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Sample records for plastid protein synthesis

  1. Protein Targeting to the Plastid of Euglena.

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    Durnford, Dion G; Schwartzbach, Steven D

    2017-01-01

    The lateral transfer of photosynthesis between kingdoms through endosymbiosis is among the most spectacular examples of evolutionary innovation. Euglena, which acquired a chloroplast indirectly through an endosymbiosis with a green alga, represents such an example. As with other endosymbiont-derived plastids from eukaryotes, there are additional membranes that surround the organelle, of which Euglena has three. Thus, photosynthetic genes that were transferred from the endosymbiont to the host nucleus and whose proteins are required in the new plastid, are now faced with targeting and plastid import challenges. Early immunoelectron microscopy data suggested that the light-harvesting complexes, photosynthetic proteins in the thylakoid membrane, are post-translationally targeted to the plastid via the Golgi apparatus, an unexpected discovery at the time. Proteins targeted to the Euglena plastid have complex, bipartite presequences that direct them into the endomembrane system, through the Golgi apparatus and ultimately on to the plastid, presumably via transport vesicles. From transcriptome sequencing, dozens of plastid-targeted proteins were identified, leading to the identification of two different presequence structures. Both have an amino terminal signal peptide followed by a transit peptide for plastid import, but only one of the two classes of presequences has a third domain-the stop transfer sequence. This discovery implied two different transport mechanisms; one where the protein was fully inserted into the lumen of the ER and another where the protein remains attached to, but effectively outside, the endomembrane system. In this review, we will discuss the biochemical and bioinformatic evidence for plastid targeting, discuss the evolution of the targeting system, and ultimately provide a working model for the targeting and import of proteins into the plastid of Euglena.

  2. Plastid Protein Targeting: Preprotein Recognition and Translocation.

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    Chotewutmontri, P; Holbrook, K; Bruce, B D

    2017-01-01

    Eukaryotic organisms are defined by their endomembrane system and various organelles. The membranes that define these organelles require complex protein sorting and molecular machines that selectively mediate the import of proteins from the cytosol to their functional location inside the organelle. The plastid possibly represents the most complex system of protein sorting, requiring many different translocons located in the three membranes found in this organelle. Despite having a small genome of its own, the vast majority of plastid-localized proteins is nuclear encoded and must be posttranslationally imported from the cytosol. These proteins are encoded as a larger molecular weight precursor that contains a special "zip code," a targeting sequence specific to the intended final destination of a given protein. The "zip code" is located at the precursor N-terminus, appropriately called a transit peptide (TP). We aim to provide an overview of plastid trafficking with a focus on the mechanism and regulation of the general import pathway, which serves as a central import hub for thousands of proteins that function in the plastid. We extend comparative analysis of plant proteomes to develop a better understanding of the evolution of TPs and differential TP recognition. We also review alternate import pathways, including vesicle-mediated trafficking, dual targeting, and import of signal-anchored and tail-anchored proteins. © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Plastid ribosomal protein S5 plays a critical role in photosynthesis, plant development, and cold stress tolerance in arabidopsis

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    Plastid ribosomal proteins (RPs) are essential components for protein synthesis machinery and exert diverse roles in plant growth and development. Mutations in plastid RPs lead to a range of developmental phenotypes in plants. However, how they regulate these processes is not fully understood and th...

  4. Plastid ribosomal protein S5 is involved in photosynthesis, plant development, and cold stress tolerance in Arabidopsis.

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    Zhang, Junxiang; Yuan, Hui; Yang, Yong; Fish, Tara; Lyi, Sangbom M; Thannhauser, Theodore W; Zhang, Lugang; Li, Li

    2016-04-01

    Plastid ribosomal proteins are essential components of protein synthesis machinery and have diverse roles in plant growth and development. Mutations in plastid ribosomal proteins lead to a range of developmental phenotypes in plants. However, how they regulate these processes is not fully understood, and the functions of some individual plastid ribosomal proteins remain unknown. To identify genes responsible for chloroplast development, we isolated and characterized a mutant that exhibited pale yellow inner leaves with a reduced growth rate in Arabidopsis. The mutant (rps5) contained a missense mutation of plastid ribosomal protein S5 (RPS5), which caused a dramatically reduced abundance of chloroplast 16S rRNA and seriously impaired 16S rRNA processing to affect ribosome function and plastid translation. Comparative proteomic analysis revealed that the rps5 mutation suppressed the expression of a large number of core components involved in photosystems I and II as well as many plastid ribosomal proteins. Unexpectedly, a number of proteins associated with cold stress responses were greatly decreased in rps5, and overexpression of the plastid RPS5 improved plant cold stress tolerance. Our results indicate that RPS5 is an important constituent of the plastid 30S subunit and affects proteins involved in photosynthesis and cold stress responses to mediate plant growth and development.

  5. Plastid chaperonin proteins Cpn60α and Cpn60β are required for plastid division in Arabidopsis thaliana

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    Osteryoung Katherine W

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Plastids arose from a free-living cyanobacterial endosymbiont and multiply by binary division as do cyanobacteria. Plastid division involves nucleus-encoded homologs of cyanobacterial division proteins such as FtsZ, MinD, MinE, and ARC6. However, homologs of many other cyanobacterial division genes are missing in plant genomes and proteins of host eukaryotic origin, such as a dynamin-related protein, PDV1 and PDV2 are involved in the division process. Recent identification of plastid division proteins has started to elucidate the similarities and differences between plastid division and cyanobacterial cell division. To further identify new proteins that are required for plastid division, we characterized previously and newly isolated plastid division mutants of Arabidopsis thaliana. Results Leaf cells of two mutants, br04 and arc2, contain fewer, larger chloroplasts than those of wild type. We found that ARC2 and BR04 are identical to nuclear genes encoding the plastid chaperonin 60α (ptCpn60α and chaperonin 60β (ptCpn60β proteins, respectively. In both mutants, plastid division FtsZ ring formation was partially perturbed though the level of FtsZ2-1 protein in plastids of ptcpn60β mutants was similar to that in wild type. Phylogenetic analyses showed that both ptCpn60 proteins are derived from ancestral cyanobacterial proteins. The A. thaliana genome encodes two members of ptCpn60α family and four members of ptCpn60β family respectively. We found that a null mutation in ptCpn60α abolished greening of plastids and resulted in an albino phenotype while a weaker mutation impairs plastid division and reduced chlorophyll levels. The functions of at least two ptCpn60β proteins are redundant and the appearance of chloroplast division defects is dependent on the number of mutant alleles. Conclusion Our results suggest that both ptCpn60α and ptCpn60β are required for the formation of a normal plastid division apparatus, as

  6. De novo pyrimidine nucleotide synthesis mainly occurs outside of plastids, but a previously undiscovered nucleobase importer provides substrates for the essential salvage pathway in Arabidopsis.

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    Witz, Sandra; Jung, Benjamin; Fürst, Sarah; Möhlmann, Torsten

    2012-04-01

    Nucleotide de novo synthesis is highly conserved among organisms and represents an essential biochemical pathway. In plants, the two initial enzymatic reactions of de novo pyrimidine synthesis occur in the plastids. By use of green fluorescent protein fusions, clear support is provided for a localization of the remaining reactions in the cytosol and mitochondria. This implies that carbamoyl aspartate, an intermediate of this pathway, must be exported and precursors of pyrimidine salvage (i.e., nucleobases or nucleosides) are imported into plastids. A corresponding uracil transport activity could be measured in intact plastids isolated from cauliflower (Brassica oleracea) buds. PLUTO (for plastidic nucleobase transporter) was identified as a member of the Nucleobase:Cation-Symporter1 protein family from Arabidopsis thaliana, capable of transporting purine and pyrimidine nucleobases. A PLUTO green fluorescent protein fusion was shown to reside in the plastid envelope after expression in Arabidopsis protoplasts. Heterologous expression of PLUTO in an Escherichia coli mutant lacking the bacterial uracil permease uraA allowed a detailed biochemical characterization. PLUTO transports uracil, adenine, and guanine with apparent affinities of 16.4, 0.4, and 6.3 μM, respectively. Transport was markedly inhibited by low concentrations of a proton uncoupler, indicating that PLUTO functions as a proton-substrate symporter. Thus, a protein for the absolutely required import of pyrimidine nucleobases into plastids was identified.

  7. Fluorescent protein aided insights on plastids and their extensions: A critical appraisal.

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    Kathleen eDelfosse

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Multi-coloured fluorescent proteins targeted to plastids have provided new insights on the dynamic behaviour of these organelles and their interactions with other cytoplasmic components and compartments. Sub-plastidic components such as thylakoids, stroma, the inner and outer membranes of the plastid envelope, nucleoids, plastoglobuli and starch grains have been efficiently highlighted in living plant cells. In addition, stroma filled membrane extensions called stromules have drawn attention to the dynamic nature of the plastid and its interactions with the rest of the cell. Use of dual and triple fluorescent protein combinations has begun to reveal plastid interactions with mitochondria, the nucleus, the endoplasmic reticulum and F-actin and suggests integral roles of plastids in retrograde signalling, cell to cell communication as well as plant-pathogen interactions. While the rapid advances and insights achieved through fluorescent protein based research on plastids are commendable it is necessary to endorse meaningful observations but subject others to closer scrutiny. Here, in order to develop a better and more comprehensive understanding of plastids and their extensions we provide a critical appraisal of recent information that has been acquired using targeted fluorescent protein probes.

  8. Combined heat shock protein 90 and ribosomal RNA sequence phylogeny supports multiple replacements of dinoflagellate plastids.

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    Shalchian-Tabrizi, Kamran; Minge, Marianne A; Cavalier-Smith, Tom; Nedreklepp, Joachim M; Klaveness, Dag; Jakobsen, Kjetill S

    2006-01-01

    Dinoflagellates harbour diverse plastids obtained from several algal groups, including haptophytes, diatoms, cryptophytes, and prasinophytes. Their major plastid type with the accessory pigment peridinin is found in the vast majority of photosynthetic species. Some species of dinoflagellates have other aberrantly pigmented plastids. We sequenced the nuclear small subunit (SSU) ribosomal RNA (rRNA) gene of the "green" dinoflagellate Gymnodinium chlorophorum and show that it is sister to Lepidodinium viride, indicating that their common ancestor obtained the prasinophyte (or other green alga) plastid in one event. As the placement of dinoflagellate species that acquired green algal or haptophyte plastids is unclear from small and large subunit (LSU) rRNA trees, we tested the usefulness of the heat shock protein (Hsp) 90 gene for dinoflagellate phylogeny by sequencing it from four species with aberrant plastids (G. chlorophorum, Karlodinium micrum, Karenia brevis, and Karenia mikimotoi) plus Alexandrium tamarense, and constructing phylogenetic trees for Hsp90 and rRNAs, separately and together. Analyses of the Hsp90 and concatenated data suggest an ancestral origin of the peridinin-containing plastid, and two independent replacements of the peridinin plastid soon after the early radiation of the dinoflagellates. Thus, the Hsp90 gene seems to be a promising phylogenetic marker for dinoflagellate phylogeny.

  9. Proteomic amino-termini profiling reveals targeting information for protein import into complex plastids.

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    Pitter F Huesgen

    Full Text Available In organisms with complex plastids acquired by secondary endosymbiosis from a photosynthetic eukaryote, the majority of plastid proteins are nuclear-encoded, translated on cytoplasmic ribosomes, and guided across four membranes by a bipartite targeting sequence. In-depth understanding of this vital import process has been impeded by a lack of information about the transit peptide part of this sequence, which mediates transport across the inner three membranes. We determined the mature N-termini of hundreds of proteins from the model diatom Thalassiosira pseudonana, revealing extensive N-terminal modification by acetylation and proteolytic processing in both cytosol and plastid. We identified 63 mature N-termini of nucleus-encoded plastid proteins, deduced their complete transit peptide sequences, determined a consensus motif for their cleavage by the stromal processing peptidase, and found evidence for subsequent processing by a plastid methionine aminopeptidase. The cleavage motif differs from that of higher plants, but is shared with other eukaryotes with complex plastids.

  10. GUN1 Controls Accumulation of the Plastid Ribosomal Protein S1 at the Protein Level and Interacts with Proteins Involved in Plastid Protein Homeostasis.

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    Tadini, Luca; Pesaresi, Paolo; Kleine, Tatjana; Rossi, Fabio; Guljamow, Arthur; Sommer, Frederik; Mühlhaus, Timo; Schroda, Michael; Masiero, Simona; Pribil, Mathias; Rothbart, Maxi; Hedtke, Boris; Grimm, Bernhard; Leister, Dario

    2016-03-01

    Developmental or metabolic changes in chloroplasts can have profound effects on the rest of the plant cell. Such intracellular responses are associated with signals that originate in chloroplasts and convey information on their physiological status to the nucleus, which leads to large-scale changes in gene expression (retrograde signaling). A screen designed to identify components of retrograde signaling resulted in the discovery of the so-called genomes uncoupled (gun) mutants. Genetic evidence suggests that the chloroplast protein GUN1 integrates signals derived from perturbations in plastid redox state, plastid gene expression, and tetrapyrrole biosynthesis (TPB) in Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) seedlings, exerting biogenic control of chloroplast functions. However, the molecular mechanism by which GUN1 integrates retrograde signaling in the chloroplast is unclear. Here we show that GUN1 also operates in adult plants, contributing to operational control of chloroplasts. The gun1 mutation genetically interacts with mutations of genes for the chloroplast ribosomal proteins S1 (PRPS1) and L11. Analysis of gun1 prps1 lines indicates that GUN1 controls PRPS1 accumulation at the protein level. The GUN1 protein physically interacts with proteins involved in chloroplast protein homeostasis based on coimmunoprecipitation experiments. Furthermore, yeast two-hybrid and bimolecular fluorescence complementation experiments suggest that GUN1 might transiently interact with several TPB enzymes, including Mg-chelatase subunit D (CHLD) and two other TPB enzymes known to activate retrograde signaling. Moreover, the association of PRPS1 and CHLD with protein complexes is modulated by GUN1. These findings allow us to speculate that retrograde signaling might involve GUN1-dependent formation of protein complexes.

  11. Distinct pathways mediate the sorting of tail-anchored proteins to the plastid outer envelope.

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    Preetinder K Dhanoa

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Tail-anchored (TA proteins are a distinct class of membrane proteins that are sorted post-translationally to various organelles and function in a number of important cellular processes, including redox reactions, vesicular trafficking and protein translocation. While the molecular targeting signals and pathways responsible for sorting TA proteins to their correct intracellular destinations in yeasts and mammals have begun to be characterized, relatively little is known about TA protein biogenesis in plant cells, especially for those sorted to the plastid outer envelope. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Here we investigated the biogenesis of three plastid TA proteins, including the 33-kDa and 34-kDa GTPases of the translocon at the outer envelope of chloroplasts (Toc33 and Toc34 and a novel 9-kDa protein of unknown function that we define here as an outer envelope TA protein (OEP9. Using a combination of in vivo and in vitro assays we show that OEP9 utilizes a different sorting pathway than that used by Toc33 and Toc34. For instance, while all three TA proteins interact with the cytosolic OEP chaperone/receptor, AKR2A, the plastid targeting information within OEP9 is distinct from that within Toc33 and Toc34. Toc33 and Toc34 also appear to differ from OEP9 in that their insertion is dependent on themselves and the unique lipid composition of the plastid outer envelope. By contrast, the insertion of OEP9 into the plastid outer envelope occurs in a proteinaceous-dependent, but Toc33/34-independent manner and membrane lipids appear to serve primarily to facilitate normal thermodynamic integration of this TA protein. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Collectively, the results provide evidence in support of at least two sorting pathways for plastid TA outer envelope proteins and shed light on not only the complex diversity of pathways involved in the targeting and insertion of proteins into plastids, but also the molecular mechanisms that underlie

  12. Accelerated evolution of functional plastid rRNA and elongation factor genes due to reduced protein synthetic load after the loss of photosynthesis in the chlorophyte alga Polytoma.

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    Vernon, D; Gutell, R R; Cannone, J J; Rumpf, R W; Birky, C W

    2001-09-01

    Polytoma obtusum and Polytoma uvella are members of a clade of nonphotosynthetic chlorophyte algae closely related to Chlamydomonas humicola and other photosynthetic members of the Chlamydomonadaceae. Descended from a nonphotosynthetic mutant, these obligate heterotrophs retain a plastid (leucoplast) with a functional protein synthetic system, and a plastid genome (lpDNA) with functional genes encoding proteins required for transcription and translation. Comparative studies of the evolution of genes in chloroplasts and leucoplasts can identify modes of selection acting on the plastid genome. Two plastid genes--rrn16, encoding the plastid small-subunit rRNA, and tufA, encoding elongation factor Tu--retain their functions in protein synthesis after the loss of photosynthesis in two nonphotosynthetic Polytoma clades but show a substantially accelerated rate of base substitution in the P. uvella clade. The accelerated evolution of tufA is due, at least partly, to relaxed codon bias favoring codons that can be read without wobble, mainly in three amino acids. Selection for these codons may be relaxed because leucoplasts are required to synthesize fewer protein molecules per unit time than are chloroplasts (reduced protein synthetic load) and thus require a lower rate of synthesis of elongation factor Tu. Relaxed selection due to a lower protein synthetic load is also a plausible explanation for the accelerated rate of evolution of rrn16, but the available data are insufficient to test the hypothesis for this gene. The tufA and rrn16 genes in Polytoma oviforme, the sole member of a second nonphotosynthetic clade, are also functional but show no sign of relaxed selection.

  13. Plant plastid engineering.

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    Wani, Shabir H; Haider, Nadia; Kumar, Hitesh; Singh, N B

    2010-11-01

    Genetic material in plants is distributed into nucleus, plastids and mitochondria. Plastid has a central role of carrying out photosynthesis in plant cells. Plastid transformation is becoming more popular and an alternative to nuclear gene transformation because of various advantages like high protein levels, the feasibility of expressing multiple proteins from polycistronic mRNAs, and gene containment through the lack of pollen transmission. Recently, much progress in plastid engineering has been made. In addition to model plant tobacco, many transplastomic crop plants have been generated which possess higher resistance to biotic and abiotic stresses and molecular pharming. In this mini review, we will discuss the features of the plastid DNA and advantages of plastid transformation. We will also present some examples of transplastomic plants developed so far through plastid engineering, and the various applications of plastid transformation.

  14. A truncated hepatitis E virus ORF2 protein expressed in tobacco plastids is immunogenic in mice

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    Yuan-Xiang Zhou; Maggie Yuk-Ting Lee; James Ming-Him Ng; Mee-Len Chye; Wing-Kin Yip; Sze-Yong Zee; Eric Lam

    2006-01-01

    AIM: To cost-effectively express the 23-ku pE2, the most promising subunit vaccine encoded by the E2fragment comprising of the 3'-portion of hepatitis E virus (HEV) open reading frame 2 (ORF2) in plastids of tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum cv. SR1), to investigate the transgene expression and pE2 accumulation in plastids,and to evaluate the antigenic effect of the plastid-derived pE2 in mice.METHODS: Plastid-targeting vector pRB94-E2containing the E2 fragment driven by rice psbA promoter was constructed. Upon delivery into tobacco plastids,this construct could initiate homologous recombination in psaB-trnfM and trnG-psbC fragments in plastid genome, and result in transgene inserted between the two fragments. The pRB94-E2 was delivered with a biolistic particle bombardment method, and the plastid-transformed plants were obtained following the regeneration .of the bombarded leaf tissues on a spectinomycin-supplemented medium. Transplastomic status of the regenerated plants was confirmed by PCR and Southern blot analysis, transgene expression was investigated by Northern blot analysis, and accumulation of pE2 was measured by ELISA. Furthermore, protein extracts were used to immunize mice, and the presence of the pE2-reactive antibodies in serum samples of the immunized mice was studied by ELISA.RESULTS: Transplastomic lines confirmed by PCR and Southern blot analysis could actively transcribe the E2 mRNA. The pE2 polypeptide was accumulated to a level as high as 13.27 μg/g fresh leaves. The pE2 could stimulate the immunized mice to generate pE2-specific antibodies.CONCLUSION: HEV-E2 fragment can be inserted into the plastid genome and the recombinant pE2 antigen derived is antigenic in mice. Hence, plastids may be a novel source for cost-effective production of HEV vaccines.

  15. Stable Plastid Transformation for High-Level Recombinant Protein Expression: Promises and Challenges

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    Meili Gao

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Plants are a promising expression system for the production of recombinant proteins. However, low protein productivity remains a major obstacle that limits extensive commercialization of whole plant and plant cell bioproduction platform. Plastid genetic engineering offers several advantages, including high levels of transgenic expression, transgenic containment via maternal inheritance, and multigene expression in a single transformation event. In recent years, the development of optimized expression strategies has given a huge boost to the exploitation of plastids in molecular farming. The driving forces behind the high expression level of plastid bioreactors include codon optimization, promoters and UTRs, genotypic modifications, endogenous enhancer and regulatory elements, posttranslational modification, and proteolysis. Exciting progress of the high expression level has been made with the plastid-based production of two particularly important classes of pharmaceuticals: vaccine antigens, therapeutic proteins, and antibiotics and enzymes. Approaches to overcome and solve the associated challenges of this culture system that include low transformation frequencies, the formation of inclusion bodies, and purification of recombinant proteins will also be discussed.

  16. Intra-plastid protein trafficking; how plant cells adapted prokaryotic mechanisms to the eukaryotic condition

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    Celedon, Jose M.; Cline, Kenneth

    2012-01-01

    Protein trafficking and localization in plastids involves a complex interplay between ancient (prokaryotic) and novel (eukaryotic) translocases and targeting machineries. During evolution, ancient systems acquired new functions and novel translocation machineries were developed to facilitate the correct localization of nuclear encoded proteins targeted to the chloroplast. Because of its post-translational nature, targeting and integration of membrane proteins posed the biggest challenge to th...

  17. Intra-plastid protein trafficking; how plant cells adapted prokaryotic mechanisms to the eukaryotic condition

    OpenAIRE

    Celedon, Jose M.; Cline, Kenneth

    2012-01-01

    Protein trafficking and localization in plastids involves a complex interplay between ancient (prokaryotic) and novel (eukaryotic) translocases and targeting machineries. During evolution, ancient systems acquired new functions and novel translocation machineries were developed to facilitate the correct localization of nuclear encoded proteins targeted to the chloroplast. Because of its post-translational nature, targeting and integration of membrane proteins posed the biggest challenge to th...

  18. Protein synthesis in chloroplasts. Characteristics and products of protein synthesis in vitro in etioplasts and developing chloroplasts from pea leaves.

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    Siddell, S G; Ellis, R J

    1975-01-01

    The function of plastid ribosomes in pea (Pisum sativum L.) was investigated by characterizing the products of protein synthesis in vitro in plastids isolated at different stages during the transition from etioplast to chloroplast. Etioplasts and plastids isolated after 24, 48 and 96h of greening in continuous white light, use added ATP to incorporate labelled amino acids into protein. Plastids isolated from greening leaves can also use light as the source of energy for protein synthesis. The labelled polypeptides synthesized in isolated plastids were analysed by electrophoresis in sodium dodecyl sulphate-ureapolyacrylamide gels. Six polypeptides are synthesized in etioplasts with ATP as energy source. Only one of these polypeptides is present in a 150 000g supernatant fraction. This polypeptide has been identified as the large subunit of Fraction I protein (3-phospho-D-glycerate carboxylyase EC 4.1.1.39) by comparing the tryptic 'map' of its L-(35S)methionine-labelled peptides with the tryptic 'map' of large subunit peptides from Fraction I labelled with L-(35S)methionine in vivo. The same gel pattern of six polypeptides is seen when plastids isolated from greening leaves are incubated with either added ATP or light as the energy source. However, the rates of synthesis of particular polypeptides are different in plastids isolated at different stages of the etioplast to chloroplast transition. The results support the idea that plastid ribosomes synthesize only a small number of proteins, and that the number and molecular weight of these proteins does not alter during the formation of chloroplasts from etioplasts. Images PLATE 1 PMID:1147911

  19. Massively convergent evolution for ribosomal protein gene content in plastid and mitochondrial genomes.

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    Maier, Uwe-G; Zauner, Stefan; Woehle, Christian; Bolte, Kathrin; Hempel, Franziska; Allen, John F; Martin, William F

    2013-01-01

    Plastid and mitochondrial genomes have undergone parallel evolution to encode the same functional set of genes. These encode conserved protein components of the electron transport chain in their respective bioenergetic membranes and genes for the ribosomes that express them. This highly convergent aspect of organelle genome evolution is partly explained by the redox regulation hypothesis, which predicts a separate plastid or mitochondrial location for genes encoding bioenergetic membrane proteins of either photosynthesis or respiration. Here we show that convergence in organelle genome evolution is far stronger than previously recognized, because the same set of genes for ribosomal proteins is independently retained by both plastid and mitochondrial genomes. A hitherto unrecognized selective pressure retains genes for the same ribosomal proteins in both organelles. On the Escherichia coli ribosome assembly map, the retained proteins are implicated in 30S and 50S ribosomal subunit assembly and initial rRNA binding. We suggest that ribosomal assembly imposes functional constraints that govern the retention of ribosomal protein coding genes in organelles. These constraints are subordinate to redox regulation for electron transport chain components, which anchor the ribosome to the organelle genome in the first place. As organelle genomes undergo reduction, the rRNAs also become smaller. Below size thresholds of approximately 1,300 nucleotides (16S rRNA) and 2,100 nucleotides (26S rRNA), all ribosomal protein coding genes are lost from organelles, while electron transport chain components remain organelle encoded as long as the organelles use redox chemistry to generate a proton motive force.

  20. Plastid proteomics for elucidating iron limited remodeling of plastid physiology in diatoms

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    Gomes, K. M.; Nunn, B. L.; Jenkins, B. D.

    2016-02-01

    Diatoms are important primary producers in the world's oceans and their growth is constrained in large regions by low iron availability. This low iron-induced limitation of primary production is due to the requirement for iron in components of essential metabolic pathways including key chloroplast functions such as photosynthesis and nitrate assimilation. Diatoms can bloom and accumulate high biomass during introduction of iron into low iron waters, indicating adaptations allowing for their survival in iron-limited waters and rapid growth when iron becomes more abundant. Prior studies have shown that under iron limited stress, diatoms alter plastid-specific processes including components of electron transport, size of light harvesting capacity and chlorophyll content, suggesting plastid-specific protein regulation. Due to their complex evolutionary history, resulting from a secondary endosymbiosis, knowledge regarding the complement of plastid localized proteins remains limited in comparison to other model photosynthetic organisms. While in-silico prediction of diatom protein localization provides putative candidates for plastid-localization, these analyses can be limited as most plastid prediction models were developed using plants, primary endosymbionts. In order to characterize proteins enriched in diatom chloroplast and to understand how the plastid proteome is remodeled in response to iron limitation, we used mass spectrometry based proteomics to compare plastid- enriched protein fractions from Thalassiosira pseudonana, grown in iron replete and limited conditions. These analyses show that iron stress alters regulation of major metabolic pathways in the plastid including the Calvin cycle and fatty acid synthesis. These components provide promising targets to further characterize the plastid specific response to iron limitation.

  1. Intra-plastid protein trafficking: how plant cells adapted prokaryotic mechanisms to the eukaryotic condition.

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    Celedon, Jose M; Cline, Kenneth

    2013-02-01

    Protein trafficking and localization in plastids involve a complex interplay between ancient (prokaryotic) and novel (eukaryotic) translocases and targeting machineries. During evolution, ancient systems acquired new functions and novel translocation machineries were developed to facilitate the correct localization of nuclear encoded proteins targeted to the chloroplast. Because of its post-translational nature, targeting and integration of membrane proteins posed the biggest challenge to the organelle to avoid aggregation in the aqueous compartments. Soluble proteins faced a different kind of problem since some had to be transported across three membranes to reach their destination. Early studies suggested that chloroplasts addressed these issues by adapting ancient-prokaryotic machineries and integrating them with novel-eukaryotic systems, a process called 'conservative sorting'. In the last decade, detailed biochemical, genetic, and structural studies have unraveled the mechanisms of protein targeting and localization in chloroplasts, suggesting a highly integrated scheme where ancient and novel systems collaborate at different stages of the process. In this review we focus on the differences and similarities between chloroplast ancestral translocases and their prokaryotic relatives to highlight known modifications that adapted them to the eukaryotic situation. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Protein Import and Quality Control in Mitochondria and Plastids.

  2. Evidence for a Contribution of ALA Synthesis to Plastid-To-Nucleus Signaling

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    Czarnecki, Olaf; Gläßer, Christine; Chen, Jin-Gui; Mayer, Klaus F. X.; Grimm, Bernhard

    2012-01-01

    The formation of 5-aminolevulinic acid (ALA) in tetrapyrrole biosynthesis is widely controlled by environmental and metabolic feedback cues that determine the influx into the entire metabolic path. Because of its central role as the rate-limiting step, we hypothesized a potential role of ALA biosynthesis in tetrapyrrole-mediated retrograde signaling and exploited the direct impact of ALA biosynthesis on nuclear gene expression (NGE) by using two different approaches. Firstly, the Arabidopsis gun1, hy1 (gun2), hy2 (gun3), gun4 mutants showing uncoupled NGE from the physiological state of chloroplasts were thoroughly examined for regulatory modifications of ALA synthesis and transcriptional control in the nucleus. We found that reduced ALA-synthesizing capacity is common to analyzed gun mutants. Inhibition of ALA synthesis by gabaculine (GAB) that inactivates glutamate-1-semialdehyde aminotransferase and ALA feeding of wild-type and mutant seedlings corroborate the expression data of gun mutants. Transcript level of photosynthetic marker genes were enhanced in norflurazon (NF)-treated seedlings upon additional GAB treatment, while enhanced ALA amounts diminish these RNA levels in NF-treated wild-type in comparison to the solely NF-treated seedlings. Secondly, the impact of posttranslationally down-regulated ALA synthesis on NGE was investigated by global transcriptome analysis of GAB-treated Arabidopsis seedlings and the gun4-1 mutant, which is also characterized by reduced ALA formation. A common set of significantly modulated genes was identified indicating ALA synthesis as a potential signal emitter. The over-represented gene ontology categories of genes with decreased or increased transcript abundance highlight a few biological processes and cellular functions, which are remarkably affected in response to plastid-localized ALA biosynthesis. These results support the hypothesis that ALA biosynthesis correlates with retrograde signaling-mediated control of NGE.

  3. Evidence for a Contribution of ALA Synthesis to Plastid-To-Nucleus Signalling

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    Olaf eCzarnecki

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available The formation of 5-aminolevulinic acid (ALA in tetrapyrrole biosynthesis is widely controlled by environmental and metabolic feedback cues that determine the influx into the entire metabolic path. Because of its central role as the rate-limiting step, we hypothesised a potential role of ALA biosynthesis in tetrapyrrole-mediated retrograde signalling and exploited the direct impact of ALA biosynthesis on nuclear gene expression (NGE by using two different approaches. Firstly, the Arabidopsis gun1, hy1 (gun2, hy2 (gun3, gun4 mutants showing uncoupled NGE from the physiological state of chloroplasts were thoroughly examined for regulatory modifications of ALA synthesis and transcriptional control in the nucleus. We found that reduced ALA-synthesising capacity is common to analysed gun mutants. Inhibition of ALA synthesis by gabaculine (GAB that inactivates glutamate-1-semialdhyde aminotransferase and ALA feeding of wild-type and mutant seedlings corroborate the expression data of gun mutants. Transcript level of photosynthetic marker genes were enhanced in norflurazon (NF-treated seedlings upon additional GAB treatment, while enhanced ALA amounts diminish these RNA levels in NF-treated wild-type in comparison to the solely NF-treated seedlings. Secondly, the impact of posttranslationally down-regulated ALA synthesis on NGE was investigated by global transcriptome analysis of GAB-treated Arabidopsis seedlings and the gun4-1 mutant, which is also characterized by reduced ALA formation. A common set of significantly modulated genes was identified indicating ALA synthesis as a potential signal emitter. The overrepresented gene ontology categories of genes with decreased or increased transcript abundance highlight a few biological processes and cellular functions, which are remarkably affected in response to plastid-localised ALA biosynthesis. These results support the hypothesis that ALA biosynthesis correlates with retrograde signalling

  4. Split photosystem protein, linear-mapping topology, and growth of structural complexity in the plastid genome of chromera velia

    KAUST Repository

    Janouškovec, Jan

    2013-08-22

    The canonical photosynthetic plastid genomes consist of a single circular-mapping chromosome that encodes a highly conserved protein core, involved in photosynthesis and ATP generation. Here, we demonstrate that the plastid genome of the photosynthetic relative of apicomplexans, Chromera velia, departs from this view in several unique ways. Core photosynthesis proteins PsaA and AtpB have been broken into two fragments, which we show are independently transcribed, oligoU-tailed, translated, and assembled into functional photosystem I and ATP synthase complexes. Genome-wide transcription profiles support expression of many other highly modified proteins, including several that contain extensions amounting to hundreds of amino acids in length. Canonical gene clusters and operons have been fragmented and reshuffled into novel putative transcriptional units. Massive genomic coverage by paired-end reads, coupled with pulsed-field gel electrophoresis and polymerase chain reaction, consistently indicate that the C. velia plastid genome is linear-mapping, a unique state among all plastids. Abundant intragenomic duplication probably mediated by recombination can explain protein splits, extensions, and genome linearization and is perhaps the key driving force behind the many features that defy the conventional ways of plastid genome architecture and function. © The Author 2013.

  5. Role of the C-terminal extension peptide of plastid located glutamine synthetase from Medicago truncatula: Crucial for enzyme activity and needless for protein import into the plastids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferreira, Maria João; Vale, Diogo; Cunha, Luis; Melo, Paula

    2017-02-01

    Glutamine synthetase (GS), a key enzyme in plant nitrogen metabolism, is encoded by a small family of highly homologous nuclear genes that produce cytosolic (GS1) and plastidic (GS2) isoforms. Compared to GS1, GS2 proteins have two extension peptides, one at the N- and the other at the C-terminus, which show a high degree of conservation among plant species. It has long been known that the N-terminal peptide acts as a transit peptide, targeting the protein to the plastids however, the function of the C-terminal extension is still unknown. To investigate whether the C-terminal extension influences the activity of the enzyme, we produced a C-terminal truncated version of Medicago truncatula GS2a in Escherechia coli and studied its catalytic properties. The activity of the truncated protein was found to be lower than that of MtGS2a and with less affinity for glutamate. The importance of the C-terminal extension for the protein import into the chloroplast was also assessed by transient expression of fluorescently-tagged MtGS2a truncated at the C-terminus, which was correctly detected in the chloroplast. The results obtained in this work demonstrate that the C-terminal extension of M. truncatula GS2a is important for the activity of the enzyme and does not contain crucial information for the import process.

  6. The SUFBC2 D complex is required for the biogenesis of all major classes of plastid Fe-S proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Xueyun; Kato, Yukako; Sumida, Akihiro; Tanaka, Ayumi; Tanaka, Ryouichi

    2017-04-01

    Iron-sulfur (Fe-S) proteins play crucial roles in plastids, participating in photosynthesis and other metabolic pathways. Fe-S clusters are thought to be assembled on a scaffold complex composed of SUFB, SUFC and SUFD proteins. However, several additional proteins provide putative scaffold functions in plastids, and, therefore, the contribution of SUFB, C and D proteins to overall Fe-S assembly still remains unclear. In order to gain insights regarding Fe-S cluster biosynthesis in plastids, we analyzed the complex composed of SUFB, C and D in Arabidopsis by blue native-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. Using this approach, a major complex of 170 kDa containing all subunits was detected, indicating that these proteins constitute a SUFBC2 D complex similar to their well characterized bacterial counterparts. The functional effects of SUFB, SUFC or SUFD depletion were analyzed using an inducible RNAi silencing system to specifically target the aforementioned components; resulting in a decrease of various plastidic Fe-S proteins including the PsaA/B and PsaC subunits of photosystem I, ferredoxin and glutamine oxoglutarate aminotransferase. In contrast, the knockout of potential Fe-S scaffold proteins, NFU2 and HCF101, resulted in a specific decrease in the PsaA/B and PsaC levels. These results indicate that the functions of SUFB, SUFC and SUFD for Fe-S cluster biosynthesis cannot be replaced by other scaffold proteins and that SUFBC2 D, NFU2 and HCF101 are involved in the same pathway for the biogenesis of PSI. Taken together, our results provide in vivo evidence supporting the hypothesis that SUFBC2 D is the major, and possibly sole scaffold in plastids.

  7. Expression of the plastid-located glutamine synthetase of Medicago truncatula. Accumulation of the precursor in root nodules reveals an in vivo control at the level of protein import into plastids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Melo, Paula M; Lima, Lígia M; Santos, Isabel M; Carvalho, Helena G; Cullimore, Julie V

    2003-05-01

    In this paper, we report the cloning and characterization of the plastid-located glutamine synthetase (GS) of Medicago truncatula Gaertn (MtGS2). A cDNA was isolated encoding a GS2 precursor polypeptide of 428 amino acids composing an N-terminal transit peptide of 49 amino acids. Expression analysis, by Westerns and by northern hybridization, revealed that MtGS2 is expressed in both photosynthetic and non-photosynthetic organs. Both transcripts and proteins of MtGS2 were detected in substantial amounts in root nodules, suggesting that the enzyme might be performing some important role in this organ. Surprisingly, about 40% of the plastid GS in nodules occurred in the non-processed precursor form (preGS2). This precursor was not detected in any other organ studied and moreover was not observed in non-fixing nodules. Cellular fractionation of nodule extracts revealed that preGS2 is associated with the plastids and that it is catalytically inactive. Immunogold electron microscopy revealed a frequent coincidence of GS with the plastid envelope. Taken together, these results suggest a nodule-specific accumulation of the GS2 precursor at the surface of the plastids in nitrogen-fixing nodules. These results may reflect a regulation of GS2 activity in relation to nitrogen fixation at the level of protein import into nodule plastids.

  8. Changes in Plastid and Mitochondria Protein Expression in Arabidopsis Thaliana Callus on Board Chinese Spacecraft SZ-8

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yue; Zheng, Hui Qiong

    2015-11-01

    Microgravity represents an adverse abiotic environment, which causes rearrangements in cellular organelles and changes in the energy metabolism of cells. Plastids and mitochondria are two subcellular energy organelles that are responsible for major metabolic processes, including photosynthesis, oxidative phosphorylation, ß-oxidation, and the tricarboxylic acid cycle. In our previous study performed on board the Chinese spacecraft SZ-8, we evaluated the global changes exerted by microgravity on the proteome of Arabidopsis thaliana cell cultures by comparing the microgravity-exposed samples with the controls either under 1 g centrifugation in space or 1 g ground conditions. Here, we report additional data from this space experiment that highlights the plastid and mitochondria proteins that responded to space flight conditions. We observed that 43 plastidial proteins and 50 mitochondrial proteins changed their abundances under microgravity in space. The major changes in both plastids and mitochondria involved proteins that functions in a suite of redox antioxidant and metabolic pathways. These results suggested that these antioxidant and metabolic changes in plastids and mitochondria could be important components of the adaptive strategy in plants subjected to microgravity in space.

  9. [Origination and evolution of plastids].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mukhina, V S

    2014-01-01

    Plastids are photosynthetic DNA-containing organelles of plants and algae. In the review, the history of their origination and evolution within different taxa is considered. All of the plastids appear to be descendants of cyanobacteria that colonized eukaryotic cells. The first plastids arose through symbiosis of cyanobacteria with algal ancestors from Archaeplastida kingdom. Later, there occurred repeated secondary symbioses of other eukariotes with photosynthetic protists: in this way plastids emerged in organisms of other taxa. Co-evolution of cyanobacteria and ancestral algae led to extensive transformation of both: reduction of endosymbiont, mass transfer of cyanobacteria genes into karyogenome, formation of complex system of proteins transportation to plastids and their functioning regulation.

  10. Plastidic phosphoglucomutase and ADP-glucose pyrophosphorylase mutants impair starch synthesis in rice pollen grains and cause male sterility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Sang-Kyu; Eom, Joon-Seob; Hwang, Seon-Kap; Shin, Dongjin; An, Gynheung; Okita, Thomas W; Jeon, Jong-Seong

    2016-10-01

    To elucidate the starch synthesis pathway and the role of this reserve in rice pollen, we characterized mutations in the plastidic phosphoglucomutase, OspPGM, and the plastidic large subunit of ADP-glucose (ADP-Glc) pyrophosphorylase, OsAGPL4 Both genes were up-regulated in maturing pollen, a stage when starch begins to accumulate. Progeny analysis of self-pollinated heterozygous lines carrying the OspPGM mutant alleles, osppgm-1 and osppgm-2, or the OsAGPL4 mutant allele, osagpl4-1, as well as reciprocal crosses between the wild type (WT) and heterozygotes revealed that loss of OspPGM or OsAGPL4 caused male sterility, with the former condition rescued by the introduction of the WT OspPGM gene. While iodine staining and transmission electron microscopy analyses of pollen grains from homozygous osppgm-1 lines produced by anther culture confirmed the starch null phenotype, pollen from homozygous osagpl4 mutant lines, osagpl4-2 and osagpl4-3, generated by the CRISPR/Cas system, accumulated small amounts of starch which were sufficient to produce viable seed. Such osagpl4 mutant pollen, however, was unable to compete against WT pollen successfully, validating the important role of this reserve in fertilization. Our results demonstrate that starch is mainly polymerized from ADP-Glc synthesized from plastidic hexose phosphates in rice pollen and that starch is an essential requirement for successful fertilization in rice.

  11. Intra-plastid protein trafficking; how plant cells adapted prokaryotic mechanisms to the eukaryotic condition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Celedon, Jose M.; Cline, Kenneth

    2012-01-01

    Protein trafficking and localization in plastids involves a complex interplay between ancient (prokaryotic) and novel (eukaryotic) translocases and targeting machineries. During evolution, ancient systems acquired new functions and novel translocation machineries were developed to facilitate the correct localization of nuclear encoded proteins targeted to the chloroplast. Because of its post-translational nature, targeting and integration of membrane proteins posed the biggest challenge to the organelle to avoid aggregation in the aqueous compartments. Soluble proteins faced a different kind of problem since some had to be transported across three membranes to reach their destination. Early studies suggested that chloroplasts addressed these issues by adapting ancient-prokaryotic machineries and integrating them with novel-eukaryotic systems, a process called ‘conservative sorting’. In the last decade, detailed biochemical, genetic, and structural studies have unraveled the mechanisms of protein targeting and localization in chloroplasts, suggesting a highly integrated scheme where ancient and novel systems collaborate at different stages of the process. In this review we focus on the differences and similarities between chloroplast ancestral translocases and their prokaryotic relatives to highlight known modifications that adapted them to the eukaryotic situation. PMID:22750312

  12. Different spectrum of Arabidopsis CHLH/GUN5 protein functions in tetrapyrrole metabolism, plastid signaling and ABA responses in guard cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Harue Ibata

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Expression of Photosynthesis-Associated Nuclear Genes (PhANGs is controlled by environmental stimuli and plastid-derived signals (plastid signals transmitting the developmental and functional status of plastids to the nucleus. Arabidopsis genomes uncoupled (gun mutants exhibit defects in plastid signaling, leading to ectopic expression of PhANGs in the absence of chloroplast development. GUN5 encodes the plastid-localized Mg-chelatase enzyme subunit (CHLH, and recent studies suggest that CHLH is a multifunctional protein involved in tetrapyrrole biosynthesis, plastid signaling and ABA responses in guard cells. To understand the basis of CHLH multifunctionality, we investigated fifteen gun5 missense mutant alleles and transgenic lines expressing a series of truncated CHLH proteins in a severe gun5 allele (cch background (tCHLHs, ten different versions. Here, we show that Mg-chelatase function and plastid signaling are generally correlated; in contrast, based on the analysis of the gun5 missense mutant alleles, ABA-regulated stomatal control is distinct from these two other functions. We found that none of the tCHLHs could restore plastid-signaling or Mg-chelatase functions. Additionally, we found that both the C-terminal half and N-terminal half of CHLH function in ABA-induced stomatal movement.

  13. Analysis of essential Arabidopsis nuclear genes encoding plastid-targeted proteins.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Linda J Savage

    Full Text Available The Chloroplast 2010 Project (http://www.plastid.msu.edu/ identified and phenotypically characterized homozygous mutants in over three thousand genes, the majority of which encode plastid-targeted proteins. Despite extensive screening by the community, no homozygous mutant alleles were available for several hundred genes, suggesting that these might be enriched for genes of essential function. Attempts were made to generate homozygotes in ~1200 of these lines and 521 of the homozygous viable lines obtained were deposited in the Arabidopsis Biological Resource Center (http://abrc.osu.edu/. Lines that did not yield a homozygote in soil were tested as potentially homozygous lethal due to defects either in seed or seedling development. Mutants were characterized at four stages of development: developing seed, mature seed, at germination, and developing seedlings. To distinguish seed development or seed pigment-defective mutants from seedling development mutants, development of seeds was assayed in siliques from heterozygous plants. Segregating seeds from heterozygous parents were sown on supplemented media in an attempt to rescue homozygous seedlings that could not germinate or survive in soil. Growth of segregating seeds in air and air enriched to 0.3% carbon dioxide was compared to discover mutants potentially impaired in photorespiration or otherwise responsive to CO2 supplementation. Chlorophyll fluorescence measurements identified CO2-responsive mutants with altered photosynthetic parameters. Examples of genes with a viable mutant allele and one or more putative homozygous-lethal alleles were documented. RT-PCR of homozygotes for potentially weak alleles revealed that essential genes may remain undiscovered because of the lack of a true null mutant allele. This work revealed 33 genes with two or more lethal alleles and 73 genes whose essentiality was not confirmed with an independent lethal mutation, although in some cases second leaky alleles

  14. Light regulation to chlorophyll synthesis and plastid development of the chlorophyll-less golden-leaf privet.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuan, Ming; Xu, Mo-Yun; Yuan, Shu; Chen, Yang-Er; Du, Jun-Bo; Xu, Fei; Zhang, Zhong-Wei; Guo, Zi-Chan; Zhao, Zhong-Yi; Lin, Hong-Hui

    2010-09-01

    Ligustrum vicaryi L. is a hybrid of Ligustrum ovalifolium Hassk. var. aureo-marginatum and Ligustrum vulgale L., and displays a chlorophyll-less phenotype. Therefore it is widely used as a horticultural shrub because of its golden-color leaves. Its putative mechanism, light responses, chlorophyll synthesis and plastid development were studied. L. vicaryi has a higher level of 5-aminolevulinic acid (ALA), but lower levels of chlorophylls compared with L. quihoui. The yellowish phenotype of L. vicaryi upper leaves could be attributed to their hampered conversion from chlorophyllide into chlorophyll a. Despite the enhanced ALA level and the decreased thylakoid stacking in plastids, L. vicaryi golden leaves contain normal levels of Lhcb transcripts and photosystem apoproteins. Furthermore, reactive oxygen species (ROS) accumulation is almost the same in L. vicaryi and L. quihoui. The golden leaves often turn green and the contents of chlorophylls increase with decreasing light intensity. Dynamic changes of chlorophyll-synthesis-system under the light transition were also analyzed.

  15. Influence of kinetin on storage protein mobilization and ultrastructure of plastids in excised lupine cotyledons grown in darkness

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marlena Jakubek

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Storage protein disappeared first from the peripheral and later from central parts of the lupine cotyledon. Kinetin (500 μM stimulated this process; its effect was most prominent after longer times of incubation. In plastids large, crystalline prolamellar bodies were observed. They some-times split into smaller parts during the course of the experiment, especially in the kinetin-treated material. Kinetin in darkness did not stimulate formation of thylakoid membranes (neither grana nor primary lamellae.

  16. Plastid genomics in horticultural species: importance and applications for plant population genetics, evolution, and biotechnology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rogalski, Marcelo; do Nascimento Vieira, Leila; Fraga, Hugo P.; Guerra, Miguel P.

    2015-01-01

    During the evolution of the eukaryotic cell, plastids, and mitochondria arose from an endosymbiotic process, which determined the presence of three genetic compartments into the incipient plant cell. After that, these three genetic materials from host and symbiont suffered several rearrangements, bringing on a complex interaction between nuclear and organellar gene products. Nowadays, plastids harbor a small genome with ∼130 genes in a 100–220 kb sequence in higher plants. Plastid genes are mostly highly conserved between plant species, being useful for phylogenetic analysis in higher taxa. However, intergenic spacers have a relatively higher mutation rate and are important markers to phylogeographical and plant population genetics analyses. The predominant uniparental inheritance of plastids is like a highly desirable feature for phylogeny studies. Moreover, the gene content and genome rearrangements are efficient tools to capture and understand evolutionary events between different plant species. Currently, genetic engineering of the plastid genome (plastome) offers a number of attractive advantages as high-level of foreign protein expression, marker gene excision, gene expression in operon and transgene containment because of maternal inheritance of plastid genome in most crops. Therefore, plastid genome can be used for adding new characteristics related to synthesis of metabolic compounds, biopharmaceutical, and tolerance to biotic and abiotic stresses. Here, we describe the importance and applications of plastid genome as tools for genetic and evolutionary studies, and plastid transformation focusing on increasing the performance of horticultural species in the field. PMID:26284102

  17. Ycf93 (Orf105, a small apicoplast-encoded membrane protein in the relict plastid of the malaria parasite Plasmodium falciparum that is conserved in Apicomplexa.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christopher D Goodman

    Full Text Available Malaria parasites retain a relict plastid (apicoplast from a photosynthetic ancestor shared with dinoflagellate algae. The apicoplast is a useful drug target; blocking housekeeping pathways such as genome replication and translation in the organelle kills parasites and protects against malaria. The apicoplast of Plasmodium falciparum encodes 30 proteins and a suite of rRNAs and tRNAs that facilitate their expression. orf105 is a hypothetical apicoplast gene that would encode a small protein (PfOrf105 with a predicted C-terminal transmembrane domain. We produced antisera to a predicted peptide within PfOrf105. Western blot analysis confirmed expression of orf105 and immunofluorescence localised the gene product to the apicoplast. Pforf105 encodes a membrane protein that has an apparent mass of 17.5 kDa and undergoes substantial turnover during the 48-hour asexual life cycle of the parasite in blood stages. The effect of actinonin, an antimalarial with a putative impact on post-translational modification of apicoplast proteins like PfOrf105, was examined. Unlike other drugs perturbing apicoplast housekeeping that induce delayed death, actinonin kills parasites immediately and has an identical drug exposure phenotype to the isopentenyl diphosphate synthesis blocker fosmidomycin. Open reading frames of similar size to PfOrf105, which also have predicted C-terminal trans membrane domains, occur in syntenic positions in all sequenced apicoplast genomes from Phylum Apicomplexa. We therefore propose to name these genes ycf93 (hypothetical chloroplast reading frame 93 according to plastid gene nomenclature convention for conserved proteins of unknown function.

  18. Evolutionary aspects of plastid proteins involved in transcription: the transcription of a tiny genome is mediated by a complicated machinery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yagi, Yusuke; Shiina, Takashi

    2012-01-01

    Chloroplasts in land plants have a small genome consisting of only 100 genes encoding partial sets of proteins for photosynthesis, transcription and translation. Although it has been thought that chloroplast transcription is mediated by a basically cyanobacterium-derived system, due to the endosymbiotic origin of plastids, recent studies suggest the existence of a hybrid transcription machinery containing non-bacterial proteins that have been newly acquired during plant evolution. Here, we highlight chloroplast-specific non-bacterial transcription mechanisms by which land plant chloroplasts have gained novel functions.

  19. Investigating the production of foreign membrane proteins in tobacco chloroplasts: expression of an algal plastid terminal oxidase.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Niaz Ahmad

    Full Text Available Chloroplast transformation provides an inexpensive, easily scalable production platform for expression of recombinant proteins in plants. However, this technology has been largely limited to the production of soluble proteins. Here we have tested the ability of tobacco chloroplasts to express a membrane protein, namely plastid terminal oxidase 1 from the green alga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii (Cr-PTOX1, which is predicted to function as a plastoquinol oxidase. A homoplastomic plant containing a codon-optimised version of the nuclear gene encoding PTOX1, driven by the 16S rRNA promoter and 5'UTR of gene 10 from phage T7, was generated using a particle delivery system. Accumulation of Cr-PTOX1 was shown by immunoblotting and expression in an enzymatically active form was confirmed by using chlorophyll fluorescence to measure changes in the redox state of the plastoquinone pool in leaves. Growth of Cr-PTOX1 expressing plants was, however, more sensitive to high light than WT. Overall our results confirm the feasibility of using plastid transformation as a means of expressing foreign membrane proteins in the chloroplast.

  20. Glutamate synthase activities and protein changes in relation to nitrogen nutrition in barley: the dependence on different plastidic glucose-6P dehydrogenase isoforms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Esposito, Sergio; Guerriero, Gea; Vona, Vincenza; Di Martino Rigano, Vittoria; Carfagna, Simona; Rigano, Carmelo

    2005-01-01

    In barley (Hordeum vulgare L. var. Nure), glutamate synthesis and the production of reducing power by the oxidative pentose phosphate pathway (OPPP) are strictly correlated biochemical processes. NADH-GOGAT was the major root isoform, whose activity increased on a medium supplied with NH4+ or NO3-; by contrast, no noticeable variations could be observed in the leaves of plants supplied with nitrogen. In the leaves, the major isoform is Fd-GOGAT, whose activity increased under nitrogen feeding. G6PDH activity increased in the roots supplied with nitrogen; no variations were observed in the leaves. Moreover, an increase of the P2 isoform in the roots was measured, giving 13.6% G6PDH activity localized in the plastids under ammonium, and 25.2% under nitrate feeding conditions. Western blots confirmed that P2-G6PDH protein was induced in the roots by nitrogen. P1-G6PDH protein was absent in the roots and increased in the leaves by nitrogen supply to the plants. The changes measured in cytosolic G6PDH seem correlated to more general cell growth processes, and do not appear to be directly involved in glutamate synthesis. The effects of light on Fd-GOGAT is discussed, together with the possibility for P2-G6PDH to sustain nitrogen assimilation upon illumination.

  1. Synthetic biology in plastids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scharff, Lars B; Bock, Ralph

    2014-06-01

    Plastids (chloroplasts) harbor a small gene-dense genome that is amenable to genetic manipulation by transformation. During 1 billion years of evolution from the cyanobacterial endosymbiont to present-day chloroplasts, the plastid genome has undergone a dramatic size reduction, mainly as a result of gene losses and the large-scale transfer of genes to the nuclear genome. Thus the plastid genome can be regarded as a naturally evolved miniature genome, the gradual size reduction and compaction of which has provided a blueprint for the design of minimum genomes. Furthermore, because of the largely prokaryotic genome structure and gene expression machinery, the high transgene expression levels attainable in transgenic chloroplasts and the very low production costs in plant systems, the chloroplast lends itself to synthetic biology applications that are directed towards the efficient synthesis of green chemicals, biopharmaceuticals and other metabolites of commercial interest. This review describes recent progress with the engineering of plastid genomes with large constructs of foreign or synthetic DNA, and highlights the potential of the chloroplast as a model system in bottom-up and top-down synthetic biology approaches.

  2. CCS5, a thioredoxin-like protein involved in the assembly of plastid c-type cytochromes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gabilly, Stéphane T; Dreyfuss, Beth Welty; Karamoko, Mohamed; Corvest, Vincent; Kropat, Janette; Page, M Dudley; Merchant, Sabeeha S; Hamel, Patrice P

    2010-09-24

    The c-type cytochromes are metalloproteins with a heme molecule covalently linked to the sulfhydryls of a CXXCH heme-binding site. In plastids, at least six assembly factors are required for heme attachment to the apo-forms of cytochrome f and cytochrome c(6) in the thylakoid lumen. CCS5, controlling plastid cytochrome c assembly, was identified through insertional mutagenesis in the unicellular green alga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii. The complementing gene encodes a protein with similarity to Arabidopsis thaliana HCF164, which is a thylakoid membrane-anchored protein with a lumen-facing thioredoxin-like domain. HCF164 is required for cytochrome b(6)f biogenesis, but its activity and site of action in the assembly process has so far remained undeciphered. We show that CCS5 is a component of a trans-thylakoid redox pathway and operates by reducing the CXXCH heme-binding site of apocytochrome c prior to the heme ligation reaction. The proposal is based on the following findings: 1) the ccs5 mutant is rescued by exogenous thiols; 2) CCS5 interacts with apocytochrome f and c(6) in a yeast two-hybrid assay; and 3) recombinant CCS5 is able to reduce a disulfide in the CXXCH heme-binding site of apocytochrome f.

  3. Chloroplast small heat shock protein HSP21 interacts with plastid nucleoid protein pTAC5 and is essential for chloroplast development in Arabidopsis under heat stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhong, Linlin; Zhou, Wen; Wang, Haijun; Ding, Shunhua; Lu, Qingtao; Wen, Xiaogang; Peng, Lianwei; Zhang, Lixin; Lu, Congming

    2013-08-01

    Compared with small heat shock proteins (sHSPs) in other organisms, those in plants are the most abundant and diverse. However, the molecular mechanisms by which sHSPs are involved in cell protection remain unknown. Here, we characterized the role of HSP21, a plastid nucleoid-localized sHSP, in chloroplast development under heat stress. We show that an Arabidopsis thaliana knockout mutant of HSP21 had an ivory phenotype under heat stress. Quantitative real-time RT-PCR, run-on transcription, RNA gel blot, and polysome association analyses demonstrated that HSP21 is involved in plastid-encoded RNA polymerase (PEP)-dependent transcription. We found that the plastid nucleoid protein pTAC5 was an HSP21 target. pTAC5 has a C4-type zinc finger similar to that of Escherichia coli DnaJ and zinc-dependent disulfide isomerase activity. Reduction of pTAC5 expression by RNA interference led to similar phenotypic effects as observed in hsp21. HSP21 and pTAC5 formed a complex that was associated mainly with the PEP complex. HSP21 and pTAC5 were associated with the PEP complex not only during transcription initiation, but also during elongation and termination. Our results suggest that HSP21 and pTAC5 are required for chloroplast development under heat stress by maintaining PEP function.

  4. Horizontal transfer of a eukaryotic plastid-targeted protein gene to cyanobacteria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Keeling Patrick J

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Horizontal or lateral transfer of genetic material between distantly related prokaryotes has been shown to play a major role in the evolution of bacterial and archaeal genomes, but exchange of genes between prokaryotes and eukaryotes is not as well understood. In particular, gene flow from eukaryotes to prokaryotes is rarely documented with strong support, which is unusual since prokaryotic genomes appear to readily accept foreign genes. Results Here, we show that abundant marine cyanobacteria in the related genera Synechococcus and Prochlorococcus acquired a key Calvin cycle/glycolytic enzyme from a eukaryote. Two non-homologous forms of fructose bisphosphate aldolase (FBA are characteristic of eukaryotes and prokaryotes respectively. However, a eukaryotic gene has been inserted immediately upstream of the ancestral prokaryotic gene in several strains (ecotypes of Synechococcus and Prochlorococcus. In one lineage this new gene has replaced the ancestral gene altogether. The eukaryotic gene is most closely related to the plastid-targeted FBA from red algae. This eukaryotic-type FBA once replaced the plastid/cyanobacterial type in photosynthetic eukaryotes, hinting at a possible functional advantage in Calvin cycle reactions. The strains that now possess this eukaryotic FBA are scattered across the tree of Synechococcus and Prochlorococcus, perhaps because the gene has been transferred multiple times among cyanobacteria, or more likely because it has been selectively retained only in certain lineages. Conclusion A gene for plastid-targeted FBA has been transferred from red algae to cyanobacteria, where it has inserted itself beside its non-homologous, functional analogue. Its current distribution in Prochlorococcus and Synechococcus is punctate, suggesting a complex history since its introduction to this group.

  5. PROTEIN SYNTHESIS GAME

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    J.C.Q. Carvalho

    2004-05-01

    Full Text Available The theoretical explanation of biological concepts, associated with the use of teaching games andmodels, intensify the comprehension and increase students interest, stimulating them to participateactively on the teaching-learning process. The sta of dissemination from Centro de BiotecnologiaMolecular Estrutural (CBME, in partnership with the Centro de Divulgac~ao Cientca e Cultural(CDCC, presents, in this work, a new educational resource denoted: Protein Synthesis Game. Theapproach of the game involves the cytological aspects of protein synthesis, directed to high schoolstudents. Students are presented to day-by-day facts related to the function of a given protein in thehuman body. Such task leads players to the goal of solving out a problem through synthesizing aspecied protein. The game comprises: (1 a board illustrated with the transversal section of animalcell, with its main structures and organelles and sequences of hypothetical genes; (2 cards with thedescription of steps and other structures required for protein synthesis in eukaryotic cells; (3 piecesrepresenting nucleotides, polynucleotides, ribosome, amino acids, and polypeptide chains. In order toplay the game, students take cards that sequentially permit them to acquire the necessary pieces forproduction of the protein described in each objective. Players must move the pieces on the board andsimulate the steps of protein synthesis. The dynamic of the game allows students to easily comprehendprocesses of transcription and translation. This game was presented to dierent groups of high schoolteachers and students. Their judgments have been heard and indicated points to be improved, whichhelped us with the game development. Furthermore, the opinions colleted were always favorable forthe application of this game as a teaching resource in classrooms.

  6. Conditional Depletion of the Chlamydomonas Chloroplast ClpP Protease Activates Nuclear Genes Involved in Autophagy and Plastid Protein Quality Control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramundo, Silvia; Casero, David; Mühlhaus, Timo; Hemme, Dorothea; Sommer, Frederik; Crèvecoeur, Michèle; Rahire, Michèle; Schroda, Michael; Rusch, Jannette; Goodenough, Ursula; Pellegrini, Matteo; Perez-Perez, Maria Esther; Crespo, José Luis; Schaad, Olivier; Civic, Natacha; Rochaix, Jean David

    2014-05-01

    Plastid protein homeostasis is critical during chloroplast biogenesis and responses to changes in environmental conditions. Proteases and molecular chaperones involved in plastid protein quality control are encoded by the nucleus except for the catalytic subunit of ClpP, an evolutionarily conserved serine protease. Unlike its Escherichia coli ortholog, this chloroplast protease is essential for cell viability. To study its function, we used a recently developed system of repressible chloroplast gene expression in the alga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii. Using this repressible system, we have shown that a selective gradual depletion of ClpP leads to alteration of chloroplast morphology, causes formation of vesicles, and induces extensive cytoplasmic vacuolization that is reminiscent of autophagy. Analysis of the transcriptome and proteome during ClpP depletion revealed a set of proteins that are more abundant at the protein level, but not at the RNA level. These proteins may comprise some of the ClpP substrates. Moreover, the specific increase in accumulation, both at the RNA and protein level, of small heat shock proteins, chaperones, proteases, and proteins involved in thylakoid maintenance upon perturbation of plastid protein homeostasis suggests the existence of a chloroplast-to-nucleus signaling pathway involved in organelle quality control. We suggest that this represents a chloroplast unfolded protein response that is conceptually similar to that observed in the endoplasmic reticulum and in mitochondria.

  7. Conditional Depletion of the Chlamydomonas Chloroplast ClpP Protease Activates Nuclear Genes Involved in Autophagy and Plastid Protein Quality Control[W

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramundo, Silvia; Casero, David; Mühlhaus, Timo; Hemme, Dorothea; Sommer, Frederik; Crèvecoeur, Michèle; Rahire, Michèle; Schroda, Michael; Rusch, Jannette; Goodenough, Ursula; Pellegrini, Matteo; Perez-Perez, Maria Esther; Crespo, José Luis; Schaad, Olivier; Civic, Natacha; Rochaix, Jean David

    2014-01-01

    Plastid protein homeostasis is critical during chloroplast biogenesis and responses to changes in environmental conditions. Proteases and molecular chaperones involved in plastid protein quality control are encoded by the nucleus except for the catalytic subunit of ClpP, an evolutionarily conserved serine protease. Unlike its Escherichia coli ortholog, this chloroplast protease is essential for cell viability. To study its function, we used a recently developed system of repressible chloroplast gene expression in the alga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii. Using this repressible system, we have shown that a selective gradual depletion of ClpP leads to alteration of chloroplast morphology, causes formation of vesicles, and induces extensive cytoplasmic vacuolization that is reminiscent of autophagy. Analysis of the transcriptome and proteome during ClpP depletion revealed a set of proteins that are more abundant at the protein level, but not at the RNA level. These proteins may comprise some of the ClpP substrates. Moreover, the specific increase in accumulation, both at the RNA and protein level, of small heat shock proteins, chaperones, proteases, and proteins involved in thylakoid maintenance upon perturbation of plastid protein homeostasis suggests the existence of a chloroplast-to-nucleus signaling pathway involved in organelle quality control. We suggest that this represents a chloroplast unfolded protein response that is conceptually similar to that observed in the endoplasmic reticulum and in mitochondria. PMID:24879428

  8. Plastid origin: who, when and why?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chuan Ku

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available The origin of plastids is best explained by endosymbiotic theory, which dates back to the early 1900s. Three lines of evidence based on protein import machineries and molecular phylogenies of eukaryote (host and cyanobacterial (endosymbiont genes point to a single origin of primary plastids, a unique and important event that successfully transferred two photosystems and oxygenic photosynthesis from prokaryotes to eukaryotes. The nature of the cyanobacterial lineage from which plastids originated has been a topic of investigation. Recent studies have focused on the branching position of the plastid lineage in the phylogeny based on cyanobacterial core genes, that is, genes shared by all cyanobacteria and plastids. These studies have delivered conflicting results, however. In addition, the core genes represent only a very small portion of cyanobacterial genomes and may not be a good proxy for the rest of the ancestral plastid genome. Information in plant nuclear genomes, where most genes that entered the eukaryotic lineage through acquisition from the plastid ancestor reside, suggests that heterocyst-forming cyanobacteria in Stanier’s sections IV and V are most similar to the plastid ancestor in terms of gene complement and sequence conservation, which is in agreement with models suggesting an important role of nitrogen fixation in symbioses involving cyanobacteria. Plastid origin is an ancient event that involved a prokaryotic symbiont and a eukaryotic host, organisms with different histories and genome evolutionary processes. The different modes of genome evolution in prokaryotes and eukaryotes bear upon our interpretations of plastid phylogeny.

  9. Regulatory Shifts in Plastid Transcription Play a Key Role in Morphological Conversions of Plastids during Plant Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liebers, Monique; Grübler, Björn; Chevalier, Fabien; Lerbs-Mache, Silva; Merendino, Livia; Blanvillain, Robert; Pfannschmidt, Thomas

    2017-01-01

    Plastids display a high morphological and functional diversity. Starting from an undifferentiated small proplastid, these plant cell organelles can develop into four major forms: etioplasts in the dark, chloroplasts in green tissues, chromoplasts in colored flowers and fruits and amyloplasts in roots. The various forms are interconvertible into each other depending on tissue context and respective environmental condition. Research of the last two decades uncovered that each plastid type contains its own specific proteome that can be highly different from that of the other types. Composition of these proteomes largely defines the enzymatic functionality of the respective plastid. The vast majority of plastid proteins is encoded in the nucleus and must be imported from the cytosol. However, a subset of proteins of the photosynthetic and gene expression machineries are encoded on the plastid genome and are transcribed by a complex transcriptional apparatus consisting of phage-type nuclear-encoded RNA polymerases and a bacterial-type plastid-encoded RNA polymerase. Both types recognize specific sets of promoters and transcribe partly over-lapping as well as specific sets of genes. Here we summarize the current knowledge about the sequential activity of these plastid RNA polymerases and their relative activities in different types of plastids. Based on published plastid gene expression profiles we hypothesize that each conversion from one plastid type into another is either accompanied or even preceded by significant changes in plastid transcription suggesting that these changes represent important determinants of plastid morphology and protein composition and, hence, the plastid type. PMID:28154576

  10. High Expression of Cry1Ac Protein in Cotton (Gossypium hirsutum by Combining Independent Transgenic Events that Target the Protein to Cytoplasm and Plastids.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amarjeet Kumar Singh

    Full Text Available Transgenic cotton was developed using two constructs containing a truncated and codon-modified cry1Ac gene (1,848 bp, which was originally characterized from Bacillus thuringiensis subspecies kurstaki strain HD73 that encodes a toxin highly effective against many lepidopteran pests. In Construct I, the cry1Ac gene was cloned under FMVde, a strong constitutively expressing promoter, to express the encoded protein in the cytoplasm. In Construct II, the encoded protein was directed to the plastids using a transit peptide taken from the cotton rbcSIb gene. Genetic transformation experiments with Construct I resulted in a single copy insertion event in which the Cry1Ac protein expression level was 2-2.5 times greater than in the Bacillus thuringiensis cotton event Mon 531, which is currently used in varieties and hybrids grown extensively in India and elsewhere. Another high expression event was selected from transgenics developed with Construct II. The Cry protein expression resulting from this event was observed only in the green plant parts. No transgenic protein expression was observed in the non-green parts, including roots, seeds and non-green floral tissues. Thus, leucoplasts may lack the mechanism to allow entry of a protein tagged with the transit peptide from a protein that is only synthesized in tissues containing mature plastids. Combining the two events through sexual crossing led to near additive levels of the toxin at 4-5 times the level currently used in the field. The two high expression events and their combination will allow for effective resistance management against lepidopteran insect pests, particularly Helicoverpa armigera, using a high dosage strategy.

  11. Deficient plastidic fatty acid synthesis triggers cell death by modulating mitochondrial reactive oxygen species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Jian; Sun, Yuefeng; Zhao, Yannan; Zhang, Jian; Luo, Lilan; Li, Meng; Wang, Jinlong; Yu, Hong; Liu, Guifu; Yang, Liusha; Xiong, Guosheng; Zhou, Jian-Min; Zuo, Jianru; Wang, Yonghong; Li, Jiayang

    2015-05-01

    Programmed cell death (PCD) is of fundamental importance to development and defense in animals and plants. In plants, a well-recognized form of PCD is hypersensitive response (HR) triggered by pathogens, which involves the generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and other signaling molecules. While the mitochondrion is a master regulator of PCD in animals, the chloroplast is known to regulate PCD in plants. Arabidopsis Mosaic Death 1 (MOD1), an enoyl-acyl carrier protein (ACP) reductase essential for fatty acid biosynthesis in chloroplasts, negatively regulates PCD in Arabidopsis. Here we report that PCD in mod1 results from accumulated ROS and can be suppressed by mutations in mitochondrial complex I components, and that the suppression is confirmed by pharmaceutical inhibition of the complex I-generated ROS. We further show that intact mitochondria are required for full HR and optimum disease resistance to the Pseudomonas syringae bacteria. These findings strongly indicate that the ROS generated in the electron transport chain in mitochondria plays a key role in triggering plant PCD and highlight an important role of the communication between chloroplast and mitochondrion in the control of PCD in plants.

