November 2008, and is being coordinated by the Finnish Meteorological Institute (FMI). Other project partners involved are NR (Norwegian Computing Centre), ENVEO IT GmbH, GAMMA Remote Sensing AG, Finnish Environment Institute (SYKE), Environment Canada (EC) and Northern Research Institute (Norut). Extensive algorithm evaluation efforts were carried out for the candidate SWE and SE algorithms during 2009 using ground truth data gathered from Canada, Scandinavia, Russia and the Alps. The acquired evaluation results have enabled the selection of the algorithms to be utilized for the GlobSnow SE and SWE products. The SWE product is derived using the FMI Algorithm and the SE product is a combination of NR and

  2. Non-linear dendrites can tune neurons

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Romain Daniel Cazé

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available A signature of visual, auditory, and motor cortices is the presence of neurons tuned to distinct features of the environment. While neuronal tuning can be observed in most brain areas, its origin remains enigmatic, and new calcium imaging data complicate this problem. Dendritic calcium signals, in a L2/3 neuron from the mouse visual cortex, display a wide range of tunings that could be different from the neuronal tuning (Jia et al 2010. To elucidate this observation we use multi-compartmental models of increasing complexity, from a binary to a realistic biophysical model of L2/3 neuron. These models possess non-linear dendritic subunits inside which the result of multiple excitatory inputs is smaller than their arithmetic sum. While dendritic non-linear subunits are ad-hoc in the binary model, non-linearities in the realistic model come from the passive saturation of synaptic currents. Because of these non-linearities our neuron models are scatter sensitive: the somatic membrane voltage is higher when presynaptic inputs target different dendrites than when they target a single dendrite. This spatial bias in synaptic integration is, in our models, the origin of neuronal tuning. Indeed, assemblies of presynaptic inputs encode the stimulus property through an increase in correlation or activity, and only the assembly that encodes the preferred stimulus targets different dendrites. Assemblies coding for the non-preferred stimuli target single dendrites, explaining the wide range of observed tunings and the possible difference between dendritic and somatic tuning. We thus propose, in accordance with the latest experimental observations, that non-linear integration in dendrites can generate neuronal tuning independently of the coding regime.

  3. Near-surface snow particle dynamics from particle tracking velocimetry and turbulence measurements during alpine blowing snow storms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aksamit, Nikolas O.; Pomeroy, John W.

    2016-12-01

    Many blowing snow conceptual and predictive models have been based on simplified two-phase flow dynamics derived from time-averaged observations of bulk flow conditions in blowing snow storms. Measurements from the first outdoor application of particle tracking velocimetry (PTV) of near-surface blowing snow yield new information on mechanisms for blowing snow initiation, entrainment, and rebound, whilst also confirming some findings from wind tunnel observations. Blowing snow particle movement is influenced by complex surface flow dynamics, including saltation development from creep that has not previously been measured for snow. Comparisons with 3-D atmospheric turbulence measurements show that blowing snow particle motion immediately above the snow surface responds strongly to high-frequency turbulent motions. Momentum exchange from wind to the dense near-surface particle-laden flow appears significant and makes an important contribution to blowing snow mass flux and saltation initiation dynamics. The more complete and accurate description of near-surface snow particle motions observable using PTV may prove useful for improving blowing snow model realism and accuracy.

  4. Non-avalanche-related snow immersion deaths: tree well and deep snow immersion asphyxiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Tilburg, Christopher

    2010-09-01

    Non-avalanche-related snow immersion death (NARSID), or snow immersion asphyxiation, is a significant winter mountain hazard for skiers and snowboarders. This phenomenon occurs predominately in western North America, where large tree wells and deep snowpacks develop. Although statistics are difficult to procure, snow immersion asphyxiation has resulted in more than 70 documented deaths in the past 2 decades. The primary purpose of this review is to examine the existing literature on NARSID to help prevent such dangerous accidents through educating wilderness medicine professionals and fostering public awareness. The exact duration of burial to time of death and the cause of death are not precisely known but can be postulated from accident reports, experimental snow burial studies, and avalanche literature. In most cases, death probably occurs within 15 to 30 minutes from the time of burial. However, survival after prolonged burial in a tree well and deep snow is possible. The cause of death is asphyxiation, probably due to one of the mechanisms that produce asphyxia in avalanche burial victims: positional asphyxia, airway obstruction, or carbon dioxide displacement asphyxia. Prevention of snow immersion asphyxiation begins with skiers and snowboarders staying within the limits of their skills, using the proper tools for deep powder, staying in control at all times, and employing a buddy system. A skier or snowboarder who falls near or into a tree well should tuck, roll, and try to land upright, grab the tree trunk or a branch, and yell or blow a whistle to alert partners. If buried upside down, the person should stay calm and create an air pocket, which is probably of paramount importance. Skiers and snowboarders should use avalanche safety equipment to lessen the risk of snow submersion asphyxiation.

  5. Dendritic tellurides acting as antioxidants

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    XU Huaping; WANG Yapei; WANG Zhiqiang; LIU Junqiu; Mario Smet; Wim Dehaen

    2006-01-01

    We have described the synthesis of a series of poly(aryl ether) dendrimers with telluride in the core and oligo(ethylene oxide) chains at the periphery which act as glutathione peroxidase (GPx) mimics. These series of compounds were well characterized by 1H-NMR, 13C-NMR and ESI-MS. Using different ROOH (H2O2, cumene hydroperoxide) for testing the antioxidizing properties of these compounds, we have found that from generation 0 to 2, the activity of the dendritic GPx mimics first decreased and then increased. This can be explained on the basis of a greater steric hindrance, going from generation 0 to 1, and stronger binding interactions going from generation 1 to 2. In other words, there exists a balance between binding interactions and steric hindrance that may optimize the GPx activity.

  6. Fate mapping of dendritic cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Barbara Ursula Schraml

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Dendritic cells (DCs are a heterogeneous group of mononuclear phagocytes with versatile roles in immunity. They are classified predominantly based on phenotypic and functional properties, namely their stellate morphology, expression of the integrin CD11c and major histocompatibility class II molecules, as well as their superior capacity to migrate to secondary lymphoid organs and stimulate naïve T cells. However, these attributes are not exclusive to DCs and often change within inflammatory or infectious environments. This led to debates over cell identification and questioned even the mere existence of DCs as distinct leukocyte lineage. Here, we review experimental approaches taken to fate map DCs and discuss how these have shaped our understanding of DC ontogeny and lineage affiliation. Considering the ontogenetic properties of DCs will help to overcome the inherent shortcomings of purely phenotypic- and function-based approaches to cell definition and will yield a more robust way of DC classification.

  7. Dendritic Cells for Anomaly Detection

    CERN Document Server

    Greensmith, Julie; Aickelin, Uwe

    2010-01-01

    Artificial immune systems, more specifically the negative selection algorithm, have previously been applied to intrusion detection. The aim of this research is to develop an intrusion detection system based on a novel concept in immunology, the Danger Theory. Dendritic Cells (DCs) are antigen presenting cells and key to the activation of the human signals from the host tissue and correlate these signals with proteins know as antigens. In algorithmic terms, individual DCs perform multi-sensor data fusion based on time-windows. The whole population of DCs asynchronously correlates the fused signals with a secondary data stream. The behaviour of human DCs is abstracted to form the DC Algorithm (DCA), which is implemented using an immune inspired framework, libtissue. This system is used to detect context switching for a basic machine learning dataset and to detect outgoing portscans in real-time. Experimental results show a significant difference between an outgoing portscan and normal traffic.

  8. A stratification model of surface snow at Dome Fuji Station, Antarctica

    OpenAIRE

    2002-01-01

    A stratification model of surface snow on the ice sheet, which includes snow density evolution, is proposed. Using the temperature profile in the surface snow layer obtained at Dome Fuji Station, Antarctica, snow density evolution under various accumulation conditions was simulated. It is demonstrated that water vapor diffusion is very important for the snow density evolution, and temperature and accumulation at the snow surface are the most important factors that determine the future snow de...

  9. A stratification model of surface snow at Dome Fuji Station, Antarctica

    OpenAIRE

    2002-01-01

    A stratification model of surface snow on the ice sheet, which includes snow density evolution, is proposed. Using the temperature profile in the surface snow layer obtained at Dome Fuji Station, Antarctica, snow density evolution under various accumulation conditions was simulated.It is demonstrated that water vapor diffusion is very important for the snow density evolution, and temperature and accumulation at the snow surface are the most important factors that determine the future snow den...

  10. Role of snow cover on urban heat island intensity investigated by urban canopy model with snow effects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sato, T.; Mori, K.

    2015-12-01

    Urban heat islands have been investigated around the world including snowy regions. However, the relationship between urban heat island and snow cover remains unclear. This study examined the effect of snow cover in urban canopy on energy budget in urban areas of Sapporo, north Japan by 1km mesh WRF experiments. The modified urban canopy model permits snow cover in urban canopy by the modification of surface albedo, surface emissivity, and thermal conductivity for roof and road according to snow depth and snow water equivalent. The experiments revealed that snow cover in urban canopy decreases urban air temperature more strongly for daily maximum temperature (0.4-0.6 K) than for daily minimum temperature (0.1-0.3 K). The high snow albedo reduces the net radiation at building roof, leading to decrease in sensible heat flux. Interestingly, the cooling effect of snow cover compensates the warming effect by anthropogenic heat release in Sapporo, suggesting the importance of snow cover treatment in urban canopy model as well as estimating accurate anthropogenic heat distributions. In addition, the effect of road snow clearance tends to increase nocturnal surface air temperature in urban areas. A possible role of snow cover on urban heat island intensity was evaluated by two experiments with snow cover (i.e., realistic condition) and without snow cover in entire numerical domain. The snow cover decreases surface air temperature more in rural areas than in urban areas, which was commonly seen throughout a day, with stronger magnitude during nighttime than daytime, resulting in intensifying urban heat island by 4.0 K for daily minimum temperature.

  11. Evaluation of snow cover and snow depth on the Qinghai-Tibetan Plateau derived from passive microwave remote sensing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dai, Liyun; Che, Tao; Ding, Yongjian; Hao, Xiaohua

    2017-08-01

    Snow cover on the Qinghai-Tibetan Plateau (QTP) plays a significant role in the global climate system and is an important water resource for rivers in the high-elevation region of Asia. At present, passive microwave (PMW) remote sensing data are the only efficient way to monitor temporal and spatial variations in snow depth at large scale. However, existing snow depth products show the largest uncertainties across the QTP. In this study, MODIS fractional snow cover product, point, line and intense sampling data are synthesized to evaluate the accuracy of snow cover and snow depth derived from PMW remote sensing data and to analyze the possible causes of uncertainties. The results show that the accuracy of snow cover extents varies spatially and depends on the fraction of snow cover. Based on the assumption that grids with MODIS snow cover fraction > 10 % are regarded as snow cover, the overall accuracy in snow cover is 66.7 %, overestimation error is 56.1 %, underestimation error is 21.1 %, commission error is 27.6 % and omission error is 47.4 %. The commission and overestimation errors of snow cover primarily occur in the northwest and southeast areas with low ground temperature. Omission error primarily occurs in cold desert areas with shallow snow, and underestimation error mainly occurs in glacier and lake areas. With the increase of snow cover fraction, the overestimation error decreases and the omission error increases. A comparison between snow depths measured in field experiments, measured at meteorological stations and estimated across the QTP shows that agreement between observation and retrieval improves with an increasing number of observation points in a PMW grid. The misclassification and errors between observed and retrieved snow depth are associated with the relatively coarse resolution of PMW remote sensing, ground temperature, snow characteristics and topography. To accurately understand the variation in snow depth across the QTP, new algorithms

  12. Evaluation of snow cover and snow depth on the Qinghai–Tibetan Plateau derived from passive microwave remote sensing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. Dai

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Snow cover on the Qinghai–Tibetan Plateau (QTP plays a significant role in the global climate system and is an important water resource for rivers in the high-elevation region of Asia. At present, passive microwave (PMW remote sensing data are the only efficient way to monitor temporal and spatial variations in snow depth at large scale. However, existing snow depth products show the largest uncertainties across the QTP. In this study, MODIS fractional snow cover product, point, line and intense sampling data are synthesized to evaluate the accuracy of snow cover and snow depth derived from PMW remote sensing data and to analyze the possible causes of uncertainties. The results show that the accuracy of snow cover extents varies spatially and depends on the fraction of snow cover. Based on the assumption that grids with MODIS snow cover fraction > 10 % are regarded as snow cover, the overall accuracy in snow cover is 66.7 %, overestimation error is 56.1 %, underestimation error is 21.1 %, commission error is 27.6 % and omission error is 47.4 %. The commission and overestimation errors of snow cover primarily occur in the northwest and southeast areas with low ground temperature. Omission error primarily occurs in cold desert areas with shallow snow, and underestimation error mainly occurs in glacier and lake areas. With the increase of snow cover fraction, the overestimation error decreases and the omission error increases. A comparison between snow depths measured in field experiments, measured at meteorological stations and estimated across the QTP shows that agreement between observation and retrieval improves with an increasing number of observation points in a PMW grid. The misclassification and errors between observed and retrieved snow depth are associated with the relatively coarse resolution of PMW remote sensing, ground temperature, snow characteristics and topography. To accurately understand the variation in snow

  13. Micrometeorological processes driving snow ablation in an Alpine catchment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Mott

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Mountain snow covers typically become patchy over the course of a melting season. The snow pattern during melt is mainly governed by the end of winter snow depth distribution and the local energy balance. The objective of this study is to investigate micro-meteorological processes driving snow ablation in an Alpine catchment. For this purpose we combine a meteorological boundary-layer model (Advanced Regional Prediction System with a fully distributed energy balance model (Alpine3D. Turbulent fluxes above melting snow are further investigated by using data from eddy-correlation systems. We compare modeled snow ablation to measured ablation rates as obtained from a series of Terrestrial Laser Scanning campaigns covering a complete ablation season. The measured ablation rates indicate that the advection of sensible heat causes locally increased ablation rates at the upwind edges of the snow patches. The effect, however, appears to be active over rather short distances of about 4–6 m. Measurements suggest that mean wind velocities of about 5 m s−1 are required for advective heat transport to increase snow ablation over a long fetch distance of about 20 m. Neglecting this effect, the model is able to capture the mean ablation rates for early ablation periods but strongly overestimates snow ablation once the fraction of snow coverage is below a critical value of approximately 0.6. While radiation dominates snow ablation early in the season, the turbulent flux contribution becomes important late in the season. Simulation results indicate that the air temperatures appear to overestimate the local air temperature above snow patches once the snow coverage is low. Measured turbulent fluxes support these findings by suggesting a stable internal boundary layer close to the snow surface causing a strong decrease of the sensible heat flux towards the snow cover. Thus, the existence of a stable internal boundary layer above a patchy snow cover

  14. Boundary layer physics over snow and ice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. S. Anderson

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available A general understanding of the physics of advection and turbulent mixing within the near surface atmosphere assists the interpretation and predictive power of air chemistry theory. The theory of the physical processes involved in diffusion of trace gas reactants in the near surface atmosphere is still incomplete. Such boundary layer theory is least understood over snow and ice covered surfaces, due in part to the thermo-optical properties of the surface. Polar boundary layers have additional aspects to consider, due to the possibility of long periods without diurnal forcing and enhanced Coriolis effects.

    This paper provides a review of present concepts in polar boundary layer meteorology, which will generally apply to atmospheric flow over snow and ice surfaces. It forms a companion paper to the chemistry review papers in this special issue of ACP.

  15. Surface oscillations in channeled snow flows

    CERN Document Server

    Rastello, Marie

    2007-01-01

    An experimental device has been built to measure velocity profiles and friction laws in channeled snow flows. The measurements show that the velocity depends linearly on the vertical position in the flow and that the friction coefficient is a first-order polynomial in velocity (u) and thickness (h) of the flow. In all flows, oscillations on the surface of the flow were observed throughout the channel and measured at the location of the probes. The experimental results are confronted with a shallow water approach. Using a Saint-Venant modeling, we show that the flow is effectively uniform in the streamwise direction at the measurement location. We show that the surface oscillations produced by the Archimedes's screw at the top of the channel persist throughout the whole length of the channel and are the source of the measured oscillations. This last result provides good validation of the description of such channeled snow flows by a Saint-Venant modeling.

  16. Weather effects on aerial snow measurement

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tollan, O.

    1979-01-01

    When aerial snow measurements are carried out, various weather phenomena have influence on the survey operations and the registered gamma radiation values. Among these phenomena are low visibility and wind causing problems to aircraft operations, and temperature inversions which may trap radioactive gases and particles in the air layer near the ground. The pressure and temperature of the air and its humidity influence the gamma radiation field above the ground, and this should be taken into consideration. As some types of weather may cause delays and errors in the snow measurement, it is important for the operators to have a reliable account of the weather situation prior to and during the survey flights. This will reduce the cost of the measurement operation and improve the quality of the collected data.

  17. A Model for the Spectral Albedo of Snow. II: Snow Containing Atmospheric Aerosols.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Warren, Stephen G.; Wiscombe, Warren J.

    1980-12-01

    Small highly absorbing particles, present in concentrations of only 1 part per million by weight (ppmw) or less, can lower snow albedo in the visible by 5-15% from the high values (96-99%) predicted for pure snow in Part I. These particles have, however, no effect on snow albedo beyond 0.9 m wavelength where ice itself becomes a strong absorber. Thus we have an attractive explanation for the discrepancy between theory and observation described in Part I, a discrepancy which seemingly cannot be resolved on the basis of near-field scattering and nonsphericity effects.Desert dust and carbon soot are the most likely contaminants. But careful measurements of spectral snow albedo in the Arctic and Antarctic paint to a `grey' absorber, one whose imaginary refractive index is nearly constant across the visible spectrum. Thus carbon soot, rather than the red iron oxide normally present in desert dust, is strongly indicated at these sites. Soot particles of radius 0.1 m, in concentrations of only 0.3 ppmw, can explain the albedo measurements of Grenfell and Maykut on Arctic Ice Island T-3. This amount is consistent with some observations of soot in Arctic air masses. 1.5 ppmw of soot is required to explain the Antarctic observations of Kuhn and Siogas, which seemed an unrealistically large amount for the earth's most unpolluted continent until we learned that burning of camp heating fuel and aircraft exhaust indeed had contaminated the measurement site with soot.Midlatitude snowfields are likely to contain larger absolute amounts of soot and dust than their polar counterparts, but the snowfall is also much larger, so that the ppmw contamination does not differ drastically until melting begins. Nevertheless, the variations in absorbing particle concentration which will exist can help to explain the wide range of visible snow albedos reported in the literature.Longwave emissivity of snow is unaltered by its soot and dust content. Thus the depression of snow albedo in the

  18. Calibration of a distributed snow model using MODIS snow covered area data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Franz, Kristie J.; Karsten, Logan R.

    2013-06-01

    Spatial ground-based observations of snow are often limited at the watershed-scale, therefore the snow modeling component of a hydrologic modeling system is often calibrated along with the rainfall-runoff model using watershed discharge observations. This practice works relatively well for lumped modeling applications when the accuracy of sub-watershed processes is generally not of concern. However, with the increasing use of distributed models, realistic representation of processes, such as snow areal depletion, become more important. In this study, we test the use of snow covered area (SCA) data from the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) on board the Terra satellite for calibration of four key parameters in the distributed US National Weather Service (NWS) SNOW17 model in the North Fork of the American River basin in California, USA. Three tests are conducted; two rely solely on MODIS SCA data and one includes discharge in the calibration procedure. The three calibrations are compared to the use of parameters obtained from the NWS California Nevada River Forecast Center (CNRFC). The calibration approach that utilizes both MODIS SCA and discharge data produces the most accurate spatial (gridded) SCA and basin discharge simulations but not the best SCA summary statistics. In general it was found that improvement in simulated SCA when averaged and evaluated by elevation zone using standard summary statistics, does not necessarily coincide with more accurate discharge simulations.

  19. Research relative to angular distribution of snow reflectance/snow cover characterization and microwave emission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dozier, Jeff; Davis, Robert E.

    1987-01-01

    Remote sensing has been applied in recent years to monitoring snow cover properties for applications in hydrologic and energy balance modeling. In addition, snow cover has been recently shown to exert a considerable local influence on weather variables. Of particular importance is the potential of sensors to provide data on the physical properties of snow with high spatial and temporal resolution. Visible and near-infrared measurements of upwelling radiance can be used to infer near-surface properties through the calculation of albedo. Microwave signals usually come from deeper within the snow pack and thus provide depth-integrated information, which can be measured through clouds and does not relay on solar illumination.Fundamental studies examining the influence of snow properties on signals from various parts of the electromagnetic spectrum continue in part because of the promise of new remote sensors with higher spectral and spatial accuracy. Information in the visible and near-infrared parts of the spectrum comprise nearly all available data with high spatial resolution. Current passive microwave sensors have poor spatial resolution and the data are problematic where the scenes consist of mixed landscape features, but they offer timely observations that are independent of cloud cover and solar illumination.

  20. New Density-based Thermal Conductivity Equation for Snow

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R.K. Aggarwal

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available More than two hundred thermal conductivity measurements for different snow densities and snow types were carried out in-situ at a field research station located in greater Himalayan range of India. These measurements were carried out using a commercially available portable thermal conductivity meter. Thermal conductivity measurements were carried out on the fresh snow, equi-temperature snow, and surface hoar and temperaturegradient snow. Average thermal conductivity of snow varied from 0.08 W/mK (Fresh snow of 120 kg/m3 density to 0.32 W/m K (Equi-temperature snow of 420 kg/m3 density. Based on these measurements, a new density-based thermal conductivity equation is proposed. Using this proposed equation, modeled snowpack temperatures showed closer agreement with the observed data as compared to the predictions based on other well-known empirical and theoretical thermal conductivity equations for snow. This study highlights the advantages and limitations of empirical based thermal conductivity equations over the complex models based on snow microstructure.Defence Science Journal, 2009, 59(2, pp.126-130, DOI:http://dx.doi.org/10.14429/dsj.59.1499

  1. Phase-field modeling of dry snow metamorphism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaempfer, Thomas U; Plapp, Mathis

    2009-03-01

    Snow on the ground is a complex three-dimensional porous medium consisting of an ice matrix formed by sintered snow crystals and a pore space filled with air and water vapor. If a temperature gradient is imposed on the snow, a water vapor gradient in the pore space is induced and the snow microstructure changes due to diffusion, sublimation, and resublimation: the snow metamorphoses. The snow microstructure, in turn, determines macroscopic snow properties such as the thermal conductivity of a snowpack. We develop a phase-field model for snow metamorphism that operates on natural snow microstructures as observed by computed x-ray microtomography. The model takes into account heat and mass diffusion within the ice matrix and pore space, as well as phase changes at the ice-air interfaces. Its construction is inspired by phase-field models for alloy solidification, which allows us to relate the phase-field to a sharp-interface formulation of the problem without performing formal matched asymptotics. To overcome the computational difficulties created by the large difference between diffusional and interface-migration time scales, we introduce a method for accelerating the numerical simulations that formally amounts to reducing the heat- and mass-diffusion coefficients while maintaining the correct interface velocities. The model is validated by simulations for simple one- and two-dimensional test cases. Furthermore, we perform qualitative metamorphism simulations on natural snow structures to demonstrate the potential of the approach.

  2. The Snow Characteristics of Aircraft Skis

    Science.gov (United States)

    1947-01-01

    bottoms are given in Table 1. The skis of different shapes were surfaced with beeswax scraped to a very smooth surface. When damaged this surface...could be restored very eas- ily. Since the low friction of smooth beeswax on snow was a relatively small part of the total slid- ing resistance of...paper coated with a very thin layer of wax. A stylus, with a smooth rounded point, made very sharp records by squeezing away the wax. There was

  3. Dyeing of Snow Surfaces to Observe Structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    1993-06-01

    of freezeup problems important to obtain a clear visual perspective and with water. We found that both coloring agents to obtain good photographic...a dye of methanol coloring in with floodlights, whereas Figure 7b is a view of the water. Freezeup at the sprayer nozzle was one same area lighted...from behind, problem and the snow surface had a blemished appearance because of the addition of the water, which then froze. Freezeup may not be a

  4. Limitations of modeling snow in ski resorts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steiger, Robert; Abegg, Bruno

    2016-04-01

    The body of literature on snow modeling in a ski area operations context has been growing over the last decades in an accelerating speed. The majority of snow model applications for ski areas can be found in the climate change impacts literature. These studies differ in many aspects: the type of model used; the meteorological variables used in the models; the spatial and temporal resolution of the meteorological variables; the method how the climate change signal is derived and applied in the model concept; the number of climate models and emission scenarios used and consequently the handling of uncertainties; the indicators used to interpret the impacts for the skiing tourism industry; the incorporation of adaptation measures (e.g. snowmaking); and the geographical scale of analysis. In this contribution we will present a review of approaches used for modeling snow conditions in a ski area context. The major limitations both from a scientific as well as from a users' perspective will be discussed and solutions for shortcomings of existing approaches will be presented.

  5. Toward mountains without permanent snow and ice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huss, M.; Bookhagen, B.; Huggel, C.; Jacobsen, D.; Bradley, R. S.; Clague, J. J.; Vuille, M.; Buytaert, W.; Cayan, D. R.; Greenwood, G.; Mark, B. G.; Milner, A. M.; Weingartner, R.; Winder, M.

    2017-05-01

    The cryosphere in mountain regions is rapidly declining, a trend that is expected to accelerate over the next several decades due to anthropogenic climate change. A cascade of effects will result, extending from mountains to lowlands with associated impacts on human livelihood, economy, and ecosystems. With rising air temperatures and increased radiative forcing, glaciers will become smaller and, in some cases, disappear, the area of frozen ground will diminish, the ratio of snow to rainfall will decrease, and the timing and magnitude of both maximum and minimum streamflow will change. These changes will affect erosion rates, sediment, and nutrient flux, and the biogeochemistry of rivers and proglacial lakes, all of which influence water quality, aquatic habitat, and biotic communities. Changes in the length of the growing season will allow low-elevation plants and animals to expand their ranges upward. Slope failures due to thawing alpine permafrost, and outburst floods from glacier- and moraine-dammed lakes will threaten downstream populations. Societies even well beyond the mountains depend on meltwater from glaciers and snow for drinking water supplies, irrigation, mining, hydropower, agriculture, and recreation. Here, we review and, where possible, quantify the impacts of anticipated climate change on the alpine cryosphere, hydrosphere, and biosphere, and consider the implications for adaptation to a future of mountains without permanent snow and ice.

  6. Propagation style controls lava-snow interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edwards, B R; Belousov, A; Belousova, M

    2014-12-16

    Understanding interactions between volcanic eruptions and the cryosphere (a.k.a. glaciovolcanism) is important for climate reconstructions as well as for hazard mitigation at ice-clad volcanoes. Here we present unique field observations of interactions between snowpack and advancing basaltic lava flows during the 2012-13 eruption at Tolbachik volcano, Kamchatka, Russia. Our observations show that lava-snow heat transfer is slow, and that styles of lava propagation control snowpack responses. 'A'a and sheet lava flows advance in a rolling caterpillar-track motion on top of the rigid, snowpack substrate with minor lava-snow interaction. In contrast, pahoehoe lava propagates by inflation of lobes beneath/inside the snowpack, producing rigorous lava-snow interaction via meltwater percolation down into the incandescent lava causing production of voluminous steam, rapid surface cooling and thermal shock fragmentation. The textures produced by pahoehoe-snowpack interactions are distinctive and, where observed at other sites, can be used to infer syn-eruption seasonality and climatic conditions.

