WorldWideScience

Sample records for plate injury responses

  1. What Are Growth Plate Injuries?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... plate injuries are:  Falling down  Competitive sports (like football)  Recreational activities. Other reasons for growth plate injuries are:  Child abuse  Injury from extreme cold (for ...

  2. Post-traumatic Raynaud's phenomenon following volar plate injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chodakiewitz, Yosef G; Daniels, Alan H; Kamal, Robin N; Weiss, Arnold-Peter C

    2014-04-01

    Post-traumatic Raynaud's phenomenon following non-penetrating or non-repetitive injury is rare. We report a case of Raynaud's phenomenon occurring in a single digit 3 months following volar plate avulsion injury. Daily episodes of painless pallor of the digit occurred for 1 month upon any exposure to cold, resolving with warm water therapy. Symptoms resolved after the initiation of hand therapy, splinting, and range-of- motion exercises.

  3. Dynamic response of visco-elastic plates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kadıoǧlu, Fethi; Tekin, Gülçin

    2016-12-01

    In this study, a comprehensive analysis about the dynamic response characteristics of visco-elastic plates is given. To construct the functional in the Laplace-Carson domain for the analysis of visco-elastic plates based on the Kirchhoff hypothesis, functional analysis method is employed. By using this new energy functional in the Laplace-Carson domain, moment values that are important for engineers can be obtained directly with excellent accuracy and element equations can be written explicitly. Three-element model is considered for modelling the visco-elastic material behavior. The solutions obtained in the Laplace-Carson domain by utilizing mixed finite element formulation are transformed to the time domain using the Durbin's inverse Laplace transform technique. The proposed mixed finite element formulation is shown to be simple to implement and gives satisfactory results for dynamic response of visco-elastic plates.

  4. Evolutional patterns of articular cartilage following growth plate injury in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quintana-Villamandos, M B; Sánchez-Hernández, J J; Delgado-Martos, M J; Delgado-Baeza, E

    2009-09-01

    No study to date has analyzed the damage of the articular cartilage and its relation to growth plate injury. The purpose of this study was to test whether primary injury to the growth plate contributes to secondary damage to the articular cartilage in rats. A total of 109 two-week-old male Wistar rats were allocated to four lesional groups. In group I (controls) no surgery took place. In the remaining animals, an injury was caused in the proximal physis of the left tibia: group II, perichondrial ring injury; group III, direct injury to the growth plate; group IV, traumatic separation of the epiphysis where a Salter-Harris II-type injury was created. The results were assessed at 1 week, 6 weeks, and 6 months. A growth plate score was used. The stereological and histological changes in the articular cartilage were analyzed, and the results were subjected to statistical analysis. Histological studies showed discrete degenerative changes in the articular cartilage in the injured growth plate. Changes in the cell density, mean cell volume, and articular cartilage occurred in the injured growth plate. The changes appeared to be transient in groups II and III. Primary injury to the growth plate contributes to secondary damage to the articular cartilage in young rats. Our data -- extrapolated to the clinical view -- suggests that a Salter-Harris type II injury does not seem to have impunity to subsequent joint degeneration.

  5. Dynamic Response of Three-Layered Annular Plate with Imperfections

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pawlus Dorota

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents the imperfection sensitivity of annular plate with three-layered structure. The plate composed of thin elastic facings and a thicker elastic core is loaded in facing plane. The classical issue of a three-layered plate was solved for dynamic deflection problem using the approximation methods: orthogonalization and finite difference. The solution includes the axisymmetric and asymmetric plate modes of the dynamic stability loss. The evaluation of the rate of plate sensitivity to imperfection of plate preliminary geometry has been enriched by the analysis of plate models built of finite elements. The ABAQUS program has been used. The numerous calculation results in the form of deflection characteristics, buckling modes, values of critical parameters create the view of response of dynamic plate structure with different rate of imperfection and linear in time loading growth, too.

  6. Non-linear resonances in the forced responses of plates. I - Symmetric responses of circular plates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sridhar, S.; Mook, D. T.; Nayfeh, A. H.

    1975-01-01

    The dynamic analogue of the von Karman equations is used to study the symmetric response of a circular plate to a harmonic excitation when the frequency of the excitation is near one of the natural frequencies. It is shown that, in general, when there is no internal resonance (i.e., the natural frequencies are not commensurable), only the mode having a frequency near that of the excitation is strongly excited (i.e., is needed to represent the response in the first approximation). A clamped, circular plate is used as a numerical example to show that, when there is an internal resonance, more than one of the modes involved in this resonance can be strongly excited; moreover, when more than one mode is strongly excited, the lower modes can dominate the response, even when the frequency of the excitation is near that of the highest mode. This possibility was not revealed by any of the earlier studies which were based on the same governing equations.

  7. Atypical growth plate closure: a possible chronic Salter and Harris Type V injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sato, Takahisa; Shinozaki, Tetsuya; Fukuda, Toshio; Watanabe, Hideomi; Aoki, Jun; Yanagawa, Takashi; Takagishi, Kenji

    2002-04-01

    Salter-Harris Type V epiphyseal injury is relatively uncommon. The authors present a case involving the proximal tibia diagnosed both by radiologic and histologic findings. The findings suggest that Salter-Harris Type V injury can be a possible outcome when the disappearance of the physeal plate is reported in a patient who has great physical activity in childhood, even if the patient has suffered from no major injury.

  8. Plate tectonics: Delayed response to mantle pull

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nedimović, Mladen R.

    2016-08-01

    At mid-ocean ridges, the directions in which plates spread and the underlying mantle flows were thought to broadly align. A synthesis of results from ridges that spread at a variety of rates reveals that instead there may be a systematic skew.

  9. MRI of pediatric growth plate injury: correlation with plain film radiographs and clinical outcome

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Carey, J.; Spence, L.; Blickman, H.; Eustace, S. [Medical Center, Boston, MA (United States). Dept. of Radiol.

    1998-05-01

    Purpose. To evaluate pediatric growth plate injuries with conventional radiographs and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). To review potential clinical impact of MRI on subsequent patient management and outcome. Methods. Fourteen patients with known or suspected growth plate injury were studied. Each patient underwent imaging by conventional radiography and MRI within 2 weeks of injury. Findings on conventional radiographs and on MR images were compared and then correlated with subsequent management and outcome at a mean of 12 months. Results. Direct visualization of cartilage afforded by MRI improved evaluation of growth plate injury in each case. MRI changed Salter Harris classification or staging in 2 of 9 patients with fractures visualized on conventional radiographs, allowed the detection of radiographically occult fractures in 5 of 14 cases, and resulted in a physical change in management in 5 of the 14 patients studied. Conclusion. MRI has an important role in the evaluation of acute pediatric growth plate injury, particularly when diagnostic uncertainty persists following the evaluation of conventional radiographs. MRI allows detection of occult fractures, may alter Salter Harris staging, and in the reported study it frequently resulted in a change in patient management. (orig.) With 4 figs., 1 tab., 20 refs.

  10. Treatment of rabbit growth plate injuries with oriented ECM scaffold and autologous BMSCs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Wenchao; Xu, Ruijiang; Huang, Jiangxiang; Bao, Xing; Zhao, Bin

    2017-01-01

    Tissue-engineered technology has provided a promising method for the repair of growth plate injuries using biocompatible and biodegradable scaffolds and appropriate cells. The aim of this study was to fabricate oriented ECM scaffolds to imitate the material and structure of a natural growth plate and to investigate whether BMSCs in a scaffold could prevent the formation of bone bridges in an injured growth plate. We developed a natural, acellular and oriented scaffold derived from a growth plate. The oriented scaffold was fabricated using new freeze-drying technology and by cross-linking the microfilaments in the growth plate. From histological examination, the scaffold contained most of the ECM components including GAG and collagen II without cell DNA fragments, and SEM revealed that oriented scaffold had a uniform aperture in the transverse plane and columnar structure in length plane. Cytotoxicity testing with MTT showed no cytotoxic effect of the scaffold extracts on BMSCs. Autogenous BMSCs in oriented scaffolds promoted the regeneration of neogenetic growth plate when repairing an injured growth plate and prevent the formation of bone bridges to reduce the angular deformity and length discrepancy in the proximal tibia in rabbits. The well-characterized ECM-derived oriented growth plate scaffold shows potential for the repair of injured growth plates in young rabbits. PMID:28266598

  11. Lower cervical spine injury treated with lateral mass plates and pedicle screws through posterior approach

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHAO Xue-ling; ZHAO Hong-bin; WANG Bin; ZHU Xiao-song; LI Lin-zhi; ZHANG Chun-qiang

    2005-01-01

    Objective: To treat injury of the lower cervical spine C6 to C7 with cervical lateral mass plates and T1 pedicle screws through posterior approach. Methods: The data of 8 patients with lower cervical spine C6 or C7 injury (6 patients with fracture and dislocation in C6 and C7 and 2 with fracture in C7) were analyzed retrospectively in this study. For the preoperative American Spinal Injury Association (ASIA) classification, Grade C was found in 3 cases and Grade D in 5 cases. Screws were placed on the lateral masses and the first thoracic pedicle with Margerl technique. Lamina or facet bone allografting was used to achieve a long-term stability. Results: All the 8 patients were followed up for 5-37 months (mean: 15 months). No operative death occurred. There were no examples of aggravation of spinal cord injury or vertebral artery injury, cerebrospinal fluid leak, nerve roots injury, screw malposition or back-out, loose of alignment or implant failure. Clinical symptoms and ASIA classification were improved in all the patients. Postoperative MRI scanning confirmed the satisfactory screw placement in all the cases. Conclusions: Lateral mass plates and pedicle screws through posterior approach are safe and beneficial for patients with lower cervical spine C6 or C7 injury.

  12. latrogenic brachial artery injury during anterolateral plating of humeral shaft fracture

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Vishal Kumar; Prateek Behera; Sameer Aggarwal; Umesh Kumar Meena

    2013-01-01

    There are several well defined indications for surgical management of humeral shaft fractures.Operative procedures on the humerus are associated with their own complications.Iatrogenic brachial artery injury as a complication of humeral shaft plating has not been reported previously.We report a case of a 48 years old femalewho received operation at a district hospital and was referred to us when the surgeon could not palpate the pulse.CT angiogram showed that there was segmental non-opacification of the brachial artery.There was distal reformation and the thrombosis was decided to be managed conservatively.We believe that the arterial injury was a result ofimproper surgical technique and the segmental block might be due to improper use of plate holding forceps.This case report makes us aware of a rare complication of operative management of humeral shaft fractures and that basic principles of surgery must be always followed to prevent such injuries.

  13. Underwater Shock Response of Circular HSLA Steel Plates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Rajendran

    2000-01-01

    Full Text Available Studies on shock response of circular plates subjected to underwater explosion is of interest to ship designers. Non-contact underwater explosion experiments were carried out on air backed circular High Strength Low Alloy (HSLA steel plates of 4 mm thickness and 290 mm diameter. The experiments were carried out in two phases. In the first phase, strain gauges were fixed at intervals of 30 mm from the centre of the plate and strains were recorded for the shock intensity gradually increasing to yielding. Semi-analytical models were derived for the elastic strain prediction which showed good agreement with the experiments. Dynamic yield stress and the shock factor for yielding were established. In the second phase, individual plates were subjected to increasing shock severity until fracture and the apex bulge depth and the thickness strains were measured. Empirical models were derived to predict the plastic deformation which were validated through a fresh set of experiments. Analysis of the fractured surface by visual examination showed that there was slant fracture indicating ductile mode of failure and the same was corroborated by Scanning Electron Microscopic (SEM examination.

  14. Remodeling of Salter-Harris type II epiphyseal plate injury of the distal radius.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Houshian, Shirzad; Holst, Anette Koch; Larsen, Morten S; Torfing, Trine

    2004-01-01

    The authors studied the relation between residual angulation at the time of healing and final orientation of the distal radius as well as the clinical outcome in patients after Salter-Harris type II epiphyseal plate injury of the distal radius. Eighty-five patients were reviewed with a median follow-up of 8.5 years. Anteroposterior and lateral radiographs were taken at follow-up. The mobility of both wrists and forearms was examined, together with grip strength. Pain with activities and sports was evaluated. At follow-up, 73 patients (86%) were anatomically normal on radiographs; the remaining 12 patients had an incomplete remodeling of the volar and/or radial inclination of the distal radius. Premature closure of the growth plate in the distal radius or ulna did not occur in any of these children. Complete remodeling was seen in children aged up to 10 years in all but one patient. Remodeling after Salter-Harris type II epiphyseal plate injury occurs in all age groups, but the potential is greater in children up to 10 years of age. The incomplete remodeling does not seem to have any substantial long-term negative effect on mobility of the wrist and grip strength.

  15. Usefulness of polyetheretherketone (PEEK) cage with plate augmentation for anterior arthrodesis in traumatic cervical spine injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Kyung-Jin; Choi, Byung-Wan; Kim, Gyu-Hyung; Song, Ji-Hun

    2010-01-01

    Even though many clinical reports about cages have been documented in patients with degenerative disorders, reports were scarce for traumatic injury cases, and those cases using metal cages were restricted to only one-level injury. To evaluate the usefulness of polyetheretherketone (PEEK) cage and plate construction in anterior interbody fusions (AIF) for traumatic cervical spine injuries by analyzing radiographic changes and clinical outcomes. Retrospective study. Fifty-eight patients (91 levels) underwent cage and plate construction for treatment of traumatic cervical spine injury. The fusion rate, fusion time, changes of Cobb angle, subsidence rate, and adjacent level changes were assessed as a radiographic outcome. Clinical analysis includes the recovery rate on the American Spinal Injury Association (ASIA) impairment scale and the presence of the complications. We evaluated 58 patients (91 levels) who underwent surgery and had at least 24 months in follow-up study. Radiographic evaluation included the assessment of interbody fusion rate, fusion time, changes of Cobb angle, subsidence rate, and adjacent level changes. Clinical assessment was done by analyzing recovery state of ASIA impairment scale from preoperative period to the last follow-up and by evaluating complications. Fifty-four cases showed bony fusion within 3 months after the surgery. The mean Cobb angle between the vertebral bodies was 2.54 degrees before operation, 9.13 degrees after operation, and 8.39 degrees at the latest follow-up. The mean intervertebral disc height was increased by 3.01 mm after the operation, but the mean height was 2.17 mm shorter at the last follow-up than after postoperation. In terms of clinical results, five Grade A cases and one Grade B case as assessed by the ASIA impairment scale were unchanged until the last follow-up. Twenty-three cases of Grade C, 16 cases of Grade D, and 13 cases of Grade E improved to seven cases, 26 cases, and 19 cases, respectively. Three

  16. PLATE

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kling, Joyce; Hjulmand, Lise-Lotte

    2008-01-01

    ’s level of English is sufficient for the increasing number of courses offered in English each semester. This paper addresses these concerns and describes a pilot project initiated in 2003 at CBS to gauge the overall English language proficiency of those teaching content courses in English. Through......Copenhagen Business School (CBS) finds itself needing to address the issue of English-medium instruction for its increasing number of foreign exchange and full degree students. With internationalisation as a main pillar of the institution’s agenda, there are concerns whether the teaching faculty...... the Project in Language Assessment for Teaching in English (PLATE) language professionals from CBS’s Language Center observe teachers and provide feedback using evaluation criteria from the Common European Framework for Reference (CEFR) supplemented by some additional criteria which take the LSP nature...

  17. PLATE

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kling, Joyce; Hjulmand, Lise-Lotte

    2008-01-01

    Copenhagen Business School (CBS) finds itself needing to address the issue of English-medium instruction for its increasing number of foreign exchange and full degree students. With internationalisation as a main pillar of the institution’s agenda, there are concerns whether the teaching faculty......’s level of English is sufficient for the increasing number of courses offered in English each semester. This paper addresses these concerns and describes a pilot project initiated in 2003 at CBS to gauge the overall English language proficiency of those teaching content courses in English. Through...... the Project in Language Assessment for Teaching in English (PLATE) language professionals from CBS’s Language Center observe teachers and provide feedback using evaluation criteria from the Common European Framework for Reference (CEFR) supplemented by some additional criteria which take the LSP nature...

  18. Avaliação por imagem das lesões da placa de crescimento Imaging of growth plate injuries

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matiko Yanaguizawa

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available As estruturas responsáveis pelo crescimento do osso incluem a fise (também chamada placa de crescimento e as epífises. Afecções que acometem pacientes com o esqueleto imaturo, ou seja, com a placa de crescimento ainda aberta, podem interferir no crescimento ósseo, resultando em complicações como parada do crescimento, encurtamento dos membros ou deformidades angulares. Condições traumáticas que resultam muitas vezes em fraturas epifisárias são a causa mais comum das lesões da placa de crescimento. A avaliação cuidadosa desses pacientes pelos métodos de diagnóstico por imagem atualmente disponíveis, sobretudo a radiografia, a tomografia computadorizada e a ressonância magnética, permite o reconhecimento precoce do comprometimento das estruturas relacionadas ao crescimento ósseo, além de tratamento adequado, diminuindo a possibilidade do desenvolvimento de tais complicações.The structures responsible for the growth of bones include the physis (also called growth plate and the epiphysis. Affections involving patients with immature skeletons, i.e., with a still open growth plate, may affect the bone growth, resulting in complications such as growth arrest, limb shortening and angular deformities. Traumatic conditions, many times resulting in epiphyseal fractures, are the most frequent cause of growth plate injuries. A careful evaluation of these patients by means of currently available imaging methods, especially radiography, computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging, allows an early diagnosis of the involvement of structures related to the bone growth, besides an appropriate management, reducing the probability of secondary complications.

  19. Sonocatalytic injury of cancer cells attached on the surface of a nickel-titanium dioxide alloy plate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ninomiya, Kazuaki; Maruyama, Hirotaka; Ogino, Chiaki; Takahashi, Kenji; Shimizu, Nobuaki

    2016-01-01

    The present study demonstrates ultrasound-induced cell injury using a nickel-titanium dioxide (Ni-TiO2) alloy plate as a sonocatalyst and a cell culture surface. Ultrasound irradiation of cell-free Ni-TiO2 alloy plates with 1 MHz ultrasound at 0.5 W/cm(2) for 30s led to an increased generation of hydroxyl (OH) radicals compared to nickel-titanium (Ni-Ti) control alloy plates with and without ultrasound irradiation. When human breast cancer cells (MCF-7 cells) cultured on the Ni-TiO2 alloy plates were irradiated with 1 MHz ultrasound at 0.5 W/cm(2) for 30s and then incubated for 48 h, cell density on the alloy plate was reduced to approximately 50% of the controls on the Ni-Ti alloy plates with and without ultrasound irradiation. These results indicate the injury of MCF-7 cells following sonocatalytic OH radical generation by Ni-TiO2. Further experiments demonstrated cell shrinkage and chromatin condensation after ultrasound irradiation of MCF-7 cells attached on the Ni-TiO2 alloy plates, indicating induction of apoptosis.

  20. APPROXIMATE SOLUTIONS FOR TRANSIENT RESPONSE OF CONSTRAINED DAMPING LAMINATED CANTILEVER PLATE

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Liuwei Mao; Anwen Wang; Mingyong Hu

    2010-01-01

    The series composed by beam mode function is used to approximate the displacement function of constrained damping of laminated cantilever plates,and the transverse deformation of the plate on which a concentrated force is acted is calculated using the principle of virtual work.By solving Lagrange's equation,the frequencies and model loss factors of free vibration of the plate are obtained,then the transient response of constrained damping of laminated cantilever plate is obtained,when the concentrated force is withdrawn suddenly.The theoretical calculations are compared with the experimental data,the results show:both the frequencies and the response time of theoretical calculation and its variational law with the parameters of the damping layer are identical with experimental results.Also,the response time of steel cantilever plate,unconstrained damping cantilever plate and constrained damping cantilever plate are brought into comparison,which shows that the constrained damping structure can effectively suppress the vibration.

  1. Transient response of an active nonlinear sandwich piezolaminated plate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oveisi, Atta; Nestorović, Tamara

    2017-04-01

    In this paper, the dynamic modelling and active vibration control of a piezolaminated plate with geometrical nonlinearities are investigated using a semi-analytical approach. For active vibration control purposes, the core orthotropic elastic layer is assumed to be perfectly bonded with two piezo-layers on its top and bottom surfaces which act as sensor and actuator, respectively. In the modelling procedure, the piezo-layers are assumed to be connected via a proportional derivative (PD) feedback control law. Hamilton's principle is employed to acquire the strong form of the dynamic equation in terms of additional higher order strain expressions by means of von Karman strain-displacement correlation. The obtained nonlinear partial differential equation (NPDE) is converted to a system of nonlinear ordinary differential equations (NODEs) by engaging Galerkin method and using the orthogonality of shape functions for the simply supported boundary conditions. Then, the resulting system of NODEs is solved numerically by employing the built-in Mathematica function, "NDSolve". Next, the vibration attenuation performance is evaluated and sensitivity of the closed-loop system is investigated for several control parameters and the external disturbance parameters. The proposed solution in open loop configuration is validated by finite element (FE) package ABAQUS both in the spatial domain and for the time-/frequency-dependent response.

  2. Dynamic Response of Stiffened Plates with Holes Subjected to Shock Waves and Fragments

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘彦; 张庆明; 黄风雷

    2004-01-01

    The power field of shock waves and fragments is analyzed and set up, and the damage modes of stiffened plates are put forward. According to the structural characters of the stiffened plates investigated and the properties of the shock waves and fragments, the experiments on the shock waves acting on the stiffened plates (penetrated and non-penetrated by fragments) are mainly conducted. The dynamic response rules of stiffened plates with holes under shock waves and fragments loading are obtained. The results show that the penetration of fragments into stiffened plates hardly affects their deformation produced by shock waves.

  3. A Biomechanical Comparison of Locking Versus Conventional Plate Fixation for Distal Fibula Fractures in Trimalleolar Ankle Injuries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyentat, Annie; Camisa, William; Patel, Sandeep; Lagaay, Pieter

    2016-01-01

    Previous biomechanical studies have advocated the use of locking plates for isolated distal fibula fractures in osteoporotic bone. Complex rotational ankle injuries involve an increased number of fractures, which can result in instability, potentially requiring the same fixed angle properties afforded by locking plates. However, the mechanical indication for locking plate technology has not been tested in this fracture model. The purpose of the present study was to compare the biomechanical properties of locking and conventional plate fixation for distal fibula fractures in trimalleolar ankle injuries. Fourteen (7 matched pairs) fresh-frozen cadaver leg specimens were used. The bone mineral density of each was obtained using dual x-ray absorptiometry scans. The fracture model simulated an OTA 44-B3.3 fracture. The syndesmosis was not disrupted. Each fracture was fixated in the same fashion, except for the distal fibula plate construct: locking (n = 7) and one-third tubular (n = 7). The specimens underwent axial and torsional cyclic loading, followed by torsional loading to failure. No statistically significant differences were found between the locking and conventional plate constructs during both fatigue and torque to failure testing (p > .05). Our specimen bone mineral density averages did not represent poor bone quality. The clinical implication of the present study is that distal fibular locking plates do not provide a mechanical advantage for trimalleolar ankle injuries in individuals with normal bone density and in the absence of fracture comminution. Copyright © 2016 American College of Foot and Ankle Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Paediatric and adolescent horse-related injuries: does the mechanism of injury justify a trauma response?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Craven, John A

    2008-08-01

    To identify the frequency, variety and disposition of horse-related injury presentations to the ED and to use this information to evaluate the existing institutional trauma team activation criteria following horse-related injuries. A retrospective case analysis was performed of all horse-related injury presentations to the ED of Women's and Children's Hospital, Adelaide, Australia, in the 5 year period between January 1999 and December 2003. A total of 186 children presented with horse-related injuries during the 5 year study period. The median age of injury was 9 years (range 1-17 years), with 81% of presentations female and 60% of patients hospitalized. The mechanism of injury was divided into four groups: 148 falls (79%), 28 kicks (15%), 7 tramples (4%) and 5 bites (3%). There was one death. Seven presentations rated an Injury Severity Score >15, with full trauma team activation occurring for two of these presentations. Although horse-related injury presentations are uncommon, severe injuries do occur. Patients presenting with severe horse-related injuries do not always activate a full trauma team response based on current trauma team activation criteria. These severe injury presentations are supported by a limited trauma team response, which activates on the mechanism of injury. The effectiveness of this as a contingency system needs to be evaluated.

  5. The vibroacoustic response and sound absorption performance of multilayer, microperforated rib-stiffened plates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Haian; Wang, Xiaoming; Wu, Huayong; Meng, Jianbing

    2017-04-01

    The vibroacoustic response and sound absorption performance of a structure composed of multilayer plates and one rigid back wall are theoretically analyzed. In this structure, all plates are two-dimensional, microperforated, and periodically rib-stiffened. To investigate such a structural system, semianalytical models of one-layer and multilayer plate structures considering the vibration effects are first developed. Then approaches of the space harmonic method and Fourier transforms are applied to a one-layer plate, and finally the cascade connection method is utilized for a multilayer plate structure. Based on fundamental acoustic formulas, the vibroacoustic responses of microperforated stiffened plates are expressed as functions of a series of harmonic amplitudes of plate displacement, which are then solved by employing the numerical truncation method. Applying the inverse Fourier transform, wave propagation, and linear addition properties, the equations of the sound pressures and absorption coefficients for the one-layer and multilayer stiffened plates in physical space are finally derived. Using numerical examples, the effects of the most important physical parameters—for example, the perforation ratio of the plate, sound incident angles, and periodical rib spacing—on sound absorption performance are examined. Numerical results indicate that the sound absorption performance of the studied structure is effectively enhanced by the flexural vibration of the plate in water. Finally, the proposed approaches are validated by comparing the results of stiffened plates of the present work with solutions from previous studies.

  6. Analysis of interlaminar stress and nonlinear dynamic response for composite laminated plates with interfacial damage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, F. H.; Fu, Y. M.

    2008-12-01

    By considering the effect of interfacial damage and using the variation principle, three-dimensional nonlinear dynamic governing equations of the laminated plates with interfacial damage are derived based on the general six-degrees-of-freedom plate theory towards the accurate stress analysis. The solutions of interlaminar stress and nonlinear dynamic response for a simply supported laminated plate with interfacial damage are obtained by using the finite difference method, and the results are validated by comparison with the solution of nonlinear finite element method. In numerical calculations, the effects of interfacial damage on the stress in the interface and the nonlinear dynamic response of laminated plates are discussed.

  7. Post-Traumatic Caspase-3 Expression in the Adjacent Areas of Growth Plate Injury Site: A Morphological Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karin Pichler

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available The epiphyseal plate is a hyaline cartilage plate that sits between the diaphysis and the epiphysis. The objective of this study was to determine the impact of an injury in the growth plate chondrocytes through the study of histological morphology, immunohistochemistry, histomorphometry and Western Blot analyses of the caspase-3 and cleaved PARP-1, and levels of the inflammatory cytokines, Interleukin-6 (IL-6 and Tumor Necrosis Factor alpha (TNF-α, in order to acquire more information about post-injury reactions of physeal cell turnover. In our results, morphological analysis showed that in experimental bones, neo-formed bone trabeculae—resulting from bone formation repair—invaded the growth plate and reached the metaphyseal bone tissue (bone bridge, and this could result in some growth arrest. We demonstrated, by ELISA, increased expression levels of the inflammatory cytokines IL-6 and TNF-α. Immunohistochemistry, histomorphometry and Western Blot analyses of the caspase-3 and cleaved PARP-1 showed that the physeal apoptosis rate of the experimental bones was significantly higher than that of the control ones. In conclusion, we could assume that the inflammation process causes stress to chondrocytes that will die as a biological defense mechanism, and will also increase the survival of new chondrocytes for maintaining cell homeostasis. Nevertheless, the exact stimulus leading to the increased apoptosis rate, observed after injury, needs additional research to understand the possible contribution of chondrocyte apoptosis to growth disturbance.

  8. Post-Traumatic Caspase-3 Expression in the Adjacent Areas of Growth Plate Injury Site: A Morphological Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Musumeci, Giuseppe; Castrogiovanni, Paola; Loreto, Carla; Castorina, Sergio; Pichler, Karin; Weinberg, Annelie Martina

    2013-01-01

    The epiphyseal plate is a hyaline cartilage plate that sits between the diaphysis and the epiphysis. The objective of this study was to determine the impact of an injury in the growth plate chondrocytes through the study of histological morphology, immunohistochemistry, histomorphometry and Western Blot analyses of the caspase-3 and cleaved PARP-1, and levels of the inflammatory cytokines, Interleukin-6 (IL-6) and Tumor Necrosis Factor alpha (TNF-α), in order to acquire more information about post-injury reactions of physeal cell turnover. In our results, morphological analysis showed that in experimental bones, neo-formed bone trabeculae—resulting from bone formation repair—invaded the growth plate and reached the metaphyseal bone tissue (bone bridge), and this could result in some growth arrest. We demonstrated, by ELISA, increased expression levels of the inflammatory cytokines IL-6 and TNF-α. Immunohistochemistry, histomorphometry and Western Blot analyses of the caspase-3 and cleaved PARP-1 showed that the physeal apoptosis rate of the experimental bones was significantly higher than that of the control ones. In conclusion, we could assume that the inflammation process causes stress to chondrocytes that will die as a biological defense mechanism, and will also increase the survival of new chondrocytes for maintaining cell homeostasis. Nevertheless, the exact stimulus leading to the increased apoptosis rate, observed after injury, needs additional research to understand the possible contribution of chondrocyte apoptosis to growth disturbance. PMID:23899790

  9. An examination of the elastic structural response of the Advanced Neutron Source fuel plates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Swinson, W.F.; Luttrell, C.R.; Yahr, G.T.

    1994-09-01

    Procedures for evaluating the elastic structural response of the Advanced Neutron Source (ANS) fuel plates to coolant flow and to temperature variations are presented in this report. Calculations are made that predict the maximum deflection and the maximum stress for a representative plate from the upper and from the lower fuel elements.

  10. Revisiting the Nonlinear Response of a Plate to Acoustic Loading

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-04-01

    measured for all tests. Displacement and velocity were measured at a point near the center of the plate with a Polytec Model PSV-400 Vibrometer. The...second point with a Polytec Model OVF-512 Fiber Optic American Institute of Aeronautics and Astronautics 7 Vibrometer. This point was 2.25 inches

  11. Effects of low-spatial-frequency response of phase plates on TEM imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edgcombe, C. J.

    2015-10-01

    Images of simple objects produced by a perfect lens and a phase plate have been calculated by use of Abbe theory for Foucault, Hilbert and Zernike phase plates. The results show that with a Zernike plate, white outlines and ringing like those observed previously can be caused by the beam hole, which limits the low-spatial-frequency response of the system even when the lens behaves perfectly. When the change of phase added by the phase plate is distributed over a range of radius rather than a simple step, the unwanted effects are substantially reduced.

  12. Forced Response of Polar Orthotropic Tapered Circular Plates Resting on Elastic Foundation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. H. Ansari

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Forced axisymmetric response of polar orthotropic circular plates of linearly varying thickness resting on Winkler type of elastic foundation has been studied on the basis of classical plate theory. An approximate solution of problem has been obtained by Rayleigh Ritz method, which employs functions based upon the static deflection of polar orthotropic circular plates. The effect of transverse loadings has been studied for orthotropic circular plate resting on elastic foundation. The transverse deflections and bending moments are presented for various values of taper parameter, rigidity ratio, foundation parameter, and flexibility parameter under different types of loadings. A comparison of results with those available in literature shows an excellent agreement.

  13. The effects of emitter-tied field plates on lateral PNP ionizing radiation response

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barnaby, H.J.; Schrimpf, R.D.; Cirba, C.R. [Vanderbilt Univ., Nashville, TN (United States); Pease, R.L. [RLP Research, Inc., Albuquerque, NM (United States); Fleetwood, D.M. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States); Kosier, S.L. [VTC Inc., Bloomington, MN (United States)

    1998-03-01

    Radiation response comparisons of lateral PNP bipolar technologies reveal that device hardening may be achieved by extending the emitter contact over the active base. The emitter-tied field plate suppresses recombination of carriers with interface traps.

  14. Assessment of caregiver responsibility in unintentional child injury deaths: challenges for injury prevention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schnitzer, Patricia G; Covington, Theresa M; Kruse, Robin L

    2011-02-01

    Most unintentional injury deaths among young children result from inadequate supervision or failure by caregivers to protect the child from potential hazards. Determining whether inadequate supervision or failure to protect could be classified as child neglect is a component of child death review (CDR) in most states. However, establishing that an unintentional injury death was neglect related can be challenging as differing definitions, lack of standards regarding supervision, and changing norms make consensus difficult. The purpose of this study was to assess CDR team members' categorisation of the extent to which unintentional injury deaths were neglect related. CDR team members were surveyed and asked to classify 20 vignettes-presented in 10 pairs-that described the circumstances of unintentional injury deaths among children. Vignette pairs differed by an attribute that might affect classification, such as poverty or intent. Categories for classifying vignettes were: (1) caregiver not responsible/not neglect related; (2) some caregiver responsibility/somewhat neglect related; (3) caregiver responsible /definitely neglect related. CDR team members from five states (287) completed surveys. Respondents assigned the child's caregiver at least some responsibility for the death in 18 vignettes (90%). A majority of respondents classified the caregiver as definitely responsible for the child's death in eight vignettes (40%). This study documents attributes that influence CDR team members' decisions when assessing caregiver responsibility in unintentional injury deaths, including supervision, intent, failure to use safety devices, and a pattern of previous neglectful behaviour. The findings offer insight for incorporating injury prevention into CDR more effectively.

  15. Static and Dynamic Structural Response of an Aircraft Wing with Damage Using Equivalent Plate Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krishnamurthy, T.; Tsai, Frank J.

    2008-01-01

    A process to generate an equivalent plate based on an optimization approach to predict the static and dynamic response of flight vehicle wing structures is proposed. Geometric-scale and frequency-scale factors are defined to construct an equivalent plate with any desired scale to use in simulation and wind tunnel experiments. It is shown that the stiffness and the displacements are scaled linearly with the geometric-scale factor, whereas the load is scaled as the square of the geometric-scale factor. The scaled stiffness of the reference flight vehicle is matched first to construct the equivalent plate. Then the frequency-scale factor is defined to scale the flight vehicle frequencies. The scaled flight vehicle frequencies are matched by placing arbitrary point masses along the equivalent plate geometry. Two simple stiffened-plate examples, one with damage and another without damage, were used to demonstrate the accuracy of the optimization procedure proposed. Geometric-scale factors ranging from 0.2 to 1.0 were used in the analyses. In both examples, the static and dynamic response of the reference stiffened-panel solution is matched accurately. The scaled equivalent plate predicted the first five frequencies of the stiffened panel very accurately. Finally, the proposed equivalent plate procedure was demonstrated in a more realistic typical aircraft wing structure. Two scale equivalent plate models were generated using the geometric-scale factors 1.0 and 0.2. Both equivalent plate models predicted the static response of the wing structure accurately. The equivalent plate models reproduced the first five frequencies of the wing structure accurately.

  16. Physical impaction injury effects on bacterial cells during spread plating influenced by cell characteristics of the organisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, P; Mujawar, M M; Sekhar, A C; Upreti, R

    2014-04-01

    To understand the factors that contribute to the variations in colony-forming units (CFU) in different bacteria during spread plating. Employing a mix culture of vegetative cells of ten organisms varying in cell characteristics (Gram reaction, cell shape and cell size), spread plating to the extent of just drying the agar surface (50-60 s) was tested in comparison with the alternate spotting-and-tilt-spreading (SATS) approach where 100 μl inoculum was distributed by mere tilting of plate after spotting as 20-25 microdrops. The former imparted a significant reduction in CFU by 20% over the spreader-independent SATS approach. Extending the testing to single organisms, Gram-negative proteobacteria with relatively larger cells (Escherichia, Enterobacter, Agrobacterium, Ralstonia, Pantoea, Pseudomonas and Sphingomonas spp.) showed significant CFU reduction with spread plating except for slow-growing Methylobacterium sp., while those with small rods (Xenophilus sp.) and cocci (Acinetobacter sp.) were less affected. Among Gram-positive nonspore formers, Staphylococcus epidermidis showed significant CFU reduction while Staphylococcus haemolyticus and actinobacteria (Microbacterium, Cellulosimicrobium and Brachybacterium spp.) with small rods/cocci were unaffected. Vegetative cells of Bacillus pumilus and B. subtilis were generally unaffected while others with larger rods (B. thuringiensis, Brevibacillus, Lysinibacillus and Paenibacillus spp.) were significantly affected. A simulated plating study coupled with live-dead bacterial staining endorsed the chances of cell disruption with spreader impaction in afflicted organisms. Significant reduction in CFU could occur during spread plating due to physical impaction injury to bacterial cells depending on the spreader usage and the variable effects on different organisms are determined by Gram reaction, cell size and cell shape. The inoculum spreader could impart physical disruption of vegetative cells against a hard surface

  17. Low-velocity impact response of a pre-stressed isotropic Uflyand-Mindlin plate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rossikhin Yury

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The low-velocity impact response of a precompressed circular isotropic elastic plate is investigated in the case when the dynamic behavior of the plate is described by equations taking the rotary inertia and transverse shear deformations into account. Contact interaction between the rigid impactor and the target is modeled by a generalized Hertz contact force, since it is assumed that the viscoelastic features of the plate represent themselves only in the place of contact and are governed by the standard linear solid model with fractional derivatives due to the fact that during the impact process decrosslinking occurs within the domain of the contact of the plate with the sphere, resulting in more free displacements of molecules with respect to each other, and finally in the decrease of the plate material viscosity in the contact zone.

  18. Response to Concentrated Moving Masses of Elastically Supported Rectangular Plates Resting on Winkler Elastic Foundation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Awodola T. O.

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available The dynamic response to moving concentrated masses of elastically supported rectangular plates resting on Winkler elastic foundation is investigated in this work. This problem, involving non-classical boundary conditions, is solved and illustrated with two common examples often encountered in engineering practice. Analysis of the closed form solutions shows that, for the same natural frequency (i the response amplitude for the moving mass problem is greater than that one of the moving force problem for fixed Rotatory inertia correction factor R0 and foundation modulus F0, (ii The critical speed for the moving mass problem is smaller than that for the moving force problem and so resonance is reached earlier in the former. The numerical results in plotted curves show that, for the elastically supported plate, as the value of R0 increases, the response amplitudes of the plate decrease and that, for fixed value of R0, the displacements of the plate decrease as F0 increases. The results also show that for fixed R0 and F0, the transverse deflections of the plates under the actions of moving masses are higher than those when only the force effects of the moving load are considered. Hence, the moving force solution is not a save approximation to the moving mass problem. Also, as the mass ratio Γ approaches zero, the response amplitude of the moving mass problem approaches that one of the moving force problem of the elastically supported rectangular plate resting on constant Winkler elastic foundation.

  19. Analysis of interlaminar stress and nonlinear dynamic response for composite laminated plates with interfacial damage

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    F. H. Zhu; Y. M. Fu

    2008-01-01

    By considering the effect of interfacial damage and using the variation principle, three-dimensional nonli-near dynamic governing equations of the laminated plates with interfacial damage are derived based on the general six-degrees-of-freedom plate theory towards the accurate stress analysis. The solutions of interlaminar stress and nonlinear dynamic response for a simply supported laminated plate with interfacial damage are obtained by using the finite dif-ference method, and the results are validated by compari-son with the solution of nonlinear finite element method. In numerical calculations, the effects of interfacial damage on the stress in the interface and the nonlinear dynamic response of laminated plates are discussed.

  20. DYNAMIC RESPONSE OF PLATES DUE TO MOVING VEHICLES USING FINITE STRIP METHOD

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    程远胜; 张佑啟; 区达光

    2002-01-01

    Dynamic response of beam-like structures to moving vehicles has been extensive-ly studied. However, the study on dynamic response of plates to moving vehicles has so farreceived but scant attention. A plate-vehicle strip for simulating the interaction between arectangular plate and moving vehicles was described. For the portion of strips that are in di-rect contact with the moving vehicles, the plate-vehicle strips were employed. Conventionalplate finite strips were used to model the portion of strips that are not directly under the ac-tion of moving vehicles. In the analysis, each moving vehicle is idealized as a one-foot dy-namic system with the unsprung mass and sprund mass interconnected by a spring and adashpot. The numerical results obtained from the proposed method agree well with availableresults.

  1. Airway epithelial cell responses to ozone injury

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Leikauf, G.D.; Simpson, L.G.; Zhao, Qiyu [Univ. of Cincinnati Medical Center, OH (United States)] [and others

    1995-03-01

    The airway epithelial cell is an important target in ozone injury. Once activated, the airway epithelium responds in three phases. The initial, or immediate phase, involves activation of constitutive cells, often through direct covalent interactions including the formation of secondary ozonolysis products-hydroxyhydroperoxides, aldehydes, and hydrogen peroxide. Recently, we found hydroxyhydroperoxides to be potent agonists; of bioactive eicosanoid formation by human airway epithelial cells in culture. Other probable immediate events include activation and inactivation of enzymes present on the epithelial surface (e.g., neutral endopeptidase). During the next 2 to 24 hr, or early phase, epithelial cells respond by synthesis and release of chemotactic factors, including chemokines-macrophage inflammatory protein-2, RANTES, and interleukin-8. Infiltrating leukocytes during this period also release elastase, an important agonist of epithelial cell mucus secretion and additional chemokine formation. The third (late) phase of ozone injury is characterized by eosinophil or monocyte infiltration. Cytokine expression leads to alteration of structural protein synthesis, with increases in fibronectin evident by in situ hybridization. Synthesis of epithelial antiproteases, e.g., secretary leukocyte protease inhibitor, may also increase locally 24 to 48 hr after elastase concentrations become excessive. Thus, the epithelium is not merely a passive barrier to ozone injury but has a dynamic role in directing the migration, activating, and then counteracting inflammatory cells. Through these complex interactions, epithelial cells can be viewed as the initiators (alpha) and the receptors (omega) of ozone-induced airway disease. 51 refs., 2 figs., 3 tabs.

  2. Harmonic response of multilayered one-dimensional quasicrystal plates subjected to patch loading

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waksmanski, Natalie; Pan, Ernian; Yang, Lian-Zhi; Gao, Yang

    2016-08-01

    Dynamic analyses of a multilayered one-dimensional quasicrystal plate subjected to a patch harmonic loading with simply supported lateral boundary conditions are presented. The pseudo-Stroh formulation and propagator matrix method are used to obtain the exact three-dimensional response of the plate. In order to avoid resonance, the frequency of the patch loading is chosen away from the natural frequencies by introducing a small imaginary part. The patch loading is expressed in the form of a double Fourier series expansion. Comprehensive numerical results are shown for a sandwich plate with two different stacking sequences. The results reveal the influence of layering, loading area, phonon-phason coupling coefficient and input frequency. This work is the first step towards understanding quasicrystals under intricate loading conditions such as indentation and impact, and the exact closed-form solution can serve as a reference in convergence studies of other numerical methods and for verification of existing or future plate theories.

  3. Structural Response of Submerged Air-Backed Plates by Experimental and Numerical Analyses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lloyd Hammond

    2000-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents the results of a series of small-scale underwater shock experiments that measured the structural responses of submerged, fully clamped, air-backed, steel plates to a range of high explosive charge sizes. The experimental results were subsequently used to validate a series of simulations using the coupled LS-DYNA/USA finite element/boundary element codes. The modelling exercise was complicated by a significant amount of local cavitation occurring in the fluid adjacent to the plate and difficulties in modelling the boundary conditions of the test plates. The finite element model results satisfactorily predicted the displacement-time history of the plate over a range of shock loadings although a less satisfactory correlation was achieved for the peak velocities. It is expected that the predictive capability of the finite element model will be significantly improved once hydrostatic initialisation can be fully utilised with the LS-DYNA/USA software.

  4. Stress-induced Salter-Harris I growth plate injury of the proximal tibia: first report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nanni, M; Butt, S; Mansour, R; Muthukumar, T; Cassar-Pullicino, V N; Roberts, A

    2005-07-01

    We describe a case of chronic Salter-Harris I injury of the proximal tibial epiphysis. To our knowledge such an injury has not been described in the English language literature. The radiological appearance can mimic chronic infection. The possibility of chronic athletic stress-related change should be considered in such scenarios to avoid a misdiagnosis.

  5. Stress-induced Salter-Harris I growth plate injury of the proximal tibia: first report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nanni, M.; Butt, S.; Mansour, R.; Muthukumar, T.; Cassar-Pullicino, V.N. [Robert Jones and Agnes Hunt Orthopaedic Hospital, Department of Radiology, Oswestry, Shropshire (United Kingdom); Roberts, A. [Robert Jones and Agnes Hunt Orthopaedic Hospital, Department of Paediatric Orthopaedic Surgery, Oswestry, Shropshire (United Kingdom)

    2005-07-01

    We describe a case of chronic Salter-Harris I injury of the proximal tibial epiphysis. To our knowledge such an injury has not been described in the English language literature. The radiological appearance can mimic chronic infection. The possibility of chronic athletic stress-related change should be considered in such scenarios to avoid a misdiagnosis. (orig.)

  6. Magnetic hysteresis and magnetic flux patterns measured by acoustically stimulated electromagnetic response in a steel plate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamada, Hisato; Watanabe, Kakeru; Ikushima, Kenji

    2015-08-01

    Magnetic hysteresis loops are measured by ultrasonic techniques and used in visualizing the magnetic-flux distribution in a steel plate. The piezomagnetic coefficient determines the amplitude of acoustically stimulated electromagnetic (ASEM) fields, yielding the hysteresis behavior of the intensity of the ASEM response. By utilizing the high correspondence of the ASEM response to the magnetic-flux density, we image the specific spatial patterns of the flux density formed by an artificial defect in a steel plate specimen. Magnetic-flux probing by ultrasonic waves is thus shown to be a viable method of nondestructive material inspection.

  7. Platelets protect lung from injury induced by systemic inflammatory response

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Shuhua; Wang, Yabo; An, Qi; Chen, Hao; Zhao, Junfei; Zhang, Jie; Meng, Wentong; Du, Lei

    2017-01-01

    Systemic inflammatory responses can severely injure lungs, prompting efforts to explore how to attenuate such injury. Here we explored whether platelets can help attenuate lung injury in mice resulting from extracorporeal circulation (ECC)-induced systemic inflammatory responses. Mice were subjected to ECC for 30 min, then treated with phosphate-buffered saline, platelets, the GPIIb/IIIa inhibitor Tirofiban, or the combination of platelets and Tirofiban. Blood and lung tissues were harvested 60 min later, and lung injury and inflammatory status were assessed. As expected, ECC caused systemic inflammation and pulmonary dysfunction, and platelet transfusion resulted in significantly milder lung injury and higher lung function. It also led to greater numbers of circulating platelet-leukocyte aggregates and greater platelet accumulation in the lung. Platelet transfusion was associated with higher production of transforming growth factor-β and as well as lower levels of tumour necrosis factor-α and neutrophil elastase in plasma and lung. None of these platelet effects was observed in the presence of Tirofiban. Our results suggest that, at least under certain conditions, platelets can protect lung from injury induced by systemic inflammatory responses. PMID:28155889

  8. Dynamic Response of a Rigid Pavement Plate Based on an Inertial Soil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gibigaye, Mohamed; Yabi, Crespin Prudence; Alloba, I Ezéchiel

    2016-01-01

    This work presents the dynamic response of a pavement plate resting on a soil whose inertia is taken into account in the design of pavements by rational methods. Thus, the pavement is modeled as a thin plate with finite dimensions, supported longitudinally by dowels and laterally by tie bars. The subgrade is modeled via Pasternak-Vlasov type (three-parameter type) foundation models and the moving traffic load is expressed as a concentrated dynamic load of harmonically varying magnitude, moving straight along the plate with a constant acceleration. The governing equation of the problem is solved using the modified Bolotin method for determining the natural frequencies and the wavenumbers of the system. The orthogonal properties of eigenfunctions are used to find the general solution of the problem. Considering the load over the center of the plate, the results showed that the deflections of the plate are maximum about the middle of the plate but are not null at its edges. It is therefore observed that the deflection decreased 18.33 percent when the inertia of the soil is taken into account. This result shows the possible economic gain when taking into account the inertia of soil in pavement dynamic design.

  9. Dynamic Response of a Rigid Pavement Plate Based on an Inertial Soil

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gibigaye, Mohamed; Yabi, Crespin Prudence; Alloba, I. Ezéchiel

    2016-01-01

    This work presents the dynamic response of a pavement plate resting on a soil whose inertia is taken into account in the design of pavements by rational methods. Thus, the pavement is modeled as a thin plate with finite dimensions, supported longitudinally by dowels and laterally by tie bars. The subgrade is modeled via Pasternak-Vlasov type (three-parameter type) foundation models and the moving traffic load is expressed as a concentrated dynamic load of harmonically varying magnitude, moving straight along the plate with a constant acceleration. The governing equation of the problem is solved using the modified Bolotin method for determining the natural frequencies and the wavenumbers of the system. The orthogonal properties of eigenfunctions are used to find the general solution of the problem. Considering the load over the center of the plate, the results showed that the deflections of the plate are maximum about the middle of the plate but are not null at its edges. It is therefore observed that the deflection decreased 18.33 percent when the inertia of the soil is taken into account. This result shows the possible economic gain when taking into account the inertia of soil in pavement dynamic design. PMID:27382639

  10. Impact Response of Cantilever Fiber Metal Laminate (FML Plates Using a Coupled Analytical-Numerical Method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Faramarz Ashenai Ghasemi

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available In this study, dynamic response of cantilever Fiber Metal Laminate (FML plates subjected to the impact of a large mass is studied. Aluminum (Al sheets are placed instead of some Fiber Reinforced Plastic (FRP layers. The effect of the Al layers on contact force and deflection of the plates is investigated by considering the interaction between the impactor and the target in the impact analysis. A two degrees-of-freedom system consisting of springs-masses and finite element modeling of the ABAQUS/Explicit software were employed to model the interaction between the impactor and the target. The results indicate that some parameters like the layer sequence, mass and velocity of the impactor, mass of the target are important factors which affect the impact response of the plates.

  11. Locking, mass flux and topographic response at convergent plate boundaries - the Chilean case

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oncken, Onno

    2016-04-01

    On the long term, convergent plate boundaries have been shown to be controlled by either accretion/underplating or by subduction erosion. Vertical surface motion is coupled to convergence rate - typically with an uplift rate of the coastal area ranging from 0 to +50% of convergence rate in accretive systems, and -20 to +30% in erosive systems. Vertical kinematics, however, are not necessarily linked to horizontal strain mode, i.e. upper plate shortening or extension, in a simple way. This range of kinematic behaviors - as well as their acceleration where forearcs collide with oceanic ridges/plateau - is well expressed along the Chilean plate margin. Towards the short end of the time scale, deformation appears to exhibit a close correlation with the frictional properties and geodetic locking at the plate interface. Corroborating analogue experiments of strain accumulation during multiple earthquake cycles, forearc deformation and uplift focus above the downdip and updip end of seismic coupling and slip and are each related to a particular stage of the seismic cycle, but with opposite trends for both domains. Similarly, barriers separating locked domains along strike appear to accumulate most upper plate faulting interseismically. Hence, locking patters are reflected in topography. From the long-term memory contained in the forearc topography the relief of the Chilean forearc seems to reflect long term stability of the observed heterogeneity of locking at the plate interface. This has fundamental implications for spatial and temporal distribution of seismic hazard. Finally, the nature of locking at the plate interface controlling the above kinematic behavior appears to be strongly controlled by the degree of fluid overpressuring at the plate interface suggesting that the hydraulic system at the interface takes a key role for the forearc response.

  12. Impact and injury response of long track speed skaters

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Forbes, P.A.; Swartjes, F.H.M.; Ruimerman, R.; Willems, J.W.M.

    2009-01-01

    The following study presents a combined numerical-experimental investigation into the impact and injury response of long track speed skaters when impacting the protective boarding around the track. The high speeds common within the sport combined with the inherent slipperiness of the ice create a hi

  13. Impact and injury response of long track speed skaters

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Forbes, P.A.; Swartjes, F.H.M.; Ruimerman, R.; Willems, J.W.M.

    2009-01-01

    The following study presents a combined numerical-experimental investigation into the impact and injury response of long track speed skaters when impacting the protective boarding around the track. The high speeds common within the sport combined with the inherent slipperiness of the ice create a

  14. Dynamic Stationary Response of Reinforced Plates by the Boundary Element Method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luiz Carlos Facundo Sanches

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available A direct version of the boundary element method (BEM is developed to model the stationary dynamic response of reinforced plate structures, such as reinforced panels in buildings, automobiles, and airplanes. The dynamic stationary fundamental solutions of thin plates and plane stress state are used to transform the governing partial differential equations into boundary integral equations (BIEs. Two sets of uncoupled BIEs are formulated, respectively, for the in-plane state (membrane and for the out-of-plane state (bending. These uncoupled systems are joined to form a macro-element, in which membrane and bending effects are present. The association of these macro-elements is able to simulate thin-walled structures, including reinforced plate structures. In the present formulation, the BIE is discretized by continuous and/or discontinuous linear elements. Four displacement integral equations are written for every boundary node. Modal data, that is, natural frequencies and the corresponding mode shapes of reinforced plates, are obtained from information contained in the frequency response functions (FRFs. A specific example is presented to illustrate the versatility of the proposed methodology. Different configurations of the reinforcements are used to simulate simply supported and clamped boundary conditions for the plate structures. The procedure is validated by comparison with results determined by the finite element method (FEM.

  15. Vibration and acoustic response of an orthotropic composite laminated plate in a hygroscopic environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Xin; Geng, Qian; Li, Yueming

    2013-03-01

    This paper is a study of the vibration and acoustic response characteristics of orthotropic laminated composite plate with simple supported boundary conditions excited by a harmonic concentrated force in a hygroscopic environment. First the natural vibration of the plate with the in-plane forces induced by hygroscopic stress is obtained analytically. Secondly, the sound pressure distribution of the plate at the far field is obtained using the Rayleigh integral. Furthermore, the sound radiation efficiency is deduced. Third, different ratios of elastic modulus in material principal directions are set to research the effects of increasing stiffness of the orthotropic plate on the vibration and acoustic radiation characteristics. Finally, to verify the theoretical solution, numerical simulations are also carried out with commercial finite software. It is found that the natural frequencies decrease with the increase of the moisture content and the first two order modes interconvert at high moisture content. The dynamic response and sound pressure level float to lower frequencies with elevated moisture content. Acoustic radiation efficiency generally floats to the low frequencies and decreases with an increase of moisture content. The dynamic and acoustic responses reduce and the coincidence frequency decreases with the enhanced stiffness.

  16. Static Response of Functionally Graded Material Plate under Transverse Load for Varying Aspect Ratio

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manish Bhandari

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Functionally gradient materials (FGM are one of the most widely used materials in various applications because of their adaptability to different situations by changing the material constituents as per the requirement. Nowadays it is very easy to tailor the properties to serve specific purposes in functionally gradient material. Most structural components used in the field of engineering can be classified as beams, plates, or shells for analysis purposes. In the present study the power law, sigmoid law and exponential distribution, is considered for the volume fraction distributions of the functionally graded plates. The work includes parametric studies performed by varying volume fraction distributions and aspect ratio. The FGM plate is subjected to transverse UDL (uniformly distributed load and point load and the response is analysed.

  17. Pepper injury and partitioning response to ozone

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bennett, J.P.; Oshima, R.J.; Lippert, L.F.

    1977-08-01

    Pepper plants (Capsicum annuum L.) grown in containers and exposed intermittently to 0.12 or 0.20 ppm ozone (O/sub 3/) while they grew to final yield, increased in plant height and total number of leaves in spite of the formation of chlorotic leaves. On an absolute basis, root, stem and leaf dry weights were not significantly affected by O/sub 3/, but fruit dry matter fell by as much as 54%. However, on a relative basis, dry matter partitioning to fruit was not constant and a significant alteration of the expected dry matter distribution was observed in the O/sub 3/ treatment. O/sub 3/ also significantly accentuated the inverse relationship between crown fruit and leaf production. A conceptual model for whole plant response to O/sub 3/ was developed.

  18. Circulating Mitochondrial DAMPs Cause Inflammatory Responses to Injury

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Qin; Raoof, Mustafa; Chen, Yu; Sumi, Yuka; Sursal, Tolga; Junger, Wolfgang; Brohi, Karim; Itagaki, Kiyoshi; Hauser, Carl J.

    2009-01-01

    Injury causes a systemic inflammatory response syndrome (SIRS) clinically much like sepsis 1. Microbial pathogen-associated molecular patterns (PAMPs) activate innate immunocytes through pattern recognition receptors 2. Similarly, cellular injury can release endogenous damage-associated molecular patterns (DAMPs) that activate innate immunity 3. Mitochondria are evolutionary endosymbionts that were derived from bacteria 4 and so might bear bacterial molecular motifs. We show here that injury releases mitochondrial DAMPs (MTD) into the circulation with functionally important immune consequences. MTD include formyl peptides and mitochondrial DNA. These activate human neutrophils (PMN) through formyl peptide receptor-1 and TLR9 respectively. MTD promote PMN Ca2+ flux and phosphorylation of MAP kinases, thus leading to PMN migration and degranulation in vitro and in vivo. Circulating MTD can elicit neutrophil-mediated organ injury. Cellular disruption by trauma releases mitochondrial DAMPs with evolutionarily conserved similarities to bacterial PAMPs into the circulation. These can then signal through identical innate immune pathways to create a sepsis-like state. The release of such mitochondrial ‘enemies within’ by cellular injury is a key link between trauma, inflammation and SIRS. PMID:20203610

  19. Detection of Thermal Sublethal Injury in Escherichia coli via the Selective Medium Plating Technique: Mechanisms and Improvements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Espina, Laura; García-Gonzalo, Diego; Pagán, Rafael

    2016-01-01

    In food preservation, the synergistic combination of different technologies aims to maximize the total lethality of the process and minimize the intensity of each hurdle. This is especially the case when at least one of the treatments can cause sublethal (reparable) injury in a great proportion of the population, so that sublethally injured cells can end up being entirely inactivated by the other hurdle(s). The selective medium plating technique (SMPT) is extensively used to enumerate bacterial sublethal injury after inimical treatments, being sodium chloride added to the recovery medium to detect damaged bacterial envelopes. However, little work has been done to explain the reasons for the inability of sublethally injured cells to outgrow in selective agar media, whereas they are able to grow in non-selective agar. In the present paper, the performance of SMPT on Escherichia coli cells after heat treatments is explored by applying different selective agents in the recovery media, using mutants lacking factors involved in osmoregulation, and also by examining the integrity of the cytoplasmic membrane. In view of the results, the possibility of a specific toxic effect of Na+ as the main mechanism under SMPT was discarded, since the same level of sublethal injury was detected using KCl instead of NaCl. The synthesis of the osmoprotectant trehalose determined the maximum osmotolerance of intact cells to the selective agents, but was not crucial in the quantification of sublethal injury. Moreover, for the first time, the extent of sublethal injury detected via SMPT was directly correlated with the physical loss of integrity of the cell membrane in 99.999% of the initial population. This was achieved through statistical analysis of flow cytometry data using propidium iodide-exclusion technique when that dye was added before thermal treatments. The present work confirms the adequacy of SMPT as a tool for detecting the occurrence and quantity of sublethally injured cells

  20. Growth plate cartilage shows different strain patterns in response to static versus dynamic mechanical modulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaviani, Rosa; Londono, Irene; Parent, Stefan; Moldovan, Florina; Villemure, Isabelle

    2016-08-01

    Longitudinal growth of long bones and vertebrae occurs in growth plate cartilage. This process is partly regulated by mechanical forces, which are one of the underlying reasons for progression of growth deformities such as idiopathic adolescent scoliosis and early-onset scoliosis. This concept of mechanical modulation of bone growth is also exploited in the development of fusionless treatments of these deformities. However, the optimal loading condition for the mechanical modulation of growth plate remains to be identified. The objective of this study was to evaluate the effects of in vitro static versus dynamic modulation and of dynamic loading parameters, such as frequency and amplitude, on the mechanical responses and histomorphology of growth plate explants. Growth plate explants from distal ulnae of 4-week-old swines were extracted and randomly distributed among six experimental groups: baseline ([Formula: see text]), control ([Formula: see text]), static ([Formula: see text]) and dynamic ([Formula: see text]). For static and dynamic groups, mechanical modulation was performed in vitro using an Indexed CartiGen bioreactor. A stress relaxation test combined with confocal microscopy and digital image correlation was used to characterize the mechanical responses of each explant in terms of peak stress, equilibrium stress, equilibrium modulus of elasticity and strain pattern. Histomorphometrical measurements were performed on toluidine blue tissue sections using a semi-automatic custom-developed MATLAB toolbox. Results suggest that compared to dynamic modulation, static modulation changes the strain pattern of the tissue and thus is more detrimental for tissue biomechanics, while the histomorphological parameters are not affected by mechanical modulation. Also, under dynamic modulation, changing the frequency or amplitude does not affect the biomechanical response of the tissue. Results of this study will be useful in finding optimal and non-damaging parameters

  1. Macrophages in cardiac homeostasis, injury responses and progenitor cell mobilisation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexander R. Pinto

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Macrophages are an immune cell type found in every organ of the body. Classically, macrophages are recognised as housekeeping cells involved in the detection of foreign antigens and danger signatures, and the clearance of tissue debris. However, macrophages are increasingly recognised as a highly versatile cell type with a diverse range of functions that are important for tissue homeostasis and injury responses. Recent research findings suggest that macrophages contribute to tissue regeneration and may play a role in the activation and mobilisation of stem cells. This review describes recent advances in our understanding of the role played by macrophages in cardiac tissue maintenance and repair following injury. We examine the involvement of exogenous and resident tissue macrophages in cardiac inflammatory responses and their potential activity in regulating cardiac regeneration.

  2. The buckling response of symmetrically laminated composite plates having a trapezoidal planform area

    Science.gov (United States)

    Radloff, H. D., II; Hyer, M. W.; Nemeth, M. P.

    1994-08-01

    The focus of this work is the buckling response of symmetrically laminated composite plates having a planform area in the shape of an isosceles trapezoid. The loading is assumed to be inplane and applied perpendicular to the parallel ends of the plate. The tapered edges of the plate are assumed to have simply supported boundary conditions, while the parallel ends are assumed to have either simply supported or clamped boundary conditions. A semi-analytic closed-form solution based on energy principles and the Trefftz stability criterion is derived and solutions are obtained using the Rayleigh-Ritz method. Intrinsic in this solution is a simplified prebuckling analysis which approximates the inplane force resultant distributions by the forms Nx=P/W(x) and Ny=Nxy=0, where P is the applied load and W(x) is the plate width which, for the trapezoidal planform, varies linearly with the lengthwise coordinate x. The out-of-plane displacement is approximated by a double trigonometric series. This analysis is posed in terms of four nondimensional parameters representing orthotropic and anisotropic material properties, and two nondimensional parameters representing geometric properties. For comparison purposes, a number of specific plate geometry, ply orientation, and stacking sequence combinations are investigated using the general purpose finite element code ABAQUS. Comparison of buckling coefficients calculated using the semi-analytical model and the finite element model show agreement within 5 percent, in general, and within 15 percent for the worst cases. In order to verify both the finite element and semi-analytical analyses, buckling loads are measured for graphite/epoxy plates having a wide range of plate geometries and stacking sequences. Test fixtures, instrumentation system, and experimental technique are described. Experimental results for the buckling load, the buckled mode shape, and the prebuckling plate stiffness are presented and show good agreement with the

  3. Topology Optimization for Minimizing the Resonant Response of Plates with Constrained Layer Damping Treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhanpeng Fang

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available A topology optimization method is proposed to minimize the resonant response of plates with constrained layer damping (CLD treatment under specified broadband harmonic excitations. The topology optimization problem is formulated and the square of displacement resonant response in frequency domain at the specified point is considered as the objective function. Two sensitivity analysis methods are investigated and discussed. The derivative of modal damp ratio is not considered in the conventional sensitivity analysis method. An improved sensitivity analysis method considering the derivative of modal damp ratio is developed to improve the computational accuracy of the sensitivity. The evolutionary structural optimization (ESO method is used to search the optimal layout of CLD material on plates. Numerical examples and experimental results show that the optimal layout of CLD treatment on the plate from the proposed topology optimization using the conventional sensitivity analysis or the improved sensitivity analysis can reduce the displacement resonant response. However, the optimization method using the improved sensitivity analysis can produce a higher modal damping ratio than that using the conventional sensitivity analysis and develop a smaller displacement resonant response.

  4. Injury Response of Resected Human Brain Tissue In Vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verwer, Ronald W H; Sluiter, Arja A; Balesar, Rawien A; Baaijen, Johannes C; de Witt Hamer, Philip C; Speijer, Dave; Li, Yichen; Swaab, Dick F

    2015-07-01

    Brain injury affects a significant number of people each year. Organotypic cultures from resected normal neocortical tissue provide unique opportunities to study the cellular and neuropathological consequences of severe injury of adult human brain tissue in vitro. The in vitro injuries caused by resection (interruption of the circulation) and aggravated by the preparation of slices (severed neuronal and glial processes and blood vessels) reflect the reaction of human brain tissue to severe injury. We investigated this process using immunocytochemical markers, reverse transcriptase quantitative polymerase chain reaction and Western blot analysis. Essential features were rapid shrinkage of neurons, loss of neuronal marker expression and proliferation of reactive cells that expressed Nestin and Vimentin. Also, microglia generally responded strongly, whereas the response of glial fibrillary acidic protein-positive astrocytes appeared to be more variable. Importantly, some reactive cells also expressed both microglia and astrocytic markers, thus confounding their origin. Comparison with post-mortem human brain tissue obtained at rapid autopsies suggested that the reactive process is not a consequence of epilepsy. © 2014 International Society of Neuropathology.

  5. Numerical Study of Effects of Fluid-Structure Interaction on Dynamic Responses of Composite Plates

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-09-01

    Structure Strain and Kine tic Energy Comparison for Elastic Modulus Variations with Concentrated Force and Clamped Boundary .........................31...side wet) slightly greater for the rectangular shape. 24 The strain and kine tic energy response between the two shap es of plates are shown in...having the same surface area for i mpact and equal mass. A cylindrical shaped impacto r has a circular shape area of i mpact and a rectangular

  6. Local-Global Interactions in the Transient Response of Lattice-Truss Plates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1984-08-01

    plate model subjected to an initial out-of-plane impulse at the lower left corner. The color scale at the right of each frame represents variations of...Fiur 4. RepneapeLoain (Core ~ ~ ~ \\ and uppe sufc ebr emvdfrcaiy 23 TETRA 11 - Tranwlezt nleporave fLvtorvy 0.003 - Mrst Uccde Ix3ltial Impulse ...vidual lattice members dynamic characteristics influence the transient response charac- teristics. When the lattice members are modeled as bars. the

  7. Response of a circular steel plate with different weld geometries subject to impact loading

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Meyer L.W.

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available The dynamic response of clamped circular steel plates was experimentally investigated under impact loading. The experiments were performed using a high energy drop weight machine with a 5 ton drop weight, which falls from a height of 0.8 m and results in a total impact energy of 40 kJ. Target plates of 10 mm thickness and 580 mm diameter were welded in three different geometrical configurations of weld elements on the lower side. The impact process was carried out using a hemispherical punch. The force was registered by strain gages on the punch. A full dynamic strain field measurement was applied on the tension side using two high speed cameras. The evaluation of the strain field was carried out with the speckle photography technique. The effect of cracks and welding on the deformation and failure behavior was studied using pre-cracked disks and plates with welded webs, welded circular discs and also with a weld seam only. The failure of the plates was registered using the high speed cameras and from the force signal. The results are analyzed and discussed regarding the behavior of the material and component under high rate loading.

  8. Injury response of Phaseolus vulgaris to ozone flux density

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amiro, B. D.; Gillespie, T. J.; Thurtell, G. W.

    This study describes a quantitative relationship between mean O 3 flux density and the length of exposure needed for the occurrence of visual injury to Phaseolus vulgaris L. Similar relationships were found for 14 day old and 6 week old plants using a whole leaf gas exchange cuvette system. Cultivars Seafarer (O 3 sensitive) and Gold Crop (O 3 resistant) exhibited similar responses at flux densities > 3 mg m -2 h -1 but only Seafarer was injured below this flux density. O 3 concentration and length of exposure period alone did not contain sufficient information to describe the onset of visual foliar injury. The use of O 3 concentrations in excess of normal ambient conditions compensated for low leaf conductances so that flux densities in the cuvette were similar to those found in the field.

  9. Galeazzi - Equivalent Pronation Type Injury with Splitting of Ulnar Epiphyseal Plate into Two Fragments – A Rare Case Report and Review of Literature

    Science.gov (United States)

    J, Ashish Suthar; V, Ashish Kothari

    2014-01-01

    Introduction: In children and adolescents distal forearm physeal fractures are common. Usually distal forearm physeal injuries of are common injuries in children and adolescents. Epiphyseal injuries to the distal radius are common in children, but involvement of the distal ulna is rare. Fracture of the distal radius with dislocation of the DRUJ is known as a True Galeazzi fracture dislocation and an epiphyseal separation of the distal ulna occurred instead of dislocation of DRUJ or both)[10] is called Galeazzi equivalent lesions. Galeazzi fractures in children are less common than in adults. [4] These injuries are uncommon and there are few descriptions of them in the current literature. Case Report: Here we report the case of a 13-year-old boy, student with history of RTA presented with pain and swelling of distal forearm diagnosed with closed injury of Galeazzi equivalent type. Here injury to the distal ulnar epiphyseal plate is in the form of epiphyseal separation (Salter Harris type I / Peterson type III) with splitting of epiphysis into two fragment – [ulnar styloid & radial side of ulnar epiphyseal plate] (Salter Harris type III / Peterson type IV) with fracture of metaphysis of lower end radius (Peterson type I) without neurovascular deficit. Patient was given surgical treatment in the form of closed reduction and K-wire fixation for fracture of distal radius and open reduction using extended ulnar approach and fixation with K-wire for ulnar epiphyseal fracture as closed reduction was not possible due to soft tissue interposition. Conclusion: Galeazzi equivalent injury is rare. It may require radiographic comparison of opposite uninvolved distal forearm with wrist, CT or MR imaging to define injury accurately. It may also require open reduction for anatomical or acceptable reduction of fracture to minimize chances of growth arrest which may occur as a complication of injury. It is also necessary for frequent follow up to identify complication early

  10. Galeazzi - Equivalent Pronation Type Injury with Splitting of Ulnar Epiphyseal Plate into Two Fragments - A Rare Case Report and Review of Literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    J, Ashish Suthar; V, Ashish Kothari

    2014-01-01

    In children and adolescents distal forearm physeal fractures are common. Usually distal forearm physeal injuries of are common injuries in children and adolescents. Epiphyseal injuries to the distal radius are common in children, but involvement of the distal ulna is rare. Fracture of the distal radius with dislocation of the DRUJ is known as a True Galeazzi fracture dislocation and an epiphyseal separation of the distal ulna occurred instead of dislocation of DRUJ or both)[10] is called Galeazzi equivalent lesions. Galeazzi fractures in children are less common than in adults. [4] These injuries are uncommon and there are few descriptions of them in the current literature. Here we report the case of a 13-year-old boy, student with history of RTA presented with pain and swelling of distal forearm diagnosed with closed injury of Galeazzi equivalent type. Here injury to the distal ulnar epiphyseal plate is in the form of epiphyseal separation (Salter Harris type I / Peterson type III) with splitting of epiphysis into two fragment - [ulnar styloid & radial side of ulnar epiphyseal plate] (Salter Harris type III / Peterson type IV) with fracture of metaphysis of lower end radius (Peterson type I) without neurovascular deficit. Patient was given surgical treatment in the form of closed reduction and K-wire fixation for fracture of distal radius and open reduction using extended ulnar approach and fixation with K-wire for ulnar epiphyseal fracture as closed reduction was not possible due to soft tissue interposition. Galeazzi equivalent injury is rare. It may require radiographic comparison of opposite uninvolved distal forearm with wrist, CT or MR imaging to define injury accurately. It may also require open reduction for anatomical or acceptable reduction of fracture to minimize chances of growth arrest which may occur as a complication of injury. It is also necessary for frequent follow up to identify complication early especially growth arrest in asymptomatic patient.