  12. Plastid-Nuclear Interaction and Accelerated Coevolution in Plastid Ribosomal Genes in Geraniaceae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weng, Mao-Lun; Ruhlman, Tracey A; Jansen, Robert K

    2016-06-27

    Plastids and mitochondria have many protein complexes that include subunits encoded by organelle and nuclear genomes. In animal cells, compensatory evolution between mitochondrial and nuclear-encoded subunits was identified and the high mitochondrial mutation rates were hypothesized to drive compensatory evolution in nuclear genomes. In plant cells, compensatory evolution between plastid and nucleus has rarely been investigated in a phylogenetic framework. To investigate plastid-nuclear coevolution, we focused on plastid ribosomal protein genes that are encoded by plastid and nuclear genomes from 27 Geraniales species. Substitution rates were compared for five sets of genes representing plastid- and nuclear-encoded ribosomal subunit proteins targeted to the cytosol or the plastid as well as nonribosomal protein controls. We found that nonsynonymous substitution rates (dN) and the ratios of nonsynonymous to synonymous substitution rates (ω) were accelerated in both plastid- (CpRP) and nuclear-encoded subunits (NuCpRP) of the plastid ribosome relative to control sequences. Our analyses revealed strong signals of cytonuclear coevolution between plastid- and nuclear-encoded subunits, in which nonsynonymous substitutions in CpRP and NuCpRP tend to occur along the same branches in the Geraniaceae phylogeny. This coevolution pattern cannot be explained by physical interaction between amino acid residues. The forces driving accelerated coevolution varied with cellular compartment of the sequence. Increased ω in CpRP was mainly due to intensified positive selection whereas increased ω in NuCpRP was caused by relaxed purifying selection. In addition, the many indels identified in plastid rRNA genes in Geraniaceae may have contributed to changes in plastid subunits.

  13. Nucleus-encoded mRNAs for chloroplast proteins GapA, PetA, and PsbO are trans-spliced in the flagellate Euglena gracilis irrespective of light and plastid function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mateášiková-Kováčová, Bianka; Vesteg, Matej; Drahovská, Hana; Záhonová, Kristína; Vacula, Rostislav; Krajčovič, Juraj

    2012-01-01

    Euglena gracilis is a fresh-water flagellate possessing secondary chloroplasts of green algal origin. In contrast with organisms possessing primary plastids, mRNA levels of nucleus-encoded genes for chloroplast proteins in E. gracilis depend on neither light nor plastid function. However, it remains unknown, if all these mRNAs are trans-spliced and possess spliced leader sequence at the 5'-end and if trans-splicing depends on light or functional plastids. This study revealed that polyadenylated mRNAs encoding the chloroplast proteins glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase (GapA), cytochrome f (PetA), and subunit O of photosystem II (PsbO) are trans-spliced irrespective of light or plastid function.

  14. A phylogenetic mosaic plastid proteome and unusual plastid-targeting signals in the green-colored dinoflagellate Lepidodinium chlorophorum

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    Inagaki Yuji

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Plastid replacements through secondary endosymbioses include massive transfer of genes from the endosymbiont to the host nucleus and require a new targeting system to enable transport of the plastid-targeted proteins across 3-4 plastid membranes. The dinoflagellates are the only eukaryotic lineage that has been shown to have undergone several plastid replacement events, and this group is thus highly relevant for studying the processes involved in plastid evolution. In this study, we analyzed the phylogenetic origin and N-terminal extensions of plastid-targeted proteins from Lepidodinium chlorophorum, a member of the only dinoflagellate genus that harbors a green secondary plastid rather than the red algal-derived, peridinin-containing plastid usually found in photosynthetic dinoflagellates. Results We sequenced 4,746 randomly picked clones from a L. chlorophorum cDNA library. 22 of the assembled genes were identified as genes encoding proteins functioning in plastids. Some of these were of green algal origin. This confirms that genes have been transferred from the plastid to the host nucleus of L. chlorophorum and indicates that the plastid is fully integrated as an organelle in the host. Other nuclear-encoded plastid-targeted protein genes, however, are clearly not of green algal origin, but have been derived from a number of different algal groups, including dinoflagellates, streptophytes, heterokonts, and red algae. The characteristics of N-terminal plastid-targeting peptides of all of these genes are substantially different from those found in peridinin-containing dinoflagellates and green algae. Conclusions L. chlorophorum expresses plastid-targeted proteins with a range of different origins, which probably arose through endosymbiotic gene transfer (EGT and horizontal gene transfer (HGT. The N-terminal extension of the genes is different from the extensions found in green alga and other dinoflagellates (peridinin- and

  15. Plastids and carotenoid accumulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plastids are ubiquitously in plants and are the organelles for carotenoid biosynthesis and storage. Based on their morphology and function, plastids are classified into various types, i.e. proplastids, etioplasts, chloroplasts, amyloplasts, and chromoplasts. All plastids except proplastids can synth...

  16. An apicoplast localized ubiquitylation system is required for the import of nuclear-encoded plastid proteins.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Swati Agrawal

    Full Text Available Apicomplexan parasites are responsible for numerous important human diseases including toxoplasmosis, cryptosporidiosis, and most importantly malaria. There is a constant need for new antimalarials, and one of most keenly pursued drug targets is an ancient algal endosymbiont, the apicoplast. The apicoplast is essential for parasite survival, and several aspects of its metabolism and maintenance have been validated as targets of anti-parasitic drug treatment. Most apicoplast proteins are nuclear encoded and have to be imported into the organelle. Recently, a protein translocon typically required for endoplasmic reticulum associated protein degradation (ERAD has been proposed to act in apicoplast protein import. Here, we show ubiquitylation to be a conserved and essential component of this process. We identify apicoplast localized ubiquitin activating, conjugating and ligating enzymes in Toxoplasma gondii and Plasmodium falciparum and observe biochemical activity by in vitro reconstitution. Using conditional gene ablation and complementation analysis we link this activity to apicoplast protein import and parasite survival. Our studies suggest ubiquitylation to be a mechanistic requirement of apicoplast protein import independent to the proteasomal degradation pathway.

  17. FAX1, a Novel Membrane Protein Mediating Plastid Fatty Acid Export

    OpenAIRE

    Roland G Roberts

    2015-01-01

    Fatty acids made in chloroplasts must be exported into the rest of the cell to be converted into commercially important plant oils. A new study identifies FAX1 as a protein that mediates this crucial transport step. Read the Research Article.

  18. Male Sterile2 Encodes a Plastid-Localized Fatty Acyl Carrier Protein Reductase Required for Pollen Exine Development in Arabidopsis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, W.; Shanklin, J.; Yu, X.-H.; Zhang, K.; Shi, J.; De Oliveira, S.; Schreiber, L.; Zhang, D.

    2011-10-01

    Male Sterile2 (MS2) is predicted to encode a fatty acid reductase required for pollen wall development in Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana). Transient expression of MS2 in tobacco (Nicotiana benthamiana) leaves resulted in the accumulation of significant levels of C16 and C18 fatty alcohols. Expression of MS2 fused with green fluorescent protein revealed that an amino-terminal transit peptide targets the MS2 to plastids. The plastidial localization of MS2 is biologically important because genetic complementation of MS2 in ms2 homozygous plants was dependent on the presence of its amino-terminal transit peptide or that of the Rubisco small subunit protein amino-terminal transit peptide. In addition, two domains, NAD(P)H-binding domain and sterile domain, conserved in MS2 and its homologs were also shown to be essential for MS2 function in pollen exine development by genetic complementation testing. Direct biochemical analysis revealed that purified recombinant MS2 enzyme is able to convert palmitoyl-Acyl Carrier Protein to the corresponding C16:0 alcohol with NAD(P)H as the preferred electron donor. Using optimized reaction conditions (i.e. at pH 6.0 and 30 C), MS2 exhibits a K{sub m} for 16:0-Acyl Carrier Protein of 23.3 {+-} 4.0 {mu}m, a V{sub max} of 38.3 {+-} 4.5 nmol mg{sup -1} min{sup -1}, and a catalytic efficiency/K{sub m} of 1,873 m{sup -1} s{sup -1}. Based on the high homology of MS2 to other characterized fatty acid reductases, it was surprising that MS2 showed no activity against palmitoyl- or other acyl-coenzyme A; however, this is consistent with its plastidial localization. In summary, genetic and biochemical evidence demonstrate an MS2-mediated conserved plastidial pathway for the production of fatty alcohols that are essential for pollen wall biosynthesis in Arabidopsis.

  19. Interplay between HEAT SHOCK PROTEIN 90 and HY5 Controls PhANG Expression in Response to the GUN5 Plastid Signal

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Peter Kindgren; Louise Norén; Juan de Dios Barajas López; Jehad Shaikhali; (A)sa Strand

    2012-01-01

    The presence of genes encoding organellar proteins in different cellular compartments necessitates a tight coordination of expression by the different genomes of the eukaryotic cell.This coordination of gene expression is achieved by organelle-to-nucleus or retrograde communication.Stress-induced perturbations of the tetrapyrrole pathway trigger large changes in nuclear gene expression in plants.Recently,we identified HSP90 proteins as ligands of the putative plastid signal Mg-ProtolX.In order to investigate whether the interaction between HSP90 and Mg-ProtolX is biologically relevant,we produced transgenic lines with reduced levels of cytosolic HSP90 in wild-type and gun5 backgrounds.Our work reveals that HSP90 proteins respond to the tetrapyrrole-mediated plastid signal to control expression of photosynthesis-associated nuclear genes(PhANG)during the response to oxidative stress.We also show that the hy5 mutant is insensitive to tetrapyrrole accumulation and that Mg-ProtolX,cytosolic HSP90,and HY5 are all part of the same signaling pathway.These findings suggest that a regulatory complex controlling gene expression that includes HSP90 proteins and a transcription factor that is modified by tetrapyrroles in response to changes in the environment is evolutionarily conserved between yeast and plants.

  20. Spectinomycin resistance mutations in the rrn16 gene are new plastid markers in Medicago sativa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dudas, Brigitta; Jenes, Barnabas; Kiss, Gyorgy Botond; Maliga, Pal

    2012-11-01

    We report here the isolation of spectinomycin-resistant mutants in cultured cells of Medicago sativa line RegenSY-T2. Spectinomycin induces bleaching of cultured alfalfa cells due to inhibition of protein synthesis on the prokaryotic type 70S plastid ribosomes. Spontaneous mutants resistant to spectinomycin bleaching were identified by their ability to form green shoots on plant regeneration medium containing selective spectinomycin concentrations in the range of 25-50 mg/l. Sequencing of the plastid rrn16 gene revealed that spectinomycin resistance is due to mutations in a conserved stem structure of the 16S rRNA. Resistant plants transferred to the greenhouse developed normally and produced spectinomycin-resistant seed progeny. In light of their absence in soybean, a related leguminous plant, the isolation of spectinomycin-resistant mutants in M. sativa was unexpected. The new mutations are useful for the study of plastid inheritance, as demonstrated by detection of predominantly paternal plastid inheritance in the RegenSY-T2 × Szapko57 cross, and can be used as selective markers in plastid transformation vectors to obtain cisgenic plants.

  1. Plastid and Stromule Morphogenesis in Tomato

    OpenAIRE

    Pyke, Kevin A.; HOWELLS, CAROLINE A.

    2002-01-01

    By using green fluorescent protein targeted to the plastid organelle in tomato (Lycopersicon esculentum Mill.), the morphology of plastids and their associated stromules in epidermal cells and trichomes from stems and petioles and in the chromoplasts of pericarp cells in the tomato fruit has been revealed. A novel characteristic of tomato stromules is the presence of extensive bead‐like structures along the stromules that are often observed as free vesicles, distinct from and apparently uncon...

  2. Dynamic composition, shaping and organization of plastid nucleoids

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marta ePowikrowska

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available In this article recent progress on the elucidation of the dynamic composition and structure of plastid nucleoids is reviewed from a structural perspective. Plastid nucleoids are compact structures of multiple copies of different forms of ptDNA, RNA, enzymes for replication and gene expression as well as DNA binding proteins. Although early electron microscopy suggested that plastid DNA is almost free of proteins, it is now well established that the DNA in nucleoids similarly as in the nuclear chromatin is associated with basic proteins playing key roles in organization of the DNA architecture and in regulation of DNA associated enzymatic activities involved in transcription, replication, and recombination. This group of DNA binding proteins has been named plastid nucleoid associated proteins (ptNAPs. Plastid nucleoids are unique with respect to their variable number, genome copy content and dynamic distribution within different types of plastids. The mechanisms underlying the shaping and reorganization of plastid nucleoids during chloroplast development and in response to environmental conditions involve posttranslational modifications of ptNAPs, similarly to those changes known for histones in the eukaryotic chromatin, as well as changes in the repertoire of ptNAPs, as known for nucleoids of bacteria. Attachment of plastid nucleoids to membranes is proposed to be important not only for regulation of DNA availability for replication and transcription, but also for the coordination of photosynthesis and plastid gene expression.

  3. Sucrose Metabolism in Plastids

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gerrits, N.; Turk, S.C.H.J.; Dun, van K.P.M.; Hulleman, H.D.; Visser, R.G.F.; Weisbeek, P.J.; Smeekens, S.C.M.

    2001-01-01

    The question whether sucrose (Suc) is present inside plastids has been long debated. Low Suc levels were reported to be present inside isolated chloroplasts, but these were argued to be artifacts of the isolation procedures used. We have introduced Suc-metabolizing enzymes in plastids and our experi

  4. New insights into plastid nucleoid structure and functionality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krupinska, Karin; Melonek, Joanna; Krause, Kirsten

    2013-03-01

    Investigations over many decades have revealed that nucleoids of higher plant plastids are highly dynamic with regard to their number, their structural organization and protein composition. Membrane attachment and environmental cues seem to determine the activity and functionality of the nucleoids and point to a highly regulated structure-function relationship. The heterogeneous composition and the many functions that are seemingly associated with the plastid nucleoids could be related to the high number of chromosomes per plastid. Recent proteomic studies have brought novel nucleoid-associated proteins into the spotlight and indicated that plastid nucleoids are an evolutionary hybrid possessing prokaryotic nucleoid features and eukaryotic (nuclear) chromatin components, several of which are dually targeted to the nucleus and chloroplasts. Future studies need to unravel if and how plastid-nucleus communication depends on nucleoid structure and plastid gene expression.

  5. Early steps in plastid evolution: current ideas and controversies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bodył, Andrzej; Mackiewicz, Paweł; Stiller, John W

    2009-11-01

    Some nuclear-encoded proteins are imported into higher plant plastids via the endomembrane (EM) system. Compared with multi-protein Toc and Tic translocons required for most plastid protein import, the relatively uncomplicated nature of EM trafficking led to suggestions that it was the original transport mechanism for nuclear-encoded endosymbiont proteins, and critical for the early stages of plastid evolution. Its apparent simplicity disappears, however, when EM transport is considered in light of selective constraints likely encountered during the conversion of stable endosymbionts into fully integrated organelles. From this perspective it is more parsimonious to presume the early evolution of post-translational protein import via simpler, ancestral forms of modern Toc and Tic plastid translocons, with EM trafficking arising later to accommodate glycosylation and/or protein targeting to multiple cellular locations. This hypothesis is supported by both empirical and comparative data, and is consistent with the relative paucity of EM-based transport to modern primary plastids.

  6. The potato mop-top virus TGB2 protein and viral RNA associate with chloroplasts and viral infection induces inclusions in the plastids

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Graham H Cowan

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available The potato mop-top virus (PMTV triple gene block 2 (TGB2 movement protein fused to monomeric red fluorescent protein (mRFP-TGB2 was expressed under the control of the PMTV subgenomic promoter from a PMTV vector. The subcellular localisations and interactions of mRFP-TGB2 were investigated using confocal imaging (CLSM and biochemical analysis. The results revealed associations with membranes of the endoplasmic reticulum, mobile granules, small round structures (1-2 µm in diameter and chloroplasts. Expression of mRFP-TGB2 in epidermal cells enabled cell-to-cell movement of a TGB2 defective PMTV reporter clone, indicating that the mRFP-TGB2 fusion protein was functional and required for cell-to-cell movement. Protein-lipid interaction assays revealed an association between TGB2 and lipids present in chloroplasts, consistent with microscopical observations where the plastid envelope was labelled later in infection. To further investigate the association of PMTV infection with chloroplasts, ultrastructural studies of thin sections of PMTV-infected potato and Nicotiana benthamiana leaves by electron microscopy revealed abnormal chloroplasts with cytoplasmic inclusions and terminal projections. Viral coat protein, genomic RNA and fluorescently-labelled TGB2 were detected in plastid preparations isolated from the infected leaves, and viral RNA was localised to chloroplasts in infected tissues. The results reveal a novel association of TGB2 and vRNA with chloroplasts, and suggest viral replication is associated with chloroplast membranes, and that TGB2 plays a novel role in targeting the virus to chloroplasts.

  7. Integration and Expression of gfp in the plastid of Medicago sativa L.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xing, Shaochen; Wei, Zhengyi; Wang, Yunpeng; Liu, Yanzhi; Lin, Chunjing

    2014-01-01

    Here we describe a protocol of alfalfa (Medicago sativa L.) plastid transformation by which gfp, a gene encoding the green fluorescent protein (GFP), is inserted into plastid genome via particle bombardment and homoplastomic plant is obtained. Plastid engineering is likely to make a significant contribution to the genetic improvement of this crop and the production of vaccines and therapeutic proteins.

  8. The plastid genome of the red macroalga Grateloupia taiwanensis (Halymeniaceae.

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    Michael S DePriest

    Full Text Available The complete plastid genome sequence of the red macroalga Grateloupia taiwanensis S.-M.Lin & H.-Y.Liang (Halymeniaceae, Rhodophyta is presented here. Comprising 191,270 bp, the circular DNA contains 233 protein-coding genes and 29 tRNA sequences. In addition, several genes previously unknown to red algal plastids are present in the genome of G. taiwanensis. The plastid genomes from G. taiwanensis and another florideophyte, Gracilaria tenuistipitata var. liui, are very similar in sequence and share significant synteny. In contrast, less synteny is shared between G. taiwanensis and the plastid genome representatives of Bangiophyceae and Cyanidiophyceae. Nevertheless, the gene content of all six red algal plastid genomes here studied is highly conserved, and a large core repertoire of plastid genes can be discerned in Rhodophyta.

  9. The Plastid Genome of the Cryptomonad Teleaulax amphioxeia.

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    Jong Im Kim

    Full Text Available Teleaulax amphioxeia is a photosynthetic unicellular cryptophyte alga that is distributed throughout marine habitats worldwide. This alga is an important plastid donor to the dinoflagellate Dinophysis caudata through the ciliate Mesodinium rubrum in the marine food web. To better understand the genomic characteristics of T. amphioxeia, we have sequenced and analyzed its plastid genome. The plastid genome sequence of T. amphioxeia is similar to that of Rhodomonas salina, and they share significant synteny. This sequence exhibits less similarity to that of Guillardia theta, the representative plastid genome of photosynthetic cryptophytes. The gene content and order of the three photosynthetic cryptomonad plastid genomes studied is highly conserved. The plastid genome of T. amphioxeia is composed of 129,772 bp and includes 143 protein-coding genes, 2 rRNA operons and 30 tRNA sequences. The DNA polymerase III gene (dnaX was most likely acquired via lateral gene transfer (LGT from a firmicute bacterium, identical to what occurred in R. salina. On the other hand, the psbN gene was independently encoded by the plastid genome without a reverse transcriptase gene as an intron. To clarify the phylogenetic relationships of the algae with red-algal derived plastids, phylogenetic analyses of 32 taxa were performed, including three previously sequenced cryptophyte plastid genomes containing 93 protein-coding genes. The stramenopiles were found to have branched out from the Chromista taxa (cryptophytes, haptophytes, and stramenopiles, while the cryptophytes and haptophytes were consistently grouped into sister relationships with high resolution.

  10. Modulation of protein synthesis by polyamines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Igarashi, Kazuei; Kashiwagi, Keiko

    2015-03-01

    Polyamines are ubiquitous small basic molecules that play important roles in cell growth and viability. Since polyamines mainly exist as a polyamine-RNA complex, we looked for proteins whose synthesis is preferentially stimulated by polyamines at the level of translation, and thus far identified 17 proteins in Escherichia coli and 6 proteins in eukaryotes. The mechanisms of polyamine stimulation of synthesis of these proteins were investigated. In addition, the role of eIF5A, containing hypusine formed from spermidine, on protein synthesis is described. These results clearly indicate that polyamines and eIF5A contribute to cell growth and viability through modulation of protein synthesis.

  11. The plastid outer envelope – a highly dynamic interface between plastid and cytoplasm

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Frederique eBreuers

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Plastids are the defining organelles of all photosynthetic eukaryotes. They are the site of photosynthesis and of a large number of other essential metabolic pathways, such as fatty acid and amino acid biosyntheses, sulfur and nitrogen assimilation, and aromatic and terpenoid compound production, to mention only a few examples. The metabolism of plastids is heavily intertwined and connected with that of the surrounding cytosol, thus causing massive traffic of metabolic precursors, intermediates, and products. Two layers of biological membranes that are called the inner (IE and the outer (OE plastid envelope membranes bound the plastids of Archaeplastida. While the IE is generally accepted as the osmo-regulatory barrier between cytosol and stroma, the OE was considered to represent an unspecific molecular sieve, permeable for molecules of up to 10 kDa. However, after the discovery of small substrate-specific pores in the OE, this view has come under scrutiny. In addition to controlling metabolic fluxes between plastid and cytosol, the OE is also crucial for protein import into the chloroplast. It contains the receptors and translocation channel of the TOC complex that is required for the canonical post-translational import of nuclear-encoded, plastid-targeted proteins. Further, the OE is a metabolically active compartment of the chloroplast, being involved in, e.g., fatty acid metabolism and membrane lipid production. Also, recent findings hint on the OE as a defense platform against several biotic and abiotic stress conditions, such as cold acclimation, freezing tolerance, and phosphate deprivation. Moreover, dynamic non-covalent interactions between the OE and the endomembrane system are thought to play important roles in lipid and non-canonical protein trafficking between plastid and endoplasmatic reticulum (ER. While proteomics and bioinformatics has provided us with comprehensive but still incomplete information on proteins localized in the

  12. The Etched1 gene of Zea mays (L.) encodes a zinc ribbon protein that belongs to the transcriptionally active chromosome (TAC) of plastids and is similar to the transcription factor TFIIS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    da Costa e Silva, Oswaldo; Lorbiecke, René; Garg, Preeti; Müller, Lenard; Wassmann, Martina; Lauert, Patricia; Scanlon, Mike; Hsia, An-Ping; Schnable, Patrick S; Krupinska, Karin; Wienand, Udo

    2004-06-01

    Etched1 (et1) is a pleiotropic, recessive mutation of maize that causes fissured and cracked mature kernels and virescent seedlings. Microscopic examinations of the et1 phenotype revealed an aberrant plastid development in mutant kernels and mutant leaves. Here, we report on the cloning of the et1 gene by transposon tagging, the localization of the gene product in chloroplasts, and its putative function in the plastid transcriptional apparatus. Several alleles of Mutator (Mu)-induced et1 mutants, the et1-reference (et1-R) mutant, and Et1 wild-type were cloned and analyzed at the molecular level. Northern analyses with wild-type plants revealed that Et1 transcripts are present in kernels, leaves, and other types of tissue, and no Et1 expression could be detected in the et1 mutants analyzed. The ET1 protein is imported by chloroplasts and has been immunologically detected in transcriptionally active chromosome (TAC) fractions derived from chloroplasts. Accordingly, the relative transcriptional activity of TAC fractions was significantly reduced in chloroplasts of et1-R plants. ET1 is the first zinc ribbon (ZR) protein shown to be targeted to plastids. With regard to its localization and its striking structural similarity to the eukaryotic transcription elongation factor TFIIS, it is feasible that ET1 functions in plastid transcription elongation by reactivation of arrested RNA polymerases.

  13. 拟南芥Psrp-4基因参与光合作用机制的研究%Studies on the Functions of Plastid-specific Ribosomal Protein 4 Gene (Psrp-4) of Arabidopsis in Photosynthesis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    左然; 徐美玲; 温泽文; 张东远

    2012-01-01

    叶绿体核糖体是植物特有的细胞器之一,其主要功能是合成质体基因编码的蛋白质.已有研究表明在叶绿体核糖体内含有6个质体特有蛋白PSRP (plastid-specific ribosomal protein),分别命名为PSRP1~PSRP6.然而,这些蛋白在叶绿体蛋白合成过程以及光合作用中的作用机制研究尚处初级阶段.在本研究中,为了阐明PSRP-4蛋白在叶绿体发育过程中的作用机制,我们利用Gateway系统构建了Psrp-4基因(At2g38140)的RNAi表达载体,转化野生型拟南芥后获得了Psrp-4基因表达量明显降低的psrp-4突变体.研究结果表明:psrp-4突变体比野生型生长略微缓慢,但叶片颜色与野生型差别不大,能够进行正常的光合作用.在高光胁迫条件下,测定psrp-4突变体光合化学效率,发现与野生型差异不明显;进一步的蛋白免疫印记实验证明Psrp-4基因表达量的降低对PSⅡ反应中心D1蛋白的周转也没有明显影响.因此,推测PSRP-4蛋白可能不是叶绿体蛋白合成以及光合作用的正常进行所必需的.%Chloroplast ribosome is an organelle which is specific to plants. Its main function is to synthetize proteins encoded by plastogenes. Study shows that chloroplast ribosome contains six PSRPs (plastid-specific ribosomal proteins), named as PSRP1~PSRP6; however, the study on the functions of those proteins in photosynthesis and protein synthesis in chloroplast is still in its infancy. To investigate the roles of Psrp-4 in chloroplast development, RNAi vector of Psrp-4 gene (At2g38140) which was subsequently transformed into wild type Arabidopsis was constructed using Gateway technology, psrp -4 mutant showedsignificant reduction in expression level. Our results indicated that the growth rate of psrp-4 mutants was slightly lower than the wild type's; however, the leaf color of mutant and wild type plants were identical and photosynthesis in the mutant plants proceeded normally. Under high light treatment

  14. Protein synthesis regulation by leucine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daiana Vianna

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available In vivo and in vitro studies have demonstrated that high protein diets affect both protein synthesis and regulation of several cellular processes. The role of amino acids as substrate for protein synthesis has been established in the literature. However, the mechanism by which these amino acids modulate transcription and regulate the mRNA translation via mTOR-dependent signaling pathway has yet to be fully determined. It has been verified that mTOR is a protein responsible for activating a cascade of biochemical intracellular events which result in the activation of the protein translation process. Of the aminoacids, leucine is the most effective in stimulating protein synthesis and reducing proteolysis. Therefore, it promotes a positive nitrogen balance, possibly by favoring the activation of this protein. This amino acid also directly and indirectly stimulates the synthesis and secretion of insulin, enhancing its anabolic cellular effects. Therefore, this review aimed to identify the role of leucine in protein synthesis modulation and to discuss the metabolic aspects related to this aminoacid.Estudos in vivo e in vitro verificaram que dietas hiperprotéicas influenciam a síntese protéica e regulam vários processos celulares. O papel dos aminoácidos como substrato para a síntese de proteínas já está bem evidenciado na literatura, porém as formas como esses aminoácidos modulam a etapa da transcrição e regulam a tradução do RNAm, pela via de sinalização dependente da mTOR, ainda não estão totalmente esclarecidas. Tem-se verificado que a mTOR é uma proteína responsável por ativar uma cascata de eventos bioquímicos intracelulares que culminam na ativação do processo de tradução protéica. Dentre todos os aminoácidos, a leucina é a mais eficaz em estimular a síntese protéica, reduzir a proteólise e, portanto, favorecer o balanço nitrogenado positivo, possivelmente por favorecer a ativação desta proteína. Al

  15. Protein chemical synthesis in drug discovery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Fa; Mayer, John P

    2015-01-01

    The discovery of novel therapeutics to combat human disease has traditionally been among the most important goals of research chemists. After a century of innovation, state-of-the-art chemical protein synthesis is now capable of efficiently assembling proteins of up to several hundred residues in length from individual amino acids. By virtue of its unique ability to incorporate non-native structural elements, chemical protein synthesis has been seminal in the recent development of several novel drug discovery technologies. In this chapter, we review the key advances in peptide and protein chemistry which have enabled our current synthetic capabilities. We also discuss the synthesis of D-proteins and their applications in mirror image phage-display and racemic protein crystallography, the synthesis of enzymes for structure-based drug discovery, and the direct synthesis of homogenous protein pharmaceuticals.

  16. Chronological protein synthesis in regenerating rat liver.

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Jinjun; Hao, Shuai; Zhang, Hao; Guo, Fuzheng; Huang, Lingyun; Xiao, Xueyuan; He, Dacheng

    2015-07-01

    Liver regeneration has been studied for decades; however, its regulation remains unclear. In this study, we report a dynamic tracing of protein synthesis in rat regenerating liver with a new proteomic technique, (35) S in vivo labeling analysis for dynamic proteomics (SiLAD). Conventional proteomic techniques typically measure protein alteration in accumulated amounts. The SiLAD technique specifically detects protein synthesis velocity instead of accumulated amounts of protein through (35) S pulse labeling of newly synthesized proteins, providing a direct way for analyzing protein synthesis variations. Consequently, protein synthesis within short as 30 min was visualized and protein regulations in the first 8 h of regenerating liver were dynamically traced. Further, the 3.5-5 h post partial hepatectomy (PHx) was shown to be an important regulatory turning point by acute regulation of many proteins in the initiation of liver regeneration.

  17. Plastid transformation in eggplant.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bansal, Kailash C; Singh, Ajay K

    2014-01-01

    Eggplant (Solanum melongena L.) is an important vegetable crop of tropical and temperate regions of the world. Here we describe a procedure for eggplant plastid transformation, which involves preparation of explants, biolistic delivery of plastid transformation vector into green stem segments, selection procedure, and identification of the transplastomic plants. Shoot buds appear from cut ends of the stem explants following 5-6 weeks of spectinomycin selection after bombardment with the plastid transformation vector containing aadA gene as selectable marker. Transplastomic lines are obtained after the regenerated shoots are subjected to several rounds of spectinomycin selection over a period of 9 weeks. Homoplasmic transplastomic lines are further confirmed by spectinomycin and streptomycin double selection. The transplastomic technology development in this plant species will open up exciting possibilities for improving crop performance, metabolic engineering, and the use of plants as factories for producing biopharmaceuticals.

  18. Evidence for the retention of two evolutionary distinct plastids in dinoflagellates with diatom endosymbionts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hehenberger, Elisabeth; Imanian, Behzad; Burki, Fabien; Keeling, Patrick J

    2014-09-01

    Dinoflagellates harboring diatom endosymbionts (termed "dinotoms") have undergone a process often referred to as "tertiary endosymbiosis"--the uptake of algae containing secondary plastids and integration of those plastids into the new host. In contrast to other tertiary plastids, and most secondary plastids, the endosymbiont of dinotoms is distinctly less reduced, retaining a number of cellular features, such as their nucleus and mitochondria and others, in addition to their plastid. This has resulted in redundancy between host and endosymbiont, at least between some mitochondrial and cytosolic metabolism, where this has been investigated. The question of plastidial redundancy is particularly interesting as the fate of the host dinoflagellate plastid is unclear. The host cytosol possesses an eyespot that has been postulated to be a remnant of the ancestral peridinin plastid, but this has not been tested, nor has its possible retention of plastid functions. To investigate this possibility, we searched for plastid-associated pathways and functions in transcriptomic data sets from three dinotom species. We show that the dinoflagellate host has indeed retained genes for plastid-associated pathways and that these genes encode targeting peptides similar to those of other dinoflagellate plastid-targeted proteins. Moreover, we also identified one gene encoding an essential component of the dinoflagellate plastid protein import machinery, altogether suggesting the presence of a functioning plastid import system in the host, and by extension a relict plastid. The presence of the same plastid-associated pathways in the endosymbiont also extends the known functional redundancy in dinotoms, further confirming the unusual state of plastid integration in this group of dinoflagellates.

  19. Plastid Proteomic Analysis in Tomato Fruit Development.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miho Suzuki

    Full Text Available To better understand the mechanism of plastid differentiation from chloroplast to chromoplast, we examined proteome and plastid changes over four distinct developmental stages of 'Micro-Tom' fruit. Additionally, to discover more about the relationship between fruit color and plastid differentiation, we also analyzed and compared 'Micro-Tom' results with those from two other varieties, 'Black' and 'White Beauty'. We confirmed that proteins related to photosynthesis remain through the orange maturity stage of 'Micro-Tom', and also learned that thylakoids no longer exist at this stage. These results suggest that at a minimum there are changes in plastid morphology occurring before all related proteins change. We also compared 'Micro-Tom' fruits with 'Black' and 'White Beauty' using two-dimensional gel electrophoresis. We found a decrease of CHRC (plastid-lipid-associated protein and HrBP1 (harpin binding protein-1 in the 'Black' and 'White Beauty' varieties. CHRC is involved in carotenoid accumulation and stabilization. HrBP1 in Arabidopsis has a sequence similar to proteins in the PAP/fibrillin family. These proteins have characteristics and functions similar to lipocalin, an example of which is the transport of hydrophobic molecules. We detected spots of TIL (temperature-induced lipocalin in 2D-PAGE results, however the number of spots and their isoelectric points differed between 'Micro-Tom' and 'Black'/'White Beauty'. Lipocalin has various functions including those related to environmental stress response, apoptosis induction, membrane formation and fixation, regulation of immune response, cell growth, and metabolism adjustment. Lipocalin related proteins such as TIL and HrBP1 could be related to the accumulation of carotenoids, fruit color and the differentiation of chromoplast.

  20. Plastid Proteomic Analysis in Tomato Fruit Development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suzuki, Miho; Takahashi, Sachiko; Kondo, Takanori; Dohra, Hideo; Ito, Yumihiko; Kiriiwa, Yoshikazu; Hayashi, Marina; Kamiya, Shiori; Kato, Masaya; Fujiwara, Masayuki; Fukao, Yoichiro; Kobayashi, Megumi; Nagata, Noriko; Motohashi, Reiko

    2015-01-01

    To better understand the mechanism of plastid differentiation from chloroplast to chromoplast, we examined proteome and plastid changes over four distinct developmental stages of 'Micro-Tom' fruit. Additionally, to discover more about the relationship between fruit color and plastid differentiation, we also analyzed and compared 'Micro-Tom' results with those from two other varieties, 'Black' and 'White Beauty'. We confirmed that proteins related to photosynthesis remain through the orange maturity stage of 'Micro-Tom', and also learned that thylakoids no longer exist at this stage. These results suggest that at a minimum there are changes in plastid morphology occurring before all related proteins change. We also compared 'Micro-Tom' fruits with 'Black' and 'White Beauty' using two-dimensional gel electrophoresis. We found a decrease of CHRC (plastid-lipid-associated protein) and HrBP1 (harpin binding protein-1) in the 'Black' and 'White Beauty' varieties. CHRC is involved in carotenoid accumulation and stabilization. HrBP1 in Arabidopsis has a sequence similar to proteins in the PAP/fibrillin family. These proteins have characteristics and functions similar to lipocalin, an example of which is the transport of hydrophobic molecules. We detected spots of TIL (temperature-induced lipocalin) in 2D-PAGE results, however the number of spots and their isoelectric points differed between 'Micro-Tom' and 'Black'/'White Beauty'. Lipocalin has various functions including those related to environmental stress response, apoptosis induction, membrane formation and fixation, regulation of immune response, cell growth, and metabolism adjustment. Lipocalin related proteins such as TIL and HrBP1 could be related to the accumulation of carotenoids, fruit color and the differentiation of chromoplast.

  1. Protein Synthesis--An Interactive Game.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clements, Lee Ann J.; Jackson, Karen E.

    1998-01-01

    Describes an interactive game designed to help students see and understand the dynamic relationship between DNA, RNA, and proteins. Appropriate for either a class or laboratory setting, following a lecture session about protein synthesis. (DDR)

  2. Blue light is required for survival of the tomato phytochrome-deficient aurea mutant and the expression of four nuclear genes coding for plastidic proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oelmüller, R; Kendrick, R E

    1991-02-01

    When dark-grown aurea mutant tomato seedlings which lack more than 95% of the phytochrome present in isogenic wild-type seedlings are kept in white or blue light, four nuclear-encoded transcripts coding for plastidic proteins (the light-harvesting chlorophyll a/b-binding protein of photosystem I and II [cab-PSII], plastocyanin and subunit 2 of photosystem I) are present in comparable amounts. These transcript levels in red light are strongly reduced in aurea seedlings when compared with those of wild type. Thus, blue light is required for normal expression of these genes in the mutant, while red light alone is not sufficient. Red light-grown aurea seedlings are very sensitive to blue light, even 10 minutes of blue light every day suffices to cause a measurable increase in cab-PSII transcript level. The action of blue light on the expression of cab-PSII in the mutant is under phytochrome control. After 8 days of blue light, phytochrome is almost as effective in inducing cab-PSII mRNA as in the isogenic wild type, whereas after 8 days of red light, only a small phytochrome response was observed in the mutant. It is concluded that blue light sensitizes the mutant to the residual phytochrome which allows normal gene expression and survival of the mutant under daylight conditions.

  3. Dual Targeting and Retrograde Translocation: Regulators of Plant Nuclear Gene Expression Can Be Sequestered by Plastids

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karin Krupinska

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Changes in the developmental or metabolic state of plastids can trigger profound changes in the transcript profiles of nuclear genes. Many nuclear transcription factors were shown to be controlled by signals generated in the organelles. In addition to the many different compounds for which an involvement in retrograde signaling is discussed, accumulating evidence suggests a role for proteins in plastid-to-nucleus communication. These proteins might be sequestered in the plastids before they act as transcriptional regulators in the nucleus. Indeed, several proteins exhibiting a dual localization in the plastids and the nucleus are promising candidates for such a direct signal transduction involving regulatory protein storage in the plastids. Among such proteins, the nuclear transcription factor WHIRLY1 stands out as being the only protein for which an export from plastids and translocation to the nucleus has been experimentally demonstrated. Other proteins, however, strongly support the notion that this pathway might be more common than currently believed.

  4. Bisphosphonate inhibitors reveal a large elasticity of plastidic isoprenoid synthesis pathway in isoprene-emitting hybrid aspen.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rasulov, Bahtijor; Talts, Eero; Kännaste, Astrid; Niinemets, Ülo

    2015-06-01

    Recently, a feedback inhibition of the chloroplastic 1-deoxy-D-xylulose 5-phosphate (DXP)/2-C-methyl-D-erythritol 4-phosphate (MEP) pathway of isoprenoid synthesis by end products dimethylallyl diphosphate (DMADP) and isopentenyl diphosphate (IDP) was postulated, but the extent to which DMADP and IDP can build up is not known. We used bisphosphonate inhibitors, alendronate and zoledronate, that inhibit the consumption of DMADP and IDP by prenyltransferases to gain insight into the extent of end product accumulation and possible feedback inhibition in isoprene-emitting hybrid aspen (Populus tremula × Populus tremuloides). A kinetic method based on dark release of isoprene emission at the expense of substrate pools accumulated in light was used to estimate the in vivo pool sizes of DMADP and upstream metabolites. Feeding with fosmidomycin, an inhibitor of DXP reductoisomerase, alone or in combination with bisphosphonates was used to inhibit carbon input into DXP/MEP pathway or both input and output. We observed a major increase in pathway intermediates, 3- to 4-fold, upstream of DMADP in bisphosphonate-inhibited leaves, but the DMADP pool was enhanced much less, 1.3- to 1.5-fold. In combined fosmidomycin/bisphosphonate treatment, pathway intermediates accumulated, reflecting cytosolic flux of intermediates that can be important under strong metabolic pull in physiological conditions. The data suggested that metabolites accumulated upstream of DMADP consist of phosphorylated intermediates and IDP. Slow conversion of the huge pools of intermediates to DMADP was limited by reductive energy supply. These data indicate that the DXP/MEP pathway is extremely elastic, and the presence of a significant pool of phosphorylated intermediates provides an important valve for fine tuning the pathway flux.

  5. New methods for chemical protein synthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guan, Xiaoyang; Chaffey, Patrick K; Zeng, Chen; Tan, Zhongping

    2015-01-01

    Chemical protein synthesis is a useful tool to generate pure proteins which are otherwise difficult to obtain in sufficient amounts for structure and property analysis. Additionally, because of the precise and flexible nature of chemical synthesis, it allows for controllable variation of protein sequences, which is valuable for understanding the relationships between protein structure and function. Despite the usefulness of chemical protein synthesis, it has not been widely adopted as a tool for protein characterization, mainly because of the lack of general and efficient methods for the preparation and coupling of peptide fragments and for the folding of polypeptide chains. To address these issues, many new methods have recently been developed in the areas of solid-phase peptide synthesis, peptide fragment assembly, and protein folding. Here we review these recent technological advances and highlight the gaps needing to be addressed in future research.

  6. Seedling Lethal1, a Pentatricopeptide Repeat Protein Lacking an E/E+ or DYW Domain in Arabidopsis, Is Involved in Plastid Gene Expression and Early Chloroplast Development1[C][W

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pyo, Young Jae; Kwon, Kwang-Chul; Kim, Anna; Cho, Myeon Haeng

    2013-01-01

    Chloroplasts are the site of photosynthesis and the biosynthesis of essential metabolites, including amino acids, fatty acids, and secondary metabolites. It is known that many seedling-lethal mutants are impaired in chloroplast function or development, indicating the development of functional chloroplast is essential for plant growth and development. Here, we isolated a novel transfer DNA insertion mutant, dubbed sel1 (for seedling lethal1), that exhibited a pigment-defective and seedling-lethal phenotype with a disrupted pentatricopeptide repeat (PPR) gene. Sequence analysis revealed that SEL1 is a member of the PLS subgroup, which is lacking known E/E+ or DYW domains at the C terminus, in the PLS subfamily of the PPR protein family containing a putative N-terminal transit peptide and 14 putative PPR or PPR-like motifs. Confocal microscopic analysis showed that the SEL1-green fluorescent protein fusion protein is localized in chloroplasts. Transmission electron microscopic analysis revealed that the sel1 mutant is impaired in the etioplast, as well as in chloroplast development. In sel1 mutants, plastid-encoded proteins involved in photosynthesis were rarely detected due to the lack of the corresponding transcripts. Furthermore, transcript profiles of plastid genes revealed that, in sel1 mutants, the transcript levels of plastid-encoded RNA polymerase-dependent genes were greatly reduced, but those of nuclear-encoded RNA polymerase-dependent genes were increased or not changed. Additionally, the RNA editing of two editing sites of the acetyl-CoA carboxylase beta subunit gene transcripts in the sel1 mutant was compromised, though it is not directly connected with the sel1 mutant phenotype. Our results demonstrate that SEL1 is involved in the regulation of plastid gene expression required for normal chloroplast development. PMID:24144791

  7. The effect of G1c6P uptake and its subsequent oxidation within pea root plastids on nitrite reduction and glutamate synthesis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bowsher, Caroline G.; Lacey, Anne E.; Hanke, Guy T.; Clarkson, David T.; Saker, Les R.; Stulen, Ineke; Emes, Michael J.

    2007-01-01

    In roots, nitrate assimilation is dependent upon a supply of reductant that is initially generated by oxidative metabolism including the pentose phosphate pathway (OPPP). The uptake of nitrite into the plastids and its subsequent reduction by nitrite reductase (NiR) and glutamate synthase (GOGAT) ar

  8. Plastid genomes of two brown algae, Ectocarpus siliculosus and Fucus vesiculosus: further insights on the evolution of red-algal derived plastids

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Corre Erwan

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Heterokont algae, together with cryptophytes, haptophytes and some alveolates, possess red-algal derived plastids. The chromalveolate hypothesis proposes that the red-algal derived plastids of all four groups have a monophyletic origin resulting from a single secondary endosymbiotic event. However, due to incongruence between nuclear and plastid phylogenies, this controversial hypothesis remains under debate. Large-scale genomic analyses have shown to be a powerful tool for phylogenetic reconstruction but insufficient sequence data have been available for red-algal derived plastid genomes. Results The chloroplast genomes of two brown algae, Ectocarpus siliculosus and Fucus vesiculosus, have been fully sequenced. These species represent two distinct orders of the Phaeophyceae, which is a major group within the heterokont lineage. The sizes of the circular plastid genomes are 139,954 and 124,986 base pairs, respectively, the size difference being due principally to the presence of longer inverted repeat and intergenic regions in E. siliculosus. Gene contents of the two plastids are similar with 139-148 protein-coding genes, 28-31 tRNA genes, and 3 ribosomal RNA genes. The two genomes also exhibit very similar rearrangements compared to other sequenced plastid genomes. The tRNA-Leu gene of E. siliculosus lacks an intron, in contrast to the F. vesiculosus and other heterokont plastid homologues, suggesting its recent loss in the Ectocarpales. Most of the brown algal plastid genes are shared with other red-algal derived plastid genomes, but a few are absent from raphidophyte or diatom plastid genomes. One of these regions is most similar to an apicomplexan nuclear sequence. The phylogenetic relationship between heterokonts, cryptophytes and haptophytes (collectively referred to as chromists plastids was investigated using several datasets of concatenated proteins from two cyanobacterial genomes and 18 plastid genomes, including

  9. Plastid genomes of two brown algae, Ectocarpus siliculosus and Fucus vesiculosus: further insights on the evolution of red-algal derived plastids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Le Corguillé, Gildas; Pearson, Gareth; Valente, Marta; Viegas, Carla; Gschloessl, Bernhard; Corre, Erwan; Bailly, Xavier; Peters, Akira F; Jubin, Claire; Vacherie, Benoit; Cock, J Mark; Leblanc, Catherine

    2009-10-16

    Heterokont algae, together with cryptophytes, haptophytes and some alveolates, possess red-algal derived plastids. The chromalveolate hypothesis proposes that the red-algal derived plastids of all four groups have a monophyletic origin resulting from a single secondary endosymbiotic event. However, due to incongruence between nuclear and plastid phylogenies, this controversial hypothesis remains under debate. Large-scale genomic analyses have shown to be a powerful tool for phylogenetic reconstruction but insufficient sequence data have been available for red-algal derived plastid genomes. The chloroplast genomes of two brown algae, Ectocarpus siliculosus and Fucus vesiculosus, have been fully sequenced. These species represent two distinct orders of the Phaeophyceae, which is a major group within the heterokont lineage. The sizes of the circular plastid genomes are 139,954 and 124,986 base pairs, respectively, the size difference being due principally to the presence of longer inverted repeat and intergenic regions in E. siliculosus. Gene contents of the two plastids are similar with 139-148 protein-coding genes, 28-31 tRNA genes, and 3 ribosomal RNA genes. The two genomes also exhibit very similar rearrangements compared to other sequenced plastid genomes. The tRNA-Leu gene of E. siliculosus lacks an intron, in contrast to the F. vesiculosus and other heterokont plastid homologues, suggesting its recent loss in the Ectocarpales. Most of the brown algal plastid genes are shared with other red-algal derived plastid genomes, but a few are absent from raphidophyte or diatom plastid genomes. One of these regions is most similar to an apicomplexan nuclear sequence. The phylogenetic relationship between heterokonts, cryptophytes and haptophytes (collectively referred to as chromists) plastids was investigated using several datasets of concatenated proteins from two cyanobacterial genomes and 18 plastid genomes, including most of the available red algal and chromist

  10. Complete Plastid Genome Sequence of the Brown Alga Undaria pinnatifida.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lei Zhang

    Full Text Available In this study, we fully sequenced the circular plastid genome of a brown alga, Undaria pinnatifida. The genome is 130,383 base pairs (bp in size; it contains a large single-copy (LSC, 76,598 bp and a small single-copy region (SSC, 42,977 bp, separated by two inverted repeats (IRa and IRb: 5,404 bp. The genome contains 139 protein-coding, 28 tRNA, and 6 rRNA genes; none of these genes contains introns. Organization and gene contents of the U. pinnatifida plastid genome were similar to those of Saccharina japonica. There is a co-linear relationship between the plastid genome of U. pinnatifida and that of three previously sequenced large brown algal species. Phylogenetic analyses of 43 taxa based on 23 plastid protein-coding genes grouped all plastids into a red or green lineage. In the large brown algae branch, U. pinnatifida and S. japonica formed a sister clade with much closer relationship to Ectocarpus siliculosus than to Fucus vesiculosus. For the first time, the start codon ATT was identified in the plastid genome of large brown algae, in the atpA gene of U. pinnatifida. In addition, we found a gene-length change induced by a 3-bp repetitive DNA in ycf35 and ilvB genes of the U. pinnatifida plastid genome.

  11. Progress towards commercialization of plastid transformation technology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maliga, Pal

    2003-01-01

    Tobacco chloroplasts are ready to be tested as a platform for the expression of recombinant proteins on a commercial scale. They hold the promise of reproducible yields of 5-25% of total soluble cellular protein in leaves and reliability has been achieved through refinement of an expression toolkit that includes vectors, recently developed expression cassettes and systems for marker gene removal. Implementation of plastid transformation technology in other crops, however, has met with difficulty and has delayed agronomic applications.

  12. Crystal structure of a conserved domain in the intermembrane space region of the plastid division protein ARC6.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Nitin; Radhakrishnan, Abhijith; Su, Chih-Chia; Osteryoung, Katherine W; Yu, Edward W

    2016-02-01

    The chloroplast division machinery is composed of numerous proteins that assemble as a large complex to divide double-membraned chloroplasts through binary fission. A key mediator of division-complex formation is ARC6, a chloroplast inner envelope protein and evolutionary descendant of the cyanobacterial cell division protein Ftn2. ARC6 connects stromal and cytosolic contractile rings across the two membranes through interaction with an outer envelope protein within the intermembrane space (IMS). The ARC6 IMS region bears a structurally uncharacterized domain of unknown function, DUF4101, that is highly conserved among ARC6 and Ftn2 proteins. Here we report the crystal structure of this domain from Arabidopsis thaliana ARC6. The domain forms an α/β barrel open towards the outer envelope membrane but closed towards the inner envelope membrane. These findings provide new clues into how ARC6 and its homologs contribute to chloroplast and cyanobacterial cell division.

  13. Complex Ancestries of Isoprenoid Synthesis in Dinoflagellates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bentlage, Bastian; Rogers, Travis S; Bachvaroff, Tsvetan R; Delwiche, Charles F

    2016-01-01

    Isoprenoid metabolism occupies a central position in the anabolic metabolism of all living cells. In plastid-bearing organisms, two pathways may be present for de novo isoprenoid synthesis, the cytosolic mevalonate pathway (MVA) and nuclear-encoded, plastid-targeted nonmevalonate pathway (DOXP). Using transcriptomic data we find that dinoflagellates apparently make exclusive use of the DOXP pathway. Using phylogenetic analyses of all DOXP genes we inferred the evolutionary origins of DOXP genes in dinoflagellates. Plastid replacements led to a DOXP pathway of multiple evolutionary origins. Dinoflagellates commonly referred to as dinotoms due to their relatively recent acquisition of a diatom plastid, express two completely redundant DOXP pathways. Dinoflagellates with a tertiary plastid of haptophyte origin, by contrast, express a hybrid pathway of dual evolutionary origin. Here, changes in the targeting motif of signal/transit peptide likely allow for targeting the new plastid by the proteins of core isoprenoid metabolism proteins. Parasitic dinoflagellates of the Amoebophyra species complex appear to have lost the DOXP pathway, suggesting that they may rely on their host for sterol synthesis.

  14. Species comparison of protein synthesis accuracy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hirsch, G.P.; Popp, R.A.; Francis, M.C.; Bradshaw, B.S.; Bailiff, E.G.

    1978-01-01

    An important force in evolutionary selection may be informational efficiency, which results in a balance between the energy expended to maintain a high level of fidelity and the energy lost from errors or mutations in the production of defective offspring. The accuracy of DNA replication may be limited by the average accuracy of protein synthesis if the major source of enzymes which make copying errors are those that contain errors resulting from the processes of transcription and translation. Since many gene products are involved in transcription and translation the frequency of mutations which might affect protein fidelity is much higher than those affecting DNA copying. Species comparisons were made of the accuracy of protein synthesis to determine if the requirements for accurate protein synthesis were more stringent for long lived mammals. Using the incorporation of isoleucine in hemoglobin chains which contain no genetically coded isoleucine as a test of protein synthesis fidelity no correlation with lifespan was found among rabbit, marmoset, cow, pig, and human protein synthesis fidelity. The purfication techniques required to prepare highly purified protein for analysis and the criteria for purity are described.

  15. Plant cellulose synthesis: CESA proteins crossing kingdoms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Manoj; Turner, Simon

    2015-04-01

    Cellulose is a biopolymer of considerable economic importance. It is synthesised by the cellulose synthase complex (CSC) in species ranging from bacteria to higher plants. Enormous progress in our understanding of bacterial cellulose synthesis has come with the recent publication of both the crystal structure and biochemical characterisation of a purified complex able to synthesis cellulose in vitro. A model structure of a plant CESA protein suggests considerable similarity between the bacterial and plant cellulose synthesis. In this review article we will cover current knowledge of how plant CESA proteins synthesise cellulose. In particular the focus will be on the lessons learned from the recent work on the catalytic mechanism and the implications that new data on cellulose structure has for the assembly of CESA proteins into the large complex that synthesis plant cellulose microfibrils.

  16. Comparison of glycerolipid biosynthesis in non-green plastids from sycamore (Acer pseudoplatanus) cells and cauliflower (Brassica oleracea) buds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alban, C; Joyard, J; Douce, R

    1989-05-01

    The availability of methods to fractionate non-green plastids and to prepare their limiting envelope membranes [Alban, Joyard & Douce (1988) Plant Physiol. 88, 709-717] allowed a detailed analysis of the biosynthesis of lysophosphatidic acid, phosphatidic acid, diacylglycerol and monogalactosyl-diacylglycerol (MGDG) in two different types of non-green starch-containing plastids: plastids isolated from cauliflower buds and amyloplasts isolated from sycamore cells. An enzyme [acyl-ACP (acyl carrier protein):sn-glycerol 3-phosphate acyltransferase) recovered in the soluble fraction of non-green plastids transfers oleic acid from oleoyl-ACP to the sn-1 position of sn-glycerol 3-phosphate to form lysophosphatidic acid. Then a membrane-bound enzyme (acyl-ACP:monoacyl-sn-glycerol 3-phosphate acyltransferase), localized in the envelope membrane, catalyses the acylation of the available sn-2 position of 1-oleoyl-sn-glycerol 3-phosphate by palmitic acid from palmitoyl-ACP. Therefore both the soluble phase and the envelope membranes are necessary for acylation of sn-glycerol 3-phosphate. The major difference between cauliflower (Brassica oleracea) and sycamore (Acer pseudoplatanus) membranes is the very low level of phosphatidate phosphatase activity in sycamore envelope membrane. Therefore, very little diacylglycerol is available for MGDG synthesis in sycamore, compared with cauliflower. These findings are consistent with the similarities and differences described in lipid metabolism of mature chloroplasts from 'C18:3' and 'C16:3' plants (those with MGDG containing C18:3 and C16:3 fatty acids). Sycamore contains only C18 fatty acids in MGDG, and the envelope membranes from sycamore amyloplasts have a low phosphatidate phosphatase activity and therefore the enzymes of the Kornberg-Pricer pathway have a low efficiency of incorporation of sn-glycerol 3-phosphate into MGDG. By contrast, cauliflower contains MGDG with C16:3 fatty acid, and the incorporation of sn-glycerol 3

  17. Synthesis of milligram quantities of proteins using a reconstituted in vitro protein synthesis system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kazuta, Yasuaki; Matsuura, Tomoaki; Ichihashi, Norikazu; Yomo, Tetsuya

    2014-11-01

    In this study, the amount of protein synthesized using an in vitro protein synthesis system composed of only highly purified components (the PURE system) was optimized. By varying the concentrations of each system component, we determined the component concentrations that result in the synthesis of 0.38 mg/mL green fluorescent protein (GFP) in batch mode and 3.8 mg/mL GFP in dialysis mode. In dialysis mode, protein concentrations of 4.3 and 4.4 mg/mL were synthesized for dihydrofolate reductase and β-galactosidase, respectively. Using the optimized system, the synthesized protein represented 30% (w/w) of the total protein, which is comparable to the level of overexpressed protein in Escherichia coli cells. This optimized reconstituted in vitro protein synthesis system may potentially be useful for various applications, including in vitro directed evolution of proteins, artificial cell assembly, and protein structural studies.

  18. Respiratory processes in non-photosynthetic plastids

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marta eRenato

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Chlororespiration is a respiratory process located in chloroplast thylakoids which consists in an electron transport chain from NAD(PH to oxygen. This respiratory chain involves the NAD(PH dehydrogenase complex, the plastoquinone pool and the plastid terminal oxidase (PTOX, and it probably acts as a safety valve to prevent the over-reduction of the photosynthetic machinery in stress conditions. The existence of a similar respiratory activity in non-photosynthetic plastids has been less studied. Recently, it has been reported that tomato fruit chromoplasts present an oxygen consumption activity linked to ATP synthesis. Etioplasts and amyloplasts contain several electron carriers and some subunits of the ATP synthase, so they could harbor a similar respiratory process. This review provides an update on the study about respiratory processes in chromoplasts, identifying the major gaps that need to be addressed in future research. It also reviews the proteomic data of etioplasts and amyloplasts, which suggest the presence of a respiratory electron transport chain in these plastids.

  19. The plastid genome of the red alga Laurencia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verbruggen, Heroen; Costa, Joana F

    2015-06-01

    We present the 174,935 nt long plastid genome of the red alga Laurencia sp. JFC0032. It is the third plastid genome characterized for the largest order of red algae (Ceramiales). The circular-mapping plastid genome is small compared to most florideophyte red algae, and our comparisons show a trend toward smaller plastid genome sizes in the family Rhodomelaceae, independent from a similar trend in Cyanidiophyceae. The Laurencia genome is densely packed with 200 annotated protein-coding genes (188 widely conserved, 3 open reading frames shared with other red algae and 9 hypothetical coding regions). It has 29 tRNAs, a single-copy ribosomal RNA cistron, a tmRNA, and the RNase P RNA. © 2015 Phycological Society of America.

  20. The plastid-dividing machinery: formation, constriction and fission.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoshida, Yamato; Miyagishima, Shin-ya; Kuroiwa, Haruko; Kuroiwa, Tsuneyoshi

    2012-12-01

    Plastids divide by constriction of the plastid-dividing (PD) machinery, which encircles the division site. The PD machinery consists of the stromal inner machinery which includes the inner PD and filamenting temperature-sensitive mutant Z (FtsZ) rings and the cytosolic outer machinery which includes the outer PD and dynamin rings. The major constituent of the PD machinery is the outer PD ring, which consists of a bundle of polyglucan filaments. In addition, recent proteomic studies suggest that the PD machinery contains additional proteins that have not been characterized. The PD machinery forms from the inside to the outside of the plastid. The constriction seems to occur by sliding of the polyglucan filaments of the outer PD ring, aided by dynamin. The final fission of the plastid is probably promoted by the 'pinchase' activity of dynamin.

  1. [Plastid genome engineering: novel optimization strategies and applications].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Fei; Lu, Shizhan; Gao, Liang; Zhang, Juanjuan; Lin, Yongjun

    2015-08-01

    The plastid genome engineering system allows site-specific modifications via two homologous recombination events. It is much safer, more precise and efficient compared with the nuclear transformation system. This technology can be applied to the basic research to expand plastid genome function analysis, and it also provides an excellent platform for not only high-level production of recombinant proteins but also plant breeding. In this review, we summarize the state of the art and progresses in this field. We focus on novel breeding strategies in transformation system improvement and new tools to enhance plastid transgene expression levels. In addition, we highlight selected applications in resistance engineering and quality improvement via metabolic engineering. We believe that by overcoming current technological limitations in the plastid transformation system can another green revolution for crop breeding beckon.

  2. Vesicles Are Persistent Features of Different Plastids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lindquist, Emelie; Solymosi, Katalin; Aronsson, Henrik

    2016-10-01

    Peripheral vesicles in plastids have been observed repeatedly, primarily in proplastids and developing chloroplasts, in which they are suggested to function in thylakoid biogenesis. Previous observations of vesicles in mature chloroplasts have mainly concerned low temperature pretreated plants occasionally treated with inhibitors blocking vesicle fusion. Here, we show that such vesicle-like structures occur not only in chloroplasts and proplastids, but also in etioplasts, etio-chloroplasts, leucoplasts, chromoplasts and even transforming desiccoplasts without any specific pretreatment. Observations are made both in C3 and C4 species, in different cell types (meristematic, epidermis, mesophyll, bundle sheath and secretory cells) and different organs (roots, stems, leaves, floral parts and fruits). Until recently not much focus has been given to the idea that vesicle transport in chloroplasts could be mediated by proteins, but recent data suggest that the vesicle system of chloroplasts has similarities with the cytosolic coat protein complex II system. All current data taken together support the idea of an ongoing, active and protein-mediated vesicle transport not only in chloroplasts but also in other plastids, obviously occurring regardless of chemical modifications, temperature and plastid developmental stage.

  3. In vivo analysis of interactions between GFP-labeled microfilaments and plastid stromules

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kwok Ernest Y

    2004-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Plastid stromules are stroma-filled tubules that extend from the surface of plastids in higher plants and allow the exchange of protein molecules between plastids. These structures are highly dynamic; stromules change both their shape and position in the cytoplasm very rapidly. Previous studies with microfilament inhibitors indicated that stromule shape and movement are dependent on the actin cytoskeleton. To learn more about the nature of the interactions of stromules and the cytoskeleton, we imaged fluorescently-labeled microfilaments and plastids. Results We have used Arabidopsis thaliana plants expressing green fluorescent protein fused to the human actin-binding protein talin to observe microfilaments and their relationship to stromules in vivo. Microfilaments were observed in close contact with stromules and plastid bodies of hypocotyl epidermis. Time-lapse confocal microscopy revealed that microfilament rearrangements were associated with changes in plastid and stromule morphology and position. We also observed close interactions between mitochondria and stromules in double-labeled cells. Conclusion Our results indicate a correlation between the rearrangement of microfilaments and changes in the shape and position of plastids and stromules. Stromules interact with microfilaments that may also be utilized by mitochondria and other organelles. The interaction of microfilaments and plastids is likely to be mediated by actin-binding proteins on the plastid envelope membrane.

  4. Protein synthesis in geostimulated root caps

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feldman, L. J.

    1982-01-01

    A study is presented of the processes occurring in the root cap of corn which are requisite for the formation of root cap inhibitor and which can be triggered or modulated by both light and gravity. The results of this study indicate the importance of protein synthesis for light-induced gravitropic bending in roots. Root caps in which protein synthesis is prevented are unable to induce downward bending. This suggests that light acts by stimulating proteins which are necessary for the translation of the gravitropic stimulus into a growth response (downward bending). The turnover of protein with time was also examined in order to determine whether light acts by stimulating the synthesis of unique proteins required for downward growth. It is found that auxin in combination with light allows for the translation of the gravitropic stimulus into a growth response at least in part through the modification of protein synthesis. It is concluded that unique proteins are stimulated by light and are involved in promoting the downward growth in roots which are responding to gravity.

  5. A rare case of plastid protein-coding gene duplication in the chloroplast genome of Euglena archaeoplastidiata (Euglenophyta).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bennett, Matthew S; Shiu, Shin-Han; Triemer, Richard E

    2017-03-12

    Gene duplication is an important evolutionary process that allows duplicate functions to diverge, or, in some cases, allows for new functional gains. However, in contrast to the nuclear genome, gene duplications within the chloroplast are extremely rare. Here, we present the chloroplast genome of the photosynthetic protist Euglena archaeoplastidiata. Upon annotation, it was found that the chloroplast genome contained a novel tandem direct duplication that encoded a portion of RuBisCO large subunit (rbcL) followed by a complete copy of ribosomal protein L32 (rpl32), as well as the associated intergenic sequences. Analyses of the duplicated rpl32 were inconclusive regarding selective pressures, although it was found that substitutions in the duplicated region, all non-synonymous, likely had a neutral functional effect. The duplicated region did not exhibit patterns consistent with previously described mechanisms for tandem direct duplications, and demonstrated an unknown mechanism of duplication. In addition, a comparison of this chloroplast genome to other previously characterized chloroplast genomes from the same family revealed characteristics that indicated E. archaeoplastidiata was probably more closely related to taxa in the genera Monomorphina, Cryptoglena, and Euglenaria than it was to other Euglena taxa. Taken together, the chloroplast genome of E. archaeoplastidiata demonstrated multiple characteristics unique to the euglenoid world, and has justified the longstanding curiosity regarding this enigmatic taxon.

  6. Plastid transformation in potato: Solanum tuberosum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valkov, Vladimir T; Gargano, Daniela; Scotti, Nunzia; Cardi, Teodoro

    2014-01-01

    Although plastid transformation has attractive advantages and potential applications in plant biotechnology, for long time it has been highly efficient only in tobacco. The lack of efficient selection and regeneration protocols and, for some species, the inefficient recombination using heterologous flanking regions in transformation vectors prevented the extension of the technology to major crops. However, the availability of this technology for species other than tobacco could offer new possibilities in plant breeding, such as resistance management or improvement of nutritional value, with no or limited environmental concerns. Herein we describe an efficient plastid transformation protocol for potato (Solanum tuberosum subsp. tuberosum). By optimizing the tissue culture system and using transformation vectors carrying homologous potato flanking sequences, we obtained up to one transplastomic shoot per bombardment. Such efficiency is comparable to that usually achieved in tobacco. The method described in this chapter can be used to regenerate potato transplastomic plants expressing recombinant proteins in chloroplasts as well as in amyloplasts.

  7. Plastid gene expression during fruit ripening in tomato.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piechulla, B; Imlay, K R; Gruissem, W

    1985-11-01

    A tomato chloroplast genome map has been constructed with the restriction enzymes Hpa I, Pvu II, and Sal I. Twelve plastid genes have been located on the tomato plastid genome (159 kb).The expression of plastid genes during tomato fruit ripening has been studied. The levels of transcripts of various genes coding for proteins of the photosystem I (psaA), photosystem II (psbA, psbB, psbC, psbD) and the stroma (rbcL) decrease when plastids differentiate from chloroplasts to chromoplasts. The amount of plastid ribosomal RNA also decreases. Transcripts of the genes for the P700 reaction center protein (psaA), for the photosystem II-associated proteins (psbC, psbD) and for the large subunit of ribulose-1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase (rbcL) cannot be detected in chromoplasts. In contrast, a relatively high level of mRNA is present for the 32 kD protein ('herbicide-binding protein', psbA) in red fruit.

  8. Protein Synthesis Initiation Factors: Phosphorylation and Regulation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Karen S. Browning

    2009-06-15

    The initiation of the synthesis of proteins is a fundamental process shared by all living organisms. Each organism has both shared and unique mechanisms for regulation of this vital process. Higher plants provide for a major amount of fixation of carbon from the environment and turn this carbon into food and fuel sources for our use. However, we have very little understanding of how plants regulate the synthesis of the proteins necessary for these metabolic processes. The research carried out during the grant period sought to address some of these unknowns in the regulation of protein synthesis initiation. Our first goal was to determine if phosphorylation plays a significant role in plant initiation of protein synthesis. The role of phosphorylation, although well documented in mammalian protein synthesis regulation, is not well studied in plants. We showed that several of the factors necessary for the initiation of protein synthesis were targets of plant casein kinase and showed differential phosphorylation by the plant specific isoforms of this kinase. In addition, we identified and confirmed the phosphorylation sites in five of the plant initiation factors. Further, we showed that phosphorylation of one of these factors, eIF5, affected the ability of the factor to participate in the initiation process. Our second goal was to develop a method to make initiation factor 3 (eIF3) using recombinant methods. To date, we successfully cloned and expressed 13/13 subunits of wheat eIF3 in E. coli using de novo gene construction methods. The final step in this process is to place the subunits into three different plasmid operons for co-expression. Successful completion of expression of eIF3 will be an invaluable tool to the plant translation community.

  9. Mitochondrial nucleoid interacting proteins support mitochondrial protein synthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, J; Cooper, H M; Reyes, A; Di Re, M; Sembongi, H; Litwin, T R; Gao, J; Neuman, K C; Fearnley, I M; Spinazzola, A; Walker, J E; Holt, I J

    2012-07-01

    Mitochondrial ribosomes and translation factors co-purify with mitochondrial nucleoids of human cells, based on affinity protein purification of tagged mitochondrial DNA binding proteins. Among the most frequently identified proteins were ATAD3 and prohibitin, which have been identified previously as nucleoid components, using a variety of methods. Both proteins are demonstrated to be required for mitochondrial protein synthesis in human cultured cells, and the major binding partner of ATAD3 is the mitochondrial ribosome. Altered ATAD3 expression also perturbs mtDNA maintenance and replication. These findings suggest an intimate association between nucleoids and the machinery of protein synthesis in mitochondria. ATAD3 and prohibitin are tightly associated with the mitochondrial membranes and so we propose that they support nucleic acid complexes at the inner membrane of the mitochondrion.

  10. ftsZ gene and plastid division

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2003-01-01

    Plastid is one of the most important cellular organelles, the normal division process of plastid is essential for the differentiation and development of plant cells. For a long time, morphological observations and genetic analyses to special mutants are the major research fields of plastid division, but the molecular mechanisms underlying plastid division are largely unknown. Because of the endosymbiotic origin, plastid division might have mechanisms in common with those involved in bacterial cell division. It has been proved that several prokaryotic cell division genes also participate in the plastid division. Recently, the mechanisms of prokaryotic cell division have been well documented, which provides a valuable paradigm for understanding the plastid division mechanisms. In plants, the functional analyses of ftsZ, a key gene involved both in bacteria and plastid division, have established the solid foundation for people to understand the plastid division in molecular level. In this paper we will make a review for the research history and progress of plastid division.

