WorldWideScience

Sample records for plate velocities relative

  1. The San Andreas fault experiment. [gross tectonic plates relative velocity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, D. E.; Vonbun, F. O.

    1973-01-01

    A plan was developed during 1971 to determine gross tectonic plate motions along the San Andreas Fault System in California. Knowledge of the gross motion along the total fault system is an essential component in the construction of realistic deformation models of fault regions. Such mathematical models will be used in the future for studies which will eventually lead to prediction of major earthquakes. The main purpose of the experiment described is the determination of the relative velocity of the North American and the Pacific Plates. This motion being so extremely small, cannot be measured directly but can be deduced from distance measurements between points on opposite sites of the plate boundary taken over a number of years.

  2. The proportionality between relative plate velocity and seismicity in subduction zones

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ide, S.

    2013-12-01

    Seismic activity differs among subduction zones due to various factors such as relative plate velocity, temperature, stress, and subducting materials. Relative plate velocity has a direct control on tectonic deformation and an overall correlation with seismicity has been suggested, as a global average or for large regions. Here I show a positive correlation between relative plate velocity and seismicity by estimating the background seismicity rate for 117 sections of subduction zones worldwide using the epidemic type aftershock sequence (ETAS) model. The background rate is stably estimated even for the period following M9-class earthquakes in Chile and Japan. A prominent proportional relationship is evident in the southwestern Pacific Ocean. Given that M9-class earthquakes occur independently of one another, the lack of M9 earthquakes in the southwestern Pacific Ocean over the last century is difficult to explain by chance. On the other hand, some subduction zones have extremely low background seismicity, and have experienced very large earthquakes. Slow earthquakes have been discovered in many of these quiet zones. Thus, this proportionality relation may be useful in assessing the seismic risk in subduction zones worldwide between two apparently confusing end members: 'active and moderate' and 'quiet and extreme'.

  3. LOW VELOCITY RESPONSE CHARACTERISTICS OF COMPOSITE PLATE WITH EMBEDDED SHAPE MEMORY ALLOY

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WuYongdong; ZhongWeifang; LiangYide

    2004-01-01

    This paper analyzes the characteristics of utilizing shape memory effect (SME) of shape memory alloy (SMA) in improving the low velocity impact resistance performance of composite plate by using finite element method. The constitutive relation for SMA hybrid composite plates is presented. The analytic model of finite element for SMA composite plate subjected to low velocity impact is established. The modified Hertz's contact law is used to determine the impact contact force. The computing procedures for solving the finite element equation using Newmark direct integration method are given. The numerical modelling results show that the SMA can effectively improve the low velocity impact resistance performance of composite plate.

  4. The Light Velocity Casimir Effect Does the Velocity of Light Increase when Propagating Between the Casimir Plates?

    CERN Document Server

    Ostoma, T; Ostoma, Tom; Trushyk, Mike

    1999-01-01

    We propose experiments that might be set up to detect the increase in the velocity of light in a vacuum in the laboratory frame for photons travelling between (and perpendicular to) the Casimir plates in a vacuum. The Casimir plates are two closely spaced, conductive plates, where an attractive force is observed to exist between the plates called the 'Casimir Force'. We propose that the velocity of light in a vacuum increases when propagating between two transparent Casimir Plates. We call this effect the 'Light Velocity Casimir Effect' or LVC effect. The LVC effect happens because the vacuum energy density in between the plates is lower than that outside the Casimir plates. The conductive plates disallow certain frequencies of electrically charged virtual particles to exist inside the plates, thus lowering the inside vacuum particle density, compared to the density outside the plates. The reduced (electrically charged) virtual particle density results in fewer photon scattering events inside the plates, whic...

  5. Along-strike variation in subducting plate velocity induced by along-strike variation in overriding plate structure: Insights from 3D numerical models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodríguez-González, Juan; Billen, Magali I.; Negredo, Ana M.; Montesi, Laurent G. J.

    2016-10-01

    Subduction dynamics can be understood as the result of the balance between driving and resisting forces. Previous work has traditionally regarded gravitational slab pull and viscous mantle drag as the main driving and resistive forces for plate motion respectively. However, this paradigm fails to explain many of the observations in subduction zones. For example, subducting plate velocity varies significantly along-strike in many subduction zones and this variation is not correlated to the age of subducting lithosphere. Here we present three-dimensional and time-dependent numerical models of subduction. We show that along-strike variations of the overriding plate thermal structure can lead to along-strike variations in subducting plate velocity. In turn, velocity variations lead to significant migration of the Euler pole over time. Our results show that the subducting plate is slower beneath the colder portion of the overriding plate due to two related mechanisms. First, the mantle wedge beneath the colder portion of the overriding plate is more viscous, which increases mantle drag. Second, where the mantle wedge is more viscous, hydrodynamic suction increases, leading to a lower slab dip. Both factors contribute to decreasing subducting plate velocity in the region; therefore, if the overriding plate is not uniform, the resulting velocity varies significantly along-strike, which causes the Euler pole to migrate closer to the subducting plate. We present a new mechanism to explain observations of subducting plate velocity in the Cocos and Nazca plates. These results shed new light on the balance of forces that control subduction dynamics and prove that future studies should take into consideration the three-dimensional structure of the overriding plate.

  6. SIMULATION TOOL OF VELOCITY AND TEMPERATURE PROFILES IN THE ACCELERATED COOLING PROCESS OF HEAVY PLATES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antônio Adel dos Santos

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this paper was to develop and apply mathematical models for determining the velocity and temperature profiles of heavy plates processed by accelerated cooling at Usiminas’ Plate Mill in Ipatinga. The development was based on the mathematical/numerical representation of physical phenomena occurring in the processing line. Production data from 3334 plates processed in the Plate Mill were used for validating the models. A user-friendly simulation tool was developed within the Visual Basic framework, taking into account all steel grades produced, the configuration parameters of the production line and these models. With the aid of this tool the thermal profile through the plate thickness for any steel grade and dimensions can be generated, which allows the tuning of online process control models. The simulation tool has been very useful for the development of new steel grades, since the process variables can be related to the thermal profile, which affects the mechanical properties of the steels.

  7. The role of the heating mode of the mantle in intermittent reorganization of the plate velocity field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lowman, Julian P.; King, Scott D.; Gable, Carl W.

    2003-02-01

    The geological record indicates that stages of relatively steady plate motion have been punctuated by comparatively brief periods in which plate velocities have reorganized. The distribution of buoyancy sources in the mantle has generally been regarded as evolving too slowly to explain these rapid transitions in plate velocity. We investigate the feedback between mantle convection and plate velocity using 2-D and 3-D mantle convection models that incorporate mobile dynamic plates. We focus on the influence of internal heating in the mantle and consider the effect of mantle viscosity stratification and different plate geometries on the plate velocity time dependence. As either the Rayleigh number or the internal heating rate is increased to magnitudes approaching mantle values, the record of the plate motion from our calculations becomes characterized by intermittent changes in direction. This behaviour is a result of the influence of plates on heat loss from the inherently unsteady, internally heated convecting system. Plate motion instills a pattern of organization on the underlying convection that reflects the plate geometry and results in the formation of sheet-like downwelling structures at convergent plate boundaries in both 2-D and 3-D calculations (in contrast, upwellings in 3-D models are not sheet-like). The role of the sheet-like downwellings is critical in the observed episodic reorganization of the plate velocities. Warm material below the plates is entrained by plate motion into regions enveloping the downwelling sheets. During periods of fairly steady plate motion, buoyancy associated with the build-up of heat around the downwelling sheets leads to the creation of an unstable convection pattern. This build-up of heat is dramatic in calculations with mantle-like internal heating rates and resists continued long-term plate motion towards mature downwellings. When there are limitations on the degree of freedom of the direction of plate movement, such as

  8. The group velocity variation of Lamb wave in fiber reinforced composite plate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rhee, Sang-Ho; Lee, Jeong-Ki; Lee, Jung-Ju

    2007-12-01

    Experimentally measured Lamb wave group velocities in composite materials with anisotropic characteristics are not the same as the theoretical group velocities which is calculated with the Lamb wave dispersion equation. This discrepancy arises from the fact that the angle between the group velocity direction and the phase velocity direction in anisotropic materials exists. Wave propagation in a composite material with anisotropic characteristics should be considered with respect to magnitude correction in addition to direction correction. In this study, S0 mode phase velocity dispersion curves are depicted with the variation of degree with respect to the fiber direction using a Lamb wave dispersion relation in the unidirectional, bidirectional, and quasi-isotropic composite plates. Slowness surface is sketched by the reciprocal value of the phase velocity curves. The magnitude and direction of the group velocity could be calculated from the slowness surface. The recalculated group velocities with consideration of the magnitude and direction from the slowness surface are compared with experimentally measured group velocities. The proposed method shows good agreements with theoretical and experimental results.

  9. Application of Vectors to Relative Velocity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tin-Lam, Toh

    2004-01-01

    The topic 'relative velocity' has recently been introduced into the Cambridge Ordinary Level Additional Mathematics syllabus under the application of Vectors. In this note, the results of relative velocity and the 'reduction to rest' technique of teaching relative velocity are derived mathematically from vector algebra, in the hope of providing…

  10. Weakly nonlinear density-velocity relation

    CERN Document Server

    Chodorowski, M J; Chodorowski, Michal J; Lokas, Ewa L

    1996-01-01

    We rigorously derive weakly nonlinear relation between cosmic density and velocity fields up to third order in perturbation theory. The density field is described by the mass density contrast, \\de. The velocity field is described by the variable \\te proportional to the velocity divergence, \\te = - f(\\Omega)^{-1} H_0^{-1} \

  11. Variables Affecting Smooth Particle Hydrodynamics Simulation of High-Velocity Flyer Plate Impact Experiments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Somasundaram, Deepak S [UNLV; Trabia, Mohamed [UNLV; O' Toole, Brendan [UNLV; Hixson, Robert S [NSTec

    2014-01-23

    This paper describes our work to characterize the variables affecting the smoothed particle hydrodynamics (SPH) method in the LS-DYNA package for simulating high-velocity flyer plate impact experiments. LS-DYNA simulations are compared with one-dimensional experimental data of an oxygen-free high-conductivity (OFHC) copper flyer plate impacting another plate of the same material. The comparison is made by measuring the velocity of a point on the back surface of the impact plate using the velocity interferometer system for any reflector (VISAR) technique.

  12. Experimental determination of the onset of turbulence on inclined plates using hot wire velocity measurements

    OpenAIRE

    Rodríguez Sevillano, Angel; Pérez Grande, María Isabel; Meseguer Ruiz, José

    2010-01-01

    The problem of determination of the turbulence onset in natural convection on heated inclined plates in an air environment has been experimentally revisited. The transition has been detected by using hot wire velocity measurements. The onset of turbulence has been considered to take place where velocity fluctuations (measured through turbulence intensity) start to grow. Experiments have shown that the distance to the plate edge where the onset begins depends both on the plate inclinatio...

  13. Uppermost mantle Pn Velocity of the Arabian Plate, a Preliminary study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Lazki, A. I.; Al-Damegh, K. S.; Al-Enizi, A.; Elhusain, I.; Al-Mahrooqi, I.

    2005-12-01

    The Arabian plate represents a unique tectonic setup. The uniqueness of this plate is its boundaries that constitute the three known types of plate boundaries. The Red Sea and the Gulf of Aden represent the south and southwest plate boundary with Africa plate. Farther north the Dead Sea Fault system represents the remainder of the northwestern boundary with Africa plate. Continent-continent collision along the Bitlis-Zagros Suture zones represents the northern and northeastern boundary with Eurasia plate. Farther south the convergent plate boundary is manifested by the Makran Subduction Zone. Finally, the Owen and Murray Transform Faults represent the southeast boundary of Arabia with India plate. The broad objective of this study is to map uppermost mantle Pn velocity and anisotropy within the Arabian plate and around its boundaries. Zones that are along the north and the northeast boundaries of Arabia plate historically and in recent years has been effected by devastating earthquakes, a recent example is the Bam earthquake on December, 2003. In this region, accurate earthquake location is essential to delineate seismically active zones, where, without proper velocity models for the region, located earthquake may have large location error. In this preliminary study we present uppermost mantle Pn velocity tomography results of the north and northeastern regions of Arabia plate. We used in this study Pn phase data from the bulletins of Oman Seismic Network, Saudi Seismic Network, Kuwait Seismic Network, International Seismological Center and the National Earthquake Information Center,USA.

  14. Global tectonics and the plate motion obtained from the ITRF97 station velocity vectors

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    MA; Zongjin(马宗晋); REN; Jinwei(任金卫); ZHANG; Jin(张进)

    2003-01-01

    By studying the characteristics of current crustal motion by using the ITRF97 station velocity vectors, it has been found that the ITRF97 station velocity vectors are coherent with those of NUVEL-1A model. Both the ITRF97 and NUVEL-1A velocity vectors show that the northern hemisphere is moving towards northeast and northwest along the North Atlantic Ridge. The Eurasian plate is moving to northeast, east, and southeast. The North American continent is moving to northwest, west, and southwest. The movement in the southern hemisphere is different completely.The movements of African, South American and Indian-Australian plates almost all direct to NE-NNE. The three plates take the South Atlantic Ridge and the Indian Ridge as boundaries, and the movement vectors increase gradually, showing a "lag" type stretch movement as the result of the superimposition of the whole movement of the southern hemisphere and the spreading of ocean ridges. The difference of velocity fields between the northern and southern hemispheres is obvious, and there is a disharmony zone between the two hemispheres. The geological data show that there is an oblique and discontinuous shear zone between the two hemispheres. Along this shear zone, eight large earthquakes (Ms≥7.8) took place from August 1999 to January 2001, while in the same time period, the seismic activities along the western and southern Pacific subduction zone is low, showing the significance of the shear zone on the global scale. The results in this paper indicate the relative shear motion between the northern and southern hemispheres.

  15. CHARACTERIZATION OF 6061 T651 ALUMINUM PLATES SUBJECTED TO HIGH-VELOCITY IMPACT LOADS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Evren ÖZŞAHİN

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Ballistic response of single or multi-layered metal armor systems subjected to kinetic energy pro-jectiles was investigated in many experimental, theoretical and numerical studies.In this study, 6061 T651 aluminum plates impacted by 9 mm bullets were investigated. Microstructural investigations have been carried out using optical microscopy. Microhardness values were used to determine the strength behavior of the plates. Influence of the plate thickness and impact velocity on the microstructure has been evaluated. It was concluded from the study that thinner plates are more prone to deformation hardening with high penetration depth values even at low impact velocities while thick plates are more susceptible to thermal softening with less penetration depths. Maximum hardness values were obtained just below the impact zone in both plate thicknesses.

  16. Effect of Flyer Plate Velocity and Rate of Crater Expansion on Performance of Explosive Reactive Armour

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H.S. Yadav

    2002-10-01

    Full Text Available "The reduction in the penetration power of the jet due to its interaction with an obliquely moving plate of explosive reactive armour (ERA sandwich has been studied. It has been assumed that the length of the jet, which gets disturbed due to its interaction with the edge of the hole made by the impact of the tip of the jet when the plate was stationary, does not contribute to penetration in the target. The jet length, which comes out of the hole undisturbed, penetrates the target. This length of the jet has been calculated considering the variation in plate velocity and rate of expansion of the crater in the plate with time. The time taken by the jet to shift its position from the centre to the wall of the hole has been determined for different velocities of the sandwich plate and varying expansion rates of the hole produced by the jet in the plate, corresponding to a constant velocity of the jet. This analysis has been used to obtain the length of undisturbed jet coming out of the hole and its penetration in the target. The present study establishes the effect of the plate velocity and rate of crater expansion on the performance of the ERA. It has been found that both these parameters affect the performance of the ERA, and the metal plates of lower density and higher strength make the ERA more effective.

  17. Low-Velocity Impact on Composite Sandwich Plates

    Science.gov (United States)

    1996-07-01

    plate and correct for this error. 3.4 One- and Two-Degree of Freedom Models A single degree of freedom system (figure 3-3a) was used by Caprino et al...Composite Materials, Vol. 26, No. 10: 1523-1535 (1992). 211) Caprino , G., and Teti, R. "Impact and post-impact behavior of foam core sandwich

  18. Near Continuum Velocity and Temperature Coupled Compressible Boundary Layer Flow over a Flat Plate

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Xin; Cai, Chunpei

    2017-04-01

    The problem of a compressible gas flows over a flat plate with the velocity-slip and temperature-jump boundary conditions are being studied. The standard single- shooting method is applied to obtain the exact solutions for velocity and temperature profiles when the momentum and energy equations are weakly coupled. A double-shooting method is applied if these two equations are closely coupled. If the temperature affects the velocity directly, more significant velocity slip happens at locations closer to the plate's leading edge, and inflections on the velocity profiles appear, indicating flows may become unstable. As a consequence, the temperature-jump and velocity-slip boundary conditions may trigger earlier flow transitions from a laminar to a turbulent flow state.

  19. Style of Plate Spreading Derived from the 2008-2014 Velocity Field Across the Northern Volcanic Zone of Iceland

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drouin, V.; Sigmundsson, F.; Hreinsdottir, S.; Ofeigsson, B.; Sturkell, E.; Einarsson, P.

    2015-12-01

    The Northern Volcanic Zone (NVZ) of Iceland is a subaerial part of the divergent boundary between the North-American and Eurasian Plates. At this latitude, the full spreading between the plates is accommodated by the NVZ. We derived the plate boundary velocity field from GPS campaign and continuous measurements between 2008 and 2014, a time period free of any magma intrusion. Average velocities were estimated in the ITRF08 reference frame. The overall extension is consistent with 18 mm/yr in the 104°N direction spreading, in accordance with the MORVEL2010 plate motion model. We find that a 40km-wide band along the plate boundary accommodates about 75% of the full plate velocities. Within this zone, the average strain rate is approximately 0.35 μstrain/yr. The deformation field and the strain rate are, however, much affected by other sources of deformations in the NVZ. These include magmatic sources at the most active volcanic centers, glacial rebound near the ice-caps and geothermal power-plant water extraction. Magmatic sources include a shallow magma chamber deflation under Askja caldera, as well as under Þeistareykir and eventual deep magma inflation north of Krafla volcano. Vatnajökull ice cap melting causes large uplift and outward displacements in the southern part of the NVZ. The two geothermal power-plants near Krafla are inducing local deflations. Our GPS velocities show a 35° change in the direction of the plate boundary axis north of Askja volcano that we infer to be linked to the geometric arrangement of volcanic systems within the NVZ.We use a simple arctangent model to describe the plate spreading to provide constraints on the location and the locking depth of the spreading axis. For that purpose we divided the area in short overlapping segments having the same amount of GPS points along the plate spreading direction and inverted for the location of the center of the spreading axis and locking depth. With this simple model we can account for most

  20. Effect of High Velocity Ballistic Impact on Pretensioned Carbon Fibre Reinforced Plastic (CFRP) Plates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Azhar KAMARUDIN, Kamarul; HAMID, Iskandar ABDUL

    2017-01-01

    This work describes an experimental investigation of the pretensioned thin plates made of Carbon Fibre Reinforced Plastic (CFRP) struck by hemispherical and blunt projectiles at various impact velocities. The experiments were done using a gas gun with combination of pretension equipment positioned at the end of gun barrel near the nozzle. Measurements of the initial and residual velocities were taken, and the ballistic limit velocity were calculated for each procedures. The pretension target results in reduction of ballistic limit compared to non-pretension target for both flat and hemispherical projectiles. Target impacted by hemispherical projectile experience split at earlier impact velocity compared to target by flat projectile. C-Scan images analysis technique was used to show target impact damaged by hemispherical and flat projectiles. The damage area was shown biggest at ballistic limit velocity and target splitting occurred most for pretention plate.

  1. Velocity, acceleration and gravity in Einstein's relativity

    CERN Document Server

    Abramowicz, Marek A

    2016-01-01

    Einstein's relativity theory demands that all meaningful physical objects should be defined covariantly, i.e. in a coordinate independent way. Concepts of relative velocity, acceleration, gravity acceleration and gravity potential are fundamental in Newton's theory and they are imprinted in everyone's physical intuition. Unfortunately, relativistic definitions of them are not commonly known or appreciated. Every now and then some confused authors use wrong, non-covariant, definitions of velocity, acceleration and gravity, based on their vague Newtonian intuitions and hidden in a superficial, often purely semantic, relativistic disguise. A recent example of such a confusion (Gorkavyi & Vasilkov, 2016) is discussed at the end of this Note.

  2. Flat Plate Wake Velocity Statistics Obtained With Circular And Elliptic Trailing Edges

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rai, Man Mohan

    2016-01-01

    The near wake of a flat plate with circular and elliptic trailing edges is investigated with data from direct numerical simulations. The plate length and thickness are the same in both cases. The separating boundary layers are turbulent and statistically identical. Therefore the wake is symmetric in the two cases. The emphasis in this study is on a comparison of the wake-distributions of velocity components, normal intensity and fluctuating shear stress obtained in the two cases.

  3. Caribbean tectonics and relative plate motions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burke, K.; Dewey, J. F.; Cooper, C.; Mann, P.; Pindell, J. L.

    1984-01-01

    During the last century, three different ways of interpreting the tectonic evolution of the Gulf of Mexico and the Caribbean have been proposed, taking into account the Bailey Willis School of a permanent pre-Jurassic deep sea basin, the Edward Suess School of a subsided continental terrain, and the Alfred Wegener School of continental separation. The present investigation is concerned with an outline of an interpretation which follows that of Pindell and Dewey (1982). An attempt is made to point out ways in which the advanced hypotheses can be tested. The fit of Africa, North America, and South America is considered along with aspects of relative motion between North and South America since the early Jurasic. Attention is given to a framework for reconstructing Caribbean plate evolution, the evolution of the Caribbean, the plate boundary zones of the northern and southern Caribbean, and the active deformation of the Caribbean plate.

  4. Research on relationships between Lamb wave velocity and static stress in metal plate

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Jun; WANG Yinguan

    2006-01-01

    On the fact that an isotropic metal solid produces anisotropic property in the state of static stress, based on the theory of the nonlinear acoustoelasticity, the equivalent secondorder elastic constants are calculated for metal plate with static stress. For the case of thin metal plate with stress, the two kinds of dispersion equation for Lamb waves propagating parallel and vertical to the direction of static stress are derived. Using the equations, the relationships between Lamb wave velocity and static stress in a metal plate are discussed.

  5. Low-velocity impact response of a pre-stressed isotropic Uflyand-Mindlin plate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rossikhin Yury

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The low-velocity impact response of a precompressed circular isotropic elastic plate is investigated in the case when the dynamic behavior of the plate is described by equations taking the rotary inertia and transverse shear deformations into account. Contact interaction between the rigid impactor and the target is modeled by a generalized Hertz contact force, since it is assumed that the viscoelastic features of the plate represent themselves only in the place of contact and are governed by the standard linear solid model with fractional derivatives due to the fact that during the impact process decrosslinking occurs within the domain of the contact of the plate with the sphere, resulting in more free displacements of molecules with respect to each other, and finally in the decrease of the plate material viscosity in the contact zone.

  6. Corrosion and erosion monitoring in plates and pipes using constant group velocity Lamb wave inspection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagy, Peter B; Simonetti, Francesco; Instanes, Geir

    2014-09-01

    Recent improvements in tomographic reconstruction techniques generated a renewed interest in short-range ultrasonic guided wave inspection for real-time monitoring of internal corrosion and erosion in pipes and other plate-like structures. Emerging evidence suggests that in most cases the fundamental asymmetric A0 mode holds a distinct advantage over the earlier market leader fundamental symmetric S0 mode. Most existing A0 mode inspections operate at relatively low inspection frequencies where the mode is highly dispersive therefore very sensitive to variations in wall thickness. This paper examines the potential advantages of increasing the inspection frequency to the so-called constant group velocity (CGV) point where the group velocity remains essentially constant over a wide range of wall thickness variation, but the phase velocity is still dispersive enough to allow accurate wall thickness assessment from phase angle measurements. This paper shows that in the CGV region the crucial issue of temperature correction becomes especially simple, which is particularly beneficial when higher-order helical modes are also exploited for tomography. One disadvantage of working at such relatively high inspection frequency is that, as the slower A0 mode becomes faster and less dispersive, the competing faster S0 mode becomes slower and more dispersive. At higher inspection frequencies these modes cannot be separated any longer based on their vibration polarization only, which is mostly tangential for the S0 mode while mostly normal for the A0 at low frequencies, as the two modes become more similar as the frequency increases. Therefore, we propose a novel method for suppressing the unwanted S0 mode based on the Poisson effect of the material by optimizing the angle of inclination of the equivalent transduction force of the Electromagnetic Acoustic Transducers (EMATs) used for generation and detection purposes.

  7. High Velocity Tensile Test for Thin Plate Specimen with One Bar Method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Itabashi, Masaaki

    In order to design thin-walled impact-resistant structure, for example, an automotive body, dynamic behavior of thin plate is essential. So far, except for laminated composite materials, high velocity tensile test of thin plate specimen did not attract impact researchers' and engineers' attention very much. In this paper, the previous thin plate specimen assembly for the one bar method was improved. The one bar method has been utilized for cylindrical specimens of various solid materials and is known as an effective high velocity tensile testing technique. Unfortunately, the previous assembly introduced a tremendous initial peak on stress-strain curves, even for aluminum alloys. With a new specimen assembly, stress-strain curves for IF (Interstitial-atom Free) steel and 7075-T6 aluminum alloy obtained by the one bar method were almost equivalent to those obtained by the tensile version of the split Hopkinson pressure bar method.

  8. Multiple plates subducting beneath Colombia, as illuminated by seismicity and velocity from the joint inversion of seismic and gravity data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Syracuse, Ellen M.; Maceira, Monica; Prieto, Germán A.; Zhang, Haijiang; Ammon, Charles J.

    2016-06-01

    Subduction beneath the northernmost Andes in Colombia is complex. Based on seismicity distributions, multiple segments of slab appear to be subducting, and arc volcanism ceases north of 5° N. Here, we illuminate the subduction system through hypocentral relocations and Vp and Vs models resulting from the joint inversion of local body wave arrivals, surface wave dispersion measurements, and gravity data. The simultaneous use of multiple data types takes advantage of the differing sensitivities of each data type, resulting in velocity models that have improved resolution at both shallower and deeper depths than would result from traditional travel time tomography alone. The relocated earthquake dataset and velocity model clearly indicate a tear in the Nazca slab at 5° N, corresponding to a 250-km shift in slab seismicity and the termination of arc volcanism. North of this tear, the slab is flat, and it comprises slabs of two sources: the Nazca and Caribbean plates. The Bucaramanga nest, a small region of among the most intense intermediate-depth seismicity globally, is associated with the boundary between these two plates and possibly with a zone of melting or elevated water content, based on reduced Vp and increased Vp/Vs. We also use relocated seismicity to identify two new faults in the South American plate, one related to plate convergence and one highlighted by induced seismicity.

  9. A new GPS velocity field for the Pacific Plate - Part 2: implications for fault slip rates in western California

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeMets, C.; Márquez-Azúa, Bertha; Cabral-Cano, Enrique

    2014-12-01

    Lower and upper bounds for present deformation rates across faults in central California between the San Andreas Fault and Pacific coast are estimated from a new Global Positioning System (GPS) velocity field for central, western California in light of geodetic evidence presented in a companion paper for slow, but significant deformation within the Pacific Plate between young seafloor in the eastern Pacific and older seafloor elsewhere on the plate. Transects of the GPS velocity field across the San Andreas Fault between Parkfield and San Juan Buatista, where fault slip is dominated by creep and the velocity field thus reveals the off-fault deformation, show that GPS sites in westernmost California move approximately parallel to the fault at an average rate of 3.4 ± 0.4 mm yr-1 relative to the older interior of the Pacific Plate, but only 1.8 ± 0.6 mm yr-1 if the Pacific Plate frame of reference is corrected for deformation within the plate. Modelled interseismic elastic deformation from the weakly coupled creeping segment of the San Andreas Fault is an order-of-magnitude too small to explain the southeastward motions of coastal sites in western California. Similarly, models that maximize residual viscoelastic deformation from the 1857 Fort Tejon and 1906 San Francisco earthquakes mismatch both the rates and directions of GPS site motions in central California relative to the Pacific Plate. Neither thus explains the site motions southwest of the San Andreas fault, indicating that the site motions measure deformation across faults and folds outboard of the San Andreas Fault. The non-zero site velocities thus constitute strong evidence for active folding and faulting outboard from the creeping segment of the San Andreas Fault and suggest limits of 0-2 mm yr-1 for the Rinconada Fault slip rate and 1.8 ± 0.6 to 3.4 ± 0.4 mm yr-1 for the slip rates integrated across near-coastal faults such as the Hosgri, San Gregorio and San Simeon faults.

  10. Effects of Velocity-Slip and Viscosity Variation in Squeeze Film Lubrication of Two Circular Plates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R.R. Rao

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available A generalized form of Reynolds equation for two symmetrical surfaces is taken by considering velocity-slip at the bearing surfaces. This equation is applied to study the effects of velocity-slip and viscosity variation for the lubrication of squeeze films between two circular plates. Expressions for the load capacity and squeezing time obtained are also studied theoretically for various parameters. The load capacity and squeezing time decreases due to slip. They increase due to the presence of high viscous layer near the surface and decrease due to low viscous layer.

  11. Determination of the elastic and stiffness characteristics of cross-laminated timber plates from flexural wave velocity measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santoni, Andrea; Schoenwald, Stefan; Van Damme, Bart; Fausti, Patrizio

    2017-07-01

    Cross-laminated timber (CLT) is an engineered wood with good structural properties and it is also economically competitive with the traditional building construction materials. However, due to its low volume density combined with its high stiffness, it does not provide sufficient sound insulation, thus it is necessary to develop specific acoustic treatments in order to increase the noise reduction performance. The material's mechanical properties are required as input data to perform the vibro-acoustic analyses necessary during the design process. In this paper the elastic constants of a CLT plate are derived by fitting the real component of the experimental flexural wave velocity with Mindlin's dispersion relation for thick plates, neglecting the influence of the plate's size and boundary conditions. Furthermore, its apparent elastic and stiffness properties are derived from the same set of experimental data, for the plate considered to be thin. Under this latter assumption the orthotropic behaviour of an equivalent thin CLT plate is described by using an elliptic model and verified with experimental results.

  12. Non contact probing of interfacial stiffnesses between two plates by Zero-Group Velocity Lamb modes

    CERN Document Server

    Mezil, Sylvain; Royer, Daniel; Prada, Claire

    2014-01-01

    A non contact technique using Zero-Group Velocity (ZGV) Lamb modes is developed to probe the bonding between two solid plates coupled by a thin layer. The layer thickness is assumed to be negligible compared with the plate thickness and the acoustic wavelength. The coupling layer is modeled by a normal and a tangential spring to take into account the normal and shear interfacial stresses. Theoretical ZGV frequencies are determined for a symmetrical bi-layer structure and the effect of the interfacial stiffnesses on the cut-off and ZGV frequencies are evaluated. Experiments are conducted with two glass plates bonded by a drop of water, oil, or salol, leading to a few micrometer thick layer. An evaluation of normal and shear stiffnesses, is obtained using ZGV resonances locally excited and detected with laser ultrasonic techniques.

  13. Thermal-hydraulic behavior of physical quantities at critical velocities in a nuclear research reactor core channel using plate type fuel

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sidi Ali Kamel

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The thermal-hydraulic study presented here relates to a channel of a nuclear reactor core. This channel is defined as being the space between two fuel plates where a coolant fluid flows. The flow velocity of this coolant should not generate vibrations in fuel plates. The aim of this study is to know the distribution of the temperature in the fuel plates, in the cladding and in the coolant fluid at the critical velocities of Miller, of Wambsganss, and of Cekirge and Ural. The velocity expressions given by these authors are function of the geometry of the fuel plate, the mechanical characteristics of the fuel plate’s material and the thermal characteristics of the coolant fluid. The thermal-hydraulic study is made under steady-state; the equation set-up of the thermal problem is made according to El Wakil and to Delhaye. Once the equation set-up is validated, the three critical velocities are calculated and then used in the calculations of the different temperature profiles. The average heat flux and the critical heat flux are evaluated for each critical velocity and their ratio reported. The recommended critical velocity to be used in nuclear channel calculations is that of Wambsganss. The mathematical model used is more precise and all the physical quantities, when using this critical velocity, stay in safe margins.

  14. Experimental and analytical study of high velocity impact on Kevlar/Epoxy composite plates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sikarwar, Rahul; Velmurugan, Raman; Madhu, Velmuri

    2012-12-01

    In the present study, impact behavior of Kevlar/Epoxy composite plates has been carried out experimentally by considering different thicknesses and lay-up sequences and compared with analytical results. The effect of thickness, lay-up sequence on energy absorbing capacity has been studied for high velocity impact. Four lay-up sequences and four thickness values have been considered. Initial velocities and residual velocities are measured experimentally to calculate the energy absorbing capacity of laminates. Residual velocity of projectile and energy absorbed by laminates are calculated analytically. The results obtained from analytical study are found to be in good agreement with experimental results. It is observed from the study that 0/90 lay-up sequence is most effective for impact resistance. Delamination area is maximum on the back side of the plate for all thickness values and lay-up sequences. The delamination area on the back is maximum for 0/90/45/-45 laminates compared to other lay-up sequences.

  15. ANALYTICAL RELATIONS BETWEEN EIGENVALUES OF CIRCULAR PLATE BASED ON VARIOUS PLATE THEORIES

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2006-01-01

    Based on the mathematical similarity of the axisymmetric eigenvalue problems of a circular plate between the classical plate theory(CPT), the first-order shear deformation plate theory(FPT) and the Reddy's third-order shear deformation plate theory(RPT), analytical relations between the eigenvalues of circular plate based on various plate theories are investigated. In the present paper, the eigenvalue problem is transformed to solve an algebra equation. Analytical relationships that are expressed explicitly between various theories are presented. Therefore, from these relationships one can easily obtain the exact RPT and FPT solutions of critical buckling load and natural frequencyfor a circular plate with CPT solutions. The relationships are useful for engineering application, and can be used to check the validity, convergence and accuracy of numerical results for the eigenvalue problem of plates.

  16. Horizontal velocity field near the hot plate in turbulent natural convection

    CERN Document Server

    Koothur, Vipin

    2014-01-01

    We study the velocity field in a horizontal (x-y) plane 1.5 mm above the hot plate in turbulent natural convection using PIV at a Rayleigh number Raw=106 and Prandtl number Pr=5.2. The plane of measurement is inside the velocity boundary layer estimated from the natural convection boundary layer equations[7] as well as inside the velocity boundary layer due to the large scale flow[2, 5].The boundary layer comprises of line plumes with sinking fluid between them. The instantaneous velocity variation from the center of the sinking fluid to the line plumes is found to deviate with the classical Prandtl-Blasius laminar boundary layer profile, which is assumed to be the nature of boundary layer by the GL theory [2, 5]. Our results agree well with the natural convection boundary layer profile. The time averaged mean velocity variation deviates from both natural convection and Blasius type profiles as expected as it depends on the orientation of the line plumes. Our measurement result is a proof to the theory of the...

  17. High-Velocity Impact Behaviour of Prestressed Composite Plates under Bird Strike Loading

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sebastian Heimbs

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available An experimental and numerical analysis of the response of laminated composite plates under high-velocity impact loads of soft body gelatine projectiles (artificial birds is presented. The plates are exposed to tensile and compressive preloads before impact in order to cover realistic loading conditions of representative aeronautic structures under foreign object impact. The modelling methodology for the composite material, delamination interfaces, impact projectile, and preload using the commercial finite element code Abaqus are presented in detail. Finally, the influence of prestress and of different delamination modelling approaches on the impact response is discussed and a comparison to experimental test data is given. Tensile and compressive preloading was found to have an influence on the damage pattern. Although this general behaviour could be predicted well by the simulations, further numerical challenges for improved bird strike simulation accuracy are highlighted.

  18. Relations between plate kinematics, slab geometry and overriding plate deformation in subduction zones: insights from statistical observations and laboratory modelling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heuret, A.; Funiciello, F.; Faccenna, C.; Lallemand, S.

    2005-12-01

    3-D laboratory models have been performed in order to investigate the way plates kinematics (subducting and overriding plate absolute motions and the resulting plate convergence rate) influences the geometry of the slab and the overriding plate deformation in subduction zones. In the experiments a viscous plate of silicone (subducting plate) is pushed beneath another plate, which is itself pushed toward or pulled away from the trench (overriding plate), and sinks into a viscous layer of glucose syrup (upper mantle). The subducting and overriding plate velocities explored the variability field of natural subduction plates kinematics. The overriding plate motion exerts a primary role in the control of slab geometries and overriding plate deformation rates. The experiments have revealed two different subduction behaviours: (Style I) the overriding plate moves toward the trench and shortens at high rates, the slab is flat and deflected when reaching the bottom of the box in a forward direction; (Style II) the overriding plates moves away from the trench and shortens at low rates the slab is steep and deflected on the box bottom in a backward direction. To a lesser extent, increasing subducting plate motion is associated to increasing slab dips and overriding plate shortening. Slab geometry and overriding plate deformation are less sensitive to the overall plate convergence rate. These laboratory models behaviours are consistent with statistical analysis performed on natural subduction zones, and enlighten the first order control exerted by the overriding plate absolute motion, on the geometry adopted by the slab and the way the overriding plate deforms.

  19. Cavitation on a semicircular leading-edge plate and NACA0015 hydrofoil: Visualization and velocity measurement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kravtsova, A. Yu.; Markovich, D. M.; Pervunin, K. S.; Timoshevskii, M. V.; Hanjalić, K.

    2014-12-01

    Using high-speed visualization and particle image velocimetry (PIV), cavitating flows near a plane plate with a rounded leading edge and NACA0015 hydrofoil at angles of attack from 0° to 9° are studied. In the experiments, several known types of cavitation, as well as some differences, were detected with variation of the cavitation number. In particular, at small angles of attack (up to 3°), cavitation on the plate appears in the form of a streak array; on the hydrofoil, it appears in the form of individual bubbles. For the NACA0015 hydrofoil, isolated and intermittent streaks are divided and grow in regimes with developed cavitation; then, however, they merge in bubble clouds and form an extremely regular cellular structure. With an increase in the angle of attack to 9°, the structure of the cavitation cavity on the hydrofoil is changed by the streak structure, like in the case with the plate. In this work, it is shown that PIV permits one to measure the velocity in cavitating flows, in particular, within the gas-vapor phase. It was established from the analysis of distributions of the average flow velocity and moments of velocity fluctuations that the cavitation generation is caused by the development of the carrier fluid flow near the leading edge of the hydrofoil. Down the stream, however, the flow structure strongly depends on the cavitation regime, which is seen from the comparison of the distributions with the case of a single-phase flow. The presented measurements qualitatively verify general trends and show some quantitative distinctions for the two considered flowpast bodies.

  20. Seismic velocity structure of the Juan de Fuca and Gorda plates revealed by a joint inversion of ambient noise and regional earthquakes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Haiying

    2016-05-01

    The crust and upper mantle seismic structure, spanning from the Juan de Fuca and Gorda spreading centers to the Cascade back arc, is imaged with full-wave propagation simulation and a joint inversion of ambient noise and regional earthquake recordings. The spreading centers have anomalously low shear wave velocity beneath the oceanic lithosphere. Around the Cobb axial seamount, we observe a low-velocity anomaly underlying a relatively thin oceanic lithosphere, indicating its influence on the Juan de Fuca ridge. The oceanic Moho is clearly defined by a P velocity increase from 6.3 km/s to 7.5 km/s at about 6 km depth beneath the seafloor. The thickness of the oceanic plates is less than 40 km prior to subduction, and the structure of the oceanic lithosphere varies both along strike and along dip. Farther landward, very low velocity anomalies are observed above the plate interface along the Cascade fore arc, indicative of subducted sediments.

  1. Supersonic Relative Velocity Effect on the Baryonic Acoustic Oscillation Measurements

    CERN Document Server

    Yoo, Jaiyul; Seljak, Uros

    2011-01-01

    We investigate the effect of supersonic relative velocities between baryons and dark matter, recently shown to arise generically at high redshift, on baryonic acoustic oscillation (BAO) measurements at low redshift. The amplitude of the relative velocity effect at low redshift is model-dependent, but can be parameterized by using an unknown bias. We find that if unaccounted, the relative velocity effect can shift the BAO peak position and bias estimates of the dark energy equation-of-state due to its non-smooth, out-of-phase oscillation structure around the BAO scale. Fortunately, the relative velocity effect can be easily modeled in constraining cosmological parameters without substantially inflating the error budget. We also demonstrate that the presence of the relative velocity effect gives rise to a unique signature in the galaxy bispectrum, which can be utilized to isolate this effect. Future dark energy surveys can accurately measure the relative velocity effect and subtract it from the power spectrum a...

  2. Shed Vortex Structure and Phase-Averaged Velocity Statistics in Symmetric/Asymmetric Turbulent Flat Plate Wakes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rai, Man Mohan

    2017-01-01

    The near wake of a flat plate is investigated via direct numerical simulations (DNS). Many earlier experimental investigations have used thin plates with sharp trailing edges and turbulent boundary layers to create the wake. This results in large theta divided by D (sub TE) values (theta is the boundary layer momentum thickness towards the end of the plate and D (sub TE) is the trailing edge thickness). In the present study the emphasis is on relatively thick plates with circular trailing edges (CTE) resulting in theta divided by D values less than one (D is the plate thickness and the diameter of the CTE), and vigorous vortex shedding. The Reynolds numbers based on the plate length and D are 1.255 x 10 (sup 6) and 10,000, respectively. Two cases are computed; one with turbulent boundary layers on both the upper and lower surfaces of the plate (statistically the same, symmetric wake, Case TT) and, a second with turbulent and laminar boundary layers on the upper and lower surfaces, respectively (asymmetric case, Case TL). The data and understanding obtained is of considerable engineering interest, particularly in turbomachinery where the pressure side of an airfoil can remain laminar or transitional because of a favorable pressure gradient and the suction side is turbulent. Shed-vortex structure and phase-averaged velocity statistics obtained in the two cases are compared here. The upper negative shed vortices in Case TL (turbulent separating boundary layer) are weaker than the lower positive ones (laminar separating boundary layer) at inception (a factor 1.27 weaker in terms of peak phase-averaged spanwise vorticity at first appearance of a peak). The upper vortices weaken rapidly as they travel downstream. A second feature of interest in Case TL is a considerable increase in the peak phase-averaged, streamwise normal intensity (random component) with increasing streamwise distance (x divided by D) that occurs nears the positive vortex cores. This behavior is

  3. Failure characteristics of a thin metallic sandwich plate with metallic sheared dimple cores under low-velocity impact loading

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ahn, Dong Gyu; Jeong, Woo Chul [Chosun University, Gwangju (Korea, Republic of)

    2013-10-15

    The functionality and the performance of a lightweight sandwich plate with periodic cellular metal (PCM) cores are influenced by failure characteristics of the lightweight sandwich plate. The goal of this paper is to investigate the failure characteristics of a thin metallic sandwich plate with metallic sheared dimple cores under low-velocity impact loading through nonlinear finite element analysis. The influence of the imperfection mode of the cores on the impact response of a thin sandwich plate is examined to obtain a proper simulation model. Repeated finite element analyses are performed to examine the failure modes of the sandwich plate for different impact conditions. Normalized impact parameters are defined in order to generalize a dynamic failure map (DFM). DFMs of the thin metallic sandwich plate have been estimated via the regression analysis of critical impact conditions for each failure mode. In addition, the influence of the normalized impact parameters on the failure mode has been investigated using the DFM.

  4. An improved car-following model considering relative velocity fluctuation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Shaowei; Shi, Zhongke

    2016-07-01

    To explore and evaluate the impacts of relative velocity fluctuation on the dynamic characteristics and fuel consumptions of traffic flow, we present an improved car-following model considering relative velocity fluctuation based on the full velocity difference model, then we carry out several numerical simulations to determine the optimal time window length and to explore how relative velocity fluctuation affects cars' velocity and its fluctuation as well as fuel consumptions. It can be found that the improved car-following model can describe the phase transition of traffic flow and estimate the evolution of traffic congestion, and that taking relative velocity fluctuation into account in designing the advanced adaptive cruise control strategy can improve the traffic flow stability and reduce fuel consumptions.

  5. A fast microchannel plate-scintillator detector for velocity map imaging and imaging mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winter, B; King, S J; Brouard, M; Vallance, C

    2014-02-01

    The time resolution achievable using standard position-sensitive ion detectors, consisting of a chevron pair of microchannel plates coupled to a phosphor screen, is primarily limited by the emission lifetime of the phosphor, around 70 ns for the most commonly used P47 phosphor. We demonstrate that poly-para-phenylene laser dyes may be employed extremely effectively as scintillators, exhibiting higher brightness and much shorter decay lifetimes than P47. We provide an extensive characterisation of the properties of such scintillators, with a particular emphasis on applications in velocity-map imaging and microscope-mode imaging mass spectrometry. The most promising of the new scintillators exhibits an electron-to-photon conversion efficiency double that of P47, with an emission lifetime an order of magnitude shorter. The new scintillator screens are vacuum stable and show no signs of signal degradation even over longer periods of operation.

  6. Lorentz invariant relative velocity and relativistic binary collisions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cannoni, Mirco

    2017-01-01

    This paper reviews the concept of Lorentz invariant relative velocity that is often misunderstood or unknown in high energy physics literature. The properties of the relative velocity allow to formulate the invariant flux and cross-section without recurring to nonphysical velocities or any assumption about the reference frame. Applications such as the luminosity of a collider, the use as kinematic variable, and the statistical theory of collisions in a relativistic classical gas are reviewed. It is emphasized how the hyperbolic properties of the velocity space explain the peculiarities of relativistic scattering.

  7. Lorentz invariant relative velocity and relativistic binary collisions

    CERN Document Server

    Cannoni, Mirco

    2016-01-01

    This article reviews the concept of Lorentz invariant relative velocity that is often misunderstood or unknown in high energy physics literature. The properties of the relative velocity allow to formulate the invariant flux and cross section without recurring to non--physical velocities or any assumption about the reference frame. Applications such as the luminosity of a collider, the use as kinematic variable, and the statistical theory of collisions in a relativistic classical gas are reviewed. It is emphasized how the hyperbolic properties of the velocity space explain the peculiarities of relativistic scattering.

  8. Prediction of Velocity and Deformation Fields During Multipass Plate Hot Rolling by Novel Mixed Analytical-Numerical Met%Prediction of Velocity and Deformation Fields During Multipass Plate Hot Rolling by Novel Mixed Analytical-Numerical Me

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG Jin-ling; CUI Zhen-shan

    2011-01-01

    An integrated mathematical model is proposed to predict the velocity field and strain distribution during multi-pass plate hot rolling. This model is a part of the mixed analytical-numerical method (ANM) aiming at predic- tion of deformation variables, te

  9. RELATIVE MOTION AND DEFORMATION OF PACIFIC PLATE FROM SPACE GEODESY

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    JinShuanggen; ZhuWenyao

    2003-01-01

    The circum-Pacific tectonic system that contains of convergent, divergent and transform boundaries, is the most active region of volcanoes and earthquakes in the world, and involves many important theoretical questions in geosciences. The relative motion and deformation of Pacific plate is still an active subject of research. In this note, we analyze the deformation of Pacific plate and obtain reliable results of the relative motion rates at the circum-Pacific boundaries based on space geodetic data, which reveals the present-day motion characteristics of Pacific plate.

  10. An Analytical Solution of the Potential Velocity Field Induced by a Growing Bubble from a Plate Orifice

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZhiTao; NingKang

    1993-01-01

    An analytical solution is derived with the mirror image method of the velocity field of an inviscid liquid induced by a growing bubble from a plate orifice.The flow is assumed potential,and the bubble shape is idealised as sphercal.In deriving the motion equation,the spherical image of a point source,which is a combination of a point source and a line source,is proved approximate to a double source,This approximation enables continuation of the effectiveness of mirror image method to the case studied in this paper.The derived velocity potential equation is verified for the boundary conditions on the bubble surface and the orifice plate.The streamlines of the velocity field are presented and compared with experimental results in the literature.

  11. Flux-Velocity Relation for H2 Outflows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salas, Luis; Cruz-González, Irene

    2002-06-01

    We present an analysis of velocity-resolved near-IR molecular hydrogen observations of a variety of protostellar outflows with very different energetics, degrees of collimation, and morphologies. Observations in the 2.12 μm line of H2 were obtained using an IR Fabry-Pérot interferometer with a spectral resolution of 23 km s-1. The integrated flux-velocity diagrams for each outflow show a flat spectrum for low velocities followed by a decreasing power law dF/dv~vγ, with γ between -1.8 and -2.6, for velocities higher than a clearly defined break velocity at 2-17 km s-1. Contrary to shock model predictions, it is shown that the H2 intensity is constant with velocity. We argue that the flux-velocity relation can then be interpreted as a mass-velocity relation, in striking similarity to the power-law mass spectra observed in CO outflows. By comparing H2 and CO mass-velocity spectra, it is shown that there is a velocity regime in which both molecules coexist and produce similar γ-values. Evolution effects in outflows appear as a correlation between outflow length and γ as outflows age, the spectra becomes steeper. Our results support a common physical origin for both CO and H2 emission and a strong association between the molecular outflows traced in each molecule. Based on observations obtained at the Observatorio Astronómico Nacional at San Pedro Mártir, Mexico.

  12. Test and Numerical Analysis for Penetration Residual Velocity of Bullet Considering Failure Strain Uncertainty of Composite Plates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cha, Myungseok; Lee, Minhyung [Sejong Univ., Sejong (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-03-15

    The ballistic performance data of composite materials is distributed due to material inhomogeneity. In this paper, the uncertainty in residual velocity is obtained experimentally, and a method of predicting it is established numerically for the high-speed impact of a bullet into laminated composites. First, the failure strain distribution was obtained by conducting a tensile test using 10 specimens. Next, a ballistic impact test was carried out for the impact of a fragment-simulating projectile (FSP) bullet with 4ply ([0/90]s) and 8ply ([0/90/0/90]s) glass fiber reinforced plastic (GFRP) plates. Eighteen shots were made at the same impact velocity and the residual velocities were obtained. Finally, simulations were conducted to predict the residual velocities by using the failure strain distributions that were obtained from the tensile test. For this simulation, two impact velocities were chosen at 411.7m/s (4ply) and 592.5m/s (8ply). The simulation results show that the predicted residual velocities are in close agreement with test results. Additionally, the modeling of a composite plate with layered solid elements requires less calculation time than modeling with solid elements.

  13. The Effect of the Relative Velocity on Traffic Flow

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    XUE Yu; DONG Li-Yun; YUAN Yi-Wu; DAI Shi-Qiang

    2002-01-01

    The optimal velocity model of traffc is extended to take the relative velocity into account. The traffcbehavior is investigated numerically and analytically with this model. It is shown that the car interaction with therelative velocity can effect the stability of the traffic flow and raise critical density. The jamming transition between thefreely moving and jamming phases is investigated with the linear stability analysis and nonlinear perturbation methods.The traffic jam is described by the kink solution of the modified Korteweg-de Vries equation. The theoretical result isin good agreement with the simulation.

  14. The compact capacitor bank CQ-1.5 employed in magnetically driven isentropic compression and high velocity flyer plate experiments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Guiji; Sun, Chengwei; Tan, Fuli; Zhao, Jianheng; Zhang, Ning; Liu, Cangli; Mo, Jianjun; Wang, Ganghua; Wang, Xiaosong

    2008-05-01

    Based on the low inductance capacitor, the parallel-plate transmission line, and the explosive network closing switch, a compact pulsed power generator CQ-1.5 has been developed at the Institute of Fluid Physics and is capable to deliver a current of peak of 1.5 MA within rise time of 500-570 ns into a 2-3 nH inductive load. The work is motivated to do isentropic compression experiments (ICEs) on metals up to 30-50 GPa and to launch flyer plates at velocities over 8 kms. The experiments were conducted with the diagnostics of both Doppler pin system and velocity interferometer system for any reflectors, and the measured free surface velocity histories of ICE samples were treated with a backward integration code. The results show that the isentropes of Cu and Al samples under 35 GPa are close to their Hugoniots within a deviation of 3%. The LY12 aluminum flyer plates were accelerated to a velocity over 8.96 kms.

  15. A multi-plate velocity-map imaging design for high-resolution photoelectron spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kregel, Steven J.; Thurston, Glen K.; Zhou, Jia; Garand, Etienne

    2017-09-01

    A velocity map imaging (VMI) setup consisting of multiple electrodes with three adjustable voltage parameters, designed for slow electron velocity map imaging applications, is presented. The motivations for this design are discussed in terms of parameters that influence the VMI resolution and functionality. Particularly, this VMI has two tunable potentials used to adjust for optimal focus, yielding good VMI focus across a relatively large energy range. It also allows for larger interaction volumes without significant sacrifice to the resolution via a smaller electric gradient at the interaction region. All the electrodes in this VMI have the same dimensions for practicality and flexibility, allowing for relatively easy modifications to suit different experimental needs. We have coupled this VMI to a cryogenic ion trap mass spectrometer that has a flexible source design. The performance is demonstrated with the photoelectron spectra of S- and CS2 -. The latter has a long vibrational progression in the ground state, and the temperature dependence of the vibronic features is probed by changing the temperature of the ion trap.

  16. Relative Motion between the Rivera and North American Plates: Constraints from Focal Mechanisms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suárez, Gerardo; Jaramillo, Said H.; Bandy, William

    2010-05-01

    The direction and velocity of the Rivera Plate in western Mexico relative to the North American plate has been a source of controversy. The southeastern segment of this plate boundary has been the site of one of the largest subduction events observed in Mexico during the last 100 years: the 3 June 1932 earthquake (Mw 8.2). To the northwest of the rupture zone of the 1932 event, however, there are no other known large subduction events, either from the historical or instrumental record. We analyze all focal mechanisms in this northern segment of the plate boundary to define the direction of relative motion between these two plates. The largest event occurred beneath the Tres Marias Escarpment, the earthquake of 4 December 1948. The recomputed magnitude yields Mw 6.4. This event caused widespread damage in a penal colony on the Tres Marias Islands. Although the focal mechanism of the 1948 event is not well constrained, the first arrival data collected shows reverse faulting with P axes oriented in a NE-SW direction. This mechanism coincides with other two fault plane solutions of more recent events. These mechanisms indicate reverse faulting beneath the Tres Marias Escarpment. To the northwest of the Islas Marias, in area where no clear physiographic feature defines the plate limits, we identify a group of strike-slip events, where the E-W trending nodal plane indicates right-lateral motion. These mechanisms suggest that the relative motion between Rivera and North America may be taken up by right-lateral strike slip motion. The accuracy of the locations does not allow to define in detail the geometry of this plate boundary. The slip vectors determined from these focal mechanisms are compared with the flow lines resulting from the various poles of relative motion between Rivera and North America to constrain its location.

  17. STUDY ON THE RESPONSE TO LOW-VELOCITY IMPACT OF A COMPOSITE PLATE IMPROVED BY SHAPE MEMORY ALLOY

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ying Wu; Yongdong Wu; Yuanxun Wang; Weifang Zhong

    2007-01-01

    Improvement from the pseudo-elastic effect of shape memory alloy (SMA) on the low-velocity impact (LVI) resistance of a composite plate is investigated by the finite element method (FEM). The stiffness matrix of the dynamic finite element equation is established step by step and the martensite fraction is obtained at each time step. The direct Newmark integration method is employed in solving the dynamic finite element equation, while the impact contact force is determined using the modified Hertz's law. It is found that SMA can effectively improve the performance of a composite structure subjected to low-velocity impact. Numerical results show that the deflection of a SMA-hybrid composite plate has been reduced approximately by thirty percent when the volume fraction of the embedded SMA reaches 0.3.

  18. Concepts about Relations among Time, Distance and Velocity In Children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsuda, F.; And Others

    Almost all experimental investigations on concepts of time (T), distance (D) and velocity (V) since 1946 have been based on the Piagetian theory. However, there are several controversial points in Piaget's investigations. In the experiment described in this paper, developmental changes of concepts concerning relation of T, D, and V were examined…

  19. Porosity and Velocity Relations of Grosmont Formation, Alberta, Canada

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keehm, Y.; Hu, D.

    2010-12-01

    We present results on porosty-velocity relations of Grosmont formation, Alberta, Canada, which is one of largest bitumen carbonate reservoirs. Grosmont formation is divided into four units: LG; UG-1; UG-2; and UG-3 from the bottom. Two lower units are mainly imestone, while upper units are mostly dolomite with vuggy porosity and fractures, which makes the upper units be a good reservoir. Rock physics modeling was then performed to quantify porosity-velocity relations for the four units, which enables us to predict porosity from seismic data. To incorporate the pore-scale details in the modeling, we used DEM (differential effective medium) models. Two lower units are very similar in velocity-porosity domain, thus the relations can be represented by one velocity-porosity model, which is used as our reference model. For the UG-2 unit, we found that one model cannot represent the unit since the degree of fracturing are heterogeneous from location to location. We thus suggested three different DEM models for the UG-2 unit: vuggy-dominant; mildly-fractured; and heavily-fractured. The UG-3 units can be modeled with vuggy porosity, and fractures were not very noticeable. We also investigated the spatial variation of the UG-2 unit, and found that the degree of fracturing is generally proportional to the proximity to the unconformity boundary, where the fresh water invasion can be dominant. In conclusion, we proposed velocity-porosity relations for the four units in Grosmont formation, and believe that these models can help to characterize the reservoir quality. In addition, since the proximity of reservoir to the unconformity boundary highly affects the degree of fracturing, a careful analysis of spatial variation would be essential for the successful characterization of Grosmont formation. Acknowledgement: This work was supported by the Energy R&D program of the Korea Institute of Energy Technology Evaluation and Planning (KETEP) grant funded by the Korea government

  20. Aero-servo-viscoelasticity theory: Lifting surfaces, plates, velocity transients, flutter, and instability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Merrett, Craig G.

    indicates that the flutter condition should be taken when simple harmonic motion occurs and certain additional velocity derivatives are satisfied. 3. The viscoelastic material behavior imposes a flutter time indicating that the presence of flutter should be verified for the entire life time of a flight vehicle. 4. An expanded definition for instability of a lifting surface or panel. Traditionally, instability is treated as a static phenomenon. The static case is only a limiting case of dynamic instability for a viscoelastic structure. Instability occurs when a particular combination of flight velocity and time are reached leading to growing displacements of the structure. 5. The inclusion of flight velocity transients that occur during maneuvers. Two- and three-dimensional unsteady incompressible and compressible aerodynamics were reformulated for a time dependent velocity. The inclusion of flight velocity transients does affect the flutter and instability conditions for a lifting surface and a panel. The applications of aero-servo-viscoelasticity are to aircraft design, wind turbine blades, submarine's stealth coatings and hulls, and land transportation to name a few examples. One caveat regarding this field of research is that general predictions for an application are not always possible as the stability of a structure depends on the phase relations between the various parameters such as mass, stiffness, damping, and the aerodynamic loads. The viscoelastic material parameters in particular alter the system parameters in directions that are difficult to predict. The inclusion of servo controls permits an additional design factor and can improve the performance of a structure beyond the native performance; however over-control is possible so a maximum limit to useful control does exist. Lastly, the number of material and control parameters present in aero-servo-viscoelasticity are amenable to optimization protocols to produce the optimal structure for a given mission.

  1. Double seismic zone of the Nazca plate in northern Chile: High-resolution velocity structure, petrological implications, and thermomechanical modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dorbath, Catherine; Gerbault, Muriel; Carlier, Gabriel; Guiraud, Michel

    2008-07-01

    This paper presents an interdisciplinary study of the northern Chile double seismic zone. First, a high-resolution velocity structure of the subducting Nazca plate has been obtained by the tomoDD double-difference tomography method. The double seismic zone (DSZ) is observed between 80 and 140 km depth, and the two seismic planes is 20 km apart. Then, the chemical and petrologic characteristics of the oceanic lithosphere associated with this DSZ are deduced by using current thermal-petrological-seismological models and are compared to pressure-temperature conditions provided by a numerical thermomechanical model. Our results agree with the common hypothesis that seismicity in both upper and lower planes is related to fluid releases associated with metamorphic dehydration reactions. In the seismic upper plane located within the upper crust, these reactions would affect material of basaltic (MORB) composition and document different metamorphic reactions occurring within high-P (>2.4 GPa) and low-T (130 km), lawsonite-amphibole eclogite conditions. The lower plane lying in the oceanic mantle can be associated with serpentinite dehydration reactions. The Vp and Vs characteristics of the region in between both planes are consistent with a partially (˜25-30 vol % antigorite, ˜0-10% vol % brucite, and ˜4-10 vol % chlorite) hydrated harzburgitic material. Discrepancies persist that we attribute to complexities inherent to heterogeneous structural compositions. While various geophysical indicators evidence particularly cold conditions in both the descending Nazca plate and the continental fore arc, thermomechanical models indicate that both seismic planes delimit the inner slab compressional zone around the 400°C (±50°C) isotherm. Lower plane earthquakes are predicted to occur in the slab's flexural neutral plane, where fluids released from surrounding metamorphic reactions could accumulate and trigger seismicity. Fluids migrating upward from the tensile zone below

  2. The weakly non-linear density-velocity relation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chodorowski, Michal J.; Lokas, Ewa L.

    1997-05-01

    We rigorously derive up to third order in perturbation theory the weakly non-linear relation between the cosmic density and velocity fields. The density field is described by the mass density contrast, delta. The velocity field is described by the variable theta proportional to the velocity divergence, theta=-f (Omega)^-1H ^-1_0∇. v, where f (Omega)~=Omega^0.6, Omega is the cosmological density parameter and H_0 is the Hubble constant. Our calculations show that mean delta given theta is a third-order polynomial in theta, --_theta=a _1theta+a_2(theta ^2-sigma^2_theta)+ a_3theta^3. This result constitutes an extension of the formula --_theta=theta+a _2(theta^2-sigma^2 _theta) found by Bernardeau which involved second-order perturbative solutions. Third-order perturbative corrections introduce the cubic term. They also, however, cause the coefficient a_1 to depart from unity, in contrast with the linear theory prediction. We compute the values of the coefficients a_p for scale-free power spectra, as well as for standard cold dark matter (CDM), for Gaussian smoothing. The coefficients obey a hierarchy a_3Ganon et al. The results provide a method for breaking the Omega-bias degeneracy in comparisons of cosmic density and velocity fields such as IRAS-potent.

  3. Velocity kinematic relations in decaying turbulent flow past a grid

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gurka, R.; Kopp, G.; Liberzon, A.; Sarathi, P.; Tsinober, A.

    Three recent publications1-3 stressed out that some kinematic relations of velocity increments Δ u_i = u_i (x + r) - u_i (x) comprise a manifestation of nonlocal effects, e.g. large and small scale quantities are correlated. This feature invalidates the so-called random sweeping hypothesis that large and small scales are statistically independent. It is noteworthy that, pure kinematic relations that emphasize the non-local effects thereby become dynamically significant. Some kinematic relations could be used for the validation of experimental results.

  4. Velocity kinematic relations in a turbulent flow past a grid

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liberzon, Alex; Gurka, Roi; Kopp, Gregory; Sarathi, Partha; Tsinober, Arkady

    2009-11-01

    We present velocity kinematic relations, involving average and difference of the longitudinal velocity component of the two points at distance r: u+= u(x+r) + u(x) and u-= u(x+r)-u(x), obtained using PIV measurements in a turbulent flow of water past a grid. The present study follows recent numerical and experimental studies, that demonstrated analytical and empirical evidence of the relations, their validity and it emphasizes the physical meaning of the relations. The relations that contain both the large (u+) and small (u-) scale quantities emphasize the non-local aspects of turbulent flows. For example, the pure kinematic relation of Hosokawa in conjunction with the the Kolmogorov 4/5 law leading to the = r/30 shows that the that the large and small scale quantities are correlated contrary to what is suggested by the commonly used sweeping decorrelation hypothesis. Some relations are purely kinematic and some are dynamic, i.e. involving , like the Kolmogorov 4/5 law. The most important aspect is that pure kinematic relations that emphasize the non-local effects, become dynamically significant. Furthermore, we suggest that many of these relations could be used for validation of experimental results.

  5. Special relativity with an arbitrary limiting velocity of particle

    CERN Document Server

    Parvan, A S

    2012-01-01

    It is shown that a generalized special theory of relativity (GSTR) with an arbitrary limiting velocity of particle different or equal to the speed of light in vacuum can be constructed from the canonical equation of the 4-dimensional hyperboloid of revolution. In particular, when the limiting velocity equals the speed of light, the special theory of relativity (STR), which corresponds to the equation of the equilateral hyperboloid of revolution, is recovered. The (generalized) Lorentz transformations were obtained. It was established that the rest mass of a space-like particle is real. Our results strongly suggest that the muon neutrino in the OPERA experiment is most likely a time-like or a light-like superluminal particle, whose limiting velocity may exceed the speed of light in vacuum, rather than a superluminal space-like particle (tachyon) with a speed limit equal to speed of light for which the rest mass $mc^{2}=117.1^{+11.0}_{-10.5}$ MeV.

  6. Combined Effect of Surface Roughness and Slip Velocity on Jenkins Model Based Magnetic Squeeze Film in Curved Rough Circular Plates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jimit R. Patel

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper aims to discuss the effect of slip velocity and surface roughness on the performance of Jenkins model based magnetic squeeze film in curved rough circular plates. The upper plate’s curvature parameter is governed by an exponential expression while a hyperbolic form describes the curvature of lower plates. The stochastic model of Christensen and Tonder has been adopted to study the effect of transverse surface roughness of the bearing surfaces. Beavers and Joseph’s slip model has been employed here. The associated Reynolds type equation is solved to obtain the pressure distribution culminating in the calculation of load carrying capacity. The computed results show that the Jenkins model modifies the performance of the bearing system as compared to Neuringer-Rosensweig model, but this model provides little support to the negatively skewed roughness for overcoming the adverse effect of standard deviation and slip velocity even if curvature parameters are suitably chosen. This study establishes that for any type of improvement in the performance characteristics the slip parameter is required to be reduced even if variance (−ve occurs and suitable magnetic strength is in force.

  7. Influence of slip velocity in Herschel-Bulkley fluid flow between parallel plates - A mathematical study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sankar, D. S. [Universiti Teknologi Brunei, Bandar Seri Begawan (Brunei Darussalam); Lee, U Sik [Inha University, Incheon (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-07-15

    This theoretical study investigates three types of basic flows of viscous incompressible Herschel-Bulkley fluid such as (i) plane Couette flow, (ii) Poiseuille flow and (iii) generalized Couette flow with slip velocity at the boundary. The analytic solutions to the nonlinear boundary value problems have been obtained. The effects of various physical parameters on the velocity, flow rate, wall shear stress and frictional resistance to flow are analyzed through appropriate graphs. It is observed that in plane Poiseuille flow and generalized Couette flow, the velocity and flow rate of the fluid increase considerably with the increase of the slip parameter, power law index, pressure gradient. The fluid velocity is significantly higher in plane Poiseuille flow than in plane Couette flow. The wall shear stress and frictional resistance to flow decrease considerably with the increase of the power law index and increase significantly with the increase of the yield stress of the fluid. The wall shear stress and frictional resistance to flow are considerably higher in plane Poiseuille flow than in generalized Couette flow.