  11. The corneal fibrosis response to epithelial-stromal injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torricelli, Andre A M; Santhanam, Abirami; Wu, Jiahui; Singh, Vivek; Wilson, Steven E

    2016-01-01

    The corneal wound healing response, including the development of stromal opacity in some eyes, is a process that often leads to scarring that occurs after injury, surgery or infection to the cornea. Immediately after epithelial and stromal injury, a complex sequence of processes contributes to wound repair and regeneration of normal corneal structure and function. In some corneas, however, often depending on the type and extent of injury, the response may also lead to the development of mature vimentin+ α-smooth muscle actin+ desmin+ myofibroblasts. Myofibroblasts are specialized fibroblastic cells generated in the cornea from keratocyte-derived or bone marrow-derived precursor cells. The disorganized extracellular matrix components secreted by myofibroblasts, in addition to decreased expression of corneal crystallins in these cells, are central biological processes that result in corneal stromal fibrosis associated with opacity or "haze". Several factors are associated with myofibroblast generation and haze development after PRK surgery in rabbits, a reproducible model of scarring, including the amount of tissue ablated, which may relate to the extent of keratocyte apoptosis in the early response to injury, irregularity of stromal surface after surgery, and changes in corneal stromal proteoglycans, but normal regeneration of the epithelial basement membrane (EBM) appears to be a critical factor determining whether a cornea heals with relative transparency or vision-limiting stromal opacity. Structural and functional abnormalities of the regenerated EBM facilitate prolonged entry of epithelium-derived growth factors such as transforming growth factor β (TGF-β) and platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF) into the stroma that both drive development of mature myofibroblasts from precursor cells and lead to persistence of the cells in the anterior stroma. A major discovery that has contributed to our understanding of haze development is that keratocytes and corneal

  12. Frequency response of laminated composite plates and shells with matrix cracks type of damage mode

    Science.gov (United States)

    Emam, Aly A.

    The present study has been designed to tackle a new set of problems for structural composites, as these materials are finding new applications in civil engineering field. An attempt has been made to study the frequency response of laminated polymer composite plates and shallow shells containing matrix cracks type of damage with arbitrary support conditions and free vibratory motions. The shell governing equations are derived using a simplified shallow shell theory based on a first order shear deformation field. The continuum damage mechanics approach has been used to model the matrix cracks in a damaged region within the plates and shallow shells. In such approach, the damage is accounted for in the laminate constitutive equations by using a set of second order tensor internal state variables which are strain-like quantities. The simplified damage model was then used to study the changes in frequency response of laminated composite plates and shallow cylindrical shells. The Ritz method and a finite element method have been proposed and developed as approximate solution procedures to quantify the change in the free vibration frequencies due to matrix cracks type of damage under both material as well as geometrical variables such as size, shape and extent of damage, degree of curvature, ratio of orthotropy, thickness ratio as well as support conditions. The analysis of various plates and shells with a centrally located damaged-zone depicts a typical trend of reduction in the vibration frequencies. This reduction is more pronounced for higher frequency modes and it shows greater sensitivity toward the size of the damaged region and density of cracks. The results also show that the changes in the frequency, especially for the fundamental mode, appear to be less sensitive to the shell boundary conditions as well as small values of curvature. The investigation of various undamaged plates and shallow shells demonstrates the importance of a first-order shear deformation

  13. Dynamic response of geometrically nonlinear, elastic rectangular plates under a moving mass loading by inclusion of all inertial components

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rofooei, Fayaz R.; Enshaeian, Alireza; Nikkhoo, Ali

    2017-04-01

    Dynamic deformations of beams and plates under moving objects have extensively been studied in the past. In this work, the dynamic response of geometrically nonlinear rectangular elastic plates subjected to moving mass loading is numerically investigated. A rectangular von Karman plate with various boundary conditions is modeled using specifically developed geometrically nonlinear plate elements. In the available finite element (FE) codes the only way to distinguish between moving masses from moving loads is to model the moving mass as a separate entity. However, these procedures still do not guarantee the inclusion of all inertial effects associated with the moving mass. In a prepared finite element code, the plate elements are developed using the conventional nonlinear methods, i.e., Total Lagrangian technique, but all inertial components associated with the travelling mass are taken into account. Since inertial components affect the mass, damping, and stiffness matrices of the system as the moving mass traverses the plate, appropriate time increments shall be selected to avoid numerical instability. The dynamic response of the plate induced by the moving mass is evaluated and compared to previous studies. Also, unlike the existing FE programs, the different inertial components of the normal contact force between the moving mass and the plate are computed separately to substantiate the no-separation assumption made for the moving mass. Also, it is observed that for large moving mass velocities, the peak plate deformation occurs somewhere away from the plate center point. Under the two extreme in-plane boundary conditions considered in this study, it is shown that if the geometrical nonlinearity of plate is accounted for, the deformations obtained would be less than the case with classical linear plate theory.

  14. Fetal inflammatory response and brain injury in the preterm newborn.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malaeb, Shadi; Dammann, Olaf

    2009-09-01

    Preterm birth can be caused by intrauterine infection and maternal/fetal inflammatory responses. Maternal inflammation (chorioamnionitis) is often followed by a systemic fetal inflammatory response characterized by elevated levels of proinflammatory cytokines in the fetal circulation. The inflammation signal is likely transmitted across the blood-brain barrier and initiates a neuroinflammatory response. Microglial activation has a central role in this process and triggers excitotoxic, inflammatory, and oxidative damage in the developing brain. Neuroinflammation can persist over a period of time and sensitize the brain to subinjurious insults in early and chronic phases but may offer relative tolerance in the intermediate period through activation of endogenous anti-inflammatory, protective, and repair mechanisms. Neuroinflammatory injury not only destroys what exists but also changes what develops.

  15. Degeneration modulates retinal response to transient exogenous oxidative injury.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michal Lederman

    Full Text Available PURPOSE: Oxidative injury is involved in retinal and macular degeneration. We aim to assess if retinal degeneration associated with genetic defect modulates the retinal threshold for encountering additional oxidative challenges. METHODS: Retinal oxidative injury was induced in degenerating retinas (rd10 and in control mice (WT by intravitreal injections of paraquat (PQ. Retinal function and structure was evaluated by electroretinogram (ERG and histology, respectively. Oxidative injury was assessed by immunohistochemistry for 4-Hydroxy-2-nonenal (HNE, and by Thiobarbituric Acid Reactive Substances (TBARS and protein carbonyl content (PCC assays. Anti-oxidant mechanism was assessed by quantitative real time PCR (QPCR for mRNA of antioxidant genes and genes related to iron metabolism, and by catalase activity assay. RESULTS: Three days following PQ injections (1 µl of 0.25, 0.75, and 2 mM the average ERG amplitudes decreased more in the WT mice compared with the rd10 mice. For example, following 2 mM PQ injection, ERG amplitudes reduced 1.84-fold more in WT compared with rd10 mice (p = 0.02. Injection of 4 mM PQ resulted in retinal destruction. Altered retina morphology associated with PQ was substantially more severe in WT eyes compared with rd10 eyes. Oxidative injury according to HNE staining and TBARS assay increased 1.3-fold and 2.1-fold more, respectively, in WT compared with rd10 mice. At baseline, prior to PQ injection, mRNA levels of antioxidant genes (Superoxide Dismutase1, Glutathione Peroxidase1, Catalase and of Transferrin measured by quantitative PCR were 2.1-7.8-fold higher in rd10 compared with WT mice (p<0.01 each, and catalase activity was 1.7-fold higher in rd10 (p = 0.0006. CONCLUSIONS: This data suggests that degenerating rd10 retinas encounter a relatively lower degree of damage in response to oxidative injury compared with normal retinas. Constitutive up-regulation of the oxidative defense mechanism in degenerating retinas

  16. Response functions of imaging plates to photons, electrons and 4He particles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonnet, T; Comet, M; Denis-Petit, D; Gobet, F; Hannachi, F; Tarisien, M; Versteegen, M; Aléonard, M M

    2013-10-01

    Imaging plates from Fuji (BAS-SR, MS, and TR types) are phosphor films routinely used in ultra high intensity laser experiments. However, few data are available on the absolute IP response functions to ionizing particles. We have previously measured and modeled the IP response functions to protons. We focus here on the determination of the responses to photons, electrons, and (4)He particles. The response functions are obtained on an energy range going from a few tens of keV to a few tens of MeV and are compared to available data. The IP sensitivities to the different ionizing particles demonstrate a quenching effect depending on the particle stopping power.

  17. Narratives of Psychosocial Response to Microtrauma Injury among Long-Distance Runners

    OpenAIRE

    Hayley C. Russell; Wiese-Bjornstal, Diane M.

    2015-01-01

    Athletes with microtrauma or overuse injuries resulting from an accumulation of repeated small forces may differ from athletes with macrotrauma or acute injuries in their psychosocial responses because of the unique challenges presented by these insidious-onset and often chronic injuries. Our purpose was to use narrative inquiry to examine the psychosocial experiences and responses of 10 long-distance runners who had experienced microtrauma injuries. Qualitative data analysis of interview dat...

  18. Left ventricular hypertrophy: an initial response to myocardial injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Francis, G S; McDonald, K M

    1992-06-04

    The prevailing wisdom generally has been that the failing heart hypertrophies in response to increased wall stress. The increase in myocardial mass observed in heart failure is therefore a relatively late compensatory event geared to normalize wall stress. Although this is undoubtedly true, especially for heart failure resulting from a large anterior myocardial infarction accompanied by rapid left ventricular expansion, it is possible that an important form of hypertrophy occurs much earlier as an initial response to myocardial injury. One can hypothesize that the initial response to injury is a nonspecific phenotypic alteration of the cardiac myocyte to one of growth and development. Such changes may be driven by both trophic and mechanical forces and may be important in altering the architecture of the myocardial cell and surrounding cardiac interstitium. Preliminary data from a variety of models support the concept that neuroendocrine activity is an important component in the ventricular remodeling process, and that pharmacologic interventions designed to block systemic and tissue neuroendocrine activity may prevent excessive cardiac enlargement and its ultimate consequences. Because this concept has important implications for preventive cardiology, the results of several prevention trials, including the Cooperative North Scandinavian Enalapril Survival Study (CONSENSUS), Studies of Left Ventricular Dysfunction (SOLVD), and Survival and Ventricular Enlargement (SAVE) are awaited eagerly.

  19. Vibration and Acoustic Response of Rectangular Sandwich Plate under Thermal Environment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuan Liu

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, we focus on the vibration and acoustic response of a rectangular sandwich plate which is subjected to a concentrated harmonic force under thermal environment. The critical buckling temperature is obtained to decide the thermal load. The natural frequencies and modes as well as dynamic responses are acquired by using the analytical formulations based on equivalent non-classical theory, in which the effects of shear deformation and rotational inertia are taken into account. The rise of thermal load decreases the natural frequencies and moves response peaks to the low-frequency range. The specific features of sandwich plates with different formations are discussed subsequently. As the thickness ratio of facing to core increases, the natural frequencies are enlarged, and the response peaks float to the high-frequency region. Raising the Young's modulus of the core can cause the similar trends. The accuracy of the theoretical method is verified by comparing its results with those computed by the FEM/BEM.

  20. Narratives of Psychosocial Response to Microtrauma Injury among Long-Distance Runners

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hayley C. Russell

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Athletes with microtrauma or overuse injuries resulting from an accumulation of repeated small forces may differ from athletes with macrotrauma or acute injuries in their psychosocial responses because of the unique challenges presented by these insidious-onset and often chronic injuries. Our purpose was to use narrative inquiry to examine the psychosocial experiences and responses of 10 long-distance runners who had experienced microtrauma injuries. Qualitative data analysis of interview data led to a chronological timeline of the injury experience and an assessment of the meaning attributed to these injury experiences using a variation of Mishler’s core-narrative approach. Participants reported distinct thoughts, feelings, and behaviors during each phase of the injury—pre-injury, injury onset, and outcome. In the pre-injury period, participants indicated specific running-related goals and attributed their injuries to overtraining or a change in training. During the injury onset phase, participants consistently indicated two themes: self-diagnosis and treatment, and not taking time off. Within the outcome phase of injury, participants acknowledged changed training because of the injury, and lessons learned from their injury experiences. The narratives of microtrauma-injured runners revealed psychosocial distress and behavioral tendencies post-injury that have important implications for runners, coaches, and healthcare professionals.

  1. The Effect of Temperature Dependent Material Nonlinearities on the Response of Piezoelectric Composite Plates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Ho-Jun; Saravanos, Dimitris A.

    1997-01-01

    Previously developed analytical formulations for piezoelectric composite plates are extended to account for the nonlinear effects of temperature on material properties. The temperature dependence of the composite and piezoelectric properties are represented at the material level through the thermopiezoelectric constitutive equations. In addition to capturing thermal effects from temperature dependent material properties, this formulation also accounts for thermal effects arising from: (1) coefficient of thermal expansion mismatch between the various composite and piezoelectric plies and (2) pyroelectric effects on the piezoelectric material. The constitutive equations are incorporated into a layerwise laminate theory to provide a unified representation of the coupled mechanical, electrical, and thermal behavior of smart structures. Corresponding finite element equations are derived and implemented for a bilinear plate element with the inherent capability to model both the active and sensory response of piezoelectric composite laminates. Numerical studies are conducted on a simply supported composite plate with attached piezoceramic patches under thermal gradients to investigate the nonlinear effects of material property temperature dependence on the displacements, sensory voltages, active voltages required to minimize thermal deflections, and the resultant stress states.

  2. Optimization of Salmonella Typhi biofilm assay on polypropylene microtiter plates using response surface methodology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ganjali Dashti, M; Abdeshahian, P; Sudesh, K; Phua, K K

    2016-01-01

    The objective of this study was to develop an optimized assay for Salmonella Typhi biofilm that mimics the environment of the gallbladder as an experimental model for chronic typhoid fever. Multi-factorial assays are difficult to optimize using traditional one-factor-at-a-time optimization methods. Response surface methodology (RSM) was used to optimize six key variables involved in S. Typhi biofilm formation on cholesterol-coated polypropylene 96-well microtiter plates. The results showed that bile (1.22%), glucose (2%), cholesterol (0.05%) and potassium chloride (0.25%) were critical factors affecting the amount of biofilm produced, but agitation (275 rpm) and sodium chloride (0.5%) had antagonistic effects on each other. Under these optimum conditions the maximum OD reading for biofilm formation was 3.4 (λ600 nm), and the coefficients of variation for intra-plate and inter-plate assays were 3% (n = 20) and 5% (n = 8), respectively. These results showed that RSM is an effective approach for biofilm assay optimization.

  3. Response of a chevron microchannel plate to 2.5 and 14 MeV neutrons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Medley, S. S.; Persing, R.

    1981-10-01

    The response of a large area (4.6×13 cm) multianode channel electron multiplier array (CEMA) detector to energetic neutrons was investigated. The measured neutron detection efficiencies of the chevron microchannel plate (MCP) were 1.7×10-3 and 6.4×10-3 counts/neutron, respectively, for 2.5 MeV-DD and 14 MeV-DT neutrons. The apparently higher efficiency observed for the 14 MeV neutrons is attributed to neutron-induced background gamma radiation.

  4. Calibration of the linear response range of x-ray imaging plates and their reader based on image grayscale values

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ren, Kuan; Xu, Tao; Zheng, Jianhua; Dong, Jianjun; Wei, Minxi; Li, Chaoguang; Cao, Zhurong; Du, Huabing; Yan, Ji; Yang, Guohong; Yi, Rongqing; Zhang, Jiyan; Huang, Tianxuan; Liu, Shenye; Wang, Feng; Yang, Zhiwen; Li, Jin; Chen, Yaohua; Lan, Ke; Ren, Guoli; Liu, Jie; Ding, Yongkun; Jiang, Shaoen

    2017-08-01

    X-ray imaging plates are one of the most important X-ray imaging detectors and are widely used in inertial-confinement fusion experiments. However, their linear response range, which is the foundation of their quantitative data analysis, has not been sufficiently deeply investigated. In this work, we develop an X-ray fluorescer calibration system and carefully explore the linear response range of X-ray imaging plates. For the first time, nearly the entire grayscale range of the X-ray imaging plate linear response—7819-64 879 in the range of 0-65 535—has been observed. Further, we discuss the uncertainties involved in the calibration process. This work demonstrates the excellent linear response qualities of X-ray imaging plates and provides a significant foundation for expanding their quantitative applied range.

  5. The cellular inflammatory response in human spinal cords after injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fleming, Jennifer C; Norenberg, Michael D; Ramsay, David A; Dekaban, Gregory A; Marcillo, Alexander E; Saenz, Alvaro D; Pasquale-Styles, Melissa; Dietrich, W Dalton; Weaver, Lynne C

    2006-12-01

    Spinal cord injury (SCI) provokes an inflammatory response that generates substantial secondary damage within the cord but also may contribute to its repair. Anti-inflammatory treatment of human SCI and its timing must be based on knowledge of the types of cells participating in the inflammatory response, the time after injury when they appear and then decrease in number, and the nature of their actions. Using post-mortem spinal cords, we evaluated the time course and distribution of pathological change, infiltrating neutrophils, monocytes/macrophages and lymphocytes, and microglial activation in injured spinal cords from patients who were 'dead at the scene' or who survived for intervals up to 1 year after SCI. SCI caused zones of pathological change, including areas of inflammation and necrosis in the acute cases, and cystic cavities with longer survival (Zone 1), mantles of less severe change, including axonal swellings, inflammation and Wallerian degeneration (Zone 2) and histologically intact areas (Zone 3). Zone 1 areas increased in size with time after injury whereas the overall injury (size of the Zones 1 and 2 combined) remained relatively constant from the time (1-3 days) when damage was first visible. The distribution of inflammatory cells correlated well with the location of Zone 1, and sometimes of Zone 2. Neutrophils, visualized by their expression of human neutrophil alpha-defensins (defensin), entered the spinal cord by haemorrhage or extravasation, were most numerous 1-3 days after SCI, and were detectable for up to 10 days after SCI. Significant numbers of activated CD68-immunoreactive ramified microglia and a few monocytes/macrophages were in injured tissue within 1-3 days of SCI. Activated microglia, a few monocytes/macrophages and numerous phagocytic macrophages were present for weeks to months after SCI. A few CD8(+) lymphocytes were in the injured cords throughout the sampling intervals. Expression by the inflammatory cells of the oxidative

  6. Charpy Impact Response of the Cracked Aluminum Plates Repaired with FML Patches using the Response Surface Methodology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Faramarz Ashenai Ghasemi

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Here, the effect of fiber metal laminate (FMLs patches was studied for repairing of single-sided cracked aluminum plates experimentally to see their response to Charpy impact tests. The main desired parameters were composite patch lay-up, crack length, and crack angle each one in three levels. All experimental attempts generated and followed based on the design of experiments method by using of response surface methodology. The predicted energy absorption values obtained from the model were in good agreement with the experimental results. No matter the specimens were repaired or not, as the crack length was increased the energy absorption of the structure was decreased. The experimental results also showed that for lengthen cracks, increasing of the crack angle had more effect on energy absorption. Also it was observed that the patch lay-up effective on the impact response of the specimens. The more the metal layer was departed from the aluminum plate and the FML patches interfacial surface, the less energy was absorbed in the structure.

  7. Ductile Tearing of Thin Aluminum Plates Under Blast Loading. Predictions with Fully Coupled Models and Biaxial Material Response Characterization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Corona, Edmundo [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Gullerud, Arne S. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Haulenbeek, Kimberly K. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Reu, Phillip L. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    2015-06-01

    The work presented in this report concerns the response and failure of thin 2024- T3 aluminum alloy circular plates to a blast load produced by the detonation of a nearby spherical charge. The plates were fully clamped around the circumference and the explosive charge was located centrally with respect to the plate. The principal objective was to conduct a numerical model validation study by comparing the results of predictions to experimental measurements of plate deformation and failure for charges with masses in the vicinity of the threshold between no tearing and tearing of the plates. Stereo digital image correlation data was acquired for all tests to measure the deflection and strains in the plates. The size of the virtual strain gage in the measurements, however, was relatively large, so the strain measurements have to be interpreted accordingly as lower bounds of the actual strains in the plate and of the severity of the strain gradients. A fully coupled interaction model between the blast and the deflection of the structure was considered. The results of the validation exercise indicated that the model predicted the deflection of the plates reasonably accurately as well as the distribution of strain on the plate. The estimation of the threshold charge based on a critical value of equivalent plastic strain measured in a bulge test, however, was not accurate. This in spite of efforts to determine the failure strain of the aluminum sheet under biaxial stress conditions. Further work is needed to be able to predict plate tearing with some degree of confidence. Given the current technology, at least one test under the actual blast conditions where the plate tears is needed to calibrate the value of equivalent plastic strain when failure occurs in the numerical model. Once that has been determined, the question of the explosive mass value at the threshold could be addressed with more confidence.

  8. RESPONSE OF TRIASSIC SEQUENCE STRATIGRAPHY OF LOWER YANGTZE TO THE COLLISION BETWEEN THE YANGTZE PLATE AND THE NORTH CHINA PLATE

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2005-01-01

    The characteristics of the Triassic sequences developed in the Lower Yangtze area display some great changes in both environment and climate. The change of environment was a transition from marine to continent via alternating environments. The change of climate was a transition from tropic (torrid) to warm and wet climate via subtropic dry climate. The type variations of the sequences were from the marine sequences to the continental sequences, corresponding to the changes of environments and climates.Sequence 1 is a type Ⅱ of sequence of mixed clastic and carbonate sediments; sequence 2 is a type Ⅰ of sequence of carbonate platform; sequence 3 is a type Ⅰ of sequence of carbonate tidal flat-salt lagoon,sequence 4 is a type Ⅱ of sequence of lacustrine within marine layers, and sequence 5 is a sequence of lacustrine-swamp. The development, distribution and preservation of those sequences reveal the tectonic controls and their changes in the background. The collision between the Yangtze plate and the North China plate was a great geological event in the geological history, but the timing of the collision is still disputed.However, the characteristics of Triassic sequence stratigraphy and sea level changes in the Lower Yangtze area responded to this coliision. The collision started at the beginning of middle Triassic and the great regression in the Lower Yangtze area started 22Ma earlier than those in the world. The tectonic conditions occurred before and during the collision controlled the development of sequences and type changes.

  9. Cancelation of transducer effects from frequency response functions: Experimental case study on the steel plate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pedram Zamani

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Modal analysis is a progressive science in the experimental evaluation of dynamic properties of the structures. Mechanical devices such as accelerometers are one of the sources of lack of quality in measuring modal testing parameters. In this article, elimination of the accelerometer’s mass effect of the frequency response of the structure is studied. So, a strategy is used for eliminating the mass effect using sensitivity analysis. In this method, the amount of mass change and the place to measure the structure’s response with least error in frequency correction is chosen. Experimental modal testing is carried out on a steel plate, and the effect of accelerometer’s mass is omitted using this strategy. Finally, a good agreement is achieved between numerical and experimental results.

  10. A compensating method of an imaging plate response to clinical proton beams

    CERN Document Server

    Kohno, R; Takada, Y; Terunuma, T; Sakae, T; Matsumoto, K

    2002-01-01

    For charged particle irradiations, the response of an imaging plate (IP) changes around the Bragg peak. Therefore, an appropriate compensation is necessary for the evaluation of dose distribution formed by charged particles such as protons. In this paper, the response of IPs to clinical proton beams is investigated. An experimentally-obtained depth-dose distribution (an ordinary Bragg curve) by a silicon semiconductor detector (SSD) is employed to evaluate the compensation factors as a function of proton penetrating depth, i.e. residual range. A typical dose distribution in a water phantom formed by an L-shaped bolus is measured by IPs and corrected by using the information of those compensation factors; the residual proton range is successfully calculated by the pencil beam algorithm at an arbitrary point. The results show a good agreement with the measurements by the SSD within the rms error of 3.0%.

  11. Response of microchannel plates to single particles and to electromagnetic showers

    CERN Document Server

    Brianza, L; Del Re, D; Gelli, S; Ghezzi, A; Gotti, C; Govoni, P; Jorda, C; Martelli, A; Marzocchi, B; Meridiani, P; Organtini, G; Paramatti, R; Pigazzini, S; Rahatlou, S; Rovelli, C; Santanastasio, F; de Fatis, T Tabarelli; Trevisani, N; [,; Bicocca, Università di Milano; INFN,; di Milano-Bicocca, Sezione; di Roma, Sapienza - Università; ], Sezione di Roma1

    2015-01-01

    We report on the response of microchannel plates (MCPs) to single relativistic particles and to electromagnetic showers. Particle detection by means of secondary emission of electrons at the MCP surface has long been proposed and is used extensively in ion time-of-flight mass spectrometers. What has not been investigated in depth is their use to detect the ionizing component of showers. The time resolution of MCPs exceeds anything that has been previously used in calorimeters and, if exploited effectively, could aid in the event reconstruction at high luminosity colliders. Several prototypes of photodetectors with the amplification stage based on MCPs were exposed to cosmic rays and to 491 MeV electrons at the INFN-LNF Beam-Test Facility. The time resolution and the efficiency of the MCPs are measured as a function of the particle multiplicity, and the results used to model the response to high-energy showers.

  12. Response of microchannel plates to single particles and to electromagnetic showers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brianza, L. [Università di Milano Bicocca and INFN, Sezione di Milano-Bicocca, Piazza della Scienza 3, I-20126 Milano (Italy); Cavallari, F.; Del Re, D.; Gelli, S. [Sapienza Università di Roma and INFN, Sezione di Roma 1, P.le A. Moro 1, I-00044 Rome (Italy); Ghezzi, A.; Gotti, C.; Govoni, P. [Università di Milano Bicocca and INFN, Sezione di Milano-Bicocca, Piazza della Scienza 3, I-20126 Milano (Italy); Jorda Lopez, C. [Sapienza Università di Roma and INFN, Sezione di Roma 1, P.le A. Moro 1, I-00044 Rome (Italy); Martelli, A.; Marzocchi, B. [Università di Milano Bicocca and INFN, Sezione di Milano-Bicocca, Piazza della Scienza 3, I-20126 Milano (Italy); Meridiani, P.; Organtini, G.; Paramatti, R.; Pernié, L. [Sapienza Università di Roma and INFN, Sezione di Roma 1, P.le A. Moro 1, I-00044 Rome (Italy); Pigazzini, S. [Università di Milano Bicocca and INFN, Sezione di Milano-Bicocca, Piazza della Scienza 3, I-20126 Milano (Italy); Rahatlou, S.; Rovelli, C.; Santanastasio, F. [Sapienza Università di Roma and INFN, Sezione di Roma 1, P.le A. Moro 1, I-00044 Rome (Italy); Tabarelli de Fatis, T., E-mail: tommaso.tabarelli@mib.infn.it [Università di Milano Bicocca and INFN, Sezione di Milano-Bicocca, Piazza della Scienza 3, I-20126 Milano (Italy); Trevisani, N. [Università di Milano Bicocca and INFN, Sezione di Milano-Bicocca, Piazza della Scienza 3, I-20126 Milano (Italy)

    2015-10-11

    We report on the response of microchannel plates (MCPs) to single relativistic particles and to electromagnetic showers. Particle detection by means of secondary emission of electrons at the MCP surface has long been proposed and is used extensively in ion time-of-flight mass spectrometers. What has not been investigated in depth is their use to detect the ionizing component of showers. The time resolution of MCPs exceeds anything that has been previously used in calorimeters and, if exploited effectively, could aid in the event reconstruction at high luminosity colliders. Several prototypes of photodetectors with the amplification stage based on MCPs were exposed to cosmic rays and to 491 MeV electrons at the INFN-LNF Beam-Test Facility. The time resolution and the efficiency of the MCPs are measured as a function of the particle multiplicity, and the results used to model the response to high-energy showers.

  13. Effect of crack on the impact response of plates by the extended finite element method (X-FEM)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tiberkak, Rachid [University of Blida, Soumaa (Algeria); Bachene, Mourad [University of Medea, Medea (Algeria); Rechak, Said [Ecole Nationale Polytechnique, Algiers (Algeria)

    2014-06-15

    The dynamic response of cracked isotropic plates subjected to impact loading is studied in this paper. The impact properties of cracked plate are compared with the virgin ones to predict the eventual presence of discontinuities in plates. The extended finite element method (X-FEM) is employed in the mathematical modeling of the impact problem, wherein the effects of shear deformation is considered. Conventional finite element without any discontinuity is initially conducted in the numerical implementation. Enriched functions are then added to the nodal displacement field for element nodes that contain cracks. The effects of crack length and crack position on contact force and on plate deflection are analyzed. Results show that the maximal contact force decreases as the deflection increases with increasing crack length a . The effect of crack position on the dynamic response is less pronounced when the crack is near the fixed end.

  14. Transient Eddy Current Response Due to a Subsurface Crack in a Conductive Plate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fu, Fangwei [Iowa State Univ., Ames, IA (United States)

    2006-01-01

    Eddy current nondestructive evaluation (NDE) is usually carried out by exciting a time harmonic field using an inductive probe. However, a viable alternative is to use transient eddy current NDE in which a current pulse in a driver coil produces a transient .eld in a conductor that decays at a rate dependent on the conductivity and the permeability of the material and the coil configuration. By using transient eddy current, it is possible to estimate the properties of the conductive medium and to locate and size potential .aws from the measured probe response. The fundamental study described in this dissertation seeks to establish a theoretical understanding of the transient eddy current NDE. Compared with the Fourier transform method, the derived analytical formulations are more convenient when the transient eddy current response within a narrow time range is evaluated. The theoretical analysis provides a valuable tool to study the effect of layer thickness, location of defect, crack opening as well as the optimization of probe design. Analytical expressions have been developed to evaluate the transient response due to eddy currents in a conductive plate based on two asymptotic series. One series converges rapidly for a short time regime and the other for a long time regime and both of them agree with the results calculated by fast Fourier transform over all the times considered. The idea of asymptotic expansion is further applied to determine the induced electromotive force (EMF) in a pick-up coil due to eddy currents in a cylindrical rod. Starting from frequency domain representation, a quasi-static time domain dyadic Green's function for an electric source in a conductive plate has been derived. The resulting expression has three parts; a free space term, multiple image terms and partial reflection terms. The dyadic Green's function serves as the kernel of an electric field integral equation which defines the interaction of an ideal crack with the

  15. DNA damage response in nephrotoxic and ischemic kidney injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Mingjuan; Tang, Chengyuan; Ma, Zhengwei; Huang, Shuang; Dong, Zheng

    2016-10-27

    DNA damage activates specific cell signaling cascades for DNA repair, cell cycle arrest, senescence, and/or cell death. Recent studies have demonstrated DNA damage response (DDR) in experimental models of acute kidney injury (AKI). In cisplatin-induced AKI or nephrotoxicity, the DDR pathway of ATR/Chk2/p53 is activated and contributes to renal tubular cell apoptosis. In ischemic AKI, DDR seems more complex and involves at least the ataxia telangiectasia mutated (ATM), a member of the phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase-related kinase (PIKK) family, and p53; however, while ATM may promote DNA repair, p53 may trigger cell death. Targeting DDR for kidney protection in AKI therefore relies on a thorough elucidation of the DDR pathways in various forms of AKI.

  16. Response of Multi-strip Multi-gap Resistive Plate Chamber

    CERN Document Server

    Datta, Ushasi; Rahaman, A; Basu, P; Basu, J; Bemmerer, D; Boretzky, K; Elekes, Z; Kempe, M; Munzenberg, G; Simon, H; Sobiella, M; Stach, D; Wagner, A; Yakorev, D

    2015-01-01

    A prototype of Multi-strip Multi-gap Resistive Plate chamber (MMRPC) with active area 40 cm $\\times$ 20 cm has been developed at SINP, Kolkata. Detailed response of the developed detector was studied with the pulsed electron beam from ELBE at Helmholtz-Zentrum Dresden-Rossendorf. In this report the response of SINP developed MMRPC with different controlling parameters is described in details. The obtained time resolution ($\\sigma_t$) of the detector after slew correction was 91.5$ \\pm $3 ps. Position resolution measured along ($\\sigma_x$) and across ($\\sigma_y$) the strip was 2.8$\\pm$0.6 cm and 0.58 cm, respectively. The measured absolute efficiency of the detector for minimum ionizing particle like electron was 95.8$\\pm$1.3 $\\%$. Better timing resolution of the detector can be achieved by restricting the events to a single strip. The response of the detector was mainly in avalanche mode but a few percentage of streamer mode response was also observed. A comparison of the response of these two modes with trig...

  17. Dynamic Response of Vertebral Elements Related to USAF Injury

    Science.gov (United States)

    1978-02-01

    eventual loss of mucopolysaccharide matrix from both the hyaline cartilage end plates and fibro- cartilage annulUS« resulting in increased cell...fibroblasts; 2. Loss of cells from and compression of the circular regions lying between the cartilage end plates and nucleus; 3. Altered staining and...is forced to the low oressuro side, with consequent thinnimj of the annuhjs at that point; 7. Thinning of the hyaline end plates; micro fractures

  18. Growth Plate Injuries

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... for hours on the uneven bars, a long-distance runner, and a baseball pitcher perfecting his curve ... need more information about available resources in your language or another language, please visit our website or ...

  19. Shrinkage Analysis on Thick Plate Part using Response Surface Methodology (RSM

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Isafiq M.

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The work reported herein is about an analysis on the quality (shrinkage on a thick plate part using Response Surface Methodology (RSM. Previous researches showed that the most influential factor affecting the shrinkage on moulded parts are mould and melt temperature. Autodesk Moldflow Insight software was used for the analysis, while specifications of Nessei NEX 1000 injection moulding machine and P20 mould material were incorporated in this study on top of Acrylonitrile Butadiene Styrene (ABS as a moulded thermoplastic material. Mould temperature, melt temperature, packing pressure and packing time were selected as variable parameters. The results show that the shrinkage have improved 42.48% and 14.41% in parallel and normal directions respectively after the optimisation process.

  20. The Time Response of Glass Resistive Plate Chambers to Heavily Ionizing Particles

    CERN Document Server

    Artamonov, A; Bogomilov, M; Booth, C; Borghi, S; Catanesi, M G; Chimenti, P; Gastaldi, Ugo; Giani, S; Graulich, J S; Grégoire, G; Grossheim, A; Guglielmi, A; Ivantchenko, V; Kolev, D; Meurer, C; Mezzetto, M; Panman, J; Popov, B; Radicioni, E; Schroeter, R; Temnikov, P; Chernyaev, E; Tsenov, R; Tsukerman, I; Wiebusch, C

    2007-01-01

    The HARP system of resistive plate chambers (RPCs) was designed to perform particle identification by the measurement of the difference in the time-of-flight of different particles. In previous papers an apparent discrepancy was shown between the response of the RPCs to minimum ionizing pions and heavily ionizing protons. Using the kinematics of elastic scattering off a hydrogen target a controlled beam of low momentum recoil protons was directed onto the chambers. With this method the trajectory and momentum, and hence the time-of-flight of the protons can be precisely predicted without need for a measurement of momentum of the protons. It is demonstrated that the measurement of the time-of-arrival of particles by the thin gas-gap glass RPC system of the HARP experiment depends on the primary ionization deposited by the particle in the detector.

  1. Elastic-plastic contact force history and response characteristics of circular plate subjected to impact by a projectile

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    L. B. Chen; F. Xi; J. L. Yang

    2007-01-01

    A new elastic-plastic impact-contact model is proposed in this paper. By adopting the principle of minimum acceleration for elastic-plastic continue at finite deformation,and with the aid of finite difference method, the proposed model is applied in the problem of dynamic response of a clamped thin circular plate subjected to a projectile impact centrally. The impact force history and response characte-ristics of the target plate is studied in detail. The theoreti-cal predictions of the impact force and plate deflection are in good agreements with those of LDA experimental data.Linear expressions of the maximum impact force/transverse deflection versus impact velocity are given on the basis of the theoretical results.

  2. LOW VELOCITY RESPONSE CHARACTERISTICS OF COMPOSITE PLATE WITH EMBEDDED SHAPE MEMORY ALLOY

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WuYongdong; ZhongWeifang; LiangYide

    2004-01-01

    This paper analyzes the characteristics of utilizing shape memory effect (SME) of shape memory alloy (SMA) in improving the low velocity impact resistance performance of composite plate by using finite element method. The constitutive relation for SMA hybrid composite plates is presented. The analytic model of finite element for SMA composite plate subjected to low velocity impact is established. The modified Hertz's contact law is used to determine the impact contact force. The computing procedures for solving the finite element equation using Newmark direct integration method are given. The numerical modelling results show that the SMA can effectively improve the low velocity impact resistance performance of composite plate.

  3. Foxj1 regulates floor plate cilia architecture and modifies the response of cells to sonic hedgehog signalling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cruz, Catarina; Ribes, Vanessa; Kutejova, Eva; Cayuso, Jordi; Lawson, Victoria; Norris, Dominic; Stevens, Jonathan; Davey, Megan; Blight, Ken; Bangs, Fiona; Mynett, Anita; Hirst, Elizabeth; Chung, Rachel; Balaskas, Nikolaos; Brody, Steven L.; Marti, Elisa; Briscoe, James

    2010-01-01

    Sonic hedgehog signalling is essential for the embryonic development of many tissues including the central nervous system, where it controls the pattern of cellular differentiation. A genome-wide screen of neural progenitor cells to evaluate the Shh signalling-regulated transcriptome identified the forkhead transcription factor Foxj1. In both chick and mouse Foxj1 is expressed in the ventral midline of the neural tube in cells that make up the floor plate. Consistent with the role of Foxj1 in the formation of long motile cilia, floor plate cells produce cilia that are longer than the primary cilia found elsewhere in the neural tube, and forced expression of Foxj1 in neuroepithelial cells is sufficient to increase cilia length. In addition, the expression of Foxj1 in the neural tube and in an Shh-responsive cell line attenuates intracellular signalling by decreasing the activity of Gli proteins, the transcriptional mediators of Shh signalling. We show that this function of Foxj1 depends on cilia. Nevertheless, floor plate identity and ciliogenesis are unaffected in mouse embryos lacking Foxj1 and we provide evidence that additional transcription factors expressed in the floor plate share overlapping functions with Foxj1. Together, these findings identify a novel mechanism that modifies the cellular response to Shh signalling and reveal morphological and functional features of the amniote floor plate that distinguish these cells from the rest of the neuroepithelium. PMID:21098568

  4. Acute high-grade acromioclavicular joint injuries treatment: Arthroscopic non-rigid coracoclavicular fixation provides better quality of life outcomes than hook plate ORIF.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Natera-Cisneros, L; Sarasquete-Reiriz, J; Escolà-Benet, A; Rodriguez-Miralles, J

    2016-02-01

    Treatment of acute high-grade acromioclavicular joint (ACJ) injuries with metal hardware alters the biomechanics of the ACJ, implying a second surgery for hardware removal. The period during which the plate is present involves functional limitations, pain and a risk factor for the development of hardware-related-injuries. Arthroscopy-assisted procedures compared to open-metal hardware techniques offer: less morbidity, the possibility to treat associated lesions and no need for a second operation. The aim was to compare the Quality of life (QoL) of patients with acute high-grade ACJ injuries (Rockwood grade III-V), managed arthroscopically with a non-rigid coracoclavicular (CC) fixation versus the QoL of patients managed with a hook plate, 24 months or more after their shoulder injury. A retrospective revision of high-grade ACJ injuries managed in three institutions was performed. Patients treated by means of an arthroscopy-assisted CC fixation or by means of a hook plate were included. The inclusion period was between 2008 and 2012. The QoL was evaluated at the last follow-up visit by means of the SF36, the visual analog scale (VAS), the Disabilities of the Arm, Shoulder and Hand (DASH) questionnaire, the Constant score and the global satisfaction (scale from 0 to 10). The presence of scapular dyskinesis and remaining vertical instability were evaluated. Comparison between groups was performed. Thirty-one patients were included: 20 arthroscopy-group (ARTH group: 3 Rockwood III, 3 IV and 14 V) and 11 hook plate-group (HOOK group: 5 Rockwood III and 6 V). The mean age was 36 [25-52] year-old for the ARTH group and 41 [19-55] for the HOOK group (P=0.185). The mean results of the questionnaires were: (1) physical SF36 score (ARTH group 58.24±2.16 and HOOK group 53.70±4.33, P<0.001); (2) mental SF36 score (ARTH group 56.15±2.21 and HOOK group 53.06±6.10, P=0.049); (3) VAS (ARTH group 0.40±0.50 and HOOK group 1.45±1.51, P=0.007); (4) DASH (ARTH group 2.98±2.03 and

  5. The synthetic NCAM-derived peptide, FGL, modulates the transcriptional response to traumatic brain injury

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Martin Volmer; Helweg-Larsen, Rehannah Borup; Nielsen, Finn Cilius;

    2008-01-01

    Cerebral responses to traumatic brain injury (TBI) include up- and downregulation of a vast number of proteins involved in endogenous inflammatory responses and defense mechanisms developing postinjury. The present study analyzed the global gene expression profile in response to cryo-induced TBI...... at various time-points postlesion (6 h, 1 day and 4 days). The effects of injury, treatment, and injury-treatment interaction were observed. TBI alone rendered a large number of genes affected. Analysis of lesion and treatment interactions resulted in a clear effect of the interaction between injury and FGL......-treatment compared to injury and placebo-treatment. Genes affected by TBI alone included inflammation markers, protein kinases, ion channel members and growth factors. Genes encoding regulators of apoptosis, signal transduction and metabolism were altered by the interaction between FGL-treatment and TBI. FGL...

  6. Learning influence on the behavioral structure of rat response to pain in hot-plate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Casarrubea, Maurizio; Sorbera, Filippina; Santangelo, Andrea; Crescimanno, Giuseppe

    2011-11-20

    Aim of the research was to study, by means of descriptive and multivariate analyses, whether, and how, learning influences the behavioral structure of rat response to pain. To this purpose, a hot-plate test daily repetition procedure was carried out on male Wistar rats for five days. A 6-day interval without stimulation elapsed before last test was carried out on day 12. After composition of an ethogram, descriptive (number, latency, per cent distribution) and multivariate analyses (cluster, stochastic) were carried out for each scheduled test day. One-way ANOVA and Newman-Keuls post-hoc test for multiple comparisons revealed significant changes for climbing, jumping, front-paw licking and stamping mean latencies. Student's t-test, carried out between days 1 and 12, showed that significant modifications persisted over time only for climbing and jumping. Cluster analysis evidenced three different clusters: exploratory (sniffing, walking), primary noxious evoked elements (front-paw licking, hind-paw licking, stamping), and escape (climbing and jumping), each showing modifications during test repetition. Comparison between days 1 and 12 revealed substantial differences in similarity values of escape patterns whereas, for the response to pain ones, a conservative structure of dendrograms was maintained. Stochastic analysis revealed a progressive increase of transitions toward jumping and a significant reduction of the ones between sniffing and walking. Such modifications persisted also after 6 days without any stimulation. Present study shows that learning provokes a complex and fine temporal evolution of the innermost behavioral structure of rat response to pain aiming at a more efficient escape strategy.

  7. Injury-Induced Type I IFN Signaling Regulates Inflammatory Responses in the Central Nervous System

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Khorooshi, Reza; Owens, Trevor

    2010-01-01

    Innate glial response is critical for the induction of inflammatory mediators and recruitment of leukocytes to sites of the injury in the CNS. We have examined the involvement of type I IFN signaling in the mouse hippocampus following sterile injury (transection of entorhinal afferents). Type I I...

  8. Frequency Response of an Aircraft Wing with Discrete Source Damage Using Equivalent Plate Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krishnamurthy, T.; Eldred, Lloyd B.

    2007-01-01

    An equivalent plate procedure is developed to provide a computationally efficient means of matching the stiffness and frequencies of flight vehicle wing structures for prescribed loading conditions. Several new approaches are proposed and studied to match the stiffness and first five natural frequencies of the two reference models with and without damage. One approach divides the candidate reference plate into multiple zones in which stiffness and mass can be varied using a variety of materials including aluminum, graphite-epoxy, and foam-core graphite-epoxy sandwiches. Another approach places point masses along the edge of the stiffness-matched plate to tune the natural frequencies. Both approaches are successful at matching the stiffness and natural frequencies of the reference plates and provide useful insight into determination of crucial features in equivalent plate models of aircraft wing structures.

  9. Parental response to child injury: examination of parental posttraumatic stress symptom trajectories following child accidental injury

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Le Brocque, Robyne M; Hendrikz, Joan; Kenardy, Justin A

    2010-01-01

    Trajectory analyses were used to empirically differentiate patterns of posttraumatic stress symptoms in parents following child accidental injury and explore the relationship between parent and child recovery patterns. Parent (n = 189...

  10. Blast response of centrally and eccentrically loaded flat-, U-, and V-shaped armored plates: comparative study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trajkovski, J.; Kunc, R.; Prebil, I.

    2017-07-01

    Light armored vehicles (LAVs) can be exposed to blast loading by landmines or improvised explosive devices (IEDs) during their lifetime. The bottom hull of these vehicles is usually made of a few millimeters of thin armored plate that is the vehicle's weak point in a blast-loading scenario. Therefore, blast resistance and blast load redirection are very important characteristics in providing adequate vehicle as well as occupant protection. Furthermore, the eccentric nature of loading caused by landmines was found to be omitted in the studies of simplified structures like beams and plates. For this purpose, blast wave dispersion and blast response of centrally and eccentrically loaded flat-, U-, and V-shaped plates are examined using a combined finite-element-smoothed-particle hydrodynamics (FE-SPH) model. The results showed that V-shaped plates better disperse blast waves for any type of loading and, therefore, can be successfully applied in LAVs. Based on the results of the study and the geometry of a typical LAV 6× 6, the minimum angle of V-shaped plates is also determined.

  11. Blast response of centrally and eccentrically loaded flat-, U-, and V-shaped armored plates: comparative study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trajkovski, J.; Kunc, R.; Prebil, I.

    2016-12-01

    Light armored vehicles (LAVs) can be exposed to blast loading by landmines or improvised explosive devices (IEDs) during their lifetime. The bottom hull of these vehicles is usually made of a few millimeters of thin armored plate that is the vehicle's weak point in a blast-loading scenario. Therefore, blast resistance and blast load redirection are very important characteristics in providing adequate vehicle as well as occupant protection. Furthermore, the eccentric nature of loading caused by landmines was found to be omitted in the studies of simplified structures like beams and plates. For this purpose, blast wave dispersion and blast response of centrally and eccentrically loaded flat-, U-, and V-shaped plates are examined using a combined finite-element-smoothed-particle hydrodynamics (FE-SPH) model. The results showed that V-shaped plates better disperse blast waves for any type of loading and, therefore, can be successfully applied in LAVs. Based on the results of the study and the geometry of a typical LAV 6× 6 , the minimum angle of V-shaped plates is also determined.

  12. Dynamic response of clamped corrugated sandwich plates subjected to underwater impulsive loads

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Wei; Zhang, Wei; Ye, Nan; Li, Dacheng

    2017-01-01

    Corrugated sandwich plates are widely used in marine industry because such plates have high strength-to-weight ratios and blast resistance. The laboratory-scaled fluid-structure interaction experiments are performed to demonstrate the shock resistance of corrugated sandwich plates by quantifying the permanent transverse deflection at mid-span of the plates as a function of impulsive loadings per areal mass. Sandwich structures with 6mm-thick 3003 H18 aluminum corrugated core and 5A06 face sheets subjected to underwater impulsive loadings are studied experimentally in this paper. The dynamic deformations of plates are captured with the the 3D digital imaging correlation method (DIC). The results affirm the peak deflection during the processes of dynamic deformation and the residual maximum deflection for post-mortem plates show a linear trend with the impulses per areal mass, and show sensitivity to the change of impulses. Inhomogeneous deformation for corrugated sandwich plates are show uneven rather than the perfect parabolic shapes reported in previous studies. With the increasing of intensities for impulsive loadings, the failure modes can be observed more complicated from the initial plastic deformation to debonding and crack. This paper provides valid data to quantify the peak deflection, residual deflection and failure modes as functions of impulses and geometric parameters in the future work.

  13. Temporal response of endogenous neural progenitor cells following injury to the adult rat spinal cord

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yilin eMao

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available A pool of endogenous neural progenitor cells found in the ependymal layer and the sub-ependymal area of the spinal cord are reported to upregulate nestin in response to traumatic spinal cord injury. These cells could potentially be manipulated within a critical time period offering one innovative approach to the repair of spinal cord injury. However, little is known about the temporal response of endogenous neural progenitor cells following spinal cord injury. This study used a mild contusion injury in rat spinal cord and immunohistochemistry to determine the temporal response of ependymal neural progenitor cells following injury and their correlation to astrocyte activation at the lesion site. The results from the study demonstrated that Nestin staining intensity at the central canal peaked at 24 hours post-injury and then gradually declined over time. Reactive astrocytes double labelled by Nestin and GFAP were found at the lesion edge and commenced to form the glial scar from 1 week after injury. We conclude that the critical time period for manipulating endogenous neural progenitor cells following a spinal cord injury in rats is between 24 hrs when nestin expression in ependymal cells is increased and 1 week when astrocytes are activated in large numbers.

  14. Acute, regional inflammatory response after traumatic brain injury: Implications for cellular therapy

    OpenAIRE

    Harting, Matthew T.; jimenez, fernando; Adams, Sasha D.; Mercer, David W.; Cox, Charles S.

    2008-01-01

    While cellular therapy has shown promise in the management of traumatic brain injury (TBI), microenvironment interactions between the intracerebral milieu and therapeutic stem cells are poorly understood. We sought to characterize the acute, regional inflammatory response after TBI.

  15. Mood, illness and injury responses and recovery with adventure racing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anglem, Nat; Lucas, Samuel J E; Rose, Elaine A; Cotter, James D

    2008-01-01

    Exercise stress, immune status, and mood are interrelated. The stress of adventure racing is unique; exercise is very prolonged and competitive, with severe sleep deprivation and sustained cognitive demands, usually in arduous terrain and environmental conditions. The purpose of this prospective, descriptive study was to identify mood changes along with symptoms of illness and injury during and in the weeks following an international-level adventure race. Mood, sleep, injury, and illness data were collected using questionnaires before, during, and for 2 weeks following New Zealand's Southern Traverse Adventure Race in November 2003. Mood was variable between athletes, but peaks of altered mood subscores were evident (P injury was common (38/48, 79%). Gastrointestinal complaints were common at the finish (8/49, 16%) and during the next 5 days but settled more quickly than upper respiratory symptoms. Adventure racing of approximately 100 hours causes significant symptomatic injury and illness and mood state disruption, which generally resolve within a fortnight following racing. Disrupted mood and symptoms of illness and injury indicate athlete susceptibility to overreaching or overtraining without sufficient recovery.

  16. Strongly compromised inflammatory response to brain injury in interleukin-6-deficient mice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Penkowa, M; Moos, T; Carrasco, J;

    1999-01-01

    Injury to the central nervous system (CNS) elicits an inflammatory response involving activation of microglia, brain macrophages, and astrocytes, processes likely mediated by the release of proinflammatory cytokines. In order to determine the role of interleukin-6 (IL-6) during the inflammatory...... response in the brain following disruption of the blood-brain barrier (BBB), we examined the effects of a focal cryo injury to the fronto-parietal cortex in interleukin-6-deficient (IL-6-/-) and normal (IL-6+/+) mice. In IL-6+/+ mice, brain injury resulted in the appearance of brain macrophages...

  17. Systems microscopy to unravel cellular stress response signalling in drug induced liver injury

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wink, Steven

    2015-01-01

    Toxicological insults are met by cellular adaptive stress response pathway activation. We find that activation of adaptive stress responses occur well before the typical ultimate outcome of chemical cell injury. To increase our understanding of chemically-induced adaptive stress response pathway act

  18. Oligodendrocyte lineage and subventricular zone response to traumatic axonal injury in the corpus callosum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sullivan, Genevieve M; Mierzwa, Amanda J; Kijpaisalratana, Naruchorn; Tang, Haiying; Wang, Yong; Song, Sheng-Kwei; Selwyn, Reed; Armstrong, Regina C

    2013-12-01

    Traumatic brain injury frequently causes traumatic axonal injury (TAI) in white matter tracts. Experimental TAI in the corpus callosum of adult mice was used to examine the effects on oligodendrocyte lineage cells and myelin in conjunction with neuroimaging. The injury targeted the corpus callosum over the subventricular zone, a source of neural stem/progenitor cells. Traumatic axonal injury was produced in the rostral body of the corpus callosum by impact onto the skull at the bregma. During the first week after injury, magnetic resonance diffusion tensor imaging showed that axial diffusivity decreased in the corpus callosum and that corresponding regions exhibited significant axon damage accompanied by hypertrophic microglia and reactive astrocytes. Oligodendrocyte progenitor proliferation increased in the subventricular zone and corpus callosum. Oligodendrocytes in the corpus callosum shifted toward upregulation of myelin gene transcription. Plp/CreER(T):R26IAP reporter mice showed normal reporter labeling of myelin sheaths 0 to 2 days after injury but labeling was increased between 2 and 7 days after injury. Electron microscopy revealed axon degeneration, demyelination, and redundant myelin figures. These findings expand the cell types and responses to white matter injuries that inform diffusion tensor imaging evaluation and identify pivotal white matter changes after TAI that may affect axon vulnerability vs. recovery after brain injury.

  19. Olfactory ensheathing cell transplantation improves sympathetic skin responses in chronic spinal cord injury

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zuncheng Zheng; Guifeng Liu; Yuexia Chen; Shugang Wei

    2013-01-01

    Forty-three patients with chronic spinal cord injury for over 6 months were transplanted with bryonic olfactory ensheathing cells, 2-4 × 106, into multiple sites in the injured area under the sur-gical microscope. The sympathetic skin response in patients was measured with an electromyo-graphy/evoked potential instrument 1 day before transplantation and 3-8 weeks after trans-tion. Spinal nerve function of patients was assessed using the American Spinal Injury Association impairment scale. The sympathetic skin response was elicited in 32 cases before olfactory en-sheathing celltransplantation, while it was observed in 34 cases after transplantation. tantly, sympathetic skin response latency decreased significantly and amplitude increased cantly after transplantation. Transplantation of olfactory ensheathing cells also improved American Spinal Injury Association scores for movement, pain and light touch. Our findings indicate that factory ensheathing celltransplantation improves motor, sensory and autonomic nerve functions in patients with chronic spinal cord injury.

  20. School Response to Non-Suicidal Self-Injury

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toste, Jessica R.; Heath, Nancy L.

    2010-01-01

    Non-suicidal self-injury (NSSI) is a growing concern among professionals working with youth. Recent studies exploring the occurrence of NSSI in middle and high schools indicate that 15% to 20% of students will admit to having engaged in this behavior at least once. The alarming number of adolescents engaging in NSSI poses a challenge to all…

  1. Using Dynamic Response Index (DRI) as a spinal injury predictor

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Ahmed, Rayeesa

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Injury Criterion (SIC). These, together with the DRI, were used to evaluate seat protection levels during a comparative seat testing study. The results of the study show that the SIC appears to produce more consistent results, in line with what...

  2. Primary and secondary genetic responses after folic acid-induced acute renal injury in the mouse.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calvet, J P; Chadwick, L J

    1994-12-01

    Folic acid-induced acute renal injury results in dramatic changes in gene expression. Among the genes affected by folic acid treatment are the primary response genes, c-fos and c-myc, which are thought to function to initiate cell cycle events. In this report, changes in the expression of three other genes in response to folic acid injury have been investigated: ornithine decarboxylase, epidermal growth factor (EGF), and sulfated glycoprotein-2 (SGP-2). Renal injury was found to cause a rapid decrease in EGF mRNA, which remained absent for several days after the initial injury, gradually returning to normal levels over an approximately 3-wk regeneration and recovery period. Ornithine decarboxylase mRNA showed a similar decrease. In contrast, folic acid caused a rapid increase in SGP-2 mRNA, which peaked several days after treatment, decreasing to normal levels over the 3-wk period. The mRNAs for the primary response genes were superinduced in the injured kidneys in the presence of the protein synthesis inhibitor cycloheximide. In contrast, the changes in EGF and SGP-2 mRNA levels were blocked by cycloheximide, indicating that these responses required new protein synthesis during the first few hours after folic acid injury. The opposite but parallel responses in the expression of the EGF and SGP-2 genes suggest that their regulation is coupled to the initial injury-induced dedifferentiation and subsequent return to the fully differentiated state.

  3. Trans-syndesmotic fibular plating for fractures of the distal tibia and fibula with medial soft tissue injury: report of 6 cases and description of surgical technique.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sciadini, Marcus F; Manson, Theodore T; Shah, Swapnil B

    2013-03-01

    This report presents a retrospective review of several cases of distal fractures of the tibia and fibula with significant injury to the medial soft tissues treated either primarily or in staged fashion with fixed-angle trans-syndesmotic fixation. This fixation strategy was used in an effort to minimize further surgical trauma and implant load in the zone of soft tissue injury. Ten patients were identified between September 2002 and November 2010 who presented to a level I trauma center with fractures of the distal tibia and fibula associated with open medial wounds (9 patients) or extensive closed medial degloving injury (1 patient). They were all treated with trans-syndesmotic plating of the distal fibula. Two patients were lost to follow-up after initial treatment, and an additional 2 patients had follow-up durations of only 6.5 and 3 months, respectively. This left 6 patients with an average of 23.3 months of follow-up (range: 14-36 months). Radiographs and medical records were reviewed, and clinical and radiographic results were evaluated. All 6 patients had radiographic evidence of bony healing and had resumed weight bearing. Two patients required additional bone graft surgery to encourage healing, 1 of whom also required free-flap coverage as a component of the nonunion repair. One patient resumed weight bearing earlier than instructed and experienced mild but acceptable loss of reduction. No patients developed wound infections of either the medial traumatic or lateral surgical wounds, although, as noted above, 1 of the patients with a nonunion required medial free-flap coverage as a component of the nonunion repair because of incompetent medial soft tissues. Trans-syndesmotic fixation has previously been described as providing enhanced fixation of diabetic and osteoporotic ankle fractures but has not, to our knowledge, been described for the treatment of higher energy traumatic injuries. Specifically, the valgus distal tibial fracture, frequently associated

  4. Plate osteosynthesis of the humerus shaft fracture an its association with radial nerve injury--a retrospective study in Melaka General Hospital.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lim, K E; Yap, C K; Ong, S C; Aminuddin

    2001-06-01

    Over a seven-year period, 170 cases of humerus fractures were plated in Hospital Melaka. Of these, 131 cases were successfully traced for this study. Besides looking at fracture epidemiology, its relationship with radial nerve injury was examined. The incidence of post-traumatic wrist drop in closed and compound fractures were 14.9% and 35.3% respectively. In relation to the site of fracture, lower third fracture had the highest incidence of wrist drop (29%). The recovery from post-traumatic wrist drop was 83%. The average duration taken for recovery was 11.8 weeks. The incidence of post-operative wrist drop was high at 17.6% but all recovered during follow-up.

  5. [Experience with Poly Ether Ether Ketone (PEEK) cages and locking plate for anterior cervical fusion in the treatment of spine trauma without cord injury].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delépine, F; Jund, S; Schlatterer, B; de Peretti, F

    2007-12-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine whether spinal fusion using radiotransparent cages can be an appropriate treatment for traumatic injury of the cervical spine. This series included 30 patients aged 17-84 years (average 46 years) treated between October 1999 and June 2003 for traumatic injury of the cervical spine without neurological deficit or cord injury. There were two bifocal cases so that the study concerned 32 fusions. Injuries were: tear drop (n=1), serious flexion sprain (n=8), biarticular dislocation (n=4), serous hyperextension sprain (n=4), dislocation-fracture (n=1), uniarticular fracture (n=7), fracture-separation of the facet joints (n=4), post-traumatic herniation (n=3). For each injury, we measured pre and postoperatively and at last follow-up: the intersomatic angle, anterior displacement, and height of the intersomatic space at the center of the intervertebral disc. All x-rays were read twice, by two independent investigators. In the event of disagreement, the x-rays were read again by a senior surgeon and the main author of this article. Anterior fusion was achieved using a Poly Ether Ether Ketone (PEEK) (32%) and knitted carbon (68%) cage (cologne, Ostapek, Nexis) filled with cancellous bone harvested percutaneously from the iliac crest. The cage was associated with an anterior titanium plate fixation (Senegas, Euros and Orion, Medtronic). A posterior approach was associated if further stability was required (n=4 fusions). All patients were reviewed at minimum five months follow-up. Intersomatic fusion was verified on the standard x-rays (plus stress images and computed tomography at three months). Fusion was considered to be achieved if continuous bone lines crossed the graft and angle measurements remained stable, with the cage in the same position on successive examinations. One patient died from lung cancer five months after spinal fusion. All other patients survived with a mean follow-up of 24 months. Fusion was achieved in all

  6. ANALYSIS OF NONLINEAR DYNAMIC RESPONSE FOR VISCOELASTIC COMPOSITE PLATE WITH TRANSVERSE MATRIX CRACKS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    FuYiming; LiPing'en; ZhengYufang

    2004-01-01

    Based on the Schapery three-dimensional viscoelastic constitutive relationship with growing damage, a damage model with transverse matrix cracks for the unidirectional fibre reinforced viscoelastic composite plates is developed. By using Karman theory, the nonlinear dynamic governing equations of the viscoelastic composite plates under transverse periodic loading are established. By applying the finite difference method in spatial domain and the Newton-Newmark method in time domain, and using the iterative procedure, the integral-partial differential governing equations are solved. Some examples are given and the results are compared with available data.

  7. Dose - response relationship between noise exposure and the risk of occupational injury

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jin-Ha Yoon

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Many workers worldwide experience fatality and disability caused by occupational injuries. This study examined the relationship between noise exposure and occupational injuries at factories in Korea. A total of 1790 factories located in northern Gyeonggi Province, Korea was evaluated. The time-weighted average levels of dust and noise exposure were taken from Workplace Exposure Assessment data. Apart occupational injuries, sports events, traffic accidents, and other accidents occurring outside workplaces were excluded. The incidences of occupational injury in each factory were calculated by data from the Korea Workers′ Compensation and Welfare Services. Workplaces were classified according to the incidence of any occupational injuries (incident or nonincident workplaces, respectively. Workplace dust exposure was classified as 90 dB. Workplaces with high noise exposure were significantly associated with being incident workplaces, whereas workplaces with high dust exposure were not. The odds ratios (95% confidence intervals derived from a logistic regression model were 1.68 (1.27-2.24 and 3.42 (2.26-5.17 at 80-89 dB and ≥90 dB versus <80 dB. These associations remained significant when in a separate analysis according to high or low dust exposure level. Noise exposure increases the risk of occupational injury in the workplace. Furthermore, the risk of occupational injury increases with noise exposure level in a dose-response relationship. Therefore, strategies for reducing noise exposure level are required to decrease the risk of occupational injury.

  8. Dose - response relationship between noise exposure and the risk of occupational injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoon, Jin-Ha; Hong, Jeong-Suk; Roh, Jaehoon; Kim, Chi-Nyon; Won, Jong-Uk

    2015-01-01

    Many workers worldwide experience fatality and disability caused by occupational injuries. This study examined the relationship between noise exposure and occupational injuries at factories in Korea. A total of 1790 factories located in northern Gyeonggi Province, Korea was evaluated. The time-weighted average levels of dust and noise exposure were taken from Workplace Exposure Assessment data. Apart occupational injuries, sports events, traffic accidents, and other accidents occurring outside workplaces were excluded. The incidences of occupational injury in each factory were calculated by data from the Korea Workers' Compensation and Welfare Services. Workplaces were classified according to the incidence of any occupational injuries (incident or nonincident workplaces, respectively). Workplace dust exposure was classified as noise exposure as 90 dB. Workplaces with high noise exposure were significantly associated with being incident workplaces, whereas workplaces with high dust exposure were not. The odds ratios (95% confidence intervals) derived from a logistic regression model were 1.68 (1.27-2.24) and 3.42 (2.26-5.17) at 80-89 dB and ≥ 90 dB versus Noise exposure increases the risk of occupational injury in the workplace. Furthermore, the risk of occupational injury increases with noise exposure level in a dose-response relationship. Therefore, strategies for reducing noise exposure level are required to decrease the risk of occupational injury.

  9. Plant injury by air pollutants: influence of humidity on stomatal apertures and plant response to ozone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Otto, H W; Daines, R H

    1969-03-14

    Ozone injury to Bel W3 tobacco and pinto bean plants increases with increasing humidity. The degree of plant injury sustained correlates well with porometer measurements; this indicates that the size of stomatal apertures increases with increasing humidity. Humidity may therefore influence plant response to all pollutants and may account in part for the greater sensitivity of plants to ozone-type injury in the eastern United States compared with the same species of plants grown in the Southwest. with those grown in the Southwest.

  10. Stabilization of the CORA based leveling osteotomy for treatment of cranial cruciate ligament injury using a bone plate augmented with a headless compression screw.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raske, Matthew; Hulse, Don; Beale, Brian; Saunders, W Brian; Kishi, Erin; Kunze, Christopher

    2013-08-01

    To report the effectiveness of a bone plate/headless compression screw (HCS) construct in preventing tibial plateau angle (TPA) shift postoperatively and to describe radiographic healing of the osteotomy. Case series. Dogs (n = 31). Records of dogs diagnosed with cranial cruciate ligament (CCL) injury treated with the center of rotation of angulation (CORA) based leveling osteotomy (CBLO) stabilized with a bone plate augmented with a HCS were reviewed. Breed, age, weight, and gender were recorded. Radiographs were reviewed for determination of preoperative tibial plateau angle (PreTPA), postoperative TPA (PostTPA), patellar tendon angle (PTA) postoperatively, and TPA at final evaluation (FinalTPA). Difference between PostTPA and FinalTPA was used to define any TPA shift. Radiographic healing at final evaluation was graded based on a 5-point scale. Mean time to final recheck was 88 days (range 49-237 days) with mean ± SD PreTPA = 28.6 ± 4.8°; PostTPA = 9.2 ± 2.2°; FinalTPA = 9.7 ± 2.6°; and TPA Shift = 0.52 ± 1.61°. There was no significant difference between PostTPA and FinalTPA (P = .084, power > 0.80). Mean postoperative PTA was 89.9 ± 1.7°. There were 2 implant related complications; 1 HCS migration and 1 HCS failure. Stabilization of the CBLO using a bone plate augmented with a HCS was effective in maintaining PostTPA and achieving satisfactory radiographic healing. © Copyright 2013 by The American College of Veterinary Surgeons.

  11. Acute stress response and recovery after whiplash injuries. A one-year prospective study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kongsted, Alice; Bendix, Tom; Qerama, Erisela

    2007-01-01

    Chronic whiplash-associated disorder (WAD) represents a major medical and psycho-social problem. The typical symptomatology presented in WAD is to some extent similar to symptoms of post traumatic stress disorder. In this study we examined if the acute stress reaction following a whiplash injury ...... be important to consider in the early management of whiplash injury. However, the emotional response did not predict chronicity in individuals....

  12. The Response of an Elastic Splitter Plate Attached to a Cylinder to Laminar Pulsatile Flow

    CERN Document Server

    Kundu, Anup; Bhardwaj, Rajneesh; Thompson, Mark C

    2016-01-01

    The flow-induced deformation of a thin, elastic splitter plate attached to the rear of a circular cylinder and subjected to laminar pulsatile inflow is investigated. The cylinder and elastic splitter plate are contained within a narrow channel and the Reynolds number is mostly restricted to Re = 100, primarily covering the two-dimensional flow regime. An in-house fluid-structure interaction code is employed for simulations, which couples a sharp-interface immersed boundary method for the fluid dynamics with a finite-element method to treat the structural dynamics. The structural solver is implicitly (two-way) coupled with the flow solver using a partitioned approach. This implicit coupling ensures numerical stability at low structure-fluid density ratios. A power spectrum analysis of the time-varying plate displacement shows that the plate oscillates at more than a single frequency for pulsatile inflow, compared to a single frequency observed for steady inflow. The multiple frequencies obtained for the former...

  13. Temporal Response of Endogenous Neural Progenitor Cells Following Injury to the Adult Rat Spinal Cord.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mao, Yilin; Mathews, Kathryn; Gorrie, Catherine A

    2016-01-01

    A pool of endogenous neural progenitor cells (NPCs) found in the ependymal layer and the sub-ependymal area of the spinal cord are reported to upregulate Nestin in response to traumatic spinal cord injury (SCI). These cells could potentially be manipulated within a critical time period offering an innovative approach to the repair of SCI. However, little is known about the temporal response of endogenous NPCs following SCI. This study used a mild contusion injury in rat spinal cord and immunohistochemistry to determine the temporal response of ependymal NPCs following injury and their correlation to astrocyte activation at the lesion edge. The results from the study demonstrated that Nestin staining intensity at the central canal peaked at 24 h post-injury and then gradually declined over time. Reactive astrocytes double labeled by Nestin and glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP) were found at the lesion edge and commenced to form the glial scar from 1 week after injury. We conclude that the critical time period for manipulating endogenous NPCs following a spinal cod injury in rats is between 24 h when Nestin expression in ependymal cells is increased and 1 week when astrocytes are activated in large numbers.

  14. Cardiovascular response during urodynamics in individuals with spinal cord injury

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Liu, N; Zhou, M-W; Biering-Sørensen, F

    2017-01-01

    STUDY DESIGN: Retrospective chart review. OBJECTIVES: To establish the frequency and severity of autonomic dysreflexia (AD) during urodynamics among individuals with chronic spinal cord injury (SCI) and to investigate the possible effect of the number of years since SCI on the severity of AD....... SETTING: SCI outpatient clinic. METHODS: A retrospective chart review was undertaken of individuals with SCI who were seen at an outpatient clinic and could potentially develop an episode of AD (T6 and above). Data regarding age, gender, urodynamic examination, lower urinary tract function, cardiovascular...

  15. Toll-like receptor 4 dependent responses to lung injury in a murine model of pulmonary contusion

    OpenAIRE

    2009-01-01

    Blunt chest trauma resulting in pulmonary contusion with an accompanying acute inflammatory response is a common but poorly understood injury. We previously demonstrated that toll-like receptor 2 participates in the inflammatory response to lung injury. We hypothesized that the toll-like receptor 4, in a MyD88-dependent manner, may also participate in the response to lung injury. To investigate this, we used a model of pulmonary contusion in the mouse that is similar to that observed clinical...

  16. Esophageal cancer related gene-4 is a choroid plexus-derived injury response gene: evidence for a biphasic response in early and late brain injury.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sonia Podvin

    Full Text Available By virtue of its ability to regulate the composition of cerebrospinal fluid (CSF, the choroid plexus (CP is ideally suited to instigate a rapid response to traumatic brain injury (TBI by producing growth regulatory proteins. For example, Esophageal Cancer Related Gene-4 (Ecrg4 is a tumor suppressor gene that encodes a hormone-like peptide called augurin that is present in large concentrations in CP epithelia (CPe. Because augurin is thought to regulate senescence, neuroprogenitor cell growth and differentiation in the CNS, we evaluated the kinetics of Ecrg4 expression and augurin immunoreactivity in CPe after CNS injury. Adult rats were injured with a penetrating cortical lesion and alterations in augurin immunoreactivity were examined by immunohistochemistry. Ecrg4 gene expression was characterized by in situ hybridization. Cell surface augurin was identified histologically by confocal microscopy and biochemically by sub-cellular fractionation. Both Ecrg4 gene expression and augurin protein levels were decreased 24-72 hrs post-injury but restored to uninjured levels by day 7 post-injury. Protein staining in the supraoptic nucleus of the hypothalamus, used as a control brain region, did not show a decrease of auguin immunoreactivity. Ecrg4 gene expression localized to CPe cells, and augurin protein to the CPe ventricular face. Extracellular cell surface tethering of 14 kDa augurin was confirmed by cell surface fractionation of primary human CPe cells in vitro while a 6-8 kDa fragment of augurin was detected in conditioned media, indicating release from the cell surface by proteolytic processing. In rat CSF however, 14 kDa augurin was detected. We hypothesize the initial release and proteolytic processing of augurin participates in the activation phase of injury while sustained Ecrg4 down-regulation is dysinhibitory during the proliferative phase. Accordingly, augurin would play a constitutive inhibitory function in normal CNS while down

  17. Multiple damage identification and imaging in an aluminum plate using effective Lamb wave response automatic extraction technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ouyang, Qinghua; Zhou, Li; Liu, Xiaotong

    2016-04-01

    In order to identify multiple damage in the structure, a method of multiple damage identification and imaging based on the effective Lamb wave response automatic extraction algorithm is proposed. In this method, the detected key area in the structure is divided into a number of subregions, and then, the effective response signals including the structural damage information are automatically extracted from the entire Lamb wave responses which are received by the piezoelectric sensors. Further, the damage index values of every subregion based on the correlation coefficient are calculated using the effective response signals. Finally, the damage identification and imaging are performed using the reconstruction algorithm for probabilistic inspection of damage (RAPID) technique. The experimental research was conducted using an aluminum plate. The experimental results show that the method proposed in this research can quickly and effectively identify the single damage or multiple damage and image the damages clearly in detected area.

  18. Experimental Structural Dynamic Response of Plate Specimens Due to Sonic Loads in a Progressive Wave Tube

    Science.gov (United States)

    Betts, Juan F.

