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Sample records for plate-associated snare protein

  1. Microdomains of SNARE proteins in the plasma membrane

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bogaart, G. van den; Lang, T.; Jahn, R.

    2013-01-01

    Exocytosis is catalyzed by the engagement of SNARE proteins embedded in the plasma membrane with complementary SNAREs in the membrane of trafficking vesicles undergoing exocytosis. In most cells studied so far, SNAREs are not randomly distributed across the plasma membrane but are clustered and

  2. The Multifaceted Role of SNARE Proteins in Membrane Fusion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Jing; Pluhackova, Kristyna; Böckmann, Rainer A

    2017-01-01

    Membrane fusion is a key process in all living organisms that contributes to a variety of biological processes including viral infection, cell fertilization, as well as intracellular transport, and neurotransmitter release. In particular, the various membrane-enclosed compartments in eukaryotic cells need to exchange their contents and communicate across membranes. Efficient and controllable fusion of biological membranes is known to be driven by cooperative action of SNARE proteins, which constitute the central components of the eukaryotic fusion machinery responsible for fusion of synaptic vesicles with the plasma membrane. During exocytosis, vesicle-associated v-SNARE (synaptobrevin) and target cell-associated t-SNAREs (syntaxin and SNAP-25) assemble into a core trans-SNARE complex. This complex plays a versatile role at various stages of exocytosis ranging from the priming to fusion pore formation and expansion, finally resulting in the release or exchange of the vesicle content. This review summarizes current knowledge on the intricate molecular mechanisms underlying exocytosis triggered and catalyzed by SNARE proteins. Particular attention is given to the function of the peptidic SNARE membrane anchors and the role of SNARE-lipid interactions in fusion. Moreover, the regulatory mechanisms by synaptic auxiliary proteins in SNARE-driven membrane fusion are briefly outlined.

  3. Identification of SNARE proteins in fish-Tilapia Oreochromis niloticus

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    HUANG Xiaohang; LAM Patrick P L; LIN Xuezheng; LIU Chenlin; BIAN Ji; GAISANO Herbert

    2007-01-01

    SNARE proteins are a group of membrane-associated proteins involved in exocytosis, secretion and membrane trafficking events in eukaryotic cells. Research on SNARE protein biology has become a more attractive field in recent years, which is applied to marine biology specifically to the fish Tilapia (Oreochromis niloticus). Plasma membrane fractions of different tissues of Tilapia, including brain, liver-pancreas, intestine, skin and muscle, were extracted, and immuno-decorated with isoform-specific antibodies to the SNARE families and associated proteins. The presence of Syntaxins -1A, 2 and 3, SNAP-23 and SNAP-25, VAMP-2, Munc-18-1 and Munc-13 in the brain was identified, which were differentially distributed in the other organ tissues of the fish Tilapia. The distinct distribution of SNARE and associated proteins will serve as the basis for further investigation into their special secretory function in these tissues of the fish.

  4. Hydrophobic mismatch sorts SNARE proteins into distinct membrane domains

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milovanovic, Dragomir; Honigmann, Alf; Koike, Seiichi; Göttfert, Fabian; Pähler, Gesa; Junius, Meike; Müllar, Stefan; Diederichsen, Ulf; Janshoff, Andreas; Grubmüller, Helmut; Risselada, Herre J.; Eggeling, Christian; Hell, Stefan W.; van den Bogaart, Geert; Jahn, Reinhard

    2015-01-01

    The clustering of proteins and lipids in distinct microdomains is emerging as an important principle for the spatial patterning of biological membranes. Such domain formation can be the result of hydrophobic and ionic interactions with membrane lipids as well as of specific protein-protein interactions. Here using plasma membrane-resident SNARE proteins as model, we show that hydrophobic mismatch between the length of transmembrane domains (TMDs) and the thickness of the lipid membrane suffices to induce clustering of proteins. Even when the TMDs differ in length by only a single residue, hydrophobic mismatch can segregate structurally closely homologous membrane proteins in distinct membrane domains. Domain formation is further fine-tuned by interactions with polyanionic phosphoinositides and homo and heterotypic protein interactions. Our findings demonstrate that hydrophobic mismatch contributes to the structural organization of membranes.

  5. Endosomal SNARE proteins regulate CFTR activity and trafficking in epithelial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bilan, Frédéric; Nacfer, Magali; Fresquet, Fleur; Norez, Caroline; Melin, Patricia; Martin-Berge, Alice; Costa de Beauregard, Marie-Alyette; Becq, Frédéric; Kitzis, Alain; Thoreau, Vincent

    2008-07-01

    The Cystic Fibrosis Transmembrane conductance Regulator (CFTR) protein is a chloride channel localized at the apical plasma membrane of epithelial cells. We previously described that syntaxin 8, an endosomal SNARE (Soluble N-ethylmaleimide-sensitive factor Attachment protein REceptor) protein, interacts with CFTR and regulates its trafficking to the plasma membrane and hence its channel activity. Syntaxin 8 belongs to the endosomal SNARE complex which also contains syntaxin 7, vti1b and VAMP8. Here, we report that these four endosomal SNARE proteins physically and functionally interact with CFTR. In LLC-PK1 cells transfected with CFTR and in Caco-2 cells endogenously expressing CFTR, we demonstrated that endosomal SNARE protein overexpression inhibits CFTR activity but not swelling- or calcium-activated iodide efflux, indicating a specific effect upon CFTR activity. Moreover, co-immunoprecipitation experiments in LLC-PK1-CFTR cells showed that CFTR and SNARE proteins belong to a same complex and pull-down assays showed that VAMP8 and vti1b preferentially interact with CFTR N-terminus tail. By cell surface biotinylation and immunofluorescence experiments, we evidenced that endosomal SNARE overexpression disturbs CFTR apical targeting. Finally, we found a colocalization of CFTR and endosomal SNARE proteins in Rab11-positive recycling endosomes, suggesting a new role for endosomal SNARE proteins in CFTR trafficking in epithelial cells.

  6. Organization and dynamics of SNARE proteins in the presynaptic membrane

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dragomir eMilovanovic

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Our view of the lateral organization of lipids and proteins in the plasma membrane has evolved substantially in the last few decades. It is widely accepted that many, if not all, plasma membrane proteins and lipids are organized in specific domains. These domains vary widely in size, composition, and stability, and they represent platforms governing diverse cell functions. The presynaptic plasma membrane is a well-studied example of a membrane which undergoes rearrangements, especially during exo- and endocytosis. Many proteins and lipids involved in presynaptic function are known, and major efforts have been made to understand their spatial organization and dynamics. Here, we focus on the mechanisms underlying the organization of SNAREs, the key proteins of the fusion machinery, in distinct domains, and we discuss the functional significance of these clusters.

  7. SNAREing the basis of multicellularity: consequences of protein family expansion during evolution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kloepper, Tobias H; Kienle, C Nickias; Fasshauer, Dirk

    2008-09-01

    Vesicle trafficking between intracellular compartments of eukaryotic cells is mediated by conserved protein machineries. In each trafficking step, fusion of the vesicle with the acceptor membrane is driven by a set of distinctive soluble N-ethylmaleimide sensitive factor attachment protein receptor (SNARE) proteins that assemble into tight 4-helix bundle complexes between the fusing membranes. During evolution, about 20 primordial SNARE types were modified independently in different eukaryotic lineages by episodes of duplication and diversification. Here we show that 2 major changes in the SNARE repertoire occurred in the evolution of animals, each reflecting a main overhaul of the endomembrane system. In addition, we found several lineage-specific losses of distinct SNAREs, particularly in nematodes and platyhelminthes. The first major transformation took place during the transition to multicellularity. The primary event that occurred during this transformation was an increase in the numbers of endosomal SNAREs, but the SNARE-related factor lethal giant larvae also emerged. Apparently, enhanced endosomal sorting capabilities were an advantage for early multicellular animals. The second major transformation during the rise of vertebrates resulted in a robust expansion of the secretory set of SNAREs, which may have helped develop a more versatile secretory apparatus.

  8. Comparative analysis of plant genomes allows the definition of the "Phytolongins": a novel non-SNARE longin domain protein family

    OpenAIRE

    Dacks Joel B; Rossi Valeria; Vedovato Marco; Filippini Francesco

    2009-01-01

    Abstract Background Subcellular trafficking is a hallmark of eukaryotic cells. Because of their pivotal role in the process, a great deal of attention has been paid to the SNARE proteins. Most R-SNAREs, or "longins", however, also possess a highly conserved, N-terminal fold. This "longin domain" is known to play multiple roles in regulating SNARE activity and targeting via interaction with other trafficking proteins. However, the diversity and complement of longins in eukaryotes is poorly und...

  9. Comparative analysis of plant genomes allows the definition of the "Phytolongins": a novel non-SNARE longin domain protein family

    OpenAIRE

    Vedovato, Marco; Rossi, Valeria; Joel B Dacks; Filippini, Francesco

    2009-01-01

    Background Subcellular trafficking is a hallmark of eukaryotic cells. Because of their pivotal role in the process, a great deal of attention has been paid to the SNARE proteins. Most R-SNAREs, or "longins", however, also possess a highly conserved, N-terminal fold. This "longin domain" is known to play multiple roles in regulating SNARE activity and targeting via interaction with other trafficking proteins. However, the diversity and complement of longins in eukaryotes is poorly understood. ...

  10. Cooperative endocytosis of the endosomal SNARE protein syntaxin-8 and the potassium channel TASK-1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Renigunta, Vijay; Fischer, Thomas; Zuzarte, Marylou; Kling, Stefan; Zou, Xinle; Siebert, Kai; Limberg, Maren M; Rinné, Susanne; Decher, Niels; Schlichthörl, Günter; Daut, Jürgen

    2014-06-15

    The endosomal SNARE protein syntaxin-8 interacts with the acid-sensitive potassium channel TASK-1. The functional relevance of this interaction was studied by heterologous expression of these proteins (and mutants thereof) in Xenopus oocytes and in mammalian cell lines. Coexpression of syntaxin-8 caused a fourfold reduction in TASK-1 current, a corresponding reduction in the expression of TASK-1 at the cell surface, and a marked increase in the rate of endocytosis of the channel. TASK-1 and syntaxin-8 colocalized in the early endosomal compartment, as indicated by the endosomal markers 2xFYVE and rab5. The stimulatory effect of the SNARE protein on the endocytosis of the channel was abolished when both an endocytosis signal in TASK-1 and an endocytosis signal in syntaxin-8 were mutated. A syntaxin-8 mutant that cannot assemble with other SNARE proteins had virtually the same effect as wild-type syntaxin-8. Total internal reflection fluorescence microscopy showed formation and endocytosis of vesicles containing fluorescence-tagged clathrin, TASK-1, and/or syntaxin-8. Our results suggest that the unassembled form of syntaxin-8 and the potassium channel TASK-1 are internalized via clathrin-mediated endocytosis in a cooperative manner. This implies that syntaxin-8 regulates the endocytosis of TASK-1. Our study supports the idea that endosomal SNARE proteins can have functions unrelated to membrane fusion.

  11. Munc18/SNARE proteins' regulation of exocytosis in guinea pig duodenal Brunner's gland acini

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Laura I Cosen-Binker; Gerry P Morris; Stephen Vanner; Herbert Y Gaisano

    2008-01-01

    AIM: To examine the molecular mechanism of exocytosis in the Brunner's gland acinar cell.METHODS: We used a submucosal preparation of guinea pig duodenal Brunner's gland acini to visualize the dilation of the ductal lumen in response to cholinergic stimulus. We correlated this to electron microscopy to determine the extent of exocytosis of the mucin-filled vesicles. We then examined the behavior of SNARE and interacting Munc18 proteins by confocal microscopy.RESULTS: One and 6 μmol/L carbachol evoked a dosedependent dilation of Brunner's gland acini lumen, which correlated to the massive exocytosis of mucin. Munc18c and its cognate SNARE proteins Syntaxin-4 and SNAP-23 were localized to the apical plasma membrane, and upon cholinergic stimulation, Munc18c was displaced into the cytosol leaving Syntaxin-4 and SNAP-23 intact.CONCLUSION: Physiologic cholinergic stimulation induces Munc18c displacement from the Brunner's gland acinar apical plasma membrane, which enables apical membrane Syntaxin-4 and SNAP-23 to form a SNARE complex with mucin-filled vesicle SNARE proteins to affect exocytosis.

  12. [Preparation, characterization and application of rice Qb-SNARE protein OsNPSN11 polyclonal antibody].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bao, Yong-Mei; Liu, Yong-Hui; Xu, Dong-Qing; Huang, Ji; Wang, Zhou-Fei; Wang, Jian-Fei; Zhang, Hong-Sheng

    2010-09-01

    Membrane fusion in vesicle trafficking in the cells of eukaryotic organisms is mediated by soluble-N-ethyl- maleimide-sensitive fusion protein attachment protein receptor (SNARE) proteins. OsNPSN11 is a member of Qb-SNARE gene family isolate from rice. The cDNA of OsNPSN11 was subcloned into pET-30a and fusion to the 6 × His tag. Induced by 0.5 mmol/L IPTG for four hours, the recombinant protein was highly expressed in Escherichia coli, which was purified by Ni2+ -NTA His-bind resin affinity chromatography column to be used as an antigen to raise the antibody in New Zealand rabbits. Western blotting analysis showed that the antibody can specifically recognize the expressed antigen and the OsNPSN11 in plasma membrane protein from various rice tissues. This indicated that the antibody can be used for expres-sion analysis in transgenic rice.

  13. The UT-A1 urea transporter interacts with snapin, a SNARE-associated protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mistry, Abinash C; Mallick, Rickta; Fröhlich, Otto; Klein, Janet D; Rehm, Armin; Chen, Guangping; Sands, Jeff M

    2007-10-12

    The UT-A1 urea transporter mediates rapid transepithelial urea transport across the inner medullary collecting duct and plays a major role in the urinary concentrating mechanism. To transport urea, UT-A1 must be present in the plasma membrane. The purpose of this study was to screen for UT-A1-interacting proteins and to study the interactions of one of the identified potential binding partners with UT-A1. Using a yeast two-hybrid screen of a human kidney cDNA library with the UT-A1 intracellular loop (residues 409-594) as bait, we identified snapin, a ubiquitously expressed SNARE-associated protein, as a novel UT-A1 binding partner. Deletion analysis indicated that the C-terminal coiled-coil domain (H2) of snapin is required for UT-A1 interaction. Snapin binds to the intracellular loop of UT-A1 but not to the N- or C-terminal fragments. Glutathione S-transferase pulldown experiments and co-immunoprecipitation studies verified that snapin interacts with native UT-A1, SNAP23, and syntaxin-4 (t-SNARE partners), indicating that UT-A1 participates with the SNARE machinery in rat kidney inner medulla. Confocal microscopic analysis of immunofluorescent UT-A1 and snapin showed co-localization in both the cytoplasm and in the plasma membrane. When we co-injected UT-A1 with snapin cRNA in Xenopus oocytes, urea influx was significantly increased. In the absence of snapin, the influx was decreased when UT-A1 was combined with t-SNARE components syntaxin-4 and SNAP23. We conclude that UT-A1 may be linked to the SNARE machinery via snapin and that this interaction may be functionally and physiologically important for urea transport.

  14. Comparative analysis of plant genomes allows the definition of the "Phytolongins": a novel non-SNARE longin domain protein family.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vedovato, Marco; Rossi, Valeria; Dacks, Joel B; Filippini, Francesco

    2009-11-04

    Subcellular trafficking is a hallmark of eukaryotic cells. Because of their pivotal role in the process, a great deal of attention has been paid to the SNARE proteins. Most R-SNAREs, or "longins", however, also possess a highly conserved, N-terminal fold. This "longin domain" is known to play multiple roles in regulating SNARE activity and targeting via interaction with other trafficking proteins. However, the diversity and complement of longins in eukaryotes is poorly understood. Our comparative genome survey identified a novel family of longin-related proteins, dubbed the "Phytolongins" because they are specific to land plants. Phytolongins share with longins the N-terminal longin domain and the C-terminal transmembrane domain; however, in the central region, the SNARE motif is replaced by a novel region. Phylogenetic analysis pinpoints the Phytolongins as a derivative of the plant specific VAMP72 longin sub-family and allows elucidation of Phytolongin evolution. "Longins" have been defined as R-SNAREs composed of both a longin domain and a SNARE motif. However, expressed gene isoforms and splice variants of longins are examples of non-SNARE motif containing longins. The discovery of Phytolongins, a family of non-SNARE longin domain proteins, together with recent evidence on the conservation of the longin-like fold in proteins involved in both vesicle fusion (e.g. the Trs20 tether) and vesicle formation (e.g. sigma and mu adaptin) highlight the importance of the longin-like domain in protein trafficking and suggest that it was one of the primordial building blocks of the eukaryotic membrane-trafficking machinery.

  15. Comparative analysis of plant genomes allows the definition of the "Phytolongins": a novel non-SNARE longin domain protein family

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dacks Joel B

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Subcellular trafficking is a hallmark of eukaryotic cells. Because of their pivotal role in the process, a great deal of attention has been paid to the SNARE proteins. Most R-SNAREs, or "longins", however, also possess a highly conserved, N-terminal fold. This "longin domain" is known to play multiple roles in regulating SNARE activity and targeting via interaction with other trafficking proteins. However, the diversity and complement of longins in eukaryotes is poorly understood. Results Our comparative genome survey identified a novel family of longin-related proteins, dubbed the "Phytolongins" because they are specific to land plants. Phytolongins share with longins the N-terminal longin domain and the C-terminal transmembrane domain; however, in the central region, the SNARE motif is replaced by a novel region. Phylogenetic analysis pinpoints the Phytolongins as a derivative of the plant specific VAMP72 longin sub-family and allows elucidation of Phytolongin evolution. Conclusion "Longins" have been defined as R-SNAREs composed of both a longin domain and a SNARE motif. However, expressed gene isoforms and splice variants of longins are examples of non-SNARE motif containing longins. The discovery of Phytolongins, a family of non-SNARE longin domain proteins, together with recent evidence on the conservation of the longin-like fold in proteins involved in both vesicle fusion (e.g. the Trs20 tether and vesicle formation (e.g. σ and μ adaptin highlight the importance of the longin-like domain in protein trafficking and suggest that it was one of the primordial building blocks of the eukaryotic membrane-trafficking machinery.

  16. Arabidopsis R-SNARE proteins VAMP721 and VAMP722 are required for cell plate formation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liang Zhang

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Cell plate formation during plant cytokinesis is facilitated by SNARE complex-mediated vesicle fusion at the cell-division plane. However, our knowledge regarding R-SNARE components of membrane fusion machinery for cell plate formation remains quite limited. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We report the in vivo function of Arabidopsis VAMP721 and VAMP722, two closely sequence-related R-SNAREs, in cell plate formation. Double homozygous vamp721vamp722 mutant seedlings showed lethal dwarf phenotypes and were characterized by rudimentary roots, cotyledons and hypocotyls. Furthermore, cell wall stubs and incomplete cytokinesis were frequently observed in vamp721vamp722 seedlings. Confocal images revealed that green fluorescent protein-tagged VAMP721 and VAMP722 were preferentially localized to the expanding cell plates in dividing cells. Drug treatments and co-localization analyses demonstrated that punctuate organelles labeled with VAMP721 and VAMP722 represented early endosomes overlapped with VHA-a1-labeled TGN, which were distinct from Golgi stacks and prevacuolar compartments. In addition, protein traffic to the plasma membrane, but not to the vacuole, was severely disrupted in vamp721vamp722 seedlings by subcellular localization of marker proteins. CONCLUSION/SIGNIFICANCE: These observations suggest that VAMP721 and VAMP722 are involved in secretory trafficking to the plasma membrane via TGN/early endosomal compartment, which contributes substantially to cell plate formation during plant cytokinesis.

  17. The Gos28 SNARE protein mediates intra-Golgi transport of rhodopsin and is required for photoreceptor survival.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosenbaum, Erica E; Vasiljevic, Eva; Cleland, Spencer C; Flores, Carlos; Colley, Nansi Jo

    2014-11-21

    SNARE proteins play indispensable roles in membrane fusion events in many cellular processes, including synaptic transmission and protein trafficking. Here, we characterize the Golgi SNARE protein, Gos28, and its role in rhodopsin (Rh1) transport through Drosophila photoreceptors. Mutations in gos28 lead to defective Rh1 trafficking and retinal degeneration. We have pinpointed a role for Gos28 in the intra-Golgi transport of Rh1, downstream from α-mannosidase-II in the medial- Golgi. We have confirmed the necessity of key residues in Gos28's SNARE motif and demonstrate that its transmembrane domain is not required for vesicle fusion, consistent with Gos28 functioning as a t-SNARE for Rh1 transport. Finally, we show that human Gos28 rescues both the Rh1 trafficking defects and retinal degeneration in Drosophila gos28 mutants, demonstrating the functional conservation of these proteins. Our results identify Gos28 as an essential SNARE protein in Drosophila photoreceptors and provide mechanistic insights into the role of SNAREs in neurodegenerative disease.

  18. Cloning and characterization of three genes encoding Qb-SNARE proteins in rice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bao, Yong-Mei; Wang, Jian-Fei; Huang, Ji; Zhang, Hong-Sheng

    2008-03-01

    Qb-SNARE proteins belong to the superfamily of SNAREs (soluble N-ethylmaleimide-sensitive factor attachment protein receptors) and function as important components of the vesicle trafficking machinery in eukaryotic cells. Here, we report three novel plant SNARE (NPSN) genes isolated from rice and named OsNPSN11, OsNPSN12 and OsNPSN13. They have about 70% nucleotide identity over their entire coding regions and similar genomic organization with ten exons and nine introns in each gene. Multiple alignment of deduced amino acid sequences indicate that the OsNPSNs proteins are homologous to AtNPSNs from Arabidopsis, containing a Qb-SNARE domain and a membrane-spanning domain in the C-terminal region. Semi-quantitative RT-PCR assays showed that the OsNPSNs were ubiquitously and differentially expressed in roots, culms, leaves, immature spikes and flowering spikes. The expression of OsNPSNs was significantly activated in rice seedlings treated with H(2)O(2), but down-regulated under NaCl and PEG6000 stresses. Transient expression method in onion epidermal cells revealed that OsNPSNs were located in the plasma membrane. Transformed yeast cells with OsNPSNs had better growth rates than empty-vector transformants when cultured on either solid or liquid selective media containing various concentrations of H(2)O(2), but more sensitive to NaCl and mannitol stresses. The 35S:OsNPSN11 transgenic tobacco also showed more tolerance to H(2)O(2) and sensitivity to NaCl and mannitol than non-transgenic tobacco. These results indicate that OsNPSNs may be involved in different aspects of the signal transduction in plant and yeast responses to abiotic stresses.

  19. Subcellular compartmentalization in protoplasts from Artemisia annua cell cultures: engineering attempts using a modified SNARE protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Di Sansebastiano, Gian Pietro; Rizzello, Francesca; Durante, Miriana; Caretto, Sofia; Nisi, Rossella; De Paolis, Angelo; Faraco, Marianna; Montefusco, Anna; Piro, Gabriella; Mita, Giovanni

    2015-05-20

    Plants are ideal bioreactors for the production of macromolecules but transport mechanisms are not fully understood and cannot be easily manipulated. Several attempts to overproduce recombinant proteins or secondary metabolites failed. Because of an independent regulation of the storage compartment, the product may be rapidly degraded or cause self-intoxication. The case of the anti-malarial compound artemisinin produced by Artemisia annua plants is emblematic. The accumulation of artemisinin naturally occurs in the apoplast of glandular trichomes probably involving autophagy and unconventional secretion thus its production by undifferentiated tissues such as cell suspension cultures can be challenging. Here we characterize the subcellular compartmentalization of several known fluorescent markers in protoplasts derived from Artemisia suspension cultures and explore the possibility to modify compartmentalization using a modified SNARE protein as molecular tool to be used in future biotechnological applications. We focused on the observation of the vacuolar organization in vivo and the truncated form of AtSYP51, 51H3, was used to induce a compartment generated by the contribution of membrane from endocytosis and from endoplasmic reticulum to vacuole trafficking. The artificial compartment crossing exocytosis and endocytosis may trap artemisinin stabilizing it until extraction; indeed, it is able to increase total enzymatic activity of a vacuolar marker (RGUSChi), probably increasing its stability. Exploring the 51H3-induced compartment we gained new insights on the function of the SNARE SYP51, recently shown to be an interfering-SNARE, and new hints to engineer eukaryote endomembranes for future biotechnological applications.

  20. The SNARE protein SNAP23 and the SNARE-interacting protein Munc18c in human skeletal muscle are implicated in insulin resistance/type 2 diabetes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Boström, Pontus; Andersson, Linda; Vind, Birgitte

    2010-01-01

    for regulation of SNAP23 were also investigated in the skeletal muscle cell line L6. RESULTS: We showed increased SNAP23 levels in skeletal muscle from patients with type 2 diabetes compared with that from lean control subjects. Moreover, SNAP23 was redistributed from the plasma membrane to the microsomal....../cytosolic compartment in the patients with the type 2 diabetes. Expression of the SNARE-interacting protein Munc18c was higher in skeletal muscle from patients with type 2 diabetes. Studies in L6 cells showed that Munc18c promoted the expression of SNAP23. CONCLUSIONS: We have translated our previous in vitro results...... into humans by showing that there is a change in the distribution of SNAP23 to the interior of the cell in skeletal muscle from patients with type 2 diabetes. We also showed that Munc18c is a potential regulator of SNAP23....

  1. Differential localization of SNARE complex proteins SNAP-25, syntaxin, and VAMP during development of the mammalian retina.

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    Greenlee, M H; Roosevelt, C B; Sakaguchi, D S

    2001-02-12

    SNARE complex proteins have critical functions during regulated vesicular release of neurotransmitter. In addition, they play critical roles during neurite outgrowth and synaptogenesis. Although it is clear that the function of any one SNARE complex protein during release of neurotransmitter is dependent on its association with other members of the complex, it is less certain whether their function during development and differentiation is dependent on interaction with one another. Previously, we have observed transient high levels of SNARE complex protein SNAP-25 in developing cholinergic amacrine cells (West Greenlee et al. [1998] J Comp Neurol 394:374-385). In addition, we detected, high levels of SNAP-25 in developing and mature photoreceptors. To better understand the functional significance of these high levels of SNAP-25 expression, we used immunocytochemistry to examine the developmental expression of the three members of the SNARE complex, SNAP-25, Syntaxin, and vesicle associated membrane protein (VAMP/also Synaptobrevin). Our results demonstrate that the high levels of SNAP-25 in cholinergic amacrine cells and photoreceptors are not accompanied by the same relatively high levels of other SNARE complex proteins. These results suggest that high levels of SNAP-25 in specific cell types may function independently of association with Syntaxin and VAMP. In this analysis, we characterized the changing patterns of immunoreactivity for the three SNARE complex proteins during the development and differentiation of the mammalian retina. We have compared the pattern of expression of the core SNARE complex proteins in the Brazilian opossum, Monodelphis domestica, and in the rat and found common patterns of expression between these diverse mammalian species. We observed temporal differences in the onset of immunoreactivity between these three proteins, and differences in their localization within synaptic layers in the developing and mature mammalian retina. This

  2. SNARE protein FgVam7 controls growth, asexual and sexual development, and plant infection in Fusarium graminearum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Haifeng; Li, Bing; Fang, Qin; Li, Ying; Zheng, Xiaobo; Zhang, Zhengguang

    2016-01-01

    Soluble N-ethylmaleimide-sensitive factor attachment protein receptor (SNARE) proteins play critical and conserved roles in membrane fusion and vesicle transport of eukaryotic cells. Previous studies have shown that various homologues of SNARE proteins are also important in the infection of host plants by pathogenic fungi. Here, we report the characterization of a SNARE homologue, FgVam7, from Fusarium graminearum that causes head blight in wheat and barley worldwide. Phylogenetic analysis and domain comparison reveal that FgVam7 is homologous to Vam7 proteins of Saccharomyces cerevisiae (ScVam7), Magnaporthe oryzae (MoVam7) and several additional fungi by containing a PhoX homology (PX) domain and a SNARE domain. We show that FgVam7 plays a regulatory role in cellular differentiation and virulence in F. graminearum. Deletion of FgVAM7 significantly reduces vegetative growth, conidiation and conidial germination, sexual reproduction and virulence. The ΔFgvam7 mutant also exhibits a defect in vacuolar maintenance and delayed endocytosis. Moreover, the ΔFgvam7 mutant is insensitive to salt and osmotic stresses, and hypersensitive to cell wall stressors. Further characterization of FgVam7 domains indicate that the PX and SNARE domains are conserved in controlling Vam7 protein localization and function, respectively. Finally, FgVam7 has been shown to positively regulate the expression of several deoxynivalenol (DON) biosynthesis genes TRI5, TRI6 and TRI101, and DON production. Our studies provide evidence for SNARE proteins as an additional means of regulatory mechanisms that govern growth, differentiation and virulence of pathogenic fungi.

  3. The Sec1/Munc18 protein Vps45 regulates cellular levels of its SNARE binding partners Tlg2 and Snc2 in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Scott G Shanks

    Full Text Available Intracellular membrane trafficking pathways must be tightly regulated to ensure proper functioning of all eukaryotic cells. Central to membrane trafficking is the formation of specific SNARE (soluble N-ethylmeleimide-sensitive factor attachment protein receptor complexes between proteins on opposing lipid bilayers. The Sec1/Munc18 (SM family of proteins play an essential role in SNARE-mediated membrane fusion, and like the SNAREs are conserved through evolution from yeast to humans. The SM protein Vps45 is required for the formation of yeast endosomal SNARE complexes and is thus essential for traffic through the endosomal system. Here we report that, in addition to its role in regulating SNARE complex assembly, Vps45 regulates cellular levels of its SNARE binding partners: the syntaxin Tlg2 and the v-SNARE Snc2: Cells lacking Vps45 have reduced cellular levels of Tlg2 and Snc2; and elevation of Vps45 levels results in concomitant increases in the levels of both Tlg2 and Snc2. As well as regulating traffic through the endosomal system, the Snc v-SNAREs are also required for exocytosis. Unlike most vps mutants, cells lacking Vps45 display multiple growth phenotypes. Here we report that these can be reversed by selectively restoring Snc2 levels in vps45 mutant cells. Our data indicate that as well as functioning as part of the machinery that controls SNARE complex assembly, Vps45 also plays a key role in determining the levels of its cognate SNARE proteins; another key factor in regulation of membrane traffic.

  4. Three v-SNAREs and two t-SNAREs, present in a pentameric cis-SNARE complex on isolated vacuoles, are essential for homotypic fusion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ungermann, C; von Mollard, G F; Jensen, Ole Nørregaard

    1999-01-01

    in the same cis multi-SNARE complex. After priming, which disassembles the cis-SNARE complex, antibodies to any of the five SNARE proteins still inhibit the fusion assay until the docking stage is completed, suggesting that each SNARE plays a role in docking. Furthermore, vti1 temperature-sensitive alleles...... cause a synthetic fusion-defective phenotype in our reaction. Our data show that vacuole-vacuole fusion requires a cis-SNARE complex of five SNAREs, the t-SNAREs Vam3p and Vam7p and the v-SNAREs Nyv1p, Vti1p, and Ykt6p....

  5. Heterogeneous expression of SNARE proteins SNAP-23, SNAP-25, Syntaxin1 and VAMP in human parathyroid tissue.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Ming; Forsberg, Lars; Höög, Anders; Juhlin, Christofer C; Vukojević, Vladana; Larsson, Catharina; Conigrave, Arthur D; Delbridge, Leigh W; Gill, Anthony; Bark, Christina; Farnebo, Lars-Ove; Bränström, Robert

    2008-06-11

    In regulated exocytosis synaptosomal-associated protein of 25kDa (SNAP-25) is one of the key-players in the formation of SNARE (soluble N-ethylmaleimide-sensitive fusion attachment protein receptor) complex and membrane fusion. SNARE proteins are essentially expressed in neurons, neuroendocrine and endocrine cells. Whether parathyroid cells express these proteins is not known. In this study, we have examined the expression of the SNARE protein SNAP-25 and its cellular homologue SNAP-23, as well as syntaxin1 and VAMP (vesicle-associated membrane protein) in samples of normal parathyroid tissue, chief cell adenoma, and parathyroid carcinoma, using immunohistochemistry and Western blot analysis. SNAP-23 and VAMP were evenly expressed in all studied parathyroid tissues using immunohistochemistry and/or Western blot analysis. SNAP-25 (and Syntaxin1) was not expressed in normal parathyroid tissue, but in approximately 20% of chief cell adenomas, and in approximately 45% of parathyroid carcinoma samples. It is likely that the SNARE proteins SNAP-23 and VAMP play a role in the stimulus-secretion coupling and exocytosis of parathyroid hormone as these proteins were expressed in all of the parathyroid samples we studied. In particular, preferential expression of SNAP-23 rather than SNAP-25 provides an explanation of the high level of PTH secretion that occurs under conditions of low cytoplasmic free Ca(2+) concentration (around 0.1micromol/l). SNAP-25 (and Syntaxin1) appears to be a tumour-specific protein(s) in parathyroid tissues since its expression was restricted to pathological tissues.

  6. A SNARE-Like Protein and Biotin Are Implicated in Soybean Cyst Nematode Virulence.

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    Sadia Bekal

    Full Text Available Phytoparasitic nematodes that are able to infect and reproduce on plants that are considered resistant are referred to as virulent. The mechanism(s that virulent nematodes employ to evade or suppress host plant defenses are not well understood. Here we report the use of a genetic strategy (allelic imbalance analysis to associate single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs with nematode virulence genes in Heterodera glycines, the soybean cyst nematode (SCN. To accomplish this analysis, a custom SCN SNP array was developed and used to genotype SCN F3-derived populations grown on resistant and susceptible soybean plants. Three SNPs reproducibly showed allele imbalances between nematodes grown on resistant and susceptible plants. Two candidate SCN virulence genes that were tightly linked to the SNPs were identified. One SCN gene encoded biotin synthase (HgBioB, and the other encoded a bacterial-like protein containing a putative SNARE domain (HgSLP-1. The two genes mapped to two different linkage groups. HgBioB contained sequence polymorphisms between avirulent and virulent nematodes. However, the gene encoding HgSLP-1 had reduced copy number in virulent nematode populations and appears to produce multiple forms of the protein via intron retention and alternative splicing. We show that HgSLP-1 is an esophageal-gland protein that is secreted by the nematode during plant parasitism. Furthermore, in bacterial co-expression experiments, HgSLP-1 co-purified with the SCN resistance protein Rhg1 α-SNAP, suggesting that these two proteins physically interact. Collectively our data suggest that multiple SCN genes are involved in SCN virulence, and that HgSLP-1 may function as an avirulence protein and when absent it helps SCN evade host defenses.

  7. Proteomics of photoreceptor outer segments identifies a subset of SNARE and Rab proteins implicated in membrane vesicle trafficking and fusion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kwok, Michael C M; Holopainen, Juha M; Molday, Laurie L; Foster, Leonard J; Molday, Robert S

    2008-06-01

    The outer segment is a specialized compartment of vertebrate rod and cone photoreceptor cells where phototransduction takes place. In rod cells it consists of an organized stack of disks enclosed by a separate plasma membrane. Although most proteins involved in phototransduction have been identified and characterized, little is known about the proteins that are responsible for outer segment structure and renewal. In this study we used a tandem mass spectrometry-based proteomics approach to identify proteins in rod outer segment preparations as an initial step in defining their roles in photoreceptor structure, function, renewal, and degeneration. Five hundred and sixteen proteins were identified including 41 proteins that function in rod and cone phototransduction and the visual cycle and most proteins previously shown to be involved in outer segment structure and metabolic pathways. In addition, numerous proteins were detected that have not been previously reported to be present in outer segments including a subset of Rab and SNARE proteins implicated in vesicle trafficking and membrane fusion. Western blotting and immunofluorescence microscopy confirmed the presence of Rab 11b, Rab 18, Rab 1b, and Rab GDP dissociation inhibitor in outer segments. The SNARE proteins, VAMP2/3, syntaxin 3, N-ethylmaleimide-sensitive factor, and Munc 18 detected in outer segment preparations by mass spectrometry and Western blotting were also observed in outer segments by immunofluorescence microscopy. Syntaxin 3 and N-ethylmaleimide- sensitive factor had a restricted localization at the base of the outer segments, whereas VAMP2/3 and Munc 18 were distributed throughout the outer segments. These results suggest that Rab and SNARE proteins play a role in vesicle trafficking and membrane fusion as part of the outer segment renewal process. The data set generated in this study is a valuable resource for further analysis of photoreceptor outer segment structure and function.

  8. Plin2 inhibits cellular glucose uptake through interactions with SNAP23, a SNARE complex protein.

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    Subramanian Senthivinayagam

    Full Text Available Although a link between excess lipid storage and aberrant glucose metabolism has been recognized for many years, little is known what role lipid storage droplets and associated proteins such as Plin2 play in managing cellular glucose levels. To address this issue, the influence of Plin2 on glucose uptake was examined using 2-NBD-Glucose and [(3H]-2-deoxyglucose to show that insulin-mediated glucose uptake was decreased 1.7- and 1.8-fold, respectively in L cell fibroblasts overexpressing Plin2. Conversely, suppression of Plin2 levels by RNAi-mediated knockdown increased 2-NBD-Glucose uptake several fold in transfected L cells and differentiated 3T3-L1 cells. The effect of Plin2 expression on proteins involved in glucose uptake and transport was also examined. Expression of the SNARE protein SNAP23 was increased 1.6-fold while levels of syntaxin-5 were decreased 1.7-fold in Plin2 overexpression cells with no significant changes observed in lipid droplet associated proteins Plin1 or FSP27 or with the insulin receptor, GLUT1, or VAMP4. FRET experiments revealed a close proximity of Plin2 to SNAP23 on lipid droplets to within an intramolecular distance of 51 Å. The extent of targeting of SNAP23 to lipid droplets was determined by co-localization and co-immunoprecipitation experiments to show increased partitioning of SNAP23 to lipid droplets when Plin2 was overexpressed. Taken together, these results suggest that Plin2 inhibits glucose uptake by interacting with, and regulating cellular targeting of SNAP23 to lipid droplets. In summary, the current study for the first time provides direct evidence for the role of Plin2 in mediating cellular glucose uptake.

  9. Functional Interaction of the SNARE Protein NtSyp121 in Ca2+ Channel Gating,Ca2+ Transients and ABA Signalling of Stomatal Guard Cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Sergei Sokolovski; Adrian Hills; Robert A.Gay; Michael R.Blatt

    2008-01-01

    There is now growing evidence that membrane vesicle trafficking proteins,especially of the superfamily of SNAREs,are critical for cellular signalling in plants.Work from this laboratory first demonstrated that a soluble,inhibitory (dominant-negative) fragment of the SNARE NtSyp121 blocked K+ and Cl- channel responses to the stress-related hormone abscisic acid (ABA),but left open a question about functional impacts on signal intermediates,especially on Ca2+-mediated signalling events.Here,we report one mode of action for the SNARE mediated directly through alterations in Caz+ channel gating and its consequent effects on cytosolic-free [Ca2+] ([Ca2+]i) elevation.We find that expressing the same inhibitory fragment of NtSyp121 blocks ABA-evoked stomatal closure,but only partially suppresses stomatal closure in the presence of the NO donor,SNAP,which promotes [Ca2+]i elevation independently of the plasma membrane Ca2+ channels.Consistent with these observations,Ca2+ channel gating at the plasma membrane is altered by the SNARE fragment in a manner effective in reducing the potential for triggering a rise in [Ca2+]i,and we show directly that its expression in vivo leads to a pronounced suppression of evoked [Ca2+]i transients.These observations offer primary evidence for the functional coupling of the SNARE with Ca2+ channels at the plant cell plasma membrane and,because [Ca2+]i plays a key role in the control of K+ and Cl- channel currents in guard cells,they underscore an important mechanism for SNARE integration with ion channel regulation during stomatal closure.

  10. Membrane translocation of t-SNARE protein syntaxin-4 abrogates ground-state pluripotency in mouse embryonic stem cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hagiwara-Chatani, Natsumi; Shirai, Kota; Kido, Takumi; Horigome, Tomoatsu; Yasue, Akihiro; Adachi, Naoki; Hirai, Yohei

    2017-01-01

    Embryonic stem (ES) and induced pluripotent stem (iPS) cells are attractive tools for regenerative medicine therapies. However, aberrant cell populations that display flattened morphology and lose ground-state pluripotency often appear spontaneously, unless glycogen synthase kinase 3β (GSK3β) and mitogen-activated protein kinase kinase (MEK1/2) are inactivated. Here, we show that membrane translocation of the t-SNARE protein syntaxin-4 possibly is involved in this phenomenon. We found that mouse ES cells cultured without GSK3β/MEK1/2 inhibitors (2i) spontaneously extrude syntaxin-4 at the cell surface and that artificial expression of cell surface syntaxin-4 induces appreciable morphological changes and mesodermal differentiation through dephosphorylation of Akt. Transcriptome analyses revealed several candidate elements responsible for this, specifically, an E-to P-cadherin switch and a marked downregulation of Zscan4 proteins, which are DNA-binding proteins essential for ES cell pluripotency. Embryonic carcinoma cell lines F9 and P19CL6, which maintain undifferentiated states independently of Zscan4 proteins, exhibited similar cellular behaviors upon stimulation with cell surface syntaxin-4. The functional ablation of E-cadherin and overexpression of P-cadherin reproduced syntaxin-4-induced cell morphology, demonstrating that the E- to P-cadherin switch executes morphological signals from cell surface syntaxin-4. Thus, spontaneous membrane translocation of syntaxin-4 emerged as a critical element for maintenance of the stem-cell niche. PMID:28057922

  11. SNARE zippering and synaptic strength.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rene C Prashad

    Full Text Available Synapses vary widely in the probability of neurotransmitter release. We tested the hypothesis that the zippered state of the trans-SNARE (Soluble N-ethylmaleimide-sensitive factor Attachment protein REceptor complex determines initial release probability. We tested this hypothesis at phasic and tonic synapses which differ by 100-1000-fold in neurotransmitter release probability. We injected, presynaptically, three Clostridial neurotoxins which bind and cleave at different sites on VAMP to determine whether these sites were occluded by the zippering of the SNARE complex or open to proteolytic attack. Under low stimulation conditions, the catalytic light-chain fragment of botulinum B (BoNT/B-LC inhibited evoked release at both phasic and tonic synapses and cleaved VAMP; however, neither BoNT/D-LC nor tetanus neurotoxin (TeNT-LC were effective in these conditions. The susceptibility of VAMP to only BoNT/B-LC indicated that SNARE complexes at both phasic and tonic synapses were partially zippered only at the N-terminal end to approximately the zero-layer with the C-terminal end exposed under resting state. Therefore, the existence of the same partially zippered state of the trans-SNARE complex at both phasic and tonic synapses indicates that release probability is not determined solely by the zippered state of the trans-SNARE complex at least to the zero-layer.

  12. SNARE zippering is hindered by polyphenols in the neuron

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yang, Yoosoo [Department of Genetic Engineering and Center for Human Interface Nanotechnology, Sungkyunkwan University, Suwon 440-746 (Korea, Republic of); Biomedical Research Institute, Korea Institute of Science and Technology, Seoul 136-791 (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Se-Hyun; Heo, Paul; Kong, Byoungjae; Shin, Jonghyeok; Jung, Young-Hun; Yoon, Keejung; Chung, Woo-Jae [Department of Genetic Engineering and Center for Human Interface Nanotechnology, Sungkyunkwan University, Suwon 440-746 (Korea, Republic of); Shin, Yeon-Kyun [Biomedical Research Institute, Korea Institute of Science and Technology, Seoul 136-791 (Korea, Republic of); Department of Biochemistry, Biophysics, and Molecular Biology, Iowa State University, Ames, IA 50011 (United States); Kweon, Dae-Hyuk, E-mail: dhkweon@skku.edu [Department of Genetic Engineering and Center for Human Interface Nanotechnology, Sungkyunkwan University, Suwon 440-746 (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-07-18

    Highlights: • Membrane fusion driven by SNARE complex is hindered by several polyphenols. • Distinctive inhibitory effect of each polyphenol on SNARE zippering in neuron was examined. • FRET between fluorescence protein-tagged SNAREs probed well SNARE zippering in PC12 cells. • Delphinidin and cyanidin inhibit N-terminal SNARE nucleation in Ca{sup 2+}-independent manner. • Myricetin inhibits Ca{sup 2+}-dependent transmembrane association of SNARE complex. - Abstract: Fusion of synaptic vesicles with the presynaptic plasma membrane in the neuron is mediated by soluble N-ethylmaleimide-sensitive fusion protein-attachment protein receptor (SNARE) proteins. SNARE complex formation is a zippering-like process which initiates at the N-terminus and proceeds to the C-terminal membrane-proximal region. Previously, we showed that this zippering-like process is regulated by several polyphenols, leading to the arrest of membrane fusion and the inhibition of neuroexocytosis. In vitro studies using purified SNARE proteins reconstituted in liposomes revealed that each polyphenol uniquely regulates SNARE zippering. However, the unique regulatory effect of each polyphenol in cells has not yet been examined. In the present study, we observed SNARE zippering in neuronal PC12 cells by measuring the fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) changes of a cyan fluorescence protein (CFP) and a yellow fluorescence protein (YFP) fused to the N-termini or C-termini of SNARE proteins. We show that delphinidin and cyanidin inhibit the initial N-terminal nucleation of SNARE complex formation in a Ca{sup 2+}-independent manner, while myricetin inhibits Ca{sup 2+}-dependent transmembrane domain association of the SNARE complex in the cell. This result explains how polyphenols exhibit botulinum neurotoxin-like activity in vivo.

  13. SNAREs Interact with Retinal Degeneration Slow and Rod Outer Segment Membrane Protein-1 during Conventional and Unconventional Outer Segment Targeting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zulliger, Rahel; Conley, Shannon M; Mwoyosvi, Maggie L; Stuck, Michael W; Azadi, Seifollah; Naash, Muna I

    2015-01-01

    Mutations in the photoreceptor protein peripherin-2 (also known as RDS) cause severe retinal degeneration. RDS and its homolog ROM-1 (rod outer segment protein 1) are synthesized in the inner segment and then trafficked into the outer segment where they function in tetramers and covalently linked larger complexes. Our goal is to identify binding partners of RDS and ROM-1 that may be involved in their biosynthetic pathway or in their function in the photoreceptor outer segment (OS). Here we utilize several methods including mass spectrometry after affinity purification, in vitro co-expression followed by pull-down, in vivo pull-down from mouse retinas, and proximity ligation assay to identify and confirm the SNARE proteins Syntaxin 3B and SNAP-25 as novel binding partners of RDS and ROM-1. We show that both covalently linked and non-covalently linked RDS complexes interact with Syntaxin 3B. RDS in the mouse is trafficked from the inner segment to the outer segment by both conventional (i.e., Golgi dependent) and unconventional secretory pathways, and RDS from both pathways interacts with Syntaxin3B. Syntaxin 3B and SNAP-25 are enriched in the inner segment (compared to the outer segment) suggesting that the interaction with RDS/ROM-1 occurs in the inner segment. Syntaxin 3B and SNAP-25 are involved in mediating fusion of vesicles carrying other outer segment proteins during outer segment targeting, so could be involved in the trafficking of RDS/ROM-1.

  14. TI-VAMP/VAMP7 and VAMP3/cellubrevin: two v-SNARE proteins involved in specific steps of the autophagy/multivesicular body pathways.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fader, Claudio Marcelo; Sánchez, Diego Germán; Mestre, María Belén; Colombo, María Isabel

    2009-12-01

    During reticulocyte maturation, some membrane proteins and organelles that are not required in the mature red cell are lost. Several of these proteins are released into the extracellular medium associated with the internal vesicles present in multivesicular bodies (MVBs). Likewise, organelles such as mitochondria and endoplasmic reticulum are wrapped into double membrane vacuoles (i.e., autophagosomes) and degraded via autophagy. Morphological, molecular, and biochemical studies have shown that autophagosomes fuse with MVBs forming the so-called amphisomes, a prelysosomal hybrid organelle. SNAREs are key molecules of the vesicle fusion machinery. TI-VAMP/VAMP7 and VAMP3/cellubrevin are two v-SNARE proteins involved in the endocytic and exocytic pathways. We have previously shown that in the human leukemic K562 cells, Rab11 decorates MVBs and it is necessary for fusion between autophagosomes with MVBs. In the present report, we present evidence indicating that VAMP3 is required for the fusion between MVBs with autophagosomes to generate the amphisome, allowing the maturation of the autophagosome, but it does not seem to be involved in the next step, i. e., fusion with the lysosome. On the other hand, we demonstrate that VAMP7 is necessary for this latter event, allowing the completion of the autophagic pathway. Furthermore, VAMP7 and ATPase NSF, a protein required for SNAREs disassembly, participate in the fusion between MVBs with the plasma membrane to release the internal vesicles (i.e., exosomes) into the extracellular medium.

  15. α-SNAP Enhances SNARE Zippering by Stabilizing the SNARE Four-Helix Bundle

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lu Ma

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Intracellular membrane fusion is mediated by dynamic assembly and disassembly of soluble N-ethylmaleimide-sensitive factor (NSF attachment protein (SNAP receptors (SNAREs. α-SNAP guides NSF to disassemble SNARE complexes after membrane fusion. Recent experiments showed that α-SNAP also dramatically enhances SNARE assembly and membrane fusion. How α-SNAP is involved in these opposing activities is not known. Here, we examine the effect of α-SNAP on the stepwise assembly of the synaptic SNARE complex using optical tweezers. We found that α-SNAP destabilized the linker domain (LD of the SNARE complex but stabilized its C-terminal domain (CTD through a conformational selection mechanism. In contrast, α-SNAP minimally affected assembly of the SNARE N-terminal domain (NTD, indicating that α-SNAP barely bound the partially assembled trans-SNARE complex. Thus, α-SNAP recognizes the folded CTD for SNARE disassembly with NSF and subtly modulates membrane fusion by altering the stabilities of the SNARE CTD and LD.

  16. A Critical Analysis of the Role of SNARE Protein SEC22B in Antigen Cross-Presentation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Julia Wu

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Cross-presentation initiates immune responses against tumors and viral infections by presenting extracellular antigen on MHC I to activate CD8+ T cell-mediated cytotoxicity. In vitro studies in dendritic cells (DCs established SNARE protein SEC22B as a specific regulator of cross-presentation. However, the in vivo contribution of SEC22B to cross-presentation has not been tested. To address this, we generated DC-specific Sec22b knockout (CD11c-Cre Sec22bfl/fl mice. Contrary to the paradigm, SEC22B-deficient DCs efficiently cross-present both in vivo and in vitro. Although in vitro small hairpin RNA (shRNA-mediated Sec22b silencing in bone-marrow-derived dendritic cells (BMDCs reduced cross-presentation, treatment of SEC22B-deficient BMDCs with the same shRNA produced a similar defect, suggesting the Sec22b shRNA modulates cross-presentation through off-target effects. RNA sequencing of Sec22b shRNA-treated SEC22B-deficient BMDCs demonstrated several changes in the transcriptome. Our data demonstrate that contrary to the accepted model, SEC22B is not necessary for cross-presentation, cautioning against extrapolating phenotypes from knockdown studies alone.

  17. Arabidopsis Sec1/Munc18 protein SEC11 is a competitive and dynamic modulator of SNARE binding and SYP121-dependent vesicle traffic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karnik, Rucha; Grefen, Christopher; Bayne, Robert; Honsbein, Annegret; Köhler, Tim; Kioumourtzoglou, Dimitrios; Williams, Mary; Bryant, Nia J; Blatt, Michael R

    2013-04-01

    The Arabidopsis thaliana Qa-SNARE SYP121 (=SYR1/PEN1) drives vesicle traffic at the plasma membrane of cells throughout the vegetative plant. It facilitates responses to drought, to the water stress hormone abscisic acid, and to pathogen attack, and it is essential for recovery from so-called programmed stomatal closure. How SYP121-mediated traffic is regulated is largely unknown, although it is thought to depend on formation of a fusion-competent SNARE core complex with the cognate partners VAMP721 and SNAP33. Like SYP121, the Arabidopsis Sec1/Munc18 protein SEC11 (=KEULE) is expressed throughout the vegetative plant. We find that SEC11 binds directly with SYP121 both in vitro and in vivo to affect secretory traffic. Binding occurs through two distinct modes, one requiring only SEC11 and SYP121 and the second dependent on assembly of a complex with VAMP721 and SNAP33. SEC11 competes dynamically for SYP121 binding with SNAP33 and VAMP721, and this competition is predicated by SEC11 association with the N terminus of SYP121. These and additional data are consistent with a model in which SYP121-mediated vesicle fusion is regulated by an unusual "handshaking" mechanism of concerted SEC11 debinding and rebinding. They also implicate one or more factors that alter or disrupt SEC11 association with the SYP121 N terminus as an early step initiating SNARE complex formation.

  18. Interactions within the yeast t-SNARE Sso1p that control SNARE complex assembly.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Munson, M; Chen, X; Cocina, A E; Schultz, S M; Hughson, F M

    2000-10-01

    In the eukaryotic secretory and endocytic pathways, transport vesicles shuttle cargo among intracellular organelles and to and from the plasma membrane. Cargo delivery entails fusion of the transport vesicle with its target, a process thought to be mediated by membrane bridging SNARE protein complexes. Temporal and spatial control of intracellular trafficking depends in part on regulating the assembly of these complexes. In vitro, SNARE assembly is inhibited by the closed conformation adopted by the syntaxin family of SNAREs. To visualize this closed conformation directly, the X-ray crystal structure of a yeast syntaxin, Sso1p, has been determined and refined to 2.1 A resolution. Mutants designed to destabilize the closed conformation exhibit accelerated rates of SNARE assembly. Our results provide insight into the mechanism of SNARE assembly and its intramolecular and intermolecular regulation.

  19. Dsl1p, Tip20p, and the novel Dsl3(Sec39) protein are required for the stability of the Q/t-SNARE complex at the endoplasmic reticulum in yeast

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kraynack, Bryan A; Chan, Angela; Rosenthal, Eva Helga

    2005-01-01

    -ER retrograde transport. Size exclusion chromatography and affinity purification approaches confirmed that Dsl3p is associated with subunits of the "Dsl1p complex." The complex also includes the Q/t-SNARE proteins, Use1p, Sec20p, and Ufe1p, integral membrane proteins that constitute the trimeric acceptor for R...

  20. Multiple roles of the vesicular-SNARE TI-VAMP in post-Golgi and endosomal trafficking.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaineau, Mathilde; Danglot, Lydia; Galli, Thierry

    2009-12-01

    SNARE (Soluble N-ethylmaleimide-sensitive factor attachment protein receptor) proteins are the core machinery of membrane fusion. Vesicular SNAREs (v-SNAREs) interact with their target SNAREs (t-SNAREs) to form SNARE complexes which mediate membrane fusion. Here we review the basic properties and functions of the v-SNARE TI-VAMP/VAMP7 (Tetanus neurotoxin insensitive-vesicle associated membrane protein). TI-VAMP interacts with its t-SNARE partners, particularly plasmalemmal syntaxins, to mediate membrane fusion and with several regulatory proteins especially via its amino-terminal regulatory Longin domain. Partners include AP-3, Hrb/(Human immunodeficiency virus Rev binding) protein, and Varp (Vps9 domain and ankyrin repeats containing protein) and regulate TI-VAMP's function and targeting. TI-VAMP is involved both in secretory and endocytic pathways which mediate neurite outgrowth and synaptic transmission, plasma membrane remodeling and lysosomal secretion.

  1. Energetics, kinetics, and pathway of SNARE folding and assembly revealed by optical tweezers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yongli

    2017-07-01

    Soluble N-ethylmaleimide-sensitive factor attachment protein receptors (SNAREs) are universal molecular engines that drive membrane fusion. Particularly, synaptic SNAREs mediate fast calcium-triggered fusion of neurotransmitter-containing vesicles with plasma membranes for synaptic transmission, the basis of all thought and action. During membrane fusion, complementary SNAREs located on two apposed membranes (often called t- and v-SNAREs) join together to assemble into a parallel four-helix bundle, releasing the energy to overcome the energy barrier for fusion. A long-standing hypothesis suggests that SNAREs act like a zipper to draw the two membranes into proximity and thereby force them to fuse. However, a quantitative test of this SNARE zippering hypothesis was hindered by difficulties to determine the energetics and kinetics of SNARE assembly and to identify the relevant folding intermediates. Here, we first review different approaches that have been applied to study SNARE assembly and then focus on high-resolution optical tweezers. We summarize the folding energies, kinetics, and pathways of both wild-type and mutant SNARE complexes derived from this new approach. These results show that synaptic SNAREs assemble in four distinct stages with different functions: slow N-terminal domain association initiates SNARE assembly; a middle domain suspends and controls SNARE assembly; and rapid sequential zippering of the C-terminal domain and the linker domain directly drive membrane fusion. In addition, the kinetics and pathway of the stagewise assembly are shared by other SNARE complexes. These measurements prove the SNARE zippering hypothesis and suggest new mechanisms for SNARE assembly regulated by other proteins. © 2017 The Protein Society.

  2. SNARE Requirements En Route to Exocytosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mohrmann, Ralf; Sørensen, Jakob Balslev

    2012-01-01

    and their complexes before and during vesicle exocytosis is still limited. Here, we review recent progress in this expanding field with emphasis on the question of fusion complex stoichiometry, i.e., how many SNARE proteins and complexes are needed for the fusion of a vesicle with the plasma membrane....

  3. The Polybasic Juxtamembrane Region of Sso1p Is Required for SNARE Function In Vivo†

    OpenAIRE

    Van Komen, Jeffrey S.; Bai, Xiaoyang; Rodkey, Travis L.; Schaub, Johanna; MCNEW, JAMES A.

    2005-01-01

    Exocytosis in Saccharomyces cerevisiae requires the specific interaction between the plasma membrane t-SNARE complex (Sso1/2p;Sec9p)and a vesicular v-SNARE (Snc1/2p). While SNARE proteins drive membrane fusion, many aspects of SNARE assembly and regulation are ill defined. Plasma membrane syntaxin homologs (including Sso1p) contain a highly charged juxtamembrane region between the transmembrane helix and the “SNARE domain” or core complex domain. We examined this region in vitro and in vivo b...

  4. Dynamics of SNARE assembly and disassembly during sperm acrosomal exocytosis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gerardo A De Blas

    2005-10-01

    Full Text Available The dynamics of SNARE assembly and disassembly during membrane recognition and fusion is a central issue in intracellular trafficking and regulated secretion. Exocytosis of sperm's single vesicle--the acrosome--is a synchronized, all-or-nothing process that happens only once in the life of the cell and depends on activation of both the GTP-binding protein Rab3 and of neurotoxin-sensitive SNAREs. These characteristics make acrosomal exocytosis a unique mammalian model for the study of the different phases of the membrane fusion cascade. By using a functional assay and immunofluorescence techniques in combination with neurotoxins and a photosensitive Ca2+ chelator we show that, in unactivated sperm, SNAREs are locked in heterotrimeric cis complexes. Upon Ca2+ entry into the cytoplasm, Rab3 is activated and triggers NSF/alpha-SNAP-dependent disassembly of cis SNARE complexes. Monomeric SNAREs in the plasma membrane and the outer acrosomal membrane are then free to reassemble in loose trans complexes that are resistant to NSF/alpha-SNAP and differentially sensitive to cleavage by two vesicle-associated membrane protein (VAMP-specific neurotoxins. Ca2+ must be released from inside the acrosome to trigger the final steps of membrane fusion that require fully assembled trans SNARE complexes and synaptotagmin. Our results indicate that the unidirectional and sequential disassembly and assembly of SNARE complexes drive acrosomal exocytosis.

  5. Alternative splicing of the human gene SYBL1 modulates protein domain architecture of longin VAMP7/TI-VAMP, showing both non-SNARE and synaptobrevin-like isoforms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    De Franceschi Nicola

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The control of intracellular vesicle trafficking is an ideal target to weigh the role of alternative splicing in shaping genomes to make cells. Alternative splicing has been reported for several Soluble N-ethylmaleimide-sensitive factor Attachment protein REceptors of the vesicle (v-SNAREs or of the target membrane (t-SNARES, which are crucial to intracellular membrane fusion and protein and lipid traffic in Eukaryotes. However, splicing has not yet been investigated in Longins, i.e. the most widespread v-SNAREs. Longins are essential in Eukaryotes and prototyped by VAMP7, Sec22b and Ykt6, sharing a conserved N-terminal Longin domain which regulates membrane fusion and subcellular targeting. Human VAMP7/TI-VAMP, encoded by gene SYBL1, is involved in multiple cell pathways, including control of neurite outgrowth. Results Alternative splicing of SYBL1 by exon skipping events results in the production of a number of VAMP7 isoforms. In-frame or frameshift coding sequence modifications modulate domain architecture of VAMP7 isoforms, which can lack whole domains or domain fragments and show variant or extra domains. Intriguingly, two main types of VAMP7 isoforms either share the inhibitory Longin domain and lack the fusion-promoting SNARE motif, or vice versa. Expression analysis in different tissues and cell lines, quantitative real time RT-PCR and confocal microscopy analysis of fluorescent protein-tagged isoforms demonstrate that VAMP7 variants have different tissue specificities and subcellular localizations. Moreover, design and use of isoform-specific antibodies provided preliminary evidence for the existence of splice variants at the protein level. Conclusions Previous evidence on VAMP7 suggests inhibitory functions for the Longin domain and fusion/growth promoting activity for the Δ-longin molecule. Thus, non-SNARE isoforms with Longin domain and non-longin SNARE isoforms might have somehow opposite regulatory functions

  6. The Longin SNARE VAMP7/TI-VAMP Adopts a Closed Conformation*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vivona, Sandro; Liu, Corey W.; Strop, Pavel; Rossi, Valeria; Filippini, Francesco; Brunger, Axel T.

    2010-01-01

    SNARE protein complexes are key mediators of exocytosis by juxtaposing opposing membranes, leading to membrane fusion. SNAREs generally consist of one or two core domains that can form a four-helix bundle with other SNARE core domains. Some SNAREs, such as syntaxin target-SNAREs and longin vesicular-SNAREs, have independent, folded N-terminal domains that can interact with their respective SNARE core domains and thereby affect the kinetics of SNARE complex formation. This autoinhibition mechanism is believed to regulate the role of the longin VAMP7/TI-VAMP in neuronal morphogenesis. Here we use nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy to study the longin-SNARE core domain interaction for VAMP7. Using complete backbone resonance assignments, chemical shift perturbations analysis, and hydrogen/deuterium exchange experiments, we conclusively show that VAMP7 adopts a preferentially closed conformation in solution. Taken together, the closed conformation of longins is conserved, in contrast to the syntaxin family of SNAREs for which mixtures of open and closed states have been observed. This may indicate different regulatory mechanisms for SNARE complexes containing syntaxins and longins, respectively. PMID:20378544

  7. The longin SNARE VAMP7/TI-VAMP adopts a closed conformation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vivona, Sandro; Liu, Corey W; Strop, Pavel; Rossi, Valeria; Filippini, Francesco; Brunger, Axel T

    2010-06-01

    SNARE protein complexes are key mediators of exocytosis by juxtaposing opposing membranes, leading to membrane fusion. SNAREs generally consist of one or two core domains that can form a four-helix bundle with other SNARE core domains. Some SNAREs, such as syntaxin target-SNAREs and longin vesicular-SNAREs, have independent, folded N-terminal domains that can interact with their respective SNARE core domains and thereby affect the kinetics of SNARE complex formation. This autoinhibition mechanism is believed to regulate the role of the longin VAMP7/TI-VAMP in neuronal morphogenesis. Here we use nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy to study the longin-SNARE core domain interaction for VAMP7. Using complete backbone resonance assignments, chemical shift perturbations analysis, and hydrogen/deuterium exchange experiments, we conclusively show that VAMP7 adopts a preferentially closed conformation in solution. Taken together, the closed conformation of longins is conserved, in contrast to the syntaxin family of SNAREs for which mixtures of open and closed states have been observed. This may indicate different regulatory mechanisms for SNARE complexes containing syntaxins and longins, respectively.

  8. VAMP subfamilies identified by specific R-SNARE motifs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rossi, Valeria; Picco, Raffaella; Vacca, Marcella; D'Esposito, Maurizio; D'Urso, Michele; Galli, Thierry; Filippini, Francesco

    2004-05-01

    In eukaryotes, interactions among the alpha-helical coiled-coil domains (CCDs) of soluble N-ethylmaleimide-sensitive factor attachment protein receptors (SNAREs) play a pivotal role in mediating the fusion among vesicles and target membranes. Surface residues of such CCDs are major candidates to regulate the specificity of membrane fusion, as they may alter local charge at the interaction layers and surface of the fusion complex, possibly modulating its formation and/or the binding of non-SNARE regulatory factors. Based on alternate patterns in surface residues, we have identified two motifs which group vesicular SNAREs in two novel subfamilies: RG-SNAREs and RD-SNAREs. The RG-SNARE CCD is common to all members of the widely conserved family of long VAMPs or longins and to yeast and non-neuronal VAMPs, possibly mediating "basic" fusion mechanisms; instead, only synaptobrevins from Bilateria share an RD-SNARE CCD, which is likely to mediate interactions to specific, yet unknown, regulatory factors and/or be the landmark of rapid fusion reactions like that mediating the release of neurotransmitters.

  9. Endobronchial Electrocautery Using Snare

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Masaaki Kawahara

    1996-01-01

    Full Text Available Between May 1987 and March 1994, upper airway and tracheobronchial electrosurgery with snare was performed in 13 patients (10 men and 3 women, ranging in age from 18 to 87 years. Four patients had benign lesions, and nine had malignant tumors. Total eradication has been achieved in the two patients with benign lesions. Electroexcision of the endobronchial portion of the tumor helped to clear the respiratory airways in all cases with malignant tumors. There has been no major side effects such as bleeding due to this method. Electrocautery is an available economical tool, which helps to diagnose and treat obstructing airway mass lesions.