  7. Dendritic cells are stressed out in tumor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maj, Tomasz; Zou, Weiping

    2015-09-01

    A recently paper published in Cell reports that dendritic cells (DCs) are dysfunctional in the tumor environment. Tumor impairs DC function through induction of endoplasmic reticulum stress response and subsequent disruption of lipid metabolic homeostasis.

  8. Dendritic ion channelopathy in acquired epilepsy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poolos, Nicholas P.; Johnston, Daniel

    2012-01-01

    Summary Ion channel dysfunction or “channelopathy” is a proven cause of epilepsy in the relatively uncommon genetic epilepsies with Mendelian inheritance. But numerous examples of acquired channelopathy in experimental animal models of epilepsy following brain injury have also been demonstrated. Our understanding of channelopathy has grown due to advances in electrophysiology techniques that have allowed the study of ion channels in the dendrites of pyramidal neurons in cortex and hippocampus. The apical dendrites of pyramidal neurons comprise the vast majority of neuronal surface membrane area, and thus the majority of the neuronal ion channel population. Investigation of dendritic ion channels has demonstrated remarkable plasticity in ion channel localization and biophysical properties in epilepsy, many of which produce hyperexcitability and may contribute to the development and maintenance of the epileptic state. Here we review recent advances in dendritic physiology and cell biology, and their relevance to epilepsy. PMID:23216577

  9. Dendritic ion channelopathy in acquired epilepsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poolos, Nicholas P; Johnston, Daniel

    2012-12-01

    Ion channel dysfunction or "channelopathy" is a proven cause of epilepsy in the relatively uncommon genetic epilepsies with Mendelian inheritance. But numerous examples of acquired channelopathy in experimental animal models of epilepsy following brain injury have also been demonstrated. Our understanding of channelopathy has grown due to advances in electrophysiology techniques that have allowed the study of ion channels in the dendrites of pyramidal neurons in cortex and hippocampus. The apical dendrites of pyramidal neurons comprise the vast majority of neuronal surface membrane area, and thus the majority of the neuronal ion channel population. Investigation of dendritic ion channels has demonstrated remarkable plasticity in ion channel localization and biophysical properties in epilepsy, many of which produce hyperexcitability and may contribute to the development and maintenance of the epileptic state. Herein we review recent advances in dendritic physiology and cell biology, and their relevance to epilepsy. Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2012 International League Against Epilepsy.

  10. Artificial Dendritic Cells: Multi-faceted Perspectives

    CERN Document Server

    Greensmith, Julie

    2009-01-01

    Dendritic cells are the crime scene investigators of the human immune system. Their function is to correlate potentially anomalous invading entities with observed damage to the body. The detection of such invaders by dendritic cells results in the activation of the adaptive immune system, eventually leading to the removal of the invader from the host body. This mechanism has provided inspiration for the development of a novel bio-inspired algorithm, the Dendritic Cell Algorithm. This algorithm processes information at multiple levels of resolution, resulting in the creation of information granules of variable structure. In this chapter we examine the multi-faceted nature of immunology and how research in this field has shaped the function of the resulting Dendritic Cell Algorithm. A brief overview of the algorithm is given in combination with the details of the processes used for its development. The chapter is concluded with a discussion of the parallels between our understanding of the human immune system a...

  11. “Dermal dendritic cells” comprise two distinct populations: CD1+ dendritic cells and CD209+ macrophages

    OpenAIRE

    Ochoa,Maria Teresa; Loncaric, Anya; Krutzik, Stephan R.; Becker, Todd C.; Modlin, Robert L.

    2008-01-01

    A key cell type of the resident skin immune system is the dendritic cell, which in normal skin is located in two distinct microanatomical compartments: Langerhans cells (LC) mainly in the epidermis and dermal dendritic cells (DDC) in the dermis. Here, the lineage of dermal dendritic cells was investigated using monoclonal antibodies and immunohistology. We provide evidence that “dermal dendritic cells” comprise at least two major phenotypic populations of dendritic appearing cells: immature D...

  12. The Airborne Snow Observatory: fusion of scanning lidar, imaging spectrometer, and physically-based modeling for mapping snow water equivalent and snow albedo

    Science.gov (United States)

    Snow cover and its melt dominate regional climate and water resources in many of the world’s mountainous regions. Snowmelt timing and magnitude in mountains tend to be controlled by absorption of solar radiation and snow water equivalent, respectively, and yet both of these are very poorly known ev...

  13. Assessment of methods for mapping snow cover from MODIS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rittger, Karl; Painter, Thomas H.; Dozier, Jeff

    2013-01-01

    Characterization of snow is critical for understanding Earth’s water and energy cycles. Maps of snow from MODIS have seen growing use in investigations of climate, hydrology, and glaciology, but the lack of rigorous validation of different snow mapping methods compromises these studies. We examine three widely used MODIS snow products: the “binary” (i.e., snow yes/no) global snow maps that were among the initial MODIS standard products; a more recent standard MODIS fractional snow product; and another fractional snow product, MODSCAG, based on spectral mixture analysis. We compare them to maps of snow obtained from Landsat ETM+ data, whose 30 m spatial resolution provides nearly 300 samples within a 500 m MODIS nadir pixel. The assessment uses 172 images spanning a range of snow and vegetation conditions, including the Colorado Rocky Mountains, the Upper Rio Grande, California’s Sierra Nevada, and the Nepal Himalaya. MOD10A1 binary and fractional fail to retrieve snow in the transitional periods during accumulation and melt while MODSCAG consistently maintains its retrieval ability during these periods. Averaged over all regions, the RMSE for MOD10A1 fractional is 0.23, whereas the MODSCAG RMSE is 0.10. MODSCAG performs the most consistently through accumulation, mid-winter and melt, with median differences ranging from -0.16 to 0.04 while differences for MOD10A1 fractional range from -0.34 to 0.35. MODSCAG maintains its performance over all land cover classes and throughout a larger range of land surface properties. Characterizing snow cover by spectral mixing is more accurate than empirical methods based on the normalized difference snow index, both for identifying where snow is and is not and for estimating the fractional snow cover within a sensor’s instantaneous field-of-view. Determining the fractional value is particularly important during spring and summer melt in mountainous terrain, where large variations in snow, vegetation and soil occur over

  14. Deriving Snow-Cover Depletion Curves for Different Spatial Scales from Remote Sensing and Snow Telemetry Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fassnacht, Steven R.; Sexstone, Graham A.; Kashipazha, Amir H.; Lopez-Moreno, Juan Ignacio; Jasinski, Michael F.; Kampf, Stephanie K.; Von Thaden, Benjamin C.

    2015-01-01

    During the melting of a snowpack, snow water equivalent (SWE) can be correlated to snow-covered area (SCA) once snow-free areas appear, which is when SCA begins to decrease below 100%. This amount of SWE is called the threshold SWE. Daily SWE data from snow telemetry stations were related to SCA derived from moderate-resolution imaging spectro radiometer images to produce snow-cover depletion curves. The snow depletion curves were created for an 80,000 sq km domain across southern Wyoming and northern Colorado encompassing 54 snow telemetry stations. Eight yearly snow depletion curves were compared, and it is shown that the slope of each is a function of the amount of snow received. Snow-cover depletion curves were also derived for all the individual stations, for which the threshold SWE could be estimated from peak SWE and the topography around each station. A stations peak SWE was much more important than the main topographic variables that included location, elevation, slope, and modelled clear sky solar radiation. The threshold SWE mostly illustrated inter-annual consistency.

  15. Free energy and dendritic self-organisation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stefan J Kiebel

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, we pursue recent observations that, through selective dendritic filtering, single neurons respond to specific sequences of presynaptic inputs. We try to provide a principled and mechanistic account of this selectivity by applying the free energy principle to a dendrite that is immersed in its neuropil or environment. We assume that neurons self-organize to minimise a free energy bound on the self-information or surprise of presynaptic inputs that are sampled. We model this as a selective pruning of dendritic spines that are expressed on a dendritic branch. This pruning occurs when the optimized postsynaptic gain falls below a threshold. Crucially, postsynaptic gain is itself optimized with respect to free energy. Pruning suppresses free energy as the dendrite selects presynaptic signals that conform to its expectations, specified by a generative model implicit in its intracellular kinetics. Not only does this provide a principled account of how neurons organize and selectively sample the myriad of potential presynaptic inputs they are exposed to, but it also connects the optimization of elemental neuronal (dendritic processing to generic (surprise or evidence-based schemes in statistics and machine learning, such as Bayesian model selection and automatic relevance determination.

  16. Synaptic Control of Secretory Trafficking in Dendrites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cyril Hanus

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Localized signaling in neuronal dendrites requires tight spatial control of membrane composition. Upon initial synthesis, nascent secretory cargo in dendrites exits the endoplasmic reticulum (ER from local zones of ER complexity that are spatially coupled to post-ER compartments. Although newly synthesized membrane proteins can be processed locally, the mechanisms that control the spatial range of secretory cargo transport in dendritic segments are unknown. Here, we monitored the dynamics of nascent membrane proteins in dendritic post-ER compartments under regimes of low or increased neuronal activity. In response to activity blockade, post-ER carriers are highly mobile and are transported over long distances. Conversely, increasing synaptic activity dramatically restricts the spatial scale of post-ER trafficking along dendrites. This activity-induced confinement of secretory cargo requires site-specific phosphorylation of the kinesin motor KIF17 by Ca2+/calmodulin-dependent protein kinases (CaMK. Thus, the length scales of early secretory trafficking in dendrites are tuned by activity-dependent regulation of microtubule-dependent transport.

  17. Estimation of Rheological Properties of Snow Subjected to Creep

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chaman Chandel

    2007-07-01

    Full Text Available Creep is one of the most important phenomenons to determine the settlement of snow. Snow,in natural conditions, exists at temperature quite close to its melting point and deforms very fast.The settlement of snow is the result of creep phenomenon under the action of overburdenpressure as well as due to metamorphic processes going on within the snowpack. In thiscommunication, creep behaviour of snow is simulated with four-parameter viscoelastic fluidmodel. This viscoelastic character is basically controlled or monitored by various rheologicalconstants. Estimation of all the rheological constants in the four-parameter viscoelastic fluidmodel appropriate for the creep properties of snow is done. Total 91 uniaxial unconfined constantstress experiments on sieved snow were conducted at controlled temperature conditions. Theeffect of density and varying temperature on these constants is found to be remarkable.

  18. A Bayesian spatial assimilation scheme for snow coverage observations in a gridded snow model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Kolberg

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available A method for assimilating remotely sensed snow covered area (SCA into the snow subroutine of a grid distributed precipitation-runoff model (PRM is presented. The PRM is assumed to simulate the snow state in each grid cell by a snow depletion curve (SDC, which relates that cell's SCA to its snow cover mass balance. The assimilation is based on Bayes' theorem, which requires a joint prior distribution of the SDC variables in all the grid cells. In this paper we propose a spatial model for this prior distribution, and include similarities and dependencies among the grid cells. Used to represent the PRM simulated snow cover state, our joint prior model regards two elevation gradients and a degree-day factor as global variables, rather than describing their effect separately for each cell. This transformation results in smooth normalised surfaces for the two related mass balance variables, supporting a strong inter-cell dependency in their joint prior model. The global features and spatial interdependency in the prior model cause each SCA observation to provide information for many grid cells. The spatial approach similarly facilitates the utilisation of observed discharge. Assimilation of SCA data using the proposed spatial model is evaluated in a 2400 km2 mountainous region in central Norway (61° N, 9° E, based on two Landsat 7 ETM+ images generalized to 1 km2 resolution. An image acquired on 11 May, a week before the peak flood, removes 78% of the variance in the remaining snow storage. Even an image from 4 May, less than a week after the melt onset, reduces this variance by 53%. These results are largely improved compared to a cell-by-cell independent assimilation routine previously reported. Including observed discharge in the updating information improves the 4 May results, but has weak effect on 11 May. Estimated elevation gradients are shown to be sensitive to informational deficits occurring at high altitude, where snowmelt has not started

  19. Observation, Simulation, and Evaluation of Snow Dynamics in the Transitional Snow Zone

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wayand, Nicholas E.

    The frequent mid-winter accumulation and ablation cycles of snowpack within the rain-snow transitional zone play an important role for the maritime basins along the western U.S. mountain ranges. Representation of transitional snowpack within hydrological models has remained a challenge, largely because surface and meteorological conditions frequently remain near the freezing point, which allows large errors in modeled accumulation or ablation to result from small forcing or structural errors. This research aims to improve model representation of accumulation and ablation processes by utilizing new observations within the transitional snow zone combined with novel methods of model evaluation. (Abstract shortened by ProQuest.).

  20. In Situ Observation of Cell-to-Dendrite Transition

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    PAN Xiu-Hong; HONG Yong; JIN Wei-Qing

    2005-01-01

    @@ The cell-to-dendrite transition of succinonitrile melt suspended on a loop-shaped Pt heater is observed in real time by a differential interference microscope coupled with Schlieren technique. The transition is divided into two parts: a dendrite coalition process and a subsequent dendrite elimination process. Firstly the dendrites from the same cell are united into a single dendrite. Secondly the competitive growth of dendrites from different cells leads to the elimination of dendrites. The two processes can be understood when involving crystallographic orientation. In addition, the tip velocity and primary spacing of a cell/dendrite are also measured. It turns out that the primary spacing has a significant jump, whereas the growth velocity has no abrupt change during the cell-to-dendrite transition.

  1. Dendritic cells in melanoma - immunohistochemical study and research trends.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nedelcu, Roxana Ioana; Ion, Daniela Adriana; Holeab, Cosmin Adrian; Cioplea, Mirela Daniela; Brînzea, Alice; Zurac, Sabina Andrada

    2015-01-01

    Cutaneous dendritic cells play multiple physiological roles and are involved in various pathophysiological processes. Research studies of dendritic cells abound in the medical literature. Nevertheless, the role of dendritic cells in melanoma regression phenomenon is not completely understood. We conducted a scientometric analysis in order to highlight the current state on research regarding dendritic cells and melanoma. We also performed an immunohistochemical study, using specific markers for dendritic cells (CD1a, langerin). We evaluated the frequency and distribution of dendritic cells in areas of tumor regression compared to the areas of inflammatory infiltrate of melanoma without regression. The immunohistochemical study we performed revealed that dendritic cells are more frequent in the regressed areas, comparing with non-regressed ones. In regressed areas, dendritic cells have a predominant nodular pattern (19 cases), followed by diffuse isolate pattern (eight cases) and mixed pattern (diffuse and nodular) (three cases). In melanoma without regression, most cases presented a diffuse pattern (27 cases) of dendritic cells distribution. In conclusion, our immunohistochemical study stressed differences between frequency and distribution of dendritic cells located in the melanoma with regression and melanoma without regression. These data suggest that dendritic cells are involved in the regression phenomenon. Following the literature analysis we obtained, we observed that dendritic cells profile in melanoma with regression was poorly studied. Insights into antitumor immune response and dendritic cells may be essential for the understanding of the potential prognostic role of dendritic cells in melanoma and for the development of new promising therapeutic strategies for melanoma.

  2. The Location of the Snow Line in Protostellar Disks

    CERN Document Server

    Podolak, Morris

    2009-01-01

    The snow line in a gas disk is defined as the distance from the star beyond which the water ice is stable against evaporation. Since oxygen is the most abundant element after hydrogen and helium, the presence of ice grains can have important consequences for disk evolution. However, determining the position of the snow line is not simple. I discuss some of the important processes that affect the position of the snow line.

  3. Influence of microscale in snow distributed modelling in semiarid regions

    OpenAIRE

    Pimentel Leiva, Rafael

    2015-01-01

    This work focuses on the importance of the microscale snow distribution in the modelling of the snow dynamics in semiarid regions. Snow over these areas has particular features that further complicate its measuring, monitoring and modelling (e.g. several snowmelt cycles throughout the year and a very heterogeneous distribution). Most extended GIS-based calculation of snowmelt/accumulation models must deal with non-negligible scales effects below the cell size, which may result ...

  4. Surface effects on the microwave backscatter and emission of snow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fung, A. K.; Stiles, W. H.; Ulaby, F. T.

    1980-01-01

    Measurements were performed with active and passive microwave sensors for both dry and wet snow conditions. A layer of Rayleigh scatterers with irregular surface boundaries is found to be a reasonable model for interpreting passive and active measurements in X- and Ku-bands. It was found that roughness had a significant effect on both backscatter and emission from wet snow; however, only a small effect was noted for dry snow.

  5. Modelling avalanche danger and understanding snow depth variability

    OpenAIRE

    2010-01-01

    This thesis addresses the causes of avalanche danger at a regional scale. Modelled snow stratigraphy variables were linked to [1] forecasted avalanche danger and [2] observed snowpack stability. Spatial variability of snowpack parameters in a region is an additional important factor that influences the avalanche danger. Snow depth and its change during individual snow fall periods are snowpack parameters which can be measured at a high spatial resolution. Hence, the spatial distribution of sn...

  6. Effect of Arctic Amplification on Design Snow Loads in Alaska

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-09-01

    This sampling error is reflected in the results of an extreme value analysis. Extremes obtained from long periods of record are more reliable...infrastructure. The design snow loads for built infrastructure are obtained from the annual maxima by an extreme value analysis (EVA) of the annual maximum... obtained by instantaneously melting the entire snowpack. SWE divided by the specific gravity of the snow is the snow depth. SWE (units of meters or

  7. Influence of snow-cover properties on avalanche dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steinkogler, W.; Sovilla, B.; Lehning, M.

    2012-04-01

    Snow avalanches with the potential of reaching traffic routes and settlements are a permanent winter threat for many mountain communities. Snow safety officers have to take the decision whether to close a road, a railway line or a ski slope. Those decisions are often very difficult as they demand the ability to interpret weather forecasts, to establish their implication for the stability and the structure of the snow cover and to evaluate the influence of the snow cover on avalanche run-out distances. In the operational programme 'Italy-Switzerland, project STRADA' we focus on the effects of snow cover on avalanche dynamics, and thus run-out distance, with the aim to provide a better understanding of this influence and to ultimately develop tools to support snow safety officers in their decision process. We selected five avalanches, measured at the Vallée de la Sionne field site, with similar initial mass and topography but different flow dynamics and run-out distances. Significant differences amongst the individual avalanches could be observed for front and internal velocities, impact pressures, flow regimes, deposition volumes and run-out distances. For each of these avalanches, the prevailing snow conditions at release were reconstructed using field data from local snowpits or were modeled with SNOWPACK. Combining flow dynamical data with snow cover properties shows that erodible snow depth, snow density and snow temperature in the snow pack along the avalanche track are among the decisive variables that appear to explain the observed differences. It is further discussed, how these influencing factors can be quantified and used for improved predictions of site and time specific avalanche hazard.

  8. Application of Bayesian decision theory to airborne gamma snow measurement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bissell, V. C.

    1975-01-01

    Measured values of several variables are incorporated into the calculation of snow water equivalent as measured from an aircraft by snow attenuation of terrestrial gamma radiation. Bayesian decision theory provides a snow water equivalent measurement by taking into account the uncertainties in the individual measurement variables and filtering information about the measurement variables through prior notions of what the calculated variable (water equivalent) should be.

  9. Accumulation of hydroxycinnamic acid amides in winter wheat under snow.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jin, Shigeki; Yoshida, Midori; Nakajima, Takashi; Murai, Akio

    2003-06-01

    It was found that the content of antifungal compounds p-coumaroylagmatine [1-(trans-4'-hydroxycinnamoylamino)-4-guanidinobutane] and p-coumaroyl-3-hydroxyagmatine [1-(trans-4'-hydroxycinnamoylamino)-3-hydroxy-4-guanidinobutane] in the crown of winter wheat (Triticum aestivum L. cv Chihokukomugi) significantly increased under snow cover. This finding suggests that the accumulation of these hydroxycinnamic acid amides was caused by winter stress and related to protecting the plant against snow mold under snow cover.

  10. Improving the snow physics of WEB-DHM and its point evaluation at the SnowMIP sites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Shrestha

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available In this study, the snow physics of a distributed biosphere hydrological model, referred to as the Water and Energy Budget based Distributed Hydrological Model (WEB-DHM is significantly improved by incorporating the three-layer physically based energy balance snowmelt model of Simplified Simple Biosphere 3 (SSiB3 and the Biosphere-Atmosphere Transfer Scheme (BATS albedo scheme. WEB-DHM with improved snow physics is hereafter termed WEB-DHM-S. Since the in-situ observations of spatially-distributed snow variables with high resolution are currently not available over large regions, the new distributed system (WEB-DHM-S is at first rigorously tested with comprehensive point measurements. The stations used for evaluation comprise the four open sites of the Snow Model Intercomparison Project (SnowMIP phase 1 with different climate characteristics (Col de Porte in France, Weissfluhjoch in Switzerland, Goose Bay in Canada and Sleepers River in USA and one open/forest site of the SnowMIP phase 2 (Hitsujigaoka in Japan. The comparisons of the snow depth, snow water equivalent, surface temperature, snow albedo and snowmelt runoff at the SnowMIP1 sites reveal that WEB-DHM-S, in general, is capable of simulating the internal snow process better than the original WEB-DHM. Sensitivity tests (through incremental addition of model processes are performed to illustrate the necessity of improvements over WEB-DHM and indicate that both the 3-layer snow module and the new albedo scheme are essential. The canopy effects on snow processes are studied at the Hitsujigaoka site of the SnowMIP2 showing that the snow holding capacity of the canopy plays a vital role in simulating the snow depth on ground. Through these point evaluations and sensitivity studies, WEB-DHM-S has demonstrated the potential to address basin-scale snow processes (e.g., the snowmelt runoff, since it inherits the distributed hydrological framework from the WEB-DHM (e.g., the slope-driven runoff

  11. Architecture of apical dendrites in the murine neocortex: dual apical dendritic systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Escobar, M I; Pimienta, H; Caviness, V S; Jacobson, M; Crandall, J E; Kosik, K S

    1986-04-01

    A monoclonal antibody (5F9) against microtubule-associated protein 2 is a selective and sensitive marker for neocortical dendrites in the mouse. The marker stains all dendrites. It affords a particularly comprehensive picture of the patterns of arrangements of apical dendrites which are most intensely stained with this antibody. Dual systems of apical dendrites arise from the polymorphic neurons of layer VI, on the one hand, and the pyramidal neurons of layers II-V, on the other. Terminal arborization of the former is concentrated principally at the interface of layers V and IV, while that of the latter is in the molecular layer. Apical dendrites of both systems are grouped into fascicles. In supragranular layers and in upper layer VI-lower layer V, where apical dendrites are most abundant, the fascicles coalesce into septa. These generate a honeycomb-like pattern, subdividing these cortical levels into columnar spaces of approximately 20-40 micron diameter. At the level of layer IV, where the number of apical dendrites is greatly reduced, the fascicles are isolated bundles. These bundles have the form of circular, elliptical or rectangular columns in the primary somatosensory, temporal and frontal regions, respectively. Those in the barrel field are preferentially concentrated in the sides of barrels and the interbarrel septa. The configurations of the dendritic fascicles, particularly the midcortical bundles, may conform to the spatial configuration of investing axons of interneurons.

  12. Snow cover data derived from MODIS for water balance applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Gafurov

    2009-02-01

    Full Text Available Snow cover information is of central importance for the estimation of water storage in cold mountainous regions. It is difficult to assess distributed snow cover information in a catchment in order to estimate possible water resources. It is especially a challenge to obtain snow cover information for high mountainous areas. Usually, snow depth is measured at meteorological stations, and it is relatively difficult to extrapolate this spatially or temporally since it highly depends on available energy and topography. The snow coverage of a catchment gives detailed information about the catchment's potential source for water. Many regions lack meteorological stations that measure snow, and usually no stations are available at high elevations.

    Satellite information is a very valuable source for obtaining several environmental parameters. One of the advantages is that the data is mostly provided in a spatially distributed format. This study uses satellite data to estimate snow coverage on high mountainous areas. Moderate-resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS snow cover data is used in the Kokcha Catchment located in the north-eastern part of Afghanistan. The main disadvantage of MODIS data that restricts its direct use in environmental applications is cloud coverage. This is why this study is focused on eliminating cloud covered cells and estimating cell information under cloud covered cells using six logical, spatial and temporal approaches. The results give total cloud removal and mapping of snow cover for the study areas.

  13. Evaluating Multispectral Snowpack Reflectivity With Changing Snow Correlation Lengths

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, Do Hyuk; Barros, Ana P.; Kim, Edward J.

    2016-01-01

    This study investigates the sensitivity of multispectral reflectivity to changing snow correlation lengths. Matzler's ice-lamellae radiative transfer model was implemented and tested to evaluate the reflectivity of snow correlation lengths at multiple frequencies from the ultraviolet (UV) to the microwave bands. The model reveals that, in the UV to infrared (IR) frequency range, the reflectivity and correlation length are inversely related, whereas reflectivity increases with snow correlation length in the microwave frequency range. The model further shows that the reflectivity behavior can be mainly attributed to scattering rather than absorption for shallow snowpacks. The largest scattering coefficients and reflectivity occur at very small correlation lengths (approximately 10(exp -5 m) for frequencies higher than the IR band. In the microwave range, the largest scattering coefficients are found at millimeter wavelengths. For validation purposes, the ice-lamella model is coupled with a multilayer snow physics model to characterize the reflectivity response of realistic snow hydrological processes. The evolution of the coupled model simulated reflectivities in both the visible and the microwave bands is consistent with satellite-based reflectivity observations in the same frequencies. The model results are also compared with colocated in situ snow correlation length measurements (Cold Land Processes Field Experiment 2002-2003). The analysis and evaluation of model results indicate that the coupled multifrequency radiative transfer and snow hydrology modeling system can be used as a forward operator in a data-assimilation framework to predict the status of snow physical properties, including snow correlation length.

  14. Snow Leopard: Ecology and Conservation Issues in India

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Abhishek Ghoshal

    2017-07-01

    Snow leopard, an elusive mammal species of the cat family,is the top-predator of the Central and South Asian, highaltitudeecosystem. Snow leopards occur at low densities acrossthe Central Asian mountains and the Indian Himalayan region.Owing to their secretive nature and inaccessible habitat,little is known about its ecology and distribution. Due toits endangered status and high aesthetic value, the snow leopardis considered as an ‘umbrella species’ for wildlife conservationin the Indian Himalayas. This article summarizes thecurrent knowledge on snow leopard ecology and conservationissues in the Indian context.

