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Sample records for plate turbulent boundary

  1. Turbulent boundary layer over flexible plates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rostami, Parand; Ioppolo, Tindaro

    2016-11-01

    This research describes the structure of a turbulent boundary layer flow with a zero pressure gradient over elastic plates. The elastic plates made of a thin aluminum sheets with thickness between 50 and 500 microns were placed on the floor of a subsonic wind tunnel and exposed to a turbulent boundary layer flow with a free stream velocity between 20m/s and 100m/s. The ceiling of the test section of the wind tunnel is adjustable so that a nearly zero pressure gradient is obtained in the test section. Hot-wire anemometry was used to measure the velocity components. Mean, fluctuating velocities and Reynolds stresses will be presented and compared with the values of a rigid plate.

  2. Spatially developing turbulent boundary layer on a flat plate

    CERN Document Server

    Lee, J H; Hutchins, N; Monty, J P

    2012-01-01

    This fluid dynamics video submitted to the Gallery of Fluid motion shows a turbulent boundary layer developing under a 5 metre-long flat plate towed through water. A stationary imaging system provides a unique view of the developing boundary layer as it would form over the hull of a ship or fuselage of an aircraft. The towed plate permits visualisation of the zero-pressure-gradient turbulent boundary layer as it develops from the trip to a high Reynolds number state ($Re_\\tau \\approx 3000$). An evolving large-scale coherent structure will appear almost stationary in this frame of reference. The visualisations provide an unique view of the evolution of fundamental processes in the boundary layer (such as interfacial bulging, entrainment, vortical motions, etc.). In the more traditional laboratory frame of reference, in which fluid passes over a stationary body, it is difficult to observe the full evolution and lifetime of turbulent coherent structures. An equivalent experiment in a wind/water-tunnel would requ...

  3. Analytical solution of conjugate turbulent forced convection boundary layer flow over plates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joneydi Shariatzadeh Omid

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available A conjugate (coupled forced convection heat transfer from a heated conducting plate under turbulent boundary layer flow is considered. A heated plate of finite thickness is cooled under turbulent forced convection boundary layer flow. Because the conduction and convection boundary layer flow is coupled (conjugated in the problem, a semi-analytical solution based on Differential Transform Method (DTM is presented for solving the non-linear integro-differential equation occurring in the problem. The main conclusion is that in the conjugate heat transfer case the temperature distribution of the plate is flatter than the one in the non-conjugate case. This feature is more pronounced under turbulent flow when compared with the laminar flow.

  4. Flat plate heat transfer for laminar transition and turbulent boundary layers using a shock tube

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brostmeyer, J. D.; Nagamatsu, H. T.

    1984-01-01

    Heat transfer results are presented for laminar, transition, and turbulent boundary layers for a Mach number of 0.12 with gas temperatures of 425 K and 1000 K over a flat plate at room temperature. The measurements were made in air for a Reynolds number range of 600 to 6 million. The heat transfer measurements were conducted in a 70-ft long, 4 in. diameter shock tube. Reflecting wedges were used to reflect the incident shock wave to produce a flow Mach number of 0.12 behind the reflected shock wave. Thin film platinum heat gages were mounted on the plate surface to measure the local heat flux. The laminar results for gas temperatures of 425 K to 1000 K agree well with theory. The turbulent results are also close to incompressible theory, with the 1000 K flow case being slightly higher. The transition results lie between the laminar and turbulent predictions.

  5. Flowfield measurements in a separated and reattached flat plate turbulent boundary layer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patrick, William P.

    1987-03-01

    The separation and reattachment of a large-scale, two-dimensional turbulent boundary layer at low subsonic speed on a flat plate has been studied experimentally. The separation bubble was 55 cm long and had a maximum bubble thickness, measured to the height of the mean dividing streamline, of 17 cm, which was twice the thickness of the inlet boundary layer. A combination of laser velocimetry, hot-wire anemometry, pneumatic probing techniques, and flow visualization were used as diagnostics. Principal findings were that an outer inviscid rotational flow was defined which essentially convected over the blockage associated with the inner, viscously dominated bubble recirculation region. A strong backflow region in which the flow moved upstream 100 percent of the time was measured near the test surface over the central 35 percent of the bubble. A laminar backflow boundary layer having pseudo-turbulent characteristics including a log-linear velocity profile was generated under the highly turbulent backflow. Velocity profile shapes in the reversed flow region matched a previously developed universal backflow profile at the upstream edge of the separation region but not in the steady backflow region downstream. A smoke flow visualization movie and hot-film measurements revealed low frequency nonperiodic flapping at reattachment. However, forward flow fraction data at reattachment and mean velocity profiles in the redeveloping boundary layer downstream of reattachment correlated with backward-facing step data when the axial dimension was scaled by the distance from the maximum bubble thickness to reattachment.

  6. HOT WIRE MEASUREMENT OF TURBULENT BOUNDARY LAYER ON A FILM COOLING PLATE WITH DIFFUSION HOLES

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    This study experimentally investigated the film cooling flowfield of a single row of diffusion holes, from which the secondary air flow was injected into a turbulent boundary layer with zero pressure gradient on a flat plate. Circular-shaped holes were also tested as a basis for comparison. All the holes were inclined downstream at 35° with respect to the surface and the lateral spacing between the holes was 3 diameters of the hole. The mainstream velocity was maintained at 17 m/s and the Reynolds number based on the injection hole diameter was almost 11000. The density ratio of the jet to mainstream was 1.0, and the jet-to-mainstream velocity ratios M were 0.5 and 1.5. Normal-type and X-type hot wire anemometries were used to measure the streamwise mean velocity and its components, the normal and shear turbulent Reynolds stress components at the locations from the backward edge of the injection hole to 25 diameters downstream.

  7. On the Estimation of Spanwise Pressure Coherence of a Turbulent Boundary Layer over a Flat Plate

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Van der Velden, W.C.P.; Van Zuijlen, A.H.; De Jong, A.T.; Bijl, H.

    2014-01-01

    A Large Eddy Simulation (LES) with four different closure models are analyzed in OpenFOAM, an open source Computional Fluid Dynamics (CFD) package and validated for the determination of the streamwise and spanwise coherence length of the pressure field below a turbulent boundary layer at low

  8. Large-eddy simulation of separation and reattachment of a flat plate turbulent boundary layer

    KAUST Repository

    Cheng, W.

    2015-11-11

    © 2015 Cambridge University Press. We present large-eddy simulations (LES) of separation and reattachment of a flat-plate turbulent boundary-layer flow. Instead of resolving the near wall region, we develop a two-dimensional virtual wall model which can calculate the time- and space-dependent skin-friction vector field at the wall, at the resolved scale. By combining the virtual-wall model with the stretched-vortex subgrid-scale (SGS) model, we construct a self-consistent framework for the LES of separating and reattaching turbulent wall-bounded flows at large Reynolds numbers. The present LES methodology is applied to two different experimental flows designed to produce separation/reattachment of a flat-plate turbulent boundary layer at medium Reynolds number Reθ based on the momentum boundary-layer thickness θ. Comparison with data from the first case at demonstrates the present capability for accurate calculation of the variation, with the streamwise co-ordinate up to separation, of the skin friction coefficient, Reθ, the boundary-layer shape factor and a non-dimensional pressure-gradient parameter. Additionally the main large-scale features of the separation bubble, including the mean streamwise velocity profiles, show good agreement with experiment. At the larger Reθ = 11000 of the second case, the LES provides good postdiction of the measured skin-friction variation along the whole streamwise extent of the experiment, consisting of a very strong adverse pressure gradient leading to separation within the separation bubble itself, and in the recovering or reattachment region of strongly-favourable pressure gradient. Overall, the present two-dimensional wall model used in LES appears to be capable of capturing the quantitative features of a separation-reattachment turbulent boundary-layer flow at low to moderately large Reynolds numbers.

  9. Effects of free stream turbulence on turbulent boundary layer on a flat plate with zero pressure gradient. 4th Report. Calculation of flow field; Seiatsu ittei no heiban ranryu kyokaiso ni oyobosu shuryubu midare no eikyo

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hori, M.; Yata, J. [Kyoto Inst. of Technology, Kyoto (Japan); Minamiyama, T. [Fukuyama University, Hiroshima (Japan)

    1996-04-25

    The effects of free stream turbulence on turbulent boundary layer were calculated using a {kappa}-{epsilon} two-equation model. The calculations were performed with respect to velocity profiles on a flat plate wall shear stress turbulence energy integral length scales of turbulence and decay of free stream turbulence and the results were compared with experimental results. The energy of free stream turbulence and the dissipation values at the leading edge of flat plate were used, as the initial conditions for calculation. These initial values of dissipation were determined from the integral length scales of free stream turbulence at the leading edge. The calculated wall shear stress increased with the free stream turbulence and integral length scales of turbulence. The velocity profiles and turbulence energy agreed well with the experimental results and the effects of free stream turbulence on the wall shear stress agreed fairly well with those observed in experiments. 15 refs., 10 figs.

  10. Turbulent Friction in the Boundary Layer of a Flat Plate in a Two-Dimensional Compressible Flow at High Speeds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frankl, F.; Voishel, V.

    1943-01-01

    In the present report an investigation is made on a flat plate in a two-dimensional compressible flow of the effect of compressibility and heating on the turbulent frictional drag coefficient in the boundary layer of an airfoil or wing radiator. The analysis is based on the Prandtl-Karman theory of the turbulent boundary later and the Stodola-Crocco, theorem on the linear relation between the total energy of the flow and its velocity. Formulas are obtained for the velocity distribution and the frictional drag law in a turbulent boundary later with the compressibility effect and heat transfer taken into account. It is found that with increase of compressibility and temperature at full retardation of the flow (the temperature when the velocity of the flow at a given point is reduced to zero in case of an adiabatic process in the gas) at a constant R (sub x), the frictional drag coefficient C (sub f) decreased, both of these factors acting in the same sense.

  11. Obliquity along plate boundaries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Philippon, Mélody; Corti, Giacomo

    2016-12-01

    Most of the plate boundaries are activated obliquely with respect to the direction of far field stresses, as roughly only 8% of the plate boundaries total length shows a very low obliquity (ranging from 0 to 10°, sub-orthogonal to the plate displacement). The obliquity along plate boundaries is controlled by (i) lateral rheological variations within the lithosphere and (ii) consistency with the global plate circuit. Indeed, plate tectonics and magmatism drive rheological changes within the lithosphere and consequently influence strain localization. Geodynamical evolution controls large-scale mantle convection and plate formation, consumption, and re-organization, thus triggering plate kinematics variations, and the adjustment and re-orientation of far field stresses. These geological processes may thus result in plate boundaries that are not perpendicular but oblique to the direction of far field stresses. This paper reviews the global patterns of obliquity along plate boundaries. Using GPlate, we provide a statistical analysis of present-day obliquity along plate boundaries. Within this framework, by comparing natural examples and geological models, we discuss deformation patterns and kinematics recorded along oblique plate boundaries.

  12. Active control of flow noise sources in turbulent boundary layer on a flat-plate using piezoelectric bimorph film

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Song, Woo Seog; Lee, Seung Bae [Inha University, Incheon (Korea, Republic of); Shin, Dong Shin [Hongik University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Na, Yang [Konkuk University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2006-11-15

    The piezoelectric bimorph film, which, as an actuator, can generate more effective displacement than the usual PVDF film, is used to control the turbulent boundary-layer flow. The change of wall pressures inside the turbulent boundary layer is observed by using the multi-channel microphone array flush-mounted on the surface when actuation at the non-dimensional frequency f{sub b}{sup +} =0.008 and 0.028 is applied to the turbulent boundary layer. The wall pressure characteristics by the actuation to produce local displacement are more dominantly influenced by the size of the actuator module than the actuation frequency. The movement of large-scale turbulent structures to the upper layer is found to be the main mechanism of the reduction in the wall-pressure energy spectrum when the 700{nu}/u{sub {tau}}-long bimorph film is periodically actuated at the non-dimensional frequency f{sub b}{sup +} =0.008 and 0.028. The bimorph actuator is triggered with the time delay for the active forcing at a single frequency when a 1/8' pressure-type, pin-holed microphone sensor detects the large-amplitude pressure event by the turbulent spot. The wall-pressure energy in the late-transitional boundary layer is partially reduced near the convection wavenumber by the open-loop control based on the large amplitude event.

  13. Analysis of turbulent boundary layers

    CERN Document Server

    Cebeci, Tuncer

    1974-01-01

    Analysis of Turbulent Boundary Layers focuses on turbulent flows meeting the requirements for the boundary-layer or thin-shear-layer approximations. Its approach is devising relatively fundamental, and often subtle, empirical engineering correlations, which are then introduced into various forms of describing equations for final solution. After introducing the topic on turbulence, the book examines the conservation equations for compressible turbulent flows, boundary-layer equations, and general behavior of turbulent boundary layers. The latter chapters describe the CS method for calculati

  14. Study of Transition from Laminar to Turbulent Boundary Layer on a Tilted Flat Plate Using Heat Transfer Measurements

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    E.Sanz; C.Nicot; R.Point; F.Plaza

    2007-01-01

    The boundary layer transition over a flat tilted plate has been studied by means of heat transfer measurements. A heat flux sensor has been developed, in order to measure the efficiency of convective heat transfer for various types of surfaces or flows. Its operation at constant temperature allows direct and fast measurements of heat flux. The present paper reports the development of the sensor and presents its application to the study of transition in a boundary layer depending on the angle of incidence of the external flow. An exponential relationship between critical Reynolds number and pressure gradient parameter has been found.

  15. Direct numerical simulation of K-type and H-type transitions to turbulence in a low Mach number flat plate boundary layer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sayadi, Taraneh; Hamman, Curtis; Moin, Parviz

    2011-11-01

    Transition to turbulence via spatially evolving secondary instabilities in compressible, zero-pressure-gradient flat plate boundary layers is numerically simulated for both the Klebanoff K-type and Herbert H-type disturbances. The objective of this work is to evaluate the universality of the breakdown process between different routes through transition in wall-bounded shear flows. Each localized linear disturbance is amplified through weak non-linear instability that grows into lambda-vortices and then hairpin-shaped eddies with harmonic wavelength, which become less organized in the late-transitional regime once a fully populated spanwise turbulent energy spectrum is established. For the H-type transition, the computational domain extends from Rex =105 , where laminar blowing and suction excites the most unstable fundamental and a pair of oblique waves, to fully turbulent stage at Rex = 10 . 6 ×105 . The computational domain for the K-type transition extends to Rex = 9 . 6 ×105 . The computational algorithm employs fourth-order central differences with non-reflective numerical sponges along the external boundaries. For each case, the Mach number is 0.2. Supported by the PSAAP program of DoE, ANL and LLNL.

  16. Alpha models and boundary-layer turbulence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheskidov, Alexey

    We study boundary-layer turbulence using the Navier-Stokes-alpha model obtaining an extension of the Prandtl equations for the averaged flow in a turbulent boundary layer. In the case of a zero pressure gradient flow along a flat plate, we derive a nonlinear fifth-order ordinary differential equation, an extension of the Blasius equation. We study it analytically and prove the existence of a two-parameter family of solutions satisfying physical boundary conditions. From this equation we obtain a theoretical prediction of the skin-friction coefficient in a wide range of Reynolds numbers based on momentum thickness, and deduce the maximal value of the skin-friction coefficient in the turbulent boundary layer. The two-parameter family of solutions to the equation matches experimental data in the transitional boundary layers with different free stream turbulence intensity. A one-parameter sub-family of solutions, obtained using our skin-friction coefficient law, matches experimental data in the turbulent boundary layer for moderately large Reynolds numbers.

  17. Effects of large-scale free stream turbulence on a turbulent boundary layer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharp, N. S.; Neuscamman, S.; Warhaft, Z.

    2009-09-01

    Results of a wind tunnel experiment in which there are systematic variations of free stream turbulence above a flat-plate boundary layer are presented. Upstream of the plate, an active grid generates free stream turbulence varying in intensity from 0.25% to 10.5%. The momentum thickness Reynolds number of the boundary layer varies from 550 to nearly 3000. In all cases, the ratio of the free stream turbulence length scale to the boundary layer depth is greater than unity. Hotwire measurements show that, at high turbulence intensities, the effects of the free stream turbulence extend deep into the boundary layer, affecting the wall stress as well as the small-scale (derivative) statistics. Premultiplied energy spectra show a double peak. At very low free stream turbulence intensities these peaks are associated with the inner and outer scales of the turbulent boundary layer, but at high turbulence intensities the free stream energy peak dominates over the boundary layer's outer scale. The implications of the effect of the large free stream turbulence scales on the small, near-wall scales is discussed with reference to recent high Reynolds number experiments in a turbulent boundary layer without free stream turbulence [Hutchins and Marusic, Philos. Trans. R. Soc. London, Ser. A 365, 647 (2007)].

  18. ALGEBRAIC TURBULENCE MODEL WITH MEMORY FOR COMPUTATION OF 3-D TURBULENT BOUNDARY LAYERS WITH VALIDATION

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2000-01-01

    Additional equations were found based on experiments for an algebraic turbulence model to improve the prediction of the behavior of three dimensional turbulent boundary layers by taking account of the effects of pressure gradient and the historical variation of eddy viscosity, so the model is with memory. Numerical calculation by solving boundary layer equations was carried out for the five pressure driven three dimensional turbulent boundary layers developed on flat plates, swept-wing, and prolate spheroid in symmetrical plane. Comparing the computational results with the experimental data, it is obvious that the prediction will be more accurate if the proposed closure equations are used, especially for the turbulent shear stresses.

  19. Supersonic Turbulent Boundary Layer: DNS and RANS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    XU Jing-Lei; MA Hui-Yang

    2007-01-01

    We assess the performance of a few turbulence models for Reynolds averaged Navier-Stokes (RANS) simulation of supersonic boundary layers, compared to the direct numerical simulations (DNS) of supersonic flat-plate turbulent boundary layers, carried out by Gao et al. [Chin. Phys. Lett. 22 (2005) 1709] and Huang et al. [Sci.Chin. 48 (2005) 614], as well as some available experimental data. The assessment is made for two test cases, with incoming Mach numbers and Reynolds numbers M = 2.25, Re = 365, 000/in, and M = 4.5, Re - 1.7 × 107/m,respectively. It is found that in the first case the prediction of RANS models agrees well with the DNS and the experimental data, while for the second case the agreement of the DNS models with experiment is less satisfactory.The compressibility effect on the RANS models is discussed.

  20. Investigation of a turbulent spot and a tripped turbulent boundary layer flow using time-resolved tomographic PIV

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schröder, A.; Geisler, R.; Elsinga, G.E.; Scarano, F.; Dierksheide, U.

    2007-01-01

    In this feasibility study the tomographic PIV technique has been applied to time resolved PIV recordings for the study of the growth of a turbulent spot in a laminar flat plate boundary layer and to visualize the topology of coherent flow structures within a tripped turbulent flat plate boundary lay

  1. Some measurements in synthetic turbulent boundary layers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Savas, O.

    1980-01-01

    Synthetic turbulent boundary layers are examined which were constructed on a flat plate by generating systematic moving patterns of turbulent spots in a laminar flow. The experiments were carried out in a wind tunnel at a Reynolds number based on plate length of 1,700,000. Spots were generated periodically in space and time near the leading edge to form a regular hexagonal pattern. The disturbance mechanism was a camshaft which displaced small pins momentarily into the laminar flow at frequencies up to 80 Hz. The main instrumentation was a rake of 24 hot wires placed across the flow in a line parallel to the surface. The main measured variable was local intermittency; i.e., the probability of observing turbulent flow at a particular point in space and time. The results are reported in x-t diagrams showing the evolution of various synthetic flows along the plate. The dimensionless celerity or phase velocity of the large eddies is found to be 0.88, independent of eddy scale. All patterns with sufficiently small scales eventually showed loss of coherence as they moved downstream. A novel phenomenon called eddy transposition was observed in several flows which contained appreciable laminar regions. The large eddies shifted in formation to new positions, intermediate to their original ones, while preserving their hexagonal pattern. The present results, together with some empirical properties of a turbulent spot, are used to estimate the best choice of scales for constructing a synthetic boundary layer suitable for detailed study. The values recommended are: spanwise scale/thickness = 2.5, streamwise scale/thickness = 8.

  2. The seismotectonics of plate boundaries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berger, J.; Brune, J. N.; Goodkind, J.; Wyatt, F.; Agnew, D. C.; Beaumont, C.

    1981-01-01

    Research on the seismotectonics of plate boundaries is summarized. Instrumental development and an observational program designed to study various aspects of the seismotectonics of southern California and the northern Gulf of California are described. A unique superconducting gravimeter was further developed and supported under this program for deployment and operation at several sites. Work on Earth tides is also discussed.

  3. DNS of compressible turbulent boundary layer around a sharp cone

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI XinLiang; FU DeXun; MA YanWen

    2008-01-01

    Direct numerical simulation of the turbulent boundary layer over a sharp cone with 20° cone angle (or 10° half-cone angle) is performed by using the mixed seventh-order up-wind biased finite difference scheme and sixth-order central difference scheme.The free stream Mach number is 0.7 and free stream unit Reynolds number is 250000/inch.The characteristics of transition and turbulence of the sharp cone boundary layer are compared with those of the flat plate boundary layer,Statistics of fully developed turbulent flow agree well with the experimental and theoretical data for the turbulent flat-plate boundary layer flow.The near wall streak-like structure is shown and the average space between streaks (normalized by the local wall unit) keeps approximately invariable at different streamwise locations,The turbulent energy equation in the cylindrical coordinate is given and turbulent en-ergy budget is studied.The computed results show that the effect of circumferen-tial curvature on turbulence characteristics is not obvious.

  4. Wave turbulence buildup in a vibrating plate

    CERN Document Server

    Auliel, Maria Ines; Mordant, Nicolas

    2015-01-01

    We report experimental and numerical results on the buildup of the energy spectrum in wave turbulence of a vibrating thin elastic plate. Three steps are observed: first a short linear stage, then the turbulent spectrum is constructed by the propagation of a front in wave number space and finally a long time saturation due to the action of dissipation. The propagation of a front at the second step is compatible with scaling predictions from the Weak Turbulence Theory.

  5. Transient thermal response of turbulent compressible boundary layers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Li, Hongwei; Nalim, M. Razi; Merkle, Charles L.

    2011-01-01

    and Smith, and the turbulent Prandtl number formulation originally developed by Kays and Crawford. The governing differential equations are discretized with the Keller-box method. The numerical accuracy is validated through grid-independence studies and comparison with the steady state solution......-dimensional semi-infinite flat plate. The compressible Reynolds-averaged boundary layer equations are transformed into incompressible form through the Dorodnitsyn-Howarth transformation and then solved with similarity transformations. Turbulence is modeled using a two-layer eddy viscosity model developed by Cebeci....... In turbulent flow as in laminar, the transient heat transfer rates are very different from that obtained from quasi-steady analysis. It is found that the time scale for response of the turbulent boundary layer to far-field temperature changes is 40% less than for laminar flow, and the turbulent local Nusselt...

  6. Turbulent natural and mixed convection along a vertical plate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abu-Mulaweh, H.I.; Armaly, B.F.; Chen, T.S.; Zhao, J.Z.

    1997-07-01

    Measurements of turbulent boundary-layer air flow in natural and mixed convection adjacent to an isothermal vertical flat plate are reported. Laser-Doppler velocimeter and cold wire anemometer were used, respectively, to measure simultaneously the mean turbulent velocity and temperature distributions were measured for a temperature difference, {Delta}T, of 30 C between the heated wall and the free stream air at a fixed location x = 3 m (with a corresponding Grashof number Gr{sub x} = 8.55 x 10{sup 10}), and for a range of free stream velocities 0 m/s {le} U{sub {infinity} } {le} 0.41 m/s. The effect of small free stream velocity on the turbulent natural convection is examined. These results reveal that the introduction of small free stream velocity on turbulent natural convection flow suppresses turbulence and decreases the heat transfer rate from the heated wall.

  7. Seismic link at plate boundary

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Faical Ramdani; Omar Kettani; Benaissa Tadili

    2015-06-01

    Seismic triggering at plate boundaries has a very complex nature that includes seismic events at varying distances. The spatial orientation of triggering cannot be reduced to sequences from the main shocks. Seismic waves propagate at all times in all directions, particularly in highly active zones. No direct evidence can be obtained regarding which earthquakes trigger the shocks. The first approach is to determine the potential linked zones where triggering may occur. The second step is to determine the causality between the events and their triggered shocks. The spatial orientation of the links between events is established from pre-ordered networks and the adapted dependence of the spatio-temporal occurrence of earthquakes. Based on a coefficient of synchronous seismic activity to grid couples, we derive a network link by each threshold. The links of high thresholds are tested using the coherence of time series to determine the causality and related orientation. The resulting link orientations at the plate boundary conditions indicate that causal triggering seems to be localized along a major fault, as a stress transfer between two major faults, and parallel to the geothermal area extension.

  8. Turbulent boundary layer on perforated surfaces with vector injection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eroshenko, V. M.; Zaichik, L. I.; Klimov, A. A.; Ianovskii, L. S.; Kondratev, V. I.

    1980-10-01

    The paper presents an experimental investigation of a turbulent boundary layer on perforated plates with uniform vector injection at various angles to gas flow. It was shown that with strong injection at angles oriented in the flow direction the intensity of turbulent pulsation is decreased, while injection at angles in the opposite direction increase the intensity. A relationship was established between the critical parameters of the boundary layer injection angles; it was concluded that the asymptotic theory of Kutateladze and Leontiev can be used for determining the coefficient of friction of vector injection.

  9. Non-Equilibrium Effects on Hypersonic Turbulent Boundary Layers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Pilbum

    Understanding non-equilibrium effects of hypersonic turbulent boundary layers is essential in order to build cost efficient and reliable hypersonic vehicles. It is well known that non-equilibrium effects on the boundary layers are notable, but our understanding of the effects are limited. The overall goal of this study is to improve the understanding of non-equilibrium effects on hypersonic turbulent boundary layers. A new code has been developed for direct numerical simulations of spatially developing hypersonic turbulent boundary layers over a flat plate with finite-rate reactions. A fifth-order hybrid weighted essentially non-oscillatory scheme with a low dissipation finite-difference scheme is utilized in order to capture stiff gradients while resolving small motions in turbulent boundary layers. The code has been validated by qualitative and quantitative comparisons of two different simulations of a non-equilibrium flow and a spatially developing turbulent boundary layer. With the validated code, direct numerical simulations of four different hypersonic turbulent boundary layers, perfect gas and non-equilibrium flows of pure oxygen and nitrogen, have been performed. In order to rule out uncertainties in comparisons, the same inlet conditions are imposed for each species, and then mean and turbulence statistics as well as near-wall turbulence structures are compared at a downstream location. Based on those comparisons, it is shown that there is no direct energy exchanges between internal and turbulent kinetic energies due to thermal and chemical non-equilibrium processes in the flow field. Instead, these non-equilibria affect turbulent boundary layers by changing the temperature without changing the main characteristics of near-wall turbulence structures. This change in the temperature induces the changes in the density and viscosity and the mean flow fields are then adjusted to satisfy the conservation laws. The perturbation fields are modified according to

  10. Structure of relaminarizing turbulent boundary layers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramesh, O.; Patwardhan, Saurabh

    2014-11-01

    Relaminarization of a turbulent boundary layer in a strongly accelerated flow has received a great attention in recent times. It has been found that such relaminarization is a general and regularly occurring phenomenon in the leading-edge region of a swept wing of an airplane (van Dam et al., 1993). In this work, we investigate the effect of initial Reynolds number on the process of relaminarization in turbulent boundary layers. The experimental and numerical investigation of relaminarizing turbulent boundary layers undergoing same history reveals that the boundary layer with higher initial Reynolds number relaminarizes at a lower pressure gradient value compared to the one with lower Reynolds number. This effect can be explained on the inviscid theory proposed earlier in the literature. Further, various parameter criteria proposed to predict relaminarization, are assessed and the structure of relaminarizing boundary layers is investigated. A mechanism for stabilization of near-wall low speed streaks is proposed.

  11. Linear Controllers for Turbulent Boundary Layers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lim, Junwoo; Kim, John; Kang, Sung-Moon; Speyer, Jason

    2000-11-01

    Several recent studies have shown that controllers based on a linear system theory work surprisingly well in turbulent flows, suggesting that a linear mechanism may play an important role even in turbulent flows. It has been also shown that non-normality of the linearized Navier-Stokes equations is an essential characteristic in the regeneration of near-wall turbulence structures in turbulent boundary layers. A few controllers designed to reduce the role of different linear mechanisms, including that to minimize the non-normality of the linearized Navier-Stokes equations, have been developed and applied to a low Reynolds nubmer turbulent channel flow. A reduced-order model containing the most controllable and observables modes is derived for each system. Other existing control schemes, such as Choi et al's opposition control, have been examined from the point of a linear system control. Further discussion on controller design, such as choice of cost function and other control parameters, will be presented.

  12. Bursting frequency prediction in turbulent boundary layers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    LIOU,WILLIAM W.; FANG,YICHUNG

    2000-02-01

    The frequencies of the bursting events associated with the streamwise coherent structures of spatially developing incompressible turbulent boundary layers were predicted using global numerical solution of the Orr-Sommerfeld and the vertical vorticity equations of hydrodynamic stability problems. The structures were modeled as wavelike disturbances associated with the turbulent mean flow. The global method developed here involves the use of second and fourth order accurate finite difference formula for the differential equations as well as the boundary conditions. An automated prediction tool, BURFIT, was developed. The predicted resonance frequencies were found to agree very well with previous results using a local shooting technique and measured data.

  13. Boundary Plasma Turbulence Simulations for Tokamaks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xu, X; Umansky, M; Dudson, B; Snyder, P

    2008-05-15

    The boundary plasma turbulence code BOUT models tokamak boundary-plasma turbulence in a realistic divertor geometry using modified Braginskii equations for plasma vorticity, density (ni), electron and ion temperature (T{sub e}; T{sub i}) and parallel momenta. The BOUT code solves for the plasma fluid equations in a three dimensional (3D) toroidal segment (or a toroidal wedge), including the region somewhat inside the separatrix and extending into the scrape-off layer; the private flux region is also included. In this paper, a description is given of the sophisticated physical models, innovative numerical algorithms, and modern software design used to simulate edge-plasmas in magnetic fusion energy devices. The BOUT code's unique capabilities and functionality are exemplified via simulations of the impact of plasma density on tokamak edge turbulence and blob dynamics.

  14. Turbulent Boundary Layers - Experiments, Theory and Modelling

    Science.gov (United States)

    1980-01-01

    DEVELOPMENT (ORGANISATION DU TRAITE DE L’ATLANTIQUE NORD ) AGARD Conference Proceedings No.271 TURBULENT BOUNDARY LAYERS - EXPERIMENTS, THEORY AND...photographs of Figures 21 and 22. In this case, the photographs are taken with a single flash strobe and thus yield the instantaneous positions of the

  15. Mixed boundary conditions for piezoelectric plates

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2009-01-01

    For plate bending and stretching problems in piezoelectric materials,the reciprocal theorem and the general solution of piezoelasticity are applied in a novel way to obtain the appropriate mixed boundary conditions accurate to all order.A decay analysis technique is used to establish necessary conditions that the prescribed data on the edge of the plate must satisfy in order that it should generate a decaying state within the plate.For the case of axisymmetric bending and stretching of a circular plate,these decaying state conditions are obtained explicitly for the first time when the mixed conditions are imposed on the plate edge.They are then used for the correct formulation of boundary conditions for the interior solution.

  16. Length Scale of Free Stream Turbulence and Its Impact on Bypass Transition in a Boundary Layer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Grzelak

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available An experimental investigation was carried out to study the turbulent flow over a flat plate in a subsonic wind tunnel. The enhanced level of turbulence was generated by five wicker grids with square meshes, and different parameters (diameter of the grid rod d = 0.3 to 3 mm and the grid mesh size M = 1 to 30 mm. The velocity of the flow was measured by means of a 1D hot-wire probe, suitable for measurements in a boundary layer. The main aim of the investigation was to explore the influence of the free stream turbulence length scale on the onset of laminar-turbulent bypass transition in a boundary layer on a flat plate. For this purpose, several transition correlations were presented, including intensity and length scales of turbulence, both at the leading edge of a plate and at the onset of transition. The paper ends with an attempt to create a correlation, which takes into account a simultaneous impact of turbulence intensity and turbulence scale on the boundary layer transition. To assess the isotropy of turbulence, the skewness factor of the flow velocity distribution was determined. Also several longitudinal scales of turbulence were determined and compared (integral scale, dissipation scale, Taylor microscale and Kolmogorov scale for different grids and different velocities of the mean flow U = 4, 6, 10, 15, 20 m/s.

  17. MHD Turbulence in Accretion Disk Boundary Layers

    CERN Document Server

    Chan, Chi-kwan

    2012-01-01

    The physical modeling of the accretion disk boundary layer, the region where the disk meets the surface of the accreting star, usually relies on the assumption that angular momentum transport is opposite to the radial angular frequency gradient of the disk. The standard model for turbulent shear viscosity, widely adopted in astrophysics, satisfies this assumption by construction. However, this behavior is not supported by numerical simulations of turbulent magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) accretion disks, which show that angular momentum transport driven by the magnetorotational instability is inefficient in this inner disk region. I will discuss the results of a recent study on the generation of hydromagnetic stresses and energy density in the boundary layer around a weakly magnetized star. Our findings suggest that although magnetic energy density can be significantly amplified in this region, angular momentum transport is rather inefficient. This seems consistent with the results obtained in numerical simulations...

  18. Turbulent Prandtl number and space-time temperature correlation measurements in an incompressible turbulent boundary layer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bagheri, Nader; Strataridakis, Constantine J.; White, Bruce R.

    1990-01-01

    Hot-wire anemometry measurements in an incompressible turbulent boundary laeyr flow over a heated flat plate at zero pressure gradient were made using an x-probe and temperature fluctuation probe. The experiments resulted in direct measurement of the turbulent Prandtl number as a function of height through the boundary layer for three temperature difference cases. Also, space-time correlations of temperature fluctuations T-prime were obtained with a pair of temperature fluctuation probes. The mean convection velocities of the T-prime large-scale structure are presented for the three temperature difference cases. The mean convection velocity of the T-prime structure is a function of position y(+) and is found to be independent of the temperature difference for the cases considered.

  19. Turbulent Plasmaspheric Boundary Layer: Observables and Consequences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mishin, Evgeny

    2014-10-01

    In situ satellite observations reveal strong lower hybrid/fast magnetosonic turbulence and broadband hiss-like VLF waves in the substorm subauroral geospace at and earthward of the electron plasmasheet boundary. These coincide with subauroral ion drifts/polarization streams (SAID/SAPS) in the plasmasphere and topside ionosphere. SAID/SAPS appear in ~10 min after the substorm onset consistent with the fast propagation of substorm injection fronts. The SAID channel follows the dispersionless cutoff of the energetic electron flux at the plasmapause. This indicates that the cold plasma maintains charge neutrality within the channel, thereby short-circuiting the injected plasma jet (injection fronts over the plasmasphere. Plasma turbulence leads to the circuit resistivity and magnetic diffusion as well as significant electron heating and acceleration. As a result, a turbulent boundary layer forms between the inner edge of the electron plasmasheet and plasmasphere. The SAID/SAPS-related VLF emissions appear to constitute a distinctive subset of substorm/storm-related VLF activity in the region co-located with freshly injected energetic ions inside the plasmasphere. Significant pitch-angle diffusion coefficients suggest that substorm SAID/SAPS-related VLF waves could be responsible for the alteration of the outer radiation belt boundary during (sub)storms. Supported by the Air Force Office of Scientific Research.

  20. Effects of small-scale freestream turbulence on turbulent boundary layers with and without thermal convection

    OpenAIRE

    Nagata, Kouji; Sakai, Yasuhiko; Komori, Satoru

    2011-01-01

    Effects of weak, small-scale freestream turbulence on turbulent boundary layers with and without thermal convection are experimentally investigated using a wind tunnel. Two experiments are carried out: the first is isothermal boundary layers with and without grid turbulence, and the second is non-isothermal boundary layers with and without grid turbulence. Both boundary layers develop under a small favorable pressure gradient. For the latter case, the bottom wall of the test section is heated...

  1. Measurements in Transitional Boundary Layers Under High Free-Stream Turbulence and Strong Acceleration Conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Volino, Ralph John

    1995-01-01

    Measurements from transitional, heated boundary layers along a concave-curved test wall are presented and discussed. A boundary layer subject to low free-stream turbulence intensity (FSTI), which contains stationary streamwise (Gortler) vortices, is documented. The low FSTI measurements are followed by measurements in boundary layers subject to high (initially 8%) free-stream turbulence intensity and moderate to strong (K = {nuover U_sp{infty} {2}}{dUinftyover dx} as high as 9times 10^{ -6}) acceleration. The high FSTI experiments are the main focus of the work. Conditions were chosen to simulate those present on the downstream half of the pressure side of a gas turbine airfoil. The high FSTI boundary layers undergo transition from a strongly disturbed non-turbulent state to a fully-turbulent state. Due to the stabilizing effect of strong acceleration, the transition zones are of extended length in spite of the high FSTI. Transitional values of skin friction coefficients and Stanton numbers drop below flat-plate, low FSTI, turbulent flow correlations, but remain well above laminar flow values. Mean velocity and temperature profiles exhibit clear changes in shape as the flow passes through transition. Turbulence statistics, including the turbulent shear stress, turbulent heat flux, and turbulent Prandtl number, are documented. Turbulent transport is strongly suppressed below values in unaccelerated turbulent boundary layers. A technique called "octant analysis" is introduced and applied to several cases from the literature as well as to data from the present study. Octant analysis shows a fundamental difference between transitional and fully-turbulent boundary layers. Transitional boundary layers are characterized by incomplete mixing compared to fully-turbulent boundary layers. Similar octant analysis results are observed in both low and high FSTI cases. Spectral analysis suggests that the non-turbulent zone of the high FSTI flow is dominated by large scale

  2. Interaction of a Boundary Layer with a Turbulent Wake

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piomelli, Ugo

    2004-01-01

    The objective of this grant was to study the transition mechanisms on a flat-plate boundary layer interacting with the wake of a bluff body. This is a simplified configuration presented and designed to exemplify the phenomena that occur in multi-element airfoils, in which the wake of an upstream element impinges on a downstream one. Some experimental data is available for this configuration at various Reynolds numbers. The first task carried out was the implementation and validation of the immersed-boundary method. This was achieved by performing calculations of the flow over a cylinder at low and moderate Reynolds numbers. The low-Reynolds number results are discussed, which is enclosed as Appendix A. The high-Reynolds number results are presented in a paper in preparation for the Journal of Fluid Mechanics. We performed calculations of the wake-boundary-layer interaction at two Reynolds numbers, Re approximately equal to 385 and 1155. The first case is discussed and a comparison of the two calculations is reported. The simulations indicate that at the lower Reynolds number the boundary layer is buffeted by the unsteady Karman vortex street shed by the cylinder. This is shown: long streaky structures appear in the boundary layer in correspondence of the three-dimensionalities in the rollers. The fluctuations, however, cannot be self-sustained due to the low Reynolds-number, and the flow does not reach a turbulent state within the computational domain. In contrast, in the higher Reynolds-number case, boundary-layer fluctuations persist after the wake has decayed (due, in part, to the higher values of the local Reynolds number Re achieved in this case); some evidence could be observed that a self-sustaining turbulence generation cycle was beginning to be established. A third simulation was subsequently carried out at a higher Reynolds number, Re=3900. This calculation gave results similar to those of the Re=l155 case. Turbulence was established at fairly low

  3. Recovery of a supersonic turbulent boundary layer after an expansion corner

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Ming-bo; Hu, Zhiwei; Sandham, Neil D.

    2017-07-01

    Supersonic turbulent flows at Mach 2.7 over expansion corners with deflection angles of 0° (flat plate), 2°, and 4° have been studied using direct numerical simulation. Distributions of skin friction, pressure, velocity, and boundary layer growth show that the turbulent boundary layer experiences a recovery from a non-equilibrium to an equilibrium state downstream of the expansion corner. Analysis of velocity profiles indicates that the streamwise velocity undergoes a reduction in the near-wall region even though the velocity in the core part of the boundary layer is accelerated after the expansion corner. Growth of the boundary layer was evaluated and a higher shape factor was found in the expansion cases. Turbulence was found to be mostly suppressed downstream of the corner, and throughout the recovery region, even though turbulence is regenerated in the near-wall region. The expansion ramp increases the near-wall streak spacing compared to a flat plate, and turbulent kinetic energy profiles and budgets exhibit a characteristic two-layer structure. Near-wall turbulence recovers to a balance between the local production and dissipation equilibrium more quickly in the inner layer than in the outer layer. The two-layer structure is due to a history effect of turbulence decay in the outer part of the boundary layer downstream of the expansion corner, with limited momentum and energy exchange between the inner layer and the main stream.

  4. On the development of turbulent boundary layer with wall transpiration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferro, Marco; Downs, Robert S., III; Fallenius, Bengt E. G.; Fransson, Jens H. M.

    2015-11-01

    An experimental study of the development of the transpired boundary layer in zero pressure gradient is carried out on a 6.4 m long hydrodynamically smooth and perforated plate. The relatively longer development length of the present perforated plate compared to the ones used in previous studies allows us to investigate whether an asymptotic suction boundary layer with constant thickness is achieved for the turbulent state, analogously to what happens in the laminar state. Velocity profiles are obtained via hot-wire anemometry while the wall shear stress is measured at several streamwise locations with hot-film and wall-wire probes as well as with oil-film interferometry. The threshold suction coefficient above which relaminarization starts to occur is examined. The scaling of the mean velocity and of higher order velocity moments is discussed in light of the measured wall shear stress data. Support from the European Research Council of the Advanced Fluid Research On Drag reduction in Turbulence Experiments (AFRODITE) is acknowledged.

  5. Structure of turbulence in three-dimensional boundary layers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Subramanian, Chelakara S.

    1993-01-01

    This report provides an overview of the three dimensional turbulent boundary layer concepts and of the currently available experimental information for their turbulence modeling. It is found that more reliable turbulence data, especially of the Reynolds stress transport terms, is needed to improve the existing modeling capabilities. An experiment is proposed to study the three dimensional boundary layer formed by a 'sink flow' in a fully developed two dimensional turbulent boundary layer. Also, the mean and turbulence field measurement procedure using a three component laser Doppler velocimeter is described.

  6. Analytic prediction for planar turbulent boundary layers

    CERN Document Server

    Chen, Xi

    2016-01-01

    Analytic predictions of mean velocity profile (MVP) and streamwise ($x$) development of related integral quantities are presented for flows in channel and turbulent boundary layer (TBL), based on a symmetry analysis of eddy length and total stress. Specific predictions are the friction velocity $u_\\tau$: ${ U_e/u_\\tau }\\approx 2.22\\ln Re_x+2.86-3.83\\ln(\\ln Re_x)$; the boundary layer thickness $\\delta_e$: $x/\\delta_e \\approx 7.27\\ln Re_x-5.18-12.52\\ln(\\ln Re_x)$; the momentum thickness Reynolds number: $Re_x/Re_\\theta=4.94[{(\\ln {{\\mathop{\\rm Re}\

  7. Turbulence in the Stable Atmospheric Boundary Layer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernando, Harindra; Kit, Eliezer; Conry, Patrick; Hocut, Christopher; Liberzon, Dan

    2016-11-01

    During the field campaigns of the Mountain Terrain Atmospheric Modeling and Observations (MATERHORN) Program, fine-scale measurements of turbulence in the atmospheric boundary layer (ABL) were made using a novel sonic and hot-film anemometer dyad (a combo probe). A swath of scales, from large down to Kolmogorov scales, was covered. The hot-film was located on a gimbal within the sonic probe volume, and was automated to rotate in the horizontal plane to align with the mean flow measured by sonic. This procedure not only helped satisfy the requirement of hot-film alignment with the mean flow, but also allowed in-situ calibration of hot-films. This paper analyzes a period of nocturnal flow that was similar to an idealized stratified parallel shear flow. Some new phenomena were identified, which included the occurrence of strong bursts in the velocity records indicative of turbulence generation at finer scales that are not captured by conventional sonic anemometers. The spectra showed bottleneck effect, but its manifestation did not fit into the framework of previous bottleneck-effect theories and was unequivocally related to bursts of turbulence. The measurements were also used to evaluate the energetics of stratified shear flows typical of the environment. ONR # N00014-11-1-0709; NSF # AGS-1528451; ISF 408/15.

  8. Turbulent boundary layer over a chine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panchapakesan, N. R.; Joubert, P. N.

    1999-11-01

    The flow over an edge aligned with the streamwise direction is studied as a representative of the turbulent boundary layers developing over hard chines found on the hulls of ships and catamarans. We present results of a traditional experimental investigation of this geometry in a wind tunnel with pitot tubes and hot-wires. The chine model consisted of two surfaces made of varnished fibre boards with leading edges of airfoil sections and a 90 degree corner. The boundary layer was tripped with wires close to the leading edge. The model was housed in a test section of length 6.5 m in a closed circuit wind tunnel. The experiments were conducted at a unit Reynolds number of 680,000 /m corresponding to a nominal free stream velocity of 10 m/s. The mean velocity field and the associated integral parameters obtained with pitot tube measurements are presented for different streamwise locations from 0.2 to 4.7 m from the trip wire. The flow at the two farthest locations were also studied with single and 'x' hot-wires. The secondary mean flow and the turbulence field in the corner region are described with these measurements.

  9. Boundary Layer for the Navier-Stokes-alpha Model of Fluid Turbulence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheskidov, A.

    We study boundary-layer turbulence using the Navier-Stokes-alpha model obtaining an extension of the Prandtl equations for the averaged flow in a turbulent boundary layer. In the case of a zero pressure gradient flow along a flat plate, we derive a nonlinear fifth-order ordinary differential equation, which is an extension of the Blasius equation. We study it analytically and prove the existence of a two-parameter family of solutions satisfying physical boundary conditions. Matching these parameters with the skin-friction coefficient and the Reynolds number based on momentum thickness, we get an agreement of the solutions with experimental data in the laminar and transitional boundary layers, as well as in the turbulent boundary layer for moderately large Reynolds numbers.

  10. Identification of Lagrangian coherent structures in the turbulent boundary layer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2009-01-01

    Using Finite-Time Lyapunov Exponents (FTLE) method, Lagrangian coherent structures (LCSs) in a fully developed flat-plate turbulent boundary layer are successfully identified from a two-dimensional (2D) velocity field obtained by time-resolved 2D PIV measurement. The typical LCSs in the turbulent boundary layer are hairpin-like structures, which are characterized as legs of quasi-streamwise vor- tices extending deep into the near wall region with an inclination angle θ to the wall, and heads of the transverse vortex tube located in the outer region. Statistical analysis on the characteristic shape of typical LCS reveals that the probability density distribution of θ accords well with t-distribution in the near wall region, but presents a bimodal distribution with two peaks in the outer region, corresponding to the hairpin head and the hairpin neck, respectively. Spatial correlation analysis of FTLE field is im- plemented to get the ensemble-averaged inclination angle θ R of typical LCS. θ R first increases and then decreases along the wall-normal direction, similar to that of the mean value of θ. Moreover, the most probable value of θ saturates at y+=100 with the maximum value of about 24°, suggesting that the most likely position where hairpins transit from the neck to the head is located around y+=100. The ensem- ble-averaged convection velocity Uc of typical LCS is finally calculated from temporal-spatial correla- tion analysis of FTLE field. It is found that the wall-normal profile of the convection velocity Uc(y) ac- cords well with the local mean velocity profile U(y) beyond the buffer layer, evidencing that the down- stream convection of hairpins determines the transportation properties of the turbulent boundary layer in the log-region and beyond.

  11. Identification of Lagrangian coherent structures in the turbulent boundary layer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    PAN Chong; WANG JinJun; ZHANG Cao

    2009-01-01

    Using Finite-Time Lyapunov Exponents (FTLE) method, Lagrangian coherent structures (LCSs) in a fully developed flat-plate turbulent boundary layer are successfully identified from a two-dimensional (2D) velocity field obtained by time-resolved 2D PIV measurement. The typical LCSs in the turbulent boundary layer are hairpin-like structures, which are characterized as legs of quasi-streamwise vor-tices extending deep into the near wall region with an inclination angle θto the wall, and heads of the transverse vortex tube located in the outer region. Statistical analysis on the characteristic shape of typical LCS reveals that the probability density distribution of # accords well with t-distribution in the near wall region, but presents a bimodal distribution with two peaks in the outer region, corresponding to the hairpin head and the hairpin neck, respectively. Spatial correlation analysis of FTLE field is im-plemented to get the ensemble-averaged inclination angle θR of typical LCS. θR first increases and then decreases along the wall-normal direction, similar to that of the mean value of θ. Moreover, the most probable value of 8 saturates at Y+=100 with the maximum value of about 24°, suggesting that the most likely position where hairpins transit from the neck to the head is located around Y+=100. The ensem-ble-averaged convection velocity Uc of typical LCS is finally calculated from temporal-spatial correla-tion analysis of FTLE field. It is found that the wall-normal profile of the convection velocity Uc(Y) ac-cords well with the local mean velocity profile U(y) beyond the buffer layer, evidencing that the down-stream convection of hairpins determines the transportation properties of the turbulent boundary layer in the log-region and beyond.

  12. Effects of small-scale freestream turbulence on turbulent boundary layers with and without thermal convection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagata, Kouji; Sakai, Yasuhiko; Komori, Satoru

    2011-06-01

    Effects of weak, small-scale freestream turbulence on turbulent boundary layers with and without thermal convection are experimentally investigated using a wind tunnel. Two experiments are carried out: the first is isothermal boundary layers with and without grid turbulence, and the second is non-isothermal boundary layers with and without grid turbulence. Both boundary layers develop under a small favorable pressure gradient. For the latter case, the bottom wall of the test section is heated at a constant wall temperature to investigate the effects of thermal convection under the effects of freestream turbulence. For both cases, the turbulence intensity in the freestream is Tu = 1.3% ˜ 2.4%, and the integral length scale of freestream turbulence, L∞, is much smaller than the boundary layer thickness δ, i.e., L∞/δ ≪1. The Reynolds numbers Reθ based on the momentum thickness and freestream speed U∞ are Reθ = 560, 1100, 1310, and 2330 in isothermal boundary layers without grid turbulence. Instantaneous velocities, U and V, and instantaneous temperature T are simultaneously measured using a hot-wire anemometry and a constant-current resistance thermometer. The results show that the rms velocities and Reynolds shear stress normalized by the friction velocity are strongly suppressed by the freestream turbulence throughout the boundary layer in both isothermal and non-isothermal boundary layers. In the non-isothermal boundary layers, the normalized rms temperature and vertical turbulent heat flux are also strongly suppressed by the freestream turbulence. Turbulent momentum and heat transfer at the wall are enhanced by the freestream turbulence and the enhancement is notable in unstable stratification. The power spectra of u, v, and θ and their cospectra show that motions of almost all scales are suppressed by the freestream turbulence in both the isothermal and non-isothermal boundary layers.

  13. Turbulent Boundary Layer at Large Re

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Horia DUMITRESCU

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available The fluids as deformable bodies without own shape, when starting from rest, experience interactions between the flowing fluid and the physical surfaces marking the bounds of flow. These interactions are a kind of impact process where there is a momentum exchange between two colliding bodies, i.e. the flow and its boundary surfaces. Within a short time of contact a post-impact shear flow occurs where two main effects are triggered off by the flow-induced collision: dramatic redistribution of the momentum and the boundary vorticity followed by the shear stress/viscosity change in the microstructure of the fluid which at the beginning behaves as linear reactive medium and latter as nonlinear dispersive medium. The disturbance of the starting flow induces the entanglement of the wall-bounded flow in the form of point-vortices or concentrated vorticity balls whence waves are emitted and propagated through flow field. The paper develops a wave mechanism for the transport of the concentrated boundary vorticity, directly related to the fascinating turbulence phenomenon, using the torsion concept of vorticity filaments associated with the hypothesis of thixotropic/nonlinear viscous fluid.

  14. Influence of temperature-dependent material properties on heat transfer in the turbulent flow over a flat plate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wehle, F.; Brandt, F.

    The influence of temperature dependence of material properties on heat transfer in a turbulent plate boundary layer is investigated using differential equations for the velocity and temperature fields of even, steady, and compressible boundary layer flows. The results are compared with the well-known material property correction factors of Zhukauskas (1966), Sieder and Tate (1936), and Hufschmidt and Bruck (1968).

  15. EXPERIMENTAL STUDY ON TURBULENT BOUNDARY LAYER CHARACTERISTICS OVER STREAMWISE RIBLETS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHAO Zhi-yong; DONG Shou-ping; DU Ya-nan

    2004-01-01

    Measurements of characteristics by means of a two-component Laser Doppler Velocimeter (LDV) were carried out in turbulent boundary layers over both a symmetric V-shaped ribbed plate and a smooth one in a low speed wind tunnel. The present results clearly indicate that the logarithmic velocity profile over the riblets surface is shifted upward with a 30.9% increase in the thickness of the viscous sublayer. Also a change in the log-law region is found. And the maximum value of streamwise velocity fluctuations is reduced by approximately 17%. The skewness and flatness factors do not show any change besides those in the region of y+<0.6. It is evident that the Reynolds shear stress over the riblets is reduced. Further more, in log-law region, the Reynolds shear stress has a larger reduction of up to 18%.

  16. Diffuse oceanic plate boundaries: Strain rates, vertically averaged rheology, and comparisons with narrow plate boundaries and stable plate interiors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gordon, Richard G.

    Diffuse plate boundaries occur in both oceanic and continental lithosphere and cover ≈ 15% of Earth's solid surface. The fastest plate speeds accommodated across diffuse oceanic plate boundaries are ≈ 15 mm/yr. The smallest strain rates averaged across narrow plate boundaries are at least 102 times larger than the largest strain rates across diffuse oceanic plate boundaries and at least 102 times larger than those across stable plate interiors. The effective viscosity (ηeff) of the lithosphere is estimated from the ratio of vertically averaged shear stresses to strain rates for three tectonic settings: (i) oceanic transform fault zones, for which ηeff = 3 ×1016 to 5×1019 Pa s, comparable to estimates for the asthenosphere, (ii) diffuse oceanic plate boundaries, for which ηeff = 1×1023 to 6×l023 Pa s, ≈ 10 times larger than for diffuse continental plate boundaries, and (iii) stable plate interiors, for which ηeff = 1x1024 to 2×1027 Pa s. The rheology of oceanic lithosphere over times longer than earthquake cycles is modeled as a plastic layer overlying a layer that deforms by creeping flow [Martinod and Davy, 1992]. Oceanic lithosphere deforms when the yield strength of the upper lithosphere is exceeded. The vertically averaged rheology of deforming oceanic lithosphere can be approximated by a power-law fluid for which ɛ. ∝ (τs)n where ɛ. is the rate of shear strain and τs is the shear stress. If the ratio of the yield strength of the upper lithosphere to the force required to deform the lower lithosphere at a strain rate of 10-16 s-1 is varied from 10-2 to 102 , the calculated value of n varies from ≈3 to ≈300. The map-view aspect ratio of a deforming zone in a thin sheet of power-law fluid is proportional to n-½ [England et al., 1985]. A profile of displacement versus distance inferred from a seismic profile across the Central Indian Basin (India-Capricorn diffuse oceanic plate boundary), where the lithosphere is about 60-Myr old

  17. An investigation of turbulence structure in a low Reynolds number incompressible turbulent boundary layer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strataridakis, Constantine John

    Hot-wire anemometry measurements in an incompressible turbulent boundary-layer flow over a flat plate at zero pressure gradient were made using two X-probes simultaneously. The experiment was performed in the large Atmospheric Boundary-Layer Wind Tunnel at the University of California, Davis. The 7.32 meter long flat plate installed within the wind tunnel generated approximately 20 cm thick boundary layer, R (sub theta) approximately 4,000. Mean velocity and turbulence intensity data very close to the wall (y(+) is greater than or = to 1) were measured with a single hot wire to improve the measurement resolution. Space-time correlations of mu' and upsilon' velocities and of their instantaneous product were obtained with a pair of X-wires. The mean convection velocities, the extent in space, the mean inclination angles, and coherence characteristics of the mu', upsilon' and (mu')(upsilon') large-scale structures are presented. (The (mu')(upsilon') results are presented for the first time.) The mu' structure is inclined at a small angle (19 deg) to the wall, while the upsilon' and (mu')(upsilon') structures propagate almost at wall-normal directions. Each of the mu' and upsilon' structures appears elongated in the direction of the corresponding velocity fluctuation and is limited to delta-extent in the other two directions. The similarity between the upsilon' and (mu')(upsilon') suggests that the (mu')(upsilon') might mainly be a consequence of the motion of the upsilon' structure. Finally, a possible explanation for the differences between the (mu')(upsilon'), upsilon' and the mu' structures is the existence of different coherent scales, one dominating mu' and the other dominating upsilon' and (mu')(upsilon').

  18. Heat transfer through turbulent boundary layers - The effects of introduction of and recovery from convex curvature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simon, T. W.; Moffat, R. J.

    1979-01-01

    Measurements have been made of the heat transfer through a turbulent boundary layer on a convexly curved isothermal wall and on a flat plate following the curved section. Data were taken for one free-stream velocity and two different ratios of boundary layer thickness to radius of curvature delta/R = 0.051 and delta/R = 0.077. Only small differences were observed in the distribution of heat transfer rates for the two boundary layer thicknesses tested, although differences were noted in the temperature distributions within the boundary layer

  19. A high-resolution code for large eddy simulation of incompressible turbulent boundary layer flows

    KAUST Repository

    Cheng, Wan

    2014-03-01

    We describe a framework for large eddy simulation (LES) of incompressible turbulent boundary layers over a flat plate. This framework uses a fractional-step method with fourth-order finite difference on a staggered mesh. We present several laminar examples to establish the fourth-order accuracy and energy conservation property of the code. Furthermore, we implement a recycling method to generate turbulent inflow. We use the stretched spiral vortex subgrid-scale model and virtual wall model to simulate the turbulent boundary layer flow. We find that the case with Reθ ≈ 2.5 × 105 agrees well with available experimental measurements of wall friction, streamwise velocity profiles and turbulent intensities. We demonstrate that for cases with extremely large Reynolds numbers (Reθ = 1012), the present LES can reasonably predict the flow with a coarse mesh. The parallel implementation of the LES code demonstrates reasonable scaling on O(103) cores. © 2013 Elsevier Ltd.

  20. Transition to turbulence in strongly heated vertical natural convection boundary layers

    CERN Document Server

    De Larochelambert, Thierry

    2008-01-01

    The mechanisms governing the transition to turbulence in natural convection boundary layers along strongly heated vertical walls remain neither very clear nor well understood, because of the lack of experiments and the difficulties of physical modelling. Our measurements bring experimental data focusing on this transition in quiescent air along radiating and conducting plates in the whole range of 2000 to 8000 W/m\\^2 heating rate. The analysis of the time series obtained by sliding window cross-correlation thermoanemometry leads us to point out coherent turbulent structures on short heights throughout the thin boundary layer, which seem to be governed by heat transfer and time-microscales of turbulence through the inner sublayer. Physical interpretations are given to relate to the observed heat transfer correlation and these turbulence transition structures along with radiation and conduction.

  1. Control of boundary layer transition location and plate vibration in the presence of an external acoustic field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maestrello, L.; Grosveld, F. W.

    1991-01-01

    The experiment is aimed at controlling the boundary layer transition location and the plate vibration when excited by a flow and an upstream sound source. Sound has been found to affect the flow at the leading edge and the response of a flexible plate in a boundary layer. Because the sound induces early transition, the panel vibration is acoustically coupled to the turbulent boundary layer by the upstream radiation. Localized surface heating at the leading edge delays the transition location downstream of the flexible plate. The response of the plate excited by a turbulent boundary layer (without sound) shows that the plate is forced to vibrate at different frequencies and with different amplitudes as the flow velocity changes indicating that the plate is driven by the convective waves of the boundary layer. The acoustic disturbances induced by the upstream sound dominate the response of the plate when the boundary layer is either turbulent or laminar. Active vibration control was used to reduce the sound induced displacement amplitude of the plate.

  2. Compressibility Effects in Turbulent Boundary Layers

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CAO Yu-Hui; PEI Jie; CHEN Jun; SHE Zhen-Su

    2008-01-01

    Local cascade (LC) scheme and space-time correlations are used to study turbulent structures and their convection behaviour in the near-wall region of compressible boundary layers at Ma = 0.8 and 1.3. The convection velocities of fluctuating velocity components u (streamwise) and v (vertical) are investigated by statistically analysing scale-dependent ensembles of LC structures. The results suggest that u is convected with entropy perturbations while v with an isentropic process. An abnormal thin layer distinct from the conventional viscous sub-layer is discovered in the immediate vicinity of the wall (y+≤1) in supersonic flows. While in the region 1 < y+ < 30,streamwise streaks dominate velocity, density and temperature fluctuations, the abnormal thin layer is dominated by spanwise streaks in vertical velocity and density fluctuations, where pressure and density fluctuations are strongly correlated. The LC scheme is proven to be effective in studying the nature of supersonic flows and compressibility effects on wall-bounded motions.

  3. Direct numerical simulation of laminar-turbulent flow over a flat plate at hypersonic flow speeds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Egorov, I. V.; Novikov, A. V.

    2016-06-01

    A method for direct numerical simulation of a laminar-turbulent flow around bodies at hypersonic flow speeds is proposed. The simulation is performed by solving the full three-dimensional unsteady Navier-Stokes equations. The method of calculation is oriented to application of supercomputers and is based on implicit monotonic approximation schemes and a modified Newton-Raphson method for solving nonlinear difference equations. By this method, the development of three-dimensional perturbations in the boundary layer over a flat plate and in a near-wall flow in a compression corner is studied at the Mach numbers of the free-stream of M = 5.37. In addition to pulsation characteristic, distributions of the mean coefficients of the viscous flow in the transient section of the streamlined surface are obtained, which enables one to determine the beginning of the laminar-turbulent transition and estimate the characteristics of the turbulent flow in the boundary layer.

  4. Boundary layers in turbulent Rayleigh-B\\'enard convection in air

    CERN Document Server

    Puits, Ronald du; Resagk, Christian; Thess, André

    2012-01-01

    The boundary layer flow in a Rayleigh-B\\'enard convection cell of rectangular shape has been visualized in this fluid dynamics video. The experiment has been undertaken in air at a Rayleigh number $Ra=1.3\\times 10^{10}$ and a Prandtl number $Pr=0.7$. Various sequences captured at selected positions of the heating plate show that the boundary layer is a very transient flow region characterized by coherent structures that permanently evolve. It becomes fully turbulent in the areas where the large-scale circulation impinge or leave the bottom plate.

  5. Effect of externally generated turbulence on wave boundary layer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fredsøe, Jørgen; Sumer, B. Mutlu; Kozakiewicz, A.

    2003-01-01

    This experimental study deals with the effect of externally generated turbulence on the oscillatory boundary layer to simulate the turbulence in the wave boundary layer under broken waves in the swash zone. The subject has been investigated experimentally in a U-shaped, oscillating water tunnel...... with a smooth bottom. Turbulence was generated ´externally´ as the flow in the oscillator was passed through a series of grids, that extended from the cover of the water tunnel to about mid-depth. Two different types of grid porosities were used. Direct measurements of the bed shear stress and velocity...... results. The mean and turbulence quantities in the outer flow region are increased substantially with the introduction of the grids. It is shown that the externally generated turbulence is able to penetrate the bed boundary layer, resulting in an increase in the bed shear stress, and therefore...

  6. On the interaction between turbulence grids and boundary layers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Irps Thomas

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Turbulence grids are widely used in wind tunnels to produce representative turbulence levels when testing aerodynamic phenomena around models. Although the purpose of the grid is to introduce a desired turbulence level in the freestream flow, the wall boundary layers of the tunnel are subjected to modification due to the presence of such grids. This could have major implications to the flow around the models to be tested and hence there is a need to further understand this interaction. The study described in this paper examines wind tunnel wall boundary layer modification by turbulence grids of different mesh sizes and porosities to understand the effect of these parameters on such interaction. Experimental results are presented in the form of pressure loss coefficients, boundary layer velocity profiles and the statistics of turbulence modification.

  7. Definition of Turbulent Boundary-Layer with Entropy Concept

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhao Rui

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The relationship between the entropy increment and the viscosity dissipation in turbulent boundary-layer is systematically investigated. Through theoretical analysis and direct numerical simulation (DNS, an entropy function fs is proposed to distinguish the turbulent boundary-layer from the external flow. This approach is proved to be reliable after comparing its performance in the following complex flows, namely, low-speed airfoil flows with different wall temperature, supersonic cavity-ramp flow dominated by the combination of free-shear layer, larger recirculation and shocks, and the hypersonic flow past an aeroplane configuration. Moreover, fs is deduced from the point of energy, independent of any particular turbulent quantities. That is, this entropy concept could be utilized by other engineering applications related with turbulent boundary-layer, such as turbulence modelling transition prediction and engineering thermal protection.

  8. The improvement of turbulence modeling for the aerothermal computation of hypersonic turbulent boundary layers

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2010-01-01

    The engineering computation of turbulent flows is mainly based on turbulence modeling,however,accurate aerothermal computation of hypersonic turbulent boundary layers is still a not well-solved problem. Aerothermal computation for turbulent boundary layers on a supersonic or hypersonic blunt cone with small bluntness is done firstly by using both direct numerical simulation and BL model,and seven different cases are investigated. Then the results obtained by the two methods are compared,and the reason causing the differences is found to be the incorrect assumption in the turbulence modeling that the ratio between eddy heat conductivity and eddy viscosity is constant throughout the whole boundary layer. Based on certain theoretical arguments,a method of modifying the expression of eddy heat conductivity in the region surrounding the peak location of the turbulent kinetic energy is proposed,which is verified to be effective,at least for the seven cases investigated.

  9. Calculation of eddy viscosity in a compressible turbulent boundary layer with mass injection and chemical reaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Omori, S.; Gross, K. W.

    1973-01-01

    The turbulent kinetic energy equation is coupled with boundary layer equations to solve the characteristics of compressible turbulent boundary layers with mass injection and combustion. The Reynolds stress is related to the turbulent kinetic energy using the Prandtl-Wieghardt formulation. When a lean mixture of hydrogen and nitrogen is injected through a porous plate into the subsonic turbulent boundary layer of air flow and ignited by external means, the turbulent kinetic energy increases twice as much as that of noncombusting flow with the same mass injection rate of nitrogen. The magnitudes of eddy viscosity between combusting and noncombusting flows with injection, however, are almost the same due to temperature effects, while the distributions are different. The velocity profiles are significantly affected by combustion. If pure hydrogen as a transpiration coolant is injected into a rocket nozzle boundary layer flow of combustion products, the temperature drops significantly across the boundary layer due to the high heat capacity of hydrogen. At a certain distance from the wall hydrogen reacts with the combustion products, liberating an extensive amount of heat.