  10. Auxin regulates SNARE-dependent vacuolar morphology restricting cell size.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Löfke, Christian; Dünser, Kai; Scheuring, David; Kleine-Vehn, Jürgen

    2015-03-05

    The control of cellular growth is central to multicellular patterning. In plants, the encapsulating cell wall literally binds neighbouring cells to each other and limits cellular sliding/migration. In contrast to its developmental importance, growth regulation is poorly understood in plants. Here, we reveal that the phytohormone auxin impacts on the shape of the biggest plant organelle, the vacuole. TIR1/AFBs-dependent auxin signalling posttranslationally controls the protein abundance of vacuolar SNARE components. Genetic and pharmacological interference with the auxin effect on vacuolar SNAREs interrelates with auxin-resistant vacuolar morphogenesis and cell size regulation. Vacuolar SNARE VTI11 is strictly required for auxin-reliant vacuolar morphogenesis and loss of function renders cells largely insensitive to auxin-dependent growth inhibition. Our data suggests that the adaptation of SNARE-dependent vacuolar morphogenesis allows auxin to limit cellular expansion, contributing to root organ growth rates.

  11. News and Views into the SNARE Complexity in Arabidopsis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sang-Jin eKim

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Secretory organelles are engaged in a continuous flux of membranes, which is believed to occur mostly via transport vesicles. Being critical in maintaining several cellular functions, transport vesicles are membrane-enclosed sacs that temporarily store and then deliver membrane lipids, protein and polysaccharides. SNAREs have a crucial role in vesicle traffic by driving membrane fusion and conferring fidelity through the formation of specific SNARE complexes. Additionally, specific roles of SNAREs in growth and development implicate that they are versatile components for the life of a plant. Here, we summarize the recent progress on the understanding of the role of SNAREs and highlight some of the questions that are still unsolved.

  12. The SNARE machinery in mast cell secretion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Axel eLorentz

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Mast cells are known as inflammatory cells which exert their functions in allergic and anaphylactic reactions by secretion of numerous inflammatory mediators. During an allergic response, the high-affinity IgE receptor, FcεRI, becomes cross-linked by receptor-bound IgE and antigen resulting in immediate release of pre-synthesized mediators – stored in granules – as well as in de novo synthesis of various mediators like cytokines and chemokines. Soluble N-ethylmaleimide-Sensitive Factor (NSF Attachment Protein (SNAP Receptors (SNARE proteins were found to play a central role in regulating membrane fusion events during exocytosis. In addition, several accessory regulators like Munc13, Munc18, Rab GTPases, SCAMPs, complexins or synaptotagmins were found to be involved in membrane fusion. In this review we summarize our current knowledge about the SNARE machinery and its mechanism of action in mast cell secretion.

  13. Lewy Body Variant of Alzheimer's Disease: Selective Neocortical Loss of t-SNARE Proteins and Loss of MAP2 and α-Synuclein in Medial Temporal Lobe

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elizabeta B. Mukaetova-Ladinska

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Lewy bodies (LBs appear in the brains of nondemented individuals and also occur in a range of neurodegenerative disorders, such as dementia with Lewy bodies (DLB and Parkinson's disease. A number of people with a definite diagnosis of Alzheimer's disease (AD also exhibit these intraneuronal inclusions in allo- and/or neocortical areas. The latter, referred to as Lewy body variant of AD (LBV, bears a clinical resemblance to AD in terms of age at onset, duration of illness, cognitive impairment, and illness severity. Since the presence of LBs is accompanied by neuronal cytoskeleton changes, it is possible that the latter may influence neuronal connectivity via alterations to the synaptic network. To address this, we examined the expression of synaptic proteins (synaptophysin, syntaxin, SNAP-25, and α-synuclein and two cytoskeletal proteins (tau and MAP2 in the brain tissue of subjects enrolled in a population-based autopsy study (n = 47. They were divided into groups with no memory problems (control group, n = 15, LBV (n = 5, AD devoid of LBs (n = 17, cerebrovascular dementia (n = 3, and mixed dementia (n = 7. The LBV and AD groups had a similar degree of cognitive impairment and neuropathological staging in terms of Braak staging and CERAD score. In comparison with the control group and the dementia groups without LBs, the LBV group had significantly lower levels of syntaxin and SNAP-25 (23% in the neocortex, and depletion of MAP2 (64%, SNAP-25 (34%, and α-synuclein (44% proteins in the medial temporal lobes. These findings suggest that the t-SNARE complex deficit present in LBV may be associated with the presence of LB-related pathology and may explain the more profound cholinergic loss seen in these patients.

  14. Probing the structural dynamics of the SNARE recycling machine based on coarse-grained modeling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Wenjun

    2016-08-01

    Membrane fusion in eukaryotes is driven by the formation of a four-helix bundle by three SNARE proteins. To recycle the SNARE proteins, they must be disassembled by the ATPase NSF and four SNAP proteins which together form a 20S supercomplex. Recently, the first high-resolution structures of the NSF (in both ATP and ADP state) and 20S (in four distinct states termed I, II, IIIa, and IIIb) were solved by cryo-electron microscopy (cryo-EM), which have paved the way for structure-driven studies of the SNARE recycling mechanism. To probe the structural dynamics of SNARE disassembly at amino-acid level of details, a systematic coarse-grained modeling based on an elastic network model and related analyses were performed. Our normal mode analysis of NSF, SNARE, and 20S predicted key modes of collective motions that partially account for the observed structural changes, and illuminated how the SNARE complex can be effectively destabilized by untwisting and bending motions of the SNARE complex driven by the amino-terminal domains of NSF in state II. Our flexibility analysis identified regions with high/low flexibility that coincide with key functional sites (such as the NSF-SNAPs-SNARE binding sites). A subset of hotspot residues that control the above collective motions, which will make promising targets for future mutagenesis studies were also identified. Finally, the conformational changes in 20S as induced by the transition of NSF from ATP to ADP state were modeled, and a concerted untwisting motion of SNARE/SNAPs and a sideway flip of two amino-terminal domains were observed. In sum, the findings have offered new structural and dynamic details relevant to the SNARE disassembly mechanism, and will guide future functional studies of the SNARE recycling machinery. Proteins 2016; 84:1055-1066. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  15. Identification and cloning of the SNARE proteins VAMP-2 and syntaxin-4 from HL-60 cells and human neutrophils.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smolen, J E; Hessler, R J; Nauseef, W M; Goedken, M; Joe, Y

    2001-08-01

    Degranulation and membrane fusion by neutrophils are essential to host defense. We sought homologues of neuron-specific fusion proteins in human neutrophils and in their precursors, the promyelocytic cell line HL-60. We screened a differentiated HL-60 library and obtained an 848 bp sequence with a 351 bp open reading frame, identical to that published for human VAMP-2 and including 5' and 3' untranslated regions. RNA from HL-60 cells during differentiation into the neutrophil lineage was subjected to Northern blot analysis. which revealed a transcript of approximately 1050 bp at all stages of differentiation. The amount of these transcripts increased approximately threefold during differentiation, a finding confirmed by quantitative RT-PCR. We also detected mRNA for VAMP-2 in human neutrophils and monocytes using RT-PCR. In like fashion, transcripts of syntaxin-4, another fusion protein, were recovered from a neutrophil cDNA library. As with VAMP-2, expression of syntaxin-4 (determined by Northern blots) also increased, but by only 50%, during differentiation of HL-60 cells. These studies demonstrate that neutrophils and their progenitors possess mRNA for the fusion proteins VAMP-2 and syntaxin-4, and that their transcription increases during differentiation, concurrent with the functional maturation of myeloid cells.

  16. Investigation of SNARE-Mediated Membrane Fusion Mechanism Using Atomic Force Microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdulreda, Midhat H.; Moy, Vincent T.

    2009-01-01

    Membrane fusion is driven by specialized proteins that reduce the free energy penalty for the fusion process. In neurons and secretory cells, soluble N-ethylmaleimide-sensitive factor-attachment protein (SNAP) receptors (SNAREs) mediate vesicle fusion with the plasma membrane during vesicular content release. Although, SNAREs have been widely accepted as the minimal machinery for membrane fusion, the specific mechanism for SNARE-mediated membrane fusion remains an active area of research. Here, we summarize recent findings based on force measurements acquired in a novel experimental system that uses atomic force microscope (AFM) force spectroscopy to investigate the mechanism(s) of membrane fusion and the role of SNAREs in facilitating membrane hemifusion during SNARE-mediated fusion. In this system, protein-free and SNARE-reconstituted lipid bilayers are formed on opposite (trans) substrates and the forces required to induce membrane hemifusion and fusion or to unbind single v-/t-SNARE complexes are measured. The obtained results provide evidence for a mechanism by which the pulling force generated by interacting trans-SNAREs provides critical proximity between the membranes and destabilizes the bilayers at fusion sites by broadening the hemifusion energy barrier and consequently making the membranes more prone to fusion. PMID:20228892

  17. SNARE function analyzed in synaptobrevin/VAMP knockout mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schoch, S; Deák, F; Königstorfer, A; Mozhayeva, M; Sara, Y; Südhof, T C; Kavalali, E T

    2001-11-01

    SNAREs (soluble NSF-attachment protein receptors) are generally acknowledged as central components of membrane fusion reactions, but their precise function has remained enigmatic. Competing hypotheses suggest roles for SNAREs in mediating the specificity of fusion, catalyzing fusion, or actually executing fusion. We generated knockout mice lacking synaptobrevin/VAMP 2, the vesicular SNARE protein responsible for synaptic vesicle fusion in forebrain synapses, to make use of the exquisite temporal resolution of electrophysiology in measuring fusion. In the absence of synaptobrevin 2, spontaneous synaptic vesicle fusion and fusion induced by hypertonic sucrose were decreased approximately 10-fold, but fast Ca2+-triggered fusion was decreased more than 100-fold. Thus, synaptobrevin 2 may function in catalyzing fusion reactions and stabilizing fusion intermediates but is not absolutely required for synaptic fusion.

  18. Conversion of functional specificity in Qb-SNARE VTI1 homologues of Arabidopsis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niihama, Mitsuru; Uemura, Tomohiro; Saito, Chieko; Nakano, Akihiko; Sato, Masa H; Tasaka, Masao; Morita, Miyo Terao

    2005-03-29

    In higher multicellular eukaryotes, highly specialized membrane structures or membrane trafficking events are required for supporting various physiological functions. SNAREs (soluble NSF attachment protein receptors) play an important role in specific membrane fusions. These protein receptors are assigned to subgroubs (Qa-, Qb-, Qc-, and R-SNARE) according to their specific SNARE structural motif. A specific set of Qa-, Qb-, and Qc-SNAREs, located on the target membrane, interact with R-SNARE on the vesicle to form a tight complex, leading to membrane fusion. The zig-1 mutant of Arabidopsis lacking Qb-SNARE VTI11 shows little shoot gravitropism and abnormal stem morphology. VTI11 and its homolog VTI12 exhibit partially overlapping but distinct intracellular localization and have different biological functions in plants. Little is known about how SNAREs are targeted to specific organelles, even though their functions and specific localization are closely linked. Here, we report that a novel mutation in VTI12 (zip1) was found as a dominant suppressor of zig-1. The zip1 mutation gave VTI12 the ability to function as VTI11 by changing both the specificity of SNARE complex formation and its intracellular localization. One amino acid substitution drastically altered VTI12, allowing it to suppress abnormalities of higher order physiological functions such as gravitropism and morphology. The zip1 mutation may be an indication of the flexibility in plant cell function afforded by gene duplication, particularly among the VTI11 genes and their recently diverged orthologs.

  19. Three v-SNAREs and two t-SNAREs, present in a pentameric cis-SNARE complex on isolated vacuoles, are essential for homotypic fusion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ungermann, C; von Mollard, G F; Jensen, Ole Nørregaard

    1999-01-01

    Vacuole SNAREs, including the t-SNAREs Vam3p and Vam7p and the v-SNARE Nyv1p, are found in a multisubunit "cis" complex on isolated organelles. We now identify the v-SNAREs Vti1p and Ykt6p by mass spectrometry as additional components of the immunoisolated vacuolar SNARE complex. Immunodepletion...... cause a synthetic fusion-defective phenotype in our reaction. Our data show that vacuole-vacuole fusion requires a cis-SNARE complex of five SNAREs, the t-SNAREs Vam3p and Vam7p and the v-SNAREs Nyv1p, Vti1p, and Ykt6p....

  20. A SNARE-like superfamily protein SbSLSP from the halophyte Salicornia brachiata confers salt and drought tolerance by maintaining membrane stability, K+/Na+ ratio, and antioxidant machinery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dinkar eSingh

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available About 1000 salt-responsive ESTs were identified from an extreme halophyte Salicornia brachiata. Among these, a novel salt-inducible gene SbSLSP, (Salicornia brachiata SNARE-like superfamily protein showed up-regulation upon salinity and dehydration stress. The presence of cis-regulatory motifs related to abiotic stress in the putative promoter region supports our finding that SbSLSP gene is inducible by abiotic stress. The SbSLSP protein showed a high sequence identity to hypothetical/uncharacterised proteins from Beta vulgaris, Spinacia oleracea, Eucalyptus grandis and Prunus persica and with SNARE-like superfamily proteins from Zostera marina and Arabidopsis thaliana. Bioinformatics analysis predicted a clathrin adaptor complex small-chain domain and N-myristoylation site in the SbSLSP protein. Subcellular localisation studies indicated that the SbSLSP protein is mainly localised in the plasma membrane. Using transgenic tobacco lines, we establish that overexpression of SbSLSP resulted in elevated tolerance to salt and drought stress. The improved tolerance was confirmed by alterations in a range of physiological parameters, including high germination and survival rate, higher leaf chlorophyll contents, and reduced accumulation of Na+ ion and reactive oxygen species (ROS. Furthermore, overexpressing lines also showed lower water loss, higher cell membrane stability and increased accumulation of proline and ROS-scavenging enzymes. Overexpression of SbSLSP also enhanced the transcript levels of ROS-scavenging and signalling enzyme genes. This study is the first investigation of the function of the SbSLSP gene as a novel determinant of salinity/drought tolerance. The results suggest that SbSLSP could be a potential candidate to increase salinity and drought tolerance in crop plants for sustainable agriculture in semi-arid saline soil.

  1. A SNARE-Like Superfamily Protein SbSLSP from the Halophyte Salicornia brachiata Confers Salt and Drought Tolerance by Maintaining Membrane Stability, K(+)/Na(+) Ratio, and Antioxidant Machinery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Dinkar; Yadav, Narendra Singh; Tiwari, Vivekanand; Agarwal, Pradeep K; Jha, Bhavanath

    2016-01-01

    About 1000 salt-responsive ESTs were identified from an extreme halophyte Salicornia brachiata. Among these, a novel salt-inducible gene SbSLSP (Salicornia brachiata SNARE-like superfamily protein), showed up-regulation upon salinity and dehydration stress. The presence of cis-regulatory motifs related to abiotic stress in the putative promoter region supports our finding that SbSLSP gene is inducible by abiotic stress. The SbSLSP protein showed a high sequence identity to hypothetical/uncharacterized proteins from Beta vulgaris, Spinacia oleracea, Eucalyptus grandis, and Prunus persica and with SNARE-like superfamily proteins from Zostera marina and Arabidopsis thaliana. Bioinformatics analysis predicted a clathrin adaptor complex small-chain domain and N-myristoylation site in the SbSLSP protein. Subcellular localization studies indicated that the SbSLSP protein is mainly localized in the plasma membrane. Using transgenic tobacco lines, we establish that overexpression of SbSLSP resulted in elevated tolerance to salt and drought stress. The improved tolerance was confirmed by alterations in a range of physiological parameters, including high germination and survival rate, higher leaf chlorophyll contents, and reduced accumulation of Na(+) ion and reactive oxygen species (ROS). Furthermore, overexpressing lines also showed lower water loss, higher cell membrane stability, and increased accumulation of proline and ROS-scavenging enzymes. Overexpression of SbSLSP also enhanced the transcript levels of ROS-scavenging and signaling enzyme genes. This study is the first investigation of the function of the SbSLSP gene as a novel determinant of salinity/drought tolerance. The results suggest that SbSLSP could be a potential candidate to increase salinity and drought tolerance in crop plants for sustainable agriculture in semi-arid saline soil.

  2. A SNARE-Like Superfamily Protein SbSLSP from the Halophyte Salicornia brachiata Confers Salt and Drought Tolerance by Maintaining Membrane Stability, K+/Na+ Ratio, and Antioxidant Machinery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Dinkar; Yadav, Narendra Singh; Tiwari, Vivekanand; Agarwal, Pradeep K.; Jha, Bhavanath

    2016-01-01

    About 1000 salt-responsive ESTs were identified from an extreme halophyte Salicornia brachiata. Among these, a novel salt-inducible gene SbSLSP (Salicornia brachiata SNARE-like superfamily protein), showed up-regulation upon salinity and dehydration stress. The presence of cis-regulatory motifs related to abiotic stress in the putative promoter region supports our finding that SbSLSP gene is inducible by abiotic stress. The SbSLSP protein showed a high sequence identity to hypothetical/uncharacterized proteins from Beta vulgaris, Spinacia oleracea, Eucalyptus grandis, and Prunus persica and with SNARE-like superfamily proteins from Zostera marina and Arabidopsis thaliana. Bioinformatics analysis predicted a clathrin adaptor complex small-chain domain and N-myristoylation site in the SbSLSP protein. Subcellular localization studies indicated that the SbSLSP protein is mainly localized in the plasma membrane. Using transgenic tobacco lines, we establish that overexpression of SbSLSP resulted in elevated tolerance to salt and drought stress. The improved tolerance was confirmed by alterations in a range of physiological parameters, including high germination and survival rate, higher leaf chlorophyll contents, and reduced accumulation of Na+ ion and reactive oxygen species (ROS). Furthermore, overexpressing lines also showed lower water loss, higher cell membrane stability, and increased accumulation of proline and ROS-scavenging enzymes. Overexpression of SbSLSP also enhanced the transcript levels of ROS-scavenging and signaling enzyme genes. This study is the first investigation of the function of the SbSLSP gene as a novel determinant of salinity/drought tolerance. The results suggest that SbSLSP could be a potential candidate to increase salinity and drought tolerance in crop plants for sustainable agriculture in semi-arid saline soil. PMID:27313584

  3. Secretory vesicle priming by CAPS is independent of the SNARE-bind MUN domain

    OpenAIRE

    Cuc Quynh Nguyen Truong; Dennis Nestvogel; Olga Ratai; Claudia Schirra; David R. Stevens; Nils Brose; JeongSeop Rhee; Jens Rettig

    2014-01-01

    Priming of secretory vesicles is a prerequisite for their Ca2+-dependent fusion with the plasma membrane. The key vesicle priming proteins, Munc13s and CAPSs, are thought to mediate vesicle priming by regulating the conformation of the t-SNARE syntaxin, thereby facilitating SNARE complex assembly. Munc13s execute their priming function through their MUN domain. Given that the MUN domain of Ca2+-dependent activator protein for secretion (CAPS) also binds syntaxin, it was assumed that CAPSs pri...

  4. Synaptotagmin-1 binds to PIP(2)-containing membrane but not to SNAREs at physiological ionic strength.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Yongsoo; Seo, Jong Bae; Fraind, Alicia; Pérez-Lara, Angel; Yavuz, Halenur; Han, Kyungreem; Jung, Seung-Ryoung; Kattan, Iman; Walla, Peter Jomo; Choi, MooYoung; Cafiso, David S; Koh, Duk-Su; Jahn, Reinhard

    2015-10-01

    The Ca(2+) sensor synaptotagmin-1 is thought to trigger membrane fusion by binding to acidic membrane lipids and SNARE proteins. Previous work has shown that binding is mediated by electrostatic interactions that are sensitive to the ionic environment. However, the influence of divalent or polyvalent ions, at physiological concentrations, on synaptotagmin's binding to membranes or SNAREs has not been explored. Here we show that binding of rat synaptotagmin-1 to membranes containing phosphatidylinositol 4,5-bisphosphate (PIP2) is regulated by charge shielding caused by the presence of divalent cations. Surprisingly, polyvalent ions such as ATP and Mg(2+) completely abrogate synaptotagmin-1 binding to SNAREs regardless of the presence of Ca(2+). Altogether, our data indicate that at physiological ion concentrations Ca(2+)-dependent synaptotagmin-1 binding is confined to PIP2-containing membrane patches in the plasma membrane, suggesting that membrane interaction of synaptotagmin-1 rather than SNARE binding triggers exocytosis of vesicles.

  5. SNARE-Mediated Cholesterol Movement to Mitochondria Supports Steroidogenesis in Rodent Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Ye; Hou, Xiaoming; Shen, Wen-Jun; Hanssen, Ruth; Khor, Victor K; Cortez, Yuan; Roseman, Ann N; Azhar, Salman; Kraemer, Fredric B

    2016-02-01

    Vesicular transport involving soluble N-ethylmaleimide sensitive factor attachment protein receptor (SNARE) proteins is known to be responsible for many major cellular activities. In steroidogenic tissues, chronic hormone stimulation results in increased expression of proteins involved in the steroidogenic pathway, whereas acute hormone stimulation prompts the rapid transfer of cholesterol to the inner mitochondrial membrane to be utilized as substrate for steroid hormone production. Several different pathways are involved in supplying cholesterol to mitochondria, but mobilization of stored cholesteryl esters appears to initially constitute the preferred source; however, the mechanisms mediating this cholesterol transfer are not fully understood. To study the potential contribution of SNARE proteins in steroidogenesis, we examined the expression levels of various SNARE proteins in response to hormone stimulation in steroidogenic tissues and cells and established an in vitro mitochondria reconstitution assay system to assess the contribution of various SNARE proteins on cholesterol delivery for steroidogenesis. Our results from reconstitution experiments along with knockdown studies in rat primary granulosa cells and in a Leydig cell line show that soluble N-ethylmaleimide sensitive factor attachment protein-α, synaptosomal-associated protein of 25 kDa, syntaxin-5, and syntaxin-17 facilitate the transport of cholesterol to mitochondria. Thus, although StAR is required for efficient cholesterol movement into mitochondria for steroidogenesis, specific SNAREs participate and are necessary to mediate cholesterol movement to mitochondria.

  6. SNARE-Mediated Cholesterol Movement to Mitochondria Supports Steroidogenesis in Rodent Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Ye; Hou, Xiaoming; Shen, Wen-Jun; Hanssen, Ruth; Khor, Victor K.; Cortez, Yuan; Roseman, Ann N.; Azhar, Salman

    2016-01-01

    Vesicular transport involving soluble N-ethylmaleimide sensitive factor attachment protein receptor (SNARE) proteins is known to be responsible for many major cellular activities. In steroidogenic tissues, chronic hormone stimulation results in increased expression of proteins involved in the steroidogenic pathway, whereas acute hormone stimulation prompts the rapid transfer of cholesterol to the inner mitochondrial membrane to be utilized as substrate for steroid hormone production. Several different pathways are involved in supplying cholesterol to mitochondria, but mobilization of stored cholesteryl esters appears to initially constitute the preferred source; however, the mechanisms mediating this cholesterol transfer are not fully understood. To study the potential contribution of SNARE proteins in steroidogenesis, we examined the expression levels of various SNARE proteins in response to hormone stimulation in steroidogenic tissues and cells and established an in vitro mitochondria reconstitution assay system to assess the contribution of various SNARE proteins on cholesterol delivery for steroidogenesis. Our results from reconstitution experiments along with knockdown studies in rat primary granulosa cells and in a Leydig cell line show that soluble N-ethylmaleimide sensitive factor attachment protein-α, synaptosomal-associated protein of 25 kDa, syntaxin-5, and syntaxin-17 facilitate the transport of cholesterol to mitochondria. Thus, although StAR is required for efficient cholesterol movement into mitochondria for steroidogenesis, specific SNAREs participate and are necessary to mediate cholesterol movement to mitochondria. PMID:26771535

  7. Secretory vesicles are preferentially targeted to areas of low molecular SNARE density.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lei Yang

    Full Text Available Intercellular communication is commonly mediated by the regulated fusion, or exocytosis, of vesicles with the cell surface. SNARE (soluble N-ethymaleimide sensitive factor attachment protein receptor proteins are the catalytic core of the secretory machinery, driving vesicle and plasma membrane merger. Plasma membrane SNAREs (tSNAREs are proposed to reside in dense clusters containing many molecules, thus providing a concentrated reservoir to promote membrane fusion. However, biophysical experiments suggest that a small number of SNAREs are sufficient to drive a single fusion event. Here we show, using molecular imaging, that the majority of tSNARE molecules are spatially separated from secretory vesicles. Furthermore, the motilities of the individual tSNAREs are constrained in membrane micro-domains, maintaining a non-random molecular distribution and limiting the maximum number of molecules encountered by secretory vesicles. Together our results provide a new model for the molecular mechanism of regulated exocytosis and demonstrate the exquisite organization of the plasma membrane at the level of individual molecular machines.

  8. Characterization of SNAREs Determines the Absence of a Typical Golgi Apparatus in the Ancient Eukaryote Giardia lamblia*S⃞

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elias, Eliana V.; Quiroga, Rodrigo; Gottig, Natalia; Nakanishi, Hideki; Nash, Theodore E.; Neiman, Aaron; Lujan, Hugo D.

    2008-01-01

    Giardia is a eukaryotic protozoal parasite with unusual characteristics, such as the absence of a morphologically evident Golgi apparatus. Although both constitutive and regulated pathways for protein secretion are evident in Giardia, little is known about the mechanisms involved in vesicular docking and fusion. In higher eukaryotes, soluble N-ethylmaleimide-sensitive factor attachment protein receptors (SNAREs) of the vesicle-associated membrane protein and syntaxin families play essential roles in these processes. In this work we identified and characterized genes for 17 SNAREs in Giardia to define the minimal set of subcellular organelles present during growth and encystation, in particular the presence or not of a Golgi apparatus. Expression and localization of all Giardia SNAREs demonstrate their presence in distinct subcellular compartments, which may represent the extent of the endomembrane system in eukaryotes. Remarkably, Giardia SNAREs, homologous to Golgi SNAREs from other organisms, do not allow the detection of a typical Golgi apparatus in either proliferating or differentiating trophozoites. However, some features of the Golgi, such as the packaging and sorting function, seem to be performed by the endoplasmic reticulum and/or the nuclear envelope. Moreover, depletion of individual genes demonstrated that several SNAREs are essential for viability, whereas others are dispensable. Thus, Giardia requires a smaller number of SNAREs compared with other eukaryotes to accomplish all of the vesicle trafficking events that are critical for the growth and differentiation of this important human pathogen. PMID:18930915

  9. The t-SNAREs syntaxin4 and SNAP23 but not v-SNARE VAMP2 are indispensable to tether GLUT4 vesicles at the plasma membrane in adipocyte

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kawaguchi, Takayuki [Division of Diabetes, Metabolism, and Endocrinology, Department of Internal Medicine, Kobe University Graduate School of Medicine (Japan); Tamori, Yoshikazu, E-mail: tamori@med.kobe-u.ac.jp [Division of Diabetes, Metabolism, and Endocrinology, Department of Internal Medicine, Kobe University Graduate School of Medicine (Japan); Kanda, Hajime; Yoshikawa, Mari; Tateya, Sanshiro; Nishino, Naonobu [Division of Diabetes, Metabolism, and Endocrinology, Department of Internal Medicine, Kobe University Graduate School of Medicine (Japan); Kasuga, Masato [Research Institute, International Medical Center of Japan (Japan)

    2010-01-15

    SNARE proteins (VAMP2, syntaxin4, and SNAP23) have been thought to play a key role in GLUT4 trafficking by mediating the tethering, docking and subsequent fusion of GLUT4-containing vesicles with the plasma membrane. The precise functions of these proteins have remained elusive, however. We have now shown that depletion of the vesicle SNARE (v-SNARE) VAMP2 by RNA interference in 3T3-L1 adipocytes inhibited the fusion of GLUT4 vesicles with the plasma membrane but did not affect tethering of the vesicles to the membrane. In contrast, depletion of the target SNAREs (t-SNAREs) syntaxin4 or SNAP23 resulted in impairment of GLUT4 vesicle tethering to the plasma membrane. Our results indicate that the t-SNAREs syntaxin4 and SNAP23 are indispensable for the tethering of GLUT4 vesicles to the plasma membrane, whereas the v-SNARE VAMP2 is not required for this step but is essential for the subsequent fusion event.

  10. AQP2 exocytosis in the renal collecting duct -- involvement of SNARE isoforms and the regulatory role of Munc18b.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Procino, Giuseppe; Barbieri, Claudia; Tamma, Grazia; De Benedictis, Leonarda; Pessin, Jeffrey E; Svelto, Maria; Valenti, Giovanna

    2008-06-15

    Vasopressin regulates the fusion of the water channel aquaporin 2 (AQP2) to the apical membrane of the renal collecting-duct principal cells and several lines of evidence indicate that SNARE proteins mediate this process. In this work MCD4 renal cells were used to investigate the functional role of a set of Q- and R-SNAREs, together with that of Munc18b as a negative regulator of the formation of the SNARE complex. Both VAMP2 and VAMP3 were associated with immunoisolated AQP2 vesicles, whereas syntaxin 3 (Stx3), SNAP23 and Munc18 were associated with the apical plasma membrane. Co-immunoprecipitation experiments indicated that Stx3 forms complexes with VAMP2, VAMP3, SNAP23 and Munc18b. Protein knockdown coupled to apical surface biotinylation demonstrated that reduced levels of the R-SNAREs VAMP2 and VAMP3, and the Q-SNAREs Stx3 and SNAP23 strongly inhibited AQP2 fusion at the apical membrane. In addition, knockdown of Munc18b promoted a sevenfold increase of AQP2 fused at the plasma membrane without forskolin stimulation. Taken together these findings propose VAMP2, VAMP3, Stx3 and SNAP23 as the complementary set of SNAREs responsible for AQP2-vesicle fusion into the apical membrane, and Munc18b as a negative regulator of SNARE-complex formation in renal collecting-duct principal cells.

  11. Importance of the N-Terminal Domain of the Qb-SNARE Vti1p for Different Membrane Transport Steps in the Yeast Endosomal System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gossing, Michael; Chidambaram, Subbulakshmi; Fischer von Mollard, Gabriele

    2013-01-01

    SNAREs (soluble N-ethylmaleimide-sensitive factor attachment protein receptor) on transport vesicles and target membranes are crucial for vesicle targeting and fusion. They form SNARE complexes, which contain four α-helical SNARE motifs contributed by three or four different SNAREs. Most SNAREs function only in a single transport step. The yeast SNARE Vti1p participates in four distinct SNARE complexes in transport from the trans Golgi network to late endosomes, in transport to the vacuole, in retrograde transport from endosomes to the trans Golgi network and in retrograde transport within the Golgi. So far, all vti1 mutants investigated had mutations within the SNARE motif. Little is known about the function of the N-terminal domain of Vti1p, which forms a three helix bundle called Habc domain. Here we generated a temperature-sensitive mutant of this domain to study the effects on different transport steps. The secondary structure of wild type and vti1-3 Habc domain was analyzed by circular dichroism spectroscopy. The amino acid exchanges identified in the temperature-sensitive vti1-3 mutant caused unfolding of the Habc domain. Transport pathways were investigated by immunoprecipitation of newly synthesized proteins after pulse-chase labeling and by fluorescence microscopy of a GFP-tagged protein cycling between plasma membrane, early endosomes and Golgi. In vti1-3 cells transport to the late endosome and assembly of the late endosomal SNARE complex was blocked at 37°C. Retrograde transport to the trans Golgi network was affected while fusion with the vacuole was possible but slower. Steady state levels of SNARE complexes mediating these steps were less affected than that of the late endosomal SNARE complex. As different transport steps were affected our data demonstrate the importance of a folded Vti1p Habc domain for transport. PMID:23776654

  12. Importance of the N-terminal domain of the Qb-SNARE Vti1p for different membrane transport steps in the yeast endosomal system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gossing, Michael; Chidambaram, Subbulakshmi; Fischer von Mollard, Gabriele

    2013-01-01

    SNAREs (soluble N-ethylmaleimide-sensitive factor attachment protein receptor) on transport vesicles and target membranes are crucial for vesicle targeting and fusion. They form SNARE complexes, which contain four α-helical SNARE motifs contributed by three or four different SNAREs. Most SNAREs function only in a single transport step. The yeast SNARE Vti1p participates in four distinct SNARE complexes in transport from the trans Golgi network to late endosomes, in transport to the vacuole, in retrograde transport from endosomes to the trans Golgi network and in retrograde transport within the Golgi. So far, all vti1 mutants investigated had mutations within the SNARE motif. Little is known about the function of the N-terminal domain of Vti1p, which forms a three helix bundle called H(abc) domain. Here we generated a temperature-sensitive mutant of this domain to study the effects on different transport steps. The secondary structure of wild type and vti1-3 H(abc) domain was analyzed by circular dichroism spectroscopy. The amino acid exchanges identified in the temperature-sensitive vti1-3 mutant caused unfolding of the H(abc) domain. Transport pathways were investigated by immunoprecipitation of newly synthesized proteins after pulse-chase labeling and by fluorescence microscopy of a GFP-tagged protein cycling between plasma membrane, early endosomes and Golgi. In vti1-3 cells transport to the late endosome and assembly of the late endosomal SNARE complex was blocked at 37°C. Retrograde transport to the trans Golgi network was affected while fusion with the vacuole was possible but slower. Steady state levels of SNARE complexes mediating these steps were less affected than that of the late endosomal SNARE complex. As different transport steps were affected our data demonstrate the importance of a folded Vti1p H(abc) domain for transport.

  13. Importance of the N-terminal domain of the Qb-SNARE Vti1p for different membrane transport steps in the yeast endosomal system.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael Gossing

    Full Text Available SNAREs (soluble N-ethylmaleimide-sensitive factor attachment protein receptor on transport vesicles and target membranes are crucial for vesicle targeting and fusion. They form SNARE complexes, which contain four α-helical SNARE motifs contributed by three or four different SNAREs. Most SNAREs function only in a single transport step. The yeast SNARE Vti1p participates in four distinct SNARE complexes in transport from the trans Golgi network to late endosomes, in transport to the vacuole, in retrograde transport from endosomes to the trans Golgi network and in retrograde transport within the Golgi. So far, all vti1 mutants investigated had mutations within the SNARE motif. Little is known about the function of the N-terminal domain of Vti1p, which forms a three helix bundle called H(abc domain. Here we generated a temperature-sensitive mutant of this domain to study the effects on different transport steps. The secondary structure of wild type and vti1-3 H(abc domain was analyzed by circular dichroism spectroscopy. The amino acid exchanges identified in the temperature-sensitive vti1-3 mutant caused unfolding of the H(abc domain. Transport pathways were investigated by immunoprecipitation of newly synthesized proteins after pulse-chase labeling and by fluorescence microscopy of a GFP-tagged protein cycling between plasma membrane, early endosomes and Golgi. In vti1-3 cells transport to the late endosome and assembly of the late endosomal SNARE complex was blocked at 37°C. Retrograde transport to the trans Golgi network was affected while fusion with the vacuole was possible but slower. Steady state levels of SNARE complexes mediating these steps were less affected than that of the late endosomal SNARE complex. As different transport steps were affected our data demonstrate the importance of a folded Vti1p H(abc domain for transport.

  14. Capture and release of partially zipped trans-SNARE complexes on intact organelles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwartz, Matthew L; Merz, Alexey J

    2009-05-04

    Soluble N-ethyl-maleimide sensitive fusion protein attachment protein receptors (SNAREs) are hypothesized to trigger membrane fusion by complexing in trans through their membrane-distal N termini and zippering toward their membrane-embedded C termini, which in turn drives the two membranes together. In this study, we use a set of truncated SNAREs to trap kinetically stable, partially zipped trans-SNARE complexes on intact organelles in the absence of hemifusion and content mixing. We show that the C-terminal zippering of SNARE cytoplasmic domains controls the onset of lipid mixing but not the subsequent transition from hemifusion to full fusion. Moreover, we find that a partially zipped nonfusogenic trans-complex is rescued by Sec17, a universal SNARE cochaperone. Rescue occurs independently of the Sec17-binding partner Sec18, and it exhibits steep cooperativity, indicating that Sec17 engages multiple stalled trans-complexes to drive fusion. These experiments delineate distinct functions within the trans-complex, provide a straightforward method to trap and study prefusion complexes on native membranes, and reveal that Sec17 can rescue a stalled, partially zipped trans-complex.

  15. Phylogeny of the SNARE vesicle fusion machinery yields insights into the conservation of the secretory pathway in fungi.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kienle, Nickias; Kloepper, Tobias H; Fasshauer, Dirk

    2009-01-23

    In eukaryotic cells, directional transport between different compartments of the endomembrane system is mediated by vesicles that bud from a donor organelle and then fuse with an acceptor organelle. A family of integral membrane proteins, termed soluble N-ethylmaleimide-sensitive factor attachment receptor (SNARE) proteins, constitute the key machineries of these different membrane fusion events. Over the past 30 years, the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae has served as a powerful model organism for studying the organization of the secretory and endocytic pathways, and a few years ago, its entire set of SNAREs was compiled. Here, we make use of the increasing amount of genomic data to investigate the history of the SNARE family during fungi evolution. Moreover, since different SNARE family members are thought to demarcate different organelles and vesicles, this approach allowed us to compare the organization of the endomembrane systems of yeast and animal cells. Our data corroborate the notion that fungi generally encompass a relatively simple set of SNARE proteins, mostly comprising the SNAREs of the proto-eukaryotic cell. However, all fungi contain a novel soluble SNARE protein, Vam7, which carries an N-terminal PX-domain that acts as a phosphoinositide binding module. In addition, the points in fungal evolution, at which lineage-specific duplications and diversifications occurred, could be determined. For instance, the endosomal syntaxins Pep12 and Vam3 arose from a gene duplication that occurred within the Saccharomycotina clade. Although the SNARE repertoire of baker's yeast is highly conserved, our analysis reveals that it is more deviated than the ones of basal fungi. This highlights that the trafficking pathways of baker's yeast are not only different to those in animal cells but also are somewhat different to those of many other fungi.

  16. Phylogeny of the SNARE vesicle fusion machinery yields insights into the conservation of the secretory pathway in fungi

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fasshauer Dirk

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In eukaryotic cells, directional transport between different compartments of the endomembrane system is mediated by vesicles that bud from a donor organelle and then fuse with an acceptor organelle. A family of integral membrane proteins, termed soluble N-ethylmaleimide-sensitive factor attachment receptor (SNARE proteins, constitute the key machineries of these different membrane fusion events. Over the past 30 years, the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae has served as a powerful model organism for studying the organization of the secretory and endocytic pathways, and a few years ago, its entire set of SNAREs was compiled. Results Here, we make use of the increasing amount of genomic data to investigate the history of the SNARE family during fungi evolution. Moreover, since different SNARE family members are thought to demarcate different organelles and vesicles, this approach allowed us to compare the organization of the endomembrane systems of yeast and animal cells. Our data corroborate the notion that fungi generally encompass a relatively simple set of SNARE proteins, mostly comprising the SNAREs of the proto-eukaryotic cell. However, all fungi contain a novel soluble SNARE protein, Vam7, which carries an N-terminal PX-domain that acts as a phosphoinositide binding module. In addition, the points in fungal evolution, at which lineage-specific duplications and diversifications occurred, could be determined. For instance, the endosomal syntaxins Pep12 and Vam3 arose from a gene duplication that occurred within the Saccharomycotina clade. Conclusion Although the SNARE repertoire of baker's yeast is highly conserved, our analysis reveals that it is more deviated than the ones of basal fungi. This highlights that the trafficking pathways of baker's yeast are not only different to those in animal cells but also are somewhat different to those of many other fungi.

  17. The cis-acting CTTC-P1BS module is indicative for gene function of LjVTI12, a Qb-SNARE protein gene that is required for arbuscule formation in Lotus japonicus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lota, Frédéric; Wegmüller, Sarah; Buer, Benjamin; Sato, Shusei; Bräutigam, Andrea; Hanf, Benjamin; Bucher, Marcel

    2013-04-01

    The majority of land plants live in symbiosis with arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi from the phylum Glomeromycota. This symbiosis improves acquisition of phosphorus (P) by the host plant in exchange for carbohydrates, especially under low-P availability. The symbiosome, constituted by root cortex cells accommodating arbuscular mycorrhizal fungal hyphae, is the site at which bi-directional exchange of nutrients and metabolites takes place. Uptake of orthophosphate (Pi) in the symbiosome is facilitated by mycorrhiza-specific plant Pi transporters. Modifications of the potato Pi transporter 3 (StPT3) promoter were analysed in transgenic mycorrhizal roots, and it was found that the CTTC cis-regulatory element is necessary and sufficient for a transcriptional response to fungal colonization under low-Pi conditions. Phylogenetic footprinting also revealed binary combination of the CTTC element with the Pi starvation response-associated PHR1-binding site (P1BS) in the promoters of several mycorrhiza-specific Pi transporter genes. Scanning of the Lotus japonicus genome for gene promoters containing both cis-regulatory elements revealed a strong over-representation of genes involved in transport processes. One of these, LjVTI12, encoding a member of the SNARE family of proteins involved in membrane transport, exhibited enhanced transcript levels in Lotus roots colonized with the arbuscular mycorrhizal fungus Glomus intraradices. Down-regulation of LjVTI12 by RNA interference resulted in a mycorrhiza-specific phenotype characterized by distorted arbuscule morphology. The results highlight cooperative cis-regulation which integrates mycorrhiza and Pi starvation signaling with vesicle trafficking in symbiosome development.

  18. The SNARE Sec22b has a non-fusogenic function in plasma membrane expansion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petkovic, Maja; Jemaiel, Aymen; Daste, Frédéric; Specht, Christian G; Izeddin, Ignacio; Vorkel, Daniela; Verbavatz, Jean-Marc; Darzacq, Xavier; Triller, Antoine; Pfenninger, Karl H; Tareste, David; Jackson, Catherine L; Galli, Thierry

    2014-05-01

    Development of the nervous system requires extensive axonal and dendritic growth during which neurons massively increase their surface area. Here we report that the endoplasmic reticulum (ER)-resident SNARE Sec22b has a conserved non-fusogenic function in plasma membrane expansion. Sec22b is closely apposed to the plasma membrane SNARE syntaxin1. Sec22b forms a trans-SNARE complex with syntaxin1 that does not include SNAP23/25/29, and does not mediate fusion. Insertion of a long rigid linker between the SNARE and transmembrane domains of Sec22b extends the distance between the ER and plasma membrane, and impairs neurite growth but not the secretion of VSV-G. In yeast, Sec22 interacts with lipid transfer proteins, and inhibition of Sec22 leads to defects in lipid metabolism at contact sites between the ER and plasma membrane. These results suggest that close apposition of the ER and plasma membrane mediated by Sec22 and plasma membrane syntaxins generates a non-fusogenic SNARE bridge contributing to plasma membrane expansion, probably through non-vesicular lipid transfer.

  19. Involvement of complexin 2 in docking, locking and unlocking of different SNARE complexes during sperm capacitation and induced acrosomal exocytosis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pei-Shiue J Tsai

    Full Text Available Acrosomal exocytosis (AE is an intracellular multipoint fusion reaction of the sperm plasma membrane (PM with the outer acrosomal membrane (OAM. This unique exocytotic event enables the penetration of the sperm through the zona pellucida of the oocyte. We previously observed a stable docking of OAM to the PM brought about by the formation of the trans-SNARE complex (syntaxin 1B, SNAP 23 and VAMP 3. By using electron microscopy, immunochemistry and immunofluorescence techniques in combination with functional studies and proteomic approaches, we here demonstrate that calcium ionophore-induced AE results in the formation of unilamellar hybrid membrane vesicles containing a mixture of components originating from the two fused membranes. These mixed vesicles (MV do not contain the earlier reported trimeric SNARE complex but instead possess a novel trimeric SNARE complex that contained syntaxin 3, SNAP 23 and VAMP 2, with an additional SNARE interacting protein, complexin 2. Our data indicate that the earlier reported raft and capacitation-dependent docking phenomenon between the PM and OAM allows a specific rearrangement of molecules between the two docked membranes and is involved in (1 recruiting SNAREs and complexin 2 in the newly formed lipid-ordered microdomains, (2 the assembly of a fusion-driving SNARE complex which executes Ca(2+-dependent AE, (3 the disassembly of the earlier reported docking SNARE complex, (4 the recruitment of secondary zona binding proteins at the zona interacting sperm surface. The possibility to study separate and dynamic interactions between SNARE proteins, complexin and Ca(2+ which are all involved in AE make sperm an ideal model for studying exocytosis.

  20. Munc18-1 mutations that strongly impair SNARE-complex binding support normal synaptic transmission.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meijer, Marieke; Burkhardt, Pawel; de Wit, Heidi; Toonen, Ruud F; Fasshauer, Dirk; Verhage, Matthijs

    2012-05-02

    Synaptic transmission depends critically on the Sec1p/Munc18 protein Munc18-1, but it is unclear whether Munc18-1 primarily operates as a integral part of the fusion machinery or has a more upstream role in fusion complex assembly. Here, we show that point mutations in Munc18-1 that interfere with binding to the free Syntaxin1a N-terminus and strongly impair binding to assembled SNARE complexes all support normal docking, priming and fusion of synaptic vesicles, and normal synaptic plasticity in munc18-1 null mutant neurons. These data support a prevailing role of Munc18-1 before/during SNARE-complex assembly, while its continued association to assembled SNARE complexes is dispensable for synaptic transmission.

  1. WNK4 inhibits plasma membrane targeting of NCC through regulation of syntaxin13 SNARE formation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chung, Woo Young; Park, Hyun Woo; Han, Jung Woo; Lee, Min Goo; Kim, Joo Young

    2013-12-01

    WNK4, a serine/threonine kinase, plays a critical role in the expression of membrane proteins in the cell surface; however, the underlying mechanism of WNK4 is not clear. Here, we demonstrate that WNK4 inhibits the fusion of plasma membrane delivering vesicle with sorting/recycling endosome through disrupting SNARE formation of syntaxin13, an endosomal t-SNARE and VAMP2, the v-SNARE in plasma membrane delivering vesicle. Their interaction and co-localization were enhanced by hyperosmotic stimulation which is known for WNK4 activation. The kinase domain of WNK4 interacts with the transmembrane domain (TM) of syntaxin13 and this interaction was abolished when the TM was replaced with that of syntaxin16. Interestingly, cell fractionation using sucrose gradients revealed that WNK4 inhibited the formation of the syntaxin13/VAMP2 SNARE complex in the endosomal compartment, but not syntaxin16/VAMP2 or syntaxin13/VAMP7. Syntaxin13 was not phosphorylated by WNK4 and WNK4KI also showed the same binding strength and similar inhibitory regulation on SNARE formation of syntaxin13. Physiological relevance of this mechanism was proved with the expression of NCC (Na(+) C1(-) co-transporter) in the cell surface. The inhibiting activity of WNK4 on surface expression of NCC was abolished by syntaxin13 siRNA transfection. These results suggest that WNK4 attenuates PM targeting of NCC proteins through regulation of syntaxin13 SNARE complex formation with VAMP2 in recycling and sorting endosome. © 2013.

  2. Silencing of the SNARE protein NAPA sensitizes cancer cells to cisplatin by inducing ERK1/2 signaling, synoviolin ubiquitination and p53 accumulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Zchong-Zcho; Sun, Nian-Kang; Chien, Kun-Yi; Chao, Chuck C-K

    2011-12-01

    We found earlier that NAPA represents an anti-apoptotic protein that promotes resistance to cisplatin in cancer cells by inducing the degradation of the tumor suppressor p53. In the present study, we investigated the cellular mechanism underlying the degradation of p53 by NAPA. Knockdown of NAPA using short-hairpin RNA was shown to induce p53 accumulation and to sensitize HEK293 cells to cisplatin. On the other hand, this sensitization effect was not found in H1299 lung carcinoma cells which lack p53. Expression of exogenous p53 in H1299 cells was increased following knockdown of NAPA and these cells showed increased sensitivity to cisplatin-induced apoptosis. Notably, knockdown of NAPA induced the ubiquitination and degradation of the E3 ubiquitin ligase synoviolin and the accumulation of p53 in unstressed HEK293 cells. Conversely, NAPA overexpression decreased the ubiquitination and degradation of synoviolin, and reduced p53 protein level. Knockdown of NAPA disrupted the interaction between synoviolin and proteins that form the endoplasmic reticulum-associated degradation (ERAD) complex and in turn decreased the ability of this complex to ubiquitinate p53. In addition, knockdown of NAPA induced the activation of the MAPK kinases ERK, JNK and p38, but only inhibition of ERK reduced synoviolin ubiquitination and p53 accumulation. These results indicate that NAPA promotes resistance to cisplatin through synoviolin and the ERAD complex which together induce the degradation of p53 and thus prevent apoptosis. Based on these findings, we propose that the combination of cisplatin and knockdown of NAPA represents a novel and attractive strategy to eradicate p53-sensitive cancer cells.

  3. Complexin Cross-links Prefusion SNAREs into a Zigzag Array

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    D Kummel; S Krishnakumar; D Radoff; F Li; C Giraudo; F Pincet; J Rothman; K Reinsch

    2011-12-31

    Complexin prevents SNAREs from releasing neurotransmitters until an action potential arrives at the synapse. To understand the mechanism for this inhibition, we determined the structure of complexin bound to a mimetic of a prefusion SNAREpin lacking the portion of the v-SNARE that zippers last to trigger fusion. The 'central helix' of complexin is anchored to one SNARE complex, while its 'accessory helix' extends away at {approx}45{sup o} and bridges to a second complex, occupying the vacant v-SNARE binding site to inhibit fusion. We expected the accessory helix to compete with the v-SNARE for t-SNARE binding but found instead that the interaction occurs intermolecularly. Thus, complexin organizes the SNAREs into a zigzag topology that, when interposed between the vesicle and plasma membranes, is incompatible with fusion.

  4. Complexin cross-links prefusion SNAREs into a zigzag array

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kümmel, Daniel; Krishnakumar, Shyam S.; Radoff, Daniel T.; Li, Feng; Giraudo, Claudio G.; Pincet, Frederic; Rothman, James E.; Reinisch, Karin M. (Yale-MED)

    2011-09-20

    Complexin prevents SNAREs from releasing neurotransmitters until an action potential arrives at the synapse. To understand the mechanism for this inhibition, we determined the structure of complexin bound to a mimetic of a prefusion SNAREpin lacking the portion of the v-SNARE that zippers last to trigger fusion. The 'central helix' of complexin is anchored to one SNARE complex, while its 'accessory helix' extends away at {approx}45 deg. and bridges to a second complex, occupying the vacant v-SNARE binding site to inhibit fusion. We expected the accessory helix to compete with the v-SNARE for t-SNARE binding but found instead that the interaction occurs intermolecularly. Thus, complexin organizes the SNAREs into a zigzag topology that, when interposed between the vesicle and plasma membranes, is incompatible with fusion.

  5. Esbern Snare og hans borg i Kalundborg

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Lars Meldgaard Sass; Roesdahl, Else

    2014-01-01

    Discussion of the person Esbern Snare and his time and of the complicated building history of the western castle (Vestborgen) in Kalundborg. Some buildings formerly attributed to Esbern were probably erected by his daughter and son in law, the presumed builders of also the town's great five-tower...

  6. Esbern Snare og hans borg i Kalundborg

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Lars Meldgaard Sass; Roesdahl, Else

    2014-01-01

    Discussion of the person Esbern Snare and his time and of the complicated building history of the western castle (Vestborgen) in Kalundborg. Some buildings formerly attributed to Esbern were probably erected by his daughter and son in law, the presumed builders of also the town's great five-tower...

  7. Cysteine residues of SNAP-25 are required for SNARE disassembly and exocytosis, but not for membrane targeting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Washbourne, P; Cansino, V; Mathews, J R; Graham, M; Burgoyne, R D; Wilson, M C

    2001-08-01

    The release of neurotransmitter at a synapse occurs via the regulated fusion of synaptic vesicles with the plasma membrane. The fusion of the two lipid bilayers is mediated by a protein complex that includes the plasma membrane target soluble N-ethylmaleimide-sensitive fusion protein (NSF) attachment protein (SNAP) receptors (t-SNAREs), syntaxin 1A and synaptosome-associated protein of 25 kDa (SNAP-25), and the vesicle SNARE (v-SNARE), vesicle-associated membrane protein (VAMP). Whereas syntaxin 1A and VAMP are tethered to the membrane by a C-terminal transmembrane domain, SNAP-25 has been suggested to be anchored to the membrane via four palmitoylated cysteine residues. We demonstrate that the cysteine residues of SNAP-25 are not required for membrane localization when syntaxin 1A is present. Analysis of the 7 S and 20 S complexes formed by mutants that lack cysteine residues demonstrates that the cysteines are required for efficient SNARE complex dissociation. Furthermore, these mutants are unable to support exocytosis, as demonstrated by a PC12 cell secretion assay. We hypothesize that syntaxin 1A serves to direct newly synthesized SNAP-25 through the Golgi transport pathway to the axons and synapses, and that palmitoylation of cysteine residues is not required for targeting, but to optimize interactions required for SNARE complex dissociation.

  8. Snapin mediates insulin secretory granule docking, but not trans-SNARE complex formation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Somanath, Sangeeta [Blizard Institute, Barts and the London School of Medicine and Dentistry, Queen Mary University of London, London, E1 2AT (United Kingdom); Partridge, Christopher J. [Diabetes Research Laboratories, Oxford Centre for Diabetes, Endocrinology and Churchill Hospital, University of Oxford, Oxford, OX3 7LJ (United Kingdom); Marshall, Catriona [Blizard Institute, Barts and the London School of Medicine and Dentistry, Queen Mary University of London, London, E1 2AT (United Kingdom); Rowe, Tony [CSL Limited, 45 Poplar Road, Parkville, Victoria 3052 (Australia); Turner, Mark D., E-mail: mark.turner@ntu.ac.uk [Interdisciplinary Biomedical Research Centre, School of Science and Technology, Nottingham Trent University, Nottingham, NG11 8NS (United Kingdom)

    2016-04-29

    Secretory granule exocytosis is a tightly regulated process requiring granule targeting, tethering, priming, and membrane fusion. At the heart of this process is the SNARE complex, which drives fusion through a coiled-coil zippering effect mediated by the granule v-SNARE protein, VAMP2, and the plasma membrane t-SNAREs, SNAP-25 and syntaxin-1A. Here we demonstrate that in pancreatic β-cells the SNAP-25 accessory protein, snapin, C-terminal H2 domain binds SNAP-25 through its N-terminal Sn-1 domain. Interestingly whilst snapin binds SNAP-25, there is only modest binding of this complex with syntaxin-1A under resting conditions. Instead synataxin-1A appears to be recruited in response to secretory stimulation. These results indicate that snapin plays a role in tethering insulin granules to the plasma membrane through coiled coil interaction of snapin with SNAP-25, with full granule fusion competency only resulting after subsequent syntaxin-1A recruitment triggered by secretory stimulation. - Highlights: • Snapin mediates granule docking. • Snapin binds SNAP-25. • SNARE complex forms downstream.

  9. Localization of plasma membrane t-SNAREs syntaxin 2 and 3 in intracellular compartments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kuismanen Esa

    2005-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Membrane fusion requires the formation of a complex between a vesicle protein (v-SNARE and the target membrane proteins (t-SNAREs. Syntaxin 2 and 3 are t-SNAREs that, according to previous over-expression studies, are predominantly localized at the plasma membrane. In the present study we investigated localization of the endogenous syntaxin 2 and 3. Results Endogenous syntaxin 2 and 3 were found in NRK cells in intracellular vesicular structures in addition to regions of the plasma membrane. Treatment of these cells with N-ethylmaleimide (NEM, which is known to inactivate membrane fusion, caused syntaxin 3 to accumulate in the trans-Golgi network and syntaxin 2 in perinuclear membrane vesicles. Kinetic analysis in the presence of NEM indicated that this redistribution of syntaxin 2 and 3 takes place via actin containing structures. Conclusion Our data suggest that syntaxin 2 cycles between the plasma membrane and the perinuclear compartment whereas syntaxin 3 cycles between the plasma membrane and the trans-Golgi network. It is possible that this cycling has an important role in the regulation of t-SNARE function.

  10. Sequence-specific conformational flexibility of SNARE transmembrane helices probed by hydrogen/deuterium exchange.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stelzer, Walter; Poschner, Bernhard C; Stalz, Holger; Heck, Albert J; Langosch, Dieter

    2008-08-01

    SNARE proteins mediate fusion of intracellular eukaryotic membranes and their alpha-helical transmembrane domains are known to contribute to lipid bilayer mixing. Synthetic transmembrane domain peptides were previously shown to mimic the function of SNARE proteins in that they trigger liposome fusion in a sequence-specific fashion. Here, we performed a detailed investigation of the conformational dynamics of the transmembrane helices of the presynaptic SNAREs synaptobrevin II and syntaxin 1a. To this end, we recorded deuterium/hydrogen-exchange kinetics in isotropic solution as well as in the membrane-embedded state. In solution, the exchange kinetics of each peptide can be described by three different classes of amide deuteriums that exchange with different rate constants. These are likely to originate from exchange at different domains of the helices. Interestingly, the rate constants of each class vary with the TMD sequence. Thus, the exchange rate is position-specific and sequence-specific. Further, the rate constants correlate with the previously determined membrane fusogenicities. In membranes, exchange is retarded and a significant proportion of amide hydrogens are protected from exchange. We conclude that the conformational dynamics of SNARE TMD helices is mechanistically linked to their ability to drive lipid mixing.

  11. Architecture of the Synaptotagmin-SNARE Machinery for Neuronal Exocytosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Qiangjun; Lai, Ying; Bacaj, Taulant; Zhao, Minglei; Lyubimov, Artem Y.; Uervirojnangkoorn, Monarin; Zeldin, Oliver B.; Brewster, Aaron S.; Sauter, Nicholas K.; Cohen, Aina E.; Soltis, S. Michael; Alonso-Mori, Roberto; Chollet, Matthieu; Lemke, Henrik T.; Pfuetzner, Richard A.; Choi, Ucheor B.; Weis, William I.; Diao, Jiajie; Südhof, Thomas C.; Brunger, Axel T.

    2015-01-01

    Summary Synaptotagmin-1 and neuronal SNARE proteins play key roles in evoked synchronous neurotransmitter release. However, it is unknown how they cooperate to trigger synaptic vesicle fusion. Here we report atomic-resolution crystal structures of Ca2+- and Mg2+-bound complexes between synaptotagmin-1 and the neuronal SNARE complex, one of which was determined with diffraction data from an X-ray free electron laser, leading to an atomic-resolution structure with accurate rotamer assignments for many sidechains. The structures revealed several interfaces, including a large, specific, Ca2+-independent, and conserved interface. Tests of this interface by mutagenesis suggest that it is essential for Ca2+-triggered neurotransmitter release in neuronal synapses and for Ca2+-triggered vesicle fusion in a reconstituted system. We propose that this interface forms prior to Ca2+-triggering, and moves en bloc as Ca2+ influx promotes the interactions between synaptotagmin-1 and the plasma membrane, and consequently remodels the membrane to promote fusion, possibly in conjunction with other interfaces. PMID:26280336

  12. AQP2 exocytosis in the renal collecting duct – involvement of SNARE isoforms and the regulatory role of Munc18b

    Science.gov (United States)

    Procino, Giuseppe; Barbieri, Claudia; Tamma, Grazia; De Benedictis, Leonarda; Pessin, Jeffrey E.; Svelto, Maria; Valenti, Giovanna

    2015-01-01

    Summary Vasopressin regulates the fusion of the water channel aquaporin 2 (AQP2) to the apical membrane of the renal collecting-duct principal cells and several lines of evidence indicate that SNARE proteins mediate this process. In this work MCD4 renal cells were used to investigate the functional role of a set of Q- and R-SNAREs, together with that of Munc18b as a negative regulator of the formation of the SNARE complex. Both VAMP2 and VAMP3 were associated with immunoisolated AQP2 vesicles, whereas syntaxin 3 (Stx3), SNAP23 and Munc18 were associated with the apical plasma membrane. Co-immunoprecipitation experiments indicated that Stx3 forms complexes with VAMP2, VAMP3, SNAP23 and Munc18b. Protein knockdown coupled to apical surface biotinylation demonstrated that reduced levels of the R-SNAREs VAMP2 and VAMP3, and the Q-SNAREs Stx3 and SNAP23 strongly inhibited AQP2 fusion at the apical membrane. In addition, knockdown of Munc18b promoted a sevenfold increase of AQP2 fused at the plasma membrane without forskolin stimulation. Taken together these findings propose VAMP2, VAMP3, Stx3 and SNAP23 as the complementary set of SNAREs responsible for AQP2-vesicle fusion into the apical membrane, and Munc18b as a negative regulator of SNARE-complex formation in renal collecting-duct principal cells. PMID:18505797

  13. ER-associated SNAREs and Sey1p mediate nuclear fusion at two distinct steps during yeast mating.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rogers, Jason V; Arlow, Tim; Inkellis, Elizabeth R; Koo, Timothy S; Rose, Mark D

    2013-12-01

    During yeast mating, two haploid nuclei fuse membranes to form a single diploid nucleus. However, the known proteins required for nuclear fusion are unlikely to function as direct fusogens (i.e., they are unlikely to directly catalyze lipid bilayer fusion) based on their predicted structure and localization. Therefore we screened known fusogens from vesicle trafficking (soluble N-ethylmaleimide-sensitive factor attachment protein receptors [SNAREs]) and homotypic endoplasmic reticulum (ER) fusion (Sey1p) for additional roles in nuclear fusion. Here we demonstrate that the ER-localized SNAREs Sec20p, Ufe1p, Use1p, and Bos1p are required for efficient nuclear fusion. In contrast, Sey1p is required indirectly for nuclear fusion; sey1Δ zygotes accumulate ER at the zone of cell fusion, causing a block in nuclear congression. However, double mutants of Sey1p and Sec20p, Ufe1p, or Use1p, but not Bos1p, display extreme ER morphology defects, worse than either single mutant, suggesting that retrograde SNAREs fuse ER in the absence of Sey1p. Together these data demonstrate that SNAREs mediate nuclear fusion, ER fusion after cell fusion is necessary to complete nuclear congression, and there exists a SNARE-mediated, Sey1p-independent ER fusion pathway.

  14. Binding of SEC11 indicates its role in SNARE recycling after vesicle fusion and identifies two pathways for vesicular traffic to the plasma membrane.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karnik, Rucha; Zhang, Ben; Waghmare, Sakharam; Aderhold, Christin; Grefen, Christopher; Blatt, Michael R

    2015-03-01

    SNARE (soluble N-ethylmaleimide-sensitive factor attachment protein receptor) proteins drive vesicle fusion in all eukaryotes and contribute to homeostasis, pathogen defense, cell expansion, and growth in plants. Two homologous SNAREs, SYP121 (=SYR1/PEN1) and SYP122, dominate secretory traffic to the Arabidopsis thaliana plasma membrane. Although these proteins overlap functionally, differences between SYP121 and SYP122 have surfaced, suggesting that they mark two discrete pathways for vesicular traffic. The SNAREs share primary cognate partners, which has made separating their respective control mechanisms difficult. Here, we show that the regulatory protein SEC11 (=KEULE) binds selectively with SYP121 to affect secretory traffic mediated by this SNARE. SEC11 rescued traffic block by dominant-negative (inhibitory) fragments of both SNAREs, but only in plants expressing the native SYP121. Traffic and its rescue were sensitive to mutations affecting SEC11 interaction with the N terminus of SYP121. Furthermore, the domain of SEC11 that bound the SYP121 N terminus was itself able to block secretory traffic in the wild type and syp122 but not in syp121 mutant Arabidopsis. Thus, SEC11 binds and selectively regulates secretory traffic mediated by SYP121 and is important for recycling of the SNARE and its cognate partners.

  15. AQP2 exocytosis in the renal collecting duct -- involvement of SNARE isoforms and the regulatory role of Munc18b.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Procino, G.; Barbieri, C.; Tamma, G.; Benedictis, L De; Pessin, J.E.; Svelto, M.; Valenti, G.

    2008-01-01

    Vasopressin regulates the fusion of the water channel aquaporin 2 (AQP2) to the apical membrane of the renal collecting-duct principal cells and several lines of evidence indicate that SNARE proteins mediate this process. In this work MCD4 renal cells were used to investigate the functional role of

  16. Endobrevin/VAMP-8 is the primary v-SNARE for the platelet release reaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ren, Qiansheng; Barber, Holly Kalani; Crawford, Garland L; Karim, Zubair A; Zhao, Chunxia; Choi, Wangsun; Wang, Cheng-Chun; Hong, Wanjin; Whiteheart, Sidney W

    2007-01-01

    Platelet secretion is critical to hemostasis. Release of granular cargo is mediated by soluble NSF attachment protein receptors (SNAREs), but despite consensus on t-SNAREs usage, it is unclear which Vesicle Associated Membrane Protein (VAMPs: synaptobrevin/VAMP-2, cellubrevin/VAMP-3, TI-VAMP/VAMP-7, and endobrevin/VAMP-8) is required. We demonstrate that VAMP-8 is required for release from dense core granules, alpha granules, and lysosomes. Platelets from VAMP-8-/- mice have a significant defect in agonist-induced secretion, though signaling, morphology, and cargo levels appear normal. In contrast, VAMP-2+/-, VAMP-3-/-, and VAMP-2+/-/VAMP-3-/- platelets showed no defect. Consistently, tetanus toxin had no effect on secretion from permeabilized mouse VAMP-3-/- platelets or human platelets, despite cleavage of VAMP-2 and/or -3. Tetanus toxin does block the residual release from permeabilized VAMP-8-/- platelets, suggesting a secondary role for VAMP-2 and/or -3. These data imply a ranked redundancy of v-SNARE usage in platelets and suggest that VAMP-8-/- mice will be a useful in vivo model to study platelet exocytosis in hemostasis and vascular inflammation.