  11. A major role for the plastid-encoded RNA polymerase complex in the expression of plastid transfer RNAs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams-Carrier, Rosalind; Zoschke, Reimo; Belcher, Susan; Pfalz, Jeannette; Barkan, Alice

    2014-01-01

    Chloroplast transcription in land plants relies on collaboration between a plastid-encoded RNA polymerase (PEP) of cyanobacterial ancestry and a nucleus-encoded RNA polymerase of phage ancestry. PEP associates with additional proteins that are unrelated to bacterial transcription factors, many of which have been shown to be important for PEP activity in Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana). However, the biochemical roles of these PEP-associated proteins are not known. We describe phenotypes conditioned by transposon insertions in genes encoding the maize (Zea mays) orthologs of five such proteins: ZmPTAC2, ZmMurE, ZmPTAC10, ZmPTAC12, and ZmPRIN2. These mutants have similar ivory/virescent pigmentation and similar reductions in plastid ribosomes and photosynthetic complexes. RNA gel-blot and microarray hybridizations revealed numerous changes in plastid transcript populations, many of which resemble those reported for the orthologous mutants in Arabidopsis. However, unanticipated reductions in the abundance of numerous transfer RNAs (tRNAs) dominated the microarray data and were validated on RNA gel blots. The magnitude of the deficiencies for several tRNAs was similar to that of the most severely affected messenger RNAs, with the loss of trnL-UAA being particularly severe. These findings suggest that PEP and its associated proteins are critical for the robust transcription of numerous plastid tRNAs and that this function is essential for the prodigious translation of plastid-encoded proteins that is required during the installation of the photosynthetic apparatus.

  12. The plastid genome of Eutreptiella provides a window into the process of secondary endosymbiosis of plastid in euglenids.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Štěpánka Hrdá

    Full Text Available Euglenids are a group of protists that comprises species with diverse feeding modes. One distinct and diversified clade of euglenids is photoautotrophic, and its members bear green secondary plastids. In this paper we present the plastid genome of the euglenid Eutreptiella, which we assembled from 454 sequencing of Eutreptiella gDNA. Comparison of this genome and the only other available plastid genomes of photosynthetic euglenid, Euglena gracilis, revealed that they contain a virtually identical set of 57 protein coding genes, 24 genes fewer than the genome of Pyramimonas parkeae, the closest extant algal relative of the euglenid plastid. Searching within the transcriptomes of Euglena and Eutreptiella showed that 6 of the missing genes were transferred to the nucleus of the euglenid host while 18 have been probably lost completely. Euglena and Eutreptiella represent the deepest bifurcation in the photosynthetic clade, and therefore all these gene transfers and losses must have happened before the last common ancestor of all known photosynthetic euglenids. After the split of Euglena and Eutreptiella only one additional gene loss took place. The conservation of gene content in the two lineages of euglenids is in contrast to the variability of gene order and intron counts, which diversified dramatically. Our results show that the early secondary plastid of euglenids was much more susceptible to gene losses and endosymbiotic gene transfers than the established plastid, which is surprisingly resistant to changes in gene content.

  13. Origins of the protein synthesis cycle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fox, S. W.

    1981-01-01

    Largely derived from experiments in molecular evolution, a theory of protein synthesis cycles has been constructed. The sequence begins with ordered thermal proteins resulting from the self-sequencing of mixed amino acids. Ordered thermal proteins then aggregate to cell-like structures. When they contained proteinoids sufficiently rich in lysine, the structures were able to synthesize offspring peptides. Since lysine-rich proteinoid (LRP) also catalyzes the polymerization of nucleoside triphosphate to polynucleotides, the same microspheres containing LRP could have synthesized both original cellular proteins and cellular nucleic acids. The LRP within protocells would have provided proximity advantageous for the origin and evolution of the genetic code.

  14. Chimeric origins of ochrophytes and haptophytes revealed through an ancient plastid proteome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dorrell, Richard G; Gile, Gillian; McCallum, Giselle; Méheust, Raphaël; Bapteste, Eric P; Klinger, Christen M; Brillet-Guéguen, Loraine; Freeman, Katalina D; Richter, Daniel J; Bowler, Chris

    2017-01-01

    Plastids are supported by a wide range of proteins encoded within the nucleus and imported from the cytoplasm. These plastid-targeted proteins may originate from the endosymbiont, the host, or other sources entirely. Here, we identify and characterise 770 plastid-targeted proteins that are conserved across the ochrophytes, a major group of algae including diatoms, pelagophytes and kelps, that possess plastids derived from red algae. We show that the ancestral ochrophyte plastid proteome was an evolutionary chimera, with 25% of its phylogenetically tractable nucleus-encoded proteins deriving from green algae. We additionally show that functional mixing of host and plastid proteomes, such as through dual-targeting, is an ancestral feature of plastid evolution. Finally, we detect a clear phylogenetic signal from one ochrophyte subgroup, the lineage containing pelagophytes and dictyochophytes, in plastid-targeted proteins from another major algal lineage, the haptophytes. This may represent a possible serial endosymbiosis event deep in eukaryotic evolutionary history. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.23717.001 PMID:28498102

  15. Maturation of Plastid c-type Cytochromes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gabilly, Stéphane T; Hamel, Patrice P

    2017-01-01

    Cytochromes c are hemoproteins, with the prosthetic group covalently linked to the apoprotein, which function as electron carriers. A class of cytochromes c is defined by a CXXCH heme-binding motif where the cysteines form thioether bonds with the vinyl groups of heme. Plastids are known to contain up to three cytochromes c. The membrane-bound cytochrome f and soluble cytochrome c6 operate in photosynthesis while the activity of soluble cytochrome c6A remains unknown. Conversion of apo- to holocytochrome c occurs in the thylakoid lumen and requires the independent transport of apocytochrome and heme across the thylakoid membrane followed by the stereospecific attachment of ferroheme via thioether linkages. Attachment of heme to apoforms of plastid cytochromes c is dependent upon the products of the CCS (for cytochrome csynthesis) genes, first uncovered via genetic analysis of photosynthetic deficient mutants in the green alga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii. The CCS pathway also occurs in cyanobacteria and several bacteria. CcsA and CCS1, the signature components of the CCS pathway are polytopic membrane proteins proposed to operate in the delivery of heme from the stroma to the lumen, and also in the catalysis of the heme ligation reaction. CCDA, CCS4, and CCS5 are components of trans-thylakoid pathways that deliver reducing equivalents in order to maintain the heme-binding cysteines in a reduced form prior to thioether bond formation. While only four CCS components are needed in bacteria, at least eight components are required for plastid cytochrome c assembly, suggesting the biochemistry of thioether formation is more nuanced in the plastid system.

  16. Maturation of Plastid c-type Cytochromes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stéphane T. Gabilly

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Cytochromes c are hemoproteins, with the prosthetic group covalently linked to the apoprotein, which function as electron carriers. A class of cytochromes c is defined by a CXXCH heme-binding motif where the cysteines form thioether bonds with the vinyl groups of heme. Plastids are known to contain up to three cytochromes c. The membrane-bound cytochrome f and soluble cytochrome c6 operate in photosynthesis while the activity of soluble cytochrome c6A remains unknown. Conversion of apo- to holocytochrome c occurs in the thylakoid lumen and requires the independent transport of apocytochrome and heme across the thylakoid membrane followed by the stereospecific attachment of ferroheme via thioether linkages. Attachment of heme to apoforms of plastid cytochromes c is dependent upon the products of the CCS (for cytochrome csynthesis genes, first uncovered via genetic analysis of photosynthetic deficient mutants in the green alga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii. The CCS pathway also occurs in cyanobacteria and several bacteria. CcsA and CCS1, the signature components of the CCS pathway are polytopic membrane proteins proposed to operate in the delivery of heme from the stroma to the lumen, and also in the catalysis of the heme ligation reaction. CCDA, CCS4, and CCS5 are components of trans-thylakoid pathways that deliver reducing equivalents in order to maintain the heme-binding cysteines in a reduced form prior to thioether bond formation. While only four CCS components are needed in bacteria, at least eight components are required for plastid cytochrome c assembly, suggesting the biochemistry of thioether formation is more nuanced in the plastid system.

  17. Proteome Dynamics during Plastid Differentiation in Rice1[W

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kleffmann, Torsten; von Zychlinski, Anne; Russenberger, Doris; Hirsch-Hoffmann, Matthias; Gehrig, Peter; Gruissem, Wilhelm; Baginsky, Sacha

    2007-01-01

    We have analyzed proteome dynamics during light-induced development of rice (Oryza sativa) chloroplasts from etioplasts using quantitative two-dimensional gel electrophoresis and tandem mass spectrometry protein identification. In the dark, the etioplast allocates the main proportion of total protein mass to carbohydrate and amino acid metabolism and a surprisingly high number of proteins to the regulation and expression of plastid genes. Chaperones, proteins for photosynthetic energy metabolism, and enzymes of the tetrapyrrole pathway were identified among the most abundant etioplast proteins. The detection of 13 N-terminal acetylated peptides allowed us to map the exact localization of the transit peptide cleavage site, demonstrating good agreement with the prediction for most proteins. Based on the quantitative etioplast proteome map, we examined early light-induced changes during chloroplast development. The transition from heterotrophic metabolism to photosynthesis-supported autotrophic metabolism was already detectable 2 h after illumination and affected most essential metabolic modules. Enzymes in carbohydrate metabolism, photosynthesis, and gene expression were up-regulated, whereas enzymes in amino acid and fatty acid metabolism were significantly decreased in relative abundance. Enzymes involved in nucleotide metabolism, tetrapyrrole biosynthesis, and redox regulation remained unchanged. Phosphoprotein-specific staining at different time points during chloroplast development revealed light-induced phosphorylation of a nuclear-encoded plastid RNA-binding protein, consistent with changes in plastid RNA metabolism. Quantitative information about all identified proteins and their regulation by light is available in plprot, the plastid proteome database (http://www.plprot.ethz.ch). PMID:17189339

  18. Haematopoietic stem cells require a highly regulated protein synthesis rate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Signer, Robert A J; Magee, Jeffrey A; Salic, Adrian; Morrison, Sean J

    2014-05-01

    Many aspects of cellular physiology remain unstudied in somatic stem cells, for example, there are almost no data on protein synthesis in any somatic stem cell. Here we set out to compare protein synthesis in haematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) and restricted haematopoietic progenitors. We found that the amount of protein synthesized per hour in HSCs in vivo was lower than in most other haematopoietic cells, even if we controlled for differences in cell cycle status or forced HSCs to undergo self-renewing divisions. Reduced ribosome function in Rpl24(Bst/+) mice further reduced protein synthesis in HSCs and impaired HSC function. Pten deletion increased protein synthesis in HSCs but also reduced HSC function. Rpl24(Bst/+) cell-autonomously rescued the effects of Pten deletion in HSCs; blocking the increase in protein synthesis, restoring HSC function, and delaying leukaemogenesis. Pten deficiency thus depletes HSCs and promotes leukaemia partly by increasing protein synthesis. Either increased or decreased protein synthesis impairs HSC function.

  19. SOT1, a pentatricopeptide repeat protein with a small MutS-related domain, is required for correct processing of plastid 23S-4.5S rRNA precursors in Arabidopsis thaliana.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Wenjuan; Liu, Sheng; Ruwe, Hannes; Zhang, Delin; Melonek, Joanna; Zhu, Yajuan; Hu, Xupeng; Gusewski, Sandra; Yin, Ping; Small, Ian D; Howell, Katharine A; Huang, Jirong

    2016-03-01

    Ribosomal RNA processing is essential for plastid ribosome biogenesis, but is still poorly understood in higher plants. Here, we show that SUPPRESSOR OF THYLAKOID FORMATION1 (SOT1), a plastid-localized pentatricopeptide repeat (PPR) protein with a small MutS-related domain, is required for maturation of the 23S-4.5S rRNA dicistron. Loss of SOT1 function leads to slower chloroplast development, suppression of leaf variegation, and abnormal 23S and 4.5S processing. Predictions based on the PPR motif sequences identified the 5' end of the 23S-4.5S rRNA dicistronic precursor as a putative SOT1 binding site. This was confirmed by electrophoretic mobility shift assay, and by loss of the abundant small RNA 'footprint' associated with this site in sot1 mutants. We found that more than half of the 23S-4.5S rRNA dicistrons in sot1 mutants contain eroded and/or unprocessed 5' and 3' ends, and that the endonucleolytic cleavage product normally released from the 5' end of the precursor is absent in a sot1 null mutant. We postulate that SOT1 binding protects the 5' extremity of the 23S-4.5S rRNA dicistron from exonucleolytic attack, and favours formation of the RNA structure that allows endonucleolytic processing of its 5' and 3' ends. © 2016 The Authors The Plant Journal © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  20. Semi-synthesis of thioamide containing proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yanxin J; Szantai-Kis, D Miklos; Petersson, E James

    2015-05-14

    Our laboratory has shown that the thioamide, a single atom O-to-S substitution, can be a versatile fluorescence quenching probe that is minimally-perturbing when placed at many locations in a protein sequence. In order to make these and other thioamide experiments applicable to full-sized proteins, we have developed methods for incorporating thioamides by generating thiopeptide fragments through solid phase synthesis and ligating them to protein fragments expressed in E. coli. To install donor fluorophores, we have adapted unnatural amino acid mutagenesis methods, including the generation of new tRNA synthetases for the incorporation of small, intrinsically fluorescent amino acids. We have used a combination of these two methods, as well as chemoenzymatic protein modification, to efficiently install sidechain and backbone modifications to generate proteins labeled with fluorophore/thioamide pairs.

  1. Characterization of the plastid-specific germination and seedling establishment transcriptional programme.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Demarsy, E; Buhr, F; Lambert, E; Lerbs-Mache, S

    2012-01-01

    Upon imbibition, dry seeds rapidly gain metabolic activity and the switching on of a germination-specific transcriptional programme in the nucleus goes ahead, with the induction of many nucleus-encoded transcripts coding for plastid-localized proteins. Dedifferentiated plastids present in dry seeds differentiate into chloroplasts in cotyledons and into amyloplasts in the root and in the hypocotyl, raising the question of whether the beginning of a new plant's life cycle is also characterized by specific changes in the plastid transcriptional programme. Here the plastid transcriptome is characterized during imbibition/stratification, germination, and early seedling outgrowth. It is shown that each of these three developmental steps is characterized by specific changes in the transcriptome profile, due to differential activities of the three plastid RNA polymerases and showing the integration of plastids into a germination-specific transcriptional programme. All three RNA polymerases are active during imbibition; that is, at 4 °C in darkness. However, activity of plastid-encoded RNA polymerase (PEP) is restricted to the rrn operon. After cold release, PEP changes specificity by also transcribing photosynthesis-related genes. The period of germination and radicle outgrowth is further characterized by remarkable antisense RNA production that diminishes during greening when photosynthesis-related mRNAs accumulate to their highest but to very different steady-state levels. During stratification and germination mRNA accumulation is not paralleled by protein accumulation, indicating that plastid transcription is more important for efficient germination than translation.

  2. Glucocorticoid effects on hippocampal protein synthesis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schlatter, L.K.

    1988-01-01

    Following subcutaneous injection of rats with 5 mg corticosterone, hippocampal slices in vitro show increased ({sup 35}S)-methionine labeling of a cytosolic protein with an apparent molecular weight (M{sub r}) of 35,000 and an isoelectric point (IEP) of 6.6. This labeling is temporally consistent with a transcriptional event, and is steroid- and tissue-specific. The pear serum concentration of steroid occurs one hour or less following the injection. Maximal labeling of this protein is reached whenever serum corticosterone values are approximately 100 ng/ml. When endogenous corticosterone levels are elevated to 100 ng/ml through stressors or exogenous ACTH injections the same maximal increase in synthesis of the 35,000 M{sub r} protein is observed. Adrenalectomy prevents the observed response from occurring following stressor application or ACTH injections. Comparison of the increases observed after administration of the type 2 receptor agonist RU 28362 and aldosterone, which has a higher affinity for the type 1 receptor, shows a 50-fold greater sensitivity of the response to the type 2 receptor agonist. Synthesis of this protein following serum increases of steroid possibly correlates to the theorized function of the type 2 receptor feedback regulation. The similar protein in the liver has an IEP of 6.8 and a slightly higher M{sub r}. A second hippocampal protein with an M{sub r} of 46,000 and an IEP of 6.2 is also increased in labeling. Two additional liver proteins, one of Mr 53,000 (IEP of 6.2) and the other with an M{sub r} of 45,000 (IEP of 8.7-7.8) are increased in the liver following glucocorticoid administration.

  3. The evolution of the protein synthesis system. I - A model of a primitive protein synthesis system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mizutani, H.; Ponnamperuma, C.

    1977-01-01

    A model is developed to describe the evolution of the protein synthesis system. The model is comprised of two independent autocatalytic systems, one including one gene (A-gene) and two activated amino acid polymerases (O and A-polymerases), and the other including the addition of another gene (N-gene) and a nucleotide polymerase. Simulation results have suggested that even a small enzymic activity and polymerase specificity could lead the system to the most accurate protein synthesis, as far as permitted by transitions to systems with higher accuracy.

  4. Large-scale phylogenomic analyses indicate a deep origin of primary plastids within cyanobacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Criscuolo, Alexis; Gribaldo, Simonetta

    2011-11-01

    The emergence of photosynthetic eukaryotes has played a crucial role in evolution and has strongly modified earth's ecology. Several phylogenetic analyses have established that primary plastids arose from a cyanobacterium through endosymbiosis. However, the question of which present-day cyanobacterial lineage is most closely related to primary plastids has been unclear. Here, we have performed an extensive phylogenomic investigation on the origin of primary plastids based on the analysis of up to 191 protein markers and over 30,000 aligned amino acid sites from 22 primary photosynthetic eukaryotes and 61 cyanobacteria representing a wide taxonomic sampling of this phylum. By using a number of solutions to circumvent a large range of systematic errors, we have reconstructed a robust global phylogeny of cyanobacteria and studied the placement of primary plastids within it. Our results strongly support an early emergence of primary plastids within cyanobacteria, prior to the diversification of most present-day cyanobacterial lineages for which genomic data are available.

  5. Codon Adaptation of Plastid Genes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suzuki, Haruo; Morton, Brian R.

    2016-01-01

    Codon adaptation is codon usage bias that results from selective pressure to increase the translation efficiency of a gene. Codon adaptation has been studied across a wide range of genomes and some early analyses of plastids have shown evidence for codon adaptation in a limited set of highly expressed plastid genes. Here we study codon usage bias across all fully sequenced plastid genomes which includes representatives of the Rhodophyta, Alveolata, Cryptophyta, Euglenozoa, Glaucocystophyceae, Rhizaria, Stramenopiles and numerous lineages within the Viridiplantae, including Chlorophyta and Embryophyta. We show evidence that codon adaptation occurs in all genomes except for two, Theileria parva and Heicosporidium sp., both of which have highly reduced gene contents and no photosynthesis genes. We also show evidence that selection for codon adaptation increases the representation of the same set of codons, which we refer to as the adaptive codons, across this wide range of taxa, which is probably due to common features descended from the initial endosymbiont. We use various measures to estimate the relative strength of selection in the different lineages and show that it appears to be fairly strong in certain Stramenopiles and Chlorophyta lineages but relatively weak in many members of the Rhodophyta, Euglenozoa and Embryophyta. Given these results we propose that codon adaptation in plastids is widespread and displays the same general features as adaptation in eubacterial genomes. PMID:27196606

  6. Codon Adaptation of Plastid Genes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Haruo Suzuki

    Full Text Available Codon adaptation is codon usage bias that results from selective pressure to increase the translation efficiency of a gene. Codon adaptation has been studied across a wide range of genomes and some early analyses of plastids have shown evidence for codon adaptation in a limited set of highly expressed plastid genes. Here we study codon usage bias across all fully sequenced plastid genomes which includes representatives of the Rhodophyta, Alveolata, Cryptophyta, Euglenozoa, Glaucocystophyceae, Rhizaria, Stramenopiles and numerous lineages within the Viridiplantae, including Chlorophyta and Embryophyta. We show evidence that codon adaptation occurs in all genomes except for two, Theileria parva and Heicosporidium sp., both of which have highly reduced gene contents and no photosynthesis genes. We also show evidence that selection for codon adaptation increases the representation of the same set of codons, which we refer to as the adaptive codons, across this wide range of taxa, which is probably due to common features descended from the initial endosymbiont. We use various measures to estimate the relative strength of selection in the different lineages and show that it appears to be fairly strong in certain Stramenopiles and Chlorophyta lineages but relatively weak in many members of the Rhodophyta, Euglenozoa and Embryophyta. Given these results we propose that codon adaptation in plastids is widespread and displays the same general features as adaptation in eubacterial genomes.

  7. Phylogeny of nuclear-encoded plastid-targeted GAPDH gene supports separate origins for the peridinin- and the fucoxanthin derivative-containing plastids of dinoflagellates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takishita, Kiyotaka; Ishida, Ken-Ichiro; Maruyama, Tadashi

    2004-12-01

    Although most photosynthetic dinoflagellates have plastids with peridinin, the three dinoflagellate genera Karenia, Karlodinium, and Takayama possess anomalously pigmented plastids that contain fucoxanthin and its derivatives (19'-hexanoyloxy-fucoxanthin and 19'-butanoyloxy-fucoxanthin) instead of the peridinin. This pigment composition is similar to that of haptophytes. All peridinin-containing dinoflagellates investigated so far have at least two types of glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase (GAPDH): cytosolic and plastid-targeted forms. In the present study, we cloned and sequenced genes encoding cytosolic and plastid-targeted GAPDH proteins from three species of the fucoxanthin derivative-containing dinoflagellates. Based on the molecular phylogeny, the plastid-targeted GAPDH genes of the fucoxanthin derivative-containing dinoflagellates were closely related to those of haptophyte algae rather than to the peridinin-containing dinoflagellates, while one of several cytosolic versions from the peridinin- and the fucoxanthin derivative-containing dinoflagellates are closely related to each other. Considering a previously reported theory that the plastid-targeted GAPDH from the peridinin-containing dinoflagellates originated by a gene duplication of the cytosolic form before the splitting of the dinoflagellate lineage, it is highly likely that the plastid-targeted GAPDH gene of the peridinin-containing dinoflagellates is original in this algal group and that in the fucoxanthin-containing dinoflagellates, the original plastid-targeted GAPDH was replaced by that of a haptophyte endosymbiont during a tertiary endosymbiosis. The present results strongly support the hypothesis that the plastids of the peridinin- and the fucoxanthin derivative-containing dinoflagellates are of separate origin.

  8. PLASTID MOVEMENT IMPAIRED1 and PLASTID MOVEMENT IMPAIRED1-RELATED1 Mediate Photorelocation Movements of Both Chloroplasts and Nuclei.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suetsugu, Noriyuki; Higa, Takeshi; Kong, Sam-Geun; Wada, Masamitsu

    2015-10-01

    Organelle movement and positioning play important roles in fundamental cellular activities and adaptive responses to environmental stress in plants. To optimize photosynthetic light utilization, chloroplasts move toward weak blue light (the accumulation response) and escape from strong blue light (the avoidance response). Nuclei also move in response to strong blue light by utilizing the light-induced movement of attached plastids in leaf cells. Blue light receptor phototropins and several factors for chloroplast photorelocation movement have been identified through molecular genetic analysis of Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana). PLASTID MOVEMENT IMPAIRED1 (PMI1) is a plant-specific C2-domain protein that is required for efficient chloroplast photorelocation movement. There are two PLASTID MOVEMENT IMPAIRED1-RELATED (PMIR) genes, PMIR1 and PMIR2, in the Arabidopsis genome. However, the mechanism in which PMI1 regulates chloroplast and nuclear photorelocation movements and the involvement of PMIR1 and PMIR2 in these organelle movements remained unknown. Here, we analyzed chloroplast and nuclear photorelocation movements in mutant lines of PMI1, PMIR1, and PMIR2. In mesophyll cells, the pmi1 single mutant showed severe defects in both chloroplast and nuclear photorelocation movements resulting from the impaired regulation of chloroplast-actin filaments. In pavement cells, pmi1 mutant plants were partially defective in both plastid and nuclear photorelocation movements, but pmi1pmir1 and pmi1pmir1pmir2 mutant lines lacked the blue light-induced movement responses of plastids and nuclei completely. These results indicated that PMI1 is essential for chloroplast and nuclear photorelocation movements in mesophyll cells and that both PMI1 and PMIR1 are indispensable for photorelocation movements of plastids and thus, nuclei in pavement cells.

  9. Nuclear and plastid genetic engineering of plants: comparison of opportunities and challenges.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meyers, Benjamin; Zaltsman, Adi; Lacroix, Benoît; Kozlovsky, Stanislav V; Krichevsky, Alexander

    2010-01-01

    Plant genetic engineering is one of the key technologies for crop improvement as well as an emerging approach for producing recombinant proteins in plants. Both plant nuclear and plastid genomes can be genetically modified, yet fundamental functional differences between the eukaryotic genome of the plant cell nucleus and the prokaryotic-like genome of the plastid will have an impact on key characteristics of the resulting transgenic organism. So, which genome, nuclear or plastid, to transform for the desired transgenic phenotype? In this review we compare the advantages and drawbacks of engineering plant nuclear and plastid genomes to generate transgenic plants with the traits of interest, and evaluate the pros and cons of their use for different biotechnology and basic research applications, ranging from generation of commercial crops with valuable new phenotypes to 'bioreactor' plants for large-scale production of recombinant proteins to research model plants expressing various reporter proteins.

  10. Understanding Protein Synthesis: An Interactive Card Game Discussion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lewis, Alison; Peat, Mary; Franklin, Sue

    2005-01-01

    Protein synthesis is a complex process and students find it difficult to understand. This article describes an interactive discussion "game" used by first year biology students at the University of Sydney. The students, in small groups, use the game in which the processes of protein synthesis are actioned by the students during a…

  11. SHORT-TERM MEMORY IS INDEPENDENT OF BRAIN PROTEIN SYNTHESIS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Davis, Hasker P.; Rosenzweig, Mark R.; Jones, Oliver W.

    1980-09-01

    Male Swiss albino CD-1 mice given a single injection of a cerebral protein synthesis inhibitor, anisomycin (ANI) (1 mg/animal), 20 min prior to single trial passive avoidance training demonstrated impaired retention at tests given 3 hr, 6 hr, 1 day, and 7 days after training. Retention was not significantly different from saline controls when tests were given 0.5 or 1.5 hr after training. Prolonging inhibition of brain protein synthesis by giving either 1 or 2 additional injections of ANI 2 or 2 and 4 hr after training did not prolong short-term retention performance. The temporal development of impaired retention in ANI treated mice could not be accounted for by drug dosage, duration of protein synthesis inhibition, or nonspecific sickness at test. In contrast to the suggestion that protein synthesis inhibition prolongs short-term memory (Quinton, 1978), the results of this experiment indicate that short-term memory is not prolonged by antibiotic drugs that inhibit cerebral protein synthesis. All evidence seems consistent with the hypothesis that short-term memory is protein synthesis independent and that the establishment of long-term memory depends upon protein synthesis during or shortly after training. Evidence for a role of protein synthesis in memory maintenance is discussed.

  12. Physiological roles of plastid terminal oxidase in plant stress responses

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Xin Sun; Tao Wen

    2011-12-01

    The plastid terminal oxidase (PTOX) is a plastoquinol oxidase localized in the plastids of plants. It is able to transfer electrons from plastoquinone (PQ) to molecular oxygen with the formation of water. Recent studies have suggested that PTOX is beneficial for plants under environmental stresses, since it is involved in the synthesis of photoprotective carotenoids and chlororespiration, which could potentially protect the chloroplast electron transport chain (ETC) from over-reduction. The absence of PTOX in plants usually results in photo-bleached variegated leaves and impaired adaptation to environment alteration. Although PTOX level and activity has been found to increase under a wide range of stress conditions, the functions of plant PTOX in stress responses are still disputed now. In this paper, the possible physiological roles of PTOX in plant stress responses are discussed based on the recent progress.

  13. CyanoClust: comparative genome resources of cyanobacteria and plastids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sasaki, Naobumi V; Sato, Naoki

    2010-01-01

    Cyanobacteria, which perform oxygen-evolving photosynthesis as do chloroplasts of plants and algae, are one of the best-studied prokaryotic phyla and one from which many representative genomes have been sequenced. Lack of a suitable comparative genomic database has been a problem in cyanobacterial genomics because many proteins involved in physiological functions such as photosynthesis and nitrogen fixation are not catalogued in commonly used databases, such as Clusters of Orthologous Proteins (COG). CyanoClust is a database of homolog groups in cyanobacteria and plastids that are produced by the program Gclust. We have developed a web-server system for the protein homology database featuring cyanobacteria and plastids. Database URL: http://cyanoclust.c.u-tokyo.ac.jp/.

  14. Cell-specific monitoring of protein synthesis in vivo.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nikos Kourtis

    Full Text Available Analysis of general and specific protein synthesis provides important information, relevant to cellular physiology and function. However, existing methodologies, involving metabolic labelling by incorporation of radioactive amino acids into nascent polypeptides, cannot be applied to monitor protein synthesis in specific cells or tissues, in live specimens. We have developed a novel approach for monitoring protein synthesis in specific cells or tissues, in vivo. Fluorescent reporter proteins such as GFP are expressed in specific cells and tissues of interest or throughout animals using appropriate promoters. Protein synthesis rates are assessed by following fluorescence recovery after partial photobleaching of the fluorophore at targeted sites. We evaluate the method by examining protein synthesis rates in diverse cell types of live, wild type or mRNA translation-defective Caenorhabditis elegans animals. Because it is non-invasive, our approach allows monitoring of protein synthesis in single cells or tissues with intrinsically different protein synthesis rates. Furthermore, it can be readily implemented in other organisms or cell culture systems.

  15. Nitrogen control of photosynthetic protein synthesis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schmidt, G.W.

    1986-09-01

    Plant growth is severely affected by impaired photosynthesis resulting from nitrogen deficiency. The molecular aspects of this effect are being studied in the green alga Chlamydomonas grown in continuous culture systems. Photosynthetic membranes of nitrogen-limited cells are dramatically depleted in chlorophylls, xanthophylls and proteins of the light-harvesting complexes. In contrast, enzymes of the reductive pentose phosphate cycle and electron transport chain complexes are reduced only 40 to 65% on a per cell basis comparison with nitrogen-sufficient cultures. From analyses of mRNA levels by in vitro translation and hybridization analyses with cloned DNA sequences for photosynthetic proteins, we have found there are rather minor effects of nitrogen deficiency on nuclear or chloroplast gene transcription. Maturation of a transcript of the nuclear-encoded small subunit of ribulose 1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase is inhibited in nitrogen-deficient cells and causes accumulation of large amounts of mRNA precursors. Most of the effects of nitrogen deficiency on photosynthetic proteins appear to result from posttranscriptional regulatory processes: light-harvesting protein synthesis may be sustained but their import into chloroplasts or translocation to photosynthetic membranes is impaired. Nitrogen-deficient cells lack violaxanthin, a pigment that is essential for the structure, function and biogenesis of the major antenna complexes. The absence of this pigment may be a causative factor for the deficiency of light harvesting complexes. Finally, the accumulation of massive amounts of starch and triglycerides in nitrogen-limited cells indicate there are some genes whose maximal expression is dependent upon nitrogen-limiting conditions. 10 refs.

  16. Regional protein synthesis in rat brain following acute hemispheric ischemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dienel, G A; Pulsinelli, W A; Duffy, T E

    1980-11-01

    Regional protein synthesis was measured in rat brain at intervals up to 48 h following occlusion of the four major arteries to the brain for either 10 or 30 min. Four-vessel occlusions produces ischemia in the cerebral hemispheres and oligemia in the midbrain-diencephalon and brainstem. During the hour following 10 min of ischemia, protein synthesis, measured by incorporation of [14C]valine into protein, was inhibited in the cerebral cortex by 67%. Normal rates of protein synthesis were attained within 4 h of recirculation. In rats subjected to 30 min of ischemia, protein synthesis was inhibited by 83% during the first hour of recirculation in the cortex, caudate-putamen, and hippocampus. Recovery of protein synthesis in these regions was slow (25-48 h). The midbrain-diencephalon showed less inhibition, 67%, and faster recovery (by 12 h). Protein synthesis was unaffected in the brainstem. [14C]Autoradiography revealed that the pyramidal neurons of the hippocampus and areas of the caudate and cortex failed to recover normal rates of protein synthesis even after 48 h. The accumulation of TCA-soluble [14C]valine was enhanced (55-65%) in the cortex, caudate, and hippocampus after 30 min of ischemia; the increase persisted for 12 h. A smaller rise in [14C]valine content (30%) and more rapid normalization of valine accumulation (by 7 h) were observed in the midbrain-diencephalon; no changes were found in the brainstem. In the cortex, recovery was more rapid when the duration of ischemia was reduced. Thus, the degree of inhibition of protein synthesis, the accumulation of valine in the tissue, and the length of time required to reestablish normal values for these processes were dependent on both the severity and the duration of the ischemic insult. Restoration of normal rates of protein synthesis after ischemia was slow compared with the normalization of cerebral energy metabolites.

  17. Protein degradation and protein synthesis in long-term memory formation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Timothy J Jarome

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Long-term memory (LTM formation requires transient changes in the activity of intracellular signaling cascades that are thought to regulate new gene transcription and de novo protein synthesis in the brain. Consistent with this, protein synthesis inhibitors impair LTM for a variety of behavioral tasks when infused into the brain around the time of training or following memory retrieval, suggesting that protein synthesis is a critical step in LTM storage in the brain. However, evidence suggests that protein degradation mediated by the ubiquitin-proteasome system may also be a critical regulator of LTM formation and stability following retrieval. This requirement for increased protein degradation has been shown in the same brain regions in which protein synthesis is required for LTM storage. Additionally, increases in the phosphorylation of proteins involved in translational control parallel increases in protein polyubiquitination and the increased demand for protein degradation is regulated by intracellular signaling molecules thought to regulate protein synthesis during LTM formation. In some cases inhibiting proteasome activity can rescue memory impairments that result from pharmacological blockade of protein synthesis, suggesting that protein degradation may control the requirement for protein synthesis during the memory storage process. Results such as these suggest that protein degradation and synthesis are both critical for LTM formation and may interact to properly consolidate and store memories in the brain. Here, we review the evidence implicating protein synthesis and degradation in LTM storage and highlight the areas of overlap between these two opposing processes. We also discuss evidence suggesting these two processes may interact to properly form and store memories. LTM storage likely requires a coordinated regulation between protein degradation and synthesis at multiple sites in the mammalian brain.

  18. Mitochondrial protein acetylation mediates nutrient sensing of mitochondrial protein synthesis and mitonuclear protein balance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Di Domenico, Antonella; Hofer, Annette; Tundo, Federica; Wenz, Tina

    2014-11-01

    Changes in nutrient supply require global metabolic reprogramming to optimize the utilization of the nutrients. Mitochondria as a central component of the cellular metabolism play a key role in this adaptive process. Since mitochondria harbor their own genome, which encodes essential enzymes, mitochondrial protein synthesis is a determinant of metabolic adaptation. While regulation of cytoplasmic protein synthesis in response to metabolic challenges has been studied in great detail, mechanisms which adapt mitochondrial translation in response to metabolic challenges remain elusive. Our results suggest that the mitochondrial acetylation status controlled by Sirt3 and its proposed opponent GCN5L1 is an important regulator of the metabolic adaptation of mitochondrial translation. Moreover, both proteins modulate regulators of cytoplasmic protein synthesis as well as the mitonuclear protein balance making Sirt3 and GCN5L1 key players in synchronizing mitochondrial and cytoplasmic translation. Our results thereby highlight regulation of mitochondrial translation as a novel component in the cellular nutrient sensing scheme and identify mitochondrial acetylation as a new regulatory principle for the metabolic competence of mitochondrial protein synthesis.

  19. Mutations in a plastid-localized elongation factor G alter early stages of plastid development in Arabidopsis thaliana

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hangarter Roger P

    2007-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Proper development of plastids in embryo and seedling tissues is critical for plant development. During germination, plastids develop to perform many critical functions that are necessary to establish the seedling for further growth. A growing body of work has demonstrated that components of the plastid transcription and translation machinery must be present and functional to establish the organelle upon germination. Results We have identified Arabidopsis thaliana mutants in a gene that encodes a plastid-targeted elongation factor G (SCO1 that is essential for plastid development during embryogenesis since two T-DNA insertion mutations in the coding sequence (sco1-2 and sco1-3 result in an embryo-lethal phenotype. In addition, a point mutation allele (sco1-1 and an allele with a T-DNA insertion in the promoter (sco1-4 of SCO1 display conditional seedling-lethal phenotypes. Seedlings of these alleles exhibit cotyledon and hypocotyl albinism due to improper chloroplast development, and normally die shortly after germination. However, when germinated on media supplemented with sucrose, the mutant plants can produce photosynthetically-active green leaves from the apical meristem. Conclusion The developmental stage-specific phenotype of the conditional-lethal sco1 alleles reveals differences in chloroplast formation during seedling germination compared to chloroplast differentiation in cells derived from the shoot apical meristem. Our identification of embryo-lethal mutant alleles in the Arabidopsis elongation factor G indicates that SCO1 is essential for plant growth, consistent with its predicted role in chloroplast protein translation.

  20. Identification of genes for sulfolipid synthesis in primitive red alga Cyanidioschyzon merolae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sato, Norihiro; Kobayashi, Satomi; Aoki, Motohide; Umemura, Tomonari; Kobayashi, Isao; Tsuzuki, Mikio

    2016-01-29

    Sulfoquinovosyl diacylglycerol is one of the lipids that construct thylakoid membranes, and is distributed from cyanobacteria to plastids in plants including a red lineage. One of the most primitive red algae, Cyanidioschyzon melorae, similar to cyanobacteria and green plants, possesses homologs of the SQD1 and SQD2 genes that code for UDP-sulfoquinovose and sulfoquinovosyl diacylglycerol synthases, respectively, for the synthesis of sulfoquinovosyl diacylglycerol. We here revealed the structural properties of SQD1 and SQD2 homologs in C. melorae intrinsic to those of the authentic proteins, and verified their enzymatic functions through heterologous expression in cyanobacterial disruptants as to the corresponding genes. The results demonstrated that the system of sulfoquinovosyl diacylglycerol synthesis could have been conserved through evolution of cyanobacteria to plastids in a red lineage, which is compatible with the monophyletic origin of plastids. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Intercalation of psoralen into DNA of plastid chromosomes decreases late during barley chloroplast development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davies, J P; Thompson, R J; Mosig, G

    1991-01-01

    We have used a DNA crosslinking assay to measure intercalation of the psoralen derivative HMT (4'-hydroxymethyl-4,5',8-trimethylpsoralen) into barley (Hordeum vulgare) plastid chromosomal DNA during chloroplast and etioplast development. Intercalation into DNA in intact plastids in vivo and in plastid lysates in vitro shows that chromosomal DNA in the most mature chloroplasts intercalates HMT less efficiently than DNA in younger chloroplasts. In contrast, there is no change in HMT intercalation during etioplast differentiation in the dark. Our results also show that DNA in higher plant plastid chromosomes is under superhelical tension in vivo. The lower susceptibility to HMT intercalation of DNA in the most mature chloroplasts indicates that late during chloroplast development the superhelical tension or the binding of proteins to the DNA or both change. Images PMID:1923805

  2. Evolution of RLSB, a nuclear-encoded S1 domain RNA binding protein associated with post-transcriptional regulation of plastid-encoded rbcL mRNA in vascular plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yerramsetty, Pradeep; Stata, Matt; Siford, Rebecca; Sage, Tammy L; Sage, Rowan F; Wong, Gane Ka-Shu; Albert, Victor A; Berry, James O

    2016-06-29

    RLSB, an S-1 domain RNA binding protein of Arabidopsis, selectively binds rbcL mRNA and co-localizes with Ribulose-1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase (Rubisco) within chloroplasts of C3 and C4 plants. Previous studies using both Arabidopsis (C3) and maize (C4) suggest RLSB homologs are post-transcriptional regulators of plastid-encoded rbcL mRNA. While RLSB accumulates in all Arabidopsis leaf chlorenchyma cells, in C4 leaves RLSB-like proteins accumulate only within Rubisco-containing bundle sheath chloroplasts of Kranz-type species, and only within central compartment chloroplasts in the single cell C4 plant Bienertia. Our recent evidence implicates this mRNA binding protein as a primary determinant of rbcL expression, cellular localization/compartmentalization, and photosynthetic function in all multicellular green plants. This study addresses the hypothesis that RLSB is a highly conserved Rubisco regulatory factor that occurs in the chloroplasts all higher plants. Phylogenetic analysis has identified RLSB orthologs and paralogs in all major plant groups, from ancient liverworts to recent angiosperms. RLSB homologs were also identified in algae of the division Charophyta, a lineage closely related to land plants. RLSB-like sequences were not identified in any other algae, suggesting that it may be specific to the evolutionary line leading to land plants. The RLSB family occurs in single copy across most angiosperms, although a few species with two copies were identified, seemingly randomly distributed throughout the various taxa, although perhaps correlating in some cases with known ancient whole genome duplications. Monocots of the order Poales (Poaceae and Cyperaceae) were found to contain two copies, designated here as RLSB-a and RLSB-b, with only RLSB-a implicated in the regulation of rbcL across the maize developmental gradient. Analysis of microsynteny in angiosperms revealed high levels of conservation across eudicot species and for both paralogs in

  3. Neural protein synthesis during aging: effects on plasticity and memory

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lesley A Schimanski

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available During aging, many experience a decline in cognitive function that includes memory loss. The encoding of long-term memories depends on new protein synthesis, and this is also reduced during aging. Thus, it is possible that changes in the regulation of protein synthesis contribute to the memory impairments observed in older animals. Several lines of evidence support this hypothesis. For instance, protein synthesis is required for a longer period following learning to establish long-term memory in aged rodents. Also, under some conditions, synaptic activity or pharmacological activation can induce de novo protein synthesis and lasting changes in synaptic transmission in aged, but not young, rodents; the opposite results can be observed in other conditions. These changes in plasticity likely play a role in manifesting the altered place field properties observed in awake and behaving aged rats. Thus, the collective evidence suggests a link between memory loss and the regulation of protein synthesis in senescence. In fact, pharmaceuticals that target the signaling pathways required for induction of protein synthesis have been shown to improve memory, synaptic plasticity, and place cell properties in aged animals. We suggest that a better understanding of the mechanisms that lead to different protein expression patterns in the neural circuits that change as a function of age will enable the development of more effective therapeutic treatments for memory loss.

  4. Leucine-Enriched Essential Amino Acids Augment Mixed Protein Synthesis, But Not Collagen Protein Synthesis, in Rat Skeletal Muscle after Downhill Running

    OpenAIRE

    2016-01-01

    Mixed and collagen protein synthesis is elevated for as many as 3 days following exercise. Immediately after exercise, enhanced amino acid availability increases synthesis of mixed muscle protein, but not muscle collagen protein. However, the potential for synergic effects of amino acid ingestion with exercise on both mixed and collagen protein synthesis remains unclear. We investigated muscle collagen protein synthesis in rats following post-exercise ingestion of leucine-enriched essential a...

  5. Digestion and microbial protein synthesis in sheep as affected by ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Useni , Alain

    microbial protein synthesis (MPS) in sheep of a milled substrate consisting of a 50 : 50 .... presence of soluble sugars would supply sufficient additional available carbohydrates to shorten .... digestion and milk production of lactating dairy cows.

  6. N-acetylcysteine stimulates protein synthesis in enterocytes independently of glutathione synthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yi, Dan; Hou, Yongqing; Wang, Lei; Long, Minhui; Hu, Shengdi; Mei, Huimin; Yan, Liqiong; Hu, Chien-An Andy; Wu, Guoyao

    2016-02-01

    Dietary supplementation with N-acetylcysteine (NAC) has been reported to improve intestinal health and treat gastrointestinal diseases. However, the underlying mechanisms are not fully understood. According to previous reports, NAC was thought to exert its effect through glutathione synthesis. This study tested the hypothesis that NAC enhances enterocyte growth and protein synthesis independently of cellular glutathione synthesis. Intestinal porcine epithelial cells were cultured for 3 days in Dulbecco's modified Eagle medium containing 0 or 100 μM NAC. To determine a possible role for GSH (the reduced form of glutathione) in mediating the effect of NAC on cell growth and protein synthesis, additional experiments were conducted using culture medium containing 100 μM GSH, 100 μM GSH ethyl ester (GSHee), diethylmaleate (a GSH-depletion agent; 10 μM), or a GSH-synthesis inhibitor (buthionine sulfoximine, BSO; 20 μM). NAC increased cell proliferation, GSH concentration, and protein synthesis, while inhibiting proteolysis. GSHee enhanced cell proliferation and GSH concentration without affecting protein synthesis but inhibited proteolysis. Conversely, BSO or diethylmaleate reduced cell proliferation and GSH concentration without affecting protein synthesis, while promoting protein degradation. At the signaling level, NAC augmented the protein abundance of total mTOR, phosphorylated mTOR, and phosphorylated 70S6 kinase as well as mRNA levels for mTOR and p70S6 kinase in IPEC-1 cells. Collectively, these results indicate that NAC upregulates expression of mTOR signaling proteins to stimulate protein synthesis in enterocytes independently of GSH generation. Our findings provide a hitherto unrecognized biochemical mechanism for beneficial effects of NAC in intestinal cells.

  7. In vivo protein synthesis determinations in human immune cells

    OpenAIRE

    Januszkiewicz, Anna

    2005-01-01

    Intact immune responses are essential for defeating severe infections in individual patients. Insufficient function of the immune system contributes to a poor prognosis in these patients, in particular the ICU patients. Nevertheless, the immune system function is not easily monitored and evaluated. The ongoing metabolic activity of immune competent cells is reflected by their in vivo protein synthesis rate. The aim of this thesis was to apply in vivo protein synthesis measur...

  8. [The synthesis of proteins in unnucleated blood platelets].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bijak, Michał; Saluk, Joanna; Ponczek, Michał Błażej Ponczek; Nowak, Paweł; Wachowicz, Barbara

    2013-07-23

    Platelets are the smallest, unnucleated blood cells that play a key role in maintaining normal hemostasis. In the human body about 1x1011 platelets are formed every day, as a the result of complex processes of differentiation, maturation and fragmentation of megakaryocytes. Studies done over 4 decades ago demonstrated that circulating in blood mature platelets can synthesize proteins. Recent discoveries confirm protein synthesis by unnucleated platelets in response to activation. Moreover, protein synthesis alters the phenotype and function of platelets. Platelets synthesize several proteins involved in hemostasis (COX, αIIbβ3, TF PAI-1, Factor XI, protein C inhibitor) and in inflammatory process (IL-1β, CCL5/RANTES). In spite of lack of transcription platelets have a stable mRNA transcripts with a long life correlated with platelet life span. Platelets also show expression of two important key regulators of translation eIF4E and EIF-2α and have a variety of miRNA molecules responsible for translational regulation. This article describes the historical overview of research on protein synthesis by platelets and presents the molecular mechanisms of protein synthesis in activated platelets (and synthesis of the most important platelet proteins).

  9. Protein intake does not increase vastus lateralis muscle protein synthesis during cycling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hulston, CJ; Wolsk, Emil; Grøndahl, Thomas Sahl

    2011-01-01

    by 51% ± 22% (0.070%·h(-1), ± 0.003%·h(-1), and 0.105%·h(-1), ± 0.013%·h(-1), in CHO and CHO+P, respectively; P protein net balance was negative during recovery with CHO intake, whereas positive leg protein net balance was achieved with CHO+P intake. CONCLUSIONS: We conclude...... that consuming protein during prolonged bicycle exercise does not increase protein synthesis within highly active leg muscles. However, protein intake may have stimulated protein synthesis within less active leg muscles and/or other nonmuscle leg tissue. Finally, protein supplementation, during exercise......PURPOSE: This study aimed to investigate the effect of protein ingestion on leg protein turnover and vastus lateralis muscle protein synthesis during bicycle exercise and recovery. METHODS: Eight healthy males participated in two experiments in which they ingested either a carbohydrate solution...

  10. The origin of polynucleotide-directed protein synthesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orgel, Leslie E.

    1989-01-01

    If protein synthesis evolved in an RNA world it was probably preceded by simpler processes by means of which interaction with amino acids conferred selective advantage on replicating RNA molecules. It is suggested that at first the simple attachment of amino acids to the 2'(3') termini of RNA templates favored initiation of replication at the end of the template rather than at internal positions. The second stage in the evolution of protein synthesis would probably have been the association of pairs of charged RNA adaptors in such a way as to favor noncoded formation of peptides. Only after this process had become efficient could coded synthesis have begun.

  11. Complete sequence and analysis of plastid genomes of two economically important red algae: Pyropia haitanensis and Pyropia yezoensis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Li Wang

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Pyropia haitanensis and P. yezoensis are two economically important marine crops that are also considered to be research models to study the physiological ecology of intertidal seaweed communities, evolutionary biology of plastids, and the origins of sexual reproduction. This plastid genome information will facilitate study of breeding, population genetics and phylogenetics. PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We have fully sequenced using next-generation sequencing the circular plastid genomes of P. hatanensis (195,597 bp and P. yezoensis (191,975 bp, the largest of all the plastid genomes of the red lineage sequenced to date. Organization and gene contents of the two plastids were similar, with 211-213 protein-coding genes (including 29-31 unknown-function ORFs, 37 tRNA genes, and 6 ribosomal RNA genes, suggesting a largest coding capacity in the red lineage. In each genome, 14 protein genes overlapped and no interrupted genes were found, indicating a high degree of genomic condensation. Pyropia maintain an ancient gene content and conserved gene clusters in their plastid genomes, containing nearly complete repertoires of the plastid genes known in photosynthetic eukaryotes. Similarity analysis based on the whole plastid genome sequences showed the distance between P. haitanensis and P. yezoensis (0.146 was much smaller than that of Porphyra purpurea and P. haitanensis (0.250, and P. yezoensis (0.251; this supports re-grouping the two species in a resurrected genus Pyropia while maintaining P. purpurea in genus Porphyra. Phylogenetic analysis supports a sister relationship between Bangiophyceae and Florideophyceae, though precise phylogenetic relationships between multicellular red alage and chromists were not fully resolved. CONCLUSIONS: These results indicate that Pyropia have compact plastid genomes. Large coding capacity and long intergenic regions contribute to the size of the largest plastid genomes reported for the red lineage. Possessing

  12. Truly Absorbed Microbial Protein Synthesis, Rumen Bypass Protein, Endogenous Protein, and Total Metabolizable Protein from Starchy and Protein-Rich Raw Materials

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Parand, Ehsan; Vakili, Alireza; Mesgaran, Mohsen Danesh; Duinkerken, Van Gert; Yu, Peiqiang

    2015-01-01

    This study was carried out to measure truly absorbed microbial protein synthesis, rumen bypass protein, and endogenous protein loss, as well as total metabolizable protein, from starchy and protein-rich raw feed materials with model comparisons. Predictions by the DVE2010 system as a more

  13. Modeling protein synthesis from a physicist's perspective: a toy model

    CERN Document Server

    Basu, A; Basu, Aakash; Chowdhury, Debashish

    2007-01-01

    Proteins are polymers of amino acids. These macromolecules are synthesized by intracellular machines called {\\it ribosome}. Although, traditionally, the experimental investigation of protein synthesis has been an active area of research in molecular cell biology, important quantitative models of this phenomenon have been reported mostly in the research journals devoted to statistical physics and related interdisciplinary topics. From the perspective of a physicist, protein synthesis is a phenomenon of {\\it classical transport of interacting ribosomes on a messenger RNA (mRNA) template} that dictates the sequence of the amino acids on the protein. Here we bring this frontier area of contemporary research into the classroom by appropriate simplification of the models and methods. In particular, we develope a simple toy model and analyze it by some elementary techniques of non-equilibrium statistical mechanics to predict the average rate of protein synthesis and their spatial organization in the steady-state.

  14. Improved cell-free RNA and protein synthesis system.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jun Li

    Full Text Available Cell-free RNA and protein synthesis (CFPS is becoming increasingly used for protein production as yields increase and costs decrease. Advances in reconstituted CFPS systems such as the Protein synthesis Using Recombinant Elements (PURE system offer new opportunities to tailor the reactions for specialized applications including in vitro protein evolution, protein microarrays, isotopic labeling, and incorporating unnatural amino acids. In this study, using firefly luciferase synthesis as a reporter system, we improved PURE system productivity up to 5 fold by adding or adjusting a variety of factors that affect transcription and translation, including Elongation factors (EF-Ts, EF-Tu, EF-G, and EF4, ribosome recycling factor (RRF, release factors (RF1, RF2, RF3, chaperones (GroEL/ES, BSA and tRNAs. The work provides a more efficient defined in vitro transcription and translation system and a deeper understanding of the factors that limit the whole system efficiency.

  15. Amiloride, protein synthesis, and activation of quiescent cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lubin, M; Cahn, F; Coutermarsh, B A

    1982-11-01

    Amiloride is known to inhibit both influx of sodium ions and activation of quiescent cells by growth factors. The coincidence of these effects has been cited to support the proposal that influx of sodium ions acts as a mitogenic signal. Although it was noted that amiloride inhibited protein synthesis, this was attributed to an action on transport of amino acids, particularly those coupled to sodium fluxes. We find, however, that amiloride directly inhibits polypeptide synthesis in a reticulocyte lysate. In Swiss 3T3 cells, concentrations of amiloride and of cycloheximide that are nearly matched in their degree of inhibition of protein synthesis, produce about the same degree of inhibition of transit of cells from G0 to S. Inhibition of protein synthesis is sufficient to explain the effect of amiloride on mitogenesis; the drug, therefore, is not suitable for testing the hypothesis that sodium influx is a mitogenic signal.

  16. Inadequacy of prebiotic synthesis as origin of proteinous amino acids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong, J T; Bronskill, P M

    1979-07-18

    The production of some nonproteinous, and lack of production of other proteinous, amino acids in model prebiotic synthesis, along with the instability of glutamine and asparagine, suggest that not all of the 20 present day proteinous amino acids gained entry into proteins directly from the primordial soup. Instead, a process of active co-evolution of the genetic code and its constituent amino acids would have to precede the final selection of these proteinous amono acids.

  17. Plastid osmotic stress influences cell differentiation at the plant shoot apex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, Margaret E; Mixdorf, Matthew; Berg, R Howard; Haswell, Elizabeth S

    2016-09-15

    The balance between proliferation and differentiation in the plant shoot apical meristem is controlled by regulatory loops involving the phytohormone cytokinin and stem cell identity genes. Concurrently, cellular differentiation in the developing shoot is coordinated with the environmental and developmental status of plastids within those cells. Here, we employ an Arabidopsis thaliana mutant exhibiting constitutive plastid osmotic stress to investigate the molecular and genetic pathways connecting plastid osmotic stress with cell differentiation at the shoot apex. msl2 msl3 mutants exhibit dramatically enlarged and deformed plastids in the shoot apical meristem, and develop a mass of callus tissue at the shoot apex. Callus production in this mutant requires the cytokinin receptor AHK2 and is characterized by increased cytokinin levels, downregulation of cytokinin signaling inhibitors ARR7 and ARR15, and induction of the stem cell identity gene WUSCHEL Furthermore, plastid stress-induced apical callus production requires elevated plastidic reactive oxygen species, ABA biosynthesis, the retrograde signaling protein GUN1, and ABI4. These results are consistent with a model wherein the cytokinin/WUS pathway and retrograde signaling control cell differentiation at the shoot apex. © 2016. Published by The Company of Biologists Ltd.

  18. Localization of Two GFP-tagged Tobacco Plastid DivisionProtein NtFtsZs in Escherichia coli%烟草质体分裂蛋白NtFtsZs在大肠杆菌中的定位分析

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王东; 孔冬冬; 鞠传丽; 胡勇; 何奕昆; 孙敬三

    2002-01-01

    Two plastid division genes, NtFtsZ1 and NtFtsZ2 isolated from Nicotiana tabacum L. were fused with gfp and expressed in Escherichia coli filamentous bacteria indicated that the NtFtsZs could recognize the potential division sites in E. coli and be polymerized with heterogeneous division of host strain cells and resulted in the long filamentous bacterial morphology. These results suggested that eukaryotic ftsZs have similar function to their prokaryotic homologs. Meanwhile, the different deletions of motifs of NtFtsZs are also employed to investigate the functions of these proteins in E. coli . The results showed that the C-terminal domains of NtFtsZs were related to the correct localization of NtFtsZs in E. coli and the N-terminal domains of NtFtsZs were responsible for the polymerization of homogeneous and heterogeneous FtsZ proteins. The significance of these results in understanding the functions of NtFtsZs in plastid division were discussed.%分别构建了两个烟草(Nicotiana tabacum L.)质体分裂基因NtFtsZ1和NtFtsZ2与编码绿色荧光蛋白的gfpS65A、V68L、S72A基因相融合的原核表达载体,并导入大肠杆菌( Escherichia coli ) JM109菌株中进行表达.全长NtFtsZs∶GFP融合蛋白在菌体中有规律地定位,暗示NtFtsZs能识别大肠杆菌潜在的分裂位点,并能与大肠杆菌的内源FtsZ发生聚合作用;融合蛋白的诱导表达抑制了宿主菌的分裂,形成了明显的丝状菌体,证明真核生物的 ftsZ 基因与大肠杆菌的 ftsZ 基因有相似的作用.同时构建了NtFtsZs不同缺失的原核表达载体,对这两个基因所编码蛋白不同结构域的功能做了初步分析.实验结果表明,烟草FtsZ蛋白的C端结构域与其在大肠杆菌细胞中的正确定位有关;而N端结构域与NtFtsZs∶GFP融合蛋白的聚合有关.

  19. Arabidopsis and Maize RidA Proteins Preempt Reactive Enamine/Imine Damage to Branched-Chain Amino Acid Biosynthesis in Plastids[C][W][OPEN

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niehaus, Thomas D.; Nguyen, Thuy N.D.; Gidda, Satinder K.; ElBadawi-Sidhu, Mona; Lambrecht, Jennifer A.; McCarty, Donald R.; Downs, Diana M.; Cooper, Arthur J.L.; Fiehn, Oliver; Mullen, Robert T.; Hanson, Andrew D.

    2014-01-01

    RidA (for Reactive Intermediate Deaminase A) proteins are ubiquitous, yet their function in eukaryotes is unclear. It is known that deleting Salmonella enterica ridA causes Ser sensitivity and that S. enterica RidA and its homologs from other organisms hydrolyze the enamine/imine intermediates that Thr dehydratase forms from Ser or Thr. In S. enterica, the Ser-derived enamine/imine inactivates a branched-chain aminotransferase; RidA prevents this damage. Arabidopsis thaliana and maize (Zea mays) have a RidA homolog that is predicted to be plastidial. Expression of either homolog complemented the Ser sensitivity of the S. enterica ridA mutant. The purified proteins hydrolyzed the enamines/imines formed by Thr dehydratase from Ser or Thr and protected the Arabidopsis plastidial branched-chain aminotransferase BCAT3 from inactivation by the Ser-derived enamine/imine. In vitro chloroplast import assays and in vivo localization of green fluorescent protein fusions showed that Arabidopsis RidA and Thr dehydratase are chloroplast targeted. Disrupting Arabidopsis RidA reduced root growth and raised the root and shoot levels of the branched-chain amino acid biosynthesis intermediate 2-oxobutanoate; Ser treatment exacerbated these effects in roots. Supplying Ile reversed the root growth defect. These results indicate that plastidial RidA proteins can preempt damage to BCAT3 and Ile biosynthesis by hydrolyzing the Ser-derived enamine/imine product of Thr dehydratase. PMID:25070638

  20. Predictors of muscle protein synthesis after severe pediatric burns

    Science.gov (United States)

    Objectives: Following a major burn, muscle protein synthesis rate increases but in most patients, this response is not sufficient to compensate the also elevated protein breakdown. Given the long-term nature of the pathophysiologic response to burn injury, we hypothesized that skeletal muscle prot...

  1. A computational framework for the design of optimal protein synthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Racle, Julien; Overney, Jan; Hatzimanikatis, Vassily

    2012-08-01

    Despite the establishment of design principles to optimize codon choice for heterologous expression vector design, the relationship between codon sequence and final protein yield remains poorly understood. In this work, we present a computational framework for the identification of a set of mutant codon sequences for optimized heterologous protein production, which uses a codon-sequence mechanistic model of protein synthesis. Through a sensitivity analysis on the optimal steady state configuration of protein synthesis we are able to identify the set of codons, that are the most rate limiting with respect to steady state protein synthesis rate, and we replace them with synonymous codons recognized by charged tRNAs more efficient for translation, so that the resulting codon-elongation rate is higher. Repeating this procedure, we iteratively optimize the codon sequence for higher protein synthesis rate taking into account multiple constraints of various types. We determine a small set of optimized synonymous codon sequences that are very close to each other in sequence space, but they have an impact on properties such as ribosomal utilization or secondary structure. This limited number of sequences can then be offered for further experimental study. Overall, the proposed method is very valuable in understanding the effects of the different properties of mRNA sequences on the final protein yield in heterologous protein production and it can find applications in synthetic biology and biotechnology.

  2. Nuclear transport factor directs localization of protein synthesis during mitosis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bogaart, Geert van den; Meinema, Anne C.; Krasnikov, Viktor; Veenhoff, Liesbeth M.; Poolman, Bert

    Export of messenger RNA from the transcription site in the nucleus and mRNA targeting to the translation site in the cytoplasm are key regulatory processes in protein synthesis. In yeast, the mRNA-binding proteins Nab2p and Nab4p/Hrp1p accompany transcripts to their translation site, where the

  3. Effect of Insulin Infusion on Liver Protein Synthesis during Hemodialysis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Reinhard, Mark; Frystyk, Jan; Jespersen, Bente;

    2011-01-01

    Background Hemodialysis (HD) is a catabolic procedure that may contribute to the high frequency of protein-energy wasting among patients receiving maintenance HD. The present study investigated the additional effect of glucose and glucose-insulin infusion on liver protein synthesis during HD...

  4. Glucose Synthesis in a Protein-Based Artificial Photosynthesis System.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Hao; Yuan, Wenqiao; Zhou, Jack; Chong, Parkson Lee-Gau

    2015-09-01

    The objective of this study was to understand glucose synthesis of a protein-based artificial photosynthesis system affected by operating conditions, including the concentrations of reactants, reaction temperature, and illumination. Results from non-vesicle-based glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate (GAP) and glucose synthesis showed that the initial concentrations of ribulose-1,5-bisphosphate (RuBP) and adenosine triphosphate (ATP), lighting source, and temperature significantly affected glucose synthesis. Higher initial concentrations of RuBP and ATP significantly enhanced GAP synthesis, which was linearly correlated to glucose synthesis, confirming the proper functions of all catalyzing enzymes in the system. White fluorescent light inhibited artificial photosynthesis and reduced glucose synthesis by 79.2 % compared to in the dark. The reaction temperature of 40 °C was optimum, whereas lower or higher temperature reduced glucose synthesis. Glucose synthesis in the vesicle-based artificial photosynthesis system reconstituted with bacteriorhodopsin, F 0 F 1 ATP synthase, and polydimethylsiloxane-methyloxazoline-polydimethylsiloxane triblock copolymer was successfully demonstrated. This system efficiently utilized light-induced ATP to drive glucose synthesis, and 5.2 μg ml(-1) glucose was synthesized in 0.78-ml reaction buffer in 7 h. Light-dependent reactions were found to be the bottleneck of the studied artificial photosynthesis system.

  5. Phylogenetic Analysis of Nucleus-Encoded Acetyl-CoA Carboxylases Targeted at the Cytosol and Plastid of Algae.

    KAUST Repository

    Huerlimann, Roger

    2015-07-01

    The understanding of algal phylogeny is being impeded by an unknown number of events of horizontal gene transfer (HGT), and primary and secondary/tertiary endosymbiosis. Through these events, previously heterotrophic eukaryotes developed photosynthesis and acquired new biochemical pathways. Acetyl-CoA carboxylase (ACCase) is a key enzyme in the fatty acid synthesis and elongation pathways in algae, where ACCase exists in two locations (cytosol and plastid) and in two forms (homomeric and heteromeric). All algae contain nucleus-encoded homomeric ACCase in the cytosol, independent of the origin of the plastid. Nucleus-encoded homomeric ACCase is also found in plastids of algae that arose from a secondary/tertiary endosymbiotic event. In contrast, plastids of algae that arose from a primary endosymbiotic event contain heteromeric ACCase, which consists of three nucleus-encoded and one plastid-encoded subunits. These properties of ACCase provide the potential to inform on the phylogenetic relationships of hosts and their plastids, allowing different hypothesis of endosymbiotic events to be tested. Alveolata (Dinoflagellata and Apicomplexa) and Chromista (Stramenopiles, Haptophyta and Cryptophyta) have traditionally been grouped together as Chromalveolata, forming the red lineage. However, recent genetic evidence groups the Stramenopiles, Alveolata and green plastid containing Rhizaria as SAR, excluding Haptophyta and Cryptophyta. Sequences coding for plastid and cytosol targeted homomeric ACCases were isolated from Isochrysis aff. galbana (TISO), Chromera velia and Nannochloropsis oculata, representing three taxonomic groups for which sequences were lacking. Phylogenetic analyses show that cytosolic ACCase strongly supports the SAR grouping. Conversely, plastidial ACCase groups the SAR with the Haptophyta, Cryptophyta and Prasinophyceae (Chlorophyta). These two ACCase based, phylogenetic relationships suggest that the plastidial homomeric ACCase was acquired by the

  6. Phylogenetic Analysis of Nucleus-Encoded Acetyl-CoA Carboxylases Targeted at the Cytosol and Plastid of Algae.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roger Huerlimann

    Full Text Available The understanding of algal phylogeny is being impeded by an unknown number of events of horizontal gene transfer (HGT, and primary and secondary/tertiary endosymbiosis. Through these events, previously heterotrophic eukaryotes developed photosynthesis and acquired new biochemical pathways. Acetyl-CoA carboxylase (ACCase is a key enzyme in the fatty acid synthesis and elongation pathways in algae, where ACCase exists in two locations (cytosol and plastid and in two forms (homomeric and heteromeric. All algae contain nucleus-encoded homomeric ACCase in the cytosol, independent of the origin of the plastid. Nucleus-encoded homomeric ACCase is also found in plastids of algae that arose from a secondary/tertiary endosymbiotic event. In contrast, plastids of algae that arose from a primary endosymbiotic event contain heteromeric ACCase, which consists of three nucleus-encoded and one plastid-encoded subunits. These properties of ACCase provide the potential to inform on the phylogenetic relationships of hosts and their plastids, allowing different hypothesis of endosymbiotic events to be tested. Alveolata (Dinoflagellata and Apicomplexa and Chromista (Stramenopiles, Haptophyta and Cryptophyta have traditionally been grouped together as Chromalveolata, forming the red lineage. However, recent genetic evidence groups the Stramenopiles, Alveolata and green plastid containing Rhizaria as SAR, excluding Haptophyta and Cryptophyta. Sequences coding for plastid and cytosol targeted homomeric ACCases were isolated from Isochrysis aff. galbana (TISO, Chromera velia and Nannochloropsis oculata, representing three taxonomic groups for which sequences were lacking. Phylogenetic analyses show that cytosolic ACCase strongly supports the SAR grouping. Conversely, plastidial ACCase groups the SAR with the Haptophyta, Cryptophyta and Prasinophyceae (Chlorophyta. These two ACCase based, phylogenetic relationships suggest that the plastidial homomeric ACCase was

  7. Arabidopsis and maize RidA proteins preempt reactive enamine/imine damage to branched-chain amino acid biosynthesis in plastids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niehaus, Thomas D; Nguyen, Thuy N D; Gidda, Satinder K; ElBadawi-Sidhu, Mona; Lambrecht, Jennifer A; McCarty, Donald R; Downs, Diana M; Cooper, Arthur J L; Fiehn, Oliver; Mullen, Robert T; Hanson, Andrew D

    2014-07-01

    RidA (for Reactive Intermediate Deaminase A) proteins are ubiquitous, yet their function in eukaryotes is unclear. It is known that deleting Salmonella enterica ridA causes Ser sensitivity and that S. enterica RidA and its homologs from other organisms hydrolyze the enamine/imine intermediates that Thr dehydratase forms from Ser or Thr. In S. enterica, the Ser-derived enamine/imine inactivates a branched-chain aminotransferase; RidA prevents this damage. Arabidopsis thaliana and maize (Zea mays) have a RidA homolog that is predicted to be plastidial. Expression of either homolog complemented the Ser sensitivity of the S. enterica ridA mutant. The purified proteins hydrolyzed the enamines/imines formed by Thr dehydratase from Ser or Thr and protected the Arabidopsis plastidial branched-chain aminotransferase BCAT3 from inactivation by the Ser-derived enamine/imine. In vitro chloroplast import assays and in vivo localization of green fluorescent protein fusions showed that Arabidopsis RidA and Thr dehydratase are chloroplast targeted. Disrupting Arabidopsis RidA reduced root growth and raised the root and shoot levels of the branched-chain amino acid biosynthesis intermediate 2-oxobutanoate; Ser treatment exacerbated these effects in roots. Supplying Ile reversed the root growth defect. These results indicate that plastidial RidA proteins can preempt damage to BCAT3 and Ile biosynthesis by hydrolyzing the Ser-derived enamine/imine product of Thr dehydratase. © 2014 American Society of Plant Biologists. All rights reserved.

  8. Strategies for complete plastid genome sequencing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Twyford, Alex D; Ness, Rob W

    2016-10-28

    Plastid sequencing is an essential tool in the study of plant evolution. This high-copy organelle is one of the most technically accessible regions of the genome, and its sequence conservation makes it a valuable region for comparative genome evolution, phylogenetic analysis and population studies. Here, we discuss recent innovations and approaches for de novo plastid assembly that harness genomic tools. We focus on technical developments including low-cost sequence library preparation approaches for genome skimming, enrichment via hybrid baits and methylation-sensitive capture, sequence platforms with higher read outputs and longer read lengths, and automated tools for assembly. These developments allow for a much more streamlined assembly than via conventional short-range PCR. Although newer methods make complete plastid sequencing possible for any land plant or green alga, there are still challenges for producing finished plastomes particularly from herbarium material or from structurally divergent plastids such as those of parasitic plants.

  9. Mildiomycin: a nucleoside antibiotic that inhibits protein synthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feduchi, E; Cosín, M; Carrasco, L

    1985-03-01

    Mildiomycin, a new nucleoside antibiotic, selectively inhibits protein synthesis in HeLa cells, and is less active in the inhibition of RNA or DNA synthesis. An increased inhibition of translation by mildiomycin is observed in cultured HeLa cells when they are permeabilized by encephalomyocarditis virus. This observation suggests that this antibiotic does not easily pass through the cell membrane, as occurs with other nucleoside and aminoglycoside antibiotics. The inhibition of translation is also observed in cell-free systems, such as endogenous protein synthesis in a rabbit reticulocyte lysate or the synthesis of polyphenylalanine directed by poly (U). Finally the mode of action of mildiomycin was investigated and the results suggest that the compound blocks the peptidyl-transferase center.

  10. Protein synthesis rates in atrophied gastrocnemius muscles after limb immobilization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tucker, K. R.; Seider, M. J.; Booth, F. W.