  10. CONTINUOUS WAVELET TRANSFORM OF TURBULENT BOUNDARY LAYER FLOW

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIU Ying-zheng; KE Feng; CHEN Han-ping

    2005-01-01

    The spatio-temporal characteristics of the velocity fluctuations in a fully-developed turbulent boundary layer flow was investigated using hotwire. A low-speed wind tunnel was established. The experimental data was extensively analyzed in terms of continuous wavelet transform coefficients and their auto-correlation. The results yielded a potential wealth of information on inherent characteristics of coherent structures embedded in turbulent boundary layer flow. Spatial and temporal variations of the low- and high- frequency motions were revealed.

  11. A Compilation of Unsteady Turbulent Boundary Layer Experimental Data,

    Science.gov (United States)

    1981-11-01

    HIRSCH KITAet ai, GOSTELOW EHERENSBERGER LU HO & CHEN KOBASHI & HAYAKAWA MAINARDI & PANDAY MARVIN* LORBER & COVERT MIZUSHINA I SAXENA RAMAPRIAN & TU...Laminar Boundary Layer by a Moving Belt. AIAA Paj_2r 69-40, New York, N.Y., 1969. (LT) Mainardi , H. and Panday, P. K.: A Study of Turbulent Pulsating...Flow in a (-cular Pipe. Eurovisc 77 - Unsteady Turbulent Boundary Layers and Shear Flows, Toulouse, France, Jar,. 2977. (TE-D) Mainardi , H. and Panday

  12. EFFECT OF COOLED BOUNDARY ON THE TURBULENT STRUCTURE

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Li Guo-xiang; Mao Hua-yong; Li Na

    2003-01-01

    The flow field in the cooled channel of a heat exchanger was measured using the X-type film probes of Hot Wire/Firm Anemotheter, and the turbulent mechanism was discussed. It is concluded that the airflow is cooled in the flow process, the distribution of the turbulent intensity is relatively convergent near the centerline and the boundary, the constriction action produced due to heat release at the foot of the fins causes u to decrease and w to increase near the root downstream. It is concluded that the turbulent flow with cooled boundary results from the balance of production, dissipation and intermittency caused by constriction action.

  13. Investigation of turbulence models with compressibility corrections for hypersonic boundary flows

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Han Tang

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The applications of pressure work, pressure-dilatation, and dilatation-dissipation (Sarkar, Zeman, and Wilcox models to hypersonic boundary flows are investigated. The flat plate boundary layer flows of Mach number 5–11 and shock wave/boundary layer interactions of compression corners are simulated numerically. For the flat plate boundary layer flows, original turbulence models overestimate the heat flux with Mach number high up to 10, and compressibility corrections applied to turbulence models lead to a decrease in friction coefficients and heating rates. The pressure work and pressure-dilatation models yield the better results. Among the three dilatation-dissipation models, Sarkar and Wilcox corrections present larger deviations from the experiment measurement, while Zeman correction can achieve acceptable results. For hypersonic compression corner flows, due to the evident increase of turbulence Mach number in separation zone, compressibility corrections make the separation areas larger, thus cannot improve the accuracy of calculated results. It is unreasonable that compressibility corrections take effect in separation zone. Density-corrected model by Catris and Aupoix is suitable for shock wave/boundary layer interaction flows which can improve the simulation accuracy of the peak heating and have a little influence on separation zone.

  14. Performance of Renormalization Group Algebraic Turbulence Model on Boundary Layer Transition Simulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahn, Kyung H.

    1994-01-01

    The RNG-based algebraic turbulence model, with a new method of solving the cubic equation and applying new length scales, is introduced. An analysis is made of the RNG length scale which was previously reported and the resulting eddy viscosity is compared with those from other algebraic turbulence models. Subsequently, a new length scale is introduced which actually uses the two previous RNG length scales in a systematic way to improve the model performance. The performance of the present RNG model is demonstrated by simulating the boundary layer flow over a flat plate and the flow over an airfoil.

  15. Structure of 2-D and 3-D Turbulent Boundary Layers with Sparsely Distributed Roughness Elements

    Science.gov (United States)

    2005-06-28

    straight orientation. Stations U, 6, mm 6", mm 0, mm Ree k+ k/6 1 25.98 58.565 12.70 7.65 11997 58.5 0.0130 2 25.36 54.56 12.65 7.52 11518 60.4 0.0139 3...a flat plate boundary layer transition. Engineering Turbulence Modeling and Experiments - 4, W. Rodi and D. Laurence (Eds.), Elsevier Science Ltd

  16. Simultaneous measurement of aero-optical distortion and turbulent structure in a heated boundary layer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saxton-Fox, Theresa; McKeon, Beverley; Smith, Adam; Gordeyev, Stanislav

    2014-11-01

    This study examines the relationship between turbulent structures and the aero-optical distortion of a laser beam passing through a turbulent boundary layer. Previous studies by Smith et al. (AIAA, 2014--2491) have found a bulk convection velocity of 0 . 8U∞ for aero-optical distortion in turbulent boundary layers, motivating a comparison of the distortion with the outer boundary layer. In this study, a turbulent boundary layer is developed over a flat plate with a moderately-heated section of length 25 δ . Density variation in the thermal boundary layer leads to aero-optical distortion, which is measured with a Malley probe (Smith et al., AIAA, 2013--3133). Simultaneously, 2D PIV measurements are recorded in a wall-normal, streamwise plane centered on the Malley probe location. Experiments are run at Reθ = 2100 and at a Mach number of 0.03, with the heated wall 10 to 20°C above the free stream temperature. Correlations and conditional averages are carried out between Malley probe distortion angles and flow features in the PIV vector fields. Aero-optical distortion in this study will be compared to distortion in higher Mach number flows studied by Gordeyev et al. (J. Fluid Mech., 2014), with the aim of extending conclusions into compressible flows. This research is made possible by the Department of Defense through the National Defense & Engineering Graduate Fellowship (NDSEG) Program and by the Air Force Office of Scientific Research Grant # FA9550-12-1-0060.

  17. Dispersed phase effects on boundary layer turbulence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richter, David; Helgans, Brian

    2016-11-01

    In natural and environmental settings, turbulence is often seeded with some sort of dispersed phase: dust, rain, snow, sediment, etc. Depending on the circumstances, elements of the dispersed phase can participate in both dynamic and thermodynamic coupling, thereby altering the turbulent transfer of heat, moisture, and momentum through several complex avenues. In this study, evaporating droplets are two-way coupled to turbulent wall-bounded flow via direct numerical simulation (DNS) and Lagrangian point particle tracking, and we are specifically interested in the wall-normal transport of momentum, heat, and moisture. Our studies show that particles can carry significant portions of all three, and that this is a strong function of the particle Stokes number. These findings are interpreted in the context of environmental flows and the practical implications will be discussed. The authors acknowledge the National Science Foundation for funding under Grant #AGS-1429921.

  18. FRACTURE CALCULATION OF BENDING PLATES BY BOUNDARY COLLOCATION METHOD

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王元汉; 伍佑伦; 余飞

    2003-01-01

    Fracture of Kirchhoff plates is analyzed by the theory of complex variables and boundary collocation method. The deflections, moments and shearing forces of the plates are assumed to be the functions of complex variables. The functions can satisfy a series of basic equations and governing conditions, such as the equilibrium equations in the domain, the boundary conditions on the crack surfaces and stress singularity at the crack tips. Thus, it ts only necessary to consider the boundary conditions on the external boundaries of the plate, which can be approximately satisfied by the collocation method and least square technique. Different boundary conditions and loading cases of the cracked plates are analyzed and calculated. Compared to other methods, the numerical examples show that the present method has many advantages such as good accuracy and less computer time This is an effective semi-analytical and semi-numerical method.

  19. Instantaneous velocity profile measurements in a turbulent boundary layer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robinson, S. K.

    1986-01-01

    Instantaneous wall shear stress and streamwise velocities have been measured simultaneously in a flat-plate, turbulent boundary layer at moderate Reynolds number in an effort to provide experimental support for large eddy simulations. Data were obtained using a buried-wire, wall shear gage and a hot-wire rake positioned in the log region of the flow. Fluctuations of the instantaneous U(+) versus Y(+) profiles about a mean law of the wall are shown to be significant and complex. Peak cross-correlation values between wall shear stress and the velocities are high, and reflect the passage of a large structure inclined at a small angle to the wall. Estimates of this angle are consistent with those made by other investigators. Conditional sampling techniques were used to detect the passage of various sizes and types of flow disturbances (events), and to estimate their mean frequency of occurrence. Events characterized by large aand sudden streamwise accelerations were found to be highly coherent throughout the log region and were strongly correlated with large fluctuations in wall shear stress. Phase randomness between the near-wall quantities and the outer velocities was small. The results suggest that the flow events detected by conditional sampling applied to velocities in the log region may be related to the bursting process.

  20. A near-wall four-equation turbulence model for compressible boundary layers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sommer, T. P.; So, R. M. C.; Zhang, H. S.

    1992-01-01

    A near-wall four-equation turbulence model is developed for the calculation of high-speed compressible turbulent boundary layers. The four equations used are the k-epsilon equations and the theta(exp 2)-epsilon(sub theta) equations. These equations are used to define the turbulent diffusivities for momentum and heat fluxes, thus allowing the assumption of dynamic similarity between momentum and heat transport to be relaxed. The Favre-averaged equations of motion are solved in conjunction with the four transport equations. Calculations are compared with measurements and with another model's predictions where the assumption of the constant turbulent Prandtl number is invoked. Compressible flat plate turbulent boundary layers with both adiabatic and constant temperature wall boundary conditions are considered. Results for the range of low Mach numbers and temperature ratios investigated are essentially the same as those obtained using an identical near-wall k-epsilon model. In general, the numerical predictions are in very good agreement with measurements and there are significant improvements in the predictions of mean flow properties at high Mach numbers.

  1. Aero-optic analysis of anisotropic turbulent boundary layer by direct integration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor, S.; Price, J.; Chen, C. P.; Pond, John E.; Sutton, G. W.

    2013-09-01

    Aero-optic aberrations that effect optical sensor performance and laser beam propagation, can be caused by changes in the index-of-refraction field as the optical wave traverses a compressible non-uniform, turbulent flowfield. Mean flowfield non-uniformities cause bore sight error and blurring and, if the mean flowfield is unsteady, jitter. Turbulence causes blurring and high frequency jitter. Blurring also causes the signal-to-noise ratio to decrease and image distortion, and adversely affects centroid location for precision tracking. The objective of this study is to develop an unified approach for whole-field aero-optics prediction using hybrid LES/RANS (Large Eddy Simulation/Reynolds Average Navier-Stokes) turbulence modeling in combination with a newly formulated optical Modulation Transfer Function (MTF). The whole field turbulence includes the near-vehicle boundary layer mean and turbulence, as well as far-field atmospheric turbulence. A flat plate compressible boundary layer case is used to demonstrate the methodology. the abstract two lines below author names and addresses.

  2. Estimating area of inclusions in anisotropic plates from boundary data

    CERN Document Server

    Morassi, Antonino; Vessella, Sergio

    2011-01-01

    We consider the inverse problem of determining the possible presence of an inclusion in a thin plate by boundary measurements. The plate is made by non-homogeneous linearly elastic material belonging to a general class of anisotropy. The inclusion is made by different elastic material. Under some a priori assumptions on the unknown inclusion, we prove constructive upper and lower estimates of the area of the unknown defect in terms of an easily expressed quantity related to work, which is given in terms of measurements of a couple field applied at the boundary and of the induced transversal displacement and its normal derivative taken at the boundary of the plate.

  3. Turbulent oceanic western-boundary layers at low latitude

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quam Cyrille Akuetevi, Cataria; Wirth, Achim

    2013-04-01

    Low latitude oceanic western-boundary layers range within the most turbulent regions in the worlds ocean. The Somali current system with the Great Whirl and the Brazilian current system with its eddy shedding are the most prominent examples. Results from analytical calculations and integration of a one layer reduced-gravity fine resolution shallow water model is used to entangle this turbulent dynamics. Two types of wind-forcing are applied: a remote Trade wind forcing with maximum shear along the equator and a local Monsoon wind forcing with maximum shear in the vicinity of the boundary. For high values of the viscosity (> 1000m2s-1) the stationary solutions compare well to analytical predictions using Munk and inertial layer theory. When lowering the friction parameter time dependence results. The onset of instability is strongly influenced by inertial effects. The unstable boundary current proceeds as a succession of anti-cyclonic coherent eddies performing a chaotic dynamics in a turbulent flow. The dynamics is governed by the turbulent fluxes of mass and momentum. We determine these fluxes by analyzing the (potential) vorticity dynamics. We demonstrate that the boundary-layer can be separated in four sub-layers, which are (starting from the boundary): (1) the viscous sub-layer (2) the turbulent buffer-layer (3) the layer containing the coherent structures and (4) the extended boundary layer. The characteristics of each sub-layer and the corresponding turbulent fluxes are determined, as are the dependence on latitude and the type of forcing. A new pragmatic method of determining the eddy viscosity, based on Munk-layer theory, is proposed. Results are compared to observations and solutions of the multi-level primitive equation model (DRAKKAR).

  4. A Experimental Investigation of the Interaction Between Convecting Spanwise Vortices and a Turbulent Boundary Layer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    MacRorie, Michael

    1995-01-01

    The interaction between convecting spanwise vortices and a flat plate turbulent boundary layer was studied experimentally. The results are relevant to the flow downstream of unsteady airfoils or spoilers. Vortices were generated with a rapidly pitched airfoil upstream of a test plate leading edge in a low-speed wind tunnel. By varying the height of the vortex generator the degree to which the vortices interacted with the test plate was controlled. Dynamic stall vortices of both positive and negative circulation were studied with Reynolds numbers (Gamma/upsilon ) of 9300 and 7400 respectively. The free-stream velocity was 5.9 m/s for all cases and the boundary layer momentum thickness Reynolds number was 480 at the primary measurement station. The measurement techniques were hot -wire anemometry (single and cross wire) and smoke-wire visualization. The results focus on two distinct aspects of the flow, first is the decay and diffusion rates of the vortices. Only in the case where a negative circulation vortex impinges directly on the leading edge does surface interaction significantly increase the vortex decay/diffusion rate. The second aspect is the response of the turbulent boundary layer to the convecting vortices. Wall shear stress measurements show that the passage of a positive circulation vortex results in an increase in wall shear after a delay-time, while the negative circulation vortices result in a decrease in wall shear. An application of log-law scaling to the ensemble-averaged mean flow was found to produce a velocity scale which resembles one based on measured wall shear stress but is offset by a phase lag. The ratio of turbulent shear stress to the two-dimensional turbulent kinetic energy was generally not constant, although it did show a constant value across the boundary layer at different phases of the interaction.

  5. Vibration Analysis of Annular Sector Plates under Different Boundary Conditions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dongyan Shi

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available An analytical framework is developed for the vibration analysis of annular sector plates with general elastic restraints along each edge of plates. Regardless of boundary conditions, the displacement solution is invariably expressed as a new form of trigonometric expansion with accelerated convergence. The expansion coefficients are treated as the generalized coordinates and determined using the Rayleigh-Ritz technique. This work allows a capability of modeling annular sector plates under a variety of boundary conditions and changing the boundary conditions as easily as modifying the material properties or dimensions of the plates. Of equal importance, the proposed approach is universally applicable to annular sector plates of any inclusion angles up to 2π. The reliability and accuracy of the current method are adequately validated through numerical examples.

  6. Direct Numerical Simulation of Transitional and Turbulent Flow Over a Heated Flat Plate Using Finite-Difference Schemes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Madavan, Nateri K.

    1995-01-01

    The work in this report was conducted at NASA Ames Research Center during the period from August 1993 to January 1995 deals with the direct numerical simulation of transitional and turbulent flow at low Mach numbers using high-order-accurate finite-difference techniques. A computation of transition to turbulence of the spatially-evolving boundary layer on a heated flat plate in the presence of relatively high freestream turbulence was performed. The geometry and flow conditions were chosen to match earlier experiments. The development of the momentum and thermal boundary layers was documented. Velocity and temperature profiles, as well as distributions of skin friction, surface heat transfer rate, Reynolds shear stress, and turbulent heat flux were shown to compare well with experiment. The numerical method used here can be applied to complex geometries in a straightforward manner.

  7. New Theories on Boundary Layer Transition and Turbulence Formation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chaoqun Liu

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper is a short review of our recent DNS work on physics of late boundary layer transition and turbulence. Based on our DNS observation, we propose a new theory on boundary layer transition, which has five steps, that is, receptivity, linear instability, large vortex structure formation, small length scale generation, loss of symmetry and randomization to turbulence. For turbulence generation and sustenance, the classical theory, described with Richardson's energy cascade and Kolmogorov length scale, is not observed by our DNS. We proposed a new theory on turbulence generation that all small length scales are generated by “shear layer instability” through multiple level ejections and sweeps and consequent multiple level positive and negative spikes, but not by “vortex breakdown.” We believe “shear layer instability” is the “mother of turbulence.” The energy transferring from large vortices to small vortices is carried out by multiple level sweeps, but does not follow Kolmogorov's theory that large vortices pass energy to small ones through vortex stretch and breakdown. The loss of symmetry starts from the second level ring cycle in the middle of the flow field and spreads to the bottom of the boundary layer and then the whole flow field.

  8. Comparison of spatial and temporal characteristics of a turbulent boundary layer in the presence of free-stream turbulence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dogan, Eda; Hearst, R. Jason; Hanson, Ronald E.; Ganapathisubramani, Bharathram

    2016-11-01

    Free-stream turbulence (FST) has previously been shown to enhance the scale interactions occurring within a turbulent boundary layer (TBL). This is investigated further by generating FST with an active grid over a zero-pressure gradient TBL that developed on a smooth flat plate. Simultaneous measurements were performed using four hot-wires mounted to a rake that traversed the boundary layer height. Planar PIV measurements were also performed. Hot-wire measurements indicate that on average large-scale structures occurring in the free-stream penetrate the boundary layer and increase the streamwise velocity fluctuations throughout. Two-point correlations of the streamwise velocity fluctuations from the hot-wires enable determination of the inclination angle of the wall-structures in the boundary layer using Taylor's hypothesis. This angle is observed to be invariant around 11-15 degrees in the near-wall region in agreement with the literature for canonical TBLs. This presentation will compare the planar PIV data to these hot-wire measurements to determine if these phenomena that appear in the statistics using Taylor's hypothesis can be tracked to instantaneous spatial features in the TBL subjected to FST. We acknowledge the financial support from the European Research Council (ERC Grant Agreement No. 277472), EPSRC (Grant ref no: EP/I037717/1).

  9. Turbulent boundary layer measurements over high-porosity surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Efstathiou, Christoph; Luhar, Mitul

    2016-11-01

    Porous surfaces are ubiquitous across a variety of turbulent boundary layer flows of scientific and engineering interest. While turbulent flows over smooth and rough walls have been studied extensively, experimental measurements over porous walls have thus far focused on packed beds, which are limited in porosity (Φ = 0 . 3 - 0 . 5) by their geometry. The current project seeks to address this limitation. A two-component laser doppler velocimeter (LDV) is used to generate velocity measurements in turbulent boundary layer flows over commercially available reticulated foams and 3D-printed porous media at Reynolds number Reθ 3000 - 4000 . Smooth wall profiles for mean and turbulent quantities are compared to data over substrates with porosity Φ > 0 . 8 and average pore sizes in the range 0.4-2.5mm (corresponding to 8 - 50 viscous units). Previous analytical and simulation efforts indicate that the effects of porous substrates on boundary layer flows depend on a modified Reynolds number defined using the length scale √{ κ}, where κ is substrate permeability. A custom permeameter is currently being developed to estimate κ for the substrates tested in the boundary layer experiments.

  10. Drizzle and Turbulence Variability in Stratocumulus-topped Boundary Layers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kollias, P.; Luke, E. P.; Szyrmer, W.

    2015-12-01

    Marine stratocumulus clouds frequently produce light precipitation in the form of drizzle. The drizzle rate at the cloud base (RCB) dictates the impact of drizzle on the boundary layer turbulence and cloud organization. Here, synergistic observations from the US Department of Energy Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) program Eastern North Atlantic (ENA) site located on Graciosa Island in the Azores are used to investigate the relationship between RCB, and boundary layer turbulence and dynamics. The ARM ENA site is a heavily instrumented ground-based facility that offers new measurement capabilities in stratocumulus-topped boundary layers (STBL). The RCB is retrieved using a radar-lidar algorithm. The STBL turbulent structure is characterized using the Doppler lidar and radar observations. The profiling radar/lidar/radiometer observations are used to describe the cloud fraction and morphology. Finally, surface-based aerosol number concentration measurements are used to investigate the connection between the boundary layer turbulence, cloud morphology and aerosol loading. Preliminary correlative relationships between the aforementioned variables will be shown.

  11. Two Phases of Coherent Structure Motions in Turbulent Boundary Layer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIU Jian-Hua; JIANG Nan

    2007-01-01

    Two phases of coherent structure motion are acquired after obtaining conditional phase-averaged waveforms for longitudinal velocity of coherent structures in turbulent boundary layer based on Harr wavelet transfer. The correspondences of the two phases to the two processes (i.e. ejection and sweep) during a burst are determined.

  12. Turbulent Boundary Layer Flow over Superhydrophobic Surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-05-10

    Figure 1 were a highly viscous fluid, such as honey , the boundary layer would be thick while if the fluid were water, a low-viscosity fluid, the boundary...drag has become even more important. In response to this need, and with the benefit of modern technology, the drag-reduction field is replete with...manufactured with “riblets,” small ridges on the order of fractions of millimeters, built-into the hull or skin that seek to reduce frictional drag. The

  13. Extending Alaska's plate boundary: tectonic tremor generated by Yakutat subduction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wech, Aaron G.

    2016-01-01

    The tectonics of the eastern end of the Alaska-Aleutian subduction zone are complicated by the inclusion of the Yakutat microplate, which is colliding into and subducting beneath continental North America at near-Pacific-plate rates. The interaction among these plates at depth is not well understood, and further east, even less is known about the plate boundary or the source of Wrangell volcanism. The drop-off in Wadati-Benioff zone (WBZ) seismicity could signal the end of the plate boundary, the start of aseismic subduction, or a tear in the downgoing plate. Further compounding the issue is the possible presence of the Wrangell slab, which is faintly outlined by an anemic, eastward-dipping WBZ beneath the Wrangell volcanoes. In this study, I performed a search for tectonic tremor to map slow, plate-boundary slip in south-central Alaska. I identified ∼11,000 tremor epicenters, which continue 85 km east of the inferred Pacific plate edge marked by WBZ seismicity. The tremor zone coincides with the edges of the downgoing Yakutat terrane, and tremors transition from periodic to continuous behavior as they near the aseismic Wrangell slab. I interpret tremor to mark slow, semicontinuous slip occurring at the interface between the Yakutat and North America plates. The slow slip region lengthens the megathrust interface beyond the WBZ and may provide evidence for a connection between the Yakutat slab and the aseismic Wrangell slab.

  14. Novel boundary element method for resolving plate bending problems

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    陈颂英; 王乐勤; 焦磊

    2003-01-01

    This paper discusses the application of the boundary contour method for resolving plate bending problems. The exploitation of the integrand divergence free property of the plate bending boundary integral equation based on the Kirchhoff hypothesis and a very useful application of Stokes' Theorem are presented to convert surface integrals on boundary elements to the computation of bending potential functions on the discretized boundary points, even for curved surface elements of arbitrary shape. Singularity and treatment of the discontinued corner point are not needed at all. The evaluation of the physics variant at internal points is also shown in this article. Numerical results are presented for some plate bending problems and compared against analytical and previous solutions.

  15. Role of the basin boundary conditions in gravity wave turbulence

    CERN Document Server

    Deike, Luc; Gutiérrez-Matus, Pablo; Jamin, Timothée; Semin, Benoit; Aumaitre, Sébastien; Berhanu, Michael; Falcon, Eric; BONNEFOY, Félicien

    2014-01-01

    Gravity wave turbulence is studied experimentally in a large wave basin where irregular waves are generated unidirectionally. The role of the basin boundary conditions (absorbing or reflecting) and of the forcing properties are investigated. To that purpose, an absorbing sloping beach opposite to the wavemaker can be replaced by a reflecting vertical wall. We observe that the wave field properties depend strongly on these boundary conditions. Quasi-one dimensional field of nonlinear waves propagate before to be damped by the beach whereas a more multidirectional wave field is observed with the wall. In both cases, the wave spectrum scales as a frequency-power law with an exponent that increases continuously with the forcing amplitude up to a value close to -4, which is the value predicted by the weak turbulence theory. The physical mechanisms involved are probably different according to the boundary condition used, but cannot be easily discriminated with only temporal measurements. We have also studied freely...

  16. Charts Adapted from Van Driest's Turbulent Flat-plate Theory for Determining Values of Turbulent Aerodynamic Friction and Heat-transfer Coefficients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Dorothy B; Faget, Maxime A

    1956-01-01

    A modified method of Van Driest's flat-plate theory for turbulent boundary layer has been found to simplify the calculation of local skin-friction coefficients which, in turn, have made it possible to obtain through Reynolds analogy theoretical turbulent heat-transfer coefficients in the form of Stanton number. A general formula is given and charts are presented from which the modified method can be solved for Mach numbers 1.0 to 12.0, temperature ratios 0.2 to 6.0, and Reynolds numbers 0.2 times 10 to the 6th power to 200 times 10 to the 6th power.

  17. The Okhotsk Plate and the Eurasia-North America plate boundary zone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hindle, David; Mackey, Kevin

    2014-05-01

    The Eurasia-North America plate boundary zone transitions from spreading at rates of ~ 25mm/yr in the North Atlantic, to compression at rates of ~ 5mm/yr in the region of the Okhotsk plate. Because the pole of rotation between Eurasia and North America lies more or less on their mutual boundary, there is a linear change in rate along the boundary, and regions near the euler pole are subject to extremely low deformation rates. The Okhotsk - Eurasia - North America triple junction lies slightly south of the rotation pole, placing the Okhotsk plate entirely in a weakly contractional setting. Regions near the triple junction absorb 1mm/yr contraction. Further south, towards the shoreline of the Okhotsk sea, up to 5 mm/yr contraction may be absorbed within the plate. How shortening is accommodated across the boundary remains an open question. One possibility is wholesale extrusion of the entire Okhotsk plate (or possibly its northwestern corner) along two plate boundary strike slip faults (Eurasia-Okhostk and North America Okhotsk). The problem with this model is that the seismic record does not presently clearly support it, with the largest events distributed both within the plate interior and on its boundaries. This may suggest that instead, the Okhotsk plate, and particularly its north-western end, consists of a series of smaller blocks which shuffle against each other, partially accommodating extrusion, but also permitting some internal deformation and change of shape of the Okhotsk plate itself. We present analyses of the very sparse seismic record from the region, as well as geometric-kinematic, tectonic models of the possible deformation of northwest Okhotsk to try to better understand the different probabilities of how this slowly deforming plate boundary zone is behaving.

  18. Direct Numerical Simulation of Hypersonic Turbulent Boundary Layer inside an Axisymmetric Nozzle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Junji; Zhang, Chao; Duan, Lian; Choudhari, Meelan M.

    2017-01-01

    As a first step toward a study of acoustic disturbance field within a conventional, hypersonic wind tunnel, direct numerical simulations (DNS) of a Mach 6 turbulent boundary layer on the inner wall of a straight axisymmetric nozzle are conducted and the results are compared with those for a flat plate. The DNS results for a nozzle radius to boundary-layer thickness ratio of 5:5 show that the turbulence statistics of the nozzle-wall boundary layer are nearly unaffected by the transverse curvature of the nozzle wall. Before the acoustic waves emanating from different parts of the nozzle surface can interfere with each other and undergo reflections from adjacent portions of the nozzle surface, the rms pressure fluctuation beyond the boundary layer edge increases toward the nozzle axis, apparently due to a focusing effect inside the axisymmetric configuration. Spectral analysis of pressure fluctuations at both the wall and the freestream indicates a similar distribution of energy content for both the nozzle and the flat plate, with the peak of the premultiplied frequency spectrum at a frequency of [(omega)(delta)]/U(sub infinity) approximately 6.0 inside the free stream and at [(omega)(delta)]/U(sub infinity) approximately 2.0 along the wall. The present results provide the basis for follow-on simulations involving reverberation effects inside the nozzle.

  19. Stability and coherent structures of the asymptotic suction boundary layer over a heated plate

    CERN Document Server

    Zammert, Stefan; Eckhardt, Bruno

    2016-01-01

    The asymptotic suction boundary layer (ASBL) is a parallel shear flow that becomes turbulent in a bypass transition in parameter regions where the laminar profile is stable. We here add a temperature gradient perpendicular to the plate and explore the interaction between convection and shear in determining the transition. We find that the laminar state becomes unstable in a subcritical bifurcation and that the critical Rayleigh number and wave number depend strongly on the Prandtl number. We also track several secondary bifurcations and identify states that are localized in two directions, showing different symmetries. In the subcritical regime, transient turbulent states which are connected to exact coherent states and follow the same transition scenario as found in linearly stable shear flows are identified and analyzed. The study extends the bypass transition scenario from shear flows to thermal boundary layers and shows the intricate interactions between thermal and shear forces in determining critical po...

  20. Experimental determination of the onset of turbulence on inclined plates using hot wire velocity measurements

    OpenAIRE

    Rodríguez Sevillano, Angel; Pérez Grande, María Isabel; Meseguer Ruiz, José

    2010-01-01

    The problem of determination of the turbulence onset in natural convection on heated inclined plates in an air environment has been experimentally revisited. The transition has been detected by using hot wire velocity measurements. The onset of turbulence has been considered to take place where velocity fluctuations (measured through turbulence intensity) start to grow. Experiments have shown that the distance to the plate edge where the onset begins depends both on the plate inclinatio...

  1. Direct simulation of a turbulent oscillating boundary layer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spalart, Philippe R.; Baldwin, Barrett S.

    1987-01-01

    The turbulent boundary layer driven by a freestream velocity that varies sinusoidally in time around a zero mean is considered. The flow has a rich behavior including strong pressure gradients, inflection points, and reversal. A theory for the velocity and stress profiles at high Reynolds number is formulated. Well-resolved direct Navier-Stokes simulations are conducted over a narrow range of Reynolds numbers, and the results are compared with the theoretical predictions. The flow is also computed over a wide range of Reynolds numbers using a new algebraic turbulence model; the results are compared with the direct simulations and the theory.

  2. Horizontal velocity field near the hot plate in turbulent natural convection

    CERN Document Server

    Koothur, Vipin

    2014-01-01

    We study the velocity field in a horizontal (x-y) plane 1.5 mm above the hot plate in turbulent natural convection using PIV at a Rayleigh number Raw=106 and Prandtl number Pr=5.2. The plane of measurement is inside the velocity boundary layer estimated from the natural convection boundary layer equations[7] as well as inside the velocity boundary layer due to the large scale flow[2, 5].The boundary layer comprises of line plumes with sinking fluid between them. The instantaneous velocity variation from the center of the sinking fluid to the line plumes is found to deviate with the classical Prandtl-Blasius laminar boundary layer profile, which is assumed to be the nature of boundary layer by the GL theory [2, 5]. Our results agree well with the natural convection boundary layer profile. The time averaged mean velocity variation deviates from both natural convection and Blasius type profiles as expected as it depends on the orientation of the line plumes. Our measurement result is a proof to the theory of the...

  3. Shed Vortex Structure and Phase-Averaged Velocity Statistics in Symmetric/Asymmetric Turbulent Flat Plate Wakes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rai, Man Mohan

    2017-01-01

    The near wake of a flat plate is investigated via direct numerical simulations (DNS). Many earlier experimental investigations have used thin plates with sharp trailing edges and turbulent boundary layers to create the wake. This results in large theta divided by D (sub TE) values (theta is the boundary layer momentum thickness towards the end of the plate and D (sub TE) is the trailing edge thickness). In the present study the emphasis is on relatively thick plates with circular trailing edges (CTE) resulting in theta divided by D values less than one (D is the plate thickness and the diameter of the CTE), and vigorous vortex shedding. The Reynolds numbers based on the plate length and D are 1.255 x 10 (sup 6) and 10,000, respectively. Two cases are computed; one with turbulent boundary layers on both the upper and lower surfaces of the plate (statistically the same, symmetric wake, Case TT) and, a second with turbulent and laminar boundary layers on the upper and lower surfaces, respectively (asymmetric case, Case TL). The data and understanding obtained is of considerable engineering interest, particularly in turbomachinery where the pressure side of an airfoil can remain laminar or transitional because of a favorable pressure gradient and the suction side is turbulent. Shed-vortex structure and phase-averaged velocity statistics obtained in the two cases are compared here. The upper negative shed vortices in Case TL (turbulent separating boundary layer) are weaker than the lower positive ones (laminar separating boundary layer) at inception (a factor 1.27 weaker in terms of peak phase-averaged spanwise vorticity at first appearance of a peak). The upper vortices weaken rapidly as they travel downstream. A second feature of interest in Case TL is a considerable increase in the peak phase-averaged, streamwise normal intensity (random component) with increasing streamwise distance (x divided by D) that occurs nears the positive vortex cores. This behavior is

  4. DNS of compressible turbulent boundary layer over a blunt wedge

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Xinliang; FU Dexun; MA Yanwan

    2005-01-01

    Direct numerical simulation of spatially evolving compressible boundary layer over a blunt wedge is performed in this paper. The free-stream Mach number is 6 and the disturbance source produced by wall blowing and suction is located downstream of the sound-speed point. Statistics are studied and compared with the results in incompressible flat-plate boundary layer. The mean pressure gradient effects on the vortex structure are studied.

  5. Turbulent dispersion in cloud-topped boundary layers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verzijlbergh, R. A.; Jonker, H. J. J.; Heus, T.; Vilöguerau de Arellano, J.

    2009-02-01

    Compared to dry boundary layers, dispersion in cloud-topped boundary layers has received less attention. In this LES based numerical study we investigate the dispersion of a passive tracer in the form of Lagrangian particles for four kinds of atmospheric boundary layers: 1) a dry convective boundary layer (for reference), 2) a "smoke" cloud boundary layer in which the turbulence is driven by radiative cooling, 3) a stratocumulus topped boundary layer and 4) a shallow cumulus topped boundary layer. We show that the dispersion characteristics of the smoke cloud boundary layer as well as the stratocumulus situation can be well understood by borrowing concepts from previous studies of dispersion in the dry convective boundary layer. A general result is that the presence of clouds enhances mixing and dispersion - a notion that is not always reflected well in traditional parameterization models, in which clouds usually suppress dispersion by diminishing solar irradiance. The dispersion characteristics of a cumulus cloud layer turn out to be markedly different from the other three cases and the results can not be explained by only considering the well-known top-hat velocity distribution. To understand the surprising characteristics in the shallow cumulus layer, this case has been examined in more detail by 1) determining the velocity distribution conditioned on the distance to the nearest cloud and 2) accounting for the wavelike behaviour associated with the stratified dry environment.

  6. DNS of heat transfer in transitional, accelerated boundary layer flow over a flat plate affected by free-stream fluctuations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wissink, Jan G. [School of Engineering and Design, Howell Building, Brunel University, Uxbridge UB8 3PH (United Kingdom)], E-mail: jan.wissink@brunel.ac.uk; Rodi, Wolfgang [Institute for Hydromechanics, University of Karlsruhe, Kaiserstr. 12, D-76128 Karlsruhe (Germany)

    2009-10-15

    Direct numerical simulations (DNS) of flow over and heat transfer from a flat plate affected by free-stream fluctuations were performed. A contoured upper wall was employed to generate a favourable streamwise pressure gradient along a large portion of the flat plate. The free-stream fluctuations originated from a separate LES of isotropic turbulence in a box. In the laminar portions of the accelerating boundary layer flow the formation of streaks was observed to induce an increase in heat transfer by the exchange of hot fluid near the surface of the plate and cold fluid from the free-stream. In the regions where the streamwise pressure gradient was only mildly favourable, intermittent turbulent spots were detected which relaminarised downstream as the streamwise pressure gradient became stronger. The relaminarisation of the turbulent spots was reflected by a slight decrease in the friction coefficient, which converged to its laminar value in the region where the streamwise pressure gradient was strongest.

  7. Near Continuum Velocity and Temperature Coupled Compressible Boundary Layer Flow over a Flat Plate

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Xin; Cai, Chunpei

    2017-04-01

    The problem of a compressible gas flows over a flat plate with the velocity-slip and temperature-jump boundary conditions are being studied. The standard single- shooting method is applied to obtain the exact solutions for velocity and temperature profiles when the momentum and energy equations are weakly coupled. A double-shooting method is applied if these two equations are closely coupled. If the temperature affects the velocity directly, more significant velocity slip happens at locations closer to the plate's leading edge, and inflections on the velocity profiles appear, indicating flows may become unstable. As a consequence, the temperature-jump and velocity-slip boundary conditions may trigger earlier flow transitions from a laminar to a turbulent flow state.

  8. Influence of localised double suction on a turbulent boundary layer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oyewola, O.; Djenidi, L.; Antonia, R. A.

    2007-07-01

    The effects of localised suction applied through a pair of porous wall strips on a turbulent boundary layer have been quantified through the measurements of mean velocity and Reynolds stresses. The results indicate that the use of second strip extends the pseudo-relaminarisation zone but also reduces the overshoot in the longitudinal and normal r.m.s. velocities. While the minimum r.m.s. occurs at x/δo=3.0 (one strip) and x/δo=12 (two strips), the reduction observed for the latter case is larger. Relative to no suction, the turbulence level is modified by suction and the effect is enhanced with double suction. This increased effectiveness reflects the fact that the second strip acts on a boundary layer whose near-wall active motion has been seriously weakened by the first strip.

  9. Small Scale Forcing in a Turbulent Boundary Layer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lorkowski, Thomas; Rathnasingham, Ruben; Breuer, Kenneth S.

    1996-11-01

    In order to understand the effect of small scale forcing on turbulent flows and its implications on control, an experimental investigation is made into the forcing of the inertial scales in the wall region of a turbulent boundary layer. A wall-mounted resonant actuator is used to produce a local vortical structure in the streamwise direction which is convected downstream by the boundary layer flow. The frequency associated with this structure is governed by the resonant frequency of the device and falls in the range of the inertial scales at the Reynolds number of the experiment (Re_θ = 2000). Hot-wire anemometry is used to map the velocity field at several stations downstream of the actuator. The signals are also conditioned to identify the effect of the actuator on different scales in the flow. Amplitude and modulation effects are also discussed. ^*Supported by ONR Grant N00014-92-J-1910.

  10. Turbulence measurements in high Reynolds number boundary layers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vallikivi, Margit; Smits, Alexander

    2013-11-01

    Measurements are conducted in zero pressure gradient turbulent boundary layers for Reynolds numbers from Reθ = 9,000 to 225,000. The experiments were performed in the High Reynolds number Test Facility (HRTF) at Princeton University, which uses compressed air as the working fluid. Nano-Scale Thermal Anemometry Probes (NSTAPs) are used to acquire data with very high spatial and temporal precision. These new data are used to study the scaling behavior of the streamwise velocity fluctuations in the boundary layer and make comparisons with the scaling of other wall-bounded turbulent flows. Supported under ONR Grant N00014-09-1-0263 (program manager Ron Joslin) and NSF Grant CBET-1064257 (program manager Henning Winter).

  11. A diffuse plate boundary model for Indian Ocean tectonics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wiens, D. A.; Demets, C.; Gordon, R. G.; Stein, S.; Argus, D.

    1985-01-01

    It is suggested that motion along the virtually aseismic Owen fracture zone is negligible, so that Arabia and India are contained within a single Indo-Arabian plate divided from the Australian plate by a diffuse boundary. The boundary is a zone of concentrated seismicity and deformation commonly characterized as 'intraplate'. The rotation vector of Australia relative to Indo-Arabia is consistent with the seismologically observed 2 cm/yr of left-lateral strike-slip along the Ninetyeast Ridge, north-south compression in the Central Indian Ocean, and the north-south extension near Chagos.

  12. Transport of particles in an atmospheric turbulent boundary layer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xiongping Luo; Shiyi Chen

    2005-01-01

    A program incorporating the parallel code of large eddy simulation (LES) and particle transportation model is developed to simulate the motion of particles in an atmospheric turbulent boundary layer (ATBL). A model of particles of 100-micrometer order coupling with large scale ATBL is proposed. Two typical cases are studied, one focuses on the evolution of particle profile in the ATBL and the landing displacement of particles, whereas the other on the motion of particle stream.

  13. Investigation of Wall Pressure Fluctuations in a Turbulent Boundary Layer by Large Eddy Simulation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    Large eddy simulation (LES) was used to investigate the space-time field of the low Mach number, fully developed turbulent boundary layer on a smooth, rigid flat plate. The wall-pressure field simulated by LES was analyzed to obtain the pressure statistics , including the wall-pressure root-mean square, skewness and flatness factors, which show the wall pressure distribution was not Gaussian. The profile of the auto-power spectral density and the contour of the streamwise wavenumber-frequency spectral density of wall-pressure were plotted. The "convection ridge" can be observed clearly and the convection velocity can be calculated from the location of the convection peak.

  14. Reactive Control of Boundary Layer Streaks Induced by Freestream Turbulence Using Plasma Actuators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gouder, Kevin; Naguib, Ahmed; Lavoie, Philippe; Morrison, Jonathan

    2015-11-01

    Over the past few years we have carried out a systematic series of investigations aimed at evaluating the capability of a plasma-actuator-based feedforward-feedback control system to weaken streaks induced ``synthetically'' in a Blasius boundary layer via dynamic roughness elements. This work has been motivated by the delay of bypass boundary layer transition in which the streaks form stochastically beneath a freestream with turbulence of intensity of more than approximately 1%. In the present work, we carry forward the knowhow from our previous research in a first attempt to control such naturally occurring streaks. The experimental setup consists of a turbulence-generating grid upstream of a flat plate with a sharp leading edge. At the freestream velocity of the experiment, turbulent spot formation is observed to start at a streamwise location of x ~ 350 mm from the leading edge. The control system is implemented within a streamwise domain stretching from x = 150 mm to 300mm, where the streaks exhibit linear growth. At the upstream and downstream end of the domain a feedforward and a feedback wall-shear-stress sensors are utilized. The output from the sensors is fed to appropriately designed controllers which drive two plasma actuators providing positive and negative wall-normal forcing to oppose naturally occurring high- and low-speed streaks respectively. The results provide an assessment of the viability of the control approach to weaken the boundary layer streaks and to delay transition.

  15. Turbulent thermal boundary layers subjected to severe acceleration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Araya, Guillermo; Castillo, Luciano

    2013-11-01

    Favorable turbulent boundary layers are flows of great importance in industry. Particularly, understanding the mechanisms of quasi-laminarization by means of a very strong favorable streamwise pressure gradient is indeed crucial in drag reduction and energy management applications. Furthermore, due to the low Reynolds numbers involved in the quasi-laminarization process, abundant experimental investigation can be found in the literature for the past few decades. However, several grey zones still remain unsolved, principally associated with the difficulties that experiments encounter as the boundary layer becomes smaller. In addition, little attention has been paid to the heat transfer in a quasi-laminarization process. In this investigation, DNS of spatially-developing turbulent thermal boundary layers with prescribed very strong favorable pressure gradients (K = 4 × 10-6) are performed. Realistic inflow conditions are prescribed based on the Dynamic Multi-scale Approach (DMA) [Araya et al. JFM, Vol. 670, pp. 581-605, 2011]. In this sense the flow carries the footprint of turbulence, particularly in the streamwise component of the Reynolds stresses.

  16. BOLIVAR & GEODINOS: Investigations of the Southern Caribbean Plate Boundary

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levander, A.; Schmitz, M.; Working Groups, B.

    2006-12-01

    The southern Caribbean-South American plate boundary has many similarities to California's San Andreas system: 1) The CAR-SA system consists of a series of strands of active right lateral strike-slip faults extending >1000 km from the Antilles subduction zone. This system has several names and includes the El Pilar, Coche, San Sebastian, Moron, and Oca faults. 2) The CAR-SA relative velocity has been about 20 mm/yr of mostly right lateral motion since about 55 Ma, giving a total displacement on the CAR-SA plate boundary similar to that of the San Andreas system. 3) The plate boundary has about 10% convergence in western SA, with less as one moves eastward due to relative convergence between North and South America. 4) The CAR-SA system has fold and thrust belts best developed continentward of the strike-slip faults, similar to the San Andreas. 5) There is a big bend in the CAR plate boundary at approximately the same distance from the Antilles trench as the big bend in Southern California is from the Cascadia subduction zone. The tectonic origins of the CAR-SA plate boundary and the San Andreas are very different, however, despite the similarities between the systems. Rather than impingement of a ridge on a trench, the CAR-SA system is thought to have resulted from a continuous oblique collision of the southern end of a Cretaceous island arc system with the northern edge of South America. During this process the CAR island arc and the modern CAR plate overrode a proto-Caribbean plate and destroyed a Mesozoic passive margin on the northern edge of SA. BOLIVAR and GEODINOS are multi-disciplinary investigations of the lithosphere and deeper structures associated with the diffuse CAR-SA plate boundary zone. We review a number of observations regarding the plate boundary obtained or confirmed from these studies: 1) The Caribbean Large Igneous Province, being overridden by the Maracaibo block in western Venezuela, can be identified beneath Aruba and coastal Venezuela

  17. Reynolds number influences on turbulent boundary layer momentum transport

    Science.gov (United States)

    Priyadarshana, Paththage A.

    There are many engineering applications at Reynolds numbers orders of magnitude higher than existing turbulent boundary layer studies. Currently, the mechanisms for turbulent transport and the Reynolds number dependence of these mechanisms are not well understood. This dissertation presents Reynolds number influences on velocity and vorticity statistics, Reynolds shear stress, and velocity-vorticity correlations for turbulent boundary layers. Well resolved hot-wire data for this study were acquired in the atmospheric surface layer at the SLTEST facility in western Utah. It is shown that during near neutral thermal stability, the flow behaves as a canonical zero pressure gradient turbulent boundary layer, in which the Reynolds number based on momentum thickness, Rtheta, is approximately 2 x 106. The present study also provides information regarding the effects of wall roughness over a limited range of roughness. It is observed that with increasing Rtheta, the inner normalized streamwise intensity increases. This statistic is less sensitive to wall roughness away from the roughness sublayer. In contrast, the inner normalized wall normal intensity is less sensitive to the variation of Rtheta, and it is significantly sensitive to wall roughness. Outside the viscous sublayer, the inner normalized vorticity intensity is less sensitive to both Rtheta and roughness. A primary observation of the Reynolds stress study is that the predominant motions underlying the Reynolds shear stress undergo a significant shift from large to intermediate scales as Rtheta becomes large, irrespective of surface roughness. Quadrant analysis shows that types of motions contributing to the Reynolds stress change significantly at comparable wall normal locations with increasing Rtheta. The mean wall normal gradients of the Reynolds shear stress and the turbulent kinetic energy have direct connections to the transport mechanisms of the turbulent boundary layer. These gradients can be expressed in

  18. The effects of external conditions in turbulent boundary layers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brzek, Brian G.

    The effects of multiple external conditions on turbulent boundary layers were studied in detail. These external conditions include: surface roughness, upstream turbulence intensity, and pressure gradient. Furthermore, the combined effects of these conditions show the complicated nature of many realistic flow conditions. It was found that the effects of surface roughness are difficult to generalize, given the importance of so many parameters. These parameters include: roughness geometry, roughness regime, roughness height to boundary layer thickness, (k/delta), roughness parameter, ( k+), Reynolds number, and roughness function (Delta B+). A further complication, is the difficulty in computing the wall shear stress, tauw/rho. For the sand grain type roughness, the mean velocity and Reynolds stresses were studied in inner and outer variables, as well as, boundary layer parameters, anisotropy tensor, production term, and viscous stress and form drag contributions. To explore the effects of roughness and Reynolds number dependence in the boundary layer, a new experiment was carefully designed to properly capture the x-dependence of the single-point statistics. It was found that roughness destroys the viscous layer near the wall, thus, reducing the contribution of the viscous stress in the wall region. As a result, the contribution in the skin friction due to form drag increases, while the viscous stress decreases. This yields Reynolds number invariance in the skin friction, near-wall roughness parameters, and inner velocity profiles as k + increases into the fully rough regime. However, in the transitionally rough regime, (i.e., 5 component shows the largest influence of roughness, where the high peak near the wall was decreased and became nearly flat for the fully rough regime profiles. In addition, the Reynolds stresses in outer variables show self-similarity for fixed experimental conditions. However, as the roughness parameter, k +, increases, all Reynolds stress

  19. DNS of stratified spatially-developing turbulent thermal boundary layers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Araya, Guillermo; Castillo, Luciano; Jansen, Kenneth

    2012-11-01

    Direct numerical simulations (DNS) of spatially-developing turbulent thermal boundary layers under stratification are performed. It is well known that the transport phenomena of the flow is significantly affected by buoyancy, particularly in urban environments where stable and unstable atmospheric boundary layers are encountered. In the present investigation, the Dynamic Multi-scale approach by Araya et al. (JFM, 670, 2011) for turbulent inflow generation is extended to thermally stratified boundary layers. Furthermore, the proposed Dynamic Multi-scale approach is based on the original rescaling-recycling method by Lund et al. (1998). The two major improvements are: (i) the utilization of two different scaling laws in the inner and outer parts of the boundary layer to better absorb external conditions such as inlet Reynolds numbers, streamwise pressure gradients, buoyancy effects, etc., (ii) the implementation of a Dynamic approach to compute scaling parameters from the flow solution without the need of empirical correlations as in Lund et al. (1998). Numerical results are shown for ZPG flows at high momentum thickness Reynolds numbers (~ 3,000) and a comparison with experimental data is also carried out.

  20. Double large field stereoscopic PIV in a high Reynolds number turbulent boundary layer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coudert, S.; Foucaut, J. M.; Kostas, J.; Stanislas, M.; Braud, P.; Fourment, C.; Delville, J.; Tutkun, M.; Mehdi, F.; Johansson, P.; George, W. K.

    2011-01-01

    An experiment on a flat plate turbulent boundary layer at high Reynolds number has been carried out in the Laboratoire de Mecanique de Lille (LML, UMR CNRS 8107) wind tunnel. This experiment was performed jointly with LEA (UMR CNRS 6609) in Poitiers (France) and Chalmers University of Technology (Sweden), in the frame of the WALLTURB European project. The simultaneous recording of 143 hot wires in one transverse plane and of two perpendicular stereoscopic PIV fields was performed successfully. The first SPIV plane is 1 cm upstream of the hot wire rake and the second is both orthogonal to the first one and to the wall. The first PIV results show a blockage effect which based on both statistical results (i.e. mean, RMS and spatial correlation) and a potential model does not seem to affect the turbulence organization.

  1. Swath sonar mapping of Earth's submarine plate boundaries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carbotte, S. M.; Ferrini, V. L.; Celnick, M.; Nitsche, F. O.; Ryan, W. B. F.

    2014-12-01

    The recent loss of Malaysia Airlines flight MH370 in an area of the Indian Ocean where less than 5% of the seafloor is mapped with depth sounding data (Smith and Marks, EOS 2014) highlights the striking lack of detailed knowledge of the topography of the seabed for much of the worlds' oceans. Advances in swath sonar mapping technology over the past 30 years have led to dramatic improvements in our capability to map the seabed. However, the oceans are vast and only an estimated 10% of the seafloor has been mapped with these systems. Furthermore, the available coverage is highly heterogeneous and focused within areas of national strategic priority and community scientific interest. The major plate boundaries that encircle the globe, most of which are located in the submarine environment, have been a significant focus of marine geoscience research since the advent of swath sonar mapping. While the location of these plate boundaries are well defined from satellite-derived bathymetry, significant regions remain unmapped at the high-resolutions provided by swath sonars and that are needed to study active volcanic and tectonic plate boundary processes. Within the plate interiors, some fossil plate boundary zones, major hotspot volcanoes, and other volcanic provinces have been the focus of dedicated research programs. Away from these major tectonic structures, swath mapping coverage is limited to sparse ocean transit lines which often reveal previously unknown deep-sea channels and other little studied sedimentary structures not resolvable in existing low-resolution global compilations, highlighting the value of these data even in the tectonically quiet plate interiors. Here, we give an overview of multibeam swath sonar mapping of the major plate boundaries of the globe as extracted from public archives. Significant quantities of swath sonar data acquired from deep-sea regions are in restricted-access international archives. Open access to more of these data sets would

  2. Rough-wall turbulent boundary layers with constant skin friction

    KAUST Repository

    Sridhar, A.

    2017-03-28

    A semi-empirical model is presented that describes the development of a fully developed turbulent boundary layer in the presence of surface roughness with length scale ks that varies with streamwise distance x . Interest is centred on flows for which all terms of the von Kármán integral relation, including the ratio of outer velocity to friction velocity U+∞≡U∞/uτ , are streamwise constant. For Rex assumed large, use is made of a simple log-wake model of the local turbulent mean-velocity profile that contains a standard mean-velocity correction for the asymptotic fully rough regime and with assumed constant parameter values. It is then shown that, for a general power-law external velocity variation U∞∼xm , all measures of the boundary-layer thickness must be proportional to x and that the surface sand-grain roughness scale variation must be the linear form ks(x)=αx , where x is the distance from the boundary layer of zero thickness and α is a dimensionless constant. This is shown to give a two-parameter (m,α) family of solutions, for which U+∞ (or equivalently Cf ) and boundary-layer thicknesses can be simply calculated. These correspond to perfectly self-similar boundary-layer growth in the streamwise direction with similarity variable z/(αx) , where z is the wall-normal coordinate. Results from this model over a range of α are discussed for several cases, including the zero-pressure-gradient ( m=0 ) and sink-flow ( m=−1 ) boundary layers. Trends observed in the model are supported by wall-modelled large-eddy simulation of the zero-pressure-gradient case for Rex in the range 108−1010 and for four values of α . Linear streamwise growth of the displacement, momentum and nominal boundary-layer thicknesses is confirmed, while, for each α , the mean-velocity profiles and streamwise turbulent variances are found to collapse reasonably well onto z/(αx) . For given α , calculations of U+∞ obtained from large-eddy simulations are streamwise

  3. Turbulent boundary layer heat transfer experiments: Convex curvature effects including introduction and recovery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simon, T. W.; Moffat, R. J.; Johnston, J. P.; Kays, W. M.

    1982-01-01

    Measurements were made of the heat transfer rate through turbulent and transitional boundary layers on an isothermal, convexly curved wall and downstream flat plate. The effect of convex curvature on the fully turbulent boundary layer was a reduction of the local Stanton numbers 20% to 50% below those predicted for a flat wall under the same circumstances. The recovery of the heat transfer rates on the downstream flat wall was extremely slow. After 60 cm of recovery length, the Stanton number was still typically 15% to 20% below the flat wall predicted value. Various effects important in the modeling of curved flows were studied separately. These are: the effect of initial boundary layer thickness, the effect of freestream velocity, the effect of freestream acceleration, the effect of unheated starting length, and the effect of the maturity of the boundary layer. An existing curvature prediction model was tested against this broad heat transfer data base to determine where it could appropriately be used for heat transfer predictions.

  4. Turbulence transition in the asymptotic suction boundary layer

    CERN Document Server

    Kreilos, Tobias; Schneider, Tobias M; Veble, Gregor; Duguet, Yohann; Schlatter, Philipp; Henningson, Dan S; Eckhardt, Bruno

    2015-01-01

    We study the transition to turbulence in the asymptotic suction boundary layer (ASBL) by direct numerical simulation. Tracking the motion of trajectories intermediate between laminar and turbulent states we can identify the invariant object inside the laminar-turbulent boundary, the edge state. In small domains, the flow behaves like a travelling wave over short time intervals. On longer times one notes that the energy shows strong bursts at regular time intervals. During the bursts the streak structure is lost, but it reforms, translated in the spanwise direction by half the domain size. Varying the suction velocity allows to embed the flow into a family of flows that interpolate between plane Couette flow and the ASBL. Near the plane Couette limit, the edge state is a travelling wave. Increasing the suction, the travelling wave and a symmetry-related copy of it undergo a saddle-node infinite-period (SNIPER) bifurcation that leads to bursting and discrete-symmetry shifts. In wider domains, the structures loc...

  5. Scaling of pressure spectrum in turbulent boundary layers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patwardhan, Saurabh S.; Ramesh, O. N.

    2014-04-01

    Scaling of pressure spectrum in zero-pressure-gradient turbulent boundary layers is discussed. Spatial DNS data of boundary layer at one time instant (Reθ = 4500) are used for the analysis. It is observed that in the outer regions the pressure spectra tends towards the -7/3 law predicted by Kolmogorov's theory of small-scale turbulence. The slope in the pressure spectra varies from -1 close to the wall to a value close to -7/3 in the outer region. The streamwise velocity spectra also show a -5/3 trend in the outer region of the flow. The exercise carried out to study the amplitude modulation effect of the large scales on the smaller ones in the near-wall region reveals a strong modulation effect for the streamwise velocity, but not for the pressure fluctuations. The skewness of the pressure follows the same trend as the amplitude modulation coefficient, as is the case for the velocity. In the inner region, pressure spectra were seen to collapse better when normalized with the local Reynolds stress than when scaled with the local turbulent kinetic energy

  6. Sonic eddy model of the turbulent boundary layer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Breidenthal, Robert; Dintilhac, Paul; Williams, Owen

    2016-11-01

    A model of the compressible turbulent boundary layer is proposed. It is based on the notion that turbulent transport by an eddy requires that information of nonsteady events propagates across the diameter of that eddy during one rotation period. The finite acoustic signaling speed then controls the turbulent fluxes. As a consequence, the fluxes are limited by the largest eddies that satisfies this requirement. Therefore "sonic eddies" with a rotational Mach number of about unity would determine the skin friction, which is predicted to vary inversely with Mach number. This sonic eddy model contrasts with conventional models that are based on the energy equation and variations in the density. The effect of density variations is known to be weak in free shear flows, and the sonic eddy model assumes the same for the boundary layer. In general, Mach number plays two simultaneous roles in compressible flow, one related to signaling and the other related to the energy equation. The predictions of the model are compared with experimental data and DNS results from the literature.

  7. The Turbulent Boundary Layer on a Horizontally Moving, Partially Submerged, Surface-Piercing Vertical Wall

    CERN Document Server

    Washuta, Nathan; Duncan, James H

    2016-01-01

    The complex interactions between turbulence and the free surface, including air entrainment processes, in boundary layer shear flows created by vertical surface-piercing plates are considered. A laboratory-scale device was built that utilizes a surface-piercing stainless steel belt that travels in a loop around two vertical rollers, with one length of the belt between the rollers acting as a horizontally-moving flat wall. The belt is operated both as a suddenly-started plate to reproduce boundary layer flow or at steady state in the presence of a stationary flat plate positioned parallel to the belt to create a Couette flow with a free surface. Surface profiles are measured with a cinematic laser-induced fluorescence system in both experiments and air entrainment events and bubble motions are observed with stereo underwater white-light movies in the suddenly started belt experiment. It is found that the RMS surface height fluctuations, $\\eta$, peak near the boundaries of the flows and increase approximately l...

  8. On determining characteristic length scales in pressure-gradient turbulent boundary layers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vinuesa, R.; Bobke, A.; Örlü, R.; Schlatter, P.

    2016-05-01

    In the present work, we analyze three commonly used methods to determine the edge of pressure gradient turbulent boundary layers: two based on composite profiles, the one by Chauhan et al. ["Criteria for assessing experiments in zero pressure gradient boundary layers," Fluid Dyn. Res. 41, 021404 (2009)] and the one by Nickels ["Inner scaling for wall-bounded flows subject to large pressure gradients," J. Fluid Mech. 521, 217-239 (2004)], and the other one based on the condition of vanishing mean velocity gradient. Additionally, a new method is introduced based on the diagnostic plot concept by Alfredsson et al. ["A new scaling for the streamwise turbulence intensity in wall-bounded turbulent flows and what it tells us about the `outer' peak," Phys. Fluids 23, 041702 (2011)]. The boundary layers developing over the suction and pressure sides of a NACA4412 wing section, extracted from a direct numerical simulation at chord Reynolds number Rec = 400 000, are used as the test case, besides other numerical and experimental data from favorable, zero, and adverse pressure-gradient flat-plate turbulent boundary layers. We find that all the methods produce robust results with mild or moderate pressure gradients, although the composite-profile techniques require data preparation, including initial estimations of fitting parameters and data truncation. Stronger pressure gradients (with a Rotta-Clauser pressure-gradient parameter β larger than around 7) lead to inconsistent results in all the techniques except the diagnostic plot. This method also has the advantage of providing an objective way of defining the point where the mean streamwise velocity is 99% of the edge velocity and shows consistent results in a wide range of pressure gradient conditions, as well as flow histories. Collapse of intermittency factors obtained from a wide range of pressure-gradient and Re conditions on the wing further highlights the robustness of the diagnostic plot method to determine the

  9. Compressible Turbulent Boundary Layers on a Strongly Heated Wall

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    1993-01-01

    This paper concerns the theoretical and experimental modelling of the flat wall,highly heated,compressible turbulent boundary layer.Its final objective is to develop a numerical Navier-Stokes solver and to conclude on its capability to correctly represent complex aerothermic viscous flows near the wall.The paper presents a constructed numerical method with particular attention given to the turbulence modelling at low Reynolds number and comparisons with supersonic and transonic experimental data.For the transonic experiment,very high wall temperature(Tw=1100K)is realized.The method of this difficult experimental set up is discussed.The comparison between experimental and computational data conducts to the first conclusion and gives some indications for the future work.

  10. Turbulent pipe flow: Statistics, Re-dependence, structures and similarities with channel and boundary layer flows

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    El Khoury, George K; Schlatter, Philipp; Brethouwer, Geert; Johansson, Arne V

    2014-01-01

    Direct numerical simulation data of fully developed turbulent pipe flow are extensively compared with those of turbulent channel flow and zero-pressure-gradient boundary layer flow for Re-tau up to 1 000...

  11. A compressible near-wall turbulence model for boundary layer calculations

    Science.gov (United States)

    So, R. M. C.; Zhang, H. S.; Lai, Y. G.

    1992-01-01

    A compressible near-wall two-equation model is derived by relaxing the assumption of dynamical field similarity between compressible and incompressible flows. This requires justifications for extending the incompressible models to compressible flows and the formulation of the turbulent kinetic energy equation in a form similar to its incompressible counterpart. As a result, the compressible dissipation function has to be split into a solenoidal part, which is not sensitive to changes of compressibility indicators, and a dilational part, which is directly affected by these changes. This approach isolates terms with explicit dependence on compressibility so that they can be modeled accordingly. An equation that governs the transport of the solenoidal dissipation rate with additional terms that are explicitly dependent on the compressibility effects is derived similarly. A model with an explicit dependence on the turbulent Mach number is proposed for the dilational dissipation rate. Thus formulated, all near-wall incompressible flow models could be expressed in terms of the solenoidal dissipation rate and straight-forwardly extended to compressible flows. Therefore, the incompressible equations are recovered correctly in the limit of constant density. The two-equation model and the assumption of constant turbulent Prandtl number are used to calculate compressible boundary layers on a flat plate with different wall thermal boundary conditions and free-stream Mach numbers. The calculated results, including the near-wall distributions of turbulence statistics and their limiting behavior, are in good agreement with measurements. In particular, the near-wall asymptotic properties are found to be consistent with incompressible behavior; thus suggesting that turbulent flows in the viscous sublayer are not much affected by compressibility effects.

  12. Thermal boundary layer profiles in turbulent Rayleigh-B\\'enard convection in a cylindrical sample

    CERN Document Server

    Stevens, Richard J A M; Grossmann, Siegfried; Verzicco, Roberto; Xia, Ke-Qing; Lohse, Detlef

    2011-01-01

    We numerically investigate the structures of the near-plate temperature profiles close to the bottom and top plates of turbulent Rayleigh-B\\'{e}nard flow in a cylindrical sample at Rayleigh numbers $Ra=10^8$ to $Ra=2\\times10^{12}$ and Prandtl numbers Pr=6.4 and Pr=0.7 thus extending previous results for quasi-2-dimensional systems to 3D systems for the first time. The results show that the instantaneous temperature profiles scaled by the dynamical frame method [Q. Zhou and K.-Q. Xia, Phys. Rev. Lett. 104, 104301 (2010)] agree well with the classical Prandtl-Blasius laminar boundary layer (BL) profiles, especially for low Ra and high Pr. The agreement is slightly less, but still good, for lower Pr, where the thermal BL is more exposed to the bulk fluctuations due to the thinner kinetic BL, and higher Ra, where more plumes are passing the measurement location.

  13. An analytical model of capped turbulent oscillatory bottom boundary layers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shimizu, Kenji

    2010-03-01

    An analytical model of capped turbulent oscillatory bottom boundary layers (BBLs) is proposed using eddy viscosity of a quadratic form. The common definition of friction velocity based on maximum bottom shear stress is found unsatisfactory for BBLs under rotating flows, and a possible extension based on turbulent kinetic energy balance is proposed. The model solutions show that the flow may slip at the top of the boundary layer due to capping by the water surface or stratification, reducing the bottom shear stress, and that the Earth's rotation induces current and bottom shear stress components perpendicular to the interior flow with a phase lag (or lead). Comparisons with field and numerical experiments indicate that the model predicts the essential characteristics of the velocity profiles, although the agreement is rather qualitative due to assumptions of quadratic eddy viscosity with time-independent friction velocity and a well-mixed boundary layer. On the other hand, the predicted linear friction coefficients, phase lead, and veering angle at the bottom agreed with available data with an error of 3%-10%, 5°-10°, and 5°-10°, respectively. As an application of the model, the friction coefficients are used to calculate e-folding decay distances of progressive internal waves with a semidiurnal frequency.

  14. Experimental measurements of large scale structures in an incompressible turbulent boundary layer using correlated X-probes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strataridakis, Constantine J.; White, Bruce R.; Robinson, Stephen K.

    1989-01-01

    Hot-wire anemometry measurements in an incompressible turbulent boundary-layer flow over a flat plate, at zero pressure gradient were made using two X-probes simultaneously. The over seven meters long flat plate installed within the wind tunnel generated an approximately 20-cm thick boundary layer, and R(theta) of about 4,000. The mean velocity and turbulence intensity data very close to the wall were measured with a single-wire. Space-time velocity fluctuation and shear-product correlation measurements enabled the calculation of large-scale structure convection velocity, inclination-angle to the wall, and spatial extent in space. The shear-product correlation results are reported for the first time.

  15. Global effect of local skin friction drag reduction in spatially developing turbulent boundary layer

    CERN Document Server

    Stroh, A; Schlatter, P; Frohnapfel, B

    2016-01-01

    A numerical investigation of two locally applied drag reducing control schemes is carried out in the configuration of a spatially developing turbulent boundary layer (TBL). One control is designed to damp near-wall turbulence and the other induces constant mass flux in the wall-normal direction. Both control schemes yield similar local drag reduction rates within the control region. However, the flow development downstream of the control significantly differs: persistent drag reduction is found for the uniform blowing case whereas drag increase is found for the turbulence damping case. In order to account for this difference the formulation of a global drag reduction rate is suggested. It represents the reduction of the streamwise force exerted by the fluid on a finite length plate. Furthermore, it is shown that the far downstream development of the TBL after the control region can be described by a single quantity, namely a streamwise shift of the uncontrolled boundary layer, i.e. a changed virtual origin. B...