  15. Idiosyncratic responses of high Arctic plants to changing snow regimes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rumpf, Sabine B; Semenchuk, Philipp R; Dullinger, Stefan; Cooper, Elisabeth J

    2014-01-01

    The Arctic is one of the ecosystems most affected by climate change; in particular, winter temperatures and precipitation are predicted to increase with consequent changes to snow cover depth and duration. Whether the snow-free period will be shortened or prolonged depends on the extent and temporal patterns of the temperature and precipitation rise; resulting changes will likely affect plant growth with cascading effects throughout the ecosystem. We experimentally manipulated snow regimes using snow fences and shoveling and assessed aboveground size of eight common high arctic plant species weekly throughout the summer. We demonstrated that plant growth responded to snow regime, and that air temperature sum during the snow free period was the best predictor for plant size. The majority of our studied species showed periodic growth; increases in plant size stopped after certain cumulative temperatures were obtained. Plants in early snow-free treatments without additional spring warming were smaller than controls. Response to deeper snow with later melt-out varied between species and categorizing responses by growth forms or habitat associations did not reveal generic trends. We therefore stress the importance of examining responses at the species level, since generalized predictions of aboveground growth responses to changing snow regimes cannot be made.

  16. Idiosyncratic responses of high Arctic plants to changing snow regimes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sabine B Rumpf

    Full Text Available The Arctic is one of the ecosystems most affected by climate change; in particular, winter temperatures and precipitation are predicted to increase with consequent changes to snow cover depth and duration. Whether the snow-free period will be shortened or prolonged depends on the extent and temporal patterns of the temperature and precipitation rise; resulting changes will likely affect plant growth with cascading effects throughout the ecosystem. We experimentally manipulated snow regimes using snow fences and shoveling and assessed aboveground size of eight common high arctic plant species weekly throughout the summer. We demonstrated that plant growth responded to snow regime, and that air temperature sum during the snow free period was the best predictor for plant size. The majority of our studied species showed periodic growth; increases in plant size stopped after certain cumulative temperatures were obtained. Plants in early snow-free treatments without additional spring warming were smaller than controls. Response to deeper snow with later melt-out varied between species and categorizing responses by growth forms or habitat associations did not reveal generic trends. We therefore stress the importance of examining responses at the species level, since generalized predictions of aboveground growth responses to changing snow regimes cannot be made.

  17. Research of Snow-Melt Process on a Heated Platform

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vasilyev Gregory P.

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The article has shown the results of experimental researches of the snow-melt on a heated platform-near building heat-pump snow-melt platform. The near-building (yard heat pump platforms for snow melt with the area up to 10-15 m2 are a basis of the new ideology of organization of the street cleaning of Moscow from snow in the winter period which supposes the creation in the megalopolis of the «distributed snow-melt system» (DSMS using non-traditional energy sources. The results of natural experimental researches are presented for the estimation of efficiency of application in the climatic conditions of Moscow of heat pumps in the snow-melt systems. The researches were conducted on a model sample of the near-building heat-pump platform which uses the low-potential thermal energy of atmospheric air. The conducted researches have confirmed experimentally in the natural conditions the possibility and efficiency of using of atmospheric air as a source of low-potential thermal energy for evaporation of the snow-melt heat pump systems in the climatic conditions of Moscow. The results of laboratory researches of snow-melt process on a heated horizontal platform are presented. The researches have revealed a considerable dependence of efficiency of the snow-melt process on its piling mode (form-building and the organization of the process of its piling mode (form-building and the organization of the process of its (snow mass heat exchange with the surface of the heated platform. In the process of researches the effect of formation of an «ice dome» under the melting snow mass called by the fact that in case of the thickness of snow loaded on the platform more than 10 cm the water formed from the melting snow while the contact with the heating surface don’t spread on it, but soaks into the snow, wets it due to capillary effect and freezes. The formation of «ice dome» leads to a sharp increase of snow-melt period and decreases the operating

  18. Cloudiness and snow cover in Alpine areas from MODIS products

    Science.gov (United States)

    Da Ronco, P.; De Michele, C.

    2014-04-01

    Snow cover maps provide an information of great practical interest for hydrologic purposes: when combined with point values of snow water equivalent (SWE), they allow to estimate the regional snow resource. Earth observation satellites are an interesting tool for evaluating large scale snow distribution and extension. In this context, MODIS (MODerate resolution Imaging Spectroradiometeron on board Terra and Aqua satellites) daily Snow Covered Area product has been widely tested and proved to be appropriate for hydrologic applications. However, within a daily map the presence of cloudiness can hide the ground, thus preventing snow detection. Here, we considered MODIS binary products for daily snow mapping over Po river basin. Modeling the variability of snow cover duration, distribution and snow water equivalent is a first important step in investigating climate change impacts on the regime of the major Italian river. Ten years (2003-2012) of MOD10A1 and MYD10A1 snow maps have been analyzed and processed with the support of 500 m-resolution Digital Elevation Model (DEM). We firstly investigated the issue of cloudiness, highlighting its dependence on altitude and season. Snow maps seem to suffer the influence of overcast conditions mainly in mountain and during the melting season. Such a result is certainly related to satellite crossing times, since cloud coverage over mountains usually increases in the afternoon: however, in Aqua and Terra snow products it highly influences those areas where snow detection is regarded with more interest. In spring, the average percentages of area lying beneath clouds are in the order of 70%, for altitudes over 1000 m a.s.l. Then, on the basis of previous studies, we proposed a cloud removal procedure and its application to a wide area, characterized by high topographic and geomorphological heterogeneities such as northern Italy. While conceiving the new method, our first target was to preserve the daily temporal resolution of the

  19. Snow cover data derived from MODIS for water balance applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gafurov, A.; Bárdossy, A.

    2009-02-01

    Snow cover information is of central importance for the estimation of water storage in cold mountainous regions. It is difficult to assess distributed snow cover information in a catchment in order to estimate possible water resources. It is especially a challenge to obtain snow cover information for high mountainous areas. Usually, snow depth is measured at meteorological stations, and it is relatively difficult to extrapolate this spatially or temporally since it highly depends on available energy and topography. The snow coverage of a catchment gives detailed information about the catchment's potential source for water. Many regions lack meteorological stations that measure snow, and usually no stations are available at high elevations. Satellite information is a very valuable source for obtaining several environmental parameters. One of the advantages is that the data is mostly provided in a spatially distributed format. This study uses satellite data to estimate snow coverage on high mountainous areas. Moderate-resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) snow cover data is used in the Kokcha Catchment located in the north-eastern part of Afghanistan. The main disadvantage of MODIS data that restricts its direct use in environmental applications is cloud coverage. This is why this study is focused on eliminating cloud covered cells and estimating cell information under cloud covered cells using six logical, spatial and temporal approaches. The results give total cloud removal and mapping of snow cover for the study areas.

  20. Black Carbon in Seasonal Snow across Northern Xinjiang, Northwestern China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ye, H.; Zhang, R.; Shi, J.; Huang, J.; Warren, S. G.; Fu, Q.

    2012-12-01

    Black carbon (BC) particles in snow can significantly reduce the snow albedo and enhance the absorption of solar radiation, with important impacts on climate and the hydrological cycle. A field campaign was carried out to measure the BC content in seasonal snow in Qinghai and Xinjiang provinces of western China, in January and February, 2012. About 300 snow samples were collected at 38 sites, 6 in Qinghai and 32 in Xinjiang. The observational results at the sites in Xinjiang, where the dominant absorbing impurities in snow are BC particles, are reported in this paper. The BC mass-fractions in seasonal snow across northern Xinjiang have a median value of ~70 ng/g, lower than those in northeast China but comparable to those in snow on glaciers of the Tianshan Mountains. The estimated concentration of BC at the cleanest site in Xinjiang is 20 ng/g, which is similar to that found along the coast of the Arctic Ocean. In general, the BC content of snow decreases with altitude. The data from this field campaign should be useful for testing transport models and climate models for the simulated BC in snow.

  1. Snow hydrology in Mediterranean mountain regions: A review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fayad, Abbas; Gascoin, Simon; Faour, Ghaleb; López-Moreno, Juan Ignacio; Drapeau, Laurent; Page, Michel Le; Escadafal, Richard

    2017-08-01

    Water resources in Mediterranean regions are under increasing pressure due to climate change, economic development, and population growth. Many Mediterranean rivers have their headwaters in mountainous regions where hydrological processes are driven by snowpack dynamics and the specific variability of the Mediterranean climate. A good knowledge of the snow processes in the Mediterranean mountains is therefore a key element of water management strategies in such regions. The objective of this paper is to review the literature on snow hydrology in Mediterranean mountains to identify the existing knowledge, key research questions, and promising technologies. We collected 620 peer-reviewed papers, published between 1913 and 2016, that deal with the Mediterranean-like mountain regions in the western United States, the central Chilean Andes, and the Mediterranean basin. A large amount of studies in the western United States form a strong scientific basis for other Mediterranean mountain regions. We found that: (1) the persistence of snow cover is highly variable in space and time but mainly controlled by elevation and precipitation; (2) the snowmelt is driven by radiative fluxes, but the contribution of heat fluxes is stronger at the end of the snow season and during heat waves and rain-on-snow events; (3) the snow densification rates are higher in these regions when compared to other climate regions; and (4) the snow sublimation is an important component of snow ablation, especially in high-elevation regions. Among the pressing issues is the lack of continuous ground observation in high-elevation regions. However, a few years of snow depth (HS) and snow water equivalent (SWE) data can provide realistic information on snowpack variability. A better spatial characterization of snow cover can be achieved by combining ground observations with remotely sensed snow data. SWE reconstruction using satellite snow cover area and a melt model provides reasonable information that

  2. Snow cover changes in the Hindu-Kush Karakoram Himalaya

    Science.gov (United States)

    Terzago, Silvia; Von Hardenberg, Jost; Palazzi, Elisa; Provenzale, Antonello

    2013-04-01

    Snow cover plays a key role in high-altitude environments, and changes in the snow spatial/temporal distribution and thickness affect energy, radiation and water budgets at the Earth's surface. In particular, a reduction in the snow amount has a direct effect on the availability and seasonal distribution of water resources. This is especially true in areas such as the Hindu-Kush Karakoram Himalaya (HKKH) region, which provides water to about 1.5 Billion peoples in India, Nepal, Pakistan and China. Despite its importance, knowledge on snow dynamics in the HKKH region is still incomplete, owing also to sparse and sporadic surface observations. In this work, we used simulations from Global Climate Models (GCMs) to gain information on snowpack characteristics and climatology in the HKKH region. We selected a set of GCM snow depth datasets from the CMIP5 ensemble, esploring snow abundance and distribution at monthly scale. In order to investigate how well Global Climate Models represent the snow climatology, we compared the results with the ERA-Interim reanalysis, used as an approximation to the real conditions. After exploring the average snow conditions in the last decades, we analyzed the effects of climate change in the HKKH region by using an ensemble of future snow projections obtained from different GCMs and in different climate change scenarios.

  3. Snow optical properties at Dome C (Concordia, Antarctica; implications for snow emissions and snow chemistry of reactive nitrogen

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. L. France

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Measurements of e-folding depth, nadir reflectivity and stratigraphy of the snowpack around Concordia station (Dome C, 75.10° S, 123.31° E were undertaken to determine wavelength dependent coefficients (350 nm to 550 nm for light scattering and absorption and to calculate potential fluxes (depth-integrated production rates of nitrogen dioxide (NO2 from the snowpack due to nitrate photolysis within the snowpack. The stratigraphy of the top 80 cm of Dome C snowpack generally consists of three main layers:- a surface of soft windpack (not ubiquitous, a hard windpack, and a hoar-like layer beneath the windpack(s. The e-folding depths are ~10 cm for the two windpack layers and ~20 cm for the hoar-like layer for solar radiation at a wavelength of 400 nm; about a factor 2–4 larger than previous model estimates for South Pole. The absorption cross-section due to impurities in each snowpack layer are consistent with a combination of absorption due to black carbon and HULIS (HUmic LIke Substances, with amounts of 1–2 ng g−1 of black carbon for the surface snow layers. Depth-integrated photochemical production rates of NO2 in the Dome C snowpack were calculated as 5.3 × 1012 molecules m−2 s−1, 2.3 × 1012 molecules m−2 s−1 and 8 × 1011 molecules m−2 s−1 for clear skies and solar zenith angles of 60°, 70° and 80° respectively using the TUV-snow radiative-transfer model. Depending upon the snowpack stratigraphy, a minimum of 85% of the NO2 may originate from the top 20 cm of the Dome C snowpack. It is found that on a multi-annual time-scale photolysis can remove up to 80% of nitrate from surface snow, confirming independent isotopic evidence that photolysis is an important driver of nitrate loss occurring in the EAIS (East Antarctic Ice Sheet snowpack. However, the model cannot

  4. Targeting vaccines to dendritic cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foged, Camilla; Sundblad, Anne; Hovgaard, Lars

    2002-03-01

    Dendritic cells (DC) are specialized antigen presenting cells (APC) with a remarkable ability to take up antigens and stimulate major histocompatibility complex (MHC)-restricted specific immune responses. Recent discoveries have shown that their role in initiating primary immune responses seems to be far superior to that of B-cells and macrophages. DC are localized at strategic places in the body at sites used by pathogens to enter the organism, and are thereby in an optimal position to capture antigens. In general, vaccination strategies try to mimic the invasiveness of the pathogens. DC are considered to play a central role for the provocation of primary immune responses by vaccination. A rational way of improving the potency and safety of new and already existing vaccines could therefore be to direct vaccines specifically to DC. There is a need for developing multifunctional vaccine drug delivery systems (DDS) with adjuvant effect that target DC directly and induce optimal immune responses. This paper will review the current knowledge of DC physiology as well as the progress in the field of novel vaccination strategies that directly or indirectly aim at targeting DC.

  5. Soil, snow, weather, and sub-surface storage data from a mountain catchment in the rain–snow transition zone

    OpenAIRE

    P. R. Kormos; Marks, D.; Williams, C J; H. P. Marshall; P. Aishlin; D. G. Chandler; J. P. McNamara

    2014-01-01

    A comprehensive hydroclimatic data set is presented for the 2011 water year to improve understanding of hydrologic processes in the rain–snow transition zone. This type of data set is extremely rare in scientific literature because of the quality and quantity of soil depth, soil texture, soil moisture, and soil temperature data. Standard meteorological and snow cover data for the entire 2011 water year are included, which include several rain-on-snow (ROS) events. Surface so...

  6. Georectification and snow classification of webcam images: potential for complementing satellite-derrived snow maps over Switzerland

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dizerens, Céline; Hüsler, Fabia; Wunderle, Stefan

    2016-04-01

    The spatial and temporal variability of snow cover has a significant impact on climate and environment and is of great socio-economic importance for the European Alps. Satellite remote sensing data is widely used to study snow cover variability and can provide spatially comprehensive information on snow cover extent. However, cloud cover strongly impedes the surface view and hence limits the number of useful snow observations. Outdoor webcam images not only offer unique potential for complementing satellite-derived snow retrieval under cloudy conditions but could also serve as a reference for improved validation of satellite-based approaches. Thousands of webcams are currently connected to the Internet and deliver freely available images with high temporal and spatial resolutions. To exploit the untapped potential of these webcams, a semi-automatic procedure was developed to generate snow cover maps based on webcam images. We used daily webcam images of the Swiss alpine region to apply, improve, and extend existing approaches dealing with the positioning of photographs within a terrain model, appropriate georectification, and the automatic snow classification of such photographs. In this presentation, we provide an overview of the implemented procedure and demonstrate how our registration approach automatically resolves the orientation of a webcam by using a high-resolution digital elevation model and the webcam's position. This allows snow-classified pixels of webcam images to be related to their real-world coordinates. We present several examples of resulting snow cover maps, which have the same resolution as the digital elevation model and indicate whether each grid cell is snow-covered, snow-free, or not visible from webcams' positions. The procedure is expected to work under almost any weather condition and demonstrates the feasibility of using webcams for the retrieval of high-resolution snow cover information.

  7. A Look at Seasonal Snow Cover and Snow Mass in the Southern Hemisphere from 1979-2006 Using SMMR and SSM/I Passive Microwave Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foster, James

    2009-01-01

    Seasonal snow cover in extra-tropical areas of South America was examined in this study using passive microwave satellite data from the Scanning Multichannel Microwave Radiometer (SMMR) on board the Nimbus-7 satellite and from the Special Sensor Microwave Imagers (SSM/I) on board the Defense Meteorological Satellite Program (DMSP) satellites. For the period from 1979-2006, both snow cover extent and snow mass were estimated for the months of May-September. Most of the seasonal snow in South America occurs in the Patagonia region of Argentina. The average snow cover extent for July, the month with the greatest average extent during the 28-year period of record, is 321,674 sq km. The seasonal (May-September) 2 average snow cover extent was greatest in 1984 (464,250 sq km) and least in 1990 (69,875 sq km). In terms of snow mass, 1984 was also the biggest year (1.19 x 10(exp 13) kg) and 1990 was the smallest year (0.12 X 10(exp 13) kg). A strong relationship exists between the snow cover area and snow mass, correlated at 0.95, though no significant trend was found over the 28 year record for either snow cover extent or snow mass. For this long term climatology, snow mass and snow cover extent are shown to vary considerably from month to month and season to season. This analysis presents a consistent approach to mapping and measuring snow in South America utilizing an appropriate and readily available long term snow satellite dataset. This is the optimal dataset available, thus far, for deriving seasonal snow cover and snow mass in this region. Nonetheless, shallow snow, wet snow, snow beneath forests, as well as snow along coastal areas all may confound interpretation using passive microwave approaches. More work needs to be done to reduce the uncertainties in the data and hence, increase the confidence of the interpretation

  8. Blocking of Snow/Water Slurry Flow in Pipeline Caused by Compression-Strengthening of Snow Column

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Masataka Shirakashi

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available In earlier works by the present authors, two systems for sustainable energy were proposed: (i a system for urban snow removal in winter and storage for air conditioning in summer, applied to Nagaoka City, which suffers heavy snow fall every winter, and (ii a district cooling system utilizing latent heat of ice to reduce the size of storage reservoir and transportation pipeline system. In these systems, the hydraulic conveying of snow or ice through pump-and-pipeline is the key technique to be developed, since characteristics of snow (ice/ water slurry is largely different from those of conventional non-cohesive solid particle slurries. In this study, the blocking of pipeline of snow/water slurry is investigated experimentally. While the blocking of conventional slurry occurs due to deposition of heavy particles at low flow velocity or arching of large rigid particles, that of snow/water slurry is caused by a compressed plug of snow formed due to cohesive nature of snow particles. This is because the strength of snow plug formed at a high resistance piping element, such as an orifice, becomes higher when the compression velocity is lower, resulting in a solid-like plug filling the whole channel upstream the element.

  9. Snow instability evaluation in skier-triggered snow slab avalanches: combining failure initiation and crack propagation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaume, Johan; Reuter, Benjamin

    2017-04-01

    Dry-snow slab avalanches start with a local failure in a weak snowpack layer buried below cohesive snow slab layers. If the size of the failed zone exceeds a critical size, rapid crack propagation occurs possibly followed by slab release if the slope is steep enough. The probability of skier-triggering a slab avalanche is generally characterized by classical stability indices that do not account for crack propagation. In this study, we propose a new model to evaluate the conditions for the onset of crack propagation in skier-triggered slab avalanches. For a given weak layer, the critical crack length characterizing crack propagation propensity was compared to the size of the area where the skier-induced stress exceeds the shear strength of the weak layer. The ratio between both length scales yields a stability criterion combining the processes of failure initiation and crack propagation. The critical crack length was calculated from a recently developed model based on numerical simulations. The skier-induced stress was computed from analytical solutions and finite element simulations to account for slab layering. A detailed sensitivity analysis was performed for simplified snow profiles to characterize the influence of snowpack properties and slab layering on crack propagation propensity. Finally, we applied our approach for manually observed snow profiles and compared our results to rutschblock stability tests.

  10. Modeling the isotopic composition of Antarctic snow using backward trajectories: simulation of snow pit records

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Helsen, M.M.; van de Wal, R.S.W.; van den Broeke, M.R.; Masson-Delmotte, V.; Meijer, H.A.J.; Scheele, M.P.; Werner, M.

    2006-01-01

    The quantitative interpretation of isotope records (d18O, dD, and d excess) in ice cores can benefit from a comparison of observed meteorology with associated isotope variability. For this reason we studied four isotope records from snow pits in western Dronning Maud Land (DML), Antarctica, covering

  11. Silvering substrates after CO2 snow cleaning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zito, Richard R.

    2005-09-01

    There have been some questions in the astronomical community concerning the quality of silver coatings deposited on substrates that have been cleaned with carbon dioxide snow. These questions center around the possible existence of carbonate ions left behind on the substrate by CO2. Such carbonate ions could react with deposited silver to produce insoluble silver carbonate, thereby reducing film adhesion and reflectivity. Carbonate ions could be produced from CO2 via the following mechanism. First, during CO2 snow cleaning, a small amount of moisture can condense on a surface. This is especially true if the jet of CO2 is allowed to dwell on one spot. CO2 gas can dissolve in this moisture, producing carbonic acid, which can undergo two acid dissociations to form carbonate ions. In reality, it is highly unlikely that charged carbonate ions will remain stable on a substrate for very long. As condensed water evaporates, Le Chatelier's principle will shift the equilibrium of the chain of reactions that produced carbonate back to CO2 gas. Furthermore, the hydration of CO2 reaction of CO2 with H20) is an extremely slow process, and the total dehydrogenation of carbonic acid is not favored. Living tissues that must carry out the equilibration of carbonic acid and CO2 use the enzyme carbonic anhydrase to speed up the reaction by a factor of one million. But no such enzymatic action is present on a clean mirror substrate. In short, the worst case analysis presented below shows that the ratio of silver atoms to carbonate radicals must be at least 500 million to one. The results of chemical tests presented here support this view. Furthermore, film lift-off tests, also presented in this report, show that silver film adhesion to fused silica substrates is actually enhanced by CO2 snow cleaning.

  12. Characteristics of snow cover in the forest-steppe of Cisbaikalia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. V. Maksyutova

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Statistical parameters and tendencies of the long-term changes in snow cover characteristics of forest-steppe in Fore-Baykal region were evaluated according to the observational data obtained at meteorological stations by means of permanent snow stake as well as using snow survey in the field and in the forest for the long-term period 1961–2000. Duration of snow cover decreases. The snow depth according to the permanent snow stake increases. The observed values of snow survey show that in the field without any significant changes in the snow depth manifest itself the local effect of water supply reduction in the snow cover. The largest rates of decrease of snow depth and snow storage has experienced in the forest. The maximum snow density decreases both in the field and in forest.

  13. Neo-realistic Features in Snow Child

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    夏静林

    2013-01-01

    This essay illustrates neo-realistic features in Snow Child. This short story inherits and develops“the typical character in the typical environment”and the traditional linear time order in realistic works. At the same time, it has some changes and transcendent. It uses real brands, events and goods in reality to create a-true to-life picture of the contemporary world. It ex⁃plores deeper in character’s psychology and creates a circular narration with three flashbacks.

  14. Take control of upgrading to Snow Leopard

    CERN Document Server

    Kissell, Joe

    2009-01-01

    Installing a major new version of Mac OS X should be exciting and fun, but without proper guidance you may find it nerve-wracking or even risk losing valuable files. Fortunately, many thousands of people have upgraded Mac OS X calmly and successfully with Joe Kissell's previous best-selling Take Control of Upgrading... titles. Joe's friendly, expert steps-developed over innumerable test installations-help you to avoid trouble, understand what's going on when you install Snow Leopard, and easily recover from problem

  15. Second International Conference on Snow Engineering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1992-12-01

    Papers of Annual Meeting, Architectural Institute of Japan, 451 -452, October 1990 (in Japanese). Watanabe, M. and Hirai, K. (1991) "Study on Snow Sliding...visitor center facility: "Washington Pass experiences temperatures from minus 30 degrees Farenheit (minus 34 degrees Centigrade) to 90 degrees Farenheit ...Comparison of drift loads by 4 C s8 12 m NBCC and ASCE for Lu =75m Figure 4 Comparison of drift loads by ASCE and ISO 451 TORONTO ASCE . _ =228 m USSR kPa 4

  16. Limitations of using a thermal imager for snow pit temperatures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Schirmer

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Driven by temperature gradients, kinetic snow metamorphism is important for avalanche formation. Even when gradients appear to be insufficient for kinetic metamorphism, based on temperatures measured 10 cm apart, faceting close to a~crust can still be observed. Recent studies that visualized small scale (< 10 cm thermal structures in a profile of snow layers with an infrared (IR camera produced interesting results. The studies found melt-freeze crusts to be warmer or cooler than the surrounding snow depending on the large scale gradient direction. However, an important assumption within the studies was that a thermal photo of a freshly exposed snow pit was similar enough to the internal temperature of the snow. In this study, we tested this assumption by recording thermal videos during the exposure of the snow pit wall. In the first minute, the results showed increasing gradients with time, both at melt-freeze crusts and at artificial surface structures such as shovel scours. Cutting through a crust with a cutting blade or a shovel produced small concavities (holes even when the objective was to cut a planar surface. Our findings suggest there is a surface structure dependency of the thermal image, which is only observed at times with large temperature differences between air and snow. We were able to reproduce the hot-crust/cold-crust phenomenon and relate it entirely to surface structure in a temperature-controlled cold laboratory. Concave areas cooled or warmed slower compared with convex areas (bumps when applying temperature differences between snow and air. This can be explained by increased radiative transfer or convection by air at convex areas. Thermal videos suggest that such processes influence the snow temperature within seconds. Our findings show the limitations of the use of a thermal camera for measuring pit-wall temperatures, particularly in scenarios where large gradients exist between air and snow and the interaction of snow

  17. Causes of snow instability variations at the basin scale

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reuter, Benjamin; Richter, Bettina; Schweizer, Jürg

    2016-04-01

    The alpine snow cover accumulates layers during characteristic meteorological events. The so formed stratigraphic features of the snowpack are known to influence avalanche release processes, such as failure initiation or crack propagation. Synoptic scale meteorological processes are altered by the underlying terrain, which causes micro-meteorological differences at smaller scales, such as the basin scale, for instance. Such micro-meteorological effects of complex snow surfaces were successfully modeled suggesting that the time is ripe to investigate their influence on snow instability. In other words, we aim at identifying the causes of spatial snow instability variations at the scale of a small basin. Over the past years we have compiled several field data sets for a small basin above Davos (Eastern Swiss Alps) covering 400 m by 400 m and consisting of snow penetration resistance profiles collected with the snow micro-penetrometer, terrain data and terrestrial laser scans. Each dataset holds about 150 vertical profiles sampled semi-randomly in the basin and captures the situation of a specific day, hence a particular avalanche situation. At those 150 point measurements the criteria for failure initiation and crack propagation were calculated and their spatial structure was analyzed. Eventually, we were able to model the distribution of snow instability in the basin by external drift kriging. We based the regression models on terrain and snow depth data. Slope aspect was the most prominent driver, but the number of significant covariates depended on the situation. Our results further suggest that the observed differences were caused by external influences possibly due to meteorological forcing as their residual autocorrelation ranges were shorter than the ones of the terrain. Repeating the geostatistical analysis with snow cover model output as covariate data, we were able to identify the causes of the snow instability patterns observed at the basin scale. The most

  18. Impact of climate change in Switzerland on socioeconomic snow indices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmucki, Edgar; Marty, Christoph; Fierz, Charles; Weingartner, Rolf; Lehning, Michael

    2017-02-01

    Snow is a key element for many socioeconomic activities in mountainous regions. Due to the sensitivity of the snow cover to variations of temperature and precipitation, major changes caused by climate change are expected to happen. We analyze the evolution of some key snow indices under future climatic conditions. Ten downscaled and postprocessed climate scenarios from the ENSEMBLES database have been used to feed the physics-based snow model SNOWPACK. The projected snow cover has been calculated for 11 stations representing the diverse climates found in Switzerland. For the first time, such a setup is used to reveal changes in frequently applied snow indices and their implications on various socioeconomic sectors. Toward the end of the twenty-first century, a continuous snow cover is likely only guaranteed at high elevations above 2000 m a.s.l., whereas at mid elevations (1000-1700 m a.s.l.), roughly 50 % of all winters might be characterized by an ephemeral snow cover. Low elevations (below 500 m a.s.l.) are projected to experience only 2 days with snowfall per year and show the strongest relative reductions in mean winter snow depth of around 90 %. The range of the mean relative reductions of the snow indices is dominated by uncertainties from different GCM-RCM projections and amounts to approximately 30 %. Despite these uncertainties, all snow indices show a clear decrease in all scenario periods and the relative reductions increase toward lower elevations. These strong reductions can serve as a basis for policy makers in the fields of tourism, ecology, and hydropower.