  8. 77 FR 20846 - Certain Food Containers, Cups, Plates, Cutlery, and Related Items and Packaging Thereof...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-04-06

    ... COMMISSION Certain Food Containers, Cups, Plates, Cutlery, and Related Items and Packaging Thereof... importation of certain food containers, cups, plates, cutlery, and related items and packaging thereof by... importation of certain food containers, cups, plates, cutlery, and related items and packaging thereof...

  9. The Relation Between Halo Shape, Velocity Dispersion and Formation Time

    CERN Document Server

    Ragone-Figueroa, C; Merchan, M; Gottlober, S; Yepes, G

    2010-01-01

    We use dark matter haloes identified in the MareNostrum Universe and galaxy groups identified in the Sloan Data Release 7 galaxy catalogue, to study the relation between halo shape and halo dynamics, parametrizing out the mass of the systems. A strong shape-dynamics, independent of mass, correlation is present in the simulation data, which we find it to be due to different halo formation times. Early formation time haloes are, at the present epoch, more spherical and have higher velocity dispersions than late forming-time haloes. The halo shape-dynamics correlation, albeit weaker, survives the projection in 2D (ie., among projected shape and 1-D velocity dispersion). A similar shape-dynamics correlation, independent of mass, is also found in the SDSS DR7 groups of galaxies and in order to investigate its cause we have tested and used, as a proxy of the group formation time, a concentration parameter. We have found, as in the case of the simulated haloes, that less concentrated groups, corresponding to late fo...

  10. The velocity-density relation in the spherical model

    CERN Document Server

    Bilicki, Maciej

    2008-01-01

    We study the cosmic velocity-density relation using the spherical collapse model (SCM) as a proxy to non-linear dynamics. Although the dependence of this relation on cosmological parameters is known to be weak, we retain the density parameter Omega_m in SCM equations, in order to study the limit Omega_m -> 0. We show that in this regime the considered relation is strictly linear, for arbitrary values of the density contrast, on the contrary to some claims in the literature. On the other hand, we confirm that for realistic values of Omega_m the exact relation in the SCM is well approximated by the classic formula of Bernardeau (1992), both for voids (delta<0) and for overdensities up to delta ~ 3. Inspired by this fact, we find further analytic approximations to the relation for the whole range delta from -1 to infinity. Our formula for voids accounts for the weak Omega_m-dependence of their maximal rate of expansion, which for Omega_m < 1 is slightly smaller that 3/2. For positive density contrasts, we ...

  11. The Force-Velocity Relation for Growing Biopolymers

    CERN Document Server

    Carlsson, A E

    2000-01-01

    The process of force generation by the growth of biopolymers is simulated via a Langevin-dynamics approach. The interaction forces are taken to have simple forms that favor the growth of straight fibers from solution. The force-velocity relation is obtained from the simulations for two versions of the monomer-monomer force field. It is found that the growth rate drops off more rapidly with applied force than expected from the simplest theories based on thermal motion of the obstacle. The discrepancies amount to a factor of three or more when the applied force exceeds 2.5kT/a, where a is the step size for the polymer growth. These results are explained on the basis of restricted diffusion of monomers near the fiber tip. It is also found that the mobility of the obstacle has little effect on the growth rate, over a broad range.

  12. Axial dispersion, holdup and slip velocity of dispersed phase in a pulsed sieve plate extraction column by radiotracer residence time distribution analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Din, Ghiyas Ud [Department of Nuclear Engineering, Pakistan Institute of Engineering and Applied Sciences (PIEAS), P.O. Nilore, Islamabad (Pakistan); Isotope Applications Division, Pakistan Institute of Nuclear Science and Technology (PINSTECH), P.O. Nilore, Islamabad (Pakistan)], E-mail: fac192@pieas.edu.pk; Chughtai, Imran Rafiq; Inayat, Mansoor Hameed [Department of Chemical and Materials Engineering, Pakistan Institute of Engineering and Applied Sciences (PIEAS), P.O. Nilore, Islamabad (Pakistan); Khan, Iqbal Hussain [Isotope Applications Division, Pakistan Institute of Nuclear Science and Technology (PINSTECH), P.O. Nilore, Islamabad (Pakistan)

    2008-12-15

    Axial dispersion, holdup and slip velocity of dispersed phase have been investigated for a range of dispersed and continuous phase superficial velocities in a pulsed sieve plate extraction column using radiotracer residence time distribution (RTD) analysis. Axial dispersion model (ADM) was used to simulate the hydrodynamics of the system. It has been observed that increase in dispersed phase superficial velocity results in a decrease in its axial dispersion and increase in its slip velocity while its holdup increases till a maximum asymptotic value is achieved. An increase in superficial velocity of continuous phase increases the axial dispersion and holdup of dispersed phase until a maximum value is obtained, while slip velocity of dispersed phase is found to decrease in the beginning and then it increases with increase in superficial velocity of continuous phase.

  13. Comprehensive observation and modeling of earthquake and temperature-related seismic velocity changes in northern Chile with passive image interferometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richter, Tom; Sens-Schönfelder, Christoph; Kind, Rainer; Asch, Günter

    2014-06-01

    We report on earthquake and temperature-related velocity changes in high-frequency autocorrelations of ambient noise data from seismic stations of the Integrated Plate Boundary Observatory Chile project in northern Chile. Daily autocorrelation functions are analyzed over a period of 5 years with passive image interferometry. A short-term velocity drop recovering after several days to weeks is observed for the Mw 7.7 Tocopilla earthquake at most stations. At the two stations PB05 and PATCX, we observe a long-term velocity decrease recovering over the course of around 2 years. While station PB05 is located in the rupture area of the Tocopilla earthquake, this is not the case for station PATCX. Station PATCX is situated in an area influenced by salt sediment in the vicinity of Salar Grande and presents a superior sensitivity to ground acceleration and periodic surface-induced changes. Due to this high sensitivity, we observe a velocity response of several regional earthquakes at PATCX, and we can show for the first time a linear relationship between the amplitude of velocity drops and peak ground acceleration for data from a single station. This relationship does not hold true when comparing different stations due to the different sensitivity of the station environments. Furthermore, we observe periodic annual velocity changes at PATCX. Analyzing data at a temporal resolution below 1 day, we are able to identify changes with a period of 24 h, too. The characteristics of the seismic velocity with annual and daily periods indicate an atmospheric origin of the velocity changes that we confirm with a model based on thermally induced stress. This comprehensive model explains the lag time dependence of the temperature-related seismic velocity changes involving the distribution of temperature fluctuations, the relationship between temperature, stress and velocity change, plus autocorrelation sensitivity kernels.

  14. Past Plate Motions and The Evolution of Earth's Lower Mantle: Relating LLSVPs and Plume Distribution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bull, A. L.; Torsvik, T. H.; Shephard, G. E.

    2015-12-01

    Seismic tomography elucidates broad, low shear-wave velocity structures in the lower mantle beneath Africa and the central Pacific with uncertain physical and compositional origins. The anomalously slow areas, which cover nearly 50% of the core-mantle boundary, are often referred to as Large Low Shear Velocity Provinces (LLSVPs) due to the reduced velocity of seismic waves passing through them. Several hypotheses have arisen to explain the LLSVPs in the context of large-scale mantle convection. One end-member scenario infers a spatial correlation between LLSVP margins at depth and the reconstructed surface eruption sites of hotspots, kimberlites, and Large Igneous Provinces. Such a correlation has been explained by the preferential triggering of plumes at LLSVP margins by impingement of the subducting lithosphere upon the lower thermal boundary layer at the interface between ambient mantle and the higher density structures. This scenario propounds that Earth's plate motion history plays a controlling role in plume development, and that the location, geometry and morphology of plumes may be influenced by the movement of subducting slabs. Here, we investigate what is necessary to create such a pattern of plume distribution in relation to LLSVPs. We consider what effect past plate motions may have had on the evolution of Earth's lower mantle, and discuss the development of mantle plumes in terms of subduction dynamics. We integrate plate tectonic histories and numerical models of mantle convection to investigate the role that subduction history plays in the development and evolution of plumes in the presence of LLSVPs. To test whether an interaction exists between the surface location of subduction and plume eruption sites, and if so, to what degree over time, we apply varying shifts to the absolute reference frame of the plate reconstruction. With this method, we are able to change the location of subduction at the surface and thus the global flow field. This in turn

  15. Age velocity dispersion relations and heating histories in disc galaxies

    CERN Document Server

    Aumer, Michael; Schönrich, Ralph

    2016-01-01

    We analyse the heating of stellar discs by non axisymmetric structures and giant molecular clouds (GMCs) in N-body simulations of growing disc galaxies. The analysis resolves long-standing discrepancies between models and data by demonstrating the importance of distinguishing between measured age-velocity dispersion relations (AVRs) and the heating histories of the stars that make up the AVR. We fit both AVRs and heating histories with formulae proportional to t^beta and determine the exponents beta_R and beta_z derived from in-plane and vertical AVRs and ~beta_R and ~beta_z from heating histories. Values of beta_z are in almost all simulations larger than values of ~beta_z, whereas values of beta_R are similar to or mildly larger than values of ~beta_R. Moreover, values of beta_z (~beta_z) are generally larger than values of beta_R (~beta_R). The dominant cause of these relations is the decline over the life of the disc in importance of GMCs as heating agents relative to spiral structure and the bar. We exam...

  16. Dark Matter Halos: Velocity Anisotropy -- Density Slope Relation

    CERN Document Server

    Zait, Amir; Shlosman, Isaac

    2007-01-01

    Dark matter (DM) halos formed in CDM cosmologies seem to be characterized by a power law phase-space density profile. The density of the DM halos is often fitted by the NFW profile but a better fit is provided by the Sersic fitting formula. These relations are empirically derived from cosmological simulations of structure formation but have not yet been explained on a first principle basis. Here we solve the Jeans equation under the assumption of a spherical DM halo in dynamical equilibrium, that obeys a power law phase space density and either the NFW-like or the Sersic density profile. We then calculate the velocity anisotropy, beta(r), analytically. Our main result is that for the NFW-like profile the beta - gamma relation is not a linear one (where gamma is the logarithmic derivative of the density rho[r]). The shape of beta(r) depends mostly on the ratio of the gravitational to kinetic energy within the NFW scale radius R_s. For the Sersic profile a linear beta - gamma relation is recovered, and in parti...

  17. PLATE

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kling, Joyce; Hjulmand, Lise-Lotte

    2008-01-01

    ’s level of English is sufficient for the increasing number of courses offered in English each semester. This paper addresses these concerns and describes a pilot project initiated in 2003 at CBS to gauge the overall English language proficiency of those teaching content courses in English. Through......Copenhagen Business School (CBS) finds itself needing to address the issue of English-medium instruction for its increasing number of foreign exchange and full degree students. With internationalisation as a main pillar of the institution’s agenda, there are concerns whether the teaching faculty...... the Project in Language Assessment for Teaching in English (PLATE) language professionals from CBS’s Language Center observe teachers and provide feedback using evaluation criteria from the Common European Framework for Reference (CEFR) supplemented by some additional criteria which take the LSP nature...

  18. PLATE

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kling, Joyce; Hjulmand, Lise-Lotte

    2008-01-01

    Copenhagen Business School (CBS) finds itself needing to address the issue of English-medium instruction for its increasing number of foreign exchange and full degree students. With internationalisation as a main pillar of the institution’s agenda, there are concerns whether the teaching faculty......’s level of English is sufficient for the increasing number of courses offered in English each semester. This paper addresses these concerns and describes a pilot project initiated in 2003 at CBS to gauge the overall English language proficiency of those teaching content courses in English. Through...... the Project in Language Assessment for Teaching in English (PLATE) language professionals from CBS’s Language Center observe teachers and provide feedback using evaluation criteria from the Common European Framework for Reference (CEFR) supplemented by some additional criteria which take the LSP nature...

  19. Relative ion expansion velocity in laser-produced plasmas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldsmith, S.; Moreno, J. C.; Griem, H. R.; Cohen, Leonard; Richardson, M. C.

    1988-01-01

    The spectra of highly ionized titanium, Ti XIII through Ti XXI, and C VI Lyman lines were excited in laser-produced plasmas. The plasma was produced by uniformly irradiating spherical glass microballoons coated with thin layers of titanium and parylene. The 24-beam Omega laser system produced short, 0.6 ns, and high-intensity, 4 x 10 to the 14th W/sq cm, laser pulses at a wavelength of 351 nm. The measured wavelength for the 2p-3s Ti XIII resonance lines had an average shift of + 0.023 A relative to the C VI and Ti XX spectral lines. No shift was found between the C VI, Ti XIX, and Ti XX lines. The shift is attributed to a Doppler effect, resulting from a difference of (2.6 + or - 0.2) x 10 to the 7th cm/s in the expansion velocities of Ti XIX and Ti XX ions compared to Ti XIII ions.

  20. Is Fish Response related to Velocity and Turbulence Magnitudes? (Invited)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, C. A.; Hockley, F. A.; Cable, J.

    2013-12-01

    Riverine fish are subject to heterogeneous velocities and turbulence, and may use this to their advantage by selecting regions which balance energy expenditure for station holding whilst maximising energy gain through feeding opportunities. This study investigated microhabitat selection by guppies (Poecilia reticulata) in terms of the three-dimensional velocity structure generated by idealised boulders in an experimental flume. Velocity and turbulence influenced intra-species variation in swimming behaviour with respect to size, sex and parasite intensity. With increasing body length, fish swam further and more frequently between boulder regions. Larger guppies spent more time in the high velocity and low turbulence region, whereas smaller guppies preferred the low velocity and high shear stress region directly behind the boulders. Male guppies selected the region of low velocity, indicating a possible reduced swimming ability due to hydrodynamic drag imposed by their fins. With increasing parasite (Gyrodactylus turnbulli) burden, fish preferentially selected the region of moderate velocity which had the lowest bulk measure of turbulence of all regions and was also the most spatially homogeneous velocity and turbulence region. Overall the least amount of time was spent in the recirculation zone which had the highest magnitude of shear stresses and mean vertical turbulent length scale to fish length ratio. Shear stresses were a factor of two greater than in the most frequented moderate velocity region, while mean vertical turbulent length scale to fish length ratio were six times greater. Indeed the mean longitudinal turbulent scale was 2-6 times greater than the fish length in all regions. While it is impossible to discriminate between these two turbulence parameters (shear stress and turbulent length to fish length ratio) in influencing the fish preference, our study infers that there is a bias towards fish spending more time in a region where both the bulk

  1. Significance of relative velocity in drag force or drag power estimation for a tethered float

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Vethamony, P.; Sastry, J.S.

    There is difference in opinion regarding the use of relative velocity instead of particle velocity alone in the estimation of drag force or power. In the present study, a tethered spherical float which undergoes oscillatory motion in regular waves...

  2. Constraints on fault slip rates of the southern California plate boundary from GPS velocity and stress inversions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Becker, T.W.; Hardebeck, J.L.; Anderson, G.

    2005-01-01

    We use Global Positioning System (GPS) velocities and stress orientations inferred from seismicity to invert for the distribution of slip on faults in the southern California plate-boundary region. Of particular interest is how long-term slip rates are partitioned between the Indio segment of the San Andreas fault (SAF), the San Jacinto fault (SJF) and the San Bernardino segment of the SAE We use two new sets of constraints to address this problem. The first is geodetic velocities from the Southern California Earthquake Center's (SCEC) Crustal Motion Map (version 3 by Shen et al.), which includes significantly more data than previous models. The second is a regional model of stress-field orientations at seismogenic depths, as determined from earthquake focal mechanisms. While GPS data have been used in similar studies before, this is the first application of stress-field observations to this problem. We construct a simplified model of the southern California fault system, and estimate the interseismic surface velocities using a backslip approach with purely elastic strain accumulation, following Meade et al. In addition, we model the stress orientations at seismogenic depths, assuming that crustal stress results from the loading of active faults. The geodetically derived stressing rates are found to be aligned with the stress orientations from seismicity. We therefore proceed to invert simultaneously GPS and stress observations for slip rates of the faults in our network. We find that the regional patterns of crustal deformation as imaged by both data sets can be explained by our model, and that joint inversions lead to better constrained slip rates. In our preferred model, the SJF accommodates ???15 mm yr-1 and the Indio segment of the SAF ???23 mm yr-1 of right-lateral motion, accompanied by a low slip rate on the San Bernardino segment of the SAF 'Anomalous' fault segments such as around the 1992 Mw = 7.3 Landers surface rupture can be detected. There, observed

  3. Metabolic responses at various intensities relative to critical swimming velocity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toubekis, Argyris G; Tokmakidis, Savvas P

    2013-06-01

    To avoid any improper training load, the speed of endurance training needs to be regularly adjusted. Both the lactate threshold (LT) velocity and the velocity corresponding to the maximum lactate steady state (MLSS) are valid and reliable indices of swimming aerobic endurance and commonly used for evaluation and training pace adjustment. Alternatively, critical velocity (CV), defined as the velocity that can be maintained without exhaustion and assessed from swimming performance of various distances, is a valid, reliable, and practical index of swimming endurance, although the selection of the proper distances is a determinant factor. Critical velocity may be 3-6 and 8-11% faster compared with MLSS and LT, respectively. Interval swimming at CV will probably show steady-lactate concentration when the CV has been calculated by distances of 3- to 15-minute duration, and this is more evident in adult swimmers, whereas increasing or decreasing lactate concentration may appear in young and children swimmers. Therefore, appropriate corrections should be made to use CV for training pace adjustment. Findings in young and national level adult swimmers suggest that repetitions of distances of 100-400 m, and velocities corresponding to a CV range of 98-102% may be used for pacing aerobic training, training at the MLSS, and possibly training for improvement of VO2max. Calculation of CV from distances of 200-400, 50-100-200-400, or 100-800 m is an easy and practical method to assess aerobic endurance. This review intends to study the physiological responses and the feasibility of using CV for aerobic endurance evaluation and training pace adjustment, to help coaches to prescribe training sets for different age-group swimmers.

  4. Influence of the Metal Volume Fraction on the permanent dent depth and energy absorption of GLARE plates subjected to low velocity impact

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bikakis, GSE; Savaidis, A.; Zalimidis, P.; Tsitos, S.

    2016-11-01

    Fiber-metal laminates are hybrid composite materials, consisting of alternating metal layers bonded to fiber-reinforced prepreg layers. GLARE (GLAss REinforced) belongs to this new family of materials. GLARE is the most successful fiber-metal laminate up to now and is currently being used for the construction of primary aerospace structures, such as the fuselage of the Airbus A380 air plane. Impact properties are very important in aerospace structures, since impact damage is caused by various sources, such as maintenance damage from dropped tools, collision between service cars or cargo and the structure, bird strikes and hail. The principal objective of this article is to evaluate the influence of the Metal Volume Fraction (MVF) on the low velocity impact response of GLARE fiber-metal laminates. Previously published differential equations of motion are employed for this purpose. The low velocity impact behavior of various circular GLARE plates is predicted and characteristic values of impact variables, which represent the impact phenomenon, are evaluated versus the corresponding MVF of the examined GLARE material grades. The considered GLARE plates are subjected to low velocity impact under identical impact conditions. A strong effect of the MVF on the maximum impact load and a significant effect on the maximum plate deflection of GLARE plates has been found.

  5. Influence of the Metal Volume Fraction on the maximum deflection and impact load of GLARE plates subjected to low velocity impact

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bikakis, GSE; Savaidis, A.; Zalimidis, P.; Tsitos, S.

    2016-11-01

    Fiber-metal laminates are hybrid composite materials, consisting of alternating metal layers bonded to fiber-reinforced prepreg layers. GLARE (GLAss REinforced) belongs to this new family of materials. GLARE is the most successful fiber-metal laminate up to now and is currently being used for the construction of primary aerospace structures, such as the fuselage of the Airbus A380 air plane. Impact properties are very important in aerospace structures, since impact damage is caused by various sources, such as maintenance damage from dropped tools, collision between service cars or cargo and the structure, bird strikes and hail. The principal objective of this article is to evaluate the influence of the Metal Volume Fraction (MVF) on the low velocity impact response of GLARE fiber-metal laminates. Previously published differential equations of motion are employed for this purpose. The low velocity impact behavior of various circular GLARE plates is predicted and characteristic values of impact variables, which represent the impact phenomenon, are evaluated versus the corresponding MVF of the examined GLARE material grades. The considered GLARE plates are subjected to low velocity impact under identical impact conditions. A strong effect of the MVF on the maximum impact load and a significant effect on the maximum plate deflection of GLARE plates has been found.

  6. Some Modal Relations and Generalized Velocity Method in State Space

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2000-01-01

    Real mode theory in configuration space has shown that the mode acceleration method converges faster than the mode displacement method. This paper demonstrates a similar conclusion in the state space. Some new expressions on modal parameter matrices were set up first. A generalized velocity method (GVM) is then demonstrated in a systematic way. This method is the so-called complex mode velocity method, but the expressions and schemes are given in terms of parametric matrices in configuration space. Theoretical comparison of this GVM with the traditional complex mode method shows some interesting conclusions. The latter approach is actually a generalized displacement method (GDM). Without mode reduction, the displacement responses of the concerned system resulting from both approaches are identical. On the other hand, both approaches have to adopt mode reduction to become practical. Under this situation, GVM has advantages because it compensates for the contribution of the omitted high-order modes to the displacement responses.

  7. Propagation of SH waves in a piezoelectric/piezomagnetic plate: Effects of interfacial imperfection couplings and the related physical mechanisms

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wei, Hong-Xing [Beijing Advanced Innovation Center for Imaging Technology, Capital Normal University, Beijing 100048 (China); Li, Yong-Dong, E-mail: LYDbeijing@163.com [Beijing Advanced Innovation Center for Imaging Technology, Capital Normal University, Beijing 100048 (China); Department of Mechanical Engineering, Academy of Armored Force Engineering, Beijing 100072 (China); Xiong, Tao [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Academy of Armored Force Engineering, Beijing 100072 (China); Guan, Yong [Beijing Advanced Innovation Center for Imaging Technology, Capital Normal University, Beijing 100048 (China)

    2016-09-07

    The problem of dispersive SH wave in a piezoelectric/piezomagnetic plate that contains an imperfect interface is considered in the present work. An imperfection coupling model is adopted to describe the magnetic, electric and mechanical imperfections on the interface. A transcendental dispersion equation is derived and numerically solved to get the phase velocity. The validity of the numerical procedure is verified in a degenerated case. The effects of the coupled interfacial imperfections on the dispersion behavior of SH waves are discussed in detail and the related underlying physical mechanisms are explained. - Highlights: • SH-wave is investigated in a multiferroic plate with coupled interfacial imperfections. • SH-wave is affected by both interfacial imperfections and their inter-couplings. • Physical mechanisms of the effects are explained via energy transformations.

  8. Three-dimensional velocity structure around Tehri region of the Garhwal Lesser Himalaya: constraints on geometry of the underthrusting Indian plate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kanaujia, Jyotima; Kumar, Ashwani; Gupta, S. C.

    2016-05-01

    We investigate the upper crustal velocity structure beneath the Tehri region of the Garhwal Himalaya. The investigated region is situated within the 700-km-long central seismic gap of the Himalaya that has experienced three gap-filling earthquakes since 1991 including the recent 2015 Nepal earthquake (Mw 7.8). The local tomographic inversion is based on a data set of 1365 events collected from 2008 January to 2012 December by a 12-station local network that covers an area of about 100 × 80 km around Tehri Dam. We perform a simultaneous inversion for P- and S-wave velocity anomalies. Tomograms are interpreted in the backdrop of the regional geological and tectonic framework of the region. The spatial distribution of relocated events from the 3-D velocity model has shed new light on the pattern of seismicity in the vicinity of the Main Central thrust (MCT), and has elucidated the structure of the underthrusting Indian plate. Our model exhibits a significant negative velocity anomaly up to ˜5 per cent beneath the central part of the Garhwal Inner Lesser Himalaya, and a P-wave low velocity anomaly near the Chamoli region. The seismicity zone around the Chamoli region may be attributed to the presence of fluid-filled rocks. Furthermore, an area with ˜3-4 per cent positive velocity anomaly is delineated to the northwest of the Uttarkashi thrust in the vicinity of the MCT. Significant findings of the study include: a flat-ramp-flat-type subsurface geometry of the underthrusting Indian plate below the Garhwal Himalaya, high-velocity images representing the trend and configuration of Delhi-Haridwar ridge below the Sub Himalaya and Lesser Himalaya and a seismically active zone representing geometrical asperity on the basement thrust in the vicinity of the MCT.

  9. BOOK AND EARLY PERIOD FORMS – PLATE AND DESIGN RELATION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mesude Hülya (ŞANES DOĞRU

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available The Koran, main book of the Islam civilization takes place in base of various art forms. The book elements such as superscription, interior face of binder, title, epilogue, heading of sura (section of the Koran applied during the centuries by the ornamentation are available in all scientific, historical and literary artworks. These forms of the ornamentation within the book as well as periods and changed styles had also continued their improvement. The ornamentation and the script in its center had met in the books firstly and this togetherness had demonstrated a full compliance at the classic period. Presentation wish of the script and the ornamentation getting out of the book pages and targeting more independent and more persons was also a precipitating of improvement in the script and the ornamentation. The cuts and murakka which could be accepted as early period forms other than books had enabled to presentation of the calligraphy and the illumination as a plate with their ornamentation concepts resembling books but becoming free. The tughras and illuminated edicts which were the basis of the Turkish-Islam plate concept are considered. At ornamentation of the tughras, it is possible to see the ornamentation in the certificate which sent by the Sultan was thought for a nice presentation of an entire artwork. While the style difference which is in view at any time are evaluated in any way, big change in the forms and presentation style must not be overlooked. If it is possible to see a plate as the interior decoration of the architecture or a space, of course we must also count inscriptions and ornamentations among basic concepts which constitute such style. While some forms such as hilye’s, mosque scripts were starting the plate tradition, improvement of the apparent scripts and aesthetic caught by the calligraphers at this field had encountered to the periods when the Turkish ornamentation had under the influence of the west. The master

  10. Seismic Structure Related to the Philippine Sea Plate Subduction beneath the Nansei-Shoto (Ryukyu) Trench

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nishizawa, A.; Kaneda, K.; Oikawa, M.; Horiuchi, D.; Fujioka, Y.; Okada, C.

    2016-12-01

    The Philippine Sea plate (PHS) subduction develops a trench-arc-backarc system at the Nansei-Shoto island arc, southwest of Japan. Its backarc basin, the Okinawa Trough, is the only area around Japan where rifting has been observed at present. In the north of the Nansei-Shoto island arc, the PHS with large bathymetric highs (e.g. the Amami Plateau and the Daito Ridge) subducts approximately perpendicularly to the trench axis. In the southwest, the PHS obliquely subducts with linear seafloor topographies such as the Okinawa-Luzon fracture zone and the Gagua Ridge. We conducted multichannel seismic reflection and wide-angle seismic surveys to obtain inhomogeneous crustal structures related to such complex features of the plate subduction. The seismic lines that we shot across the Nansei-Shoto arc, consisted of two lines in the north and five lines in the southwest. We also shot two along-arc lines in the island arc and forearc areas in the southwest. Since we could not constrain the crustal structure deeper than 10 km precisely by a tomographic inversion of first arrival traveltimes, we carried out two-dimensional forward modeling using several reflection signals from the inner crust and Moho discontinuity. As a result, a middle crust with P wave velocity (Vp) of 5.9-6.5 km/s was detected between an upper and lower crust beneath the arc for all the seismic lines. However, the inner crustal structure largely differs depending on the survey lines. Distribution of low Vp forearc accretionary wedge also varies regionally along the trench axis. High Vp of 4-5 km/s within 2 km below the seafloor and Vp larger than 6 km/s just on the subducting plate boundary characterize the forearc at 125-127 E in the southwest region, which corresponds distinctive high free-air gravity anomaly. We could also obtain clear seismic images of the subducting bathymetric highs in the north and the Okinawa-Luzon fracture zone in the southwest.

  11. Influence of the contact line velocity on the finger formation of the liquid film expanding on an inclined plate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamashita, Masatoshi; Nishikawa, Masato; Ito, Takahiro; Tsuji, Yoshiyuki

    2015-11-01

    When a liquid film flows down on an inclined solid surface, the contact line can be destabilized to finger shape. This phenomenon leads to the non-uniform height of the liquid surface or even to generation of dry patch, and then has a great effect on cooling of energy device and quality of coating. In previous studies, the final finger shapes have been discussed by relating the with capillary (Ca) number and the wetting properties of the liquid for the solid substrate, i.e. the contact angle. However, in the experimental studies, little attention has been paid on the difference between the static contact angle and the dynamic one, the latter which is actually observed when the finger is developing. In this study, we performed three-dimensional measurement of surface geometry of the liquid film to clarify how the dynamic contact angles and the Ca number influence the finger shape by optical method. We observed two different finger shapes depending on the volumes of the working fluid., and verified that the finger shapes depend on the contact angle scaled by Ca number. We found that the local dynamic contact angle and the contact line velocity on the trough part of the wavy contact line can be highly related with the final finger shape.

  12. On the relation between lithospheric strength and ridge push transmission in the Nazca plate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahatsente, R.; Ranalli, G.; Bolte, D.; Götze, H.-J.

    2012-01-01

    The ridge push force and the total lithospheric strength of the Nazca plate are compared along an East-West transect from the East Pacific Rise to the Peru-Chile trench at latitude 12°S. The thermal structure of the plate is estimated from the plate cooling model and constrained by heat flow, bathymetry, and geoid height data. The best fitting thermal model has a basal temperature of ˜1600 K and an asymptotic plate thickness (not reached because of the relatively young age of the plate at the trench) of ˜101 km. The ridge push force, also determined from the plate cooling model, is of the order of 1.5 TN m -1 at the trench. The total lithospheric strength as a function of age is estimated for a possible range of conditions (compressional/extensional intraplate tectonic regime, wet/dry rheology). A comparison of ridge push force with lithospheric strength, extended beyond the Nazca plate by considering different spreading rates and ages, shows that oceanic plates with dry rheology have strengths higher than the ridge push force at any age if the tectonic regime is compressional, and comparable if the regime is extensional. On the other hand, oceanic plates with wet rheology have strengths lower than the ridge push force, especially if the tectonic regime is extensional. Therefore, if the rheology is wet and mantle drag at the base of the plate is sufficiently strong, the ridge push force may result in intraplate deformation and be partly dissipated within the plate.

  13. Stellar populations across the black hole mass - velocity dispersion relation

    CERN Document Server

    Martín-Navarro, Ignacio; Bosch, Remco C E van den; Romanowsky, Aaron J; Forbes, Duncan A

    2016-01-01

    Coevolution between supermassive black holes (BHs) and their host galaxies is universally adopted in models for galaxy formation. In the absence of feedback from active galactic nuclei, simulated massive galaxies keep forming stars in the local Universe. From an observational point of view, however, such coevolution remains unclear. We present a stellar population analysis of galaxies with direct BH mass measurements and the BH mass-{\\sigma} relation as a working framework. We find that over-massive BH galaxies, i.e., galaxies lying above the best-fitting BH mass-{\\sigma} line, tend to be older and more {\\alpha}-element enhanced than under-massive BH galaxies. The scatter in the BH mass-{\\sigma}-[{\\alpha}/Fe] plane is significantly lower than in the standard BH mass-{\\sigma} relation. We interpret this trend as an imprint of active galactic nucleus feedback on the star formation histories of massive galaxies.

  14. Relative seismic velocity variations correlate with deformation at Kīlauea volcano.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donaldson, Clare; Caudron, Corentin; Green, Robert G; Thelen, Weston A; White, Robert S

    2017-06-01

    Seismic noise interferometry allows the continuous and real-time measurement of relative seismic velocity through a volcanic edifice. Because seismic velocity is sensitive to the pressurization state of the system, this method is an exciting new monitoring tool at active volcanoes. Despite the potential of this tool, no studies have yet comprehensively compared velocity to other geophysical observables on a short-term time scale at a volcano over a significant length of time. We use volcanic tremor (~0.3 to 1.0 Hz) at Kīlauea as a passive source for interferometry to measure relative velocity changes with time. By cross-correlating the vertical component of day-long seismic records between ~230 station pairs, we extract coherent and temporally consistent coda wave signals with time lags of up to 120 s. Our resulting time series of relative velocity shows a remarkable correlation between relative velocity and the radial tilt record measured at Kīlauea summit, consistently correlating on a time scale of days to weeks for almost the entire study period (June 2011 to November 2015). As the summit continually deforms in deflation-inflation events, the velocity decreases and increases, respectively. Modeling of strain at Kīlauea suggests that, during inflation of the shallow magma reservoir (1 to 2 km below the surface), most of the edifice is dominated by compression-hence closing cracks and producing faster velocities-and vice versa. The excellent correlation between relative velocity and deformation in this study provides an opportunity to understand better the mechanisms causing seismic velocity changes at volcanoes, and therefore realize the potential of passive interferometry as a monitoring tool.

  15. Self-action of propagating and standing Lamb waves in the plates exhibiting hysteretic nonlinearity: Nonlinear zero-group velocity modes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gusev, Vitalyi E; Lomonosov, Alexey M; Ni, Chenyin; Shen, Zhonghua

    2017-09-01

    An analytical theory accounting for the influence of hysteretic nonlinearity of micro-inhomogeneous plate material on the Lamb waves near the S1 zero group velocity point is developed. The theory predicts that the main effect of the hysteretic quadratic nonlinearity consists in the modification of the frequency and the induced absorption of the Lamb modes. The effects of the nonlinear self-action in the propagating and standing Lamb waves are expected to be, respectively, nearly twice and three times stronger than those in the plane propagating acoustic waves. The theory is restricted to the simplest hysteretic nonlinearity, which is influencing only one of the Lamé moduli of the materials. However, possible extensions of the theory to the cases of more general hysteretic nonlinearities are discussed as well as the perspectives of its experimental testing. Applications include nondestructive evaluation of micro-inhomogeneous and cracked plates. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Study of axial mixing, holdup and slip velocity of dispersed phase in a pulsed sieve plate extraction column using radiotracer technique

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ghiyas Ud Din [Department of Nuclear Engineering, Pakistan Institute of Engineering and Applied Sciences -PIEAS, P.O Nilore, Islamabad (Pakistan); Isotope Application Division, Pakistan Institute of Nuclear Science and Technology - PINSTECH, P.O Nilore, Islamabad (Pakistan)], E-mail: fac192@pieas.edu.pk; Imran Rafiq Chughtai; Mansoor Hameed Inayat [Department of Chemical and Materials Engineering, Pakistan Institute of Engineering and Applied Sciences - PIEAS, P.O Nilore, Islamabad (Pakistan); Iqbal Hussain Khan [Isotope Application Division, Pakistan Institute of Nuclear Science and Technology - PINSTECH, P.O Nilore, Islamabad (Pakistan)

    2009-07-15

    Axial mixing, holdup and slip velocity of dispersed phase which are parameters of fundamental importance in the design and operation of liquid-liquid extraction pulsed sieve plate columns have been investigated. Experiments for residence time distribution (RTD) analysis have been carried out for a range of pulsation frequency and amplitude in a liquid-liquid extraction pulsed sieve plate column with water as dispersed and kerosene as continuous phase using radiotracer technique. The column was operated in emulsion region and {sup 99m}Tc in the form of sodium pertechnetate eluted from a {sup 99}Mo/{sup 99m}Tc generator was used to trace the dispersed phase. Axial dispersed plug flow model with open-open boundary condition and two points measurement method was used to simulate the hydrodynamics of dispersed phase. It has been observed that the axial mixing and holdup of dispersed phase increases with increase in pulsation frequency and amplitude until a maximum value is achieved while slip velocity decreases with increase in pulsation frequency and amplitude until it approaches a minimum value. Short lived and low energy radiotracer {sup 99m}Tc in the form of sodium pertechnetate was found to be a good water tracer to study the hydrodynamics of a liquid-liquid extraction pulsed sieve plate column operating with two immiscible liquids, water and kerosene. Axial dispersed plug flow model with open-open boundary condition was found to be a suitable model to describe the hydrodynamics of dispersed phase in the pulsed sieve plate extraction column.

  17. Insights into seasonal active layer dynamics by monitoring relative velocity changes using ambient seismic noise

    Science.gov (United States)

    James, S. R.; Knox, H. A.; Cole, C. J.; Abbott, R. E.; Screaton, E.

    2016-12-01

    Seasonal freeze and thaw of the active layer above permafrost results in dramatic changes in seismic velocity. We used daily cross correlations of ambient seismic noise recorded at Poker Flat Research Range in central Alaska to create a nearly continuous 2-year record of relative velocity changes. This analysis required that we modify the Moving Window Cross-spectral Analysis technique used in the Python package MSNoise to reduce the occurrence of cycle skipping. Results show relative velocity variations follow a seasonal pattern, where velocities decrease in late spring through the summer months and increase through the fall and winter months. This timing is consistent with active layer freeze and thaw in this region. These results were compared to a suite of ground- and satellite-based measurements to identify relationships. A decrease in relative velocities in late spring closely follows the timing of snow melt recorded in nearby ground temperatures and snow-depth logs. This transition also aligns with a decrease in the Normalized Difference Snow Index (NDSI) derived from multi-temporal Landsat 8 satellite imagery collected over the study site. A gradual increase in relative velocity through the fall months occurs when temperatures below ground surface remain near zero. We suggest this is due to latent heat feedbacks that keep temperatures constant while active layer velocities increase from continued ice formation. This highlights the value in velocity variations for capturing details on the freezing process. In addition, spatial variations in the magnitude of velocity changes are consistent with thaw probe surveys. Exploring relationships with remote sensing may allow indirect measurements of thaw over larger areas and further surface wave analysis may allow for thickness evolution measurements. Sandia National Laboratories is a multi-program laboratory managed and operated by Sandia Corporation, a wholly owned subsidiary of Lockheed Martin Corporation, for

  18. Statistics of particle pair relative velocity in the homogeneous shear flow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gualtieri, P.; Picano, F.; Sardina, G.; Casciola, C. M.

    2012-02-01

    Small scale clustering of inertial particles and relative velocity of particle pairs have been fully characterized for statistically steady homogeneous isotropic flows. Depending on the particle Stokes relaxation time, the spatial distribution of the disperse phase results in a multi-scale manifold characterized by local particle concentration and voids and, because of finite inertia, the two nearby particles have high probability to exhibit large relative velocities. Both effects might explain the speed-up of particle collision rate in turbulent flows. Recently it has been shown that the large scale geometry of the flow plays a crucial role in organizing small scale particle clusters. For instance, a mean shear preferentially orients particle patterns. In this case, depending on the Stokes time, anisotropic clustering may occur even in the inertial range of scales where the turbulent fluctuations which drive the particles have already recovered isotropy. Here we consider the statistics of particle pair relative velocity in the homogeneous shear flow, the prototypical flow which manifests anisotropic clustering at small scales. We show that the mean shear, by imprinting anisotropy on the large scale velocity fluctuations, dramatically affects the particle relative velocity distribution even in the range of small scales where the anisotropic mechanisms of turbulent kinetic energy production are sub-dominant with respect to the inertial energy transfer which drives the carrier fluid velocity towards isotropy. We find that the particles’ populations which manifest strong anisotropy in their relative velocities are the same which exhibit small scale clustering. In contrast to any Kolmogorov-like picture of turbulent transport these phenomena may persist even below the smallest dissipative scales where the residual level of anisotropy may eventually blow-up. The observed anisotropy of particle relative velocity and spatial configuration is suggested to influence the

  19. Calculation of the Arc Velocity Along the Polluted Surface of Short Glass Plates Considering the Air Effect

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tao Yuan

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available To investigate the microphysics mechanism and the factors that influence arc development along a polluted surface, the arc was considered as a plasma fluid. Based on the image method and the collision ionization theory, the electric field of the arc needed to maintain movement with different degrees of pollution was calculated. According to the force of the charged particle in an arc plasma stressed under an electric field, a calculation model of arc velocity, which is dependent on the electric field of the arc head that incorporated the effects of airflow around the electrode and air resistance is presented. An experiment was carried out to measure the arc velocity, which was then compared with the calculated value. The results of the experiment indicated that the lighter the pollution is, the larger the electric field of the arc head and arc velocity is; when the pollution is heavy, the effect of thermal buoyancy that hinders arc movement increases, which greatly reduces the arc velocity.

  20. Effects of Thermal Diffusion and Viscous Dissipation on Unsteady MHD Free Convection Flow Past a Vertical Porous Plate Under Oscillatory Suction Velocity with Heat Sink

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Prabhakar Reddy B.

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available The thermal diffusion and viscous dissipation effects on an unsteady MHD free convection heat and mass transfer flow of an incompressible, electrically conducting, fluid past an infinite vertical porous plate embedded in a porous medium of time dependent permeability under oscillatory suction velocity in the presence of a heat absorbing sink have been studied. It is considered that the influence of a uniform magnetic field acts normal to the flow and the permeability of the porous medium fluctuates with time. The dimensionless governing equations for this investigation have been solved numerically by using the efficient Galerkin finite element method. The numerical results obtained have been presented through graphs and tables for the thermal Grashof number (Gr > 0 corresponding to the cooling of the porous plate and (Gr < 0 corresponding to heating of the porous plate to observe the effects of various material parameters encountered in the problem under investigation. Numerical data for skin-friction, Nusselt and Sherwood numbers are tabulated and then discussed.

  1. Proof of Concept: Model Based Bionic Muscle with Hyperbolic Force-Velocity Relation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. F. B. Haeufle

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Recently, the hyperbolic Hill-type force-velocity relation was derived from basic physical components. It was shown that a contractile element CE consisting of a mechanical energy source (active element AE, a parallel damper element (PDE, and a serial element (SE exhibits operating points with hyperbolic force-velocity dependency. In this paper, a technical proof of this concept was presented. AE and PDE were implemented as electric motors, SE as a mechanical spring. The force-velocity relation of this artificial CE was determined in quick release experiments. The CE exhibited hyperbolic force-velocity dependency. This proof of concept can be seen as a well-founded starting point for the development of Hill-type artificial muscles.

  2. Mantle plume related dynamic uplift and plate kinematics: The NE Atlantic case with global implications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skogseid, Jakob; Khabbaz Ghazian, Reza; Lunt, Ian

    2014-05-01

    At present a pronounced residual depth anomaly (RDA), centred on Iceland, is characterizing the bathymetry of the NE Atlantic region. For the oceanic lithosphere this anomaly represents a 2500 m elevation difference compared to 'normal' oceanic lithosphere. The observed depth anomaly has since Cochran and Talwani (1978) been ascribed to a 200 -300 km thick moderate thermal anomaly beneath the oceanic lithosphere, the existence of which today has been proven by a sizable low velocity zone on seismic tomography data. The sub-lithosphere low velocities are, however, not limited to the oceanic domain, but also underlie the adjacent continental lithosphere, thus causing a similar magnitude anomalous elevation of the continental shelves and landmasses. The thermal anomaly is presumed to relate to the arrival of the Iceland mantle plume demonstrated by excess Paleocene and Early Eocene magmatism and the formation of the North Atlantic Volcanic Province (NAVP), and subsequent volcanic margin formation. The present width of the RDA compares with the size of the regions that experienced excess magmatism during rifting and breakup, which implies that the sub-lithospheric thermally anomalous body was emplaced in Paleocene time, but still resides in the area. This presentation aims to describe the temporal and spatial development of uplift based on combining plate kinematic modeling with models of lithospheric and plume body thickness development through Late Cretaceous-Paleocene extension, and subsequent seafloor spreading. The model prediction of uplift compares well with descriptions of erosional episodes and depositional sequences off Greenland, in the Northern North Sea, off mid-Norway and in the SW Barents Sea, and represents a mechanism that explains the present elevation of East Greenland as well as western Norway. In a global perspective the close correlation between Large Igneous Provinces (LIP's), the arrival of known mantle plumes and formation of volcanic margins

  3. Long-Period Ground Motion Prediction Equations for Relative, Pseudo-Relative and Absolute Velocity Response Spectra in Japan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dhakal, Y. P.; Kunugi, T.; Suzuki, W.; Aoi, S.

    2014-12-01

    Many of the empirical ground motion prediction equations (GMPE) also known as attenuation relations have been developed for absolute acceleration or pseudo relative velocity response spectra. For a small damping, pseudo and absolute acceleration response spectra are nearly identical and hence interchangeable. It is generally known that the relative and pseudo relative velocity response spectra differ considerably at very short or very long periods, and the two are often considered similar at intermediate periods. However, observations show that the period range at which the two spectra become comparable is different from site to site. Also, the relationship of the above two types of velocity response spectra with absolute velocity response spectra are not discussed well in literature. The absolute velocity response spectra are the peak values of time histories obtained by adding the ground velocities to relative velocity response time histories at individual natural periods. There exists many tall buildings on huge and deep sedimentary basins such as the Kanto basin, and the number of such buildings is growing. Recently, Japan Meteorological Agency (JMA) has proposed four classes of long-period ground motion intensity (http://www.data.jma.go.jp/svd/eew/data/ltpgm/) based on absolute velocity response spectra, which correlate to the difficulty of movement of people in tall buildings. As the researchers are using various types of response spectra for long-period ground motions, it is important to understand the relationships between them to take appropriate measures for disaster prevention applications. In this paper, we, therefore, obtain and discuss the empirical attenuation relationships using the same functional forms for the three types of velocity response spectra computed from observed strong motion records from moderate to large earthquakes in relation to JMA magnitude, hypocentral distance, sediment depths, and AVS30 as predictor variables at periods between

  4. 77 FR 14423 - Certain Food Containers, Cups, Plates, Cutlery, and Related Items, and Packaging Thereof; Notice...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-03-09

    ... COMMISSION Certain Food Containers, Cups, Plates, Cutlery, and Related Items, and Packaging Thereof; Notice... Related Items, and Packaging Thereof, DN 2883; the Commission is soliciting comments on any public interest issues raised by the complaint or complainant's filing under section 210.8(b) of the...

  5. Customization of flexographic printing plates related to uvc-induced changes in the crosslinking degree

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tamara Tomašegović

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, the swelling properties of photopolymer flexographic printing plates related to the variations of UVC post-treatment have been analysed. The aim of the research was to interconnect the changes in the crosslinking degree of the photopolymer material occurring due to the modified UVC radiation of the printing plate and the changes of its surface free energy crucial in the graphic reproduction process. Changes in the crosslinking degree in the photopolymer materials have been analysed by the swelling experiments. Results have proven that the partial dissolution of the photopolymer material caused by the immersion of the printing plates in various solvents is in the direct relation with the changes of the dispersive surface free energy. UVC post-treatment, used for the crosslinking termination and the definition of the surface properties of printing plates, is therefore directly affecting the resistivity of the printing plate in the solvent environment. By calculating the correlation coefficients for the weight loss of the photopolymer material in solvents and the dispersive surface free energy, the relation between the crosslinking degree and the UVC post-treatment has been established.

  6. Monitoring changes in seismic velocity related to an ongoing rapid inflation event at Okmok volcano, Alaska

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bennington, Ninfa; Haney, Matt; De Angelis, Silvio; Thurber, Clifford; Freymueller, Jeff

    2015-01-01

    Okmok is one of the most active volcanoes in the Aleutian Arc. In an effort to improve our ability to detect precursory activity leading to eruption at Okmok, we monitor a recent, and possibly ongoing, GPS-inferred rapid inflation event at the volcano using ambient noise interferometry (ANI). Applying this method, we identify changes in seismic velocity outside of Okmok’s caldera, which are related to the hydrologic cycle. Within the caldera, we observe decreases in seismic velocity that are associated with the GPS-inferred rapid inflation event. We also determine temporal changes in waveform decorrelation and show a continual increase in decorrelation rate over the time associated with the rapid inflation event. Themagnitude of relative velocity decreases and decorrelation rate increases are comparable to previous studies at Piton de la Fournaise that associate such changes with increased production of volatiles and/ormagmatic intrusion within the magma reservoir and associated opening of fractures and/or fissures. Notably, the largest decrease in relative velocity occurs along the intrastation path passing nearest to the center of the caldera. This observation, along with equal amplitude relative velocity decreases revealed via analysis of intracaldera autocorrelations, suggests that the inflation sourcemay be located approximately within the center of the caldera and represent recharge of shallow magma storage in this location. Importantly, there is a relative absence of seismicity associated with this and previous rapid inflation events at Okmok. Thus, these ANI results are the first seismic evidence of such rapid inflation at the volcano.

  7. Determination of Euler parameters of Philippine Sea plate and the inferences

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    臧绍先; 陈起永; 宁杰远; 沈正康; 刘永刚

    2002-01-01

    Euler vectors of 12 plates, including Philippine Sea plate (PH), relative to a randomly fixed Pacific plate(PA) were determined by inverting the 1122 data from NUVEL-1 global plate motion model, earthquake slip vectors along Philippine Sea plate boundary, and GPS observed velocities. Euler vectors of Philippine Sea plate relative to adjacent plates are also gained. Our results are well consistent with observed data and can satisfy the geological and geophysical constraints along the Caroline(CR)-PH and PA-CR boundaries. Deformation of Philippine Sea plate is also discussed by using the plate motion Euler parameters.

  8. Hardware-related complications following radiocarpal arthrodesis using a dorsal plate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berling, Stephen E; Kiefhaber, Thomas R; Stern, Peter J

    2015-02-01

    Background Hardware-related complications more than 6 months after total wrist arthrodesis are rarely reported, and controversy remains around the inclusion of the middle finger carpometacarpal joint (CMCJ) in the fusion mass. Purpose To determine the frequency of hardware-related complications including plate fractures, screw fractures, and symptomatic plate/screw loosening, and to investigate whether failure to fuse the middle finger CMCJ contributed to these hardware complications. Patients and Methods A retrospective chart review was designed to identify long-term hardware-related complications following 122 wrist arthrodeses using plate fixation. Patients with at least 6 months of follow-up were reviewed to determine the number of complications, the involvement of the middle finger CMCJ, and the procedures required to address these complications. Results At a median of 2.5 years following arthrodesis (range, 6 months-19 years), 20 (16%) hardware-related complications occurred and included screw fracture (n = 12), plate loosening (n = 5), and plate fracture (n = 3). Thirteen (65%) of the hardware complications occurred after the CMCJ was not fused during the procedure. The CMCJ did not fuse after attempted arthrodesis in 6 additional wrists. Conclusions Persistent middle finger CMCJ micromotion was likely present in 19/20 wrists (95%) that experienced symptomatic hardware complications. Given the occurrence of hardware failures centering on this joint, it is our recommendation that, unless one plans for routine plate removal within a given timeframe, the middle finger CMCJ must be included in the fusion mass. Level 4 Therapeutic Case Series.

  9. Cosmological special relativity the large scale structure of space, time and velocity

    CERN Document Server

    Carmeli, Moshe

    2002-01-01

    This book presents Einstein's theory of space and time in detail, and describes the large-scale structure of space, time and velocity as a new cosmological special relativity. A cosmological Lorentz-like transformation, which relates events at different cosmic times, is derived and applied. A new law of addition of cosmic times is obtained, and the inflation of the space at the early universe is derived, both from the cosmological transformation. The relationship between cosmic velocity, acceleration and distances is given. In the appendices gravitation is added in the form of a cosmological g

  10. Turbulence-Induced Relative Velocity of Dust Particles II: The Bidisperse Case

    CERN Document Server

    Pan, Liubin; Scalo, John

    2014-01-01

    We investigate the relative velocity of inertial particles induced by turbulent motions, extending our earlier work on equal-size particles to the bidisperse case for different particles of arbitrary sizes. The model of Pan & Padoan (PP10) shows that the relative velocity between different particles has two contributions, named the generalized shear and acceleration terms, respectively. The generalized shear term represents the particles' memory of the spatial flow velocity difference across the particle distance at given times in the past, while the acceleration term is associated with the temporal flow velocity difference on individual particle trajectories. The latter vanishes for equal-size particles. Using a simulation, we compute the root-mean-square (rms) relative velocity, ^1/2, as a function of the particle friction times, tau_p1 and tau_p2, and show that the prediction of the PP10 model is in satisfactory agreement with the data, confirming the validity of its physical picture. For a given tau_p...

  11. A study of relative velocity statistics in Lagrangian perturbation theory with PINOCCHIO

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heisenberg, Lavinia; Schäfer, Björn Malte; Bartelmann, Matthias

    2011-10-01

    Subject of this paper is a detailed analysis of the PINpointing Orbit-Crossing Collapsed HIerarchical Object (PINOCCHIO) algorithm for studying the relative velocity statistics of merging haloes in Lagrangian perturbation theory. Given a cosmological background model, a power spectrum of fluctuations as well as a Gaussian linear density contrast field δl is generated on a cubic grid, which is then smoothed repeatedly with Gaussian filters. For each Lagrangian particle at position q and each smoothing radius R, the collapse time, the velocities and ellipsoidal truncation are computed using Lagrangian perturbation theory. The collapsed medium is then fragmented into isolated objects by an algorithm designed to mimic the accretion and merger events of hierarchical collapse. Directly after the fragmentation process the mass function, merger histories of haloes and the statistics of the relative velocities at merging are evaluated. We reimplemented the algorithm in C++, recovered the mass function and optimized the construction of halo merging histories. When compared with the output of the Millennium Simulation our results suggest that the PINOCCHIO is well suited for studying relative velocities of merging haloes and is able to reproduce the pairwise velocity distribution.

  12. Shear velocity structure of the Tyrrhenian region in relation to volcanism and tectonics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paulssen, H.; Greve, S.

    2012-12-01

    We present a detailed 3D shear velocity model of the Tyrrhenian Sea and surrounding onshore areas down to about 160 km depth. The high resolution of the model is achieved through the measurement of interstation Rayleigh wave dispersion curves in a small regional setting with dense station coverage. The most noticeable structure is a pronounced, nearly ringshaped low velocity region at about 80 km depth surrounding the Tyrrhenian Sea: from Corsica to the western part of the Italian mainland, continuing to the western part of Sicily and Sardinia. The thickness of this low velocity region is constrained to a maximum of 40 km, and it is independent of the chosen inversion parameters or the background model. The low values of the shear velocity suggest the presence of fluids or melt. The lateral extent of the low velocity region beneath the Italian mainland is well correlated with the locations of subduction-related volcanism, but there is also a striking continuation of the anomalous low-velocity region along the Northern Tyrrhenian Sea towards (and beneath) the island of Corsica. The recent (volcanism along the Northern Tyrrhenian Sea. Our seismic results now suggest that the anomalous mantle is still present beneath Corsica and the Northern Tyrrhenian Sea, although it does not produce any active volcanism anymore. The picture for the Southern Tyrrhenian Sea is different. Intriguingly, the sublithospheric low velocity anomaly does not continue to southeasternmost part of the Tyrrhenian Sea where the volcanism of the Aeolian arc is related to subduction of the steep, active Ionian slab. Instead, the seismic anomaly crosses the Tyrrhenian Sea from Vesuvius on the Italian mainland to the western part of Sicily, continuing to the southeast of Sardinia: a pattern which correlates with the locations of past subduction-related volcanism. It is striking that the Vavilov Basin in the central Tyrrhenian Sea, characterized by MORB-type volcanism, is a region of relatively normal

  13. On the Critical Ionization Velocity Effect in Interstellar Space and Possible Detection of Related Continuum Emission

    CERN Document Server

    Verschuur, Gerrit L

    2007-01-01

    Interstellar neutral hydrogen (HI) emission spectra manifest several families of linewidths whose numerical values (34, 13 & 6 km/s) appear to be related to the critical ionization velocities (CIVs) of the most abundant interstellar atomic species. Extended new analysis of HI emission profiles shows that the 34 km/s wide component, probably corresponding to the CIV for helium, is pervasive. The 34 km/s wide linewidth family is found in low-velocity (local) neutral hydrogen (HI) profiles as well as in the so-called high-velocity clouds. In addition, published studies of HI linewidths found in the Magellanic Stream, Very-High-Velocity Clouds, and Compact High-Velocity Clouds, all of which are believed to be intergalactic, have noted that typical values are of the same order. If the critical ionization velocity effect does play a role in interstellar space it may be expected to produce locally enhanced electron densities where rapidly moving neutral gas masses interact with surrounding plasma. Evidence is pr...

  14. Building a Dispersion Relation Solver for Hot Plasmas with Arbitrary Non-relativistic Parallel Velocity Distributions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fu, X.; Waters, T.; Gary, S. P.

    2014-12-01

    Collisionless space plasmas often deviate from Maxwellian-like velocity distributions. To study kinetic waves and instabilities in such plasmas, the dispersion relation, which depends on the velocity distribution, needs to be solved numerically. Most current dispersion solvers (e.g. WHAMP) take advantage of mathematical properties of the Gaussian (or generalized Lorentzian) function, and assume that the velocity distributions can be modeled by a combination of several drift-Maxwellian (or drift-Lorentzian) components. In this study we are developing a kinetic dispersion solver that admits nearly arbitrary non-relativistic parallel velocity distributions. A key part of any dispersion solver is the evaluation of a Hilbert transform of the velocity distribution function and its derivative along Landau contours. Our new solver builds upon a recent method to compute the Hilbert transform accurately and efficiently using the fast Fourier transform, while simultaneously treating the singularities arising from resonances analytically. We have benchmarked our new solver against other codes dealing with Maxwellian distributions. As an example usage of our code, we will show results for several instabilities that occur for electron velocity distributions observed in the solar wind.

  15. Low velocities in the oceanic upper mantle and their relation to plumes: insights from SEM-based waveform tomography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lekic, V.; French, S. W.; Romanowicz, B. A.

    2013-12-01

    The exchange of heat, mass and momentum between tectonic plates and mantle convection controls lithospheric evolution and hotspot volcanism, and must occur at a range of spatial scales. Yet, the detailed morphology of the associated convection patterns continues to elude geophysicists. Because seismic velocities are affected by temperature, seismic tomography can be used to map the patterns of flow in the Earth's mantle. Here, we present a global-scale long-period full-waveform seismic tomographic model SEMum2 constructed using the Spectral Element Method, which can very accurately model wave propagation through highly complex structures, and account for phenomena such as scattering, (de)focusing, and wavefront healing. Notably, SEMum2 achieves more realistic amplitudes of lateral heterogeneity - particularly low velocities in the upper 250km - than previous generations of global models, while still retrieving the long-wavelength structure present in earlier tomographic models. Cluster analysis of profiles of shear velocity in the SEMum2 oceanic upper mantle, confirms the presence of a well marked shear wave low velocity zone (LVZ) beneath the lithosphere, with a velocity minimum which deepens progressively as a function of age of the plate. The LVZ minimum in SEMum2 reaches values that are lower than in previous tomographic global models and in agreement with local estimates where available. Interestingly, reaching below this "classical" low velocity zone, the model reveals a pattern of alternating lower and higher velocities organized into elongated bands in the direction of absolute plate motion (APM), with a quasi-regular spacing of ~2000 km perpendicular to the APM. This fingerlike structure, most prominent around 200-250 km and extending down to 350-400 km, is most prominent beneath the Pacific plate, but also present under the eastern Antarctic plate, in the south Atlantic and in parts of the Indian Ocean Below this depth, the low velocities appear organized

  16. A New Arabia-Africa-Eurasia GPS Velocity Field (1994-2014) and E Mediterranean Block Model: Implications for Continental Deformation in a Zone of Active Plate Interaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vernant, P.; Floyd, M.; Ozener, H.; Ergintav, S.; Karakhanian, A.; Kadirov, F. A.; Sokhadze, G.; ArRajehi, A.; Nankali, H. R.; Georgiev, I.; Ganas, A.; Paradissis, D.; McClusky, S.; Gomez, F. G.; Reilinger, R. E.

    2014-12-01

    We present new GPS velocities for the Arabia-Africa-Eurasia region determined with GAMIT/GLOBK (>830 velocities) spanning the period 1994-2014. Here we consider the E Mediterranean region of plate interaction. We use DEFNODE software to develop block models and estimate slip rates on major faults and strain of some blocks. The wrms of residual velocities from our new model is 1.3 mm/yr. We identify small E-W extension within the newly defined Anatolian block confined to a 100-200 km wide zone south of the North Anatolian Fault (NAF) reaching 2-3 mm/yr with rates increasing towards the west. Possible causes we consider include, un-modeled postseismic effects of the 1999 Izmit/Duzce earthquake sequence, continuing post-seismic effects of the 20th Century sequence of M>7 earthquakes, and/or toroidal sub-lithospheric flow towards the subducting Hellenic slab. The overall strain rate of the Marmara Sea block is dominantly N-S extension, and the Van block, N-S compression. Present slip rates along the NAF increase from E to W, 22-24 mm/yr along the E to E-central segment and 27-28 mm/yr along the W segment. We quantify extension in the G. of Corinth, central Greece, and G. of Evia; the W, central and E sections of the Hellenic Trench are shortening with extension in the back-arc. The W Hellenic Trench and W Peloponnese have right-lateral strike-slip and the E Hellenic Trench, left-lateral ss. N-S extension (2-4 mm/yr) in N Greece and the N Aegean Sea extends at least to 42°N. Arabia-Sinai left-lateral motion across the Dead Sea Fault is ~5 mm/yr along the S segment; significant residual velocities along the N and S segments indicate lower slip rates in the N and require fault segmentation to account for slip rate variations along strike. We identify E-W contraction of the Arabian (Persian) Gulf (~3-5 mm/yr) that extends into the E part of the Arabian Plate. We will quantify and present these and other observed deformation patterns and discuss their tectonic implications.

  17. A study of relative velocity statistics in Lagrangian perturbation theory with PINOCCHIO

    CERN Document Server

    Heisenberg, Lavinia; Bartelmann, Matthias

    2010-01-01

    Subject of this paper is a careful and detailed analysis of the PINOCCHIO algorithm for studying the relative velocity statistics of merging haloes in Lagrangian perturbation theory. Given a cosmological background model, a power spectrum of fluctuations as well as a Gaussian linear density contrast field $\\delta_{\\rm l}$ is generated on a cubic grid, which is then smoothed repeatedly with Gaussian filters. For each Lagrangian particle at position $\\bmath{q}$ and each smoothing radius $R$, the collapse time, the velocities and ellipsoidal truncation are computed using Lagrangian Perturbation Theory. The collapsed medium is then fragmented into isolated objects by an algorithm designed to mimic the accretion and merger events of hierarchical collapse. Directly after the fragmentation process the mass function, merger histories of haloes and the statistics of the relative velocities at merging are evaluated. We reimplemented the algorithm in C++ and optimised the construction of halo merging histories. Comparin...

  18. a Dynamical Model with Next-Nearest Interaction in Relative Velocity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Zhipeng; Liu, Yuncai; Liu, Fuqiang

    By introducing the velocity difference between the preceding car and the car before the preceding one into the optimal velocity model (OVM), we present an extended dynamical model which takes into account the next-nearest-neighbor interaction in relative velocity. The stability condition of this model is derived by considering a small perturbation around the uniform flow solution and the validity of our theoretical analysis is also confirmed by direct simulations. The analytic and simulation results indicate that traffic congestion is suppressed efficiently by incorporating the effect of new consideration. Moreover, the effect of the new consideration is investigated by numerical simulation. In particular, the jamming flow, the current-density relation, and the propagation speed of small disturbance are examined in detail by varying various values of the parameter.

  19. Preferential accumulation and enhanced relative velocity of inertial droplets due to interactions with homogeneous isotropic turbulence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bateson, Colin; Aliseda, Alberto

    2015-11-01

    We present results from wind tunnel experiments on the evolution of small inertial (d ~ 10 - 200 μm) water droplets in homogeneous, isotropic, slowly decaying grid turbulence. High-speed imaging and a Particle Tracking algorithm are used to calculate relative velocity distributions. We analyze the preferential concentration, via the 2D Radial Distribution Function, and enhanced relative velocity of droplets resulting from their inertial interactions with the underlying turbulence. The two-dimensional particle velocities, measured from multi-image tracks along a streamwise plane, are conditionally analyzed with respect to the distance from the nearest particle. We focus on the non-normality of the statistics for the particle-particle separation velocity component to examine the influence of the inertial interaction with the turbulence on the dynamics of the droplets. We observe a negative bias (in the mean and mode) in the separation velocity of particles for short separations, signaling a tendency of particles to collide more frequently than a random agitation by turbulence would predict. The tails of the distribution are interpreted in terms of the collision/coalescence process and the probability of collisions that do not lead to coalescence.

  20. Relative shortening velocity in locomotor muscles: turkey ankle extensors operate at low V/V(max).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gabaldón, Annette M; Nelson, Frank E; Roberts, Thomas J

    2008-01-01

    The force-velocity properties of skeletal muscle have an important influence on locomotor performance. All skeletal muscles produce less force the faster they shorten and typically develop maximal power at velocities of approximately 30% of maximum shortening velocity (V(max)). We used direct measurements of muscle mechanical function in two ankle extensor muscles of wild turkeys to test the hypothesis that during level running muscles operate at velocities that favor force rather than power. Sonomicrometer measurements of muscle length, tendon strain-gauge measurements of muscle force, and bipolar electromyographs were taken as animals ran over a range of speeds and inclines. These measurements were integrated with previously measured values of muscle V(max) for these muscles to calculate relative shortening velocity (V/V(max)). At all speeds for level running the V/V(max) values of the lateral gastrocnemius and the peroneus longus were low (muscles were capable of producing 90% of peak isometric force but only 35% of peak isotonic power. V/V(max) increased in response to the demand for mechanical power with increases in running incline and decreased to negative values to absorb energy during downhill running. Measurements of integrated electromyograph activity indicated that the volume of muscle required to produce a given force increased from level to uphill running. This observation is consistent with the idea that V/V(max) is an important determinant of locomotor cost because it affects the volume of muscle that must be recruited to support body weight.

  1. Turbulence-Induced Relative Velocity of Dust Particles I: Identical Particles

    CERN Document Server

    Pan, Liubin

    2013-01-01

    We study the relative velocity of inertial particles suspended in turbulent flows and discuss implications for dust particle collisions in protoplanetay disks. We simulate a weakly compressible turbulent flow at 512^3 and evolve 14 species of particles with different friction timescales, tau_p. The Stoke number, St, of the smallest particles is ~0.1, where St is the ratio of tau_p to the Kolmorgorov timescale, while the largest particles have tau_p =54T_L, where T_L is the flow Lagrangian correlation timescale. We find that the model by Pan & Padoan (PP10) gives satisfactory predictions for the rms relative velocity between identical particles. The model shows that the relative velocity of two same-size particles is determined by the particle memory of the flow velocity difference along their trajectories, and thus depends on the particle pair separation backward in time. We compute the collision kernel accounting for the effect of turbulent clustering. The kernel per unit cross section shows an abrupt ri...