  16. Injection-induced turbulence in stagnation-point boundary layers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, C.

    1984-02-01

    A theory is developed for the stagnation point boundary layer with injection under the hypothesis that turbulence is produced at the wall by injection. From the existing experimental heat transfer rate data obtained in wind tunnels, the wall mixing length is deduced to be a product of a time constant and an injection velocity. The theory reproduces the observed increase in heat transfer rates at high injection rates. For graphite and carbon-carbon composite, the time constant is determined to be 0.0002 sec from the existing ablation data taken in an arc-jet tunnel and a balistic range.

  17. Relaminarization of the boundary layer over a flat plate in shock tube experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hinckel, J. N.; Nagamatsu, H. T.

    1986-01-01

    The relaminarization of the boundary layer over a flat plate in the shock tube was investigated by using the partially reflected shock wave technique. The flow Mach number was approximately 0.14, which corresponds to the inleft flow Mach number for the first row of vanes in a gas turbine. The thin film platinum heat gauges were used to measure the heat transfer rate and the Stanton number was calculated from the oscilloscope voltage traces. The Reynolds number was varied by changing the operation pressure of the shock tube and the values varied from 2.3 x 10 to the 4th to 5.3 x 10 to the 5th. For a Reynolds number range of 7 x 10 to the 4th to 3.5 x 10 to the 5th, the relaminarization of the boundary layer was observed. This phenomenon is due to the decay of the turbulence level in the flow as the reflected shock wave moves upstream from the flat plate. As the Reynolds number increased, the relaminarization was delayed and the delay was related to the turbulence generated by the reflected shock wave.

  18. Free, transverse vibrations of thin plates with discontinuous boundary conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Febbo, M.; Vera, S. A.; Laura, P. A. A.

    2005-03-01

    Vibrations of circular and rectangular plates clamped on part of the boundary and simply supported along the remainder are analyzed by means of a method of perturbation of boundary conditions. This approach appears to be simple and straightforward, giving excellent results for the first mode and its versatility permits to extend it to higher modes of vibration without difficulty. Furthermore, it is shown that the fundamental frequency coefficient can also be determined using a modified Galerkin approach and very simple polynomial coordinate functions which yield good engineering accuracy.

  19. Optimal control of wind turbines in a turbulent boundary layer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yilmaz, Ali Emre; Meyers, Johan

    2016-11-01

    In recent years, optimal control theory was combined with large-eddy simulations to study the optimal control of wind farms and their interaction with the atmospheric boundary layer. The individual turbine's induction factors were dynamically controlled in time with the aim of increasing overall power extraction. In these studies, wind turbines were represented using an actuator disk method. In the current work, we focus on optimal control on a much finer mesh (and a smaller computational domain), representing turbines with an actuator line method. Similar to Refs., optimization is performed using a gradient-based method, and gradients are obtained employing an adjoint formulation. Different cases are investigated, that include a single and a double turbine case both with uniform inflow, and with turbulent-boundary-layer inflow. The authors acknowledge support from the European Research Council (FP7-Ideas, Grant No. 306471).

  20. Temporally optimized spanwise vorticity sensor measurements in turbulent boundary layers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morrill-Winter, C.; Klewicki, J.; Baidya, R.; Marusic, I.

    2015-12-01

    Multi-element hot-wire anemometry was used to measure spanwise vorticity fluctuations in turbulent boundary layers. Smooth wall boundary layer profiles, with very good spatial and temporal resolution, were acquired over a Kármán number range of 2000-12,700 at the Melbourne Wind Tunnel at the University of Melbourne and the University of New Hampshire's Flow Physics Facility. A custom hot-wire probe was necessary to simultaneously obtain velocity and spanwise vorticity measurements centered at a fixed point in space. A custom calibration/processing scheme was developed to utilize single-wall-parallel wires to optimize the accuracy of the measured wall-normal velocity fluctuations derived from the sensor's ×-array.

  1. A Cautionary Note on the Thermal Boundary Layer Similarity Scaling for the Turbulent Boundary Layer

    CERN Document Server

    Weyburne, David

    2016-01-01

    Wang and Castillo have developed empirical parameters for scaling the temperature profile of the turbulent boundary layer flowing over a heated wall in the paper X. Wang and L. Castillo, J. Turbul., 4, 1(2003). They presented experimental data plots that showed similarity type behavior when scaled with their new scaling parameters. However, what was actually plotted, and what actually showed similarity type behavior, was not the temperature profile but the defect profile formed by subtracting the temperature in the boundary layer from the temperature in the bulk flow. We show that if the same data and same scaling is replotted as just the scaled temperature profile, similarity is no longer prevalent. This failure to show both defect profile similarity and temperature profile similarity is indicative of false similarity. The nature of this false similarity problem is discussed in detail.

  2. Heavy Particle Transport in the Turbulent Boundary Layer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richter, D. H.

    2016-12-01

    To describe the emission and transport of dust in the atmosphere, assumptions must typically be made in order to connect the micro-scale emission and saltation process with the larger-scale atmospheric uptake and turbulent flux. In the context of numerical models, this can be thought of as the transport process which occurs between the domain bottom and the first vertical grid point. For example, in the limit of small particles (both low inertia and low settling velocity), theory built upon Monin-Obukhov similarity has proven effective in relating mean dust concentration profiles to surface emission fluxes. For increasing particle mass, however, it becomes more difficult to represent dust transport as a simple extension of the transport of a passive scalar due to issues such as the crossing trajectories effect. This study focuses specifically on the problem of large particle transport and dispersion in the turbulent boundary layer by utilizing direct numerical simulations with Lagrangian point-particle tracking to determine under what, if any, conditions the large particles can be described in a simplified Eulerian framework such as Monin-Obukhov similarity theory. In particular, results will be presented detailing the independent contributions of both particle inertia and particle settling velocity relative to the strength of the surrounding turbulent flow.

  3. Global plate boundary evolution and kinematics since the late Paleozoic

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matthews, Kara J.; Maloney, Kayla T.; Zahirovic, Sabin; Williams, Simon E.; Seton, Maria; Müller, R. Dietmar

    2016-11-01

    Many aspects of deep-time Earth System models, including mantle convection, paleoclimatology, paleobiogeography and the deep Earth carbon cycle, require high-resolution plate motion models that include the evolution of the mosaic of plate boundaries through time. We present the first continuous late Paleozoic to present-day global plate model with evolving plate boundaries, building on and extending two previously published models for the late Paleozoic (410-250 Ma) and Mesozoic-Cenozoic (230-0 Ma). We ensure continuity during the 250-230 Ma transition period between the two models, update the absolute reference frame of the Mesozoic-Cenozoic model and add a new Paleozoic reconstruction for the Baltica-derived Alexander Terrane, now accreted to western North America. This 410-0 Ma open access model provides a framework for deep-time whole Earth modelling and acts as a base for future extensions and refinement. We analyse the model in terms of the number of plates, predicted plate size distribution, plate and continental root mean square (RMS) speeds, plate velocities and trench migration through time. Overall model trends share many similarities to those for recent times, which we use as a first order benchmark against which to compare the model and identify targets for future model refinement. Except for during the period 260-160 Ma, the number of plates (16-46) and ratio of "large" plates (≥ 107.5 km2) to smaller plates ( 2.7-6.6) are fairly similar to present-day values (46 and 6.6, respectively), with lower values occurring during late Paleozoic assembly and growth of Pangea. This temporal pattern may also reflect difficulties in reconstructing small, now subducted oceanic plates further back in time, as well as whether a supercontinent is assembling or breaking up. During the 260-160 Ma timeframe the model reaches a minima in the number of plates, in contrast to what we would expect during initial Pangea breakup and thus highlighting the need for refinement

  4. Tectonics of the Nazca-Antarctic plate boundary

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson-Fontana, Sandra; Larson, Roger L.; Engeln, Joseph F.; Lundgren, Paul; Stein, Seth

    1987-01-01

    A new bathymetric chart of part of the Chile transform system is constructed, based mainly on an R/V Endeavor survey from 100 deg W to its intersection with the East Ridge of the Juan Fernandez microplate. A generally continuous lineated trend can be followed through the entire region, with the transform valley being relatively narrow and well-defined from 109 deg W to approximately 104 deg 30 min W. The fracture zone then widens to the east, with at least two probable en echelon offsets to the south at 104 deg and 102 deg W. Six new strike-slip mechanisms along the Chile Transform and one normal fault mechanism near the northern end of the Chile Rise, inverted together with other plate-motion data from the eastern portion of the boundary, produce a new best-fit Euler pole for the Nazca-Antarctic plate pair, providing tighter constraints on the relative plate motions.

  5. Tectonics of the Nazca-Antarctic plate boundary

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson-Fontana, Sandra; Larson, Roger L.; Engeln, Joseph F.; Lundgren, Paul; Stein, Seth

    1987-01-01

    A new bathymetric chart of part of the Chile transform system is constructed, based mainly on an R/V Endeavor survey from 100 deg W to its intersection with the East Ridge of the Juan Fernandez microplate. A generally continuous lineated trend can be followed through the entire region, with the transform valley being relatively narrow and well-defined from 109 deg W to approximately 104 deg 30 min W. The fracture zone then widens to the east, with at least two probable en echelon offsets to the south at 104 deg and 102 deg W. Six new strike-slip mechanisms along the Chile Transform and one normal fault mechanism near the northern end of the Chile Rise, inverted together with other plate-motion data from the eastern portion of the boundary, produce a new best-fit Euler pole for the Nazca-Antarctic plate pair, providing tighter constraints on the relative plate motions.

  6. Thermographic analysis of turbulent non-isothermal water boundary layer

    CERN Document Server

    Znamenskaya, Irina A

    2015-01-01

    The paper is devoted to the investigation of the turbulent water boundary layer in the jet mixing flows using high-speed infrared (IR) thermography. Two turbulent mixing processes were studied: a submerged water jet impinging on a flat surface and two intersecting jets in a round disc-shaped vessel. An infrared camera (FLIR Systems SC7700) was focused on the window transparent for IR radiation; it provided high-speed recordings of heat fluxes from a thin water layer close to the window. Temperature versus time curves at different points of water boundary layer near the wall surface were acquired using the IR camera with the recording frequency of 100 Hz. The time of recording varied from 3 till 20 min. The power spectra for the temperature fluctuations at different points on the hot-cold water mixing zone were calculated using the Fast Fourier Transform algorithm. The obtained spectral behavior was compared to the Kolmogorov "-5/3 spectrum" (a direct energy cascade) and the dual-cascade scenario predicted for...

  7. Wave-Particle Interactions in the Turbulent Plasmaspheric Boundary Layer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mishin, Evgeny

    2012-10-01

    We present in situ satellite observations of plasmaspheric lower hybrid/fast magnetosonic turbulence and broadband hiss-like VLF emissions related with substorm subauroral ion drifts/polarization streams (SAID/SAPS) in the magnetosphere and topside ionosphere. SAID/SAPS appear in ˜10 min after the substorm onset consistent with the fast propagation of substorm injection fronts. The SAID channel follows the dispersionless cutoff of the energetic electron flux at the plasmapause. This indicates that the cold plasma maintains charge neutrality within the channel, thereby short-circuiting the injected plasmoid (injection front) over the plasmasphere. As with the well-documented plasmoid-magnetic barrier problem, plasma turbulence ensures the circuit resistivity and magnetic diffusion as well as significant electron heating and acceleration. The SAID/SAPS-related VLF emissions were used to simulate interactions with the outer zone electrons. These emissions appear to constitute a distinctive subset of substorm/storm-related VLF activity in the region co-located with freshly injected energetic ions equatorward of the plasma sheet boundary. Significant pitch-angle diffusion coefficients suggest that substorm SAID/SAPS-related VLF waves could be responsible for the alteration of the outer radiation belt boundary during (sub)storms.

  8. Velocity-vorticity correlation structures in compressible turbulent boundary layer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Jun; Li, Shi-Yao; She, Zhen-Su

    2016-11-01

    A velocity-vorticity correlation structure (VVCS) analysis is applied to analyze data of 3-dimensional (3-D) direct numerical simulations (DNS), to investigate the quantitative properties of the most correlated vortex structures in compressible turbulent boundary layer (CTBL) at Mach numbers, Ma = 2 . 25 and 6 . 0 . It is found that the geometry variation of the VVCS closely reflects the streamwise development of CTBL. In laminar region, the VVCS captures the instability wave number of the boundary layer. The transition region displays a distinct scaling change of the dimensions of VVCS. The developed turbulence region is characterized by a constant spatial extension of the VVCS. For various Mach numbers, the maximum correlation coefficient of the VVCS presents a clear multi-layer structure with the same scaling laws as a recent symmetry analysis proposed to quantifying the sublayer, the log-layer, and the wake flow. A surprising discovery is that the wall friction coefficient, Cf, holds a "-1"-power law of the wall normal distance of the VVCS, ys. This validates the speculation that the wall friction is determined by the near-wall coherent structure, which clarifies the correlation between statistical structures and the near-wall dynamics. Project 11452002 and 11172006 supported by National Natural Science Foundation of China.

  9. Lumley decomposition of turbulent boundary layer at high Reynolds numbers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tutkun, Murat; George, William K.

    2017-02-01

    The decomposition proposed by Lumley in 1966 is applied to a high Reynolds number turbulent boundary layer. The experimental database was created by a hot-wire rake of 143 probes in the Laboratoire de Mécanique de Lille wind tunnel. The Reynolds numbers based on momentum thickness (Reθ) are 9800 and 19 100. Three-dimensional decomposition is performed, namely, proper orthogonal decomposition (POD) in the inhomogeneous and bounded wall-normal direction, Fourier decomposition in the homogeneous spanwise direction, and Fourier decomposition in time. The first POD modes in both cases carry nearly 50% of turbulence kinetic energy when the energy is integrated over Fourier dimensions. The eigenspectra always peak near zero frequency and most of the large scale, energy carrying features are found at the low end of the spectra. The spanwise Fourier mode which has the largest amount of energy is the first spanwise mode and its symmetrical pair. Pre-multiplied eigenspectra have only one distinct peak and it matches the secondary peak observed in the log-layer of pre-multiplied velocity spectra. Energy carrying modes obtained from the POD scale with outer scaling parameters. Full or partial reconstruction of turbulent velocity signal based only on energetic modes or non-energetic modes revealed the behaviour of urms in distinct regions across the boundary layer. When urms is based on energetic reconstruction, there exists (a) an exponential decay from near wall to log-layer, (b) a constant layer through the log-layer, and (c) another exponential decay in the outer region. The non-energetic reconstruction reveals that urms has (a) an exponential decay from the near-wall to the end of log-layer and (b) a constant layer in the outer region. Scaling of urms using the outer parameters is best when both energetic and non-energetic profiles are combined.

  10. Boundary layer structure in turbulent Rayleigh-Benard convection

    CERN Document Server

    Shi, Nan; Schumacher, Joerg

    2012-01-01

    The structure of the boundary layers in turbulent Rayleigh-Benard convection is studied by means of three-dimensional direct numerical simulations. We consider convection in a cylindrical cell at an aspect ratio one for Rayleigh numbers of Ra=3e+9 and 3e+10 at fixed Prandtl number Pr=0.7. Similar to the experimental results in the same setup and for the same Prandtl number, the structure of the laminar boundary layers of the velocity and temperature fields is found to deviate from the prediction of the Prandtl-Blasius-Pohlhausen theory. Deviations decrease when a dynamical rescaling of the data with an instantaneously defined boundary layer thickness is performed and the analysis plane is aligned with the instantaneous direction of the large-scale circulation in the closed cell. Our numerical results demonstrate that important assumptions which enter existing classical laminar boundary layer theories for forced and natural convection are violated, such as the strict two-dimensionality of the dynamics or the s...

  11. Properties of the turbulent/non-turbulent interface in boundary layers

    CERN Document Server

    Borrell, Guillem

    2016-01-01

    The turbulent/non-turbulent interface is analysed in a direct numerical simulation of a boundary layer in the range $Re_\\theta=2800-6600$, with emphasis on the behaviour of the relatively large-scale fractal intermittent region. This requires the introduction of a new definition of the distance between a point and a general surface, which is compared with the more usual vertical distance to the top of the layer. Interfaces are obtained by thresholding the enstrophy field and the magnitude of the rate-of-strain tensor, and it is concluded that, while the former are physically relevant features, the latter are not. By varying the threshold, a topological transition is identified as the interface moves from the free stream into the turbulent core. A vorticity scale is defined that collapses that transition for different Reynolds numbers, roughly equivalent to the root-mean-squared vorticity at the edge of the boundary layer. Conditionally averaged flow variables are analysed as functions of the new distance, bot...

  12. Experimental study on the local similarity scaling of the turbulence spectrum in the turbulent boundary layer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    XIA ZhenYan; JIANG Nan; TIAN Yan; WANG YuChun

    2009-01-01

    The streamwise fluctuating velocity in the turbulent boundary layer is measured under approximately medium Reynolds Number by hot wire in order to investigate the scaling properties of the overlapped turbulent spectrum among energy-containing area, inertial subrange and dissipation range based on FFT analysis. The experiment indicates that the high Reynolds flow reported before is not indispensable to produce -1 scaling. So far as the measured position is provided with much higher spatial resolution and enough closing to the wall, -1 scaling is determinate to exist when approaching medium Reynolds. The scaling ranges are supposed to begin at inner scale and end in outer scale, which reveals the local similarity of the energy spectrum over the energy-containing eddies near the wall. In the logarithmic area (y+>130), -5/3 scaling occurs in the energy spectrum, while moving away from the wall with Reynolds numbers increasing, the inertial subrange extends to the lower wavenumbers. On the condition k1η>>0.1, the curves of the turbulence spectrum in the logarithmic layer are superposed, which expresses the similarity of turbulence energy distributed in Komogorov scaling area and exhibits local isotropy characteristics by virtue of the viscous dissipation.

  13. Experimental study on the local similarity scaling of the turbulence spectrum in the turbulent boundary layer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2009-01-01

    The streamwise fluctuating velocity in the turbulent boundary layer is measured under approximately medium Reynolds Number by hot wire in order to investigate the scaling properties of the overlapped turbulent spectrum among energy-containing area, inertial subrange and dissipation range based on FFT analysis. The experiment indicates that the high Reynolds flow reported before is not indispensable to produce -1 scaling. So far as the measured position is provided with much higher spatial resolution and enough closing to the wall, -1 scaling is determinate to exist when approaching medium Reynolds. The scaling ranges are supposed to begin at inner scale and end in outer scale, which reveals the local similarity of the energy spectrum over the energy-containing eddies near the wall. In the logarithmic area (y+ > 130), -5/3 scaling occurs in the energy spectrum, while moving away from the wall with Reynolds numbers increasing, the inertial subrange extends to the lower wavenumbers. On the condition k1η 0.1, the curves of the turbulence spectrum in the logarithmic layer are superposed, which expresses the similarity of turbulence energy distributed in Komogorov scaling area and exhibits local isotropy characteristics by virtue of the viscous dissipation.

  14. Use of a rotating cylinder to induce laminar and turbulent separation over a flat plate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Afroz, F.; Lang, A.; Jones, E.

    2017-06-01

    An innovative and easy technique using a rotating cylinder system has been implemented in a water tunnel experiment to generate an adverse pressure gradient (APG). The strength of the APG was varied through adjustment in the rotation speed and location of the cylinder. Then the technique was used for inducing a laminar separation bubble (LSB) and turbulent boundary layer (TBL) separation over a flat plate. A theoretical model to predict the pressure variation induced on the plate consists of an inviscid flow over a reverse doublet-like configuration of two counter rotating cylinders. This model quantified the pressure distribution with changes of cylinder speed and location. The dimensionless velocity ratio (VR) of the cylinder rotation rate to the mainstream velocity and gap to diameter ratio \\tfrac{G}{D} were chosen as the two main ways of varying the strength of the APG, which affects the nature and extent of the LSB as well as TBL separation. The experimental parametric study, using time-resolved digital particle image velocimetry, was then conducted in a water tunnel. The variation in height (h), length (l), and the separation point (S) of the LSB was documented due to the variation in the APG. The similar type of experimental parametric study was used to explore the unsteady, turbulent separation bubble in a 2D plane aligned with the flow and perpendicular to the plate. The mean detachment locations of TBL separation are determined by two different definitions: (i) back-flow coefficient (χ) = 50%, and (ii) location of start of negative mean skin friction coefficient (C f). They are in good agreement and separation bubble characteristics agreed well with results obtained using different methods thus proving the validity of the technique.

  15. Bed slope effects on turbulent wave boundary layers: 1. Model validation and quantification of rough-turbulent results

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fuhrman, David R.; Fredsøe, Jørgen; Sumer, B. Mutlu

    2009-01-01

    A numerical model solving incompressible Reynolds-averaged Navier-Stokes equations, combined with a two-equation k-omega turbulence closure, is used to study converging-diverging effects from a sloping bed on turbulent (oscillatory) wave boundary layers. Bed shear stresses from the numerical model...

  16. Interaction between a normal shock wave and a turbulent boundary layer at high transonic speeds. II - Wall shear stress

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liou, M. S.; Adamson, T. C., Jr.

    1980-01-01

    Asymptotic methods are used to calculate the shear stress at the wall for the interaction between a normal shock wave and a turbulent boundary layer on a flat plate. A mixing length model is used for the eddy viscosity. The shock wave is taken to be strong enough that the sonic line is deep in the boundary layer and the upstream influence is thus very small. It is shown that unlike the result found for laminar flow an asymptotic criterion for separation is not found; however, conditions for incipient separation are computed numerically using the derived solution for the shear stress at the wall. Results are compared with available experimental measurements.

  17. On the onset of turbulence in natural convection on inclined plates

    OpenAIRE

    Rodríguez Sevillano, Angel; Pérez Grande, María Isabel; Meseguer Ruiz, José

    2011-01-01

    The problem of determination of the turbulence onset in natural convection on heated inclined plates in an air environment has been experimentally revisited. The transition has been detected by using hot wire velocity measurements. The onset of turbulence has been considered to take place where velocity fluctuations (measured through turbulence intensity) start to grow. Experiments have shown that the onset depends not only on the Grashof number defined in terms of the temperature difference ...

  18. A model for turbulent dissipation rate in a constant pressure boundary layer

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    J DEY; P PHANI KUMAR

    2016-04-01

    Estimation of the turbulent dissipation rate in a boundary layer is a very involved process.Experimental determination of either the dissipation rate or the Taylor microscale, even in isotropic turbulence,which may occur in a portion of the turbulent boundary layer, is known to be a difficult task. For constant pressure boundary layers, a model for the turbulent dissipation rate is proposed here in terms of the local mean flow quantities. Comparable agreement between the estimated Taylor microscale and Kolmogorov length scale with other data in the logarithmic region suggests usefulness of this model in obtaining these quantitiesexperimentally

  19. Computational Fluid Dynamics Simulation and Experimental Validation of Hypersonic Turbulence Boundary Layer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiao Hong

    2013-08-01

    large deviation. The hypersonic flat-plate laminar flow was also compared with CP and st calculated from the three turbulence models for the three grids. Evidently, the grids near the wall must be encrypted to an appropriate extent to simulate more accurately the boundary laminar flow as well as obtain proper surface friction and heat flow. The calculation in the present study showed that the Reynolds number in the first layer of the grid was more reasonable when it was about 20. The simulation result for the hypersonic isothermal two-dimensional turning wall flow showed that the calculation and experiment results from the different turbulence model were consistent. There was little difference between the location of the simulated heat flow peak and the position given by experiment. However, the peak, the curve trend after the peak and the experimental result widely differed. The curve and experimental results for pressure distribution greatly varied because of the existence of an isolated area in the calculation of the laminar flow. The calculation and experimental results from different turbulence models were close. The curve trend, the peak and the experimental result basically matched.

  20. Detecting Multi-Scale Coherent Eddy Structures and Intermittency in Turbulent Boundary Layer by Wavelet Analysis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    JIANG Nan; ZHANG Jin

    2005-01-01

    @@ Multi-scale decomposition by wavelet transform has been performed to velocity time sequences obtained by fine measurements of turbulent boundary layer flow. A conditional sampling technique for detecting multi-scale coherent eddy structures in turbulent field is proposed by using multi-scale instantaneous intensity factor and flatness factor of wavelet coefficients. Although the number of coherent eddy structures in the turbulent boundary layer is very small, their energy percentage with respect to the turbulence kinetic energy is high. Especially in buffer layer, the energy percentages of coherent structures are significantly higher than those in the logarithmic layer, indicating that the buffer layer is the most active region in the turbulent boundary layer. These multi-scale coherent eddy structures share some common dynamical characteristics and are responsible for the anomalous scaling law in the turbulent boundary layer.

  1. The Boundary Layer Late Afternoon and Sunset Turbulence 2011 field experiment

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lothon, M.; Lohou, F.; Durand, P.; Couvreux, F.; Hartogensis, O.K.; Legain, D.; Pardyjak, E.; Pino, D.; Vilà-Guerau de Arellano, J.; Boer, van de A.; Moene, A.F.; Steeneveld, G.J.

    2012-01-01

    BLLAST (Boundary Layer Late Afternoon and Sunset Turbulence) aims at better understanding the thermodynamical processes that occur during the late afternoon in the lower troposphere. In direct contact with the Earth surface, the atmospheric boundary layer is governed by buoyant and mechanical turbul

  2. Modification of Turbulent Boundary Layer Flows by Superhydrophobic Surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gose, James W.; Golovin, Kevin; Barros, Julio; Schultz, Michael P.; Tuteja, Anish; Perlin, Marc; Ceccio, Steven L.

    2016-11-01

    Measurements of near zero pressure gradient turbulent boundary layer (TBL) flow over several superhydrophobic surfaces (SHSs) are presented and compared to those for a hydraulically smooth baseline. The surfaces were developed at the University of Michigan as part of an ongoing research thrust to investigate the feasibility of SHSs for skin-friction drag reduction in turbulent flow. The SHSs were previously evaluated in fully-developed turbulent channel flow and have been shown to provide meaningful drag reduction. The TBL experiments were conducted at the USNA in a water tunnel with a test section 2.0 m (L) x 0.2 m (W) x 0.2 m (H). The free-stream speed was set to 1.26 m/s which corresponded to a friction Reynolds number of 1,500. The TBL was tripped at the test section inlet with a 0.8 mm diameter wire. The upper and side walls provided optical access, while the lower wall was either the smooth baseline or a spray coated SHS. The velocity measurements were obtained with a TSI FSA3500 two-component Laser-Doppler Velocimeter (LDV) and custom-designed beam displacer operated in coincidence mode. The LDV probe volume diameter was 45 μm (approx. one wall-unit). The measurements were recorded 1.5 m downstream of the trip. When the measured quantities were normalized using the inner variables, the results indicated a significant reduction in the near wall viscous and total stresses with little effect on the flow outside the inner layer.

  3. Computation of turbulent boundary layers employing the defect wall-function method. M.S. Thesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Douglas L.

    1994-01-01

    In order to decrease overall computational time requirements of spatially-marching parabolized Navier-Stokes finite-difference computer code when applied to turbulent fluid flow, a wall-function methodology, originally proposed by R. Barnwell, was implemented. This numerical effort increases computational speed and calculates reasonably accurate wall shear stress spatial distributions and boundary-layer profiles. Since the wall shear stress is analytically determined from the wall-function model, the computational grid near the wall is not required to spatially resolve the laminar-viscous sublayer. Consequently, a substantially increased computational integration step size is achieved resulting in a considerable decrease in net computational time. This wall-function technique is demonstrated for adiabatic flat plate test cases from Mach 2 to Mach 8. These test cases are analytically verified employing: (1) Eckert reference method solutions, (2) experimental turbulent boundary-layer data of Mabey, and (3) finite-difference computational code solutions with fully resolved laminar-viscous sublayers. Additionally, results have been obtained for two pressure-gradient cases: (1) an adiabatic expansion corner and (2) an adiabatic compression corner.

  4. Coherent vorticity extraction in turbulent boundary layers using orthogonal wavelets

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Khujadze, George; Oberlack, Martin [Chair of Fluid Dynamics, Technische Universitaet Darmstadt (Germany); Yen, Romain Nguyen van [Institut fuer Mathematik, Freie Universitaet Berlin (Germany); Schneider, Kai [M2P2-CNRS and CMI, Universite de Provence, Marseille (France); Farge, Marie, E-mail: khujadze@fdy.tu-darmstadt.de [LMD-IPSL-CNRS, Ecole Normale Superieure, Paris (France)

    2011-12-22

    Turbulent boundary layer data computed by direct numerical simulation are analyzed using orthogonal anisotropic wavelets. The flow fields, originally given on a Chebychev grid, are first interpolated on a locally refined dyadic grid. Then, they are decomposed using a wavelet basis, which accounts for the anisotropy of the flow by using different scales in the wall-normal direction and in the planes parallel to the wall. Thus the vorticity field is decomposed into coherent and incoherent contributions using thresholding of the wavelet coefficients. It is shown that less than 1% of the coefficients retain the coherent structures of the flow, while the majority of the coefficients corresponds to a structureless, i.e., noise-like background flow. Scale-and direction-dependent statistics in wavelet space quantify the flow properties at different wall distances.

  5. Footprints of funnel vortices in a turbulent boundary layer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gurka, Roi; Liberzon, Alex; Hetsroni, Gad

    2003-11-01

    The topology of large scale funnel structures in a turbulent boundary layer in a flume is investigated experimentally. The large scale structure is reconstructed from the proper orthogonal decomposition (POD) eigenmodes, calculated from the two-dimensional projections of the fluctuated vorticity field realizations. The instantaneous two-dimensional velocity field realizations are obtained using Particle Image Velocimetry (PIV) technique. The dominant funnel structure appears to have a longitudinal streamwise orientation, an inclination angle of 8 degrees, streamwise length of 1000 wall units, and a distance between the neighboring structures of about 100 wall units in the spanwise direction. The spatial characteristics of the funnel structure, measured in the streamwise - wall normal plane of the flume, has been found to be independent of the Reynolds number. The identification technique is based on all the data set and provide a statistical descrition of the structure footprint.

  6. Logarithmic boundary layers in highly turbulent Taylor-Couette flow

    CERN Document Server

    Huisman, Sander G; Cierpka, Christian; Kahler, Christian J; Lohse, Detlef; Sun, Chao

    2013-01-01

    We provide direct measurements of the boundary layer properties in highly turbulent Taylor-Couette flow up to $\\text{Ta}=6.2 \\times 10^{12}$ using high-resolution particle image velocimetry (PIV). We find that the mean azimuthal velocity profile at the inner and outer cylinder can be fitted by the von K\\'arm\\'an log law $u^+ = \\frac 1\\kappa \\ln y^+ +B$. The von K\\'arm\\'an constant $\\kappa$ is found to depend on the driving strength $\\text{Ta}$ and for large $\\text{Ta}$ asymptotically approaches $\\kappa \\approx 0.40$. The variance profiles of the local azimuthal velocity have a universal peak around $y^+ \\approx 12$ and collapse when rescaled with the driving velocity (and not with the friction velocity), displaying a log-dependence of $y^+$ as also found for channel and pipe flows [1,2].

  7. Turbulent boundary layer over a divergent convergent superhydrophobic surface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jalalabadi, Razieh; Hwang, Jinyul; Nadeem, Muhammad; Yoon, Min; Sung, Hyung Jin

    2017-08-01

    A direct numerical simulation of a spatially developing turbulent boundary layer over a divergent and convergent superhydrophobic surface (SHS) was performed over the range 800 < Reθ < 1200. The surface patterns were aligned along the streamwise direction. The SHS was modeled as a pattern of free-slip and no-slip surfaces. The gas fraction of the divergent and convergent SHS was the same as that for the straight SHS for a given slip area. The divergent and convergent SHS gave 21% more drag reduction than the straight SHS. Although the maximum value of the streamwise slip velocity was larger over the divergent and convergent SHS, the average slip velocity (Uslip/U∞) was larger over the straight SHS. The greater drag reduction was attributed to the manipulation of the secondary flow in the y-z plane and the changes in the turbulence structure. The streamwise vortices generated by the secondary flow over the divergent and convergent SHS were diminished which reduced drag relative to the flow over the straight SHS. The ejection and sweep motions were weak, and the vortical structure was attenuated near the wall over the divergent and convergent SHS. The skin friction contributions were explored using the velocity-vorticity correlation. The vortex stretching contribution dominated the skin friction budget. The reduced skin friction over the divergent and convergent SHS resulted mainly from reduced vortex stretching.

  8. A study of synthetic large scales in turbulent boundary layers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duvvuri, Subrahmanyam; Luhar, Mitul; Barnard, Casey; Sheplak, Mark; McKeon, Beverley

    2013-11-01

    Synthetic spanwise-constant spatio-temporal disturbances are excited in a turbulent boundary layer through a spatially impulsive patch of dynamic wall-roughness. The downstream flow response is studied through hot wire anemometry, pressure measurements at the wall and direct measurements of wall-shear-stress made using a novel micro-machined capacitive floating element sensor. These measurements are phase-locked to the input perturbation to recover the synthetic large-scale motion and characterize its structure and wall signature. The phase relationship between the synthetic large scale and small scale activity provides further insights into the apparent amplitude modulation effect between them, and the dynamics of wall-bounded turbulent flows in general. Results from these experiments will be discussed in the context of the critical-layer behavior revealed by the resolvent analysis of McKeon & Sharma (J Fluid Mech, 2010), and compared with similar earlier work by Jacobi & McKeon (J Fluid Mech, 2011). Model predictions are shown to be in broad agreement with experiments. The support of AFOSR grant #FA 9550-12-1-0469, Resnick Institute Graduate Research Fellowship (S.D.) and Sandia Graduate Fellowship (C.B.) are gratefully acknowledged.

  9. Calculations of Turbulent Boundary Layer (TBL) Pressure Fluctuations Transmitted into a Viscoelastic Layer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-06-07

    turbulent boundary layer pressure fluctuation transmitted into a layer of viscoelastic material. The theoretical model used here is a plane elastomer...Spring 1985. The objective of this paper is to develop a model for calculating the turbulent boundary layer pressure fluctuation transmitted into a...the noise level calculated in terms of decibels. FIGURE 4 (CORCOS MODEL ) This is a model cross-spectrum of turbulent wall pressure , frequently

  10. Breaking the boundary layer symmetry in turbulent convection using wall geometry

    CERN Document Server

    Toppaladoddi, Srikanth; Wettlaufer, John S

    2014-01-01

    We systematically probe the interaction of the boundary layer with the core flow during two-dimensional turbulent Rayleigh-B\\'{e}nard convection using numerical simulations and scaling theory. The boundary layer/core flow interaction is manipulated by configuring the top plate with a sinusoidal geometry and breaking the symmetry between the top and bottom thermal boundary layers. At long wavelength the planar results are recovered. However, at intermediate wavelengths, and for Rayleigh numbers ($Ra$) such that the amplitude of the roughness elements is larger than the boundary layer thickness, there is enhanced cold plume production at the tips of the elements. It is found that, while the interior of the flow is well mixed as in the classical theory of Malkus, the mean temperature is lower than that in the planar case. For a Prandtl number of unity and $Ra = 10^6$ to $2.5 \\times 10^9$ we find a Nusselt number ($Nu$) scaling law of $Nu = 0.052 \\times Ra^{0.34}$, in good agreement with recent experiments. The c...

  11. Turbulence measurements in axisymmetric supersonic boundary layer flow in adverse pressure gradients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gootzait, E.; Childs, M. E.

    1977-01-01

    Mean flow and turbulence measurements are presented for adiabatic compressible turbulent boundary layer flow in adverse pressure gradients. The gradients were induced on the wall of an axially symmetric wind tunnel by contoured centerbodies mounted on the wind tunnel centerline. The boundary layer turbulence downstream of a boundary layer bleed section in a zero pressure gradient was also examined. The measurements were obtained using a constant temperature hot-wire anemometer. The adverse pressure gradients were found to significantly alter the turbulence properties of the boundary layer. With flow through the bleed holes there was a measureable decrease in the rms longitudinal velocity fluctuations near the wall and the turbulent shear stress in the boundary layer was reduced.

  12. PIV-based pressure fluctuations in the turbulent boundary layer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghaemi, Sina; Ragni, Daniele; Scarano, Fulvio

    2012-12-01

    The unsteady pressure field is obtained from time-resolved tomographic particle image velocimetry (Tomo-PIV) measurement within a fully developed turbulent boundary layer at free stream velocity of U ∞ = 9.3 m/s and Reθ = 2,400. The pressure field is evaluated from the velocity fields measured by Tomo-PIV at 10 kHz invoking the momentum equation for unsteady incompressible flows. The spatial integration of the pressure gradient is conducted by solving the Poisson pressure equation with fixed boundary conditions at the outer edge of the boundary layer. The PIV-based evaluation of the pressure field is validated against simultaneous surface pressure measurement using calibrated condenser microphones mounted behind a pinhole orifice. The comparison shows agreement between the two pressure signals obtained from the Tomo-PIV and the microphones with a cross-correlation coefficient of 0.6 while their power spectral densities (PSD) overlap up to 3 kHz. The impact of several parameters governing the pressure evaluation from the PIV data is evaluated. The use of the Tomo-PIV system with the application of three-dimensional momentum equation shows higher accuracy compared to the planar version of the technique. The results show that the evaluation of the wall pressure can be conducted using a domain as small as half the boundary layer thickness (0.5δ99) in both the streamwise and the wall normal directions. The combination of a correlation sliding-average technique, the Lagrangian approach to the evaluation of the material derivative and the planar integration of the Poisson pressure equation results in the best agreement with the pressure measurement of the surface microphones.

  13. Turbulence

    CERN Document Server

    Bailly, Christophe

    2015-01-01

    This book covers the major problems of turbulence and turbulent processes, including  physical phenomena, their modeling and their simulation. After a general introduction in Chapter 1 illustrating many aspects dealing with turbulent flows, averaged equations and kinetic energy budgets are provided in Chapter 2. The concept of turbulent viscosity as a closure of the Reynolds stress is also introduced. Wall-bounded flows are presented in Chapter 3, and aspects specific to boundary layers and channel or pipe flows are also pointed out. Free shear flows, namely free jets and wakes, are considered in Chapter 4. Chapter 5 deals with vortex dynamics. Homogeneous turbulence, isotropy, and dynamics of isotropic turbulence are presented in Chapters 6 and 7. Turbulence is then described both in the physical space and in the wave number space. Time dependent numerical simulations are presented in Chapter 8, where an introduction to large eddy simulation is offered. The last three chapters of the book summarize remarka...

  14. Vibration suppression for laminated composite plates with arbitrary boundary conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, J.; Narita, Y.

    2013-11-01

    An analysis of vibration suppression for laminated composite plates subject to active constrained layer damping under various boundary conditions is presented. Piezoelectric-fiber-reinforced composites (PFRCs) are used as active actuators, and the effect of PFRC patches on vibration control is reported here. An analytical approach is expanded to analyze the vibration of laminated composites with arbitrary boundary conditions. By using Hamilton's principle and the Rayleigh-Ritz method, the equation of motion for the resulting electromechanical coupling system is derived. A velocity feedback control rule is employed to obtain an effective active damping in the vibration control. The orientation effect of piezoelectric fibers in the PFRC patches on the suppression of forced vibrations is also investigated.

  15. The effect of high temperature induced variation of specific heat on the hypersonic turbulent boundary layer and its computation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2010-01-01

    For hypersonic vehicles,as the temperature in its boundary layer usually exceeds 600 K,for which the molecular vibrational degree of freedom is excited,the perfect gas model is no longer valid.In this paper,the effect of high temperature induced variation of specific heat on the hypersonic turbulent boundary layer of flat plates is investigated by direct numerical simulations with the perfect gas model,i.e.with constant specific heat,as well as with a variable specific heat gas model.The comparison of the results from the two gas models has found that the effect of the variation of specific heat on the velocity of the turbulent boundary layers is relatively small,while its effect on temperature,such as the mean temperature,the temperature fluctuations,is appreciable.It is also found that the mean specific heat is quite close to the specific heat calculated by using the mean temperature,indicating that it is possible to do turbulence modeling.The modeling is done under the variable specific heat gas model with the mean temperature as the variable.The feasibility of such consideration is verified by applying the SST model for variable specific heat turbulence computation.

  16. Measured Instantaneous Viscous Boundary Layer in Turbulent Rayleigh-B\\'{e}nard Convection

    CERN Document Server

    Zhou, Quan

    2009-01-01

    We report measurements of the instantaneous viscous boundary layer (BL) thickness $\\delta_v(t)$ in turbulent Rayleigh-B\\'{e}nard convection. It is found that $\\delta_v(t)$ obtained from the measured instantaneous two-dimensional velocity field exhibits intermittent fluctuations. For small values, $\\delta_v(t)$ obeys a lognormal distribution, whereas for large values the distribution of $\\delta_v(t)$ exhibits an exponential tail. The variation of $\\delta_v(t)$ with time is found to be driven by the fluctuations of the large-scale mean flow velocity, as expected, and the local horizontal velocities close to the plate can be used as an instant measure of this variation. It is further found that the mean velocity profile measured in the laboratory frame can now be brought into coincidence with the theoretical Blasius laminar BL profile, if it is resampled relative to the time-dependent frame of $\\delta_v(t)$.

  17. The investigation of coherent structures in the wall region of a supersonic turbulent boundary layer based on DNS database

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    Through temporal mode direct numerical simulation, flow field database of a fully developed turbulent boundary layer on a flat plate with Mach number 4.5 and Reynolds number Reθ =1094 has been obtained. Commonly used detection meth- ods in experiments are applied to detecting coherent structures in the flow field, and it is found that coherent structures do exist in the wall region of a supersonic turbulent boundary layer. The detected results show that a low-speed streak is de- tected by using the Mu-level method, the rising parts of this streak are detected by using the second quadrant method, and the crossing regions from a low-speed streak to the high-speed one are detected by using the VITA method respectively. Notwithstanding that different regions are detected by different methods, they are all accompanied by quasi-stream-wise vortex structures.

  18. The investigation of coherent structures in the wall region of a supersonic turbulent boundary layer based on DNS database

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    HUANG ZhangFeng; ZHOU Heng; LUO JiSheng

    2007-01-01

    Through temporal mode direct numerical simulation, flow field database of a fully developed turbulent boundary layer on a flat plate with Mach number 4.5 and Reynolds number Reθ=1094 has been obtained. Commonly used detection methods in experiments are applied to detecting coherent structures in the flow field,and it is found that coherent structures do exist in the wall region of a supersonic turbulent boundary layer. The detected results show that a low-speed streak is detected by using the Mu-level method, the rising parts of this streak are detected by using the second quadrant method, and the crossing regions from a low-speed streak to the high-speed one are detected by using the VITA method respectively.Notwithstanding that different regions are detected by different methods, they are all accompanied by quasi-stream-wise vortex structures.

  19. Effect of Fluid Viscoelasticity on Turbulence and Large-Scale Vortices behind Wall-Mounted Plates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Takahiro Tsukahara

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Direct numerical simulations of turbulent viscoelastic fluid flows in a channel with wall-mounted plates were performed to investigate the influence of viscoelasticity on turbulent structures and the mean flow around the plate. The constitutive equation follows the Giesekus model, valid for polymer or surfactant solutions, which are generally capable of reducing the turbulent frictional drag in a smooth channel. We found that turbulent eddies just behind the plates in viscoelastic fluid decreased in number and in magnitude, but their size increased. Three pairs of organized longitudinal vortices were observed downstream of the plates in both Newtonian and viscoelastic fluids: two vortex pairs were behind the plates and the other one with the longest length was in a plate-free area. In the viscoelastic fluid, the latter vortex pair in the plate-free area was maintained and reached the downstream rib, but its swirling strength was weakened and the local skin-friction drag near the vortex was much weaker than those in the Newtonian flow. The mean flow and small spanwise eddies were influenced by the additional fluid force due to the viscoelasticity and, moreover, the spanwise component of the fluid elastic force may also play a role in the suppression of fluid vortical motions behind the plates.

  20. How transpressive is the northern Caribbean plate boundary?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corbeau, J.; Rolandone, F.; Leroy, S.; Meyer, B.; Mercier de Lépinay, B.; Ellouz-Zimmermann, N.; Momplaisir, R.

    2016-04-01

    Transpressive deformation at the northern Caribbean plate boundary is accommodated mostly by two major strike-slip faults, but the amount and location of accommodation of the compressional component of deformation are still debated. We collected marine geophysical data including multibeam bathymetry and multichannel seismic reflection profiles along this plate boundary around Hispaniola, in the Jamaica Passage, and in the Gulf of Gonâve. The data set allows us to image the offshore active strike-slip faults as well as the compressional structures. We confirm that the Enriquillo-Plantain-Garden Fault Zone (EPGFZ) in the Jamaica Passage has a primary strike-slip motion, as indicated by active left-lateral strike-slip-related structures, i.e., restraining bend, asymmetrical basin, en echelon pressures ridges, and horsetail splay. Based on topographic cross sections across the EPGFZ, we image a very limited compressional component, if any, for at least the western part of the Jamaica Passage. Toward the east of the Jamaica Passage, the fault trace becomes more complex, and we identify adjacent compressional structures. In the Gulf of Gonâve, distributed folding and thrust faulting of the most recent sediments indicate active pervasive compressional tectonics. Estimates of shortening in the Jamaica Passage and in the Gulf of Gonâve indicate an increase of the compressional component of deformation toward the east, which nonetheless remains very small compared to that inferred from block modeling based on GPS measurements.

  1. The GEORED and Plate Boundary Observatory Engineer Exchange Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feaux, K.; Mora-Paez, H.

    2007-05-01

    In early 2007, the Colombian Institute of Geology and Mining - INGEOMINAS initiated GEORED (Geodesia: Red de Estudios de Deformación) in order to increase the knowledge of the geodynamics of northwestern South America. GEORED is an essential tool for determining crustal deformation and is primary in the analysis of inter- plate and intraplate deformation and the present seismic cycle. Some of the objectives of the project are to improve the technical, scientific, and operational capabilities of Colombian scientists regarding tectonic and volcanic deformation in Colombia, to implement a Colombian GPS permanent network for the study of geodynamics, with near real-time data retrieval and processing, and to establish a high precision geodetic reference frame for multipurpose activities within INGEOMINAS. Phase 1 of GEORED, which includes the installation of 30 permanent GPS stations in Colombia, will commence in early 2007. The Plate Boundary Observatory (PBO), part of the larger NSF-funded EarthScope project managed by UNAVCO, will study the three-dimensional strain field resulting from active plate boundary deformation across the Western United States. PBO is a large construction project involving the reconnaissance, permitting, installation, documentation, and maintenance of 875 permanent GPS stations scheduled for completion in September 2008. PBO is currently in the fourth year of the project, with over 550 GPS stations completed to date. INGEOMINAS recently became a member of the UNAVCO consortium. UNAVCO has been working with INGEOMINAS by providing technical support for the GEORED project relating to GPS receiver specifications. In the spirit of collaboration and outreach, INGEOMINAS and UNAVCO will begin an engineer exchange program starting in early summer 2007. The purpose of this outreach program is to provide a mechanism for the exchange of ideas relating to GPS station construction techniques, hardware designs, data communications, and data archiving

  2. Numerical Study of Laminar-Turbulent Transition on a Plate in a Low-Speen Tunnel with Contoured Wall

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    1999-01-01

    Laminar-turbulent transition flow phenomena on a flat plate in a low-speed wind tunnel at different Reynolds numbers were studied numerically.The flow calculation is based on an inviscid/boundary layer interaction method with modified Abu-Ghannam/Shaw(AGS) transition criterion.The test section has non-symmetrical contoured walls,and the plate is located biased the bottom side with a height ratio of 26:14.Intest case of steady flow,a laminar-turbulent transition takes place and a small separation bubble occurs on the upper side of the plate,when the inlet Reynolds number is as small as 0.631×10-6,.The predicted transition location agrees well with that of the test results,but the separation bubble is hardly to see from the calculated velocity profiles though the printed data of velocity in this region do show the negative values.The further numerical predictions with different Reynolds numbers corresponding to the incoming flow velocities show that when the Reynolds number is greater than 1.379×10-6,the separation bubble does not occur,which is coincident with the experimental results.The influence of the side wall geometry on the transition on the plate is also studied.

  3. Direct Numerical Simulation of Supersonic Turbulent Boundary Layer with Spanwise Wall Oscillation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Weidan Ni

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Direct numerical simulations (DNS of Mach = 2.9 supersonic turbulent boundary layers with spanwise wall oscillation (SWO are conducted to investigate the turbulent heat transport mechanism and its relation with the turbulent momentum transport. The turbulent coherent structures are suppressed by SWO and the drag is reduced. Although the velocity and temperature statistics are disturbed by SWO differently, the turbulence transports of momentum and heat are simultaneously suppressed. The Reynolds analogy and the strong Reynolds analogy are also preserved in all the controlled flows, proving the consistent mechanisms of momentum transport and heat transport in the turbulent boundary layer with SWO. Despite the extra dissipation and heat induced by SWO, a net wall heat flux reduction can be achieved with the proper selected SWO parameters. The consistent mechanism of momentum and heat transports supports the application of turbulent drag reduction technologies to wall heat flux controls in high-speed vehicles.

  4. Hidden Earthquake Potential in Plate Boundary Transition Zones

    Science.gov (United States)

    Furlong, Kevin P.; Herman, Matthew; Govers, Rob

    2017-04-01

    Plate boundaries can exhibit spatially abrupt changes in their long-term tectonic deformation (and associated kinematics) at triple junctions and other sites of changes in plate boundary structure. How earthquake behavior responds to these abrupt tectonic changes is unclear. The situation may be additionally obscured by the effects of superimposed deformational signals - juxtaposed short-term (earthquake cycle) kinematics may combine to produce a net deformational signal that does not reflect intuition about the actual strain accumulation in the region. Two examples of this effect are in the vicinity of the Mendocino triple junction (MTJ) along the west coast of North America, and at the southern end of the Hikurangi subduction zone, New Zealand. In the region immediately north of the MTJ, GPS-based observed crustal displacements (relative to North America (NAm)) are intermediate between Pacific and Juan de Fuca (JdF) motions. With distance north, these displacements rotate to become more aligned with JdF - NAm displacements, i.e. to motions expected along a coupled subduction interface. The deviation of GPS motions from the coupled subduction interface signal near the MTJ has been previously interpreted to reflect clock-wise rotation of a coastal, crustal block and/or reduced coupling at the southern Cascadia margin. The geologic record of crustal deformation near the MTJ reflects the combined effects of northward crustal shortening (on geologic time scales) associated with the MTJ Crustal Conveyor (Furlong and Govers, 1999) overprinted onto the subduction earthquake cycle signal. With this interpretation, the Cascadia subduction margin appears to be well-coupled along its entire length, consistent with paleo-seismic records of large earthquake ruptures extending to its southern limit. At the Hikurangi to Alpine Fault transition in New Zealand, plate interactions switch from subduction to oblique translation as a consequence of changes in lithospheric structure of

  5. LARGE-EDDY SIMULATIONS OF A SEPARATION/REATTACHMENT BUBBLE IN A TURBULENT-BOUNDARY-LAYER SUBJECTED TO A PRESCRIBED UPPER-BOUNDARY, VERTICAL-VELOCITY PROFILE

    KAUST Repository

    Cheng, Wan

    2015-06-30

    We describe large-eddy simulations of turbulent boundary-layer flow over a flat plate at high Reynolds number in the presence of an unsteady, three-dimensional flow separation/reattachment bubble. The stretched-vortex subgrid-scale model is used in the main flow domain combined with a wall-model that is a two-dimensional extension of that developed by Chung & Pullin (2009). Flow separation and re-attachment of the incoming boundary layer is induced by prescribing wall-normal velocity distribution on the upper boundary of the flow domain that produces an adverse-favorable stream-wise pressure distribution at the wall. The LES predicts the distribution of mean shear stress along the wall including the interior of the separation bubble. Several properties of the separation/reattachment flow are discussed.

  6. Boundary-layer turbulence in experiments of quasi-Keplerian flows

    CERN Document Server

    Lopez, Jose M

    2016-01-01

    Most flows in nature and engineering are turbulent because of their large velocities and spatial scales. Laboratory experiments of rotating quasi-Keplerian flows, for which the angular velocity decreases radially but the angular momentum increases, are however laminar at Reynolds numbers exceeding one million. This is in apparent contradiction to direct numerical simulations showing that in these experiments turbulence transition is triggered by the axial boundaries. We here show numerically that as the Reynolds number increases turbulence becomes progressively confined to the boundary layers and the flow in the bulk fully relaminarizes. Our findings support that hydrodynamic turbulence cannot drive accretion in astrophysical disks.

  7. Near-Surface Boundary Layer Turbulence Along a Horizontally-Moving, Surface-Piercing Vertical Wall

    CERN Document Server

    Washuta, Nathan; Duncan, James H

    2016-01-01

    The complex interaction between turbulence and the free surface in boundary layer shear flow created by a vertical surface-piercing wall is considered. A laboratory-scale device was built that utilizes a surface-piercing stainless steel belt that travels in a loop around two vertical rollers, with one length of the belt between the rollers acting as a horizontally-moving flat wall. The belt is accelerated suddenly from rest until reaching constant speed in order to create a temporally-evolving boundary layer analogous to the spatially-evolving boundary layer that would exist along a surface-piercing towed flat plate. Surface profiles are measured with a cinematic laser-induced fluorescence system and sub-surface velocity fields are recorded using a high-speed planar particle image velocimetry system. It is found that the belt initially travels through the water without creating any significant waves, before the free surface bursts with activity close to the belt surface. These free surface ripples travel away...

  8. Numerical investigation of non-equilibrium effects in hypersonic turbulent boundary layers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Pilbum; Kim, John; Zhong, Xiaolin; Eldredge, Jeff

    2014-11-01

    Direct numerical simulations of a spatially developing hypersonic boundary layer have been conducted in order to investigate thermal and chemical non-equilibrium effects in a hypersonic turbulent boundary layer. Two different flows, pure oxygen and pure nitrogen flows with specific total enthalpy, h0 ,O2 = 9 . 5017 MJ/kg and h0 ,N2 = 19 . 1116 MJ/kg, respectively, have been considered. The boundary edge conditions were obtained from a separate calculation of a flow over a blunt wedge at free-stream Mach numbers M∞ ,O2 = 15 and M∞ ,N2 = 20 . The inflow conditions were obtained from a simulation of a turbulent boundary layer of a perfect gas. Non-equilibrium effects on turbulence statistics and near-wall turbulence structures were examined by comparing with those obtained in a simulation of the same boundary layer with a perfect-gas assumption.

  9. Controllability of a viscoelastic plate using one boundary control in displacement or bending

    OpenAIRE

    Pandolfi, L.

    2016-01-01

    In this paper we consider a viscoelastic plate (linear viscoelasticity of the Maxwell-Boltzmann type) and we compare its controllability properties with the (known) controllability of a purely elastic plate (the control acts on the boundary displacement or bending). By combining operator and moment methods, we prove that the viscoelastic plate inherits the controllability properties of the purely elastic plate.

  10. Geostrophic convective turbulence: The effect of boundary layers

    CERN Document Server

    Ostilla-Mónico, Rodolfo; Kunnen, Rudie P J; Verzicco, Roberto; Lohse, Detlef

    2014-01-01

    This Letter presents results of the first direct numerical simulations of rotating Rayleigh--B\\'enard convection in the so-called geostrophic regime, (hence very small Ekman numbers $\\mathcal{O}(10^{-7})$ and high Rayleigh numbers~$Ra=10^{10}$ and~$5\\cdot 10^{10}$), employing the \\emph{full} Navier--Stokes equations. In the geostrophic regime the criteria of very strong rotation and large supercriticality are met simultaneously, which is true for many geophysical and astrophysical flows. Until now, numerical approaches of this regime have been based on \\emph{reduced} versions of the Navier--Stokes equations (cf. Sprague \\emph{et al.} J. Fluid Mech., \\textbf{551}, 141 (2006)), omitting the effect of the viscous (Ekman) boundary layers. By using different velocity boundary conditions at the plates, we study the effect of these Ekman layers. We find that the formation of large-scale structures (Rubio \\emph{et al.} (Phys. Rev. Lett. \\textbf{112} (2014)), which indicates the presence of an inverse energy cascade, ...

  11. Statistical evidence of anasymptotic geometric structure to the momentum transporting motions in turbulent boundary layers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morrill-Winter, Caleb; Philip, Jimmy; Klewicki, Joseph

    2017-03-01

    The turbulence contribution to the mean flow is reflected by the motions producing the Reynolds shear stress () and its gradient. Recent analyses of the mean dynamical equation, along with data, evidence that these motions asymptotically exhibit self-similar geometric properties. This study discerns additional properties associated with the uv signal, with an emphasis on the magnitudes and length scales of its negative contributions. The signals analysed derive from high-resolution multi-wire hot-wire sensor data acquired in flat-plate turbulent boundary layers. Space-filling properties of the present signals are shown to reinforce previous observations, while the skewness of uv suggests a connection between the size and magnitude of the negative excursions on the inertial domain. Here, the size and length scales of the negative uv motions are shown to increase with distance from the wall, whereas their occurrences decrease. A joint analysis of the signal magnitudes and their corresponding lengths reveals that the length scales that contribute most to are distinctly larger than the average geometric size of the negative uv motions. Co-spectra of the streamwise and wall-normal velocities, however, are shown to exhibit invariance across the inertial region when their wavelengths are normalized by the width distribution, W(y), of the scaling layer hierarchy, which renders the mean momentum equation invariant on the inertial domain.

  12. Large Scale Organization of a Near Wall Turbulent Boundary Layer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stanislas, Michel; Dekou Tiomajou, Raoul Florent; Foucaut, Jean Marc

    2016-11-01

    This study lies in the context of large scale coherent structures investigation in a near wall turbulent boundary layer. An experimental database at high Reynolds numbers (Re θ = 9830 and Re θ = 19660) was obtained in the LML wind tunnel with stereo-PIV at 4 Hz and hot wire anemometry at 30 kHz. A Linear Stochastic Estimation procedure, is used to reconstruct a 3 component field resolved in space and time. Algorithms were developed to extract coherent structures from the reconstructed field. A sample of 3D view of the structures is depicted in Figure 1. Uniform momentum regions are characterized with their mean hydraulic diameter in the YZ plane, their life time and their contribution to Reynolds stresses. The vortical motions are characterized by their position, radius, circulation and vorticity in addition to their life time and their number computed at a fixed position from the wall. The spatial organization of the structures was investigated through a correlation of their respective indicative functions in the spanwise direction. The simplified large scale model that arise is compared to the ones available in the literature. Streamwise low (green) and high (yellow) uniform momentum regions with positive (red) and negative (blue) vortical motions. This work was supported by Campus International pour la Sécurité et l'Intermodalité des Transports.

  13. Mixing at the external boundary of a submerged turbulent jet

    CERN Document Server

    Eidelman, A; Kleeorin, N; Hazak, G; Rogachevskii, I; Sadot, O; Sapir-Katiraie, I

    2009-01-01

    We study experimentally and theoretically mixing at the external boundary of a submerged turbulent jet. In the experimental study we use Particle Image Velocimetry and an Image Processing Technique based on the analysis of the intensity of the Mie scattering to determine the spatial distribution of tracer particles. An air jet is seeded with the incense smoke particles which are characterized by large Schmidt number and small Stokes number. We determine the spatial distributions of the jet fluid characterized by a high concentration of the particles and of the ambient fluid characterized by a low concentration of the tracer particles. In the data analysis we use two approaches, whereby one approach is based on the measured phase function for the study of the mixed state of two fluids. The other approach is based on the analysis of the two-point second-order correlation function of the particle number density fluctuations generated by tangling of the gradient of the mean particle number density by the turbulen...

  14. Velocity fields and optical turbulence near the boundary in a strongly convective laboratory flow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matt, Silvia; Hou, Weilin; Goode, Wesley; Hellman, Samuel

    2016-05-01

    Boundary layers around moving underwater vehicles or other platforms can be a limiting factor for optical communication. Turbulence in the boundary layer of a body moving through a stratified medium can lead to small variations in the index of refraction, which impede optical signals. As a first step towards investigating this boundary layer effect on underwater optics, we study the flow near the boundary in the Rayleigh-Bénard laboratory tank at the Naval Research Laboratory Stennis Space Center. The tank is set up to generate temperature-driven, i.e., convective turbulence, and allows control of the turbulence intensity. This controlled turbulence environment is complemented by computational fluid dynamics simulations to visualize and quantify multi-scale flow patterns. The boundary layer dynamics in the laboratory tank are quantified using a state-of-the-art Particle Image Velocimetry (PIV) system to examine the boundary layer velocities and turbulence parameters. The velocity fields and flow dynamics from the PIV are compared to the numerical model and show the model to accurately reproduce the velocity range and flow dynamics. The temperature variations and thus optical turbulence effects can then be inferred from the model temperature data. Optical turbulence is also visible in the raw data from the PIV system. The newly collected data are consistent with previously reported measurements from high-resolution Acoustic Doppler Velocimeter profilers (Nortek Vectrino), as well as fast thermistor probes and novel next-generation fiber-optics temperature sensors. This multi-level approach to studying optical turbulence near a boundary, combining in-situ measurements, optical techniques, and numerical simulations, can provide new insight and aid in mitigating turbulence impacts on underwater optical signal transmission.

  15. Budget of Turbulent Kinetic Energy in a Shock Wave Boundary-Layer Interaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vyas, Manan A.; Waindim, Mbu; Gaitonde, Datta V.

    2016-01-01

    Implicit large-eddy simulation (ILES) of a shock wave/boundary-layer interaction (SBLI) was performed. Quantities present in the exact equation of the turbulent kinetic energy transport were accumulated and used to calculate terms like production, dissipation, molecular diffusion, and turbulent transport. The present results for a turbulent boundary layer were validated by comparison with direct numerical simulation data. It was found that a longer development domain was necessary for the boundary layer to reach an equilibrium state and a finer mesh resolution would improve the predictions. In spite of these findings, trends of the present budget match closely with that of the direct numerical simulation. Budgets for the SBLI region are presented at key axial stations. These budgets showed interesting dynamics as the incoming boundary layer transforms and the terms of the turbulent kinetic energy budget change behavior within the interaction region.

  16. Intermittent turbulence and oscillations in the stable boundary layer over land

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wiel, van de B.J.H.

    2002-01-01

    As the title of this thesis indicates, our main subject of interest is: "Intermittent turbulence and oscillation in the stable boundary layer over land". As such, this theme connects the different chapters. Here, intermittent turbulence is defined as a sequence of events were 'burst' of increased tu

  17. The Minimum Wind Speed for Sustainable Turbulence in the Nocturnal Boundary Layer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wiel, van de B.J.H.; Moene, A.F.; Jonker, H.J.J.; Baas, P.; Basu, S.; Donda, J.M.M.; Sun, J.; Holtslag, A.A.M.

    2012-01-01

    The collapse of turbulence in the nocturnal boundary layer is studied by means of a simple bulk model that describes the basic physical interactions in the surface energy balance. It is shown that for a given mechanical forcing, the amount of turbulent heat that can be transported downward is

  18. The minimum wind speed for sustainable turbulence in the nocturnal boundary layer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Van de Wiel, B.J.H.; Moene, A.F.; Jonker, H.J.J.; Baas, P.; Basu, S.; Donda, J.M.M.; Sun, J.; Holtslag, A.A.M.

    2012-01-01

    The collapse of turbulence in the nocturnal boundary layer is studied by means of a simple bulk model that describes the basic physical interactions in the surface energy balance. It is shown that for a given mechanical forcing, the amount of turbulent heat that can be transported downward is

  19. Low-Dimensional Dynamical Characteristics of Shock Wave /Turbulent Boundary Layer Interaction in Conical Flows

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-12-16

    Shock Wave /Turbulent Boundary Layer Interaction in Conical Flows FA9550-11-1-0203 Dr. Charles E. Tinney, Aerospace Engineering and Engineering...Low-Dimensional Dynamical Characteristics of Shock Wave /Turbulent Boundary Layer Interaction in Conical Flows Contract/Grant Number: FA9550-11-1-0203...driven by transonic resonance (Zaman et al, 2002). What is common about many of these planar nozzle studies is that there is just one single

  20. Conditionally-Sampled Turbulent and Non-turbulent Measurements of Entropy Generation Rate in the Transition Region of Boundary Layers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Edmond J. Walsh; Kevin P. Nolan; Donald M. McEligot; Ralph J. Volino; Adrian Bejan

    2007-05-01

    Conditionally-sampled boundary layer data for an accelerating transitional boundary layer have been analyzed to calculate the entropy generation rate in the transition region. By weighing the nondimensional dissipation coefficient for the laminar-conditioned-data and turbulent-conditioned-data with the intermittency factor the average entropy generation rate in the transition region can be determined and hence be compared to the time averaged data and correlations for steady laminar and turbulent flows. It is demonstrated that this method provides, for the first time, an accurate and detailed picture of the entropy generation rate during transition. The data used in this paper have been taken from detailed boundary layer measurements available in the literature. This paper provides, using an intermittency weighted approach, a methodology for predicting entropy generation in a transitional boundary layer.

  1. A scaling procedure for panel vibro-acoustic response induced by turbulent boundary layer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiaojian, Zhao; Bangcheng, AI; Ziqiang, Liu; Dun, Li

    2016-10-01

    A new method of predicting structure vibration based on scaled model is proposed for panel vibration induced by turbulent boundary layer. The aerodynamic effects such as the variation of TBL excitation and its frequency for a scaled model used, and the material properties are also considered in the proposed scaling law. The contributions of resonant modes dominate the energy of low-frequency vibration, and the scaling procedure is derived with the analytical expansion method. For high-frequency vibration, the SEA method is used to derive the scaling law because of the highly coupled modes in the frequency range of analysis. A criterion is also proposed to identify the boundary between high-frequency and low-frequency vibration. For the validation of the proposed scaling procedure, an experiment is conducted with scaled plate models under external excitation. Despite slightly offset of resonant frequencies in the low frequency range likely caused by the difference in the condition of panel fixing, the results reveal that the proposed scaling procedure is effective.

  2. Moist turbulent Rayleigh-Benard convection with Neumann and Dirichlet boundary conditions

    CERN Document Server

    Weidauer, Thomas

    2012-01-01

    Turbulent Rayleigh-Benard convection with phase changes in an extended layer between two parallel impermeable planes is studied by means of three-dimensional direct numerical simulations for Rayleigh numbers between 10^4 and 1.5\\times 10^7 and for Prandtl number Pr=0.7. Two different sets of boundary conditions of temperature and total water content are compared: imposed constant amplitudes which translate into Dirichlet boundary conditions for the scalar field fluctuations about the quiescent diffusive equilibrium and constant imposed flux boundary conditions that result in Neumann boundary conditions. Moist turbulent convection is in the conditionally unstable regime throughout this study for which unsaturated air parcels are stably and saturated air parcels unstably stratified. A direct comparison of both sets of boundary conditions with the same parameters requires to start the turbulence simulations out of differently saturated equilibrium states. Similar to dry Rayleigh-Benard convection the differences...