  17. Visualization of SNARE-Mediated Hemifusion between Giant Unilamellar Vesicles Arrested by Myricetin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heo, Paul; Park, Joon-Bum; Shin, Yeon-Kyun; Kweon, Dae-Hyuk

    2017-01-01

    Neurotransmitters are released within a millisecond after Ca2+ arrives at an active zone. However, the vesicle fusion pathway underlying this synchronous release is yet to be understood. At the center of controversy is whether hemifusion, in which outer leaflets are merged while inner leaflets are still separated, is an on-pathway or off-pathway product of Ca2+-triggered exocytosis. Using the single vesicle fusion assay, we recently demonstrated that hemifusion is an on-pathway intermediate that immediately proceeds to full fusion upon Ca2+ triggering. It has been shown that the flavonoid myricetin arrests soluble N-ethylmaleimide-sensitive factor (NSF) attachment protein receptor (SNARE)-mediated vesicle fusion at hemifusion, but that the hemifused vesicles spontaneously convert to full fusion when the myricetin clamp is removed by the enzyme laccase. In the present study, we visualized SNARE-mediated hemifusion between two SNARE-reconstituted giant unilamellar vesicles (GUVs) arrested by myricetin. The large size of the GUVs enabled us to directly image the hemifusion between them. When two merging GUVs were labeled with different fluorescent dyes, GUV pairs showed asymmetric fluorescence intensities depending on the position on the GUV pair consistent with what is expected for hemifusion. The flow of lipids from one vesicle to the other was revealed with fluorescence recovery after photobleaching (FRAP), indicating that the two membranes had hemifused. These results support the hypothesis that hemifusion may be the molecular status that primes Ca2+-triggered millisecond exocytosis. This study represents the first imaging of SNARE-driven hemifusion between GUVs. PMID:28408867

  18. The Structure of the Synaptic Vesicle-Plasma Membrane Interface Constrains SNARE Models of Rapid, Synchronous Exocytosis at Nerve Terminals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gundersen, Cameron B.

    2017-01-01

    Contemporary models of neurotransmitter release invoke direct or indirect interactions between the Ca2+ sensor, synaptotagmin and the incompletely zippered soluble, N-ethyl-maleimide-sensitive factor attachment protein receptor (SNARE) complex. However, recent electron microscopic (EM) investigations have raised pragmatic issues concerning the mechanism by which SNAREs trigger membrane fusion at nerve terminals. The first issue is related to the finding that the area of contact between a “fully primed” synaptic vesicle and the plasma membrane can exceed 600 nm2. Approximately four-thousands lipid molecules can inhabit this contact zone. Thus, renewed efforts will be needed to explain how the zippering of as few as two SNARE complexes mobilizes these lipids to achieve membrane fusion. The second issue emerges from the finding that “docking filaments” are sandwiched within the area of vesicle-plasma membrane contact. It is challenging to reconcile the location of these filaments with SNARE models of exocytosis. Instead, this commentary outlines how these data are more compatible with a model in which a cluster of synaptotagmins catalyzes exocytotic membrane fusion. PMID:28280457

  19. Development of a Single-Sampling Noninvasive Hair Snare

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bremner-Harrison, Samantha; Harrison, Stephen W. R.; Cypher, Brian L.

    2006-01-01

    multiple sampling, is cost-effective, easy to construct, and safe for target and nontarget species. Our initial field tests on endangered San Joaquin kit foxes (Vulpes macrotis mutica) and swift foxes (Vulpes velox) suggest that this hair snare may be effective in collecting uncontaminated samples for DNA......Noninvasive hair and fecal DNA sampling provides a means of collecting information on elusive species, while causing little or no disturbance. However, current methods of hair collection do not preclude multiple sampling, thus risking sample contamination. We developed a hair snare that prevents...

  20. Selective regulation of maize plasma membrane aquaporin trafficking and activity by the SNARE SYP121.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Besserer, Arnaud; Burnotte, Emeline; Bienert, Gerd Patrick; Chevalier, Adrien S; Errachid, Abdelmounaim; Grefen, Christopher; Blatt, Michael R; Chaumont, François

    2012-08-01

    Plasma membrane intrinsic proteins (PIPs) are aquaporins facilitating the diffusion of water through the cell membrane. We previously showed that the traffic of the maize (Zea mays) PIP2;5 to the plasma membrane is dependent on the endoplasmic reticulum diacidic export motif. Here, we report that the post-Golgi traffic and water channel activity of PIP2;5 are regulated by the SNARE (for soluble N-ethylmaleimide-sensitive factor protein attachment protein receptor) SYP121, a plasma membrane resident syntaxin involved in vesicle traffic, signaling, and regulation of K(+) channels. We demonstrate that the expression of the dominant-negative SYP121-Sp2 fragment in maize mesophyll protoplasts or epidermal cells leads to a decrease in the delivery of PIP2;5 to the plasma membrane. Protoplast and oocyte swelling assays showed that PIP2;5 water channel activity is negatively affected by SYP121-Sp2. A combination of in vitro (copurification assays) and in vivo (bimolecular fluorescence complementation, Förster resonance energy transfer, and yeast split-ubiquitin) approaches allowed us to demonstrate that SYP121 and PIP2;5 physically interact. Together with previous data demonstrating the role of SYP121 in regulating K(+) channel trafficking and activity, these results suggest that SYP121 SNARE contributes to the regulation of the cell osmotic homeostasis.

  1. Selective Regulation of Maize Plasma Membrane Aquaporin Trafficking and Activity by the SNARE SYP121[W

    Science.gov (United States)

    Besserer, Arnaud; Burnotte, Emeline; Bienert, Gerd Patrick; Chevalier, Adrien S.; Errachid, Abdelmounaim; Grefen, Christopher; Blatt, Michael R.; Chaumont, François

    2012-01-01

    Plasma membrane intrinsic proteins (PIPs) are aquaporins facilitating the diffusion of water through the cell membrane. We previously showed that the traffic of the maize (Zea mays) PIP2;5 to the plasma membrane is dependent on the endoplasmic reticulum diacidic export motif. Here, we report that the post-Golgi traffic and water channel activity of PIP2;5 are regulated by the SNARE (for soluble N-ethylmaleimide-sensitive factor protein attachment protein receptor) SYP121, a plasma membrane resident syntaxin involved in vesicle traffic, signaling, and regulation of K+ channels. We demonstrate that the expression of the dominant-negative SYP121-Sp2 fragment in maize mesophyll protoplasts or epidermal cells leads to a decrease in the delivery of PIP2;5 to the plasma membrane. Protoplast and oocyte swelling assays showed that PIP2;5 water channel activity is negatively affected by SYP121-Sp2. A combination of in vitro (copurification assays) and in vivo (bimolecular fluorescence complementation, Förster resonance energy transfer, and yeast split-ubiquitin) approaches allowed us to demonstrate that SYP121 and PIP2;5 physically interact. Together with previous data demonstrating the role of SYP121 in regulating K+ channel trafficking and activity, these results suggest that SYP121 SNARE contributes to the regulation of the cell osmotic homeostasis. PMID:22942383

  2. Secretory vesicle priming by CAPS is independent of its SNARE-binding MUN domain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen Truong, Cuc Quynh; Nestvogel, Dennis; Ratai, Olga; Schirra, Claudia; Stevens, David R; Brose, Nils; Rhee, JeongSeop; Rettig, Jens

    2014-11-06

    Priming of secretory vesicles is a prerequisite for their Ca(2+)-dependent fusion with the plasma membrane. The key vesicle priming proteins, Munc13s and CAPSs, are thought to mediate vesicle priming by regulating the conformation of the t-SNARE syntaxin, thereby facilitating SNARE complex assembly. Munc13s execute their priming function through their MUN domain. Given that the MUN domain of Ca(2+)-dependent activator protein for secretion (CAPS) also binds syntaxin, it was assumed that CAPSs prime vesicles through the same mechanism as Munc13s. We studied naturally occurring splice variants of CAPS2 in CAPS1/CAPS2-deficient cells and found that CAPS2 primes vesicles independently of its MUN domain. Instead, the pleckstrin homology domain of CAPS2 seemingly is essential for its priming function. Our findings indicate a priming mode for secretory vesicles. This process apparently requires membrane phospholipids, does not involve the binding or direct conformational regulation of syntaxin by MUN domains of CAPSs, and is therefore not redundant with Munc13 action.

  3. Secretory Vesicle Priming by CAPS Is Independent of Its SNARE-Binding MUN Domain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cuc Quynh Nguyen Truong

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Priming of secretory vesicles is a prerequisite for their Ca2+-dependent fusion with the plasma membrane. The key vesicle priming proteins, Munc13s and CAPSs, are thought to mediate vesicle priming by regulating the conformation of the t-SNARE syntaxin, thereby facilitating SNARE complex assembly. Munc13s execute their priming function through their MUN domain. Given that the MUN domain of Ca2+-dependent activator protein for secretion (CAPS also binds syntaxin, it was assumed that CAPSs prime vesicles through the same mechanism as Munc13s. We studied naturally occurring splice variants of CAPS2 in CAPS1/CAPS2-deficient cells and found that CAPS2 primes vesicles independently of its MUN domain. Instead, the pleckstrin homology domain of CAPS2 seemingly is essential for its priming function. Our findings indicate a priming mode for secretory vesicles. This process apparently requires membrane phospholipids, does not involve the binding or direct conformational regulation of syntaxin by MUN domains of CAPSs, and is therefore not redundant with Munc13 action.

  4. Inhibition of Calpains Protects Mn-Induced Neurotransmitter release disorders in Synaptosomes from Mice: Involvement of SNARE Complex and Synaptic Vesicle Fusion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Can; Xu, Bin; Ma, Zhuo; Liu, Chang; Deng, Yu; Liu, Wei; Xu, Zhao-Fa

    2017-06-16

    Overexposure to manganese (Mn) could disrupt neurotransmitter release via influencing the formation of SNARE complex, but the underlying mechanisms are still unclear. A previous study demonstrated that SNAP-25 is one of substrate of calpains. The current study investigated whether calpains were involved in Mn-induced disorder of SNARE complex. After mice were treated with Mn for 24 days, Mn deposition increased significantly in basal nuclei in Mn-treated and calpeptin pre-treated groups. Behaviorally, less time spent in the center of the area and decreased average velocity significantly in an open field test after 24 days of Mn exposure. With the increase in MnCl2 dosage, intracellular Ca(2+) increased significantly, but pretreatment with calpeptin caused a dose-dependent decrease in calpains activity. There were fragments of N-terminal of SNAP-25 protein appearance in Mn-treated groups, but it is decreased with pretreatment of calpeptin. FM1-43-labeled synaptic vesicles also provided evidence that the treatment with Mn resulted in increasing first and then decreasing, which was consistent with Glu release and the 80 kDa protein levels of SNARE complexes. In summary, Mn induced the disorder of neurotransmitter release through influencing the formation of SNARE complex via cleaving SNAP-25 by overactivation of calpains in vivo.

  5. Chromatographic purification of an insoluble histidine tag recombinant Ykt6p SNARE from Arabidopsis thaliana over-expressed in E. coli.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vincent, Patrick; Dieryck, Wilfrid; Maneta-Peyret, Lilly; Moreau, Patrick; Cassagne, Claude; Santarelli, Xavier

    2004-08-25

    In order to undertake in plant cell the study of the endoplasmic reticulum (ER)-Golgi apparatus (GA) protein and/or lipid vesicular transport pathway, expressed sequence tag (EST) coding for a homologue to the yeast soluble N-ethylmaleimide-sensitive factor attachment protein receptors (SNAREs) Ykt6p has been cloned in Arabidopsis thaliana by reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR). The corresponding protein was over-expressed as a recombinant histidine-tag (his-tag) protein in E. coli. Starting from one litter of culture, an ultrasonic homogenization was performed for cell disruption and after centrifugation the Arabidopsis Ykt6p SNARE present in inclusion bodies in the pellet was solubilized. After centrifugation, the clarified feedstock obtained was injected onto an immobilized metal affinity chromatography (IMAC) in presence of 6 M guanidine and on-column refolding was performed. Folded and subsequently purified (94% purity) recombinant protein was obtained with 82% of recovery.

  6. Feasibility of cold snare polypectomy in Japan: A pilot study

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yoji; Takeuchi; Takeshi; Yamashina; Noriko; Matsuura; Takashi; Ito; Mototsugu; Fujii; Kengo; Nagai; Fumi; Matsui; Tomofumi; Akasaka; Noboru; Hanaoka; Koji; Higashino; Hiroyasu; Iishi; Ryu; Ishihara; Henrik; Thorlacius; Noriya; Uedo

    2015-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the feasibility of cold snare polypectomy(CSP) in Japan.METHODS: The outcomes of 234 non-pedunculated polyps smaller than 10 mm in 61 patients who underwent CSP in a Japanese referral center were retrospectively analyzed. The cold snare polypectomies were performed by nine endoscopists with no prior experience in CSP using an electrosurgical snare without electrocautery.RESULTS: CSPs were completed for 232 of the 234 polyps. Two(0.9%) polyps could not be removed without electrocautery. Immediate postpolypectomy bleeding requiring endoscopic hemostasis occurred in eight lesions(3.4%; 95%CI: 1.1%-5.8%), but all were easily managed. The incidence of immediate bleeding after CSP for small polyps(6-9 mm) was significantly higher than that of diminutive polyps(≤ 5 mm; 15% vs 1%, respectively). Three(5%) patients complained of minor bleeding after the procedure but required no intervention. The incidence of delayed bleeding requiringendoscopic intervention was 0.0%(95%CI: 0.0%-1.7%). In total, 12% of the resected lesions could not be retrieved for pathological examination. Tumor involvement in the lateral margin could not be histologically assessed in 70(40%) lesions.CONCLUSION: CSP is feasible in Japan. However, immediate bleeding, retrieval failure and uncertain assessment of the lateral tumor margin should not be underestimated. Careful endoscopic diagnosis before and evaluation of the tumor residue after CSP are recommended when implementing CSP in Japan.

  7. RGS12 interacts with the SNARE-binding region of the Cav2.2 calcium channel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richman, Ryan W; Strock, Jesse; Hains, Melinda D; Cabanilla, Nory Jun; Lau, King-Kei; Siderovski, David P; Diversé-Pierluissi, María

    2005-01-14

    Activation of GABAB receptors in chick dorsal root ganglion (DRG) neurons inhibits the Cav2.2 calcium channel in both a voltage-dependent and voltage-independent manner. The voltage-independent inhibition requires activation of a tyrosine kinase that phosphorylates the alpha1 subunit of the channel and thereby recruits RGS12, a member of the "regulator of G protein signaling" (RGS) proteins. Here we report that RGS12 binds to the SNARE-binding or "synprint" region (amino acids 726-985) in loop II-III of the calcium channel alpha1 subunit. A recombinant protein encompassing the N-terminal PTB domain of RGS12 binds to the synprint region in protein overlay and surface plasmon resonance binding assays; this interaction is dependent on tyrosine phosphorylation and yet is within a sequence that differs from the canonical NPXY motif targeted by other PTB domains. In electrophysiological experiments, microinjection of DRG neurons with synprint-derived peptides containing the tyrosine residue Tyr-804 altered the rate of desensitization of neurotransmitter-mediated inhibition of the Cav2.2 calcium channel, whereas peptides centered about a second tyrosine residue, Tyr-815, were without effect. RGS12 from a DRG neuron lysate was precipitated using synprint peptides containing phosphorylated Tyr-804. The high degree of conservation of Tyr-804 in the SNARE-binding region of Cav2.1 and Cav2.2 calcium channels suggests that this region, in addition to the binding of SNARE proteins, is also important for determining the time course of the modulation of calcium current via tyrosine phosphorylation.

  8. Expression and subcellular localization of the Qa-SNARE syntaxin17 in human eosinophils

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Carmo, Lívia A.S.; Dias, Felipe F.; Malta, Kássia K.; Amaral, Kátia B. [Laboratory of Cellular Biology, Department of Biology, Federal University of Juiz de Fora, UFJF, Juiz de Fora, MG (Brazil); Shamri, Revital; Weller, Peter F. [Department of Medicine, Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA (United States); Melo, Rossana C.N., E-mail: rossana.melo@ufjf.edu.br [Laboratory of Cellular Biology, Department of Biology, Federal University of Juiz de Fora, UFJF, Juiz de Fora, MG (Brazil); Department of Medicine, Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA (United States)

    2015-10-01

    Background: SNARE members mediate membrane fusion during intracellular trafficking underlying innate and adaptive immune responses by different cells. However, little is known about the expression and function of these proteins in human eosinophils, cells involved in allergic, inflammatory and immunoregulatory responses. Here, we investigate the expression and distribution of the Qa-SNARE syntaxin17 (STX17) within human eosinophils isolated from the peripheral blood. Methods: Flow cytometry and a pre-embedding immunonanogold electron microscopy (EM) technique that combines optimal epitope preservation and secondary Fab-fragments of antibodies linked to 1.4 nm gold particles for optimal access to microdomains, were used to investigate STX17. Results: STX17 was detected within unstimulated eosinophils. Immunogold EM revealed STX17 on secretory granules and on granule-derived vesiculotubular transport carriers (Eosinophil Sombrero Vesicles-EoSVs). Quantitative EM analyses showed that 77.7% of the granules were positive for STX17 with a mean±SEM of 3.9±0.2 gold particles/granule. Labeling was present on both granule outer membranes and matrices while EoSVs showed clear membrane-associated labeling. STX17 was also present in secretory granules in eosinophils stimulated with the cytokine tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α) or the CC-chemokine ligand 11 CCL11 (eotaxin-1), stimuli that induce eosinophil degranulation. The number of secretory granules labeled for STX17 was significantly higher in CCL11 compared with the unstimulated group. The level of cell labeling did not change when unstimulated cells were compared with TNF-α-stimulated eosinophils. Conclusions: The present study clearly shows by immunanonogold EM that STX17 is localized in eosinophil secretory granules and transport vesicles and might be involved in the transport of granule-derived cargos. - Highlights: • First demonstration of the Qa-SNARE syntaxin-17 (STX17) in human eosinophils. • High

  9. Geology and geochronology of the Sub-Antarctic Snares Islands/Tini Heke, New Zealand

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Scott, JM; Turnbull, IM; Sagar, MW

    2015-01-01

    The first comprehensive geological map, a summary of lithologies and new radiogenic isotope data (U–Pb, Rb–Sr) are presented for crystalline rocks of the Sub-Antarctic Snares Islands/Tini Heke, 150 km south of Stewart Island. The main lithology is Snares Granite (c. 109 Ma from U–Pb dating of zir...

  10. Longins: a new evolutionary conserved VAMP family sharing a novel SNARE domain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Filippini, F; Rossi, V; Galli, T; Budillon, A; D'Urso, M; D'Esposito, M

    2001-07-01

    This article describes the discovery of a novel SNARE domain that might be involved in the regulation of membrane fusion. This domain is shared by a novel family of VAMPs called long VAMPs or longins. Members of this family are more conserved among eukaryotes than are classical VAMPs, possibly because of their underlying basic SNARE function.

  11. Fast Vesicle Fusion in Living Cells Requires at Least Three SNARE Complexes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mohrmann, Ralf; de Wit, Heidi; Verhage, Matthijs

    2010-01-01

    Exocytosis requires formation of SNARE complexes between vesicle- and target-membranes. Recent assessments in reduced model systems have produced divergent estimates of the number of SNARE complexes needed for fusion. Here, we used a titration approach to answer this question in intact, cultured ...

  12. TaSYP71, a Qc-SNARE, Contributes to Wheat Resistance against Puccinia striiformis f. sp. tritici

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Minjie eLiu

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available N-ethylmaleimide-sensitive factor attachment protein receptors (SNAREs are involved in plant resistance; however, the role of SYP71 in the regulation of plant–pathogen interactions is not well known. In this study, we characterized a plant-specific SNARE in wheat, TaSYP71, which contains a Qc-SNARE domain. Three homologues are localized on chromosome 1AL, 1BL and 1DL. Using Agrobacterium-mediated transient expression, TaSYP71 was localized to the plasma membrane in Nicotiana benthamiana. Quantitative real-time PCR assays revealed that TaSYP71 homologues was induced by NaCl, H2O2 stress and infection by virulent and avirulent Puccinia striiformis f. sp. tritici (Pst isolates. Heterologous expression of TaSYP71 in Schizosaccharomyces pombe elevated tolerance to H2O2. Meanwhile, H2O2 scavenging gene (TaCAT was downregulated in TaSYP71 silenced plants treated by H2O2 compared to that in control, which indicated that TaSYP71 enhanced tolerance to H2O2 stress possibly by influencing the expression of TaCAT to remove the excessive H2O2 accumulation. When TaSYP71 homologues were all silenced in wheat by the virus-induced gene silencing system, wheat plants were more susceptible to Pst, with larger infection area and more haustoria number, but the necrotic area of wheat mesophyll cells were larger, one possible explanation that minor contribution of resistance to Pst was insufficient to hinder pathogen extension when TaSYP71were silenced, and the necrotic area was enlarged accompanied with the pathogen growth. Of course, later cell death could not be excluded. In addition, the expression of pathogenesis-related genes were down-regulated in TaSYP71 silenced wheat plants. These results together suggest that TaSYP71 play a positive role in wheat defence against Pst.

  13. The Qb-SNARE Memb11 interacts specifically with Arf1 in the Golgi apparatus of Arabidopsis thaliana.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marais, Claireline; Wattelet-Boyer, Valérie; Bouyssou, Guillaume; Hocquellet, Agnès; Dupuy, Jean-William; Batailler, Brigitte; Brocard, Lysiane; Boutté, Yohann; Maneta-Peyret, Lilly; Moreau, Patrick

    2015-11-01

    The SNARE (soluble N-ethylmaleimide-sensitive factor attachment protein receptor) proteins are critical for the function of the secretory pathway. The SNARE Memb11 is involved in membrane trafficking at the ER-Golgi interface. The aim of the work was to decipher molecular mechanisms acting in Memb11-mediated ER-Golgi traffic. In mammalian cells, the orthologue of Memb11 (membrin) is potentially involved in the recruitment of the GTPase Arf1 at the Golgi membrane. However molecular mechanisms associated to Memb11 remain unknown in plants. Memb11 was detected mainly at the cis-Golgi and co-immunoprecipitated with Arf1, suggesting that Arf1 may interact with Memb11. This interaction of Memb11 with Arf1 at the Golgi was confirmed by in vivo BiFC (Bimolecular Fluorescence Complementation) experiments. This interaction was found to be specific to Memb11 as compared to either Memb12 or Sec22. Using a structural bioinformatic approach, several sequences in the N-ter part of Memb11 were hypothesized to be critical for this interaction and were tested by BiFC on corresponding mutants. Finally, by using both in vitro and in vivo approaches, we determined that only the GDP-bound form of Arf1 interacts with Memb11. Together, our results indicate that Memb11 interacts with the GDP-bound form of Arf1 in the Golgi apparatus.

  14. A new role for RINT-1 in SNARE complex assembly at the trans-Golgi network in coordination with the COG complex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arasaki, Kohei; Takagi, Daichi; Furuno, Akiko; Sohda, Miwa; Misumi, Yoshio; Wakana, Yuichi; Inoue, Hiroki; Tagaya, Mitsuo

    2013-09-01

    Docking and fusion of transport vesicles/carriers with the target membrane involve a tethering factor-mediated initial contact followed by soluble N-ethylmaleimide-sensitive factor attachment protein receptor (SNARE)-catalyzed membrane fusion. The multisubunit tethering CATCHR family complexes (Dsl1, COG, exocyst, and GARP complexes) share very low sequence homology among subunits despite likely evolving from a common ancestor and participate in fundamentally different membrane trafficking pathways. Yeast Tip20, as a subunit of the Dsl1 complex, has been implicated in retrograde transport from the Golgi apparatus to the endoplasmic reticulum. Our previous study showed that RINT-1, the mammalian counterpart of yeast Tip20, mediates the association of ZW10 (mammalian Dsl1) with endoplasmic reticulum-localized SNARE proteins. In the present study, we show that RINT-1 is also required for endosome-to-trans-Golgi network trafficking. RINT-1 uncomplexed with ZW10 interacts with the COG complex, another member of the CATCHR family complex, and regulates SNARE complex assembly at the trans-Golgi network. This additional role for RINT-1 may in part reflect adaptation to the demand for more diverse transport routes from endosomes to the trans-Golgi network in mammals compared with those in a unicellular organism, yeast. The present findings highlight a new role of RINT-1 in coordination with the COG complex.

  15. Doc2b promotes GLUT4 exocytosis by activating the SNARE-mediated fusion reaction in a calcium- and membrane bending-dependent manner.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Haijia; Rathore, Shailendra S; Davis, Eric M; Ouyang, Yan; Shen, Jingshi

    2013-04-01

    The glucose transporter GLUT4 plays a central role in maintaining body glucose homeostasis. On insulin stimulation, GLUT4-containing vesicles fuse with the plasma membrane, relocating GLUT4 from intracellular reservoirs to the cell surface to uptake excess blood glucose. The GLUT4 vesicle fusion reaction requires soluble N-ethylmaleimide-sensitive factor attachment protein receptors (SNAREs) as the core fusion engine and a group of regulatory proteins. In particular, the soluble C2-domain factor Doc2b plays a key role in GLUT4 vesicle fusion, but its molecular mechanism has been unclear. Here we reconstituted the SNARE-dependent GLUT4 vesicle fusion in a defined proteoliposome fusion system. We observed that Doc2b binds to GLUT4 exocytic SNAREs and potently accelerates the fusion kinetics in the presence of Ca(2+). The stimulatory activity of Doc2b requires intact Ca(2+)-binding sites on both the C2A and C2B domains. Using electron microscopy, we observed that Doc2b strongly bends the membrane bilayer, and this membrane-bending activity is essential to the stimulatory function of Doc2b in fusion. These results demonstrate that Doc2b promotes GLUT4 exocytosis by accelerating the SNARE-dependent fusion reaction by a Ca(2+)- and membrane bending-dependent mechanism. Of importance, certain features of Doc2b function appear to be distinct from how synaptotagmin-1 promotes synaptic neurotransmitter release, suggesting that exocytic Ca(2+) sensors may possess divergent mechanisms in regulating vesicle fusion.

  16. Giant endobronchial hamartoma resected by fiberoptic bronchoscopy electrosurgical snaring

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cavallari Vittorio

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Less than 1% of lung neoplasms are represented by benign tumors. Among these, hamartomas are the most common with an incidence between 0.025% and 0.32%. In relation to the localization, hamartomas are divided into intraparenchymal and endobronchial. Clinical manifestation of an endobronchial hamartoma (EH results from tracheobronchial obstruction or bleeding. Usually, EH localizes in large diameter bronchus. Endoscopic removal is usually recommended. Bronchotomy or parenchimal resection through thoracotomy should be reserved only for cases where the hamatoma cannot be approached through endoscopy, or when irreversible lung functional impairment occurred after prolonged airflow obstruction. Generally, when endoscopic approach is used, this is through rigid bronchoscopy, laser photocoagulation or mechanical resection. Here we present a giant EH occasionally diagnosed and treated by fiberoptic bronchoscopy electrosurgical snaring.

  17. NSF- and SNARE-mediated membrane fusion is required for nuclear envelope formation and completion of nuclear pore complex assembly in Xenopus laevis egg extracts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baur, Tina; Ramadan, Kristijan; Schlundt, Andreas; Kartenbeck, Jürgen; Meyer, Hemmo H

    2007-08-15

    Despite the progress in understanding nuclear envelope (NE) reformation after mitosis, it has remained unclear what drives the required membrane fusion and how exactly this is coordinated with nuclear pore complex (NPC) assembly. Here, we show that, like other intracellular fusion reactions, NE fusion in Xenopus laevis egg extracts is mediated by SNARE proteins that require activation by NSF. Antibodies against Xenopus NSF, depletion of NSF or the dominant-negative NSF(E329Q) variant specifically inhibited NE formation. Staging experiments further revealed that NSF was required until sealing of the envelope was completed. Moreover, excess exogenous alpha-SNAP that blocks SNARE function prevented membrane fusion and caused accumulation of non-flattened vesicles on the chromatin surface. Under these conditions, the nucleoporins Nup107 and gp210 were fully recruited, whereas assembly of FxFG-repeat-containing nucleoporins was blocked. Together, we define NSF- and SNARE-mediated membrane fusion events as essential steps during NE formation downstream of Nup107 recruitment, and upstream of membrane flattening and completion of NPC assembly.

  18. Transpapillary incision of refractory circumscript pancreatic duct stricture using wire-guided snare forceps

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Takao; Itoi; Atsushi; Sofuni; Fumihide; Itokawa; Toshio; Kurihara; Takayoshi; Tsuchiya; Kentaro; Ishii; Shujiro; Tsuji; Nobuhito; Ikeuchi; Fuminori; Moriyasu

    2010-01-01

    Endoscopic therapy of pancreatic duct(PD)strictures using balloon dilation and pancreatic duct stent(PS) placement has been reported to improve the severity of abdominal pain in selected patients with chronic pancreatitis(CP).However,some strictures are refractory and require frequent PS exchange to control symptoms.We describe two cases of successful endoscopic PD incision for difficult PD stricture using a wireguided snare.The snare is partially opened within the strictured pancreatic duct while applying ...

  19. Günther Tulip inferior vena cava filter retrieval using a bidirectional loop-snare technique

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ross, Jordan; Allison, Stephen; Vaidya, Sandeep; Monroe, Eric

    2016-01-01

    Many advanced techniques have been reported in the literature for difficult Günther Tulip filter removal. This report describes a bidirectional loop-snare technique in the setting of a fibrin scar formation around the filter leg anchors. The bidirectional loop-snare technique allows for maximal axial tension and alignment for stripping fibrin scar from the filter legs, a commonly encountered complication of prolonged dwell times. PMID:27338675

  20. Günther Tulip inferior vena cava filter retrieval using a bidirectional loop-snare technique.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ross, Jordan; Allison, Stephen; Vaidya, Sandeep; Monroe, Eric

    2016-01-01

    Many advanced techniques have been reported in the literature for difficult Günther Tulip filter removal. This report describes a bidirectional loop-snare technique in the setting of a fibrin scar formation around the filter leg anchors. The bidirectional loop-snare technique allows for maximal axial tension and alignment for stripping fibrin scar from the filter legs, a commonly encountered complication of prolonged dwell times.

  1. Combinatorial SNARE complexes with VAMP7 or VAMP8 define different late endocytic fusion events.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pryor, Paul R; Mullock, Barbara M; Bright, Nicholas A; Lindsay, Margaret R; Gray, Sally R; Richardson, Simon C W; Stewart, Abigail; James, David E; Piper, Robert C; Luzio, J Paul

    2004-06-01

    Both heterotypic and homotypic fusion events are required to deliver endocytosed macromolecules to lysosomes and remodel late endocytic organelles. A trans-SNARE complex consisting of Q-SNAREs syntaxin 7, Vti1b and syntaxin 8 and the R-SNARE VAMP8 has been shown by others to be responsible for homotypic fusion of late endosomes. Using antibody inhibition experiments in rat liver cell-free systems, we confirmed this result, but found that the same Q-SNAREs can combine with an alternative R-SNARE, namely VAMP7, for heterotypic fusion between late endosomes and lysosomes. Co-immunoprecipitation demonstrated separate syntaxin 7 complexes with either VAMP7 or VAMP8 in solubilized rat liver membranes. Additionally, overexpression of the N-terminal domain of VAMP7, in cultured fibroblastic cells, inhibited the mixing of a preloaded lysosomal content marker with a marker delivered to late endosomes. These data show that combinatorial interactions of SNAREs determine whether late endosomes undergo homotypic or heterotypic fusion events.

  2. Vesicle-associated membrane protein (VAMP) cleavage by a new metalloprotease from the Brazilian scorpion Tityus serrulatus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fletcher, Paul L; Fletcher, Maryann D; Weninger, Keith; Anderson, Trevor E; Martin, Brian M

    2010-03-01

    We present evidence that venom from the Brazilian scorpion Tityus serrulatus and a purified fraction selectively cleave essential SNARE proteins within exocrine pancreatic tissue. Western blotting for vesicle-associated membrane protein type v-SNARE proteins (or synaptobrevins) reveals characteristic alterations to venom-treated excised pancreatic lobules in vitro. Immunocytochemistry by electron microscopy confirms both the SNARE identity as VAMP2 and the proteolysis of VAMP2 as a marked decrease in secondary antibody-conjugated colloidal gold particles that are predominantly associated with mature zymogen granules. Studies with recombinant SNARE proteins were used to determine the specific cleavage site in VAMP2 and the susceptibility of VAMP8 (endobrevin). The VAMP2 cleavage site is between the transmembrane anchor and the SNARE motif that assembles into the ternary SNARE complex. Inclusion of divalent chelating agents (EDTA) with fraction nu, an otherwise active purified component from venom, eliminates SNARE proteolysis, suggesting the active protein is a metalloprotease. The unique cleavages of VAMP2 and VAMP8 may be linked to pancreatitis that develops following scorpion envenomation as both of these v-SNARE proteins are associated with zymogen granule membranes in pancreatic acinar cells. We have isolated antarease, a metalloprotease from fraction nu that cleaves VAMP2, and report its amino acid sequence.

  3. Vesicle-associated Membrane Protein (VAMP) Cleavage by a New Metalloprotease from the Brazilian Scorpion Tityus serrulatus*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fletcher, Paul L.; Fletcher, Maryann D.; Weninger, Keith; Anderson, Trevor E.; Martin, Brian M.

    2010-01-01

    We present evidence that venom from the Brazilian scorpion Tityus serrulatus and a purified fraction selectively cleave essential SNARE proteins within exocrine pancreatic tissue. Western blotting for vesicle-associated membrane protein type v-SNARE proteins (or synaptobrevins) reveals characteristic alterations to venom-treated excised pancreatic lobules in vitro. Immunocytochemistry by electron microscopy confirms both the SNARE identity as VAMP2 and the proteolysis of VAMP2 as a marked decrease in secondary antibody-conjugated colloidal gold particles that are predominantly associated with mature zymogen granules. Studies with recombinant SNARE proteins were used to determine the specific cleavage site in VAMP2 and the susceptibility of VAMP8 (endobrevin). The VAMP2 cleavage site is between the transmembrane anchor and the SNARE motif that assembles into the ternary SNARE complex. Inclusion of divalent chelating agents (EDTA) with fraction ν, an otherwise active purified component from venom, eliminates SNARE proteolysis, suggesting the active protein is a metalloprotease. The unique cleavages of VAMP2 and VAMP8 may be linked to pancreatitis that develops following scorpion envenomation as both of these v-SNARE proteins are associated with zymogen granule membranes in pancreatic acinar cells. We have isolated antarease, a metalloprotease from fraction ν that cleaves VAMP2, and report its amino acid sequence. PMID:20026600

  4. Inhibition of a SNARE-sensitive pathway in astrocytes attenuates damage following stroke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hines, Dustin J; Haydon, Philip G

    2013-03-06

    A strong body of research has defined the role of excitotoxic glutamate in animal models of brain ischemia and stroke; however, clinical trials of glutamate receptor antagonists have demonstrated their limited capacity to prevent brain damage following ischemia. We propose that astrocyte-neuron signaling represents an important modulatory target that may be useful in mediating damage following stroke. To assess the impact of astrocyte signaling on damage following stroke, we have used the astrocyte-specific dominant-negative SNARE mouse model (dnSNARE). Recent findings have shown that the astrocytic SNARE signaling pathway can affect neuronal excitability by regulating the surface expression of NMDA receptors. Using focal photothrombosis via the Rose Bengal method, as well as excitotoxic NMDA lesions, we show that dnSNARE animals exhibited a sparing of damaged tissue quantified using Nissl and NeuN staining. At the same time point, animals were also tested in behavioral tasks that probe the functional integrity of stroke- or lesion-damaged motor and somatosensory areas. We found that dnSNARE mice performed significantly better than littermate controls on rung walk and adhesive dot removal tasks following lesion. Together, our results demonstrate the important role of astrocytic signaling under ischemic conditions. Drugs targeting astrocyte signaling have a potential benefit for the outcome of stroke in human patients by limiting the spread of damage.

  5. A carcinoid tumor of the ampulla of Vater treated by endoscopic snare papillectomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pyun, Dae-Keun; Moon, Gyoo; Han, Jimin; Kim, Myung-Hwan; Lee, Sang Soo; Seo, Dong-Wan; Lee, Sung-Koo

    2004-12-01

    Here, a case of a patient with incidental finding of a carcinoid tumor of the ampulla of Vater, who was treated with endoscopic snare papillectomy, is reported. A 62-year-old male was admitted to our hospital due to a carcinoid tumor of the ampulla of Vater, which was found during follow-up endoscopy after an endoscopic mucosal resection of early gastric cancer. No lymphadenopathy or visceral metastasis was found on an abdominal CT scan, In-111 octerotide scan and EUS. The ampulla was then en bloc removed by endoscopic snare papillectomy. The resected specimen revealed a 0.7 x 0.5 x 0.1 cm sized carcinoid tumor. All margins of resection were negative for tumor. After six months of follow-up, there was no evidence of recurrence and metastasis, either endoscopically or radiologically. To our knowledge, this case is the first report of an ampullary carcinoid tumor treated by endoscopic snare papillectomy in Korea.

  6. Exertional myopathy in a grizzly bear (Ursus arctos) captured by leghold snare.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cattet, Marc; Stenhouse, Gordon; Bollinger, Trent

    2008-10-01

    We diagnosed exertional myopathy (EM) in a grizzly bear (Ursus arctos) that died approximately 10 days after capture by leghold snare in west-central Alberta, Canada, in June 2003. The diagnosis was based on history, post-capture movement data, gross necropsy, histopathology, and serum enzyme levels. We were unable to determine whether EM was the primary cause of death because autolysis precluded accurate evaluation of all tissues. Nevertheless, comparison of serum aspartate aminotransferase and creatine kinase concentrations and survival between the affected bear and other grizzly bears captured by leghold snare in the same research project suggests EM also occurred in other bears, but that it is not generally a cause of mortality. We propose, however, occurrence of nonfatal EM in grizzly bears after capture by leghold snare has potential implications for use of this capture method, including negative effects on wildlife welfare and research data.

  7. Successful removal of endobronchial lipoma by flexible bronchoscopy using electrosurgical snare.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yun, Seong Cheol; Na, Moon Jun; Choi, Eugene; Kwon, Sun Jung; Lee, Seong Ju; Oh, Sun Hee; Cha, Eun Jung; Son, Ji Woong

    2013-02-01

    A 62-year-old man with a chronic cough presented with atelectasis of the left upper lobe on chest X-ray. Chest computed tomography showed an atelectasis in the left upper lobe with bronchial wall thickening, stenosis, dilatation, and mucoid impaction. We performed bronchoscopy and found a well-circumscribed mass on the left upper lobe bronchus. The mass was removed by flexible bronchoscopy using an electrosurgical snare and diagnosed with lipoma. An endobronchial lipoma is a rare benign tumor that can be treated by a surgical or endoscopic approach. We report the successful removal of endobronchial lipoma via flexible bronchoscopic electrosurgical snare.

  8. The trans-Golgi SNARE syntaxin 10 is required for optimal development of Chlamydia trachomatis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrea L Lucas

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Chlamydia trachomatis, an obligate intracellular pathogen, grows inside of a vacuole, termed the inclusion. Within the inclusion, the organisms differentiate from the infectious elementary body (EB into the reticulate body (RB. The RB communicates with the host cell through the inclusion membrane to obtain the nutrients necessary to divide, thus expanding the chlamydial population. At late time points within the developmental cycle, the RBs respond to unknown molecular signals to redifferentiate into infectious EBs to perpetuate the infection cycle. One strategy for Chlamydia to obtain necessary nutrients and metabolites from the host is to intercept host vesicular trafficking pathways. In this study we demonstrate that a trans-Golgi soluble N-ethylmaleimide–sensitive factor attachment protein (SNARE, syntaxin 10, and/or syntaxin10-associated Golgi elements colocalize with the chlamydial inclusion. We hypothesized that Chlamydia utilizes the molecular machinery of syntaxin 10 at the inclusion membrane to intercept specific vesicular trafficking pathways in order to create and maintain an optimal intra-inclusion environment. To test this hypothesis, we used siRNA knockdown of syntaxin 10 to examine the impact of the loss of syntaxin 10 on chlamydial growth and development. Our results demonstrate that loss of syntaxin 10 leads to defects in normal chlamydial maturation including: variable inclusion size with fewer chlamydial organisms per inclusion, fewer infectious progeny, and delayed or halted RB-EB differentiation. These defects in chlamydial development correlate with an overabundance of NBD-lipid retained by inclusions cultured in syntaxin 10 knockdown cells. Overall, loss of syntaxin 10 at the inclusion membrane negatively affects Chlamydia. Understanding host machinery involved in maintaining an optimal inclusion environment to support chlamydial growth and development is critical towards understanding the molecular signals involved in

  9. Opposing functions of two sub-domains of the SNARE-complex in neurotransmission

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Weber, Jens P; Reim, Kerstin; Sørensen, Jakob B

    2010-01-01

    The SNARE-complex consisting of synaptobrevin-2/VAMP-2, SNAP-25 and syntaxin-1 is essential for evoked neurotransmission and also involved in spontaneous release. Here, we used cultured autaptic hippocampal neurons from Snap-25 null mice rescued with mutants challenging the C-terminal, N-terminal...

  10. Clinical evaluation of endoscopic ligation with nylon snares for adenoma of the major duodenal papilla

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    ZHANG Yingchun

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available ObjectiveTo evaluate the feasibility, safety, and follow-up results of endoscopic ligation with nylon snares for adenoma of the major duodenal papilla. MethodsTwenty-three patients with adenoma of the major papilla who were treated in our hospital from January 2012 to June 2014 were enrolled as subjects. All patients had biliary and pancreatic duct stents placed by endoscopic cholangiopancreatography, followed by complete ligation of tumors with nylon snares. Endoscopic follow-up evaluation of recurrence was performed regularly. ResultsAll patients had biliary and pancreatic duct stents successfully placed and tumors successfully ligated with nylon snares in their first surgery. Endoscopic reexamination at two weeks after surgery showed that tumors were removed in all patients. Postoperative complications, cholangitis and pancreatitis, were found in one (4.3% and two (8.7% patients, respectively, and there were no bleeding, perforation, or death. A follow-up of more than one year in all patients showed that two patients had local recurrence of adenoma. ConclusionEndoscopic ligation with nylon snares is a safe and effective approach for treating adenoma of the major duodenal papilla.

  11. Snaring to control feral pigs sus scrofa in a remote Hawaiian rain forest

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, Stephen J.; Stone, Charles P.

    1993-01-01

    Feral pig Sus scrofa control in Kipahulu Valley, a remote rain forest in Haleakala National Park, Maui, Hawaiian Islands, has been achieved with snares over a 45-month period. Initial pig densities in fenced management units of 6·2 km2 and 7·8 km2were estimated at 6 animals/km2 and 14·3 animals/km2 for the two units, based on population reconstruction from animals killed and aged. During the 45 months of the study, 1978 snares were set, and 1·6 million snare nights were logged. Snare density reached 96/km2 and 200/km2 for the two management units by the end of the study. A mean effort of 43 worker hours/pig was used to remove 53 pigs from the upper management unit, and a mean of 7 worker hours/pig to remove 175 animals from the more densely populated lower unit. Pig activity monitoring along transects provided a good measure of control effectiveness until densities of about 1 pig/km2 were achieved, after which transects became less useful than scouting for determining pig activity.

  12. Multiple Roles of VARP in Endosomal Trafficking: Rabs, Retromer Components and R-SNARE VAMP7 Meet on VARP.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fukuda, Mitsunori

    2016-07-01

    VARP (VPS9-ankyrin-repeat protein, also known as ANKRD27) was originally identified as an N-terminal VPS9 (vacuolar protein sorting 9)-domain-containing protein that possesses guanine nucleotide exchange factor (GEF) activity toward small GTPase Rab21 and contains two ankyrin repeat (ANKR) domains in its central region. A number of VARP-interacting molecules have been identified during the past five years, and considerable attention is now being directed to the multiple roles of VARP in endosomal trafficking. More specifically, VARP is now known to interact with three different types of key membrane trafficking regulators, i.e. small GTPase Rabs (Rab32, Rab38 and Rab40C), the retromer complex (a sorting nexin dimer, VPS26, VPS29 and VPS35) and R-SNARE VAMP7. By binding to several of these molecules, VARP regulates endosomal trafficking, which underlies a variety of cellular events, including melanogenic enzyme trafficking to melanosomes, dendrite outgrowth of melanocytes, neurite outgrowth and retromer-mediated endosome-to-plasma membrane sorting of transmembrane proteins.

  13. Insulin and hypertonicity recruit GLUT4 to the plasma membrane of muscle cells by using N-ethylmaleimide-sensitive factor-dependent SNARE mechanisms but different v-SNAREs: role of TI-VAMP.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Randhawa, Varinder K; Thong, Farah S L; Lim, Dawn Y; Li, Dailin; Garg, Rami R; Rudge, Rachel; Galli, Thierry; Rudich, Assaf; Klip, Amira

    2004-12-01

    Insulin and hypertonicity each increase the content of GLUT4 glucose transporters at the surface of muscle cells. Insulin enhances GLUT4 exocytosis without diminishing its endocytosis. The insulin but not the hypertonicity response is reduced by tetanus neurotoxin, which cleaves vesicle-associated membrane protein (VAMP)2 and VAMP3, and is rescued upon introducing tetanus neurotoxin-resistant VAMP2. Here, we show that hypertonicity enhances GLUT4 recycling, compounding its previously shown ability to reduce GLUT4 endocytosis. To examine whether the canonical soluble N-ethylmaleimide-sensitive factor attachment protein receptor (SNARE) mechanism is required for the plasma membrane fusion of the tetanus neurotoxin-insensitive GLUT4 vesicles, L6 myoblasts stably expressing myc-tagged GLUT4 (GLUT4myc) were transiently transfected with dominant negative N-ethylmaleimide-sensitive factor (NSF) (DN-NSF) or small-interfering RNA to tetanus neurotoxin-insensitive VAMP (TI-VAMP siRNA). Both strategies markedly reduced the basal level of surface GLUT4myc and the surface gain of GLUT4myc in response to hypertonicity. The insulin effect was abolished by DN-NSF, but only partly reduced by TI-VAMP siRNA. We propose that insulin and hypertonicity recruit GLUT4myc from partly overlapping, but distinct sources defined by VAMP2 and TI-VAMP, respectively.

  14. Steel-Jawed Leghold Traps and Killing Neck Snares: Similar Injuries Command Change to Agreement on International Humane Trapping Standards.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Proulx, Gilbert; Rodtka, Dwight

    2017-01-01

    According to the Agreement on International Humane Trapping Standards (AIHTS), which was signed by the European Community, Canada, and Russia in 1997, killing devices used for the capture of canids and other fur-bearing nonhuman animals should render an animal irreversibly unconscious within 300 s. However, killing neck snares are not included in the agreement. In this commentary, a parallel is drawn between injuries caused by steel-jawed leghold traps, which have been banned by the AIHTS signatory countries, and killing neck snares to demonstrate that these snares should also be included in international humane trapping standards (i.e., AIHTS). Previous scientific investigations have shown that neither manual nor power-killing neck snares can consistently render canids unconscious rapidly. Animals caught in killing neck snares suffer injuries that are similar to or worse than those reported for leg-captured canids. The authors strongly recommend that AIHTS be modified to include killing neck snares and that such devices be subject to the criteria applied to other trapping devices. Alternative restraining trapping devices, which are effective and more humane, are available for capturing wild canids.

  15. A novel Netrin-1–sensitive mechanism promotes local SNARE-mediated exocytosis during axon branching

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winkle, Cortney C.; McClain, Leslie M.; Valtschanoff, Juli G.; Park, Charles S.; Maglione, Christopher

    2014-01-01

    Developmental axon branching dramatically increases synaptic capacity and neuronal surface area. Netrin-1 promotes branching and synaptogenesis, but the mechanism by which Netrin-1 stimulates plasma membrane expansion is unknown. We demonstrate that SNARE-mediated exocytosis is a prerequisite for axon branching and identify the E3 ubiquitin ligase TRIM9 as a critical catalytic link between Netrin-1 and exocytic SNARE machinery in murine cortical neurons. TRIM9 ligase activity promotes SNARE-mediated vesicle fusion and axon branching in a Netrin-dependent manner. We identified a direct interaction between TRIM9 and the Netrin-1 receptor DCC as well as a Netrin-1–sensitive interaction between TRIM9 and the SNARE component SNAP25. The interaction with SNAP25 negatively regulates SNARE-mediated exocytosis and axon branching in the absence of Netrin-1. Deletion of TRIM9 elevated exocytosis in vitro and increased axon branching in vitro and in vivo. Our data provide a novel model for the spatial regulation of axon branching by Netrin-1, in which localized plasma membrane expansion occurs via TRIM9-dependent regulation of SNARE-mediated vesicle fusion. PMID:24778312

  16. Rescue endoscopic bleeding control for nonvariceal upper gastrointestinal hemorrhage using clipping and detachable snaring.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, J H; Kim, B K; Seol, D C; Byun, S J; Park, K H; Sung, I K; Park, H S; Shim, C S

    2013-06-01

    Nonvariceal upper gastrointestinal (UGI) bleeding recurs after appropriate endoscopic therapy in 10 % - 15 % of cases. The mortality rate can be as high as 25 % when bleeding recurs, but there is no consensus about the best modality for endoscopic re-treatment. The aim of this study was to evaluate clipping and detachable snaring (CDS) for rescue endoscopic control of nonvariceal UGI hemorrhage. We report a case series of seven patients from a Korean tertiary center who underwent endoscopic hemostasis using the combined method of detachable snares with hemoclips. The success rate of endoscopic hemostasis with CDS was 86 %: six of the seven patients who had experienced primary endoscopic treatment failure or recurrent bleeding after endoscopic hemostasis were treated successfully. In conclusion, rescue endoscopic bleeding control by means of CDS is an option for controlling nonvariceal UGI bleeding when no other method of endoscopic treatment for recurrent bleeding and primary hemostatic failure is possible.

  17. Endoscopic snare excision of adenoma of the papilla of Vater without prophylactic pancreatic-duct stent.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Attaallah, Wafi; Gunal, Omer; Mokhtare, Sina; Ozmen, Tolga; Cingi, Asim

    2014-11-28

    The endoscopic excision of adenomas of the papilla of Vater has gained increased popularity in the recent years. Temporary pancreatic drainage has been advised to accompany snare papillectomy in order to prevent ductal obstruction and serious pancreatitis. We evaluated treatment outcome of patients who had undergone endoscopic papillectomy without pancreatic drainage. Three consecutive adult patients with adenomas of the papilla of Vater presented with jaundice and pain were treated by endoscopic snare excision between October 2013 and February 2014 in a single center. ERCP procedures revealed papillary tumors and endoscopic biopsy specimens revealed tubular adenoma the papilla of Vater. Adenomas were treated by snare papillectomy method and a biliary stent was inserted as a prophylactic procedure immediately after excision of the adenoma in each case. In addition to physical examination, laboratory tests were repeated in the follow-up period after papillectomy in order to document if there is any complication particularly pancreatitis. None of the patients experienced an immediate complication, including pancreatitis after papillectomy. Also neither patient experienced abnormal fluctuations of laboratory tests during the follow-up. Histopathologic evaluation of the resection specimens revealed a tubular adenoma with low grade dysplasia in the first two patients and a tubular adenoma with high-grade dysplasia in the third one. Endoscopy and pathologic evaluation revealed no recurrent/residual disease during the follow-up period of these patients. Endoscopic snare resection of adenoma of the major papilla of the duodenum is a safe and minimal invasive alternative to surgical therapy. Biliary stent is sufficient to prevent biliary ductal patency and pancreatic stenting might not be necessary to prevent pancreatitis.

  18. Assessing the efficacy of hair snares as a method for noninvasive sampling of Neotropical felids

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tatiana P. Portella

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Hair snares have been used in North and Central America for a long time in assessment and monitoring studies of several mammalian species. This method can provide a cheap, suitable, and efficient way to monitor mammals because it combines characteristics that are not present in most alternative techniques. However, despite their usefulness, hair snares are rarely used in other parts of the world. The aim of our study was to evaluate the effectiveness of hair snares and three scent lures (cinnamon, catnip, and vanilla in the detection of felids in one of the largest remnants of the Brazilian Atlantic Forest. We performed tests with six captive felid species - Panthera onca (Linnaeus, 1758, Leopardus pardalis (Linnaeus, 1758, L. tigrinus (Schreber, 1775, L. wiedii (Schinz, 1821, Puma concolor (Linnaeus, 1771, and P. yagouaroundi (É. Geoffroy Saint-Hilaire, 1803 - to examine their responses to the attractants, and to correlate those with lure efficiency in the field. The field tests were conducted at the Parque Estadual Pico do Marumbi, state of Paraná, Brazil. Hair traps were placed on seven transects. There were equal numbers of traps with each scent lure, for a total of 1,551 trap-days. In captivity, vanilla provided the greatest response, yet no felids were detected in the field with any of the tested lures, although other species were recorded. Based on the sampling of non-target species, and the comparison with similar studies elsewhere, this study points to a possible caveat of this method when rare species or small populations are concerned. Meanwhile, we believe that improved hair snares could provide important results with several species in the location tested and others.

  19. Caesium accumulation in yeast and plants is selectively repressed by loss of the SNARE Sec22p/SEC22.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dräxl, Stephan; Müller, Johannes; Li, Wei B; Michalke, Bernhard; Scherb, Hagen; Hense, Burkhard A; Tschiersch, Jochen; Kanter, Ulrike; Schäffner, Anton R

    2013-01-01

    The non-essential cation caesium (Cs(+)) is assimilated by all organisms. Thus, anthropogenically released radiocaesium is of concern to agriculture. Cs(+) accumulates owing to its chemical similarity to the potassium ion (K(+)). The apparent lack of a Cs(+)-specific uptake mechanism has obstructed attempts to manipulate Cs(+) accumulation without causing pleiotropic effects. Here we show that the SNARE protein Sec22p/SEC22 specifically impacts Cs(+) accumulation in yeast and in plants. Loss of Saccharomyces cerevisiae Sec22p does not affect K(+) homeostasis, yet halves Cs(+) concentration compared with the wild type. Mathematical modelling of the uptake time course predicts a compromised vacuolar Cs(+) deposition in sec22Δ. Biochemical fractionation confirms this and indicates a new feature of Sec22p in enhancing non-selective cation deposition. A developmentally controlled loss-of-function mutant of the orthologous Arabidopsis thaliana SEC22 phenocopies the reduced Cs(+) uptake without affecting plant growth. This finding provides a new strategy to reduce radiocaesium entry into the food chain.

  20. The R-SNARE endobrevin/VAMP-8 mediates homotypic fusion of early endosomes and late endosomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Antonin, W; Holroyd, C; Tikkanen, R; Höning, S; Jahn, R

    2000-10-01

    Endobrevin/VAMP-8 is an R-SNARE localized to endosomes, but it is unknown in which intracellular fusion step it operates. Using subcellular fractionation and quantitative immunogold electron microscopy, we found that endobrevin/VAMP-8 is present on all membranes known to communicate with early endosomes, including the plasma membrane, clathrin-coated pits, late endosomes, and membranes of the trans-Golgi network. Affinity-purified antibodies that block the ability of endobrevin/VAMP-8 to form SNARE core complexes potently inhibit homotypic fusion of both early and late endosomes in vitro. Fab fragments were as active as intact immunoglobulin Gs. Recombinant endobrevin/VAMP-8 inhibited both fusion reactions with similar potency. We conclude that endobrevin/VAMP-8 operates as an R-SNARE in the homotypic fusion of early and late endosomes.

  1. A Carcinoid Tumor of the Ampulla of Vater Treated by Endoscopic Snare Papillectomy

    OpenAIRE

    Pyun, Dae-Keun; Moon, Gyoo; Han, Jimin; Kim, Myung-Hwan; Lee, Sang Soo; Seo, Dong-Wan; Lee, Sung-Koo

    2004-01-01

    Here, a case of a patient with incidental finding of a carcinoid tumor of the ampulla of Vater, who was treated with endoscopic snare papillectomy, is reported. A 62-year-old male was admitted to our hospital due to a carcinoid tumor of the ampulla of Vater, which was found during follow-up endoscopy after an endoscopic mucosal resection of early gastric cancer. No lymphadenopathy or visceral metastasis was found on an abdominal CT scan, In-111 octerotide scan and EUS. The ampulla was then en...

  2. Dendritic SNAREs add a new twist to the old neuron theory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ovsepian, Saak V.; Dolly, J. Oliver

    2011-01-01

    Dendritic exocytosis underpins a broad range of integrative and homeostatic synaptic functions. Emerging data highlight the essential role of SNAREs in trafficking and fusion of secretory organelles with release of peptides and neurotransmitters from dendrites. This Perspective analyzes recent evidence inferring axo-dendritic polarization of vesicular release machinery and pinpoints progress made with existing challenges in this rapidly progressing field of dendritic research. Interpreting the relation of new molecular data to physiological results on secretion from dendrites would greatly advance our understanding of this facet of neuronal mechanisms. PMID:22080607

  3. A Homemade Snare: An Alternative Method for Mechanical Removal of Dirofilaria immitis in Dogs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana Margarida Alho

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Canine dirofilariosis is a life-threatening parasitic disease that is increasingly reported worldwide. Once diagnosed the main treatment goals are to improve the animal’s clinical condition and to eliminate all life stages of the parasite with minimal posttreatment side effects. This can be achieved through mechanical, surgical, or chemotherapeutical approaches. Currently, manual extraction is the preferred method to remove adult heartworms due to its diminished invasiveness, reduced damage to the vascular endothelium, and shortened anaesthesia duration. However, it remains an expensive technique that can be highly traumatic. To address this issue, a nontraumatic homemade catheter-guided snare was developed for heartworm removal by adapting and folding a 0.014-inch coronary wire (BMW, Abbott Vascular. Transvenous heartworm extraction was performed on a dog severely infected with adult heartworms by inserting the modified snare into a 6-F Judkins right coronary guiding catheter BMW (Cordis and advancing it into the right ventricle under fluoroscopic guidance. Fifteen adult specimens of Dirofilaria immitis were successfully extracted from the pulmonary artery and right ventricle without complications. To assure the death of both larvae and adults, postoperative treatment was successfully managed using ivermectin, doxycycline, and melarsomine, with no recurrence after surgery.

  4. Nuclear management in manual small incision cataract surgery by snare technique

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bhattacharya Debasish

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Manual small incision cataract surgery has evolved into a popular method of cataract surgery in India. However, in supra hard cataract, bringing out the whole nucleus through the sclerocorneal flap valve incision becomes difficult. A bigger incision required in such cataracts loses its value action, as the internal incision and corneal valve slips beyond the limbus into sclera. Struggling with the supra hard cataracts through a regular small incision. Phacofracture in the anterior chamber becomes a useful option in these cases. In the snare technique, a stainless steel wire loop when lassoed around the nucleus in the anterior chamber constricts from the equator, easily dividing the hardest of the nuclei into two halves. The wire loop constricts in a controlled way when the second cannula of snare is pulled. The divided halves can easily be brought out by serrated crocodile forceps. This nuclear management can be safely performed through a smaller sclerocorneal flap valve incision where the corneal valve action is retained within the limbus without sutures, and the endothelium or the incision is not disturbed. However, the technique requires space in the anterior chamber to maneuver the wire loop and anterior chamber depth more than 2.5 mm is recommended. Much evidence to this wonderful technique is not available in literature, as its popularity grew through live surgical workshops and small interactive conferences.

  5. Segregation of the Qb-SNAREs GS27 and GS28 into Golgi vesicles regulates intra-Golgi transport.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fusella, Aurora; Micaroni, Massimo; Di Giandomenico, Daniele; Mironov, Alexandre A; Beznoussenko, Galina V

    2013-05-01

    The Golgi apparatus is the main glycosylation and sorting station along the secretory pathway. Its structure includes the Golgi vesicles, which are depleted of anterograde cargo, and also of at least some Golgi-resident proteins. The role of Golgi vesicles remains unclear. Here, we show that Golgi vesicles are enriched in the Qb-SNAREs GS27 (membrin) and GS28 (GOS-28), and depleted of nucleotide sugar transporters. A block of intra-Golgi transport leads to accumulation of Golgi vesicles and partitioning of GS27 and GS28 into these vesicles. Conversely, active intra-Golgi transport induces fusion of these vesicles with the Golgi cisternae, delivering GS27 and GS28 to these cisternae. In an in vitro assay based on a donor compartment that lacks UDP-galactose translocase (a sugar transporter), the segregation of Golgi vesicles from isolated Golgi membranes inhibits intra-Golgi transport; re-addition of isolated Golgi vesicles devoid of UDP-galactose translocase obtained from normal cells restores intra-Golgi transport. We conclude that this activity is due to the presence of GS27 and GS28 in the Golgi vesicles, rather than the sugar transporter. Furthermore, there is an inverse correlation between the number of Golgi vesicles and the number of inter-cisternal connections under different experimental conditions. Finally, a rapid block of the formation of vesicles via COPI through degradation of ϵCOP accelerates the cis-to-trans delivery of VSVG. These data suggest that Golgi vesicles, presumably with COPI, serve to inhibit intra-Golgi transport by the extraction of GS27 and GS28 from the Golgi cisternae, which blocks the formation of inter-cisternal connections.

  6. Fluoroscopy-guided snare retrieval of the celt ACD(®) metallic vascular closure device following failed deployment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cahill, Thomas J; Choji, Kiyoshi; Kardos, Attila

    2014-03-01

    We report a case of endovascular snare retrieval of a new stainless steel vascular closure device (Celt ACD(®) , Kimal, Middlesex, UK) from the common femoral artery, following device failure after diagnostic coronary angiography. The stainless steel composition of the device aided successful fluoroscopic localization and removal.

  7. Concurrent use of pigtail and loop snare catheters for percutaneous retrieval of dislodged central venous port catheter.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chuang, Ming-Tsung; Wu, Ding-Kwo; Chang, Cheng-Ang; Shih, Ming-Chen Paul; Ou-Yang, Fu; Chuang, Chien-Han; Tsai, Yi-Fan; Hsu, Jui-Sheng

    2011-11-01

    The purpose of this study was to report our experience of percutaneous retrieval of dislodged port catheters with concurrent use of pigtail and loop snare catheters. During a 5-year period at our institute (June 2005 to July 2010), a total of 23 dislodged port catheters were retrieved. The interval between port catheter implantation and dislodged catheter retrieval ranged from 43 days to 1,414 days (mean 586.7 days). The time of delayed retrieval ranged from 1 day to 45 days (mean 4.6 days). All dislodged catheters were retrieved with the concurrent use of pigtail and loop snare catheters via femoral venous route. The prevalence of port catheter dislodgement at our institute was 3.4%. All dislodged port catheters were removed successfully with pigtail and loop snare catheters together. No procedure-related complications were encountered, except for transient arrhythmia in two patients, which required no medication. In conclusion, the concurrent use of pigtail and loop snare catheters is a feasible and easy way for percutaneous retrieval of a dislodged central venous port catheter.

  8. Concurrent use of pigtail and loop snare catheters for percutaneous retrieval of dislodged central venous port catheter

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ming-Tsung Chuang

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study was to report our experience of percutaneous retrieval of dislodged port catheters with concurrent use of pigtail and loop snare catheters. During a 5-year period at our institute (June 2005 to July 2010, a total of 23 dislodged port catheters were retrieved. The interval between port catheter implantation and dislodged catheter retrieval ranged from 43 days to 1,414 days (mean 586.7 days. The time of delayed retrieval ranged from 1 day to 45 days (mean 4.6 days. All dislodged catheters were retrieved with the concurrent use of pigtail and loop snare catheters via femoral venous route. The prevalence of port catheter dislodgement at our institute was 3.4%. All dislodged port catheters were removed successfully with pigtail and loop snare catheters together. No procedure-related complications were encountered, except for transient arrhythmia in two patients, which required no medication. In conclusion, the concurrent use of pigtail and loop snare catheters is a feasible and easy way for percutaneous retrieval of a dislodged central venous port catheter.

  9. Effects of chronic fluoride exposure on object recognition memory and mRNA expression of SNARE complex in hippocampus of male mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Haijun; Du, Wenjuan; Zhou, Bingrui; Zhang, Wen; Xu, Guoli; Niu, Ruiyan; Sun, Zilong

    2014-04-01

    This study aimed to investigate the effects of long-term fluoride exposure on object recognition memory and mRNA expression of soluble N-ethylmaleimidesensitive fusion protein attachment protein receptors (SNARE) complex (synaptosome-associated protein of 25 kDa (SNAP-25), vesicle-associated membrane protein 2 (VAMP-2), and syntaxin 1A) in the hippocampus of male mice. Sixty sexually matured male Kunming mice were randomly divided into four groups: control group (given distilled water), low F group (25 mg/L NaF, corresponding to 11 mg/L F(-)), medium F group (50 mg/L NaF, corresponding to 22 mg/L F(-)), and high F group (100 mg/L NaF, corresponding to 45 mg/L F(-)). After 180 days, the spontaneous locomotor behavior and object recognition memory were detected by open field test and novel object recognition (NOR) test. Results showed that compared with the control group, frequency in each zone, total distance, and line crosses were significantly increased in low F and medium F groups, suggesting fluoride enhanced excitement of mice, while there were no marked changes in high F group. Twenty-four hours after training, a deficit of long-term memory (LTM) occurred only in high F group (P recognition memory, and upregulate VAMP-2 mRNA expression, which are involved in the adverse effects of fluoride on the object recognition memory of nervous system.