  2. Compressional and shear-wave velocity versus depth relations for common rock types in northern California

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brocher, T.M.

    2008-01-01

    This article presents new empirical compressional and shear-wave velocity (Vp and Vs) versus depth relationships for the most common rock types in northern California. Vp versus depth relations were developed from borehole, laboratory, seismic refraction and tomography, and density measurements, and were converted to Vs versus depth relations using new empirical relations between Vp and Vs. The relations proposed here account for increasing overburden pressure but not for variations in other factors that can influence velocity over short distance scales, such as lithology, consolidation, induration, porosity, and stratigraphic age. Standard deviations of the misfits predicted by these relations thus provide a measure of the importance of the variability in Vp and Vs caused by these other factors. Because gabbros, greenstones, basalts, and other mafic rocks have a different Vp and Vs relationship than sedimentary and granitic rocks, the differences in Vs between these rock types at depths below 6 or 7 km are generally small. The new relations were used to derive the 2005 U.S. Geological Survey seismic velocity model for northern California employed in the broadband strong motion simulations of the 1989 Loma Prieta and 1906 San Francisco earthquakes; initial tests of the model indicate that the Vp model generally compares favorably to regional seismic tomography models but that the Vp and Vs values proposed for the Franciscan Complex may be about 5% too high.

  3. Inferring regional vertical crustal velocities from averaged relative sea level trends: A proof of concept

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bâki Iz, H.; Shum, C. K.; Zhang, C.; Kuo, C. Y.

    2017-02-01

    This study demonstrates that relative sea level trends calculated from long-term tide gauge records can be used to estimate relative vertical crustal velocities in a region with high accuracy. A comparison of the weighted averages of the relative sea level trends estimated at six tide gauge stations in two clusters along the Eastern coast of United States, in Florida and in Maryland, reveals a statistically significant regional vertical crustal motion of Maryland with respect to Florida with a subsidence rate of -1.15±0.15 mm/yr identified predominantly due to the ongoing glacial isostatic adjustment process. The estimate is a consilience value to validate vertical crustal velocities calculated from GPS time series as well as towards constraining predictive GIA models in these regions.

  4. Analytical study of dispersion relations for shear horizontal wave propagation in plates with periodic stubs

    KAUST Repository

    Xu, Yanlong

    2015-08-01

    The coupled mode theory with coupling of diffraction modes and waveguide modes is usually used on the calculations of transmission and reflection coefficients for electromagnetic waves traveling through periodic sub-wavelength structures. In this paper, I extend this method to derive analytical solutions of high-order dispersion relations for shear horizontal (SH) wave propagation in elastic plates with periodic stubs. In the long wavelength regime, the explicit expression is obtained by this theory and derived specially by employing an effective medium. This indicates that the periodical stubs are equivalent to an effective homogenous layer in the long wavelength. Notably, in the short wavelength regime, high-order diffraction modes in the plate and high-order waveguide modes in the stubs are considered with modes coupling to compute the band structures. Numerical results of the coupled mode theory fit pretty well with the results of the finite element method (FEM). In addition, the band structures\\' evolution with the height of the stubs and the thickness of the plate shows clearly that the method can predict well the Bragg band gaps, locally resonant band gaps and high-order symmetric and anti-symmetric thickness-twist modes for the periodically structured plates. © 2015 Elsevier B.V.

  5. The relation of motion sickness to the spatial-temporal properties of velocity storage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dai, Mingjia; Kunin, Mikhail; Raphan, Theodore; Cohen, Bernard; Young, L. R. (Principal Investigator)

    2003-01-01

    Tilting the head in roll to or from the upright while rotating at a constant velocity (roll while rotating, RWR) alters the position of the semicircular canals relative to the axis of rotation. This produces vertical and horizontal nystagmus, disorientation, vertigo, and nausea. With recurrent exposure, subjects habituate and can make more head movements before experiencing overpowering motion sickness. We questioned whether promethazine lessened the vertigo or delayed the habituation, whether habituation of the vertigo was related to the central vestibular time constant, i.e., to the time constant of velocity storage, and whether the severity of the motion sickness was related to deviation of the axis of eye velocity from gravity. Sixteen subjects received promethazine and placebo in a double-blind, crossover study in two consecutive 4-day test series 1 month apart, termed series I and II. Horizontal and vertical eye movements were recorded with video-oculography while subjects performed roll head movements of approx. 45 degrees over 2 s to and from the upright position while being rotated at 138 degrees /s around a vertical axis. Motion sickness was scaled from 1 (no sickness) to an endpoint of 20, at which time the subject was too sick to continue or was about to vomit. Habituation was determined by the number of head movements that subjects made before reaching the maximum motion sickness score of 20. Head movements increased steadily in each session with repeated testing, and there was no difference between the number of head movements made by the promethazine and placebo groups. Horizontal and vertical angular vestibulo-ocular reflex (aVOR) time constants declined in each test, with the declines being closely correlated to the increase in the number of head movements. The strength of vertiginous sensation was associated with the amount of deviation of the axis of eye velocity from gravity; the larger the deviation of the eye velocity axis from gravity, the

  6. Beyond plate tectonics - Looking at plate deformation with space geodesy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jordan, Thomas H.; Minster, J. Bernard

    1988-01-01

    The requirements that must be met by space-geodetic systems in order to constrain the horizontal secular motions associated with the geological deformation of the earth's surface are explored. It is suggested that in order to improve existing plate-motion models, the tangential components of relative velocities on interplate baselines must be resolved to an accuracy of less than 3 mm/yr. Results indicate that measuring the velocities between crustal blocks to + or - 5 mm/yr on 100-km to 1000-km scales can produce geologically significant constraints on the integrated deformation rates across continental plate-boundary zones such as the western United States.

  7. Beyond plate tectonics - Looking at plate deformation with space geodesy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jordan, Thomas H.; Minster, J. Bernard

    1988-01-01

    The requirements that must be met by space-geodetic systems in order to constrain the horizontal secular motions associated with the geological deformation of the earth's surface are explored. It is suggested that in order to improve existing plate-motion models, the tangential components of relative velocities on interplate baselines must be resolved to an accuracy of less than 3 mm/yr. Results indicate that measuring the velocities between crustal blocks to + or - 5 mm/yr on 100-km to 1000-km scales can produce geologically significant constraints on the integrated deformation rates across continental plate-boundary zones such as the western United States.

  8. Relative velocity of sliding of microtubules by the action of Kinesin-5

    CERN Document Server

    Roy, Sthitadhi

    2011-01-01

    Kinesin-5, also known as Eg5 in vertebrates is a processive motor with 4 heads, which moves on filamentous tracks called microtubules. The basic function of Kinesin-5 is to slide apart two anti-parallel microtubules by simultaneously walking on both the microtubules. We develop an analytical expression for the steady-state relative velocity of this sliding in terms of the rates of attachments and detachments of motor heads with the ATPase sites on the microtubules. We first analyse the motion of one pair of motor heads on one microtubule and then couple it to the motion of the other pair of motor heads of the same motor on the second microtubule to get the relative velocity of sliding.

  9. Car-following model with relative-velocity effect and its experimental verification

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shamoto, Daisuke; Tomoeda, Akiyasu; Nishi, Ryosuke; Nishinari, Katsuhiro

    2011-04-01

    In driving a vehicle, drivers respond to the changes of both the headway and the relative velocity to the vehicle in front. In this paper a new car-following model including these maneuvers is proposed. The acceleration of the model becomes infinite (has a singularity) when the distance between two vehicles is zero, and the asymmetry between the acceleration and the deceleration is incorporated in a nonlinear way. The model is simple but contains enough features of driving for reproducing real vehicle traffic. From the linear stability analysis, we confirm that the model shows the metastable homogeneous flow around the critical density, beyond which a traffic jam emerges. Moreover, we perform experiments to verify this model. From the data it is shown that the acceleration of a vehicle has a positive correlation with the relative velocity.

  10. Non-zero density-velocity consistency relations for large scale structures

    CERN Document Server

    Rizzo, Luca Alberto; Valageas, Patrick

    2016-01-01

    We present exact kinematic consistency relations for cosmological structures that do not vanish at equal times and can thus be measured in surveys. These rely on cross-correlations between the density and velocity, or momentum, fields. Indeed, the uniform transport of small-scale structures by long wavelength modes, which cannot be detected at equal times by looking at density correlations only, gives rise to a shift in the amplitude of the velocity field that could be measured. These consistency relations only rely on the weak equivalence principle and Gaussian initial conditions. They remain valid in the non-linear regime and for biased galaxy fields. They can be used to constrain non-standard cosmological scenarios or the large-scale galaxy bias.

  11. RELATIONS BETWEEN DAIRY FOOD INTAKE AND ARTERIAL STIFFNESS: PULSE WAVE VELOCITY AND PULSE PRESSURE

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crichton, Georgina E.; Elias, Merrrill F.; Dore, Gregory A.; Abhayaratna, Walter P.; Robbins, Michael A.

    2012-01-01

    Modifiable risk factors, such as diet, are becomingly increasingly important in the management of cardiovascular disease, one of the greatest major causes of death and disease burden. Few studies have examined the role of diet as a possible means of reducing arterial stiffness, as measured by pulse wave velocity, an independent predictor of cardiovascular events and all-cause mortality. The aim of this study was to investigate whether dairy food intake is associated with measures of arterial stiffness including carotid-femoral pulse wave velocity and pulse pressure. A cross-sectional analysis of a subset of the Maine Syracuse Longitudinal Study sample was performed. A linear decrease in pulse wave velocity was observed across increasing intakes of dairy food consumption (ranging from never/rarely to daily dairy food intake). The negative linear relationship between pulse wave velocity and intake of dairy food was independent of demographic variables, other cardiovascular disease risk factors and nutrition variables. The pattern of results was very similar for pulse pressure, while no association between dairy food intake and lipid levels was found. Further intervention studies are needed to ascertain whether dairy food intake may be an appropriate dietary intervention for the attenuation of age-related arterial stiffening and reduction of cardiovascular disease risk. PMID:22431583

  12. Cosmological special relativity the large scale structure of space, time and velocity

    CERN Document Server

    Carmeli, Moshe

    1997-01-01

    This book deals with special relativity theory and its application to cosmology. It presents Einstein's theory of space and time in detail, and describes the large scale structure of space, time and velocity as a new cosmological special relativity. A cosmological Lorentz-like transformation, which relates events at different cosmic times, is derived and applied. A new law of addition of cosmic times is obtained, and the inflation of the space at the early universe is derived, both from the cosmological transformation. The book will be of interest to cosmologists, astrophysicists, theoretical

  13. MHD free convection flow of a visco-elastic (Kuvshiniski type dusty gas through a semi infinite plate moving with velocity decreasing exponentially with time and radiative heat transfer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Om Prakash

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available The present paper is concerned with the study of MHD free convective flow of a visco-elastic (Kuvshinski type dusty gas through a porous medium induced by the motion of a semi-infinite flat plate under the influence of radiative heat transfer moving with velocity decreasing exponentially with time. The expressions for velocity distribution of a dusty gas and dust particles, concentration profile and temperature field are obtained. The effect of Schmidt number (Sc, Magnetic field parameter (M and Radiation parameter (N on velocity distribution of dusty gas and dust particles, concentration and temperature distribution are discussed graphically.

  14. Turbulence-Induced Relative Velocity of Dust Particles III: The Probability Distribution

    CERN Document Server

    Pan, Liubin; Scalo, John

    2014-01-01

    Motivated by its important role in the collisional growth of dust particles in protoplanetary disks, we investigate the probability distribution function (PDF) of the relative velocity of inertial particles suspended in turbulent flows. Using the simulation from our previous work, we compute the relative velocity PDF as a function of the friction timescales, tau_p1 and tau_p2, of two particles of arbitrary sizes. The friction time of particles included in the simulation ranges from 0.1 tau_eta to 54T_L, with tau_eta and T_L the Kolmogorov time and the Lagrangian correlation time of the flow, respectively. The relative velocity PDF is generically non-Gaussian, exhibiting fat tails. For a fixed value of tau_p1, the PDF is the fattest for equal-size particles (tau_p2~tau_p1), and becomes thinner at both tau_p2tau_p1. Defining f as the friction time ratio of the smaller particle to the larger one, we find that, at a given f in 1/2>T_L). These features are successfully explained by the Pan & Padoan model. Usin...

  15. Features of Seismicity in the Northeastern China Region and Their Relation to the Subduction of the Japan Sea Plate

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Sun Wenbin; He Yueshi

    2004-01-01

    Based on the analyses of grouped activity features of deep-focus (M ≥ 6.0) and shallow-focus(Ms ≥ 5.0) earthquakes in the Northeast China region, the time-space correlation betweendeep focus "strong earthquake group" and shallow focus "strong earthquake group" have beenstudied. The study was mainly on the characteristics of earthquake distribution on the collisionzone between the west Pacific plate and the Eurasian plate and on its relations to themorphological feature of the western Pacific subduction zone. Moreover, emphasis was laid onanalysis of the effect of the west Pacific plate on the seismicity of Eurasian plate. It is shownthat in the region where the west Pacific plate subducts at low angles, the seismicity on theplate collision zone is strong, the effect of plate subduction on Eurasian continent is strong too,and the subduction zone is under a state of high compressional stress. However, in the regionwhere the west Pacific plate subducts at high angles, the seismicity along the plate collision zoneis weak, the effect of plate subduction on Eurasian continent is weak too, and the tensile stressproduced by the subduction zone at depth is enhanced. We therefore propose that the seismicityin the northeast China region will enter an active period of shallow "strong earthquake group"in the future 10 years. In the period, six earthquakes of Ms ≥5.0 may occur. Therefore, the work of earthquake monitoring and prediction in this region shall be strengthened.

  16. Pressure-velocity relations in reservoir rocks: Modified MacBeth's equation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grana, Dario

    2016-09-01

    The knowledge of the saturation and pressure effects on elastic properties is a key factor in reservoir monitoring. The relation between saturation changes and velocity variations is well known in rock physics and at seismic frequency it can be satisfactorily described by Gassmann's equations. The pressure effect still requires deeper investigations in order to be included in rock physics models for 4D studies. Theoretical models of velocity-pressure relations often do not match lab measurements, or contain empirical constants or theoretical parameters that are difficult to calibrate or do not have a precise physical meaning. In this work, I present a new model to describe the pressure sensitivity of elastic moduli for clastic rocks. The proposed model is an extension of MacBeth's relations. These equations are then integrated within a complete rock physics model to describe the relation between rock properties (porosity and clay content), dynamic attributes (saturation and pressure) and elastic properties. The proposed model is calibrated with laboratory measurements of dry samples over a wide range of pressure variations and then applied to well data to simulate different production scenarios. The complete rock physics model can then be used in time-lapse inversion to predict the distribution of dynamic property changes in the reservoir within an inversion workflow for reservoir monitoring.

  17. High lipid order of Arabidopsis cell-plate membranes mediated by sterol and DYNAMIN-RELATED PROTEIN1A function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frescatada-Rosa, Márcia; Stanislas, Thomas; Backues, Steven K; Reichardt, Ilka; Men, Shuzhen; Boutté, Yohann; Jürgens, Gerd; Moritz, Thomas; Bednarek, Sebastian Y; Grebe, Markus

    2014-12-01

    Membranes of eukaryotic cells contain high lipid-order sterol-rich domains that are thought to mediate temporal and spatial organization of cellular processes. Sterols are crucial for execution of cytokinesis, the last stage of cell division, in diverse eukaryotes. The cell plate of higher-plant cells is the membrane structure that separates daughter cells during somatic cytokinesis. Cell-plate formation in Arabidopsis relies on sterol- and DYNAMIN-RELATED PROTEIN1A (DRP1A)-dependent endocytosis. However, functional relationships between lipid membrane order or lipid packing and endocytic machinery components during eukaryotic cytokinesis have not been elucidated. Using ratiometric live imaging of lipid order-sensitive fluorescent probes, we show that the cell plate of Arabidopsis thaliana represents a dynamic, high lipid-order membrane domain. The cell-plate lipid order was found to be sensitive to pharmacological and genetic alterations of sterol composition. Sterols co-localize with DRP1A at the cell plate, and DRP1A accumulates in detergent-resistant membrane fractions. Modifications of sterol concentration or composition reduce cell-plate membrane order and affect DRP1A localization. Strikingly, DRP1A function itself is essential for high lipid order at the cell plate. Our findings provide evidence that the cell plate represents a high lipid-order domain, and pave the way to explore potential feedback between lipid order and function of dynamin-related proteins during cytokinesis.

  18. Configuration of geological domains and geodynamic evolution of the Africa-Eurasia plate boundary off SW Iberia revisited based on seismic velocity and density models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martínez-Loriente, Sara; Sallarès, Valentí; Gràcia, Eulàlia; Bartolome, Rafael; Ranero, César

    2015-04-01

    We present a new classification of geological (basement) domains at the Africa-Eurasia plate boundary offshore SW Iberia, together with a regional geodynamic reconstruction spanning from the Mesozoic extension to the Neogene-to-present-day convergence. It is based on seismic velocity and density models along two regional wide-angle seismic transects, one running NW-SE from the Tagus to the Seine abyssal plains, and the other running N-S from S Portugal to the Seine Abyssal Plain, combined with previously available information. The seismic velocity and density structure at the Seine Abyssal Plain and the internal Gulf of Cadiz indicates the presence of a highly heterogeneous oceanic crust, similar to that described in ultra-slow spreading centers, whereas in the Horseshoe and Tagus abyssal plains, the basement structure resembles that of exhumed mantle sections identified in the Northern Atlantic margin. The integration of all this new information allows defining the presence of three oceanic domains off SW Iberia: (1) the Seine Abyssal Plain domain, generated during the first stages of slow seafloor spreading in the NE segment of the Central Atlantic (Early Jurassic); (2) the Gulf of Cadiz domain, made of oceanic crust generated in the Alpine-Tethys spreading system between Iberia and Africa, which was coeval with the formation of the Seine Abyssal Plain domain and lasted up to the North Atlantic continental break-up (Late Jurassic); and (3) the Gorringe Bank domain, mainly made of rocks exhumed from the mantle with little synchronous magmatism, which formed during the first stages of North Atlantic opening (Early Cretaceous). Our models suggest that the Seine Abyssal Plain and Gulf of Cadiz domains are separated by the Lineament South strike-slip fault, whereas the Gulf of Cadiz and Gorringe Bank domains appear to be limited by a deep thrust fault located at the center of the Horseshoe Abyssal Plain, which coincides with the seismicity cluster nucleated in the

  19. Development of a laser speckle imaging system for measuring relative blood flow velocity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Michael S. D.; Packulak, Ernie F.; Sowa, Michael G.

    2006-09-01

    Determining the viability of damaged or surgically reconstructed tissue is critical in most plastic and reconstructive surgery procedures. Information about tissue blood flow in the region in question can make this determination much easier. Laser speckle imaging (LSI) is one technique that could potentially aid in making this determination. LSI is a non-contact full-field imaging technique with simultaneous high spatial and temporal resolution. Tissue is illuminated with diffuse red laser light and the spatial and/or temporal statistics of the resulting speckle pattern can be used to calculate relative flow velocities. We have developed a LSI system that produces relative velocity blood flow images. Bench tests of the system indicate that it may be used to distinguish between normal, decreased, and increased blood flow states of a human finger. The system has also been used to take some initial laboratory measurements using an animal model - an epigastric free flap on a rat. Preliminary results indicate that the method may be used to distinguish states of venous or arterial occlusion from unoccluded states of the skin flap. While further experimentation is necessary, these initial results indicate that LSI could be a useful aid to the plastic surgeon for assessing tissue viability.

  20. Non-linear hydrodynamics of axion dark matter: relative velocity effects and "quantum forces"

    CERN Document Server

    Marsh, David J E

    2015-01-01

    The non-linear hydrodynamic equations for axion/scalar field dark matter (DM) in the non-relativistic Madelung-Shcr\\"{o}dinger form are derived in a simple manner, including the effects of universal expansion and Hubble drag. The hydrodynamic equations are used to investigate the relative velocity between axion DM and baryons, and the moving-background perturbation theory (MBPT) derived. Axions massive enough to be all of the DM do not affect the coherence length of the relative velocity, but the MBPT equations are modified by the inclusion of the axion effective sound speed. These MBPT equations are necessary for accurately modelling the effects of axion DM on the formation of the first cosmic structures, and suggest that the 21cm power spectrum could improve constraints on axion mass by up to four orders of magnitude with respect to the current best constraints. A further application of these results uses the "quantum force" analogy to model scalar field gradient energy in a smoothed-particle hydrodynamics ...

  1. The XMM Cluster Survey: evolution of the velocity dispersion -- temperature relation over half a Hubble time

    CERN Document Server

    Wilson, Susan; Rooney, Philip J; Caldwell, Caroline; Kay, Scott T; Collins, Chris A; McCarthy, Ian G; Romer, A Kathy; Bermeo-Hernandez, Alberto; Bernstein, Rebecca; da Costa, Luiz; Gifford, Daniel; Hollowood, Devon; Hoyle, Ben; Jeltema, Tesla; Liddle, Andrew R; Maia, Marcio A G; Mann, Robert G; Mayers, Julian A; Mehrtens, Nicola; Miller, Christopher J; Nichol, Robert C; Ogando, Ricardo; Sahlén, Martin; Stahl, Benjamin; Stott, John P; Thomas, Peter A; Viana, Pedro T P; Wilcox, Harry

    2015-01-01

    We measure the evolution of the velocity dispersion--temperature ($\\sigma_{\\rm v}$--$T_{\\rm X}$) relation up to $z = 1$ using a sample of 38 galaxy clusters drawn from the \\textit{XMM} Cluster Survey. This work improves upon previous studies by the use of a homogeneous cluster sample and in terms of the number of high redshift clusters included. We present here new redshift and velocity dispersion measurements for 12 $z > 0.5$ clusters observed with the GMOS instruments on the Gemini telescopes. Using an orthogonal regression method, we find that the slope of the relation is steeper than that expected if clusters were self-similar, and that the evolution of the normalisation is slightly negative, but not significantly different from zero ($\\sigma_{\\rm v} \\propto T^{0.86 \\pm 0.14} E(z)^{-0.37 \\pm 0.33}$). We verify our results by applying our methods to cosmological hydrodynamical simulations. The lack of evolution seen from the data suggests that the feedback does not significantly heat the gas, a result that...

  2. Disk galaxy scaling relations at intermediate redshifts - I. The Tully-Fisher and velocity-size relations

    CERN Document Server

    Boehm, Asmus

    2015-01-01

    Galaxy scaling relations such as the Tully-Fisher relation (between maximum rotation velocity Vmax and luminosity) and the velocity-size relation (between Vmax and disk scale length) are powerful tools to quantify the evolution of disk galaxies with cosmic time. We took spatially resolved slit spectra of 261 field disk galaxies at redshifts up to z~1 using the FORS instruments of the ESO Very Large Telescope. The targets were selected from the FORS Deep Field and William Herschel Deep Field. Our spectroscopy was complemented with HST/ACS imaging in the F814W filter. We analyzed the ionized gas kinematics by extracting rotation curves from the 2-D spectra. Taking into account all geometrical, observational and instrumental effects, these rotation curves were used to derive the intrinsic Vmax. Neglecting galaxies with disturbed kinematics or insufficient spatial rotation curve extent, Vmax could be determined for 137 galaxies covering redshifts 0.05

  3. Evidence for relative motions between the Indian and Australian Plates during the last 20 m.y. from plate tectonic reconstructions: Implications for the deformation of the Indo-Australian Plate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Royer, Jean-Yves; Chang, Ted

    1991-07-01

    We use plate tectonic reconstructions to establish whether motions between India and Australia occurred since chron 18 (43 Ma). We test the Africa/Antarctica/Australia/India plate circuit closure at chrons 5 (10 Ma), 6 (21 Ma) and 13 (36 Ma) using a compilation of magnetic anomalies and fracture zone traces from the Southeast, Southwest, Central Indian and the Carlsberg ridges. Additional reconstructions at chrons 23 (55 Ma) and 26 (61 Ma) are used to estimate the overall motion between India and Australia. Relative motions between the Indian and Australian plates are estimated using the plate circuit India → Africa → Australia. A new statistical approach, based on spherical regression analyses, is used to assess the uncertainty of the "best-fitting" finite rotations from the uncertainties in the data. The uncertainty in a rotation is described by a covariance matrix directly related to the geometry of the reconstructed plate boundary, to the distribution and estimated errors of the data points along it. Our parameterization of the rotations allows for simple combination of the rotation uncertainties along a plate circuit path. Results for chron 5 are remarkably consistent with present-day kinematics in the Indian Ocean, except that the Arabian and Indian plates are found to be separate plates. Comparisons of the motions between the Indian and African plates across the Carlsberg Ridge with that between the Australian and African plates across the Central Indian Ridge evidence a significant counterclockwise rotation of the Australian plate relative to the Indian plate about a pole located in the Central Indian Basin. The determinations are consistent for chrons 26, 13, 6 and 5. Determination at chron 23 is different but questionable due to the small number of available data. We propose two alternative solutions that both predict convergence within the Wharton and Central Indian basins and extension in the vicinity of the Chagos-Laccadive Ridge. The first

  4. The GALEX Arecibo SDSS Survey. IV. Baryonic Mass-Velocity-Size Relations of Massive Galaxies

    CERN Document Server

    Catinella, Barbara; Schiminovich, David; Lemonias, Jenna; Scannapieco, Cecilia; Wang, Jing; Fabello, Silvia; Hummels, Cameron; Moran, Sean M; Wu, Ronin; Cooper, Andrew P; Giovanelli, Riccardo; Haynes, Martha P; Heckman, Timothy M; Saintonge, Amélie

    2011-01-01

    We present dynamical scaling relations for a homogeneous and representative sample of ~500 massive galaxies, selected only by stellar mass (>10^10 Msun) and redshift (0.025relations for this sample, and investigate how galaxies scatter around the best fits obtained for pruned subsets of disk-dominated and bulge-dominated systems. The BFJ relation is significantly less scattered than the BTF when the relations are applied to their maximum samples, and is not affected by the inclination problems that plague the BTF. Disk-dominated, gas-rich galaxies systematically deviate from the BFJ relation defined by the spheroids. We demonstrate that by applying a simple correction to the stellar velocity dispersions that depends only on the concentration index of the galaxy, we are able to bring disks and spheroids onto the same dynamical relation -- in other words, we obtain a generalized BFJ re...

  5. Age-velocity dispersion relations and heating histories in disc galaxies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aumer, Michael; Binney, James; Schönrich, Ralph

    2016-10-01

    We analyse the heating of stellar discs by non-axisymmetric structures and giant molecular clouds (GMCs) in N-body simulations of growing disc galaxies. The analysis resolves long-standing discrepancies between models and data by demonstrating the importance of distinguishing between measured age-velocity dispersion relations (AVRs) and the heating histories of the stars that make up the AVR. We fit both AVRs and heating histories with formulae ∝tβ and determine the exponents βR and βz derived from in-plane and vertical AVRs and tilde{β }_R and tilde{β }_z from heating histories. Values of βz are in almost all simulations larger than values of tilde{β }_z, whereas values of βR are similar to or mildly larger than values of tilde{β }_R. Moreover, values of βz (tilde{β }_z) are generally larger than values of βR (tilde{β }_R). The dominant cause of these relations is the decline over the life of the disc in importance of GMCs as heating agents relative to spiral structure and the bar. We examine how age errors and biases in solar neighbourhood surveys influence the measured AVR: they tend to decrease β values by smearing out ages and thus measured dispersions. We compare AVRs and velocity ellipsoid shapes σz/σR from simulations to solar neighbourhood data. We conclude that for the expected disc mass and dark halo structure, combined GMC and spiral/bar heating can explain the AVR of the Galactic thin disc. Strong departures of the disc mass or the dark halo structure from expectation spoil fits to the data.

  6. Milgrom Relation Models for Spiral Galaxies from Two-Dimensional Velocity Maps

    CERN Document Server

    Barnes, E I; Sellwood, J A; Barnes, Eric I.; Kosowsky, Arthur; Sellwood, Jerry A.

    2007-01-01

    Using two-dimensional velocity maps and I-band photometry, we have created mass models of 40 spiral galaxies using the Milgrom relation (the basis of modified Newtonian dynamics, or MOND) to complement previous work. A Bayesian technique is employed to compare several different dark matter halo models to Milgrom and Newtonian models. Pseudo-isothermal dark matter halos provide the best statistical fits to the data in a majority of cases, while the Milgrom relation generally provides good fits as well. We also find that Milgrom models give mass-to-light ratios that roughly correlate with galaxy color, as predicted by stellar population models. A subsample of galaxies in the Hydra cluster follow a tight relation between mass-to-light and color, but one that is significantly different from relations found in previous studies. Ruling out the Milgrom relation with rotational kinematics is difficult due to systematic uncertainties in the observations as well as underlying model assumptions. We discuss in detail two...

  7. A framework for simulating ultrasound imaging based on first order nonlinear pressure–velocity relations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Du, Yigang; Fan, Rui; Li, Yong

    2016-01-01

    An ultrasound imaging framework modeled with the first order nonlinear pressure–velocity relations (NPVR) based simulation and implemented by a half-time staggered solution and pseudospectral method is presented in this paper. The framework is capable of simulating linear and nonlinear ultrasound...... propagation and reflections in a heterogeneous medium with different sound speeds and densities. It can be initialized with arbitrary focus, excitation and apodization for multiple individual channels in both 2D and 3D spatial fields. The simulated channel data can be generated using this framework......, and ultrasound image can be obtained by beamforming the simulated channel data. Various results simulated by different algorithms are illustrated for comparisons. The root mean square (RMS) errors for each compared pulses are calculated. The linear propagation is validated by an angular spectrum approach (ASA...

  8. Disk galaxy scaling relations at intermediate redshifts. I. The Tully-Fisher and velocity-size relations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Böhm, Asmus; Ziegler, Bodo L.

    2016-07-01

    Aims: Galaxy scaling relations such as the Tully-Fisher relation (between the maximum rotation velocity Vmax and luminosity) and the velocity-size relation (between Vmax and the disk scale length) are powerful tools to quantify the evolution of disk galaxies with cosmic time. Methods: We took spatially resolved slit spectra of 261 field disk galaxies at redshifts up to z ≈ 1 using the FORS instruments of the ESO Very Large Telescope. The targets were selected from the FORS Deep Field and William Herschel Deep Field. Our spectroscopy was complemented with HST/ACS imaging in the F814W filter. We analyzed the ionized gas kinematics by extracting rotation curves from the two-dimensional spectra. Taking into account all geometrical, observational, and instrumental effects, these rotation curves were used to derive the intrinsic Vmax. Results: Neglecting galaxies with disturbed kinematics or insufficient spatial rotation curve extent, Vmax was reliably determined for 124 galaxies covering redshifts 0.05 gas and/or small satellites. From scrutinizing the combined evolution in luminosity and size, we find that the galaxies that show the strongest evolution toward smaller sizes at z ≈ 1 are not those that feature the strongest evolution in luminosity, and vice versa. Based on observations with the European Southern Observatory Very Large Telescope (ESO-VLT), observing run IDs 65.O-0049, 66.A-0547, 68.A-0013, 69.B-0278B, 70.B-0251A and 081.B-0107A.The full Table 1 is only available at the CDS via anonymous ftp to http://cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr (http://130.79.128.5) or via http://cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr/viz-bin/qcat?J/A+A/592/A64

  9. Inversion for the driving forces of plate tectonics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richardson, R. M.

    1983-01-01

    Inverse modeling techniques have been applied to the problem of determining the roles of various forces that may drive and resist plate tectonic motions. Separate linear inverse problems have been solved to find the best fitting pole of rotation for finite element grid point velocities and to find the best combination of force models to fit the observed relative plate velocities for the earth's twelve major plates using the generalized inverse operator. Variance-covariance data on plate motion have also been included. Results emphasize the relative importance of ridge push forces in the driving mechanism. Convergent margin forces are smaller by at least a factor of two, and perhaps by as much as a factor of twenty. Slab pull, apparently, is poorly transmitted to the surface plate as a driving force. Drag forces at the base of the plate are smaller than ridge push forces, although the sign of the force remains in question.

  10. Inversion for the driving forces of plate tectonics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richardson, R. M.

    1983-01-01

    Inverse modeling techniques have been applied to the problem of determining the roles of various forces that may drive and resist plate tectonic motions. Separate linear inverse problems have been solved to find the best fitting pole of rotation for finite element grid point velocities and to find the best combination of force models to fit the observed relative plate velocities for the earth's twelve major plates using the generalized inverse operator. Variance-covariance data on plate motion have also been included. Results emphasize the relative importance of ridge push forces in the driving mechanism. Convergent margin forces are smaller by at least a factor of two, and perhaps by as much as a factor of twenty. Slab pull, apparently, is poorly transmitted to the surface plate as a driving force. Drag forces at the base of the plate are smaller than ridge push forces, although the sign of the force remains in question.

  11. Automation of manufacturing products from intelligent polymeric composites with regard to the components relative velocity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Олексій Модестович Халімовський

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available A device design has been developed that makes it possible to insert intelligent sensors (IS into the products from composite polymeric materials to control their stress-strain state. The results of the experiments made it possible to improve the algorithm of coordinated work of the vector controlled induction electric drive of the device elements. The simulation results of the transient processes of the operating conditions of the IS automatic insertions into the predetermined spatial coordinates of the extruder channel polymer have been shown. The presence of such sensors within the given spatial coordinates of a product is realized due to rapid movement of molten polymer with included IS under use of the scheme of influx fitting to the polymer that moves in the main channel of the extruder. Based on the simulation results a dependence function for the immersion depth of the polymer melt with included IS from its movement velocity has been obtained. The approximation of this dependence via a polynomial function of 5-th order made it possible to determine with the relative error less than 1% analytically the linear velocity of the rod in the cylinder injector for transporting of the molten polymer with included IS to the predetermined spatial coordinates of the polymer channel of the extruder. For inserting of the intelligent sensors (IS into the depth of 1.2 mm a required motor speed of electric drive was calculated under considering of the peculiarities of the chosen kinematic scheme. The obtained experimental data have confirmed the possibility of technical implementation of the developed device as well as allowed refining of the algorithm for the automation system. The simulation results for the system have been presented. The system used the vector-controlled asynchronous electric drives with standard settings for their contours to provide the agreed movement of the plasticiser screw and the injector rod by inserting of IS at a given depth

  12. Plate Boundary Observatory and related networks: GPS data analysis methods and geodetic products

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herring, Thomas A.; Melbourne, Timothy I.; Murray, Mark H.; Floyd, Michael A.; Szeliga, Walter M.; King, Robert W.; Phillips, David A.; Puskas, Christine M.; Santillan, Marcelo; Wang, Lei

    2016-12-01

    The Geodesy Advancing Geosciences and EarthScope (GAGE) Facility Global Positioning System (GPS) Data Analysis Centers produce position time series, velocities, and other parameters for approximately 2000 continuously operating GPS receivers spanning a quadrant of Earth's surface encompassing the high Arctic, North America, and Caribbean. The purpose of this review is to document the methodology for generating station positions and their evolution over time and to describe the requisite trade-offs involved with combination of results. GAGE GPS analysis involves formal merging within a Kalman filter of two independent, loosely constrained solutions: one is based on precise point positioning produced with the GIPSY/OASIS software at Central Washington University and the other is a network solution based on phase and range double-differencing produced with the GAMIT software at New Mexico Institute of Mining and Technology. The primary products generated are the position time series that show motions relative to a North America reference frame and secular motions of the stations represented in the velocity field. The position time series themselves contain a multitude of signals in addition to the secular motions. Coseismic and postseismic signals, seasonal signals from hydrology, and transient events, some understood and others not yet fully explained, are all evident in the time series and ready for further analysis and interpretation. We explore the impact of analysis assumptions on the reference frame realization and on the final solutions, and we compare within the GAGE solutions and with others.

  13. On the mass-metallicity relation, velocity dispersion and gravitational well depth of GRB host galaxies

    CERN Document Server

    Arabsalmani, Maryam; Fynbo, Johan P U; Christensen, Lise; Freudling, Wolfram; Savaglio, Sandra; Zafar, Tayyaba

    2014-01-01

    We analyze a sample of 16 absorption systems intrinsic to long duration GRB host galaxies at $z \\gtrsim 2$ for which the metallicities are known. We compare the relation between the metallicity and cold gas velocity width for this sample to that of the QSO-DLAs, and find complete agreement. We then compare the redshift evolution of the mass-metallicity relation of our sample to that of QSO-DLAs and find that also GRB hosts favour a late onset of this evolution, around a redshift of $\\approx 2.6$. We compute predicted stellar masses for the GRB host galaxies using the prescription determined from QSO-DLA samples and compare the measured stellar masses for the four hosts where stellar masses have been determined from SED fits. We find excellent agreement and conclude that, on basis of all available data and tests, long duration GRB-DLA hosts and intervening QSO-DLAs are consistent with being drawn from the same underlying population. GRB host galaxies and QSO-DLAs are found to have different impact parameter di...

  14. Health-related quality of life after segmental resection of the lateral mandible: Free fibula flap versus plate reconstruction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Gemert, Johannes; Holtslag, Irene; van der Bilt, Andries; Merkx, Matthias; Koole, Ron; Van Cann, Ellen

    2015-06-01

    Segmental resection of the mandible causes functional, aesthetic and social problems affecting health-related quality of life (HRQoL). It is often assumed that reconstruction with composite free flaps guarantees better function and aesthetics than bridging the defect with reconstruction plates. Using the European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer questionnaires (EORTC QLQ-C30 version 3.0 and EORTC QLQ-H&N35), we compared HRQoL in patients who received free fibula flaps versus reconstruction plates after segmental resection of the lateral mandible. Thirty-seven completed questionnaires (18 fibula reconstructions and 19 patients with reconstruction plates) were available. Reconstruction with a free fibula flap did not provide clear additional benefit to bridging the defect with a reconstruction plate after segmental resection of the lateral mandible. In particular aspects known to have the most impact on HRQoL like swallowing, speech and chewing were not influenced by the type of reconstruction. Reconstruction of segmental defects of the lateral mandible with free fibula flap and reconstruction plate resulted in comparable HRQoL. If dental rehabilitation by means of dental implants is not anticipated in the fibula, then plate reconstruction with adequate soft tissue remains a suitable technique for the reconstruction of segmental defects of the lateral mandible. Copyright © 2015 European Association for Cranio-Maxillo-Facial Surgery. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. The relation between hip impact velocity and hip impact force differs between sideways fall techniques.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Groen, B.E.; Weerdesteijn, V.G.M.; Duysens, J.

    2008-01-01

    Fall techniques that reduce fall severity may decrease the risk of hip fractures. A fundamental variable for fall severity is impact force, but impact velocity is also used. The purpose of the study was to determine whether impact velocity is valid to determine differences in fall severity between

  16. The relation between hip impact velocity and hip impact force differs between sideways fall techniques.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Groen, B.E.; Weerdesteijn, V.G.M.; Duysens, J.

    2008-01-01

    Fall techniques that reduce fall severity may decrease the risk of hip fractures. A fundamental variable for fall severity is impact force, but impact velocity is also used. The purpose of the study was to determine whether impact velocity is valid to determine differences in fall severity between d

  17. The Mean and Scatter of the Velocity Dispersion-Optical Richness Relation for MaxBCG Galaxy Clusters

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Becker, M.R.; McKay, T.A.; /Michigan U.; Koester, B.; /Chicago U., Astron. Astrophys. Ctr.; Wechsler, R.H.; /KIPAC, Menlo Park /SLAC /Stanford U., Phys. Dept.; Rozo, E.; /Ohio State U.; Evrard, A.; /Michigan U. /Michigan U., MCTP; Johnston, D.; /Caltech, JPL; Sheldon, E.; /New York U.; Annis, J.; /Fermilab; Lau, E.; /Chicago U., Astron. Astrophys. Ctr.; Nichol, R.; /Portsmouth U., ICG; Miller, C.; /Michigan U.

    2007-06-05

    The distribution of galaxies in position and velocity around the centers of galaxy clusters encodes important information about cluster mass and structure. Using the maxBCG galaxy cluster catalog identified from imaging data obtained in the Sloan Digital Sky Survey, we study the BCG--galaxy velocity correlation function. By modeling its non-Gaussianity, we measure the mean and scatter in velocity dispersion at fixed richness. The mean velocity dispersion increases from 202 {+-} 10 km s{sup -1} for small groups to more than 854 {+-} 102 km s{sup -1} for large clusters. We show the scatter to be at most 40.5{+-}3.5%, declining to 14.9{+-}9.4% in the richest bins. We test our methods in the C4 cluster catalog, a spectroscopic cluster catalog produced from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey DR2 spectroscopic sample, and in mock galaxy catalogs constructed from N-body simulations. Our methods are robust, measuring the scatter to well within one-sigma of the true value, and the mean to within 10%, in the mock catalogs. By convolving the scatter in velocity dispersion at fixed richness with the observed richness space density function, we measure the velocity dispersion function of the maxBCG galaxy clusters. Although velocity dispersion and richness do not form a true mass--observable relation, the relationship between velocity dispersion and mass is theoretically well characterized and has low scatter. Thus our results provide a key link between theory and observations up to the velocity bias between dark matter and galaxies.

  18. LINKING MOTOR-RELATED BRAIN POTENTIALS AND VELOCITY PROFILES IN MULTI-JOINT ARM REACHING MOVEMENTS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Julià L Amengual

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available The study of the movement related brain potentials (MRPBs needs accurate technical approaches to disentangle the specific patterns of bran activity during the preparation and execution of movements. During the last forty years, synchronizing the electromiographic activation (EMG of the muscle with the electrophysiological recordings (EEG has been commonly ussed for these purposes. However, new clinical approaches in the study of motor diseases and rehabilitation suggest the demand of new paradigms that might go further into the study of the brain activity associated with the kinematics of movement. As a response to this call, we have used a 3-D hand tracking system with the aim to record continuously the position of an ultrasonic sender located on the hand during the performance of multi-joint self-pace movements. We synchronized the time-series of position of velocity of the sender with the EEG recordings, obtaining specific patterns of brain activity as a function of the fluctuations of the kinematics during the natural movement performance. Additionally, the distribution of the brain activity during the preparation and execution phases of movement was similar that reported previously using the EMG, suggesting the validity of our technique. We claim that this paradigm could be usable in patients because of its simplicity and the potential knowledge that can be extracted from clinical protocols.

  19. Universal current-velocity relation of skyrmion motion in chiral magnets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iwasaki, Junichi; Mochizuki, Masahito; Nagaosa, Naoto

    2013-03-01

    Current-driven motion of the magnetic domain wall requires large critical current density jc ~109 -1012 A/m2, at which the joule heating is a serious problem. The skyrmions recently discovered in chiral magnets, on the other hand, have much smaller critical current of jc ~105 -106 A/m2. We present a numerical simulation of the Landau-Lifshitz-Gilbert equation, which reveals a remarkably robust and universal current-velocity relation of the slyrmion motion driven by the spin transfer torque unaffected by either impurities or nonadiabatic effect in sharp contrast to the case of domain wall or spin helix (HL). Simulation results are analyzed using a theory based on Thiele's equation, and it is concluded that this surprising behavior is due to the Magnus force and flexible shape-deformation of individual skyrmions and skyrmion crystal (SkX), which enable them to avoid pinning centers and then weaken the net pinning force. Dynamical deformation of SkX leads to the fluctuation of Bragg peak with large amplitude, which can be detected by the recent neutron-scattering experiment.

  20. The Development of High Power Materials with Enhanced Vibrational Velocity and Related Origin Investigation

    Science.gov (United States)

    2003-06-01

    Introduction Ultrasonic transducers for high power applications, such as ultrasonic motors and piezoelectric actuators have been intensively...investigated in recent years 1-5. The materials with low loss and high vibrational velocity vo are desirable for ultrasonic motors application. Higher...velocity are an important issue, which to date has proven difficult to achieve. Heat generation is the most serious problem in ultrasonic motors , which

  1. Sound velocity and related properties of seafloor sediments in the Bering Sea and Chukchi Sea

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    MENG Xiangmei; LI Guanbao; HAN Guozhong; KAN Guangming

    2015-01-01

    The Bering Sea shelf and Chukchi Sea shelf are believed to hold enormous oil and gas reserves which have attracted a lot of geophysical surveys. For the interpretation of acoustic geophysical survey results, sediment sound velocity is one of the main parameters. On seven sediment cores collected from the Bering Sea and Chukchi Sea during the 5th Chinese National Arctic Research Expedition, sound velocity measurements were made at 35, 50, 100, 135, 150, 174, 200, and 250 kHz using eight separate pairs of ultrasonic transducers. The measured sound velocities range from 1 425.1 m/s to 1 606.4 m/s and are dispersive with the degrees of dispersion from 2.2% to 4.0% over a frequency range of 35–250 kHz. After the sound velocity measurements, the measurements of selected geotechnical properties and the Scanning Electron Microscopic observation of microstructure were also made on the sediment cores. The results show that the seafloor sediments are composed of silty sand, sandy silt, coarse silt, clayey silt, sand-silt-clay and silty clay. Aggregate and diatom debris is found in the seafloor sediments. Through comparative analysis of microphotographs and geotechnical properties, it is assumed that the large pore spaces between aggregates and the intraparticulate porosity of diatom debris increase the porosity of the seafloor sediments, and affect other geotechnical properties. The correlation analysis of sound velocity and geotechnical properties shows that the correlation of sound velocity with porosity and wet bulk density is extreme significant, while the correlation of sound velocity with clay content, mean grain size and organic content is not significant. The regression equations between porosity, wet bulk density and sound velocity based on best-fit polynomial are given.

  2. Bulbous epiphysis and popcorn calcification as related to growth plate differentiation in osteogenesis imperfecta

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brizola, Evelise; McCarthy, Edward; Shapiro, Jay Robert

    2015-01-01

    Summary Background Osteogenesis Imperfecta (OI) is an heritable systemic disorder of connective tissue due to different sequence variants in genes affecting both the synthesis of type I collagen and osteoblast function. Dominant and recessive inheritance is recognized. Approximately 90% of the OI cases are due to mutations in COL1A1/A2 genes. We clinically and radiologically describes an adult male with type III osteogenesis imperfecta who presents a rare bone dysplasia termed bulbous epiphyseal deformity in association with popcorn calcifications. Popcorn calcifications may occur with bulbous epiphyseal deformity or independently. Methods Molecular analysis was performed for COL1A1, COL1A2, LEPRE1 and WNT1 genes. Results An uncommon COL1A1 mutation was identified. Clinical and radiological exams confirmed a distinctive bulbous epiphyseal deformity with popcorn calcifications in distal femurs. We have identified four additional OI patients reported in current literature, whose X-rays show bulbous epiphyseal deformity related to mutations in CR-TAP, LEPRE1 and WNT1 genes. Conclusion The mutation identified here had been previously described twice in OI patients and no previous correlation with bulbous epiphyseal deformity was described. The occurrence of this bone dysplasia focuses attention on alterations in normal growth plate differentiation and the subsequent effect on endochondral bone formation in OI. PMID:26604951

  3. Plate Tectonics Constrained by Evidence-Based Magmatic Temperatures and Phase Relations of Fertile Lherzolite (Invited)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Green, D. H.; Falloon, T.

    2010-12-01

    In order to understand Earth’s plate tectonics we must interpret the most direct probes for mantle composition and temperature distribution i.e. the primitive basaltic magmas and peridotites representing partial melts and mantle residues. An evidence-based approach to identification of parental magmas and determination of their temperatures requires glass and phenocryst compositions and experimentally calibrated Fe/Mg partitioning between olivine and melt. We have compared magmatic crystallization temperatures between ‘hot-spot’(proposed to be plume-related) and normal mid-ocean ridge basalt (MORB) parental liquids, by examining three representative magmatic suites from both ocean island (Hawaii, Iceland, and Réunion) and mid-ocean ridge settings (Cocos-Nazca, East Pacific Rise, and Mid-Atlantic Ridge). We have glass and olivine phenocryst compositions, including volatile (H2O) contents, and have calculated parental liquid compositions at 0.2GPa by incrementally adding olivine back into the glass compositions until a liquid in equilibrium with the most-magnesian olivine phenocryst composition is obtained. The results of these calculations demonstrate that there is very little difference (maximum of ~20°C) between the ranges of crystallization temperatures of the parental liquids (MORB:1243-1351°C versus OIB:1286-1372°C) when volatile contents are taken into account. However while lacking temperature contrast, the source regions for ‘hot-spot’ parental magmas contain geochemical signatures of old subducted crust/lithosphere. The mantle depths of origin determined for both the MORB and OIB suites are similar (MORB:1-2 GPa; OIB:1-2.5 GPa). Calculations of mantle potential temperatures (Tp) are model dependent, particularly to melt fraction from an inferred source. Assuming similar fertile lherzolite sources, the differences in Tp values between the hottest MORB and the hottest ocean island tholeiite sources are ~80°C. These differences disappear if the

  4. Calibrating stellar velocity dispersions based on spatially-resolved h-band spectra for improving the m-sigma relation

    CERN Document Server

    Kang, Wol-Rang; Schulze, Andreas; Riechers, Dominik A; Kim, Sang Chul; Park, Daeseong; Smolcic, Vernesa

    2013-01-01

    To calibrate stellar velocity dispersion measurements from optical and near-IR stellar lines, and to improve the black hole mass (MBH)- stellar velocity dispersion (sigma) relation, we measure stellar velocity dispersions based on high quality H-band spectra for a sample of 31 nearby galaxies, for which dynamical MBH is available in the literature. By comparing velocity dispersions measured from stellar lines in the H-band with those measured from optical stellar lines, we find no significant difference, suggesting that optical and near-IR stellar lines represent the same kinematics and that dust effect is negligible for early-type galaxies. Based on the spatially-resolved rotation and velocity dispersion measurements along the major axis of each galaxy, we find that a rotating stellar disk is present for 80% of galaxies in the sample. For galaxies with a rotation component, velocity dispersions measured from a single aperture spectrum can vary by up to ~20%, depending on the size of the adopted extraction ap...

  5. Causal determination of acoustic group velocity and frequency derivative of attenuation with finite-bandwidth Kramers-Kronig relations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mobley, Joel; Waters, Kendall R; Miller, James G

    2005-07-01

    Kramers-Kronig (KK) analyses of experimental data are complicated by the extrapolation problem, that is, how the unexamined spectral bands impact KK calculations. This work demonstrates the causal linkages in resonant-type data provided by acoustic KK relations for the group velocity (c(g)) and the derivative of the attenuation coefficient (alpha') (components of the derivative of the acoustic complex wave number) without extrapolation or unmeasured parameters. These relations provide stricter tests of causal consistency relative to previously established KK relations for the phase velocity (c(p)) and attenuation coefficient (alpha) (components of the undifferentiated acoustic wave number) due to their shape invariance with respect to subtraction constants. For both the group velocity and attenuation derivative, three forms of the relations are derived. These relations are equivalent for bandwidths covering the entire infinite spectrum, but differ when restricted to bandlimited spectra. Using experimental data from suspensions of elastic spheres in saline, the accuracy of finite-bandwidth KK predictions for c(g) and alpha' is demonstrated. Of the multiple methods, the most accurate were found to be those whose integrals were expressed only in terms of the phase velocity and attenuation coefficient themselves, requiring no differentiated quantities.

  6. Epiphyseal growth plate growth hormone receptor signaling is decreased in chronic kidney disease-related growth retardation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Troib, Ariel; Landau, Daniel; Kachko, Leonid; Rabkin, Ralph; Segev, Yael

    2013-11-01

    Linear growth retardation in children with chronic kidney disease (CKD) has been ascribed to insensitivity to growth hormone. This resistance state has been attributed to impaired growth hormone signaling through the JAK2/STAT5 pathway in liver and skeletal muscle leading to reduced insulin-like growth factor-I (IGF-I). Here we determine whether systemic and growth plate alterations in growth hormone signaling contribute to CKD-induced linear growth retardation using partially nephrectomized and pair-fed control 20-day-old rats. Serum growth hormone did not change in rats with CKD, yet serum IGF-I levels were decreased and growth retarded. The tibial growth plate hypertrophic zone was wider and vascularization at the primary ossification center was reduced in CKD. This was associated with a decrease in growth plate vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) mRNA and immunostainable VEGF and IGF-I levels. Growth plate growth hormone receptor and STAT5 protein levels were unchanged, while JAK2 was reduced. Despite comparable growth hormone and growth hormone receptor levels in CKD and control rats, relative STAT5 phosphorylation was significantly depressed in CKD. Of note, the mRNA of SOCS2, an inhibitor of growth hormone signaling, was increased. Thus, linear growth impairment in CKD can in part be explained by impaired long bone growth plate growth hormone receptor signaling through the JAK2/STAT5 pathway, an abnormality that may be caused by an increase in SOCS2 expression.

  7. Movement Velocity as Indicator of Relative Intensity and Level of Effort Attained During the Set in Pull-Up Exercise.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sánchez-Moreno, Miguel; Rodríguez-Rosell, David; Pareja-Blanco, Fernando; Mora-Custodio, Ricardo; González-Badillo, Juan José

    2017-03-24

    to analyze the relationship between movement velocity and relative load (%1RM) in the pull-up exercise (PU), and to determine the pattern of repetition velocity loss during a single set to failure in pulling one's own body mass. Fifty-two men (age = 26.5 ± 3.9 years, body mass = 74.3 ± 7.2 kg) performed a first evaluation (T1) consisting of an one-repetition maximum test (1RM), and a test of maximum number of repetitions to failure pulling one's own body mass (MNR) in the PU exercise. Thirty-nine subjects performed both tests on a second occasion (T2) following 12 weeks' training. We observed a strong relationship between mean propulsive velocity (MPV) and %1RM (r = -.96). Mean velocity attained with 1RM load (V1RM) was 0.20 ± 0.05 m·s(-1) and it influenced the MPV attained with each %1RM. Although 1RM increased by 3.4% from T1 to T2, the relationship between MPV and %1RM, and V1RM remained stable. We also confirmed stability in the V1RM regardless of individual relative strength. We found a strong relationship between percentage of velocity loss and percentage of performed repetitions (R(2) = .88), which remained stable despite a 15% increase in MNR. Monitoring repetition velocity allows estimation of the %1RM used as soon as the first repetition with a given load is performed, and the number of repetitions remaining in reserve when a given percentage of velocity loss is achieved during a PU exercise set.

  8. About scaling properties of relative velocity between heavy particles in turbulence

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lanotte, A S [ISAC-CNR, and INFN, Sez. Lecce, 73100 Lecce (Italy); Bee, J [Universite de Nice-Sophia Antipolis, CNRS- OCA, Laboratoire Cassiopee, 06300 Nice (France); Biferale, L [Department of Physics and INFN, University of Rome Tor Vergata, 00133 Rome (Italy); Cencini, M [INFM-CNR, SMC Department of Physics, University of Rome La Sapienza, and ISC-CNR, 00185 Roma (Italy); Toschi, F, E-mail: a.lanotte@isac.cnr.it [Department of Physics Technische Universiteit Eindhoven, 5600 MB Eindhoven (Netherlands)

    2011-12-22

    We present results obtained from high-resolution direct numerical simulations (DNS) of incompressible, statistically homogeneous and isotropic turbulence, up to a Taylor scale based Reynolds number Re{sub {lambda}} {approx_equal} 200 and with millions of heavy particles with different inertia. In our set-up, particles are assumed to be spherical and rigid, they simply move by viscous forces, such as the Stokes drag. The velocity statistics is found to be extremely intermittent, with an almost bi-fractal behavior. Here, we consider also a new data analysis for the stationary distribution of rescaled longitudinal velocity difference and further assess the intermittent character of the heavy particles velocities, characterized by the presence of quasi-algebraic tails.

  9. Performance of streamlined bridge decks in relation to the aerodynamics of a flat plate

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larose, Guy; Livesey, Flora M.

    1997-01-01

    The aerodynamics of three modern bridge decks are compared to the aerodynamics of a 16:1 flat plate. The comparisons are made on the basis of the analytical evaluation of the performance of each cross-section to the buffeting action of the wind. In general, the closed-box girders studied in this ...... in this paper showed buffeting responses similar to a flat plate with the exception of the multi-box girder which performed much better aerodynamically.......The aerodynamics of three modern bridge decks are compared to the aerodynamics of a 16:1 flat plate. The comparisons are made on the basis of the analytical evaluation of the performance of each cross-section to the buffeting action of the wind. In general, the closed-box girders studied...

  10. The XMM Cluster Survey: evolution of the velocity dispersion–temperature relation over half a Hubble time

    OpenAIRE

    2016-01-01

    We measure the evolution of the velocity dispersion--temperature ($\\sigma_{\\rm v}$--$T_{\\rm X}$) relation up to $z = 1$ using a sample of 38 galaxy clusters drawn from the \\textit{XMM} Cluster Survey. This work improves upon previous studies by the use of a homogeneous cluster sample and in terms of the number of high redshift clusters included. We present here new redshift and velocity dispersion measurements for 12 $z > 0.5$ clusters observed with the GMOS instruments on the Gemini telescop...

  11. The XMM cluster survey:evolution of the velocity dispersion-temperature relation over half a Hubble time

    OpenAIRE

    Wilson, Susan; Rooney, Philip J; Caldwell, Caroline; Kay, Scott T; Collins, Chris A.; McCarthy, Ian G.; Romer, A. Kathy; Bermeo, Alberto; Bernstein, Rebecca; da Costa, Luiz; Gifford, Daniel; Hollowood, Devon; Hoyle, Ben; Jeltema, Tesla; Liddle, Andrew R.

    2016-01-01

    We measure the evolution of the velocity dispersion-temperature (sigma(v)-T-X) relation up to z = 1 using a sample of 38 galaxy clusters drawn from the XMM Cluster Survey. This work improves upon previous studies by the use of a homogeneous cluster sample and in terms of the number of high-redshift clusters included. We present here new redshift and velocity dispersion measurements for 12 z > 0.5 clusters observed with the Gemini Multi Object Spectographs instruments on the Gemini telescopes....

  12. Age-related botulinum toxin effects on muscle fiber conduction velocity in non-injected muscles

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lange, Fiete; van Weerden, Tiemen W.; van der Hoeven, Johannes H.

    2007-01-01

    Objective: We studied systemic effects of botulinum toxin (BTX) treatment on muscle fiber conduction velocity (MFCV) and possible effects of age. Methods: MFCV was determined by an invasive EMG method in the biceps brachii muscle. Seventeen BTX treated patients and 58 controls were investigated. BTX

  13. Age-related decline in mitral peak diastolic velocities is unaffected in well-trained runners

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olsen, Rasmus Huan; Couppé, Christian; Dall, Christian Have;

    2015-01-01

    (a') diastolic and systolic (s') annular longitudinal tissue Doppler velocities were measured by echocardiography during four stages (rest, supine bike exercise at 30% and 60% of maximal workload, and recovery). RESULTS: The athletes had marked cardiac remodeling, while overall differences in mitral...

  14. Velocities and relative amount of material ejected from Comet 9P/Tempel 1 after the Deep Impact collision

    CERN Document Server

    Ipatov, Sergei I

    2008-01-01

    Time variations of velocities and relative amount of material ejected from Comet 9P/Tempel 1 are studied based on analysis of the images made by Deep Impact (DI) cameras during the first 13 minutes after the collision of the DI impactor with the comet. The rate of production of observed ejected material and velocities considered correspond mainly to small (with diameter d1 s can be considered to be proportional to te^{-0.75} or te^{-0.7 }, but the decrease of velocity could differ from this exponential dependence. Comparison of the observed DI ejection with theoretical models testifies in favor of a model close to gravity-dominated cratering, i.e. in favor of greater amounts of ejected material and greater size of a crater.

  15. Motion of the Philippine Sea plate consistent with the NUVEL-1A model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zang, Shao Xian; Chen, Qi Yong; Ning, Jie Yuan; Shen, Zheng Kang; Liu, Yong Gang

    2002-09-01

    We determine Euler vectors for 12 plates, including the Philippine Sea plate (PH), relative to the fixed Pacific plate (PA) by inverting the earthquake slip vectors along the boundaries of the Philippine Sea plate, GPS observed velocities, and 1122 data from the NUVEL-1 and the NUVEL-1A global plate motion model, respectively. This analysis thus also yields Euler vectors for the Philippine Sea plate relative to adjacent plates. Our results are consistent with observed data and can satisfy the geological and geophysical constraints along the Caroline (CR)-PH and PA-CR boundaries. The results also give insight into internal deformation of the Philippine Sea plate. The area enclosed by the Ryukyu Trench-Nankai Trough, Izu-Bonin Trench and GPS stations S102, S063 and Okino Torishima moves uniformly as a rigid plate, but the areas near the Philippine Trench, Mariana Trough and Yap-Palau Trench have obvious deformation.

  16. The diastolic flow velocity-pressure gradient relation and dpv50 to assess the hemodynamic significance of coronary stenoses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marques, Koen M J; van Eenige, Machiel J; Spruijt, Hugo J; Westerhof, Nico; Twisk, Jos; Visser, Cees A; Visser, Frans C

    2006-12-01

    To evaluate the hemodynamic impact of coronary stenoses, the fractional (FFR) or coronary flow velocity reserve (CFVR) usually is measured. The combined measurement of instantaneous flow velocity and pressure gradient (v-dp relation) is rarely used in humans. We derived from the v-dp relation a new index, dp(v50) (pressure gradient at flow velocity of 50 cm/s), and compared the diagnostic performance of dp(v50), CFVR, and FFR. Before coronary angiography was performed, patients underwent noninvasive stress testing. In all coronary vessels with an intermediate or severe stenosis, the flow velocity, aortic, and distal coronary pressure were measured simultaneously with a Doppler and pressure guidewire after induction of hyperemia. After regression analysis of all middiastolic flow velocity and pressure gradient data, the dp(v50) was calculated. With the use of the results of noninvasive stress testing, the dp(v50) cutoff value was established at 22.4 mmHg. In 77 patients, 124 coronary vessels with a mean 39% (SD 19) diameter stenosis were analyzed. In 43 stenoses, ischemia was detected. We found a sensitivity, specificity, and accuracy of 56%, 86%, and 76% for CFVR; 77%, 99%, and 91% for FFR; and 95%, 95%, and 95% for dp(v50). To establish that dp(v50) is not dependent on maximal hyperemia, dp(v50) was recalculated after omission of the highest quartile of flow velocity data, showing a difference of 3%. We found that dp(v50) provided the highest sensitivity and accuracy compared with FFR and CFVR in the assessment of coronary stenoses. In contrast to CFVR and FFR, assessment of dp(v50) is not dependent on maximal hyperemia.

  17. Seismic and experimental insights into relative velocity changes at Volcán de Colima in 1998

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lamb, O. D.; De Angelis, S.; Wall, R.; Varley, N. R.; Reyes Dávila, G. A.; Arámbula-Mendoza, R.; Hornby, A. J.; Kendrick, J. E.; Lavallée, Y.

    2016-12-01

    Temporal changes in seismic velocity before eruptions have been measured in a few volcanoes around the world, raising its potential as a forecasting tool. Here we use seismic data from Volcán de Colima, Mexico, to investigate the effect of ascending magma on seismic wave propagation in the edifice. In addition, we use acoustic emissions from laboratory experiments to test the mechanism inferred from the seismic data. Volcán de Colima entered a new phase of eruptive activity in late 1998 with the extrusion of a new lava dome and flow. A multi-station detection algorithm was used to build a catalogue of 17,893 earthquakes from continuous data recorded by the local seismic network between 1 October 1998 and 1 January 1999. Coda wave interferometry was employed to assess relative seismic velocity change between pairs of repeating earthquakes at each station in the seismic network. First, 1,313 repeating events were identified using waveform correlation, before a stretching technique calculated the relative velocity change of each pair. Linear inversion of these measurements allowed us to retrieve the time history of seismic velocity change within the observation period. We infer that the variation in seismic velocity resulted from changes in the local stress regime caused by dyke formation during magma ascent. Using acoustic emissions recorded during Brazilian tensile tests on andesite from Volcán de Colima, we demonstrate that a decrease in seismic velocity can be attributed to crack dilation due to tensile stress. This study highlights how a multi-disciplinary approach to understanding geophysical signals can help future interpretations of pre-eruptive activity at volcanoes.

  18. 复合材料层压板低速冲击响应比例效应数值模拟研究%NUMERICAL MODELING OF SCALE EFFECTS ON THE RESPONSES OF LAMINATED COMPOSITE PLATE UNDER LOW VELOCITY IMPACT

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    陈亚军; 于哲峰; 汪海

    2012-01-01

    This paper presents the results of numerical modeling of the scale effect on the responses of laminated composite plate under low-velocity impact. Three full 3-D composite laminate models of different sizes are developed using ABAQUS finite element code. In these models,the modified Chang-Chang criterion is used to determine the interlaminar damage;and the delamination between the ply interfaces is simulated via interface elements. Once the impact damage initiates,the material properties are degraded with the subroutine VUMAT. By means of this method,impact responses under different impact velocities are computationally studied. From the results, some conclusions are drawn; if no damage occurs in the composite laminates during the impact,the displacement and the contact force are consistent with the presented scaling rules;whereas,the contact force disagrees with the scaling rules well once the impact damage appears. Moreover,if the velocity ratio between different models is equal to the square root of their scale factor,the relative delamination dimensions in the models are almost the same,showing good agreement with the experimental results. Further investigation shows that the dimensions of in-plane damage,i. e. , fibre failure, matrix cracking and matrix crushing,can not be predicted using the above rule.%为了研究结构几何比例对复合材料层压板在低速冲击作用下的动态响应和损伤的影响,基于ABAQUS有限元仿真平台使用包含面内损伤和分层损伤准则的层压板三维有限元模型进行冲击响应分析.在这些模型中,对于层压板的面内损伤,采用改进的Chang-Chang准则进行面内损伤预测;对于层压板内层间分层损伤,使用cohesive界面单元的失效进行模拟.一旦层压板在低速冲击作用下产生损伤,则通过VUMAT子程序对出现损伤区域的材料刚度参数进行折减.采用这种模型对三种尺寸的层压板受冲击过程进行仿真,比较了不同冲击

  19. Relation between hardness and ultrasonic velocity on pipeline steel welded joints

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carreón, H.; Barrera, G.; Natividad, C.; Salazar, M.; Contreras, A.