    1981-01-01

    Noting that protein synthesis declines in the gastrocnemius 6 hr after immobilization, the study sought to detect an increase of protein synthesis when the limb was freed, and to examine the effects of exercise on the rate of increase. Rats were used as subjects, with their hind legs in plaster of Paris in plantar flexion to eliminate strain on the gastrocnemius. Periods of immobilization were varied and samples of blood from the muscle were taken to track protein synthesis rates for different groups in immobilization and exercise regimens (running and weightlifting). Synthesis rates declined 3.6% during time in the cast, then increased 6.3%/day after the casts were removed. Both running and weightlifting were found to increase the fractional rate of protein formation in the gastrocnemius muscle when compared with contralateral muscles that were not exercised and were used as controls, suggesting that the mechanism controlling protein synthesis in skeletal muscles is rapidly responsive to changes in muscular contractile activity.

  11. His6 tag-assisted chemical protein synthesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bang, Duhee; Kent, Stephen B. H.

    2005-04-01

    To make more practical the total chemical synthesis of proteins by the ligation of unprotected peptide building blocks, we have developed a method to facilitate the isolation and handling of intermediate products. The synthetic technique makes use of a His6 tag at the C terminus of the target polypeptide chain, introduced during the synthesis of the C-terminal peptide segment building block. The presence of a His6 tag enables the isolation of peptide or protein products directly from ligation reaction mixtures by Ni-NTA affinity column purification. This simple approach enables facile buffer exchange to alternate reaction conditions and is compatible with direct analytical control by protein MS of the multiple ligation steps involved in protein synthesis. We used syntheses of crambin and a modular tetratricopeptide repeat protein of 17 kDa as models to examine the utility of this affinity purification approach. The results show that His6 tag-assisted chemical protein synthesis is a useful method that substantially reduces handling losses and provides for rapid chemical protein syntheses. affinity purification | native chemical ligation

  12. Leucine-Enriched Essential Amino Acids Augment Mixed Protein Synthesis, But Not Collagen Protein Synthesis, in Rat Skeletal Muscle after Downhill Running

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hiroyuki Kato

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Mixed and collagen protein synthesis is elevated for as many as 3 days following exercise. Immediately after exercise, enhanced amino acid availability increases synthesis of mixed muscle protein, but not muscle collagen protein. However, the potential for synergic effects of amino acid ingestion with exercise on both mixed and collagen protein synthesis remains unclear. We investigated muscle collagen protein synthesis in rats following post-exercise ingestion of leucine-enriched essential amino acids. We determined fractional protein synthesis rates (FSR at different time points following exercise. Mixed protein and collagen protein FSRs in skeletal muscle were determined by measuring protein-bound enrichments of hydroxyproline and proline, and by measuring the intracellular enrichment of proline, using injections of flooding d3-proline doses. A leucine-enriched mixture of essential amino acids (or distilled water as a control was administrated 30 min or 1 day post-exercise. The collagen protein synthesis in the vastus lateralis was elevated for 2 days after exercise. Although amino acid administration did not increase muscle collagen protein synthesis, it did lead to augmented mixed muscle protein synthesis 1 day following exercise. Thus, contrary to the regulation of mixed muscle protein synthesis, muscle collagen protein synthesis is not affected by amino acid availability after damage-inducing exercise.

  13. Leucine-Enriched Essential Amino Acids Augment Mixed Protein Synthesis, But Not Collagen Protein Synthesis, in Rat Skeletal Muscle after Downhill Running.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kato, Hiroyuki; Suzuki, Hiromi; Inoue, Yoshiko; Suzuki, Katsuya; Kobayashi, Hisamine

    2016-06-28

    Mixed and collagen protein synthesis is elevated for as many as 3 days following exercise. Immediately after exercise, enhanced amino acid availability increases synthesis of mixed muscle protein, but not muscle collagen protein. However, the potential for synergic effects of amino acid ingestion with exercise on both mixed and collagen protein synthesis remains unclear. We investigated muscle collagen protein synthesis in rats following post-exercise ingestion of leucine-enriched essential amino acids. We determined fractional protein synthesis rates (FSR) at different time points following exercise. Mixed protein and collagen protein FSRs in skeletal muscle were determined by measuring protein-bound enrichments of hydroxyproline and proline, and by measuring the intracellular enrichment of proline, using injections of flooding d₃-proline doses. A leucine-enriched mixture of essential amino acids (or distilled water as a control) was administrated 30 min or 1 day post-exercise. The collagen protein synthesis in the vastus lateralis was elevated for 2 days after exercise. Although amino acid administration did not increase muscle collagen protein synthesis, it did lead to augmented mixed muscle protein synthesis 1 day following exercise. Thus, contrary to the regulation of mixed muscle protein synthesis, muscle collagen protein synthesis is not affected by amino acid availability after damage-inducing exercise.

  14. Functional analysis of plastid-encoded genes

    OpenAIRE

    Swiatek, Magdalena

    2002-01-01

    Plastid chromosomes from the variety of plant species contain several conserved open reading frames of unknown function, which most probably represent functional genes. The primary aim of this thesis was the analysis of the role of two such ORFs, designated ycfs or hypothetical chloroplast reading frames, namely ycf9 (ORF62) and ycf10 (ORF229, cemA). Both were analyzed in Nicotiana tabacum (tobacco) via their inactivation using biolistic plastid transformation. A new experiment...

  15. Production of high levels of poly-3-hydroxybutyrate in plastids of Camelina sativa seeds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malik, Meghna R; Yang, Wenyu; Patterson, Nii; Tang, Jihong; Wellinghoff, Rachel L; Preuss, Mary L; Burkitt, Claire; Sharma, Nirmala; Ji, Yuanyuan; Jez, Joseph M; Peoples, Oliver P; Jaworski, Jan G; Cahoon, Edgar B; Snell, Kristi D

    2015-06-01

    Poly-3-hydroxybutyrate (PHB) production in plastids of Camelina sativa seeds was investigated by comparing levels of polymer produced upon transformation of plants with five different binary vectors containing combinations of five seed-specific promoters for expression of transgenes. Genes encoding PHB biosynthetic enzymes were modified at the N-terminus to encode a plastid targeting signal. PHB levels of up to 15% of the mature seed weight were measured in single sacrificed T1 seeds with a genetic construct containing the oleosin and glycinin promoters. A more detailed analysis of the PHB production potential of two of the best performing binary vectors in a Camelina line bred for larger seed size yielded lines containing up to 15% polymer in mature T2 seeds. Transmission electron microscopy showed the presence of distinct granules of PHB in the seeds. PHB production had varying effects on germination, emergence and survival of seedlings. Once true leaves formed, plants grew normally and were able to set seeds. PHB synthesis lowered the total oil but not the protein content of engineered seeds. A change in the oil fatty acid profile was also observed. High molecular weight polymer was produced with weight-averaged molecular weights varying between 600 000 and 1 500 000, depending on the line. Select lines were advanced to later generations yielding a line with 13.7% PHB in T4 seeds. The levels of polymer produced in this study are the highest reported to date in a seed and are an important step forward for commercializing an oilseed-based platform for PHB production.

  16. Residual plastids of bleached mutants of Euglena gracilis and their effects on the expression of nucleus-encoded genes

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Jiangxin; SHI Zhixin; XU Xudong

    2004-01-01

    Bleached mutants of Euglena gracilis were obtained by treatment with ofloxacin (Ofl)and streptomycin (Sm) respectively. As shown by electron microscopy, the residual plastids contain prothylakoids in an Ofl mutant, and the highly developed and tightly stacked membranous structure found in cells of two Sm mutants. Nine genes of the plastid genome were examined with PCR, showing that ribosomal protein genes and most other plastid genes were lost in all but one Sm mutant. Using differential display and RT-PCR, it was shown that chloroplast degeneration could cause changes in transcription of certain nucleus-encoded genes during heterotrophic growth in darkness.

  17. DNA Nanoparticles for Improved Protein Synthesis In Vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galinis, Robertas; Stonyte, Greta; Kiseliovas, Vaidotas; Zilionis, Rapolas; Studer, Sabine; Hilvert, Donald; Janulaitis, Arvydas; Mazutis, Linas

    2016-02-24

    The amplification and digital quantification of single DNA molecules are important in biomedicine and diagnostics. Beyond quantifying DNA molecules in a sample, the ability to express proteins from the amplified DNA would open even broader applications in synthetic biology, directed evolution, and proteomics. Herein, a microfluidic approach is reported for the production of condensed DNA nanoparticles that can serve as efficient templates for in vitro protein synthesis. Using phi29 DNA polymerase and a multiple displacement amplification reaction, single DNA molecules were converted into DNA nanoparticles containing up to about 10(4)  clonal gene copies of the starting template. DNA nanoparticle formation was triggered by accumulation of inorganic pyrophosphate (produced during DNA synthesis) and magnesium ions from the buffer. Transcription-translation reactions performed in vitro showed that individual DNA nanoparticles can serve as efficient templates for protein synthesis in vitro.

  18. Consumption of Milk Protein or Whey Protein Results in a Similar Increase in Muscle Protein Synthesis in Middle Aged Men

    OpenAIRE

    Mitchell, Cameron J.; Robin A McGregor; D’Souza, Randall F.; Thorstensen, Eric B.; Markworth, James F.; Fanning, Aaron C.; Sally D. Poppitt; David Cameron-Smith

    2015-01-01

    The differential ability of various milk protein fractions to stimulate muscle protein synthesis (MPS) has been previously described, with whey protein generally considered to be superior to other fractions. However, the relative ability of a whole milk protein to stimulate MPS has not been compared to whey. Sixteen healthy middle-aged males ingested either 20 g of milk protein (n = 8) or whey protein (n = 8) while undergoing a primed constant infusion of ring 13C6 phenylalanine. Muscle biops...

  19. Proteomic and Functional Analyses Reveal MAPK1 Regulates Milk Protein Synthesis

    OpenAIRE

    Xue-Jun Gao; Jian-Guo Huang; Qing-Zhang Li; Li-Min Lu

    2012-01-01

    L-Lysine (L-Lys) is an essential amino acid that plays fundamental roles in protein synthesis. Many nuclear phosphorylated proteins such as Stat5 and mTOR regulate milk protein synthesis. However, the details of milk protein synthesis control at the transcript and translational levels are not well known. In this current study, a two-dimensional gel electrophoresis (2-DE)/MS-based proteomic technology was used to identify phosphoproteins responsible for milk protein synthesis in dairy cow mamm...

  20. Determination of in vivo protein synthesis in human palatine tonsil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Januszkiewicz, Anna; Klaude, Maria; Loré, Karin; Andersson, Jan; Ringdén, Olle; Rooyackers, Olav; Wernerman, Jan

    2005-02-01

    The palatine tonsils are constantly exposed to ingested or inhaled antigens which, in turn, lead to a permanent activation of tonsillar immune cells, even in a basic physiological state. The aim of the present study was to investigate if the immunological activation of the human palatine tonsil is reflected by a high metabolic activity, as determined by in vivo measurement of protein synthesis. The protein synthesis rate of the tonsil was also compared with that of the circulating T-lymphocytes, the total blood mononuclear cells and the whole population of blood leucocytes. Phenotypic characterization of immune-competent cells in tonsil tissue and blood was performed by flow cytometry. Pinch tonsil biopsies were taken after induction of anaesthesia in healthy adult patients (n=12) scheduled for ear surgery, uvulopalatopharyngoplasty or nose surgery. Protein synthesis was quantitatively determined during a 90-min period by a flooding-dose technique. The in vivo protein synthesis rate in the palatine tonsils was 22.8+/-5.7%/24 h (mean+/-S.D.), whereas protein synthesis in the circulating T-lymphocytes was 10.7+/-3.4%/24 h, in mononuclear cells was 10.8+/-2.8%/24 h and in leucocytes was 3.2+/-1.2%/24 h. CD3+ lymphocytes were the most abundant cell population in the tonsil. The in vivo protein synthesis rate in human tonsils was higher compared with the circulating immune cells. This high metabolic rate may reflect the permanent immunological activity present in human tonsils, although cell phenotypes and activity markers do not explain the differences.

  1. The relationship between protein synthesis and protein degradation in object recognition memory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Furini, Cristiane R G; Myskiw, Jociane de C; Schmidt, Bianca E; Zinn, Carolina G; Peixoto, Patricia B; Pereira, Luiza D; Izquierdo, Ivan

    2015-11-01

    For decades there has been a consensus that de novo protein synthesis is necessary for long-term memory. A second round of protein synthesis has been described for both extinction and reconsolidation following an unreinforced test session. Recently, it was shown that consolidation and reconsolidation depend not only on protein synthesis but also on protein degradation by the ubiquitin-proteasome system (UPS), a major mechanism responsible for protein turnover. However, the involvement of UPS on consolidation and reconsolidation of object recognition memory remains unknown. Here we investigate in the CA1 region of the dorsal hippocampus the involvement of UPS-mediated protein degradation in consolidation and reconsolidation of object recognition memory. Animals with infusion cannulae stereotaxically implanted in the CA1 region of the dorsal hippocampus, were exposed to an object recognition task. The UPS inhibitor β-Lactacystin did not affect the consolidation and the reconsolidation of object recognition memory at doses known to affect other forms of memory (inhibitory avoidance, spatial learning in a water maze) while the protein synthesis inhibitor anisomycin impaired the consolidation and the reconsolidation of the object recognition memory. However, β-Lactacystin was able to reverse the impairment caused by anisomycin on the reconsolidation process in the CA1 region of the hippocampus. Therefore, it is possible to postulate a direct link between protein degradation and protein synthesis during the reconsolidation of the object recognition memory.

  2. Preparation of ubiquitin-conjugated proteins using an insect cell-free protein synthesis system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suzuki, Takashi; Ezure, Toru; Ando, Eiji; Nishimura, Osamu; Utsumi, Toshihiko; Tsunasawa, Susumu

    2010-01-01

    Ubiquitination is one of the most significant posttranslational modifications (PTMs). To evaluate the ability of an insect cell-free protein synthesis system to carry out ubiquitin (Ub) conjugation to in vitro translated proteins, poly-Ub chain formation was studied in an insect cell-free protein synthesis system. Poly-Ub was generated in the presence of Ub aldehyde (UA), a de-ubiquitinating enzyme inhibitor. In vitro ubiquitination of the p53 tumor suppressor protein was also analyzed, and p53 was poly-ubiquitinated when Ub, UA, and Mdm2, an E3 Ub ligase (E3) for p53, were added to the in vitro reaction mixture. These results suggest that the insect cell-free protein synthesis system contains enzymatic activities capable of carrying out ubiquitination. CBB-detectable ubiquitinated p53 was easily purified from the insect cell-free protein synthesis system, allowing analysis of the Ub-conjugated proteins by mass spectrometry (MS). Lys 305 of p53 was identified as one of the Ub acceptor sites using this strategy. Thus, we conclude that the insect cell-free protein synthesis system is a powerful tool for studying various PTMs of eukaryotic proteins including ubiqutination presented here.

  3. Efficient and stable transformation of Lactuca sativa L. cv. Cisco (lettuce) plastids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kanamoto, Hirosuke; Yamashita, Atsushi; Asao, Hiroshi; Okumura, Satoru; Takase, Hisabumi; Hattori, Masahira; Yokota, Akiho; Tomizawa, Ken-Ichi

    2006-04-01

    Transgenic plastids offer unique advantages in plant biotechnology, including high-level foreign protein expression. However, broad application of plastid genome engineering in biotechnology has been largely hampered by the lack of plastid transformation systems for major crops. Here we describe the development of a plastid transformation system for lettuce, Lactuca sativa L. cv. Cisco. The transforming DNA carries a spectinomycin-resistance gene (aadA) under the control of lettuce chloroplast regulatory expression elements, flanked by two adjacent lettuce plastid genome sequences allowing its targeted insertion between the rbcL and accD genes. On average, we obtained 1 transplastomic lettuce plant per bombardment. We show that lettuce leaf chloroplasts can express transgene-encoded GFP to approximately 36% of the total soluble protein. All transplastomic T0 plants were fertile and the T1 progeny uniformly showed stability of the transgene in the chloroplast genome. This system will open up new possibilities for the efficient production of edible vaccines, pharmaceuticals, and antibodies in plants.

  4. The plastid ancestor originated among one of the major cyanobacterial lineages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ochoa de Alda, Jesús A G; Esteban, Rocío; Diago, María Luz; Houmard, Jean

    2014-09-15

    The primary endosymbiotic origin of chloroplasts is now well established but the identification of the present cyanobacteria most closely related to the plastid ancestor remains debated. We analyse the evolutionary trajectory of a subset of highly conserved cyanobacterial proteins (core) along the plastid lineage, those which were not lost after the endosymbiosis. We concatenate the sequences of 33 cyanobacterial core proteins that share a congruent evolutionary history, with their eukaryotic counterparts to reconstruct their phylogeny using sophisticated evolutionary models. We perform an independent reconstruction using concatenated 16S and 23S rRNA sequences. These complementary approaches converge to a plastid origin occurring during the divergence of one of the major cyanobacterial lineages that include N2-fixing filamentous cyanobacteria and species able to differentiate heterocysts.

  5. Versatile roles of plastids in plant growth and development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inaba, Takehito; Ito-Inaba, Yasuko

    2010-11-01

    Plastids, found in plants and some parasites, are of endosymbiotic origin. The best-characterized plastid is the plant cell chloroplast. Plastids provide essential metabolic and signaling functions, such as the photosynthetic process in chloroplasts. However, the role of plastids is not limited to production of metabolites. Plastids affect numerous aspects of plant growth and development through biogenesis, varying functional states and metabolic activities. Examples include, but are not limited to, embryogenesis, leaf development, gravitropism, temperature response and plant-microbe interactions. In this review, we summarize the versatile roles of plastids in plant growth and development.

  6. Effects of Whey, Caseinate, or Milk Protein Ingestion on Muscle Protein Synthesis after Exercise.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kanda, Atsushi; Nakayama, Kyosuke; Sanbongi, Chiaki; Nagata, Masashi; Ikegami, Shuji; Itoh, Hiroyuki

    2016-06-03

    Whey protein (WP) is characterized as a "fast" protein and caseinate (CA) as a "slow" protein according to their digestion and absorption rates. We hypothesized that co-ingestion of milk proteins (WP and CA) may be effective for prolonging the muscle protein synthesis response compared to either protein alone. We therefore compared the effect of ingesting milk protein (MP) to either WP or CA alone on muscle protein synthesis after exercise in rats. We also compared the effects of these milk-derived proteins to a control, soy protein (SP). Male Sprague-Dawley rats swam for two hours. Immediately after exercise, one of the following four solutions was administered: WP, CA, MP, or SP. Individual rats were euthanized at designated postprandial time points and triceps muscle samples collected for measurement of the protein fractional synthesis rate (FSR). FSR tended to increase in all groups post-ingestion, although the initial peaks of FSR occurred at different times (WP, peak time = 60 min, FSR = 7.76%/day; MP, peak time = 90 min, FSR = 8.34%/day; CA, peak time = 120 min, FSR = 7.85%/day). Milk-derived proteins caused significantly greater increases (p < 0.05) in FSR compared with SP at different times (WP, 60 min; MP, 90 and 120 min; CA, 120 min). Although statistical analysis could not be performed, the calculated the area under the curve (AUC) values for FSR following this trend were: MP, 534.61; CA, 498.22; WP, 473.46; and SP, 406.18. We conclude that ingestion of MP, CA or WP causes the initial peak time in muscle protein synthesis to occur at different times (WP, fast; MP, intermediate; CA, slow) and the dairy proteins have a superior effect on muscle protein synthesis after exercise compared with SP.

  7. Molecular characterization of the Calvin cycle enzyme phosphoribulokinase in the stramenopile alga Vaucheria litorea and the plastid hosting mollusc Elysia chlorotica.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rumpho, Mary E; Pochareddy, Sirisha; Worful, Jared M; Summer, Elizabeth J; Bhattacharya, Debashish; Pelletreau, Karen N; Tyler, Mary S; Lee, Jungho; Manhart, James R; Soule, Kara M

    2009-11-01

    Phosphoribulokinase (PRK), a nuclear-encoded plastid-localized enzyme unique to the photosynthetic carbon reduction (Calvin) cycle, was cloned and characterized from the stramenopile alga Vaucheria litorea. This alga is the source of plastids for the mollusc (sea slug) Elysia chlorotica which enable the animal to survive for months solely by photoautotrophic CO2 fixation. The 1633-bp V. litorea prk gene was cloned and the coding region, found to be interrupted by four introns, encodes a 405-amino acid protein. This protein contains the typical bipartite target sequence expected of nuclear-encoded proteins that are directed to complex (i.e. four membrane-bound) algal plastids. De novo synthesis of PRK and enzyme activity were detected in E. chlorotica in spite of having been starved of V. litorea for several months. Unlike the algal enzyme, PRK in the sea slug did not exhibit redox regulation. Two copies of partial PRK-encoding genes were isolated from both sea slug and aposymbiotic sea slug egg DNA using PCR. Each copy contains the nucleotide region spanning exon 1 and part of exon 2 of V. litorea prk, including the bipartite targeting peptide. However, the larger prk fragment also includes intron 1. The exon and intron sequences of prk in E. chlorotica and V. litorea are nearly identical. These data suggest that PRK is differentially regulated in V. litorea and E. chlorotica and at least a portion of the V. litorea nuclear PRK gene is present in sea slugs that have been starved for several months.

  8. Rheb Inhibits Protein Synthesis by Activating the PERK-eIF2α Signaling Cascade

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Richa Tyagi

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Rheb, a ubiquitous small GTPase, is well known to bind and activate mTOR, which augments protein synthesis. Inhibition of protein synthesis is also physiologically regulated. Thus, with cell stress, the unfolded protein response system leads to phosphorylation of the initiation factor eIF2α and arrest of protein synthesis. We now demonstrate a major role for Rheb in inhibiting protein synthesis by enhancing the phosphorylation of eIF2α by protein kinase-like ER kinase (PERK. Interplay between the stimulatory and inhibitory roles of Rheb may enable cells to modulate protein synthesis in response to varying environmental stresses.

  9. Semi-Synthesis of Labeled Proteins for Spectroscopic Applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luca Domenico D'Andrea

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Since the introduction of SPPS by Merrifield in the 60s, peptide chemists have considered the possibility of preparing large proteins. The introduction of native chemical ligation in the 90s and then of expressed protein ligation have opened the way to the preparation of synthetic proteins without size limitations. This review focuses on semi-synthetic strategies useful to prepare proteins decorated with spectroscopic probes, like fluorescent labels and stable isotopes, and their biophysical applications. We show that expressed protein ligation, combining the advantages of organic chemistry with the easy and size limitless recombinant protein expression, is an excellent strategy for the chemical synthesis of labeled proteins, enabling a single protein to be functionalized at one or even more distinct positions with different probes.

  10. Synthesis, modification and turnover of proteins during aging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rattan, Suresh I S

    2010-01-01

    Iterations in the rate and extent of protein synthesis, accuracy, post-translational modifications and turnover are among the main molecular characteristics of aging. A decline in the cellular capacity through proteasomal and lysosomal pathways to recognize and preferentially degrade damaged proteins leads to the accumulation of abnormal proteins during aging. The consequent increase in molecular heterogeneity and impaired functioning of proteins is the basis of several age-related pathologies, such as cataracts, sarcopenia and neurodegerative diseases. Understanding the proteomic spectrum and its functional implications during aging can facilitate developing effective means of intervention, prevention and therapy of aging and age-related diseases.

  11. Insulin accelerates global and mitochondrial protein synthesis rates in neonatal muscle during sepsis

    Science.gov (United States)

    In neonatal pigs, sepsis decreases protein synthesis in skeletal muscle by decreasing translation initiation. However, insulin stimulates muscle protein synthesis despite persistent repression of translation initiation signaling. To determine whether the insulin-induced increase in global rates of m...

  12. A Working Model of Protein Synthesis Using Lego(TM) Building Blocks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Templin, Mark A.; Fetters, Marcia K.

    2002-01-01

    Uses Lego building blocks to improve the effectiveness of teaching about protein synthesis. Provides diagrams and pictures for a 2-3 day student activity. Discusses mRNA, transfer RNA, and a protein synthesis model. (MVL)

  13. The synthesis of proteins in unnucleated blood platelets

    OpenAIRE

    Michał Bijak; Joanna Saluk; Michał Błażej Ponczek Ponczek; Paweł Nowak; Barbara Wachowicz

    2013-01-01

    Platelets are the smallest, unnucleated blood cells that play a key role in maintaining normal hemostasis. In the human body about 1x1011 platelets are formed every day, as a the result of complex processes of differentiation, maturation and fragmentation of megakaryocytes. Studies done over 4 decades ago demonstrated that circulating in blood mature platelets can synthesize proteins. Recent discoveries confirm protein synthesis by unnucleated platelets in response to activation. Moreover, pr...

  14. Plastids: the Green Frontiers for Vaccine Production

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad Tahir eWaheed

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Infectious diseases pose an increasing risk to health, especially in developing countries. Vaccines are available to either cure or prevent many of these diseases. However, there are certain limitations related to these vaccines, mainly the costs, which make these vaccines mostly unaffordable for people in resource poor countries. These costs are mainly related to production and purification of the products manufactured from fermenter-based systems. Plastid biotechnology has become an attractive platform to produce biopharmaceuticals in large amounts and cost-effectively. This is mainly due to high copy number of plastids DNA in mature chloroplasts, a characteristic particularly important for vaccine production in large amounts. An additional advantage lies in the maternal inheritance of plastids in most plant species, which addresses the regulatory concerns related to transgenic plants. These and many other aspects of plastids will be discussed in the present review, especially those that particularly make these green biofactories an attractive platform for vaccine production. A summary of recent vaccine antigens against different human diseases expressed in plastids will also be presented.

  15. Frog Foam Nest Protein Diversity and Synthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hissa, Denise Cavalcante; Bezerra, Walderly Melgaço; Freitas, Cléverson Diniz Teixeira De; Ramos, Márcio Viana; Lopes, José Luiz De Souza; Beltramini, Leila Maria; Roberto, Igor Joventino; Cascon, Paulo; Melo, Vânia Maria Maciel

    2016-08-01

    Some amphibian species have developed a breeding strategy in which they deposit their eggs in stable foam nests to protect their eggs and larvae. The frog foam nests are rich in proteins (ranaspumin), especially surfactant proteins, involved in the production of the foam nest. Despite the ecological importance of the foam nests for evolution and species conservation, the biochemical composition, the long-term stability and even the origin of the components are still not completely understood. Recently we showed that Lv-RSN-1, a 23.5-kDa surfactant protein isolated from the nest of the frog Leptodacylus vastus, presents a structural conformation distinct from any protein structures yet reported. So, in the current study we aimed to reveal the protein composition of the foam nest of L. vastus and further characterize the Lv-RSN-1. Proteomic analysis showed the foam nest contains more than 100 of proteins, and that Lv-RSN-1 comprises 45% of the total proteins, suggesting a key role in the nest construction and stability. We demonstrated by Western blotting that Lv-RSN-1 is mainly produced only by the female in the pars convoluta dilata, which highlights the importance of the female preservation for conservation of species that depend on the production of foam nests in the early stages of development. Overall, our results showed the foam nest of L. vastus is composed of a great diversity of proteins and that besides Lv-RSN-1, the main protein in the foam, other proteins must have a coadjuvant role in building and stability of the nest.

  16. Protein Synthesis Inhibition Blocks Consolidation of an Acrobatic Motor Skill

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaelin-Lang, Alain; Dichgans, Johannes; Schulz, Jorg B.; Luft, Andreas R.; Buitrago, Manuel M.

    2004-01-01

    To investigate whether motor skill learning depends on de novo protein synthesis, adult rats were trained in an acrobatic locomotor task (accelerating rotarod) for 7 d. Animals were systemically injected with cycloheximide (CHX, 0.5 mg/kg, i.p.) 1 h before sessions 1 and 2 or sessions 2 and 3. Control rats received vehicle injections before…

  17. Problem-Solving Test: The Mechanism of Protein Synthesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szeberenyi, Jozsef

    2009-01-01

    Terms to be familiar with before you start to solve the test: protein synthesis, ribosomes, amino acids, peptides, peptide bond, polypeptide chain, N- and C-terminus, hemoglobin, [alpha]- and [beta]-globin chains, radioactive labeling, [[to the third power]H] and [[to the fourteenth power]C]leucine, cytosol, differential centrifugation, density…

  18. Sulfur in human nutrition - effects beyond protein synthesis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schaafsma, Gertjan

    2008-01-01

    That sulfur is essential to humans is based on the requirement of S-animo acids for normal growth and maintenance of nitrogen balance and not on the optimization of metabolic proccesses involving the synthesis of non-protein sulphur containing compounds. This paper reviews the significance of sulfur

  19. Phenylketonuria : brain phenylalanine concentrations relate inversely to cerebral protein synthesis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Groot, Martijn J.; Sijens, Paul E.; Reijngoud, Dirk-Jan; Paans, Anne M.; van Spronsen, Francjan J.

    2015-01-01

    In phenylketonuria, elevated plasma phenylalanine concentrations may disturb blood-to-brain large neutral amino acid (LNAA) transport and cerebral protein synthesis (CPS). We investigated the associations between these processes, using data obtained by positron emission tomography with L-[1-C-11]-ty

  20. Habituation to low or high protein intake does not modulate basal or postprandial muscle protein synthesis rates: a randomized trial

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gorissen, S.H.; Horstman, Astrid; Franssen, Rinske; Kouw, I.W.; Wall, B.T.; Burd, N.A.; Groot, de C.P.G.M.; Loon, van L.J.C.

    2017-01-01

    Background: Muscle mass maintenance is largely regulated by basal muscle protein synthesis rates and the ability to increase muscle protein synthesis after protein ingestion. To our knowledge, no previous studies have evaluated the impact of habituation to either low protein intake (LOW PRO) or high

  1. Effects of Source and Concentrations of Nitrogen and Carbohydrate on Ruminal Microbial Protein Synthesis

    OpenAIRE

    2002-01-01

    The objective of this review was to discuss microbial protein synthesis and the effects of sources and concentrations of nitrogen and carbohydrate on microbial protein synthesis. Even though ammonia-N is a satisfactory source of nitrogen for the growth of the majority of rumen microbes, substitution of intact protein for urea usually stimulates ruminal microbial protein synthesis. While protein sources high in degradable intake protein (DIP), such as soybean meal, appear to have properties ...

  2. A Mutation in Arabidopsis SEEDLING PLASTID DEVELOPMENT1 Affects Plastid Differentiation in Embryo-Derived Tissues during Seedling Growth1[W][OA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruppel, Nicholas J.; Logsdon, Charles A.; Whippo, Craig W.; Inoue, Kentaro; Hangarter, Roger P.

    2011-01-01

    Oilseed plants like Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) develop green photosynthetically active embryos. Upon seed maturation, the embryonic chloroplasts degenerate into a highly reduced plastid type called the eoplast. Upon germination, eoplasts redifferentiate into chloroplasts and other plastid types. Here, we describe seedling plastid development1 (spd1), an Arabidopsis seedling albino mutant capable of producing normal green vegetative tissues. Mutant seedlings also display defects in etioplast and amyloplast development. Precocious germination of spd1 embryos showed that the albino seedling phenotype of spd1 was dependent on the passage of developing embryos through the degreening and dehydration stages of seed maturation, suggesting that SPD1 is critical during eoplast development or early stages of eoplast redifferentiation. The SPD1 gene was found to encode a protein containing a putative chloroplast-targeting sequence in its amino terminus and also domains common to P-loop ATPases. Chloroplast localization of the SPD1 protein was confirmed by targeting assays in vivo and in vitro. Although the exact function of SPD1 remains to be defined, our findings reveal aspects of plastid development unique to embryo-derived cells. PMID:21045120

  3. Engineering plastid fatty acid biosynthesis to improve food quality and biofuel production in higher plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rogalski, Marcelo; Carrer, Helaine

    2011-06-01

    The ability to manipulate plant fatty acid biosynthesis by using new biotechnological approaches has allowed the production of transgenic plants with unusual fatty acid profile and increased oil content. This review focuses on the production of very long chain polyunsaturated fatty acids (VLCPUFAs) and the increase in oil content in plants using molecular biology tools. Evidences suggest that regular consumption of food rich in VLCPUFAs has multiple positive health benefits. Alternative sources of these nutritional fatty acids are found in cold-water fishes. However, fish stocks are in severe decline because of decades of overfishing, and also fish oils can be contaminated by the accumulation of toxic compounds. Recently, there is also an increase in oilseed use for the production of biofuels. This tendency is partly associated with the rapidly rising costs of petroleum, increased concern about the environmental impact of fossil oil and the attractive need to develop renewable sources of fuel. In contrast to this scenario, oil derived from crop plants is normally contaminant free and less environmentally aggressive. Genetic engineering of the plastid genome (plastome) offers a number of attractive advantages, including high-level foreign protein expression, marker-gene excision and transgene containment because of maternal inheritance of plastid genome in most crops. Here, we describe the possibility to improve fatty acid biosynthesis in plastids, production of new fatty acids and increase their content in plants by genetic engineering of plastid fatty acid biosynthesis via plastid transformation.

  4. Protein-mediated synthesis of gold nanoparticles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ravindra, Pratibha [Department of Life Sciences, University of Mumbai, Kalina, Santacruz (E) 400098, Mumbai (India)], E-mail: Pratibha.kamble@osumc.edu

    2009-07-15

    Our current approach is to synthesize gold nanoparticles utilizing Serrapeptase that serves as both a reducing and stabilizing agent. The investigations further reveal that certain amino acid groups like lysine are involved in reduction and stabilization of these particles. The particles are characterized with UV-vis spectroscopy, Transmission electron microscopy, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, X-ray diffraction, Proton Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (H NMR) Spectroscopy studies and Sodium dodecyl sulphate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis for Serrapeptidase and Au-Serrapeptidase isolation. Transmission electron microscopy studies show particles ranging from 20 nm to 200 nm that are spherical, hexagonal and polygonal in nature. UV-vis spectroscopy shows surface plasmon band at 536 nm that indicates formation of spherical particles whereas, results further add that gold particles are formed inside the nanosphere that is stabilized by interaction of amino acid groups like {gamma}-lysine of peptase. Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy studies reveal that few carboxyl groups are involved during the synthesis process followed by stretching of -CH bonds which has been seen in the case of lysine of Serrapeptase. Current studies therefore show that the method utilized for the synthesis of Au-nanoparticles is a biofriendly method and the nanogold formed can be a useful attribute for various applications.

  5. Studies on protein synthesis by protoplasts of Saccharomyces carlsbergensis I. The effect of ribonuclease on protein synthesis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kloet, S.R. de; Wermeskerken, R.K.A. van; Koningsberger, V.V.

    1961-01-01

    Ribonuclease was found to inhibit the protein synthesis in the naked yeast protoplast for nearly 100%. Even small concentrations (5 μg/ml) were found inhibitory. The cause of this inhibition can be attributed at least in part to a 90% inhibition of the respiration. Amino acid uptake was found to be

  6. THE ROLE OF POST-EXERCISE NUTRIENT ADMINISTRATION ON MUSCLE PROTEIN SYNTHESIS AND GLYCOGEN SYNTHESIS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chris Poole

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Nutrient administration following an exercise bout vastly affects anabolic processes within the human body, irrespective of exercise mode. Of particular importance are protein and carbohydrates whereby these two macronutrients portray distinct functions as anabolic agents. It has been confirmed that protein and/or amino acid ingestion following resistance training is required to reach a positive protein/nitrogen balance, and carbohydrate intake during recovery is the most important consideration to replenish glycogen stores from an exhaustive exercise bout. Several factors play significant roles in determining the effectiveness of protein and carbohydrate supplementation on post-exercise protein and glycogen synthesis. Improper application of these factors can limit the body's ability to reach an anabolic status. The provided evidence clearly denotes the importance these two macronutrients have in regards to post-exercise nutrition and anabolism. Therefore, the purpose of this review is to discuss the impact of dietary protein and carbohydrate intake during the recovery state on muscle protein synthesis and glycogen synthesis

  7. Integration of plastids with their hosts: Lessons learned from dinoflagellates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dorrell, Richard G; Howe, Christopher J

    2015-08-18

    After their endosymbiotic acquisition, plastids become intimately connected with the biology of their host. For example, genes essential for plastid function may be relocated from the genomes of plastids to the host nucleus, and pathways may evolve within the host to support the plastid. In this review, we consider the different degrees of integration observed in dinoflagellates and their associated plastids, which have been acquired through multiple different endosymbiotic events. Most dinoflagellate species possess plastids that contain the pigment peridinin and show extreme reduction and integration with the host biology. In some species, these plastids have been replaced through serial endosymbiosis with plastids derived from a different phylogenetic derivation, of which some have become intimately connected with the biology of the host whereas others have not. We discuss in particular the evolution of the fucoxanthin-containing dinoflagellates, which have adapted pathways retained from the ancestral peridinin plastid symbiosis for transcript processing in their current, serially acquired plastids. Finally, we consider why such a diversity of different degrees of integration between host and plastid is observed in different dinoflagellates and how dinoflagellates may thus inform our broader understanding of plastid evolution and function.

  8. Ribosomal history reveals origins of modern protein synthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harish, Ajith; Caetano-Anollés, Gustavo

    2012-01-01

    The origin and evolution of the ribosome is central to our understanding of the cellular world. Most hypotheses posit that the ribosome originated in the peptidyl transferase center of the large ribosomal subunit. However, these proposals do not link protein synthesis to RNA recognition and do not use a phylogenetic comparative framework to study ribosomal evolution. Here we infer evolution of the structural components of the ribosome. Phylogenetic methods widely used in morphometrics are applied directly to RNA structures of thousands of molecules and to a census of protein structures in hundreds of genomes. We find that components of the small subunit involved in ribosomal processivity evolved earlier than the catalytic peptidyl transferase center responsible for protein synthesis. Remarkably, subunit RNA and proteins coevolved, starting with interactions between the oldest proteins (S12 and S17) and the oldest substructure (the ribosomal ratchet) in the small subunit and ending with the rise of a modern multi-subunit ribosome. Ancestral ribonucleoprotein components show similarities to in vitro evolved RNA replicase ribozymes and protein structures in extant replication machinery. Our study therefore provides important clues about the chicken-or-egg dilemma associated with the central dogma of molecular biology by showing that ribosomal history is driven by the gradual structural accretion of protein and RNA structures. Most importantly, results suggest that functionally important and conserved regions of the ribosome were recruited and could be relics of an ancient ribonucleoprotein world.

  9. Escherichia coli cell-free protein synthesis and isotope labeling of mammalian proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Terada, Takaho; Yokoyama, Shigeyuki

    2015-01-01

    This chapter describes the cell-free protein synthesis method, using an Escherichia coli cell extract. This is a cost-effective method for milligram-scale protein production and is particularly useful for the production of mammalian proteins, protein complexes, and membrane proteins that are difficult to synthesize by recombinant expression methods, using E. coli and eukaryotic cells. By adjusting the conditions of the cell-free method, zinc-binding proteins, disulfide-bonded proteins, ligand-bound proteins, etc., may also be produced. Stable isotope labeling of proteins can be accomplished by the cell-free method, simply by using stable isotope-labeled amino acid(s) in the cell-free reaction. Moreover, the cell-free protein synthesis method facilitates the avoidance of stable isotope scrambling and dilution over the recombinant expression methods and is therefore advantageous for amino acid-selective stable isotope labeling. Site-specific stable isotope labeling is also possible with a tRNA molecule specific to the UAG codon. By the cell-free protein synthesis method, coupled transcription-translation is performed from a plasmid vector or a PCR-amplified DNA fragment encoding the protein. A milligram quantity of protein can be produced with a milliliter-scale reaction solution in the dialysis mode. More than a thousand solution structures have been determined by NMR spectroscopy for uniformly labeled samples of human and mouse functional domain proteins, produced by the cell-free method. Here, we describe the practical aspects of mammalian protein production by the cell-free method for NMR spectroscopy.

  10. N(α)-Acetylation of yeast ribosomal proteins and its effect on protein synthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamita, Masahiro; Kimura, Yayoi; Ino, Yoko; Kamp, Roza M; Polevoda, Bogdan; Sherman, Fred; Hirano, Hisashi

    2011-04-01

    N(α)-Acetyltransferases (NATs) cause the N(α)-acetylation of the majority of eukaryotic proteins during their translation, although the functions of this modification have been largely unexplored. In yeast (Saccharomyces cerevisiae), four NATs have been identified: NatA, NatB, NatC, and NatD. In this study, the N(α)-acetylation status of ribosomal protein was analyzed using NAT mutants combined with two-dimensional difference gel electrophoresis (2D-DIGE) and mass spectrometry (MS). A total of 60 ribosomal proteins were identified, of which 17 were N(α)-acetylated by NatA, and two by NatB. The N(α)-acetylation of two of these, S17 and L23, by NatA was not previously observed. Furthermore, we tested the effect of ribosomal protein N(α)-acetylation on protein synthesis using the purified ribosomes from each NAT mutant. It was found that the protein synthesis activities of ribosomes from NatA and NatB mutants were decreased by 27% and 23%, respectively, as compared to that of the normal strain. Furthermore, we have shown that ribosomal protein N(α)-acetylation by NatA influences translational fidelity in the presence of paromomycin. These results suggest that ribosomal protein N(α)-acetylation is necessary to maintain the ribosome's protein synthesis function.

  11. Plastid transformation in lettuce (Lactuca sativa L.) by biolistic DNA delivery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruhlman, Tracey A

    2014-01-01

    The interest in producing pharmaceutical proteins in a nontoxic plant host has led to the development of an approach to express such proteins in transplastomic lettuce (Lactuca sativa L.). A number of therapeutic proteins and vaccine antigen candidates have been stably integrated into the lettuce plastid genome using biolistic DNA delivery. High levels of accumulation and retention of biological activity suggest that lettuce may provide an ideal platform for the production of biopharmaceuticals.

  12. Polyaromatic compounds alter placental protein synthesis in pregnant rats

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shiverick, K.T.; Ogilvie, S.; Medrano, T. (Univ. of Florida, Gainesville (United States))

    1991-03-15

    The administration of the polyaromatic compounds {beta}-naphthoflavone ({beta}NF) and 3-methylcholanthrene (3MC) to pregnant rats during mid-gestation has been shown to produce marked feto-placental growth retardation. This study examined secretory protein synthesis in placental tissue from rats following administration of {beta}NF on gestation days (gd) 11-14 or 3MC on gd 12-14. Explants of placental basal zone tissue were cultured for 24 hours in serum-free medium in the presence of ({sup 3}H)leucine. Secreted proteins were analyzed by two-dimensional SDS-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis followed by either fluorography or immunostaining. Total incorporation of ({sup 3}H)leucine into secreted proteins was not altered in BZ explants from {beta}NF or 3MC-treated animals. However a selective decrease was observed in ({sup 3}H)leucine incorporation into a major complex of proteins with apparent molecular weight of 25-30,000 and isoelectric point between 5.3 to 5.7. This group of proteins has been further identified as being related to rat pituitary growth hormone (GH) using N-terminal amino acid microsequencing of individual spots from 2-D SDS-PA gels. This is the first report that synthesis of GH-related proteins by rat placenta is decreased following {beta}NF and 3MC administration, a change which may underlie the feto-placental growth retardation associated with these polyaromatic compounds.

  13. PROTEIN TARGETING TO STARCH is required for localising GRANULE-BOUND STARCH SYNTHASE to starch granules and for normal amylose synthesis in Arabidopsis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David Seung

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available The domestication of starch crops underpinned the development of human civilisation, yet we still do not fully understand how plants make starch. Starch is composed of glucose polymers that are branched (amylopectin or linear (amylose. The amount of amylose strongly influences the physico-chemical behaviour of starchy foods during cooking and of starch mixtures in non-food manufacturing processes. The GRANULE-BOUND STARCH SYNTHASE (GBSS is the glucosyltransferase specifically responsible for elongating amylose polymers and was the only protein known to be required for its biosynthesis. Here, we demonstrate that PROTEIN TARGETING TO STARCH (PTST is also specifically required for amylose synthesis in Arabidopsis. PTST is a plastidial protein possessing an N-terminal coiled coil domain and a C-terminal carbohydrate binding module (CBM. We discovered that Arabidopsis ptst mutants synthesise amylose-free starch and are phenotypically similar to mutants lacking GBSS. Analysis of granule-bound proteins showed a dramatic reduction of GBSS protein in ptst mutant starch granules. Pull-down assays with recombinant proteins in vitro, as well as immunoprecipitation assays in planta, revealed that GBSS physically interacts with PTST via a coiled coil. Furthermore, we show that the CBM domain of PTST, which mediates its interaction with starch granules, is also required for correct GBSS localisation. Fluorescently tagged Arabidopsis GBSS, expressed either in tobacco or Arabidopsis leaves, required the presence of Arabidopsis PTST to localise to starch granules. Mutation of the CBM of PTST caused GBSS to remain in the plastid stroma. PTST fulfils a previously unknown function in targeting GBSS to starch. This sheds new light on the importance of targeting biosynthetic enzymes to sub-cellular sites where their action is required. Importantly, PTST represents a promising new gene target for the biotechnological modification of starch composition, as it is

  14. Concurrent protein synthesis is required for in vivo chitin synthesis in postmolt blue crabs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Horst, M.N. (Mercer Univ., Macon, GA (USA))

    1990-12-01

    Chitin synthesis in crustaceans involves the deposition of a protein-polysaccharide complex at the apical surface of epithelial cells which secrete the cuticle or exoskeleton. The present study involves an examination of in vivo incorporation of radiolabeled amino acids and amino sugars into the cuticle of postmolt blue crabs, Callinectes sapidus. Rates of incorporation of both 3H leucine and 3H threonine were linear with respect to time of incubation. Incorporation of 3H threonine into the endocuticle was inhibited greater than 90% in the presence of the protein synthesis inhibitor, puromycin. Linear incorporation of 14C glucosamine into the cuticle was also demonstrated; a significant improvement of radiolabeling was achieved by using 14C-N-acetylglucosamine as the labeled precursor. Incorporation of 3H-N-acetylglucosamine into the cuticle of postmolt blue crabs was inhibited 89% by puromycin, indicating that concurrent protein synthesis is required for the deposition of chitin in the blue crab. Autoradiographic analysis of control vs. puromycin-treated crabs indicates that puromycin totally blocks labeling of the new endocuticle with 3H glucosamine. These results are consistent with the notion that crustacean chitin is synthesized as a protein-polysaccharide complex. Analysis of the postmolt and intermolt blue crab cuticle indicates that the exoskeleton contains about 60% protein and 40% chitin. The predominant amino acids are arginine, glutamic acid, alanine, aspartic acid, and threonine.

  15. [Peptide synthesis aiming at elucidation and creation of protein functions].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Futaki, S

    1998-11-01

    The recent development of molecular biology has been elucidating outlines of the cross-talk of biomolecules. The understanding of the function of these biomolecules from the viewpoint of chemistry is now demanded not only for the understanding of biological systems but also for the creation of novel functional molecules. Here two topics are described about peptide synthesis aiming at the elucidation and the creation of protein functions. The first topic is the development of approaches for the synthesis of Tyr (SO3H)-containing peptides. Tyrosine sulfation is one of the most popular protein post-translational modifications. Synthetic peptides are of great help for the elucidation of the biological significance of tyrosine sulfation. We have developed two approaches for the efficient synthesis of tyrosine sulfate [Tyr (SO3H)]-containing peptides. The first approach employs a dimethylformamide-sulfur trioxide (DMF-SO3) complex as a sulfating agent and safety-catch protecting groups for the selective sulfation of tyrosine in the presence of serine. The second approach employs the direct introduction of Tyr(SO3H) into the peptide chain in the form of Fmoc-Tyr(SO3Na) followed by deprotection at 4 degrees C in trifluoroacetic acid. These approaches were successfully applied for the synthesis of cholecystokinin (CCK)-related peptides. The second topic deals with new approaches for the creation of artificial proteins through assembling alpha-helical peptides via selective disulfide or thioether formation. Approaches to assemble individual peptide segments on a peptide template were also developed. Four peptides corresponding to the transmembrane segments of the sodium channel (S4 in repeat I-IV) were assembled on a peptide template to give a protein having ion channel activity with rectification.

  16. Effects of Some Dietary Factors on Ruminal Microbial Protein Synthesis

    OpenAIRE

    KARSLI, Mehmet Akif

    2001-01-01

    The effects of some dietary factors, other than source and amount of N and carbohydrate, on the amount and efficiency of microbial protein synthesis are discussed in this review. Specifically, these factors include dry matter intake of animals, forage:concentrate ratio of diets, rate of N and carbohydrate degradation, synchronized release of N and energy from diets, rate of passage, and other factors, such as vitamins and minerals. It seemed that diets containing a mixture of forages and conc...

  17. Complete Plastid Genome of the Brown Alga Costaria costata (Laminariales, Phaeophyceae.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lei Zhang

    Full Text Available Costaria costata is a commercially and industrially important brown alga. In this study, we used next-generation sequencing to determine the complete plastid genome of C. costata. The genome consists of a 129,947 bp circular DNA molecule with an A+T content of 69.13% encoding a standard set of six ribosomal RNA genes, 27 transfer RNA genes, and 137 protein-coding genes with two conserved open reading frames (ORFs. The overall genome structure of C. costata is nearly the same as those of Saccharina japonica and Undaria pinnatifida. The plastid genomes of these three algal species retain a strong conservation of the GTG start codon while infrequently using TGA as a stop codon. In this regard, they differ substantially from the plastid genomes of Ectocarpus siliculosus and Fucus vesiculosus. Analysis of the nucleic acid substitution rates of the Laminariales plastid genes revealed that the petF gene has the highest substitution rate and the petN gene contains no substitution over its complete length. The variation in plastid genes between C. costata and S. japonica is lower than that between C. costata and U. pinnatifida as well as that between U. pinnatifida and S. japonica. Phylogenetic analyses demonstrated that C. costata and U. pinnatifida have a closer genetic relationship. We also identified two gene length mutations caused by the insertion or deletion of repeated sequences, which suggest a mechanism of gene length mutation that may be one of the key explanations for the genetic variation in plastid genomes.

  18. Comparative analysis of complete plastid genomes from wild soybean (Glycine soja) and nine other Glycine species

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khan, Abdul Latif; Aaqil Khan, Muhammad; Muhammad Imran, Qari; Kang, Sang-Mo; Al-Hosni, Khdija; Jeong, Eun Ju; Lee, Ko Eun; Lee, In-Jung

    2017-01-01

    The plastid genomes of different plant species exhibit significant variation, thereby providing valuable markers for exploring evolutionary relationships and population genetics. Glycine soja (wild soybean) is recognized as the wild ancestor of cultivated soybean (G. max), representing a valuable genetic resource for soybean breeding programmes. In the present study, the complete plastid genome of G. soja was sequenced using Illumina paired-end sequencing and then compared it for the first time with previously reported plastid genome sequences from nine other Glycine species. The G. soja plastid genome was 152,224 bp in length and possessed a typical quadripartite structure, consisting of a pair of inverted repeats (IRa/IRb; 25,574 bp) separated by small (178,963 bp) and large (83,181 bp) single-copy regions, with a 51-kb inversion in the large single-copy region. The genome encoded 134 genes, including 87 protein-coding genes, eight ribosomal RNA genes, and 39 transfer RNA genes, and possessed 204 randomly distributed microsatellites, including 15 forward, 25 tandem, and 34 palindromic repeats. Whole-plastid genome comparisons revealed an overall high degree of sequence similarity between G. max and G. gracilis and some divergence in the intergenic spacers of other species. Greater numbers of indels and SNP substitutions were observed compared with G. cyrtoloba. The sequence of the accD gene from G. soja was highly divergent from those of the other species except for G. max and G. gracilis. Phylogenomic analyses of the complete plastid genomes and 76 shared genes yielded an identical topology and indicated that G. soja is closely related to G. max and G. gracilis. The complete G. soja genome sequenced in the present study is a valuable resource for investigating the population and evolutionary genetics of Glycine species and can be used to identify related species. PMID:28763486

  19. SYNTHESIS OF PROTEINS BY NATIVE CHEMICAL LIGATION USING FMOC-BASED CHEMISTRY

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Camarero, J A; Mitchell, A R

    2005-01-20

    C-terminal peptide {alpha}-thioesters are valuable intermediates in the synthesis/semisynthesis of proteins by native chemical ligation. They are prepared either by solid-phase peptide synthesis (SPPS) or biosynthetically by protein splicing techniques. The present paper reviews the different methods available for the chemical synthesis of peptide {alpha}-thioesters using Fmoc-based SPPS.

  20. The plastidic DEAD-box RNA helicase 22, HS3, is essential for plastid functions both in seed development and in seedling growth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kanai, Masatake; Hayashi, Makoto; Kondo, Maki; Nishimura, Mikio

    2013-09-01

    Plants accumulate large amounts of storage products in seeds to provide an energy reserve and to supply nutrients for germination and post-germinative growth. Arabidopsis thaliana belongs to the Brassica family, and oil is the main storage product in Arabidopsis seeds. To elucidate the regulatory mechanisms of oil biosynthesis in seeds, we screened for high density seeds (heavy seed) that have a low oil content. HS3 (heavy seed 3) encodes the DEAD-box RNA helicase 22 that is localized to plastids. The triacylglycerol (TAG) content of hs3-1 seeds was 10% lower than that of wild-type (WT) seeds, while the protein content was unchanged. The hs3-1 plants displayed a pale-green phenotype in developing seeds and seedlings, but not in adult leaves. The HS3 expression level was high in developing seeds and seedlings, but was low in stems, rosette leaves and flowers. The plastid gene expression profile of WT developing seeds and seedlings differed from that of hs3-1 developing seeds and seedlings. The expression of several genes was reduced in developing hs3-1 seeds, including accD, a gene that encodes the β subunit of carboxyltransferase, which is one component of acetyl-CoA carboxylase in plastids. In contrast, no differences were observed between the expression profiles of WT and hs3-1 rosette leaves. These results show that HS3 is essential for proper mRNA accumulation of plastid genes during seed development and seedling growth, and suggest that HS3 ensures seed oil biosynthesis by maintaining plastid mRNA levels.

  1. Glycolipid transfer protein expression is affected by glycosphingolipid synthesis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matti A Kjellberg

    Full Text Available Members of the glycolipid transfer protein superfamily (GLTP are found from animals and fungi to plants and red micro-alga. Eukaryotes that encode the glucosylceramide synthase responsible for the synthesis of glucosylceramide, the precursor for most glycosphingolipids, also produce GLTPs. Cells that does not synthesize glucosylceramide neither express GLTPs. Based on this genetic relationship there must be a strong correlation between the synthesis of glucosylceramide and GLTPs. To regulate the levels of glycolipids we have used inhibitors of intracellular trafficking, glycosphingolipid synthesis and degradation, and small interfering RNA to down-regulate the activity of glucosylceramide synthase activity. We found that GLTP expression, both at the mRNA and protein levels, is elevated in cells that accumulate glucosylceramide. Monensin and brefeldin A block intracellular vesicular transport mechanisms. Brefeldin A treatment leads to accumulation of newly synthesized glucosylceramide, galactosylceramide and lactosylceramide in a fused endoplasmic reticulum-Golgi complex. On the other hand, inhibiting glycosphingolipid degradation with conduritol-B-epoxide, that generates glucosylceramide accumulation in the lysosomes, did not affect the levels of GLTP. However, glycosphingolipid synthesis inhibitors like PDMP, NB-DNJ and myriocin, all decreased glucosylceramide and GLTP below normal levels. We also found that an 80% loss of glucosylceramide due to glucosylceramide synthase knockdown resulted in a significant reduction in the expression of GLTP. We show here that interfering with membrane trafficking events and simple neutral glycosphingolipid synthesis will affect the expression of GLTP. We postulate that a change in the glucosylceramide balance causes a response in the GLTP expression, and put forward that GLTP might play a role in lipid directing and sensing of glucosylceramide at the ER-Golgi interface.

  2. Monitoring protein synthesis by fluorescence recovery after photobleaching (FRAP) in vivo

    OpenAIRE

    2015-01-01

    Currently available methodologies for measuring protein synthesis rates rely on metabolic labelling by incorporation of radioactive amino acids into nascent polypeptides. These approaches are hampered by several limitations and cannot be applied to monitor protein synthesis in specific cells or tissues, in live specimens. Here, we describe a novel method for monitoring protein synthesis in specific cells and tissues of live Caenorhabditis elegans animals. Fluorescent reporter proteins such as...

  3. High-throughput synthesis of stable isotope-labeled transmembrane proteins for targeted transmembrane proteomics using a wheat germ cell-free protein synthesis system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takemori, Nobuaki; Takemori, Ayako; Matsuoka, Kazuhiro; Morishita, Ryo; Matsushita, Natsuki; Aoshima, Masato; Takeda, Hiroyuki; Sawasaki, Tatsuya; Endo, Yaeta; Higashiyama, Shigeki

    2015-02-01

    Using a wheat germ cell-free protein synthesis system, we developed a high-throughput method for the synthesis of stable isotope-labeled full-length transmembrane proteins as proteoliposomes to mimic the in vivo environment, and we successfully constructed an internal standard library for targeted transmembrane proteomics by using mass spectrometry.

  4. Twister Protein: a ludic tool involving protein synthesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aline Weyh

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Several studies show that students of various grade levels report the Genetics as an abstract theme and difficult to assimilate by the students, with multiple problems in the teaching-learning process and becoming necessary the development of auxiliary practices. Among the teaching tools, the game is the most currently opted playful activity by stimulating multiple intelligences, allowing greater student-teacher interaction. This work seeks the production of an innovative and dynamic educational game, Twister Protein, as a pedagogical resource for Genetics discipline. The development of the game was based on the use of easily accessible and low cost materials by teachers, allowing the knowledge of transcription, translation and protein folding. The activity was proposed and applied in the classroom with pilot undergraduate students. The fun associated with the knowledge of science not only allowed a better memorization of the content addressed, as aroused the curiosity, theme reflection, character building and collaborative spirits, as well as competitiveness through the interaction between class. This practice proved to be an effective tool in the escape from routine and fault repair of the theoretical process.

  5. Terpenoid Metabolism in Plastids 1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Camara, Bilal; Bardat, Françoise; Dogbo, Odette; Brangeon, Judy; Monéger, René

    1983-01-01

    A technique for the isolation and the purification of Capsicum annum L. var. Yolo Wonder chromoplasts is described. The degree of purity of the isolated chromoplasts is greatly improved by the absence of MgCl2 in the extraction medium and in the gradient purification system, as shown by electron micrographs and the near absence of antimycin-insensitive NADH:cytochrome c reductase activity and succinate:cytochrome c reductase activity. Furthermore, phosphatidylserine was absent and the phosphatidylethanolamine content was reduced by a factor of 5 in these preparations, which were active in the synthesis of galactolipids, prenylquinones, and carotenoids. Images Fig. 1 PMID:16663194

  6. VCP and ATL1 regulate endoplasmic reticulum and protein synthesis for dendritic spine formation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shih, Yu-Tzu; Hsueh, Yi-Ping

    2016-03-17

    Imbalanced protein homeostasis, such as excessive protein synthesis and protein aggregation, is a pathogenic hallmark of a range of neurological disorders. Here, using expression of mutant proteins, a knockdown approach and disease mutation knockin mice, we show that VCP (valosin-containing protein), together with its cofactor P47 and the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) morphology regulator ATL1 (Atlastin-1), regulates tubular ER formation and influences the efficiency of protein synthesis to control dendritic spine formation in neurons. Strengthening the significance of protein synthesis in dendritic spinogenesis, the translation blocker cyclohexamide and the mTOR inhibitor rapamycin reduce dendritic spine density, while a leucine supplement that increases protein synthesis ameliorates the dendritic spine defects caused by Vcp and Atl1 deficiencies. Because VCP and ATL1 are the causative genes of several neurodegenerative and neurodevelopmental disorders, we suggest that impaired ER formation and inefficient protein synthesis are significant in the pathogenesis of multiple neurological disorders.

  7. Growth hormone stimulates the collagen synthesis in human tendon and skeletal muscle without affecting myofibrillar protein synthesis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Doessing, Simon; Heinemeier, Katja; Holm, Lars;

    2010-01-01

    young individuals. rhGH administration caused an increase in serum GH, serum IGF-I, and IGF-I mRNA expression in tendon and muscle. Tendon collagen I mRNA expression and tendon collagen protein synthesis increased by 3.9-fold and 1.3-fold, respectively (P ...RNA expression and muscle collagen protein synthesis increased by 2.3-fold and 5.8-fold, respectively (P protein synthesis was unaffected by elevation of GH and IGF-I. Moderate exercise did not enhance the effects of GH manipulation. Thus, increased GH availability stimulates...... matrix collagen synthesis in skeletal muscle and tendon, but without any effect upon myofibrillar protein synthesis. The results suggest that GH is more important in strengthening the matrix tissue than for muscle cell hypertrophy in adult human musculotendinous tissue....

  8. Arginine depletion by arginine deiminase does not affect whole protein metabolism or muscle fractional protein synthesis rate in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marini, Juan C; Didelija, Inka Cajo

    2015-01-01

    Due to the absolute need for arginine that certain cancer cells have, arginine depletion is a therapy in clinical trials to treat several types of cancers. Arginine is an amino acids utilized not only as a precursor for other important molecules, but also for protein synthesis. Because arginine depletion can potentially exacerbate the progressive loss of body weight, and especially lean body mass, in cancer patients we determined the effect of arginine depletion by pegylated arginine deiminase (ADI-PEG 20) on whole body protein synthesis and fractional protein synthesis rate in multiple tissues of mice. ADI-PEG 20 successfully depleted circulating arginine (arginine, whole body protein synthesis and breakdown were maintained in the ADI-PEG 20 treated mice. The fractional protein synthesis rate of muscle was also not affected by arginine depletion. Most tissues (liver, kidney, spleen, heart, lungs, stomach, small and large intestine, pancreas) were able to maintain their fractional protein synthesis rate; however, the fractional protein synthesis rate of brain, thymus and testicles was reduced due to the ADI-PEG 20 treatment. Furthermore, these results were confirmed by the incorporation of ureido [14C]citrulline, which indicate the local conversion into arginine, into protein. In conclusion, the intracellular recycling pathway of citrulline is able to provide enough arginine to maintain protein synthesis rate and prevent the loss of lean body mass and body weight.

  9. Alphavirus RNA synthesis and non-structural protein functions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rupp, Jonathan C; Sokoloski, Kevin J; Gebhart, Natasha N; Hardy, Richard W

    2015-09-01

    The members of the genus Alphavirus are positive-sense RNA viruses, which are predominantly transmitted to vertebrates by a mosquito vector. Alphavirus disease in humans can be severely debilitating, and depending on the particular viral species, infection may result in encephalitis and possibly death. In recent years, alphaviruses have received significant attention from public health authorities as a consequence of the dramatic emergence of chikungunya virus in the Indian Ocean islands and the Caribbean. Currently, no safe, approved or effective vaccine or antiviral intervention exists for human alphavirus infection. The molecular biology of alphavirus RNA synthesis has been well studied in a few species of the genus and represents a general target for antiviral drug development. This review describes what is currently understood about the regulation of alphavirus RNA synthesis, the roles of the viral non-structural proteins in this process and the functions of cis-acting RNA elements in replication, and points to open questions within the field.

  10. Creating a completely "cell-free" system for protein synthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Mark Thomas; Bennett, Anthony M; Hunt, Jeremy M; Bundy, Bradley C

    2015-01-01

    Cell-free protein synthesis is a promising tool to take biotechnology outside of the cell. A cell-free approach provides distinct advantages over in vivo systems including open access to the reaction environment and direct control over all chemical components for facile optimization and synthetic biology integration. Promising applications of cell-free systems include portable diagnostics, biotherapeutics expression, rational protein engineering, and biocatalyst production. The highest yielding and most economical cell-free systems use an extract composed of the soluble component of lysed Escherichia coli. Although E. coli lysis can be highly efficient (>99.999%), one persistent challenge is that the extract remains contaminated with up to millions of cells per mL. In this work, we examine the potential of multiple decontamination strategies to further reduce or eliminate bacteria in cell-free systems. Two strategies, sterile filtration and lyophilization, effectively eliminate contaminating cells while maintaining the systems' protein synthesis capabilities. Lyophilization provides the additional benefit of long-term stability at storage above freezing. Technologies for personalized, portable medicine and diagnostics can be expanded based on these foundational sterilized and completely "cell-free" systems.

  11. Synaptosomal protein synthesis in P2 and Ficoll purified fractions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eyman, Maria; Cefaliello, Carolina; Bruno, Anna Paola; Bruno, Annapaola; Crispino, Marianna; Giuditta, Antonio

    2012-01-30

    Cytoplasmic protein synthesis of brain synaptosomes has generally been determined in the Ficoll purified fraction which contains fewer contaminating mitochondria, microsomes and myelin fragments than the parent P2 fraction. Using a highly selective assay of this activity we have compared the total translation activity and the specific activity of the proteins synthesized by either fraction in control rats and in rats trained for a two-way active avoidance task. In control rats the specific activity remained essentially the same in both fractions but in trained rats the value of the Ficoll fraction was markedly lower (38.5%) than in the P2 fraction. Furthermore, the total translation activity of the Ficoll fraction was 30% lower than in the P2 fraction in control rats and 62% lower in trained rats. These decrements indicate that a large proportion of active synaptosomes present in the P2 fraction is not recovered in the Ficoll fraction, notably in rats undergoing plastic brain changes. We conclude that cytoplasmic protein synthesis of brain synaptosomes is better preserved in the P2 fraction.

  12. Ribosome recycling: An essential process of protein synthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kiel, Michael C; Kaji, Hideko; Kaji, Akira

    2007-01-01

    A preponderance of textbooks outlines cellular protein synthesis (translation) in three basic steps: initiation, elongation, and termination. However, researchers in the field of translation accept that a vital fourth step exists; this fourth step is called ribosome recycling. Ribosome recycling occurs after the nascent polypeptide has been released during the termination step. Despite the release of the polypeptide, ribosomes remain bound to the mRNA and tRNA. It is only during the fourth step of translation that ribosomes are ultimately released from the mRNA, split into subunits, and are free to bind new mRNA, thus the term "ribosome recycling." This step is essential to the viability of cells. In bacteria, it is catalyzed by two proteins, elongation factor G and ribosome recycling factor, a near perfect structural mimic of tRNA. Eukaryotic organelles such as mitochondria and chloroplasts possess ribosome recycling factor and elongation factor G homologues, but the nature of ribosome recycling in eukaryotic cytoplasm is still under investigation. In this review, the discovery of ribosome recycling and the basic mechanisms involved are discussed so that textbook writers and teachers can include this vital step, which is just as important as the three conventional steps, in sections dealing with protein synthesis.

  13. Lovastatin Corrects Excess Protein Synthesis and Prevents Epileptogenesis in a Mouse Model of Fragile X Syndrome

    OpenAIRE

    Chuang, Shih-Chieh; Chubykin, Alexander A.; Sidorov, Michael; Bianchi, Riccardo; Wong, Robert K.S.; Osterweil, Emily; Bear, Mark; Chubykin, Alexander A.

    2013-01-01

    Many neuropsychiatric symptoms of fragile X syndrome (FXS) are believed to be a consequence of altered regulation of protein synthesis at synapses. We discovered that lovastatin, a drug that is widely prescribed for the treatment of high cholesterol, can correct excess hippocampal protein synthesis in the mouse model of FXS and can prevent one of the robust functional consequences of increased protein synthesis in FXS, epileptogenesis. These data suggest that lovastatin is potentially disease...

  14. Lovastatin corrects excess protein synthesis and prevents epileptogenesis in a mouse model of fragile X syndrome

    OpenAIRE

    Osterweil, Emily K.; Chuang, Shih-Chieh; Chubykin, Alexander A.; Sidorov, Michael; Bianchi, Riccardo; Wong, Robert K. S.; Bear, Mark F.

    2013-01-01

    Many neuropsychiatric symptoms of fragile X syndrome (FXS) are believed to be a consequence of altered regulation of protein synthesis at synapses. We discovered that lovastatin, a drug that is widely prescribed for treatment of high cholesterol, can correct excess hippocampal protein synthesis in themouse model of FXS and can prevent one of the robust functional consequences of increased protein synthesis in FXS, epileptogenesis. These data suggest that lovastatin is potentially disease modi...

  15. Amnesia produced by altered release of neurotransmitters after intraamygdala injections of a protein synthesis inhibitor

    OpenAIRE

    Canal, Clinton E.; Chang, Qing; Paul E Gold

    2007-01-01

    Amnesia produced by protein synthesis inhibitors such as anisomycin provides major support for the prevalent view that the formation of long-lasting memories requires de novo protein synthesis. However, inhibition of protein synthesis might disrupt other neural functions to interfere with memory formation. Intraamygdala injections of anisomycin before inhibitory avoidance training impaired memory in rats tested 48 h later. Release of norepinephrine (NE), dopamine (DA), and serotonin, measured...

  16. Complete plastid genome of Eriobotrya japonica (Thunb.) Lindl and comparative analysis in Rosaceae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Liqun; Guan, Qijie; Amin, Awais; Zhu, Wei; Li, Mengzhu; Li, Ximin; Zhang, Lin; Tian, Jingkui

    2016-01-01

    Eriobotrya japonica (Thunb.) Lindl (loquat) is an evergreen Rosaceae fruit tree widely distributed in subtropical regions. Its leaves are considered as traditional Chinese medicine and are of high medical value especially for cough and emesis. Thus, we sequenced the complete plastid genome of E. japonica to better utilize this important species. The complete plastid genome of E. japonica is 159,137 bp in length, which contains a typical quadripartite structure with a pair of inverted repeats (IR, 26,326 bp) separated by large (LSC, 89,202 bp) and small (SSC, 19,283 bp) single-copy regions. The E. japonica plastid genome encodes 112 unique genes which consist of 78 protein-coding genes, 30 tRNA genes and 4 rRNA genes. Gene structure and content of E. japonica plastid genome are quite conserved and show similarity among Rosaceous species. Five large indels are unique to E. japonica in comparison with Pyrus pyrifolia and Prunus persica, which could be utilized as molecular markers. A total of 72 simple sequence repeats (SSRs) were detected and most of them are mononucleotide repeats composed of A or T, indicating a strong A or T bias for base composition. The Ka and Ks ratios of most genes are lower than 1, which suggests that most genes are under purifying selection. The phylogenetic analysis described the evolutionary relationship within Rosaceae and fully supported a close relationship between E. japonica and P. pyrifolia.