  10. LegC3, an effector protein from Legionella pneumophila, inhibits homotypic yeast vacuole fusion in vivo and in vitro.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Terry L Bennett

    Full Text Available During infection, the intracellular pathogenic bacterium Legionella pneumophila causes an extensive remodeling of host membrane trafficking pathways, both in the construction of a replication-competent vacuole comprised of ER-derived vesicles and plasma membrane components, and in the inhibition of normal phagosome:endosome/lysosome fusion pathways. Here, we identify the LegC3 secreted effector protein from L. pneumophila as able to inhibit a SNARE- and Rab GTPase-dependent membrane fusion pathway in vitro, the homotypic fusion of yeast vacuoles (lysosomes. This vacuole fusion inhibition appeared to be specific, as similar secreted coiled-coiled domain containing proteins from L. pneumophila, LegC7/YlfA and LegC2/YlfB, did not inhibit vacuole fusion. The LegC3-mediated fusion inhibition was reversible by a yeast cytosolic extract, as well as by a purified soluble SNARE, Vam7p. LegC3 blocked the formation of trans-SNARE complexes during vacuole fusion, although we did not detect a direct interaction of LegC3 with the vacuolar SNARE protein complexes required for fusion. Additionally, LegC3 was incapable of inhibiting a defined synthetic model of vacuolar SNARE-driven membrane fusion, further suggesting that LegC3 does not directly inhibit the activity of vacuolar SNAREs, HOPS complex, or Sec17p/18p during membrane fusion. LegC3 is likely utilized by Legionella to modulate eukaryotic membrane fusion events during pathogenesis.

  11. The SNARE VAMP7 Regulates Exocytic Trafficking of Interleukin-12 in Dendritic Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giulia Chiaruttini

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Interleukin-12 (IL-12, produced by dendritic cells in response to activation, is central to pathogen eradication and tumor rejection. The trafficking pathways controlling spatial distribution and intracellular transport of IL-12 vesicles to the cell surface are still unknown. Here, we show that intracellular IL-12 localizes in late endocytic vesicles marked by the SNARE VAMP7. Dendritic cells (DCs from VAMP7-deficient mice are partially impaired in the multidirectional release of IL-12. Upon encounter with antigen-specific T cells, IL-12-containing vesicles rapidly redistribute at the immune synapse and release IL-12 in a process entirely dependent on VAMP7 expression. Consistently, acquisition of effector functions is reduced in T cells stimulated by VAMP7-null DCs. These results provide insights into IL-12 intracellular trafficking pathways and show that VAMP7-mediated release of IL-12 at the immune synapse is a mechanism to transmit innate signals to T cells.

  12. A SNARE-protein has opposing functions in penetration resistance and defence signalling pathways

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhang, Ziguo; Feechan, Angela; Pedersen, Carsten

    2007-01-01

    Penetration resistance is often the first line of defence against fungal pathogens. Subsequently induced defences are mediated by the programmed cell death (PCD) reaction pathway and the salicylic acid (SA), jasmonic acid (JA) and ethylene (ET) signalling pathways. We previously demonstrated...

  13. A SNARE-like protein and biotin are implicated in soybean cyst nematode virulence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Some phytoparasitic nematodes have the ability to infect and reproduce on plants that are normally considered resistant to nematode infection. Such nematodes are referred to as virulent and the mechanisms they use to evade or suppress host plant defenses are not well understood. Here, we report the ...

  14. Scaffolding proteins in membrane trafficking : the role of ELKS

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Yu, K.L.

    2015-01-01

    Intracellular membrane trafficking is an essential cellular process that involves cooperation of many factors such as scaffolding proteins, GTPases and SNAREs. These proteins work together to ensure proper delivery of different membrane-enclosed cargoes to specific cellular destinations. In this the

  15. Application of a snare technique in retrograde chronic total occlusion percutaneous coronary intervention - a step by step practical approach and an observational study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fang, Hsiu-Yu; Lee, Wei-Chieh; Fang, Chih-Yuan; Wu, Chiung-Jen

    2016-10-01

    Percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI) for chronic total occlusion (CTO) has recently become popular among interventional cardiologists. CTO originating from the ostium has been one of the most difficult CTO lesions to treat with PCI for a number of reasons. Our aim was to illustrate a specific technique during retrograde CTO PCI referred to as the "snare technique."We retrospectively examined the use of "snare technique" among 371 consecutive retrograde CTO PCIs performed at our institution between 2006 and 2015."Snare technique" was used in 10 patients among the 371 retrograde CTO PCIs. The baseline clinical and angiographic characteristics of patients with or without "snare technique" were similar. The "snare technique" group had significantly fewer side branches at occlusion (30.0% vs 71.2%, P = 0.01) and a higher incidence of externalization (90% vs 25.5%, P technique" group (285.0 ± 68.5 vs 379.2 ± 144.0, P = 0.04). The incidence of major complications, retrograde success, or final success did not differ between the groups.The "snare technique" is safe and feasible in retrograde CTO PCI, especially in cases of difficult coronary engagement in cases such as ostial occlusion, challenging coronary anatomy, or retrograde guidewire cannot get in antegrade guiding catheter.

  16. Complexin 2 modulates vesicle-associated membrane protein (VAMP) 2-regulated zymogen granule exocytosis in pancreatic acini.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Falkowski, Michelle A; Thomas, Diana D H; Groblewski, Guy E

    2010-11-12

    Complexins are soluble proteins that regulate the activity of soluble N-ethylmaleimide-sensitive factor attachment protein receptor (SNARE) complexes necessary for vesicle fusion. Neuronal specific complexin 1 has inhibitory and stimulatory effects on exocytosis by clamping trans-SNARE complexes in a prefusion state and promoting conformational changes to facilitate membrane fusion following cell stimulation. Complexins are unable to bind to monomeric SNARE proteins but bind with high affinity to ternary SNARE complexes and with lower affinity to target SNARE complexes. Far less is understood about complexin function outside the nervous system. Pancreatic acini express the complexin 2 isoform by RT-PCR and immunoblotting. Immunofluorescence microscopy revealed complexin 2 localized along the apical plasma membrane consistent with a role in secretion. Accordingly, complexin 2 was found to interact with vesicle-associated membrane protein (VAMP) 2, syntaxins 3 and 4, but not with VAMP 8 or syntaxin 2. Introduction of recombinant complexin 2 into permeabilized acini inhibited Ca(2+)-stimulated secretion in a concentration-dependent manner with a maximal inhibition of nearly 50%. Mutations of the central α-helical domain reduced complexin 2 SNARE binding and concurrently abolished its inhibitory activity. Surprisingly, mutation of arginine 59 to histidine within the central α-helical domain did not alter SNARE binding and moreover, augmented Ca(2+)-stimulated secretion by 130% of control. Consistent with biochemical studies, complexin 2 colocalized with VAMP 2 along the apical plasma membrane following cholecystokinin-8 stimulation. These data demonstrate a functional role for complexin 2 outside the nervous system and indicate that it participates in the Ca(2+)-sensitive regulatory pathway for zymogen granule exocytosis.

  17. Complexin 2 Modulates Vesicle-associated Membrane Protein (VAMP) 2-regulated Zymogen Granule Exocytosis in Pancreatic Acini*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Falkowski, Michelle A.; Thomas, Diana D. H.; Groblewski, Guy E.

    2010-01-01

    Complexins are soluble proteins that regulate the activity of soluble N-ethylmaleimide-sensitive factor attachment protein receptor (SNARE) complexes necessary for vesicle fusion. Neuronal specific complexin 1 has inhibitory and stimulatory effects on exocytosis by clamping trans-SNARE complexes in a prefusion state and promoting conformational changes to facilitate membrane fusion following cell stimulation. Complexins are unable to bind to monomeric SNARE proteins but bind with high affinity to ternary SNARE complexes and with lower affinity to target SNARE complexes. Far less is understood about complexin function outside the nervous system. Pancreatic acini express the complexin 2 isoform by RT-PCR and immunoblotting. Immunofluorescence microscopy revealed complexin 2 localized along the apical plasma membrane consistent with a role in secretion. Accordingly, complexin 2 was found to interact with vesicle-associated membrane protein (VAMP) 2, syntaxins 3 and 4, but not with VAMP 8 or syntaxin 2. Introduction of recombinant complexin 2 into permeabilized acini inhibited Ca2+-stimulated secretion in a concentration-dependent manner with a maximal inhibition of nearly 50%. Mutations of the central α-helical domain reduced complexin 2 SNARE binding and concurrently abolished its inhibitory activity. Surprisingly, mutation of arginine 59 to histidine within the central α-helical domain did not alter SNARE binding and moreover, augmented Ca2+-stimulated secretion by 130% of control. Consistent with biochemical studies, complexin 2 colocalized with VAMP 2 along the apical plasma membrane following cholecystokinin-8 stimulation. These data demonstrate a functional role for complexin 2 outside the nervous system and indicate that it participates in the Ca2+-sensitive regulatory pathway for zymogen granule exocytosis. PMID:20829354

  18. Application of a snare technique in retrograde chronic total occlusion percutaneous coronary intervention – a step by step practical approach and an observational study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fang, Hsiu-Yu; Lee, Wei-Chieh; Fang, Chih-Yuan; Wu, Chiung-Jen

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI) for chronic total occlusion (CTO) has recently become popular among interventional cardiologists. CTO originating from the ostium has been one of the most difficult CTO lesions to treat with PCI for a number of reasons. Our aim was to illustrate a specific technique during retrograde CTO PCI referred to as the “snare technique.” We retrospectively examined the use of “snare technique” among 371 consecutive retrograde CTO PCIs performed at our institution between 2006 and 2015. “Snare technique” was used in 10 patients among the 371 retrograde CTO PCIs. The baseline clinical and angiographic characteristics of patients with or without “snare technique” were similar. The “snare technique” group had significantly fewer side branches at occlusion (30.0% vs 71.2%, P = 0.01) and a higher incidence of externalization (90% vs 25.5%, P CTO PCI, especially in cases of difficult coronary engagement in cases such as ostial occlusion, challenging coronary anatomy, or retrograde guidewire cannot get in antegrade guiding catheter. PMID:27741138

  19. Interactions between synaptic vesicle fusion proteins explored by atomic force microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yersin, A; Hirling, H; Steiner, P; Magnin, S; Regazzi, R; Hüni, B; Huguenot, P; De los Rios, P; Dietler, G; Catsicas, S; Kasas, S

    2003-07-22

    Measuring the biophysical properties of macromolecular complexes at work is a major challenge of modern biology. The protein complex composed of vesicle-associated membrane protein 2, synaptosomal-associated protein of 25 kDa, and syntaxin 1 [soluble N-ethyl-maleimide-sensitive factor attachment protein receptor (SNARE) complex] is essential for docking and fusion of neurotransmitter-filled synaptic vesicles with the presynaptic membrane. To better understand the fusion mechanisms, we reconstituted the synaptic SNARE complex in the imaging chamber of an atomic force microscope and measured the interaction forces between its components. Each protein was tested against the two others, taken either individually or as binary complexes. This approach allowed us to determine specific interaction forces and dissociation kinetics of the SNAREs and led us to propose a sequence of interactions. A theoretical model based on our measurements suggests that a minimum of four complexes is probably necessary for fusion to occur. We also showed that the regulatory protein neuronal Sec1 injected into the atomic force microscope chamber prevented the complex formation. Finally, we measured the effect of tetanus toxin protease on the SNARE complex and its activity by on-line registration during tetanus toxin injection. These experiments provide a basis for the functional study of protein microdomains and also suggest opportunities for sensitive screening of drugs that can modulate protein-protein interactions.

  20. Specificity of botulinum protease for human VAMP family proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamamoto, Hideyuki; Ida, Tomoaki; Tsutsuki, Hiroyasu; Mori, Masatoshi; Matsumoto, Tomoko; Kohda, Tomoko; Mukamoto, Masafumi; Goshima, Naoki; Kozaki, Shunji; Ihara, Hideshi

    2012-04-01

    The botulinum neurotoxin light chain (BoNT-LC) is a zinc-dependent metalloprotease that cleaves neuronal SNARE proteins such as SNAP-25, VAMP2, and Syntaxin1. This cleavage interferes with the neurotransmitter release of peripheral neurons and results in flaccid paralysis. SNAP, VAMP, and Syntaxin are representative of large families of proteins that mediate most membrane fusion reactions, as well as both neuronal and non-neuronal exocytotic events in eukaryotic cells. Neuron-specific SNARE proteins, which are target substrates of BoNT, have been well studied; however, it is unclear whether other SNARE proteins are also proteolyzed by BoNT. Herein, we define the substrate specificity of BoNT-LC/B, /D, and /F towards recombinant human VAMP family proteins. We demonstrate that LC/B, /D, and /F are able to cleave VAMP1, 2, and 3, but no other VAMP family proteins. Kinetic analysis revealed that all LC have higher affinity and catalytic activity for the non-neuronal SNARE isoform VAMP3 than for the neuronal VAMP1 and 2 isoforms. LC/D in particular exhibited extremely low catalytic activity towards VAMP1 relative to other interactions, which we determined through point mutation analysis to be a result of the Ile present at residue 48 of VAMP1. We also identified the VAMP3 cleavage sites to be at the Gln 59-Phe 60 (LC/B), Lys 42-Leu 43 (LC/D), and Gln 41-Lys 42 (LC/F) peptide bonds, which correspond to those of VAMP1 or 2. Understanding the substrate specificity and kinetic characteristics of BoNT towards human SNARE proteins may aid in the development of novel therapeutic uses for BoNT.

  1. Intracellular localization of VAMP-1 protein in human neutrophils.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nabokina, S M

    2001-02-01

    We studied the intracellular localization of vesicle-associated membrane protein VAMP-1 in human neutrophils. VAMP-1 was associated with membranes of gelatinase and specific secretory granules rapidly mobilized during exocytosis. VAMP-1 probably acts as a component of the SNARE complex during exocytosis of gelatinase and specific granules in human neutrophils.

  2. Incomplete resection rate of cold snare polypectomy: a prospective single-arm observational study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsuura, Noriko; Takeuchi, Yoji; Yamashina, Takeshi; Ito, Takashi; Aoi, Kenji; Nagai, Kengo; Kanesaka, Takashi; Matsui, Fumi; Fujii, Mototsugu; Akasaka, Tomofumi; Hanaoka, Noboru; Higashino, Koji; Tomita, Yasuhiko; Ito, Yuri; Ishihara, Ryu; Iishi, Hiroyasu; Uedo, Noriya

    2017-03-01

    Background and study aims Cold snare polypectomy (CSP) is considered to be safe for the removal of subcentimeter colorectal polyps. This study aimed to determine the rate of incomplete CSP resection for subcentimeter neoplastic polyps at our center. Patients and methods Patients with small or diminutive adenomas (diameter 1 - 9 mm) were recruited to undergo CSP until no polyp was visible. After CSP, a 1 - 3 mm margin around the resection site was removed using endoscopic mucosal resection. The polyps and resection site marginal specimens were microscopically evaluated. Incomplete resection was defined as the presence of neoplastic tissue in the marginal specimen. We also calculated the frequency at which the polyp lateral margins could be assessed for completeness of resection. Results A total of 307 subcentimeter neoplastic polyps were removed from 120 patients. The incomplete resection rate was 3.9 % (95 % confidence interval [CI] 1.7 % - 6.1 %); incomplete resection was not associated with polyp size, location, morphology, or operator experience. The polyp lateral margins could not be assessed adequately for 206 polyps (67.1 %). Interobserver agreement between incomplete resection and lateral polyp margins that were inadequate for assessment was poor (κ = 0.029, 95 %CI 0 - 0.04). Female sex was an independent risk factor for incomplete resection (odds ratio 4.41, 95 %CI 1.26 - 15.48; P  = 0.02). Conclusions At our center, CSP resection was associated with a moderate rate of incomplete resection, which was not associated with polyp characteristics. However, adequate evaluation of resection may not be routinely possible using the lateral margin from subcentimeter polyps that were removed using CSP.Trial registered at University Hospital Medical Information Network (UMIN 000010879).

  3. Transurethral exchange of double-J ureteral stent using goose- neck snare

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kang, Chang Ho; Kim, Yun Hwan; Cho, Sung Bum; Kim, Chul Joong; Kim, Hyoung Rae; Kim, Hong Weon; Suh, Won Hyuck [College of Medicine, Korea University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Cho, Sung Bum [Eulji Hospital, Eulji College of Medicine, Taejon (Korea, Republic of)

    2000-09-01

    To evaluate the usefulness of transurethral exchange of double-J ureteral stent as an effective alternative to the cystoscopic approach. There were 20 exchange cases involving seven patients (six women and one man) who initially underwent anterograde manipulation of a double-J ureteral stent. Indications for stent placement were ureteral stricture caused by malignancy in six patients (cervical carcinoma (n=3D5), stomach carcinoma (n=3D1)), and renal tuberculosis in one. An 8-F Nelaton catheter was inserted in the bladder via the urethra and contrast material was injected until the bladder was fully distended. The distal end of a double-J ureteral stent was extracted to the urethral orifice using a goose-neck snare and a 0.035{sup s}tiff guide wire was then advanced to the renal pelvis through the stent. After that, the stent was removed and a 4-F Cobra catheter was advanced to the renal pelvis along the guide wire. Contrast material was injected through the catheter, and the renal pelvis, calyx and ureter were opacified. The 0.035 stiff guide wire was again inserted via the catheter, and a new double-J ureteral stent was inserted, and the catheter removed. Finally, the new double-J stent was properly located within the renal pelvis and the bladder. Double-J ureteral stents were successfully exchanged in 19 of 20 exchange cases. After the procedure, all patients reported tolerable, minimal lower abdominal pain. Transurethral exchange of double-J ureteral stent is a useful alternative to cystoscopy. (author)

  4. Three new techniques for creation of a steerable sheath, a 4F snare, and bidirectional sheath inversion using existing endovascular materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mallios, Alexandros; Yankovic, Willy; Boura, Benoit; Combes, Myriam

    2012-09-01

    We present three novel techniques for creation of (1) a steerable sheath, (2) a 4F snare device, and (3) dual anterograde and retrograde double-wire percutaneous transluminal angioplasty access technique using a single femoral puncture. These techniques were conceived and bench-tested in our institution, allowing the utilization of inexpensive equipment for complicated endovascular procedures. They offer (1) controlled navigation, no-touch vessel cannulation and cannulation of angulated vessels, contralateral limb of stent grafts, fenestrations, and branches; (2) a low-profile (4F external diameter) modifiable snare with the ability to expand to the size of an entire aneurysm and the ability to undo the snare in case of blockage with other endovascular material; and (3) in situ sheath inversion for concomitant anterograde and retrograde percutaneous angioplasty with a single femoral puncture.

  5. Convolutional Neural Networks with Batch Normalization for Classifying Hi-hat, Snare, and Bass Percussion Sound Samples

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gajhede, Nicolai; Beck, Oliver; Purwins, Hendrik

    2016-01-01

    After having revolutionized image and speech processing, convolu- tional neural networks (CNN) are now starting to become more and more successful in music information retrieval as well. We compare four CNN types for classifying a dataset of more than 3000 acoustic and synthesized samples...... of the most prominent drum set instru- ments (bass, snare, hi-hat). We use the Mel scale log magnitudes (MLS) as a representation for the input of the CNN. We compare the classification results of 1) a CNN (3 conv/max-pool layers and 2 fully connected layers) without drop-out and batch normalization vs. three...

  6. Scintigraphy in postoperative follow-up of osteosynthesis of the femur with a bridge plate associated with an intramedullary pin in rabbits

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N.F. Borges

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this work was to monitor the consolidation of the femur after osteosynthesis with a bridge plate associated with the intramedullary pin using scintigraphy. We used seven New Zealand breed male rabbits, at 4 months of age, with a mean weight of 3.5 kg. We performed a three-phase bone scintigraphy with technetium-labeled methylene diphosphonate (99mTc-MDP before and after surgery, and 20, 50 and 90 days postoperatively. The activity index (AI was calculated by dividing the average number of uptake counts in the region of the osteotomy by the average number of counts in the corresponding region in the contralateral limb. Radiography was performed before surgery, after surgery, and 15, 30, 45, 60 and 90 days postoperatively. We found a direct relationship between the activity index and progress of bone scintigraphy in the evaluation sequence over the period of observation. Scintigraphy allows monitoring of bone metabolism and measurement of vascularization and/or bone or tissue perfusion. The images obtained in the blood pool and static phases are the most appropriate for assessing bone metabolism in the context of this study. The bridge plate associated with the intramedullary pin promotes osteosynthesis with sufficient stability to allow bone consolidation.

  7. Paracrine intercellular communication by a Ca2+- and SNARE-independent release of GABA and glutamate prior to synapse formation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Demarque, Michael; Represa, Alfonso; Becq, Hélène; Khalilov, Ilgam; Ben-Ari, Yehezkel; Aniksztejn, Laurent

    2002-12-19

    GABA and glutamate receptors are expressed in immature "silent" CA1 pyramidal neurons prior to synapse formation, but their function is unknown. We now report the presence of tonic, spontaneous, and evoked currents in embryonic and neonatal CA1 neurons mediated primarily by the activation of GABA(A) receptors. These currents are mediated by a nonconventional release of transmitters, as they persist in the presence of calcium channel blockers or botulinium toxin and are observed in Munc18-1-deficient mice in which vesicular release is abolished. This paracrine communication is modulated by glutamate but not GABA transporters, which do not operate during this period of life. Thus, a Ca(2+)- and SNARE-independent release of transmitters underlies a paracrine mode of communication before synapse formation.

  8. Laryngeal snaring by ingested fishing net in a common bottlenose dolphin (Tursiops truncatus) off the Israeli shoreline.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levy, Alon M; Brenner, Ori; Scheinin, Aviad; Morick, Dan; Ratner, Eliana; Goffman, Oz; Kerem, Dan

    2009-07-01

    We report an unusual snaring of the larynx in an adult, female common bottlenose dolphin (Tursiops truncatus). The dolphin was observed swimming and diving in Haifa Port, Israel, but was found dead the next day, 60 km south, on the coast. Postmortem examination revealed stranded-cordage, nylon filaments wrapped around the larynx, cutting through the soft tissue, and extending down into the forestomach, where a large mass of netting was found. The cachectic state of the dolphin and the subacute to chronic, hyper-plastic response of soft tissue surrounding the filaments lodged around the larynx, suggest a prolonged period of starvation, which led to the final weakness and wasting of the dolphin.

  9. Yeast Interacting Proteins Database: YGR247W, YOR327C [Yeast Interacting Proteins Database

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available ferred by null mutation or by overexpression Rows with this bait as bait (1) Rows with this bait as prey (0)...f R-type v-SNARE proteins Rows with this prey as prey (2) Rows with this prey as bait (0) 7 27 3 4 0 0 0 0 0...phosphate; may have a role in tRNA splicing; no detectable phenotype is conferred by null mutation or by overexpression Row...s with this bait as bait Rows with this bait as bait (1) Rows with this bait as prey Row...h the plasma membrane; member of the synaptobrevin/VAMP family of R-type v-SNARE proteins Rows with this prey as prey Row

  10. Advances in X-ray free electron laser (XFEL) diffraction data processing applied to the crystal structure of the synaptotagmin-1 / SNARE complex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lyubimov, Artem Y; Uervirojnangkoorn, Monarin; Zeldin, Oliver B; Zhou, Qiangjun; Zhao, Minglei; Brewster, Aaron S; Michels-Clark, Tara; Holton, James M; Sauter, Nicholas K; Weis, William I; Brunger, Axel T

    2016-10-12

    X-ray free electron lasers (XFELs) reduce the effects of radiation damage on macromolecular diffraction data and thereby extend the limiting resolution. Previously, we adapted classical post-refinement techniques to XFEL diffraction data to produce accurate diffraction data sets from a limited number of diffraction images (Uervirojnangkoorn et al., 2015), and went on to use these techniques to obtain a complete data set from crystals of the synaptotagmin-1 / SNARE complex and to determine the structure at 3.5 Å resolution (Zhou et al., 2015). Here, we describe new advances in our methods and present a reprocessed XFEL data set of the synaptotagmin-1 / SNARE complex. The reprocessing produced small improvements in electron density maps and the refined atomic model. The maps also contained more information than those of a lower resolution (4.1 Å) synchrotron data set. Processing a set of simulated XFEL diffraction images revealed that our methods yield accurate data and atomic models.

  11. Proteomics characterization of abundant Golgi membrane proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bell, A W; Ward, M A; Blackstock, W P; Freeman, H N; Choudhary, J S; Lewis, A P; Chotai, D; Fazel, A; Gushue, J N; Paiement, J; Palcy, S; Chevet, E; Lafrenière-Roula, M; Solari, R; Thomas, D Y; Rowley, A; Bergeron, J J

    2001-02-16

    A mass spectrometric analysis of proteins partitioning into Triton X-114 from purified hepatic Golgi apparatus (84% purity by morphometry, 122-fold enrichment over the homogenate for the Golgi marker galactosyl transferase) led to the unambiguous identification of 81 proteins including a novel Golgi-associated protein of 34 kDa (GPP34). The membrane protein complement was resolved by SDS-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis and subjected to a hierarchical approach using delayed extraction matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization mass spectrometry characterization by peptide mass fingerprinting, tandem mass spectrometry to generate sequence tags, and Edman sequencing of proteins. Major membrane proteins corresponded to known Golgi residents, a Golgi lectin, anterograde cargo, and an abundance of trafficking proteins including KDEL receptors, p24 family members, SNAREs, Rabs, a single ARF-guanine nucleotide exchange factor, and two SCAMPs. Analytical fractionation and gold immunolabeling of proteins in the purified Golgi fraction were used to assess the intra-Golgi and total cellular distribution of GPP34, two SNAREs, SCAMPs, and the trafficking proteins GBF1, BAP31, and alpha(2)P24 identified by the proteomics approach as well as the endoplasmic reticulum contaminant calnexin. Although GPP34 has never previously been identified as a protein, the localization of GPP34 to the Golgi complex, the conservation of GPP34 from yeast to humans, and the cytosolically exposed location of GPP34 predict a role for a novel coat protein in Golgi trafficking.

  12. An α-helical core encodes the dual functions of the chlamydial protein IncA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ronzone, Erik; Wesolowski, Jordan; Bauler, Laura D; Bhardwaj, Anshul; Hackstadt, Ted; Paumet, Fabienne

    2014-11-28

    Chlamydia is an intracellular bacterium that establishes residence within parasitophorous compartments (inclusions) inside host cells. Chlamydial inclusions are uncoupled from the endolysosomal pathway and undergo fusion with cellular organelles and with each other. To do so, Chlamydia expresses proteins on the surface of the inclusion using a Type III secretion system. These proteins, termed Incs, are located at the interface between host and pathogen and carry out the functions necessary for Chlamydia survival. Among these Incs, IncA plays a critical role in both protecting the inclusion from lysosomal fusion and inducing the homotypic fusion of inclusions. Within IncA are two regions homologous to eukaryotic SNARE (soluble N-ethylmaleimide-sensitive factor attachment receptor) domains referred to as SNARE-like domain 1 (SLD1) and SNARE-like domain 2 (SLD2). Using a multidisciplinary approach, we have discovered the functional core of IncA that retains the ability to both inhibit SNARE-mediated fusion and promote the homotypic fusion of Chlamydia inclusions. Circular dichroism and analytical ultracentrifugation experiments show that this core region is composed almost entirely of α-helices and assembles into stable homodimers in solution. Altogether, we propose that both IncA functions are encoded in a structured core domain that encompasses SLD1 and part of SLD2. © 2014 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  13. An α-Helical Core Encodes the Dual Functions of the Chlamydial Protein IncA*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ronzone, Erik; Wesolowski, Jordan; Bauler, Laura D.; Bhardwaj, Anshul; Hackstadt, Ted; Paumet, Fabienne

    2014-01-01

    Chlamydia is an intracellular bacterium that establishes residence within parasitophorous compartments (inclusions) inside host cells. Chlamydial inclusions are uncoupled from the endolysosomal pathway and undergo fusion with cellular organelles and with each other. To do so, Chlamydia expresses proteins on the surface of the inclusion using a Type III secretion system. These proteins, termed Incs, are located at the interface between host and pathogen and carry out the functions necessary for Chlamydia survival. Among these Incs, IncA plays a critical role in both protecting the inclusion from lysosomal fusion and inducing the homotypic fusion of inclusions. Within IncA are two regions homologous to eukaryotic SNARE (soluble N-ethylmaleimide-sensitive factor attachment receptor) domains referred to as SNARE-like domain 1 (SLD1) and SNARE-like domain 2 (SLD2). Using a multidisciplinary approach, we have discovered the functional core of IncA that retains the ability to both inhibit SNARE-mediated fusion and promote the homotypic fusion of Chlamydia inclusions. Circular dichroism and analytical ultracentrifugation experiments show that this core region is composed almost entirely of α-helices and assembles into stable homodimers in solution. Altogether, we propose that both IncA functions are encoded in a structured core domain that encompasses SLD1 and part of SLD2. PMID:25324548

  14. Protein

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Food Service Resources Additional Resources About FAQ Contact Protein Protein is found throughout the body—in muscle, ... the heart and respiratory system, and death. All Protein Isn’t Alike Protein is built from building ...

  15. Association of syntaxin 3 and vesicle-associated membrane protein (VAMP) with H+/K(+)-ATPase-containing tubulovesicles in gastric parietal cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peng, X R; Yao, X; Chow, D C; Forte, J G; Bennett, M K

    1997-01-01

    H+/K(+)-ATPase is the proton pump in the gastric parietal cell that is responsible for gastric acid secretion. Stimulation of acid secretion is associated with a reorganization of the parietal cells resulting in the incorporation of H+/K(+)-ATPase from a cytoplasmic membrane pool, the tubulovesicle compartment, into the apical canalicular membrane. To better characterize the role of membrane trafficking events in the morphological and physiological changes associated with acid secretion from parietal cells, we have characterized the expression and localization of soluble N-ethylmaleimide-sensitive factor attachment protein receptors (SNAREs) in these cells. Each of the six different SNARE proteins examined [syntaxins 1 through 4 of 25-kDa synaptosome-associated protein, and vesicle-associated membrane protein] were found to be expressed in parietal cells. Furthermore, two of these SNAREs, vesicle-associated membrane protein and syntaxin 3, were associated with H+/K(+)-ATPase-containing tubulovesicles while the remainder were excluded from this compartment. The expression of syntaxin 1 and synaptosome-associated protein of 25 kDa in parietal cells, two SNAREs previously thought to be restricted to neuroendocrine tissues, suggests that parietal cells may utilize membrane trafficking machinery that is similar to that utilized for regulated exocytosis in neurons. Furthermore, the localization of syntaxin 3, a putative target membrane SNARE, to the tubulovesicle compartment indicates that syntaxin 3 may have an alternative function. These observations support a role for intracellular membrane trafficking events in the regulated recruitment of H+/K(+)-ATPase to the plasma membrane after parietal cell stimulation. Images PMID:9188093

  16. Botulinum neurotoxin: a marvel of protein design.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montal, Mauricio

    2010-01-01

    Botulinum neurotoxin (BoNT), the causative agent of botulism, is acknowledged to be the most poisonous protein known. BoNT proteases disable synaptic vesicle exocytosis by cleaving their cytosolic SNARE (soluble NSF attachment protein receptor) substrates. BoNT is a modular nanomachine: an N-terminal Zn(2+)-metalloprotease, which cleaves the SNAREs; a central helical protein-conducting channel, which chaperones the protease across endosomes; and a C-terminal receptor-binding module, consisting of two subdomains that determine target specificity by binding to a ganglioside and a protein receptor on the cell surface and triggering endocytosis. For BoNT, functional complexity emerges from its modular design and the tight interplay between its component modules--a partnership with consequences that surpass the simple sum of the individual component's action. BoNTs exploit this design at each step of the intoxication process, thereby achieving an exquisite toxicity. This review summarizes current knowledge on the structure of individual modules and presents mechanistic insights into how this protein machine evolved to this level of sophistication. Understanding the design principles underpinning the function of such a dynamic modular protein remains a challenging task.

  17. Protein (Viridiplantae): 356536651 [PGDBj - Ortholog DB

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available 3847:289 PREDICTED: bet1-like SNARE 1-2-like Glycine max MSYRRDNRSSRSSLVDGFDSLEEGGLRASSSYSREINEHDNDKAIENLQDRVSFLKRLTGDIHEEVESHNQLLDRVGNKMDGSRGVMMGTMDRFKKVFEKKSARKTCSLVGYFTLAFIFIYYLIR ...

  18. Secretion induces cell pH dynamics impacting assembly-disassembly of the fusion protein complex: A combined fluorescence and atomic force microscopy study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lewis, Kenneth T; Naik, Akshata R; Laha, Suvra S; Wang, Sunxi; Mao, Guangzhao; Kuhn, Eric; Jena, Bhanu P

    2017-08-03

    A wide range of cellular activities including protein folding and cell secretion, such as neurotransmission or insulin release, are all governed by intracellular pH homeostasis, underscoring the importance of pH on critical life processes. Nano- scale pH measurements of cells and biomolecules therefore hold great promise in understanding a plethora of cellular functions, in addition to disease detection and therapy. In the current study, a novel approach using cadmium telluride quantum dots (CdTeQDs) as pH sensors, combined with fluorescent imaging, spectrofluorimetry, atomic force microscopy (AFM), and Western blot analysis, enabled the study of intracellular pH dynamics at 1 milli-pH sensitivity and 80nm pixel resolution, during insulin secretion. Additionally, the pH-dependent interaction between membrane fusion proteins, also called the soluble N-ethylmaleimide-sensitive factor activating protein receptor (SNARE), was determined. Glucose stimulation of CdTeQD-loaded insulin secreting Min-6 mouse insulinoma cell line demonstrated the initial (5-6min) intracellular acidification reflected as a loss in QD fluorescence, followed by alkalization and a return to resting pH in 10min. Analysis of the SNARE complex in insulin secreting Min-6 cells demonstrated an initial gain followed by loss of complexed SNAREs in 10min. Stabilization of the SNARE complex at low intracellular pH is further supported by results from studies utilizing both native and AFM measurements of liposome-reconstituted recombinant neuronal SNAREs, providing a molecular understanding of the role of pH during cell secretion. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Autophagy and proteins involved in vesicular trafficking.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amaya, Celina; Fader, Claudio Marcelo; Colombo, María Isabel

    2015-11-14

    Autophagy is an intracellular degradation system that, as a basic mechanism it delivers cytoplasmic components to the lysosomes in order to maintain adequate energy levels and cellular homeostasis. This complex cellular process is activated by low cellular nutrient levels and other stress situations such as low ATP levels, the accumulation of damaged proteins or organelles, or pathogen invasion. Autophagy as a multistep process involves vesicular transport events leading to tethering and fusion of autophagic vesicles with several intracellular compartments. This review summarizes our current understanding of the autophagic pathway with emphasis in the trafficking machinery (i.e. Rabs GTPases and SNAP receptors (SNAREs)) involved in specific steps of the pathway.

  20. Yeast Interacting Proteins Database: YOR036W, YBL102W [Yeast Interacting Proteins Database

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available YOR036W PEP12 Target membrane receptor (t-SNARE) for vesicular intermediates travel...me PEP12 Bait description Target membrane receptor (t-SNARE) for vesicular intermediates traveling between t

  1. Yeast Interacting Proteins Database: YPL151C, YOR036W [Yeast Interacting Proteins Database

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available t-SNARE) for vesicular intermediates traveling between the Golgi apparatus and the vacuole; controls entry o...e PEP12 Prey description Target membrane receptor (t-SNARE) for vesicular intermediates traveling between th

  2. Absalon and Esbern Snare

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nørby, Søren; Wismann, Tom

    2017-01-01

    of Africa, as well as in Operation RECSYR where the world community removed Syria's chemical weapons from the civil war-stricken country. This e-book tells the fascinating story of the ships' design, building, their equipment, life on board and the first years of operations. The e-book contains over 150...

  3. PTPRT regulates the interaction of Syntaxin-binding protein 1 with Syntaxin 1 through dephosphorylation of specific tyrosine residue

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lim, So-Hee; Moon, Jeonghee [Biomedical Proteomics Research Center, Korea Research Institute of Bioscience and Biotechnology, Daejeon 305-806 (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Myungkyu [Bionanotechnology Research Center, Korea Research Institute of Bioscience and Biotechnology, Daejeon 305-806 (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Jae-Ran, E-mail: leejr@kribb.re.kr [Biomedical Proteomics Research Center, Korea Research Institute of Bioscience and Biotechnology, Daejeon 305-806 (Korea, Republic of)

    2013-09-13

    Highlights: •PTPRT is a brain-specific, expressed, protein tyrosine phosphatase. •PTPRT regulated the interaction of Syntaxin-binding protein 1 with Syntaxin 1. •PTPRT dephosphorylated the specific tyrosine residue of Syntaxin-binding protein 1. •Dephosphorylation of Syntaxin-binding protein 1 enhanced the interaction with Syntaxin 1. •PTPRT appears to regulate the fusion of synaptic vesicle through dephosphorylation. -- Abstract: PTPRT (protein tyrosine phosphatase receptor T), a brain-specific tyrosine phosphatase, has been found to regulate synaptic formation and development of hippocampal neurons, but its regulation mechanism is not yet fully understood. Here, Syntaxin-binding protein 1, a key component of synaptic vesicle fusion machinery, was identified as a possible interaction partner and an endogenous substrate of PTPRT. PTPRT interacted with Syntaxin-binding protein 1 in rat synaptosome, and co-localized with Syntaxin-binding protein 1 in cultured hippocampal neurons. PTPRT dephosphorylated tyrosine 145 located around the linker between domain 1 and 2 of Syntaxin-binding protein 1. Syntaxin-binding protein 1 directly binds to Syntaxin 1, a t-SNARE (soluble N-ethylmaleimide-sensitive factor attachment protein receptor) protein, and plays a role as catalysts of SNARE complex formation. Syntaxin-binding protein 1 mutant mimicking non-phosphorylation (Y145F) enhanced the interaction with Syntaxin 1 compared to wild type, and therefore, dephosphorylation of Syntaxin-binding protein 1 appeared to be important for SNARE-complex formation. In conclusion, PTPRT could regulate the interaction of Syntaxin-binding protein 1 with Syntaxin 1, and as a result, the synaptic vesicle fusion appeared to be controlled through dephosphorylation of Syntaxin-binding protein 1.

  4. Loss-of-function mutations of retromer large subunit genes suppress the phenotype of an Arabidopsis zig mutant that lacks Qb-SNARE VTI11.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hashiguchi, Yasuko; Niihama, Mitsuru; Takahashi, Tetsuya; Saito, Chieko; Nakano, Akihiko; Tasaka, Masao; Morita, Miyo Terao

    2010-01-01

    Arabidopsis thaliana zigzag (zig) is a loss-of-function mutant of Qb-SNARE VTI11, which is involved in membrane trafficking between the trans-Golgi network and the vacuole. zig-1 exhibits abnormalities in shoot gravitropism and morphology. Here, we report that loss-of-function mutants of the retromer large subunit partially suppress the zig-1 phenotype. Moreover, we demonstrate that three paralogous VPS35 genes of Arabidopsis have partially overlapping but distinct genetic functions with respect to zig-1 suppression. Tissue-specific complementation experiments using an endodermis-specific SCR promoter show that expression of VPS35B or VPS35C cannot complement the function of VPS35A. The data suggest the existence of functionally specialized paralogous VPS35 genes that nevertheless share common functions.

  5. Loss-of-Function Mutations of Retromer Large Subunit Genes Suppress the Phenotype of an Arabidopsis zig Mutant That Lacks Qb-SNARE VTI11[C][W

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hashiguchi, Yasuko; Niihama, Mitsuru; Takahashi, Tetsuya; Saito, Chieko; Nakano, Akihiko; Tasaka, Masao; Morita, Miyo Terao

    2010-01-01

    Arabidopsis thaliana zigzag (zig) is a loss-of-function mutant of Qb-SNARE VTI11, which is involved in membrane trafficking between the trans-Golgi network and the vacuole. zig-1 exhibits abnormalities in shoot gravitropism and morphology. Here, we report that loss-of-function mutants of the retromer large subunit partially suppress the zig-1 phenotype. Moreover, we demonstrate that three paralogous VPS35 genes of Arabidopsis have partially overlapping but distinct genetic functions with respect to zig-1 suppression. Tissue-specific complementation experiments using an endodermis-specific SCR promoter show that expression of VPS35B or VPS35C cannot complement the function of VPS35A. The data suggest the existence of functionally specialized paralogous VPS35 genes that nevertheless share common functions. PMID:20086190

  6. Combined Use of Clips and Nylon Snare (“Tulip-Bundle” as a Rescue Endoscopic Bleeding Control in a Mallory-Weiss Syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hrvoje Ivekovic

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Mallory-Weiss syndrome (MWS accounts for 6–14% of all cases of upper gastrointestinal bleeding. Prognosis of patients with MWS is generally good, with a benign course and rare recurrence of bleeding. However, no strict recommendations exist in regard to the mode of action after a failure of primary endoscopic hemostasis. We report a case of an 83-year-old male with MWS and rebleeding after the initial endoscopic treatment with epinephrine and clips. The final endoscopic control of bleeding was achieved by a combined application of clips and a nylon snare in a “tulip-bundle” fashion. The patient had an uneventful postprocedural clinical course and was discharged from the hospital five days later. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first case report showing the “tulip-bundle” technique as a rescue endoscopic bleeding control in the esophagus.

  7. Combined use of clips and nylon snare ("tulip-bundle") as a rescue endoscopic bleeding control in a mallory-weiss syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ivekovic, Hrvoje; Radulovic, Bojana; Jankovic, Suzana; Markos, Pave; Rustemovic, Nadan

    2014-01-01

    Mallory-Weiss syndrome (MWS) accounts for 6-14% of all cases of upper gastrointestinal bleeding. Prognosis of patients with MWS is generally good, with a benign course and rare recurrence of bleeding. However, no strict recommendations exist in regard to the mode of action after a failure of primary endoscopic hemostasis. We report a case of an 83-year-old male with MWS and rebleeding after the initial endoscopic treatment with epinephrine and clips. The final endoscopic control of bleeding was achieved by a combined application of clips and a nylon snare in a "tulip-bundle" fashion. The patient had an uneventful postprocedural clinical course and was discharged from the hospital five days later. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first case report showing the "tulip-bundle" technique as a rescue endoscopic bleeding control in the esophagus.

  8. Single Vesicle Assaying of SNARE-Synaptotagmin-Driven Fusion Reveals Fast and Slow Modes of Both Docking and Fusion and Intrasample Heterogeneity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    M. Christensen, Sune; W. Mortensen, Michael; Stamou, Dimitrios

    2011-01-01

    the docking or the fusion of vesicles. Here we report a fluorescence microscopy-based assay to monitor SNARE-mediated docking and fusion of individual vesicle pairs. In situ measurement of the concentration of diffusing particles allowed us to quantify docking rates by a maximum-likelihood approach....... This analysis showed that C2AB and Ca(2+) accelerate vesicle-vesicle docking with more than two orders of magnitude. Comparison of the measured docking rates with ensemble lipid mixing kinetics, however, suggests that in most cases bilayer fusion remains therate-limiting step. Our single vesicle results show...... that only 60% of the vesicles dock and only 6% of docked vesicles fuse. Lipid mixing on single vesicles was fast (t(mix)docking and fusion pathways cannot be rationalized...

  9. Role of tetanus neurotoxin insensitive vesicle-associated membrane protein (TI-VAMP) in vesicular transport mediating neurite outgrowth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martinez-Arca, S; Alberts, P; Zahraoui, A; Louvard, D; Galli, T

    2000-05-15

    How vesicular transport participates in neurite outgrowth is still poorly understood. Neurite outgrowth is not sensitive to tetanus neurotoxin thus does not involve synaptobrevin-mediated vesicular transport to the plasma membrane of neurons. Tetanus neurotoxin-insensitive vesicle-associated membrane protein (TI-VAMP) is a vesicle-SNARE (soluble N-ethylmaleimide-sensitive fusion protein [NSF] attachment protein [SNAP] receptor), involved in transport to the apical plasma membrane in epithelial cells, a tetanus neurotoxin-resistant pathway. Here we show that TI-VAMP is essential for vesicular transport-mediating neurite outgrowth in staurosporine-differentiated PC12 cells. The NH(2)-terminal domain, which precedes the SNARE motif of TI-VAMP, inhibits the association of TI-VAMP with synaptosome-associated protein of 25 kD (SNAP25). Expression of this domain inhibits neurite outgrowth as potently as Botulinum neurotoxin E, which cleaves SNAP25. In contrast, expression of the NH(2)-terminal deletion mutant of TI-VAMP increases SNARE complex formation and strongly stimulates neurite outgrowth. These results provide the first functional evidence for the role of TI-VAMP in neurite outgrowth and point to its NH(2)-terminal domain as a key regulator in this process.

  10. A vesicle-trafficking protein commandeers Kv channel voltage sensors for voltage-dependent secretion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grefen, Christopher; Karnik, Rucha; Larson, Emily; Lefoulon, Cécile; Wang, Yizhou; Waghmare, Sakharam; Zhang, Ben; Hills, Adrian; Blatt, Michael R

    2015-01-01

    Growth in plants depends on ion transport for osmotic solute uptake and secretory membrane trafficking to deliver material for wall remodelling and cell expansion. The coordination of these processes lies at the heart of the question, unresolved for more than a century, of how plants regulate cell volume and turgor. Here we report that the SNARE protein SYP121 (SYR1/PEN1), which mediates vesicle fusion at the Arabidopsis plasma membrane, binds the voltage sensor domains (VSDs) of K(+) channels to confer a voltage dependence on secretory traffic in parallel with K(+) uptake. VSD binding enhances secretion in vivo subject to voltage, and mutations affecting VSD conformation alter binding and secretion in parallel with channel gating, net K(+) concentration, osmotic content and growth. These results demonstrate a new and unexpected mechanism for secretory control, in which a subset of plant SNAREs commandeer K(+) channel VSDs to coordinate membrane trafficking with K(+) uptake for growth.

  11. Discrete and continuous models of protein sorting in the Golgi

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gong, Haijun; Schwartz, Russell

    2009-03-01

    The Golgi apparatus plays an important role in processing and sorting proteins and lipids. Golgi compartments constantly exchange material with each other and with other cellular components, allowing them to maintain and reform distinct identities despite dramatic changes in structure and size during cell division, development and osmotic stress. We have developed two minimal models of membrane and protein exchange in the Golgi --- a discrete, stochastic model [1] and a continuous ordinary differential equation (ODE) model --- both based on two fundamental mechanisms: vesicle-coat-mediated selective concentration of soluble N-ethylmaleimide-sensitive factor attachment protein receptor (SNARE) proteins during vesicle formation and SNARE-mediated selective fusion of vesicles. Both show similar ability to establish and maintain distinct identities over broad parameter ranges, but they diverge in extreme conditions where Golgi collapse and reassembly may be observed. By exploring where the models differ, we hope to better identify those features essential to minimal models of various Golgi behaviors. [1] H. Gong, D. Sengupta, A. D. Linstedt, R. Schwartz. Biophys J. 95: 1674-1688, 2008.

  12. Effect of Metformin on v-SNAREs expression in Human omental Adipocytes%二甲双胍对人网膜脂肪细胞中v-SNAREs家族表达的影响

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    丁跃; 刘云峰; 章毅; 杨静

    2015-01-01

    目的:观察二甲双胍对人成熟脂肪细胞中囊泡相关可溶性N-乙酰基亚胺敏感因子附着蛋白受体(vescical-souble N-ethymaleimide sensitive factor attachment proteins receptor, v-SNAREs)家族成员VAMP2、3、4、5、7、8表达的影响。方法:诱导分化人前脂肪细胞为成熟脂肪细胞,并用油红O染色证明。给予不同浓度二甲双胍(0mM,1mM,10mM)干预24小时后,运用实时荧光相对定量PCR技术检测脂肪细胞VAMP2、3、4、5、7、8的mRNA基因水平。结果:与对照组(0mM二甲双胍)相比,1mM二甲双胍上调脂肪细胞VAMP4,5,8水平(分别P<0.05,P<0.05,P<0.05,),下调VAMP3、7水平(分别P<0.05,P<0.01),对VAMP2表达的差异无统计学意义;与对照组相比10mM二甲双胍上调脂肪细胞VAMP4、5、8水平(分别P<0.01,P<0.01,P<0.01),下调VAMP7水平(P<0.01),VAMP2、3表达差异无统计学意义。10mM二甲双胍干预组与1mM组比较, VAMP3、4、5、8表达水平升高(P<0.05,P<0.05,P<0.05,P<0.01),VAMP2、7表达差异无统计学意义。结论:二甲双胍可上调VAMP4,5,8的表达,可下调VAMP3、7的表达,且具有一定的剂量依赖效应,对VAMP2的表达无影响,显示二甲双胍可能通过对v-SNAREs家族表达的调节而参与对脂肪细胞GLUT4转运的调节。%Objective:To observe the effects of metformin on the expression of vesicle-associated membrane proteins (VAMP2,3,4,7,8) which the subfailmilies of vescical-souble N-ethymaleimide sensitive factor attachment proteins receptor (v-SNAREs) in human omental adipocytes. Method:Induce human preadipocytes into mature adipocytes and proofed by oil red O staining. Twenty-four hours after giving different concentration metfomin ( 0mM, 1mM, 10mM) intervention, we using real-time PCR technology to detect the mRNA expression of VAMP2,3,4,5,7,8.Results The levels of VAMP4,5,8 in 1mM metformin group was increased compared with

  13. Syntaxin 7 complexes with mouse Vps10p tail interactor 1b, syntaxin 6, vesicle-associated membrane protein (VAMP)8, and VAMP7 in b16 melanoma cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wade, N; Bryant, N J; Connolly, L M; Simpson, R J; Luzio, J P; Piper, R C; James, D E

    2001-06-01

    Syntaxin 7 is a mammalian target soluble N-ethylmaleimide-sensitive factor attachment protein receptor (SNARE) involved in membrane transport between late endosomes and lysosomes. The aim of the present study was to use immunoaffinity techniques to identify proteins that interact with Syntaxin 7. We reasoned that this would be facilitated by the use of cells producing high levels of Syntaxin 7. Screening of a large number of tissues and cell lines revealed that Syntaxin 7 is expressed at very high levels in B16 melanoma cells. Moreover, the expression of Syntaxin 7 increased in these cells as they underwent melanogenesis. From a large scale Syntaxin 7 immunoprecipitation, we have identified six polypeptides using a combination of electrospray mass spectrometry and immunoblotting. These polypeptides corresponded to Syntaxin 7, Syntaxin 6, mouse Vps10p tail interactor 1b (mVti1b), alpha-synaptosome-associated protein (SNAP), vesicle-associated membrane protein (VAMP)8, VAMP7, and the protein phosphatase 1M regulatory subunit. We also observed partial colocalization between Syntaxin 6 and Syntaxin 7, between Syntaxin 6 and mVti1b, but not between Syntaxin 6 and the early endosomal t-SNARE Syntaxin 13. Based on these and data reported previously, we propose that Syntaxin 7/mVti1b/Syntaxin 6 may form discrete SNARE complexes with either VAMP7 or VAMP8 to regulate fusion events within the late endosomal pathway and that these events may play a critical role in melanogenesis.

  14. Music Preferences, Friendship, and Externalizing Behavior in Early Adolescence: A SIENA Examination of the Music Marker Theory Using the SNARE Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Franken, Aart; Keijsers, Loes; Dijkstra, Jan Kornelis; Ter Bogt, Tom

    2017-01-18

    Music Marker Theory posits that music is relevant for the structuring of peer groups and that rock, urban, or dance music preferences relate to externalizing behavior. The present study tested these hypotheses, by investigating the role of music preference similarity in friendship selection and the development of externalizing behavior, while taking the effects of friends' externalizing behavior into account. Data were used from the first three waves of the SNARE (Social Network Analysis of Risk behavior in Early adolescence) study (N = 1144; 50% boys; M age = 12.7; SD = 0.47), including students who entered the first-year of secondary school. Two hypotheses were tested. First, adolescents were expected to select friends based both on a similarity in externalizing behavior and music genre preference. Second, a preference for rock, urban, or dance, music types was expected to predict the development of externalizing behavior, even when taking friends' influence on externalizing behavior into account. Stochastic Actor-Based Modeling indicated that adolescents select their friends based on both externalizing behavior and highbrow music preference. Moreover, both friends' externalizing behavior and a preference for dance music predicted the development of externalizing behavior. Intervention programs might focus on adolescents with dance music preferences.

  15. Vesicle-associated membrane protein 3 (VAMP-3) and VAMP-8 are present in human platelets and are required for granule secretion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Polgár, János; Chung, Sul-Hee; Reed, Guy L

    2002-08-01

    Secretion of platelet granules is necessary for normal hemostasis. Platelet secretion requires soluble N-ethylmaleimide-sensitive factor attachment protein (SNAP) receptor (SNARE) complex formation between different members of the syntaxin, SNAP-25, and vesicle-associated membrane protein (VAMP) gene families. Using microcapillary reverse-phase high-performance liquid chromatography-nano-electrospray tandem mass spectrometry, we identified VAMP-3 and VAMP-8 as VAMP isoforms coimmunoprecipitated from platelets with syntaxin 4. Immunoblotting experiments confirmed the presence of VAMP-3 and VAMP-8 but not VAMP-1 or VAMP-2 in platelets. To examine the effect of VAMP proteins on platelet secretion, soluble recombinant (r) VAMP-2, rVAMP-3, and rVAMP-8 were incubated with streptolysin O-permeabilized platelets. Secretion of alpha granules (monitored by flow cytometric measurement of P-selectin) was blocked, and dense-granule secretion (assessed by release of carbon 14-serotonin) was almost completely inhibited by rVAMP-3, whereas rVAMP-8 inhibited secretion of dense granules but not alpha granules. In contrast, rVAMP-2, which formed SNARE complexes in vitro, had no effect on platelet exocytosis. We conclude that VAMP-3 and VAMP-8 form SNARE complexes with platelet syntaxin 4 and are required for platelet granule secretion.

  16. Structure of synaptophysin: a hexameric MARVEL-domain channel protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arthur, Christopher P; Stowell, Michael H B

    2007-06-01

    Synaptophysin I (SypI) is an archetypal member of the MARVEL-domain family of integral membrane proteins and one of the first synaptic vesicle proteins to be identified and cloned. Most all MARVEL-domain proteins are involved in membrane apposition and vesicle-trafficking events, but their precise role in these processes is unclear. We have purified mammalian SypI and determined its three-dimensional (3D) structure by using electron microscopy and single-particle 3D reconstruction. The hexameric structure resembles an open basket with a large pore and tenuous interactions within the cytosolic domain. The structure suggests a model for Synaptophysin's role in fusion and recycling that is regulated by known interactions with the SNARE machinery. This 3D structure of a MARVEL-domain protein provides a structural foundation for understanding the role of these important proteins in a variety of biological processes.

  17. Short transmembrane domains with high-volume exoplasmic halves determine retention of Type II membrane proteins in the Golgi complex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quiroga, Rodrigo; Trenchi, Alejandra; González Montoro, Ayelén; Valdez Taubas, Javier; Maccioni, Hugo J F

    2013-12-01

    It is still unclear why some proteins that travel along the secretory pathway are retained in the Golgi complex whereas others make their way to the plasma membrane. Recent bioinformatic analyses on a large number of single-spanning membrane proteins support the hypothesis that specific features of the transmembrane domain (TMD) are relevant to the sorting of these proteins to particular organelles. Here we experimentally test this hypothesis for Golgi and plasma membrane proteins. Using the Golgi SNARE protein Sft1 and the plasma membrane SNARE protein Sso1 from Saccharomyces cerevisiae as model proteins, we modified the length of their TMDs and the volume of their exoplasmic hemi-TMD, and determined their subcellular localization both in yeast and mammalian cells. We found that short TMDs with high-volume exoplasmic hemi-TMDs confer Golgi membrane residence, whereas TMDs with low-volume exoplasmic hemi-TMDs, either short or long, confer plasma membrane residence to these proteins. Results indicate that the shape of the exoplasmic hemi-TMD, in addition to the length of the entire TMD, determine retention in the Golgi or exit to the plasma membrane of Type II membrane proteins.

  18. Syntaxin 7 and VAMP-7 are soluble N-ethylmaleimide-sensitive factor attachment protein receptors required for late endosome-lysosome and homotypic lysosome fusion in alveolar macrophages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ward, D M; Pevsner, J; Scullion, M A; Vaughn, M; Kaplan, J

    2000-07-01

    Endocytosis in alveolar macrophages can be reversibly inhibited, permitting the isolation of endocytic vesicles at defined stages of maturation. Using an in vitro fusion assay, we determined that each isolated endosome population was capable of homotypic fusion. All vesicle populations were also capable of heterotypic fusion in a temporally specific manner; early endosomes, isolated 4 min after internalization, could fuse with endosomes isolated 8 min after internalization but not with 12-min endosomes or lysosomes. Lysosomes fuse with 12-min endosomes but not with earlier endosomes. Using homogenous populations of endosomes, we have identified Syntaxin 7 as a soluble N-ethylmaleimide-sensitive factor attachment protein receptor (SNARE) required for late endosome-lysosome and homotypic lysosome fusion in vitro. A bacterially expressed human Syntaxin 7 lacking the transmembrane domain inhibited homotypic late endosome and lysosome fusion as well as heterotypic late endosome-lysosome fusion. Affinity-purified antibodies directed against Syntaxin 7 also inhibited lysosome fusion in vitro but had no affect on homotypic early endosome fusion. Previous work suggested that human VAMP-7 (vesicle-associated membrane protein-7) was a SNARE required for late endosome-lysosome fusion. A bacterially expressed human VAMP-7 lacking the transmembrane domain inhibited both late endosome-lysosome fusion and homotypic lysosome fusion in vitro. These studies indicate that: 1) fusion along the endocytic pathway is a highly regulated process, and 2) two SNARE molecules, Syntaxin 7 and human VAMP-7, are involved in fusion of vesicles in the late endocytic pathway in alveolar macrophages.

  19. Colonoscopia com polipectomia: análise crítica de fatores de risco e complicações Colonic snare polipectomy: critical analysis of risk factors and complications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Edson Jurado da Silva

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Objetivo: Analisar complicações de polipectomia com alça ditérmica em cólon. Pacientes e Métodos: Estudo retrospectivo de polipectomias em colonoscopias realizadas em dois hospitais de 2001 a 2007. Teste t de Student foi usado para média, desvio padrão e qui-quadrado para números absolutos. P0,05. Síndrome pós-polipectomia em 6 (0,35%. Ressecção fatiada somente em maiores que 2 cm, 89/116 (77% sésseis e 11/87 (13% pediculados pPurpose: The aim of this study was to evaluate adverse events from snare polypectomy. Methods: We retrospectively analysed the rate of complications of 1687 snare polypectomies carried out in 8447 colonoscopies between 2001 and 2007 at two Medical Institutions. Student t test was used for statistical analysis of mean and chi-square to compare absolute numbers. A significant p-value was defined as 0,05.Post-polypectomy syndrome occurred in 6 patients (0,35%. In polyps larger than 2 cm, piecemeal resection was performed more often in sessile than in pedunculated ones 89/116 ( 77% versus 11/87 (13% p<0,01. Invasive carcinoma was present in 40 adenoma larger than 2 cm (19,7%. Conclusion: Snare polypectomy is safe procedure, being bleeding the most common complication, related with polyp size mainly its base, treated most of the time endoscopically. Perforation being the next, treated too without surgery.

  20. Interaction of anesthetics with neurotransmitter release machinery proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Zheng; McMillan, Kyle; Pike, Carolyn M; Cahill, Anne L; Herring, Bruce E; Wang, Qiang; Fox, Aaron P

    2013-02-01

    General anesthetics produce anesthesia by depressing central nervous system activity. Activation of inhibitory GABA(A) receptors plays a central role in the action of many clinically relevant general anesthetics. Even so, there is growing evidence that anesthetics can act at a presynaptic locus to inhibit neurotransmitter release. Our own data identified the neurotransmitter release machinery as a target for anesthetic action. In the present study, we sought to examine the site of anesthetic action more closely. Exocytosis was stimulated by directly elevating the intracellular Ca(2+) concentration at neurotransmitter release sites, thereby bypassing anesthetic effects on channels and receptors, allowing anesthetic effects on the neurotransmitter release machinery to be examined in isolation. Three different PC12 cell lines, which had the expression of different release machinery proteins stably suppressed by RNA interference, were used in these studies. Interestingly, there was still significant neurotransmitter release when these knockdown PC12 cells were stimulated. We have previously shown that etomidate, isoflurane, and propofol all inhibited the neurotransmitter release machinery in wild-type PC12 cells. In the present study, we show that knocking down synaptotagmin I completely prevented etomidate from inhibiting neurotransmitter release. Synaptotagmin I knockdown also diminished the inhibition produced by propofol and isoflurane, but the magnitude of the effect was not as large. Knockdown of SNAP-25 and SNAP-23 expression also changed the ability of these three anesthetics to inhibit neurotransmitter release. Our results suggest that general anesthetics inhibit the neurotransmitter release machinery by interacting with multiple SNARE and SNARE-associated proteins.

  1. A mutation in the Golgi Qb-SNARE gene GOSR2 causes progressive myoclonus epilepsy with early ataxia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corbett, Mark A; Schwake, Michael; Bahlo, Melanie; Dibbens, Leanne M; Lin, Meng; Gandolfo, Luke C; Vears, Danya F; O'Sullivan, John D; Robertson, Thomas; Bayly, Marta A; Gardner, Alison E; Vlaar, Annemarie M; Korenke, G Christoph; Bloem, Bastiaan R; de Coo, Irenaeus F; Verhagen, Judith M A; Lehesjoki, Anna-Elina; Gecz, Jozef; Berkovic, Samuel F

    2011-05-13

    The progressive myoclonus epilepsies (PMEs) are a group of predominantly recessive disorders that present with action myoclonus, tonic-clonic seizures, and progressive neurological decline. Many PMEs have similar clinical presentations yet are genetically heterogeneous, making accurate diagnosis difficult. A locus for PME was mapped in a consanguineous family with a single affected individual to chromosome 17q21. An identical-by-descent, homozygous mutation in GOSR2 (c.430G>T, p.Gly144Trp), a Golgi vesicle transport gene, was identified in this patient and in four apparently unrelated individuals. A comparison of the phenotypes in these patients defined a clinically distinct PME syndrome characterized by early-onset ataxia, action myoclonus by age 6, scoliosis, and mildly elevated serum creatine kinase. This p.Gly144Trp mutation is equivalent to a loss of function and results in failure of GOSR2 protein to localize to the cis-Golgi.

  2. A Mutation in the Golgi Qb-SNARE Gene GOSR2 Causes Progressive Myoclonus Epilepsy with Early Ataxia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corbett, Mark A.; Schwake, Michael; Bahlo, Melanie; Dibbens, Leanne M.; Lin, Meng; Gandolfo, Luke C.; Vears, Danya F.; O'Sullivan, John D.; Robertson, Thomas; Bayly, Marta A.; Gardner, Alison E.; Vlaar, Annemarie M.; Korenke, G. Christoph; Bloem, Bastiaan R.; de Coo, Irenaeus F.; Verhagen, Judith M.A.; Lehesjoki, Anna-Elina; Gecz, Jozef; Berkovic, Samuel F.

    2011-01-01

    The progressive myoclonus epilepsies (PMEs) are a group of predominantly recessive disorders that present with action myoclonus, tonic-clonic seizures, and progressive neurological decline. Many PMEs have similar clinical presentations yet are genetically heterogeneous, making accurate diagnosis difficult. A locus for PME was mapped in a consanguineous family with a single affected individual to chromosome 17q21. An identical-by-descent, homozygous mutation in GOSR2 (c.430G>T, p.Gly144Trp), a Golgi vesicle transport gene, was identified in this patient and in four apparently unrelated individuals. A comparison of the phenotypes in these patients defined a clinically distinct PME syndrome characterized by early-onset ataxia, action myoclonus by age 6, scoliosis, and mildly elevated serum creatine kinase. This p.Gly144Trp mutation is equivalent to a loss of function and results in failure of GOSR2 protein to localize to the cis-Golgi. PMID:21549339

  3. Effects of contraction on localization of GLUT4 and v-SNARE isoforms in rat skeletal muscle

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rose, Adam John; Jeppesen, Jacob; Kiens, Bente

    2009-01-01

    In skeletal muscle, contractions increase glucose uptake due to a translocation of GLUT4 glucose transporters from intracellular storage sites to the surface membrane. Vesicle associated membrane proteins (VAMPs) are believed to play an important role in docking and fusion of the GLUT4 transporters...... at the surface membrane. However, knowledge about which VAMP isoforms in fact co-localize with GLUT4 vesicles in mature skeletal muscle and whether they translocate during muscle contractions is incomplete. The aim of the present study was to further identify VAMP isoforms which are associated with GLUT4...... vesicles and examine which VAMP isoforms translocate to surface membranes in skeletal muscles undergoing contractions. VAMP2, VAMP3, VAMP5 and VAMP7 were enriched in immuno-precipitated GLUT4 vesicles. In response to 20 min of in situ contractions, there was a redistribution of GLUT4 (+64 +/- 13...

  4. SNAP23, Syntaxin4, and vesicle-associated membrane protein 7 (VAMP7) mediate trafficking of membrane type 1-matrix metalloproteinase (MT1-MMP) during invadopodium formation and tumor cell invasion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Karla C; McNeilly, Rachael E; Coppolino, Marc G

    2014-07-01

    Movement through the extracellular matrix (ECM) requires cells to degrade ECM components, primarily through the action of matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs). Membrane type 1-matrix metalloproteinase (MT1-MMP) has an essential role in matrix degradation and cell invasion and localizes to subcellular degradative structures termed invadopodia. Trafficking of MT1-MMP to invadopodia is required for the function of these structures, and here we examine the role of N-ethylmaleimide-sensitive factor-activating protein receptor (SNARE)-mediated membrane traffic in the transport of MT1-MMP to invadopodia. During invadopodium formation in MDA-MB-231 human breast cancer cells, increased association of SNAP23, Syntaxin4, and vesicle-associated membrane protein 7 (VAMP7) is detected by coimmunoprecipitation. Blocking the function of these SNAREs perturbs invadopodium-based ECM degradation and cell invasion. Increased level of SNAP23-Syntaxin4-VAMP7 interaction correlates with decreased Syntaxin4 phosphorylation. These results reveal an important role for SNARE-regulated trafficking of MT1-MMP to invadopodia during cellular invasion of ECM.