    2016-04-01

    In general, the ultrasonic techniques have been used to determine the mechanical properties of materials based on their relationship with metallurgical characteristics. In this research work, the relationship between ultrasonic wave velocity, hardness and the microstructure of steel pipeline welded joints is investigated. Measurements of ultrasonic wave velocity were made as a function of the location across the weld. Hardness measurements were performed in an attempt to correlate with ultrasonic response. In addition, the coarse and dendritic grain structure of the weld material is extreme and unpredictably anisotropic. Thus, due to the acoustic anisotropy of the crystal, weld material of studied joints is anisotropic too. Such structure is no longer direction-independent to the ultrasonic wave propagation; therefore, the ultrasonic beam deflects and redirects and the wave front becomes distorted. Thus, the use of conventional ultrasonic testing techniques using fixed beam angles is very limited and the application of conventional ultrasonic phased array techniques becomes desirable. This technique is proposed to assist pipeline operators in estimating the hardness through ultrasonic measures to evaluate the susceptibility to stress sulphide cracking and hydrogen-induced cracking due to hard spots in steel pipeline welded joints in service. Sound wave velocity and hardness measurements have been carried out on a steel welded joint. For each section of the welding, weld bead, fusion zone, heat affected zone and base metal were found to correspond particular values of the ultrasound velocity. These results were correlated with electron microscopy observations of the microstructure and sectorial scan view of welded joints by ultrasonic phased array.

  20. Significance of face velocity fluctuation in relation to laboratory fume hood performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tseng, Li-Ching; Huang, Rong Fung; Chen, Chih-Chieh

    2010-01-01

    In order to recognize the problems associated with the transport mechanism of containment during the ventilation process of a laboratory fume hood, a transparent, full scale chemical fume hood is constructed for experimental studies. Distributions of mean velocity and velocity fluctuation in the sash plane are measured using a thermal anemometer. Flow patterns and tracer-gas concentration leakages are respectively diagnosed via the laser-assisted flow visualization method and the EN 14175-3 test protocol. The magnitudes of measured velocity fluctuations exhibit a sharp peak along the perimeter of the sash opening. The results of flow visualization verify that the elevated turbulence fluctuations are induced by the boundary-layer separation when the flow passes over the edges of sash perimeter. The tracer gas experiment shows that the regions where high degree containment leakages detected are located along the perimeter of hood aperture. Eleven commercial hoods which are claimed with fine aerodynamic design are further tested for confirmation of these observations. The results show similar correlations. Conclusions thus are made that large-scale vortex structures occurring around the perimeters of hood aperture due to the boundary-layer separation could induce strong turbulence, and therefore enhance dispersion of the hood containment.

  1. Removing Activity-Related Radial Velocity Noise to Improve Extrasolar Planet Searches

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saar, Steven; Lindstrom, David M. (Technical Monitor)

    2004-01-01

    We have made significant progress towards the proposal goals of understanding the causes and effects of magnetic activity-induced radial velocity (v_r) jitter and developing methods for correcting it. In the process, we have also made some significant discoveries in the fields of planet-induced stellar activity, planet detection methods, M dwarf convection, starspot properties, and magnetic dynamo cycles. We have obtained super high resolution (R approximately 200,000), high S / N (greater than 300) echelle study of joint line bisector and radial velocity variations using the McDonald 2-D coude. A long observing run in October 2002 in particular was quite successful (8 clear nights). We now have close to three years of data, which begins to sample a good fraction of the magnetic cycle timescales for some of our targets (e.g., kappa Ceti; P_cyc = 5.6 yrs). This will be very helpful in unraveling the complex relationships between plage and radial velocity (v-r) changes which we have uncovered. Preliminary analysis (Saar et al. 2003) of the data in hand, reveals correlations between median line bisector displacement and v_r. The correlation appears to be specific the the particular star being considered, probably since it is a function of both spectral type and rotation rate. Further analysis and interpretation will be in the context of evolving plage models and is in progress.

  2. Trapping of surface gravity waves by a vertical flexible porous plate near a wall

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaligatla, R. B.; Koley, S.; Sahoo, T.

    2015-10-01

    The present study deals with the trapping of oblique surface gravity waves by a vertical submerged flexible porous plate located near a rigid wall in water of finite as well as infinite depths. The physical problem is based on the assumption of small amplitude water wave theory and structural response. The flexible plate is assumed to be thin and is modeled based on the Euler-Bernoulli beam equation. Using the Green's function technique to the plate equation and associated boundary conditions, an integral equation is derived which relates the normal velocity on the plate to the difference in velocity potentials across the plate involving the porous-effect parameter and structural rigidity. Further, applying Green's second identity to the free-surface Green's function and the scattered velocity potentials on the two sides of the plate, a system of three more integral equations is derived involving the velocity potentials and their normal derivatives across the plate boundary along with the velocity potential on the rigid wall. The system of integral equations is converted into a set of algebraic equations using appropriate Gauss quadrature formula which in turn solved to obtain various quantities of physical interest. Utilizing Green's identity, explicit expressions for the reflection coefficients are derived in terms of the velocity potentials and their normal derivatives across the plate. Energy balance relations are derived and used to check the accuracy of the computational results. As special cases of the submerged plate, wave trapping by the bottom-standing as well as surface-piercing plates is analyzed. Effects of various wave and structural parameters in trapping of surface waves are studied from the computational results by analyzing the reflection coefficients, wave forces exerted on the plate and the rigid wall, flow velocity, plate deflections and surface elevations. It is observed that surface-piercing plate is more effective for trapping of water waves

  3. The relation between gas density and velocity power spectra in galaxy clusters: qualitative treatment and cosmological simulations

    CERN Document Server

    Zhuravleva, I; Schekochihin, A A; Lau, E T; Nagai, D; Gaspari, M; Allen, S W; Nelson, K; Parrish, I J

    2014-01-01

    We address the problem of evaluating the power spectrum of the velocity field of the ICM using only information on the plasma density fluctuations, which can be measured today by Chandra and XMM-Newton observatories. We argue that for relaxed clusters there is a linear relation between the rms density and velocity fluctuations across a range of scales, from the largest ones, where motions are dominated by buoyancy, down to small, turbulent scales: $(\\delta\\rho_k/\\rho)^2 = \\eta_1^2 (V_{1,k}/c_s)^2$, where $\\delta\\rho_k/\\rho$ is the spectral amplitude of the density perturbations at wave number $k$, $V_{1,k}^2=V_k^2/3$ is the mean square component of the velocity field, $c_s$ is the sound speed, and $\\eta_1$ is a dimensionless constant of order unity. Using cosmological simulations of relaxed galaxy clusters, we calibrate this relation and find $\\eta_1\\approx 1 \\pm 0.3$. We argue that this value is set at large scales by buoyancy physics, while at small scales the density and velocity power spectra are proporti...

  4. Developments and difficulties in predicting the relative velocities of inertial particles at the small-scales of turbulence

    CERN Document Server

    Bragg, Andrew D

    2016-01-01

    In this paper, we use our recently developed theory for the backward-in-time (BIT) relative dispersion of inertial particles in turbulence (Bragg \\emph{et al.}, Phys. Fluids 28, 013305, 2016) to develop the theoretical model by Pan \\& Padoan (J. Fluid Mech. 661 73, 2010) for inertial particle relative velocities in isotropic turbulence. We focus on the most difficult regime to model, the dissipation range, and find that the modified Pan \\& Padoan model (that uses the BIT dispersion theory) can lead to significantly improved predictions for the relative velocities, when compared with Direct Numerical Simulation (DNS) data. However, when the particle separation distance, $r$, is less than the Kolmogorov length scale, $\\eta$, the modified model overpredicts the DNS data. We explain how these overpredictions arise from two assumptions in the BIT dispersion theory, that are in general not satisfied when the final separation of the BIT dispersing particles is $<\\eta$. We then demonstrate the failure of b...

  5. Use of the Hugoniot elastic limit in laser shockwave experiments to relate velocity measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, James A.; Lacy, Jeffrey M.; Lévesque, Daniel; Monchalin, Jean-Pierre; Lord, Martin

    2016-02-01

    The US National Nuclear Security Agency has a Global Threat Reduction Initiative (GTRI) with the goal of reducing the worldwide use of high-enriched uranium (HEU). A salient component of that initiative is the conversion of research reactors from HEU to low enriched uranium (LEU) fuels. An innovative fuel is being developed to replace HEU in high-power research reactors. The new LEU fuel is a monolithic fuel made from a U-Mo alloy foil encapsulated in Al-6061 cladding. In order to support the fuel qualification process, the Laser Shockwave Technique (LST) is being developed to characterize the clad-clad and fuel-clad interface strengths in fresh and irradiated fuel plates. This fuel-cladding interface qualification will ensure the survivability of the fuel plates in the harsh reactor environment even under abnormal operating conditions. One of the concerns of the project is the difficulty of calibrating and standardizing the laser shock technique. An analytical study under development and experimental testing supports the hypothesis that the Hugoniot Elastic Limit (HEL) in materials can be a robust and simple benchmark to compare stresses generated by different laser shock systems.

  6. Increasingly complex bimanual multi-frequency coordination patterns are equally easy to perform with on-line relative velocity feedback.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boyles, Jason; Panzer, Stefan; Shea, Charles H

    2012-02-01

    An experiment was conducted to determine whether multi-frequency continuous bimanual circling movements of varying difficulty (1:2, 2:3, 3:4, and 4:5) could be effectively performed following relatively little practice when on-line continuous relative velocity feedback is provided. The between-subjects results indicate extremely effective bimanual multi-frequency performance for all coordination patterns with relatively stable and continuous movements of both limbs. The findings suggest that the previous performance effects using Lissajous feedback with reciprocal movement can be extended to circling movements using on-line relative velocity feedback. Contrary to the long-held position that these coordination patterns result in increasing difficulty, we failed to find systematic relative velocity error, variability, or bias differences between the participants performing the various multi-frequency coordination patterns. Indeed, coordination error, variability, and biases were remarkably low for each of the tasks. The results clearly indicate the ease with which participants are able to produce bimanual coordination patterns typically considered difficult if not impossible when salient visual information is provided that allows the participants to detect and correct their coordination errors.

  7. Vibration of a delaminated beam-plate relative to buckled states

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yin, W.-L.; Jane, K. C.

    1992-07-01

    Free vibrations of delaminated beam-plates with respect to postbuckled referential states are studied. If the postbuckling deformation of the referential state is symmetric with respect to the mid-point, then the symmetric and antisymmetric vibration modes are uncoupled. Short delaminations which do not significantly degradate the overall stiffness of the beam-plate have little effect on the lowest modes of vibration and their frequencies, while the presence of a long delamination generally introduces additional vibration frequencies, the associated mode shapes of which show out-of-phase motions of the upper and lower delaminated layers. These new vibration modes and frequencies depend sensitively on the delamination length and location and on the magnitude of the postbuckling load. Hence their detection may indicate the presence and the nature of internal delamination damage.

  8. Spermatozoal traits and sperm competition in Atlantic salmon: relative sperm velocity is the primary determinant of fertilization success.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gage, Matthew J G; Macfarlane, Christopher P; Yeates, Sarah; Ward, Richard G; Searle, Jeremy B; Parker, Geoffrey A

    2004-01-06

    Sperm competition occurs when sperm from more than one male compete for fertilizations. This form of post-copulatory sexual selection is recognized as a significant and widespread force in the evolution of male reproductive biology and as a key determinant of differential male reproductive success. Despite its importance, however, detailed mechanisms of sperm competition at the gamete level remain poorly understood. Here, we use natural variation in spermatozoal traits among wild Atlantic salmon (Salmo salar), a species naturally adapted to sperm competition, to examine how the relative influences of sperm (i) number, (ii) velocity, (iii) longevity, and (iv) total length determine sperm competition success. Atlantic salmon fertilize externally, and we were therefore able to conduct controlled in vitro fertilization competitions while concurrently measuring spermatozoal traits within the aqueous micro-environment to which salmon gametes are naturally adapted. Microsatellite DNA fingerprinting revealed that a male's relative sperm velocity was the primary determinant of sperm competition success. There was no significant relationship between fertilization success and either relative sperm number or total length; sperm longevity showed an inverse relationship with competition success. These relationships were consistent for two experimental repeats of the in vitro fertilization competitions. Our results therefore show, under the natural microenvironment for salmon gametes, that relative sperm velocity is a key spermatozoal component for sperm competition success. Atlantic salmon sperm can be considered to enter a competition analogous to a race in which the fastest sperm have the highest probability of success.

  9. The relation between velocity dispersion and mass in simulated clusters of galaxies: dependence on the tracer and the baryonic physics

    CERN Document Server

    Munari, Emiliano; Borgani, Stefano; Murante, Giuseppe; Fabjan, Dunja

    2013-01-01

    [Abridged] We present an analysis of the relation between the masses of cluster- and group-sized halos, extracted from $\\Lambda$CDM cosmological N-body and hydrodynamic simulations, and their velocity dispersions, at different redshifts from $z=2$ to $z=0$. The main aim of this analysis is to understand how the implementation of baryonic physics in simulations affects such relation, i.e. to what extent the use of the velocity dispersion as a proxy for cluster mass determination is hampered by the imperfect knowledge of the baryonic physics. In our analysis we use several sets of simulations with different physics implemented. Velocity dispersions are determined using three different tracers, DM particles, subhalos, and galaxies. We confirm that DM particles trace a relation that is fully consistent with the theoretical expectations based on the virial theorem and with previous results presented in the literature. On the other hand, subhalos and galaxies trace steeper relations, and with larger values of the n...

  10. On the mass-metallicity relation, velocity dispersion and gravitational well depth of GRB host galaxies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Arabsalmani, Maryam; Møller, Palle; Fynbo, Johan P. U.;

    2016-01-01

    away from the metallicity in the centre of the galaxy, second the path of the sightline through different parts of the potential well of the dark matter halo will cause different velocity fields to be sampled. We report evidence suggesting that this second effect may have been detected....... the same underlying population. GRB host galaxies and QSO-DLAs are found to have different impact parameter distributions and we briefly discuss how this may affect statistical samples. The impact parameter distribution has two effects. First any metallicity gradient will shift the measured metallicity...

  11. Shrinking of the Cocos and Nazca Plates due to Horizontal Thermal Contraction and Implications for Plate Non-rigidity and the Non-closure of the Pacific-Cocos-Nazca Plate Motion Circuit

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gordon, R. G.; Kreemer, C.

    2015-12-01

    Plate rigidity is the central tenet of plate tectonics. Mounting evidence suggests, however, that significant intraplate deformation occurs in oceanic lithosphere due to horizontal thermal contraction, the rate of which decreases as ≈ 1/age [Kumar & Gordon 2009]. Support for this hypothesis comes from the azimuths of submarine transform faults, which are fit significantly better assuming shrinking plates than by assuming rigid plates [Mishra & Gordon 2015]. Previously we estimated the intraplate velocity field of the Pacific plate accounting for horizontal thermal contraction. The ≈2 mm/yr southeastward motion predicted for the northeastern part of the plate relative to the Pacific-Antarctic Rise may contribute to the non-closure of the Pacific-North America plate motion circuit. In a reference frame in which fix the oldest portion of the Pacific plate, some sites on the plate move up to ≈2 mm/yr [Kreemer & Gordon 2014]. Here we present intraplate velocity fields of the Cocos and Nazca plates and discuss their implications for the non-rigidity of plates and the non-closure of the Pacific-Cocos-Nazca plate circuit, which fails closure by a stunning 14 ±5 mm/yr [DeMets et al. 2010]. If we fix the oldest part of the Cocos plate, intraplate velocities of up to ≈2 mm/yr are estimated, with the fastest motion occurring at the northern end of the plate. If we fix the oldest part of the Nazca plate, displacement rates up to 2 mm/yr are estimated, with the fastest motion occurring in the northeasternmost portion of the plate. In the velocity fields for both plates, the lithosphere adjacent to transform faults along the East Pacific Rise tends to move to the south, which would skew the azimuths of the transform faults clockwise of the values expected for rigid plates, which is the same as the sense of misfit between observed azimuths of transform faults and the azimuths calculated from the MORVEL global set of relative angular velocities [DeMets et al. 2010]. Direct

  12. 钨合金球形破片侵彻陶瓷/DFRP 复合靶的弹道极限速度%Ballistic limit velocity of tungsten alloy spherical fragment penetrating ceramic/DFRP composite target plates

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    毛亮; 王华; 姜春兰; 李明

    2015-01-01

    An experimental study on ballistic limit velocities (v50 )of tungsten alloy spherical fragment penetrating ceramic /DFRP composite target plates was performed.Firstly,tungsten alloy spherical fragments vertically impacting ceramic /DFRP composite target plates with different thickness ratio was tested by using a ballistic gun equipment. According to the ballistic experimental results,the relationship between ballistic limit velocity (v50 )and area density (AD)of composite target was obtained.Secondly,using the dimensional analysis method and the similarity theory,the simulation law of tungsten alloy spherical fragments penetrating ceramic /DFRP composite target plates was studied.Based on the above results,the empirical formula of the ballistic limit velocity v50 was built.The predicted values using the empirical formula agreed well with the experimental results.The study results were valuable for optimally designing fragment warheads and light armor protective structures.%研究钨合金球形破片垂直侵彻陶瓷/DFRP 复合靶的弹道极限速度 v50。首先,利用弹道枪动加载设备,对钨合金球形破片垂直撞击不同厚度比的陶瓷/DFRP 复合靶进行了实验研究,获得了弹道极限速度(v50)与复合靶面密度(AD)之间的关系;其次,根据量纲分析和相似理论,研究了钨合金球形破片侵彻陶瓷/DFRP 复合靶的模拟律,并建立了弹道极限速度 v50的经验关系式。经验关系的预测值与实验结果吻合较好。研究结果对破片式战斗部及轻型装甲防护结构的优化设计都具有十分重要的应用价值。

  13. Study on Approach for Computer-Aided Design and Machining of General Cylindrical Cam Using Relative Velocity and Inverse Kinematics

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Se-Hwan; Park; Byong-Kook; Gu; Joong-Ho; Shin; Geun-Jong; Yoo

    2002-01-01

    Cylindrical Cam Mechanism which is one of the best eq uipments to accomplish an accurate motion transmission is widely used in the fie lds of industries, such as machine tool exchangers, textile machinery and automa tic transfer equipments. This paper proposes a new approach for the shape design and manufacturing of the cylindrical cam. The design approach uses the relative velocity concept and the manufacturing approach uses the inverse kinematics concept. For the shape desig n, the contact points betw...

  14. Origins of Solar Systems: Removing Activity-Related Radial Velocity Noise to Improve Extrasolar Planet Searches

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saar, Steven; Lindstrom, David (Technical Monitor)

    2003-01-01

    We have continued the super high resolution (R is approximately 200,000), high S/N (> 300) echelle study of joint line bisector and radial velocity variations using the McDonald 2-D coude. A long observing run in October 2002 was quite successful (8 clear nights). We now have close to three years of data, which begins to sample a good fraction of the magnetic cycle timescales for some of our targets (e.g., K Ceti; P(sub cyc)=5.6 yrs). This will be very helpful in unraveling the complex relationships between plage and v(sub r), changes which we have uncovered. A preliminary analysis of the limited data in hand, and find some tantalizing evidence for correlations between median line bisector displacement and radial velocity v(sub r). The correlation appears to be specific to the particular star being considered, probably since it is a function of both spectral type and rotation rate. Additional information regarding progress on the grant is included.

  15. NICA-MPD fixed target mode: soft jet studies in the relative 4-velocity space

    CERN Document Server

    Okorokov, V A

    2016-01-01

    Experimental results obtained by studying the properties of soft jets in the 4-velocity space at $\\sqrt{s} \\sim 2-20$ GeV are presented. The changes in the mean distance from the jet axis to the jet particles, the mean kinetic energy of these particles, and the cluster dimension in response to the growth of the collision energy are consistent with the assumption that quark degrees of freedom manifest themselves in processes of pion jet production at intermediate energies. The energy at which quark degrees of freedom begin to manifest themselves experimentally in the production of soft pion jets is estimated for the first time. The estimated value of this energy is $2.8 \\pm 0.6$ GeV. The suggestions are made for future investigations on NICA-MPD.

  16. Mantle-derived peridotites in southwestern Oregon: relation to plate tectonics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Medaris, L G; Dott, R H

    1970-09-04

    A group of peridotites in southwestern Oregon contains high-pressure mineral assemblages reflecting recrystallization at high temperatures (1100 degrees to 1200 degrees C) over a range of pressure decreasing from 19 to 5 kilobars. It is proposed that the peridotites represent upper-mantle material brought from depth along the ancestral Gorda-Juan de Fuca ridge system, transported eastward by the spreading Gorda lithosphere plate, and then emplaced by thrust-faulting in the western margin of the Cordillera during late Mesozoic time.

  17. Organization of the Indian hedgehog--parathyroid hormone-related protein system in the postnatal growth plate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chau, Michael; Forcinito, Patricia; Andrade, Anenisia C; Hegde, Anita; Ahn, Sohyun; Lui, Julian C; Baron, Jeffrey; Nilsson, Ola

    2011-08-01

    In embryonic growth cartilage, Indian hedgehog (Ihh) and parathyroid hormone-related protein (PTHrP) participate in a negative feedback loop that regulates chondrocyte differentiation. Postnatally, this region undergoes major structural and functional changes. To explore the organization of the Ihh–PTHrP system in postnatal growth plate, we microdissected growth plates of 7-day-old rats into their constituent zones and assessed expression of genes participating in the h–PTHrP feedback loop. Ihh, Patched 1, Smoothened, Gli1, Gli2, Gli3, and Pthr1 were expressed in regions analogous to the expression domains in embryonic growth cartilage. However, PTHrP was expressed in resting zone cartilage, a site that differs from the embryonic source, the periarticular cells. We then used mice in which lacZ has replaced coding sequences of Gli1 and thus serves as a marker for active hedgehog signaling. At 1, 4, 8, and 12 weeks of age, lacZ expression was detected in a pattern analogous to that of embryonic cartilage. The findings support the hypothesis that the embryonic Ihh–PTHrP feedback loop is maintained in the postnatal growth plate except that the source of PTHrP has shifted to a more proximal location in the resting zone.

  18. Zfp521 is a target gene and key effector of parathyroid hormone-related peptide signaling in growth plate chondrocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Correa, Diego; Hesse, Eric; Seriwatanachai, Dutmanee; Kiviranta, Riku; Saito, Hiroaki; Yamana, Kei; Neff, Lynn; Atfi, Azeddine; Coillard, Lucie; Sitara, Despina; Maeda, Yukiko; Warming, Soren; Jenkins, Nancy A; Copeland, Neal G; Horne, William C; Lanske, Beate; Baron, Roland

    2010-10-19

    In the growth plate, the interplay between parathyroid hormone-related peptide (PTHrP) and Indian hedgehog (Ihh) signaling tightly regulates chondrocyte proliferation and differentiation during longitudinal bone growth. We found that PTHrP increases the expression of Zfp521, a zinc finger transcriptional coregulator, in prehypertrophic chondrocytes. Mice with chondrocyte-targeted deletion of Zfp521 resembled PTHrP(-/-) and chondrocyte-specific PTHR1(-/-) mice, with decreased chondrocyte proliferation, early hypertrophic transition, and reduced growth plate thickness. Deleting Zfp521 increased expression of Runx2 and Runx2 target genes, and decreased Cyclin D1 and Bcl-2 expression while increasing Caspase-3 activation and apoptosis. Zfp521 associated with Runx2 in chondrocytes, antagonizing its activity via an HDAC4-dependent mechanism. PTHrP failed to upregulate Cyclin D1 and to antagonize Runx2, Ihh, and collagen X expression when Zfp521 was absent. Thus, Zfp521 is an important PTHrP target gene that regulates growth plate chondrocyte proliferation and differentiation.

  19. On the rotation and pitching of flat plates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jin, Yaqing; Ji, Sheng; Chamorro, Leonardo P.

    2016-11-01

    Wind tunnel experiments were performed to characterize the flow-induced rotation and pitching of various flat plates as a function of the thickness ratio, the location of the axis of rotation and turbulence levels. High-resolution telemetry, laser tachometer, and hotwire were used to get time series of the plates motions and the signature of the wake flow at a specific location. Results show that a minor axis offset can induce high-order modes in the plate rotation under low turbulence due to torque unbalance. The spectral decomposition of the flow velocity in the plate wake reveals the existence of a dominating high-frequency mode that corresponds to a static-like vortex shedding occurring at the maximum plate pitch, where the characteristic length scale is the projected width at maximum pitch. The plate thickness ratio shows inverse relation with the angular velocity. A simple model is derived to explain the linear relation between pitching frequency and wind speed. The spectra of the plate rotation show nonlinear relation with the incoming turbulence, and the dominating role of the generated vortices in the plate motions.

  20. Relative pressure estimation from velocity measurements in blood flows: state-of-the-art and new approaches.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bertoglio, Cristóbal; Núñez, Rodolfo; Galarce, Felipe; Nordsletten, David; Osses, Axel

    2017-09-07

    The relative pressure difference across stenotic blood vessels serves as an important clinical index for the diagnosis of many cardiovascular diseases. While the clinical gold standard for relative pressure difference measurements is invasive catheterization, Phase-Contrast Magnetic Resonance Imaging has emerged as a promising tool for enabling a non-invasive quantification, by linking highly spatially resolved velocity measurements with relative pressures via the incompressible Navier-Stokes equations. In this work we provide a review and analysis of current methods for relative pressure estimation and propose three additional techniques. Methods are compared using synthetic data from numerical examples and sensitivity to subsampling and noise was explored. Through our analysis, we verify that the newly proposed approaches are more robust with respect to spatial subsampling and less sensitive to noise, and therefore provide improved means for estimating relative pressure differences non-invasively. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  1. Variation of b and p values from aftershocks sequences along the Mexican subduction zone and their relation to plate characteristics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ávila-Barrientos, L.; Zúñiga, F. R.; Rodríguez-Pérez, Q.; Guzmán-Speziale, M.

    2015-11-01

    Aftershock sequences along the Mexican subduction margin (between coordinates 110ºW and 91ºW) were analyzed by means of the p value from the Omori-Utsu relation and the b value from the Gutenberg-Richter relation. We focused on recent medium to large (Mw > 5.6) events considered susceptible of generating aftershock sequences suitable for analysis. The main goal was to try to find a possible correlation between aftershock parameters and plate characteristics, such as displacement rate, age and segmentation. The subduction regime of Mexico is one of the most active regions of the world with a high frequency of occurrence of medium to large events and plate characteristics change along the subduction margin. Previous studies have observed differences in seismic source characteristics at the subduction regime, which may indicate a difference in rheology and possible segmentation. The results of the analysis of the aftershock sequences indicate a slight tendency for p values to decrease from west to east with increasing of plate age although a statistical significance is undermined by the small number of aftershocks in the sequences, a particular feature distinctive of the region as compared to other world subduction regimes. The b values show an opposite, increasing trend towards the east even though the statistical significance is not enough to warrant the validation of such a trend. A linear regression between both parameters provides additional support for the inverse relation. Moreover, we calculated the seismic coupling coefficient, showing a direct relation with the p and b values. While we cannot undoubtedly confirm the hypothesis that aftershock generation depends on certain tectonic characteristics (age, thickness, temperature), our results do not reject it thus encouraging further study into this question.

  2. Flow structure on a rotating plate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ozen, C.A.; Rockwell, D. [Lehigh University, Department of Mechanical Engineering and Mechanics, Bethlehem, PA (United States)

    2012-01-15

    The flow structure on a rotating plate of low aspect ratio is characterized well after the onset of motion, such that transient effects are not significant, and only centripetal and Coriolis accelerations are present. Patterns of vorticity, velocity contours, and streamline topology are determined via quantitative imaging, in order to characterize the leading-edge vortex in relation to the overall flow structure. A stable leading-edge vortex is maintained over effective angles of attack from 30 to 75 , and at each angle of attack, its sectional structure at midspan is relatively insensitive to Reynolds number over the range from 3,600 to 14,500. The streamline topology, vorticity distribution, and circulation of the leading-edge vortex are determined as a function of angle of attack, and related to the velocity field oriented toward, and extending along, the leeward surface of the plate. The structure of the leading-edge vortex is classified into basic regimes along the span of the plate. Images of these regimes are complemented by patterns on crossflow planes, which indicate the influence of root and tip swirl, and spanwise flow along the leeward surface of the plate. Comparison with the equivalent of the purely translating plate, which does not induce the foregoing flow structure, further clarifies the effects of rotation. (orig.)

  3. Entropy generation in the flow system generated in between two parallel plates due to bivertical motion of the top plate

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Ahmet Z Sahin; Bekir S Yilbas

    2009-06-01

    Thermodynamic irreversibility in the flow system provides information on the energy and power losses in the system. Minimization of entropy generation in the flow system enables for the parametric optimization of the system operation. In the present study, parallel plates, in between, filled with the fluid are considered. The fluid motion resulted from the bi-vertical compression of the top plate of the parallel plates is examined. The entropy generation rate in the flow system is formulated after considering the constant movement of the top plate, constant applied load, and the combination of the constant velocity and applied load to the top plate. The optimum operating conditions related to the fluid motion in between the parallel plates is determined through the entropy analysis. It is found that the combination of the constant velocity and the constant applied load resulted in the low entropy generation rate.

  4. Signatures of First Stars in Galaxy Surveys: Multi-Tracer Analysis of the Supersonic Relative Velocity Effect and the Constraints from the BOSS Power Spectrum Measurements

    CERN Document Server

    Yoo, Jaiyul

    2013-01-01

    We study the effect of the supersonic relative velocity between dark matter and baryons on large-scale galaxy clustering and derive the constraint on the relative velocity bias parameter from the Baryonic Oscillation Spectroscopic Survey (BOSS) power spectrum measurements. Recent work has shown that the relative velocity effect may have a dramatic impact on the star formation at high redshifts, if first stars are formed in minihalos around z~20, or if the effect propagates through secondary effects to stars formed at later redshifts. The relative velocity effect has particularly strong signatures in the large scale clustering of these sources, including the BAO position. Assuming that a small fraction of stars in low-redshift massive galaxies retain the memory of the primordial relative velocity effect, galaxy clustering measurements can be used to constrain the signatures of the first stars. Luminous red galaxies contain some of the oldest stars in the Universe and are ideally suited to search for this effec...

  5. Laser Doppler measurement of relative blood velocity in the human optic nerve head.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riva, C E; Grunwald, J E; Sinclair, S H

    1982-02-01

    The Doppler shift frequency spectrum (DSFS) of laser light scattered from red blood cells (RBCs) moving in the microcirculation of the optic nerve head has been recorded in normal volunteers by means of a fundus camera laser Doppler velocimeter. The width of the DSFS, which varies in proportion to the speed of the RBCs, has been characterized by a parameter alpha. With the use of a model for the scattering of light by tissue and RBCs and for the RBC velocity distribution, values of alpha recorded at normal intraocular pressure (IOP) suggest that the RBCs that contribute to the Doppler signal are flowing in capillaries. The parameter alpha was found to vary markedly with the IOP and with the phase of the ocular pressure pulse at elevated IOP. The return of the speed of RBCs toward normal, which is observed after a step increase of IOP above normal and after a step decrease below normal, has been attributed to an autoregulatory response of the optic nerve circulation.

  6. Relations between diabetes, blood pressure and aortic pulse wave velocity in haemodialysis patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Peters, Christian Daugaard; Kjærgaard, Krista Dybtved; Dzeko, Mirela;

    Diabetes (DM) is common in haemodialysis (HD) patients and affects both blood pressure (BP) and arterial stiffness. Carotid femoral pulse wave velocity (PWV) reflects the stiffness of the aorta and is regarded as a strong risk factor for cardiovascular (CV) mortality in HD patients. However, PWV...... is highly influenced by the BP-level. Higher PWV-values among HD patients with DM could reflect a higher BP-level rather than increased arterial stiffness. The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of DM on BP and PWV in a group of HD patients. BP and PWV were measured in 66 HD patients without DM...... (HD) and 32 HD patients with DM (HD+DM). The SphygmoCor system was used for estimation of PWV. HD-duration, age, gender and BP medication were similar in the two groups. Mean DM-duration was 23±11 years and 25(78%) had type 2 DM. HD+DM had higher BMI (26±5 vs. 29±5 kg/m2, p=0.02), systolic BP (142...

  7. A relation between velocity-vorticity correlations and skin friction in wall-bounded turbulent flows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoon, Min; Ahn, Junsun; Hwang, Jinyul; Sung, Hyung Jin

    2016-11-01

    The relationship between the skin friction and the velocity-vorticity correlations in wall-bounded turbulent flows is derived from the mean vorticity equation. A formula for the skin friction coefficient (Cf) is proposed and evaluated with regards to three canonical wall-bounded flows: turbulent boundary layer, turbulent channel flow, and turbulent pipe flow. The skin friction coefficient can be derived from the mean spanwise vorticity at the wall. Double integration with respect to the wall-normal direction (from 0 to y) is needed to derive Cf from the second derivative of the mean spanwise vorticity in the mean spanwise vorticity equation. One more integration is needed to find the contribution of each component to Cf from the wall to the boundary layer edge (from 0 to δ) . The present formula encompasses four terms: advective vorticity transport, vortex stretching, viscous, and inhomogeneous terms. Drag-reduced channel flow with the slip condition is used to test the reliability of the formula. The advective vorticity transport and vortex stretching terms are found to dominate the contributions to the frictional drag. This work was supported by the Creative Research Initiatives (No. 2016-004749) program of the National Research Foundation of Korea (MSIP).

  8. Models of convection-driven tectonic plates - A comparison of methods and results

    Science.gov (United States)

    King, Scott D.; Gable, Carl W.; Weinstein, Stuart A.

    1992-01-01

    Recent numerical studies of convection in the earth's mantle have included various features of plate tectonics. This paper describes three methods of modeling plates: through material properties, through force balance, and through a thin power-law sheet approximation. The results obtained are compared using each method on a series of simple calculations. From these results, scaling relations between the different parameterizations are developed. While each method produces different degrees of deformation within the surface plate, the surface heat flux and average plate velocity agree to within a few percent. The main results are not dependent upon the plate modeling method and herefore are representative of the physical system modeled.

  9. Gravitational Contraction versus Supernova Driving and the Origin of the Velocity Dispersion-Size Relation in Molecular Clouds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ibáñez-Mejía, Juan C.; Mac Low, Mordecai-Mark; Klessen, Ralf S.; Baczynski, Christian

    2016-06-01

    Molecular cloud (MC) observations show that clouds have non-thermal velocity dispersions that scale with the cloud size as σ ∝ R 1/2 at a constant surface density, and for varying surface density scale with both the cloud’s size and surface density, σ 2 ∝ RΣ. The energy source driving these chaotic motions remains poorly understood. We describe the velocity dispersions observed in a cloud population formed in a numerical simulation of a magnetized, stratified, supernova (SN)-driven, interstellar medium, including diffuse heating and radiative cooling, before and after we include the effects of the self-gravity of the gas. We compare the relationships between velocity dispersion, size, and surface density measured in the simulated cloud population to those found in observations of Galactic MCs. Our simulations prior to the onset of self-gravity suggest that external SN explosions alone do not drive turbulent motions of the observed magnitudes within dense clouds. On the other hand, self-gravity induces non-thermal motions as gravitationally bound clouds begin to collapse in our model, approaching the observed relations between velocity dispersion, size, and surface density. Energy conservation suggests that the observed behavior is consistent with the kinetic energy being proportional to the gravitational energy. However, the clouds in our model show no sign of reaching a stable equilibrium state at any time, even for strongly magnetized clouds. We conclude that gravitationally bound MCs are always in a state of gravitational contraction and their properties are a natural result of this chaotic collapse. In order to agree with observed star formation efficiencies, this process must be terminated by the early destruction of the clouds, presumably from internal stellar feedback.

  10. Constriction velocities of renal afferent and efferent arterioles of mice are not related to SMB expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patzak, Andreas; Petzhold, Daria; Wronski, Thomas; Martinka, Peter; Babu, Gopal J; Periasamy, Muthu; Haase, Hannelore; Morano, Ingo

    2005-12-01

    Constriction of renal arterioles contributes significantly to the control of perfusion and glomerular filtration. Afferent but not efferent arterioles express smooth muscle myosin heavy chain B (SMB) (with a 5'-insert of seven amino acids). The aim of the present study was to investigate (1) the constriction characteristics of afferent and efferent arterioles under physiologic load and (2) whether expression of SMB may causally contribute to these constriction characteristics. We compared constriction parameters [constriction amplitude, maximal rate of constriction velocity ("dc/dt(max)"), and time to half-maximal constriction (t(1/2)) of in vitro perfused renal afferent and efferent arterioles of wild-type (smb(+/+)] and homozygous SMB knockout [smb(-/-)] mice upon stimulation with angiotensin II (Ang II) (10(-8) mol/L) and potassium chloride (KCl) (100 mmol/L). SMB expression was investigated by double-labeling immunofluorescence. Contraction amplitude and dc/dt(max) of mouse afferent arterioles upon Ang II stimulation were significantly greater compared to efferent arterioles. However, constriction amplitudes, dc/dt(max), and t(1/2) of afferent as well as efferent arterioles upon Ang II stimulation were similar in smb(+/+) and smb(-/-) mice. Constriction amplitudes upon KCl stimulation of afferent arterioles were similar in both smb(+/+) and smb(-/-) mice. Furthermore, KCl-induced dc/dt(max) and t(1/2) of afferent arterioles were similar in both smb(+/+) and smb(-/-) mice. SMB expression could be detected in afferent but not efferent arterioles in smb(+/+) mice. No SMB expression in either arteriole could be observed in smb(-/-) mice. Our results suggest that the presence of different alternatively 5'-spliced smooth muscle-myosin heavy chain (SM-MHC) isoforms does not dominate the different contractile features of physiologically loaded renal afferent or efferent arterioles.

  11. Accelerated plate tectonics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, D L

    1975-03-21

    The concept of a stressed elastic lithospheric plate riding on a viscous asthenosphere is used to calculate the recurrence interval of great earthquakes at convergent plate boundaries, the separation of decoupling and lithospheric earthquakes, and the migration pattern of large earthquakes along an arc. It is proposed that plate motions accelerate after great decoupling earthquakes and that most of the observed plate motions occur during short periods of time, separated by periods of relative quiescence.

  12. Evaluation of Relative Sensitivity of SAW and Flexural Plate Wave Devices for Atmospheric Sensing

    Science.gov (United States)

    White, Richard M.; Black, Justin; Chen, Bryan

    1998-01-01

    The objective of this project is to evaluate the suitability of the ultrasonic flexural plate wave (FPW) device as the detector in a gas chromatograph (GC). Of particular interest is the detection of nitrous oxide (N2O). From experimental results we conclude analyte detection is achieved through two mechanisms: changes in gas density, and mass loading of the device membrane due to the sorption of gas molecules. Reducing the dead volume of the FPW chamber increased the FPW response. A comparison of the FPW response to that of the surface acoustic wave (SAW) detector provided with the GC (made by MSI, Microsensor Technologies, Inc.), shows that for unseparated N2O in N2, the FPW exhibits a sensitivity that is at least 550 times greater than that of the SAW device. A Porapak Q column was found to separate N2O from its carrier gas, N2 or He. With the Porapak Q column, a coated FPW detected 1 ppm N2O in N2 or He, with a response magnitude of 7 Hz. A coated SAW exhibited a response of 25 Hz to pure N2O. The minimal detectable N2O concentrations of the sensors were not evaluated.

  13. Angular shear plate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruda, Mitchell C [Tucson, AZ; Greynolds, Alan W [Tucson, AZ; Stuhlinger, Tilman W [Tucson, AZ

    2009-07-14

    One or more disc-shaped angular shear plates each include a region thereon having a thickness that varies with a nonlinear function. For the case of two such shear plates, they are positioned in a facing relationship and rotated relative to each other. Light passing through the variable thickness regions in the angular plates is refracted. By properly timing the relative rotation of the plates and by the use of an appropriate polynomial function for the thickness of the shear plate, light passing therethrough can be focused at variable positions.

  14. The XMM Cluster Survey: evolution of the velocity dispersion-temperature relation over half a Hubble time

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, Susan; Hilton, Matt; Rooney, Philip J.; Caldwell, Caroline; Kay, Scott T.; Collins, Chris A.; McCarthy, Ian G.; Romer, A. Kathy; Bermeo, Alberto; Bernstein, Rebecca; da Costa, Luiz; Gifford, Daniel; Hollowood, Devon; Hoyle, Ben; Jeltema, Tesla; Liddle, Andrew R.; Maia, Marcio A. G.; Mann, Robert G.; Mayers, Julian A.; Mehrtens, Nicola; Miller, Christopher J.; Nichol, Robert C.; Ogando, Ricardo; Sahlén, Martin; Stahl, Benjamin; Stott, John P.; Thomas, Peter A.; Viana, Pedro T. P.; Wilcox, Harry

    2016-11-01

    We measure the evolution of the velocity dispersion-temperature (σv-TX) relation up to z = 1 using a sample of 38 galaxy clusters drawn from the XMM Cluster Survey. This work improves upon previous studies by the use of a homogeneous cluster sample and in terms of the number of high-redshift clusters included. We present here new redshift and velocity dispersion measurements for 12 z > 0.5 clusters observed with the Gemini Multi Object Spectographs instruments on the Gemini telescopes. Using an orthogonal regression method, we find that the slope of the relation is steeper than that expected if clusters were self-similar, and that the evolution of the normalization is slightly negative, but not significantly different from zero (σv ∝ T0.86±0.14E(z)-0.37±0.33). We verify our results by applying our methods to cosmological hydrodynamical simulations. The lack of evolution seen in our data is consistent with simulations that include both feedback and radiative cooling.

  15. Stellar Populations across the Black Hole Mass-Velocity Dispersion Relation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martín-Navarro, Ignacio; Brodie, Jean P.; van den Bosch, Remco C. E.; Romanowsky, Aaron J.; Forbes, Duncan A.

    2016-11-01

    Coevolution between supermassive black holes (BH) and their host galaxies is universally adopted in models for galaxy formation. In the absence of feedback from active galactic nuclei (AGNs), simulated massive galaxies keep forming stars in the local universe. From an observational point of view, however, such coevolution remains unclear. We present a stellar population analysis of galaxies with direct BH mass measurements and the BH mass-σ relation as a working framework. We find that over-massive BH galaxies, i.e., galaxies lying above the best-fitting BH mass-σ line, tend to be older and more α-element-enhanced than under-massive BH galaxies. The scatter in the BH mass-σ-[α/Fe] plane is significantly lower than that in the standard BH mass-σ relation. We interpret this trend as an imprint of AGN feedback on the star formation histories of massive galaxies.

  16. Confirmation of general relativity on large scales from weak lensing and galaxy velocities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reyes, Reinabelle; Mandelbaum, Rachel; Seljak, Uros; Baldauf, Tobias; Gunn, James E; Lombriser, Lucas; Smith, Robert E

    2010-03-11

    Although general relativity underlies modern cosmology, its applicability on cosmological length scales has yet to be stringently tested. Such a test has recently been proposed, using a quantity, E(G), that combines measures of large-scale gravitational lensing, galaxy clustering and structure growth rate. The combination is insensitive to 'galaxy bias' (the difference between the clustering of visible galaxies and invisible dark matter) and is thus robust to the uncertainty in this parameter. Modified theories of gravity generally predict values of E(G) different from the general relativistic prediction because, in these theories, the 'gravitational slip' (the difference between the two potentials that describe perturbations in the gravitational metric) is non-zero, which leads to changes in the growth of structure and the strength of the gravitational lensing effect. Here we report that E(G) = 0.39 +/- 0.06 on length scales of tens of megaparsecs, in agreement with the general relativistic prediction of E(G) approximately 0.4. The measured value excludes a model within the tensor-vector-scalar gravity theory, which modifies both Newtonian and Einstein gravity. However, the relatively large uncertainty still permits models within f(R) theory, which is an extension of general relativity. A fivefold decrease in uncertainty is needed to rule out these models.

  17. Arabian-Anatolian plate movements and related trends in Southeast Turkey's oilfields

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Coskun, Bulent [Ankara Univ., Geological Engineering Dept., Ankara (Turkey)

    2004-09-15

    Two important tectonic phases generated by African and Arabian plate movements influenced the evolution of trends in SE Turkey's oilfields. The main phase occurred during the late Cretaceous (Maastrichtian) time, while the second phase reactivated the existing trends in Miocene. Paleogeological evolutions reveal that SE Turkey was tectonically stable from Paleozoic up to the end of Cretaceous, during which the structural trends were oriented in a WSW-ENE direction, contrarily, under the influence of opening of the Red Sea area, the existing trends rotated in a counterclockwise direction and oriented in a SW-NE direction. This rotational tectonic event is evidenced by SW-NE alignments of SE Turkey's oilfields in subsurface and Karacadag basaltic expansions and appearance of major faults, like the Dead Sea fault, Adiyaman fault, and Akcakale fault, on surface. Subsurface interpretations indicate that, contrarily to the previous works, which considered the Dead Sea fault and Adiyaman fault separate tectonic features from each other and also attached them to the East Anatolian fault, the Adiyaman fault is the continuity of the Dead Sea fault through the Adiyaman, Diyarbakir and Selmo areas. The Akcakale fault, which generated the Karacadag basaltic flows, is another tectonic element and has influenced the exploration activities in SE Turkey. Moreover, detailed interpretations of well data reveal that the SW-NE structural trends also improved reservoir conditions by creating fractures and dolomitizations in reservoir rocks, and the high geothermal and potential (piezometric) gradients and porosity trends are also aligned in the same direction. (Author)

  18. Relation of the fourth-order statistical invariants of velocity gradient tensor in isotropic turbulence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fang, L.; Zhang, Y. J.; Fang, J.; Zhu, Y.

    2016-08-01

    We show by direct numerical simulations (DNSs) that in different types of isotropic turbulence, the fourth-order statistical invariants have approximately a linear relation, which can be represented by a straight line in the phase plane, passing two extreme states: the Gaussian state and the restricted Euler state. Also, each DNS case corresponds to an equilibrium region that is roughly Reynolds-dependent. In addition, both the time reversal and the compressibility effect lead to nonequilibrium transition processes in this phase plane. This observation adds a new restriction on the mean-field theory.

  19. Confirmation of general relativity on large scales from weak lensing and galaxy velocities

    CERN Document Server

    Reyes, Reinabelle; Seljak, Uros; Baldauf, Tobias; Gunn, James E; Lombriser, Lucas; Smith, Robert E; 10.1038/nature08857

    2010-01-01

    Although general relativity underlies modern cosmology, its applicability on cosmological length scales has yet to be stringently tested. Such a test has recently been proposed, using a quantity, EG, that combines measures of large-scale gravitational lensing, galaxy clustering and structure growth rate. The combination is insensitive to 'galaxy bias' (the difference between the clustering of visible galaxies and invisible dark matter) and is thus robust to the uncertainty in this parameter. Modified theories of gravity generally predict values of EG different from the general relativistic prediction because, in these theories, the 'gravitational slip' (the difference between the two potentials that describe perturbations in the gravitational metric) is non-zero, which leads to changes in the growth of structure and the strength of the gravitational lensing effect3. Here we report that EG = 0.39 +/- 0.06 on length scales of tens of megaparsecs, in agreement with the general relativistic prediction of EG $\\app...

  20. Plate tectonics conserves angular momentum

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. Bowin

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available A new combined understanding of plate tectonics, Earth internal structure, and the role of impulse in deformation of the Earth's crust is presented. Plate accelerations and decelerations have been revealed by iterative filtering of the quaternion history for the Euler poles that define absolute plate motion history for the past 68 million years, and provide an unprecedented precision for plate angular rotation variations with time at 2-million year intervals. Stage poles represent the angular rotation of a plate's motion between adjacent Euler poles, and from which the maximum velocity vector for a plate can be determined. The consistent maximum velocity variations, in turn, yield consistent estimates of plate accelerations and decelerations. The fact that the Pacific plate was shown to accelerate and decelerate, implied that conservation of plate tectonic angular momentum must be globally conserved, and that is confirmed by the results shown here (total angular momentum ~1.4 E+27 kgm2s−1. Accordingly, if a plate decelerates, other plates must increase their angular momentums to compensate. In addition, the azimuth of the maximum velocity vectors yields clues as to why the "bend" in the Emperor-Hawaiian seamount trend occurred near 46 Myr. This report summarizes processing results for 12 of the 14 major tectonic plates of the Earth (except for the Juan de Fuca and Philippine plates. Plate accelerations support the contention that plate tectonics is a product of torques that most likely are sustained by the sinking of positive density anomalies due to phase changes in subducted gabbroic lithosphere at depth in the upper lower mantle (above 1200 km depth. The tectonic plates are pulled along by the sinking of these positive mass anomalies, rather than moving at near constant velocity on the crests of convection cells driven by rising heat. These results imply that spreading centers are primarily passive reactive

  1. Constraining the Baryon-Dark Matter Relative Velocity with the Large-Scale 3-Point Correlation Function of the SDSS BOSS DR12 CMASS Galaxies

    CERN Document Server

    Slepian, Zachary; Blazek, Jonathan A; Brownstein, Joel R; Chuang, Chia-Hsun; Gil-Marín, Héctor; Ho, Shirley; Kitaura, Francisco-Shu; McEwen, Joseph E; Percival, Will J; Ross, Ashley J; Rossi, Graziano; Seo, Hee-Jong; Slosar, Anže; Vargas-Magaña, Mariana

    2016-01-01

    We search for a galaxy clustering bias due to a modulation of galaxy number with the baryon-dark matter relative velocity resulting from recombination-era physics. We find no detected signal and place the constraint $b_v < 0.01$ on the relative velocity bias for the CMASS galaxies. This bias is an important potential systematic of Baryon Acoustic Oscillation (BAO) method measurements of the cosmic distance scale using the 2-point clustering. Our limit on the relative velocity bias indicates a systematic shift of no more than $0.3\\%$ rms in the distance scale inferred from the BAO feature in the BOSS 2-point clustering, well below the $1\\%$ statistical error of this measurement. This constraint is the most stringent currently available and has important implications for the ability of upcoming large-scale structure surveys such as DESI to self-protect against the relative velocity as a possible systematic.

  2. Offshore Rayleigh Group Velocity Observations of the South Island, New Zealand, from Ambient Noise Data

    KAUST Repository

    Yeck, William L.

    2017-02-15

    We present azimuthally anisotropic Rayleigh group velocity models from 8 - 35 s both offshore and onshore of the South Island of New Zealand. We use MOANA (Marine Observations of Anisotropy Near Aotearoa) broadband ocean seismic data in combination with on land data from the New Zealand National Seismography Network (NZNSN) to investigate the seismic structure of the flanks of the Australian-Pacific plate boundary. At 8 s, we observe low offshore group velocities best explained by the influence of the water layer and thick water-laden sediments. At long periods (20-30 s), group velocities are lower on the South Island relative to its offshore flanks, due to thickened crust beneath the island, with the lowest velocities primarily beneath the Southern Alps. Group velocity azimuthal anisotropy fast directions near the Alpine Fault align with the direction of relative plate motion between the Australian and Pacific plates. In the southern portion of the island, fast directions rotate anticlockwise, likely in response to a decrease in dextral shearing away from the plate boundary. Azimuthal anisotropy fast directions align with absolute plate motion offshore on the Pacific plate. Based on the depth sensitivity of our observations, we suggest diffuse deformation occurs throughout the crust. Our observations match trends in previous Pn anisotropy and SKS shear wave splitting observations, and therefore suggest a consistent pattern of distributed deformation throughout the lithosphere.

  3. New analytical methods for gravitational radiation and reaction in binaries with arbitrary mass ratio and relative velocity

    CERN Document Server

    Galley, Chad R

    2009-01-01

    We present a new analytical framework for describing the dynamics of a gravitational binary system with unequal masses moving with arbitrary relative velocity, taking into account the backreaction from both compact objects in the form of tidal deformation, gravitational waves and self forces. Allowing all dynamical variables to interact with each other in a self-consistent manner this formalism ensures that all the dynamical quantities involved are conserved on the background spacetime and obey the gauge invariance under general coordinate transformations that preserve the background geometry. Because it is based on a generalized perturbation theory and the important new emphasis is on the self-consistency of all the dynamical variables involved we call it a gravitational perturbation theory with self-consistent backreaction (GP-SCB). As an illustration of how this formalism is implemented we construct perturbatively a self-consistent set of equations of motion for an inspiraling gravitational binary, which d...

  4. Involvement of calcitonin gene-related peptide in migraine: regional cerebral blood flow and blood flow velocity in migraine patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lassen, L.H.; Jacobsen, V.B.; Haderslev, P.A.

    2008-01-01

    g/min) or placebo for 20 min was studied in 12 patients with migraine without aura outside attacks. Xenon-133 inhalation SPECT-determined regional cerebral blood flow (rCBF) and transcranial Doppler (TCD)-determined blood velocity (V-mean) in the middle cerebral artery (MCA), as well as the heart......Calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP)-containing nerves are closely associated with cranial blood vessels. CGRP is the most potent vasodilator known in isolated cerebral blood vessels. CGRP can induce migraine attacks, and two selective CGRP receptor antagonists are effective in the treatment...... of migraine attacks. It is therefore important to investigate its mechanism of action in patients with migraine. We here investigate the effects of intravenous human alpha-CGRP (h alpha CGRP) on intracranial hemodynamics. In a double-blind, cross-over study, the effect of intravenous infusion of haCGRP (2 mu...

  5. SPH Simulation of Ballistic Impact on Ceramic Plate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chetan Swaroop

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available This paper studies the use of smooth particle hydrodynamics (SPH numerical technique to simulate the impact, penetration and perforation of Ceramic plate (Al2O3-99.7% by Lead Round Nose (LRN projectile. The general discussion of the SPH solver is introduced first then AUTODYN 2D simulation of penetration and perforation of ceramic plate. The numerical prediction of the time history of velocity of bullet is investigated for a range of impact velocity between 400m/s to 800m/s and an empirical relation is derived between impact velocity and residual velocity. For this type of problem, the SPH approach can provide significant advantages over more traditional numerical methods.

  6. Real Plates and Dubious Microplates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kogan, M. G.; Steblov, G. M.

    2008-12-01

    From the onset of plate tectonics, the existence of most of the plates was never put in doubt, although the boundaries of some plates, like Africa, were later revised. There are however, two microplates in northeast Asia, the Amurian and Okhotsk, whose existence and the sense of rotation was revised several times. The rms value of plate-residual GPS velocities is 0.5-0.9 mm/a for sets of stations representing the motion of the following plates: Antarctic, Australian, Eurasian, North American, Nubian, Pacific, and South American. This value can be regarded as an upper bound on deviation of real plates from infinite stiffness. The rms value of plate-residual GPS velocities is 1.2-1.8 mm/a for the Indian, Nazca, and Somalian plates. Higher rms values for India and Nazca are attributed to the noisier data. The higher rms value for Somalia appears to arise from the distributed deformation to the east of the East African Rift; whether this statement is true can only be decided from observations of denser network in the future. From the analysis of plate-residual GPS velocities, the Canadian Arctic and northeastern Siberia belong to the North American plate. The detailed GPS survey on Sakhalin Island shows that the Sea of Okhotsk region also belongs to the North American plate while the region to the west of it belongs to the Eurasian plate. These results provide a constraint on the geometry of the North American plate and put in doubt the existence of smaller plates in northeast Asia.

  7. Velocity anticipation in the optimal velocity model

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    DONG Li-yun; WENG Xu-dan; LI Qing-ding

    2009-01-01

    In this paper,the velocity anticipation in the optimal velocity model (OVM) is investigated.The driver adjusts the velocity of his vehicle by the desired headway,which depends on both instantaneous headway and relative velocity.The effect of relative velocity is measured by a sensitivity function.A specific form of the sensitivity function is supposed and the involved parameters are determined by the both numerical simulation and empirical data.It is shown that inclusion of velocity anticipation enhances the stability of traffic flow.Numerical simulations show a good agreement with empirical data.This model provides a better description of real traffic,including the acceleration process from standing states and the deceleration process approaching a stopped car.

  8. Relation of Isotope Geochemical Steep Zones with Geophysical Fields and Tectonics in the Junction Area of the Cathaysian, Yangtze and Indochina Plates

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2000-01-01

    Through lead isotope geochemical mapping in the Yunnan-Guizhou area geochemical steep zones (GSZ) have been established, which clearly reveal the junction relationship of the Cathaysian, Yangtze and Indo-China plates. GSZ are closey related to gravity Moho gradient zones and lithospheric thickness. The GSZ between the Yangtze and Cathaysian plates is consistent with the Shizong-Mile tectonic belt, where island arc basalts are well developed. The Yangtze-Indo-China GSZ is parallel to the Jingdong-Mojiang volcanic belt in rift-island arc environments. The evidence of geology, geophysics and geochemistry all indicates that Cathaysia was subducted towards the Yangtze plate and that the Yangtze plate was underthrust beneath the Indo-China, which took place from the Early Carboniferous to the Early Triassic.

  9. Routine removal of the plate after surgical treatment for mandibular angle fracture with a third molar in relation to the fracture line

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamamoto, Kazuhiko; Matsusue, Yumiko; Horita, Satoshi; Murakami, Kazuhiro; Sugiura, Tsutomu; Kirita, Tadaaki

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose was to analyze the clinical course of surgically treated mandibular angle fractures from the viewpoint of routine removal of the plate because these fractures are associated with high rates of complications and plate removal. Subjects and Methods: The subjects were 40 patients with unilateral mandibular angle fracture, which was intraorally reduced and principally fixed with a single miniplate on the external oblique ridge. The third molar in relation to the fracture line was extracted in seven patients during the surgery. Clinical course was evaluated in terms of removal of the plate, preservation of the third molar and complications. Results: One patient showed a wound infection postoperatively, and two patients developed pericoronitis during the follow-up. These were managed with medication and local irrigation. One patient with a preserved third molar did not make a required visit and was lost from the follow-up. Removal of the plates was performed in 39 patients after confirmation of good fracture healing, mostly within a year. Twenty-four of 32 preserved third molars were simultaneously extracted. These procedures were generally performed under local anesthesia on an outpatient basis, and they did not cause any complications. Conclusions: Routine removal of the plate after surgical treatment for mandibular angle fractures, simultaneously with extraction of the third molar if indicated, may be beneficial to avoid complications related to the plate and the third molar later in life. PMID:26389039

  10. Energy velocity and group velocity

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    陈宇

    1995-01-01

    A new Lagrangian method for studying the relationship between the energy velocity and the group velocity is described. It is proved that under the usual quasistatic electric field, the energy velocity is identical to the group velocity for acoustic waves in anisotropic piezoelectric (or non-piezoelectric) media.

  11. Numerical modelling of instantaneous plate tectonics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Minster, J. B.; Haines, E.; Jordan, T. H.; Molnar, P.

    1974-01-01

    Assuming lithospheric plates to be rigid, 68 spreading rates, 62 fracture zones trends, and 106 earthquake slip vectors are systematically inverted to obtain a self-consistent model of instantaneous relative motions for eleven major plates. The inverse problem is linearized and solved iteratively by a maximum-likelihood procedure. Because the uncertainties in the data are small, Gaussian statistics are shown to be adequate. The use of a linear theory permits (1) the calculation of the uncertainties in the various angular velocity vectors caused by uncertainties in the data, and (2) quantitative examination of the distribution of information within the data set. The existence of a self-consistent model satisfying all the data is strong justification of the rigid plate assumption. Slow movement between North and South America is shown to be resolvable.

  12. Establishment and analyses on the unified horizontal crustal velocity fields in the Chinese mainland

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    The related data of GPS networks in the Chinese mainland and its peripheral areas are collected from internet sites in the paper. And various data fusion methods are presented based on the collected GPS data. Thus the unified horizontal crustal velocity fields can be established in the Chinese mainland and its peripheral areas. The available data of 423 GPS sites are applied to the velocity fields and its area gets to 1.2′107 km2. By analyzing the velocity fields, the basic spatial distribution feature of the horizontal crustal motion in the Chinese mainland and its peripheral area can be obtained preliminarily. Meanwhile, the range of the velocity fields in the Chinese mainland affected by the collision force of India plate to Eurasia plate and the problem of principal direction of the force from India plate are discussed.

  13. Parathyroid hormone/parathyroid hormone-related protein receptor signaling is required for maintenance of the growth plate in postnatal life.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hirai, Takao; Chagin, Andrei S; Kobayashi, Tatsuya; Mackem, Susan; Kronenberg, Henry M

    2011-01-04

    Parathyroid hormone (PTH)-related protein (PTHrP), regulated by Indian hedgehog and acting through the PTH/PTHrP receptor (PPR), is crucial for normal cartilage development. These observations suggest a possible role of PPR signaling in the postnatal growth plate; however, the role of PPR signaling in postnatal chondrocytes is unknown. In this study, we have generated tamoxifen-inducible and cartilage-specific PPR KO mice to evaluate the physiological role of PPR signaling in postnatal chondrocytes. We found that inactivation of the PPR in chondrocytes postnatally leads to accelerated differentiation of chondrocytes, followed by disappearance of the growth plate. We also observed an increase of TUNEL-positive cells and activities of caspase-3 and caspase-9 in the growth plate, along with a decrease in phosphorylation of Bad at Ser155 in postnatal PPR KO mice. Administration of a low-phosphate diet, which prevents apoptosis of chondrocytes, prevented the disappearance of the growth plate. Taken together, these observations suggest that the major consequences of PPR activation are similar in both the fetal and postnatal growth plates. Moreover, chondrocyte apoptosis through the activation of a mitochondrial pathway may be involved in the process of premature disappearance of the growth plate by postnatal inactivation of the PPR in chondrocytes.

  14. Sales of Forestry-Related Specialty License Plates in the Southern United States: A County Level Empirical Analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shaun M. Tanger

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available In recent years, specialty license plates have become an increasingly popular way to raise awareness and show support for a myriad of issues with which the plate is linked. Several states and various organizations that provide forestry education have developed forestry license plates. Vehicle owners can purchase the plates to show their support towards forestry by buying the forestry license plates, which generates revenue for the provider organization. Using county-level data from five states in the Southeastern United States, a statistical model was developed to examine explanatory factors of forestry-based specialty license plate sales in 2014. Using linear count regression modeling, we observed that the significant predictor variables of plate sales were income per capita, population density, the percentage of acres that are forested in the county, acres of forest in the county that are privately owned, percentage of people who are 65 or older, and presence of the forest industry in the county. Plate sales were positively correlated with the presence of the forest industry in the county.

  15. Effects of Reynolds Number and Stokes Number on Particle-pair Relative Velocity in Isotropic Turbulence: An Experimental Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dou, Zhongwang; Bragg, Andrew; Hammond, Adam; Liang, Zach; Collins, Lance; Meng, Hui

    2016-11-01

    Effects of Reynolds number (Rλ) and Stokes number (St) on particle-pair relative velocity (RV) were studied using four-frame particle tracking in an enclosed turbulence chamber. Two tests were performed: varying Rλ between 246 and 357 at six St values, and varying St between 0.02 and 4.63 at five Rλ values. By comparing experimental and DNS results of mean inward particle-pair RV, , we observed excellent agreement for all test conditions across a large range of particle separation distance (r) ; however at r values were higher than simulation. At fixed St , was found to be independent of Rλ in the observable St , r, and Rλ ranges. At fixed Rλ, increased with St at small r and decreased with St at large r. We further compared and variance of RV, , between experiments, DNS and theoretical predictions by Pan and Padoan (2010). At 0 theory-predicted and matched with DNS and experiment in the range of r = 1 - 60 η . As St increased, theoretical predictions were lower than experiment and DNS results. The potential causes of these trends are explored. Additionally, we discuss the observed electrostatic charge effect on particle relative motion in isotropic turbulence and our plans of studying this effect using an integrated experimental, numerical and theoretical approach. This work was supported by NSF CBET-0967407 and CBET-0967349.

  16. A Comparative Assessment of Track Plates to Quantify Fine Scale Variations in the Relative Abundance of Norway Rats in Urban Slums.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hacker, Kathryn P; Minter, Amanda; Begon, Mike; Diggle, Peter J; Serrano, Soledad; Reis, Mitermayer G; Childs, James E; Ko, Albert I; Costa, Federico

    2016-06-01

    Norway rats (Rattus norvegicus) living in urban environments are a critical public health and economic problem, particularly in urban slums where residents are at a higher risk for rat borne diseases, yet convenient methods to quantitatively assess population sizes are lacking. We evaluated track plates as a method to determine rat distribution and relative abundance in a complex urban slum environment by correlating the presence and intensity of rat-specific marks on track plates with findings from rat infestation surveys and trapping of rats to population exhaustion. To integrate the zero-inflated track plate data we developed a two-component mixture model with one binary and one censored continuous component. Track plate mark-intensity was highly correlated with signs of rodent infestation (all coefficients between 0.61 and 0.79 and all p-values < 0.05). Moreover, the mean level of pre-trapping rat-mark intensity on plates was significantly associated with the number of rats captured subsequently (Odds ratio1.38; 95% CI 1.19-1.61) and declined significantly following trapping (Odds ratio 0.86; 95% CI 0.78-0.95). Track plates provided robust proxy measurements of rat abundance and distribution and detected rat presence even when populations appeared 'trapped out'. Tracking plates are relatively easy and inexpensive methods that can be used to intensively sample settings such as urban slums, where traditional trapping or mark-recapture studies are impossible to implement, and therefore the results can inform and assess the impact of targeted urban rodent control campaigns.

  17. Left ventricular long axis tissue Doppler systolic velocity is independently related to heart rate and body size.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peverill, Roger E; Chou, Bon; Donelan, Lesley

    2017-01-01

    The physiological factors which affect left ventricular (LV) long-axis function are not fully defined. We investigated the relationships of resting heart rate and body size with the peak velocities and amplitudes of LV systolic and early diastolic long axis motion, and also with long-axis contraction duration. Two groups of adults free of cardiac disease underwent pulsed-wave tissue Doppler imaging at the septal and lateral mitral annular borders. Group 1 (n = 77) were healthy subjects heart rate, height or body surface area (BSA) for either LV wall in either group, but SDur was inversely correlated with heart rate for both walls and both groups, and after adjustment for heart rate, males in both groups had a shorter septal SDur. Septal and lateral s` were independently and positively correlated with SExc, heart rate and height in both groups, independent of sex and age. There were no correlations of heart rate, height or BSA with either e` or EDExc for either wall in either group. Heart rate and height independently modify the relationship between s` and SExc, but neither are related to EDExc or e`. These findings suggest that s` and SExc cannot be used interchangeably for the assessment of LV long-axis contraction.

  18. Imaging Fractures Through Relative Velocity Change Using Ambient Seismic Noise And Distributed Acoustic Sensing (DAS): A SUBTER Pilot Study At Blue Canyon Dome, Socorro NM

    Science.gov (United States)

    James, S. R.; Knox, H. A.; Ajo Franklin, J. B.; Johnson, T. C.; Morris, J.; Grubelich, M. C.; King, D. K.