    2001-01-01

    The objective of the current study was to assess the repeatability of experiments at NASA Langley's Thermal Acoustic Fatigue Apparatus (TAFA) facility and to use these experiments to validate numerical models. Experiments show that power spectral density (PSD) curves were repeatable except at the resonant frequencies, which tended to vary between 5 Hz to 15 Hz. Results show that the thinner specimen had more variability in the resonant frequency location than the thicker sample, especially for modes higher than the first mode in the frequency range. Root Mean Square (RMS) tended to be more repeatable. The RMS behaved linearly through the SPL range of 135 to 153 dB. Standard Deviations (STDs) of the results tended to be relatively low constant up to about 147 dB. The RMS results were more repeatable than the PDS results. The STD results were less than 10% of the RMS results for both the 0.125 in (0.318 cm) and 0.062 in (0.1588 cm) thick plate. The STD of the PSD results were around 20% to 100% of the mean PSD results for non-resonant and resonant frequencies, respectively, for the 0.125 in (0.318 cm) thicker plate and between 25% to 125% of the mean PSD results, for nonresonant and resonant frequencies, respectively, for the thinner plate.

  19. Comparing the Use of Dynamic Response Index (DRI) and Lumbar Load as Relevant Spinal Injury Metrics

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-01-09

    whereas injury criteria are established with physical parameters which describe the biomechanical response of the human body or its surrogate [14]. Neck ...Response Index (DRI) – Mechanical Model • Simple lumped mass parameter model (single spring-mass-damper) to simulate the biomechanical response...the paper. • Perhaps Tremblay meant to refer to Alem [6], who also refers to a factor 3.4 that was used on Mertz’s neck data in estimating 6675 N

  20. Arthroscopic knee surgery does not modify hyperalgesic responses to heat injury

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Werner, Mads U; Duun, Preben; Kraemer, Otto

    2003-01-01

    thresholds were higher during the second burn injury in patients (P 0.8), secondary hyperalgesia areas (P > 0.1), mechanical and thermal pain perception (P > 0.1), or mechanical and thermal pain......BACKGROUND: Experimental studies suggest that surgical injury may up- or down-regulate nociceptive function. Therefore, the aim of this clinical study was to evaluate the effect of elective arthroscopically assisted knee surgery on nociceptive responses to a heat injury. METHODS: Seventeen patients...... scheduled to undergo repair of the anterior cruciate ligament and 16 healthy controls were studied. The first burn injury was induced 6 days before surgery, and the second burn was induced 1 day after surgery with a contact thermode (12.5 cm2, 47 degrees C for 7 min) placed on the medial aspect of the calf...

  1. Tolerance and compensatory response of rice to sugarcane borer (Lepidoptera: Crambidae) injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lv, J; Wilson, L T; Longnecker, M T

    2008-06-01

    A 3-yr field experiment was conducted to evaluate the tolerance and compensatory response of rice (Oryza sativa L.) to injury caused by sugarcane borer, Diatraea saccharalis (F.), as affected by cultivar (Cocodrie, Francis, and Jefferson), stage of crop growth during which the injury occurred (third tiller stage, panicle differentiation stage, and heading stage), and sugarcane borer density. The proportion of rice tillers with sugarcane borer injury (leaf and leaf sheath injury and/or stem injury) was lower when injury occurred at the third tiller stage (0.05) than at panicle differentiation (0.19) and heading (0.18). When injury occurred at the two latter stages, both the proportion of tillers with injury and the proportion of tillers with stem injury were negatively correlated with rainfall. Rainfall resulted in dislodgement and mortality of sugarcane borer eggs and larvae before the larvae entered the stems. Rice plant density in this study (111.1 plants/m2) was higher than recorded for previous research on rice compensation using potted rice or conducted in low-density hill production systems (26.7-51.3 plants/m2). Two mechanisms of within-plant tolerance/compensation were observed. Stem injured plants produced approximately 0.69 more tillers than uninjured plants, whereas tillers with leaf and leaf sheath injury produced larger panicles, up to 39.5 and 21.0% heavier than uninjured tillers, when injury occurred at third tiller stage and at panicle differentiation, respectively. Rice yield was not reduced with up to 23% injured tiller and up to 10% injured stems at the third tiller stage, 42% injured tillers and 17% injured stems at panicle differentiation, and 28% injured tillers and 14% injured stems at heading. Significant between-plant compensation was not detected, suggesting competition between adjacent plants is not significantly reduced by injury. Our results suggest that rice can tolerate and/or compensate for a level of stem borer injury previously

  2. Appropriate Coupling Solvers for the Numerical Simulation of Rolled Homogeneous Armor Plate Response Subjected to Blast Loading

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahmad Mujahid Ahmad Zaidi

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Rolled homogeneous armor (RHA plate subjected to blast loading is a complex problem involving the nonlinear fluid-structure interaction. The numerical techniques using the spatial discretization scheme that has been provided as a solver in the AUTODYN computer code will be used in this study in order to predict the RHA response subjected to explosive (TNT blast loading. The final deflection will be used as a reference in order to identify the suitable solver for both materials RHA and TNT; then the plastic deformation will be chosen in the simulation process. Instead of using the same solver for RHA and TNT domains, the optimization of solver can be achieved if it is only used in an appropriate domain, or in other words, a different domain will be using different solver. The solvers, which were available in AUTODYN, were used in the analysis of impact and explosion or fluid-structure interaction. Therefore, in this paper, we will determine the suitable solver for both materials (TNT and RHA plate, and the appropriate interaction coupling solver will be obtained. Defining TNT and RHA plates using the Arbitrary Lagrangian Eulerian solver has found the best coupling solver for this case study when compared with existing experimental data. This coupling solver will be used for future analysis in simulating blast-loading phenomena.

  3. The Local CNP/GC-B system in growth plate is responsible for physiological endochondral bone growth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakao, Kazumasa; Osawa, Kenji; Yasoda, Akihiro; Yamanaka, Shigeki; Fujii, Toshihito; Kondo, Eri; Koyama, Noriaki; Kanamoto, Naotetsu; Miura, Masako; Kuwahara, Koichiro; Akiyama, Haruhiko; Bessho, Kazuhisa; Nakao, Kazuwa

    2015-05-27

    Recent studies revealed C-type natriuretic peptide (CNP) and its receptor, guanylyl cyclase-B (GC-B) are potent stimulators of endochondral bone growth. As they exist ubiquitously in body, we investigated the physiological role of the local CNP/GC-B in the growth plate on bone growth using cartilage-specific knockout mice. Bones were severely shorter in cartilage-specific CNP or GC-B knockout mice and the extent was almost the same as that in respective systemic knockout mice. Cartilage-specific GC-B knockout mice were shorter than cartilage-specific CNP knockout mice. Hypertrophic chondrocyte layer of the growth plate was drastically reduced and proliferative chondrocyte layer, along with the proliferation of chondrocytes there, was moderately reduced in either cartilage-specific knockout mice. The survival rate of cartilage-specific CNP knockout mice was comparable to that of systemic CNP knockout mice. The local CNP/GC-B system in growth plate is responsible for physiological endochondral bone growth and might further affect mortality via unknown mechanisms.

  4. Nonlinear dynamic response and active control of fiber metal laminated plates with piezoelectric actuators and sensors in unsteady temperature field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shao, Xuefei; Fu, Yiming; Chen, Yang

    2015-05-01

    Based on the higher order shear deformation theory and the geometric nonlinear theory, the nonlinear motion equations, to which the effects of the positive and negative piezoelectric and the thermal are introduced by piezoelectric fiber metal laminated (FML) plates in an unsteady temperature, are established by Hamilton’s variational principle. Then, the control algorithm of negative-velocity feedback is applied to realize the vibration control of the piezoelectric FML plates. During the solving process, firstly, the formal functions of the displacements that fulfilled the boundary conditions are proposed. Then, heat conduction equations and nonlinear differential equations are dealt with using the differential quadrature (DQ) and Galerkin methods, respectively. On the basis of the previous processing, the time domain is dispersed by the Newmark-β method. Finally, the whole problem can be investigated by the iterative method. In the numerical examples, the influence of the applied voltage, the temperature loading and geometric parameters on the nonlinear dynamic response of the piezoelectric FML plates is analyzed. Meanwhile, the effect of feedback control gain and the position of the piezoelectric layer, the initial deflection and the external temperature on the active control effect of the piezoelectric layers has been studied. The model development and the research results can serve as a basis for nonlinear vibration analysis of the FML structures.

  5. FINITE ELEMENT SIMULATION FOR STRUCTURAL RESPONSE OF U7MO DISPERSION FUEL PLATES VIA FLUID-THERMAL-STRUCTURAL INTERACTION

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hakan Ozaltun; Herman Shen; Pavel Madvedev

    2010-11-01

    This article presents numerical simulation of dispersion fuel mini plates via fluid–thermal–structural interaction performed by commercial finite element solver COMSOL Multiphysics to identify initial mechanical response under actual operating conditions. Since fuel particles are dispersed in Aluminum matrix, and temperatures during the fabrication process reach to the melting temperature of the Aluminum matrix, stress/strain characteristics of the domain cannot be reproduced by using simplified models and assumptions. Therefore, fabrication induced stresses were considered and simulated via image based modeling techniques with the consideration of the high temperature material data. In order to identify the residuals over the U7Mo particles and the Aluminum matrix, a representative SEM image was employed to construct a microstructure based thermo-elasto-plastic FE model. Once residuals and plastic strains were identified in micro-scale, solution was used as initial condition for subsequent multiphysics simulations at the continuum level. Furthermore, since solid, thermal and fluid properties are temperature dependent and temperature field is a function of the velocity field of the coolant, coupled multiphysics simulations were considered. First, velocity and pressure fields of the coolant were computed via fluidstructural interaction. Computed solution for velocity fields were used to identify the temperature distribution on the coolant and on the fuel plate via fluid-thermal interaction. Finally, temperature fields and residual stresses were used to obtain the stress field of the plates via fluid-thermal-structural interaction.

  6. HIF-1 mediates pathogenic inflammatory responses to intestinal ischemia-reperfusion injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feinman, Rena; Deitch, Edwin A; Watkins, Anthony C; Abungu, Billy; Colorado, Iriana; Kannan, Kolenkode B; Sheth, Sharvil U; Caputo, Francis J; Lu, Qi; Ramanathan, Madhuri; Attan, Shirhan; Badami, Chirag D; Doucet, Danielle; Barlos, Dimitrios; Bosch-Marce, Marta; Semenza, Gregg L; Xu, Da-Zhong

    2010-10-01

    Acute lung injury (ALI) and the development of the multiple organ dysfunction syndrome (MODS) are major causes of death in trauma patients. Gut inflammation and loss of gut barrier function as a consequence of splanchnic ischemia-reperfusion (I/R) have been implicated as the initial triggering events that contribute to the development of the systemic inflammatory response, ALI, and MODS. Since hypoxia-inducible factor (HIF-1) is a key regulator of the physiological and pathophysiological response to hypoxia, we asked whether HIF-1 plays a proximal role in the induction of gut injury and subsequent lung injury. Utilizing partially HIF-1α-deficient mice in a global trauma hemorrhagic shock (T/HS) model, we found that HIF-1 activation was necessary for the development of gut injury and that the prevention of gut injury was associated with an abrogation of lung injury. Specifically, in vivo studies demonstrated that partial HIF-1α deficiency ameliorated T/HS-induced increases in intestinal permeability, bacterial translocation, and caspase-3 activation. Lastly, partial HIF-1α deficiency reduced TNF-α, IL-1β, cyclooxygenase-2, and inducible nitric oxide synthase levels in the ileal mucosa after T/HS whereas IL-1β mRNA levels were reduced in the lung after T/HS. This study indicates that prolonged intestinal HIF-1 activation is a proximal regulator of I/R-induced gut mucosal injury and gut-induced lung injury. Consequently, these results provide unique information on the initiating events in trauma-hemorrhagic shock-induced ALI and MODS as well as potential therapeutic insights.

  7. Response of the contralateral hippocampus to lateral fluid percussion brain injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tran, Lorriann D; Lifshitz, Jonathan; Witgen, Brent M; Schwarzbach, Elizabeth; Cohen, Akiva S; Grady, M Sean

    2006-09-01

    Traumatic brain injury is a leading cause of death and disability in the United States. Pathological examinations of humans and animal models after brain injury demonstrate hippocampal neuronal damage, which may contribute to cognitive impairments. Data from our laboratories have shown that, at 1 week after brain injury, mice possess significantly fewer neurons in all ipsilateral hippocampal subregions and a cognitive impairment. Since cognitive function is distributed across both cerebral hemispheres, the present paper explores the morphological and physiological response of the contralateral hippocampus to lateral brain injury. We analyzed the contralateral hippocampus using design-based stereology, Fluoro-Jade (FJ) histochemistry, and extracellular field recordings in mice at 7 and 30 days after lateral fluid percussion injury (FPI). At 7 days, all contralateral hippocampal subregions possess significantly fewer healthy neurons compared to sham-injured animals and demonstrate FJ-positive neuronal damage, but not at 30 days. Both the ipsilateral and contralateral dentate gyri demonstrate significantly increased excitability at 7 days post-injury, but only ipsilateral dentate gyrus hyperexcitability persists at 30 days compared to sham. In the contralateral hippocampus, the transient decrease in the number of healthy neurons, concomitant with FJ damage, and electrophysiological alterations establish a stunned period of cellular and circuit dysfunction. The return of healthy neuron number, absence of FJ damage, and sham level of excitability in the contralateral hippocampus suggest recovery of structure and function by 30 days after injury. The cognitive recovery observed after human traumatic brain injury may stem from a differential injury exposure and time course of recovery between homologous regions of the two hemispheres.

  8. Gene expression profiling of the response to thermal injury in human cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dinh, H K; Zhao, B; Schuschereba, S T; Merrill, G; Bowman, P D

    2001-10-10

    The genetic response of human cells to sublethal thermal injury was assessed by gene expression profiling, using macroarrays containing 588 complementary known genes. At 1, 4, 8, and 24 h following thermal injury, RNA was isolated, and a cDNA copy was generated incorporating (33)P and hybridized to Atlas arrays. About one-fifth of the genes on the membrane exhibited a significant elevation or depression in expression (>/=2-fold) by 4 h posttreatment. Genes for heat shock proteins (HSPs) were upregulated as well as genes for transcription factors, growth regulation, and DNA repair. Cluster analysis was performed to assess temporal relationships between expression of genes. Translation of mRNA for some expressed genes, including HSP70 and HSP40, was corroborated by Western blotting. Gene expression profiling can be used to determine information about gene responses to thermal injury by retinal pigment epithelium cells following sublethal injury. The induction of gene expression following thermal injury involves a number of genes not previously identified as related to the stress response.

  9. An experimental and numerical study on nonlinear impact responses of steel-plated structures in an Arctic environment

    OpenAIRE

    Kim, K. J.; Lee, J. H.; Park, D. K.; Jung, B. G.; Han, X.(Physikalisches Institut, Ruprecht-Karls-Universität Heidelberg, Heidelberg, Germany); Paik, J. K.

    2016-01-01

    Ships and offshore platforms that operate in Arctic regions at low temperatures are likely subjected to impact loads that arise from collisions with icebergs. The aim of this paper was to examine the nonlinear impact response of steel-plated structures in an Arctic environment. In addition to material tensile tests for characterisation of the mechanical properties of polar-class high-tensile steel of grade DH36, an experimental study was undertaken in a dropped-object test facility on steel-p...

  10. Frontal White Matter Damage Impairs Response Inhibition in Children Following Traumatic Brain Injury

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lipszyc, Jonathan; Levin, Harvey; Hanten, Gerri; Hunter, Jill; Dennis, Maureen; Schachar, Russell

    2014-01-01

    Inhibition, the ability to suppress inappropriate cognitions or behaviors, can be measured using computer tasks and questionnaires. Inhibition depends on the frontal cortex, but the role of the underlying white matter (WM) is unclear. We assessed the specific impact of frontal WM damage on inhibition in 29 children with moderate-to-severe traumatic brain injury (15 with and 14 without frontal WM damage), 21 children with orthopedic injury, and 29 population controls. We used the Stop Signal Task to measure response inhibition, the Behavior Rating Inventory of Executive Function to assess everyday inhibition, and T2 fluid-attenuated inversion recovery magnetic resonance imaging to identify lesions. Children with frontal WM damage had impaired response inhibition compared with all other groups and poorer everyday inhibition than the orthopedic injury group. Frontal WM lesions most often affected the superior frontal gyrus. These results provide evidence for the critical role of frontal WM in inhibition. PMID:24618405

  11. MW151 Inhibited IL-1β Levels after Traumatic Brain Injury with No Effect on Microglia Physiological Responses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bachstetter, Adam D; Zhou, Zhengqiu; Rowe, Rachel K; Xing, Bin; Goulding, Danielle S; Conley, Alyssa N; Sompol, Pradoldej; Meier, Shelby; Abisambra, Jose F; Lifshitz, Jonathan; Watterson, D Martin; Van Eldik, Linda J

    2016-01-01

    A prevailing neuroinflammation hypothesis is that increased production of proinflammatory cytokines contributes to progressive neuropathology, secondary to the primary damage caused by a traumatic brain injury (TBI). In support of the hypothesis, post-injury interventions that inhibit the proinflammatory cytokine surge can attenuate the progressive pathology. However, other post-injury neuroinflammatory responses are key to endogenous recovery responses. Therefore, it is critical that pharmacological attenuation of detrimental or dysregulated neuroinflammatory processes avoid pan-suppression of inflammation. MW151 is a CNS-penetrant, small molecule experimental therapeutic that restores injury- or disease-induced overproduction of proinflammatory cytokines towards homeostasis without immunosuppression. Post-injury administration of MW151 in a closed head injury model of mild TBI suppressed acute cytokine up-regulation and downstream cognitive impairment. Here, we report results from a diffuse brain injury model in mice using midline fluid percussion. Low dose (0.5-5.0 mg/kg) administration of MW151 suppresses interleukin-1 beta (IL-1β) levels in the cortex while sparing reactive microglia and astrocyte responses. To probe molecular mechanisms, we used live cell imaging of the BV-2 microglia cell line to demonstrate that MW151 does not affect proliferation, migration, or phagocytosis of the cells. Our results provide insight into the roles of glial responses to brain injury and indicate the feasibility of using appropriate dosing for selective therapeutic modulation of injurious IL-1β increases while sparing other glial responses to injury.

  12. MW151 Inhibited IL-1β Levels after Traumatic Brain Injury with No Effect on Microglia Physiological Responses.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adam D Bachstetter

    Full Text Available A prevailing neuroinflammation hypothesis is that increased production of proinflammatory cytokines contributes to progressive neuropathology, secondary to the primary damage caused by a traumatic brain injury (TBI. In support of the hypothesis, post-injury interventions that inhibit the proinflammatory cytokine surge can attenuate the progressive pathology. However, other post-injury neuroinflammatory responses are key to endogenous recovery responses. Therefore, it is critical that pharmacological attenuation of detrimental or dysregulated neuroinflammatory processes avoid pan-suppression of inflammation. MW151 is a CNS-penetrant, small molecule experimental therapeutic that restores injury- or disease-induced overproduction of proinflammatory cytokines towards homeostasis without immunosuppression. Post-injury administration of MW151 in a closed head injury model of mild TBI suppressed acute cytokine up-regulation and downstream cognitive impairment. Here, we report results from a diffuse brain injury model in mice using midline fluid percussion. Low dose (0.5-5.0 mg/kg administration of MW151 suppresses interleukin-1 beta (IL-1β levels in the cortex while sparing reactive microglia and astrocyte responses. To probe molecular mechanisms, we used live cell imaging of the BV-2 microglia cell line to demonstrate that MW151 does not affect proliferation, migration, or phagocytosis of the cells. Our results provide insight into the roles of glial responses to brain injury and indicate the feasibility of using appropriate dosing for selective therapeutic modulation of injurious IL-1β increases while sparing other glial responses to injury.

  13. An injury-response mechanism conserved across kingdoms determines entry of the fungus Trichoderma atroviride into development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hernández-Oñate, Miguel A; Esquivel-Naranjo, Edgardo U; Mendoza-Mendoza, Artemio; Stewart, Alison; Herrera-Estrella, Alfredo H

    2012-09-11

    A conserved injury-defense mechanism is present in plants and animals, in which the production of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and lipid metabolism are essential to the response. Here, we describe that in the filamentous fungus Trichoderma atroviride, injury results in the formation of asexual reproduction structures restricted to regenerating cells. High-throughput RNA-seq analyses of the response to injury in T. atroviride suggested an oxidative response and activation of calcium-signaling pathways, as well as the participation of lipid metabolism, in this phenomenon. Gene-replacement experiments demonstrated that injury triggers NADPH oxidase (Nox)-dependent ROS production and that Nox1 and NoxR are essential for asexual development in response to damage. We further provide evidence of H(2)O(2) and oxylipin production that, as in plants and animals, may act as signal molecules in response to injury in fungi, suggesting that the three kingdoms share a conserved defense-response mechanism.

  14. Thermal response simulation for tuning PID controllers in a 1016 mm guarded hot plate apparatus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, William C; Zarr, Robert R

    2011-07-01

    A mathematical model has been developed and used to simulate the controlled thermal performance of a large guarded hot-plate apparatus. This highly specialized apparatus comprises three interdependent components whose temperatures are closely controlled in order to measure the thermal conductivity of insulation materials. The simulation model was used to investigate control strategies and derive controller gain parameters that are directly transferable to the actual instrument. The simulations take orders-of-magnitude less time to carry out when compared to traditional tuning methods based on operating the actual apparatus. The control system consists primarily of a PC-based PID control algorithm that regulates the output voltage of programmable power amplifiers. Feedback parameters in the form of controller gains are required for the three heating circuits. An objective is to determine an improved set of gains that meet temperature control criteria for testing insulation materials of interest. The analytical model is based on aggregated thermal capacity representations of the primary components and includes the same control algorithm as used in the actual hot-plate apparatus. The model, accounting for both thermal characteristics and temperature control, was validated by comparisons with test data. The tuning methodology used with the simulation model is described and results are presented. The resulting control algorithm and gain parameters have been used in the actual apparatus without modification during several years of testing materials over wide ranges of thermal conductivity, thickness, and insulation resistance values.

  15. Effect of functional electrostimulation on impaired skin vasodilator responses to local heating in spinal cord injury.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Duijnhoven, N.T.L. van; Janssen, T.W.; Green, D.J.; Minson, C.T.; Hopman, M.T.E.; Thijssen, D.H.J.

    2009-01-01

    Spinal cord injury (SCI) induces vascular adaptations below the level of the lesion, such as impaired cutaneous vasodilation. However, the mechanisms underlying these differences are unclear. The aim of this study is to examine arm and leg cutaneous vascular conductance (CVC) responses to local heat

  16. Self-Awareness of the Male Sexual Response after Spinal Cord Injury

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cardoso, Fernando Luiz; Savall, Ana Carolina R.; Mendes, Aline K.

    2009-01-01

    The aim of this study was to assess the impact of spinal cord injury on men's sexual motivation, through the sexual desire self-assessment, and the sexual arousal and orgasm physiological responses. This research consisted of a descriptive, nonprobabilistic and comparative study, designed to outline the target population characteristics to compare…

  17. Using Differential Reinforcement to Decrease Academic Response Latencies of an Adolescent with Acquired Brain Injury

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heinicke, Megan R.; Carr, James E.; Mozzoni, Michael P.

    2009-01-01

    The present study investigated the effects of contingency-specifying rules and a token economy to decrease the latency to comply with academic instructions by a 16-year-old girl with acquired brain injury. Results showed that treatment was successful in reducing academic response latencies. These results replicate previous research in which…

  18. Self-Awareness of the Male Sexual Response after Spinal Cord Injury

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cardoso, Fernando Luiz; Savall, Ana Carolina R.; Mendes, Aline K.

    2009-01-01

    The aim of this study was to assess the impact of spinal cord injury on men's sexual motivation, through the sexual desire self-assessment, and the sexual arousal and orgasm physiological responses. This research consisted of a descriptive, nonprobabilistic and comparative study, designed to outline the target population characteristics to compare…

  19. Post Mortem Human Surrogate Injury Response of the Pelvis and Lower Extremities to Simulated Underbody Blast.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bailey, Ann M; Christopher, John J; Brozoski, Frederick; Salzar, Robert S

    2015-08-01

    Military vehicle underbody blast (UBB) is the cause of many serious injuries in theatre today; however, the effects of these chaotic events on the human body are not well understood. The purpose of this research was to replicate both UBB loading conditions and investigate occupant response in a controlled laboratory setting. In addition to better understanding the response of the human to high rate vertical loading, this test series also aimed to identify high rate injury thresholds. Ten whole body post mortem human surrogate (PMHS) tests were completed using the University of Virginia's ODYSSEY simulated blast rig under a range of loading conditions. Seat pan accelerations ranged from 291 to 738 g's over 3 ms of positive phase duration, and foot pan accelerations from 234 to 858 g's over 3 ms of positive phase duration. Post-test computed tomography (CT) scans and necropsies were performed to determine injuries, and revealed a combination of pelvic, lumbar, thoracic, and lower extremity injuries. The research in this paper discusses pelvis and lower extremity injuries under high rate vertical loads.

  20. Modeling brain injury response for rotational velocities of varying directions and magnitudes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weaver, Ashley A; Danelson, Kerry A; Stitzel, Joel D

    2012-09-01

    An estimated 1.7 million people in the United States sustain a traumatic brain injury (TBI) annually. To investigate the effects of rotational motions on TBI risk and location, this study modeled rotational velocities of five magnitudes and 26 directions of rotation using the Simulated Injury Monitor finite element brain model. The volume fraction of the total brain exceeding a predetermined strain threshold, the Cumulative Strain Damage Measure (CSDM), was investigated to evaluate global model response. To evaluate regional response, this metric was computed relative to individual brain structures and termed the Structure Cumulative Strain Damage Measure (SCSDM). CSDM increased as input magnitude increased and varied with the direction of rotation. CSDM was 0.55-1.7 times larger in simulations with transverse plane rotation compared to those without transverse plane rotation. The largest SCSDM in the cerebrum and brainstem occurred with rotations in the transverse and sagittal planes, respectively. Velocities causing medial rotation of the cerebellum resulted in the largest SCSDM in this structure. For velocities of the same magnitude, injury risk calculated from CSDM varied from 0 to 97% with variations in the direction of rotation. These findings demonstrate injury risk, as estimated by CSDM and SCSDM, is affected by the direction of rotation and input magnitude, and these may be important considerations for injury prediction.

  1. Minor Functional Deficits in Basic Response Patterns for Reinforcement after Frontal Traumatic Brain Injury in Rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vonder Haar, Cole; Winstanley, Catharine A

    2016-10-15

    Traumatic brain injury (TBI) is a major contributor to numerous psychiatric conditions and chronic behavioral dysfunction. Recent studies in experimental brain injury have begun to adopt operant methodologies to assess these deficits, all of which rely on the process of reinforcement. No studies have directly examined how reinforced behaviors are affected by TBI, however. The current study assessed performance under the four most common schedules of reinforcement (fixed ratio, variable ratio, fixed interval, variable interval) and one higher order schedule assessing motivation (progressive ratio) after bilateral, pre-frontal controlled cortical impact injury. TBI-induced differences on the basic schedules were minor, with the exception of the variable ratio, where increased efficacy (more reinforcers, higher response rates, lower interresponse times) at higher requirements was observed as a result of brain injury. Performance on the progressive ratio schedule showed some gross differences between the groups, in that sham rats became more efficient under this schedule while injured rats perseverated in lever pressing. Further, injured rats were specifically impaired at lower response requirements on the progressive ratio. Taken together, these findings indicate that simple reinforced behaviors are mostly unaffected after TBI, except in the case of variable ratio schedules, but the altered performance on the higher-order progressive ratio schedule suggests changes involving motivation or potentially perseveration. These findings validate operant measures of more complex behaviors for brain injury, all of which rely on reinforcement and can be taken into consideration when adapting and developing novel functional assessments.

  2. The Acute Inflammatory Response in Trauma/Hemorrhage and Traumatic Brain Injury : Current State and Emerging Prospects

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Namas, R.; Ghuma, A.; Hermus, L.; Zamora, R.; Okonkwo, D. O.; Billiar, T. R.; Vodovotz, Y.

    2009-01-01

    Traumatic injury/hemorrhagic shock (T/HS) elicits an acute inflammatory response that may result in death. Inflammation describes a coordinated series of molecular, cellular, tissue, organ, and systemic responses that drive the pathology of various diseases including T/HS and traumatic brain injury

  3. Genome expression analysis of Anopheles gambiae: responses to injury, bacterial challenge, and malaria infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dimopoulos, George; Christophides, George K; Meister, Stephan; Schultz, Jörg; White, Kevin P; Barillas-Mury, Carolina; Kafatos, Fotis C

    2002-06-25

    The complex gene expression responses of Anopheles gambiae to microbial and malaria challenges, injury, and oxidative stress (in the mosquito and/or a cultured cell line) were surveyed by using cDNA microarrays constructed from an EST-clone collection. The expression profiles were broadly subdivided into induced and down-regulated gene clusters. Gram+ and Gram- bacteria and microbial elicitors up-regulated a diverse set of genes, many belonging to the immunity class, and the response to malaria partially overlapped with this response. Oxidative stress activated a distinctive set of genes, mainly implicated in oxidoreductive processes. Injury up- and down-regulated gene clusters also were distinctive, prominently implicating glycolysis-related genes and citric acid cycle/oxidative phosphorylation/redox-mitochondrial functions, respectively. Cross-comparison of in vivo and in vitro responses indicated the existence of tightly coregulated gene groups that may correspond to gene pathways.

  4. A Novel 96well-formatted Micro-gap Plate Enabling Drug Response Profiling on Primary Tumour Samples

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Wei-Yuan; Hsiung, Lo-Chang; Wang, Chen-Ho; Chiang, Chi-Ling; Lin, Ching-Hung; Huang, Chiun-Sheng; Wo, Andrew M.

    2015-04-01

    Drug-based treatments are the most widely used interventions for cancer management. Personalized drug response profiling remains inherently challenging with low cell count harvested from tumour sample. We present a 96well-formatted microfluidic plate with built-in micro-gap that preserves up to 99.2% of cells during multiple assay/wash operation and only 9,000 cells needed for a single reagent test (i.e. 1,000 cells per test spot x 3 selected concentration x triplication), enabling drug screening and compatibility with conventional automated workstations. Results with MCF7 and MDA-MB-231 cell lines showed that no statistical significance was found in dose-response between the device and conventional 96-well plate control. Primary tumour samples from breast cancer patients tested in the device also showed good IC50 prediction. With drug screening of primary cancer cells must consider a wide range of scenarios, e.g. suspended/attached cell types and rare/abundant cell availability, the device enables high throughput screening even for suspended cells with low cell count since the signature microfluidic cell-trapping feature ensures cell preservation in a multiple solution exchange protocol.

  5. Study of timing response and charge spectra of glass based Resistive Plate Chamber detectors for INO-ICAL experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaur, A.; Kumar, A.; Naimuddin, Md.

    2017-03-01

    Resistive Plate chambers (RPCs) are robust and affordable gaseous detectors that combine low cost with excellent timing, good spatial resolution and fast response to the incoming particles. The India Based Neutrino Observatory is an approved project aimed at building a magnetised Iron Calorimeter (ICAL) detector to study Neutrino physics and related issues. The ICAL experiment will utilize about 29000 RPC's as active detector elements, sandwiched between alternate plates of thick iron. The RPC detectors will be used to detect muons produced from the atmospheric neutrinos interaction with an iron target. The spatial information of the muons will be extracted from the two dimensional readout and the hit position in the respective layers. The up going and down going directionality will be obtained using the time stamp of hits in the active detectors. The charge induced by the particle and its behaviour with respect to the applied voltage play a significant role in designing the readout electronics for the detector. In this paper, we present the timing and charge measurement of single gap glass based RPC detectors. We will also report about studies on the dependence of the timing and charge response of these RPC detectors as a function of the gas composition.

  6. Phase-dependent modulation of percutaneously elicited multisegmental muscle responses after spinal cord injury

    OpenAIRE

    Dy, Christine J.; Gerasimenko, Yury P.; Edgerton, V Reggie; Dyhre-Poulsen, Poul; Courtine, Grégoire; Harkema, Susan J.

    2010-01-01

    Phase-dependent modulation of monosynaptic reflexes has been reported for several muscles of the lower limb of uninjured rats and humans. To assess whether this step-phase-dependent modulation can be mediated at the level of the human spinal cord, we compared the modulation of responses evoked simultaneously in multiple motor pools in clinically complete spinal cord injury (SCI) compared with noninjured (NI) individuals. We induced multisegmental responses of the soleus, medial gastrocnemius,...

  7. Galectin-3 released in response to traumatic brain injury acts as an alarmin orchestrating brain immune response and promoting neurodegeneration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yip, Ping Kei; Carrillo-Jimenez, Alejandro; King, Paul; Vilalta, Anna; Nomura, Koji; Chau, Chi Cheng; Egerton, Alexander Michael Scott; Liu, Zhuo-Hao; Shetty, Ashray Jayaram; Tremoleda, Jordi L.; Davies, Meirion; Deierborg, Tomas; Priestley, John V.; Brown, Guy Charles; Michael-Titus, Adina Teodora; Venero, Jose Luis; Burguillos, Miguel Angel

    2017-01-01

    Traumatic brain injury (TBI) is currently a major cause of morbidity and poor quality of life in Western society, with an estimate of 2.5 million people affected per year in Europe, indicating the need for advances in TBI treatment. Within the first 24 h after TBI, several inflammatory response factors become upregulated, including the lectin galectin-3. In this study, using a controlled cortical impact (CCI) model of head injury, we show a large increase in the expression of galectin-3 in microglia and also an increase in the released form of galectin-3 in the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) 24 h after head injury. We report that galectin-3 can bind to TLR-4, and that administration of a neutralizing antibody against galectin-3 decreases the expression of IL-1β, IL-6, TNFα and NOS2 and promotes neuroprotection in the cortical and hippocampal cell populations after head injury. Long-term analysis demonstrated a significant neuroprotection in the cortical region in the galectin-3 knockout animals in response to TBI. These results suggest that following head trauma, released galectin-3 may act as an alarmin, binding, among other proteins, to TLR-4 and promoting inflammation and neuronal loss. Taking all together, galectin-3 emerges as a clinically relevant target for TBI therapy. PMID:28128358

  8. Extracellular signal regulated kinases 1/2 signal pathway and responses of astrocytes after diffuse brain injury

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jinxing Li; Haimei Zhao; Yu Li; Chong Wang; Jiashan Zhao; Xianli Zhu

    2007-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The treatment of diffuse brain injury during an acute period is focused on relieving degrees of secondary brain injury. Generation and development of pathological changes of secondary brain injury depend on signal conduction, so down-regulating over response of astrocyte through interfering a key link of signal conduction pathway may bring a new thinking for the treatment of diffuse brain injury. OBJECTIVE: To observe the effect of over activity of extracellular signal regulated kinases 1/2 (ERK1/2) signal pathway on the response of astrocyte during an acute period of diffuse brain injury. DESIGN: Completely randomized grouping and controlled animal study.SETTINGS: Department of Neurosurgery, the Third Affiliated Hospital, Nanchang University; Department of Neurosurgery, Union Hospital Affiliated to Tongji Medical College, Huazhong University of Science and Technology.MATERIALS: A total of 158 healthy male SD rats, of 11 weeks old, weighing 320 - 370 g, were provided by Experimental Animal Faulty, Tongji Medical College, Huazhong University of Science and Technology. Rabbit-anti-phosphorylated ERK1/2 (pERKl/2) polyclonal antibody was provided by R&D Company; rabbit-anti-glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP) polyclonal antibody, SP immunohistochemical kit and horseradish peroxidase (HRP)-labeled goat-anti-rabbit IgG by Santa Cruz Company; specific inhibitor U0126 of ERK1/2 signal pathway by Alexis Company. METHODS: The experiment was carried out in the Laboratory of Neurosurgery, Union Hospital Affiliated to Tongji Medical College, Huazhong University of Science and Technology from September 2004 to March 2006. ①Detection of pERKl/2 expression: A total of 110 rats were randomly divided into sham operation group (n =5), model group (n =35), high-dosage U0126 group (n =35) and low-dosage U0126 group (n =35). Rats in the sham operation group were only treated with incision of epicranium and fixation of backup plate, but not hit. Rats in the model group

  9. The Electrical Response to Injury: Molecular Mechanisms and Wound Healing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reid, Brian; Zhao, Min

    2014-01-01

    Significance: Natural, endogenous electric fields (EFs) and currents arise spontaneously after wounding of many tissues, especially epithelia, and are necessary for normal healing. This wound electrical activity is a long-lasting and regulated response. Enhancing or inhibiting this electrical activity increases or decreases wound healing, respectively. Cells that are responsible for wound closure such as corneal epithelial cells or skin keratinocytes migrate directionally in EFs of physiological magnitude. However, the mechanisms of how the wound electrical response is initiated and regulated remain unclear. Recent Advances: Wound EFs and currents appear to arise by ion channel up-regulation and redistribution, which are perhaps triggered by an intracellular calcium wave or cell depolarization. We discuss the possibility of stimulation of wound healing via pharmacological enhancement of the wound electric signal by stimulation of ion pumping. Critical Issues: Chronic wounds are a major problem in the elderly and diabetic patient. Any strategy to stimulate wound healing in these patients is desirable. Applying electrical stimulation directly is problematic, but pharmacological enhancement of the wound signal may be a promising strategy. Future Directions: Understanding the molecular regulation of wound electric signals may reveal some fundamental mechanisms in wound healing. Manipulating fluxes of ions and electric currents at wounds might offer new approaches to achieve better wound healing and to heal chronic wounds. PMID:24761358

  10. The effect of brain injury on the inflammatory response following severe trauma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lustenberger, T; Kern, M; Relja, B; Wutzler, S; Störmann, P; Marzi, I

    2016-03-01

    The inflammatory response is an important part of the pathophysiology of severe injury and, in particular, of severe traumatic brain injury (TBI). This study evaluates the inflammatory course following major trauma and focuses on the effect of severe TBI on inflammatory markers. This was a retrospective analysis of prospectively collected data in 123 severely injured (ISS ≥16) trauma patients. The study cohort was divided into patients with isolated TBI (Head AIS ≥3, all other AIS trauma. Significant correlations between admission IL-6 values and the development of MOF, sepsis and the neurological outcome were found in patients with TBI. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  11. Brain Cholinergic Function and Response to Rivastigmine in Patients With Chronic Sequels of Traumatic Brain Injury

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Östberg, Anna; Virta, Jere; Rinne, Juha O

    2017-01-01

    subjects for more than 1 year after at least moderate traumatic brain injury. Ten of the subjects were respondents and 7 nonrespondents to cholinergic medication. DESIGN:: Cholinergic function was assessed with [methyl-C] N-methylpiperidyl-4-acetate-PET (C-MP4A-PET), which reflects the activity...... was notably lower throughout the cortex in both respondents and nonrespondents, without significant differences between them. CONCLUSION:: Our study suggests that frontal cholinergic dysfunction is associated with the clinical response to cholinergic stimulation in patients with traumatic brain injury....

  12. Cortical hypoexcitation defines neuronal responses in the immediate aftermath of traumatic brain injury.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Victoria Philippa Anne Johnstone

    Full Text Available Traumatic brain injury (TBI from a blow to the head is often associated with complex patterns of brain abnormalities that accompany deficits in cognitive and motor function. Previously we reported that a long-term consequence of TBI, induced with a closed-head injury method modelling human car and sporting accidents, is neuronal hyper-excitation in the rat sensory barrel cortex that receives tactile input from the face whiskers. Hyper-excitation occurred only in supra-granular layers and was stronger to complex than simple stimuli. We now examine changes in the immediate aftermath of TBI induced with same injury method. At 24 hours post-trauma significant sensorimotor deficits were observed and characterisation of the cortical population neuronal responses at that time revealed a depth-dependent suppression of neuronal responses, with reduced responses from supragranular layers through to input layer IV, but not in infragranular layers. In addition, increased spontaneous firing rate was recorded in cortical layers IV and V. We postulate that this early post-injury suppression of cortical processing of sensory input accounts for immediate post-trauma sensory morbidity and sets into train events that resolve into long-term cortical hyper-excitability in upper sensory cortex layers that may account for long-term sensory hyper-sensitivity in humans with TBI.

  13. Cross-calibration of Fuji TR image plate and RAR 2492 x-ray film to determine the response of a DITABIS Super Micron image plate scanner

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dunham, G.; Harding, E. C.; Loisel, G. P.; Lake, P. W.; Nielsen-Weber, L. B.

    2016-11-01

    Fuji TR image plate is frequently used as a replacement detector medium for x-ray imaging and spectroscopy diagnostics at NIF, Omega, and Z facilities. However, the familiar Fuji BAS line of image plate scanners is no longer supported by the industry, and so a replacement scanning system is needed. While the General Electric Typhoon line of scanners could replace the Fuji systems, the shift away from photo stimulated luminescence units to 16-bit grayscale Tag Image File Format (TIFF) leaves a discontinuity when comparing data collected from both systems. For the purposes of quantitative spectroscopy, a known unit of intensity applied to the grayscale values of the TIFF is needed. The DITABIS Super Micron image plate scanning system was tested and shown to potentially rival the resolution and dynamic range of Kodak RAR 2492 x-ray film. However, the absolute sensitivity of the scanner is unknown. In this work, a methodology to cross calibrate Fuji TR image plate and the absolutely calibrated Kodak RAR 2492 x-ray film is presented. Details of the experimental configurations used are included. An energy dependent scale factor to convert Fuji TR IP scanned on a DITABIS Super Micron scanner from 16-bit grayscale TIFF to intensity units (i.e., photons per square micron) is discussed.

  14. Cross-calibration of Fuji TR image plate and RAR 2492 x-ray film to determine the response of a DITABIS Super Micron image plate scanner

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dunham, G., E-mail: gsdunha@sandia.gov; Harding, E. C.; Loisel, G. P.; Lake, P. W.; Nielsen-Weber, L. B. [Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque, New Mexico 87185 (United States)

    2016-11-15

    Fuji TR image plate is frequently used as a replacement detector medium for x-ray imaging and spectroscopy diagnostics at NIF, Omega, and Z facilities. However, the familiar Fuji BAS line of image plate scanners is no longer supported by the industry, and so a replacement scanning system is needed. While the General Electric Typhoon line of scanners could replace the Fuji systems, the shift away from photo stimulated luminescence units to 16-bit grayscale Tag Image File Format (TIFF) leaves a discontinuity when comparing data collected from both systems. For the purposes of quantitative spectroscopy, a known unit of intensity applied to the grayscale values of the TIFF is needed. The DITABIS Super Micron image plate scanning system was tested and shown to potentially rival the resolution and dynamic range of Kodak RAR 2492 x-ray film. However, the absolute sensitivity of the scanner is unknown. In this work, a methodology to cross calibrate Fuji TR image plate and the absolutely calibrated Kodak RAR 2492 x-ray film is presented. Details of the experimental configurations used are included. An energy dependent scale factor to convert Fuji TR IP scanned on a DITABIS Super Micron scanner from 16-bit grayscale TIFF to intensity units (i.e., photons per square micron) is discussed.

  15. Cross-calibration of Fuji TR image plate and RAR 2492 x-ray film to determine the response of a DITABIS Super Micron image plate scanner.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dunham, G; Harding, E C; Loisel, G P; Lake, P W; Nielsen-Weber, L B

    2016-11-01

    Fuji TR image plate is frequently used as a replacement detector medium for x-ray imaging and spectroscopy diagnostics at NIF, Omega, and Z facilities. However, the familiar Fuji BAS line of image plate scanners is no longer supported by the industry, and so a replacement scanning system is needed. While the General Electric Typhoon line of scanners could replace the Fuji systems, the shift away from photo stimulated luminescence units to 16-bit grayscale Tag Image File Format (TIFF) leaves a discontinuity when comparing data collected from both systems. For the purposes of quantitative spectroscopy, a known unit of intensity applied to the grayscale values of the TIFF is needed. The DITABIS Super Micron image plate scanning system was tested and shown to potentially rival the resolution and dynamic range of Kodak RAR 2492 x-ray film. However, the absolute sensitivity of the scanner is unknown. In this work, a methodology to cross calibrate Fuji TR image plate and the absolutely calibrated Kodak RAR 2492 x-ray film is presented. Details of the experimental configurations used are included. An energy dependent scale factor to convert Fuji TR IP scanned on a DITABIS Super Micron scanner from 16-bit grayscale TIFF to intensity units (i.e., photons per square micron) is discussed.

  16. Flecainide Improve Sepsis Induced Acute Lung Injury by Controlling Inflammatory Response

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jia Song

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Background: Flecainide is an antiarrhythmic agent that is used primarily in the treatment of cardiac arrhythmias. Some evidences also suggest that flecainide can participate in alveolar fluid clearance and inflammatory responses. This experiment was aimed to evaluate the effects of flecainide on sepsis induced acute lung injury in a rat model. Methods: Rats were treated with subcutaneous infusion of saline or flecainide (0.1 or 0.2 mg/kg/hr by a mini-osmotic pump. Subcutaneous infusion was started 3 hours before and continued until 8 hours after intraperitoneal injection of saline or endotoxin. Animals were sacrificed for analyses of severity of acute lung injury with wet to dry (W/D ratio and lung injury score (LIS in lung and inflammatory responses with level of leukocyte, polymorphonuclear neutrophils (PMNs and inteleukin-8 (IL-8 in bronchoalveolar lavages fluid (BALF. Results: Flecainide markedly improved dose dependently sepsis induced acute lung injury as analysed by W/D ratio (from 2.24 ± 0.11 to 1.76 ± 0.09, p < 0.05 and LIS (from 3 to 1, p < 0.05, and inflammatory response as determined by leukocyte (from 443 ± 127 to 229 ± 95, p < 0.05, PMNs (from 41.43 ± 17.63 to 2.43 ± 2.61, p < 0.05 and IL-8 (from 95.00 ± 15.28 to 40.00 ± 10.21, p < 0.05 in BALF. Conclusions: Flecanide improve sepsis induced acute lung injury in rats by controlling inflammatory responses.

  17. Altered mucosal immune response after acute lung injury in a murine model of Ataxia Telangiectasia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eickmeier, Olaf; Kim, Su Youn; Herrmann, Eva; Döring, Constanze; Duecker, Ruth; Voss, Sandra; Wehner, Sibylle; Hölscher, Christoph; Pietzner, Julia; Zielen, Stefan; Schubert, Ralf

    2014-05-29

    Ataxia telangiectasia (A-T) is a rare but devastating and progressive disorder characterized by cerebellar dysfunction, lymphoreticular malignancies and recurrent sinopulmonary infections. In A-T, disease of the respiratory system causes significant morbidity and is a frequent cause of death. We used a self-limited murine model of hydrochloric acid-induced acute lung injury (ALI) to determine the inflammatory answer due to mucosal injury in Atm (A-T mutated)- deficient mice (Atm(-/-)). ATM deficiency increased peak lung inflammation as demonstrated by bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF) neutrophils and lymphocytes and increased levels of BALF pro-inflammatory cytokines (e.g. IL-6, TNF). Furthermore, bronchial epithelial damage after ALI was increased in Atm(-/-) mice. ATM deficiency increased airway resistance and tissue compliance before ALI was performed. Together, these findings indicate that ATM plays a key role in inflammatory response after airway mucosal injury.

  18. Adipose Tissue Drives Response to Ischemia-Reperfusion Injury in a Murine Pressure Sore Model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gust, Madeleine J; Hong, Seok Jong; Fang, Robert C; Lanier, Steven T; Buck, Donald W; Nuñez, Jennifer M; Jia, Shengxian; Park, Eugene D; Galiano, Robert D; Mustoe, Thomas A

    2017-05-01

    Ischemia-reperfusion injury contributes significantly to the pathogenesis of chronic wounds such as pressure sores and diabetic foot ulcers. The authors' laboratory has previously developed a cyclical murine ischemia-reperfusion injury model. The authors here use this model to determine factors underlying tissue response to ischemia-reperfusion injury. C57BL/6 mice were subjected to cycles of ischemia-reperfusion that varied in number (one to four cycles) and duration of ischemia (1 to 2 hours). For each ischemia-reperfusion condition, the following variables were analyzed: (1) digital photographs for area of necrosis; (2) hematoxylin and eosin staining and immunohistochemistry for inflammatory infiltrate; and (3) expression of inflammatory markers by quantitative polymerase chain reaction. In addition, human adipocytes and fibroblasts were cultured in vitro under conditions of hypoxia and reoxygenation, and expression of inflammatory markers was analyzed by quantitative polymerase chain reaction. Increases in both ischemia-reperfusion cycle number and ischemia duration correlated with increased areas of epithelial necrosis both grossly and histologically, and with an increase in cellularity and neutrophil density. This increased inflammatory infiltrate and a significant increase in the expression of proinflammatory markers (Hmox1, interleukin-6, interleukin-1, and monocyte chemoattractant protein-1) was observed in adipose tissue subjected to ischemia-reperfusion injury, but not in dermis. These results were mirrored in human adipose tissue. The authors further characterize a novel, reproducible murine model of ischemia-reperfusion injury. The results of their study indicate that adipose tissue is less tolerant of ischemia-reperfusion than dermal tissue. Rather than being an "innocent bystander," adipose tissue plays an active role in driving the inflammatory response to ischemia-reperfusion injury.

  19. Model System for Live Imaging of Neuronal Responses to Injury and Repair

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mathieu Gravel

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Although it has been well established that induction of growth-associated protein-43 (GAP-43 during development coincides with axonal outgrowth and early synapse formation, the existence of neuronal plasticity and neurite outgrowth in the adult central nervous system after injuries is more controversial. To visualize the processes of neuronal injury and repair in living animals, we generated reporter mice for bioluminescence and fluorescence imaging bearing the luc (luciferase and gfp (green fluorescent protein reporter genes under the control of the murine GAP-43 promoter. Reporter functionality was first observed during the development of transgenic embryos. Using in vivo bioluminescence and fluorescence imaging, we visualized induction of the GAP-43 signals from live embryos starting at E10.5, as well as neuronal responses to brain and peripheral nerve injuries (the signals peaked at 14 days postinjury. Moreover, three-dimensional analysis of the GAP-43 bioluminescent signal confirmed that it originated from brain structures affected by ischemic injury. The analysis of fluorescence signal at cellular level revealed colocalization between endogenous protein and the GAP-43-driven gfp transgene. Taken together, our results suggest that the GAP-43-luc/gfp reporter mouse represents a valid model system for real-time analysis of neurite outgrowth and the capacity of the adult nervous system to regenerate after injuries.

  20. COMPARISON OF THE EFFECTS OF AGING AND IL-6 ON THE HEPATIC INFLAMMATORY RESPONSE IN TWO MODELS OF SYSTEMIC INJURY: SCALD INJURY VERSUS I.P. LPS ADMINISTRATION

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gomez, Christian R.; Nomellini, Vanessa; Baila, Horea; Oshima, Kiyoko; Kovacs, Elizabeth J.

    2011-01-01

    Regardless of age, a marked elevation in circulating IL-6 levels correlates with increased mortality after injury or an inflammatory challenge. We previously reported that aged IL-6 knockout mice given LPS have improved survival and reduced inflammatory response than LPS-treated aged wild type (WT) mice. Herein, we analyzed the effects of aging and IL-6 on the hepatic inflammatory response in two models of systemic injury: dorsal scald (burn) injury versus intraperitoneal LPS administration. At 24 h after burn injury, circulating alanine aminotransferase and hepatic neutrophil accumulation were comparable regardless of age or IL-6 deficiency. However, at this same time point, these indicators of liver damage, in addition to hepatic levels of KC, a neutrophil chemoattractant, were increased in aged WT mice given LPS relative to young WT mice given LPS. The hepatic injury was drastically reduced in aged IL-6 knockout mice given LPS as compared with LPS-exposed aged WT mice. Our results suggest that the nature of the insult will determine the degree of remote injury in aged animals. In addition, the role of IL-6 as a contributing factor of tissue injury may be insult specific. PMID:18636046

  1. Comparison of the effects of aging and IL-6 on the hepatic inflammatory response in two models of systemic injury: scald injury versus i.p. LPS administration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gomez, Christian R; Nomellini, Vanessa; Baila, Horea; Oshima, Kiyoko; Kovacs, Elizabeth J

    2009-02-01

    Regardless of age, a marked elevation in circulating IL-6 levels correlates with increased mortality after injury or an inflammatory challenge. We previously reported that aged IL-6 knockout mice given LPS have improved survival and reduced inflammatory response than LPS-treated aged wild type (WT) mice. Herein, we analyzed the effects of aging and IL-6 on the hepatic inflammatory response in two models of systemic injury: dorsal scald (burn) injury versus intraperitoneal LPS administration. At 24 h after burn injury, circulating alanine aminotransferase and hepatic neutrophil accumulation were comparable regardless of age or IL-6 deficiency. However, at this same time point, these indicators of liver damage, in addition to hepatic levels of KC, a neutrophil chemoattractant, were increased in aged WT mice given LPS relative to young WT mice given LPS. The hepatic injury was drastically reduced in aged IL-6 knockout mice given LPS as compared with LPS-exposed aged WT mice. Our results suggest that the nature of the insult will determine the degree of remote injury in aged animals. In addition, the role of IL-6 as a contributing factor of tissue injury may be insult specific.

  2. Thermochronology in southeast Alaska and southwest Yukon: Implications for North American Plate response to terrane accretion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Enkelmann, Eva; Piestrzeniewicz, Adam; Falkowski, Sarah; Stübner, Konstanze; Ehlers, Todd A.

    2017-01-01

    This study presents the first comprehensive dataset of low-temperature thermochronology from 43 bedrock samples collected north of the active Yakutat-North American plate boundary. Our apatite and zircon (U-Th)/He and fission-track data reveal the cooling history of the inboard Wrangellia Composite Terrane that is dominated by rapid cooling after Late Jurassic to Early Cretaceous arc magmatism followed by very little cooling and exhumation until today. Deformation resulting in rock exhumation due to the collision of the Yakutat microplate is spatially very limited (20-30 km) and is concentrated mainly in the Chugach-Prince William Terrane and rocks near the Border Ranges Fault. Focused exhumation from greater depths of ca. 10 km with very high rates (>5 km/Myr) is localized at the syntaxis region, starting ca. 10 Ma and shifted south through time. The rapid exhumation rates are explained by the development of strong feedbacks between tectonically driven surface uplift and erosion, which started already before glaciation of the area. The shift in the location towards the south is a consequence of continuous readjusting between tectonics and climate, which is changing on local and global scales since the Late Miocene.

  3. Differential role of tumor necrosis factor receptors in mouse brain inflammatory responses in cryolesion brain injury

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Quintana, Albert; Giralt, Mercedes; Rojas, Santiago

    2005-01-01

    Tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-alpha) is one of the mediators dramatically increased after traumatic brain injury that leads to the activation, proliferation, and hypertrophy of mononuclear, phagocytic cells and gliosis. Eventually, TNF-alpha can induce both apoptosis and necrosis via intracell......Tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-alpha) is one of the mediators dramatically increased after traumatic brain injury that leads to the activation, proliferation, and hypertrophy of mononuclear, phagocytic cells and gliosis. Eventually, TNF-alpha can induce both apoptosis and necrosis via...... signaling also affected the expression of apoptosis/cell death-related genes (Fas, Rip, p53), matrix metalloproteinases (MMP3, MMP9, MMP12), and their inhibitors (TIMP1), suggesting a role of TNFR1 in extracellular matrix remodeling after injury. However, GDNF, NGF, and BDNF expression were not affected...... by TNFR1 deficiency. Overall, these results suggest that TNFR1 is involved in the early establishment of the inflammatory response and that its deficiency causes a decreased inflammatory response and tissue damage following brain injury....

  4. Super-resolution non-parametric deconvolution in modelling the radial response function of a parallel plate ionization chamber.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kulmala, A; Tenhunen, M

    2012-11-07

    The signal of the dosimetric detector is generally dependent on the shape and size of the sensitive volume of the detector. In order to optimize the performance of the detector and reliability of the output signal the effect of the detector size should be corrected or, at least, taken into account. The response of the detector can be modelled using the convolution theorem that connects the system input (actual dose), output (measured result) and the effect of the detector (response function) by a linear convolution operator. We have developed the super-resolution and non-parametric deconvolution method for determination of the cylinder symmetric ionization chamber radial response function. We have demonstrated that the presented deconvolution method is able to determine the radial response for the Roos parallel plate ionization chamber with a better than 0.5 mm correspondence with the physical measures of the chamber. In addition, the performance of the method was proved by the excellent agreement between the output factors of the stereotactic conical collimators (4-20 mm diameter) measured by the Roos chamber, where the detector size is larger than the measured field, and the reference detector (diode). The presented deconvolution method has a potential in providing reference data for more accurate physical models of the ionization chamber as well as for improving and enhancing the performance of the detectors in specific dosimetric problems.

  5. Endogenous neural stem cell responses to stroke and spinal cord injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grégoire, Catherine-Alexandra; Goldenstein, Brianna L; Floriddia, Elisa M; Barnabé-Heider, Fanie; Fernandes, Karl J L

    2015-08-01

    Stroke and spinal cord injury (SCI) are among the most frequent causes of central nervous system (CNS) dysfunction, affecting millions of people worldwide each year. The personal and financial costs for affected individuals, their families, and the broader communities are enormous. Although the mammalian CNS exhibits little spontaneous regeneration and self-repair, recent discoveries have revealed that subpopulations of glial cells in the adult forebrain subventricular zone and the spinal cord ependymal zone possess neural stem cell properties. These endogenous neural stem cells react to stroke and SCI by contributing a significant number of new neural cells to formation of the glial scar. These findings have raised hopes that new therapeutic strategies can be designed based on appropriate modulation of endogenous neural stem cell responses to CNS injury. Here, we review the responses of forebrain and spinal cord neural stem cells to stroke and SCI, the role of these responses in restricting injury-induced tissue loss, and the possibility of directing these responses to promote anatomical and functional repair of the CNS. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  6. Spatiotemporal phosphoprotein distribution and associated cytokine response of a traumatic injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Alice A; Currie, Holly N; Loos, Matthew S; Vrana, Julie A; Fabyanic, Emily B; Prediger, Maren S; Boyd, Jonathan W

    2016-03-01

    Molecular mechanisms of wound healing have been extensively characterized, providing a better understanding of the processes involved in wound repair and offering advances in treatment methods. Both spatial and temporal investigations of injury biomarkers have helped to pinpoint significant time points and locations during the recovery process, which may be vital in managing the injury and making the appropriate diagnosis. This study addresses spatial and temporal differences of phosphoproteins found in skeletal muscle tissue following a traumatic femur fracture, which were further compared to co-localized cytokine responses. In particular, several proteins (Akt, ERK, c-Jun, CREB, JNK, MEK1, and p38) and post-translational phosphorylations (p-Akt, p-c-Jun, p-CREB, p-ERK1/2, p-MEK1, p-p38, p-GSK3α/β, p-HSP27, p-p70S6K, and p-STAT3) associated with inflammation, new tissue formation, and remodeling were found to exhibit significant spatial and temporal differences in response to the traumatic injury. Quadratic discriminant analysis of all measured responses, including cytokine concentrations from previously published findings, was used to classify temporal and spatial observations at high predictive rates, further confirming that distinct spatiotemporal distributions for total protein, phosphorylation signaling, and cytokine (IL-1α, IL-1ß, IL2, IL6, TNF-α, and MIP-1α) responses exist. Finally, phosphoprotein measurements were found to be significantly correlated to cytokine concentrations, suggesting coordinated intracellular and extracellular activity during crucial periods of repair. This study represents a first attempt to monitor and assess integrated changes in extracellular and intracellular signaling in response to a traumatic injury in muscle tissues, which may provide a framework for future research to improve both our understanding of wounds and their treatment options.

  7. Psychosocial responses during different phases of sport-injury rehabilitation: a qualitative study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clement, Damien; Arvinen-Barrow, Monna; Fetty, Tera

    2015-01-01

    Athletic trainers have traditionally conceptualized rehabilitation programs in terms of 3 distinct physiologic phases; however, these phases appear to neglect athletes' psychosocial responses to their injuries. To document injured athletes' psychosocial responses during the different phases of injury rehabilitation. Qualitative study. National Collegiate Athletic Association Division II university in the mid-Atlantic region of the United States. A total of 8 previously injured athletes (4 men and 4 women) participated in the study. We collected participant data by using semistructured interviews, transcribed verbatim and analyzed by directed content analysis. Established themes were triangulated to determine trustworthiness. Initially, athletes' cognitive appraisals were predominantly negative in nature, leading to negative emotions. These appraisals changed after diagnosis and when moving to the reaction-to-rehabilitation phase and the reaction-to-sport phase. During the reaction-to-rehabilitation phase, athletes reported mixed cognitive appraisals and identified frustration as the main emotional response. When returning to sport, athletes reflected on the lessons learned, yet they expressed some doubts related to their ability to return to play. These cognitive appraisals served as a precursor to the resulting emotional responses of nervousness and reinjury anxiety, as well as excitement. Throughout the various phases of rehabilitation, athletes reported seeking out social support: initially from significant others and then from their athletic trainers during the reaction-to-rehabilitation phase. The results appear to support the use of the integrated model of psychological response to sport injury and the rehabilitation process and the 3 phases of rehabilitation as a framework for understanding how physical and psychosocial factors may interact during sport-injury rehabilitation. Understanding this interaction may help athletic trainers provide better care to

  8. Response of the growth plate of uremic rats to human growth hormone and corticosteroids

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A.P.F. Barbosa

    2007-08-01

    Full Text Available Children with chronic renal failure in general present growth retardation that is aggravated by corticosteroids. We describe here the effects of methylprednisolone (MP and recombinant human growth hormone (rhGH on the growth plate (GP of uremic rats. Uremia was induced by subtotal nephrectomy in 30-day-old rats, followed by 20 IU kg-1 day-1 rhGH (N = 7 or 3 mg kg-1 day-1 MP (N = 7 or 20 IU kg-1 day-1 rhGH + 3 mg kg-1 day-1 MP (N = 7 treatment for 10 days. Control rats with intact renal function were sham-operated and treated with 3 mg kg-1 day-1 MP (N = 7 or vehicle (N = 7. Uremic rats (N = 7 were used as untreated control animals. Structural alterations in the GP and the expression of anti-proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA and anti-insulin-like growth factor I (IGF-I by epiphyseal chondrocytes were evaluated. Uremic MP rats displayed a reduction in the proliferative zone height (59.08 ± 4.54 vs 68.07 ± 7.5 µm, P < 0.05 and modifications in the microarchitecture of the GP. MP and uremia had an additive inhibitory effect on the proliferative activity of GP chondrocytes, lowering the expression of PCNA (19.48 ± 11.13 vs 68.64 ± 7.9% in control, P < 0.0005 and IGF-I (58.53 ± 0.96 vs 84.78 ± 2.93% in control, P < 0.0001, that was counteracted by rhGH. These findings suggest that in uremic rats rhGH therapy improves longitudinal growth by increasing IGF-I synthesis in the GP and by stimulating chondrocyte proliferation.

  9. Elucidating the Role of Injury-Induced Electric Fields (EFs) in Regulating the Astrocytic Response to Injury in the Mammalian Central Nervous System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baer, Matthew L.; Henderson, Scott C.; Colello, Raymond J.

    2015-01-01

    Injury to the vertebrate central nervous system (CNS) induces astrocytes to change their morphology, to increase their rate of proliferation, and to display directional migration to the injury site, all to facilitate repair. These astrocytic responses to injury occur in a clear temporal sequence and, by their intensity and duration, can have both beneficial and detrimental effects on the repair of damaged CNS tissue. Studies on highly regenerative tissues in non-mammalian vertebrates have demonstrated that the intensity of direct-current extracellular electric fields (EFs) at the injury site, which are 50–100 fold greater than in uninjured tissue, represent a potent signal to drive tissue repair. In contrast, a 10-fold EF increase has been measured in many injured mammalian tissues where limited regeneration occurs. As the astrocytic response to CNS injury is crucial to the reparative outcome, we exposed purified rat cortical astrocytes to EF intensities associated with intact and injured mammalian tissues, as well as to those EF intensities measured in regenerating non-mammalian vertebrate tissues, to determine whether EFs may contribute to the astrocytic injury response. Astrocytes exposed to EF intensities associated with uninjured tissue showed little change in their cellular behavior. However, astrocytes exposed to EF intensities associated with injured tissue showed a dramatic increase in migration and proliferation. At EF intensities associated with regenerating non-mammalian vertebrate tissues, these cellular responses were even more robust and included morphological changes consistent with a regenerative phenotype. These findings suggest that endogenous EFs may be a crucial signal for regulating the astrocytic response to injury and that their manipulation may be a novel target for facilitating CNS repair. PMID:26562295

  10. Elucidating the Role of Injury-Induced Electric Fields (EFs in Regulating the Astrocytic Response to Injury in the Mammalian Central Nervous System.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matthew L Baer

    Full Text Available Injury to the vertebrate central nervous system (CNS induces astrocytes to change their morphology, to increase their rate of proliferation, and to display directional migration to the injury site, all to facilitate repair. These astrocytic responses to injury occur in a clear temporal sequence and, by their intensity and duration, can have both beneficial and detrimental effects on the repair of damaged CNS tissue. Studies on highly regenerative tissues in non-mammalian vertebrates have demonstrated that the intensity of direct-current extracellular electric fields (EFs at the injury site, which are 50-100 fold greater than in uninjured tissue, represent a potent signal to drive tissue repair. In contrast, a 10-fold EF increase has been measured in many injured mammalian tissues where limited regeneration occurs. As the astrocytic response to CNS injury is crucial to the reparative outcome, we exposed purified rat cortical astrocytes to EF intensities associated with intact and injured mammalian tissues, as well as to those EF intensities measured in regenerating non-mammalian vertebrate tissues, to determine whether EFs may contribute to the astrocytic injury response. Astrocytes exposed to EF intensities associated with uninjured tissue showed little change in their cellular behavior. However, astrocytes exposed to EF intensities associated with injured tissue showed a dramatic increase in migration and proliferation. At EF intensities associated with regenerating non-mammalian vertebrate tissues, these cellular responses were even more robust and included morphological changes consistent with a regenerative phenotype. These findings suggest that endogenous EFs may be a crucial signal for regulating the astrocytic response to injury and that their manipulation may be a novel target for facilitating CNS repair.

  11. Elucidating the Role of Injury-Induced Electric Fields (EFs) in Regulating the Astrocytic Response to Injury in the Mammalian Central Nervous System.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baer, Matthew L; Henderson, Scott C; Colello, Raymond J

    2015-01-01

    Injury to the vertebrate central nervous system (CNS) induces astrocytes to change their morphology, to increase their rate of proliferation, and to display directional migration to the injury site, all to facilitate repair. These astrocytic responses to injury occur in a clear temporal sequence and, by their intensity and duration, can have both beneficial and detrimental effects on the repair of damaged CNS tissue. Studies on highly regenerative tissues in non-mammalian vertebrates have demonstrated that the intensity of direct-current extracellular electric fields (EFs) at the injury site, which are 50-100 fold greater than in uninjured tissue, represent a potent signal to drive tissue repair. In contrast, a 10-fold EF increase has been measured in many injured mammalian tissues where limited regeneration occurs. As the astrocytic response to CNS injury is crucial to the reparative outcome, we exposed purified rat cortical astrocytes to EF intensities associated with intact and injured mammalian tissues, as well as to those EF intensities measured in regenerating non-mammalian vertebrate tissues, to determine whether EFs may contribute to the astrocytic injury response. Astrocytes exposed to EF intensities associated with uninjured tissue showed little change in their cellular behavior. However, astrocytes exposed to EF intensities associated with injured tissue showed a dramatic increase in migration and proliferation. At EF intensities associated with regenerating non-mammalian vertebrate tissues, these cellular responses were even more robust and included morphological changes consistent with a regenerative phenotype. These findings suggest that endogenous EFs may be a crucial signal for regulating the astrocytic response to injury and that their manipulation may be a novel target for facilitating CNS repair.

  12. Dynamic membrane depolarization is an early regulator of ependymoglial cell response to spinal cord injury in axolotl.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sabin, Keith; Santos-Ferreira, Tiago; Essig, Jaclyn; Rudasill, Sarah; Echeverri, Karen

    2015-12-01

    Salamanders, such as the Mexican axolotl, are some of the few vertebrates fortunate in their ability to regenerate diverse structures after injury. Unlike mammals they are able to regenerate a fully functional spinal cord after injury. However, the molecular circuitry required to initiate a pro-regenerative response after spinal cord injury is not well understood. To address this question we developed a spinal cord injury model in axolotls and used in vivo imaging of labeled ependymoglial cells to characterize the response of these cells to injury. Using in vivo imaging of ion sensitive dyes we identified that spinal cord injury induces a rapid and dynamic change in the resting membrane potential of ependymoglial cells. Prolonged depolarization of ependymoglial cells after injury inhibits ependymoglial cell proliferation and subsequent axon regeneration. Using transcriptional profiling we identified c-Fos as a key voltage sensitive early response gene that is expressed specifically in the ependymoglial cells after injury. This data establishes that dynamic changes in the membrane potential after injury are essential for regulating the specific spatiotemporal expression of c-Fos that is critical for promoting faithful spinal cord regeneration in axolotl.

  13. Shaping frequency response of a vibrating plate for passive and active control applications by simultaneous optimization of arrangement of additional masses and ribs. Part I: Modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wrona, Stanislaw; Pawelczyk, Marek

    2016-03-01

    An ability to shape frequency response of a vibrating plate according to precisely defined demands has a very high practical potential. It can be applied to improve acoustic radiation of the plate for required frequencies or enhance acoustic isolation of noise barriers and device casings by using both passive and active control. The proposed method is based on mounting severaladditional ribs and masses (passive and/or active) to the plate surface at locations followed from an optimization process. This paper, Part I, concerns derivation of a mathematical model of the plate with attached elements in the function of their shape and placement. The model is validated by means of simulations and laboratory experiments, and compared with models known from the literature. This paper is followed by a companion paper, Part II, where the optimization process is described. It includes arrangement of passive elements as well as actuators and sensors to improve controllability and observability measures, if active control is concerned.

  14. Cyclosporin A Inhibits Smooth Muscle Proliferation in the Vascular Response to Injury

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jonasson, Lena; Holm, Jan; Hansson, Goran K.

    1988-04-01

    The arterial response to injury is dominated by proliferation of smooth muscle cells and infiltration of blood-borne cells in the vascular intima. Arterial smooth muscle cell proliferation is under growth factor control, but how this regulation operates in vivo is unclear. We studied the effect on arterial response to mechanical injury of cyclosporin A, a drug that inhibits T-lymphocyte activation. Cyclosporin A treatment at surgery caused a persistent inhibition of the intimal proliferative lesion. Cyclosporin A also inhibited expression of Ia antigens on smooth muscle cells in situ but had no direct effects on smooth muscle cell proliferation in culture. Therefore, the inhibition of intimal cell proliferation appears to be mediated via the immune system.

  15. Effect of fasting on the metabolic response of liver to experimental burn injury.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mehmet A Orman

    Full Text Available Liver metabolism is altered after systemic injuries such as burns and trauma. These changes have been elucidated in rat models of experimental burn injury where the liver was isolated and perfused ex vivo. Because these studies were performed in fasted animals to deplete glycogen stores, thus simplifying quantification of gluconeogenesis, these observations reflect the combined impact of fasting and injury on liver metabolism. Herein we asked whether the metabolic response to experimental burn injury is different in fed vs. fasted animals. Rats were subjected to a cutaneous burn covering 20% of the total body surface area, or to similar procedures without administering the burn, hence a sham-burn. Half of the animals in the burn and sham-burn groups were fasted starting on postburn day 3, and the others allowed to continue ad libitum. On postburn day 4, livers were isolated and perfused for 1 hour in physiological medium supplemented with 10% hematocrit red blood cells. The uptake/release rates of major carbon and nitrogen sources, oxygen, and carbon dioxide were measured during the perfusion and the data fed into a mass balance model to estimate intracellular fluxes. The data show that in fed animals, injury increased glucose output mainly from glycogen breakdown and minimally impacted amino acid metabolism. In fasted animals, injury did not increase glucose output but increased urea production and the uptake of several amino acids, namely glutamine, arginine, glycine, and methionine. Furthermore, sham-burn animals responded to fasting by triggering gluconeogenesis from lactate; however, in burned animals the preferred gluconeogenic substrate was amino acids. Taken together, these results suggest that the fed state prevents the burn-induced increase in hepatic amino acid utilization for gluconeogenesis. The role of glycogen stores and means to increase and/or maintain internal sources of glucose to prevent increased hepatic amino acid

  16. Brain response to traumatic brain injury in wild-type and interleukin-6 knockout mice: a microarray analysis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Poulsen, Christian Bjørn; Penkowa, Milena; Borup, Rehannah

    2005-01-01

    Traumatic injury to the brain is one of the leading causes of injury-related death or disability. Brain response to injury is orchestrated by cytokines, such as interleukin (IL)-6, but the full repertoire of responses involved is not well known. We here report the results obtained with microarrays...... in the initial tissue injury and later regeneration of the parenchyma. IL-6 deficiency showed a dramatic effect in the expression of many genes, especially in the 1 day post-lesion timing, which presumably underlies the poor capacity of IL-6 knockout mice to cope with brain damage. The results highlight...... the importance of IL-6 controlling the response of the brain to injury as well as the suitability of microarrays for identifying specific targets worthy of further study....