  5. Discrete, continuous, and stochastic models of protein sorting in the Golgi apparatus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gong, Haijun; Guo, Yusong; Linstedt, Adam; Schwartz, Russell

    2010-01-01

    The Golgi apparatus plays a central role in processing and sorting proteins and lipids in eukaryotic cells. Golgi compartments constantly exchange material with each other and with other cellular components, allowing them to maintain and reform distinct identities despite dramatic changes in structure and size during cell division, development, and osmotic stress. We have developed three minimal models of membrane and protein exchange in the Golgi—a discrete, stochastic model, a continuous ordinary differential equation model, and a continuous stochastic differential equation model—each based on two fundamental mechanisms: vesicle-coat-mediated selective concentration of cargoes and soluble N-ethylmaleimide-sensitive factor attachment protein receptor (SNARE) proteins during vesicle formation and SNARE-mediated selective fusion of vesicles. By exploring where the models differ, we hope to discover whether the discrete, stochastic nature of vesicle-mediated transport is likely to have appreciable functional consequences for the Golgi. All three models show similar ability to restore and maintain distinct identities over broad parameter ranges. They diverge, however, in conditions corresponding to collapse and reassembly of the Golgi. The results suggest that a continuum model provides a good description of Golgi maintenance but that considering the discrete nature of vesicle-based traffic is important to understanding assembly and disassembly of the Golgi. Experimental analysis validates a prediction of the models that altering guanine nucleotide exchange factor expression levels will modulate Golgi size.

  6. Transport vesicle tethering at the trans Golgi network: coiled coil proteins in action

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pak-yan Patricia Cheung

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available The Golgi complex is decorated with so-called Golgin proteins that share a common feature: a large proportion of their amino acid sequences are predicted to form coiled-coil structures. The possible presence of extensive coiled coils implies that these proteins are highly elongated molecules that can extend a significant distance from the Golgi surface. This property would help them to capture or trap inbound transport vesicles and to tether Golgi mini-stacks together. This review will summarize our current understanding of coiled coil tethers that are needed for the receipt of transport vesicles at the trans Golgi network. How do long tethering proteins actually catch vesicles? Golgi-associated, coiled coil tethers contain numerous binding sites for small GTPases, SNARE proteins, and vesicle coat proteins. How are these interactions coordinated and are any or all of them important for the tethering process? Progress towards understanding these questions and remaining, unresolved mysteries will be discussed.

  7. Ethics Issues Snare School Leaders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borja, Rhea R.

    2005-01-01

    This article reports on ethics issues involving school leaders. Some superintendents have landed in murky ethical waters for their ties to for-profit companies, highlighting the temptations administrators face as industry and education increasingly intersect. Some questionable judgments by superintendents--from accepting company-paid trips to…

  8. Yeast Interacting Proteins Database: YDL226C, YKR088C [Yeast Interacting Proteins Database

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available -SNARE Tlg2p; required for asymmetric localization of Kar9p during mitosis; GFP-f...cles along with the v-SNARE Tlg2p; required for asymmetric localization of Kar9p during mitosis; GFP-fusion

  9. Endoplasmatic reticulum shaping by generic mechanisms and protein-induced spontaneous curvature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sackmann, Erich

    2014-06-01

    The endoplasmatic reticulum (ER) comprises flattened vesicles (cisternae) with worm holes dubbed with ribosomes coexisting with a network of interconnected tubes which can extend to the cell periphery or even penetrate nerve axons. The coexisting topologies enclose a continuous luminal space. The complex ER topology is specifically controlled by a group of ER-shaping proteins often called reticulons (discovered by the group of Tom Rapoport). They include atlastin, reticulon, REEP and the MT severing protein spastin. A generic ER shape controlling factor is the necessity to maximize the area-to-volume ratio of ER membranes in the highly crowded cytoplasmic space. I present a model of the ER-shaping function of the reticulons based on the Helfrich bending elasticity concept of soft shell shape changes. Common structural motifs of the reticulons are hydrophobic sequences forming wedge shaped hairpins which penetrate the lipid bilayer of the cell membranes. The wedge-like hydrophobic anchors can both induce the high curvature of the tubular ER fraction and ensure the preferred distribution of the reticulons along the tubules. Tubular junctions may be stabilized by the reticulons forming two forceps twisted by 90°. The ER extensions to the cell periphery and the axons are mediated by coupling of the tubes to the microtubules which is mediated by REEP and spastin. At the end I present a model of the tension driven homotype fusion of ER-membranes by atlastin, based on analogies to the SNARE-complexin-SNARE driven heterotype fusion process.

  10. Prion Aggregates Are Recruited to the Insoluble Protein Deposit (IPOD via Myosin 2-Based Vesicular Transport.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rajesh Kumar

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Aggregation of amyloidogenic proteins is associated with several neurodegenerative diseases. Sequestration of misfolded and aggregated proteins into specialized deposition sites may reduce their potentially detrimental properties. Yeast exhibits a distinct deposition site for amyloid aggregates termed "Insoluble PrOtein Deposit (IPOD", but nothing is known about the mechanism of substrate recruitment to this site. The IPOD is located directly adjacent to the Phagophore Assembly Site (PAS where the cell initiates autophagy and the Cytoplasm-to-Vacuole Targeting (CVT pathway destined for delivery of precursor peptidases to the vacuole. Recruitment of CVT substrates to the PAS was proposed to occur via vesicular transport on Atg9 vesicles and requires an intact actin cytoskeleton and "SNAP (Soluble NSF Attachment Protein Receptor Proteins (SNARE" protein function. It is, however, unknown how this vesicular transport machinery is linked to the actin cytoskeleton. We demonstrate that recruitment of model amyloid PrD-GFP and the CVT substrate precursor-aminopeptidase 1 (preApe1 to the IPOD or PAS, respectively, is disturbed after genetic impairment of Myo2-based actin cable transport and SNARE protein function. Rather than accumulating at the respective deposition sites, both substrates reversibly accumulated often together in the same punctate structures. Components of the CVT vesicular transport machinery including Atg8 and Atg9 as well as Myo2 partially co-localized with the joint accumulations. Thus we propose a model where vesicles, loaded with preApe1 or PrD-GFP, are recruited to tropomyosin coated actin cables via the Myo2 motor protein for delivery to the PAS and IPOD, respectively. We discuss that deposition at the IPOD is not an integrated mandatory part of the degradation pathway for amyloid aggregates, but more likely stores excess aggregates until downstream degradation pathways have the capacity to turn them over after liberation by the

  11. Prion Aggregates Are Recruited to the Insoluble Protein Deposit (IPOD) via Myosin 2-Based Vesicular Transport.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Rajesh; Nawroth, Peter P; Tyedmers, Jens

    2016-09-01

    Aggregation of amyloidogenic proteins is associated with several neurodegenerative diseases. Sequestration of misfolded and aggregated proteins into specialized deposition sites may reduce their potentially detrimental properties. Yeast exhibits a distinct deposition site for amyloid aggregates termed "Insoluble PrOtein Deposit (IPOD)", but nothing is known about the mechanism of substrate recruitment to this site. The IPOD is located directly adjacent to the Phagophore Assembly Site (PAS) where the cell initiates autophagy and the Cytoplasm-to-Vacuole Targeting (CVT) pathway destined for delivery of precursor peptidases to the vacuole. Recruitment of CVT substrates to the PAS was proposed to occur via vesicular transport on Atg9 vesicles and requires an intact actin cytoskeleton and "SNAP (Soluble NSF Attachment Protein) Receptor Proteins (SNARE)" protein function. It is, however, unknown how this vesicular transport machinery is linked to the actin cytoskeleton. We demonstrate that recruitment of model amyloid PrD-GFP and the CVT substrate precursor-aminopeptidase 1 (preApe1) to the IPOD or PAS, respectively, is disturbed after genetic impairment of Myo2-based actin cable transport and SNARE protein function. Rather than accumulating at the respective deposition sites, both substrates reversibly accumulated often together in the same punctate structures. Components of the CVT vesicular transport machinery including Atg8 and Atg9 as well as Myo2 partially co-localized with the joint accumulations. Thus we propose a model where vesicles, loaded with preApe1 or PrD-GFP, are recruited to tropomyosin coated actin cables via the Myo2 motor protein for delivery to the PAS and IPOD, respectively. We discuss that deposition at the IPOD is not an integrated mandatory part of the degradation pathway for amyloid aggregates, but more likely stores excess aggregates until downstream degradation pathways have the capacity to turn them over after liberation by the Hsp104

  12. Vesicle associated membrane protein (VAMP)-7 and VAMP-8, but not VAMP-2 or VAMP-3, are required for activation-induced degranulation of mature human mast cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sander, Leif E; Frank, Simon P C; Bolat, Seza; Blank, Ulrich; Galli, Thierry; Bigalke, Hans; Bischoff, Stephan C; Lorentz, Axel

    2008-03-01

    Mediator release from mast cells (MC) is a crucial step in allergic and non-allergic inflammatory disorders. However, the final events in response to activation leading to membrane fusion and thereby facilitating degranulation have hitherto not been analyzed in human MC. Soluble N-ethyl-maleimide-sensitive factor attachment protein receptors (SNARE) represent a highly conserved family of proteins that have been shown to mediate intracellular membrane fusion events. Here, we show that mature MC isolated from human intestinal tissue express soluble N-ethylmaleide sensitive factor attachment protein (SNAP)-23, Syntaxin (STX)-1B, STX-2, STX-3, STX-4, and STX-6 but not SNAP-25. Furthermore, we found that primary human MC express substantial amounts of vesicle associated membrane protein (VAMP)-3, VAMP-7 and VAMP-8 and, in contrast to previous reports about rodent MC, only low levels of VAMP-2. Furthermore, VAMP-7 and VAMP-8 were found to translocate to the plasma membrane and interact with SNAP-23 and STX-4 upon activation. Inhibition of SNAP-23, STX-4, VAMP-7 or VAMP-8, but not VAMP-2 or VAMP-3, resulted in a markedly reduced high-affinity IgE receptor-mediated histamine release. In summary, our data show that mature human MC express a specific pattern of SNARE and that VAMP-7 and VAMP-8, but not VAMP-2, are required for rapid degranulation.

  13. Syntaxin of plant proteins SYP123 and SYP132 mediate root hair tip growth in Arabidopsis thaliana.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ichikawa, Mie; Hirano, Tomoko; Enami, Kazuhiko; Fuselier, Taylor; Kato, Naohiro; Kwon, Chian; Voigt, Boris; Schulze-Lefert, Paul; Baluška, František; Sato, Masa H

    2014-04-01

    Root hairs are fast-growing tubular protrusions on root epidermal cells that play important roles in water and nutrient uptake in plants. The tip-focused polarized growth of root hairs is accomplished by the secretion of newly synthesized materials to the tip via the polarized membrane trafficking mechanism. Here, we report the function of two different types of plasma membrane (PM) Qa-SNAREs (soluble N-ethylmaleimide-sensitive factor attachment protein receptors), SYP123 and SYP132, in the growth of root hair in Arabidopsis. We found that SYP123, but not SYP132, localizes in the tip region of root hairs by recycling between the brefeldin A (BFA)-sensitive endosomes and the PM of the expanding tip in an F-actin-dependent manner. The vesicle-associated membrane proteins VAMP721/722/724 also exhibited tip-focused localization in root hairs and formed ternary SNARE complexes with both SYP123 and SYP132. These results demonstrate that SYP123 and SYP132 act in a coordinated fashion to mediate tip-focused membrane trafficking for root hair tip growth.

  14. Syntaxin 7 and VAMP-7 are Soluble N-Ethylmaleimide–sensitive Factor Attachment Protein Receptors Required for Late Endosome–Lysosome and Homotypic Lysosome Fusion in Alveolar Macrophages

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ward, Diane McVey; Pevsner, Jonathan; Scullion, Matthew A.; Vaughn, Michael; Kaplan, Jerry

    2000-01-01

    Endocytosis in alveolar macrophages can be reversibly inhibited, permitting the isolation of endocytic vesicles at defined stages of maturation. Using an in vitro fusion assay, we determined that each isolated endosome population was capable of homotypic fusion. All vesicle populations were also capable of heterotypic fusion in a temporally specific manner; early endosomes, isolated 4 min after internalization, could fuse with endosomes isolated 8 min after internalization but not with 12-min endosomes or lysosomes. Lysosomes fuse with 12-min endosomes but not with earlier endosomes. Using homogenous populations of endosomes, we have identified Syntaxin 7 as a soluble N-ethylmaleimide-sensitive factor attachment protein receptor (SNARE) required for late endosome–lysosome and homotypic lysosome fusion in vitro. A bacterially expressed human Syntaxin 7 lacking the transmembrane domain inhibited homotypic late endosome and lysosome fusion as well as heterotypic late endosome–lysosome fusion. Affinity-purified antibodies directed against Syntaxin 7 also inhibited lysosome fusion in vitro but had no affect on homotypic early endosome fusion. Previous work suggested that human VAMP-7 (vesicle-associated membrane protein-7) was a SNARE required for late endosome–lysosome fusion. A bacterially expressed human VAMP-7 lacking the transmembrane domain inhibited both late endosome–lysosome fusion and homotypic lysosome fusion in vitro. These studies indicate that: 1) fusion along the endocytic pathway is a highly regulated process, and 2) two SNARE molecules, Syntaxin 7 and human VAMP-7, are involved in fusion of vesicles in the late endocytic pathway in alveolar macrophages. PMID:10888671

  15. Acyl-CoA-binding protein, Acb1p, is required for normal vacuole function and ceramide synthesis in Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Færgeman, Nils J.; Feddersen, Søren; Christiansen, Janne K

    2004-01-01

    In the present study, we show that depletion of acyl-CoA-binding protein, Acb1p, in yeast affects ceramide levels, protein trafficking, vacuole fusion and structure. Vacuoles in Acb1p-depleted cells are multi-lobed, contain significantly less of the SNAREs (soluble N -ethylmaleimide......-sensitive fusion protein attachment protein receptors) Nyv1p, Vam3p and Vti1p, and are unable to fuse in vitro. Mass spectrometric analysis revealed a dramatic reduction in the content of ceramides in whole-cell lipids and in vacuoles isolated from Acb1p-depleted cells. Maturation of yeast aminopeptidase I...... be compartmentalized. We suggest that the reduced ceramide synthesis in Acb1p-depleted cells leads to severely altered vacuole morphology, perturbed vacuole assembly and strong inhibition of homotypic vacuole fusion....

  16. Members of the synaptobrevin/vesicle-associated membrane protein (VAMP) family in Drosophila are functionally interchangeable in vivo for neurotransmitter release and cell viability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhattacharya, Sharmila; Stewart, Bryan A; Niemeyer, Barbara A; Burgess, Robert W; McCabe, Brian D; Lin, Peter; Boulianne, Gabrielle; O'Kane, Cahir J; Schwarz, Thomas L

    2002-10-15

    Synaptobrevins or VAMPs are vesicle-associated membrane proteins, often called v-SNARES, that are important for vesicle transport and fusion at the plasma membrane. Drosophila has two characterized members of this gene family: synaptobrevin (syb) and neuronal synaptobrevin (n-syb). Mutant phenotypes and gene-expression patterns indicate that n-Syb is exclusively neuronal and required only for synaptic vesicle secretion, whereas Syb is ubiquitous and, as shown here, essential for cell viability. When the eye precursor cells were made homozygous for syb(-), the eye failed to develop. In contrast, n-syb(-) eye clones developed appropriately but failed to activate downstream neurons. To determine whether the two proteins are structurally specialized to accomplish these distinct in vivo functions, we have driven the expression of each gene in the absence of the other to look for phenotypic rescue. We find that expression of n-syb during eye development can rescue the cell lethality of the syb mutations, as can rat VAMP2 and cellubrevin. Expression of syb can restore synaptic transmission to n-syb mutants as assayed both by electroretinogram and recordings of excitatory junctional currents at the neuromuscular junction. Therefore, we find that Syb, which usually is not involved in synaptic function, can mediate Ca(2+)-triggered synaptic activity and that no particular specialization of the v-SNARE is required to differentiate synaptic exocytosis from other forms.

  17. A sandwich enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay for the quantification of insoluble membrane and scaffold proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geumann, Constanze; Grønborg, Mads; Hellwig, Michaela; Martens, Henrik; Jahn, Reinhard

    2010-07-15

    Enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays (ELISAs) are applied for the quantification of a vast diversity of small molecules. However, ELISAs require that the antigen is present in a soluble form in the sample. Accordingly, the few ELISAs described so far targeting insoluble proteins such as integral membrane and scaffold proteins have been restricted by limited extraction efficiencies and the need to establish an individual solubilization protocol for each protein. Here we describe a sandwich ELISA that allows the quantification of a diverse array of synaptic membrane and scaffold proteins such as munc13-1, gephyrin, NMDA R1 (N-methyl-d-aspartate receptor subunit 1), synaptic vesicle membrane proteins, and SNAREs (soluble N-ethylmaleimide-sensitive factor attachment protein receptors). The assay is based on initial solubilization by the denaturing detergent sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS), followed by partial SDS removal using the detergent Triton X-100, which restores antigenicity while keeping the proteins in solution. Using recombinant standard proteins, we determined assay sensitivities of 78ng/ml to 77pg/ml (or 74-0.1fmol). Calibration of the assay using both immunoblotting and mass spectroscopy revealed that in some cases correction factors need to be included for absolute quantification. The assay is versatile, allows parallel processing and automation, and should be applicable to a wide range of hitherto inaccessible proteins.

  18. A Case of Snare Conbine With Cola in Treatment of Huge Gastric Calculus Under Endoscopy%内镜下圈套器联合可乐治疗巨大胃结石1例

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王疆

    2016-01-01

    目的:报道口服可乐治疗巨大胃结石成功实例1例,探讨可乐治疗胃结石的可行性。方法内镜下圈套器切割部分胃结石,使结石内部暴露,有利于充分接触可乐,然后口服可乐1周,并同时服用质子泵抑制剂,胃肠动力剂。结果1周后复查胃镜,患者胃结石消失。结论口服可乐结合内镜治疗胃结石患者依从性好,经济负担小,疗效显著。%Objective To analyze the feasibility of treating gastric calculus with cola by reporting a case of successful treatment of it with oral cola. MethodsPart of the gastric calculus was cut with the application of endoscopic snare to enable the gastric calculus to be fully exposed to cola which was administered as oral formulation for a week; meanwhile, proton-pump inhibitors and gastrointestinal mobility agents were taken.ResultThe disappearance of the gastric calculus was conifrmed by follow-up gastroscopy one week later. Conclusion Endoscopic treatment of the gastric calculus in combination with oral cola is good compliance, affordable treatment fee, and good clinical effects.

  19. Lineage-specific proteins essential for endocytosis in trypanosomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manna, Paul T; Obado, Samson O; Boehm, Cordula; Gadelha, Catarina; Sali, Andrej; Chait, Brian T; Rout, Michael P; Field, Mark C

    2017-04-15

    Clathrin-mediated endocytosis (CME) is the most evolutionarily ancient endocytic mechanism known, and in many lineages the sole mechanism for internalisation. Significantly, in mammalian cells CME is responsible for the vast bulk of endocytic flux and has likely undergone multiple adaptations to accommodate specific requirements by individual species. In African trypanosomes, we previously demonstrated that CME is independent of the AP-2 adaptor protein complex, that orthologues to many of the animal and fungal CME protein cohort are absent, and that a novel, trypanosome-restricted protein cohort interacts with clathrin and drives CME. Here, we used a novel cryomilling affinity isolation strategy to preserve transient low-affinity interactions, giving the most comprehensive trypanosome clathrin interactome to date. We identified the trypanosome AP-1 complex, Trypanosoma brucei (Tb)EpsinR, several endosomal SNAREs plus orthologues of SMAP and the AP-2 associated kinase AAK1 as interacting with clathrin. Novel lineage-specific proteins were identified, which we designate TbCAP80 and TbCAP141. Their depletion produced extensive defects in endocytosis and endomembrane system organisation, revealing a novel molecular pathway subtending an early-branching and highly divergent form of CME, which is conserved and likely functionally important across the kinetoplastid parasites. © 2017. Published by The Company of Biologists Ltd.

  20. Grizzly bear corticosteroid binding globulin: Cloning and serum protein expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chow, Brian A; Hamilton, Jason; Alsop, Derek; Cattet, Marc R L; Stenhouse, Gordon; Vijayan, Mathilakath M

    2010-06-01

    Serum corticosteroid levels are routinely measured as markers of stress in wild animals. However, corticosteroid levels rise rapidly in response to the acute stress of capture and restraint for sampling, limiting its use as an indicator of chronic stress. We hypothesized that serum corticosteroid binding globulin (CBG), the primary transport protein for corticosteroids in circulation, may be a better marker of the stress status prior to capture in grizzly bears (Ursus arctos). To test this, a full-length CBG cDNA was cloned and sequenced from grizzly bear testis and polyclonal antibodies were generated for detection of this protein in bear sera. The deduced nucleotide and protein sequences were 1218 bp and 405 amino acids, respectively. Multiple sequence alignments showed that grizzly bear CBG (gbCBG) was 90% and 83% identical to the dog CBG nucleotide and amino acid sequences, respectively. The affinity purified rabbit gbCBG antiserum detected grizzly bear but not human CBG. There were no sex differences in serum total cortisol concentration, while CBG expression was significantly higher in adult females compared to males. Serum cortisol levels were significantly higher in bears captured by leg-hold snare compared to those captured by remote drug delivery from helicopter. However, serum CBG expression between these two groups did not differ significantly. Overall, serum CBG levels may be a better marker of chronic stress, especially because this protein is not modulated by the stress of capture and restraint in grizzly bears.

  1. Deployment of membrane fusion protein domains during fusion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bentz, J; Mittal, A

    2000-01-01

    It is clear that both viral and intracellular membrane fusion proteins contain a minimal set of domains which must be deployed at the appropriate time during the fusion process. An account of these domains and their functions is given here for the four best-described fusion systems: influenza HA, sendai virus F1, HIV gp120/41 and the neuronal SNARE core composed of synaptobrevin (syn), syntaxin (stx) and the N- and C-termini of SNAP25 (sn25), together with the Ca(2+)binding protein synaptotagmin (syt). Membrane fusion begins with the binding of the virion or vesicle to the target membrane via receptors. The committed step in influenza HA- mediated fusion begins with an aggregate of HAs (at least eight) with some of their HA2 N-termini, a.k.a. fusion peptides, embedded into the viral bilayer (Bentz, 2000 a). The hypothesis presented in Bentz (2000 b) is that the conformational change of HA to the extended coiled coil extracts the fusion peptides from the viral bilayer. When this extraction occurs from the center of the site of restricted lipid flow, it exposes acyl chains and parts of the HA transmembrane domains to the aqueous media, i.e. a hydrophobic defect is formed. This is the 'transition state' of the committed step of fusion. It is stabilized by a 'dam' of HAs, which are inhibited from diffusing away by the rest of the HAs in the aggregate and because that would initially expose more acyl chains to water. Recruitment of lipids from the apposed target membrane can heal this hydrophobic defect, initiating lipid mixing and fusion. The HA transmembrane domains are required to be part of the hydrophobic defect, because the HA aggregate must be closely packed enough to restrict lipid flow. This hypothesis provides a simple and direct coupling between the energy released by the formation of the coiled coil to the energy needed to create and stabilize the high energy intermediates of fusion. Several of these essential domains have been described for the viral fusion

  2. Binary polypeptide system for permanent and oriented protein immobilization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bailes Julian

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Many techniques in molecular biology, clinical diagnostics and biotechnology rely on binary affinity tags. The existing tags are based on either small molecules (e.g., biotin/streptavidin or glutathione/GST or peptide tags (FLAG, Myc, HA, Strep-tag and His-tag. Among these, the biotin-streptavidin system is most popular due to the nearly irreversible interaction of biotin with the tetrameric protein, streptavidin. The major drawback of the stable biotin-streptavidin system, however, is that neither of the two tags can be added to a protein of interest via recombinant means (except for the Strep-tag case leading to the requirement for chemical coupling. Results Here we report a new immobilization system which utilizes two monomeric polypeptides which self-assemble to produce non-covalent yet nearly irreversible complex which is stable in strong detergents, chaotropic agents, as well as in acids and alkali. Our system is based on the core region of the tetra-helical bundle known as the SNARE (soluble N-ethylmaleimide-sensitive factor attachment protein receptor complex. This irreversible protein attachment system (IPAS uses either a shortened syntaxin helix and fused SNAP25-synaptobrevin or a fused syntaxin-synaptobrevin and SNAP25 allowing a two-component system suitable for recombinant protein tagging, capture and immobilization. We also show that IPAS is suitable for use with traditional beads and chromatography, planar surfaces and Biacore, gold nanoparticles and for protein-protein interaction in solution. Conclusions IPAS offers an alternative to chemical cross-linking, streptavidin-biotin system and to traditional peptide affinity tags and can be used for a wide range of applications in nanotechnology and molecular sciences.

  3. Hitchhiking vesicular transport routes to the vacuole: amyloid recruitment to the Insoluble Protein Deposit (IPOD).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Rajesh; Neuser, Nicole; Tyedmers, Jens

    2017-03-09

    Sequestration of aggregates into specialized deposition sites occurs in many species across all kingdoms of life ranging from bacteria to mammals and is commonly believed to have a cytoprotective function. Yeast cells possess at least three different spatially separated deposition sites, one of which is termed "Insoluble Protein Deposit (IPOD)" and harbors amyloid aggregates. We have recently discovered that recruitment of amyloid aggregates to the IPOD employs an actin cable based recruitment machinery that also involves vesicular transport (1) . Here we discuss how different proteins known to be involved in vesicular transport processes to the vacuole might act to guide amyloid aggregates to the IPOD. These factors include the Myosin V motor protein Myo2 involved in transporting vacuolar vesicles along actin cables, the transmembrane protein Atg9 involved in the recruitment of large precursor hydrolase complexes to the vacuole, the phosphatidylinositol/ phosphatidylcholine (PI/PC) transfer protein Sec 14 and the SNARE chaperone Sec 18. Furthermore, we present new data suggesting that the yeast dynamin homolog Vps1 is also crucial for faithful delivery of the amyloid model protein PrD-GFP to the IPOD. This is in agreement with a previously identified role for Vps1 in recruitment of heat-denatured aggregates to a perivacuolar deposition site (2) .

  4. Protein Foods

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Text Size: A A A Listen En Español Protein Foods Foods high in protein such as fish, ... for the vegetarian proteins, whether they have carbohydrate. Protein Choices Plant-Based Proteins Plant-based protein foods ...

  5. Gravitropism and lateral root emergence are dependent on the trans-Golgi network protein TNO1

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rahul eRoy

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available The trans-Golgi network (TGN is a dynamic organelle that functions as a relay station for receiving endocytosed cargo, directing secretory cargo, and trafficking to the vacuole. TGN-LOCALIZED SYP41-INTERACTING PROTEIN (TNO1 is a large, TGN-localized, coiled-coil protein that associates with the membrane fusion protein SYP41, a t-SNARE, and is required for efficient protein trafficking to the vacuole. Here, we show that a tno1 mutant has auxin transport-related defects. Mutant roots have delayed lateral root emergence, decreased gravitropic bending of plant organs and increased sensitivity to the auxin analog 2,4-Dichlorophenoxyacetic acid. Auxin asymmetry at the tips of elongating stage II lateral roots was reduced in the tno1 mutant, suggesting a role for TNO1 in cellular auxin transport during lateral root emergence. During gravistimulation, tno1 roots exhibited delayed auxin transport from the columella to the basal epidermal cells. Endocytosis to the TGN was unaffected in the mutant, indicating that bulk endocytic defects are not responsible for the observed phenotypes. Together these studies demonstrate a role for TNO1 in mediating auxin responses during root development and gravistimulation, potentially through trafficking of auxin transport proteins.

  6. A vesicle carrier that mediates peroxisome protein traffic from the endoplasmic reticulum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lam, Sheung Kwan; Yoda, Naofumi; Schekman, Randy

    2010-12-14

    Pex19p, a soluble cytoplasmic transport protein, is required for the traffic of the peroxisomal membrane proteins Pex3p and Pex15p from the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) to the peroxisome. We documented Pex15p traffic from the ER using a chimeric protein containing a C-terminal glycosylation acceptor peptide. Pex15Gp expressed in wild-type yeast cells is N-glycosylated and functions properly in the peroxisome. In contrast, pex19Δ-mutant cells accumulate the glycoprotein Pex15Gp in the ER. We developed a cell-free preperoxisomal vesicle-budding reaction in which Pex15Gp and Pex3p are packaged into small vesicles in the presence of cytosol, Pex19p, and ATP. Secretory vesicle budding (COPII) detected by the packaging of a SNARE protein (soluble N-ethylmaleimide-sensitive attachment protein receptor) occurs in the same incubation but does not depend on Pex19p. Conversely a dominant GTPase mutant Sar1p which inhibits COPII has no effect on Pex3p packaging. Pex15Gp and Pex3p budded vesicles sediment as low-buoyant-density membranes on a Nycodenz gradient and copurify by affinity isolation using native but not Triton X-100-treated budded vesicles. ER-peroxisome transport vesicles appear to rely on a novel budding mechanism requiring Pex19p and additional unknown factors.

  7. Preferential increase in the hippocampal synaptic vesicle protein 2A (SV2A) by pentylenetetrazole kindling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohno, Yukihiro; Ishihara, Shizuka; Terada, Ryo; Kikuta, Miki; Sofue, Nobumasa; Kawai, Yoshiko; Serikawa, Tadao; Sasa, Masashi

    2009-12-18

    The present study evaluated the expressional levels of synaptic vesicle protein 2A (SV2A) and other secretary machinery proteins (i.e., soluble N-ethylmaleimide-sensitive factor attachment protein receptor (SNARE) complexes, Munc18-1, N-ethylmaleimide-sensitive factor (NSF) and soluble N-ethylmaleimide-sensitive factor attachment protein (SNAP)) in a pentylenetetrazole (PTZ) kindling model. Repeated administration of sub-convulsive PTZ (40 mg/kg, i.p.) progressively increased seizure susceptibility in mice and consistently induced clonic seizures in most animals tested at 15 days after the treatment. Western blot analysis revealed that, among the secretary machinery proteins examined, hippocampal SV2A was selectively elevated by PTZ kindling. PTZ kindling-induced SV2A expression appeared region-specific and the SV2A levels in the cerebral cortex or cerebellum were unaltered. In addition, SV2A expression by PTZ kindling was prominent in the hilar region of the dentate gyrus (DG) where GABAergic interneurons are located, but not in other hippocampal regions (e.g., the stratum lucidum of the CA3 and synaptic layers surrounding CA1 or CA3 pyramidal neurons). These findings suggest that PTZ kindling preferentially elevates SV2A expression in the hippocampus probably as a compensatory mechanism to activate the inhibitory neurotransmission.

  8. The lipid transfer protein CERT interacts with the Chlamydia inclusion protein IncD and participates to ER-Chlamydia inclusion membrane contact sites.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Isabelle Derré

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Bacterial pathogens that reside in membrane bound compartment manipulate the host cell machinery to establish and maintain their intracellular niche. The hijacking of inter-organelle vesicular trafficking through the targeting of small GTPases or SNARE proteins has been well established. Here, we show that intracellular pathogens also establish direct membrane contact sites with organelles and exploit non-vesicular transport machinery. We identified the ER-to-Golgi ceramide transfer protein CERT as a host cell factor specifically recruited to the inclusion, a membrane-bound compartment harboring the obligate intracellular pathogen Chlamydia trachomatis. We further showed that CERT recruitment to the inclusion correlated with the recruitment of VAPA/B-positive tubules in close proximity of the inclusion membrane, suggesting that ER-Inclusion membrane contact sites are formed upon C. trachomatis infection. Moreover, we identified the C. trachomatis effector protein IncD as a specific binding partner for CERT. Finally we showed that depletion of either CERT or the VAP proteins impaired bacterial development. We propose that the presence of IncD, CERT, VAPA/B, and potentially additional host and/or bacterial factors, at points of contact between the ER and the inclusion membrane provides a specialized metabolic and/or signaling microenvironment favorable to bacterial development.

  9. Yeast Interacting Proteins Database: YDR425W, YJL036W [Yeast Interacting Proteins Database

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available e post-Golgi endosome to the trans-Golgi network; interacts with Snx4p Rows with this bait as bait (4) Rows ...Golgi endosomes to the trans-Golgi network and in cytoplasm to vacuole transport;...eval of late-Golgi SNAREs from the post-Golgi endosome to the trans-Golgi network; interacts with Snx4p Rows...lved in retrieval of late-Golgi SNAREs from post-Golgi endosomes to the trans-Golgi network and in cytoplasm

  10. Vesicle-associated membrane protein 7 (VAMP-7) is essential for target cell killing in a natural killer cell line.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marcet-Palacios, Marcelo; Odemuyiwa, Solomon O; Coughlin, Jason J; Garofoli, Daniella; Ewen, Catherine; Davidson, Courtney E; Ghaffari, Mazyar; Kane, Kevin P; Lacy, Paige; Logan, Michael R; Befus, A Dean; Bleackley, R Chris; Moqbel, Redwan

    2008-02-15

    Natural killer cells recognize and induce apoptosis in foreign, transformed or virus-infected cells through the release of perforin and granzymes from secretory lysosomes. Clinically, NK-cell mediated killing is a major limitation to successful allo- and xenotransplantation. The molecular mechanisms that regulate the fusion of granzyme B-containing secretory lysosomes to the plasma membrane in activated NK cells, prior to target cell killing, are not fully understood. Using the NK cell line YT-Indy as a model, we have investigated the expression of SNAP REceptors (SNAREs), both target (t-) and vesicular (v-) SNAREs, and their function in granzyme B-mediated target cell killing. Our data showed that YT-Indy cells express VAMP-7 and SNAP-23, but not VAMP-2. VAMP-7 was associated with granzyme B-containing lysosomal granules. Using VAMP-7 small interfering RNA (siRNA), we successfully knocked down the expression of VAMP-7 protein in YT-Indy to less than 10% of untreated cells in 24h. VAMP7-deficient YT-Indy cells activated via co-culture with Jurkat cells released <1ng/mL of granzyme B, compared to 1.5-2.5 microg/mL from controls. Using Jurkat cells as targets, we showed a 7-fold reduction in NK cell-mediated killing by VAMP-7 deficient YT-Indy cells. Our results show that VAMP-7 is a crucial component of granzyme B release and target cell killing in the NK cell line YT-Indy. Thus, targeting VAMP-7 expression specifically with siRNA, following transplantation, may be a viable strategy for preventing NK cell-mediated transplant rejection, in vivo.

  11. Protein-protein interactions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Byron, Olwyn; Vestergaard, Bente

    2015-01-01

    Responsive formation of protein:protein interaction (PPI) upon diverse stimuli is a fundament of cellular function. As a consequence, PPIs are complex, adaptive entities, and exist in structurally heterogeneous interplays defined by the energetic states of the free and complexed protomers....... The biophysical and structural investigations of PPIs consequently demand hybrid approaches, implementing orthogonal methods and strategies for global data analysis. Currently, impressive developments in hardware and software within several methodologies define a new era for the biostructural community. Data can...

  12. Reduction of vesicle-associated membrane protein 2 expression leads to a kindling-resistant phenotype in a murine model of epilepsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matveeva, E A; Price, D A; Whiteheart, S W; Vanaman, T C; Gerhardt, G A; Slevin, J T

    2012-01-27

    Our previous work has correlated permanent alterations in the rat neurosecretory machinery with epileptogenesis. Such findings highlighted the need for a greater understanding of the molecular mechanisms underlying epilepsy so that novel therapeutic regimens can be designed. To this end, we examined kindling in transgenic mice with a defined reduction of a key element of the neurosecretory machinery: the v-SNARE (vesicle-bound SNAP [soluble NSF attachment protein] receptor), synaptobrevin/vesicle-associated membrane protein 2 (VAMP2). Initial analysis of biochemical markers, which previously displayed kindling-dependent alterations in rat hippocampal synaptosomes, showed similar trends in both wild-type and VAMP2(+/-) mice, demonstrating that kindled rat and mouse models are comparable. This report focuses on the effects that a ~50% reduction of synaptosomal VAMP2 has on the progression of electrical kindling and on glutamate release in hippocampal subregions. Our studies show that epileptogenesis is dramatically attenuated in VAMP2(+/-) mice, requiring both higher current and more stimulations to reach a fully kindled state (two successive Racine stage 5 seizures). Progression through the five identifiable Racine stages was slower and more variable in the VAMP2(+/-) animals compared with the almost linear progression seen in wild-type littermates. Consistent with the expected effects of reducing a major neuronal v-SNARE, glutamate-selective, microelectrode array (MEA) measurements in specific hippocampal subregions of VAMP2(+/-) mice showed significant reductions in potassium-evoked glutamate release. Taken together these studies demonstrate that manipulating the levels of the neurosecretory machinery not only affects neurotransmitter release but also mitigates kindling-induced epileptogenesis.

  13. Human axillary apocrine glands: proteins involved in the apocrine secretory mechanism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stoeckelhuber, Mechthild; Schubert, Christoph; Kesting, Marco R; Loeffelbein, Denys J; Nieberler, Markus; Koehler, Claudia; Welsch, Ulrich

    2011-02-01

    The apocrine secretory mechanism is a mode of secretion by which the apical part of the cell cytoplasm is pinched off, which leads to the formation of an aposome. The distinct mechanism of formation and decapitation of the aposome is not well investigated. Only few proteins are known that are involved in this secretory mechanism. We studied the human axillary apocrine gland and looked at proteins associated with cytokinesis, a process that is comparable to the pinching-off mechanism of apocrine glandular cells. By immunohistochemistry, we detected actin, myosin II, cytokeratin 7 and 19, α- and β-tubulin, anillin, cofilin, syntaxin 2, vamp8/endobrevin and septin 2. In highly active glandular cells, these proteins are located at the base of the apical protrusion when the aposome is in the process of being released or are concentrated in the cap of the apical protrusion. These findings demonstrate new insights on apocrine secretory mechanisms and point to similarities to the terminal step of cytokinesis, which is regulated by a SNARE-mediated membrane fusion event.

  14. Protein Condensation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gunton, James D.; Shiryayev, Andrey; Pagan, Daniel L.

    2014-07-01

    Preface; 1. Introduction; 2. Globular protein structure; 3. Experimental methods; 4. Thermodynamics and statistical mechanics; 5. Protein-protein interactions; 6. Theoretical studies of equilibrium; 7. Nucleation theory; 8. Experimental studies of nucleation; 9. Lysozyme; 10. Some other globular proteins; 11. Membrane proteins; 12. Crystallins and cataracts; 13. Sickle hemoglobin and sickle cell anemia; 14, Alzheimer's disease; Index.

  15. Developmental and diurnal expression of the synaptosomal-associated protein 25 (Snap25) in the rat pineal gland.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karlsen, Anna S; Rath, Martin F; Rohde, Kristian; Toft, Trine; Møller, Morten

    2013-06-01

    Snap25 (synaptosomal-associated protein) is a 25 kDa protein, belonging to the SNARE-family (soluble N-ethylmaleimide-sensitive factor attachment protein receptors) of proteins, essential for synaptic and secretory vesicle exocytosis. Snap25 has by immunohistochemistry been demonstrated in the rat pineal gland but the biological importance of this is unknown. In this study, we demonstrate a high expression of mRNA encoding Snap25 in all parts of the rat pineal complex, the superficial-, and deep-pineal gland, as well as in the pineal stalk. Snap25 showed a low pineal expression during embryonic stages with a strong increase in expression levels just after birth. The expression showed no day/night variations. Neither removal of the sympathetic input to the pineal gland by superior cervical ganglionectomy nor bilateral decentralization of the superior cervical ganglia significantly affected the expression of Snap25 in the gland. The pineal expression levels of Snap25 were not changed following intraperitoneal injection of isoproterenol. The strong expression of Snap25 in the pineal gland suggests the presence of secretory granules and microvesicles in the rat pinealocyte supporting the concept of a vesicular release. At the transcriptional level, this Snap25-based release mechanism does not exhibit any diurnal rhythmicity and is regulated independently of the sympathetic nervous input to the gland.

  16. Protein C

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... have an unexplained blood clot, or a family history of blood clots. Protein C helps control blood clotting. A lack of this protein or problem with the function of this protein may cause blood clots to ...

  17. Protein S

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... have an unexplained blood clot, or a family history of blood clots. Protein S helps control blood clotting. A lack of this protein or problem with the function of this protein may cause blood clots to ...

  18. Comparative study of bridge plate associated to the intramedullary pin and the dynamic compression plate on the experimental osteotomy fixation of femoral in rabbits (Oryctolagus cuniculus). Clinical, radiographic, histological and scintigraphy analyses; Estudo comparativo da placa em ponte associada ao pino intramedular e da placa de compressao dinamica na fixacao de osteotomia experimental em femur de coelhos (Oryctolagus cuniculus). Analises clinica, radiografica, histologica e cintilografica

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Borges, Natalie Ferreira

    2011-07-01

    The objectives were to benchmark and monitor the fracture healing of femoral osteotomy in rabbits after fixation with dynamic compression plate and bridge plate associated with intramedullary pin. Were used 14 New Zealand rabbits, four months old with mean weight of 3.5 pounds, from the Experimental Farm Professor Helio Barbosa of the Veterinary School of Minas Gerais Federal Univ. (UFMG). The animals were randomly divided into two groups (I and II). All rabbits underwent osteotomy across the middle third of right femur. In the group I was made to fix the osteotomy with the bridge plate (BP) associated with intramedullary pin, introduced the technique of minimal invasion. In group II, we used dynamic compression plate (DCP) via the conventional approach. Both groups were evaluated clinical, radiographic, histologic and scintigraphic findings. Clinical assessments were performed weekly until the 12{sup th} postoperative week and radiographic examinations were performed before, immediately after, at 15, 30, 45, 60 and 90 days. The bone scintigraphy were performed before and at 20, 50 and 90 days after surgery to monitor the bone metabolism qualitatively and quantitatively. Observed perfusion and bone healing process. After 90 days of study, there was histopathologic evaluation of the osteotomized area and the insertion of screws. In the region of the osteotomy was observed predominance of trabecular bone in group I and group II, the predominance of bone osteons, compatible with the original bone. On insertion of the screws did not differ between groups and there was cortical discontinuity, little necrosis and local hemorrhage. The two types of fixation have led to consolidation within the scheduled period, maturing in early fixation with DCP fixation compared with BP. Scintigraphy demonstrated by the indices of activity and image characteristics, the process of bone healing was significantly greater in animals undergoing early fixation with DCP. (author)

  19. Total protein

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/003483.htm Total protein To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. The total protein test measures the total amount of two classes ...

  20. Protein Structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asmus, Elaine Garbarino

    2007-01-01

    Individual students model specific amino acids and then, through dehydration synthesis, a class of students models a protein. The students clearly learn amino acid structure, primary, secondary, tertiary, and quaternary structure in proteins and the nature of the bonds maintaining a protein's shape. This activity is fun, concrete, inexpensive and…

  1. Identification of fibroblast growth factor receptor 3 (FGFR3 as a protein receptor for botulinum neurotoxin serotype A (BoNT/A.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Birgitte P S Jacky

    Full Text Available Botulinum neurotoxin serotype A (BoNT/A causes transient muscle paralysis by entering motor nerve terminals (MNTs where it cleaves the SNARE protein Synaptosomal-associated protein 25 (SNAP25206 to yield SNAP25197. Cleavage of SNAP25 results in blockage of synaptic vesicle fusion and inhibition of the release of acetylcholine. The specific uptake of BoNT/A into pre-synaptic nerve terminals is a tightly controlled multistep process, involving a combination of high and low affinity receptors. Interestingly, the C-terminal binding domain region of BoNT/A, HC/A, is homologous to fibroblast growth factors (FGFs, making it a possible ligand for Fibroblast Growth Factor Receptors (FGFRs. Here we present data supporting the identification of Fibroblast Growth Factor Receptor 3 (FGFR3 as a high affinity receptor for BoNT/A in neuronal cells. HC/A binds with high affinity to the two extra-cellular loops of FGFR3 and acts similar to an agonist ligand for FGFR3, resulting in phosphorylation of the receptor. Native ligands for FGFR3; FGF1, FGF2, and FGF9 compete for binding to FGFR3 and block BoNT/A cellular uptake. These findings show that FGFR3 plays a pivotal role in the specific uptake of BoNT/A across the cell membrane being part of a larger receptor complex involving ganglioside- and protein-protein interactions.

  2. Identification of fibroblast growth factor receptor 3 (FGFR3 as a protein receptor for botulinum neurotoxin serotype A (BoNT/A.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Birgitte P S Jacky

    Full Text Available Botulinum neurotoxin serotype A (BoNT/A causes transient muscle paralysis by entering motor nerve terminals (MNTs where it cleaves the SNARE protein Synaptosomal-associated protein 25 (SNAP25206 to yield SNAP25197. Cleavage of SNAP25 results in blockage of synaptic vesicle fusion and inhibition of the release of acetylcholine. The specific uptake of BoNT/A into pre-synaptic nerve terminals is a tightly controlled multistep process, involving a combination of high and low affinity receptors. Interestingly, the C-terminal binding domain region of BoNT/A, HC/A, is homologous to fibroblast growth factors (FGFs, making it a possible ligand for Fibroblast Growth Factor Receptors (FGFRs. Here we present data supporting the identification of Fibroblast Growth Factor Receptor 3 (FGFR3 as a high affinity receptor for BoNT/A in neuronal cells. HC/A binds with high affinity to the two extra-cellular loops of FGFR3 and acts similar to an agonist ligand for FGFR3, resulting in phosphorylation of the receptor. Native ligands for FGFR3; FGF1, FGF2, and FGF9 compete for binding to FGFR3 and block BoNT/A cellular uptake. These findings show that FGFR3 plays a pivotal role in the specific uptake of BoNT/A across the cell membrane being part of a larger receptor complex involving ganglioside- and protein-protein interactions.

  3. Whey Protein

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Fraction de Lactosérum, Fraction de Petit-Lait, Goat Milk Whey, Goat Whey, Isolat de Protéine de Lactosérum, Isolat ... Lactosérum de Lait de Chèvre, MBP, Milk Protein, Milk Protein Isolate, Mineral Whey Concentrate, Proteínas del Suero de la Leche, Protéine ...

  4. Tau protein

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Frederiksen, Jette Lautrup Battistini; Kristensen, Kim; Bahl, Jmc

    2011-01-01

    Background: Tau protein has been proposed as biomarker of axonal damage leading to irreversible neurological impairment in MS. CSF concentrations may be useful when determining risk of progression from ON to MS. Objective: To investigate the association between tau protein concentration and 14......-3-3 protein in the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) of patients with monosymptomatic optic neuritis (ON) versus patients with monosymptomatic onset who progressed to multiple sclerosis (MS). To evaluate results against data found in a complete literature review. Methods: A total of 66 patients with MS and/or ON from...... the Department of Neurology of Glostrup Hospital, University of Copenhagen, Denmark, were included. CSF samples were analysed for tau protein and 14-3-3 protein, and clinical and paraclinical information was obtained from medical records. Results: The study shows a significantly increased concentration of tau...

  5. Avaliação do tratamento da discopatia degenerativa cervical pela artrodese via anterior utilizando placas associadas a cages ou cages em peek isoladamente Evaluación del tratamiento de la enfermedad degenerativa del disco cervical por la artrodesis anterior utilizando placas asociadas con jaulas o jaulas en peec, aisladamente Evaluation of cervical degenerative disc disease treatment by anterior arthrodesis using plates associated with cages or cages in peek alone

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    André Rafael Hübner

    2011-01-01

    por el método de fijación con placas asociadas a jaulas - Grupo I - y 35 con las jaulas en PEEK, aisladamente - Grupo II. Se recolectarondatos de historial clínico, examen físico, puntuaciones de dolor (escala visual y analógica del dolor-EVA y función (criterios de Odom, SF-36, Índice de Discapacidad Cervical del pre y posoperatorio y exámenes de imagen. RESULTADOS: Se encontró un predominio de pacientes de sexo femenino en ambos grupos, con una edad promediode 55 años en el Grupo I y de 47 en el Grupo II. Ambos grupos mostraron una distribución similar en el número de niveles operados, así como de las complicaciones encontradas y de las puntuaciones de dolor, índice de discapacidad cervical y SF36 para el pre y posoperatorio. Hubo 97,1% para la fusión y 94,3% de buenos resultados en el Grupo I y el 100% de fusión, con 97% de buenos resultados en el Grupo II. CONCLUSIONES: El estudio comparativo de la utilización de placas con jaulas y estas en PEEK, aisladamente, presentó resultados similares y satisfactorios para los grupos estudiados, sin mostrar superioridad o inferioridad de un método sobre otro.OBJECTIVES: To comparatively evaluate the treatment of cervical degenerative disc disease by anterior approach using plates associated or cages and PEEK device alone. METHODS: A retrospective study comparing two groups of patients treated by anterior arthrodesis was performed. Seventy patients were randomly selected, 35 operated using plates associated with cages - Group I - and 35 with cages in PEEK alone - Group II. Medical history was obtained as well as physical examination, pain scores (pain visual analogue score and function scores (Odom's criteria, SF-36, Neck Disability Index and the pre and postoperative imaging studies. RESULTS: There was a predominance of female patients in both groups, with a mean age of 55 years in Group I and 47 in Group II. Both groups showed a similar distribution of the number of levels operated, as well as the

  6. Protein-Protein Interaction Databases

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Szklarczyk, Damian; Jensen, Lars Juhl

    2015-01-01

    of research are explored. Here we present an overview of the most widely used protein-protein interaction databases and the methods they employ to gather, combine, and predict interactions. We also point out the trade-off between comprehensiveness and accuracy and the main pitfall scientists have to be aware......Years of meticulous curation of scientific literature and increasingly reliable computational predictions have resulted in creation of vast databases of protein interaction data. Over the years, these repositories have become a basic framework in which experiments are analyzed and new directions...

  7. Increased activity of the Vesicular Soluble N-Ethylmaleimide-sensitive Factor Attachment Protein Receptor TI-VAMP/VAMP7 by Tyrosine Phosphorylation in the Longin Domain*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burgo, Andrea; Casano, Alessandra M.; Kuster, Aurelia; Arold, Stefan T.; Wang, Guan; Nola, Sébastien; Verraes, Agathe; Dingli, Florent; Loew, Damarys; Galli, Thierry

    2013-01-01

    Vesicular (v)- and target (t)-SNAREs play essential roles in intracellular membrane fusion through the formation of cytoplasmic α-helical bundles. Several v-SNAREs have a Longin N-terminal extension that, by promoting a closed conformation, plays an autoinhibitory function and decreases SNARE complex formation and membrane fusion efficiency. The molecular mechanism leading to Longin v-SNARE activation is largely unknown. Here we find that exocytosis mediated by the Longin v-SNARE TI-VAMP/VAMP7 is activated by tonic treatment with insulin and insulin-like growth factor-1 but not by depolarization and intracellular calcium rise. In search of a potential downstream mechanism, we found that TI-VAMP is phosphorylated in vitro by c-Src kinase on tyrosine 45 of the Longin domain. Accordingly, a mutation of tyrosine 45 into glutamate, but not phenylalanine, activates both t-SNARE binding and exocytosis. Activation of TI-VAMP-mediated exocytosis thus relies on tyrosine phosphorylation. PMID:23471971

  8. Increased activity of the vesicular soluble N-ethylmaleimide-sensitive factor attachment protein receptor TI-VAMP/VAMP7 by tyrosine phosphorylation in the Longin domain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burgo, Andrea; Casano, Alessandra M; Kuster, Aurelia; Arold, Stefan T; Wang, Guan; Nola, Sébastien; Verraes, Agathe; Dingli, Florent; Loew, Damarys; Galli, Thierry

    2013-04-26

    Vesicular (v)- and target (t)-SNAREs play essential roles in intracellular membrane fusion through the formation of cytoplasmic α-helical bundles. Several v-SNAREs have a Longin N-terminal extension that, by promoting a closed conformation, plays an autoinhibitory function and decreases SNARE complex formation and membrane fusion efficiency. The molecular mechanism leading to Longin v-SNARE activation is largely unknown. Here we find that exocytosis mediated by the Longin v-SNARE TI-VAMP/VAMP7 is activated by tonic treatment with insulin and insulin-like growth factor-1 but not by depolarization and intracellular calcium rise. In search of a potential downstream mechanism, we found that TI-VAMP is phosphorylated in vitro by c-Src kinase on tyrosine 45 of the Longin domain. Accordingly, a mutation of tyrosine 45 into glutamate, but not phenylalanine, activates both t-SNARE binding and exocytosis. Activation of TI-VAMP-mediated exocytosis thus relies on tyrosine phosphorylation.

  9. Fusion Machinery

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Jakob Balslev; Milosevic, Ira

    2015-01-01

    the vesicular SNARE VAMP2/synaptobrevin-2 and the target (plasma membrane) SNAREs SNAP25 and syntaxin-1 results in fusion and release of neurotransmitter, synchronized to the electrical activity of the cell by calcium influx and binding to synaptotagmin. Formation of the SNARE complex is tightly regulated...... and appears to start with syntaxin-1 bound to an SM (Sec1/Munc18-like) protein. Proteins of the Munc13-family are responsible for opening up syntaxin and allowing sequential binding of SNAP-25 and VAMP2/synaptobrevin-2. N- to C-terminal “zippering” of the SNARE domains leads to membrane fusion...

  10. Protein Crystallization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chernov, Alexander A.

    2005-01-01

    Nucleation, growth and perfection of protein crystals will be overviewed along with crystal mechanical properties. The knowledge is based on experiments using optical and force crystals behave similar to inorganic crystals, though with a difference in orders of magnitude in growing parameters. For example, the low incorporation rate of large biomolecules requires up to 100 times larger supersaturation to grow protein, rather than inorganic crystals. Nucleation is often poorly reproducible, partly because of turbulence accompanying the mixing of precipitant with protein solution. Light scattering reveals fluctuations of molecular cluster size, its growth, surface energies and increased clustering as protein ages. Growth most often occurs layer-by-layer resulting in faceted crystals. New molecular layer on crystal face is terminated by a step where molecular incorporation occurs. Quantitative data on the incorporation rate will be discussed. Rounded crystals with molecularly disordered interfaces will be explained. Defects in crystals compromise the x-ray diffraction resolution crucially needed to find the 3D atomic structure of biomolecules. The defects are immobile so that birth defects stay forever. All lattice defects known for inorganics are revealed in protein crystals. Contribution of molecular conformations to lattice disorder is important, but not studied. This contribution may be enhanced by stress field from other defects. Homologous impurities (e.g., dimers, acetylated molecules) are trapped more willingly by a growing crystal than foreign protein impurities. The trapped impurities induce internal stress eliminated in crystals exceeding a critical size (part of mni for ferritin, lysozyme). Lesser impurities are trapped from stagnant, as compared to the flowing, solution. Freezing may induce much more defects unless quickly amorphysizing intracrystalline water.

  11. Role of AtCDC48 & the AtCDC48 Regulatory Protein Family, PUX, in Plant Cell Morphogenesis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bednarek, Sebastian, Y.

    2009-11-08

    The long-term objective of this work is to understand the molecular events and mechanisms involved in secretory membrane trafficking and organelle biogenesis, which are crucial for normal plant growth and development. Our studies have suggested a vital role for the cytosolic chaperone Cdc48p/p97 during cytokinesis and cell expansion which are highly dependent upon secretory membrane trafficking. Localization studies have shown that the plant Cdc48p/p97, AtCDC48, and the Arabidopsis ortholog of the ER- and Golgi-associated SNARE, syntaxin 5, (referred to as SYP31) are targeted to the division plane during cytokinesis. In addition, AtCDC48 and SYP31 were shown to interact in vitro and in vivo. To characterize further the function of AtCDC48 and SYP31 we have utilized affinity chromatography and MALDI-MS to identify several plant-specific proteins that interact with SYP31 and/or modulate the activity of AtCDC48 including two UBX (i.e. ubiquitin-like) domain containing proteins, PUX1 and PUX2 (Proteins containing UBX domain). These proteins define a plant protein family consisting of 15 uncharacterized members that we postulate interact with AtCDC48. Biochemical studies have demonstrated that PUX2 is a novel membrane adapter for AtCDC48 that mediates AtCDC48/SYP31 interaction and is likely to control AtCDC48-dependent membrane fusion. In contrast, PUX1 negatively regulates AtCDC48 by inhibiting its ATPase activity and by promoting the disassembly of the active hexamer. These findings provide the first evidence that the assembly and disassembly of the CDC48/p97complex is actually a dynamic process. This new unexpected level of regulation for CDC48/p97 was demonstrated to be critical in vivo as pux1 loss-of-function mutants grow faster than wild-type plants. These studies suggest a role for AtCDC48 in plant cell cycle progression including cytokinesis and/or cell expansion. The proposed studies are designed to: 1) characterize further the localization and function of At

  12. CNC Skills Help Carpentry Students Snare High-Paying Jobs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panella, John

    2007-01-01

    Wages of entry-level carpenters have been driven down along with those of many other non-professional occupations in recent years. If carpenters stay in the field, they typically advance slowly over the years until they reach the level of master craftsman, perhaps by the time they reach the age of 40. However, technology is having a major impact…

  13. "Democracy Is the Devil's Snare": Theological Certainty in Teacher Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    James, Jennifer Hauver

    2010-01-01

    Education has long been heralded as the key to sustaining a healthy democratic state (Dewey, 1916/1996; Jefferson & Peterson, 1984; Parker, 2003). As such, teacher educators have a responsibility to prepare teachers committed to the aims and practices of democracy. Central to this goal is helping teachers understand the relationship between…

  14. CNC Skills Help Carpentry Students Snare High-Paying Jobs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panella, John

    2007-01-01

    Wages of entry-level carpenters have been driven down along with those of many other non-professional occupations in recent years. If carpenters stay in the field, they typically advance slowly over the years until they reach the level of master craftsman, perhaps by the time they reach the age of 40. However, technology is having a major impact…

  15. Mechanical thrombectomy with snare in patients with acute ischemic stroke

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gonzalez, Alejandro; Mayol, Antonio [Hospital Universitario Virgen del Rocio, Interventional Neuroradiology, Department of Radiology, Seville (Spain); Martinez, Eva; Gonzalez-Marcos, Jose R.; Gil-Peralta, Alberto [Hospital Universitario Virgen del Rocio, Department of Neurology, Seville (Spain)

    2007-04-15

    We evaluated the efficacy and safety of thrombus extraction using a microsnare in patients with acute ischemic stroke (AIS). This was a prospective, observational, cohort study in which consecutive patients with AIS (<6 hours of ischemia for anterior circulation and <24 hours for posterior circulation) who had been previously excluded from intravenous tissue plasminogen activator (tPA) thrombolysis were included and followed-up for 3 months. Mechanical embolectomy with a microsnare of 2-4 mm was undertaken as the first treatment. Low-dose intraarterial thrombolysis or angioplasty was used if needed. TIMI grade and modified Rankin stroke scale (mRSS) score were used to evaluate vessel recanalization and clinical efficacy, respectively. Nine patients (mean age 55 years, range 17-69 years) were included. Their basal mean NIHSS score was 16 (range 12-24). In seven out of the nine patients (77.8%) the clot was removed, giving a TIMI grade of 3 in four patients and TIMI grade 2 in three patients. Occlusion sites were: middle cerebral artery (four), basilar artery (two) and anterior cerebral artery plus middle cerebral artery (one). The mean time for recanalization from the start of the procedure was 50 min (range 50-75 min). At 3 months, the mRSS score was 0 in two patients and 3-4 in three patients (two patients died). According to our results, the microsnare is a safe procedure for mechanical thrombectomy with a good recanalization rate. Further studies are required to determine the role of the microsnare in the treatment of AIS. (orig.)

  16. A simultaneous navigation and radiation evasion algorithm (SNARE)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Khasawneh, Mohammed A., E-mail: mkha@ieee.org [Department of Electrical Engineering, Jordan University of Science and Technology, Irbid 221 10 (Jordan); Jaradat, Mohammad A., E-mail: majaradat@just.edu.jo [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Jordan University of Science and Technology, Irbid 221 10 (Jordan); Al-Shboul, Zeina Aman M., E-mail: xeinaaman@gmail.com [Department of Electrical Engineering, Jordan University of Science and Technology, Irbid 221 10 (Jordan)

    2013-12-15

    Highlights: • A new navigation algorithm for radiation evasion around nuclear facilities. • An optimization criteria minimized under algorithm operation. • A man-borne device guiding the occupational worker towards paths that warrant least radiation × time products. • Benefits of using localized navigation as opposed to global navigation schemas. • A path discrimination function for finding the navigational paths exhibiting the least amounts of radiation. - Abstract: In this paper, we address the issue of localization as pertains to indoor navigation under radiation contaminated environments. In this context, navigation, in the absence of any GPS signals, is guided by the location of the sensors that make up the entire wireless sensor network in a given locality within a nuclear facility. It, also, draws on the radiation levels as measured by the sensors around a given locale. Here, localization is inherently embedded into the algorithm presented in (Khasawneh et al., 2011a, 2011b) which was designed to provide navigational guidance to optimize any of two criteria: “Radiation Evasion” and “Nearest Exit”. As such, the algorithm can either be applied to setting a navigational “lowest” radiation exposure path from an initial point A to some other point B; a case typical of occupational workers performing maintenance operations around the facility; or providing a radiation-safe passage from point A to the nearest exit. Algorithm's navigational performance is tested under statistical reference, wherein for a given number of runs (trials) algorithm performance is evaluated as a function of the number of steps of look-ahead it uses to acquire navigational information, and is compared against the performance of the renowned Dijkstra global navigation algorithm. This is done with reference to the amount of (radiation × time) product and that of the time needed to reach an exit point, under the two optimization criteria. To evaluate algorithm ruggedness against rough radiation terrains, navigational performance was assessed for a U-shaped radiation field: a case typical of testing for robotics applications and a multi-island radiation environment. Under these two test environments, the algorithm was shown to perform in accordance with set optimization criteria. Simulations reveal that localization of the mobile device is achieved in compliance with design requirements leading to navigational paths that compare favorably to Dijkstra navigation in terms of the (radiation × time) product and the time needed to reach an exit. Results of these simulations also show that while there were cases of failure encountered under navigation involving the “Radiation Evasion” criterion, algorithm performed favorably well when operated to optimize the “Nearest Exit” criterion with no cases of failure reported in any of the simulations.

  17. Early Golgi abnormalities and neurodegeneration upon loss of presynaptic proteins Munc18-1, syntaxin-1 or SNAP-25.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santos, Tatiana C; Wierda, Keimpe; Broeke, Jurjen H; Toonen, Ruud F; Verhage, Matthijs

    2017-03-27

    The loss of presynaptic proteins Munc18-1, syntaxin-1 or SNAP-25 is known to produce cell death, but the underlying features have not been compared experimentally. Here, we investigated these features in cultured mouse CNS and dorsal root ganglion neurons. Side-by-side comparisons confirmed massive cell death, before synaptogenesis, within 1-4 days in vitro (DIV) upon loss of t-SNAREs (syntaxin-1, SNAP-25) or Munc18-1, but not v-SNAREs (synaptobrevins/VAMP1/2/3 using Tetanus Neurotoxin (TeNT), also in TI-VAMP/VAMP7 knock-out (KO) neurons). A condensed cis-Golgi was the first abnormality observed upon Munc18-1 or SNAP-25 loss within 3 DIV. This phenotype was distinct from the Golgi fragmentation observed in apoptosis. Cell death was too rapid after syntaxin-1 loss to study Golgi abnormalities. Syntaxin-1 and Munc18-1 depend on each other for normal cellular levels. We observed that endogenous syntaxin-1 accumulates at the Golgi of Munc18-1 KO neurons. However, expression of a non-neuronal Munc18 isoform that does not bind syntaxin-1, Munc18-3, in Munc18-1 KO neurons prevented cell death and restored normal cis-Golgi morphology, but not synaptic transmission or syntaxin-1 targeting. Finally, we observed that dorsal root ganglion neurons are the only Munc18-1 KO neurons that do not degenerate in vivo or in vitro In these neurons, cis-Golgi abnormalities were less severe, with no changes in Golgi shape. Together these data demonstrate that cell death upon Munc18-1, syntaxin-1 or SNAP-25 loss occurs via a degenerative pathway unrelated to the known synapse function of these proteins and involving early cis-Golgi abnormalities, distinct from apoptosis.SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENTThis study provides new insights in a neurodegeneration pathway triggered by the absence of specific proteins involved in synaptic transmission (syntaxin-1, Munc18-1, SNAP-25), while other proteins involved in the same molecular process (synaptobrevins, Munc13-1/2) do not cause degeneration. Massive

  18. Protein inference: A protein quantification perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Zengyou; Huang, Ting; Liu, Xiaoqing; Zhu, Peijun; Teng, Ben; Deng, Shengchun

    2016-08-01

    In mass spectrometry-based shotgun proteomics, protein quantification and protein identification are two major computational problems. To quantify the protein abundance, a list of proteins must be firstly inferred from the raw data. Then the relative or absolute protein abundance is estimated with quantification methods, such as spectral counting. Until now, most researchers have been dealing with these two processes separately. In fact, the protein inference problem can be regarded as a special protein quantification problem in the sense that truly present proteins are those proteins whose abundance values are not zero. Some recent published papers have conceptually discussed this possibility. However, there is still a lack of rigorous experimental studies to test this hypothesis. In this paper, we investigate the feasibility of using protein quantification methods to solve the protein inference problem. Protein inference methods aim to determine whether each candidate protein is present in the sample or not. Protein quantification methods estimate the abundance value of each inferred protein. Naturally, the abundance value of an absent protein should be zero. Thus, we argue that the protein inference problem can be viewed as a special protein quantification problem in which one protein is considered to be present if its abundance is not zero. Based on this idea, our paper tries to use three simple protein quantification methods to solve the protein inference problem effectively. The experimental results on six data sets show that these three methods are competitive with previous protein inference algorithms. This demonstrates that it is plausible to model the protein inference problem as a special protein quantification task, which opens the door of devising more effective protein inference algorithms from a quantification perspective. The source codes of our methods are available at: http://code.google.com/p/protein-inference/.