  17. Kluyveromyces marxianus as a host for heterologous protein synthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gombert, Andreas K; Madeira, José Valdo; Cerdán, María-Esperanza; González-Siso, María-Isabel

    2016-07-01

    The preferentially respiring and thermotolerant yeast Kluyveromyces marxianus is an emerging host for heterologous protein synthesis, surpassing the traditional preferentially fermenting yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae in some important aspects: K . marxianus can grow at temperatures 10 °C higher than S. cerevisiae, which may result in decreased costs for cooling bioreactors and reduced contamination risk; has ability to metabolize a wider variety of sugars, such as lactose and xylose; is the fastest growing eukaryote described so far; and does not require special cultivation techniques (such as fed-batch) to avoid fermentative metabolism. All these advantages exist together with a high secretory capacity, performance of eukaryotic post-translational modifications, and with a generally regarded as safe (GRAS) status. In the last years, replication origins from several Kluyveromyces spp. have been used for the construction of episomal vectors, and also integrative strategies have been developed based on the tendency for non-homologous recombination displayed by K. marxianus. The recessive URA3 auxotrophic marker and the dominant Kan(R) are mostly used for selection of transformed cells, but other markers have been made available. Homologous and heterologous promoters and secretion signals have been characterized, with the K. marxianus INU1 expression and secretion system being of remarkable functionality. The efficient synthesis of roughly 50 heterologous proteins has been demonstrated, including one thermophilic enzyme. In this mini-review, we summarize the physiological characteristics of K. marxianus relevant for its use in the efficient synthesis of heterologous proteins, the efforts performed hitherto in the development of a molecular toolbox for this purpose, and some successful examples.

  18. Mechanism underlying carbon tetrachloride-inhibited protein synthesis in liver

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2010-01-01

    AIM: To study the mechanism underlying carbon tetrachloride (CCl4)-induced alterations of protein synthesis in liver. METHODS: Male Sprague-Dawley rats were given CCl4 (1 mL/100 g body weight) and 3H-leucine incorporation. Malondialdehyde (MDA) level in the liver, in vitro response of hepatocyte nuclei nucleotide triphosphatase (NTPase) to free radicals, and nuclear export of total mRNA with 3'-poly A+ were measured respectively. Survival response of HepG2 cells to CCl4 treatment was assessed by methyl thia...

  19. Influence of anabolic agents on protein synthesis and degradation in muscle cells grown in culture

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Roeder, R.A.; Thorpe, S.D.; Byers, F.M.; Schelling, G.T.; Gunn, J.M.

    Muscle cell culture (L/sub 6/) studies were conducted to determine whether anabolic agents have a direct effect on the muscle cell. The effect of zeranol, testosterone propionate, estradiol benzoate, progesterone, dexamethasone and anabolic agent-dexamethasone combinations on protein synthesis and degradation were measured. Myoblast and myotube cultures were pretreated with 1 ..mu..M compounds for 12, 24 and 48 h before a 6-h synthesis or degradation measuring period. Protein synthesis was determined as cpm of (/sup 3/H) leucine incorporated per mg cell protein. Protein degradation was measured by a pulse-chase procedure using (/sup 3/H) leucine and expressed as the percentage labeled protein degraded in 6 h. Progesterone slightly increased protein synthesis in myoblast cultures. Testosterone propionate had no effect on synthesis. Protein synthesis was decreased by estradiol benzoate in myotube cultures. Protein degradation was not altered appreciably by anabolic agents. Protein synthesis was initially inhibited in myotubes by dexamethasone, but increased in myoblasts and myotubes in the extended incubation time. Dexamethasone also consistently increased protein degradation, but this required several hours to be expressed. Anabolic agents did not interfere with dexamethasone-induced increases in protein synthesis and degradation. The magnitude of response and sensitivity were similar for both the myoblast and the more fully differentiated myotube for all compounds tested. These results indicate that anabolic agents at the 1 ..mu..M level do not have a direct anabolic effect on muscle or alter glucocorticoid-induced catabolic response in muscle.

  20. Lewis lung carcinoma regulation of mechanical stretch-induced protein synthesis in cultured myotubes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Song; Carson, James A

    2016-01-01

    Mechanical stretch can activate muscle and myotube protein synthesis through mammalian target of rapamycin complex 1 (mTORC1) signaling. While it has been established that tumor-derived cachectic factors can induce myotube wasting, the effect of this catabolic environment on myotube mechanical signaling has not been determined. We investigated whether media containing cachectic factors derived from Lewis lung carcinoma (LLC) can regulate the stretch induction of myotube protein synthesis. C2C12 myotubes preincubated in control or LLC-derived media were chronically stretched. Protein synthesis regulation by anabolic and catabolic signaling was then examined. In the control condition, stretch increased mTORC1 activity and protein synthesis. The LLC treatment decreased basal mTORC1 activity and protein synthesis and attenuated the stretch induction of protein synthesis. LLC media increased STAT3 and AMP-activated protein kinase phosphorylation in myotubes, independent of stretch. Both stretch and LLC independently increased ERK1/2, p38, and NF-κB phosphorylation. In LLC-treated myotubes, the inhibition of ERK1/2 and p38 rescued the stretch induction of protein synthesis. Interestingly, either leukemia inhibitory factor or glycoprotein 130 antibody administration caused further inhibition of mTORC1 signaling and protein synthesis in stretched myotubes. AMP-activated protein kinase inhibition increased basal mTORC1 signaling activity and protein synthesis in LLC-treated myotubes, but did not restore the stretch induction of protein synthesis. These results demonstrate that LLC-derived cachectic factors can dissociate stretch-induced signaling from protein synthesis through ERK1/2 and p38 signaling, and that glycoprotein 130 signaling is associated with the basal stretch response in myotubes.

  1. Endosymbiotic gene transfer in tertiary plastid-containing dinoflagellates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burki, Fabien; Imanian, Behzad; Hehenberger, Elisabeth; Hirakawa, Yoshihisa; Maruyama, Shinichiro; Keeling, Patrick J

    2014-02-01

    Plastid establishment involves the transfer of endosymbiotic genes to the host nucleus, a process known as endosymbiotic gene transfer (EGT). Large amounts of EGT have been shown in several photosynthetic lineages but also in present-day plastid-lacking organisms, supporting the notion that endosymbiotic genes leave a substantial genetic footprint in the host nucleus. Yet the extent of this genetic relocation remains debated, largely because the long period that has passed since most plastids originated has erased many of the clues to how this process unfolded. Among the dinoflagellates, however, the ancestral peridinin-containing plastid has been replaced by tertiary plastids on several more recent occasions, giving us a less ancient window to examine plastid origins. In this study, we evaluated the endosymbiotic contribution to the host genome in two dinoflagellate lineages with tertiary plastids. We generated the first nuclear transcriptome data sets for the "dinotoms," which harbor diatom-derived plastids, and analyzed these data in combination with the available transcriptomes for kareniaceans, which harbor haptophyte-derived plastids. We found low level of detectable EGT in both dinoflagellate lineages, with only 9 genes and 90 genes of possible tertiary endosymbiotic origin in dinotoms and kareniaceans, respectively, suggesting that tertiary endosymbioses did not heavily impact the host dinoflagellate genomes.

  2. Cost of protein synthesis and energy allocation during development of antarctic sea urchin embryos and larvae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pace, Douglas A; Manahan, Donal T

    2007-04-01

    Cold environments represent a substantial volume of the biosphere. To study developmental physiology in subzero seawater temperatures typically found in the Southern Ocean, rates and costs of protein synthesis were measured in embryos and larvae of Sterechinus neumayeri, the Antarctic sea urchin. Our analysis of the "cost of living" in extreme cold for this species shows (1) that cost of protein synthesis is strikingly low during development, at 0.41 +/- 0.05 J (mg protein synthesized)(-1) (n = 16); (2) that synthesis cost is fixed and independent of synthesis rate; and (3) that a low synthesis cost permits high rates of protein turnover at -1 degrees C, at rates comparable to those of temperate species of sea urchin embryos developing at 15 degrees C. With a low synthesis cost, even at the highest synthesis rates measured (gastrulae), the proportion of total metabolism accounted for by protein synthesis in the Antarctic sea urchin was 54%-a value similar to that of temperate sea urchin embryos. In the Antarctic sea urchin, up to 87% of metabolic rate can be accounted for by the combined energy costs of protein synthesis and the sodium pump. We conclude that, in Antarctic sea urchin embryos, high rates of protein synthesis can be supported in extreme-cold environments while still maintaining low rates of respiration.

  3. Targeting of the polyhydroxybutyrate biosynthetic pathway to the plastids of Arabidopsis thaliana results in high levels of polymer accumulation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nawrath, C.; Poirier, Y.; Somerville, C. (Carnegie Institution of Washington, Stanford, CA (United States))

    1994-12-20

    In the bacterium Alcaligenes eutrophus, three genes encode the enzymes necessary to catalyze the synthesis of poly[(R)-(-)-3-hydroxybutyrate] (PHB) from acetyl-CoA. In order to target these enzymes into the plastids of higher plants, the genes were modified by addition of DNA fragments encoding a pea chloroplast transit peptide, a constitutive plant promoter, and a poly(A) addition sequence. Each of the modified bacterial genes was introduced into Arabidopsis thaliana by Agrobacterium-mediated transformation, and plants containing all three genes were obtained by sexual crosses. These plans accumulated PHB up to 14% of the dry weight as 0.2- to 0.7-[mu]m granules within plastids. In contrast to earlier experiments in which expression of the PHB biosynthetic pathway in the cytoplasm led to a deleterious effect on growth, expression of the PHB biosynthetic pathway in plastids had no obvious effect on the growth or fertility of the transgenic plants and resulted in a 100-fold increase in the amount of PHB in higher plants. The high level of PHB accumulation also suggests that the synthesis of plastid acetyl-CoA is regulated by a mechanism which responds to metabolic demand. 20 refs., 6 figs.

  4. Amyloid precursor protein (APP) affects global protein synthesis in dividing human cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sobol, Anna; Galluzzo, Paola; Liang, Shuang; Rambo, Brittany; Skucha, Sylvia; Weber, Megan J; Alani, Sara; Bocchetta, Maurizio

    2015-05-01

    Hypoxic non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) is dependent on Notch-1 signaling for survival. Targeting Notch-1 by means of γ-secretase inhibitors (GSI) proved effective in killing hypoxic NSCLC. Post-mortem analysis of GSI-treated, NSCLC-burdened mice suggested enhanced phosphorylation of 4E-BP1 at threonines 37/46 in hypoxic tumor tissues. In vitro dissection of this phenomenon revealed that Amyloid Precursor Protein (APP) inhibition was responsible for a non-canonical 4E-BP1 phosphorylation pattern rearrangement-a process, in part, mediated by APP regulation of the pseudophosphatase Styx. Upon APP depletion we observed modifications of eIF-4F composition indicating increased recruitment of eIF-4A to the mRNA cap. This phenomenon was supported by the observation that cells with depleted APP were partially resistant to silvestrol, an antibiotic that interferes with eIF-4A assembly into eIF-4F complexes. APP downregulation in dividing human cells increased the rate of global protein synthesis, both cap- and IRES-dependent. Such an increase seemed independent of mTOR inhibition. After administration of Torin-1, APP downregulation and Mechanistic Target of Rapamycin Complex 1 (mTORC-1) inhibition affected 4E-BP1 phosphorylation and global protein synthesis in opposite fashions. Additional investigations indicated that APP operates independently of mTORC-1. Key phenomena described in this study were reversed by overexpression of the APP C-terminal domain. The presented data suggest that APP may be a novel regulator of protein synthesis in dividing human cells, both cancerous and primary. Furthermore, APP appears to affect translation initiation using mechanisms seemingly dissimilar to mTORC-1 regulation of cap-dependent protein synthesis.

  5. Evidence for transitional stages in the evolution of euglenid group II introns and twintrons in the Monomorphina aenigmatica plastid genome.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jean-François Pombert

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Photosynthetic euglenids acquired their plastid by secondary endosymbiosis of a prasinophyte-like green alga. But unlike its prasinophyte counterparts, the plastid genome of the euglenid Euglena gracilis is riddled with introns that interrupt almost every protein-encoding gene. The atypical group II introns and twintrons (introns-within-introns found in the E. gracilis plastid have been hypothesized to have been acquired late in the evolution of euglenids, implying that massive numbers of introns may be lacking in other taxa. This late emergence was recently corroborated by the plastid genome sequences of the two basal euglenids, Eutreptiella gymnastica and Eutreptia viridis, which were found to contain fewer introns. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: To gain further insights into the proliferation of introns in euglenid plastids, we have characterized the complete plastid genome sequence of Monomorphina aenigmatica, a freshwater species occupying an intermediate phylogenetic position between early and late branching euglenids. The M. aenigmatica UTEX 1284 plastid genome (74,746 bp, 70.6% A+T, 87 genes contains 53 intron insertion sites, of which 41 were found to be shared with other euglenids including 12 of the 15 twintron insertion sites reported in E. gracilis. CONCLUSIONS: The pattern of insertion sites suggests an ongoing but uneven process of intron gain in the lineage, with perhaps a minimum of two bursts of rapid intron proliferation. We also identified several sites that represent intermediates in the process of twintron evolution, where the external intron is in place, but not the internal one, offering a glimpse into how these convoluted molecular contraptions originate.

  6. Acute propranolol infusion stimulates protein synthesis in rabbit skin wound.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xiao-Jun; Meng, Chengyue; Chinkes, David L; Finnerty, Celeste C; Aarsland, Asle; Jeschke, Marc G; Herndon, David N

    2009-05-01

    Propranolol administration has been demonstrated to improve cardiac work, decrease energy expenditure, and attenuate lipolysis in burned patients; however, its effect on wound healing has not been reported. In rabbits, a partial-thickness skin donor site wound was created on the back, and catheters were placed in the carotid artery and jugular vein. A nasogastric feeding tube was placed for enteral feeding. On day 5 after injury, stable isotope tracers were infused to determine protein and DNA kinetics in the wound. Propranolol hydrochloride was injected in 1 group during the tracer infusion to decrease heart rate, and the other group without propranolol injection served as a control. The propranolol infusion decreased heart rate by 21%. The protein fractional synthetic rate in the wound was greater in the propranolol group (8.6 +/- 0.9 vs 6.1 +/- 0.5%/day, P synthesis - breakdown) was increased in the propranolol group (5.0 +/- 1.2 vs 2.8 +/- 0.7%/day, P = .07). Wound DNA fractional synthetic rates were comparable. The protein fractional synthetic rate was correlated with percent decrease in heart rate, but expression of the beta-adrenergic receptors and downstream signaling cascades in local wounds were not affected after propranolol treatment. Propranolol infusion increased wound protein synthetic rate and tended to increase wound protein deposition rate, which might be beneficial to wound healing. These changes might reflect a systemic response to the beta-adrenergic blockade.

  7. Evolution of red algal plastid genomes: ancient architectures, introns, horizontal gene transfer, and taxonomic utility of plastid markers.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jan Janouškovec

    Full Text Available Red algae have the most gene-rich plastid genomes known, but despite their evolutionary importance these genomes remain poorly sampled. Here we characterize three complete and one partial plastid genome from a diverse range of florideophytes. By unifying annotations across all available red algal plastid genomes we show they all share a highly compact and slowly-evolving architecture and uniquely rich gene complements. Both chromosome structure and gene content have changed very little during red algal diversification, and suggest that plastid-to nucleus gene transfers have been rare. Despite their ancient character, however, the red algal plastids also contain several unprecedented features, including a group II intron in a tRNA-Met gene that encodes the first example of red algal plastid intron maturase - a feature uniquely shared among florideophytes. We also identify a rare case of a horizontally-acquired proteobacterial operon, and propose this operon may have been recruited for plastid function and potentially replaced a nucleus-encoded plastid-targeted paralogue. Plastid genome phylogenies yield a fully resolved tree and suggest that plastid DNA is a useful tool for resolving red algal relationships. Lastly, we estimate the evolutionary rates among more than 200 plastid genes, and assess their usefulness for species and subspecies taxonomy by comparison to well-established barcoding markers such as cox1 and rbcL. Overall, these data demonstrates that red algal plastid genomes are easily obtainable using high-throughput sequencing of total genomic DNA, interesting from evolutionary perspectives, and promising in resolving red algal relationships at evolutionarily-deep and species/subspecies levels.

  8. Effect of Insulin Infusion on Liver Protein Synthesis during Hemodialysis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Reinhard, Mark; Frystyk, Jan; Jespersen, Bente

    2011-01-01

    Background Hemodialysis (HD) is a catabolic procedure that may contribute to the high frequency of protein-energy wasting among patients receiving maintenance HD. The present study investigated the additional effect of glucose and glucose-insulin infusion on liver protein synthesis during HD...... compared with a meal alone. Methods In a randomized cross-over study with three arms, 11 non-diabetic HD patients were assigned to receive a conventional HD session with either: • no treatment (NT) • IV infusion of glucose (G) • IV infusion of glucose-insulin (GI) During infusions blood glucose levels were...... maintained at 8.0-10.0 mmol/L by additional glucose infusion. Glucose and glucose-insulin infusions were commenced 2 h prior to HD and continued throughout the HD session. Fasting blood samples were collected at baseline before infusion and followed by the only meal allowed during the study. Results Blood...

  9. Extremophilic Enzymatic Response: Role of Proteins in Controlling Selenium Nanoparticle Synthesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-11-28

    structures formed called nanorods. 3. Additional work: Synthesis of gold nanoparticles . Additionally, we produced gold nanoparticles using another...Performance Report Title: Extremophilic Enzymatic Response: Role of Proteins in Controlling Selenium Nanoparticle Synthesis . Research Interest...of selenite. Apparently a NADPH/NADH-dependent 4 reductase, extracted from this microorganism, mediates selenium nanoparticles synthesis under

  10. Plastids of three Cuscuta species differing in plastid coding capacity have a common parasite-specific RNA composition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berg, Sabine; Krupinska, Karin; Krause, Kirsten

    2003-11-01

    The chlorophyll containing holoparasitic species Cuscuta reflexa, the achlorophyllous species Cuscuta odorata and the intermediate species Cuscuta gronovii, which contains only traces of chlorophyll, were compared with respect to their plastid coding capacity and plastid gene expression at the level of RNA. While extensive deletions have taken place in the plastid DNA of the achlorophyllous species C. odorata, the green species C. reflexa has retained an almost complete plastid genome. Although the plastid genome of the intermediate species C. gronovii has suffered extensive deletions, in contrast to the plastid genome of C. odorata it has retained photosynthesis-related genes. Hybridization with radioactive 3'-labelled RNA revealed that in all three species only a small 'parasite-specific' portion of the plastid genome consisting of mainly rRNAs and tRNAs is represented at the level of steady-state RNA. Run-on transcription assays revealed that in plastids of C. reflexa the entire genome is transcribed. Hence, the subset of RNA species required for a parasitic lifestyle is preferentially stabilized in Cuscuta plastids.

  11. From algae to angiosperms-inferring the phylogeny of green plants (Viridiplantae) from 360 plastid genomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruhfel, Brad R; Gitzendanner, Matthew A; Soltis, Pamela S; Soltis, Douglas E; Burleigh, J Gordon

    2014-02-17

    Next-generation sequencing has provided a wealth of plastid genome sequence data from an increasingly diverse set of green plants (Viridiplantae). Although these data have helped resolve the phylogeny of numerous clades (e.g., green algae, angiosperms, and gymnosperms), their utility for inferring relationships across all green plants is uncertain. Viridiplantae originated 700-1500 million years ago and may comprise as many as 500,000 species. This clade represents a major source of photosynthetic carbon and contains an immense diversity of life forms, including some of the smallest and largest eukaryotes. Here we explore the limits and challenges of inferring a comprehensive green plant phylogeny from available complete or nearly complete plastid genome sequence data. We assembled protein-coding sequence data for 78 genes from 360 diverse green plant taxa with complete or nearly complete plastid genome sequences available from GenBank. Phylogenetic analyses of the plastid data recovered well-supported backbone relationships and strong support for relationships that were not observed in previous analyses of major subclades within Viridiplantae. However, there also is evidence of systematic error in some analyses. In several instances we obtained strongly supported but conflicting topologies from analyses of nucleotides versus amino acid characters, and the considerable variation in GC content among lineages and within single genomes affected the phylogenetic placement of several taxa. Analyses of the plastid sequence data recovered a strongly supported framework of relationships for green plants. This framework includes: i) the placement of Zygnematophyceace as sister to land plants (Embryophyta), ii) a clade of extant gymnosperms (Acrogymnospermae) with cycads + Ginkgo sister to remaining extant gymnosperms and with gnetophytes (Gnetophyta) sister to non-Pinaceae conifers (Gnecup trees), and iii) within the monilophyte clade (Monilophyta), Equisetales

  12. Roles of Protein Synthesis Elongation Factor EF-Tu in Heat Tolerance in Plants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jianming Fu

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available EF-Tu proteins of plastids, mitochondria, and the cytosolic counterpart EF-1α in plants, as well as EF-Tu proteins of bacteria, are highly conserved and multifunctional. The functions of EF-Tu include transporting the aminoacyl-tRNA complex to the A site of the ribosome during protein biosynthesis; chaperone activity in protecting other proteins from aggregation caused by environmental stresses, facilitating renaturation of proteins when conditions return to normal; displaying a protein disulfide isomerase activity; participating in the degradation of N-terminally blocked proteins by the proteasome; eliciting innate immunity and triggering resistance to pathogenic bacteria in plants; participating in transcription when an E. coli host is infected with phages. EF-Tu genes are upregulated by abiotic stresses in plants, and EF-Tu plays important role in stress responses. Expression of a plant EF-Tu gene confers heat tolerance in E. coli, maize knock-out EF-Tu null mutants are heat susceptible, and over-expression of an EF-Tu gene improves heat tolerance in crop plants. This review paper summarizes the current knowledge of EF-Tu proteins in stress responses in plants and progress on application of EF-Tu for developing crop varieties tolerant to abiotic stresses, such as high temperatures.

  13. Consumption of Milk Protein or Whey Protein Results in a Similar Increase in Muscle Protein Synthesis in Middle Aged Men

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitchell, Cameron J.; McGregor, Robin A.; D’Souza, Randall F.; Thorstensen, Eric B.; Markworth, James F.; Fanning, Aaron C.; Poppitt, Sally D.; Cameron-Smith, David

    2015-01-01

    The differential ability of various milk protein fractions to stimulate muscle protein synthesis (MPS) has been previously described, with whey protein generally considered to be superior to other fractions. However, the relative ability of a whole milk protein to stimulate MPS has not been compared to whey. Sixteen healthy middle-aged males ingested either 20 g of milk protein (n = 8) or whey protein (n = 8) while undergoing a primed constant infusion of ring 13C6 phenylalanine. Muscle biopsies were obtained 120 min prior to consumption of the protein and 90 and 210 min afterwards. Resting myofibrillar fractional synthetic rates (FSR) were 0.019% ± 0.009% and 0.021% ± 0.018% h−1 in the milk and whey groups respectively. For the first 90 min after protein ingestion the FSR increased (p < 0.001) to 0.057% ± 0.018% and 0.052% ± 0.024% h−1 in the milk and whey groups respectively with no difference between groups (p = 0.810). FSR returned to baseline in both groups between 90 and 210 min after protein ingestion. Despite evidence of increased rate of digestion and leucine availability following the ingestion of whey protein, there was similar activation of MPS in middle-aged men with either 20 g of milk protein or whey protein. PMID:26506377

  14. Consumption of Milk Protein or Whey Protein Results in a Similar Increase in Muscle Protein Synthesis in Middle Aged Men.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitchell, Cameron J; McGregor, Robin A; D'Souza, Randall F; Thorstensen, Eric B; Markworth, James F; Fanning, Aaron C; Poppitt, Sally D; Cameron-Smith, David

    2015-10-21

    The differential ability of various milk protein fractions to stimulate muscle protein synthesis (MPS) has been previously described, with whey protein generally considered to be superior to other fractions. However, the relative ability of a whole milk protein to stimulate MPS has not been compared to whey. Sixteen healthy middle-aged males ingested either 20 g of milk protein (n = 8) or whey protein (n = 8) while undergoing a primed constant infusion of ring (13)C₆ phenylalanine. Muscle biopsies were obtained 120 min prior to consumption of the protein and 90 and 210 min afterwards. Resting myofibrillar fractional synthetic rates (FSR) were 0.019% ± 0.009% and 0.021% ± 0.018% h(-1) in the milk and whey groups respectively. For the first 90 min after protein ingestion the FSR increased (p milk and whey groups respectively with no difference between groups (p = 0.810). FSR returned to baseline in both groups between 90 and 210 min after protein ingestion. Despite evidence of increased rate of digestion and leucine availability following the ingestion of whey protein, there was similar activation of MPS in middle-aged men with either 20 g of milk protein or whey protein.

  15. Consumption of Milk Protein or Whey Protein Results in a Similar Increase in Muscle Protein Synthesis in Middle Aged Men

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cameron J. Mitchell

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available The differential ability of various milk protein fractions to stimulate muscle protein synthesis (MPS has been previously described, with whey protein generally considered to be superior to other fractions. However, the relative ability of a whole milk protein to stimulate MPS has not been compared to whey. Sixteen healthy middle-aged males ingested either 20 g of milk protein (n = 8 or whey protein (n = 8 while undergoing a primed constant infusion of ring 13C6 phenylalanine. Muscle biopsies were obtained 120 min prior to consumption of the protein and 90 and 210 min afterwards. Resting myofibrillar fractional synthetic rates (FSR were 0.019% ± 0.009% and 0.021% ± 0.018% h−1 in the milk and whey groups respectively. For the first 90 min after protein ingestion the FSR increased (p < 0.001 to 0.057% ± 0.018% and 0.052% ± 0.024% h−1 in the milk and whey groups respectively with no difference between groups (p = 0.810. FSR returned to baseline in both groups between 90 and 210 min after protein ingestion. Despite evidence of increased rate of digestion and leucine availability following the ingestion of whey protein, there was similar activation of MPS in middle-aged men with either 20 g of milk protein or whey protein.

  16. Cloning and Expression Pattern of a Gene Encoding a Putative Plastidic ATP/ADP Transporter from Helianthus tuberosus L.

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Kun MENG; Tuan-Jie CHANG; Xiang LIU; Song-Biao CHEN; Yong-Qin WANG; Ai-Jun SUN; Hong-Lin XU; Xiao-Li WEI; Zhen ZHU

    2005-01-01

    Herein, we report the cloning and molecular characterization of a full cDNA encoding a putative plastidic ATP/ADP transporter, designated HtAATP, for Helianthus tuberosus L. The ATP/ADP translocator protein was isolated from the tuber-cDNA library of H. tuberosus for the first time. The predicted HtAATP protein was judged as a plastidic ATP/ADP translocator protein from its high homology at the amino acid sequence level to the two Arabidopsis thaliana plastidic ATP/ADP translocator proteins AATP1 and AATP2 (84.8% and 79.9% identity, respectively). Amino acid sequence analysis of the primary structure of HtAATP revealed that it belonged to the plastidic ATP/ADP transporter family. Hydropathy prediction indicated that HtAATP gene product is a highly hydrophobic membrane protein that contains 10 transmembrane domains to form a spanning topology. Southern blotting analysis showed that the HtAATP gene is a single-copy gene in the H. tuberosus genome. Tissue distribution analysis showed that the HtAATP gene is prominently expressed in sink tissues. A stable expression pattern in tubers at different developmental stages implies an active involvement of HtAATP during carbohydrate formation.

  17. Variable frequency of plastid RNA editing among ferns and repeated loss of uridine-to-cytidine editing from vascular plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Wenhu; Grewe, Felix; Mower, Jeffrey P

    2015-01-01

    The distinct distribution and abundance of C-to-U and U-to-C RNA editing among land plants suggest that these two processes originated and evolve independently, but the paucity of information from several key lineages limits our understanding of their evolution. To examine the evolutionary diversity of RNA editing among ferns, we sequenced the plastid transcriptomes from two early diverging species, Ophioglossum californicum and Psilotum nudum. Using a relaxed automated approach to minimize false negatives combined with manual inspection to eliminate false positives, we identified 297 C-to-U and three U-to-C edit sites in the O. californicum plastid transcriptome but only 27 C-to-U and no U-to-C edit sites in the P. nudum plastid transcriptome. A broader comparison of editing content with the leptosporangiate fern Adiantum capillus-veneris and the hornwort Anthoceros formosae uncovered large variance in the abundance of plastid editing, indicating that the frequency and type of RNA editing is highly labile in ferns. Edit sites that increase protein conservation among species are more abundant and more efficiently edited than silent and non-conservative sites, suggesting that selection maintains functionally important editing. The absence of U-to-C editing from P. nudum plastid transcripts and other vascular plants demonstrates that U-to-C editing loss is a recurrent phenomenon in vascular plant evolution.

  18. Integrating gene synthesis and microfluidic protein analysis for rapid protein engineering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blackburn, Matthew C; Petrova, Ekaterina; Correia, Bruno E; Maerkl, Sebastian J

    2016-04-20

    The capability to rapidly design proteins with novel functions will have a significant impact on medicine, biotechnology and synthetic biology. Synthetic genes are becoming a commodity, but integrated approaches have yet to be developed that take full advantage of gene synthesis. We developed a solid-phase gene synthesis method based on asymmetric primer extension (APE) and coupled this process directly to high-throughput, on-chip protein expression, purification and characterization (via mechanically induced trapping of molecular interactions, MITOMI). By completely circumventing molecular cloning and cell-based steps, APE-MITOMI reduces the time between protein design and quantitative characterization to 3-4 days. With APE-MITOMI we synthesized and characterized over 400 zinc-finger (ZF) transcription factors (TF), showing that although ZF TFs can be readily engineered to recognize a particular DNA sequence, engineering the precise binding energy landscape remains challenging. We also found that it is possible to engineer ZF-DNA affinity precisely and independently of sequence specificity and that in silico modeling can explain some of the observed affinity differences. APE-MITOMI is a generic approach that should facilitate fundamental studies in protein biophysics, and protein design/engineering.

  19. Effect of tobacco mosaic virus infection on host and virus-specific protein synthesis in protoplasts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Siegel, A.; Hari, V.; Kolacz, K.

    1978-04-01

    The nature and rate of virus-specific protein synthesis were determined in tobacco mosaic virus-infected protoplasts as a function of time after inoculation. Samples of infected and mock-infected protoplasts were exposed to radioactive amino acid for relatively short sequential time periods and the consequent labeled proteins were assessed following SDS-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis and fluorography. The synthesis of three virus-specific proteins of molecular weights 160,000, 135,000, and 17,500 was confirmed. Synthesis of all three proteins was first detected during the 5- to 7-hr postinoculation period at which time the synthetic rate of the 135,000-dalton protein was greatest.This was soon overtaken by the 17,500-dalton capsid protein, the synthetic rate of which kept increasing until it accounted for a major portion of total protoplast protein synthesis. At 1 day postinoculation, it accounted for 50% and, at not quite 2 days, 70% of the total protein synthesis. Evidence is presented to suggest that virus-specific protein synthesis occurs in addition to, rather than at the expense of, normal cellular protein synthesis.

  20. Non-standard amino acid incorporation into proteins using Escherichia coli cell-free protein synthesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seok Hoon eHong

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Incorporating non-standard amino acids (NSAAs into proteins enables new chemical properties, new structures, and new functions. In recent years, improvements in cell-free protein synthesis (CFPS systems have opened the way to accurate and efficient incorporation of NSAAs into proteins. The driving force behind this development has been three-fold. First, a technical renaissance has enabled high-yielding (>1 g/L and long-lasting (>10 h in batch operation CFPS in systems derived from Escherichia coli. Second, the efficiency of orthogonal translation systems has improved. Third, the open nature of the CFPS platform has brought about an unprecedented level of control and freedom of design. Here, we review recent developments in CFPS platforms designed to precisely incorporate NSAAs. In the coming years, we anticipate that CFPS systems will impact efforts to elucidate structure/function relationships of proteins and to make biomaterials and sequence-defined biopolymers for medical and industrial applications.

  1. On the Role of Hippocampal Protein Synthesis in the Consolidation and Reconsolidation of Object Recognition Memory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rossato, Janine I.; Bevilaqua, Lia R. M.; Myskiw, Jociane C.; Medina, Jorge H.; Izquierdo, Ivan; Cammarota, Martin

    2007-01-01

    Upon retrieval, consolidated memories are again rendered vulnerable to the action of metabolic blockers, notably protein synthesis inhibitors. This has led to the hypothesis that memories are reconsolidated at the time of retrieval, and that this depends on protein synthesis. Ample evidence indicates that the hippocampus plays a key role both in…

  2. Social Recognition Memory Requires Two Stages of Protein Synthesis in Mice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolf, Gerald; Engelmann, Mario; Richter, Karin

    2005-01-01

    Olfactory recognition memory was tested in adult male mice using a social discrimination task. The testing was conducted to begin to characterize the role of protein synthesis and the specific brain regions associated with activity in this task. Long-term olfactory recognition memory was blocked when the protein synthesis inhibitor anisomycin was…

  3. Recalling an Aversive Experience by Day-Old Chicks Is Not Dependent on Somatic Protein Synthesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mileusnic, Radmila; Lancashire, Christine L.; Rose, Steven P. R.

    2005-01-01

    Long-term memory is dependent on protein synthesis and inhibiting such synthesis following training results in amnesia for the task. Proteins synthesized during training must be transported to the synapse and disrupting microtubules with Colchicines, and hence, blocking transport, results in transient amnesia. Reactivating memory for a previously…

  4. Effects of aging and life-prolonging diet on thyroid regulation of protein synthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gromakova, I A; Konovalenko, O A

    2004-03-01

    The effect of thyroxin on the intensity of protein synthesis in rats of different age was studied during natural aging and in rats maintained on a low-caloric diet inhibiting aging. The intensity of protein synthesis decreased and the reaction to hormonal stimulus was absent in animals fed life-prolonging diet.

  5. Heterogeneity in the acute control of vascular protein synthesis in vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beaucage, Pierre; Yamaguchi, Nobuharu; Larivière, Richard; Moreau, Pierre

    2003-01-01

    In response to both hemodynamic and neurohumoral changes, the cardiovascular system remodels and this process could contribute to end organ damage. The aim of this study was to determine the early in vivo interactions between 3 systems known to contribute to vascular hypertrophic remodeling, in conduit and resistance arteries. Exogenous angiotensin II, norepinephrine and endothelin 1 administration elevated protein synthesis in the aorta and in small mesenteric arteries. In small arteries, the effect of angiotensin II was blocked by angiotensin II type 1, alpha-adrenergic and endothelin receptor antagonists, while only the alpha-adrenergic and endothelin receptor antagonists inhibited the effect of norepinephrine. Moreover, only the endothelin receptor antagonist significantly blunted the effect of exogenous endothelin on protein synthesis. In the aorta, the stimulation of angiotensin II on protein synthesis was also inhibited by the 3 antagonists. However, only the alpha-adrenoceptor antagonist blunted the response to norepinephrine, and the 3 antagonists prevented the endothelin-induced elevation of protein synthesis. The blood pressure effects of the drugs did not correlate with their capacity to stimulate or inhibit vascular protein synthesis. In conclusion, interactions in the control of protein synthesis are heterogeneous along the vascular tree. In small arteries, the interaction is linear with endothelin as the downstream effector. In the aorta, the local sympathetic nervous system appears to control protein synthesis. The heterogeneity in downstream effectors should be considered in studies investigating signaling events related to protein synthesis, which is used as an early marker of hypertrophy.

  6. Effect of dietary protein quality and feeding level on milk secretion and mammary protein synthesis in the rat

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sampson, D.A.; Jansen, G.R.

    1985-04-01

    Protein synthesis was studied in mammary tissue of rats fed diets deficient in protein quality and/or restricted in food intake throughout gestation and lactation. Diets containing 25% wheat gluten (WG), wheat gluten plus lysine and threonine (WGLT), or casein (C) were pair-fed from conception until day 15 of lactation at 100% or 85% of WG ad libitum consumption (PF100 and PF85, respectively). A seventh group was fed C ad libitum. Rates of protein synthesis were measured in vivo at day 15 of lactation from incorporation of (3-/sup 3/H)phenylalanine. At both PF100 and PF85, fractional and absolute rates of mammary gland protein synthesis were two- to three-fold higher in rats fed C than in those fed WG. Pup weights showed similar treatment effects. Both mammary protein synthesis rates and pup weights were significantly higher in rats fed C at PF85 than rats fed WG ad libitum. Food restriction from PF100 to PF85 depressed pup weights and mammary protein synthesis rates in rats fed WGLT, but had no effect in rats fed WG. These results demonstrate that when food intake is restricted, improvement of protein quality of the maternal diet increases milk output in the rat in association with increased rates of mammary protein synthesis.

  7. Assessment of protein synthesis in highly aerobic canine species at the onset and during exercise training.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Benjamin F; Ehrlicher, Sarah E; Drake, Joshua C; Peelor, Frederick F; Biela, Laurie M; Pratt-Phillips, Shannon; Davis, Michael; Hamilton, Karyn L

    2015-04-01

    Canis lupus familiaris, the domesticated dog, is capable of extreme endurance performance. The ability to perform sustained aerobic exercise is dependent on a well-developed mitochondrial reticulum. In this study we examined the cumulative muscle protein and DNA synthesis in groups of athletic dogs at the onset of an exercise training program and following a strenuous exercise training program. We hypothesized that both at the onset and during an exercise training program there would be greater mitochondrial protein synthesis rates compared with sedentary control with no difference in mixed or cytoplasmic protein synthesis rates. Protein synthetic rates of three protein fractions and DNA synthesis were determined over 1 wk using (2)H2O in competitive Alaskan Huskies and Labrador Retrievers trained for explosive device detection. Both groups of dogs had very high rates of skeletal muscle protein synthesis in the sedentary state [Alaskan Huskies: Mixed = 2.28 ± 0.12, cytoplasmic (Cyto) = 2.91 ± 0.10, and mitochondrial (Mito) = 2.62 ± 0.07; Labrador Retrievers: Mixed = 3.88 ± 0.37, Cyto = 3.85 ± 0.06, and Mito = 2.92 ± 0.20%/day]. Mitochondrial (Mito) protein synthesis rates did not increase at the onset of an exercise training program. Exercise-trained dogs maintained Mito protein synthesis during exercise training when mixed (Mixed) and cytosolic (Cyto) fractions decreased, and this coincided with a decrease in p-RpS6 but also a decrease in p-ACC signaling. Contrary to our hypothesis, canines did not have large increases in mitochondrial protein synthesis at the onset or during an exercise training program. However, dogs have a high rate of protein synthesis compared with humans that perhaps does not necessitate an extra increase in protein synthesis at the onset of aerobic exercise training.

  8. Protein synthesis inhibition in the basolateral nucleus of amygdala facilitates extinction of auditory fear memory

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    JIN XinChun; QI XueLian; YANG XiaoFei; LI BaoMing

    2007-01-01

    It is known that consolidation of fear conditioning requires de novo protein synthesis in the amygdala. However, there is controversy about the role of protein synthesis in post-retrieval extinction of fear memory. The present study investigated the effect of protein synthesis inhibition (PSI) in the basolateral nucleus of amygdala (BLA) on post-retrieval extinction of auditory fear memory. Intra-BLA infusion of the protein synthesis inhibitor anisomycin '0' h post-retrieval facilitated the extinction, but was ineffective if the memory was not retrieved. Anisomycin had no effect on the extinction when it was infused 6 h post-retrieval. The present results suggest that there exists a protein-synthesis-dependent mechanism in the BLA that retards extinction of auditory fear memory.

  9. N-terminally truncated GADD34 proteins are convenient translation enhancers in a human cell-derived in vitro protein synthesis system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mikami, Satoshi; Kobayashi, Tominari; Machida, Kodai; Masutani, Mamiko; Yokoyama, Shigeyuki; Imataka, Hiroaki

    2010-07-01

    Human cell-derived in vitro protein synthesis systems are useful for the production of recombinant proteins. Productivity can be increased by supplementation with GADD34, a protein that is difficult to express in and purify from E. coli. Deletion of the N-terminal 120 or 240 amino acids of GADD34 improves recovery of this protein from E. coli without compromising its ability to boost protein synthesis in an in vitro protein synthesis system. The use of N-terminally truncated GADD34 proteins in place of full-length GADD34 should improve the utility of human cell-based cell-free protein synthesis systems.

  10. Plastid sigma factors: Their individual functions and regulation in transcription.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chi, Wei; He, Baoye; Mao, Juan; Jiang, Jingjing; Zhang, Lixin

    2015-09-01

    Sigma factors are the predominant factors involved in transcription regulation in bacteria. These factors can recruit the core RNA polymerase to promoters with specific DNA sequences and initiate gene transcription. The plastids of higher plants originating from an ancestral cyanobacterial endosymbiont also contain sigma factors that are encoded by a small family of nuclear genes. Although all plastid sigma factors contain sequences conserved in bacterial sigma factors, a considerable number of distinct traits have been acquired during evolution. The present review summarises recent advances concerning the regulation of the structure, function and activity of plastid sigma factors since their discovery nearly 40 years ago. We highlight the specialised roles and overlapping redundant functions of plastid sigma factors according to their promoter selectivity. We also focus on the mechanisms that modulate the activity of sigma factors to optimise plastid function in response to developmental cues and environmental signals. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Chloroplast Biogenesis.

  11. Repressed synthesis of ribosomal proteins generates protein-specific cell cycle and morphological phenotypes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thapa, Mamata; Bommakanti, Ananth; Shamsuzzaman, Md; Gregory, Brian; Samsel, Leigh; Zengel, Janice M; Lindahl, Lasse

    2013-12-01

    The biogenesis of ribosomes is coordinated with cell growth and proliferation. Distortion of the coordinated synthesis of ribosomal components affects not only ribosome formation, but also cell fate. However, the connection between ribosome biogenesis and cell fate is not well understood. To establish a model system for inquiries into these processes, we systematically analyzed cell cycle progression, cell morphology, and bud site selection after repression of 54 individual ribosomal protein (r-protein) genes in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. We found that repression of nine 60S r-protein genes results in arrest in the G2/M phase, whereas repression of nine other 60S and 22 40S r-protein genes causes arrest in the G1 phase. Furthermore, bud morphology changes after repression of some r-protein genes. For example, very elongated buds form after repression of seven 60S r-protein genes. These genes overlap with, but are not identical to, those causing the G2/M cell cycle phenotype. Finally, repression of most r-protein genes results in changed sites of bud formation. Strikingly, the r-proteins whose repression generates similar effects on cell cycle progression cluster in the ribosome physical structure, suggesting that different topological areas of the precursor and/or mature ribosome are mechanistically connected to separate aspects of the cell cycle.

  12. Optimizing the measurement of mitochondrial protein synthesis in human skeletal muscle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burd, Nicholas A; Tardif, Nicolas; Rooyackers, Olav; van Loon, Luc J C

    2015-01-01

    The measurement of mitochondrial protein synthesis after food ingestion, contractile activity, and/or disease is often used to provide insight into skeletal muscle adaptations that occur in the longer term. Studies have shown that protein ingestion stimulates mitochondrial protein synthesis in human skeletal muscle. Minor differences in the stimulation of mitochondrial protein synthesis occur after a single bout of resistance or endurance exercise. There appear to be no measurable differences in mitochondrial protein synthesis between critically ill patients and aged-matched controls. However, the mitochondrial protein synthetic response is reduced at a more advanced age. In this paper, we discuss the challenges involved in the measurement of human skeletal muscle mitochondrial protein synthesis rates based on stable isotope amino acid tracer methods. Practical guidelines are discussed to improve the reliability of the measurement of mitochondrial protein synthesis rates. The value of the measurement of mitochondrial protein synthesis after a single meal or exercise bout on the prediction of the longer term skeletal muscle mass and performance outcomes in both the healthy and disease populations requires more work, but we emphasize that the measurements need to be reliable to be of any value to the field.

  13. Molecular and biochemical analysis of the plastidic ADP-glucose transporter (ZmBT1) from Zea mays.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kirchberger, S.; Leroch, M.; Huynen, M.A.; Wahl, M.; Neuhaus, H.E.; Tjaden, J.

    2007-01-01

    Physiological studies on the Brittle1 maize mutant have provided circumstantial evidence that ZmBT1 (Zea mays Brittle1 protein) is involved in the ADP-Glc transport into maize endosperm plastids, but up to now, no direct ADP-Glc transport mediated by ZmBT1 has ever been shown. The heterologous synth

  14. Molecular and biochemical analysis of the plastidic ADP-glucose transporter (ZmBT1) from Zea mays

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kirchberger, S.; Leroch, M.; Huynen, M.A.; Wahl, M.; Neuhaus, H.E.; Tjaden, J.

    2007-01-01

    Physiological studies on the Brittle1 maize mutant have provided circumstantial evidence that ZmBT1 (Zea mays Brittle1 protein) is involved in the ADP-Glc transport into maize endosperm plastids, but up to now, no direct ADP-Glc transport mediated by ZmBT1 has ever been shown. The heterologous synth

  15. Arginine depletion by arginine deiminase does not affect whole protein metabolism or muscle fractional protein synthesis rate in mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juan C Marini

    Full Text Available Due to the absolute need for arginine that certain cancer cells have, arginine depletion is a therapy in clinical trials to treat several types of cancers. Arginine is an amino acids utilized not only as a precursor for other important molecules, but also for protein synthesis. Because arginine depletion can potentially exacerbate the progressive loss of body weight, and especially lean body mass, in cancer patients we determined the effect of arginine depletion by pegylated arginine deiminase (ADI-PEG 20 on whole body protein synthesis and fractional protein synthesis rate in multiple tissues of mice. ADI-PEG 20 successfully depleted circulating arginine (<1 μmol/L, and increased citrulline concentration more than tenfold. Body weight and body composition, however, were not affected by ADI-PEG 20. Despite the depletion of arginine, whole body protein synthesis and breakdown were maintained in the ADI-PEG 20 treated mice. The fractional protein synthesis rate of muscle was also not affected by arginine depletion. Most tissues (liver, kidney, spleen, heart, lungs, stomach, small and large intestine, pancreas were able to maintain their fractional protein synthesis rate; however, the fractional protein synthesis rate of brain, thymus and testicles was reduced due to the ADI-PEG 20 treatment. Furthermore, these results were confirmed by the incorporation of ureido [14C]citrulline, which indicate the local conversion into arginine, into protein. In conclusion, the intracellular recycling pathway of citrulline is able to provide enough arginine to maintain protein synthesis rate and prevent the loss of lean body mass and body weight.

  16. Determination of human muscle protein fractional synthesis rate

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bornø, Andreas; Hulston, Carl J; van Hall, Gerrit

    2014-01-01

    In the present study, different MS methods for the determination of human muscle protein fractional synthesis rate (FSR) using [ring-(13)C6 ]phenylalanine as a tracer were evaluated. Because the turnover rate of human skeletal muscle is slow, only minute quantities of the stable isotopically......-MS/MS) and GC-tandem MS (GC-MS/MS) have made these techniques an option for human muscle FSR measurements. Human muscle biopsies were freeze dried, cleaned, and hydrolyzed, and the amino acids derivatized using either N-acetyl-n-propyl, phenylisothiocyanate, or N.......89 ± 0.01, P muscle FSR, (2) LC-MS/MS comes quite close and is a good alternative when tissue quantities are too small for GC-C-IRMS, and (3) If GC-MS/MS is to be used, then the HFBA derivative should be used instead...

  17. Proteomic and functional analyses reveal MAPK1 regulates milk protein synthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Li-Min; Li, Qing-Zhang; Huang, Jian-Guo; Gao, Xue-Jun

    2012-12-27

    L-Lysine (L-Lys) is an essential amino acid that plays fundamental roles in protein synthesis. Many nuclear phosphorylated proteins such as Stat5 and mTOR regulate milk protein synthesis. However, the details of milk protein synthesis control at the transcript and translational levels are not well known. In this current study, a two-dimensional gel electrophoresis (2-DE)/MS-based proteomic technology was used to identify phosphoproteins responsible for milk protein synthesis in dairy cow mammary epithelial cells (DCMECs). The effect of L-Lys on DCMECs was analyzed by CASY technology and reversed phase high performance liquid chromatography (RP-HPLC). The results showed that cell proliferation ability and β-casein expression were enhanced in DCMECs treated with L-Lys. By phosphoproteomics analysis, six proteins, including MAPK1, were identified up-expressed in DCMECs treated with 1.2 mM L-Lys for 24 h, and were verified by quantitative real-time PCR (qRT-PCR) and western blot. Overexpression and siRNA inhibition of MAPK1 experiments showed that MAPK1 upregulated milk protein synthesis through Stat5 and mTOR pathway. These findings that MAPK1 involves in regulation of milk synthesis shed new insights for understanding the mechanisms of milk protein synthesis.

  18. Genomes of Stigonematalean cyanobacteria (subsection V) and the evolution of oxygenic photosynthesis from prokaryotes to plastids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dagan, Tal; Roettger, Mayo; Stucken, Karina; Landan, Giddy; Koch, Robin; Major, Peter; Gould, Sven B; Goremykin, Vadim V; Rippka, Rosmarie; Tandeau de Marsac, Nicole; Gugger, Muriel; Lockhart, Peter J; Allen, John F; Brune, Iris; Maus, Irena; Pühler, Alfred; Martin, William F

    2013-01-01

    Cyanobacteria forged two major evolutionary transitions with the invention of oxygenic photosynthesis and the bestowal of photosynthetic lifestyle upon eukaryotes through endosymbiosis. Information germane to understanding those transitions is imprinted in cyanobacterial genomes, but deciphering it is complicated by lateral gene transfer (LGT). Here, we report genome sequences for the morphologically most complex true-branching cyanobacteria, and for Scytonema hofmanni PCC 7110, which with 12,356 proteins is the most gene-rich prokaryote currently known. We investigated components of cyanobacterial evolution that have been vertically inherited, horizontally transferred, and donated to eukaryotes at plastid origin. The vertical component indicates a freshwater origin for water-splitting photosynthesis. Networks of the horizontal component reveal that 60% of cyanobacterial gene families have been affected by LGT. Plant nuclear genes acquired from cyanobacteria define a lower bound frequency of 611 multigene families that, in turn, specify diazotrophic cyanobacterial lineages as having a gene collection most similar to that possessed by the plastid ancestor.

  19. Phenylketonuria: brain phenylalanine concentrations relate inversely to cerebral protein synthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Groot, Martijn J; Sijens, Paul E; Reijngoud, Dirk-Jan; Paans, Anne M; van Spronsen, Francjan J

    2015-02-01

    In phenylketonuria, elevated plasma phenylalanine concentrations may disturb blood-to-brain large neutral amino acid (LNAA) transport and cerebral protein synthesis (CPS). We investigated the associations between these processes, using data obtained by positron emission tomography with l-[1-(11)C]-tyrosine ((11)C-Tyr) as a tracer. Blood-to-brain transport of non-Phe LNAAs was modeled by the rate constant for (11)C-Tyr transport from arterial plasma to brain tissue (K1), while CPS was modeled by the rate constant for (11)C-Tyr incorporation into cerebral protein (k3). Brain phenylalanine concentrations were measured by magnetic resonance spectroscopy in three volumes of interest (VOIs): supraventricular brain tissue (VOI 1), ventricular brain tissue (VOI 2), and fluid-containing ventricular voxels (VOI 3). The associations between k3 and each predictor variable were analyzed by multiple linear regression. The rate constant k3 was inversely associated with brain phenylalanine concentrations in VOIs 2 and 3 (adjusted R(2)=0.826, F=19.936, P=0.021). Since brain phenylalanine concentrations in these VOIs highly correlated with each other, the specific associations of each predictor with k3 could not be determined. The associations between k3 and plasma phenylalanine concentration, K1, and brain phenylalanine concentrations in VOI 1 were nonsignificant. In conclusion, our study shows an inverse association between k3 and increased brain phenylalanine concentrations.

  20. Reduced Protein Synthesis Fidelity Inhibits Flagellar Biosynthesis and Motility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fan, Yongqiang; Evans, Christopher R; Ling, Jiqiang

    2016-07-29

    Accurate translation of the genetic information from DNA to protein is maintained by multiple quality control steps from bacteria to mammals. Genetic and environmental alterations have been shown to compromise translational quality control and reduce fidelity during protein synthesis. The physiological impact of increased translational errors is not fully understood. While generally considered harmful, translational errors have recently been shown to benefit cells under certain stress conditions. In this work, we describe a novel regulatory pathway in which reduced translational fidelity downregulates expression of flagellar genes and suppresses bacterial motility. Electron microscopy imaging shows that the error-prone Escherichia coli strain lacks mature flagella. Further genetic analyses reveal that translational errors upregulate expression of a small RNA DsrA through enhancing its transcription, and deleting DsrA from the error-prone strain restores motility. DsrA regulates expression of H-NS and RpoS, both of which regulate flagellar genes. We demonstrate that an increased level of DsrA in the error-prone strain suppresses motility through the H-NS pathway. Our work suggests that bacteria are capable of switching on and off the flagellar system by altering translational fidelity, which may serve as a previously unknown mechanism to improve fitness in response to environmental cues.

  1. Bacterial Obg proteins: GTPases at the nexus of protein and DNA synthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kint, Cyrielle; Verstraeten, Natalie; Hofkens, Johan; Fauvart, Maarten; Michiels, Jan

    2014-08-01

    Obg proteins (also known as ObgE, YhbZ and CgtA) are conserved P-loop GTPases, essential for growth in bacteria. Like other GTPases, Obg proteins cycle between a GTP-bound ON and a GDP-bound OFF state, thereby controlling cellular processes. Interestingly, the in vitro biochemical properties of Obg proteins suggest that they act as sensors for the cellular GDP/GTP pools and adjust their activity according to the cellular energy status. Obg proteins have been attributed a host of cellular functions, including roles in essential cellular processes (DNA replication, ribosome maturation) and roles in different stress adaptation pathways (stringent response, sporulation, general stress response). This review summarizes the current knowledge on Obg activity and function. Furthermore, we present a model that integrates the different functions of Obg by assigning it a fundamental role in cellular physiology, at the hub of protein and DNA synthesis. In particular, we believe that Obg proteins might provide a connection between different global pathways in order to fine-tune cellular processes in response to a given energy status.

  2. The foundation of extranuclear inheritance: plastid and mitochondrial genetics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hagemann, Rudolf

    2010-03-01

    In 1909 two papers by Correns and by Baur published in volume 1 of Zeitschrift für induktive Abstammungs- und Vererbungslehre (now Molecular Genetics and Genomics) reported on the non-Mendelian inheritance of chlorophyll deficiencies. These papers, reporting the very first cases of extranuclear inheritance, laid the foundation for a new field: non-Mendelian or extranuclear genetics. Correns observed a purely maternal inheritance (in Mirabilis), whereas Baur found a biparental inheritance (in Pelargonium). Correns suspected the non-Mendelian factors in the cytoplasm, while Baur believed that the plastids carry these extranuclear factors. In the following years, Baur's hypothesis was proved to be correct. Baur subsequently developed the theory of plastid inheritance. In many genera the plastids are transmitted only uniparentally by the mother, while in a few genera there is a biparental plastid inheritance. Commonly there is random sorting of plastids during ontogenetic development. Renner and Schwemmle as well as geneticists in other countries added additional details to this theory. Pioneering studies on mitochondrial inheritance in yeast started in 1949 in the group of Ephrussi and Slonimski; respiration-deficient cells (petites in yeast, poky in Neurospora) were demonstrated to be due to mitochondrial mutations. Electron microscopical and biochemical studies (1962-1964) showed that plastids and mitochondria contain organelle-specific DNA molecules. These findings laid the molecular basis for the two branches of extranuclear inheritance: plastid and mitochondrial genetics.

  3. The plastid terminal oxidase: its elusive function points to multiple contributions to plastid physiology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nawrocki, Wojciech J; Tourasse, Nicolas J; Taly, Antoine; Rappaport, Fabrice; Wollman, Francis-André

    2015-01-01

    Plastids have retained from their cyanobacterial ancestor a fragment of the respiratory electron chain comprising an NADPH dehydrogenase and a diiron oxidase, which sustain the so-called chlororespiration pathway. Despite its very low turnover rates compared with photosynthetic electron flow, knocking out the plastid terminal oxidase (PTOX) in plants or microalgae leads to severe phenotypes that encompass developmental and growth defects together with increased photosensitivity. On the basis of a phylogenetic and structural analysis of the enzyme, we discuss its physiological contribution to chloroplast metabolism, with an emphasis on its critical function in setting the redox poise of the chloroplast stroma in darkness. The emerging picture of PTOX is that of an enzyme at the crossroads of a variety of metabolic processes, such as, among others, the regulation of cyclic electron transfer and carotenoid biosynthesis, which have in common their dependence on the redox state of the plastoquinone pool, set largely by the activity of PTOX in darkness.

  4. Activated protein synthesis and suppressed protein breakdown signaling in skeletal muscle of critically ill patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jespersen, Jakob G; Nedergaard, Anders; Reitelseder, Søren

    2011-01-01

    involved in muscle mass regulation, we investigated the phosphorylation and expression of key factors in these protein synthesis and breakdown signaling pathways in thigh skeletal muscle of critically ill intensive care unit (ICU) patients compared with healthy controls.......Skeletal muscle mass is controlled by myostatin and Akt-dependent signaling on mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR), glycogen synthase kinase 3β (GSK3β) and forkhead box O (FoxO) pathways, but it is unknown how these pathways are regulated in critically ill human muscle. To describe factors...

  5. Activated protein synthesis and suppressed protein breakdown signaling in skeletal muscle of critically ill patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jespersen, Jakob G; Nedergaard, Anders; Reitelseder, Søren

    2011-01-01

    involved in muscle mass regulation, we investigated the phosphorylation and expression of key factors in these protein synthesis and breakdown signaling pathways in thigh skeletal muscle of critically ill intensive care unit (ICU) patients compared with healthy controls.......Skeletal muscle mass is controlled by myostatin and Akt-dependent signaling on mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR), glycogen synthase kinase 3ß (GSK3ß) and forkhead box O (FoxO) pathways, but it is unknown how these pathways are regulated in critically ill human muscle. To describe factors...

  6. Rational Design, Synthesis and Evaluation of Coumarin Derivatives as Protein-protein Interaction Inhibitors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Luca, Laura; Agharbaoui, Fatima E; Gitto, Rosaria; Buemi, Maria Rosa; Christ, Frauke; Debyser, Zeger; Ferro, Stefania

    2016-09-01

    Herein we describe the design and synthesis of a new series of coumarin derivatives searching for novel HIV-1 integrase (IN) allosteric inhibitors. All new obtained compounds were tested in order to evaluate their ability to inhibit the interaction between the HIV-1 IN enzyme and the nuclear protein lens epithelium growth factor LEDGF/p75. A combined approach of docking and molecular dynamic simulations has been applied to clarify the activity of the new compounds. Specifically, the binding free energies by using the method of molecular mechanics-generalized Born surface area (MM-GBSA) was calculated, whereas hydrogen bond occupancies were monitored throughout simulations methods.

  7. Protein synthesis in postischemic rat brain: a two-dimensional electrophoretic analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kiessling, M; Dienel, G A; Jacewicz, M; Pulsinelli, W A

    1986-12-01

    This study examined the pattern of protein synthesis in the neocortex, caudate-putamen, and the hippocampus following transient forebrain ischemia in rats. The animal model of temporary ischemia used in this study causes permanent damage to vulnerable neurons with a time course of injury that varies from hours (caudate nucleus) to days (hippocampus). To examine the spectrum of proteins synthesized in these regions at 3 and 18 h after recirculation, cerebral proteins were pulse-labeled in vivo by an intravenous injection of [35S]methionine. Newly synthesized (35S-labeled) and constitutive (unlabeled) proteins were analyzed by two-dimensional gel electrophoresis and fluorography. In all three brain regions, specific proteins underwent preferential synthesis (Mr approximately 27,000, approximately 65,000, approximately 70,000, approximately 110,000), while others showed decreased synthesis (neuron-specific enolase, alpha- and beta-tubulin). There was an early (3 h post ischemia) induction of the Mr approximately 70,000 mammalian "stress" protein; at 18 h post ischemia, its synthesis remained high in the hippocampus but was diminished in the neocortex and had largely subsided in the caudate-putamen. All regions at 18 h showed increased synthesis of an Mr approximately 50,000 protein, tentatively identified as glial fibrillary acidic protein. The results show that temporary forebrain ischemia induces changes in protein synthesis that include features similar to those observed in other eukaryotic cells subjected to injurious stress. These postischemic changes in protein synthesis are qualitatively similar in all brain regions examined despite regional differences in the severity of subsequent neuronal damage. The persistent synthesis of the Mr approximately 70,000 stress protein in the hippocampus, however, may reflect continued metabolic injury long after the ischemic episode has passed.

  8. Plastid Molecular Pharming I. Production of Oral Vaccines via Plastid Transformation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berecz, Bernadett; Zelenyánszki, Helga; Pólya, Sára; Tamás-Nyitrai, Cecília; Oszvald, Mária

    2017-01-01

    Vaccines produced in plants have opened up new opportunities in vaccination. Among the various categories of vaccines, the recombinant vaccine is generally regarded as the most economical and safest type because it cannot cause disease and does not require large-scale cultivation of pathogens. Due to the low cost of their cultivation, plants may represent viable alternative platforms for producing subunit vaccines. Genetic engineering of plastids is the innovation of the last three decades and has numerous benefits when compared to nuclear transformation. Due to the high level of expression, oral vaccines produced in transplastomic plants do not have to be purified as they can be consumed raw, which, therefore, reduces the cost of preparation, transportation and handling of the vaccines. Oral vaccination also excludes the risk of other infections or contaminations, while compartmentation of the plant cell provides an excellent encapsulation to the antigen within the plastid. Herein we review the main biotechnological and immunological aspects of the progress achieved in the field of plastid derived edible vaccines during the last decade. As there is a public debate against genetically modified crops, the advantages and limitations of oral vaccines are also discussed. Copyright© Bentham Science Publishers; For any queries, please email at epub@benthamscience.org.

  9. Alternative translational initiation of ATP sulfurylase underlying dual localization of sulfate assimilation pathways in plastids and cytosol in Arabidopsis thaliana

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anne-Sophie eBohrer

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Plants assimilate inorganic sulfate into sulfur-containing vital metabolites. ATP sulfurylase (ATPS is the enzyme catalyzing the key entry step of the sulfate assimilation pathway in both plastids and cytosol in plants. Arabidopsis thaliana has four ATPS genes (ATPS1, -2, -3 and -4 encoding ATPS pre-proteins containing N-terminal transit peptide sequences for plastid targeting, however, the genetic identity of the cytosolic ATPS has remained unverified. Here we show that Arabidopsis ATPS2 dually encodes plastidic and cytosolic ATPS isoforms, differentiating their subcellular localizations by initiating translation at AUGMet1 to produce plastid-targeted ATPS2 pre-proteins or at AUGMet52 or AUGMet58 within the transit peptide to have ATPS2 stay in cytosol. Translational initiation of ATPS2 at AUGMet52 or AUGMet58 was verified by expressing a tandem-fused synthetic gene, ATPS2(5’UTR-His12:Renilla luciferase:ATPS2(Ile13-Val77:firefly luciferase, under a single constitutively active CaMV 35S promoter in Arabidopsis protoplasts and examining the activities of two different luciferases translated in-frame with split N-terminal portions of ATPS2. Introducing missense mutations at AUGMet52 and AUGMet58 significantly reduced the firefly luciferase activity, while AUGMet52 was a relatively preferred site for the alternative translational initiation. The activity of luciferase fusion protein starting at AUGMet52 or AUGMet58 was not modulated by changes in sulfate conditions. The dual localizations of ATPS2 in plastids and cytosol were further evidenced by expression of ATPS2-GFP fusion proteins in Arabidopsis protoplasts and transgenic lines, while they were also under control of tissue-specific ATPS2 promoter activity found predominantly in leaf epidermal cells, guard cells, vascular tissues and roots.

  10. Muscle and liver protein synthesis in growing rats fed diets containing raw legumes as the main source of protein

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Goena, M.; Santidrian, S.; Cuevillas, F.; Larralde, J.

    1986-03-01

    Although legumes are widely used as protein sources, their effects on protein metabolism remain quite unexplored. The authors have measured the rates of gastrocnemius muscle and liver protein synthesis in growing rats fed ad libitum over periods of 12 days on diets containing raw field bean (Vicia faba L.), raw kidney bean (Phaseolus vulgaris L.), and raw bitter vetch (Vicia ervilia L.) as the major sources of protein. Diets were isocaloric and contained about 12% protein. Protein synthesis was evaluated by the constant-intravenous-infusion method, using L-//sup 14/C/-tyrosine, as well as by the determination of the RNA-activity (g of newly synthesized protein/day/g RNA). Results showed that, as compared to well-fed control animals, those fed the raw legume diets exhibited a marked reduction in the rate of growth with no changes in the amount of food intake (per 100 g b.wt.). These changes were accompanied by a significant reduction in the rate of muscle protein synthesis in all legume-treated rats, being this reduction greater in the animals fed the Ph. vulgaris and V. ervilia diets. Liver protein synthesis was slightly higher in the rats fed the V. faba and V. ervilia diets, and smaller in the Ph. vulgaris-fed rats. It is suggested that both sulfur amino acid deficiency and the presence of different anti-nutritive factors in raw legumes may account for these effects.

  11. Coevolution of plastid genomes and transcript processing pathways in photosynthetic alveolates

    OpenAIRE

    Dorrell, Richard G.

    2014-01-01

    Following their endosymbiotic uptake, plastids undergo profound changes to genome content and to their associated biochemistry. I have investigated how evolutionary transitions in plastid genomes may impact on biochemical pathways associated with plastid gene expression, focusing on the highly unusual plastids found in one group of eukaryotes, the alveolates. The principal photosynthetic alveolate lineage is the dinoflagellate algae. Most dinoflagellate species harbour unusual plastids derive...

  12. Cell-free Protein Synthesis in an Autoinduction System for NMR Studies of Protein-Protein Interactions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ozawa, Kiyoshi; Jergic, Slobodan; Crowther, Jeffrey A.; Thompson, Phillip R. [Australian National University, Research School of Chemistry (Australia); Wijffels, Gene [Queensland Bioscience Precinct, CSIRO Livestock Industries (Australia); Otting, Gottfried; Dixon, Nicholas A. [Australian National University, Research School of Chemistry (Australia)], E-mail: dixon@rsc.anu.edu.au

    2005-07-15

    Cell-free protein synthesis systems provide facile access to proteins in a nascent state that enables formation of soluble, native protein-protein complexes even if one of the protein components is prone to self-aggregation and precipitation. Combined with selective isotope-labeling, this allows the rapid analysis of protein-protein interactions with few {sup 15}N-HSQC spectra. The concept is demonstrated with binary and ternary complexes between the {chi}, {psi} and {gamma} subunits of Escherichia coli DNA polymerase III: nascent, selectively {sup 15}N-labeled {psi} produced in the presence of {chi} resulted in a soluble, correctly folded {chi}-{psi} complex, whereas {psi} alone precipitated irrespective of whether {gamma} was present or not. The {sup 15}N-HSQC spectra showed that the N-terminal segment of {psi} is mobile in the {chi}-{psi} complex, yet important for its binding to {gamma}. The sample preparation was greatly enhanced by an autoinduction strategy, where the T7 RNA polymerase needed for transcription of a gene in a T7-promoter vector was produced in situ.

  13. Plastid transformation in sugar beet: Beta vulgaris.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Marchis, Francesca; Bellucci, Michele

    2014-01-01

    Chloroplast biotechnology has assumed great importance in the past 20 years and, thanks to the numerous advantages as compared to conventional transgenic technologies, has been applied in an increasing number of plant species but still very much limited. Hence, it is of utmost importance to extend the range of species in which plastid transformation can be applied. Sugar beet (Beta vulgaris L.) is an important industrial crop of the temperate zone in which chloroplast DNA is not transmitted trough pollen. Transformation of the sugar beet genome is performed in several research laboratories; conversely sugar beet plastome genetic transformation is far away from being considered a routine technique. We describe here a method to obtain transplastomic sugar beet plants trough biolistic transformation. The availability of sugar beet transplastomic plants should avoid the risk of gene flow between these cultivated genetic modified sugar beet plants and the wild-type plants or relative wild species.

  14. Basal lamina inhibition suppresses synthesis of calcium-dependent proteins associated with mammary epithelial cell spreading.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rocha, V; Hom, Y K; Marinkovich, M P

    1986-08-01

    Spreading of mouse mammary epithelial cells on collagen gels is closely correlated with the synthesis of a group of putative calcium-binding proteins (CBP) (Braslau et al., Exp cell res 155 (1984) 213). Collagen synthesis was shown to occur during cell spreading, while omission of serum prevented cell spreading and the synthesis of collagen. The proline analogues cis-hydroxyproline and L-azetidine-2-carboxylic acid were shown to inhibit epithelial cell spreading and to suppress the collagen synthesis that occurs during serum-supported cell spreading. Inhibition of collagen synthesis resulted in the inhibition of CBP synthesis associated with cell spreading. In contrast, the collagen cross-linking inhibitor B-aminopropionitrile did not inhibit cell spreading nor did it suppress collagen synthesis; CBP synthesis was also normal during treatment with this inhibitor. Thus, mammary epithelial cell spreading on collagen gels and CBP synthesis can both be suppressed by inhibition of collagen synthesis indicating that they may be integrated in some manner. It is suggested that inhibition of cell spreading during inhibition of collagen synthesis results from failure to assemble a normal basal lamina; this may in turn signal suppression of CBP synthesis.

  15. Neuromuscular electrical stimulation prior to presleep protein feeding stimulates the use of protein-derived amino acids for overnight muscle protein synthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dirks, Marlou L; Groen, Bart B L; Franssen, Rinske; van Kranenburg, Janneau; van Loon, Luc J C

    2017-01-01

    Short periods of muscle disuse result in substantial skeletal muscle atrophy. Recently, we showed that both neuromuscular electrical stimulation (NMES) as well as presleep dietary protein ingestion represent effective strategies to stimulate muscle protein synthesis rates. In this study, we test our hypothesis that NMES can augment the use of presleep protein-derived amino acids for overnight muscle protein synthesis in older men. Twenty healthy, older [69 ± 1 (SE) yr] men were subjected to 24 h of bed rest, starting at 8:00 AM. In the evening, volunteers were subjected to 70-min 1-legged NMES, while the other leg served as nonstimulated control (CON). Immediately following NMES, 40 g of intrinsically l-[1-(13)C]-phenylalanine labeled protein was ingested prior to sleep. Blood samples were taken throughout the night, and muscle biopsies were obtained from both legs in the evening and the following morning (8 h after protein ingestion) to assess dietary protein-derived l-[1-(13)C]-phenylalanine enrichments in myofibrillar protein. Plasma phenylalanine concentrations and plasma l-[1-(13)C]-phenylalanine enrichments increased significantly following protein ingestion and remained elevated for up to 6 h after protein ingestion (P stimulated compared with the control leg (0.0344 ± 0.0019 vs. 0.0297 ± 0.0016 MPE, respectively; P stimulates the use of dietary protein-derived amino acids for overnight muscle protein synthesis in older men. Neuromuscular electrical stimulation (NMES) as well as presleep dietary protein ingestion represent effective strategies to stimulate muscle protein synthesis rates. Here we demonstrate that in older men after a day of bed rest, the application of NMES prior to presleep protein feeding stimulates the use of dietary protein-derived amino acids for overnight muscle protein synthesis by 18% compared with presleep protein feeding only. Copyright © 2017 the American Physiological Society.