  17. Influence of Cooling Channel Geometry on the Thermal Response in Silicon Nitride Plates Studied

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdul-Aziz, Ali; Bhatt, Ramakrishna T.; Baaklini, George Y.

    2002-01-01

    maximum and minimum temperature obtained for the plates under air cooling. Each channel's cross-sectional shape delivered a different temperature; however, the two-dimensional analyses for circular and square or equal-side rectangular holes produced close results. Moreover, the model of the panel with ascending order cooling channels experienced the lowest temperature. A difference of near 260 C was found among the three cooling-hole configurations investigated. The ascending-order cooling channels arrangement showed superior performance by attaining the lowest temperature (1077 C) in comparison to the circular (1379 C) and square (1343 C) channels for the same cooling-hole size. This indicates that the panel with ascending-order cooling channels is the most suitable configuration regardless of the complexity involved in its manufacture. More details pertaining to this study are reported.

  18. Responsiveness of a Neuromuscular Recovery Scale for Spinal Cord Injury: Inpatient and Outpatient Rehabilitation

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-10-01

    introduction to the NRS via video and an instructional guide. The NRS has been presented at the APTA Combined Sections and American Spinal Injury Asso...2013. (Velozo – UF/MUSC, co-author).  COMPLETED, YEAR 3, Abstract accepted for Combined Sections Meeting, APTA , Jan. 2013, only methods to be...Abstracts and Manuscripts  Two abstracts presented: o APTA Combined Sections Meeting, 2013, responsiveness study methods only reported and the

  19. The Acute Inflammatory Response in Trauma / Hemorrhage and Traumatic Brain Injury: Current State and Emerging Prospects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Y Vodovotz

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Traumatic injury/hemorrhagic shock (T/HS elicits an acute inflammatory response that may result in death. Inflammation describes a coordinated series of molecular, cellular, tissue, organ, and systemic responses that drive the pathology of various diseases including T/HS and traumatic brain injury (TBI. Inflammation is a finely tuned, dynamic, highly-regulated process that is not inherentlydetrimental, but rather required for immune surveillance, optimal post-injury tissue repair, and regeneration. The inflammatory response is driven by cytokines and chemokines and is partiallypropagated by damaged tissue-derived products (Damage-associated Molecular Patterns; DAMP’s.DAMPs perpetuate inflammation through the release of pro-inflammatory cytokines, but may also inhibit anti-inflammatory cytokines. Various animal models of T/HS in mice, rats, pigs, dogs, and nonhumanprimates have been utilized in an attempt to move from bench to bedside. Novel approaches, including those from the field of systems biology, may yield therapeutic breakthroughs in T/HS andTBI in the near future.

  20. The extent of soft tissue and musculoskeletal injuries after earthquakes; describing a role for reconstructive surgeons in an emergency response.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clover, A J P; Jemec, B; Redmond, A D

    2014-10-01

    Earthquakes are the leading cause of natural disaster-related mortality and morbidity. Soft tissue and musculoskeletal injuries are the predominant type of injury seen after these events and a major reason for admission to hospital. Open fractures are relatively common; however, they are resource-intense to manage. Appropriate management is important in minimising amputation rates and preserving function. This review describes the pattern of musculoskeletal and soft-tissue injuries seen after earthquakes and explores the manpower and resource implications involved in their management. A Medline search was performed, including terms "injury pattern" and "earthquake," "epidemiology injuries" and "earthquakes," "plastic surgery," "reconstructive surgery," "limb salvage" and "earthquake." Papers published between December 1992 and December 2012 were included, with no initial language restriction. Limb injuries are the commonest injuries seen accounting for 60 % of all injuries, with fractures in more than 50 % of those admitted to hospital, with between 8 and 13 % of these fractures open. After the first few days and once the immediate lifesaving phase is over, the management of these musculoskeletal and soft-tissue injuries are the commonest procedures required. Due to the predominance of soft-tissue and musculoskeletal injuries, plastic surgeons as specialists in soft-tissue reconstruction should be mobilised in the early stages of a disaster response as part of a multidisciplinary team with a focus on limb salvage.

  1. Effect of shell drilling stiffness on response calculations of rectangular plates and tubes of rectangular cross-section under compression.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gorman, Jhana; Hales, Jason Dean; Corona, Edmundo

    2010-05-01

    This report considers the calculation of the quasi-static nonlinear response of rectangular flat plates and tubes of rectangular cross-section subjected to compressive loads using quadrilateralshell finite element models. The principal objective is to assess the effect that the shell drilling stiffness parameter has on the calculated results. The calculated collapse load of elastic-plastic tubes of rectangular cross-section is of particular interest here. The drilling stiffness factor specifies the amount of artificial stiffness that is given to the shell element drilling Degree of freedom (rotation normal to the plane of the element). The element formulation has no stiffness for this degree of freedom, and this can lead to numerical difficulties. The results indicate that in the problems considered it is necessary to add a small amount of drilling tiffness to obtain converged results when using both implicit quasi-statics or explicit dynamics methods. The report concludes with a parametric study of the imperfection sensitivity of the calculated responses of the elastic-plastic tubes with rectangular cross-section.

  2. Exposure to experimental preeclampsia in mice enhances the vascular response to future injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pruthi, Dafina; Khankin, Eliyahu V; Blanton, Robert M; Aronovitz, Mark; Burke, Suzanne D; McCurley, Amy; Karumanchi, S Ananth; Jaffe, Iris Z

    2015-04-01

    Cardiovascular disease (CVD) remains the leading killer of women in developed nations. One sex-specific risk factor is preeclampsia, a syndrome of hypertension and proteinuria that complicates 5% of pregnancies. Although preeclampsia resolves after delivery, exposed women are at increased long-term risk of premature CVD and mortality. Pre-existing CVD risk factors are associated with increased risk of developing preeclampsia but whether preeclampsia merely uncovers risk or contributes directly to future CVD remains a critical unanswered question. A mouse preeclampsia model was used to test the hypothesis that preeclampsia causes an enhanced vascular response to future vessel injury. A preeclampsia-like state was induced in pregnant CD1 mice by overexpressing soluble fms-like tyrosine kinase-1, a circulating antiangiogenic protein that induces hypertension and glomerular disease resembling human preeclampsia. Two months postpartum, soluble fms-like tyrosine kinase-1 levels and blood pressure normalized and cardiac size and function by echocardiography and renal histology were indistinguishable in preeclampsia-exposed compared with control mice. Mice were then challenged with unilateral carotid injury. Preeclampsia-exposed mice had significantly enhanced vascular remodeling with increased vascular smooth muscle cell proliferation (180% increase; Ppreeclampsia. These data support a new model in which vessels exposed to preeclampsia retain a persistently enhanced vascular response to injury despite resolution of preeclampsia after delivery. This new paradigm may contribute to the substantially increased risk of CVD in woman exposed to preeclampsia.

  3. Maturational change in the cortical response to hypoperfusion injury in the fetal sheep.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reddy, K; Mallard, C; Guan, J; Marks, K; Bennet, L; Gunning, M; Gunn, A; Gluckman, P; Williams, C

    1998-05-01

    A characteristic of perinatal encephalopathies are the distinct patterns of neuronal and glial cell loss. Cerebral hypoperfusion is thought to be a major cause of these lesions. Gestational age is likely to influence outcome. This study compares the cortical electrophysiologic and histopathologic responses to hypoperfusion injury between preterm and near term fetuses. Chronically instrumented 0.65 (93-99-d, n = 9) and 0.9 (119-133-d, n = 6) gestation fetal sheep underwent 30 min of cerebral hypoperfusion injury. The parasagittal cortical EEG and impedance (measure of cytotoxic edema) responses plus histologic outcome (3 d) were compared. The acute rise in impedance was similar in amplitude, but the onset was delayed (5.0 +/- 0.7 versus 9.1 +/- 1.1 min, p preterm fetuses relative to those near term. In contrast the extent of the secondary rise was reduced (p preterm fetuses (19.8 +/- 1.0 versus 40.5 +/- 3.5 h, p fall in EEG spectral edge frequency. The preterm fetuses had a milder loss of EEG intensity at 72 h (-7.7 +/- 1.5 versus -12.8 +/- 0.9 dB, p term. In contrast the preterm fetuses developed subcortical infarcts (p term. In contrast, the preterm fetuses had a more rapidly evolving injury leading to necrosis of the subcortical white matter.

  4. Sympathetic skin response in incomplete spinal cord injury with urinary incontinence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Reza Emad

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: Sympathetic skin response (SSR is a test for evaluation of the sympathetic sweat gland pathways, and it has been used to study the central sympathetic pathways in spinal cord injury (SCI. This study aimed to assess the autonomic pathways according to normal or abnormal SSR in urinary incontinence patients due to incomplete spinal cord injury. Materials and Methods: Suprapubic, palmar, and plantar SSR to the peripheral nerve electrical stimulation were recorded in 16 urinary incontinence patients with incomplete spinal cord injury at various neurological levels and in 30 healthy control subjects. Results: All the recordings of SSR from the incomplete SCI patients with urinary incontinence as compared with their counterparts in the control group showed significantly reduced amplitudes with more prominent reduction in the suprapubic area recording site (P value < 0.0004. SSR with significantly prolonged latencies were recorded from palm and plantar areas in response to suprapubic area and tibial N stimuli, respectively (P value < 0.02. In this study, a significantly higher stimulus intensity (P value < 0.01 was needed to elicit SSR in the cases compared with the control group. Conclusion: This study showed abnormal SSR in urinary incontinence patients due to incomplete SCI. In addition, for the first time we have described recording of abnormal SSR from the suprapubic area as another way to show bladder sympathetic system involvement.

  5. Responsibility for child and adolescent's psychosocial support associated with severe sports injuries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hallquist, Charlotte; Fitzgerald, Ulrika Tranaeus; Alricsson, Marie

    2016-12-01

    The manner in which health professionals and coaches act and decide on treatment and prognosis can influence athletes in a way that not only strengthens them, but it can also reduce their confidence in their own ability. The purpose was to determine who has the responsibility for child and adolescent psychosocial support needed in connection with a severe sports injury as well as investigate whether coaches, physiotherapists and parents are aware of the support that is needed. Qualitative interviews with coaches, parents and physiotherapists with experience of serious sports injuries in young people aged 12 to 16 years old from different sports were analysed using content analysis. The study showed that all actors independently imparted communication as being the major problem and indicated that the role of a coordinator was missing. They imparted cognitive, emotional and behavioural reactions in children, which were considered to be more common in younger children as indicated in previous studies. Coaches felt they had lack of education and time; parents described their disappointment in caregivers and personality changes in their children in connection with the injury. Physiotherapists felt that rehabilitation was often served as a substitute for the sport and that they therefore had greater responsibility for the child than they had been educated for. Results should be communicated to participants who are involved in children's and adolescent's sports to increase their knowledge and thus allow them to be able to give our children the best possibility, regardless of whether they return to the sport or not.

  6. Trans-sacroiliac joint with plate via the anterior approach in management of posterior pelvic injuries%前路跨骶髂钢板固定治疗骨盆后环损伤

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    曹奇勇; 王满宜; 吴新宝; 朱仕文; 吴宏华

    2008-01-01

    目的 评价前入路跨骶髂钢板固定方法在骨盆后环损伤治疗中的应用价值.方法 收集29例(30侧)采用前入路跨骶髂钢板固定方法治疗的骨盆后环损伤病例的临床资料进行回顾性分析.骨折分型:Tile B型16例,C型13例,后环损伤平均移位18 mm(5~35 mm);手术跨骶髂双钢板固定20侧,单钢板固定10侧;前环损伤钢板固定22例.结果 手术平均耗时3 h,平均输血1200 ml;手术损伤腰骶干神经3侧(10%),股外侧皮神经7侧(23%),术中大出血2侧(7%);骨折复位优23侧(77%),好6侧(20%),可1侧(3%);术后后环平均移位3 mm(0~18 mm);21例获得平均35个月(9~65个月)随访,Majeed评分平均93分(75~100分),功能恢复情况均满意.结论 前路跨骶髂钢板固定,对于骶髂关节脱位或经髂骨的骨折脱位,能获得满意复位及稳定固定,感染率低,但手术出血多,有较高神经损伤并发症.%Objective To report the clinical experience in trans-sacroiliac joint with plate via the anterior approach in management of posterior pelvic injuries.Methods The clinical data of 29 cases ( 30 sides)with pelvic injury,16 being of type B,and 13 of type C according to the Tile classification;with the average displacement of the posterior ring injuries of 18 mm;undergoing trans-sacroiliac joint with plate via the anterior approach from January 2002 to June 2007 were analyzed retrospectively,among which 20 sides were fixed by two plates across the sacroiliac joint and 10 sides by single plate.The anterior pelvic injuries of 22 cases were fixed by plates too.Twenty-one cases were followed up for 35 months on average.Results The average operation time was 3 hours,and the average blood transfusion was 1200 ml.Reduction was excellent in 23 sides(77%),good in 6 sides(20%),and fair in 1 side(3%).Operative injury of lumbosacral trunk occurred in 3 sides(10%)and operative injury of lateral femoral cutaneous nerve occurred in 7 sides(23%).Intra-operative major

  7. Expression and cellular distribution of ubiquitin in response to injury in the developing spinal cord of Monodelphis domestica

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Noor, Natassya M; Møllgård, Kjeld; Wheaton, Benjamin J;

    2013-01-01

    Ubiquitin, an 8.5 kDa protein associated with the proteasome degradation pathway has been recently identified as differentially expressed in segment of cord caudal to site of injury in developing spinal cord. Here we describe ubiquitin expression and cellular distribution in spinal cord up to pos...... changes in ubiquitin expression and cellular distribution in development and response to spinal injury suggest an intricate regulatory system that modulates these responses which, when better understood, may lead to potential therapeutic targets....

  8. Effect of insulin on the inflammatory and acute phase response after burn injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeschke, Marc G; Boehning, Darren F; Finnerty, Celeste C; Herndon, David N

    2007-09-01

    After a severe burn, the liver plays a pivotal role by modulating inflammatory processes, metabolic pathways, immune functions, and the acute phase response. Therefore, liver integrity and function are important for recovery. A thermal injury, however, causes hepatic damage by inducing hepatic edema, fatty infiltration, hepatocyte apoptosis, and metabolic derangements associated with insulin resistance and impaired insulin signaling. In preliminary studies, we found that these pathophysiological processes are related to hepatic inflammation, altered intracellular signaling, and mitochondrial dysfunction. We hypothesize that modulation of these processes with insulin could improve hepatic structure and function and, therefore, outcome of burned and critically ill patients. Insulin administration improves survival and decreases the rate of infections in severely burned and critically ill patients. Here, we show that insulin administration decreases the synthesis of proinflammatory cytokines and signal transcription factors and improves hepatic structure and function after a severe burn injury; insulin also restores hepatic homeostasis and improves hepatic dysfunction postburn via alterations in the signaling cascade.

  9. Inflammatory and protein metabolism signaling responses in human skeletal muscle after burn injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Merritt, Edward K; Cross, James M; Bamman, Marcas M

    2012-01-01

    Severe burn injuries lead to a prolonged hypercatabolic state resulting in dramatic loss of skeletal muscle mass. Postburn muscle loss is well documented but the molecular signaling cascade preceding atrophy is not. The purpose of this study is to determine the response to burn injury of signaling pathways driving muscle inflammation and protein metabolism. Muscle biopsies were collected in the early flow phase after burn injury from the vastus lateralis of a noninjured leg in patients with 20 to 60% TBSA burns and compared with uninjured, matched controls. Circulating levels of proinflammatory cytokines were also compared. Immunoblotting was performed to determine the protein levels of key signaling components for translation initiation, proteolysis, and tumor necrosis factor/nuclear factor kappa B (NFκB)and interleukin (IL)-6/STAT3 signaling. Burn subjects had significantly higher levels of circulating proinflammatory cytokines, with no difference in muscle STAT3 activity and lower NFκB activity. No differences were found in any translational signaling components. Regarding proteolytic signaling in burn, calpain-2 was 47% higher, calpastatin tended to be lower, and total ubiquitination was substantially higher. Surprisingly, a systemic proinflammatory response 3 to 10 days postburn did not lead to elevated muscle STAT3 or NFκB signaling. Signaling molecules governing translation initiation were unaffected, whereas indices of calcium-mediated proteolysis and ubiquitin-proteasome activity were upregulated. These novel findings are the first in humans to suggest that the net catabolic effect of burn injury in skeletal muscle (ie, atrophy) may be mediated, at least during the early flow phase, almost entirely by an increased proteolytic activity in the absence of suppressed protein synthesis signaling.

  10. Xanthohumol suppresses inflammatory response to warm ischemia-reperfusion induced liver injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dorn, Christoph; Massinger, Sabine; Wuzik, Andreas; Heilmann, Jörg; Hellerbrand, Claus

    2013-02-01

    Liver ischemia/reperfusion (I/R) leads to formation of reactive oxygen species (ROS), which cause hepatic injury and initiate an inflammatory response, which is a critical problem after liver surgery and transplantation. Xanthohumol, the major prenylated chalcone found in hops, has been discussed for its anti-inflammatory and ROS-scavenging properties, and thus, we aimed to investigate the effect of xanthohumol in a model of warm I/R liver injury. Xanthohumol was applied to BALB/c mice orally at a dose of 1 mg/g body weight for 5 days before I/R-injury was induced by clamping the vascular blood supply to the median and left lateral liver lobe for 1 h followed by a 6 h period of reperfusion. At this time, HPLC analysis revealed hepatic xanthohumol levels of approximately 2 μM, a concentration which has been shown to inhibit inflammatory effects in vitro. Assessment of hepatic HMOX1 expression, hepatic glutathione content and immunohistochemical analysis for proteins conjugated with the reactive aldehyde 4-hydroxynonenal indicated that I/R-induced oxidative stress was significantly inhibited in xanthohumol-fed compared to control mice. Histological analysis, TUNEL staining and determination of transaminase serum levels revealed no significant effects of xanthohumol on acute hepatocellular injury. However, at the same time point, pretreatment with xanthohumol almost completely blunted the I/R-induced AKT and NFκB activation and the expression of the proinflammatory genes IL-1alpha, IL-6, MCP-1 and ICAM-1, which are known to play a crucial role in the subacute phase of I/R-induced liver damage. In conclusion, these data indicate the potential of xanthohumol application to prevent adverse inflammatory responses to I/R-induced liver damage such as after surgical liver resection or transplantation.

  11. Long-term persistance of the pathophysiologic response to severe burn injury.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marc G Jeschke

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Main contributors to adverse outcomes in severely burned pediatric patients are profound and complex metabolic changes in response to the initial injury. It is currently unknown how long these conditions persist beyond the acute phase post-injury. The aim of the present study was to examine the persistence of abnormalities of various clinical parameters commonly utilized to assess the degree hypermetabolic and inflammatory alterations in severely burned children for up to three years post-burn to identify patient specific therapeutic needs and interventions. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: PATIENTS: Nine-hundred seventy-seven severely burned pediatric patients with burns over 30% of the total body surface admitted to our institution between 1998 and 2008 were enrolled in this study and compared to a cohort non-burned, non-injured children. Demographics and clinical outcomes, hypermetabolism, body composition, organ function, inflammatory and acute phase responses were determined at admission and subsequent regular intervals for up to 36 months post-burn. Statistical analysis was performed using One-way ANOVA, Student's t-test with Bonferroni correction where appropriate with significance accepted at p<0.05. Resting energy expenditure, body composition, metabolic markers, cardiac and organ function clearly demonstrated that burn caused profound alterations for up to three years post-burn demonstrating marked and prolonged hypermetabolism, p<0.05. Along with increased hypermetabolism, significant elevation of cortisol, catecholamines, cytokines, and acute phase proteins indicate that burn patients are in a hyperinflammatory state for up to three years post-burn p<0.05. CONCLUSIONS: Severe burn injury leads to a much more profound and prolonged hypermetabolic and hyperinflammatory response than previously shown. Given the tremendous adverse events associated with the hypermetabolic and hyperinflamamtory responses, we now identified

  12. Mediators' Emotional Responses to Self-Injurious Behavior: An Experimental Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mossman, Dominique A.; Hastings, Richard P.; Brown, Tony

    2002-01-01

    Sixty mediators from British schools for children with mental retardation watched one of five matched videos depicting no self-injury, self-injury maintained by positive reinforcement, self-injury maintained by negative reinforcement, and self-injury unrelated to social events. Self-injury maintained by negative reinforcement was associated with…

  13. Increased response to glutamate in small diameter dorsal root ganglion neurons after sciatic nerve injury.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kerui Gong

    Full Text Available Glutamate in the peripheral nervous system is involved in neuropathic pain, yet we know little how nerve injury alters responses to this neurotransmitter in primary sensory neurons. We recorded neuronal responses from the ex-vivo preparations of the dorsal root ganglia (DRG one week following a chronic constriction injury (CCI of the sciatic nerve in adult rats. We found that small diameter DRG neurons (30 µm were unaffected. Puff application of either glutamate, or the selective ionotropic glutamate receptor agonists alpha-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methyl-4-isoxazolepropionic acid (AMPA and kainic acid (KA, or the group I metabotropic receptor (mGluR agonist (S-3,5-dihydroxyphenylglycine (DHPG, induced larger inward currents in CCI DRGs compared to those from uninjured rats. N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA-induced currents were unchanged. In addition to larger inward currents following CCI, a greater number of neurons responded to glutamate, AMPA, NMDA, and DHPG, but not to KA. Western blot analysis of the DRGs revealed that CCI resulted in a 35% increase in GluA1 and a 60% decrease in GluA2, the AMPA receptor subunits, compared to uninjured controls. mGluR1 receptor expression increased by 60% in the membrane fraction, whereas mGluR5 receptor subunit expression remained unchanged after CCI. These results show that following nerve injury, small diameter DRG neurons, many of which are nociceptive, have increased excitability and an increased response to glutamate that is associated with changes in receptor expression at the neuronal membrane. Our findings provide further evidence that glutamatergic transmission in the periphery plays a role in nociception.

  14. Quantitative relationship between axonal injury and mechanical response in a rodent head impact acceleration model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yan; Zhang, Liying; Kallakuri, Srinivasu; Zhou, Runzhou; Cavanaugh, John M

    2011-09-01

    A modified Marmarou impact acceleration model was developed to study the mechanical responses induced by this model and their correlation to traumatic axonal injury (TAI). Traumatic brain injury (TBI) was induced in 31 anesthetized male Sprague-Dawley rats (392±13 g) by a custom-made 450-g impactor from heights of 1.25 m or 2.25 m. An accelerometer and angular rate sensor measured the linear and angular responses of the head, while the impact event was captured by a high-speed video camera. TAI distribution along the rostro-caudal direction, as well as across the left and right hemispheres, was determined using β-amyloid precursor protein (β-APP) immunocytochemistry, and detailed TAI injury maps were constructed for the entire corpus callosum. Peak linear acceleration 1.25 m and 2.25 m impacts were 666±165 g and 907±501 g, respectively. Peak angular velocities were 95±24 rad/sec and 124±48 rad/sec, respectively. Compared to the 2.25-m group, the observed TAI counts in the 1.25-m impact group were significantly lower. Average linear acceleration, peak angular velocity, average angular acceleration, and surface righting time were also significantly different between the two groups. A positive correlation was observed between normalized total TAI counts and average linear acceleration (R(2)=0.612, plinear and angular acceleration response of the rat head during impact, not necessarily the drop height.

  15. Barley Sprouts Extract Attenuates Alcoholic Fatty Liver Injury in Mice by Reducing Inflammatory Response

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    Yun-Hee Lee

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available It has been reported that barley leaves possess beneficial properties such as antioxidant, hypolipidemic, antidepressant, and antidiabetic. Interestingly, barley sprouts contain a high content of saponarin, which showed both anti-inflammatory and antioxidant activities. In this study, we evaluated the effect of barley sprouts on alcohol-induced liver injury mediated by inflammation and oxidative stress. Raw barley sprouts were extracted, and quantitative and qualitative analyses of its components were performed. The mice were fed a liquid alcohol diet with or without barley sprouts for four weeks. Lipopolysaccharide (LPS-stimulated RAW 264.7 cells were used to study the effect of barley sprouts on inflammation. Alcohol intake for four weeks caused liver injury, evidenced by an increase in serum alanine aminotransferase and aspartate aminotransferase activities and tumor necrosis factor (TNF-α levels. The accumulation of lipid in the liver was also significantly induced, whereas the glutathione (GSH level was reduced. Moreover, the inflammation-related gene expression was dramatically increased. All these alcohol-induced changes were effectively prevented by barley sprouts treatment. In particular, pretreatment with barley sprouts significantly blocked inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS and cyclooxygenase (COX-2 expression in LPS-stimulated RAW 264.7. This study suggests that the protective effect of barley sprouts against alcohol-induced liver injury is potentially attributable to its inhibition of the inflammatory response induced by alcohol.

  16. Erythropoietin-mediated tissue protection: reducing collateral damage from the primary injury response.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brines, M; Cerami, A

    2008-11-01

    In its classic hormonal role, erythropoietin (EPO) is produced by the kidney and regulates the number of erythrocytes within the circulation to provide adequate tissue oxygenation. EPO also mediates other effects directed towards optimizing oxygen delivery to tissues, e.g. modulating regional blood flow and reducing blood loss by promoting thrombosis within damaged vessels. Over the past 15 years, many unexpected nonhaematopoietic functions of EPO have been identified. In these more recently appreciated nonhormonal roles, locally-produced EPO signals through a different receptor isoform and is a major molecular component of the injury response, in which it counteracts the effects of pro-inflammatory cytokines. Acutely, EPO prevents programmed cell death and reduces the development of secondary, pro-inflammatory cytokine-induced injury. Within a longer time frame, EPO provides trophic support to enable regeneration and healing. As the region immediately surrounding damage is typically relatively deficient in endogenous EPO, administration of recombinant EPO can provide increased tissue protection. However, effective use of EPO as therapy for tissue injury requires higher doses than for haematopoiesis, potentially triggering serious adverse effects. The identification of a tissue-protective receptor isoform has facilitated the engineering of nonhaematopoietic, tissue-protective EPO derivatives, e.g. carbamyl EPO, that avoid these complications. Recently, regions within the EPO molecule mediating tissue protection have been identified and this has enabled the development of potent tissue-protective peptides, including some mimicking EPO's tertiary structure but unrelated in primary sequence.

  17. Injury and physiological responses of Larrea tridentata (DC) Coville exposed in situ to sulphur dioxide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olszyk, D M; Bytnerowicz, A; Fox, C A; Kats, G; Dawson, P J; Wolf, J

    1987-01-01

    The response of shrubs of Larrea tridentata (DEC) Coville (creosotebush) exposed to sulphur dioxide (SO(2)) was evaluated using in situ plants of the Majove Desert. Larrea was exposed to acute levels of 0.3 to 2.0 microl litre(-1) SO(2) for periods up to 13 days using field chambers or an open-air fumigation system. Plants exposed in the spring exhibited considerable leaf injury (necrosis and defoliation) when exposed to 2.0 microl litre(-1) SO(2), and in the autumn had leaf injury when exposed to >0.4microl litre(-1) SO(2). Injured plants had higher transpiration rates, less negative water pressure potentials, and/or lower photosynthetic rates than control plants. It is likely that Larrea would not be injured by the typically low SO(2) concentrations and dry environmental conditions of the Mojave Desert. However, if injury were to occur, it would be accompanied by changes in plant-water relations and photosynthesis, followed by recovery after the SO(2) stress was removed.

  18. Lactobacillus rhamnosus GG and Bifidobacterium longum attenuate lung injury and inflammatory response in experimental sepsis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ludmila Khailova

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION: Probiotic use to prevent nosocomial gastrointestinal and potentially respiratory tract infections in critical care has shown great promise in recent clinical trials of adult and pediatric patients. Despite well-documented benefits of probiotic use in intestinal disorders, the potential for probiotic treatment to reduce lung injury following infection and shock has not been well explored. OBJECTIVE: Evaluate if Lactobacillus rhamnosus GG (LGG or Bifidobacterium longum (BL treatment in a weanling mouse model of cecal ligation and puncture (CLP peritonitis will protect against lung injury. METHODS: 3 week-old FVB/N mice were orally gavaged with 200 µl of either LGG, BL or sterile water (vehicle immediately prior to CLP. Mice were euthanized at 24 h. Lung injury was evaluated via histology and lung neutrophil infiltration was evaluated by myeloperoxidase (MPO staining. mRNA levels of IL-6, TNF-α, MyD88, TLR-4, TLR-2, NFΚB (p50/p105 and Cox-2 in the lung analyzed via real-time PCR. TNF-α and IL-6 in lung was analyzed via ELISA. RESULTS: LGG and BL treatment significantly improved lung injury following experimental infection and sepsis and lung neutrophil infiltration was significantly lower than in untreated septic mice. Lung mRNA and protein levels of IL-6 and TNF-α and gene expression of Cox-2 were also significantly reduced in mice receiving LGG or BL treatment. Gene expression of TLR-2, MyD88 and NFΚB (p50/p105 was significantly increased in septic mice compared to shams and decreased in the lung of mice receiving LGG or BL while TLR-4 levels remained unchanged. CONCLUSIONS: Treatment with LGG and BL can reduce lung injury following experimental infection and sepsis and is associated with reduced lung inflammatory cell infiltrate and decreased markers of lung inflammatory response. Probiotic therapy may be a promising intervention to improve clinical lung injury following systemic infection and sepsis.

  19. Liver regeneration - The best kept secret: A model of tissue injury response

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    Javier A. Cienfuegos

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Liver regeneration (LR is one of the most amazing tissue injury response. Given its therapeutic significance has been deeply studied in the last decades. LR is an extraordinary complex process, strictly regulated, which accomplishes the characteristics of the most evolutionary biologic systems (robustness and explains the difficulties of reshaping it with therapeutic goals. TH reproduces the physiological tissue damage response pattern, with a first phase of priming of the hepatocytes -cell-cycle transition G0-G1-, and a second phase of proliferation -cell-cycle S/M phases- which ends with the liver mass recovering. This process has been related with the tissue injury response regulators as: complement system, platelets, inflammatory cytokines (TNF-α, IL-1β, IL-6, growth factors (HGF, EGF, VGF and anti-inflammatory factors (IL-10, TGF-β. Given its complexity and strict regulation, illustrates the unique alternative to liver failure is liver transplantation. The recent induced pluripotential cells (iPS description and the mesenchymal stem cell (CD133+ plastic capability have aroused new prospects in the cellular therapy field. Those works have assured the cooperation between mesenchymal and epithelial cells. Herein, we review the physiologic mechanisms of liver regeneration.

  20. Spinal Cord Injury Functional Ambulation Profile: a preliminary look at responsiveness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Musselman, Kristin E; Yang, Jaynie F

    2014-02-01

    The Spinal Cord Injury Functional Ambulation Profile (SCI-FAP) is a valid, reliable measure of walking skill (eg, walking while negotiating obstacles, doors, and stairs). The responsiveness of the SCI-FAP was assessed at least 7 months after spinal cord injury (SCI) and compared with that of the 10-Meter Walk Test (10MWT) and the Six-Minute Walk Test (6MWT). A secondary analysis of data collected during a randomized, single-blind, crossover trial was performed. Participants had incomplete SCI and could walk at least 5 m without manual assistance. After 3 or 4 baseline assessments, participants completed 2 months of precision training (stepping over obstacles and onto targets on the ground) and 2 months of endurance training (treadmill training with body weight support, if needed). Walking function was assessed with the SCI-FAP, 10MWT, and 6MWT. Internal responsiveness was evaluated through change scores and standardized response means (SRMs). External responsiveness was gauged by correlating change scores on the SCI-FAP, 10MWT, and 6MWT. The minimal detectable change was calculated from the standard error of measurement from the baseline assessments. The SCI-FAP scores improved with both interventions. The magnitude of change was greater for participants whose pretraining self-selected speed was less than 0.5 m/s. The SCI-FAP had moderate SRMs. The 10MWT (fastest speed) and 6MWT had the largest SRMs after precision training and endurance training, respectively. The minimal detectable change in the SCI-FAP was 96 points. The convenience sample was small and all participants could ambulate independently (with devices); therefore, the generalizability of the findings is limited. The SCI-FAP was responsive to changes in walking ability in participants who had incomplete SCI and walked at slow speeds, but overall the 10MWT and 6MWT were more responsive.

  1. Hardness and microstructural response to thermal annealing of irradiated ASTM A533B class 1 plate steel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reinhart, D.E. [SMS Concast, Inc., Pittsburgh, PA (United States); Kumar, A.S. [Univ. of Missouri, Rolla, MO (United States); Gelles, D.S.; Hamilton, M.L. [Pacific Northwest Lab., Richland, WA (United States); Rosinski, S.T. [Electric Power Research Inst., Charlotte, NC (United States)

    1999-10-01

    Hardness measurements were used to determine the post-irradiation annealing response of A533B class 1 plate steel irradiated to a fluence of 1 {times} 10{sup 19} n/cm{sup 2} (E > 1 MeV) at 150 C. Rockwell hardness measurements indicated that the material had hardened by 6.6 points on the B scale after irradiation. The irradiation induced hardness increase was associated with a decrease in upper shelf energy from 63.4 J to 5-1.8 J and a temperature shift in the Charpy curve at the 41 J level from 115 C to 215 C. Specimens were annealed after irradiation at temperatures of 343 C (650 F), 399 C (750 F), and 454 C (850 F) for durations of up to one week (168 h). Hardness measurements were made to chart recovery of hardness as a function of time and temperature. Specimens annealed at the highest temperature 454 C recovered the fastest, fully recovering within 144 h. Specimens annealed at 399 C recovered completely within 168 h. Specimens annealed at the lowest temperature, 343 C recovered only {approximately}70% after 168 h of annealing. After neutron irradiation, a new feature of black spot damage was found to be superimposed on the unirradiated microstructure. The density of black spots was found to vary from 2.3 {times} 10{sup 15}/cm{sup 3} to 1.1 {times} 10{sup 16}/cm{sup 3} with an average diameter of 2.85 nm. Following annealing at 454 C for 24 h the black spot damage was completely annealed out. It was concluded that the black spot damage was responsible for 70% of the irradiation-induced hardness.

  2. Functional role of monocytes and macrophages for the inflammatory response in acute liver injury

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Henning W Zimmermann

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Different etiologies such as drug toxicity, acute viral hepatitis B or acetaminophen poisoning can cause acute liver injury (ALI or even acute liver failure (ALF. Excessive cell death of hepatocytes in the liver is known to result in a strong hepatic inflammation. Experimental murine models of liver injury highlighted the importance of hepatic macrophages, so-called Kupffer cells, for initiating and driving this inflammatory response by releasing proinflammatory cytokines and chemokines including tumor necrosis factor (TNF, interleukin-6 (IL-6, IL-1-beta or monocyte chemoattractant protein 1 (MCP-1, CCL2 as well as activating other non-parenchymal liver cells, e.g. endothelial or hepatic stellate cells (HSC. Many of these proinflammatory mediators can trigger hepatocytic cell death pathways, e.g. via caspase activation, but also activate protective signaling pathways, e.g. via nuclear factor kappa B (NF-kB. Recent studies in mice demonstrated that these macrophage actions largely depend on the recruitment of monocytes into the liver, namely of the inflammatory Ly6c+ (Gr1+ monocyte subset as precursors of tissue macrophages. The chemokine receptor CCR2 and its ligand MCP-1/CCL2 promote monocyte subset infiltration upon liver injury. In contrast, the chemokine receptor CX3CR1 and its ligand fractalkine (CX3CL1 are important negative regulators of monocyte infiltration by controlling their survival and differentiation into functionally diverse macrophage subsets upon injury. The recently identified cellular and molecular pathways for monocyte subset recruitment, macrophage differentiation and interactions with other hepatic cell types in the injured liver may therefore represent interesting novel targets for future therapeutic approaches in ALF.

  3. Differences in the Cellular Response to Acute Spinal Cord Injury between Developing and Mature Rats Highlights the Potential Significance of the Inflammatory Response

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sutherland, Theresa C.; Mathews, Kathryn J.; Mao, Yilin; Nguyen, Tara; Gorrie, Catherine A.

    2017-01-01

    There exists a trend for a better functional recovery from spinal cord injury (SCI) in younger patients compared to adults, which is also reported for animal studies; however, the reasons for this are yet to be elucidated. The post injury tissue microenvironment is a complex milieu of cells and signals that interact on multiple levels. Inflammation has been shown to play a significant role in this post injury microenvironment. Endogenous neural progenitor cells (NPC), in the ependymal layer of the central canal, have also been shown to respond and migrate to the lesion site. This study used a mild contusion injury model to compare adult (9 week), juvenile (5 week) and infant (P7) Sprague-Dawley rats at 24 h, 1, 2, and 6 weeks post-injury (n = 108). The innate cells of the inflammatory response were examined using counts of ED1/IBA1 labeled cells. This found a decreased inflammatory response in the infants, compared to the adult and juvenile animals, demonstrated by a decreased neutrophil infiltration and macrophage and microglial activation at all 4 time points. Two other prominent cellular contributors to the post-injury microenvironment, the reactive astrocytes, which eventually form the glial scar, and the NPC were quantitated using GFAP and Nestin immunohistochemistry. After SCI in all 3 ages there was an obvious increase in Nestin staining in the ependymal layer, with long basal processes extending into the parenchyma. This was consistent between age groups early post injury then deviated at 2 weeks. The GFAP results also showed stark differences between the mature and infant animals. These results point to significant differences in the inflammatory response between infants and adults that may contribute to the better recovery indicated by other researchers, as well as differences in the overall injury progression and cellular responses. This may have important consequences if we are able to mirror and manipulate this response in patients of all ages; however

  4. A rat model of unilateral hindpaw burn injury: slowly developing rightwards shift of the morphine dose-response curve.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Shuxing; Lim, Grewo; Yang, Liling; Zeng, Qing; Sung, Backil; Jeevendra Martyn, J A; Mao, Jianren

    2005-07-01

    Management of pain after burn injury is an unresolved clinical issue. In a rat model of hindpaw burn injury, we examined the effects of systemic morphine on nociceptive behaviors following injury. Injury was induced by immersing the dorsal part of one hindpaw into a hot water bath (85 degrees C) for 4, 7, or 12 s under pentobarbital anesthesia. Mechanical allodynia to von Frey filament stimulation and thermal hyperalgesia to radiant heat were assessed. Burn injury induced by the 12-s (but not 4-, or 7-s) hot water immersion resulted in reliable and lasting mechanical allodynia and thermal hyperalgesia evident by day 1. In addition, there was an upregulation of protein kinase Cgamma and a progressive downregulation of mu-opioid receptors within the spinal cord dorsal horn ipsilateral to injury as revealed by immunohistochemistry and Western blot. In both injured and sham rats, the anti-nociceptive effects of subcutaneous morphine were examined on post-injury days 7 and 14. While the morphine AD50 dose was comparable on day 7 between burn (1.61 mg/kg) and control (1.7 mg/kg) rats, the morphine dose-response curve was shifted to the right in burn-injured rats (4.6 mg/kg) on post-injury day 14 as compared with both the injured rats on post-injury day 7 and sham rats on day 14 (1.72 mg/kg). These data indicate that hindpaw burn injury reliably produces persistent mechanical allodynia and thermal hyperalgesia and that the reduced efficacy of morphine anti-nociception in chronic burn injury may be in part due to a downregulation of spinal mu-opioid receptors.

  5. The Impact of Autonomic Dysreflexia on Blood Flow and Skin Response in Individuals with Spinal Cord Injury

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    J. C. Ramella-Roman

    2008-08-01

    Full Text Available Autonomic dysreflexia (AD is an inappropriate response of the sympathetic nervous system that commonly occurs when individuals with spinal cord injury (SCI, at or above the sixth thoracic (T6 vertebra, are subjected to a noxious stimulus below the level of injury. An AD event can be put into motion by something as simple as an ingrown toenail or a full bladder, with symptoms ranging from headache, high blood pressure, and even stroke. We have characterized the onset of AD and resulting autonomic events in an individual with SCI using a fiberoptic-based probe. Two probes were located above and below the injury level, on the subjects forearm and thigh, respectively, and were connected to a dual channel spectrophotometer. Oxygen saturation was calculated using the reflectance spectra and an algorithm based on melanin and hemoglobin absorption. We noticed that during an AD event the amount of oxygen in the skin below the injury level dropped by as much as 40%, while above the injury level, skin oxygenation remained constant. In addition, we found that the level of skin perspiration below the level of injury increased significantly. We hypothesize that the combination of AD-related ischemia with pressure-related ischemia and increased perspiration places individuals with spinal cord injury level at T6 or above at an elevated risk for developing a pressure sore below the injury site.

  6. AFFECTIVE RESPONSES AFTER DIFFERENT INTENSITIES OF EXERCISE IN PATIENTS WITH TRAUMATIC BRAIN INJURY

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    Patricia eRzezak

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Patients with traumatic brain injury (TBI usually have mood and anxiety symptoms secondary to their brain injury. Exercise may be a cost-effective intervention for the regulation of the affective responses of this population. However, there are no studies evaluating the effects of exercise or the optimal intensity of exercise for this clinical group. METHODS: Twelve male patients with moderate or severe TBI [mean age of 31.83 and SD of 9.53] and 12 age- and gender-matched healthy volunteers [mean age of 30.58 and SD of 9.53] participated in two sessions of exercise of high and moderate intensity. Anxiety and mood was evaluated, and subjective assessment of experience pre- and post-exercise was assessed. A mixed between and within-subjects GLM analysis was conducted to compare groups [TBI, control] over condition [baseline, session 1, session 2] allowing for group by condition interaction to be determined. Planned comparisons were also conducted to test study hypotheses.RESULTS: Although no group by condition interaction was observed, planned comparisons indicated that baseline differences between patients and controls in anxiety (Cohens’ d=1.80, tension (d=1.31, depression (d=1.18, anger (d=1.08, confusion (d=1.70, psychological distress (d=1.28 and physical symptoms (d=1.42 disappear after one session of exercise, independently of the intensity of exercise. CONCLUSIONS: A single-section of exercise, regardless of exercise intensity, had a positive effect on the affective responses of patients with TBI both by increasing positive valence feelings and decreasing negative ones. Exercise can be an easily accessible intervention that may alleviate depressive symptoms related to brain injury.

  7. Response of ependymal progenitors to spinal cord injury or enhanced physical activity in adult rat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cizkova, Dasa; Nagyova, Miriam; Slovinska, Lucia; Novotna, Ivana; Radonak, Jozef; Cizek, Milan; Mechirova, Eva; Tomori, Zoltan; Hlucilova, Jana; Motlik, Jan; Sulla, Igor; Vanicky, Ivo

    2009-09-01

    Ependymal cells (EC) in the spinal cord central canal (CC) are believed to be responsible for the postnatal neurogenesis following pathological or stimulatory conditions. In this study, we have analyzed the proliferation of the CC ependymal progenitors in adult rats processed to compression SCI or enhanced physical activity. To label dividing cells, a single daily injection of Bromo-deoxyuridine (BrdU) was administered over a 14-day-survival period. Systematic quantification of BrdU-positive ependymal progenitors was performed by using stereological principles of systematic, random sampling, and optical Dissector software. The number of proliferating BrdU-labeled EC increased gradually with the time of survival after both paradigms, spinal cord injury, or increased physical activity. In the spinal cord injury group, we have found 4.9-fold (4 days), 7.1-fold (7 days), 4.9-fold (10 days), and 5.6-fold (14 days) increase of proliferating EC in the rostro-caudal regions, 4 mm away from the epicenter. In the second group subjected to enhanced physical activity by running wheel, we have observed 2.1-2.6 fold increase of dividing EC in the thoracic spinal cord segments at 4 and 7 days, but no significant progression at 10-14 days. Nestin was rapidly induced in the ependymal cells of the CC by 2-4 days and expression decreased by 7-14 days post-injury. Double immunohistochemistry showed that dividing cells adjacent to CC expressed astrocytic (GFAP, S100beta) or nestin markers at 14 days. These data demonstrate that SCI or enhanced physical activity in adult rats induces an endogenous ependymal cell response leading to increased proliferation and differentiation primarily into macroglia or cells with nestin phenotype.

  8. Responsibility for child and adolescent’s psychosocial support associated with severe sports injuries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hallquist, Charlotte; Fitzgerald, Ulrika Tranaeus; Alricsson, Marie

    2016-01-01

    The manner in which health professionals and coaches act and decide on treatment and prognosis can influence athletes in a way that not only strengthens them, but it can also reduce their confidence in their own ability. The purpose was to determine who has the responsibility for child and adolescent psychosocial support needed in connection with a severe sports injury as well as investigate whether coaches, physiotherapists and parents are aware of the support that is needed. Qualitative interviews with coaches, parents and physiotherapists with experience of serious sports injuries in young people aged 12 to 16 years old from different sports were analysed using content analysis. The study showed that all actors independently imparted communication as being the major problem and indicated that the role of a coordinator was missing. They imparted cognitive, emotional and behavioural reactions in children, which were considered to be more common in younger children as indicated in previous studies. Coaches felt they had lack of education and time; parents described their disappointment in caregivers and personality changes in their children in connection with the injury. Physiotherapists felt that rehabilitation was often served as a substitute for the sport and that they therefore had greater responsibility for the child than they had been educated for. Results should be communicated to participants who are involved in children’s and adolescent’s sports to increase their knowledge and thus allow them to be able to give our children the best possibility, regardless of whether they return to the sport or not. PMID:28119882

  9. CD14 is a key organizer of microglial responses to CNS infection and injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Janova, Hana; Böttcher, Chotima; Holtman, Inge R; Regen, Tommy; van Rossum, Denise; Götz, Alexander; Ernst, Anne-Sophie; Fritsche, Christin; Gertig, Ulla; Saiepour, Nasrin; Gronke, Konrad; Wrzos, Claudia; Ribes, Sandra; Rolfes, Simone; Weinstein, Jonathan; Ehrenreich, Hannelore; Pukrop, Tobias; Kopatz, Jens; Stadelmann, Christine; Salinas-Riester, Gabriela; Weber, Martin S; Prinz, Marco; Brück, Wolfgang; Eggen, Bart J L; Boddeke, Hendrikus W G M; Priller, Josef; Hanisch, Uwe-Karsten

    2016-04-01

    Microglia, innate immune cells of the CNS, sense infection and damage through overlapping receptor sets. Toll-like receptor (TLR) 4 recognizes bacterial lipopolysaccharide (LPS) and multiple injury-associated factors. We show that its co-receptor CD14 serves three non-redundant functions in microglia. First, it confers an up to 100-fold higher LPS sensitivity compared to peripheral macrophages to enable efficient proinflammatory cytokine induction. Second, CD14 prevents excessive responses to massive LPS challenges via an interferon β-mediated feedback. Third, CD14 is mandatory for microglial reactions to tissue damage-associated signals. In mice, these functions are essential for balanced CNS responses to bacterial infection, traumatic and ischemic injuries, since CD14 deficiency causes either hypo- or hyperinflammation, insufficient or exaggerated immune cell recruitment or worsened stroke outcomes. While CD14 orchestrates functions of TLR4 and related immune receptors, it is itself regulated by TLR and non-TLR systems to thereby fine-tune microglial damage-sensing capacity upon infectious and non-infectious CNS challenges.

  10. Principal component analysis of the cytokine and chemokine response to human traumatic brain injury.

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    Adel Helmy

    Full Text Available There is a growing realisation that neuro-inflammation plays a fundamental role in the pathology of Traumatic Brain Injury (TBI. This has led to the search for biomarkers that reflect these underlying inflammatory processes using techniques such as cerebral microdialysis. The interpretation of such biomarker data has been limited by the statistical methods used. When analysing data of this sort the multiple putative interactions between mediators need to be considered as well as the timing of production and high degree of statistical co-variance in levels of these mediators. Here we present a cytokine and chemokine dataset from human brain following human traumatic brain injury and use principal component analysis and partial least squares discriminant analysis to demonstrate the pattern of production following TBI, distinct phases of the humoral inflammatory response and the differing patterns of response in brain and in peripheral blood. This technique has the added advantage of making no assumptions about the Relative Recovery (RR of microdialysis derived parameters. Taken together these techniques can be used in complex microdialysis datasets to summarise the data succinctly and generate hypotheses for future study.

  11. XB130 deficiency enhances lipopolysaccharide-induced septic response and acute lung injury

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toba, Hiroaki; Tomankova, Tereza; Wang, Yingchun; Bai, Xiaohui; Cho, Hae-Ra; Guan, Zhehong; Adeyi, Oyedele A.; Tian, Feng; Keshavjee, Shaf; Liu, Mingyao

    2016-01-01

    XB130 is a novel oncoprotein that promotes cancer cell survival, proliferation and migration. Its physiological function in vivo is largely unknown. The objective of this study was to determine the role of XB130 in lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced septic responses and acute lung injury. LPS was intraperitoneally administrated to Xb130 knockout (KO) and wild type (WT) mice. There was a significant weight loss in KO mice at Day 2 and significantly higher disease scores during the 7 days of observation. The levels of tumor necrosis factor-alpha, monocyte chemoattractant protein-1, interleukin-6 and interleukin-10 in the serum were significantly higher in KO mice at Day 2. In KO mice there were a significantly higher lung injury score, higher wet/dry lung weight ratio, more apoptotic cells and less proliferative cells in the lung. Macrophage infiltration was significantly elevated in the lung of KO mice. There was significantly increased number of p-GSK-3β positive cells in KO mice, which were mainly neutrophils and macrophages. XB130 is expressed in alveolar type I and type II cells in the lung. The expression in these cells was significantly reduced after LPS challenge. XB130 deficiency delayed the recovery from systemic septic responses, and the presence of XB130 in the alveolar epithelial cells may provide protective mechanisms by reducing cell death and promoting cell proliferation, and reducing pulmonary permeability. PMID:27029000

  12. Toll-like receptor 4-dependent responses to lung injury in a murine model of pulmonary contusion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoth, J Jason; Wells, Jonathan D; Brownlee, Noel A; Hiltbold, Elizabeth M; Meredith, J Wayne; McCall, Charles E; Yoza, Barbara K

    2009-04-01

    Blunt chest trauma resulting in pulmonary contusion with an accompanying acute inflammatory response is a common but poorly understood injury. We previously demonstrated that toll-like receptor 2 (TLR-2) participates in the inflammatory response to lung injury. We hypothesized that the TLR-4, in an MyD88-dependent manner, may also participate in the response to lung injury. To investigate this, we used a model of pulmonary contusion in the mouse that is similar to that observed clinically in humans and evaluated postinjury lung function, pulmonary neutrophil recruitment, and the systemic innate immune response. Comparisons were made between wild-type mice and mice deficient in TLR-4 or MyD88. We found TLR-4-dependent responses to pulmonary contusion that include hypoxemia, edema, and neutrophil infiltration. Increased expression of IL-6 and chemokine (C-X-C motif) ligand 1 in the bronchoalveolar lavage and serum was also dependent on TLR-4 activation. We further demonstrated that these responses to pulmonary contusion were dependent on MyD88, an adapter protein in the signal transduction pathway mediated by TLRs. These results show that TLRs have a primary role in the response to acute lung injury. Lung inflammation and systemic innate immune responses are dependent on TLR activation by pulmonary contusion.

  13. Plasma proteome response to severe burn injury revealed by 18O-labeled "universal" reference-based quantitative proteomics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qian, Wei-Jun; Petritis, Brianne O; Kaushal, Amit; Finnerty, Celeste C; Jeschke, Marc G; Monroe, Matthew E; Moore, Ronald J; Schepmoes, Athena A; Xiao, Wenzhong; Moldawer, Lyle L; Davis, Ronald W; Tompkins, Ronald G; Herndon, David N; Camp, David G; Smith, Richard D

    2010-09-01

    A burn injury represents one of the most severe forms of human trauma and is responsible for significant mortality worldwide. Here, we present the first quantitative proteomics investigation of the blood plasma proteome response to severe burn injury by comparing the plasma protein concentrations of 10 healthy control subjects with those of 15 severe burn patients at two time-points following the injury. The overall analytical strategy for this work integrated immunoaffinity depletion of the 12 most abundant plasma proteins with cysteinyl-peptide enrichment-based fractionation prior to LC-MS analyses of individual patient samples. Incorporation of an 18O-labeled "universal" reference among the sample sets enabled precise relative quantification across samples. In total, 313 plasma proteins confidently identified with two or more unique peptides were quantified. Following statistical analysis, 110 proteins exhibited significant abundance changes in response to the burn injury. The observed changes in protein concentrations suggest significant inflammatory and hypermetabolic response to the injury, which is supported by the fact that many of the identified proteins are associated with acute phase response signaling, the complement system, and coagulation system pathways. The regulation of approximately 35 proteins observed in this study is in agreement with previous results reported for inflammatory or burn response, but approximately 50 potentially novel proteins previously not known to be associated with burn response or inflammation are also found. Elucidating proteins involved in the response to severe burn injury may reveal novel targets for therapeutic interventions as well as potential predictive biomarkers for patient outcomes such as multiple organ failure.

  14. The buckling response of symmetrically laminated composite plates having a trapezoidal planform area. M.S. Thesis Interim Report No. 98, Aug. 1990 - May 1994

    Science.gov (United States)

    Radloff, H. D., II; Hyer, M. W.; Nemeth, M. P.

    1994-01-01

    The focus of this work is the buckling response of symmetrically laminated composite plates having a planform area in the shape of an isosceles trapezoid. The loading is assumed to be inplane and applied perpendicular to the parallel ends of the plate. The tapered edges of the plate are assumed to have simply supported boundary conditions, while the parallel ends are assumed to have either simply supported or clamped boundary conditions. A semi-analytic closed-form solution based on energy principles and the Trefftz stability criterion is derived and solutions are obtained using the Rayleigh-Ritz method. Intrinsic in this solution is a simplified prebuckling analysis which approximates the inplane force resultant distributions by the forms Nx=P/W(x) and Ny=Nxy=0, where P is the applied load and W(x) is the plate width which, for the trapezoidal planform, varies linearly with the lengthwise coordinate x. The out-of-plane displacement is approximated by a double trigonometric series. This analysis is posed in terms of four nondimensional parameters representing orthotropic and anisotropic material properties, and two nondimensional parameters representing geometric properties. For comparison purposes, a number of specific plate geometry, ply orientation, and stacking sequence combinations are investigated using the general purpose finite element code ABAQUS. Comparison of buckling coefficients calculated using the semi-analytical model and the finite element model show agreement within 5 percent, in general, and within 15 percent for the worst cases. In order to verify both the finite element and semi-analytical analyses, buckling loads are measured for graphite/epoxy plates having a wide range of plate geometries and stacking sequences. Test fixtures, instrumentation system, and experimental technique are described. Experimental results for the buckling load, the buckled mode shape, and the prebuckling plate stiffness are presented and show good agreement with the

  15. In situ metabolic flux analysis to quantify the liver metabolic response to experimental burn injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Izamis, Maria-Louisa; Sharma, Nripen S; Uygun, Basak; Bieganski, Robert; Saeidi, Nima; Nahmias, Yaakov; Uygun, Korkut; Yarmush, Martin L; Berthiaume, Francois

    2011-04-01

    Trauma such as burns induces a hypermetabolic response associated with altered central carbon and nitrogen metabolism. The liver plays a key role in these metabolic changes; however, studies to date have evaluated the metabolic state of liver using ex vivo perfusions or isotope labeling techniques targeted to specific pathways. Herein, we developed a unique mass balance approach to characterize the metabolic state of the liver in situ, and used it to quantify the metabolic changes to experimental burn injury in rats. Rats received a sham (control uninjured), 20% or 40% total body surface area (TBSA) scald burn, and were allowed to develop a hypermetabolic response. One day prior to evaluation, all animals were fasted to deplete glycogen stores. Four days post-burn, blood flow rates in major vessels of the liver were measured, and blood samples harvested. We combined measurements of metabolite concentrations and flow rates in the major vessels entering and leaving the liver with a steady-state mass balance model to generate a quantitative picture of the metabolic state of liver. The main findings were: (1) Sham-burned animals exhibited a gluconeogenic pattern, consistent with the fasted state; (2) the 20% TBSA burn inhibited gluconeogenesis and exhibited glycolytic-like features with very few other significant changes; (3) the 40% TBSA burn, by contrast, further enhanced gluconeogenesis and also increased amino acid extraction, urea cycle reactions, and several reactions involved in oxidative phosphorylation. These results suggest that increasing the severity of injury does not lead to a simple dose-dependent metabolic response, but rather leads to qualitatively different responses.

  16. Repressor and activator protein accelerates hepatic ischemia reperfusion injury by promoting neutrophil inflammatory response.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Chang Xian; Lo, Chung Mau; Lian, Qizhou; Ng, Kevin Tak-Pan; Liu, Xiao Bing; Ma, Yuen Yuen; Qi, Xiang; Yeung, Oscar Wai Ho; Tergaonkar, Vinay; Yang, Xin Xiang; Liu, Hui; Liu, Jiang; Shao, Yan; Man, Kwan

    2016-05-10

    Repressor and activator protein (Rap1) directly regulates nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB) dependent signaling, which contributes to hepatic IRI. We here intended to investigate the effect of Rap1 in hepatic ischemia reperfusion injury (IRI) and to explore the underlying mechanisms. The association of Rap1 expression with hepatic inflammatory response were investigated in both human and rat liver transplantation. The effect of Rap1 in hepatic IRI was studied in Rap1 knockout mice IRI model in vivo and primary cells in vitro. Our results showed that over expression of Rap1 was associated with severe liver graft inflammatory response, especially in living donor liver transplantation. The results were also validated in rat liver transplantation model. In mice hepatic IRI model, the knockout of Rap1 reduced hepatic damage and hepatic inflammatory response. In primary cells, the knockout of Rap1 suppressed neutrophils migration activity and adhesion in response to liver sinusoidal endothelial cells through down-regulating neutrophils F-Actin expression and CXCL2/CXCR2 pathway. In addition, the knockout of Rap1 also decreased production of pro-inflammatory cytokines/chemokines in primary neutrophils and neutrophils-induced hepatocyte damage. In conclusion, Rap1 may induce hepatic IRI through promoting neutrophils inflammatory response. Rap1 may be the potential therapeutic target of attenuating hepatic IRI.

  17. Phase-dependent modulation of percutaneously elicited multisegmental muscle responses after spinal cord injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dy, Christine J; Gerasimenko, Yury P; Edgerton, V Reggie; Dyhre-Poulsen, Poul; Courtine, Grégoire; Harkema, Susan J

    2010-05-01

    Phase-dependent modulation of monosynaptic reflexes has been reported for several muscles of the lower limb of uninjured rats and humans. To assess whether this step-phase-dependent modulation can be mediated at the level of the human spinal cord, we compared the modulation of responses evoked simultaneously in multiple motor pools in clinically complete spinal cord injury (SCI) compared with noninjured (NI) individuals. We induced multisegmental responses of the soleus, medial gastrocnemius, tibialis anterior, medial hamstring, and vastus lateralis muscles in response to percutaneous spinal cord stimulation over the Th11-Th12 vertebrae during standing and stepping on a treadmill. Individuals with SCI stepped on a treadmill with partial body-weight support and manual assistance of leg movements. The NI group demonstrated phase-dependent modulation of evoked potentials in all recorded muscles with the modulation of the response amplitude corresponding with changes in EMG amplitude in the same muscle. The SCI group demonstrated more variation in the pattern of modulation across the step cycle and same individuals in the SCI group could display responses with a magnitude as great as that of modulation observed in the NI group. The relationship between modulation and EMG activity during the step cycle varied from noncorrelated to highly correlated patterns. These findings demonstrate that the human lumbosacral spinal cord can phase-dependently modulate motor neuron excitability in the absence of functional supraspinal influence, although with much less consistency than that in NI individuals.

  18. Experimental, numerical, and analytical studies on the seismic response of steel-plate concrete (SC) composite shear walls

    Science.gov (United States)

    Epackachi, Siamak

    The seismic performance of rectangular steel-plate concrete (SC) composite shear walls is assessed for application to buildings and mission-critical infrastructure. The SC walls considered in this study were composed of two steel faceplates and infill concrete. The steel faceplates were connected together and to the infill concrete using tie rods and headed studs, respectively. The research focused on the in-plane behavior of flexure- and flexure-shear-critical SC walls. An experimental program was executed in the NEES laboratory at the University at Buffalo and was followed by numerical and analytical studies. In the experimental program, four large-size specimens were tested under displacement-controlled cyclic loading. The design variables considered in the testing program included wall thickness, reinforcement ratio, and slenderness ratio. The aspect ratio (height-to-length) of the four walls was 1.0. Each SC wall was installed on top of a re-usable foundation block. A bolted baseplate to RC foundation connection was used for all four walls. The walls were identified to be flexure- and flexure-shear critical. The progression of damage in the four walls was identical, namely, cracking and crushing of the infill concrete at the toes of the walls, outward buckling and yielding of the steel faceplates near the base of the wall, and tearing of the faceplates at their junctions with the baseplate. A robust finite element model was developed in LS-DYNA for nonlinear cyclic analysis of the flexure- and flexure-shear-critical SC walls. The DYNA model was validated using the results of the cyclic tests of the four SC walls. The validated and benchmarked models were then used to conduct a parametric study, which investigated the effects of wall aspect ratio, reinforcement ratio, wall thickness, and uniaxial concrete compressive strength on the in-plane response of SC walls. Simplified analytical models, suitable for preliminary analysis and design of SC walls, were

  19. 斜荷载冲击层合板的响应研究%Study on the dynamic response of composite laminated plates under inclined loads impact

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    胡辉; 郑敏毅; 郭源君; 孙光永

    2011-01-01

    为了分析层合板受到斜荷载冲击时的响应,基于Kirchhoff经典层合板理论从平衡微分方程出发推导层合板振动的控制微分方程,利用模态叠加原理求解层合板振动控制微分方程得到层合板的位移、速度和加速度的响应.给出算例,分析了冲击力的大小、冲击的角度、板的尺寸等参数对接触面上最大剪应力的影响,并给出了剪应力在接触面上的分布情况.%The study was present, that on the dynamic response of composite laminated plates under inclined loads impact. Base on Kirchhoff classical composite laminated plated theory, the dynamic control differential equation of the composite laminated plates was established by the equilibrium differential equation. The dynamic response values relate to the structure displacement, speed and acceleration are obtained by using modal superposition methods to solve the dynamic control differential equation of the composite laminated plates. An example was given to show that the impact force, the angle of inclined loads and the length of the plate affect the maximal shearing stress of the contact surface. The distribution of the shearing stress of the contact surface is given.

  20. Effect of systemic inflammatory response in the development of encephalopathy in severe thermal injury

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sorokina O.Y.

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available The article discusses the burn encephalopathy as a manifestation of organ dysfunction. Purpose: to determine the impact of the systemic inflammatory response to the development of en­cephalopathy in thermal injury. The study involved 104 patients, who were divided into two groups depending on the severity of the burn injury. The development of SIRS in patients was confirmed by high levels of IL-6 during the whole period of observation. The level of IL-6 did not affect the development, timing and duration of sleep disorders in both groups. The level of LII on the day 1 affects the development of sleep disorders in group 1 (R=0.499, p=0.041. Development of insomnia correlated with the shift of leukocyte formula to the left in group 2 on the day 5 (R=0.349, p=0.020. We found a relationship between the development of delirium, its duration and the level of young forms of neutrophils in patients of 1 (R=0.563, p=0.001 and 2 (R=0.3488, p=0.003 groups. Development of delirium, its timing and duration correlated with the level of IL-6 on day 3 (R=0.812, p=0,049, R=0.5903, p=0.079 and R=0.615, p=0.059, respectively in the group 2. The extent of the inflammatory reaction determined the disorders of thought (R=-0.545, p=0.036, memory (R=-0.547, p=0.023 and the dynamic of the recovery of cognitive functions in patients of group 1. Cognitive deficit correlated with the level of IL-6 (R=0.760, p=0.079 and the level of young forms of neutrophils (R=-0.603, p=0,013 in group 2. Thus, SIRS is a defining moment in the development of nervous system dysfunction in severe thermal injury.

  1. Inflammatory and epithelial responses in mouse strains that differ in sensitivity to hyperoxic injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnston, C J; Stripp, B R; Piedbeouf, B; Wright, T W; Mango, G W; Reed, C K; Finkelstein, J N

    1998-01-01

    The pulmonary response to various toxicants including bleomycin, ozone, ionizing radiation, and hyperoxia is highly variable among mouse strains. The current study tests the hypothesis that at a similar stage of injury, regardless of strain, expression of inflammatory cytokine and epithelial marker genes would be similar, indicating a common pathway of injury progression. Three strains of mice, C57B1/6J, 129/J, and C3H/HeJ, ranging from sensitive to resistant, were exposed to > 95% O2 for varying times. Ribonuclease protection was used to quantify changes in cytokine mRNA. Despite differences in the kinetics, each strain demonstrated similar hyperoxia-induced changes in the abundance of interleukin (IL)-6, IL-1 beta, IL-3, and tumor neucrosis factor (TNF)-alpha. For each strain, death was accompanied by similar increases in cytokine mRNAs above steady-state control levels. Other inflammatory cytokines, including IL-1 alpha, IL-4, and interferon (IFN)-gamma, were unaltered in all strains at all times. In situ hybridization analysis of the epithelial markers, surfactant protein B (SPB), and clara cell secretory protein (CCSP) at the time of proinflammatory induction showed a similar pattern of expression in all strains. Increased SPB was detected in bronchiolar epithelium, while the number of type II cells expressing this message declined. Both the number of cells expressing CCSP as well as abundance per cell declined. These results suggest that although differences in acute sensitivity to hyperoxia exist between mouse strains, once initiated, acute epithelial cell injury and associated inflammatory changes follow the same pattern in all strains.

  2. Brain response to traumatic brain injury in wild-type and interleukin-6 knockout mice: a microarray analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poulsen, Christian Bjørn; Penkowa, Milena; Borup, Rehannah; Nielsen, Finn Cilius; Cáceres, Mario; Quintana, Albert; Molinero, Amalia; Carrasco, Javier; Giralt, Mercedes; Hidalgo, Juan

    2005-01-01

    Traumatic injury to the brain is one of the leading causes of injury-related death or disability. Brain response to injury is orchestrated by cytokines, such as interleukin (IL)-6, but the full repertoire of responses involved is not well known. We here report the results obtained with microarrays in wild-type and IL-6 knockout mice subjected to a cryolesion of the somatosensorial cortex and killed at 0, 1, 4, 8 and 16 days post-lesion. Overall gene expression was analyzed by using Affymetrix genechips/oligonucleotide arrays with approximately 12,400 probe sets corresponding to approximately 10,000 different murine genes (MG_U74Av2). A robust, conventional statistical method (two-way anova) was employed to select the genes significantly affected. An orderly pattern of gene responses was clearly detected, with genes being up- or down-regulated at specific timings consistent with the processes involved in the initial tissue injury and later regeneration of the parenchyma. IL-6 deficiency showed a dramatic effect in the expression of many genes, especially in the 1 day post-lesion timing, which presumably underlies the poor capacity of IL-6 knockout mice to cope with brain damage. The results highlight the importance of IL-6 controlling the response of the brain to injury as well as the suitability of microarrays for identifying specific targets worthy of further study.

  3. Effect of depression on response inhibition of patients after traumatic brain injury

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chun-hong SHAO

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Objective To investigate the effect of depression on response inhibition of patients after traumatic brain injury (TBI.  Methods Glasgow Coma Scale (GCS, Hamilton Depression Rating Scale-17 Items (HAMD-17 and Activities of Daily Living (ADL were used to assess the severity of trauma, depression and activities of daily living in 104 TBI patients (54 with depression and 50 without depression. Besides, 51 normal controls with matched age, sex and education were enrolled. Stimulus-Response Compatibility (SRC task was employed to record the reaction time (RT of response inhibition of the subjects in 3 groups.  Results Both HAMD-17 and ADL scores in TBI with depression group were significantly higher than those in TBI without depression group (P = 0.000, 0.000 and normal control group (P = 0.000, 0.000. Besides, HAMD-17 and ADL scores in TBI without depression group were significantly higher than those in normal control group (P = 0.000, 0.000. Compared with normal control group, no matter in compatible or incompatible condition, RT was significantly longer in both TBI groups (P = 0.000, 0.000. RT was much longer in TBI with depression group than that in TBI without depression group (P = 0.000.  Conclusions Cognitive dysfunction is a common symptom after TBI, which may exist 6 months after injury or even longer. TBI combined with depression could aggravate the impaired cognitive function, so early identification and timely intervention is very important. DOI: 10.3969/j.issn.1672-6731.2016.06.004

  4. Systemic Inflammatory Responses and Lung Injury following Hip Fracture Surgery Increases Susceptibility to Infection in Aged Rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hao Zhang

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Pulmonary infections frequently occur following hip fracture surgery in aged patients. However, the underlying reasons are not fully understood. The present study investigates the systemic inflammatory response and pulmonary conditions following hip fracture surgery as a means of identifying risk factors for lung infections using an aged rodent model. Aged, male Sprague-Dawley rats (8 animals per group underwent a sham procedure or hip fracture plus femoral intramedullary pinning. Animals were sacrificed 1, 3, and 7 days after the injury. Markers of systemic inflammation and pulmonary injury were analyzed. Both sham-operated and injured/surgical group animals underwent intratracheal inoculation with Pseudomonas aeruginosa 1, 3, and 7 days after surgery. P. aeruginosa counts in blood and bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL fluid and survival rates were recorded. Serum TNF-α, IL-6, IL-1β, and IL-10 levels and markers of pulmonary injury were significantly increased at 1 and 3 days following hip fracture and surgery. Animals challenged with P. aeruginosa at 1 and 3 days after injury had a significantly decreased survival rate and more P. aeruginosa recovered from blood and BAL fluid. This study shows that hip fracture and surgery in aged rats induced a systemic inflammatory response and lung injury associated with increased susceptibility to infection during the acute phase after injury and surgery.

  5. Leaf age affects the responses of foliar injury and gas exchange to tropospheric ozone in Prunus serotina seedlings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang Jianwei, E-mail: jianweizhang@fs.fed.u [Environmental Resources Research Institute, Pennsylvania State University, University Park, PA 16802 (United States); School of Forest Resources, Pennsylvania State University, University Park, PA 16802 (United States); Schaub, Marcus; Ferdinand, Jonathan A. [Environmental Resources Research Institute, Pennsylvania State University, University Park, PA 16802 (United States); Skelly, John M. [Department of Plant Pathology, Pennsylvania State University, University Park, PA 16802 (United States); Steiner, Kim C. [School of Forest Resources, Pennsylvania State University, University Park, PA 16802 (United States); Savage, James E. [Department of Plant Pathology, Pennsylvania State University, University Park, PA 16802 (United States)

    2010-08-15

    We investigated the effect of leaf age on the response of net photosynthesis (A), stomatal conductance (g{sub wv}), foliar injury, and leaf nitrogen concentration (N{sub L}) to tropospheric ozone (O{sub 3}) on Prunus serotina seedlings grown in open-plots (AA) and open-top chambers, supplied with either carbon-filtered or non-filtered air. We found significant variation in A, g{sub wv}, foliar injury, and N{sub L} (P < 0.05) among O{sub 3} treatments. Seedlings in AA showed the highest A and g{sub wv} due to relatively low vapor pressure deficit (VPD). Older leaves showed significantly lower A, g{sub wv}, N{sub L}, and higher foliar injury (P < 0.001) than younger leaves. Leaf age affected the response of A, g{sub wv}, and foliar injury to O{sub 3}. Both VPD and N{sub L} had a strong influence on leaf gas exchange. Foliar O{sub 3}-induced injury appeared when cumulative O{sub 3} uptake reached 8-12 mmol m{sup -2}, depending on soil water availability. The mechanistic assessment of O{sub 3}-induced injury is a valuable approach for a biologically relevant O{sub 3} risk assessment for forest trees. - Ozone effects on symptom development and leaf gas exchange interacted with leaf age and N-content on black cherry seedlings.