  3. Vortex statistics for turbulence in a container with rigid boundaries

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Clercx, H.J.H.; Nielsen, A.H.

    2000-01-01

    The evolution of vortex statistics for decaying two-dimensional turbulence in a square container with rigid no-slip walls is compared with a few available experimental results and with the scaling theory of two-dimensional turbulent decay as proposed by Carnevale et al. Power-law exponents...

  4. An experimental study on laminar-turbulent transition at high free-stream turbulence in boundary layers with pressure gradients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chernoray Valery

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available We report here the results of a study on measurements and prediction of laminar-turbulent transition at high free-stream turbulence in boundary layers of the airfoil-like geometries with presence of the external pressure gradient changeover. The experiments are performed for a number of flow cases with different flow Reynolds number, turbulence intensity and pressure gradient distributions. The results were then compared to numerical calculations for same geometries and flow conditions. The experiments and computations are performed for the flow parameters which are typical for turbomachinery applications and the major idea of the current study is the validation of the turbulence model which can be used for such engineering applications.

  5. Initial-boundary value problems for a class of nonlinear thermoelastic plate equations

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhang Jian-Wen; Rong Xiao-Liang; Wu Run-Heng

    2009-01-01

    This paper studies initial-boundary value problems for a class of nonlinear thermoelastic plate equations. Under some certain initial data and boundary conditions,it obtains an existence and uniqueness theorem of global weak solutions of the nonlinear thermoelstic plate equations,by means of the Galerkin method. Moreover,it also proves the existence of strong and classical solutions.

  6. Accommodation of collisional shortening along the Alpine plate boundary : plate kinematics vs rheological controls

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosenberg, Claudio; Bellahsen, Nicolas

    2016-04-01

    The style of collision in the Alps varies along strike, reflecting different amounts and different modes of accommodation of collisional shortening. These differences control the patterns of exhumation during collision. Whereas the western Alps largely consist of a metamorphic complex formed during subduction and largely exhumed before the initiation of collision, the subduction nappe-stack of the Central and the Eastern Alps is strongly overprinted by collisional shortening and by Barrovian metamorphism. Based on compiled and new data we estimate amounts of collisional shortening along the strike of the chain and set it in relationship to the geometry of the collisional prism. The western Alpine collisional structures form a very large (in map view), but moderately shortened wedge, terminating in front of a poorly developed Molasse basin. Shortening of this wedge was mainly localized along its external parts, resulting in accretion of basement and cover units thrusted towards the foreland. Back-folding and back-thrusting are barely developed and no shortening takes place in the upper, Adriatic plate. In the Central Alps, the amount of collisional shortening is larger and it is distributed both in the lower and in the upper plate. The collisional prism is bivergent and partitioning of the amount of shortening between the upper and lower plates varies along strike, being most probably controlled by rheological, heterogeneities. The thickened accreted lower plate is strongly affected by Barrovian metamorphism where shortening is largest and localized within a confined area. A deep Molasse basin developed in front of the prism. In the Eastern Alps collisional kinematics vary from east to west, with orogen-parallel displacements dominating in the east and orogen-perpendicular ones in the West, where they culminate in the structural and metamorphic dome of the Tauern Window. Nowhere else in the Alps collisional shortening is so strongly localized in one and the same

  7. Implicit Large-Eddy Simulations of Zero-Pressure Gradient, Turbulent Boundary Layer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sekhar, Susheel; Mansour, Nagi N.

    2015-01-01

    A set of direct simulations of zero-pressure gradient, turbulent boundary layer flows are conducted using various span widths (62-630 wall units), to document their influence on the generated turbulence. The FDL3DI code that solves compressible Navier-Stokes equations using high-order compact-difference scheme and filter, with the standard recycling/rescaling method of turbulence generation, is used. Results are analyzed at two different Re values (500 and 1,400), and compared with spectral DNS data. They show that a minimum span width is required for the mere initiation of numerical turbulence. Narrower domains ((is) less than 100 w.u.) result in relaminarization. Wider spans ((is) greater than 600 w.u.) are required for the turbulent statistics to match reference DNS. The upper-wall boundary condition for this setup spawns marginal deviations in the mean velocity and Reynolds stress profiles, particularly in the buffer region.

  8. Turbulent dispersion in cloud-topped boundary layers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Verzijlbergh, R.A.; Jonker, H.J.J.; Heus, T.; Vilà-Guerau de Arellano, J.

    2009-01-01

    Compared to dry boundary layers, dispersion in cloud-topped boundary layers has received less attention. In this LES based numerical study we investigate the dispersion of a passive tracer in the form of Lagrangian particles for four kinds of atmospheric boundary layers: 1) a dry convective boundary

  9. Dike-induced contraction along oceanic and continental divergent plate boundaries

    KAUST Repository

    Trippanera, D.

    2014-10-28

    The axis of divergent plate boundaries shows extension fractures and normal faults at the surface. Here we present evidence of contraction along the axis of the oceanic ridge of Iceland and the continental Main Ethiopian Rift. Contraction is found at the base of the tilted hanging wall of dilational normal faults, balancing part of their extension. Our experiments suggest that these structures result from dike emplacement. Multiple dike injection induces subsidence above and uplift to the sides of the dikes; the transition in between is accommodated by reverse faults and subsequent peripheral inward dipping normal faults. Our results suggest that contraction is a direct product of magma emplacement along divergent plate boundaries, at various scales, marking a precise evolutionary stage and initiating part of the extensional structures (extension fractures and normal faults). Key Points Contraction along divergent plate boundaries results from dike emplacementContraction generates extensional structures along divergent plate boundariesSurface deformation along divergent plate boundaries may be magma induced

  10. Turbulence vertical structure of the boundary layer during the afternoon transition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. Darbieu

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available We investigate the decay of planetary boundary layer (PBL turbulence in the afternoon, from the time the surface buoyancy flux starts to decrease until sunset. Dense observations of mean and turbulent parameters were acquired during the Boundary Layer Late Afternoon and Sunset Turbulence (BLLAST field experiment by several meteorological surface stations, sounding balloons, radars, lidars, and two aircraft flying extensively during the afternoon transition. We analyzed a case study based on some of those observations and Large-Eddy Simulation (LES data focusing on the turbulent vertical structure throughout the afternoon transition. The decay of turbulence is quantified through the temporal and vertical evolution of (1 the turbulence kinetic energy (TKE, (2 the characteristic length scales of turbulence, (3 the shape of the turbulence spectra. A spectral analysis of LES data, airborne and surface measurements is performed in order to (1 characterize the variation of the turbulent decay with height and (2 study the distribution of turbulence over eddy size. This study points out the LES ability to reproduce the turbulence evolution throughout the afternoon. LES and observations agree that the afternoon transition can be divided in two phases: (1 a first phase during which the TKE decays with a low rate, with no significant change in turbulence characteristics, (2 a second phase characterized by a larger TKE decay rate and a change spectral shape, implying an evolution of eddy size distribution and energy cascade from low to high wavenumber. The changes observed either on TKE decay (during the first phase or on the vertical wind spectra shape (during the second phase of the afternoon transition occur first in the upper region of the PBL. The higher within the PBL, the stronger the spectra shape changes.

  11. Dynamics of turbulent western boundary currents at low latitude in a shallow water model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. Q. C. Akuetevi

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available The dynamics of low latitude turbulent western boundary currents, subject to two different types of idealized wind forcing, Monsoon Wind and Trade Wind, is considered using numerical results from integrations of a reduced gravity shallow-water model. For viscosity values of 1000 m2 s−1 and above, the boundary layer dynamics compares well to the analytical solutions of the Munk-layer and the inertial-layer, derived from quasigeostrophic theory. Modifications due to variations in the layer thickness (vortex stretching are only important close to the boundary. When the viscosity is reduced the boundary layer becomes turbulent and coherent structures in form of anticyclonic eddies, bursts (violent detachments of the viscous sub-layer and dipoles appear. Three distinct boundary layers emerge, the viscous sub-layer, the advective boundary layer and the extended boundary layer. The first is characterized by a dominant vorticity balance between the viscous transport and the advective transport of vorticity. The second by a balance between the advection of planetary vorticity and the advective transport of relative vorticity. The extended boundary layer is the area to which turbulent motion from the boundary extends. The scaling of the three boundary layer thicknesses with viscosity is evaluated. A pragmatic approach to determine the eddy viscosity diagnostically for coarse resolution numerical models is proposed.

  12. Unsteady heat-flux measurements of second-mode instability waves in a hypersonic flat-plate boundary layer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kegerise, Michael A.; Rufer, Shann J.

    2016-08-01

    In this paper, we report on the application of the atomic layer thermopile (ALTP) heat-flux sensor to the measurement of laminar-to-turbulent transition in a hypersonic flat-plate boundary layer. The centerline of the flat-plate model was instrumented with a streamwise array of ALTP sensors, and the flat-plate model was exposed to a Mach 6 freestream over a range of unit Reynolds numbers. Here, we observed an unstable band of frequencies that are associated with second-mode instability waves in the laminar boundary layer that forms on the flat-plate surface. The measured frequencies, group velocities, phase speeds, and wavelengths of these instability waves are consistent with data previously reported in the literature. Heat flux time series, and the Morlet wavelet transforms of them, revealed the wave-packet nature of the second-mode instability waves. In addition, a laser-based radiative heating system was used to measure the frequency response functions (FRF) of the ALTP sensors used in the wind tunnel test. These measurements were used to assess the stability of the sensor FRFs over time and to correct spectral estimates for any attenuation caused by the finite sensor bandwidth.

  13. Interaction of Atmospheric Turbulence with Blade Boundary Layer Dynamics on a 5MW Wind Turbine using Blade-Boundary-Layer-Resolved CFD with hybrid URANS-LES.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vijayakumar, Ganesh [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Pennsylvania State Univ., University Park, PA (United States); Brasseur, James [Pennsylvania State Univ., University Park, PA (United States); Univ. of Colorado, Boulder, CO (United States); Lavely, Adam; Jayaraman, Balaji; Craven, Brent

    2016-01-04

    We describe the response of the NREL 5 MW wind turbine blade boundary layer to the passage of atmospheric turbulence using blade-boundary-layer-resolved computational fluid dynamics with hybrid URANS-LES modeling.

  14. Developments in the Taxonomy of Structures in Rotating Turbulent Boundary Layers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaiser, B.; Clayson, C. A.; Jayne, S. R.

    2016-12-01

    The creation, migration, and destruction of coherent flow structures within rotating turbulent boundary layers has received far less attention than statistical descriptions of the dynamics, but identification of coherent structures can yield physical insights for improved modelling efforts. The broad range of dynamical scales with turbulent boundary layers makes instantaneous flow structure data difficult to collect either by observations or direct numerical simulations, and the lack of a standard definition of a vortex renders the definition of flow structures a qualitative endeavor. However, the formation and evolution of a menagerie of coherent structures, such as high/low momentum streaks and hairpin vorticies, has been documented and widely accepted for canonical non-rotating turbulent boundary layers. How do turbulent structures form and evolve as the Reynolds number increases in Ekman layers? Are turbulent Ekman layer structures similar to turbulent internal flow boundary layers, which are also constrained vertically? How does buoyancy or sloping topography alter, destroy, or generate flow structures? In this study flow structure descriptions from experiments, observations, and simulations are reviewed.

  15. On the impact of adverse pressure gradient on the supersonic turbulent boundary layer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Qian-Cheng; Wang, Zhen-Guo; Zhao, Yu-Xin

    2016-11-01

    By employing the particle image velocimetry, the mean and turbulent characteristics of a Mach 2.95 turbulent boundary layer are experimentally investigated without the impact of curvature. The physical mechanism with which the streamwise adverse pressure gradient affects the supersonic boundary layer is revealed. The data are compared to that of the concave boundary layer with similar streamwise distributions of wall static pressure to clarify the separate impacts of the adverse pressure gradient and the concave curvature. The logarithmic law is observed to be well preserved for both of the cases. The dip below the logarithmic law is not observed in present investigation. Theoretical analysis indicates that it could be the result of compromise between the opposite impacts of the compression wave and the increased turbulent intensity. Compared to the zero pressure gradient boundary layer, the principal strain rate and the turbulent intensities are increased by the adverse pressure gradient. The shear layer formed due the hairpin packets could be sharpened by the compression wave, which leads to higher principal strain rate and the associated turbulent level. Due to the additional impact of the centrifugal instability brought by the concave wall, even higher turbulent intensities than that of the adverse pressure gradient case are introduced. The existence of velocity modes within the zero pressure gradient boundary layer suggests that the large scale motions are statistically well organized. The generation of new velocity modes due to the adverse pressure gradient indicates that the turbulent structure is changed by the adverse pressure gradient, through which more turbulence production that cannot be effectively predicted by the Reynolds-stress transport equations could be brought.

  16. Numerical Investigation of Wall Cooling and Suction Effects on Supersonic Flat-Plate Boundary Layer Transition Using Large Eddy Simulation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Suozhu Wang

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Reducing friction resistance and aerodynamic heating has important engineering significance to improve the performances of super/hypersonic aircraft, so the purpose of transition control and turbulent drag reduction becomes one of the cutting edges in turbulence research. In order to investigate the influences of wall cooling and suction on the transition process and fully developed turbulence, the large eddy simulation of spatially evolving supersonic boundary layer transition over a flat-plate with freestream Mach number 4.5 at different wall temperature and suction intensity is performed in the present work. It is found that the wall cooling and suction are capable of changing the mean velocity profile within the boundary layer and improving the stability of the flow field, thus delaying the onset of the spatial transition process. The transition control will become more effective as the wall temperature decreases, while there is an optimal wall suction intensity under the given conditions. Moreover, the development of large-scale coherent structures can be suppressed effectively via wall cooling, but wall suction has no influence.

  17. The Plate Boundary Observatory: Data Management Progress and Highlights

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, G.; Blackman, B.; Eakins, J.; Hodgkinson, K.; Matykiewicz, J.; Boler, F.; Beldyk, M.; Henderson, B.; Hoyt, B.; Lee, E.; Persson, E.; Smith, J.; Torrez, D.; Wright, J.; Jackson, M.; Meertens, C.

    2007-12-01

    The Plate Boundary Observatory (PBO), part of the NSF-funded EarthScope project, is designed to study the three- dimensional strain field resulting from deformation across the active boundary zone between the Pacific and North American plates in the western United States. To meet these goals, UNAVCO will install 880 continuous GPS stations, 103 borehole strainmeter stations, 28 tiltmeters, and five laser strainmeters by October 2008, as well as manage data for 209 previously existing continuous GPS stations and one laser strainmeter through the PBO Nucleus project and 11 GPS stations installed by the USArray segment of EarthScope. As of 1 September 2007, UNAVCO had completed 680 PBO GPS stations and had upgraded 89% of the planned PBO Nucleus stations. Most of these stations return data to the UNAVCO Boulder Network Operations Center (NOC) on a daily basis, with about 40 stations returning data on an hourly basis. Overall, the combined PBO and Nucleus network has now provided almost 350 GB of raw standard rate data, which are routinely processed by the PBO GPS Analysis Centers, at Central Washington University and the New Mexico Institute of Mining and Technology, and the PBO GPS Analysis Center Coordinator at MIT. These groups create a range of GPS products, including station position time series, GPS velocity vectors, and related information. As of September 2007, these centers processed data on a daily basis from about 920 stations; typical position uncertainties are under 1.5 mm horizontally and 4 mm vertically. All PBO GPS data products are archived at and available from the UNAVCO Facility, with a second archive at the IRIS Data Management Center (DMC). All these products may be accessed via the PBO web page at http://pboweb.unavco.org/gps_data. As part of PBO, UNAVCO will also install and operate the largest borehole seismic and strainmeter networks in North America, as well as tiltmeters and laser strainmeters. As of September 2007, 41 PBO borehole stations

  18. Dynamics of turbulent western-boundary currents at low latitude in a shallow-water model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akuetevi, C. Q. C.; Wirth, A.

    2015-06-01

    The dynamics of low latitude turbulent western-boundary currents (WBCs) crossing the Equator are considered using numerical results from integrations of a reduced-gravity shallow-water model. For viscosity values of 1000 m2 s-1 and greater, the boundary layer dynamics compares well to the analytical Munk-layer solution. When the viscosity is reduced, the boundary layer becomes turbulent and coherent structures in the form of anticyclonic eddies, bursts (violent detachments of the viscous sub-layer, VSL) and dipoles appear. Three distinct boundary layers emerge, the VSL, the advective boundary layer and the extended boundary layer. The first is characterized by a dominant vorticity balance between the viscous transport and the advective transport of vorticity; the second by a balance between the advection of planetary vorticity and the advective transport of relative vorticity. The extended boundary layer is the area to which turbulent motion from the boundary extends. The scaling of the three boundary layer thicknesses with viscosity is evaluated. Characteristic scales of the dynamics and dissipation are determined. A pragmatic approach to determine the eddy viscosity diagnostically for coarse-resolution numerical models is proposed.

  19. Dynamics of turbulent western boundary currents at low latitude in a shallow water model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. Q. C. Akuetevi

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available The dynamics of low latitude turbulent western boundary currents crossing the equator is considered using numerical results from integrations of a reduced gravity shallow-water model. For viscosity values of 1000 m2 s−1 and more, the boundary layer dynamics compares well to the analytical Munk-layer solution. When the viscosity is reduced, the boundary layer becomes turbulent and coherent structures in form of anticyclonic eddies, bursts (violent detachments of the viscous sub-layer and dipoles appear. Three distinct boundary layers emerge, the viscous sub-layer, the advective boundary layer and the extended boundary layer. The first is characterized by a dominant vorticity balance between the viscous transport and the advective transport of vorticity. The second by a balance between the advection of planetary vorticity and the advective transport of relative vorticity. The extended boundary layer is the area to which turbulent motion from the boundary extends. The scaling of the three boundary layer thicknesses with viscosity is evaluated. Characteristic scales of the dynamics and dissipation are determined. A pragmatic approach to determine the eddy viscosity diagnostically for coarse resolution numerical models is proposed.

  20. Effect of spanwise pressure gradient on flow and heat transfer characteristics of longitudinal vortices embedded in a turbulent boundary layer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Jeong Min; Moon, Joo Hyun; Park, Jae Yong; Kim, Dae Yun; Lee, Seong Hyuk [Chung-Ang University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-02-15

    This study numerically investigated the influence of spanwise pressure gradient on heat transfer of a 3D turbulent boundary layer with longitudinal vortices. A 30° bend in the passage provided the spanwise pressure gradient. The longitudinal pair vortices were generated using a pair of delta winglets. The Reynolds-averaged Navier-Stokes and energy equations based on the conventional Reynolds stress model were used. The predictions agreed well with the experimental data for the straight plate. The turbulent boundary layer was significantly perturbed with the longitudinal vortices. The spanwise pressure gradient contributed to faster degradation of the longitudinal vortices and widened the perturbed flow region. The local Stanton number distributions were asymmetric because of the difference in the evolution of the longitudinal vortices in the curved region. Moreover, comparison showed that the local Stanton number in the downstream of the straight channel increased near the surface because of the secondary re-circulating vortex. The thickness of the thermal boundary layers increased in the streamwise direction because of the significant flow mixing and heat transfer.

  1. Turbulent boundary-layer control with spanwise travelling waves

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Whalley, Richard D; Choi, Kwing-So, E-mail: Richard.Whalley@nottingham.ac.uk, E-mail: Kwing-So.Choi@nottingham.ac.uk [Faculty of Engineering, University of Nottingham, Nottingham, NG7 2RD (United Kingdom)

    2011-12-22

    It has been demonstrated through numerical simulations using Lorentz forcing that spanwise travelling waves on turbulent wall flows can lead to a skin-friction drag reduction on the order of 30%. As an aeronautical application of this innovative flow control technique, we have investigated into the use of Dielectric-Barrier-Discharge (DBD) plasma actuators to generate spanwise travelling waves in air. The near-wall structures modified by the spanwise travelling waves were studied using the PIV technique in a wind tunnel, while the associated turbulence statistics were carefully documented using hot-wire anemometry. We observed the spreading of low-speed fluid by the spanwise travelling streamwise vortices, which seems to have greatly attenuated the turbulence production process. This is very much in line with the finding of DNS studies, where wide low-speed ribbons replaced the low-speed streaks.

  2. LES of shock wave/turbulent boundary layer interaction affected by microramp vortex generators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joly, Laurent; Grebert, Arnaud; Jamme, Stéphane; Bodart, Julien; Aerodynamics, Energetics; Propulsion Dep. Team

    2016-11-01

    At large Mach numbers, the interaction of an oblique shock wave with a turbulent boundary layer (SWTBLI) developing over a flat plate gives rise to a separation bubble known to exhibit low-frequency streamwise oscillations around StL = 0 . 03 (a Strouhal number based on the separated region length). Because these oscillations yield wall pressure or load fluctuations, efforts are made to reduce their amplitude. We perform large eddy simulations to reproduce the experiments by Wang etal (2012) where a rake of microramp vortex generators (MVGs) were inserted upstream the SWTBLI with consequences yet to be fully understood. There is no consensus on the flow structure downstream MVGs and this is first clarified in the case of MVGs protruding by 0 . 47 δ in a TBL at Mach number M = 2 . 7 and Reynolds number Reθ = 3600 . Large-scale vortices intermittently shed downstream the MVGs are characterized by a streamwise period close to twice the TBL thickness and a frequency f 0 . 5Ue / δ , two orders of magnitude higher than the one of the uncontrolled SWTBLI. We then characterize the interaction between the unsteady wake of the MVGs with the SWTBLI resulting in the reduction of the interaction length and the high-frequency modulation of the shock feet motions.

  3. Conjugate heat transfer study of a turbulent slot jet impinging on a moving plate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Achari, A. Madhusudana; Das, Manab Kumar

    2017-03-01

    Numerical simulation of the flow field and conjugate heat transfer in an impinging jet with moving impingement plate is one of the important problems as it mimics closely with practical applications in industries. The Yang-Shih version of low Reynolds number k-ɛ model has been used to resolve the flow field and the temperature field in a two-dimensional, steady, incompressible, confined, turbulent slot jet impinging normally on a moving flat plate of finite thickness. The turbulence intensity and the Reynolds number considered at the inlet are 2 % and 15,000, respectively. The bottom face of the impingement plate has been maintained at a constant temperature higher than the nozzle exit temperature. The confinement plate has been considered to be adiabatic. The nozzle-to-surface spacing for the above study has been taken to be 6 and the surface-to-jet velocity ratios have been taken over a range of 0.25-1. The effects of impingement plate motion on the flow field and temperature field have been discussed elaborately with reference to stationary impingement plate. The dependence of flow field and fluid temperature field on impingement plate motion has been analyzed by plotting streamlines, isotherms for different plate speeds. A thorough study of flow characteristics for different surface-to-jet velocity ratios has been carried out by plotting profiles of mean vertical and horizontal components of velocity, pressure distribution, local shear stress distribution. The isotherms in the impingement plate of finite thickness, the distributions of solid-fluid interface temperature, the local Nusselt number, and the local heat flux for different surface-to-jet velocity ratios added to the understanding of conjugate heat transfer phenomenon.

  4. Measurements of laminar and turbulent flow in a curved duct with thin inlet boundary layers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor, A. M. K. P.; Whitelaw, J. H.; Yianneskis, M.

    1981-01-01

    Laser Doppler velocimetry was used to measure the laminar and turbulent flow in a 90 deg square bend of strong curvature. The boundary layers at the inlet to the bend were approximately 25 percent and 15 percent of the hydraulic diameter for the laminar and turbulent flows, respectively. The development of the pressure driven secondary motion is more rapid for laminar flow: the maximum cross stream component measured was 60 percent of the bulk velocity in contrast to 40 percent for turbulent flow. The streamwise isotachs show that, for laminar flow, large velocities are found progressively nearer to the outer radius of the bend and along the sidewalls. For turbulent flow, the isotachs move towards the inner radius until about 60 deg around the bend where strong secondary motion results in a similar redistribution. Turbulence level and shear stress measurements are also presented.

  5. Turbulence measurements in hypersonic boundary layers using constant-temperature anemometry and Reynolds stress measurements in hypersonic boundary layers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spina, Eric F.

    1995-01-01

    The primary objective in the two research investigations performed under NASA Langley sponsorship (Turbulence measurements in hypersonic boundary layers using constant temperature anemometry and Reynolds stress measurements in hypersonic boundary layers) has been to increase the understanding of the physics of hypersonic turbulent boundary layers. The study began with an extension of constant-temperature thermal anemometry techniques to a Mach 11 helium flow, including careful examinations of hot-wire construction techniques, system response, and system calibration. This was followed by the application of these techniques to the exploration of a Mach 11 helium turbulent boundary layer (To approximately 290 K). The data that was acquired over the course of more than two years consists of instantaneous streamwise mass flux measurements at a frequency response of about 500 kHz. The data are of exceptional quality in both the time and frequency domain and possess a high degree of repeatability. The data analysis that has been performed to date has added significantly to the body of knowledge on hypersonic turbulence, and the data reduction is continuing. An attempt was then made to extend these thermal anemometry techniques to higher enthalpy flows, starting with a Mach 6 air flow with a stagnation temperature just above that needed to prevent liquefaction (To approximately 475 F). Conventional hot-wire anemometry proved to be inadequate for the selected high-temperature, high dynamic pressure flow, with frequent wire breakage and poor system frequency response. The use of hot-film anemometry has since been investigated for these higher-enthalpy, severe environment flows. The difficulty with using hot-film probes for dynamic (turbulence) measurements is associated with construction limitations and conduction of heat into the film substrate. Work continues under a NASA GSRP grant on the development of a hot film probe that overcomes these shortcomings for hypersonic

  6. Reynolds shear stress near its maxima, turbulent bursting process and associated velocity profle in a turbulent boundary layer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Afzal, Noor

    2014-11-01

    The Reynolds shear stress around maxima, turbulent bursting process and associate velocity profile in ZGP turbulent boundary layer is considered in the intermediate layer/mesolayer proposed by Afzal (1982 Ing. Arch. 53, 355-277), in addition to inner and outer layers. The intermediate length scale δm = δRτ- 1 / 2 having velocity Um = mUe with 1 / 2 AIAA J). For channel/pipe flow, Sreenivasan et al. (1981989, 1997, 2006a,b) proposed critical layer / mesolayer, cited/adopted work Long and Chen and McKeon, B.J. & Sharma, A. 2010 JFM 658, page 370 stated ``retaining the assumption that the critical layer occurs when U (y) = (2 / 3) UCL (i.e. that the critical layer scales with y+ ~Rτ+ 2 / 3),'' both untenable assumptions, but ignored citation of papers Afzal 1982 onwards on pipe flow. The present turbulent boundary layer work shows that Reynolds shear maxima, shape factor and turbulent bursting time scale with mesolayer variables and Taylor length/time scale. Residence, Embassy Hotel Rasal Gang Aligarh 202001 UP India.

  7. Is Ultra-High Reynolds Number Necessary for Comprehensive Log Scaling in a Turbulent Boundary Layer?

    CERN Document Server

    Dixit, Shivsai Ajit

    2015-01-01

    Experiments in an extraordinary turbulent boundary layer called the sink flow, displaying a perfect streamwise invariance, show a wide extent of logarithmic scaling for moments of streamwise velocity up to order 12, even at moderate Reynolds numbers. This is in striking contrast to canonical constant-pressure turbulent boundary layers that show such comprehensive log scaling only at ultra-high Reynolds numbers. This suggests that for comprehensive log scaling, ultra-high-Reynolds-number is not a necessary condition; while specific details of the sink flow are special, the relevance to general turbulent boundary layers is that the sink flow underscores the importance of the streamwise invariance condition that needs to be met in a general flow for obtaining log scaling. Indeed, a simple theory shows that, for log scaling in the inertial sublayer, the invariance of dimensionless mean velocity and higher-order moments along a mean streamline is a necessary and sufficient condition. Ultra-high Reynolds number pri...

  8. Relating instantaneous structures and mean flow characteristics of turbulent boundary layers

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Silva, Charitha; Philip, Jimmy; Hutchins, Nicholas; Marusic, Ivan

    2016-11-01

    Recent works have highlighted the presence of thin interfacial layers of high shear that demarcate regions of relatively uniform streamwise momentum in turbulent boundary layers. Here, we aim to further our understanding of how such a zonal-like structural arrangement manifests in the averaged flow statistics. To this end, we start by identifying high shear interfaces in turbulent boundary layers employing particle image velocimetry databases that span more than an order of magnitude of friction Reynolds number (Reτ =103 -104). Inspection of these recurrent features reveal that their geometry is highly contorted and exhibits self-similarity across a wide range of scales. The Reynolds number dependence of these features is also investigated, together with their associated scaling. Based on these findings and the persistent presence of sharp changes in momentum in turbulent boundary layers, a simple model is presented towards reconstructing the mean velocity profile.

  9. Predicting the mean fields of compressible turbulent boundary layer via a symmetry approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bi, Wei-Tao; Wu, Bin; She, Zhen-Su

    2016-11-01

    A symmetry approach for canonical wall turbulence is extended to develop mean-field predictions for compressible turbulent boundary layer (CTBL). A stress length and a weighted heat flux length are identified to obey the multilayer dilation symmetry of canonical flows, giving rise to predictions of the mean velocity and temperature profiles for a range of Reynolds number (Re), Mach number (Ma) and wall temperature (Tw). Also predicted are the streamwise developments of the shape factor, the boundary layer edge velocity and the boundary layer thicknesses, etc. Only three parameters are involved in the predictions, which have sound physics and organized behaviors with respect to the Re, Ma and Tw effects. The predictions are extensively validated by direct numerical simulation and experimental data, showing better accuracies than the previous theories. The results provide new quantifications that can be used to assess computations, measurements and turbulence models of CTBL, as well as to provide new insights for the CTBL physics.

  10. NUMERICAL SIMULATION OF MOVING SCOUR BOUNDARY AND TURBULENCE FLOW AROUND SUBMARINE PIPELINES

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Yu-cheng; LU Lin

    2005-01-01

    A two dimensional vertical mathematical model is proposed in this paper for simulating the equilibrium profile of local scour around submarine pipelines. The current model is composed of a new k-ε turbulence model, fitting moving boundary with pre-meshed grid lines and incipient criterion of shear stress for sediments. Employing the proposed model, an instance is carried out numerically and compared with experiments. The calculation results agree well with the experiments. It shows that the improved two-equation turbulence model adopted in this paper is appropriate to simulating the turbulent flow field around submarine pipelines, fitting moving boundary with pre-meshed grid lines method is efficient for moving boundary problems in a multiply-connected domain and the stability evaluation method for seabed with critical shear stress based on log-wall law is a reliable choice.

  11. Smooth and rough boundaries in turbulent Taylor-Couette flow

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Berg, van den Thomas H.; Doering, Charles R.; Lohse, Detlef; Lathrop, Daniel P.

    2003-01-01

    We examine the torque required to drive the smooth or rough cylinders in turbulent Taylor-Couette flow. With rough inner and outer walls the scaling of the dimensionless torque G is found to be consistent with pure Kolmogorov scaling G~Re2. The results are interpreted within the Grossmann-Lohse theo

  12. Statistical characterization of turbulence in the boundary plasma of EAST

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Yan, Ning; Nielsen, Anders Henry; Xu, G.S.

    2013-01-01

    In Ohmic heated low confinement mode (L-mode) discharges, the intermittent statistical characteristics of turbulent fluctuations have been investigated in the edge and the scrape-off layer (SOL) plasma on EAST (the experimental advanced superconducting tokamak) by fast reciprocating Langmuir probe...

  13. Impact of Neutral Boundary-Layer Turbulence on Wind-Turbine Wakes: A Numerical Modelling Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Englberger, Antonia; Dörnbrack, Andreas

    2017-03-01

    The wake characteristics of a wind turbine in a turbulent boundary layer under neutral stratification are investigated systematically by means of large-eddy simulations. A methodology to maintain the turbulence of the background flow for simulations with open horizontal boundaries, without the necessity of the permanent import of turbulence data from a precursor simulation, was implemented in the geophysical flow solver EULAG. These requirements are fulfilled by applying the spectral energy distribution of a neutral boundary layer in the wind-turbine simulations. A detailed analysis of the wake response towards different turbulence levels of the background flow results in a more rapid recovery of the wake for a higher level of turbulence. A modified version of the Rankine-Froude actuator disc model and the blade element momentum method are tested as wind-turbine parametrizations resulting in a strong dependence of the near-wake wind field on the parametrization, whereas the far-wake flow is fairly insensitive to it. The wake characteristics are influenced by the two considered airfoils in the blade element momentum method up to a streamwise distance of 14 D ( D = rotor diameter). In addition, the swirl induced by the rotation has an impact on the velocity field of the wind turbine even in the far wake. Further, a wake response study reveals a considerable effect of different subgrid-scale closure models on the streamwise turbulent intensity.

  14. Investigation of Turbulence Behaviour in the Stable Boundary Layer Using Arbitrary-Order Hilbert Spectra

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, W.; Zhang, H. S.; Schmitt, F. G.; Huang, Y. X.; Cai, X. H.; Song, Y.; Huang, X.; Zhang, H.

    2017-01-01

    The CASES-99 experimental data are used to analyze turbulence behaviour under a range of stable conditions using an adaptive method based on Hilbert spectral analysis. The characteristic scales of intrinsic mode functions vary between different stratifications. The second-order Hilbert marginal spectra display clear separation between fine-scale turbulence and large-scale motions. After removing the large-scale motions, the statistical characteristics of the reconstructed signals confirm the distinction of different stratifications in the fine-scale range. The correlation coefficient analyses reveal that the Hilbert spectral analysis method separates turbulence from large-scale motions in the stable boundary layer.

  15. Nonisothermal turbulent boundary-layer adverse pressure gradient large scale thermal structure measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bagheri, Nader; White, Bruce R.; Lei, Ting-Kwo

    1994-01-01

    Hot-wire anemometry measurements in an incompressible turbulent boundary-layer flow over a heated flat plate under equilibrium adverse-pressure-gradient conditions (beta = 1.8) were made for two different temperature difference cases (10 and 15 C) between the wall and the freestream. Space-time correlations of temperature fluctuations (T') were obtained with a pair of subminiature temperature fluctuation probes. The mean convection velocities, the mean inclination angles, and coherence characteristics of the T' large-scale structure were determined. The present temperature structures measurements for a nonisothermal boundary layer are compared to the zero-pressure-gradient case with identical temperature differences previously reported, in which the mean convection velocity of the T' structure was a function of position y(sup +) and independent of the limited temperature-difference cases tested. The three major findings of the present study, as compared to the zero-pressure-gradient case, are (1) the mean convection speed of the T' structure under beta = 1.8 pressure-gradient conditions was found to be substantially lower in the logarithmic core region than the zero-pressure-gradient case. Additionally, the mean convection speed is felt by the authors to be a function of pressure-gradient parameter beta; (2) the mean inclination angle of the T' structure to the wall under the adverse-pressure-gradient flow was 32 deg, which compares favorably to the 30-deg value of the zero-pressure-gradient case; and (3) the limited data suggests that the mean convection velocity of the T' structure is a function of y(sup +) and independent of the limited temperature-difference cases tested.

  16. Equilibrium turbulent boundary layers with wall suction/blowing and pressure gradients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patwardhan, Saurabh; Ramesh, O. N.

    2012-11-01

    Conditions for the equilibrium conditions in turbulent boundary layers with suction or blowing across a no slip wall and pressure gradients are derived from the governing equations. It is also shown that under these conditions the governing equations show self similarity in the conventional inner co-ordinates as well as ``laminar-like'' co-ordinates. The only turbulent boundary layer in ``perfect equilibrium'' known as sink flow turbulent boundary layer forms a subset of this more general equilibrium concept. Direct numerical simulations were carried out to investigate this hypothesis for the case of favourable pressure gradient with small blowing at the wall. Reynolds number invariance and complete self similarity of mean velocity profile and second order turbulence statistics is observed along the flow direction similar to the sink flow boundary layer. A comparison between the case with wall blowing and imposed favourable pressure gradient and the sink flow case for same value of pressure gradient parameter reveals a shift in log law in mean velocity profile and increase in peak turbulence intensities.

  17. Characterization of an incipiently separated shock wave/turbulent boundary layer interaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schreyer, A.-M.; Dussauge, J.-P.; Krämer, E.

    2017-03-01

    The turbulence structure in a shock wave/turbulent boundary layer interaction at incipient separation was investigated in order to get insight into turbulence generation and amplification mechanisms in such flow fields. The flow along a two-dimensional 11.5° compression corner was studied experimentally at a Mach number of M=2.53 and with a momentum-thickness Reynolds number of Re_{θ }=5370. From hot-wire boundary layer traverses and surface heat-flux density fluctuation measurements with the fast-response atomic layer thermopile, the turbulence structure and amplification was described. Space-time correlations of the mass-flux fluctuations across the boundary layer and the surface heat-flux density fluctuations were measured to further characterize the development of the turbulence structure across the interaction. The large-scale boundary layer structures are concealed by shock-related effects in the strongly disturbed shock-foot region. Shortly downstream, however, large-scale structures dominate the signal again, just as in the incoming flow. A mechanism explaining this behavior is suggested.

  18. MHD Boundary Layer Slip Flow and Heat Transfer over a Flat Plate

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Krishnendu Bhattacharyya; Swati Mukhopadhyay; G.C.Layek

    2011-01-01

    An analysis of magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) boundary layer flow and heat transfer over a flat plate with slip condition at the boundary is presented. A complete self-similar set of equations are obtained from the governing equations using similarity transformations and are solved by a shooting method. In the boundary slip condition no local similarity occurs. Velocity and temperature distributions within the boundary layer are presented. Our analysis reveals that the increase of magnetic and slip parameters reduce the boundary layer thickness and also enhance the heat transfer from the plate.%@@ An analysis of magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) boundary layer flow and heat transfer over a flat plate with slip condition at the boundary is presented.A complete self-similar set of equations are obtained from the governing equations using similarity transformations and are solved by a shooting method.In the boundary slip condition no local similarity occurs.Velocity and temperature distributions within the boundary layer are presented.Our analysis reveals that the increase of magnetic and slip parameters reduce the boundary layer thickness and also enhance the heat transfer from the plate.

  19. Hydrological Effects in the EarthScope Plate Boundary Observatory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meertens, C.; Wahr, J.; Borsa, A.; Jackson, M.; Wahr, A.

    2008-12-01

    The dense network of 1,100 continuously operating GPS stations in the Plate Boundary Observatory (PBO) is providing high quality position time series. Data are processed by PBO Analysis Centers at the New Mexico Institute of Mining and Technology and at Central Washington University. The results are combined by the Analysis Center Coordinator at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology and are made available from the UNAVCO Data Center in Boulder. Analysis software of Langbein, 2008, was used to estimate secular trends and annual variations in the time series. The results were interpreted in terms of hydrological loading and poroelastic effects, from both natural and anthropogenic changes in water storage. The effects of monument stability were also considered. The density of PBO observations allows for the identification of spatial patterns that appear coherent over relatively broad areas. Vertical annual signals of 8-10 mm peak-to-peak amplitude are evident at stations in the mountains of northern and central California and southern Oregon showing peak uplift in October and are correlated to hydrological loading. The vertical elastic loading signal, calculated from the 0.25 by 0.25 degree community Noah land-surface model, fits the annual signal well and appears also to model the secular trends, although the time duration of ~3 years is still limited. In contrast to mountainous regions, stations in the valleys of California show greater spatial variability ranging from stations with almost no detectable annual signal to stations with very large, 20-30 mm, amplitudes with peak uplift in March. The vertical signals are temporally correlated to ground-water variations caused by pumping for agricultural irrigation and likely are caused by poroelastic effects in the sediments rather than loading. Annual vertical signals in southern California, where not obviously influenced from localized ground-water fluctuations, are small with ~2 mm amplitude and may be due to

  20. The Influence of Convergence Movement on Turbulent Transportation in the Atmospheric Boundary Layer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    胡隐樵; 左洪超

    2003-01-01

    Classical turbulent K closure theory of the atmospheric boundary layer assumes that the verticalturbulent transport flux of any macroscopic quantity is equivalent to that quantity's vertical gradienttransport flux. But a cross coupling between the thermodynamic processes and the dynamic processesin the atmospheric system is demonstrated based on the Curier-Prigogine principle of cross coupling oflinear thermodynamics. The vertical turbulent transportation of energy and substance in the atmosphericboundary layer is related not only to their macroscopic gradient but also to the convergence and the di-vergence movement. The transportation of the convergence or divergence movement is important for theatmospheric boundary layer of the heterogeneous underlying surface and the convection boundary layer.Based on this, the turbulent transportatiou in the atmospheric boundary layer, the energy budget of theheterogeneous underlying surface and the convection boundary layer, and the boundary layer parameteri-zation of land surface processes over the heterogeneous underlying surface are studied. This research offersclues not only for establishing the atmospheric boundary layer theory about the heterogeneous underlyingsurface, but also for overcoming the difficulties encountered recently in the application of the atmosphericboundary layer theory.

  1. Plate boundaries and evolution of the Solomon Sea region

    Science.gov (United States)

    Honza, E.; Davies, H. L.; Keene, J. B.; Tiffin, D. L.

    1987-09-01

    The Solomon Sea Plate was widely developed during late Oligocene, separating the proto-West Melanesian Arc from the proto-Trobriand Arc. Spreading in the Bismarck Sea and in the Woodlark Basin resulted from interaction between the Pacific and Australian Plates, specifically from the collision of the proto-West Melanesian Arc with north New Guinea, which occurred after arc reversal. This model explains the extensive Miocene, Pliocene, and Quaternary volcanism of the Papua New Guinea mainland as it related to southward subduction of the Trobriand Trough. Our interpreted plate motions are concordant with the geological evidence onshore and also with complex tectonic features in the Solomon Sea Basin Region.

  2. Active faulting and transpression tectonics along the plate boundary in North Africa

    OpenAIRE

    Mustapha Meghraoui; Silvia Pondrelli

    2012-01-01

    International audience; We present a synthesis of the active tectonics of the northern Atlas Mountains , and suggest a kinematic model of transpression and block rotation that illustrates the mechanics of this section of the Africa–Eurasia plate boundary. Neotectonic structures and significant shallow seismicity (with Mw >5.0) indicate that coeval E-W-trending, right-lateral faulting and NE-SW, thrust-related folding result from oblique convergence at the plate boundary, which forms a transpr...

  3. A Generic Length-scale Equation For Second-order Turbulence Models of Oceanic Boundary Layers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Umlauf, L.; Burchard, H.

    A generic transport equation for a generalized length-scale in second-order turbulence closure models for geophysical boundary layers is suggested. This variable consists of the products of powers of the turbulent kinetic energy, k, and the integral length-scale, l. The new approach generalizes traditional second-order models used in geophysical boundary layer modelling, e.g. the Mellor-Yamada model and the k- model, which, however, can be recovered as special cases. It is demonstrated how this new model can be calibrated with measurements in some typical geophysical boundary layer flows. As an example, the generic model is applied to the uppermost oceanic boundary layer directly influenced by the effects of breaking surface waves. Recent measurements show that in this layer the classical law of the wall is invalid, since there turbulence is dominated by turbulent transport of TKE from above, and not by shear-production. A widely accepted approach to describe the wave-affected layer with a one-equation turbulence model was suggested by Craig and Banner (1994). Here, some deficien- cies of their solutions are pointed out and a generalization of their ideas for the case of two-equation models is suggested. Direct comparison with very recently obtained measurements of the dissipation rate, , in the wave-affected boundary layer with com- puted results clearly demonstrate that only the generic two-equation model yields cor- rect predictions for the profiles of and the turbulent length scale, l. Also, the pre- dicted velocity profiles in the wave-affected layer, important e.g. for the interpretation of surface drifter experiments, are reproduced correctly only by the generic model. Implementation and computational costs of the generic model are comparable with traditonal two-equation models.

  4. The BOUT Project; Validation and Benchmark of BOUT Code and Experimental Diagnostic Tools for Fusion Boundary Turbulence

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    徐学桥

    2001-01-01

    A boundary plasma turbulence code BOUT is presented. The preliminary encour aging results have been obtained when comparing with probe measurements for a typical Ohmic discharge in HT-7 tokamak. The validation and benchmark of BOUT code and experimental diagnostic tools for fusion boundary plasma turbulence is proposed.

  5. An Experimental Study of the Dynamics of an Unsteady Turbulent Boundary Layer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1982-12-01

    41 3.4 Data-Rduction Procedure . . . . . . 42 v p 4 EXPERIENTAL RESULTS .................. 43 4.1 General Considerations ... *..*.... . 44...fruitful. The following recommendations are addressed to the unsteady tur- bulent boundary layer research community at large: 0 Unsteady, turbulent...34 private communication , submit- ted to Journal of Fluid Mechanics, 1983. Tellonis, D. P. [1977], "Unsteady Boundary Layers, Separated and At- tached," AGARD

  6. Vegetation Effects on Turbulent Boundary Layer Flows and their Role in Lotic Ecosystems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neary, V. S.

    2009-12-01

    The effects of vegetation on fully developed turbulent boundary layer flows are profound and play an important role in lotic ecosystems. Recent experiments on flow past isolated plant stems (e.g. tree trunks in flood plains), alternating vegetation patches (e.g. Justicia americana in gravel bed rivers), and simulated emergent and submerged plant stem arrays in laboratory flumes are reviewed. Particular emphasis is given to fully developed turbulent flows through submerged vegetation modeled by large eddy simulation (LES), with a focus on understanding the role of the coherent structures on the momentum transfer across the water-plant interface. Comparisons are made with fully developed turbulent boundary layer flows in unobstructed (unvegetated) channels to show how the vegetation significantly changes the mean flow, Reynolds shear stress, turbulence intensities, turbulence event frequencies and the energy budget within and above the vegetation layer. The results demonstrate how vegetation in the lotic environment delineates ecotones with edge effects that are beneficial to mobile organisms (e.g. macroinvertebrates and fish), and how it alters mean flow and turbulence characteristics near the bed to promote desirable physical habitat conditions, e.g. substrate composition and stability, for benthic organisms such as mussels and crayfish. Vincent Neary, Ph.D., P.E. President, Springburn LLC Natural Engineering and Restoration

  7. Structure and dynamics of turbulent boundary layer flow over healthy and algae-covered corals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stocking, Jonathan B.; Rippe, John P.; Reidenbach, Matthew A.

    2016-09-01

    Fine-scale velocity measurements over healthy and algae-covered corals were collected in situ to characterize combined wave-current boundary layer flow and the effects of algal canopies on turbulence hydrodynamics. Data were collected using acoustic Doppler velocimetry and particle image velocimetry. Flow over healthy corals is well described by traditional wall-bounded shear layers, distinguished by a logarithmic velocity profile, a local balance of turbulence production and dissipation, and high levels of bed shear stress. Healthy corals exhibit significant spatial heterogeneity in boundary layer flow structure resulting from variations in large-scale coral topography. By contrast, the turbulence structure of algae-covered corals is best represented by a plane mixing layer, with a sharp inflection point in mean velocity at the canopy top, a large imbalance of turbulence production and dissipation, and strongly damped flow and shear stresses within the canopy. The presence of an algal canopy increases turbulent kinetic energy within the roughness sublayer by ~2.5 times compared to healthy corals while simultaneously reducing bed shear stress by nearly an order of magnitude. Reduced bed shear at the coral surface and within-canopy turbulent stresses imply reduced mass transfer of necessary metabolites (e.g., oxygen, nutrients), leading to negative impacts on coral health.

  8. Boundary layer control by a fish: Unsteady laminar boundary layers of rainbow trout swimming in turbulent flows

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kazutaka Yanase

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available The boundary layers of rainbow trout, Oncorhynchus mykiss [0.231±0.016 m total body length (L (mean±s.d.; N=6], swimming at 1.6±0.09 L s−1 (N=6 in an experimental flow channel (Reynolds number, Re=4×105 with medium turbulence (5.6% intensity were examined using the particle image velocimetry technique. The tangential flow velocity distributions in the pectoral and pelvic surface regions (arc length from the rostrum, lx=71±8 mm, N=3, and lx=110±13 mm, N=4, respectively were approximated by a laminar boundary layer model, the Falkner−Skan equation. The flow regime over the pectoral and pelvic surfaces was regarded as a laminar flow, which could create less skin-friction drag than would be the case with turbulent flow. Flow separation was postponed until vortex shedding occurred over the posterior surface (lx=163±22 mm, N=3. The ratio of the body-wave velocity to the swimming speed was in the order of 1.2. This was consistent with the condition of the boundary layer laminarization that had been confirmed earlier using a mechanical model. These findings suggest an energy-efficient swimming strategy for rainbow trout in a turbulent environment.

  9. Turbulence and intermittent transport at the boundary of magnetized plasmas

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Garcia, O.E.; Naulin, V.; Nielsen, A.H.

    2005-01-01

    a forcing region with spatially localized sources of particles and heat outside which losses due to the motion along open magnetic-field lines dominate, corresponding to the edge region and the scrape-off layer, respectively. Turbulent states reveal intermittent eruptions of hot plasma from the edge region......, propagating radially far into the scrape-off layer in the form of field-aligned filaments, or blobs. This results in positively skewed and flattened single-point probability distribution functions of particle density and temperature, reflecting the frequent appearance of large fluctuations. The conditional...

  10. Vertical structure of aeolian turbulence in a boundary layer with sand transport

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Zoe S.; Baas, Andreas C. W.

    2016-04-01

    Recently we have found that Reynolds shear stress shows a significant variability with measurement height (Lee and Baas, 2016), and so an alternative parameter for boundary layer turbulence may help to explain the relationship between wind forcing and sediment transport. We present data that were collected during a field study of boundary layer turbulence conducted on a North Atlantic beach. High-frequency (50 Hz) 3D wind velocity measurements were collected using ultrasonic anemometry at thirteen different measurement heights in a tight vertical array between 0.11 and 1.62 metres above the surface. Thanks to the high density installation of sensors a detailed analysis of the boundary layer flow can be conducted using methods more typically used in studies where data is only available from one or just a few measurement heights. We use quadrant analysis to explore the vertical structure of turbulence and track the changes in quadrant signatures with measurement elevation and over time. Results of quadrant analysis, at the 'raw' 50 Hz timescale, demonstrates the tendency for event clustering across all four quadrants, which implies that at-a-point quadrant events are part of larger-scale turbulent structures. Using an HSV colour model, applied to the quadrant analysis data and plotted in series, we create colour maps of turbulence, which can provide a clear visualisation of the clustering of event activity at each height and illustrate the shape of the larger coherent flow structures that are present within the boundary layer. By including a saturation component to the colour model, the most significant stress producing sections of the data are emphasised. This results in a 'banded' colour map, which relates to clustering of quadrant I (Outward Interaction) and quadrant IV (Sweep) activity, separate from clustering of quadrant II (Burst) and quadrant III (Inward Interaction). Both 'sweep-type' and 'burst-type' sequences are shown to have a diagonal structure

  11. Internal (Annular) and Compressible External (Flat Plate) Turbulent Flow Heat Transfer Correlations.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dechant, Lawrence [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Smith, Justin [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    2016-01-01

    Here we provide a discussion regarding the applicability of a family of traditional heat transfer correlation based models for several (unit level) heat transfer problems associated with flight heat transfer estimates and internal flow heat transfer associated with an experimental simulation design (Dobranich 2014). Variability between semi-empirical free-flight models suggests relative differences for heat transfer coefficients on the order of 10%, while the internal annular flow behavior is larger with differences on the order of 20%. We emphasize that these expressions are strictly valid only for the geometries they have been derived for e.g. the fully developed annular flow or simple external flow problems. Though, the application of flat plate skin friction estimate to cylindrical bodies is a traditional procedure to estimate skin friction and heat transfer, an over-prediction bias is often observed using these approximations for missile type bodies. As a correction for this over-estimate trend, we discuss a simple scaling reduction factor for flat plate turbulent skin friction and heat transfer solutions (correlations) applied to blunt bodies of revolution at zero angle of attack. The method estimates the ratio between axisymmetric and 2-d stagnation point heat transfer skin friction and Stanton number solution expressions for sub-turbulent Reynolds numbers %3C1x10 4 . This factor is assumed to also directly influence the flat plate results applied to the cylindrical portion of the flow and the flat plate correlations are modified by

  12. Drag Reduction in a Swimming Humboldt Penguin, Spheniscus Humboldti, when the Boundary Layer is Turbulent

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Alex R. Parfitt; Julian F.V. Vincent

    2005-01-01

    An area of protruding feathers found around the beak of many penguin species is thought to induce a turbulent boundary layer whilst swimming. Hydrodynamic tests on a model Humboldt penguin, Spheniscus humboldti, suggest that induced turbulence causes a significant reduction in boundary layer height, flow separation, and an average of 31% reduction in drag (1.0 m/s to 4.5 m/s). Visualisation of surface flow showed it to follow the body profile, over the feet and tail, before separating. Movement of the feet in swimming penguins correlates with steering of the bird. Induced turbulence may therefore further increase swimming efficiency by reducing the amount of foot movement required to direct the swimming bird.

  13. Three-dimensional structure of dominant instabilities in turbulent flow over smooth and rough boundaries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grass, A. J.; Stuart, R. J.; Mansour-Tehrani, M.

    1991-01-01

    The current status of knowledge regarding coherent vortical structures in turbulent boundary layers and their role in turbulence generation are reviewed. The investigations reported in the study concentrate attention on rough-wall flows prevailing in the geophysical environment and include an experiment determining the three-dimensional form of the turbulence structures linked to the ejection and inrush events observed over rough walls and an experiment concerned with measuring the actual spanwise scale of the near-wall structures for boundary conditions ranging from hydrodynamically smooth to fully rough. It is demonstrated that horseshoe vortical structures are present and play an important role in rough-wall flows and they increase in scale with increasing wall distance, while a dominant spanwise wavelength occurs in the instantaneous cross-flow distribution of streamwise velocity close to the rough wall.

  14. Coherent structures of a self-similar adverse pressure gradient turbulent boundary layer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sekimoto, Atsushi; Kitsios, Vassili; Atkinson, Callum; Jiménez, Javier; Soria, Julio

    2016-11-01

    The turbulence statistics and structures are studied in direct numerical simulation (DNS) of a self-similar adverse pressure gradient turbulent boundary layer (APG-TBL). The self-similar APG-TBL at the verged of separation is achieved by a modification of the far-field boundary condition to produce the desired pressure gradient. The turbulence statistics in the self-similar region collapse by using the scaling of the external velocity and the displacement thickness. The coherent structures of the APG-TBL are investigated and compared to those of zero-pressure gradient case and homogeneous shear flow. The support of the ARC, NCI and Pawsey SCC funded by the Australian and Western Australian governments as well as the support of PRACE funded by the European Union are gratefully acknowledged.

  15. Modeling of individual coherent structures in wall region of a turbulent boundary layer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    周恒; 陆昌根; 罗纪生

    1999-01-01

    Models for individual coherent structures in the wall region of a turbulent boundary layer are proposed. Method of numerical simulations is used to follow the evolution of the structures. It is found that the proposed model does bear many features of coherent structures found in experiments.

  16. Effects of shear in the convective boundary layer: analysis of the turbulent kinetic energy budget

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pino, D.; Vilà-Guerau de Arellano, J.

    2008-01-01

    Effects of convective and mechanical turbulence at the entrainment zone are studied through the use of systematic Large-Eddy Simulation (LES) experiments. Five LES experiments with different shear characteristics in the quasi-steady barotropic boundary layer were conducted by increasing the value of

  17. Eulerian and Lagrangian views of a turbulent boundary layer flow using time-resolved tomographic PIV

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schröder, A.; Geisler, R.; Staack, K.; Elsinga, G.E.; Scarano, F.; Wieneke, B.; Henning, A.; Poelma, C.; Westerweel, J.

    2010-01-01

    Coherent structures and their time evolution in the logarithmic region of a turbulent boundary layer investigated by means of 3D space–time correlations and time-dependent conditional averaging techniques are the focuses of the present paper. Experiments have been performed in the water tunnel at TU

  18. Three-dimensional vortex organization in a high-Reynolds-number supersonic turbulent boundary layer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Elsinga, G.E.; Adrian, R.J.; Van Oudheusden, B.W.; Scarano, F.

    2010-01-01

    Tomographic particle image velocimetry was used to quantitatively visualize the three-dimensional coherent structures in a supersonic (Mach 2) turbulent boundary layer in the region between y/δ = 0.15 and 0.89. The Reynolds number based on momentum thickness Reθ = 34000. The instantaneous velocity f

  19. Embedded-LES and experiment of turbulent boundary layer flow around a floor-mounted cube

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jørgensen, Nina Gall; Koss, Holger; Bennetsen, Jens Chr.

    An Embedded LES approach is used to numerically simulate fluctuating surface pressures on a floor-mounted cube in a turbulent boundary layer flow and compared to wind tunnel experiments. The computation were performed with the CFD software ANSYS FLUENT at a Reynolds number at cube height of Reh = 1...

  20. Prediction of mean flow data for adiabatic 2-D compressible turbulent boundary layers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Motallebi, F.

    1997-01-01

    This book presents a method for the prediction of mean flow data (i.e. skin friction, velocity profile and shape parameter) for adiabatic two-dimensional compressible turbulent boundary layers at zero pressure gradient. The transformed law of the wall, law of the lake, the van Driest model for the

  1. Prediction of mean flow data for adiabatic 2-D compressible turbulent boundary layers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Motallebi, F.

    1997-01-01

    This book presents a method for the prediction of mean flow data (i.e. skin friction, velocity profile and shape parameter) for adiabatic two-dimensional compressible turbulent boundary layers at zero pressure gradient. The transformed law of the wall, law of the lake, the van Driest model for the c

  2. Direct numerical simulation of heat transfer in a spatially developing turbulent boundary layer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Dong; Luo, Kun; Fan, Jianren

    2016-10-01

    Direct numerical simulation has been performed to investigate heat transfer in a zero-pressure-gradient spatially developing turbulent boundary layer with realistic thermal inflow boundary conditions. The temperature is considered as a passive scalar and the molecular Prandtl number is set to be 0.71. The turbulence statistics for both the velocity and temperature fields show good agreement with previous numerical and experimental data in the literature. The present study provides a valuable database for the spatially developing turbulent thermal boundary layer over a wide range of Reynolds numbers from Reθ = 1100 to 1940. The simulation results indicate that both the peak value and peak location of the streamwise velocity fluctuation grow slightly with increasing Reynolds number, same as those of the temperature fluctuation. The relationship between the streamwise velocity and temperature fluctuations has been examined and a strong correlation is observed in the vicinity of the wall. With increasing distance from the wall, however, the degree of correlation significantly decreases. In addition, the difference between the turbulent velocity and temperature fields is also analysed by investigating the mechanisms of heat and momentum transport in boundary layer flow.

  3. Tuning of turbulent boundary layer anisotropy for improved surface pressure and trailing-edge noise modeling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bertagnolio, Franck; Fischer, Andreas; Zhu, Wei Jun

    2014-01-01

    The modeling of the surface pressure spectrum beneath a turbulent boundary layer is investigated, focusing on the case of airfoil flows and associated trailing edge noise prediction using the so-called TNO model. This type of flow is characterized by the presence of an adverse pressure gradient a...

  4. DUAL RECIPROCITY BOUNDARY ELEMENT METHOD FOR FLEXURAL WAVES IN THIN PLATE WITH CUTOUT

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    GAO Suo-wen; WANG Yue-sheng; ZHANG Zi-mao; MA Xing-rui

    2005-01-01

    The theoretical analysis and numerical calculation of scattering of elastic waves and dynamic stress concentrations in the thin plate with the cutout was studied using dual reciprocity boundary element method (DRM). Based on the work equivalent law, the dual reciprocity boundary integral equations for flexural waves in the thin plate were established using static fundamental solution. As illustration, numerical results for the dynamic stress concentration factors in the thin plate with a circular hole are given.The results obtained demonstrate good agreement with other reported results and show high accuracy.

  5. Application of a Novel Laser-Doppler Velocimeter for Turbulence: Structural Measurements in Turbulent Boundary Layers

    Science.gov (United States)

    2006-10-18

    Reynolds stress anisotropy which exists in all real turbulent flows ( Durbin and Petterson Reif 2001). To solve the system in (1.3), it is necessary to...general frequency-domain techniques like the FFT. Thus, a purely algebraic algorithm is specified, as described to follow. 3.1.2.1.2.1 RMS Power...how often?" Sound and Vibration, January, pp. 14- 24. Durbin , P.A. and Petterson Reif, B.A. 2001 Statistical Theory and Modeling for Turbulent Flows

  6. Relationship between outer forearc subsidence and plate boundary kinematics along the Northeast Japan convergent margin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Regalla, Christine; Fisher, Donald M.; Kirby, Eric; Furlong, Kevin P.

    2013-12-01

    Tectonic erosion along convergent plate boundaries, whereby removal of upper plate material along the subduction zone interface drives kilometer-scale outer forearc subsidence, has been purported to explain the evolution of nearly half the world's subduction margins, including part of the history of northeast Japan. Here, we evaluate the role of plate boundary dynamics in driving forearc subsidence in northeastern Japan. A synthesis of newly updated analyses of outer forearc subsidence, the timing and kinematics of upper plate deformation, and the history of plate convergence along the Japan trench demonstrate that the onset of rapid fore-arc tectonic subsidence is contemporaneous with upper plate extension during the opening of the Sea of Japan and with an acceleration in convergence rate at the trench. In Plio-Quaternary time, relative uplift of the outer forearc is contemporaneous with contraction across the arc and a decrease in plate convergence rate. The coincidence of these changes across the forearc, arc, backarc system appears to require an explanation at the scale of the entire plate boundary. Similar observations along other western Pacific margins suggest that correlations between forearc subsidence and major changes in plate kinematics are the rule, rather than the exception. We suggest that a significant component of forearc subsidence at the northeast Japan margin is not the consequence of basal tectonic erosion, but instead reflects dynamic changes in plate boundary geometry driven by temporal variations in plate kinematics. If correct, this model requires a reconsideration of the mass balance and crustal recycling of continental crust at nonaccretionary margins.

  7. The calculation of incompressible separated turbulent boundary layers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kogan, A.; Migemi, S.

    1990-02-01

    The algebraic turbulent model of Baldwin-Lomax was incorporated into the incompressible Navier-Stokes code FIDAP. This model has been extensively tested in the past in finite difference codes. We believe that the incorporation of the model into the finite element code also has resulted in a practical method to compute a variety of separated turbulent two-dimensional flows. Firstly, the model is used to compute the attached flow about an airfoil. Next, the application of the model to separated flows is presented, by computing the flows at high angles of attack up to maximum lift. It is shown that the model is capable of predicting separation, steady stall and C(sub L MAX). As a difficult test of the model, we compute the laminar separation bubble development directly, using the full Navier-Stokes finite elements code. As far as we know, this approach has not been reported previously. The importance of using an appropriate upwinding is discussed. When possible, comparison of computed results with experiments is presented and the agreement is good.

  8. Comparison of several methods for predicting separation in a compressible turbulent boundary layer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gerhart, P. M.; Bober, L. J.

    1974-01-01

    Several methods for predicting the separation point for a compressible turbulent boundary layer were applied to the flow over a bump on a wind-tunnel wall. Measured pressure distributions were used as input. Two integral boundary-layer methods, three finite-difference boundary-layer methods, and three simple methods were applied at five free-stream Mach numbers ranging from 0.354 to 0.7325. Each of the boundary-layer methods failed to explicitly predict separation. However, by relaxing the theoretical separation criteria, several boundary-layer methods were made to yield reasonable separation predictions, but none of the methods accurately predicted the important boundary-layer parameters at separation. Only one of the simple methods consistently predicted separation with reasonable accuracy in a manner consistent with the theory. The other methods either indicated several possible separation locations or only sometimes predicted separation.

  9. Stress and mixed boundary conditions for two-dimensional dodecagonal quasi-crystal plates

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Yan Gao; Si-Peng Xu; Bao-Sheng Zhao

    2007-05-01

    For plate bending and stretching problems in two-dimensional (2D) dodecagonal quasi-crystal (QC) media, the reciprocal theorem and the general solution for QCs are applied in a novel way to obtain the appropriate stress and mixed boundary conditions accurate to all order. The method developed by Gregory and Wan is used to generate necessary conditions which the prescribed data on the edge of the plate must satisfy in order that it should generate a decaying state within the plate; these decaying state conditions are obtained explicitly for axisymmetric bending and stretching of a circular plate when stress or mixed conditions are imposed on the plate edge. They are then used for the correct formulation of boundary conditions for the interior solution. For the stress data, our boundary conditions coincide with those obtained in conventional forms of plate theories. More importantly, appropriate boundary conditions with a set of mixed edge-data are obtained for the first time. Furthermore, the corresponding necessary conditions for transversely isotropic elastic plate are obtained directly, and their isotropic elastic counterparts are also obtained.

  10. Turbulent Boundary Layer on a Cylinder in Axial Flow

    Science.gov (United States)

    1988-09-29

    wall- norma 6caling or Rao’s wall-normal scaling. Other measurements of the mean velocity in a cylindrical boundary layer should be mentioned for...located near the wall at three azimuthal locations that w𔃽re 900 apa ,-t and at several streamwise spacings for flow conditions resulting in 8/a=8

  11. Skin-friction measurements in a turbulent boundary layer under the influence of free-stream turbulence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Esteban, Luis Blay; Dogan, Eda; Rodríguez-López, Eduardo; Ganapathisubramani, Bharathram

    2017-09-01

    This experimental investigation deals with the influence of free-stream turbulence (FST) produced by an active grid on the skin friction of a zero-pressure-gradient turbulent boundary layer. Wall shear stress is obtained by oil-film interferometry. In addition, hot-wire anemometry was performed to obtain wall-normal profiles of streamwise velocity. This enables the skin friction to be deduced from the mean profile. Both methods show remarkable agreement for every test case. Although skin friction is shown to increase with FST, the trend with Reynolds number is found to be similar to cases without FST. Furthermore, once the change in the friction velocity is accounted for, the self-similarity of the logarithmic region and below (i.e. law of the wall) appears to hold for all FST cases investigated.

  12. Upper boundary of the Pacific plate subducting beneath Hokkaido, Japan, estimated from ScSp phase

    OpenAIRE

    Osada, Kinue; Yoshizawa, Kazunori; YOMOGIDA, Kiyoshi

    2010-01-01

    Three-dimensional geometry of the upper boundary of the Pacific plate subducting beneath Hokkaido, Japan, was obtained using the ScSp phase: the phase converted from ScS (S wave reflected at the core-mantle boundary) to P wave at the plate boundary. Taking the advantage of a dense seismic network, "Hi-net", recently deployed across the Japanese islands, we applied several seismic array analyses to the recorded waveform data for a large nearby deep earthquake, in order to enhance very weak ScS...