  16. Differential Synthesis in Vitro of Barley Aleurone and Starchy Endosperm Proteins

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mundy, John; Hejgaard, Jørn; Hansen, Annette

    1986-01-01

    To widen the selection of proteins for gene expression studies in barley seeds, experiments were performed to identify proteins whose synthesis is differentially regulated in developing and germinating seed tissues. The in vitro synthesis of nine distinct barley proteins was compared using m......), the alpha-amylase/subtilisin inhibitor (ASI) and the inhibitor of animal cell-free protein synthesis systems (PSI) were synthesized with mRNA from developing starchy endosperm tissue. Of these proteins, beta-amylase, protein Z, and CI- 1 and 2 were also synthesized with mRNA from developing aleurone cells......, but ASI, PSI, and protein C were not. CI-1 and also a probable amylase/protease inhibitor (PAPI) were synthesized at high levels with mRNAs from late developing and mature aleurone. These results show that mRNAs encoding PAPI and CI-1 survive seed dessication and are long-lived in aleurone cells. Thus...

  17. Differential Synthesis in Vitro of Barley Aleurone and Starchy Endosperm Proteins

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mundy, John; Hejgaard, Jørn; Hansen, Annette

    1986-01-01

    RNAs from isolated endosperm and aleurone tissues (developing and mature grain) and from cultured (germinating) aleurone layers treated with abscisic acid (ABA) and GA(3). B and C hordein polypeptides and the salt-soluble proteins beta-amylase, protein Z, protein C, the chymotrypsin inhibitors (CI-1 and 2......To widen the selection of proteins for gene expression studies in barley seeds, experiments were performed to identify proteins whose synthesis is differentially regulated in developing and germinating seed tissues. The in vitro synthesis of nine distinct barley proteins was compared using m......, expression of genes encoding ASI, PSI, protein C, and PAPI is tissue and stage-specific during seed development. Only ASI, CI-1, and PAPI were synthesized in significant amounts with mRNA from cultured aleurone layers. The levels of synthesis of PAPI and CI-1 were independent of hormone treatment...

  18. Death-associated Protein 3 Regulates Mitochondrial-encoded Protein Synthesis and Mitochondrial Dynamics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiao, Lin; Xian, Hongxu; Lee, Kit Yee; Xiao, Bin; Wang, Hongyan; Yu, Fengwei; Shen, Han-Ming; Liou, Yih-Cherng

    2015-10-09

    Mitochondrial morphologies change over time and are tightly regulated by dynamic machinery proteins such as dynamin-related protein 1 (Drp1), mitofusion 1/2, and optic atrophy 1 (OPA1). However, the detailed mechanisms of how these molecules cooperate to mediate fission and fusion remain elusive. DAP3 is a mitochondrial ribosomal protein that involves in apoptosis, but its biological function has not been well characterized. Here, we demonstrate that DAP3 specifically localizes in the mitochondrial matrix. Knockdown of DAP3 in mitochondria leads to defects in mitochondrial-encoded protein synthesis and abnormal mitochondrial dynamics. Moreover, depletion of DAP3 dramatically decreases the phosphorylation of Drp1 at Ser-637 on mitochondria, enhancing the retention time of Drp1 puncta on mitochondria during the fission process. Furthermore, autophagy is inhibited in the DAP3-depleted cells, which sensitizes cells to different types of death stimuli. Together, our results suggest that DAP3 plays important roles in mitochondrial function and dynamics, providing new insights into the mechanism of a mitochondrial ribosomal protein function in cell death.

  19. Cloning of plastid division gene GlFtsZ from Gentiana lutea and its expression during petal development

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2002-01-01

    A full-length cDNA of GlFtsZ was isolated by screening the cDNA library of Gentiana lutea. Analysis of the deduced amino acid sequence encoded by GlFtsZ indicated that GlFtsZ protein possesses the typical conservative motifs existed in all FtsZ proteins. The existence of putative plastid transit peptide in its N-terminus suggested that GlFtsZ might function inside of plastids. With the deve- lopmental process of petals of Gentiana lutea, the expression of plastid division gene GlFtsZ declined gradually, whereas the expression of carotenoids biosynthesis gene Zds increased obviously; meanwhile, in contrast to the increment of carotenoids, the content of chlorophyll in petals decreased sharply. The chloroplasts turned into chromoplasts, and the color of petals also turned from green to golden. All of these results suggested that the expression of GlFtsZ is accompanied with the development and differentiation of plastids.

  20. Effects of experimentally increased protein supply to postpartum dairy cows on plasma protein synthesis, rumen tissue proliferation, and immune homeostasis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Mogens; Røntved, Christine Maria; Theil, Peter Kappel

    2017-01-01

    enrichment in arterial plasma free Phe, total plasma proteins, and albumin after 3, 5, and 7 h of jugular ring[13C]Phe infusion. Plasma volume was determined at +4 and +29 DRTC by dilution of a [125I]BSA dose. Synthesis rate of tissue protein in biopsied rumen papillae was determined by measuring [13C...

  1. The effect of chloramphenicol on synthesis of ΦX 174-specific proteins and detection of the cistron A protein

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mei, D. Van Der; Zandberg, J.; Jansz, H.S.

    1972-01-01

    Synthesis of ΦX 174-specific proteins in Escherichia coli H 502 was examined on sodium dodecyl sulphate-acrylamide gels by coelectrophoresis of proteins from [3H]leucine-labelled infected cells and [14C]leucine-labelled reference cells, which had been infected with ultraviolet-light irradiated phage

  2. Design and modular parallel synthesis of a MCR derived α-helix mimetic protein-protein interaction inhibitor scaffold

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Antuch, Walfrido; Menon, Sanjay; Chen, Quin-Zene; Lu, Yingchun; Sakamuri, Sukumar; Beck, Barbara; Schauer-Vukašinović, Vesna; Agarwal, Seema; Hess, Sibylle; Dömling, Alexander

    2006-01-01

    A terphenyl α-helix mimetic scaffold recognized to be capable of disrupting protein-protein interactions was structurally morphed into an easily amenable and versatile multicomponent reaction (MCR) backbone. The design, modular in-parallel library synthesis, initial cell based biological data, and p

  3. The Sensitivity of Memory Consolidation and Reconsolidation to Inhibitors of Protein Synthesis and Kinases: Computational Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yili; Smolen, Paul; Baxter, Douglas A.; Byrne, John H.

    2010-01-01

    Memory consolidation and reconsolidation require kinase activation and protein synthesis. Blocking either process during or shortly after training or recall disrupts memory stabilization, which suggests the existence of a critical time window during which these processes are necessary. Using a computational model of kinase synthesis and…

  4. Overexpression of plastid terminal oxidase in Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803 alters cellular redox state.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feilke, Kathleen; Ajlani, Ghada; Krieger-Liszkay, Anja

    2017-09-26

    Cyanobacteria are the most ancient organisms performing oxygenic photosynthesis, and they are the ancestors of plant plastids. All plastids contain the plastid terminal oxidase (PTOX), while only certain cyanobacteria contain PTOX. Many putative functions have been discussed for PTOX in higher plants including a photoprotective role during abiotic stresses like high light, salinity and extreme temperatures. Since PTOX oxidizes PQH2 and reduces oxygen to water, it is thought to protect against photo-oxidative damage by removing excess electrons from the plastoquinone (PQ) pool. To investigate the role of PTOX we overexpressed rice PTOX fused to the maltose-binding protein (MBP-OsPTOX) in Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803, a model cyanobacterium that does not encode PTOX. The fusion was highly expressed and OsPTOX was active, as shown by chlorophyll fluorescence and P700 absorption measurements. The presence of PTOX led to a highly oxidized state of the NAD(P)H/NAD(P)(+) pool, as detected by NAD(P)H fluorescence. Moreover, in the PTOX overexpressor the electron transport capacity of PSI relative to PSII was higher, indicating an alteration of the photosystem I (PSI) to photosystem II (PSII) stoichiometry. We suggest that PTOX controls the expression of responsive genes of the photosynthetic apparatus in a different way from the PQ/PQH2 ratio.This article is part of the themed issue 'Enhancing photosynthesis in crop plants: targets for improvement'. © 2017 The Author(s).

  5. Evolutionary analysis of Arabidopsis, cyanobacterial, and chloroplast genomes reveals plastid phylogeny and thousands of cyanobacterial genes in the nucleus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, William; Rujan, Tamas; Richly, Erik; Hansen, Andrea; Cornelsen, Sabine; Lins, Thomas; Leister, Dario; Stoebe, Bettina; Hasegawa, Masami; Penny, David

    2002-09-17

    Chloroplasts were once free-living cyanobacteria that became endosymbionts, but the genomes of contemporary plastids encode only approximately 5-10% as many genes as those of their free-living cousins, indicating that many genes were either lost from plastids or transferred to the nucleus during the course of plant evolution. Previous estimates have suggested that between 800 and perhaps as many as 2,000 genes in the Arabidopsis genome might come from cyanobacteria, but genome-wide phylogenetic surveys that could provide direct estimates of this number are lacking. We compared 24,990 proteins encoded in the Arabidopsis genome to the proteins from three cyanobacterial genomes, 16 other prokaryotic reference genomes, and yeast. Of 9,368 Arabidopsis proteins sufficiently conserved for primary sequence comparison, 866 detected homologues only among cyanobacteria and 834 other branched with cyanobacterial homologues in phylogenetic trees. Extrapolating from these conserved proteins to the whole genome, the data suggest that approximately 4,500 of Arabidopsis protein-coding genes ( approximately 18% of the total) were acquired from the cyanobacterial ancestor of plastids. These proteins encompass all functional classes, and the majority of them are targeted to cell compartments other than the chloroplast. Analysis of 15 sequenced chloroplast genomes revealed 117 nuclear-encoded proteins that are also still present in at least one chloroplast genome. A phylogeny of chloroplast genomes inferred from 41 proteins and 8,303 amino acids sites indicates that at least two independent secondary endosymbiotic events have occurred involving red algae and that amino acid composition bias in chloroplast proteins strongly affects plastid genome phylogeny.

  6. Plastidic phosphoglucose isomerase is an important determinant of starch accumulation in mesophyll cells, growth, photosynthetic capacity, and biosynthesis of plastidic cytokinins in Arabidopsis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abdellatif Bahaji

    status, growth and starch accumulation in mesophyll cells likely as a consequence of its involvement in the production of OPPP/glycolysis intermediates necessary for the synthesis of plastidic MEP-pathway derived hormones such as CKs.

  7. PCR-based gene synthesis to produce recombinant proteins for crystallization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Byrne-Steele Miranda L

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Gene synthesis technologies are an important tool for structural biology projects, allowing increased protein expression through codon optimization and facilitating sequence alterations. Existing methods, however, can be complex and not always reproducible, prompting researchers to use commercial suppliers rather than synthesize genes themselves. Results A PCR-based gene synthesis method, referred to as SeqTBIO, is described to efficiently assemble the coding regions of two novel hyperthermophilic proteins, PAZ (Piwi/Argonaute/Zwille domain, a siRNA-binding domain of an Argonaute protein homologue and a deletion mutant of a family A DNA polymerase (PolA. The gene synthesis procedure is based on sequential assembly such that homogeneous DNA products can be obtained after each synthesis step without extensive manipulation or purification requirements. Coupling the gene synthesis procedure to in vivo homologous recombination techniques allows efficient subcloning and site-directed mutagenesis for error correction. The recombinant proteins of PAZ and PolA were subsequently overexpressed in E. coli and used for protein crystallization. Crystals of both proteins were obtained and they were suitable for X-ray analysis. Conclusion We demonstrate, by using PAZ and PolA as examples, the feasibility of integrating the gene synthesis, error correction and subcloning techniques into a non-automated gene to crystal pipeline such that genes can be designed, synthesized and implemented for recombinant expression and protein crystallization.

  8. Implications of the plastid genome sequence of typha (typhaceae, poales) for understanding genome evolution in poaceae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guisinger, Mary M; Chumley, Timothy W; Kuehl, Jennifer V; Boore, Jeffrey L; Jansen, Robert K

    2010-02-01

    Plastid genomes of the grasses (Poaceae) are unusual in their organization and rates of sequence evolution. There has been a recent surge in the availability of grass plastid genome sequences, but a comprehensive comparative analysis of genome evolution has not been performed that includes any related families in the Poales. We report on the plastid genome of Typha latifolia, the first non-grass Poales sequenced to date, and we present comparisons of genome organization and sequence evolution within Poales. Our results confirm that grass plastid genomes exhibit acceleration in both genomic rearrangements and nucleotide substitutions. Poaceae have multiple structural rearrangements, including three inversions, three genes losses (accD, ycf1, ycf2), intron losses in two genes (clpP, rpoC1), and expansion of the inverted repeat (IR) into both large and small single-copy regions. These rearrangements are restricted to the Poaceae, and IR expansion into the small single-copy region correlates with the phylogeny of the family. Comparisons of 73 protein-coding genes for 47 angiosperms including nine Poaceae genera confirm that the branch leading to Poaceae has significantly accelerated rates of change relative to other monocots and angiosperms. Furthermore, rates of sequence evolution within grasses are lower, indicating a deceleration during diversification of the family. Overall there is a strong correlation between accelerated rates of genomic rearrangements and nucleotide substitutions in Poaceae, a phenomenon that has been noted recently throughout angiosperms. The cause of the correlation is unknown, but faulty DNA repair has been suggested in other systems including bacterial and animal mitochondrial genomes.

  9. Habituation to low or high protein intake does not modulate basal or postprandial muscle protein synthesis rates: a randomized trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gorissen, Stefan Hm; Horstman, Astrid Mh; Franssen, Rinske; Kouw, Imre Wk; Wall, Benjamin T; Burd, Nicholas A; de Groot, Lisette Cpgm; van Loon, Luc Jc

    2017-02-01

    Muscle mass maintenance is largely regulated by basal muscle protein synthesis rates and the ability to increase muscle protein synthesis after protein ingestion. To our knowledge, no previous studies have evaluated the impact of habituation to either low protein intake (LOW PRO) or high protein intake (HIGH PRO) on the postprandial muscle protein synthetic response. We assessed the impact of LOW PRO compared with HIGH PRO on basal and postprandial muscle protein synthesis rates after the ingestion of 25 g whey protein. Twenty-four healthy, older men [age: 62 ± 1 y; body mass index (in kg/m(2)): 25.9 ± 0.4 (mean ± SEM)] participated in a parallel-group randomized trial in which they adapted to either a LOW PRO diet (0.7 g · kg(-1) · d(-1); n = 12) or a HIGH PRO diet (1.5 g · kg(-1) · d(-1); n = 12) for 14 d. On day 15, participants received primed continuous l-[ring-(2)H5]-phenylalanine and l-[1-(13)C]-leucine infusions and ingested 25 g intrinsically l-[1-(13)C]-phenylalanine- and l-[1-(13)C]-leucine-labeled whey protein. Muscle biopsies and blood samples were collected to assess muscle protein synthesis rates as well as dietary protein digestion and absorption kinetics. Plasma leucine concentrations and exogenous phenylalanine appearance rates increased after protein ingestion (P 0.05). Plasma exogenous phenylalanine availability over the 5-h postprandial period was greater after LOW PRO than after HIGH PRO (61% ± 1% compared with 56% ± 2%, respectively; P synthesis rates increased from 0.031% ± 0.004% compared with 0.039% ± 0.007%/h in the fasted state to 0.062% ± 0.005% compared with 0.057% ± 0.005%/h in the postprandial state after LOW PRO compared with HIGH PRO, respectively (P synthesis rates or increase postprandial muscle protein synthesis rates after ingestion of 25 g protein in older men. This trial was registered at clinicaltrials.gov as NCT01986842. © 2017 American Society for Nutrition.

  10. The complete plastid genome sequence of Bomarea edulis (Alstroemeriaceae: Liliales).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Jung Sung; Kim, Hyoung Tae; Yoon, Chang Young; Kim, Joo-Hwan

    2016-05-01

    Bomarea, a member of the family Alstroemeriaceae, is distributed from Chile to Mexico and includes approximately 120 species. Recent molecular phylogenetic studies have clarified the monophyly of the family within the order Liliales and the sister relationship with the family Colchicaceae. At this time, five plastid genomes of Liliales have been analyzed at the familial level. To examine plastid genome variation at the generic level, we sequenced the plastid genome of Bomarea edulis, which is the most widely distributed species in the genus, and compared it with Alstroemeria aurea. The plastid genome sequence of B. edulis was 154,925 bp in length with a similar structure as A. aurea, excluding the IR-LSC junction. Ycf68 and infA were pseudogenes caused by frameshift mutations, and the ycf15 gene was deleted, similar to A. aurea.

  11. Enhanced green fluorescent protein-mediated synthesis of biocompatible graphene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gurunathan, Sangiliyandi; Woong Han, Jae; Kim, Eunsu; Kwon, Deug-Nam; Park, Jin-Ki; Kim, Jin-Hoi

    2014-10-03

    Graphene is the 2D form of carbon that exists as a single layer of atoms arranged in a honeycomb lattice and has attracted great interest in the last decade in view of its physical, chemical, electrical, elastic, thermal, and biocompatible properties. The objective of this study was to synthesize an environmentally friendly and simple methodology for the preparation of graphene using a recombinant enhanced green fluorescent protein (EGFP). The successful reduction of GO to graphene was confirmed using UV-vis spectroscopy, and FT-IR. DLS and SEM were employed to demonstrate the particle size and surface morphology of GO and EGFP-rGO. The results from Raman spectroscopy suggest the removal of oxygen-containing functional groups from the surface of GO and formation of graphene with defects. The biocompatibility analysis of GO and EGFP-rGO in human embryonic kidney (HEK) 293 cells suggests that GO induces significant concentration-dependent cell toxicity in HEK cells, whereas graphene exerts no adverse effects on HEK cells even at a higher concentration (100 μg/mL). Altogether, our findings suggest that recombinant EGFP can be used as a reducing and stabilizing agent for the preparation of biocompatible graphene. The novelty and originality of this work is that it describes a safe, simple, and environmentally friendly method for the production of graphene using recombinant enhanced green fluorescent protein. Furthermore, the synthesized graphene shows excellent biocompatibility with HEK cells; therefore, biologically synthesized graphene can be used for biomedical applications. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first and novel report describing the synthesis of graphene using recombinant EGFP.

  12. Targeting deubiquitinases enabled by chemical synthesis of proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohayon, Shimrit; Spasser, Liat; Aharoni, Amir; Brik, Ashraf

    2012-02-15

    Ubiquitination/ubiquitylation is involved in a wide range of cellular processes in eukaryotes, such as protein degradation and DNA repair. Ubiquitination is a reversible post-translational modification, with the removal of the ubiquitin (Ub) protein being catalyzed by a family of enzymes known as deubiquitinases (DUBs). Approximately 100 DUBs are encoded in the human genome and are involved in a variety of regulatory processes, such as cell-cycle progression, tissue development, and differentiation. DUBs were, moreover, found to be associated with several diseases and as such are emerging as potential therapeutic targets. Several directions have been pursued in the search for lead anti-DUB compounds. However, none of these strategies have delivered inhibitors reaching advanced clinical stages due to several challenges in the discovery process, such as the absence of a highly sensitive and practically available high-throughput screening assay. In this study, we report on the design and preparation of a FRET-based assay for DUBs based on the application of our recent chemical method for the synthesis of Ub bioconjugates. In the assay, the ubiquitinated peptide was specifically labeled with a pair of FRET labels and used to screen a library comprising 1000 compounds against UCH-L3. Such analysis identified a novel and potent inhibitor able to inhibit this DUB in time-dependent manner with k(inact) = 0.065 min(-1) and K(i) = 0.8 μM. Our assay, which was also found suitable for the UCH-L1 enzyme, should assist in the ongoing efforts targeting the various components of the ubiquitin system and studying the role of DUBs in health and disease.

  13. Rapid and accurate pyrosequencing of angiosperm plastid genomes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Farmerie William G

    2006-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Plastid genome sequence information is vital to several disciplines in plant biology, including phylogenetics and molecular biology. The past five years have witnessed a dramatic increase in the number of completely sequenced plastid genomes, fuelled largely by advances in conventional Sanger sequencing technology. Here we report a further significant reduction in time and cost for plastid genome sequencing through the successful use of a newly available pyrosequencing platform, the Genome Sequencer 20 (GS 20 System (454 Life Sciences Corporation, to rapidly and accurately sequence the whole plastid genomes of the basal eudicot angiosperms Nandina domestica (Berberidaceae and Platanus occidentalis (Platanaceae. Results More than 99.75% of each plastid genome was simultaneously obtained during two GS 20 sequence runs, to an average depth of coverage of 24.6× in Nandina and 17.3× in Platanus. The Nandina and Platanus plastid genomes shared essentially identical gene complements and possessed the typical angiosperm plastid structure and gene arrangement. To assess the accuracy of the GS 20 sequence, over 45 kilobases of sequence were generated for each genome using conventional sequencing. Overall error rates of 0.043% and 0.031% were observed in GS 20 sequence for Nandina and Platanus, respectively. More than 97% of all observed errors were associated with homopolymer runs, with ~60% of all errors associated with homopolymer runs of 5 or more nucleotides and ~50% of all errors associated with regions of extensive homopolymer runs. No substitution errors were present in either genome. Error rates were generally higher in the single-copy and noncoding regions of both plastid genomes relative to the inverted repeat and coding regions. Conclusion Highly accurate and essentially complete sequence information was obtained for the Nandina and Platanus plastid genomes using the GS 20 System. More importantly, the high accuracy

  14. Fine structure of plastids during androgenesis in Hordeum vulgare L.

    OpenAIRE

    Fortunat Młodzianowski; Krystyna Idzikowska

    2014-01-01

    The fine structure of plastids was studied in the course of androgenesis in in the pollen of Hordeum vulgare L. It was found that these organelles occur in all stages of androgenesis. Their structure was simple and was frequently manifested on the cross section only by the presence of the envelope and matrix of different degree of density. Single thylakoids, nucleoid-like regions and starch grains were, however, also noted. The structure of plastids in embryoids formed from microspores of bar...

  15. Coordinated collagen and muscle protein synthesis in human patella tendon and quadriceps muscle after exercise

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Miller, Benjamin F; Olesen, Jens L; Hansen, Mette

    2005-01-01

    We hypothesized that an acute bout of strenuous, non-damaging exercise would increase rates of protein synthesis of collagen in tendon and skeletal muscle but these would be less than those of muscle myofibrillar and sarcoplasmic proteins. Two groups (n = 8 and 6) of healthy young men were studied...... collagen (0.077% h(-1)), muscle collagen (0.054% h(-1)), myofibrillar protein (0.121% h(-1)), and sarcoplasmic protein (0.134% h(-1))). The rates decreased toward basal values by 72 h although rates of tendon collagen and myofibrillar protein synthesis remained elevated. There was no tissue damage...... of muscle visible on histological evaluation. Neither tissue microdialysate nor serum concentrations of IGF-I and IGF binding proteins (IGFBP-3 and IGFBP-4) or procollagen type I N-terminal propeptide changed from resting values. Thus, there is a rapid increase in collagen synthesis after strenuous exercise...

  16. Late protein synthesis-dependent phases in CTA long-term memory: BDNF requirement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Araceli eMartínez-Moreno

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available It has been proposed that long-term memory persistence requires a late protein synthesis-dependent phase, even many hours after memory acquisition. Brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF is an essential protein synthesis product that has emerged as one of the most potent molecular mediators for long-term synaptic plasticity. Studies in the rat hippocampus have been shown that BDNF is capable to rescue the late-phase of long-term potentiation as well as the hippocampus-related long-term memory when protein synthesis was inhibited. Our previous studies on the insular cortex (IC, a region of the temporal cortex implicated in the acquisition and storage of conditioned taste aversion (CTA, have demonstrated that intracortical delivery of BDNF reverses the deficit in CTA memory caused by the inhibition of IC protein synthesis due to anisomycin administration during early acquisition. In this work, we first analyze whether CTA memory storage is protein synthesis dependent in different time-windows. We observed that CTA memory become sensible to protein synthesis inhibition 5 and 7 hours after acquisition. Then, we explore the effect of BDNF delivery (2 μg/2 μl per side in the IC during those late protein synthesis-dependent phases. Our results show that BDNF reverses the CTA memory deficit produced by protein synthesis inhibition in both phases. These findings support the notion that recurrent rounds of consolidation-like events take place in the neocortex for maintenance of CTA memory trace and that BDNF is an essential component of these processes.

  17. In vitro synthesis of ribosomal proteins directed by Escherichia coli DNA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaltschmidt, E; Kahan, L; Nomura, M

    1974-02-01

    In vitro synthesis of a number of E. coli 30S ribosomal proteins has been demonstrated in a cell-free system consisting of ribosomes, initiation factors, RNA polymerase, a fraction containing soluble enzymes and factors, and E. coli DNA. DNA-dependent synthesis of the following 30S proteins has been demonstrated: S4, S5, S7, S8, S9, S10, S13, S14, S16, S19, and S20.

  18. Late Protein Synthesis-Dependent Phases in CTA Long-Term Memory: BDNF Requirement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martínez-Moreno, Araceli; Rodríguez-Durán, Luis F.; Escobar, Martha L.

    2011-01-01

    It has been proposed that long-term memory (LTM) persistence requires a late protein synthesis-dependent phase, even many hours after memory acquisition. Brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) is an essential protein synthesis product that has emerged as one of the most potent molecular mediators for long-term synaptic plasticity. Studies in the rat hippocampus have been shown that BDNF is capable to rescue the late-phase of long-term potentiation as well as the hippocampus-related LTM when protein synthesis was inhibited. Our previous studies on the insular cortex (IC), a region of the temporal cortex implicated in the acquisition and storage of conditioned taste aversion (CTA), have demonstrated that intracortical delivery of BDNF reverses the deficit in CTA memory caused by the inhibition of IC protein synthesis due to anisomycin administration during early acquisition. In this work, we first analyze whether CTA memory storage is protein synthesis-dependent in different time windows. We observed that CTA memory become sensible to protein synthesis inhibition 5 and 7 h after acquisition. Then, we explore the effect of BDNF delivery (2 μg/2 μl per side) in the IC during those late protein synthesis-dependent phases. Our results show that BDNF reverses the CTA memory deficit produced by protein synthesis inhibition in both phases. These findings support the notion that recurrent rounds of consolidation-like events take place in the neocortex for maintenance of CTA memory trace and that BDNF is an essential component of these processes. PMID:21960964

  19. Didanosine Prodrugs : Synthesis, protein binding, bioanalytical method development and pharmacokinetic studies

    OpenAIRE

    Høyem, Sverre

    2008-01-01

    A series of prodrugs of 2´, 3´-dideoxyinosine (didanosine, ddI) were synthesized in an effort to alter different pharmacokinetic properties. The 5`OH function of ddI was esterified with three different carboxylic diacids. The diacids used was adipic acid, azelaic acid, dodecanedioic acid. The synthesis was optimized in order to develop a high yielding and regioselective synthesis. Protein binding studies, using ultrafiltration, showed an increased protein binding compared to ddI itself....

  20. Differential effect of NMDA and AMPA receptor blockade on protein synthesis in the rat infarct borderzone

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Thomas; Bruhn, T; Frank, L

    1996-01-01

    We investigated whether the known neuroprotective effects of two selective glutamate receptor antagonists, the NMDA antagonist MK-801 and the AMPA antagonist NBQX, are reflected in the regional cerebral protein synthesis rates (CPSR) in rats with middle cerebral artery occlusion (MCAO). Rats trea...... compounds reduce infarct size, it is questionable that acute inhibition of protein synthesis in focal ischemia is of significant importance to the final outcome of a stroke lesion....

  1. Entire plastid phylogeny of the carrot genus (Daucus, Apiaceae):Concordance with nuclear data and mitochondrial and nuclear DNA insertions to the plastid

    Science.gov (United States)

    We explored the phylogenetic utility of entire plastid DNA sequences in Daucus and compared the results to prior phylogenetic results using plastid, nuclear, and mitochondrial DNA sequences. We obtained, using Illumina sequencing, full plastid sequences of 37 accessions of 20 Daucus taxa and outgrou...

  2. mTORC1-independent reduction of retinal protein synthesis in type 1 diabetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fort, Patrice E; Losiewicz, Mandy K; Pennathur, Subramaniam; Jefferson, Leonard S; Kimball, Scot R; Abcouwer, Steven F; Gardner, Thomas W

    2014-09-01

    Poorly controlled diabetes has long been known as a catabolic disorder with profound loss of muscle and fat body mass resulting from a simultaneous reduction in protein synthesis and enhanced protein degradation. By contrast, retinal structure is largely maintained during diabetes despite reduced Akt activity and increased rate of cell death. Therefore, we hypothesized that retinal protein turnover is regulated differently than in other insulin-sensitive tissues, such as skeletal muscle. Ins2(Akita) diabetic mice and streptozotocin-induced diabetic rats exhibited marked reductions in retinal protein synthesis matched by a concomitant reduction in retinal protein degradation associated with preserved retinal mass and protein content. The reduction in protein synthesis depended on both hyperglycemia and insulin deficiency, but protein degradation was only reversed by normalization of hyperglycemia. The reduction in protein synthesis was associated with diminished protein translation efficiency but, surprisingly, not with reduced activity of the mTORC1/S6K1/4E-BP1 pathway. Instead, diabetes induced a specific reduction of mTORC2 complex activity. These findings reveal distinctive responses of diabetes-induced retinal protein turnover compared with muscle and liver that may provide a new means to ameliorate diabetic retinopathy.

  3. Faithful transcription initiation from a mitochondrial promoter in transgenic plastids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bohne, Alexandra-Viola; Ruf, Stephanie; Börner, Thomas; Bock, Ralph

    2007-01-01

    The transcriptional machineries of plastids and mitochondria in higher plants exhibit striking similarities. All mitochondrial genes and part of the plastid genes are transcribed by related phage-type RNA polymerases. Furthermore, the majority of mitochondrial promoters and a subset of plastid promoters show a similar structural organization. We show here that the plant mitochondrial atpA promoter is recognized by plastid RNA polymerases in vitro and in vivo. The Arabidopsis phage-type RNA polymerase RpoTp, an enzyme localized exclusively to plastids, was found to recognize the mitochondrial atpA promoter in in vitro assays suggesting the possibility that mitochondrial promoters might function as well in plastids. We have, therefore, generated transplastomic tobacco plants harboring in their chloroplast genome the atpA promoter fused to the coding region of the bacterial nptII gene. The chimeric nptII gene was found to be efficiently transcribed in chloroplasts. Mapping of the 5' ends of the nptII transcripts revealed accurate recognition of the atpA promoter by the chloroplast transcription machinery. We show further that the 5' untranslated region (UTR) of the mitochondrial atpA transcript is capable of mediating translation in chloroplasts. The functional and evolutionary implications of these findings as well as possible applications in chloroplast genome engineering are discussed.

  4. Insulin receptors mediate growth effects in cultured fetal neurons. I. Rapid stimulation of protein synthesis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Heidenreich, K.A.; Toledo, S.P. (Univ. of California-San Diego, La Jolla (USA))

    1989-09-01

    In this study we have examined the effects of insulin on protein synthesis in cultured fetal chick neurons. Protein synthesis was monitored by measuring the incorporation of (3H)leucine (3H-leu) into trichloroacetic acid (TCA)-precipitable protein. Upon addition of 3H-leu, there was a 5-min lag before radioactivity occurred in protein. During this period cell-associated radioactivity reached equilibrium and was totally recovered in the TCA-soluble fraction. After 5 min, the incorporation of 3H-leu into protein was linear for 2 h and was inhibited (98%) by the inclusion of 10 micrograms/ml cycloheximide. After 24 h of serum deprivation, insulin increased 3H-leu incorporation into protein by approximately 2-fold. The stimulation of protein synthesis by insulin was dose dependent (ED50 = 70 pM) and seen within 30 min. Proinsulin was approximately 10-fold less potent than insulin on a molar basis in stimulating neuronal protein synthesis. Insulin had no effect on the TCA-soluble fraction of 3H-leu at any time and did not influence the uptake of (3H)aminoisobutyric acid into neurons. The isotope ratio of 3H-leu/14C-leu in the leucyl tRNA pool was the same in control and insulin-treated neurons. Analysis of newly synthesized proteins by sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis revealed that insulin uniformly increased the incorporation of 14C-leu into all of the resolved neuronal proteins. We conclude from these data that (1) insulin rapidly stimulates overall protein synthesis in fetal neurons independent of amino acid uptake and aminoacyl tRNA precursor pools; (2) stimulation of protein synthesis is mediated by the brain subtype of insulin receptor; and (3) insulin is potentially an important in vivo growth factor for fetal central nervous system neurons.

  5. Presynaptic Protein Synthesis Is Required for Long-Term Plasticity of GABA Release.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Younts, Thomas J; Monday, Hannah R; Dudok, Barna; Klein, Matthew E; Jordan, Bryen A; Katona, István; Castillo, Pablo E

    2016-10-19

    Long-term changes of neurotransmitter release are critical for proper brain function. However, the molecular mechanisms underlying these changes are poorly understood. While protein synthesis is crucial for the consolidation of postsynaptic plasticity, whether and how protein synthesis regulates presynaptic plasticity in the mature mammalian brain remain unclear. Here, using paired whole-cell recordings in rodent hippocampal slices, we report that presynaptic protein synthesis is required for long-term, but not short-term, plasticity of GABA release from type 1 cannabinoid receptor (CB1)-expressing axons. This long-term depression of inhibitory transmission (iLTD) involves cap-dependent protein synthesis in presynaptic interneuron axons, but not somata. Translation is required during the induction, but not maintenance, of iLTD. Mechanistically, CB1 activation enhances protein synthesis via the mTOR pathway. Furthermore, using super-resolution STORM microscopy, we revealed eukaryotic ribosomes in CB1-expressing axon terminals. These findings suggest that presynaptic local protein synthesis controls neurotransmitter release during long-term plasticity in the mature mammalian brain. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Overview of cell-free protein synthesis: historic landmarks, commercial systems, and expanding applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chong, Shaorong

    2014-10-01

    During the early days of molecular biology, cell-free protein synthesis played an essential role in deciphering the genetic code and contributed to our understanding of translation of protein from messenger RNA. Owing to several decades of major and incremental improvements, modern cell-free systems have achieved higher protein synthesis yields at lower production costs. Commercial cell-free systems are now available from a variety of material sources, ranging from "traditional" E. coli, rabbit reticulocyte lysate, and wheat germ extracts, to recent insect and human cell extracts, to defined systems reconstituted from purified recombinant components. Although each cell-free system has certain advantages and disadvantages, the diversity of the cell-free systems allows in vitro synthesis of a wide range of proteins for a variety of downstream applications. In the post-genomic era, cell-free protein synthesis has rapidly become the preferred approach for high-throughput functional and structural studies of proteins and a versatile tool for in vitro protein evolution and synthetic biology. This unit provides a brief history of cell-free protein synthesis and describes key advances in modern cell-free systems, practical differences between widely used commercial cell-free systems, and applications of this important technology.

  7. Complete Plastid Genome of the Recent Holoparasite Lathraea squamaria Reveals Earliest Stages of Plastome Reduction in Orobanchaceae.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tahir H Samigullin

    Full Text Available Plants from the family Orobanchaceae are widely used as a model to study different aspects of parasitic lifestyle including host-parasite interactions and physiological and genomic adaptations. Among the latter, the most prominent are those that occurred due to the loss of photosynthesis; they include the reduction of the photosynthesis-related gene set in both nuclear and plastid genomes. In Orobanchaceae, the transition to non-photosynthetic lifestyle occurred several times independently, but only one lineage has been in the focus of evolutionary studies. These studies included analysis of plastid genomes and transcriptomes and allowed the inference of patterns and mechanisms of genome reduction that are thought to be general for parasitic plants. Here we report the plastid genome of Lathraea squamaria, a holoparasitic plant from Orobanchaceae, clade Rhinantheae. We found that in this plant the degree of plastome reduction is the least among non-photosynthetic plants. Like other parasites, Lathraea possess a plastome with elevated absolute rate of nucleotide substitution. The only gene lost is petL, all other genes typical for the plastid genome are present, but some of them-those encoding photosystem components (22 genes, cytochrome b6/f complex proteins (4 genes, plastid-encoded RNA polymerase subunits (2 genes, ribosomal proteins (2 genes, ccsA and cemA-are pseudogenized. Genes for cytochrome b6/f complex and photosystems I and II that do not carry nonsense or frameshift mutations have an increased ratio of non-synonymous to synonymous substitution rates, indicating the relaxation of purifying selection. Our divergence time estimates showed that transition to holoparasitism in Lathraea lineage occurred relatively recently, whereas the holoparasitic lineage Orobancheae is about two times older.

  8. Complete Plastid Genome of the Recent Holoparasite Lathraea squamaria Reveals Earliest Stages of Plastome Reduction in Orobanchaceae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samigullin, Tahir H; Logacheva, Maria D; Penin, Aleksey A; Vallejo-Roman, Carmen M

    2016-01-01

    Plants from the family Orobanchaceae are widely used as a model to study different aspects of parasitic lifestyle including host-parasite interactions and physiological and genomic adaptations. Among the latter, the most prominent are those that occurred due to the loss of photosynthesis; they include the reduction of the photosynthesis-related gene set in both nuclear and plastid genomes. In Orobanchaceae, the transition to non-photosynthetic lifestyle occurred several times independently, but only one lineage has been in the focus of evolutionary studies. These studies included analysis of plastid genomes and transcriptomes and allowed the inference of patterns and mechanisms of genome reduction that are thought to be general for parasitic plants. Here we report the plastid genome of Lathraea squamaria, a holoparasitic plant from Orobanchaceae, clade Rhinantheae. We found that in this plant the degree of plastome reduction is the least among non-photosynthetic plants. Like other parasites, Lathraea possess a plastome with elevated absolute rate of nucleotide substitution. The only gene lost is petL, all other genes typical for the plastid genome are present, but some of them-those encoding photosystem components (22 genes), cytochrome b6/f complex proteins (4 genes), plastid-encoded RNA polymerase subunits (2 genes), ribosomal proteins (2 genes), ccsA and cemA-are pseudogenized. Genes for cytochrome b6/f complex and photosystems I and II that do not carry nonsense or frameshift mutations have an increased ratio of non-synonymous to synonymous substitution rates, indicating the relaxation of purifying selection. Our divergence time estimates showed that transition to holoparasitism in Lathraea lineage occurred relatively recently, whereas the holoparasitic lineage Orobancheae is about two times older.

  9. Role of chloroplasts and other plastids in ageing and death of plants and animals: a tale of Vishnu and Shiva.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Doorn, Wouter G; Yoshimoto, Kohki

    2010-04-01

    Chloroplasts (chlorophyll-containing plastids) and other plastids are found in all plants and many animals. They are crucial to the survival of plants and most of the animals that harbour them. An example of a non-photosynthesizing plastid in animals is the apicoplast in the malaria-causing Plasmodium species, which is required for survival of the parasite. Many animals (such as sea slugs, sponges, reef corals, and clams) consume prey containing chloroplasts, or feed on algae. Some of these incorporate the chloroplasts from their food, or whole algal cells, into their own cells. Other species from these groups place algal cells between their own cells. Reef-building corals often lose their intracellular algae as a result of environmental changes, resulting in coral bleaching and death. The sensitivity of the chloroplast internal membranes to temperature stress is one of the reasons for coral death. Chloroplasts can also be a causal factor in the processes leading to whole-plant death, as the knockout of a gene encoding a chloroplast protein delayed the yellowing that proceeds death in tobacco plants. It is concluded that chloroplasts and other plastids are essential to individual survival in many species, including animals, and that they also play a role in triggering death in some plant and animal species.

  10. Nuclear encoding of a plastid sigma factor in rice and its tissue- and light-dependent expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tozawa, Y; Tanaka, K; Takahashi, H; Wakasa, K

    1998-01-15

    A full-length cDNA encoding a putative sigma factor for a plastid RNA polymerase was isolated from the higher plant Oryza sativa . The nucleotide sequence of the corresponding nuclear gene, named Os-sigA ( O.sativa sigma A), predicts a polypeptide of 519 amino acids that contains a putative plastid-targeting sequence in its N-terminal region. The predicted mature protein shows extensive sequence homology to bacterial sigma factors, encompassing the conserved regions 1.2, 2.1, 2.2, 2.3, 2.4, 3, 4.1 and 4.2 implicated in binding to -10 promoter elements, promoter melting and interaction with the core RNA polymerase enzyme. RNA blot analysis revealed that the abundance of Os-sigA transcripts was markedly greater in green shoots than in roots or in dark-grown etiolated shoots of rice seedlings. Furthermore, exposure of dark-grown etiolated seedlings to light resulted in a rapid increase in the amount of Os-sigA mRNA in the shoot. These observations suggest that regulation of expression of the nuclear gene for this putative plastid RNA polymerase sigmafactor by light contributes to light-dependent transcriptional regulation of plastid genes.

  11. Pigment content and leaf plastid ultrastructure in the tomato mutant lutescent-2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fornasiero, R B; Bonatti, P M

    1985-03-01

    The non-lethal tomato mutant «lutescent-2» shows an early yellowing of normal developed leaves. Its ripe fruits display a yellow colouring, red pigment synthesis being delayed by up to two weeks. Typical pigment synthesis, related to leaf maturation, does not occur in mutant leaves. Both the concentration of chl a and chl b start to decrease very quickly at the end of leaf expansion. Early yellowing of «1-2» leaves appears to be related to the reduced car(470) content, which leads to chlorophyll photooxidation. Structural evidence of a deficiency in car(470) content in young «1- 2» plastids is given by a reduction of stroma thylakoids as well as by a limited grana stacking. The altered balance between the two pigment classes determined an active, even if incomplete, conversion of chloroplasts to chromoplast-like organelles.

  12. HOPS: a novel cAMP-dependent shuttling protein involved in protein synthesis regulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Della Fazia, Maria Agnese; Castelli, Marilena; Bartoli, Daniela; Pieroni, Stefania; Pettirossi, Valentina; Piobbico, Danilo; Viola-Magni, Mariapia; Servillo, Giuseppe

    2005-07-15

    The liver has the ability to autonomously regulate growth and mass. Following partial hepatectomy, hormones, growth factors, cytokines and their coupled signal transduction pathways have been implicated in hepatocyte proliferation. To understand the mechanisms responsible for the proliferative response, we studied liver regeneration by characterization of novel genes that are activated in residual hepatocytes. A regenerating liver cDNA library screening was performed with cDNA-subtracted probes derived from regenerating and normal liver. Here, we describe the biology of Hops (for hepatocyte odd protein shuttling). HOPS is a novel shuttling protein that contains an ubiquitin-like domain, a putative NES and a proline-rich region. HOPS is rapidly exported from the nucleus and is overexpressed during liver regeneration. Evidence shows that cAMP governs HOPS export in hepatocytes of normal and regenerating liver and is mediated via CRM-1. We demonstrate that HOPS binds to elongation factor eEF-1A and interferes in protein synthesis. HOPS overexpression in H-35-hepatoma and 3T3-NIH cells strongly reduces proliferation.

  13. Ribosomal analysis of rapid rates of protein synthesis in the Antarctic sea urchin Sterechinus neumayeri.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pace, Douglas A; Maxson, Robert; Manahan, Donal T

    2010-02-01

    Previous research has shown that developing stages of the Antarctic sea urchin Sterechinus neumayeri have high rates of protein synthesis that are comparable to those of similar species living in much warmer waters. Direct measurements of the biosynthetic capacities of isolated ribosomes have not been reported for marine organisms living in the extreme-cold environment of Antarctica. Such measurements are required for a mechanistic understanding of how the critical and highly complex processes involved in protein synthesis are regulated in animals living in the coldest marine environment on Earth (< -1 degrees C). We tested the hypothesis that high rates of protein synthesis in the cold are a direct result of high biosynthetic capacities of ribosomes engaged in protein synthesis. Our results show that the rate at which ribosomes manufacture proteins (i.e., the peptide elongation rate) at -1 degrees C is surprisingly similar to rates measured in other sea urchin species at temperatures that are over 15 degrees C warmer. Average peptide elongation rates for a range of developmental stages of the Antarctic sea urchin were 0.36 codons s(-1) (+/- 0.05, SE). On the basis of subcellular rate determinations of ribosomal activity, we calculated stage-specific rates of protein synthesis for blastulae and gastrulae to be 3.7 and 6.5 ng protein h(-1), respectively. These findings support the conclusion that the high rates of biosynthesis previously reported for the Antarctic sea urchin are an outcome of high ribosomal activities.

  14. Lack of dependance of transcription-induced cytosine deaminations on protein synthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mokkapati, Sanath Kumar; Bhagwat, Ashok S

    2002-10-31

    Transcription-induced mutations (TIM) is a phenomenon in Escherichia coli in which transcription promotes C to T and other mutations in a strand-specific manner. Because the processes of transcription and translation are coupled in prokaryotes and some models regarding creating a hypermutagenic state in E. coli require new protein synthesis, we tested the possibility that TIM was dependent on efficient synthesis of proteins. We used puromycin to reversibly inhibit protein synthesis and found that it had little effect on mRNA synthesis, plasmid copy-number or TIM. Our results show that TIM is not dependent on efficient translation of mRNA and this helps eliminate certain models concerning the mechanism underlying TIM.

  15. Long-term olfactory memories are stabilised via protein synthesis in Camponotus fellah ants

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Guerrieri, Fernando Javier; D'Ettorre, Patrizia; Deveaud, J-M.;

    2011-01-01

    of molecular bases of learning and memory. An open question is whether the memories formed upon olfactory learning that are retrievable several days after training are indeed based on de novo protein synthesis. Here, we addressed this question in the ant Camponotus fellah using a conditioning protocol in which......-chain hydrocarbons, one paired with sucrose and the other with quinine solution. Differential conditioning leads to the formation of a long-term memory retrievable at least 72¿h after training. Long-term memory consolidation was impaired by the ingestion of cycloheximide, a protein synthesis blocker, prior...... synthesis, long-term memories are stabilised via protein synthesis. Our behavioural protocol opens interesting research avenues to explore the cellular and molecular bases of olfactory learning and memory in ants....

  16. Comparative studies of effect of auxin and ethylene on permeability and synthesis of RNA and protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sacher, J A; Salminen, S O

    1969-10-01

    The effects of ethylene on permeability and RNA and protein synthesis were assayed over a 6 to 26 hr period in tissue sections from avocado (Persea gratissima Gaertn. F., var. Fuerte), both pulp and peel of banana (Musa sapientum L., var. Gros Michel), bean endocarp (Phaseolus vulgaris L., var. Kentucky Wonder Pole beans) and leaves of Rhoeo discolor. Ethylene had no effect on permeability in 4 of the 5 tissues, but sometimes enhanced solute uptake in banana peel; it had either no effect or an inhibitory effect on synthesis of RNA and protein in sections from fruits of avocado and banana. Auxin (alpha-naphthalene acetic acid) stimulated synthesis of RNA and protein in bean endocarp and Rhoeo leaf sections, whereas ethylene inhibited both basal and auxin-induced synthesis. It is concluded that in these tissues the auxin effect is not an ethylene effect.

  17. Microsomal protein synthesis inhibition: an early manifestation of gentamicin nephrotoxicity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bennett, W.M.; Mela-Riker, L.M.; Houghton, D.C.; Gilbert, D.N.; Buss, W.C.

    1988-08-01

    Aminoglycoside antibiotics achieve bacterial killing by binding to bacterial ribosomes and inhibiting protein synthesis. To examine whether similar mechanisms could be present in renal tubular cells prior to the onset of overt proximal tubular necrosis due to these drugs, we isolated microsomes from Fischer rats given 20 mg/kg gentamicin every 12 h subcutaneously for 2 days and from vehicle-injected controls. Concomitant studies of renal structure, function, and mitochondrial respiration were carried out. (3H)leucine incorporation into renal microsomes of treated animals was reduced by 21.9% (P less than 0.01), whereas brain and liver microsomes from the same animals were unaffected. Gentamicin concentration in the renal microsomal preparation was 56 micrograms/ml, a value 7- to 10-fold above concentrations necessary to inhibit bacterial growth. Conventional renal function studies were normal (blood urea, serum creatinine, creatinine clearance). Treated animals showed only a mild reduction of inulin clearance, 0.71 compared with 0.93 ml.min-1.100 g-1 in controls (P less than 0.05), and an increase in urinary excretion of N-acetylglucosaminidase of 20 compared with 14.8 units/l (P less than 0.05). Renal slice transport of p-aminohippuric acid, tetraethylammonium, and the fractional excretion of sodium were well preserved. There was no evidence, as seen by light microscopy, of proximal tubular necrosis. Mitochondrial cytochrome concentrations were normal and respiratory activities only slightly reduced. Processes similar to those responsible for bacterial killing could be involved in experimental gentamicin nephrotoxicity before overt cellular necrosis.

  18. Real-time quantification of protein expression at the single-cell level via dynamic protein synthesis translocation reporters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aymoz, Delphine; Wosika, Victoria; Durandau, Eric; Pelet, Serge

    2016-04-21

    Protein expression is a dynamic process, which can be rapidly induced by extracellular signals. It is widely appreciated that single cells can display large variations in the level of gene induction. However, the variability in the dynamics of this process in individual cells is difficult to quantify using standard fluorescent protein (FP) expression assays, due to the slow maturation of their fluorophore. Here we have developed expression reporters that accurately measure both the levels and dynamics of protein synthesis in live single cells with a temporal resolution under a minute. Our system relies on the quantification of the translocation of a constitutively expressed FP into the nucleus. As a proof of concept, we used these reporters to measure the transient protein synthesis arising from two promoters responding to the yeast hyper osmolarity glycerol mitogen-activated protein kinase pathway (pSTL1 and pGPD1). They display distinct expression dynamics giving rise to strikingly different instantaneous expression noise.

  19. Application of a nonradioactive method of measuring protein synthesis in industrially relevant Chinese hamster ovary cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dadehbeigi, Nazanin; Dickson, Alan James

    2013-01-01

    Due to the high medical and commercial value of recombinant proteins for clinical and diagnostic purposes, the protein synthesis machinery of mammalian host cells is the subject of extensive research by the biopharmaceutical industry. RNA translation and protein synthesis are steps that may determine the extent of growth and productivity of host cells. To address the problems of utilization of current radioisotope methods with proprietary media, we have focused on the application of an alternative method of measuring protein synthesis in recombinant Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cells. This method employs puromycin as a nonradioactive label which incorporates into nascent polypeptide chains and is detectable by western blotting. This method, which is referred to as SUnSET, successfully demonstrated the expected changes in protein synthesis in conditions that inhibit and restore translation activity and was reproducibly quantifiable. The study of the effects of feed and sodium butyrate addition on protein synthesis by SUnSET revealed an increase following 1 h feed supplementation while a high concentration of sodium butyrate was able to decrease translation during the same treatment period. Finally, SUnSET was used to compare protein synthesis activity during batch culture of the CHO cell line in relation to growth. The results indicate that as the cells approached the end of batch culture, the global rate of protein synthesis declined in parallel with the decreasing growth rate. In conclusion, this method can be used as a "snapshot" to directly monitor the effects of different culture conditions and treatments on translation in recombinant host cells.

  20. A small portion of plastid transcripts is polyadenylated in the flagellate Euglena gracilis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Záhonová, Kristína; Hadariová, Lucia; Vacula, Rostislav; Yurchenko, Vyacheslav; Eliáš, Marek; Krajčovič, Juraj; Vesteg, Matej

    2014-03-03

    Euglena gracilis possesses secondary plastids of green algal origin. In this study, E. gracilis expressed sequence tags (ESTs) derived from polyA-selected mRNA were searched and several ESTs corresponding to plastid genes were found. PCR experiments failed to detect SL sequence at the 5'-end of any of these transcripts, suggesting plastid origin of these polyadenylated molecules. Quantitative PCR experiments confirmed that polyadenylation of transcripts occurs in the Euglena plastids. Such transcripts have been previously observed in primary plastids of plants and algae as low-abundance intermediates of transcript degradation. Our results suggest that a similar mechanism exists in secondary plastids.

  1. Quantitative analysis of protein turnover in plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nelson, Clark J; Li, Lei; Millar, A Harvey

    2014-03-01

    Proteins are constantly being synthesised and degraded as plant cells age and as plants grow, develop and adapt the proteome. Given that plants develop through a series of events from germination to fruiting and even undertake whole organ senescence, an understanding of protein turnover as a fundamental part of this process in plants is essential. Both synthesis and degradation processes are spatially separated in a cell across its compartmented structure. The majority of protein synthesis occurs in the cytosol, while synthesis of specific components occurs inside plastids and mitochondria. Degradation of proteins occurs in both the cytosol, through the action of the plant proteasome, and in organelles and lytic structures through different protease classes. Tracking the specific synthesis and degradation rate of individual proteins can be undertaken using stable isotope feeding and the ability of peptide MS to track labelled peptide fractions over time. Mathematical modelling can be used to follow the isotope signature of newly synthesised protein as it accumulates and natural abundance proteins as they are lost through degradation. Different technical and biological constraints govern the potential for the use of (13)C, (15)N, (2)H and (18)O for these experiments in complete labelling and partial labelling strategies. Future development of quantitative protein turnover analysis will involve analysis of protein populations in complexes and subcellular compartments, assessing the effect of PTMs and integrating turnover studies into wider system biology study of plants.

  2. Studies on protein synthesis by protoplasts of saccharomyces carlsbergensis III. Studies on the specificity and the mechanism of the action of ribonuclease on protein synthesis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kloet, S.R. de; Dam, G.J.W. van; Koningsberger, V.V.

    1962-01-01

    In this paper, the experimental results are presented of a continued study on the specificity and the mechanism of the inhibition by ribonuclease of protein synthesis in protoplasts of Saccharomyces carlsbergensis. By comparing the effects of native pancreatic ribonuclease with those of heat-denatur

  3. Studies on protein synthesis by protoplasts of saccharomyces carlsbergensis III. Studies on the specificity and the mechanism of the action of ribonuclease on protein synthesis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kloet, S.R. de; Dam, G.J.W. van; Koningsberger, V.V.

    1962-01-01

    In this paper, the experimental results are presented of a continued study on the specificity and the mechanism of the inhibition by ribonuclease of protein synthesis in protoplasts of Saccharomyces carlsbergensis. By comparing the effects of native pancreatic ribonuclease with those of

  4. Synthesis of heat shock proteins in rat brain cortex after transient ischemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dienel, G A; Kiessling, M; Jacewicz, M; Pulsinelli, W A

    1986-08-01

    Cell-free protein synthesis and two-dimensional gel autoradiography were used to characterize early postischemic protein synthesis in rat neocortex. Severe forebrain ischemia was induced for 30 min (four-vessel occlusion model) and followed by 3 h of recirculation. Polysomes were isolated from the cerebral cortex, translated in vitro in a reticulocyte system, and analyzed by two-dimensional gel electrophoresis. The translation products of postischemic polysomes included a major new protein family (70 kDa) with multiple isoelectric variants that was found to comigrate with the 68- to 70-kDa "heat shock" protein synthesized from polysomes of hyperthermic rats. Two other stress proteins (93 and 110 kDa) also appeared to be synthesized in increased amounts after ischemia. A complement of proteins that was indistinguishable from that of controls was also synthesized after ischemia, indicating that messenger ribonucleic acid coding for most brain proteins is preserved after ischemia and is bound to polysomes.

  5. Prolonged bed rest decreases skeletal muscle and whole body protein synthesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferrando, A. A.; Lane, H. W.; Stuart, C. A.; Davis-Street, J.; Wolfe, R. R.

    1996-01-01

    We sought to determine the extent to which the loss of lean body mass and nitrogen during inactivity was due to alterations in skeletal muscle protein metabolism. Six male subjects were studied during 7 days of diet stabilization and after 14 days of stimulated microgravity (-6 degrees bed rest). Nitrogen balance became more negative (P protein synthesis (PS; P protein also decreased by 46% (P protein breakdown and inward transport. Whole body protein synthesis determined by [15N]alanine ingestion on six subjects also revealed a 14% decrease (P protein breakdown change significantly. These results indicate that the loss of body protein with inactivity is predominantly due to a decrease in muscle PS and that this decrease is reflected in both whole body and skeletal muscle measures.

  6. Erythropoietin Does Not Enhance Skeletal Muscle Protein Synthesis Following Exercise in Young and Older Adults

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lamon, Séverine; Zacharewicz, Evelyn; Arentson-Lantz, Emily; Gatta, Paul A. Della; Ghobrial, Lobna; Gerlinger-Romero, Frederico; Garnham, Andrew; Paddon-Jones, Douglas; Russell, Aaron P.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: Erythropoietin (EPO) is a renal cytokine that is primarily involved in hematopoiesis while also playing a role in non-hematopoietic tissues expressing the EPO-receptor (EPOR). The EPOR is present in human skeletal muscle. In mouse skeletal muscle, EPO stimulation can activate the AKT serine/threonine kinase 1 (AKT) signaling pathway, the main positive regulator of muscle protein synthesis. We hypothesized that a single intravenous EPO injection combined with acute resistance exercise would have a synergistic effect on skeletal muscle protein synthesis via activation of the AKT pathway. Methods: Ten young (24.2 ± 0.9 years) and 10 older (66.6 ± 1.1 years) healthy subjects received a primed, constant infusion of [ring-13C6] L-phenylalanine and a single injection of 10,000 IU epoetin-beta or placebo in a double-blind randomized, cross-over design. 2 h after the injection, the subjects completed an acute bout of leg extension resistance exercise to stimulate skeletal muscle protein synthesis. Results: Significant interaction effects in the phosphorylation levels of the members of the AKT signaling pathway indicated a differential activation of protein synthesis signaling in older subjects when compared to young subjects. However, EPO offered no synergistic effect on vastus lateralis mixed muscle protein synthesis rate in young or older subjects. Conclusions: Despite its ability to activate the AKT pathway in skeletal muscle, an acute EPO injection had no additive or synergistic effect on the exercise-induced activation of muscle protein synthesis or muscle protein synthesis signaling pathways. PMID:27458387

  7. Regulation of muscle protein synthesis and the effects of catabolic states.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gordon, Bradley S; Kelleher, Andrew R; Kimball, Scot R

    2013-10-01

    Protein synthesis and degradation are dynamically regulated processes that act in concert to control the accretion or loss of muscle mass. The present article focuses on the mechanisms involved in the impairment of protein synthesis that are associated with skeletal muscle atrophy. The vast majority of mechanisms known to regulate protein synthesis involve modulation of the initiation phase of mRNA translation, which comprises a series of reactions that result in the binding of initiator methionyl-tRNAi and mRNA to the 40S ribosomal subunit. The function of the proteins involved in both events has been shown to be repressed under atrophic conditions such as sepsis, cachexia, chronic kidney disease, sarcopenia, and disuse atrophy. The basis for the inhibition of protein synthesis under such conditions is likely to be multifactorial and includes insulin/insulin-like growth factor 1 resistance, pro-inflammatory cytokine expression, malnutrition, corticosteroids, and/or physical inactivity. The present article provides an overview of the existing literature regarding mechanisms and signaling pathways involved in the regulation of mRNA translation as they apply to skeletal muscle wasting, as well as the efficacy of potential clinical interventions such as nutrition and exercise in the maintenance of skeletal muscle protein synthesis under atrophic conditions. This article is part of a Directed Issue entitled: Molecular basis of muscle wasting.

  8. Exogenous insulin does not increase muscle protein synthesis rate when administered systemically: a systematic review

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Trommelen, J.; Groen, B.; Hamer, H.M.; Groot, de C.P.G.M.; Loon, van L.J.C.

    2015-01-01

    Background Though it is well appreciated that insulin plays an important role in the regulation of muscle protein metabolism, there is much discrepancy in the literature on the capacity of exogenous insulin administration to increase muscle protein synthesis rates in vivo in humans. Objective To ass

  9. Sepsis and development impede muscle protein synthesis in neonatal pigs by different ribosomal mechanisms

    Science.gov (United States)

    In muscle, sepsis reduces protein synthesis (MPS) by restraining translation in neonates and adults. Even though protein accretion decreases with development as neonatal MPS rapidly declines by maturation, the changes imposed by development on the sepsis-associated decrease in MPS have not been desc...

  10. Leucine pulses enhance skeletal muscle protein synthesis during continuous feeding in neonatal pigs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Infants unable to maintain oral feeding can be nourished by orogastric tube. We have shown that orogastric continuous feeding restricts muscle protein synthesis compared with intermittent bolus feeding in neonatal pigs. To determine whether leucine leu infusion can be used to enhance protein synthes...

  11. Enteral B-hydroxy-B-methylbutyrate supplementation increases protein synthesis in skeletal muscle of neonatal pigs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Many low-birth weight infants are at risk for poor growth due to an inability to achieve adequate protein intake. Administration of the amino acid leucine stimulates protein synthesis in skeletal muscle of neonates. To determine the effects of enteral supplementation of the leucine metabolite B-hydr...

  12. mTORC1 Coordinates Protein Synthesis and Immunoproteasome Formation via PRAS40 to Prevent Accumulation of Protein Stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yun, Young Sung; Kim, Kwan Hyun; Tschida, Barbara; Sachs, Zohar; Noble-Orcutt, Klara E; Moriarity, Branden S; Ai, Teng; Ding, Rui; Williams, Jessica; Chen, Liqiang; Largaespada, David; Kim, Do-Hyung

    2016-02-18

    Reduction of translational fidelity often occurs in cells with high rates of protein synthesis, generating defective ribosomal products. If not removed, such aberrant proteins can be a major source of cellular stress causing human diseases. Here, we demonstrate that mTORC1 promotes the formation of immunoproteasomes for efficient turnover of defective proteins and cell survival. mTORC1 sequesters precursors of immunoproteasome β subunits via PRAS40. When activated, mTORC1 phosphorylates PRAS40 to enhance protein synthesis and simultaneously to facilitate the assembly of the β subunits for forming immunoproteasomes. Consequently, the PRAS40 phosphorylations play crucial roles in clearing aberrant proteins that accumulate due to mTORC1 activation. Mutations of RAS, PTEN, and TSC1, which cause mTORC1 hyperactivation, enhance immunoproteasome formation in cells and tissues. Those mutations increase cellular dependence on immunoproteasomes for stress response and survival. These results define a mechanism by which mTORC1 couples elevated protein synthesis with immunoproteasome biogenesis to protect cells against protein stress.

  13. Role of the C terminus of Lassa virus L protein in viral mRNA synthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lehmann, Maria; Pahlmann, Meike; Jérôme, Hanna; Busch, Carola; Lelke, Michaela; Günther, Stephan

    2014-08-01

    The N terminus of arenavirus L protein contains an endonuclease presumably involved in "cap snatching." Here, we employed the Lassa virus replicon system to map other L protein sites that might be involved in this mechanism. Residues Phe-1979, Arg-2018, Phe-2071, Asp-2106, Trp-2173, Tyr-2179, Arg-2200, and Arg-2204 were important for viral mRNA synthesis but dispensable for genome replication. Thus, the C terminus of L protein is involved in the mRNA synthesis process, potentially by mediating cap binding.

  14. Plastid ultrastructure and photosynthesis in greening petaloid hypsophylls.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weidner, M; Franz, A; Napp-Zinn, K

    1985-02-01

    The ultrastructural and biochemicalphysiological aspects of postfloral greening have been studied in hypsophylls of Heliconia aurantiaca Ghiesbr., Guzmania cf. x magnifica Richter and Spathiphyllum wallisii Regel. In all three species the greening of the hypsophylls is due to plastid transformation, chloroplast formation proceeding from the initially different types of plastids. The degradation process of the original plastid structures and the mode of thylakoid formation are distinct in each case. In none of the species do the transformed plastids look identical to the chloroplasts of the corresponding foliage leaves. On a chlorophyll basis, the rate of photosynthesis of the greened hypsophylls surpasses the rate of the leaves considerably in Spathiphyllum, but is much lower in Heliconia (no data for Guzmania). In all species, anatomy, plastid structure, pigments, 77° K-fluorescence emission, ribulose-1,5-bis-phosphate carboxylase activities and short-term photosynthesis (14)CO2-assimilation patterns prove the greened hypsophylls to be capable of providing additional carbon to the developing fruits, thus supplementing the import of organic matter from the foliage leaves.

  15. Prolonging cell-free protein synthesis with a novel ATP regeneration system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, D M; Swartz, J R

    1999-01-01

    A new approach for the regeneration of adenosine triphosphate (ATP) during cell-free protein synthesis was developed to prolong the synthesis and also to avoid the accumulation of inorganic phosphate. This approach was demonstrated in a batch system derived from Escherichia coli. Contrary to the conventional methods in which exogenous energy sources contain high-energy phosphate bonds, the new system was designed to generate continuously the required high-energy phosphate bonds within the reaction mixture, thereby recycling the phosphate released during protein synthesis. If allowed to accumulate, phosphate inhibits protein synthesis, most likely by reducing the concentration of free magnesium ion. Pediococcus sp. pyruvate oxidase, when introduced in the reaction mixture along with thiamine pyrophosphate (TPP) and flavin adenine dinucleotide (FAD), catalyzed the generation of acetyl phosphate from pyruvate and inorganic phosphate. Acetyl kinase, already present with sufficient activity in Escherichia coli S30 extract, then catalyzed the regeneration of ATP. Oxygen is required for the generation of acetyl phosphate and the H(2)O(2) produced as a byproduct is sufficiently degraded by endogenous catalase activity. Through the continuous supply of chemical energy, and also through the prevention of inorganic phosphate accumulation, the duration of protein synthesis is extended up to 2 h. Protein accumulation levels also increase. The synthesis of human lymphotoxin receives greater benefit than than that of chloramphenicol acetyl transferase, because the former is more sensitive to phosphate inhibition. Finally, through repeated addition of pyruvate and amino acids during the reaction period, protein synthesis continued for 6 h in the new system, resulting in a final yield of 0.7 mg/mL.

  16. Alpha-ketoglutarate inhibits glutamine degradation and enhances protein synthesis in intestinal porcine epithelial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yao, Kang; Yin, Yulong; Li, Xilong; Xi, Pengbin; Wang, Junjun; Lei, Jian; Hou, Yongqing; Wu, Guoyao

    2012-06-01

    α-Ketoglutarate (AKG) is a key intermediate in glutamine metabolism. Emerging evidence shows beneficial effects of AKG on clinical and experimental nutrition, particularly with respect to intestinal growth and integrity. However, the underlying mechanisms are unknown. Intestinal porcine epithelial cells (IPEC-1) were used to test the hypothesis that AKG inhibits glutamine degradation and enhances protein synthesis. IPEC-1 cells were cultured for 3 days in Dulbecco's modified Eagle's-F12 Ham medium (DMEM-F12) containing 0, 0.2, 0.5 or 2 mM of AKG. At the end of the 3-day culture, cells were used to determine L-[U-14C]glutamine utilization, protein concentration, protein synthesis, and the total and phosphorylated levels of the mammalian target of the rapamycin (mTOR), ribosomal protein S6 kinase-1 (S6K1) and eukaryotic initiation factor (eIF) 4E-binding protein-1 (4E-BP1). Compared with 0 mM of AKG (control), 0.2 and 0.5 mM of AKG dose-dependently reduced (P<0.05) glutamine degradation and the production of glutamate, alanine and aspartate in IPEC-1 cells. Addition of 0.5 and 2 mM of AKG to culture medium enhanced protein synthesis (P<0.05) by 78 and 101% without affecting protein degradation, compared to the control group. Rapamycin (50 nM; a potent inhibitor of mTOR) attenuated the stimulatory effect of AKG on protein synthesis. Consistent with these metabolic data, the addition of 0.5 or 2 mM of AKG to culture medium increased (P<0.05) the phosphorylated levels of mTOR, S6k1 and 4E-BP1 proteins. Collectively, these results indicate that AKG can spare glutamine and activate the mTOR signaling pathway to stimulate protein synthesis in intestinal epithelial cells.

  17. Arginine depletion by arginine deiminase does not affect whole protein metabolism or muscle fractional protein synthesis rate in mice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Due to the absolute need for arginine that certain cancer cells have, arginine depletion is a therapy in clinical trials to treat several types of cancers. Arginine is an amino acids utilized not only as a precursor for other important molecules, but also for protein synthesis. Because arginine depl...

  18. Intra-axonal protein synthesis - a new target for neural repair?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jeffery L Twiss

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Although initially argued to be a feature of immature neurons with incomplete polarization, there is clear evidence that neurons in the peripheral nervous system retain the capacity for intra-axonal protein synthesis well into adulthood. This localized protein synthesis has been shown to contribute to injury signaling and axon regeneration in peripheral nerves. Recent works point to potential for protein synthesis in axons of the vertebrate central nervous system. mRNAs and protein synthesis machinery have now been documented in lamprey, mouse, and rat spinal cord axons. Intra-axonal protein synthesis appears to be activated in adult vertebrate spinal cord axons when they are regeneration-competent. Rat spinal cord axons regenerating into a peripheral nerve graft contain mRNAs and markers of activated translational machinery. Indeed, levels of some growth-associated mRNAs in these spinal cord axons are comparable to the regenerating sciatic nerve. Markers of active translation tend to decrease when these axons stop growing, but can be reactivated by a second axotomy. These emerging observations raise the possibility that mRNA transport into and translation within axons could be targeted to facilitate regeneration in both the peripheral and central nervous systems.

  19. Intra-axonal protein synthesis - a new target for neural repair?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Twiss, Jeffery L; Kalinski, Ashley L; Sachdeva, Rahul; Houle, John D

    2016-09-01

    Although initially argued to be a feature of immature neurons with incomplete polarization, there is clear evidence that neurons in the peripheral nervous system retain the capacity for intra-axonal protein synthesis well into adulthood. This localized protein synthesis has been shown to contribute to injury signaling and axon regeneration in peripheral nerves. Recent works point to potential for protein synthesis in axons of the vertebrate central nervous system. mRNAs and protein synthesis machinery have now been documented in lamprey, mouse, and rat spinal cord axons. Intra-axonal protein synthesis appears to be activated in adult vertebrate spinal cord axons when they are regeneration-competent. Rat spinal cord axons regenerating into a peripheral nerve graft contain mRNAs and markers of activated translational machinery. Indeed, levels of some growth-associated mRNAs in these spinal cord axons are comparable to the regenerating sciatic nerve. Markers of active translation tend to decrease when these axons stop growing, but can be reactivated by a second axotomy. These emerging observations raise the possibility that mRNA transport into and translation within axons could be targeted to facilitate regeneration in both the peripheral and central nervous systems.