  19. Snow Depth Retrieval with UAS Using Photogrammetric Techniques

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Benjamin Vander Jagt

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Alpine areas pose challenges for many existing remote sensing methods for snow depth retrieval, thus leading to uncertainty in water forecasting and budgeting. Herein, we present the results of a field campaign conducted in Tasmania, Australia in 2013 from which estimates of snow depth were derived using a low-cost photogrammetric approach on-board a micro unmanned aircraft system (UAS. Using commercial off-the-shelf (COTS sensors mounted on a multi-rotor UAS and photogrammetric image processing techniques, the results demonstrate that snow depth can be accurately retrieved by differencing two surface models corresponding to the snow-free and snow-covered scenes, respectively. In addition to accurate snow depth retrieval, we show that high-resolution (50 cm spatially continuous snow depth maps can be created using this methodology. Two types of photogrammetric bundle adjustment (BA routines are implemented in this study to determine the optimal estimates of sensor position and orientation, in addition to 3D scene information; conventional BA (which relies on measured ground control points and direct BA (which does not require ground control points. Error sources that affect the accuracy of the BA and subsequent snow depth reconstruction are discussed. The results indicate the UAS is capable of providing high-resolution and high-accuracy (<10 cm estimates of snow depth over a small alpine area (~0.7 ha with significant snow accumulation (depths greater than one meter at a fraction of the cost of full-size aerial survey approaches. The RMSE of estimated snow depths using the conventional BA approach is 9.6 cm, whereas the direct BA is characterized by larger error, with an RMSE of 18.4 cm. If a simple affine transformation is applied to the point cloud derived from the direct BA, the overall RMSE is reduced to 8.8 cm RMSE.

  20. Airborne Surveys of Snow Depth over Arctic Sea Ice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kwok, R.; Panzer, B.; Leuschen, C.; Pang, S.; Markus, T.; Holt, B.; Gogineni, S.

    2011-01-01

    During the spring of 2009, an ultrawideband microwave radar was deployed as part of Operation IceBridge to provide the first cross-basin surveys of snow thickness over Arctic sea ice. In this paper, we analyze data from three approx 2000 km transects to examine detection issues, the limitations of the current instrument, and the regional variability of the retrieved snow depth. Snow depth is the vertical distance between the air \\snow and snow-ice interfaces detected in the radar echograms. Under ideal conditions, the per echogram uncertainty in snow depth retrieval is approx 4 - 5 cm. The finite range resolution of the radar (approx 5 cm) and the relative amplitude of backscatter from the two interfaces limit the direct retrieval of snow depths much below approx 8 cm. Well-defined interfaces are observed over only relatively smooth surfaces within the radar footprint of approx 6.5 m. Sampling is thus restricted to undeformed, level ice. In early April, mean snow depths are 28.5 +/- 16.6 cm and 41.0 +/- 22.2 cm over first-year and multiyear sea ice (MYI), respectively. Regionally, snow thickness is thinner and quite uniform over the large expanse of seasonal ice in the Beaufort Sea, and gets progressively thicker toward the MYI cover north of Ellesmere Island, Greenland, and the Fram Strait. Snow depth over MYI is comparable to that reported in the climatology by Warren et al. Ongoing improvements to the radar system and the utility of these snow depth measurements are discussed.

  1. Snow loads in a changing climate: new risks?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    U. Strasser

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available In January/February 2006, heavy snowfalls in Bavaria (Germany lead to a series of infrastructural damage of catastrophic nature. Since on many collapsed roofs the total snow load was not exceptional, serious engineering deficiencies in roof construction and a sudden rise in the total snow load were considered to be the trigger of the events. An analysis of the then meteorological conditions reveals, that the early winter of 2005/2006 was characterised by an exceptional continuous snow cover, temperatures remained around the freezing point and no significant snowmelt was evident. The frequent freezing/thawing cycles were followed by a general compaction of the snow load. This resulted in a re-distribution and a new concentration of the snow load on specific locations on roofs. With respect to climate change, the question arises as to whether the risks relating to snow loads will increase. The future probability of a continuous snow cover occurrence with frequent freezing/thawing cycles will probably decline due to predicted higher temperatures. However, where temperatures remain low, an increase in winter precipitation will result in increased snow loads. Furthermore, the variability of extremes is predicted to increase. If heavy snowfall events are more frequent, the risk of a trigger event will likely increase. Finally, an attempt will be made here in this paper to outline a concept for an operational warning system for the Bavarian region. This system envisages to predict the development and risk of critical snow loads for a 3-day time period, utilising a combination of climate and snow modelling data and using this together with a snow pillow device (located on roofs and the results of which.

  2. Fractional snow-covered area parameterization over complex topography

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. Helbig

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Fractional snow-covered area (SCA is a key parameter in large-scale hydrological, meteorological and climate models. Since SCA affects albedos and surface energy balance fluxes, it is especially of interest over mountainous terrain where generally a reduced SCA is observed in large grid cells. Temporal and spatial snow distributions are however difficult to measure over complex topography. We therefore present a parameterization of the SCA based on a new subgrid parameterization for the standard deviation of snow depth over complex topography. Highly-resolved snow depth data at peak of winter were used from two distinct climatic regions, in eastern Switzerland and in the Spanish Pyrenees. Topographic scaling parameters are derived assuming Gaussian slope characteristics. We use computationally cheap terrain parameters, namely the correlation length of subgrid topographic features and the mean squared slope. A scale dependent analysis was performed by randomly aggregating the alpine catchments in domain sizes ranging from 50 m to 3 km. For the larger domain sizes, snow depth was predominantly normally distributed. Trends between terrain parameters and standard deviation of snow depth were similar for both climatic regions, allowing to parameterize the standard deviation of snow depth based on terrain parameters. To make the parameterization widely applicable, we introduced the mean snow depth as a climate indicator. Assuming a normal snow distribution and spatially homogeneous melt, snow cover depletion curves were derived for a broad range of coefficients of variations. The most accurate closed form fit resembled an existing SCA parameterization. By including the subgrid parameterization for the standard deviation of snow depth, we extended the SCA parameterization for topographic influences. For all domain sizes we obtained errors lower than 10% between measured and parameterized SCA.

  3. Observations and model simulations of snow albedo reduction in seasonal snow due to insoluble light-absorbing particles during 2014 Chinese survey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xin; Pu, Wei; Ren, Yong; Zhang, Xuelei; Zhang, Xueying; Shi, Jinsen; Jin, Hongchun; Dai, Mingkai; Chen, Quanliang

    2017-02-01

    A snow survey was carried out to collect 13 surface snow samples (10 for fresh snow, and 3 for aged snow) and 79 subsurface snow samples in seasonal snow at 13 sites across northeastern China in January 2014. A spectrophotometer combined with chemical analysis was used to quantify snow particulate absorption by insoluble light-absorbing particles (ILAPs, e.g., black carbon, BC; mineral dust, MD; and organic carbon, OC) in snow. Snow albedo was measured using a field spectroradiometer. A new radiative transfer model (Spectral Albedo Model for Dirty Snow, or SAMDS) was then developed to simulate the spectral albedo of snow based on the asymptotic radiative transfer theory. A comparison between SAMDS and an existing model - the Snow, Ice, and Aerosol Radiation (SNICAR) - indicates good agreements in the model-simulated spectral albedos of pure snow. However, the SNICAR model values tended to be slightly lower than those of SAMDS when BC and MD were considered. Given the measured BC, MD, and OC mixing ratios of 100-5000, 2000-6000, and 1000-30 000 ng g-1, respectively, in surface snow across northeastern China, the SAMDS model produced a snow albedo in the range of 0.95-0.75 for fresh snow at 550 nm, with a snow grain optical effective radius (Reff) of 100 µm. The snow albedo reduction due to spherical snow grains assumed to be aged snow is larger than fresh snow such as fractal snow grains and hexagonal plate or column snow grains associated with the increased BC in snow. For typical BC mixing ratios of 100 ng g-1 in remote areas and 3000 ng g-1 in heavy industrial areas across northern China, the snow albedo for internal mixing of BC and snow is lower by 0.005 and 0.036 than that of external mixing for hexagonal plate or column snow grains with Reff of 100 µm. These results also show that the simulated snow albedos by both SAMDS and SNICAR agree well with the observed values at low ILAP mixing ratios but tend to be higher than surface observations at high ILAP

  4. An Integrated Snow Radiance and Snow Physics Modeling Framework for Cold Land Surface Modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Edward J.; Tedesco, Marco

    2006-01-01

    Recent developments in forward radiative transfer modeling and physical land surface modeling are converging to allow the assembly of an integrated snow/cold lands modeling framework for land surface modeling and data assimilation applications. The key elements of this framework include: a forward radiative transfer model (FRTM) for snow, a snowpack physical model, a land surface water/energy cycle model, and a data assimilation scheme. Together these form a flexible framework for self-consistent remote sensing and water/energy cycle studies. In this paper we will describe the elements and the integration plan. Each element of this framework is modular so the choice of element can be tailored to match the emphasis of a particular study. For example, within our framework, four choices of a FRTM are available to simulate the brightness temperature of snow: Two models are available to model the physical evolution of the snowpack and underlying soil, and two models are available to handle the water/energy balance at the land surface. Since the framework is modular, other models-physical or statistical--can be accommodated, too. All modules will operate within the framework of the Land Information System (LIS), a land surface modeling framework with data assimilation capabilities running on a parallel-node computing cluster at the NASA Goddard Space Flight Center. The advantages of such an integrated modular framework built on the LIS will be described through examples-e.g., studies to analyze snow field experiment observations, and simulations of future satellite missions for snow and cold land processes.

  5. Nerve Conduction Through Dendrites via Proton Hopping.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kier, Lemont B

    2017-01-01

    In our previous studies of nerve conduction conducted by proton hopping, we have considered the axon, soma, synapse and the nodes of Ranvier. The role of proton hopping described the passage of information through each of these units of a typical nerve system. The synapse projects information from the axon to the dendrite and their associated spines. We have invoked the passage of protons via a hopping mechanism to illustrate the continuum of the impulse through the system, via the soma following the dendrites. This is proposed to be a continuum invoked by the proton hopping method. With the proposal of the activity through the dendrites, via proton hopping, a complete model of the nerve function is invoked. At each step to the way, a water pathway is present and is invoked in the proposed model as the carrier of the message via proton hopping. The importance of the dendrites is evident by the presence of a vast number of spines, each possessing the possibility to carry unique messages through the nervous system. With this model of the role of dendrites, functioning with the presence of proton hopping, a complete model of the nerve system is presented. The validity of this model will be available for further studies and models to assess it's validity. Copyright© Bentham Science Publishers; For any queries, please email at epub@benthamscience.org.

  6. Numerical Simulation of the Evolution of Snow Cover and Its Sensitivity Experiments

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CHEN Haishan; SUN Zhaobo

    2005-01-01

    By using Comprehensive Land Surface Model (CLSM), three snow cases, i.e., France Col de Porte 1993/1994, 1994/1995 and BOREAS SSA-OJP 1994/1995, were simulated. The simulated results were compared with the observations to examine the capability of the model to describe the evolutions of snow cover under two different land cover conditions. Several sensitivity experiments were performed to investigate the effects of the parameterization schemes of some snow cover internal processes and vegetation on the model results. Results suggest that the CLSM simulates the basic processes of snow cover accurately and describes the features of snow cover evolutions reasonably, indicating that the model has the potential to model the processes related to the snow cover evolution. It is also found that the different parameterization schemes of the snowfall density and snow water holding capacity have significant effects on the simulation of snow cover. The estimation of snowfall density mainly impacts the simulated snow depth, and the underestimation (overestimation) of the snowfall density increases (decreases) the snow depth simulated significantly but with little effect on the simulated snow water equivalent (SWE). The parameterization of the snow water holding capacity plays a crucial role in the evolution of snow cover, especially in the ablation of snow cover. Larger snow water holding capacity usually leads to larger snow density and heat capacity by storing more liquid water in the snow layer, and makes the temperature of snow cover and the snow ablation vary more slowly.To a smaller snow water holding capacity, contrary is the case. The results also show that the physical processes related to the snow cover variation are different, which are dependent on the vegetation existed.Vegetation plays an important role in the evolution of soil-snow system by changing the energy balance at the snow-soil surface. The existence of vegetation is favorable to the maintenance of snow

  7. Early results from NASA's SnowEx campaign

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Edward; Gatebe, Charles; Hall, Dorothy; Misakonis, Amy; Elder, Kelly; Marshall, Hans Peter; Hiemstra, Chris; Brucker, Ludovic; Crawford, Chris; Kang, Do Hyuk; De Marco, Eugenia; Beckley, Matt; Entin, Jared

    2017-04-01

    SnowEx is a multi-year airborne snow campaign with the primary goal of addressing the question: How much water is stored in Earth's terrestrial snow-covered regions? Year 1 (2016-17) focuses on the distribution of snow-water equivalent (SWE) and the snow energy balance in a forested environment. The year 1 primary site is Grand Mesa and the secondary site is the Senator Beck Basin, both in western, Colorado, USA. Ten core sensors on four core aircraft will make observations using a broad suite of airborne sensors including active and passive microwave, and active and passive optical/infrared sensing techniques to determine the sensitivity and accuracy of these potential satellite remote sensing techniques, along with models, to measure snow under a range of forest conditions. SnowEx also includes an extensive range of ground truth measurements—in-situ samples, snow pits, ground based remote sensing measurements, and sophisticated new techniques. A detailed description of the data collected will be given and some early results will be presented. Seasonal snow cover is the largest single component of the cryosphere in areal extent (covering an average of 46M km2 of Earth's surface (31 % of land areas) each year). This seasonal snow has major societal impacts in the areas of water resources, natural hazards (floods and droughts), water security, and weather and climate. The only practical way to estimate the quantity of snow on a consistent global basis is through satellites. Yet, current space-based techniques underestimate storage of snow water equivalent (SWE) by as much as 50%, and model-based estimates can differ greatly vs. estimates based on remotely-sensed observations. At peak coverage, as much as half of snow-covered terrestrial areas involve forested areas, so quantifying the challenge represented by forests is important to plan any future snow mission. Single-sensor approaches may work for certain snow types and certain conditions, but not for others

  8. Air-snow exchange of nitrate: a modelling approach to investigate physicochemical processes in surface snow at Dome C, Antarctica

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bock, Josué; Savarino, Joël; Picard, Ghislain

    2016-04-01

    Snowpack is a multiphase (photo)chemical reactor that strongly influences the air composition in polar and snow-covered regions. Snowpack plays a special role in the nitrogen cycle, as it has been shown that nitrate undergoes numerous recycling stages (including photolysis) in the snow before being permanently buried in the firn. However, the current understanding of these physicochemical processes remains very poor. Several modelling studies have attempted to reproduce (photo)chemical reactions inside snow grains, but these required strong assumptions to characterise snow reactive properties, which are not well defined. Physical processes such as adsorption, solid state diffusion and co-condensation also affect snow chemical composition. We developed a model including a physically based parameterisation of these air-snow exchange processes for nitrate. This modelling study divides into two distinct parts: firstly, surface concentration of nitrate adsorbed onto snow is calculated using existing isotherm parametrisation. Secondly, bulk concentration of nitrate in solid solution into the ice matrix is modelled. In this second approach, solid state diffusion drives the evolution of nitrate concentration inside a layered spherical snow grain. A physically-based parameterisation defining the concentration at the air-snow interface was developed to account for the the co-condensation process. The model uses as input a one-year long time series of atmospheric nitrate concentration measured at Dome C, Antarctica. The modelled nitrate concentration in surface snow is compared to field measurements. We show that on the one hand, the adsorption of nitric acid on the surface of the snow grains fails to fit the observed variations. During winter and spring, the modelled adsorbed concentration of nitrate is 2.5 and 8.3-fold higher than the measured one, respectively. A strong diurnal variation driven by the temperature cycle and a peak occurring in early spring are two other

  9. The value of snow cover maps for hydrological model calibration in snow dominated catchments in Central Asia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duethmann, Doris; Güntner, Andreas; Peters, Juliane; Vorogushyn, Sergiy

    2013-04-01

    This study aims at investigating the value of snow cover data in addition to discharge data for the calibration of a hydrological model in six headwater catchments of the Karadarya basin, Central Asia. If a hydrological model is to be used for the investigation of potential impacts of climate change, it is important that also internal variables are simulated correctly. Snow melt is of particular relevance, as it is probably the most important runoff generation process in these catchments. The study investigates whether there is a trade-off between good simulations with respect to discharge and with respect to snow cover area. Furthermore, we are interested in the information content of snow cover data, i.e. how many snow cover images would be sufficient for effective calibration of a hydrological model. As suitable precipitation data for the study area are only available up to 1990, MODIS snow cover data could not be used and we instead resorted to AVHRR data. Processing of the AVHRR snow cover data is time consuming, because georeferencing has to be performed manually. If only few images could already exclude parameter sets resulting in low model performance with respect to snow cover area, this would be a very valuable piece of information. In order to investigate this, a varying number of snow cover images is used for model calibration within a Monte-Carlo framework, and the effect on model performance with respect to snow cover area in the validation period is evaluated. The selected study period is 1986-1989, in which both AVHRR data and other input data are available. It is split into two parts with up to around 20 snow cover scenes for model calibration and about the same number for model validation. In most of the catchments we found only a small trade-off between good simulations with respect to discharge and with respect to snow cover area, but if the parameters were selected based on the discharge objective function only, this could also include

  10. Surface energy balance of seasonal snow cover for snow-melt estimation in N–W Himalaya

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Prem Datt; P K Srivastava; P S Negi; P K Satyawali

    2008-10-01

    This study describes time series analysis of snow-melt,radiation data and energy balance for a seasonal snow cover at Dhundi field station of SASE,which lies in Pir Panjal range of the N –W Himalaya,for a winter season from 13 January to 12 April 2005.The analysis shows that mean snow surface temperature remains very close to the melting temperature of snow.It was found close to -1°C for the complete observational period which makes the snow pack at Dhundi moist from its beginning.The average air temperature over this period was found to be 3.5°C with hourly average variation from -5.5°C to 13°C. The snow surface at this station received a mean short wave radiation of 430 W m−2, out of which 298 W m−2 was re flected back by the snow surface with mean albedo value of 0.70. The high average temperature and more absorption of solar radiation resulted in higher thermal state of the snowpack which was further responsible for faster and higher densification of the snowpack. Net radiation energy was the major component of surface energy budget with a mean value of 83 W m−2. Bulk transfer model was used to calculate turbulent fluxes. The net energy was utilized for satisfying cold content and snow-melt by using measured snow surface temperature and density of snow pack. The mean square error between calculated and measured daily snow-melt was found to be approximately 6.6 mm of water equivalent.

  11. The effect of mountain wind on the falling snow deposition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Zhengshi; Huang, Ning

    2017-04-01

    The air-flow over morphologic prominence is of vital importance for the temporal and spatial variations of snow distribution, which may further affect the hydrological cycle, climate system, ecological evolution as well as other natural processes. Most previous studies have neglected the effect of non-uniform mountain wind on the trajectory of falling snow particle and thus the uneven snow distribution over complex terrain is little known. Here in this paper, we carry out a numerical study on the deposition process of mixed grain size snow particles over mountain terrains. A three-dimensional large eddy simulation (LES) code is used to predict the wind field and the fluid-solid coupling effect is considered, the Lagrangian particle tracking method is employed to track the movement of each falling snow particle. Our results suggest the boundary layer flow over steep slopes or complex terrains exhibits obvious uneven characteristics. The mountain wind has obvious effect on the motion of snow particles and finally results in a non-uniform distribution of snow. This research is of significance to understand the evolution of high resolution snow distribution in cold highland areas.

  12. Gridded snow maps supporting avalanche forecasting in Norway

    Science.gov (United States)

    Müller, K.; Humstad, T.; Engeset, R. V.; Andersen, J.

    2012-04-01

    We present gridded maps indicating key parameters for avalanche forecasting with a 1 km x 1 km resolution. Based on the HBV hydrology model, snow parameters are modeled based on observed and interpolated precipitation and temperature data. Modeled parameters include for example new snow accumulated the last 24 and 72 hours, snow-water equivalent, and snow-water content. In addition we use meteorological parameters from the UK weather prediction model "Unified Model" such as wind and radiation to model snow-pack properties. Additional loading in lee-slopes by wind-transport is modeled based on prevailing wind conditions, snow-water content and snow age. A depth hoar index accounts for days with considerable negative temperature gradients in the snow pack. A surface hoar index based on radiation and humidity is currently under development. The maps are tested against field reports from avalanche observers throughout Norway. All data is available via a web-platform that combines maps for geo-hazards such as floods, landslides and avalanches. The maps are used by the Norwegian avalanche forecasting service, which is currently in a test phase. The service will be operational by winter 2012/2013.

  13. Hydrological Application of Remote Sensing: Surface States -- Snow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hall, Dorothy K.; Kelly, Richard E. J.; Foster, James L.; Chang, Alfred T. C.

    2004-01-01

    Remote sensing research of snow cover has been accomplished for nearly 40 years. The use of visible, near-infrared, active and passive-microwave remote sensing for the analysis of snow cover is reviewed with an emphasis on the work on the last decade.

  14. A spotlight on snow leopard conservation in China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alexander, Justine S; Zhang, Chengcheng; Shi, Kun; Riordan, Philip

    2016-07-01

    China holds the greatest proportion of the snow leopard's (Panthera uncia) global range and is central to their conservation. The country is also undergoing unprecedented economic growth, which increases both the threats to the snow leopard and the opportunities for its conservation. In this paper we aim to review published literature (from 1950 to 2014) in English and Mandarin on snow leopard ecology and conservation in China in order to identify thematic and geographic research gaps and propose research priorities. We first retrieved all published items that considered snow leopards in China (n = 106). We extracted from these papers 274 reports of snow leopard presence in China. We then reviewed a subset of papers (n = 33) of this literature, which specifically focused on snow leopard ecology and conservation within China. We introduced a thematic framework that allows a structured and comprehensive assessment of findings. This framework recognizes 4 critical and interrelated topics underpinning snow leopard ecology and conservation: habitat (distribution and protected area coverage); prey (distribution and abundance, predator-prey relationships); human interactions (hunting and trade, livestock interactions and conflicts); and the underlying policy context. Significant gains in knowledge as well as research gaps and priorities are discussed with reference to our framework. The modest quantity and limited scope of published research on the snow leopard in China calls for a continued and intensified effort to inform and support national conservation policies.

  15. DISCOVERY OF A TRANSITING PLANET NEAR THE SNOW-LINE

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kipping, D. M.; Torres, G.; Buchhave, L. A.

    2014-01-01

    In most theories of planet formation, the snow-line represents a boundary between the emergence of the interior rocky planets and the exterior ice giants. The wide separation of the snow-line makes the discovery of transiting worlds challenging, yet transits would allow for detailed subsequent...

  16. Prevent Snow from Blocking your Tailpipe PSA (:30)

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2014-12-11

    If it's snowing, make sure your vehicle’s tailpipe is clear of snow before starting the engine to prevent carbon monoxide poisoning.  Created: 12/11/2014 by National Center for Environmental Health (NCEH).   Date Released: 12/11/2014.

  17. Overview of SnowEx Year 1 Activities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Edward; Gatebe, Charles; Hall, Dorothy; Newlin, Jerry; Misakonis, Amy; Elder, Kelly; Marshall, Hans Peter; Heimstra, Chris; Brucker, Ludovic; De Marco, Eugenia; hide

    2017-01-01

    SnowEx is a multi-year airborne snow campaign with the primary goal of addressing the question: How much water is stored in Earths terrestrial snow-covered regions? Year 1 (2016-17) focused on the distribution of snow-water equivalent (SWE) and the snow energy balance in a forested environment. The year 1 primary site was Grand Mesa and the secondary site was the Senator Beck Basin, both in western, Colorado, USA. Nine sensors on five aircraft made observations using a broad range of sensing techniques, active and passive microwave, and active and passive optical infrared to determine the sensitivity and accuracy of these potential satellite remote sensing techniques, along with models, to measure snow under a range of forest conditions. SnowEx also included an extensive range of ground truth measurements in-situ manual samples, snow pits, ground based remote sensing measurements, and sophisticated new techniques. A detailed description of the data collected will be given and some preliminary results will be presented.

  18. Potential for Using Satellite Lidar for Seasonal Snow Depth Estimation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jasinski, M. F.; Stoll, J.; Harding, D. J.; Fassnacht, S. R.; Carabajal, C. C.; Markus, T.

    2013-12-01

    This study evaluates the potential for estimating snow depth in complex mountainous terrain using high resolution satellite lidar. For over three decades, satellite remote sensing of snow depth and water equivalent has relied primarily on passive microwave sensors with an approximately 25 km footprint. While successfully employed in many global water balance analyses, their large footprints, necessary to capture the natural emission of the surface, are too coarse to define the spatial heterogeneity of mountain watershed-scale snow due to variable topography and vegetation. In this study, the capability of satellite lidar altimetry for estimating snow depth was evaluated primarily using surface elevations observed by the Geoscience Laser Altimeter Sensor (GLAS) flown on board the Ice, Cloud, and land Elevation Satellite from 2003-2009, with a footprint size of ~70m. The evaluation includes the analysis of GLAS waveforms at near-repeat locations during snow-off and snow on conditions, using several snow depth estimation approaches, focusing on the Uinta Mountains of NE Utah. Also presented is the concept for the ICESat-2 Advanced Topographic Laser Altimeter System (ATLAS), currently set to launch in July 2016, and its potential capability for characterizing snow depth. The opportunity for partnering through NASA's Early Adopter Program using prototype aircraft observations also is presented.