  6. Sweat gland density and response during high-intensity exercise in athletes with spinal cord injuries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pritchett, R C; Al-Nawaiseh, A M; Pritchett, K K; Nethery, V; Bishop, P A; Green, J M

    2015-09-01

    Sweat production is crucial for thermoregulation. However, sweating can be problematic for individuals with spinal cord injuries (SCI), as they display a blunting of sudomotor and vasomotor responses below the level of the injury. Sweat gland density and eccrine gland metabolism in SCI are not well understood. Consequently, this study examined sweat lactate (S-LA) (reflective of sweat gland metabolism), active sweat gland density (SGD), and sweat output per gland (S/G) in 7 SCI athletes and 8 able-bodied (AB) controls matched for arm ergometry VO2peak. A sweat collection device was positioned on the upper scapular and medial calf of each subject just prior to the beginning of the trial, with iodine sweat gland density patches positioned on the upper scapular and medial calf. Participants were tested on a ramp protocol (7 min per stage, 20 W increase per stage) in a common exercise environment (21±1°C, 45-65% relative humidity). An independent t-test revealed lower (pSLA, S/G) between AB and SCI athletes. The results suggest similar interglandular metabolic activity irrespective of overall sweat rate.

  7. Emodin alleviates jejunum injury in rats with sepsis by inhibiting inflammation response.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Yi-Kun; Xu, Ying-Kun; Zhang, Hao; Yin, Jiang-Tao; Fan, Xin; Liu, Da-Dong; Fu, Hai-Yan; Wan, Bing

    2016-12-01

    Emodin is an anthraquinone derived from Chinese herb that exerts anti-inflammation effects. This study aimed to investigate whether emodin provides the protection for jejunum injury by inhibiting inflammation. We established a model of sepsis caused by cecal ligation and puncture. Forty-eight male Wistar rats were divided into four groups (n=12). Jejunum injury was assessed by pathological examination. The activity of pJAK1/pSTAT3 and protein levels of Bcl-2 and Bax were detected by Western blot analysis. Inflammatory factors IL-6, TNF-α and procalcitonin were detected by ELISA. Apoptosis was detected by TUNEL. We found that emodin alleviated jejunum damage and apoptosis induced by sepsis and decreased the levels of IL-6, TNF-α and procalcitonin in septic rats. Furthermore, we observed that emodin increased the levels of pJAK1 and of pSTAT3, which were decreased in rats with sepsis. In addition, emodin enhanced the expression of Bcl-2 which was downregulated by sepsis and decreased the expression of Bax which was upregulated by sepsis. In conclusion, these results indicate that emodin suppresses inflammatory response induced by sepsis. Emodin activates JAK1/STAT3 signaling pathway and regulates Bcl-2 and Bax expression to protect the jejunum in rats with sepsis. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  8. In the presence of danger:the extracellular matrix defensive response to central nervous system injury

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Lyn B. Jakeman; Kent E. Williams; Bryan Brautigam

    2014-01-01

    Glial cells in the central nervous system (CNS) contribute to formation of the extracellular matrix, which provides adhesive sites, signaling molecules, and a diffusion barrier to enhance efifcient neurotransmission and axon potential propagation. In the normal adult CNS, the extracellular matrix (ECM) is relatively stable except in selected regions characterized by dynamic remodel-ing. However, after trauma such as a spinal cord injury or cortical contusion, the lesion epicenter becomes a focus of acute neuroinlfammation. The activation of the surrounding glial cells leads to a dramatic change in the composition of the ECM at the edges of the lesion, creating a perile-sion environment dominated by growth inhibitory molecules and restoration of the peripheral/central nervous system border. An advantage of this response is to limit the invasion of damaging cells and diffusion of toxic molecules into the spared tissue regions, but this occurs at the cost of inhibiting migration of endogenous repair cells and preventing axonal regrowth. The following review was prepared by reading and discussing over 200 research articles in the ifeld published in PubMed and selecting those with signiifcant impact and/or controversial points. This article highlights structural and functional features of the normal adult CNS ECM and then focuses on the reactions of glial cells and changes in the perilesion border that occur following spinal cord or contusive brain injury. Current research strategies directed at modifying the inhibitory perile-sion microenvironment without eliminating the protective functions of glial cell activation are discussed.

  9. Rapid neuroinflammatory response localized to injured neurons after diffuse traumatic brain injury in swine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wofford, Kathryn L; Harris, James P; Browne, Kevin D; Brown, Daniel P; Grovola, Michael R; Mietus, Constance J; Wolf, John A; Duda, John E; Putt, Mary E; Spiller, Kara L; Cullen, D Kacy

    2017-04-01

    Despite increasing appreciation of the critical role that neuroinflammatory pathways play in brain injury and neurodegeneration, little is known about acute microglial reactivity following diffuse traumatic brain injury (TBI) - the most common clinical presentation that includes all concussions. Therefore, we investigated acute microglial reactivity using a porcine model of closed-head rotational velocity/acceleration-induced TBI that closely mimics the biomechanical etiology of inertial TBI in humans. We observed rapid microglial reactivity within 15min of both mild and severe TBI. Strikingly, microglial activation was restrained to regions proximal to individual injured neurons - as denoted by trauma-induced plasma membrane disruption - which served as epicenters of acute reactivity. Single-cell quantitative analysis showed that in areas free of traumatically permeabilized neurons, microglial density and morphology were similar between sham or following mild or severe TBI. However, microglia density increased and morphology shifted to become more reactive in proximity to injured neurons. Microglial reactivity around injured neurons was exacerbated following repetitive TBI, suggesting further amplification of acute neuroinflammatory responses. These results indicate that neuronal trauma rapidly activates microglia in a highly localized manner, and suggest that activated microglia may rapidly influence neuronal stability and/or pathophysiology after diffuse TBI. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Development of a Finite Element Model of the Human Shoulder to Investigate the Mechanical Responses and Injuries in Side Impact

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iwamoto, Masami; Miki, Kazuo; Yang, King H.

    Previous studies in both fields of automotive safety and orthopedic surgery have hypothesized that immobilization of the shoulder caused by the shoulder injury could be related to multiple rib fractures, which are frequently life threatening. Therefore, for more effective occupant protection, it is important to understand the relationship between shoulder injury and multiple rib fractures in side impact. The purpose of this study is to develop a finite element model of the human shoulder in order to understand this relationship. The shoulder model included three bones (the humerus, scapula and clavicle) and major ligaments and muscles around the shoulder. The model also included approaches to represent bone fractures and joint dislocations. The relationships between shoulder injury and immobilization of the shoulder are discussed using model responses for lateral shoulder impact. It is also discussed how the injury can be related to multiple rib fractures.

  11. 微型钢板结合克氏针固定治疗 Lisfranc 损伤%Treatment of the Lisfranc injury using miniature plate combined with the Kirschner wire

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    燕冰; 孙士强; 杨通宝

    2014-01-01

    Objective To summarize and analyze the clinical effect of miniature plate combined with the Kirschner wire on the Lisfranc injury. Methods From March 2010 to March 2013,22 patients with Lisfranc injury were treated,including 15 male cases and 7 female cases,and their age was from 23 - 62,with an average of 39. 8 years old. The injury causes including traffic accident in 8 cases,high falling in 5 cases,heavy parts in 3 cases,and sport injury in 6 cases. According to the Myerson injury parting,there were 6 cases of type A,7 cases of type B1,4 cases of type B2,3 cases of type C1 and 2 cases of type C2. The time from injury to surgery was 7 - 11 d,with an average of 8. 8 d. And all pa-tients were treated by miniature plate combined with the Kirschner wire. Results All patients were fol-lowed up,and the follow-up time was 10 - 38 months,with the average of(21. 3 ± 6. 25)months. Ac-cording to the AOFAS scoring standard,12 feet were optimal,8 feet were good,2 feet were fair,and the fine rate was 90. 9% . Conclusions The treatment of the Lisfranc injury by miniature plate combined with the Kirschner wire has strong fixation,less complications and satisfactory clinical effect,and it is also beneficial to early functional training.%目的:分析切开复位微型钢板结合克氏针固定治疗 Lisfranc 损伤的临床疗效。方法2010年3月至2013年3月期间收治22例 Lisfranc 损伤患者,其中男15例,女7例;年龄23~62岁,平均39.8岁;致伤原因:车祸伤8例,高处坠落伤5例,重物砸伤3例,运动伤6例;根据 Myerson 损伤分型,A 型6例,B1型7例,B2型4例, C1型3例,C2型2例。受伤距离手术时间为7~11 d,平均8.8 d,采用微型钢板结合克氏针进行治疗。结果12例患者均获得随访,随访时间为10~38个月,平均(21.3±6.25)个月。采用 AOFAS 评分标准进行评定,本研究优12足,良8足,可为2足,优良率为90.9%。结论采用微型钢

  12. Genome-wide gene expression profiling of stress response in a spinal cord clip compression injury model

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    Background The aneurysm clip impact-compression model of spinal cord injury (SCI) is a standard injury model in animals that closely mimics the primary mechanism of most human injuries: acute impact and persisting compression. Its histo-pathological and behavioural outcomes are extensively similar to human SCI. To understand the distinct molecular events underlying this injury model we analyzed global mRNA abundance changes during the acute, subacute and chronic stages of a moderate to severe injury to the rat spinal cord. Results Time-series expression analyses resulted in clustering of the majority of deregulated transcripts into eight statistically significant expression profiles. Systematic application of Gene Ontology (GO) enrichment pathway analysis allowed inference of biological processes participating in SCI pathology. Temporal analysis identified events specific to and common between acute, subacute and chronic time-points. Processes common to all phases of injury include blood coagulation, cellular extravasation, leukocyte cell-cell adhesion, the integrin-mediated signaling pathway, cytokine production and secretion, neutrophil chemotaxis, phagocytosis, response to hypoxia and reactive oxygen species, angiogenesis, apoptosis, inflammatory processes and ossification. Importantly, various elements of adaptive and induced innate immune responses span, not only the acute and subacute phases, but also persist throughout the chronic phase of SCI. Induced innate responses, such as Toll-like receptor signaling, are more active during the acute phase but persist throughout the chronic phase. However, adaptive immune response processes such as B and T cell activation, proliferation, and migration, T cell differentiation, B and T cell receptor-mediated signaling, and B cell- and immunoglobulin-mediated immune response become more significant during the chronic phase. Conclusions This analysis showed that, surprisingly, the diverse series of molecular events that

  13. Lung surfactant protein D (SP-D) response and regulation during acute and chronic lung injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaunsbaek, Maria Quisgaard; Rasmussen, Karina Juhl; Beers, Michael F; Atochina-Vasserman, Elena N; Hansen, Soren

    2013-06-01

    Surfactant protein D (SP-D) is a collection that plays important roles in modulating host defense functions and maintaining phospholipid homeostasis in the lung. The aim of current study was to characterize comparatively the SP-D response in bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) and serum in three murine models of lung injury, using a validated ELISA technology for estimation of SP-D levels. Mice were exposed to lipopolysaccharide, bleomycin, or Pneumocystis carinii (Pc) and sacrificed at different time points. In lipopolysaccharide-challenged mice, the level of SP-D in BAL increased within 6 h, peaked at 51 h (4,518 ng/ml), and returned to base level at 99 h (612 ng/ml). Serum levels of SP-D increased immediately (8.6 ng/ml), peaked at 51 h (16 ng/ml), and returned to base levels at 99 h (3.8 ng/ml). In a subacute bleomycin inflammation model, SP-D levels were 4,625 and 367 ng/ml in BAL and serum, respectively, 8 days after exposure. In a chronic Pc inflammation model, the highest level of SP-D was observed 6 weeks after inoculation, with BAL and serum levels of 1,868 and 335 ng/ml, respectively. We conclude that serum levels of SP-D increase during lung injury, with a sustained increment during chronic inflammation compared with acute inflammation. A quick upregulation of SP-D in serum in response to acute airway inflammation supports the notion that SP-D translocates from the airways into the vascular system, in favor of being synthesized systemically. The study also confirms the concept of using increased SP-D serum levels as a biomarker of especially chronic airway inflammation.

  14. Acute stress response and recovery after whiplash injuries. A one-year prospective study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kongsted, Alice; Bendix, Tom; Qerama, Erisela; Kasch, Helge; Bach, Flemming W; Korsholm, Lars; Jensen, Troels S

    2008-05-01

    Chronic whiplash-associated disorder (WAD) represents a major medical and psycho-social problem. The typical symptomatology presented in WAD is to some extent similar to symptoms of post traumatic stress disorder. In this study we examined if the acute stress reaction following a whiplash injury predicted long-term sequelae. Participants with acute whiplash-associated symptoms after a motor vehicle accident were recruited from emergency units and general practitioners. The predictor variable was the sum score of the impact of event scale (IES) completed within 10 days after the accident. The main outcome-measures were neck pain and headache, neck disability, general health, and working ability one year after the accident. A total of 737 participants were included and completed the IES, and 668 (91%) participated in the 1-year follow-up. A baseline IES-score denoting a moderate to severe stress response was obtained by 13% of the participants. This was associated with increased risk of considerable persistent pain (OR=3.3; 1.8-5.9), neck disability (OR=3.2; 1.7-6.0), reduced working ability (OR=2.8; 1.6-4.9), and lowered self-reported general health one year after the accident. These associations were modified by baseline neck pain intensity. It was not possible to distinguish between participants who recovered and those who did not by means of the IES (AUC=0.6). In conclusion, the association between the acute stress reaction and persistent WAD suggests that post traumatic stress reaction may be important to consider in the early management of whiplash injury. However, the emotional response did not predict chronicity in individuals.

  15. Influence of boundary conditions on the response of multilayered plates with cohesive interfaces and delaminations using a homogenized approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Massabò

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Stress and displacement fields in multilayered composites with interfacial imperfections, such as imperfect bonding of the layers or delaminations, or where the plies are separated by thin interlayers allowing relative motion, have large variations in the thickness, with characteristic zigzag patterns and jumps at the layer interfaces. These effects are well captured by a model recently formulated by the author for multilayered plates with imperfect interfaces and affine interfacial traction laws (Massabò & Campi, Meccanica, 2014, in press; Compos Struct, 2014, 116, 311-324. The model defines a homogenized displacement field, which satisfies interfacial continuity, and uses a variational technique to derive equilibrium equations depending on only six generalized displacement functions, for any arbitrary numbers of layers and interfaces. The model accurately predicts stresses and displacements in simply supported, highly anisotropic, thick plates with continuous, sliding interfaces. In this paper the model is applied to wide plates with clamped edges and some inconsistencies, which have been noted in the literature for models based on similar approaches and have limited their utilization, are explained. A generalized transverse shear force is introduced as the gross stress resultant which is directly related to the bending moment in the equilibrium equations of multilayered structures with imperfect interfaces and substitutes for the shear force of single-layer theory. An application to a delaminated wide plate highlights the potential and limitations of the proposed model for the solution of fracture mechanics problems.

  16. Toll-like receptor 2 participates in the response to lung injury in a murine model of pulmonary contusion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoth, J Jason; Hudson, William P; Brownlee, Noel A; Yoza, Barbara K; Hiltbold, Elizabeth M; Meredith, J Wayne; McCall, Charles E

    2007-10-01

    Blunt chest trauma resulting in pulmonary contusion with an accompanying acute inflammatory response is a common but poorly understood injury. We report that Toll-like receptor (TLR) 2 participates in the inflammatory response to lung injury. To show this, we use a model of pulmonary contusion in the mouse that is similar to that observed clinically in humans based on histologic, morphologic, and biochemical criteria of acute lung injury. The inflammatory response to pulmonary contusion in our mouse model is characterized by pulmonary edema, neutrophil transepithelial migration, and increased expression of the innate immunity proinflammatory cytokines IL 1beta and IL 6, the adhesion intracellular adhesion molecule 1, and chemokine (CXC motif) ligand 1. Compared with wild-type animals, contused Tlr2(-/-) mice have significantly reduced pulmonary edema and neutrophilia. These findings are associated with decreased levels of circulating chemokine (CXC motif) ligand 1. In contrast, systemic IL 6 levels remain elevated in the TLR2-deficient phenotype. These results show that TLR2 has a primary role in the neutrophil response to acute lung injury. We suggest that an unidentified noninfectious ligand generated by pulmonary contusion acts via TLR2 to generate inflammatory responses.

  17. Deep tissue injury in development of pressure ulcers: a decrease of inflammasome activation and changes in human skin morphology in response to aging and mechanical load.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Olivera Stojadinovic

    Full Text Available Molecular mechanisms leading to pressure ulcer development are scarce in spite of high mortality of patients. Development of pressure ulcers that is initially observed as deep tissue injury is multifactorial. We postulate that biomechanical forces and inflammasome activation, together with ischemia and aging, may play a role in pressure ulcer development. To test this we used a newly-developed bio-mechanical model in which ischemic young and aged human skin was subjected to a constant physiological compressive stress (load of 300 kPa (determined by pressure plate analyses of a person in a reclining position for 0.5-4 hours. Collagen orientation was assessed using polarized light, whereas inflammasome proteins were quantified by immunoblotting. Loaded skin showed marked changes in morphology and NLRP3 inflammasome protein expression. Sub-epidermal separations and altered orientation of collagen fibers were observed in aged skin at earlier time points. Aged skin showed significant decreases in the levels of NLRP3 inflammasome proteins. Loading did not alter NLRP3 inflammasome proteins expression in aged skin, whereas it significantly increased their levels in young skin. We conclude that aging contributes to rapid morphological changes and decrease in inflammasome proteins in response to tissue damage, suggesting that a decline in the innate inflammatory response in elderly skin could contribute to pressure ulcer pathogenesis. Observed morphological changes suggest that tissue damage upon loading may not be entirely preventable. Furthermore, newly developed model described here may be very useful in understanding the mechanisms of deep tissue injury that may lead towards development of pressure ulcers.

  18. NF-kappaB-driven STAT2 and CCL2 expression in astrocytes in response to brain injury

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Khorooshi, Reza; Babcock, Alicia A; Owens, Trevor

    2008-01-01

    Tissue response to injury includes expression of genes encoding cytokines and chemokines. These regulate entry of immune cells to the injured tissue. The synthesis of many cytokines and chemokines involves NF-kappaB and signal transducers and activators of transcription (STAT). Injury to the CNS...... induces glial response. Astrocytes are the major glial population in the CNS. We examined expression of STATs and the chemokine CCL2 and their relationship to astroglial NF-kappaB signaling in the CNS following axonal transection. Double labeling with Mac-1/CD11b and glial fibrillary acidic protein......-regulation and phosphorylation were NF-kappaB -dependent since they did not occur in the lesion-reactive hippocampus of transgenic mice with specific inhibition of NF-kappaB activation in astrocytes. We further showed that lack of NF-kappaB signaling significantly reduced injury-induced CCL2 expression as well as leukocyte...

  19. Unmasking the responses of the stem cells and progenitors in the subventricular zone after neonatal and pediatric brain injuries

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mariano Guardia Clausi

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available There is great interest in the regenerative potential of the neural stem cells and progenitors that populate the subventricular zone (SVZ. However, a comprehensive understanding of SVZ cell responses to brain injuries has been hindered by the lack of sensitive approaches to study the cellular composition of this niche. Here we review progress being made in deciphering the cells of the SVZ gleaned from the use of a recently designed flow cytometry panel that allows SVZ cells to be parsed into multiple subsets of progenitors as well as putative stem cells. We review how this approach has begun to unmask both the heterogeneity of SVZ cells as well as the dynamic shifts in cell populations with neonatal and pediatric brain injuries. We also discuss how flow cytometric analyses also have begun to reveal how specific cytokines, such as Leukemia inhibitory factor are coordinating SVZ responses to injury.

  20. Unmasking the responses of the stem cells and progenitors in the subventricular zone after neonatal and pediatric brain injuries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clausi, Mariano Guardia; Kumari, Ekta; Levison, Steven W

    2016-01-01

    There is great interest in the regenerative potential of the neural stem cells and progenitors that populate the subventricular zone (SVZ). However, a comprehensive understanding of SVZ cell responses to brain injuries has been hindered by the lack of sensitive approaches to study the cellular composition of this niche. Here we review progress being made in deciphering the cells of the SVZ gleaned from the use of a recently designed flow cytometry panel that allows SVZ cells to be parsed into multiple subsets of progenitors as well as putative stem cells. We review how this approach has begun to unmask both the heterogeneity of SVZ cells as well as the dynamic shifts in cell populations with neonatal and pediatric brain injuries. We also discuss how flow cytometric analyses also have begun to reveal how specific cytokines, such as Leukemia inhibitory factor are coordinating SVZ responses to injury.

  1. Unmasking the responses of the stem cells and progenitors in the subventricular zone after neonatal and pediatric brain injuries

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Mariano Guardia Clausi; Ekta Kumari; Steven W.Levison

    2016-01-01

    There is great interest in the regenerative potential of the neural stem cells and progenitors that populate the subventricular zone (SVZ). However, a comprehensive understanding of SVZ cell responses to brain in-juries has been hindered by the lack of sensitive approaches to study the cellular composition of this niche. Here we review progress being made in deciphering the cells of the SVZ gleaned from the use of a recently designed lfow cytometry panel that allows SVZ cells to be parsed into multiple subsets of progenitors as well as putative stem cells. We review how this approach has begun to unmask both the heterogeneity of SVZ cells as well as the dynamic shifts in cell populations with neonatal and pediatric brain injuries. We also discuss how lfow cytometric analyses also have begun to reveal how speciifc cytokines, such as Leuke-mia inhibitory factor are coordinating SVZ responses to injury.

  2. Imaging of Physeal Injury

    OpenAIRE

    Jawetz, Shari T.; Shah, Parina H.; Potter, Hollis G.

    2015-01-01

    Context: As the intensity of youth participation in athletic activities continues to rise, the number of overuse injuries has also increased. A subset of overuse injuries involves the physis, which is extremely susceptible to injury. This paper aims to review the utility of the various imaging modalities in the diagnosis and management of physeal injuries in the skeletally immature population. Evidence Acquisition: A search for the keywords pediatric, physis, growth plate, x-ray, computed tom...

  3. Changes in Strenght, Sensation, and Prehension in Acute Cervical Spinal Cord Injury: European Multicenter Responsiveness Study of the GRASSP

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Velstra, I.; Curt, A.; Frotzler, A.; Abel, R.; Kalsi-Ryan, S.; Rietman, J.S.; Bolliger, M.

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the internal and external responsiveness and recovery profiles of the Graded Redefined Assessment of Strength, Sensibility, and Prehension (GRASSP) instrument in revealing changes in upper limb function within the first year following cervical spinal cord injury (SCI). Met

  4. The Relationship of Parental Warm Responsiveness and Negativity to Emerging Behavior Problems following Traumatic Brain Injury in Young Children

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wade, Shari L.; Cassedy, Amy; Walz, Nicolay C.; Taylor, H. Gerry; Stancin, Terry; Yeates, Keith Owen

    2011-01-01

    Parenting behaviors play a critical role in the child's behavioral development, particularly for children with neurological deficits. This study examined the relationship of parental warm responsiveness and negativity to changes in behavior following traumatic brain injury (TBI) in young children relative to an age-matched cohort of children with…

  5. Toll-Like Receptor-9 (TLR9) is Requisite for Acute Inflammatory Response and Injury Following Lung Contusion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suresh, Madathilparambil V; Thomas, Bivin; Dolgachev, Vladislav A; Sherman, Matthew A; Goldberg, Rebecca; Johnson, Mark; Chowdhury, Aulina; Machado-Aranda, David; Raghavendran, Krishnan

    2016-10-01

    Lung contusion (LC) is a significant risk factor for the development of acute respiratory distress syndrome. Toll-like receptor 9 (TLR9) recognizes specific unmethylated CpG motifs, which are prevalent in microbial but not vertebrate genomic DNA, leading to innate and acquired immune responses. TLR9 signaling has recently been implicated as a critical component of the inflammatory response following lung injury. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the contribution of TLR9 signaling to the acute physiologic changes following LC. Nonlethal unilateral closed-chest LC was induced in TLR9 (-/-) and wild-type (WT) mice. The mice were sacrificed at 5, 24, 48, and 72-h time points. The extent of injury was assessed by measuring bronchoalveolar lavage, cells (cytospin), albumin (permeability injury), and cytokines (inflammation). Following LC, only the TLR9 (-/-) mice showed significant reductions in the levels of albumin; release of pro-inflammatory cytokines IL-1β, IL-6, and Keratinocyte chemoattractant; production of macrophage chemoattractant protein 5; and recruitment of alveolar macrophages and neutrophil infiltration. Histological evaluation demonstrated significantly worse injury at all-time points for WT mice. Macrophages, isolated from TLR9 (-/-) mice, exhibited increased phagocytic activity at 24 h after LC compared with those isolated from WT mice. TLR9, therefore, appears to be functionally important in the development of progressive lung injury and inflammation following LC. Our findings provide a new framework for understanding the pathogenesis of lung injury and suggest blockade of TLR9 as a new therapeutic strategy for the treatment of LC-induced lung injury.

  6. Aging- and injury-related differential apoptotic response in the dentate gyrus of the hippocampus in rats following brain trauma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dong eSun

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available The elderly are among the most vulnerable to traumatic brain injury (TBI with poor functional outcomes and impaired cognitive recovery. Of the pathological changes that occur following TBI, apoptosis is an important contributor to the secondary insults and subsequent morbidity associated with TBI. The current study investigated age-related differences in the apoptotic response to injury, which may represent a mechanistic underpinning of the heightened vulnerability of the aged brain to TBI. This study compared the degree of TBI-induced apoptotic response and changes of several apoptosis-related proteins in the hippocampal dentate gyrus (DG of juvenile and aged animals following injury. Juvenile (p28 and aged rats (24 months were subjected to a moderate fluid percussive injury or sham injury and sacrificed at 2 days post-injury. One group of rats in both ages was sacrificed and brain sections were processed for TUNEL and immunofluorescent labeling to assess the level of apoptosis and to identify cell types which undergo apoptosis. Another group of animals was subjected to proteomic analysis, whereby proteins from the ipsilateral DG were extracted and subjected to 2D-gel electrophoresis and mass spectrometry analysis. Histological studies revealed age- and injury-related differences in the number of TUNEL-labeled cells in the DG. In sham animals, juveniles displayed a higher number of TUNEL+ apoptotic cells located primarily in the subgranular zone of the DG as compared to the aged brain. These apoptotic cells expressed the early neuronal marker PSA-NCAM, suggestive of newly generated immature neurons. In contrast, aged rats had a significantly higher number of TUNEL+ cells following TBI than injured juveniles, which were NeuN-positive mature neurons located predominantly in the granule cell layer. Fluorescent triple labeling revealed that microglial cells were closely associated to the apoptotic cells. In concert with these cellular changes

  7. Mesenchymal stem cells promote augmented response of endogenous neural stem cells in spinal cord injury of rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marta Rocha Araujo

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Traumatic spinal cord injury results in severe neurological deficits, mostly irreversible. The cell therapy represents a strategy for treatment particularly with the use of stem cells with satisfactory results in several experimental models. The aim of the study was to compare the treatment of spinal cord injury (SCI with and without mesenchymal stem cells (MSC, to investigate whether MSCs migrate and/or remain at the site of injury, and to analyze the effects of MSCs on inflammation, astrocytic reactivity and activation of endogenous stem cells. Three hours after SCI, animals received bone marrow-derived MSCs (1×107 in 1mL PBS, IV. Animals were euthanized 24 hours, 7 and 21 days post-injury. The MSC were not present in the site of the lesion and the immunofluorescent evaluation showed significant attenuation of inflammatory response with reduction in macrophages labeled with anti-CD68 antibody (ED1, decreased immunoreactivity of astrocytes (GFAP+ and greater activation of endogenous stem cells (nestin+ in the treated groups. Therefore, cell transplantation have a positive effect on recovery from traumatic spinal cord injury possibly due to the potential of MSCs to attenuate the immune response.

  8. STUDY ON THE RESPONSE TO LOW-VELOCITY IMPACT OF A COMPOSITE PLATE IMPROVED BY SHAPE MEMORY ALLOY

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ying Wu; Yongdong Wu; Yuanxun Wang; Weifang Zhong

    2007-01-01

    Improvement from the pseudo-elastic effect of shape memory alloy (SMA) on the low-velocity impact (LVI) resistance of a composite plate is investigated by the finite element method (FEM). The stiffness matrix of the dynamic finite element equation is established step by step and the martensite fraction is obtained at each time step. The direct Newmark integration method is employed in solving the dynamic finite element equation, while the impact contact force is determined using the modified Hertz's law. It is found that SMA can effectively improve the performance of a composite structure subjected to low-velocity impact. Numerical results show that the deflection of a SMA-hybrid composite plate has been reduced approximately by thirty percent when the volume fraction of the embedded SMA reaches 0.3.

  9. Different patterns of intestinal response to injury after arterial, venous or arteriovenous occlusion in rats

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Francisco Javier Guzmán-de la Garza; Carlos Rodrigo Cámara-Lemarroy; Gabriela Alarcón-Galván; Paula Cordero-Pérez; Linda Elsa Mu(n)oz-Espinosa; Nancy Esthela Fernández-Garza

    2009-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the differences in injury patterns caused by arterial, venous or arteriovenous mesenteric occlusion.METHODS: Male Wistar rats were separated equally into four groups. Occlusion was performed by clamping the superior mesenteric artery (A), the mesenteric vein (V) or both (AV) for 30 min, followed by 60 min of reperfusion. A control group received sham surgery only. Intestinal sections were examined for histological damage and serum tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α), endothelin-1 (ET-1), P-selectin, antithrombin Ⅲ (ATⅢ) and soluble intracellular adhesion molecule-1 (ICAM-1) concentrations were measured.RESULTS: All groups showed significant mucosal injury compared to controls. Furthermore, mucosal injury was significantly more severe in the V and AV groups compared to the A group (3.6 ± 0.55, 3.4 ± 0.55 and 2 ± 0.71, respectively, P = 0.01). ICAM-1 was similarly elevated in all groups, with no significant differences between the groups. P-selectin levels were significantly elevated in the V and AV groups but not the A group (1.4 ± 0.5 ng/mL, 2.52 ± 0.9 ng/mL and 0.02 ± 0.01 ng/mL,respectively, P = 0.01) and ET-1 was significantly elevated in the A and V groups but not the AV group (0.32 ± 0.04 pg/mL, 0.36 ± 0.05 pg/mL and 0.29 ± 0.03 pg/mL, respectively, P = 0.01) compared to sham controls. ATⅢ levels were markedly depleted in the V and AV groups, but not in the A group (29.1 ± 5.2 pg/mL,31.4 ± 21.8 pg/mL and 55.8 ± 35.6 pg/mL ,respectively, P = 0.01), compared to controls. Serum TNF-α was significantly increased in all groups compared to sham controls (1.32 ± 0.87 ng/mL, 1.79 ± 0.20 ng/mL and 4.4 ± 0.69 ng/mL, for groups A, V and AV,respectively, P = 0.01), with higher values in the AV group.CONCLUSION: Different patterns of response to ischemia/reperfusion are associated with venous, arterial or arteriovenous occlusion. Venous and arteriovenous occlusion was associated with the most severe alterations.

  10. Extracellular ATP activates MAPK and ROS signaling during injury response in the fungus Trichoderma atroviride

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elizabeth eMedina-Castellanos

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available The response to mechanical damage is crucial for the survival of multicellular organisms, enabling their adaptation to hostile environments. Trichoderma atroviride, a filamentous fungus of great importance in the biological control of plant diseases, responds to mechanical damage by activating regenerative processes and asexual reproduction (conidiation. During this response, reactive oxygen species (ROS are produced by the NADPH oxidase (Nox1/NoxR complex. To understand the underlying early signaling events, we evaluated molecules such as extracellular ATP (eATP and Ca2+ that are known to trigger wound-induced responses in plants and animals. Concretely, we investigated the activation of mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK pathways by eATP, Ca2+ and ROS. Indeed, application of exogenous ATP and Ca2+ triggered conidiation. Furthermore, eATP promoted the Nox1-dependent production of ROS and activated a MAPK pathway. Mutants in the MAPK-encoding genes tmk1 and tmk3 were affected in wound-induced conidiation, and phosphorylation of both Tmk1 and Tmk3 was triggered by eATP. We conclude that in this fungus, eATP acts as a damage-associated molecular pattern (DAMP. Our data indicate the existence of an eATP receptor and suggest that in fungi, eATP triggers pathways that converge to regulate asexual reproduction genes that are required for injury-induced conidiation. By contrast, Ca2+ is more likely to act as a downstream second messenger. The early steps of mechanical damage response in T. atroviride share conserved elements with those known from plants and animals.

  11. Characterization of troponin responses in isoproterenol-induced cardiac injury in the Hanover Wistar rat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    York, Malcolm; Scudamore, Cheryl; Brady, Sally; Chen, Christabelle; Wilson, Sharon; Curtis, Mark; Evans, Gareth; Griffiths, William; Whayman, Matthew; Williams, Thomas; Turton, John

    2007-06-01

    The investigations aimed to evaluate the usefulness of cardiac troponins as biomarkers of acute myocardial injury in the rat. Serum from female Hanover Wistar rats treated with a single intraperitoneal (IP) injection of isoproterenol (ISO) was assayed for cardiac troponin I (cTnI) (ACS: 180SE, Bayer), cTnI (Immulite 2000, Diagnostic Products Corporation) and cardiac troponin T (cTnT) (Elecsys 2010, Roche). In a time-course study (50.0 mg/kg ISO), serum cTnI (ACS:180SE) and cTnT increased above control levels at 1 hour postdosing, peaking at 2 hours (cTnI, 4.30 microg/L; cTnT, 1.79 microg/L), and declined to baseline by 48 hours, with histologic cardiac lesions first seen at 4 hours postdosing. The Immulite 2000 assay gave minimal cTnI signals, indicating poor immunoreactivity towards rat cTnI. In a dose-response study (0.25 to 20.0 mg/kg ISO), there was a trend for increasing cTnI (ACS:180SE) values with increasing ISO dose levels at 2 hours postdosing. By 24 hours, cTnI levels returned to baseline although chronic cardiac myodegeneration was present. We conclude that serum cTnI and cTnT levels are sensitive and specific biomarkers for detecting ISO induced myocardial injury in the rat. Serum troponin values reflect the development of histopathologic lesions; however peak troponin levels precede maximal lesion severity.

  12. Systemic Inflammatory Response Syndrome (SIRS) Score Independently Predicts Poor Outcome in Isolated Traumatic Brain Injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacome, Tomas; Tatum, Danielle

    2017-05-25

    Systemic inflammatory response syndrome (SIRS) is frequently observed after various types of acute cerebral injury and has been linked to clinical deterioration in non-traumatic brain injury (TBI). SIRS scores have also been shown to be predictive of length of stay and mortality in trauma patients. We aimed to determine the prognostic utility of SIRS present at admission in trauma patients with isolated TBI. This was a 5-year retrospective cohort study of adults (≥18 years) with isolated TBI admitted to a Level II trauma center. The prognostic value of SIRS, total SIRS scores, and each SIRS criterion was examined by Χ (2) and logistic regression analyses. Of the 330 patients identified, 50 (15.2%) met SIRS criteria. SIRS was significantly associated with poor outcome (P SIRS score of 2 on admission (P = 0.007) and increased significantly to 6.5 times in patients with a SIRS score of 3 (P = 0.002). Logistic regression demonstrated SIRS and each criterion to be significant independent prognostic factors (SIRS, P = 0.030; body temperature, P = 0.006; tachypnea, P = 0.022, tachycardia P = 0.023). SIRS at admission is an independent predictor of poor outcome in isolated TBI patients. These data demonstrate SIRS to be an important clinical tool that may be used in facilitating prognostication, particularly in elderly trauma patients. Future prospective studies aimed at therapeutic interventions to mitigate SIRS in TBI patients are warranted. Prognostic, Level III.

  13. Reflex responses to combined hip and knee motion in human chronic spinal cord injury

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ming Wu, PhD

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available The relative contributions of hip and knee proprioceptors to the origination of extensor spasms were examined in 11 subjects with chronic spinal cord injury (SCI. Ramp and hold extension and combined hip and knee oscillation movements were imposed to the right leg while the ankle was held in a static position by a custom-designed robot. Isometric joint torques of the hip, knee, and ankle and surface electromyograms (EMGs from seven leg muscles were recorded following controlled hip and knee extension. A stereotypical torque response consisting of hip flexion, knee extension, and ankle plantar flexion was observed following hip and knee perturbations. Further, the hip or knee joint posture modulated the spastic reflexes triggered by the extension movement of the other joint, with larger responses observed with the hip and knee extended. In addition, combined hip and knee oscillation movements were imposed to one leg with four different phasing conditions. The phasing between the hip and knee modulated the reflex activity triggered by hip and knee oscillations. The EMG patterns of the spastic reflexes were generally consistent with muscle timing during locomotion in human SCI. This knowledge may help identify rehabilitation strategies that produce functional movements in human SCI.

  14. Initial and sustained brain responses to threat anticipation in blood-injection-injury phobia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leonie Brinkmann

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Blood-injection-injury (BII phobia differs from other subtypes of specific phobia in that it is associated with elevated disgust-sensitivity as well as specific autonomic and brain responses during processing of phobia-relevant stimuli. To what extent these features play a role already during threat anticipation is unclear. In the current fMRI experiment, 16 female BII phobics and 16 female healthy controls anticipated the presentation of phobia-specific and neutral pictures. On the behavioral level, anxiety dominated the anticipatory period in BII phobics relative to controls, while both anxiety and disgust were elevated during picture presentation. By applying two different models for the analysis of brain responses to anticipation of phobia-specific versus neutral stimuli, we found initial and sustained increases of activation in anterior cingulate cortex (ACC, insula, lateral and medial prefrontal cortex (PFC, thalamus and visual areas, as well as initial activation in the amygdala for BII phobics as compared to healthy controls. These results suggest that BII phobia is characterized by activation of a typical neural defense network during threat anticipation, with anxiety as the predominant emotion.

  15. [Who is responsible for the postoperative nerve injury? Anesthesia? Orthopedics? Trauma?].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelsaka, Ebru; Güldoğuş, Fuat; Erdoğan, Murat; Zengin, Eyüp Cağatay

    2014-01-01

    In the pathogenesis of peripheral nerve injury, mechanical as well as vascular pressure, and chemical reasons play a role. In the applications of peripheral nerve block, there can be mechanical injury due to the type of needle and intrafascicular injections. In humerus fractures, nerve injury can be seen due to the surgical retractions and close proximity of the nerves with the bone. In addition, trauma may be the reason for posttraumatic nerve injury. In this presentation, we discussed the causes of postoperative nerve damage, which is seen after the operation of the distal humerus fracture.

  16. An analytical model for the prediction of the dynamic response of premixed flames stabilized on a heat-conducting perforated plate

    KAUST Repository

    Kedia, Kushal S.

    2013-01-01

    The dynamic response of a premixed flame stabilized on a heat-conducting perforated plate depends critically on their coupled thermal interaction. The objective of this paper is to develop an analytical model to capture this coupling. The model predicts the mean flame base standoff distance; the flame base area, curvature and speed; and the burner plate temperature given the operating conditions; the mean velocity, temperature and equivalence ratio of the reactants; thermal conductivity and the perforation ratio of the burner. This coupled model is combined with our flame transfer function (FTF) model to predict the dynamic response of the flame to velocity perturbations. We show that modeling the thermal coupling between the flame and the burner, while accounting for the two-dimensionality of the former, is critical to predicting the dynamic response characteristics such as the overshoot in the gain curve (resonant condition) and the phase delay. Good agreement with the numerical and experimental results is demonstrated over a range of conditions. © 2012 The Combustion Institute. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. The effects and mechanisms of insulin on systemic inflammatory response and immune cells in severe trauma, burn injury, and sepsis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deng, Hu-Ping; Chai, Jia-Ke

    2009-10-01

    Insulin resistance, hyperglycemia, inflammatory disorders and immune dysfunction cause high morbidity and mortality in patients with severe trauma, burn injuries, or sepsis. Many studies have shown that intensive insulin therapy can combat insulin resistance, decrease blood glucose levels, and induce anabolic processes, thus, decreasing morbidity and mortality. Moreover, in recent years, it has been proven that insulin can attenuate systemic inflammatory responses and modulate the proliferation, apoptosis, differentiation and immune functions of certain immune cells, especially monocytes/macrophages, neutrophils, and T cells associated with severe trauma, burn injury, or sepsis. This effect of insulin may expand our understanding of intensive insulin therapy in critically ill patients. This review attempts to summarize studies on the modulatory effects and mechanisms of insulin therapy on systemic inflammation and immune cells in severe trauma, burn injury and sepsis, and further propose some questions for future studies.

  18. Kinesiological study of the push-up motion in spinal cord injury patients: involving measurement of hand pressure applied to a force plate.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kotani Y

    2002-04-01

    Full Text Available We studied the pressure exerted by hands during push-ups in 21 paraplegic and 2 tetraplegic patients employing 4 different hand positions. In the fingers-spread position, the initial force exerted was a vertical force (Fz, followed by a medio-lateral force (Fy and then an antero-posterior force (Fx. In the other 3 positions, the order of force type exertion was Fz, Fx, and then Fy. All subjects with neurological injury levels above T4 and subjects between T5 and T10 without spinal instrumentation could not push themselves up in the fingers-spread position. The fact that Fy is initiated before Fx in the fingers-spread position indicates that lateral balancing of the trunk is critical in this position, thus explaining why subjects without spinal instrumentation with neurological injury at a level higher than T10 could not control their spinal columns while performing push-ups. In contrast, antero-posterior balancing takes priority in the other hand positions. We believe that spinal instrumentation helps balance the trunk in the lateral direction, converting the thoracic spine into a rigid body in subjects with neurological injury at levels above T10.

  19. Early applied electric field stimulation attenuates secondary apoptotic responses and exerts neuroprotective effects in acute spinal cord injury of rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, C; Zhang, G; Rong, W; Wang, A; Wu, C; Huo, X

    2015-04-16

    Injury potential, which refers to a direct current voltage between intact and injured nerve ends, is mainly caused by injury-induced Ca2+ influx. Our previous studies revealed that injury potential increased with the onset and severity of spinal cord injury (SCI), and an application of applied electric field stimulation (EFS) with the cathode distal to the lesion could delay and attenuate injury potential formation. As Ca2+ influx is also considered as a major trigger for secondary injury after SCI, we hypothesize that EFS would protect an injured spinal cord from secondary injury and consequently improve functional and pathological outcomes. In this study, rats were divided into three groups: (1) sham group, laminectomy only; (2) control group, subjected to SCI only; and (3) EFS group, received EFS immediately post-injury with the injury potential modulated to 0±0.5 mV by EFS. Functional recovery of the hind limbs was assessed using the Basso, Beattie, and Bresnahan (BBB) locomotor scale. Results revealed that EFS-treated rats exhibited significantly better locomotor function recovery. Luxol fast blue staining was performed to assess the spared myelin area. Immunofluorescence was used to observe the number of myelinated nerve fibers. Ultrastructural analysis was performed to evaluate the size of myelinated nerve fibers. Findings showed that the EFS group rats exhibited significantly less myelin loss and had larger and more myelinated nerve fibers than the control group rats in dorsal corticospinal tract (dCST) 8 weeks after SCI. Furthermore, we found that EFS inhibited the activation of calpain and caspase-3, as well as the expression of Bax, as detected by Western blot analysis. Moreover, EFS decreased cellular apoptosis, as measured by TUNEL, within 4 weeks post-injury. Results suggest that early EFS could significantly reduce spinal cord degeneration and improve functional and historical recovery. Furthermore, these neuroprotective effects may be related to

  20. Estrogen Sulfotransferase Is an Oxidative Stress-responsive Gene That Gender-specifically Affects Liver Ischemia/Reperfusion Injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Yan; Hu, Bingfang; Huang, Hai; Tsung, Allan; Gaikwad, Nilesh W; Xu, Meishu; Jiang, Mengxi; Ren, Songrong; Fan, Jie; Billiar, Timothy R; Huang, Min; Xie, Wen

    2015-06-05

    Estrogen sulfotransferase (EST) regulates estrogen homeostasis by sulfonating and deactivating estrogens. Liver ischemia and reperfusion (I/R) involves both hypoxia during the ischemic phase and oxidative damage during the reperfusion phase. In this report, we showed that the expression of EST was markedly induced by I/R. Mechanistically, oxidative stress-induced activation of Nrf2 was responsible for the EST induction, which was abolished in Nrf2(-/-) mice. EST is a direct transcriptional target of Nrf2. In female mice, the I/R-responsive induction of EST compromised estrogen activity. EST ablation attenuated I/R injury as a result of decreased estrogen deprivation, whereas this benefit was abolished upon ovariectomy. The effect of EST ablation was sex-specific because the EST(-/-) males showed heightened I/R injury. Reciprocally, both estrogens and EST regulate the expression and activity of Nrf2. Estrogen deprivation by ovariectomy abolished the I/R-responsive Nrf2 accumulation, whereas the compromised estrogen deprivation in EST(-/-) mice was associated with increased Nrf2 accumulation. Our results suggested a novel I/R-responsive feedback mechanism to limit the activity of Nrf2 in which Nrf2 induces the expression of EST, which subsequently increases estrogen deactivation and limits the estrogen-responsive activation of Nrf2. Inhibition of EST, at least in females, may represent an effective approach to manage hepatic I/R injury.

  1. Responsiveness of SF-36 and Lower Extremity Functional Scale for assessing outcomes in traumatic injuries of lower extremities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pan, Shin-Liang; Liang, Huey-Wen; Hou, Wen-Hsuan; Yeh, Tian-Shin

    2014-11-01

    To assess the responsiveness of one generic questionnaire, Medical Outcomes Study Short Form-36 (SF-36), and one region-specific outcome measure, Lower Extremity Functional Scale (LEFS), in patients with traumatic injuries of lower extremities. A prospective and observational study of patients after traumatic injuries of lower extremities. Assessments were performed at baseline and 3 months later. In-patients and out-patients in two university hospitals in Taiwan. A convenience sample of 109 subjects were evaluated and 94 (86%) were followed. Not applicable. Assessments of responsiveness with distribution-based approach (effect size, standardized response mean [SRM], minimal detectable change) and anchor-based approach (receiver's operating curve analysis, ROC analysis). LEFS and physical component score (PCS) of SF-36 were all responsive to global improvement, with fair-to-good accuracy in discriminating between participants with and without improvement. The area under curve gained by ROC analysis for LEFS and SF-36 PCS was similar (0.65 vs. 0.70, p=0.26). Our findings revealed comparable responsiveness of LEFS and PCS of SF-36 in a sample of subjects with traumatic injuries of lower limbs. Either type of functional measure would be suitable for use in clinical trials where improvement in function was an endpoint of interest. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Psychology and socioculture affect injury risk, response, and recovery in high-intensity athletes: a consensus statement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wiese-Bjornstal, D M

    2010-10-01

    This consensus statement summarizes key contemporary research themes relevant to understanding the psychology and socioculture of sport injury. Special consideration is given toward high-intensity sport in which elite athlete training and performance efforts are characterized by explosive physical speed and strength, mental fortitude to push physical limits, and maximum effort and commitment to highly challenging goals associated with achieving exceptional performance. Sport injury occurrence in high-intensity sport is an adverse and stressful health event associated with a complex multitude of risks, consequences and outcomes. A biopsychosocial (Engel, 1980) view is advocated which contextualizes an understanding of the psychological aspects of sport injury in light of influential sociocultural, ethical, and biomedical issues. Outcomes related to athlete health and performance excellence are of equal importance in considering how psychological scholarship, expertise and services can be used to improve efforts focused on the prevention and management of sport injury among high-intensity athletes. The consensus view is that psychology and socioculture do affect sport injury risk, response and recovery in high-intensity athletes, and that continued efforts in psychological research and professional practice are needed to protect athlete physical and mental health and contribute toward performance excellence and career longevity.

  3. Berberine Attenuates Myocardial Ischemia/Reperfusion Injury by Reducing Oxidative Stress and Inflammation Response: Role of Silent Information Regulator 1

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liming Yu

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Berberine (BBR exerts potential protective effect against myocardial ischemia/reperfusion (MI/R injury. Activation of silent information regulator 1 (SIRT1 signaling attenuates MI/R injury by reducing oxidative damage and inflammation response. This study investigated the antioxidative and anti-inflammatory effects of BBR treatment in MI/R condition and elucidated its potential mechanisms. Sprague-Dawley rats were treated with BBR in the absence or presence of the SIRT1 inhibitor sirtinol (Stnl and then subjected to MI/R injury. BBR conferred cardioprotective effects by improving postischemic cardiac function, decreasing infarct size, reducing apoptotic index, diminishing serum creatine kinase and lactate dehydrogenase levels, upregulating SIRT1, Bcl-2 expressions, and downregulating Bax and caspase-3 expressions. Stnl attenuated these effects by inhibiting SIRT1 signaling. BBR treatment also reduced myocardium superoxide generation, gp91phox expression, malondialdehyde (MDA level, and cardiac inflammatory markers and increased myocardium superoxide dismutase (SOD level. However, these effects were also inhibited by Stnl. Consistently, BBR conferred similar antioxidative and anti-inflammatory effects against simulated ischemia reperfusion injury in cultured H9C2 cardiomyocytes. SIRT1 siRNA administration also abolished these effects. In summary, our results demonstrate that BBR significantly improves post-MI/R cardiac function recovery and reduces infarct size against MI/R injury possibly due to its strong antioxidative and anti-inflammatory activity. Additionally, SIRT1 signaling plays a key role in this process.

  4. SIRT IS REQUIRED FOR EDP-MEDIATED PROTECTIVE RESPONSES TOWARD HYPOXIA-REOXYGEANTION INJURY IN CARDIAC CELLS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Victor eSamokhvalov

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Hypoxia-reoxygenation (H/R injury is known to cause extensive injury to cardiac myocardium promoting development of cardiac dysfunction. Despite the vast number of studies dedicated to studying H/R injury, the molecular mechanisms behind it are multiple, complex and remain very poorly understood, which makes development of novel pharmacological agents challenging. Docosahexaenoic acid (DHA, 22:6n3 is an n-3 polyunsaturated fatty acid (PUFA obtained from dietary sources, which produces numerous effects including regulation of cell survival and death mechanisms. The beneficial effects of DHA toward the cardiovascular system are well documented but the relative role of DHA or one of its more potent metabolites is unresolved. Emerging evidence indicates that cytochrome P450 (CYP epoxygenase metabolites of DHA, epoxydocosapentaenoic acids (EDPs, have more potent biological activity than DHA in cardiac cells. In this study we examined whether EDPs protect HL-1 cardiac cells from H/R injury. Our observations demonstrate that treatment with 19,20-EDP protected HL-1 cardiac cells from H/R damage through a mechanism(s protecting and enhancing mitochondrial quality. EDP treatment increased the relative rates of mitobiogenesis and mitochondrial respiration in control and H/R exposed cardiac cells. The observed EDP protective response toward H/R injury involved SIRT1-dependent pathways.

  5. SIRT Is Required for EDP-Mediated Protective Responses toward Hypoxia-Reoxygenation Injury in Cardiac Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samokhvalov, Victor; Jamieson, Kristi L; Fedotov, Ilia; Endo, Tomoko; Seubert, John M

    2016-01-01

    Hypoxia-reoxygenation (H/R) injury is known to cause extensive injury to cardiac myocardium promoting development of cardiac dysfunction. Despite the vast number of studies dedicated to studying H/R injury, the molecular mechanisms behind it are multiple, complex, and remain very poorly understood, which makes development of novel pharmacological agents challenging. Docosahexaenoic acid (DHA, 22:6n3) is an n - 3 polyunsaturated fatty acid obtained from dietary sources, which produces numerous effects including regulation of cell survival and death mechanisms. The beneficial effects of DHA toward the cardiovascular system are well documented but the relative role of DHA or one of its more potent metabolites is unresolved. Emerging evidence indicates that cytochrome P450 (CYP) epoxygenase metabolites of DHA, epoxydocosapentaenoic acids (EDPs), have more potent biological activity than DHA in cardiac cells. In this study we examined whether EDPs protect HL-1 cardiac cells from H/R injury. Our observations demonstrate that treatment with 19,20-EDP protected HL-1 cardiac cells from H/R damage through a mechanism(s) protecting and enhancing mitochondrial quality. EDP treatment increased the relative rates of mitobiogenesis and mitochondrial respiration in control and H/R exposed cardiac cells. The observed EDP protective response toward H/R injury involved SIRT1-dependent pathways.

  6. Visualizing the neutrophil response to sterile tissue injury in mouse dermis reveals a three-phase cascade of events.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ng, Lai Guan; Qin, Jim S; Roediger, Ben; Wang, Yilin; Jain, Rohit; Cavanagh, Lois L; Smith, Adrian L; Jones, Cheryl A; de Veer, Michael; Grimbaldeston, Michele A; Meeusen, Els N; Weninger, Wolfgang

    2011-10-01

    Neutrophil granulocytes traffic into sites of organ injury in which they may not only participate in tissue repair and pathogen clearance but may also contribute to collateral cell damage through the release of noxious mediators. The dynamics and mechanisms of neutrophil migration in the extravascular space toward loci of tissue damage are not well understood. Here, we have used intravital multi-photon microscopy to dissect the behavior of neutrophils in response to tissue injury in the dermis of mice. We found that, following confined physical injury, initially rare scouting neutrophils migrated in a directional manner toward the damage focus. This was followed by the attraction of waves of additional neutrophils, and finally stabilization of the neutrophil cluster around the injury. Although neutrophil migration in the steady state and during the scouting phase depended on pertussis toxin-sensitive signals, the amplification phase was sensitive to interference with the cyclic adenosine diphosphate ribose pathway. We finally demonstrated that neutrophil scouts also transit through the non-inflamed dermis, suggesting immunosurveillance function by these cells. Together, our data unravel a three-step cascade of events that mediates the specific accumulation of neutrophils at sites of sterile tissue injury in the interstitial space.

  7. 颈椎前路减压植骨钛板内固定治疗颈脊髓损伤%Treatment of Cervical Spinal Cord Injury by Anterior Decompression, Bone Graft and Titanium Plate Internal Fixation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    沈宁江; 王先安; 林庆彪; 林明侠; 陈建

    2013-01-01

    Objective To evaluate the clinical efficacy of anterior decompression, bone graft and internal fixation for cervical spine fracture with cervical spinal cord injury. Methods 215 cases of cervical spine fracture with cervical spinal cord injury had been treated by the method of anterior decompression,iliac bone graft and cervical locking titanium plate fixation. X-rays were taken regularly after surgery and recovery of spinal cord function were recorded. Results 184 cases were followed for an average time of 3. 5 years. Bone graft union was achieved 3 months after surgery. The cervical intervertebral height and the physiological curvature maintained satisfactory without implant complications. Nerve function of 172 patients improved 1 to 2 degree. Only 12 cases with stage A nerve function obtained no recovery. Conclusion Patients of cervical fracture with cervical spinal cord injury should undergo surgery of anterior decompression,bone graft and plate fixation as soon as possible. It is good to spinal cord function recovery. The injured segments can obtain instant and firm stability, which makes care and functional exercises easier.%目的 评价颈椎前路减压植骨内固定治疗颈椎骨折合并颈脊髓损伤的临床疗效.方法 对215例颈椎骨折合并颈脊髓损伤的患者施行颈椎前路减压、自体髂骨植骨和颈椎带锁钛板内固定术.术后定期复查X线片,判定脊髓功能恢复情况.结果 随访184例患者,平均随访时间3.5年.术后3个月植骨块获得骨性愈合,颈椎椎间高度和生理曲度维持满意,无内置物并发症,172例患者神经功能提高1~2级,仅12例A级患者神经功能无恢复.结论 颈椎骨折合并颈脊髓损伤应尽早行前路减压、植骨、钛板内固定术,有利于脊髓功能恢复,能使损伤节段获得即刻、坚强的稳定,方便护理和功能锻炼.

  8. Skin microvascular and metabolic response to pressure relief maneuvers in people with spinal cord injury

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramella-Roman, Jessica C.; Le, Du V. N.; Ghassemi, Pejhman; Nguyen, Thu A.; Lichy, Alison; Groah, Suzanne

    2013-02-01

    Clinician's recommendations on wheelchair pressure reliefs in the context of the high prevalence of pressure ulcers that occur in people with spinal cord injury is not supported by strong experimental evidence. Some data indicates that altered tissue perfusion and oxygenation occurring under pressure loads, such as during sitting, induce various pathophysiologic changes that may lead to pressure ulcers. Pressure causes a cascade of responses, including initial tissue hypoxia, which leads to ischemia, vascular leakage, tissue acidification, compensatory angiogenesis, thrombosis, and hyperemia, all of which may lead to tissue damage. We have developed an advanced skin sensor that allows measurement of oxygenation in addition to perfusion, and can be safely used during sitting. The sensor consists of a set of fiber optics probes, spectroscopic and Laser Doppler techniques that are used to obtain parameters of interest. The overriding goal of this project is to develop the evidence base for clinical recommendations on pressure reliefs. In this paper we will illustrate the experimental apparatus as well as some preliminary results of a small clinical trial conducted at the National Rehabilitation Hospital.

  9. Acute stress response and recovery after whiplash injuries. A one-year prospective study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kongsted, Alice; Bendix, Tom; Montvilas, Erisela Qerama

    2008-01-01

    outcome-measures were neck pain and headache, neck disability, general health, and working ability one year after the accident. A total of 737 participants were included and completed the IES, and 668 (91%) participated in the 1-year follow-up. A baseline IES-score denoting a moderate to severe stress...... response was obtained by 13% of the participants. This was associated with increased risk of considerable persistent pain (OR=3.3; 1.8-5.9), neck disability (OR=3.2; 1.7-6.0), reduced working ability (OR=2.8; 1.6-4.9), and lowered self-reported general health one year after the accident. These associations......Chronic whiplash-associated disorder (WAD) represents a major medical and psycho-social problem. The typical symptomatology presented in WAD is to some extent similar to symptoms of post traumatic stress disorder. In this study we examined if the acute stress reaction following a whiplash injury...

  10. Cold stress aggravates inflammatory responses in an LPS-induced mouse model of acute lung injury

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joo, Su-Yeon; Park, Mi-Ju; Kim, Kyun-Ha; Choi, Hee-Jung; Chung, Tae-Wook; Kim, Yong Jin; Kim, Joung Hee; Kim, Keuk-Jun; Joo, Myungsoo; Ha, Ki-Tae

    2016-08-01

    Although the relationship between environmental cold temperature and susceptibility to respiratory infection is generally accepted, the effect of ambient cold temperature on host reactivity in lung inflammation has not been fully studied. To examine the function of ambient cold temperature on lung inflammation, mice were exposed to 4 °C for 8 h each day for 14 days. In the lungs of mice exposed to cold stress, inflammatory cells in bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) fluid and lung tissues were slightly increased by about twofold. However, the structures of pulmonary epithelial cells were kept within normal limits. Next, we examined the effect of cold stress on the inflammatory responses in a lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced acute lung injury (ALI) mouse model. The infiltration of neutrophils and inflammation of lung tissue determined by histology were significantly increased by exposure to ambient cold temperature. In addition, the production of pro-inflammatory cytokines including interleukin (IL)-12, IL-17, and monokine induced by gamma interferon (MIG) was elevated by exposure to cold stress. Therefore, we suggest that cold stress is a factor that exacerbates lung inflammation including ALI. To our knowledge, this is the first report on the relationship between cold stress and severity of lung inflammation.

  11. A New Approach for Studying Nonlinear Dynamic Response of a Thin Plate with Internal Resonance in a Fractional Viscoelastic Medium

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yury A. Rossikhin

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available In the previous analysis, the dynamic behaviour of a nonlinear plate embedded into a fractional derivative viscoelastic medium has been studied by the method of multiple time scales under the conditions of the internal resonances two-to-one and one-to-one, as well as the internal combinational resonances for the case when the linear parts of nonlinear equations of motion occur to be coupled. A new approach proposed in this paper allows one to uncouple the linear parts of equations of motion of the plate, while the same method, the method of multiple time scales, has been utilized for solving nonlinear equations. The influence of viscosity on the energy exchange mechanism between interacting nonlinear modes has been analyzed. It has been shown that for some internal resonances there exist such particular cases when it is possible to obtain two first integrals, namely, the energy integral and the stream function, which allows one to reduce the problem to the calculation of elliptic integrals. The new approach enables one to solve the problems of vibrations of thin bodies more efficiently.

  12. Arthroscopic knee surgery does not modify hyperalgesic responses to heat injury

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Werner, Mads U; Duun, Preben; Kraemer, Otto

    2003-01-01

    contralateral to the surgical side. Ibuprofen and acetaminophen were given for 2 days before the first burn injury and again from the time of surgery. In the controls, the two burn injuries were separated by 7 days. Sensory variables included cumulated pain score during induction of the burn (visual analog...

  13. Role of the p21 Cyclin-Dependent Kinase Inhibitor in Limiting Intimal Cell Proliferation in Response to Arterial Injury

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Zhi-Yong; Simari, Robert D.; Perkins, Neil D.; San, Hong; Gordon, David; Nabel, Gary J.; Nabel, Elizabeth G.

    1996-07-01

    Arterial injury induces a series of proliferative, vasoactive, and inflammatory responses that lead to vascular proliferative diseases, including atherosclerosis and restenosis. Although several factors have been defined which stimulate this process in vivo, the role of specific cellular gene products in limiting this response is not well understood. The p21 cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor affects cell cycle progression, senescence, and differentiation in transformed cells, but its expression in injured blood vessels has not been investigated. In this study, we report that p21 protein is induced in porcine arteries following balloon catheter injury and suggest that p21 is likely to play a role in limiting arterial cell proliferation in vivo. Vascular endothelial and smooth muscle cell growth was arrested through the ability of p21 to inhibit progression through the G1 phase of the cell cycle. Following injury to porcine arteries, p21 gene product was detected in the neointima and correlated inversely with the location and kinetics of intimal cell proliferation. Direct gene transfer of p21 using an adenoviral vector into balloon injured porcine arteries inhibited the development of intimal hyperplasia. Taken together, these findings suggest that p21, and possibly related cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitors, may normally regulate cellular proliferation following arterial injury, and strategies to increase its expression may prove therapeutically beneficial in vascular diseases.

  14. IL-17 response mediates acute lung injury induced by the 2009 Pandemic Influenza A(H1N1)Virus

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Chenggang Li; Chen Wang; Zhongwei Chen; Li Xing; Chong Tang; Xiangwu Ju; Feng Guo; Jiejie Deng; Yan Zhao; Peng Yang; Jun Tang; Penghui Yang; Huanling Wang; Zhongpeng Zhao; Zhinan Yin; Bin Cao; Xiliang Wang; Chengyu Jiang; Yang Sun; Taisheng Li; Chen Wang; Zhong Wang; Zhen Zou; Yiwu Yan; Wei Wang

    2012-01-01

    The 2009 flu pandemic involved the emergence of a new strain of a swine-origin H1N1 influenza virus(S-OIV H1N1)that infected almost every country in the world.Most infections resulted in respiratory illness and some severe cases resulted in acute lung injury.In this report,we are the first to describe a mouse model of S-OIV virus infection with acute lung injury and immune responses that reflect human clinical disease.The clinical efficacy of the antiviral oseltamivir(Tamiflu)administered in the early stages of S-OIV H1N1 infection was confirmed in the mouse model.Moreover,elevated levels of IL-17,Th-17 mediators and IL-17-responsive cytokines were found in serum samples of S-OIV-infected patients in Beijing.IL-17 deficiency or treatment with monoclonal antibodies against IL-17-ameliorated acute lung injury induced by the S-OIV H1N1 virus in mice.These results suggest that IL-17 plays an important role in S-OIV-induced acute lung injury and that monoclonal antibodies against IL-17 could be useful as a potential therapeutic remedy for future S-OIV H1N1 pandemics.

  15. The astroglial response to Wallerian degeneration after spinal cord injury in humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Puckett, W R; Hiester, E D; Norenberg, M D; Marcillo, A E; Bunge, R P

    1997-12-01

    We describe the changes exhibited by astrocytes in areas of Wallerian degeneration after spinal cord injury in humans using glial fibrillary acidic protein immunohistochemistry correlated to standard histology at time points ranging from 8 days to 23 years after injury. Astrocytes were slow to react; a slight increase in immunoreactivity was observed at 4 months. Over time they began to lose immunoreactivity in both the somata and the processes as the debris from the degenerative process was cleared. By 1 year after injury the staining intensity had decreased to levels which were lower than in normal areas of the cord. This hypointense staining persisted for at least 23 years after injury. These findings are significantly different from those observed in animal studies and emphasize the need for additional pathological studies of human spinal cord injury. Copyright 1997 Academic Press.

  16. Tanshinone IIA attenuates the inflammatory response and apoptosis after traumatic injury of the spinal cord in adult rats.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xin Yin

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Spinal cord injury (SCI, including immediate mechanical injury and secondary injury, is associated with the inflammatory response, apoptosis and oxidative stress in response to traumatic injury. Tanshinone IIA (TIIA is one of the major extracts obtained from Salvia miltiorrhiza BUNGE, which has anti-inflammatory and anti-apoptotic effects on many diseases. However, little is known about the effects of TIIA treatment on SCI. Therefore, the aim of the present study is to evaluate the pharmacological action of TIIA on secondary damage and the underlying mechanisms of experimental SCI in rats. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: SCI was generated using a weight drop device on the dorsal spinal cord via a two-level T9-T11 laminectomy. SCI in rats resulted in severe trauma, characterized by locomotor disturbance, edema, neutrophil infiltration, the production of astrocytes and inflammatory mediators, apoptosis and oxidative stress. TIIA treatment (20 mg/kg, i.p. after SCI induced significant effects: (1 improved motor function (Basso, Beattie and Bresnahan scores, (2 reduced the degree of tissue injury (histological score, neutrophil infiltration (myeloperoxidase activity and the expression of astrocytes, (3 inhibited the activation of SCI-related pathways, such as NF-κB and MAPK signaling pathways, (4 decreased the production of pro-inflammatory cytokines (TNF-α, IL-1β, and IL-6 and iNOS, (5 reduced apoptosis (TUNEL staining, and Bcl-2 and caspase-3 expression and (6 reversed the redox state imbalance. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: The results clearly show that TIIA has a prominent protective effect against SCI through inhibiting the inflammatory response and apoptosis in the spinal cord tissue after SCI.

  17. Stab injury and device implantation within the brain results in inversely multiphasic neuroinflammatory and neurodegenerative responses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Potter, Kelsey A.; Buck, Amy C.; Self, Wade K.; Capadona, Jeffrey R.

    2012-08-01

    An estimated 25 million people in the US alone rely on implanted medical devices, ˜2.5 million implanted within the nervous system. Even though many devices perform adequately for years, the host response to medical devices often severely limits tissue integration and long-term performance. This host response is believed to be particularly limiting in the case of intracortical microelectrodes, where it has been shown that glial cell encapsulation and localized neuronal cell loss accompany intracortical microelectrode implantation. Since neuronal ensembles must be within ˜50 µm of the electrode to obtain neuronal spikes and local field potentials, developing a better understanding of the molecular and cellular environment at the device-tissue interface has been the subject of significant research. Unfortunately, immunohistochemical studies of scar maturation in correlation to device function have been inconclusive. Therefore, here we present a detailed quantitative study of the cellular events and the stability of the blood-brain barrier (BBB) following intracortical microelectrode implantation and cortical stab injury in a chronic survival model. We found two distinctly inverse multiphasic profiles for neuronal survival in device-implanted tissue compared to stab-injured animals. For chronically implanted animals, we observed a biphasic paradigm between blood-derived/trauma-induced and CNS-derived inflammatory markers driving neurodegeneration at the interface. In contrast, stab injured animals demonstrated a CNS-mediated neurodegenerative environment. Collectively these data provide valuable insight to the possibility of multiple roles of chronic neuroinflammatory events on BBB disruption and localized neurodegeneration, while also suggesting the importance to consider multiphasic neuroinflammatory kinetics in the design of therapeutic strategies for stabilizing neural interfaces.

  18. Compensatory Paracrine Mechanisms That Define The Urothelial Response to Injury in Partial Bladder Outlet Obstruction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bassuk, James; Lendvay, Thomas S.; Sweet, Robert; Han, Chang-Hee; Soygur, Tarkan; Cheng, Jan-Fang; Plaire, J. Chadwick; Charleston, Jay S.; Charleston, Lynne B.; Bagai, Shelly; Cochrane, Kimberly; Rubio, Eric; Bassuk, James A.; Fuchs, Elaine

    2007-06-21

    Diseases and conditions affecting the lower urinary tract are a leading cause of dysfunctional sexual health, incontinence, infection, and kidney failure. The growth, differentiation, and repair of the bladder's epithelial lining are regulated, in part, by fibroblast growth factor (FGF)-7 and -10 via a paracrine cascade originating in the mesenchyme (lamina propria) and targeting the receptor for FGF-7 and -10 within the transitional epithelium (urothelium). The FGF-7 gene is located at the 15q15-q21.1 locus on chromosome 15 and four exons generate a 3.852-kb mRNA. Five duplicated FGF-7 gene sequences that localized to chromosome 9 were predicted not to generate functional protein products, thus validating the use of FGF-7-null mice as an experimental model. Recombinant FGF-7 and -10 induced proliferation of human urothelial cells in vitro and transitional epithelium of wild-type and FGF-7-null mice in vivo.To determine the extent that induction of urothelial cell proliferation during the bladder response to injury is dependent on FGF-7, an animal model of partial bladder outlet obstruction was developed. Unbiased stereology was used to measure the percentage of proliferating urothelial cells between obstructed groups of wild-type and FGF-7-null mice. The stereological analysis indicated that a statistical significant difference did not exist between the two groups, suggesting that FGF-7 is not essential for urothelial cell proliferation in response to partial outlet obstruction. In contrast, a significant increase in FGF-10 expression was observed in the obstructed FGF-7-null group, indicating that the compensatory pathway that functions in this model results in urothelial repair.

  19. Micro-channel plate detector

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elam, Jeffrey W.; Lee, Seon W.; Wang, Hsien -Hau; Pellin, Michael J.; Byrum, Karen; Frisch, Henry J.

    2015-09-22

    A method and system for providing a micro-channel plate detector. An anodized aluminum oxide membrane is provided and includes a plurality of nanopores which have an Al coating and a thin layer of an emissive oxide material responsive to incident radiation, thereby providing a plurality of radiation sensitive channels for the micro-channel plate detector.

  20. Experimental evaluation of the response of micro-channel plate detector to ions with 10s of MeV energies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeong, Tae Won; Singh, P. K.; Scullion, C.; Ahmed, H.; Kakolee, K. F.; Hadjisolomou, P.; Alejo, A.; Kar, S.; Borghesi, M.; Ter-Avetisyan, S.

    2016-08-01

    The absolute calibration of a microchannel plate (MCP) assembly using a Thomson spectrometer for laser-driven ion beams is described. In order to obtain the response of the whole detection system to the particles' impact, a slotted solid state nuclear track detector (CR-39) was installed in front of the MCP to record the ions simultaneously on both detectors. The response of the MCP (counts/particles) was measured for 5-58 MeV carbon ions and for protons in the energy range 2-17.3 MeV. The response of the MCP detector is non-trivial when the stopping range of particles becomes larger than the thickness of the detector. Protons with energies E ≳ 10 MeV are energetic enough that they can pass through the MCP detector. Quantitative analysis of the pits formed in CR-39 and the signal generated in the MCP allowed to determine the MCP response to particles in this energy range. Moreover, a theoretical model allows to predict the response of MCP at even higher proton energies. This suggests that in this regime the MCP response is a slowly decreasing function of energy, consistently with the decrease of the deposited energy. These calibration data will enable particle spectra to be obtained in absolute terms over a broad energy range.

  1. SMG-1 and mTORC1 act antagonistically to regulate response to injury and growth in planarians

    OpenAIRE

    Gonzalez-Estevez, Christina; Felix, Daniel A; Smith, Matthew D.; Paps, Jordi; Morley, Simon J.; James, Victoria; Sharp, Tyson V.; Aboobaker, A. Aziz

    2012-01-01

    Planarian flatworms are able to both regenerate their whole bodies and continuously adapt their size to nutrient status. Tight control of stem cell proliferation and differentiation during these processes is the key feature of planarian biology. Here we show that the planarian homolog of the phosphoinositide 3-kinase-related kinase (PIKK) family member SMG-1 and mTOR complex 1 components are required for this tight control. Loss of smg-1 results in a hyper-responsiveness to injury and growth ...