    2016-12-01

    Knowledge of fracture systems, including locations, morphology, and evolution, is critical for groundwater management, contaminant transport, and energy applications such as reservoir development (i.e. tight shale and geothermal) and reservoir management (i.e. carbon sequestration and wastewater injection). It has long been understood that the presence of fractures reduces bulk seismic velocity, with waves traveling perpendicular to fracture planes experiencing the strongest velocity reduction. We present results from seismic interferometry using ambient seismic noise to detect velocity changes following fracture emplacement from two energetic stimulations. Distributed Acoustic Sensing (DAS) using fiber optic cables was used to record seismic arrivals at high spatial resolution ( 3 ft). Cables were grouted in the annulus of four cased monitoring boreholes surrounding the stimulation borehole at a radius of 4 feet. Ambient noise was recorded before and after each stimulation for 12-hour time periods. We used the Python package MSNoise to compute cross-correlations of all near-horizontal (less than 60°) channel pairs between boreholes and calculated the velocity change of each time period relative to initial conditions prior to stimulation. Results show an average velocity decrease of approximately 6% following the first fracturing event. Variations between channel pairs suggest some are more strongly affected than others, which is supported by evaluation of other geophysical data. These results show promise for locating fractures based on spatial variation in velocity changes. Unsurprisingly, results following the second stimulation are generally more scattered. Some velocities are further reduced compared to those after the first stimulation while others show a relative velocity increase. These results are roughly consistent with time-lapse seismic measurements conducted using active sources and classical sensors (e.g. hydrophones). Sandia National Laboratories is

  19. Stereomotion speed perception: contributions from both changing disparity and interocular velocity difference over a range of relative disparities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brooks, Kevin R.; Stone, Leland S.

    2004-01-01

    The role of two binocular cues to motion in depth-changing disparity (CD) and interocular velocity difference (IOVD)- was investigated by measuring stereomotion speed discrimination and static disparity discrimination performance (stereoacuity). Speed discrimination thresholds were assessed both for random dot stereograms (RDS), and for their temporally uncorrelated equivalents, dynamic random dot stereograms (DRDS), at relative disparity pedestals of -19, 0, and +19 arcmin. While RDS stimuli contain both CD and IOVD cues, DRDS stimuli carry only CD information. On average, thresholds were a factor of 1.7 higher for DRDS than for RDS stimuli with no clear effect of relative disparity pedestal. Results were similar for approaching and receding targets. Variations in stimulus duration had no significant effect on thresholds, and there was no observed correlation between stimulus displacement and perceived speed, confirming that subjects responded to stimulus speed in each condition. Stereoacuity was equally good for our RDS and DRDS stimuli, showing that the difference in stereomotion speed discrimination performance for these stimuli was not due to any difference in the precision of the disparity cue. In addition, when we altered stereomotion stimulus trajectory by independently manipulating the speeds and directions of its monocular half-images, perceived stereomotion speed remained accurate. This finding is inconsistent with response strategies based on properties of either monocular half-image motion, or any ad hoc combination of the monocular speeds. We conclude that although subjects are able to discriminate stereomotion speed reliably on the basis of CD information alone, IOVD provides a precise additional cue to stereomotion speed perception.

  20. Sonication for diagnosis of catheter-related infection is not better than traditional roll-plate culture: a prospective cohort study with 975 central venous catheters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erb, Stefan; Frei, Reno; Schregenberger, Katharina; Dangel, Marc; Nogarth, Danica; Widmer, Andreas F

    2014-08-15

    This prospective randomized controlled study with 975 nontunneled central venous catheters (CVCs) showed that the semiquantitative roll-plate culture technique (SQC) was as accurate as the sonication method for diagnosis of catheter-related infections. Sonication is difficult to standardize, whereas SQC is simpler, faster, and as reliable as the sonication method for culturing CVCs.

  1. Distribution and migration of aftershocks of the 2010 Mw 7.4 Ogasawara Islands intraplate normal-faulting earthquake related to a fracture zone in the Pacific plate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Obana, Koichiro; Takahashi, Tsutomu; No, Tetsuo; Kaiho, Yuka; Kodaira, Shuichi; Yamashita, Mikiya; Sato, Takeshi; Nakamura, Takeshi

    2014-04-01

    describe the aftershocks of a Mw 7.4 intraplate normal-faulting earthquake that occurred 150 km east Ogasawara (Bonin) Islands, Japan, on 21 December 2010. It occurred beneath the outer trench slope of the Izu-Ogasawara trench, where the Pacific plate subducts beneath the Philippine Sea plate. Aftershock observations using ocean bottom seismographs (OBSs) began soon after the earthquake and multichannel seismic reflection surveys were conducted across the aftershock area. Aftershocks were distributed in a NW-SE belt 140 km long, oblique to the N-S trench axis. They formed three subparallel lineations along a fracture zone in the Pacific plate. The OBS observations combined with data from stations on Chichi-jima and Haha-jima Islands revealed a migration of the aftershock activity. The first hour, which likely outlines the main shock rupture, was limited to an 80 km long area in the central part of the subsequent aftershock area. The first hour activity occurred mainly around, and appears to have been influenced by, nearby large seamounts and oceanic plateau, such as the Ogasawara Plateau and the Uyeda Ridge. Over the following days, the aftershocks expanded beyond or into these seamounts and plateau. The aftershock distribution and migration suggest that crustal heterogeneities related to a fracture zone and large seamounts and oceanic plateau in the incoming Pacific plate affected the rupture of the main shock. Such preexisting structures may influence intraplate normal-faulting earthquakes in other regions of plate flexure prior to subduction.

  2. Application of repeated passive source travel time tomography to reveal weak velocity changes related to the 2011 Tohoku-Oki Mw 9.0 earthquake

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koulakov, Ivan; Gladkov, Valery; El Khrepy, Sami; Al-Arifi, Nassir; Fathi, Ismail Husain

    2016-06-01

    Temporal changes of seismic velocities may provide important information on the processes that occur inside the Earth. However, using body wave data with passive sources faces the problem of an uneven distribution of rays, which may cause artifacts with stronger amplitudes than the actual velocity changes in the Earth. We propose an algorithm for the selection of similar data sets in different time periods that minimize the artifacts related to variable data distributions. In this study, we used the data of the Japan Meteorological Agency for several years before and after the Mw 9.0 Tohoku-Oki event that occurred on 11 March 2011. We performed careful testing using different synthetic models, showing that the selected data subsets allow detecting weak velocity changes with amplitudes above 0.2%. The analysis of the experimental data revealed important features associated with the stress and deformation distributions after the megathrust event. In the upper crust, we found a large zone along the coast with significant P velocity increase likely caused by compression of crustal rocks. This zone was cut by several elongated anomalies with local velocity decrease coinciding with the limits of the maximum slip area. These anomalies possibly mark the areas of major ruptures and deformations after the Tohoku-Oki earthquake. In the coupling zone at a depth of 40 km, we observe a velocity decrease in the area of the Mw 7.7 aftershock representing strong fracturing in the focal zone. Beneath the volcanic arc, we observe significant (up to 0.5%) decrease of P velocity but less prominent S velocity changes.

  3. Horizontal versus vertical plate motions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Cuffaro

    2006-07-01

    Full Text Available We review both present and past motions at major plate boundaries, which have the horizontal component in average 10 to 100 times faster (10–100 mm/yr than the vertical component (0.01–1 mm/yr in all geodynamic settings. The steady faster horizontal velocity of the lithosphere with respect to the upward or downward velocities at plate boundaries supports dominating tangential forces acting on plates. This suggests a passive role of plate boundaries with respect to far field forces determining the velocity of plates. The forces acting on the lithosphere can be subdivided in coupled and uncoupled, as a function of the shear at the lithosphere base. Higher the asthenosphere viscosity, more significant should be the coupled forces, i.e., the mantle drag and the trench suction. Lower the asthenosphere viscosity, more the effects of uncoupled forces might result determinant, i.e., the ridge push, the slab pull and the tidal drag. Although a combination of all forces acting on the lithosphere is likely, the decoupling between lithosphere and mantle suggests that a torque acts on the lithosphere independently of the mantle drag. Slab pull and ridge push are candidates for generating this torque, but, unlike these boundary forces, the advantage of the tidal drag is to be a volume force, acting simultaneously on the whole plates, and being the decoupling at the lithosphere base controlled by lateral variations in viscosity of the low-velocity layer.

  4. Relation between muscle fiber conduction velocity and exerted dynamic characteristics of muscular tension in patients with hemiplegia caused by stroke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murakami, Kenichi; Fujisawa, Hiroyuki; Suzuki, Makoto; Sato, Yoichiro; Sakurai, Kentaro; Abe, Chie

    2016-10-01

    [Purpose] The aim of this study was to clarify the relationships among muscle fiber conduction velocity, time-force characteristics of muscle force production, and voluntary movement in patients with hemiplegia. [Subjects and Methods] The participants in the present study were 13 patients with hemiplegia. Muscle fiber conduction velocity, deep temperature of muscles and muscle thickness were measured for the tibialis anterior, and a time force curve was obtained from dorsiflexion of the ankle and lower thigh girth (maximum, minimum) for both sides. The maximum torque rate of change and maximum torque were calculated from the force-time curve. In addition, Brunnstrom Recovery Stage was used to evaluate the function of the hemiplegic side. [Results] In all the measurement items, significant differences were observed between the hemiplegic side and the healthy side. The maximum torque rate of change and Brunnstrom Recovery Stage showed a high degree of correlation. The muscle fiber conduction velocity and maximum torque rate of change or maximum torque showed a medium degree of correlation. However, muscle fiber conduction velocity was not significantly correlated with Brunnstrom Recovery Stage. [Conclusion] Brunnstrom Recovery Stage was good as a determination factor for the maximum torque rate of change. In addition, in patients with hemiplegia, it became clear that relationship is between muscle fiber conduction velocity and time-force characteristics of muscle force production as in healthy persons.

  5. Are anthropometric, flexibility, muscular strength, and endurance variables related to clubhead velocity in low- and high-handicap golfers?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keogh, Justin W L; Marnewick, Michel C; Maulder, Peter S; Nortje, Jacques P; Hume, Patria A; Bradshaw, Elizabeth J

    2009-09-01

    The present study assessed the anthropometric profile (International Society for the Advancement of Kinanthropometry protocol), flexibility, muscular strength, and endurance of 20 male golfers. These data were collected in order to determine: a) the relationship between these kinanthropometric measures and clubhead velocity; and b) if these measures could distinguish low-handicap (LHG) and high-handicap (HHG) golfers. Ten LHG (handicap of 0.3 +/- 0.5) and 10 HHG (handicap of 20.3 +/- 2.4) performed 10 swings for maximum velocity and accuracy with their own 5-iron golf club at a wall-mounted target. LHG hit the target significantly more (115%) and had a 12% faster clubhead velocity than HHG (p swing-specific cable woodchop (GSCWC) strength (p high GSCWC strength and perhaps greater bench press strength and longer arms may therefore be at a competitive advantage, as these characteristics allow the production of greater clubhead velocity and resulting ball displacement. Such results have implications for golf talent identification programs and for the prescription and monitoring of golf conditioning programs. While golf conditioning programs may have many aims, specific trunk rotation exercises need to be included if increased clubhead velocity is the goal. Muscular hypertrophy development may not need to be emphasized as it could reduce golf performance by limiting range of motion and/or increasing moment of inertia.

  6. Evaluation of relative speed of latent images in relation to changes in fading time and storage temperature of imaging plates in computed radiography systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seoung, Youl-Hun

    2014-01-01

    This study aimed to evaluate the relative speed (RS) of latent images in relation to changes in the fading time and storage temperature of imaging plates (IPs) in computed radiography systems. The storage temperatures adopted were 20, 30, and 40°C, while the fading times employed were 0, 4, 8, 12, and 24 hours. The X-ray exposure factors were 50 kVp, 10 mAs, and a 150 cm distance from an IP to an X-ray source. In the processing of each image, the parameters used for multi-scale image contrast amplification were multiscale image contrast, noise reduction, edge enhancement, and latitude reduction, all assigned a value of 0. Image sensitivity was used to convert linear properties. The RS used for the characteristic curve was evaluated using a uniform aluminum 11-step wedge. Results show that the RS values of IPs with changing fading time were 17.8 ± 0.9 at 20°C, 13.9 ± 1.1 at 30°C, and 13.4 ± 0.9 at 40°C. On the basis of these findings, we conclude that IPs should be stored in the long term at temperatures as low as 20°C.

  7. Gravitational contraction versus Supernova driving and the origin of the velocity dispersion-size relation in molecular clouds

    CERN Document Server

    Ibáñez-Mejía, Juan C; Klessen, Ralf S; Baczynski, Christian

    2015-01-01

    Molecular cloud observations show that clouds have non-thermal velocity dispersions that scale with the cloud size as $\\sigma\\propto R^{1/2}$ at constant surface density, and for varying surface density scale with both the cloud`s size and surface density, $\\sigma^2 \\propto R \\Sigma$. The energy source driving these chaotic motions remains poorly understood. We describe the velocity dispersions observed in a cloud population formed in a kiloparsec-scale numerical simulation of a magnetized, supernova-driven, self-gravitating, interstellar medium, including diffuse heating and radiative cooling. We compare the relationships between velocity dispersion, size, and surface density measured in the simulated cloud population to those found in observations of Galactic molecular clouds. We find that external supernova explosions can not drive turbulent motions of the observed magnitudes within dense clouds. On the other hand, self-gravity also induces non-thermal motions as gravitationally bound clouds begin to colla...

  8. Glottal volume velocity waveform characteristics in subjects with and without vocal training, related to gender, sound intensity, fundamental frequency, and age

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sulter, AM; Wit, HP

    1996-01-01

    Glottal volume velocity waveform characteristics of 224 subjects, categorized in four groups according to gender and vocal training, were determined, and their relations to sound-pressure level, fundamental frequency, intra-oral pressure, and age were analyzed. Subjects phonated at three intensity

  9. The dynamics of Cenozoic and Mesozoic plate motions

    OpenAIRE

    Lithgow-Bertelloni, C.; Richards, M. A.

    1998-01-01

    Our understanding of the dynamics of plate motions is based almost entirely upon modeling of present-day plate motions. A fuller understanding, however, can be derived from consideration of the history of plate motions. Here we investigate the kinematics of the last 120 Myr of plate motions and the dynamics of Cenozoic motions, paying special attention to changes in the character of plate motions and plate-driving forces. We analyze the partitioning of the observed surface velocity field into...

  10. C57BL/6 life span study: age-related declines in muscle power production and contractile velocity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Graber, Ted G; Kim, Jong-Hee; Grange, Robert W; McLoon, Linda K; Thompson, LaDora V

    2015-06-01

    Quantification of key outcome measures in animal models of aging is an important step preceding intervention testing. One such measurement, skeletal muscle power generation (force * velocity), is critical for dynamic movement. Prior research focused on maximum power (P max), which occurs around 30-40 % of maximum load. However, movement occurs over the entire load range. Thus, the primary purpose of this study was to determine the effect of age on power generation during concentric contractions in the extensor digitorum longus (EDL) and soleus muscles over the load range from 10 to 90 % of peak isometric tetanic force (P 0). Adult, old, and elderly male C57BL/6 mice were examined for contractile function (6-7 months old, 100 % survival; ~24 months, 75 %; and ~28 months, power decreased with age not only at P max but also over the load range. Importantly, we found greater age-associated deficits in both power and velocity when the muscles were contracting concentrically against heavy loads (>50 % P 0). The shape of the force-velocity curve also changed with age (a/P 0 increased). In addition, there were prolonged contraction times to maximum force and shifts in the distribution of the myosin light and heavy chain isoforms in the EDL. The results demonstrate that age-associated difficulty in movement during challenging tasks is likely due, in addition to overall reduced force output, to an accelerated deterioration of power production and contractile velocity under heavily loaded conditions.

  11. The relation between electromyography and growth velocity of the spine in the evaluation of curve progression in idiopathic scoliosis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cheung, J.; Veldhuizen, A.G.; Halbertsma, J.P.; Maurits, N.M.; Sluiter, W.J.; Cool, J.C.; van Horn, J.R.

    2004-01-01

    Study Design. A prospective study in which patients with idiopathic scoliosis were examined longitudinally by radiographic and electromyographic measurements according to a protocol. Objectives. To measure the growth velocity of the spine and the electromyographic ratio of the paraspinal muscles to

  12. The space density of primordial gas clouds near galaxies and groups and their relation to galactic high-velocity clouds

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zwaan, MA; Briggs, FH

    2000-01-01

    The Arecibo H I Strip Survey probed the halos of similar to 300 cataloged galaxies and the environments of similar to 14 groups with sensitivity to neutral hydrogen masses greater than or equal to 10(7) M-circle dot. The survey detected no objects with properties resembling the high-velocity clouds

  13. Tectonic Plate Movement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Landalf, Helen

    1998-01-01

    Presents an activity that employs movement to enable students to understand concepts related to plate tectonics. Argues that movement brings topics to life in a concrete way and helps children retain knowledge. (DDR)

  14. Tectonic Plate Movement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Landalf, Helen

    1998-01-01

    Presents an activity that employs movement to enable students to understand concepts related to plate tectonics. Argues that movement brings topics to life in a concrete way and helps children retain knowledge. (DDR)

  15. Break-up spots : Could the Pacific open as a consequence of plate kinematics?

    OpenAIRE

    Clouard, V.; Gerbault, Muriel

    2008-01-01

    The South Central Pacific is the location of an abnormal concentration of intraplate volcanism. Noting that this volcanism is present from the Kermadec Tonga trench to the Easter microplate and forms a wide east-west channel, we propose to explain its occurrence in relation to the Pacific plate geometry and kinematics. We construct 2D numerical models of stress and strain within the Pacific plate using its velocity field and boundary conditions. The models indicate a shear band, associated to...

  16. Some invariant solutions for non-conformal perfect fluid plates in 5-flat form in general relativity

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Mukesh Kumar; Y K Gupta

    2010-06-01

    A set of six invariant solutions for non-conformal perfect fluid plates in 5-flat form is obtained using one-parametric Lie group of transformations. Out of the six solutions so obtained, three are in implicit form while the remaining three could be expressed explicitly. Each solution describes an accelerating fluid distribution and is new as far as authors are aware.

  17. Lithospheric deformation in the Africa-Iberia plate boundary: Improved neotectonic modeling testing a basal-driven Alboran plate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neres, M.; Carafa, M. M. C.; Fernandes, R. M. S.; Matias, L.; Duarte, J. C.; Barba, S.; Terrinha, P.

    2016-09-01

    We present an improved neotectonic numerical model of the complex NW Africa-SW Eurasia plate boundary segment that runs from west to east along the Gloria Fault up to the northern Algerian margin. We model the surface velocity field and the ongoing lithospheric deformation using the most recent version of the thin-shell code SHELLS and updated lithospheric model and fault map of the region. To check the presence versus the absence of an independently driven Alboran domain, we develop two alternative plate models: one does not include an Alboran plate; another includes it and determines the basal shear tractions necessary to drive it with known velocities. We also compare two alternative sets of Africa-Eurasia velocity boundary conditions, corresponding to geodetic and geological-scale averages of plate motion. Finally, we perform an extensive parametric study of fault friction coefficient, trench resistance, and velocities imposed in Alboran nodes. The final run comprises 5240 experiments, each scored to geodetic velocities (estimated for 250 stations and here provided), stress direction data, and seismic strain rates. The model with the least discrepancy to the data includes the Alboran plate driven by a basal WSW directed shear traction, slightly oblique to the westward direction of Alboran motion. We provide estimates of long-term strain rates and slip rates for the modeled faults, which can be useful for further hazard studies. Our results support that a mechanism additional to the Africa-Eurasia convergence is required to drive the Alboran domain, which can be related to subduction processes occurring within the mantle.

  18. Controlling Laminate Plate Elastic Behavior

    OpenAIRE

    Mareš, T.

    2004-01-01

    This paper aims to express the relation of a measure of laminate plate stiffness with respect to the fiber orientation of its plies. The inverse of the scalar product of the lateral displacement of the central plane and lateral loading of the plate is the measure of laminate plate stiffness. In the case of a simply supported rectangular laminate plate this measure of stiffness is maximized, and the optimum orientation of its plies is searched.

  19. On the relation between the microscopic structure and the sound velocity anomaly in elemental melts of groups IV, V, VI

    CERN Document Server

    Greenberg, Yaron; Caspi, El'ad N; Beuneu, Brigitte; Dariel, Moshe P; Makov, Guy

    2010-01-01

    The sound velocity of some liquid elements of groups IV, V and VI, as reported in the literature, displays anomalous features that set them apart from other liquid metals. In an effort to determine a possible common origin of these anomalies, extensive neutron diffraction measurements of liquid Bi and Sb were carried out over a wide temperature range. The structure factors of liquid Sb and Bi were determined as a function of temperature. The structure of the two molten metals was carefully analyzed with respect to peak locations, widths and coordination number in their respective radial distribution function. The width of the peaks in the radial distribution function were not found to increase and even decreased within a certain temperature range. This anomalous temperature dependence of the peak widths correlates with the anomalous temperature dependence of the sound velocity. This correlation may be accounted for by increasing rigidity of the liquid structure with temperature. A phenomenological correlation...

  20. Wave propagation and group velocity

    CERN Document Server

    Brillouin, Léon

    1960-01-01

    Wave Propagation and Group Velocity contains papers on group velocity which were published during the First World War and are missing in many libraries. It introduces three different definitions of velocities: the group velocity of Lord Rayleigh, the signal velocity of Sommerfeld, and the velocity of energy transfer, which yields the rate of energy flow through a continuous wave and is strongly related to the characteristic impedance. These three velocities are identical for nonabsorbing media, but they differ considerably in an absorption band. Some examples are discussed in the last chapter

  1. Relation between etch-pit morphology and step retreat velocity on a calcite surface in aspartic acid solution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoshino, Toru; Kagi, Hiroyuki; Kamiya, Natsumi; Kokawa, Ryohei

    2010-04-01

    Effects of L-aspartic acid ( L-Asp) on dissolution of calcite were investigated. The step retreat velocity and dissolution rate of calcite were measured simultaneously using an AFM flow-through system. The etch-pit morphology of calcite was observed using confocal laser scanning microscopy. Results show that the etch-pit morphologies changed drastically depending on the L-Asp concentration ([ L-Asp]) in the order of rhomboidal, pentagonal, and triangular (not perfectly, but retaining an extra step). The change in obtuse step directions and appearance of the [0 1 0] step triggered these morphological changes. Addition of L-Asp accelerated all step retreats at [ L-Asp]0.01 M, L-Asp inhibited the retreats of obtuse steps and [0 1 0] step, although the retreat velocities of acute steps were constant irrespective of [ L-Asp]. These results suggest that the directional changes and the inhibition of retreat velocities of obtuse steps were attributed to the generation of [ 4 1 1] and [4 5 1] steps caused by L-Asp. Moreover, we confirmed the preferential effects of L-Asp on the [4 8 1] + to [ 4 4 1] ± step edge, and proposed the preferential effects of L-Asp on the [ 4 1 1] to [4 5 1] step edge.

  2. The Effects of Taekwondo Training on Peripheral Neuroplasticity-Related Growth Factors, Cerebral Blood Flow Velocity, and Cognitive Functions in Healthy Children: A Randomized Controlled Trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Su-Youn Cho

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Although regular Taekwondo (TKD training has been reported to be effective for improving cognitive function in children, the mechanism underlying this improvement remains unclear. The purpose of the present study was to observe changes in neuroplasticity-related growth factors in the blood, assess cerebral blood flow velocity, and verify the resulting changes in children’s cognitive function after TKD training. Thirty healthy elementary school students were randomly assigned to control (n = 15 and TKD (n = 15 groups. The TKD training was conducted for 60 min at a rating of perceived exertion (RPE of 11–15, 5 times per week, for 16 weeks. Brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF, vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF, and insulin-like growth factor-1 (IGF-1 levels were measured by blood sampling before and after the training, and the cerebral blood flow velocities (peak systolic [MCAs], end diastolic [MCAd], mean cerebral blood flow velocities [MCAm], and pulsatility index [PI] of the middle cerebral artery (MCA were measured using Doppler ultrasonography. For cognitive function assessment, Stroop Color and Word Tests (Word, Color, and Color-Word were administered along with other measurements. The serum BDNF, VEGF, and IGF-1 levels and the Color-Word test scores among the sub-factors of the Stroop Color and Word Test scores were significantly higher in the TKD group after the intervention (p < 0.05. On the other hand, no statistically significant differences were found in any factors related to cerebral blood flow velocities, or in the Word test and Color test scores (p > 0.05. Thus, 16-week TKD training did not significantly affect cerebral blood flow velocities, but the training may have been effective in increasing children’s cognitive function by inducing an increase in the levels of neuroplasticity-related growth factors.

  3. A new visualization of the motion of the Indian Plate in the Cenozoic

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holmes, J. J.; Stegman, D. R.

    2011-12-01

    90 million years ago the Indian Plate detached from the ancient supercontinent Gondwana and diverged away from the Antarctic and African plates in a northwest-wards direction. Evidence from magnetic anomalies and paleomagnetic data shows that between 67 and 49 million years ago spreading rates increased the Indian plate to anomalously rapid velocities, with a peak of nearly 200 mm/yr relative to the African plate. Cande and Stegman (2011) have shown new evidence that the Indian Plate acceleration was caused by a push force originating from the Reunion mantle plume. Two notable slowdowns occurred during that time period: a sharp reduction in velocity at 63 million years ago, and another more gradual reduction from 52 to 45 million years ago. The first slowdown coincides with rapidly dwindling flood basalt eruptions caused by the plume head of the Reunion mantle plume. The second slowdown is thought to be due to collision with either the Eurasian continent or a now extinct intermediate plate that may have contained an island arc. We are motivated to create a new visual model using new data and considering the Reunion plume as a driving force. Using the GPlates tectonics modeling software and rotation data developed by the EarthBytes Project we reconstruct the trajectory to develop a velocity vector model of the Indian plate. We use these tools to explore alternative plate reconstructions, such as one that includes a collision between India and a hypothetical intraoceanic arc beginning at 52 Ma (Ali and Aitchison, 2008) to help explain the reduction in plate velocity over the 7 million year span during the second slowdown.

  4. Kinematics of the New Zealand Plate Boundary: Relative Motion by GPS Across Networks of 1000 km and 50 km Spacing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scholz, Chris; Beavan, John

    1998-01-01

    From the 1995-97 data we are able to estimate interseismic velocities - the original aim of the project - though corrections must first be made for the coseismic effects of the Cass earthquake and postseismic effects of the Arthur's Pass event. In the following, we present four sets of results: (1) Interseismic velocities, (2) Arthur's Pass earthquake - coseismic, (3) Cass earthquake, and (4) Arthur's Pass earthquake postseismic. Work on all these fronts is still incomplete, but is being actively continued with funding from the NZ Foundation for Research, Science and Technology (FRST).

  5. SH-guided waves in layered piezoelectric/piezomagnetic plates

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Guoquan Nie; Zijun An; Jinxi Liu

    2009-01-01

    The propagation of shear horizontal (SH) guided waves in a coupled plate consisting of a piezoelectric layer and a piezomagnetic layer is studied. Both the layers are transversely isotropic and perfectly bonded along the interface. The upper and the lower surfaces of the plate are assumed to be mechanically free, electrically open and magnetically dosed. Two different cases are considered. One is that the bulk shear wave velocity of piezoelectric material is larger than that of piezomagnetic material. The other is that the bulk shear wave velocity of piezomagnetic material is larger than that of piezoelectric material. The dispersion relation is obtained while the phase velocity is among the bulk shear wave velocity of two different layers. The numerical results show that the phase velocity approaches the smaller bulk shear wave velocity of the material in the system with the increase in the wave number for different modes. The thickness ratio and the properties of the piezoelectric material have great effect on the dispersion behaviors. The results of this paper can offer some funda-mental theory to the application of piezoelectric/piezomagnetic composites or structures.

  6. Ocean Basin Evolution and Global-Scale Plate Reorganization Events Since Pangea Breakup

    Science.gov (United States)

    Müller, R. Dietmar; Seton, Maria; Zahirovic, Sabin; Williams, Simon E.; Matthews, Kara J.; Wright, Nicky M.; Shephard, Grace E.; Maloney, Kayla T.; Barnett-Moore, Nicholas; Hosseinpour, Maral; Bower, Dan J.; Cannon, John

    2016-06-01

    We present a revised global plate motion model with continuously closing plate boundaries ranging from the Triassic at 230 Ma to the present day, assess differences among alternative absolute plate motion models, and review global tectonic events. Relatively high mean absolute plate motion rates of approximately 9-10 cm yr-1 between 140 and 120 Ma may be related to transient plate motion accelerations driven by the successive emplacement of a sequence of large igneous provinces during that time. An event at ˜100 Ma is most clearly expressed in the Indian Ocean and may reflect the initiation of Andean-style subduction along southern continental Eurasia, whereas an acceleration at ˜80 Ma of mean rates from 6 to 8 cm yr-1 reflects the initial northward acceleration of India and simultaneous speedups of plates in the Pacific. An event at ˜50 Ma expressed in relative, and some absolute, plate motion changes around the globe and in a reduction of global mean plate speeds from about 6 to 4-5 cm yr-1 indicates that an increase in collisional forces (such as the India-Eurasia collision) and ridge subduction events in the Pacific (such as the Izanagi-Pacific Ridge) play a significant role in modulating plate velocities.

  7. Mass spectrometry of planetary exospheres at high relative velocity: direct comparison of open- and closed-source measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meyer, Stefan; Tulej, Marek; Wurz, Peter

    2017-01-01

    The exploration of habitable environments on or inside icy moons around the gas giants in the solar system is of major interest in upcoming planetary missions. Exactly this theme is addressed by the JUpiter ICy moons Explorer (JUICE) mission of ESA, which will characterise Ganymede, Europa and Callisto as planetary objects and potential habitats. We developed a prototype of the Neutral Gas and Ion Mass spectrometer (NIM) of the Particle Environment Package (PEP) for the JUICE mission intended for composition measurements of neutral gas and thermal plasma. NIM/PEP will be used to measure the chemical composition of the exospheres of the icy Jovian moons. Besides direct ion measurement, the NIM instrument is able to measure the inflowing neutral gas in two different modes: in neutral mode, where the gas enters directly the ion source (open source), and in thermal mode, where the gas gets thermally accommodated to the wall temperature by several collisions inside an equilibrium sphere, called antechamber, before entering the ion source (closed source). We performed measurements with the prototype NIM using a neutral gas beam of 1 up to 4.5 km s-1 velocity in the neutral and thermal mode. The current trajectory of JUICE foresees a flyby velocity of 4 km s-1 at Europa; other flybys are in the range of 1 up to 7 km s-1 and orbital velocity in Ganymede orbits is around 2 km s-1. Different species are used for the gas beam, such as noble gases Ne, Ar, Kr as well as molecules like H2, methane, ethane, propane and more complex ones. The NIM prototype was successfully tested under realistic JUICE mission conditions. In addition, we find that the antechamber (closed source) behaves as expected with predictable density enhancement over the specified mass range and within the JUICE mission phase velocities. Furthermore, with the open source and the closed source we measure almost the same composition for noble gases, as well as for molecules, indicating no additional

  8. Influence of relative rolling reduction and thickness layers bimetallic plate at the non-uniformity of the strain after rolling process

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rydz, D.; Stradomski, G.; Dyja, H.

    2017-02-01

    In the article were made numerical and laboratory tests of two-layers rolling process sheet composed of Al99,8 + M1E. Laboratory tests made with use of 150 mm diameter working rolls mill. To the modeling of the bimetallic plate rolling were taken the FEM Forge 2D software based on the theory of plasticity and MathCad program (in which to the rolling process modeling were used the mathematical model developed in the work [5] based on the theory of viscoelasticity). The aim of study was to determine the influence of layer thickness HT0/HM0 and relative deformation ε on the uneven distribution of steel sheet deformation after rolling process. Calculations based on the theory of viscoelasticity allowed additionally take into account the impact of the delayed effects of the variation of viscoelastic deformation of layers of the bimetallic plate rolling process.

  9. Quantitative tests for plate tectonics on Venus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaula, W. M.; Phillips, R. J.

    1981-01-01

    Quantitative comparisons are made between the characteristics of plate tectonics on the earth and those which are possible on Venus. Considerations of the factors influencing rise height and relating the decrease in rise height to plate velocity indicate that the rate of topographic dropoff from spreading centers should be about half that on earth due to greater rock-fluid density contrast and lower temperature differential between the surface and interior. Statistical analyses of Pioneer Venus radar altimetry data and global earth elevation data is used to identify 21,000 km of ridge on Venus and 33,000 km on earth, and reveal Venus ridges to have a less well-defined mode in crest heights and a greater concavity than earth ridges. Comparison of the Venus results with the spreading rates and associated heat flow on earth reveals plate creation rates on Venus to be 0.7 sq km/year or less and indicates that not more than 15% of Venus's energy is delivered to the surface by plate tectonics, in contrast to values of 2.9 sq km a year and 70% for earth.

  10. Severe lung contusion and death after high-velocity behind-armor blunt trauma: relation to protection level.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gryth, Dan; Rocksén, David; Persson, Jonas K E; Arborelius, Ulf P; Drobin, Dan; Bursell, Jenny; Olsson, Lars-Gunnar; Kjellström, Thomas B

    2007-10-01

    The most-used safety recommendation for protective vests is that the impact should not cause more than a 44-mm impression in plasticine. The aim of this study was to investigate whether this criterion was sufficient if the vest was exposed to a high-velocity projectile. We tested the hypothesis with pigs divided into a 40-mm group (n = 10) and a 34-mm group (n = 8) protected by a vest allowing a 40-mm or 34-mm impression in plasticine, respectively. Five (50%) of 10 animals in the 40-mm group and 2 (25%) of 8 in the 34-mm group died due to the trauma. We observed severe lung hematoma, impaired circulation, desaturation, and electroencephalogram changes. These effects were more aggravated in the 40-mm group compared to the 34-mm group. Based on our results, the overall judgment is that the safety criterion of 44-mm impression is insufficient when a vest is exposed to a high-velocity projectile.

  11. Mass spectrometry of planetary exospheres at high relative velocity: direct comparison of open- and closed source measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meyer, Stefan; Tulej, Marek; Wurz, Peter

    2016-04-01

    The exploration of habitable worlds around the gas giants in the Solar System is of major interest in upcoming planetary missions. Exactly this theme is addressed by the Jupiter Icy Moons Explorer (JUICE) mission of ESA, which will characterise Ganymede, Europa and Callisto as planetary objects and potential habitats [1], [2]. We developed a prototype of the Neutral gas and Ion Mass spectrometer (NIM) of the Particle Environment Package (PEP) for the JUICE mission intended for composition measurements of neutral gas and thermal plasma. NIM/PEP will be used to measure the chemical composition of the exospheres of the icy Jovian moons. Besides direct ion measurement, the NIM instrument is able to measure the inflowing neutral gas in two different modes: in neutral mode the gas enters directly the ion source (open source) and in thermal mode, the gas gets thermally accommodated to wall temperature by several collisions inside an equilibrium sphere before entering the ion source (closed source). We performed measurements with the prototype NIM using a neutral gas beam of 1 up to 5 km/s velocity in the neutral and thermal mode. The current trajectory of JUICE foresees a flyby velocity of 4 km/s at Europa, other flybys are in the range of 1 up to 7 km/s and velocity in Ganymede orbits is around 2 km/s. Different species are used for gas beam, such as noble gases Ne, Ar, Kr as well as molecules like H2, Methane, Ethane, Propane and more complex ones. We will present the results of these measurements with respect to fragmentation and density enhancements in the closed source mode. Furthermore, we will give a direct comparison between open and closed source mode measurements. References: [1] ESA, "JUICE assessment study report (Yellow Book)", ESA/SRE(2011)18, 2012. [2] O. Grasset, M.K. Dougherty, A. Coustenis, E.J. Bunce, C. Erd, D. Titov, M. Blanc, A. Coates, P. Drossart, L.N. Fletcher, H. Hussmann, R. Jaumann, N. Krupp, J.-P. Lebreton, O. Prieto-Ballesteros, P. Tortora, F

  12. Earth's Decelerating Tectonic Plates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Forte, A M; Moucha, R; Rowley, D B; Quere, S; Mitrovica, J X; Simmons, N A; Grand, S P

    2008-08-22

    Space geodetic and oceanic magnetic anomaly constraints on tectonic plate motions are employed to determine a new global map of present-day rates of change of plate velocities. This map shows that Earth's largest plate, the Pacific, is presently decelerating along with several other plates in the Pacific and Indo-Atlantic hemispheres. These plate decelerations contribute to an overall, globally averaged slowdown in tectonic plate speeds. The map of plate decelerations provides new and unique constraints on the dynamics of time-dependent convection in Earth's mantle. We employ a recently developed convection model constrained by seismic, geodynamic and mineral physics data to show that time-dependent changes in mantle buoyancy forces can explain the deceleration of the major plates in the Pacific and Indo-Atlantic hemispheres.

  13. Earth's Decelerating Tectonic Plates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Forte, A M; Moucha, R; Rowley, D B; Quere, S; Mitrovica, J X; Simmons, N A; Grand, S P

    2008-08-22

    Space geodetic and oceanic magnetic anomaly constraints on tectonic plate motions are employed to determine a new global map of present-day rates of change of plate velocities. This map shows that Earth's largest plate, the Pacific, is presently decelerating along with several other plates in the Pacific and Indo-Atlantic hemispheres. These plate decelerations contribute to an overall, globally averaged slowdown in tectonic plate speeds. The map of plate decelerations provides new and unique constraints on the dynamics of time-dependent convection in Earth's mantle. We employ a recently developed convection model constrained by seismic, geodynamic and mineral physics data to show that time-dependent changes in mantle buoyancy forces can explain the deceleration of the major plates in the Pacific and Indo-Atlantic hemispheres.

  14. Space density distribution of galaxies in the absolute magnitude - rotation velocity plane: a volume-complete Tully-Fisher relation from CALIFA stellar kinematics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bekeraité, S.; Walcher, C. J.; Falcón-Barroso, J.; Garcia Lorenzo, B.; Lyubenova, M.; Sánchez, S. F.; Spekkens, K.; van de Ven, G.; Wisotzki, L.; Ziegler, B.; Aguerri, J. A. L.; Barrera-Ballesteros, J.; Bland-Hawthorn, J.; Catalán-Torrecilla, C.; García-Benito, R.

    2016-10-01

    We measured the distribution in absolute magnitude - circular velocity space for a well-defined sample of 199 rotating galaxies of the Calar Alto Legacy Integral Field Area Survey (CALIFA) using their stellar kinematics. Our aim in this analysis is to avoid subjective selection criteria and to take volume and large-scale structure factors into account. Using stellar velocity fields instead of gas emission line kinematics allows including rapidly rotating early-type galaxies. Our initial sample contains 277 galaxies with available stellar velocity fields and growth curve r-band photometry. After rejecting 51 velocity fields that could not be modelled because of the low number of bins, foreground contamination, or significant interaction, we performed Markov chain Monte Carlo modelling of the velocity fields, from which we obtained the rotation curve and kinematic parameters and their realistic uncertainties. We performed an extinction correction and calculated the circular velocity vcirc accounting for the pressure support of a given galaxy. The resulting galaxy distribution on the Mr-vcirc plane was then modelled as a mixture of two distinct populations, allowing robust and reproducible rejection of outliers, a significant fraction of which are slow rotators. The selection effects are understood well enough that we were able to correct for the incompleteness of the sample. The 199 galaxies were weighted by volume and large-scale structure factors, which enabled us to fit a volume-corrected Tully-Fisher relation (TFR). More importantly, we also provide the volume-corrected distribution of galaxies in the Mr-vcirc plane, which can be compared with cosmological simulations. The joint distribution of the luminosity and circular velocity space densities, representative over the range of -20 > Mr > -22 mag, can place more stringent constraints on the galaxy formation and evolution scenarios than linear TFR fit parameters or the luminosity function alone. Galaxies main

  15. Neuromuscular contributions to the age-related reduction in muscle power: Mechanisms and potential role of high velocity power training.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McKinnon, Neal B; Connelly, Denise M; Rice, Charles L; Hunter, Susan W; Doherty, Timothy J

    2017-05-01

    Although much of the literature on neuromuscular changes with aging has focused on loss of muscle mass and isometric strength, deficits in muscle power are more pronounced with aging and may be a more sensitive measure of neuromuscular degeneration. This review aims to identify the adaptations to the neuromuscular system with aging, with specific emphasis on changes that result in decreased muscle power. We discuss how these changes in neuromuscular performance can affect mobility, and ultimately contribute to an increased risk for falls in older adults. Finally, we evaluate the literature regarding high-velocity muscle power training (PT), and its potential advantages over conventional strength training for improving functional performance and mitigating fall risk in older adults. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Relations among threshold, spike height, electrode distance, and conduction velocity in electrical stimulation of certain medullospinal neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hentall, I D; Zorman, G; Kansky, S; Fields, H L

    1984-05-01

    This report describes how the threshold for extracellular, electrical stimulation of cell bodies in the rat's rostromedial medulla depends on the distance to the stimulating electrode. A monopolar microelectrode both delivered current pulses near medullospinal neurons and, after decay of the stimulus artifact, detected whether an orthodromic spike had occurred by collision of that spike with a suitably timed antidromic spike initiated at the thoracic spinal cord. The liminal current and the height of antidromic spikes were noted at a series of vertical electrode positions. Regression analysis was performed to determine whether threshold and the inverse of peak-to-peak spike height varied more as the radial distance or its square. The square relationship provided a much better fit for threshold and a marginally better fit for the inverse of spike height. The spatial decline in excitability (K2) averaged 859 microA/mm2, falling within the range of values found for fibers and cell bodies in other studies. The constant of spatial decline in spike height (C2) in millivolts per square millimeter was positively correlated with K2. Both C2 and K2 were negatively correlated with conduction velocity. From threshold distance curves fitted by regression analysis, the mean separation of sites of spike maxima and threshold minima along each electrode path was 16 micron; the estimated distance from these sites to, respectively, the loci of spike generation and spike excitation were positively correlated and similar. The variation of C2 and K2 with conduction velocity may be due either to an influence of the size and shape of the dendritic tree on the spatial decrement of excitability and spike height or to a confounding in the studied equations of the space-independent effect of the size of a cell body on spike height and excitability.

  17. The Sloan Digital Sky Survey Reverberation Mapping Project: Stellar Velocity Dispersions of Quasar Hosts and the M-sigma Relation to z~1

    CERN Document Server

    Shen, Yue; Ho, Luis C; Brandt, W N; Denney, Kelly D; Horne, Keith; Jiang, Linhua; Kochanek, Christopher S; McGreer, Ian D; Merloni, Andrea; Peterson, Bradley M; Petitjean, Patrick; Schneider, Donald P; Schulze, Andreas; Strauss, Michael A; Tao, Charling; Trump, Jonathan R; Pan, Kaike; Bizyaev, Dmitry

    2015-01-01

    We present host stellar velocity dispersion measurements for a sample of 88 broad-line quasars at 0.10.6) from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey Reverberation Mapping (SDSS-RM) project. High signal-to-noise ratio coadded spectra (average S/N~30 per 69 km/s pixel) from SDSS-RM allowed decomposition of the host and quasar spectra, and measurement of the host stellar velocity dispersions and black hole (BH) masses using the single-epoch (SE) virial method. The large sample size and dynamic range in luminosity (L5100=10^(43.2-44.7) erg/s) lead to the first clear detection of a correlation between SE virial BH mass and host stellar velocity dispersion far beyond the local universe. However, the observed correlation is significantly flatter than the local relation, suggesting that there are selection biases in high-z luminosity-threshold quasar samples for such studies. Our uniform sample and analysis enable an investigation of the redshift evolution of the M-sigma relation free of caveats by comparing different samples...

  18. Novel chemiluminescent imaging microtiter plates for high-throughput detection of multiple serum biomarkers related to Down's syndrome via soybean peroxidase as label enzyme.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Fang; Chai, Da; Lu, Jusheng; Yu, Jiachao; Liu, Songqin

    2015-08-01

    Novel chemiluminescent (CL) imaging microtiter plates with high-throughput, low-cost, and simple operation for detection of four biomarkers related to Down's syndrome screening were developed and evaluated. To enhance the sensitivity of CL immunosensing, soybean peroxidase (SBP) was used instead of horseradish peroxide (HRP) as a label enzyme. The microtiter plates were fabricated by simultaneously immobilizing four capture monoclonal antibodies, anti-inhibin-A, anti-unconjugated oestriol (anti-uE3), anti-alpha-fetoprotein (anti-AFP), and beta anti-HCG (anti-β-HCG), on nitrocellulose (NC) membrane to form immunosensing microtiter wells. Under a sandwiched immunoassay, the CL signals on each sensing site of the microtiter plates were collected by a charge-coupled device (CCD), presenting an array-based chemiluminescence imaging method for detection of four target antigens in a well at the same time. The linear response to the analyte concentration ranged from 0.1 to 40 ng/mL for inhibin-A, 0.075 to 40 ng/mL for uE3, 0.2 to 400 ng/mL for AFP, and 0.4 to 220 ng/mL for β-HCG. The proposed microtiter plates possessed high-throughput, good stability, and acceptable accuracy for detection of four antigens in clinical serum samples and demonstrated potential for practical applicability of the proposed method to Down's syndrome screening. Graphical Abstract Schematic evaluation of the microtiter plater for simultaneous detection of the four biomarkers.

  19. Anisotropic velocity structure of the crust and upper mantle in the Taiwan region from local travel time tomography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jakovlev, Andrey; Koulakov, Ivan; Wu, Yih-Min

    2014-05-01

    Taiwan Island located in a contact zone between the Eurasian and Philippine Sea plates, the tectonic processes in this area are mostly controlled by the relative kinematics of these two plates. In the east, the Philippine Sea plate subducts northward under the Eurasian plate along the Ryukyu trench. Off the southern tip of Taiwan, the South China Sea subplate, part of the Eurasian plate, subducts eastward under the Philippine Sea plate underneath the Luzon Island. The Taiwan Island is located at the junction between these two subduction zones. Here we present anisotropic velocity model of the crust and upper mantle in the Taiwan region derived from local travel time tomography. We use more than 300 000 P and more than 150 000 S rays coming from 12910 earthquakes occurred in the Taiwan region and registered by 816 stations of different local Taiwanese seismic networks. The ANITA algorithm, for iterative nonlinear inversion of local earthquake data in orthorhombic anisotropic media with one predefined vertical orientation, was used for the tomographic inversion. This algorithm presumes anisotropy for only P velocity described as horizontally oriented ellipsoid. For S velocity we presume an isotropic model. Results show a good agreement with tectonic structure of the region. Obtained isotropic P and S velocity models show fit to each other. The most prominent features of the models are Philippine Sea plate characterized by increased velocities and decreased velocities observed along the Luzon and Ryukyu arcs. We observe that orientation of the fast velocity axis within the Philippine Sea plate coincides with direction of its displacement. Along the Luzon and Ryukyu arcs orientation of the fast velocities axis coincide with the arcs extension. The results show that upper mantle beneath the eastern Taiwan characterized by decreased velocities and N-S orientation of the fast velocity axis. The western Taiwan characterized by alteration of the relatively small negative

  20. The Effects of Taekwondo Training on Peripheral Neuroplasticity-Related Growth Factors, Cerebral Blood Flow Velocity, and Cognitive Functions in Healthy Children: A Randomized Controlled Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cho, Su-Youn; So, Wi-Young; Roh, Hee-Tae

    2017-04-25

    Although regular Taekwondo (TKD) training has been reported to be effective for improving cognitive function in children, the mechanism underlying this improvement remains unclear. The purpose of the present study was to observe changes in neuroplasticity-related growth factors in the blood, assess cerebral blood flow velocity, and verify the resulting changes in children's cognitive function after TKD training. Thirty healthy elementary school students were randomly assigned to control (n = 15) and TKD (n = 15) groups. The TKD training was conducted for 60 min at a rating of perceived exertion (RPE) of 11-15, 5 times per week, for 16 weeks. Brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF), vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), and insulin-like growth factor-1 (IGF-1) levels were measured by blood sampling before and after the training, and the cerebral blood flow velocities (peak systolic [MCAs], end diastolic [MCAd], mean cerebral blood flow velocities [MCAm], and pulsatility index [PI]) of the middle cerebral artery (MCA) were measured using Doppler ultrasonography. For cognitive function assessment, Stroop Color and Word Tests (Word, Color, and Color-Word) were administered along with other measurements. The serum BDNF, VEGF, and IGF-1 levels and the Color-Word test scores among the sub-factors of the Stroop Color and Word Test scores were significantly higher in the TKD group after the intervention (p 0.05). Thus, 16-week TKD training did not significantly affect cerebral blood flow velocities, but the training may have been effective in increasing children's cognitive function by inducing an increase in the levels of neuroplasticity-related growth factors.

  1. How mantle slabs drive plate tectonics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conrad, Clinton P; Lithgow-Bertelloni, Carolina

    2002-10-04

    The gravitational pull of subducted slabs is thought to drive the motions of Earth's tectonic plates, but the coupling between slabs and plates is not well established. If a slab is mechanically attached to a subducting plate, it can exert a direct pull on the plate. Alternatively, a detached slab may drive a plate by exciting flow in the mantle that exerts a shear traction on the base of the plate. From the geologic history of subduction, we estimated the relative importance of "pull" versus "suction" for the present-day plates. Observed plate motions are best predicted if slabs in the upper mantle are attached to plates and generate slab pull forces that account for about half of the total driving force on plates. Slabs in the lower mantle are supported by viscous mantle forces and drive plates through slab suction.

  2. Equilibrium Points and Related Periodic Motions in the Restricted Three-Body Problem with Angular Velocity and Radiation Effects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. A. Perdios

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper deals with a modification of the restricted three-body problem in which the angular velocity variation is considered in the case where the primaries are sources of radiation. In particular, the existence and stability of its equilibrium points in the plane of motion of the primaries are studied. We find that this problem admits the well-known five planar equilibria of the classical problem with the difference that the corresponding collinear points may be stable depending on the parameters of the problem. For all planar equilibria, sufficient parametric conditions for their stability have been established which are used for the numerical determination of the stability regions in various parametric planes. Also, for certain values of the parameters of the problem for which the equilibrium points are stable, the short and long period families have been computed. To do so, semianalytical expressions have been found for the determination of appropriate initial conditions. Special attention has been given to the continuation of the long period family, in the case of the classical restricted three-body problem, where we show numerically that periodic orbits of the short period family, which are bifurcation points with the long period family, are connected through the characteristic curve of the long period family.

  3. LOW-MASS SUPPRESSION OF THE SATELLITE LUMINOSITY FUNCTION DUE TO THE SUPERSONIC BARYON-COLD-DARK-MATTER RELATIVE VELOCITY

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bovy, Jo; Dvorkin, Cora [Institute for Advanced Study, Einstein Drive, Princeton, NJ 08540 (United States)

    2013-05-01

    We study the effect of the supersonic baryon-cold-dark-matter (CDM) flow, which has recently been shown to have a large effect on structure formation during the dark ages 10 {approx}< z {approx}< 1000, on the abundance of luminous, low-mass satellite galaxies around galaxies like the Milky Way. As the supersonic baryon-CDM flow significantly suppresses both the number of halos formed and the amount of baryons accreted onto such halos of masses 10{sup 6} < M{sub halo}/M{sub Sun} < 10{sup 8} at z {approx}> 10, a large effect results on the stellar luminosity function before reionization. As halos of these masses are believed to have very little star formation after reionization due to the effects of photoheating by the ultraviolet background, this effect persists to the present day. We calculate that the number of low-mass 10{sup 6} < M{sub halo}/M{sub Sun} < 5 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 7} halos that host luminous satellite galaxies today is typically suppressed by 50%, with values ranging up to 90% in regions where the initial supersonic velocity is high. We show that this previously ignored cosmological effect resolves some of the tension between the observed and predicted number of low-mass satellites in the Milky Way, reducing the need for other mass-dependent star-formation suppression before reionization.

  4. Relation of tricuspid annular displacement and tissue Doppler imaging velocities with duration of weaning in mechanically ventilated patients with acute pulmonary edema

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dragoumanis Christos K

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Liberation from the ventilator is a difficult task, whereas early echocardiographic indices of weaning readiness are still lacking. The aim of this study was to test whether tricuspid annular plane systolic excursion (TAPSE and right ventricular (RV systolic (Sm and diastolic (Em & Am tissue Doppler imaging (TDI velocities are related with duration of weaning in mechanically ventilated patients with acute respiratory failure due to acute pulmonary edema (APE. Methods Detailed quantification of left and right ventricular systolic and diastolic function was performed at admission to the Intensive Care Unit by Doppler echocardiography, in a cohort of 32 mechanically ventilated patients with APE. TAPSE and RV TDI velocities were compared between patients with and without prolonged weaning (≥ or Results Patients with prolonged weaning (n = 12 had decreased TAPSE (14.59 ± 1.56 vs 19.13 ± 2.59 mm, Sm (8.68 ± 0.94 vs 11.62 ± 1.77 cm/sec and Em/Am ratio (0.98 ± 0.80 vs 2.62 ± 0.67, p 2 = 0.53, beta slope = 0.76, p 2 = 0.52, beta = 0.75, p 2 = 0.57, beta = 0.32, p Conclusions We suggest that in mechanically ventilated patients with APE, low TAPSE and RV TDI velocities upon admission are associated with delayed liberation from mechanical ventilation, probably due to more severe LV heart failure.

  5. Relative humidity effects on the surface electrical properties of resistive plate chamber melaminic laminates uncoated and coated with polymerized linseed oil film

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bearzotti, Andrea; Palummo, Lucrezia

    2007-09-01

    Relative humidity is an important quantity to control in many manufacturing environments such as semiconductor industry. Humidity and moisture can affect many electronic devices, generally rendering their operation worse. In this study we present results showing that in some specific applications, humidity can improve the performance of an electronic device. Resistive plate chambers are used as trigger detectors of the muon system in LHC (large hadron collider) experiments ATLAS (a toroidal LHC apparatus), CMS (compact muon solenoid) and ALICE (a large ion collider experiment) and as detector in cosmic rays experiment ARGO (astrophysical radiation with ground-based observatory). These detectors are made of phenolic-melaminic laminate electrodes, coated with a polymerized linseed oil film delimiting the gaseous sensitive volume. The loss of some of the detector capability can be progressive in time and due to the intrinsic limits of the detector materials. One of these effects is due to an increase of the total plate resistance, that is correlated to ion migration and relativity humidity phenomena. Our purpose is to understand the relative humidity (RH) influence on the conduction mechanisms on the electrodes surface. Results of amperometric measurements on laminate samples kept at a fixed temperature of 22°C, cycling RH between 10% and 90% are here presented.

  6. Thin plate neotectonic models of the Australian plate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burbidge, D. R.

    2004-10-01

    Thin plate finite element models of the neotectonic deformation of the Australian plate have been calculated in order to estimate the stress and strain rate within the plate, specifically concentrating on the Australian continent. The model includes plate-bounding faults, an anelastic brittle-ductile layered rheology and the option of laterally varying elevation and heat flow. The results of the models are compared to (1) the velocity of geodetic benchmarks on the Australian plate, (2) the spreading rate of the mid-oceanic ridges along the Australian plate's margins, (3) the direction of the maximum horizontal principal stress, (4) the stress regime within the plate, and (5) the crustal thickness estimated from the depth to the base of Mohorovicic discontinuity's transition zone. A variety of models are tested with a wide range of input parameters. The model with the smallest misfit with observations predicts that the strain rate for most of the Australian continent is approximately 10-17 s-1. This model has a slightly lower strain rate in the central Australia and is higher off the northern coast of Australia than for the rest of the continent. Strain rates of this magnitude would be difficult to observe from geodetic or geologic data for most parts of Australia but would be enough to generate much of the seismicity that has been observed over the last century.

  7. Fine structure of Pn velocity beneath Sichuan-Yunnan region

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    黄金莉; 宋晓东; 汪素云

    2003-01-01

    We use 23298 Pn arrival-time data from Chinese national and provincial earthquake bulletins to invert fine structure of Pn velocity and anisotropy at the top of the mantle beneath the Sichuan-Yunnan and its adjacent region. The results suggest that the Pn velocity in this region shows significant lateral variation; the Pn velocity varies from 7.7 to 8.3 km/s. The Pn-velocity variation correlates well with the tectonic activity and heat flow of the region. Low Pn velocity is observed in southwest Yunnan , Tengchong volcano area, and the Panxi tectonic area. These areas have very active seismicity and tectonic activity with high surface heat flow. On the other hand, high Pn velocity is observed in some stable regions, such as the central region of the Yangtze Platform; the most pronounced high velocity area is located in the Sichuan Basin, south of Chengdu. Pn anisotropy shows a complex pattern of regional deformation. The Pn fast direction shows a prominent clockwise rotation pattern from east of the Tibetan block to the Sichuan-Yunnan diamond block to southwest Yunnan, which may be related to southeastward escape of the Tibetan Plateau material due to the collision of the Indian Plate to the Eurasia Plate. Thus there appears to be strong correlation between the crustal deformation and the upper mantle structure in the region. The delay times of events and stations show that the crust thickness decreases from the Tibetan Plateau to eastern China, which is consistent with the results from deep seismic sounding.

  8. Superluminal Recession Velocities

    CERN Document Server

    Davis, T M; Davis, Tamara M.; Lineweaver, Charles H.

    2000-01-01

    Hubble's Law, v=HD (recession velocity is proportional to distance), is a theoretical result derived from the Friedmann-Robertson-Walker metric. v=HD applies at least as far as the particle horizon and in principle for all distances. Thus, galaxies with distances greater than D=c/H are receding from us with velocities greater than the speed of light and superluminal recession is a fundamental part of the general relativistic description of the expanding universe. This apparent contradiction of special relativity (SR) is often mistakenly remedied by converting redshift to velocity using SR. Here we show that galaxies with recession velocities faster than the speed of light are observable and that in all viable cosmological models, galaxies above a redshift of three are receding superluminally.

  9. Experimental Investigation of Instantaneous Properties of Wave Slamming on the Plate

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to investigate the instantaneous properties of wave slamming on the plate structure of an open structure. The advanced instantaneous measuring technique-Particle Image Velocimetry (PIV) is applied to acquire the instantaneous velocity field of wave slamming. From the cross-correlation analysis results of the images captured by the CCD camera, the flow fields of wave impacting on the structure are displayed visually, and the instantaneous whole-field fluid velocity vectors are obtained. The relation between the instantaneous peak impacting pressures and the instantaneous velocities of water particles is studied by probability analysis.

  10. Multiple-Dynode-Layer Microchannel Plate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woodgate, Bruce E.

    1990-01-01

    Improved microchannel-plate electron image amplifier made of stack of discrete microchannel-plate layers. New plates easier to manufacture because no need to etch long, narrow holes, to draw and bundle thin glass tubes, or to shear plates to give microchannels curvatures necessary for reduction of undesired emission of ions. Discrete dynode layers stacked with slight offset from layer to layer to form microchannel plate with curved channels. Provides for relatively fast recharging of microchannel dynodes, with consequent enhancement of performance.

  11. Influence of nonlinearity of the phonon dispersion relation on wave velocities in the four-moment maximum entropy phonon hydrodynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larecki, Wieslaw; Banach, Zbigniew

    2014-01-01

    This paper analyzes the propagation of the waves of weak discontinuity in a phonon gas described by the four-moment maximum entropy phonon hydrodynamics involving a nonlinear isotropic phonon dispersion relation. For the considered hyperbolic equations of phonon gas hydrodynamics, the eigenvalue problem is analyzed and the condition of genuine nonlinearity is discussed. The speed of the wave front propagating into the region in thermal equilibrium is first determined in terms of the integral formula dependent on the phonon dispersion relation and subsequently explicitly calculated for the Dubey dispersion-relation model: |k|=ωc-1(1+bω2). The specification of the parameters c and b for sodium fluoride (NaF) and semimetallic bismuth (Bi) then makes it possible to compare the calculated dependence of the wave-front speed on the sample’s temperature with the empirical relations of Coleman and Newman (1988) describing for NaF and Bi the variation of the second-sound speed with temperature. It is demonstrated that the calculated temperature dependence of the wave-front speed resembles the empirical relation and that the parameters c and b obtained from fitting respectively the empirical relation and the original material parameters of Dubey (1973) are of the same order of magnitude, the difference being in the values of the numerical factors. It is also shown that the calculated temperature dependence is in good agreement with the predictions of Hardy and Jaswal’s theory (Hardy and Jaswal, 1971) on second-sound propagation. This suggests that the nonlinearity of a phonon dispersion relation should be taken into account in the theories aiming at the description of the wave-type phonon heat transport and that the Dubey nonlinear isotropic dispersion-relation model can be very useful for this purpose.

  12. Numerical simulations on a twin-plate wake

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fernández-Gámiz, U.; Velte, Clara Marika; Egusquiza, E.

    2013-01-01

    In this work, a detailed numerical analysis of two dimensional mean velocity profiles downstream of two parallel flat plates was carried out at a Reynolds number of 3.2x104 (based on the plate length and free stream velocity) using Reynolds Averaged Navier-Stokes (RANS) and have been compared...

  13. Numerical investigation of flow-induced rotary oscillation of circular cylinder with rigid splitter plate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Lin; Guo, Xiao-ling; Tang, Guo-qiang; Liu, Ming-ming; Chen, Chuan-qi; Xie, Zhi-hua

    2016-09-01

    Numerical results of fluid flow over a rotationally oscillating circular cylinder with splitter plate are presented here. Different from the previous examinations with freely rotatable assembly, the fluid and structure interactions are treated as a coupled dynamic system by fully considering the structural inertia, stiffness, and damping. The hydrodynamic characteristics are examined in terms of reduced velocity Ur at a relatively low Reynolds number Re = 100 for different plate lengths of L/D = 0.5, 1.0, and 1.5, where Ur = U/(Dfn), Re = UD/υ and fn = (κ/J)0.5/2π with U the free stream velocity, D the diameter of the circular cylinder, υ the fluid kinematic viscosity, fn the natural frequency, J the inertial moment, κ the torsional stiffness, and L the plate length. Contrast to the freely rotating cylinder/plate body, that is, in the limit of κ → 0 or Ur →∞, remarkable rotary oscillation is observed at relatively low reduced velocities. For the typical case with L/D = 1.0, the maximum amplitude may reach five times that at the highest reduced velocity of Ur = 15.0 considered in this work. At the critical reduced velocity Ur = 4.2, notable hydrodynamic jumps are identified for the rotation amplitude, response frequency, mean drag coefficient, lift amplitude, and vortex shedding frequency. Moreover, the phase angle between the fluid moment and rotary oscillation abruptly changes from 0 to π at Ur = 6.5. Due to the combined effect of fluid moment, rotation response, and phase difference, the natural frequency of the rotating body varies in flow, leading to a wide regime of lock-in/synchronization (Ur ≥4.2, for L/D = 1.0). The phenomenon of rotation bifurcation, i.e., the equilibrium position of the rotary oscillation deflects to a position which is not parallel to the free stream, is found to only occur at higher reduced velocities. The longer splitter plate has the lower critical reduced velocity. The occurrence of bifurcation is attributed to the

  14. Summary of the stratigraphy and structural elements related to plate convergence of the Quetta-Muslim Bagh-Sibi region, Balochistan, west-central Pakistan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maldonado, Florian; Mengal, Jan M.; Khan, Shahid H.; Warwick, Peter D.

    2011-01-01

    Obduction of an ophiolite complex onto the northwestern continental margin of the India plate occurred during the Late Cretaceous to early Paleocene, followed by collision of the ophiolitic complex of the India plate with the Eurasia plate in the Eocene. Lower Eocene marine strata overlie the ophiolitic complex suggesting that suturing was completed by early Eocene time.

  15. Plate osteosynthesis of simple forearm fractures : LCP versus DC plates

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Stevens, Charles Tjerk; Ten Duis, Henk Jan

    2008-01-01

    The aim of this study was to compare the time to radiological bony union of simple A-type fractures of the forearm, treated with either a locking compression plate (LCP) or a dynamic compression plate (DCP). For each fracture, the relation between the use of compression and radiological healing time

  16. Plate osteosynthesis of simple forearm fractures : LCP versus DC plates

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Stevens, Charles Tjerk; Ten Duis, Henk Jan

    The aim of this study was to compare the time to radiological bony union of simple A-type fractures of the forearm, treated with either a locking compression plate (LCP) or a dynamic compression plate (DCP). For each fracture, the relation between the use of compression and radiological healing time

  17. Velocity structure of uppermost mantle beneath China continent from Pn tomography

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2002-01-01

    39473 Pn travel times are inverted to tomographically image both lateral variation and anisotropy of uppermost mantle velocities beneath China continent. The result indicates that the overall average Pn velocity of uppermost mantle in the studied region is 8.0 km/s and the regional velocity fluctuation varies from -0.30 km/s to +0.35 km/s. Pn velocities higher than 8.2 km/s are found in the regions surrounding Qingzang Plateau, such as Junggar Basin, Tarim Basin, Qaidam Basin and Sichun Basin. Pn velocities slightly lower than the average are found in western Sichuan and Yunnan, Shanxi Graben and Bohai Bay region. A Pn velocity as low as 7.8 km/s may exist in the region striding the boundary between Guangxi and Guangdong provinces. In general, Pn velocity in tectonically stable region like cratonic platform tends to be high, while that in tectonically active region tends to be low. The regions in compressive setting usually show higher Pn velocity, while extensional basins or grabens generally display lower one. Anisotropy of Pn velocity is seen in some regions. In the southeastern region of Qingzang Plateau the directions of fastest Pn velocity show a rotation pattern, which may be related to southeastward escape of the plateau material due to the collision and compression of Indian Plate to Asia along Himalaya arc. Notable anisotropy also exists around Bohai Bay region, likely indicating crustal extending and possible magma activity therein.

  18. Localised Plate Motion on Venus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghail, R. C.

    1996-03-01

    The volcanic and tectonic features observed in Dali Vinculum, Parga Vinculum and Imdr Regio are concentrated at long, narrow, curvilinear zones, with relatively minor volcanism and tectonism between these zones. These zones, whilst more diffuse than terrestrial plate boundaries, nevertheless define the margins of tectonic plates. In contrast to Earth, however, it appears that venusian plates are neither created nor destroyed by lateral motion. Rather, plates are thinned and intruded at vincula plate boundaries, vertically accreted by small-scale intra-plate (planitia) volcanism and perhaps destroyed by delamination of thickened crust in tesserae and montane regions such as Thetis Regio and Ishtar Terra. The diversity in age both between and within these three areas together with the evidence for infrequent, small scale resurfacing in the planitiae are difficult to reconcile with a non-uniformitarian geological process.