  19. Protein immobilization strategies for protein biochips

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rusmini, F.; Rusmini, Federica; Zhong, Zhiyuan; Feijen, Jan

    2007-01-01

    In the past few years, protein biochips have emerged as promising proteomic and diagnostic tools for obtaining information about protein functions and interactions. Important technological innovations have been made. However, considerable development is still required, especially regarding protein

  20. Protein immobilization strategies for protein biochips

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rusmini, F.; Rusmini, Federica; Zhong, Zhiyuan; Feijen, Jan

    2007-01-01

    In the past few years, protein biochips have emerged as promising proteomic and diagnostic tools for obtaining information about protein functions and interactions. Important technological innovations have been made. However, considerable development is still required, especially regarding protein i

  1. Latent membrane protein 1 of Epstein-Barr virus sensitizes cancer cells to cisplatin by enhancing NF-κB p50 homodimer formation and downregulating NAPA expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Zchong-Zcho; Chow, Kai-Ping N; Kuo, Tzu-Ching; Chang, Yu-Sun; Chao, Chuck C-K

    2011-12-15

    Expression of the oncogenic latent membrane protein 1 (LMP1) of Epstein-Barr virus is involved in the pathogenesis of nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC) and lymphoma. In previous studies, we found that expression of LMP1 was sufficient to transform BALB/c-3T3 cells. In contrast, other studies have shown that LMP1 induces apoptosis in a NF-κB-dependent manner and also inhibits the growth of tumors in mice, thereby indicating that LMP1 may produce various biological effects depending on the biological and cellular context. Still, the mechanism underlying the pro-apoptotic activity of LMP1 remains unclear. In the present study, we found that LMP1 inhibits the expression of NAPA, an endoplasmic reticulum SNARE protein that possesses anti-apoptotic properties against the DNA-damaging drug cisplatin. Accordingly, LMP1-transformed BALB/c-3T3 cells were sensitized to cisplatin-induced apoptosis, whereas no sensitization effect was noted following treatment with the mitotic spindle-damaging drugs vincristine and taxol. Knockdown of LMP1 with antisense oligonucleotides restored NAPA protein level and rendered the cells resistant to cisplatin. Similarly, overexpression of NAPA reduced the effect of LMP1 and induced resistance to cisplatin. LMP1 was shown to upregulate the NF-κB subunit p50, leading to formation of p50 homodimers on the NAPA promoter. These findings suggest that the viral protein LMP1 may sensitize cancer cells to cisplatin chemotherapy by downregulating NAPA and by enhancing the formation of p50 homodimers which in turn inhibit the expression of NF-κB regulated anti-apoptotic genes. These findings provide an explanatory mechanism for the pro-apoptotic activity of LMP1 as well as new therapeutic targets to control tumor growth.

  2. Expression of VAMP-2-like protein in kidney collecting duct intracellular vesicles. Colocalization with Aquaporin-2 water channels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nielsen, S; Marples, D; Birn, H; Mohtashami, M; Dalby, N O; Trimble, M; Knepper, M

    1995-01-01

    Body water balance is controlled by vasopressin, which regulates Aquaporin-2 (AQP2) water channels in kidney collecting duct cells by vesicular trafficking between intracellular vesicles and the plasma membrane. To examine the molecular apparatus involved in vesicle trafficking and vasopressin regulation of AQP2 in collecting duct cells, we tested if targeting proteins expressed in the synaptic vesicles, namely vesicle-associated membrane proteins 1 and 2 (VAMP1 and 2), are expressed in kidney collecting duct. Immunoblotting revealed specific labeling of VAMP2 (18-kD band) but not VAMP1 in membrane fractions prepared from kidney inner medulla. Controls using preadsorbed antibody or preimmune serum were negative. Bands of identical molecular size were detected in immunoblots of brain membrane vesicles and purified synaptic vesicles. VAMP2 in kidney membranes was cleaved by tetanus toxin, revealing a tetanus toxin-sensitive VAMP homologue. Similarly, tetanus toxin cleaved VAMP2 in synaptic vesicles. In kidney inner medulla, VAMP2 was predominantly expressed in the membrane fraction enriched for intracellular vesicles, with little or no VAMP2 in the plasma membrane enriched fraction. This was confirmed by immunocytochemistry using semithin cryosections, which showed mainly vesicular labeling in collecting duct principal cells, with no labeling of intercalated cells. VAMP2 immunolabeling colocalized with AQP2 labeling in intracellular vesicles, as determined by immunoelectron microscopy after double immunolabeling of isolated vesicles. Quantitative analysis of 1,310 vesicles revealed a highly significant association of both AQP2 and VAMP2 in the same vesicles (P < 0.0001). Furthermore, the presence of AQP2 in vesicles immunoisolated with anti-VAMP2 antibodies was confirmed by immunoblotting. In conclusion, VAMP2, a component of the neuronal SNARE complex, is expressed in vesicles carrying AQP2, suggesting a role in vasopressin-regulated vesicle trafficking of AQP2

  3. Arabidopsis CDS blastp result: AK108585 [KOME

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available 5358 Elongation of fatty acids protein 2 (GNS1 protein) (V-SNARE bypass mutant gene 2 protein) {Saccharomyces cerevisiae}; contains Pfam profile PF01151: GNS1/SUR4 family 1e-19 ...

  4. Grafting of protein-protein binding sites

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2000-01-01

    A strategy for grafting protein-protein binding sites is described. Firstly, key interaction residues at the interface of ligand protein to be grafted are identified and suitable positions in scaffold protein for grafting these key residues are sought. Secondly, the scaffold proteins are superposed onto the ligand protein based on the corresponding Ca and Cb atoms. The complementarity between the scaffold protein and the receptor protein is evaluated and only matches with high score are accepted. The relative position between scaffold and receptor proteins is adjusted so that the interface has a reasonable packing density. Then the scaffold protein is mutated to corresponding residues in ligand protein at each candidate position. And the residues having bad steric contacts with the receptor proteins, or buried charged residues not involved in the formation of any salt bridge are mutated. Finally, the mutated scaffold protein in complex with receptor protein is co-minimized by Charmm. In addition, we deduce a scoring function to evaluate the affinity between mutated scaffold protein and receptor protein by statistical analysis of rigid binding data sets.

  5. Molecular principles of protein stability and protein-protein interactions

    OpenAIRE

    Lendel, Christofer

    2005-01-01

    Proteins with highly specific binding properties constitute the basis for many important applications in biotechnology and medicine. Immunoglobulins have so far been the obvious choice but recent advances in protein engineering have provided several novel constructs that indeed challenge antibodies. One class of such binding proteins is based on the 58 residues three-helix bundle Z domain from staphylococcal protein A (SPA). These so-called affibodies are selected from libraries containing Z ...

  6. Small heat shock proteins, protein degradation and protein aggregation diseases

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vos, Michel J.; Zijlstra, Marianne P.; Carra, Serena; Sibon, Ody C. M.; Kampinga, Harm H.

    Small heat shock proteins have been characterized in vitro as ATP-independent molecular chaperones that can prevent aggregation of un- or misfolded proteins and assist in their refolding with the help of ATP-dependent chaperone machines (e. g., the Hsp70 proteins). Comparison of the functionality of

  7. EDITORIAL: Precision proteins Precision proteins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Demming, Anna

    2010-06-01

    Since the birth of modern day medicine, during the times of Hippocrates in ancient Greece, the profession has developed from the rudimentary classification of disease into a rigorous science with an inspiring capability to treat and cure. Scientific methodology has distilled clinical diagnostic tools from the early arts of prognosis, which used to rely as much on revelation and prophecy, as intuition and judgement [1]. Over the past decade, research into the interactions between proteins and nanosystems has provided some ingenious and apt techniques for delving into the intricacies of anatomical systems. In vivo biosensing has emerged as a vibrant field of research, as much of medical diagnosis relies on the detection of substances or an imbalance in the chemicals in the body. The inherent properties of nanoscale structures, such as cantilevers, make them well suited to biosensing applications that demand the detection of molecules at very low concentrations. Measurable deflections in cantilevers functionalised with antibodies provide quantitative indicators of the presence of specific antigens when the two react. Such developments have roused mounting interest in the interactions of proteins with nanostructures, such as carbon nanotubes [3], which have demonstrated great potential as generic biomarkers. Plasmonic properties are also being exploited in sensing applications, such as the molecular sentinel recently devised by researchers in the US. The device uses the plasmonic properties of a silver nanoparticle linked to a Raman labelled hairpin DNA probe to signal changes in the probe geometry resulting from interactions with substances in the environment. Success stories so far include the detection of two specific genes associated with breast cancer [4]. A greater understanding of how RNA interference regulates gene expression has highlighted the potential of using this natural process as another agent for combating disease in personalized medicine. However, the

  8. Fusion-protein-assisted protein crystallization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kobe, Bostjan; Ve, Thomas; Williams, Simon J

    2015-07-01

    Fusion proteins can be used directly in protein crystallization to assist crystallization in at least two different ways. In one approach, the `heterologous fusion-protein approach', the fusion partner can provide additional surface area to promote crystal contact formation. In another approach, the `fusion of interacting proteins approach', protein assemblies can be stabilized by covalently linking the interacting partners. The linker connecting the proteins plays different roles in the two applications: in the first approach a rigid linker is required to reduce conformational heterogeneity; in the second, conversely, a flexible linker is required that allows the native interaction between the fused proteins. The two approaches can also be combined. The recent applications of fusion-protein technology in protein crystallization from the work of our own and other laboratories are briefly reviewed.

  9. Scaffolds for blocking protein-protein interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hershberger, Stefan J; Lee, Song-Gil; Chmielewski, Jean

    2007-01-01

    Due to the pivotal roles that protein-protein interactions play in a plethora of biological processes, the design of therapeutic agents targeting these interactions has become an attractive and important area of research. The development of such agents is faced with a variety of challenges. Nevertheless, considerable progress has been made in the design of proteomimetics capable of disrupting protein-protein interactions. Those inhibitors based on molecular scaffold designs hold considerable interest because of the ease of variation in regard to their displayed functionality. In particular, protein surface mimetics, alpha-helical mimetics, beta-sheet/beta-strand mimetics, as well as beta-turn mimetics have successfully modulated protein-protein interactions involved in such diseases as cancer and HIV. In this review, current progress in the development of molecular scaffolds designed for the disruption of protein-protein interactions will be discussed with an emphasis on those active against biological targets.

  10. Protein docking prediction using predicted protein-protein interface

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Li Bin

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Many important cellular processes are carried out by protein complexes. To provide physical pictures of interacting proteins, many computational protein-protein prediction methods have been developed in the past. However, it is still difficult to identify the correct docking complex structure within top ranks among alternative conformations. Results We present a novel protein docking algorithm that utilizes imperfect protein-protein binding interface prediction for guiding protein docking. Since the accuracy of protein binding site prediction varies depending on cases, the challenge is to develop a method which does not deteriorate but improves docking results by using a binding site prediction which may not be 100% accurate. The algorithm, named PI-LZerD (using Predicted Interface with Local 3D Zernike descriptor-based Docking algorithm, is based on a pair wise protein docking prediction algorithm, LZerD, which we have developed earlier. PI-LZerD starts from performing docking prediction using the provided protein-protein binding interface prediction as constraints, which is followed by the second round of docking with updated docking interface information to further improve docking conformation. Benchmark results on bound and unbound cases show that PI-LZerD consistently improves the docking prediction accuracy as compared with docking without using binding site prediction or using the binding site prediction as post-filtering. Conclusion We have developed PI-LZerD, a pairwise docking algorithm, which uses imperfect protein-protein binding interface prediction to improve docking accuracy. PI-LZerD consistently showed better prediction accuracy over alternative methods in the series of benchmark experiments including docking using actual docking interface site predictions as well as unbound docking cases.

  11. Protein Crystal Based Nanomaterials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bell, Jeffrey A.; VanRoey, Patrick

    2001-01-01

    This is the final report on a NASA Grant. It concerns a description of work done, which includes: (1) Protein crystals cross-linked to form fibers; (2) Engineering of protein to favor crystallization; (3) Better knowledge-based potentials for protein-protein contacts; (4) Simulation of protein crystallization.

  12. Shotgun protein sequencing.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Faulon, Jean-Loup Michel; Heffelfinger, Grant S.

    2009-06-01

    A novel experimental and computational technique based on multiple enzymatic digestion of a protein or protein mixture that reconstructs protein sequences from sequences of overlapping peptides is described in this SAND report. This approach, analogous to shotgun sequencing of DNA, is to be used to sequence alternative spliced proteins, to identify post-translational modifications, and to sequence genetically engineered proteins.

  13. Protein folding, protein homeostasis, and cancer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    John H. Van Drie

    2011-01-01

    Proteins fold into their functional 3-dimensional structures from a linear amino acid sequence. In vitro this process is spontaneous; while in vivo it is orchestrated by a specialized set of proteins, called chaperones. Protein folding is an ongoing cellular process, as cellular proteins constantly undergo synthesis and degradation. Here emerging links between this process and cancer are reviewed. This perspective both yields insights into the current struggle to develop novel cancer chemotherapeutics and has implications for future chemotherapy discovery.

  14. Oligomeric protein structure networks: insights into protein-protein interactions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brinda KV

    2005-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Protein-protein association is essential for a variety of cellular processes and hence a large number of investigations are being carried out to understand the principles of protein-protein interactions. In this study, oligomeric protein structures are viewed from a network perspective to obtain new insights into protein association. Structure graphs of proteins have been constructed from a non-redundant set of protein oligomer crystal structures by considering amino acid residues as nodes and the edges are based on the strength of the non-covalent interactions between the residues. The analysis of such networks has been carried out in terms of amino acid clusters and hubs (highly connected residues with special emphasis to protein interfaces. Results A variety of interactions such as hydrogen bond, salt bridges, aromatic and hydrophobic interactions, which occur at the interfaces are identified in a consolidated manner as amino acid clusters at the interface, from this study. Moreover, the characterization of the highly connected hub-forming residues at the interfaces and their comparison with the hubs from the non-interface regions and the non-hubs in the interface regions show that there is a predominance of charged interactions at the interfaces. Further, strong and weak interfaces are identified on the basis of the interaction strength between amino acid residues and the sizes of the interface clusters, which also show that many protein interfaces are stronger than their monomeric protein cores. The interface strengths evaluated based on the interface clusters and hubs also correlate well with experimentally determined dissociation constants for known complexes. Finally, the interface hubs identified using the present method correlate very well with experimentally determined hotspots in the interfaces of protein complexes obtained from the Alanine Scanning Energetics database (ASEdb. A few predictions of interface hot

  15. Protein-losing enteropathy

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/007338.htm Protein-losing enteropathy To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Protein-losing enteropathy is an abnormal loss of protein ...

  16. Protein and Heart Health

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... It Works Healthy Workplace Food and Beverage Toolkit Protein and Heart Health Updated:May 5,2015 Protein ... said. What’s the harm in getting too much protein? The main problem is that often the extra ...

  17. Sequence Classification: 893291 [

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available milarity to mammalian CASP; genetic interactions with GOS1 (encoding a Golgi snare protein) suggest a role in Golgi function; Coy1p || http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/protein/6322669 ...

  18. Conductometric monitoring of protein-protein interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spera, Rosanna; Festa, Fernanda; Bragazzi, Nicola L; Pechkova, Eugenia; LaBaer, Joshua; Nicolini, Claudio

    2013-12-06

    Conductometric monitoring of protein-protein and protein-sterol interactions is here proved feasible by coupling quartz crystal microbalance with dissipation monitoring (QCM_D) to nucleic acid programmable protein arrays (NAPPA). The conductance curves measured in NAPPA microarrays printed on quartz surface allowed the identification of binding events between the immobilized proteins and the query. NAPPA allows the immobilization on the quartz surface of a wide range of proteins and can be easily adapted to generate innumerous types of biosensors. Indeed multiple proteins on the same quartz crystal have been tested and envisaged proving the possibility of analyzing the same array for several distinct interactions. Two examples of NAPPA-based conductometer applications with clinical relevance are presented herein, the interaction between the transcription factors Jun and ATF2 and the interaction between Cytochrome P540scc and cholesterol.

  19. Protein Structure Prediction by Protein Threading

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Ying; Liu, Zhijie; Cai, Liming; Xu, Dong

    The seminal work of Bowie, Lüthy, and Eisenberg (Bowie et al., 1991) on "the inverse protein folding problem" laid the foundation of protein structure prediction by protein threading. By using simple measures for fitness of different amino acid types to local structural environments defined in terms of solvent accessibility and protein secondary structure, the authors derived a simple and yet profoundly novel approach to assessing if a protein sequence fits well with a given protein structural fold. Their follow-up work (Elofsson et al., 1996; Fischer and Eisenberg, 1996; Fischer et al., 1996a,b) and the work by Jones, Taylor, and Thornton (Jones et al., 1992) on protein fold recognition led to the development of a new brand of powerful tools for protein structure prediction, which we now term "protein threading." These computational tools have played a key role in extending the utility of all the experimentally solved structures by X-ray crystallography and nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR), providing structural models and functional predictions for many of the proteins encoded in the hundreds of genomes that have been sequenced up to now.

  20. Protein sequence comparison and protein evolution

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pearson, W.R. [Univ. of Virginia, Charlottesville, VA (United States). Dept. of Biochemistry

    1995-12-31

    This tutorial was one of eight tutorials selected to be presented at the Third International Conference on Intelligent Systems for Molecular Biology which was held in the United Kingdom from July 16 to 19, 1995. This tutorial examines how the information conserved during the evolution of a protein molecule can be used to infer reliably homology, and thus a shared proteinfold and possibly a shared active site or function. The authors start by reviewing a geological/evolutionary time scale. Next they look at the evolution of several protein families. During the tutorial, these families will be used to demonstrate that homologous protein ancestry can be inferred with confidence. They also examine different modes of protein evolution and consider some hypotheses that have been presented to explain the very earliest events in protein evolution. The next part of the tutorial will examine the technical aspects of protein sequence comparison. Both optimal and heuristic algorithms and their associated parameters that are used to characterize protein sequence similarities are discussed. Perhaps more importantly, they survey the statistics of local similarity scores, and how these statistics can both be used to improve the selectivity of a search and to evaluate the significance of a match. They them examine distantly related members of three protein families, the serine proteases, the glutathione transferases, and the G-protein-coupled receptors (GCRs). Finally, the discuss how sequence similarity can be used to examine internal repeated or mosaic structures in proteins.

  1. Prediction of Protein-Protein Interactions Using Protein Signature Profiling

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Mahmood A. Mahdavi; Yen-Han Lin

    2007-01-01

    Protein domains are conserved and functionally independent structures that play an important role in interactions among related proteins. Domain-domain inter- actions have been recently used to predict protein-protein interactions (PPI). In general, the interaction probability of a pair of domains is scored using a trained scoring function. Satisfying a threshold, the protein pairs carrying those domains are regarded as "interacting". In this study, the signature contents of proteins were utilized to predict PPI pairs in Saccharomyces cerevisiae, Caenorhabditis ele- gans, and Homo sapiens. Similarity between protein signature patterns was scored and PPI predictions were drawn based on the binary similarity scoring function. Results show that the true positive rate of prediction by the proposed approach is approximately 32% higher than that using the maximum likelihood estimation method when compared with a test set, resulting in 22% increase in the area un- der the receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve. When proteins containing one or two signatures were removed, the sensitivity of the predicted PPI pairs in- creased significantly. The predicted PPI pairs are on average 11 times more likely to interact than the random selection at a confidence level of 0.95, and on aver- age 4 times better than those predicted by either phylogenetic profiling or gene expression profiling.

  2. Inferring Protein Associations Using Protein Pulldown Assays

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sharp, Julia L.; Anderson, Kevin K.; Daly, Don S.; Auberry, Deanna L.; Borkowski, John J.; Cannon, William R.

    2007-02-01

    Background: One method to infer protein-protein associations is through a “bait-prey pulldown” assay using a protein affinity agent and an LC-MS (liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry)-based protein identification method. False positive and negative protein identifications are not uncommon, however, leading to incorrect inferences. Methods: A pulldown experiment generates a protein association matrix wherein each column represents a sample from one bait protein, each row represents one prey protein and each cell contains a presence/absence association indicator. Our method evaluates the presence/absence pattern across a prey protein (row) with a Likelihood Ratio Test (LRT), computing its p-value with simulated LRT test statistic distributions after a check with simulated binomial random variates disqualified the large sample 2 test. A pulldown experiment often involves hundreds of tests so we apply the false discovery rate method to control the false positive rate. Based on the p-value, each prey protein is assigned a category (specific association, non-specific association, or not associated) and appraised with respect to the pulldown experiment’s goal and design. The method is illustrated using a pulldown experiment investigating the protein complexes of Shewanella oneidensis MR-1. Results: The Monte Carlo simulated LRT p-values objectively reveal specific and ubiquitous prey, as well as potential systematic errors. The example analysis shows the results to be biologically sensible and more realistic than the ad hoc screening methods previously utilized. Conclusions: The method presented appears to be informative for screening for protein-protein associations.

  3. Mouse taste cells with G protein-coupled taste receptors lack voltage-gated calcium channels and SNAP-25

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Medler Kathryn F

    2006-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Taste receptor cells are responsible for transducing chemical stimuli from the environment and relaying information to the nervous system. Bitter, sweet and umami stimuli utilize G-protein coupled receptors which activate the phospholipase C (PLC signaling pathway in Type II taste cells. However, it is not known how these cells communicate with the nervous system. Previous studies have shown that the subset of taste cells that expresses the T2R bitter receptors lack voltage-gated Ca2+ channels, which are normally required for synaptic transmission at conventional synapses. Here we use two lines of transgenic mice expressing green fluorescent protein (GFP from two taste-specific promoters to examine Ca2+ signaling in subsets of Type II cells: T1R3-GFP mice were used to identify sweet- and umami-sensitive taste cells, while TRPM5-GFP mice were used to identify all cells that utilize the PLC signaling pathway for transduction. Voltage-gated Ca2+ currents were assessed with Ca2+ imaging and whole cell recording, while immunocytochemistry was used to detect expression of SNAP-25, a presynaptic SNARE protein that is associated with conventional synapses in taste cells. Results Depolarization with high K+ resulted in an increase in intracellular Ca2+ in a small subset of non-GFP labeled cells of both transgenic mouse lines. In contrast, no depolarization-evoked Ca2+ responses were observed in GFP-expressing taste cells of either genotype, but GFP-labeled cells responded to the PLC activator m-3M3FBS, suggesting that these cells were viable. Whole cell recording indicated that the GFP-labeled cells of both genotypes had small voltage-dependent Na+ and K+ currents, but no evidence of Ca2+ currents. A subset of non-GFP labeled taste cells exhibited large voltage-dependent Na+ and K+ currents and a high threshold voltage-gated Ca2+ current. Immunocytochemistry indicated that SNAP-25 was expressed in a separate population of taste cells

  4. Polymer Directed Protein Assemblies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Rijn, Patrick

    2013-01-01

    Protein aggregation and protein self-assembly is an important occurrence in natural systems, and is in some form or other dictated by biopolymers. Very obvious influences of biopolymers on protein assemblies are, e. g., virus particles. Viruses are a multi-protein assembly of which the morphology is

  5. Polymer Directed Protein Assemblies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Rijn, Patrick

    Protein aggregation and protein self-assembly is an important occurrence in natural systems, and is in some form or other dictated by biopolymers. Very obvious influences of biopolymers on protein assemblies are, e. g., virus particles. Viruses are a multi-protein assembly of which the morphology is

  6. Syntaxin and VAMP association with lipid rafts depends on cholesterol depletion in capacitating sperm cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsai, Pei-Shiue; De Vries, Klaas J; De Boer-Brouwer, Mieke; Garcia-Gil, Nuria; Van Gestel, Renske A; Colenbrander, Ben; Gadella, Bart M; Van Haeften, Theo

    2007-01-01

    Sperm cells represent a special exocytotic system since mature sperm cells contain only one large secretory vesicle, the acrosome, which fuses with the overlying plasma membrane during the fertilization process. Acrosomal exocytosis is believed to be regulated by activation of SNARE proteins. In this paper, we identified specific members of the SNARE protein family, i.e., the t-SNAREs syntaxin1 and 2, and the v-SNARE VAMP, present in boar sperm cells. Both syntaxins were predominantly found in the plasma membrane whereas v-SNAREs are mainly located in the outer acrosomal membrane of these cells. Under non-capacitating conditions both syntaxins and VAMP are scattered in well-defined punctate structures over the entire sperm head. Bicarbonate-induced in vitro activation in the presence of BSA causes a relocalization of these SNAREs to a more homogeneous distribution restricted to the apical ridge area of the sperm head, exactly matching the site of sperm zona binding and subsequent induced acrosomal exocytosis. This redistribution of syntaxin and VAMP depends on cholesterol depletion and closely resembles the previously reported redistribution of lipid raft marker proteins. Detergent-resistant membrane isolation and subsequent analysis shows that a significant proportion of syntaxin emerges in the detergent-resistant membrane (raft) fraction under such conditions, which is not the case under those conditions where cholesterol depletion is blocked. The v-SNARE VAMP displays a similar cholesterol depletion-dependent lateral and raft redistribution. Taken together, our results indicate that redistribution of syntaxin and VAMP during capacitation depends on association of these SNAREs with lipid rafts and that such a SNARE-raft association may be essential for spatial control of exocytosis and/or regulation of SNARE functioning.

  7. Protein- protein interaction detection system using fluorescent protein microdomains

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waldo, Geoffrey S.; Cabantous, Stephanie

    2010-02-23

    The invention provides a protein labeling and interaction detection system based on engineered fragments of fluorescent and chromophoric proteins that require fused interacting polypeptides to drive the association of the fragments, and further are soluble and stable, and do not change the solubility of polypeptides to which they are fused. In one embodiment, a test protein X is fused to a sixteen amino acid fragment of GFP (.beta.-strand 10, amino acids 198-214), engineered to not perturb fusion protein solubility. A second test protein Y is fused to a sixteen amino acid fragment of GFP (.beta.-strand 11, amino acids 215-230), engineered to not perturb fusion protein solubility. When X and Y interact, they bring the GFP strands into proximity, and are detected by complementation with a third GFP fragment consisting of GFP amino acids 1-198 (strands 1-9). When GFP strands 10 and 11 are held together by interaction of protein X and Y, they spontaneous association with GFP strands 1-9, resulting in structural complementation, folding, and concomitant GFP fluorescence.

  8. Negative regulation of syntaxin4/SNAP-23/VAMP2-mediated membrane fusion by Munc18c in vitro.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fiona M Brandie

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Translocation of the facilitative glucose transporter GLUT4 from an intracellular store to the plasma membrane is responsible for the increased rate of glucose transport into fat and muscle cells in response to insulin. This represents a specialised form of regulated membrane trafficking. Intracellular membrane traffic is subject to multiple levels of regulation by conserved families of proteins in all eukaryotic cells. Notably, all intracellular fusion events require SNARE proteins and Sec1p/Munc18 family members. Fusion of GLUT4-containing vesicles with the plasma membrane of insulin-sensitive cells involves the SM protein Munc18c, and is regulated by the formation of syntaxin 4/SNAP23/VAMP2 SNARE complexes. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Here we have used biochemical approaches to characterise the interaction(s of Munc18c with its cognate SNARE proteins and to examine the role of Munc18c in regulating liposome fusion catalysed by syntaxin 4/SNAP23/VAMP2 SNARE complex formation. We demonstrate that Munc18c makes contacts with both t- and v-SNARE proteins of this complex, and directly inhibits bilayer fusion mediated by the syntaxin 4/SNAP23/VAMP2 SNARE complex. CONCLUSION/SIGNIFICANCE: Our reductionist approach has enabled us to ascertain a direct inhibitory role for Munc18c in regulating membrane fusion mediated by syntaxin 4/SNAP23/VAMP2 SNARE complex formation. It is important to note that two different SM proteins have recently been shown to stimulate liposome fusion mediated by their cognate SNARE complexes. Given the structural similarities between SM proteins, it seems unlikely that different members of this family perform opposing regulatory functions. Hence, our findings indicate that Munc18c requires a further level of regulation in order to stimulate SNARE-mediated membrane fusion.

  9. Ectopic expression of syntaxin 1 in the ER redirects TI-VAMP- and cellubrevin-containing vesicles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martinez-Arca, Sonia; Proux-Gillardeaux, Veronique; Alberts, Philipp; Louvard, Daniel; Galli, Thierry

    2003-07-01

    SNARE proteins are key mediators of membrane fusion. Their function in ensuring compartmental specificity of membrane fusion has been suggested by in vitro studies but not demonstrated in vivo. We show here that ectopic expression of the plasma membrane t-SNARE heavy chain syntaxin 1 in the endoplasmic reticulum induces the redistribution of its cognate vesicular SNAREs, TI-VAMP and cellubrevin, and its light chain t-SNARE SNAP-23. These effects were prevented by co-expressing nSec1. Expression of syntaxin 1 alone impaired the cell surface expression of TI-VAMP and cellubrevin but not the recycling of transferrin receptor. TI-VAMP, cellubrevin and SNAP-23 associated in vivo with exogenous syntaxin 1. Redistribution of TI-VAMP in the ER of syntaxin-1-expressing cells was microtubule dependent and impaired the trafficking of CD63, a cargo of TI-VAMP-containing vesicles. We conclude that the destination of v-SNAREs is driven by their specific interaction with cognate t-SNAREs. Our in vivo data provide strong support for the theory that highly specific v-SNARE-t-SNARE interactions control compartmental specificity of membrane fusion.

  10. Urine Protein and Urine Protein to Creatinine Ratio

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... products and services. Advertising & Sponsorship: Policy | Opportunities Urine Protein and Urine Protein to Creatinine Ratio Share this page: Was this page helpful? Also known as: 24-Hour Urine Protein; Urine Total Protein; Urine Protein to Creatinine Ratio; ...

  11. IGSF9 Family Proteins

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Maria; Walmod, Peter Schledermann

    2013-01-01

    The Drosophila protein Turtle and the vertebrate proteins immunoglobulin superfamily (IgSF), member 9 (IGSF9/Dasm1) and IGSF9B are members of an evolutionarily ancient protein family. A bioinformatics analysis of the protein family revealed that invertebrates contain only a single IGSF9 family gene......, the longest isoforms of the proteins have the same general organization as the neural cell adhesion molecule family of cell adhesion molecule proteins, and like this family of proteins, IGSF9 family members are expressed in the nervous system. A review of the literature revealed that Drosophila Turtle...... facilitates homophilic cell adhesion. Moreover, IGSF9 family proteins have been implicated in the outgrowth and branching of neurites, axon guidance, synapse maturation, self-avoidance, and tiling. However, despite the few published studies on IGSF9 family proteins, reports on the functions of both Turtle...

  12. Physics of protein motility and motor proteins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kolomeisky, Anatoly B.

    2013-09-01

    Motor proteins are enzymatic molecules that transform chemical energy into mechanical motion and work. They are critically important for supporting various cellular activities and functions. In the last 15 years significant progress in understanding the functioning of motor proteins has been achieved due to revolutionary breakthroughs in single-molecule experimental techniques and strong advances in theoretical modelling. However, microscopic mechanisms of protein motility are still not well explained, and the collective efforts of many scientists are needed in order to solve these complex problems. In this special section the reader will find the latest advances on the difficult road to mapping motor proteins dynamics in various systems. Recent experimental developments have allowed researchers to monitor and to influence the activity of single motor proteins with a high spatial and temporal resolution. It has stimulated significant theoretical efforts to understand the non-equilibrium nature of protein motility phenomena. The latest results from all these advances are presented and discussed in this special section. We would like to thank the scientists from all over the world who have reported their latest research results for this special section. We are also grateful to the staff and editors of Journal of Physics: Condensed Matter for their invaluable help in handling all the administrative and refereeing activities. The field of motor proteins and protein motility is fast moving, and we hope that this collection of articles will be a useful source of information in this highly interdisciplinary area. Physics of protein motility and motor proteins contents Physics of protein motility and motor proteinsAnatoly B Kolomeisky Identification of unique interactions between the flexible linker and the RecA-like domains of DEAD-box helicase Mss116 Yuan Zhang, Mirkó Palla, Andrew Sun and Jung-Chi Liao The load dependence of the physical properties of a molecular motor

  13. Polymer Directed Protein Assemblies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patrick van Rijn

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Protein aggregation and protein self-assembly is an important occurrence in natural systems, and is in some form or other dictated by biopolymers. Very obvious influences of biopolymers on protein assemblies are, e.g., virus particles. Viruses are a multi-protein assembly of which the morphology is dictated by poly-nucleotides namely RNA or DNA. This “biopolymer” directs the proteins and imposes limitations on the structure like the length or diameter of the particle. Not only do these bionanoparticles use polymer-directed self-assembly, also processes like amyloid formation are in a way a result of directed protein assembly by partial unfolded/misfolded biopolymers namely, polypeptides. The combination of proteins and synthetic polymers, inspired by the natural processes, are therefore regarded as a highly promising area of research. Directed protein assembly is versatile with respect to the possible interactions which brings together the protein and polymer, e.g., electrostatic, v.d. Waals forces or covalent conjugation, and possible combinations are numerous due to the large amounts of different polymers and proteins available. The protein-polymer interacting behavior and overall morphology is envisioned to aid in clarifying protein-protein interactions and are thought to entail some interesting new functions and properties which will ultimately lead to novel bio-hybrid materials.

  14. Protein and protein hydrolysates in sports nutrition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Loon, Luc J C; Kies, Arie K; Saris, Wim H M

    2007-08-01

    With the increasing knowledge about the role of nutrition in increasing exercise performance, it has become clear over the last 2 decades that amino acids, protein, and protein hydrolysates can play an important role. Most of the attention has been focused on their effects at a muscular level. As these nutrients are ingested, however, it also means that gastrointestinal digestibility and absorption can modulate their efficacy significantly. Therefore, discussing the role of amino acids, protein, and protein hydrolysates in sports nutrition entails holding a discussion on all levels of the metabolic route. On May 28-29, 2007, a small group of researchers active in the field of exercise science and protein metabolism presented an overview of the different aspects of the application of protein and protein hydrolysates in sports nutrition. In addition, they were asked to share their opinions on the future progress in their fields of research. In this overview, an introduction to the workshop and a short summary of its outcome is provided.

  15. Protein Data Bank (PDB)

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — The Protein Data Bank (PDB) archive is the single worldwide repository of information about the 3D structures of large biological molecules, including proteins and...

  16. Protein electrophoresis - serum

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/003540.htm Protein electrophoresis - serum To use the sharing features on ... JavaScript. This lab test measures the types of protein in the fluid (serum) part of a blood ...

  17. Urine protein electrophoresis test

    Science.gov (United States)

    Urine protein electrophoresis; UPEP; Multiple myeloma - UPEP; Waldenström macroglobulinemia - UPEP; Amyloidosis - UPEP ... special paper and apply an electric current. The proteins move and form visible bands. These reveal the ...

  18. Protein in diet

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... building blocks of life. Every cell in the human body contains protein. The basic structure of protein is ... into parts called amino acids during digestion. The human body needs a number of amino acids in large ...

  19. Abnormal protein aggregationand neurodegenerativediseases

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    Abnormal protein aggregation or amyloid is the major cause ofmany neurodegenerative disorders. The present review focuses on the correlation between sequence and structure features of proteins related to the diseases and abnormal protein aggregation. Recent progress has improved our knowledge on understand-ing the mechanism of amyloid formation. We suggest a nucleation model for ordered protein aggregation, which can also explain pathogenesis mechanisms of these neurodegenerative diseases in vivo.

  20. Of proteins and processing

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Salazar Villanea, Sergio

    2017-01-01

    Hydrothermal processing is a common practice during the manufacture of protein-rich feed ingredients, such as rapeseed meal (RSM), and feeds. This processing step can induce physical and chemical changes to the proteins, thereby reducing the digestibility and utilization of crude protein (CP) and

  1. Protein Frustratometer 2

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gonzalo Parra, R.; Schafer, Nicholas P.; Radusky, Leandro G.

    2016-01-01

    The protein frustratometer is an energy landscape theory-inspired algorithm that aims at localizing and quantifying the energetic frustration present in protein molecules. Frustration is a useful concept for analyzing proteins' biological behavior. It compares the energy distributions of the nati...

  2. Destabilized bioluminescent proteins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allen, Michael S.; Rakesh, Gupta; Gary, Sayler S.

    2007-07-31

    Purified nucleic acids, vectors and cells containing a gene cassette encoding at least one modified bioluminescent protein, wherein the modification includes the addition of a peptide sequence. The duration of bioluminescence emitted by the modified bioluminescent protein is shorter than the duration of bioluminescence emitted by an unmodified form of the bioluminescent protein.

  3. CSF total protein

    Science.gov (United States)

    CSF total protein is a test to determine the amount of protein in your spinal fluid, also called cerebrospinal fluid (CSF). ... The normal protein range varies from lab to lab, but is typically about 15 to 60 milligrams per deciliter (mg/dL) ...

  4. Destabilized bioluminescent proteins

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Allen, Michael S. (Knoxville, TN); Rakesh, Gupta (New Delhi, IN); Gary, Sayler S. (Blaine, TN)

    2007-07-31

    Purified nucleic acids, vectors and cells containing a gene cassette encoding at least one modified bioluminescent protein, wherein the modification includes the addition of a peptide sequence. The duration of bioluminescence emitted by the modified bioluminescent protein is shorter than the duration of bioluminescence emitted by an unmodified form of the bioluminescent protein.

  5. Protein domain prediction

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ingolfsson, Helgi; Yona, Golan

    2008-01-01

    Domains are considered to be the building blocks of protein structures. A protein can contain a single domain or multiple domains, each one typically associated with a specific function. The combination of domains determines the function of the protein, its subcellular localization and the interacti

  6. The glucose transporter (GLUT-4) and vesicle-associated membrane protein-2 (VAMP-2) are segregated from recycling endosomes in insulin- sensitive cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    1996-01-01

    Insulin stimulates glucose transport in adipocytes by translocation of the glucose transporter (GLUT-4) from an intracellular site to the cell surface. We have characterized different synaptobrevin/vesicle- associated membrane protein (VAMP) homologues in adipocytes and studied their intracellular distribution with respect to GLUT-4. VAMP-1, VAMP- 2, and cellubrevin cDNAs were isolated from a 3T3-L1 adipocyte expression library. VAMP-2 and cellubrevin were: (a) the most abundant isoforms in adipocytes, (b) detectable in all insulin responsive tissues, (c) translocated to the cell surface in response to insulin, and (d) found in immunoadsorbed GLUT-4 vesicles. To further define their intracellular distribution, 3T3-L1 adipocytes were incubated with a transferrin/HRP conjugate (Tf/HRP) and endosomes ablated following addition of DAB and H2O2. While this resulted in ablation of > 90% of the transferrin receptor (TfR) and cellubrevin found in intracellular membranes, 60% of GLUT-4 and 90% of VAMP-2 was not ablated. Immuno-EM on intracellular vesicles from adipocytes revealed that VAMP-2 was colocalized with GLUT-4, whereas only partial colocalization was observed between GLUT-4 and cellubrevin. These studies show that two different v-SNAREs, cellubrevin and VAMP-2, are partially segregated in different intracellular compartments in adipocytes, implying that they may define separate classes of secretory vesicles in these cells. We conclude that a proportion of GLUT-4 is found in recycling endosomes in nonstimulated adipocytes together with cellubrevin and the transferrin receptor. In addition, GLUT-4 and VAMP-2 are selectively enriched in a postendocytic compartment. Further study is required to elucidate the function of this latter compartment in insulin-responsive cells. PMID:8707843

  7. Protopia: a protein-protein interaction tool

    Science.gov (United States)

    Real-Chicharro, Alejandro; Ruiz-Mostazo, Iván; Navas-Delgado, Ismael; Kerzazi, Amine; Chniber, Othmane; Sánchez-Jiménez, Francisca; Medina, Miguel Ángel; Aldana-Montes, José F

    2009-01-01

    Background Protein-protein interactions can be considered the basic skeleton for living organism self-organization and homeostasis. Impressive quantities of experimental data are being obtained and computational tools are essential to integrate and to organize this information. This paper presents Protopia, a biological tool that offers a way of searching for proteins and their interactions in different Protein Interaction Web Databases, as a part of a multidisciplinary initiative of our institution for the integration of biological data . Results The tool accesses the different Databases (at present, the free version of Transfac, DIP, Hprd, Int-Act and iHop), and results are expressed with biological protein names or databases codes and can be depicted as a vector or a matrix. They can be represented and handled interactively as an organic graph. Comparison among databases is carried out using the Uniprot codes annotated for each protein. Conclusion The tool locates and integrates the current information stored in the aforementioned databases, and redundancies among them are detected. Results are compatible with the most important network analysers, so that they can be compared and analysed by other world-wide known tools and platforms. The visualization possibilities help to attain this goal and they are especially interesting for handling multiple-step or complex networks. PMID:19828077

  8. Protein oxidation and peroxidation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Davies, Michael Jonathan

    2016-01-01

    and chain reactions with alcohols and carbonyls as major products; the latter are commonly used markers of protein damage. Direct oxidation of cysteine (and less commonly) methionine residues is a major reaction; this is typically faster than with H2O2, and results in altered protein activity and function....... Unlike H2O2, which is rapidly removed by protective enzymes, protein peroxides are only slowly removed, and catabolism is a major fate. Although turnover of modified proteins by proteasomal and lysosomal enzymes, and other proteases (e.g. mitochondrial Lon), can be efficient, protein hydroperoxides...

  9. Highly thermostable fluorescent proteins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bradbury, Andrew M [Santa Fe, NM; Waldo, Geoffrey S [Santa Fe, NM; Kiss, Csaba [Los Alamos, NM

    2012-05-01

    Thermostable fluorescent proteins (TSFPs), methods for generating these and other stability-enhanced proteins, polynucleotides encoding such proteins, and assays and method for using the TSFPs and TSFP-encoding nucleic acid molecules are provided. The TSFPs of the invention show extremely enhanced levels of stability and thermotolerance. In one case, for example, a TSFP of the invention is so stable it can be heated to 99.degree. C. for short periods of time without denaturing, and retains 85% of its fluorescence when heated to 80.degree. C. for several minutes. The invention also provides a method for generating stability-enhanced variants of a protein, including but not limited to fluorescent proteins.

  10. Highly thermostable fluorescent proteins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bradbury, Andrew M.; Waldo, Geoffrey S.; Kiss, Csaba

    2011-03-22

    Thermostable fluorescent proteins (TSFPs), methods for generating these and other stability-enhanced proteins, polynucleotides encoding such proteins, and assays and method for using the TSFPs and TSFP-encoding nucleic acid molecules are provided. The TSFPs of the invention show extremely enhanced levels of stability and thermotolerance. In one case, for example, a TSFP of the invention is so stable it can be heated to 99.degree. C. for short periods of time without denaturing, and retains 85% of its fluorescence when heated to 80.degree. C. for several minutes. The invention also provides a method for generating stability-enhanced variants of a protein, including but not limited to fluorescent proteins.

  11. Protein crystallization with paper

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsuoka, Miki; Kakinouchi, Keisuke; Adachi, Hiroaki; Maruyama, Mihoko; Sugiyama, Shigeru; Sano, Satoshi; Yoshikawa, Hiroshi Y.; Takahashi, Yoshinori; Yoshimura, Masashi; Matsumura, Hiroyoshi; Murakami, Satoshi; Inoue, Tsuyoshi; Mori, Yusuke; Takano, Kazufumi

    2016-05-01

    We developed a new protein crystallization method that incorporates paper. A small piece of paper, such as facial tissue or KimWipes, was added to a drop of protein solution in the traditional sitting drop vapor diffusion technique, and protein crystals grew by incorporating paper. By this method, we achieved the growth of protein crystals with reducing osmotic shock. Because the technique is very simple and the materials are easy to obtain, this method will come into wide use for protein crystallization. In the future, it could be applied to nanoliter-scale crystallization screening on a paper sheet such as in inkjet printing.

  12. Protein aggregate myopathies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sharma M

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available Protein aggregate myopathies (PAM are an emerging group of muscle diseases characterized by structural abnormalities. Protein aggregate myopathies are marked by the aggregation of intrinsic proteins within muscle fibers and fall into four major groups or conditions: (1 desmin-related myopathies (DRM that include desminopathies, a-B crystallinopathies, selenoproteinopathies caused by mutations in the, a-B crystallin and selenoprotein N1 genes, (2 hereditary inclusion body myopathies, several of which have been linked to different chromosomal gene loci, but with as yet unidentified protein product, (3 actinopathies marked by mutations in the sarcomeric ACTA1 gene, and (4 myosinopathy marked by a mutation in the MYH-7 gene. While PAM forms 1 and 2 are probably based on impaired extralysosomal protein degradation, resulting in the accumulation of numerous and diverse proteins (in familial types in addition to respective mutant proteins, PAM forms 3 and 4 may represent anabolic or developmental defects because of preservation of sarcomeres outside of the actin and myosin aggregates and dearth or absence of other proteins in these actin or myosin aggregates, respectively. The pathogenetic principles governing protein aggregation within muscle fibers and subsequent structural sarcomeres are still largely unknown in both the putative catabolic and anabolic forms of PAM. Presence of inclusions and their protein composition in other congenital myopathies such as reducing bodies, cylindrical spirals, tubular aggregates and others await clarification. The hitherto described PAMs were first identified by immunohistochemistry of proteins and subsequently by molecular analysis of their genes.

  13. Protein and vegetarian diets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marsh, Kate A; Munn, Elizabeth A; Baines, Surinder K

    2013-08-19

    A vegetarian diet can easily meet human dietary protein requirements as long as energy needs are met and a variety of foods are eaten. Vegetarians should obtain protein from a variety of plant sources, including legumes, soy products, grains, nuts and seeds. Eggs and dairy products also provide protein for those following a lacto-ovo-vegetarian diet. There is no need to consciously combine different plant proteins at each meal as long as a variety of foods are eaten from day to day, because the human body maintains a pool of amino acids which can be used to complement dietary protein. The consumption of plant proteins rather than animal proteins by vegetarians may contribute to their reduced risk of chronic diseases such as diabetes and heart disease.

  14. Racemic protein crystallography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yeates, Todd O; Kent, Stephen B H

    2012-01-01

    Although natural proteins are chiral and are all of one "handedness," their mirror image forms can be prepared by chemical synthesis. This opens up new opportunities for protein crystallography. A racemic mixture of the enantiomeric forms of a protein molecule can crystallize in ways that natural proteins cannot. Recent experimental data support a theoretical prediction that this should make racemic protein mixtures highly amenable to crystallization. Crystals obtained from racemic mixtures also offer advantages in structure determination strategies. The relevance of these potential advantages is heightened by advances in synthetic methods, which are extending the size limit for proteins that can be prepared by chemical synthesis. Recent ideas and results in the area of racemic protein crystallography are reviewed.

  15. Packing in protein cores

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaines, J. C.; Clark, A. H.; Regan, L.; O'Hern, C. S.

    2017-07-01

    Proteins are biological polymers that underlie all cellular functions. The first high-resolution protein structures were determined by x-ray crystallography in the 1960s. Since then, there has been continued interest in understanding and predicting protein structure and stability. It is well-established that a large contribution to protein stability originates from the sequestration from solvent of hydrophobic residues in the protein core. How are such hydrophobic residues arranged in the core; how can one best model the packing of these residues, and are residues loosely packed with multiple allowed side chain conformations or densely packed with a single allowed side chain conformation? Here we show that to properly model the packing of residues in protein cores it is essential that amino acids are represented by appropriately calibrated atom sizes, and that hydrogen atoms are explicitly included. We show that protein cores possess a packing fraction of φ ≈ 0.56 , which is significantly less than the typically quoted value of 0.74 obtained using the extended atom representation. We also compare the results for the packing of amino acids in protein cores to results obtained for jammed packings from discrete element simulations of spheres, elongated particles, and composite particles with bumpy surfaces. We show that amino acids in protein cores pack as densely as disordered jammed packings of particles with similar values for the aspect ratio and bumpiness as found for amino acids. Knowing the structural properties of protein cores is of both fundamental and practical importance. Practically, it enables the assessment of changes in the structure and stability of proteins arising from amino acid mutations (such as those identified as a result of the massive human genome sequencing efforts) and the design of new folded, stable proteins and protein-protein interactions with tunable specificity and affinity.

  16. The I-BAR protein Ivy1 is an effector of the Rab7 GTPase Ypt7 involved in vacuole membrane homeostasis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Numrich, Johannes; Péli-Gulli, Marie-Pierre; Arlt, Henning; Sardu, Alessandro; Griffith, Janice; Levine, Tim; Engelbrecht-Vandré, Siegfried; Reggiori, Fulvio; De Virgilio, Claudio; Ungermann, Christian

    2015-01-01

    Membrane fusion at the vacuole depends on a conserved machinery that includes SNAREs, the Rab7 homolog Ypt7 and its effector HOPS. Here, we demonstrate that Ypt7 has an unexpected additional function by controlling membrane homeostasis and nutrient-dependent signaling on the vacuole surface. We show

  17. Rat basophilic leukemia cells express syntaxin-3 and VAMP-7 in granule membranes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hibi, T; Hirashima, N; Nakanishi, M

    2000-04-29

    In neuronal cells, it is generally agreed that SNARE proteins underlie the release of neurotransmitter. It is controversial, however, whether they also work functionally in the degranulation of RBL-2H3 cells because the expression of SNARE proteins has not been confirmed and the degranulation is not inhibited by tetanus toxin which cleaves one of SNARE proteins, VAMP-2. We investigated the expression and the localization of SNARE proteins including VAMP-7 which is insensitive to tetanus toxin. RT-PCR analysis showed the existence of SNARE proteins, including syntaxin-2, -3, -4, SNAP-23, VAMP-2, and VAMP-7. Experiments using GFP-conjugated proteins revealed that VAMP-7 was localized only in granule membranes, whereas syntaxin-3 was in both the plasma and granule membranes. Upon antigen stimulation, these proteins in granule membranes moved to the cell surface due to the fusion of granules with the plasma membrane. The results suggest the involvement of SNARE proteins in the degranulation of RBL-2H3 cells.

  18. Sequence Classification: 893608 [

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Sec9p, that binds v-SNARE Snc2p; also required for sporulation; syntaxin homolog that is functionally redundant with Sso2p; Sso1p || http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/protein/6325024 ...

  19. Toxic proteins in plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dang, Liuyi; Van Damme, Els J M

    2015-09-01

    Plants have evolved to synthesize a variety of noxious compounds to cope with unfavorable circumstances, among which a large group of toxic proteins that play a critical role in plant defense against predators and microbes. Up to now, a wide range of harmful proteins have been discovered in different plants, including lectins, ribosome-inactivating proteins, protease inhibitors, ureases, arcelins, antimicrobial peptides and pore-forming toxins. To fulfill their role in plant defense, these proteins exhibit various degrees of toxicity towards animals, insects, bacteria or fungi. Numerous studies have been carried out to investigate the toxic effects and mode of action of these plant proteins in order to explore their possible applications. Indeed, because of their biological activities, toxic plant proteins are also considered as potentially useful tools in crop protection and in biomedical applications, such as cancer treatment. Genes encoding toxic plant proteins have been introduced into crop genomes using genetic engineering technology in order to increase the plant's resistance against pathogens and diseases. Despite the availability of ample information on toxic plant proteins, very few publications have attempted to summarize the research progress made during the last decades. This review focuses on the diversity of toxic plant proteins in view of their toxicity as well as their mode of action. Furthermore, an outlook towards the biological role(s) of these proteins and their potential applications is discussed.

  20. PROTEIN - WHICH IS BEST?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael J. Falvo

    2004-09-01

    Full Text Available Protein intake that exceeds the recommended daily allowance is widely accepted for both endurance and power athletes. However, considering the variety of proteins that are available much less is known concerning the benefits of consuming one protein versus another. The purpose of this paper is to identify and analyze key factors in order to make responsible recommendations to both the general and athletic populations. Evaluation of a protein is fundamental in determining its appropriateness in the human diet. Proteins that are of inferior content and digestibility are important to recognize and restrict or limit in the diet. Similarly, such knowledge will provide an ability to identify proteins that provide the greatest benefit and should be consumed. The various techniques utilized to rate protein will be discussed. Traditionally, sources of dietary protein are seen as either being of animal or vegetable origin. Animal sources provide a complete source of protein (i.e. containing all essential amino acids, whereas vegetable sources generally lack one or more of the essential amino acids. Animal sources of dietary protein, despite providing a complete protein and numerous vitamins and minerals, have some health professionals concerned about the amount of saturated fat common in these foods compared to vegetable sources. The advent of processing techniques has shifted some of this attention and ignited the sports supplement marketplace with derivative products such as whey, casein and soy. Individually, these products vary in quality and applicability to certain populations. The benefits that these particular proteins possess are discussed. In addition, the impact that elevated protein consumption has on health and safety issues (i.e. bone health, renal function are also reviewed

  1. Protein kinesis: The dynamics of protein trafficking and stability

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1995-12-31

    The purpose of this conference is to provide a multidisciplinary forum for exchange of state-of-the-art information on protein kinesis. This volume contains abstracts of papers in the following areas: protein folding and modification in the endoplasmic reticulum; protein trafficking; protein translocation and folding; protein degradation; polarity; nuclear trafficking; membrane dynamics; and protein import into organelles.

  2. Protein: FEA4 [TP Atlas

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available FEA4 Proteins in gibberellin signaling GID2 F-box protein GID2 Gibberellin-insensitive dwarf protein 2, Prot...ein GIBBERELLIN INSENSITIVE DWARF2 39947 Oryza sativa subsp. japonica Q7XAK4 ...

  3. Protein Electrophoresis/Immunofixation Electrophoresis

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... be limited. Home Visit Global Sites Search Help? Protein Electrophoresis Immunofixation Electrophoresis Share this page: Was this page helpful? Also known as: Serum Protein Electrophoresis; Protein ELP; SPE; SPEP; Urine Protein Electrophoresis; ...

  4. Characterization of VAMP isoforms in 3T3-L1 adipocytes: implications for GLUT4 trafficking.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sadler, Jessica B A; Bryant, Nia J; Gould, Gwyn W

    2015-02-01

    The fusion of GLUT4-containing vesicles with the plasma membrane of adipocytes is a key facet of insulin action. This process is mediated by the formation of functional soluble N-ethylmaleimide-sensitive factor attachment protein receptor (SNARE) complexes between the plasma membrane t-SNARE complex and the vesicle v-SNARE or VAMP. The t-SNARE complex consists of Syntaxin4 and SNAP23, and whereas many studies identify VAMP2 as the v-SNARE, others suggest that either VAMP3 or VAMP8 may also fulfil this role. Here we characterized the levels of expression, distribution, and association of all the VAMPs expressed in 3T3-L1 adipocytes to provide the first systematic analysis of all members of this protein family for any cell type. Despite our finding that all VAMP isoforms form SDS-resistant SNARE complexes with Syntaxin4/SNAP23 in vitro, a combination of levels of expression (which vary by >30-fold), subcellular distribution, and coimmunoprecipitation analyses lead us to propose that VAMP2 is the major v-SNARE involved in GLUT4 trafficking to the surface of 3T3-L1 adipocytes.

  5. NMR of unfolded proteins

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Amarnath Chtterjee; Ashutosh Kumar; Jeetender Chugh; Sudha Srivastava; Neel S Bhavesh; Ramakrishna V Hosur

    2005-01-01

    In the post-genomic era, as more and more genome sequences are becoming known and hectic efforts are underway to decode the information content in them, it is becoming increasingly evident that flexibility in proteins plays a crucial role in many of the biological functions. Many proteins have intrinsic disorder either wholly or in specific regions. It appears that this disorder may be important for regulatory functions of the proteins, on the one hand, and may help in directing the folding process to reach the compact native state, on the other. Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) has over the last two decades emerged as the sole, most powerful technique to help characterize these disordered protein systems. In this review, we first discuss the significance of disorder in proteins and then describe the recent developments in NMR methods for their characterization. A brief description of the results obtained on several disordered proteins is presented at the end.

  6. Mayaro virus proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mezencio, J M; Rebello, M A

    1993-01-01

    Mayaro virus was grown in BHK-21 cells and purified by centrifugation in a potassium-tartrate gradient (5-50%). The electron microscopy analyses of the purified virus showed an homogeneous population of enveloped particles with 69 +/- 2.3 nm in diameter. Three structural virus proteins were identified and designated p1, p2 and p3. Their average molecular weight were p1, 54 KDa; p2, 50 KDa and p3, 34 KDa. In Mayaro virus infected Aedes albopictus cells and in BHK-21 infected cells we detected six viral proteins, in which three of them are the structural virus proteins and the other three were products from processing of precursors of viral proteins, whose molecular weights are 62 KDa, 64 KDa and 110 KDa. The 34 KDa protein was the first viral protein synthesized at 5 hours post-infection in both cell lines studied.

  7. Mayaro virus proteins

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. M. S. Mezencio

    1993-06-01

    Full Text Available Mayaro virus was grown in BHK-21 cells and purified by centrifugation in a potassium-tartrate gradient (5-50%. The electron microscopy analyses of the purified virus showed an homogeneous population of enveloped particles with 69 ñ 2.3 nm in diameter. Three structural virus proteins were identified and designated pl, p2 and p3. Their average molecular weight were p1, 54 KDa; p2, 50 KDa and p3, 34 KDa. In Mayaro virus infected. Aedes albopictus cells and in BHK-21 infected cells we detected six viral proteins, in wich three of them are the structural virus proteins and the other three were products from processing of precursors of viral proteins, whose molecular weights are 62 KDa, 64 KDa and 110 KDa. The 34 KDa protein was the first viral protein sinthesized at 5 hours post-infection in both cell lines studied.

  8. Protein Models Comparator

    CERN Document Server

    Widera, Paweł

    2011-01-01

    The process of comparison of computer generated protein structural models is an important element of protein structure prediction. It has many uses including model quality evaluation, selection of the final models from a large set of candidates or optimisation of parameters of energy functions used in template free modelling and refinement. Although many protein comparison methods are available online on numerous web servers, their ability to handle a large scale model comparison is often very limited. Most of the servers offer only a single pairwise structural comparison, and they usually do not provide a model-specific comparison with a fixed alignment between the models. To bridge the gap between the protein and model structure comparison we have developed the Protein Models Comparator (pm-cmp). To be able to deliver the scalability on demand and handle large comparison experiments the pm-cmp was implemented "in the cloud". Protein Models Comparator is a scalable web application for a fast distributed comp...

  9. Supramolecular Chemistry Targeting Proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Dun, Sam; Ottmann, Christian; Milroy, Lech-Gustav; Brunsveld, Luc

    2017-09-28

    The specific recognition of protein surface elements is a fundamental challenge in the life sciences. New developments in this field will form the basis of advanced therapeutic approaches and lead to applications such as sensors, affinity tags, immobilization techniques, and protein-based materials. Synthetic supramolecular molecules and materials are creating new opportunities for protein recognition that are orthogonal to classical small molecule and protein-based approaches. As outlined here, their unique molecular features enable the recognition of amino acids, peptides, and even whole protein surfaces, which can be applied to the modulation and assembly of proteins. We believe that structural insights into these processes are of great value for the further development of this field and have therefore focused this Perspective on contributions that provide such structural data.

  10. Computational Protein Design

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Johansson, Kristoffer Enøe

    Proteins are the major functional group of molecules in biology. The impact of protein science on medicine and chemical productions is rapidly increasing. However, the greatest potential remains to be realized. The fi eld of protein design has advanced computational modeling from a tool of support...... to a central method that enables new developments. For example, novel enzymes with functions not found in natural proteins have been de novo designed to give enough activity for experimental optimization. This thesis presents the current state-of-the-art within computational design methods together...... with a novel method based on probability theory. With the aim of assembling a complete pipeline for protein design, this work touches upon several aspects of protein design. The presented work is the computational half of a design project where the other half is dedicated to the experimental part...

  11. Computational Protein Design

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Johansson, Kristoffer Enøe

    Proteins are the major functional group of molecules in biology. The impact of protein science on medicine and chemical productions is rapidly increasing. However, the greatest potential remains to be realized. The fi eld of protein design has advanced computational modeling from a tool of support...... to a central method that enables new developments. For example, novel enzymes with functions not found in natural proteins have been de novo designed to give enough activity for experimental optimization. This thesis presents the current state-of-the-art within computational design methods together...... with a novel method based on probability theory. With the aim of assembling a complete pipeline for protein design, this work touches upon several aspects of protein design. The presented work is the computational half of a design project where the other half is dedicated to the experimental part...

  12. Protein-protein interactions as drug targets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skwarczynska, Malgorzata; Ottmann, Christian

    2015-01-01

    Modulation of protein-protein interactions (PPIs) is becoming increasingly important in drug discovery and chemical biology. While a few years ago this 'target class' was deemed to be largely undruggable an impressing number of publications and success stories now show that targeting PPIs with small, drug-like molecules indeed is a feasible approach. Here, we summarize the current state of small-molecule inhibition and stabilization of PPIs and review the active molecules from a structural and medicinal chemistry angle, especially focusing on the key examples of iNOS, LFA-1 and 14-3-3.

  13. Acanthamoeba castellanii STAT Protein

    OpenAIRE

    Anna Kicinska; Jacek Leluk; Wieslawa Jarmuszkiewicz

    2014-01-01

    STAT (signal transducers and activators of transcription) proteins are one of the important mediators of phosphotyrosine-regulated signaling in metazoan cells. We described the presence of STAT protein in a unicellular, free-living amoebae with a simple life cycle, Acanthamoeba castellanii. A. castellanii is the only, studied to date, Amoebozoan that does not belong to Mycetozoa but possesses STATs. A sequence of the A. castellanii STAT protein includes domains similar to those of the Dictyos...

  14. Proteins: Form and function

    OpenAIRE

    Roy D Sleator

    2012-01-01

    An overwhelming array of structural variants has evolved from a comparatively small number of protein structural domains; which has in turn facilitated an expanse of functional derivatives. Herein, I review the primary mechanisms which have contributed to the vastness of our existing, and expanding, protein repertoires. Protein function prediction strategies, both sequence and structure based, are also discussed and their associated strengths and weaknesses assessed.

  15. Pressure cryocooling protein crystals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Chae Un; Gruner, Sol M.

    2011-10-04

    Preparation of cryocooled protein crystal is provided by use of helium pressurizing and cryocooling to obtain cryocooled protein crystal allowing collection of high resolution data and by heavier noble gas (krypton or xenon) binding followed by helium pressurizing and cryocooling to obtain cryocooled protein crystal for collection of high resolution data and SAD phasing simultaneously. The helium pressurizing is carried out on crystal coated to prevent dehydration or on crystal grown in aqueous solution in a capillary.

  16. PIC: Protein Interactions Calculator.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tina, K G; Bhadra, R; Srinivasan, N

    2007-07-01

    Interactions within a protein structure and interactions between proteins in an assembly are essential considerations in understanding molecular basis of stability and functions of proteins and their complexes. There are several weak and strong interactions that render stability to a protein structure or an assembly. Protein Interactions Calculator (PIC) is a server which, given the coordinate set of 3D structure of a protein or an assembly, computes various interactions such as disulphide bonds, interactions between hydrophobic residues, ionic interactions, hydrogen bonds, aromatic-aromatic interactions, aromatic-sulphur interactions and cation-pi interactions within a protein or between proteins in a complex. Interactions are calculated on the basis of standard, published criteria. The identified interactions between residues can be visualized using a RasMol and Jmol interface. The advantage with PIC server is the easy availability of inter-residue interaction calculations in a single site. It also determines the accessible surface area and residue-depth, which is the distance of a residue from the surface of the protein. User can also recognize specific kind of interactions, such as apolar-apolar residue interactions or ionic interactions, that are formed between buried or exposed residues or near the surface or deep inside.

  17. Dietary proteins and angiogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Medina, Miguel Ángel; Quesada, Ana R

    2014-01-17

    Both defective and persistent angiogenesis are linked to pathological situations in the adult. Compounds able to modulate angiogenesis have a potential value for the treatment of such pathologies. Several small molecules present in the diet have been shown to have modulatory effects on angiogenesis. This review presents the current state of knowledge on the potential modulatory roles of dietary proteins on angiogenesis. There is currently limited available information on the topic. Milk contains at least three proteins for which modulatory effects on angiogenesis have been previously demonstrated. On the other hand, there is some scarce information on the potential of dietary lectins, edible plant proteins and high protein diets to modulate angiogenesis.

  18. [Alternative scaffold proteins].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petrovskaia, L E; Shingarova, L N; Dolgikh, D A; Kirpichnikov, M P

    2011-01-01

    Review is devoted to the challenging direction in modem molecular biology and bioengineering - the properties of alternative scaffold proteins (ASP) and methods for obtaining ASP binding molecules. ASP molecules incorporate conservative protein core and hypervariable regions, providing for the binding function. Structural classification of ASP includes several types which differ also in their molecular targets and potential applications. Construction of artificial binding proteins on the ASP basis implies a combinatorial library design with subsequent selection of specific binders with the use of phage display or the modem cell-free systems. Alternative binding proteins on non-immunoglobulin scaffolds find broad applications in different fields ofbiotechnology and molecular medicine.