  20. Intra-axonal protein synthesis - a new target for neural repair?

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jeffery L Twiss; Ashley L Kalinski; Rahul Sachdeva; John D Houle

    2016-01-01

    Although initially argued to be a feature of immature neurons with incomplete polarization, there is clear evidence that neurons in the peripheral nervous system retain the capacity for intra-axonal protein synthe-sis well into adulthood. This localized protein synthesis has been shown to contribute to injury signaling and axon regeneration in peripheral nerves. Recent works point to potential for protein synthesis in axons of the vertebrate central nervous system. mRNAs and protein synthesis machinery have now been docu-mented in lamprey, mouse, and rat spinal cord axons. Intra-axonal protein synthesis appears to be activated in adult vertebrate spinal cord axons when they are regeneration-competent. Rat spinal cord axons regen-erating into a peripheral nerve graft contain mRNAs and markers of activated translational machinery. Indeed, levels of some growth-associated mRNAs in these spinal cord axons are comparable to the regen-erating sciatic nerve. Markers of active translation tend to decrease when these axons stop growing, but can be reactivated by a second axotomy. These emerging observations raise the possibility that mRNA transport into and translation within axons could be targeted to facilitate regeneration in both the peripheral and central nervous systems.

  1. Nuclear-cytoplasmic conflict in pea (Pisum sativum L.) is associated with nuclear and plastidic candidate genes encoding acetyl-CoA carboxylase subunits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bogdanova, Vera S; Zaytseva, Olga O; Mglinets, Anatoliy V; Shatskaya, Natalia V; Kosterin, Oleg E; Vasiliev, Gennadiy V

    2015-01-01

    In crosses of wild and cultivated peas (Pisum sativum L.), nuclear-cytoplasmic incompatibility frequently occurs manifested as decreased pollen fertility, male gametophyte lethality, sporophyte lethality. High-throughput sequencing of plastid genomes of one cultivated and four wild pea accessions differing in cross-compatibility was performed. Candidate genes for involvement in the nuclear-plastid conflict were searched in the reconstructed plastid genomes. In the annotated Medicago truncatula genome, nuclear candidate genes were searched in the portion syntenic to the pea chromosome region known to harbor a locus involved in the conflict. In the plastid genomes, a substantial variability of the accD locus represented by nucleotide substitutions and indels was found to correspond to the pattern of cross-compatibility among the accessions analyzed. Amino acid substitutions in the polypeptides encoded by the alleles of a nuclear locus, designated as Bccp3, with a complementary function to accD, fitted the compatibility pattern. The accD locus in the plastid genome encoding beta subunit of the carboxyltransferase of acetyl-coA carboxylase and the nuclear locus Bccp3 encoding biotin carboxyl carrier protein of the same multi-subunit enzyme were nominated as candidate genes for main contribution to nuclear-cytoplasmic incompatibility in peas. Existence of another nuclear locus involved in the accD-mediated conflict is hypothesized.

  2. Coordinated regulation of protein synthesis and degradation by mTORC1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yinan; Nicholatos, Justin; Dreier, John R; Ricoult, Stéphane J H; Widenmaier, Scott B; Hotamisligil, Gökhan S; Kwiatkowski, David J; Manning, Brendan D

    2014-09-18

    Eukaryotic cells coordinately control anabolic and catabolic processes to maintain cell and tissue homeostasis. Mechanistic target of rapamycin complex 1 (mTORC1) promotes nutrient-consuming anabolic processes, such as protein synthesis. Here we show that as well as increasing protein synthesis, mTORC1 activation in mouse and human cells also promotes an increased capacity for protein degradation. Cells with activated mTORC1 exhibited elevated levels of intact and active proteasomes through a global increase in the expression of genes encoding proteasome subunits. The increase in proteasome gene expression, cellular proteasome content, and rates of protein turnover downstream of mTORC1 were all dependent on induction of the transcription factor nuclear factor erythroid-derived 2-related factor 1 (NRF1; also known as NFE2L1). Genetic activation of mTORC1 through loss of the tuberous sclerosis complex tumour suppressors, TSC1 or TSC2, or physiological activation of mTORC1 in response to growth factors or feeding resulted in increased NRF1 expression in cells and tissues. We find that this NRF1-dependent elevation in proteasome levels serves to increase the intracellular pool of amino acids, which thereby influences rates of new protein synthesis. Therefore, mTORC1 signalling increases the efficiency of proteasome-mediated protein degradation for both quality control and as a mechanism to supply substrate for sustained protein synthesis.

  3. Hypoxia stimulates prostacyclin synthesis in newborn pulmonary artery endothelium by increasing cyclooxygenase-1 protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    North, A J; Brannon, T S; Wells, L B; Campbell, W B; Shaul, P W

    1994-07-01

    In newborn lambs, pulmonary prostacyclin (PGI2) production increases acutely in response to low oxygen. We tested the hypothesis that decreased oxygenation directly stimulates PGI2 synthesis in arterial segments and cultured endothelial cells from newborn lamb intrapulmonary arteries. In segments studied at PO2 of 680 mm Hg, the synthesis of PGI2 exceeded prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) by 73%. Endothelium removal lowered PGI2 by 77% and PGE2 by 66%. At low oxygen tension (PO2, 40 mm Hg), PGI2 and PGE2 synthesis rose by 96% and 102%, respectively. Similarly, in endothelial cells studied at PO2 of 680 mm Hg, the synthesis of PGI2 exceeded PGE2 by 50%, and at low oxygen tension both PGI2 and PGE2 increased (89% and 64%, respectively). Endothelial cell PGI2 synthesis maximally stimulated by bradykinin, A23187, or arachidonic acid was also increased at low PO2 by 50%, 66%, and 48%, respectively. PGE2 synthesis was similarly altered, increasing by 33%, 37%, and 41%, respectively. In contrast, lowering oxygen had minimal effect on PGI2 and PGE2 synthesis with exogenous PGH2, which is the product of cyclooxygenase. Immunoblot analyses revealed that there was a 2.6-fold greater abundance of cyclooxygenase-1 protein at PO2 of 40 versus 680 mm Hg, and the increase at lower oxygen tension was inhibited by cycloheximide. The cyclooxygenase-2 isoform was not detected. Thus, attenuated oxygenation directly stimulates PGI2 and PGE2 synthesis in intrapulmonary arterial segments and endothelial cells from newborn lambs. This process is due to enhanced cyclooxygenase activity related to increased abundance of the cyclooxygenase-1 protein, and this effect may be due to increased synthesis of the enzyme protein.

  4. Host range restriction of vaccinia virus in Chinese hamster ovary cells: relationship to shutoff of protein synthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drillien, R; Spehner, D; Kirn, A

    1978-12-01

    Chinese hamster ovary cells were found to be nonpermissive for vaccinia virus. Although early virus-induced events occurred in these cells (RNA and polypeptide synthesis), subsequent events appeared to be prevented by a very rapid and nonselective shutoff of protein synthesis. Within less than 2 h after infection, both host and viral protein syntheses were arrested. At low multiplicities of infection, inhibition of RNA synthesis with cordycepin resulted in failure of the virus to block protein synthesis. Moreover, infection of the cells in the presence of cycloheximide prevented the immediate onset of shutoff after reversal of cycloheximide. Inactivation of virus particles by UV irradiation also impaired the capacity of the virus to inhibit protein synthesis. These results suggested that an early vaccinia virus-coded product was implicated in the shutoff of protein synthesis. Either the nonpermissive Chinese hamster ovary cells were more sensitive to this inhibition than permissive cells, or a regulatory control of the vaccinia shutoff function was defective.

  5. Novel filaments 5 nm in diameter constitute the cytosolic ring of the plastid division apparatus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miyagishima, S; Takahara, M; Kuroiwa, T

    2001-03-01

    The plastid division apparatus (called the plastid-dividing ring) has been detected in several plant and algal species at the constricted region of plastids by transmission electron microscopy. The apparatus is composed of two or three rings: an outer ring in the cytosol, an inner ring in the stroma, and a middle ring in the intermembrane space. The components of these rings are not clear. FtsZ, which forms the bacterial cytokinetic ring, has been proposed as a component of both the inner and outer rings. Here, we present the ultrastructure of the outer ring at high resolution. To visualize the outer ring by negative staining, we isolated dividing chloroplasts from a synchronized culture of a red alga, Cyanidioschyzon merolae, and lysed them with nonionic detergent Nonidet P-40. Nonidet P-40 extracted primarily stroma, thylakoids, and the inner and middle rings, leaving the envelope and outer ring largely intact. Negative staining revealed that the outer ring consists of a bundle of 5-nm filaments in which globular proteins are spaced 4.8 nm apart. Immunoblotting using an FtsZ-specific antibody failed to show immunoreactivity in the fraction containing the filament. Moreover, the filament structure and properties are unlike those of known cytoskeletal filaments. The bundle of filaments forms a very rigid structure and does not disassemble in 2 M urea. We also identified a dividing phase-specific 56-kD protein of chloroplasts as a candidate component of the ring. Our results suggest that the main architecture of the outer ring did not descend from cyanobacteria during the course of endosymbiosis but was added by the host cell early in plant evolution.

  6. Plastid thioredoxins: a “one-for-all” redox-signaling system in plants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Serrato, Antonio J.; Fernández-Trijueque, Juan; Barajas-López, Juan-de-Dios; Chueca, Ana; Sahrawy, Mariam

    2013-01-01

    The sessile nature of plants forces them to face an ever-changing environment instead of escape from hostile conditions as animals do. In order to overcome this survival challenge, a fine monitoring and controlling of the status of the photosynthetic electron transport chain and the general metabolism is vital for these organisms. Frequently, evolutionary plant adaptation has consisted in the appearance of multigenic families, comprising an array of enzymes, structural components, or sensing, and signaling elements, in numerous occasions with highly conserved primary sequences that sometimes make it difficult to discern between redundancy and specificity among the members of a same family. However, all this gene diversity is aimed to sort environment-derived plant signals to efficiently channel the external incoming information inducing a right physiological answer. Oxygenic photosynthesis is a powerful source of reactive oxygen species (ROS), molecules with a dual oxidative/signaling nature. In response to ROS, one of the most frequent post-translational modifications occurring in redox signaling proteins is the formation of disulfide bridges (from Cys oxidation). This review is focused on the role of plastid thioredoxins (pTRXs), proteins containing two Cys in their active site and largely known as part of the plant redox-signaling network. Several pTRXs types have been described so far, namely, TRX f, m, x, y, and z. In recent years, improvements in proteomic techniques and the study of loss-of-function mutants have enabled us to grasp the importance of TRXs for the plastid physiology. We will analyze the specific signaling function of each TRX type and discuss about the emerging role in non-photosynthetic plastids of these redox switchers. PMID:24319449

  7. Plastid thioredoxins: a "one-for-all" redox-signaling system in plants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antonio Jesús Serrato

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available The sessile nature of plants forces them to face an ever-changing environment instead of escape from hostile conditions as animals do. In order to overcome this survival challenge, a fine monitoring and controlling of the status of the photosynthetic electron transport chain (PETC and the general metabolism is vital for these organisms. Frequently, evolutionary plant adaptation has consisted in the appearance of multigenic families, comprising an array of enzymes, structural components, or sensing and signaling elements, in numerous occasions with highly conserved primary sequences that sometimes make it difficult to discern between redundancy and specificity among the members of a same family. However, all this gene diversity is aimed to sort environment-derived plant signals to efficiently channel the external incoming information inducing a right physiological answer. Oxygenic photosynthesis is a powerful source of reactive oxygen species (ROS, molecules with a dual oxidative/signaling nature. In response to ROS, one of the most frequent post-translational modifications occurring in redox signaling proteins is the formation of disulfide bridges (from Cys oxidation. This review is focused on the role of plastid thioredoxins (pTRXs, proteins containing two Cys in their active site and largely known as part of the plant redox-signaling network. Several pTRXs types have been described so far, namely, TRX f, m, x, y, and z. In recent years, improvements in proteomic techniques and the study of loss-of-function mutants have enabled us to grasp the importance of TRXs for the plastid physiology. We will analyze the specific signaling function of each TRX type and discuss about the emerging role in non-photosynthetic plastids of these redox switchers.

  8. Plastid thioredoxins: a "one-for-all" redox-signaling system in plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Serrato, Antonio J; Fernández-Trijueque, Juan; Barajas-López, Juan-de-Dios; Chueca, Ana; Sahrawy, Mariam

    2013-11-21

    The sessile nature of plants forces them to face an ever-changing environment instead of escape from hostile conditions as animals do. In order to overcome this survival challenge, a fine monitoring and controlling of the status of the photosynthetic electron transport chain and the general metabolism is vital for these organisms. Frequently, evolutionary plant adaptation has consisted in the appearance of multigenic families, comprising an array of enzymes, structural components, or sensing, and signaling elements, in numerous occasions with highly conserved primary sequences that sometimes make it difficult to discern between redundancy and specificity among the members of a same family. However, all this gene diversity is aimed to sort environment-derived plant signals to efficiently channel the external incoming information inducing a right physiological answer. Oxygenic photosynthesis is a powerful source of reactive oxygen species (ROS), molecules with a dual oxidative/signaling nature. In response to ROS, one of the most frequent post-translational modifications occurring in redox signaling proteins is the formation of disulfide bridges (from Cys oxidation). This review is focused on the role of plastid thioredoxins (pTRXs), proteins containing two Cys in their active site and largely known as part of the plant redox-signaling network. Several pTRXs types have been described so far, namely, TRX f, m, x, y, and z. In recent years, improvements in proteomic techniques and the study of loss-of-function mutants have enabled us to grasp the importance of TRXs for the plastid physiology. We will analyze the specific signaling function of each TRX type and discuss about the emerging role in non-photosynthetic plastids of these redox switchers.

  9. RNA and protein synthesis in cultured human fibroblasts derived from donors of various ages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, J J; Brot, N; Weissbach, H

    1980-07-01

    RNA synthesis in human fibroblasts from donors of various ages was studied in fibroblasts made permeable to nucleoside triphosphates with the nonionic detergent Nonidet P40. Cells from donors of 11 years and older showed a 30-40% decline in total RNA synthesis. The decrease in RNA synthesis was primarily due to a lowering of RNA polymerase II activity (alpha-amanitin sensitive). Studies on the incorporation of leucine into protein also showed a 30-40% decrease in cells from older donors.

  10. Arabidopsis CHL27, located in both envelope and thylakoid membranes, is required for the synthesis of protochlorophyllide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tottey, Stephen; Block, Maryse A; Allen, Michael; Westergren, Tomas; Albrieux, Catherine; Scheller, Henrik V; Merchant, Sabeeha; Jensen, Poul Erik

    2003-12-23

    CHL27, the Arabidopsis homologue to Chlamydomonas Crd1, a plastid-localized putative diiron protein, is required for the synthesis of protochlorophyllide and therefore is a candidate subunit of the aerobic cyclase in chlorophyll biosynthesis. delta-Aminolevulinic acid-fed antisense Arabidopsis plants with reduced amounts of Crd1/CHL27 accumulate Mg-protoporphyrin IX monomethyl ester, the substrate of the cyclase reaction. Mutant plants have chlorotic leaves with reduced abundance of all chlorophyll proteins. Fractionation of Arabidopsis chloroplast membranes shows that Crd1/CHL27 is equally distributed on a membrane-weight basis in the thylakoid and inner-envelope membranes.

  11. A HYPOTHESIS FOR PLASTID EVOLUTION IN CHROMALVEOLATES(1).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanchez-Puerta, M Virginia; Delwiche, Charles F

    2008-10-01

    Four eukaryotic lineages, namely, haptophytes, alveolates, cryptophytes, and heterokonts, contain in most cases photosynthetic and nonphotosynthetic members-the photosynthetic ones with secondary plastids with chl c as the main photosynthetic pigment. These four photosynthetic lineages were grouped together on the basis of their pigmentation and called chromalveolates, which is usually understood to imply loss of plastids in the nonphotosynthetic members. Despite the ecological and economic importance of this group of organisms, the phylogenetic relationships among these algae are only partially understood, and the so-called chromalveolate hypothesis is very controversial. This review evaluates the evidence for and against this grouping and summarizes the present understanding of chromalveolate evolution. We also describe a testable hypothesis that is intended to accommodate current knowledge based on plastid and nuclear genomic data, discuss the implications of this model, and comment on areas that require further examination.

  12. Fine structure of plastids during androgenesis in Hordeum vulgare L.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fortunat Młodzianowski

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The fine structure of plastids was studied in the course of androgenesis in in the pollen of Hordeum vulgare L. It was found that these organelles occur in all stages of androgenesis. Their structure was simple and was frequently manifested on the cross section only by the presence of the envelope and matrix of different degree of density. Single thylakoids, nucleoid-like regions and starch grains were, however, also noted. The structure of plastids in embryoids formed from microspores of barley was compared with embryos developed from fertilized egg cell, and we did not found any fundamental differences between them. However, only plastid ribosomes were difficult to identify on ultrathin sections in embryoids and in the embryos.

  13. Activation of protein kinase C inhibits synthesis and release of decidual prolactin

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Harman, I.; Costello, A.; Ganong, B.; Bell, R.M.; Handwerger, S.

    1986-08-01

    Activation of calcium-activated, phospholipid-dependent protein kinase C by diacylglycerol and phorbol esters has been shown to mediate release of hormones in many systems. To determine whether protein kinase C activation is also involved in the regulation of prolactin release from human decidual, the authors have examined the effects of various acylglycerols and phorbol esters on the synthesis and release of prolactin from cultured human decidual cells. sn-1,2-Dioctanolyglycerol (diC8), which is known to stimulate protein kinase C in other systems, inhibited prolactin release in a dose-dependent manner with maximal inhibition of 53.1% at 100 M. Diolein (100 M), which also stimulates protein kinase C activity in some systems, inhibited prolactin release by 21.3%. Phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate (PMA), phorbol 12,13-didecanoate, and 4US -phorbol 12,13-dibutyrate, which activate protein kinase C in other systems, also inhibited the release of prolactin, which the protein kinase C inactivate 4 -phorbol-12,13-didecanoate was without effect. The inhibition of prolactin release was secondary to a decrease in prolactin synthesis. Although diC8 and PMA inhibited the synthesis and release of prolactin, these agents had no effect on the synthesis or release of trichloroacetic acid-precipitable (TVS)methionine-labeled decidual proteins and did not cause the release of the cytosolic enzymes lactic dehydrogenase and alkaline phosphatase. DiC8 and PMA stimulates the specific activity of protein kinase C in decidual tissue by 14.6 and 14.0-fold, respectively. The inhibition of the synthesis and release of prolactin by diC8 and phorbol esters strongly implicates protein kinase C in the regulation of the production and release of prolactin from the decidua.

  14. Quantity of dietary protein intake, but not pattern of intake, affects net protein balance primarily through differences in protein synthesis in older adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Il-Young; Schutzler, Scott; Schrader, Amy; Spencer, Horace; Kortebein, Patrick; Deutz, Nicolaas E P; Wolfe, Robert R; Ferrando, Arny A

    2015-01-01

    To examine whole body protein turnover and muscle protein fractional synthesis rate (MPS) following ingestions of protein in mixed meals at two doses of protein and two intake patterns, 20 healthy older adult subjects (52-75 yr) participated in one of four groups in a randomized clinical trial: a level of protein intake of 0.8 g (1RDA) or 1.5 g·kg(-1)·day(-1) (∼2RDA) with uneven (U: 15/20/65%) or even distribution (E: 33/33/33%) patterns of intake for breakfast, lunch, and dinner over the day (1RDA-U, 1RDA-E, 2RDA-U, or 2RDA-E). Subjects were studied with primed continuous infusions of L-[(2)H5]phenylalanine and L-[(2)H2]tyrosine on day 4 following 3 days of diet habituation. Whole body protein kinetics [protein synthesis (PS), breakdown, and net balance (NB)] were expressed as changes from the fasted to the fed states. Positive NB was achieved at both protein levels, but NB was greater in 2RDA vs. 1RDA (94.8 ± 6.0 vs. 58.9 ± 4.9 g protein/750 min; P = 0.0001), without effects of distribution on NB. The greater NB was due to the higher PS with 2RDA vs. 1RDA (15.4 ± 4.8 vs. -18.0 ± 8.4 g protein/750 min; P = 0.0018). Consistent with PS, MPS was greater with 2RDA vs. 1RDA, regardless of distribution patterns. In conclusion, whole body net protein balance was greater with protein intake above recommended dietary allowance (0.8 g protein·kg(-1)·day(-1)) in the context of mixed meals, without demonstrated effects of protein intake pattern, primarily through higher rates of protein synthesis at whole body and muscle levels.

  15. Nucleic acid and protein synthesis during lateral root initiation in Marsilea quadrifolia (Marsileaceae)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, B. L.; Raghavan, V.

    1991-01-01

    The pattern of DNA, RNA, and protein synthesis during lateral root initiation in Marsilea quadrifolia L. was monitored by autoradiography of incorporated of 3H-thymidine, 3H-uridine, and 3H-leucine, respectively. DNA synthesis was associated with the enlargement of the lateral root initial prior to its division. Consistent with histological studies, derivatives of the lateral root initial as well as the cells of the adjacent inner cortex and pericycle of the parent root also continued to synthesize DNA. RNA and protein synthetic activities were found to be higher in the lateral root initials than in the endodermal initials of the same longitudinal layer. The data suggest a role for nucleic acid and protein synthesis during cytodifferentiation of a potential endodermal cell into a lateral root initial.

  16. Biosynthetic pathways of plastid-derived organelles as potential drug targets against parasitic apicomplexa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seeber, Frank

    2003-06-01

    Apicomplexan parasites are a large phylum of unicellular and obligate intracellular organisms of great medical importance. They include the human pathogens Plasmodium spp., the causative agent of malaria, and Toxoplasma gondii, an opportunistic parasite of immunosuppressed individuals and a common cause of congenital disease, together affecting several hundred million people worldwide. The search for new and effective drugs against these pathogens has been boosted during the last years by an unexpected finding. Through molecular and cell biological analysis it was realized that probably most members of this phylum harbor a plastid-like organelle, called the apicoplast, which probably is derived from the engulfment of a red alga in ancient times. Although the apicoplast itself contains a small circular genome, most of the proteome of this organelle is encoded in the nuclear genome, and the proteins are subsequently transported to the apicoplast. It is assumed to contain a number of unique metabolic pathways not found in the vertebrate host, making it an ideal "playground" for those interested in drug targets. Recent reports have shown that the rationale of this approach is valid and that new drugs which are urgently needed especially for plasmodial infections, might be developed in the near future based on these targets. Amongst them are three enzymes of the plant-like fatty acid synthesis machinery and enzymes of the non-mevalonat isoprenoid biosynthesis pathway. From their presence in the apicoplast it can be concluded that fatty acid and lipid biosynthesis seems to be a major function of the apicoplast. Another recently described apicoplast enzyme, ferredoxin-NADP(+)-reductase and its redox partner, ferredoxin, points to another interesting organelle-specific biosynthetic pathway, namely [Fe-S] cluster biosynthesis. In the present review, the fundamental aspects of the apicoplast as drug target will be described, together with the specific pathways and their

  17. AKAP3 synthesis is mediated by RNA binding proteins and PKA signaling during mouse spermiogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Kaibiao; Yang, Lele; Zhao, Danyun; Wu, Yaoyao; Qi, Huayu

    2014-06-01

    Mammalian spermatogenesis is regulated by coordinated gene expression in a spatiotemporal manner. The spatiotemporal regulation of major sperm proteins plays important roles during normal development of the male gamete, of which the underlying molecular mechanisms are poorly understood. A-kinase anchoring protein 3 (AKAP3) is one of the major components of the fibrous sheath of the sperm tail that is formed during spermiogenesis. In the present study, we analyzed the expression of sperm-specific Akap3 and the potential regulatory factors of its protein synthesis during mouse spermiogenesis. Results showed that the transcription of Akap3 precedes its protein synthesis by about 2 wk. Nascent AKAP3 was found to form protein complex with PKA and RNA binding proteins (RBPs), including PIWIL1, PABPC1, and NONO, as revealed by coimmunoprecipitation and protein mass spectrometry. RNA electrophoretic gel mobility shift assay showed that these RBPs bind sperm-specific mRNAs, of which proteins are synthesized during the elongating stage of spermiogenesis. Biochemical and cell biological experiments demonstrated that PIWIL1, PABPC1, and NONO interact with each other and colocalize in spermatids' RNA granule, the chromatoid body. In addition, NONO was found in extracytoplasmic granules in round spermatids, whereas PIWIL1 and PABPC1 were diffusely localized in cytoplasm of elongating spermatids, indicating their participation at different steps of mRNA metabolism during spermatogenesis. Interestingly, type I PKA subunits colocalize with PIWIL1 and PABPC1 in the cytoplasm of elongating spermatids and cosediment with the RBPs in polysomal fractions on sucrose gradients. Further biochemical analyses revealed that activation of PKA positively regulates AKAP3 protein synthesis without changing its mRNA level in elongating spermatids. Taken together, these results indicate that PKA signaling directly participates in the regulation of protein translation in postmeiotic male germ cells

  18. Peptide segment ligation:A new method for synthesis of peptide and protein

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2003-01-01

    @@ The protein structure-function relationships are always highlighted in the field of life science. Protein synthesis from genomic sequence data is gaining significance in the "post-genomic era" of biomedical research by providing direct access to functional proteins. The manually or automatically stepwise solid phase peptide synthesis (SPPS) allows peptide of up to 60 residues to be routinely constructed in good yield and high purity[1,2]. The assembly of longer proteins via the gene engineering technology (e.g. recombinant DNA-based molecular biology or site- directed mutagenesis) and convergent peptide synthesis are necessary. Although the current biosynthetic method allows unnatural amino acids to be incorporated into proteins or peptides[3], only ?-peptide in the protein backbone can be obtained. A lot of problems associated with the classic convergent peptide synthesis approach, such as the poor solubility, inadequate purification techniques, and limited characterization methods with the fully protected segment[6]. However, totally chemical synthetic method can easily obtain ?- or ?-peptide[4] and even branch peptide[5].

  19. Synthesis of the major storage protein, hordein, in barley

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Giese, Nanna Henriette; Andersen, B.; Doll, Hans

    1983-01-01

    A liquid culture system for culturing detached spikes of barley (Hordeum vulgare L.) at different nutritional levels was established. The synthesis of hordein polypeptides was studied by pulse-labeling with [14C]sucrose at different stages of development and nitrogen (N) nutrition. All polypeptid...

  20. Regulation of chloroplast number and DNA synthesis in higher plants. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mullet, J.E.

    1995-11-10

    The long term objective of this research is to understand the process of chloroplast development and its coordination with leaf development in higher plants. This is important because the photosynthetic capacity of plants is directly related to leaf and chloroplast development. This research focuses on obtaining a detailed description of leaf development and the early steps in chloroplast development including activation of plastid DNA synthesis, changes in plastid DNA copy number, activation of chloroplast transcription and increases in plastid number per cell. The grant will also begin analysis of specific biochemical mechanisms by isolation of the plastid DNA polymerase, and identification of genetic mutants which are altered in their accumulation of plastid DNA and plastid number per cell.

  1. Regulation of chloroplast number and DNA synthesis in higher plants. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mullet, J.E.

    1995-11-10

    The long term objective of this research is to understand the process of chloroplast development and its coordination with leaf development in higher plants. This is important because the photosynthetic capacity of plants is directly related to leaf and chloroplast development. This research focuses on obtaining a detailing description of leaf development and the early steps in chloroplast development including activation of plastid DNA synthesis, changes in plastid DNA copy number, activation of chloroplast transcription and increases in plastid number per cell. The grant will also begin analysis of specific biochemical mechanisms by isolation of the plastid DNA polymerase, and identification of genetic mutants which are altered in their accumulation of plastid DNA and plastid number per cell.

  2. A Recombinant Collagen-mRNA Platform for Controllable Protein Synthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Liping; Xiong, Yunjing; Bashan, Anat; Zimmerman, Ella; Shulman Daube, Shirley; Peleg, Yoav; Albeck, Shira; Unger, Tamar; Yonath, Hagith; Krupkin, Miri; Matzov, Donna; Yonath, Ada

    2015-07-06

    We have developed a collagen-mRNA platform for controllable protein production that is intended to be less prone to the problems associated with commonly used mRNA therapy as well as with collagen skin-healing procedures. A collagen mimic was constructed according to a recombinant method and was used as scaffold for translating mRNA chains into proteins. Cysteines were genetically inserted into the collagen chain at positions allowing efficient ribosome translation activity while minimizing mRNA misfolding and degradation. Enhanced green fluorescence protein (eGFP) mRNA bound to collagen was successfully translated by cell-free Escherichia coli ribosomes. This system enabled an accurate control of specific protein synthesis by monitoring expression time and level. Luciferase-mRNA was also translated on collagen scaffold by eukaryotic cell extracts. Thus we have demonstrated the feasibility of controllable protein synthesis on collagen scaffolds by ribosomal machinery.

  3. Content of intrinsic disorder influences the outcome of cell-free protein synthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tokmakov, Alexander A; Kurotani, Atsushi; Ikeda, Mariko; Terazawa, Yumiko; Shirouzu, Mikako; Stefanov, Vasily; Sakurai, Tetsuya; Yokoyama, Shigeyuki

    2015-09-11

    Cell-free protein synthesis is used to produce proteins with various structural traits. Recent bioinformatics analyses indicate that more than half of eukaryotic proteins possess long intrinsically disordered regions. However, no systematic study concerning the connection between intrinsic disorder and expression success of cell-free protein synthesis has been presented until now. To address this issue, we examined correlations of the experimentally observed cell-free protein expression yields with the contents of intrinsic disorder bioinformatically predicted in the expressed sequences. This analysis revealed strong relationships between intrinsic disorder and protein amenability to heterologous cell-free expression. On the one hand, elevated disorder content was associated with the increased ratio of soluble expression. On the other hand, overall propensity for detectable protein expression decreased with disorder content. We further demonstrated that these tendencies are rooted in some distinct features of intrinsically disordered regions, such as low hydrophobicity, elevated surface accessibility and high abundance of sequence motifs for proteolytic degradation, including sites of ubiquitination and PEST sequences. Our findings suggest that identification of intrinsically disordered regions in the expressed amino acid sequences can be of practical use for predicting expression success and optimizing cell-free protein synthesis.

  4. Effect of transcutaneous electrical muscle stimulation on postoperative muscle mass and protein synthesis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vinge, O; Edvardsen, L; Jensen, F

    1996-01-01

    In an experimental study, 13 patients undergoing major elective abdominal surgery were given postoperative transcutaneous electrical muscle stimulation (TEMS) to the quadriceps femoris muscle on one leg; the opposite leg served as control. Changes in cross-sectional area (CSA) and muscle protein...... muscle protein synthesis and muscle mass after abdominal surgery and should be evaluated in other catabolic states with muscle wasting....... synthesis were assessed by computed tomography and ribosome analysis of percutaneous muscle biopsies before surgery and on the sixth postoperative day. The percentage of polyribosomes in the ribosome suspension decreased significantly (P

  5. Rational design and asymmetric synthesis of potent and neurotrophic ligands for FK506-binding proteins (FKBPs).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pomplun, Sebastian; Wang, Yansong; Kirschner, Alexander; Kozany, Christian; Bracher, Andreas; Hausch, Felix

    2015-01-01

    To create highly efficient inhibitors for FK506-binding proteins, a new asymmetric synthesis for pro-(S)-C(5) -branched [4.3.1] aza-amide bicycles was developed. The key step of the synthesis is an HF-driven N-acyliminium cyclization. Functionalization of the C(5)  moiety resulted in novel protein contacts with the psychiatric risk factor FKBP51, which led to a more than 280-fold enhancement in affinity. The most potent ligands facilitated the differentiation of N2a neuroblastoma cells with low nanomolar potency.

  6. Quassinoid inhibition of AP-1 function does not correlate with cytotoxicity or protein synthesis inhibition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beutler, John A; Kang, Moon-Il; Robert, Francis; Clement, Jason A; Pelletier, Jerry; Colburn, Nancy H; McKee, Tawnya C; Goncharova, Ekaterina; McMahon, James B; Henrich, Curtis J

    2009-03-27

    Several quassinoids were identified in a high-throughput screening assay as inhibitors of the transcription factor AP-1. Further biological characterization revealed that while their effect was not specific to AP-1, protein synthesis inhibition and cell growth assays were inconsistent with a mechanism of simple protein synthesis inhibition. Numerous plant extracts from the plant family Simaroubaceae were also identified in the same screen; bioassay-guided fractionation of one extract (Ailanthus triphylla) yielded two known quassinoids, ailanthinone (3) and glaucarubinone (4), which were also identified in the pure compound screening procedure.

  7. PAPP5 is involved in the tetrapyrrole mediated plastid signalling during chloroplast development.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juan de Dios Barajas-López

    Full Text Available The initiation of chloroplast development in the light is dependent on nuclear encoded components. The nuclear genes encoding key components in the photosynthetic machinery are regulated by signals originating in the plastids. These plastid signals play an essential role in the regulation of photosynthesis associated nuclear genes (PhANGs when proplastids develop into chloroplasts. One of the plastid signals is linked to the tetrapyrrole biosynthesis and accumulation of the intermediates the Mg-ProtoIX and its methyl ester Mg-ProtoIX-ME. Phytochrome-Associated Protein Phosphatase 5 (PAPP5 was isolated in a previous study as a putative Mg-ProtoIX interacting protein. In order to elucidate if there is a biological link between PAPP5 and the tetrapyrrole mediated signal we generated double mutants between the Arabidopsis papp5 and the crd mutants. The crd mutant over-accumulates Mg-ProtoIX and Mg-ProtoIX-ME and the tetrapyrrole accumulation triggers retrograde signalling. The crd mutant exhibits repression of PhANG expression, altered chloroplast morphology and a pale phenotype. However, in the papp5crd double mutant, the crd phenotype is restored and papp5crd accumulated wild type levels of chlorophyll, developed proper chloroplasts and showed normal induction of PhANG expression in response to light. Tetrapyrrole feeding experiments showed that PAPP5 is required to respond correctly to accumulation of tetrapyrroles in the cell and that PAPP5 is most likely a component in the plastid signalling pathway down stream of the tetrapyrrole Mg-ProtoIX/Mg-ProtoIX-ME. Inhibition of phosphatase activity phenocopied the papp5crd phenotype in the crd single mutant demonstrating that PAPP5 phosphatase activity is essential to mediate the retrograde signal and to suppress PhANG expression in the crd mutant. Thus, our results suggest that PAPP5 receives an inbalance in the tetrapyrrole biosynthesis through the accumulation of Mg-ProtoIX and acts as a negative

  8. Membrane protein synthesis in cell-free systems: from bio-mimetic systems to bio-membranes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sachse, Rita; Dondapati, Srujan K; Fenz, Susanne F; Schmidt, Thomas; Kubick, Stefan

    2014-08-25

    When taking up the gauntlet of studying membrane protein functionality, scientists are provided with a plethora of advantages, which can be exploited for the synthesis of these difficult-to-express proteins by utilizing cell-free protein synthesis systems. Due to their hydrophobicity, membrane proteins have exceptional demands regarding their environment to ensure correct functionality. Thus, the challenge is to find the appropriate hydrophobic support that facilitates proper membrane protein folding. So far, various modes of membrane protein synthesis have been presented. Here, we summarize current state-of-the-art methodologies of membrane protein synthesis in biomimetic-supported systems. The correct folding and functionality of membrane proteins depend in many cases on their integration into a lipid bilayer and subsequent posttranslational modification. We highlight cell-free systems utilizing the advantages of biological membranes.

  9. Quantifying protein synthesis and degradation in Arabidopsis by dynamic 13CO2 labeling and analysis of enrichment in individual amino acids in their free pools and in protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ishihara, Hirofumi; Obata, Toshihiro; Sulpice, Ronan; Fernie, Alisdair R; Stitt, Mark

    2015-05-01

    Protein synthesis and degradation represent substantial costs during plant growth. To obtain a quantitative measure of the rate of protein synthesis and degradation, we supplied (13)CO2 to intact Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) Columbia-0 plants and analyzed enrichment in free amino acids and in amino acid residues in protein during a 24-h pulse and 4-d chase. While many free amino acids labeled slowly and incompletely, alanine showed a rapid rise in enrichment in the pulse and a decrease in the chase. Enrichment in free alanine was used to correct enrichment in alanine residues in protein and calculate the rate of protein synthesis. The latter was compared with the relative growth rate to estimate the rate of protein degradation. The relative growth rate was estimated from sequential determination of fresh weight, sequential images of rosette area, and labeling of glucose in the cell wall. In an 8-h photoperiod, protein synthesis and cell wall synthesis were 3-fold faster in the day than at night, protein degradation was slow (3%-4% d(-1)), and flux to growth and degradation resulted in a protein half-life of 3.5 d. In the starchless phosphoglucomutase mutant at night, protein synthesis was further decreased and protein degradation increased, while cell wall synthesis was totally inhibited, quantitatively accounting for the inhibition of growth in this mutant. We also investigated the rates of protein synthesis and degradation during leaf development, during growth at high temperature, and compared synthesis rates of Rubisco large and small subunits of in the light and dark.

  10. Neutrophil-activating protein (HP-NAP) versus ferritin (Pfr): comparison of synthesis in Helicobacter pylori.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dundon, W G; Polenghi, A; Del Guidice, G; Rappuoli, R; Montecucco, C

    2001-05-15

    We recently reported that the neutrophil-activating protein (HP-NAP) of Helicobacter pylori is capable of binding iron in vitro. To more fully understand the relationship between iron and HP-NAP the synthesis of HP-NAP was compared to that of Pfr, another iron-binding protein of H. pylori. Synthesis of HP-NAP and Pfr in growing cultures of H. pylori was analysed under iron depletion and iron, copper, nickel and zinc overload. The synthesis of HP-NAP and Pfr in H. pylori was also analysed under conditions of varying pH and oxidative stress. In addition, recombinant HP-NAP and Pfr were produced in Escherichia coli to assess the contribution of the two proteins to increased survival of E. coli under heavy metal overload. Our data reveal that both HP-NAP and Pfr accumulate in the stationary phase of growth. HP-NAP synthesis is not regulated by iron depletion or overload or by the presence of copper, nickel or zinc in liquid medium and it does not confer resistance to these metals when produced in E. coli. Except for an increase in the synthesis of Pfr at pH 5.7 neither the pH or oxidative stress conditions investigated had an affect on the synthesis of either protein. An increase in Pfr synthesis was observed under iron overload and a decrease was observed under conditions of copper, nickel and zinc overload confirming previous reports. Recombinant Pfr, as well as conferring resistance to iron and copper as previously reported, also conferred resistance to zinc overload when produced in E. coli.

  11. Calpain-2-mediated PTEN degradation contributes to BDNF-induced stimulation of dendritic protein synthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Briz, Victor; Hsu, Yu-Tien; Li, Yi; Lee, Erin; Bi, Xiaoning; Baudry, Michel

    2013-03-06

    Memory consolidation has been suggested to be protein synthesis dependent. Previous data indicate that BDNF-induced dendritic protein synthesis is a key event in memory formation through activation of the mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) pathway. BDNF also activates calpain, a calcium-dependent cysteine protease, which has been shown to play a critical role in learning and memory. This study was therefore directed at testing the hypothesis that calpain activity is required for BDNF-stimulated local protein synthesis, and at identifying the underlying molecular mechanism. In rat hippocampal slices, cortical synaptoneurosomes, and cultured neurons, BDNF-induced mTOR pathway activation and protein translation were blocked by calpain inhibition. BDNF treatment rapidly reduced levels of hamartin and tuberin, negative regulators of mTOR, in a calpain-dependent manner. Treatment of brain homogenates with purified calpain-1 and calpain-2 truncated both proteins. BDNF treatment increased phosphorylation of both Akt and ERK, but only the effect on Akt was blocked by calpain inhibition. Levels of phosphatase and tensin homolog deleted on chromosome 10 (PTEN), a phosphatase that inactivates Akt, were decreased following BDNF treatment, and calpain inhibition reversed this effect. Calpain-2, but not calpain-1, treatment of brain homogenates resulted in PTEN degradation. In cultured cortical neurons, knockdown of calpain-2, but not calpain-1, by small interfering RNA completely suppressed the effect of BDNF on mTOR activation. Our results reveal a critical role for calpain-2 in BDNF-induced mTOR signaling and dendritic protein synthesis via PTEN, hamartin, and tuberin degradation. This mechanism therefore provides a link between proteolysis and protein synthesis that might contribute to synaptic plasticity.

  12. Myocardial Reloading after Extracorporeal Membrane Oxygenation Alters Substrate Metabolism While Promoting Protein Synthesis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kajimoto, Masaki; Priddy, Colleen M.; Ledee, Dolena; Xu, Chun; Isern, Nancy G.; Olson, Aaron; Des Rosiers, Christine; Portman, Michael A.

    2013-08-19

    Extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (ECMO) unloads the heart providing a bridge to recovery in children after myocardial stunning. Mortality after ECMO remains high.Cardiac substrate and amino acid requirements upon weaning are unknown and may impact recovery. We assessed the hypothesis that ventricular reloading modulates both substrate entry into the citric acid cycle (CAC) and myocardial protein synthesis. Fourteen immature piglets (7.8-15.6 kg) were separated into 2 groups based on ventricular loading status: 8 hour-ECMO (UNLOAD) and post-wean from ECMO (RELOAD). We infused [2-13C]-pyruvate as an oxidative substrate and [13C6]-L-leucine, as a tracer of amino acid oxidation and protein synthesis into the coronary artery. RELOAD showed marked elevations in myocardial oxygen consumption above baseline and UNLOAD. Pyruvate uptake was markedly increased though RELOAD decreased pyruvate contribution to oxidative CAC metabolism.RELOAD also increased absolute concentrations of all CAC intermediates, while maintaining or increasing 13C-molar percent enrichment. RELOAD also significantly increased cardiac fractional protein synthesis rates by >70% over UNLOAD. Conclusions: RELOAD produced high energy metabolic requirement and rebound protein synthesis. Relative pyruvate decarboxylation decreased with RELOAD while promoting anaplerotic pyruvate carboxylation and amino acid incorporation into protein rather than to the CAC for oxidation. These perturbations may serve as therapeutic targets to improve contractile function after ECMO.

  13. The application of 2H2O to measure skeletal muscle protein synthesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fluckey James D

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Skeletal muscle protein synthesis has generally been determined by the precursor:product labeling approach using labeled amino acids (e.g., [13C]leucine or [13C]-, [15N]-, or [2H]phenylalanine as the tracers. Although reliable for determining rates of protein synthesis, this methodological approach requires experiments to be conducted in a controlled environment, and as a result, has limited our understanding of muscle protein renewal under free-living conditions over extended periods of time (i.e., integrative/cumulative assessments. An alternative tracer, 2H2O, has been successfully used to measure rates of muscle protein synthesis in mice, rats, fish and humans. Moreover, perturbations such as feeding and exercise have been included in these measurements without exclusion of common environmental and biological factors. In this review, we discuss the principle behind using 2H2O to measure muscle protein synthesis and highlight recent investigations that have examined the effects of feeding and exercise. The framework provided in this review should assist muscle biologists in designing experiments that advance our understanding of conditions in which anabolism is altered (e.g., exercise, feeding, growth, debilitating and metabolic pathologies.

  14. Protein synthesis patterns of Paracoccidiodes brasiliensis isolates in stage-specific forms and during cellular differentiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salem-Izacc, S M; Jesuino, R S; Brito, W A; Pereira, M; Felipe, M S; Soares, C M

    1997-01-01

    In this paper we compared the protein synthesis patterns of Paracoccidioides brasiliensis isolates. The protein profiles were compared for both yeast and mycelial forms and similarity analysis among them was performed by calculating similarity matrices and grouping the isolates in dendrograms. The examined isolates exhibited highly variable cellular morphology at 36 degrees C, when typical yeast cells were expected. On the other hand, at 26 degrees C all the isolates showed mycelial morphology. The analysis of protein synthesis profiles made it possible to cluster the P. brasiliensis isolates into groups that correlated with the morphological data. Interestingly, growth at 36 degrees C strongly decreased the heterogeneity of protein synthesis patterns seen in mycelial isolates. It was possible to cluster the isolates grown at 36 degrees C in three groups based on their two-dimensional protein synthesis analysis. The similarity index observed among the mycelial isolates was lower than that obtained with yeast cells, suggesting a more homogenous gene expression pattern in the host-adapted form than in the saprobic phase.

  15. Sulforaphane, a cruciferous vegetable-derived isothiocyanate, inhibits protein synthesis in human prostate cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wiczk, Aleksandra; Hofman, Dagmara; Konopa, Grażyna; Herman-Antosiewicz, Anna

    2012-08-01

    Sulforaphane (SFN) is a compound derived from cruciferous plants. Its anticancer properties have been demonstrated both, in cancer cell lines as well as tumors in animal models. It has been shown that SFN inhibits cell proliferation, induces apoptosis, autophagy, and sensitizes cancer cells to therapies. As induction of catabolic processes is often related to perturbation in protein synthesis we aimed to investigate the impact of SFN on this process in PC-3 human prostate cancer cells. In the present study we show that SFN inhibits protein synthesis in PC-3 cells in a dose- and time-dependent manner which is accompanied by a decreased phosphorylation of mTOR substrates. Translation inhibition is independent of mitochondria-derived ROS as it is observed in PC-3 derivatives devoid of functional mitochondrial respiratory chain (Rho0 cells). Although SFN affects mitochondria and slightly decreases glycolysis, the ATP level is maintained on the level characteristic for control cells. Inhibition of protein synthesis might be a protective response of prostate cancer cells to save energy. However, translation inhibition contributes to the death of PC-3 cells due to decreased level of a short-lived protein, survivin. Overexpression of this anti-apoptotic factor protects PC-3 cells against SFN cytotoxicity. Protein synthesis inhibition by SFN is not restricted to prostate cancer cells as we observed similar effect in SKBR-3 breast cancer cell line. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Effects of phenylalanine and threonine oligopeptides on milk protein synthesis in cultured bovine mammary epithelial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, M M; Wu, Y M; Liu, H Y; Liu, J X

    2015-04-01

    This study was conducted to investigate the effects of phenylalanine (Phe) and threonine (Thr) oligopeptides on αs1 casein gene expression and milk protein synthesis in bovine mammary epithelial cells. Primary mammary epithelial cells were obtained from Holstein dairy cows and incubated in Dulbecco's modified Eagle's medium-F12 medium (DMEM/F12) containing lactogenic hormones (prolactin and glucocorticoids). Free Phe (117 μg/ml) was substituted partly with peptide-bound Phe (phenylalanylphenylalanine, phenylalanyl threonine, threonyl-phenylalanyl-phenylalanine) in the experimental media. After incubation with experimental medium, cells were collected for gene expression analysis and medium was collected for milk protein or amino acid determination. The results showed that peptide-bound Phe at 10% (11.7 μg/ml) significantly enhanced αs1 casein gene expression and milk protein synthesis as compared with equivalent amount of free Phe. When 10% Phe was replaced by phenylalanylphenylalanine, the disappearance of most essential amino acids increased significantly, and gene expression of peptide transporter 2 and some amino acid transporters was significantly enhanced. These results indicate that the Phe and Thr oligopeptides are important for milk protein synthesis, and peptide-bound amino acids could be utilised more efficiently in milk protein synthesis than the equivalent amount of free amino acids.

  17. Herpes simplex virus types 1 and 2 induce shutoff of host protein synthesis by different mechanisms in Friend erythroleukemia cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hill, T M; Sinden, R R; Sadler, J R

    1983-01-01

    Herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1) and HSV-2 disrupt host protein synthesis after viral infection. We have treated both viral types with agents which prevent transcription of the viral genome and used these treated viruses to infect induced Friend erythroleukemia cells. By measuring the changes in globin synthesis after infection, we have determined whether expression of the viral genome precedes the shutoff of host protein synthesis or whether the inhibitor molecule enters the cells as part of the virion. HSV-2-induced shutoff of host protein synthesis was insensitive to the effects of shortwave (254-nm) UV light and actinomycin D. Both of the treatments inhibited HSV-1-induced host protein shutoff. Likewise, treatment of HSV-1 with the cross-linking agent 4,5',8-trimethylpsoralen and longwave (360-nm) UV light prevented HSV-1 from inhibiting cellular protein synthesis. Treatment of HSV-2 with 4,5',8-trimethylpsoralen did not affect the ability of the virus to interfere with host protein synthesis, except at the highest doses of longwave UV light. It was determined that the highest longwave UV dosage damaged the HSV-2 virion as well as cross-linking the viral DNA. The results suggest that HSV-2 uses a virion-associated component to inhibit host protein synthesis and that HSV-1 requires the expression of the viral genome to cause cellular protein synthesis shutoff.

  18. L-1-C-11-tyrosine PET in patients with laryngeal carcinomas : Comparison of standardized uptake value and protein synthesis rate

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Boer, [No Value; Pruim, J; van der Laan, BFAM; Que, TH; Willemsen, ATM; Albers, FWJ; Vaalburg, W

    2003-01-01

    PET with L-1-C-11-tyrosine (TYR) can measure and quantify increased protein synthesis in tumor tissue in vivo. For quantification of the protein synthesis rate (PSR), arterial cannulation with repeated blood sampling to obtain the plasma input function and a dynamic TYR PET study to calculate a time

  19. The antituberculosis antibiotic capreomycin inhibits protein synthesis by disrupting interaction between ribosomal proteins L12 and L10.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Yuan; Li, Yan; Zhu, Ningyu; Han, Yanxing; Jiang, Wei; Wang, Yanchang; Si, Shuyi; Jiang, Jiandong

    2014-01-01

    Capreomycin is a second-line drug for multiple-drug-resistant tuberculosis (TB). However, with increased use in clinics, the therapeutic efficiency of capreomycin is decreasing. To better understand TB resistance to capreomycin, we have done research to identify the molecular target of capreomycin. Mycobacterium tuberculosis ribosomal proteins L12 and L10 interact with each other and constitute the stalk of the 50S ribosomal subunit, which recruits initiation and elongation factors during translation. Hence, the L12-L10 interaction is considered to be essential for ribosomal function and protein synthesis. Here we provide evidence showing that capreomycin inhibits the L12-L10 interaction by using an established L12-L10 interaction assay. Overexpression of L12 and/or L10 in M. smegmatis, a species close to M. tuberculosis, increases the MIC of capreomycin. Moreover, both elongation factor G-dependent GTPase activity and ribosome-mediated protein synthesis are inhibited by capreomycin. When protein synthesis was blocked with thiostrepton, however, the bactericidal activity of capreomycin was restrained. All of these results suggest that capreomycin seems to inhibit TB by interrupting the L12-L10 interaction. This finding might provide novel clues for anti-TB drug discovery.

  20. Potential Genes for Regulation of Milk Protein Synthesis in Dairy Goat Mammary Gland

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Chen Dan; Zhang Na; Nan Xue-mei; Li Qing-zhang; Gao Xue-jun

    2016-01-01

    The lactating mammary gland is a prodigious protein-producing factory, but the milk protein synthesis mechanisms are not well understood. The major objective of this paper was to elucidate which genes and pathways were involved in the regulation of milk protein synthesis in the dairy goat mammary gland. Total 36 primiparous Guanzhong dairy goats were allotted in 12 groups according to their mammary development stages: days 90 and 150 of virgin, days 30, 90, and 150 of pregnancy, days 1, 10, 35, and 60 of lactation and days 3, 7, and 21 of involution (three animals per group). Mammary tissue RNA was isolated for quantitative real-time RT-PCR of four casein genes alpha-s1 casein (CSN1S1), alpha-s2 casein (CSN1S2), beta-casein (CSN2) and casein kappa (CSN3), four whey protein genes lactoglobulin (LGB), lactalbumin (LALBA), lactofarrin (LTF), and Whey acidic protein (WAP) and the genes which were potentially to regulate dairy goat milk protein synthesis at the level of transcription or translation [prolactin receptor (PRLR), AKT1, signal transducers and activators of transcription 5 (STAT5), E74-Like Factor 5 (ELF5), eukaryotic translation initiation factor 4E binding protein 1 (EIF4E-BP1), S6kinase (S6K) and caveolin 1]. The results showed that all genes were up-regulated in lactation period. The expressions of PRLR, AKT1, STAT5, ELF5, and S6K were similar to mRNA expressions of milk proteins. Our results indicated that milk protein synthesis in dairy goat mammary gland was possibly regulated by these genes.

  1. Differential regulation of protein synthesis by amino acids and insulin in peripheral and visceral tissues of neonatal pigs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suryawan, Agus; O'Connor, Pamela M J; Bush, Jill A; Nguyen, Hanh V; Davis, Teresa A

    2009-05-01

    The high efficiency of protein deposition during the neonatal period is driven by high rates of protein synthesis, which are maximally stimulated after feeding. In the current study, we examined the individual roles of amino acids and insulin in the regulation of protein synthesis in peripheral and visceral tissues of the neonate by performing pancreatic glucose-amino acid clamps in overnight-fasted 7-day-old pigs. We infused pigs (n = 8-12/group) with insulin at 0, 10, 22, and 110 ng kg(-0.66) min(-1) to achieve approximately 0, 2, 6 and 30 muU ml(-1) insulin so as to simulate below fasting, fasting, intermediate, and fed insulin levels, respectively. At each insulin dose, amino acids were maintained at the fasting or fed level. In conjunction with the highest insulin dose, amino acids were also allowed to fall below the fasting level. Tissue protein synthesis was measured using a flooding dose of L: -[4-(3)H] phenylalanine. Both insulin and amino acids increased fractional rates of protein synthesis in longissimus dorsi, gastrocnemius, masseter, and diaphragm muscles. Insulin, but not amino acids, increased protein synthesis in the skin. Amino acids, but not insulin, increased protein synthesis in the liver, pancreas, spleen, and lung and tended to increase protein synthesis in the jejunum and kidney. Neither insulin nor amino acids altered protein synthesis in the stomach. The results suggest that the stimulation of protein synthesis by feeding in most tissues of the neonate is regulated by the post-prandial rise in amino acids. However, the feeding-induced stimulation of protein synthesis in skeletal muscles is independently mediated by insulin as well as amino acids.

  2. Energetic costs of protein synthesis do not differ between red- and white-blooded Antarctic notothenioid fishes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lewis, Johanne M; Grove, Theresa J; O'Brien, Kristin M

    2015-09-01

    Antarctic icefishes (Family Channichthyidae) within the suborder Notothenioidei lack the oxygen-binding protein hemoglobin (Hb), and six of the 16 species of icefishes lack myoglobin (Mb) in heart ventricle. As iron-centered proteins, Hb and Mb can promote the formation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) that damage biological macromolecules. Consistent with this, our previous studies have shown that icefishes have lower levels of oxidized proteins and lipids in oxidative muscle compared to red-blooded notothenioids. Because oxidized proteins are usually degraded by the 20S proteasome and must be resynthesized, we hypothesized that rates of protein synthesis would be lower in icefishes compared to red-blooded notothenioids, thereby reducing the energetic costs of protein synthesis and conferring a benefit to the loss of Hb and Mb. Rates of protein synthesis were quantified in hearts, and the fraction of oxygen consumption devoted to protein synthesis was measured in isolated hepatocytes and cardiomyocytes of notothenioids differing in the expression of Hb and cardiac Mb. Neither rates of protein synthesis nor the energetic costs of protein synthesis differed among species, suggesting that red-blooded species do not degrade and replace oxidatively modified proteins at a higher rate compared to icefishes but rather, persist with higher levels of oxidized proteins.

  3. Cell-Free Protein Synthesis: Pros and Cons of Prokaryotic and Eukaryotic Systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zemella, Anne; Thoring, Lena; Hoffmeister, Christian; Kubick, Stefan

    2015-11-01

    From its start as a small-scale in vitro system to study fundamental translation processes, cell-free protein synthesis quickly rose to become a potent platform for the high-yield production of proteins. In contrast to classical in vivo protein expression, cell-free systems do not need time-consuming cloning steps, and the open nature provides easy manipulation of reaction conditions as well as high-throughput potential. Especially for the synthesis of difficult to express proteins, such as toxic and transmembrane proteins, cell-free systems are of enormous interest. The modification of the genetic code to incorporate non-canonical amino acids into the target protein in particular provides enormous potential in biotechnology and pharmaceutical research and is in the focus of many cell-free projects. Many sophisticated cell-free systems for manifold applications have been established. This review describes the recent advances in cell-free protein synthesis and details the expanding applications in this field. © 2015 The Authors. Published by Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA.

  4. Combinatorial codon scrambling enables scalable gene synthesis and amplification of repetitive proteins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Nicholas C.; Chilkoti, Ashutosh

    2016-04-01

    Most genes are synthesized using seamless assembly methods that rely on the polymerase chain reaction (PCR). However, PCR of genes encoding repetitive proteins either fails or generates nonspecific products. Motivated by the need to efficiently generate new protein polymers through high-throughput gene synthesis, here we report a codon-scrambling algorithm that enables the PCR-based gene synthesis of repetitive proteins by exploiting the codon redundancy of amino acids and finding the least-repetitive synonymous gene sequence. We also show that the codon-scrambling problem is analogous to the well-known travelling salesman problem, and obtain an exact solution to it by using De Bruijn graphs and a modern mixed integer linear programme solver. As experimental proof of the utility of this approach, we use it to optimize the synthetic genes for 19 repetitive proteins, and show that the gene fragments are amenable to PCR-based gene assembly and recombinant expression.

  5. Combinatorial codon scrambling enables scalable gene synthesis and amplification of repetitive proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Nicholas C; Chilkoti, Ashutosh

    2016-04-01

    Most genes are synthesized using seamless assembly methods that rely on the polymerase chain reaction (PCR). However, PCR of genes encoding repetitive proteins either fails or generates nonspecific products. Motivated by the need to efficiently generate new protein polymers through high-throughput gene synthesis, here we report a codon-scrambling algorithm that enables the PCR-based gene synthesis of repetitive proteins by exploiting the codon redundancy of amino acids and finding the least-repetitive synonymous gene sequence. We also show that the codon-scrambling problem is analogous to the well-known travelling salesman problem, and obtain an exact solution to it by using De Bruijn graphs and a modern mixed integer linear programme solver. As experimental proof of the utility of this approach, we use it to optimize the synthetic genes for 19 repetitive proteins, and show that the gene fragments are amenable to PCR-based gene assembly and recombinant expression.

  6. A highly stable plastidic-type ferredoxin-NADP(H reductase in the pathogenic bacterium Leptospira interrogans.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniela L Catalano-Dupuy

    Full Text Available Leptospira interrogans is a bacterium that is capable of infecting animals and humans, and its infection causes leptospirosis with a range of symptoms from flu-like to severe illness and death. Despite being a bacteria, Leptospira interrogans contains a plastidic class ferredoxin-NADP(H reductase (FNR with high catalytic efficiency, at difference from the bacterial class FNRs. These flavoenzymes catalyze the electron transfer between NADP(H and ferredoxins or flavodoxins. The inclusion of a plastidic FNR in Leptospira metabolism and in its parasitic life cycle is not currently understood. Bioinformatic analyses of the available genomic and proteins sequences showed that the presence of this enzyme in nonphotosynthetic bacteria is restricted to the Leptospira genus and that a [4Fe-4S] ferredoxin (LB107 encoded by the Leptospira genome may be the natural substrate of the enzyme. Leptospira FNR (LepFNR displayed high diaphorase activity using artificial acceptors and functioned as a ferric reductase. LepFNR displayed cytochrome c reductase activity with the Leptospira LB107 ferredoxin with an optimum at pH 6.5. Structural stability analysis demonstrates that LepFNR is one of the most stable FNRs analyzed to date. The persistence of a native folded LepFNR structure was detected in up to 6 M urea, a condition in which the enzyme retains 38% activity. In silico analysis indicates that the high LepFNR stability might be due to robust interactions between the FAD and the NADP(+ domains of the protein. The limited bacterial distribution of plastidic class FNRs and the biochemical and structural properties of LepFNR emphasize the uniqueness of this enzyme in the Leptospira metabolism. Our studies show that in L. interrogans a plastidic-type FNR exchanges electrons with a bacterial-type ferredoxin, process which has not been previously observed in nature.

  7. A highly stable plastidic-type ferredoxin-NADP(H) reductase in the pathogenic bacterium Leptospira interrogans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Catalano-Dupuy, Daniela L; Musumeci, Matías A; López-Rivero, Arleth; Ceccarelli, Eduardo A

    2011-01-01

    Leptospira interrogans is a bacterium that is capable of infecting animals and humans, and its infection causes leptospirosis with a range of symptoms from flu-like to severe illness and death. Despite being a bacteria, Leptospira interrogans contains a plastidic class ferredoxin-NADP(H) reductase (FNR) with high catalytic efficiency, at difference from the bacterial class FNRs. These flavoenzymes catalyze the electron transfer between NADP(H) and ferredoxins or flavodoxins. The inclusion of a plastidic FNR in Leptospira metabolism and in its parasitic life cycle is not currently understood. Bioinformatic analyses of the available genomic and proteins sequences showed that the presence of this enzyme in nonphotosynthetic bacteria is restricted to the Leptospira genus and that a [4Fe-4S] ferredoxin (LB107) encoded by the Leptospira genome may be the natural substrate of the enzyme. Leptospira FNR (LepFNR) displayed high diaphorase activity using artificial acceptors and functioned as a ferric reductase. LepFNR displayed cytochrome c reductase activity with the Leptospira LB107 ferredoxin with an optimum at pH 6.5. Structural stability analysis demonstrates that LepFNR is one of the most stable FNRs analyzed to date. The persistence of a native folded LepFNR structure was detected in up to 6 M urea, a condition in which the enzyme retains 38% activity. In silico analysis indicates that the high LepFNR stability might be due to robust interactions between the FAD and the NADP(+) domains of the protein. The limited bacterial distribution of plastidic class FNRs and the biochemical and structural properties of LepFNR emphasize the uniqueness of this enzyme in the Leptospira metabolism. Our studies show that in L. interrogans a plastidic-type FNR exchanges electrons with a bacterial-type ferredoxin, process which has not been previously observed in nature.

  8. Discovery, application and protein engineering of Baeyer-Villiger monooxygenases for organic synthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balke, Kathleen; Kadow, Maria; Mallin, Hendrik; Sass, Stefan; Bornscheuer, Uwe T

    2012-08-21

    Baeyer-Villiger monooxygenases (BVMOs) are useful enzymes for organic synthesis as they enable the direct and highly regio- and stereoselective oxidation of ketones to esters or lactones simply with molecular oxygen. This contribution covers novel concepts such as searching in protein sequence databases using distinct motifs to discover new Baeyer-Villiger monooxygenases as well as high-throughput assays to facilitate protein engineering in order to improve BVMOs with respect to substrate range, enantioselectivity, thermostability and other properties. Recent examples for the application of BVMOs in synthetic organic synthesis illustrate the broad potential of these biocatalysts. Furthermore, methods to facilitate the more efficient use of BVMOs in organic synthesis by applying e.g. improved cofactor regeneration, substrate feed and in situ product removal or immobilization are covered in this perspective.

  9. Applications of cell-free protein synthesis in synthetic biology: Interfacing bio-machinery with synthetic environments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Kyung-Ho; Kim, Dong-Myung

    2013-11-01

    Synthetic biology is built on the synthesis, engineering, and assembly of biological parts. Proteins are the first components considered for the construction of systems with designed biological functions because proteins carry out most of the biological functions and chemical reactions inside cells. Protein synthesis is considered to comprise the most basic levels of the hierarchical structure of synthetic biology. Cell-free protein synthesis has emerged as a powerful technology that can potentially transform the concept of bioprocesses. With the ability to harness the synthetic power of biology without many of the constraints of cell-based systems, cell-free protein synthesis enables the rapid creation of protein molecules from diverse sources of genetic information. Cell-free protein synthesis is virtually free from the intrinsic constraints of cell-based methods and offers greater flexibility in system design and manipulability of biological synthetic machinery. Among its potential applications, cell-free protein synthesis can be combined with various man-made devices for rapid functional analysis of genomic sequences. This review covers recent efforts to integrate cell-free protein synthesis with various reaction devices and analytical platforms. Copyright © 2013 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  10. Comparative analysis of the complete sequence of the plastid genome of Parthenium argentatum and identification of DNA barcodes to differentiate Parthenium species and lines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cornish Katrina

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Parthenium argentatum (guayule is an industrial crop that produces latex, which was recently commercialized as a source of latex rubber safe for people with Type I latex allergy. The complete plastid genome of P. argentatum was sequenced. The sequence provides important information useful for genetic engineering strategies. Comparison to the sequences of plastid genomes from three other members of the Asteraceae, Lactuca sativa, Guitozia abyssinica and Helianthus annuus revealed details of the evolution of the four genomes. Chloroplast-specific DNA barcodes were developed for identification of Parthenium species and lines. Results The complete plastid genome of P. argentatum is 152,803 bp. Based on the overall comparison of individual protein coding genes with those in L. sativa, G. abyssinica and H. annuus, we demonstrate that the P. argentatum chloroplast genome sequence is most closely related to that of H. annuus. Similar to chloroplast genomes in G. abyssinica, L. sativa and H. annuus, the plastid genome of P. argentatum has a large 23 kb inversion with a smaller 3.4 kb inversion, within the large inversion. Using the matK and psbA-trnH spacer chloroplast DNA barcodes, three of the four Parthenium species tested, P. tomentosum, P. hysterophorus and P. schottii, can be differentiated from P. argentatum. In addition, we identified lines within P. argentatum. Conclusion The genome sequence of the P. argentatum chloroplast will enrich the sequence resources of plastid genomes in commercial crops. The availability of the complete plastid genome sequence may facilitate transformation efficiency by using the precise sequence of endogenous flanking sequences and regulatory elements in chloroplast transformation vectors. The DNA barcoding study forms the foundation for genetic identification of commercially significant lines of P. argentatum that are important for producing latex.

  11. De novo assembly of the carrot mitochondrial genome using next generation sequencing of whole genomic DNA provides first evidence of DNA transfer into an angiosperm plastid genome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Iorizzo Massimo

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Sequence analysis of organelle genomes has revealed important aspects of plant cell evolution. The scope of this study was to develop an approach for de novo assembly of the carrot mitochondrial genome using next generation sequence data from total genomic DNA. Results Sequencing data from a carrot 454 whole genome library were used to develop a de novo assembly of the mitochondrial genome. Development of a new bioinformatic tool allowed visualizing contig connections and elucidation of the de novo assembly. Southern hybridization demonstrated recombination across two large repeats. Genome annotation allowed identification of 44 protein coding genes, three rRNA and 17 tRNA. Identification of the plastid genome sequence allowed organelle genome comparison. Mitochondrial intergenic sequence analysis allowed detection of a fragment of DNA specific to the carrot plastid genome. PCR amplification and sequence analysis across different Apiaceae species revealed consistent conservation of this fragment in the mitochondrial genomes and an insertion in Daucus plastid genomes, giving evidence of a mitochondrial to plastid transfer of DNA. Sequence similarity with a retrotransposon element suggests a possibility that a transposon-like event transferred this sequence into the plastid genome. Conclusions This study confirmed that whole genome sequencing is a practical approach for de novo assembly of higher plant mitochondrial genomes. In addition, a new aspect of intercompartmental genome interaction was reported providing the first evidence for DNA transfer into an angiosperm plastid genome. The approach used here could be used more broadly to sequence and assemble mitochondrial genomes of diverse species. This information will allow us to better understand intercompartmental interactions and cell evolution.

  12. Understanding of Protein Synthesis in a Living Cell

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mustapha, Y.; Muhammad, S.

    2006-01-01

    The assembly of proteins takes place in the cytoplasm of a cell. There are three main steps. In initiation, far left, all the necessary parts of the process are brought together by a small molecule called a ribosome. During elongation, amino acids, the building blocks of proteins, are joined to one another in a long chain. The sequence in which…

  13. Solid-phase synthesis of an apoptosis-inducing tetrapeptide mimicking the Smac protein

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Le Quement, Sebastian Thordal; Ishøy, Mette; Petersen, Mette Terp;

    2011-01-01

    An approach for the solid-phase synthesis of apoptosis-inducing Smac peptidomimetics is presented. Using a Rink linker strategy, tetrapeptides mimicking the N-4-terminal residue of the Smac protein [(N-Me)AVPF sequence] were synthesized on PEGA resin in excellent purities and yields. Following tw...

  14. Absorption tuning of the green fluorescent protein chromophore: synthesis and studies of model compounds

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brøndsted Nielsen, Mogens; Andersen, Lars Henrik; Rinza, Tomás Rocha

    2011-01-01

    The green fluorescent protein (GFP) chromophore is a heterocyclic compound containing a p-hydroxybenzylidine attached to an imidazol-5(4H)-one ring. This review covers the synthesis of a variety of model systems for elucidating the intrinsic optical properties of the chromophore in the gas phase...

  15. Problem-Solving Test: RNA and Protein Synthesis in Bacteriophage-Infected "E. coli" Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szeberenyi, Jozsef

    2008-01-01

    The classic experiment presented in this problem-solving test was designed to identify the template molecules of translation by analyzing the synthesis of phage proteins in "Escherichia coli" cells infected with bacteriophage T4. The work described in this test led to one of the most seminal discoveries of early molecular biology: it dealt a…

  16. Origins of tmRNA: the missing link in the birth of protein synthesis?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Macé, Kevin; Gillet, Reynald

    2016-09-30

    The RNA world hypothesis refers to the early period on earth in which RNA was central in assuring both genetic continuity and catalysis. The end of this era coincided with the development of the genetic code and protein synthesis, symbolized by the apparition of the first non-random messenger RNA (mRNA). Modern transfer-messenger RNA (tmRNA) is a unique hybrid molecule which has the properties of both mRNA and transfer RNA (tRNA). It acts as a key molecule during trans-translation, a major quality control pathway of modern bacterial protein synthesis. tmRNA shares many common characteristics with ancestral RNA. Here, we present a model in which proto-tmRNAs were the first molecules on earth to support non-random protein synthesis, explaining the emergence of early genetic code. In this way, proto-tmRNA could be the missing link between the first mRNA and tRNA molecules and modern ribosome-mediated protein synthesis.