  2. Diffuse traumatic brain injury initially attenuates and later expands activation of the rat somatosensory whisker circuit concomitant with neuroplastic responses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hall, Kelley D; Lifshitz, Jonathan

    2010-04-06

    Traumatic brain injury can initiate an array of chronic neurological deficits, effecting executive function, language and sensorimotor integration. Mechanical forces produce the diffuse pathology that disrupts neural circuit activation across vulnerable brain regions. The present manuscript explores the hypothesis that the extent of functional activation of brain-injured circuits is a consequence of initial disruption and consequent reorganization. In the rat, enduring sensory sensitivity to whisker stimulation directs regional analysis to the whisker barrel circuit. Adult, male rats were subjected to midline fluid percussion brain or sham injury and evaluated between 1day and 42days post-injury. Whisker somatosensory regions of the cortex and thalamus maintained cellular composition as visualized by Nissl stain. Within the first week post-injury, quantitatively less cFos activation was elicited by whisker stimulation, potentially due to axotomy within and surrounding the whisker circuit as visualized by amyloid precursor protein immunohistochemistry. Over six weeks post-injury, cFos activation after whisker stimulation showed a significant linear correlation with time in the cortex (r(2)=0.545; p=0.015), non-significant correlation in the thalamus (r(2)=0.326) and U-shaped correlation in the dentate gyrus (r(2)=0.831), all eventually exceeding sham levels. Ongoing neuroplastic responses in the cortex are evidenced by accumulating growth associated protein and synaptophysin gene expression. In the thalamus, the delayed restoration of plasticity markers may explain the broad distribution of neuronal activation extending into the striatum and hippocampus with whisker stimulation. The sprouting of diffuse-injured circuits into diffuse-injured tissue likely establishes maladaptive circuits responsible for behavioral morbidity. Therapeutic interventions to promote adaptive circuit restructuring may mitigate post-traumatic morbidity. Copyright 2010 Elsevier B.V. All

  3. Acute hepatic ischemic-reperfusion injury induces a renal cortical "stress response," renal "cytoresistance," and an endotoxin hyperresponsive state.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zager, Richard A; Johnson, Ali C M; Frostad, Kirsten B

    2014-10-01

    Hepatic ischemic-reperfusion injury (HIRI) is considered a risk factor for clinical acute kidney injury (AKI). However, HIRI's impact on renal tubular cell homeostasis and subsequent injury responses remain ill-defined. To explore this issue, 30-45 min of partial HIRI was induced in CD-1 mice. Sham-operated or normal mice served as controls. Renal changes and superimposed injury responses (glycerol-induced AKI; endotoxemia) were assessed 2-18 h later. HIRI induced mild azotemia (blood urea nitrogen ∼45 mg/dl) in the absence of renal histologic injury or proteinuria, implying a "prerenal" state. However, marked renal cortical, and isolated proximal tubule, cytoprotective "stress protein" gene induction (neutrophil gelatinase-associated lipocalin, heme oxygenase-1, hemopexin, hepcidin), and increased Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4) expression resulted (protein/mRNA levels). Ischemia caused release of hepatic heme-based proteins (e.g., cytochrome c) into the circulation. This corresponded with renal cortical oxidant stress (malondialdehyde increases). That hepatic derived factors can evoke redox-sensitive "stress protein" induction was implied by the following: peritoneal dialysate from HIRI mice, soluble hepatic extract, or exogenous cytochrome c each induced the above stress protein(s) either in vivo or in cultured tubule cells. Functional significance of HIRI-induced renal "preconditioning" was indicated by the following: 1) HIRI conferred virtually complete morphologic protection against glycerol-induced AKI (in the absence of hyperbilirubinemia) and 2) HIRI-induced TLR4 upregulation led to a renal endotoxin hyperresponsive state (excess TNF-α/MCP-1 gene induction). In conclusion, HIRI can evoke "renal preconditioning," likely due, in part, to hepatic release of pro-oxidant factors (e.g., cytochrome c) into the systemic circulation. The resulting renal changes can impact subsequent AKI susceptibility and TLR4 pathway-mediated stress.

  4. Long descending cervical propriospinal neurons differ from thoracic propriospinal neurons in response to low thoracic spinal injury

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stelzner Dennis J

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Propriospinal neurons, with axonal projections intrinsic to the spinal cord, have shown a greater regenerative response than supraspinal neurons after axotomy due to spinal cord injury (SCI. Our previous work focused on the response of axotomized short thoracic propriospinal (TPS neurons following a low thoracic SCI (T9 spinal transection or moderate spinal contusion injury in the rat. The present investigation analyzes the intrinsic response of cervical propriospinal neurons having long descending axons which project into the lumbosacral enlargement, long descending propriospinal tract (LDPT axons. These neurons also were axotomized by T9 spinal injury in the same animals used in our previous study. Results Utilizing laser microdissection (LMD, qRT-PCR, and immunohistochemistry, we studied LDPT neurons (located in the C5-C6 spinal segments between 3-days, and 1-month following a low thoracic (T9 spinal cord injury. We examined the response of 89 genes related to growth factors, cell surface receptors, apoptosis, axonal regeneration, and neuroprotection/cell survival. We found a strong and significant down-regulation of ~25% of the genes analyzed early after injury (3-days post-injury with a sustained down-regulation in most instances. In the few genes that were up-regulated (Actb, Atf3, Frs2, Hspb1, Nrap, Stat1 post-axotomy, the expression for all but one was down-regulated by 2-weeks post-injury. We also compared the uninjured TPS control neurons to the uninjured LDPT neurons used in this experiment for phenotypic differences between these two subpopulations of propriospinal neurons. We found significant differences in expression in 37 of the 84 genes examined between these two subpopulations of propriospinal neurons with LDPT neurons exhibiting a significantly higher base line expression for all but 3 of these genes compared to TPS neurons. Conclusions Taken collectively these data indicate a broad overall down

  5. Effect of continuous blood purification on inflammatory state, immune response and erythrocyte glycometabolism in patients with multiple injury and sepsis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhao-Hui Gan

    2017-01-01

    Objective:To analysis the effect of continuous blood purification on inflammatory state, immune response and erythrocyte glycometabolism in patients with multiple injury and sepsis. Methods: A total of 78 patients with multiple injury and sepsis were randomly divided into observation group (n=39) and control group (n=39), control group received routine therapy, observation group received continuous blood purification treatment, and then the differences in inflammatory state, immune response, erythrocyte glycometabolism and other indexes were compared between the two groups after treatment.Results: Inflammatory factor hs-CRP, TNF-α, PCT, sTREM-1 and HBP content in serum of observation group after treatment were significantly lower than those of control group; Th1 cytokines IL-2 and IFN-γ content in serum were lower than those of control group while Th2 cytokines IL-4 and IL-10 content were higher than those of control group; PFK and EGSH content in erythrocyte solution were higher than those of control group while G-6PD, AR and ELPO content were lower than those of control group; fluorescence intensity of CD11a, CD54, CD106 and CD49d in peripheral blood were significantly lower than those of control group.Conclusions: Continuous blood purification can significantly reduce the systemic inflammatory response in patients with multiple injury and sepsis, and promote the immune function and erythrocyte metabolism to return to normal.

  6. Evaluation of the Kinematic Responses and Potential Injury Mechanisms of the Jejunum during Seatbelt Loading.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Howes, Meghan K; Hardy, Warren N; Agnew, Amanda M; Hallman, Jason J

    2015-11-01

    High-speed biplane x-ray was used to research the kinematics of the small intestine in response to seatbelt loading. Six driver-side 3-point seatbelt simulations were conducted with the lap belt routed superior to the pelvis of six unembalmed human cadavers. Testing was conducted with each cadaver perfused, ventilated, and positioned in a fixed-back configuration with the spine angled 30° from the vertical axis. Four tests were conducted with the cadavers in an inverted position, and two tests were conducted with the cadavers upright. The jejunum was instrumented with radiopaque markers using a minimally-invasive, intraluminal approach without inducing preparation-related damage to the small intestine. Tests were conducted at a target peak lap belt speed of 3 m/s, resulting in peak lap belt loads ranging from 5.4-7.9 kN. Displacement of the radiopaque markers was recorded using high-speed x-ray from two perspectives. Marker trajectories were tracked using motion analysis software and projected into calibrated three-dimensional coordinates to quantify the seatbelt and jejunum kinematics for each test. Five of the six tests resulted in jejunum damage. Based on the autopsy findings and the assessment of the belt and jejunum kinematics, it is likely that direct abdominal interactions with the seatbelt resulting in compression and stretch of the jejunum are components of the mechanisms of crash-induced jejunum injuries. In addition, the presence of fluid or air in the portion of the jejunum in the load path appears to be necessary to create jejunum damage in the cadaver model. Overall, the kinematics and damage data generated in this study may be useful for future restraint system development.

  7. Hydrogen sulfide is essential for Schwann cell responses to peripheral nerve injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Byung Sun; Kim, Hyun-Wook; Rhyu, Im Joo; Park, Chan; Yeo, Seung Geun; Huh, Youngbuhm; Jeong, Na Young; Jung, Junyang

    2015-01-01

    Hydrogen sulfide (H2 S) functions as a physiological gas transmitter in both normal and pathophysiological cellular events. H2 S is produced from substances by three enzymes: cystathionine β-synthase (CBS), cystathionine γ-lyase (CSE), and 3-mercaptopyruvate sulfurtransferase (MST). In human tissues, these enzymes are involved in tissue-specific biochemical pathways for H2 S production. For example, CBS and cysteine aminotransferase/MST are present in the brain, but CSE is not. Thus, we examined the expression of H2 S production-related enzymes in peripheral nerves. Here, we found that CSE and MST/cysteine aminotransferase, but not CBS, were present in normal peripheral nerves. In addition, injured sciatic nerves in vivo up-regulated CSE in Schwann cells during Wallerian degeneration (WD); however, CSE was not up-regulated in peripheral axons. Using an ex vivo sciatic nerve explant culture, we found that the inhibition of H2 S production broadly prevented the process of nerve degeneration, including myelin fragmentation, axonal degradation, Schwann cell dedifferentiation, and Schwann cell proliferation in vitro and in vivo. Thus, these results indicate that H2 S signaling is essential for Schwann cell responses to peripheral nerve injury. Hydrogen sulfide (H2 S) functions as a physiological gas transmitter in both normal and pathophysiological cellular events. H2 S is produced from cystathionine β-synthase (CBS), cystathionine γ-lyase (CSE), and 3-mercaptopyruvate sulfur transferase (MST). Here, we found that CSE and MST/CAT were present in normal peripheral nerves. Injured static nerves in vivo up-regulated CSE in Schwann cells during Wallerian degeneration, but CSE was not up-regulated in peripheral axons.

  8. Endogenous LXA4 circuits are determinants of pathological angiogenesis in response to chronic injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leedom, Alexander J; Sullivan, Aaron B; Dong, Baiyan; Lau, Denise; Gronert, Karsten

    2010-01-01

    Inflammation and angiogenesis are intimately linked, and their dysregulation leads to pathological angiogenesis in human diseases. 15-lipoxygenase (15-LOX) and lipoxin A(4) receptors (ALX) constitute a LXA(4) circuit that is a key feature of inflammatory resolution. LXA(4) analogs have been shown to regulate vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF)-A-induced angiogenic response in vitro. 15-LOX and ALX are highly expressed in the avascular and immune-privileged cornea. However, the role of this endogenous LXA(4) circuit in pathological neovascularization has not been determined. We report that suture-induced chronic injury in the cornea triggered polymorphonuclear leukocytes (PMN) infiltration, pathological neovascularization, and up-regulation of mediators of inflammatory angiogenesis, namely VEGF-A and the VEGF-3 receptor (FLT4). Up-regulation of the VEGF circuit and neovascularization correlated with selective changes in both 15-LOX (Alox15) and ALX (Fpr-rs2) expression and a temporally defined increase in basal 15-LOX activity. More importantly, genetic deletion of 15-LOX or 5-LOX, key and obligatory enzymes in the formation of LXA(4), respectively, led to exacerbated inflammatory neovascularization coincident with increased VEGF-A and FLT4 expression. Direct topical treatment with LXA(4), but not its metabolic precursor 15-hydroxyeicosatetraenoic acid, reduced expression of VEGF-A and FLT4 and inflammatory angiogenesis and rescued 15-LOX knockout mice from exacerbated angiogenesis. In summary, our findings and the prominent expression of 15-LOX and ALX in epithelial cells and macrophages place the LXA(4) circuit as an endogenous regulator of pathological angiogenesis.

  9. Adult axolotls can regenerate original neuronal diversity in response to brain injury

    OpenAIRE

    Amamoto, Ryoji; Huerta, Violeta Gisselle Lopez; Takahashi, Emi; Dai, Guangping; Grant, Aaron K.; Fu, Zhanyan; Arlotta, Paola

    2016-01-01

    The axolotl can regenerate multiple organs, including the brain. It remains, however, unclear whether neuronal diversity, intricate tissue architecture, and axonal connectivity can be regenerated; yet, this is critical for recovery of function and a central aim of cell replacement strategies in the mammalian central nervous system. Here, we demonstrate that, upon mechanical injury to the adult pallium, axolotls can regenerate several of the populations of neurons present before injury. Notabl...

  10. Response functions of Fuji imaging plates to monoenergetic protons in the energy range 0.6-3.2 MeV.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonnet, T; Comet, M; Denis-Petit, D; Gobet, F; Hannachi, F; Tarisien, M; Versteegen, M; Aleonard, M M

    2013-01-01

    We have measured the responses of Fuji MS, SR, and TR imaging plates (IPs) to protons with energies ranging from 0.6 to 3.2 MeV. Monoenergetic protons were produced with the 3.5 MV AIFIRA (Applications Interdisciplinaires de Faisceaux d'Ions en Région Aquitaine) accelerator at the Centre d'Etudes Nucléaires de Bordeaux Gradignan (CENBG). The IPs were irradiated with protons backscattered off a tantalum target. We present the photo-stimulated luminescence response of the IPs together with the fading measurements for these IPs. A method is applied to allow correction of fading effects for variable proton irradiation duration. Using the IP fading corrections, a model of the IP response function to protons was developed. The model enables extrapolation of the IP response to protons up to proton energies of 10 MeV. Our work is finally compared to previous works conducted on Fuji TR IP response to protons.

  11. Photosynthetic response of soybean to twospotted spider mite (Acari: Tetranychydae injury

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adeney de Freitas Bueno

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available The twospotted spider mite Tetranychus urticae Koch is a common pest on soybean plants. To clarify plant-arthropod interaction on mite-soybean system, leaf fluorescence, photosynthetic responses to variable carbon dioxide levels, and chlorophyll content were evaluated. Significant photosynthetic rate reduction was observed due to stomatal limitation. Stomatal closure was the major plant physiological response. As a consequence, there was reduction in photosynthetic rates. Surprisingly, plants did not show chlorophyll content reduction associated with photosynthetic impairment. No differences in fluorescence data indicate that T. urticae injury did not impair the function of light harvesting and photoelectron transport. These results showed that T. urticae could be a serious pest of soybean even on lower infestation, at least when photosynthesis was determinant to yield.O ácaro-rajado, Tetranychus urticae Koch é uma praga comum em plantas de soja. Para elucidar a interação entre o artrópode e a planta no sistema soja-ácaro, a fluorescência, as respostas fotossintéticas em diferentes concentrações internas de CO2 e o conteúdo de clorofila foram avaliados. Observou-se redução na capacidade fotossintética das plantas infestadas e o fechamento dos estômatos foi a principal causa dessa redução. As plantas infestadas não mostraram redução no conteúdo de clorofila. Também, nenhuma diferença foi encontrada na leitura de fluorescência, o que mostra que a injúria causada pelo ácaro não prejudica a coleta de luz nem o transporte de elétrons. Estes resultados mostram que T. urticae pode ser uma praga séria na cultura da soja mesmo em baixas infestações, principalmente nas situações em que a fotossíntese é fator determinante na produção.

  12. Plate-like osteoma cutis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orme, Charisse M; Hale, Christopher S; Meehan, Shane A; Long, Wendy

    2014-12-16

    Osteoma cutis is the aberrant development of bone within the skin. The bone formation may be de novo (primary) or result from an injury to the skin (secondary). Here we present a healthy 53-year-old man with no known abnormalities in calcium or phosphate metabolism with plate-like osteoma cutis of the scalp. Plate- or plaque-like osteoma cutis was initially described as a congenital condition but has now been reported several times in the literature as an idiopathic process that occurs in adults. Treatment options are limited and are only required if the lesion is bothersome to the patient.

  13. HIGH BLOOD LEVELS PROCALCITONIN AS SYSTEMIC IMFLAMATORY RESPONSE SYNDROME PREDICTOR IN SEVERE AND MODERATE HEAD INJURY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B. Sinaga

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available BackgroundNumerous studies have shown that procalcitonin (PCT was not related to degree of trauma. High PCT serum levels have been found in patients with bacterial or fungal infection and also in acute phase of trauma. Currently, there has been no research discussed about changes in serum levels of PCT in particular head injuries and severe head injuries. Moderate and severe head injuries were common trauma cases in Emergency Room (ER and had high mortality rate. Based on Glasgow Coma Scale (GCS, moderate and severe head injuries were scored between 3 and 13. This research aim to determine whether high blood levels PCT can be used as a predictor of the occurrence of SIRS. Method: A cohort prospective study was applied in this research to determine high blood levels of PCT as a predictor for SIRS in moderate and severe head injury. This study was conducted from June 2013 - August 2013 at Sanglah General Hospital with 40 research subjects. Data was presented in tables and analyzed with Chi Square test at 95% CI and p <0.05% was considered significant. Results: From the 40 samples, there were 34 males (85% and 6 females (15%, 18 samples (45% had moderate head injury and 22 samples (65% had severe head injury. One sample (2.5 % was 0-10 years old, 15 samples (37.5% were 10-20 years old, 13 samples (32.5% were 20-40 years old, 7 samples (17.5% were 40-60 years old and 4 samples (10% were>60 years old. PCT levels in the blood obtained on day first were normal in 6 samples (15% and elevated in 34 samples (85%, SIRS (+ were found in 35 samples (87.5% and 5 samples (12.5% were SIRS (-. Using bivariate analysis between PCT levels and SIRS showed p = 0.000 (p < 0.05, and multivariate analysis of the control variables showed no significant correlation between variables with PCT levels. Conclusion: From 40 samples moderate head injury and severe head injury, there were 34 samples (85% with elevated PCT level on the first day, while 35 samples (87.5% had SIRS

  14. Preliminary Evidence of Reduced Urge to Cough and Cough Response in Four Individuals following Remote Traumatic Brain Injury with Tracheostomy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Erin Silverman

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Cough and swallow protect the lungs and are frequently impaired following traumatic brain injury (TBI. This project examined cough response to inhaled capsaicin solution challenge in a cohort of four young adults with a history of TBI within the preceding five years. All participants had a history of tracheostomy with subsequent decannulation and dysphagia after their injuries (resolved for all but one participant. Urge to cough (UTC and cough response were measured and compared to an existing database of normative cough response data obtained from 32 healthy controls (HCs. Participants displayed decreased UTC and cough responses compared to HCs. It is unknown if these preliminary results manifest as a consequence of disrupted sensory (afferent projections, an inability to perceive or discriminate cough stimuli, disrupted motor (efferent response, peripheral weakness, or any combination of these factors. Future work should attempt to clarify if the observed phenomena are borne out in a larger sample of individuals with TBI, determine the relative contributions of central versus peripheral nervous system structures to cough sensory perceptual changes following TBI (should they exist, and formulate recommendations for systematic screening and assessment of cough sensory perception in order to facilitate rehabilitative efforts. This project is identified with the National Clinical Trials NCT02240329.

  15. Preliminary Evidence of Reduced Urge to Cough and Cough Response in Four Individuals following Remote Traumatic Brain Injury with Tracheostomy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Sarah; Carnaby, Giselle; Tsai, Hsiu-Wen; Davenport, Paul W.

    2016-01-01

    Cough and swallow protect the lungs and are frequently impaired following traumatic brain injury (TBI). This project examined cough response to inhaled capsaicin solution challenge in a cohort of four young adults with a history of TBI within the preceding five years. All participants had a history of tracheostomy with subsequent decannulation and dysphagia after their injuries (resolved for all but one participant). Urge to cough (UTC) and cough response were measured and compared to an existing database of normative cough response data obtained from 32 healthy controls (HCs). Participants displayed decreased UTC and cough responses compared to HCs. It is unknown if these preliminary results manifest as a consequence of disrupted sensory (afferent) projections, an inability to perceive or discriminate cough stimuli, disrupted motor (efferent) response, peripheral weakness, or any combination of these factors. Future work should attempt to clarify if the observed phenomena are borne out in a larger sample of individuals with TBI, determine the relative contributions of central versus peripheral nervous system structures to cough sensory perceptual changes following TBI (should they exist), and formulate recommendations for systematic screening and assessment of cough sensory perception in order to facilitate rehabilitative efforts. This project is identified with the National Clinical Trials NCT02240329.

  16. Metabolic rate and cardiorespiratory response during hybrid cycling versus handcycling at equal subjective exercise intensity levels in people with spinal cord injury

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bakkum, Arjan J. T.; de Groot, Sonja; Onderwater, Mark Q.; de Jong, Jelle; Janssen, Thomas W. J.

    2014-01-01

    Objective: To compare the metabolic rate and cardiorespiratory response during hybrid cycling versus handcycling at equal subjective exercise intensity levels in people with spinal cord injury (SCI). Design: Cross-sectional study. Setting: Amsterdam Rehabilitation Research Centre vertical bar Reade,

  17. 急性骨损伤金属钢板置入的生物力学分析%Biomechanical analysis of metal plate implantation for acute bone injury

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王永强

    2012-01-01

    背景:体育运动及日常生活中骨受暴力损伤较为常见,金属材料在对受损骨进行固定和重建中得到了普遍运用,而金属钢板的生物力学性能对骨的稳定性和血供等产生较大影响,进而影响康复效果.目的:对骨金属材料的材料学性质和种类以及临床应用情况进行概述,着重以骨金属钢板材料的生物力学特征为视角,对其临床治疗效果进行阐述与分析.方法:应用计算机检索PubMed、维普和万方数据库中1980-01/2011-09关于骨损伤治疗及其金属材料学方面的文章,在标题和摘要中以"骨,医用,金属,材料"或"bone,medical,metal,materials"为检索词进行检索.选择文章内容与骨治疗措施及金属材料学相关,同一领域文献则选择近期发表或发表在权威杂志文章.初检得到276篇文献,根据纳入标准选择24篇文章进行综述.结果与结论:经过长期的研究和临床筛选,在临床治疗中得到广泛应用的生物医学金属材料主要有医用不锈钢、医用钴基合金、医用钛和钛合金、医用形状记忆合金和医用磁性合金等.文章从材料学性质对植入体的力学影响,螺钉数量对骨钢板的力学影响,骨锁定钢板与普通钢板的力学性能,材料的植入方式对钢板力学的影响,材料的形状对钢板力学的影响等方面进行了分析.金属材料自身的性质、锻造工艺以及临床植入方式等方面的因素,对其临床生物力学性能和治疗效果起到较大的影响.%BACKGROUND: Bone injury caused by violence is common in daily life and sports, metal materials have been widely utilized in the fixation and reconstruction of the damaged bone, while the biomechanical properties of metal plate greatly affect the on the bone stability and blood supply, thereby affecting the recovery.OBJECTIVE: To summarize the properties, type and clinical applicati ons of bone metal materials, to summarize and analyze clinical effects with

  18. Sexual dimorphism of growth plate prehypertrophic and hypertrophic chondrocytes in response to testosterone requires metabolism to dihydrotestosterone (DHT) by steroid 5-alpha reductase type 1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raz, P; Nasatzky, E; Boyan, B D; Ornoy, A; Schwartz, Z

    2005-05-01

    Rat costochondral growth plate chondrocytes exhibit sex-specific and cell maturation dependent responses to testosterone. Only male cells respond to testosterone, although testosterone receptors are present in both male and female cells, suggesting other mechanisms are involved. We examined the hypothesis that the sex-specific response of rat costochondral cartilage cells to testosterone requires further metabolism of the hormone to dihydrotestosterone (DHT). Resting zone (RC) and growth zone (GC, prehypertrophic and upper hypertrophic zones) chondrocytes from male and female Sabra strain rats exhibited sex-specific responses to testosterone and DHT: only male cells were responsive. Testosterone and DHT treatment for 24 h caused a comparable dose-dependent increase in [3H]-thymidine incorporation in quiescent preconfluent cultures of male GC cells, and a comparable increase in alkaline phosphatase specific activity in confluent cultures. RC cells responded in a differential manner to testosterone and DHT. Testosterone decreased DNA synthesis in male RC cells but DHT had no effect and alkaline phosphatase specific activity of male RC cells was unaffected by either hormone. Inhibition of steroid 5alpha-reductase activity with finasteride (1, 5, or 10 microg/ml), reduced the response of male GC cells to testosterone in a dose-dependent manner, indicating that metabolism to DHT was required. RT-PCR showed that both male and female cells expressed mRNAs for steroid 5alpha-reductase type 1 but lacked mRNAs for the type 2 form of the enzyme. Male cells also exhibited 5alpha-reductase activity but activity of this enzyme was undetectable in female cells. These observations show that sex-specific responses of rat growth zone chondrocytes to testosterone requires the further metabolism of the hormone to DHT and that the effect of DHT in the male growth plate is maturation-state dependent. Failure of female chondrocytes to respond to testosterone may reflect differences in

  19. IL-23 Promotes Myocardial I/R Injury by Increasing the Inflammatory Responses and Oxidative Stress Reactions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaorong Hu

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Background/Aims: Inflammation and oxidative stress play an important role in myocardial ischemia and reperfusion (I/R injury. We hypothesized that IL-23, a pro-inflammatory cytokine, could promote myocardial I/R injury by increasing the inflammatory response and oxidative stress. Methods: Male Sprague-Dawley rats were randomly assigned into sham operated control (SO group, ischemia and reperfusion (I/R group, (IL-23 + I/R group and (anti-IL-23 + I/R group. At 4 h after reperfusion, the serum concentration of lactate dehydrogenase (LDH, creatine kinase (CK and the tissue MDA concentration and SOD activity were measured. The infarcte size was measured by TTC staining. Apoptosis in heart sections were measured by TUNEL staining. The expression of HMGB1 and IL-17A were detected by Western Blotting and the expression of TNF-α and IL-6 were detected by Elisa. Results: After 4 h reperfusion, compared with the I/R group, IL-23 significantly increased the infarct size, the apoptosis of cardiomyocytes and the levels of LDH and CK (all P 0.05. All these effects were abolished by anti-IL-23 administration. Conclusion: The present study suggested that IL-23 may promote myocardial I/R injury by increasing the inflammatory responses and oxidative stress reaction.

  20. A spatial generalized ordered response model to examine highway crash injury severity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castro, Marisol; Paleti, Rajesh; Bhat, Chandra R

    2013-03-01

    This paper proposes a flexible econometric structure for injury severity analysis at the level of individual crashes that recognizes the ordinal nature of injury severity categories, allows unobserved heterogeneity in the effects of contributing factors, as well as accommodates spatial dependencies in the injury severity levels experienced in crashes that occur close to one another in space. The modeling framework is applied to analyze the injury severity sustained in crashes occurring on highway road segments in Austin, Texas. The sample is drawn from the Texas Department of Transportation (TxDOT) crash incident files from 2009 and includes a variety of crash characteristics, highway design attributes, driver and vehicle characteristics, and environmental factors. The results from our analysis underscore the value of our proposed model for data fit purposes as well as to accurately estimate variable effects. The most important determinants of injury severity on highways, according to our results, are (1) whether any vehicle occupant is ejected, (2) whether collision type is head-on, (3) whether any vehicle involved in the crash overturned, (4) whether any vehicle occupant is unrestrained by a seat-belt, and (5) whether a commercial truck is involved. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Inflammatory responses are not sufficient to cause delayed neuronal death in ATP-induced acute brain injury.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hey-Kyeong Jeong

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Brain inflammation is accompanied by brain injury. However, it is controversial whether inflammatory responses are harmful or beneficial to neurons. Because many studies have been performed using cultured microglia and neurons, it has not been possible to assess the influence of multiple cell types and diverse factors that dynamically and continuously change in vivo. Furthermore, behavior of microglia and other inflammatory cells could have been overlooked since most studies have focused on neuronal death. Therefore, it is essential to analyze the precise roles of microglia and brain inflammation in the injured brain, and determine their contribution to neuronal damage in vivo from the onset of injury. METHODS AND FINDINGS: Acute neuronal damage was induced by stereotaxic injection of ATP into the substantia nigra pars compacta (SNpc and the cortex of the rat brain. Inflammatory responses and their effects on neuronal damage were investigated by immunohistochemistry, electron microscopy, quantitative RT-PCR, and stereological counting, etc. ATP acutely caused death of microglia as well as neurons in a similar area within 3 h. We defined as the core region the area where both TH(+ and Iba-1(+ cells acutely died, and as the penumbra the area surrounding the core where Iba-1(+ cells showed activated morphology. In the penumbra region, morphologically activated microglia arranged around the injury sites. Monocytes filled the damaged core after neurons and microglia died. Interestingly, neither activated microglia nor monocytes expressed iNOS, a major neurotoxic inflammatory mediator. Monocytes rather expressed CD68, a marker of phagocytic activity. Importantly, the total number of dopaminergic neurons in the SNpc at 3 h (∼80% of that in the contralateral side did not decrease further at 7 d. Similarly, in the cortex, ATP-induced neuron-damage area detected at 3 h did not increase for up to 7 d. CONCLUSIONS: Different cellular

  2. Create Your Plate

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... A A A Listen En Español Create Your Plate Create Your Plate is a simple and effective ... and that your options are endless. Create Your Plate! Click on the plate sections below to add ...

  3. Effects of resolvin D1 on inflammatory responses and oxidative stress of lipopolysaccharide-induced acute lung injury in mice

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wang Lei; Yuan Ruixia; Yao Chengyue; Wu Qingping; Marie Christelle; Xie Wanli; Zhang Xingcai

    2014-01-01

    Background A variety of inflammatory mediators and effector cells participate together in acute lung injury,and lead to secondary injury that is due to an inflammatory cascade and secondary diffuse lung parenchyma injury.Inflammation is associated with an oxidative stress reaction,which is produced in the development of airway inflammation,and which has positive feedback on inflammation itself.Resolvin D1 can reduce the infiltration of neutrophils,regulate cytokine levels and reduce the inflammation reaction,and thereby promote the resolution of inflammation.The purpose of this study is to investigate the effects of resolvin D1 on an inflammatory response and oxidative stress during lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced acute lung injury.Methods LPS (3 mg/kg) was used to induce the acute lung injury model.Pretreatment resolvin D1 (100 ng/mouse) was given to mice 30 minutes before inducing acute lung injury.Mice were observed at 6 hours,12 hours,1 day,2 days,3 days,4 days and 7 days after LPS was administrated,then they were humanely sacrificed.We collected bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF) and the lung tissues for further analysis.Paraffin section and HE staining of the lung tissues were made for histopathology observations.Parts of the lung tissues were evaluated for wet-to-dry (W/D) weight ratio.tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α,inter leukin (IL)-1β,IL-10 and myeloperoxidase (MPO) were detected by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA).A lipid peroxidation malondialdehyde (MDA) assay kit was used to detect MDA.A total superoxide dismutase assay kit with WST-1 was used to analyze superoxide dismutase (SOD).We determined the apoptosis of neutrophils by Flow Cytometry.A real-time quantitative PCR Detecting System detected the expression of mRNA for heme oxygenase (HO)-1.Results Pretreatment with resolvin D1 reduced the pathological damage in the lung,decreased the recruitment of neutrophils and stimulated their apoptosis.It markedly decreased the expressions of TNF

  4. Effects of the Cell Cycle Inhibitor Olomoucine on Inflammatory Response and Neuronal Cell Death after Spinal Cord Injury in Rats

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    TIAN Dai-shi; XIE Min-jie; YU Zhi-yuan; ZHANG Qiang; WANG Yi-hui; CHEN Bin; CHEN Chen; WANG Wei

    2007-01-01

    Objective:The influence of olomoucine on microglial proliferation with associated inflammatory response after spinal cord injury has been determined.Methods:Microglial proliferation and neuronal apoptosis were observed by immunofluorescence.Level of the proinflammatory cytokine interleukin-1β (IL-1β) expression in the injured cord was determined by Western blot analysis.Results:the cell cycle inhibitor olomoucine,administered at 1 h post injury,significantly suppressed microglial proliferation and produced a remarkable reduction of tissue edema formation.In the olomoucine-treated group,a significant reduction of activated and/or proliferated microglial induced IL-1β expression was observed 24 h after SCI.Moreover,olomoucine evidently attenuated the number of apoptotic neurons after SCI.Conclusion:Our findings suggest that modulation of microglial proliferation with associated proinflammatory cytokine expression may be a mechanism of cell cycle inhibition-mediated neuroprotections in the CNS trauma.

  5. Optical coherence tomography reveals in vivo cortical structures of adult rats in response to cerebral ischemia injury

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ni, Yi-rong; Guo, Zhou-yi; Shu, So-yun; Bao, Xin-min

    2008-12-01

    Optical coherence tomography(OCT) is a high resolution imaging technique which uses light to directly image living tissue. we investigate the potential use of OCT for structural imaging of the ischemia injury mammalian cerebral cortex. And we examine models of middle cerebral artery occlusion (MCAO) in rats in vivo using OCT. In particular, we show that OCT can perform in vivo detection of cortex and differentiate normal and abnormal cortical anatomy. This OCT system in this study provided an axial resolution of 10~15μ m, the transverse resolution of the system is about 25 μm. OCT can provide cross-sectional images of cortical of adult rats in response to cerebral ischemia injury.We conclude that OCT represents an exciting new approach to visualize, in real-time, pathological changes in the cerebral cortex structures and may offer a new tool for Possible neuroscience clinical applications.

  6. The effects of diazepam on the behavioral structure of the rat's response to pain in the hot-plate test: anxiolysis vs. pain modulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Casarrubea, Maurizio; Sorbera, Filippina; Santangelo, Andrea; Crescimanno, Giuseppe

    2012-08-01

    The aim of the present study was to evaluate, by means of quantitative and multivariate analyses, the effects of diazepam on the behavioral structure of the rat's response to pain in the hot-plate test as well as whether such changes are associated with drug-induced effects on anxiety and/or nociception. To this purpose, ten groups of male Wistar rats were intraperitoneally injected with saline, diazepam (0.25, 0.5 and 2 mg/kg), FG-7142 (1, 4 and 8 mg/kg) or morphine (3, 6 and 12 mg/kg). The mean number and mean latency to first appearance were calculated for each behavioral component. In addition, multivariate cluster and adjusted residual analyses based on the elaboration of transition matrices were performed. Three main behavioral categories were identified: exploratory (walking, sniffing), primary noxious-evoked (hind paw licking, front paw licking, shaking/stamping) and escape (climbing, jumping). Although no significant modifications in the latencies of the primary noxious-evoked components were induced by treatment with diazepam or FG-7142, significant effects were provoked by morphine treatment. Multivariate analyses showed that diazepam-induced anxiolysis redirected the rat's behavior toward a more purposeful and effective escape strategy. In contrast, the high level of anxiety induced by FG-7142 caused the behavioral structure to become disorganized and not purposefully oriented. Changes in the organization of behavioral components were observed in morphine-treated animals and mainly consisted of modifications in the primary noxious-evoked and escape components. The findings suggest that the effects of diazepam on the structure of the rat's response to pain in the hot-plate test are more likely attributable to anxiolysis than pain modulation.

  7. Insights into the metabolic response to traumatic brain injury as revealed by 13C NMR spectroscopy.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brenda eBartnik-Olson

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available The present review highlights critical issues related to cerebral metabolism following traumatic brain injury (TBI and the use of 13C labeled substrates and nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR spectroscopy to study these changes. First we address some pathophysiologic factors contributing to metabolic dysfunction following TBI. We then examine how 13C NMR spectroscopy strategies have been used to investigate energy metabolism, neurotransmission, the intracellular redox state, and neuroglial compartmentation following injury. 13C NMR spectroscopy studies of brain extracts from animal models of TBI have revealed enhanced glycolytic production of lactate, evidence of pentose phosphate pathway (PPP activation, and alterations in neuronal and astrocyte oxidative metabolism that are dependent on injury severity. Differential incorporation of label into glutamate and glutamine from 13C labeled glucose or acetate also suggest TBI-induced adaptations to the glutamate-glutamine cycle.

  8. Adult axolotls can regenerate original neuronal diversity in response to brain injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amamoto, Ryoji; Huerta, Violeta Gisselle Lopez; Takahashi, Emi; Dai, Guangping; Grant, Aaron K; Fu, Zhanyan; Arlotta, Paola

    2016-05-09

    The axolotl can regenerate multiple organs, including the brain. It remains, however, unclear whether neuronal diversity, intricate tissue architecture, and axonal connectivity can be regenerated; yet, this is critical for recovery of function and a central aim of cell replacement strategies in the mammalian central nervous system. Here, we demonstrate that, upon mechanical injury to the adult pallium, axolotls can regenerate several of the populations of neurons present before injury. Notably, regenerated neurons acquire functional electrophysiological traits and respond appropriately to afferent inputs. Despite the ability to regenerate specific, molecularly-defined neuronal subtypes, we also uncovered previously unappreciated limitations by showing that newborn neurons organize within altered tissue architecture and fail to re-establish the long-distance axonal tracts and circuit physiology present before injury. The data provide a direct demonstration that diverse, electrophysiologically functional neurons can be regenerated in axolotls, but challenge prior assumptions of functional brain repair in regenerative species.

  9. Macrophagic and microglial responses after focal traumatic brain injury in the female rat

    OpenAIRE

    Turtzo, L. Christine; Lescher, Jacob; Janes, Lindsay; Dean, Dana D.; Budde, Matthew D.; Joseph A Frank

    2014-01-01

    Background After central nervous system injury, inflammatory macrophages (M1) predominate over anti-inflammatory macrophages (M2). The temporal profile of M1/M2 phenotypes in macrophages and microglia after traumatic brain injury (TBI) in rats is unknown. We subjected female rats to severe controlled cortical impact (CCI) and examined the postinjury M1/M2 time course in their brains. Methods The motor cortex (2.5 mm left laterally and 1.0 mm anteriorly from the bregma) of anesthetized female ...

  10. Endocannabinoids regulate the activity of astrocytic hemichannels and the microglial response against an injury: In vivo studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vázquez, Carmen; Tolón, Rosa María; Pazos, María Ruth; Moreno, Marta; Koester, Erin C; Cravatt, Benjamin F; Hillard, Cecilia J; Romero, Julián

    2015-07-01

    Anandamide (AEA) is an endocannabinoid (EC) that modulates multiple functions in the CNS and that is released in areas of injury, exerting putative neuroprotective actions. In the present study, we have used intravital microscopy to analyze the role of the EC system in the glial response against an acute insult. Our data show that AEA modulates astroglial function in vivo by increasing connexin-43 hemichannel (HC) activity. Furthermore, the genetic inactivation of the AEA-degrading enzyme, fatty acid amide hydrolase (FAAH), also increased HC activity and enhanced the microglial response against an acute injury to the brain parenchyma, effects that were mediated by cannabinoid CB1 receptors. The contribution of ATP released through an astrocytic HC was critical for the microglial response, as this was prevented by the use of the HC blocker flufenamic acid and by apyrase. As could be expected, brain concentrations of AEA, palmitoylethanolamide (PEA) and oleoylethanolamide (OEA) were elevated in FAAH-null mice, while 2-arachidonoylglycerol (2-AG) concentrations remained unaltered. In summary, these findings demonstrate that AEA modifies glial functions by promoting an enhanced pro-inflammatory glial response in the brain.

  11. Long-lasting neonatal inflammation enhances pain responses to subsequent inflammation, but not peripheral nerve injury in adult rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lim, Eun Jeong; Back, Seung Keun; Kim, Myung Ah; Li, Chengjin; Lee, Jaehee; Jeong, Keun Yeong; Na, Heung Sik

    2009-05-01

    The early postnatal period has been suggested to be the vulnerable time for structural and functional reorganization of sensory systems, and painful stimuli at this time may alter neuronal circuits, thereby leading to changes in an individual's response to pain later in life. In the present study, we examined whether inflammatory experience in the early life can affect pain responses to subsequent noxious insults later in life. The two groups of neonatal rats, treated with an inflammatory irritant and untreated, were subjected to inflammation and peripheral nerve injury in adulthood. Neonatal inflammation was induced by injection of complete Freund's adjuvant (CFA, 25 microl) into the hindpaw or tail of newborn rat pups. Adult rats which had suffered from neonatal paw inflammation at P0 were subjected to re-injection of CFA into the paw neonatally exposed to CFA or L5 spinal nerve ligation. Paw thickness and histology of inflamed paw were examined to assess the neonatal inflammation. Adult animals whose tail had been subjected to CFA injection on P3 received tail-innervating nerve injury. The results showed that the neonatal CFA-treated rats suffered from chronic inflammation, confirmed by persistent increase of paw thickness and histological result of inflamed paw. These animals showed enhanced pain responses to re-inflammatory challenge by injection of CFA (200 microl) into the neonatally inflamed paw 8 weeks after birth compared with the neonatally untreated animals. However, neuropathic pain on the hindpaw and the tail which had been induced by peripheral nerve injury in the neonatal CFA-treated group were not different from those of the untreated group. The present data suggest that early neonatal long-lasting inflammation differentially affects pain responses later in life, depending on the types of subsequent noxious insults.

  12. Simulation analysis for dynamic response of sandwich plates under moving load%移动荷载作用下夹层板的动力学响应仿真分析

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    曾伟; 张劲夫; 邓子辰; 侯秀慧

    2011-01-01

    Based on the laminated plate theory,sandwich plate is equivalent to an orthotropic plate, where the equivalent rigidities of four sandwich plates including solid metal core, metal foam core,hexagonal honeycomb core and metal corrugated core are calculated respectively.Then the orthotropic plate theory and modal superposition principle are applied for response calculation of the four sandwich plates.And the dynamic responses of the different sandwich plates under moving load are analyzed and compared.Thus valuable results are obtained that the sandwich plate of hexagonal honeycomb core is superior to the other three ones and solid metal core is the worst under moving load.The findings will provide guidelines for bridge and railway engineering applications.%应用层合板理论将夹层板等效为一个正交各向异性板,分别计算出了实体金属夹芯、金属泡沫夹芯、正六边形蜂窝夹芯、金属波纹板夹芯四种夹层板的等效刚度,再应用正交各向异性板理论和模态叠加原理分析了这四种夹层板在移动荷载作用下的动力学响应,并对此做了比较分析,得出移动荷载作用下正六边形蜂窝夹层板相对于其它三种夹层板更具有优越性,而实体金属夹层板是这四种夹层板中承载能力最差的.所得结果对桥梁,公路的建设具有一定的指导意义.

  13. Derivation of injury-responsive dendritic cells for acute brain targeting and therapeutic protein delivery in the stroke-injured rat.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nathan C Manley

    Full Text Available Research with experimental stroke models has identified a wide range of therapeutic proteins that can prevent the brain damage caused by this form of acute neurological injury. Despite this, we do not yet have safe and effective ways to deliver therapeutic proteins to the injured brain, and this remains a major obstacle for clinical translation. Current targeted strategies typically involve invasive neurosurgery, whereas systemic approaches produce the undesirable outcome of non-specific protein delivery to the entire brain, rather than solely to the injury site. As a potential way to address this, we developed a protein delivery system modeled after the endogenous immune cell response to brain injury. Using ex-vivo-engineered dendritic cells (DCs, we find that these cells can transiently home to brain injury in a rat model of stroke with both temporal and spatial selectivity. We present a standardized method to derive injury-responsive DCs from bone marrow and show that injury targeting is dependent on culture conditions that maintain an immature DC phenotype. Further, we find evidence that when loaded with therapeutic cargo, cultured DCs can suppress initial neuron death caused by an ischemic injury. These results demonstrate a non-invasive method to target ischemic brain injury and may ultimately provide a way to selectively deliver therapeutic compounds to the injured brain.

  14. Modeling the hydrodynamics of Phloem sieve plates

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Kaare Hartvig; Mullendore, Daniel Leroy; Holbrook, Noel Michele;

    2012-01-01

    Sieve plates have an enormous impact on the efficiency of the phloem vascular system of plants, responsible for the distribution of photosynthetic products. These thin plates, which separate neighboring phloem cells, are perforated by a large number of tiny sieve pores and are believed to play...... are investigated. We find that the sieve plate resistance is correlated to the cell lumen resistance, and that the sieve plate and the lumen contribute almost equally to the total hydraulic resistance of the phloem translocation pathway....

  15. Distinctive response of CNS glial cells in oro-facial pain associated with injury, infection and inflammation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ribeiro-da-Silva Alfredo

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Oro-facial pain following injury and infection is frequently observed in dental clinics. While neuropathic pain evoked by injury associated with nerve lesion has an involvement of glia/immune cells, inflammatory hyperalgesia has an exaggerated sensitization mediated by local and circulating immune mediators. To better understand the contribution of central nervous system (CNS glial cells in these different pathological conditions, in this study we sought to characterize functional phenotypes of glial cells in response to trigeminal nerve injury (loose ligation of the mental branch, infection (subcutaneous injection of lipopolysaccharide-LPS and to sterile inflammation (subcutaneous injection of complete Freund's adjuvant-CFA on the lower lip. Each of the three insults triggered a specific pattern of mechanical allodynia. In parallel with changes in sensory response, CNS glial cells reacted distinctively to the challenges. Following ligation of the mental nerve, both microglia and astrocytes in the trigeminal nuclear complex were highly activated, more prominent in the principal sensory nucleus (Pr5 and subnucleus caudalis (Sp5C area. Microglial response was initiated early (days 3-14, followed by delayed astrocytes activation (days 7-28. Although the temporal profile of microglial and astrocyte reaction corresponded respectively to the initiation and chronic stage of neuropathic pain, these activated glial cells exhibited a low profile of cytokine expression. Local injection of LPS in the lower lip skin also triggered a microglial reaction in the brain, which started in the circumventricular organs (CVOs at 5 hours post-injection and diffused progressively into the brain parenchyma at 48 hours. This LPS-induced microglial reaction was accompanied by a robust induction of IκB-α mRNA and pro-inflammatory cytokines within the CVOs. However, LPS induced microglial activation did not specifically occur along the pain signaling pathway. In

  16. Suprathreshold heat pain response predicts activity-related pain, but not rest-related pain, in an exercise-induced injury model.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rogelio A Coronado

    Full Text Available Exercise-induced injury models are advantageous for studying pain since the onset of pain is controlled and both pre-injury and post-injury factors can be utilized as explanatory variables or predictors. In these studies, rest-related pain is often considered the primary dependent variable or outcome, as opposed to a measure of activity-related pain. Additionally, few studies include pain sensitivity measures as predictors. In this study, we examined the influence of pre-injury and post-injury factors, including pain sensitivity, for induced rest and activity-related pain following exercise induced muscle injury. The overall goal of this investigation was to determine if there were convergent or divergent predictors of rest and activity-related pain. One hundred forty-three participants provided demographic, psychological, and pain sensitivity information and underwent a standard fatigue trial of resistance exercise to induce injury of the dominant shoulder. Pain at rest and during active and resisted shoulder motion were measured at 48- and 96-hours post-injury. Separate hierarchical models were generated for assessing the influence of pre-injury and post-injury factors on 48- and 96-hour rest-related and activity-related pain. Overall, we did not find a universal predictor of pain across all models. However, pre-injury and post-injury suprathreshold heat pain response (SHPR, a pain sensitivity measure, was a consistent predictor of activity-related pain, even after controlling for known psychological factors. These results suggest there is differential prediction of pain. A measure of pain sensitivity such as SHPR appears more influential for activity-related pain, but not rest-related pain, and may reflect different underlying processes involved during pain appraisal.

  17. CD14 is a key organizer of microglial responses to CNS infection and injury

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Janova, Hana; Boettcher, Chotima; Holtman, Inge R.; Regen, Tommy; van Rossum, Denise; Goetz, Alexander; Ernst, Anne-Sophie; Fritsche, Christin; Gertig, Ulla; Saiepour, Nasrin; Gronke, Konrad; Wrzos, Claudia; Ribes, Sandra; Rolfes, Simone; Weinstein, Jonathan; Ehrenreich, Hannelore; Pukrop, Tobias; Kopatz, Jens; Stadelmann, Christine; Salinas-Riester, Gabriela; Weber, Martin S.; Prinz, Marco; Brueck, Wolfgang; Eggen, Bart J. L.; Boddeke, Hendrikus W. G. M.; Priller, Josef; Hanisch, Uwe-Karsten

    2016-01-01

    Microglia, innate immune cells of the CNS, sense infection and damage through overlapping receptor sets. Toll-like receptor (TLR) 4 recognizes bacterial lipopolysaccharide (LPS) and multiple injury-associated factors. We show that its co-receptor CD14 serves three non-redundant functions in microgli

  18. The Treatment of Covert Self-Injury through Contingencies on Response Products.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grace, Nancy C.; And Others

    1996-01-01

    Covert self-injurious behavior in a 21-year old with mild mental retardation and cerebral palsy was treated by first identifying tangible and social reinforcers and then providing reinforcers contingent on absence of tissue damage identified during physical examination. Almost complete success was achieved and maintained over 10 months. (DB)

  19. Position Paper for Guiding Response to Non-Suicidal Self-Injury in Schools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hasking, Penelope A.; Heath, Nancy L.; Kaess, Michael; Lewis, Stephen P.; Plener, Paul L.; Walsh, Barent W.; Whitlock, Janis; Wilson, Marc S.

    2016-01-01

    Around the world, school staff are increasingly expressing concern about nonsuicidal self-injury (NSSI) and how best to address this behavior in the school setting. However, there is a notable lack of informed guidance for schools, and clear inconsistencies in the practices school staff adopt. In this position paper we draw on our collective…

  20. Inflammatory response to mucosal barrier injury after myeloablative therapy in allogeneic stem cell transplant recipients.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Blijlevens, N.M.A.; Donnelly, J.P.; Pauw, B.E. de

    2005-01-01

    We noted a significant increase of interleukin-8 (IL-8), LBP and CRP mirroring the pattern of mucosal barrier injury as measured by gut integrity (lactulose/rhamnose ratio), daily mucositis score (DMS) and serum citrulline concentrations of 32 haematopoietic stem cell transplant (HSCT) recipients fo

  1. Virtual testing of driver OOP scenarios: effect of modeling detail on injury response

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bosch-Rekveldt, M.G.C.; Hoof, J.F.A.M. van

    2004-01-01

    This study investigates the relevance of certain parameters for virtual testing of the driver's side OOP problem and attempts to answer the following questions: Which level of detail is needed in the airbag models to assess occupants' injury values for OOP scenarios? What is the influence of the air

  2. Emotional Responses to Self-Injury Imagery among Adults with Borderline Personality Disorder

    Science.gov (United States)

    Welch, Stacy Shaw; Linehan, Marsha M.; Sylvers, Patrick; Chittams, Jesse; Rizvi, Shireen L.

    2008-01-01

    Nonsuicidal self-injury (NSSI) and suicide attempts (SAs) are especially prevalent in borderline personality disorder. One proposed mechanism for the maintenance of NSSI and SAs is escape conditioning, whereby immediate reductions in aversive emotional states negatively reinforce the behaviors. Psychophysiological and subjective indicators of…

  3. 20 CFR 702.211 - Notice of employee's injury or death; designation of responsible official.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... (including foreman, hatchboss or timekeeper), local plant manager or personnel office official; (2) to any..., to an officer or to the person in charge of the business at the place where the injury occurred. In... position and the employer shall provide the name and/or position, exact location and telephone number of...

  4. Pediatric running injuries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seto, Craig K; Statuta, Siobhan M; Solari, Ian L

    2010-07-01

    As more children have become involved in athletic activities and running, there has been a significant increase in overuse injuries. The young athlete with open growth plates is vulnerable to unique overuse injuries involving the apophyses, articular cartilage, and growth plate. The physician caring for these young athletes needs to be aware of these conditions to diagnose and treat them appropriately. Physicians should also be aware of the risk of overtraining and overuse injury in athletes participating in year-round sports and competition. Current guidelines for overuse injury prevention in young athletes are primarily based on consensus and expert opinion. Further research is needed to provide evidence-based guidelines for overuse injury prevention in young athletes and runners. Copyright 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Comparison of curative effects of traditional reconstruction plate and sacroiliac anterior cervical butterfly plate in treatment of sacroiliac joint injury%传统重建钢板与骶髂前路蝶形钢板治疗骶髂关节损伤的疗效比较

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    赵亮; 邢宏; 王劲松; 李雪松

    2015-01-01

    目的::对比传统重建钢板与骶髂前路蝶形钢板治疗骶髂关节损伤的疗效。方法:将64例患者分为观察组和对照组,每组各32例。观察组患者行骶髂前路蝶形钢板治疗,对照组患者行传统重建钢板治疗。结果:两组患者的损伤恢复优良率对比,观察组患者优于对照组(P>0.05);功能恢复、手术时间、盆骨稳定时间对比,观察组患者也好于对照组(P0. 05), and the time of function recovery, operation time, pelvic stability time were also better than those of control group (P<0. 05) with no severe complications. Conclusions:The sacroiliac anterior cervical butterfly plate in the treatment of sacroiliac joint injury has signifi-cant curative effects.

  6. Assessment of abdominal muscle function in individuals with motor-complete spinal cord injury above T6 in response to transcranial magnetic stimulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bjerkefors, Anna; Squair, Jordan W; Chua, Romeo; Lam, Tania; Chen, Zhen; Carpenter, Mark G

    2015-02-01

    To use transcranial magnetic stimulation and electromyography to assess the potential for preserved function in the abdominal muscles in individuals classified with motor-complete spinal cord injury above T6. Five individuals with spinal cord injury (C5-T3) and 5 able-bodied individuals. Transcranial magnetic stimulation was delivered over the abdominal region of primary motor cortex during resting and sub-maximal (or attempted) contractions. Surface electromyography was used to record motor-evoked potentials as well as maximal voluntary (or attempted) contractions in the abdominal muscles and the diaphragm. Responses to transcranial magnetic stimulation in the abdominal muscles occurred in all spinal cord injury subjects. Latencies of muscle response onsets were similar in both groups; however, peak-to-peak amplitudes were smaller in the spinal cord injury group. During maximal voluntary (or attempted) contractions all spinal cord injury subjects were able to elicit electromyography activity above resting levels in more than one abdominal muscle across tasks. Individuals with motor-complete spinal cord injury above T6 were able to activate abdominal muscles in response to transcranial magnetic stimulation and during maximal voluntary (or attempted) contractions. The activation was induced directly through corticospinal pathways, and not indirectly by stretch reflex activations of the diaphragm. Transcranial magnetic stimulation and electromyography measurements provide a useful method to assess motor preservation of abdominal muscles in persons with spinal cord injury.

  7. Telomere shortening impairs regeneration of the olfactory epithelium in response to injury but not under homeostatic conditions.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Masami Watabe-Rudolph

    Full Text Available Atrophy of the olfactory epithelium (OE associated with impaired olfaction and dry nose represents one of the most common phenotypes of human aging. Impairment in regeneration of a functional olfactory epithelium can also occur in response to injury due to infection or nasal surgery. These complications occur more frequently in aged patients. Although age is the most unifying risk factor for atrophic changes and functional decline of the olfactory epithelium, little is known about molecular mechanisms that could influence maintenance and repair of the olfactory epithelium. Here, we analyzed the influence of telomere shortening (a basic mechanism of cellular aging on homeostasis and regenerative reserve in response to chemical induced injury of the OE in late generation telomere knockout mice (G3 mTerc(-/- with short telomeres compared to wild type mice (mTerc(+/+ with long telomeres. The study revealed no significant influence of telomere shortening on homeostatic maintenance of the OE during mouse aging. In contrast, the regenerative response to chemical induced injury of the OE was significantly impaired in G3 mTerc(-/- mice compared to mTerc(+/+ mice. Seven days after chemical induced damage, G3 mTerc(-/- mice exhibited significantly enlarged areas of persisting atrophy compared to mTerc(+/+ mice (p = 0.031. Telomere dysfunction was associated with impairments in cell proliferation in the regenerating epithelium. Deletion of the cell cycle inhibitor, Cdkn1a (p21 rescued defects in OE regeneration in telomere dysfunctional mice. Together, these data indicate that telomere shortening impairs the regenerative capacity of the OE by impairing cell cycle progression in a p21-dependent manner. These findings could be relevant for the impairment in OE function in elderly people.

  8. SMG-1 and mTORC1 act antagonistically to regulate response to injury and growth in planarians.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cristina González-Estévez

    Full Text Available Planarian flatworms are able to both regenerate their whole bodies and continuously adapt their size to nutrient status. Tight control of stem cell proliferation and differentiation during these processes is the key feature of planarian biology. Here we show that the planarian homolog of the phosphoinositide 3-kinase-related kinase (PIKK family member SMG-1 and mTOR complex 1 components are required for this tight control. Loss of smg-1 results in a hyper-responsiveness to injury and growth and the formation of regenerative blastemas that remain undifferentiated and that lead to lethal ectopic outgrowths. Invasive stem cell hyper-proliferation, hyperplasia, hypertrophy, and differentiation defects are hallmarks of this uncontrolled growth. These data imply a previously unappreciated and novel physiological function for this PIKK family member. In contrast we found that planarian members of the mTOR complex 1, tor and raptor, are required for the initial response to injury and blastema formation. Double smg-1 RNAi experiments with tor or raptor show that abnormal growth requires mTOR signalling. We also found that the macrolide rapamycin, a natural compound inhibitor of mTORC1, is able to increase the survival rate of smg-1 RNAi animals by decreasing cell proliferation. Our findings support a model where Smg-1 acts as a novel regulator of both the response to injury and growth control mechanisms. Our data suggest the possibility that this may be by suppressing mTOR signalling. Characterisation of both the planarian mTORC1 signalling components and another PIKK family member as key regulators of regeneration and growth will influence future work on regeneration, growth control, and the development of anti-cancer therapies that target mTOR signalling.

  9. SMG-1 and mTORC1 act antagonistically to regulate response to injury and growth in planarians.

    Science.gov (United States)

    González-Estévez, Cristina; Felix, Daniel A; Smith, Matthew D; Paps, Jordi; Morley, Simon J; James, Victoria; Sharp, Tyson V; Aboobaker, A Aziz

    2012-01-01

    Planarian flatworms are able to both regenerate their whole bodies and continuously adapt their size to nutrient status. Tight control of stem cell proliferation and differentiation during these processes is the key feature of planarian biology. Here we show that the planarian homolog of the phosphoinositide 3-kinase-related kinase (PIKK) family member SMG-1 and mTOR complex 1 components are required for this tight control. Loss of smg-1 results in a hyper-responsiveness to injury and growth and the formation of regenerative blastemas that remain undifferentiated and that lead to lethal ectopic outgrowths. Invasive stem cell hyper-proliferation, hyperplasia, hypertrophy, and differentiation defects are hallmarks of this uncontrolled growth. These data imply a previously unappreciated and novel physiological function for this PIKK family member. In contrast we found that planarian members of the mTOR complex 1, tor and raptor, are required for the initial response to injury and blastema formation. Double smg-1 RNAi experiments with tor or raptor show that abnormal growth requires mTOR signalling. We also found that the macrolide rapamycin, a natural compound inhibitor of mTORC1, is able to increase the survival rate of smg-1 RNAi animals by decreasing cell proliferation. Our findings support a model where Smg-1 acts as a novel regulator of both the response to injury and growth control mechanisms. Our data suggest the possibility that this may be by suppressing mTOR signalling. Characterisation of both the planarian mTORC1 signalling components and another PIKK family member as key regulators of regeneration and growth will influence future work on regeneration, growth control, and the development of anti-cancer therapies that target mTOR signalling.

  10. Impact of Moderate Heat, Carvacrol, and Thymol Treatments on the Viability, Injury, and Stress Response of Listeria monocytogenes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. Guevara

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The microbial safety and stability of minimally processed foods are based on the application of combined preservative factors. Since microorganisms are able to develop adaptive networks to survive under conditions of stress, food safety may be affected, and therefore understanding of stress adaptive mechanisms plays a key role in designing safe food processing conditions. In the present study, the viability and the sublethal injury of Listeria monocytogenes exposed to moderate heat (55°C and/or essential oil compounds (carvacrol and thymol, 0.3 mM treatments were studied. Synergistic effects were obtained when combining mild heat (55°C with one or both essential oil compounds, leading to inactivation kinetics values three to four times lower than when using heat alone. All the treatments applied caused some injury in the population. The injury levels ranged from around 20% of the surviving population under the mildest conditions to more than 99.99% under the most stringent conditions. Protein extracts of cells exposed to these treatments were analysed by two-dimensional gel electrophoresis. The results obtained revealed that stressed cells exhibited differential protein expression to control cells. The proteins upregulated under these stressing conditions were implicated, among other functions, in stress response, metabolism, and protein refolding.

  11. ASTROGLIOSIS INVOLVES ACTIVATION OF RIG-LIKE SIGNALING IN THE INNATE IMMUNE RESPONSE AFTER SPINAL CORD INJURY

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Rivero Vaccari, Juan Pablo; Minkiewicz, Julia; Wang, Xiaoliang; de Rivero Vaccari, Juan Carlos; German, Ramon; Marcillo, Alex E.; Dietrich, W. Dalton; Keane, Robert W.

    2011-01-01

    Spinal cord injury (SCI) induces a glial response in which astrocytes become activated and produce inflammatory mediators. The molecular basis for regulation of glial-innate immune responses remains poorly understood. Here, we examined the activation of retinoic acid inducible gene (RIG)-like receptors (RLRs) and their involvement in regulating inflammation following SCI. We show that astrocytes express two intracellular RLRs: RIG-I and melanoma differentiation-associated gene 5 (MDA5). SCI and stretch injury of cultured astrocytes stimulated RLR signaling as determined by phosphorylation of IRF3 leading to production of type I interferons (IFNs). RLR signaling stimulation with synthetic RNA resulted in RLR activation, phosphorylation of interferon regulatory factor 3 (IRF3), and increased expression of glial fibrillary acidic protein and vimentin, two hallmarks of reactive astrocytes. Moreover, mitochondrial E3 ubiquitin protein ligase 1 (MUL1), an RLR inhibitor, decreased production of glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP) and vimentin following RIG-I signaling stimulation. Our findings identify a role for RLR signaling and type I IFN in regulating astrocyte innate immune responses after SCI. PMID:22161971

  12. Kidney injury molecule-1 is up-regulated in renal epithelial cells in response to oxalate in vitro and in renal tissues in response to hyperoxaluria in vivo.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lakshmipathi Khandrika

    Full Text Available Oxalate is a metabolic end product excreted by the kidney. Mild increases in urinary oxalate are most commonly associated with Nephrolithiasis. Chronically high levels of urinary oxalate, as seen in patients with primary hyperoxaluria, are driving factor for recurrent renal stones, and ultimately lead to renal failure, calcification of soft tissue and premature death. In previous studies others and we have demonstrated that high levels of oxalate promote injury of renal epithelial cells. However, methods to monitor oxalate induced renal injury are limited. In the present study we evaluated changes in expression of Kidney Injury Molecule-1 (KIM-1 in response to oxalate in human renal cells (HK2 cells in culture and in renal tissue and urine samples in hyperoxaluric animals which mimic in vitro and in vivo models of hyper-oxaluria. Results presented, herein demonstrate that oxalate exposure resulted in increased expression of KIM-1 m RNA as well as protein in HK2 cells. These effects were rapid and concentration dependent. Using in vivo models of hyperoxaluria we observed elevated expression of KIM-1 in renal tissues of hyperoxaluric rats as compared to normal controls. The increase in KIM-1 was both at protein and mRNA level, suggesting transcriptional activation of KIM-1 in response to oxalate exposure. Interestingly, in addition to increased KIM-1 expression, we observed increased levels of the ectodomain of KIM-1 in urine collected from hyperoxaluric rats. To the best of our knowledge our studies are the first direct demonstration of regulation of KIM-1 in response to oxalate exposure in renal epithelial cells in vitro and in vivo. Our results suggest that detection of KIM-1 over-expression and measurement of the ectodomain of KIM-1 in urine may hold promise as a marker to monitor oxalate nephrotoxicity in hyperoxaluria.

  13. The association between attributions of responsibility for motor vehicle accidents and patient satisfaction: a study within a no-fault injury compensation system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thompson, Jason; Berk, Michael; O'Donnell, Meaghan; Stafford, Lesley; Nordfjaern, Trond

    2015-05-01

    This study set out to test the relationship between attributions of responsibility for motor vehicle accidents and satisfaction with personal injury compensation systems. The study analysed survey data from 1394 people injured in a motor vehicle accident who were compensated under a no-fault personal injury compensation system. Patients' ratings of satisfaction with the compensation system across five domains (resolves your issues, keeps you up-to-date, treats you as an individual, cares about you, and overall satisfaction) were analysed alongside patient attributions of responsibility for their accident (not responsible, partly responsible, totally responsible). Postaccident physical and mental health status, age, gender, and duration of compensation claim were controlled for in the analysis. A multivariate analysis of covariance indicated attributions of responsibility for accidents were significantly associated with levels of patient satisfaction across all five domains under study (F (10, 2084) = 3.7, presponsibility for their accidents to others were significantly less satisfied with the injury compensation system than those who attributed responsibility to themselves. Satisfaction with no-fault motor vehicle injury compensation services are associated with patients' attributions of responsibility for their accident. Compensation systems and other rehabilitation services monitoring patient satisfaction should adjust for attributions of responsibility when assessing levels of patient satisfaction between time periods, services, or injured populations. Differences in levels of patient satisfaction observed between compensation or rehabilitation populations may reflect differences in attributions of responsibility for accidents rather than objective service quality. © The Author(s) 2014.

  14. p53 Regulates the neuronal intrinsic and extrinsic responses affecting the recovery of motor function following spinal cord injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Floriddia, Elisa M; Rathore, Khizr I; Tedeschi, Andrea; Quadrato, Giorgia; Wuttke, Anja; Lueckmann, Jan-Matthis; Kigerl, Kristina A; Popovich, Phillip G; Di Giovanni, Simone

    2012-10-01

    Following spinal trauma, the limited physiological axonal sprouting that contributes to partial recovery of function is dependent upon the intrinsic properties of neurons as well as the inhibitory glial environment. The transcription factor p53 is involved in DNA repair, cell cycle, cell survival, and axonal outgrowth, suggesting p53 as key modifier of axonal and glial responses influencing functional recovery following spinal injury. Indeed, in a spinal cord dorsal hemisection injury model, we observed a significant impairment in locomotor recovery in p53(-/-) versus wild-type mice. p53(-/-) spinal cords showed an increased number of activated microglia/macrophages and a larger scar at the lesion site. Loss- and gain-of-function experiments suggested p53 as a direct regulator of microglia/macrophages proliferation. At the axonal level, p53(-/-) mice showed a more pronounced dieback of the corticospinal tract (CST) and a decreased sprouting capacity of both CST and spinal serotoninergic fibers. In vivo expression of p53 in the sensorimotor cortex rescued and enhanced the sprouting potential of the CST in p53(-/-) mice, while, similarly, p53 expression in p53(-/-) cultured cortical neurons rescued a defect in neurite outgrowth, suggesting a direct role for p53 in regulating the intrinsic sprouting ability of CNS neurons. In conclusion, we show that p53 plays an important regulatory role at both extrinsic and intrinsic levels affecting the recovery of motor function following spinal cord injury. Therefore, we propose p53 as a novel potential multilevel therapeutic target for spinal cord injury.

  15. Brain and Serum Androsterone Is Elevated in Response to Stress in Rats with Mild Traumatic Brain Injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Servatius, Richard J; Marx, Christine E; Sinha, Swamini; Avcu, Pelin; Kilts, Jason D; Naylor, Jennifer C; Pang, Kevin C H

    2016-01-01

    Exposure to lateral fluid percussion (LFP) injury consistent with mild traumatic brain injury (mTBI) persistently attenuates acoustic startle responses (ASRs) in rats. Here, we examined whether the experience of head trauma affects stress reactivity. Male Sprague-Dawley rats were matched for ASRs and randomly assigned to receive mTBI through LFP or experience a sham surgery (SHAM). ASRs were measured post injury days (PIDs) 1, 3, 7, 14, 21, and 28. To assess neurosteroids, rats received a single 2.0 mA, 0.5 s foot shock on PID 34 (S34), PID 35 (S35), on both days (2S), or the experimental context (CON). Levels of the neurosteroids pregnenolone (PREG), allopregnanolone (ALLO), and androsterone (ANDRO) were determined for the prefrontal cortex, hippocampus, and cerebellum. For 2S rats, repeated blood samples were obtained at 15, 30, and 60 min post-stressor for determination of corticosterone (CORT) levels after stress or context on PID 34. Similar to earlier work, ASRs were severely attenuated in mTBI rats without remission for 28 days after injury. No differences were observed between mTBI and SHAM rats in basal CORT, peak CORT levels or its recovery. In serum and brain, ANDRO levels were the most stress-sensitive. Stress-induced ANDRO elevations were greater than those in mTBI rats. As a positive allosteric modulator of gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABAA) receptors, increased brain ANDRO levels are expected to be anxiolytic. The impact of brain ANDRO elevations in the aftermath of mTBI on coping warrants further elaboration.

  16. Brain and Serum Androsterone is Elevated in Response to Stress in Rats with Mild Traumatic Brain Injury

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Richard J Servatius

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Exposure to lateral fluid percussion (LFP injury consistent with mild traumatic brain injury (mTBI persistently attenuates acoustic startle responses (ASRs in rats. Here, we examined whether the experience of head trauma affects stress reactivity. Male Sprague-Dawley rats were matched for ASRs and randomly assigned to receive mTBI through LFP or experience a sham surgery (SHAM. ASRs were measured post injury days (PIDs 1, 3, 7, 14, 21 and 28. To assess neurosteroids, rats received a single 2.0 mA, 0.5 s foot shock on PID 34 (S34, PID 35 (S35, on both days (2S, or the experimental context (CON. Levels of the neurosteroids pregnenolone (PREG, allopregnanolone (ALLO, and androsterone (ANDRO were determined for the prefrontal cortex, hippocampus and cerebellum. For 2S rats, repeated blood samples were obtained at 15, 30 and 60 min post-stressor for determination of corticosterone (CORT levels after stress or context on PID 34. Similar to earlier work, ASRs were severely attenuated in mTBI rats without remission for 28 days after injury. No differences were observed between mTBI and SHAM rats in basal CORT, peak CORT levels or its recovery. In serum and brain, ANDRO levels were the most stress-sensitive. Stress-induced ANDRO elevations were greater than those in mTBI rats. As a positive allosteric modulator of gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABAA receptors, increased brain ANDRO levels are expected to be anxiolytic. The impact of brain ANDRO elevations in the aftermath of mTBI on coping warrants further elaboration.

  17. The Impact of the Spectral Response of an Achromatic Half-Wave Plate on the Measurement of the Cosmic Microwave Background Polarization

    CERN Document Server

    Bao, C; Baccigalupi, C; Didier, J; Hanany, S; Jaffe, A; Johnson, B R; Leach, S; Matsumura, T; Miller, A; O'Dea, D

    2011-01-01

    We study the impact of the spectral dependence of the linear polarization rotation induced by an achromatic half-wave plate on measurements of cosmic microwave background polarization in the presence of astrophysical foregrounds. We focus on the systematic effects induced on the measurement of inflationary gravitational waves by uncertainties in the polarization and spectral index of Galactic dust. We find that for the experimental configuration and noise levels of the balloon-borne EBEX experiment, which has three frequency bands centered at 150, 250, and 410 GHz, a crude dust subtraction process mitigates systematic effects to below detectable levels for 10% polarized dust and tensor to scalar ratio of as low as r = 0.01. We also study the impact of uncertainties in the spectral response of the instrument. With a top-hat model of the spectral response for each band, characterized by band-center and band-width, and with the same crude dust subtraction process, we find that these parameters need to be determi...

  18. Glucocorticoids modulate the NGF mRNA response in the rat hippocampus after traumatic brain injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grundy, P L; Patel, N; Harbuz, M S; Lightman, S L; Sharples, P M

    2001-02-23

    Nerve growth factor (NGF) expression in the rat hippocampus is increased after experimental traumatic brain injury (TBI) and is neuroprotective. Glucocorticoids are regulators of brain neurotrophin levels and are often prescribed following TBI. The effect of adrenalectomy (ADX) and corticosterone (CORT) replacement on the expression of NGF mRNA in the hippocampus after TBI has not been investigated to date. We used fluid percussion injury and in situ hybridisation to evaluate the expression of NGF mRNA in the hippocampus 4 h after TBI in adrenal-intact or adrenalectomised rats (with or without CORT replacement). TBI increased expression of NGF mRNA in sham-ADX rats, but not in ADX rats. Furthermore, CORT replacement in ADX rats restored the increase in NGF mRNA induced by TBI. These findings suggest that glucocorticoids have an important role in the induction of hippocampal NGF mRNA after TBI.