  19. Distribution and characteristic of PAHs in snow of Fildes Peninsula

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Guangshui Na; Chunyang Liu; Zhen Wang; Linke Ge; Xindong Ma; Ziwei Yao

    2011-01-01

    Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) investigation in different matrices has been reported largely,whereas reports on snow samples were limited.Snow,as the main matrix in the polar region,has an important study meaning.PAHs in snow samples were analyzed to investigate the distribution and contamination status of them in the Antarctic,as well as to provide some references for global migration of PAHs.Snow samples collected in Fildes Peninsula were enriched and separated by solid-phase membrane disks and eluted by methylene dichloride,then quantified by gas chromatography/mass spectrometry.All types of PAHs were detected except for Benzo(a)pyrene.Principal component analysis method was applied to characterize them.Three factors (Naphthalene,Fluorene and Pbenanthrene) accounted for 60.57%,21.61% and 9.80%,respectively.The results showed that the major PAHs sources maybe the atmospheric transportation,and the combustion of fuel in Fildes Peninsula.The comparison of concentration and types of PAHs between accumulated snow and fresh snow showed that the main compound concentrations in accumulated snow samples were higher than those in fresh ones.The risk assessment indicated that the amount of PAHs in the snow samples would not lead to ecological risk.

  20. Snow isotope diffusion rates measured in a laboratory experiment

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Van der Wel, L. G.; Gkinis, V.; Pohjola, V. A.; Meijer, H. A. J.

    2011-01-01

    The diffusion of stable water isotopes in snow was measured in two controlled laboratory experiments. Two batches of snow of different isotopic composition were stacked alternately with varying layer thicknesses. The stack was stored in a freezer room at constant temperature for several months, and

  1. Effective UV surface albedo of seasonally snow-covered lands

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanskanen, A.; Manninen, T.

    2007-05-01

    At ultraviolet wavelengths the albedo of most natural surfaces is small with the striking exception of snow and ice. Therefore, snow cover is a major challenge for various applications based on radiative transfer modelling. The aim of this work was to determine the characteristic effective UV range surface albedo of various land cover types when covered by snow. First we selected 1 by 1 degree sample regions that met three criteria: the sample region contained dominantly subpixels of only one land cover type according to the 8 km global land cover classification product from the University of Maryland; the average slope of the sample region was less than 2 degrees according to the USGS's HYDRO1K slope data; the sample region had snow cover in March according to the NSIDC Northern Hemisphere weekly snow cover data. Next we generated 1 by 1 degree gridded 360 nm surface albedo data from the Nimbus-7 TOMS Lambertian equivalent reflectivity data, and used them to construct characteristic effective surface albedo distributions for each land cover type. The resulting distributions showed that each land cover type experiences a characteristic range of surface albedo values when covered by snow. The result is explained by the vegetation that extends upward beyond the snow cover and masks the bright snow covered surface.

  2. Lemming winter habitat choice: a snow-fencing experiment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reid, Donald G; Bilodeau, Frédéric; Krebs, Charles J; Gauthier, Gilles; Kenney, Alice J; Gilbert, B Scott; Leung, Maria C-Y; Duchesne, David; Hofer, Elizabeth

    2012-04-01

    The insulative value of early and deep winter snow is thought to enhance winter reproduction and survival by arctic lemmings (Lemmus and Dicrostonyx spp). This leads to the general hypothesis that landscapes with persistently low lemming population densities, or low amplitude population fluctuations, have a low proportion of the land base with deep snow. We experimentally tested a component of this hypothesis, that snow depth influences habitat choice, at three Canadian Arctic sites: Bylot Island, Nunavut; Herschel Island, Yukon; Komakuk Beach, Yukon. We used snow fencing to enhance snow depth on 9-ha tundra habitats, and measured the intensity of winter use of these and control areas by counting rodent winter nests in spring. At all three sites, the density of winter nests increased in treated areas compared to control areas after the treatment, and remained higher on treated areas during the treatment. The treatment was relaxed at one site, and winter nest density returned to pre-treatment levels. The rodents' proportional use of treated areas compared to adjacent control areas increased and remained higher during the treatment. At two of three sites, lemmings and voles showed significant attraction to the areas of deepest snow accumulation closest to the fences. The strength of the treatment effect appeared to depend on how quickly the ground level temperature regime became stable in autumn, coincident with snow depths near the hiemal threshold. Our results provide strong support for the hypothesis that snow depth is a primary determinant of winter habitat choice by tundra lemmings and voles.

  3. QTLs for Snow Mold Disease Resistance in Creeping Bentgrass

    Science.gov (United States)

    Snow molds caused by Typhula spp. are the most economically important winter diseases of turfgrass in the northern and alpine regions of the United States and Canada. During winter, the psychrophilic pathogens take advantage of the weakened host plants at low temperatures under persistent snow cover...

  4. Numerical simulations on artificial reduction of snow and ice ablation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olefs, M.; Obleitner, F.

    2007-06-01

    This snow modeling study investigates two methods to artificially reduce ablation in Alpine glacier ski resorts. Using the snow cover model SNTHERM, a first set of sensitivity studies focuses on the potential effects of artificial compaction of snow during winter. In comparison to a reference run representing the natural conditions, a stepwise increase of the model's new snow density toward 500 kg m-3 yields no more than 218 kg m-2 water equivalent being saved at the end of the ablation period. Further studies consider effects of covering the snow surface with different materials in spring. The physical properties and the energetic processes at the model's surface node are parameterized accordingly. The results show that 2489 kg m-2 water equivalent are saved compared to the reference run. Thus 15% of the winter snow cover as well as the whole amount of the underlying glacier ice are preserved. This indicates that surface covering reduces snow and ice ablation more effectively than snow compaction, which is confirmed by field measurements.

  5. Snow as Field-Teaching Medium for Earth Science.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Custer, Stephan Gregory

    1991-01-01

    Snow is a widely available earth-science teaching medium which can be used to explore scientific concepts in the field, either directly or by analogy. Snow can be considered a mineral, sediment, sedimentary rock, or metamorphic rock. Natural processes such as crystal growth, melting, sedimentation, and metamorphism can be studied in practical time…

  6. Detection of Oil in Ice and Snow

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Merv Fingas

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available The response to a major oil spill can be challenging in temperate climates and with good weather conditions. By contrast, a major spill in or under ice and snow, presents a whole new series of challenges. This paper reviews detection technologies for these challenging situations. A number of acoustic techniques have been tried in test tank situations and it was found that acoustic detection of oil was possible because oil behaves as a solid in acoustic terms and transmits shear waves. Laboratory tests have been carried out and a prototype was built and tested in the field. Radio frequency methods, such as ground penetrating radar (GPR, have been tested for both oil-under-ice and oil-under-snow. The GPR method does not provide sufficient discrimination for positive oil detection in actual spills. Preliminary tests on the use of Nuclear Magnetic Resonance for detecting oil, in and under ice, shows promise and further work on this is being done at this time. A number of other oil-in-ice detection technologies have been tried and evaluated, including standard acoustic thickness probes, fluorosensor techniques, and augmented infrared detection. Each of these showed potential in theory during tank tests. Further testing on these proposed methods is required.

  7. John Snow's legacy: epidemiology without borders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fine, Paul; Victora, Cesar G; Rothman, Kenneth J; Moore, Patrick S; Chang, Yuan; Curtis, Val; Heymann, David L; Slutkin, Gary; May, Robert M; Patel, Vikram; Roberts, Ian; Wortley, Richard; Torgerson, Carole; Deaton, Angus

    2013-04-13

    This Review provides abstracts from a meeting held at the London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine, on April 11-12, 2013, to celebrate the legacy of John Snow. They describe conventional and unconventional applications of epidemiological methods to problems ranging from diarrhoeal disease, mental health, cancer, and accident care, to education, poverty, financial networks, crime, and violence. Common themes appear throughout, including recognition of the importance of Snow's example, the philosophical and practical implications of assessment of causality, and an emphasis on the evaluation of preventive, ameliorative, and curative interventions, in a wide variety of medical and societal examples. Almost all self-described epidemiologists nowadays work within the health arena, and this is the focus of most of the societies, journals, and courses that carry the name epidemiology. The range of applications evident in these contributions might encourage some of these institutions to consider broadening their remits. In so doing, they may contribute more directly to, and learn from, non-health-related areas that use the language and methods of epidemiology to address many important problems now facing the world.

  8. High Resolution Radar Measurements of Snow Avalanches

    Science.gov (United States)

    McElwaine, Jim; Sovilla, Betty; Vriend, Nathalie; Brennan, Paul; Ash, Matt; Keylock, Chris

    2013-04-01

    Geophysical mass flows, such as snow avalanches, are a major hazard in mountainous areas and have a significant impact on the infrastructure, economy and tourism of such regions. Obtaining a thorough understanding of the dynamics of snow avalanches is crucial for risk assessment and the design of defensive structures. However, because the underlying physics is poorly understood there are significant uncertainties concerning current models, which are poorly validated due to a lack of high resolution data. Direct observations of the denser core of a large avalanche are particularly difficult, since it is frequently obscured by the dilute powder cloud. We have developed and installed a phased array FMCW radar system that penetrates the powder cloud and directly images the dense core with a resolution of around 1 m at 50 Hz over the entire slope. We present data from recent avalanches at Vallee de la Sionne that show a wealth of internal structure and allow the tracking of individual fronts, roll waves and surges down the slope for the first time. We also show good agreement between the radar results and existing measurement systems that record data at particular points on the avalanche track.

  9. Snow Line Localization in Classical Protoplanetary Disks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blevins, S.

    2014-04-01

    Protoplanetary disks are volatile-rich environments capable of producing the essential conditions that make planet formation viable. Establishing a molecular inventory of dominant volatile species, such as water, in the planet-forming zones surrounding young, solar-type stars elevates our understanding of the chemistry involved with planet formation, composition and disk evolution. For this study we measure the water vapor content and determine the location of the condensation front, or snow line, for four classical disks selected for the strong water emission present in their mid-infrared spectra. To accomplish this we combine deep Herschel PACS observations with high resolution Spitzer IRS spectra to create molecular maps comprised of water lines with excitation temperatures that trace the disks' surfaces from 1-100 AU. We use two-dimensional, axisymmetric radiative transfer modeling to retrieve the disks' dust structures and the RADLite raytracer to render model spectra for each disk. A simple step function is used to define the abundance structure and the model spectra are fit to the observed water lines. Preliminary results will be discussed, including the inner disk chemical content, snow line radius and fractional water vapor abundances for the classical disk RNO 90.

  10. Detecting Danger: The Dendritic Cell Algorithm

    CERN Document Server

    Greensmith, Julie; Cayzer, Steve

    2010-01-01

    The Dendritic Cell Algorithm (DCA) is inspired by the function of the dendritic cells of the human immune system. In nature, dendritic cells are the intrusion detection agents of the human body, policing the tissue and organs for potential invaders in the form of pathogens. In this research, and abstract model of DC behaviour is developed and subsequently used to form an algorithm, the DCA. The abstraction process was facilitated through close collaboration with laboratory- based immunologists, who performed bespoke experiments, the results of which are used as an integral part of this algorithm. The DCA is a population based algorithm, with each agent in the system represented as an 'artificial DC'. Each DC has the ability to combine multiple data streams and can add context to data suspected as anomalous. In this chapter the abstraction process and details of the resultant algorithm are given. The algorithm is applied to numerous intrusion detection problems in computer security including the detection of p...

  11. Mapping Snow Cover Loss Patterns in the Western United States

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moore, C.; Kampf, S. K.; Richer, E.; Stone, B.

    2011-12-01

    Cara Moore, Stephanie Kampf, Eric Richer, Brandon Stone Natural Resource Ecology Laboratory, Colorado State University, Fort Collins, CO 80523-1499 The Western United States depends on snowmelt to provide water for industrial, municipal, and agricultural needs. Some areas in this region have observed an increase in the proportion of precipitation falling as rain rather than snow in response to climate warming, a trend that can alter the timing and magnitude of runoff. Transitional snow zones, which lie between lower elevation intermittent snowpack and higher elevation persistent snowpack, may be particularly sensitive to changing climate conditions. Snow covered area is an easily obtainable measurement that can help identify the locations and elevations of these transitional snow zones. The purpose of this study is to improve the understanding of snowpack characteristics in the Western U.S. by mapping snow cover loss patterns using the Moderate-Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) snow covered area (SCA) product. Snow cover loss patterns can be difficult to compare objectively between regions because spring snow storms lead to abrupt increases and decreases in SCA. Therefore, we develop a curve-fitting snow cover depletion model (SCoDMod) used to derive standardized snow cover loss curves. We fit the model to snow cover patterns within 100m elevation zones from January 1st until July 19th for each USGS eight digit hydrologic unit in the Western US. We use the model to identify 11 year (2000-2010) average snow cover loss patterns and compare those patterns to snow cover loss behavior in wet and dry years. Model results give maps of average SCA in the Western United States on the first of the month from January to July, as well as maps of the date of SCA loss to 75% (Q75), 50% (Q50), and 25% (Q25) SCA. Results show that the Cascade, Sierra Nevada, and Rocky mountains from Colorado northward retain >90% SCA until March, whereas most parts of lower elevation

  12. What controls the isotopic composition of Greenland surface snow?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. C. Steen-Larsen

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Water stable isotopes in Greenland ice core data provide key paleoclimatic information, and have been compared with precipitation isotopic composition simulated by isotopically-enabled atmospheric models. However, post-deposition processes linked with snow metamorphism remain poorly documented. For this purpose, a monitoring of the isotopic composition (δ18O, δD of surface water vapor, precipitation and samples of top (0.5 cm snow surface has been conducted during two summers (2011–2012 at NEEM, NW Greenland. The measurements also include a subset of 17O-excess measurements over 4 days, and the measurements span the 2012 Greenland heat wave. Our observations are consistent with calculations assuming isotopic equilibrium between surface snow and water vapor. We observe a strong correlation between surface vapor δ18O and air temperature (0.85 ± 0.11 ‰ °C−1 (R = 0.76 for 2012. The correlation with air temperature is not observed in precipitation data or surface snow data. Deuterium excess (d-excess is strongly anti-correlated with δ18O with a stronger slope for vapor than for precipitation and snow surface data. During nine 1–5 days periods between precipitation events, our data demonstrate parallel changes of δ18O and d-excess in surface snow and surface vapor. The changes in δ18O of the vapor are similar or larger than those of the snow δ18O. It is estimated that 6 to 20% of the surface snow mass is exchanged with the atmosphere using the CROCUS snow model. In our data, the sign of surface snow isotopic changes is not related to the sign or magnitude of sublimation or condensation. Comparisons with atmospheric models show that day-to-day variations in surface vapor isotopic composition are driven by synoptic weather and changes in air mass trajectories and distillation histories. We suggest that, in-between precipitation events, changes in the surface snow isotopic composition are driven by these changes in surface vapor isotopic

  13. What controls the isotopic composition of Greenland surface snow?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. C. Steen-Larsen

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Water stable isotopes in Greenland ice core data provide key paleoclimatic information, and have been compared with precipitation isotopic composition simulated by isotopically enabled atmospheric models. However, post-depositional processes linked with snow metamorphism remain poorly documented. For this purpose, monitoring of the isotopic composition (δ18O, δD of near-surface water vapor, precipitation and samples of the top (0.5 cm snow surface has been conducted during two summers (2011–2012 at NEEM, NW Greenland. The samples also include a subset of 17O-excess measurements over 4 days, and the measurements span the 2012 Greenland heat wave. Our observations are consistent with calculations assuming isotopic equilibrium between surface snow and water vapor. We observe a strong correlation between near-surface vapor δ18O and air temperature (0.85 ± 0.11‰ °C−1 (R = 0.76 for 2012. The correlation with air temperature is not observed in precipitation data or surface snow data. Deuterium excess (d-excess is strongly anti-correlated with δ18O with a stronger slope for vapor than for precipitation and snow surface data. During nine 1–5-day periods between precipitation events, our data demonstrate parallel changes of δ18O and d-excess in surface snow and near-surface vapor. The changes in δ18O of the vapor are similar or larger than those of the snow δ18O. It is estimated using the CROCUS snow model that 6 to 20% of the surface snow mass is exchanged with the atmosphere. In our data, the sign of surface snow isotopic changes is not related to the sign or magnitude of sublimation or deposition. Comparisons with atmospheric models show that day-to-day variations in near-surface vapor isotopic composition are driven by synoptic variations and changes in air mass trajectories and distillation histories. We suggest that, in between precipitation events, changes in the surface snow isotopic composition are driven by these changes in near

  14. What controls the isotopic composition of Greenland surface snow?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steen-Larsen, H. C.; Masson-Delmotte, V.; Hirabayashi, M.; Winkler, R.; Satow, K.; Prié, F.; Bayou, N.; Brun, E.; Cuffey, K. M.; Dahl-Jensen, D.; Dumont, M.; Guillevic, M.; Kipfstuhl, S.; Landais, A.; Popp, T.; Risi, C.; Steffen, K.; Stenni, B.; Sveinbjörnsdottír, A. E.

    2014-02-01

    Water stable isotopes in Greenland ice core data provide key paleoclimatic information, and have been compared with precipitation isotopic composition simulated by isotopically enabled atmospheric models. However, post-depositional processes linked with snow metamorphism remain poorly documented. For this purpose, monitoring of the isotopic composition (δ18O, δD) of near-surface water vapor, precipitation and samples of the top (0.5 cm) snow surface has been conducted during two summers (2011-2012) at NEEM, NW Greenland. The samples also include a subset of 17O-excess measurements over 4 days, and the measurements span the 2012 Greenland heat wave. Our observations are consistent with calculations assuming isotopic equilibrium between surface snow and water vapor. We observe a strong correlation between near-surface vapor δ18O and air temperature (0.85 ± 0.11‰ °C-1 (R = 0.76) for 2012). The correlation with air temperature is not observed in precipitation data or surface snow data. Deuterium excess (d-excess) is strongly anti-correlated with δ18O with a stronger slope for vapor than for precipitation and snow surface data. During nine 1-5-day periods between precipitation events, our data demonstrate parallel changes of δ18O and d-excess in surface snow and near-surface vapor. The changes in δ18O of the vapor are similar or larger than those of the snow δ18O. It is estimated using the CROCUS snow model that 6 to 20% of the surface snow mass is exchanged with the atmosphere. In our data, the sign of surface snow isotopic changes is not related to the sign or magnitude of sublimation or deposition. Comparisons with atmospheric models show that day-to-day variations in near-surface vapor isotopic composition are driven by synoptic variations and changes in air mass trajectories and distillation histories. We suggest that, in between precipitation events, changes in the surface snow isotopic composition are driven by these changes in near-surface vapor

  15. Is the snow of yesterday, the flood of tomorrow?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rössler, Ole; Weingartner, Rolf

    2014-05-01

    "The snow of yesterday, is the flood of tomorrow." This famous quote could just as much be a folk wisdom or a farmer's wisdom, but it describes the social awareness that the water of the winterly snow amounts may lead to flooding in the spring. Furthermore, this common experience finds its confirmation in reality - though only at a first glance. For example, in spring 1999, a major flooding occurred after a winter with the highest snow amounts recorded over the last 30 years. This is to forget that sustained rainfall occurred prior to the flood event. For scientists, the question remains whether and to what extent winterly snow contributes to spring flooding and how this information might help in forecasts. As snow depth measurements are insufficiently for an empirical study, we set up a hydrological model approach, combining the various snow conditions with the different spring weather conditions of the last 29 years (1981-2009). The study was conducted in three mesoscale (380-550 km2) headwater catchments in the Bernese Oberland. We set up the hydrological model WaSiM-ETH and validated the model against runoff and snow water equivalent. Then, we estimated the start of the melting season for each year following the approach of Egli and Jonas (2009). This date and the according SWE serves as the initial condition to model the spring runoff using all weather conditions during the last 29 years (until June). This leads to 841 possible spring runoff series. Assuming that the last 29 years represent a major part of the natural variance, the influence of snow on the spring discharge and the flood peak in specific is presented. We found that the snow amount and the flood peak are not directly correlated as suggested by the saying. But, the snow amount causes primarily higher mean flow values while the effect on spring flood peaks are a function of weather. Thereby, snow conditions primarily alter the disposition of the catchments to a flood event. We estimate the

  16. Single dendrite-targeting interneurons generate branch-specific inhibition.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Caleb eStokes

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Microcircuits composed of dendrite-targeting inhibitory interneurons and pyramidal cells are fundamental elements of cortical networks, however, the impact of individual interneurons on pyramidal dendrites is unclear. Here, we combine paired recordings and calcium imaging to determine the spatial domain over which single dendrite-targeting interneurons influence pyramidal cells in olfactory cortex. We show that a major action of individual interneurons is to inhibit dendrites in a branch-specific fashion.

  17. Semiautomated analysis of dendrite morphology in cell culture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sweet, Eric S; Langhammer, Chris L; Kutzing, Melinda K; Firestein, Bonnie L

    2013-01-01

    Quantifying dendrite morphology is a method for determining the effect of biochemical pathways and extracellular agents on neuronal development and differentiation. Quantification can be performed using Sholl analysis, dendrite counting, and length quantification. These procedures can be performed on dendrite-forming cell lines or primary neurons grown in culture. In this protocol, we describe the use of a set of computer programs to assist in quantifying many aspects of dendrite morphology, including changes in total and localized arbor complexity.

  18. Role of active dendritic conductances in subthreshold input integration

    OpenAIRE

    Rinzel John; Remme Michiel

    2010-01-01

    Dendrites of many types of neurons contain voltage-dependent conductances that are active at subthreshold membrane potentials. To understand the computations neurons perform it is key to understand the role of active dendrites in the subthreshold processing of synaptic inputs. We examine systematically how active dendritic conductances affect the time course of postsynaptic potentials propagating along dendrites, and how they affect the interaction between such signals. Voltage-dependent curr...

  19. Infection of Dendritic Cells by the Maedi-Visna Lentivirus

    OpenAIRE

    Ryan, Susanna; Tiley, Laurence; McConnell, Ian; Blacklaws, Barbara

    2000-01-01

    The early stages of lentivirus infection of dendritic cells have been studied in an in vivo model. Maedi-visna virus (MVV) is a natural pathogen of sheep with a tropism for macrophages, but the infection of dendritic cells has not been proven, largely because of the difficulties of definitively distinguishing the two cell types. Afferent lymphatic dendritic cells from sheep have been phenotypically characterized and separated from macrophages. Dendritic cells purified from experimentally infe...

  20. Actin remodeling and polymerization forces control dendritic spine morphology

    OpenAIRE

    2015-01-01

    Dendritic spines are small membranous structures that protrude from the neuronal dendrite. Each spine contains a synaptic contact site that may connect its parent dendrite to the axons of neighboring neurons. Dendritic spines are markedly distinct in shape and size, and certain types of stimulation prompt spines to evolve, in fairly predictable fashion, from thin nascent morphologies to the mushroom-like shapes associated with mature spines. This striking progression is coincident with the (r...

  1. Snow optical properties at Dome C, Antarctica – implications for snow emissions and snow chemistry of reactive nitrogen

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. L. France

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Measurements of $e$-folding depth, nadir reflectivity and stratigraphy of the snowpack around Concordia station (Dome C, 75.10° S, 123.31° E were undertaken and used to determine wavelength dependent coefficients (350 nm to 550 nm for light scattering and absorption and to calculate potential fluxes of nitrogen dioxide (NO2 from the snowpack due to nitrate photolysis within the snowpack. The stratigraphy of the top 80 cm of Dome C snowpack generally consists of three main layers: a surface of soft windpack (not ubiquitous, a hard windpack and a hoar-like layer beneath the windpack(s. The $e$-folding depths are ~10 cm for the two windpack layers and ~20 cm for the hoar-like layer for solar radiation at a wavelength of 400 nm, about a factor 2–4 larger than previous model estimates for South Pole. Depth integrated photochemical reaction rates of nitrate photolysis in the Dome C snowpack were calculated to give molecular fluxes of NO2 of 5.3×1012 molecules m−2 s−1, 2.3×1012 molecules m−2 s−1 and 8×1011 molecules m−2 s−1 for solar zenith angles of 60°, 70° and 80° respectively for clear sky conditions using the TUV-snow radiative-transfer model. Depending upon the snowpack stratigraphy, a minimum of 85% of the NO2 originates from within the top 20 cm of the Dome C snowpack. It is found that on a multi-annual scale, nitrate photolysis can remove up to 80% of nitrate from surface snow, confirming independent isotopic evidence that photolysis is an important driver of nitrate loss occurring in the EAIS snowpack. However, the model cannot account for the total observed nitrate loss of 90–95% or the shape of the observed nitrate depth profile. A more complete model will need to include also physical processes such as evaporation, re-deposition or diffusion between the quasi-liquid layer on snow grains

  2. Laboratory study of nitrate photolysis in Antarctic snow

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Berhanu, Tesfaye A.; Meusinger, Carl; Erbland, Joseph;

    2014-01-01

    Atmospheric nitrate is preserved in Antarctic snow firn and ice. However, at low snow accumulation sites, post-depositional processes induced by sunlight obscure its interpretation. The goal of these studies (see also Paper I by Meusinger et al. [" Laboratory study of nitrate photolysis...... in Antarctic snow. I. Observed quantum yield, domain of photolysis, and secondary chemistry," J. Chem. Phys. 140, 244305 (2014)]) is to characterize nitrate photochemistry and improve the interpretation of the nitrate ice core record. Naturally occurring stable isotopes in nitrate (15N, 17O, and 18O) provide...... additional information concerning post-depositional processes. Here, we present results from studies of the wavelength-dependent isotope effects from photolysis of nitrate in a matrix of natural snow. Snow from Dome C, Antarctica was irradiated in selected wavelength regions using a Xe UV lamp and filters...

  3. Facilitating the exploitation of ERTS imagery using snow enhancement techniques

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wobber, F. J.; Martin, K. (Principal Investigator); Amato, R. V.; Leshendok, T.

    1973-01-01

    The author has identified the following significant results. Comparative analysis of snow-free and snow-covered imagery of the New England Test Area has resulted in a larger number of lineaments mapped from snow-covered imagery in three out of four sets of comparative imagery. Analysts unfamiliar with the New England Test Area were utilized; the quality of imagery was independently judged to be uniform. In all image sets, a greater total length of lineaments was mapped with the snow-covered imagery. The value of this technique for fracture mapping in areas with thick soil cover is suggested. A number of potentially useful environmental applications of snow enhancement related to such areas as mining, land use, and hydrology have been identified.

  4. Identification and classification of weak layers in the snow

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. S. Klimenko

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper considers the role of vertical snowpack structure for snow avalanche formation and describes the idea of «structural instability». It aims at enhancing the knowledge about transition mechanisms between stable and unstable states of snowpack and snow avalanches release. Structural instability implies the presence of weak layer or interface in vertical snowpack profile. Type of snow failure and avalanche characteristics are completely defined by snowpack state and properties. Thus wide variety of genetic types of snow avalanches indicates the existence of structural instability of different types. The detailed analysis of scientific publications and field observations led to the creation of a new classification of weak layers. The layers are classified basing on their cohesiveness, the causes of initial disturbance and internal and external processes which form a weak layer. The classification is a necessary part of global method which allows assessing snowpack stability using modern physical models of snow cover evolution.

  5. Observations of atmospheric chemical deposition to high Arctic snow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Macdonald, Katrina M.; Sharma, Sangeeta; Toom, Desiree; Chivulescu, Alina; Hanna, Sarah; Bertram, Allan K.; Platt, Andrew; Elsasser, Mike; Huang, Lin; Tarasick, David; Chellman, Nathan; McConnell, Joseph R.; Bozem, Heiko; Kunkel, Daniel; Duan Lei, Ying; Evans, Greg J.; Abbatt, Jonathan P. D.