  19. Measurement of rectangular surface mobility of an infinite plate

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    DAI Jue

    2001-01-01

    A measuring method of surface mobility for an infinite plate subject to a uniform conphase velocity excitation is investigated. In the measurement, a finite plate is employed to simulate an infinite plate and a rigid cone is used to make a uniform conphase velocity excitation. A method to deduct the affect of additional mass is derived: The results of the measurement agree with that calculated theoretically.

  20. Current plate motions across the Red Sea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chu, Dezhi; Gordon, Richard G.

    1998-11-01

    A new objective method is used to estimate precisely 64 rates of seafloor spreading since chron 2A (3.2 Ma) from all the Red Sea magnetic profiles available from 15.9° to 26°N. The fastest spreading rate, ~16 mm yr-1, occurs near 18°N, whereas the slowest rate, 10 mm yr-1, occurs at 25.5°N and is consistent with the rate predicted from Arabia-Nubia data to the south. The standard deviation of the spreading rates is 0.8 mm yr-1, much smaller than the median standard deviation of 4 mm yr-1 previously assigned to spreading rates in the global plate-motion model NUVEL-1 (DeMets et al. 1990). The fit to the spreading rates, as well as the locations of earthquakes in and near the Red Sea, indicate that spreading south of approximately 17.7°N is less than the full rate of spreading between the Arabian and Nubian plates. The Red Sea spreading centre is instead usefully interpreted as the boundary between the Arabian Plate and a Danakil microplate that includes the subaerial Danakil block and a larger oceanic portion of lithosphere. Despite the absence of reliable azimuths of transform faults in the Red Sea, all components of the angular velocity of Arabia relative to Nubia are usefully constrained from just the 45 relevant spreading rates. The new compact 95 per cent confidence region of the angular velocity excludes prior estimates based on only four and two spreading rates by Chase (1978) and Jestin et al. (1994), respectively. 19 spreading rates in the southern Red Sea are used to estimate the angular velocity between the Danakil microplate and Arabia. An approach based on singular value decomposition shows that without slip vectors only two of the three components of the angular velocity of the Danakil microplate relative to Arabia or Nubia are usefully constrained, but that all three components are usefully constrained if one earthquake slip vector is included.

  1. Relative relocation of earthquakes without a predefined velocity model: an example from a peculiar seismic cluster on Katla volcano's south-flank (Iceland)

    CERN Document Server

    Sgattoni, Giulia; Einarsson, Páll; Lucchi, Federico

    2016-01-01

    Relative relocation methods are commonly used to precisely relocate earthquake clusters consisting of similar waveforms. Repeating waveforms are often recorded at volcanoes, where, however, the crust structure is expected to contain strong heterogeneities and therefore the 1D velocity model assumption that is made in most location strategies is not likely to describe reality. A peculiar cluster of repeating low-frequency seismic events was recorded on the south flank of Katla volcano (Iceland) from 2011. As the hypocentres are located at the rim of the glacier, the seismicity may be due to volcanic or glacial processes. Information on the size and shape of the cluster may help constraining the source process. The extreme similarity of waveforms points to a very small spatial distribution of hypocentres. In order to extract meaningful information about size and shape of the cluster, we minimize uncertainty by optimizing the cross-correlation measurements and relative-relocation process. With a synthetic test w...

  2. Create Your Plate

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... A A A Listen En Español Create Your Plate Create Your Plate is a simple and effective ... and that your options are endless. Create Your Plate! Click on the plate sections below to add ...

  3. Relation between three-dimensional geometry of the inflow tract to the orifice and the area, shape, and velocity of regurgitant color Doppler jets: an in vitro study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nicolosi, G L; Budano, S; Grenci, G M; Mangano, S; Cervesato, E; Zanuttini, D

    1990-01-01

    The relation between three-dimensional geometry of the inflow tract to the orifice and the area, shape, and velocity of regurgitant jets was studied in a pulsatile in vitro color Doppler flow model. A 2.5 MHz transducer connected to a diagnostic ultrasound machine was placed in a water tank facing pulsatile jets (duration, 0.5 second) obtained by a calibrated injector. Flow rate from 6 to 52 ml/sec were tested through a 5 mm diameter circular orifice. Four different three-dimensional inflow tract geometries were compared: (A) sharp-edged, (B) Venturi (funnel), (C) converging conical, and (D) diverging conical. Mean velocities of jets were measured by continuous-wave Doppler echocardiography. Driving pressures were also measured by means of a fluid-filled catheter. Two observers independently digitized contours of maximal color jet areas by computer system from two separate sets of experiments. Results are given as the mean values of the four measurements for each parameter. Jet areas were correlated to flow rate, with no difference from A through D. The shape (eccentricity) of jets was different between A and B (p less than 0.05), between B and D (p less than 0.01), and between C and D (p less than 0.01). The shape of jets was correlated with flow rate, continuous-wave velocity, and pressure gradient in B, C, and D but not in A. Measured pressure gradients and estimated gradients by continuous-wave Doppler echocardiography were similarly correlated from A through D.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  4. Statistics of Velocity from Spectral Data Modified Velocity Centroids

    CERN Document Server

    Lazarian, A

    2003-01-01

    We address the problem of studying interstellar (ISM) turbulence using spectral line data. We construct a measure that we term modified velocity centroids (MVCs) and derive an analytical solution that relates the 2D spectra of the modified centroids with the underlying 3D velocity spectrum. We test our results using synthetic maps constructed with data obtained through simulations of compressible MHD turbulence. We prove that the MVCs are able to restore the underlying spectrum of turbulent velocity. We show that the modified velocity centroids (MVCs) are complementary to the the Velocity Channel Analysis (VCA) technique that we introduced earlier. Employed together they make determining of the velocity spectral index more reliable. At the same time we show that MVCs allow to determine velocity spectra when the underlying statistics is not a power law and/or the turbulence is subsonic.

  5. Expression of cell adhesion and differentiation related genes in MC3T3 osteoblasts plated on titanium alloys: role of surface properties

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sista, Subhash [CSIR-Centre for Cellular and Molecular Biology, Uppal Road, Hyderabad 500 007 (India); Institute for Frontier Materials, Deakin University, Pigdons Road, Waurn Ponds, Geelong, Victoria 3217 (Australia); Wen, Cuie [Faculty of Engineering and Industrial Sciences, Swinburne University of Technology, Hawthorn, Victoria 3122 (Australia); Hodgson, Peter D. [Institute for Frontier Materials, Deakin University, Pigdons Road, Waurn Ponds, Geelong, Victoria 3217 (Australia); Pande, Gopal, E-mail: gpande@ccmb.res.in [CSIR-Centre for Cellular and Molecular Biology, Uppal Road, Hyderabad 500 007 (India)

    2013-04-01

    It is important to understand the cellular and molecular events that take place at the cell–material interface of implants used for bone repair. An understanding of the mechanisms involved in the initial stages of osteoblast interactions with the surface of the implant material is fundamental in deciding the fate of the cells that come in contact with it. In this study, we compared the relative gene expression of markers that are known to be associated with cell adhesion and differentiation in MC3T3 osteoblast cells, at various time points after plating the cells on surfaces of titanium (Ti) and its two alloys, titanium–zirconium (TiZr) and titanium–niobium (TiNb) by using Quantitative Real Time Polymerase Chain Reaction (RT-PCR). Our analysis indicated that expression of adhesion supporting genes was higher on TiZr surface as compared to Ti and TiNb. The behavior of these genes is possibly driven by a higher surface energy of TiZr. However no significant difference in the expression of differentiation related genes could be seen between the two alloys, although on both substrates it was higher as compared to unalloyed Ti. We propose that substrate composition of the alloys can influence the adhesion and differentiation related gene expression and that Ti alloys are better substrates for inducing osteogenesis as compared to unalloyed Ti. - Highlights: ► Methodology for comparing gene expression in osteoblasts plated on Ti, TiZr or TiNb ► Alloys with higher surface energy (TiZr) induce cell adhesion genes more efficiently ► Alloyed Ti is superior to unalloyed Ti to induce osteoblast differentiation genes.

  6. Calculating forces on thin flat plates with incomplete vorticity-field data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Limacher, Eric; Morton, Chris; Wood, David

    2016-11-01

    Optical experimental techniques such as particle image velocimetry (PIV) permit detailed quantification of velocities in the wakes of bluff bodies. Patterns in the wake development are significant to force generation, but it is not trivial to quantitatively relate changes in the wake to changes in measured forces. Key difficulties in this regard include: (i) accurate quantification of velocities close to the body, and (ii) the effect of missing velocity or vorticity data in regions where optical access is obscured. In the present work, we consider force formulations based on the vorticity field, wherein mathematical manipulation eliminates the need for accurate near-body velocity information. Attention is restricted to nominally two dimensional problems, namely (i) a linearly accelerating flat plate, investigated using PIV in a water tunnel, and (ii) a pitching plate in a freestream flow, as investigated numerically by Wang & Eldredge (2013). The effect of missing vorticity data on the pressure side of the plate has a significant impact on the calculation of force for the pitching plate test case. Fortunately, if the vorticity on the pressure side remains confined to a thin boundary layer, simple corrections can be applied to recover a force estimate.

  7. Search for Anisotropic Light Propagation as a Function of Laser Beam Alignment Relative to the Earth's Velocity Vector

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Navia C. E.

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available A laser diffraction experiment was conducted to study light propagation in air. The experiment is easy to reproduce and it is based on simple optical principles. Two optical sensors (segmented photo-diodes are used for measuring the position of diffracted light spots with a precision better than 0.1 μ m. The goal is to look for signals of anisotropic light propagation as function of the laser beam alignment to the Earth’s motion (solar barycenter motion obtained by COBE. Two raster search techniques have been used. First, a laser beam fixed in the laboratory frame scans in space due to Earth’s rotation. Second, a laser beam mounted on a turntable system scans actively in space by turning the table. The results obtained with both methods show that the course of light rays are affected by the motion of the Earth, and a predominant first order quantity with a Δ c/c = − β (1 + 2 a cos θ signature with ˉ a = − 0.393 ± 0.032 describes well the experimental results. This result differs in amount of 21% from the Special Relativity Theory prediction and that supplies the value of a = − 1 2 (isotropy.

  8. Regional variations in the nature of the incoming plate and its implication to the subduction zone

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fujie, Gou; Kodaira, Shuichi; Obana, Koichiro; Kaiho, Yuka; Sato, Takeshi; Yamamoto, Yojiro; Takahashi, Tsutomu; Miura, Seiichi; Yamada, Tomoaki

    2017-04-01

    The megathrust earthquakes like the 2011 Tohoku earthquake are caused by the interaction between the overlying plate and the subducting oceanic plate, indicating that the properties of the subducing oceanic plate, such as their geometry, thermal state, lithology, and water content, have a potential to controll the megathrust earthquakes. Of these properties, water content (degree of hydration) is highly influential because water transported by the incoming plate lowers the temperature of the subduction zone, promotes forearc metamorphism. Moreover, the presence of water and hydrated materials like serpentine can affect interplate seismic coupling on the plate interface. Accordingly, the regional variations in the degree of the hydration within the incoming plate might have strong influences on the regional variations in the interplate earthquakes. To reveal the regional variations in the nature of the incoming oceanic plate and its evolution owing to bending-related faulting near the trench axis, we conducted extensive controlled-source seismic surveys in the trench-outer rise region off northeastern Japan arc. We confirmed the systematic changes in seismic velocities owing to the bending-realated faulting, suggesting the water content within the incoming oceanic plate increases toward the trench accompanied by the development of bending-related fractures. In addition, we found along-trench variations in the seismic structure of the incoming oceanic plate; lower seismic velocities and higher Vp/Vs ration around the ancient fracture zones associated with ridge propagation. This observation suggests that the ancient scar on the oceanic plate influences along-trench variations in the current water amount transported by the oceanic plate. If we extend the ancient fracture zone toward the forearc region, it corresponds to an area of weak interplate coupling, characterized by low Vp and high Vp/Vs ratio around the depth of the plate interface. Our observations suggest

  9. Joint relative location of earthquakes without a predefined velocity model: an example from a peculiar seismic cluster on Katla volcano's south-flank (Iceland)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sgattoni, G.; Gudmundsson, Ó.; Einarsson, P.; Lucchi, F.

    2016-09-01

    Relative location methods are commonly used to precisely locate earthquake clusters consisting of similar waveforms. Repeating waveforms are often recorded at volcanoes, where, however, the crust structure is expected to contain strong heterogeneities and therefore the 1D velocity model assumption that is made in most location strategies is not likely to describe reality. A peculiar cluster of repeating low-frequency seismic events was recorded on the south flank of Katla volcano (Iceland) from 2011. As the hypocentres are located at the rim of the glacier, the seismicity may be due to volcanic or glacial processes. Information on the size and shape of the cluster may help constraining the source process. The extreme similarity of waveforms points to a very small spatial distribution of hypocentres. In order to extract meaningful information about size and shape of the cluster, we minimize uncertainty by optimizing the cross-correlation measurements and relative-location process. With a synthetic test we determine the best parameters for differential-time measurements and estimate their uncertainties, specifically for each waveform. We design a location strategy to work without a predefined velocity model, by formulating and inverting the problem to seek changes in both location and slowness, thus accounting for azimuth, take-off angles and velocity deviations from a 1D model. We solve the inversion explicitly in order to propagate data errors through the calculation. With this approach we are able to resolve a source volume few tens of meters wide in horizontal directions and around 100 meters in depth. There is no suggestion that the hypocentres lie on a single fault plane and the depth distribution indicates that their source is unlikely to be related to glacial processes as the ice thickness is not expected to exceed few tens of meters in the source area. Our method is designed for a very small source region, allowing us to assume a constant slowness for the

  10. Joint relative location of earthquakes without a pre-defined velocity model: an example from a peculiar seismic cluster on Katla volcano's south-flank (Iceland)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sgattoni, G.; Gudmundsson, Ó.; Einarsson, P.; Lucchi, F.

    2016-11-01

    Relative location methods are commonly used to precisely locate earthquake clusters consisting of similar waveforms. Repeating waveforms are often recorded at volcanoes, where, however, the crust structure is expected to contain strong heterogeneities and therefore the 1-D velocity model assumption that is made in most location strategies is not likely to describe reality. A peculiar cluster of repeating low-frequency seismic events was recorded on the south flank of Katla volcano (Iceland) from 2011. As the hypocentres are located at the rim of the glacier, the seismicity may be due to volcanic or glacial processes. Information on the size and shape of the cluster may help constraining the source process. The extreme similarity of waveforms points to a very small spatial distribution of hypocentres. In order to extract meaningful information about size and shape of the cluster, we minimize uncertainty by optimizing the cross-correlation measurements and relative-location process. With a synthetic test we determine the best parameters for differential-time measurements and estimate their uncertainties, specifically for each waveform. We design a location strategy to work without a pre-defined velocity model, by formulating and inverting the problem to seek changes in both location and slowness, thus accounting for azimuth, take-off angles and velocity deviations from a 1-D model. We solve the inversion explicitly in order to propagate data errors through the calculation. With this approach we are able to resolve a source volume few tens of metres wide in horizontal directions and around 100 metres in depth. There is no suggestion that the hypocentres lie on a single fault plane and the depth distribution indicates that their source is unlikely to be related to glacial processes as the ice thickness is not expected to exceed few tens of metres in the source area. Our method is designed for a very small source region, allowing us to assume a constant slowness for the

  11. Hall Effects on Mhd Flow Past an Accelerated Plate with Heat Transfer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sundarnath J.K.

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Hall current and rotation on an MHD flow past an accelerated horizontal plate relative to a rotating fluid, in the presence of heat transfer has been analyzed. The effects of the Hall parameter, Hartmann number, rotation parameter (non-dimensional angular velocity, Grashof’s number and Prandtl number on axial and transverse velocity profiles are presented graphically. It is found that with the increase in the Hartmann number, the axial and transverse velocity components increase in a direction opposite to that of obtained by increasing the Hall parameter and rotation parameter. Also, when Ω=M2m /(1 + m2 , it is observed that the transverse velocity component vanishes and axial velocity attains a maximum value.

  12. Visual control of walking velocity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    François, Matthieu; Morice, Antoine H P; Bootsma, Reinoud J; Montagne, Gilles

    2011-06-01

    Even if optical correlates of self-motion velocity have already been identified, their contribution to the control of displacement velocity remains to be established. In this study, we used a virtual reality set-up coupled to a treadmill to test the role of both Global Optic Flow Rate (GOFR) and Edge Rate (ER) in the regulation of walking velocity. Participants were required to walk at a constant velocity, corresponding to their preferred walking velocity, while eye height and texture density were manipulated. This manipulation perturbed the natural relationship between the actual walking velocity and its optical specification by GOFR and ER, respectively. Results revealed that both these sources of information are indeed used by participants to control walking speed, as demonstrated by a slowing down of actual walking velocity when the optical specification of velocity by either GOFR or ER gives rise to an overestimation of actual velocity, and vice versa. Gait analyses showed that these walking velocity adjustments result from simultaneous adaptations in both step length and step duration. The role of visual information in the control of self-motion velocity is discussed in relation with other factors.

  13. The relation between gas density and velocity power spectra in galaxy clusters: high-resolution hydrodynamic simulations and the role of conduction

    CERN Document Server

    Gaspari, M; Nagai, D; Lau, E T; Zhuravleva, I

    2014-01-01

    Exploring the ICM power spectrum can help us to probe the physics of galaxy clusters. Using high-resolution 3D plasma simulations, we study the statistics of the velocity field and its relation with the thermodynamic perturbations. The normalization of the ICM spectrum (density, entropy, or pressure) is linearly tied to the level of large-scale motions, which excite both gravity and sound waves due to stratification. For low 3D Mach number M~0.25, gravity waves mainly drive entropy perturbations, traced by preferentially tangential turbulence. For M>0.5, sound waves start to significantly contribute, passing the leading role to compressive pressure fluctuations, associated with isotropic turbulence (or a slight radial bias). Density and temperature fluctuations are then characterized by the dominant process: isobaric (low M), adiabatic (high M), or isothermal (strong conduction). Most clusters reside in the intermediate regime, showing a mixture of gravity and sound waves, hence drifting towards isotropic vel...

  14. S-wave velocity structure inferred from receiver function inversion in Tengchong volcanic area

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    贺传松; 王椿镛; 吴建平

    2004-01-01

    Tengchong volcanic area is located near the impinging and underthrust margin of India and Eurasia plates. The volcanic activity is closely related to the tectonic environment. The deep structure characteristics are inferred from the receiver function inversion with the teleseismic records in the paper. The results show that the low velocity zone is influenced by the NE-trending Dayingjiang fault. The S-wave low velocity structure occurs obviously in the southern part of the fault, but unobviously in its northern part. There are low velocity zones in the shallow position, which coincides with the seismicity. It also demonstrates that the low velocity zone is directly related to the thermal activity in the volcanic area. Therefore, we consider that the volcano may be alive again.

  15. Calculations supporting HyperVelocity Launcher development

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Trucano, T.G.; Chhabildas, L.C.

    1993-08-01

    Sandia National Laboratories has developed a HyperVelocity Launcher (also referred to as HVL) in which a thin flier plate (nominally 1 mm thick) is launched to velocities in excess of 12 km/s. The length to diameter ratio of these launched flier plates varies from 0.02 to 0.06. The launch technique is based upon using structured, time-dependant, high-pressure, high-acceleration pulses to drive the flier plates. Such pulses are achieved by using a graded-density material to impact a stationary flier. A computational and experimental program at Sandia seeks to extend this technique to allow launching thick plates whose length-to-diameter ratio is 10 to 20 times larger than thin plates. Hydrodynamic codes are used to design modifications to the basic technique. The authors have controlled and used these effects to successfully launch a chunk-flier, consisting of 0.33 gm of titanium alloy, 0.3 cm thick by 0.6 cm in diameter, to a velocity of 10.2 km/s. This is the largest chunky size ever launched at this velocity from a gas gun configuration.

  16. Quantitative velocity modulation spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hodges, James N.; McCall, Benjamin J.

    2016-05-01

    Velocity Modulation Spectroscopy (VMS) is arguably the most important development in the 20th century for spectroscopic study of molecular ions. For decades, interpretation of VMS lineshapes has presented challenges due to the intrinsic covariance of fit parameters including velocity modulation amplitude, linewidth, and intensity. This limitation has stifled the growth of this technique into the quantitative realm. In this work, we show that subtle changes in the lineshape can be used to help address this complexity. This allows for determination of the linewidth, intensity relative to other transitions, velocity modulation amplitude, and electric field strength in the positive column of a glow discharge. Additionally, we explain the large homogeneous component of the linewidth that has been previously described. Using this component, the ion mobility can be determined.

  17. Seismic evidence for sharp lithosphere-asthenosphere boundaries of oceanic plates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawakatsu, Hitoshi; Kumar, Prakash; Takei, Yasuko; Shinohara, Masanao; Kanazawa, Toshihiko; Araki, Eiichiro; Suyehiro, Kiyoshi

    2009-04-24

    The mobility of the lithosphere over a weaker asthenosphere constitutes the essential element of plate tectonics, and thus the understanding of the processes at the lithosphere-asthenosphere boundary (LAB) is fundamental to understand how our planet works. It is especially so for oceanic plates because their relatively simple creation and evolution should enable easy elucidation of the LAB. Data from borehole broadband ocean bottom seismometers show that the LAB beneath the Pacific and Philippine Sea plates is sharp and age-dependent. The observed large shear wave velocity reduction at the LAB requires a partially molten asthenosphere consisting of horizontal melt-rich layers embedded in meltless mantle, which accounts for the large viscosity contrast at the LAB that facilitates horizontal plate motions.

  18. Non-uniform, axisymmetric misfit strain: in thin films bonded on plate substrates/substrate systems: the relation between non-uniform film stresses and system curvatures

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yonggang Huang; D. Ngo; A.J. Rosakis

    2005-01-01

    Current methodologies used for the inference of thin film stress through curvature measurements are strictly restricted to stress and curvature states which are assumed to remain uniform over the entire film/substrate system. By considering a circular thin film/substrate system subject to non-uniform, but axisymmetric misfit strain distributions in the thin film, we derived relations between the film stresses and the misfit strain, and between the plate system's curvatures and the misfit strain. These relations feature a "local"part which involves a direct dependence of the stress or curvature components on the misfit strain at the same point, and a "non-local" part which reflects the effect of misfit strain of other points on the location of scrutiny. Most notably, we also derived relations between the polar components of the film stress and those of system curvatures which allow for the experimental inference of such stresses from full-field curvature measurements in the presence of arbitrary radial non-uniformities. These relations also feature a "non-local"dependence on curvatures making a full-field measurement a necessity. Finally, it is shown that the interfacial shear tractions between the film and the substrate are proportional to the radial gradients of the first curvature invariant and can also be inferred experimentally.

  19. Cirrus Crystal Terminal Velocities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heymsfield, Andrew J.; Iaquinta, Jean

    2000-04-01

    Cirrus crystal terminal velocities are of primary importance in determining the rate of transport of condensate from upper- to middle-tropospheric levels and profoundly influence the earth's radiation balance through their effect on the rate of buildup or decay of cirrus clouds. In this study, laboratory and field-based cirrus crystal drag coefficient data, as well as analytical descriptions of cirrus crystal shapes, are used to derive more physically based expressions for the velocities of cirrus crystals than have been available in the past.Polycrystals-often bullet rosettes-are shown to be the dominant crystal types in synoptically generated cirrus, with columns present in varying but relatively large percentages, depending on the cloud. The two critical parameters needed to calculate terminal velocity are the drag coefficient and the ratio of mass to cross-sectional area normal to their fall direction. Using measurements and calculations, it is shown that drag coefficients from theory and laboratory studies are applicable to crystals of the types found in cirrus. The ratio of the mass to area, which is shown to be relatively independent of the number of bullets in the rosette, is derived from an analytic model that represents bullet rosettes containing one to eight bullets in 19 primary geometric configurations. The ratio is also derived for columns. Using this information, a general set of equations is developed to calculate the terminal velocities and masses in terms of the aspect ratio (width divided by length), ice density, and rosette maximum dimension. Simple expressions for terminal velocity and mass as a function of bullet rosette maximum dimension are developed by incorporating new information on bullet aspect ratios.The general terminal velocity and mass relations are then applied to a case from the First International Satellite Cloud Climatology Project (ISCCP) Research Experiment (FIRE) 2, when size spectra from a balloon-borne ice crystal

  20. Three-dimensional velocity structure of the outer fore arc of the Colombia-Ecuador subduction zone and implications for the 1958 megathrust earthquake rupture zone

    Science.gov (United States)

    García Cano, Lina Constanza; Galve, Audrey; Charvis, Philippe; Marcaillou, Boris

    2014-02-01

    In 2005, an onshore, offshore 3-D refraction and wide-angle reflection seismic experiment was conducted along the convergent margin at the border between Colombia and Ecuador, over the rupture zone of the 1958, Mw 7.6 subduction earthquake. A well-defined Vp velocity model of the plate boundary and upper and lower plates was constructed, down to 25 km depth, using first arrival traveltimes inversion. The model reveals a several kilometers thick, low-velocity zone in the upper plate, located immediately above the interplate contact. This low-velocity zone might be related to alteration and fracturing of the mafic and ultramafic rocks, which composed the upper plate in this area by fluids released by the lower plate with possible contributions from sediment underplating. Near the toe of the margin, the model shows a low-velocity gradient in the outer wedge, which is interpreted as highly faulted and fractured rocks. This low-velocity/low-gradient region appears to limit the oceanward extension of the rupture zones of the 1958 and 1979 earthquakes, possibly because coseismic deformation and uplift of the outer margin wedge dissipates most of the seismic energy.

  1. Global plate boundary evolution and kinematics since the late Paleozoic

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matthews, Kara J.; Maloney, Kayla T.; Zahirovic, Sabin; Williams, Simon E.; Seton, Maria; Müller, R. Dietmar

    2016-11-01

    Many aspects of deep-time Earth System models, including mantle convection, paleoclimatology, paleobiogeography and the deep Earth carbon cycle, require high-resolution plate motion models that include the evolution of the mosaic of plate boundaries through time. We present the first continuous late Paleozoic to present-day global plate model with evolving plate boundaries, building on and extending two previously published models for the late Paleozoic (410-250 Ma) and Mesozoic-Cenozoic (230-0 Ma). We ensure continuity during the 250-230 Ma transition period between the two models, update the absolute reference frame of the Mesozoic-Cenozoic model and add a new Paleozoic reconstruction for the Baltica-derived Alexander Terrane, now accreted to western North America. This 410-0 Ma open access model provides a framework for deep-time whole Earth modelling and acts as a base for future extensions and refinement. We analyse the model in terms of the number of plates, predicted plate size distribution, plate and continental root mean square (RMS) speeds, plate velocities and trench migration through time. Overall model trends share many similarities to those for recent times, which we use as a first order benchmark against which to compare the model and identify targets for future model refinement. Except for during the period 260-160 Ma, the number of plates (16-46) and ratio of "large" plates (≥ 107.5 km2) to smaller plates ( 2.7-6.6) are fairly similar to present-day values (46 and 6.6, respectively), with lower values occurring during late Paleozoic assembly and growth of Pangea. This temporal pattern may also reflect difficulties in reconstructing small, now subducted oceanic plates further back in time, as well as whether a supercontinent is assembling or breaking up. During the 260-160 Ma timeframe the model reaches a minima in the number of plates, in contrast to what we would expect during initial Pangea breakup and thus highlighting the need for refinement

  2. Relative influence of surficial, climatic, and plate tectonic processes on the development of thick Paleoproterozoic quartz arenite successions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corcoran, P.; Bynoe, L.

    2010-12-01

    Quartz arenites are significant components of the rock record and appear to be most abundant during specific time intervals in Earth history. Thick quartz arenite successions are typical in Precambrian strata and have been associated with extensive cratonization during the late Archean to early Proterozoic. These supermature sandstones can also be attributed to the intense weathering conditions of early Earth’s atmosphere, source rocks rich in quartz, recycling and diagenesis, or simply the higher preservation potential of quartz compared with other minerals. Modern quartz-rich sands develop in low relief settings where high residence times contribute to chemical breakdown of labile grains. The lack of land vegetation during the Precambrian would have precluded confined sedimentation patterns and stabilization of soils, both of which enhance sediment residence times. Thus, the generation of first-cycle late Archean quartz arenites in fault-controlled, high relief basins necessitates periods of intense chemical weathering. The inferred change from a greenhouse to oxygenated atmosphere at around 2.3-2.2 Ga could have been the major control on the relative change to thinner units of pure sandstones with time. In order to test this hypothesis, detailed facies and compositional analyses are being conducted on the ca. 2.2 Ga Bar River Formation of the Huronian Supergroup, Canada. Four groups comprise Huronian stratigraphy, three of which contain basal glaciogenic conglomerates, followed by mudstone-dominated then quartz-rich formations. It has been suggested that these tripartite cycles could have been climatically controlled. Detailed facies analysis of the 500-750 m thick quartz arenite indicates shallow water, wave-influenced settings, akin to shoreface environments along extensive stable shelves. Thin mudstone interbeds, representing brief periods of suspension sedimentation, have been sampled for geochemical analysis in order to determine the degree of chemical

  3. Relation between aging skeletal muscles and force-velocity%骨骼肌衰老与力量-速度的关系

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    杜少辉; 李文惠; 闫万军

    2011-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Aging in human beings is correlated with a decline in neuromuscular function and performance. It directly results in alterations of force-velocity relationship in muscles. The alterations above have direct functional im plications which causes the loss of activities of daily living and self-care ability.OBJECTIVE: To review the changes of the force-velocity relationship with age and the fu nctional implications caused by these changes.METHODS: Databases of CNKI, Duxiu, Elsevier SD, and Springer Link were searched. Documents related to changes laws of force-velocity relationship with age and the functional implications caused by these changes were included. Repetitive research or Meta analysis was excluded.RESULTS AND CONCLUSION: Totally 46 literatu res were included in this review. The findings demonstrated that: Strength of muscles, especially power and contraction velocity, are declined with aging. It is directly associated with loss of daily living and self-care abilities. The decline of power is highly related to functional ability. Thus, amelioration of muscle power can effective improve the functional ability and elevate life quality of aging people.%背景:人类的衰老与神经肌肉系统的功能能力衰退有关,年龄增长所致的肌肉质量丢失和肌肉结构的变化直接导致骨骼肌的力量-速度关系发生变化,而这些变化直接影响了老年人的功能活动,使老年人的活动能力和自理能力丧失.目的:综述肌肉的力量-速度关系随年龄变化的研究进展,探讨这些变化对老龄肌肉的功能产生的影响.方法:应用计算机检索CNKI 期刊全文数据库、读秀学术搜索和Elsevier SD、Springer Link数据库(1980-01/2010-04)与骨骼肌衰老与力量-速度关系的相关的文献.纳入所述内容与骨骼肌力量-速度关系随年龄变化的规律,以及该变化对老龄肌肉产生的影响相关的文章,排除重复研究或Meta分析类文章.结果与结论:共

  4. Expression of cell adhesion and differentiation related genes in MC3T3 osteoblasts plated on titanium alloys: role of surface properties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sista, Subhash; Wen, Cuie; Hodgson, Peter D; Pande, Gopal

    2013-04-01

    It is important to understand the cellular and molecular events that take place at the cell-material interface of implants used for bone repair. An understanding of the mechanisms involved in the initial stages of osteoblast interactions with the surface of the implant material is fundamental in deciding the fate of the cells that come in contact with it. In this study, we compared the relative gene expression of markers that are known to be associated with cell adhesion and differentiation in MC3T3 osteoblast cells, at various time points after plating the cells on surfaces of titanium (Ti) and its two alloys, titanium-zirconium (TiZr) and titanium-niobium (TiNb) by using Quantitative Real Time Polymerase Chain Reaction (RT-PCR). Our analysis indicated that expression of adhesion supporting genes was higher on TiZr surface as compared to Ti and TiNb. The behavior of these genes is possibly driven by a higher surface energy of TiZr. However no significant difference in the expression of differentiation related genes could be seen between the two alloys, although on both substrates it was higher as compared to unalloyed Ti. We propose that substrate composition of the alloys can influence the adhesion and differentiation related gene expression and that Ti alloys are better substrates for inducing osteogenesis as compared to unalloyed Ti.

  5. Secure matching of Dutch car license plates

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sunil, A.B.; Erkiny, Z.; Veugenyz, T.

    2016-01-01

    License plate matching plays an important role in applications like law enforcement, traffic management and road pricing, where the plate is first recognized and then compared to a database of authorized vehicle registration plates. Unfortunately, there are several privacy related issues that should

  6. Plate shell structures of glass

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bagger, Anne

    . This modelling technique is used to model a plate shell structure with a span of 11.5 meters in the FE software \\textsc{Abaqus}. The structure is analyzed with six different connection details with varying stiffness characteristics, to investigate the influence of these characteristics on the structural effects...... University, a script has been developed for an automated generation of a given plate shell geometry and a corresponding finite element (FE) model. A suitable FE modelling technique is proposed, suggesting a relatively simple method of modelling the connection detail's stiffness characteristics....... Based on these investigations, and FE analysis of other plate shell models, the structural behaviour is described. Possible methods of estimating the stresses in a given plate shell structure are proposed. The non-linear behaviour of a plate shell structure is investigated for varying parameters...

  7. Turbulent boundary layer over flexible plates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rostami, Parand; Ioppolo, Tindaro

    2016-11-01

    This research describes the structure of a turbulent boundary layer flow with a zero pressure gradient over elastic plates. The elastic plates made of a thin aluminum sheets with thickness between 50 and 500 microns were placed on the floor of a subsonic wind tunnel and exposed to a turbulent boundary layer flow with a free stream velocity between 20m/s and 100m/s. The ceiling of the test section of the wind tunnel is adjustable so that a nearly zero pressure gradient is obtained in the test section. Hot-wire anemometry was used to measure the velocity components. Mean, fluctuating velocities and Reynolds stresses will be presented and compared with the values of a rigid plate.

  8. Rayleigh-wave phase-velocity maps and three-dimensional shear velocity structure of the western US from local non-plane surface wave tomography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pollitz, F.F.; Snoke, J. Arthur

    2010-01-01

    We utilize two-and-three-quarter years of vertical-component recordings made by the Transportable Array (TA) component of Earthscope to constrain three-dimensional (3-D) seismic shear wave velocity structure in the upper 200 km of the western United States. Single-taper spectral estimation is used to compile measurements of complex spectral amplitudes from 44 317 seismograms generated by 123 teleseismic events. In the first step employed to determine the Rayleigh-wave phase-velocity structure, we implement a new tomographic method, which is simpler and more robust than scattering-based methods (e.g. multi-plane surface wave tomography). The TA is effectively implemented as a large number of local arrays by defining a horizontal Gaussian smoothing distance that weights observations near a given target point. The complex spectral-amplitude measurements are interpreted with the spherical Helmholtz equation using local observations about a succession of target points, resulting in Rayleigh-wave phase-velocity maps at periods over the range of 18–125 s. The derived maps depend on the form of local fits to the Helmholtz equation, which generally involve the nonplane-wave solutions of Friederich et al. In a second step, the phase-velocity maps are used to derive 3-D shear velocity structure. The 3-D velocity images confirm details witnessed in prior body-wave and surface-wave studies and reveal new structures, including a deep (>100 km deep) high-velocity lineament, of width ∼200 km, stretching from the southern Great Valley to northern Utah that may be a relic of plate subduction or, alternatively, either a remnant of the Mojave Precambrian Province or a mantle downwelling. Mantle seismic velocity is highly correlated with heat flow, Holocene volcanism, elastic plate thickness and seismicity. This suggests that shallow mantle structure provides the heat source for associated magmatism, as well as thinning of the thermal lithosphere, leading to relatively high

  9. Crustal structure and evolution of the southern Juan de Fuca plate from wide-angle seismic data: Insights into the hydration state of the incoming plate off Cascadia subduction zone

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horning, G.; Canales, J. P.; Carbotte, S. M.; Nedimovic, M. R.; Carton, H. D.

    2014-12-01

    A multi-channel seismic reflection and wide-angle refraction seismic experiment was conducted on the Juan de Fuca (JdF) plate to investigate the evolution of the plate from accretion to its subduction at the Cascadia margin. Hydration of the upper crust (UC) of the JdF Plate is well documented, but the state of hydration of the lower crust (LC) and upper mantle (UM] remains to be investigated. A 2D P-wave velocity model of the plate is derived from a joint reflection-refraction travel-time inversion of wide-angle seismic data. Stacked MCS reflection images together with modeled sedimentary velocities define an increasing thickness of sedimentary cover of up to 2.7km. Evidence for bending-related faulting is identified in coincident MCS images both indirectly as faulting in the sedimentary layer [Gibson, et al., this meeting] and directly as dipping crustal reflectors [Han et al., this meeting]. Three first order features are evident in the patterns of crustal velocity variations along the profile. 1: Crustal velocities at 150-250 km landward of the spreading ridge (~5 Ma age) show reduced velocities up to -0.20 km/s in comparison to velocities in younger crust (~3 Ma) 100-150 km from the ridge. This decrease in velocities is coincident with a propagator wake. 2: Upper crustal velocities begin to increase at 170km from the deformation front (DF), which coincides with the first evidence of faulting from sedimentary offsets. Crustal velocities start a decreasing trend at 80km from the DF where fault throws are seen to begin increasing trend landward. 3: UC velocities in the region of directly imaged crustal faulting (40km from trench) increase ~0.5km/s at the DF, while LC velocities decrease ~0.3km/s. The contrasting behavior in the upper and lower crust may indicate that bending promotes hydrothermal circulation in the outer rise. Circulation may be vigorous enough within the sediments/UC so that any residual shallow porosity is clogged with alteration products

  10. Liquid repellency by a moving plate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bouillant, Ambre; Anais Gauthier Team; David Quere Team; Christophe Clanet Team

    2016-11-01

    Moving solids can repel impacting drops, owing to their motion. Provided the solid velocity is larger than a threshold value, air entrained at the vicinity of the moving plate prevents the drop from wetting, and makes it bounce. In addition, the rebound is oblique, which enhances the evacuation of liquid. We discuss experiments and models on this theme, and extend them to case of small droplets (such as formed in a spray) found to be even more efficiently repelled by the moving plate.

  11. Kinematics to dynamics in the New Zealand plate-boundary zone

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lamb, S. H.

    2013-12-01

    New Zealand straddles the boundary between the Australian and Pacific plate, with a transition from subduction of Pacific oceanic lithosphere beneath North Island, to oblique continental collision in South Island. Cenozoic relative plate motion has resulted in a complex pattern of faulting and block rotation in a zone up to 250 km wide, with displacements on individual faults up to 100s of kilometres. Active deformation must be driven by a combination of plate-boundary forces and internal buoyancy forces. I use a compilation of seismic reflection/refraction studies and high quality receiver function analyses, together with simple Airy isostasy, to determine regional crustal and mantle structure. Integration of the vertical normal stress to the base of the deforming layer yields the buoyancy stress. Horizontal gradients of this can be compared with horizontal gradients of strain rate, using the method of England & Molnar (1997), in the context of a simple thin sheet model of deformation. Thus, if deformation is that of a Newtonian fluid, then appropriate combinations of the horizontal gradients of vorticity and dilatation are related to gradients of buoyancy stress by the fluid viscosity. However, the short term geodetic deformation is strongly biased by elastic strain accumulation related to locking on the plate interface, and cannot be used to determine the plate-boundary velocity field averaged over many seismic cycles (see Lamb & Smith 2013). Therefore, I derive here a velocity field for the plate-boundary zone, which is representative of deformation over tens of thousands of years. This is based on an inversion of fault slip, strain rate azimuth and paleomagnetic data, in the context of the short term relative plate motions, solved in a network of triangles spanning the plate-boundary, using the method of Lamb (2000). A comparison of gradients of buoyancy stress with the appropriate combinations of gradients of vorticity and dilatation shows that deformation in

  12. Elastic plate spallation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oline, L.; Medaglia, J.

    1972-01-01

    The dynamic finite element method was used to investigate elastic stress waves in a plate. Strain displacement and stress strain relations are discussed along with the stiffness and mass matrix. The results of studying point load, and distributed load over small, intermediate, and large radii are reported. The derivation of finite element matrices, and the derivation of lumped and consistent matrices for one dimensional problems with Laplace transfer solutions are included. The computer program JMMSPALL is also included.

  13. Flow Field Analysis of Submerged Horizontal Plate Type Breakwater

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张志强; 栾茂田; 王科

    2013-01-01

    Submerged horizontal plate can be considered as a new concept breakwater. In order to reveal the wave elimination mechanism of this type breakwater, boundary element method is utilized to investigate the velocity field around plate carefully. The flow field analysis shows that the interaction between incident wave and reverse flow caused by submerged plate will lead to the formation of wave elimination area around both sides of the plate. The velocity magnitude of flow field has been reduced and this is the main reason of wave elimination.

  14. Imaging megathrust zone and Yakutat/Pacific plate interface in Alaska subduction zone

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Y.; Abers, G. A.; Li, J.; Christensen, D. H.; Calkins, J. A.

    2013-05-01

    We image the subducted slab underneath a 450 km long transect of the Alaska subduction zone. Dense stations in southern Alaska are set up to investigate (1) the geometry and velocity structure of the downgoing plate and their relation to slab seismicity, and (2) the interplate coupled zone where the great 1964 (magnitude 9.3) had greatest rupture. The joint teleseismic migration of two array datasets (MOOS, Multidisciplinary Observations of Onshore Subduction, and BEAAR, Broadband Experiment Across the Alaska Range) based on teleseismic receiver functions (RFs) using the MOOS data reveal a shallow-dipping prominent low-velocity layer at ~25-30 km depth in southern Alaska. Modeling of these RF amplitudes shows a thin (plate. The observed low-velocity megathrust layer (with P-to-S velocity ratio (Vp/Vs) exceeding 2.0) may be due to a thick sediment input from the trench in combination of elevated pore fluid pressure in the channel. The subducted crust below the low-velocity channel has gabbroic velocities with a thickness of 11-12 km. Both velocities and thickness of the low-velocity channel abruptly increase as the slab bends in central Alaska, which agrees with previously published RF results. Our image also includes an unusually thick low-velocity crust subducting with a ~20 degree dip down to 130 km depth at approximately 200 km inland beneath central Alaska. The unusual nature of this subducted segment has been suggested to be due to the subduction of the Yakutat terrane. We also show a clear image of the Yakutat and Pacific plate subduction beneath the Kenai Peninsula, and the along-strike boundary between them at megathrust depths. Our imaged western edge of the Yakutat terrane, at 25-30 km depth in the central Kenai along the megathrust, aligns with the western end of the geodetically locked patch with high slip deficit, and coincides with the boundary of aftershock events from the 1964 earthquake. It seems plausible that this sharp change in the nature of

  15. The radiation Q factors obtained from the partial derivatives of the phase of the reflection coefficient of an elastic plate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lenoir, O; Conoir, J M; Izbicki, J L

    2003-08-01

    The phase gradient method is applied to study the partial derivatives of the phase of the reflection coefficient of a fluid-loaded elastic plate. We consider the derivatives with respect to the frequency f, the incidence angle theta, the phase velocities of the longitudinal and transverse waves propagating in the plate, cL and cT, respectively, and the phase velocity in the fluid cF. The partial derivatives with respect to f, cL, cT, cF are linked by a relation involving products of one of these variables with the corresponding partial derivative. At a resonance frequency, the product of frequency with the frequency phase derivative can be identified as a radiation quality factor. By analogy, the other products correspond to quality factors. It can be shown that the product assigned to the fluid phase velocity corresponds to an angular radiation quality factor. The products assigned to the longitudinal and transverse phase velocities are identified as longitudinal and transverse radiation quality factors. These quality factors are shown to be related to stored energies associated with either standing waves across the plate, guided waves, longitudinal waves or transverse waves. A reactive power balance between the plate and the fluid is also established.

  16. Laminar forced convection with viscous dissipation in a Couette-Poiseuille flow between parallel plates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aydin, Orhan; Avci, Mete [Karadeniz Technical University, Trabzon (Turkey). Department of Mechanical Engineering

    2006-08-15

    In this study, analytical solutions are obtained to predict laminar heat-convection in a Couette-Poiseuille flow between two plane parallel plates with a simultaneous pressure gradient and an axial movement of the upper plate. A Newtonian fluid with constant properties is considered with an emphasis on the viscous-dissipation effect. Both hydrodynamically and thermally fully-developed flow cases are investigated. The axial heat-conduction in the fluid is neglected. Two different orientations of the thermal boundary-conditions are considered: the constant heat-flux at the upper plate with an adiabatic lower plate (Case A) and the constant heat-flux at the lower plate with an adiabatic upper plate (Case B). For different values of the relative velocity of the upper plate, the effect of the modified Brinkman number on the temperature distribution and the Nusselt number are discussed. Comparison of the present analytical results for a special case with those available in the literature indicates an excellent agreement. (author)

  17. Indonesian Landforms and Plate Tectonics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Herman Th. Verstappen

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available DOI: 10.17014/ijog.v5i3.103The horizontal configuration and vertical dimension of the landforms occurring in the tectonically unstable parts of Indonesia were resulted in the first place from plate tectonics. Most of them date from the Quaternary and endogenous forces are ongoing. Three major plates – the northward moving Indo-Australian Plate, the south-eastward moving SE-Asian Plate and the westward moving Pacific Plate - meet at a plate triple-junction situated in the south of New Guinea’s Bird’s Head. The narrow North-Moluccan plate is interposed between the Asia and Pacific. It tapers out northward in the Philippine Mobile Belt and is gradually disappearing. The greatest relief amplitudes occur near the plate boundaries: deep ocean trenches are associated with subduction zones and mountain ranges with collision belts. The landforms of the more stable areas of the plates date back to a more remote past and, where emerged, have a more subdued relief that is in the first place related to the resistance of the rocks to humid tropical weathering Rising mountain ranges and emerging island arcs are subjected to rapid humid-tropical river erosions and mass movements. The erosion products accumulate in adjacent sedimentary basins where their increasing weight causes subsidence by gravity and isostatic compensations. Living and raised coral reefs, volcanoes, and fault scarps are important geomorphic indicators of active plate tectonics. Compartmental faults may strongly affect island arcs stretching perpendicular to the plate movement. This is the case on Java. Transcurrent faults and related pull-apart basins are a leading factor where plates meet at an angle, such as on Sumatra. The most complicated situation exists near the triple-junction and in the Moluccas. Modern research methods, such as GPS measurements of plate movements and absolute dating of volcanic outbursts and raised coral reefs are important tools. The mega-landforms resulting

  18. Indonesian Landforms and Plate Tectonics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Herman Th. Verstappen

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available DOI: 10.17014/ijog.v5i3.103The horizontal configuration and vertical dimension of the landforms occurring in the tectonically unstable parts of Indonesia were resulted in the first place from plate tectonics. Most of them date from the Quaternary and endogenous forces are ongoing. Three major plates – the northward moving Indo-Australian Plate, the south-eastward moving SE-Asian Plate and the westward moving Pacific Plate - meet at a plate triple-junction situated in the south of New Guinea’s Bird’s Head. The narrow North-Moluccan plate is interposed between the Asia and Pacific. It tapers out northward in the Philippine Mobile Belt and is gradually disappearing. The greatest relief amplitudes occur near the plate boundaries: deep ocean trenches are associated with subduction zones and mountain ranges with collision belts. The landforms of the more stable areas of the plates date back to a more remote past and, where emerged, have a more subdued relief that is in the first place related to the resistance of the rocks to humid tropical weathering Rising mountain ranges and emerging island arcs are subjected to rapid humid-tropical river erosions and mass movements. The erosion products accumulate in adjacent sedimentary basins where their increasing weight causes subsidence by gravity and isostatic compensations. Living and raised coral reefs, volcanoes, and fault scarps are important geomorphic indicators of active plate tectonics. Compartmental faults may strongly affect island arcs stretching perpendicular to the plate movement. This is the case on Java. Transcurrent faults and related pull-apart basins are a leading factor where plates meet at an angle, such as on Sumatra. The most complicated situation exists near the triple-junction and in the Moluccas. Modern research methods, such as GPS measurements of plate movements and absolute dating of volcanic outbursts and raised coral reefs are important tools. The mega-landforms resulting

  19. BOLIVAR & GEODINOS: Investigations of the Southern Caribbean Plate Boundary

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levander, A.; Schmitz, M.; Working Groups, B.

    2006-12-01

    The southern Caribbean-South American plate boundary has many similarities to California's San Andreas system: 1) The CAR-SA system consists of a series of strands of active right lateral strike-slip faults extending >1000 km from the Antilles subduction zone. This system has several names and includes the El Pilar, Coche, San Sebastian, Moron, and Oca faults. 2) The CAR-SA relative velocity has been about 20 mm/yr of mostly right lateral motion since about 55 Ma, giving a total displacement on the CAR-SA plate boundary similar to that of the San Andreas system. 3) The plate boundary has about 10% convergence in western SA, with less as one moves eastward due to relative convergence between North and South America. 4) The CAR-SA system has fold and thrust belts best developed continentward of the strike-slip faults, similar to the San Andreas. 5) There is a big bend in the CAR plate boundary at approximately the same distance from the Antilles trench as the big bend in Southern California is from the Cascadia subduction zone. The tectonic origins of the CAR-SA plate boundary and the San Andreas are very different, however, despite the similarities between the systems. Rather than impingement of a ridge on a trench, the CAR-SA system is thought to have resulted from a continuous oblique collision of the southern end of a Cretaceous island arc system with the northern edge of South America. During this process the CAR island arc and the modern CAR plate overrode a proto-Caribbean plate and destroyed a Mesozoic passive margin on the northern edge of SA. BOLIVAR and GEODINOS are multi-disciplinary investigations of the lithosphere and deeper structures associated with the diffuse CAR-SA plate boundary zone. We review a number of observations regarding the plate boundary obtained or confirmed from these studies: 1) The Caribbean Large Igneous Province, being overridden by the Maracaibo block in western Venezuela, can be identified beneath Aruba and coastal Venezuela

  20. Plate tectonics and hotspots: the third dimension.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, D L; Tanimoto, T; Zhang, Y S

    1992-06-19

    High-resolution seismic tomographic models of the upper mantle provide powerful new constraints on theories of plate tectonics and hotspots. Midocean ridges have extremely low seismic velocities to a depth of 100 kilometers. These low velocities imply partial melting. At greater depths, low-velocity and high-velocity anomalies record, respectively, previous positions of migrating ridges and trenches. Extensional, rifting, and hotspot regions have deep (> 200 kilometers) low-velocity anomalies. The upper mantle is characterized by vast domains of high temperature rather than small regions surrounding hotspots; the asthenosphere is not homogeneous or isothermal. Extensive magmatism requires a combination of hot upper mantle and suitable lithospheric conditions. High-velocity regions of the upper 200 kilometers of the mantle correlate with Archean cratons.

  1. Sodium Velocity Maps on Mercury

    Science.gov (United States)

    Potter, A. E.; Killen, R. M.

    2011-01-01

    The objective of the current work was to measure two-dimensional maps of sodium velocities on the Mercury surface and examine the maps for evidence of sources or sinks of sodium on the surface. The McMath-Pierce Solar Telescope and the Stellar Spectrograph were used to measure Mercury spectra that were sampled at 7 milliAngstrom intervals. Observations were made each day during the period October 5-9, 2010. The dawn terminator was in view during that time. The velocity shift of the centroid of the Mercury emission line was measured relative to the solar sodium Fraunhofer line corrected for radial velocity of the Earth. The difference between the observed and calculated velocity shift was taken to be the velocity vector of the sodium relative to Earth. For each position of the spectrograph slit, a line of velocities across the planet was measured. Then, the spectrograph slit was stepped over the surface of Mercury at 1 arc second intervals. The position of Mercury was stabilized by an adaptive optics system. The collection of lines were assembled into an images of surface reflection, sodium emission intensities, and Earthward velocities over the surface of Mercury. The velocity map shows patches of higher velocity in the southern hemisphere, suggesting the existence of sodium sources there. The peak earthward velocity occurs in the equatorial region, and extends to the terminator. Since this was a dawn terminator, this might be an indication of dawn evaporation of sodium. Leblanc et al. (2008) have published a velocity map that is similar.

  2. Intermediate-Depth Intraplate Strike-Slip Earthquake Along the Subducted Nazca Plate: Stress Conditions Related to Flat-Slab Transition Zone?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carrizo, D.; Peyrat, S.; Comte, D.; Boroschek, R.

    2013-05-01

    On October 11th, 2012 an strike-slip intraplate earthquake Mw=5.6 occurred at about 15 km NE of Santiago-Chile, at 107 km depth. This earthquake had a distribution of intensities of about VI MM, around Santiago region. In the past only few similar seismic events had been occurred, the majority of them without reported intensities. The location, the focal mechanism, and the depth of this earthquake, make it particularly interesting because the processes responsible for this kind of ruptures is still an open question. Moreover, it was also recorded by a local strong motion networks, allowing for the first time the possibility to study this kind of earthquakes using seismic and accelerographic data. We study the nature of this event using the aftershocks recorded by the Chilean Seismological Network and with a joint inversion of local strong-motion and teleseimic data, to understand the kinematic of rupture. Preliminary results suggest a singular stress condition in the subducted plate related to the transition from flat to normal subduction, which could be accommodated by strike-slip faulting. The strong motion analysis reveals high horizontal accelerations in agreement with high angle fault planes. Understand the tectonic setting associated to this type of earthquakes represents a relevant goal for seismic risk evaluation in the most populated Chilean region.

  3. 锆钢复合板反应器制作技术%Relative Manufacturing Technology on Zirconium- steel Clad Plate Reactor

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    汪雪涛; 高振宇

    2009-01-01

    Some key technology and method on the manufacturing zirconium - steel clad plate reactor is presented. This paper summarizes and compares some different solutions during the domestic manufacture process, then some comparative better solution were found out. These solution and technology is proved good for the equipment quality and the production etficiency through the manufacture practice and some relative analyze, so it's worth to be spread and referenced to other similar equipment manufacture.%介绍了锆钢复合板反应设备国产化过程中的一些重点技术.通过总结、比较的方法,得出较优的一些解决方案.通过实际生产应用的效果及原理分析,可以看出这些技术方案有利于保证设备质量并提高生产效率,对以后类似设备的制作具有推广及借鉴作用.

  4. Ultra-wideband ladder filters using zero-th shear mode plate wave in ultrathin LiNbO3 plate with apodized interdigital transducers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kadota, Michio; Tanaka, Shuji

    2016-07-01

    There are two kinds of plate waves propagating in a thin plate, Lamb and shear horizontal (SH) waves. The former has a velocity higher than 15,000 m/s when the plate is very thin. On the contrary, 0th SH (SH0) mode plate wave in an ultrathin LiNbO3 plate has an electro-mechanical coupling factor larger than 50%. Authors fabricated an ultra-wideband T-type ladder filter with a relative bandwidth (BW) of 41% using the SH0 mode plate wave. Although the BW of the filter fully covers the digital TV band in Japan, it does not have sufficient margin at the lower and higher end of BW. Besides, periodic small ripples due to transverse mode in pass-band of the filter were observed. In this study π-type ladder filters were fabricated by changing the pitch ratio of interdigital transducer (IDT) of parallel and series arm resonators (PR(IDT)) to control the BW, and by apodizing IDTs to improve the periodic small ripples due to transverse mode. Ultra-wideband filters without periodic small transverse mode with ultrawide bandwidth from 41 to 49% were fabricated. The BWs fully cover ultrawide digital television bands in Japan and U.S.A. These filters with an ultrawide BW and a steep characteristic show the possibility to be applied to a reported cognitive radio system and other communication systems requiring an ultrawide BW.

  5. Geometry of the Cocos Plate Under North American Plate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perez-Campos, X.

    2015-12-01

    The Cocos plate subducts under the North American plate with a complex geometry, and previous seismicity studies revealed some of this complexity. However, details of the geometry and the depth that the plate penetrates werelargely unknown. Since 2004, temporary experiments and the expansion of the permanent network of the Servicio Sismológico Nacional (SSN, Mexican National Seismological Service) have improved resolution of the plate geometry and have helped to map its descent into the upper mantle. Going from northwest to southeast, the Cocos plate appears to be fragmenting into north and south segments. The north segment subducts with an angle of ~30º and the south with an angle of ~10-15º. The transition is smooth near the trench and progresses to a tear at depth; this coincides with the projection of the Orozco Fracture Zone to depth. Also, this transition marks the limit of the presence to the south of an ultra slow velocity layer (USL) on top of the slab.South of this transition, the Cocos plate subducts horizontally , underplating the North American plate for a distance of ~140 to ~300 km from the trench. Along this horizontal region, silent slow events (SSE) and tectonic tremor (TT) have been observed. At a distance of 300 km from the trench (beneath central Mexico), the plate dives into the mantle with an angle of 76º to a depth of 500 km. This geometry changes abruptly to the south, marking the eastern limit of the USL. This change seems to be also characterized by a tear on the slab. Finally to the south, the Cocos plate subducts with a constant angle of 26º. This presentation summarizes the work of many contributors including A. Arciniega-Ceballos, M. Brudzinski, E. Cabral-Cano, T. Chen, R. Clayton,F. Cordoba-Montiel,P. Davis,S. Dougherty,F. Green, M. Gurnis, D. V. Helmberger, A. Husker,A. Iglesias, Y. Kim, V. Manea, D. Melgar, M. Rodríguez-Domínguez,S. K. Singh, T.-R. A. Song, C. M. Valdés-González, D. Valencia-Cabrera

  6. Rainbow trapping of ultrasonic guided waves in chirped phononic crystal plates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tian, Zhenhua; Yu, Lingyu

    2017-01-05

    The rainbow trapping effect has been demonstrated in electromagnetic and acoustic waves. In this study, rainbow trapping of ultrasonic guided waves is achieved in chirped phononic crystal plates that spatially modulate the dispersion, group velocity, and stopband. The rainbow trapping is related to the progressively slowing group velocity, and the extremely low group velocity near the lower boundary of a stopband that gradually varies in chirped phononic crystal plates. As guided waves propagate along the phononic crystal plate, waves gradually slow down and finally stop forward propagating. The energy of guided waves is concentrated at the low velocity region near the stopband. Moreover, the guided wave energy of different frequencies is concentrated at different locations, which manifests as rainbow guided waves. We believe implementing the rainbow trapping will open new paradigms for guiding and focusing of guided waves. Moreover, the rainbow guided waves with energy concentration and spatial separation of frequencies may have potential applications in nondestructive evaluation, spatial wave filtering, energy harvesting, and acoustofluidics.

  7. Decomposition of the Two Lowest Lamb Modes in a Bonded Plate

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王小民; 廉国选; 李明轩

    2003-01-01

    Based on the expression of the dispersion equation of Lamb waves in an adhesive two-layered plate presented in our previous paper [Chin. Phys. Lett. 18(2001)1483], the two lowest Lamb modes, the symmetric mode So and the antisymmetric mode Ao are successfully decomposed in the low-frequency regime. Relations between the rigidity of the bond and the velocity of the two Lamb modes are found, which lay a foundation for the estimation of the bond rigidity of the adhesive plate. The influence of the variations of the bond rigidity in terms of the stiffness constants KN and KT of the spring model on the velocity of the two Lamb modes is discussed and numerically evaluated. Numerical results indicate that the deterioration of the bond rigidity causes the phase velocity decrease for Lamb modes of the two lowest order, thus having a possibility for the evaluation of the bonding state of the adhesive plate by using ultrasonic wave velocity measurement.

  8. 1D Modeling of a Bifacial Silicon Solar Cell under Frequency Modulation Monochromatic Illumination: Determination of the Equivalent Electrical Circuit Related to the Surface Recombination Velocity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. Ly Diallo

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available We present in this study the determination of the equivalent electrical circuits associated to the recombination velocities for a bifacial silicon solar cell under frequency modulation and monochromatic illumination. This determination is based on Bode and Nyquist diagrams that is the variations of the phase and the module of the back surface and intrinsic junction recombination velocities. Their dependence on illumination wavelength is also shown.

  9. Kinematics of the Suez-Sinai area from combined GPS velocity field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pietrantonio, G.; Devoti, R.; Mahmoud, S.; Riguzzi, F.

    2016-12-01

    A combined GPS velocity solution covering a wide area from Egypt to Middle East allowed us to infer the current rates across the main, already well known, tectonic features. We have estimated 126 velocities from time series of 90 permanent and 36 non permanent GPS sites located in Africa (Egypt), Eurasia and Arabia plates in the time span 1996-2015, the largest available for the Egyptian sites. We have combined our velocity solution in a least-squares sense with two other recent velocity solutions of networks located around the eastern Mediterranean, obtaining a final IGb08 velocity field of about 450 sites. Then, we have estimated the IGb08 Euler poles of Africa, Sinai and Arabia, analyzing the kinematics of the Sinai area, particular velocity profiles, and estimating the 2D strain rate field. We show that it is possible to reliably model the rigid motion of Sinai block only including some GPS sites located south of the Carmel Fault. The estimated relative motion with respect to Africa is of the order of 2-3 mm/yr, however there is a clear mismatch between the modeled and the observed velocities in the southern Sinai sites. We have also assessed the NNE left shear motion along the Dead Sea Transform Fault, estimating a relative motion between Arabia and Africa of about 6 mm/yr in the direction of the Red Sea opening.

  10. Minimum Length - Maximum Velocity

    CERN Document Server

    Panes, Boris

    2011-01-01

    We study a framework where the hypothesis of a minimum length in space-time is complemented with the notion of reference frame invariance. It turns out natural to interpret the action of the obtained reference frame transformations in the context of doubly special relativity. As a consequence of this formalism we find interesting connections between the minimum length properties and the modified velocity-energy relation for ultra-relativistic particles. For example we can predict the ratio between the minimum lengths in space and time using the results from OPERA about superluminal neutrinos.

  11. High-resolution reconstructions of Pacific-North America plate motion: 20 Ma to present

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeMets, C.; Merkouriev, S.

    2016-11-01

    We present new rotations that describe the relative positions and velocities of the Pacific and North America plates at 22 times during the past 19.7 Myr, offering ≈1-Myr temporal resolution for studies of the geotectonic evolution of western North America and other plate boundary locations. Derived from ≈18 000 magnetic reversal, fracture zone and transform fault identifications from the Pacific-Antarctic-Nubia-North America plate circuit and the velocities of 935 GPS sites on the Pacific and North America plates, the new rotations and GPS-derived angular velocity indicate that the rate of motion between the two plates increased by ≈70 per cent from 19.7 to 9±1 Ma, but changed by less than 2 per cent since 8 Ma and even less since 4.2 Ma. The rotations further suggest that the relative plate direction has rotated clockwise for most of the past 20 Myr, with a possible hiatus from 9 to 5 Ma. This conflicts with previously reported evidence for a significant clockwise change in the plate direction at ≈8-6 Ma. Our new rotations indicate that Pacific plate motion became obliquely convergent with respect to the San Andreas Fault of central California at 5.2-4.2 Ma, in agreement with geological evidence for a Pliocene onset of folding and faulting in central California. Our reconstruction of the northern Gulf of California at 6.3 Ma differs by only 15-30 km from structurally derived reconstructions after including 3-4 km Myr-1 of geodetically measured slip between the Baja California Peninsula and Pacific plate. This implies an approximate 15-30 km upper bound for plate non-rigidity integrated around the global circuit at 6.3 Ma. A much larger 200±54 km discrepancy between our reconstruction of the northern Gulf of California at 12 Ma and that estimated from structural and marine geophysical observations suggests that faults in northwestern Mexico or possibly west of the Baja California Peninsula accommodated large amounts of obliquely divergent dextral shear

  12. Global crustal movement and tectonic plate boundary deformation constrained by the ITRF2008

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhu Ze

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available On the basis of the newly released International Terrestrial Reference Frame(ITRF2008 by the International Earth Rotation Service (IERS, a new global plate model ITRF2008 plate for the major plates is established. This ITRF2008-derived model is analyzed in comparison with NNR-NUVEL1A model, which is mainly based on geological and geophysical data. The Eurasia and Pacific plates display obvious differences in terms of the velocity fields derived from the two plate motion models. Plate acceleration is also introduced to characterize the differences of the two velocity fields which obtained from ITRF2008 -plate and NNR-NUVEL1A models for major individual plates. The results show that the Africa, South America and Eurasia plates are undergoing acceleration, while the North America and Australia plates are in the state of deceleration motion.

  13. Simultaneous Local and Teleseismic P-Wave Velocity Tomography in Western Mexico

    Science.gov (United States)

    Escudero, C. R.; Alarcon, E.; Ochoa, J.; Nuñez-Cornu, F. J.

    2015-12-01

    In western Mexico, the subduction of the Rivera and Cocos plates beneath the North America plate has deformed and fragmented the overriding plate, forming several structural rifts and crustal blocks. To improve the current tomographic images of the continental crust and uppermost mantle in this complex area, we used P-wave arrivals of local and teleseismic earthquakes along with the Fast Marching Method tomography technique. Our traveltime datasets include 2100 local earthquakes P-wave arrival times and 5,062 P-wave relative arrival time residuals of teleseismic earthquakes. The local earthquake phase picking was manually corrected and the relative arrival time residuals were estimated using the Multi-Channel Cross-Correlation method. All earthquakes occurred between 2006 and 2007 and were recorded by seismic stations deployed during the Mapping the Rivera Subduction Zone (MARS) experiment. The temporal seismic network consisted of 50 stations equipped with Streckeisen STS-2 and Quanterra Q330. We use an iterative nonlinear tomographic procedure and the fast marching method to map the residual patterns as P wave velocity anomalies. We followed an inversion scheme consisting of: (1) selection of a local and teleseismic earthquake, (2) estimation of improved 1-D reference velocity model, and (3) checkerboard testing to determine the optimum configuration of the velocity nodes, and inversion parameters, finally (4) perform final tomography and results analysis.

  14. Processless offset printing plates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sanja Mahović Poljaček

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available With the implementation of platesetters in the offset printing plate making process, imaging of the printing plate became more stable and ensured increase of the printing plate quality. But as the chemical processing of the printing plates still highly influences the plate making process and the graphic reproduction workflow, development of printing plates that do not require chemical processing for offset printing technique has been one of the top interests in graphic technology in the last few years. The main reason for that came from the user experience, where majority of the problems with plate making process could be connected with the chemical processing of the printing plate. Furthermore, increased environmental standards lead to reducing of the chemicals used in the industrial processes. Considering these facts, different types of offset printing plates have been introduced to the market today. This paper presents some of the processless printing plates.