  19. Prevalence of needle stick injuries among nurses in a tertiary care hospital and their immediate response

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jalina Laishram

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Context: Needle stick injuries (NSIs are wounds caused by needles in health care setup that accidentally puncture the skin and may result in exposure to blood or other body fluids. NSI is a major occupational health and safety issue faced by health care professionals globally. Nurses have the highest rate of needle stick injury among health care workers. Aims: To determine the prevalence of needle stick injuries (NSIs among the nurses, to determine the association between NSI and selected variables like age, marital status, years in service, educational qualification and to assess the measures undertaken by the respondents after the NSI. Materials and Methods: A cross sectional study was conducted in a tertiary care hospital in Imphal among nurses from October to November 2011. Self-administered questionnaire was used for data collection. Descriptive statistics were used. Chi square test was used to see the association and a P-value of <0.05 was taken as significant. Results: The prevalence of NSI within the last one year was found to be 28.1% (N=86. Of them 49(46.5% had two or more NSIs in the last one year. More than half of the NSIs occurred during intravenous (IV injection, 16.3% during intramuscular (IM injection and only 1.6% during recapping of the needle. Eighty three (96% of them did not were gloves during NSI. Forty (46.5% of them washed the injured part with water and soap as immediate measure. Thirty seven (43% did not report it. Though 251(82% knew about the free availability of Post Exposure Prophylaxis (PEP in the hospital, only 5(5.7% took PEP. Conclusion: Needle stick injury is an important occupational health hazard among the nurses. Reporting to the concerned authorities, screening after NSI and promotion of safety measures should be greatly encouraged.

  20. Fucoidan reduces inflammatory response in a rat model of hepatic ischemia-reperfusion injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xiao-Jing; Ye, Qi-Fa

    2015-11-01

    Ischemia-reperfusion (I/R) injury after a liver transplant is a major cause of severe complications that lead to graft dysfunction. Fucoidan, a complex of sulfated polysaccharides derived from marine brown algae, demonstrated antiapoptotic as well as potential anti-inflammatory properties in previous studies. Fucoidan has also shown protective effects on I/R-injured kidney and heart. However, whether fucoidan can attenuate hepatic I/R injury has not been examined. To clarify the role of fucoidan in hepatic I/R injury, Sprague-Dawley rats were subjected to sham operation or ischemia followed by reperfusion with treatment of saline or fucoidan (50, 100, or 200 mg·(kg body mass)(-1)·d(-1)). The fucoidan-treated group showed decreased levels of alanine aminotransferase and aspartate aminotransferase compared with the control group. Myeloperoxidase and malondialdehyde activities and mRNA levels of CD11b in the fucoidan-treated group were significantly decreased. Hepatocellular swelling/necrosis, sinusoidal/vascular congestion, and inflammatory cell infiltration were also attenuated in the fucoidan group. The expression of TNF-α, IL-6, IL-1β, CXCL-10, VCAM-1, and ICAM-1 were markedly decreased in the samples from the fucoidan-treated group. Fucoidan largely prevented activation of the inflammatory signaling pathway, compared with the control group. In summary, fucoidan can protect the liver from I/R injury through suppressing activation of the inflammatory signaling pathway, as well as the expression of inflammatory mediators, and inflammatory cell infiltration.

  1. Neural activity control of neural stem cells and SVZ niche response to brain injury

    OpenAIRE

    Páez González, Patricia

    2014-01-01

    Patricia Paez-Gonzalez Kuo Lab, Dept. of Cell Biology, Duke University Medical Center, NC,USA. Date: 11/16/2014 Utilizing stem cells in the adult brain hold great promise for regenerative medicine. Harnessing ability of adult neural stem cells (NSCs) to generate new neurons or other types of brain cells may provide much needed therapies for patients suffering from brain injuries or neuro-degenerative diseases such as Parkinson’s, Scizophrenia, or Alzheimer’s disease. However...

  2. Morphologic analysis of the cerebral microcirculation after thermal injury and the response to fluid resuscitation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barone, M; Jimenez, F; Huxley, V H; Yang, X F

    1997-01-01

    Using the pial window model, we have previously demonstrated that there is a disruption of the blood brain barrier with distal thermal injury [1-3]. Our laboratory has shown that treatment with Lactated Ringer's Solution did not improve labeled albumin leakage. However, treatment with hypertonic hyperosmotic saline (HHS) solution post thermal injury seemed to essentially eliminate the albumin leakage in cerebral vessels. Using adult Sprague-Dawley rats and epifluorescent microscopy, the cerebral vessel size and diameter were measured, as well as the number of leukocytes rolling or adherent to the endothelium. The results show that there was significant progressive arterial dilatation over six hours in the thermally injured animals treated with HHS. There was also a significant increase in leukocyte number if the animals were thermally injured and had no resuscitation fluid or if the animals were thermally injured and underwent resuscitation fluid with Lactated Ringer's compared to either the control group or the group that was treated with HHS after thermal injury.

  3. Hemodynamic and morphologic responses in mouse brain during acute head injury imaged by multispectral structured illumination

    Science.gov (United States)

    Volkov, Boris; Mathews, Marlon S.; Abookasis, David

    2015-03-01

    Multispectral imaging has received significant attention over the last decade as it integrates spectroscopy, imaging, tomography analysis concurrently to acquire both spatial and spectral information from biological tissue. In the present study, a multispectral setup based on projection of structured illumination at several near-infrared wavelengths and at different spatial frequencies is applied to quantitatively assess brain function before, during, and after the onset of traumatic brain injury in an intact mouse brain (n=5). For the production of head injury, we used the weight drop method where weight of a cylindrical metallic rod falling along a metal tube strikes the mouse's head. Structured light was projected onto the scalp surface and diffuse reflected light was recorded by a CCD camera positioned perpendicular to the mouse head. Following data analysis, we were able to concurrently show a series of hemodynamic and morphologic changes over time including higher deoxyhemoglobin, reduction in oxygen saturation, cell swelling, etc., in comparison with baseline measurements. Overall, results demonstrates the capability of multispectral imaging based structured illumination to detect and map of brain tissue optical and physiological properties following brain injury in a simple noninvasive and noncontact manner.

  4. Molecular response of chorioretinal endothelial cells to complement injury: implications for macular degeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeng, Shemin; Whitmore, S Scott; Sohn, Elliott H; Riker, Megan J; Wiley, Luke A; Scheetz, Todd E; Stone, Edwin M; Tucker, Budd A; Mullins, Robert F

    2016-02-01

    Age-related macular degeneration (AMD) is a common, blinding disease of the elderly in which macular photoreceptor cells, retinal pigment epithelium and choriocapillaris endothelial cells ultimately degenerate. Recent studies have found that degeneration of the choriocapillaris occurs early in this disease and that endothelial cell drop-out is concomitant with increased deposition of the complement membrane attack complex (MAC) at the choroidal endothelium. However, the impact of MAC injury to choroidal endothelial cells is poorly understood. To model this event in vitro, and to study the downstream consequences of MAC injury, endothelial cells were exposed to complement from human serum, compared to heat-inactivated serum, which lacks complement components. Cells exposed to complement components in human serum showed increased labelling with antibodies directed against the MAC, time- and dose-dependent cell death, as assessed by lactate dehydrogenase assay and increased permeability. RNA-Seq analysis following complement injury revealed increased expression of genes associated with angiogenesis including matrix metalloproteinase (MMP)-3 and -9, and VEGF-A. The MAC-induced increase in MMP9 RNA expression was validated using C5-depleted serum compared to C5-reconstituted serum. Increased levels of MMP9 were also established, using western blot and zymography. These data suggest that, in addition to cell lysis, complement attack on choroidal endothelial cells promotes an angiogenic phenotype in surviving cells.

  5. Adult axolotls can regenerate original neuronal diversity in response to brain injury

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amamoto, Ryoji; Huerta, Violeta Gisselle Lopez; Takahashi, Emi; Dai, Guangping; Grant, Aaron K; Fu, Zhanyan; Arlotta, Paola

    2016-01-01

    The axolotl can regenerate multiple organs, including the brain. It remains, however, unclear whether neuronal diversity, intricate tissue architecture, and axonal connectivity can be regenerated; yet, this is critical for recovery of function and a central aim of cell replacement strategies in the mammalian central nervous system. Here, we demonstrate that, upon mechanical injury to the adult pallium, axolotls can regenerate several of the populations of neurons present before injury. Notably, regenerated neurons acquire functional electrophysiological traits and respond appropriately to afferent inputs. Despite the ability to regenerate specific, molecularly-defined neuronal subtypes, we also uncovered previously unappreciated limitations by showing that newborn neurons organize within altered tissue architecture and fail to re-establish the long-distance axonal tracts and circuit physiology present before injury. The data provide a direct demonstration that diverse, electrophysiologically functional neurons can be regenerated in axolotls, but challenge prior assumptions of functional brain repair in regenerative species. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.13998.001 PMID:27156560

  6. 冲击载荷下加筋板非线性瞬态分析%Transient Responses of Stiffened Plates under Lateral Impact Load by Semi-analytic Method

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张涛; 刘土光; 刘增荣; 刘敬喜

    2003-01-01

    本文用半解析的方法分析了横向冲击载荷下加筋板的非线性瞬态响应.考虑膜力的存在,忽略筋截面上的剪切应力,引人板的应力函数,采用离散加筋板模型,运用能量原理建立加筋板的动响应控制方程.假设挠度为双级数形式,运用迦辽金法,将加筋板的动响应方程转化为一个多自由度的动力系统,采用数值方法来求解.本文最后给出了几个模型的计算结果.%This paper presents a simple and efficient semi - analytic method to solve the response of stiff-ened plates under lateral impact load. Applying the discrete stiffened plates model, the motion equations ofstiffened plate is deduced using Hamilton's variation principle. Based on the large deformation theory, theyon Karman kinematic relations of the plate and stiffener are considered in the formula. The stress functionsand the deflection of the plate are taken as double Fourier series. The motion equations expressed by deflec-tion are obtained with the Galerkin method, and solved by numerical approach. Examples are given for thenon - linear transient response of stiffened plates tinder lateral impact, and parametric studies are alsoperformed for various stiffener/plate geometric parameters and impact load configurations.

  7. Responses and Injuries to PMHS in Side-Facing and Oblique Seats in Horizontal Longitudinal Sled Tests per FAA Emergency Landing Conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Humm, John R; Yoganandan, Narayan; Pintar, Frank A; DeWeese, Richard L; Moorcroft, David M; Taylor, Amanda M; Peterson, Brian

    2016-11-01

    The objective of the present exploratory study is to understand occupant responses in oblique and side-facing seats in the aviation environment, which are increasingly installed in modern aircrafts. Sled tests were conducted using intact Post Mortem Human Surrogates (PMHS) seated in custom seats approximating standard aircraft geometry. End conditions were selected to represent candidate aviation seat and restraint configurations. Three-dimensional head center-of-gravity linear accelerations, head angular velocities, and linear accelerations of the T1, T6, and T12 spinous processes, and sacrum were obtained. Three-dimensional kinematics relative to the seat were obtained from retroreflective targets attached to the head, T1, T6, T12, and sacrum. All specimens sustained spinal injuries, although variations existed by vertebral level. While the tension mechanism was associated with cervical spine injuries, complex distraction-coupled with bending and tension was attributed to thoracolumbar spine injuries. Skeletal fractures to the ribcage were attributed to compression induced by the restraint from the seatbelt, the presence of the armrest, and/or severe motions of the unconstrained torso. Pelvic injuries were also attributed to restraint offered by the lap belt on the accelerating torso-pelvis complex in the absence of the armrest. Lower extremity injuries occurred due to the unconstrained motion (flailing mechanism). These results serve as an initial dataset to understand the kinematics of different body regions, injuries and patterns, and potential injury mechanisms describing PMHS responses in the aviation environment.

  8. Effects of acidic fog on seedlings of Pinus ponderosa and Abies concolor: foliar injury, physiological and biochemical responses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takemoto, B K; Bytnerowicz, A

    1993-01-01

    Seedlings of Pinus ponderosa (ponderosa pine) and Abies concolor (white fir) were exposed to acidic fog (pH 2.0, 3.0 or 4.0) in open-field plots for six weeks. The two species exhibited dissimilar injury responses; neither current year nor previous year needles of ponderosa pine were injured by pH 2.0 fog, but current year needles exhibited higher membrane permeability responses (i.e. needle extract conductivity, K+ concentration). In comparison, both needle age classes in white fir were significantly injured by pH 2.0 fog, but no significant effects on membrane permeability were observed. For both species, whole-study average rates of net photosynthesis in previous year needles were lower in plants exposed to pH 2.0 fog than in plants treated with pH 4.0 fog. While decreased process rates coincided with leaf necrosis in white fir, stomatal closure appeared to be the mechanism of inhibition in ponderosa pine with pH 2.0 fog (i.e. no visible injury). The findings of the present study provide evidence that frequent applications of highly acidic fog (i.e. pH 2.0-3.0) can cause temporal alterations in membrane permeability and gas exchange rates in western conifer seedlings, in the presence or absence of visible injury. However, because incipient effects on other measures of foliage health were species-specific (i.e. concentrations of starch, photosynthetic pigments, inorganic nutrients), a general mechanism of phytotoxicity could not be identified.

  9. Stat 6-dependent induction of myeloid derived suppressor cells after physical injury regulates nitric oxide response to endotoxin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Munera, Veronica; Popovic, Petar J; Bryk, Jodie; Pribis, John; Caba, David; Matta, Benjamin M; Zenati, Mazen; Ochoa, Juan B

    2010-01-01

    To delineate the role of T-helper 2 (Th2) cytokines in the induction of trauma induced myeloid suppressor cells (TIMSC) and the regulation of nitric oxide production. Trauma induces myeloid cells that express CD11b+/Gr1+ and arginase 1 and exhibit an immune suppressing activity. This article explores the mechanisms that induce TIMSC and the effects on nitric oxide production in response to endotoxin. TIMSC were studied in response to Th2 cytokines and a subsequent challenge to endotoxin. The role of Th2 cytokines was studied in STAT6-/- mice. Accumulation of TIMSC in spleens was studied using flow cytometry and immunhistochemistry. Plasma was recovered to measure accumulation of nitric oxide metabolites. TIMSC accumulated in the spleen of injured mice and were particularly sensitive to IL-4 and IL-13 with large inductions of arginase activity. Significant blunting in both the accumulation of TIMSC in the spleen and induction of arginase 1 was observed in STAT6-/- mice after physical injury. Accumulation of nitric oxide metabolites to endotoxin was observed in STAT6-/- mice. This study shows that induction of CD11b+/Gr1+ cells after physical injury play an essential role in the regulation of nitric oxide production after a septic challenge. The accumulation and induction of arginase 1 in TIMSC is Th2 cytokine dependent. To our knowledge, the role of TIMSC in the regulation of nitric oxide is a novel finding. This observation adds to the possibility that TIMSC could play an important role in immunosuppression observed after physical injury.

  10. ID1 Is a Functional Marker for Intestinal Stem and Progenitor Cells Required for Normal Response to Injury

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ning Zhang

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available LGR5 and BMI1 mark intestinal stem cells in crypt base columnar cells and +4 position cells, respectively, but characterization of functional markers in these cell populations is limited. ID1 maintains the stem cell potential of embryonic, neural, and long-term repopulating hematopoietic stem cells. Here, we show in both human and mouse intestine that ID1 is expressed in cycling columnar cells, +4 position cells, and transit-amplifying cells in the crypt. Lineage tracing revealed ID1+ cells to be self-renewing, multipotent stem/progenitor cells that are responsible for the long-term renewal of the intestinal epithelium. Single ID1+ cells can generate long-lived organoids resembling mature intestinal epithelium. Complete knockout of Id1 or selective deletion of Id1 in intestinal epithelium or in LGR5+ stem cells sensitizes mice to chemical-induced colon injury. These experiments identify ID1 as a marker for intestinal stem/progenitor cells and demonstrate a role for ID1 in maintaining the potential for repair in response to colonic injury.

  11. SARM is required for neuronal injury and cytokine production in response to central nervous system viral infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hou, Ying-Ju; Banerjee, Rebecca; Thomas, Bobby; Nathan, Carl; García-Sastre, Adolfo; Ding, Aihao; Uccellini, Melissa B

    2013-07-15

    Four of the five members of the Toll/IL-1R domain-containing adaptor family are required for signaling downstream of TLRs, promoting innate immune responses against different pathogens. However, the role of the fifth member of this family, sterile α and Toll/IL-1R domain-containing 1 (SARM), is unclear. SARM is expressed primarily in the CNS where it is required for axonal death. Studies in Caenorhabditis elegans have also shown a role for SARM in innate immunity. To clarify the role of mammalian SARM in innate immunity, we infected SARM(-/-) mice with a number of bacterial and viral pathogens. SARM(-/-) mice show normal responses to Listeria monocytogenes, Mycobacterium tuberculosis, and influenza virus, but show dramatic protection from death after CNS infection with vesicular stomatitis virus. Protection correlates with reduced CNS injury and cytokine production by nonhematopoietic cells, suggesting that SARM is a positive regulator of cytokine production. Neurons and microglia are the predominant source of cytokines in vivo, supporting a role for SARM as a link between neuronal injury and innate immunity.

  12. Inhibitory Effect on Cerebral Inflammatory Response following Traumatic Brain Injury in Rats: A Potential Neuroprotective Mechanism of N-Acetylcysteine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gang Chen

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Although N-acetylcysteine (NAC has been shown to be neuroprotective for traumatic brain injury (TBI, the mechanisms for this beneficial effect are still poorly understood. Cerebral inflammation plays an important role in the pathogenesis of secondary brain injury after TBI. However, it has not been investigated whether NAC modulates TBI-induced cerebral inflammatory response. In this work, we investigated the effect of NAC administration on cortical expressions of nuclear factor kappa B (NF-κB and inflammatory proteins such as interleukin-1β (IL-1β, tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α, interleukin-6 (IL-6, and intercellular adhesion molecule-1 (ICAM-1 after TBI. As a result, we found that NF-κB, proinflammatory cytokines, and ICAM-1 were increased in all injured animals. In animals given NAC post-TBI, NF-κB, IL-1β, TNF-α, and ICAM-1 were decreased in comparison to vehicle-treated animals. Measures of IL-6 showed no change after NAC treatment. NAC administration reduced brain edema, BBB permeability, and apoptotic index in the injured brain. The results suggest that post-TBI NAC administration may attenuate inflammatory response in the injured rat brain, and this may be one mechanism by which NAC ameliorates secondary brain damage following TBI.

  13. New Insights into the Role of Peroxisome Proliferator-Activated Receptors in Regulating the Inflammatory Response after Tissue Injury

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neher, Miriam D.; Weckbach, Sebastian; Huber-Lang, Markus S.; Stahel, Philip F.

    2012-01-01

    Major trauma results in a strong inflammatory response in injured tissue. This posttraumatic hyperinflammation has been implied in the adverse events leading to a breakdown of host defense mechanisms and ultimately to delayed organ failure. Ligands to peroxisome proliferator-activated receptors (PPARs) have recently been identified as potent modulators of inflammation in various acute and chronic inflammatory conditions. The main mechanism of action mediated by ligand binding to PPARs is the inhibition of the nuclear transcription factor NF-κB, leading to downregulation of downstream gene transcription, such as for genes encoding proinflammatory cytokines. Pharmacological PPAR agonists exert strong anti-inflammatory properties in various animal models of tissue injury, including central nervous system trauma, ischemia/reperfusion injury, sepsis, and shock. In addition, PPAR agonists have been shown to induce wound healing process after tissue trauma. The present review was designed to provide an up-to-date overview on the current understanding of the role of PPARs in the pathophysiology of the inflammatory response after major trauma. Therapeutic options for using recombinant PPAR agonists as pharmacological agents in the management of posttraumatic inflammation will be discussed. PMID:22481914

  14. Imaging of Physeal Injury

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jawetz, Shari T.; Shah, Parina H.; Potter, Hollis G.

    2015-01-01

    Context: As the intensity of youth participation in athletic activities continues to rise, the number of overuse injuries has also increased. A subset of overuse injuries involves the physis, which is extremely susceptible to injury. This paper aims to review the utility of the various imaging modalities in the diagnosis and management of physeal injuries in the skeletally immature population. Evidence Acquisition: A search for the keywords pediatric, physis, growth plate, x-ray, computed tomography, magnetic resonance imaging, and overuse injury was performed using the PubMed database. No limits were set for the years of publication. Articles were reviewed for relevance with an emphasis on the imaging of growth plate injuries. Study Design: Retrospective literature review. Level of Evidence: Level 4. Results: Three major imaging modalities (radiographs, computed tomography, and magnetic resonance imaging) complement each other in the evaluation of pediatric patients with overuse injuries. However, magnetic resonance imaging is the only modality that offers direct visualization of the physis, and it also offers the best soft tissue contrast for evaluating the other periarticular structures for concomitant injury. Conclusion: Imaging has an important role in the diagnosis of physeal injuries, and the information it provides has a tremendous impact on the subsequent management of these patients. PMID:25984260

  15. Polynomial algebra reveals diverging roles of the unfolded protein response in endothelial cells during ischemia-reperfusion injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Le Pape, Sylvain; Dimitrova, Elena; Hannaert, Patrick; Konovalov, Alexander; Volmer, Romain; Ron, David; Thuillier, Raphaël; Hauet, Thierry

    2014-08-25

    The unfolded protein response (UPR)--the endoplasmic reticulum stress response--is found in various pathologies including ischemia-reperfusion injury (IRI). However, its role during IRI is still unclear. Here, by combining two different bioinformatical methods--a method based on ordinary differential equations (Time Series Network Inference) and an algebraic method (probabilistic polynomial dynamical systems)--we identified the IRE1α-XBP1 and the ATF6 pathways as the main UPR effectors involved in cell's adaptation to IRI. We validated these findings experimentally by assessing the impact of their knock-out and knock-down on cell survival during IRI. Copyright © 2014 Federation of European Biochemical Societies. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Underwater Shock-Induced Responses of Stiffened Flat Plates: An Investigation Into the Predictive Capabilities of the USA-STAGS Code.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1984-12-01

    rectangular stif- fened plate was small (j pound of TNT), and the correspond- ing plate deflections were far too slight for any firm conclusions to be drawn...s)F(s) = X(s) (eqn 5.5) For an oscillating system of order n, the transfer func- tion will have 2n poles occurring in complex conjugate pairs. Each

  17. Inflammatory response and pneumocyte apoptosis during lung ischemia-reperfusion injury in an experimental pulmonary thromboembolism model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deng, Chaosheng; Zhai, Zhenguo; Wu, Dawen; Lin, Qichang; Yang, Yuanhua; Yang, Minxia; Ding, Haibo; Cao, Xiaoming; Zhang, Qiaoxian; Wang, Chen

    2015-07-01

    Lung ischemia-reperfusion injury (LIRI) may occur in the region of the affected lung after reperfusion therapy. The inflammatory response mechanisms related to LIRI in pulmonary thromboembolism (PTE), especially in chronic PTE, need to be studied further. In a PTE model, inflammatory response and apoptosis may occur during LIRI and nitric oxide (NO) inhalation may alleviate the inflammatory response and apoptosis of pneumocytes during LIRI. A PTE canine model was established through blood clot embolism to the right lower lobar pulmonary artery. Two weeks later, we performed embolectomy with reperfusion to examine the LIRI changes among different groups. In particular, the ratio of arterial oxygen partial pressure to fractional inspired oxygen (PaO2/FiO2), serum concentrations of tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α), myeloperoxidase concentrations in lung homogenates, alveolar polymorphonuclear neutrophils (PMNs), lobar lung wet to dry ratio (W/D ratio), apoptotic pneumocytes, and lung sample ultrastructure were assessed. The PaO2/FiO2 in the NO inhalation group increased significantly when compared with the reperfusion group 4 and 6 h after reperfusion (368.83 ± 55.29 vs. 287.90 ± 54.84 mmHg, P inflammatory response and apoptosis occur in our PTE model and NO inhalation may be useful in treating LIRI by alleviating the inflammatory response and pneumocyte apoptosis. This potential application warrants further investigation.

  18. Assigned versus participative goal setting and response generalization: managing injury control among professional pizza deliverers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ludwig, T D; Geller, E S

    1997-04-01

    Safety belt use, turn signal use, and intersection stopping were observed at 3 pizza delivery locations per driver's license plate numbers. After baseline observations, employees at 1 store participated in goal setting targeting complete stops. Employees at the other store were assigned a goal. Over 4 weeks, the group's percentages of complete intersection stopping were posted. Both intervention groups significantly increased their complete intersection stops during the intervention phase. The participative goal-setting group also showed significant increases in turn signal and safety belt use (nontargeted behaviors) concurrent with their increases in intersection stopping (targeted behaviors). Drivers decreased their turn signal and safety belt use concurrent with the assigned goal condition targeting complete stops.

  19. Reduced fractional anisotropy does not change the shape of the hemodynamic response in survivors of severe traumatic brain injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palmer, Helen S; Garzon, Benjamin; Xu, Jian; Berntsen, Erik M; Skandsen, Toril; Håberg, Asta K

    2010-05-01

    The hemodynamic response (HDR) function is the basis for standard functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) analysis. HDR is influenced by white matter inflammation. Traumatic brain injury (TBI) is frequently accompanied by diffuse white matter injury, but the effect of this on the HDR has not been investigated. The aims of the present study were to describe the HDR in visual cortex and examine its relationship with the microstructure of the optic radiation in severe TBI survivors and controls. Ten severe TBI survivors without visual impairments, but with known diffuse axonal injury, and 9 matched controls underwent diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) and fMRI. From the fMRI time series obtained during brief randomized visual stimuli, blood oxygenation level-dependent (BOLD) signal changes for each subject were estimated in V1, and group HDR curves were produced. Standard between-group analysis of BOLD activation in V1 + V2 was performed. For each individual the optic radiations were identified and fractional anisotropy (FA) plus mean apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC(mean)) values for these tracts were calculated. Group HDR curves from the visual cortex were fully transposable between TBI survivors and controls, despite a significant reduction in FA in the optic radiation in TBI survivors. A significant correlation between BOLD signal in the visual cortex and FA values in the optical tract was present in controls, but not in TBI survivors. Between-group comparisons showed that TBI survivors had increased areas of activation in V1 and V2. The HDR appears to be intact in traumatic white matter damage, supporting the validity of using standard fMRI methodology to study neuroplasticity in TBI.

  20. Propofol Ameliorates Calpain-induced Collapsin Response Mediator Protein-2 Proteolysis in Traumatic Brain Injury in Rats

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Yun; Jian, Min-Yu; Wang, Yun-Zhen; Han, Ru-Quan

    2015-01-01

    Background: Collapsin response mediator protein-2 (CRMP2), a multifunctional cytosolic protein highly expressed in the brain, is degraded by calpain following traumatic brain injury (TBI), possibly inhibiting posttraumatic neurite regeneration. Lipid peroxidation (LP) is involved in triggering postinjury CRMP2 proteolysis. We examined the hypothesis that propofol could attenuate LP, calpain-induced CRMP2 degradation, and brain injury after TBI. Methods: A unilateral moderate controlled cortical impact injury was induced in adult male Sprague-Dawley rats. The animals were randomly divided into seven groups: Sham control group, TBI group, TBI + propofol groups (including propofol 1 h, 2 h, and 4 h groups), TBI + U83836E group and TBI + fat emulsion group. The LP inhibitor U83836E was used as a control to identify that antioxidation partially accounts for the potential neuroprotective effects of propofol. The solvent of propofol, fat emulsion, was used as the vehicle control. Ipsilateral cortex tissues were harvested at 24 h post-TBI. Immunofluorescent staining, Western blot analysis, and terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase-mediated dUTP nick-end labeling were used to evaluate LP, calpain activity, CRMP2 proteolysis and programmed cell death. The data were statistically analyzed using one-way analysis of variance and a paired t-test. Results: Propofol and U83836E significantly ameliorated the CRMP2 proteolysis. In addition, both propofol and U83836E significantly decreased the ratio of 145-kDa αII-spectrin breakdown products to intact 270-kDa spectrin, the 4-hydroxynonenal expression and programmed cell death in the pericontusional cortex at 24 h after TBI. There was no difference between the TBI group and the fat emulsion group. Conclusions: These results demonstrate that propofol postconditioning alleviates calpain-mediated CRMP2 proteolysis and provides neuroprotective effects following moderate TBI potentially by counteracting LP and reducing calpain activation

  1. DNA damage response in renal ischemia-reperfusion and ATP-depletion injury of renal tubular cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Zhengwei; Wei, Qingqing; Dong, Guie; Huo, Yuqing; Dong, Zheng

    2014-07-01

    Renal ischemia-reperfusion leads to acute kidney injury (AKI) that is characterized pathologically by tubular damage and cell death, followed by tubular repair, atrophy and interstitial fibrosis. Recent work suggested the possible presence of DNA damage response (DDR) in AKI. However, the evidence is sketchy and the role and regulation of DDR in ischemic AKI remain elusive. In this study, we demonstrated the induction of phosphorylation of ATM, H2AX, Chk2 and p53 during renal ischemia-reperfusion in mice, suggesting DDR in kidney tissues. DDR was also induced in vitro during the recovery or "reperfusion" of renal proximal tubular cells (RPTCs) after ATP depletion. DDR in RPTCs was abrogated by supplying glucose to maintain ATP via glycolysis, indicating that the DDR depends on ATP depletion. The DDR was also suppressed by the general caspase inhibitor z-VAD and the overexpression of Bcl-2, supporting a role of apoptosis-associated DNA damage in the DDR. N-acetylcysteine (NAC), an antioxidant, suppressed the phosphorylation of ATM and p53 and, to a less extent, Chk2, but NAC increased the phosphorylation and nuclear foci formation of H2AX. Interestingly, NAC increased apoptosis, which may account for the observed H2AX activation. Ku55933, an ATM inhibitor, blocked ATM phosphorylation and ameliorated the phosphorylation of Chk2 and p53, but it increased H2AX phosphorylation and nuclear foci formation. Ku55933 also increased apoptosis in RPTCs following ATP depletion. The results suggest that DDR occurs during renal ischemia-reperfusion in vivo and ATP-depletion injury in vitro. The DDR is partially induced by apoptosis and oxidative stress-related DNA damage. ATM, as a sensor in the DDR, may play a cytoprotective role against tubular cell injury and death.

  2. MicroRNA-15a/b are up-regulated in response to myocardial ischemia/reperfusion injury

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Li-Feng Liu; Zhuo Liang; Zhen-Rong Lv; Xiu-Hua Liu; Jing Bai; Jie Chen; Chen Chen; Yu Wang

    2012-01-01

    Objective Several studies have indicated that miR-15a,miR-15b and miR-16 may be the important regulators of apoptosis.Since attenuate apoptosis could protect myocardium and reduce infarction size,the present study was aimed to find out whether these miRNAs participate in regulating myocardial ischemia reperfusion (I/R) injury.Methods Apoptosis in mice hearts subjected to I/R was detected by TUNEL assay in vivo,while flow cytometry analysis followed by Annexin V/PI double stain in vitro was used to detect apoptosis in cultured cardiomyocytes which were subjected to hypoxia/reoxygenation (H/R).Taqman real-time quantitative PCR was used to confirm whether miR-15a/15b/16 were involved in the regulation of cardiac I/R and H/R.Results Compared to those of the controls,I/R or H/R induced apoptosis of cardiomyocytes was significantly iucreased both in vivo (24.4% ± 9.4% vs.2.2% ± 1.9%,P < 0.01,n =5) and in vitro (14.12% ±0.92% vs.2.22% ± 0.08%).The expression of miR-15a and miR-15b,but not miR-16,was increased in the mice I/R model,and the results were consistent in the H/R model.Conclusions Our data indicate miR-15 and miR-15b are up-regulated in response to cardiac I/R injury,therefore,down-regulation of miR- 15a/b may be a promising strategy to reduce myocardial apoptosis induced by cardiac I/R injury.

  3. Analysis of BH3-only proteins upregulated in response to oxygen/glucose deprivation in cortical neurons identifies Bmf but not Noxa as potential mediator of neuronal injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pfeiffer, S; Anilkumar, U; Chen, G; Ramírez-Peinado, S; Galindo-Moreno, J; Muñoz-Pinedo, C; Prehn, J H M

    2014-10-09

    Stress signaling in response to oxygen/glucose deprivation (OGD) and ischemic injury activates a group of pro-apoptotic genes, the Bcl-2 homology domain 3 (BH3)-only proteins, which are capable of activating the mitochondrial apoptosis pathway. Targeted studies previously identified the BH3-only proteins Puma, Bim and Bid to have a role in ischemic/hypoxic neuronal injury. We here investigated the transcriptional activation of pro-apoptotic BH3-only proteins after OGD-induced injury in murine neocortical neurons. We observed a potent and early upregulation of noxa at mRNA and protein level, and a significant increase in Bmf protein levels during OGD in neocortical neurons and in the ipsilateral cortex of mice subjected to transient middle cerebral artery occlusion (tMCAO). Surprisingly, gene deficiency in noxa reduced neither OGD- nor glutamate-induced neuronal injury in cortical neurons and failed to influence infarct size or neurological deficits after tMCAO. In contrast, bmf deficiency induced significant protection against OGD- or glutamate-induced injury in cultured neurons, and bmf-deficient mice showed reduced neurological deficits after tMCAO in vivo. Collectively, our data not only point to a role of Bmf as a BH3-only protein contributing to excitotoxic and ischemic neuronal injury but also demonstrate that the early and potent induction of noxa does not influence ischemic neuronal injury.

  4. Parenteral iron formulations differentially affect MCP-1, HO-1, and NGAL gene expression and renal responses to injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Ali C M; Becker, Kirsten; Zager, Richard A

    2010-08-01

    Despite their prooxidant effects, ferric iron compounds are routinely administered to patients with renal disease to correct Fe deficiency. This study assessed relative degrees to which three clinically employed Fe formulations [Fe sucrose (FeS); Fe gluconate (FeG); ferumoxytol (FMX)] impact renal redox- sensitive signaling, cytotoxicity, and responses to superimposed stress [endotoxin; glycerol-induced acute renal failure (ARF)]. Cultured human proximal tubule (HK-2) cells, isolated proximal tubule segments (PTS), or mice were exposed to variable, but equal, amounts of FeS, FeG, or FMX. Oxidant-stimulated signaling was assessed by heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1) or monocyte chemoattractant protein (MCP)-1 mRNA induction. Cell injury was gauged by MTT assay (HK-2 cells), %LDH release (PTS), or renal cortical neutrophil gelatinase-associated lipoprotein (NGAL) protein/mRNA levels. Endotoxin sensitivity and ARF severity were assessed by TNF-alpha and blood urea nitrogen concentrations, respectively. FeS and FeG induced lethal cell injury (in HK-2 cells, PTS), increased HO-1 and MCP-1 mRNAs (HK-2 cells; in vivo), and markedly raised plasma ( approximately 10 times), and renal cortical ( approximately 3 times) NGAL protein levels. Both renal and extrarenal (e.g., hepatic) NGAL production likely contributed to these results, based on assessments of tissue and HK-2 cell NGAL mRNA. FeS pretreatment exacerbated endotoxemia. However, it conferred marked protection against the glycerol model of ARF (halving azotemia). FMX appeared to be "bioneutral," as it exerted none of the above noted FeS/FeG effects. We conclude that 1) parenteral iron formulations that stimulate redox signaling can evoke cyto/nephrotoxicity; 2) secondary adaptive responses to this injury (e.g., HO-1/NGAL induction) can initiate a renal tubular cytoresistant state; this suggests a potential new clinical application for intravenous Fe therapy; and 3) FMX is bioneutral regarding these responses. The clinical

  5. Response to traumatic brain injury neurorehabilitation through an artificial intelligence and statistics hybrid knowledge discovery from databases methodology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gibert, Karina; García-Rudolph, Alejandro; García-Molina, Alberto; Roig-Rovira, Teresa; Bernabeu, Montse; Tormos, José María

    2008-01-01

    Develop a classificatory tool to identify different populations of patients with Traumatic Brain Injury based on the characteristics of deficit and response to treatment. A KDD framework where first, descriptive statistics of every variable was done, data cleaning and selection of relevant variables. Then data was mined using a generalization of Clustering based on rules (CIBR), an hybrid AI and Statistics technique which combines inductive learning (AI) and clustering (Statistics). A prior Knowledge Base (KB) is considered to properly bias the clustering; semantic constraints implied by the KB hold in final clusters, guaranteeing interpretability of the resultis. A generalization (Exogenous Clustering based on rules, ECIBR) is presented, allowing to define the KB in terms of variables which will not be considered in the clustering process itself, to get more flexibility. Several tools as Class panel graph are introduced in the methodology to assist final interpretation. A set of 5 classes was recommended by the system and interpretation permitted profiles labeling. From the medical point of view, composition of classes is well corresponding with different patterns of increasing level of response to rehabilitation treatments. All the patients initially assessable conform a single group. Severe impaired patients are subdivided in four profiles which clearly distinct response patterns. Particularly interesting the partial response profile, where patients could not improve executive functions. Meaningful classes were obtained and, from a semantics point of view, the results were sensibly improved regarding classical clustering, according to our opinion that hybrid AI & Stats techniques are more powerful for KDD than pure ones.

  6. A method to characterize average cervical spine ligament response based on raw data sets for implementation into injury biomechanics models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mattucci, Stephen F E; Cronin, Duane S

    2015-01-01

    Experimental testing on cervical spine ligaments provides important data for advanced numerical modeling and injury prediction; however, accurate characterization of individual ligament response and determination of average mechanical properties for specific ligaments has not been adequately addressed in the literature. Existing methods are limited by a number of arbitrary choices made during the curve fits that often misrepresent the characteristic shape response of the ligaments, which is important for incorporation into numerical models to produce a biofidelic response. A method was developed to represent the mechanical properties of individual ligaments using a piece-wise curve fit with first derivative continuity between adjacent regions. The method was applied to published data for cervical spine ligaments and preserved the shape response (toe, linear, and traumatic regions) up to failure, for strain rates of 0.5s(-1), 20s(-1), and 150-250s(-1), to determine the average force-displacement curves. Individual ligament coefficients of determination were 0.989 to 1.000 demonstrating excellent fit. This study produced a novel method in which a set of experimental ligament material property data exhibiting scatter was fit using a characteristic curve approach with a toe, linear, and traumatic region, as often observed in ligaments and tendons, and could be applied to other biological material data with a similar characteristic shape. The resultant average cervical spine ligament curves provide an accurate representation of the raw test data and the expected material property effects corresponding to varying deformation rates.

  7. Fibrocyte-like cells recruited to the spleen support innate and adaptive immune responses to acute injury or infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kisseleva, Tatiana; von Köckritz-Blickwede, Maren; Reichart, Donna; McGillvray, Shauna M; Wingender, Gerhard; Kronenberg, Mitchell; Glass, Christopher K; Nizet, Victor; Brenner, David A

    2011-10-01

    Bone marrow (BM)-derived fibrocytes are a population of CD45(+) and collagen Type I-expressing cells that migrate to the spleen and to target injured organs, such as skin, lungs, kidneys, and liver. While CD45(+)Col(+) fibrocytes contribute to collagen deposition at the site of injury, the role of CD45(+)Col(+) cells in spleen has not been elucidated. Here, we demonstrate that hepatotoxic injury (CCl(4)), TGF-β1, lipopolysaccharide, or infection with Listeria monocytogenes induce rapid recruitment of CD45(+)Col(+) fibrocyte-like cells to the spleen. These cells have a gene expression pattern that includes antimicrobial factors (myleoperoxidase, cathelicidin, and defensins) and MHC II at higher levels than found on quiescent or activated macrophages. The immune functions of these splenic CD45(+)Col(+) fibrocyte-like cells include entrapment of bacteria into extracellular DNA-based structures containing cathelicidin and presentation of antigens to naïve CD8(+) T cells to induce their proliferation. Stimulation of these splenic fibrocyte-like cells with granulocyte macrophage-colony stimulating factor or macrophage-colony stimulating factor induces downregulation of collagen expression and terminal differentiation into the dendritic cells or macrophage. Thus, splenic CD45(+)Col(+) cells are a population of rapidly mobilized BM-derived fibrocyte-like cells that respond to inflammation or infection to participate in innate and adaptive immune responses.

  8. Injury-stimulated Sonic hedgehog expression in microglia contributes to neuroinflammatory response in the MPTP model of Parkinson's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Jeong Hwi; Chung, Young Cheul; Bok, Eugene; Lee, Hankyu; Huh, Sue Hee; Lee, Ji Eun; Jin, Byung Kwan; Ko, Hyuk Wan

    2017-01-22

    Parkinson's disease (PD) is a progressive neurodegenerative disorder in which dopamine (DA) neurons in the substantia nigra pars compacta (SNpc) region are selectively destroyed. Sonic hedgehog (Shh) has been well known to play a key role in a variety of processes such as embryogenesis, cell proliferation and protection, and tissue repair during inflammation. However, the evidences for the innate role of Shh in adult brain injury are presently lacking and studies have been needed to unveil the importance of Shh in the process of neurodegeneration. Here, we investigated the role of Shh in the pathologic progress of Parkinson's disease in MPTP-induced animal model system. Interestingly, we observed that Shh expression was gradually increased in MPTP affected SNpc region. Activated microglia exclusively expressed SHH in vivo and we could recapitulate Shh induction in activated cultured primary microglia cells. Using the SHH responsive Cre-loxP binary genetic reporter transgenic mouse system, we also found that most of the cell types except for oligodendrocyte in the SNpc region reacted to the SHH by MPTP injection. Taken together, activated microglia induced Shh expression and most neural cells except oligodendrocyte responded to microglia-derived SHH in MPTP-treated SN. These results suggest that SHH in activated microglia by MPTP-injection might be involved in the innate processes of recovery from neurotoxin induced injury in the PD animal model system. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. HDAC inhibitor increases histone H3 acetylation and reduces microglia inflammatory response following traumatic brain injury in rats

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Bin; West, Eric J.; Van, Ken C.; Gurkoff, Gene G.; Zhou, Jia; Zhang, Xiu-Mei; Kozikowski, Alan P.; Lyeth, Bruce G.

    2008-01-01

    Traumatic brain injury (TBI) produces a rapid and robust inflammatory response in the brain characterized in part by activation of microglia. A novel histone deacetylase (HDAC) inhibitor, 4-dimethylamino-N-[5-(2-mercaptoacetylamino)pentyl]benzamide (DMA-PB), was administered (0, 0.25, 2.5, 25 mg/kg) systemically immediately after lateral fluid percussion TBI in rats. Hippocampal CA2/3 tissue was processed for acetyl-histone H3 immunolocalization, OX-42 immunolocalization (for microglia), and Fluoro-Jade B histofluorescence (for degenerating neurons) at 24 h after injury. Vehicle-treated TBI rats exhibited a significant reduction in acetyl-histone H3 immunostaining in the ipsilateral CA2/3 hippocampus compared to the sham TBI group (p<0.05). The reduction in acetyl-histone H3 immunostaining was attenuated by each of the DMA-PB dosage treatment groups. Vehicle-treated TBI rats exhibited a high density of phagocytic microglia in the ipsilateral CA2/3 hippocampus compared to sham TBI in which none were observed. All doses of DMA-PB significantly reduced the density of phagocytic microglia (p<0.05). There was a trend for DMA-PB to reduce the number of degenerating neurons in the ipsilateral CA2/3 hippocampus (p = 0.076). We conclude that the HDAC inhibitor DMA-PB is a potential novel therapeutic for inhibiting neuroinflammation associated with TBI. PMID:18582446

  10. Activation of the Nuclear Factor E2-Related Factor 2/Antioxidant Response Element Pathway Is Neuroprotective after Spinal Cord Injury

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xiaoliang; de Rivero Vaccari, Juan Pablo; Wang, Handong; Diaz, Paulo; German, Ramon; Marcillo, Alex E.

    2012-01-01

    Abstract The activation of oxidative damage, neuroinflammation, and mitochondrial dysfunction has been implicated in secondary pathomechanisms following spinal cord injury (SCI). These pathophysiological processes lead to cell death and are tightly regulated by nuclear factor E2-related factor 2/antioxidant response element (Nrf2/ARE) signaling. Here, we investigated whether activation of Nrf2/ARE is neuroprotective following SCI. Female Fischer rats were subjected to mild thoracic SCI (T8) using the New York University injury device. As early as 30 min after SCI, levels of Nrf2 transcription factor were increased in both nuclear and cytoplasmic fractions of neurons and astrocytes at the lesion site and remained elevated for 3 days. Treatment of injured rats with sulforaphane, an activator of Nrf2/ARE signaling, significantly increased levels of Nrf2 and glutamate-cysteine ligase (GCL), a rate-limiting enzyme for synthesis of glutathione, and decreased levels of inflammatory cytokines, interleukin-1β (IL-1β) and tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) thus leading to a reduction in contusion volume and improvement in coordination. These results show that activation of the Nrf2/ARE pathway following SCI is neuroprotective and that sulforaphane is a viable compound for neurotherapeutic intervention in blocking pathomechanisms following SCI. PMID:21806470

  11. Activation of the nuclear factor E2-related factor 2/antioxidant response element pathway is neuroprotective after spinal cord injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xiaoliang; de Rivero Vaccari, Juan Pablo; Wang, Handong; Diaz, Paulo; German, Ramon; Marcillo, Alex E; Keane, Robert W

    2012-03-20

    The activation of oxidative damage, neuroinflammation, and mitochondrial dysfunction has been implicated in secondary pathomechanisms following spinal cord injury (SCI). These pathophysiological processes lead to cell death and are tightly regulated by nuclear factor E2-related factor 2/antioxidant response element (Nrf2/ARE) signaling. Here, we investigated whether activation of Nrf2/ARE is neuroprotective following SCI. Female Fischer rats were subjected to mild thoracic SCI (T8) using the New York University injury device. As early as 30 min after SCI, levels of Nrf2 transcription factor were increased in both nuclear and cytoplasmic fractions of neurons and astrocytes at the lesion site and remained elevated for 3 days. Treatment of injured rats with sulforaphane, an activator of Nrf2/ARE signaling, significantly increased levels of Nrf2 and glutamate-cysteine ligase (GCL), a rate-limiting enzyme for synthesis of glutathione, and decreased levels of inflammatory cytokines, interleukin-1β (IL-1β) and tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) thus leading to a reduction in contusion volume and improvement in coordination. These results show that activation of the Nrf2/ARE pathway following SCI is neuroprotective and that sulforaphane is a viable compound for neurotherapeutic intervention in blocking pathomechanisms following SCI.

  12. Dental pulp response to traumatic injuries--a retrospective analysis with case reports.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feiglin, B

    1996-02-01

    The reactions of the dental pulp to traumatic injuries can be extremely varied. They range from almost immediate pulp death to long-term slow pulp canal calcification. In this study the pulpal reactions were divided into three types: pulps with a very poor prognosis that required endodontic therapy soon after the tooth was traumatized. Seventy-nine teeth were studied in this category, and all 79 teeth required endodontic therapy; pulps with a moderate prognosis that required endodontic intervention some 18 to 24 months after the traumatic episode. Forty-eight teeth were studied in this category, and 27 of them required endodontic therapy: pulps with a very good prognosis that rarely required endodontic therapy. Fifty-two teeth were studied in this category, and only 2 required endodontic therapy. The prognosis of a particular pulp depends on the degree and type of trauma.

  13. Characteristics of myogenic response and ankle torque recovery after lengthening contraction-induced rat gastrocnemius injury

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Song Hongsun

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Although muscle dysfunction caused by unfamiliar lengthening contraction is one of most important issues in sports medicine, there is little known about the molecular events on regeneration process. The purpose of this study was to investigate the temporal and spatial expression patterns of myogenin, myoD, pax7, and myostatin after acute lengthening contraction (LC-induced injury in the rat hindlimb. Methods We employed our originally developed device with LC in rat gastrocnemius muscle (n = 24. Male Wistar rats were anesthetized with isoflurane (aspiration rate, 450 ml/min, concentration, 2.0%. The triceps surae muscle of the right hindlimb was then electrically stimulated with forced isokinetic dorsi-flexion (180°/sec and from 0 to 45°. Tissue contents of myoD, myogenin, pax7, myostatin were measured by western blotting and localizations of myoD and pax7 was measured by immunohistochemistry. After measuring isometric tetanic torque, a single bout of LC was performed in vivo. Results The torque was significantly decreased on days 2 and 5 as compared to the pre-treatment value, and recovered by day 7. The content of myoD and pax7 showed significant increases on day 2. Myogenin showed an increase from day 2 to 5. Myostatin on days 5 and 7 were significantly increased. Immunohistochemical analysis showed that myoD-positive/pax7-positive cells increased on day 2, suggesting that activated satellite cells play a role in the destruction and the early recovery phases. Conclusion We, thus, conclude that myogenic events associate with torque recovery after LC-induced injury.

  14. Vitamin D3 pretreatment regulates renal inflammatory responses during lipopolysaccharide-induced acute kidney injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Shen; Chen, Yuan-Hua; Tan, Zhu-Xia; Xie, Dong-Dong; Zhang, Cheng; Zhang, Zhi-Hui; Wang, Hua; Zhao, Hui; Yu, De-Xin; Xu, De-Xiang

    2015-12-22

    Vitamin D receptor (VDR) is highly expressed in human and mouse kidneys. Nevertheless, its functions remain obscure. This study investigated the effects of vitamin D3 (VitD3) pretreatment on renal inflammation during lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced acute kidney injury. Mice were intraperitoneally injected with LPS. In VitD3 + LPS group, mice were pretreated with VitD3 (25 μg/kg) at 48, 24 and 1 h before LPS injection. As expected, an obvious reduction of renal function and pathological damage was observed in LPS-treated mice. VitD3 pretreatment significantly alleviated LPS-induced reduction of renal function and pathological damage. Moreover, VitD3 pretreatment attenuated LPS-induced renal inflammatory cytokines, chemokines and adhesion molecules. In addition, pretreatment with 1,25(OH)2D3, the active form of VitD3, alleviated LPS-induced up-regulation of inflammatory cytokines and chemokines in human HK-2 cells, a renal tubular epithelial cell line, in a VDR-dependent manner. Further analysis showed that VitD3, which activated renal VDR, specifically repressed LPS-induced nuclear translocation of nuclear factor kappa B (NF-κB) p65 subunit in the renal tubules. LPS, which activated renal NF-κB, reciprocally suppressed renal VDR and its target gene. Moreover, VitD3 reinforced the physical interaction between renal VDR and NF-κB p65 subunit. These results provide a mechanistic explanation for VitD3-mediated anti-inflammatory activity during LPS-induced acute kidney injury.

  15. Atrial natriuretic peptide attenuates inflammatory responses on oleic acid-induced acute lung injury model in rats

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHU Yao-bin; ZHANG Yan-bo; LIU Dong-hai; LI Xiao-feng; LIU Ai-jun; FAN Xiang-ming; QIAO Chen-hui

    2013-01-01

    Background An inflammatory response leading to organ dysfunction and failure continues to be a major problem after injury in many clinical conditions such as sepsis,severe burns,and trauma.It is increasingly recognized that atrial natriuretic peptide (ANP) possesses a broad range of biological activities,including effects on endothelial function and inflammation.A recent study has revealed that ANP exerts anti-inflammatory effects.In this study we tested the effects of human ANP (hANP) on lung injury in a model of oleic acid (OA)-induced acute lung injury (ALl) in rats.Methods Rats were randomly assigned to three groups (n=6 in each group).Rats in the control group received a 0.9% solution of NaCl (1 ml.kg1.h-1) by continuous intravenous infusion,after 30 minutes a 0.9% solution of NaCl (1 ml/kg) was injected intravenously,and then the 0.9% NaCl infusion was restarted.Rats in the ALl group received a 0.9% NaCl solution (1 ml·kg-1·h-1) intravenous infusion,after 30 minutes OA was injected intravenously (0.1 ml/kg),and then the 0.9% NaCl infusion was restarted.Rats in the hANP-treated ALI group received a hANP (0.1μg·kg-1·min-1) infusion,after 30 minutes OA was injected intravenously (0.1 ml/kg),and then the hANP infusion was restarted.The anti-inflammation effects of hANP were evaluated by histological examination and determination of serum cytokine levels.Results Serum intedeukin (IL)-1β,IL-6,IL-10 and tumor necrosis factor (TNF) α were increased in the ALI group at six hours.The levels of all factors were significantly lower in the hANP treated rats (P <0.005).Similarly,levels of IL-1β,IL-6,IL-10 and TNF-α were higher in the lung tissue in the ALI group at six hours.hANP treatment significantly reduced the levels of these factors in the lungs (P <0.005).Histological examination revealed marked reduction in interstitial congestion,edema,and inflammation.Conclusion hANP can attenuate inflammation in an OA-induced lung injury in rat model.

  16. Abdominal adiposity is the main determinant of the C-reactive response to injury in subjects undergoing inguinal hernia repair

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Irkulla Sashidhar

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Obesity and serum C-reactive protein (CRP (a sensitive marker of inflammatory activity are associated with most chronic diseases. Abdominal adiposity along with age is the strongest determinant of baseline CRP levels in healthy subjects. The mechanism of the association of serum CRP with disease is uncertain. We hypothesized that baseline serum CRP is a marker of inflammatory responsiveness to injury and that abdominal adiposity is the main determinant of this responsiveness. We studied the effect of abdominal adiposity, age and other environmental risk factors for chronic disease on the CRP response to a standardised surgical insult, unilateral hernia repair to not only test this hypothesis but to inform the factors which must be taken into account when assessing systemic inflammatory responses to surgery. Methods 102 male subjects aged 24-94 underwent unilateral hernia repair by a single operator. CRP was measured at 0, 6, 24 and 48 hrs. Response was defined as the peak CRP adjusted for baseline CRP. Results Age and waist:hip ratio (WHR were associated both with basal CRP and CRP response with similar effect sizes after adjustment for a wide-range of covariates. The adjusted proportional difference in CRP response per 10% increase in WHR was 1.50 (1.17-1.91 p = 0.0014 and 1.15(1.00-1.31 p = 0.05 per decade increase in age. There was no evidence of important effects of other environmental cardiovascular risk factors on CRP response. Conclusion Waist:hip ratio and age need to be considered when studying the inflammatory response to surgery. The finding that age and waist:hip ratio influence baseline and post-operative CRP levels to a similar extent suggests that baseline CRP is a measure of inflammatory responsiveness to casual stimuli and that higher age and obesity modulate the generic excitability of the inflammatory system leading to both higher baseline CRP and higher CRP response to surgery. The mechanism for

  17. Toll-like receptor 2 signaling in response to brain injury: an innate bridge to neuroinflammation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Babcock, Alicia; Wirenfeldt, Martin; Holm, Thomas

    2006-01-01

    Reactive gliosis is a prominent feature of neurodegenerative and neuroinflammatory disease in the CNS, yet the stimuli that drive this response are not known. There is growing appreciation that signaling through Toll-like receptors (TLRs), which is key to generating innate responses to infection,...... to neuroinflammation. Udgivelsesdato: Dec-6...

  18. Induced response of tomato plants to injury by green and red strains of Tetranychus urticae

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Takabayashi, J.; Shimoda, T.; Dicke, M.; Ashihara, W.; Takafuji, A.

    2000-01-01

    We studied the induced response of tomato plants to the green strain and the red strain of the spider mite Tetranychus urticae. We focused on the olfactory response of the predatory mite Phytoseiulus persimilis to volatiles from T. urticae-infested tomato leaves in a Y-tube olfactometer. Tomato leav

  19. Reliability assessment of different plate theories for elastic wave propagation analysis in functionally graded plates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mehrkash, Milad; Azhari, Mojtaba; Mirdamadi, Hamid Reza

    2014-01-01

    The importance of elastic wave propagation problem in plates arises from the application of ultrasonic elastic waves in non-destructive evaluation of plate-like structures. However, precise study and analysis of acoustic guided waves especially in non-homogeneous waveguides such as functionally graded plates are so complicated that exact elastodynamic methods are rarely employed in practical applications. Thus, the simple approximate plate theories have attracted much interest for the calculation of wave fields in FGM plates. Therefore, in the current research, the classical plate theory (CPT), first-order shear deformation theory (FSDT) and third-order shear deformation theory (TSDT) are used to obtain the transient responses of flexural waves in FGM plates subjected to transverse impulsive loadings. Moreover, comparing the results with those based on a well recognized hybrid numerical method (HNM), we examine the accuracy of the plate theories for several plates of various thicknesses under excitations of different frequencies. The material properties of the plate are assumed to vary across the plate thickness according to a simple power-law distribution in terms of volume fractions of constituents. In all analyses, spatial Fourier transform together with modal analysis are applied to compute displacement responses of the plates. A comparison of the results demonstrates the reliability ranges of the approximate plate theories for elastic wave propagation analysis in FGM plates. Furthermore, based on various examples, it is shown that whenever the plate theories are used within the appropriate ranges of plate thickness and frequency content, solution process in wave number-time domain based on modal analysis approach is not only sufficient but also efficient for finding the transient waveforms in FGM plates.

  20. A Mouse Model of Hyperproliferative Human Epithelium Validated by Keratin Profiling Shows an Aberrant Cytoskeletal Response to Injury

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    Samal Zhussupbekova

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available A validated animal model would assist with research on the immunological consequences of the chronic expression of stress keratins KRT6, KRT16, and KRT17, as observed in human pre-malignant hyperproliferative epithelium. Here we examine keratin gene expression profile in skin from mice expressing the E7 oncoprotein of HPV16 (K14E7 demonstrating persistently hyperproliferative epithelium, in nontransgenic mouse skin, and in hyperproliferative actinic keratosis lesions from human skin. We demonstrate that K14E7 mouse skin overexpresses stress keratins in a similar manner to human actinic keratoses, that overexpression is a consequence of epithelial hyperproliferation induced by E7, and that overexpression further increases in response to injury. As stress keratins modify local immunity and epithelial cell function and differentiation, the K14E7 mouse model should permit study of how continued overexpression of stress keratins impacts on epithelial tumor development and on local innate and adaptive immunity.

  1. Impact of systemic inflammatory response syndrome and surgical Apgar score on post-operative acute kidney injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toyonaga, Y; Asayama, K; Maehara, Y

    2017-08-28

    Surgical Apgar Score (SAS) is relatively weakly associated with post-operative outcomes in emergency surgery, compared with elective surgery. A combination of systemic inflammatory response syndrome (SIRS) and SAS may be useful for prediction of poor outcomes after emergency surgery. A retrospective study was conducted in patients who underwent emergency abdominal or cerebral surgery from January 2005 to December 2010. AKI was diagnosed using Acute Kidney Injury Network criteria for 2 days after surgery. Pre-operative SIRS was defined as SIRS score ≥ 2. Patients were divided into those with SAS ≥ 5 and SIRS (OR 1.9, 95% CI: 1.2-2.9, P SIRS and SAS SIRS and SAS SIRS and SAS SIRS and SAS are independently associated with post-operative AKI. Simultaneous use of pre-operative SIRS and SAS may improve prediction of poor post-operative outcomes. © 2017 The Acta Anaesthesiologica Scandinavica Foundation. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  2. Mitochondrial reactive oxygen species generation triggers inflammatory response and tissue injury associated with hepatic ischemia-reperfusion: therapeutic potential of mitochondrially-targeted antioxidants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mukhopadhyay, Partha; Horváth, Bėla; Zsengellėr, Zsuzsanna; Bátkai, Sándor; Cao, Zongxian; Kechrid, Malek; Holovac, Eileen; Erdėlyi, Katalin; Tanchian, Galin; Liaudet, Lucas; Stillman, Isaac E.; Joseph, Joy; Kalyanaraman, Balaraman; Pacher, Pál

    2012-01-01

    Mitochondrial reactive oxygen species generation has been implicated in the pathophysiology of ischemia-reperfusion (I/R) injury, however its exact role and its spatial-temporal relationship with inflammation are elusive. Herein we explored the spatial-temporal relationship of oxidative/nitrative stress and inflammatory response during the course of hepatic I/R and the possible therapeutic potential of mitochondrial-targeted antioxidants, using a mouse model of segmental hepatic ischemia-reperfusion injury. Hepatic I/R was characterized by early (at 2 hours of reperfusion) mitochondrial injury, decreased complex I activity, increased oxidant generation in the liver or liver mitochondria, and profound hepatocellular injury/dysfunction with acute pro-inflammatory response (TNF-α, MIP-1αCCL3, MIP-2/CXCL2) without inflammatory cell infiltration, followed by marked neutrophil infiltration and more pronounced secondary wave of oxidative/nitrative stress in the liver (starting from 6 hours of reperfusion and peaking at 24 hours). Mitochondrially-targeted antioxidants, MitoQ or Mito-CP, dose-dependently attenuated I/R-induced liver dysfunction, the early and delayed oxidative and nitrative stress response (HNE/carbonyl adducts, malondialdehyde, 8-OHdG, and 3-nitrotyrosine formation), mitochondrial and histopathological injury/dysfunction, as well as delayed inflammatory cell infiltration and cell death. Mitochondrially generated oxidants play a central role in triggering the deleterious cascade of events associated with hepatic I/R, which may be targeted by novel antioxidants for therapeutic advantage. PMID:22683818

  3. Exacerbation of ischemic brain injury in hypercholesterolemic mice is associated with pronounced changes in peripheral and cerebral immune responses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herz, Josephine; Hagen, Sabine I; Bergmüller, Eileen; Sabellek, Pascal; Göthert, Joachim R; Buer, Jan; Hansen, Wiebke; Hermann, Dirk M; Doeppner, Thorsten R

    2014-02-01

    Inflammation contributes to ischemic brain injury. However, translation of experimental findings from animal models into clinical trials is still ineffective, since the majority of human stroke studies mainly focus on acute neuroprotection, thereby neglecting inflammatory mechanisms and inflammation-associated co-morbidity factors such as hypercholesterolemia. Therefore, both wildtype and ApoE(-/-) mice that exhibit increased serum plasma cholesterol levels fed with normal or high cholesterol diet were exposed to transient middle cerebral artery occlusion. Analysis of peripheral immune responses revealed an ischemia-induced acute leukocytosis in the blood, which was accompanied by enhanced myeloid cell and specifically granulocyte cell counts in the spleen and blood of ApoE(-/-) mice fed with Western diet. These cellular immune changes were further associated with increased levels of pro-inflammatory cytokines like IL-6 and TNF-α. Moreover, endogenous stroke-induced endothelial activation as well as CXCL-1 and CXCL-2 expression were increased, thus resulting in accelerated leukocyte, particularly granulocyte accumulation, and enhanced ischemic tissue damage. The latter was revealed by larger infarct volumes and increased local DNA fragmentation in ischemic brains of ApoE(-/-) mice on Western diet. These effects were not observed in wildtype mice on normal or Western diet and in ApoE(-/-) mice on normal diet. Our data demonstrate that the combination of both ApoE knockout and a high cholesterol diet leads to increased ischemia-induced peripheral and cerebral immune responses, which go along with enhanced cerebral tissue injury. Thus, clinically predisposing conditions related to peripheral inflammation such as hypercholesterolemia should be included in up-coming preclinical stroke research. © 2013.

  4. Next generation sequencing based transcriptome analysis of septic-injury responsive genes in the beetle Tribolium castaneum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Altincicek, Boran; Elashry, Abdelnaser; Guz, Nurper; Grundler, Florian M W; Vilcinskas, Andreas; Dehne, Heinz-Wilhelm

    2013-01-01

    Beetles (Coleoptera) are the most diverse animal group on earth and interact with numerous symbiotic or pathogenic microbes in their environments. The red flour beetle Tribolium castaneum is a genetically tractable model beetle species and its whole genome sequence has recently been determined. To advance our understanding of the molecular basis of beetle immunity here we analyzed the whole transcriptome of T. castaneum by high-throughput next generation sequencing technology. Here, we demonstrate that the Illumina/Solexa sequencing approach of cDNA samples from T. castaneum including over 9.7 million reads with 72 base pairs (bp) length (approximately 700 million bp sequence information with about 30× transcriptome coverage) confirms the expression of most predicted genes and enabled subsequent qualitative and quantitative transcriptome analysis. This approach recapitulates our recent quantitative real-time PCR studies of immune-challenged and naïve T. castaneum beetles, validating our approach. Furthermore, this sequencing analysis resulted in the identification of 73 differentially expressed genes upon immune-challenge with statistical significance by comparing expression data to calculated values derived by fitting to generalized linear models. We identified up regulation of diverse immune-related genes (e.g. Toll receptor, serine proteinases, DOPA decarboxylase and thaumatin) and of numerous genes encoding proteins with yet unknown functions. Of note, septic-injury resulted also in the elevated expression of genes encoding heat-shock proteins or cytochrome P450s supporting the view that there is crosstalk between immune and stress responses in T. castaneum. The present study provides a first comprehensive overview of septic-injury responsive genes in T. castaneum beetles. Identified genes advance our understanding of T. castaneum specific gene expression alteration upon immune-challenge in particular and may help to understand beetle immunity in general.

  5. Operant behavioral responses to orofacial cold stimuli in rats with chronic constrictive trigeminal nerve injury: effects of menthol and capsazepine

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    Both spinal and trigeminal somatosensory systems use the TRPM8 channel as a principal transducer for detecting cold stimuli. It is currently unclear whether this cold transducer may play a role in trigeminal neuropathic pain manifesting cold allodynia and hyperalgesia. In the present study, trigeminal neuropathy was induced by chronic constrictive nerve injury of the infraorbital nerve (ION-CCI). Behavioral responses to cold stimuli in orofacial regions were assessed by the newly developed orofacial operant test in the ION-CCI rats. We tested menthol and capsazepine, two compounds that can activate and inhibit TRPM8 respectively, on orofacial operant responses to cold stimuli in ION-CCI rats. Testing animals performed operant tasks by voluntarily contacting their orofacial regions to a cold stimulation module in order to access sweetened milk as a reward, and contact time and number of the operant behaviors were automatically recorded. Total contact time was significantly reduced at the cooling temperatures of 17°C and 12°C in ION-CCI group in comparison with sham group, indicating the presence of cold allodynia and hyperalgesia in ION-CCI rats. When menthol was administered to ION-CCI rats, total contact time was further reduced and total contact number increased at the cooling temperatures. In contrast, after administration of capsazepine to ION-CCI rats, total contact time was significantly increased at the cooling temperatures. The behavioral outcomes support the idea that TRPM8 plays a role in cold allodynia and hyperalgesia following chronic trigeminal nerve injury. PMID:23767981

  6. The contribution of staff call light response time to fall and injurious fall rates: an exploratory study in four US hospitals using archived hospital data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tzeng Huey-Ming

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Fall prevention programs for hospitalized patients have had limited success, and the effect of programs on decreasing total falls and fall-related injuries is still inconclusive. This exploratory multi-hospital study examined the unique contribution of call light response time to predicting total fall rates and injurious fall rates in inpatient acute care settings. The conceptual model was based on Donabedian's framework of structure, process, and health-care outcomes. The covariates included the hospital, unit type, total nursing hours per patient-day (HPPDs, percentage of the total nursing HPPDs supplied by registered nurses, percentage of patients aged 65 years or older, average case mix index, percentage of patients with altered mental status, percentage of patients with hearing problems, and call light use rate per patient-day. Methods We analyzed data from 28 units from 4 Michigan hospitals, using archived data and chart reviews from January 2004 to May 2009. The patient care unit-month, defined as data aggregated by month for each patient care unit, was the unit of analysis (N = 1063. Hierarchical multiple regression analyses were used. Results Faster call light response time was associated with lower total fall and injurious fall rates. Units with a higher call light use rate had lower total fall and injurious fall rates. A higher percentage of productive nursing hours provided by registered nurses was associated with lower total fall and injurious fall rates. A higher percentage of patients with altered mental status was associated with a higher total fall rate but not a higher injurious fall rate. Units with a higher percentage of patients aged 65 years or older had lower injurious fall rates. Conclusions Faster call light response time appeared to contribute to lower total fall and injurious fall rates, after controlling for the covariates. For practical relevance, hospital and nursing executives should consider

  7. Behavioral and physiological methods for early quantitative assessment of spinal cord injury and prognosis in rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C.A. Giglio

    2006-12-01

    Full Text Available Methods for reliable evaluation of spinal cord (SC injury in rats at short periods (2 and 24 h after lesion were tested to characterize the mechanisms implicated in primary SC damage. We measured the physiological changes occurring after several procedures for producing SC injury, with particular emphasis on sensorimotor functions. Segmental and suprasegmental reflexes were tested in 39 male Wistar rats weighing 250-300 g divided into three control groups that were subjected to a anesthesia, b dissection of soft prevertebral tissue, and c laminectomy of the vertebral segments between T10 and L1. In the lesion group the SC was completely transected, hemisected or subjected to vertebral compression. All animals were evaluated 2 and 24 h after the experimental procedure by the hind limb motility index, Bohlman motor score, open-field, hot-plate, tail flick, and paw compression tests. The locomotion scale proved to be less sensitive than the sensorimotor tests. A reduction in exploratory movements was detected in the animals 24 h after the procedures. The hot-plate was the most sensitive test for detecting sensorimotor deficiencies following light, moderate or severe SC injury. The most sensitive and simplest test of reflex function was the hot-plate. The hemisection model promoted reproducible moderate SC injury which allowed us to quantify the resulting behavior and analyze the evolution of the lesion and its consequences during the first 24 h after injury. We conclude that hemisection permitted the quantitation of behavioral responses for evaluation of the development of deficits after lesions. Hind limb evaluation scores and spontaneous exploration events provided a sensitive index of immediate injury effects after SC lesion at 2 and 24 h. Taken together, locomotion scales, open-field, and hot-plate tests represent reproducible, quantitatively sensitive methods for detecting functional deficiencies within short periods of time, indicating their

  8. Coupling between plate vibration and acoustic radiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frendi, Abdelkader; Maestrello, Lucio; Bayliss, Alvin

    1993-01-01

    A detailed numerical investigation of the coupling between the vibration of a flexible plate and the acoustic radiation is performed. The nonlinear Euler equations are used to describe the acoustic fluid while the nonlinear plate equation is used to describe the plate vibration. Linear, nonlinear, and quasi-periodic or chaotic vibrations and the resultant acoustic radiation are analyzed. We find that for the linear plate response, acoustic coupling is negligible. However, for the nonlinear and chaotic responses, acoustic coupling has a significant effect on the vibration level as the loading increases. The radiated pressure from a plate undergoing nonlinear or chaotic vibrations is found to propagate nonlinearly into the far field. However, the nonlinearity due to wave propagation is much weaker than that due to the plate vibrations. As the acoustic wave propagates into the far field, the relative difference in level between the fundamental and its harmonics and subharmonics decreases with distance.

  9. Workshop on Numerical Analysis of Human and Surrogate Response to Accelerative Loading

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-05-01

    inserted into the brain of the perfused specimen. Response was characterized using three primary metrics: head kinematic response, intracranial pressure ...Split Hopkinson Pressure Bar (SHPB) technique to apply shear loading to soft tissue. Other novel techniques such as plate impact experiments, where...measurements, and (c) apply statistical analyses , including model validations and characterization of its predictive limitations. • Injury

  10. miR-203 protects microglia mediated brain injury by regulating inflammatory responses via feedback to MyD88 in ischemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Zhao; Zhong, Lina; Zhong, Shanchuan; Xian, Ronghua; Yuan, Bangqing

    2015-06-01

    Much evidence demonstrates that microglia mediated inflammatory responses play an important role in brain injury in ischemia. miRNA is the important factor in regulation of inflammation. However, the effect of miRNA in microglia mediated inflammatory responses has not been well studied. In the study, we demonstrate that miR-203 negatively regulates ischemia induced microglia activation by targeting MyD88, an important adapter protein involved in most Toll-like receptors (TLRs) and interleukin-1 receptor (IL-1R) pathways. Through negative feedback, enforced expression of miR-203 or MyD88 siRNA silencing inhibits downstream NF-κβ signaling and microglia activation, thereby alleviating neuronal injury. These findings reveal that miR-203 represents a novel target regulating neuroinflammation and brain injury, thus offering a new therapeutical strategy for cerebral hypoxic diseases.

  11. Processless offset printing plates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sanja Mahović Poljaček

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available With the implementation of platesetters in the offset printing plate making process, imaging of the printing plate became more stable and ensured increase of the printing plate quality. But as the chemical processing of the printing plates still highly influences the plate making process and the graphic reproduction workflow, development of printing plates that do not require chemical processing for offset printing technique has been one of the top interests in graphic technology in the last few years. The main reason for that came from the user experience, where majority of the problems with plate making process could be connected with the chemical processing of the printing plate. Furthermore, increased environmental standards lead to reducing of the chemicals used in the industrial processes. Considering these facts, different types of offset printing plates have been introduced to the market today. This paper presents some of the processless printing plates.