  13. A finite-difference outer layer and integral inner layer method for the solution of the turbulent boundary layer equations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barnwell, R. W.; Dejarnette, F. R.; Wahls, R. A.

    1987-01-01

    A new turbulent boundary-layer method is developed which models the inner region with the law of the wall while the outer region uses Clauser's eddy viscosity in Matsuno's finite-difference method. The match point between the inner and outer regions as well as the wall shear stress are determined at each marching step during the computation. Results obtained for incompressible, two-dimensional flow over flat plates and ellipses are compared with solutions from a baseline method which uses a finite-difference method for the entire boundary layer. Since the present method used the finite-difference method in the outer region only, the number of grid points required was about half that needed for the baseline method. Accurate displacement and momentum thicknesses were predicted for all cases. Skin friction was predicted well for the flat plate, but the accuracy decreased significantly for the ellipses. Adding a wake functions to the law of the wall allows some of the pressure gradient effect to be taken into account thereby increasing the accuracy of the method.

  14. Enhancing the prediction of turbulent kinetic energy in the marine atmospheric boundary layer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foreman, R. J.; Emeis, S.

    2010-09-01

    A recent study by Shaikh and Siddiqui (2010) has shown definitively that the turbulent structure of boundary layer flows over water is fundamentally different compared with that over a smooth surface and with that over a solid wavy surface whose wave amplitude is similar to that of dynamically wind-generated waves. In light of this new information, the constants of the Mellor-Yamada boundary layer model, which are based on laboratory data over solid walls, are re-evaluated to suit the turbulent dynamics of a dynamic, wavy surface. The constants are based on the principal that the enhanced turbulent production in the vicinity of waves is redistributed among the normal stress components by virtue of the enhanced pressure-velocity covariances also found in the vicinity of waves. There is then a feedback mechanism whereby enhanced normal stresses modify the dynamic surface. The net effect of this is that in the marine boundary layer, one can expect an enhancement of turbulent kinetic energy due to the enhancement of normal stresses at the expense of shear stresses. The constants in the Mellor-Yamada-Janjic planetary boundary layer scheme within the Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) model are changed to fit this principal. Simulations are then performed and compared with data (wind speed and turbulent kinetic energy) from the FINO1 platform in the North Sea. It is found that while predictions of the wind speed are barely changed, the magnitude of the tke error (RMS) is reduced by up to 50%. This is expected to be practically relevant for the estimation of blade fatigue of wind energy converters, where the tke is an important parameter in this assessment. It could also be relevant for pollution dispersion in marine boundary layers.

  15. New method for solving the bending problem of rectangular plates with mixed boundary conditions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liu Xin Min

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available A new method is used to solve the rectangular plate bending problem with mixed boundary conditions. The method overcomes the complicated derivation of the classical solution by Fourth-order differential problem into integrating question. Under uniform loading rectangular plate bending problem with one side fixed the opposite side half simply supported half fixed the other two sides free rectangular plate, one side simply supported the opposite side half simply supported half fixed the other two sides free rectangular plate is systematically solved. According to the actual boundary conditions of the rectangular plate, the corresponding characteristic equation can easily be set up. It is presented deflection curve equation and the numerical calculation. By compared the results of the equation to the finite element program, we are able to demonstrate the correctness of the method. So the method not only has certain theoretical value, but also can be directly applied to engineering practice.

  16. Kinematics to dynamics in the New Zealand plate-boundary zone

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lamb, S. H.

    2013-12-01

    New Zealand straddles the boundary between the Australian and Pacific plate, with a transition from subduction of Pacific oceanic lithosphere beneath North Island, to oblique continental collision in South Island. Cenozoic relative plate motion has resulted in a complex pattern of faulting and block rotation in a zone up to 250 km wide, with displacements on individual faults up to 100s of kilometres. Active deformation must be driven by a combination of plate-boundary forces and internal buoyancy forces. I use a compilation of seismic reflection/refraction studies and high quality receiver function analyses, together with simple Airy isostasy, to determine regional crustal and mantle structure. Integration of the vertical normal stress to the base of the deforming layer yields the buoyancy stress. Horizontal gradients of this can be compared with horizontal gradients of strain rate, using the method of England & Molnar (1997), in the context of a simple thin sheet model of deformation. Thus, if deformation is that of a Newtonian fluid, then appropriate combinations of the horizontal gradients of vorticity and dilatation are related to gradients of buoyancy stress by the fluid viscosity. However, the short term geodetic deformation is strongly biased by elastic strain accumulation related to locking on the plate interface, and cannot be used to determine the plate-boundary velocity field averaged over many seismic cycles (see Lamb & Smith 2013). Therefore, I derive here a velocity field for the plate-boundary zone, which is representative of deformation over tens of thousands of years. This is based on an inversion of fault slip, strain rate azimuth and paleomagnetic data, in the context of the short term relative plate motions, solved in a network of triangles spanning the plate-boundary, using the method of Lamb (2000). A comparison of gradients of buoyancy stress with the appropriate combinations of gradients of vorticity and dilatation shows that deformation in

  17. The Cause of the Republic Day Earthquake of India: Intraplate or Plate Boundary Process?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Q.

    2001-12-01

    The Mw 7.6 Republic Day (1/26/2001) earthquake of India killed at least 14,000 people and destroyed tens of thousands of homes. The cause of this earthquake and other historic earthquakes in the surrounding region, all thrust faults with roughly N-S compression, has been the subject of intensive debate. Some workers argued that this earthquake, located ~400 km from the plate boundary, is an intraplate event that may bear important implications for other intraplate earthquakes such as those in the New Madrid seismic zone. Others, however, recognize the diffuse plate boundary in western India and regard this earthquake as part of the plate boundary activity. We have developed a viscoelastic finite element model to address the question of why this and other historic earthquakes concentrated in this part of the India plate. The computer model includes relevant boundary conditions and first-order rheologic variations as indicated by geological and seismic data. We calculated the stresses within the India plate using displacement boundary conditions as indicated by the GPS data and compared the predicted stresses with the theoretical crustal strengths. Our results indicate that the change of plate boundary conditions (from transform fault along the Owen Fracture zone in the India ocean to continental thrusting and shearing along northwestern India) causes stress to accumulate in a broad zone near the junction of the Indian, the Arabian, and the Eurasian plates. Crustal weakening by diffuse seismicity along the northwestern Indian plate boundary may cause further inland migration of stress accumulation. With additional factors, including the contrasts of the crustal strength between the continental and oceanic Indian plate, the presence of the Kachchh rift zone, and the pronounced thinning of the lithosphere in this region as indicated by seismic tomography, the model predict an earthquake-prone belt extending hundreds of kilometers into the interior of the India plate

  18. Reorganization of convergent plate boundaries. Geologica Ultraiectina (340)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Baes, M.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/304824739

    2011-01-01

    It is still unclear where a subduction is initiated and what are the responsible mechanisms involved in subduction initiation process. Understanding of subduction initiation will advance our knowledge of how and when plate tectonics started on Earth. Another issue concerning the subduction process

  19. Linking mantle dynamics, plate tectonics and surface processes in the active plate boundary zones of eastern New Guinea (Invited)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baldwin, S.; Moucha, R.; Fitzgerald, P. G.; Hoke, G. D.; Bermudez, M. A.; Webb, L. E.; Braun, J.; Rowley, D. B.; Insel, N.; Abers, G. A.; Wallace, L. M.; Vervoort, J. D.

    2013-12-01

    Eastern New Guinea lies within the rapidly obliquely converging Australian (AUS)- Pacific (PAC) plate boundary zone and is characterized by transient plate boundaries, rapidly rotating microplates and a globally significant geoid high. As the AUS plate moved northward in the Cenozoic, its leading edge has been a zone of subduction and arc accretion. The variety of tectonic settings in this region permits assessment of the complex interplay among mantle dynamics, plate tectonics, and surface processes. Importantly, the timescale of tectonic events (e.g., subduction, (U)HP exhumation, seafloor spreading) are within the valid bounds of mantle convection models. A record of changes in bathymetry and topography are preserved in high standing mountain belts, exhumed extensional gneiss domes and core complexes, uplifted coral terraces, and marine sedimentary basins. Global seismic tomography models indicate accumulation of subducted slabs beneath eastern New Guinea at the bottom of the upper mantle (i.e., 250-300 km). Preliminary global-scale backward advected mantle convection models, driven by density inferred from joint seismic-geodynamic tomography models, exhibit large-scale flow associated with these subducted slab remnants and predict the timing and magnitude (up to 1500 m) of dynamic topography change (both subsidence and uplift) since the Oligocene. In this talk we will explore the effects of large-scale background mantle flow and plate tectonics on the evolution of topography and bathymetry in eastern New Guinea, and discuss possible mechanisms to explain basin subsidence and surface uplift in the region.

  20. Aerodynamic heating in gaps of thermal protection system tile arrays in laminar and turbulent boundary layers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Avery, D. E.

    1978-01-01

    An experimental heat-transfer investigation was conducted on two staggered arrays of metallic tiles in laminar and turbulent boundary layers. This investigation was conducted for two purposes. The impingement heating distribution where flow in a longitudinal gap intersects a transverse gap and impinges on a downstream blocking tile was defined. The influence of tile and gap geometries was analyzed to develop empirical relationships for impingement heating in laminar and turbulent boundary layers. Tests were conducted in a high temperature structures tunnel at a nominal Mach number of 7, a nominal total temperature of 1800 K, and free-stream unit Reynolds numbers from 1.0 x 10 million to 4.8 x 10 million per meter. The test results were used to assess the impingement heating effects produced by parameters that include gap width, longitudinal gap length, slope of the tile forward-facing wall, boundary-layer displacement thickness, Reynolds number, and local surface pressure.

  1. A high-order immersed boundary method for high-fidelity turbulent combustion simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Minamoto, Yuki; Aoki, Kozo; Osawa, Kosuke; Shi, Tuo; Prodan, Alexandru; Tanahashi, Mamoru

    2016-11-01

    Direct numerical simulations (DNS) have played important roles in the research of turbulent combustion. With the recent advancement in high-performance computing, DNS of slightly complicated configurations such as V-, various jet and swirl flames have been performed, and such DNS will further our understanding on the physics of turbulent combustion. Since these configurations include walls that do not necessarily conform with the preferred mesh coordinates for combustion DNS, most of these simulations use presumed profiles for inflow/near-wall flows as boundary conditions. A high-order immersed boundary method suited for parallel computation is one way to improve these simulations. The present research implements such a boundary technique in a combustion DNS code, and simulations are performed to confirm its accuracy and performance. This work was partly supported by Council for Science, Technology and Innovation, Cross-ministerial Strategic Innovation Promotion Program (SIP), "Innovative Combustion Technology" (Funding agency: JST).

  2. Analytical Solutions to the Fundamental Frequency of Arbitrary Laminated Plates under Various Boundary Conditions

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yingqin Luo; Ming Hong; Yuan Liu

    2015-01-01

    In recent years, as the composite laminated plates are widely used in engineering practice such as aerospace, marine and building engineering, the vibration problem of the composite laminated plates is becoming more and more important. Frequency, especially the fundamental frequency, has been considered as an important factor in vibration problem. In this paper, a calculation method of the fundamental frequency of arbitrary laminated plates under various boundary conditions is proposed. The vibration differential equation of the laminated plates is established at the beginning of this paper and the frequency formulae of specialty orthotropic laminated plates under various boundary conditions and antisymmetric angle-ply laminated plates with simply-supported edges are investigated. They are proved to be correct. Simple algorithm of the fundamental frequency for multilayer antisymmetric and arbitrary laminated plates under various boundary conditions is studied by a series of typical examples. From the perspective of coupling, when the number of laminated plates layersN > 8–10, some coupling influence on the fundamental frequency can be neglected. It is reasonable to use specialty orthotropic laminated plates with the same thickness but less layers to calculate the corresponding fundamental frequency of laminated plates. Several examples are conducted to prove correctness of this conclusion. At the end of this paper, the influence of the selected number of layers of specialty orthotropic laminates on the fundamental frequency is investigated. The accuracy and complexity are determined by the number of layers. It is necessary to use proper number of layers of special orthotropic laminates with the same thickness to simulate the fundamental frequency in different boundary conditions.

  3. Modeling Turbulence Generation in the Atmospheric Surface and Boundary Layers

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-10-01

    index. In the boundary layer, atmospheric temperature fluctuations are primarily responsible for the variations in refractive index at ultraviolet...parameterization of the atmospheric emissivity, in the early 1980s a parallel study of the SEB was conducted by the US Army Waterways Experiment Station...period of rotation of the atmosphere can be defined as TI = 2π/fc. At most mid- latitude locations this period is approximately 17 h. This quantity is

  4. A consistent turbulence formulation for the dynamic wake meandering model in the atmospheric boundary layer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Keck, R.-E.

    2013-07-15

    This thesis describes the further development and validation of the dynamic meandering wake model for simulating the flow field and power production of wind farms operating in the atmospheric boundary layer (ABL). The overall objective of the conducted research is to improve the modelling capability of the dynamics wake meandering model to a level where it is sufficiently mature to be applied in industrial applications and for an augmentation of the IEC-standard for wind turbine wake modelling. Based on a comparison of capabilities of the dynamic wake meandering model to the requirement of the wind industry, four areas were identified as high prioritizations for further research: 1. the turbulence distribution in a single wake. 2. multiple wake deficits and build-up of turbulence over a row of turbines. 3. the effect of the atmospheric boundary layer on wake turbulence and wake deficit evolution. 4. atmospheric stability effects on wake deficit evolution and meandering. The conducted research is to a large extent based on detailed wake investigations and reference data generated through computational fluid dynamics simulations, where the wind turbine rotor has been represented by an actuator line model. As a consequence, part of the research also targets the performance of the actuator line model when generating wind turbine wakes in the atmospheric boundary layer. Highlights of the conducted research: 1. A description is given for using the dynamic wake meandering model as a standalone flow-solver for the velocity and turbulence distribution, and power production in a wind farm. The performance of the standalone implementation is validated against field data, higher-order computational fluid dynamics models, as well as the most common engineering wake models in the wind industry. 2. The EllipSys3D actuator line model, including the synthetic methods used to model atmospheric boundary layer shear and turbulence, is verified for modelling the evolution of wind

  5. Anisotropy from SKS splitting across the Pacific-North America plate boundary offshore southern California

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramsay, Joseph; Kohler, Monica D.; Davis, Paul M.; Wang, Xinguo; Holt, William; Weeraratne, Dayanthie S.

    2016-10-01

    SKS arrivals from ocean bottom seismometer (OBS) data from an offshore southern California deployment are analysed for shear wave splitting. The project involved 34 OBSs deployed for 12 months in a region extending up to 500 km west of the coastline into the oceanic Pacific plate. The measurement process consisted of removing the effects of anisotropy using a range of values for splitting fast directions and delay times to minimize energy along the transverse seismometer axis. Computed splitting parameters are unexpectedly similar to onland parameters, exhibiting WSW-ENE fast polarization directions and delays between 0.8 and 1.8 s, even for oceanic plate sites. This is the first SKS splitting study to extend across the entire boundary between the North America and Pacific plates, into the oceanic part of the Pacific plate. The splitting results show that the fast direction of anisotropy on the Pacific plate does not align with absolute plate motion (APM), and they extend the trend of anisotropy in southern California an additional 500 km west, well onto the oceanic Pacific plate. We model the finite strain and anisotropy within the asthenosphere associated with density-buoyancy driven mantle flow and the effects of APM. In the absence of plate motion effects, such buoyancy driven mantle flow would be NE-directed beneath the Pacific plate observations. The best-fit patterns of mantle flow are inferred from the tomography-based models that show primary influences from foundering higher-density zones associated with the history of subduction beneath North America. The new offshore SKS measurements, when combined with measurements onshore within the plate boundary zone, indicate that dramatic lateral variations in density-driven upper-mantle flow are required from offshore California into the plate boundary zone in California and western Basin and Range.

  6. Turbulent boundary layer separation control using plasma actuator at Reynolds number 2000000

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhang Xin; Huang Yong; Wang Xunnian; Wang Wanbo; Tang Kun; Li Huaxing

    2016-01-01

    An experimental investigation was conducted to evaluate the effect of symmetrical plasma actuators on turbulent boundary layer separation control at high Reynolds number. Com-pared with the traditional control method of plasma actuator, the whole test model was made of aluminum and acted as a covered electrode of the symmetrical plasma actuator. The experimental study of plasma actuators’ effect on surrounding air, a canonical zero-pressure gradient turbulent boundary, was carried out using particle image velocimetry (PIV) and laser Doppler velocimetry (LDV) in the 0.75 m ? 0.75 m low speed wind tunnel to reveal the symmetrical plasma actuator characterization in an external flow. A half model of wing-body configuration was experimentally investigated in the £ 3.2 m low speed wind tunnel with a six-component strain gauge balance and PIV. The results show that the turbulent boundary layer separation of wing can be obviously sup-pressed and the maximum lift coefficient is improved at high Reynolds number with the symmetri-cal plasma actuator. It turns out that the maximum lift coefficient increased by approximately 8.98% and the stall angle of attack was delayed by approximately 2? at Reynolds number 2 ? 106. The effective mechanism for the turbulent separation control by the symmetrical plasma actuators is to induce the vortex near the wing surface which could create the relatively large-scale disturbance and promote momentum mixing between low speed flow and main flow regions.

  7. Turbulent kinetic energy generation in the convective boundary layer derived from thermodynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slameršak, Aljoša; Renner, Maik; Ganzeveld, Laurens; Hartogensis, Oscar; Kolle, Olaf; Kleidon, Axel

    2016-04-01

    Turbulent heat fluxes facilitate the bulk of heat transfer between the surface and lower atmosphere, which results in the diurnal growth of convective boundary layer (CBL) and turbulent kinetic energy generation (TKE). Here we postulate the hypothesis that TKE generation in the CBL occurs as a result of heat transfer in a "Carnot-like" heat engine with temporal changes in the internal energy of the boundary layer. We used the Tennekes energy-balance model of CBL and extended it with the analysis of the entropy balance to derive the estimates of TKE generation in the CBL. These TKE generation estimates were compared to the turbulent dissipation from a simple dissipation model from Moeng and Sullivan, to test the validity of our heat engine hypothesis. In addition, to evaluate the performance of the dissipation model, this was independently validated by a comparison of its estimates with the turbulent dissipation calculations based on spectral analysis of eddy covariance wind measurements at a German field station. Our analysis demonstrates how a consistent application of thermodynamics can be used to obtain an independent physical constraint on the diurnal boundary layer evolution. Furthermore, our analysis suggests that the CBL operates at the thermodynamic limit, thus imposing a thermodynamic constraint on surface-atmosphere exchange.

  8. Plate boundaries in the Woodlark Basin and Solomon Sea Region, Papua New Guinea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goodliffe, A. M.; Cameron, M.

    2009-12-01

    The Solomon Sea and Woodlark Basin region of eastern Papua New Guinea is a tectonically complex region between the obliquely converging Pacific and Australian plates. Despite numerous marine geophysical surveys in the region, the exact nature of the tectonic boundaries between the Solomon Sea and the Woodlark Basin remains controversial. Marine geophysical data collected in the last decade provides additional insight into this region and clearly defines the boundaries of the Solomon Sea, Trobriand, Woodlark, and Australian plates. Multibeam bathymetry data collected in 2004 along the Trobriand Trough, together with seismic profiles across the trough, show a prominent deformation front in the trench that defines the southern boundary of the Solomon Sea plate. Petrologic data from volcanoes to the south of this boundary indicate that they have a subduction affinity. Heat flow profiles to the south of the plate boundary show a clear subduction signature. At the eastern termination of the Trobriand Trough the plate boundary forms a triple junction with the NE-SW trending Nubaru strike-slip fault. To the NE this major fault separates the Solomon Sea plate from the Woodlark plate. The morphology of this fault and a CMT solution indicate that it is right-lateral. To the SW the Nubaru strike-slip fault passes to the south of the Trobriand Trough, forming the southern boundary of the Trobriand plate (with the Trobriand Trough as the northern boundary). Further west the trend of the strike slip fault becomes more ENE-WSW. A significant extension component is evident as the fault passes to the north of Egum Graben and meets the Woodlark Basin spreading system at the current rifting to seafloor spreading transition directly to the east of Moresby Seamount. The revised tectonic model for this region has important implications for tectonic reconstructions that include an active rifting to spreading transition and prominent core complexes. In the past, models have assumed a

  9. Numerical prediction of film cooling effectiveness over flat plate using variable turbulent prandtl number closures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ochrymiuk, Tomasz

    2016-06-01

    Numerical simulations were performed to predict the film cooling effectiveness on the fiat plate with a three- dimensional discrete-hole film cooling arrangement. The effects of basic geometrical characteristics of the holes, i.e. diameter D, length L and pitch S/D were studied. Different turbulent heat transfer models based on constant and variable turbulent Prandtl number approaches were considered. The variability of the turbulent Prandtl number Pr t in the energy equation was assumed using an algebraic relation proposed by Kays and Crawford, or employing the Abe, Kondoh and Nagano eddy heat diffusivity closure with two differential transport equations for the temperature variance k θ and its destruction rate ɛ θ . The obtained numerical results were directly compared with the data that came from an experiment based on Transient Liquid Crystal methodology. All implemented models for turbulent heat transfer performed sufficiently well for the considered case. It was confirmed, however, that the two- equation closure can give a detailed look into film cooling problems without using any time-consuming and inherently unsteady models.

  10. Estimation of turbulent energy dissipation in the boundary layer using Smoke Image Velocimetry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mikheev, N. I.; Goltsman, A. E.; Saushin, I. I.; Dushina, O. A.

    2017-08-01

    Turbulent energy dissipation in the turbulent boundary layer has been estimated experimentally. Dissipation has been derived from dynamics of two-component instantaneous velocity vector fields measured by an optical method. Smoke Image Velocimetry technique based on digital processing of smoke visualization of flow and adapted to relatively large smoke displacement between two consecutive video frames has been employed. The obtained dissipation profiles have been compared with measurements by multi-sensor hot-wire anemometers, stereo PIV, Tomo-3D-PTV with VIC+, and DNS results.

  11. A law of the wall for turbulent boundary layers with suction: Stevenson's formula revisited

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vigdorovich, Igor

    2016-08-01

    The turbulent velocity field in the viscous sublayer of the boundary layer with suction to a first approximation is homogeneous in any direction parallel to the wall and is determined by only three constant quantities — the wall shear stress, the suction velocity, and the fluid viscosity. This means that there exists a finite algebraic relation between the turbulent shear stress and the longitudinal mean-velocity gradient, using which as a closure condition for the equations of motion, we establish an exact asymptotic behavior of the velocity profile at the outer edge of the viscous sublayer. The obtained relationship provides a generalization of the logarithmic law to the case of wall suction.

  12. Calculation of Turbulent Boundary Layers Using the Dissipation Integral Method

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    MatthiasBuschmann

    1999-01-01

    This paper gives an introduction into the dissipation integral method.The general integral equations for the three-dimensional case are derved.It is found that for a practical calculation algorithm the integral monentum equation and the integral energy equation are msot useful.Using Two different sets of mean velocity profiles the hyperbolical character of a dissipation integral method is shown.Test cases for two-and three-dimensional boundary layers are analysed and discussed.The paper concludes with a discussion of the advantages and limits of dissipation integral methods.

  13. Turbulent transitions in the stable boundary layer: Couette and Poiseuille flow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holdsworth, Amber M.; Monahan, Adam H.

    2016-11-01

    The stable boundary layer (SBL) can be classified into two distinct regimes. The weakly stable regime (WSBL) which occurs in the presence of moderate to strong pressure gradients or cloudy skies and is characterized by continuous turbulent mixing, and the very stable regime (VSBL) which occurs in the presence of weak pressure gradients or clear skies and turbulence weakens to the point of collapse. Modelling and observational results indicate that transitions from the WSBL to the VSBL occur when the maximum sustainable heat flux (MSHF), or shear capacity, is exceeded. The collapse of turbulence in the SBL is investigated using a one dimensional model of Couette flow with a constant heat flux. We show that the MSHF framework for predicting turbulent collapse is qualitatively robust to the choice of turbulence parameterization and extend these earlier stability analyses by numerically determining the unstable modes along the unstable branch. To explore transitions between the VSBL and the WSBL we extend the model to include a horizontal pressure gradient and a surface radiation scheme. Analysis of the Poiseuille flow demonstrates how the idealized energy/momentum budget model with parameterized turbulence can reproduce the regime transitions present in atmospheric data. We acknowledge support from NSERC and the computing facilities of Westgrid and Compute Canada.

  14. Inflow conditions for spatial direct numerical simulation of turbulent boundary layers

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    The inflow conditions for spatial direct numerical simulation(SDNS) of turbulent boundary layers should reflect the characteristics of upstream turbulence,which is a puzzle. In this paper a new method is suggested,in which the flow field obtained by using temporal direct numerical simulation(TDNS) for fully developed turbulent flow(only flow field for a single moment is sufficient) can be used as the inflow of SDNS with a proper transformation. The calculation results confirm that this method is feasible and effective. It is also found that,under a proper time-space transformation,all statistics of the fully developed turbulence obtained by both temporal mode and spatial mode DNS are in excellent agreement with each other,not only qualitatively,but also quantitatively. The normal-wise distributions of mean flow profile,turbulent Mach number and the root mean square(RMS) of the fluctuations of various variables,as well as the Reynolds stresses of the fully developed turbulence obtained by using SDNS,bear similarity in nature.

  15. High Reynolds number rough-wall turbulent boundary layers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Squire, Dougal; Morrill-Winter, Caleb; Schultz, Michael; Hutchins, Nicholas; Klewicki, Joseph; Marusic, Ivan

    2015-11-01

    In his review of turbulent flows over rough-walls, Jimenez (2004) concludes that there are gaps in the current database of relevant experiments. The author calls for measurements in which δ / k and k+ are both large--low blockage, fully-rough flow--and where δ / k is large and k+ is small--low blockage, transitionally-rough flow--to help clarify ongoing questions regarding the physics of rough-wall-bounded flows. The present contribution details results from a large set of measurements carried out above sandpaper in the Melbourne Wind Tunnel. The campaign spans 45 rough-wall measurements using single and multiple-wire hot-wire anemometry sensors and particle image velocimetry. A floating element drag balance is employed to obtain the rough-wall skin friction force. The data span 20

  16. Rupture across arc segment and plate boundaries in the 1 April 2007 Solomons earthquake

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor, Frederick W.; Briggs, Richard W.; Frohlich, Cliff; Brown, Abel; Hornbach, Matt; Papabatu, Alison K.; Meltzner, Aron J.; Billy, Douglas

    2008-04-01

    The largest earthquakes are generated in subduction zones, and the earthquake rupture typically extends for hundreds of kilometres along a single subducting plate. These ruptures often begin or end at structural boundaries on the overriding plate that are associated with the subduction of prominent bathymetric features of the downgoing plate. Here, we determine uplift and subsidence along shorelines for the 1 April 2007 moment magnitude MW 8.1 earthquake in the western Solomon Islands, using coral microatolls which provide precise measurements of vertical motions in locations where instrumental data are unavailable. We demonstrate that the 2007 earthquake ruptured across the subducting Simbo ridge transform and thus broke through a triple junction where the Australian and Woodlark plates subduct beneath the overriding Pacific plate. Previously, no known major megathrust rupture has involved two subducting plates. We conclude that this event illustrates the uncertainties of predicting the segmentation of subduction zone rupture on the basis of structural discontinuities.

  17. Assessment of Turbulent Shock-Boundary Layer Interaction Computations Using the OVERFLOW Code

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oliver, A. B.; Lillard, R. P.; Schwing, A. M.; Blaisdell, G> A.; Lyrintzis, A. S.

    2007-01-01

    The performance of two popular turbulence models, the Spalart-Allmaras model and Menter s SST model, and one relatively new model, Olsen & Coakley s Lag model, are evaluated using the OVERFLOWcode. Turbulent shock-boundary layer interaction predictions are evaluated with three different experimental datasets: a series of 2D compression ramps at Mach 2.87, a series of 2D compression ramps at Mach 2.94, and an axisymmetric coneflare at Mach 11. The experimental datasets include flows with no separation, moderate separation, and significant separation, and use several different experimental measurement techniques (including laser doppler velocimetry (LDV), pitot-probe measurement, inclined hot-wire probe measurement, preston tube skin friction measurement, and surface pressure measurement). Additionally, the OVERFLOW solutions are compared to the solutions of a second CFD code, DPLR. The predictions for weak shock-boundary layer interactions are in reasonable agreement with the experimental data. For strong shock-boundary layer interactions, all of the turbulence models overpredict the separation size and fail to predict the correct skin friction recovery distribution. In most cases, surface pressure predictions show too much upstream influence, however including the tunnel side-wall boundary layers in the computation improves the separation predictions.

  18. DNS of self-similar adverse pressure gradient turbulent boundary layer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soria, Julio; Kitsios, Vassili; Sekimoto, Atsushi; Atkinson, Callum; Jiménez, Javier

    2016-11-01

    A direct numerical simulation (DNS) of a self-similar adverse pressure gradient (APG) turbulent boundary layer (TBL) at the verge of separation has been set-up and carried out. The DNS APG TBL has a displacement thickness based Reynolds number that ranges up to 30,000. The conditions for self-similarity and appropriate scaling will be highlighted, with the first and second order velocity statistical profiles non-dimensionalised using this scaling. The details of the DNS and the required boundary conditions that are necessary to establish this self-similar APG-TBL will be presented. The statistical properties of the self-similar adverse pressure gradient (APG) turbulent boundary layer (TBL) DNS will presented, as will the profiles of the terms in the momentum equation, spanwise/wall-normal kinetic energy spectrum and two-point correlations, which will be compared to those of a zero pressure gradient turbulent boundary layer. NCI and Pawsey SCC funded by the Australian and Western Australian governments as well as the support of PRACE funded by the European Union are gratefully acknowledged.

  19. Routes to turbulence in the rotating disk boundary-layer of a rotor-stator cavity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yim, Eunok; Serre, Eric; Martinand, Denis; Chomaz, Jean-Marc

    2016-11-01

    The rotating disk is an important classical problem, due to the similarities between the 3D boundary layers on a disk and a swept aircraft wing. It is nowadays admitted that a direct transition to turbulence may exist through a steep-fronted nonlinear global mode located at the boundary between the locally connectively and absolutely unstable regions (Pier 2003; Viaud et al. 2008, 2011; Imayama et al. 2014 and others). However, recent studies (Healey 2010; Harris et al. 2012; Imayama et al. 2013) suggest that there may be an alternative route starting at lower critical Reynolds number, based on convective travelling waves but this scenario is still not fully validated and proven. To better characterize such transition, direct numerical simulations are performed in a closed cylindrical rotor-stator cavity (without hub) up to Re = O (105) . All boundaries are no slip and for the stable region around the rotation axis prevents the disturbances coming from the very unstable stator boundary to disturb the rotor boundary layer. Different transition scenarii to turbulence are investigated when the rotor boundary layer is forced at different positions and forcing amplitude. The associated dynamics of coherent structures in various flow regions are also investigated when increasing Re .

  20. The Modelling of Particle Resuspension in a Turbulent Boundary Layer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Fan

    2011-10-20

    The work presented concerns the way small particles attached to a surface are resuspended when exposed to a turbulent flow. Of particular concern to this work is the remobilization of radioactive particles as a consequence of potential nuclear accidents. In this particular case the focus is on small particles, < 5 microns in diameter, where the principal force holding such particles onto a surface arises from van der Waals inter-molecular forces. Given its suitable treatment of the microphysics of small particles, it was decided here to aim to develop improved versions of the Rock'n'Roll (R'n'R) model; the R'n'R model is based on a statistical approach to resuspension involving the rocking and rolling of a particle about surface asperities induced by the moments of the fluctuating drag forces acting on the particle close to the surface. Firstly, a force (moment) balance model has been modified by including the distribution of the aerodynamic force instead of considering only its mean value. The R'n'R model is significantly improved by using realistic statistical fluctuations of both the stream-wise fluid velocity and acceleration close to the wall obtained from Large Eddy Simulation (LES) and Direct Numerical Simulation (DNS) of turbulent channel flow; in the standard model a major assumption is that these obey a Gaussian distribution. The flow conditions are translated into the moments of the drag force acting on the particle attached to the surface. In so doing the influence of highly non-Gaussian forces on the resuspension rate has been examined along with the sensitivity of the fluctuation statistics to LES and DNS. As a result of the analysis of our DNS/LES data 3 distinct features of the modified R'n'R model have emerged as playing an important part in the resuspension. The first is the typical forcing frequency due to the turbulent aerodynamic drag forces acting on the particle attached to a surface. The

  1. Large-eddy simulations of geophysical turbulent flows with applications to planetary boundary layer research

    CERN Document Server

    Esau, Igor

    2009-01-01

    The present study gives an overview and emphasizes principal moments of the applications of the turbulence-resolving modeling with large-eddy simulation (LES) numerical technique to planetary boundary layer (PBL) research and climate studies. LES proved to be very useful in understanding of the atmospheric and ocean turbulent exchange and ultimately in parameterization improvement in traditional meteorological models. LES have played a key role in recognizing the importance of previously ignored self-organized structures in the geophysical turbulence. LES assisted theoreticians and weather/climate modelers with reliable information about the averaged vertical structure of the PBL in convection and shear regimes as well as with better estimations of key PBL parameters, e.g. an entrainment rate, for model calibrations. At present, LES are an essential, indispensible part of geosciences, while the mainstream of the LES research still deals with idealized case studies with rather simple micro-physics.

  2. Spontaneous generation of inertial waves from boundary turbulence in a librating sphere

    CERN Document Server

    Sauret, Alban; Bars, Michael Le

    2013-01-01

    In this work, we report the excitation of inertial waves in a librating sphere even for libration frequencies where these waves are not directly forced. This spontaneous generation comes from the localized turbulence induced by the centrifugal instabilities in the Ekman boundary layer near the equator and does not depend on the libration frequency. We characterize the key features of these inertial waves in analogy with previous studies of the generation of internal waves in stratified flows from localized turbulent patterns. In particular, the temporal spectrum exhibits preferred values of excited frequency. This first-order phenomenon is generic to any rotating flow in the presence of localized turbulence and is fully relevant for planetary applications.

  3. Spatio-temporal mapping of plate boundary faults in California using geodetic imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donnellan, Andrea; Arrowsmith, Ramon; DeLong, Stephen B.

    2017-01-01

    The Pacific–North American plate boundary in California is composed of a 400-km-wide network of faults and zones of distributed deformation. Earthquakes, even large ones, can occur along individual or combinations of faults within the larger plate boundary system. While research often focuses on the primary and secondary faults, holistic study of the plate boundary is required to answer several fundamental questions. How do plate boundary motions partition across California faults? How do faults within the plate boundary interact during earthquakes? What fraction of strain accumulation is relieved aseismically and does this provide limits on fault rupture propagation? Geodetic imaging, broadly defined as measurement of crustal deformation and topography of the Earth’s surface, enables assessment of topographic characteristics and the spatio-temporal behavior of the Earth’s crust. We focus here on crustal deformation observed with continuous Global Positioning System (GPS) data and Interferometric Synthetic Aperture Radar (InSAR) from NASA’s airborne UAVSAR platform, and on high-resolution topography acquired from lidar and Structure from Motion (SfM) methods. Combined, these measurements are used to identify active structures, past ruptures, transient motions, and distribution of deformation. The observations inform estimates of the mechanical and geometric properties of faults. We discuss five areas in California as examples of different fault behavior, fault maturity and times within the earthquake cycle: the M6.0 2014 South Napa earthquake rupture, the San Jacinto fault, the creeping and locked Carrizo sections of the San Andreas fault, the Landers rupture in the Eastern California Shear Zone, and the convergence of the Eastern California Shear Zone and San Andreas fault in southern California. These examples indicate that distribution of crustal deformation can be measured using interferometric synthetic aperture radar (InSAR), Global Navigation

  4. Asymptotic analysis of the equations and boundary conditions of thermoelasticity of micropolar thin plates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vardanyan S. A.

    2007-09-01

    Full Text Available In the framework of the asymmetrical momental micropolar theory in the present work the boundary value problem of thermal stresses in a three-dimensional thin plate with independent fields of displacements and rotations is studied on the basis of asymptotic method. Depending on the values of physical dimensionless constants of the material three applied two-dimensional theories of thermoelasticity of micropolar thin plate are constructed (theories with independent rotations, with constrained rotations and with small shift rigidity.

  5. RESEARCH AND MATHEMATICAL MODELING OF TURBULENT BOUNDARY LAYER AT POSITIVE PRESSURE GRADIENT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vitaliy Mamchuk

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: Mathematical modeling of complex turbulent near-wall flows, that occur during the flow of airfoils, is impossible without understanding the nature of the flow in boundary layer. From a mathematical point of view, the calculation of such flows, because in practical problems they regarded as turbulent, and the characteristics of turbulence are largely dependent on the geometry of the profile of the longitudinal component of the average velocity of the near-wall flow. Based on this, the purpose of this work is studying and mathematical modeling of turbulent near-wall flows in the interaction with the real streamlined surface, that has certain features, such as the curvature, roughness, etc., as well as the study and research of the influence of the pressure gradient on the empirical coefficients, parameters of the flow, velocity profiles and friction stress. Methods: We performed the calculations using numerical finite-difference marching method with algebraic model of turbulent viscosity coefficient. Results: In this paper we present some results of the numerical study of the effect of the positive pressure gradient on the empirical coefficients of the transition zone and the law of the near-wall and the outer-wall areas. Discussion: Comparison of the calculated results with the experimental data shows that the proposed approaches provide an opportunity to simulate the flow as close as possible to their physical properties. Presented mathematical model for the calculation of turbulent boundary layers and near-wall flows makes it possible to calculate such a complex and valuable from a practical point of view type of the flow as the aerodynamic trail behind the streamlined body.

  6. Dynamic Stationary Response of Reinforced Plates by the Boundary Element Method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luiz Carlos Facundo Sanches

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available A direct version of the boundary element method (BEM is developed to model the stationary dynamic response of reinforced plate structures, such as reinforced panels in buildings, automobiles, and airplanes. The dynamic stationary fundamental solutions of thin plates and plane stress state are used to transform the governing partial differential equations into boundary integral equations (BIEs. Two sets of uncoupled BIEs are formulated, respectively, for the in-plane state (membrane and for the out-of-plane state (bending. These uncoupled systems are joined to form a macro-element, in which membrane and bending effects are present. The association of these macro-elements is able to simulate thin-walled structures, including reinforced plate structures. In the present formulation, the BIE is discretized by continuous and/or discontinuous linear elements. Four displacement integral equations are written for every boundary node. Modal data, that is, natural frequencies and the corresponding mode shapes of reinforced plates, are obtained from information contained in the frequency response functions (FRFs. A specific example is presented to illustrate the versatility of the proposed methodology. Different configurations of the reinforcements are used to simulate simply supported and clamped boundary conditions for the plate structures. The procedure is validated by comparison with results determined by the finite element method (FEM.

  7. A finite difference method for predicting supersonic turbulent boundary layer flows with tangential slot injection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miner, E. W.; Lewis, C. H.

    1972-01-01

    An implicit finite difference method has been applied to tangential slot injection into supersonic turbulent boundary layer flows. In addition, the effects induced by the interaction between the boundary layer displacement thickness and the external pressure field are considered. In the present method, three different eddy viscosity models have been used to specify the turbulent momentum exchange. One model depends on the species concentration profile and the species conservation equation has been included in the system of governing partial differential equations. Results are compared with experimental data at stream Mach numbers of 2.4 and 6.0 and with results of another finite difference method. Good agreement was generally obtained for the reduction of wall skin friction with slot injection and with experimental Mach number and pitot pressure profiles. Calculations with the effects of pressure interaction included showed these effects to be smaller than effects of changing eddy viscosity models.

  8. Interaction between a shock wave and a turbulent boundary layer in transonic flow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adamson, T. C., Jr.; Feo, A.

    1975-01-01

    Interaction between a shock wave and an unseparated turbulent boundary layer is considered. The method of matched asymptotic expansions is used, with solutions valid in the double limit as Reynolds number tends to infinity and Mach number tends to unity. The shock is weak enough that interaction effects can be considered as perturbations to the undisturbed flow; the case considered is that where the sonic line is near the outer edge of the boundary layer. It is shown that, with order estimates for Reynolds stress perturbations, the induced wall pressure distribution can be calculated using only the two outer interaction regions, independent of a specific closure condition and that this solution is in fact a turbulent free interaction solution. A detailed analysis of the inner regions, for which an eddy viscosity model for the Reynolds shear stress is used, provides a description of the variations in velocity, temperature and density near and at the wall.

  9. Experimental Study of Turbulent Boundary Layers on Groove/Smooth Flat Surfaces

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Hongwei MA; Qiao TIAN; Hui WU

    2005-01-01

    This paper presents an experimental investigation of the turbulent boundary layers on both groove and smooth flat surfaces. The flow structures were shown in a water tunnel using the hydrogen-bubble flow visualization technique. The measurement results indicate that: (1) the grooves can effectively reduce accumulation of low-speed fluids, decrease the number of the low-speed streaks and depress oscillation of the streaks in the sublayer; (2) the grooves can restrain forming of the horseshoe vortices in the buffer region; (3) the grooves bate oscillation and kinking of the quasi-streamwise vortices and restrain production of the hairpin vortices and the ring vortices, reducing both frequency and intensity of the turbulence bursting; (4) the grooves directly affect the flow structures in the sublayer of the boundary layer and then modulate the flow field up to the buffer region and the logarithmic region by restraining development and interaction of the vortices.

  10. Spectrum of turbulent-boundary-layer fluctuation pressure and response of a polyvinylidence fluoride hydrophone

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    GE Huiliang; HE Zuoyong; BAO Xuemei

    2001-01-01

    The point power spectrum density and the wavenumber frequency spectrum density of turbulent-boundary-layer fluctuation pressure were measured in water-tunnel by use of a φ8 mm hydrophone and a 20-element array, respectively. The non-dimensional representation of measured point power spectrum coincides with the measured results by Bull M. K. et. al. in wind tunnel. The convection peak can be seen clearly in the measured wavenumber frequencyspectrum and the convection velocity can be calculated from the location of the convection peak.The response spectrum of a polyvinylidence fluoride (PVDF) hydrophone, which receiving area is 100 mm × 60 mm, was also measured. By comparing it with the response spectrum of the φ8 mm hydrophone, it is shown that the PVDF hyrdophone has a strong wavenumber filtering effect on turbulent-boundary-layer pressure fluctuation.

  11. On the Coupling Between a Supersonic Turbulent Boundary Layer and a Flexible Structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frendi, Abdelkader

    1996-01-01

    A mathematical model and a computer code have been developed to fully couple the vibration of an aircraft fuselage panel to the surrounding flow field, turbulent boundary layer and acoustic fluid. The turbulent boundary layer model is derived using a triple decomposition of the flow variables and applying a conditional averaging to the resulting equations. Linearized panel and acoustic equations are used. Results from this model are in good agreement with existing experimental and numerical data. It is shown that in the supersonic regime, full coupling of the flexible panel leads to lower response and radiation from the panel. This is believed to be due to an increase in acoustic damping on the panel in this regime. Increasing the Mach number increases the acoustic damping, which is in agreement with earlier work.

  12. Modeling of the thermal boundary layer in turbulent Rayleigh-Bénard convection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Emran, Mohammad; Shishkina, Olga

    2016-11-01

    We report modeling of the thermal boundary layer in turbulent Rayleigh-Bénard convection (RBC), which incorporates the effect of turbulent fluctuations. The study is based on the thermal boundary layer equation from Shishkina et al., and new Direct Numerical Simulations (DNS) of RBC in a cylindrical cell of the aspect ratio 1, for the Prandtl number variation of several orders of magnitude. Our modeled temperature profiles are found to agree with the DNS much better than those obtained with the classical Prandtl-Blasius or Falkner-Skan approaches. The work is supported by the Deutsche Forschungsgemeinschaft (DFG) under the Grant Sh405/4 - Heisenberg fellowship and SFB963, Project A06.

  13. Wavelets, turbulence, and boundary value problems for partial differential equations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weiss, John E.

    1995-04-01

    In this paper the qualitative properties of an inviscid, incompressible two-dimensional fluid are examined by numerical methods based on the compactly supported wavelets (the wavelet- Galerkin method). In particular, we examine the behavior of the spatial gradients of the vorticity. The growth of these gradients is related to the transfer of enstrophy (integral of squared vorticity) to the small-scales of the fluid motion. Implicit time differencing and wavelet-Galerkin space discretization allow a direct investigation of the long time behavior of the inviscid fluid. The effects of hyperviscosity on the long time limit are examined. To solve boundary problems we developed a new numerical method for the solution of partial differential equations in nonseparable domains. The method uses a wavelet-Galerkin solver with a nontrivial adaptation of the standard capacitance matrix method. The numerical solutions exhibit spectral convergence with regard to the order of the compactly supported, Daubechies wavelet basis. Furthermore, the rate of convergence is found to be independent of the geometry. We solve the Helmholtz equation since, for the indefinite case, the solutions have qualitative properties that well illustrate the applications of our method.

  14. Drag reduction by means of dimpled surfaces in turbulent boundary layers

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Nesselrooij, M.; Veldhuis, L. L. M.; van Oudheusden, B. W.; Schrijer, F. F. J.

    2016-09-01

    Direct force measurements and particle image velocimetry (PIV) were used to investigate the drag and flow structure caused by surfaces with patterns of shallow spherical dimples with rounded edges subject to turbulent boundary layers. Drag reduction of up to 4 % is found compared to a flat surface. The largest drag reduction was found at the highest tested Reynolds number of 40,000 (based on dimple diameter). A favorable trend promises further improvements at higher Reynolds numbers. PIV revealed the absence of significant separation inside the dimples but did show the existence of a converging/diverging flow in the upstream and downstream dimple half, respectively. This leads to the rejection of theories proposed by other authors concerning the mechanism responsible for drag reduction. Instead, a fundamental dependence on pattern orientation is observed. Furthermore, preliminary Reynolds-averaged Navier-Stokes (RANS) simulations have been compared with the PIV data. Although the large-scale mean flows show good agreement, the numerical simulation predicts no drag reduction. As the RANS approach is inherently incapable of resolving effects on the behavior of small-scale turbulence structure, the origin of drag reduction is attributed to effects on the small-scale turbulence, which is not resolved in the simulations. It is argued that dimples, when placed in well-designed patterns to create the necessary large-scale flow structure, lead to drag reduction by affecting the turbulent structures in the boundary layer, possibly in a way similar to spanwise oscillations of the wall.

  15. RANS-based simulation of turbulent wave boundary layer and sheet-flow sediment transport processes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fuhrman, David R.; Schløer, Signe; Sterner, Johanna

    2013-01-01

    suspended sediment concentrations, (2) turbulence suppression due to density gradients in the water–sand mixture, (3) boundary layer streaming due to convective terms, and (4) converging–diverging effects due to a sloping bed. The present model therefore provides a framework for simultaneous inclusion...... of a number of local factors important within cross-shore wave boundary layer and sediment transport dynamics. The hydrodynamic model is validated for both hydraulically smooth and rough conditions, based on wave friction factor diagrams and boundary layer streaming profiles, with the results in excellent...... to investigate the importance of boundary layer streaming effects on sediment transport in selected velocity-skewed conditions. For the medium sand grain conditions considered, the model results suggest that streaming effects can enhance onshore sediment transport rates by asmuch as a factor of two...

  16. An extension of the transpired skin-friction equation to compressible turbulent boundary layers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silva-Freire, Atila P.

    1988-11-01

    A skin-friction equation for transpired incompressible turbulent boundary layer, proposed in a previous paper (Silva-Freire, 1988), is extended to compressible flow. The expression derived here is simple and gives more consistent results than the momentum-integral equation. The difficulty with the present formulation, however, is that the wake profile parameter due to injection has to be carefully determined in order to obtain good results.

  17. Drag of a turbulent boundary layer with transverse 2D circular rods on the wall

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamruzzaman, Md; Djenidi, L.; Antonia, R. A.; Talluru, K. M.

    2015-06-01

    In this paper, we present the results of a turbulent boundary layer developing over a rod-roughened wall with a spacing of ( is the spacing between two adjacent roughness elements, and is the rod diameter). Static pressure measurements are taken around a single roughness element to accurately determine the friction velocity, and the error in the origin, , which are the two prominent issues that surround rough-wall boundary layers. In addition, velocity measurements are taken at several streamwise locations using hot-wire anemometry to obtain from the momentum integral equation. Results showed that both methods give consistent values for , indicating that the contribution of the viscous drag over this rough wall is negligible. This supports the results of Perry et al. (J Fluid Mech 177:437-466, 1969) and Antonia and Luxton (J Fluid Mech 48(04):721-761, 1971) in a boundary layer and of Leonardi et al. (2003) in a channel flow but does not agree with those of Furuya et al. (J Fluids Eng 98(4):635-643, 1976). The results show that both and can be unambiguously measured on this particular rough wall. This paves the way for a proper comparison between the boundary layer developing over this wall and the smooth-wall turbulent boundary layer.

  18. Direct Numerical Simulation of Zero-Pressure Gradient and Sink Flow Turbulent Boundary Layers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramesh, O.; Patwardhan, Saurabh

    2010-11-01

    Direct Numerical Simulations have been performed for the zero pressure gradient (ZPG) (600 < Reθ< 900) and for the sink flow turbulent boundary layers (K = 7.71x10-7). A finite difference code on Cartesian grid was used to perform the simulations. Inflow generation method developed by Lund et al. was used to generate inflow boundary condition for the ZPG case. This method was slightly modified for the case of sink flow in view of self-similarity it possesses in the inner co-ordinates. Hence, there was no need to use empirical relations for the calculation of inlet θ or δ and rescaling in outer co-ordinates. The average statistics obtained from the simulations are in close agreement with the experimental as well as DNS data available in the literature. The intermittency distribution in the case of sink flow approaches zero inside the boundary layer (y = 0.8δ), an observation which is also confirmed by the experiments. This effect could be due to the acceleration near the boundary layer edge which suppresses the turbulent fluctuations near the boundary layer edge.

  19. A Laboratory Study of the Turbulent Velocity Characteristics in the Convective Boundary Layer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2005-01-01

    Based on the measurement of the velocity field in the convective boundary layer (CBL) in a convection water tank with the particle image velocimetry (PIV) technique, this paper studies the characteristics of the CBL turbulent velocity in a modified convection tank. The experiment results show that the velocity distribution in the mixed layer clearly possesses the characteristics of the CBL thermals, and the turbulent eddies can be seen obviously. The comparison of the vertical distribution of the turbulent velocity variables indicates that the modeling in the new tank is better than in the old one. The experiment data show that the thermal's motion in the entrainment zone sometimes fluctuates obviously due to the intermittence of turbulence. Analyses show that this fluctuation can influence the agreement of the measurement data with the parameterization scheme, in which the convective Richardson number is used to characterize the entrainment zone depth. The normalized square velocity w2i/w2* at the top of the mixed layer seems to be time-dependent, and has a decreasing trend during the experiments. This implies that the vertical turbulent velocity at the top of the mixed layer may not be proportional to the convective velocity (w*).

  20. Turbulent boundary layer heat transfer experiments - A separate effects study on a convexly-curved wall

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simon, T. W.; Moffat, R. J.

    1981-01-01

    Surface heat transfer rates have been measured for several different flows on an isothermal, convexly curved surface. The freestream velocity, boundary layer thickness, acceleration parameter, and unheated starting length were varied systematically, and both turbulent and transitional boundary layers were studied. The effect of convex curvature on heat transfer rates is significant with Stanton numbers reduced 20-25% below flat wall values for the same enthalpy thickness Reynolds number. Heat transfer rates recovered slowly on a flat wall downstream of the curved wall, and after 60 cm, the Stanton numbers were still 15-20% below flat wall values. The behavior of the boundary layer suggests the existence of an asymptotic condition. Boundary layer thickness, freestream velocity, and boundary layer maturity affect the initial response to the introduction of curvature and the rate at which the asymptotic state is approached. Convex curvature appears to increase the boundary layer's sensitivity to acceleration; it also delays and retards transition. Near-laminar or early-transitional boundary layers recover from curvature rapidly, whereas late-transitional and mature boundary layers recover slowly.

  1. INTERACTIVE STUDY BETWEEN IDENTICAL COHERENT STRUCTURES IN THE WALL REGION OF A TURBULENT BOUNDARY LAYER

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2002-01-01

    A theoretical model for identical coherent structures in the wall region of a turbulent boundary layer was proposed, using the idea of general resonant triad of the hydrodynamic stability. The evolution of the structures in the wall region of a turbulent boundary layer was studied by combining the compact finite differences of high numerical accuracy and the Fourier spectral hybrid method for solving the three dimensional Navier-Stokes equations. In this method, the third order mixed explicit-implicit scheme was applied for the time integration. The fifth-order upwind compact finite difference schemes for the nonlinear convection terms in the physical space, and the sixth-order center compact schemes for the derivatives in spectral space were introduced, respectively. The fourth-order compact schemes satisfied by the velocities and pressure in spectral space was derived. As an application, the method was implemented to the wall region of a turbulent boundary to study the evolution of identical coherent structures. It is found that the numerical results are satisfactory.

  2. Turbulent boundary layer control through spanwise wall oscillation using Kagome lattice structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bird, James; Santer, Matthew; Morrison, Jonathan

    2015-11-01

    It is well established that a reduction in skin-friction and turbulence intensity can be achieved by applying in-plane spanwise forcing to a surface beneath a turbulent boundary layer. It has also been shown in DNS (M. Quadrio, P. Ricco, & C. Viotti; J. Fluid Mech; 627, 161, 2009), that this phenomenon is significantly enhanced when the forcing takes the form of a streamwise travelling wave of spanwise perturbation. In the present work, this type of forcing is generated by an active surface comprising a compliant structure, based on a Kagome lattice geometry, supporting a membrane skin. The structural design ensures negligible wall normal displacement while facilitating large in-plane velocities. The surface is driven pneumatically, achieving displacements of 3 mm approximately, at frequencies in excess of 70 Hz for a turbulent boundary layer at Reτ ~ 1000 . As the influence of this forcing on boundary layer is highly dependent on the wavenumber and frequency of the travelling wave, a flat surface was designed and optimised to allow these forcing parameters to be varied, without reconfiguration of the experiment. Simultaneous measurements of the fluid and surface motion are presented, and notable skin-friction drag reduction is demonstrated. Airbus support agreement IW202838 is gratefully acknowledged.

  3. An experimental investigation of the supersonic turbulent boundary layer subjected to concave curvature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Qian-cheng; Wang, Zhen-guo; Zhao, Yu-xin

    2016-09-01

    By employing particle image velocimetry, the response of a Mach 2.95 turbulent boundary layer to the concave curvature is experimentally investigated. The radius of the concave wall is 350 mm, and the turning angle is 20∘. Logarithmic law is well preserved in the profile of streamwise velocity at all streamwise positions despite the impact of curvature. The varying trend of principal strain rate is found to be different at different heights within the boundary layer, which cannot be explained by the suggestion given by former researchers. Based on the three-layer model proposed in this paper, distribution of the principal strain rate is carefully analyzed. The streamwise increase of wall friction is suggested to be brought by the increase of velocity gradient in the thin subsonic layer. Increases of the static temperature and the related sound speed are responsible for that. Larger correlated turbulent motions could be introduced by the concave curvature. The probability density histograms of streamwise velocity reveal that the large scale hairpin packets are statistically well organized. The concave curvature is found to have the potential of reinforcing the organization, which explains the increase of turbulent level in the supersonic concave boundary layer.

  4. Lithospheric deformation in the Africa-Iberia plate boundary: Improved neotectonic modeling testing a basal-driven Alboran plate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neres, M.; Carafa, M. M. C.; Fernandes, R. M. S.; Matias, L.; Duarte, J. C.; Barba, S.; Terrinha, P.

    2016-09-01

    We present an improved neotectonic numerical model of the complex NW Africa-SW Eurasia plate boundary segment that runs from west to east along the Gloria Fault up to the northern Algerian margin. We model the surface velocity field and the ongoing lithospheric deformation using the most recent version of the thin-shell code SHELLS and updated lithospheric model and fault map of the region. To check the presence versus the absence of an independently driven Alboran domain, we develop two alternative plate models: one does not include an Alboran plate; another includes it and determines the basal shear tractions necessary to drive it with known velocities. We also compare two alternative sets of Africa-Eurasia velocity boundary conditions, corresponding to geodetic and geological-scale averages of plate motion. Finally, we perform an extensive parametric study of fault friction coefficient, trench resistance, and velocities imposed in Alboran nodes. The final run comprises 5240 experiments, each scored to geodetic velocities (estimated for 250 stations and here provided), stress direction data, and seismic strain rates. The model with the least discrepancy to the data includes the Alboran plate driven by a basal WSW directed shear traction, slightly oblique to the westward direction of Alboran motion. We provide estimates of long-term strain rates and slip rates for the modeled faults, which can be useful for further hazard studies. Our results support that a mechanism additional to the Africa-Eurasia convergence is required to drive the Alboran domain, which can be related to subduction processes occurring within the mantle.

  5. High Frequency Measurements in Shock-Wave/Turbulent Boundary-Layer Interaction at Duplicated Flight Conditions Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Large amplitude, unsteady heating loads and steep flow gradients produced in regions of shock-wave/turbulent boundary-layer interaction (SWTBLI) pose a serious and...

  6. High Frequency Measurements in Shock-Wave/Turbulent Boundary-Layer Interaction at Duplicated Flight Conditions Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Large amplitude, unsteady heating loads and steep flow gradients produced in regions of shock-wave/turbulent boundary-layer interaction (SWTBLI) pose a serious and...

  7. Geodynamic Evolution of the Nubia-Arabia-Somalia Plate Boundary System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reilinger, R. E.; McClusky, S.; Vernant, P.; Ogubazghi, G.; Fisseha, S.; Arrajehi, A.; Bendick, R. O.; Sholan, J.

    2009-12-01

    We present a geodynamic scenario for the evolution of the Nubia (Nu)-Arabia (Ar)-Somalia (So) plate boundary system that is based on new geodetic constraints on the kinematics of active deformation, and published estimates of the timing of regional tectonic processes. This scenario supports two, long debated, principal hypotheses for plate dynamics, 1) plate motions are driven primarily by sinking of oceanic lithosphere at subduction zones, and 2) the lithosphere is strong in relation to plate boundaries and drag forces on the base of the lithosphere (and likely, resisting forces associate with continental collision). 1) During the Late Oligocene (~30 Ma), domal uplift of the Afar region due to the Afar hot spot caused regional extension and the initial development of the Afar Triple Junction (TJ) along pre-existing zones of weakness; 2) The So-Nu plate boundary, East African Rift (EAR), developed at a slow rate due to the absence of boundary-normal extensional stresses (i.e., no subduction “pulling” the So Plate), slow motion that continues to the present; 3) Larger extensional stresses across the Nu-Ar and Ar-So boundaries (Red Sea and Gulf of Aden) due to active subduction of the Neotethys ocean lithosphere beneath Eu caused more rapid extension of these early rifts, with full scale continental rifting beginning ~ 25-30 Ma; 4) Between 16 - 11 Ma full ocean rifting in the Gulf of Aden caused a decrease in the forces transmitted to the So and Nu plates, causing slowing of the Nu and So plates with respect to Eu and Ar, and (possibly) an additional component of N-S oriented extension across the Red Sea; 5) Around this time (~10 Ma), activity shifted from the Gulf of Suez to the DSF system in the N Red Sea, and the Danakil Block in the southern Red Sea began rotating with respect to Nu and Ar, both changes related to the change in Nu-Ar relative motion; and 6) The balance of forces on the plate system have remained roughly unchanged since ~10 Ma, as have

  8. Extension of Golay's plate height equation from laminar to turbulent flow I - Theory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gritti, Fabrice

    2017-04-07

    The reduced plate height (RPH) equation of Golay derived in 1958 for open tubular columns (OTC) is extended from laminar to turbulent-like flow. The mass balance equation is solved under near-equilibrium conditions in the mobile phase for changing shapes of the velocity profile across the OTC diameter. The final expression of the general RPH equation is: [Formula: see text] where ν is the reduced linear velocity, k is the retention factor, Dm is the bulk diffusion coefficient in the mobile phase, Da¯ is the average axial dispersion coefficient, Dr¯ is the average radial dispersion coefficient, Ds is the diffusion coefficient of the analyte in the stationary film of thickness df, D is the OTC inner diameter, and n≥2 is a positive number controlling the shape of the flow profile (polynomial of degree n). The correctness of the derived RPH equation is verified for Poiseuille (n=2), turburlent-like (n=10), and uniformly flat (n→∞) flow profiles. The derived RPH equation is applied to predict the gain in speed-resolution of a 180μm i.d.×20m OTC (df=2μm) from laminar to turbulent flow in supercritical fluid chromatography. Using pure carbon dioxide as the mobile phase at 297K, k=1, and increasing the Reynolds number from 2000 (laminar) to 4000 (turbulent), the OTC efficiency is expected to increase from 125 to 670 (×5.4) while the hold-up time decreases from 19 to 9s (×0.5). Despite the stronger resistance to mass transfer in the stationary phase, the projected improvement of the column performance in turbulent flow is explained by the quasi-elimination of the resistance to mass transfer in the mobile phase while axial dispersion remains negligible. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. An experimental investigation of heat transfer to reusable surface insulation tile array gaps in a turbulent boundary layer with pressure gradient. M.S. Thesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Throckmorton, D. A.

    1975-01-01

    An experimental investigation was performed to determine the effect of pressure gradient on the heat transfer to space shuttle reusable surface insulation (RSI) tile array gaps under thick, turbulent boundary layer conditions. Heat transfer and pressure measurements were obtained on a curved array of full-scale simulated RSI tiles in a tunnel wall boundary layer at a nominal freestream Mach number of 10.3 and freestream unit Reynolds numbers of 1.6, 3.3, and and 6.1 million per meter. Transverse pressure gradients were induced over the model surface by rotating the curved array with respect to the flow. Definition of the tunnel wall boundary layer flow was obtained by measurement of boundary layer pitot pressure profiles, and flat plate wall pressure and heat transfer. Flat plate wall heat transfer data were correlated and a method was derived for prediction of smooth, curved array heat transfer in the highly three-dimensional tunnel wall boundary layer flow and simulation of full-scale space shuttle vehicle pressure gradient levels was assessed.

  10. Evaluation of the hydrodynamic behaviour of turbulence promoters in parallel plate electrochemical reactors by means of the dispersion model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Colli, A.N. [Programa de Electroquimica Aplicada e Ingenieria Electroquimica (PRELINE), Facultad de Ingenieria Quimica, Universidad Nacional del Litoral, Santiago del Estero 2829, S3000AOM Santa Fe (Argentina); Bisang, J.M., E-mail: jbisang@fiq.unl.edu.ar [Programa de Electroquimica Aplicada e Ingenieria Electroquimica (PRELINE), Facultad de Ingenieria Quimica, Universidad Nacional del Litoral, Santiago del Estero 2829, S3000AOM Santa Fe (Argentina)

    2011-08-30

    Highlights: {center_dot} The type of turbulence promoters has a strong influence on the hydrodynamics. {center_dot} The dispersion model is appropriate for expanded plastic turbulence promoters. {center_dot} The dispersion model is appropriate for glass beads turbulence promoters. - Abstract: The hydrodynamic behaviour of electrochemical reactors with parallel plate electrodes is experimentally studied using the stimulus-response method either with an empty reactor or with different turbulence promoters. Theoretical results which are in accordance with the analytical and numerical resolution of the dispersion model for a closed system are compared with the classical relationships of the normalized outlet concentration for open systems and the validity range of the equations is discussed. The experimental results were well correlated with the dispersion model using glass beads or expanded plastic meshes as turbulence promoters, which have shown the most advantageous performance. The Peclet number was higher than 63. The dispersion coefficient was found to increase linearly with flow velocity in these cases.

  11. Spatio-temporal characteristics of large scale motions in a turbulent boundary layer from direct wall shear stress measurement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pabon, Rommel; Barnard, Casey; Ukeiley, Lawrence; Sheplak, Mark

    2016-11-01

    Particle image velocimetry (PIV) and fluctuating wall shear stress experiments were performed on a flat plate turbulent boundary layer (TBL) under zero pressure gradient conditions. The fluctuating wall shear stress was measured using a microelectromechanical 1mm × 1mm floating element capacitive shear stress sensor (CSSS) developed at the University of Florida. The experiments elucidated the imprint of the organized motions in a TBL on the wall shear stress through its direct measurement. Spatial autocorrelation of the streamwise velocity from the PIV snapshots revealed large scale motions that scale on the order of boundary layer thickness. However, the captured inclination angle was lower than that determined using the classic method by means of wall shear stress and hot-wire anemometry (HWA) temporal cross-correlations and a frozen field hypothesis using a convection velocity. The current study suggests the large size of these motions begins to degrade the applicability of the frozen field hypothesis for the time resolved HWA experiments. The simultaneous PIV and CSSS measurements are also used for spatial reconstruction of the velocity field during conditionally sampled intense wall shear stress events. This material is based upon work supported by the National Science Foundation Graduate Research Fellowship under Grant No. DGE-1315138.

  12. Analysis of Blasius Equation for Flat-Plate Flow with Infinite Boundary Value

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Miansari, M. O.; Miansari, M. E.; Barari, Amin;

    2010-01-01

    This paper applies the homotopy perturbation method (HPM) to determine the well-known Blasius equation with infinite boundary value for Flat-plate Flow. We study here the possibility of reducing the momentum and continuity equations to ordinary differential equations by a similarity transformatio...

  13. What drives microplate motion and deformation in the northeastern Caribbean plate boundary region?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Benthem, S.A.C.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/304833657; Govers, R.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/108173836; Wortel, R.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/068439202

    2014-01-01

    The north Caribbean plate boundary zone is a broad deformation zone with several fault systems and tectonic blocks that move with different velocities. The indentation by the Bahamas Platform (the “Bahamas Collision”) is generally invoked as a cause of this fragmentation. We propose that a second

  14. Exact controllability of the Euler-Bernoulli plate with variable coefficients and simply supported boundary condition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fengyan Yang

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available This article studies the exact controllability of an Euler-Bernoulli plate equation with variable coefficients, subject to the simply supported boundary condition. By the Riemannian geometry approach, the duality method, the multiplier technique, and the compactness-uniqueness argument, we establish the corresponding observability inequality and obtain the exact controllability results.