    2017-05-01

    Rapidly rising temperatures and loss of snow and ice cover have demonstrated the unique vulnerability of the high Arctic to climate change. There are major uncertainties in modelling the chemical depositional and scavenging processes of Arctic snow. To that end, fresh snow samples collected on average every 4 days at Alert, Nunavut, from September 2014 to June 2015 were analyzed for black carbon, major ions, and metals, and their concentrations and fluxes were reported. Comparison with simultaneous measurements of atmospheric aerosol mass loadings yields effective deposition velocities that encompass all processes by which the atmospheric species are transferred to the snow. It is inferred from these values that dry deposition is the dominant removal mechanism for several compounds over the winter while wet deposition increased in importance in the fall and spring, possibly due to enhanced scavenging by mixed-phase clouds. Black carbon aerosol was the least efficiently deposited species to the snow.

  6. Dendritic Cells Stimulated by Cationic Liposomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vitor, Micaela Tamara; Bergami-Santos, Patrícia Cruz; Cruz, Karen Steponavicius Piedade; Pinho, Mariana Pereira; Barbuto, José Alexandre Marzagão; De La Torre, Lucimara Gaziola

    2016-01-01

    Immunotherapy of cancer aims to harness the immune system to detect and destroy cancer cells. To induce an immune response against cancer, activated dendritic cells (DCs) must present tumor antigens to T lymphocytes of patients. However, cancer patients' DCs are frequently defective, therefore, they are prone to induce rather tolerance than immune responses. In this context, loading tumor antigens into DCs and, at the same time, activating these cells, is a tempting goal within the field. Thus, we investigated the effects of cationic liposomes on the DCs differentiation/maturation, evaluating their surface phenotype and ability to stimulate T lymphocytes proliferation in vitro. The cationic liposomes composed by egg phosphatidylcholine, 1,2-dioleoyl-3-trimethylammonium propane and 1,2-dioleoylphosphatidylethanolamine (50/25/25% molar) were prepared by the thin film method followed by extrusion (65 nm, polydispersity of 0.13) and by the dehydration-rehydration method (95% of the population 107 nm, polydispersity of 0.52). The phenotypic analysis of dendritic cells and the analysis of T lymphocyte proliferation were performed by flow cytometry and showed that both cationic liposomes were incorporated and activated dendritic cells. Extruded liposomes were better incorporated and induced higher CD86 expression for dendritic cells than dehydrated-rehydrated vesicles. Furthermore, dendritic cells which internalized extruded liposomes also provided stronger T lymphocyte stimulation. Thus, cationic liposomes with a smaller size and polydispersity seem to be better incorporated by dendritic cells. Hence, these cationic liposomes could be used as a potential tool in further cancer immunotherapy strategies and contribute to new strategies in immunotherapy.

  7. Estimation of snow water equivalent using a radiance assimilation scheme with a multi-layered snow physical model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mounirou Toure, Ally

    The feasibility of a radiance assimilation using a multi-layered snow physical model to estimate snow physical parameters is studied. The work is divided in five parts. The first two chapters are dedicated to the literature review. In the third chapter, experimental work was conducted in the alpine snow to estimate snow correlation (for microwave emission modelling) using near-infrared digital photography. We made microwave radiometric and near-infrared reflectance measurements of snow slabs under different experimental conditions. We used an empirical relation to link near-infrared reflectance of snow to the specific surface area (SSA), and converted the SSA into the correlation length. From the measurements of snow radiances at 21 and 35 GHz, we derived the microwave scattering coefficient by inverting two coupled radiative transfer models (RTM) (the sandwich and six-flux model). The correlation lengths found are in the same range as those determined in the literature using cold laboratory work. The technique shows great potential in the determination of the snow correlation length under field conditions. In the fourth chapter, the performance of the ensemble Kalman filter (EnKF) for snow water equivalent (SWE) estimation is assessed by assimilating synthetic microwave observations at Ground Based Microwave Radiometer (GBMR-7) frequencies (18.7, 23.8, 36.5, 89 vertical and horizontal polarization) into a snow physics model, CROCUS. CROCUS has a realistic stratigraphic and ice layer modelling scheme. This work builds on previous methods that used snow physics model with limited number of layers. Data assimilation methods require accurate predictions of the brightness temperature (Tb) emitted by the snowpack. It has been shown that the accuracy of RTMs is sensitive to the stratigraphic representation of the snowpack. However, as the stratigraphic fidelity increases, the number of layers increases, as does the number of state variables estimated in the assimilation

  8. Sequence learning in differentially activated dendrites

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Bjørn Gilbert

    2003-01-01

    . It is proposed that the neural machinery required in such a learning/retrieval mechanism could involve the NMDA receptor, in conjunction with the ability of dendrites to maintain differentially activated regions. In particular, it is suggested that such a parcellation of the dendrite allows the neuron...... to participate in multiple sequences, which can be learned without suffering from the 'wash-out' of synaptic efficacy associated with superimposition of training patterns. This is a biologically plausible solution to the stability-plasticity dilemma of learning in neural networks....

  9. Seaweed to dendrite transition in directional solidification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Provatas, Nikolas; Wang, Quanyong; Haataja, Mikko; Grant, Martin

    2003-10-10

    We simulate directional solidification using a phase-field model solved with adaptive mesh refinement. For small surface tension anisotropy directed at 45 degrees relative to the pulling direction we observe a crossover from a seaweed to a dendritic morphology as the thermal gradient is lowered, consistent with recent experimental findings. We show that the morphology of crystal structures can be unambiguously characterized through the local interface velocity distribution. We derive semiempirically an estimate for the crossover from seaweed to dendrite as a function of thermal gradient and pulling speed.

  10. Dendritic Cells Endocytose Bacillus Anthracis Spores: Implications for Anthrax Pathogenesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    2007-11-02

    Dendritic Cells Endocytose Bacillus anthracis Spores: Implications for Anthrax Pathogenesis1 Katherine C. Brittingham,* Gordon Ruthel,* Rekha G...germination and dissemination of spores. Found in high frequency throughout the respiratory track, dendritic cells (DCs) routinely take up foreign...COVERED - 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Dendritic cells endocytose Bacillus anthracis spores: implications for anthrax pathogenesis, The Journal of

  11. Design of an optimal snow observation network to estimate snowpack

    Science.gov (United States)

    Juan Collados Lara, Antonio; Pardo-Iguzquiza, Eulogio; Pulido-Velazquez, David

    2016-04-01

    Snow is an important water resource in many river basins that must be taken into account in hydrological modeling. Although the snow cover area may be nowadays estimated from satellite data, the snow pack thickness must be estimated from experimental data by using some interpolation procedure or hydrological models that approximates snow accumulation and fusion processes. The experimental data consist of hand probes and snow samples collected in a given number of locations that constitute the monitoring network. Assuming that there is an existing monitoring network, its optimization may imply the selection of an optimal network as a subset of the existing network (decrease of the existing network in the case that there are no funds for maintaining the full existing network) or to increase the existing network by one or more stations (optimal augmentation problem). In this work we propose a multicriterion approach for the optimal design of a snow network. These criteria include the estimation variance from a regression kriging approach for estimating thickness of the snowpack (using ground and satellite data), to minimize the total snow volume and accessibility criteria. We have also proposed a procedure to analyze the sensitivity of the results to the non-snow data deduced from the satellite information. We intent to minimize the uncertities in snowpack estimation. The methodology has been applied to estimation of the snow cover area and the design of the optimal snow observation network in Sierra Nevada mountain range in the Southern of Spain. Acknowledgments: This research has been partially supported by the GESINHIMPADAPT project (CGL2013-48424-C2-2-R) with Spanish MINECO funds. We would also like to thank ERHIN program and NASA DAAC for the data provided for this study.

  12. Combining low-cost GPS receivers with upGPR to derive continuously liquid water content, snow height and snow water equivalent in Alpine snow covers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koch, Franziska; Schmid, Lino; Prasch, Monika; Heilig, Achim; Eisen, Olaf; Schweizer, Jürg; Mauser, Wolfram

    2015-04-01

    The temporal evolution of Alpine snowpacks is important for assessing water supply, hydropower generation, flood predictions and avalanche forecasts. Especially in high mountain regions with an extremely varying topography, it is until now often difficult to derive continuous and non-destructive information on snow parameters. Since autumn 2012, we are running a new low-cost GPS (Global Positioning System) snow measurement experiment at the high alpine study site Weissfluhjoch (2450 m a.s.l.) in Switzerland. The globally and freely broadcasted GPS L1-band (1.57542 GHz) was continuously recorded with GPS antennas, which are installed at the ground surface underneath the snowpack. GPS raw data, containing carrier-to-noise power density ratio (C/N0) as well as elevation and azimuth angle information for each time step of 1 s, was stored and analyzed for all 32 GPS satellites. Since the dielectric permittivity of an overlying wet snowpack influences microwave radiation, the bulk volumetric liquid water content as well as daily melt-freeze cycles can be derived non-destructively from GPS signal strength losses and external snow height information. This liquid water content information is qualitatively in good accordance with meteorological and snow-hydrological data and quantitatively highly agrees with continuous data derived from an upward-looking ground-penetrating radar (upGPR) working in a similar frequency range. As a promising novelty, we combined the GPS signal strength data with upGPR travel-time information of active impulse radar rays to the snow surface and back from underneath the snow cover. This combination allows determining liquid water content, snow height and snow water equivalent from beneath the snow cover without using any other external information. The snow parameters derived by combining upGPR and GPS data are in good agreement with conventional sensors as e.g. laser distance gauges or snow pillows. As the GPS sensors are cheap, they can easily

  13. Soil, snow, weather, and sub-surface storage data from a mountain catchment in the rain-snow transition zone

    Science.gov (United States)

    A comprehensive hydroclimatic data set is presented for the 2011 water year to improve understanding of hydrologic processes in the rain-snow transition zone. Catchment soil depths and surface texture from 57 points are presented along with soil moisture, snow cover, weather data, and associated hy...

  14. Eurasian Snow Conditions and Summer Monsoon Rainfall over South and Southeast Asia:Assessment and Comparison

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2005-01-01

    This study reveals the complex nature of the connection between Eurasian snow and the following summer season's monsoon rainfall by using four different indicators of snow conditions and correlating each of them to summer monsoon rainfall. Using 46 years of historical records of mean winter snow depth,maximum snow depth, and snow starting dates, and 27 years of snow area coverage from remote sensing observations over Eurasia, the authors found diverse correlation patterns between snow conditions and the following warm season's rainfall over South and Southeast Asia. Some of the results contradict the well-known inverse relationships between snow and the summer monsoon. This study provides an easy comparison of results in that it shows the connections between Eurasian snow and monsoon rainfall by using different Eurasian snow indicators based on the best available historical records without discrimination of regional variations in snow conditions.

  15. Variation of snow water resources in northwestern China,1951—1997

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李培基

    1999-01-01

    An observation study is carried out on snow mass amount estimate in northwestern China by using microwave derived snow depth charts employing data from SMMR in conjunction with daily snow depth, density and snow cover duration records for 46 ground climate stations. Spatial patterns, seasonal cycle, and interannual variation of snow cover are discussed. Results show that snow cover is the second largest water supply over the arid northwestern China,and unlike most other areas in the world, northwestern China did not experience any decrease in snow cover since 1987.Secular trends reveal systematic increase in snow mass and durations. Analysis of snow cover-climate relationship indicates that gradual increase in snow cover is primarily in response to increase in snow season precipitation.

  16. Snow multivariable data assimilation for hydrological predictions in Alpine sites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piazzi, Gaia; Thirel, Guillaume; Campo, Lorenzo; Gabellani, Simone; Stevenin, Hervè

    2017-04-01

    Snowpack dynamics (snow accumulation and ablation) strongly impacts on hydrological processes in Alpine areas. During the winter season the presence of snow cover (snow accumulation) reduces the drainage in the basin with a resulting lower watershed time of concentration in case of possible rainfall events. Moreover, the release of the significant water volume stored in winter (snowmelt) considerably contributes to the total discharge during the melting period. Therefore when modeling hydrological processes in snow-dominated catchments the quality of predictions deeply depends on how the model succeeds in catching snowpack dynamics. The integration of a hydrological model with a snow module allows improving predictions of river discharges. Besides the well-known modeling limitations (uncertainty in parameterizations; possible errors affecting both meteorological forcing data and initial conditions; approximations in boundary conditions), there are physical factors that make an exhaustive reconstruction of snow dynamics complicated: snow intermittence in space and time, stratification and slow phenomena like metamorphism processes, uncertainty in snowfall evaluation, wind transportation, etc. Data Assimilation (DA) techniques provide an objective methodology to combine several independent snow-related data sources (model simulations, ground-based measurements and remote sensed observations) in order to obtain the most likely estimate of snowpack state. This study presents SMASH (Snow Multidata Assimilation System for Hydrology), a multi-layer snow dynamic model strengthened by a multivariable DA framework for hydrological purposes. The model is physically based on mass and energy balances and can be used to reproduce the main physical processes occurring within the snowpack: accumulation, density dynamics, melting, sublimation, radiative balance, heat and mass exchanges. The model is driven by observed forcing meteorological data (air temperature, wind velocity

  17. Estimation of global snow cover using passive microwave data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Alfred T. C.; Kelly, Richard E.; Foster, James L.; Hall, Dorothy K.

    2003-04-01

    This paper describes an approach to estimate global snow cover using satellite passive microwave data. Snow cover is detected using the high frequency scattering signal from natural microwave radiation, which is observed by passive microwave instruments. Developed for the retrieval of global snow depth and snow water equivalent using Advanced Microwave Scanning Radiometer EOS (AMSR-E), the algorithm uses passive microwave radiation along with a microwave emission model and a snow grain growth model to estimate snow depth. The microwave emission model is based on the Dense Media Radiative Transfer (DMRT) model that uses the quasi-crystalline approach and sticky particle theory to predict the brightness temperature from a single layered snowpack. The grain growth model is a generic single layer model based on an empirical approach to predict snow grain size evolution with time. Gridding to the 25 km EASE-grid projection, a daily record of Special Sensor Microwave Imager (SSM/I) snow depth estimates was generated for December 2000 to March 2001. The estimates are tested using ground measurements from two continental-scale river catchments (Nelson River and the Ob River in Russia). This regional-scale testing of the algorithm shows that for passive microwave estimates, the average daily snow depth retrieval standard error between estimated and measured snow depths ranges from 0 cm to 40 cm of point observations. Bias characteristics are different for each basin. A fraction of the error is related to uncertainties about the grain growth initialization states and uncertainties about grain size changes through the winter season that directly affect the parameterization of the snow depth estimation in the DMRT model. Also, the algorithm does not include a correction for forest cover and this effect is clearly observed in the retrieval. Finally, error is also related to scale differences between in situ ground measurements and area-integrated satellite estimates. With AMSR

  18. Interactions with Astroglia Influence the Shape of the Developing Dendritic Arbor and Restrict Dendrite Growth Independent of Promoting Synaptic Contacts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farley, Jennifer R.; Sterritt, Jeffrey R.; Crane, Andrés B.; Wallace, Christopher S.

    2017-01-01

    Astroglia play key roles in the development of neurons, ranging from regulating neuron survival to promoting synapse formation, yet basic questions remain about whether astrocytes might be involved in forming the dendritic arbor. Here, we used cultured hippocampal neurons as a simple in vitro model that allowed dendritic growth and geometry to be analyzed quantitatively under conditions where the extent of interactions between neurons and astrocytes varied. When astroglia were proximal to neurons, dendrites and dendritic filopodia oriented toward them, but the general presence of astroglia significantly reduced overall dendrite growth. Further, dendritic arbors in partial physical contact with astroglia developed a pronounced pattern of asymmetrical growth, because the dendrites in direct contact were significantly smaller than the portion of the arbor not in contact. Notably, thrombospondin, the astroglial factor shown previously to promote synapse formation, did not inhibit dendritic growth. Thus, while astroglia promoted the formation of presynaptic contacts onto dendrites, dendritic growth was constrained locally within a developing arbor at sites where dendrites contacted astroglia. Taken together, these observations reveal influences on spatial orientation of growth as well as influences on morphogenesis of the dendritic arbor that have not been previously identified. PMID:28081563

  19. The Airborne Snow Observatory: fusion of imaging spectrometer and scanning lidar for studies of mountain snow cover (Invited)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Painter, T. H.; Andreadis, K.; Berisford, D. F.; Goodale, C. E.; Hart, A. F.; Heneghan, C.; Deems, J. S.; Gehrke, F.; Marks, D. G.; Mattmann, C. A.; McGurk, B. J.; Ramirez, P.; Seidel, F. C.; Skiles, M.; Trangsrud, A.; Winstral, A. H.; Kirchner, P.; Zimdars, P. A.; Yaghoobi, R.; Boustani, M.; Khudikyan, S.; Richardson, M.; Atwater, R.; Horn, J.; Goods, D.; Verma, R.; Boardman, J. W.

    2013-12-01

    Snow cover and its melt dominate regional climate and water resources in many of the world's mountainous regions. However, we face significant water resource challenges due to the intersection of increasing demand from population growth and changes in runoff total and timing due to climate change. Moreover, increasing temperatures in desert systems will increase dust loading to mountain snow cover, thus reducing the snow cover albedo and accelerating snowmelt runoff. The two most critical properties for understanding snowmelt runoff and timing are the spatial and temporal distributions of snow water equivalent (SWE) and snow albedo. Despite their importance in controlling volume and timing of runoff, snowpack albedo and SWE are still poorly quantified in the US and not at all in most of the globe, leaving runoff models poorly constrained. Recognizing this need, JPL developed the Airborne Snow Observatory (ASO), an imaging spectrometer and imaging LiDAR system, to quantify snow water equivalent and snow albedo, provide unprecedented knowledge of snow properties, and provide complete, robust inputs to snowmelt runoff models, water management models, and systems of the future. Critical in the design of the ASO system is the availability of snow water equivalent and albedo products within 24 hours of acquisition for timely constraint of snowmelt runoff forecast models. In spring 2013, ASO was deployed for its first year of a multi-year Demonstration Mission of weekly acquisitions in the Tuolumne River Basin (Sierra Nevada) and monthly acquisitions in the Uncompahgre River Basin (Colorado). The ASO data were used to constrain spatially distributed models of varying complexities and integrated into the operations of the O'Shaughnessy Dam on the Hetch Hetchy reservoir on the Tuolumne River. Here we present the first results from the ASO Demonstration Mission 1 along with modeling results with and without the constraint by the ASO's high spatial resolution and spatially

  20. Is Snow a Drought Buster? The Need to Incorporate Snow into Common Drought Indices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weiner, J.; Harpold, A. A.; Safeeq, M.

    2016-12-01

    The Palmer Drought Severity Index (PDSI) is used for quantifying present and historical drought conditions based on a simple water balance model. The PDSI is broadly accepted in the U.S and is routinely used in water management decision-making. However, in the Western U.S. a significant portion of precipitation falls as snow, which is not considered in common PDSI methods. The timing and rate of snowmelt is fundamentally different from rainfall, occurring later in the year and often at higher daily rates. In this study we ask the question: "How does snowmelt modify the severity and forecastability of hydrological drought?" To address this question, we developed a metric of effective precipitation that included both snowmelt and rainfall at 462 SNOTEL sites across the Western U.S. We then ran classic PDSI algorithms using both the standard precipitation metric and our effective precipitation metric. We found that incorporating snowmelt into the PDSI resulted in the moderation of drought, especially intense drought conditions. During extreme drought (PDSI between -4 and -5) we found a 15% reduction in PDSI by including snow and a 20% reduction during exceptional drought (PDSI < -5). One complication to including snowmelt is that snow-adjusted PDSI methods typically indicated drought later than normal PDSI methods due to the delay in water release from snowmelt. To validate our methods, we plan to compare the PDSI results to soil moisture measurements at the SNOTEL sites and to nearby streamflow. Our results suggest that extreme drought is likely to increase from earlier snowmelt and shifts from snow to rain. Prediction of drought timing and severity at regional scales could benefit dramatically from including snowmelt, which remains a challenge for future research.

  1. Active dendrites support efficient initiation of dendritic spikes in hippocampal CA3 pyramidal neurons

    OpenAIRE

    Kim, Sooyun; Guzman, Segundo J.; Hu, Hua; Jonas, Peter

    2012-01-01

    CA3 pyramidal neurons are important for memory formation and pattern completion in the hippocampal network. It is generally thought that proximal synapses from the mossy fibers activate these neurons most efficiently, whereas distal inputs from the perforant path have a weaker modulatory influence. We used confocally targeted patch-clamp recording from dendrites and axons to map the activation of rat CA3 pyramidal neurons at the subcellular level. Our results reveal two distinct dendritic dom...

  2. Numerical Simulations of Equiaxed Dendrite Growth Using Phase Field Method

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2002-01-01

    Phase field method offers the prospect of being able to perform realistic numerical experiments on dendrite growthin a metallic system. In this paper, the equiaxed dendrite evolution during the solidification of a pure material wasnumerically simulated using the phase field model. The equiaxed dendrite growth in a two-dimensional square domainof undercooled melt (nickel) with four-fold anisotropy was simulated. The phase field model equations was solvedusing the explicit finite difference method on a uniform mesh. The formation of various equiaxed dendrite patternswas shown by a series of simulations, and the effect of anisotropy on equiaxed dendrite morphology was investigated.

  3. Observations and modelling of snow avalanche entrainment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B. Sovilla

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available In this paper full scale avalanche dynamics measurements from the Italian Pizzac and Swiss Vallée de la Sionne test sites are used to develop a snowcover entrainment model. A detailed analysis of three avalanche events shows that snowcover entrainment at the avalanche front appears to dominate over bed erosion at the basal sliding surface. Furthermore, the distribution of mass within the avalanche body is primarily a function of basal friction. We show that the mass distribution in the avalanche changes the flow dynamics significantly. Two different dynamical models, the Swiss Voellmy-fluid model and the Norwegian NIS model, are used to back calculate the events. Various entrainment methods are investigated and compared to measurements. We demon-strate that the Norwegian NIS model is clearly better able to simulate the events once snow entrainment has been included in the simulations.

  4. Mac OS X Snow Leopard试用

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    大大

    2009-01-01

    苹果新一代操作系统Mac OS X 10.6 Snow Leopard(雪豹)于8月底上市。根据NPD集团的统计数据,该系统在美国市场前两周的销售非常喜人,是2007年Mac OS X 10.5 Leopard上市销量的2倍以上,是2005年的Mac OS X 10.4 Tiger操作系统的售量的4倍。假如你也对升级价格仅需88元雪豹系统感兴趣,就让我们从一起升级安装开始,体验它独特的魅力。

  5. [Snow white small intestinal villi in hypobetalipoproteinemia].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goerg, K J; Borchard, F; Luley, C; Schubert, G E

    1996-09-01

    In contrast to the severe clinical picture of abetalipoproteinemia patients with hypobetalipoproteinemia are often asymptomatic. We demonstrate a 52-years-old female patient with a white mucosa of the small intestine casually observed by endoscopy. The white appearance of the mucosa was limited to the villi. As demonstrated by light and transmission electron microscopy this was caused by fat loaded enterocytes similar to the picture of abetalipoproteinemia. Fasting serum lipids and apolipoproteins were only if the lower norm level for some parameters, but no increase of the serum lipids was observed after an oral fat load. Because of the missing symptoms, the typical histomorphology and laboratory findings the snow white mucosa of the small intestine is due by the hetocygote form of the autosomal dominant hypobetalipoproteinemia with fat loaded enterocytes.

  6. Hydrogen peroxide enteritis: the "snow white" sign.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bilotta, J J; Waye, J D

    1989-01-01

    Hydrogen peroxide is a useful disinfectant that has achieved widespread utility in varied clinical settings. We report an epidemic of hydrogen peroxide enteritis that developed in seven patients in our gastrointestinal endoscopy unit during a 2-week period in early 1988. During endoscopy, using recently sterilized endoscopes that were flushed with 3% hydrogen peroxide after the glutaraldehyde cycle, instantaneous blanching (the "snow white" sign) and effervescence were noted on the mucosal surfaces when the water button was depressed. No patient subsequently suffered morbidity or mortality associated with this peroxide enteritis, and the biopsy specimens revealed nonspecific inflammation. The toxicity of hydrogen peroxide when used in enema form is reviewed, as well as the pathogenesis of peroxide enteritis.

  7. Snow White Trench Prepared for Sample Collection

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-01-01

    The informally named 'Snow White' trench is the source for the next sample to be acquired by NASA's Phoenix Mars Lander for analysis by the wet chemistry lab. The Surface Stereo Imager on Phoenix took this shadow-enhanced image of the trench, on the eastern end of Phoenix's work area, on Sol 103, or the 103rd day of the mission, Sept. 8, 2008. The trench is about 23 centimeters (9 inches) wide. The wet chemistry lab is part of Phoenix's Microscopy, Electrochemistry and Conductivity suite of instruments. The Phoenix Mission is led by the University of Arizona, Tucson, on behalf of NASA. Project management of the mission is by NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, Calif. Spacecraft development is by Lockheed Martin Space Systems, Denver.

  8. Frost seen on Snow White Trench

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-01-01

    The Surface Stereo Imager (SSI) on NASA's Phoenix Mars Lander took this shadow-enhanced false color image of the 'Snow White' trench, on the eastern end of Phoenix's digging area. The image was taken on Sol 144, or the 144th day of the mission, Oct. 20, 2008. Temperatures measured on Sol 151, the last day weather data were received, showed overnight lows of minus128 Fahrenheit (minus 89 Celsius) and day time highs in the minus 50 F (minus 46 C) range. The last communication from the spacecraft came on Nov. 2, 2008. The Phoenix Mission is led by the University of Arizona, Tucson, on behalf of NASA. Project management of the mission is by NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, Calif. Spacecraft development is by Lockheed Martin Space Systems, Denver.

  9. Aerial view of CERN under the snow

    CERN Multimedia

    1963-01-01

    In this photograph taken in the winter of 1963, CERN still looks quite bare under its mantle of snow. The Proton Synchrotron (PS), resembling a bicycle wheel in shape, had been in operation since the summer of 1959. A proposal had just been made for the site of CERN's second large project, the Intersecting Storage Rings (ISR): France was to house the world's first proton-proton collider. In September 1965, the French authorities signed an agreement making more than 40 hectares of land available for the extension of the CERN site established in Switzerland into French territory. The ISR project received final approval from the CERN Council in December 1965. The civil engineering work on the French part began in November 196

  10. 'Snow White' Trench After Scraping (Stereo View)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-01-01

    This 3D view from the Surface Stereo Imager on NASA's Phoenix Mars Lander shows the trench informally named 'Snow White.' This anaglyph was taken after a series of scrapings by the lander's Robotic Arm on the 58th Martian day, or sol, of the mission (July 23, 2008). The scrapings were done in preparation for collecting a sample for analysis from a hard subsurface layer where soil may contain frozen water. The trench is 4 to 5 centimeters (about 2 inches) deep, about 23 centimeters (9 inches) wide and about 60 centimeters (24 inches) long. The Phoenix Mission is led by the University of Arizona, Tucson, on behalf of NASA. Project management of the mission is by NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, Calif. Spacecraft development is by Lockheed Martin Space Systems, Denver.