  12. Cardiovascular response of individuals with spinal cord injury to dynamic functional electrical stimulation under orthostatic stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoshida, Takashi; Masani, Kei; Sayenko, Dimitry G; Miyatani, Masae; Fisher, Joseph A; Popovic, Milos R

    2013-01-01

    In this pilot study, we examined how effectively functional electrical stimulation (FES) and passive stepping mitigated orthostatic hypotension in participants with chronic spinal cord injury (SCI). While being tilted head-up to 70 (°) from the supine position, the participants underwent four 10-min conditions in a random sequence: 1) no intervention, 2) passive stepping, 3) isometric FES of leg muscles, and 4) FES of leg muscles combined with passive stepping. We found that FES and passive stepping independently mitigated a decrease in stroke volume and helped to maintain the mean blood pressure. The effects of FES on stroke volume and mean blood pressure were greater than those of passive stepping. When combined, FES and passive stepping did not interfere with each other, but they also did not synergistically increase stroke volume or mean blood pressure. Thus, the present study suggests that FES delivered to lower limbs can be used in individuals with SCI to help them withstand orthostatic stress. Additional studies are needed to confirm whether this use of FES is applicable to a larger population of individuals with SCI.

  13. Metformin attenuates hyperoxia-induced lung injury in neonatal rats by reducing the inflammatory response.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Xueyu; Walther, Frans J; Sengers, Rozemarijn M A; Laghmani, El Houari; Salam, Asma; Folkerts, Gert; Pera, Tonio; Wagenaar, Gerry T M

    2015-08-01

    Because therapeutic options are lacking for bronchopulmonary dysplasia (BPD), there is an urgent medical need to discover novel targets/drugs to treat this neonatal chronic lung disease. Metformin, a drug commonly used to lower blood glucose in type 2 diabetes patients, may be a novel therapeutic option for BPD by reducing pulmonary inflammation and fibrosis and improving vascularization. We investigated the therapeutic potential of daily treatment with 25 and 100 mg/kg metformin, injected subcutaneously in neonatal Wistar rats with severe experimental BPD, induced by continuous exposure to 100% oxygen for 10 days. Parameters investigated included survival, lung and heart histopathology, pulmonary fibrin and collagen deposition, vascular leakage, right ventricular hypertrophy, and differential mRNA expression in the lungs of key genes involved in BPD pathogenesis, including inflammation, coagulation, and alveolar development. After daily metformin treatment rat pups with experimental BPD had reduced mortality, alveolar septum thickness, lung inflammation, and fibrosis, demonstrated by a reduced influx of macrophages and neutrophils and hyperoxia-induced collagen III and fibrin deposition (25 mg/kg), as well as improved vascularization (100 mg/kg) compared with control treatment. However, metformin did not ameliorate alveolar enlargement, small arteriole wall thickening, vascular alveolar leakage, and right ventricular hypertrophy. In conclusion metformin prolongs survival and attenuates pulmonary injury by reducing pulmonary inflammation, coagulation, and fibrosis but does not affect alveolar development or prevent pulmonary arterial hypertension and right ventricular hypertrophy in neonatal rats with severe hyperoxia-induced experimental BPD.

  14. 431K/CD vehicle number plates

    CERN Multimedia

    GS Department

    2009-01-01

    The Green Plates Service, which is responsible for issuing the 431K/CD vehicle number plates , wishes to apologise for the delay in processing applications over the past weeks. The delay is outside the Service’s control, as it is due to the recent introduction of new rules governing the vehicle registration process in France. Normal service will be resumed as soon as possible. Thank you for your understanding. GS-SEM-LS – Green Plates Service

  15. On the Legal Responsibility for the Body Injury in Sports%体育人身伤害法律责任研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王胜伟

    2012-01-01

    Body injuries are easily happened in sports, the regulations of laws about personal injuries do not distinguish general body injury and sports injury in our country and cant effectively solve the disputes. It is not only unfavorable to protect the athletes' right, but also was disadvantageous to the development of sports, Thus we analyze the particularity of the sports injury, adopt the different principle to investigate legal responsibility according to the degree of the athletes fault that caused personal injury, which can reduce the legal dispute, reduce athletes arxiety and improve people's enthusiasm for sports.%体育运动容易造成人身伤害,我国现有法律有关人身伤害的规定没有区分一般人身伤害与体育伤害,不能有效解决体育伤害的纠纷,既不利于保护运动员的权益,也不利于体育运动的发展,因而分析体育运动伤害的特殊性,根据运动员在运动中造成人身伤害的过错程度,采用不同的原则追究法律责任,可以减少法律纠纷,让运动员减少顾虑,提高全民的运动积极性。

  16. Electrical response grading versus House-Brackmann scale for evaluation of facial nerve injury after Bell’s palsy:a comparative study

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Bin Huang; Zhang-ling Zhou; Li-li Wang; Cong Zuo; Yan Lu; Yong Chen

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: There are no convenient techniques to evaluate the degree of facial nerve injury during a course of acupuncture treatment for Bell’s palsy. Our previous studies found that observing the electrical response of specific facial muscles provided reasonable correlation with the prognosis of electroacupuncture treatment. Hence, we used the new method to evaluate the degree of facial nerve injury in patients with Bell’s palsy in comparison with the House-Brackmann scale. The relationship between therapeutic effects and prognosis was analyzed to explore an objective method for evaluating Bell’s palsy. METHODS: The facial nerve function of 68 patients with Bell’s palsy was assessed with both electrical response grading and the House-Brackmann scale before treatment. Then differences in evaluation results of the two methods were compared. All enrolled patients received electroacupuncture treatment with disperse-dense wave at 1/100 Hz for 4 weeks. After treatment, correlation analysis was conducted to ifnd the relationship between electrical response and therapeutic effects or prognosis. RESULTS: Checking consistency between electrical response grading and House-Brackmann scale: Kappa value 0.028 (P = 0.578). Correlation analysis: the two methods were correlated with the prognosis, and electrical response grading (rER= 0.789) was better than the House-Brackmann scale (rHB= 0.423). CONCLUSION: Electrical response grading is superior to the House-Brackmann scale in efficacy and reliability, and can conveniently assess the degree of facial nerve injury. The House-Brackmann scale is suitable for the patients with mild facial nerve injury, but its evaluation quality for severe facial nerve injury is poor.

  17. The Wheelchair Circuit : Construct validity and responsiveness of a test to assess manual wheelchair mobility in persons with spinal cord injury

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kilkens, Olga J; Dallmeijer, Annet J; De Witte, Luc P; Van Der Woude, Lucas H; Post, Marcel W

    2004-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To assess the validity and responsiveness of the Wheelchair Circuit, a test to assess manual wheelchair mobility in persons with spinal cord injury (SCI). DESIGN: Longitudinal. Subjects performed the Wheelchair Circuit at the start (T1) and at the end (T3) of inpatient functional rehabili

  18. L-arginine supplementation improves responses to injury and inflammation in dextran sulfate sodium colitis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lori A Coburn

    Full Text Available Inflammatory bowel disease (IBD, consisting of Crohn's disease and ulcerative colitis (UC, results in substantial morbidity and is difficult to treat. New strategies for adjunct therapies are needed. One candidate is the semi-essential amino acid, L-arginine (L-Arg, a complementary medicine purported to be an enhancer of immunity and vitality in the lay media. Using dextran sulfate sodium (DSS as a murine colonic injury and repair model with similarities to human UC, we assessed the effect of L-Arg, as DSS induced increases in colonic expression of the y(+ cationic amino acid transporter 2 (CAT2 and L-Arg uptake. L-Arg supplementation improved the clinical parameters of survival, body weight loss, and colon weight, and reduced colonic permeability and the number of myeloperoxidase-positive neutrophils in DSS colitis. Luminex-based multi-analyte profiling demonstrated that there was a marked reduction in proinflammatory cytokine and chemokine expression with L-Arg treatment. Genomic analysis by microarray demonstrated that DSS-treated mice supplemented with L-Arg clustered more closely with mice not exposed to DSS than to those receiving DSS alone, and revealed that multiple genes that were upregulated or downregulated with DSS alone exhibited normalization of expression with L-Arg supplementation. Additionally, L-Arg treatment of mice with DSS colitis resulted in increased ex vivo migration of colonic epithelial cells, suggestive of increased capacity for wound repair. Because CAT2 induction was sustained during L-Arg treatment and inducible nitric oxide (NO synthase (iNOS requires uptake of L-Arg for generation of NO, we tested the effect of L-Arg in iNOS(-/- mice and found that its benefits in DSS colitis were eliminated. These preclinical studies indicate that L-Arg supplementation could be a potential therapy for IBD, and that one mechanism of action may be functional enhancement of iNOS activity.

  19. LXW7 ameliorates focal cerebral ischemia injury and attenuates inflammatory responses in activated microglia in rats

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fang, T.; Zhou, D.; Lu, L.; Tong, X.; Wu, J.; Yi, L. [Department of Neurology, Shenzhen Hospital, Peking University, Shenzhen (China)

    2016-08-01

    Inflammation plays a pivotal role in ischemic stroke, when activated microglia release excessive pro-inflammatory mediators. The inhibition of integrin αvβ3 improves outcomes in rat focal cerebral ischemia models. However, the mechanisms by which microglia are neuroprotective remain unclear. This study evaluated whether post-ischemic treatment with another integrin αvβ3 inhibitor, the cyclic arginine-glycine-aspartic acid (RGD) peptide-cGRGDdvc (LXW7), alleviates cerebral ischemic injury. The anti-inflammatory effect of LXW7 in activated microglia within rat focal cerebral ischemia models was examined. A total of 108 Sprague-Dawley rats (250–280 g) were subjected to middle cerebral artery occlusion (MCAO). After 2 h, the rats were given an intravenous injection of LXW7 (100 μg/kg) or phosphate-buffered saline (PBS). Neurological scores, infarct volumes, brain water content (BWC) and histology alterations were determined. The expressions of pro-inflammatory cytokines [tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-α) and interleukin-1 beta (IL-1β)], and Iba1-positive activated microglia, within peri-ischemic brain tissue, were assessed with ELISA, western blot and immunofluorescence staining. Infarct volumes and BWC were significantly lower in LXW7-treated rats compared to those in the MCAO + PBS (control) group. The LXW7 treatment lowered the expression of pro-inflammatory cytokines. There was a reduction of Iba1-positive activated microglia, and the TNF-α and IL-1β expressions were attenuated. However, there was no difference in the Zea Longa scores between the ischemia and LXW7 groups. The results suggest that LXW7 protected against focal cerebral ischemia and attenuated inflammation in activated microglia. LXW7 may be neuroprotective during acute MCAO-induced brain damage and microglia-related neurodegenerative diseases.

  20. Methamphetamine preconditioning alters midbrain transcriptional responses to methamphetamine-induced injury in the rat striatum.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jean Lud Cadet

    Full Text Available Methamphetamine (METH is an illicit drug which is neurotoxic to the mammalian brain. Numerous studies have revealed significant decreases in dopamine and serotonin levels in the brains of animals exposed to moderate-to-large METH doses given within short intervals of time. In contrast, repeated injections of small nontoxic doses of the drug followed by a challenge with toxic METH doses afford significant protection against monoamine depletion. The present study was undertaken to test the possibility that repeated injections of the drug might be accompanied by transcriptional changes involved in rendering the nigrostriatal dopaminergic system refractory to METH toxicity. Our results confirm that METH preconditioning can provide significant protection against METH-induced striatal dopamine depletion. In addition, the presence and absence of METH preconditioning were associated with substantial differences in the identity of the genes whose expression was affected by a toxic METH challenge. Quantitative PCR confirmed METH-induced changes in genes of interest and identified additional genes that were differentially impacted by the toxic METH challenge in the presence of METH preconditioning. These genes include small heat shock 27 kD 27 protein 2 (HspB2, thyrotropin-releasing hormone (TRH, brain derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF, c-fos, and some encoding antioxidant proteins including CuZn superoxide dismutase (CuZnSOD, glutathione peroxidase (GPx-1, and heme oxygenase-1 (Hmox-1. These observations are consistent, in part, with the transcriptional alterations reported in models of lethal ischemic injuries which are preceded by ischemic or pharmacological preconditioning. Our findings suggest that multiple molecular pathways might work in tandem to protect the nigrostriatal dopaminergic pathway against the deleterious effects of the toxic psychostimulant. Further analysis of the molecular and cellular pathways regulated by these genes should help to

  1. Individual Differences in Working Memory Capacity Predicts Responsiveness to Memory Rehabilitation After Traumatic Brain Injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sandry, Joshua; Chiou, Kathy S; DeLuca, John; Chiaravalloti, Nancy D

    2016-06-01

    To explore how individual differences affect rehabilitation outcomes by specifically investigating whether working memory capacity (WMC) can be used as a cognitive marker to identify who will and will not improve from memory rehabilitation. Post hoc analysis of a randomized controlled clinical trial designed to treat learning and memory impairment after traumatic brain injury (TBI): 2 × 2 between-subjects quasiexperimental design (2 [group: treatment vs control] × 2 [WMC: high vs low]). Nonprofit medical rehabilitation research center. Participants (N=65) with moderate to severe TBI with pre- and posttreatment data. The treatment group completed 10 cognitive rehabilitation sessions in which subjects were taught a memory strategy focusing on learning to use context and imagery to remember information. The placebo control group engaged in active therapy sessions that did not involve learning the memory strategy. Long-term memory percent retention change scores for an unorganized list of words from the California Verbal Learning Test-II. Group and WMC interacted (P=.008, ηp(2)=.12). High WMC participants showed a benefit from treatment compared with low WMC participants. Individual differences in WMC accounted for 45% of the variance in whether participants with TBI in the treatment group benefited from applying the compensatory treatment strategy to learn unorganized information. Individuals with higher WMC showed a significantly greater rehabilitation benefit when applying the compensatory strategy to learn unorganized information. WMC is a useful cognitive marker for identifying participants with TBI who respond to memory rehabilitation with the modified Story Memory Technique. Copyright © 2016 American Congress of Rehabilitation Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. The Effects of Female Sex Steroids on Gastric Secretory Responses of Rat Following Traumatic Brain Injury

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zakieh Keshavarzi

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available AbstractObjective(sGastric ulceration is induced by various forms of stress like surgery, ischemia and trauma. The female sex has more resistance to stress and the gastrointestinal lesions happen fewer than male sex. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the role of estradiol and progesterone on the gastric acid and pepsin levels following traumatic brain injury (TBI induction.Materials and MethodsDiffuse TBI was induced by Marmarou method in female rats. Rats randomly assigned into 9 groups: intact, OVX (ovarectomized rat, Sham+OVX, TBI (intact rats under TBI, TBI+OVX (ovarectomized rats under TBI and treated OVX rats with vehicle (sesame oil, E2 (estradiol, P4 (progesterone or E2+P4 combination. The acid content and pepsin levels of each gastric washout sample were measured 5 days after the TBI induction.ResultsThere was no significant difference in gastric acid output between groups either after TBI induction or after treatment with E2 or P4 or E2+P4. Gastric pepsin levels were increased in Sham+OVX, TBI (P< 0.001 and TBI+OVX (P< 0.05 compared to intact group. Gastric pepsin levels were significantly lower in E2 and E2+ P4 treated rats than vehicle treated group (P< 0.01. P4 treatment increased gastric pepsin level compared to TBI+OVX group (P< 0.05 and this increment was higher than rats that were treated with the E2 and E2+P4 (P< 0.01.ConclusionThese results suggest that protective effect of estradiol and E2+P4 combination against mucosal damage after TBI, might be mediated by inhibition of pepsin secretion.

  3. Sphingosine 1-Phosphate Receptor 3-Deficient Dendritic Cells Modulate Splenic Responses to Ischemia-Reperfusion Injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bajwa, Amandeep; Huang, Liping; Kurmaeva, Elvira; Gigliotti, Joseph C; Ye, Hong; Miller, Jacqueline; Rosin, Diane L; Lobo, Peter I; Okusa, Mark D

    2016-04-01

    The plasticity of dendritic cells (DCs) permits phenotypic modulation ex vivo by gene expression or pharmacologic agents, and these modified DCs can exert therapeutic immunosuppressive effects in vivo through direct interactions with T cells, either inducing T regulatory cells (T(REG)s) or causing anergy. Sphingosine 1-phosphate (S1P) is a sphingolipid and the natural ligand for five G protein-coupled receptors (S1P1, S1P2, S1P3, S1P4, and S1P5), and S1PR agonists reduce kidney ischemia-reperfusion injury (IRI) in mice. S1pr3(-/-)mice are protected from kidney IRI, because DCs do not mature. We tested the therapeutic advantage of S1pr3(-/-) bone marrow-derived dendritic cell (BMDC) transfers in kidney IRI. IRI produced a rise in plasma creatinine (PCr) levels in mice receiving no cells (NCs) and mice pretreated with wild-type (WT) BMDCs. However, S1pr3(-/-) BMDC-pretreated mice were protected from kidney IRI. S1pr3(-/-) BMDC-pretreated mice had significantly higher numbers of splenic T(REG)s compared with NC and WT BMDC-pretreated mice. S1pr3(-/-) BMDCs did not attenuate IRI in splenectomized, Rag-1(-/-), or CD11c(+) DC-depleted mice. Additionally, S1pr3(-/-) BMDC-dependent protection required CD169(+)marginal zone macrophages and the macrophage-derived chemokine CCL22 to increase splenic CD4(+)Foxp3(+) T(REG)s. Pretreatment with S1pr3(-/-) BMDCs also induced T(REG)-dependent protection against IRI in an allogeneic mouse model. In summary, adoptively transferred S1pr3(-/-) BMDCs prevent kidney IRI through interactions within the spleen and expansion of splenic CD4(+)Foxp3(+) T(REG)s. We conclude that genetically induced deficiency of S1pr3 in allogenic BMDCs could serve as a therapeutic approach to prevent IRI-induced AKI.

  4. Regulator of G-protein signaling-5 is a marker of hepatic stellate cells and expression mediates response to liver injury.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arya J Bahrami

    Full Text Available Liver fibrosis is mediated by hepatic stellate cells (HSCs, which respond to a variety of cytokine and growth factors to moderate the response to injury and create extracellular matrix at the site of injury. G-protein coupled receptor (GPCR-mediated signaling, via endothelin-1 (ET-1 and angiotensin II (AngII, increases HSC contraction, migration and fibrogenesis. Regulator of G-protein signaling-5 (RGS5, an inhibitor of vasoactive GPCR agonists, functions to control GPCR-mediated contraction and hypertrophy in pericytes and smooth muscle cells (SMCs. Therefore we hypothesized that RGS5 controls GPCR signaling in activated HSCs in the context of liver injury. In this study, we localize RGS5 to the HSCs and demonstrate that Rgs5 expression is regulated during carbon tetrachloride (CCl4-induced acute and chronic liver injury in Rgs5LacZ/LacZ reporter mice. Furthermore, CCl4 treated RGS5-null mice develop increased hepatocyte damage and fibrosis in response to CCl4 and have increased expression of markers of HSC activation. Knockdown of Rgs5 enhances ET-1-mediated signaling in HSCs in vitro. Taken together, we demonstrate that RGS5 is a critical regulator of GPCR signaling in HSCs and regulates HSC activation and fibrogenesis in liver injury.

  5. Pedagogies of Censorship, Injury, and Masochism: Teacher Responses to Homophobic Speech in Physical Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sykes, Heather

    2004-01-01

    I examine how physical education teachers respond to homophobic name-calling, as revealed in life history interviews with 'lesbian', 'gay', and 'heterosexual' teachers in Canada and the USA. Censoring homophobic name-calling in schools is discussed as an important, but insufficient, response. Several 'lesbian' and 'gay' teachers responded with…

  6. Propofol Ameliorates Calpain-induced Collapsin Response Mediator Protein-2 Proteolysis in Traumatic Brain Injury in Rats

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yun Yu; Min-Yu Jian; Yun-Zhen Wang; Ru-Quan Han

    2015-01-01

    Background:Collapsin response mediator protein-2 (CRMP2),a multifunctional cytosolic protein highly expressed in the brain,is degraded by calpain following traumatic brain injury (TBI),possibly inhibiting posttraumatic neurite regeneration.Lipid peroxidation (LP) is involved in triggering postinjury CRMP2 proteolysis.We examined the hypothesis that propofol could attenuate LP,calpain-induced CRMP2 degradation,and brain injury after TBI.Methods:A unilateral moderate controlled cortical impact injury was induced in adult male Sprague-Dawley rats.The animals were randomly divided into seven groups:Sham control group,TBI group,TBI + propofol groups (including propofol 1 h,2 h,and 4 h groups),TBI + U83836E group and TBI + fat emulsion group.The LP inhibitor U83836E was used as a control to identify that antioxidation partially accounts for the potential neuroprotective effects of propofol.The solvent of propofol,fat emulsion,was used as the vehicle control.Ipsilateral cortex tissues were harvested at 24 h post-TBI.Immunofluorescent staining,Western blot analysis,and terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase-mediated dUTP nick-end labeling were used to evaluate LP,calpain activity,CRMP2 proteolysis and programmed cell death.The data were statistically analyzed using one-way analysis of variance and a paired t-test.Results:Propofol and U83836E significantly ameliorated the CRMP2 proteolysis.In addition,both propofol and U83836E significantly decreased the ratio of 145-kDa αⅡ-spectrin breakdown products to intact 270-kDa spectrin,the 4-hydroxynonenal expression and programmed cell death in the pericontusional cortex at 24 h after TBI.There was no difference between the TBI group and the fat emulsion group.Conclusions:These results demonstrate that propofol postconditioning alleviates calpain-mediated CRMP2 proteolysis and provides neuroprotective effects following moderate TBI potentially by counteracting LP and reducing calpain activation.

  7. Respostas cardio-respiratórias em pacientes com traumatismo raquimedular Cardiorespiratory responses of patients with spinal cord injuries

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fernanda Rossi Paolillo

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available O objetivo desta pesquisa foi investigar as variáveis cardio-respiratórias (Pa, FC, VO2, VCO2 e Ve durante a Estimulação Elétrica Neuromuscular (EENM do quadríceps em portadores de lesão medular. Participaram da pesquisa dez pacientes (cinco paraplégicos e cinco tetraplégicos. O protocolo do teste consistiu em 10 minutos de repouso, 20 minutos de EENM dos quadriceps e 10 minutos de recuperação. Durante a EENM foram constatados baixos valores de VO2 e VCO2. Os paraplégicos apresentaram rápida cinética dos gases e os tetraplégicos lenta cinética dos gases. Houve o aumento da Pa sistólica e da FC. Ainda, os valores das variáveis cardio-respiratórias foram inversamente relatadas para o nível de lesão, ou seja, quanto maior o nível de lesão, menor os valores. Portanto, a maioria dos pacientes apresentaram algumas limitações nas respostas cardio-respiratórias, indicando realização de exercício exaustivo, mas apresentaram capacidade de realização de exercício induzido artificialmente, possivelmente devido aos benefícios da EENM.The objective of this study was to investigate cardiorespiratory responses (Heart Rate, Blood Pressure, VO2, VCO2 e Ve to Neuromuscular Electrical Stimulation (NMES of the quadriceps in patients with spinal cord injury. Ten patients (five paraplegics and five tetraplegics participated in this study. The protocol of the test consisted of ten minutes of rest, twenty minutes of NMES of the quadriceps and ten minutes of recovery. The findings in this study indicated that, during NMES, the patients demonstrated low levels of VO2 and VCO2 and slow gas kinetics for tetraplegic individuals, and a fast gas kinetics for paraplegic individuals. Moreover, there were increases in blood pressure and heart rate. Cardiorespiratory responses increased with descending spinal cord injury level, meaning that the more severe the lesion, the lower the values. Therefore, most of the patients presented some limitations

  8. Gene expression arrays as a tool to unravel mechanisms of normal tissue radiation injury and prediction of response

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jacqueline JCM Kruse; Fiona A Stewart

    2007-01-01

    Over the past 5 years there has been a rapid increase in the use of microarray technology in the field of cancer research. The majority of studies use microarray analysis of tumor biopsies for profiling of molecular characteristics in an attempt to produce robust classifiers for prognosis. There are now several published gene sets that have been shown to predict for aggressive forms of breast cancer, where patients are most likely to benefit from adjuvant chemotherapy and tumors most likely to develop distant metastases, or be resistant to treatment. The number of publications relating to the use of microarrays for analysis of normal tissue damage, after cancer treatment or genotoxic exposure, is much more limited. A PubMed literature search was conducted using the following keywords and combination of terms: radiation, normal tissue, microarray, gene expression profiling, prediction. With respect to normal tissue radiation injury, microarrays have been used in three ways: (1) to generate gene signatures to identify sensitive and resistant populations (prognosis); (2) to identify sets of biomarker genes for estimating radiation exposure, either accidental or as a result of terrorist attack (diagnosis); (3) to identify genes and pathways involved in tissue response to injury (mechanistic). In this article we will review all (relevant) papers that covered our literature search criteria on microarray technology as it has been applied to normal tissue radiation biology and discuss how successful this has been in defining predisposition markers for radiation sensitivity or how it has helped us to unravel molecular mechanisms leading to acute and late tissue toxicity. We also discuss some of the problems and limitations in application and interpretation of such data.

  9. Intravenous multipotent adult progenitor cell therapy attenuates activated microglial/macrophage response and improves spatial learning after traumatic brain injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bedi, Supinder S; Hetz, Robert; Thomas, Chelsea; Smith, Philippa; Olsen, Alex B; Williams, Stephen; Xue, Hasen; Aroom, Kevin; Uray, Karen; Hamilton, Jason; Mays, Robert W; Cox, Charles S

    2013-12-01

    We previously demonstrated that the intravenous delivery of multipotent adult progenitor cells (MAPCs) after traumatic brain injury (TBI) in rodents provides neuroprotection by preserving the blood-brain barrier and systemically attenuating inflammation in the acute time frame following cell treatment; however, the long-term behavioral and anti-inflammatory effects of MAPC administration after TBI have yet to be explored. We hypothesized that the intravenous injection of MAPCs after TBI attenuates the inflammatory response (as measured by microglial morphology) and improves performance at motor tasks and spatial learning (Morris water maze [MWM]). MAPCs were administered intravenously 2 and 24 hours after a cortical contusion injury (CCI). We tested four groups at 120 days after TBI: sham (uninjured), injured but not treated (CCI), and injured and treated with one of two concentrations of MAPCs, either 2 million cells per kilogram (CCI-2) or 10 million cells per kilogram (CCI-10). CCI-10 rats showed significant improvement in left hind limb deficit on the balance beam. On the fifth day of MWM trials, CCI-10 animals showed a significant decrease in both latency to platform and distance traveled compared with CCI. Probe trials revealed a significant decrease in proximity measure in CCI-10 compared with CCI, suggesting improved memory retrieval. Neuroinflammation was quantified by enumerating activated microglia in the ipsilateral hippocampus. We observed a significant decrease in the number of activated microglia in the dentate gyrus in CCI-10 compared with CCI. Our results demonstrate that intravenous MAPC treatment after TBI in a rodent model offers long-term improvements in spatial learning as well as attenuation of neuroinflammation.

  10. Inhibition of inflammatory responses by ambroxol, a mucolytic agent, in a murine model of acute lung injury induced by lipopolysaccharide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Su, Xiao; Wang, Ling; Song, Yuanlin; Bai, Chunxue

    2004-01-01

    The aim of this study is to investigate whether ambroxol inhibits inflammatory responses in a murine model of lipopolysaccharide-induced acute lung injury (ALI). Mice (n=295) were first intratracheally instilled with lipopolysaccharide (LPS) to induce ALI and then received an intraperitoneal (i.p.) injection of either normal saline (NS), ambroxol (30 or 90 mg/kg per day) or dexamethasone (2.5 or 5 mg/kg per day) for 7 days. Metabolism (n=10, each), lung morphology (n=5, each) and wet-to-dry lung weight ratio (n=10, each) were studied. The levels of tumor necrosis factor (TNF-alpha), interleukin-6 (IL-6) and transforming growth factor (TGF-beta1) and the protein concentration (n=5 or 7, each) in bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) were measured. Mice with LPS-induced ALI that were treated with ambroxol at a dosage of 90 mg/kg per day significantly gained weight compared to the control and dexamethasone-treated groups. Ambroxol and dexamethasone significantly reduced the lung hemorrhage, edema, exudation, neutrophil infiltration and total lung injury histology score at 24 and 48 h. In addition, ambroxol and dexamethasone significantly attenuated the lung wet-to-dry weight ratio at 24 and 48 h (pambroxol- and dexamethasone-treated groups were significantly reduced at 24 and 48 h. The protein in BAL, an index of vascular permeability, was also significantly decreased in the ambroxol- and dexamethasone-treated groups (pAmbroxol inhibited proinflammatory cytokines, reduced lung inflammation and accelerated recovery from LPS-induced ALI.

  11. The adult pituitary shows stem/progenitor cell activation in response to injury and is capable of regeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fu, Qiuli; Gremeaux, Lies; Luque, Raul M; Liekens, Daisy; Chen, Jianghai; Buch, Thorsten; Waisman, Ari; Kineman, Rhonda; Vankelecom, Hugo

    2012-07-01

    The pituitary gland constitutes, together with the hypothalamus, the regulatory core of the endocrine system. Whether the gland is capable of cell regeneration after injury, in particular when suffered at adult age, is unknown. To investigate the adult pituitary's regenerative capacity and the response of its stem/progenitor cell compartment to damage, we constructed a transgenic mouse model to conditionally destroy pituitary cells. GHCre/iDTR mice express diphtheria toxin (DT) receptor after transcriptional activation by Cre recombinase, which is driven by the GH promoter. Treatment with DT for 3 d leads to gradual GH(+) (somatotrope) cell obliteration with a final ablation grade of 80-90% 1 wk later. The stem/progenitor cell-clustering side population promptly expands after injury, concordant with the immediate increase in Sox2(+) stem/progenitor cells. In addition, folliculo-stellate cells, previously designated as pituitary stem/progenitor cells and significantly overlapping with Sox2(+) cells, also increase in abundance. In situ examination reveals expansion of the Sox2(+) marginal-zone niche and appearance of remarkable Sox2(+) cells that contain GH. When mice are left after the DT-provoked lesion, GH(+) cells considerably regenerate during the following months. Double Sox2(+)/GH(+) cells are observed throughout the regenerative period, suggesting recovery of somatotropes from stem/progenitor cells, as further supported by 5-ethynyl-2'-deoxyuridine (EdU) pulse-chase lineage tracing. In conclusion, our study demonstrates that the adult pituitary gland holds regenerative competence and that tissue repair follows prompt activation and plausible involvement of the stem/progenitor cells.

  12. Effect of adjuvant nasal continuous positive airway pressure therapy on immune response and organ injury in children with severe pneumonia

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ni-Na Huang; Yu-Dan Zhang

    2016-01-01

    Objective:To analyze the effect of adjuvant nasal continuous positive airway pressure therapy on immune response and organ injury in children with severe pneumonia.Methods:A total of 90 children with severe pneumonia were randomly divided into observation group and control group (n=45), control group received conventional therapy, observation group accepted regular + adjuvant nasal continuous positive airway pressure therapy, and then differences in immune globulin, Th1/Th2 indexes, blood coagulation indexes, echocardiography parameters and so on were compared between two groups of children.Results:IgG2, IgG3, IgA and IgM content in peripheral blood of observation group were higher than those of control group; Th1/Th2 indexes IL-4 and IFN-γ content in serum as well as IL-4/IFN-γ level were lower than those of control group; blood coagulation indexes PT, TT, APTT and D-D levels were lower than those of control group while FIB and PLT levels were higher than those of control group; echocardiography parameters PVAT and AVAT levels were higher than those of control group while PFVMA level was lower than that of control group.Conclusions: Adjuvant nasal continuous positive airway pressure therapy helps to enhance the immune response and optimize blood coagulation function and cardiac function in children with severe pneumonia.

  13. Using the laws of thermodynamics to understand how matrix metalloproteinases coordinate the myocardial response to injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iyer, Rugmani Padmanabhan; Jung, Mira; Lindsey, Merry L

    Following myocardial infarction (MI), the left ventricle (LV) undergoes a series of molecular, cellular, and functional alterations that are both part of the wound healing response to form a scar in the infarct region and the consequence of that response. Using the laws of thermodynamics as an analogy, we present here three laws for categorizing the post-MI LV remodeling process. The first law is that the LV will attempt to maintain equilibrium and compensate as a way to maximize function, the second law is that remodeling is progressive and unidirectional, and the third law is that the final goal is (ideally, but not always achievable) a stable, equilibrated scar. This comparison helps to define the boundaries of the system, whether it be the infarct zone, the LV, the heart, or the entire body. This review provides an overview for those not directly in the field and establishes a framework to help prioritize future research directions.

  14. JAK‐STAT pathway activation in response to spinal cord injury in regenerative and non‐regenerative stages of Xenopus laevis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tapia, Victor S.; Herrera‐Rojas, Mauricio

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Xenopus laevis tadpoles can regenerate the spinal cord after injury but this capability is lost during metamorphosis. Comparative studies between pre‐metamorphic and metamorphic Xenopus stages can aid towards understanding the molecular mechanisms of spinal cord regeneration. Analysis of a previous transcriptome‐wide study suggests that, in response to injury, the JAK‐STAT pathway is differentially activated in regenerative and non‐regenerative stages. We characterized the activation of the JAK‐STAT pathway and found that regenerative tadpoles have an early and transient activation. In contrast, the non‐regenerative stages have a delayed and sustained activation of the pathway. We found that STAT3 is activated in response to injury mainly in Sox2/3+ ependymal cells, motoneurons and sensory neurons. Finally, to study the role of temporal activation we generated a transgenic line to express a constitutively active version of STAT3. The sustained activation of the JAK‐STAT pathway in regenerative tadpoles reduced the expression of pro‐neurogenic genes normally upregulated in response to spinal cord injury, suggesting that activation of the JAK‐STAT pathway modulates the fate of neural progenitors. PMID:28316792

  15. MicroRNAs in inflammation and response to injuries induced by environmental pollution

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sonkoly, Enikoe [Molecular Dermatology Research Group, Unit of Dermatology and Venerology, Department of Medicine, Karolinska Institute, Stockholm (Sweden); Department of Dermatology and Allergology, University of Szeged, Szeged (Hungary); Pivarcsi, Andor, E-mail: andor.pivarcsi@ki.se [Molecular Dermatology Research Group, Unit of Dermatology and Venerology, Department of Medicine, Karolinska Institute, Stockholm (Sweden); Department of Dermatology and Allergology, University of Szeged, Szeged (Hungary)

    2011-12-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are small noncoding RNAs that regulate basic biological processes by posttranscriptional suppression of their target genes. Altered miRNA expression may lead to widespread gene expression changes and has been implicated in pathophysiological processes such as cancer and inflammation. In this review, we summarize the present knowledge about the role of miRNAs in inflammation and in the response to environmental agents and pollutants, such as cigarette smoke, ethanol, carcinogenic chemicals such as benzo(a)pyrene (BaP) and dioxin, and UV radiation.

  16. Brain tissue oxygen tension and its response to physiological manipulations: influence of distance from injury site in a swine model of traumatic brain injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hawryluk, Gregory W J; Phan, Nicolas; Ferguson, Adam R; Morabito, Diane; Derugin, Nikita; Stewart, Campbell L; Knudson, M Margaret; Manley, Geoffrey; Rosenthal, Guy

    2016-11-01

    OBJECTIVE The optimal site for placement of tissue oxygen probes following traumatic brain injury (TBI) remains unresolved. The authors used a previously described swine model of focal TBI and studied brain tissue oxygen tension (PbtO2) at the sites of contusion, proximal and distal to contusion, and in the contralateral hemisphere to determine the effect of probe location on PbtO2 and to assess the effects of physiological interventions on PbtO2 at these different sites. METHODS A controlled cortical impact device was used to generate a focal lesion in the right frontal lobe in 12 anesthetized swine. PbtO2 was measured using Licox brain tissue oxygen probes placed at the site of contusion, in pericontusional tissue (proximal probe), in the right parietal region (distal probe), and in the contralateral hemisphere. PbtO2 was measured during normoxia, hyperoxia, hypoventilation, and hyperventilation. RESULTS Physiological interventions led to expected changes, including a large increase in partial pressure of oxygen in arterial blood with hyperoxia, increased intracranial pressure (ICP) with hypoventilation, and decreased ICP with hyperventilation. Importantly, PbtO2 decreased substantially with proximity to the focal injury (contusion and proximal probes), and this difference was maintained at different levels of fraction of inspired oxygen and partial pressure of carbon dioxide in arterial blood. In the distal and contralateral probes, hypoventilation and hyperventilation were associated with expected increased and decreased PbtO2 values, respectively. However, in the contusion and proximal probes, these effects were diminished, consistent with loss of cerebrovascular CO2 reactivity at and near the injury site. Similarly, hyperoxia led to the expected rise in PbtO2 only in the distal and contralateral probes, with little or no effect in the proximal and contusion probes, respectively. CONCLUSIONS PbtO2 measurements are strongly influenced by the distance from the

  17. Response to Hypothetical Social Scenarios in Individuals with Traumatic Brain Injury Who Present Inappropriate Social Behavior: A Preliminary Report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michel Ouellette

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Very little research thus far has examined the decision making that underlies inappropriate social behavior (ISB post-TBI (traumatic brain injury. Objectives: To verify the usefulness of a new instrument, the Social Responding Task, for investigating whether, in social decision making, individuals with TBI, who present inappropriate social behavior (ISB, have difficulty anticipating their own feelings of embarrassment and others’ angry reactions following an ISB. Methods: Seven subjects with TBI presenting with inappropriate social behavior (TBI-ISB, 10 presenting with appropriate social behavior (TBI-ASB, and 15 healthy controls were given 12 hypothetical scenarios three times, each time ending with a different behavioral response. Subjects were asked to gauge the likelihood of their displaying the behavior in that situation (part A and of it being followed by an angry reaction from the other or by feelings of embarrassment in themselves (part B. Results: TBI-ISB subjects scored higher than TBI-ASB and healthy controls on a scale of likelihood of displaying an ISB. Results regarding expectations of angry reactions from others and feelings of embarrassment after an ISB were similar among groups. Negative correlations between endorsement of an inappropriate behavior and anticipation of negative emotional consequences were significant for both TBI-ASB and control subjects, but not for TBI-ISB subjects. Conclusions: Results suggest that the TBI-ISB participants were likely to endorse an ISB despite being able to anticipate a negative emotional response in themselves or others, suggesting that there were other explanations for their poor behavior. A self-reported likely response to hypothetical social scenarios can be a useful approach for studying the neurocognitive processes behind the poor choices of individuals with TBI-ISB, but the task needs further validation studies. A comprehensive discussion follows on the underlying

  18. ALE方法分析爆炸载荷作用下圆板动力反直观行为%Anomalous Response of a Circular Plate Under Blast Loading with the ALE Method

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    吴桂英; 梁利平; 李鑫

    2009-01-01

    运用ANSYS/LS-DYNA软件对TNT炸药爆炸后,空气冲击波作用下弹塑性圆板的动力反直观行为进行了数值模拟. 采用任意拉格朗日-欧拉算法(ALE算法),将炸药、空气和板进行有限元离散,在考虑材料屈服极限及应变率效应对动力反直观行为影响的情况下,分别取全模型和1/4模型进行比较. 结果表明,用ALE流-固耦合方法研究爆炸载荷作用下结构反直观行为是行之有效的;材料性能、板厚度对动力反直观行为有较大影响,只有材料的屈服极限较低且厚度较薄的板,容易发生反直观行为;同时,在数值分析时需要考虑应变率的效应.%Anomalous response of elastic-plastic circular plate subjected to TNT air blast loading is studied using LS-DYNA as the numerical tool. TNT. air and plate are taken as varied finite elements with ALE arithmetic comparing full model and 1/4 model. Yield stress and strain rate have been considered for anomalous responses. It is found by numerical analyses that ALE arithmetic is a better method for structural anomalous dynamic behavior under blast loading. Material parameters and the thickness of the plate have influence on anomalous response. Anomalous response of the plate appeared easily when yield stress is lower and the thickness of plate thinner. Strain rate should be considered for numerical simulation of anomalous response under blast loading.

  19. Microfluidic chips for in vivo imaging of cellular responses to neural injury in Drosophila larvae.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mostafa Ghannad-Rezaie

    Full Text Available With powerful genetics and a translucent cuticle, the Drosophila larva is an ideal model system for live imaging studies of neuronal cell biology and function. Here, we present an easy-to-use approach for high resolution live imaging in Drosophila using microfluidic chips. Two different designs allow for non-invasive and chemical-free immobilization of 3(rd instar larvae over short (up to 1 hour and long (up to 10 hours time periods. We utilized these 'larva chips' to characterize several sub-cellular responses to axotomy which occur over a range of time scales in intact, unanaesthetized animals. These include waves of calcium which are induced within seconds of axotomy, and the intracellular transport of vesicles whose rate and flux within axons changes dramatically within 3 hours of axotomy. Axonal transport halts throughout the entire distal stump, but increases in the proximal stump. These responses precede the degeneration of the distal stump and regenerative sprouting of the proximal stump, which is initiated after a 7 hour period of dormancy and is associated with a dramatic increase in F-actin dynamics. In addition to allowing for the study of axonal regeneration in vivo, the larva chips can be utilized for a wide variety of in vivo imaging applications in Drosophila.

  20. Create Your Plate

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... steps to get started: Using your dinner plate, put a line down the middle of the plate. ... vegetables . Now in one of the small sections, put grains and starchy foods. See this list of ...

  1. Create Your Plate

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Your Plate It's simple and effective for both managing diabetes and losing weight. Creating your plate lets ... 2016 Articles from Diabetes Forecast® magazine: wcie-meal-planning, In this section Food Planning Meals Diabetes Meal ...

  2. Create Your Plate

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Your Plate Gluten Free Diets Meal Planning for Vegetarian Diets Cook with Heart-Healthy Foods Holiday Meal ... Healthy Diet Create Your Plate Meal Planning for Vegetarian Diets Gluten Free Diets Holiday Meal Planning Cook ...

  3. Food guide plate

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... chips or cookies. VEGETABLES: MAKE HALF OF YOUR PLATE FRUITS AND VEGETABLES Vegetables can be raw, fresh, ... as a snack. FRUITS: MAKE HALF OF YOUR PLATE FRUITS AND VEGETABLES Fruits can be fresh, canned, ...

  4. Growth Plate Fractures

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... the most widely used by doctors is the Salter-Harris system, described below. Type I Fractures These ... incidence of growth plate fractures peaks in adolescence. Salter-Harris classification of growth plate fractures. AAOS does ...

  5. Create Your Plate

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Planning Meals Diabetes Meal Plans Create Your Plate Gluten Free Diets Meal Planning for Vegetarian Diets Cook ... Create Your Plate Meal Planning for Vegetarian Diets Gluten Free Diets Holiday Meal Planning Cook with Heart- ...

  6. Create Your Plate

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Planning Meals Diabetes Meal Plans Create Your Plate Gluten Free Diets Meal Planning for Vegetarian Diets Cook ... Create Your Plate Meal Planning for Vegetarian Diets Gluten Free Diets Holiday Meal Planning Cook with Heart- ...

  7. Create Your Plate

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Your Plate It's simple and effective for both managing diabetes and losing weight. Creating your plate lets you still choose the foods you want, but changes the portion sizes so you are getting larger ...

  8. Create Your Plate

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Your Plate It's simple and effective for both managing diabetes and losing weight. Creating your plate lets ... Sleeve Custom jerseys for your Tour de Cure team benefits the cause. Ask the Experts: Learn to ...

  9. Accelerated plate tectonics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, D L

    1975-03-21

    The concept of a stressed elastic lithospheric plate riding on a viscous asthenosphere is used to calculate the recurrence interval of great earthquakes at convergent plate boundaries, the separation of decoupling and lithospheric earthquakes, and the migration pattern of large earthquakes along an arc. It is proposed that plate motions accelerate after great decoupling earthquakes and that most of the observed plate motions occur during short periods of time, separated by periods of relative quiescence.

  10. Biomechanical comparison of reconstruction plate versus pedicle screw-rod system in fixation of the models of Tile B1 pelvic injury%钢板与钉棒系统固定骨盆Tile B1型损伤模型的生物力学比较

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李尚政; 苏伟; 庄小强; 白宇; 陆生林

    2014-01-01

    Objective To compare the biomechanical properties of reconstruction plate and pedicle screw-rod system in fixation of the models of Tile B1 pelvic injury.Methods We used 7 cadaveric specimens of normal adult pelvis from 2 males and 5 females with an average death age of 42.1 years.The cadaveric pelvis preserved an intact spine from the fifth lumbar vertebra to 20 centimeters above the proximal ends of both femurs,intact pubic symphysis,bilateral hip joints,bilateral sacroiliac joints,and major pelvic ligaments.After the pelvic specimens were put in an AGS-X biomechanical testing machine at a simulated standing neutral posture,they were subjected to a vertical load of up to 500 N downward from the L5 vertebral body.The displacements of the symphysis pubis were recorded sequentially in the following 4 conditions:1.intact pelvis (the intact group); 2.models of Tile B1 pelvic injury simulating rotatory unstable injury of the pelvis in which the symphysis pubis was cut apart in combination with ruptures of ipsilateral sacrospinous and sacrotuberous ligaments (the injury group); 3.Tile B1 pelvic injury fixated with a reconstruction plate (the plate group).4.Tile B1 pelvic injury fixated with the pedicle screw-rod system (the screw-rod group).Results Under the vertical load of 500 N,the displacements of the symphysis pubis in the intact,injury,plate and screw-rod groups were respectively 0.121 ±0.025 mm,4.512 ±0.391 mm,0.358 ±0.051 mm,and 0.656 ±0.103 mm.There were significant differences between the 4 groups (F =725.707,P =0.000).The displacement increased from the intact group,the plate group,the screw-rod group to the injury group.The differences between any 2 groups were significant (P < 0.05).Conclusions In fixation of the models of Tile B1 pelvic injury,the reconstruction plate and the pedicle screw-rod system can both effectively restore the biomechanical stability of the injured pelvis.However,internal fixation with the reconstruction plate may yield better

  11. Create Your Plate

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Reset Plate Share Create Your Plate ! Share: Seven Simple Steps to Create Your Plate It's simple and effective for both managing diabetes and losing ... en.html Have Type 2 Diabetes? Our free program will help you live well. More from diabetes. ...

  12. Obliquity along plate boundaries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Philippon, Mélody; Corti, Giacomo

    2016-12-01

    Most of the plate boundaries are activated obliquely with respect to the direction of far field stresses, as roughly only 8% of the plate boundaries total length shows a very low obliquity (ranging from 0 to 10°, sub-orthogonal to the plate displacement). The obliquity along plate boundaries is controlled by (i) lateral rheological variations within the lithosphere and (ii) consistency with the global plate circuit. Indeed, plate tectonics and magmatism drive rheological changes within the lithosphere and consequently influence strain localization. Geodynamical evolution controls large-scale mantle convection and plate formation, consumption, and re-organization, thus triggering plate kinematics variations, and the adjustment and re-orientation of far field stresses. These geological processes may thus result in plate boundaries that are not perpendicular but oblique to the direction of far field stresses. This paper reviews the global patterns of obliquity along plate boundaries. Using GPlate, we provide a statistical analysis of present-day obliquity along plate boundaries. Within this framework, by comparing natural examples and geological models, we discuss deformation patterns and kinematics recorded along oblique plate boundaries.

  13. Vasoprotective effects of neurocompensatory response to balloon injury during diabetes involve the improvement of Mas signaling by TGFβ1 activation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pernomian, Larissa; Gomes, Mayara S; Pernomian, Laena; Moreira, Rafael P; Corrêa, Fernando M A; de Oliveira, Ana M

    2015-01-01

    Balloon injury in diabetic rats triggers a sensory neurocompensatory response that restores the blood flow in contralateral carotid. These vasoprotective effects result from H2O2-mediated relaxation that counteracts AT1-dependent contractile hyperreactivity. The most important mechanism from the renin-angiotensin-system in counteracting AT1-mediated effects is that one is mediated by Mas receptors. Thus, we hypothesized that the vasoprotective effects of balloon neurocompensation in diabetic rats could result from the improvement of Mas signaling by H2O2-mediated sensory mechanisms. NK1 receptors are sensory components whose activation could lead to H2O2 generation upon TGFβ1 release and ALK5-mediated Nox4 upregulation. Based on this, we aimed to investigate: (1) the role of the TGFβ1/ALK5-Nox4-H2O2 pathway on modulating Mas signaling in diabetic rat contralateral carotid; and (2) the contribution of Mas signaling in the control of local blood flow. Our results showed that balloon neurocompensation restored diabetic rat contralateral carotid flow by improving Mas signaling through NK1-mediated TGFβ1 release. TGFβ1/ALK5 activation enhanced Nox4 expression and Nox4-driven generation of H2O2. In turn, H2O2 enhanced the local Mas-mediated relaxation. Since restenosis impairs diabetic rat ipsilateral carotid flow, the restoration of diabetic rat contralateral carotid flow may prevent further damages in cerebral irrigation by carotid pathways after angioplasty during diabetes. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Activation of transcription factor AP-1 in response to thermal injury in rat small intestine and IEC-6 cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yonghong; Zhao, Hong; Liu, Tao; Wan, Changrong; Liu, Xiaoxi; Gao, Zhimin; Hou, Xiaolin; Jiang, Linshu; Liu, Fenghua

    2015-07-11

    Our previous studies indicated that heat stress can cause significant damage to the intestinal epithelium and induce differential expression of many genes in rat small intestine. The transcription factors AP-1 and NF-κB, which act as important mediators by binding to specific DNA sequences within gene promoters, regulate the transcription of genes associated with immune regulation, stress response and cell fate. To determine whether AP-1 and NF-κB are involved in hyperthermia-induced injury in rat small intestine and IEC-6 cells, we investigated their activity, and the expression of related proteins, by electrophoretic mobility shift assays and western blotting, respectively. Heat stress resulted in severe damage to the epithelium of the small intestine. The cell morphology and viability were obviously altered when IEC-6 cell was exposed to hyperthermia. AP-1 was activated in the small intestine of heat-stressed rats, as was phosphorylation of the JNK signaling pathway. In IEC-6 cell line, AP-1 activation in groups exposed to 42 °C for 1 h, 2 h and 4 h was significantly increased. In contrast, NF-κB was not activated in both in vivo and in vitro models. These results reveal that AP-1 is likely to play an important role in regulating gene transcription in rat small intestine and IEC-6 cells during exposure to heat stress.

  15. The inflammatory response in blood and in remote organs following acute kidney injury

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brøchner, Anne Craveiro; Dagnaes-Hansen, Frederik; Højberg-Holm, Jimmy

    2014-01-01

    /R of both hind legs + LPS. In groups B and E, I/R times were identical. All mice were kept alive for 24 h and then sacrificed. Levels of interleukin (IL)-1β, IL-6, IL-10, and tumor necrosis factor-α were measured in the blood. The activity of myeloperoxidase (MPO) in lungs, kidneys, and liver was evaluated...... infiltration of distant organs measured by the levels of MPO in the lung and liver also showed a significantly higher level in renal I/R compared to hind leg I/R. Renal I/R is associated with a more pronounced inflammatory response in blood and distant organs. The high cytokine levels measured following...... was that elevated levels of cytokines would be found in both blood and in organs distant to the kidneys. Forty mice were divided into five groups. The mice were subjected to the following operations: A: Sham only, no lipopolysaccharide (LPS); B: I/R of both kidneys + LPS; C: LPS only; D: Nephrectomy + LPS; E: I...

  16. Rho kinase inhibition following traumatic brain injury in mice promotes functional improvement and acute neuron survival but has little effect on neurogenesis, glial responses or neuroinflammation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bye, Nicole; Christie, Kimberly J; Turbic, Alisa; Basrai, Harleen S; Turnley, Ann M

    2016-05-01

    Inhibition of the Rho/Rho kinase pathway has been shown to be beneficial in a variety of neural injuries and diseases. In this manuscript we investigate the role of Rho kinase inhibition in recovery from traumatic brain injury using a controlled cortical impact model in mice. Mice subjected to a moderately severe TBI were treated for 1 or 4 weeks with the Rho kinase inhibitor Y27632, and functional outcomes and neuronal and glial cell responses were analysed at 1, 7 and 35 days post-injury. We hypothesised that Y27632-treated mice would show functional improvement, with augmented recruitment of neuroblasts from the SVZ and enhanced survival of newborn neurons in the pericontusional cortex, with protection against neuronal degeneration, neuroinflammation and modulation of astrocyte reactivity and blood-brain-barrier permeability. While Rho kinase inhibition enhanced recovery of motor function after trauma, there were no substantial increases in the recruitment of DCX(+) neuroblasts or the number of BrdU(+) or EdU(+) labelled newborn neurons in the pericontusional cortex of Y27632-treated mice. Inhibition of Rho kinase significantly reduced the number of degenerating cortical neurons at 1day post-injury compared to saline controls but had no longer term effect on neuronal degeneration, with only modest effects on astrocytic reactivity and macrophage/microglial responses. Overall, this study showed that Rho kinase contributes to acute neurodegenerative processes in the injured cortex but does not play a significant role in SVZ neural precursor cell-derived adult neurogenesis, glial responses or blood-brain barrier permeability following a moderately severe brain injury.

  17. Acute kidney injury and inflammatory response of sepsis following cecal ligation and puncture in d-galactose-induced aging rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Chao; Hu, Jie; Mao, Zhi; Kang, Hongjun; Liu, Hui; Fu, Wanlei; Lv, Yangfan; Zhou, Feihu

    2017-01-01

    Recently, the d-galactose (d-gal)-induced mimetic aging rat model has been widely used in studies of age-associated diseases, which have shown that chronic d-gal exposure induces premature aging similar to natural aging in rats. With the increasing rate of sepsis in the geriatric population, an easy-access animal model for preclinical studies of elderly sepsis is urgently needed. This study investigates whether a sepsis model that is established in d-gal-induced aging rats can serve as a suitable model for preclinical studies of elderly patients with sepsis. To investigate the acute kidney injury (AKI) and inflammatory response of sepsis following cecal ligation and puncture (CLP) in d-gal-induced aging rats. Twelve-week-old male Sprague Dawley rats were divided into low-dose d-gal (L d-gal, 125 mg/kg/d), high-dose d-gal (H d-gal, 500 mg/kg/d), and control groups. After daily subcutaneous injection of d-gal for 6 weeks, the CLP method was used to establish a sepsis model. The mortality was 73.3%, 40%, and 33.3% in the H d-gal, L d-gal, and control groups, respectively. Blood urea nitrogen, creatinine, plasma neutrophil gelatinase-associated lipocalin, interleukin-6, interleukin-10, and tumor necrosis factor-α were markedly increased in the H d-gal group after establishment of the sepsis model (H d-gal vs control, Paging rats are more likely to die from sepsis than are young rats, and probably this is associated with increased severity of septic AKI and an increased inflammatory response. Therefore, use of the high-dose- d-gal-induced aging rat model of sepsis for preclinical studies can provide more useful information for the treatment of sepsis in elderly patients.

  18. Attenuation of Acute Phase Injury in Rat Intracranial Hemorrhage by Cerebrolysin that Inhibits Brain Edema and Inflammatory Response.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Yang; Zhang, Yan; Wang, Zhaotao; Wang, Shanshan; Gao, Mou; Xu, Ruxiang; Liang, Chunyang; Zhang, Hongtian

    2016-04-01

    The outcome of intracerebral hemorrhage (ICH) is mainly determined by the volume of the hemorrhage core and the secondary brain damage to penumbral tissues due to brain swelling, microcirculation disturbance and inflammation. The present study aims to investigate the protective effects of cerebrolysin on brain edema and inhibition of the inflammation response surrounding the hematoma core in the acute stage after ICH. The ICH model was induced by administration of type VII bacterial collagenase into the stratum of adult rats, which were then randomly divided into three groups: ICH + saline; ICH + Cerebrolysin (5 ml/kg) and sham. Cerebrolysin or saline was administered intraperitoneally 1 h post surgery. Neurological scores, extent of brain edema content and Evans blue dye extravasation were recorded. The levels of pro-inflammatory factors (IL-1β, TNF-α and IL-6) were assayed by Real-time PCR and Elisa kits. Aquaporin-4 (AQP4) and tight junction proteins (TJPs; claudin-5, occludin and zonula occluden-1) expression were measured at multiple time points. The morphological and intercellular changes were characterized by Electron microscopy. It is found that cerebrolysin (5 ml/kg) improved the neurological behavior and reduced the ipsilateral brain water content and Evans blue dye extravasation. After cerebrolysin treated, the levels of pro-inflammatory factors and AQP4 in the peri-hematomal areas were markedly reduced and were accompanied with higher expression of TJPs. Electron microscopy showed the astrocytic swelling and concentrated chromatin in the ICH group and confirmed the cell junction changes. Thus, early cerebrolysin treatment ameliorates secondary injury after ICH and promotes behavioral performance during the acute phase by reducing brain edema, inflammatory response, and blood-brain barrier permeability.

  19. Somatosympathetic vasoconstrictor reflexes in human spinal cord injury: responses to innocuous and noxious sensory stimulation below lesion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vaughan G Macefield

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available It is known that the sudden increases in blood pressure associated with autonomic dysreflexia in people with spinal cord injury (SCI is due to a spinally-mediated reflex activation of sympathetic vasoconstrictor neurones supplying skeletal muscle and the gut. Apart from visceral inputs, such as those originating from a distended bladder, there is a prevailing opinion that autonomic dysreflexia can be triggered by noxious stimulation below the lesion. However, do noxious inputs really cause an increase in blood pressure in SCI? Using microelectrodes inserted into a peripheral nerve to record sympathetic nerve activity we had previously shown that selective stimulation of small-diameter afferents in muscle or skin, induced by bolus injection of hypertonic saline into the tibialis anterior muscle or the overlying skin, evokes a sustained increase in muscle sympathetic nerve activity and blood pressure and a transient increase in skin sympathetic nerve activity and decrease in skin blood flow. We postulated that these sympathetic responses would be exaggerated in SCI, with a purely noxious stimulus causing long-lasting increases in blood pressure and long-lasting decreases in skin blood flow. Surprisingly, though, we found that intramuscular or subcutaneous injection of hypertonic saline into the leg caused negligible changes in these parameters. Conversely, weak electrical stimulation over the abdominal wall, which in able-bodied subjects is not painful and activates large-diameter cutaneous afferents, caused a marked increase in blood pressure in SCI but not in able-bodied subjects. This suggests that it is activation of large-diameter somatic afferents, not small-diameter afferents, that triggers increases in sympathetic outflow in SCI. Whether the responses to activation of large-diameter afferents reflect plastic changes in the spinal cord in SCI is unknown.

  20. Human neural stem cell grafts modify microglial response and enhance axonal sprouting in neonatal hypoxic-ischemic brain injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daadi, Marcel M; Davis, Alexis S; Arac, Ahmet; Li, Zongjin; Maag, Anne-Lise; Bhatnagar, Rishi; Jiang, Kewen; Sun, Guohua; Wu, Joseph C; Steinberg, Gary K

    2010-03-01

    Hypoxic-ischemic (HI) brain injury in newborn infants represents a major cause of cerebral palsy, development delay, and epilepsy. Stem cell-based therapy has the potential to rescue and replace the ischemic tissue caused by HI and to restore function. However, the mechanisms by which stem cell transplants induce functional recovery are yet to be elucidated. In the present study, we sought to investigate the efficacy of human neural stem cells derived from human embryonic stem cells in a rat model of neonatal HI and the mechanisms enhancing brain repair. The human neural stem cells were genetically engineered for in vivo molecular imaging and for postmortem histological tracking. Twenty-four hours after the induction of HI, animals were grafted with human neural stem cells into the forebrain. Motor behavioral tests were performed the fourth week after transplantation. We used immunocytochemistry and neuroanatomical tracing to analyze neural differentiation, axonal sprouting, and microglia response. Treatment-induced changes in gene expression were investigated by microarray and quantitative polymerase chain reaction. Bioluminescence imaging permitted real time longitudinal tracking of grafted human neural stem cells. HI transplanted animals significantly improved in their use of the contralateral impeded forelimb and in the Rotorod test. The grafts showed good survival, dispersion, and differentiation. We observed an increase of uniformly distributed microglia cells in the grafted side. Anterograde neuroanatomical tracing demonstrated significant contralesional sprouting. Microarray analysis revealed upregulation of genes involved in neurogenesis, gliogenesis, and neurotrophic support. These results suggest that human neural stem cell transplants enhance endogenous brain repair through multiple modalities in response to HI.

  1. Acute Cardiorespiratory and Metabolic Responses During Exoskeleton-Assisted Walking Overground Among Persons with Chronic Spinal Cord Injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evans, Nicholas; Hartigan, Clare; Kandilakis, Casey; Pharo, Elizabeth; Clesson, Ismari

    2015-01-01

    Lower extremity robotic exoskeleton technology is being developed with the promise of affording people with spinal cord injury (SCI) the opportunity to stand and walk. The mobility benefits of exoskeleton-assisted walking can be realized immediately, however the cardiorespiratory and metabolic benefits of this technology have not been thoroughly investigated. The purpose of this pilot study was to evaluate the acute cardiorespiratory and metabolic responses associated with exoskeleton-assisted walking overground and to determine the degree to which these responses change at differing walking speeds. Five subjects (4 male, 1 female) with chronic SCI (AIS A) volunteered for the study. Expired gases were collected during maximal graded exercise testing and two, 6-minute bouts of exoskeleton-assisted walking overground. Outcome measures included peak oxygen consumption (V̇O2peak), average oxygen consumption (V̇O2avg), peak heart rate (HRpeak), walking economy, metabolic equivalent of tasks for SCI (METssci), walk speed, and walk distance. Significant differences were observed between walk-1 and walk-2 for walk speed, total walk distance, V̇O2avg, and METssci. Exoskeleton-assisted walking resulted in %V̇O2peak range of 51.5% to 63.2%. The metabolic cost of exoskeleton-assisted walking ranged from 3.5 to 4.3 METssci. Persons with motor-complete SCI may be limited in their capacity to perform physical exercise to the extent needed to improve health and fitness. Based on preliminary data, cardiorespiratory and metabolic demands of exoskeleton-assisted walking are consistent with activities performed at a moderate intensity.

  2. Angular shear plate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruda, Mitchell C [Tucson, AZ; Greynolds, Alan W [Tucson, AZ; Stuhlinger, Tilman W [Tucson, AZ

    2009-07-14

    One or more disc-shaped angular shear plates each include a region thereon having a thickness that varies with a nonlinear function. For the case of two such shear plates, they are positioned in a facing relationship and rotated relative to each other. Light passing through the variable thickness regions in the angular plates is refracted. By properly timing the relative rotation of the plates and by the use of an appropriate polynomial function for the thickness of the shear plate, light passing therethrough can be focused at variable positions.

  3. A Soil-Plate Based Pipeline for Assessing Cereal Root Growth in Response to Polyethylene Glycol (PEG-Induced Water Deficit Stress

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sven K. Nelson

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Drought is a serious problem that causes losses in crop-yield every year, but the mechanisms underlying how roots respond to water deficit are difficult to study under controlled conditions. Methods for assaying root elongation and architecture, especially for seedlings, are commonly achieved on artificial media, such as agar, moistened filter paper, or in hydroponic systems. However, it has been demonstrated that measuring root characteristics under such conditions does not accurately mimic what is observed when plants are grown in soil. Morphological changes in root behavior occur because of differences in solute diffusion, mechanical impedance, exposure to light (in some designs, and gas exchange of roots grown under these conditions. To address such deficiencies, we developed a quantitative method for assaying seedling root lengths and germination in soil using a plate-based approach with wheat as a model crop. We also further developed the method to include defined water deficits stress levels using the osmotic properties of polyethylene glycol (PEG. Seeds were sown into soil-filled vertical plates and grown in the dark. Root length measurements were collected using digital photography through the transparent lid under green lighting to avoid effects of white light exposure on growth. Photographs were analyzed using the cross-platform ImageJ plugin, SmartRoot, which can detect root edges and partially automate root detection for extraction of lengths. This allowed for quick measurements and straightforward and accurate assessments of non-linear roots. Other measurements, such as root width or angle, can also be collected by this method. An R function was developed to collect exported root length data, process and reformat the data, and output plots depicting root/shoot growth dynamics. For water deficit experiments, seedlings were transplanted side-by-side into well-watered plates and plates containing PEG solutions to simulate precise

  4. Impact on plate waste of switching from a tray to a trayless delivery system in a university dining hall and employee response to the switch.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thiagarajah, Krisha; Getty, Victoria M

    2013-01-01

    A potential strategy for decreasing food waste in foodservice operations is trayless dining. The objective of this 2010 study was to compare the impact of using a tray vs a trayless system on plate waste and on employees' attitudes. To test the hypothesis that going trayless would reduce waste, liquid and solid plate waste were measured for 1 week with the then-existing tray system and again after a new trayless system was implemented in a buffet-style university dining hall serving roughly1,000 meals a day. Foodservice staff were invited to participate in a focus group about the impact on their jobs. The investigators calculated plate waste per patron under the two systems and used an independent samples t test to examine the significance of the difference. Comments from the focus group were analyzed for themes. A significant decrease in solid waste per patron (0.81 oz; P=0.001) was observed in switching from the tray to the trayless system (4.39 ± 0.24 oz vs 3.58 ± 0.08 oz per patron). A nonsignificant reduction was observed with liquid waste (49.77 ± 2.62 mL vs 46.36 ± 4.51 mL; P=0.18). Most of the employees preferred the trayless system as long as it did reduce waste, but felt that increased breakage of dishware and increased need to wipe down tables were possible concerns resulting from the switch. This study demonstrates that trayless dining can reduce plate waste, and that employees can be supportive of the change.

  5. Fractal zone plates with variable lacunarity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monsoriu, Juan; Saavedra, Genaro; Furlan, Walter

    2004-09-06

    Fractal zone plates (FZPs), i.e., zone plates with fractal structure, have been recently introduced in optics. These zone plates are distinguished by the fractal focusing structure they provide along the optical axis. In this paper we study the effects on this axial response of an important descriptor of fractals: the lacunarity. It is shown that this parameter drastically affects the profile of the irradiance response along the optical axis. In spite of this fact, the axial behavior always has the self-similarity characteristics of the FZP itself.

  6. Effects of epithelial cell injury of the lower respiratory tract in the pathogenesis of allergic responses in a rat model

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CHU Wei-li; CHU Ming; WANG Yue-dan; HU Yan; ZHAO Can; SU Li; XIONG Yan

    2013-01-01

    detected by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA).Bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF) was collected to conduct differential cell counts.Flow cytometry analysis was also used to count Th1 and Th2 cells.Results The pathological changes in the LPS+OVA group were similar to the asthma group,while in other groups,the pathological changes were not obvious.The ratio of lymphocytes in BALF,IL-4/IFN-γ in plasma and the expression of the TSLP and IL-4 in the asthma and LPS+OVA groups were higher than in the control group and the OVA+OVA group (P <0.05).The level of IgE was higher in the asthma,LPS and LPS+OVA groups than in the control group and the OVA+OVA group (P <0.05).By flow cytometry analysis,the Th1/Th2 ratio was lower in the LPS+OVA and asthma groups than in other groups (P <0.05).Conclusions The experiment results show that the injury to the bronchial epithelial layer may be the initial event of allergic responses.This finding implies that a rational approach to therapeutics would be to increase the resistance of the airways to environmental injuries rather than concentrating on suppressing inflammation.

  7. Acute kidney injury and inflammatory response of sepsis following cecal ligation and puncture in D-galactose-induced aging rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liu C

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Chao Liu,1,* Jie Hu,1,* Zhi Mao,1,* Hongjun Kang,1 Hui Liu,1 Wanlei Fu,2 Yangfan Lv,2 Feihu Zhou1 1Department of Critical Care Medicine, Chinese People’s Liberation Army General Hospital, Beijing, People’s Republic of China; 2Department of Pathology, Xinqiao Hospital, Third Military Medical University, Chongqing, People’s Republic of China *These authors contributed equally to this work Background: Recently, the D-galactose (D-gal-induced mimetic aging rat model has been widely used in studies of age-associated diseases, which have shown that chronic D-gal exposure induces premature aging similar to natural aging in rats. With the increasing rate of sepsis in the geriatric population, an easy-access animal model for preclinical studies of elderly sepsis is urgently needed. This study investigates whether a sepsis model that is established in D-gal-induced aging rats can serve as a suitable model for preclinical studies of elderly patients with sepsis.Objective: To investigate the acute kidney injury (AKI and inflammatory response of sepsis following cecal ligation and puncture (CLP in D-gal-induced aging rats.Methods: Twelve-week-old male Sprague Dawley rats were divided into low-dose D-gal (L D-gal, 125 mg/kg/d, high-dose D-gal (H D-gal, 500 mg/kg/d, and control groups. After daily subcutaneous injection of D-gal for 6 weeks, the CLP method was used to establish a sepsis model.Results: The mortality was 73.3%, 40%, and 33.3% in the H D-gal, L D-gal, and control groups, respectively. Blood urea nitrogen, creatinine, plasma neutrophil gelatinase-associated lipocalin, interleukin-6, interleukin-10, and tumor necrosis factor-α were markedly increased in the H D-gal group after establishment of the sepsis model (H D-gal vs control, P<0.05 at 12 h and 24 h post-CLP. The rate of severe AKI (RIFLE-F at 24 h post-CLP was 43% for both the control and L D-gal groups and 80% for the H D-gal group.Conclusion: High-dose-D-gal-induced aging rats are

  8. Back Injuries

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... extending from your neck to your pelvis. Back injuries can result from sports injuries, work around the house or in the garden, ... back is the most common site of back injuries and back pain. Common back injuries include Sprains ...

  9. Electrical Injuries

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... it can pass through your body and cause injuries. These electrical injuries can be external or internal. You may have one or both types. External injuries are skin burns. Internal injuries include damage to ...

  10. Acute Cognitive Impairment After Lateral Fluid Percussion Brain Injury Recovers by One Month: Evaluation by Conditioned Fear Response

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lifshitz, Jonathan; Witgen, Brent M.; Grady, M. Sean

    2007-01-01

    Conditioned fear associates a contextual environment and cue stimulus to a foot shock in a single training trial, where fear expressed to the trained context or cue indicates cognitive performance. Lesion, aspiration or inactivation of the hippocampus and amygdala impair conditioned fear to the trained context and cue, respectively. Moreover, only bilateral experimental manipulations, in contrast to unilateral, abolish cognitive performance. In a model of unilateral brain injury, we sought to test whether a single lateral fluid percussion brain injury impairs cognitive performance in conditioned fear. Brain-injured mice were evaluated for anterograde cognitive deficits, with the hypothesis that acute injury-induced impairments improve over time. Male C57BL/6J mice were brain-injured, trained at five or 27 days post-injury, and tested 48 hours later for recall of the association between the conditioned stimuli (trained context or cue) and the unconditioned stimulus (foot shock) by quantifying fear-associated freezing behavior. A significant anterograde hippocampal-dependent cognitive deficit was observed at seven days in brain-injured compared to sham. Cued fear conditioning could not detect amygdala-dependent cognitive deficits after injury and stereological estimation of amygdala neuron number corroborated this finding. The absence of injury-related freezing in a novel context substantiated injury-induced hippocampal-dependent cognitive dysfunction, rather than generalized fear. Variations in the training and testing paradigms demonstrated a cognitive deficit in consolidation, rather than acquisition or recall. By one month post-injury, cognitive function recovered in brain-injured mice. Hence, the acute injury-induced cognitive impairment may persist while transient pathophysiological sequelae are underway, and improve as global dysfunction subsides. PMID:17169443

  11. Acute cognitive impairment after lateral fluid percussion brain injury recovers by 1 month: evaluation by conditioned fear response.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lifshitz, Jonathan; Witgen, Brent M; Grady, M Sean

    2007-02-27

    Conditioned fear associates a contextual environment and cue stimulus to a foot shock in a single training trial, where fear expressed to the trained context or cue indicates cognitive performance. Lesion, aspiration or inactivation of the hippocampus and amygdala impair conditioned fear to the trained context and cue, respectively. Moreover, only bilateral experimental manipulations, in contrast to unilateral, abolish cognitive performance. In a model of unilateral brain injury, we sought to test whether a single lateral fluid percussion brain injury impairs cognitive performance in conditioned fear. Brain-injured mice were evaluated for anterograde cognitive deficits, with the hypothesis that acute injury-induced impairments improve over time. Male C57BL/6J mice were brain-injured, trained at 5 or 27 days post-injury, and tested 48h later for recall of the association between the conditioned stimuli (trained context or cue) and the unconditioned stimulus (foot shock) by quantifying fear-associated freezing behavior. A significant anterograde hippocampal-dependent cognitive deficit was observed at 7 days in brain-injured compared to sham. Cued fear conditioning could not detect amygdala-dependent cognitive deficits after injury and stereological estimation of amygdala neuron number corroborated this finding. The absence of injury-related freezing in a novel context substantiated injury-induced hippocampal-dependent cognitive dysfunction, rather than generalized fear. Variations in the training and testing paradigms demonstrated a cognitive deficit in consolidation, rather than acquisition or recall. By 1-month post-injury, cognitive function recovered in brain-injured mice. Hence, the acute injury-induced cognitive impairment may persist while transient pathophysiological sequelae are underway, and improve as global dysfunction subsides.