  15. AN EFFECTIVE BOUNDARY ELEMENT METHOD FOR ANALYSIS OF CRACK PROBLEMS IN A PLANE ELASTIC PLATE

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YAN Xiang-qiao

    2005-01-01

    A simple and effective boundary element method for stress intensity factor calculation for crack problems in a plane elastic plate is presented. The boundary element method consists of the constant displacement discontinuity element presented by Crouch and Starfield and the crack-tip displacement discontinuity elements proposed by YAN Xiangqiao. In the boundary element implementation the left or the right crack-tip displacement discontinuity element was placed locally at the corresponding left or right each crack tip on top of the constant displacement discontinuity elements that cover the entire crack surface and the other boundaries. Test examples ( i. e. , a center crack in an infinite plate under tension, a circular hole and a crack in an infinite plate under tension) are included to illustrate that the numerical approach is very simple and accurate for stress intensity factor calculation of plane elasticity crack problems. In addition, specifically, the stress intensity factors of branching cracks emanating from a square hole in a rectangular plate under biaxial loads were analysed. These numerical results indicate the present numerical approach is very effective for calculating stress intensity factors of complex cracks in a 2-D finite body, and are used to reveal the effect of the biaxial loads and the cracked body geometry on stress intensity factors.

  16. What drives microplate motion and deformation in the northeastern Caribbean plate boundary region?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Benthem, S.A.C.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/304833657; Govers, R.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/108173836; Wortel, R.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/068439202

    2014-01-01

    The north Caribbean plate boundary zone is a broad deformation zone with several fault systems and tectonic blocks that move with different velocities. The indentation by the Bahamas Platform (the “Bahamas Collision”) is generally invoked as a cause of this fragmentation. We propose that a second dr

  17. Turbulent boundary layer separation control using plasma actuator at Reynolds number 2000000

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhang Xin

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available An experimental investigation was conducted to evaluate the effect of symmetrical plasma actuators on turbulent boundary layer separation control at high Reynolds number. Compared with the traditional control method of plasma actuator, the whole test model was made of aluminum and acted as a covered electrode of the symmetrical plasma actuator. The experimental study of plasma actuators’ effect on surrounding air, a canonical zero-pressure gradient turbulent boundary, was carried out using particle image velocimetry (PIV and laser Doppler velocimetry (LDV in the 0.75 m × 0.75 m low speed wind tunnel to reveal the symmetrical plasma actuator characterization in an external flow. A half model of wing-body configuration was experimentally investigated in the ∅ 3.2 m low speed wind tunnel with a six-component strain gauge balance and PIV. The results show that the turbulent boundary layer separation of wing can be obviously suppressed and the maximum lift coefficient is improved at high Reynolds number with the symmetrical plasma actuator. It turns out that the maximum lift coefficient increased by approximately 8.98% and the stall angle of attack was delayed by approximately 2° at Reynolds number 2 × 106. The effective mechanism for the turbulent separation control by the symmetrical plasma actuators is to induce the vortex near the wing surface which could create the relatively large-scale disturbance and promote momentum mixing between low speed flow and main flow regions.

  18. Influence of large-eddy breakup device on near-wall turbulent structures in turbulent boundary layer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Joon-Seok; Hwang, Jinyul; Yoon, Min; Ahn, Junsun; Sung, Hyung Jin; Flow Control Lab Team

    2016-11-01

    Direct numerical simulation of a large-eddy breakup (LEBU) device in a spatially developing turbulent boundary layer was performed to investigate the influence of outer structures on the near-wall turbulence. The thin and rectangular shaped LEBU device was placed on y / δ = 0 . 8 and the device reduced the skin-friction coefficient (Cf) up to 17%. Decomposition of Cf showed that the contribution of the Reynolds shear stress decreased along the wall-normal direction. The reduction of the Reynolds shear stress was associated with the decrease of the ejection and sweep events, and in particular the latter was significantly reduced compared to the former in the near-wall region. The spanwise length scale of high-speed structures was more shortened than that of low-speed very near the wall (y+ = 20). As a result, the dispersive motions induced by the outer sweeps were weakened leading to the reduction of Cf even the LEBU device located far from the wall. This work was supported by the Creative Research Initiatives (No. 2016-004749) program of the National Research Foundation of Korea (MSIP).

  19. Scientific Advances from Paul Silver's Inspirational Leadership of the EarthScope Plate Boundary Observatory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, M. M.; Calais, E.; Jackson, M. E.; Owen, S. E.; Segall, P.

    2009-12-01

    While major scientific endeavors and advances rely on the work and dedication of many, they are often made possible thanks to the passion and clear vision articulated by one or two leading scientists. Paul Silver was that leading visionary for EarthScope’s Plate Boundary Observatory. Paul Silver understood early on that the synergy of seismic and geodetic observations contained fundamental information on the coupled lithosphere-mantle system, the key to cracking the dynamics that underlies plate tectonics and continental deformation. This became a central theme of the Earthscope initiative, and Paul, a seismologist by training, became a tireless advocate for geodesy at all stages of the project - and for instrumentation over the broadest possible temporal bandwidth, from GPS geodesy to strainmeters. The presentation, given on behalf of UNAVCO and the UNAVCO community, will review and honor Paul's contributions to UNAVCO and the Plate Boundary Observatory science.

  20. An updated length-scale formulation for turbulent mixing in clear and cloudy boundary layers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lenderink, G.; Holtslag, A. A. M.

    2004-10-01

    A new mixing-length scale is presented for turbulence-closure schemes, with special emphasis on neutral-to-convective conditions in clear and cloudy boundary layers. The length scale is intended for a prognostic turbulent-kinetic-energy closure. It is argued that present-day length-scale formulations may easily fail in one of two limiting situations. Schemes based on a local stability measure (e.g.the Richardson number) display unrealistic behaviour and instabilities in the convective limit. This strongly limits the representation of mixing in cloudy boundary layers. On the other hand, it is shown that non-local parcel methods may misrepresent mixing near the surface. The new length-scale formulation combines local and non-local stability in a new way; it uses vertical integrals over the stability (the Richardson number) in a simple 'parcel' framework. The length scale matches with surface-layer similarity for near-neutral conditions and displays a realistic convective limit. The use of the length-scale formulation can be extended easily to cloudy boundary layers. The scheme is numerically stable and computationally cheap. The behaviour of the length scale is evaluated in a single-column model (SCM) and in a high-resolution limited-area model (LAM). The SCM shows good behaviour in three cases with and without boundary-layer clouds. The prediction of the near-surface wind and temperature in the LAM compares favourably with tower measurements at Cabauw (the Netherlands).

  1. On determining characteristic length scales in pressure gradient turbulent boundary layers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vinuesa, Ricardo; Örlü, Ramis; Schlatter, Philipp

    2016-04-01

    In the present work we analyze three methods used to determine the edge of pressure gradient turbulent boundary layers: two based on composite profiles, the one by Chauhan et al. (Fluid Dyn. Res. 41:021401, 2009) and the one by Nickels (J. Fluid Mech. 521:217-239, 2004), and the other one based on the condition of vanishing mean velocity gradient. Additionally, a new method is introduced based on the diagnostic plot concept by Alfredsson et al. (Phys. Fluids 23:041702, 2011). The boundary layer developing over the suction side of a NACA4412 wing profile, extracted from a direct numerical simulation at Rec = 400,000, is used as the test case. We find that all the methods produce robust results with mild or moderate pressure gradients, but stronger pressure gradients (with β larger than around 7) lead to inconsistent results in all the techniques except the diagnostic plot. This method also has the advantage of providing an objective way of defining the point where the mean streamwise velocity is 99% of the edge velocity, and shows consistent results in a wide range of pressure gradient conditions, as well as flow histories. Therefore, the technique based on the diagnostic plot is a robust method to determine the boundary layer thickness (equivalent to δ99) and edge velocity in pressure gradient turbulent boundary layers.

  2. Local wall shear stress measurements with a thin plate submerged in the sublayer in wall turbulent flows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hua, Dan; Suzuki, Hiroki; Mochizuki, Shinsuke

    2017-09-01

    A local wall shear stress measurement technique has been developed using a thin plate, referred to as a sublayer plate which is attached to the wall in the sublayer of a near-wall turbulent flow. The pressure difference between the leading and trailing edges of the plate is correlated to the known wall shear stress obtained in the fully developed turbulent channel flow. The universal calibration curve can be well represented in dimensionless form, and the sensitivity of the proposed method is as high as that of the sublayer fence, even if the sublayer fence is enveloped by the linear sublayer. The results of additional experiments prove that the sublayer plate has fairly good angular resolution in detecting the direction of the local wall shear stress vector.

  3. Cocos Ridge Collision as a Driver for Plate Boundary Deformation in the Western Caribbean

    Science.gov (United States)

    La Femina, P. C.; Govers, R. M.; Geirsson, H.; Kobayashi, D.

    2011-12-01

    The subduction and collision of bathymetric highs can result in geodynamic changes along convergent plate boundaries, including intense upper plate deformation, increases in mechanical coupling and seismicity, migration and or cessation of volcanism and formation of forearc terranes. But how extensive can the deformation associated with these features be and what are the implications for the long-term formation and evolution of plate boundary zones? Plate boundary evolution and upper plate deformation in southern Central America associated with Cocos Ridge collision is well studied and indicates, 1) migration of the volcanic arc toward the backarc northwest of and cessation of volcanism directly inboard the ridge, 2) uplift of the Cordillera de Talamanca inboard the ridge, 3) shortening across the forearc Fila Costena fold and thrust belt, and 4) outer forearc uplift above and flanking the ridge. Recent geodynamical modeling of Cocos Ridge collision, combined with the results of kinematic block models for the Central American margin, suggests the ridge drives northwest-directed forearc motion from central Costa Rica northwest to the Cocos - Caribbean (Central American forearc block) - North America triple junction, greatly increasing the spatial scale of deformation. Upperplate deformation of the Central American margin to the southeast of the Cocos Ridge in Panama was not investigated in these models. We investigate the dynamics of Cocos Ridge collision along the entire Central American margin and the implications on plate boundary evolution with a new geodynamic model of ridge collision. Our model results are compared to a new GPS derived horizontal velocity field for Central America and preliminary results indicate that the Cocos Ridge drives the Panamanian isthmus into northern South America (i.e., the North Andes block).

  4. Discovering plate boundaries: Laboratory and classroom exercises using geodetic data to develop students' understanding of plate motion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olds, S. E.

    2010-12-01

    To introduce the concept of plate boundaries, typical introductory geology exercises include students observing and plotting the location of earthquakes and volcanoes on a map to visually demarcate plate boundaries. Accompanying these exercises, students are often exposed to animations depicting the movement of Earth’s tectonic plates over time. Both of these teaching techniques are very useful for describing where the tectonics plates have been in the past, their shapes, and where the plates are now. With the integration of data from current geodetic techniques such as GPS, InSAR, LiDAR, students can learn that not only have the tectonic plates moved in the past, but they are moving, deforming, and changing shape right now. Additionally, GPS data can be visualized using time scales of days to weeks and on the scale of millimeters to centimeters per year. The familiar temporal and spatial scales of GPS data also help students understand that plate tectonics is a process that is happening in the present and can ease the transition to thinking about processes that are typically described using deep time, a very difficult concept for students to grasp. To provide a more robust learning environment, UNAVCO has been incorporating high-precision GPS data into free, place-based, data-rich learning modules for educators and students in introductory Earth science courses at secondary and undergraduate levels. These modules integrate new scientific discoveries related to crustal deformation and explore applications of GPS, LiDAR, and InSAR techniques to research. They also provide students with case studies highlighting the process of scientific discovery, providing context and meaning. Concurrent to these efforts, tools to visualize the inter-relationships of geophysical and geologic processes, structures, and measurements including high-precision GPS velocity data are an essential part of the learning materials. Among the suite of visualization tools that UNAVCO has made

  5. Experimental Study for the Determination of the Turbulence Onset in Natural Convection on Inclined Plates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pérez Grande, Isabel; Rodriguez Sevillano, Angel; Meseguer, Jos

    In June, 8th, 2009 the balloon-borne solar telescope SUNRISE was launched from the Swedish Space Corporation balloon facility Esrange. A telescope with a mirror of 1 m in diameter ob-served the Sun during six days until the mission was terminated in Canada. The design process of SUNRISE and of any optical telescope requires the analysis of the effect of surrounding air on the quality of images. The turbulence encountered in the local telescope environment de-grades its optical performance. This phenomenon called `seeing' consists of optical aberrations produced by density non-homogeneities in the air along the optical path. The refraction index of air changes due to thermal non-uniformities so that the wavefront incident on the mirror is randomly distorted, and therefore, images are altered. When telescope mirrors are heated, as it happens in solar telescopes, and therefore they are at a temperature different from the environment's, natural convection occurs. It is then crucial to know whether the flow in front of the mirror is laminar or turbulent. After reviewing the literature, it was found that the scattering of results about the onset of the transition gives only rough orders of magnitude of the values of the critical Grashof numbers. Aiming to obtain more information about it, the problem of determination of the turbulence onset in natural convection on heated inclined plates in air environment was experimentally revisited. The transition has been determined from hot wire velocity measurements. The onset of turbulence has been considered to take place where velocity perturbations start to grow. Experiments have shown that the onset depends not only on the Grashof number, but also on other parameters as the temperature difference between the heated plate and the surrounding air. A correlation between dimensionless Grashof and Reynolds numbers has been obtained, fitting extraordinarily well the experimental data. The results are obtained in terms of non

  6. DNS of laminar-turbulent boundary layer transition induced by solid obstacles

    CERN Document Server

    Orlandi, Paolo; Bernardini, Matteo

    2015-01-01

    Results of numerical simulations obtained by a staggered finite difference scheme together with an efficient immersed boundary method are presented to understand the effects of the shape of three-dimensional obstacles on the transition of a boundary layer from a laminar to a turbulent regime. Fully resolved Direct Numerical Simulations (DNS), highlight that the closer to the obstacle the symmetry is disrupted the smaller is the transitional Reynolds number. It has been also found that the transition can not be related to the critical roughness Reynolds number used in the past. The simulations highlight the differences between wake and inflectional instabilities, proving that two-dimensional tripping devices are more efficient in promoting the transition. Simulations at high Reynolds number demonstrate that the reproduction of a real experiment with a solid obstacle at the inlet is an efficient tool to generate numerical data bases for understanding the physics of boundary layers. The quality of the numerical ...

  7. Turbulent transport in the atmospheric boundary layer with application to wind farm dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waggy, Scott B.

    With the recent push for renewable energy sources, wind energy has emerged as a candidate to replace some of the power produced by traditional fossil fuels. Recent studies, however, have indicated that wind farms may have a direct effect on local meteorology by transporting water vapor away from the Earth's surface. Such turbulent transport could result in an increased drying of soil, and, in turn, negatively affect the productivity of land in the wind farm's immediate vicinity. This numerical study will analyze four scenarios with the goal of understanding turbulence transport in the wake of a turbine: the neutrally-stratified boundary layer with system rotation, the unstably-stratified atmospheric boundary layer, and wind turbine simulations of these previous two cases. For this work, the Ekman layer is used as an approximation of the atmospheric boundary layer and the governing equations are solved using a fully-parallelized direct numerical simulation (DNS). The in-depth studies of the neutrally and unstably-stratified boundary layers without introducing wind farm effects will act to provide a concrete background for the final study concerning turbulent transport due to turbine wakes. Although neutral stratification rarely occurs in the atmospheric boundary layer, it is useful to study the turbulent Ekman layer under such conditions as it provides a limiting case when unstable or stable stratification are weak. In this work, a thorough analysis was completed including turbulent statistics, velocity and pressure autocorrelations, and a calculation of the full turbulent energy budget. The unstably-stratified atmospheric boundary layer was studied under two levels of heating: moderate and vigorous. Under moderate stratification, both buoyancy and shearing contribute significantly to the turbulent dynamics. As the level of stratification increases, the role of shearing is shown to diminish and is confined to the near-wall region only. A recent, multi

  8. The Research of Laminar-Turbulent Transition in Hypersonic Three-Dimensional Boundary Layer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Marat A.GOLDFELD; Evgeniy V. ORLIK

    2005-01-01

    @@ The results of experimental investigation of laminar-turbulent transition in three-dimensional flow under the high continuous pressure gradient including the flow with local boundary layer separation are presented. The experimental studies were performed within the Mach number range from 4 to 6 and Reynolds number 10~60 ×106 1/m, the angles of attack were 00 and 50. The experiments were carried out on the three-dimensional convergent inlet model with and without sidewalls. The influence of artificial turbulator of boundary layer on transition and flow structure was studied. The conducted researches have shown that adverse pressure gradient increase hastens transition and leads to decrease of transition area length. If pressure gradient rises velocity profile fullness increases and profile transformation from laminar to turbulent occurs. As a result of it the decrease of separation area length occurs. The same effect was reached with Reynolds number increase. These results are compared with the data on two-dimensional model with longitudinal curvature.

  9. On the influence of free-stream turbulence length scales on boundary-layer transition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fransson, Jens; Shahinfar, Shahab

    2015-11-01

    A measurement campaign on the free-stream turbulence (FST) induced boundary layer transition has been carried out in the Minimum-Turbulence-Level wind tunnel at KTH. Previous numerical investigations where the turbulence intensity (Tu) has been kept constant, while the integral length scale (Λx) has been varied, have shown that the transition location is advanced for increasing Λx. The present measurement campaign has been carried out using hot-wire anemometry and consists of 42 unique FST conditions with thorough measurements throughout the transitional region. Unlike other extensive FST induced transition measurements the free-stream velocity was here kept constant for all cases, implying that the boundary layer scale is locked up to transition onset. Our measurements confirm previous results on the advancement of the transition location with increasing Λx for low to moderate Tu levels, but show the opposite effect for higher levels, i.e. a delay in the transition location for larger Λx, which to the knowledge of the present authors so far is unreported. In addition, the common belief that the FST length scales have a negligible effect on the transition location with regards to the Tu level does not seem to be fully true.

  10. A symmetry based approach to quantifying the compressible turbulent boundary layer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Bin; Bi, Wei-Tao; She, Zhen-Su; Hussain, Fazle

    2015-11-01

    Developing analytical description of the compressible turbulent boundary layer (CTBL) is of great importance to many technological applications and to the understanding and modeling of compressible turbulence. Here a symmetry-based approach is applied to analyze the CTBL data acquired from DNS, covering a wide range of Reynolds number (Re), Mach number (Ma) and wall temperature. The Reynolds stress length scale displays a four-layer structure in the direction normal to the wall and obeys the dilation group invariance as in the incompressible TBL. A newly-identified turbulent heat flux length scale behaves similarly, which is the classical temperature mixing length weighted by the mean temperature. A significant result is the identification of three physical parameters for each length function to characterize the adiabatic flow: a bulk flow constant, a buffer layer thickness and a boundary layer edge, which vary with Re and Ma. For the diabatic flow, the sublayer thickness and the inner layer scaling exponents vary additionally with the wall temperature. These parameters are modeled empirically, leading to a highly accurate prediction of the mean fields of the CTBL. Thus we reveal that the symmetry principle found in canonical wall-bounded flows holds also for the CTBL, and a quantitative mean field theory is viable with appropriate symmetry considerations.

  11. The effects of an algal biofilm on the turbulent boundary layer at high Reynolds number

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murphy, Elizabeth; Barros, Julio; Schultz, Michael; Flack, Karen; Steppe, Cecily; Reidenbach, Matthew

    2016-11-01

    Algal biofilms are an important fouling community on ship hulls, with severe economic consequences due to increased drag. As with other types of roughness on aquatic surfaces, biofilms increase skin friction and thus induce severe drag penalties. In fact, slime layers appear to induce greater drag than would be predicted by the roughness height alone. Our work indicates that this is likely due to two characteristics of algal biofilms: i) flexible streamers that protrude into the flow, and ii) the compliant nature of a biofilm layer. High resolution PIV was used to measure the turbulent boundary layer flow over diatomaceous biofilm grown under dynamic conditions. Local mean streamwise velocity profiles were used to estimate the local wall shear stresses and to determine the similarity between the inner and outer layers of the boundary layer and those of a smooth wall. Spatially explicit turbulent kinetic energy (TKE), Reynolds shear stress (RSS), swirling strength and quadrant analyses over the biofilm were compared to those over a smooth wall and a rigid mesh roughness. We found that the combination of canopy flow due to streamers coupled with compliant wall-flow interactions result in large wall shear stresses and higher turbulence. Funding provided by the ONR NURP program and the NSF GRIP program.

  12. Influence of pressure gradient on streamwise skewness factor in turbulent boundary layer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dróżdż, Artur

    2014-08-01

    The paper shows an effect of favourable and adverse pressure gradients on turbulent boundary layer. The skewness factor of streamwise velocity component was chosen as a measure of the pressure gradient impact. It appears that skewness factor is an indicator of convection velocity of coherent structures, which is not always equal to the average flow velocity. The analysis has been performed based upon velocity profiles measured with hot-wire technique in turbulent boundary layer with pressure gradient corresponding to turbomachinery conditions. The results show that the skewness factor decreases in the flow region subjected to FPG and increases in the APG conditions. The changes of convection velocity and skewness factor are caused by influence of large-scale motion through the mechanism called amplitude modulation. The large-scale motion is less active in FPG and more active in APG, therefore in FPG the production of vortices is random (there are no high and low speed regions), while in the APG the large-scale motion drives the production of vortices. Namely, the vortices appear only in the high-speed regions, therefore have convection velocity higher than local mean velocity. The convection velocity affects directly the turbulent sweep and ejection events. The more flow is dominated by large-scale motion the higher values takes both the convection velocity of small-scale structures and sweep events induced by them.

  13. DHMPIV and Tomo-PIV measurements of three-dimensional structures in a turbulent boundary layer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amili, O.; Atkinson, C.; Soria, J.

    In turbulent boundary layers, a large portion of total turbulence production happens in the near wall region, y/δ Tomo-PIV) was used to extract the 3C-3D velocity field using a rapid and less memory intensive reconstruction algorithm. It is based on a multiplicative line-of-sight (MLOS) estimation that determines possible particle locations in the volume, followed by simultaneous iterative correction. Application of MLOS-SART and MART to a turbulent boundary layer at Refθ=2200 using a 4 camera Tomo-PIV system with a volume of 1000×1000×160 voxels is discussed. In addition, near wall velocity measurement attempt made by digital holographic microscopic particle image velocimetry (DHMPIV). The technique provides a solution to overcome the poor axial accuracy and the low spatial resolution which are common problems in digital holography [5]. By reducing the depth of focus by at least one order of magnitude as well as increasing the lateral spatial resolution, DHMPIV provides the opportunity to resolve the small-scale structures existing in near wall layers.

  14. Similarity considerations for a turbulent axisymmetric wake with rotation subjected to a boundary layer flow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wosnik, Martin

    2015-11-01

    Recently an analytical and experimental investigation of the turbulent axisymmetric wake with rotation found a new asymptotic scaling function for the mean swirl, Wmax ~Uo3/ 2 ~x-1 (Dufresne and Wosnik, Mar Technol Soc J, 47, no.4, 193-205, 2013). An equilibrium similarity theory derived scaling functions from the conditions for the existence of similarity directly from the equations of motion. Axial and azimuthal (swirl) velocities were measured in the wake of a single 3-bladed wind turbine in a free stream up to 20 diameters downstream, and the data were found to support the theoretical results. The scaling implies that the mean swirl decays faster, with x-1, than the mean velocity deficit, with x - 2 / 3. Real wind turbines, however, operate in the atmospheric boundary layer. They are subjected to mean shear and turbulence, both have been observed to improve wake recovery. Similarity considerations are extended to place a turbulent axisymmetric wake with rotation in a boundary layer flow, and the scaling implications are examined. Corresponding experiments were carried out in the UNH Flow Physics Facility, using model wind turbines of various sizes as swirling wake generators. Supported by NSF CBET grant 1150797.

  15. PIV experiments in rough-wall, laminar-to-turbulent, oscillatory boundary-layer flows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mujal-Colilles, Anna; Mier, Jose M.; Christensen, Kenneth T.; Bateman, Allen; Garcia, Marcelo H.

    2014-01-01

    Exploratory measurements of oscillatory boundary layers were conducted over a smooth and two different rough beds spanning the laminar, transitional and turbulent flow regimes using a multi-camera 2D-PIV system in a small oscillatory-flow tunnel (Admiraal et al. in J Hydraul Res 44(4):437-450, 2006). Results show how the phase lag between bed shear stress and free-stream velocity is better defined when the integral of the momentum equation is used to estimate the bed shear stress. Observed differences in bed shear stress and phase lag between bed shear stress and free-stream velocity are highly sensitive to the definition of the bed position ( y = b). The underestimation of turbulent stresses close to the wall is found to explain such differences when using the addition of Reynolds and viscous stresses to define both the bed shear stress and the phase lag. Regardless of the flow regime, in all experiments, boundary-layer thickness reached its maximum value at a phase near the flow reversal at the wall. Friction factors in smooth walls are better estimated using a theoretical equation first proposed by Batchelor (An introduction to fluid dynamics. Cambridge University Press, Cambridge, 1967) while the more recent empirical predictor of Pedocchi and Garcia (J Hydraul Res 47(4):438-444, 2009a) was found to be appropriate for estimating friction coefficients in the laminar-to-turbulent transition regime.

  16. Seismic evidence for sharp lithosphere-asthenosphere boundaries of oceanic plates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawakatsu, Hitoshi; Kumar, Prakash; Takei, Yasuko; Shinohara, Masanao; Kanazawa, Toshihiko; Araki, Eiichiro; Suyehiro, Kiyoshi

    2009-04-24

    The mobility of the lithosphere over a weaker asthenosphere constitutes the essential element of plate tectonics, and thus the understanding of the processes at the lithosphere-asthenosphere boundary (LAB) is fundamental to understand how our planet works. It is especially so for oceanic plates because their relatively simple creation and evolution should enable easy elucidation of the LAB. Data from borehole broadband ocean bottom seismometers show that the LAB beneath the Pacific and Philippine Sea plates is sharp and age-dependent. The observed large shear wave velocity reduction at the LAB requires a partially molten asthenosphere consisting of horizontal melt-rich layers embedded in meltless mantle, which accounts for the large viscosity contrast at the LAB that facilitates horizontal plate motions.

  17. Multilayer scaling of mean velocity and thermal fields of compressible turbulent boundary layer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bi, Weitao; Wu, Bin; Zhang, Yousheng; Hussain, Fazle; She, Zhen-Su

    2014-11-01

    Recently, a symmetry based structural ensemble dynamics (SED) theory was proposed by She et al. for canonical wall bounded turbulent flows, yielding prediction of the mean velocity profile at an unprecedented accuracy (99%). Here, we extend the theory to compressible turbulent boundary layers (TBL) at supersonic and hypersonic Mach numbers. The flows are acquired by spatially evolving direct numerical simulations (DNS). A momentum mixing length displays a four layer structure and quantitatively obeys the dilation group invariance as for the incompressible TBL. In addition, a temperature mixing length behaves very similarly to the momentum mixing length when the wall is adiabatic, with a small difference in the scaling exponents in the buffer layer - consistent with the strong Reynolds analogy. The Lie group based formulization of the two mixing lengths yields a multilayer model for the turbulent Prandtl number, along with predictions to the mean thermal and velocity profiles, both in good agreement with the DNS. Thus, we assert that the compressible TBLs are governed by the same symmetry principle as that in the canonical wall bounded turbulent flows, and its mean fields can be accurately described by the SED theory.

  18. Turbulent pipe flow: Statistics, Re-dependence, structures and similarities with channel and boundary layer flows

    Science.gov (United States)

    El Khoury, George K.; Schlatter, Philipp; Brethouwer, Geert; Johansson, Arne V.

    2014-04-01

    Direct numerical simulation data of fully developed turbulent pipe flow are extensively compared with those of turbulent channel flow and zero-pressure-gradient boundary layer flow for Reτ up to 1000. In the near-wall region, a high degree of similarity is observed in the three flow cases in terms of one-point statistics, probability density functions of the wall-shear stress and pressure, spectra, Reynolds stress budgets and advection velocity of the turbulent structures. This supports the notion that the near-wall region is universal for pipe and channel flow. Probability density functions of the wall shear stress, streamwise turbulence intensities, one-dimensional spanwise/azimuthal spectra of the streamwise velocity and Reynolds-stress budgets are very similar near the wall in the three flow cases, suggesting that the three canonical wall-bounded flows share many features. In the wake region, the mean streamwise velocity and Reynolds stress budgets show some expected differences.

  19. Discovering Plate Boundaries Update: Builds Content Knowledge and Models Inquiry-based Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sawyer, D. S.; Pringle, M. S.; Henning, A. T.

    2009-12-01

    Discovering Plate Boundaries (DPB) is a jigsaw-structured classroom exercise in which students explore the fundamental datasets from which plate boundary processes were discovered. The exercise has been widely used in the past ten years as a classroom activity for students in fifth grade through high school, and for Earth Science major and general education courses in college. Perhaps more importantly, the exercise has been used extensively for professional development of in-service and pre-service K-12 science teachers, where it simultaneously builds content knowledge in plate boundary processes (including natural hazards), models an effective data-rich, inquiry-based pedagogy, and provides a set of lesson plans and materials which teachers can port directly into their own classroom (see Pringle, et al, this session for a specific example). DPB is based on 4 “specialty” data maps, 1) earthquake locations, 2) modern volcanic activity, 3) seafloor age, and 4) topography and bathymetry, plus a fifth map of (undifferentiated) plate boundary locations. The jigsaw is structured so that students are first split into one of the four “specialties,” then re-arranged into groups with each of the four specialties to describe the boundaries of a particular plate. We have taken the original DPB materials, used the latest digital data sets to update all the basic maps, and expanded the opportunities for further student and teacher learning. The earthquake maps now cover the recent period including the deadly Banda Aceh event. The topography/bathymetry map now has global coverage and uses ice-free elevations, which can, for example, extend to further inquiry about mantle viscosity and loading processes (why are significant portions of the bedrock surface of Greenland and Antarctica below sea level?). The volcanic activity map now differentiates volcano type and primary volcanic lithology, allowing a more elaborate understanding of volcanism at different plate boundaries

  20. The transpired turbulent boundary layer in various pressure gradients and the blow-off condition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Georgiou, D. P.; Louis, J. F.

    1984-12-01

    Experimental data are reported from studies of the cooling effectiveness and conditions leading to blow-off in transpiration cooling (TC). The TC configuration used featured a sintered bronze plate in a hot blowdown wind tunnel. Cooled air was pumped through the plate and data were gathered with calorimeters downstream of a piece of sandpaper which tripped the boundary layer. Pressure taps were also used. Local pressure gradient effects were small, but local accelerations reduced the cooling effectiveness. The downstream Stanton numbers were sensitive to the upstream coolant-injection ratio. Increasing the injection rate had, at best, only a small effect on the local heat flux.

  1. The effect of pressure gradient on the structure of an equilibrium turbulent boundary layer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lei, Ting-Kwo

    1993-01-01

    Hot-wire anemometry was used to study the effect of adverse pressure gradient on the large-scale structures of equilibrium turbulent boundary layers. A previously existing zero-pressure gradient wind tunnel was modified into an adverse-pressure gradient wind tunnel, which had the capability of creating designated adverse-pressure gradient equilibrium turbulent boundary layer flows. The range of the equilibrium parameter beta was from 0.0 to 1.8 along a 1.50 m long test section of the wind tunnel. Computer programs were developed to predict the geometric shape of the test section for an equilibrium adverse-pressure gradient turbulent boundary layer flow. The numerical prediction of the test section geometry was found to be satisfactory and a substantial effort was saved in the establishment of an equilibrium boundary layer. Three equilibrium boundary layer flows at values of beta = 0.0, 0.8, and 1.8, which respectively represents zero, mild, and strong adverse pressure gradient, were established and were found to be suitable for turbulence structure measurements. Space-time correlation measurements were carried out to determine the convection velocities and inclination angles of the large-scale structures for the three different pressure gradient cases. The convection velocity measurements were performed at various heights which ranged form y(sup +) = 225 to 525 for each beta value. It was found that, within the range of height of the measurements, the convection velocity was independent of height In the case of the strong adverse-pressure gradient flow, the convection velocity was observed to be much lower than the convection velocity observed in the case of zero-pressure gradient. In the case of the mild-pressure gradient flow, it was observed that the pressure gradient effect on the convection velocity was negligible as compared to the zero-pressure gradient case. The inclination angle in the case of strong-pressure gradient case was found to be much greater than

  2. A computational study on oblique shock wave-turbulent boundary layer interaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joy, Md. Saddam Hossain; Rahman, Saeedur; Hasan, A. B. M. Toufique; Ali, M.; Mitsutake, Y.; Matsuo, S.; Setoguchi, T.

    2016-07-01

    A numerical computation of an oblique shock wave incident on a turbulent boundary layer was performed for free stream flow of air at M∞ = 2.0 and Re1 = 10.5×106 m-1. The oblique shock wave was generated from a 8° wedge. Reynolds averaged Navier-Stokes (RANS) simulation with k-ω SST turbulence model was first utilized for two dimensional (2D) steady case. The results were compared with the experiment at the same flow conditions. Further, to capture the unsteadiness, a 2D Large Eddy Simulation (LES) with sub-grid scale model WMLES was performed which showed the unsteady effects. The frequency of the shock oscillation was computed and was found to be comparable with that of experimental measurement.

  3. The measurement of shear stress and total heat flux in a nonadiabatic turbulent hypersonic boundary layer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mikulla, V.; Horstman, C. C.

    1975-01-01

    Turbulent shear stress and direct turbulent total heat-flux measurements have been made across a nonadiabatic, zero pressure gradient, hypersonic boundary layer by using specially designed hot-wire probes free of strain-gauging and wire oscillation. Heat-flux measurements were in reasonably good agreement with values obtained by integrating the energy equation using measured profiles of velocity and temperature. The shear-stress values deduced from the measurements, by assuming zero correlation of velocity and pressure fluctuations, were lower than the values obtained by integrating the momentum equation. Statistical properties of the cross-correlations are similar to corresponding incompressible measurements at approximately the same momentum-thickness Reynolds number.

  4. Coupled Mesoscale-Large-Eddy Modeling of Realistic Stable Boundary Layer Turbulence

    CERN Document Server

    Wang, Yao; Manuel, Lance

    2013-01-01

    Site-specific flow and turbulence information are needed for various practical applications, ranging from aerodynamic/aeroelastic modeling for wind turbine design to optical diffraction calculations. Even though highly desirable, collecting on-site meteorological measurements can be an expensive, time-consuming, and sometimes a challenging task. In this work, we propose a coupled mesoscale-large-eddy modeling framework to synthetically generate site-specific flow and turbulence data. The workhorses behind our framework are a state-of-the-art, open-source atmospheric model called the Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) model and a tuning-free large-eddy simulation (LES) model. Using this coupled framework, we simulate a nighttime stable boundary layer (SBL) case from the well-known CASES-99 field campaign. One of the unique aspects of this work is the usage of a diverse range of observations for characterization and validation. The coupled models reproduce certain characteristics of observed low-level jets....

  5. Investigation of turbulent boundary layer flow over 2D bump using highly resolved large eddy simulation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cavar, Dalibor; Meyer, Knud Erik

    2011-01-01

    A large eddy simulation (LES) study of turbulent non-equilibrium boundary layer flow over 2 D Bump, at comparatively low Reynolds number Reh = U∞h/ν = 1950, was conducted. A well-known LES issue of obtaining and sustaining turbulent flow inside the computational domain at such low Re, is addresse...... partially confirm a close interdependency between generation and evolution of internal layers and the abrupt changes in the skin friction, previously reported in the literature. © 2011 American Society of Mechanical Engineers......., showed a good agreement with the available laser Doppler anemometry (LDA) measurements. Analysis of the flow was directly able to identify and confirm the existence of internal layers at positions related to the vicinity of the upstream and downstream discontinuities in the surface curvature and also...

  6. LOLAS: an optical turbulence profiler in the atmospheric boundary layer with extreme altitude-resolution

    CERN Document Server

    Avila, R; Wilson, R W; Chun, M; Butterley, T; Carrasco, E

    2008-01-01

    We report the development and first results of an instrument called Low Layer Scidar (LOLAS) which is aimed at the measurement of optical-turbulence profiles in the atmospheric boundary layer with high altitude-resolution. The method is based on the Generalized Scidar (GS) concept, but unlike the GS instruments which need a 1- m or larger telescope, LOLAS is implemented on a dedicated 40-cm telescope, making it an independent instrument. The system is designed for widely separated double-star targets, which enables the high altitude-resolution. Using a 20000-separation double- star, we have obtained turbulence profiles with unprecedented 12-m resolution. The system incorporates necessary novel algorithms for autoguiding, autofocus and image stabilisation. The results presented here were obtained at Mauna Kea Observatory. They show LOLAS capabilities but cannot be considered as representative of the site. A forthcoming paper will be devoted to the site characterisation. The instrument was built as part of the ...

  7. Fluid-structure interaction of turbulent boundary layer over a compliant surface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anantharamu, Sreevatsa; Mahesh, Krishnan

    2016-11-01

    Turbulent flows induce unsteady loads on surfaces in contact with them, which affect material stresses, surface vibrations and far-field acoustics. We are developing a numerical methodology to study the coupled interaction of a turbulent boundary layer with the underlying surface. The surface is modeled as a linear elastic solid, while the fluid follows the spatially filtered incompressible Navier-Stokes equations. An incompressible Large Eddy Simulation finite volume flow approach based on the algorithm of Mahesh et al. is used in the fluid domain. The discrete kinetic energy conserving property of the method ensures robustness at high Reynolds number. The linear elastic model in the solid domain is integrated in space using finite element method and in time using the Newmark time integration method. The fluid and solid domain solvers are coupled using both weak and strong coupling methods. Details of the algorithm, validation, and relevant results will be presented. This work is supported by NSWCCD, ONR.

  8. Mean flow development of a longitudinal vortex embedded in an attached, three-dimensional, turbulent boundary layer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shizawa, T. [Science Univ. of Tokyo (Japan); Eaton, J.K. [Stanford Univ., CA (United States). Dept. of Mechanical Engineering

    1990-12-31

    The interaction of a longitudinal vortex with a pressure-driven, three dimensional turbulent boundary layer was investigated experimentally. The vortex was attenuated much more rapidly in the three dimensional layer than in a two-dimensional boundary layer. The persistence for the vortex-induced perturbation was strongly dependent on the sign of the vortex.

  9. Lower plate deformation structures along the Costa Rica erosive plate boundary - results from IODP Expedition 344 (CRISP 2)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brandstätter, Jennifer; Kurz, Walter; Micheuz, Peter; Krenn, Kurt

    2015-04-01

    1414 is located ~1 km seaward of the deformation front offshore the Osa Peninsula and Caño Island. Primary science goals at Site U1414 included characterization of the alteration state of the magmatic basement. Brittle structures within the incoming plate (sites U1380, U1414) are mineralized extensional fractures and shear fractures. The shear fractures mainly show a normal component of shear. Within the sedimentary sequence both types of fractures dip steeply (vertical to subvertical) and strike NNE-SSW. Deformation bands trend roughly ENE-WSW, sub-parallel to the trend of the Cocos ridge. Structures in the Cocos Ridge basalt mainly comprise mineralized veins at various orientations. A preferred orientation of strike directions was not observed. Some veins show straight boundaries, others are characterized by an irregular geometry characterized by brecciated wall rock clasts embedded within vein precipitates. The vein mineralization was analysed in detail by RAMAN spectroscopy. Precipitation conditions and fluid chemistry were analysed by fluid inclusions entrapped within vein minerals. Vein mineralizations mainly consist of carbonate (fibrous aragonite, calcite), chalcedony, and quartz. Vein mineralization is mainly characterized by zoned antitaxial growth of carbonate fibres including a suture along the central vein domains. Quartz is often characterized by fibre growth of crystals perpendicular to the vein boundaries, too. These zoned veins additinally have wall rock alteration seams consisting of clay minerals. The precipitation sequence basically indicates that fluid chemistry evolved from an CO2-rich towards a SiO2- rich fluid.

  10. Geological record of fluid flow and seismogenesis along an erosive subducting plate boundary.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vannucchi, Paola; Remitti, Francesca; Bettelli, Giuseppe

    2008-02-07

    Tectonic erosion of the overriding plate by the downgoing slab is believed to occur at half the Earth's subduction zones. In situ investigation of the geological processes at active erosive margins is extremely difficult owing to the deep marine environment and the net loss of forearc crust to deeper levels in the subduction zone. Until now, a fossil erosive subduction channel-the shear zone marking the plate boundary-has not been recognized in the field, so that seismic observations have provided the only information on plate boundary processes at erosive margins. Here we show that a fossil erosive margin is preserved in the Northern Apennines of Italy. It formed during the Tertiary transition from oceanic subduction to continental collision, and was preserved by the late deactivation and fossilization of the plate boundary. The outcropping erosive subduction channel is approximately 500 m thick. It is representative of the first 5 km of depth, with its deeper portions reaching approximately 150 degrees C. The fossil zone records several surprises. Two décollements were simultaneously active at the top and base of the subduction channel. Both deeper basal erosion and near-surface frontal erosion occurred. At shallow depths extension was a key deformation component within this erosive convergent plate boundary, and slip occurred without an observable fluid pressure cycle. At depths greater than about 3 km a fluid cycle is clearly shown by the development of veins and the alternation of fast (co-seismic) and slow (inter-seismic) slip. In the deepest portions of the outcropping subduction channel, extension is finally overprinted by compressional structures. In modern subduction zones the onset of seismic activity is believed to occur at approximately 150 degrees C, but in the fossil channel the onset occurred at cooler palaeo-temperatures.

  11. Structuring of turbulence and its impact on basic features of Ekman boundary layers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I. Esau

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available The turbulent Ekman boundary layer (EBL has been studied in a large number of theoretical, laboratory and modeling works since F. Nansen's observations during the Norwegian Polar Expedition 1893–1896. Nevertheless, the proposed analytical models, analysis of the EBL instabilities, and turbulence-resolving numerical simulations are not fully consistent. In particular, the role of turbulence self-organization into longitudinal roll vortices in the EBL and its dependence on the meridional component of the Coriolis force remain unclear. A new set of large-eddy simulations (LES are presented in this study. LES were performed for eight different latitudes (from 1° N to 90° N in the domain spanning 144 km in the meridional direction. Geostrophic winds from the west and from the east were used to drive the development of EBL turbulence. The emergence and growth of longitudinal rolls in the EBL was simulated. The simulated rolls are in good agreement with EBL stability analysis given in Dubos et al. (2008. The destruction of rolls in the westerly flow at low latitude was observed in simulations, which agrees well with the action of secondary instability on the rolls in the EBL. This study quantifies the effect of the meridional component of the Coriolis force and the effect of rolls in the EBL on the internal EBL parameters such as friction velocity, cross-isobaric angle, parameters of the EBL depth and resistance laws. A large impact of the roll development or destruction is found. The depth of the EBL in the westerly flow is about five times less than it is in the easterly flow at low latitudes. The EBL parameters, which depend on the depth, also exhibit large difference in these two types of the EBL. Thus, this study supports the need to include the horizontal component of the Coriolis force into theoretical constructions and parameterizations of the boundary layer in models.

  12. Krypton tagging velocimetry in a turbulent Mach 2.7 boundary layer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zahradka, D.; Parziale, N. J.; Smith, M. S.; Marineau, E. C.

    2016-05-01

    The krypton tagging velocimetry (KTV) technique is applied to the turbulent boundary layer on the wall of the "Mach 3 Calibration Tunnel" at Arnold Engineering Development Complex (AEDC) White Oak. Profiles of velocity were measured with KTV and Pitot-pressure probes in the Mach 2.7 turbulent boundary layer comprised of 99 % {N}2/1 % Kr at momentum-thickness Reynolds numbers of {Re}_{\\varTheta }= 800, 1400, and 2400. Agreement between the KTV- and Pitot-derived velocity profiles is excellent. The KTV and Pitot velocity data follow the law of the wall in the logarithmic region with application of the Van Driest I transformation. The velocity data are analyzed in the outer region of the boundary layer with the law of the wake and a velocity-defect law. KTV-derived streamwise velocity fluctuation measurements are reported and are consistent with data from the literature. To enable near-wall measurement with KTV (y/δ ≈ 0.1-0.2), an 800-nm longpass filter was used to block the 760.2-nm read-laser pulse. With the longpass filter, the 819.0-nm emission from the re-excited Kr can be imaged to track the displacement of the metastable tracer without imaging the reflection and scatter from the read-laser off of solid surfaces. To operate the Mach 3 AEDC Calibration Tunnel at several discrete unit Reynolds numbers, a modification was required and is described herein.

  13. Study of Transitions in the Atmospheric Boundary Layer Using Explicit Algebraic Turbulence Models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lazeroms, W. M. J.; Svensson, G.; Bazile, E.; Brethouwer, G.; Wallin, S.; Johansson, A. V.

    2016-10-01

    We test a recently developed engineering turbulence model, a so-called explicit algebraic Reynolds-stress (EARS) model, in the context of the atmospheric boundary layer. First of all, we consider a stable boundary layer used as the well-known first test case from the Global Energy and Water Cycle Experiment Atmospheric Boundary Layer Study (GABLS1). The model is shown to agree well with data from large-eddy simulations (LES), and this agreement is significantly better than for a standard operational scheme with a prognostic equation for turbulent kinetic energy. Furthermore, we apply the model to a case with a (idealized) diurnal cycle and make a qualitative comparison with a simpler first-order model. Some interesting features of the model are highlighted, pertaining to its stronger foundation on physical principles. In particular, the use of more prognostic equations in the model is shown to give a more realistic dynamical behaviour. This qualitative study is the first step towards a more detailed comparison, for which additional LES data are needed.

  14. Measurements of a supersonic turbulent boundary layer by focusing schlieren deflectometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garg, S.; Settles, G. S.

    Some novel, non-intrusive, high-frequency, localized optical measurements of turbulence in compressible flows are described. The technique is based upon focusing schlieren optics coupled with high-speed quantitative measurement of light intensity fluctuations in the schlieren image. Measurements of density gradient fluctuations confined to a thin slice of the flowfield are thus obtained. The new instrument was used to investigate the structure of a two-dimensional, adiabatic, wind tunnel wall boundary layer at a Mach number of 3. The measurements were compared to data obtained using hot-wire anemometry and good agreement was found between the two. Distributions of broadband convection velocity of large-scale structures through the boundary later were also measured. In marked contrast to earlier results, it is shown here that the convection velocity is essentially identical to the local mean velocity. Further, results obtained using the VITA conditional sampling technique shed new light on the turbulent boundary layer structure. Overall, the data presented herein serve to validate the new measurement technique.

  15. DNS of Laminar-Turbulent Transition in Swept-Wing Boundary Layers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duan, L.; Choudhari, M.; Li, F.

    2014-01-01

    Direct numerical simulation (DNS) is performed to examine laminar to turbulent transition due to high-frequency secondary instability of stationary crossflow vortices in a subsonic swept-wing boundary layer for a realistic natural-laminar-flow airfoil configuration. The secondary instability is introduced via inflow forcing and the mode selected for forcing corresponds to the most amplified secondary instability mode that, in this case, derives a majority of its growth from energy production mechanisms associated with the wall-normal shear of the stationary basic state. An inlet boundary condition is carefully designed to allow for accurate injection of instability wave modes and minimize acoustic reflections at numerical boundaries. Nonlinear parabolized stability equation (PSE) predictions compare well with the DNS in terms of modal amplitudes and modal shape during the strongly nonlinear phase of the secondary instability mode. During the transition process, the skin friction coefficient rises rather rapidly and the wall-shear distribution shows a sawtooth pattern that is analogous to the previously documented surface flow visualizations of transition due to stationary crossflow instability. Fully turbulent features are observed in the downstream region of the flow.

  16. Three-Dimensional Structure of Boundary Layers in Transition to Turbulence

    Science.gov (United States)

    1989-03-01

    basic flows are boundary layers (flat plate, curved wall, Falkner-Skan, rotating disk, Falkner-Skan-Cook), plane and circular Couette and Poiseuille ...metric), the viscous normal shock, and the compressible plane Couette flow . The code and selected insert files have been distributed to students, various...that depend on a single independent variable 9, e.g. a stratified fluid with density p(U), 9 pointing opposite to gravity, circular Couette flow with

  17. Structural vibration a uniform accurate solution for laminated beams, plates and shells with general boundary conditions

    CERN Document Server

    Jin, Guoyong; Su, Zhu

    2015-01-01

    This book develops a uniform accurate method which is capable of dealing with vibrations of laminated beams, plates and shells with arbitrary boundary conditions including classical boundaries, elastic supports and their combinations. It also provides numerous solutions for various configurations including various boundary conditions, laminated schemes, geometry and material parameters, which fill certain gaps in this area of reach and may serve as benchmark solutions for the readers. For each case, corresponding fundamental equations in the framework of classical and shear deformation theory are developed. Following the fundamental equations, numerous free vibration results are presented for various configurations including different boundary conditions, laminated sequences and geometry and material properties. The proposed method and corresponding formulations can be readily extended to static analysis.

  18. Plate boundary forces in the vicinity of Trinidad-the-transition from transpression to transtension in the Southern Caribbean plate boundary zones

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Algar, S.T.; Pindell, J.L. (Dartmouth College, Hanover, NH (United States))

    1993-02-01

    Deformation in the southern Caribbean plate boundary zones as recorded in the Northern Range of Trinidad initiated in the Oligocene with northward vergent gravity sliding of Northern Range sediments due to uplift and oversteepening of the previously passive margin by the eastward migration of the Caribbean flexural forebulge. Progressive east-southeast transvergence of the Caribbean Plate with respect to South America overthrust incorporated the Northern Range sediments into the Caribbean accretionary prism, thrusting them south-southeast to produce a Middle Miocene transpressive foreland fold and thrust belt in southern Trinidad. Late Miocene deformation within Trinidad was increasingly dominated by right-lateral strike-slop (RLSS) faulting, at the expense of transpressive compressional features. Right-stepping of RLSS motion initiated the Gulf of Paria and Caroni pull-apart basins, Since Early Pliocene these basins and other areas to the north of Trinidad have undergone north-south extension in addition to east-west trending RLSS. Such extension caused the northward withdrawal of Caribbean terranes from atop of the Northern Range, Resulting in rapid isostatically induced uplift (approximately 0.5 mmyr[sup -1]). This change in deformation style may relate to a hitherto unrecognized shift in the relative motion of the eastern Caribbean Plate with respect to South America: from east-southeast-directed transpression to east-northeast-directed transtension.

  19. MHD free convective boundary layer flow of a nanofluid past a flat vertical plate with Newtonian heating boundary condition.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammed J Uddin

    Full Text Available Steady two dimensional MHD laminar free convective boundary layer flows of an electrically conducting Newtonian nanofluid over a solid stationary vertical plate in a quiescent fluid taking into account the Newtonian heating boundary condition is investigated numerically. A magnetic field can be used to control the motion of an electrically conducting fluid in micro/nano scale systems used for transportation of fluid. The transport equations along with the boundary conditions are first converted into dimensionless form and then using linear group of transformations, the similarity governing equations are developed. The transformed equations are solved numerically using the Runge-Kutta-Fehlberg fourth-fifth order method with shooting technique. The effects of different controlling parameters, namely, Lewis number, Prandtl number, buoyancy ratio, thermophoresis, Brownian motion, magnetic field and Newtonian heating on the flow and heat transfer are investigated. The numerical results for the dimensionless axial velocity, temperature and nanoparticle volume fraction as well as the reduced Nusselt and Sherwood number have been presented graphically and discussed. It is found that the rate of heat and mass transfer increase as Newtonian heating parameter increases. The dimensionless velocity and temperature distributions increase with the increase of Newtonian heating parameter. The results of the reduced heat transfer rate is compared for convective heating boundary condition and found an excellent agreement.

  20. MHD free convective boundary layer flow of a nanofluid past a flat vertical plate with Newtonian heating boundary condition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uddin, Mohammed J; Khan, Waqar A; Ismail, Ahmed I

    2012-01-01

    Steady two dimensional MHD laminar free convective boundary layer flows of an electrically conducting Newtonian nanofluid over a solid stationary vertical plate in a quiescent fluid taking into account the Newtonian heating boundary condition is investigated numerically. A magnetic field can be used to control the motion of an electrically conducting fluid in micro/nano scale systems used for transportation of fluid. The transport equations along with the boundary conditions are first converted into dimensionless form and then using linear group of transformations, the similarity governing equations are developed. The transformed equations are solved numerically using the Runge-Kutta-Fehlberg fourth-fifth order method with shooting technique. The effects of different controlling parameters, namely, Lewis number, Prandtl number, buoyancy ratio, thermophoresis, Brownian motion, magnetic field and Newtonian heating on the flow and heat transfer are investigated. The numerical results for the dimensionless axial velocity, temperature and nanoparticle volume fraction as well as the reduced Nusselt and Sherwood number have been presented graphically and discussed. It is found that the rate of heat and mass transfer increase as Newtonian heating parameter increases. The dimensionless velocity and temperature distributions increase with the increase of Newtonian heating parameter. The results of the reduced heat transfer rate is compared for convective heating boundary condition and found an excellent agreement.

  1. Experimental Study of the Fluid Mechanics of Unsteady Turbulent Boundary Layers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1987-05-01

    research most relevant to the present work, the material of this section is restricted to developing turbulent boundary-layer flows and to fully...within which the results of this study are to be examined is presented in this chapter. Although some of the material is found in , earlier works on...8y !-U,, ( aula ) (7 (uly -UIVI(a I/ay) unste ’.dy flow steady flow Figure 5.17 Transfer of kinetic energy between velocity fields near the wall (the

  2. Non-Gaussian PDF Modeling of Turbulent Boundary Layer Fluctuating Pressure Excitation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steinwolf, Alexander; Rizzi, Stephen A.

    2003-01-01

    The purpose of the study is to investigate properties of the probability density function (PDF) of turbulent boundary layer fluctuating pressures measured on the exterior of a supersonic transport aircraft. It is shown that fluctuating pressure PDFs differ from the Gaussian distribution even for surface conditions having no significant discontinuities. The PDF tails are wider and longer than those of the Gaussian model. For pressure fluctuations upstream of forward-facing step discontinuities and downstream of aft-facing step discontinuities, deviations from the Gaussian model are more significant and the PDFs become asymmetrical. Various analytical PDF distributions are used and further developed to model this behavior.

  3. Computational solution of the defect stream-function equation for nonequilibrium turbulent boundary layers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barnwell, Richard W.

    1993-01-01

    The derivation of the accurate, second-order, almost linear, approximate equation governing the defect stream function for nonequilibrium compressible turbulent boundary layers is reviewed. The similarity of this equation to the heat conduction equation is exploited in the development of an unconditionally stable, tridiagonal computational method which is second-order accurate in the marching direction and fourth-order accurate in the surface-normal direction. Results compare well with experimental data. Nonlinear effects are shown to be small. This two-dimensional method is simple and has been implemented on a programmable calculator.

  4. Numerical simulation of quasi-streamwise hairpin-like vortex generation in turbulent boundary layer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG Nan; LU Li-peng; DUAN Zhen-zhen; YUAN Xiang-jiang

    2008-01-01

    A mechanism for generation of near wall quasi-streamwise hairpin-like vortex (QHV) and secondary quasi-streamwise vortices (SQV) is presented. The conceptual model of resonant triad in the theory of hydrodynamic instability and direct numerical simulation of a turbulent boundary layer were applied to reveal the formation of QHV and SQV. The generation procedures and the characteristics of the vortex structures are obtained, which share some similarities with previous numerical simulations. The research using resonant triad conceptual model and numerical simulation provides a possibility for investigating and controling the vortex structures, which play a dominant role in the evolution of coherent structures in the near-wall region.

  5. A study on turbulence transportation and modification of Spalart–Allmaras model for shock-wave/turbulent boundary layer interaction flow

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ma Li

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available It is of great significance to improve the accuracy of turbulence models in shock-wave/boundary layer interaction flow. The relationship between the pressure gradient, as well as the shear layer, and the development of turbulent kinetic energy in impinging shock-wave/turbulent boundary layer interaction flow at Mach 2.25 is analyzed based on the data of direct numerical simulation (DNS. It is found that the turbulent kinetic energy is amplified by strong shear in the separation zone and the adverse pressure gradient near the separation point. The pressure gradient was non-dimensionalised with local density, velocity, and viscosity. Spalart–Allmaras (S–A model is modified by introducing the non-dimensional pressure gradient into the production term of the eddy viscosity transportation equation. Simulation results show that the production and dissipation of eddy viscosity are strongly enhanced by the modification of S–A model. Compared with DNS and experimental data, the wall pressure and the wall skin friction coefficient as well as the velocity profile of the modified S–A model are obviously improved. Thus it can be concluded that the modification of S–A model with the pressure gradient can improve the predictive accuracy for simulating the shock-wave/turbulent boundary layer interaction.

  6. Heat transfer, velocity-temperature correlation, and turbulent shear stress from Navier-Stokes computations of shock wave/turbulent boundary layer interaction flows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, C. R.; Hingst, W. R.; Porro, A. R.

    1991-01-01

    The properties of 2-D shock wave/turbulent boundary layer interaction flows were calculated by using a compressible turbulent Navier-Stokes numerical computational code. Interaction flows caused by oblique shock wave impingement on the turbulent boundary layer flow were considered. The oblique shock waves were induced with shock generators at angles of attack less than 10 degs in supersonic flows. The surface temperatures were kept at near-adiabatic (ratio of wall static temperature to free stream total temperature) and cold wall (ratio of wall static temperature to free stream total temperature) conditions. The computational results were studied for the surface heat transfer, velocity temperature correlation, and turbulent shear stress in the interaction flow fields. Comparisons of the computational results with existing measurements indicated that (1) the surface heat transfer rates and surface pressures could be correlated with Holden's relationship, (2) the mean flow streamwise velocity components and static temperatures could be correlated with Crocco's relationship if flow separation did not occur, and (3) the Baldwin-Lomax turbulence model should be modified for turbulent shear stress computations in the interaction flows.

  7. An Estimation of Turbulent Kinetic Energy and Energy Dissipation Rate Based on Atmospheric Boundary Layer Similarity Theory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Jongil; Arya, S. Pal; Shaohua, Shen; Lin, Yuh-Lang; Proctor, Fred H. (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    Algorithms are developed to extract atmospheric boundary layer profiles for turbulence kinetic energy (TKE) and energy dissipation rate (EDR), with data from a meteorological tower as input. The profiles are based on similarity theory and scalings for the atmospheric boundary layer. The calculated profiles of EDR and TKE are required to match the observed values at 5 and 40 m. The algorithms are coded for operational use and yield plausible profiles over the diurnal variation of the atmospheric boundary layer.

  8. Alternate model of Chladni figures for the circular homogenous thin plate case with open boundaries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trejo-Mandujano, H. A.; Mijares-Bernal, G.; Ordoñez-Casanova, E. G.

    2015-01-01

    The wave equation is a direct but a complex approach to solve analytically for the Chladni figures, mainly because of the complications that non-smooth and open boundary conditions impose. In this paper, we present an alternate solution model based on the principle of Huygens-Fresnel and on the ideas of Bohr for the hydrogen atom. The proposed model has been implemented numerically and compared, with good agreement, to our own experimental results for the case of a thin homogenous circular plate with open boundaries.

  9. STRESS INTENSITY FACTORS FOR A FINITE PLATE WITH AN INCLINED CRACK BY BOUNDARY COLLOCATION

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xing Li; Xuemei You

    2005-01-01

    In this paper, we combine the Muskhelishvili's complex variable method and boundary collocation method, and choose a set of new stress function based on the stress boundary condition of crack surface,the higher precision and less computation are reached. This method is applied to calculating the stress intensity factor for a finite plate with an inclined crack. The influence of θ (the obliquity of crack) on the stress intensity factors, as well as the number of summation terms on the stress intensity factor are studied and graphically represented.

  10. Tectonic plate under a localized boundary stress: fitting of a zero-range solvable model

    CERN Document Server

    Petrova, L

    2008-01-01

    We suggest a method of fitting of a zero-range model of a tectonic plate under a boundary stress on the basis of comparison of the theoretical formulae for the corresponding eigenfunctions/eigenvalues with the results extraction under monitoring, in the remote zone, of non-random (regular) oscillations of the Earth with periods 0.2-6 hours, on the background seismic process, in case of low seismic activity. Observations of changes of the characteristics of the oscillations (frequency, amplitude and polarization) in course of time, together with the theoretical analysis of the fitted model, would enable us to localize the stressed zone on the boundary of the plate and estimate the risk of a powerful earthquake at the zone.

  11. World Stress Map Release 2005 - Stress orientations from single focal mechanisms at plate boundaries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heidbach, O.; Barth, A.; Müller, B.; Reinecker, J.; Sperner, B.; Tingay, M.

    2005-12-01

    The World Stress Map (WSM) is a global compilation of data about recent tectonic stresses from a wide range of indicators (e.g. focal mechanisms, borehole breakouts). It is a valuable tool for the solution of numerous of technological and scientific problems. The orientation of the stress field, for instance, is a primary control on subsurface fluid flow and thus WSM data can be used to improve petroleum production or the efficiency of geothermal power stations. In scientific context, information on the stress state is essential for seismic hazard assessment. The WSM database release 2005 contains more than 14,000 data sets all classified according to a unified quality ranking. Thus, the comparability of data from different types of measurement is guaranteed. The database as well as guidelines and software for plotting stress maps are available free of charge from our website www.world-stress-map.org. Users can create their own stress map including their own stress data almost instantly with the CASMO (Create A Stress Map Online) web tool. Alternatively, users can download the software CASMI (Create A Stress Map Interactively) free of charge and produce their own stress maps. In the WSM 2005 release we refined the definition of so-called Possible Plate Boundary Events (PBE) for stress data from single focal mechanisms (FMS) considering that the orientations of these earthquakes might be rather controlled by the geometry of the plate boundary than by the stress field orientation. In general, it is assumed that numerous randomly oriented faults are present in the crust, so that earthquakes occur on faults optimally oriented relative to the regional stress field. In such a setting the principal axes of the moment tensor (P, B, T) provide good approximations for the principal stress orientations (σ_1, σ2, σ3). However, plate boundaries show a different mechanical behavior. They are characterized by faults with preferred orientations and presumably include major

  12. MHD Natural Convection with Convective Surface Boundary Condition over a Flat Plate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad M. Rashidi

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available We apply the one parameter continuous group method to investigate similarity solutions of magnetohydrodynamic (MHD heat and mass transfer flow of a steady viscous incompressible fluid over a flat plate. By using the one parameter group method, similarity transformations and corresponding similarity representations are presented. A convective boundary condition is applied instead of the usual boundary conditions of constant surface temperature or constant heat flux. In addition it is assumed that viscosity, thermal conductivity, and concentration diffusivity vary linearly. Our study indicates that a similarity solution is possible if the convective heat transfer related to the hot fluid on the lower surface of the plate is directly proportional to (x--1/2 where x- is the distance from the leading edge of the solid surface. Numerical solutions of the ordinary differential equations are obtained by the Keller Box method for different values of the controlling parameters associated with the problem.

  13. Characteristics and generation of elastic turbulence in a three-dimensional parallel plate channel using direct numerical simulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Hong-Na; Li, Feng-Chen; Li, Xiao-Bin; Li, Dong-Yang; Cai, Wei-Hua; Yu, Bo

    2016-09-01

    Direct numerical simulations (DNSs) of purely elastic turbulence in rectilinear shear flows in a three-dimensional (3D) parallel plate channel were carried out, by which numerical databases were established. Based on the numerical databases, the present paper analyzed the structural and statistical characteristics of the elastic turbulence including flow patterns, the wall effect on the turbulent kinetic energy spectrum, and the local relationship between the flow motion and the microstructures’ behavior. Moreover, to address the underlying physical mechanism of elastic turbulence, its generation was presented in terms of the global energy budget. The results showed that the flow structures in elastic turbulence were 3D with spatial scales on the order of the geometrical characteristic length, and vortex tubes were more likely to be embedded in the regions where the polymers were strongly stretched. In addition, the patterns of microstructures’ elongation behave like a filament. From the results of the turbulent kinetic energy budget, it was found that the continuous energy releasing from the polymers into the main flow was the main source of the generation and maintenance of the elastic turbulent status. Project supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant Nos. 51276046 and 51506037), the Foundation for Innovative Research Groups of the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant No. 51421063), the China Postdoctoral Science Foundation (Grant No. 2016M591526), the Heilongjiang Postdoctoral Fund, China (Grant No. LBH-Z15063), and the China Postdoctoral International Exchange Program.

  14. Geodetic observations in Iceland: divergent plate boundary influenced by a hotspot

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ofeigsson, Benedikt Gunnar; Hreinsdóttir, Sigrun; Sigmundsson, Freysteinn; Arnadottir, Thora; Vogfjord, Kristin; Geirsson, Halldor; Einarsson, Pall; Jonsson, Sigurjon; Villemin, Thierry; Fjalar Sigurdsson, Sigurdur; Roberts, Matthew; Sturkell, Erik; Lafemina, Peter C.; Bennett, Richard; Voelksen, Christof; Valsson, Gudmundur; Sigurdsson, Thorarinn

    2013-04-01

    The mid Atlantic ridge, separating the Eurasian and North American tectonic plates, is mostly buried below the Atlantic. There are, however, a few places where subaerial exposure of the mid-oceanic rift system allows geodetic observations of the deformation associated with the plate boundary. Iceland is the largest portion of the system emerged above sea level, a consequence of excessive volcanism caused by the interaction of a mantle plume with the mid-oceanic ridge. Iceland is therefore a unique site to study processes associated with divergent plate boundaries, and the effects of the plume-ridge interaction. A network of continuous GPS stations have been operating in Iceland since 1995 when the first station was installed in Reykjavik. Since then, stations have been added to the network at different points in time, with over 70 stations presently in operation. The network has been used e.g. for studies of deformation associated with the divergent plate boundary, micro-plate formation due to rift jumps, the plate-spreading deformation cycle associated with rifting episodes, strain rates and stress accumulation on transform zones connecting the ridge segments and deformation due to magmatic processes. In addition the GPS network is used in studies of the deformation associated with mass variations of Iceland's glaciers. The continuous GPS network serves as monitoring tool in Iceland, both for volcanic and seismic hazards but also as a research tool. In the recent Futurvolc project, which partly builds on EPOS, the data from the continuous GPS network along with data from the seismic network and InSAR observations, will serve as the main input in joint analyses of long and short term magma movements in volcanic regions. The establishment of the continuous GPS network in Iceland has provided an ideal tool to further increase our understanding of the geodynamic processes associated with divergent plate boundaries and plume-ridge interaction as well as establishing a

  15. Direct force wall shear measurements in pressure-driven three-dimensional turbulent boundary layers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mcallister, J. E.; Tennant, M. H.; Pierce, F. J.

    1982-01-01

    Unique, simultaneous direct measurements of the magnitude and direction of the local wall shear stress in a pressure-driven three-dimensional turbulent boundary layer are presented. The flow is also described with an oil streak wall flow pattern, a map of the wall shear stress-wall pressure gradient orientations, a comparison of the wall shear stress directions relative to the directions of the nearest wall velocity as measured with a typical, small boundary layer directionally sensitive claw probe, as well as limiting wall streamline directions from the oil streak patterns, and a comparison of the freestream streamlines and the wall flow streamlines. A review of corrections for direct force sensing shear meters for two-dimensional flows is presented with a brief discussion of their applicability to three-dimensional devices.