  15. N-terminal pro-brain natriuretic peptide is related with coronary flow velocity reserve and diastolic dysfunction in patients with asymmetric hypertrophic cardiomyopathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tesic, Milorad; Seferovic, Jelena; Trifunovic, Danijela; Djordjevic-Dikic, Ana; Giga, Vojislav; Jovanovic, Ivana; Petrovic, Olga; Marinkovic, Jelena; Stankovic, Sanja; Stepanovic, Jelena; Ristic, Arsen; Petrovic, Milan; Mujovic, Nebojsa; Vujisic-Tesic, Bosiljka; Beleslin, Branko; Vukcevic, Vladan; Stankovic, Goran; Seferovic, Petar

    2017-10-01

    The relations of elevated N-terminal pro-brain natriuretic peptide (NT-pro-BNP) and cardiac ischemia in hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM) patients is uncertain. Therefore we designed the study with the following aims: (1) to analyze plasma concentrations of NT-pro-BNP in various subsets of HCM patients; (2) to reveal the correlations of NT-pro-BNP, myocardial ischemia, and diastolic dysfunction; (3) to assess predictors of the elevated plasma levels of NT-pro-BNP. In 61 patients (mean age 48.9±16.3 years; 26 male) with asymmetric HCM plasma levels of NT-pro-BNP were obtained. Standard transthoracic examination, tissue Doppler echocardiography with measurement of transthoracic coronary flow velocity reserve (CFVR) in left anterior descending artery (LAD) was done. Mean natural logarithm value of NT-pro-BNP was 7.11±0.95pg/ml [median value 1133 (interquartile range 561-2442)pg/ml]. NT-pro-BNP was significantly higher in patients with higher NYHA class, in obstructive HCM, more severe mitral regurgitation, increased left atrial volume index (LAVI), presence of calcified mitral annulus, elevated left ventricular (LV) filling pressure and in decreased CFVR. Levels of NT-pro-BNP significantly correlated with the ratio of E/e' (r=0.534, ppro-BNP. Plasma levels of NT-pro-BNP were significantly higher in HCM patients with more advanced disease. Elevated NT-pro-BNP not only reflects the diastolic impairment of the LV, but it might also be the result of cardiac ischemia in patients with HCM. Copyright © 2017 Japanese College of Cardiology. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Instantaneous velocity profile measurements in a turbulent boundary layer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robinson, S. K.

    1986-01-01

    Instantaneous wall shear stress and streamwise velocities have been measured simultaneously in a flat-plate, turbulent boundary layer at moderate Reynolds number in an effort to provide experimental support for large eddy simulations. Data were obtained using a buried-wire, wall shear gage and a hot-wire rake positioned in the log region of the flow. Fluctuations of the instantaneous U(+) versus Y(+) profiles about a mean law of the wall are shown to be significant and complex. Peak cross-correlation values between wall shear stress and the velocities are high, and reflect the passage of a large structure inclined at a small angle to the wall. Estimates of this angle are consistent with those made by other investigators. Conditional sampling techniques were used to detect the passage of various sizes and types of flow disturbances (events), and to estimate their mean frequency of occurrence. Events characterized by large aand sudden streamwise accelerations were found to be highly coherent throughout the log region and were strongly correlated with large fluctuations in wall shear stress. Phase randomness between the near-wall quantities and the outer velocities was small. The results suggest that the flow events detected by conditional sampling applied to velocities in the log region may be related to the bursting process.

  17. Longitudinal wave motion in width-constrained auxetic plates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lim, Teik-Cheng

    2016-05-01

    This paper investigates the longitudinal wave velocity in auxetic plates in comparison to conventional ones, in which the plate is constrained from motion in the width direction. By taking into account the thickness change of the plate and its corresponding change in density, the developed wave velocity is casted not only as a function of Young’s modulus and density, but also in terms of Poisson’s ratio and longitudinal strain. Results show that density and thickness variations compensate for one another when the Poisson’s ratio is positive, but add up when the Poisson’s ratio is negative. Results also reveal that the classical model of longitudinal wave velocity for the plate is accurate when the Poisson’s ratio is about 1/3; at this Poisson’s ratio the influence from density and thickness variations cancel each other. Comparison between the current corrected model and the density-corrected Rayleigh-Lamb model reveals a number of consistent trends, while the discrepancies are elucidated. If the plate material possesses a negative Poisson’s ratio, the deviation of the actual wave velocity from the classical model becomes significant; auxeticity suppresses and enhances the wave velocity in compressive and tensile impacts, respectively. Hence the use of the corrected model is proposed when predicting longitudinal waves in width-constrained auxetic plates, and auxetic materials can be harnessed for effectively controlling wave velocities in thin-walled structures.

  18. Oblique Impact of Projectile on Thin Aluminium Plates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    W.U. Khan

    2003-04-01

    Full Text Available Experiments were performed, wherein cylindrical projectiles made of hardened steel were impacted on commercially available aluminium plates at different angles. Projectiles were of 12.8 mm diameter and plates were of 0.81 mm, 1.52mm and 1.91mm thicknesses. Based on the experimental results, an analytical model has been developed to predict the residual velocity of the projectile and the ballistic limit of the plate.

  19. Abrupt plate accelerations shape rifted continental margins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brune, Sascha; Williams, Simon E.; Butterworth, Nathaniel P.; Müller, R. Dietmar

    2016-08-01

    Rifted margins are formed by persistent stretching of continental lithosphere until breakup is achieved. It is well known that strain-rate-dependent processes control rift evolution, yet quantified extension histories of Earth’s major passive margins have become available only recently. Here we investigate rift kinematics globally by applying a new geotectonic analysis technique to revised global plate reconstructions. We find that rifted margins feature an initial, slow rift phase (less than ten millimetres per year, full rate) and that an abrupt increase of plate divergence introduces a fast rift phase. Plate acceleration takes place before continental rupture and considerable margin area is created during each phase. We reproduce the rapid transition from slow to fast extension using analytical and numerical modelling with constant force boundary conditions. The extension models suggest that the two-phase velocity behaviour is caused by a rift-intrinsic strength-velocity feedback, which can be robustly inferred for diverse lithosphere configurations and rheologies. Our results explain differences between proximal and distal margin areas and demonstrate that abrupt plate acceleration during continental rifting is controlled by the nonlinear decay of the resistive rift strength force. This mechanism provides an explanation for several previously unexplained rapid absolute plate motion changes, offering new insights into the balance of plate driving forces through time.

  20. Abrupt plate accelerations shape rifted continental margins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brune, Sascha; Williams, Simon E; Butterworth, Nathaniel P; Müller, R Dietmar

    2016-08-11

    Rifted margins are formed by persistent stretching of continental lithosphere until breakup is achieved. It is well known that strain-rate-dependent processes control rift evolution, yet quantified extension histories of Earth's major passive margins have become available only recently. Here we investigate rift kinematics globally by applying a new geotectonic analysis technique to revised global plate reconstructions. We find that rifted margins feature an initial, slow rift phase (less than ten millimetres per year, full rate) and that an abrupt increase of plate divergence introduces a fast rift phase. Plate acceleration takes place before continental rupture and considerable margin area is created during each phase. We reproduce the rapid transition from slow to fast extension using analytical and numerical modelling with constant force boundary conditions. The extension models suggest that the two-phase velocity behaviour is caused by a rift-intrinsic strength--velocity feedback, which can be robustly inferred for diverse lithosphere configurations and rheologies. Our results explain differences between proximal and distal margin areas and demonstrate that abrupt plate acceleration during continental rifting is controlled by the nonlinear decay of the resistive rift strength force. This mechanism provides an explanation for several previously unexplained rapid absolute plate motion changes, offering new insights into the balance of plate driving forces through time.

  1. Pulse Wave Velocity and its Related Factors in Hypertensive Patients%高血压患者脉搏波速度及相关因素分析

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张晏; 杨书文; 朱玲; 马兰军; 宋悦华; 刘德平

    2009-01-01

    目的 探讨高血压患者脉搏波速度(PWV)及其影响因素.方法 共入选179例,分为高血压组和非高血压组,使用VP-1000全自动动脉硬化测定仪测定其双侧肱踝PWV(BaPWV),并测定血脂各项,血肌酐、尿素氮,血尿酸及晨尿尿微量白蛋白.比较高血压组和非高血压组PWV及尿微量白蛋白.并将各因素与PWV进行多元逐步回归分析.结果 高血压组右侧PWV(RPWV)均值为(1568±250)cm/s,左侧PWV(LPWV)均值为(1572±261)cm/s;非高血压组PWV均值分别为(1440±193)cm/s和(1440±202)cm/s.高血压组的PWV和尿微量白蛋白均明显高于非高血压组(P<0.01,P<0.05).多因素分析显示年龄、收缩压、高血压、尿微量白蛋白与PWV独立相关.结论 年龄、收缩压、尿微量白蛋白、高血压是PWV的独立影响因素.%Objective To investigate pulse wave velocity (PWV) in hypertensive patients and evaluate its related factors.Method 179 subjects were divided into hypertension(HTN) group and non-hypertension (NHTN) group according to whether he or she had hypertension or not.Left and right Brachial-ankle PWV(BaPWV) were measured by VP-1000 automatic arterial stiffness determinator.Blood chemistry and microalbuminuria were measured.Both PWV and microalbuminuria were compared between two groups.Multiple stepwise regression method was used to analyze PWV and all possible related factors.Results Both PWV and microalbuminuria in HTN group were higher than those in NHTN group (P<0.001,P<0.05).Multiple stepwise regression analysis demonstrated that age,systolic blood pressure,hypertension and microalbuminuria were correlated with PWV independently.Conclusion Age,microalbuminuria,systolic blood pressure and hypertension are independent influentid factors of PWV.

  2. Dark Matter Velocity Spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Speckhard, Eric G; Ng, Kenny C Y; Beacom, John F; Laha, Ranjan

    2016-01-22

    Dark matter decays or annihilations that produce linelike spectra may be smoking-gun signals. However, even such distinctive signatures can be mimicked by astrophysical or instrumental causes. We show that velocity spectroscopy-the measurement of energy shifts induced by relative motion of source and observer-can separate these three causes with minimal theoretical uncertainties. The principal obstacle has been energy resolution, but upcoming experiments will have the precision needed. As an example, we show that the imminent Astro-H mission can use Milky Way observations to separate possible causes of the 3.5-keV line. We discuss other applications.

  3. Dark Matter Velocity Spectroscopy

    CERN Document Server

    Speckhard, Eric G; Beacom, John F; Laha, Ranjan

    2016-01-01

    Dark matter decays or annihilations that produce line-like spectra may be smoking-gun signals. However, even such distinctive signatures can be mimicked by astrophysical or instrumental causes. We show that velocity spectroscopy-the measurement of energy shifts induced by relative motion of source and observer-can separate these three causes with minimal theoretical uncertainties. The principal obstacle has been energy resolution, but upcoming and proposed experiments will make significant improvements. As an example, we show that the imminent Astro-H mission can use Milky Way observations to separate possible causes of the 3.5-keV line. We discuss other applications.

  4. Measurement of the velocity of a quantum object: A role of phase and group velocities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lapinski, Mikaila; Rostovtsev, Yuri V.

    2017-08-01

    We consider the motion of a quantum particle in a free space. Introducing an explicit measurement procedure for velocity, we demonstrate that the measured velocity is related to the group and phase velocities of the corresponding matter waves. We show that for long distances the measured velocity coincides with the matter wave group velocity. We discuss the possibilities to demonstrate these effects for the optical pulses in coherently driven media or for radiation propagating in waveguides.

  5. Nonlinear active control of damaged piezoelectric smart laminated plates and damage detection

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Fu Yi-ming; RUAN Jian-li

    2008-01-01

    Considering mass and stiffness of piezoelectric layers and damage effects of composite layers,nonlinear dynamic equations of damaged piezoelectric smart laminated plates are derived.The derivation is based on the Hamilton's principle,the higherorder shear deformation plate theory, von Karman type geometrically nonlinear straindisplacement relations,and the strain energy equivalence theory.A negative velocity feedback control algorithm coupling the direct and converse piezoelectric effects is used to realize the active control and damage detection with a closed control loop. Simply supported rectangular laminated plates with immovable edges are used in numerical computation.Influence of the piezoelectric layers'location on the vibration control is investigated.In addition,effects of the degree and location of damage on the sensor output voltage are discussed.A method for damage detection is introduced.

  6. Fast fluid-flow events within a subduction-related vein system in oceanic eclogite: implications for pore fluid pressure at the plate interface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taetz, Stephan; John, Timm; Bröcker, Michael; Spandler, Carl; Stracke, Andreas

    2017-04-01

    been completed within ca. 3 years. The short-lived, pulse-like character of this process is in accordance with the notion that fluid flow related to oceanic crust dehydration at the blueschist-to-eclogite transition contributes to or even dominates episodic pore fluid pressure increases at the plate interface which may trigger slip events reported from many subduction zones.

  7. Horizontally oriented plates in clouds

    CERN Document Server

    Bréon, François-Marie

    2011-01-01

    Horizontally oriented plates in clouds generate a sharp specular reflectance signal in the glint direction, often referred to as "subsun". This signal (amplitude and width) may be used to analyze the relative area fraction of oriented plates in the cloud top layer and their characteristic tilt angle to the horizontal. We make use of spaceborne measurements from the POLDER instrument to provide a statistical analysis of these parameters. More than half of the clouds show a detectable maximum reflectance in the glint direction, although this maximum may be rather faint. The typical effective fraction (area weighted) of oriented plates in clouds lies between 10-3 and 10-2. For those oriented plates, the characteristic tilt angle is less than 1 degree in most cases. These low fractions imply that the impact of oriented plates on the cloud albedo is insignificant. The largest proportion of clouds with horizontally oriented plates is found in the range 500-700 hPa, in agreement with typical in situ observation of p...

  8. Low peripheral nerve conduction velocities and amplitudes are strongly related to diabetic microvascular complications in type 1 diabetes: the EURODIAB Prospective Complications Study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Charles, M.; Soedamah-Muthu, S.S.; Tesfaye, S.; Fuller, J.H.; Arezzo, J.C.; Chaturvedi, N.; Witte, D.R.

    2010-01-01

    Objective: Slow nerve conduction velocity and reduction in response amplitude are objective hallmarks of diabetic sensorimotor polyneuropathy. As subjective or clinical indicators of neuropathy do not always match well with the presence of abnormal nerve physiology tests, we evaluated associations t

  9. The Relation between Relaxation Time, Mean Free Path, Collision Time and Drift Velocity--Pitfalls and a Proposal for an Approach Illustrating the Essentials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jakoby, Bernhard

    2009-01-01

    The collision model is frequently introduced to describe electronic conductivity in solids. Depending on the chosen approach, the introduction of the collision time can lead to erroneous results for the average velocity of the electrons, which enters the expression for the electrical conductivity. In other textbooks, correct results are obtained…

  10. Effect of plate bending on the Urey ratio and the thermal evolution of the mantle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davies, Geoffrey F.

    2009-10-01

    The bending of tectonic plates as they subduct causes resistance to plate motions and mantle convection. It has been proposed that this effect could keep plate velocities relatively constant with time, and it would imply relatively high mantle temperatures through much of Earth history and relatively rapid cooling at present. It also implies a low Urey ratio, compatible with that inferred from cosmochemistry. Here it is confirmed that bending resistance only plays a significant role if plate thickness is determined mainly by dehydration stiffening accompanying melting, rather than by conductive cooling. Even then the bending resistance is quite sensitive to the radius of curvature of the subducting plate. Observed radii are generally larger than the 200 km assumed in some studies, ranging up to 600 km or more. Furthermore radii of curvature tend to adjust so as to prevent bending resistance from becoming large. When these factors are accounted for, calculations show that bending resistance is unlikely to have been a large factor through Earth history, and the thermal evolution of the mantle is unlikely to have been affected very much. The resolution of the Urey ratio problem should then be sought elsewhere.

  11. Travel times of P and S from the global digital seismic networks: Implications for the relative variation of P and S velocity in the mantle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bolton, H.; Masters, G.

    2001-01-01

    We present new data sets of P and S arrival times which have been handpicked from long-period vertical and transverse component recordings of the various global seismic networks. Using events which occurred from 1976 to 1994 results in ???38,000 globally well-distributed measurements of teleseismic P and ???41,000 measurements of S. These data are particularly useful for looking at the relative variation of S and P velocities in the lower mantle. We describe both the measurement techniques and the gross characteristics of the data sets. The size of our data sets allows us to exploit the internal consistency of the data to identify outliers using a summary ray analysis. Since the polarity of each arrival is also known, we can construct fault plane solutions and J.or compare with polarities predicted by the Harvard centroid moment tensor solutions to further diagnose phase misidentification. This analysis results in ???5% of the data being identified as outliers. An analysis of variance indicates that the S residual travel times are dominated by the effects of three-dimensional structure but the P data have comparable contributions from noise and source mislocation effects. The summary ray analysis reveals the basic character of lower mantle structure, and there are large-scale patterns in both the S and P data sets that correlate quite well with each other. This analysis suggests that on average, d ln vS J.d. In vP is an increasing function of depth in the mantle going from a value of ???1.7 at the top of the lower mantle to an apparent value of 4 near the base of the mantle. This latter extreme value of R seems to result mainly from data which sample one region in the lowermost mantle under the central Pacific, where large positive S residuals are associated with very small P residuals. Such an anomaly cannot be thermal in origin. Copyright 2001 by the American Geophysical Union.

  12. Shear wave velocity structure in North America from large-scale waveform inversions of surface waves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alsina, D.; Woodward, R. L.; Snieder, R. K.

    1996-07-01

    A two-step nonlinear and linear inversion is carried out to map the lateral heterogeneity beneath North America using surface wave data. The lateral resolution for most areas of the model is of the order of several hundred kilometers. The most obvious feature in the tomographic images is the rapid transition between low velocities in the tectonically active region west of the Rocky Mountains and high velocities in the stable central and eastern shield of North America. The model also reveals smaller-scale heterogeneous velocity structures. A high-velocity anomaly is imaged beneath the state of Washington that could be explained as the subducting Juan de Fuca plate beneath the Cascades. A large low-velocity structure extends along the coast from the Mendocino to the Rivera triple junction and to the continental interior across the southwestern United States and northwestern Mexico. Its shape changes notably with depth. This anomaly largely coincides with the part of the margin where no lithosphere is consumed since the subduction has been replaced by a transform fault. Evidence for a discontinuous subduction of the Cocos plate along the Middle American Trench is found. In central Mexico a transition is visible from low velocities across the Trans-Mexican Volcanic Belt (TMVB) to high velocities beneath the Yucatan Peninsula. Two elongated low-velocity anomalies beneath the Yellowstone Plateau and the eastern Snake River Plain volcanic system and beneath central Mexico and the TMVB seem to be associated with magmatism and partial melting. Another low-velocity feature is seen at depths of approximately 200 km beneath Florida and the Atlantic Coastal Plain. The inversion technique used is based on a linear surface wave scattering theory, which gives tomographic images of the relative phase velocity perturbations in four period bands ranging from 40 to 150 s. In order to find a smooth reference model a nonlinear inversion based on ray theory is first performed. After

  13. Shear wave velocity structure in North America from large-scale waveform inversions of surface waves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alsina, D.; Woodward, R.L.; Snieder, R.K.

    1996-01-01

    A two-step nonlinear and linear inversion is carried out to map the lateral heterogeneity beneath North America using surface wave data. The lateral resolution for most areas of the model is of the order of several hundred kilometers. The most obvious feature in the tomographic images is the rapid transition between low velocities in the technically active region west of the Rocky Mountains and high velocities in the stable central and eastern shield of North America. The model also reveals smaller-scale heterogeneous velocity structures. A high-velocity anomaly is imaged beneath the state of Washington that could be explained as the subducting Juan de Fuca plate beneath the Cascades. A large low-velocity structure extends along the coast from the Mendocino to the Rivera triple junction and to the continental interior across the southwestern United States and northwestern Mexico. Its shape changes notably with depth. This anomaly largely coincides with the part of the margin where no lithosphere is consumed since the subduction has been replaced by a transform fault. Evidence for a discontinuous subduction of the Cocos plate along the Middle American Trench is found. In central Mexico a transition is visible from low velocities across the Trans-Mexican Volcanic Belt (TMVB) to high velocities beneath the Yucatan Peninsula. Two elongated low-velocity anomalies beneath the Yellowstone Plateau and the eastern Snake River Plain volcanic system and beneath central Mexico and the TMVB seem to be associated with magmatism and partial melting. Another low-velocity feature is seen at depths of approximately 200 km beneath Florida and the Atlantic Coastal Plain. The inversion technique used is based on a linear surface wave scattering theory, which gives tomographic images of the relative phase velocity perturbations in four period bands ranging from 40 to 150 s. In order to find a smooth reference model a nonlinear inversion based on ray theory is first performed. After

  14. Chladni's patterns for random vibration of a plate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crandall, S. H.; Wittig, L. E.

    1972-01-01

    A typical Chladni pattern for pure tone excitation is shown. The aluminum plate used is clamped in a steel frame. The measured fundamental frequency is 13 Hz. The random vibration of a taut spring is discussed together with the random vibration of a thin plate and approximations for the modal sum. The Chladni pattern for wide band excitation applied at a certain point is shown together with the predicted distribution of mean square velocity as a function of the y coordinate of the plate and the experimentally measured distribution of mean square velocity as a function of y.

  15. Next-generation plate-tectonic reconstructions using GPlates

    OpenAIRE

    2011-01-01

    Plate tectonics is the kinematic theory that describes the large-scale motions and events of the outermost shell of the solid Earth in terms of the relative motions and interactions of large, rigid, interlocking fragments of lithosphere called tectonic plates. Plates form and disappear incrementally over time as a result of tectonic processes. There are currently about a dozen major plates on the surface of the Earth, and many minor ones. The present-day configuration of tectonic plates is il...

  16. Create Your Plate

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... steps to get started: Using your dinner plate, put a line down the middle of the plate. ... vegetables . Now in one of the small sections, put grains and starchy foods. See this list of ...

  17. Create Your Plate

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Your Plate It's simple and effective for both managing diabetes and losing weight. Creating your plate lets ... 2016 Articles from Diabetes Forecast® magazine: wcie-meal-planning, In this section Food Planning Meals Diabetes Meal ...

  18. Create Your Plate

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Your Plate Gluten Free Diets Meal Planning for Vegetarian Diets Cook with Heart-Healthy Foods Holiday Meal ... Healthy Diet Create Your Plate Meal Planning for Vegetarian Diets Gluten Free Diets Holiday Meal Planning Cook ...

  19. Food guide plate

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... chips or cookies. VEGETABLES: MAKE HALF OF YOUR PLATE FRUITS AND VEGETABLES Vegetables can be raw, fresh, ... as a snack. FRUITS: MAKE HALF OF YOUR PLATE FRUITS AND VEGETABLES Fruits can be fresh, canned, ...

  20. Growth Plate Fractures

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... the most widely used by doctors is the Salter-Harris system, described below. Type I Fractures These ... incidence of growth plate fractures peaks in adolescence. Salter-Harris classification of growth plate fractures. AAOS does ...

  1. Create Your Plate

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Planning Meals Diabetes Meal Plans Create Your Plate Gluten Free Diets Meal Planning for Vegetarian Diets Cook ... Create Your Plate Meal Planning for Vegetarian Diets Gluten Free Diets Holiday Meal Planning Cook with Heart- ...

  2. Create Your Plate

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Planning Meals Diabetes Meal Plans Create Your Plate Gluten Free Diets Meal Planning for Vegetarian Diets Cook ... Create Your Plate Meal Planning for Vegetarian Diets Gluten Free Diets Holiday Meal Planning Cook with Heart- ...

  3. Create Your Plate

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Your Plate It's simple and effective for both managing diabetes and losing weight. Creating your plate lets you still choose the foods you want, but changes the portion sizes so you are getting larger ...

  4. Create Your Plate

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Your Plate It's simple and effective for both managing diabetes and losing weight. Creating your plate lets ... Sleeve Custom jerseys for your Tour de Cure team benefits the cause. Ask the Experts: Learn to ...

  5. Global Plate Driving Forces at 50Ma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Butterworth, N. P.; Quevedo, L. E.; Müller, R. D.

    2011-12-01

    We apply a novel workflow utilising the BEM-Earth geodynamic software to analyse the global coupled plate-mantle dynamics at 50 Ma. A subduction history model based on kinematic data going as far back as 80 Ma was developed using the GPlates software. Advection of the plates into the mantle takes into account the absolute plate motions and lithospheric thickness derived from its age to produce an estimated density heterogeneity initial model condition in the upper mantle. The resulting global model consists of regions of a mantle viscosity and density structure that is post-processed to ensure smooth non-overlapping 3D surfaces. BEM-Earth is then free to evolve the model toward the 50 Ma solution. The evolution of the model is driven by self-consistent buoyancy driven mantle dynamics. We use the model velocity output to quantify changes in forces driving the plates before and after 50 Ma. We analyse the rapid change in plate motion of India, Africa and plates in the Pacific Ocean basin by considering slab-pull, ridge-push and mantle drag/suction forces that naturally result from such top-down driven mantle flow. We compare the results with plate kinematic reconstructions and other geological observations.

  6. Using the Mesozoic History of the Canadian Cordillera as a Case Study in Teaching Plate Tectonics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chamberlain, Valerie Elaine

    1989-01-01

    Reviews a model used in the teaching of plate tectonics which includes processes and concepts related to: terranes and the amalgamation of terranes, relative plate motion and oblique subduction, the effects of continent-continent collision, changes in plate motion, plate configuration, and the type of plate boundary. Diagrams are included.…

  7. Using the Mesozoic History of the Canadian Cordillera as a Case Study in Teaching Plate Tectonics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chamberlain, Valerie Elaine

    1989-01-01

    Reviews a model used in the teaching of plate tectonics which includes processes and concepts related to: terranes and the amalgamation of terranes, relative plate motion and oblique subduction, the effects of continent-continent collision, changes in plate motion, plate configuration, and the type of plate boundary. Diagrams are included.…

  8. Create Your Plate

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Reset Plate Share Create Your Plate ! Share: Seven Simple Steps to Create Your Plate It's simple and effective for both managing diabetes and losing ... en.html Have Type 2 Diabetes? Our free program will help you live well. More from diabetes. ...

  9. Obliquity along plate boundaries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Philippon, Mélody; Corti, Giacomo

    2016-12-01

    Most of the plate boundaries are activated obliquely with respect to the direction of far field stresses, as roughly only 8% of the plate boundaries total length shows a very low obliquity (ranging from 0 to 10°, sub-orthogonal to the plate displacement). The obliquity along plate boundaries is controlled by (i) lateral rheological variations within the lithosphere and (ii) consistency with the global plate circuit. Indeed, plate tectonics and magmatism drive rheological changes within the lithosphere and consequently influence strain localization. Geodynamical evolution controls large-scale mantle convection and plate formation, consumption, and re-organization, thus triggering plate kinematics variations, and the adjustment and re-orientation of far field stresses. These geological processes may thus result in plate boundaries that are not perpendicular but oblique to the direction of far field stresses. This paper reviews the global patterns of obliquity along plate boundaries. Using GPlate, we provide a statistical analysis of present-day obliquity along plate boundaries. Within this framework, by comparing natural examples and geological models, we discuss deformation patterns and kinematics recorded along oblique plate boundaries.

  10. Evolution of Eocene to Oligocene arc-related volcanism in the North Patagonian Andes (39-41°S), prior to the break-up of the Farallon plate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iannelli, Sofía B.; Litvak, Vanesa D.; Fernández Paz, Lucía; Folguera, Andrés; Ramos, Miguel E.; Ramos, Víctor A.

    2017-01-01

    Voluminous Paleogene magmatic rocks (44 to 29 Ma) are found in a retroarc position in the Northern Patagonian to Southern Central Andes ( 39-42°S), whose origin remains controversial. Geochemical data in these Eocene to Oligocene volcanic associations are herein used to unravel their origin and understand changes in subduction parameters. Geochemical signatures indicate arc-related associations and reflect changing geodynamic boundary conditions of the Andean margin through time. In particular, Eocene magmatism ( 44 Ma; Pilcaniyeu Belt) shows an alkaline-like signature and limited slab influence. Reported contemporaneous within-plate magmatism ( 47-43 Ma) in an easternmost position reflects a more typical enriched source. Oligocene arc-like volcanism ( 29 Ma; El Maitén Belt), which developed in an extensional retroarc setting, shows a higher contribution from slab-derived fluids and a calc-alkaline source. A comparison with younger arc-related magmas from the region ( 26-20 Ma), emplaced in an intra- to retroarc position (Cura Mallín and Abanico basins), indicates a progressive increase in slab-signature, associated with a tholeiitic magma source. We propose that these compositional variations could be directly related to changes in plate configuration before and after the Farallon plate break-up and the initiation of a more orthogonal convergence typical of the present Andean-type subduction zone.

  11. Second law analysis of a plate heat exchanger with an axial dispersive wave

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar Das, Sarit; Roetzel, Wilfried

    A second law analysis is presented for thermally dispersive flow through a plate heat exchanger. It is well known that in plate or plate fin type heat exchangers the backmixing and other deviations from plug flow contribute significantly to the inefficiency of the heat exchanger, which is of importance to heat exchangers working in the cryogenic regime. The conventional axial heat dispersion model which is used so far is found to be better than `plug flow' model but still unsatisfactory where the timescale related to heat transfer is comparable with the thermal relaxation time for the propagation of dispersion. The present work therefore considers dispersion as a wave phenomenon propagating with a finite velocity. The study discusses the nature of variation of different contributions to total exergy loss in the heat exchanger with respect to dispersion parameters of the Peclet number and propagation velocity of the dispersive wave. The practical example of the single-pass plate heat exchanger demonstrates how a second law optimization can be carried out for heat transfer equipment under such conditions.

  12. Vestibular-related frontal cortical areas and their roles in smooth-pursuit eye movements: representation of neck velocity, neck-vestibular interactions and memory-based smooth-pursuit

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kikuro eFukushima

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Smooth-pursuit eye movements are voluntary responses to small slow-moving objects in the fronto-parallel plane. They evolved in primates, who possess high-acuity foveae, to ensure clear vision about the moving target. The primate frontal cortex contains two smooth-pursuit related areas; the caudal part of the frontal eye fields (FEF and the supplementary eye fields (SEF. Both areas receive vestibular inputs. We review functional differences between the two areas in smooth-pursuit. Most FEF pursuit neurons signal pursuit parameters such as eye velocity and gaze-velocity, and are involved in cancelling the vestibulo-ocular reflex by linear addition of vestibular and smooth-pursuit responses. In contrast, gaze-velocity signals are rarely represented in the SEF. Most FEF pursuit neurons receive neck velocity inputs, while discharge modulation during pursuit and trunk-on-head rotation adds linearly. Linear addition also occurs between neck velocity responses and vestibular responses during head-on-trunk rotation in a task-dependent manner. During cross-axis pursuit-vestibular interactions, vestibular signals effectively initiate predictive pursuit eye movements. Most FEF pursuit neurons discharge during the interaction training after the onset of pursuit eye velocity, making their involvement unlikely in the initial stages of generating predictive pursuit. Comparison of representative signals in the two areas and the results of chemical inactivation during a memory-based smooth-pursuit task indicate they have different roles; the SEF plans smooth-pursuit including working memory of motion-direction, whereas the caudal FEF generates motor commands for pursuit eye movements. Patients with idiopathic Parkinson’s disease were asked to perform this task, since impaired smooth-pursuit and visual working memory deficit during cognitive tasks have been reported in most patients. Preliminary results suggested specific roles of the basal ganglia in memory

  13. VISAS AND GREEN PLATES

    CERN Multimedia

    2000-01-01

    From 3 April 2000, all questions relating to visa requests for Switzerland, France, or Russia for a member of the personnel must be addressed to Ms. Agnita Querrou (telephone 72838, office 5-2-019, e-mail Agnita.Querrou@cern.ch).The Users' Office continues to deal with requests for letters of invitation and questions concerning visas for users in EP Division.Questions relating to removals, requests for green plates, to privileges of members of the personnel and to the importation of vehicles are still dealt with by Ms Zuzana Miller (telephone 79257, office 33-1-017, e-mail Zuzana.Muller@cern.ch) and Ms Joëlle Belleman (telephone 73962, office 33-1-019, e-mail Joelle.Belleman@cern.ch).

  14. Steel plates and concrete filled composite shear walls related nuclear structural engineering: Experimental study for out-of-plane cyclic loading

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Xiaohu [The College of Architecture and Civil Engineering, Beijing University of Technology, Beijing 100124 (China); Li, Xiaojun, E-mail: beerli@vip.sina.com [The College of Architecture and Civil Engineering, Beijing University of Technology, Beijing 100124 (China); Institute of Geophysics, China Earthquake Administration, Beijing 100081 (China)

    2017-04-15

    Based on the program of CAP1400 nuclear structural engineering, the out-of-plane seismic behavior of steel plate and concrete infill composite shear walls (SCW) was investigated. 6 1/5 scaled specimens were conducted which consist of 5 SCW specimens and 1 reinforced concrete (RC) specimen. The specimens were tested under out-of-plane cyclic loading. The effect of the thickness of steel plate, vertical load and the strength grade of concrete on the out-of-plane seismic behavior of SCW were analyzed. The results show that the thickness of steel plate and vertical load have great influence on the ultimate bearing capacity and lateral stiffness, however, the influence of the strength grade of concrete was little within a certain range. SCW is presented to have a better ultimate capacity and lateral stiffness but have worse ductility in failure stage than that of RC. Based on the experiment, the cracking load of concrete infill SCW was analyzed in theory. The modified calculation formula of the cracking load was made, the calculated results showed good agreement with the test results. The formula can be used as the practical design for the design of cracking loads.

  15. Development of a beam ion velocity detector for the heavy ion beam probe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fimognari, P. J.; Crowley, T. P.; Demers, D. R.

    2016-11-01

    In an axisymmetric plasma, the conservation of canonical angular momentum constrains heavy ion beam probe (HIBP) trajectories such that measurement of the toroidal velocity component of secondary ions provides a localized determination of the poloidal flux at the volume where they originated. We have developed a prototype detector which is designed to determine the beam angle in one dimension through the detection of ion current landing on two parallel planes of detecting elements. A set of apertures creates a pattern of ion current on wires in the first plane and solid metal plates behind them; the relative amounts detected by the wires and plates determine the angle which beam ions enter the detector, which is used to infer the toroidal velocity component. The design evolved from a series of simulations within which we modeled ion beam velocity changes due to equilibrium and fluctuating magnetic fields, along with the ion beam profile and velocity dispersion, and studied how these and characteristics such as the size, cross section, and spacing of the detector elements affect performance.

  16. Analytical solution for multilayer plates using general layerwise plate theory

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vuksanović Đorđe M.

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper deals with closed-form solution for static analysis of simply supported composite plate, based on generalized laminate plate theory (GLPT. The mathematical model assumes piece-wise linear variation of in-plane displacement components and a constant transverse displacement through the thickness. It also include discrete transverse shear effect into the assumed displacement field, thus providing accurate prediction of transverse shear stresses. Namely, transverse stresses satisfy Hook's law, 3D equilibrium equations and traction free boundary conditions. With assumed displacement field, linear strain-displacement relation, and constitutive equations of the lamina, equilibrium equations are derived using principle of virtual displacements. Navier-type closed form solution of GLPT, is derived for simply supported plate, made of orthotropic laminae, loaded by harmonic and uniform distribution of transverse pressure. Results are compared with 3D elasticity solutions and excellent agreement is found.

  17. High-velocity clouds

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wakker, BP; vanWoerden, H

    1997-01-01

    High-velocity clouds (HVCs) consist of neutral hydrogen (HI) at velocities incompatible with a simple model of differential galactic rotation; in practice one uses \\v(LSR)\\ greater than or equal to 90 km/s to define HVCs. This review describes the main features of the sky and velocity distributions,

  18. Transverse Spectral Velocity Estimation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Jørgen Arendt

    2014-01-01

    A transverse oscillation (TO)-based method for calculating the velocity spectrum for fully transverse flow is described. Current methods yield the mean velocity at one position, whereas the new method reveals the transverse velocity spectrum as a function of time at one spatial location. A convex...

  19. Water wave scattering by an elastic thin vertical plate submerged in finite depth water

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chakraborty, Rumpa; Mandal, B. N.

    2013-12-01

    The problem of water wave scattering by a thin vertical elastic plate submerged in uniform finite depth water is investigated here. The boundary condition on the elastic plate is derived from the Bernoulli-Euler equation of motion satisfied by the plate. Using the Green's function technique, from this boundary condition, the normal velocity of the plate is expressed in terms of the difference between the velocity potentials (unknown) across the plate. The two ends of the plate are either clamped or free. The reflection and transmission coefficients are obtained in terms of the integrals' involving combinations of the unknown velocity potential on the two sides of the plate, which satisfy three simultaneous integral equations and are solved numerically. These coefficients are computed numerically for various values of different parameters and depicted graphically against the wave number in a number of figures.

  20. Coupling between plate vibration and acoustic radiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frendi, Abdelkader; Maestrello, Lucio; Bayliss, Alvin

    1993-01-01

    A detailed numerical investigation of the coupling between the vibration of a flexible plate and the acoustic radiation is performed. The nonlinear Euler equations are used to describe the acoustic fluid while the nonlinear plate equation is used to describe the plate vibration. Linear, nonlinear, and quasi-periodic or chaotic vibrations and the resultant acoustic radiation are analyzed. We find that for the linear plate response, acoustic coupling is negligible. However, for the nonlinear and chaotic responses, acoustic coupling has a significant effect on the vibration level as the loading increases. The radiated pressure from a plate undergoing nonlinear or chaotic vibrations is found to propagate nonlinearly into the far field. However, the nonlinearity due to wave propagation is much weaker than that due to the plate vibrations. As the acoustic wave propagates into the far field, the relative difference in level between the fundamental and its harmonics and subharmonics decreases with distance.

  1. Newly velocity field of Sulawesi Island from GPS observation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarsito, D. A.; Susilo, Simons, W. J. F.; Abidin, H. Z.; Sapiie, B.; Triyoso, W.; Andreas, H.

    2017-07-01

    Sulawesi microplate Island is located at famous triple junction area of the Eurasian, India-Australian, and Philippine Sea plates. Under the influence of the northward moving Australian plate and the westward motion of the Philippine plate, the island at Eastern part of Indonesia is collide and with the Eurasian plate and Sunda Block. Those recent microplate tectonic motions can be quantitatively determine by GNSS-GPS measurement. We use combine GNSS-GPS observation types (campaign type and continuous type) from 1997 to 2015 to derive newly velocity field of the area. Several strategies are applied and tested to get the optimum result, and finally we choose regional strategy to reduce error propagation contribution from global multi baseline processing using GAMIT/GLOBK 10.5. Velocity field are analyzed in global reference frame ITRF 2008 and local reference frame by fixing with respect alternatively to Eurasian plate - Sunda block, India-Australian plate and Philippine Sea plates. Newly results show dense distribution of velocity field. This information is useful for tectonic deformation studying in geospatial era.

  2. Acoustic measurements above a plate carrying Lamb waves

    CERN Document Server

    Talberg, Andreas Sørbrøden

    2016-01-01

    This article presents a set of acoustic measurements conducted on the Statoil funded Behind Casing Logging Set-Up, designed by SINTEF Petroleum Research to resemble an oil well casing. A set of simple simulations using COMSOL Multiphysics were also conducted and the results compared with the measurements. The experiments consists of measuring the pressure wave radiated of a set of Lamb waves propagating in a 3 mm thick steel plate, using the so called pitch-catch method. The Lamb waves were excited by a broadband piezoelectric immersion transducer with center frequency of 1 MHz. Through measurements and analysis the group velocity of the fastest mode in the plate was found to be 3138.5 m/s. Measuring the wave radiated into the water in a grid consisting of 8x33 measuring points, the spreading of the plate wave normal to the direction of propagation was investigated. Comparing the point where the amplitude had decreased 50 % relative to the amplitude measured at the axis pointing straight forward from the tran...

  3. Transient vibration of thin viscoelastic orthotropic plates

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    J. Soukup; F. Vale(s); J. Volek; J. Sko(c)ilas

    2011-01-01

    This article deals with solutions of transient vibration of a rectangular viscoelastic orthotropic thin 2D plate for particular deformation models according to Flügge and Timoshenko-Mindlin. The linear model, a general standard viscoelastic body, of the rheologic properties of a viscoelastic material was applied. The time and coordinate curves of the basic quantities displacement, rotation, velocity, stress and deformation are compared. The results obtained by an approximate analytic method are compared with numerical results for 3D plate generated by FEM application and with experimental investigation.

  4. 影响胎儿大脑中动脉血流峰速的临床相关因素%Related clinical effect factors of peak velocity of blood flow of fetal middle cerebral artery

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    凌奕; 金松; 南瑞霞; 华少萍; 张宏玉; 胡春霞; 莫秀兰

    2011-01-01

    Objective: To analyze the related clinical effect factors of peak velocity of blood flow of fetal middle cerebral artery ( MCA) , provide a basis for predicting fetal anemia by peak velocity of blood flow of MCA. Methods; 140 fetuses from the hospital were analyzed and divided into normal control group (85 fetuses), uncomplicated twin group (22 fetuses) , thalassemia group (IS fetuses) and fetal anomaly group (18 fetuses) , all the fetuses received color Doppler examination of peak velocity of blood flow of MCA and hemoglobin detection. MOM value was used as the unit, the differences of peak velocities of blood flow of MCA and fetal hemoglobin contents among the four groups were analyzed. Results; There was no significant difference in peak velocity of blood flow of MCA and fetal hemoglobin content between uncomplicated twin group and single pregnancy group. In thalassemia group, the peak velocity of blood flow of MCA increased significantly , while fetal hemoglobin content decreased. Compared with normal single pregnancy group, the peak velocity of blood flow of MCA in fetal anomaly group increased significantly (P < 0. 05 ) , but after exclusing anemia fetuses, there is no significant difference in the peak velocity of blood flow of MCA between fetal anomaly non - anemia group and normal single pregnancy group. Conclusion: The peak velocity of blood flow of MCA is significantly related to fetal anemia, but there was no correlation between peak velocity of blood now of MCA and un-complicated twin pregnancy; the study shows that there is no significant difference in the peak velocity of blood flow of MCAbetween fetal anomaly non - anemia group and normal single pregnancy group after exclusing anemia fetuses, a further study with large samples is needed.%目的:分析影响胎儿大脑中动脉血流峰速(MCA-PSV)的临床相关因素,为应用MCA-PSV预测胎儿贫血提供依据.方法:对海南医学院附属医院140例胎儿进行临

  5. Evidence for fast seismic lid structure beneath the Californian margin and its implication on regional plate deformation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lai, V. H.; Graves, R. W.; Wei, S.; Helmberger, D. V.

    2015-12-01

    The lithospheric structure of the Pacific and North American plates play an important role in modulating plate deformation along the California margin. Pure path models indicate that the Pacific plate has a fast thick (80km) lid overlaying a strong low velocity zone (LVZ) extending to beyond 300 km depth. In contrast, the North America structure is characterized by a relatively thin (25-35km) lid and a shallow LVZ. Vertical ray paths have similar travel times across the plate boundary for the two models, making resolution of the transitional structure difficult. Earthquakes such as the 2014 March 10 Mw 6.8 Mendocino and 2014 August 25 Mw 6.0 Napa events recorded at regional distances across California provide an opportunity to study horizontal paths and track the lateral variation in the lower crust-uppermost mantle structure under the Californian margin. Observations from both Napa and Mendocino events show direct SH-wave arrivals at Southern California Seismic Network (SCSN) stations are systematically earlier (up to 10 s) for coastal and island stations relative to inland sites. The shift in SH arrival times may be due to features such as varying crustal thickness, varying upper mantle velocity and the presence of a fast seismic lid. To test the different hypotheses, we perform extensive forward modeling using both 1-D frequency-wavenumber and 3-D finite-difference approaches. The model that best fits the SH arrival times has a fast lid (Vs = 4.7 km/s) underlying the whole California margin, with the lid increasing in thickness from east to west to a maximum thickness about 70 km in the western offshore region. The fast, thick seismic lid lends strength and rigidity to the Pacific plate lithosphere in contrast with the weaker North American continental plate, which influences the overall plate deformation along the Californian margin and is in agreement with GPS measurements.

  6. An evaluation of the Johnson-Cook model to simulate puncture of 7075 aluminum plates.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Corona, Edmundo; Orient, George Edgar

    2014-02-01

    The objective of this project was to evaluate the use of the Johnson-Cook strength and failure models in an adiabatic finite element model to simulate the puncture of 7075- T651 aluminum plates that were studied as part of an ASC L2 milestone by Corona et al (2012). The Johnson-Cook model parameters were determined from material test data. The results show a marked improvement, in particular in the calculated threshold velocity between no puncture and puncture, over those obtained in 2012. The threshold velocity calculated using a baseline model is just 4% higher than the mean value determined from experiment, in contrast to 60% in the 2012 predictions. Sensitivity studies showed that the threshold velocity predictions were improved by calibrating the relations between the equivalent plastic strain at failure and stress triaxiality, strain rate and temperature, as well as by the inclusion of adiabatic heating.

  7. Experimental Investigation on the Ballistic Resistace of Metal Plates Subjected to Impact of Rigid Projectiles

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG Wei; DENG Yun-fei; CAO Zong-sheng

    2012-01-01

    The ballistic performance of monolithic and multi-layered steel plates impacted by ogival-nosed projectiles was investigated by using a gas gun experimentally.The total thickness of in-contact multi-layered target was equally to that of monolithic target.The results show that,for the high strength targets,the monolithic targets have greater ballistic limit velocities than multi-layered targets,and also the ballistic limit velocities of targets decrease with the increase of the number of layers.However,for the low strength targets,the monolithic targets have lower ballistic limit velocities than multi-layered targets.The differences in target capacity between various impact conditions can be related to the transitions of perforation mechanisms and failure models.

  8. Kinematics of the Ethiopian Rift and Absolute motion of Africa and Somalia Plates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muluneh, A. A.; Cuffaro, M.; Doglioni, C.

    2013-12-01

    The Ethiopian Rift (ER), in the northern part of East African Rift System (EARS), forms a boundary zone accommodating differential motion between Africa and Somalia Plates. Its orientation was influenced by the inherited Pan-African collisional system and related lithospheric fabric. We present the kinematics of ER derived from compilation of geodetic velocities, focal mechanism inversions, structural data analysis, and construction of geological profiles. GPS velocity field shows a systematic eastward magnitude increase in NE direction in the central ER. In the same region, incremental extensional strain axes recorded by earthquake focal mechanism and fault slip inversion show ≈N1000E orientation. This deviation between GPS velocity trajectories and orientation of incremental extensional strain is developed due to left lateral transtensional deformation. This interpretation is consistent with the en-échelon pattern of tensional and transtensional faults, the distribution of the volcanic centers, and the asymmetry of the rift itself. Small amount of vertical axis blocks rotation, sinistral strike slip faults and dyke intrusions in the rift accommodate the transtensional deformation. We analyzed the kinematics of ER relative to Deep and Shallow Hot Spot Reference Frames (HSRF). Comparison between the two reference frames shows different kinematics in ER and also Africa and Somalia plate motion both in magnitude and direction. Plate spreading direction in shallow HSRF (i.e. the source of the plumes locates in the asthenosphere) and the trend of ER deviate by about 27°. Shearing and extension across the plate boundary zone contribute both to the style of deformation and overall kinematics in the rift. We conclude that the observed long wavelength kinematics and tectonics are consequences of faster SW ward motion of Africa than Somalia in the shallow HSRF. This reference frame seems more consistent with the geophysical and geological constraints in the Rift. The

  9. Special relativity as classical kinematics of a particle with the upper bound on its speed. Part II. The general Lorentz transforrmation and the generalized velocity composition theorem

    CERN Document Server

    Granik, Alex

    2014-01-01

    The kinematics of a particle with the upper bound on the particle's speed (a modification of classical kinematics where such a restriction is absent) has been developed in [arXiv:1204.5740]. It was based solely on classical mechanics without employing any concepts , associated with the time dilatation or/and length contraction. It yielded the 1-D Lorentz transformation (LT), free of inconsistencies (inherent in the canonical derivation and interpretations of the LT). Here we apply the same approach to derive the LT for the 3-dimensional motion of a particle and the attendant law of velocity composition. As a result, the infinite set of four-parameter transformations is obtained. The requirement of linearity of these transformations selects out of this set the two-parameter subset . The values of the remaining two parameters ,dictated by physics of the motion, is explicitly determined , yielding the canonical form of the 3-dimensional LT. The generalized law of velocity composition and the attendant invariant ...

  10. Measurements of Spatially Resolved Velocity Variations in Shock Compressed Heterogeneous Materials Using a Line-Imaging Velocity Interferometer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    ASAY,JAMES R.; CHHABILDAS,LALIT C.; KNUDSON,MARCUS D.; TROTT,WAYNE M.

    1999-09-01

    Relatively straightforward changes in the optical design of a conventional optically recording velocity interferometer system (ORVIS) can be used to produce a line-imaging velocity interferometer wherein both temporal and spatial resolution can be adjusted over a wide range. As a result line-imaging ORVIS can be tailored to a variety of specific applications involving dynamic deformation of heterogeneous materials as required by the characteristic length scale of these materials (ranging from a few {micro}m for ferroelectric ceramics to a few mm for concrete). A line-imaging ORVIS has been successfully interfaced to the target chamber of a compressed gas gun driver and fielded on numerous tests in combination with simultaneous measurements using a dual delay-leg, ''push-pull'' VISAR system. These tests include shock loading of glass-reinforced polyester composites, foam reverberation experiments (measurements at the free surface of a thin aluminum plate impacted by foam), and measurements of dispersive velocity in a shock-loaded explosive simulant (sugar). Comparison of detailed spatially-resolved material response to the spatially averaged VISAR measurements will be discussed.

  11. Modeling Fragment Simulating Projectile Penetration into Steel Plates Using Finite Elements and Meshfree Particles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    James O’Daniel

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Simulating fragment penetration into steel involves complicated modeling of severe behavior of the materials through multiple phases of response. Penetration of a fragment-like projectile was simulated using finite element (FE and meshfree particle formulations. Extreme deformation and failure of the material during the penetration event were modeled with several approaches to evaluate each as to how well it represents the actual physics of the material and structural response. A steel Fragment Simulating Projectile (FSP – designed to simulate a fragment of metal from a weapon casing – was simulated for normal impact into a flat square plate. A range of impact velocities was used to examine levels of exit velocity ranging from relatively small to one on the same level as the impact velocity. The numerical code EPIC, used for all the simulations presented herein, contains the element and particle formulations, as well as the explicit methodology and constitutive models needed to perform these simulations. These simulations were compared against experimental data, evaluating the damage caused to the projectile and the target plates, as well as comparing the residual velocity when the projectile perforated the target.

  12. Apparatus and method for explosive bonding to edge of flyer plate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bement, Laurence J.; Kushnick, Anne C.

    1991-09-01

    The invention is an apparatus and a process for the explosive joining of a flyer plate and a base plate. The apparatus consists of a flyer plate positioned over a base plate. The flyer plate has a notch containing a filler material in intimate contact with the flyer plate. An adhesive means holds a ribbon explosive partially overlapping the notch in the flyer plate. A detonating means initiates the ribbon explosive that drives the flyer plate to accomplish a high velocity, angular collision between the mating surfaces. This collision creates surface melts and effacing bonding, resulting in electron sharing linkups between the plates. An unbonded tab fractures at a base of the notch leaving a bond to an edge of the attached flyer plate.

  13. Strong lateral variations of S-wave velocity in the upper mantle across the western Alps

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lyu, Chao; Pedersen, Helle; Paul, Anne; Zhao, Liang

    2016-04-01

    Absolute S-wave velocity gives more insight into temperature and mineralogy than relative P-wave velocity variations (ΔV p/ V p) imaged by teleseismic traveltime tomography. Moreover, teleseismic P-wave tomography has poor vertical but good horizontal resolution. By contrast, the inversion of surface waves dispersion data gives absolute S-wave velocity with a good vertical but relatively poor horizontal resolution. However, the horizontal resolution of surface wave imaging can be improved by using closely spaced stations in mini-arrays. In this work, we use Rayleigh wave phase velocity dispersion data to measure absolute S-wave velocities beneath the CIFALPS profile across the French-Italian western Alps. We apply the array processing technique proposed by Pedersen et al. (2003) to derive Rayleigh wave phase dispersion curves between 20 s and 100 s period in 15 mini-arrays along the CIFALPS line. We estimate a 1-D S-wave velocity model at depth 50-150 km beneath each mini-array by inverting the dispersion curves jointly with receiver functions. The joint inversion helps separating the crustal and mantle contributions in the inversion of dispersion curves. Distinct lithospheric structures and marked lateral variations are revealed beneath the study region, correlating well with regional geological and tectonic features. The average S-wave velocity from 50 to 150 km depth beneath the CIFALPS area is ˜4.48km/s, almost the same as in model AK135, indicating a normal upper mantle structure in average. Lateral variations are dominated by relatively low velocities (˜4.4km/s) in the mantle of the European plate, very low velocities (4.0km/s, i.e. approximately 12% lower than AK135) beneath the Dora Maira internal crystalline massif and high velocities (˜ 5.0km/s, i.e. 12% higher than AK135) beneath the Po plain. The lateral variations of S-wave velocity perturbation show the same features as the P wave tomography (Zhao et al., submitted), but with different amplitudes

  14. Transient 3D elastodynamic field in an embedded multilayered anisotropic plate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mora, Pierric; Ducasse, Eric; Deschamps, Marc

    2016-07-01

    The aim of this paper is to study the ultrasonic response to a transient source that radiates ultrasonic waves in a 3D embedded multilayered anisotropic and dissipative plate. The source can be inside the plate or outside, in a fluid loading the plate for example. In the context of Non-Destructive Testing applied to composite materials, our goal is to create a robust algorithm to calculate ultrasonic field, irrespective of the source and receiver positions. The principle of the method described in this paper is well-established. This method is based on time analysis using the Laplace transform. In the present work, it has been customized for computing ultrasonic source interactions with multilayered dissipative anisotropic plates. The fields are transformed in the 2D Fourier wave-vector domain for the space variables related to the plate surface, and they are expressed in the partial-wave basis. Surprisingly, this method has been very little used in the ultrasonic community, while it is a useful tool which complements the much used technique based on generalized Lamb wave decomposition. By avoiding mode analysis - which can be problematic in some cases - exact numerical calculations (i.e., approximations by truncating infinite series that may be poorly convergent are not needed) can be made in a relatively short time for immersed plates and viscoelastic layers. Even for 3D cases, numerical costs are relatively low. Special attention is given to separate up- and down-going waves, which is a simple matter when using the Laplace transform. Numerical results show the effectiveness of this method. Three examples are presented here to investigate the quality of the model and the robustness of the algorithm: first, a comparison of experiment and simulation for a monolayer carbon-epoxy plate, where the diffracted field is due to a source located on the first free surface of the sample, for both dissipative and non-dissipative cases; second, the basic configuration of an

  15. Global Plate Motions and Their Impact on the Earth's Surface Area Change

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Cao Shuai; Zhang Keliang; Wei Dongping

    2010-01-01

    Based on their Euler polea,we calculated the relative velocities between every two plates in the typical global plate motion models,respectively,and estimated the area change along these boundaries.In our calculations.plates on both sides accommodated area changes depending on the boundary types:extensional,convergent or transform,so we can estimate area change of each plate and then globally.Our preliminary results show that the area of the southern hemisphere increased while that of the northern hemisphere decreased over the past 1 million years,and global area has increased by 26,000km2 to 36,000km2,which corresponds to the 160m~250m increment on the Earth's radius if all these area increments are attributed to Earth's expansion.Taking the NUVEL-1 model as an example,of the 14 plates in this model,11 are decreasing,but the global area has increased because of the larger increment amount from Africa,North America and Antarctica.Finally,we also discussed factors affecting the global area change such as subduction zone retreating and back-arc spreading.

  16. Influence of mean grain size with ultrasonic velocity on microhardness of B{sub 4}C–Fe–Ni composite

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Özkan, Vildan, E-mail: v.ozkan@alparslan.edu.tr [Muş Alparslan University, Physics Dept., Muş (Turkey); Sarpün, İsmail H. [Afyon Kocatepe University, Physics Dept., Afyonkarahisar (Turkey); Erol, Ayhan [Afyon Kocatepe University, Technology Faculty, Afyonkarahisar (Turkey); Yönetken, Ahmet [Afyon Kocatepe University, Electrical Engineering Dept., Afyonkarahisar (Turkey)

    2013-10-15

    Highlights: •B{sub 4}C–Fe–Ni composites have been developed powder metallurgy and electroless plating technique. •Ultrasound has been used for evaluating mechanical and physical properties samples. •Hardness and compressive strength show a peak around 1000 °C due to changings in structure. •Mean grain size have effects on velocity, attenuation, hardness and compressive strength. -- Abstract: Composite samples were produced from boron carbide, iron and nickel matrix powders by using a powder metallurgy and electroless plating technique. Prepared samples were sintered at the temperature of ranging from 800 °C–1200 °C under Ar shroud. Ultrasonic velocity, ultrasonic attenuation and rate of screen heights of peaks were determined according to the pulse-echo method by using 2 MHz and 4 MHz probes. SEM (Scanning Electron Microscope), compressive testing and hardness measurements were employed to characterize the properties of the samples. Ultrasonic velocity, ultrasonic attenuation and rate of screen heights of successive peaks have showed a linear relation with mean grain size of samples. The ultrasonic velocity has been correlated with the hardness and the compressive strength and sintering temperature. We see that the sharp decrease in the hardness and a rapid increase in the ultrasonic velocities versus sintering temperature are attributed to the increase in the amount of grain size.

  17. Ambient Noise Tomography of Southern California Images Dipping San Andreas-Parallel Structure and Low-Velocity Salton Trough Mantle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barak, S.; Klemperer, S. L.; Lawrence, J. F.

    2014-12-01

    Ambient noise tomography (ANT) images the entire crust but does not depend on the spatial and temporal distribution of events. Our ANT high-resolution 3D velocity model of southern California uses 849 broadband stations, vastly more than previous studies, and four years of data, 1997-1998, 2007, and 2011, chosen to include our own broadband Salton Seismic Imaging Project, a 40-station transect across the Salton Trough, as well as other campaign stations in both Mexico and the U.S.A., and permanent stations. Our shear-wave model has 0.05° x 0.05° lateral and 1 km vertical blocks. We used the Harvard Community Velocity Model (CVM-H) as the initial model for the inversion. We show significant differences relative to the CVM-H model, especially in the lower crust and upper mantle. We observe prominent low-velocity anomalies in the upper mantle under the Salton Buttes and Cerro Prieto geothermal fields, indicating high-temperatures and possibly partial-melt. Similar low-velocity zones have been previously observed along the Gulf of California. We also observe vertical to gradually dipping lateral velocity contrasts in the lower crust under the southern part of the San Andreas Fault. The east to northeast dip may represent crustal fabric sheared by movement of the Pacific plate under the North American plate prior to the initiation of transform motion.

  18. Turbulent Velocity Structure in Molecular Clouds

    CERN Document Server

    Ossenkopf, V; Ossenkopf, Volker; Low, Mordecai-Mark Mac

    2002-01-01

    We compare velocity structure observed in the Polaris Flare molecular cloud at scales ranging from 0.015 pc to 20 pc to the velocity structure of a suite of simulations of supersonic hydrodynamic and MHD turbulence computed with the ZEUS MHD code. We examine different methods of characterising the structure, including a scanning-beam size-linewidth relation, structure functions, velocity and velocity difference probability distribution functions (PDFs), and the Delta-variance wavelet transform, and use them to compare models and observations. The Delta-variance is most sensitive in detecting characteristic scales and varying scaling laws, but is limited in the observational application by its lack of intensity weighting. We compare the true velocity PDF in our models to simulated observations of velocity centroids and average line profiles in optically thin lines, and find that the line profiles reflect the true PDF better. The observed velocity structure is consistent with supersonic turbulence showing a com...

  19. Discovering plate boundaries: Laboratory and classroom exercises using geodetic data to develop students' understanding of plate motion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olds, S. E.

    2010-12-01

    To introduce the concept of plate boundaries, typical introductory geology exercises include students observing and plotting the location of earthquakes and volcanoes on a map to visually demarcate plate boundaries. Accompanying these exercises, students are often exposed to animations depicting the movement of Earth’s tectonic plates over time. Both of these teaching techniques are very useful for describing where the tectonics plates have been in the past, their shapes, and where the plates are now. With the integration of data from current geodetic techniques such as GPS, InSAR, LiDAR, students can learn that not only have the tectonic plates moved in the past, but they are moving, deforming, and changing shape right now. Additionally, GPS data can be visualized using time scales of days to weeks and on the scale of millimeters to centimeters per year. The familiar temporal and spatial scales of GPS data also help students understand that plate tectonics is a process that is happening in the present and can ease the transition to thinking about processes that are typically described using deep time, a very difficult concept for students to grasp. To provide a more robust learning environment, UNAVCO has been incorporating high-precision GPS data into free, place-based, data-rich learning modules for educators and students in introductory Earth science courses at secondary and undergraduate levels. These modules integrate new scientific discoveries related to crustal deformation and explore applications of GPS, LiDAR, and InSAR techniques to research. They also provide students with case studies highlighting the process of scientific discovery, providing context and meaning. Concurrent to these efforts, tools to visualize the inter-relationships of geophysical and geologic processes, structures, and measurements including high-precision GPS velocity data are an essential part of the learning materials. Among the suite of visualization tools that UNAVCO has made

  20. Numerical simulations of temperature, dehydration, and flow fields associated with subduction of the Cocos plate, and its relation to the occurrence of interplate seismic events in southern Mexico

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suenaga, N.; Ji, Y.; Yoshioka, S.; Manea, M.; Manea, V. C.

    2016-12-01

    In southern Mexico, tectonic tremors mainly occur in the "flat slab region, and the last three SSEs in southern Mexico occurred in the shallower region. Besides, there are two seismic gaps of megathrust earthquakes in Guerrero and Oaxaca. To investigate generation mechanisms of megathrust earthquakes, tectonic tremors, and slow slip events (SSEs) in southern Mexico, we performed three-dimensional numerical simulations of temperature and mantle flow associated with subduction of the Cocos plate, and estimated dehydrated water content from the subducting plate. Here we considered retreat of the Middle American trench initiating about 16 Ma as one of the generation mechanisms of the slab flattening. In our model, we introduced the trench retreat effect during only a certain period between 16 Ma and present in order to best fit the observed heat flow data (from Global Heat Flow Database) as well as Curie point depths defined by the 580 ° isotherm. Our preliminary results show that trench rollback has a strong influence on temperature distribution. Models with trench rollback induce a weaker mantle wedge convection cell compared with models with stationary trench. Other parameter that is currently investigated in this study is the rate of trench retreat.

  1. Velocity selective optical pumping

    OpenAIRE

    Aminoff, C. G.; Pinard, M.

    1982-01-01

    We consider optical pumping with a quasi monochromatic tunable light beam, in the low intensity limit where a rate equation regime is obtained The velocity selective optical pumping (V.S.O.P.) introduces a correlation between atomic velocity and internal variables in the ground (or metastable) state. The aim of this article is to evaluate these atomic observables (orientation, alignment, population) as a function of velocity, using a phenomenological description of the relaxation effect of co...

  2. Generalized Fibonacci zone plates

    CERN Document Server

    Ke, Jie; Zhu, Jianqiang

    2015-01-01

    We propose a family of zone plates which are produced by the generalized Fibonacci sequences and their axial focusing properties are analyzed in detail. Compared with traditional Fresnel zone plates, the generalized Fibonacci zone plates present two axial foci with equal intensity. Besides, we propose an approach to adjust the axial locations of the two foci by means of different optical path difference, and further give the deterministic ratio of the two focal distances which attributes to their own generalized Fibonacci sequences. The generalized Fibonacci zone plates may allow for new applications in micro and nanophotonics.

  3. Effect of nozzle-to-plate spacing on the development of a plane jet impinging on a heated plate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rim, Ben Kalifa; Saïd, Nejla Mahjoub; Bournot, Hervé; Le Palec, Georges

    2016-09-01

    An experimental investigation was carried out to study the behavior of a turbulent air jet impinging on a heated plate. The study of the flow field was performed using a particle image velocimetry. A three-dimensional numerical model with Reynolds stress model has been conducted to examine the global flow. Numerical results agree well with experimental data. The main properties of the fluid occurring between the nozzle and the flat plate are presented. In addition, the effect of the distance between the nozzle exit and the plate (h/e = 14 and 28) were investigated and detailed analysis of the dynamic, turbulent distribution and temperature fields were performed. The wall shear stress and the pressure fields near the heated plate are then explored. Results showed that the mean velocity and the heat transfer characteristics of small nozzle-to-plate spacing are significantly different from those of large nozzle-to-plate spacing.

  4. Velocity requirements for causality violation

    CERN Document Server

    Modanese, Giovanni

    2013-01-01

    It is known that the hypothetical existence of superluminal signals would imply the logical possibility of active causal violation: an observer in relative motion with respect to a primary source could in principle emit secondary superluminal signals (triggered by the primary ones) which go back in time and deactivate the primary source before the initial emission. This is a direct consequence of the structure of the Lorentz transformations, sometimes called "Regge-Tolman paradox". It is straightforward to find a formula for the velocity of the moving observer required to produce the causality violation. When applied to some recent claims of slight superluminal propagation, this formula yields a required velocity very close to the speed of light; this raises some doubts about the real physical observability of such violations. We re-compute this velocity requirement introducing a realistic delay between the reception of the primary signal and the emission of the secondary. It turns out that for -any- delay it...

  5. Signal velocity in oscillator arrays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cantos, C. E.; Veerman, J. J. P.; Hammond, D. K.

    2016-09-01

    We investigate a system of coupled oscillators on the circle, which arises from a simple model for behavior of large numbers of autonomous vehicles where the acceleration of each vehicle depends on the relative positions and velocities between itself and a set of local neighbors. After describing necessary and sufficient conditions for asymptotic stability, we derive expressions for the phase velocity of propagation of disturbances in velocity through this system. We show that the high frequencies exhibit damping, which implies existence of well-defined signal velocitiesc+ > 0 and c- < 0 such that low frequency disturbances travel through the flock as f+(x - c+t) in the direction of increasing agent numbers and f-(x - c-t) in the other.

  6. 3-D simulation for the tectonic evolution around the Kanto Region of Japan using the kinematic plate subduction model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hashima, A.; Sato, T.; Ito, T.; Miyauchi, T.; Kameo, K.; Yamamoto, S.