  19. Acanthamoeba castellanii STAT protein.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna Kicinska

    Full Text Available STAT (signal transducers and activators of transcription proteins are one of the important mediators of phosphotyrosine-regulated signaling in metazoan cells. We described the presence of STAT protein in a unicellular, free-living amoebae with a simple life cycle, Acanthamoeba castellanii. A. castellanii is the only, studied to date, Amoebozoan that does not belong to Mycetozoa but possesses STATs. A sequence of the A. castellanii STAT protein includes domains similar to those of the Dictyostelium STAT proteins: a coiled coil (characteristic for Dictyostelium STAT coiled coil, a STAT DNA-binding domain and a Src-homology domain. The search for protein sequences homologous to A. castellanii STAT revealed 17 additional sequences from lower eukaryotes. Interestingly, all of these sequences come from Amoebozoa organisms that belong to either Mycetozoa (slime molds or Centramoebida. We showed that there are four separated clades within the slime mold STAT proteins. The A. castellanii STAT protein branches next to a group of STATc proteins from Mycetozoa. We also demonstrate that Amoebozoa form a distinct monophyletic lineage within the STAT protein world that is well separated from the other groups.

  20. Acanthamoeba castellanii STAT protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kicinska, Anna; Leluk, Jacek; Jarmuszkiewicz, Wieslawa

    2014-01-01

    STAT (signal transducers and activators of transcription) proteins are one of the important mediators of phosphotyrosine-regulated signaling in metazoan cells. We described the presence of STAT protein in a unicellular, free-living amoebae with a simple life cycle, Acanthamoeba castellanii. A. castellanii is the only, studied to date, Amoebozoan that does not belong to Mycetozoa but possesses STATs. A sequence of the A. castellanii STAT protein includes domains similar to those of the Dictyostelium STAT proteins: a coiled coil (characteristic for Dictyostelium STAT coiled coil), a STAT DNA-binding domain and a Src-homology domain. The search for protein sequences homologous to A. castellanii STAT revealed 17 additional sequences from lower eukaryotes. Interestingly, all of these sequences come from Amoebozoa organisms that belong to either Mycetozoa (slime molds) or Centramoebida. We showed that there are four separated clades within the slime mold STAT proteins. The A. castellanii STAT protein branches next to a group of STATc proteins from Mycetozoa. We also demonstrate that Amoebozoa form a distinct monophyletic lineage within the STAT protein world that is well separated from the other groups.

  1. Simulations of Protein Folding

    CERN Document Server

    Cahill, M; Cahill, K E; Cahill, Michael; Fleharty, Mark; Cahill, Kevin

    2000-01-01

    We have developed a simple, phenomenological, Monte-Carlo code that predicts the three-dimensional structure of globular proteins from the DNA sequences that define them. We have applied this code to two small proteins, the villin headpiece (1VII) and cole1 rop (1ROP). Our code folded the 36-residue villin headpiece to a mean rms distance of less than 5 A from its native structure as revealed by NMR; it folded a 56-residue fragment of the protein cole1 rop to within 11 A of its native structure. The denatured starting configurations of these two proteins were, respectively, 29 A and 55 A distant from their native structures.

  2. Moonlighting proteins in cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Min, Kyung-Won; Lee, Seong-Ho; Baek, Seung Joon

    2016-01-01

    Since the 1980s, growing evidence suggested that the cellular localization of proteins determined their activity and biological functions. In a classical view, a protein is characterized by the single cellular compartment where it primarily resides and functions. It is now believed that when proteins appear in different subcellular locations, the cells surpass the expected activity of proteins given the same genomic information to fulfill complex biological behavior. Many proteins are recognized for having the potential to exist in multiple locations in cells. Dysregulation of translocation may cause cancer or contribute to poorer cancer prognosis. Thus, quantitative and comprehensive assessment of dynamic proteins and associated protein movements could be a promising indicator in determining cancer prognosis and efficiency of cancer treatment and therapy. This review will summarize these so-called moonlighting proteins, in terms of a coupled intracellular cancer signaling pathway. Determination of the detailed biological intracellular and extracellular transit and regulatory activity of moonlighting proteins permits a better understanding of cancer and identification of potential means of molecular intervention.

  3. Self assembling proteins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yeates, Todd O.; Padilla, Jennifer; Colovos, Chris

    2004-06-29

    Novel fusion proteins capable of self-assembling into regular structures, as well as nucleic acids encoding the same, are provided. The subject fusion proteins comprise at least two oligomerization domains rigidly linked together, e.g. through an alpha helical linking group. Also provided are regular structures comprising a plurality of self-assembled fusion proteins of the subject invention, and methods for producing the same. The subject fusion proteins find use in the preparation of a variety of nanostructures, where such structures include: cages, shells, double-layer rings, two-dimensional layers, three-dimensional crystals, filaments, and tubes.

  4. Characterization of Metal Proteins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Unno, Masaki; Ikeda-Saito, Masao

    Some metals are essential for life. Most of these metals are associated with biological macromolecule like DNA (deoxyribonucleic acid), RNA (ribonucleic acid), and more often with proteins: metals bind or interact with them. A number of protein molecules intrinsically contain metals in their structure. Some of these proteins catalyze unique chemical reactions and perform specific physiological functions. In this chapter, we will shed light on the several metalcontaining proteins, termed metalloproteins, and other proteins interacting metals. We will also introduce several key techniques which have been used to characterize these proteins. Characterizing these proteins and to understand the relationships between their structures and functions shall continue to be one of the major avenues to solve the mysteries of life. At first, we introduce what are the protein structures and how these proteins interact with metals. In the next section, we discuss the physiological roles of some representative metals. Next, we show two examples of special metal cofactors those help the biological macromolecules to carry out their functions. Then we describe some functions of metalloproteins. Finally, we introduce some physical methods to characterize metalloproteins.

  5. Ultrafiltration of pegylated proteins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Molek, Jessica R.

    There is considerable clinical interest in the use of "second-generation" therapeutics produced by conjugation of a native protein with various polymers including polyethylene glycol (PEG). PEG--protein conjugates, so-called PEGylated proteins, can exhibit enhanced stability, half-life, and bioavailability. One of the challenges in the commercial production of PEGylated proteins is the purification required to remove unreacted polymer, native protein, and in many cases PEGylated proteins with nonoptimal degrees of conjugation. The overall objective of this thesis was to examine the use of ultrafiltration for the purification of PEGylated proteins. This included: (1) analysis of size-based separation of PEGylated proteins using conventional ultrafiltration membranes, (2) use of electrically-charged membranes to exploit differences in electrostatic interactions, and (3) examination of the effects of PEGylation on protein fouling. The experimental results were analyzed using appropriate theoretical models, with the underlying physical properties of the PEGylated proteins evaluated using size exclusion chromatography, capillary electrophoresis, dynamic light scattering, and reverse phase chromatography. PEGylated proteins were produced by covalent attachment of activated PEG to a protein via primary amines on the lysine residues. A simple model was developed for the reaction kinetics, which was used to explore the effect of reaction conditions and mode of operation on the distribution of PEGylated products. The effective size of the PEGylated proteins was evaluated using size exclusion chromatography, with appropriate correlations developed for the size in terms of the molecular weight of the native protein and attached PEG. The electrophoretic mobility of the PEGylated proteins were evaluated by capillary electrophoresis with the data in good agreement with a simple model accounting for the increase in protein size and the reduction in the number of protonated amine

  6. Protein: FBB5 [TP Atlas

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available ependent protein kinase activator A PKR-associated protein X, PKR-associating protein X, Protein activator o...f the interferon-induced protein kinase, Protein kinase, interferon-inducible double stranded RNA-dependent activator 9606 Homo sapiens O75569 8575 2DIX 8575 O75569 ...

  7. Enumeration of starter cultures during yogurt production using Petrifilm AC plates associated with acidified MRS and M17 broths.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonçalves, Marília M; Freitas, Rosangela; Nero, Luís A; Carvalho, Antônio F

    2009-05-01

    The efficiency of Petrifilm AC (3M Microbiology, St. Paul, MN, USA) associated with the broths M17 and de Mann-Rogosa-Sharpe (MRS) at pH 5.4 was evaluated to enumerate Streptococcus salivarius subsp. thermophilus and Lactobacillus delbrueckii subsp. bulgaricus during the yogurt production. Commercial and reference strains of these microorganisms were experimentally inoculated in nonfat milk and incubated at 42 degrees C for 4 h for yogurt production. At the moment of inoculation and after incubation, aliquots were collected, submitted to dilution using the broths M17 and MRS at pH 5.4, and plated for Strep. salivarius and Lb. bulgaricus enumeration according ISO 9232 and at Petrifilm AC plates, respectively. M17 plates were incubated at 42 degrees C, and MRS plates were incubated at 35 degrees C under anaerobiosis. After 48 h, the formed colonies were enumerated and the counts were compared by correlation and analysis of variance (Pyogurt production, with slight interferences due to the acidity of MRS at the moment of inoculation, and due to the acidity of yogurt at the end of fermentation process. It was also observed that the MRS at pH 5.4 was not sufficiently selective for Lb. delbrueckii enumeration, despite it is indicated by the official protocol from ISO 9232.

  8. Protein Attachment on Nanodiamonds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Chung-Lun; Lin, Cheng-Huang; Chang, Huan-Cheng; Su, Meng-Chih

    2015-07-16

    A recent advance in nanotechnology is the scale-up production of small and nonaggregated diamond nanoparticles suitable for biological applications. Using detonation nanodiamonds (NDs) with an average diameter of ∼4 nm as the adsorbents, we have studied the static attachment of three proteins (myoglobin, bovine serum albumin, and insulin) onto the nanoparticles by optical spectroscopy, mass spectrometry, and dynamic light scattering, and electrophoretic zeta potential measurements. Results show that the protein surface coverage is predominantly determined by the competition between protein-protein and protein-ND interactions, giving each protein a unique and characteristic structural configuration in its own complex. Specifically, both myoglobin and bovine serum albumin show a Langmuir-type adsorption behavior, forming 1:1 complexes at saturation, whereas insulin folds into a tightly bound multimer before adsorption. The markedly different adsorption patterns appear to be independent of the protein concentration and are closely related to the affinity of the individual proteins for the NDs. The present study provides a fundamental understanding for the use of NDs as a platform for nanomedical drug delivery.

  9. Poxviral Ankyrin Proteins

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael H. Herbert

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Multiple repeats of the ankyrin motif (ANK are ubiquitous throughout the kingdoms of life but are absent from most viruses. The main exception to this is the poxvirus family, and specifically the chordopoxviruses, with ANK repeat proteins present in all but three species from separate genera. The poxviral ANK repeat proteins belong to distinct orthologue groups spread over different species, and align well with the phylogeny of their genera. This distribution throughout the chordopoxviruses indicates these proteins were present in an ancestral vertebrate poxvirus, and have since undergone numerous duplication events. Most poxviral ANK repeat proteins contain an unusual topology of multiple ANK motifs starting at the N-terminus with a C-terminal poxviral homologue of the cellular F-box enabling interaction with the cellular SCF ubiquitin ligase complex. The subtle variations between ANK repeat proteins of individual poxviruses suggest an array of different substrates may be bound by these protein-protein interaction domains and, via the F-box, potentially directed to cellular ubiquitination pathways and possible degradation. Known interaction partners of several of these proteins indicate that the NF-κB coordinated anti-viral response is a key target, whilst some poxviral ANK repeat domains also have an F-box independent affect on viral host-range.

  10. Engineered Protein Polymers

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-05-31

    of each pure polymer, we plan to combine the various polymer solutions in different ratios to tune the composition and physico-chemical properties...protein materials as vehicles for storage and delivery of small molecules. Each protein polymer under concentrations for particle formation ( vida

  11. MODELS OF PROTEIN FOLDING

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Unnati Ahluwalia

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available In an attempt to explore the understanding of protein folding mechanism, various models have been proposed in the literature. Advances in recent experimental and computational techniques rationalized our understanding on some of the fundamental features of the protein folding pathways. The goal of this review is to revisit the various models and outline the essential aspects of the folding reaction.

  12. Poxviral Ankyrin Proteins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herbert, Michael H.; Squire, Christopher J.; Mercer, Andrew A

    2015-01-01

    Multiple repeats of the ankyrin motif (ANK) are ubiquitous throughout the kingdoms of life but are absent from most viruses. The main exception to this is the poxvirus family, and specifically the chordopoxviruses, with ANK repeat proteins present in all but three species from separate genera. The poxviral ANK repeat proteins belong to distinct orthologue groups spread over different species, and align well with the phylogeny of their genera. This distribution throughout the chordopoxviruses indicates these proteins were present in an ancestral vertebrate poxvirus, and have since undergone numerous duplication events. Most poxviral ANK repeat proteins contain an unusual topology of multiple ANK motifs starting at the N-terminus with a C-terminal poxviral homologue of the cellular F-box enabling interaction with the cellular SCF ubiquitin ligase complex. The subtle variations between ANK repeat proteins of individual poxviruses suggest an array of different substrates may be bound by these protein-protein interaction domains and, via the F-box, potentially directed to cellular ubiquitination pathways and possible degradation. Known interaction partners of several of these proteins indicate that the NF-κB coordinated anti-viral response is a key target, whilst some poxviral ANK repeat domains also have an F-box independent affect on viral host-range. PMID:25690795

  13. Advances in Protein Precipitation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Golubovic, M.

    2009-01-01

    Proteins are biological macromolecules, which are among the key components of all living organisms. Proteins are nowadays present in all fields of biotech industry, such as food and feed, synthetic and pharmaceutical industry. They are isolated from their natural sources or produced in different cel

  14. Brushes and proteins

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bosker, W.T.E.

    2011-01-01

      Brushes and Proteins   Wouter T. E. Bosker         Protein adsorption at solid surfaces can be prevented by applying a polymer brush at the surface. A polymer brush consists of polymer chains end-grafted to the surface at such a grafting density that th

  15. Manipulating and Visualizing Proteins

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Simon, Horst D.

    2003-12-05

    ProteinShop Gives Researchers a Hands-On Tool for Manipulating, Visualizing Protein Structures. The Human Genome Project and other biological research efforts are creating an avalanche of new data about the chemical makeup and genetic codes of living organisms. But in order to make sense of this raw data, researchers need software tools which let them explore and model data in a more intuitive fashion. With this in mind, researchers at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory and the University of California, Davis, have developed ProteinShop, a visualization and modeling program which allows researchers to manipulate protein structures with pinpoint control, guided in large part by their own biological and experimental instincts. Biologists have spent the last half century trying to unravel the ''protein folding problem,'' which refers to the way chains of amino acids physically fold themselves into three-dimensional proteins. This final shape, which resembles a crumpled ribbon or piece of origami, is what determines how the protein functions and translates genetic information. Understanding and modeling this geometrically complex formation is no easy matter. ProteinShop takes a given sequence of amino acids and uses visualization guides to help generate predictions about the secondary structures, identifying alpha helices and flat beta strands, and the coil regions that bind them. Once secondary structures are in place, researchers can twist and turn these pre-configurations until they come up with a number of possible tertiary structure conformations. In turn, these are fed into a computationally intensive optimization procedure that tries to find the final, three-dimensional protein structure. Most importantly, ProteinShop allows users to add human knowledge and intuition to the protein structure prediction process, thus bypassing bad configurations that would otherwise be fruitless for optimization. This saves compute cycles and accelerates

  16. Sensitizing properties of proteins

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Poulsen, Lars K.; Ladics, Gregory S; McClain, Scott

    2014-01-01

    The scope of allergy risk is diverse considering the myriad ways in which protein allergenicity is affected by physiochemical characteristics of proteins. The complexity created by the matrices of foods and the variability of the human immune system add additional challenges to understanding...... the relationship between sensitization potential and allergy disease. To address these and other issues, an April 2012 international symposium was held in Prague, Czech Republic, to review and discuss the state-of-the-science of sensitizing properties of protein allergens. The symposium, organized by the Protein...... Allergenicity Technical Committee of the International Life Sciences Institute's Health and Environmental Sciences Institute, featured presentations on current methods, test systems, research trends, and unanswered questions in the field of protein sensitization. A diverse group of over 70 interdisciplinary...

  17. Unconventional protein secretion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ding, Yu; Wang, Juan; Wang, Junqi; Stierhof, York-Dieter; Robinson, David G; Jiang, Liwen

    2012-10-01

    It is generally believed that protein secretion or exocytosis is achieved via a conventional ER (endoplasmic reticulum)-Golgi-TGN (trans-Golgi network)-PM (plasma membrane) pathway in the plant endomembrane system. However, such signal peptide (SP)-dependent protein secretion cannot explain the increasing number of SP-lacking proteins which are found outside of the PM in plant cells. The process by which such leaderless secretory proteins (LSPs) gain access to the cell exterior is termed unconventional protein secretion (UPS) and has been well-studied in animal and yeast cells, but largely ignored by the plant community. Here, we review the evidence for UPS in plants especially in regard to the recently discovered EXPO (exocyst-positive-organelle).

  18. Protein Unfolding and Alzheimer's

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Kelvin

    2012-10-01

    Early interaction events of beta-amyloid (Aβ) proteins with neurons have been associated with the pathogenesis of Alzheimer's disease. Knowledge pertaining to the role of lipid molecules, particularly cholesterol, in modulating the single Aβ interactions with neurons at the atomic length and picosecond time resolutions, remains unclear. In our research, we have used atomistic molecular dynamics simulations to explore early molecular events including protein insertion kinetics, protein unfolding, and protein-induced membrane disruption of Aβ in lipid domains that mimic the nanoscopic raft and non-raft regions of the neural membrane. In this talk, I will summarize our current work on investigating the role of cholesterol in regulating the Aβ interaction events with membranes at the molecular level. I will also explain how our results will provide new insights into understanding the pathogenesis of Alzheimer's disease associated with the Aβ proteins.

  19. Transdermal delivery of proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalluri, Haripriya; Banga, Ajay K

    2011-03-01

    Transdermal delivery of peptides and proteins avoids the disadvantages associated with the invasive parenteral route of administration and other alternative routes such as the pulmonary and nasal routes. Since proteins have a large size and are hydrophilic in nature, they cannot permeate passively across the skin due to the stratum corneum which allows the transport of only small lipophilic drug molecules. Enhancement techniques such as chemical enhancers, iontophoresis, microneedles, electroporation, sonophoresis, thermal ablation, laser ablation, radiofrequency ablation and noninvasive jet injectors aid in the delivery of proteins by overcoming the skin barrier in different ways. In this review, these enhancement techniques that can enable the transdermal delivery of proteins are discussed, including a discussion of mechanisms, sterility requirements, and commercial development of products. Combination of enhancement techniques may result in a synergistic effect allowing increased protein delivery and these are also discussed.

  20. Coarse-grain modelling of protein-protein interactions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Baaden, Marc; Marrink, Siewert J.

    2013-01-01

    Here, we review recent advances towards the modelling of protein-protein interactions (PPI) at the coarse-grained (CG) level, a technique that is now widely used to understand protein affinity, aggregation and self-assembly behaviour. PPI models of soluble proteins and membrane proteins are separate

  1. New Compound Classes: Protein-Protein Interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ottmann, C

    2016-01-01

    "Protein-protein interactions (PPIs) are one of the most promising new targets in drug discovery. With estimates between 300,000 and 650,000 in human physiology, targeted modulation of PPIs would tremendously extend the "druggable" genome. In fact, in every disease a wealth of potentially addressable PPIs can be found making pharmacological intervention based on PPI modulators in principle a generally applicable technology. An impressing number of success stories in small-molecule PPI inhibition and natural-product PPI stabilization increasingly encourage academia and industry to invest in PPI modulation. In this chapter examples of both inhibition as well as stabilization of PPIs are reviewed including some of the technologies which has been used for their identification."

  2. Anchored design of protein-protein interfaces.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Steven M Lewis

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Few existing protein-protein interface design methods allow for extensive backbone rearrangements during the design process. There is also a dichotomy between redesign methods, which take advantage of the native interface, and de novo methods, which produce novel binders. METHODOLOGY: Here, we propose a new method for designing novel protein reagents that combines advantages of redesign and de novo methods and allows for extensive backbone motion. This method requires a bound structure of a target and one of its natural binding partners. A key interaction in this interface, the anchor, is computationally grafted out of the partner and into a surface loop on the design scaffold. The design scaffold's surface is then redesigned with backbone flexibility to create a new binding partner for the target. Careful choice of a scaffold will bring experimentally desirable characteristics into the new complex. The use of an anchor both expedites the design process and ensures that binding proceeds against a known location on the target. The use of surface loops on the scaffold allows for flexible-backbone redesign to properly search conformational space. CONCLUSIONS AND SIGNIFICANCE: This protocol was implemented within the Rosetta3 software suite. To demonstrate and evaluate this protocol, we have developed a benchmarking set of structures from the PDB with loop-mediated interfaces. This protocol can recover the correct loop-mediated interface in 15 out of 16 tested structures, using only a single residue as an anchor.

  3. Protein Binding Pocket Dynamics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stank, Antonia; Kokh, Daria B; Fuller, Jonathan C; Wade, Rebecca C

    2016-05-17

    The dynamics of protein binding pockets are crucial for their interaction specificity. Structural flexibility allows proteins to adapt to their individual molecular binding partners and facilitates the binding process. This implies the necessity to consider protein internal motion in determining and predicting binding properties and in designing new binders. Although accounting for protein dynamics presents a challenge for computational approaches, it expands the structural and physicochemical space for compound design and thus offers the prospect of improved binding specificity and selectivity. A cavity on the surface or in the interior of a protein that possesses suitable properties for binding a ligand is usually referred to as a binding pocket. The set of amino acid residues around a binding pocket determines its physicochemical characteristics and, together with its shape and location in a protein, defines its functionality. Residues outside the binding site can also have a long-range effect on the properties of the binding pocket. Cavities with similar functionalities are often conserved across protein families. For example, enzyme active sites are usually concave surfaces that present amino acid residues in a suitable configuration for binding low molecular weight compounds. Macromolecular binding pockets, on the other hand, are located on the protein surface and are often shallower. The mobility of proteins allows the opening, closing, and adaptation of binding pockets to regulate binding processes and specific protein functionalities. For example, channels and tunnels can exist permanently or transiently to transport compounds to and from a binding site. The influence of protein flexibility on binding pockets can vary from small changes to an already existent pocket to the formation of a completely new pocket. Here, we review recent developments in computational methods to detect and define binding pockets and to study pocket dynamics. We introduce five

  4. PSC: protein surface classification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tseng, Yan Yuan; Li, Wen-Hsiung

    2012-07-01

    We recently proposed to classify proteins by their functional surfaces. Using the structural attributes of functional surfaces, we inferred the pairwise relationships of proteins and constructed an expandable database of protein surface classification (PSC). As the functional surface(s) of a protein is the local region where the protein performs its function, our classification may reflect the functional relationships among proteins. Currently, PSC contains a library of 1974 surface types that include 25,857 functional surfaces identified from 24,170 bound structures. The search tool in PSC empowers users to explore related surfaces that share similar local structures and core functions. Each functional surface is characterized by structural attributes, which are geometric, physicochemical or evolutionary features. The attributes have been normalized as descriptors and integrated to produce a profile for each functional surface in PSC. In addition, binding ligands are recorded for comparisons among homologs. PSC allows users to exploit related binding surfaces to reveal the changes in functionally important residues on homologs that have led to functional divergence during evolution. The substitutions at the key residues of a spatial pattern may determine the functional evolution of a protein. In PSC (http://pocket.uchicago.edu/psc/), a pool of changes in residues on similar functional surfaces is provided.

  5. Protein oxidation in aquatic foods

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Baron, Caroline P.

    2014-01-01

    The chapter discusses general considerations about protein oxidation and reviews the mechanisms involved in protein oxidation and consequences of protein oxidation on fish proteins. It presents two case studies, the first deals with protein and lipid oxidation in frozen rainbow trout......, and the second with oxidation in salted herring. The mechanisms responsible for initiation of protein oxidation are unclear, but it is generally accepted that free radical species initiating lipid oxidation can also initiate protein oxidation. The chapter focuses on interaction between protein and lipid...... oxidation. The protein carbonyl group measurement is the widely used method for estimating protein oxidation in foods and has been used in fish muscle. The chapter also talks about the impact of protein oxidation on protein functionality, fish muscle texture, and food nutritional value. Protein oxidation...

  6. Bacterial Ice Crystal Controlling Proteins

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Janet S. H. Lorv

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Across the world, many ice active bacteria utilize ice crystal controlling proteins for aid in freezing tolerance at subzero temperatures. Ice crystal controlling proteins include both antifreeze and ice nucleation proteins. Antifreeze proteins minimize freezing damage by inhibiting growth of large ice crystals, while ice nucleation proteins induce formation of embryonic ice crystals. Although both protein classes have differing functions, these proteins use the same ice binding mechanisms. Rather than direct binding, it is probable that these protein classes create an ice surface prior to ice crystal surface adsorption. Function is differentiated by molecular size of the protein. This paper reviews the similar and different aspects of bacterial antifreeze and ice nucleation proteins, the role of these proteins in freezing tolerance, prevalence of these proteins in psychrophiles, and current mechanisms of protein-ice interactions.

  7. Piezoelectric allostery of protein

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohnuki, Jun; Sato, Takato; Takano, Mitsunori

    2016-07-01

    Allostery is indispensable for a protein to work, where a locally applied stimulus is transmitted to a distant part of the molecule. While the allostery due to chemical stimuli such as ligand binding has long been studied, the growing interest in mechanobiology prompts the study of the mechanically stimulated allostery, the physical mechanism of which has not been established. By molecular dynamics simulation of a motor protein myosin, we found that a locally applied mechanical stimulus induces electrostatic potential change at distant regions, just like the piezoelectricity. This novel allosteric mechanism, "piezoelectric allostery", should be of particularly high value for mechanosensor/transducer proteins.

  8. Alpha Shapes and Proteins

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Winter, Pawel; Sterner, Henrik; Sterner, Peter

    2009-01-01

    We provide a unified description of (weighted) alpha shapes, beta shapes and the corresponding simplicialcomplexes. We discuss their applicability to various protein-related problems. We also discuss filtrations of alpha shapes and touch upon related persistence issues.We claim that the full...... potential of alpha-shapes and related geometrical constructs in protein-related problems yet remains to be realized and verified. We suggest parallel algorithms for (weighted) alpha shapes, and we argue that future use of filtrations and kinetic variants for larger proteins will need such implementation....

  9. Sound of proteins

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2007-01-01

    In my group we work with Molecular Dynamics to model several different proteins and protein systems. We submit our modelled molecules to changes in temperature, changes in solvent composition and even external pulling forces. To analyze our simulation results we have so far used visual inspection...... and statistical analysis of the resulting molecular trajectories (as everybody else!). However, recently I started assigning a particular sound frequency to each amino acid in the protein, and by setting the amplitude of each frequency according to the movement amplitude we can "hear" whenever two aminoacids...

  10. Protein oxidation and ageing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Linton, S; Davies, Michael Jonathan; Dean, R T

    2001-01-01

    of redox-active metal ions that could catalyse oxidant formation. As a result of this decrease in antioxidant defences, and increased rate of ROS formation, it is possible that the impact of ROS increases with age. ROS are known to oxidise biological macromolecules, with proteins an important target....... If the argument that the impact of ROS increases with age is true, then proteins would be expected to accumulate oxidised materials with age, and the rate of such accumulation should increase with time, reflecting impaired inefficiency of homeostasis. Here we review the evidence for the accumulation of oxidised......, or modified, extra- and intra-cellular proteins in vivo....

  11. Protein crystallography prescreen kit

    Science.gov (United States)

    Segelke, Brent W.; Krupka, Heike I.; Rupp, Bernhard

    2005-07-12

    A kit for prescreening protein concentration for crystallization includes a multiplicity of vials, a multiplicity of pre-selected reagents, and a multiplicity of sample plates. The reagents and a corresponding multiplicity of samples of the protein in solutions of varying concentrations are placed on sample plates. The sample plates containing the reagents and samples are incubated. After incubation the sample plates are examined to determine which of the sample concentrations are too low and which the sample concentrations are too high. The sample concentrations that are optimal for protein crystallization are selected and used.

  12. Protein: MPA6 [TP Atlas

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available in 30 kDa adipocyte complement-related protein, Adipocyte complement-related 30 kDa protein, Adipocyte, C1q ...and collagen domain-containing protein, Adipose most abundant gene transcript 1 protein, Gelatin-binding protein 9606 Homo sapiens Q15848 9370 9370 Q15848 18054335, 19646806 ...

  13. Protein: FEB6 [TP Atlas

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available FEB6 Photoresponse regulatory proteins HD1 SE1 Zinc finger protein HD1 Protein CONSTANS-like, Prot...ein HEADING DATE 1, Protein PHOTOPERIOD SENSITIVITY 1 39947 Oryza sativa subsp. japonica 4340746 Q9FDX8 21952207, 19246394 #shimamoto ...

  14. New approach for predicting protein-protein interactions

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    @@ Protein-protein interactions (PPIs) are of vital importance for virtually all processes of a living cell. The study of these associations of protein molecules could improve people's understanding of diseases and provide basis for therapeutic approaches.

  15. Analysis of correlations between protein complex and protein-protein interaction and mRNA expression

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CAI Lun; XUE Hong; LU Hongchao; ZHAO Yi; ZHU Xiaopeng; BU Dongbo; LING Lunjiang; CHEN Runsheng

    2003-01-01

    Protein-protein interaction is a physical interaction of two proteins in living cells. In budding yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae, large-scale protein-protein interaction data have been obtained through high-throughput yeast two-hybrid systems (Y2H) and protein complex purification techniques based on mass-spectrometry. Here, we collect 11855 interactions between total 2617 proteins. Through seriate genome-wide mRNA expression data, similarity between two genes could be measured. Protein complex data can also be obtained publicly and can be translated to pair relationship that any two proteins can only exist in the same complex or not. Analysis of protein complex data, protein-protein interaction data and mRNA expression data can elucidate correlations between them. The results show that proteins that have interactions or similar expression patterns have a higher possibility to be in the same protein complex than randomized selected proteins, and proteins which have interactions and similar expression patterns are even more possible to exist in the same protein complex. The work indicates that comprehensive integration and analysis of public large-scale bioinformatical data, such as protein complex data, protein-protein interaction data and mRNA expression data, may help to uncover their relationships and common biological information underlying these data. The strategies described here may help to integrate and analyze other functional genomic and proteomic data, such as gene expression profiling, protein-localization mapping and large-scale phenotypic data, both in yeast and in other organisms.

  16. Protein Model Database

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fidelis, K; Adzhubej, A; Kryshtafovych, A; Daniluk, P

    2005-02-23

    The phenomenal success of the genome sequencing projects reveals the power of completeness in revolutionizing biological science. Currently it is possible to sequence entire organisms at a time, allowing for a systemic rather than fractional view of their organization and the various genome-encoded functions. There is an international plan to move towards a similar goal in the area of protein structure. This will not be achieved by experiment alone, but rather by a combination of efforts in crystallography, NMR spectroscopy, and computational modeling. Only a small fraction of structures are expected to be identified experimentally, the remainder to be modeled. Presently there is no organized infrastructure to critically evaluate and present these data to the biological community. The goal of the Protein Model Database project is to create such infrastructure, including (1) public database of theoretically derived protein structures; (2) reliable annotation of protein model quality, (3) novel structure analysis tools, and (4) access to the highest quality modeling techniques available.

  17. Protein urine test

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Urine albumin; Proteinuria; Albuminuria Images White nail syndrome Protein urine test References Gerber GS, Brendler CB. Evaluation of the urologic patient: history, physical examination, and urinalysis. In: Wein AJ, Kavoussi ...

  18. MicroProteins

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Eguen, Teinai Ebimienere; Straub, Daniel; Graeff, Moritz;

    2015-01-01

    MicroProteins (miPs) are short, usually single-domain proteins that, in analogy to miRNAs, heterodimerize with their targets and exert a dominant-negative effect. Recent bioinformatic attempts to identify miPs have resulted in a list of potential miPs, many of which lack the defining...... characteristics of a miP. In this opinion article, we clearly state the characteristics of a miP as evidenced by known proteins that fit the definition; we explain why modulatory proteins misrepresented as miPs do not qualify as true miPs. We also discuss the evolutionary history of miPs, and how the miP concept...

  19. The Pentapeptide Repeat Proteins

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vetting,M.; Hegde, S.; Fajardo, J.; Fiser, A.; Roderick, S.; Takiff, H.; Blanchard, J.

    2006-01-01

    The Pentapeptide Repeat Protein (PRP) family has over 500 members in the prokaryotic and eukaryotic kingdoms. These proteins are composed of, or contain domains composed of, tandemly repeated amino acid sequences with a consensus sequence of [S, T,A, V][D, N][L, F]-[S, T,R][G]. The biochemical function of the vast majority of PRP family members is unknown. The three-dimensional structure of the first member of the PRP family was determined for the fluoroquinolone resistance protein (MfpA) from Mycobacterium tuberculosis. The structure revealed that the pentapeptide repeats encode the folding of a novel right-handed quadrilateral {beta}-helix. MfpA binds to DNA gyrase and inhibits its activity. The rod-shaped, dimeric protein exhibits remarkable size, shape and electrostatic similarity to DNA.

  20. Interactive protein manipulation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    SNCrivelli@lbl.gov

    2003-07-01

    We describe an interactive visualization and modeling program for the creation of protein structures ''from scratch''. The input to our program is an amino acid sequence -decoded from a gene- and a sequence of predicted secondary structure types for each amino acid-provided by external structure prediction programs. Our program can be used in the set-up phase of a protein structure prediction process; the structures created with it serve as input for a subsequent global internal energy minimization, or another method of protein structure prediction. Our program supports basic visualization methods for protein structures, interactive manipulation based on inverse kinematics, and visualization guides to aid a user in creating ''good'' initial structures.

  1. Protein Polymers and Amyloids

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Risør, Michael Wulff

    2014-01-01

    Several human disorders are caused by a common general disease mechanism arising from abnormal folding and aggregation of the underlying protein. These include the prevalent dementias like Alzheimer’s and Parkinson’s, where accumulation of protein fibrillar structures, known as amyloid fibrils......, is a general hallmark. They also include the α1-antitrypsin deficiency, where disease-causing mutations in the serine protease inhibitor, α1-antitrypsin (α1AT), leads to accumulation of the aberrant protein in the liver of these patients. The native metastable structure of α1AT constitutes a molecular trap...... that inhibits its target protease through a large conformational change but mutations compromise this function and cause premature structural collapse into hyperstable polymers. Understanding the conformational disorders at a molecular level is not only important for our general knowledge on protein folding...

  2. Markers of protein oxidation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Headlam, Henrietta A; Davies, Michael Jonathan

    2004-01-01

    Exposure of proteins to radicals in the presence of O2 gives both side-chain oxidation and backbone fragmentation. These processes can be interrelated, with initial side-chain oxidation giving rise to backbone damage via transfer reactions. We have shown previously that alkoxyl radicals formed...... of this process depends on the extent of oxidation at C-3 compared with other sites. HO*, generated by gamma radiolysis, gave the highest total carbonyl yield, with protein-bound carbonyls predominating over released. In contrast, metal ion/H2O2 systems, gave more released than bound carbonyls, with this ratio...... modulated by EDTA. This is ascribed to metal ion-protein interactions affecting the sites of initial oxidation. Hypochlorous acid gave low concentrations of released carbonyls, but high yields of protein-bound material. The peroxyl radical generator 2,2'-azobis(2-amidinopropane) hydrochloride...

  3. Protein Colloidal Aggregation Project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oliva-Buisson, Yvette J. (Compiler)

    2014-01-01

    To investigate the pathways and kinetics of protein aggregation to allow accurate predictive modeling of the process and evaluation of potential inhibitors to prevalent diseases including cataract formation, chronic traumatic encephalopathy, Alzheimer's Disease, Parkinson's Disease and others.

  4. Protein dimerization. Inside job.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Metzger, H

    1994-04-01

    In a sophisticated combination of genetic engineering and organic synthesis, a general method for dimerizing recombinant intracellular proteins has been devised; the usefulness of the method should now be testable.

  5. Plant protein glycosylation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strasser, Richard

    2016-01-01

    Protein glycosylation is an essential co- and post-translational modification of secretory and membrane proteins in all eukaryotes. The initial steps of N-glycosylation and N-glycan processing are highly conserved between plants, mammals and yeast. In contrast, late N-glycan maturation steps in the Golgi differ significantly in plants giving rise to complex N-glycans with β1,2-linked xylose, core α1,3-linked fucose and Lewis A-type structures. While the essential role of N-glycan modifications on distinct mammalian glycoproteins is already well documented, we have only begun to decipher the biological function of this ubiquitous protein modification in different plant species. In this review, I focus on the biosynthesis and function of different protein N-linked glycans in plants. Special emphasis is given on glycan-mediated quality control processes in the ER and on the biological role of characteristic complex N-glycan structures. PMID:26911286

  6. Protein digestion in ruminants

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    protein nitrogen (NPN) in the rumen, the effect of digestible energy on the rate and .... Fahey, 1982) and inhibitors of amino acid deamination. (Chalupa & Scott, 1976). ... the omasum, although both urea and ammonia may be absorbed (0,9 gld.

  7. Polymers for Protein Conjugation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gianfranco Pasut

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Polyethylene glycol (PEG at the moment is considered the leading polymer for protein conjugation in view of its unique properties, as well as to its low toxicity in humans, qualities which have been confirmed by its extensive use in clinical practice. Other polymers that are safe, biodegradable and custom-designed have, nevertheless, also been investigated as potential candidates for protein conjugation. This review will focus on natural polymers and synthetic linear polymers that have been used for protein delivery and the results associated with their use. Genetic fusion approaches for the preparation of protein-polypeptide conjugates will be also reviewed and compared with the best known chemical conjugation ones.

  8. Electron transfer in proteins

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Farver, O; Pecht, I

    1991-01-01

    Electron migration between and within proteins is one of the most prevalent forms of biological energy conversion processes. Electron transfer reactions take place between active centers such as transition metal ions or organic cofactors over considerable distances at fast rates and with remarkable...... specificity. The electron transfer is attained through weak electronic interaction between the active sites, so that considerable research efforts are centered on resolving the factors that control the rates of long-distance electron transfer reactions in proteins. These factors include (in addition......-containing proteins. These proteins serve almost exclusively in electron transfer reactions, and as it turns out, their metal coordination sites are endowed with properties uniquely optimized for their function....

  9. Occupational protein contact dermatitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barbaud, Annick; Poreaux, Claire; Penven, Emmanuelle; Waton, Julie

    2015-01-01

    Occupational contact dermatitis is generally caused by haptens but can also be induced by proteins causing mainly immunological contact urticaria (ICU); chronic hand eczema in the context of protein contact dermatitis (PCD). In a monocentric retrospective study, from our database, only 31 (0.41%) of patients with contact dermatitis had positive skin tests with proteins: 22 had occupational PCD, 3 had non-occupational PCD, 5 occupational ICU and 1 cook had a neutrophilic fixed food eruption (NFFE) due to fish. From these results and analysis of literature, the characteristics of PCD can be summarized as follows. It is a chronic eczematous dermatitis, possibly exacerbated by work, suggestive if associated with inflammatory perionyxix and immediate erythema with pruritis, to be investigated when the patient resumes work after a period of interruption. Prick tests with the suspected protein-containing material are essential, as patch tests have negative results. In case of multisensitisation revealed by prick tests, it is advisable to analyse IgE against recombinant allergens. A history of atopy, found in 56 to 68% of the patients, has to be checked for. Most of the cases are observed among food-handlers but PCD can also be due to non-edible plants, latex, hydrolysed proteins or animal proteins. Occupational exposure to proteins can thus lead to the development of ICU. Reflecting hypersensitivity to very low concentrations of allergens, investigating ICU therefore requires caution and prick tests should be performed with a diluted form of the causative protein-containing product. Causes are food, especially fruit peel, non-edible plants, cosmetic products, latex, animals.

  10. Recombinant Collagenlike Proteins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fertala, Andzej

    2007-01-01

    A group of collagenlike recombinant proteins containing high densities of biologically active sites has been invented. The method used to express these proteins is similar to a method of expressing recombinant procollagens and collagens described in U. S. Patent 5,593,859, "Synthesis of human procollagens and collagens in recombinant DNA systems." Customized collagenous proteins are needed for biomedical applications. In particular, fibrillar collagens are attractive for production of matrices needed for tissue engineering and drug delivery. Prior to this invention, there was no way of producing customized collagenous proteins for these and other applications. Heretofore, collagenous proteins have been produced by use of such biological systems as yeasts, bacteria, and transgenic animals and plants. These products are normal collagens that can also be extracted from such sources as tendons, bones, and hides. These products cannot be made to consist only of biologically active, specific amino acid sequences that may be needed for specific applications. Prior to this invention, it had been established that fibrillar collagens consist of domains that are responsible for such processes as interaction with cells, binding of growth factors, and interaction with a number of structural proteins present in the extracellular matrix. A normal collagen consists of a sequence of domains that can be represented by a corresponding sequence of labels, e.g., D1D2D3D4. A collagenlike protein of the present invention contains regions of collagen II that contain multiples of a single domain (e.g., D1D1D1D1 or D4D4D4D4) chosen for its specific biological activity. By virtue of the multiplicity of the chosen domain, the density of sites having that specific biological activity is greater than it is in a normal collagen. A collagenlike protein according to this invention can thus be made to have properties that are necessary for tissue engineering.

  11. Protein tyrosine nitration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaki, Mounira; Leterrier, Marina; Barroso, Juan B

    2009-01-01

    Nitric oxide metabolism in plant cells has a relative short history. Nitration is a chemical process which consists of introducing a nitro group (-NO2) into a chemical compound. in biological systems, this process has been found in different molecules such as proteins, lipids and nucleic acids that can affect its function. This mini-review offers an overview of this process with special emphasis on protein tyrosine nitration in plants and its involvement in the process of nitrosative stress. PMID:19826215

  12. Digestibility of sorghum proteins.

    OpenAIRE

    Axtell, J D; Kirleis, A. W.; Hassen, M M; D'Croz Mason, N; Mertz, E T; Munck, L.

    1981-01-01

    Published information indicates that rice, maize, and wheat proteins are much more digestible in children than sorghum proteins are (66-81% compared with 46%). However, this digestibility difference cannot be demonstrated with the weanling rat, which gave digestibility values of 80% for cooked and 85% for uncooked sorghum gruels. Therefore, a search was made for a laboratory system sensitive to the digestibility differences between sorghum and other cereals. We found that porcine pepsin in vi...

  13. Colorimetric protein assay techniques.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sapan, C V; Lundblad, R L; Price, N C

    1999-04-01

    There has been an increase in the number of colorimetric assay techniques for the determination of protein concentration over the past 20 years. This has resulted in a perceived increase in sensitivity and accuracy with the advent of new techniques. The present review considers these advances with emphasis on the potential use of such technologies in the assay of biopharmaceuticals. The techniques reviewed include Coomassie Blue G-250 dye binding (the Bradford assay), the Lowry assay, the bicinchoninic acid assay and the biuret assay. It is shown that each assay has advantages and disadvantages relative to sensitivity, ease of performance, acceptance in the literature, accuracy and reproducibility/coefficient of variation/laboratory-to-laboratory variation. A comparison of the use of several assays with the same sample population is presented. It is suggested that the most critical issue in the use of a chromogenic protein assay for the characterization of a biopharmaceutical is the selection of a standard for the calibration of the assay; it is crucial that the standard be representative of the sample. If it is not possible to match the standard with the sample from the perspective of protein composition, then it is preferable to use an assay that is not sensitive to the composition of the protein such as a micro-Kjeldahl technique, quantitative amino acid analysis or the biuret assay. In a complex mixture it might be inappropriate to focus on a general method of protein determination and much more informative to use specific methods relating to the protein(s) of particular interest, using either specific assays or antibody-based methods. The key point is that whatever method is adopted as the 'gold standard' for a given protein, this method needs to be used routinely for calibration.

  14. Protein Nitrogen Determination

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nielsen, S. Suzanne

    The protein content of foods can be determined by numerous methods. The Kjeldahl method and the nitrogen combustion (Dumas) method for protein analysis are based on nitrogen determination. Both methods are official for the purposes of nutrition labeling of foods. While the Kjeldahl method has been used widely for over a hundred years, the recent availability of automated instrumentation for the Dumas method in many cases is replacing use of the Kjeldahl method.

  15. Transdermal Delivery of Proteins

    OpenAIRE

    Kalluri, Haripriya; Banga, Ajay K.

    2011-01-01

    Transdermal delivery of peptides and proteins avoids the disadvantages associated with the invasive parenteral route of administration and other alternative routes such as the pulmonary and nasal routes. Since proteins have a large size and are hydrophilic in nature, they cannot permeate passively across the skin due to the stratum corneum which allows the transport of only small lipophilic drug molecules. Enhancement techniques such as chemical enhancers, iontophoresis, microneedles, electro...

  16. Identification of calcium/calmodulin-binding receptor-like kinase GsCBRLK-interactive proteins using yeast two-hybrid system%酵母双杂交筛选与GsCBRLK相互作用的蛋白质

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    杨姗姗; 孙晓丽; 于洋; 才华; 纪巍; 柏锡; 朱延明

    2013-01-01

    GsCBRLK(calcium/calmodulin-binding receptor-like kinase from Glycine soja)在ABA及盐胁迫诱导的钙离子信号通路中起到关键的调节作用.为深入研究GsCBRLK蛋白的作用机制,文章采用膜酵母双杂交系统,以GsCBRLK为诱饵蛋白,筛选与其相互作用的蛋白质.通过构建野生大豆盐胁迫条件下的cDNA文库、膜酵母双杂交系统筛选、复筛、回转验证、生物信息学分析以及酵母体内互作验证等手段,最终获得2个(SNARE和14-3-3蛋白)与GsCBRLK诱饵蛋白相互作用的蛋白质.%GsCBRLK (calcium/calmodulin-binding receptor-like kinase from Glycine soja) links ABA (abscisic acid)-and salt-induced calcium/calmodulin signal in plant cells. In order to study the molecular mechanismes of GsCBLRK, the salt-treated Glycine soja cDNA library was screened with pB73-STE-CBRLK as bait plasmid using yeast two hybrid system. Two positive clones (SNARE and 14-3-3 protein) were identified by constructing cDNA library of wild soybean under salt treatment, membrane system yeast two hybrid screening, multiple screen, rotary validation, bioinformatic analysis and interaction identification in yeast.

  17. Hepatitis C virus proteins

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jean Dubuisson

    2007-01-01

    Hepatitis C virus (HCV) encodes a single polyprotein,which is processed by cellular and viral proteases to generate 10 polypeptides. The HCV genome also contains an overlapping +1 reading frame that may lead to the synthesis of an additional protein. Until recently,studies of HCV have been hampered by the lack of a productive cell culture system. Since the identification of HCV genome approximately 17 years ago, structural,biochemical and biological information on HCV proteins has mainly been obtained with proteins produced by heterologous expression systems. In addition, some functional studies have also been confirmed with replicon systems or with retroviral particles pseudotyped with HCV envelope glycoproteins. The data that have accumulated on HCV proteins begin to provide a framework for understanding the molecular mechanisms involved in the major steps of HCV life cycle. Moreover,the knowledge accumulated on HCV proteins is also leading to the development of antiviral drugs among which some are showing promising results in early-phase clinical trials. This review summarizes the current knowledge on the functions and biochemical features of HCV proteins.

  18. Cardiolipin Interactions with Proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Planas-Iglesias, Joan; Dwarakanath, Himal; Mohammadyani, Dariush; Yanamala, Naveena; Kagan, Valerian E; Klein-Seetharaman, Judith

    2015-09-15

    Cardiolipins (CL) represent unique phospholipids of bacteria and eukaryotic mitochondria with four acyl chains and two phosphate groups that have been implicated in numerous functions from energy metabolism to apoptosis. Many proteins are known to interact with CL, and several cocrystal structures of protein-CL complexes exist. In this work, we describe the collection of the first systematic and, to the best of our knowledge, the comprehensive gold standard data set of all known CL-binding proteins. There are 62 proteins in this data set, 21 of which have nonredundant crystal structures with bound CL molecules available. Using binding patch analysis of amino acid frequencies, secondary structures and loop supersecondary structures considering phosphate and acyl chain binding regions together and separately, we gained a detailed understanding of the general structural and dynamic features involved in CL binding to proteins. Exhaustive docking of CL to all known structures of proteins experimentally shown to interact with CL demonstrated the validity of the docking approach, and provides a rich source of information for experimentalists who may wish to validate predictions.

  19. Disease specific protein corona

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rahman, M.; Mahmoudi, M.

    2015-03-01

    It is now well accepted that upon their entrance into the biological environments, the surface of nanomaterials would be covered by various biomacromolecules (e.g., proteins and lipids). The absorption of these biomolecules, so called `protein corona', onto the surface of (nano)biomaterials confers them a new `biological identity'. Although the formation of protein coronas on the surface of nanoparticles has been widely investigated, there are few reports on the effect of various diseases on the biological identity of nanoparticles. As the type of diseases may tremendously changes the composition of the protein source (e.g., human plasma/serum), one can expect that amount and composition of associated proteins in the corona composition may be varied, in disease type manner. Here, we show that corona coated silica and polystyrene nanoparticles (after interaction with in the plasma of the healthy individuals) could induce unfolding of fibrinogen, which promotes release of the inflammatory cytokines. However, no considerable releases of inflammatory cytokines were observed for corona coated graphene sheets. In contrast, the obtained corona coated silica and polystyrene nanoparticles from the hypofibrinogenemia patients could not induce inflammatory cytokine release where graphene sheets do. Therefore, one can expect that disease-specific protein coronas can provide a novel approach for applying nanomedicine to personalized medicine, improving diagnosis and treatment of different diseases tailored to the specific conditions and circumstances.

  20. Fast protein folding kinetics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gelman, Hannah; Gruebele, Martin

    2014-01-01

    Fast folding proteins have been a major focus of computational and experimental study because they are accessible to both techniques: they are small and fast enough to be reasonably simulated with current computational power, but have dynamics slow enough to be observed with specially developed experimental techniques. This coupled study of fast folding proteins has provided insight into the mechanisms which allow some proteins to find their native conformation well less than 1 ms and has uncovered examples of theoretically predicted phenomena such as downhill folding. The study of fast folders also informs our understanding of even “slow” folding processes: fast folders are small, relatively simple protein domains and the principles that govern their folding also govern the folding of more complex systems. This review summarizes the major theoretical and experimental techniques used to study fast folding proteins and provides an overview of the major findings of fast folding research. Finally, we examine the themes that have emerged from studying fast folders and briefly summarize their application to protein folding in general as well as some work that is left to do. PMID:24641816

  1. Fast protein folding kinetics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gelman, Hannah; Gruebele, Martin

    2014-05-01

    Fast-folding proteins have been a major focus of computational and experimental study because they are accessible to both techniques: they are small and fast enough to be reasonably simulated with current computational power, but have dynamics slow enough to be observed with specially developed experimental techniques. This coupled study of fast-folding proteins has provided insight into the mechanisms, which allow some proteins to find their native conformation well fast folders also informs our understanding of even 'slow' folding processes: fast folders are small; relatively simple protein domains and the principles that govern their folding also govern the folding of more complex systems. This review summarizes the major theoretical and experimental techniques used to study fast-folding proteins and provides an overview of the major findings of fast-folding research. Finally, we examine the themes that have emerged from studying fast folders and briefly summarize their application to protein folding in general, as well as some work that is left to do.

  2. Recombinant human milk proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lönnerdal, Bo

    2006-01-01

    Human milk provides proteins that benefit newborn infants. They not only provide amino acids, but also facilitate the absorption of nutrients, stimulate growth and development of the intestine, modulate immune function, and aid in the digestion of other nutrients. Breastfed infants have a lower prevalence of infections than formula-fed infants. Since many women in industrialized countries choose not to breastfeed, and an increasing proportion of women in developing countries are advised not to breastfeed because of the risk of HIV transmission, incorporation of recombinant human milk proteins into infant foods is likely to be beneficial. We are expressing human milk proteins known to have anti-infective activity in rice. Since rice is a normal constituent of the diet of infants and children, limited purification of the proteins is required. Lactoferrin has antimicrobial and iron-binding activities. Lysozyme is an enzyme that is bactericidal and also acts synergistically with lactoferrin. These recombinant proteins have biological activities identical to their native counterparts. They are equally resistant to heat processing, which is necessary for food applications, and to acid and proteolytic enzymes which are needed to maintain their biological activity in the gastrointestinal tract of infants. These recombinant human milk proteins may be incorporated into infant formulas, baby foods and complementary foods, and used with the goal to reduce infectious diseases.

  3. Protein phosphorylation and photorespiration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hodges, M; Jossier, M; Boex-Fontvieille, E; Tcherkez, G

    2013-07-01

    Photorespiration allows the recycling of carbon atoms of 2-phosphoglycolate produced by ribulose-1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase (Rubisco) oxygenase activity, as well as the removal of potentially toxic metabolites. The photorespiratory pathway takes place in the light, encompasses four cellular compartments and interacts with several other metabolic pathways and functions. Therefore, the regulation of this cycle is probably of paramount importance to plant metabolism, however, our current knowledge is poor. To rapidly respond to changing conditions, proteins undergo a number of different post-translational modifications that include acetylation, methylation and ubiquitylation, but protein phosphorylation is probably the most common. The reversible covalent addition of a phosphate group to a specific amino acid residue allows the modulation of protein function, such as activity, subcellular localisation, capacity to interact with other proteins and stability. Recent data indicate that many photorespiratory enzymes can be phosphorylated, and thus it seems that the photorespiratory cycle is, in part, regulated by protein phosphorylation. In this review, the known phosphorylation sites of each Arabidopsis thaliana photorespiratory enzyme and several photorespiratory-associated proteins are described and discussed. A brief account of phosphoproteomic protocols is also given since the published data compiled in this review are the fruit of this approach.

  4. The effect of protein-protein and protein-membrane interactions on membrane fouling in ultrafiltration

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Huisman, I.H.; Prádanos, P.; Hernández, A.

    2000-01-01

    It was studied how protein-protein and protein-membrane interactions influence the filtration performance during the ultrafiltration of protein solutions over polymeric membranes. This was done by measuring flux, streaming potential, and protein transmission during filtration of bovine serum albumin

  5. The effect of protein-protein and protein-membrane interactions on membrane fouling in ultrafiltration

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Huisman, I.H.; Prádanos, P.; Hernández, A.

    2000-01-01

    It was studied how protein-protein and protein-membrane interactions influence the filtration performance during the ultrafiltration of protein solutions over polymeric membranes. This was done by measuring flux, streaming potential, and protein transmission during filtration of bovine serum albumin

  6. Similarity measures for protein ensembles

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lindorff-Larsen, Kresten; Ferkinghoff-Borg, Jesper

    2009-01-01

    Analyses of similarities and changes in protein conformation can provide important information regarding protein function and evolution. Many scores, including the commonly used root mean square deviation, have therefore been developed to quantify the similarities of different protein conformatio...

  7. Controllability in protein interaction networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wuchty, Stefan

    2014-05-13

    Recently, the focus of network research shifted to network controllability, prompting us to determine proteins that are important for the control of the underlying interaction webs. In particular, we determined minimum dominating sets of proteins (MDSets) in human and yeast protein interaction networks. Such groups of proteins were defined as optimized subsets where each non-MDSet protein can be reached by an interaction from an MDSet protein. Notably, we found that MDSet proteins were enriched with essential, cancer-related, and virus-targeted genes. Their central position allowed MDSet proteins to connect protein complexes and to have a higher impact on network resilience than hub proteins. As for their involvement in regulatory functions, MDSet proteins were enriched with transcription factors and protein kinases and were significantly involved in bottleneck interactions, regulatory links, phosphorylation events, and genetic interactions.

  8. Two coiled-coil domains of Chlamydia trachomatis IncA affect membrane fusion events during infection.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Erik Ronzone

    Full Text Available Chlamydia trachomatis replicates in a parasitophorous membrane-bound compartment called an inclusion. The inclusions corrupt host vesicle trafficking networks to avoid the degradative endolysosomal pathway but promote fusion with each other in order to sustain higher bacterial loads in a process known as homotypic fusion. The Chlamydia protein IncA (Inclusion protein A appears to play central roles in both these processes as it participates to homotypic fusion and inhibits endocytic SNARE-mediated membrane fusion. How IncA selectively inhibits or activates membrane fusion remains poorly understood. In this study, we analyzed the spatial and molecular determinants of IncA's fusogenic and inhibitory functions. Using a cell-free membrane fusion assay, we found that inhibition of SNARE-mediated fusion requires IncA to be on the same membrane as the endocytic SNARE proteins. IncA displays two coiled-coil domains showing high homology with SNARE proteins. Domain swap and deletion experiments revealed that although both these domains are capable of independently inhibiting SNARE-mediated fusion, these two coiled-coil domains cooperate in mediating IncA multimerization and homotypic membrane interaction. Our results support the hypothesis that Chlamydia employs SNARE-like virulence factors that positively and negatively affect membrane fusion and promote infection.

  9. Two coiled-coil domains of Chlamydia trachomatis IncA affect membrane fusion events during infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ronzone, Erik; Paumet, Fabienne

    2013-01-01

    Chlamydia trachomatis replicates in a parasitophorous membrane-bound compartment called an inclusion. The inclusions corrupt host vesicle trafficking networks to avoid the degradative endolysosomal pathway but promote fusion with each other in order to sustain higher bacterial loads in a process known as homotypic fusion. The Chlamydia protein IncA (Inclusion protein A) appears to play central roles in both these processes as it participates to homotypic fusion and inhibits endocytic SNARE-mediated membrane fusion. How IncA selectively inhibits or activates membrane fusion remains poorly understood. In this study, we analyzed the spatial and molecular determinants of IncA's fusogenic and inhibitory functions. Using a cell-free membrane fusion assay, we found that inhibition of SNARE-mediated fusion requires IncA to be on the same membrane as the endocytic SNARE proteins. IncA displays two coiled-coil domains showing high homology with SNARE proteins. Domain swap and deletion experiments revealed that although both these domains are capable of independently inhibiting SNARE-mediated fusion, these two coiled-coil domains cooperate in mediating IncA multimerization and homotypic membrane interaction. Our results support the hypothesis that Chlamydia employs SNARE-like virulence factors that positively and negatively affect membrane fusion and promote infection.

  10. Protein hydrolysates in sports nutrition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manninen Anssi H

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract It has been suggested that protein hydrolysates providing mainly di- and tripeptides are superior to intact (whole proteins and free amino acids in terms of skeletal muscle protein anabolism. This review provides a critical examination of protein hydrolysate studies conducted in healthy humans with special reference to sports nutrition. The effects of protein hydrolysate ingestion on blood amino acid levels, muscle protein anabolism, body composition, exercise performance and muscle glycogen resynthesis are discussed.

  11. Protein Functionality in Food Systems

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Panpan

    2010-01-01

    The structure,shape,color,smell and taste of food were decided by protein functionality.The utilization of protein will improve by changing the protein functionality.Protein functionality is also advantage to maintain and utilize the nutrition of food.This paper summarized the nature,classification,factors and prospect of protein functionality.It ccn provide a theoretical basis for application of protein in food industry.

  12. Knockdown of flotillin-2 inhibits lung surfactant secretion by alveolar type Ⅱ cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Narendranath Reddy Chintagari; Deming Gou; Lin Liu

    2008-01-01

    @@ Dear Editor, Lung surfactant is stored in lamellar bodies and exocytosed following fusion of the lamellar bodies with the plasma membrane of alveolar type Ⅱ (AT2) cells [1].A number of proteins have been shown to be involved in surfactant secretion including SNAREs,NSF,α-SNAP and annexin A2 [2,3].Lipid rafts enriched in SNAREs are crucial for surfactant secretion [4].

  13. Modeling Mercury in Proteins

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Smith, Jeremy C [ORNL; Parks, Jerry M [ORNL

    2016-01-01

    Mercury (Hg) is a naturally occurring element that is released into the biosphere both by natural processes and anthropogenic activities. Although its reduced, elemental form Hg(0) is relatively non-toxic, other forms such as Hg2+ and, in particular, its methylated form, methylmercury, are toxic, with deleterious effects on both ecosystems and humans. Microorganisms play important roles in the transformation of mercury in the environment. Inorganic Hg2+ can be methylated by certain bacteria and archaea to form methylmercury. Conversely, bacteria also demethylate methylmercury and reduce Hg2+ to relatively inert Hg(0). Transformations and toxicity occur as a result of mercury interacting with various proteins. Clearly, then, understanding the toxic effects of mercury and its cycling in the environment requires characterization of these interactions. Computational approaches are ideally suited to studies of mercury in proteins because they can provide a detailed picture and circumvent issues associated with toxicity. Here we describe computational methods for investigating and characterizing how mercury binds to proteins, how inter- and intra-protein transfer of mercury is orchestrated in biological systems, and how chemical reactions in proteins transform the metal. We describe quantum chemical analyses of aqueous Hg(II), which reveal critical factors that determine ligand binding propensities. We then provide a perspective on how we used chemical reasoning to discover how microorganisms methylate mercury. We also highlight our combined computational and experimental studies of the proteins and enzymes of the mer operon, a suite of genes that confers mercury resistance in many bacteria. Lastly, we place work on mercury in proteins in the context of what is needed for a comprehensive multi-scale model of environmental mercury cycling.

  14. PROTEIN SYNTHESIS GAME

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J.C.Q. Carvalho

    2004-05-01

    Full Text Available The theoretical explanation of biological concepts, associated with the use of teaching games andmodels, intensify the comprehension and increase students interest, stimulating them to participateactively on the teaching-learning process. The sta of dissemination from Centro de BiotecnologiaMolecular Estrutural (CBME, in partnership with the Centro de Divulgac~ao Cientca e Cultural(CDCC, presents, in this work, a new educational resource denoted: Protein Synthesis Game. Theapproach of the game involves the cytological aspects of protein synthesis, directed to high schoolstudents. Students are presented to day-by-day facts related to the function of a given protein in thehuman body. Such task leads players to the goal of solving out a problem through synthesizing aspecied protein. The game comprises: (1 a board illustrated with the transversal section of animalcell, with its main structures and organelles and sequences of hypothetical genes; (2 cards with thedescription of steps and other structures required for protein synthesis in eukaryotic cells; (3 piecesrepresenting nucleotides, polynucleotides, ribosome, amino acids, and polypeptide chains. In order toplay the game, students take cards that sequentially permit them to acquire the necessary pieces forproduction of the protein described in each objective. Players must move the pieces on the board andsimulate the steps of protein synthesis. The dynamic of the game allows students to easily comprehendprocesses of transcription and translation. This game was presented to dierent groups of high schoolteachers and students. Their judgments have been heard and indicated points to be improved, whichhelped us with the game development. Furthermore, the opinions colleted were always favorable forthe application of this game as a teaching resource in classrooms.

  15. Bioinformatics and moonlighting proteins

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sergio eHernández

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Multitasking or moonlighting is the capability of some proteins to execute two or more biochemical functions. Usually, moonlighting proteins are experimentally revealed by serendipity. For this reason, it would be helpful that Bioinformatics could predict this multifunctionality, especially because of the large amounts of sequences from genome projects. In the present work, we analyse and describe several approaches that use sequences, structures, interactomics and current bioinformatics algorithms and programs to try to overcome this problem. Among these approaches are: a remote homology searches using Psi-Blast, b detection of functional motifs and domains, c analysis of data from protein-protein interaction databases (PPIs, d match the query protein sequence to 3D databases (i.e., algorithms as PISITE, e mutation correlation analysis between amino acids by algorithms as MISTIC. Programs designed to identify functional motif/domains detect mainly the canonical function but usually fail in the detection of the moonlighting one, Pfam and ProDom being the best methods. Remote homology search by Psi-Blast combined with data from interactomics databases (PPIs have the best performance. Structural information and mutation correlation analysis can help us to map the functional sites. Mutation correlation analysis can only be used in very specific situations –it requires the existence of multialigned family protein sequences - but can suggest how the evolutionary process of second function acquisition took place. The multitasking protein database MultitaskProtDB (http://wallace.uab.es/multitask/, previously published by our group, has been used as a benchmark for the all of the analyses.

  16. The cullin protein family.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarikas, Antonio; Hartmann, Thomas; Pan, Zhen-Qiang

    2011-01-01

    Cullin proteins are molecular scaffolds that have crucial roles in the post-translational modification of cellular proteins involving ubiquitin. The mammalian cullin protein family comprises eight members (CUL1 to CUL7 and PARC), which are characterized by a cullin homology domain. CUL1 to CUL7 assemble multi-subunit Cullin-RING E3 ubiquitin ligase (CRL) complexes, the largest family of E3 ligases with more than 200 members. Although CUL7 and PARC are present only in chordates, other members of the cullin protein family are found in Drosophila melanogaster, Caenorhabditis elegans, Arabidopsis thaliana and yeast. A cullin protein tethers both a substrate-targeting unit, often through an adaptor protein, and the RING finger component in a CRL. The cullin-organized CRL thus positions a substrate close to the RING-bound E2 ubiquitin-conjugating enzyme, which catalyzes the transfer of ubiquitin to the substrate. In addition, conjugation of cullins with the ubiquitin-like molecule Nedd8 modulates activation of the corresponding CRL complex, probably through conformational regulation of the interactions between cullin's carboxy-terminal tail and CRL's RING subunit. Genetic studies in several model organisms have helped to unravel a multitude of physiological functions associated with cullin proteins and their respective CRLs. CRLs target numerous substrates and thus have an impact on a range of biological processes, including cell growth, development, signal transduction, transcriptional control, genomic integrity and tumor suppression. Moreover, mutations in CUL7 and CUL4B genes have been linked to hereditary human diseases.

  17. Deciphering protein-protein interactions. Part II. Computational methods to predict protein and domain interaction partners

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Shoemaker, Benjamin A; Panchenko, Anna R

    2007-01-01

    .... In this review we describe different approaches to predict protein interaction partners as well as highlight recent achievements in the prediction of specific domains mediating protein-protein interactions...