  16. Experimental Measurements of a High Reynolds Num- ber Adverse Pressure Gradient Turbulent Boundary Layer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atkinson, Callum; Amili, Omid; Stanislas, Michel; Cuvier, Christophe; Foucaut, Jean-Marc; Srinath, Sricharan; Laval, Jean-Philippe; Kaehler, Christian; Hain, Rainer; Scharnowski, Sven; Schroeder, Andreas; Geisler, Reinhard; Agocs, Janos; Roese, Anni; Willert, Christian; Klinner, Joachim; Soria, Julio

    2016-11-01

    The study of adverse pressure gradient turbulent boundary layers is complicated by the need to characterise both the local pressure gradient and it's upstream flow history. It is therefore necessary to measure a significant streamwise domain at a resolution sufficient to resolve the small scales features. To achieve this collaborative particle image velocimetry (PIV) measurements were performed in the large boundary layer wind-tunnel at the Laboratoire de Mecanique de Lille, including: planar measurements spanning a streamwise domain of 3.5m using 16 cameras covering 15 δ spanwise wall-normal stereo-PIV measurements, high-speed micro-PIV of the near wall region and wall shear stress; and streamwise wall-normal PIV in the viscous sub layer. Details of the measurements and preliminary results will be presented.

  17. Unsteady Boundary-Layer Flow over Jerked Plate Moving in a Free Stream of Viscoelastic Fluid

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sufian Munawar

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available This study aims to investigate the unsteady boundary-layer flow of a viscoelastic non-Newtonian fluid over a flat surface. The plate is suddenly jerked to move with uniform velocity in a uniform stream of non-Newtonian fluid. Purely analytic solution to governing nonlinear equation is obtained. The solution is highly accurate and valid for all values of the dimensionless time 0≤τ<∞. Flow properties of the viscoelastic fluid are discussed through graphs.

  18. Seismo-electromagnetic phenomena in the western part of the Eurasia-Nubia plate boundary

    OpenAIRE

    Silva, H. G; Bezzeghoud, M.; J. P. Rocha; P. F. Biagi; Tlemçani, M.; Rosa, R.N.; M. A. Salgueiro da Silva; Borges, J. F.; Caldeira, B.; Reis, A. H.; MANSO M.

    2011-01-01

    This paper presents a future research plan that aims to monitor Seismo-electromagnetic (SEM) phenomena in the western part of the Eurasia-Nubia plate boundary (WENP). This region has a significant tectonic activity [1] combined with relatively low electromagnetic noise levels and for that reason presents the possibility to perform high quality SEM measurements. Further, it is known that low-frequency [ultra (ULF), very (VLF), and low-frequencies (LF)] electromag- netic (EM) waves produce m...

  19. Turbulent behaviour within a coastal boundary layer, observations and modelling at the Isola del Giglio

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brandini, Carlo; Taddei, Stefano; Doronzo, Bartolomeo; Fattorini, Maria; Costanza, Letizia; Perna, Massimo; Serafino, Francesco; Ludeno, Giovanni

    2017-09-01

    The hydrodynamics of coastal areas is characterized by the interaction among phenomena occurring at different spatial and temporal scales, such as the interaction of a large-scale ocean current with the local bathymetry and coastline, and local forcing conditions. In order to take into account all relevant phenomena, the study of the hydrodynamics of coastal zones requires a high-spatial and temporal resolution for both observations and simulation of local currents. This resolution can be obtained by using X-band radar, which allows simultaneous measurement of waves and currents in a range of 1-3 miles from the coastline, as well as high-resolution numerical models implemented in the area and configured through multiple nesting techniques in order to reach resolutions comparable to such coastal observations. Such an integrated monitoring system was implemented at the Isola del Giglio in 2012, after the accident of the Costa Concordia ship. Results can be used as a cross-validation of data produced independently by radar observations and numerical models. In addition, results give some important insights on the dynamics of the coastal boundary layer, both for what concerns the attenuation in the profile of the depth-averaged velocities which typically occur in turbulent boundary layers, as well as for the production, detachment and evolution of vorticity produced by the interaction of large-scale ocean currents with the coastline and the subsequent time evolution of such boundary layer. This transition between large-scale regional currents and the coastal boundary layer is often neglected in regional forecasting systems, but it has an important role in the ocean turbulence processes.

  20. Turbulent production in an internal wave bottom boundary layer maintained by a vertically propagating seiche

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henderson, Stephen M.

    2016-04-01

    Internal seiches, which supply the energy responsible for mixing many lakes, are often modeled as vertically standing waves. However, recent observations of vertical seiche propagation in a small lake are inconsistent with the standard, vertically standing model. To examine the processes responsible for such propagation, drag and turbulent production in the bottom boundary layer of a small lake are related to the energy supplied by a propagating seiche (period 10-24 h). Despite complex and fluctuating stratification, which often inhibited mixing within 0.4 m of the bed, bottom stress was well represented by a simple drag coefficient model (drag coefficient 1.5 × 10-3). The net supply of seiche energy to the boundary layer was estimated by fitting a model for internal wave vertical propagation to velocity profiles measured above the boundary layer (1-4.5 m above lakebed). Fitted reflection coefficients ranged from 0.3 at 1 cycle/d frequency to 0.7 at 2.4 cycles/d (cf. near-unity coefficients of classical seiche theories). The net supply of seiche energy approximately balanced boundary layer turbulent production. Three of four peaks in production and energy flux occurred 0.8-2.2 days after strong oscillating winds, a delay comparable to the time required for seiche energy to propagate to the lakebed. A model based on the estimated drag coefficient predicted the observed frequency dependence of the seiche reflection coefficient. For flat-bed regions in narrow lakes, the model predicts that reflection is controlled by the ratio of water velocity to vertical wave propagation speed, with sufficiently large ratios leading to weak reflection, and clear vertical seiche propagation.

  1. Heat transfer and wall temperature effects in shock wave turbulent boundary layer interactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bernardini, M.; Asproulias, I.; Larsson, J.; Pirozzoli, S.; Grasso, F.

    2016-12-01

    Direct numerical simulations are carried out to investigate the effect of the wall temperature on the behavior of oblique shock wave turbulent boundary layer interactions at free-stream Mach number 2.28 and shock angle of the wedge generator φ =8∘ . Five values of the wall-to-recovery-temperature ratio (Tw/Tr ) are considered, corresponding to cold, adiabatic, and hot wall thermal conditions. We show that the main effect of cooling is to decrease the characteristic scales of the interaction in terms of upstream influence and extent of the separation bubble. The opposite behavior is observed in the case of heating, which produces a marked dilatation of the interaction region. The distribution of the Stanton number shows that a strong amplification of the heat transfer occurs across the interaction, with the maximum thermal and dynamic loads found for the case of the cold wall. The analysis reveals that the fluctuating heat flux exhibits a strong intermittent behavior, characterized by scattered spots with extremely high values compared to the mean. Furthermore, the analogy between momentum and heat transfer, typical of compressible, wall-bounded, equilibrium turbulent flows, does not apply for most of the interaction domain. The premultiplied spectra of the wall heat flux do not show any evidence of the influence of the low-frequency shock motion, and the primary mechanism for the generation of peak heating is found to be linked with the turbulence amplification in the interaction region.

  2. Influence of grid aspect ratio on planetary boundary layer turbulence in large-eddy simulations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Nishizawa

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available We examine the influence of the grid aspect ratio of horizontal to vertical grid spacing on turbulence in the planetary boundary layer (PBL in a large-eddy simulation (LES. In order to clarify and distinguish them from other artificial effects caused by numerical schemes, we used a fully compressible meteorological LES model with a fully explicit scheme of temporal integration. The influences are investigated with a series of sensitivity tests with parameter sweeps of spatial resolution and grid aspect ratio. We confirmed that the mixing length of the eddy viscosity and diffusion due to sub-grid-scale turbulence plays an essential role in reproducing the theoretical −5/3 slope of the energy spectrum. If we define the filter length in LES modeling based on consideration of the numerical scheme, and introduce a corrective factor for the grid aspect ratio into the mixing length, the theoretical slope of the energy spectrum can be obtained; otherwise, spurious energy piling appears at high wave numbers. We also found that the grid aspect ratio has influence on the turbulent statistics, especially the skewness of the vertical velocity near the top of the PBL, which becomes spuriously large with large aspect ratio, even if a reasonable spectrum is obtained.

  3. The response of the Ocean Surface Boundary Layer and Langmuir turbulence to tropical cyclones

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Dong; Kukulka, Tobias; Reichl, Brandon; Hara, Tetsu; Ginis, Isaac

    2016-11-01

    The interaction of turbulent ocean surface boundary layer (OSBL) currents and the surface waves' Stokes drift generates Langmuir turbulence (LT), which enhances OSBL mixing. This study investigates the response of LT to extreme wind and complex wave forcing under tropical cyclones (TCs), using a large eddy simulation (LES) approach based on the wave-averaged Navier-Stokes equations. We simulate the OSBL response to TC systems by imposing the wind forcing of an idealized TC storm model, covering the entire horizontal extent of the storm systems. The Stokes drift vector that drives the wave forcing in the LES is determined from realistic spectral wave simulations forced by the same wind fields. We find that the orientations of Langmuir cells are vertically uniform and aligned with the wind in most regions despite substantial wind-wave misalignment in TC conditions. LT's penetration depth is related to Stokes drift depth and limited by OSBL depth. A wind-projected surface layer Langmuir number is proposed and successfully applied to scale turbulent vertical velocity variance in extreme TC conditions. Current affiliation: Princeton University/NOAA GFDL.

  4. A Clustering Method to Characterize Intermittent Bursts of Turbulence and Submeso Motions Interaction in the Stable Boundary Layer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vercauteren, N.; Klein, R.

    2014-12-01

    Atmospheric boundary layers with stable stratification include a variety of small-scale non-turbulent motions such as waves, microfronts and other complex structures. When the thermal stratification becomes strong, the presence of such submeso motions could affect the turbulent mixing to a large extent and common similarity theory that is used to describe weakly stable conditions may become unreliable. The scientific community clearly lacks understanding of what these motions are and of the extent to which they affect turbulent mixing in the stable boundary layer. We use a data-based approach to isolate regimes in which small-scale, non-turbulent motions are a main influencing parameter of turbulent mixing. We apply a clustering methodology derived for multidimensional nonstationary timeseries. The technique is based on a bounded variation, finite element method (FEM-BV) and we use it to characterize the interaction between small-scale non-turbulent motions and turbulence. Turbulence data are approximated by an optimal sequence of locally stationary multivariate autoregressive factor models (VARX) processes and some slow hidden process switching between them (FEM-BV-VARX (Horenko 2010, JAS)). The VARX processes that approximate the data include influence from external forcing. We perform prefiltering of the turbulence data to isolate submeso motions and use them as external forcing in the clustering strategy. Thus the strategy separates periods for which the influence of the external factors, i.e. non-turbulent motions on the turbulence differs. We use this strategy to derive a stochastic representation of the interactions between non-turbulent motions and turbulence under stable stratification. Our results show that submeso motions are a main forcing of turbulence in the most stable cases and not for the weakly stable cases. As these different influence regimes are isolated by the FEM-BV-VARX technique, a Markov transition matrix describes the probability of

  5. Locking, mass flux and topographic response at convergent plate boundaries - the Chilean case

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oncken, Onno

    2016-04-01

    On the long term, convergent plate boundaries have been shown to be controlled by either accretion/underplating or by subduction erosion. Vertical surface motion is coupled to convergence rate - typically with an uplift rate of the coastal area ranging from 0 to +50% of convergence rate in accretive systems, and -20 to +30% in erosive systems. Vertical kinematics, however, are not necessarily linked to horizontal strain mode, i.e. upper plate shortening or extension, in a simple way. This range of kinematic behaviors - as well as their acceleration where forearcs collide with oceanic ridges/plateau - is well expressed along the Chilean plate margin. Towards the short end of the time scale, deformation appears to exhibit a close correlation with the frictional properties and geodetic locking at the plate interface. Corroborating analogue experiments of strain accumulation during multiple earthquake cycles, forearc deformation and uplift focus above the downdip and updip end of seismic coupling and slip and are each related to a particular stage of the seismic cycle, but with opposite trends for both domains. Similarly, barriers separating locked domains along strike appear to accumulate most upper plate faulting interseismically. Hence, locking patters are reflected in topography. From the long-term memory contained in the forearc topography the relief of the Chilean forearc seems to reflect long term stability of the observed heterogeneity of locking at the plate interface. This has fundamental implications for spatial and temporal distribution of seismic hazard. Finally, the nature of locking at the plate interface controlling the above kinematic behavior appears to be strongly controlled by the degree of fluid overpressuring at the plate interface suggesting that the hydraulic system at the interface takes a key role for the forearc response.

  6. Long-term exhumation of landscapes along the Pacific-North American plate boundary as inferred from apatite (U-Th)/He and ArcGIS analyses

    OpenAIRE

    Buscher, Jamie Todd

    2007-01-01

    The Pacific-North American plate boundary is typified by transpression and convergence, yet the relationship between interplate deformation and long-term crustal shortening is not fully understood. The continuous belt of rugged topography that extends along the entire plate boundary is generally associated with oblique tectonic plate motion, strong interplate coupling, and terrane accretion, but relating plate boundary orogenesis to variations in plate geometry and behavior requires detailed ...

  7. Some remarks on the role of the boundary layers in decaying 2D turbulence in containers no-slip walls

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Clercx, H.J.H.; Van Heijst, G.J.F. [Eindhoven University of Technology, Eindhoven (Netherlands). J.M. Burges Centre for Fluid Dynamics, Dept. of Physics

    1999-12-01

    Direct numerical simulations of decaying two-dimensional (2D) turbulence inside a square container with no-slip boundaries have been carried out for Reynolds numbers up to 2000. The role of the boundary layers during the decay process has been illustrated with ensemble-averaged results for the power law behaviour of several characteristic properties of the coherent vortices which emerge during the decay of 2D turbulence. The evolution of the vortex density, the average vortex radius, the enstrophy and the vorticity extrema have been computed. An algebraic decay regime has been observed during the initial turbulent decay stage. The computed decay exponents disagree, however, with the exponents from the classical scaling theory for 2D decaying turbulence on an unbounded domain.

  8. High Reynolds number rough wall turbulent boundary layer experiments using Braille surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harris, Michael; Monty, Jason; Nova, Todd; Allen, James; Chong, Min

    2007-11-01

    This paper details smooth, transitional and fully rough turbulent boundary layer experiments in the New Mexico State high Reynolds number rough wall wind tunnel. The initial surface tested was generated with a Braille printer and consisted of an uniform array of Braille points. The average point height being 0.5mm, the spacing between the points in the span was 0.5mm and the surface consisted of span wise rows separated by 4mm. The wavelength to peak ratio was 8:1. The boundary layer thickness at the measurement location was 190mm giving a large separation of roughness height to layer thickness. The maximum friction velocity was uτ=1.5m/s at Rex=3.8 x10^7. Results for the skin friction co-efficient show that this surface follows a Nikuradse type inflectional curve and that Townsends outer layer similarity hypothesis is valid for rough wall flows with a large separation of scales. Mean flow and turbulence statistics will be presented.

  9. Insight on Turbulence Characteristics of an Urban-type Boundary Layer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monnier, Bruno; Swanson, Jonathan; Wark, Candace

    2010-11-01

    An experimental investigation of the flow through an urban-type boundary layer (4 rows of 3 cuboid Plexiglas blocks) in an experimentally modeled atmospheric boundary layer will be presented. Stereoscopic PIV is utilized to obtain 3D flow characteristics of the flow field within this complex geometry. The streamwise spacing of the array is chosen so as to mimic a common flow regime in urban areas, i.e. skimming flow regime. A large number of vertical planes distributed across the streets allows for a very good spatial description of the flow features. Measurements are obtained directly upstream of the model and in each of the middle streets of the 4 by 3 array. Coherent structure identification tools are used to highlight the 3D patterns within each of the streets. A large number of SPIV realizations in the domain provides valuable information about the flow field turbulence statistics as the flow is evolving from one street to the next. The incidence angle of the incoming flow field is also varied to assess the effect of flow channeling within the urban environment. Finally, two mean free stream speeds are studied to investigate the effect of the incoming wind profiles on the flow field turbulence.

  10. The accuracy of tomographic particle image velocimetry for measurements of a turbulent boundary layer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atkinson, Callum; Coudert, Sebastien; Foucaut, Jean-Marc; Stanislas, Michel; Soria, Julio

    2011-04-01

    To investigate the accuracy of tomographic particle image velocimetry (Tomo-PIV) for turbulent boundary layer measurements, a series of synthetic image-based simulations and practical experiments are performed on a high Reynolds number turbulent boundary layer at Reθ = 7,800. Two different approaches to Tomo-PIV are examined using a full-volume slab measurement and a thin-volume "fat" light sheet approach. Tomographic reconstruction is performed using both the standard MART technique and the more efficient MLOS-SMART approach, showing a 10-time increase in processing speed. Random and bias errors are quantified under the influence of the near-wall velocity gradient, reconstruction method, ghost particles, seeding density and volume thickness, using synthetic images. Experimental Tomo-PIV results are compared with hot-wire measurements and errors are examined in terms of the measured mean and fluctuating profiles, probability density functions of the fluctuations, distributions of fluctuating divergence through the volume and velocity power spectra. Velocity gradients have a large effect on errors near the wall and also increase the errors associated with ghost particles, which convect at mean velocities through the volume thickness. Tomo-PIV provides accurate experimental measurements at low wave numbers; however, reconstruction introduces high noise levels that reduces the effective spatial resolution. A thinner volume is shown to provide a higher measurement accuracy at the expense of the measurement domain, albeit still at a lower effective spatial resolution than planar and Stereo-PIV.

  11. Coupling Between Turbulent Boundary Layer and Radiative Heat Transfer Under Engine-Relevant Conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sircar, A.; Paul, C.; Ferreyro, S.; Imren, A.; Haworth, D. C.; Roy, S.; Ge, W.; Modest, M. F.

    2016-11-01

    The lack of accurate submodels for in-cylinder radiation and heat transfer has been identified as a key shortcoming in developing truly predictive CFD models that can be used to develop combustion systems for advanced high-efficiency, low-emissions engines. Recent measurements of wall layers in engines show discrepancies of up to 100% with respect to standard CFD boundary-layer models. And recent analysis of in-cylinder radiation based on recent spectral property databases and high-fidelity radiative transfer equation (RTE) solvers has shown that at operating conditions typical of heavy-duty CI engines, radiative emission can be as high as 40% of the wall heat losses, that molecular gas radiation can be more important than soot radiation, and that a significant fraction of the emitted radiation can be reabsorbed before reaching the walls. That is, radiation changes the in-cylinder temperature distribution, which in turn affects combustion and emissions. The goal of this research is to develop models that explicitly account for the potentially strong coupling between radiative and turbulent boundary layer heat transfer. For example, for optically thick conditions, a simple diffusion model might be formulated in terms of an absorption-coefficient-dependent turbulent Prandtl number. NSF, DOE.

  12. Evolution and formation of shear layers in a developing turbulent boundary layer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Junghoon; Monty, Jason; Hutchins, Nicholas

    2016-11-01

    The evolution and formation mechanism of shear layers in the outer region of a turbulent boundary layer are investigated using time-resolved PIV datasets of a developing turbulent boundary layer from inception at the trip up to Reτ = 3000 . An analysis of a sequence of instantaneous streamwise velocity fluctuation fields reveals that strong streamwise velocity gradients are prevalent along interfaces where low- and high-speed regions interact. To provide an insight on how such regions are associated with the formation of shear layers in the outer regions, we compute conditional averages of streamwise velocity fluctuations based on a strong shear layer. Our results reveal that one possible mechanism for the generation of shear layers in the outer region is due to the mismatch in the convection velocities between low- and high-speed regions. The results also indicate that the angle of the inclined shear layer is developing in time. In addition, the conditionally averaged velocity fluctuations exhibit a local instability along these shear layers, leading to a shear layer roll-up event as the layers evolve in time. Based on these findings, we propose a conceptual model which describes dynamic interactions of shear layers and their associated large-scale coherent motions. The authors wish to acknowledge the financial support of the Australian Research Council.

  13. Confinement effects in shock/turbulent-boundary-layer interaction through wall-modeled LES

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bermejo-Moreno, Ivan; Campo, Laura; Larsson, Johan; Bodart, Julien; Helmer, David; Eaton, John

    2016-11-01

    Wall-modeled large-eddy simulations (WMLES) are used to investigate three-dimensional effects imposed by lateral confinement on the interaction of oblique shock waves impinging on turbulent boundary layers (TBLs) developed along the walls of a nearly-square duct. A constant Mach number, M = 2 . 05 , of the incoming air stream is considered, with a Reynolds number based on the incoming turbulent boundary layer momentum thickness Reθ 14 , 000 . The strength of the impinging shock is varied by increasing the height of a compression wedge located at a constant streamwise location that spans the top wall of the duct at a 20° angle. Simulation results are first validated with particle image velocimetry (PIV) experimental data obtained at several vertical planes. Emphasis is placed on the study of the instantaneous and time-averaged structure of the flow for the stronger-interaction case, which shows mean flow reversal. By performing additional spanwise-periodic simulations, it is found that the structure and location of the shock system and separation bubble are significantly modified by the lateral confinement. Low-frequency unsteadiness and downstream evolution of corner flows are also investigated. Financial support from the United States Department of Energy under the PSAAP program is gratefully acknowledged.

  14. Turbulence radiation coupling in boundary layers of heavy-duty diesel engines

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sircar, Arpan [Pennsylvania State Univ., University Park, PA (United States); Paul, Chandan [Pennsylvania State Univ., University Park, PA (United States); Ferreyro-Fernandez, Sebastian [Pennsylvania State Univ., University Park, PA (United States); Imren, Abdurrahman [Pennsylvania State Univ., University Park, PA (United States); Haworth, Daniel C [Pennsylvania State Univ., University Park, PA (United States); Roy, Somesh P [Marquette University (United States); Ge, Wenjun [University of California Merced (United States); Modest, Michael F [University of California Merced (United States)

    2017-04-05

    The lack of accurate submodels for in-cylinder radiation and heat transfer has been identified as a key shortcoming in developing truly predictive, physics-based computational fluid dynamics (CFD) models that can be used to develop combustion systems for advanced high-efficiency, low-emissions engines. Recent measurements of wall layers in engines show discrepancies of up to 100% with respect to standard CFD boundary-layer models. And recent analysis of in-cylinder radiation based on the most recent spectral property databases and high-fidelity radiative transfer equation (RTE) solvers has shown that at operating pressures and exhaust-gas recirculation levels typical of modern heavy-duty compression-ignition engines, radiative emission can be as high as 40% of the wall heat losses, that molecular gas radiation (mainly CO2 and H2O) can be more important than soot radiation, and that a significant fraction of the emitted radiation can be reabsorbed before reaching the walls. That is, radiation not only contributes to heat losses, but also changes the in-cylinder temperature distribution, which in turn affects combustion and emissions. The goal of this research is to develop models that explicitly account for the potentially strong coupling between radiative and turbulent boundary layer heat transfer. For example, for optically thick conditions, a simple diffusion model might be formulated in terms of an absorption-coefficient-dependent turbulent Prandtl number.

  15. A simple stochastic quadrant model for the transport and deposition of particles in turbulent boundary layers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jin, C.; Potts, I.; Reeks, M. W., E-mail: mike.reeks@ncl.ac.uk [School of Mechanical and Systems Engineering, Newcastle University, Stephenson Building, Claremont Road, Newcastle upon Tyne NE1 7RU (United Kingdom)

    2015-05-15

    We present a simple stochastic quadrant model for calculating the transport and deposition of heavy particles in a fully developed turbulent boundary layer based on the statistics of wall-normal fluid velocity fluctuations obtained from a fully developed channel flow. Individual particles are tracked through the boundary layer via their interactions with a succession of random eddies found in each of the quadrants of the fluid Reynolds shear stress domain in a homogeneous Markov chain process. In this way, we are able to account directly for the influence of ejection and sweeping events as others have done but without resorting to the use of adjustable parameters. Deposition rate predictions for a wide range of heavy particles predicted by the model compare well with benchmark experimental measurements. In addition, deposition rates are compared with those obtained from continuous random walk models and Langevin equation based ejection and sweep models which noticeably give significantly lower deposition rates. Various statistics related to the particle near wall behavior are also presented. Finally, we consider the model limitations in using the model to calculate deposition in more complex flows where the near wall turbulence may be significantly different.

  16. Edge states for the turbulence transition in the asymptotic suction boundary layer

    CERN Document Server

    Kreilos, Tobias; Schneider, Tobias M; Eckhardt, Bruno

    2013-01-01

    We demonstrate the existence of an exact invariant solution to the Navier-Stokes equations for the asymptotic suction boundary layer. The identified periodic orbit with a very long period of several thousand advective time units is found as a local dynamical attractor embedded in the stability boundary between laminar and turbulent dynamics. Its dynamics captures both the interplay of downstream oriented vortex pairs and streaks observed in numerous shear flows as well as the energetic bursting that is characteristic for boundary layers. By embedding the flow into a family of flows that interpolates between plane Couette flow and the boundary layer we demonstrate that the periodic orbit emerges in a saddle-node infinite-period (SNIPER) bifurcation of two symmetry-related travelling wave solutions of plane Couette flow. Physically, the long period is due to a slow streak instability which leads to a violent breakup of a streak associated with the bursting and the reformation of the streak at a different spanwi...

  17. Sensitivity to Mean Flow Parameters of the Low Wavenumber Content of the Wall Pressure under a Turbulent Boundary Layer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-09-26

    fit to the turbulence data discussed in Section B .2 and the analytical expression for the mean shear discussed in Section B .2. A cubic spline fit to the...functions) interpolation schemes. The inner integral in Eqs. 16 and 17 is evaluated using Simpson’s rule. B . Turbulent Boundary Layer Data 1. Data Sources...the data points. Once such a curve has been defined, the data can be interpolated at any location between measurement points. Spline interpolation is

  18. Laboratory measurements of scalar and momentum structure in turbulent aquatic benthic boundary layers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dombroski, Daniel Edward

    In aquatic benthic environments, hydrodynamic transport of mass and momentum have shaped the evolution of form-function relationships. Animals whose life cycle depends on success in such environments have developed the biological structure and behavioral mechanisms to sustain dynamic stresses and complex chemical signals. It has become increasingly clear that understanding the ecology of these organisms is dependent on examining the complexities of the turbulent environment. In this dissertation, hydrodynamics and the structure of chemical signals within turbulent boundary layer flows are examined in the context of natural and biological systems. Experiments were conducted in the benthic region of a water flume using a combination of point-measurement and full-field imaging techniques. There are three areas of focus within the complete body of work: (1) The accuracy of an acoustic measurement technique commonly used in natural flows was evaluated. Errors in the technique, primarily attributed to a sampling volume that is large relative to the scales of motion in turbulent flows, were found to be larger than and extend farther from the bed than previously reported. (2) A three-dimensional laser-based imaging system was developed for quantifying turbulent scalar structure. The system was employed to study the topology and orientation of structure within a bed-level, passively released scalar plume. (3) Hydrodynamic stresses were measured near marine fouling communities in a study aimed at predicting larval settlement probabilities. Turbulent stresses, and by extension, the suitability of microhabitats, were found to be highly dependent on local topography and outer-scale flow conditions. This body of work advances the field of experimental fluid mechanics by contributing to the development of methods for quantifying turbulent flows, as well as furthering current understanding of the capabilities and limitations associated with new and existing techniques. Statistical

  19. Resolving vorticity and dissipation in a turbulent boundary layer by tomographic PTV and VIC+

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schneiders, Jan F. G.; Scarano, Fulvio; Elsinga, Gerrit E.

    2017-04-01

    The existing time-resolved tomographic particle image velocimetry (PIV) measurements by Jodai and Elsinga (J Fluid Mech 795:611-633; Jodai, Elsinga, J Fluid Mech 795:611-633, 2016) in a turbulent boundary layer ( Re θ = 2038) are reprocessed using tomographic particle tracking velocimetry (PTV) and vortex-in-cell-plus (VIC+). The resulting small-scale flow properties, i.e. vorticity and turbulence dissipation, are compared. The VIC+ technique was recently proposed and uses the concept of pouring time into space to increase reconstruction quality of instantaneous velocity. The tomographic PTV particle track measurements are interpolated using VIC+ to a dense grid, making use of both particle velocity and Lagrangian acceleration. Comparison of the vortical structures by visualization of isosurfaces of vorticity magnitude shows that the two methods return similar coherent vortical structures, but their strength in terms of vorticity magnitude is increased when using VIC+, which suggests an improvement in spatial resolution. Further statistical evaluation shows that the root mean square (rms) of vorticity fluctuations from tomographic PIV is approximately 40% lower in comparison to a reference profile available from a DNS simulation, while the VIC+ technique returns rms vorticity fluctuations to within 10% of the reference. The dissipation rate is heavily underestimated by tomographic PIV with approximately 50% damping, whereas the VIC+ analysis yields a dissipation rate to within approximately 5% for y + > 25. The fact that dissipation can be directly measured by a volumetric experiment is novel. It differs from existing approaches that involve 2d measurements combined with isotropic turbulence assumptions or apply corrections based on sub-grid scale turbulence modelling. Finally, the study quantifies the spatial response of VIC+ with a sine-wave lattice analysis. The results indicate a twofold increase of spatial resolution with respect to cross

  20. Measurements of Turbulence Dissipation Rates in the Planetary Boundary Layer from Wind Profiling Radars

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCaffrey, K.; Bianco, L.; Wilczak, J. M.; Johnston, P. E.

    2015-12-01

    When forecasting winds at a wind plant for energy production, the turbulence parameterizations are crucial for understanding wind plant performance. Recent research shows that the turbulence (eddy) dissipation rate in planetary boundary layer (PBL) parameterization schemes introduces significant uncertainty in the Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) model. Thus, developing the capability to measure dissipation rates in the PBL will allow for identification of weaknesses in, and improvements to the parameterizations. We use data from a 915-MHz wind profiling radar at the Boulder Atmospheric Observatory, collected during the XPIA campaign in spring 2015, to identify the critical parameters for measuring eddy dissipation rates using the spectral width method. Radar set-up parameters (e.g., spectral resolution), post-processing techniques (e.g., filtering for non-atmospheric signals), and spectral averaging, are optimized to capture the most accurate power spectrum for measuring spectral widths for use in the computation of the eddy dissipation rates. These estimates are compared to six heights of turbulence-measuring sonic anemometers from 50 - 300 m on a co-located 300 m tower as verification, showing encouraging results. These methods are then applied to the wind profiling radar data being collected in the Wind Forecasting Improvement Project 2 (WFIP2), a DOE funded campaign that aims to improve the ability to forecast hub-height winds from WRF-based models. This campaign uses of a suite of field observations, including many wind profiling radars, in the Columbia River Gorge, a location with complex terrain where turbulence parameterizations are critical for wind energy prediction.

  1. Wind-tunnel experiments of thermally-stratified turbulent boundary layer flow over a wall-mounted 2-D block

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Wei; Markfort, Corey; Porté-Agel, Fernando

    2014-05-01

    Turbulent boundary-layer flows over complex topography have been extensively studied in the atmospheric sciences and wind engineering communities. The upwind turbulence level, the atmospheric thermal stability and the shape of the topography as well as surface characteristics play important roles in turbulent transport of momentum and scalar fluxes. However, to the best of our knowledge, atmospheric thermal stability has rarely been taken into account in laboratory simulations, particularly in wind-tunnel experiments. Extension of such studies in thermally-stratified wind tunnels will substantially advance our understanding of thermal stability effects on the physics of flow over complex topography. Additionally, high-resolution experimental data can be used for development of new parameterization of surface fluxes and validation of numerical models such as Large-Eddy Simulation (LES). A series of experiments of neutral and thermally-stratified boundary-layer flows over a wall-mounted 2-D block were conducted at the Saint Anthony Falls Laboratory boundary-layer wind tunnel. The 2-D block, with a width to height ratio of 2:1, occupied the lowest 25% of the turbulent boundary layer. Stable and convective boundary layers were simulated by independently controlling the temperature of air flow, the test section floor, and the wall-mounted block surfaces. Measurements using high-resolution Particle Image Velocimetry (PIV), x-wire/cold-wire anemometry, thermal-couples and surface heat flux sensors were made to quantify the turbulent properties and surface fluxes in distinct macroscopic flow regions, including the separation/recirculation zones, evolving shear layer and the asymptotic far wake. Emphasis will be put on addressing thermal stability effects on the spatial distribution of turbulent kinetic energy (TKE) and turbulent fluxes of momentum and scalar from the near to far wake region. Terms of the TKE budget equation are also inferred from measurements and

  2. Streamwise counter-rotating vortices generated by triangular leading edge pattern in flat plate boundary layer

    KAUST Repository

    Hasheminejad, S. M.

    2016-01-05

    A series of flow visualizations were conducted to qualitatively study the development of streamwise counter-rotating vortices over a flat plate induced by triangular patterns at the leading edge of a flat plate. The experiments were carried out for a Reynolds number based on the pattern wavelength (λ) of 3080. The results depict the onset, development and breakdown of the vortical structures within the flat plate boundary layer. Moreover, the effect of one spanwise array of holes with diameter of 0.2λ (=3 mm) was examined. This investigation was done on two different flat plates with holes placed at the location x/λ = 2 downstream of the troughs and peaks. The presence of holes after troughs does not show any significant effect on the vortical structures. However, the plate with holes after peaks noticeably delays the vortex breakdown. In this case, the “mushroom-like” vortices move away from the wall and propagate downstream with stable vortical structures. The vortex growth is halted further downstream but start to tilt aside.

  3. Plate boundary deformation at the latitude of the Salton Trough - northern Gulf of California (Invited)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stock, J. M.

    2013-12-01

    Along the Pacific-North America plate boundary zone, the segment including the southern San Andreas fault to Salton Trough and northern Gulf of California basins has been transtensional throughout its evolution, based on Pacific-North America displacement vectors calculated from the global plate circuit (900 × 20 km at N54°W since 20 Ma; 460 × 20 km at N48°W since 11 Ma). Nevertheless, active seismicity and focal mechanisms show a broad zone of plate boundary deformation within which the inferred stress regime varies locally (Yang & Hauksson 2013 GJI), and fault patterns in some regions suggest ongoing tectonic rotation. Similar behavior is inferred to have occurred in this zone over most of its history. Crustal structure in this region is constrained by surface geology, geophysical experiments (e.g., the 2011 Salton Seismic Imaging Project (SSIP), USGS Imperial Valley 1979, PACE), and interdisciplinary marine and onland studies in Mexico (e.g., NARS-Baja, Cortes, and surveys by PEMEX). Magnetic data (e.g., EMAG-2) aids in the recognition of large-scale crustal provinces and fault boundaries in regions lacking detailed geophysical surveys. Consideration of existing constraints on crustal thickness and architecture, and fault and basin evolution suggests that to reconcile geological deformation with plate motion history, the following additional factors need to be taken into account. 1) Plate boundary displacement via interacting systems of rotating blocks, coeval with slip on steep strike slip faults, and possibly related to slip on low angle extensional faults (e.g, Axen & Fletcher 1998 IGR) may be typical prior to the onset of seafloor spreading. This fault style may have accommodated up to 150 km of plate motion in the Mexican Continental Borderland and north of the Vizcaino Peninsula, likely between 12 and 15 Ma, as well as explaining younger rotations adjacent to the Gulf of California and current deformation southwest of the Salton Sea. 2) Geophysical

  4. Implications of Stably Stratified Atmospheric Boundary Layer Turbulence on the Near-Wake Structure of Wind Turbines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kiran Bhaganagar

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Turbulence structure in the wake behind a full-scale horizontal-axis wind turbine under the influence of real-time atmospheric inflow conditions has been investigated using actuator-line-model based large-eddy-simulations. Precursor atmospheric boundary layer (ABL simulations have been performed to obtain mean and turbulence states of the atmosphere under stable stratification subjected to two different cooling rates. Wind turbine simulations have revealed that, in addition to wind shear and ABL turbulence, height-varying wind angle and low-level jets are ABL metrics that influence the structure of the turbine wake. Increasing stability results in shallower boundary layers with stronger wind shear, steeper vertical wind angle gradients, lower turbulence, and suppressed vertical motions. A turbulent mixing layer forms downstream of the wind turbines, the strength and size of which decreases with increasing stability. Height dependent wind angle and turbulence are the ABL metrics influencing the lateral wake expansion. Further, ABL metrics strongly impact the evolution of tip and root vortices formed behind the rotor. Two factors play an important role in wake meandering: tip vortex merging due to the mutual inductance form of instability and the corresponding instability of the turbulent mixing layer.

  5. Seismotectonics of the Lwandle-Nubia plate boundary between South Africa and the Southwest Indian Ridge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hartnady, Chris; Okal, Emile; Calais, Eric; Stamps, Sarah; Saria, Elifuraha

    2013-04-01

    The Lwandle (LW) plate shares a boundary with the Nubia (NU) plate, extending from a diffuse triple junction with the Rovuma plate in Southern Mozambique to a triple junction with the Antarctic plate along a segment of the Southwest Indian Ridge (SWIR). The LW-NU boundary terminates in the ~750 km-long, complex transform of the Andrew Bain Fracture Zone (ABFZ), but its exact locus is still unclear. Recent works locate it along the eastern boundary of the submarine Mozambique Ridge, parallel to the pre-existing, oceanic transform-fault fabric. However, an early concept of the LW block ('ambiguous region' of Hartnady, 1990, Fig. 2) indicates a more westerly trajectory in the north that includes parts of South Africa, with a southerly extension across old oceanic crust of the submarine Natal Valley and Transkei Basin. This proposed boundary is marked by several, aligned epicentres of moderate to strong earthquakes (1941, 1942, 1956, 1969, 1972, 1975, 1981 and 1989). Our re-examination of seismographic records from the 1975 'intraplate' earthquake (-37.62°N, 30.98°E, mb5.0), in the oceanic crust of the distal Transkei Basin, shows a thrust-faulting focal mechanism along a nodal plane striking N272°E. The largest (ML4.2) of a series of three small earthquakes in the Natal Valley in 2009, close to a zone of recent seafloor deformation mapped in 1992, has similar first-motion patterns at Southern African seismograph stations. When the 1975 slip-vector result (N173°E) is combined with a normal-faulting slip vector (N078°E) from a 1986 onland earthquake (-30.53°N, 28.84°E, mb5.0) near the Lesotho-KZN border, and both are incorporated into the wider data-set previously used to solve for East African Rift kinematics, they produce a LW-NU rotation pole that is located south of Africa, near the Agulhas Plateau, and approximately 950 km from the Natal Valley deformation zone. The modeled low rate of right-lateral, LW-NU slip (~0.50-0.75 mm/yr) across this LW-NU boundary

  6. Fluctuation spectra and variances in convective turbulent boundary layers: A reevaluation of old models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yaglom, A. M.

    1994-02-01

    Most of the existing theoretical models for statistical characteristics of turbulence in convective boundary layers are based on the similarity theory by Monin and Obukhov [Trudy Geofiz. Inst. Akad. Nauk SSSR 24(151), 163 (1954)], and its further refinements. A number of such models was recently reconsidered and partially compared with available data by Kader and Yaglom [J. Fluid Mech. 212, 637 (1990); Turbulence and Coherent Structures (Kluwer, Dordrecht, 1991), p. 387]. However, in these papers the data related to variances =σ2u and =σ2v of horizontal velocity components were not considered at all, and the data on horizontal velocity spectra Eu(k) and Ev(k) were used only for a restricted range of not too small wave numbers k. This is connected with findings by Kaimal et al. [Q. J. R. Meteorol. Soc. 98, 563 (1972)] and Panofsky et al. [Boundary-Layer Meteorol. 11, 355 (1977)], who showed that the Monin-Obukhov theory cannot be applied to velocity variance σ2u and σ2v and to spectra Eu(k) and Ev(k) in energy ranges of wave numbers. It is shown in this paper that a simple generalization of the traditional similarity theory, which takes into account the influence of large-scale organized structures, leads to new models of horizontal velocity variances and spectra, which describe the observed deviations of these characteristics from the predictions based on the Monin-Obukhov theory, and agree satisfactorily with the available data. The application of the same approach to the temperature spectrum and variance explains why the observed deviations of temperature spectrum in convective boundary layers from the Monin-Obukhov similarity does not lead to marked violations of the same similarity as applied to temperature variance =σ2t.

  7. Modeling the Philippine Mobile Belt: Tectonic blocks in a deforming plate boundary zone

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galgana, G. A.; Hamburger, M. W.; McCaffrey, R.; Bacolcol, T. C.; Aurelio, M. A.

    2007-12-01

    The Philippine Mobile Belt, a seismically active, rapidly deforming plate boundary zone situated along the convergent Philippine Sea/Eurasian plate boundary, is examined using geodetic and seismological data. Oblique convergence between the Philippine Sea Plate and the Eurasian plate is accommodated by nearly orthogonal subduction along the Philippine Trench and the Manila Trench, as well as by strike-slip faulting along the Philippine Fault system. We develop a model of active plate boundary deformation in this region, using elastic block models constrained by known fault geometries, published GPS observations and focal mechanism solutions. We then present an estimate of block rotations, fault coupling, and intra-block deformation, based on the best-fit model that minimizes the misfit between observed and predicted geodetic vectors and earthquake slip vectors. Slip rates along the Philippine fault vary from ~22 - 36 mm/yr in the Central Visayas and about 10 to 40 mm/yr in Luzon, trending almost parallel to the fault trace. In northern Luzon, Philippine Fault splays accommodate transpressional strain. The Central Visayas block experiences convergence with the Sundaland block along the Negros Trench and the Mindoro-Palawan collision zone. On the eastern side of Central Visayas, sinistral strike-slip faulting occurs along the NNW-SSE-trending Philippine Fault. Mindanao Island in southern Philippines is dominated by east-verging subduction along the Cotabato Trench, and strain partitioning (strike- slip faulting with west-verging subduction) in eastern Mindanao along the southern Philippine Fault and Philippine Trench, respectively. Oblique active sinistral strike slip faults in Central and Eastern Mindanao that were hypothesized to be responsible for basin formation are obvious boundaries for tectonic blocks. Located south of Mindanao Island we define an adjoining oceanic block defined by the N-S trending complex dual subduction zone of Sangihe and Halmahera

  8. Distributed Plate Boundary Deformation Across the San Andreas Fault System, Central California

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dyson, M.; Titus, S. J.; Demets, C.; Tikoff, B.

    2007-12-01

    Plate boundaries are now recognized as broad zones of complex deformation as opposed to narrow zones with discrete offsets. When assessing how plate boundary deformation is accommodated, both spatially and temporally, it is therefore crucial to understand the relative contribution of the discrete and distributed components of deformation. The creeping segment of the San Andreas fault is an ideal location to study the distribution of plate boundary deformation for several reasons. First, the geometry of the fault system in central California is relatively simple. Plate motion is dominated by slip along the relatively linear strike-slip San Andreas fault, but also includes lesser slip along the adjacent and parallel Hosgri-San Gregorio and Rinconada faults, as well as within the borderlands between the three fault strands. Second, the aseismic character of the San Andreas fault in this region allows for the application of modern geodetic techniques to assess creep rates along the fault and across the region. Third, geologic structures within the borderlands are relatively well-preserved allowing comparison between modern and ancient rates and styles of deformation. Continuous GPS stations, alignment arrays surveys, and other geodetic methods demonstrate that approximately 5 mm/yr of distributed slip is accumulated (on top of the fault slip rate) across a 70-100 km wide region centered on the San Andreas fault. New campaign GPS data also suggest 2-5 mm/yr of deformation in the borderlands. These rates depend on the magnitude of the coseismic and postseismic corrections that must be made to our GPS time series to compensate for the 2003 San Simeon and 2004 Parkfield earthquakes, which rupture faults outside, but near the edges of our GPS network. The off-fault deformation pattern can be compared to the style of permanent deformation recorded in the geologic record. Fold and thrust belts in the borderlands are better developed in the Tertiary sedimentary rocks west of

  9. How diking affects the longer-term structure and evolution of divergent plate boundaries

    KAUST Repository

    Trippanera, Daniele

    2015-04-01

    Recurrent diking episodes along divergent plate boundaries, as at Dabbahu (2005, Afar) or at Bardarbunga (2014, Iceland) , highlight the possibility to have m-wide opening in a short time (days to weeks). This suggests a prominent role of magma enhancing transient plate separations. However, the role of diking on a longer term (> 102 years) and its influence on the structure and the evolution of a divergent plate boundary is still poorly investigated. Here we use field surveys along the oceanic Icelandic and continental Ethiopian plate boundaries, along five eruptive fissures and four rift segments. Field observations have also been integrated with analogue and numerical models of dike emplacement to better understand the effect of dike emplacement at depth and at the surface. Our results show that the dike-fed eruptive fissures are systematically associated with graben structures formed by inward dipping normal faults having throws up to 10 m and commonly propagating downward. Moreover, rift segments (i.e. mature rift zones), despite any asymmetry and repetition, are characterized by the same features as the eruptive fissures, the only difference lying in the larger size (higher fault throws, up to 40 m, and wider deformation zones). Analogue and numerical models of dike intrusion confirm that all the structural features observed along the rift segments may be dike-induced; these features include downward propagating normal faults bordering graben structures, contraction at the base of the hanging walls of the faults and upward propagating faults. Simple calculations based on the deeper structure of the eroded rift segments in eastern and western Iceland also suggest that all the fault slip in the active rift segments may result from diking. These results suggest that the overall deformation pattern of eruptive fissures and rift segments may be explained only by dike emplacement. In a magmatic rift, the regional tectonic stress may rarely be high enough to be

  10. The boundary between the Indian and Asian tectonic plates below Tibet.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Junmeng; Yuan, Xiaohui; Liu, Hongbing; Kumar, Prakash; Pei, Shunping; Kind, Rainer; Zhang, Zhongjie; Teng, Jiwen; Ding, Lin; Gao, Xing; Xu, Qiang; Wang, Wei

    2010-06-22

    The fate of the colliding Indian and Asian tectonic plates below the Tibetan high plateau may be visualized by, in addition to seismic tomography, mapping the deep seismic discontinuities, like the crust-mantle boundary (Moho), the lithosphere-asthenosphere boundary (LAB), or the discontinuities at 410 and 660 km depth. We herein present observations of seismic discontinuities with the P and S receiver function techniques beneath central and western Tibet along two new profiles and discuss the results in connection with results from earlier profiles, which did observe the LAB. The LAB of the Indian and Asian plates is well-imaged by several profiles and suggests a changing mode of India-Asia collision in the east-west direction. From eastern Himalayan syntaxis to the western edge of the Tarim Basin, the Indian lithosphere is underthrusting Tibet at an increasingly shallower angle and reaching progressively further to the north. A particular lithospheric region was formed in northern and eastern Tibet as a crush zone between the two colliding plates, the existence of which is marked by high temperature, low mantle seismic wavespeed (correlating with late arriving signals from the 410 discontinuity), poor Sn propagation, east and southeast oriented global positioning system displacements, and strikingly larger seismic (SKS) anisotropy.

  11. New GPS constraints on active deformation along the Africa-Iberia plate boundary

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koulali, A.; Ouazar, D.; Tahayt, A.; King, R. W.; Vernant, P.; Reilinger, R. E.; McClusky, S.; Mourabit, T.; Davila, J. M.; Amraoui, N.

    2011-08-01

    We use velocities from 65 continuous stations and 31 survey-mode GPS sites as well as kinematic modeling to investigate present day deformation along the Africa-Iberia plate boundary zone in the western Mediterranean region. The GPS velocity field shows southwestward motion of the central part of the Rif Mountains in northern Morocco with respect to Africa varying between 3.5 and 4.0 mm/yr, consistent with prior published results. Stations in the southwestern part of the Betic Mountains of southern Spain move west-southwest with respect to Eurasia (˜ 2-3 mm/yr). The western component of Betics motion is consistent with partial transfer of Nubia-Eurasia plate motion into the southern Betics. The southward component of Betics motion with respect to Iberia is kinematically consistent with south to southwest motion of the Rif Mountains with respect to Africa. We use block modeling, constrained by mapped surface faults and seismicity to estimate the geometry and rates of strain accumulation on plate boundary structures. Our preferred plate boundary geometry includes one block between Iberia and Africa including the SW Betics, Alboran Sea, and central Rif. This geometry provides a good fit to the observed motions, suggesting a wide transpressive boundary in the westernmost Mediterranean, with deformation mainly accommodated by the Gloria-Azores fault system to the West and the Rif-Tell lineament to the East. Block boundaries encompass aspects of earlier interpretations suggesting three main deformation styles: (i) extension along the NE-SW trending Trans-Alboran shear zone, (ii) dextral strike-slip in the Betics corresponding to a well defined E-W seismic lineament, and (iii) right lateral strike-slip motion extending West to the Azores and right-lateral motion with compression extending East along the Algerian Tell. We interpret differential motion in the Rif-Alboran-Betic system to be driven both by surface processes related the Africa-Eurasia oblique convergence and

  12. Numerical Study of Outlet Boundary Conditions for Unsteady Turbulent Internal Flows Using the NCC

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Nan-Suey; Shih, Tsan-Hsing

    2009-01-01

    This paper presents the results of studies on the outlet boundary conditions for turbulent internal flow simulations. Several outlet boundary conditions have been investigated by applying the National Combustion Code (NCC) to the configuration of a LM6000 single injector flame tube. First of all, very large eddy simulations (VLES) have been performed using the partially resolved numerical simulation (PRNS) approach, in which both the nonlinear and linear dynamic subscale models were employed. Secondly, unsteady Reynolds averaged Navier- Stokes (URANS) simulations have also been performed for the same configuration to investigate the effects of different outlet boundary conditions in the context of URANS. Thirdly, the possible role of the initial condition is inspected by using three different initial flow fields for both the PRNS/VLES simulation and the URANS simulation. The same grid is used for all the simulations and the number of mesh element is about 0.5 million. The main purpose of this study is to examine the long-time behavior of the solution as determined by the imposed outlet boundary conditions. For a particular simulation to be considered as successful under the given initial and boundary conditions, the solution must be sustainable in a physically meaningful manner over a sufficiently long period of time. The commonly used outlet boundary condition for steady Reynolds averaged Navier-Stokes (RANS) simulation is a fixed pressure at the outlet with all the other dependent variables being extrapolated from the interior. The results of the present study suggest that this is also workable for the URANS simulation of the LM6000 injector flame tube. However, it does not work for the PRNS/VLES simulation due to the unphysical reflections of the pressure disturbances at the outlet boundary. This undesirable situation can be practically alleviated by applying a simple unsteady convection equation for the pressure disturbances at the outlet boundary. The

  13. Turbulent boundary layer on a large freely moving particle suspended in high-Reynolds number isotropic turbulence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Byron, Margaret; Meyer, Colin; Bellani, Gabriele; Variano, Evan

    2011-11-01

    We experimentally measure the flow surrounding neutrally buoyant particles freely moving in homogeneous, isotropic turbulence. Particle size is within the inertial subrange of the ambient turbulence. We measure the flow using stereoscopic particle image velocimetry which resolves 3 velocity components in a nearly 2-dimensional planar volume. We calculate ensemble average velocity statistics, conditional on the particle kinematics. Two-point statistics indicate the effect of the moving particle on the surrounding turbulent flow. We use these results to consider the impact of ambient turbulence on aquatic microorganisms, specifically those which are larger than the Kolmogorov timescale and small enough that swimming does not dominate transport.

  14. Schlieren and OH* chemiluminescence imaging of combustion in a turbulent boundary layer over a solid fuel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jens, Elizabeth T.; Miller, Victor A.; Cantwell, Brian J.

    2016-03-01

    Combustion in a turbulent boundary layer over a solid fuel is studied using simultaneous schlieren and OH* chemiluminescence imaging. The flow configuration is representative of a hybrid rocket motor combustor. Six different hydrocarbon fuels, including both classical hybrid rocket fuels and a high regression rate fuel (paraffin wax), are burned in an undiluted oxygen free-stream at pressures ranging from atmospheric to 1524.2 kPa (221.1 psi). A detailed explanation of methods for registering the schlieren and OH* chemiluminescence images to one another is presented, and additionally, details of the routines used to extract flow features of interest (like the boundary layer height and flame location) are provided. At atmospheric pressure, the boundary layer location is consistent between all fuels; however, the flame location varies for each fuel. The flame zone appears to be smoothly distributed over the fuel surface at atmospheric pressure. At elevated pressures and correspondingly increased Dahmköhler number (but at constant Reynolds number), flame morphology is markedly different, exhibiting large rollers in a shear layer above the fuel grain and finer structures in the flame. The chemiluminescence intensity is found to be roughly proportional to the fuel burn rate at both atmospheric and elevated chamber pressures.

  15. Flow noise predictions of a submerged cylinder under turbulent boundary layer excitations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Kuangcheng; Vlahopoulos, Nickolas

    2002-05-01

    The unsteady fluctuated pressure underneath turbulent boundary layers (TBL) is one of major noise sources in moving vehicles. Recently, discretized TBL forcing functions have been applied to planar structures in air [Y. F. Hwang and S. A. Hambric, Noise-Con, 2000; M. Allen and N. Vlahopoulos, Computers and Structures, 2000; M. Allen and N. Vlahopoulos, Finite Elements in Analysis and Design, 2001; M. Allen, R. Sbragio, and N. Vlahopoulos, AIAA J. 2001]. This paper discusses prediction of the flow-induced radiated noise and surface responses of a submerged hemisphere-capped cylindrical shell (L/D=11). The FEM/IFEM (infinite finite element method) approach is used to calculate structural acoustic transfer functions and to accurately account for the fluid loading effects. The effect on TBL due to the curvature of a cylinder is captured by utilizing the potential flow-boundary layer theory to determine key boundary layer parameters. Predictions of the surface intensity and far field responses are developed through stochastic analysis due to the natural of the TBL excitations. A MATLAB script is generated to determine the power spectral density of the responses. [Work supported by ONR Code 334.

  16. Turbulent dusty boundary layer in an ANFO surface-burst explosion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuhl, A. L.; Ferguson, R. E.; Chien, K. Y.; Collins, J. P.

    1992-01-01

    This paper describes the results of numerical simulations of the dusty, turbulent boundary layer created by a surface burst explosion. The blast wave was generated by the detonation of a 600-T hemisphere of ANFO, similar to those used in large-scale field tests. The surface was assumed to be ideally noncratering but contained an initial loose layer of dust. The dust-air mixture in this fluidized bed was modeled as a dense gas (i.e., an equilibrium model, valid for very small-diameter dust particles). The evolution of the flow was calculated by a high-order Godunov code that solves the nonsteady conservation laws. Shock interactions with dense layer generated vorticity near the wall, a result that is similar to viscous, no-slip effects found in clean flows. The resulting wall shear layer was unstable, and rolled up into large-scale rotational structures. These structures entrained dense material from the wall layer and created a chaotically striated flow. The boundary layer grew due to merging of the large-scale structures and due to local entrainment of the dense material from the fluidized bed. The chaotic flow was averaged along similarity lines (i.e., lines of constant values of x = r/Rs and y = z/Rs where R(sub s) = ct(exp alpha)) to establish the mean-flow profiles and the r.m.s. fluctuating-flow profiles of the boundary layer.

  17. Separation control in a hypersonic shock wave / turbulent boundary-layer interaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schreyer, Anne-Marie; Bermejo-Moreno, Ivan; Kim, Jeonglae; Urzay, Javier

    2016-11-01

    Hypersonic vehicles play a key role for affordable access to space. The associated flow fields are strongly affected by shock wave/turbulent boundary-layer interactions, and the inherent separation causes flow distortion and low-frequency unsteadiness. Microramp sub-boundary layer vortex generators are a promising means to control separation and diminish associated detrimental effects. We investigate the effect of a microramp on the low-frequency unsteadiness in a fully separated interaction. A large eddy simulation of a 33 ∘ -compression-ramp interaction was performed for an inflow Mach number of 7.2 and a Reynolds number based on momentum thickness of Reθ = 3500 , matching the experiment of Schreyer et al. (2011). For the control case, we introduced a counter-rotating vortex pair, as induced by a single microramp, into the boundary layer through the inflow conditions. We applied a dynamic mode decomposition (DMD) on both cases to identify coherent structures that are responsible for the dynamic behavior. Based on the DMD, we discuss the reduction of the separation zone and the stabilization of the shock motion achieved by the microramp, and contribute to the description of the governing mechanisms. Pursued during the 2016 CTR Summer Program at Stanford University.

  18. Active faulting south of the Himalayan Front: Establishing a new plate boundary

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yeats, Robert S.; Thakur, V. C.

    2008-06-01

    New tectonic uplifts south of the Salt Range Thrust and Himalayan Front Thrust (HFT) represent an outward step of the plate boundary from the principal tectonic displacement zone into the Indo-Gangetic Plain. In Pakistan, the Lilla Anticline deforms fine-grained overbank deposits of the Jhelum River floodplain 15 km south of the Salt Range. The anticline is overpressured in Eocambrian non-marine strata. In northwest India south of Dehra Dun, the Piedmont Fault (PF) lies 15 km south of the HFT. Coalescing fans derived from the Himalaya form a piedmont (Old Piedmont Zone) 15-20 km wide east of the Yamuna River. This zone is uplifted as much as 15-20 m near the PF, and bedding is tilted 5-7° northeast. Holocene thermoluminescence-optically-stimulated luminescence dates for sediments in the Old Piedmont Zone suggest that the uplift rate might be as high as several mm/a. The Old Piedmont Zone is traced northwest 200 km and southeast another 200 km to the Nepal border. These structures, analogous to protothrusts in subduction zones, indicate that the Himalayan plate boundary is not a single structure but a series of structures across strike, including reactivated parts of the Main Boundary Thrust north of the range front, the HFT sensu stricto, and stepout structures on the Indo-Gangetic Plain. Displacement rates on all these structures must be added to determine the local India-Himalaya convergence rate.

  19. Conditionally-Sampled Turbulent and Nonturbulent Measurements of Entropy Generation Rate in the Transition Region of Boundary Layers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    D. M. McEligot; J. R. Wolf; K. P. Nolan; E. J. Walsh; R. J. Volino

    2006-05-01

    Conditionally-sampled boundary layer data for an accelerating transitional boundary layer have been analyzed to calculate the entropy generation rate in the transition region. By weighing the nondimensional dissipation coefficient for the laminar-conditioned-data and turbulent-conditioned-data with the intermittency factor the average entropy generation rate in the transition region can be determined and hence be compared to the time averaged data and correlations for steady laminar and turbulent flows. It is demonstrated that this method provides, for the first time, an accurate and detailed picture of the entropy generation rate during transition. The data used in this paper have been taken from detailed boundary layer measurements available in the literature. This paper provides, using an intermittency weighted approach, a methodology for predicting entropy generation in a transitional boundary layer.

  20. Immersed boundary methods for numerical simulation of confined fluid and plasma turbulence in complex geometries: a review

    CERN Document Server

    Schneider, Kai

    2015-01-01

    Immersed boundary methods for computing confined fluid and plasma flows in complex geometries are reviewed. The mathematical principle of the volume penalization technique is described and simple examples for imposing Dirichlet and Neumann boundary conditions in one dimension are given. Applications for fluid and plasma turbulence in two and three space dimensions illustrate the applicability and the efficiency of the method in computing flows in complex geometries, for example in toroidal geometries with asymmetric poloidal cross-sections.

  1. Reynolds number trend of hierarchies and scale interactions in turbulent boundary layers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baars, W. J.; Hutchins, N.; Marusic, I.

    2017-03-01

    Small-scale velocity fluctuations in turbulent boundary layers are often coupled with the larger-scale motions. Studying the nature and extent of this scale interaction allows for a statistically representative description of the small scales over a time scale of the larger, coherent scales. In this study, we consider temporal data from hot-wire anemometry at Reynolds numbers ranging from Reτ≈2800 to 22 800, in order to reveal how the scale interaction varies with Reynolds number. Large-scale conditional views of the representative amplitude and frequency of the small-scale turbulence, relative to the large-scale features, complement the existing consensus on large-scale modulation of the small-scale dynamics in the near-wall region. Modulation is a type of scale interaction, where the amplitude of the small-scale fluctuations is continuously proportional to the near-wall footprint of the large-scale velocity fluctuations. Aside from this amplitude modulation phenomenon, we reveal the influence of the large-scale motions on the characteristic frequency of the small scales, known as frequency modulation. From the wall-normal trends in the conditional averages of the small-scale properties, it is revealed how the near-wall modulation transitions to an intermittent-type scale arrangement in the log-region. On average, the amplitude of the small-scale velocity fluctuations only deviates from its mean value in a confined temporal domain, the duration of which is fixed in terms of the local Taylor time scale. These concentrated temporal regions are centred on the internal shear layers of the large-scale uniform momentum zones, which exhibit regions of positive and negative streamwise velocity fluctuations. With an increasing scale separation at high Reynolds numbers, this interaction pattern encompasses the features found in studies on internal shear layers and concentrated vorticity fluctuations in high-Reynolds-number wall turbulence.

  2. Impact of planetary boundary layer turbulence on model climate and tracer transport

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGrath-Spangler, E. L.; Molod, A.; Ott, L. E.; Pawson, S.

    2015-07-01

    Planetary boundary layer (PBL) processes are important for weather, climate, and tracer transport and concentration. One measure of the strength of these processes is the PBL depth. However, no single PBL depth definition exists and several studies have found that the estimated depth can vary substantially based on the definition used. In the Goddard Earth Observing System (GEOS-5) atmospheric general circulation model, the PBL depth is particularly important because it is used to calculate the turbulent length scale that is used in the estimation of turbulent mixing. This study analyzes the impact of using three different PBL depth definitions in this calculation. Two definitions are based on the scalar eddy diffusion coefficient and the third is based on the bulk Richardson number. Over land, the bulk Richardson number definition estimates shallower nocturnal PBLs than the other estimates while over water this definition generally produces deeper PBLs. The near-surface wind velocity, temperature, and specific humidity responses to the change in turbulence are spatially and temporally heterogeneous, resulting in changes to tracer transport and concentrations. Near-surface wind speed increases in the bulk Richardson number experiment cause Saharan dust increases on the order of 1 × 10-4 kg m-2 downwind over the Atlantic Ocean. Carbon monoxide (CO) surface concentrations are modified over Africa during boreal summer, producing differences on the order of 20 ppb, due to the model's treatment of emissions from biomass burning. While differences in carbon dioxide (CO2) are small in the time mean, instantaneous differences are on the order of 10 ppm and these are especially prevalent at high latitude during boreal winter. Understanding the sensitivity of trace gas and aerosol concentration estimates to PBL depth is important for studies seeking to calculate surface fluxes based on near-surface concentrations and for studies projecting future concentrations.

  3. Plate boundary deformation and man-made subsidence around geothermal fields on the Reykjanes Peninsula, Iceland

    KAUST Repository

    Keiding, Marie

    2010-07-01

    We present Interferometric Synthetic Aperture Radar (InSAR) data from 1992-1999 and 2003-2008 as well as GPS data from 2000-2009 for the active plate boundary on the Reykjanes Peninsula, southwest Iceland. The geodetic data reveal deformation mainly due to plate spreading, anthropogenic subsidence caused by geothermal fluid extraction and, possibly, increasing pressure in a geothermal system. Subsidence of around 10. cm is observed during the first 2. years of production at the Reykjanes geothermal power plant, which started operating in May 2006. We model the surface subsidence around the new power plant using point and ellipsoidal pressure sources in an elastic halfspace. Short-lived swarms of micro-earthquakes as well as aseismic fault movement are observed near the geothermal field following the start of production, possibly triggered by the stresses induced by geothermal fluid extraction. © 2010 Elsevier B.V.

  4. Prediction of Turbulent Boundary Layer Induced Noise in the Cabin of a BWB Aircraft

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joana Rocha

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper discusses the development of analytical models for the prediction of aircraft cabin noise induced by the external turbulent boundary layer (TBL. While, in previous works, the contribution of an individual panel to the cabin interior noise was considered, here, the simultaneous contribution of multiple flow-excited panels is analyzed. Analytical predictions are presented for the interior sound pressure level (SPL at different locations inside the cabin of a Blended Wing Body (BWB aircraft, for the frequency range 0–1000 Hz. The results show that the number of vibrating panels significantly affects the interior noise levels. It is shown that the average SPL, over the cabin volume, increases with the number of vibrating panels. Additionally, the model is able to predict local SPL values, at specific locations in the cabin, which are also affected with by number of vibrating panels, and are different from the average values.

  5. Exploring the Turbulent Urban Boundary by Use of Lidars and Microwave Radiometers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arend, Mark; Valerio, Ivan; Neufeld, Stephen; Bishir, Raymond; Wu, Younghu; Moshary, Fred; Melecio-Vazquez, David; Gonzalez, Jorge

    2016-06-01

    A Doppler lidar has been developed using fiber optic based technologies and advanced signal processing techniques. Although this system has been operated in a scanning mode in the past, for this application, the system is operated in a vertically pointing mode and delivers a time series of vertical velocity profiles. By cooperating the Doppler lidar with other instruments, including a back scatter lidar, and a microwave radiometer, models of atmospheric stability can be tested, opening up an exciting path for researchers, applied scientists and engineers to discover unique phenomena related to fundamental atmospheric science processes. A consistent set of retrievals between each of these instruments emphasizes the utility for such a network of instruments to better characterize the turbulent atmospheric urban boundary layers which is expected to offer a useful capability for assessing and improving models that are in great need of such ground truth.

  6. Distribution of Orientations in Fibre Suspension Flowing in a Turbulent Boundary Layer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIN Jian-Zhong; SUN Ke; LIN Jiang

    2005-01-01

    @@ The equation of probability distribution function for mean fibre orientation in a turbulent boundary layer is derived, in which the correlation terms of the fluctuating velocity, fluctuating angular velocity with the fluctuating probability distribution function are related to the gradient of mean probability distribution function and the dispersion coefficients in order to make the equation be solvable. The finite-difference method is used to solve the equation numerically. The results show that the fibres tend to align with the streamline, which is in agreement qualitatively with the experimental result given by visualization. The fibre aspect-ratio has a significant effect on the orientation distribution of fibres, while the effect of the distance from the wall is negligible.

  7. Turbulent flow over a house in a simulated hurricane boundary layer

    CERN Document Server

    Taylor, Zachary; Gurka, Roi; Kopp, Gregory

    2009-01-01

    Every year hurricanes and other extreme wind storms cause billions of dollars in damage worldwide. For residential construction, such failures are usually associated with roofs, which see the largest aerodynamic loading. However, determining aerodynamic loads on different portions of North American houses is complicated by the lack of clear load paths and non-linear load sharing in wood frame roofs. This problem of fluid-structure interaction requires both wind tunnel testing and full-scale structural testing. A series of wind tunnel tests have been performed on a house in a simulated atmospheric boundary layer (ABL), with the resulting wind-induced pressures applied to the full-scale structure. The ABL was simulated for flow over open country terrain where both velocity and turbulence intensity profiles, as well as spectra, were matched with available full scale measurements for this type of terrain. The first set of measurements was 600 simultaneous surface pressure measurements over the entire house. A key...