  11. Defining snow drought and why it matters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harpold, Adrian; Dettinger, Michael; Rajagopal, Seshadri

    2017-01-01

    On 12 February, water resource managers at the Oroville Dam issued an evacuation warning that forced some 180,000 Californians to relocate to higher ground. The story of how conditions got to this point involves several factors, but two clearly stand out: the need to prevent water shortages during a record drought, followed by one of the wettest October–February periods in California history.The situation at Oroville Dam highlights difficulties that many reservoir managers face in managing flood risks while simultaneously storing water to mitigate severe droughts and smaller snowpacks. Central to this difficulty is the idea of “snow drought,” a term that’s gaining traction in both scientific and lay literature.

  12. The role of dendritic cells in cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Morten; Andersen, Mads Hald

    2017-01-01

    Though present in low numbers, dendritic cells (DCs) are recognized as major players in the control of cancer by adaptive immunity. The roles of cytotoxic CD8+ T-cells and Th1 helper CD4+ T-cells are well-documented in murine models of cancer and associated with a profound prognostic impact when...... treatment regimens against cancer....

  13. Characterization of chicken dendritic cell markers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Animal and Natural Resources Institute, ARS-USDA, Beltsville, MD, USA. New mouse monoclonal antibodies which detect CD80 and CD83 were developed to characterize chicken dendritic cells (DCs). The characteristics of these molecules have been studied in human, swine, ovine, feline, and canine but not ...

  14. ISOLATION OF CHICKEN FOLLICULAR DENDRITIC CELLS

    Science.gov (United States)

    The aim of the present study was to isolate chicken follicular dendritic cells (FDC). A combination of methods involving panning, iodixanol density gradient centrifugation, and magnetic cell separation technology made it possible to obtain functional FDC from the cecal tonsils from chickens, which h...

  15. Dendritic cells in peripheral tolerance and immunity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gad, Monika; Claesson, Mogens Helweg; Pedersen, Anders Elm

    2003-01-01

    Dendritic cells capable of influencing immunity exist as functionally distinct subsets, T cell-tolerizing and T cell-immunizing subsets. The present paper reviews how these subsets of DCs develop, differentiate and function in vivo and in vitro at the cellular and molecular level. In particular...

  16. An Unmanned Tracked Vehicle for Snow Research Applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R.K. Das

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Lightweight robotic vehicles can be designed for over-snow mobility to carry out a variety of snow and glacier related studies like carrying out GPR survey of cracks & crevasses over ice crusts that cannot support foot travel, for collecting snow samples and carrying out sub-surface experiments with penetrometers on terrain that are dangerous for human, GPS mapping of avalanche debris etc. Sinkage, resistance to snow compaction, loss of traction and ingestion of snow into the driving system are some of the challenges that an unmanned lightweight tracked vehicle faces in snowbound terrain. In present work, a lightweight and unmanned remotely operated vehicle (ROV is conceptualized and developed as a technological solution. In this paper design and features of this vehicle, named HimBot, are presented along with the results obtained from tests carried over snow at Solang Nullah field observatory of SASE in February 2013. The outcome of this work will help in developing an optimized design of an ROV for over snow mobility for a variety of applications.

  17. Effect of unsteady wind on drifting snow: first investigations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J.-L. Michaux

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available Wind is not always a steady flow. It can oscillate, producing blasts. However, most of the current numerical models of drifting snow are constrained by one major assumption: forcing winds are steady and uniform. Moreover, very few studies have been done to verify this hypothesis, because of the lack of available instrumentation and measurement difficulties. Therefore, too little is known about the possible role of wind gust in drifting snow. In order to better understand the effect of unsteady winds, we have performed both experiments at the climatic wind tunnel at the CSTB (Centre Scientifique et Technique des Bâtiments in Nantes, France, and in situ experiments on our experimental high-altitude site, at the Lac Blanc Pass. These experiments were carried out collaboratively with Cemagref (France, Météo-France, and the IFENA (Switzerland. Through the wind tunnel experiments, we found that drifting snow is in a state of permanent disequilibrium in the presence of fluctuating airflows. In addition, the in situ experiments show that the largest drifting snow episodes appear during periods of roughly constant strong wind, whereas a short but strong blast does not produce significant drifting snow.  Key words. Drifting snow, blowing snow, gust, blast, acoustic sensor

  18. Seasonal controls on snow distribution and aerial ablation at the snow-patch and landscape scales, McMurdo Dry Valleys, Antarctica

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. W. Eveland

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Accumulated snow in the McMurdo Dry Valleys, while limited, has great ecological significance to subnivian soil environments. Though sublimation dominates the ablation process in this region, measurable increases in soil moisture and insulation from temperature extremes provide more favorable conditions with respect to subnivian soil communities. While precipitation is not substantial, significant amounts of snow can accumulate, via wind transport, in topographic lees along the valley bottoms, forming thousands of discontinuous snow patches. These patches have the potential to act as significant sources of local meltwater, controlling biogeochemical cycling and the landscape distribution of microbial communities. Therefore, determining the spatial and temporal dynamics of snow at multiple scales is imperative to understanding the broader ecological role of snow in this region. High-resolution satellite imagery acquired during the 2009–2010 and 2010–2011 austral summers was used to quantify the distribution of snow across Taylor and Wright valleys. Extracted snow-covered area from the imagery was used as the basis for assessing inter-annual variability and seasonal controls on accumulation and ablation of snow at multiple scales. In addition to landscape analyses, fifteen 1 km2 plots (3 in each of 5 study regions were selected to assess the prevalence of snow cover at finer spatial scales, referred to herein as the snow-patch scale. Results confirm that snow patches tend to form in the same locations each year with some minor deviations observed. At the snow-patch scale, neighboring patches often exhibit considerable differences in aerial ablation rates, and particular snow patches do not reflect trends for snow-covered area observed at the landscape scale. These differences are presumably related to microtopographic influences acting on individual snow patches, such as wind sheltering and differences in snow depth due to the underlying

  19. Air-snow exchange of nitrate: a modelling approach to investigate physicochemical processes in surface snow at Dome C, Antarctica

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bock, Josué; Savarino, Joël; Picard, Ghislain

    2016-10-01

    Snowpack is a multiphase (photo)chemical reactor that strongly influences the air composition in polar and snow-covered regions. Snowpack plays a special role in the nitrogen cycle, as it has been shown that nitrate undergoes numerous recycling stages (including photolysis) in the snow before being permanently buried in the ice. However, the current understanding of these physicochemical processes remains very poor. Several modelling studies have attempted to reproduce (photo)chemical reactions inside snow grains, but these have relied on strong assumptions to characterise snow reactive properties, which are not well defined. Air-snow exchange processes such as adsorption, solid-state diffusion, or co-condensation also affect snow chemical composition. Here, we present a physically based model of these processes for nitrate. Using as input a 1-year-long time series of atmospheric nitrate concentration measured at Dome C, Antarctica, our model reproduces with good agreement the nitrate measurements in the surface snow. By investigating the relative importance of the main exchange processes, this study shows that, on the one hand, the combination of bulk diffusion and co-condensation allows a good reproduction of the measurements (correlation coefficient r = 0.95), with a correct amplitude and timing of summer peak concentration of nitrate in snow. During winter, nitrate concentration in surface snow is mainly driven by thermodynamic equilibrium, whilst the peak observed in summer is explained by the kinetic process of co-condensation. On the other hand, the adsorption of nitric acid on the surface of the snow grains, constrained by an already existing parameterisation for the isotherm, fails to fit the observed variations. During winter and spring, the modelled concentration of adsorbed nitrate is respectively 2.5 and 8.3-fold higher than the measured one. A strong diurnal variation driven by the temperature cycle and a peak occurring in early spring are two other

  20. Wind slab formation in snow: experimental setup and first results

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sommer, Christian; Lehning, Michael; Fierz, Charles

    2016-04-01

    The formation of wind-hardened surface layers, also known as wind slabs or wind crusts, is studied. Better knowledge about which processes and parameters are important will lead to an improved understanding of the mass balances in polar and alpine areas. It will also improve snow-cover models (i.e. SNOWPACK) as well as the forecast of avalanche danger. A ring-shaped wind tunnel has been built and instrumented. The facility is ring-shaped to simulate an infinitely long snow surface (infinite fetch). A SnowMicroPen (SMP) is used to measure the snow hardness. Other sensors measure environmental conditions such as wind velocity, air temperature, air humidity, the temperature of the snow and of the snow surface. A camera is used to detect drifting particles and to measure the Specific Surface Area (SSA) at the snow surface via near-infrared photography. First experiments indicate that mechanical fragmentation followed by sintering is the most efficient process to harden the surface. The hardness increased rapidly during drifting snow events, but only slowly or not at all when the wind speed was kept below the threshold for drifting snow. With drifting, the penetration resistance increased from the original 0.07 N to around 0.3 N in about an hour. Without drifting, a slow, further increase in resistance was observed. In about six hours, the hardness of the top 1-2 cm increased to 0.5 N. During this eight-hour experiment consisting of about two hours with intermittent drifting and six hours without drifting, the density at the surface increased from 66 kg/m3 to around 170 kg/m3. In the unaffected region close to the ground, the density increased from 100 kg/m3 to 110 kg/m3.

  1. An Integrated Approach for Site Selection of Snow Measurement Stations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bahram Saghafian

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Snowmelt provides a reliable water resource for meeting domestic, agricultural, industrial and hydropower demands. Consequently, estimating the available snow water equivalent is essential for water resource management of snowy regions. Due to the spatiotemporal variability of the snowfall pattern in mountainous areas and difficult access to high altitudes areas, snow measurement is one of the most challenging hydro-meteorological data collection efforts. Development of an optimum snow measurement network is a complex task that requires integration of meteorological, hydrological, physiographical and economic studies. In this study, site selection of snow measurement stations is carried out through an integrated process using observed snow course data and analysis of historical snow cover images from National Oceanic Atmospheric Administration Advanced Very High Resolution Radiometer (NOAA-AVHRR at both regional and local scales. Several important meteorological and hydrological factors, such as monthly and annual rainfall distribution, spatial distribution of average frequency of snow observation (FSO for two periods of snow falling and melting season, as well as priority contribution of sub-basins to annual snowmelt runoff are considered for selecting optimum station network. The FSO maps representing accumulation of snowfall during falling months and snowpack persistence during melting months are prepared in the GIS based on NOAA-AVHRR historical snow cover images. Basins are partitioned into 250 m elevation intervals such that within each interval, establishment of new stations or relocation/removing of the existing stations were proposed. The decision is made on the basis of the combination of meteorological, hydrological and satellite information. Economic aspects and road access constraints are also considered in determining the station type. Eventually, for the study area encompassing a number of large basins in southwest of Iran

  2. Is snow sublimation important in the alpine water balance?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    U. Strasser

    2007-09-01

    Full Text Available In alpine terrain, snow sublimation as a component of the winter moisture budget represents a proportion of precipitation which does not contribute to melt. To quantify its amount we analyze the spatial pattern of snow sublimation at the ground, from a canopy and from turbulent suspension during wind-induced snow transport for a high alpine area in the Berchtesgaden National Park (Germany, and we discuss the efficiency of these processes with respect to seasonal snowfall. Therefore, we utilized hourly meteorological recordings from a network of automatic stations, and a distributed simulation framework comprising validated, physically based models. Meteorological data records were spatially distributed over the simulation domain by means of a quasi-physically based interpolation scheme that accounts for topographic influences on the distributed fields. The applied simulation tools were: a detailed model for shortwave and longwave radiative fluxes, a mass and energy balance model for the ground snow cover, a model for the microclimatic conditions within a forest canopy and related snow-vegetation interactions including snow sublimation from the surface of the trees, and a model for the simulation of wind-induced snow transport and related sublimation from suspended snow particles. For each of the sublimation processes, mass rates were quantified and aggregated over an entire winter season. Sublimation from the ground and from most canopy types are spatially relatively homogeneous and sum up to about 100 mm of snow water equivalent (SWE over the winter period. Accumulated seasonal sublimation due to turbulent suspension is small in the valley areas, but can locally, at very wind-exposed mountain ridges, add up to more than 1000 mm of SWE. The fraction of these sublimation losses of winter snowfall is between 10 and 90%.

  3. Use of machine learning techniques for modeling of snow depth

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. V. Ayzel

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Snow exerts significant regulating effect on the land hydrological cycle since it controls intensity of heat and water exchange between the soil-vegetative cover and the atmosphere. Estimating of a spring flood runoff or a rain-flood on mountainous rivers requires understanding of the snow cover dynamics on a watershed. In our work, solving a problem of the snow cover depth modeling is based on both available databases of hydro-meteorological observations and easily accessible scientific software that allows complete reproduction of investigation results and further development of this theme by scientific community. In this research we used the daily observational data on the snow cover and surface meteorological parameters, obtained at three stations situated in different geographical regions: Col de Porte (France, Sodankyla (Finland, and Snoquamie Pass (USA.Statistical modeling of the snow cover depth is based on a complex of freely distributed the present-day machine learning models: Decision Trees, Adaptive Boosting, Gradient Boosting. It is demonstrated that use of combination of modern machine learning methods with available meteorological data provides the good accuracy of the snow cover modeling. The best results of snow cover depth modeling for every investigated site were obtained by the ensemble method of gradient boosting above decision trees – this model reproduces well both, the periods of snow cover accumulation and its melting. The purposeful character of learning process for models of the gradient boosting type, their ensemble character, and use of combined redundancy of a test sample in learning procedure makes this type of models a good and sustainable research tool. The results obtained can be used for estimating the snow cover characteristics for river basins where hydro-meteorological information is absent or insufficient.

  4. Multidecadal climate and seasonal snow conditions in Svalbard

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pelt, W. J. J.; Kohler, J.; Liston, G. E.; Hagen, J. O.; Luks, B.; Reijmer, C. H.; Pohjola, V. A.

    2016-11-01

    Svalbard climate is undergoing amplified change with respect to the global mean. Changing climate conditions directly affect the evolution of the seasonal snowpack, through its impact on accumulation, melt, and moisture exchange. We analyze long-term trends and spatial patterns of seasonal snow conditions in Svalbard between 1961 and 2012. Downscaled regional climate model output is used to drive a snow modeling system (SnowModel), with coupled modules simulating the surface energy balance and snowpack evolution. The precipitation forcing is calibrated and validated against snow depth data on a set of glaciers around Svalbard. Climate trends reveal seasonally inhomogeneous warming and a weakly positive precipitation trend, with strongest changes in the north. In response to autumn warming the date of snow onset increased (2 days decade-1), whereas in spring/summer opposing effects cause a nonsignificant trend in the snow disappearance date. Maximum snow water equivalent (SWE) in winter/spring shows a modest increase (+0.01 meters water equivalent (mwe) decade-1), while the end-of-summer minimum snow area fraction declined strongly (from 48% to 36%). The equilibrium line altitude is highest in relatively dry inland regions, and time series show a clear positive trend (25 m decade-1) as a result of summer warming. Finally, rain-on-snow in the core winter season, affecting ground ice formation and limiting access of grazing animals to food supplies, peaks during specific years (1994, 1996, 2000, and 2012) and is found to be concentrated in the lower lying coastal regions in southwestern Svalbard.

  5. Dendritic mitochondria reach stable positions during circuit development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faits, Michelle C; Zhang, Chunmeng; Soto, Florentina; Kerschensteiner, Daniel

    2016-01-07

    Mitochondria move throughout neuronal dendrites and localize to sites of energy demand. The prevailing view of dendritic mitochondria as highly motile organelles whose distribution is continually adjusted by neuronal activity via Ca(2+)-dependent arrests is based on observations in cultured neurons exposed to artificial stimuli. Here, we analyze the movements of mitochondria in ganglion cell dendrites in the intact retina. We find that whereas during development 30% of mitochondria are motile at any time, as dendrites mature, mitochondria all but stop moving and localize stably to synapses and branch points. Neither spontaneous nor sensory-evoked activity and Ca(2+) transients alter motility of dendritic mitochondria; and pathological hyperactivity in a mouse model of retinal degeneration elevates rather than reduces motility. Thus, our findings indicate that dendritic mitochondria reach stable positions during a critical developmental period of high motility, and challenge current views about the role of activity in regulating mitochondrial transport in dendrites.

  6. Snow crystal imaging using scanning electron microscopy: III. Glacier ice, snow and biota

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rango, A.; Wergin, W.P.; Erbe, E.F.; Josberger, E.G.

    2000-01-01

    Low-temperature scanning electron microscopy (SEM) was used to observe metamorphosed snow, glacial firn, and glacial ice obtained from South Cascade Glacier in Washington State, USA. Biotic samples consisting of algae (Chlamydomonas nivalis) and ice worms (a species of oligochaetes) were also collected and imaged. In the field, the snow and biological samples were mounted on copper plates, cooled in liquid nitrogen, and stored in dry shipping containers which maintain a temperature of -196??C. The firn and glacier ice samples were obtained by extracting horizontal ice cores, 8 mm in diameter, at different levels from larger standard glaciological (vertical) ice cores 7.5 cm in diameter. These samples were cooled in liquid nitrogen and placed in cryotubes, were stored in the same dry shipping container, and sent to the SEM facility. In the laboratory, the samples were sputter coated with platinum and imaged by a low-temperature SEM. To image the firn and glacier ice samples, the cores were fractured in liquid nitrogen, attached to a specimen holder, and then imaged. While light microscope images of snow and ice are difficult to interpret because of internal reflection and refraction, the SEM images provide a clear and unique view of the surface of the samples because they are generated from electrons emitted or reflected only from the surface of the sample. In addition, the SEM has a great depth of field with a wide range of magnifying capabilities. The resulting images clearly show the individual grains of the seasonal snowpack and the bonding between the snow grains. Images of firn show individual ice crystals, the bonding between the crystals, and connected air spaces. Images of glacier ice show a crystal structure on a scale of 1-2 mm which is considerably smaller than the expected crystal size. Microscopic air bubbles, less than 15 ??m in diameter, clearly marked the boundaries between these crystal-like features. The life forms associated with the glacier were

  7. Snow HDRF Measurements on Various Snow Surfaces with the new IAC-Gonio-Spectrometer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bourgeois, C. S.; Schroff, K.; Frei, H.

    2004-12-01

    This work presents a field Gonio-Spectrometer developed at the Institute for Atmospheric and Climate Science, Swiss Federal Institute of Technology, Zurich (IAC-ETH). The main motivation to built this Gonio-Spectrometer was the study of the Hemispherical Distribution Reflectance Factor (HDRF) of dry snow on the Ice Sheet of Greenland and to examine the influence of the HDRF on the surface energy balance. The surface Albedo is of great importance for both, large scale and small scale climate modelling and energy balance studies. Especially for remote regions, satellites provide an extraordinary means to measure reflected sunlight. However, raw satellite data have to undergo several corrections depending on the viewing angles of the sensors relative to the targets and the irradiance source (sun). The function that describes the distribution of reflected radiance with angle is called Bidirectional Reflectance Distribution Function (BRDF). The HDRF is the commonly used dimensionless form of the angular distribution of reflectance. BRDF and HDRF are a functions of four angles: incoming (solar) zenith angle and azimuth, and outgoing (reflected) zenith angle and azimuth. In situ measurements of HDRF data, a combination of multidirectional and hyperspectral data, require complex and demanding experiments. Therefore, existing data sets a rare. However, the advent of new satellite systems that offer hyperspectral resolution and off-nadir tilting capability ask for ground truth data sets. The IAC-Gonio-Spectrometer measures the HDRF with a distance of 1 meter between sensor and target. The sensor, an optic cable, can be placed on an arbitrary place on the hemisphere and always points towards the same surface area. Depending on the viewing geometry, the diameter of the footprint area varies from 5~cm (at nadir) to 20~cm (at 75 degree zenith angle). The pointing accuracy, analyzed in a laboratory experiment with a laser beam, was measured at ± 2.5~cm. In the summer field

  8. Mac OS X Snow Leopard Server For Dummies

    CERN Document Server

    Rizzo, John

    2009-01-01

    Making Everything Easier!. Mac OS® X Snow Leopard Server for Dummies. Learn to::;. Set up and configure a Mac network with Snow Leopard Server;. Administer, secure, and troubleshoot the network;. Incorporate a Mac subnet into a Windows Active Directory® domain;. Take advantage of Unix® power and security. John Rizzo. Want to set up and administer a network even if you don't have an IT department? Read on!. Like everything Mac, Snow Leopard Server was designed to be easy to set up and use. Still, there are so many options and features that this book will save you heaps of time and effort. It wa

  9. Short term settlement of footing on snow foundation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Puneet Mahajan

    2001-10-01

    Full Text Available "A constitutive theory for snow, developed by the authors, is applied to solve for the short-term settlement of footing on snow foundation. The constitutive law used is a microstructurally-based formulation which includes the effects of bond deformation and fracture. It also includes transient creep effects and strain hardening of snow. The foundation problem is solved for stress and displacement distribution, with two different loads of 0.008 MPa and 0.1 MPa distributed uniformly over a part of the top face. The stress distribution matches closely with the existing theoretical results.

  10. Relationship between snow microstructure and physical and chemical processes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. Bartels-Rausch

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Ice and snow in the environment are important because they not only act as a host to rich chemistry but also provide a matrix for physical exchanges of contaminants within the ecosystem. This review discusses how the structure of snow influences both chemical reactivity and physical processes, which thereby makes snow a unique medium for study. The focus is placed on impacts of the presence of liquid and surface disorder using many experimental studies, simulations, and field observations from the molecular to the micro-scale.

  11. Microwave snow emission modeling uncertainties in boreal and subarctic environments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Roy

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available This study aims to better understand and quantify the uncertainties in microwave snow emission models using the Dense Media Radiative Theory-Multilayer model (DMRT-ML with in situ measurements of snow properties. We use surface-based radiometric measurements at 10.67, 19 and 37 GHz in boreal forest and subarctic environments and a new in situ dataset of measurements of snow properties (profiles of density, snow grain size and temperature, soil characterization and ice lens detection acquired in the James Bay and Umijuaq regions of Northern Québec, Canada. A snow excavation experiment – where snow was removed from the ground to measure the microwave emission of bare frozen ground – shows that small-scale spatial variability in the emission of frozen soil is small. Hence, variability in the emission of frozen soil has a small effect on snow-covered brightness temperature (TB. Grain size and density measurement errors can explain the errors at 37 GHz, while the sensitivity of TB at 19 GHz to snow increases during the winter because of the snow grain growth that leads to scattering. Furthermore, the inclusion of observed ice lenses in DMRT-ML leads to significant improvements in the simulations at horizontal polarization (H-pol for the three frequencies (up to 20 K of root mean square error. However, the representation of the spatial variability of TB remains poor at 10.67 and 19 GHz at H-pol given the spatial variability of ice lens characteristics and the difficulty in simulating snowpack stratigraphy related to the snow crust. The results also show that for ground-based radiometric measurements, forest emission reflected by the surface leads to TB underestimation of up to 40 K if neglected. We perform a comprehensive analysis of the components that contribute to the snow-covered microwave signal, which will help to develop DMRT-ML and to improve the required field measurements. The analysis shows that a better consideration of ice lenses and

  12. Optimizing placements of ground-based snow sensors for areal snow cover estimation using a machine-learning algorithm and melt-season snow-LiDAR data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oroza, C.; Zheng, Z.; Glaser, S. D.; Bales, R. C.; Conklin, M. H.

    2016-12-01

    We present a structured, analytical approach to optimize ground-sensor placements based on time-series remotely sensed (LiDAR) data and machine-learning algorithms. We focused on catchments within the Merced and Tuolumne river basins, covered by the JPL Airborne Snow Observatory LiDAR program. First, we used a Gaussian mixture model to identify representative sensor locations in the space of independent variables for each catchment. Multiple independent variables that govern the distribution of snow depth were used, including elevation, slope, and aspect. Second, we used a Gaussian process to estimate the areal distribution of snow depth from the initial set of measurements. This is a covariance-based model that also estimates the areal distribution of model uncertainty based on the independent variable weights and autocorrelation. The uncertainty raster was used to strategically add sensors to minimize model uncertainty. We assessed the temporal accuracy of the method using LiDAR-derived snow-depth rasters collected in water-year 2014. In each area, optimal sensor placements were determined using the first available snow raster for the year. The accuracy in the remaining LiDAR surveys was compared to 100 configurations of sensors selected at random. We found the accuracy of the model from the proposed placements to be higher and more consistent in each remaining survey than the average random configuration. We found that a relatively small number of sensors can be used to accurately reproduce the spatial patterns of snow depth across the basins, when placed using spatial snow data. Our approach also simplifies sensor placement. At present, field surveys are required to identify representative locations for such networks, a process that is labor intensive and provides limited guarantees on the networks' representation of catchment independent variables.

  13. Characterizing parameter sensitivity and uncertainty for a snow model across hydroclimatic regimes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    He, M.; Hogue, T.S.; Franz, K.J.; Margulis, S.A.; Vrugt, J.A.

    2011-01-01

    The National Weather Service (NWS) uses the SNOW17 model to forecast snow accumulation and ablation processes in snow-dominated watersheds nationwide. Successful application of the SNOW17 relies heavily on site-specific estimation of model parameters. The current study undertakes a comprehensive

  14. Interannual consistency in fractal snow depth patterns at two Colorado mountain sites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeffrey S. Deems; Steven R. Fassnacht; Kelly J. Elder

    2008-01-01

    Fractal dimensions derived from log-log variograms are useful for characterizing spatial structure and scaling behavior in snow depth distributions. This study examines the temporal consistency of snow depth scaling features at two sites using snow depth distributions derived from lidar datasets collected in 2003 and 2005. The temporal snow accumulation patterns in...

  15. Characterizing parameter sensitivity and uncertainty for a snow model across hydroclimatic regimes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    He, M.; Hogue, T.S.; Franz, K.J.; Margulis, S.A.; Vrugt, J.A.

    2011-01-01

    The National Weather Service (NWS) uses the SNOW17 model to forecast snow accumulation and ablation processes in snow-dominated watersheds nationwide. Successful application of the SNOW17 relies heavily on site-specific estimation of model parameters. The current study undertakes a comprehensive sen

  16. Estimation of snow cover distribution in Beas basin, Indian Himalaya using satellite data and ground measurements

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    H S Negi; A V Kulkarni; B S Semwal

    2009-10-01

    In the present paper,a methodology has been developed for the mapping of snow cover in Beas basin,Indian Himalaya using AWiFS (IRS-P6)satellite data.The complexities in the mapping of snow cover in the study area are snow under vegetation,contaminated snow and patchy snow. To overcome these problems,field measurements using spectroradiometer were carried out and reflectance/snow indices trend were studied.By evaluation and validation of different topographic correction models,it was observed that,the normalized difference snow index (NDSI)values remain constant with the variations in slope and aspect and thus NDSI can take care of topography effects.Different snow cover mapping methods using snow indices are compared to find the suitable mapping technique.The proposed methodology for snow cover mapping uses the NDSI (estimated using planetary re flectance),NIR band reflectance and forest/vegetation cover information.The satellite estimated snow or non-snow pixel information using proposed methodology was validated with the snow cover information collected at three observatory locations and it was found that the algorithm classify all the sample points correctly,once that pixel is cloud free.The snow cover distribution was estimated using one year (2004 –05)cloud free satellite data and good correlation was observed between increase/decrease areal extent of seasonal snow cover and ground observed fresh snowfall and standing snow data.