  18. Direct protein-protein conjugation by genetically introducing bioorthogonal functional groups into proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Sanggil; Ko, Wooseok; Sung, Bong Hyun; Kim, Sun Chang; Lee, Hyun Soo

    2016-11-15

    Proteins often function as complex structures in conjunction with other proteins. Because these complex structures are essential for sophisticated functions, developing protein-protein conjugates has gained research interest. In this study, site-specific protein-protein conjugation was performed by genetically incorporating an azide-containing amino acid into one protein and a bicyclononyne (BCN)-containing amino acid into the other. Three to four sites in each of the proteins were tested for conjugation efficiency, and three combinations showed excellent conjugation efficiency. The genetic incorporation of unnatural amino acids (UAAs) is technically simple and produces the mutant protein in high yield. In addition, the conjugation reaction can be conducted by simple mixing, and does not require additional reagents or linker molecules. Therefore, this method may prove very useful for generating protein-protein conjugates and protein complexes of biochemical significance. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  19. Benchtop Detection of Proteins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scardelletti, Maximilian C.; Varaljay, Vanessa

    2007-01-01

    A process, and a benchtop-scale apparatus for implementing the process, have been developed to detect proteins associated with specific microbes in water. The process and apparatus may also be useful for detection of proteins in other, more complex liquids. There may be numerous potential applications, including monitoring lakes and streams for contamination, testing of blood and other bodily fluids in medical laboratories, and testing for microbial contamination of liquids in restaurants and industrial food-processing facilities. A sample can be prepared and analyzed by use of this process and apparatus within minutes, whereas an equivalent analysis performed by use of other processes and equipment can often take hours to days. The process begins with the conjugation of near-infrared-fluorescent dyes to antibodies that are specific to a particular protein. Initially, the research has focused on using near-infrared dyes to detect antigens or associated proteins in solution, which has proven successful vs. microbial cells, and streamlining the technique in use for surface protein detection on microbes would theoretically render similar results. However, it is noted that additional work is needed to transition protein-based techniques to microbial cell detection. Consequently, multiple such dye/antibody pairs could be prepared to enable detection of multiple selected microbial species, using a different dye for each species. When excited by near-infrared light of a suitable wavelength, each dye fluoresces at a unique longer wavelength that differs from those of the other dyes, enabling discrimination among the various species. In initial tests, the dye/antibody pairs are mixed into a solution suspected of containing the selected proteins, causing the binding of the dye/antibody pairs to such suspect proteins that may be present. The solution is then run through a microcentrifuge that includes a membrane that acts as a filter in that it retains the dye/antibody/protein

  20. A Novel Approach for Protein-Named Entity Recognition and Protein-Protein Interaction Extraction

    OpenAIRE

    Meijing Li; Tsendsuren Munkhdalai; Xiuming Yu; Keun Ho Ryu

    2015-01-01

    Many researchers focus on developing protein-named entity recognition (Protein-NER) or PPI extraction systems. However, the studies about these two topics cannot be merged well; then existing PPI extraction systems’ Protein-NER still needs to improve. In this paper, we developed the protein-protein interaction extraction system named PPIMiner based on Support Vector Machine (SVM) and parsing tree. PPIMiner consists of three main models: natural language processing (NLP) model, Protein-NER mod...

  1. ADSORPTION OF PROTEIN ON NANOPARTICLES

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WU Qi

    1994-01-01

    The adsorption of protein on nanoparticles was studied by using dynamic light scattering to measure the hydrodynamic size of both pure protein and nanoparticles adsorbed with different amounts of protein. The thickness of the adsorbed protein layer increases as protein concentration, but decreases as the initial size of nanoparticles. After properly scaling the thickness with the initial diameter, we are able to fit all experimental data with a single master curve. Our experimental results suggest that the adsorbed proteins form a monolayeron the nanoparticle surface and the adsorbed protein molecules are attached to the particle surface at many points through a possible hydrogen-bonding. Our results also indicate that as protein concentration increases, the overall shape of the adsorbed protein molecule continuously changes from a flat layer on the particle surface to a stretched coil extended into water. During the change, the hydrodynamic volume of the adsorbed protein increases linearly with protein concentration.

  2. Protein Dynamics in Enzymology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brooks, , III

    2001-03-01

    Enzymes carry-out the chemical activity essential for living processes by providing particular structural arrangements of chemically functional moieties through the structure of their constituent proteins. They are suggested to be optimized through evolution to specifically bind the transition state for the chemical processes they participate in, thereby enhancing the rate of these chemical events by 6-12 orders of magnitude. However, proteins are malleable and fluctuating many-body systems and may also utilize coupling between motional processes with catalysis to regulate or promote these processes. Our studies are aimed at exploring the hypothesis that motions of the protein couple distant regions of the molecule to assist catalytic processes. We demonstrate, through the use of molecular simulations, that strongly coupled motions occur in regions of protein molecules distant in sequence and space from each other, and the enzyme’s active site, when the protein is in a reactant state. Further, we find that the presence of this coupling disappears in complexes no longer reactive-competent, i.e., for product configurations and mutant sequences. The implications of these findings and aspects of evolutionary relationships and mutational studies which support the coupling hypothesis will be discussed in the context of our work on dihydrofolate reductase.

  3. Electrochemical nanomoulding through proteins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allred, Daniel B.

    The continued improvements in performance of modern electronic devices are directly related to the manufacturing of smaller, denser features on surfaces. Electrochemical fabrication has played a large role in continuing this trend due to its low cost and ease of scaleability toward ever smaller dimensions. This work introduces the concept of using proteins, essentially monodisperse complex polymers whose three-dimensional structures are fixed by their encoded amino acid sequences, as "moulds" around which nanostructures can be built by electrochemical fabrication. Bacterial cell-surface layer proteins, or "S-layer" proteins, from two organisms---Deinococcus radiodurans and Sporosarcina ureae---were used as the "moulds" for electrochemical fabrication. The proteins are easily purified as micron-sized sheets of periodic molecular complexes with 18-nm hexagonal and 13-nm square unit cell lattices, respectively. Direct imaging by transmission electron microscopy on ultrathin noble metal films without sample preparation eliminates potential artifacts to the high surface energy substrates necessary for high nucleation densities. Characterization involved imaging, electron diffraction, spectroscopy, and three-dimensional reconstruction. The S-layer protein of D. radiodurans was further subjected to an atomic force microscope based assay to determine the integrity of its structure and long-range order and was found to be useful for fabrication from around pH 3 to 12.

  4. Heat Capacity in Proteins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prabhu, Ninad V.; Sharp, Kim A.

    2005-05-01

    Heat capacity (Cp) is one of several major thermodynamic quantities commonly measured in proteins. With more than half a dozen definitions, it is the hardest of these quantities to understand in physical terms, but the richest in insight. There are many ramifications of observed Cp changes: The sign distinguishes apolar from polar solvation. It imparts a temperature (T) dependence to entropy and enthalpy that may change their signs and which of them dominate. Protein unfolding usually has a positive ΔCp, producing a maximum in stability and sometimes cold denaturation. There are two heat capacity contributions, from hydration and protein-protein interactions; which dominates in folding and binding is an open question. Theoretical work to date has dealt mostly with the hydration term and can account, at least semiquantitatively, for the major Cp-related features: the positive and negative Cp of hydration for apolar and polar groups, respectively; the convergence of apolar group hydration entropy at T ≈ 112°C; the decrease in apolar hydration Cp with increasing T; and the T-maximum in protein stability and cold denaturation.

  5. Integral UBL domain proteins: a family of proteasome interacting proteins

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hartmann-Petersen, Rasmus; Gordon, Colin

    2004-01-01

    The family of ubiquitin-like (UBL) domain proteins (UDPs) comprises a conserved group of proteins involved in a multitude of different cellular activities. However, recent studies on UBL-domain proteins indicate that these proteins appear to share a common property in their ability to interact wi...

  6. Purine inhibitors of protein kinases, G proteins and polymerases

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gray, Nathanael S. (Berkeley, CA); Schultz, Peter (Oakland, CA); Kim, Sung-Hou (Moraga, CA); Meijer, Laurent (Roscoff, FR)

    2001-07-03

    The present invention relates to purine analogs that inhibit, inter alia, protein kinases, G-proteins and polymerases. In addition, the present invention relates to methods of using such purine analogs to inhibit protein kinases, G-proteins, polymerases and other cellular processes and to treat cellular proliferative diseases.

  7. Accessory Proteins at ERES

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Klinkenberg, Rafael David

    proteins. Together these components co‐operate in cargo‐selection as well as forming, loading and releasing budding vesicles from specific regions on the membrane surface of the ER. Coat components furthermore convey vesicle targeting towards the Golgi. However, not much is known about the mechanisms...... that regulate the COPII assembly at the vesicle bud site. This thesis provides the first regulatory mechanism of COPII assembly in relation to ER‐membrane lipid‐signal recognition by the accessory protein p125A (Sec23IP). The aim of the project was to characterize p125A function by dissecting two main domains...... in the protein; a putative lipid‐associating domain termed the DDHD domain that is defined by the four amino acid motif that gives the domain its name; and a ubiquitously found domain termed Sterile α‐motif (SAM), which is mostly associated with oligomerization and polymerization. We first show, that the DDHD...

  8. Polarizable protein packing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ng, Albert H; Snow, Christopher D

    2011-05-01

    To incorporate protein polarization effects within a protein combinatorial optimization framework, we decompose the polarizable force field AMOEBA into low order terms. Including terms up to the third-order provides a fair approximation to the full energy while maintaining tractability. We represent the polarizable packing problem for protein G as a hypergraph and solve for optimal rotamers with the FASTER combinatorial optimization algorithm. These approximate energy models can be improved to high accuracy [root mean square deviation (rmsd) < 1 kJ mol(-1)] via ridge regression. The resulting trained approximations are used to efficiently identify new, low-energy solutions. The approach is general and should allow combinatorial optimization of other many-body problems. Copyright © 2011 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  9. Protein Crystal Serum Albumin

    Science.gov (United States)

    1998-01-01

    As the most abundant protein in the circulatory system albumin contributes 80% to colloid osmotic blood pressure. Albumin is also chiefly responsible for the maintenance of blood pH. It is located in every tissue and bodily secretion, with extracellular protein comprising 60% of total albumin. Perhaps the most outstanding property of albumin is its ability to bind reversibly to an incredible variety of ligands. It is widely accepted in the pharmaceutical industry that the overall distribution, metabolism, and efficiency of many drugs are rendered ineffective because of their unusually high affinity for this abundant protein. An understanding of the chemistry of the various classes of pharmaceutical interactions with albumin can suggest new approaches to drug therapy and design. Principal Investigator: Dan Carter/New Century Pharmaceuticals

  10. Polarizable protein packing

    KAUST Repository

    Ng, Albert H.

    2011-01-24

    To incorporate protein polarization effects within a protein combinatorial optimization framework, we decompose the polarizable force field AMOEBA into low order terms. Including terms up to the third-order provides a fair approximation to the full energy while maintaining tractability. We represent the polarizable packing problem for protein G as a hypergraph and solve for optimal rotamers with the FASTER combinatorial optimization algorithm. These approximate energy models can be improved to high accuracy [root mean square deviation (rmsd) < 1 kJ mol -1] via ridge regression. The resulting trained approximations are used to efficiently identify new, low-energy solutions. The approach is general and should allow combinatorial optimization of other many-body problems. © 2011 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. J Comput Chem, 2011 Copyright © 2011 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  11. Protein-protein interaction assays: eliminating false positive interactions

    OpenAIRE

    Nguyen, Tuan N.; Goodrich, James A.

    2006-01-01

    Many methods commonly used to identify and characterize interactions between two or more proteins are variations of the immobilized protein-protein interaction assay (for example, glutathione S-transferase (GST) pulldown and coimmunoprecipitation). A potential, and often overlooked, problem with these assays is the possibility that an observed interaction is mediated not by direct contact between proteins, but instead by nucleic acid contaminating the protein preparations. As a negatively cha...

  12. Amyloidogenesis of Tau protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nizynski, Bartosz; Dzwolak, Wojciech; Nieznanski, Krzysztof

    2017-08-17

    The role of microtubule-associated protein Tau in neurodegeneration has been extensively investigated since the discovery of Tau amyloid aggregates in the brains of patients with Alzheimer's disease (AD). The process of formation of amyloid fibrils is known as amyloidogenesis and attracts much attention as a potential target in the prevention and treatment of neurodegenerative conditions linked to protein aggregation. Cerebral deposition of amyloid aggregates of Tau is observed not only in AD but also in numerous other tauopathies and prion diseases. Amyloidogenesis of intrinsically unstructured monomers of Tau can be triggered by mutations in the Tau gene, post-translational modifications, or interactions with polyanionic molecules and aggregation-prone proteins/peptides. The self-assembly of amyloid fibrils of Tau shares a number of characteristic features with amyloidogenesis of other proteins involved in neurodegenerative diseases. For example, in vitro experiments have demonstrated that the nucleation phase, which is the rate-limiting stage of Tau amyloidogenesis, is shortened in the presence of fragmented preformed Tau fibrils acting as aggregation templates ("seeds"). Accordingly, Tau aggregates released by tauopathy-affected neurons can spread the neurodegenerative process in the brain through a prion-like mechanism, originally described for the pathogenic form of prion protein. Moreover, Tau has been shown to form amyloid strains-structurally diverse self-propagating aggregates of potentially various pathological effects, resembling in this respect prion strains. Here, we review the current literature on Tau aggregation and discuss mechanisms of propagation of Tau amyloid in the light of the prion-like paradigm. © 2017 The Protein Society.

  13. Discovery of binding proteins for a protein target using protein-protein docking-based virtual screening.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Changsheng; Tang, Bo; Wang, Qian; Lai, Luhua

    2014-10-01

    Target structure-based virtual screening, which employs protein-small molecule docking to identify potential ligands, has been widely used in small-molecule drug discovery. In the present study, we used a protein-protein docking program to identify proteins that bind to a specific target protein. In the testing phase, an all-to-all protein-protein docking run on a large dataset was performed. The three-dimensional rigid docking program SDOCK was used to examine protein-protein docking on all protein pairs in the dataset. Both the binding affinity and features of the binding energy landscape were considered in the scoring function in order to distinguish positive binding pairs from negative binding pairs. Thus, the lowest docking score, the average Z-score, and convergency of the low-score solutions were incorporated in the analysis. The hybrid scoring function was optimized in the all-to-all docking test. The docking method and the hybrid scoring function were then used to screen for proteins that bind to tumor necrosis factor-α (TNFα), which is a well-known therapeutic target for rheumatoid arthritis and other autoimmune diseases. A protein library containing 677 proteins was used for the screen. Proteins with scores among the top 20% were further examined. Sixteen proteins from the top-ranking 67 proteins were selected for experimental study. Two of these proteins showed significant binding to TNFα in an in vitro binding study. The results of the present study demonstrate the power and potential application of protein-protein docking for the discovery of novel binding proteins for specific protein targets.

  14. The representation of protein complexes in the Protein Ontology (PRO

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Smith Barry

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Representing species-specific proteins and protein complexes in ontologies that are both human- and machine-readable facilitates the retrieval, analysis, and interpretation of genome-scale data sets. Although existing protin-centric informatics resources provide the biomedical research community with well-curated compendia of protein sequence and structure, these resources lack formal ontological representations of the relationships among the proteins themselves. The Protein Ontology (PRO Consortium is filling this informatics resource gap by developing ontological representations and relationships among proteins and their variants and modified forms. Because proteins are often functional only as members of stable protein complexes, the PRO Consortium, in collaboration with existing protein and pathway databases, has launched a new initiative to implement logical and consistent representation of protein complexes. Description We describe here how the PRO Consortium is meeting the challenge of representing species-specific protein complexes, how protein complex representation in PRO supports annotation of protein complexes and comparative biology, and how PRO is being integrated into existing community bioinformatics resources. The PRO resource is accessible at http://pir.georgetown.edu/pro/. Conclusion PRO is a unique database resource for species-specific protein complexes. PRO facilitates robust annotation of variations in composition and function contexts for protein complexes within and between species.

  15. The Formation of Protein Structure

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bohr, Jakob; Bohr, Henrik; Brunak, Søren

    1996-01-01

    Dynamically induced curvature owing to long-range excitations along the backbones of protein molecules with non-linear elastic properties may control the folding of proteins.......Dynamically induced curvature owing to long-range excitations along the backbones of protein molecules with non-linear elastic properties may control the folding of proteins....

  16. Protein: FBB5 [TP Atlas

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available FBB5 RNA silencing TNRC6A CAGH26, KIAA1460, TNRC6 TNRC6A Trinucleotide repeat-containing gene 6A protein... CAG repeat protein 26, EMSY interactor protein, GW182 autoantigen, Glycine-tryptophan protein of 182 kDa 9606 Homo sapiens Q8NDV7 27327 27327 19398495 ...

  17. Cold gelation of globular proteins

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Alting, A.C.

    2003-01-01

    Keywords : globular proteins, whey protein, ovalbumin, cold gelation, disulfide bonds, texture, gel hardnessProtein gelation in food products is important to obtain desirable sensory and textural properties. Cold gelation is a novel method to produce protein-based gels. It is a two step process in w

  18. Cold gelation of globular proteins

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Alting, A.C.

    2003-01-01

    Keywords : globular proteins, whey protein, ovalbumin, cold gelation, disulfide bonds, texture, gel hardnessProtein gelation in food products is important to obtain desirable sensory and textural properties. Cold gelation is a novel method to produce protein-based gels. It is a two step process in w

  19. Stress proteins in CNS inflammation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Noort, J.M. van

    2008-01-01

    Stress proteins or heat shock proteins (HSPs) are ubiquitous cellular components that have long been known to act as molecular chaperones. By assisting proper folding and transport of proteins, and by assisting in the degradation of aberrant proteins, they play key roles in cellular metabolism. The

  20. Protein: FBA3 [TP Atlas

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available FBA3 Atg1 kinase complex ATG1 APG1, AUT3, CVT10 Serine/threonine-protein kinase ATG1 Autophagy prot...ein 3, Autophagy-related protein 1, Cytoplasm to vacuole targeting protein 10 559292 Sacchar

  1. Protein: FEA3 [TP Atlas

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available FEA3 AREB pathway: Signaling proteins SRK2E OST1, SNRK2.6 Serine/threonine-protein kinase SRK2E Prot...ein OPEN STOMATA 1, SNF1-related kinase 2.6, Serine/threonine-protein kinase OST1 3702 Arabidopsis thaliana 829541 Q940H6 3UC4, 3ZUT, 3ZUU, 3UDB 19805022 ...

  2. Protein: FEA3 [TP Atlas

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available FEA3 AREB pathway: Signaling proteins AZF1 OZAKGYO, ZF1 At5g67450, Cys2/His2-type zinc finger prot...ein 1, Zinc finger protein OZAKGYO, Zinc-finger protein 1 3702 Arabidopsis thaliana 836881 Q9SSW1 21852415 ...

  3. Protein: MPA6 [TP Atlas

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available ocyte complement-related protein, Adipocyte complement-related 30 kDa protein, Adipocyte, C1q and collagen d...omain-containing protein, Adipocyte-specific protein AdipoQ 10090 Mus musculus 11450 Q60994 1C28, 1C3H Q60994 18446001, 19788607 ...

  4. Protein: FBA7 [TP Atlas

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available FBA7 claudin-zona occluden TJP3 ZO3 TJP3 Tight junction protein ZO-3 Tight junction protein 3, Zona occlude...ns protein 3, Zonula occludens protein 3 9606 Homo sapiens O95049 27134 3KFV 27134 O95049 ...

  5. Protein: FBA7 [TP Atlas

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available FBA7 claudin-zona occluden TJP2 X104, ZO2 TJP2 Tight junction protein ZO-2 Tight ju...nction protein 2, Zona occludens protein 2, Zonula occludens protein 2 9606 Homo sapiens Q9UDY2 9414 3E17, 2OSG 9414 ...

  6. Protein: FBA7 [TP Atlas

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available FBA7 claudin-zona occluden Tjp1 Zo1 Tight junction protein ZO-1 Tight junction protein 1, Zona occlude...ns protein 1, Zonula occludens protein 1 10090 Mus musculus 21872 P39447 2RRM P39447 21431884 ...

  7. A simple dependence between protein evolution rate and the number of protein-protein interactions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hirsh Aaron E

    2003-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background It has been shown for an evolutionarily distant genomic comparison that the number of protein-protein interactions a protein has correlates negatively with their rates of evolution. However, the generality of this observation has recently been challenged. Here we examine the problem using protein-protein interaction data from the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae and genome sequences from two other yeast species. Results In contrast to a previous study that used an incomplete set of protein-protein interactions, we observed a highly significant correlation between number of interactions and evolutionary distance to either Candida albicans or Schizosaccharomyces pombe. This study differs from the previous one in that it includes all known protein interactions from S. cerevisiae, and a larger set of protein evolutionary rates. In both evolutionary comparisons, a simple monotonic relationship was found across the entire range of the number of protein-protein interactions. In agreement with our earlier findings, this relationship cannot be explained by the fact that proteins with many interactions tend to be important to yeast. The generality of these correlations in other kingdoms of life unfortunately cannot be addressed at this time, due to the incompleteness of protein-protein interaction data from organisms other than S. cerevisiae. Conclusions Protein-protein interactions tend to slow the rate at which proteins evolve. This may be due to structural constraints that must be met to maintain interactions, but more work is needed to definitively establish the mechanism(s behind the correlations we have observed.

  8. Ubiquitin domain proteins in disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Klausen, Louise Kjær; Schulze, Andrea; Seeger, Michael

    2007-01-01

    The human genome encodes several ubiquitin-like (UBL) domain proteins (UDPs). Members of this protein family are involved in a variety of cellular functions and many are connected to the ubiquitin proteasome system, an essential pathway for protein degradation in eukaryotic cells. Despite their s...... and cancer. Publication history: Republished from Current BioData's Targeted Proteins database (TPdb; http://www.targetedproteinsdb.com).......The human genome encodes several ubiquitin-like (UBL) domain proteins (UDPs). Members of this protein family are involved in a variety of cellular functions and many are connected to the ubiquitin proteasome system, an essential pathway for protein degradation in eukaryotic cells. Despite...

  9. Modelling of proteins in membranes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sperotto, Maria Maddalena; May, S.; Baumgaertner, A.

    2006-01-01

    This review describes some recent theories and simulations of mesoscopic and microscopic models of lipid membranes with embedded or attached proteins. We summarize results supporting our understanding of phenomena for which the activities of proteins in membranes are expected to be significantly...... affected by the lipid environment. Theoretical predictions are pointed out, and compared to experimental findings, if available. Among others, the following phenomena are discussed: interactions of interfacially adsorbed peptides, pore-forming amphipathic peptides, adsorption of charged proteins onto...... oppositely charged lipid membranes, lipid-induced tilting of proteins embedded in lipid bilayers, protein-induced bilayer deformations, protein insertion and assembly, and lipid-controlled functioning of membrane proteins....

  10. Truly Absorbed Microbial Protein Synthesis, Rumen Bypass Protein, Endogenous Protein, and Total Metabolizable Protein from Starchy and Protein-Rich Raw Materials

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Parand, Ehsan; Vakili, Alireza; Mesgaran, Mohsen Danesh; Duinkerken, Van Gert; Yu, Peiqiang

    2015-01-01

    This study was carried out to measure truly absorbed microbial protein synthesis, rumen bypass protein, and endogenous protein loss, as well as total metabolizable protein, from starchy and protein-rich raw feed materials with model comparisons. Predictions by the DVE2010 system as a more

  11. The Development and Characterization of Protein-Based Stationary Phases for Studying Drug-Protein and Protein-Protein Interactions

    OpenAIRE

    Sanghvi, Mitesh; Moaddel, Ruin; Wainer, Irving W.

    2011-01-01

    Protein-based liquid chromatography stationary phases are used in bioaffinity chromatography for studying drug-protein interactions, the determination of binding affinities, competitive and allosteric interactions, as well as for studying protein-protein interactions. This review addresses the development and characterization of protein-based stationary phase, and the application of these phases using frontal and zonal chromatography techniques. The approach will be illustrated using immobili...

  12. Protein oxidation in aquatic foods

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Baron, Caroline P.

    2014-01-01

    oxidation. The protein carbonyl group measurement is the widely used method for estimating protein oxidation in foods and has been used in fish muscle. The chapter also talks about the impact of protein oxidation on protein functionality, fish muscle texture, and food nutritional value. Protein oxidation...... may not only induce quality losses but may be desirable in some type of foods, such as salted herring....

  13. Protein oxidation and peroxidation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Davies, Michael Jonathan

    2016-01-01

    to the residues targeted and their spatial location. Modification can result in increased side-chain hydrophilicity, side-chain and backbone fragmentation, aggregation via covalent cross-linking or hydrophobic interactions, protein unfolding and altered conformation, altered interactions with biological partners...

  14. Cellulose binding domain proteins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shoseyov, Oded; Shpiegl, Itai; Goldstein, Marc; Doi, Roy

    1998-01-01

    A cellulose binding domain (CBD) having a high affinity for crystalline cellulose and chitin is disclosed, along with methods for the molecular cloning and recombinant production thereof. Fusion products comprising the CBD and a second protein are likewise described. A wide range of applications are contemplated for both the CBD and the fusion products, including drug delivery, affinity separations, and diagnostic techniques.

  15. Protein Sorting Prediction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Henrik

    2017-01-01

    Many computational methods are available for predicting protein sorting in bacteria. When comparing them, it is important to know that they can be grouped into three fundamentally different approaches: signal-based, global-property-based and homology-based prediction. In this chapter, the strengths...

  16. Protein Requirements during Aging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Glenda Courtney-Martin

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Protein recommendations for elderly, both men and women, are based on nitrogen balance studies. They are set at 0.66 and 0.8 g/kg/day as the estimated average requirement (EAR and recommended dietary allowance (RDA, respectively, similar to young adults. This recommendation is based on single linear regression of available nitrogen balance data obtained at test protein intakes close to or below zero balance. Using the indicator amino acid oxidation (IAAO method, we estimated the protein requirement in young adults and in both elderly men and women to be 0.9 and 1.2 g/kg/day as the EAR and RDA, respectively. This suggests that there is no difference in requirement on a gender basis or on a per kg body weight basis between younger and older adults. The requirement estimates however are ~40% higher than the current protein recommendations on a body weight basis. They are also 40% higher than our estimates in young men when calculated on the basis of fat free mass. Thus, current recommendations may need to be re-assessed. Potential rationale for this difference includes a decreased sensitivity to dietary amino acids and increased insulin resistance in the elderly compared with younger individuals.

  17. Tuber storage proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shewry, Peter R

    2003-06-01

    A wide range of plants are grown for their edible tubers, but five species together account for almost 90 % of the total world production. These are potato (Solanum tuberosum), cassava (Manihot esculenta), sweet potato (Ipomoea batatus), yams (Dioscorea spp.) and taro (Colocasia, Cyrtosperma and Xanthosoma spp.). All of these, except cassava, contain groups of storage proteins, but these differ in the biological properties and evolutionary relationships. Thus, patatin from potato exhibits activity as an acylhydrolase and esterase, sporamin from sweet potato is an inhibitor of trypsin, and dioscorin from yam is a carbonic anhydrase. Both sporamin and dioscorin also exhibit antioxidant and radical scavenging activity. Taro differs from the other three crops in that it contains two major types of storage protein: a trypsin inhibitor related to sporamin and a mannose-binding lectin. These characteristics indicate that tuber storage proteins have evolved independently in different species, which contrasts with the highly conserved families of storage proteins present in seeds. Furthermore, all exhibit biological activities which could contribute to resistance to pests, pathogens or abiotic stresses, indicating that they may have dual roles in the tubers.

  18. Interaction between plate make and protein in protein crystallisation screening.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gordon J King

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Protein crystallisation screening involves the parallel testing of large numbers of candidate conditions with the aim of identifying conditions suitable as a starting point for the production of diffraction quality crystals. Generally, condition screening is performed in 96-well plates. While previous studies have examined the effects of protein construct, protein purity, or crystallisation condition ingredients on protein crystallisation, few have examined the effect of the crystallisation plate. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We performed a statistically rigorous examination of protein crystallisation, and evaluated interactions between crystallisation success and plate row/column, different plates of same make, different plate makes and different proteins. From our analysis of protein crystallisation, we found a significant interaction between plate make and the specific protein being crystallised. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Protein crystal structure determination is the principal method for determining protein structure but is limited by the need to produce crystals of the protein under study. Many important proteins are difficult to crystallize, so that identification of factors that assist crystallisation could open up the structure determination of these more challenging targets. Our findings suggest that protein crystallisation success may be improved by matching a protein with its optimal plate make.

  19. Predicting where small molecules bind at protein-protein interfaces.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peter Walter

    Full Text Available Small molecules that bind at protein-protein interfaces may either block or stabilize protein-protein interactions in cells. Thus, some of these binding interfaces may turn into prospective targets for drug design. Here, we collected 175 pairs of protein-protein (PP complexes and protein-ligand (PL complexes with known three-dimensional structures for which (1 one protein from the PP complex shares at least 40% sequence identity with the protein from the PL complex, and (2 the interface regions of these proteins overlap at least partially with each other. We found that those residues of the interfaces that may bind the other protein as well as the small molecule are evolutionary more conserved on average, have a higher tendency of being located in pockets and expose a smaller fraction of their surface area to the solvent than the remaining protein-protein interface region. Based on these findings we derived a statistical classifier that predicts patches at binding interfaces that have a higher tendency to bind small molecules. We applied this new prediction method to more than 10,000 interfaces from the protein data bank. For several complexes related to apoptosis the predicted binding patches were in direct contact to co-crystallized small molecules.

  20. An evaluation of in vitro protein-protein interaction techniques: assessing contaminating background proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Howell, Jenika M; Winstone, Tara L; Coorssen, Jens R; Turner, Raymond J

    2006-04-01

    Determination of protein-protein interactions is an important component in assigning function and discerning the biological relevance of proteins within a broader cellular context. In vitro protein-protein interaction methodologies, including affinity chromatography, coimmunoprecipitation, and newer approaches such as protein chip arrays, hold much promise in the detection of protein interactions, particularly in well-characterized organisms with sequenced genomes. However, each of these approaches attracts certain background proteins that can thwart detection and identification of true interactors. In addition, recombinant proteins expressed in Escherichia coli are also extensively used to assess protein-protein interactions, and background proteins in these isolates can thus contaminate interaction studies. Rigorous validation of a true interaction thus requires not only that an interaction be found by alternate techniques, but more importantly that researchers be aware of and control for matrix/support dependence. Here, we evaluate these methods for proteins interacting with DmsD (an E. coli redox enzyme maturation protein chaperone), in vitro, using E. coli subcellular fractions as prey sources. We compare and contrast the various in vitro interaction methods to identify some of the background proteins and protein profiles that are inherent to each of the methods in an E. coli system.

  1. Exploring NMR ensembles of calcium binding proteins: Perspectives to design inhibitors of protein-protein interactions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Craescu Constantin T

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Disrupting protein-protein interactions by small organic molecules is nowadays a promising strategy employed to block protein targets involved in different pathologies. However, structural changes occurring at the binding interfaces make difficult drug discovery processes using structure-based drug design/virtual screening approaches. Here we focused on two homologous calcium binding proteins, calmodulin and human centrin 2, involved in different cellular functions via protein-protein interactions, and known to undergo important conformational changes upon ligand binding. Results In order to find suitable protein conformations of calmodulin and centrin for further structure-based drug design/virtual screening, we performed in silico structural/energetic analysis and molecular docking of terphenyl (a mimicking alpha-helical molecule known to inhibit protein-protein interactions of calmodulin into X-ray and NMR ensembles of calmodulin and centrin. We employed several scoring methods in order to find the best protein conformations. Our results show that docking on NMR structures of calmodulin and centrin can be very helpful to take into account conformational changes occurring at protein-protein interfaces. Conclusions NMR structures of protein-protein complexes nowadays available could efficiently be exploited for further structure-based drug design/virtual screening processes employed to design small molecule inhibitors of protein-protein interactions.

  2. High quality protein microarray using in situ protein purification

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fleischmann Robert D

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In the postgenomic era, high throughput protein expression and protein microarray technologies have progressed markedly permitting screening of therapeutic reagents and discovery of novel protein functions. Hexa-histidine is one of the most commonly used fusion tags for protein expression due to its small size and convenient purification via immobilized metal ion affinity chromatography (IMAC. This purification process has been adapted to the protein microarray format, but the quality of in situ His-tagged protein purification on slides has not been systematically evaluated. We established methods to determine the level of purification of such proteins on metal chelate-modified slide surfaces. Optimized in situ purification of His-tagged recombinant proteins has the potential to become the new gold standard for cost-effective generation of high-quality and high-density protein microarrays. Results Two slide surfaces were examined, chelated Cu2+ slides suspended on a polyethylene glycol (PEG coating and chelated Ni2+ slides immobilized on a support without PEG coating. Using PEG-coated chelated Cu2+ slides, consistently higher purities of recombinant proteins were measured. An optimized wash buffer (PBST composed of 10 mM phosphate buffer, 2.7 mM KCl, 140 mM NaCl and 0.05% Tween 20, pH 7.4, further improved protein purity levels. Using Escherichia coli cell lysates expressing 90 recombinant Streptococcus pneumoniae proteins, 73 proteins were successfully immobilized, and 66 proteins were in situ purified with greater than 90% purity. We identified several antigens among the in situ-purified proteins via assays with anti-S. pneumoniae rabbit antibodies and a human patient antiserum, as a demonstration project of large scale microarray-based immunoproteomics profiling. The methodology is compatible with higher throughput formats of in vivo protein expression, eliminates the need for resin-based purification and circumvents

  3. Aberrant localization of fusion receptors involved in regulated exocytosis in salivary glands of Sjögren's syndrome patients is linked to ectopic mucin secretion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barrera, María-José; Sánchez, Marianela; Aguilera, Sergio; Alliende, Cecilia; Bahamondes, Verónica; Molina, Claudio; Quest, Andrew F G; Urzúa, Ulises; Castro, Isabel; González, Sergio; Sung, Hsiao Hsin; Albornoz, Amelina; Hermoso, Marcela; Leyton, Cecilia; González, María-Julieta

    2012-08-01

    Sjögren's syndrome (SS) is a chronic inflammatory autoimmune disease that mainly affects tear and salivary glands, whereby SS-patients frequently complain of eye and mouth dryness. Salivary acinar cells of SS-patients display alterations in their cell polarity; which may affect the correct localization and function of proteins involved in regulated exocytosis. Here we determined whether the expression and localization of SNARE proteins (membrane fusion receptors) involved in regulated secretion, such as VAMP8, syntaxin 3 (STX3), STX4 and SNAP-23 were altered in salivary glands (SG) from SS-patients. Additionally, we investigated SNARE proteins function, by evaluating their ability to form SNARE complexes under basal conditions. In SG from SS-patients and control subjects mRNA and proteins levels of SNARE complex components were determined by real-time PCR and Western blotting, respectively. SNARE protein distribution and mucin exocytosis were determined by indirect immunofluorescence. In SS-patients, the expression levels of mRNA and protein for VAMP8, STX4 and STX3 were altered. STX4, STX3, SNAP-23 and VAMP8 relocated from the apical to the basal region of acinar cells. Increased formation of SNARE complexes in a manner independent of external stimuli for secretion was detected. Mucins were detected in the extracellular matrix (ECM). Presence of mucins in the ECM, together with the observed alterations in SNARE protein localization is indicative of ectopic exocytosis. In the context of SS, such aberrantly localized mucins are likely to favor a pro-inflammatory response, which may represent an important initial step in the pathogenesis of this disease. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Metabolism of minor isoforms of prion proteins: Cytosolic prion protein and transmembrane prion protein

    OpenAIRE

    Song, Zhiqi; Zhao, Deming; Yang, Lifeng

    2013-01-01

    Transmissible spongiform encephalopathy or prion disease is triggered by the conversion from cellular prion protein to pathogenic prion protein. Growing evidence has concentrated on prion protein configuration changes and their correlation with prion disease transmissibility and pathogenicity. In vivo and in vitro studies have shown that several cytosolic forms of prion protein with specific topological structure can destroy intracellular stability and contribute to prion protein pathogenicit...

  5. Dairy Proteins and Energy Balance

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bendtsen, Line Quist

    High protein diets affect energy balance beneficially through decreased hunger, enhanced satiety and increased energy expenditure. Dairy products are a major source of protein. Dairy proteins are comprised of two classes, casein (80%) and whey proteins (20%), which are both of high quality......, but casein is absorbed slowly and whey is absorbed rapidly. The present PhD study investigated the effects of total dairy proteins, whey, and casein, on energy balance and the mechanisms behind any differences in the effects of the specific proteins. The results do not support the hypothesis that dairy...... proteins, whey or casein are more beneficial than other protein sources in the regulation of energy balance, and suggest that dairy proteins, whey or casein seem to play only a minor role, if any, in the prevention and treatment of obesity....

  6. Dairy Proteins and Energy Balance

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bendtsen, Line Quist

    High protein diets affect energy balance beneficially through decreased hunger, enhanced satiety and increased energy expenditure. Dairy products are a major source of protein. Dairy proteins are comprised of two classes, casein (80%) and whey proteins (20%), which are both of high quality......, but casein is absorbed slowly and whey is absorbed rapidly. The present PhD study investigated the effects of total dairy proteins, whey, and casein, on energy balance and the mechanisms behind any differences in the effects of the specific proteins. The results do not support the hypothesis that dairy...... proteins, whey or casein are more beneficial than other protein sources in the regulation of energy balance, and suggest that dairy proteins, whey or casein seem to play only a minor role, if any, in the prevention and treatment of obesity....

  7. The quality of microparticulated protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erdman, J W

    1990-08-01

    The purpose of this paper is to describe the effects of microparticulation upon the quality of microparticulated protein products and to confirm that microparticulation does not result in changes in protein structure or quality different from those that occur with cooking. Two products were tested: microparticulated egg white and skim milk proteins and microparticulated whey protein concentrate. Three approaches were used to monitor for changes in amino acid and protein value: amino acid analysis, protein efficiency ratio (PER) bioassay, and both one- and two-dimensional sodium dodecyl sulfate polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. Evaluation of the results of these tests indicates that no significant differences were found when comparing the premix before and after microparticulation. Significant differences also did not occur when the premix was cooked using conventional methods. Collectively, the data provide strong evidence that the protein microparticulation process used to prepare microparticulated protein products (e.g., Simplesse) does not alter the quality or nutritional value of protein in the final products.

  8. Protein-protein interaction network of celiac disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zamanian Azodi, Mona; Peyvandi, Hassan; Rostami-Nejad, Mohammad; Safaei, Akram; Rostami, Kamran; Vafaee, Reza; Heidari, Mohammadhossein; Hosseini, Mostafa; Zali, Mohammad Reza

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study is to investigate the Protein-Protein Interaction Network of Celiac Disease. Celiac disease (CD) is an autoimmune disease with susceptibility of individuals to gluten of wheat, rye and barley. Understanding the molecular mechanisms and involved pathway may lead to the development of drug target discovery. The protein interaction network is one of the supportive fields to discover the pathogenesis biomarkers for celiac disease. In the present study, we collected the articles that focused on the proteomic data in celiac disease. According to the gene expression investigations of these articles, 31 candidate proteins were selected for this study. The networks of related differentially expressed protein were explored using Cytoscape 3.3 and the PPI analysis methods such as MCODE and ClueGO. According to the network analysis Ubiquitin C, Heat shock protein 90kDa alpha (cytosolic and Grp94); class A, B and 1 member, Heat shock 70kDa protein, and protein 5 (glucose-regulated protein, 78kDa), T-complex, Chaperon in containing TCP1; subunit 7 (beta) and subunit 4 (delta) and subunit 2 (beta), have been introduced as hub-bottlnecks proteins. HSP90AA1, MKKS, EZR, HSPA14, APOB and CAD have been determined as seed proteins. Chaperons have a bold presentation in curtail area in network therefore these key proteins beside the other hub-bottlneck proteins may be a suitable candidates biomarker panel for diagnosis, prognosis and treatment processes in celiac disease.

  9. Coverage of protein domain families with structural protein-protein interactions: current progress and future trends.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goncearenco, Alexander; Shoemaker, Benjamin A; Zhang, Dachuan; Sarychev, Alexey; Panchenko, Anna R

    2014-01-01

    Protein interactions have evolved into highly precise and regulated networks adding an immense layer of complexity to cellular systems. The most accurate atomistic description of protein binding sites can be obtained directly from structures of protein complexes. The availability of structurally characterized protein interfaces significantly improves our understanding of interactomes, and the progress in structural characterization of protein-protein interactions (PPIs) can be measured by calculating the structural coverage of protein domain families. We analyze the coverage of protein domain families (defined according to CDD and Pfam databases) by structures, structural protein-protein complexes and unique protein binding sites. Structural PPI coverage of currently available protein families is about 30% without any signs of saturation in coverage growth dynamics. Given the current growth rates of domain databases and structural PPI deposition, complete domain coverage with PPIs is not expected in the near future. As a result of this study we identify families without any protein-protein interaction evidence (listed on a supporting website http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/Structure/ibis/coverage/) and propose them as potential targets for structural studies with a focus on protein interactions. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  10. Coevolution study of mitochondria respiratory chain proteins:Toward the understanding of protein-protein interaction

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ming Yang; Yan Ge; Jiayan Wu; Jingfa Xiao; Jun Yu

    2011-01-01

    Coevolution can be seen as the interdependency between evolutionary histories. In the context of protein evolution, functional correlation proteins are ever-present coordinated evolutionary characters without disruption of organismal integrity. As to complex system, there are two forms of protein-protein interactions in vivo, which refer to inter-complex interaction and intra-complex interaction. In this paper, we studied the difference of coevolution characters between inter-complex interaction and intra-complex interaction using "Mirror tree" method on the respiratory chain (RC) proteins. We divided the correlation coefficients of every pairwise RC proteins into two groups corresponding to the binary protein-protein interaction in intra-complex and the binary protein-protein interaction in inter-complex, respectively. A dramatical discrepancy is detected between the coevolution characters of the two sets of protein interactions (Wilcoxon test, p-value = 4.4 x 10-6). Our finding reveals some critical information on coevolutionary study and assists the mechanical investigation of protein-protein interaction.Furthermore, the results also provide some unique clue for supramolecular organization of protein complexes in the mitochondrial inner membrane. More detailed binding sites map and genome information of nuclear encoded RC proteins will be extraordinary valuable for the further mitochondria dynamics study.

  11. Mapping the human protein interactome

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Daniel Figeys

    2008-01-01

    Interactions are the essence of all biomolecules because they cannot fulfill their roles without interacting with other molecules. Hence, mapping the interactions of biomolecules can be useful for understanding their roles and functions. Furthermore, the development of molecular based systems biology requires an understanding of the biomolecular interactions. In recent years, the mapping of protein-protein interactions in different species has been reported, but few reports have focused on the large-scale mapping of protein-protein interactions in human. Here, we review the developments in protein interaction mapping and we discuss issues and strategies for the mapping of the human protein interactome.

  12. Hydrogels Constructed from Engineered Proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Hongbin; Kong, Na; Laver, Bryce; Liu, Junqiu

    2016-02-24

    Due to their various potential biomedical applications, hydrogels based on engineered proteins have attracted considerable interest. Benefitting from significant progress in recombinant DNA technology and protein engineering/design techniques, the field of protein hydrogels has made amazing progress. The latest progress of hydrogels constructed from engineered recombinant proteins are presented, mainly focused on biorecognition-driven physical hydrogels as well as chemically crosslinked hydrogels. The various bio-recognition based physical crosslinking strategies are discussed, as well as chemical crosslinking chemistries used to engineer protein hydrogels, and protein hydrogels' various biomedical applications. The future perspectives of this fast evolving field of biomaterials are also discussed.

  13. Cow's Milk Protein Allergy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mousan, Grace; Kamat, Deepak

    2016-10-01

    Cow's milk protein allergy (CMPA) is a common condition encountered in children with incidence estimated as 2% to 7.5% in the first year of life. Formula and breast-fed babies can present with symptoms of CMPA. It is important to accurately diagnose CMPA to avoid the consequences of either under- or overdiagnosis. CMPA is classically categorized into immunoglobulin E (IgE)- or non-IgE-mediated reaction that vary in clinical manifestations, diagnostic evaluation, and prognosis. The most commonly involved systems in patients with CMPA are gastrointestinal, skin, and respiratory. Evaluation of CMPA starts with good data gathering followed by testing if indicated. Treatment is simply by avoidance of cow's milk protein (CMP) in the child's or mother's diet, if exclusively breast-feeding. This article reviews the definition, epidemiology, risk factors, pathogenesis, clinical presentation, evaluation, management, and prognosis of CMPA and provides an overview of different options for formulas and their indication in the treatment of CMPA.

  14. Protein Functionalized Nanodiamond Arrays

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liu YL

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Various nanoscale elements are currently being explored for bio-applications, such as in bio-images, bio-detection, and bio-sensors. Among them, nanodiamonds possess remarkable features such as low bio-cytotoxicity, good optical property in fluorescent and Raman spectra, and good photostability for bio-applications. In this work, we devise techniques to position functionalized nanodiamonds on self-assembled monolayer (SAMs arrays adsorbed on silicon and ITO substrates surface using electron beam lithography techniques. The nanodiamond arrays were functionalized with lysozyme to target a certain biomolecule or protein specifically. The optical properties of the nanodiamond-protein complex arrays were characterized by a high throughput confocal microscope. The synthesized nanodiamond-lysozyme complex arrays were found to still retain their functionality in interacting with E. coli.

  15. Inferring protein-protein interaction complexes from immunoprecipitation data

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kutzera, J.; Hoefsloot, H.C.J.; Malovannaya, A.; Smit, A.B.; Van Mechelen, I.; Smilde, A.K.

    2013-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Protein inverted question markprotein interactions in cells are widely explored using small inverted question markscale experiments. However, the search for protein complexes and their interactions in data from high throughput experiments such as immunoprecipitation is still a challenge.

  16. Competitive Protein Adsorption - Multilayer Adsorption and Surface Induced Protein Aggregation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holmberg, Maria; Hou, Xiaolin

    2009-01-01

    In this study, competitive adsorption of albumin and IgG (immunoglobulin G) from human serum solutions and protein mixtures onto polymer surfaces is studied by means of radioactive labeling. By using two different radiolabels (125I and 131I), albumin and IgG adsorption to polymer surfaces...... is monitored simultaneously and the influence from the presence of other human serum proteins on albumin and IgG adsorption, as well as their mutual influence during adsorption processes, is investigated. Exploring protein adsorption by combining analysis of competitive adsorption from complex solutions...... of high concentration with investigation of single protein adsorption and interdependent adsorption between two specific proteins enables us to map protein adsorption sequences during competitive protein adsorption. Our study shows that proteins can adsorb in a multilayer fashion onto the polymer surfaces...

  17. Inferring protein-protein interaction complexes from immunoprecipitation data

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kutzera, J.; Hoefsloot, H.C.J.; Malovannaya, A.; Smit, A.B.; Van Mechelen, I.; Smilde, A.K.

    2013-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Protein inverted question markprotein interactions in cells are widely explored using small inverted question markscale experiments. However, the search for protein complexes and their interactions in data from high throughput experiments such as immunoprecipitation is still a challenge.

  18. Autotransporter protein secretion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tame, Jeremy R H

    2011-12-01

    Autotransporter proteins are a large family of virulence factors secreted from Gram-negative bacteria by a unique mechanism. First described in the 1980s, these proteins have a C-terminal region that folds into a β-barrel in the bacterial outer membrane. The so-called passenger domain attached to this barrel projects away from the cell surface and may be liberated from the cell by self-cleavage or surface proteases. Although the majority of passenger domains have a similar β-helical structure, they carry a variety of sub-domains, allowing them to carry out widely differing functions related to pathogenesis. Considerable biochemical and structural characterisation of the barrel domain has shown that 'autotransporters' in fact require a conserved and essential protein complex in the outer membrane for correct folding. Although the globular domains of this complex projecting into the periplasmic space have also been structurally characterised, the overall secretion pathway of the autotransporters remains highly puzzling. It was presumed for many years that the passenger domain passed through the centre of the barrel domain to reach the cell surface, driven at least in part by folding. This picture is complicated by conflicting data, and there is currently little hard information on the true nature of the secretion intermediates. As well as their medical importance therefore, autotransporters are proving to be an excellent system to study the folding and membrane insertion of outer membrane proteins in general. This review focuses on structural aspects of autotransporters; their many functions in pathogenesis are beyond its scope.

  19. Plant nuclear envelope proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rose, Annkatrin; Patel, Shalaka; Meier, Iris

    2004-01-01

    Compared to research in the animal field, the plant NE has been clearly under-investigated. The available data so far indicate similarities as well as striking differences that raise interesting questions about the function and evolution of the NE in different kingdoms. Despite a seemingly similar structure and organization of the NE, many of the proteins that are integral components of the animal NE appear to lack homologues in plant cells. The sequencing of the Arabidopsis genome has not led to the identification of homologues of animal NE components, but has indicated that the plant NE must have a distinct protein composition different from that found in metazoan cells. Besides providing a selective barrier between the nucleoplasm and the cytoplasm, the plant NE functions as a scaffold for chromatin but the scaffolding components are not identical to those found in animal cells. The NE comprises an MTOC in higher plant cells, a striking difference to the organization of microtubule nucleation in other eukaryotic cells. Nuclear pores are present in the plant NE, but identifiable orthologues of most animal and yeast nucleoporins are presently lacking. The transport pathway through the nuclear pores via the action of karyopherins and the Ran cycle is conserved in plant cells. Interestingly, RanGAP is sequestered to the NE in plant cells and animal cells, yet the targeting domains and mechanisms of attachment are different between the two kingdoms. At present, only a few proteins localized at the plant NE have been identified molecularly. Future research will have to expand the list of known protein components involved in building a functional plant NE.

  20. Process for protein PEGylation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pfister, David; Morbidelli, Massimo

    2014-04-28

    PEGylation is a versatile drug delivery technique that presents a particularly wide range of conjugation chemistry and polymer structure. The conjugated protein can be tuned to specifically meet the needs of the desired application. In the area of drug delivery this typically means to increase the persistency in the human body without affecting the activity profile of the original protein. On the other hand, because of the high costs associated with the production of therapeutic proteins, subsequent operations imposed by PEGylation must be optimized to minimize the costs inherent to the additional steps. The closest attention has to be given to the PEGylation reaction engineering and to the subsequent purification processes. This review article focuses on these two aspects and critically reviews the current state of the art with a clear focus on the development of industrial scale processes which can meet the market requirements in terms of quality and costs. The possibility of using continuous processes, with integration between the reaction and the separation steps is also illustrated.

  1. Hydrolyzed Proteins in Allergy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salvatore, Silvia; Vandenplas, Yvan

    2016-01-01

    Hydrolyzed proteins are used worldwide in the therapeutic management of infants with allergic manifestations and have long been proposed as a dietetic measure to prevent allergy in at risk infants. The degree and method of hydrolysis, protein source and non-nitrogen components characterize different hydrolyzed formulas (HFs) and may determine clinical efficacy, tolerance and nutritional effects. Cow's milk (CM)-based HFs are classified as extensively (eHF) or partially HF (pHF) based on the percentage of small peptides. One whey pHF has been shown to reduce atopic dermatitis in high-risk infants who are not exclusively breastfed. More studies are needed to determine the benefit of these formulas in the prevention of CM allergy (CMA) and in the general population. eHFs represent up to now the treatment of choice for most infants with CMA. However, new developments, such as an extensively hydrolyzed rice protein-based formula, could become alternative options if safety and nutritional and therapeutic efficacy are confirmed as this type of formula is less expensive. In some countries, an extensive soy hydrolysate is available.

  2. Quality protein maize: QPM

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ignjatović-Micić Dragana

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Quality protein maize (QPM contains the opaque-2 gene along with numerous modifiers for kernel hardness. Therefore, QPM is maize with high nutritive value of endosperm protein, with substantially higher content of two essential amino acids - lysine and tryptophan, and with good agronomical performances. Although QPM was developed primarily for utilization in the regions where, because of poverty, maize is the main staple food, it has many advantages for production and consumption in other parts of the world, too. QPM can be used for production of conventional and new animal feed, as well as for human nurture. As the rate of animal weight gain is doubled with QPM and portion viability is better, a part of normal maize production could be available for other purposes, such as, for example, ethanol production. Thus, breeding QPM is set as a challenge to produce high quality protein maize with high yield and other important agronomical traits, especially with today's food and feed demands and significance of energy crisis.

  3. Extracellular Matrix Proteins

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Linda Christian Carrijo-Carvalho

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Lipocalin family members have been implicated in development, regeneration, and pathological processes, but their roles are unclear. Interestingly, these proteins are found abundant in the venom of the Lonomia obliqua caterpillar. Lipocalins are β-barrel proteins, which have three conserved motifs in their amino acid sequence. One of these motifs was shown to be a sequence signature involved in cell modulation. The aim of this study is to investigate the effects of a synthetic peptide comprising the lipocalin sequence motif in fibroblasts. This peptide suppressed caspase 3 activity and upregulated Bcl-2 and Ki-67, but did not interfere with GPCR calcium mobilization. Fibroblast responses also involved increased expression of proinflammatory mediators. Increase of extracellular matrix proteins, such as collagen, fibronectin, and tenascin, was observed. Increase in collagen content was also observed in vivo. Results indicate that modulation effects displayed by lipocalins through this sequence motif involve cell survival, extracellular matrix remodeling, and cytokine signaling. Such effects can be related to the lipocalin roles in disease, development, and tissue repair.

  4. Neutron protein crystallography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Niimura, Nobuo [Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Tokai, Ibaraki (Japan). Tokai Research Establishment

    1998-10-01

    X-ray diffraction of single crystal has enriched the knowledge of various biological molecules such as proteins, DNA, t-RNA, viruses, etc. It is difficult to make structural analysis of hydrogen atoms in a protein using X-ray crystallography, whereas neutron diffraction seems usable to directly determine the location of those hydrogen atoms. Here, neutron diffraction method was applied to structural analysis of hen egg-white lysozyme. Since the crystal size of a protein to analyze is generally small (5 mm{sup 3} at most), the neutron beam at the sample position in monochromator system was set to less than 5 x 5 mm{sup 2} and beam divergence to 0.4 degree or less. Neutron imaging plate with {sup 6}Li or Gd mixed with photostimulated luminescence material was used and about 2500 Bragg reflections were recorded in one crystal setting. A total of 38278 reflections for 2.0 A resolution were collected in less than 10 days. Thus, stereo views of Trp-111 omit map around the indol ring of Trp-111 was presented and the three-dimensional arrangement of 696H and 264D atoms in the lysozyme molecules was determined using the omit map. (M.N.)

  5. Purine inhibitors of protein kinases, G proteins and polymerases

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gray, Nathanael S.; Schultz, Peter; Kim, Sung-Hou; Meijer, Laurent

    2004-10-12

    The present invention relates to 2-N-substituted 6-(4-methoxybenzylamino)-9-isopropylpurines that inhibit, inter alia, protein kinases, G-proteins and polymerases. In addition, the present invention relates to methods of using such 2-N-substituted 6-(4-methoxybenzylamino)-9-isopropylpurines to inhibit protein kinases, G-proteins, polymerases and other cellular processes and to treat cellular proliferative diseases.

  6. Neurocognitive derivation of protein surface property from protein aggregate parameters

    OpenAIRE

    Mishra, Hrishikesh; Lahiri, Tapobrata

    2011-01-01

    Current work targeted to predicate parametric relationship between aggregate and individual property of a protein. In this approach, we considered individual property of a protein as its Surface Roughness Index (SRI) which was shown to have potential to classify SCOP protein families. The bulk property was however considered as Intensity Level based Multi-fractal Dimension (ILMFD) of ordinary microscopic images of heat denatured protein aggregates which was known to have potential to serve as...

  7. Protein-protein fusion catalyzed by sortase A.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levary, David A; Parthasarathy, Ranganath; Boder, Eric T; Ackerman, Margaret E

    2011-04-06

    Chimeric proteins boast widespread use in areas ranging from cell biology to drug delivery. Post-translational protein fusion using the bacterial transpeptidase sortase A provides an attractive alternative when traditional gene fusion fails. We describe use of this enzyme for in vitro protein ligation and report the successful fusion of 10 pairs of protein domains with preserved functionality--demonstrating the robust and facile nature of this reaction.

  8. Protein-protein fusion catalyzed by sortase A.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David A Levary

    Full Text Available Chimeric proteins boast widespread use in areas ranging from cell biology to drug delivery. Post-translational protein fusion using the bacterial transpeptidase sortase A provides an attractive alternative when traditional gene fusion fails. We describe use of this enzyme for in vitro protein ligation and report the successful fusion of 10 pairs of protein domains with preserved functionality--demonstrating the robust and facile nature of this reaction.

  9. Predicting disease-related proteins based on clique backbone in protein-protein interaction network.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Lei; Zhao, Xudong; Tang, Xianglong

    2014-01-01

    Network biology integrates different kinds of data, including physical or functional networks and disease gene sets, to interpret human disease. A clique (maximal complete subgraph) in a protein-protein interaction network is a topological module and possesses inherently biological significance. A disease-related clique possibly associates with complex diseases. Fully identifying disease components in a clique is conductive to uncovering disease mechanisms. This paper proposes an approach of predicting disease proteins based on cliques in a protein-protein interaction network. To tolerate false positive and negative interactions in protein networks, extending cliques and scoring predicted disease proteins with gene ontology terms are introduced to the clique-based method. Precisions of predicted disease proteins are verified by disease phenotypes and steadily keep to more than 95%. The predicted disease proteins associated with cliques can partly complement mapping between genotype and phenotype, and provide clues for understanding the pathogenesis of serious diseases.

  10. Metabolism of minor isoforms of prion proteins Cytosolic prion protein and transmembrane prion protein*

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhiqi Song; Deming Zhao; Lifeng Yang

    2013-01-01

    Transmissible spongiform encephalopathy or prion disease is triggered by the conversion from cellular prion protein to pathogenic prion protein. Growing evidence has concentrated on prion protein configuration changes and their correlation with prion disease transmissibility and pathoge-nicity. In vivo and in vitro studies have shown that several cytosolic forms of prion protein with spe-cific topological structure can destroy intracellular stability and contribute to prion protein pathoge-nicity. In this study, the latest molecular chaperone system associated with endoplasmic reticu-lum-associated protein degradation, the endoplasmic reticulum resident protein quality-control system and the ubiquitination proteasome system, is outlined. The molecular chaperone system directly correlates with the prion protein degradation pathway. Understanding the molecular me-chanisms wil help provide a fascinating avenue for further investigations on prion disease treatment and prion protein-induced neurodegenerative diseases.

  11. A Bayesian Framework for Combining Protein and Network Topology Information for Predicting Protein-Protein Interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Birlutiu, Adriana; d'Alché-Buc, Florence; Heskes, Tom

    2015-01-01

    Computational methods for predicting protein-protein interactions are important tools that can complement high-throughput technologies and guide biologists in designing new laboratory experiments. The proteins and the interactions between them can be described by a network which is characterized by several topological properties. Information about proteins and interactions between them, in combination with knowledge about topological properties of the network, can be used for developing computational methods that can accurately predict unknown protein-protein interactions. This paper presents a supervised learning framework based on Bayesian inference for combining two types of information: i) network topology information, and ii) information related to proteins and the interactions between them. The motivation of our model is that by combining these two types of information one can achieve a better accuracy in predicting protein-protein interactions, than by using models constructed from these two types of information independently.

  12. Understanding Protein Non-Folding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uversky, Vladimir N.; Dunker, A. Keith

    2010-01-01

    This review describes the family of intrinsically disordered proteins, members of which fail to form rigid 3-D structures under physiological conditions, either along their entire lengths or only in localized regions. Instead, these intriguing proteins/regions exist as dynamic ensembles within which atom positions and backbone Ramachandran angles exhibit extreme temporal fluctuations without specific equilibrium values. Many of these intrinsically disordered proteins are known to carry out important biological functions which, in fact, depend on the absence of specific 3-D structure. The existence of such proteins does not fit the prevailing structure-function paradigm, which states that unique 3-D structure is a prerequisite to function. Thus, the protein structure-function paradigm has to be expanded to include intrinsically disordered proteins and alternative relationships among protein sequence, structure, and function. This shift in the paradigm represents a major breakthrough for biochemistry, biophysics and molecular biology, as it opens new levels of understanding with regard to the complex life of proteins. This review will try to answer the following questions: How were intrinsically disordered proteins discovered? Why don't these proteins fold? What is so special about intrinsic disorder? What are the functional advantages of disordered proteins/regions? What is the functional repertoire of these proteins? What are the relationships between intrinsically disordered proteins and human diseases? PMID:20117254

  13. Characterization of VAMP-2 in the lung: implication in lung surfactant secretion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Pengcheng; Howard, Marcia D; Zhang, Honghao; Chintagari, Narendranath Reddy; Bell, Anna; Jin, Nili; Mishra, Amarjit; Liu, Lin

    2012-09-01

    Lung surfactant is crucial for reducing the surface tension of alveolar space, thus preventing the alveoli from collapse. Lung surfactant is synthesized in alveolar epithelial type II cells and stored in lamellar bodies before being released via the fusion of lamellar bodies with the apical plasma membrane. SNAREs (soluble N-ethylmaleimide-sensitive fusion protein-attachment protein receptors) play an essential role in membrane fusion. We have previously demonstrated the requirement of t-SNARE (target SNARE) proteins, syntaxin 2 and SNAP-23 (N-ethylmaleimide-sensitive factor-attachment protein 23), in regulated surfactant secretion. Here, we characterized the distribution of VAMPs (vesicle-associated membrane proteins) in rat lung and alveolar type II cells. VAMP-2, -3 and -8 are shown in type II cells at both mRNA and protein levels. VAMP-2 and -8 were enriched in LB (lamellar body) fraction. Immunochemistry studies indicated that VAMP-2 was co-localized with the LB marker protein, LB-180. Functionally, the cytoplasmic domain of VAMP-2, but not VAMP-8 inhibited surfactant secretion in type II cells. We suggest that VAMP-2 is the v-SNARE (vesicle SNARE) involved in regulated surfactant secretion.

  14. Digestion of protein and protein gels in simulated gastric environment

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Luo, Q.; Boom, R.M.; Janssen, A.E.M.

    2015-01-01

    Despite the increasing attention to food digestion research, food scientists still need to better understand the underlying mechanisms of digestion. Most in vitro studies on protein digestion are based on experiments with protein solutions. In this study, the digestion of egg white protein and whey

  15. High throughput recombinant protein production of fungal secreted proteins

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vala, Andrea Lages Lino; Roth, Doris; Grell, Morten Nedergaard

    2011-01-01

    Secreted proteins are important for both symbiotic and pathogenic interactions between fungi and their hosts. Our research group uses screens and genomic mining to discover novel proteins involved in these processes. To efficiently study the large number of candidate proteins, we are establishing...

  16. Protein engineering techniques gateways to synthetic protein universe

    CERN Document Server

    Poluri, Krishna Mohan

    2017-01-01

    This brief provides a broad overview of protein-engineering research, offering a glimpse of the most common experimental methods. It also presents various computational programs with applications that are widely used in directed evolution, computational and de novo protein design. Further, it sheds light on the advantages and pitfalls of existing methodologies and future perspectives of protein engineering techniques.

  17. Ontology integration to identify protein complex in protein interaction networks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yang Zhihao

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Protein complexes can be identified from the protein interaction networks derived from experimental data sets. However, these analyses are challenging because of the presence of unreliable interactions and the complex connectivity of the network. The integration of protein-protein interactions with the data from other sources can be leveraged for improving the effectiveness of protein complexes detection algorithms. Methods We have developed novel semantic similarity method, which use Gene Ontology (GO annotations to measure the reliability of protein-protein interactions. The protein interaction networks can be converted into a weighted graph representation by assigning the reliability values to each interaction as a weight. Following the approach of that of the previously proposed clustering algorithm IPCA which expands clusters starting from seeded vertices, we present a clustering algorithm OIIP based on the new weighted Protein-Protein interaction networks for identifying protein complexes. Results The algorithm OIIP is applied to the protein interaction network of Sacchromyces cerevisiae and identifies many well known complexes. Experimental results show that the algorithm OIIP has higher F-measure and accuracy compared to other competing approaches.

  18. Multiscale modeling of proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tozzini, Valentina

    2010-02-16

    The activity within a living cell is based on a complex network of interactions among biomolecules, exchanging information and energy through biochemical processes. These events occur on different scales, from the nano- to the macroscale, spanning about 10 orders of magnitude in the space domain and 15 orders of magnitude in the time domain. Consequently, many different modeling techniques, each proper for a particular time or space scale, are commonly used. In addition, a single process often spans more than a single time or space scale. Thus, the necessity arises for combining the modeling techniques in multiscale approaches. In this Account, I first review the different modeling methods for bio-systems, from quantum mechanics to the coarse-grained and continuum-like descriptions, passing through the atomistic force field simulations. Special attention is devoted to their combination in different possible multiscale approaches and to the questions and problems related to their coherent matching in the space and time domains. These aspects are often considered secondary, but in fact, they have primary relevance when the aim is the coherent and complete description of bioprocesses. Subsequently, applications are illustrated by means of two paradigmatic examples: (i) the green fluorescent protein (GFP) family and (ii) the proteins involved in the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) replication cycle. The GFPs are currently one of the most frequently used markers for monitoring protein trafficking within living cells; nanobiotechnology and cell biology strongly rely on their use in fluorescence microscopy techniques. A detailed knowledge of the actions of the virus-specific enzymes of HIV (specifically HIV protease and integrase) is necessary to study novel therapeutic strategies against this disease. Thus, the insight accumulated over years of intense study is an excellent framework for this Account. The foremost relevance of these two biomolecular systems was

  19. Protein: FBA6 [TP Atlas

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available FBA6 transport vesicle formation SEC12 SED2 Guanine nucleotide-exchange factor SEC12 Protein... transport protein SEC12 559292 Saccharomyces cerevisiae (strain ATCC 204508 / S288c) 855760 P11655 ...

  20. Microtubules, Tubulins and Associated Proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raxworthy, Michael J.

    1988-01-01

    Reviews much of what is known about microtubules, which are biopolymers consisting predominantly of subunits of the globular protein, tubulin. Describes the functions of microtubules, their structure and assembly, microtube associated proteins, and microtubule-disrupting agents. (TW)