  8. Active control of turbulent boundary layer sound transmission into a vehicle interior

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caiazzo, A.; Alujević, N.; Pluymers, B.; Desmet, W.

    2016-09-01

    In high speed automotive, aerospace, and railway transportation, the turbulent boundary layer (TBL) is one of the most important sources of interior noise. The stochastic pressure distribution associated with the turbulence is able to excite significantly structural vibration of vehicle exterior panels. They radiate sound into the vehicle through the interior panels. Therefore, the air flow noise becomes very influential when it comes to the noise vibration and harshness assessment of a vehicle, in particular at low frequencies. Normally, passive solutions, such as sound absorbing materials, are used for reducing the TBL-induced noise transmission into a vehicle interior, which generally improve the structure sound isolation performance. These can achieve excellent isolation performance at higher frequencies, but are unable to deal with the low-frequency interior noise components. In this paper, active control of TBL noise transmission through an acoustically coupled double panel system into a rectangular cavity is examined theoretically. The Corcos model of the TBL pressure distribution is used to model the disturbance. The disturbance is rejected by an active vibration isolation unit reacting between the exterior and the interior panels. Significant reductions of the low-frequency vibrations of the interior panel and the sound pressure in the cavity are observed.

  9. The logarithmic and power law behaviors of the accelerating, turbulent thermal boundary layer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castillo, Luciano; Hussain, Fazle

    2017-02-01

    Direct numerical simulation of spatially evolving thermal turbulent boundary layers with strong favorable pressure gradient (FPG) shows that the thermal fluctuation intensity, θ' + and the Reynolds shear stress, u'v'¯+ exhibit a logarithmic behavior spanning the meso-layer (e.g., 50 ≤y+≤170 ). However, the mean thermal profile is not logarithmic even in the zero pressure gradient (ZPG) region; instead, it follows a power law. The maxima of u' 2 ¯+ and v'θ'¯+ change little with the strength of acceleration, while v'+, w'+, and u'v'¯+ continue to decay in the flow direction. Furthermore, θ'+ and u'θ'¯+ surprisingly experience changes from constants in ZPG to sharp rises in the FPG region. Such behavior appears to be due to squashing of the streaks which decreases the streak flank angle below the critical value for "transient growth" generation of streamwise vortices, shutting down production [W. Schoppa and F. Hussain, "Coherent structure generation near-wall turbulence," J. Fluid Mech. 453, 57-108 (2002)]. The streamwise vortices near the wall, although shrink because of stretching, simultaneously, also become weaker as the structures are progressively pushed farther down to the more viscous region near the wall. While the vortical structures decay rapidly in accelerating flows, the thermal field does not—nullifying the myth that both the thermal and velocity fields are similar.

  10. Aerodynamic wake study: oscillating model wind turbine within a turbulent boundary layer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feist, Christopher J.

    An experimental investigation on the aerodynamic wake behind a pitching and/or heaving model wind turbine was performed. The study was split into two quasi-coupled phases; the first phase characterized the motion of an offshore floating wind turbine subjected to linear wave forcing, the second phase replicated specific motion cases, which were driven by results from phase I, on a model wind turbine within a turbulent boundary layer. Wake measurements were made in an effort to quantify fluctuations in the flow associated with the motion of the turbine. Weak differences were observed in the mean, streamwise velocity and turbulent fluctuations between the static and oscillating turbine cases. These weak differences were a result of opposing trends in the velocity quantities based on turbine motion phases. The wake oscillations created by the turbine motion was characteristic of a 2D wave (with convection in the x plane and amplitude in the z plane) with a relatively small amplitude as compared to urms..

  11. Modeling turbulent mixing and sand distribution in the bottom boundary layer

    CERN Document Server

    Absi, Rafik

    2011-01-01

    For the calculation of turbulent mixing in the bottom boundary layer, we present simple analytical tools for the mixing velocity wm and the mixing length lm. Based on observations of turbulence intensity measurements, the mixing velocity wm is represented by an exponential function decaying with z. We suggest two theoretical functions for the mixing length, a first lm1 obtained from the k-equation written as a constant modeled fluctuating kinetic energy flux and a second lm2 based on von K\\'arm\\'an's similarity hypothesis. These analytical tools were used in the finite-mixing-length model of Nielsen and Teakle (2004). The modeling of time-mean sediment concentration profiles C(z) over wave ripples shows that at the opposite of the second equation lm2 which increases the upward convexity of C(z), the first equation lm1 increases the upward concavity of C(z) and is able to reproduce the shape of the measured concentrations for coarse sand.

  12. Reduced-order FSI simulation of NREL 5 MW wind turbine in atmospheric boundary layer turbulence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Motta-Mena, Javier; Campbell, Robert; Lavely, Adam; Jha, Pankaj

    2015-11-01

    A partitioned fluid-structure interaction (FSI) solver based on an actuator-line method solver and a finite-element modal-dynamic structural solver is used to evaluate the effect of blade deformation in the presence of a day-time, moderately convective atmospheric boundary layer (ABL). The solver components were validated separately and the integrated solver was partially validated against FAST. An overview of the solver is provided in addition to results of the validation study. A finite element model of the NREL 5 MW rotor was developed for use in the present simulations. The effect of blade pitching moment and the inherent bend/twist coupling of the rotor blades are assessed for both uniform inflow and the ABL turbulence cases. The results suggest that blade twisting in response to pitching moment and the bend/twist coupling can have a significant impact on rotor out-of-plane bending moment and power generated for both the uniform inflow and the ABL turbulence cases.

  13. Profiles of Wind and Turbulence in the Coastal Atmospheric Boundary Layer of Lake Erie

    KAUST Repository

    Wang, H

    2014-06-16

    Prediction of wind resource in coastal zones is difficult due to the complexity of flow in the coastal atmospheric boundary layer (CABL). A three week campaign was conducted over Lake Erie in May 2013 to investigate wind characteristics and improve model parameterizations in the CABL. Vertical profiles of wind speed up to 200 m were measured onshore and offshore by lidar wind profilers, and horizontal gradients of wind speed by a 3-D scanning lidar. Turbulence data were collected from sonic anemometers deployed onshore and offshore. Numerical simulations were conducted with the Weather Research Forecasting (WRF) model with 2 nested domains down to a resolution of 1-km over the lake. Initial data analyses presented in this paper investigate complex flow patterns across the coast. Acceleration was observed up to 200 m above the surface for flow coming from the land to the water. However, by 7 km off the coast the wind field had not yet reached equilibrium with the new surface (water) conditions. The surface turbulence parameters over the water derived from the sonic data could not predict wind profiles observed by the ZephlR lidar located offshore. Horizontal wind speed gradients near the coast show the influence of atmospheric stability on flow dynamics. Wind profiles retrieved from the 3-D scanning lidar show evidence of nocturnal low level jets (LLJs). The WRF model was able to capture the occurrence of LLJ events, but its performance varied in predicting their intensity, duration, and the location of the jet core.

  14. Stereoscopic PIV measurements of a turbulent boundary layer with a large spatial dynamic range

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Herpin, Sophie [MONASH University, Laboratory for Turbulence Research in Aerospace and Combustion, Department of Mechanical Engineering, Melbourne, VIC (Australia); Cite Scientifique, Laboratoire de Mecanique de Lille (UMR CNRS 8107), Ecole Centrale de Lille, Bd Paul Langevin, Villeneuve d' Ascq (France); Wong, Chong Yau [MONASH University, Laboratory for Turbulence Research in Aerospace and Combustion, Department of Mechanical Engineering, Melbourne, VIC (Australia); CSIRO Materials Science and Engineering, Commonwealth Science and Industrial Research Organisation (CSIRO) Thermal and Fluid Dynamics, Highett, VIC (Australia); Stanislas, Michel [Cite Scientifique, Laboratoire de Mecanique de Lille (UMR CNRS 8107), Ecole Centrale de Lille, Bd Paul Langevin, Villeneuve d' Ascq (France); Soria, Julio [MONASH University, Laboratory for Turbulence Research in Aerospace and Combustion, Department of Mechanical Engineering, Melbourne, VIC (Australia)

    2008-10-15

    The flow in a streamwise/wall-normal plane of a turbulent boundary layer at moderate Reynolds number (Re{sub {theta}}=2,200) is characterized using two stereo PIV systems just overlapping in the streamwise direction. The aim is to generate SPIV data for near-wall turbulence with enough spatial dynamic range to resolve most of the coherent structures present in the flow and to facilitate future comparisons with direct numerical simulations. This is made possibly through the use of four cameras with large CCD arrays (4,008 px x 2,672 px) and through a rigorous experimental procedure designed to minimize the impact of measurement noise on the resolution of the small scales. For the first time, both a large field of view [S{sub x}; S{sub y}]=[2.6{delta}; 0.75{delta}] and a high spatial resolution (with an interrogation window size of 13.6{sup +}) have been achieved. The quality of the data is assessed through an analysis of some of the statistical results such as the mean velocity profile, the rms and the PDF of the fluctuations, and the power spectra. (orig.)

  15. A Note on Turbulence Stationarity and Wind Persistence Within the Stable Planetary Boundary Layer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nappo, Carmen J.; Hiscox, April L.; Miller, David R.

    2010-07-01

    This note presents initial results of an analysis of the stationarity of turbulence kinetic energy and the persistence of winds within the stable boundary layer (SBL). Measurements were made at 1.5 and 11 m above ground level from 0100 to 0600 local time on five nights during the JORNADA field experiment. The average stationarity ranged from about 160 to about 570 s. Wind persistence ranged from about ± 40° (3-min average) to about ± 36° (30-min average) on a weakly stable night, and from about ± 40° (3-min average) to about ± 27° (30-min average) on an strongly stable night. It is shown that, at 1.5 m, which we take to be within the surface layer, the average duration of stationarity of turbulent kinetic energy tends to correlate with the kurtosis of the heat flux; however, at 11 m, which we take to be outside of the surface layer, this correlation is poorly approximated.

  16. Active faulting and transpression tectonics along the plate boundary in North Africa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mustapha Meghraoui

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available We present a synthesis of the active tectonics of the northern Atlas Mountains, and suggest a kinematic model of transpression and block rotation that illustrates the mechanics of this section of the Africa–Eurasia plate boundary. Neotectonic structures and significant shallow seismicity (with Mw >5.0 indicate that coeval E-W-trending, right-lateral faulting and NE-SW, thrust-related folding result from oblique convergence at the plate boundary, which forms a transpressional system. The strain distribution obtained from fault–fold structures and P axes of focal mechanism solutions, and the geodetic (NUVEL-1 and GPS convergence show that the shortening and convergence directions are not coaxial. The transpressional strain is partitioned along the strike and the quantitative description of the displacement field yields a compression-to-transcurrence ratio varying from 33% near Gibraltar, to 50% along the Tunisian Atlas. Shortening directions oriented NNE and NNW for the Pliocene and Quaternary, respectively, and the S shape of the Quaternary anticline axes, are in agreement with the 2.24˚/Myr to 3.9˚/Myr modeled clockwise rotation of the small tectonic blocks and with the paleomagnetic data. The convergence between Africa and Eurasia is absorbed along the Atlas Mountains at the upper crustal level, by means of thrusting above decollement systems, which are controlled by subdued transcurrent faults. The Tell Atlas of northwest Algeria, which has experienced numerous large earthquakes with respect to the other regions, is interpreted as a restraining bend that localizes the strain distribution along the plate boundary.

  17. The boundary point method for Reissner′s plates%Reissner型板边界点法

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    吴约; 王左辉

    2001-01-01

    In this paper, a series of particular solutions are formed by utilizing correspondent Reissher′s plate fundamental solutions. Thus all elements in the coefficient matrix of boundary element equations for plates to be solved will be determined by boundary point method. In the process of solving, interpolation and numerical integration are not needed and numerical treatment for singular integration is avoided, meanwhile, the calculation of physical characteristics of any point does not depend on boundary unknowns to be solved, therefore, the accuracy is excellent. The method presented may be applied to solving the problems of all kinds of plates and shells no matter if the problem is isotropic or anisotropic. But it should be noticed that the matrix of all particular solution field should conform with the fundamental solution of the specific problem.%文章采用Reissner型板基本解来构建一系列特解,再通过边界点法确定边界元方程系效矩阵的全部元素。解算中不涉及具体插值,不用数值积分,避免了奇性处理,而任意点物理量的计算不依赖于待解的边界未知量,算效高,精度好。该法还可用来分析其它各类板壳问题,无论是各向同性还是各向异性的,不同的只是应按各自的基本解来构造全特解场矩阵。

  18. Inherited segmentation of the Iberian-African margins and tectonic reconstruction of a diffuse plate boundary.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernàndez, Manel; Torne, Montserrat; Vergés, Jaume; Casciello, Emilio

    2016-04-01

    Diffuse plate-boundary regions are characterized by non-well defined contacts between tectonic plates thus making difficult their reconstruction through time. The Western Mediterranean is one of these regions, where the convergence between the African and Iberian plates since Late Cretaceous resulted in the Betic-Rif arcuate orogen, the Gulf of Cadiz imbricate wedge, and the Alboran back-arc basin. Whereas the Iberia-Africa plate boundary is well defined west to the Gorringe Bank and along the Gloria Fault, it becomes much more diffuse eastwards with seismicity spreading over both the south-Iberian and north-African margins. Gravity data, when filtered for short wavelengths, show conspicuous positive Bouguer anomalies associated with the Gorringe Bank, the Gulf of Cadiz High and the Ronda/Beni-Bousera peridotitic massifs reflecting an inherited Jurassic margin segmentation. The subsequent Alpine convergence between Africa and Iberia reactivated these domains, producing crustal-scale thrusting in the Atlantic segments and eventually subduction in the proto-Mediterranean segments. The Jurassic segmentation of the Iberia-Africa margins substantiates the double-polarity subduction model proposed for the region characterized by a change from SE-dipping polarity in the Gorringe, Gulf of Cadiz and Betic-Rif domains, to NW-dipping polarity in the proto-Algerian domain. Therefore, the Algerian and Tyrrhenian basins in the east and the Alboran basin in the west are the result of SSE-E and NW-W retreating slabs of oceanic and/or hyper-extended Tethyan domains, respectively.

  19. The Northern Caribbean Plate Boundary Offshore Hispaniola: Strike-slip and Compressive Tectonic Processes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corbeau, J.; Rolandone, F.; Leroy, S. D.; Mercier De Lepinay, B. F.; Meyer, B.; Ellouz, N.

    2014-12-01

    The boundary between the Caribbean plate and the North American plate is transpressive due to the oblique collision between these two plates. The transpressive movement is partitioned and accommodated in the Hispaniola region along two left-lateral strike-slip structures surrounding a fold-and-thrust belt. New multibeam bathymetry data and multichannel seismic reflection profiles have been recently collected during the Haiti-SIS and Haiti-SIS 2 cruises, along part of the northern Caribbean plate boundary between Cuba, Jamaica and Hispaniola. From the north to the south, three types of deformations are observed. In the Windward Passage, the analysis of the data set reveals that the movement on the Oriente fault between Cuba and Hispaniola is purely left-lateral strike-slip according to the GPS measurements. In the Gonave basin, west of Hispaniola, the deformation is compressive. A series of folds is identified and moves toward the southwest. The Enriquillo-Plantain-Garden Fault (EPGF) is localized in the Jamaica Passage, between Jamaica and Hispaniola. The analysis of the data set reveals that the left-lateral EPGF recently intersects inherited basins from the eastern Cayman Trough margin. The study of the actual EPGF active trace shows that this fault moves with a pure strike-slip component, at least in its western part: the presence of a little push-up structure and a set of three en echelon folds is highlighting in the western part of the Jamaica Passage. The shortening rate in the inherited basins crossed by the EPGF increases from west to east (5.8% to 8.5%), indicating that a thrusting component is also accommodated around the EPGF.

  20. Geodetic and tectonic analyses along an active plate boundary: The central Gulf of California

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ortlieb, L.; Ruegg, J. C.; Angelier, J.; Colletta, B.; Kasser, M.; Lesage, P.

    1989-06-01

    The Gulf of California is traversed by the shear plate boundary between Pacific and North American plates and, because of several islands in its central part, offers the possibility of direct geodetic measurements of plate motion. A geodetic network of 150 km aperture, and comprising 11 stations, was measured in 1982 and 1986 by laser trilateration methods. The deformations deduced from the comparison of the two epochs indicate right-lateral shear strain covering the entire gulf rather than localized movements. In the eastern part of the network, between the axial islands and the Sonoran coast, significant right-lateral shear deformation occurs with a relative displacement of about 23 ± 12 cm over 4 years. In the northwestern region (Canal de Ballenas) a right-lateral displacement of about 17 ± 4 cm is observed, whereas in the southwestern part of the network (Canal Sal-si-Puedes), the deformation remains very weak. This suggests that south of the Canal de Ballenas the plate boundary is locked. A tectonic analysis of Neogene and Quaternary faults in Baja California, Sonora, and the central islands of the gulf, permitted the reconstruction of the stress pattern evolution of this area. These data also indicate the predominance of right-lateral motion on a NW-SE trending zone within a regional framework characterized by an approximately N-S compression and an E-W extension. The geodetic results are discussed in comparison with the neotectonic analysis and the seismic data available in the area. The data suggest a broad strain accumulation zone covering the totality of the central Gulf of California. A NW-SE relative velocity of about 8 ± 3 cm/yr is found between the two sides of the gulf during the 1982-1986 interval.

  1. A comparative study of near-wall turbulence in high and low Reynolds number boundary layers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Metzger, M. M.; Klewicki, J. C.

    2001-03-01

    The present study explores the effects of Reynolds number, over three orders of magnitude, in the viscous wall region of a turbulent boundary layer. Complementary experiments were conducted both in the boundary layer wind tunnel at the University of Utah and in the atmospheric surface layer which flows over the salt flats of the Great Salt Lake Desert in western Utah. The Reynolds numbers, based on momentum deficit thickness, of the two flows were Rθ=2×103 and Rθ≈5×106, respectively. High-resolution velocity measurements were obtained from a five-element vertical rake of hot-wires spanning the buffer region. In both the low and high Rθ flows, the length of the hot-wires measured less than 6 viscous units. To facilitate reliable comparisons, both the laboratory and field experiments employed the same instrumentation and procedures. Data indicate that, even in the immediate vicinity of the surface, strong influences from low-frequency motions at high Rθ produce noticeable Reynolds number differences in the streamwise velocity and velocity gradient statistics. In particular, the peak value in the root mean square streamwise velocity profile, when normalized by viscous scales, was found to exhibit a logarithmic dependence on Reynolds number. The mean streamwise velocity profile, on the other hand, appears to be essentially independent of Reynolds number. Spectra and spatial correlation data suggest that low-frequency motions at high Reynolds number engender intensified local convection velocities which affect the structure of both the velocity and velocity gradient fields. Implications for turbulent production mechanisms and coherent motions in the buffer layer are discussed.

  2. The accuracy of tomographic particle image velocimetry for measurements of a turbulent boundary layer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Atkinson, Callum [Monash University, Laboratory for Turbulence Research in Aerospace and Combustion, Department of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering, Victoria (Australia); Ecole Centrale de Lille, Bd Paul Langevin, Laboratoire de Mecanique de Lille (UMR CNRS 8107), Villeneuve d' Ascq cedex (France); Coudert, Sebastien; Foucaut, Jean-Marc; Stanislas, Michel [Ecole Centrale de Lille, Bd Paul Langevin, Laboratoire de Mecanique de Lille (UMR CNRS 8107), Villeneuve d' Ascq cedex (France); Soria, Julio [Monash University, Laboratory for Turbulence Research in Aerospace and Combustion, Department of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering, Victoria (Australia)

    2011-04-15

    To investigate the accuracy of tomographic particle image velocimetry (Tomo-PIV) for turbulent boundary layer measurements, a series of synthetic image-based simulations and practical experiments are performed on a high Reynolds number turbulent boundary layer at Re{sub {theta}} = 7,800. Two different approaches to Tomo-PIV are examined using a full-volume slab measurement and a thin-volume ''fat'' light sheet approach. Tomographic reconstruction is performed using both the standard MART technique and the more efficient MLOS-SMART approach, showing a 10-time increase in processing speed. Random and bias errors are quantified under the influence of the near-wall velocity gradient, reconstruction method, ghost particles, seeding density and volume thickness, using synthetic images. Experimental Tomo-PIV results are compared with hot-wire measurements and errors are examined in terms of the measured mean and fluctuating profiles, probability density functions of the fluctuations, distributions of fluctuating divergence through the volume and velocity power spectra. Velocity gradients have a large effect on errors near the wall and also increase the errors associated with ghost particles, which convect at mean velocities through the volume thickness. Tomo-PIV provides accurate experimental measurements at low wave numbers; however, reconstruction introduces high noise levels that reduces the effective spatial resolution. A thinner volume is shown to provide a higher measurement accuracy at the expense of the measurement domain, albeit still at a lower effective spatial resolution than planar and Stereo-PIV. (orig.)

  3. Architectural Blueprint for Plate Boundary Observatories based on interoperable Data Management Platforms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kerschke, D. I.; Häner, R.; Schurr, B.; Oncken, O.; Wächter, J.

    2014-12-01

    Interoperable data management platforms play an increasing role in the advancement of knowledge and technology in many scientific disciplines. Through high quality services they support the establishment of efficient and innovative research environments. Well-designed research environments can facilitate the sustainable utilization, exchange, and re-use of scientific data and functionality by using standardized community models. Together with innovative 3D/4D visualization, these concepts provide added value in improving scientific knowledge-gain, even across the boundaries of disciplines. A project benefiting from the added value is the Integrated Plate boundary Observatory in Chile (IPOC). IPOC is a European-South American network to study earthquakes and deformation at the Chilean continental margin and to monitor the plate boundary system for capturing an anticipated great earthquake in a seismic gap. In contrast to conventional observatories that monitor individual signals only, IPOC captures a large range of different processes through various observation methods (e.g., seismographs, GPS, magneto-telluric sensors, creep-meter, accelerometer, InSAR). For IPOC a conceptual design has been devised that comprises an architectural blueprint for a data management platform based on common and standardized data models, protocols, and encodings as well as on an exclusive use of Free and Open Source Software (FOSS) including visualization components. Following the principles of event-driven service-oriented architectures, the design enables novel processes by sharing and re-using functionality and information on the basis of innovative data mining and data fusion technologies. This platform can help to improve the understanding of the physical processes underlying plate deformations as well as the natural hazards induced by them. Through the use of standards, this blueprint can not only be facilitated for other plate observing systems (e.g., the European Plate

  4. Triangular Differential Quadrature for Bending Analysis of Reissner Plates with Curved Boundaries

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    华永霞; 钟宏志

    2003-01-01

    The recently proposed concept of the triangular differential quadrature method (TDQM) is applied to the bending analysis of Reissner plates with various curvilinear geometries subjected to various combinations of boundary conditions. A unit isosceles right triangle is used as the standard triangle for all the derivatives expressed using the triangular differential quadrature rule. Geometric transformations are introduced using basis functions to determine the weighting coefficients for the triangular differential quadrature to map an arbitrary curvilinear triangle into the standard triangle. The triangular differential quadrature method provides good accuracy and rapid convergence relative to other available exact and numerical results.

  5. Boundary Layer Flow and Heat Transfer of FMWCNT/Water Nanofluids over a Flat Plate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad Reza Safaei

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available In the present study, the heat transfer and flow of water/FMWCNT (functionalized multi-walled carbon nanotube nanofluids over a flat plate was investigated using a finite volume method. Simulations were performed for velocity ranging from 0.17 mm/s to 1.7 mm/s under laminar regime and nanotube concentrations up to 0.2%. The 2-D governing equations were solved using an in-house FORTRAN code. For a specific free stream velocity, the presented results showed that increasing the weight percentage of nanotubes increased the Nusselt number. However, an increase in the solid weight percentage had a negligible effect on the wall shear stress. The results also indicated that increasing the free stream velocity for all cases leads to thinner boundary layer thickness, while increasing the FMWCNT concentration causes an increase in the boundary layer thickness.

  6. Coherent Structures in Transition of a Flat-Plate Boundary Layer at Ma=0.7

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHOU Ying; LI Xin-Liang; FU De-Xun; MA Yan-Wen

    2007-01-01

    @@ Direct numerical simulation (DNS) of a spatially evolving flat-plate boundary layer transition process at free stream Mach number 0.7 is performed. Tollmien-Schlichting (T-S) waves are added on the inlet boundary as the disturbances before transition. Typical coherent structures in the transition process are investigated based on the second invariant of velocity gradient tensor. The instantaneous shear stress and the mean velocity profile in the transition region are studied. In our view, the fact that the peak value of shear stress in the stress concentration area increases and exceeds a threshold value during the later stage of the transition process plays an important role in the laminar breakdown process.

  7. 3D Wind Reconstruction and Turbulence Estimation in the Boundary Layer from Doppler Lidar Measurements using Particle Method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rottner, L.; Baehr, C.

    2014-12-01

    Turbulent phenomena in the atmospheric boundary layer (ABL) are characterized by small spatial and temporal scales which make them difficult to observe and to model.New remote sensing instruments, like Doppler Lidar, give access to fine and high-frequency observations of wind in the ABL. This study suggests to use a method of nonlinear estimation based on these observations to reconstruct 3D wind in a hemispheric volume, and to estimate atmospheric turbulent parameters. The wind observations are associated to particle systems which are driven by a local turbulence model. The particles have both fluid and stochastic properties. Therefore, spatial averages and covariances may be deduced from the particles. Among the innovative aspects, we point out the absence of the common hypothesis of stationary-ergodic turbulence and the non-use of particle model closure hypothesis. Every time observations are available, 3D wind is reconstructed and turbulent parameters such as turbulent kinectic energy, dissipation rate, and Turbulent Intensity (TI) are provided. This study presents some results obtained using real wind measurements provided by a five lines of sight Lidar. Compared with classical methods (e.g. eddy covariance) our technic renders equivalent long time results. Moreover it provides finer and real time turbulence estimations. To assess this new method, we suggest computing independently TI using different observation types. First anemometer data are used to have TI reference.Then raw and filtered Lidar observations have also been compared. The TI obtained from raw data is significantly higher than the reference one, whereas the TI estimated with the new algorithm has the same order.In this study we have presented a new class of algorithm to reconstruct local random media. It offers a new way to understand turbulence in the ABL, in both stable or convective conditions. Later, it could be used to refine turbulence parametrization in meteorological meso-scale models.

  8. The Effects of Varying Horizontal Boundary Conditions on the Momentum Distribution and Subcritical Turbulent Transition within Taylor-Couette Flow

    Science.gov (United States)

    McDonald, K. R.; Czarnocki, C. J.; Burin, M. J.

    2010-11-01

    We have experimentally investigated the momentum distribution and transition to turbulence within a high curvature (radii ratio of 0.55), low aspect ratio (height/gap of 6.3) Taylor-Couette flow using three different horizontal boundary conditions. End-caps between the two cylinders were wholly coupled to either the inner or outer cylinder, or otherwise split in half. By rotating only the outer cylinder we have obtained velocity data from fully cyclonic regimes using Laser Doppler Velocimetry (LDV). The subcritical transition to turbulence is clearly affected by the horizontal boundaries: end-caps that move with either cylinder yield a transition Reynolds number that is higher than when split. These results help clarify the role of secondary flows in the turbulent transition of this system, and also add to the early torque-based work of Wendt (1933) & Taylor (1936).

  9. Methods for estimating pressure and thermal loads induced by elevon deflections on hypersonic-vehicle surfaces with turbulent boundary layers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaufman, L. G., II; Johnson, C. B.

    1981-01-01

    Empirical anaytic methods are presented for calculating thermal and pressure distributions in three-dimensional, shock-wave turbulent-boundary-layer, interaction-flow regions on the surface of controllable hypersonic aircraft and missiles. The methods, based on several experimental investigations, are useful and reliable for estimating both the extent and magnitude of the increased thermal and pressure loads on the vehicle surfaces.

  10. Coastal Boundary Layer Characteristics of Wind, Turbulence, and Surface Roughness Parameter over the Thumba Equatorial Rocket Launching Station, India

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. V. S. Namboodiri

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The study discusses the features of wind, turbulence, and surface roughness parameter over the coastal boundary layer of the Peninsular Indian Station, Thumba Equatorial Rocket Launching Station (TERLS. Every 5 min measurements from an ultrasonic anemometer at 3.3 m agl from May 2007 to December 2012 are used for this work. Symmetries in mesoscale turbulence, stress off-wind angle computations, structure of scalar wind, resultant wind direction, momentum flux (M, Obukhov length (L, frictional velocity (u*, w-component, turbulent heat flux (H, drag coefficient (CD, turbulent intensities, standard deviation of wind directions (σθ, wind steadiness factor-σθ relationship, bivariate normal distribution (BND wind model, surface roughness parameter (z0, z0 and wind direction (θ relationship, and variation of z0 with the Indian South West monsoon activity are discussed.

  11. Fluid-mechanical Representation of Plate Boundaries - Trench-Ridge System -

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takaku, M.; Fukao, Y.

    2005-12-01

    Seismic tomography models have been used extensively to simulate mantle convection driven by density heterogeneity. Such simulation to date has been unsuccessful to reconcile itself with the most obvious convection-related phenomenon of plate motions. Here we present a theoretical framework for tomography-based convection modeling to include the plates as an integral part of the mantle convection. We model the lithosphere as a highly viscous, incompressible, Newtonian fluid layer and plate boundaries as faults across which tangential velocities are discontinuous. Fluid-mechanical expressions of such faults have their exact analogies in the seismic source representation theory and can be derived by referring to it. We test this idea against the simplest two-dimensional case with only trench and ridge as plate boundaries, and with only subducting slab as mass anomaly. We model ridge (trench) as the horizontal (vertical) tensile fault that comprises of a conjugate pair of 45-degree dip normal (reverse) faults extending over the entire thickness of the surface layer. The system comprises of three elementary convections, slab mass-driven convection, trench fault-driven convection and ridge fault-driven convection. Flow due to the slab excess mass imposes vertical tensile stress on trench, which is released by flow driven by trench faulting. This faulting converts efficiently the vertical tensile stress to the horizontal tensile stress, which can transmit to extreme distances through the surface viscous layer. This horizontal tensile stress is relieved by flow driven by ridge faulting. The three elementary convections are thus coupled through the stress minimum conditions at ridge and trench. The resultant coupled flow is very plate-like in the surface viscous layer. In this system the horizontal surface velocity depends little on the relative distance between the ridge and trench and depends mostly on the excess weight of the subducting slab. The horizontal speed can be

  12. Reynolds number trend of hierarchies and scale interactions in turbulent boundary layers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baars, W J; Hutchins, N; Marusic, I

    2017-03-13

    Small-scale velocity fluctuations in turbulent boundary layers are often coupled with the larger-scale motions. Studying the nature and extent of this scale interaction allows for a statistically representative description of the small scales over a time scale of the larger, coherent scales. In this study, we consider temporal data from hot-wire anemometry at Reynolds numbers ranging from Reτ≈2800 to 22 800, in order to reveal how the scale interaction varies with Reynolds number. Large-scale conditional views of the representative amplitude and frequency of the small-scale turbulence, relative to the large-scale features, complement the existing consensus on large-scale modulation of the small-scale dynamics in the near-wall region. Modulation is a type of scale interaction, where the amplitude of the small-scale fluctuations is continuously proportional to the near-wall footprint of the large-scale velocity fluctuations. Aside from this amplitude modulation phenomenon, we reveal the influence of the large-scale motions on the characteristic frequency of the small scales, known as frequency modulation. From the wall-normal trends in the conditional averages of the small-scale properties, it is revealed how the near-wall modulation transitions to an intermittent-type scale arrangement in the log-region. On average, the amplitude of the small-scale velocity fluctuations only deviates from its mean value in a confined temporal domain, the duration of which is fixed in terms of the local Taylor time scale. These concentrated temporal regions are centred on the internal shear layers of the large-scale uniform momentum zones, which exhibit regions of positive and negative streamwise velocity fluctuations. With an increasing scale separation at high Reynolds numbers, this interaction pattern encompasses the features found in studies on internal shear layers and concentrated vorticity fluctuations in high-Reynolds-number wall turbulence.This article is part of the

  13. RESEARCH ON THE COMPANION SOLUTION FOR A THIN PLATE IN THE MESHLESS LOCAL BOUNDARY INTEGRAL EQUATION METHOD

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    龙述尧; 熊渊博

    2004-01-01

    The meshless local boundary integral equation method is a currently developed numerical method, which combines the advantageous features of Galerkin finite element method(GFEM), boundary element method(BEM) and element free Galerkin method(EFGM), and is a truly meshless method possessing wide prospects in engineering applications.The companion solution and all the other formulas required in the meshless local boundary integral equation for a thin plate were presented, in order to make this method apply to solve the thin plate problem.

  14. The role of near-trench extension at convergent plate boundaries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vannucchi, P.

    2009-04-01

    Knowledge of how convergent plate boundary coupling in the seismogenic zone controls the nucleation of subduction zone earthquakes is fundamental to assess seismic risks. Increased data at convergent margins has revealed the complexity of the earthquake cycle through the detection of strain-release processes like episodic tremors and slip events, low frequency earthquakes, afterslip, slip heterogeneity along the fault plane. The processes controlling the earthquake cycle and their interactions are still far from being understood; improved understanding will require better characterization of the fault zone. Here we compare in-situ observations from two major subduction zones drilled by ODP and IODP (Costa Rica Trench and Nankai Trough) with a well-preserved fossil convergent plate boundary zone in the Northern Apennines of Italy. At all three sites, deformation in the region above and at the updip limit of the seismogenic zone is dominated by extension and normal faulting (i.e. maximum principal stress is oriented sub-vertically). Episodes of reverse shearing are also present, but occur with less intensity, alternating with extension. Ocean Drilling Program Legs 170 and 205 offshore Costa Rica provide structural observations of the frontal part of the upper plate and décollement at about 2 km from the trench. Analysis of drilled cores reveals the presence of normal faults cutting the frontal part of the upper plate. Normal faults are also seen from seismic reflection to develop along all the forearc (about 60 km from the trench). The décollement damage zone is a few tens of meters in width; it develops mainly within frontal prism material. A clear cm-thick fault core is observed 1.6 km from the trench. Both the upper plate and the décollement damage zone show the co-existence of two distinct fracturing processes in which extension fracturing is frequent in the upper part of the damage zone farthest from the fault core, while both extension and shear fracturing

  15. Turbulent transport and production/destruction of ozone in a boundary layer over complex terrain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greenhut, Gary K.; Jochum, Anne M.; Neininger, Bruno

    1994-01-01

    The first Intensive Observation Period (IOP) of the Swiss air pollution experiment POLLUMET took place in 1990 in the Aare River Valley between Bern and Zurich. During the IOP, fast response measurements of meteorological variables and ozone concentration were made within the boundary layer aboard a motorglider. In addition, mean values of meteorological variables and the concentrations of ozone and other trace species were measured using other aircraft, pilot balloons, tethersondes, and ground stations. Turbulent flux profiles of latent and sensible heat and ozone are calculated from the fast response data. Terms in the ozone mean concentration budget (time rate of change of mean concentration, horizontal advection, and flux divergence) are calculated for stationary time periods both before and after the passage of a cold front. The source/sink term is calculated as a residual in the budget, and its sign and magnitude are related to the measured concentrations of reactive trace species within the boundary layer. Relationships between concentration ratios of trace species and ozone concentration are determined in order to understand the influence of complex terrain on the processes that produce and destroy ozone.

  16. Comparison of Measured and Numerically Simulated Turbulence Statistics in a Convective Boundary Layer Over Complex Terrain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rai, Raj K.; Berg, Larry K.; Kosović, Branko; Mirocha, Jeffrey D.; Pekour, Mikhail S.; Shaw, William J.

    2016-11-01

    The Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) model can be used to simulate atmospheric processes ranging from quasi-global to tens of m in scale. Here we employ large-eddy simulation (LES) using the WRF model, with the LES-domain nested within a mesoscale WRF model domain with grid spacing decreasing from 12.15 km (mesoscale) to 0.03 km (LES). We simulate real-world conditions in the convective planetary boundary layer over an area of complex terrain. The WRF-LES model results are evaluated against observations collected during the US Department of Energy-supported Columbia Basin Wind Energy Study. Comparison of the first- and second-order moments, turbulence spectrum, and probability density function of wind speed shows good agreement between the simulations and observations. One key result is to demonstrate that a systematic methodology needs to be applied to select the grid spacing and refinement ratio used between domains, to avoid having a grid resolution that falls in the grey zone and to minimize artefacts in the WRF-LES model solutions. Furthermore, the WRF-LES model variables show large variability in space and time caused by the complex topography in the LES domain. Analyses of WRF-LES model results show that the flow structures, such as roll vortices and convective cells, vary depending on both the location and time of day as well as the distance from the inflow boundaries.

  17. Comparison of Measured and Numerically Simulated Turbulence Statistics in a Convective Boundary Layer Over Complex Terrain

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rai, Raj K.; Berg, Larry K.; Kosović, Branko; Mirocha, Jeffrey D.; Pekour, Mikhail S.; Shaw, William J.

    2016-11-25

    High resolution numerical simulation can provide insight into important physical processes that occur within the planetary boundary layer (PBL). The present work employs large eddy simulation (LES) using the Weather Forecasting and Research (WRF) model, with the LES domain nested within mesoscale simulation, to simulate real conditions in the convective PBL over an area of complex terrain. A multiple nesting approach has been used to downsize the grid spacing from 12.15 km (mesoscale) to 0.03 km (LES). A careful selection of grid spacing in the WRF Meso domain has been conducted to minimize artifacts in the WRF-LES solutions. The WRF-LES results have been evaluated with in situ and remote sensing observations collected during the US Department of Energy-supported Columbia BasinWind Energy Study (CBWES). Comparison of the first- and second-order moments, turbulence spectrum, and probability density function (PDF) of wind speed shows good agreement between the simulations and data. Furthermore, the WRF-LES variables show a great deal of variability in space and time caused by the complex topography in the LES domain. The WRF-LES results show that the flow structures, such as roll vortices and convective cells, vary depending on both the location and time of day. In addition to basic studies related to boundary-layer meteorology, results from these simulations can be used in other applications, such as studying wind energy resources, atmospheric dispersion, fire weather etc.

  18. Spectra and Large-Scale Structures in a Turbulent Boundary Layer Interacting with Wind Turbine Arrays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peet, Yulia; Chatterjee, Tanmoy

    2016-11-01

    Wind Turbine Array Boundary Layer is a relatively simple, yet useful theoretical conceptualization to study very large wind farms in an atmospheric boundary layer. In this talk, we investigate the length scales of eddies involved in the power generation in these very large, "infinite" wind farms by analyzing the spectra of the turbulent flux of the mean kinetic energy from Large Eddy Simulations (LES). A goal is to provide a fundamental understanding of the dynamic behavior, the size, the scaling laws and the anisotropic structure of the energy containing eddies responsible for power generation from the wind turbines. Large-scale structures with an order of magnitude bigger than the turbine rotor diameter are shown to have substantial contribution to wind power. The study is performed with a Spectral Element LES code with the recently implemented near-wall model and the actuator line model to represent the effect of rotating wind turbine blades. In this presentation, we also explore an idea of a "multiscale" wind farm, where larger and smaller turbines are arranged in a symbiotic way, with smaller turbines helping to harvest additional power from the wakes of the larger turbines, inspired by the findings of the spectral analysis in uniform wind farms. NSF CBET 13358568 award.

  19. Comparison of Measured and Numerically Simulated Turbulence Statistics in a Convective Boundary Layer Over Complex Terrain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rai, Raj K.; Berg, Larry K.; Kosović, Branko; Mirocha, Jeffrey D.; Pekour, Mikhail S.; Shaw, William J.

    2017-04-01

    The Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) model can be used to simulate atmospheric processes ranging from quasi-global to tens of m in scale. Here we employ large-eddy simulation (LES) using the WRF model, with the LES-domain nested within a mesoscale WRF model domain with grid spacing decreasing from 12.15 km (mesoscale) to 0.03 km (LES). We simulate real-world conditions in the convective planetary boundary layer over an area of complex terrain. The WRF-LES model results are evaluated against observations collected during the US Department of Energy-supported Columbia Basin Wind Energy Study. Comparison of the first- and second-order moments, turbulence spectrum, and probability density function of wind speed shows good agreement between the simulations and observations. One key result is to demonstrate that a systematic methodology needs to be applied to select the grid spacing and refinement ratio used between domains, to avoid having a grid resolution that falls in the grey zone and to minimize artefacts in the WRF-LES model solutions. Furthermore, the WRF-LES model variables show large variability in space and time caused by the complex topography in the LES domain. Analyses of WRF-LES model results show that the flow structures, such as roll vortices and convective cells, vary depending on both the location and time of day as well as the distance from the inflow boundaries.

  20. MHD flow in a cylindrical vessel of finite size with turbulent boundary layers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gorbachev, L.P.; Nikitin, N.V.

    1979-01-01

    The hydrodynamic characteristics of flows generated by electromagnetic forces in a cylindrical vessel of finite size, for the case of large values of the hydrodynamic and small values of the magnetic Reynolds numbers have been inadequately analyzed in previous literature, since neither the nonlinear nor the linear theory adequately accounts for secondary flows due to the strong action of boundary layers formed at the end faces of the cylinders at large Reynolds numbers and the results do not agree with experimental data. This paper generalizes the previously more accurate nonlinear scheme of the same authors, the basis for which was the fact that viscosity at large Reynolds numbers is manifest only close to solid surfaces. Two cases are treated: crossed fields and a rotating magnetic field in the cylindrical vessel, where the entire flow region is broken down into an inviscid core and end face boundary layers. It is assumed that the velocity distribution near the end surfaces obeys an empirical one-seventh power law, which is applicable to turbulent liquid flow in a tube in a range of Re = 3 x 10/sup 3/ to 10/sup 5/ simple engineering formulas are derived for the angular velocity, which exhibit good agreement with the experimental data for Hartmann numbers less than 10. The procedure can be generalized to the case of a rotating magnetic field having several pairs of poles. 6 references, 2 figures.

  1. Interaction between a normal shock wave and a turbulent boundary layer at high transonic speeds. I - Pressure distribution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Messiter, A. F.

    1980-01-01

    Asymptotic solutions are derived for the pressure distribution in the interaction of a weak normal shock wave with a turbulent boundary layer. The undisturbed boundary layer is characterized by the law of the wall and the law of the wake for compressible flow. In the limiting case considered, for 'high' transonic speeds, the sonic line is very close to the wall. Comparisons with experiment are shown, with corrections included for the effect of longitudinal wall curvature and for the boundary-layer displacement effect in a circular pipe.

  2. The ultra low frequency electromagnetic radiation observed in the topside ionosphere above boundaries of tectonic plates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael A. Athanasiou

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available In this paper we present results of a comparison between ultra low frequency (ULF electromagnetic (EM radiation, recorded by an electric field instrument onboard the satellite detection of electromagnetic emissions transmitted from earthquake regions in the topside ionosphere, and the seismicity of regions with high and low seismic activity. In particular, we evaluated the energy variations of the ULF Ezelectric field component during a period of four years (2006-2009, in order to examine the possible relation of ULF EM radiation with seismogenic regions located in Central America, Indonesia, the Eastern Mediterranean Basin and Greece. As a tool for evaluating the ULF Ez energy variations we used singular spectrum analysis techniques. The results of our analysis clearly show a significant increase of the ULF EM energy emitted from regions of highest seismic activity at the boundaries tectonic plates. Furthermore, we found that higher electromagnetic radiation was detected in a region above the northern- western Greek Arc (R1 than above the adjacent region including Athens and its urban area. We interpret these results of the present study as suggesting that: i the seismogenic regions at the boundary of tectonic plates radiate ULF EM emissions observed by satellites in the topside ionosphere; and ii that this EM radiation is not only related with the occurrence time of great (M≥5 earthquakes, but it is often present in intermediate times and it appears as a quasi-permanent phenomenon.

  3. Theoretical Studies of Turbulent Transport Processes at Rough Boundaries with Application to the Interface Between Sea Ice and the Ocean

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toppaladoddi, S.; Succi, S.; Wettlaufer, J. S.

    2015-12-01

    We study the effects of rough walls on turbulent flows to understand the coupling between the rough underside of Arctic sea ice and the ocean. Of particular relevance is the fact that the climatological thickness of Arctic sea ice is a sensitive function of the turbulent ice/ocean heat flux, which depends sensitively on the roughness of the phase boundary. We tailor the geometry of the upper boundary to manipulate the boundary layer - interior flow interaction and study the turbulent transport of heat in two-dimensional Rayleigh-Bénard convection with numerical simulations using the Lattice Boltzmann method. By fixing the roughness amplitude of the upper boundary and varying the wavelength λλ, we find that the exponent ββ in the Nusselt-Rayleigh scaling relation, Nu-1∝RaβNu-1 ∝ Ra^β, is maximized at λ≡λmax≈(2π)-1λ ≡ λ_{max} ≈ (2 π)^{-1}, but decays to the planar value in both the large (λ≫λmaxλ ≫ λ_{max}) and small (λ≪λmaxλ ≪ λ_{max}) wavelength limits. The changes in the exponent originate in the nature of the coupling between the boundary layer and the interior flow. We present a simple scaling argument embodying this coupling, which describes the maximal convective heat flux.

  4. Turbulence

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Z. Lin; R.E. Waltz

    2007-01-01

    @@ Turbulent transport driven by plasma pressure gradients [Tangl978] is one of the most important scientific challenges in burning plasma experiments since the balance between turbulent transport and the self-heating by the fusion products (a-particles) determines the performance of a fusion reactor like ITER.

  5. Crustal structure of the Eurasia-Africa plate boundary across the Gloria Fault, North Atlantic Ocean

    Science.gov (United States)

    Batista, Luis; Hübscher, Christian; Terrinha, Pedro; Matias, Luis; Afilhado, Alexandra; Lüdmann, Thomas

    2017-05-01

    The oceanic crustal and uppermost lithospheric mantle structure across the Gloria Fault (GF) transcurrent plate boundary between Africa and Eurasia in the Northeast Atlantic is investigated based on seismic reflection, seismic refraction and wide-angle reflection data. This experiment used 18 ocean bottom stations along an N-S 150 km long traverse together with acquisition of a multichannel seismic reflection profile. Modeling of P and S seismic waves and gravimetric anomalies allowed estimation of P- and S-wave velocities, density, Poisson's ratio and discussion of a compositional model. A five-layer model is proposed in which layers 1-3 correspond to normal sediments through typical oceanic crust layers 2 and 3. Layer 5 yielded mantle velocities above 7.9 km s-1. Layer 4 with 4 km of thickness has Vp velocities between 7.1 and 7.4 km s-1 and is clearly separated from typical oceanic crust and mantle layers. Comparison with natural analogues and published lab measurements suggest that layer 4 can be a mix of lithologies that comply with the estimated P and S velocities and computed Poisson's ratio and densities, such as, olivine cumulates, peridotite, gabbro and hydrated mantle. We favour the tectonic process that produces secondary porosity from which results serpentinization due to sea water circulation in fractures. Structural and seismic stratigraphic interpretation of the reflection profile shows that Neogene to recent tectonic deformation on this segment of the plate boundary concentrated on the southern side of the GF, that is, the Africa plate.

  6. Turbulent boundary layers under irregular waves and currents: Experiments and the equivalent-wave concept

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuan, Jing

    2016-04-01

    A full-scale experimental study of turbulent boundary layer flows under irregular waves and currents is conducted with the primary objective to investigate the equivalent-wave concept by Madsen (1994). Irregular oscillatory flows following the bottom-velocity spectrum under realistic surface irregular waves are produced over two fixed rough bottoms in an oscillatory water tunnel, and flow velocities are measured using a Particle Image Velocimetry. The root-mean-square (RMS) value and representative phase lead of wave velocities have vertical variations very similar to those of the first-harmonic velocity of periodic wave boundary layers, e.g., the RMS wave velocity follows a logarithmic distribution controlled by the physical bottom roughness in the very near-bottom region. The RMS wave bottom shear stress and the associated representative phase lead can be accurately predicted using the equivalent-wave approach. The spectra of wave bottom shear stress and boundary layer velocity are found to be proportional to the spectrum of free-stream velocity. Currents in the presence of irregular waves exhibit the classic two-log-profile structure with the lower log-profile controlled by the physical bottom roughness and the upper log-profile controlled by a much larger apparent roughness. Replacing the irregular waves by their equivalent sinusoidal waves virtually makes no difference for the coexisting currents. These observations, together with the excellent agreement between measurements and model predictions, suggest that the equivalent-wave representation adequately characterizes the basic wave-current interaction under irregular waves.

  7. A Physically Based Horizontal Subgrid-scale Turbulent Mixing Parameterization for the Convective Boundary Layer in Mesoscale Models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Bowen; Xue, Ming; Zhu, Kefeng

    2017-04-01

    Compared to the representation of vertical turbulent mixing through various PBL schemes, the treatment of horizontal turbulence mixing in the boundary layer within mesoscale models, with O(10) km horizontal grid spacing, has received much less attention. In mesoscale models, subgrid-scale horizontal fluxes most often adopt the gradient-diffusion assumption. The horizontal mixing coefficients are usually set to a constant, or through the 2D Smagorinsky formulation, or in some cases based on the 1.5-order turbulence kinetic energy (TKE) closure. In this work, horizontal turbulent mixing parameterizations using physically based characteristic velocity and length scales are proposed for the convective boundary layer based on analysis of a well-resolved, wide-domain large-eddy simulation (LES). The proposed schemes involve different levels of sophistication. The first two schemes can be used together with first-order PBL schemes, while the third uses TKE to define its characteristic velocity scale and can be used together with TKE-based higher-order PBL schemes. The current horizontal mixing formulations are also assessed a priori through the filtered LES results to illustrate their limitations. The proposed parameterizations are tested a posteriori in idealized simulations of turbulent dispersion of a passive scalar. Comparisons show improved horizontal dispersion by the proposed schemes, and further demonstrate the weakness of the current schemes.

  8. Coefficient of Variation Estimates for the Plate Boundary Fault System of California

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biasi, G. P.; Scharer, K. M.

    2015-12-01

    The number of high-quality paleoseismic records on major strike-slip faults of California has increased in recent years to the point that patterns in earthquake recurrence are emerging. The degree of predictability in time intervals between ground-rupturing earthquakes can be measured by the CoV (coefficient of variation). The CoV approximately normalizes for mean recurrence, and is thus useful to isolate the temporal variability of earthquake records. CoV estimates are themselves uncertain because input dates are actually probability distributions and because paleoseismic records are short and not necessarily representative samples from the underlying recurrence distribution. Radiocarbon dating uncertainty can be incorporated by sampling from event PDFs and compiling sample CoV estimates. Uncertainty due to the brevity of the site event record is larger, and neglect of it can lead to improbable estimates. Long records are now available on the San Andreas and San Jacinto faults in Southern California, and the San Andreas and Hayward faults in northern California. These faults accommodate most of the Pacific-North American relative plate motion in their respective regions. CoV estimates from sites with 8 or more events cluster around 0.63, but are as low as 0.4 for the southern Hayward fault. Sites with fewer events give similar estimates, though with lower resolution. The one prominent outlier, Burro Flats, with a CoV near 1.0, is in a region of severe fault complexity and rapid fault-normal compression. Quasi-periodic recurrence is emerging as a general property for these plate boundary faults. Some individual site records allow that, at low probabilities, recurrence could be random in time. When the ensemble is considered together, however, it is improbable that we would see the observed degree of agreement among boundary fault paleoseismic records; the more likely explanation is that quasi-periodic recurrence is a real property of the boundary fault system.

  9. Implementation of Turbulent Mixing over a Stratocumulus-Topped Boundary Layer and Its Impact in a GCM

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Sun-Hee SHIN; Kyung-Ja HA

    2009-01-01

    The effect of a vertical diffusion scheme over a stratocumulus topped boundary layer (STBL) was investigated using the YONU AGCM (Yonsei University Atmospheric General Circulation Model).To consider the impact of clouds on the turbulence production,the turbulence mixing term,driven by radiative cooling at the cloud top,is implemented as an extended non-local diffusion scheme.In the model with this new scheme,the STBL parameterization significantly influences the lower atmosphere over the tropical and subtropical regions.Consideration of the turbulent mixing within the cloud layer leads to continuous stratocumulus formation.The cloud-top radiative cooling tends to favor more rapid entrainment and produces top-down turbulent mixing.This cooling develops a mixed layer without initiation of deep convection by surface fluxes.Variations in thermodynamical and dynamical features are produced by planetary boundary layer (PBL)cloud development.The simulated stratocumulus induces more mixing of heat and moisture due to the cloud forcing.Over STBL regions,the lower boundary layer bccomes warmer and drier.It also weakens vertical motion and zonal trade winds in the eastern Pacific,which indicates that stratocumulus cloud cover plays a role in weakening the Walker circulation;that is,cloud cover damps the tropical circulation.

  10. Thermochronology and tectonics of the Leeward Antilles: Evolution of the southern Caribbean Plate boundary zone

    Science.gov (United States)

    van der Lelij, Roelant; Spikings, Richard A.; Kerr, Andrew C.; Kounov, Alexandre; Cosca, Michael; Chew, David; Villagomez, Diego

    2010-01-01

    Tectonic reconstructions of the Caribbean Plate are severely hampered by a paucity of geochronologic and exhumation constraints from anastomosed basement blocks along its southern margin. New U/Pb, 40Ar/39Ar, apatite fission track, and apatite (U-Th)/He data constrain quantitative thermal and exhumation histories, which have been used to propose a model for the tectonic evolution of the emergent parts of the Bonaire Block and the southern Caribbean Plate boundary zone. An east facing arc system intruded through an oceanic plateau during ~90 to ~87 Ma and crops out on Aruba. Subsequent structural displacements resulted in >80°C of cooling on Aruba during 70–60 Ma. In contrast, exhumation of the island arc sequence exposed on Bonaire occurred at 85–80 Ma and 55–45 Ma. Santonian exhumation on Bonaire occurred immediately subsequent to burial metamorphism and may have been driven by the collision of a west facing island arc with the Caribbean Plate. Island arc rocks intruded oceanic plateau rocks on Gran Roque at ~65 Ma and exhumed rapidly at 55–45 Ma. We attribute Maastrichtian-Danian exhumation on Aruba and early Eocene exhumation on Bonaire and Gran Roque to sequential diachronous accretion of their basement units to the South American Plate. Widespread unconformities indicate late Eocene subaerial exposure. Late Oligocene–early Miocene dextral transtension within the Bonaire Block drove subsidence and burial of crystalline basement rocks of the Leeward Antilles to ≤1 km. Late Miocene–recent transpression caused inversion and ≤1 km of exhumation, possibly as a result of the northward escape of the Maracaibo Block.

  11. Unsteady Hydromagnetic Flow past a Moving Vertical Plate with Convective Surface Boundary Condition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gauri Shanker Seth

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Investigation of unsteady MHD natural convection flow through a fluid-saturated porous medium of a viscous, incompressible, electrically-conducting and optically-thin radiating fluid past an impulsively moving semi-infinite vertical plate with convective surface boundary condition is carried out. With the aim to replicate practical situations, the heat transfer and thermal expansion coefficients are chosen to be constant and a new set of non-dimensional quantities and parameters are introduced to represent the governing equations along with initial and boundary conditions in dimensionless form. Solution of the initial boundary-value problem (IBVP is obtained by an efficient implicit finite-difference scheme of the Crank-Nicolson type which is one of the most popular schemes to solve IBVPs. The numerical values of fluid velocity and fluid temperature are depicted graphically whereas those of the shear stress at the wall, wall temperature and the wall heat transfer are presented in tabular form for various values of the pertinent flow parameters. A comparison with previously published papers is made for validation of the numerical code and the results are found to be in good agreement.

  12. Boundary integral equation methods and numerical solutions thin plates on an elastic foundation

    CERN Document Server

    Constanda, Christian; Hamill, William

    2016-01-01

    This book presents and explains a general, efficient, and elegant method for solving the Dirichlet, Neumann, and Robin boundary value problems for the extensional deformation of a thin plate on an elastic foundation. The solutions of these problems are obtained both analytically—by means of direct and indirect boundary integral equation methods (BIEMs)—and numerically, through the application of a boundary element technique. The text discusses the methodology for constructing a BIEM, deriving all the attending mathematical properties with full rigor. The model investigated in the book can serve as a template for the study of any linear elliptic two-dimensional problem with constant coefficients. The representation of the solution in terms of single-layer and double-layer potentials is pivotal in the development of a BIEM, which, in turn, forms the basis for the second part of the book, where approximate solutions are computed with a high degree of accuracy. The book is intended for graduate students and r...

  13. Effects of very high turbulence on convective heat transfer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moffat, R. J.; Maciejewski, P. K.

    1984-01-01

    The effects of high-intensity, large-scale turbulence on turbulent boundary-layer heat transfer are studied. Flow fields were produced with turbulence intensities up to 40% and length scales up to several times the boundary layer thickness. In addition, three different types of turbulence will be compared to see whether they have the same effect on the boundary layer. The three are: the far field of a free jet, flow downstream of a grid, and flow downstream of a simulated gas turbine combustor. Each turbulence field will be characterized by several measures: intensity (by component), scale, and spectrum. Heat transfer will be measured on a 2.5 m long, 0.5 m wide flat plate using the energy-balance technique. The same plate will be used in each of the four flow fields; a low-turbulence tunnel for baseline data, and the three flow situations mentioned.

  14. Dynamics and structure analysis of coherent turbulent structures at the boundary of toroidally confined plasmas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fuchert, Golo

    2013-12-13

    The safe and reliable satisfaction of the world's increasing energy demand at affordable costs is one of the major challenges of our century. Nuclear fusion power plants following the magnetic confinement approach may play an essential role in solving this issue. The energy loss of the fusion plasma due to plasma turbulence reduces the efficiency and poses a threat to the first wall of a fusion reactor. Close to the wall, in the scrape-off layer, this transport is dominated by blobs or filaments: Localized structures of increased pressure, which transport energy and particles towards the wall by propagating radially outwards. Their contribution to the transport depends on their size, propagation velocity and generation rate. An analytical model for the evolution of blobs predicts their velocity and size, but not the generation rate. Experiments indicate that edge turbulence in the vicinity of the last closed flux surface (the boundary between the confined plasma and the scrape-off layer) is involved in the blob generation process and should influence the generation rate. The present thesis aims at answering two main questions: How well do the blob properties predicted from the simple model compare to experimental observations in more complex magnetic field configurations of actual fusion experiments and does the edge turbulence influence the blob properties during the generation process. A fast camera was used to measure blob properties in two devices, TJ-K and ASDEX Upgrade. In TJ-K, blob sizes and velocities were determined together with the generation rate. An overall agreement with the predictions from the simple model is found. For the first time a clear influence of the edge dynamics on the analyzed blob properties is demonstrated. These measurements include the first systematic comparison of the structure-size scaling inside and outside of the last closed flux surface. Furthermore, measurements with a multi-probe array are used to reconstruct the blob

  15. Characterization of the 222Rn family turbulent transport in the convective atmospheric boundary layer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Galmarini

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available The combined effect of turbulent transport and radioactive decay on the distribution of 222Rn and its progeny in convective atmospheric boundary layers (CBL is investigated. Large eddy simulation is used to simulate their dispersion in steady state CBL and in unsteady conditions represented by the growth of a CBL within a pre-existing reservoir layer. The exact decomposition of the concentration and flux budget equations under steady state conditions allowed us to determine which processes are responsible for the vertical distribution of 222Rn and its progeny. Their mean concentrations are directly correlated with their half-life, e.g. 222Rn and 210Pb are the most abundant whereas 218Po show the lowest concentrations. 222Rn flux decreases linearly with height and its flux budget is similar to the one of inert emitted scalar, i.e., a balance between on the one hand the gradient and the buoyancy production terms, and on the other hand the pressure and dissipation at smaller scales which tends to destroy the fluxes. While 222Rn exhibits the typical bottom-up behavior, the maximum flux location of the daughters is moving upwards while their rank in the 222Rn progeny is increasing leading to a typical top-down behavior for 210Pb. We also found that the relevant radioactive decaying contributions of 222Rn short-lived daughters (218Po and 214Pb act as flux sources leading to deviations from the linear flux shape. In addition, while analyzing the vertical distribution of the radioactive decay contributions to the concentrations, e.g. the decaying zone, we found a variation in height of 222Rn daughters' radioactive transformations. Under unsteady conditions, the same behaviors reported under steady state conditions are found: deviation of the fluxes from the linear shape for 218Po, enhanced discrepancy in height of the radioactive transformation contributions for all the daughters. In addition, 222Rn and its progeny concentrations decrease due to the

  16. EarthScope Plate Boundary Observatory Data in the College Classroom (Invited)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eriksson, S. C.; Olds, S. E.

    2009-12-01

    The Plate Boundary Observatory (PBO) is the geodetic component of the EarthScope project, designed to study the 3-D strain field across the active boundary zone between the Pacific and North American tectonics plates in the western United States. All PBO data are freely available to scientific and educational communities and have been incorporated into a variety of activities for college and university classrooms. UNAVCO Education and Outreach program staff have worked closely with faculty users, scientific researchers, and facility staff to create materials that are scientifically and technically accurate as well as useful to the classroom user. Availability of processed GPS data is not new to the geoscience community. However, PBO data staff have worked with education staff to deliver data that are readily accessible to educators. The UNAVCO Data for Educators webpage, incorporating an embedded Google Map with PBO GPS locations and providing current GPS time series plots and downloadable data, extends and updates the datasets available to our community. Google Earth allows the visualization GPS data with other types of datasets, e.g. LiDAR, while maintaining the self-contained and easy-to-use interface of UNAVCO’s Jules Verne Voyager map tools, which have multiple sets of geological and geophysical data. Curricular materials provide scaffolds for using EarthScope data in a variety of forms for different learning goals. Simple visualization of earthquake epicenters and locations of volcanoes can be used with velocity vectors to make simple deductions of plate boundary behaviors. Readily available time series plots provide opportunities for additional science skills, and there are web and paper-based support materials for downloading data, manipulating tables, and using plotting programs for processed GPS data. Scientists have provided contextual materials to explore the importance of these data in interpreting the structure and dynamics of the Earth. These data

  17. CFD SIMULATION OF THE HEAT TRANSFER PROCESS IN A CHEVRON PLATE HEAT EXCHANGER USING THE SST TURBULENCE MODEL

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jan Skočilas

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available This paper deals with a computational fluid dynamics (CFD simulation of the heat transfer process during turbulent hot water flow between two chevron plates in a plate heat exchanger. A three-dimensional model with the simplified geometry of two cross-corrugated channels provided by chevron plates, taking into account the inlet and outlet ports, has been designed for the numerical study. The numerical model was based on the shear-stress transport (SST k-! model. The basic characteristics of the heat exchanger, as values of heat transfer coefficient and pressure drop, have been investigated. A comparative analysis of analytical calculation results, based on experimental data obtained from literature, and of the results obtained by numerical simulation, has been carried out. The coefficients and the exponents in the design equations for the considered plates have been arranged by using simulation results. The influence on the main flow parameters of the corrugation inclination angle relative to the flow direction has been taken into account. An analysis of the temperature distribution across the plates has been carried out, and it has shown the presence of zones with higher heat losses and low fluid flow intensity.

  18. Detached eddy simulation for turbulent fluid-structure interaction of moving bodies using the constraint-based immersed boundary method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nangia, Nishant; Bhalla, Amneet P. S.; Griffith, Boyce E.; Patankar, Neelesh A.

    2016-11-01

    Flows over bodies of industrial importance often contain both an attached boundary layer region near the structure and a region of massively separated flow near its trailing edge. When simulating these flows with turbulence modeling, the Reynolds-averaged Navier-Stokes (RANS) approach is more efficient in the former, whereas large-eddy simulation (LES) is more accurate in the latter. Detached-eddy simulation (DES), based on the Spalart-Allmaras model, is a hybrid method that switches from RANS mode of solution in attached boundary layers to LES in detached flow regions. Simulations of turbulent flows over moving structures on a body-fitted mesh incur an enormous remeshing cost every time step. The constraint-based immersed boundary (cIB) method eliminates this operation by placing the structure on a Cartesian mesh and enforcing a rigidity constraint as an additional forcing in the Navier-Stokes momentum equation. We outline the formulation and development of a parallel DES-cIB method using adaptive mesh refinement. We show preliminary validation results for flows past stationary bodies with both attached and separated boundary layers along with results for turbulent flows past moving bodies. This work is supported by the National Science Foundation Graduate Research Fellowship under Grant No. DGE-1324585.

  19. Modeling and large-eddy simulation (LES) of a turbulent boundary layer over linearly-varying surface roughness

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sridhar, A.; Pullin, D. I.; Cheng, W.

    2016-11-01

    An empirical model is presented, after Rotta (1962), that describes the development of a fully-developed turbulent boundary layer in the presence of surface roughness with nominal roughness length-scale ks that varies with stream-wise distance x. For Rex =Ue (x) x / ν large, use is made of the log-wake model of the local turbulent mean-velocity profile that contains the Hama roughness correction ΔU+ (ks+) for the asymptotic, fully rough regime. It is shown that the skin friction coefficient Cf is constant in x only for ks = αx , where α is a dimensionless number. For Ue (x) = Axm , this then gives a two-parameter (α , m) family of solutions for boundary-layer flows that are self similar in the variable z / (α x) where z is the wall-normal co-ordinate. Trends observed in this model are supported by wall-modeled LES of the zero-pressure-gradient turbulent boundary layer (m = 0) at very large Rex . It is argued that the present results suggest that, in the sense that Cf is spatially constant and independent of Rex , this class of flows can be interpreted as providing the asymptotically-rough equivalent of Moody-like diagrams for boundary layers in the presence of small-scale roughness. Supported partially by KAUST OCRF Award No. URF/1/1394-01 and partially by NSF award CBET 1235605.

  20. Turbulent structure and scaling of the inertial subrange in a stratocumulus-topped boundary layer observed by a Doppler lidar

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Tonttila

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available The turbulent structure of a stratocumulus-topped marine boundary layer over a two-day period is observed with a Doppler lidar at Mace Head in Ireland. Using profiles of vertical velocity statistics, the bulk of the mixing is identified as cloud-driven. This is supported by the pertinent feature of negative vertical velocity skewness in the sub-cloud layer which extends, on occasion, almost to the surface. Both coupled and decoupled turbulence characteristics are observed. The length and time scales related to the cloud driven mixing are investigated, which are shown to provide additional information about the structure and the source of the mixing inside the boundary layer. They are also shown to place constraints on the length of the sampling periods used to derive products, such as the turbulent dissipation rate, from lidar measurements. For this, the upper cut-off wavelength of the inertial subrange is studied through spectral analysis of the vertical velocity. The bulk statistical profiles and the scaling of the inertial subrange show consistent behaviour as the boundary layer undergoes transitions between a coupled and decoupled stratocumulus layer. The cut-off wavelength of the inertial subrange does not appear to scale robustly with the relative depth of the local mixing regime at different altitudes during decoupled periods. Rather, the competition between surface-based and cloud-driven mixed layers suppresses the range of eddy sizes at all heights inside the boundary layer.