  17. Effect of short 5' UTRs on protein synthesis in two biological kingdoms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teilhet, M; Rashid, M B; Hawk, A; Al-Qahtani, A; Mensa-Wilmot, K

    1998-11-05

    Efficient ribosomal protein synthesis is dependent on cis-acting elements in the 5' untranslated region (UTR) of mRNAs. Between prokaryotes and eukaryotes, the sequence and location of these elements differ to the extent of not being functionally interchangeable. We explored the possibility of constructing bifunctional UTRs that could direct translation in both prokaryotes and eukaryotes. A variant of a UTR from ner of phage Mu (ner-ACC) enhanced protein synthesis in a rabbit reticulocyte lysate, and it was compared to a lacZ-CTA, containing the lambda cro RBS and the Escherichia coli lacZ spacer. Several mutants in the -3 to -1 regions of both lacZ-CTA and ner-ACC were tested in rabbit reticulocyte lysate and E. coli to select UTRs that were optimized simultaneously for both biological kingdoms. The lacZ-ATC proved 217-fold more effective than ner-ACC in this cross-species ability to enhance translation. The lacZ-ACC and ner-ATC were 83- and 78-fold, respectively, better than ner-ACC. We conclude that short UTRs (12-15 nt in length) can be fine-tuned in the -9 to -1 regions to enhance protein synthesis concurrently in prokaryotes and eukaryotes. In related studies, we show that nt at the -3 to -1 region of mRNAs exert an enormous impact on synthesis of proteins in E. coli.

  18. In Profile: Models of Ribosome Biogenesis Defects and Regulation of Protein Synthesis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Essers, P.B.M.

    2013-01-01

    Ribosomes are the mediators of protein synthesis in the cell and therefore crucial to proper cell function. In addition, ribosomes are highly abundant, with ribosomal RNA making up 80% of the RNA in the cell. A large amount of resources go into maintaining this pool of ribosomes, so ribosome biogene

  19. REGULATION OF MUSCLE GLYCOGEN REPLETION, MUSCLE PROTEIN SYNTHESIS AND REPAIR FOLLOWING EXERCISE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John L. Ivy

    2004-09-01

    Full Text Available Recovery from prolonged strenuous exercise requires that depleted fuel stores be replenished, that damaged tissue be repaired and that training adaptations be initiated. Critical to these processes are the type, amount and timing of nutrient intake. Muscle glycogen is an essential fuel for intense exercise, whether the exercise is of an aerobic or anaerobic nature. Glycogen synthesis is a relatively slow process, and therefore the restoration of muscle glycogen requires special considerations when there is limited time between training sessions or competition. To maximize the rate of muscle glycogen synthesis it is important to consume a carbohydrate supplement immediately post exercise, to continue to supplement at frequent intervals and to consume approximately 1.2 g carbohydrate·kg-1 body wt·h-1. Maximizing glycogen synthesis with less frequent supplementation and less carbohydrate can be achieved with the addition of protein to the carbohydrate supplement. This will also promote protein synthesis and reduce protein degradation, thus having the added benefit of stimulating muscle tissue repair and adaptation. Moreover, recent research suggests that consuming a carbohydrate/protein supplement post exercise will have a more positive influence on subsequent exercise performance than a carbohydrate supplement.

  20. Hormonal control of protein synthesis in the fat body of Leptinotarsa decemlineata

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dortland, J.F.

    1979-01-01

    This thesis deals with the hormonal control of protein synthesis in the female fat body of Leptinotarsa decemlineata Say. The results are discussed in relation to reproduction (obtained by rearing under long day conditions) and the preparation for diapause (obtained by rearing u

  1. Enhanced in vivo protein synthesis in circulating immune cells of ICU patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Januszkiewicz, Anna; Klaude, Maria; Loré, Karin; Andersson, Jan; Ringdén, Olle; Rooyackers, Olav; Wernerman, Jan

    2007-11-01

    Insufficient function of the immune system contributes to a poor prognosis in intensive care unit (ICU) patients. However, the immune system function is not easily monitored and evaluated. In vivo protein synthesis determination in immune competent cells offers a possibility to quantify immunological activation. The aim of this descriptive study was to determine the in vivo fractional protein synthesis rate (FSR) in immune cells of ICU patients during the initial phase of the critical illness. Patients (n = 20) on ventilator treatment in the general ICU were studied during their first week of ICU stay. FSR was determined in circulating T lymphocytes, mononuclear cells, the whole population of blood leukocytes, and in stationary immune cells of palatine tonsils during a 90-min period by a flooding technique. Healthy, adult subjects (n = 11), scheduled for elective ear, nose, and throat surgery served as a control group. The FSR in leukocytes and mononuclear cells of ICU patients was higher compared with the control group. In contrast, the FSR of circulating T lymphocytes and of tonsillar cells was not different from that in the healthy subjects. In summary, the ICU patients showed a distinct polarization of metabolic responses during the initial phase of the critical illness. The in vivo rate of protein synthesis was high in the circulating mononuclear cells and leukocytes, reflecting enhanced metabolic activity in these cell populations. Determination of the in vivo protein synthesis rate may be used as a tool to obtain additional information on activation of the immune system.

  2. Reconsolidation of a Context Long-Term Memory in the Terrestrial Snail Requires Protein Synthesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gainutdinova, Tatiana H.; Tagirova, Rosa R.; Ismailova, Asja I.; Muranova, Lyudmila N.; Samarova, Elena I.; Gainutdinov, Khalil L.; Balaban, Pavel M.

    2005-01-01

    We investigated the influence of the protein synthesis blocker anisomycin on contextual memory in the terrestrial snail "Helix." Prior to the training session, the behavioral responses in two contexts were similar. Two days after a session of electric shocks (5 d) in one context only, the context conditioning was observed as the significant…

  3. Using Simple Manipulatives to Improve Student Comprehension of a Complex Biological Process: Protein Synthesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guzman, Karen; Bartlett, John

    2012-01-01

    Biological systems and living processes involve a complex interplay of biochemicals and macromolecular structures that can be challenging for undergraduate students to comprehend and, thus, misconceptions abound. Protein synthesis, or translation, is an example of a biological process for which students often hold many misconceptions. This article…

  4. Inhibition of prefrontal protein synthesis following recall does not disrupt memory for trace fear conditioning

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dash Pramod K

    2006-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The extent of similarity between consolidation and reconsolidation is not yet fully understood. One of the differences noted is that not every brain region involved in consolidation exhibits reconsolidation. In trace fear conditioning, the hippocampus and the medial prefrontal cortex (mPFC are required for consolidation of long-term memory. We have previously demonstrated that trace fear memory is susceptible to infusion of the protein synthesis inhibitor anisomycin into the hippocampus following recall. In the present study, we examine whether protein synthesis inhibition in the mPFC following recall similarly results in the observation of reconsolidation of trace fear memory. Results Targeted intra-mPFC infusions of anisomycin or vehicle were performed immediately following recall of trace fear memory at 24 hours, or at 30 days, following training in a one-day or a two-day protocol. The present study demonstrates three key findings: 1 trace fear memory does not undergo protein synthesis dependent reconsolidation in the PFC, regardless of the intensity of the training, and 2 regardless of whether the memory is recent or remote, and 3 intra-mPFC inhibition of protein synthesis immediately following training impaired remote (30 days memory. Conclusion These results suggest that not all structures that participate in memory storage are involved in reconsolidation. Alternatively, certain types of memory-related information may reconsolidate, while other components of memory may not.

  5. Long lasting protein synthesis- and activity-dependent spine shrinkage and elimination after synaptic depression.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yazmín Ramiro-Cortés

    Full Text Available Neuronal circuits modify their response to synaptic inputs in an experience-dependent fashion. Increases in synaptic weights are accompanied by structural modifications, and activity dependent, long lasting growth of dendritic spines requires new protein synthesis. When multiple spines are potentiated within a dendritic domain, they show dynamic structural plasticity changes, indicating that spines can undergo bidirectional physical modifications. However, it is unclear whether protein synthesis dependent synaptic depression leads to long lasting structural changes. Here, we investigate the structural correlates of protein synthesis dependent long-term depression (LTD mediated by metabotropic glutamate receptors (mGluRs through two-photon imaging of dendritic spines on hippocampal pyramidal neurons. We find that induction of mGluR-LTD leads to robust and long lasting spine shrinkage and elimination that lasts for up to 24 hours. These effects depend on signaling through group I mGluRs, require protein synthesis, and activity. These data reveal a mechanism for long lasting remodeling of synaptic inputs, and offer potential insights into mental retardation.

  6. Problem-Solving Test: RNA and Protein Synthesis in Bacteriophage-Infected "E. coli" Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szeberenyi, Jozsef

    2008-01-01

    The classic experiment presented in this problem-solving test was designed to identify the template molecules of translation by analyzing the synthesis of phage proteins in "Escherichia coli" cells infected with bacteriophage T4. The work described in this test led to one of the most seminal discoveries of early molecular biology: it dealt a…

  7. EGF receptor transactivation in angiotensin II and endothelin control of vascular protein synthesis in vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beaucage, Pierre; Moreau, Pierre

    2004-11-01

    Endothelin represents a necessary intermediate of angiotensin II-induced resistance artery remodeling in hypertension. Recent data suggest that epidermal growth factor receptors are rapidly transactivated by angiotensin II stimulation to mediate its growth-promoting effects. Because endothelin also transactivates epidermal growth factor receptors in vitro, we studied the contribution of epidermal growth factor receptor transactivation in the in vivo trophic actions of the upstream effector angiotensin II and its downstream mediator endothelin in rat mesenteric arteries. Twenty-six-hour infusion of angiotensin II (400 ng/kg per min) or endothelin (5 pmol/kg per min) via osmotic pumps significantly enhanced vascular protein synthesis. With angiotensin II, treatment with the inhibitor of epidermal growth factor receptor transactivation (AG1478, 0.5 mg/kg) produced a significant attenuation (P < 0.05) of protein synthesis. In contrast, AG1478 did not abrogate the elevation of protein synthesis induced by endothelin. In conclusion, angiotensin II-induced epidermal growth factor receptor transactivation seems to be involved in the recruitment of endothelin in the cascade leading to vascular protein synthesis, rather than in the effect of endothelin on small artery remodeling.

  8. Synthesis of a polyhistidine-bearing amphipol and its use for immobilizing membrane proteins

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Giusti, Fabrice; Kessler, Pascal; Hansen, Randi Westh;

    2015-01-01

    Amphipols (APols) are short amphipathic polymers that stabilize membrane proteins (MPs) in aqueous solutions. In the present study, A8-35, a polyacrylate-based APol, was grafted with hexahistidine tags (His6-tags). The synthesis and characterization of this novel functionalized APol, named Hist...

  9. Synthesis of an oligonucleotide-derivatized amphipol and its use to trap and immobilize membrane proteins

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bon, Christel Le; Della Pia, Eduardo Antonio; Giusti, Fabrice

    2014-01-01

    Amphipols (APols) are specially designed amphipathic polymers that stabilize membrane proteins (MPs) in aqueous solutions in the absence of detergent. A8-35, a polyacrylate-based APol, has been grafted with an oligodeoxynucleotide (ODN). The synthesis, purification and properties of the resulting...

  10. Ammonia treatment of wheat straw. 2. Efficiency of microbial protein synthesis, rumen microbial protein pool size and turnover, and small intestinal protein digestion in sheep.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Oosting, S.J.; Viets, T.C.; Lammers-Wienhoven, S.C.W.; Bruchem, van J.

    1993-01-01

    Ammonia-treated wheat straw (AWS) was compared with untreated wheat straw (UWS) and untreated wheat straw supplemented with urea (SWS) in an experiment with 6 wether sheep. Microbial protein synthesis increased after ammonia treatment due to the higher intake of rumen degradable organic matter (OM).

  11. Leptin stimulates protein synthesis-activating translation machinery in human trophoblastic cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pérez-Pérez, Antonio; Maymó, Julieta; Gambino, Yésica; Dueñas, José L; Goberna, Raimundo; Varone, Cecilia; Sánchez-Margalet, Víctor

    2009-11-01

    Leptin was originally considered as an adipocyte-derived signaling molecule for the central control of metabolism. However, pleiotropic effects of leptin have been identified in reproduction and pregnancy, particularly in placenta, where it may work as an autocrine hormone, mediating angiogenesis, growth, and immunomodulation. Leptin receptor (LEPR, also known as Ob-R) shows sequence homology to members of the class I cytokine receptor (gp130) superfamily. In fact, leptin may function as a proinflammatory cytokine. We have previously found that leptin is a trophic and mitogenic factor for trophoblastic cells. In order to further investigate the mechanism by which leptin stimulates cell growth in JEG-3 cells and trophoblastic cells, we studied the phosphorylation state of different proteins of the initiation stage of translation and the total protein synthesis by [(3)H]leucine incorporation in JEG-3 cells. We have found that leptin dose-dependently stimulates the phosphorylation and activation of the translation initiation factor EIF4E as well as the phosphorylation of the EIF4E binding protein EIF4EBP1 (PHAS-I), which releases EIF4E to form active complexes. Moreover, leptin dose-dependently stimulates protein synthesis, and this effect can be partially prevented by blocking mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) and phosphatidylinositol 3 kinase (PIK3) pathways. In conclusion, leptin stimulates protein synthesis, at least in part activating the translation machinery, via the activation of MAPK and PIK3 pathways.

  12. Sulfate resupply accentuates protein synthesis in coordination with nitrogen metabolism in sulfur deprived Brassica napus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Qian; Lee, Bok-Rye; Park, Sang-Hyun; Zaman, Rashed; Avice, Jean-Christophe; Ourry, Alain; Kim, Tae-Hwan

    2015-02-01

    To investigate the regulatory interactions between S assimilation and N metabolism in Brassica napus, de novo synthesis of amino acids and proteins was quantified by (15)N and (34)S tracing, and the responses of transporter genes, assimilatory enzymes and metabolites pool involving in nitrate and sulfate metabolism were assessed under continuous sulfur supply, sulfur deprivation and sulfate resupply after 3 days of sulfur (S) deprivation. S-deprived plants were characterized by a strong induction of sulfate transporter genes, ATP sulfurylase (ATPS) and adenosine 5'-phosphosulfate reductase (APR), and by a repressed activity of nitrate reductase (NR) and glutamine synthetase (GS). Sulfate resupply to the S-deprived plants strongly increased cysteine, amino acids and proteins concentration. The increase in sulfate and cysteine concentration caused by sulfate resupply was not matched with the expression of sulfate transporters and the activity of ATPS and APR which were rapidly decreased by sulfate resupply. A strong induction of O-acetylserine(thiol)lyase (OASTL), NR and GS upon sulfate resupply was accompanied with the increase in cysteine, amino acids and proteins pool. Sulfate resupply resulted in a strong increase in de novo synthesis of amino acids and proteins, as evidenced by the increases in N and S incorporation into amino acids (1.8- and 2.4-fold increase) and proteins (2.2-and 6.3-fold increase) when compared to S-deprived plants. The results thus indicate that sulfate resupply followed by S-deprivation accelerates nitrate assimilation for protein synthesis.

  13. Pharmacological activation of CB1 receptor modulates long term potentiation by interfering with protein synthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Navakkode, Sheeja; Korte, Martin

    2014-04-01

    Cognitive impairment is one of the most important side effects associated with cannabis drug abuse, as well as the serious issue concerning the therapeutic use of cannabinoids. Cognitive impairments and neuropsychiatric symptoms are caused by early synaptic dysfunctions, such as loss of synaptic connections in different brain structures including the hippocampus, a region that is believed to play an important role in certain forms of learning and memory. We report here that metaplastic priming of synapses with a cannabinoid type 1 receptor (CB1 receptor) agonist, WIN55,212-2 (WIN55), significantly impaired long-term potentiation in the apical dendrites of CA1 pyramidal neurons. Interestingly, the CB1 receptor exerts its effect by altering the balance of protein synthesis machinery towards higher protein production. Therefore the activation of CB1 receptor, prior to strong tetanization, increased the propensity to produce new proteins. In addition, WIN55 priming resulted in the expression of late-LTP in a synaptic input that would have normally expressed early-LTP, thus confirming that WIN55 priming of LTP induces new synthesis of plasticity-related proteins. Furthermore, in addition to the effects on protein translation, WIN55 also induced synaptic deficits due to the ability of CB1 receptors to inhibit the release of acetylcholine, mediated by both muscarinic and nicotinic acetylcholine receptors. Taken together this supports the notion that the modulation of cholinergic activity by CB1 receptor activation is one mechanism that regulates the synthesis of plasticity-related proteins.

  14. Hybridization study of developmental plastid gene expression in mustard (Sinapsis alba L.) with cloned probes for most plastid DNA regions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Link, G

    1984-07-01

    An approach to assess the extent of developmental gene expression of various regions of plastid (pt)DNA in mustard (Sinapis alba L.) is described. It involves cloning of most ptDNA regions. The cloned regions then serve as hybridization probes to detect and assess the abundance of complementary RNA sequences represented in total plastid RNA. By comparison of the hybridization pattern observed with plastid RNA from either dark-grown or light-grown plants it was found that many ptDNA regions are constitutively expressed, while several 'inducible' regions account for much higher transcript levels in the chloroplast than in the etioplast stage. The reverse situation, i.e. 'repressed' regions which would account for higher transcript levels in the etioplast, was not observed. The hybridization results obtained with RNA from 'intermediatetype' plastids suggest that transient gene expression is a common feature during light-induced chloroplast development. The time-course of gene expression differs for various ptDNA regions.

  15. Whole-Transcriptome RNA-seq, Gene Set Enrichment Pathway Analysis, and Exon Coverage Analysis of Two Plastid RNA Editing Mutants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hackett, Justin B; Lu, Yan

    2017-04-07

    In land plants, plastid and mitochondrial RNAs are subject to post-transcriptional C-to-U RNA editing. T-DNA insertions in the ORGANELLE RNA RECOGNITION MOTIF PROTEIN6 gene resulted in reduced photosystem II (PSII) activity and smaller plant and leaf sizes. Exon coverage analysis of the ORRM6 gene showed that orrm6-1 and orrm6-2 are loss-of-function mutants. Compared to other ORRM proteins, ORRM6 affects a relative small number of RNA editing sites. Sanger sequencing of reverse transcription-PCR products of plastid transcripts revealed two plastid RNA editing sites that are substantially affected in the orrm6 mutants: psbF-C77 and accD-C794. The psbF gene encodes the beta subunit of cytochrome b559, an essential component of PSII. The accD gene encodes the beta subunit of acetyl-CoA carboxylase, a protein required in plastid fatty acid biosynthesis. Whole-transcriptome RNA-seq demonstrated that editing at psbF-C77 is nearly absent and the editing extent at accD-C794 was significantly reduced. Gene set enrichment pathway analysis showed that expression of multiple gene sets involved in photosynthesis, especially photosynthetic electron transport, is significantly up-regulated in both orrm6 mutants. The up-regulation could be a mechanism to compensate for the reduced PSII electron transport rate in the orrm6 mutants. These results further demonstrated that Organelle RNA Recognition Motif protein ORRM6 is required in editing of specific RNAs in the Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) plastid.

  16. Modifications to the translational apparatus which affect the regulation of protein synthesis in sea urchin embryos

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Scalise, F.W.

    1988-01-01

    Protein synthesis can be regulated at a number of cellular levels. I have examined how modifications to specific components of the protein synthetic machinery are involved in regulating the efficiency of initiation of translation during early sea urchin embryogenesis. It is demonstrated that Ca{sup 2+} concentrations exceeding 500 uM cause the inhibition of protein synthesis in cell-free translation lysates prepared from sea urchin embryos. Specific changes in the state of phosphorylation of at least 8 proteins occur during this Ca{sup 2+}-mediated repression of translation. Analysis of these proteins has indicated that, unlike mammalian systems, there is no detectable level of Ca{sup 2+}-dependent phosphorylation of the {alpha}subunit eIF-2. Two of the proteins which do become phosphorylated in response to Ca{sup 2+} are calmodulin and an isoelectric form of sea urchin eIF-4D. In addition, 2 proteins which share similarities with kinases involved in the regulation of protein synthesis in mammalian cells, also become phosphorylated. I have investigated the consequences of changes in eIF-4D during sea urchin embryogenesis because it has been proposed that a polyamine-mediated conversion of lysine to hypusine in this factor may enhance translational activity. It is demonstrated that ({sup 3}H) spermidine-derived radioactivity is incorporated into a number of proteins when sea urchin embryos are labeled in vivo, and that the pattern of individual proteins that become labeled changes over the course of the first 30 hr of development.

  17. Post-exercise whey protein hydrolysate supplementation induces a greater increase in muscle protein synthesis than its constituent amino acid content.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kanda, Atsushi; Nakayama, Kyosuke; Fukasawa, Tomoyuki; Koga, Jinichiro; Kanegae, Minoru; Kawanaka, Kentaro; Higuchi, Mitsuru

    2013-09-28

    It is well known that ingestion of a protein source is effective in stimulating muscle protein synthesis after exercise. In addition, there are numerous reports on the impact of leucine and leucine-rich whey protein on muscle protein synthesis and mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) signalling. However, there is only limited information on the effects of whey protein hydrolysates (WPH) on muscle protein synthesis and mTOR signalling. The aim of the present study was to compare the effects of WPH and amino acids on muscle protein synthesis and the initiation of translation in skeletal muscle during the post-exercise phase. Male Sprague–Dawley rats swam for 2 h to depress muscle protein synthesis. Immediately after exercise, the animals were administered either carbohydrate (CHO), CHO plus an amino acid mixture (AA) or CHO plus WPH. At 1 h after exercise, the supplements containing whey-based protein (AA and WPH) caused a significant increase in the fractional rate of protein synthesis (FSR) compared with CHO. WPH also caused a significant increase in FSR compared with AA. Post-exercise ingestion of WPH caused a significant increase in the phosphorylation of mTOR levels compared with AA or CHO. In addition, WPH caused greater phosphorylation of ribosomal protein S6 kinase and eukaryotic initiation factor 4E-binding protein 1 than AA and CHO. In contrast, there was no difference in plasma amino acid levels following supplementation with either AA or WPH. These results indicate that WPH may include active components that are superior to amino acids for stimulating muscle protein synthesis and initiating translation.

  18. Ultrastructural and metabolic transformations of differentiating Hyacinthus orientalis L, pollen grain cells. I. RNA and protein synthesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elżbieta Bednarska

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available RNA and protein synthesis were investigated in generative and vegetative cells during maturation of pollen grains. The rate of RNA and protein synthesis was analysed in reference to the successive interphase periods of the life cycle of pollen cells as well as against the background of the growth dynamics of the cell volume. The results of studies demonstrated that the pollen grain increases in size owing to the growth of the vegetative cell. The generative one does not grow. RNA synthesis and that of proteins in differentiating pollen cells has a different course. In the growing vegetative cell it lasts longer and is more intensive than in the generative cell which does not grow. RNA and protein synthesis in the vegetative cell take place in the period from the callose stage to the stage of lemon-shaped generative cell, that is in the period of phases G1, S and G2. This synthesis is positively correlated with the growth of the pollen grain. RNA and protein synthesis in the generative cell comprises the period from the callose-less lenticular stage to the stage of spherical generative cell, that is the phases S and early phase G2. These results suggest that in the vegetative cell RNA and protein synthesis is utilised above all to increase of its cell, instead in non growing generative cell protein synthese is probably limited mostly to a histones and enzymatic proteins serving for the DNA replication process.

  19. The differential role of cortical protein synthesis in taste memory formation and persistence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levitan, David; Gal-Ben-Ari, Shunit; Heise, Christopher; Rosenberg, Tali; Elkobi, Alina; Inberg, Sharon; Sala, Carlo; Rosenblum, Kobi

    2016-05-01

    The current dogma suggests that the formation of long-term memory (LTM) is dependent on protein synthesis but persistence of the memory trace is not. However, many of the studies examining the effect of protein synthesis inhibitors (PSIs) on LTM persistence were performed in the hippocampus, which is known to have a time-dependent role in memory storage, rather than the cortex, which is considered to be the main structure to store long-term memories. Here we studied the effect of PSIs on LTM formation and persistence in male Wistar Hola (n⩾5) rats by infusing the protein synthesis inhibitor, anisomycin (100 μg, 1 μl), into the gustatory cortex (GC) during LTM formation and persistence in conditioned taste aversion (CTA). We found that local anisomycin infusion to the GC before memory acquisition impaired LTM formation (P=8.9E-5), but had no effect on LTM persistence when infused 3 days post acquisition (P=0.94). However, when we extended the time interval between treatment with anisomycin and testing from 3 days to 14 days, LTM persistence was enhanced (P=0.01). The enhancement was on the background of stable and non-declining memory, and was not recapitulated by another amnesic agent, APV (10 μg, 1 μl), an N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor antagonist (P=0.54). In conclusion, CTA LTM remains sensitive to the action of PSIs in the GC even 3 days following memory acquisition. This sensitivity is differentially expressed between the formation and persistence of LTM, suggesting that increased cortical protein synthesis promotes LTM formation, whereas decreased protein synthesis promotes LTM persistence.

  20. The differential role of cortical protein synthesis in taste memory formation and persistence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levitan, David; Gal-Ben-Ari, Shunit; Heise, Christopher; Rosenberg, Tali; Elkobi, Alina; Inberg, Sharon; Sala, Carlo; Rosenblum, Kobi

    2016-01-01

    The current dogma suggests that the formation of long-term memory (LTM) is dependent on protein synthesis but persistence of the memory trace is not. However, many of the studies examining the effect of protein synthesis inhibitors (PSIs) on LTM persistence were performed in the hippocampus, which is known to have a time-dependent role in memory storage, rather than the cortex, which is considered to be the main structure to store long-term memories. Here we studied the effect of PSIs on LTM formation and persistence in male Wistar Hola (n ≥ 5) rats by infusing the protein synthesis inhibitor, anisomycin (100 μg, 1 μl), into the gustatory cortex (GC) during LTM formation and persistence in conditioned taste aversion (CTA). We found that local anisomycin infusion to the GC before memory acquisition impaired LTM formation (P = 8.9E − 5), but had no effect on LTM persistence when infused 3 days post acquisition (P = 0.94). However, when we extended the time interval between treatment with anisomycin and testing from 3 days to 14 days, LTM persistence was enhanced (P = 0.01). The enhancement was on the background of stable and non-declining memory, and was not recapitulated by another amnesic agent, APV (10 μg, 1 μl), an N-methyl-d-aspartate receptor antagonist (P = 0.54). In conclusion, CTA LTM remains sensitive to the action of PSIs in the GC even 3 days following memory acquisition. This sensitivity is differentially expressed between the formation and persistence of LTM, suggesting that increased cortical protein synthesis promotes LTM formation, whereas decreased protein synthesis promotes LTM persistence. PMID:27721985

  1. A model for the origin of protein synthesis as coreplicational scanning of nascent RNA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yakhnin, Alexander V

    2007-12-01

    The origin of protein synthesis is one of the major riddles of molecular biology. It was proposed a decade ago that the ribosomal RNA evolved from an earlier RNA-replisome (a ribozyme fulfilling RNA replication) while transfer RNA (tRNA) evolved from a genomic replication origin. Applying these hypotheses, I suggest that protein synthesis arose for the purpose of segregating copy and template RNA during replication through the conventional formation of a complementary strand. Nascent RNA was scanned in 5' to 3' direction following the progress of replication. The base pairing of several tRNA-like molecules with nascent RNA released the replication intermediates trapped in duplex. Synthesis of random peptides evolved to fuel the turnover of tRNAs. Then the combination of replication-coupled peptide formation and the independent development of amino acid-specific tRNA aminoacylation resulted in template-based protein synthesis. Therefore, the positioning of tRNAs adjacent to each other developed for the purpose of replication rather than peptide synthesis. This hypothesis does not include either selection for useful peptides or specific recognition of amino acids at the initial evolution of translation. It does, however, explain a number of features of modern translation apparatus, such as the relative flexibility of genetic code, the number of proteins shared by the transcription and translation machines, the universal participation of an RNA subunit in co-translational protein secretion, 'unscheduled translation', and factor-independent translocation. Assistance of original ribosomes in keeping apart the nascent transcript from its template is still widely explored by modern bacteria and perhaps by other domains of life.

  2. From cyanobacteria to plants: conservation of PII functions during plastid evolution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chellamuthu, Vasuki Ranjani; Alva, Vikram; Forchhammer, Karl

    2013-02-01

    This article reviews the current state-of-the-art concerning the functions of the signal processing protein PII in cyanobacteria and plants, with a special focus on evolutionary aspects. We start out with a general introduction to PII proteins, their distribution, and their evolution. We also discuss PII-like proteins and domains, in particular, the similarity between ATP-phosphoribosyltransferase (ATP-PRT) and its PII-like domain and the complex between N-acetyl-L-glutamate kinase (NAGK) and its PII activator protein from oxygenic phototrophs. The structural basis of the function of PII as an ATP/ADP/2-oxoglutarate signal processor is described for Synechococcus elongatus PII. In both cyanobacteria and plants, a major target of PII regulation is NAGK, which catalyzes the committed step of arginine biosynthesis. The common principles of NAGK regulation by PII are outlined. Based on the observation that PII proteins from cyanobacteria and plants can functionally replace each other, the hypothesis that PII-dependent NAGK control was under selective pressure during the evolution of plastids of Chloroplastida and Rhodophyta is tested by bioinformatics approaches. It is noteworthy that two lineages of heterokont algae, diatoms and brown algae, also possess NAGK, albeit lacking PII; their NAGK however appears to have descended from an alphaproteobacterium and not from a cyanobacterium as in plants. We end this article by coming to the conclusion that during the evolution of plastids, PII lost its function in coordinating gene expression through the PipX-NtcA network but preserved its role in nitrogen (arginine) storage metabolism, and subsequently took over the fine-tuned regulation of carbon (fatty acid) storage metabolism, which is important in certain developmental stages of plants.

  3. Flavin nucleotide metabolism in plants: monofunctional enzymes synthesize fad in plastids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sandoval, Francisco J; Zhang, Yi; Roje, Sanja

    2008-11-07

    FAD synthetases (EC 2.7.7.2) catalyze biosynthesis of FAD from FMN and ATP. Monofunctional FAD synthetases are known to exist in mammals and yeast; bifunctional enzymes also catalyzing phosphorylation of riboflavin to FMN are known to exist in bacteria. Previously known eukaryotic enzymes with FAD synthetase activity have no sequence similarity to prokaryotic enzymes with riboflavin kinase and FAD synthetase activities. Proteins homologous to bacterial bifunctional FAD synthetases, yet shorter and lacking amino acid motifs at the C terminus, were found by bioinformatic analyses in vascular plant genomes, suggesting that plants contain a type of FAD synthetase previously known to exist only in prokaryotes. The Arabidopsis thaliana genome encodes two of such proteins. Both proteins, which we named AtRibF1 and AtRibF2, carry N-terminal extensions with characteristics of organellar targeting peptides. AtRibF1 and AtRibF2 cDNAs were cloned by reverse transcription-PCR. Only FAD synthetase activity was detected in the recombinant enzymes produced in Escherichia coli. FMN and ATP inhibited both enzymes. Kinetic parameters of AtRibF1 and AtRibF2 for the two substrates were similar. Confocal microscopy of protoplasts transformed with enhanced green fluorescence protein-fused proteins showed that AtRibF1 and AtRibF2 are targeted to plastids. In agreement with subcellular localization to plastids, Percoll-isolated chloroplasts from pea (Pisum sativum) synthesized FAD from imported riboflavin. Riboflavin kinase, FMN hydrolase, and FAD pyrophosphatase activities were detected in Percoll-isolated chloroplasts and mitochondria from pea. We propose from these new findings a model for subcellular distribution of enzymes that synthesize and hydrolyze flavin nucleotides in plants.

  4. Use of Modern Chemical Protein Synthesis and Advanced Fluorescent Assay Techniques to Experimentally Validate the Functional Annotation of Microbial Genomes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kent, Stephen [University of Chicago

    2012-07-20

    The objective of this research program was to prototype methods for the chemical synthesis of predicted protein molecules in annotated microbial genomes. High throughput chemical methods were to be used to make large numbers of predicted proteins and protein domains, based on microbial genome sequences. Microscale chemical synthesis methods for the parallel preparation of peptide-thioester building blocks were developed; these peptide segments are used for the parallel chemical synthesis of proteins and protein domains. Ultimately, it is envisaged that these synthetic molecules would be ‘printed’ in spatially addressable arrays. The unique ability of total synthesis to precision label protein molecules with dyes and with chemical or biochemical ‘tags’ can be used to facilitate novel assay technologies adapted from state-of-the art single molecule fluorescence detection techniques. In the future, in conjunction with modern laboratory automation this integrated set of techniques will enable high throughput experimental validation of the functional annotation of microbial genomes.

  5. Protein targeting to glycogen is a master regulator of glycogen synthesis in astrocytes

    KAUST Repository

    Ruchti, E.

    2016-10-08

    The storage and use of glycogen, the main energy reserve in the brain, is a metabolic feature of astrocytes. Glycogen synthesis is regulated by Protein Targeting to Glycogen (PTG), a member of specific glycogen-binding subunits of protein phosphatase-1 (PPP1). It positively regulates glycogen synthesis through de-phosphorylation of both glycogen synthase (activation) and glycogen phosphorylase (inactivation). In cultured astrocytes, PTG mRNA levels were previously shown to be enhanced by the neurotransmitter noradrenaline. To achieve further insight into the role of PTG in the regulation of astrocytic glycogen, its levels of expression were manipulated in primary cultures of mouse cortical astrocytes using adenovirus-mediated overexpression of tagged-PTG or siRNA to downregulate its expression. Infection of astrocytes with adenovirus led to a strong increase in PTG expression and was associated with massive glycogen accumulation (>100 fold), demonstrating that increased PTG expression is sufficient to induce glycogen synthesis and accumulation. In contrast, siRNA-mediated downregulation of PTG resulted in a 2-fold decrease in glycogen levels. Interestingly, PTG downregulation strongly impaired long-term astrocytic glycogen synthesis induced by insulin or noradrenaline. Finally, these effects of PTG downregulation on glycogen metabolism could also be observed in cultured astrocytes isolated from PTG-KO mice. Collectively, these observations point to a major role of PTG in the regulation of glycogen synthesis in astrocytes and indicate that conditions leading to changes in PTG expression will directly impact glycogen levels in this cell type.

  6. Citrus plastid-related gene profiling based on expressed sequence tag analyses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tercilio Calsa Jr.

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Plastid-related sequences, derived from putative nuclear or plastome genes, were searched in a large collection of expressed sequence tags (ESTs and genomic sequences from the Citrus Biotechnology initiative in Brazil. The identified putative Citrus chloroplast gene sequences were compared to those from Arabidopsis, Eucalyptus and Pinus. Differential expression profiling for plastid-directed nuclear-encoded proteins and photosynthesis-related gene expression variation between Citrus sinensis and Citrus reticulata, when inoculated or not with Xylella fastidiosa, were also analyzed. Presumed Citrus plastome regions were more similar to Eucalyptus. Some putative genes appeared to be preferentially expressed in vegetative tissues (leaves and bark or in reproductive organs (flowers and fruits. Genes preferentially expressed in fruit and flower may be associated with hypothetical physiological functions. Expression pattern clustering analysis suggested that photosynthesis- and carbon fixation-related genes appeared to be up- or down-regulated in a resistant or susceptible Citrus species after Xylella inoculation in comparison to non-infected controls, generating novel information which may be helpful to develop novel genetic manipulation strategies to control Citrus variegated chlorosis (CVC.

  7. Metabolic engineering by plastid transformation as a strategy to modulate isoprenoid yield in plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hasunuma, Tomohisa; Kondo, Akihiko; Miyake, Chikahiro

    2010-01-01

    Plants synthesize a large number of isoprenoid compounds that have diverse structures and functions. All isoprenoids are synthesized through consecutive condensation of five-carbon precursors, isopentenyl diphosphate (IPP) and its allyl isomer dimethylallyl diphosphate (DMAPP). With recent success in the cloning of genes that encode the enzymes of isoprenoid biosynthesis, genetic engineering strategies for the improvement of plant isoprenoid metabolism have emerged. Plastid transformation technology offers attractive features in plant genetic engineering. It has many advantages over nuclear genome transformation: high-level foreign protein expression, no need for a transit peptide, absence of gene silencing, and convenient transgene stacking in operons. We demonstrated that this technology is a remarkable tool for the production of isoprenoids in plants through metabolic engineering. The expression of bacterial genes encoding CrtW (beta-carotene ketolase) and CrtZ (beta-carotene hydroxylase) or cyanobacterial genes encoding DXR (1-deoxy-D-xylulose-5-phosphate reductoisomerase) in the plastid genome leads to alteration in isoprenoid content of tobacco leaves.

  8. ROLE OF NEUROTRANSMITTERS AND PROTEIN SYNTHESIS IN SHORT- AND LONG-TERM MEMORY

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bennett, E.L.; Rosenzweig, M.R.; Flood, J.F.

    1978-10-01

    Anisomycin is an effective inhibitor of cerebral protein synthesis in mice and is also an effective amnestic agent for both passive and active behavioral tasks. From use of anisomycin in combination with a variety of stimulant and depressant drugs, we conclude that the level of arousal following acquisition plays an important role in determining the duration and the rate of the biosynthetic phase of memory formation. While we have interpreted the experiments with anisomycin as evidence for an essential role of protein in memory storage, others have suggested that side effects of inhibitors of protein synthesis on catecholamine metabolism are the main cause of amnesia. Several experiments were therefore done to compare the effects of anisemycin and catecholamine inhibitors on memory. We conclude that anisomycin's principal amnestic mechanism does not involve inhibition of the catecholamine system. The results strengthen our conclusion that protein synthesis is an essential component for longterm memory trace formation. Also, it is suggested that proteins synthesized in the neuronal cell body are used, in conjunction with other molecules, to produce permanent and semi-permanent anatomical changes.

  9. Optimized extract preparation methods and reaction conditions for improved yeast cell-free protein synthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hodgman, C Eric; Jewett, Michael C

    2013-10-01

    Cell-free protein synthesis (CFPS) has emerged as a powerful platform technology to help satisfy the growing demand for simple, affordable, and efficient protein production. In this article, we describe a novel CFPS platform derived from the popular bio-manufacturing organism Saccharomyces cerevisiae. By developing a streamlined crude extract preparation protocol and optimizing the CFPS reaction conditions we were able to achieve active firefly luciferase synthesis yields of 7.7 ± 0.5 µg mL(-1) with batch reactions lasting up to 2 h. This duration of synthesis is the longest ever reported for a yeast CFPS batch reaction. Furthermore, by removing extraneous processing steps and eliminating expensive reagents from the cell-free reaction, we have increased relative product yield (µg protein synthesized per $ reagent cost) over an alternative commonly used method up to 2000-fold from ∼2 × 10(-4) to ∼4 × 10(-1)  µg $(-1) , which now puts the yeast CPFS platform on par with other eukaryotic CFPS platforms commercially available. Our results set the stage for developing a yeast CFPS platform that provides for high-yielding and cost-effective expression of a variety of protein therapeutics and protein libraries.

  10. Skeletal muscle morphology, protein synthesis and gene expression in Ehlers Danlos Syndrome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nygaard, Rie H; Jensen, Jacob K; Voermans, Nicol C

    2017-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: Patients with Ehlers Danlos Syndrome are known to have genetically impaired connective tissue and skeletal muscle symptoms in form of pain, fatigue and cramps, however earlier studies have not been able to link these symptoms to morphological muscle changes. METHODS: We obtained...... skeletal muscle biopsies in patients with classic EDS (cEDS, n=5 (Denmark)+ 8 (The Netherlands)) and vascular EDS (vEDS, n=3) and analyzed muscle fiber morphology and content (Western blotting and muscle fiber type/area distributions) and muscle mRNA expression and protein synthesis rate (RT-PCR and stable...... isotope technique). RESULTS: The cEDS patients did not differ from healthy controls (n = 7-11) with regard to muscle fiber type/area, myosin/α-actin ratio, muscle protein synthesis rate or mRNA expression. In contrast, the vEDS patients demonstrated higher expression of matrix proteins compared to c...

  11. Stem cell function and stress response are controlled by protein synthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blanco, Sandra; Bandiera, Roberto; Popis, Martyna; Hussain, Shobbir; Lombard, Patrick; Aleksic, Jelena; Sajini, Abdulrahim; Tanna, Hinal; Cortés-Garrido, Rosana; Gkatza, Nikoletta; Dietmann, Sabine; Frye, Michaela

    2016-06-15

    Whether protein synthesis and cellular stress response pathways interact to control stem cell function is currently unknown. Here we show that mouse skin stem cells synthesize less protein than their immediate progenitors in vivo, even when forced to proliferate. Our analyses reveal that activation of stress response pathways drives both a global reduction of protein synthesis and altered translational programmes that together promote stem cell functions and tumorigenesis. Mechanistically, we show that inhibition of post-transcriptional cytosine-5 methylation locks tumour-initiating cells in this distinct translational inhibition programme. Paradoxically, this inhibition renders stem cells hypersensitive to cytotoxic stress, as tumour regeneration after treatment with 5-fluorouracil is blocked. Thus, stem cells must revoke translation inhibition pathways to regenerate a tissue or tumour.

  12. Traffic of interacting ribosomes: effects of single-machine mechano-chemistry on protein synthesis

    CERN Document Server

    Basu, A; Basu, Aakash; Chowdhury, Debashish

    2006-01-01

    Many ribosomes simultaneously move on the same messenger RNA (mRNA), each synthesizing a protein. Earlier models of ribosome traffic represent each ribosome by a ``self-propelled particle'' and capture the dynamics by an extension of the totally asymmetric simple exclusion process. In contrast, here we develope a ``unified'' theoretical model that not only incorporates the mutual exclusions of the interacting ribosomes, but also describes explicitly the mechano-chemistry of each of these individual cyclic machines during protein synthesis. Using a combination of analytical and numerical techniques of non-equilibrium statistical mechanics, we analyze this model and illustrate its power by making experimentally testable predictions on the rate of protein synthesis and the density profile of the ribosomes on some mRNAs in E-Coli.

  13. Total synthesis and structure–activity relationship studies of a series of selective G protein inhibitors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Xiong, Xiaofeng; Zhang, Hang; Underwood, Christina R.;

    2016-01-01

    G proteins are key mediators of G protein-coupled receptor signalling, which facilitates a plethora of important physiological processes. The cyclic depsipeptides YM-254890 and FR900359 are the only known specific inhibitors of the Gq subfamily of G proteins; however, no synthetic route has been...... reported previously for these complex natural products and they are not easily isolated from natural sources. Here we report the first total synthesis of YM-254890 and FR900359, as well as of two known analogues, YM-385780 and YM-385781. The versatility of the synthetic approach also enabled the design...... and synthesis of ten analogues, which provided the first structure–activity relationship study for this class of compounds. Pharmacological characterization of all the compounds at Gq-, Gi- and Gs-mediated signalling provided succinct information on the structural requirements for inhibition, and demonstrated...

  14. MATHEMATICAL AND COMPUTATIONAL MODELLING OF RIBOSOMAL MOVEMENT AND PROTEIN SYNTHESIS: AN OVERVIEW

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tobias von der Haar

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Translation or protein synthesis consists of a complex system of chemical reactions, which ultimately result in decoding of the mRNA and the production of a protein. The complexity of this reaction system makes it difficult to quantitatively connect its input parameters (such as translation factor or ribosome concentrations, codon composition of the mRNA, or energy availability to output parameters (such as protein synthesis rates or ribosome densities on mRNAs. Mathematical and computational models of translation have now been used for nearly five decades to investigate translation, and to shed light on the relationship between the different reactions in the system. This review gives an overview over the principal approaches used in the modelling efforts, and summarises some of the major findings that were made.

  15. Control of Lipid Synthesis during Soybean Seed Development: Enzymic and Immunochemical Assay of Acyl Carrier Protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohlrogge, J B; Kuo, T M

    1984-03-01

    During soybean seed (Glycine max, var Am Soy 71) development, the rate of lipid biosynthesis per seed increases greatly. As the seed reaches maturity, lipid synthesis declines. To study the controls over the oil synthesis and storage process, we have chosen acyl carrier protein (ACP) as a representative marker for the fatty acid synthetase pathway. We have quantitated soybean ACP levels by both enzymic and immunochemical methods. Escherichia coli acyl-ACP synthetase was used as an assay for enzymically active ACP. Total ACP protein was determined by immunoassay using antibodies prepared in rabbits against spinach ACP. These antibody preparations also bind ACP isolated from soybeans, allowing development of a radioimmunoassay based on competition with [(3)H]palmitoyl-ACP. The enzymic and immunochemical measurement of ACP at various stages of seed development have indicated that ACP activity and ACP antigen increase markedly in correlation with the in vivo increase in lipid synthesis. These results indicate that a major control over the increase in lipid synthesis arises through regulation of the levels of the fatty acid biosynthetic proteins. However, as the seed reaches maturity and lipid biosynthesis declines, ACP per seed remains relatively high. In the mature seed, we found that more than 95% of the ACP is localized in the cotyledons, less than 5% is in the axis, and less than 1% is in the seed coat.

  16. Functional divergence and convergent evolution in the plastid-targeted glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenases of diverse eukaryotic algae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaston, Daniel; Roger, Andrew J

    2013-01-01

    Glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase (GAPDH) is a key enzyme of the glycolytic pathway, reversibly catalyzing the sixth step of glycolysis and concurrently reducing the coenzyme NAD(+) to NADH. In photosynthetic organisms a GAPDH paralog (Gap2 in Cyanobacteria, GapA in most photosynthetic eukaryotes) functions in the Calvin cycle, performing the reverse of the glycolytic reaction and using the coenzyme NADPH preferentially. In a number of photosynthetic eukaryotes that acquired their plastid by the secondary endosymbiosis of a eukaryotic red alga (Alveolates, haptophytes, cryptomonads and stramenopiles) GapA has been apparently replaced with a paralog of the host's own cytosolic GAPDH (GapC1). Plastid GapC1 and GapA therefore represent two independent cases of functional divergence and adaptations to the Calvin cycle entailing a shift in subcellular targeting and a shift in binding preference from NAD(+) to NADPH. We used the programs FunDi, GroupSim, and Difference Evolutionary-Trace to detect sites involved in the functional divergence of these two groups of GAPDH sequences and to identify potential cases of convergent evolution in the Calvin-cycle adapted GapA and GapC1 families. Sites identified as being functionally divergent by all or some of these programs were then investigated with respect to their possible roles in the structure and function of both glycolytic and plastid-targeted GAPDH isoforms. In this work we found substantial evidence for convergent evolution in GapA/B and GapC1. In many cases sites in GAPDHs of these groups converged on identical amino acid residues in specific positions of the protein known to play a role in the function and regulation of plastid-functioning enzymes relative to their cytosolic counterparts. In addition, we demonstrate that bioinformatic software like FunDi are important tools for the generation of meaningful biological hypotheses that can then be tested with direct experimental techniques.

  17. Antigenic protein synthesis of Campylobacter jejuni in contact with chicken cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vegge, Christina Skovgaard; Bang, Dang D.; Li, Yiping

    to the environment of the avian gastrointestinal tract. Consequently, the most important reservoir for C. jejuni is the gut of chickens, which are colonized efficiently without causing disease in the birds. Upon co-cultivation with mammalian cells, C. jejuni secrete specific Cia proteins, which are required...... the synthesis of antigenic C. jejuni proteins upon cultivation with chicken cells. Two strains of C. jejuni (the human isolate NCTC11168 and the chicken isolate DVI-SC11) were incubated with primary intestinal chicken cells and subsequently used to raise antisera in rabbits. Negative controls were carried out...... in parallel. These antisera were tested by Western blotting against C. jejuni total protein as well as periplasmic-, surface- and extracellular protein fractions. A unique antibody reaction was discovered to a protein from samples, which had been cultivated with chicken cells. The identity of this protein...

  18. Antigenic protein synthesis of Campylobacter jejuni in contact with chicken cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vegge, Christina Skovgaard; Bang, Dang D.; Li, Yiping

    to the environment of the avian gastrointestinal tract. Consequently, the most important reservoir for C. jejuni is the gut of chickens, which are colonized efficiently without causing disease in the birds. Upon co-cultivation with mammalian cells, C. jejuni secrete specific Cia proteins, which are required...... the synthesis of antigenic C. jejuni proteins upon cultivation with chicken cells. Two strains of C. jejuni (the human isolate NCTC11168 and the chicken isolate DVI-SC11) were incubated with primary intestinal chicken cells and subsequently used to raise antisera in rabbits. Negative controls were carried out...... in parallel. These antisera were tested by Western blotting against C. jejuni total protein as well as periplasmic-, surface- and extracellular protein fractions. A unique antibody reaction was discovered to a protein from samples, which had been cultivated with chicken cells. The identity of this protein...

  19. Contraction mode and whey protein intake affect the synthesis rate of intramuscular connective tissue

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holm, Lars; Klejs Rahbek, Stine; Farup, Jean

    2016-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: In this study we investigated the impact of whey protein hydrolysate and maltodextrin (WPH) intake on intramuscular connective tissue (IMCT) protein fractional synthesis rate (FSR) after maximal shortening and lengthening contractions. METHODS: Twenty young men were randomized...... to receive either WPH or maltodextrin [carbohydrate (CHO)] immediately after completion of unilateral shortening and lengthening knee extensions. Ring-(13) C6 -phenylalanine was infused, and muscle biopsies were obtained. IMCT protein FSR was measured at 1-5, as well as 1-3 and 3-5 hours after contractions...

  20. Multienzyme Modification of Hemp Protein for Functional Peptides Synthesis

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    Ranjana Das

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Functional foods and nutraceuticals are of special importance, particularly for their impact on human health and prevention of certain chronic diseases. Consequently, the production and properties of bioactive peptides have received an increasing scientific interest over past few years. Present work intends to compare the competence of metalloendopeptidases (“Protease N” and “Protease A” with papain for getting functional peptides from hemp seed meal, which is an obligatory waste of hemp fiber production industry. As a measure of the functional potential hemp protein hydrolysates were analyzed for their antiradical properties in DPPH system. “Protease N” modified protein hydrolysate exhibited comparatively superior radical scavenging activity in DPPH system. Overall findings represent the importance of “Protease N,” as endopeptidase in getting peptides of good antiradical properties from various protein sources.

  1. Curdlan microspheres. Synthesis, characterization and interaction with proteins (enzymes, vaccines).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mocanu, Georgeta; Mihai, Doina; Moscovici, Misu; Picton, Luc; LeCerf, Didier

    2009-04-01

    Microparticles of curdlan, synthesized through crosslinking with epichlorohydrin in organic suspension media, were chemically modified with the aim of introducing strongly and/or weakly acidic anionic and palmitoyl hydrophobic groups. Microparticles of both curdlan and curdlan derivatives were physico-chemically characterized. Study of the interaction with enzymes, such as lysozyme, and vaccines, such as tetanus anatoxin, showed a co-operative protein retention effect, induced by electrostatic and hydrophobic forces. The results of the in vitro release studies on support-protein complexes recommend them as potential controlled release systems.

  2. Oral N-carbamylglutamate supplementation increases protein synthesis in skeletal muscle of piglets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frank, Jason W; Escobar, Jeffery; Nguyen, Hanh V; Jobgen, Scott C; Jobgen, Wenjuan S; Davis, Teresa A; Wu, Guoyao

    2007-02-01

    This study investigated the potential mechanisms by which oral supplementation of N-carbamylglutamate (NCG), an analogue of endogenous N-acetylglutamate (an activator of arginine synthesis) increases growth rate in sow-reared piglets. Two piglets of equal body weight (BW) and of the same gender from each lactating sow were allotted to receive oral administration of 0 (control) or 50 mg of NCG/kg BW every 12 h for 7 d. Piglets (n=32; BW=3 kg) were studied in the food-deprived or fed state following the 7 d of treatment. Overnight food-deprived piglets were given NCG or water (control) at time 0 and 60 min. Piglets studied in the fed state were gavage-fed sow's milk with their respective NCG treatment at 0 and 60 min. At 60 min, the piglets were administered a flooding dose of [3H]phenylalanine and killed at 90 min to measure tissue protein synthesis. Piglets treated with NCG gained 28% more weight than control pigs (P<0.001) over the 7-d period. Fed pigs had greater rates of protein synthesis in longissimus dorsi and gastrocnemius muscles and duodenum compared with food-deprived pigs (P<0.001). Absolute protein synthesis rates in longissimus dorsi (P=0.050) and gastrocnemius (P=0.068) muscles were 30 and 21% greater, respectively, in NCG-treated compared with control pigs. Piglets supplemented with NCG also had greater plasma concentrations of arginine and somatotropin than control pigs (P<0.001). The results suggest that oral NCG supplementation increases plasma arginine and somatotropin levels, leading to an increase in growth rate and muscle protein synthesis in nursing piglets.

  3. The exocyst affects protein synthesis by acting on the translocation machinery of the endoplasmic reticulum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lipschutz, Joshua H; Lingappa, Vishwanath R; Mostov, Keith E

    2003-06-01

    We previously showed that the exocyst complex specifically affected the synthesis and delivery of secretory and basolateral plasma membrane proteins. Significantly, the entire spectrum of secreted proteins was increased when the hSec10 (human Sec10) component of the exocyst complex was overexpressed, suggestive of post-transcriptional regulation (Lipschutz, J. H., Guo, W., O'Brien, L. E., Nguyen, Y. H., Novick, P., and Mostov, K. E. (2000) Mol. Biol. Cell 11, 4259-4275). Here, using an exogenously transfected basolateral protein, the polymeric immunoglobulin receptor (pIgR), and a secretory protein, gp80, we show that pIgR and gp80 protein synthesis and delivery are increased in cells overexpressing Sec10 despite the fact that mRNA levels are unchanged, which is highly indicative of post-transcriptional regulation. To test specificity, we also examined the synthesis and delivery of an exogenous apical protein, CNT1 (concentrative nucleoside transporter 1), and found no increase in CNT1 protein synthesis, delivery, or mRNA levels in cells overexpressing Sec10. Sec10-GFP-overexpressing cell lines were created, and staining was seen in the endoplasmic reticulum. It was demonstrated previously in yeast that high levels of expression of SEB1, the Sec61beta homologue, suppressed sec15-1, an exocyst mutant (Toikkanen, J., Gatti, E., Takei, K., Saloheimo, M., Olkkonen, V. M., Soderlund, H., De Camilli, P., and Keranen, S. (1996) Yeast 12, 425-438). Sec61beta is a member of the Sec61 heterotrimer, which is the main component of the endoplasmic reticulum translocon. By co-immunoprecipitation we show that Sec10, which forms an exocyst subcomplex with Sec15, specifically associates with the Sec61beta component of the translocon and that Sec10 overexpression increases the association of other exocyst complex members with Sec61beta. Proteosome inhibition does not appear to be the mechanism by which increased protein synthesis occurs in the face of equivalent amounts of m

  4. Influence of Protoplasmic Water Loss on the Control of Protein Synthesis in the Desiccation-Tolerant Moss Tortula ruralis 1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oliver, Melvin J.

    1991-01-01

    Desiccation tolerance of the moss Tortula ruralis is characterized by a desiccation-induced change in gene expression that becomes evident upon rehydration. As reported earlier, this change in gene expression is apparently brought about by a change in the control of translation and does not include a major shift in mRNA abundance. A full qualitative and quantitative analysis of the alteration in gene expression, which is characterized by the loss of (or greater than fivefold decrease in) the synthesis of 25 hydration (h) proteins and initiation (or greater than fivefold increase) of the synthesis of 74 rehydration (r) proteins, is given in this report. Exposure to a desiccating atmosphere, for times that result in varying levels of water loss, enabled the determination that the control of synthesis of r proteins is different from the control of synthesis of h proteins. The r and h protein synthesis responses are internally coordinate, however. Similarly, the return to normal levels of h protein synthesis differs from that of the r proteins. The return to normal synthetic levels for all h proteins is synchronous, but the rate of loss of r protein synthesis varies with each individual r protein. Run-off translation of polysomes isolated from gametophytes during the drying phase demonstrates that there are no novel mRNAs recruited and no particular mRNA is favored for translation during desiccation. These findings add credence to the argument that translational control is the major component of the desiccation-induced alteration in gene expression in this plant, as discussed. Aspects of the response of protein synthesis to desiccation are consistent with the hypothesis that T. ruralis exhibits a repair-based mechanism of desiccation tolerance. ImagesFigure 2Figure 3Figure 5Figure 6Figure 7 PMID:16668577

  5. Partial Support Ventilation and Mitochondrial-Targeted Antioxidants Protect against Ventilator-Induced Decreases in Diaphragm Muscle Protein Synthesis.

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    Matthew B Hudson

    Full Text Available Mechanical ventilation (MV is a life-saving intervention in patients in respiratory failure. Unfortunately, prolonged MV results in the rapid development of diaphragm atrophy and weakness. MV-induced diaphragmatic weakness is significant because inspiratory muscle dysfunction is a risk factor for problematic weaning from MV. Therefore, developing a clinical intervention to prevent MV-induced diaphragm atrophy is important. In this regard, MV-induced diaphragmatic atrophy occurs due to both increased proteolysis and decreased protein synthesis. While efforts to impede MV-induced increased proteolysis in the diaphragm are well-documented, only one study has investigated methods of preserving diaphragmatic protein synthesis during prolonged MV. Therefore, we evaluated the efficacy of two therapeutic interventions that, conceptually, have the potential to sustain protein synthesis in the rat diaphragm during prolonged MV. Specifically, these experiments were designed to: 1 determine if partial-support MV will protect against the decrease in diaphragmatic protein synthesis that occurs during prolonged full-support MV; and 2 establish if treatment with a mitochondrial-targeted antioxidant will maintain diaphragm protein synthesis during full-support MV. Compared to spontaneously breathing animals, full support MV resulted in a significant decline in diaphragmatic protein synthesis during 12 hours of MV. In contrast, diaphragm protein synthesis rates were maintained during partial support MV at levels comparable to spontaneous breathing animals. Further, treatment of animals with a mitochondrial-targeted antioxidant prevented oxidative stress during full support MV and maintained diaphragm protein synthesis at the level of spontaneous breathing animals. We conclude that treatment with mitochondrial-targeted antioxidants or the use of partial-support MV are potential strategies to preserve diaphragm protein synthesis during prolonged MV.

  6. Partial Support Ventilation and Mitochondrial-Targeted Antioxidants Protect against Ventilator-Induced Decreases in Diaphragm Muscle Protein Synthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hudson, Matthew B; Smuder, Ashley J; Nelson, W Bradley; Wiggs, Michael P; Shimkus, Kevin L; Fluckey, James D; Szeto, Hazel H; Powers, Scott K

    2015-01-01

    Mechanical ventilation (MV) is a life-saving intervention in patients in respiratory failure. Unfortunately, prolonged MV results in the rapid development of diaphragm atrophy and weakness. MV-induced diaphragmatic weakness is significant because inspiratory muscle dysfunction is a risk factor for problematic weaning from MV. Therefore, developing a clinical intervention to prevent MV-induced diaphragm atrophy is important. In this regard, MV-induced diaphragmatic atrophy occurs due to both increased proteolysis and decreased protein synthesis. While efforts to impede MV-induced increased proteolysis in the diaphragm are well-documented, only one study has investigated methods of preserving diaphragmatic protein synthesis during prolonged MV. Therefore, we evaluated the efficacy of two therapeutic interventions that, conceptually, have the potential to sustain protein synthesis in the rat diaphragm during prolonged MV. Specifically, these experiments were designed to: 1) determine if partial-support MV will protect against the decrease in diaphragmatic protein synthesis that occurs during prolonged full-support MV; and 2) establish if treatment with a mitochondrial-targeted antioxidant will maintain diaphragm protein synthesis during full-support MV. Compared to spontaneously breathing animals, full support MV resulted in a significant decline in diaphragmatic protein synthesis during 12 hours of MV. In contrast, diaphragm protein synthesis rates were maintained during partial support MV at levels comparable to spontaneous breathing animals. Further, treatment of animals with a mitochondrial-targeted antioxidant prevented oxidative stress during full support MV and maintained diaphragm protein synthesis at the level of spontaneous breathing animals. We conclude that treatment with mitochondrial-targeted antioxidants or the use of partial-support MV are potential strategies to preserve diaphragm protein synthesis during prolonged MV.

  7. A continuous-exchange cell-free protein synthesis system based on extracts from cultured insect cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marlitt Stech

    Full Text Available In this study, we present a novel technique for the synthesis of complex prokaryotic and eukaryotic proteins by using a continuous-exchange cell-free (CECF protein synthesis system based on extracts from cultured insect cells. Our approach consists of two basic elements: First, protein synthesis is performed in insect cell lysates which harbor endogenous microsomal vesicles, enabling a translocation of de novo synthesized target proteins into the lumen of the insect vesicles or, in the case of membrane proteins, their embedding into a natural membrane scaffold. Second, cell-free reactions are performed in a two chamber dialysis device for 48 h. The combination of the eukaryotic cell-free translation system based on insect cell extracts and the CECF translation system results in significantly prolonged reaction life times and increased protein yields compared to conventional batch reactions. In this context, we demonstrate the synthesis of various representative model proteins, among them cytosolic proteins, pharmacological relevant membrane proteins and glycosylated proteins in an endotoxin-free environment. Furthermore, the cell-free system used in this study is well-suited for the synthesis of biologically active tissue-type-plasminogen activator, a complex eukaryotic protein harboring multiple disulfide bonds.

  8. The evolution of glycogen and starch metabolism in eukaryotes gives molecular clues to understand the establishment of plastid endosymbiosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ball, Steven; Colleoni, Christophe; Cenci, Ugo; Raj, Jenifer Nirmal; Tirtiaux, Catherine

    2011-03-01

    Solid semi-crystalline starch and hydrosoluble glycogen define two distinct physical states of the same type of storage polysaccharide. Appearance of semi-crystalline storage polysaccharides appears linked to the requirement of unicellular diazotrophic cyanobacteria to fuel nitrogenase and protect it from oxygen through respiration of vast amounts of stored carbon. Starch metabolism itself resulted from the merging of the bacterial and eukaryote pathways of storage polysaccharide metabolism after endosymbiosis of the plastid. This generated the three Archaeplastida lineages: the green algae and land plants (Chloroplastida), the red algae (Rhodophyceae), and the glaucophytes (Glaucophyta). Reconstruction of starch metabolism in the common ancestor of Archaeplastida suggests that polysaccharide synthesis was ancestrally cytosolic. In addition, the synthesis of cytosolic starch from the ADP-glucose exported from the cyanobacterial symbiont possibly defined the original metabolic flux by which the cyanobiont provided photosynthate to its host. Additional evidence supporting this scenario include the monophyletic origin of the major carbon translocators of the inner membrane of eukaryote plastids which are sisters to nucleotide-sugar transporters of the eukaryote endomembrane system. It also includes the extent of enzyme subfunctionalization that came as a consequence of the rewiring of this pathway to the chloroplasts in the green algae. Recent evidence suggests that, at the time of endosymbiosis, obligate intracellular energy parasites related to extant Chlamydia have donated important genes to the ancestral starch metabolism network.

  9. Enteral leucine and protein synthesis in skeletal and cardiac muscle

    Science.gov (United States)

    There are three members of the Branch Chain Amino Acids: leucine, isoleucine, and valine. As essential amino acids, these amino acids have important functions which include a primary role in protein structure and metabolism. It is intriguing that the requirement for BCAA in humans comprise about 40–...

  10. Ribosome-dependent ATPase interacts with conserved membrane protein in Escherichia coli to modulate protein synthesis and oxidative phosphorylation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohan Babu

    Full Text Available Elongation factor RbbA is required for ATP-dependent deacyl-tRNA release presumably after each peptide bond formation; however, there is no information about the cellular role. Proteomic analysis in Escherichia coli revealed that RbbA reciprocally co-purified with a conserved inner membrane protein of unknown function, YhjD. Both proteins are also physically associated with the 30S ribosome and with members of the lipopolysaccharide transport machinery. Genome-wide genetic screens of rbbA and yhjD deletion mutants revealed aggravating genetic interactions with mutants deficient in the electron transport chain. Cells lacking both rbbA and yhjD exhibited reduced cell division, respiration and global protein synthesis as well as increased sensitivity to antibiotics targeting the ETC and the accuracy of protein synthesis. Our results suggest that RbbA appears to function together with YhjD as part of a regulatory network that impacts bacterial oxidative phosphorylation and translation efficiency.

  11. Protein Synthesis Inhibition Activity by Strawberry Tissue Protein Extracts during Plant Life Cycle and under Biotic and Abiotic Stresses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Walther Faedi

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Ribosome-inactivating proteins (RIPs, enzymes that are widely distributed in the plant kingdom, inhibit protein synthesis by depurinating rRNA and many other polynucleotidic substrates. Although RIPs show antiviral, antifungal, and insecticidal activities, their biological and physiological roles are not completely understood. Additionally, it has been described that RIP expression is augmented under stressful conditions. In this study, we evaluated protein synthesis inhibition activity in partially purified basic proteins (hereafter referred to as RIP activity from tissue extracts of Fragaria × ananassa (strawberry cultivars with low (Dora and high (Record tolerance to root pathogens and fructification stress. Association between the presence of RIP activity and the crop management (organic or integrated soil, growth stage (quiescence, flowering, and fructification, and exogenous stress (drought were investigated. RIP activity was found in every tissue tested (roots, rhizomes, leaves, buds, flowers, and fruits and under each tested condition. However, significant differences in RIP distribution were observed depending on the soil and growth stage, and an increase in RIP activity was found in the leaves of drought-stressed plants. These results suggest that RIP expression and activity could represent a response mechanism against biotic and abiotic stresses and could be a useful tool in selecting stress-resistant strawberry genotypes.

  12. Zein synthesis and processing on zein protein body membranes. [Maize proteins

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Burr, F A

    1978-01-01

    The storage protein of maize, zein, is translated from messenger RNA on ribosomes bound to the outer membrane of the zein protein bodies. No other proteins appear to be made on this membrane. Before zein is transported through the protein body membrane it undergoes at least two post-translational modifications, which are discussed.

  13. Environmental stress-mediated changes in transcriptional and translational regulation of protein synthesis in crop plants. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1996-12-31

    The research described in this final report focused on the influence of stress agents on protein synthesis in crop plants (primarily soybean). Investigations into the `heat shock` (HS) stress mediated changes in transcriptional and translocational regulation of protein synthesis coupled with studies on anaerobic water deficit and other stress mediated alterations in protein synthesis in plants provided the basis of the research. Understanding of the HS gene expression and function(s) of the HSPs may clarify regulatory mechanisms operative in development. Since the reproductive systems of plants if often very temperature sensitive, it may be that the system could be manipulated to provide greater thermotolerance.

  14. The anabolic response to a meal containing different amounts of protein is not limited by the maximal stimulation of protein synthesis in healthy young adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Il-Young; Schutzler, Scott; Schrader, Amy; Spencer, Horace J; Azhar, Gohar; Ferrando, Arny A; Wolfe, Robert R

    2016-01-01

    We have determined whole body protein kinetics, i.e., protein synthesis (PS), breakdown (PB), and net balance (NB) in human subjects in the fasted state and following ingestion of ~40 g [moderate protein (MP)], which has been reported to maximize the protein synthetic response or ~70 g [higher protein (HP)] protein, more representative of the amount of protein in the dinner of an average American diet. Twenty-three healthy young adults who had performed prior resistance exercise (X-MP or X-HP) or time-matched resting (R-MP or R-HP) were studied during a primed continuous infusion of l-[(2)H5]phenylalanine and l-[(2)H2]tyrosine. Subjects were randomly assigned into an exercise (X, n = 12) or resting (R, n = 11) group, and each group was studied at the two levels of dietary protein intake in random order. PS, PB, and NB were expressed as increases above the basal, fasting values (mg·kg lean body mass(-1)·min(-1)). Exercise did not significantly affect protein kinetics and blood chemistry. Feeding resulted in positive NB at both levels of protein intake: NB was greater in response to the meal containing HP vs. MP (P protein synthesis (for all, P protein balance improves with greater protein intake above that previously suggested to maximally stimulating muscle protein synthesis because of a simultaneous reduction in protein breakdown.

  15. Combinatorial Synthesis of and high-throughput protein release from polymer film and nanoparticle libraries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petersen, Latrisha K; Chavez-Santoscoy, Ana V; Narasimhan, Balaji

    2012-09-06

    Polyanhydrides are a class of biomaterials with excellent biocompatibility and drug delivery capabilities. While they have been studied extensively with conventional one-sample-at-a-time synthesis techniques, a more recent high-throughput approach has been developed enabling the synthesis and testing of large libraries of polyanhydrides(1). This will facilitate more efficient optimization and design process of these biomaterials for drug and vaccine delivery applications. The method in this work describes the combinatorial synthesis of biodegradable polyanhydride film and nanoparticle libraries and the high-throughput detection of protein release from these libraries. In this robotically operated method (Figure 1), linear actuators and syringe pumps are controlled by LabVIEW, which enables a hands-free automated protocol, eliminating user error. Furthermore, this method enables the rapid fabrication of micro-scale polymer libraries, reducing the batch size while resulting in the creation of multivariant polymer systems. This combinatorial approach to polymer synthesis facilitates the synthesis of up to 15 different polymers in an equivalent amount of time it would take to synthesize one polymer conventionally. In addition, the combinatorial polymer library can be fabricated into blank or protein-loaded geometries including films or nanoparticles upon dissolution of the polymer library in a solvent and precipitation into a non-solvent (for nanoparticles) or by vacuum drying (for films). Upon loading a fluorochrome-conjugated protein into the polymer libraries, protein release kinetics can be assessed at high-throughput using a fluorescence-based detection method (Figures 2 and 3) as described previously(1). This combinatorial platform has been validated with conventional methods(2) and the polyanhydride film and nanoparticle libraries have been characterized with (1)H NMR and FTIR. The libraries have been screened for protein release kinetics, stability and

  16. Plastid endosymbiosis, genome evolution and the origin of green plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stiller, John W

    2007-09-01

    Evolutionary relationships among complex, multicellular eukaryotes are generally interpreted within the framework of molecular sequence-based phylogenies that suggest green plants and animals are only distantly related on the eukaryotic tree. However, important anomalies have been reported in phylogenomic analyses, including several that relate specifically to green plant evolution. In addition, plants and animals share molecular, biochemical and genome-level features that suggest a relatively close relationship between the two groups. This article explores the impacts of plastid endosymbioses on nuclear genomes, how they can explain incongruent phylogenetic signals in molecular data sets and reconcile conflicts among different sources of comparative data. Specifically, I argue that the large influx of plastid DNA into plant and algal nuclear genomes has resulted in tree-building artifacts that obscure a relatively close evolutionary relationship between green plants and animals.

  17. The Staphylococcus aureus Membrane Protein SA2056 Interacts with Peptidoglycan Synthesis Enzymes

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    Brigitte Berger-Bächi

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The yet uncharacterized membrane protein SA2056 belongs to the ubiquitous RN