  17. Torsional pendulum vibration model with nonlinear damping and its application in measurement of moment of inertia of large aled plate-like objects%非线性阻尼扭摆振动模型及在转动惯量测量中应用

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    林洪文; 马强; 唐文彦; 王军; 张晓琳

    2014-01-01

    为减小传统扭摆振动数学模型在大尺寸板状物体转动惯量测量中的误差,建立扭摆振动一般形式的非线性数学模型,利用弱非线性条件下平均值方法将其线性化获得扭摆振动线性化方程。导出转动惯量新的数学表达式并计算转动惯量,其结果的重复性误差减小、精度提高,实现转动惯量的精确测量。%Here,a general nonlinear mathematical model of torsional pendulum vibration was built to reduce the error of the traditional torsional pendulum vibration model in measuring moment of inertia for large scaled plate-like objects.The average value method under a weak nonlinear damping condition was adopted to linearize the nonlinear model to get a linear equation of torsional pendulum vibration.The new mathematical expression for the moment of inertia to be measured was deduced and calculated.The results obtained with the new model showed higher repeatability and accuracy in measurement of moment of inertia of large scaled plate-liked objects.

  18. STUDIES ON THE HARDNESS OF WET SNOW AND ITS DECREASE DUE TO SOLAR RADIATION

    OpenAIRE

    Izumi, Kaoru

    1987-01-01

    As wet snow plays one of the most important roles in the release of avalanches in temperate snowy districts, observations and experiments were made on the characteristics of hardness of wet snow in the field and laboratory. By measuring Kinosita's hardness of natural wet snow over a wide range of snow density, a relation among hardness, dry density and free water content of wet snow was obtained for each snow type. As hardness of snow decreased with an increase in water content according to t...

  19. Study of snow cover area and depth variation of the Tianshan Mountains

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tao, Jianwei; Qin, Qiming

    2008-10-01

    Based on the image characteristics of Tianshan Mountains, using multi-temporal multi-band NOAA/AVHRR, MODIS images, combined with high resolution CBERS-1/2 and ETM images, a model for estimating the area of snow cover and the depth of snow cover at different places was proposed. The snow cover variation characteristics including the distribution of snow cover, the depth of snow cover and the drawing method for snow cover were focused. Based on the model, the snow cover of the area along Tianshan Highway from 1996-2006 was studied.

  20. Topographic control of snow distribution in an alpine watershed of western Canada inferred from spatially-filtered MODIS snow products

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Tong

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available A spatial filter (SF is used to reduce cloud coverage in Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS 8-day maximum snow cover extent products (MOD10A2 from 2000–2007, which are obtained from MODIS daily snow cover extent products (MOD10A1, to assess the topographic control on snow cover fraction (SCF and snow cover duration (SCD in the Quesnel River Basin (QRB of British Columbia, Canada. Results show that the SF reduces cloud coverage and improves by 2% the accuracy of snow mapping in the QRB. The new product developed using the SF method shows larger SCF and longer SCD than MOD10A2, with higher altitudes experiencing longer snow cover and perennial snow above 2500 m. The gradient of SCF with elevation (d(SCF/dz during the snowmelt season is 8% (100 m−1. The average ablation rates of SCF are similar for different 100 m elevation bands at about 5.5% (8 days−1 for altitudes <1500 m with decreasing values with elevation to near 0% (8 days−1 for altitudes >2500 m. Different combinations of slopes and aspects also affect the SCF with a maximum difference of 20.9% at a given time. Correlation coefficients between SCD and elevation attain 0.96 (p<0.001. Mean gradients of SCD with elevation are 3.8, 4.3, and 11.6 days (100 m−1 for the snow onset season, snowmelt season, and entire year, respectively. The SF decreases the standard deviations of SCDs compared to MOD10A2 with a maximum difference near 0.6 day, 0.9 day, and 1.0 day for the snow onset season, snowmelt season, and entire year, respectively.

  1. Measurement of snow interception and canopy effects on snow accumulation and melt in a mountainous maritime climate, Oregon, United States

    Science.gov (United States)

    Storck, Pascal; Lettenmaier, Dennis P.; Bolton, Susan M.

    2002-11-01

    The results of a 3 year field study to observe the processes controlling snow interception by forest canopies and under canopy snow accumulation and ablation in mountain maritime climates are reported. The field study was further intended to provide data to develop and test models of forest canopy effects on beneath-canopy snowpack accumulation and melt and the plot and stand scales. Weighing lysimeters, cut-tree experiments, and manual snow surveys were deployed at a site in the Umpqua National Forest, Oregon (elevation 1200 m). A unique design for a weighing lysimeter was employed that allowed continuous measurements of snowpack evolution beneath a forest canopy to be taken at a scale unaffected by variability in canopy throughfall. Continuous observations of snowpack evolution in large clearings were made coincidentally with the canopy measurements. Large differences in snow accumulation and ablation were observed at sites beneath the forest canopy and in large clearings. These differences were not well described by simple relationships between the sites. Over the study period, approximately 60% of snowfall was intercepted by the canopy (up to a maximum of about 40 mm water equivalent). Instantaneous sublimation rates exceeded 0.5 mm per hour for short periods. However, apparent average sublimation from the intercepted snow was less than 1 mm per day and totaled approximately 100 mm per winter season. Approximately 72 and 28% of the remaining intercepted snow was removed as meltwater drip and large snow masses, respectively. Observed differences in snow interception rate and maximum snow interception capacity between Douglas fir (Pseudotsuga menziesii), white fir (Abies concolor), ponderosa pine (Pinus ponderosa), and lodgepole pine (Pinus contorta) were minimal.

  2. Impact of Rain Snow Threshold Temperature on Snow Depth Simulation in Land Surface and Regional Atmospheric Models

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WEN Lijuan; Nidhi NAGABHATLA; L(U) Shihua; Shih-Yu WANG

    2013-01-01

    This study investigates the impact of rain snow threshold (RST) temperatures on snow depth simulation using the Community Land Model (CLM) and the Weather Research and Forecasting model (WRF coupled with the CLM and hereafter referred to as WRF_CLM),and the difference in impacts.Simulations were performed from 17 December 1994 to 30 May 1995 in the French Alps.Results showed that both the CLM and the WRF_CLM were able to represent a fair simulation of snow depth with actual terrain height and 2.5℃ RST temperature.When six RST methods were applied to the simulation using WRF_CLM,the simulated snow depth was the closest to observations using 2.5℃ RST temperature,followed by that with Pipes',USACE,Kienzle's,Dai's,and 0℃ RST temperature methods.In the case of using CLM,simulated snow depth was the closest to the observation with Dai's method,followed by with USACE,Pipes',2.5℃ RST temperature,Kienzle's,and 0℃ RST temperature method.The snow depth simulation using the WRF_CLM was comparatively sensitive to changes in RST temperatures,because the RST temperature was not only the factor to partition snow and rainfall.In addition,the simulated snow related to RST temperature could induce a significant feedback by influencing the meteorological variables forcing the land surface model in WRF_CLM.In comparison,the above variables did not change with changes in RST in CLM.Impacts of RST temperatures on snow depth simulation could also be influenced by the patterns of temperature and precipitation,spatial resolution,and input terrain heights.

  3. Application of snow models to snow removal operations on the Going-to-the-Sun Road, Glacier National Park

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fagre, Daniel B.; Klasner, Frederick L.

    2000-01-01

    Snow removal, and the attendant avalanche risk for road crews, is a major issue on mountain highways worldwide. The Going-to-the-Sun Road is the only road that crosses Glacier National Park, Montana. This 80-km highway ascends over 1200m along the wall of a glaciated basin and crosses the continental divide. The annual opening of the road is critical to the regional economy and there is public pressure to open the road as early as possible. Despite the 67-year history of snow removal activities, few stat on snow conditions at upper elevations were available to guide annual planning for the raod opening. We examined statistical relationships between the opening date and nearby SNOTEL data on snow water equivalence (WE) for 30 years. Early spring SWE (first Monday in April) accounted for only 33% of the variance in road opening dates. Because avalanche spotters, used to warn heavy equipment operators of danger, are ineffective during spring storms or low-visibility conditions, we incorporated the percentage of days with precipitation during plowing as a proxy for visibility. This improved the model's predictive power to 69%/ A mountain snow simulator (MTSNOW) was used to calculate the depth and density of snow at various points along the road and field data were collected for comparison. MTSNOW underestimated the observed snow conditions, in part because it does not yet account for wind redistribution of snow. The severe topography of the upper reaches of the road are subjected to extensive wind redistribution of snow as evidence by the formation of "The Big Drift" on the lee side of Logan Pass.

  4. Differentiation of apical and basal dendrites in pyramidal cells and granule cells in dissociated hippocampal cultures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, You Kure; Fujishima, Kazuto; Kengaku, Mineko

    2015-01-01

    Hippocampal pyramidal cells and dentate granule cells develop morphologically distinct dendritic arbors, yet also share some common features. Both cell types form a long apical dendrite which extends from the apex of the cell soma, while short basal dendrites are developed only in pyramidal cells. Using quantitative morphometric analyses of mouse hippocampal cultures, we evaluated the differences in dendritic arborization patterns between pyramidal and granule cells. Furthermore, we observed and described the final apical dendrite determination during dendritic polarization by time-lapse imaging. Pyramidal and granule cells in culture exhibited similar dendritic patterns with a single principal dendrite and several minor dendrites so that the cell types were not readily distinguished by appearance. While basal dendrites in granule cells are normally degraded by adulthood in vivo, cultured granule cells retained their minor dendrites. Asymmetric growth of a single principal dendrite harboring the Golgi was observed in both cell types soon after the onset of dendritic growth. Time-lapse imaging revealed that up until the second week in culture, final principal dendrite designation was not stabilized, but was frequently replaced by other minor dendrites. Before dendritic polarity was stabilized, the Golgi moved dynamically within the soma and was repeatedly repositioned at newly emerging principal dendrites. Our results suggest that polarized growth of the apical dendrite is regulated by cell intrinsic programs, while regression of basal dendrites requires cue(s) from the extracellular environment in the dentate gyrus. The apical dendrite designation is determined from among multiple growing dendrites of young developing neurons.

  5. Asymmetry in signal propagation between the soma and dendrites plays a key role in determining dendritic excitability in motoneurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Hojeong; Jones, Kelvin E; Heckman, C J

    2014-01-01

    It is widely recognized that propagation of electrophysiological signals between the soma and dendrites of neurons differs depending on direction, i.e. it is asymmetric. How this asymmetry influences the activation of voltage-gated dendritic channels, and consequent neuronal behavior, remains unclear. Based on the analysis of asymmetry in several types of motoneurons, we extended our previous methodology for reducing a fully reconstructed motoneuron model to a two-compartment representation that preserved asymmetric signal propagation. The reduced models accurately replicated the dendritic excitability and the dynamics of the anatomical model involving a persistent inward current (PIC) dispersed over the dendrites. The relationship between asymmetric signal propagation and dendritic excitability was investigated using the reduced models while varying the asymmetry in signal propagation between the soma and the dendrite with PIC density constant. We found that increases in signal attenuation from soma to dendrites increased the activation threshold of a PIC (hypo-excitability), whereas increases in signal attenuation from dendrites to soma decreased the activation threshold of a PIC (hyper-excitability). These effects were so strong that reversing the asymmetry in the soma-to-dendrite vs. dendrite-to-soma attenuation, reversed the correlation between PIC threshold and distance of this current source from the soma. We propose the tight relation of the asymmetric signal propagation to the input resistance in the dendrites as a mechanism underlying the influence of the asymmetric signal propagation on the dendritic excitability. All these results emphasize the importance of maintaining the physiological asymmetry in dendritic signaling not only for normal function of the cells but also for biophysically realistic simulations of dendritic excitability.

  6. Stochastic ion channel gating in dendritic neurons: morphology dependence and probabilistic synaptic activation of dendritic spikes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robert C Cannon

    Full Text Available Neuronal activity is mediated through changes in the probability of stochastic transitions between open and closed states of ion channels. While differences in morphology define neuronal cell types and may underlie neurological disorders, very little is known about influences of stochastic ion channel gating in neurons with complex morphology. We introduce and validate new computational tools that enable efficient generation and simulation of models containing stochastic ion channels distributed across dendritic and axonal membranes. Comparison of five morphologically distinct neuronal cell types reveals that when all simulated neurons contain identical densities of stochastic ion channels, the amplitude of stochastic membrane potential fluctuations differs between cell types and depends on sub-cellular location. For typical neurons, the amplitude of membrane potential fluctuations depends on channel kinetics as well as open probability. Using a detailed model of a hippocampal CA1 pyramidal neuron, we show that when intrinsic ion channels gate stochastically, the probability of initiation of dendritic or somatic spikes by dendritic synaptic input varies continuously between zero and one, whereas when ion channels gate deterministically, the probability is either zero or one. At physiological firing rates, stochastic gating of dendritic ion channels almost completely accounts for probabilistic somatic and dendritic spikes generated by the fully stochastic model. These results suggest that the consequences of stochastic ion channel gating differ globally between neuronal cell-types and locally between neuronal compartments. Whereas dendritic neurons are often assumed to behave deterministically, our simulations suggest that a direct consequence of stochastic gating of intrinsic ion channels is that spike output may instead be a probabilistic function of patterns of synaptic input to dendrites.

  7. High fidelity remote sensing of snow properties from MODIS and the Airborne Snow Observatory: Snowflakes to Terabytes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Painter, T.; Mattmann, C. A.; Brodzik, M.; Bryant, A. C.; Goodale, C. E.; Hart, A. F.; Ramirez, P.; Rittger, K. E.; Seidel, F. C.; Zimdars, P. A.

    2012-12-01

    The response of the cryosphere to climate forcings largely determines Earth's climate sensitivity. However, our understanding of the strength of the simulated snow albedo feedback varies by a factor of three in the GCMs used in the Fourth Assessment Report of the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change, mainly caused by uncertainties in snow extent and the albedo of snow-covered areas from imprecise remote sensing retrievals. Additionally, the Western US and other regions of the globe depend predominantly on snowmelt for their water supply to agriculture, industry and cities, hydroelectric power, and recreation, against rising demand from increasing population. In the mountains of the Upper Colorado River Basin, dust radiative forcing in snow shortens snow cover duration by 3-7 weeks. Extended to the entire upper basin, the 5-fold increase in dust load since the late-1800s results in a 3-week earlier peak runoff and a 5% annual loss of total runoff. The remotely sensed dynamics of snow cover duration and melt however have not been factored into hydrological modeling, operational forecasting, and policymaking. To address these deficiencies in our understanding of snow properties, we have developed and validated a suite of MODIS snow products that provide accurate fractional snow covered area and radiative forcing of dust and carbonaceous aerosols in snow. The MODIS Snow Covered Area and Grain size (MODSCAG) and MODIS Dust Radiative Forcing in Snow (MODDRFS) algorithms, developed and transferred from imaging spectroscopy techniques, leverage the complete MODIS surface reflectance spectrum. The two most critical properties for understanding snowmelt runoff and timing are the spatial and temporal distributions of snow water equivalent (SWE) and snow albedo. We have created the Airborne Snow Observatory (ASO), an imaging spectrometer and scanning LiDAR system, to quantify SWE and snow albedo, generate unprecedented knowledge of snow properties, and provide complete

  8. Gas Gun Experiments to Determine Shock Wave Behavior in Snow: Methods and Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    1993-07-01

    7 7. Snow collection site in the Sangre de Cristo Mountains...description G009 -6.8 400 Artificial snow sample made by sieving natural snow through a number 14 screen (1.4 mm) and allowing it to sinter for % hours...Same as G031. G034 -10.0 520 Artificial snow sample made by sieving new snow through a number 14 screen (1.4 mm) and allowing it to sinter for more than

  9. Snow drift: acoustic sensors for avalanche warning and research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lehning, M.; Naaim, F.; Naaim, M.; Brabec, B.; Doorschot, J.; Durand, Y.; Guyomarc'h, G.; Michaux, J.-L.; Zimmerli, M.

    Based on wind tunnel measurements at the CSTB (Jules Verne) facility in Nantes and based on field observations at the SLF experimental site Versuchsfeld Weissfluhjoch, two acoustic wind drift sensors are evaluated against different mechanical snow traps and one optical snow particle counter. The focus of the work is the suitability of the acoustic sensors for applications such as avalanche warning and research. Although the acoustic sensors have not yet reached the accuracy required for typical research applications, they can, however, be useful for snow drift monitoring to help avalanche forecasters. The main problem of the acoustic sensors is a difficult calibration that has to take into account the variable snow properties. Further difficulties arise from snow fall and high wind speeds. However, the sensor is robust and can be operated remotely under harsh conditions. It is emphasized that due to the lack of an accurate reference method for snow drift measurements, all sensors play a role in improving and evaluating snow drift models. Finally, current operational snow drift models and snow drift sensors are compared with respect to their usefulness as an aid for avalanche warning. While drift sensors always make a point measurement, the models are able to give a more representative drift index that is valid for a larger area. Therefore, models have the potential to replace difficult observations such as snow drift in operational applications. Current models on snow drift are either only applicable in flat terrain, are still too complex for an operational application (Lehning et al., 2000b), or offer only limited information on snow drift, such as the SNOWPACK drift index (Lehning et al., 2000a). On the other hand, snow drift is also difficult to measure. While mechanical traps (Mellor 1960; Budd et al., 1966) are probably still the best reference, they require more or less continuous manual operation and are thus not suitable for remote locations or long

  10. Snow drift: acoustic sensors for avalanche warning and research

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Lehning

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available Based on wind tunnel measurements at the CSTB (Jules Verne facility in Nantes and based on field observations at the SLF experimental site Versuchsfeld Weissfluhjoch, two acoustic wind drift sensors are evaluated against different mechanical snow traps and one optical snow particle counter. The focus of the work is the suitability of the acoustic sensors for applications such as avalanche warning and research. Although the acoustic sensors have not yet reached the accuracy required for typical research applications, they can, however, be useful for snow drift monitoring to help avalanche forecasters. The main problem of the acoustic sensors is a difficult calibration that has to take into account the variable snow properties. Further difficulties arise from snow fall and high wind speeds. However, the sensor is robust and can be operated remotely under harsh conditions. It is emphasized that due to the lack of an accurate reference method for snow drift measurements, all sensors play a role in improving and evaluating snow drift models. Finally, current operational snow drift models and snow drift sensors are compared with respect to their usefulness as an aid for avalanche warning. While drift sensors always make a point measurement, the models are able to give a more representative drift index that is valid for a larger area. Therefore, models have the potential to replace difficult observations such as snow drift in operational applications. Current models on snow drift are either only applicable in flat terrain, are still too complex for an operational application (Lehning et al., 2000b, or offer only limited information on snow drift, such as the SNOWPACK drift index (Lehning et al., 2000a. On the other hand, snow drift is also difficult to measure. While mechanical traps (Mellor 1960; Budd et al., 1966 are probably still the best reference, they require more or less continuous manual operation and are thus not suitable for remote locations

  11. Operational Bright-Band Snow Level Detection Using Doppler Radar

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — A method to detect the bright-band snow level from radar reflectivity and Doppler vertical velocity data collection with an atmospheric profiling Doppler radar. The...

  12. Changes in Snow Cover Characteristics over Northern Eurasia since 1966

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bulygina, Olga; Groisman, Pavel; Razuvaev, Vyacheslav; Korshunova, Natalia

    2010-05-01

    Data. In addition to a standard suite of snow observations across Northern Eurasia and its surroundings, we used in our study the national snow survey data set archived at the Russian Institute for Hydrometeorological Information. The last dataset has routine snow surveys run throughout the cold season each decade (during the intense snowmelt, each 5 days) at all meteorological stations of the former USSR, thereafter, in Russia since 1966. Prior to 1966 snow surveys are also available but the methodology of observations has substantially changed at that year. Therefore, this analysis includes only data of more than1000 Russian stations from 1966 to 2009 that have a minimal number of missing observations. Surveys run separately along all types of environment typical for the site for 1 to 2 km, describing the current snow cover properties such as snow density, depth, water equivalent, and characteristics of snow and ice crust. Background. During the past 128 years (since 1881), the annual surface air temperature in Northern Eurasia has increased by 1.5° C and in the winter season by 3° C. Nearby to the north in the Arctic Ocean, the late summer sea ice extent decreased by 40% exposing a near-infinite source of water vapor for the dry Arctic atmosphere in early cold season months. As a result of these processes the following changes in snow cover characteristics have been observed: (a) in autumn the dates of the onset of snow cover have not changed noticeably despite the strong temperature increase in this season; (b) in late spring, snow cover extent has decreased, retreating by 1 to 2 weeks earlier during the past 40 years; and (c) in the cold season maximum snow depth and SWE (at open areas) have increased over most of Russia. In the western half of Eurasian continent days with thaw became more frequent. Snowmelt duration and ice crust changes. Over Northern Eurasia, the snowmelt process can be lengthy but even the first such melt initiates a process of snow

  13. (NDSI) and Normalised Difference Principal Component Snow Index

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Phila Sibandze

    Snow is a common global meteorological phenomenon known to be a critical component .... This procedure generated eight spectrally independent principal components. ... therefore chosen for calculation of the NDPCSI as they showed high ...

  14. Former Soviet Union Hydrological Snow Surveys, 1966-1996

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The Former Soviet Union Hydrological Snow Surveys are based on observations made by personnel at 1,345 sites throughout the Former Soviet Union between 1966 and...

  15. Electromagnetic reflection from multi-layered snow models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Linlor, W. I.; Jiracek, G. R.

    1975-01-01

    The remote sensing of snow-pack characteristics with surface installations or an airborne system could have important applications in water-resource management and flood prediction. To derive some insight into such applications, the electromagnetic response of multilayered snow models is analyzed in this paper. Normally incident plane waves at frequencies ranging from 1 MHz to 10 GHz are assumed, and amplitude reflection coefficients are calculated for models having various snow-layer combinations, including ice layers. Layers are defined by thickness, permittivity, and conductivity; the electrical parameters are constant or prescribed functions of frequency. To illustrate the effect of various layering combinations, results are given in the form of curves of amplitude reflection coefficients versus frequency for a variety of models. Under simplifying assumptions, the snow thickness and effective dielectric constant can be estimated from the variations of reflection coefficient as a function of frequency.

  16. Reconstructed North American Snow Extent, 1900-1993

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This data set contains reconstructed monthly North American snow extent values for November through March, 1900-1993. Investigators used a combination of satellite...

  17. Snowfall and Snow Depth for Canada 1943-1982

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Data include monthly snowfall and end-of-month snow depth for 140 stations across Canada. Stations that maintained at least 20 years of data were chosen. The...

  18. Improvement of human dendritic cell culture for immunotoxicological investigations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hymery, N; Sibiril, Y; Parent-Massin, D

    2006-07-01

    A toxic injury such as a decrease in the number of immature dendritic cells caused by a cytotoxic effect or a disturbance in their maturation process can be responsible for immunodepression. There is a need to improve in vitro assays on human dendritic cells used to detect and evaluate adverse effects of xenobiotics. Two aspects were explored in this work: cytotoxic effects of xenobiotics on immature dendritic cells, and the interference of xenobiotics with dendritic cell maturation. Dendritic cells of two different origins were tested. Dendritic cells obtained either from umbilical cord blood CD34(+) cells or, for the first time, from umbilical cord blood monocytes. The cytotoxicity assay on immature dendritic cells has been improved. For the study of the potential adverse effects of xenobiotics on the maturation process of dendritic cells, several parameters were selected such as expression of markers (CD86, CD83, HLA-DR), secretion of interleukins 10 and 12, and proliferation of autologous lymphocytes. The relevance and the efficiency of the protocol applied were tested using two mycotoxins, T-2 toxin and deoxynivalence, DON, which are known to be immunosuppressive, and one phycotoxin, domoic acid, which is known not to have any immunotoxic effect. Assays using umbilical cord monocyte dendritic cell cultures with the protocol defined in this work, which involves a cytotoxicity study followed by evaluation of several markers of adverse effects on the dendritic cell maturation process, revealed their usefulness for investigating xenobiotic immunotoxicity toward immune primary reactions.

  19. Remodeling of monoplanar Purkinje cell dendrites during cerebellar circuit formation.

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    Megumi Kaneko

    Full Text Available Dendrite arborization patterns are critical determinants of neuronal connectivity and integration. Planar and highly branched dendrites of the cerebellar Purkinje cell receive specific topographical projections from two major afferent pathways; a single climbing fiber axon from the inferior olive that extend along Purkinje dendrites, and parallel fiber axons of granule cells that contact vertically to the plane of dendrites. It has been believed that murine Purkinje cell dendrites extend in a single parasagittal plane in the molecular layer after the cell polarity is determined during the early postnatal development. By three-dimensional confocal analysis of growing Purkinje cells, we observed that mouse Purkinje cells underwent dynamic dendritic remodeling during circuit maturation in the third postnatal week. After dendrites were polarized and flattened in the early second postnatal week, dendritic arbors gradually expanded in multiple sagittal planes in the molecular layer by intensive growth and branching by the third postnatal week. Dendrites then became confined to a single plane in the fourth postnatal week. Multiplanar Purkinje cells in the third week were often associated by ectopic climbing fibers innervating nearby Purkinje cells in distinct sagittal planes. The mature monoplanar arborization was disrupted in mutant mice with abnormal Purkinje cell connectivity and motor discoordination. The dendrite remodeling was also impaired by pharmacological disruption of normal afferent activity during the second or third postnatal week. Our results suggest that the monoplanar arborization of Purkinje cells is coupled with functional development of the cerebellar circuitry.

  20. Determination of the elastic modulus of snow via acoustic measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gerling, Bastian; van Herwijnen, Alec; Löwe, Henning

    2016-04-01

    The elastic modulus of snow is a key quantity from the viewpoint of avalanche research and forecasting, snow engineering or materials science in general. Since it is a fundamental property, many measurements have been reported in the literature. Due to differences in measurement methods, there is a lot of variation in the reported values. Especially values derived via computer tomography (CT) based numerical calculations using finite element methods are not corresponding to the results of other methods. The central issue is that CT based moduli are purely elastic whereas other methods may include viscoelastic deformation. In order to avoid this discrepancy we derived the elastic modulus of snow via wave propagation measurements and compared our results with CT based calculations. We measured the arrival times of acoustic pulses propagating through the snow samples to determine the P-wave velocity and in turn derive the elastic modulus along the direction of wave propagation. We performed a series of laboratory experiments to derive the P-wave modulus of snow in relation to density. The P-wave modulus ranged from 10 to 280 MPa for a snow density between 150 and 370 kg/m^3;. The moduli derived from the acoustic measurements correlated well with the CT-based values and both exhibited a power law trend over the entire density range. Encouraged by these results we used the acoustic method to investigate the temporal evolution of the elastic modulus. The rate of increase was very close to values mentioned in literature on the sintering rate of snow. Overall, our results are a first but important step towards a