    2011-12-01

    In the Kanto region of Japan, we can observe one of the most active crustal deformations on the earth. In the southern part of the Boso peninsula to the south, the uplift rate is estimated to be 5 mm/yr from the height of marine terraces. From geological evidence, the Kanto mountains to the west are considered to uplift at 1mm/yr. In contrast, the center part of the Kanto region is stable or subsiding, covered by the Holocene sediments. The depth of the basement reaches 3 km at the deepest. Vertical deformation in the timescale of 1 Myr is being revealed by the analysis of the recent seismic reflection experiments compared with the heights of the dated sediment layers exposed on land. These crustal deformation occurs in a highly complex tectonic setting with four plates interacting with each other: beneath Kanto, situated on the Eurasian and North American plates, the Philippine sea plate subducts and the Pacific plate further descends beneath the North American and Philippine sea plates, forming the unique trench-trench-trench triple junction on the earth. In addition, the Izu-Bonin (Ogasawara) arc on the Philippine sea plate is colliding with the Japan islands due to the buoyancy of the arc crust. At the plate boundaries near the Izu-Bonin arc, large interplate earthquakes occurred at the Sagami trough in 1703 and 1923 (Kanto earthquake) and at the Nankai trough in 1707, 1854 and 1944. To reveal the crustal deformation under these plate-to-plate interactions, we use the kinematic plate subduction model based on the elastic dislocation theory. This model is based on the idea that mechanical interaction between plates can rationally be represented by the increase of the displacement discontinuity (dislocation) across plate interfaces. Given the 3-D geometry of plate interfaces, the distribution of slip rate vectors for simple plate subduction can be obtained directly from relative plate velocities. In collision zones, the plate with arc crust cannot easily descend

  7. Oblique wave scattering by a semi-infinite elastic plate with finite draft floating on a step topography

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    GUO Yunxia; LIU Yong; MENG Xun

    2016-01-01

    On the basis of a potential theory and Euler-Bernoulli beam theory, an analytical solution for oblique wave scattering by a semi-infinite elastic plate with finite draft floating on a step topography is developed using matched eigenfunction expansions. Different from previous studies, the effects of a wave incident angle, a plate draft, three different plate edge conditions (free, simply supported and built-in) and a sea-bottom topography are all taken into account. Moreover, the plate edge conditions are directly incorporated into linear algebraic equations for determining unknown expansion coefficients in velocity potentials, which leads to a simple and efficient solving procedure. Numerical results show that the convergence of the present solution is good, and an energy conservation relation is well satisfied. Also, the present predictions are in good agreement with known results for special cases. The effects of the wave incident angle, the plate draft, the plate edge conditions and the sea-bottom topography on various hydrodynamic quantities are analyzed. Some useful results are presented for engineering designs.

  8. Near-surface seismic velocity changes in a salt-dominated environment due to shaking and thermal stressing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richter, Tom; Sens-Schönfelder, Christoph; Kind, Rainer; Asch, Günter

    2014-05-01

    We report on results from a seismic station of the Integrated Plate Boundary Observatory Chile (IPOC) showing a superior sensitivity of seismic velocity changes in the surrounding medium to shaking and temperature. 5 years of daily autocorrelations of the IPOC network are analyzed with passive image interferometry. Due to the particular geological conditions we observe a high sensitivity of the medium around the station near Patache (PATCX) resulting in annual periodic velocity variations and temporary velocity reductions induced by ground shaking. We observe a linear relationship between the amplitude of the velocity reductions and the peak ground acceleration (PGA) of nearby earthquakes at station PATCX. Although velocity reductions are also observed at other stations of the IPOC array for the Mw 7.7 Tocopilla earthquake a clear relationship between the PGA of this earthquake and the induced velocity reductions at the different stations is not visible. Furthermore, we observe velocity variations with an annual and daily period. We present different arguments that these periodic changes are caused by variations of the atmospheric temperature. In this context we construct a model that starts at observed temperature variations and evaluates thermal stresses induced by the temperature gradients. Using radiative transfer based sensitivity kernels and third order elastic constants we relate the distribution of thermal stress in the subsurface to observable time shifts of coda waves. The model is able to reproduce the major features confirming that stress changes in the subsurface can be detected with noise based monitoring.

  9. Block modeling of crustal deformation in Tierra del Fuego from GNSS velocities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mendoza, L.; Richter, A.; Fritsche, M.; Hormaechea, J. L.; Perdomo, R.; Dietrich, R.

    2015-05-01

    The Tierra del Fuego (TDF) main island is divided by a major transform boundary between the South America and Scotia tectonic plates. Using a block model, we infer slip rates, locking depths and inclinations of active faults in TDF from inversion of site velocities derived from Global Navigation Satellite System observations. We use interseismic velocities from 48 sites, obtained from field measurements spanning 20 years. Euler vectors consistent with a simple seismic cycle are estimated for each block. In addition, we introduce far-field information into the modeling by applying constraints on Euler vectors of major tectonic plates. The difference between model and observed surface deformation near the Magallanes Fagnano Fault System (MFS) is reduced by considering finite dip in the forward model. For this tectonic boundary global plate circuits models predict relative movements between 7 and 9 mm yr- 1, while our regional model indicates that a strike-slip rate of 5.9 ± 0.2 mm yr- 1 is accommodated across the MFS. Our results indicate faults dipping 66- 4+ 6° southward, locked to a depth of 11- 5+ 5 km, which are consistent with geological models for the MFS. However, normal slip also dominates the fault perpendicular motion throughout the eastern MFS, with a maximum rate along the Fagnano Lake.

  10. Relation of Na+, K(+)-ATPase to delayed motor nerve conduction velocity: effect of aldose reductase inhibitor, ADN-138, on Na+, K(+)-ATPase activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hirata, Y; Okada, K

    1990-06-01

    The role of sorbitol, myo-inositol, and Na+, K(+)-adenosine triphosphatase (ATPase) activity on motor nerve conduction velocity (MNCV) in streptozotocin (STZ)-diabetic rats was studied. Reduction of MNCV and Na+, K(+)-ATPase in caudal nerves appeared after 3 weeks of diabetes, and at this time treatment with aldose reductase inhibitor (ARI), ADN-138 and 1% myo-inositol supplement was begun. One percent myo-inositol supplement for 3 weeks resulted in a significant increase in myo-inositol levels in diabetic nerves, but left MNCV and sorbitol levels unchanged. In contrast, treatment with ADN-138 for 3 weeks reduced sorbitol levels in diabetic nerves and resulted in significant increases in MNCV and Na+, K(+)-ATPase in the nerves. Since ADN-138 did not restore myo-inositol levels, the increase in Na+, K(+)-ATPase levels by ADN-138 treatment was independent of myo-inositol levels. Also, nerve Na+ levels in ADN-138-treated rats were reduced and the ratio of K+ to Na+ was raised, while 1% myo-inositol supplement did not affect them. These results suggest that treatment with ADN-138 elevates MNCV through a series of processes: ARI----reduction of sorbitol level----increase in Na+, K(+)-ATPase activity----correction of K+, Na+ imbalance----increase in MNCV.

  11. The relations of “go and stop” wave to car accidents in a cellular automaton with velocity-dependent randomization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Xian-Qing; Zhang, Wei; Qiu, Kang; Xu, Wen-tao; Tang, Gang; Ren, Lin

    2007-10-01

    In this paper we numerically study the probability Pac of the occurrence of traffic accidents in the Nagel-Schreckenberg (NS) model with velocity-dependent randomization (VDR). Numerical results show that there is a critical density over which car accidents occur, but below which no car accidents happen. Different from the accident probability in the NS model, the accident probability in the VDR model monotonously decreases with increase of car density above the critical density. The value of the accident probability is only determined by the stochastic noise and the number of cars on road. In the stochastic VDR model with the speed limit vmax=1, no critical density exists and car accidents happen in the whole density region. The braking probabilities of standing cars and moving cars have different influences on the accident probability. A mean-field theory reveals that the accident probability is proportional to the mean density of “go and stop” wave per time step. Theoretical analyses give excellent agreement with numerical results in the VDR model.

  12. "Half plate of rice to a male casual sexual partner, full plate belongs to the husband": Findings from a qualitative study on sexual behaviour in relation to HIV and AIDS in northern Tanzania

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mwanga Joseph R

    2011-12-01

    prevention need to be developed in close collaboration with affected communities and be closely related to policy-making and implementation; to go beyond the limited success of traditional behavioural and biomedical interventions to particularly address the underlying social and structural drivers of HIV risk and vulnerability in the study communities.

  13. Estimation of vector velocity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2000-01-01

    Using a pulsed ultrasound field, the two-dimensional velocity vector can be determined with the invention. The method uses a transversally modulated ultrasound field for probing the moving medium under investigation. A modified autocorrelation approach is used in the velocity estimation. The new...

  14. Estimation of vector velocity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2000-01-01

    Using a pulsed ultrasound field, the two-dimensional velocity vector can be determined with the invention. The method uses a transversally modulated ultrasound field for probing the moving medium under investigation. A modified autocorrelation approach is used in the velocity estimation. The new...

  15. Blue Willow Story Plates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fontes, Kris

    2009-01-01

    In the December 1997 issue of "SchoolArts" is a lesson titled "Blue Willow Story Plates" by Susan Striker. In this article, the author shares how she used this lesson with her middle-school students many times over the years. Here, she describes a Blue Willow plate painting project that her students made.

  16. Create Your Plate

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... In Memory In Honor Become a Member En Español Type 1 Type 2 About Us Online Community ... Page Text Size: A A A Listen En Español Create Your Plate Create Your Plate is a ...

  17. Create Your Plate

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Diabetes Meal Plans Create Your Plate Gluten Free Diets Meal Planning for Vegetarian Diets Cook with Heart-Healthy Foods Holiday Meal Planning ... Planning Meals Diabetes Meal Plans and a Healthy Diet Create Your Plate Meal Planning for Vegetarian Diets ...

  18. Plate Motions Predicted from Global Dynamic Models and Seismic Tomography: The Problem of North American Plate Motion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, S.; King, S. D.; Adam, C. M.

    2016-12-01

    Seismic tomography is a snapshot of the mantle convection system and provides important constraints on Earth's internal dynamics. An increasing number of global seismic tomography models along with various rheological structures have been used to compute mantle flow pattern and the resulting surface expressions, including dynamic topography and geoid. Accurately predicting the plate motion from the mantle dynamic models is a challenge particularly with the newest generation of seismic tomography models (e.g., S40RTS, SAVANI), especially for the North American plate which only has a little subduction along it's boundary. The difficulties include the uncertainty of the velocity-to-density scaling, discrepancies between different seismic tomography models, and the computational technology to solve for global mantle flow with observationally constrained high resolution models. We use the code ASPECT (Advanced Solver for Problems in Earth CovecTion) to make a series of tests to derive mantle flow pattern from different global seismic tomography models and rheological structures. We further make a quantitative statistical comparison between the modeled and observed plate motions in terms of flow magnitude, flow direction, and plateness within each plate area. We investigate how the velocity-to-density scaling, the features of seismic tomography models, and the lateral rheological structures of the lithosphere and upper mantle influence the modeled plate motions. We find that the velocity-to-density scaling mainly changes the flow magnitude and has little impact on the flow direction. The results of different seismic tomography models are similar broadly but can be quite different in some regions. The presence of lateral viscosity variations including stiff cratons, weak plate boundary zones, and high viscosity slabs along with density variations from seafloor age and subducting slabs can improve the fit to observed plate motions. With a very small fraction of subduction

  19. Near surface shear wave velocity in Bucharest, Romania

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. von Steht

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available Bucharest, the capital of Romania with nearly 2 1/2 million inhabitants, is endangered by the strong earthquakes in the Vrancea seismic zone. To obtain information on the near surface shear-wave velocity Vs structure and to improve the available microzonations we conducted seismic refraction measurements in two parks of the city. There the shallow Vs structure is determined along five profiles, and the compressional-wave velocity (Vp structure is obtained along one profile. Although the amount of data collected is limited, they offer a reasonable idea about the seismic velocity distribution in these two locations. This knowledge is useful for a city like Bucharest where seismic velocity information so far is sparse and poorly documented. Using sledge-hammer blows on a steel plate and a 24-channel recording unit, we observe clear shear-wave arrivals in a very noisy environment up to a distance of 300 m from the source. The Vp model along profile 1 can be correlated with the known near surface sedimentary layers. Vp increases from 320 m/s near the surface to 1280 m/s above 55–65 m depth. The Vs models along all five profiles are characterized by low Vs (<350 m/s in the upper 60 m depth and a maximum Vs of about 1000 m/s below this depth. In the upper 30 m the average Vs30 varies from 210 m/s to 290 m/s. The Vp-Vs relations lead to a high Poisson's ratio of 0.45–0.49 in the upper ~60 m depth, which is an indication for water-saturated clayey sediments. Such ground conditions may severely influence the ground motion during strong Vrancea earthquakes.

  20. Studies of electron drift velocity in nitrogen and isobutane

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Goncalves, Josemary A.C.; Botelho, Suzana; Tobias, Carmen C.B. [Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleares (IPEN/CNEN-SP), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil); Pontificia Univ. Catolica de Sao Paulo (PUC/SP), SP (Brazil); Vivaldini, Tulio C.; Lima, Iara B. [Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleares (IPEN/CNEN-SP), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil); Ridenti, Marco A.; Pascholati, Paulo R. [Universidade de Sao Paulo (USP), SP (Brazil). Inst. de Fisica. Lab. do Acelerador Linear; Fonte, Paulo; Mangiarotti, Alessio [Universidade de Coimbra (Portugal). Dept. de fisica. Lab. de Instrumentacao e Fisica Experimental de Particulas

    2009-07-01

    Full text: The electron drift velocity is one of the most important transport parameters used to describe the physical behaviour of gas discharges and the development of avalanches in gaseous detectors, mainly when temporal information is significant, as in drift chambers and in the recent Resistive Plate Chambers (RPCs). Although many filling gases, isobutane is frequently used in RPCs, due to its excellent timing properties, but at high electric fields conditions there are insufficient data available in literature. In the present work we report the preliminary results related to the dependence of the electron drift velocity for isobutane as function of the reduced electric field E/N, in the range of 100 Td up to 216 Td. There are different methods to determine electron drift velocity in a gas, and our measurements were based on the Pulsed Townsend technique, which consists of extracting electrons from a metallic cathode and accelerates them toward the anode by a uniform electric field. Once the drift distance and the transit time are known, the drift velocities can be determined. In our system, the incidence of a nitrogen laser beam (LTB MNL200-LD) liberates electron from the cathode made of aluminium (40mm diameter). By means of a high voltage supply (Bertan, 225-30), these electrons are accelerated toward the anode (made of a high resistivity glass - 2:10{sup 12}{omega} cm) and this movement produces a fast electric signal in the anode, which is digitalized in an oscilloscope (LeCroy WavePro 7000) with 1 GHz bandwidth and 10 GS/s. The values obtained were compared to that ones of a Bolsig+ simulation code. In order to validate the technique and to analyze non-uniformity effects, results for nitrogen are also presented. (author)

  1. Plain carbon steel bipolar plates for PEMFC

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Jianli; SUN Juncai; TIAN Rujin; XU Jing

    2006-01-01

    Bipolar plates are a multifunctional component of PEMFC. Comparing with the machined graphite and stainless steels, the plain carbon steel is a very cheap commercial metal material. In this paper, the possibility of applying the plain carbon steels in the bipolar plate for PEMFC was exploited. In order to improve the corrosion resistance of the low carbon steel in the PEMFCs' environments,two surface modification processes was developed and then the electrochemical performances and interfacial contact resistance (ICR) of the surface modified plate of plain carbon steel were investigated. The results show that the surface modified steel plates have good corrosion resistance and relatively low contact resistance, and it may be a candidate material as bipolar plate of PEMFC.

  2. Surface wave tomography of North America and the Caribbean using global and regional broad-band networks: Phase velocity maps and limitations of ray theory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Godey, S.; Snieder, R.; Villasenor, A.; Benz, H.M.

    2003-01-01

    We present phase velocity maps of fundamental mode Rayleigh waves across the North American and Caribbean plates. Our data set consists of 1846 waveforms from 172 events recorded at 91 broad-band stations operating in North America. We compute phase velocity maps in four narrow period bands between 50 and 150 s using a non-linear waveform inversion method that solves for phase velocity perturbations relative to a reference Earth model (PREM). Our results show a strong velocity contrast between high velocities beneath the stable North American craton, and lower velocities in the tectonically active western margin, in agreement with other regional and global surface wave tomography studies. We perform detailed comparisons with global model results, which display good agreement between phase velocity maps in the location and amplitude of the anomalies. However, forward modelling shows that regional maps are more accurate for predicting waveforms. In addition, at long periods, the amplitude of the velocity anomalies imaged in our regional phase velocity maps is three time larger than in global phase velocity models. This amplitude factor is necessary to explain the data accurately, showing that regional models provide a better image of velocity structures. Synthetic tests show that the raypath coverage used in this study enables one to resolve velocity features of the order of 800-1000 km. However, only larger length-scale features are observed in the phase velocity maps. The limitation in resolution of our maps can be attributed to the wave propagation theory used in the inversion. Ray theory does not account for off-great-circle ray propagation effects, such as ray bending or scattering. For wavelengths less than 1000 km, scattering effects are significant and may need to be considered.

  3. Petrologic implications of plate tectonics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoder, H S

    1971-07-30

    Petrologists can make significant contributions to the plate tectonic concept. Fixing the stability fields of the principal rock types involved will provide the limits of pressure and temperature of the various environments. Experimental determination of the partition coefficients of the trace elements will be helpful. Studies of the partial melting behavior of possible parental materials in the absence and presence of water, especially the undersaturated region, will contribute to the understanding of magma production. Experimental observations on the rheological properties of the peridotites below and just above the solidus will lead to a better evaluation of the convective mechanism. Measurement of the fundamental properties of rocks, such as the density of solids and liquids at high pressures and temperatures, would contribute to understanding the concepts of diapiric rise, magma segregation, and the low-velocity zone. Broader rock sampling of the oceanic areas of all environments will do much to define the petrologic provinces. The field petrologist specializing in the Paleozoic regions and Precambrian shields can contribute by examining those regions for old plate boundaries and devising new criteria for their recognition.

  4. Secondary craters from large impacts on Europa and Ganymede: Ejecta size-velocity distributions on icy worlds, and the scaling of ejected blocks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singer, Kelsi N.; McKinnon, William B.; Nowicki, L. T.

    2013-09-01

    We have mapped fields of secondary craters around three large primary craters on Europa and Ganymede and estimated the size and velocity of the fragments that formed the secondaries using updated scaling equations for ice impacts. We characterize the upper envelope of the fragment size-velocity distribution to obtain a function for the largest fragments at a given ejection velocity. Power-law velocity exponents found in our study of icy satellite secondary fields are compared to the exponents found for similar studies of mercurian, lunar, and martian craters; for all but basin-scale impacts, fragment size decreases more slowly with increasing ejection velocity than on rocky bodies. Spallation theory provides estimates of the size of ejected spall plates at a given velocity, but this theory predicts fragments considerably smaller than are necessary to form most of our observed secondaries. In general, ejecta fragment sizes scale with primary crater diameter and decrease with increasing ejection velocity, υej, by 1/υej or greater, and point-source scaling implies a relation between the two. The largest crater represented in any of these studies, Gilgamesh on Ganymede, exhibits a relatively steep velocity dependence. Extrapolating the results to the escape speed for each icy moon yields the size of the largest fragment that could later re-impact to form a so-called sesquinary crater, either on the parent moon or a neighboring satellite. We find that craters above 2 km in diameter on Europa and Ganymede are unlikely to be sesquinaries.

  5. Fluid-mechanical Representation of Plate Boundaries - Trench-Ridge System -

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takaku, M.; Fukao, Y.

    2005-12-01

    Seismic tomography models have been used extensively to simulate mantle convection driven by density heterogeneity. Such simulation to date has been unsuccessful to reconcile itself with the most obvious convection-related phenomenon of plate motions. Here we present a theoretical framework for tomography-based convection modeling to include the plates as an integral part of the mantle convection. We model the lithosphere as a highly viscous, incompressible, Newtonian fluid layer and plate boundaries as faults across which tangential velocities are discontinuous. Fluid-mechanical expressions of such faults have their exact analogies in the seismic source representation theory and can be derived by referring to it. We test this idea against the simplest two-dimensional case with only trench and ridge as plate boundaries, and with only subducting slab as mass anomaly. We model ridge (trench) as the horizontal (vertical) tensile fault that comprises of a conjugate pair of 45-degree dip normal (reverse) faults extending over the entire thickness of the surface layer. The system comprises of three elementary convections, slab mass-driven convection, trench fault-driven convection and ridge fault-driven convection. Flow due to the slab excess mass imposes vertical tensile stress on trench, which is released by flow driven by trench faulting. This faulting converts efficiently the vertical tensile stress to the horizontal tensile stress, which can transmit to extreme distances through the surface viscous layer. This horizontal tensile stress is relieved by flow driven by ridge faulting. The three elementary convections are thus coupled through the stress minimum conditions at ridge and trench. The resultant coupled flow is very plate-like in the surface viscous layer. In this system the horizontal surface velocity depends little on the relative distance between the ridge and trench and depends mostly on the excess weight of the subducting slab. The horizontal speed can be

  6. The correct mechanism of lithospheric plates movement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ostrihansky, L.

    2016-12-01

    Imagination that lithospheric plates move above low-viscous seismic low-velocity zone contradicts to reality but alternating movement of variations of the Earth's rotation deform plastic mantle. Because these deformations never return to original position and solidified ascending magma in mid-ocean ridge prevents return, the lithospheric plates move plunging to mantle by their own weight and move westward pushed by force of tidal friction enlarged by alternating movement of heavy and large-volume mantle. This imagination has been proven by calculating azimuths of Moon and opposite tidal bulging in a moment of earthquake. They resulted occurring on local eastern horizon when earthquake was triggered and also calculated tidal torques in their maximums coincided with earthquakes. To distinguish these tidal properties the earthquakes in Hindu Kush in westward moving Eurasian plate were examined and also in northward moving Indian plate. LOD graph has shown that in Hindu Kush tidal friction triggers earthquake almost every day and large earthquakes are triggered in large positive LOD anomalies corresponding to deceleration. In the Indian plate the calculated maximum tidal torques corresponding to accelerations (LOD minimums) coincided with the greatest earthquakes: with the Great Sumatra 2004, largest Nepal earthquake 1934, large earthquake Nepal 2015 evoked by resonance effect and others.

  7. Spectra of Velocity components over Complex Terrain

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Panofsky, H. A.; Larko, D.; Lipschut, R.

    1982-01-01

    Spectra have been measured over a variety of types of complex terrain: on tops of hills and escarpments, over land downstream of a water surface, and over rolling terrain. Differences between spectra over many types of complex terrain, and over uniform terrain, can be explained by these hypotheses...... is horizontal, and decrease when the flow is uphill, for the longitudinal velocity component only. Since vertical-velocity spectra contain relatively less low wavenumber energy than horizontal-velocity spectra, energetic vertical-velocity fluctuations tend to be in equilibrium with local terrain....

  8. Local wavefield velocity imaging for damage evaluation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chia, Chen Ciang; Gan, Chia Sheng; Mustapha, F.

    2017-02-01

    Ultrasonic Propagation Imaging or Acoustic Wavefield Imaging has been widely used to evaluate structural damages and internal features. Inspecting complete wavefield time history for damage identification is tedious and error-prone. A more effective way is by extracting damage-related information into a single image. A wavefield velocity imaging method that maps the local estimates of group or phase velocity is proposed. Actual velocity values rather than arbitrarily-scaled intensities are mapped, enabling damage sizing without the need of supervised training or inspecting wavefield propagation video. Performance of the proposed method was tested by inspecting a 100 mm by 100 mm area of a 2 mm thick stainless steel specimen. Local phase velocity maps of A0 mode showed a half-thickness hole of 2 mm diameter as significant change in local phase velocity from the nominal 2 m/ms. Full width at half maximum of relevant velocity profiles proved the accuracy and consistency of the damage sizing.

  9. Ballistic Behaviour of Thick Steel Armour Plate under Oblique Impact : Experimental Investigation II

    OpenAIRE

    S. N. Dikshit

    1999-01-01

    The ballistic behaviour of thick steel armour plate at different obliquities has been investigated. Ballistic experiments were conducted in the velocity range 300-800 mls at 0°, 15°, 30° and 45° obliquity .A steel, conical projectile or 6.1 mm diameter was impacted on a 10 mm thick steel armour plate. At 30° and 45° obliquity, the plate offers protection up to a striking velocity of 800 mls. At zero obliquity, the plate provides protection below 6~ m/s. The depth of penetration decreases with...

  10. Ballistic Behaviour of Thick Steel Armour Plate under Oblique Impact : Experimental Investigation II

    OpenAIRE

    S. N. Dikshit

    1999-01-01

    The ballistic behaviour of thick steel armour plate at different obliquities has been investigated. Ballistic experiments were conducted in the velocity range 300-800 mls at 0°, 15°, 30° and 45° obliquity .A steel, conical projectile or 6.1 mm diameter was impacted on a 10 mm thick steel armour plate. At 30° and 45° obliquity, the plate offers protection up to a striking velocity of 800 mls. At zero obliquity, the plate provides protection below 6~ m/s. The depth of penetration decreases with...

  11. Critical Landau Velocity in Helium Nanodroplets

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    N.B. Brauer; S. Smolarek; E. Loginov; D. Mateo; A. Hernando; M. Pi; M. Barranco; W.J. Buma; M. Drabbels

    2013-01-01

    The best-known property of superfluid helium is the vanishing viscosity that objects experience while moving through the liquid with speeds below the so-called critical Landau velocity. This critical velocity is generally considered a macroscopic property as it is related to the collective excitatio

  12. Application of phase stretch transform to plate license identification under blur and noise conditions (Conference Presentation)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asghari, Hossein; Hadar, Ofer; Jalali, Bahram

    2016-09-01

    This paper deals with implementing a new algorithm for edge detection based on the Phase Stretch Transform (PST) for purposes of car plate license recognition. In PST edge detection algorithm, the image is first filtered with a spatial kernel followed by application of a nonlinear frequency-dependent phase. The output of the transform is the phase in the spatial domain. The main step is the 2-D phase function which is typically applied in the frequency domain. The amount of phase applied to the image is frequency dependent with higher amount of phase applied to higher frequency features of the image. Since sharp transitions, such as edges and corners, contain higher frequencies, PST emphasizes the edge information. Features can be further enhanced by applying thresholding and morphological operations. Here we investigate the influence of noise and blur on the ability to recognize the characters in the plate license, by comparison of our suggested algorithm with the well known Canny algorithm. We use several types of noise distributions among them, Gaussian noise, salt and paper noise and uniform distributed noise, with several levels of noise variances. The simulated blur is related to the car velocity and we applied several filters representing different velocities of the car. Another interesting degradation that we intend to investigate is the cases that Laser shield license plate cover is used to distort the image taken by the authorities. Our comparison results are presented in terms of True positive, False positive and False negative probabilities.

  13. Shear waves in a fluid saturated elastic plate

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    A Pradhan; S K Samal; N C Mahanti

    2002-12-01

    In the present context, we consider the propagation of shear waves in the transverse isotropic fluid saturated porous plate. The frequency spectrum for SH-modes in the plate has been studied. It is observed that the frequency of the propagation is damped due to the two-phase character of the porous medium. The dimensionless phase velocities of the shear waves have also been calculated and presented graphically. It is interesting to note that the frequency and phase velocity of shear waves in porous media differ significantly in comparison to that in isotropic elastic media.

  14. Modal radiation patterns of baffled circular plates and membranes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christiansen, Thomas Lehrmann; Hansen, Ole; Thomsen, Erik Vilain

    2014-01-01

    The far field velocity potential and radiation pattern of baffled circular plates and membranes are found analytically using the full set of modal velocity profiles derived from the corresponding equation of motion. The derivation is valid for a plate or membrane subjected to an external excitation...... that of a monopole, while the non-axisymmetric modes exhibit multipole behavior. Numerical results are also given, demonstrating the implications of having non-axisymmetric excitation using both a point excitation with varying eccentricity and a homogeneous excitation acting on half of the circular radiator....

  15. Pixelated neutron image plates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schlapp, M.; Conrad, H.; von Seggern, H.

    2004-09-01

    Neutron image plates (NIPs) have found widespread application as neutron detectors for single-crystal and powder diffraction, small-angle scattering and tomography. After neutron exposure, the image plate can be read out by scanning with a laser. Commercially available NIPs consist of a powder mixture of BaFBr : Eu2+ and Gd2O3 dispersed in a polymer matrix and supported by a flexible polymer sheet. Since BaFBr : Eu2+ is an excellent x-ray storage phosphor, these NIPs are particularly sensitive to ggr-radiation, which is always present as a background radiation in neutron experiments. In this work we present results on NIPs consisting of KCl : Eu2+ and LiF that were fabricated into ceramic image plates in which the alkali halides act as a self-supporting matrix without the necessity for using a polymeric binder. An advantage of this type of NIP is the significantly reduced ggr-sensitivity. However, the much lower neutron absorption cross section of LiF compared with Gd2O3 demands a thicker image plate for obtaining comparable neutron absorption. The greater thickness of the NIP inevitably leads to a loss in spatial resolution of the image plate. However, this reduction in resolution can be restricted by a novel image plate concept in which a ceramic structure with square cells (referred to as a 'honeycomb') is embedded in the NIP, resulting in a pixelated image plate. In such a NIP the read-out light is confined to the particular illuminated pixel, decoupling the spatial resolution from the optical properties of the image plate material and morphology. In this work, a comparison of experimentally determined and simulated spatial resolutions of pixelated and unstructured image plates for a fixed read-out laser intensity is presented, as well as simulations of the properties of these NIPs at higher laser powers.

  16. Plate removal following orthognathic surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Little, Mhairi; Langford, Richard Julian; Bhanji, Adam; Farr, David

    2015-11-01

    The objectives of this study are to determine the removal rates of orthognathic plates used during orthognathic surgery at James Cook University Hospital and describe the reasons for plate removal. 202 consecutive orthognathic cases were identified between July 2004 and July 2012. Demographics and procedure details were collected for these patients. Patients from this group who returned to theatre for plate removal between July 2004 and November 2012 were identified and their notes were analysed for data including reason for plate removal, age, smoking status, sex and time to plate removal. 3.2% of plates were removed with proportionally more plates removed from the mandible than the maxilla. 10.4% of patients required removal of one or more plate. Most plates were removed within the first post-operative year. The commonest reasons for plate removal were plate exposure and infection. The plate removal rates in our study are comparable to those seen in the literature.

  17. Anisotropic elastic plates

    CERN Document Server

    Hwu, Chyanbin

    2010-01-01

    As structural elements, anisotropic elastic plates find wide applications in modern technology. The plates here are considered to be subjected to not only in plane load but also transverse load. In other words, both plane and plate bending problems as well as the stretching-bending coupling problems are all explained in this book. In addition to the introduction of the theory of anisotropic elasticity, several important subjects have are discussed in this book such as interfaces, cracks, holes, inclusions, contact problems, piezoelectric materials, thermoelastic problems and boundary element a

  18. Plating in Top Agar

    OpenAIRE

    sprotocols

    2014-01-01

    1. Warm plates to room temperature before use. Cold plates causes the top agar to solidify irregularly. DO not warm plates to 37° as the top agar will take forever to solidify. - Prepare top agar as the appropriate liquid medium with 0.7% agar. Keeping 100 mL bottles is convenient. For phages, use λ top agar, which is less rich and yields bigger plaques. - Melt top agar in the microwave completely. Allow the agar to boil after liquification; incompletely melted agar looks liquid, but is...

  19. Matching Lithosphere velocity changes to the GOCE gravity signal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Braitenberg, Carla

    2016-07-01

    Authors: Carla Braitenberg, Patrizia Mariani, Alberto Pastorutti Department of Mathematics and Geosciences, University of Trieste Via Weiss 1, 34100 Trieste Seismic tomography models result in 3D velocity models of lithosphere and sublithospheric mantle, which are due to mineralogic compositional changes and variations in the thermal gradient. The assignment of density is non-univocal and can lead to inverted density changes with respect to velocity changes, depending on composition and temperature. Velocity changes due to temperature result in a proportional density change, whereas changes due to compositional changes and age of the lithosphere can lead to density changes of inverted sign. The relation between velocity and density implies changes in the lithosphere rigidity. We analyze the GOCE gradient fields and the velocity models jointly, making simulations on thermal and compositional density changes, using the velocity models as constraint on lithosphere geometry. The correlations are enhanced by applying geodynamic plate reconstructions to the GOCE gravity field and the tomography models which places today's observed fields at the Gondwana pre-breakup position. We find that the lithosphere geometry is a controlling factor on the overlying geologic elements, defining the regions where rifting and collision alternate and repeat through time. The study is carried out globally, with focus on the conjugate margins of the African and South American continents. The background for the study can be found in the following publications where the techniques which have been used are described: Braitenberg, C., Mariani, P. and De Min, A. (2013). The European Alps and nearby orogenic belts sensed by GOCE, Boll. Bollettino di Geofisica Teorica ed Applicata, 54(4), 321-334. doi:10.4430/bgta0105---- Braitenberg, C. and Mariani, P. (2015). Geological implications from complete Gondwana GOCE-products reconstructions and link to lithospheric roots. Proceedings of 5th

  20. Thermodynamic optimization of fluid flow over an isothermal moving plate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Malvandi

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, entropy generation minimization (EGM was employed in order to achieve a thermodynamic optimization of fluid flow and heat transfer over a flat plate. The basic boundary layer equations including continuity, momentum, energy, and entropy generation have been reduced to a two-point boundary value problem via similarity variables and solved numerically via Runge–Kutta–Fehlberg scheme. The novelty of this study was to consider the effects of velocity ratio λ – which represents the ratio of the wall velocity to the free stream fluid velocity – in a thermodynamic system. Focusing on the velocity ratio as a pivotal parameter, in view of minimizing the entropy generation, the optimum value of λ=λo was achieved. Moreover, considering Bejan number, it was shown that the region, in which the maximum entropy generates, gets closer to the plate as λ increases.

  1. 3-D simulation of temporal change in tectonic deformation pattern and evolution of the plate boundary around the Kanto Region of Japan due to the collision of the Izu-Bonin Arc

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hashima, A.; Sato, T.; Ito, T.; Miyauchi, T.; Furuya, H.; Tsumura, N.; Kameo, K.; Yamamoto, S.

    2010-12-01

    The Kanto region of Japan is in a highly complex tectonic setting with four plates interacting with each other: beneath Kanto, situated on the Eurasian and North American plates, the Philippine sea plate subducts and the Pacific plate further descends beneath the North American and Philippine sea plates, forming the unique trench-trench-trench triple junction on the earth. In addition, the Izu-Bonin (Ogasawara) arc on the Philippine sea plate is colliding with the Japan islands, which is considered to be a significant effect on the tectonics of Kanto. To reveal the present crustal structure and the present internal stress fields in such a complex tectonic setting, it is essential to comprehend them through the long-term tectonic evolution process. In this study, we estimate the temporal change in tectonic deformation pattern along with the geometry of the plate boundary around Kanto by numerical simulation with a kinematic plate subduction model based on the elastic dislocation theory. This model is based on the idea that mechanical interaction between plates can rationally be represented by the increase of the displacement discontinuity (dislocation) across plate interfaces. Given the 3-D geometry of plate interfaces, the distribution of slip rate vectors for simple plate subduction can be obtained directly from relative plate velocities. In collision zones, the plate with arc crust cannot easily descend because of its buoyancy. This can be represented by giving slip-rate deficit. When crustal deformation occurs, it also causes change in geometry of the plate boundary itself. This geometry change sensitively affects mechanical interaction at the plate boundary. Then the renewed plate-to-plete interaction alters crustal deformation rates. This feedback system has a large effect on collision zones. Indeed, the plate boundary around the Izu peninsula, the northernmost end of the Izu-Bonin arc, intends landward as large as 100 km. Iterating this effect sequentially

  2. Shear flow past a flat plate in hydromagnetics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. R. N. Sastry

    1980-01-01

    Full Text Available The problem of simple shear flow past a flat plate has been extended to the hydromagnetic case in which a viscous, electrically conducting, incompressible fluid flows past an electrically insulated flat plate with a magnetic field parallel to the plate. For simplicity all physical parameters are assumed constant. A series solution for the velocity field has been developed for small values of a magnetic parameter. The equations governing this flow field were integrated numerically It is found that the effect of the magnetic field is to diminish and increase respectively, the first and second order contributions for the skin friction.

  3. Influence of Subducting Plate Geometry on Upper Plate Deformation at Orogen Syntaxes: A Thermomechanical Modeling Approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nettesheim, Matthias; Ehlers, Todd; Whipp, David

    2016-04-01

    Syntaxes are short, convex bends in the otherwise slightly concave plate boundaries of subduction zones. These regions are of scientific interest because some syntaxes (e.g., the Himalaya or St. Elias region in Alaska) exhibit exceptionally rapid, focused rock uplift. These areas have led to a hypothesized connection between erosional and tectonic processes (top-down control), but have so far neglected the unique 3D geometry of the subducting plates at these locations. In this study, we contribute to this discussion by exploring the idea that subduction geometry may be sufficient to trigger focused tectonic uplift in the overriding plate (a bottom-up control). For this, we use a fully coupled 3D thermomechanical model that includes thermochronometric age prediction. The downgoing plate is approximated as spherical indenter of high rigidity, whereas both viscous and visco-plastic material properties are used to model deformation in the overriding plate. We also consider the influence of the curvature of the subduction zone and the ratio of subduction velocity to subduction zone advance. We evaluate these models with respect to their effect on the upper plate exhumation rates and localization. Results indicate that increasing curvature of the indenter and a stronger upper crust lead to more focused tectonic uplift, whereas slab advance causes the uplift focus to migrate and thus may hinder the emergence of a positive feedback.

  4. Extreme Velocity Wind Sensor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perotti, Jose; Voska, Ned (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    This presentation provides an overview of the development of new hurricane wind sensor (Extreme Velocity Wind Sensor) for the Kennedy Space Center (KSC) which is designed to withstand winds of up to three hundred miles an hour. The proposed Extreme Velocity Wind Sensor contains no moveable components that would be exposed to extreme wind conditions. Topics covered include: need for new hurricane wind sensor, conceptual design, software applications, computational fluid dynamic simulations of design concept, preliminary performance tests, and project status.

  5. Reducing risk where tectonic plates collide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gomberg, Joan S.; Ludwig, Kristin A.

    2017-06-19

    Most of the world’s earthquakes, tsunamis, landslides, and volcanic eruptions are caused by the continuous motions of the many tectonic plates that make up the Earth’s outer shell. The most powerful of these natural hazards occur in subduction zones, where two plates collide and one is thrust beneath another. The U.S. Geological Survey’s (USGS) “Reducing Risk Where Tectonic Plates Collide—A USGS Plan to Advance Subduction Zone Science” is a blueprint for building the crucial scientific foundation needed to inform the policies and practices that can make our Nation more resilient to subduction zone-related hazards.

  6. FLEXURAL WAVE PROPAGATION IN NARROW MINDLIN'S PLATE

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    HU Chao; HAN Gang; FANG Xue-qian; HUANG Wen-hu

    2006-01-01

    Appling Mindlin's theory of thick plates and Hamilton system to propagation of elastic waves under free boundary condition, a solution of the problem was given.Dispersion equations of propagation mode of strip plates were deduced from eigenfunction expansion method. It was compared with the dispersion relation that was gained through solution of thick plate theory proposed by Mindlin. Based on the two kinds of theories,the dispersion curves show great difference in the region of short waves, and the cutoff frequencies are higher in Hamiltonian systems. However, the dispersion curves are almost the same in the region of long waves.

  7. Create Your Plate

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... blood glucose levels and lose weight. With this method, you fill your plate with more non-starchy ... but changes the portion sizes so you are getting larger portions of non-starchy vegetables and a ...

  8. Create Your Plate

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... blood glucose levels and lose weight. With this method, you fill your plate with more non-starchy ... 4/Box) Taking the guesswork out of portion control has never been easier. It can be a ...

  9. MyPlate

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... our stage of life, situations, preferences, access to food, culture, traditions, and the personal decisions we make over time. All your food and beverage choices count. MyPlate offers ideas and ...

  10. Create Your Plate

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... blood glucose levels and lose weight. With this method, you fill your plate with more non-starchy ... you have an easy portion control solution that works. Last Reviewed: October 8, 2015 Last Edited: September ...

  11. Designing Assemblies Of Plates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, F. W.; Kennedy, D.; Butler, R.; Aston, G.; Anderson, M. S.

    1992-01-01

    VICONOPT calculates vibrations and instabilities of assemblies of prismatic plates. Designed for efficient, accurate analysis of buckling and vibration, and for optimum design of panels of composite materials. Written in FORTRAN 77.

  12. Create Your Plate

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Your Plate Gluten Free Diets Meal Planning for Vegetarian Diets Cook with Heart-Healthy Foods Holiday Meal Planning What Can I Eat? Making Healthy Food Choices Diabetes Superfoods Non-starchy Vegetables Grains and Starchy Vegetables ...

  13. Create Your Plate

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Recipes Association Cookbook Recipes Planning Meals Diabetes Meal Plans Create Your Plate Gluten Free Diets Meal Planning ... serving of dairy or both as your meal plan allows. Choose healthy fats in small amounts. For ...

  14. Create Your Plate

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... 1 Diabetes Get Started Safely Get And Stay Fit Types of Activity Weight Loss Assess Your Lifestyle ... manage portion control wherever you are. Now, our best-selling, sectioned to-go plate with easy-sealing ...

  15. Create Your Plate

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Plate is a simple and effective way to manage your blood glucose levels and lose weight. With ... been easier. It can be a challenge to manage portion control wherever you are. Now, our best- ...

  16. Create Your Plate

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Carbohydrates Carbohydrate Counting Make Your Carbs Count Glycemic ... to manage portion control wherever you are. Now, our best-selling, sectioned to-go plate with easy-sealing ...

  17. Focusing on Plates: Controlling Guided Waves using Negative Refraction

    OpenAIRE

    2015-01-01

    Elastic waves are guided along finite structures such as cylinders, plates, or rods through reflection, refraction, and mode conversion at the interfaces. Such wave propagation is ubiquitous in the world around us, and studies of elastic waveguides first emerged in the later part of the 19th century. Early work on elastic waveguides revealed the presence of backward propagating waves, in which the phase velocity and group velocity are anti-parallel. While backward wave propagation exists natu...

  18. Origami - Folded Plate Structures

    OpenAIRE

    Buri, Hans Ulrich

    2010-01-01

    This research investigates new methods of designing folded plate structures that can be built with cross-laminated timber panels. Folded plate structures are attractive to both architects and engineers for their structural, spatial, and plastic qualities. Thin surfaces can be stiffened by a series of folds, and thus not only cover space, but also act as load bearing elements. The variation of light and shadow along the folded faces emphasizes the plas...

  19. Fractal multifiber microchannel plates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cook, Lee M.; Feller, W. B.; Kenter, Almus T.; Chappell, Jon H.

    1992-01-01

    The construction and performance of microchannel plates (MCPs) made using fractal tiling mehtods are reviewed. MCPs with 40 mm active areas having near-perfect channel ordering were produced. These plates demonstrated electrical performance characteristics equivalent to conventionally constructed MCPs. These apparently are the first MCPs which have a sufficiently high degree of order to permit single channel addressability. Potential applications for these devices and the prospects for further development are discussed.

  20. Mapping the subducted Nazca plate in the lower mantle beneath South America

    Science.gov (United States)

    Contenti, S. M.; Gu, Y. J.; Okeler, A.

    2009-12-01

    Recent improvements in data coverage have enabled high-resolution imaging of the morphology of subduction zones and mantle plumes. In this study, we migrate the SS precursors from over 5000 seismograms to obtain a detailed map of mid- and upper-mantle reflectors beneath the northern portion of the South American subduction zone, where the oceanic Nazca plate is descending below the South American plate. In addition to an elevated 410 and depressed 660 (as expected for a subduction zone), strong mid-mantle reflectors at 800-1100 km depth are also apparent. The amplitudes of these steeply dipping reflectors are comparable to that of the 660-kilometer discontinuity. This anomaly outlines a high-velocity (therefore presumably cold) region present in recent finite-frequency based mantle velocity models, suggesting the extension of slab material into the lower mantle. The strength of the reflection is interpreted to be caused by a relatively sharp velocity change, likely due to a strong temperature gradient in combination with mineral phase transitions, the presence of water, or other chemical heterogeneities. Significant mass and heat exchange is therefore expected between the upper- and lower-mantle beneath the study region.

  1. The effect of initial stress on the propagation behavior of SH waves in piezoelectric coupled plates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Son, Myung Seob; Kang, Yeon June

    2011-05-01

    This study analytically investigates the propagation of shear waves (SH waves) in a coupled plate consisting of a piezoelectric layer and an elastic layer with initial stress. The piezoelectric material is polarized in z-axis direction and perfectly bonded to an elastic layer. The mechanical displacement and electrical potential function are derived for the piezoelectric coupled plates by solving the electromechanical field equations. The effects of the thickness ratio and the initial stress on the dispersion relations and the phase and group velocities are obtained for electrically open and mechanically free situations. The numerical examples are provided to illustrate graphically the variations of the phase and group velocities versus the wave number for the different layers comparatively. It is seen that the phase velocity of SH waves decreases with the increase of the magnitude of the initial compression stress, while it increases with the increase of the magnitude of the initial tensile stress. The initial stress has a great effect on the propagation of SH waves with the decrease of the thickness ratio. This research is theoretically useful for the design of surface acoustic wave (SAW) devices with high performance.

  2. Computing discharge using the index velocity method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levesque, Victor A.; Oberg, Kevin A.

    2012-01-01

    techniques in which the mean cross-sectional velocity for the standard section is related to the measured index velocity. Most ratings are simple-linear regressions, but more complex ratings may be necessary in some cases. Once the rating is established, validation measurements should be made periodically. Over time, validation measurements may provide additional definition to the rating or result in the creation of a new rating. The computation of discharge is the last step in the index velocity method, and in some ways it is the most straight-forward step. This step differs little from the steps used to compute discharge records for stage-discharge gaging stations. The ratings are entered into database software used for records computation, and continuous records of discharge are computed.

  3. Initial stage of flat plate impact onto liquid free surface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iafrati, Alessandro; Korobkin, Alexander A.

    2004-07-01

    The liquid flow and the free surface shape during the initial stage of flat plate impact onto liquid half-space are investigated. Method of matched asymptotic expansions is used to derive equations of motion and boundary conditions in the main flow region and in small vicinities of the plate edges. Asymptotic analysis is performed within the ideal and incompressible liquid model. The liquid flow is assumed potential and two dimensional. The ratio of the plate displacement to the plate width plays the role of a small parameter. In the main region the flow is given in the leading order by the pressure-impulse theory. This theory provides the flow field around the plate after a short acoustic stage and predicts unbounded velocity of the liquid at the plate edges. In order to resolve the singular flow caused by the normal impact of a flat plate, the fine pattern of the flow in small vicinities of the plate edges is studied. It is shown that the initial flow close to the plate edges is self-similar in the leading order and is governed by nonlinear boundary-value problem with unknown shape of the free surface. The Kutta conditions are imposed at the plate edges, in order to obtain a nonsingular inner solution. This boundary-value problem is solved numerically by iterations. At each step of iterations the "inner" velocity potential is calculated by the boundary-element method. The asymptotics of the inner solution in both the far field and the jet region are obtained to make the numerical algorithm more efficient. The numerical procedure is carefully verified. Agreement of the computed free surface shape with available experimental data is fairly good. Stability of the numerical solution and its convergence are discussed.

  4. 计及板厚的平板电容器边缘电场特性%Characteristics of Edge Electric Field of Plate Capacitor Relating to its Thickness

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    吴锐; 袁长迎

    2015-01-01

    电容器一般视为不计板厚的理想元件,但实际上板厚对其电场分布存在着较大的影响。利用施瓦兹﹣克利斯多菲变换得到忽略板厚时平板电容器的边缘场强分布,再利用有限元模拟得到计及板厚时平板电容器的边缘场强分布。通过比较与分析,得出了边缘场强随板厚的变化关系以及边缘定点处的场强理想值误差。%The caPacitor is generally regarded as the ideal element regardless of its thickness,but,it actually has a great influence on the electric field. This article gets the distribution of edge electric field ignoring the Plate thickness by taking advantage of Schwarz ﹣ Christoffel transformation. As for the different thicknesses of the caPac-itor,the distribution of edge electric field can be obtained by the use of the finite element simulation. We can ob-tain that the changes in relations between Plate thickness and electric field,as well as the errors of the ideal value in Point through comParison and analysis.

  5. Vibrations and instabilities of thin rectangular plates separated by fluid medium with applications to the plate type heat exchanger

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gi-Man, Kim [Kum-Oh National Univ., Taegu (Korea, Republic of)

    1994-12-31

    Due to the prohibition law for using preon gas, many items in engineering field, specially heat exchanger, should be redesigned. The newly designed heat exchanger such a plate type heat exchanger is known to have a good efficiency in exchanging heat. From view of structures of a plate type heat exchanger, thin tube are used instead of circular pipe and the path of the fluid is developed for the high efficiency of the heat exchange by varying the array of tubes. The principal problem in the design of the plate heat exchanger is the potentiality of structural instabilities due to the fluid loading effect during operations. Excessive plate deflections would eventually result in permanent deformation or collapse which would cause an obstruction of the fluid flow in the narrow channels. In this study, a fluid-structural interaction model was developed to investigate analytically the static and dynamic instabilities that have been observed in flat plate heat exchanger. The model consist of two flat plates separated by water. The effects of the internal fluid in the channel was studied. As results, the natural frequency coefficients were investigated for the plate aspect ratios, channel heights, and boundary conditions. For the design criteria in plate type heat exchanger, the critical flow velocities which cause the responses of a plate were defined for divergence, resonance and flutter phenomena. (author). 25 refs. 2 tabs. 48 figs.

  6. Effect of a weak layer at the base of an oceanic plate on subduction dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carluccio, Roberta; Kaus, Boris

    2017-04-01

    The plate tectonics model relies on the concept of a relatively rigid lithospheric lid moving over a weaker asthenosphere. In this frame, the lithosphere asthenosphere boundary (LAB) is a first-order discontinuity that accommodates differential motions between tectonic plates and the underlying mantle. Recent seismic studies have revealed the existence of a low velocity and high electrical conductivity layer at the base of subducting tectonic plates. This thin layer has been interpreted as being weak and slightly buoyant and was suggested to affect the dynamics of subducting plates. However, geodynamically, the role of a weak layer at the base of the lithosphere remains poorly studied, especially at subduction zones. Therefore, we here use numerical models to investigate the first-order effects of a weak buoyant layer at the LAB on subduction dynamics. We employ both 2-D and 3-D models in which the slab and mantle are either linear viscous or have a more realistic temperature-dependent visco-elastic-plastic rheology. Results show that a weak layer affects the dynamics of the plates, foremost by increasing the subduction speed. The impact of this effect depends on the thickness of the layer and the viscosity contrast between the mantle and the weak layer. For moderate viscosity contrasts (1000), it can also change the morphology of the subduction itself, perhaps because this changes the overall effective viscosity contrast between the slab the and the mantle. For thinner layers, the overall effect is reduced. Yet, if seismological observations are correct that suggests that this layer is 10 km thick and partially molten, such that the viscosity is 1000 times lower than that of the mantle, our models suggest that this effect should be measurable. Some of our models also show a pile-up of weak material in the bending zone of the subducting plate, consistent with recent seismological observations.

  7. Finite Temperature Casimir Effect for Corrugated Plates

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHAO Yan; SHAO Cheng-Gang; LUO Jun

    2006-01-01

    @@ Using the path-integral method, the corrections to the Casimir energy due to the combined effect of surface roughness and the finite temperature are calculated. For the specific case of two sinusoidally corrugated plates,the lateral Casimir force at finite temperature is obtained. The amplitude of the lateral Casimir force has a maximum at an optimal wavelength of λ≈ 2H with the mean plate distance H. This optimal parameter relation is almost independent of temperature.

  8. Sensitivity analysis of the GNSS derived Victoria plate motion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Apolinário, João; Fernandes, Rui; Bos, Machiel

    2014-05-01

    estimated trend (Williams 2003, Langbein 2012). Finally, our preferable angular velocity estimation is used to evaluate the consequences on the kinematics of the Victoria block, namely the magnitude and azimuth of the relative motions with respect to the Nubia and Somalia plates and their tectonic implications. References Agnew, D. C. (2013). Realistic simulations of geodetic network data: The Fakenet package, Seismol. Res. Lett., 84 , 426-432, doi:10.1785/0220120185. Blewitt, G. & Lavallee, D., (2002). Effect of annual signals on geodetic velocity, J. geophys. Res., 107(B7), doi:10.1029/2001JB000570. Bos, M.S., R.M.S. Fernandes, S. Williams, L. Bastos (2012) Fast Error Analysis of Continuous GNSS Observations with Missing Data, Journal of Geodesy, doi: 10.1007/s00190-012-0605-0. Bos, M.S., L. Bastos, R.M.S. Fernandes, (2009). The influence of seasonal signals on the estimation of the tectonic motion in short continuous GPS time-series, J. of Geodynamics, j.jog.2009.10.005. Fernandes, R.M.S., J. M. Miranda, D. Delvaux, D. S. Stamps and E. Saria (2013). Re-evaluation of the kinematics of Victoria Block using continuous GNSS data, Geophysical Journal International, doi:10.1093/gji/ggs071. Langbein, J. (2012). Estimating rate uncertainty with maximum likelihood: differences between power-law and flicker-random-walk models, Journal of Geodesy, Volume 86, Issue 9, pp 775-783, Williams, S. D. P. (2003). Offsets in Global Positioning System time series, J. Geophys. Res., 108, 2310, doi:10.1029/2002JB002156, B6.

  9. Vibration and Buckling of Web Plate of the Plate Girder

    OpenAIRE

    高橋, 和雄; 呉, 明強; 中澤, 聡志; 筑紫, 宏之

    1998-01-01

    The vibration and buckling of the web of the plate girder are studied in this paper. The small deflection theory of the thin plate is used. The finite strip method is employed to solve vibration and buckling of the plate girder. Natural frequenies of buckling properties are shown for various plate girder bridges.

  10. Quantitative morphometric study of the subaxial cervical vertebrae end plate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feng, Hang; Fang, Xiangyi; Huang, Dageng; Yu, Chengcheng; Zhao, Songchuan; Hao, Dingjun

    2017-02-01

    Cervical disc arthroplasty has been gradually adopted as an alternative for the treatment of cervical degenerative disease. However, there is a large discrepancy between footprints of currently available cervical disc prostheses and anatomic dimensions of cervical end plates. This study aimed to accurately and comprehensively quantify the three-dimensional (3D) anatomic morphology of the cervical vertebral end plate and provide a theoretical basis for designing appropriate disc prostheses. Moreover, we introduced a novel geometric and mechanical model for 3D reconstruction techniques of the cervical end plate. A descriptive study of the geometry of the middle and lower cervical vertebral end plates in cadaveric spines was carried out. A total of 138 cervical vertebral end plates were digitized using an optical 3D range scanning system, and then each end plate was reconstructed using the digitized image. For each end plate, the morphologic characteristics of six surface curves and the end plate concavity depth were symmetrically chosen and depicted. The cranial end plates (relative to the disc) were concave and the caudal end plates were relatively flat at all disc levels, with mean concavity depths of 2.04 and 0.69 mm, respectively. For the caudal end plates, the end plate concavity apex was most often (81.42%) located in the posterior portion, whereas in the cranial end plates, the distribution was relatively even. For the sagittal curves, the foremost point and the rearmost point on the middle curve had a more forward position than those in the left curve and the right curve. Regarding the frontal plane curves, the length of the middle curve was longer than that of the anterior curve and posterior curve. For the cranial end plate, the maximal mean depth was the middle curve, whereas for the caudal end plate, the maximum depth was the posterior curve. There is marked morphologic asymmetry, in that the cranial end plate is more concave than the corresponding

  11. The escape velocity and Schwarzschild metric

    CERN Document Server

    Murzagalieva, A G; Murzagaliev, G Z

    2002-01-01

    The escape velocity value in the terms of general relativity by means Schwarzschild metric is provided to make of the motion equation with Friedman cosmological model behavior build in the terms of Robertson-Worker metric. (author)

  12. 基于灰熵分析法的电枢出口速度影响因素分析%Analysis on Factors Influencing Muzzle Velocity of Armature Based on Grey Relation Entropy Method

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张祎; 杨春霞; 栗保明

    2011-01-01

    为了研究电磁轨道炮结构设计参数与电枢出口速度之间的相关性,建立了电磁轨道炮电枢出口速度影响因素的指标体系,采用灰熵关联法,分析了电容、电感、电阻、电枢质量、轨道有效长度、放电电压对某口径电磁轨道炮电枢出口速度散布特性影响的显著程度.结果表明,放电电压、电容是影响电磁轨道炮精度的主要因素,电枢质量时电磁轨道炮精度影响最小,这为提高电磁发射系统的优化设计提供了科学依据.%In order to study the relationship between the design parameters of electromagnetic railgun(EMG)and the velocity of armature, the index system of factors affecting the velocity of armature was built. By using grey relation entropy method, the significance of factors influencing the scattering of armature's muzzle velocity, including capacitance, inductance, resistance,armature's mass,effective length of railgun and charge voltage, was analyzed. The result shows that the main factors affecting the accuracy of EMG are discharge voltage and capacitance,and the effect of armature's mass on the accuracy of EMG is the smallest. The result offers scientific evidence for optimization design of EMG system.

  13. Velocities in Solar Pores

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balasubramaniam, K. S.; Keil, S. L.; Smaldone, L. A.

    1996-05-01

    We investigate the three dimensional structure of solar pores and their surroundings using high spatial and spectral resolution data. We present evidence that surface velocities decrease around pores with a corresponding increase in the line-of-sight (LOS) velocities. LOS velocities in pores increase with the strength of the magnetic field. Surface velocities show convergence toward a weak downflow which appear to trace boundaries resembling meso-granular and super granular flows. The observed magnetic fields in the pores appear near these boundaries. We analyze the vertical velocity structure in pores and show that they generally have downflows decreasing exponentially with height, with a scale height of about 90 km. Evidence is also presented for the expanding nature of flux tubes. Finally we describe a phenomenological model for pores. This work was supported by AFOSR Task 2311G3. LAS was partially supported by the Progetto Nazionale Astrofisica e Fisica Cosmica of MURST and Scambi Internazionali of the Universita degli Studi di Napoli Frederico II. National Solar Observatory, NOAO, is operated for the National Science Foundation by AURA, Inc.

  14. Insights into the fragmentation of the Adria Plate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sani, Federico; Vannucci, Gianfranco; Boccaletti, Mario; Bonini, Marco; Corti, Giacomo; Serpelloni, Enrico

    2016-12-01

    This study gives an interpretation of the current tectonics and kinematics of the Adria Plate, a region mostly coinciding with Italy and its surroundings. We have examined the spatial distribution and kinematics of seismicity by using an updated dataset obtained integrating the available catalogues of earthquakes and focal mechanisms. Moreover, to highlight the distribution of seismicity and of the associated strain patterns, we have elaborated a seismic flux map of the Italian region, which is a map of the energy released per unit time and per unit area. Seismic flux represents the energy released and provides a synthetic and continuous view of areas with greater seismicity and associated strain patterns with respect to the plot of earthquakes only. The seismic data, and the results of some elaborations carried out using these datasets have been compared with the present-day state of stress and slip rates of the major active faults of some sectors of Italy, as well as with the horizontal kinematics highlighted by GPS observations. The distribution and kinematics of earthquakes and active faults, the seismic flux, and GPS velocities, suggest that the Adria Plate is currently behaving as an ensemble of independent blocks rather than as a unique rigid plate. The Adria Plate can be thus subdivided into three major blocks and a number of smaller blocks moving independently under the action of a first-order mechanism related to the ongoing, roughly N-S, Europe-Africa convergence vector. This complicated setting may promote the occurrence of mutual relationships between blocks, and generate peculiar local kinematics causing seismic activity. We infer that the great majority of the seismic events occur at the boundaries of the main or minor blocks, and therefore the alignments of seismicity allows the individuation of the different blocks and the main seismogenic belts. A major crustal structure subdivides the Adria Plate into a western and two eastern blocks, and

  15. Automatic brush-plating technology for component remanufacturing

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WU Bin; XU Bin-shi; JING Xue-dong; LIU Cun-long; ZHANG Bin

    2005-01-01

    An automatic brush-plating system was developed for component remanufacturing. With this system, Ni/nano-alumina composite coatings from an electrolyte containing 20 g/L nano-alumina particles were prepared.Microstructure, surface morphology, microhardness and wear resistance of automatically plated coatings and manu ally plated coatings were investigated comparatively. The results show that the automatically plated coatings are relatively dense and uniform and have lower friction coefficient of 0. 089 under lubricant condition, when compared with manually plated coatings with friction coefficient of 0. 14.

  16. Crustal motion studies in the southwest Pacific: Geodetic measurements of plate convergence in Tonga, Vanuatu and the Solomon Islands

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phillips, David A.

    The southwest Pacific is one of the most tectonically dynamic regions on Earth. This research focused on crustal motion studies in three regions of active Pacific-Australia plate convergence in the southwest Pacific: Tonga, the New Hebrides (Vanuatu) and the Solomons Islands. In Tonga, new and refined velocity estimates based on more than a decade of Global Positioning System (GPS) measurements and advanced analysis techniques are much more accurate than previously reported values. Convergence rates of 80 to 165 mm/yr at the Tonga trench represent the fastest plate motions observed on Earth. For the first time, rotation of the Fiji platform relative to the Australian plate is observed, and anomalous deformation of the Tonga ridge was also detected. In the New Hebrides, a combined GPS dataset with a total time series of more than ten years led to new and refined velocity estimates throughout the island arc. Impingement of large bathymetric features has led to arc fragmentation, and four distinct tectonic segments are identified. The central New Hebrides arc segment is being shoved eastward relative to the rest of the arc as convergence is partitioned between the forearc (Australian plate) and the backarc (North Fiji Basin) boundaries due to impingement of the d'Entrecasteaux Ridge and associated Bougainville seamount. The southern New Hebrides arc converges with the Australian plate more rapidly than predicted due to backarc extension. The first measurements of convergence in the northern and southernmost arc segments were also made. In the Solomon Islands, a four-year GPS time series was used to generate the first geodetic estimates of crustal velocity in the New Georgia Group, with 57--84 mm/yr of Australia-Solomon motion and 19--39 mm/yr of Pacific-Solomon motion being observed. These velocities are 20--40% lower than predicted Australia-Pacific velocities. Two-dimensional dislocation models suggest that most of this discrepancy can be attributed to locking of

  17. Next Generation Attenuation of Ground Motions in Ilan, Taiwan: Establishment and Analysis of Attenuation Relations for Peak Ground Acceleration (PGA) and Peak Ground Velocity (PGV)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, K.

    2009-12-01

    An evaluation of seismic hazards requires an estimate of the expected ground motion at the site of interest. The most common means of estimating this ground motion in engineering practice is the use of an attenuation relation. A number of developments have arisen recently to suggest that a new generation of attenuation relationships is warranted. The project named Next Generation Attenuation of Ground Motions (NGA) Project was developed by Pacific Earthquake Engineering Research Center (PEER) in response to a core objective: reducing uncertainty in earthquake ground motion estimation. This objective reflects recognition from industry sponsors that improvements in earthquake ground motion estimation will result in significant cost savings and will result in improved system performance in the event of a large earthquake. The Central Weather Bureau has implemented the Taiwan Strong Motion Instrumentation Program (TSMIP) to collect high-quality instrumental recordings of strong earthquake shaking.It is necessary for us to study the strong ground motion characteristics at the Ilan area of northeastern Taiwan. Further analyses using a good quality data base that includes 486 events and 4172 recordings of magnitude greater than 4.0 are required to derive the next generation attenuation of ground motion in Ilan area. In addition, Liu and Tsai (2007) used a catalog of more than 1840 shallow earthquakes with homogenized Mw magnitude ranging from 5.0 to 8.2 in 1900-2007 to estimate the seismic hazard potential in Taiwan. As a result, the PGA and PGV contour patterns of maximum ground motion show that Ilan Plain has high values of 0.2g and 80cm/sec with respect to MMI intensity VII and IX, respectively. Furthermore, from the mean ground motion and the seismic intensity rate analyses, they show that a high annul probability of MMI > VI greater than 35 percents are located at the Chianan area of western Taiwan and Ilan Plain in northeastern Taiwan. However, these results was

  18. Minimum length-maximum velocity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panes, Boris

    2012-03-01

    We study a framework where the hypothesis of a minimum length in space-time is complemented with the notion of reference frame invariance. It turns out natural to interpret the action of the obtained reference frame transformations in the context of doubly special relativity. As a consequence of this formalism we find interesting connections between the minimum length properties and the modified velocity-energy relation for ultra-relativistic particles. For example, we can predict the ratio between the minimum lengths in space and time using the results from OPERA on superluminal neutrinos.

  19. HALL CURRENT EFFECTS ON FREE CONVECTION MHD FLOW PAST A POROUS PLATE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. Ramireddy

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Heat and mass transfer along a vertical porous plate under the combined buoyancy force effects of thermal and species diffusion is investigated in the presence of a transversely applied uniform magnetic field and the Hall currents are taken into account. The governing fundamental equations on the assumption of a small magnetic Reynolds number are approximated by a system of non-linear ordinary differential equations, which are integrated by fourth-order Runge–Kutta method. Velocity, temperature and concentration are shown on graphs. The numerical values of the local shear stress, the local Nusselt number Nu and the local Sherwood number Sh are entered in tables. The effects of the magnetic parameter, Hall parameter and the relative buoyancy force effect between species and thermal diffusion on the velocity, temperature and concentration are discussed. The results are compared with those known from the literature.

  20. Episodic plate tectonics on Venus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turcotte, Donald

    1992-01-01

    Studies of impact craters on Venus from the Magellan images have placed important constraints on surface volcanism. Some 840 impact craters have been identified with diameters ranging from 2 to 280 km. Correlations of this impact flux with craters on the Moon, Earth, and Mars indicate a mean surface age of 0.5 +/- 0.3 Ga. Another important observation is that 52 percent of the craters are slightly fractured and only 4.5 percent are embayed by lava flows. These observations led researchers to hypothesize that a pervasive resurfacing event occurred about 500 m.y. ago and that relatively little surface volcanism has occurred since. Other researchers have pointed out that a global resurfacing event that ceased about 500 MYBP is consistent with the results given by a recent study. These authors carried out a series of numerical calculations of mantle convection in Venus yielding thermal evolution results. Their model considered crustal recycling and gave rapid planetary cooling. They, in fact, suggested that prior to 500 MYBP plate tectonics was active in Venus and since 500 MYBP the lithosphere has stabilized and only hot-spot volcanism has reached the surface. We propose an alternative hypothesis for the inferred cessation of surface volcanism on Venus. We hypothesize that plate tectonics on Venus is episodic. Periods of rapid plate tectonics result in high rates of subduction that cool the interior resulting in more sluggish mantle convection.